Science.gov

Sample records for hiv virions induces

  1. HIV-1 Virion Production from Single Inducible Proviruses following T-Cell Activation Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mellors, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying induced virion production from single proviruses is important for assessing the effects of HIV-1 latency reversal agents. Limiting dilution ex vivo cultures of resting CD4+ T cells from 14 HIV-positive volunteers revealed that virion production after T-cell activation from individual proviruses varies by 10,000-fold to 100,000-fold. High-producing proviruses were associated with increases in cell-associated HIV-1 DNA levels, suggesting that reactivated proviruses proliferate. Single-cell analyses are needed to investigate differences in proviral expansion and virus production following latency reversal. PMID:26559835

  2. Induced Packaging of Cellular MicroRNAs into HIV-1 Virions Can Inhibit Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Bogerd, Hal P.; Kennedy, Edward M.; Whisnant, Adam W.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Analysis of the incorporation of cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) into highly purified HIV-1 virions revealed that this largely, but not entirely, mirrored the level of miRNA expression in the producer CD4+ T cells. Specifically, of the 58 cellular miRNAs detected at significant levels in the producer cells, only 5 were found in virions at a level 2- to 4-fold higher than that predicted on the basis of random cytoplasmic sampling. Of note, these included two miRNAs, miR-155 and miR-92a, that were reported previously to at least weakly bind HIV-1 transcripts. To test whether miRNA binding to the HIV-1 genome can induce virion incorporation, artificial miRNA target sites were introduced into the viral genome and a 10- to 40-fold increase in the packaging of the cognate miRNAs into virions was then observed, leading to the recruitment of up to 1.6 miRNA copies per virion. Importantly, this high level of incorporation significantly inhibited HIV-1 virion infectivity. These results suggest that target sites for cellular miRNAs can inhibit RNA virus replication at two distinct steps, i.e., during infection and during viral gene expression, thus explaining why a range of different RNA viruses appear to have evolved to avoid cellular miRNA binding to their genome. PMID:28096489

  3. Interactions of peptide triazole thiols with Env gp120 induce irreversible breakdown and inactivation of HIV-1 virions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We examined the underlying mechanism of action of the peptide triazole thiol, KR13 that has been shown previously to specifically bind gp120, block cell receptor site interactions and potently inhibit HIV-1 infectivity. Results KR13, the sulfhydryl blocked KR13b and its parent non-sulfhydryl peptide triazole, HNG156, induced gp120 shedding but only KR13 induced p24 capsid protein release. The resulting virion post virolysis had an altered morphology, contained no gp120, but retained gp41 that bound to neutralizing gp41 antibodies. Remarkably, HIV-1 p24 release by KR13 was inhibited by enfuvirtide, which blocks formation of the gp41 6-helix bundle during membrane fusion, while no inhibition of p24 release occurred for enfuvirtide-resistant virus. KR13 thus appears to induce structural changes in gp41 normally associated with membrane fusion and cell entry. The HIV-1 p24 release induced by KR13 was observed in several clades of HIV-1 as well as in fully infectious HIV-1 virions. Conclusions The antiviral activity of KR13 and its ability to inactivate virions prior to target cell engagement suggest that peptide triazole thiols could be highly effective in inhibiting HIV transmission across mucosal barriers and provide a novel probe to understand biochemical signals within envelope that are involved in membrane fusion. PMID:24330857

  4. Interactions of peptide triazole thiols with Env gp120 induce irreversible breakdown and inactivation of HIV-1 virions.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Arangassery Rosemary; Contarino, Mark; Bailey, Lauren D; Aneja, Rachna; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo Magalhaes; Freedman, Kevin; McFadden, Karyn; Duffy, Caitlin; Emileh, Ali; Leslie, George; Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Hoxie, James A; Chaiken, Irwin

    2013-12-13

    We examined the underlying mechanism of action of the peptide triazole thiol, KR13 that has been shown previously to specifically bind gp120, block cell receptor site interactions and potently inhibit HIV-1 infectivity. KR13, the sulfhydryl blocked KR13b and its parent non-sulfhydryl peptide triazole, HNG156, induced gp120 shedding but only KR13 induced p24 capsid protein release. The resulting virion post virolysis had an altered morphology, contained no gp120, but retained gp41 that bound to neutralizing gp41 antibodies. Remarkably, HIV-1 p24 release by KR13 was inhibited by enfuvirtide, which blocks formation of the gp41 6-helix bundle during membrane fusion, while no inhibition of p24 release occurred for enfuvirtide-resistant virus. KR13 thus appears to induce structural changes in gp41 normally associated with membrane fusion and cell entry. The HIV-1 p24 release induced by KR13 was observed in several clades of HIV-1 as well as in fully infectious HIV-1 virions. The antiviral activity of KR13 and its ability to inactivate virions prior to target cell engagement suggest that peptide triazole thiols could be highly effective in inhibiting HIV transmission across mucosal barriers and provide a novel probe to understand biochemical signals within envelope that are involved in membrane fusion.

  5. Virion encapsidated HIV-1 Vpr induces NFAT to prime non-activated T cells for productive infection

    PubMed Central

    Höhne, Kristin; Businger, Ramona; van Nuffel, Anouk; Bolduan, Sebastian; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Baeyens, Ann; Vermeire, Jolien; Malatinkova, Eva; Verhasselt, Bruno; Schindler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The majority of T cells encountered by HIV-1 are non-activated and do not readily allow productive infection. HIV-1 Vpr is highly abundant in progeny virions, and induces signalling and HIV-1 LTR transcription. We hence hypothesized that Vpr might be a determinant of non-activated T-cell infection. Virion-delivered Vpr activated nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) through Ca2+ influx and interference with the NFAT export kinase GSK3β. This leads to NFAT translocation and accumulation within the nucleus and was required for productive infection of unstimulated primary CD4+ T cells. A mutagenesis approach revealed correlation of Vpr-mediated NFAT activation with its ability to enhance LTR transcription and mediate cell cycle arrest. Upon NFAT inhibition, Vpr did not augment resting T-cell infection, and showed reduced G2/M arrest and LTR transactivation. Altogether, Vpr renders unstimulated T cells more permissive for productive HIV-1 infection and stimulates activation of productively infected as well as virus-exposed T cells. Therefore, it could be involved in the establishment and reactivation of HIV-1 from viral reservoirs and might have an impact on the levels of immune activation, which are determinants of HIV-1 pathogenesis. PMID:27383627

  6. Virion encapsidated HIV-1 Vpr induces NFAT to prime non-activated T cells for productive infection.

    PubMed

    Höhne, Kristin; Businger, Ramona; van Nuffel, Anouk; Bolduan, Sebastian; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Baeyens, Ann; Vermeire, Jolien; Malatinkova, Eva; Verhasselt, Bruno; Schindler, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The majority of T cells encountered by HIV-1 are non-activated and do not readily allow productive infection. HIV-1 Vpr is highly abundant in progeny virions, and induces signalling and HIV-1 LTR transcription. We hence hypothesized that Vpr might be a determinant of non-activated T-cell infection. Virion-delivered Vpr activated nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) through Ca(2+) influx and interference with the NFAT export kinase GSK3β. This leads to NFAT translocation and accumulation within the nucleus and was required for productive infection of unstimulated primary CD4(+) T cells. A mutagenesis approach revealed correlation of Vpr-mediated NFAT activation with its ability to enhance LTR transcription and mediate cell cycle arrest. Upon NFAT inhibition, Vpr did not augment resting T-cell infection, and showed reduced G2/M arrest and LTR transactivation. Altogether, Vpr renders unstimulated T cells more permissive for productive HIV-1 infection and stimulates activation of productively infected as well as virus-exposed T cells. Therefore, it could be involved in the establishment and reactivation of HIV-1 from viral reservoirs and might have an impact on the levels of immune activation, which are determinants of HIV-1 pathogenesis. © 2016 The Authors.

  7. Capacity for Infectious HIV-1 Virion Capture Differs by Envelope Antibody Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pinghuang; Williams, LaTonya D.; Shen, Xiaoying; Bonsignori, Mattia; Vandergrift, Nathan A.; Overman, R. Glenn; Moody, M. Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Stieh, Daniel J.; McCotter, Kerrie L.; French, Audrey L.; Hope, Thomas J.; Shattock, Robin; Haynes, Barton F.

    2014-01-01

    Antibody capacity to recognize infectious virus is a prerequisite of many antiviral functions. We determined the infectious virion capture index (IVCI) of different antibody specificities. Whereas broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), except for an MPER bNAb, selectively captured infectious virions, non-bNAbs and mucosal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-positive IgG captured subsets of both infectious and noninfectious virions. Infectious virion capture was additive with a mixture of antibodies, providing proof of concept for vaccine-induced antibodies that together have improved capacity to recognize infectious virions. PMID:24554654

  8. Antigenic Properties of the HIV Envelope on Virions in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Mengistu, Meron; Lewis, George K.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    The structural flexibility found in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoproteins creates a complex relationship between antigenicity and sensitivity to antiviral antibodies. The study of this issue in the context of viral particles is particularly problematic as conventional virus capture approaches can perturb antigenicity profiles. Here, we employed a unique analytical system based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which measures antibody-virion binding with all reactants continuously in solution. Panels of nine anti-envelope monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and five virus types were used to connect antibody binding profiles with neutralizing activities. Anti-gp120 MAbs against the 2G12 or b12 epitope, which marks functional envelope structures, neutralized viruses expressing CCR5-tropic envelopes and exhibited efficient virion binding in solution. MAbs against CD4-induced (CD4i) epitopes considered hidden on functional envelope structures poorly bound these viruses and were not neutralizing. Anti-gp41 MAb 2F5 was neutralizing despite limited virion binding. Similar antigenicity patterns occurred on CXCR4-tropic viruses, except that anti-CD4i MAbs 17b and 19e were neutralizing despite little or no virion binding. Notably, anti-gp120 MAb PG9 and anti-gp41 MAb F240 bound to both CCR5-tropic and CXCR4-tropic viruses without exerting neutralizing activity. Differences in the virus production system altered the binding efficiencies of some antibodies but did not enhance antigenicity of aberrant gp120 structures. Of all viruses tested, only JRFL pseudoviruses showed a direct relationship between MAb binding efficiency and neutralizing potency. Collectively, these data indicate that the antigenic profiles of free HIV particles generally favor the exposure of functional over aberrant gp120 structures. However, the efficiency of virion-antibody interactions in solution inconsistently predicts neutralizing activity in vitro. PMID:24284318

  9. Antibodies elicited by yeast glycoproteins recognize HIV-1 virions and potently neutralize virions with high mannose N-glycans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Fu, Hu; Luallen, Robert J.; Liu, Bingfen; Lee, Fang-Hua; Doms, Robert W.; Geng, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The glycan shield on the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein has drawn attention as a target for HIV-1 vaccine design given that an increasing number of potent and broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) recognize epitopes entirely or partially comprised of high mannose type N-linked glycans. In an attempt to generate immunogens that target the glycan shield of HIV-1, we previously engineered a triple mutant (TM) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that results in exclusive presentation of high mannose type N-glycans, and identified five TM yeast glycoproteins that support strong binding of 2G12, a bNAb that targets a cluster of high mannose glycans on the gp120 subunit of Env. Here, we further analyzed the antigenicity and immunogenicity of these proteins in inducing anti-HIV responses. Our study demonstrated that the 2G12-reactive TM yeast glycoproteins efficiently bound to recently identified bNAbs including PGT125–130 and PGT135 that recognize high mannose glycan-dependent epitopes. Immunization of rabbits with a single TM yeast glycoprotein (Gp38 or Pst1), when conjugated to a promiscuous T-cell epitope peptide and coadministered with a Toll-like receptor 2 agonist, induced glycan-specific HIV-1 Env cross-reactive antibodies. The immune sera bound to both synthetic mannose oligosaccharides and gp120 proteins from a broad range of HIV-1 strains. The purified antibodies recognized and captured virions that contain both complex- and high mannose-type of N-glycans, and potently neutralized virions from different HIV-1 clades but only when the virions were enforced to retain high mannose N-glycans. This study provides insights into the elicitation of anti-carbohydrate, HIV-1 Env-cross reactive antibodies with a heterologous glycoprotein and may have applications in the design and administration of immunogens that target the viral glycan shield for development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:26277072

  10. Zinc binding to the HCCH motif of HIV-1 virion infectivity factor induces a conformational change that mediates protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Indrani; Cui, Jian; Maynard, Ernest L.

    2006-01-01

    Virion infectivity factor (Vif) is an accessory protein encoded by HIV-1 and is critical for viral infection of the host CD4+ T cell population. Vif induces ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of Apo3G, a cytosolic cytidine deaminase that otherwise targets the retroviral genome. Interaction of Vif with the cellular Cullin5-based E3 ubiquitin ligase requires a conserved BC box and upstream residues that are part of the conserved H-(Xaa)5-C-(Xaa)17–18-C-(Xaa)3–5-H (HCCH) motif. The HCCH motif is involved in stabilizing the Vif–Cullin 5 interaction, but the exact role of the conserved His and Cys residues remains elusive. In this report, we find that full-length HIV-1 Vif, as well as a HCCH peptide, is capable of binding to zinc with high specificity. Zinc binding induces a conformational change that leads to the formation of large protein aggregates. EDTA reversed aggregation and regenerated the apoprotein conformation. Cysteine modification studies with the HCCH peptide suggest that C114 is critical for stabilizing the fold of the apopeptide, and that C133 is located in a solvent-exposed region with no definite secondary structure. Selective alkylation of C133 reduced metal-binding specificity of the HCCH peptide, allowing cobalt to bind with rates comparable to that with zinc. This study demonstrates that the HCCH motif of HIV-1 Vif is a unique metal-binding domain capable of mediating protein–protein interactions in the presence of zinc and adds to a growing list of examples in which metal ion binding induces protein misfolding and/or aggregation. PMID:17132731

  11. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses

    PubMed Central

    McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T.; Dennison, S. Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Tomaras, Georgia D.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine-induced

  12. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses.

    PubMed

    Tay, Matthew Zirui; Liu, Pinghuang; Williams, LaTonya D; McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T; Dennison, S Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Hope, Thomas J; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2016-08-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine-induced

  13. Human Erythrocytes Selectively Bind and Enrich Infectious HIV-1 Virions

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Zoltan; Brown, Bruce K.; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Peachman, Kristina K.; Matyas, Gary R.; Polonis, Victoria R.; Rao, Mangala; Alving, Carl R.

    2009-01-01

    Although CD4(+) cells represent the major target for HIV infection in blood, claims of complement-independent binding of HIV-1 to erythrocytes and the possible role of Duffy blood group antigen, have generated controversy. To examine the question of binding to erythrocytes, HIV-1 was incubated in vitro with erythrocytes from 30 healthy leukapheresis donors, and binding was determined by p24 analysis and adsorption of HIV-1 with reduction of infectivity for CD4(+) target cells. All of the cells, regardless of blood group type, bound HIV-1 p24. A typical preparation of erythrocytes bound <2.4% of the added p24, but erythrocytes selectively removed essentially all of the viral infectivity as determined by decreased infection of CD4(+) target cells; however, cell-associated HIV-1 was approximately 100-fold more efficient, via trans infection, than unadsorbed virus for infection of CD4(+) cells. All of the bound HIV-1 p24 was released by treatment of the cells with EDTA, and binding was optimized by adding Ca2+ and Mg2+ during the washing of erythrocytes containing bound HIV-1. Although the small number of contaminating leukocytes in the erythrocyte preparation also bound HIV-1 p24, there was no significant binding to CD4, and it thus appears that the binding occurred on leukocytes at non-CD4 sites. Furthermore, binding occurred to erythrocyte ghosts from which contaminating leukocytes had been previously removed. The results demonstrate that erythrocytes incubated in vitro with HIV-1 differentially adsorb all of the infectious HIV-1 virions (as opposed to non-infectious or degraded virions) in the absence of complement and independent of blood group, and binding is dependent on divalent cations. By analogy with HIV-1 bound to DC-SIGN on dendritic cells, erythrocyte-bound HIV-1 might comprise an important surface reservoir for trans infection of permissive cells. PMID:20011536

  14. GANP interacts with APOBEC3G and facilitates its encapsidation into the virions to reduce HIV-1 infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Eid, Mohammed Mansour Abbas; Shimoda, Mayuko; Ikeda, Terumasa; Koito, Atsushi; Pham, Phuong; Goodman, Myron F.; Sakaguchi, Nobuo

    2013-01-01

    The single-stranded DNA-dependent deoxycytidine deaminase APOBEC3G (A3G) is a potent restrictive factor against HIV-1 virus lacking viral-encoded infectivity factor (Vif) in CD4+ T cells. A3G antiretroviral activity requires its encapsulation into HIV-1 virions. Here we show that germinal center-associated nuclear protein (GANP) is induced in activated CD4+ T cells and physically interacts with A3G. Overexpression of GANP augments the A3G encapsidation into the virion-like particles and ΔVif HIV-1 virions. GANP is encapsidated in HIV-1 virion and modulates A3G packaging into the cores together with cellular RNAs including 7SL RNA, and with unspliced HIV-1 genomic RNA. GANP upregulation leads to a significant increase in A3G-catalyzed G→A hypermutation in the viral genome and suppression of HIV-1 infectivity in a single-round viral infection assay. Conversely, GANP knockdown caused a marked increase in HIV-1 infectivity in a multiple rounds infection assay. The data suggest that GANP is a cellular factor that facilitates A3G encapsidation into HIV-1 virions to inhibit the viral infectivity. PMID:24198285

  15. An oligosaccharide-based HIV-1 2G12 mimotope vaccine induces carbohydrate-specific antibodies that fail to neutralize HIV-1 virions.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Joseph G; Krauss, Isaac J; Song, Hong C; Opalka, David W; Grimm, Karen M; Nahas, Deborah D; Esser, Mark T; Hrin, Renee; Feng, Meizhen; Dudkin, Vadim Y; Chastain, Michael; Shiver, John W; Danishefsky, Samuel J

    2008-10-14

    The conserved oligomannose epitope, Man(9)GlcNAc(2), recognized by the broadly neutralizing human mAb 2G12 is an attractive prophylactic vaccine candidate for the prevention of HIV-1 infection. We recently reported total chemical synthesis of a series of glycopeptides incorporating one to three copies of Man(9)GlcNAc(2) coupled to a cyclic peptide scaffold. Surface plasmon resonance studies showed that divalent and trivalent, but not monovalent, compounds were capable of binding 2G12. To test the efficacy of the divalent glycopeptide as an immunogen capable of inducing a 2G12-like neutralizing antibody response, we covalently coupled the molecule to a powerful immune-stimulating protein carrier and evaluated immunogenicity of the conjugate in two animal species. We used a differential immunoassay to demonstrate induction of high levels of carbohydrate-specific antibodies; however, these antibodies showed poor recognition of recombinant gp160 and failed to neutralize a panel of viral isolates in entry-based neutralization assays. To ascertain whether antibodies produced during natural infection could recognize the mimetics, we screened a panel of HIV-1-positive and -negative sera for binding to gp120 and the synthetic antigens. We present evidence from both direct and competitive binding assays that no significant recognition of the glycopeptides was observed, although certain sera did contain antibodies that could compete with 2G12 for binding to recombinant gp120.

  16. Tetherin inhibits HIV-1 release by directly tethering virions to cells

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Caballero, David; Zang, Trinity; Ebrahimi, Alaleh; McNatt, Matthew W.; Gregory, Devon A.; Johnson, Marc C.; Bieniasz, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Tetherin is an interferon-induced protein whose expression blocks the release of HIV-1 and other enveloped viral particles. The underlying mechanism by which tetherin functions, and whether it directly or indirectly causes virion retention are unknown. Here, we elucidate the mechanism by which tetherin exerts its antiviral activity. We demonstrate, through mutational analyses and domain replacement experiments, that tetherin configuration rather than primary sequence is critical for antiviral activity. These findings allowed the design of a completely artificial protein, lacking sequence homology with native tetherin, that nevertheless mimicked its antiviral activity. We further show that tetherin is incorporated into HIV-1 particles as a parallel homodimer using either of its two membrane anchors. These results indicate that tetherin functions autonomously and directly, and that infiltration of virion envelopes by one or both of tetherin's membrane anchors is necessary, and likely sufficient, to tether enveloped virus particles that bud through plasma membrane. PMID:19879838

  17. Aqueous extracts from peppermint, sage and lemon balm leaves display potent anti-HIV-1 activity by increasing the virion density.

    PubMed

    Geuenich, Silvia; Goffinet, Christine; Venzke, Stephanie; Nolkemper, Silke; Baumann, Ingo; Plinkert, Peter; Reichling, Jürgen; Keppler, Oliver T

    2008-03-20

    Aqueous extracts from leaves of well known species of the Lamiaceae family were examined for their potency to inhibit infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Extracts from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.), peppermint (Mentha x piperita L.), and sage (Salvia officinalis L.) exhibited a high and concentration-dependent activity against the infection of HIV-1 in T-cell lines, primary macrophages, and in ex vivo tonsil histocultures with 50% inhibitory concentrations as low as 0.004%. The aqueous Lamiaceae extracts did not or only at very high concentrations interfere with cell viability. Mechanistically, extract exposure of free virions potently and rapidly inhibited infection, while exposure of surface-bound virions or target cells alone had virtually no antiviral effect. In line with this observation, a virion-fusion assay demonstrated that HIV-1 entry was drastically impaired following treatment of particles with Lamiaceae extracts, and the magnitude of this effect at the early stage of infection correlated with the inhibitory potency on HIV-1 replication. Extracts were active against virions carrying diverse envelopes (X4 and R5 HIV-1, vesicular stomatitis virus, ecotropic murine leukemia virus), but not against a non-enveloped adenovirus. Following exposure to Lamiaceae extracts, the stability of virions as well as virion-associated levels of envelope glycoprotein and processed Gag protein were unaffected, while, surprisingly, sucrose-density equilibrium gradient analyses disclosed a marked increase of virion density. Aqueous extracts from Lamiaceae can drastically and rapidly reduce the infectivity of HIV-1 virions at non-cytotoxic concentrations. An extract-induced enhancement of the virion's density prior to its surface engagement appears to be the most likely mode of action. By harbouring also a strong activity against herpes simplex virus type 2, these extracts may provide a basis for the development of novel virucidal topical

  18. Aqueous extracts from peppermint, sage and lemon balm leaves display potent anti-HIV-1 activity by increasing the virion density

    PubMed Central

    Geuenich, Silvia; Goffinet, Christine; Venzke, Stephanie; Nolkemper, Silke; Baumann, Ingo; Plinkert, Peter; Reichling, Jürgen; Keppler, Oliver T

    2008-01-01

    Background Aqueous extracts from leaves of well known species of the Lamiaceae family were examined for their potency to inhibit infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Results Extracts from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.), peppermint (Mentha × piperita L.), and sage (Salvia officinalis L.) exhibited a high and concentration-dependent activity against the infection of HIV-1 in T-cell lines, primary macrophages, and in ex vivo tonsil histocultures with 50% inhibitory concentrations as low as 0.004%. The aqueous Lamiaceae extracts did not or only at very high concentrations interfere with cell viability. Mechanistically, extract exposure of free virions potently and rapidly inhibited infection, while exposure of surface-bound virions or target cells alone had virtually no antiviral effect. In line with this observation, a virion-fusion assay demonstrated that HIV-1 entry was drastically impaired following treatment of particles with Lamiaceae extracts, and the magnitude of this effect at the early stage of infection correlated with the inhibitory potency on HIV-1 replication. Extracts were active against virions carrying diverse envelopes (X4 and R5 HIV-1, vesicular stomatitis virus, ecotropic murine leukemia virus), but not against a non-enveloped adenovirus. Following exposure to Lamiaceae extracts, the stability of virions as well as virion-associated levels of envelope glycoprotein and processed Gag protein were unaffected, while, surprisingly, sucrose-density equilibrium gradient analyses disclosed a marked increase of virion density. Conclusion Aqueous extracts from Lamiaceae can drastically and rapidly reduce the infectivity of HIV-1 virions at non-cytotoxic concentrations. An extract-induced enhancement of the virion's density prior to its surface engagement appears to be the most likely mode of action. By harbouring also a strong activity against herpes simplex virus type 2, these extracts may provide a basis for the development of

  19. The choreography of HIV-1 proteolytic processing and virion assembly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Kyung; Potempa, Marc; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2012-11-30

    HIV-1 has been the target of intensive research at the molecular and biochemical levels for >25 years. Collectively, this work has led to a detailed understanding of viral replication and the development of 24 approved drugs that have five different targets on various viral proteins and one cellular target (CCR5). Although most drugs target viral enzymatic activities, our detailed knowledge of so much of the viral life cycle is leading us into other types of inhibitors that can block or disrupt protein-protein interactions. Viruses have compact genomes and employ a strategy of using a small number of proteins that can form repeating structures to enclose space (i.e. condensing the viral genome inside of a protein shell), thus minimizing the need for a large protein coding capacity. This creates a relatively small number of critical protein-protein interactions that are essential for viral replication. For HIV-1, the Gag protein has the role of a polyprotein precursor that contains all of the structural proteins of the virion: matrix, capsid, spacer peptide 1, nucleocapsid, spacer peptide 2, and p6 (which contains protein-binding domains that interact with host proteins during budding). Similarly, the Gag-Pro-Pol precursor encodes most of the Gag protein but now includes the viral enzymes: protease, reverse transcriptase (with its associated RNase H activity), and integrase. Gag and Gag-Pro-Pol are the substrates of the viral protease, which is responsible for cleaving these precursors into their mature and fully active forms (see Fig. 1A).

  20. Purification of HIV-1 virions by subtilisin digestion or CD45 immunoaffinity depletion for biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Ott, David E

    2009-01-01

    The presence of cellular proteins outside and inside retroviruses can indicate the roles they play in viral biology. However, experiments examining retroviruses can be complicated by the contamination of even highly purified virion preparations with nonviral particles (either microvesicles or exosomes). Two useful methods have been developed that can remove contaminating particles from virus stocks to produce highly pure virus preparations. One approach, the subtilisin digestion procedure, enzymatically removes the proteins outside the virions. While this method is well suited for the analysis of the interior proteins in the virions, it removes the extracellular domains of the integral membrane proteins on the virion. To preserve the proteins on the exterior of the virion for biochemical studies, a CD45 immunoaffinity depletion procedure that removes vesicles by capture with antibody-linked microbeads is employed. These methods allow for the isolation of highly purified virion preparations that are suitable for a wide variety of experiments, including the biochemical characterization of cellular proteins both on and in HIV virions, examination of virion/cell interactions, and imaging of virions.

  1. High efficiency of HIV-1 genomic RNA packaging and heterozygote formation revealed by single virion analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianbo; Nikolaitchik, Olga; Singh, Jatinder; Wright, Andrew; Bencsics, Craig E; Coffin, John M; Ni, Na; Lockett, Stephen; Pathak, Vinay K; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2009-08-11

    A long-standing question in retrovirus biology is how RNA genomes are distributed among virions. In the studies presented in this report, we addressed this issue by directly examining HIV-1 RNAs in virions using a modified HIV-1 genome that contained recognition sites for BglG, an antitermination protein in the Escherichia coli bgl operon, which was coexpressed with a fragment of BglG RNA binding protein fused to a fluorescent protein. Our results demonstrate that the majority of virions (>90%) contain viral RNAs. We also coexpressed HIV-1 genomes containing binding sites for BglG or the bacteriophage MS2 coat protein along with 2 fluorescent protein-tagged RNA binding proteins. This method allows simultaneously labeling and discrimination of 2 different RNAs at single-RNA-detection sensitivity. Using this strategy, we obtained physical evidence that virions contain RNAs derived from different parental viruses (heterozygous virion) at ratios expected from a random distribution, and we found that this ratio can be altered by changing the dimerization sequences. Our studies of heterozygous virions also support a generally accepted but unproven assumption that most particles contain 1 dimer. This study provides answers to long-standing questions in HIV-1 biology and illustrates the power and sensitivity of the 2-RNA labeling method, which can also be adapted to analyze various issues of RNA biogenesis including the detection of different RNAs in live cell imaging.

  2. HIV-1 Integrase Binds the Viral RNA Genome and Is Essential during Virion Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kessl, Jacques J; Kutluay, Sebla B; Townsend, Dana; Rebensburg, Stephanie; Slaughter, Alison; Larue, Ross C; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Bakouche, Nordine; Fuchs, James R; Bieniasz, Paul D; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2016-08-25

    While an essential role of HIV-1 integrase (IN) for integration of viral cDNA into human chromosome is established, studies with IN mutants and allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs) have suggested that IN can also influence viral particle maturation. However, it has remained enigmatic as to how IN contributes to virion morphogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that IN directly binds the viral RNA genome in virions. These interactions have specificity, as IN exhibits distinct preference for select viral RNA structural elements. We show that IN substitutions that selectively impair its binding to viral RNA result in eccentric, non-infectious virions without affecting nucleocapsid-RNA interactions. Likewise, ALLINIs impair IN binding to viral RNA in virions of wild-type, but not escape mutant, virus. These results reveal an unexpected biological role of IN binding to the viral RNA genome during virion morphogenesis and elucidate the mode of action of ALLINIs.

  3. Interactions between HIV-1 Gag and Viral RNA Genome Enhance Virion Assembly.

    PubMed

    Dilley, Kari A; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Galli, Andrea; Burdick, Ryan C; Levine, Louis; Li, Kelvin; Rein, Alan; Pathak, Vinay K; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2017-08-15

    Most HIV-1 virions contain two copies of full-length viral RNA, indicating that genome packaging is efficient and tightly regulated. However, the structural protein Gag is the only component required for the assembly of noninfectious viruslike particles, and the viral RNA is dispensable in this process. The mechanism that allows HIV-1 to achieve such high efficiency of genome packaging when a packageable viral RNA is not required for virus assembly is currently unknown. In this report, we examined the role of HIV-1 RNA in virus assembly and found that packageable HIV-1 RNA enhances particle production when Gag is expressed at levels similar to those in cells containing one provirus. However, such enhancement is diminished when Gag is overexpressed, suggesting that the effects of viral RNA can be replaced by increased Gag concentration in cells. We also showed that the specific interactions between Gag and viral RNA are required for the enhancement of particle production. Taken together, these studies are consistent with our previous hypothesis that specific dimeric viral RNA-Gag interactions are the nucleation event of infectious virion assembly, ensuring that one RNA dimer is packaged into each nascent virion. These studies shed light on the mechanism by which HIV-1 achieves efficient genome packaging during virus assembly.IMPORTANCE Retrovirus assembly is a well-choreographed event, during which many viral and cellular components come together to generate infectious virions. The viral RNA genome carries the genetic information to new host cells, providing instructions to generate new virions, and therefore is essential for virion infectivity. In this report, we show that the specific interaction of the viral RNA genome with the structural protein Gag facilitates virion assembly and particle production. These findings resolve the conundrum that HIV-1 RNA is selectively packaged into virions with high efficiency despite being dispensable for virion assembly

  4. M2BP inhibits HIV-1 virion production in a vimentin filaments-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Xiaolin; Han, Yuling; Wang, Xinlu; Gao, Guangxia

    2016-01-01

    M2BP (also called 90K) is an interferon-stimulated gene product that is upregulated in HIV-1 infection. A recent study revealed that M2BP reduces the infectivity of HIV-1 by inhibiting the processing of the viral envelope protein. Here we report that in addition to reducing viral infectivity, M2BP inhibits HIV-1 virion production. We provide evidence showing that M2BP inhibits HIV-1 Gag trafficking to the plasma membrane in a vimentin-dependent manner. When vimentin filaments were collapsed by treating cells with acrylamide or by overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of vimentin, M2BP inhibition of HIV-1 virion production was significantly relieved. We further show that M2BP interacts with both HIV-1 Gag and vimentin and thereby mediates their interactions. We propose that M2BP traps HIV-1 Gag to vimentin filaments to inhibit the transportation of HIV-1 Gag to the plasma membrane. These findings uncover a novel mechanism by which a host antiviral factor inhibits HIV-1 virion production. PMID:27604950

  5. Dynamics of HIV-Containing Compartments in Macrophages Reveal Sequestration of Virions and Transient Surface Connections

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, Raphaël; Berre, Stefano; Cunha de Alencar, Bruna; Decalf, Jérémie; Schindler, Michael; Gobert, François-Xavier; Jouve, Mabel; Benaroch, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    During HIV pathogenesis, infected macrophages behave as “viral reservoirs” that accumulate and retain virions within dedicated internal Virus-Containing Compartments (VCCs). The nature of VCCs remains ill characterized and controversial. Using wild-type HIV-1 and a replication-competent HIV-1 carrying GFP internal to the Gag precursor, we analyzed the biogenesis and evolution of VCCs in primary human macrophages. VCCs appear roughly 14 hours after viral protein synthesis is detected, initially contain few motile viral particles, and then mature to fill up with virions that become packed and immobile. The amount of intracellular Gag, the proportion of dense VCCs, and the density of viral particles in their lumen increased with time post-infection. In contrast, the secretion of virions, their infectivity and their transmission to T cells decreased overtime, suggesting that HIV-infected macrophages tend to pack and retain newly formed virions into dense compartments. A minor proportion of VCCs remains connected to the plasma membrane overtime. Surprisingly, live cell imaging combined with correlative light and electron microscopy revealed that such connections can be transient, highlighting their dynamic nature. Together, our results shed light on the late phases of the HIV-1 cycle and reveal some of its macrophage specific features. PMID:23922713

  6. Evidence for direct association of Vpr and matrix protein p17 within the HIV-1 virion.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Yoshimoto, J; Isaka, Y; Miki, S; Suyama, A; Adachi, A; Hayami, M; Fujiwara, T; Yoshie, O

    1996-06-01

    Vpr is one of the auxiliary proteins of HIV-1 and is selectively incorporated into the virion by a process involving the C-terminal p6 portion of the Gag precursor Pr55. Vpr and the matrix protein p17 are the components of the viral preintegration complex and appear to play important roles in the nuclear transport of proviral DNA in nondividing cells. In the present study, we have demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation experiments that Vpr associates with matrix protein p17 but not with capsid protein p24 within the HIV-1 virion. Experiments employing the yeast two-hybrid GAL4 assay for protein-protein interactions also demonstrated a direct association between Vpr and the C-terminal region of matrix protein p17. Association of Vpr and the matrix protein p17 within the mature virion is consistent with their collaborative role in the nuclear transportation of the viral preintegration complex in nondividing cells such as macrophages.

  7. Modulation of HIV-1 infectivity by MAPK, a virion-associated kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Jacqué, J M; Mann, A; Enslen, H; Sharova, N; Brichacek, B; Davis, R J; Stevenson, M

    1998-01-01

    Infection of a cell by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) results in the formation of a reverse transcription complex in which viral nucleic acids are synthesized. Efficient disengagement of the reverse transcription complex from the cell membrane and subsequent nuclear translocation require phosphorylation of reverse transcription complex components by a virion-associated kinase. In this study, we identify the virion-associated kinase as mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK). Upon density gradient fractionation, MAPK, but not its activating kinase MEK, co-sedimented with viral particles. Expression of a constitutively active, but not kinase-inactive, MEK1 in virus producer cells was able to activate virion-associated MAPK in trans. Stimulation of virion-associated MAPK activity in trans by the mitogen phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) increased viral infectivity. Conversely, suppression of virion-associated MAPK by specific inhibitors of the MAPK cascade markedly impaired viral infectivity. These studies demonstrate regulation of an early step in HIV-1 infection by the host cell MAPK signal transduction pathway. PMID:9564043

  8. Capillarity-induced disassembly of virions in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaobin; Barclay, J. Elaine; Peng, Wenchao; Li, Yang; Li, Xianyu; Zhang, Guoliang; Evans, David J.; Zhang, Fengbao

    2008-04-01

    Studying the transport and fate of viruses through nanochannels is of great importance. By using the nanochannel of a carbon nanotube (CNT) as an ideal model, we evaluated the possibility of capillarity-induced viral transport through a closely fitting nanochannel and explored the mechanisms involved. It is shown both experimentally and theoretically that Cowpea mosaic virus can enter CNTs by capillarity. However, when introduced into a nanotube the protein capsid may disassemble. During the initial capillary filling stage, anomalous needle-shaped high pressure exists in the centre of the nanotube's entrance. This high pressure, combining with the significant negative pressure within the nanotube, may account for the disassembly of the virions.

  9. Estimating the fraction of progeny virions that must incorporate APOBEC3G for suppression of productive HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Thangavelu, Pulari U.; Gupta, Vipul; Dixit, Narendra M.

    2014-01-20

    The contest between the host factor APOBEC3G (A3G) and the HIV-1 protein Vif presents an attractive target of intervention. The extent to which the A3G–Vif interaction must be suppressed to tilt the balance in favor of A3G remains unknown. We employed stochastic simulations and mathematical modeling of the within-host dynamics and evolution of HIV-1 to estimate the fraction of progeny virions that must incorporate A3G to render productive infection unsustainable. Using three different approaches, we found consistently that a transition from sustained infection to suppression of productive infection occurred when the latter fraction exceeded ∼0.8. The transition was triggered by A3G-induced hypermutations that led to premature stop codons compromising viral production and was consistent with driving the basic reproductive number, R{sub 0}, below unity. The fraction identified may serve as a quantitative guideline for strategies targeting the A3G–Vif axis. - Highlights: • We perform simulations and mathematical modeling of the role of APOBEC3G in suppressing HIV-1 infection. • In three distinct ways, we estimate that when over 80% of progeny virions carry APOBEC3G, productive HIV-1 infection would be suppressed. • Our estimate of this critical fraction presents quantitative guidelines for strategies targeting the APOBEC3G–Vif axis.

  10. Gp120 on HIV-1 Virions Lacks O-Linked Carbohydrate.

    PubMed

    Stansell, Elizabeth; Panico, Maria; Canis, Kevin; Pang, Poh-Choo; Bouché, Laura; Binet, Daniel; O'Connor, Michael-John; Chertova, Elena; Bess, Julian; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Haslam, Stuart M; Morris, Howard R; Desrosiers, Ronald C; Dell, Anne

    2015-01-01

    As HIV-1-encoded envelope protein traverses the secretory pathway, it may be modified with N- and O-linked carbohydrate. When the gp120s of HIV-1 NL4-3, HIV-1 YU2, HIV-1 Bal, HIV-1 JRFL, and HIV-1 JRCSF were expressed as secreted proteins, the threonine at consensus position 499 was found to be O-glycosylated. For SIVmac239, the corresponding threonine was also glycosylated when gp120 was recombinantly expressed. Similarly-positioned, highly-conserved threonines in the influenza A virus H1N1 HA1 and H5N1 HA1 envelope proteins were also found to carry O-glycans when expressed as secreted proteins. In all cases, the threonines were modified predominantly with disialylated core 1 glycans, together with related core 1 and core 2 structures. Secreted HIV-1 gp140 was modified to a lesser extent with mainly monosialylated core 1 O-glycans, suggesting that the ectodomain of the gp41 transmembrane component may limit the accessibility of Thr499 to glycosyltransferases. In striking contrast to these findings, gp120 on purified virions of HIV-1 Bal and SIV CP-MAC lacked any detectable O-glycosylation of the C-terminal threonine. Our results indicate the absence of O-linked carbohydrates on Thr499 as it exists on the surface of virions and suggest caution in the interpretation of analyses of post-translational modifications that utilize recombinant forms of envelope protein.

  11. Gp120 on HIV-1 Virions Lacks O-Linked Carbohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Stansell, Elizabeth; Panico, Maria; Canis, Kevin; Pang, Poh-Choo; Bouché, Laura; Binet, Daniel; O'Connor, Michael-John; Chertova, Elena; Bess, Julian; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Morris, Howard R.; Desrosiers, Ronald C.; Dell, Anne

    2015-01-01

    As HIV-1-encoded envelope protein traverses the secretory pathway, it may be modified with N- and O-linked carbohydrate. When the gp120s of HIV-1 NL4-3, HIV-1 YU2, HIV-1 Bal, HIV-1 JRFL, and HIV-1 JRCSF were expressed as secreted proteins, the threonine at consensus position 499 was found to be O-glycosylated. For SIVmac239, the corresponding threonine was also glycosylated when gp120 was recombinantly expressed. Similarly-positioned, highly-conserved threonines in the influenza A virus H1N1 HA1 and H5N1 HA1 envelope proteins were also found to carry O-glycans when expressed as secreted proteins. In all cases, the threonines were modified predominantly with disialylated core 1 glycans, together with related core 1 and core 2 structures. Secreted HIV-1 gp140 was modified to a lesser extent with mainly monosialylated core 1 O-glycans, suggesting that the ectodomain of the gp41 transmembrane component may limit the accessibility of Thr499 to glycosyltransferases. In striking contrast to these findings, gp120 on purified virions of HIV-1 Bal and SIV CP-MAC lacked any detectable O-glycosylation of the C-terminal threonine. Our results indicate the absence of O-linked carbohydrates on Thr499 as it exists on the surface of virions and suggest caution in the interpretation of analyses of post-translational modifications that utilize recombinant forms of envelope protein. PMID:25915761

  12. Quantitative Correlation between Infectivity and Gp120 Density on HIV-1 Virions Revealed by Optical Trapping Virometry.

    PubMed

    DeSantis, Michael C; Kim, Jin H; Song, Hanna; Klasse, Per Johan; Cheng, Wei

    2016-06-17

    The envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120/gp41 is required for HIV-1 infection of host cells. Although in general it has been perceived that more Env gives rise to higher infectivity, the precise quantitative dependence of HIV-1 virion infectivity on Env density has remained unknown. Here we have developed a method to examine this dependence. This method involves 1) production of a set of single-cycle HIV-1 virions with varied density of Env on their surface, 2) site-specific labeling of Env-specific antibody Fab with a fluorophore at high efficiency, and 3) optical trapping virometry to measure the number of gp120 molecules on individual HIV-1 virions. The resulting gp120 density per virion is then correlated with the infectivity of the virions measured in cell culture. In the presence of DEAE-dextran, the polycation known to enhance HIV-1 infectivity in cell culture, virion infectivity follows gp120 density as a sigmoidal dependence and reaches an apparent plateau. This quantitative dependence can be described by a Hill equation, with a Hill coefficient of 2.4 ± 0.6. In contrast, in the absence of DEAE-dextran, virion infectivity increases monotonically with gp120 density and no saturation is observed under the experimental conditions. These results provide the first quantitative evidence that Env trimers cooperate on the virion surface to mediate productive infection by HIV-1. Moreover, as a result of the low number of Env trimers on individual virions, the number of additional Env trimers per virion that is required for the optimal infectivity will depend on the inclusion of facilitating agents during infection.

  13. 3D Visualization of HIV Virions by Cryoelectron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Wright, Elizabeth R.; Winkler, Hanspeter

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and some of its components have been difficult to study in three-dimensions (3D) primarily because of their intrinsic structural variability. Recent advances in cryoelectron tomography (cryo-ET) have provided a new approach for determining the 3D structures of the intact virus, the HIV capsid, and the envelope glycoproteins located on the viral surface. A number of cryo-ET procedures related to specimen preservation, data collection, and image processing are presented in this chapter. The techniques described herein are well suited for determining the ultrastructure of bacterial and viral pathogens and their associated molecular machines in situ at nanometer resolution. PMID:20888479

  14. Unusual features of protein interaction in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virions.

    PubMed

    Bukrinskaya, A G; Sharova, N K

    1990-01-01

    The treatment of HIV-1 virions with ionic and nonionic detergents (NP 40, octylglucoside, Na deoxycholate) resulted in an effect unusual for enveloped viruses: instead of solubilization of glycoproteins, the core protein p24 was solubilized while envelope glycoproteins with other structural proteins were found in subviral particles. These data are consistent with a model of HIV structural organization in which glycoproteins are included in the matrix formed by the protein p 17 and suggest that p24 is neither involved in the matrix nor closely bound to any viral proteins.

  15. TRIM5α associates with proteasomal subunits in cells while in complex with HIV-1 virions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The TRIM5 proteins are cellular restriction factors that prevent retroviral infection in a species-specific manner. Multiple experiments indicate that restriction activity requires accessory host factors, including E2-enzymes. To better understand the mechanism of restriction, we conducted yeast-two hybrid screens to identify proteins that bind to two TRIM5 orthologues. Results The only cDNAs that scored on repeat testing with both TRIM5 orthologues were the proteasome subunit PSMC2 and ubiquitin. Using co-immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrated an interaction between TRIM5α and PSMC2, as well as numerous other proteasome subunits. Fluorescence microscopy revealed co-localization of proteasomes and TRIM5α cytoplasmic bodies. Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis indicated that the interaction between TRIM5 and PSMC2 was direct. Previous imaging experiments demonstrated that, when cells are challenged with fluorescently-labeled HIV-1 virions, restrictive TRIM5α orthologues assemble cytoplasmic bodies around incoming virion particles. Following virus challenge, we observed localization of proteasome subunits to rhTRIM5α cytoplasmic bodies that contained fluorescently labeled HIV-1 virions. Conclusions Taken together, the results presented here suggest that localization of the proteasome to TRIM5α cytoplasmic bodies makes an important contribution to TRIM5α-mediated restriction. PMID:22078707

  16. Immunomagnetic quantitative immuno-PCR for detection of less than one HIV-1 virion.

    PubMed

    Barletta, Janet; Bartolome, Amelita; Constantine, Niel T

    2009-05-01

    Methods that allow the accurate and reliable detection of ultra-low molecular levels of proteins using techniques such as quantitative immuno-PCR (qIPCR) have demonstrated numerous technical difficulties. Protein detection methods lose specificity when the protein target is immersed within a matrix of thousands of molecules having wide ranges of concentrations. In addition, sensitivities are limited because of high background signals. To validate the performance of an immunomagnetic bead qIPCR method designed to remove the 'matrix' effect for HIV-1 p24 antigen detection, regression analyses were performed using samples from patients infected with HIV-1 diluted to approximately 100-1000, 10-100, 1-10, and 0.1-1.0 HIV-1 p24 Ag molecules/reaction. The number of HIV-1 p24 Ag molecules was derived from quantified HIV-1 RNA determinations. The modified immunomagnetic qIPCR bead assay demonstrated a limit of quantification of 10-100 HIV-1 p24 molecules per reaction, with an average correlation coefficient of 0.948+/-0.028 over a 4-log dynamic range. This method detects less than one HIV-1 virion (a limit of detection unreported previously for HIV-1), and thus, has the potential to identify HIV-1 infection and monitor the dynamics of the disease course earlier than nucleic acid methods. The immunomagnetic qIPCR bead assay is a simple and inexpensive method for ultra-low protein detection of infectious agents, toxins, and cancer markers at a level unrecognized previously using any enzymatic or molecular method.

  17. Prostaglandin E2 Reduces the Release and Infectivity of New Cell-Free Virions and Cell-To-Cell HIV-1 Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Serramía, María Jesús; Martínez-Bonet, Marta; Muñoz-Fernández, María Ángeles

    2014-01-01

    Background The course of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection is influenced by a complex interplay between viral and host factors. HIV infection stimulates several proinflammatory genes, such as cyclooxigense-2 (COX-2), which leads to an increase in prostaglandin (PG) levels in the plasma of HIV-1-infected patients. These genes play an indeterminate role in HIV replication and pathogenesis. The effect of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on HIV infection is quite controversial and even contradictory, so we sought to determine the role of PGE2 and the signal transduction pathways involved in HIV infection to elucidate possible new targets for antiretrovirals. Results Our results suggest that PGE2 post-infection treatment acts in the late stages of the viral cycle to reduce HIV replication. Interestingly, viral protein synthesis was not affected, but a loss of progeny virus production was observed. No modulation of CD4 CXCR4 and CCR5 receptor expression, cell proliferation, or activation after PGE2 treatment was detected. Moreover, PGE2 induced an increase in intracellular cAMP (cyclic AMP) levels through the EP2/EP4 receptors. PGE2 effects were mimicked by dbcAMP and by a specific Epac (exchange protein directly activated by cyclic AMP) agonist, 8-Cpt-cAMP. Treatment with PGE2 increased Rap1 activity, decreased RhoA activity and subsequently reduced the polymerization of actin by approximately 30% compared with untreated cells. In connection with this finding, polarized viral assembly platforms enriched in Gag were disrupted, altering HIV cell-to-cell transfer and the infectivity of new virions. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that PGE2, through Epac and Rap activation, alters the transport of newly synthesized HIV-1 components to the assembly site, reducing the release and infectivity of new cell-free virions and cell-to-cell HIV-1 transfer. PMID:24586238

  18. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) virion induced cancer and subfertility, two sides of the same coin.

    PubMed

    Depuydt, T; Beert, J; Bosmans, E; Salembier, G

    2016-12-01

    In the natural history of HPV infections, the HPV virions can induce two different pathways, namely the infec- tious virion producing pathway and the clonal transforming pathway. An overview is given of the burden that is associated with HPV infections that can both lead to cervical cancer and/or temporal subfertility. That HPV infections cause serious global health burden due to HPV-associated cancers is common knowledge, but that it is also responsible for a substantial part of idiopathic subfertility is greatly underestimated. The bulk of the detected HPV DNA whether in men or women is however infectious from origin. Because the dissociation between HPV viruses and HPV virions or infection and disease remains difficult for clinicians as well as for HPV detection, we propose a review of the different effects caused by the two different HPV virion induced pathways, and highlight the mechanisms that are responsible for causing transient subfertility and cancer.

  19. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) virion induced cancer and subfertility, two sides of the same coin

    PubMed Central

    Depuydt, CE; Beert, J; Bosmans, E; Salembier, G

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the natural history of HPV infections, the HPV virions can induce two different pathways, namely the infec- tious virion producing pathway and the clonal transforming pathway. An overview is given of the burden that is associated with HPV infections that can both lead to cervical cancer and/or temporal subfertility. That HPV infections cause serious global health burden due to HPV-associated cancers is common knowledge, but that it is also responsible for a substantial part of idiopathic subfertility is greatly underestimated. The bulk of the detected HPV DNA whether in men or women is however infectious from origin. Because the dissociation between HPV viruses and HPV virions or infection and disease remains difficult for clinicians as well as for HPV detection, we propose a review of the different effects caused by the two different HPV virion induced pathways, and highlight the mechanisms that are responsible for causing transient subfertility and cancer. PMID:28210481

  20. RNA helicase A modulates translation of HIV-1 and infectivity of progeny virions

    PubMed Central

    Bolinger, Cheryl; Sharma, Amit; Singh, Deepali; Yu, Lianbo; Boris-Lawrie, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Retroviruses rely on host RNA-binding proteins to modulate various steps in their replication. Previously several animal retroviruses were determined to mediate Dhx9/RNA helicase A (RHA) interaction with a 5′ terminal post-transcriptional control element (PCE) for efficient translation. Herein PCE reporter assays determined HTLV-1 and HIV-1 RU5 confer orientation-dependent PCE activity. The effect of Dhx9/RHA down-regulation and rescue with siRNA-resistant RHA on expression of HIV-1NL4–3 provirus determined that RHA is necessary for efficient HIV-1 RNA translation and requires ATPase-dependent helicase function. Quantitative analysis determined HIV-1 RNA steady-state and cytoplasmic accumulation were not reduced; rather the translational activity of viral RNA was reduced. Western blotting determined that RHA-deficient virions assemble with Lys-tRNA synthetase, exhibit processed reverse transcriptase and contain similar level of viral RNA, but they are poorly infectious on primary lymphocytes and HeLa cells. The results demonstrate RHA is an important host factor within the virus-producer cell and within the viral particle. The identification of RHA-dependent PCE activity in cellular junD RNA and in six of seven genera of Retroviridae suggests conservation of this translational control mechanism among vertebrates, and convergent evolution of Retroviridae to utilize this host mechanism. PMID:20007598

  1. Subcellular Localization of HIV-1 gag-pol mRNAs Regulates Sites of Virion Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Jordan T.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Full-length unspliced human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNAs serve dual roles in the cytoplasm as mRNAs encoding the Gag and Gag-Pol capsid proteins as well as genomic RNAs (gRNAs) packaged by Gag into virions undergoing assembly at the plasma membrane (PM). Because Gag is sufficient to drive the assembly of virus-like particles even in the absence of gRNA binding, whether viral RNA trafficking plays an active role in the native assembly pathway is unknown. In this study, we tested the effects of modulating the cytoplasmic abundance or distribution of full-length viral RNAs on Gag trafficking and assembly in the context of single cells. Increasing full-length viral RNA abundance or distribution had little-to-no net effect on Gag assembly competency when provided in trans. In contrast, artificially tethering full-length viral RNAs or surrogate gag-pol mRNAs competent for Gag synthesis to non-PM membranes or the actin cytoskeleton severely reduced net virus particle production. These effects were explained, in large part, by RNA-directed changes to Gag's distribution in the cytoplasm, yielding aberrant subcellular sites of virion assembly. Interestingly, RNA-dependent disruption of Gag trafficking required either of two cis-acting RNA regulatory elements: the 5′ packaging signal (Psi) bound by Gag during genome encapsidation or, unexpectedly, the Rev response element (RRE), which regulates the nuclear export of gRNAs and other intron-retaining viral RNAs. Taken together, these data support a model for native infection wherein structural features of the gag-pol mRNA actively compartmentalize Gag to preferred sites within the cytoplasm and/or PM. IMPORTANCE The spatial distribution of viral mRNAs within the cytoplasm can be a crucial determinant of efficient translation and successful virion production. Here we provide direct evidence that mRNA subcellular trafficking plays an important role in regulating the assembly of human immunodeficiency

  2. The phosphorylation of HIV-1 Gag by atypical protein kinase C facilitates viral infectivity by promoting Vpr incorporation into virions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag is the main structural protein that mediates the assembly and release of virus-like particles (VLPs) from an infected cell membrane. The Gag C-terminal p6 domain contains short sequence motifs that facilitate virus release from the plasma membrane and mediate incorporation of the viral Vpr protein. Gag p6 has also been found to be phosphorylated during HIV-1 infection and this event may affect virus replication. However, the kinase that directs the phosphorylation of Gag p6 toward virus replication remains to be identified. In our present study, we identified this kinase using a proteomic approach and further delineate its role in HIV-1 replication. Results A proteomic approach was designed to systematically identify human protein kinases that potently interact with HIV-1 Gag and successfully identified 22 candidates. Among this panel, atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) was found to phosphorylate HIV-1 Gag p6. Subsequent LC-MS/MS and immunoblotting analysis with a phospho-specific antibody confirmed both in vitro and in vivo that aPKC phosphorylates HIV-1 Gag at Ser487. Computer-assisted structural modeling and a subsequent cell-based assay revealed that this phosphorylation event is necessary for the interaction between Gag and Vpr and results in the incorporation of Vpr into virions. Moreover, the inhibition of aPKC activity reduced the Vpr levels in virions and impaired HIV-1 infectivity of human primary macrophages. Conclusion Our current results indicate for the first time that HIV-1 Gag phosphorylation on Ser487 is mediated by aPKC and that this kinase may regulate the incorporation of Vpr into HIV-1 virions and thereby supports virus infectivity. Furthermore, aPKC inhibition efficiently suppresses HIV-1 infectivity in macrophages. aPKC may therefore be an intriguing therapeutic target for HIV-1 infection. PMID:24447338

  3. HIV-1 dynamics in vivo: Virion clearance rate, infected cell life-span, and viral generation time

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, A.S.; Neumann, A.U.; Markowitz, M.; Ho, D.D.; Leonard, J.M.

    1996-03-15

    A new mathematical model was used to analyze a detailed set of human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) viral load data collected from five infected individuals after the administration of a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 protease. Productively infected cells were estimated to have, on average, a life-span of 2.2 days (half-life t{sub 1/2} = 1.6 days), and plasma virions were estimated to have, on average, a mean life-span of 0.3 days (t{sub 1/2} = 0.24 days). The estimated average total HIV-1 production was 10.3 x 10{sup 9}virions per day, which is substantially greater than previous minimum estimates. The results also suggest that the minimum duration of the HIV-1 life cycle in vivo is 1.2 days on average, and that the average HIV-1 generation time-defined as the time from release of a virion until it infects another cell and causes the release of a new generation of viral particles-is 2.6 days. These findings on viral dynamics provide not only a kinetic picture of HIV-1 pathogenesis, but also theoretical principles to guide the development of treatment strategies. 22 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. How do cell-free HIV virions avoid infecting dead-end host cells and cell fragments?

    PubMed

    Lyengar, Sujatha; Schwartz, David H

    2004-01-01

    HIV faces the challenge of identifying and entering suitable host cells (i.e. activated and viable) among a wide array of receptor-positive but unsuitable targets. Lymph nodes contain resting cells, activated cells destined for apoptosis within 24 h, and cell fragments, all of which represent replicative dead ends. We postulate that 1) HIV virions have evolved the ability to probe the internal status of potential host cells from the external cell membrane by assessing the ability of cells to co-cap CD4 and chemokine receptors, and 2) the requirement for dual receptor binding in a concerted manner by three gp120 molecules is the molecular mechanism by which virions stochastically ensure high density co-capping of receptors. Cell-associated HIV accomplishes the same selective process by targeting cells capable of participating in immunological synapse formation.

  5. Concentration and purification of HIV-1 virions by microfluidic separation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Grace Dongqing; Alberts, Catharina Johanna

    2009-01-01

    The low concentration and complex sample matrix of many clinical and environmental viral samples presents a significant challenge in the development of low cost, point-of-care viral assays. To address this problem, we investigated the use of a microfluidic passive magnetic separator combined with on-chip mixer to both purify and concentrate whole particle HIV-1 virions. Virus-containing plasma samples are first mixed to allow specific binding of the viral particles with antibody-conjugated superparamagnetic nanoparticles, and several passive mixer geometries were assessed for their mixing efficiencies. The virus-nanoparticle complexes are then separated from the plasma in a novel magnetic separation chamber, where packed micron-sized ferromagnetic particles serve as high magnetic gradient concentrators for an externally applied magnetic field. Thereafter, a viral lysis buffer was flowed through the chip and the released HIV proteins were assayed off-chip. Viral protein extraction efficiencies of 62% and 45% were achieved at 10uL/min and 30uL/min throughputs respectively. More importantly, an 80-fold concentration was observed for an initial sample volume of 1mL, and a 44-fold concentration for an initial sample volume of 0.5mL. The system is broadly applicable to microscale sample preparation of any viral sample and can be used for nucleic acid extraction as well as 40–80 fold enrichment of target viruses. PMID:19954210

  6. Mechanism of Enhanced HIV Restriction by Virion Coencapsidated Cytidine Deaminases APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G.

    PubMed

    Ara, Anjuman; Love, Robin P; Follack, Tyson B; Ahmed, Khawaja A; Adolph, Madison B; Chelico, Linda

    2017-02-01

    The APOBEC3 (A3) enzymes, A3G and A3F, are coordinately expressed in CD4(+) T cells and can become coencapsidated into HIV-1 virions, primarily in the absence of the viral infectivity factor (Vif). A3F and A3G are deoxycytidine deaminases that inhibit HIV-1 replication by inducing guanine-to-adenine hypermutation through deamination of cytosine to form uracil in minus-strand DNA. The effect of the simultaneous presence of both A3G and A3F on HIV-1 restriction ability is not clear. Here, we used a single-cycle infectivity assay and biochemical analyses to determine if coencapsidated A3G and A3F differ in their restriction capacity from A3G or A3F alone. Proviral DNA sequencing demonstrated that compared to each A3 enzyme alone, A3G and A3F, when combined, had a coordinate effect on hypermutation. Using size exclusion chromatography, rotational anisotropy, and in vitro deamination assays, we demonstrate that A3F promotes A3G deamination activity by forming an A3F/G hetero-oligomer in the absence of RNA which is more efficient at deaminating cytosines. Further, A3F caused the accumulation of shorter reverse transcripts due to decreasing reverse transcriptase efficiency, which would leave single-stranded minus-strand DNA exposed for longer periods of time, enabling more deamination events to occur. Although A3G and A3F are known to function alongside each other, these data provide evidence for an A3F/G hetero-oligomeric A3 with unique properties compared to each individual counterpart.

  7. Enhancing Virion Tethering by BST2 Sensitizes Productively and Latently HIV-infected T cells to ADCC Mediated by Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Tram N. Q.; Lukhele, Sabelo; Dallaire, Frédéric; Perron, Gabrielle; Cohen, Éric A.

    2016-01-01

    Binding of anti-HIV antibodies (Abs) to envelope (Env) glycoproteins on infected cells can mark them for elimination via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). BST2, a type I interferon (IFN)-stimulated restriction factor that anchors nascent Env-containing virions at the surface of infected cells has been shown to enhance ADCC functions. In a comprehensive analysis of ADCC potency by neutralizing anti-HIV Abs (NAbs), we show in this study that NAbs are capable of mediating ADCC against HIV-infected T cells with 3BNC117, PGT126 and PG9 being most efficient. We demonstrate that HIV-induced BST2 antagonism effectively attenuates Ab binding and ADCC responses mediated by all classes of NAbs that were tested. Interestingly, IFNα treatment can reverse this effect in a BST2-dependent manner. Importantly, while reactivated latent T cell lines display some susceptibility to ADCC mediated by broadly NAbs, inactivating BST2 viral countermeasures and/or exogenous IFNα augment their elimination. Overall, our findings support the notion that NAbs can induce ADCC. They highlight that while BST2 antagonism by HIV promotes ADCC evasion, strategies aimed at restoring BST2 restriction could improve anti-HIV responses and potentially provide a means to eliminate reactivated cells in latent reservoirs. PMID:27853288

  8. HIV-1 gag proteins in virions and in infected cell fractions.

    PubMed

    Sharova, N K; Grigor'ev, V B; Bukrinskaya, A G

    1991-01-01

    The relation of the initial products of the HIV-1 gag gene to the final products was determined in virus samples and cell fractions of infected H9 and Jurkat-tat cell cultures. The proteins were identified by immunoblotting with pooled sera from AIDS patients or monoclonal antibodies. The proportion in the virions of gag precursor proteins and the products of their proteolytic cleavage varied according to the maturity of the virus particles as determined by electron microscopy. The distribution of viral gag proteins in the cell fractions was determined 2, 4, and 24 h after infection. Treatment of cells with cycloheximide to block de novo protein synthesis did not significantly affect the results. Gag proteins containing the N terminus of the precursor p55 (including p55, the intermediate precursors p41(45) and p39, and mature protein p17) were found in the cell nuclei up to 24 h after infection. The major core protein p24 was located in the cytoplasmic fraction. These data strongly suggest that gag precursors from the p55 N terminus and the matrix protein p17 enter the infected cell separately from the major core protein p24, or become separated from it in the cytoplasm.

  9. A large extension to HIV-1 Gag, like Pol, has negative impacts on virion assembly.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Hiyori; Noda, Takeshi; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Morikawa, Yuko

    2012-01-01

    The GagPol protein of HIV-1 harbors viral enzymes, such as protease (PR), reverse transcriptase, and integrase, that are all crucial for virion infectivity. Previous studies have suggested that expression of GagPol alone does not produce viral particles and that the budding defect is caused by the presence of the Pol region. However, it has remained unknown why GagPol fails to produce viral particles. We show here that HIV-1 GagPol is incapable of membrane binding and subsequent particle assembly. Our confocal data indicated that, despite full N-myristoylation, GagPol protein failed to target plasma membrane with diffuse distribution in the cytoplasm. Membrane flotation analysis confirmed these findings. Progressive C-terminal truncation of GagPol to give GagPR allowed for plasma membrane targeting but still not for particle production. Conversely, the C-terminal addition of a noncognate protein, such as ß-galactosidase or 4 tandem GFP, to Gag impaired the membrane affinity, indicating that the Pol region, a large extension to Gag, inhibits membrane binding in the context of GagPol. The addition of the 10 N-terminal amino acids of Fyn kinase [Fyn(10)], a tight membrane-binding signal, conferred plasma membrane targeting on GagPol, but the Fyn(10)GagPol did not produce viral particles. The defect in particle budding was not rescued by the introduction of the PTAP motif, which is responsible for a late stage of viral particle budding. Rather, electron microscopy suggested that the budding defect of GagPR occurred at an early stage of particle morphogenesis. Our data, which were consistent with previous observations, demonstrate the defects of GagPol in membrane binding and particle assembly.

  10. Dextran Sulfate Suppression of Viruses in the HIV Family: Inhibition of Virion Binding to CD4+ Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Looney, David J.; Kuno, Sachiko; Ueno, Ryuji; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Broder, Samuel

    1988-04-01

    The first step in the infection of human T lymphocytes by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is attachment to the target cell receptor, the CD4 antigen. This step may be vulnerable to attack by antibodies, chemicals, or small peptides. Dextran sulfate (molecular weight approximately 8000), which has been given to patients as an anticoagulant or antilipemic agent for more than two decades, was found to block the binding of virions to various target T lymphocytes, inhibit syncytia formation, and exert a potent inhibitory effect against HIV-1 in vitro at concentrations that may be clinically attainable in human beings. This drug also suppressed the replication of HIV-2 in vitro. These observations could have theoretical and clinical implications in the strategy to develop drugs against HIV types 1 and 2.

  11. The Use of Nanotrap Particles Technology in Capturing HIV-1 Virions and Viral Proteins from Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sampey, Gavin; Shafagati, Nazly; Van Duyne, Rachel; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Liotta, Lance; Petricoin, Emanuel; Young, Mary; Lepene, Benjamin; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 infection results in a chronic but incurable illness since long-term HAART can keep the virus to an undetectable level. However, discontinuation of therapy rapidly increases viral burden. Moreover, patients under HAART frequently develop various metabolic disorders and HIV-associated neuronal disease. Today, the main challenge of HIV-1 research is the elimination of the residual virus in infected individuals. The current HIV-1 diagnostics are largely comprised of serological and nucleic acid based technologies. Our goal is to integrate the nanotrap technology into a standard research tool that will allow sensitive detection of HIV-1 infection. This study demonstrates that majority of HIV-1 virions in culture supernatants and Tat/Nef proteins spiked in culture medium can be captured by nanotrap particles. To determine the binding affinities of different baits, we incubated target molecules with nanotrap particles at room temperature. After short sequestration, materials were either eluted or remained attached to nanotrap particles prior to analysis. The unique affinity baits of nanotrap particles preferentially bound HIV-1 materials while excluded albumin. A high level capture of Tat or Tat peptide by NT082 and NT084 particles was measured by western blot (WB). Intracellular Nef protein was captured by NT080, while membrane-associated Nef was captured by NT086 and also detected by WB. Selective capture of HIV-1 particles by NT073 and NT086 was measured by reverse transcriptase assay, while capture of infectious HIV-1 by these nanoparticles was demonstrated by functional transactivation in TZM-bl cells. We also demonstrated specific capture of HIV-1 particles and exosomes-containing TAR-RNA in patients' serum by NT086 and NT082 particles, respectively, using specific qRT-PCR. Collectively, our data indicate that certain types of nanotrap particles selectively capture specific HIV-1 molecules, and we propose to use this technology as a platform to enhance HIV-1

  12. Mutations in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase tryptophan repeat motif affect virion maturation and Gag-Pol packaging.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chien-Cheng; Tseng, Ying-Tzu; Huang, Kuo-Jung; Pan, Yen-Yu; Wang, Chin-Tien

    2012-01-20

    Our goal was to determine the contribution of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase tryptophan repeat motif residues to virion maturation. With the exception of W402A, we found none of the single substitution mutations exerted major impacts on virus assembly or processing. However, all mutants except for W410A exhibited significant decreases in virus-associated RT, presumably a result of unstable RT mutant degradation. Mutations W398A, W401A and W406A decreased the enhancement effect of efavirenz on PR-mediated Gag processing efficiency, which is in agreement with their destabilizing RT effects. Furthermore, combined double or triple W398, W401 and W406 mutations significantly affected virus processing and Gag-Pol packaging. Further analyses suggest that inefficient PR-mediated Gag cleavage partly accounts for the virion processing defect. Our results support the idea that in addition to playing a role in RT heterodimer stabilization, the RT Trp repeat motif in the Gag-Pol context is also involved in PR activation via Gag-Pol/Gag-Pol interaction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Probing the HIV-1 genomic RNA trafficking pathway and dimerization by genetic recombination and single virion analyses.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael D; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Chen, Jianbo; Hammarskjöld, Marie-Louise; Rekosh, David; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2009-10-01

    Once transcribed, the nascent full-length RNA of HIV-1 must travel to the appropriate host cell sites to be translated or to find a partner RNA for copackaging to form newly generated viruses. In this report, we sought to delineate the location where HIV-1 RNA initiates dimerization and the influence of the RNA transport pathway used by the virus on downstream events essential to viral replication. Using a cell-fusion-dependent recombination assay, we demonstrate that the two RNAs destined for copackaging into the same virion select each other mostly within the cytoplasm. Moreover, by manipulating the RNA export element in the viral genome, we show that the export pathway taken is important for the ability of RNA molecules derived from two viruses to interact and be copackaged. These results further illustrate that at the point of dimerization the two main cellular export pathways are partially distinct. Lastly, by providing Gag in trans, we have demonstrated that Gag is able to package RNA from either export pathway, irrespective of the transport pathway used by the gag mRNA. These findings provide unique insights into the process of RNA export in general, and more specifically, of HIV-1 genomic RNA trafficking.

  14. Mapping the complete glycoproteome of virion-derived HIV-1 gp120 provides insights into broadly neutralizing antibody binding

    PubMed Central

    Panico, Maria; Bouché, Laura; Binet, Daniel; O’Connor, Michael-John; Rahman, Dinah; Pang, Poh-Choo; Canis, Kevin; North, Simon J.; Desrosiers, Ronald C.; Chertova, Elena; Keele, Brandon F.; Bess, Julian W.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Dell, Anne; Morris, Howard R.

    2016-01-01

    The surface envelope glycoprotein (SU) of Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), gp120SU plays an essential role in virus binding to target CD4+ T-cells and is a major vaccine target. Gp120 has remarkably high levels of N-linked glycosylation and there is considerable evidence that this “glycan shield” can help protect the virus from antibody-mediated neutralization. In recent years, however, it has become clear that gp120 glycosylation can also be included in the targets of recognition by some of the most potent broadly neutralizing antibodies. Knowing the site-specific glycosylation of gp120 can facilitate the rational design of glycopeptide antigens for HIV vaccine development. While most prior studies have focused on glycan analysis of recombinant forms of gp120, here we report the first systematic glycosylation site analysis of gp120 derived from virions produced by infected T lymphoid cells and show that a single site is exclusively substituted with complex glycans. These results should help guide the design of vaccine immunogens. PMID:27604319

  15. The virion-associated incoming HIV-1 RNA genome is not targeted by RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Westerhout, Ellen M; ter Brake, Olivier; Berkhout, Ben

    2006-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) has proven to be a powerful tool to suppress gene expression and can be used as a therapeutic strategy against human pathogenic viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Theoretically, RNAi-mediated inhibition can occur at two points in the replication cycle, upon viral entry before reverse transcription of the RNA genome, and on the newly transcribed viral RNA transcripts. There have been conflicting results on whether RNAi can target the RNA genome of infecting HIV-1 particles. We have addressed this issue with HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors. Results We determined the transduction efficiency of a lentiviral vector, as measured by GFP expressing cells, which reflects the number of successful integration events in a cell line stably expressing shNef. We did not observe a difference in the transduction efficiency comparing lentiviral vectors with or without the Nef target sequence in their genome. The results were similar with particles pseudotyped with either the VSV-G or HIV-1 envelope. Additionally, no reduced transduction efficiencies were observed with multiple other shRNAs targeting the vector genome or with synthetic siNef when transiently transfected prior to transduction. Conclusion Our findings indicate that the incoming HIV-1 RNA genome is not targeted by RNAi, probably due to inaccessibility to the RNAi machinery. Thus, therapeutic RNAi strategies aimed at preventing proviral integration should be targeting cellular receptors or co-factors involved in pre-integration events. PMID:16948865

  16. The structure and flexibility of conical HIV-1 capsids determined within intact virions.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Simone; Glass, Bärbel; Hagen, Wim J H; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Briggs, John A G

    2016-12-16

    HIV-1 contains a cone-shaped capsid encasing the viral genome. This capsid is thought to follow fullerene geometry-a curved hexameric lattice of the capsid protein, CA, closed by incorporating 12 CA pentamers. Current models for core structure are based on crystallography of hexameric and cross-linked pentameric CA, electron microscopy of tubular CA arrays, and simulations. Here, we report subnanometer-resolution cryo-electron tomography structures of hexameric and pentameric CA within intact HIV-1 particles. Whereas the hexamer structure is compatible with crystallography studies, the pentamer forms using different interfaces. Determining multiple structures revealed how CA flexes to form the variably curved core shell. We show that HIV-1 CA assembles both aberrant and perfect fullerene cones, supporting models in which conical cores assemble de novo after maturation. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Influenza A whole virion vaccine induces a rapid reduction of peripheral blood leukocytes via interferon-α-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ato, Manabu; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Fujii, Hideki; Hashimoto, Shu-ichi; Kaji, Tomohiro; Itamura, Shigeyuki; Horiuchi, Yoshinobu; Arakawa, Yoshichika; Tashiro, Masato; Takemori, Toshitada

    2013-04-19

    Infection with single strand RNA (ssRNA) viruses, such as influenza A virus, is known to induce protective acquired immune responses, including the production of neutralizing antibodies. Vaccination also causes a reduction in the number of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) shortly after inoculation, a result which may have undesirable adverse effects. The cellular mechanisms for this response have not been elucidated so far. Here we report that formalin-inactivated influenza A whole virus vaccine (whole virion) induces a significant decrease in PBL in mice 5-16 h after administration, whereas an ether-split vaccine (HA split) made from the same influenza virus strain does not induce a similar loss of PBL. Concordant with this reduction in the number of PBL, a rapidly induced and massive production of interferon (IFN)-α is observed when mice are injected with whole virion, but not with HA split vaccines. The role of Toll-like receptors (TLR), which are involved in signal transduction of influenza virus, and the subsequent induction of IFNα were confirmed using mice lacking TLR7, MyD-88, or IFNα/β receptor. We further demonstrated that the observed PBL loss is caused by apoptosis in an IFNα-dependent manner, and not by leukocyte redistribution due to chemokine signaling failure. These findings indicate that RNA-encapsulated whole virion vaccines can rapidly induce a loss of leukocytes from peripheral blood by apoptosis, which may modulate the subsequent immune response.

  18. Cocaine Enhances HIV-1–Induced CD4+ T-Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Pandhare, Jui; Addai, Amma B.; Mantri, Chinmay K.; Hager, Cynthia; Smith, Rita M.; Barnett, Louis; Villalta, Fernando; Kalams, Spyros A.; Dash, Chandravanu

    2015-01-01

    Substance abuse is a major barrier in eradication of the HIV epidemic because it serves as a powerful cofactor for viral transmission, disease progression, and AIDS-related mortality. Cocaine, one of the commonly abused drugs among HIV-1 patients, has been suggested to accelerate HIV disease progression. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Therefore, we tested whether cocaine augments HIV-1–associated CD4+ T-cell decline, a predictor of HIV disease progression. We examined apoptosis of resting CD4+ T cells from HIV-1–negative and HIV-1–positive donors in our study, because decline of uninfected cells plays a major role in HIV-1 disease progression. Treatment of resting CD4+ T cells with cocaine (up to 100 μmol/L concentrations) did not induce apoptosis, but 200 to 1000 μmol/L cocaine induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, treatment of CD4+ T cells isolated from healthy donors with both HIV-1 virions and cocaine significantly increased apoptosis compared with the apoptosis induced by cocaine or virions alone. Most important, our biochemical data suggest that cocaine induces CD4+ T-cell apoptosis by increasing intracellular reactive oxygen species levels and inducing mitochondrial depolarization. Collectively, our results provide evidence of a synergy between cocaine and HIV-1 on CD4+ T-cell apoptosis that may, in part, explain the accelerated disease observed in HIV-1–infected drug abusers. PMID:24486327

  19. The allosteric HIV-1 integrase inhibitor BI-D affects virion maturation but does not influence packaging of a functional RNA genome.

    PubMed

    van Bel, Nikki; van der Velden, Yme; Bonnard, Damien; Le Rouzic, Erwann; Das, Atze T; Benarous, Richard; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-01-01

    The viral integrase (IN) is an essential protein for HIV-1 replication. IN inserts the viral dsDNA into the host chromosome, thereby aided by the cellular co-factor LEDGF/p75. Recently a new class of integrase inhibitors was described: allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs). Although designed to interfere with the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction to block HIV DNA integration during the early phase of HIV-1 replication, the major impact was surprisingly found on the process of virus maturation during the late phase, causing a reverse transcription defect upon infection of target cells. Virus particles produced in the presence of an ALLINI are misformed with the ribonucleoprotein located outside the virus core. Virus assembly and maturation are highly orchestrated and regulated processes in which several viral proteins and RNA molecules closely interact. It is therefore of interest to study whether ALLINIs have unpredicted pleiotropic effects on these RNA-related processes. We confirm that the ALLINI BI-D inhibits virus replication and that the produced virus is non-infectious. Furthermore, we show that the wild-type level of HIV-1 genomic RNA is packaged in virions and these genomes are in a dimeric state. The tRNAlys3 primer for reverse transcription was properly placed on this genomic RNA and could be extended ex vivo. In addition, the packaged reverse transcriptase enzyme was fully active when extracted from virions. As the RNA and enzyme components for reverse transcription are properly present in virions produced in the presence of BI-D, the inhibition of reverse transcription is likely to reflect the mislocalization of the components in the aberrant virus particle.

  20. Cell Surface Antigen Induced by Friend Murine Leukemia Virus Is also in the Virion

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Maureen; Lilly, Frank; Nathenson, Stanley G.

    1974-01-01

    Intact particles of Friend leukemia virus derived from infectious mouse serum absorb only trace amounts of cytotoxic anti-FMR antibodies, but physical disruption of the virions by freezing and thawing, by ether extraction or by detergent treatment releases large amounts of FMR antigenic activity. Thus this antigen, previously considered to occur mainly as a neo-antigen on the surfaces of virus-infected cells and as a soluble substance in the serum of infected mice, may be primarily a virion component. PMID:4431079

  1. HIV-1 Infection Leads to Increased Transcription of Human Endogenous Retrovirus HERV-K (HML-2) Proviruses In Vivo but Not to Increased Virion Production

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Neeru; Maldarelli, Frank; Mellors, John

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent studies suggest that human endogenous retrovirus group K (HERV-K) provirus expression plays a role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. In particular, RNA from the HML-2 subgroup of HERV-K proviruses has been reported to be highly expressed at the cellular level and detectable in the plasma of HIV-1-infected patients, suggestive of virion production and, perhaps, replication. In this study, we developed an HML-2-specific quantitative-PCR assay that detects 51 of the 89 known HML-2 proviruses in the human genome. Plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HIV-negative controls and HIV-1-infected patients were collected for analysis of HML-2 RNA expression. Contrary to previous reports, we did not detect high levels of HML-2 RNA in the plasma of HIV-1-infected patients, but we did observe a significant increase of HML-2 RNA in total PBMCs compared to HIV-negative controls. The level of HML-2 expression in PBMCs does not appear to be related to patient use of antiretrovirals or to HIV-1 plasma RNA, cellular RNA, or cellular DNA levels. To investigate the source of HML-2 RNA expression, patient PBMCs were sorted into CD3+ CD4+, CD3+ CD8+, CD3− CD14+, and CD3− CD20+ cell subsets and then analyzed for HML-2 RNA levels. No single cell subset was enriched for HML-2 RNA expression in HIV-1-infected patients, but there appears to be substantial variability in the level of HML-2 expression depending on the cell type. IMPORTANCE Here, we report that human endogenous retrovirus group K (HERV-K) (HML-2) proviruses are expressed at significantly higher levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with HIV-1 infection than in those from uninfected individuals. However, contrary to previous reports, this expression did not lead to detectable virions in the plasma of these patients. In addition, we found that HML-2 proviruses were expressed in multiple blood cell types from HIV-1-infected individuals, and the magnitude of

  2. Cocaine enhances HIV-1-induced CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis: implications in disease progression in cocaine-abusing HIV-1 patients.

    PubMed

    Pandhare, Jui; Addai, Amma B; Mantri, Chinmay K; Hager, Cynthia; Smith, Rita M; Barnett, Louis; Villalta, Fernando; Kalams, Spyros A; Dash, Chandravanu

    2014-04-01

    Substance abuse is a major barrier in eradication of the HIV epidemic because it serves as a powerful cofactor for viral transmission, disease progression, and AIDS-related mortality. Cocaine, one of the commonly abused drugs among HIV-1 patients, has been suggested to accelerate HIV disease progression. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Therefore, we tested whether cocaine augments HIV-1-associated CD4(+) T-cell decline, a predictor of HIV disease progression. We examined apoptosis of resting CD4(+) T cells from HIV-1-negative and HIV-1-positive donors in our study, because decline of uninfected cells plays a major role in HIV-1 disease progression. Treatment of resting CD4(+) T cells with cocaine (up to 100 μmol/L concentrations) did not induce apoptosis, but 200 to 1000 μmol/L cocaine induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, treatment of CD4(+) T cells isolated from healthy donors with both HIV-1 virions and cocaine significantly increased apoptosis compared with the apoptosis induced by cocaine or virions alone. Most important, our biochemical data suggest that cocaine induces CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis by increasing intracellular reactive oxygen species levels and inducing mitochondrial depolarization. Collectively, our results provide evidence of a synergy between cocaine and HIV-1 on CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis that may, in part, explain the accelerated disease observed in HIV-1-infected drug abusers.

  3. Enhanced expression of HIV and SIV vaccine antigens in the structural gene region of live attenuated rubella viral vectors and their incorporation into virions.

    PubMed

    Virnik, Konstantin; Ni, Yisheng; Berkower, Ira

    2013-04-19

    Despite the urgent need for an HIV vaccine, its development has been hindered by virus variability, weak immunogenicity of conserved epitopes, and limited durability of the immune response. For other viruses, difficulties with immunogenicity were overcome by developing live attenuated vaccine strains. However, there is no reliable method of attenuation for HIV, and an attenuated strain would risk reversion to wild type. We have developed rubella viral vectors, based on the live attenuated vaccine strain RA27/3, which are capable of expressing important HIV and SIV vaccine antigens. The rubella vaccine strain has demonstrated safety, immunogenicity, and long lasting protection in millions of children. Rubella vectors combine the growth and immunogenicity of live rubella vaccine with the antigenicity of HIV or SIV inserts. This is the first report showing that live attenuated rubella vectors can stably express HIV and SIV vaccine antigens at an insertion site located within the structural gene region. Unlike the Not I site described previously, the new site accommodates a broader range of vaccine antigens without interfering with essential viral functions. In addition, antigens expressed at the structural site were controlled by the strong subgenomic promoter, resulting in higher levels and longer duration of antigen expression. The inserts were expressed as part of the structural polyprotein, processed to free antigen, and incorporated into rubella virions. The rubella vaccine strain readily infects rhesus macaques, and these animals will be the model of choice for testing vector growth in vivo and immunogenicity.

  4. Effects of HCV on Basal and Tat-Induced HIV LTR Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Satarupa; Powell, Eleanor; Kong, Ling; Blackard, Jason T.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection occurs in ∼30–40% of the HIV-infected population in the US. While a significant body of research suggests an adverse effect of HIV on HCV replication and disease progression, the impact of HCV on HIV infection has not been well studied. Increasing data suggest that hepatocytes and other liver cell populations can serve as reservoirs for HIV replication. Therefore, to gain insight into the impact of HCV on HIV, the effects of the HCV Core protein and infectious hepatitis C virions were evaluated on basal and Tat-induced activation of the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR) in hepatocytes. The HIV LTR was highly induced by the HIV transactivator protein Tat in hepatocytes. Activation varied according to the number of NF-kB binding sites present in the LTRs from different HIV subtypes. Involvement of the NF-kB binding pathway in LTR activation was demonstrated using an NF-kB inhibitor and deletion of the NF-kB binding sites. TNFα, a pro-inflammatory cytokine that plays an important role in HIV pathogenesis, also induced LTR activity in hepatocytes. However, HIV LTR activity was suppressed in hepatocytes in the presence of HCV Core protein, and the suppressive effect persisted in the presence of TNFα. In contrast, infectious hepatitis C virions upregulated HIV LTR activation and gene transcription. Core-mediated suppression remained unaltered in the presence of HCV NS3/4A protein, suggesting the involvement of other viral/cellular factors. These findings have significant clinical implications as they imply that HCV could accelerate HIV disease progression in HIV/HCV co-infected patients. Such analyses are important to elucidate the mechanisms by which these viruses interact and could facilitate the development of more effective therapies to treat HIV/HCV co-infection. PMID:23762271

  5. HIV-1 Vpr reactivates latent HIV-1 provirus by inducing depletion of class I HDACs on chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Bizhan; Kamali Jamil, Razieh; Hamidi-Fard, Mojtaba; Rahimi, Pooneh; Momen, Seyed Bahman; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Allahbakhshi, Elham

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Vpr is an accessory protein that induces proteasomal degradation of multiple proteins. We recently showed that Vpr targets class I HDACs on chromatin for proteasomal degradation. Here we show that Vpr induces degradation of HDAC1 and HDAC3 in HIV-1 latently infected J-Lat cells. Degradation of HDAC1 and HDAC3 was also observed on the HIV-1 LTR and as a result, markers of active transcription were recruited to the viral promoter and induced viral activation. Knockdown of HDAC1 and HDAC3 activated the latent HIV-1 provirus and complementation with HDAC3 inhibited Vpr-induced HIV-1 reactivation. Viral reactivation and degradation of HDAC1 and HDAC3 was conserved among Vpr proteins of HV-1 group M. Serum Vpr isolated from patients or the release of virion-incorporated Vpr from viral lysates also activated HIV-1 in latently infected cell lines and PBMCs from HIV-1 infected patients. Our results indicate that Vpr counteracts HIV-1 latency by inducing proteasomal degradation of HDAC1 and 3 leading to reactivation of the viral promoter. PMID:27550312

  6. Detection of Receptor-Induced Glycoprotein Conformational Changes on Enveloped Virions by Using Confocal Micro-Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaonan; Liu, Qian; Benavides-Montano, Javier A.; Nicola, Anthony V.; Aston, D. Eric; Rasco, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Conformational changes in the glycoproteins of enveloped viruses are critical for membrane fusion, which enables viral entry into cells and the pathological cell-cell fusion (syncytia) associated with some viral infections. However, technological capabilities for identifying viral glycoproteins and their conformational changes on actual enveloped virus surfaces are generally scarce, challenging, and time-consuming. Our model, Nipah virus (NiV), is a syncytium-forming biosafety level 4 pathogen with a high mortality rate (40 to 75%) in humans. Once the NiV attachment glycoprotein (G) (NiV-G) binds the cell receptor ephrinB2 or -B3, G triggers conformational changes in the fusion glycoprotein (F) that result in membrane fusion and viral entry. We demonstrate that confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy can, within minutes, simultaneously identify specific G and F glycoprotein signals and receptor-induced conformational changes in NiV-F on NiV virus-like particles (VLPs). First, we identified reproducible G- and F-specific Raman spectral features on NiV VLPs containing M (assembly matrix protein), G, and/or F or on NiV/vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) pseudotyped virions via second-derivative transformations and principal component analysis (PCA). Statistical analyses validated our PCA models. Dynamic temperature-induced conformational changes in F and G or receptor-induced target membrane-dependent conformational changes in F were monitored in NiV pseudovirions in situ in real time by confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy. Advantageously, Raman spectroscopy can identify specific protein signals in relatively impure samples. Thus, this proof-of-principle technological development has implications for the rapid identification and biostability characterization of viruses in medical, veterinary, and food samples and for the analysis of virion glycoprotein conformational changes in situ during viral entry. PMID:23283947

  7. RhoA Signaling Is Required for Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Induced Syncytium Formation and Filamentous Virion Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Gower, Tara L.; Pastey, Manoj K.; Peeples, Mark E.; Collins, Peter L.; McCurdy, Lewis H.; Hart, Timothy K.; Guth, Alex; Johnson, Teresa R.; Graham, Barney S.

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important human pathogen that can cause severe and life-threatening respiratory infections in infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised adults. RSV infection of HEp-2 cells induces the activation of RhoA, a small GTPase. We therefore asked whether RhoA signaling is important for RSV replication or syncytium formation. The treatment of HEp-2 cells with Clostridium botulinum C3, an enzyme that ADP-ribosylates and specifically inactivates RhoA, inhibited RSV-induced syncytium formation and cell-to-cell fusion, although similar levels of PFU were released into the medium and viral protein expression levels were equivalent. Treatment with another inhibitor of RhoA signaling, the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632, yielded similar results. Scanning electron microscopy of C3-treated infected cells showed reduced numbers of single blunted filaments, in contrast to the large clumps of long filaments in untreated infected cells. These data suggest that RhoA signaling is associated with filamentous virus morphology, cell-to-cell fusion, and syncytium formation but is dispensable for the efficient infection and production of infectious virus in vitro. Next, we developed a semiquantitative method to measure spherical and filamentous virus particles by using sucrose gradient velocity sedimentation. Fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the separation of spherical and filamentous forms of infectious virus into two identifiable peaks. The C3 treatment of RSV-infected cells resulted in a shift to relatively more spherical virions than those from untreated cells. These data suggest that viral filamentous protuberances characteristic of RSV infection are associated with RhoA signaling, are important for filamentous virion morphology, and may play a role in initiating cell-to-cell fusion. PMID:15827147

  8. Blockage of CD59 Function Restores Activities of Neutralizing and Nonneutralizing Antibodies in Triggering Antibody-Dependent Complement-Mediated Lysis of HIV-1 Virions and Provirus-Activated Latently Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai; Lan, Jie; Shepherd, Nicole; Hu, Ningjie; Xing, Yanyan; Byrd, Daniel; Amet, Tohti; Jewell, Corlin; Gupta, Samir; Kounga, Carole

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Both HIV-1 virions and infected cells use their surface regulators of complement activation (RCA) to resist antibody-dependent complement-mediated lysis (ADCML). Blockage of the biological function of RCA members, particularly CD59 (a key RCA member that controls formation of the membrane attack complex at the terminal stage of the complement activation cascades via all three activation pathways), has rendered both HIV-1 virions and infected cells sensitive to ADCML mediated by anti-Env antibodies (Abs) or sera/plasma from patients at different stages of viral infection. In the current study, we used the well-characterized anti-HIV-1 neutralizing Abs (nAbs), including 2G12, 2F5, and 4E10, and non-nAbs, including 2.2C, A32, N5-i5, and N12-i15, to investigate whether the enhancement of ADCML by blockage of CD59 function is mediated by nAbs, non-nAbs, or both. We found that all nAbs and two non-nAbs (N5-i5 and A32) strongly reacted to three HIV-1 laboratory strains (R5, X4, and R5/X4), six primary isolates, and provirus-activated ACH-2 cells examined. In contrast, two non-nAbs, 2.2C and N12-i15, reacted weakly and did not react to these targets, respectively. After blockage of CD59 function, the reactive Abs, regardless of their neutralizing activities, significantly enhanced specific ADCML of HIV-1 virions (both laboratory strains and primary isolates) and provirus-activated latently infected cells. The ADMCL efficacy positively correlated with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-reactive intensity of those Abs with their targets. Thus, blockage of RCA function represents a novel approach to restore activities of both nAbs and non-nAbs in triggering ADCML of HIV-1 virions and provirus-activated latently infected cells. IMPORTANCE There is a renewed interest in the potential role of non-nAbs in the control of HIV-1 infection. Our data, for the first time, demonstrated that blockage of the biological function of RCA members rendered both HIV-1 virions and

  9. Blockage of CD59 Function Restores Activities of Neutralizing and Nonneutralizing Antibodies in Triggering Antibody-Dependent Complement-Mediated Lysis of HIV-1 Virions and Provirus-Activated Latently Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai; Lan, Jie; Shepherd, Nicole; Hu, Ningjie; Xing, Yanyan; Byrd, Daniel; Amet, Tohti; Jewell, Corlin; Gupta, Samir; Kounga, Carole; Gao, Jimin; Yu, Qigui

    2015-09-01

    Both HIV-1 virions and infected cells use their surface regulators of complement activation (RCA) to resist antibody-dependent complement-mediated lysis (ADCML). Blockage of the biological function of RCA members, particularly CD59 (a key RCA member that controls formation of the membrane attack complex at the terminal stage of the complement activation cascades via all three activation pathways), has rendered both HIV-1 virions and infected cells sensitive to ADCML mediated by anti-Env antibodies (Abs) or sera/plasma from patients at different stages of viral infection. In the current study, we used the well-characterized anti-HIV-1 neutralizing Abs (nAbs), including 2G12, 2F5, and 4E10, and non-nAbs, including 2.2C, A32, N5-i5, and N12-i15, to investigate whether the enhancement of ADCML by blockage of CD59 function is mediated by nAbs, non-nAbs, or both. We found that all nAbs and two non-nAbs (N5-i5 and A32) strongly reacted to three HIV-1 laboratory strains (R5, X4, and R5/X4), six primary isolates, and provirus-activated ACH-2 cells examined. In contrast, two non-nAbs, 2.2C and N12-i15, reacted weakly and did not react to these targets, respectively. After blockage of CD59 function, the reactive Abs, regardless of their neutralizing activities, significantly enhanced specific ADCML of HIV-1 virions (both laboratory strains and primary isolates) and provirus-activated latently infected cells. The ADMCL efficacy positively correlated with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-reactive intensity of those Abs with their targets. Thus, blockage of RCA function represents a novel approach to restore activities of both nAbs and non-nAbs in triggering ADCML of HIV-1 virions and provirus-activated latently infected cells. There is a renewed interest in the potential role of non-nAbs in the control of HIV-1 infection. Our data, for the first time, demonstrated that blockage of the biological function of RCA members rendered both HIV-1 virions and infected cells

  10. Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Rab32 Aggregation and Its Implications for Virion Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Tu M.; Tran, Si C.; Lim, Yun-Sook

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly dependent on cellular factors for viral propagation. Using high-throughput next-generation sequencing, we analyzed the host transcriptomic changes and identified 30 candidate genes which were upregulated in cell culture-grown HCV (HCVcc)-infected cells. Of these candidates, we selected Rab32 for further investigation. Rab32 is a small GTPase that regulates a variety of intracellular membrane-trafficking events in various cell types. In this study, we demonstrated that both mRNA and protein levels of Rab32 were increased in HCV-infected cells. Furthermore, we showed that HCV infection converted the predominantly expressed GTP-bound Rab32 to GDP-bound Rab32, contributing to the aggregation of Rab32 and thus making it less sensitive to cellular degradation machinery. In addition, GDP-bound Rab32 selectively interacted with HCV core protein and deposited core protein into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated Rab32-derived aggregated structures in the perinuclear region, which were likely to be viral assembly sites. Using RNA interference technology, we demonstrated that Rab32 was required for the assembly step but not for other stages of the HCV life cycle. Taken together, these data suggest that HCV may modulate Rab32 activity to facilitate virion assembly. IMPORTANCE Rab32, a member of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases, regulates various intracellular membrane-trafficking events in many cell types. In this study, we showed that HCV infection concomitantly increased Rab32 expression at the transcriptional level and altered the balance between GDP- and GTP-bound Rab32 toward production of Rab32-GDP. GDP-bound Rab32 selectively interacted with HCV core protein and enriched core in the ER-associated Rab32-derived aggregated structures that were probably necessary for viral assembly. Indeed, we showed that Rab32 was specifically required for the assembly of HCV. Collectively, our study identifies that Rab32 is a novel

  11. Virus-Induced Tubules: A Vehicle for Spread of Virions into Ovary Oocyte Cells of an Insect Vector.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhenfeng; Mao, Qianzhuo; Li, Jiajia; Lu, Chengcong; Wu, Wei; Chen, Hongyan; Chen, Qian; Jia, Dongsheng; Wei, Taiyun

    2017-01-01

    Many arthropod-borne viruses are persistently propagated and transovarially transmitted by female insect vectors through eggs, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. Insect oocytes are surrounded by a layer of follicular cells, which are connected to the oocyte through actin-based microvilli. Here, we demonstrate that a plant reovirus, rice gall dwarf virus (RGDV), exploits virus-containing tubules composed of viral non-structural protein Pns11 to pass through actin-based junctions between follicular cells or through actin-based microvilli from follicular cells into oocyte of its leafhopper vector Recilia dorsalis, thus overcoming transovarial transmission barriers. We further determine that the association of Pns11 tubules with actin-based cellular junctions or microvilli of the ovary is mediated by a specific interaction between Pns11 and actin. Interestingly, RGDV can replicate and assemble progeny virions in the oocyte cytoplasm. The destruction of the tubule assembly by RNA interference with synthesized double-stranded RNA targeting the Pns11 gene strongly inhibits transovarial transmission of RGDV by its vectors. For the first time, we show that a virus can exploit virus-induced tubule as a vehicle to overcome the transovarial transmission barrier by insect vectors.

  12. Virus-Induced Tubules: A Vehicle for Spread of Virions into Ovary Oocyte Cells of an Insect Vector

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zhenfeng; Mao, Qianzhuo; Li, Jiajia; Lu, Chengcong; Wu, Wei; Chen, Hongyan; Chen, Qian; Jia, Dongsheng; Wei, Taiyun

    2017-01-01

    Many arthropod-borne viruses are persistently propagated and transovarially transmitted by female insect vectors through eggs, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. Insect oocytes are surrounded by a layer of follicular cells, which are connected to the oocyte through actin-based microvilli. Here, we demonstrate that a plant reovirus, rice gall dwarf virus (RGDV), exploits virus-containing tubules composed of viral non-structural protein Pns11 to pass through actin-based junctions between follicular cells or through actin-based microvilli from follicular cells into oocyte of its leafhopper vector Recilia dorsalis, thus overcoming transovarial transmission barriers. We further determine that the association of Pns11 tubules with actin-based cellular junctions or microvilli of the ovary is mediated by a specific interaction between Pns11 and actin. Interestingly, RGDV can replicate and assemble progeny virions in the oocyte cytoplasm. The destruction of the tubule assembly by RNA interference with synthesized double-stranded RNA targeting the Pns11 gene strongly inhibits transovarial transmission of RGDV by its vectors. For the first time, we show that a virus can exploit virus-induced tubule as a vehicle to overcome the transovarial transmission barrier by insect vectors. PMID:28382031

  13. Rapid dissociation of HIV-1 from cultured cells severely limits infectivity assays, causes the inactivation ascribed to entry inhibitors, and masks the inherently high level of infectivity of virions.

    PubMed

    Platt, Emily J; Kozak, Susan L; Durnin, James P; Hope, Thomas J; Kabat, David

    2010-03-01

    By using immunofluorescence microscopy to observe and analyze freshly made HIV-1 virions adsorbed onto cells, we found that they are inherently highly infectious, rather than predominantly defective as previously suggested. Surprisingly, polycations enhance titers 20- to 30-fold by stabilizing adsorption and preventing a previously undescribed process of rapid dissociation, strongly implying that infectivity assays for many viruses are limited not only by inefficient virus diffusion onto cells but also by a postattachment race between entry and dissociation. This kinetic competition underlies inhibitory effects of CCR5 antagonists and explains why adaptive HIV-1 mutations overcome many cell entry limitations by accelerating entry.

  14. Two potential recombinant rabies vaccines expressing canine parvovirus virion protein 2 induce immunogenicity to canine parvovirus and rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Shi, Hehe; Tan, Yeping; Niu, Xuefeng; Long, Teng; Zhao, Jing; Tian, Qin; Wang, Yifei; Chen, Hao; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2016-08-17

    Both rabies virus (RABV) and canine parvovirus (CPV) cause lethal diseases in dogs. In this study, both high egg passage Flury (HEP-Flury) strains of RABV and recombinant RABV carrying double RABV glycoprotein (G) gene were used to express the CPV virion protein 2 (VP2) gene, and were designated rHEP-VP2 and, rHEP-dG-VP2 respectively. The two recombinant RABVs maintained optimal virus titration according to their viral growth kinetics assay compared with the parental strain HEP-Flury. Western blotting indicated that G protein and VP2 were expressed in vitro. The expression of VP2 in Crandell feline kidney cells post-infection by rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence assay with antibody against VP2. Immunogenicity of recombinant rabies viruses was tested in Kunming mice. Both rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 induced high levels of rabies antibody compared with HEP-Flury. Mice immunized with rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 both had a high level of antibodies against VP2, which can protect against CPV infection. A challenge experiment indicated that more than 80% mice immunized with recombinant RABVs survived after infection of challenge virus standard 24 (CVS-24). Together, this study showed that recombinant RABVs expressing VP2 induced protective immune responses to RABV and CPV. Therefore, rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 might be potential combined vaccines for RABV and CPV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Anti-phospholipid human monoclonal antibodies inhibit CCR5-tropic HIV-1 and induce β-chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hua-Xin; Alam, S. Munir; Scearce, Richard M.; Plonk, M. Kelly; Kozink, Daniel M.; Drinker, Mark S.; Zhang, Ruijun; Xia, Shi-Mao; Sutherland, Laura L.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Giles, Ian P.; Kappes, John C.; Ochsenbauer-Jambor, Christina; Edmonds, Tara G.; Soares, Melina; Barbero, Gustavo; Forthal, Donald N.; Landucci, Gary; Chang, Connie; King, Steven W.; Kavlie, Anita; Denny, Thomas N.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Chen, Pojen P.; Thorpe, Philip E.; Montefiori, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional antibody-mediated neutralization of HIV-1 infection is thought to result from the binding of antibodies to virions, thus preventing virus entry. However, antibodies that broadly neutralize HIV-1 are rare and are not induced by current vaccines. We report that four human anti-phospholipid monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (PGN632, P1, IS4, and CL1) inhibit HIV-1 CCR5-tropic (R5) primary isolate infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with 80% inhibitory concentrations of <0.02 to ∼10 µg/ml. Anti-phospholipid mAbs inhibited PBMC HIV-1 infection in vitro by mechanisms involving binding to monocytes and triggering the release of MIP-1α and MIP-1β. The release of these β-chemokines explains both the specificity for R5 HIV-1 and the activity of these mAbs in PBMC cultures containing both primary lymphocytes and monocytes. PMID:20368576

  16. Swine adipose stromal cells loaded with recombinant bovine herpesvirus 4 virions expressing a foreign antigen induce potent humoral immune responses in pigs.

    PubMed

    Donofrio, Gaetano; Taddei, Simone; Franceschi, Valentina; Capocefalo, Antonio; Cavirani, Sandro; Martinelli, Nicola; Ottonello, Simone; Ferrari, Maura

    2011-01-29

    Increasingly effective vaccination strategies are needed to counteract the high incidence of contagious diseases associated with intensive swine breeding. Recombinant viral vaccines are a promising new avenue in this direction. Key features of viral vectors suitable for immunoprophylaxis are safety, ease of manipulation and the ability to replicate in a variety of hosts. Most of the above requirements are met by bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4), a non-pathogenic dsDNA virus capable of infecting a broad range of cell types in vitro. Here we report the results of an exploratory study using an engineered BoHV-4 virus (eBoHV-4) expressing two unrelated glycoprotein antigens from bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), to assess the potential of recombinant BoHV-4 as a self-adjuvanted immunogen in pigs. Free eBoHV-4 virions and virions preloaded into homologous swine adipose-derived stromal cells (SADSC) were tested. Neither virus formulation elicited neutralizing anti-BoHV-4 antibodies, nor any disease symptom, yet both induced specific immune responses against the heterologous antigens. However, a much earlier (18 vs 28 days post-infection) and more robust neutralizing response against BVDV and BoHV-1 viruses was elicited by eBoHV-4-preinfected SADSCs compared to free virions. The data validate BoHV-4 as a safe and effective heterologous antigen carrier/producer and identify SADSCs as helpful tools for the formulation of increasingly efficacious recombinant immunogens for pig vaccination.

  17. HIV-1 Vpu Blocks Recycling and Biosynthetic Transport of the Intrinsic Immunity Factor CD317/Tetherin To Overcome the Virion Release Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Sarah; Fritz, Joëlle V.; Bitzegeio, Julia; Fackler, Oliver T.; Keppler, Oliver T.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The intrinsic immunity factor CD317 (BST-2/HM1.24/tetherin) imposes a barrier to HIV-1 release at the cell surface that can be overcome by the viral protein Vpu. Expression of Vpu results in a reduction of CD317 surface levels; however, the mechanism of this Vpu activity and its contribution to the virological antagonism are incompletely understood. Here, we characterized the influence of Vpu on major CD317 trafficking pathways using quantitative antibody-based endocytosis and recycling assays as well as a microinjection/microscopy-based kinetic de novo expression approach. We report that HIV-1 Vpu inhibited both the anterograde transport of newly synthesized CD317 and the recycling of CD317 to the cell surface, while the kinetics of CD317 endocytosis remained unaffected. Vpu trapped trafficking CD317 molecules at the trans-Golgi network, where the two molecules colocalized. The subversion of both CD317 transport pathways was dependent on the highly conserved diserine S52/S56 motif of Vpu; however, it did not require recruitment of the diserine motif interactor and substrate adaptor of the SCF-E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, β-TrCP. Treatment of cells with the malaria drug primaquine resulted in a CD317 trafficking defect that mirrored that induced by Vpu. Importantly, primaquine could functionally replace Vpu as a CD317 antagonist and rescue HIV-1 particle release. PMID:21610122

  18. Lentiviral Delivery of HIV-1 Vpr Protein Induces Apoptosis in Transformed Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Sheila A.; Poon, Betty; Jowett, Jeremy B. M.; Xie, Yiming; Chen, Irvin S. Y.

    1999-10-01

    Most current anticancer therapies act by inducing tumor cell stasis followed by apoptosis. HIV-1 Vpr effectively induces apoptosis of T cells after arrest of cells at a G2/M checkpoint. Here, we investigated whether this property of Vpr could be exploited for use as a potential anticancer agent. As a potentially safer alternative to transfer of genes encoding Vpr, we developed a method to efficiently introduce Vpr protein directly into cells. Vpr packaged into HIV-1 virions lacking a genome induced efficient cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Introduction of Vpr into tumor cell lines of various tissue origin, including those bearing predisposing mutations in p53, XPA, and hMLH1, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis with high efficiency. Significantly, apoptosis mediated by virion-associated Vpr was more effective on rapidly dividing cells compared with slow-growing cells, thus, in concept, providing a potential differential effect between some types of tumor cells and surrounding normal cells. This model system provides a rationale and proof of concept for the development of potential cancer therapeutic agents based on the growth-arresting and apoptotic properties of Vpr.

  19. gag, vif, and nef Genes Contribute to the Homologous Viral Interference Induced by a Nonproducer Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Variant: Identification of Novel HIV-1-Inhibiting Viral Protein Mutants

    PubMed Central

    D’Aloja, Paola; Olivetta, Eleonora; Bona, Roberta; Nappi, Filomena; Pedacchia, Daniela; Pugliese, Katherina; Ferrari, Giuliana; Verani, Paola; Federico, Maurizio

    1998-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that expression of the nonproducer F12-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variant induces a block in the replication of superinfecting HIV that does not depend on the down-regulation of CD4 HIV receptors. In order to individuate the gene(s) involved in F12-HIV-induced interference, vectors expressing each of the nine F12-HIV proteins were transfected in HIV-susceptible HeLa CD4 cells. Pools of cell clones stably producing each viral protein were infected with HIV-1, and virus release was measured in terms of reverse transcriptase activity in supernatants. We hereby demonstrate that HeLa CD4 cells expressing the F12-HIV gag, vif, or nef gene were resistant, to different degrees, to infection with T-cell-line-adapted HIV-1 strains. Conversely, expression of either the tat, rev, or vpu F12-HIV gene increased the rate of HIV release, and no apparent effects on HIV replication were observed in cells expressing either the F12-HIV vpr, pol, or env gene. No variation of CD4 exposure was detected in any of the uninfected HeLa CD4 pools. These data indicate that F12-HIV homologous viral interference is the consequence of the synergistic anti-HIV effects of Gag, Vif, and Nef proteins. Retrovirus vectors expressing F12-HIV vif or nef allowed us to further establish that the expression of each mutated protein (i) inhibits the replication of clinical HIV-1 isolates as well, (ii) impairs the infectivity of the virus released by cells chronically infected with HIV-1, and (iii) limitedly to F12-HIV Vif protein, induces HIV resistance in both vif-permissive and vif-nonpermissive cells. The levels of action of F12-HIV vif and nef anti-HIV effects were also determined. We observed that HIV virions emerging from the first viral cycle on F12-HIV vif-expressing cells, although released in unaltered amounts, had a strongly reduced ability to initiate the retrotranscription process when they reinfected parental HeLa CD4 cells. Differently, we observed

  20. Curdlan sulfate and HIV-1. I. In vitro inhibitory effects of curdlan sulfate on HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Aoki, T; Kaneko, Y; Stefanski, M S; Nguyen, T; Ting, R C

    1991-04-01

    Action mechanisms of a newly synthesized polysaccharide, curdlan sulfate (CRDS), on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection were investigated in vitro using syncytium formation microassay and p24 antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. These assays measured the titer of infectious virions and the amounts of HIV-1 core antigen p24 in soluble, intraviral, and intracellular forms. CRDS treatments were performed for 1 h at 37 degrees C. H9 cells pretreated with 0.1 to 100.0 micrograms/ml of CRDS appreciably inhibited HIV-1 infection. CRDS-treated HIV-1 virions were less able to infect H9 cells than untreated virions. The simultaneous treatment of H9 cells and HIV-1 virions with CRDS induced a significant inhibition of HIV-1 infection, resulting in the temporary disappearance of virions at the highest dose of CRDS. In contrast, CRDS treatment of newly HIV-1-infected H9 cells caused a significant decrease in the titer of infectious HIV-1 and the p24 amounts of all three forms, but no absolute elimination. Taken together, these results indicate that CRDS may block the binding of the HIV-1 envelope to the H9 cell surface, with emphasis on the high affinity of CRDS to the HIV-1 envelope.

  1. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Schreck, S. |; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1996-02-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Doses which caused over 99% cell killing induced HIV-LTR transcription maximally, demonstrating that cells that will go on to die by 14 days are the cells expressing HIV-LTR-CAT.

  2. Guanylate Binding Protein (GBP) 5 Is an Interferon-Inducible Inhibitor of HIV-1 Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Krapp, Christian; Hotter, Dominik; Gawanbacht, Ali; McLaren, Paul J; Kluge, Silvia F; Stürzel, Christina M; Mack, Katharina; Reith, Elisabeth; Engelhart, Susanne; Ciuffi, Angela; Hornung, Veit; Sauter, Daniel; Telenti, Amalio; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2016-04-13

    Guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are an interferon (IFN)-inducible subfamily of guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) with well-established activity against intracellular bacteria and parasites. Here we show that GBP5 potently restricts HIV-1 and other retroviruses. GBP5 is expressed in the primary target cells of HIV-1, where it impairs viral infectivity by interfering with the processing and virion incorporation of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). GBP5 levels in macrophages determine and inversely correlate with infectious HIV-1 yield over several orders of magnitude, which may explain the high donor variability in macrophage susceptibility to HIV. Antiviral activity requires Golgi localization of GBP5, but not its GTPase activity. Start codon mutations in the accessory vpu gene from macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strains conferred partial resistance to GBP5 inhibition by increasing Env expression. Our results identify GBP5 as an antiviral effector of the IFN response and may explain the increased frequency of defective vpu genes in primary HIV-1 strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Inducible heat shock protein 70 enhances HPV31 viral genome replication and virion production during the differentiation-dependent life cycle in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Song, Hebin; Moseley, Pope L; Lowe, Stephanie L; Ozbun, Michelle A

    2010-01-01

    Increasing data indicate heat shock proteins (HSPs) including inducible HSP70 (HSP70i) are involved in the replicative cycles of various viruses including adenoviruses (Ads), polyomaviruses (PyVs), and some RNA viruses. Cell-free system studies implicate HSP70i in human papillomavirus type 11 (HPV11) genome replication with E1 and E2 proteins, and there is evidence that HSP70 is involved in capsid assembly and disassembly for PyVs and HPVs. HSP70 expression is increased in HPV16 E6/E7 gene transduced human primary keratinocytes, and frequently detected in early stage uterine cervical cancer at levels in conjunction with lesion severity. In this study we carry out analyses in the natural host epithelial tissues to assess the role of inducible HSP70 (HSP70i) in the HPV infectious life cycle. For these studies we used the organotypic (raft) culture system to recapitulate the full viral life cycle of the high-risk HPV31. Upon heat shock of HPV31-infected organotypic tissues, we find high and sustained expression of HSP70i coincident with enhanced HPV genome replication and virion production. Whereas there is no clear effect on L1 expression levels, we find HSP70i and L1 interact and HSP70i colocalizes with and enhances the nuclear localization of L1 in differentiated cells. Ad-mediated gene transfer was used to study the effects of HSP70i in naturally HPV-infected differentiating tissues and showed results similar to those in heat shocked rafts. These results indicate that increased HSP70i augments late activities in the viral life cycle. We conclude that HSP70i contributes directly to HPV replicative viral activities and the production of infectious virions.

  4. HIV increases HCV-induced hepatocyte apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jae Young; Shao, Run-Xuan; Lin, Wenyu; Weinberg, Ethan; Chung, Woo Jin; Tsai, Wei Lun; Zhao, Hong; Goto, Kaku; Zhang, Leiliang; Mendez-Navarro, Jorge; Jilg, Nikolaus; Peng, Lee F.; Brockman, Mark A.; Chung, Raymond T.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims HCV related liver disease is one of the most important complications in persons with HIV, with accelerated fibrosis progression in coinfected persons compared to those with HCV alone. We hypothesized that HIV coinfection increases HCV related hepatocyte apoptosis and that HCV and HIV influence TRAIL signaling in hepatocytes. Methods We analyzed the effect of HIV on JFH1-infected Huh 7.5.1 cells. Apoptosis was measured by Caspase-Glo 3/7 assay and Western blot for cleaved PARP. TRAIL, TRAIL receptor 1 (DR4) and 2 (DR5) mRNA and protein levels were assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. We also investigated activation of caspase pathways using caspase inhibitors and assessed expression of Bid and cytochrome C. Results We found increased caspase 3/7 activity and cleaved PARP in JFH1 HCV-infected Huh7.5.1 cells in the presence of heat-inactivated HIV compared to Huh7.5.1 cells infected with JFH1 or exposed to heat-inactivated HIV alone. Both DR4 and DR5 mRNA and protein expression were increased in JFH1-infected cells in the presence of inactivated HIV compared to Huh7.5.1 cells infected with JFH1 or exposed to heat-inactivated HIV alone. Pancaspase, Caspase-8, and caspase-9 inhibition blocked apoptosis induced by HCV, inactivated HIV and HCV plus inactivated HIV. A caspase-9 inhibitor blocked apoptosis induced by HCV, HIV and HCV-HIV comparably to pancaspase and caspase-8 inhibitors. HCV induced the activation of Bid cleavage and cytochrome C release. The addition of HIV substantially augmented this induction. Conclusions Our findings indicate that hepatocyte apoptosis is increased in the presence of HCV and HIV compared to HCV or HIV alone, and that this increase is mediated by DR4 and DR5 up-regulation. They provide an additional mechanism for the observed accelerated liver disease progression observed in HCV-HIV coinfection. PMID:21146890

  5. Lymphotropic Virions Affect Chemokine Receptor-Mediated Neural Signaling and Apoptosis: Implications for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Associated Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jialin; Ghorpade, Anuja; Niemann, Douglas; Cotter, Robin L.; Thylin, Michael R.; Epstein, Leon; Swartz, Jennifer M.; Shepard, Robin B.; Liu, Xiaojuan; Nukuna, Adeline; Gendelman, Howard E.

    1999-01-01

    Chemokine receptors pivotal for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in lymphocytes and macrophages (CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4) are expressed on neural cells (microglia, astrocytes, and/or neurons). It is these cells which are damaged during progressive HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system. We theorize that viral coreceptors could effect neural cell damage during HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD) without simultaneously affecting viral replication. To these ends, we studied the ability of diverse viral strains to affect intracellular signaling and apoptosis of neurons, astrocytes, and monocyte-derived macrophages. Inhibition of cyclic AMP, activation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and apoptosis were induced by diverse HIV-1 strains, principally in neurons. Virions from T-cell-tropic (T-tropic) strains (MN, IIIB, and Lai) produced the most significant alterations in signaling of neurons and astrocytes. The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, induced markedly less neural damage than purified virions. Macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) strains (ADA, JR-FL, Bal, MS-CSF, and DJV) produced the least neural damage, while 89.6, a dual-tropic HIV-1 strain, elicited intermediate neural cell damage. All T-tropic strain-mediated neuronal impairments were blocked by the CXCR4 antibody, 12G5. In contrast, the M-tropic strains were only partially blocked by 12G5. CXCR4-mediated neuronal apoptosis was confirmed in pure populations of rat cerebellar granule neurons and was blocked by HA1004, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, protein kinase A, and protein kinase C. Taken together, these results suggest that progeny HIV-1 virions can influence neuronal signal transduction and apoptosis. This process occurs, in part, through CXCR4 and is independent of CD4 binding. T-tropic viruses that traffic in and out of the brain during progressive HIV-1 disease may play an important role in HAD neuropathogenesis. PMID:10482576

  6. RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Activity in Influenza Virions

    PubMed Central

    Penhoet, Edward; Miller, Henry; Doyle, Michael; Blatti, Stanley

    1971-01-01

    An RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity has been detected in purified preparations of influenza virus. In contrast to the replicase activity induced in influenza-infected cells, the virion-associated enzyme has an absolute requirement for Mn++. Most of the RNA synthesized in vitro is complementary to virion RNA. PMID:5288388

  7. HIV-1 protease-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is one of the presumptive causes of CD4+ T cell depletion during HIV infection and progression to AIDS. However, the precise role of HIV-1 in this process remains unexplained. HIV-1 protease (PR) has been suggested as a possible factor, but a direct link between HIV-1 PR enzymatic activity and apoptosis has not been established. Results Here, we show that expression of active HIV-1 PR induces death in HeLa and HEK-293 cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. This conclusion is based on in vivo observations of the direct localization of HIV-1 PR in mitochondria, a key player in triggering apoptosis. Moreover, we observed an HIV-1 PR concentration-dependent decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and the role of HIV-1 PR in activation of caspase 9, PARP cleavage and DNA fragmentation. In addition, in vitro data demonstrated that HIV-1 PR mediates cleavage of mitochondrial proteins Tom22, VDAC and ANT, leading to release of AIF and Hsp60 proteins. By using yeast two-hybrid screening, we also identified a new HIV-1 PR interaction partner, breast carcinoma-associated protein 3 (BCA3). We found that BCA3 accelerates p53 transcriptional activity on the bax promoter, thus elevating the cellular level of pro-apoptotic Bax protein. Conclusion In summary, our results describe the involvement of HIV-1 PR in apoptosis, which is caused either by a direct effect of HIV-1 PR on mitochondrial membrane integrity or by its interaction with cellular protein BCA3. PMID:24886575

  8. Cyclin F/FBXO1 Interacts with HIV-1 Viral Infectivity Factor (Vif) and Restricts Progeny Virion Infectivity by Ubiquitination and Proteasomal Degradation of Vif Protein through SCF(cyclin F) E3 Ligase Machinery.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Tracy; Chaudhary, Priyanka; Gupta, Kailash; Islam, Sehbanul; Ghosh, Payel; Santra, Manas Kumar; Mitra, Debashis

    2017-03-31

    Cyclin F protein, also known as FBXO1, is the largest among all cyclins and oscillates in the cell cycle like other cyclins. Apart from being a G2/M cyclin, cyclin F functions as the substrate-binding subunit of SCF(cyclin F) E3 ubiquitin ligase. In a gene expression analysis performed to identify novel gene modulations associated with cell cycle dysregulation during HIV-1 infection in CD4(+) T cells, we observed down-regulation of the cyclin F gene (CCNF). Later, using gene overexpression and knockdown studies, we identified cyclin F as negatively influencing HIV-1 viral infectivity without any significant impact on virus production. Subsequently, we found that cyclin F negatively regulates the expression of viral protein Vif (viral infectivity factor) at the protein level. We also identified a novel host-pathogen interaction between cyclin F and Vif protein in T cells during HIV-1 infection. Mutational analysis of a cyclin F-specific amino acid motif in the C-terminal region of Vif indicated rescue of the protein from cyclin F-mediated down-regulation. Subsequently, we showed that Vif is a novel substrate of the SCF(cyclin F) E3 ligase, where cyclin F mediates the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of Vif through physical interaction. Finally, we showed that cyclin F augments APOBEC3G expression through degradation of Vif to regulate infectivity of progeny virions. Taken together, our results demonstrate that cyclin F is a novel F-box protein that functions as an intrinsic cellular regulator of HIV-1 Vif and has a negative regulatory effect on the maintenance of viral infectivity by restoring APOBEC3G expression.

  9. A rev1-vpu polymorphism unique to HIV-1 subtype A and C strains impairs envelope glycoprotein expression from rev-vpu-env cassettes and reduces virion infectivity in pseudotyping assays

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Matthias H.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Shaw, Katharina S.; Decker, Julie M.; Keele, Brandon F.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Grayson, Truman; McPherson, David T.; Ping, Li-Hua; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Swanstrom, Ronald; Williamson, Carolyn; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2010-02-20

    Functional studies of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs) commonly include the generation of pseudoviruses, which are produced by co-transfection of rev-vpu-env cassettes with an env-deficient provirus. Here, we describe six Env constructs from transmitted/founder HIV-1 that were defective in the pseudotyping assay, although two produced infectious virions when expressed from their cognate proviruses. All of these constructs exhibited an unusual gene arrangement in which the first exon of rev (rev1) and vpu were in the same reading frame without an intervening stop codon. Disruption of the rev1-vpu fusion gene by frameshift mutation, stop codon, or abrogation of the rev initiation codon restored pseudovirion infectivity. Introduction of the fusion gene into wildtype Env cassettes severely compromised their function. The defect was not due to altered env and rev transcription or a dominant negative effect of the expressed fusion protein, but seemed to be caused by inefficient translation at the env initiation codon. Although the rev1-vpu polymorphism affects Env expression only in vitro, it can cause problems in studies requiring Env complementation, such as analyses of co-receptor usage and neutralization properties, since 3% of subtype A, 20% of subtype C and 5% of CRF01{sub A}/E viruses encode the fusion gene. A solution is to eliminate the rev initiation codon when amplifying rev-vpu-env cassettes since this increases Env expression irrespective of the presence of the polymorphism.

  10. Nanoparticle-based flow virometry for the analysis of individual virions

    PubMed Central

    Arakelyan, Anush; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Margolis, Leonid; Grivel, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    While flow cytometry has been used to analyze the antigenic composition of individual cells, the antigenic makeup of viral particles is still characterized predominantly in bulk. Here, we describe a technology, “flow virometry,” that can be used for antigen detection on individual virions. The technology is based on binding magnetic nanoparticles to virions, staining the virions with monoclonal antibodies, separating the formed complexes with magnetic columns, and characterizing them with flow cytometers. We used this technology to study the distribution of two antigens (HLA-DR and LFA-1) that HIV-1 acquires from infected cells among individual HIV-1 virions. Flow virometry revealed that the antigenic makeup of virions from a single preparation is heterogeneous. This heterogeneity could not be detected with bulk analysis of viruses. Moreover, in two preparations of the same HIV-1 produced by different cells, the distribution of antigens among virions was different. In contrast, HIV-1 of two different HIV-1 genotypes replicating in the same cells became somewhat antigenically similar. This nanotechnology allows the study of virions in bodily fluids without virus propagation and in principle is not restricted to the analysis of HIV, but can be applied to the analysis of the individual surface antigenic makeup of any virus. PMID:23925291

  11. HIV transcription is induced with cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Chang-Liu, Chin Mei; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    Previous work has shown that HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct are induced to express chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) following exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation, {gamma} rays, neutrons, and others. In this report, the authors demonstrate that this induction of HIV-LTR transcription occurs when stably transfected HeLa cells are exposed to agents which mediate cell killing, such as UV radiation, electroporation of sucrose buffer, prolonged heating, and low and high pH. Cells cultured following UV exposure demonstrated a peak in CAT expression that is evidence in viable (but not necessarily cell division-competent) cells 24 h after exposure; this inductive response continued until at least 72 h after exposure. HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent, and the amount of CAT transcription induced was correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Other agents which caused no cell killing (such as heat-shock for up to 2 h, treatment with metronidazole, exposure to sunlight, vitamin C treatment, and others) had no effect on HIV-LTR induction. These results suggest that HIV transcription is induced as a consequence of the turn on of a cellular death or apoptotic pathway.

  12. RNA Polymerase in Mumps Virion

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Jacqueline P.; Northrop, Robert L.

    1974-01-01

    Mumps virions of the Enders' strain were examined for polymerase activity in vitro. An RNA-dependent RNA polymerase was found to be associated with the virion. The general properties of the reaction appear to be similar to those described for other paramyxoviruses. PMID:4836602

  13. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Schreck, S. |

    1995-06-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Virion-targeted viral inactivation: new therapy against viral infection.

    PubMed

    Okui, N; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, N; Sakuma, R; Ishikawa, T; Kitamura, T

    2001-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is resistant to all current therapy. Gene therapy is an attractive alternative or additive to current, unsatisfactory AIDS therapy. To develop an antiviral molecule targeting viral integrase (HIV IN), we generated a single-chain antibody, termed scAb, which interacted with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IN and inhibited virus replication at the integration step when expressed intracellularly. To reduce infectivity from within the virus particles, we made expression plasmids (pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-CA, and pC-scAbE-WXXF), which expressed the anti-HIV IN scAb fused to the N-terminus of HIV-1-associated accessory protein R (Vpr), capsid protein (CA), and specific binding motif to Vpr (WXXF), respectively. All fusion proteins were tagged with a nine-amino acid peptide derived from influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) at the C terminus. The fusion molecules, termed scAbE-Vpr, scAbE-CA, and scAbE-WXXF, interacted specifically with HIV IN immobilized on a nitrocellulose membrane. Immunoblot analysis showed that scAbE-Vpr, scAbE-CA, and scAbE-WXXF were incorporated into the virions produced by cotransfection of 293T cells with HIV-1 infectious clone DNA (pLAI) and pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-WXXF. A multinuclear activation galactosidase indicator (MAGI) assay revealed that the virions released from 293T cells cotransfected with pLAI and pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-WXXF had as little 1000-fold of the infectivity of the control wild-type virions, which were produced from the 293T cells transfected with pLAI alone. Furthermore, the virions produced from the 293T cells cotransfected with pLAI and an scAb expression vector (pC-scAb) showed only 1% of the infectivity of the control HIV-1 in a MAGI assay, although scAb was not incorporated into the virions. In either instance, the total quantity of the progeny virions released from the transfected 293T cells and the patterns of the virion proteins were hardly affected by the presence of

  15. Trivalent inactivated influenza vaccines induce broad immunological reactivity to both internal virion components and influenza surface proteins

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Katherine A.; Chaves, Francisco A.; Alam, Shabnam; Sant, Andrea J.

    2012-01-01

    There are a number of related goals of influenza vaccination, including elicitation of protective antibodies and induction of cellular CD4 and CD8 T cell responses. Because CD4 T cell expansion and functionality are influenced by peptide specificity and T cell gene expression can be modified by repeated re-stimulations, it is important to evaluate how frequent influenza vaccinations affect CD4 T cell dependent functions in protective immunity to influenza. Trivalent influenza vaccines (TIV) have production of neutralizing antibodies to HA as their primary goal and main criteria for efficacy. Accordingly, they are not characterized for any other viral components. In the current study, we evaluated whether other influenza virus proteins were present in commercial TIV at levels sufficient for immunogenicity in vivo. Mice that differed with regard to their expressed class II molecules were used in concert with peptide-stimulated cytokine EliSpot assays to comprehensively evaluate the CD4 T cell antigen specificity induced by the TIV. Our studies revealed that NA, NP, M1 and NS1 were present in sufficient quantities in the TIV to prime and boost CD4 T cells. These results suggest that in humans, the broad CD4 T cell repertoire induced by live infection is continually boosted and maintained throughout life by regular vaccination with licensed intramuscular split vaccines. The implications raised by our findings on CD4 T cell functionality in influenza are discussed. PMID:23099328

  16. Target Cell APOBEC3C Can Induce Limited G-to-A Mutation in HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Bourara, Khaoula; Liegler, Teri J; Grant, Robert M

    2007-01-01

    The evolutionary success of primate lentiviruses reflects their high capacity to mutate and adapt to new host species, immune responses within individual hosts, and, in recent years, antiviral drugs. APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3F (A3F) are host cell DNA-editing enzymes that induce extensive HIV-1 mutation that severely attenuates viral replication. The HIV-1 virion infectivity factor (Vif), expressed in vivo, counteracts the antiviral activity of A3G and A3F by inducing their degradation. Other APOBECs may contribute more to viral diversity by inducing less extensive mutations allowing viral replication to persist. Here we show that in APOBEC3C (A3C)-expressing cells infected with the patient-derived HIV-1 molecular clones 210WW, 210WM, 210MW, and 210MM, and the lab-adapted molecular clone LAI, viral G-to-A mutations were detected in the presence of Vif expression. Mutations occurred primarily in the GA context and were relatively infrequent, thereby allowing for spreading infection. The mutations were absent in cells lacking A3C but were induced after transient expression of A3C in the infected target cell. Inhibiting endogenous A3C by RNA interference in Magi cells prevented the viral mutations. Thus, A3C is necessary and sufficient for G-to-A mutations in some HIV-1 strains. A3C-induced mutations occur at levels that allow replication to persist and may therefore contribute to viral diversity. Developing drugs that inhibit A3C may be a novel strategy for delaying viral escape from immune or antiretroviral inhibition. PMID:17967058

  17. HIV transcription is induced with cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-11-01

    In this report, we demonstrate that this induction of HIV-LTR transcription occurs when stably transfected HeLa cells are exposed to agents which mediate cell killing, such as UV radiation, electroporation of sucrose buffer, prolonged heating, and low and high pH. Cells cultured following UV exposure demonstrated a peak in CAT expression that is evident in viable (but not necessarily cell division-competent) cells 24 h after exposure; this inductive response continued until at least 72 h after exposure. HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent, and the amount of CAT transcription induced was correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture.

  18. Extracellular ATP induces the rapid release of HIV-1 from virus containing compartments of human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Francesca; Desdouits, Marion; Garzetti, Livia; Podini, Paola; Alfano, Massimo; Rubartelli, Anna; Furlan, Roberto; Benaroch, Philippe; Poli, Guido

    2015-01-01

    HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infects CD4+ T lymphocytes and tissue macrophages. Infected macrophages differ from T cells in terms of decreased to absent cytopathicity and for active accumulation of new progeny HIV-1 virions in virus-containing compartments (VCC). For these reasons, infected macrophages are believed to act as “Trojan horses” carrying infectious particles to be released on cell necrosis or functional stimulation. Here we explored the hypothesis that extracellular ATP (eATP) could represent a microenvironmental signal potentially affecting virion release from VCC of infected macrophages. Indeed, eATP triggered the rapid release of infectious HIV-1 from primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) acutely infected with the CCR5-dependent HIV-1 strain. A similar phenomenon was observed in chronically infected promonocytic U1 cells differentiated to macrophage-like cells (D-U1) by costimulation with phorbol esters and urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Worthy of note, eATP did not cause necrotic, apoptotic, or pyroptotic cell death, and its effect on HIV-1 release was suppressed by Imipramine (an antidepressant agent known to inhibit microvesicle formation by interfering with membrane-associated acid sphingomyelinase). Virion release was not triggered by oxidized ATP, whereas the effect of eATP was inhibited by a specific inhibitor of the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). Thus, eATP triggered the discharge of virions actively accumulating in VCC of infected macrophages via interaction with the P2X7R in the absence of significant cytopathicity. These findings suggest that the microvesicle pathway and P2X7R could represent exploitable targets for interfering with the VCC-associated reservoir of infectious HIV-1 virions in tissue macrophages. PMID:26056317

  19. Herpesvirus gB-induced fusion between the virion envelope and outer nuclear membrane during virus egress is regulated by the viral US3 kinase.

    PubMed

    Wisner, Todd W; Wright, Catherine C; Kato, Akihisa; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Mou, Fan; Baines, Joel D; Roller, Richard J; Johnson, David C

    2009-04-01

    Herpesvirus capsids collect along the inner surface of the nuclear envelope and bud into the perinuclear space. Enveloped virions then fuse with the outer nuclear membrane (NM). We previously showed that herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoproteins gB and gH act in a redundant fashion to promote fusion between the virion envelope and the outer NM. HSV mutants lacking both gB and gH accumulate enveloped virions in herniations, vesicles that bulge into the nucleoplasm. Earlier studies had shown that HSV mutants lacking the viral serine/threonine kinase US3 also accumulate herniations. Here, we demonstrate that HSV gB is phosphorylated in a US3-dependent manner in HSV-infected cells, especially in a crude nuclear fraction. Moreover, US3 directly phosphorylated the gB cytoplasmic (CT) domain in in vitro assays. Deletion of gB in the context of a US3-null virus did not add substantially to defects in nuclear egress. The majority of the US3-dependent phosphorylation of gB involved the CT domain and amino acid T887, a residue present in a motif similar to that recognized by US3 in other proteins. HSV recombinants lacking gH and expressing either gB substitution mutation T887A or a gB truncated at residue 886 displayed substantial defects in nuclear egress. We concluded that phosphorylation of the gB CT domain is important for gB-mediated fusion with the outer NM. This suggested a model in which the US3 kinase is incorporated into the tegument layer (between the capsid and envelope) in HSV virions present in the perinuclear space. By this packaging, US3 might be brought close to the gB CT tail, leading to phosphorylation and triggering fusion between the virion envelope and the outer NM.

  20. Comparative thermodynamic analysis of zinc binding to the His/Cys motif in virion infectivity factor.

    PubMed

    Ghimire-Rijal, Sudipa; Maynard, Ernest L

    2014-05-05

    HIV-1 virion infectivity factor (Vif) is an accessory protein that induces the proteasomal degradation of the host restriction factor, apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G). Degradation of APOBEC3G requires the interaction of Vif with Cul5, the scaffold for an E3 ubiquitin ligase. A highly conserved region in HIV-1 Vif termed the HCCH motif binds zinc and is critical for recruitment of Cul5 and degradation of APOBEC3G. To gain thermodynamic and mechanistic insight into zinc binding to diverse Vif proteins, we have employed a combination of isothermal titration calorimetry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and Cul5 pull down assays. The proton linkage of zinc binding to HIV-1 Vif was analyzed under different buffer conditions and consistent with the release of two Cys-thiol protons upon zinc binding, supporting earlier EXAFS studies. Zinc binding to Vif proteins from HIV-1, SIVAgm, HIV-2, and SIVMac followed a trend in which the enthalpy of zinc binding became less favorable and the entropy of zinc binding became more favorable. Using AUC, we determined that zinc induced oligomerization of Vif proteins from HIV-1 and SIVAgm but had little or no effect on the oligomeric properties of Vif proteins from HIV-2 and SIVMac. The zinc dependence of Cul5 recruitment by Vif was investigated. All Vif proteins except HIV-2 Vif required zinc to stabilize the interaction with Cul5. The trends in enthalpy-entropy compensation, zinc-induced oligomerization, and Cul5 recruitment are discussed in terms of the apo conformation of the HCCH motif and the role of zinc in stabilizing the structure of Vif.

  1. Neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1 induced by immunization

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Laura E.

    2013-01-01

    Most neutralizing antibodies act at the earliest steps of viral infection and block interaction of the virus with cellular receptors to prevent entry into host cells. The inability to induce neutralizing antibodies to HIV has been a major obstacle to HIV vaccine research since the early days of the epidemic. However, in the past three years, the definition of a neutralizing antibody against HIV has been revolutionized by the isolation of extremely broad and potent neutralizing antibodies from HIV-infected individuals. Considerable hurdles remain for inducing neutralizing antibodies to a protective level after immunization. Meanwhile, novel technologies to bypass the induction of antibodies are being explored to provide prophylactic antibody-based interventions. This review addresses the challenge of inducing HIV neutralizing antibodies upon immunization and considers notable recent advances in the field. A greater understanding of the successes and failures for inducing a neutralizing response upon immunization is required to accelerate the development of an effective HIV vaccine. PMID:23401570

  2. Minimal Contribution of APOBEC3-Induced G-to-A Hypermutation to HIV-1 Recombination and Genetic Variation.

    PubMed

    Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista A; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Burdick, Ryan C; Gorelick, Robert J; Keele, Brandon F; Hu, Wei-Shau; Pathak, Vinay K

    2016-05-01

    Although the predominant effect of host restriction APOBEC3 proteins on HIV-1 infection is to block viral replication, they might inadvertently increase retroviral genetic variation by inducing G-to-A hypermutation. Numerous studies have disagreed on the contribution of hypermutation to viral genetic diversity and evolution. Confounding factors contributing to the debate include the extent of lethal (stop codon) and sublethal hypermutation induced by different APOBEC3 proteins, the inability to distinguish between G-to-A mutations induced by APOBEC3 proteins and error-prone viral replication, the potential impact of hypermutation on the frequency of retroviral recombination, and the extent to which viral recombination occurs in vivo, which can reassort mutations in hypermutated genomes. Here, we determined the effects of hypermutation on the HIV-1 recombination rate and its contribution to genetic variation through recombination to generate progeny genomes containing portions of hypermutated genomes without lethal mutations. We found that hypermutation did not significantly affect the rate of recombination, and recombination between hypermutated and wild-type genomes only increased the viral mutation rate by 3.9 × 10-5 mutations/bp/replication cycle in heterozygous virions, which is similar to the HIV-1 mutation rate. Since copackaging of hypermutated and wild-type genomes occurs very rarely in vivo, recombination between hypermutated and wild-type genomes does not significantly contribute to the genetic variation of replicating HIV-1. We also analyzed previously reported hypermutated sequences from infected patients and determined that the frequency of sublethal mutagenesis for A3G and A3F is negligible (4 × 10-21 and1 × 10-11, respectively) and its contribution to viral mutations is far below mutations generated during error-prone reverse transcription. Taken together, we conclude that the contribution of APOBEC3-induced hypermutation to HIV-1 genetic

  3. Minimal Contribution of APOBEC3-Induced G-to-A Hypermutation to HIV-1 Recombination and Genetic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaitchik, Olga A.; Burdick, Ryan C.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Keele, Brandon F.; Hu, Wei-Shau; Pathak, Vinay K.

    2016-01-01

    Although the predominant effect of host restriction APOBEC3 proteins on HIV-1 infection is to block viral replication, they might inadvertently increase retroviral genetic variation by inducing G-to-A hypermutation. Numerous studies have disagreed on the contribution of hypermutation to viral genetic diversity and evolution. Confounding factors contributing to the debate include the extent of lethal (stop codon) and sublethal hypermutation induced by different APOBEC3 proteins, the inability to distinguish between G-to-A mutations induced by APOBEC3 proteins and error-prone viral replication, the potential impact of hypermutation on the frequency of retroviral recombination, and the extent to which viral recombination occurs in vivo, which can reassort mutations in hypermutated genomes. Here, we determined the effects of hypermutation on the HIV-1 recombination rate and its contribution to genetic variation through recombination to generate progeny genomes containing portions of hypermutated genomes without lethal mutations. We found that hypermutation did not significantly affect the rate of recombination, and recombination between hypermutated and wild-type genomes only increased the viral mutation rate by 3.9 × 10−5 mutations/bp/replication cycle in heterozygous virions, which is similar to the HIV-1 mutation rate. Since copackaging of hypermutated and wild-type genomes occurs very rarely in vivo, recombination between hypermutated and wild-type genomes does not significantly contribute to the genetic variation of replicating HIV-1. We also analyzed previously reported hypermutated sequences from infected patients and determined that the frequency of sublethal mutagenesis for A3G and A3F is negligible (4 × 10−21 and1 × 10−11, respectively) and its contribution to viral mutations is far below mutations generated during error-prone reverse transcription. Taken together, we conclude that the contribution of APOBEC3-induced hypermutation to HIV-1 genetic

  4. The localization of a heterologous displayed antigen in the baculovirus-budded virion determines the type and strength of induced adaptive immune response.

    PubMed

    Tavarone, Eugenia; Molina, Guido Nicolás; Amalfi, Sabrina; Peralta, Andrea; Molinari, Paula; Taboga, Oscar

    2017-02-17

    In the search of strategies of presentation of heterologous antigens to elicit humoral or cellular immune responses that modulate and properly potentiate each type of response, researchers have been studying baculovirus (BV) as vaccine vectors with promising results. For some years, several research groups explored different antigen presentation approaches using the BV AcNPV by expressing polypeptides on the surface of budded virions or by de novo synthesis of heterologous antigens by transduction of mammalian cells. In the case of expression on the surface of budded virions, for example, researchers have expressed polypeptides in peplomers as GP64 glycoprotein fusions or distributed throughout the entire surface by fusions to portions of the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus, VSV. Recently, our group developed the strategy of cross-presentation of antigens by fusions of GP64 to the capsid protein VP39 (capsid display) for the generation of cytotoxic responses. While the different strategies showed to be effective in raising immune responses, the individuality of each analysis makes difficult the comparison of the results. Here, by comparing the different strategies, we show that localization of the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) strongly determined the quality and intensity of the adaptive response to the heterologous antigen. Furthermore, surface display favored humoral responses, whereas capsid display favored cytotoxic responses. Finally, capsid display showed a much more efficient strategy to activate CD8-mediated responses than transduction. The incorporation of adjuvants in baculovirus formulations dramatically diminished the immunostimulatory properties of baculovirus.

  5. HIV-Induced Epigenetic Alterations in Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hameed, Enass A; Ji, Hong; Shata, Mohamed Tarek

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a member of the Retroviridae family, is a positive-sense, enveloped RNA virus. HIV, the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has two major types, HIV-1 and HIV-2 In HIV-infected cells the single stranded viral RNA genome is reverse transcribed and the double-stranded viral DNA integrates into the cellular DNA, forming a provirus. The proviral HIV genome is controlled by the host epigenetic regulatory machinery. Cellular epigenetic regulators control HIV latency and reactivation by affecting the chromatin state in the vicinity of the viral promoter located to the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) sequence. In turn, distinct HIV proteins affect the epigenotype and gene expression pattern of the host cells. HIV-1 infection of CD4(+) T cells in vitro upregulated DNMT activity and induced hypermethylation of distinct cellular promoters. In contrast, in the colon mucosa and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-infected patients demethylation of the FOXP3 promoter was observed, possibly due to the downregulation of DNA methyltransferase 1. For a curative therapy of HIV infected individuals and AIDS patients, a combination of antiretroviral drugs with epigenetic modifying compounds have been suggested for the reactivation of latent HIV-1 genomes. These epigenetic drugs include histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACI), histone methyltransferase inhibitors (HMTI), histone demethylase inhibitors, and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTI).

  6. Amino acid substitutions in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 V3 loop that change viral tropism also alter physical and functional properties of the virion envelope.

    PubMed Central

    Willey, R L; Theodore, T S; Martin, M A

    1994-01-01

    The third variable (V3) region within the gp120 envelope glycoprotein of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been reported to be an important determinant of viral tropism. In this study a series of isogenic recombinant HIV-1 viruses, containing V3 regions from fresh isolates, were examined to ascertain if a relationship exists between viral tropism and specific properties of the virion-associated envelope. All of the viruses were able to infect CD4+ primary lymphocytes, although with different infection kinetics. Several recombinants, however, were unable to infect a continuous CD4+ T-cell line permissive for the parental virus and exhibited a marked decrease in the kinetics of virion-associated gp120 binding to a soluble form of CD4. A known macrophage-tropic HIV-1 isolate, also unable to infect the T-cell line, bound CD4 with similarly slow reaction kinetics. Although the inability to infect T-cell lines is a commonly observed property of macrophage-tropic isolates of HIV-1, the loss of T-cell line tropism by the V3 recombinants was not accompanied by a substantial infectivity for monocyte-derived macrophages, as monitored by reverse transcriptase production. Additional analyses of the recombinant virion gp120s indicated that most of the V3 substitutions increased the inherent stability of the virion gp120-gp41 envelope complex. These results indicate that V3-induced alterations in viral tropism are associated with changes in physical and functional properties of the virion envelope. Images PMID:7515973

  7. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Romidepsin Induces HIV Expression in CD4 T Cells from Patients on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy at Concentrations Achieved by Clinical Dosing

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Datsen George; Chiang, Vicki; Fyne, Elizabeth; Balakrishnan, Mini; Barnes, Tiffany; Graupe, Michael; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Irrinki, Alivelu; Murry, Jeffrey P.; Stepan, George; Stray, Kirsten M.; Tsai, Angela; Yu, Helen; Spindler, Jonathan; Kearney, Mary; Spina, Celsa A.; McMahon, Deborah; Lalezari, Jacob; Sloan, Derek; Mellors, John; Geleziunas, Romas; Cihlar, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Persistent latent reservoir of replication-competent proviruses in memory CD4 T cells is a major obstacle to curing HIV infection. Pharmacological activation of HIV expression in latently infected cells is being explored as one of the strategies to deplete the latent HIV reservoir. In this study, we characterized the ability of romidepsin (RMD), a histone deacetylase inhibitor approved for the treatment of T-cell lymphomas, to activate the expression of latent HIV. In an in vitro T-cell model of HIV latency, RMD was the most potent inducer of HIV (EC50 = 4.5 nM) compared with vorinostat (VOR; EC50 = 3,950 nM) and other histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors in clinical development including panobinostat (PNB; EC50 = 10 nM). The HIV induction potencies of RMD, VOR, and PNB paralleled their inhibitory activities against multiple human HDAC isoenzymes. In both resting and memory CD4 T cells isolated from HIV-infected patients on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), a 4-hour exposure to 40 nM RMD induced a mean 6-fold increase in intracellular HIV RNA levels, whereas a 24-hour treatment with 1 µM VOR resulted in 2- to 3-fold increases. RMD-induced intracellular HIV RNA expression persisted for 48 hours and correlated with sustained inhibition of cell-associated HDAC activity. By comparison, the induction of HIV RNA by VOR and PNB was transient and diminished after 24 hours. RMD also increased levels of extracellular HIV RNA and virions from both memory and resting CD4 T-cell cultures. The activation of HIV expression was observed at RMD concentrations below the drug plasma levels achieved by doses used in patients treated for T-cell lymphomas. In conclusion, RMD induces HIV expression ex vivo at concentrations that can be achieved clinically, indicating that the drug may reactivate latent HIV in patients on suppressive cART. PMID:24722454

  8. Recent progress in HIV vaccines inducing mucosal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Pavot, Vincent; Rochereau, Nicolas; Lawrence, Philip; Girard, Marc P; Genin, Christian; Verrier, Bernard; Paul, Stéphane

    2014-07-31

    In spite of several attempts over many years at developing a HIV vaccine based on classical strategies, none has convincingly succeeded to date. As HIV is transmitted primarily by the mucosal route, particularly through sexual intercourse, understanding antiviral immunity at mucosal sites is of major importance. An ideal vaccine should elicit HIV-specific antibodies and mucosal CD8⁺ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) as a first line of defense at a very early stage of HIV infection, before the virus can disseminate into the secondary lymphoid organs in mucosal and systemic tissues. A primary focus of HIV preventive vaccine research is therefore the induction of protective immune responses in these crucial early stages of HIV infection. Numerous approaches are being studied in the field, including building upon the recent RV144 clinical trial. In this article, we will review current strategies and briefly discuss the use of adjuvants in designing HIV vaccines that induce mucosal immune responses.

  9. AS03-adjuvanted H7N1 detergent-split virion vaccine is highly immunogenic in unprimed mice and induces cross-reactive antibodies to emerged H7N9 and additional H7 subtypes.

    PubMed

    Mallett, Corey P; Beaulieu, Edith; Joly, Marie-Hélène; Baras, Benoît; Lu, Xiuhua; Liu, Feng; Levine, Min Z; Katz, Jacqueline M; Innis, Bruce L; Giannini, Sandra L

    2015-07-31

    Avian H7 is one of several influenza A virus subtypes that have the potential to cause pandemics. Herein we describe preclinical results following administration of an investigational H7N1 inactivated detergent-split virion vaccine adjuvanted with the AS03 Adjuvant System. The adjuvanted H7N1 vaccine was highly immunogenic compared to the non-adjuvanted H7N1 vaccine in unprimed mice with less than 100ng of hemagglutinin antigen per dose. In addition, compared to the non-adjuvanted vaccine, the AS03-adjuvanted H7N1 vaccine also induced robust HI and VN antibody responses that cross-reacted with other H7 subtypes, including recently emerged H7N9 virus. These H7 data from the preclinical mouse model add to the existing H5 data to suggest that AS03 adjuvant technology may be generally effective for formulating antigen-sparing detergent-split virion vaccines against intrinsically sub-immunogenic avian influenza A virus subtypes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Guanylate binding protein 5: Impairing virion infectivity by targeting retroviral envelope glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Hotter, Dominik; Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2017-01-02

    Guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are interferon-inducible cellular factors that belong to the superfamily of guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) and play important roles in the cell-intrinsic defense against bacteria, protozoa and viruses. In a recent report in Cell Host & Microbe, we identify GBP5 as novel restriction factor of HIV-1 that reduces the infectivity of progeny virions by interfering with processing and incorporation of the viral envelope (Env) glycoprotein. The inhibitory activity of GBP5 requires C-terminal isoprenylation, mediating Golgi-association, but not its GTPase function. Notably, GBP5 expression levels vary considerably in human macrophages and inversely correlate with infectious virus yield. We demonstrate that GBP5 can be evaded by an unusual tradeoff mechanism: Naturally occurring mutations in the start codon of the viral accessory gene vpu attenuate GBP5 inhibition by increasing Env expression at the cost of Vpu function. Whether direct counteraction mechanisms or more subtle changes balancing Vpu and Env expression also affect HIV-1 inhibition by GBP5 remains to be clarified. Other open questions are whether GBP5 restricts HIV-1 in CD4(+) T cells and if other GBP family members also decrease infectivity of HIV and/or additional enveloped viruses.

  11. Guanylate binding protein 5: Impairing virion infectivity by targeting retroviral envelope glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Hotter, Dominik; Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are interferon-inducible cellular factors that belong to the superfamily of guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) and play important roles in the cell-intrinsic defense against bacteria, protozoa and viruses. In a recent report in Cell Host & Microbe, we identify GBP5 as novel restriction factor of HIV-1 that reduces the infectivity of progeny virions by interfering with processing and incorporation of the viral envelope (Env) glycoprotein. The inhibitory activity of GBP5 requires C-terminal isoprenylation, mediating Golgi-association, but not its GTPase function. Notably, GBP5 expression levels vary considerably in human macrophages and inversely correlate with infectious virus yield. We demonstrate that GBP5 can be evaded by an unusual tradeoff mechanism: Naturally occurring mutations in the start codon of the viral accessory gene vpu attenuate GBP5 inhibition by increasing Env expression at the cost of Vpu function. Whether direct counteraction mechanisms or more subtle changes balancing Vpu and Env expression also affect HIV-1 inhibition by GBP5 remains to be clarified. Other open questions are whether GBP5 restricts HIV-1 in CD4+ T cells and if other GBP family members also decrease infectivity of HIV and/or additional enveloped viruses. PMID:27275775

  12. BST2/CD317 counteracts human coronavirus 229E productive infection by tethering virions at the cell surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shiu-Mei; Huang, Kuo-Jung; Wang, Chin-Tien

    2014-01-20

    Bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST2), an interferon-inducible antiviral factor, has been shown to block the release of various enveloped viruses from cells. It has also been identified as an innate immune system component. Most enveloped viruses subject to BST2 restriction bud at the plasma membrane. Here we report our findings that (a) the production of human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) progeny viruses, whose budding occurs at the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC), markedly decreases in the presence of BST2; and (b) BST2 knockdown expression results in enhanced HCoV-229E virion production. Electron microscopy analyses indicate that HCoV-229E virions are tethered to cell surfaces or intracellular membranes by BST2. Our results suggest that BST2 exerts a broad blocking effect against enveloped virus release, regardless of whether budding occurs at the plasma membrane or intracellular compartments. - Highlights: • BST2 knockdown expression results in enhanced HCoV-229E egress. • HCoV-229E virions are tethered to cell surfaces or intracellular membranes by BST2. • HCoV-229E infection at high MOI can significantly downregulate HeLa BST2 and rescue HIV-1 egress.

  13. Binding of HIV-1 gp120 to DC-SIGN Promotes ASK-1-Dependent Activation-Induced Apoptosis of Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Vera S. F.; Chung, Nancy P. Y.; Wang, Shu-Rong; Li, Zhongye; Ma, Jing; Lin, Chia-Wei; Hsieh, Ya-Ju; Chang, Kao-Ping; Kung, Sui-Sum; Wu, Yi-Chia; Chu, Cheng-Wei; Tai, Hsiao-Ting; Gao, George F.; Zheng, Bojian; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.; Austyn, Jonathan M.; Lin, Chen-Lung S.

    2013-01-01

    During disease progression to AIDS, HIV-1 infected individuals become increasingly immunosuppressed and susceptible to opportunistic infections. It has also been demonstrated that multiple subsets of dendritic cells (DC), including DC-SIGN(+) cells, become significantly depleted in the blood and lymphoid tissues of AIDS patients, which may contribute to the failure in initiating effective host immune responses. The mechanism for DC depletion, however, is unclear. It is also known that vast quantities of viral envelope protein gp120 are shed from maturing HIV-1 virions and form circulating immune complexes in the serum of HIV-1-infected individuals, but the pathological role of gp120 in HIV-1 pathogenesis remains elusive. Here we describe a previously unrecognized mechanism of DC death in chronic HIV-1 infection, in which ligation of DC-SIGN by gp120 sensitizes DC to undergo accelerated apoptosis in response to a variety of activation stimuli. The cultured monocyte-derived DC and also freshly-isolated DC-SIGN(+) blood DC that were exposed to either cross-linked recombinant gp120 or immune-complex gp120 in HIV(+) serum underwent considerable apoptosis after CD40 ligation or exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα and IL-1β. Furthermore, circulating DC-SIGN(+) DC that were isolated directly from HIV-1(+) individuals had actually been pre-sensitized by serum gp120 for activation-induced exorbitant apoptosis. In all cases the DC apoptosis was substantially inhibited by DC-SIGN blockade. Finally, we showed that accelerated DC apoptosis was a direct consequence of excessive activation of the pro-apoptotic molecule ASK-1 and transfection of siRNA against ASK-1 significantly prevented the activation-induced excessive DC death. Our study discloses a previously unknown mechanism of immune modulation by envelope protein gp120, provides new insights into HIV immunopathogenesis, and suggests potential therapeutic approaches to

  14. Packageable antiviral therapeutics against human immunodeficiency virus type 1: virion-targeted virus inactivation by incorporation of a single-chain antibody against viral integrase into progeny virions.

    PubMed

    Okui, N; Sakuma, R; Kobayashi, N; Yoshikura, H; Kitamura, T; Chiba, J; Kitamura, Y

    2000-03-01

    To determine their activities as an antiviral agent packageable within virions and suitable for continued expression in cells, we tested a single-chain antibody (scAb) against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase and its three fusion proteins: fused to viral protein R (scab-Vpr), a double-cassette of the WXXF motif binding to Vpr (scAb-WXXF), and viral major capsid protein (scAb-CA), respectively. Cotransfection of human 293T cells with expression plasmid for scAb-Vpr or -WXXF along with HIV-1 clone pLAI resulted in the production of a normal amount of progeny virions with infectivity decreased by more than 10(3)-fold. Immunoblot analyses showed that scAb-Vpr or -WXXF was associated with virions, whereas scAb or scAb-CA was not, suggesting that scAb-Vpr or -WXXF was incorporated into virions. The incorporation of scAb-WXXF appeared to be Vpr dependent, because the fusion protein was associated with the wild-type but not with Vpr-truncated HIV-1 virions. Since G418-selected HeLa clones carrying expression plasmid for scAb-WXXF were obtained much more frequently than those for scAb-Vpr, scAb-WXXF was inferred to be less toxic to cells than scAb-Vpr. These results suggest that scAb-WXXF may serve as a novel class of antiviral therapeutic that inactivates progeny HIV virions from within.

  15. HIV infection increases HCV-induced hepatocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae Young; Shao, Run-Xuan; Lin, Wenyu; Weinberg, Ethan; Chung, Woo Jin; Tsai, Wei Lun; Zhao, Hong; Goto, Kaku; Zhang, Leiliang; Mendez-Navarro, Jorge; Jilg, Nikolaus; Peng, Lee F; Brockman, Mark A; Chung, Raymond T

    2011-04-01

    HCV related liver disease is one of the most important complications in persons with HIV, with accelerated fibrosis progression in coinfected persons compared to those with HCV alone. We hypothesized that HCV-HIV coinfection increases HCV related hepatocyte apoptosis and that HCV and HIV influence TRAIL signaling in hepatocytes. We analyzed the effect of HIV in JFH1-infected Huh7.5.1 cells. Apoptosis was measured by Caspase-Glo 3/7 assay and Western blotting for cleaved PARP. TRAIL, TRAIL receptor 1 (DR4), and 2 (DR5) mRNA and protein levels were assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. We also investigated activation of caspase pathways using caspase inhibitors and assessed expression of Bid and cytochrome C. We found increased caspase 3/7 activity and cleaved PARP in JFH1 HCV-infected Huh7.5.1 cells in the presence of heat-inactivated HIV, compared to Huh7.5.1 cells infected with JFH1 or exposed to heat-inactivated HIV alone. Both DR4 and DR5 mRNA and protein expression were increased in JFH1-infected cells in the presence of inactivated HIV compared to Huh7.5.1 cells infected with JFH1 or exposed to heat-inactivated HIV alone. Pancaspase, caspase-8, and caspase-9 inhibition blocked apoptosis induced by HCV, inactivated HIV, and HCV plus inactivated HIV. A caspase-9 inhibitor blocked apoptosis induced by HCV, HIV, and HCV-HIV comparably to pancaspase and caspase-8 inhibitors. HCV induced the activation of Bid cleavage and cytochrome C release. The addition of HIV substantially augmented this induction. Our findings indicate that hepatocyte apoptosis is increased in the presence of HCV and HIV compared to HCV or HIV alone, and that this increase is mediated by DR4 and DR5 up-regulation. These results provide an additional mechanism for the accelerated liver disease progression observed in HCV-HIV co-infection. Copyright © 2010 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. HIV transcription is induced with some forms of cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Panozzo, J.; Chang-Liu, C.-M.; Libertin, C.R.

    1996-11-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct`, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {Gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires function p53, which is missing in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture.

  17. Dengue virus infection induces broadly cross-reactive human IgM antibodies that recognize intact virions in humanized BLT-NSG mice

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Smita; Smith, Kenneth; Ramirez, Alejandro; Woda, Marcia; Pazoles, Pamela; Shultz, Leonard D; Greiner, Dale L; Brehm, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The development of small animal models that elicit human immune responses to dengue virus (DENV) is important since prior immunity is a major risk factor for developing severe dengue disease. This study evaluated anti-DENV human antibody (hAb) responses generated from immortalized B cells after DENV-2 infection in NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice that were co-transplanted with human fetal thymus and liver tissues (BLT-NSG mice). DENV-specific human antibodies predominantly of the IgM isotype were isolated during acute infection and in convalescence. We found that while a few hAbs recognized the envelope protein produced as a soluble recombinant, a number of hAbs only recognized epitopes on intact virions. The majority of the hAbs isolated during acute infection and in immune mice were serotype-cross-reactive and poorly neutralizing. Viral titers in immune BLT-NSG mice were significantly decreased after challenge with a clinical strain of dengue. DENV-specific hAbs generated in BLT-NSG mice share some of the characteristics of Abs isolated in humans with natural infection. Humanized BLT-NSG mice provide an attractive preclinical platform to assess the immunogenicity of candidate dengue vaccines. PMID:25125497

  18. Noninfectious X4 but not R5 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 virions inhibit humoral immune responses in human lymphoid tissue ex vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, Wendy; Sylwester, Andrew W.; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Margolis, Leonid B.

    2004-01-01

    Ex vivo human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of human lymphoid tissue recapitulates some aspects of in vivo HIV-1 infection, including a severe depletion of CD4(+) T cells and suppression of humoral immune responses to recall antigens or to polyclonal stimuli. These effects are induced by infection with X4 HIV-1 variants, whereas infection with R5 variants results in only mild depletion of CD4(+) T cells and no suppression of immune responses. To study the mechanisms of suppression of immune responses in this ex vivo system, we used aldrithiol-2 (AT-2)-inactivated virions that have functional envelope glycoproteins but are not infectious and do not deplete CD4(+) T cells in human lymphoid tissues ex vivo. Nevertheless, AT-2-inactivated X4 (but not R5) HIV-1 virions, even with only a brief exposure, inhibit antibody responses in human lymphoid tissue ex vivo, similarly to infectious virus. This phenomenon is mediated by soluble immunosuppressive factor(s) secreted by tissue exposed to virus.

  19. Noninfectious X4 but not R5 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 virions inhibit humoral immune responses in human lymphoid tissue ex vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, Wendy; Sylwester, Andrew W.; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Margolis, Leonid B.

    2004-01-01

    Ex vivo human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of human lymphoid tissue recapitulates some aspects of in vivo HIV-1 infection, including a severe depletion of CD4(+) T cells and suppression of humoral immune responses to recall antigens or to polyclonal stimuli. These effects are induced by infection with X4 HIV-1 variants, whereas infection with R5 variants results in only mild depletion of CD4(+) T cells and no suppression of immune responses. To study the mechanisms of suppression of immune responses in this ex vivo system, we used aldrithiol-2 (AT-2)-inactivated virions that have functional envelope glycoproteins but are not infectious and do not deplete CD4(+) T cells in human lymphoid tissues ex vivo. Nevertheless, AT-2-inactivated X4 (but not R5) HIV-1 virions, even with only a brief exposure, inhibit antibody responses in human lymphoid tissue ex vivo, similarly to infectious virus. This phenomenon is mediated by soluble immunosuppressive factor(s) secreted by tissue exposed to virus.

  20. HIV-1 VACCINES. HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies induced by native-like envelope trimers.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Rogier W; van Gils, Marit J; Derking, Ronald; Sok, Devin; Ketas, Thomas J; Burger, Judith A; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Cupo, Albert; Simonich, Cassandra; Goo, Leslie; Arendt, Heather; Kim, Helen J; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Pugach, Pavel; Williams, Melissa; Debnath, Gargi; Moldt, Brian; van Breemen, Mariëlle J; Isik, Gözde; Medina-Ramírez, Max; Back, Jaap Willem; Koff, Wayne C; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Rakasz, Eva G; Seaman, Michael S; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly K; Klasse, Per Johan; LaBranche, Celia; Schief, William R; Wilson, Ian A; Overbaugh, Julie; Burton, Dennis R; Ward, Andrew B; Montefiori, David C; Dean, Hansi; Moore, John P

    2015-07-10

    A challenge for HIV-1 immunogen design is the difficulty of inducing neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against neutralization-resistant (tier 2) viruses that dominate human transmissions. We show that a soluble recombinant HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer that adopts a native conformation, BG505 SOSIP.664, induced NAbs potently against the sequence-matched tier 2 virus in rabbits and similar but weaker responses in macaques. The trimer also consistently induced cross-reactive NAbs against more sensitive (tier 1) viruses. Tier 2 NAbs recognized conformational epitopes that differed between animals and in some cases overlapped with those recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), whereas tier 1 responses targeted linear V3 epitopes. A second trimer, B41 SOSIP.664, also induced a strong autologous tier 2 NAb response in rabbits. Thus, native-like trimers represent a promising starting point for the development of HIV-1 vaccines aimed at inducing bNAbs.

  1. HIV Neutralizing Antibodies Induced by Native-like Envelope Trimers

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Rogier W.; van Gils, Marit J.; Derking, Ronald; Sok, Devin; Ketas, Thomas J.; Burger, Judith A.; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Cupo, Albert; Simonich, Cassandra; Goo, Leslie; Arendt, Heather; Kim, Helen J.; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Pugach, Pavel; Williams, Melissa; Debnath, Gargi; Moldt, Brian; van Breemen, Mariëlle J.; Isik, Gözde; Medina-Ramírez, Max; Back, Jaap Willem; Koff, Wayne; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Rakasz, Eva G.; Seaman, Michael S.; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly K.; Klasse, Per Johan; LaBranche, Celia; Schief, William R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Overbaugh, Julie; Burton, Dennis R.; Ward, Andrew B.; Montefiori, David C.; Dean, Hansi; Moore, John P.

    2015-01-01

    A challenge for HIV-1 immunogen design is inducing neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against neutralization-resistant (Tier-2) viruses that dominate human transmissions. We show that a soluble recombinant HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer that adopts a native conformation (BG505 SOSIP.664) induced NAbs potently against the sequence-matched Tier-2 virus in rabbits and similar but weaker responses in macaques. The trimer also consistently induced cross-reactive NAbs against more sensitive (Tier-1) viruses. Tier-2 NAbs recognized conformational epitopes that differed between animals and in some cases overlapped with those recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), whereas Tier-1 responses targeted linear V3 epitopes. A second trimer, B41 SOSIP.664, also induced a strong autologous Tier-2 NAb response in rabbits. Thus, native-like trimers represent a promising starting point for developing HIV-1 vaccines aimed at inducing bNAbs. PMID:26089353

  2. HIV-1-induced AIDS in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hatziioannou, Theodora; Del Prete, Gregory Q; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; McNatt, Matthew W; Bitzegeio, Julia; Raymond, Alice; Rodriguez, Anthony; Schmidt, Fabian; Mac Trubey, C; Smedley, Jeremy; Piatak, Michael; KewalRamani, Vineet N; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2014-06-20

    Primate lentiviruses exhibit narrow host tropism, reducing the occurrence of zoonoses but also impairing the development of optimal animal models of AIDS. To delineate the factors limiting cross-species HIV-1 transmission, we passaged a modified HIV-1 in pigtailed macaques that were transiently depleted of CD8(+) cells during acute infection. During adaptation over four passages in macaques, HIV-1 acquired the ability to antagonize the macaque restriction factor tetherin, replicated at progressively higher levels, and ultimately caused marked CD4(+) T cell depletion and AIDS-defining conditions. Transient treatment with an antibody to CD8 during acute HIV-1 infection caused rapid progression to AIDS, whereas untreated animals exhibited an elite controller phenotype. Thus, an adapted HIV-1 can cause AIDS in macaques, and stark differences in outcome can be determined by immunological perturbations during early infection.

  3. Innate Sensing of HIV-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lepelley, Alice; Louis, Stéphanie; Sourisseau, Marion; Law, Helen K. W.; Pothlichet, Julien; Schilte, Clémentine; Chaperot, Laurence; Plumas, Joël; Randall, Richard E.; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Mammano, Fabrizio; Albert, Matthew L.; Schwartz, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Cell-free HIV-1 virions are poor stimulators of type I interferon (IFN) production. We examined here how HIV-infected cells are recognized by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and by other cells. We show that infected lymphocytes are more potent inducers of IFN than virions. There are target cell-type differences in the recognition of infected lymphocytes. In primary pDCs and pDC-like cells, recognition occurs in large part through TLR7, as demonstrated by the use of inhibitors and by TLR7 silencing. Donor cells expressing replication-defective viruses, carrying mutated reverse transcriptase, integrase or nucleocapsid proteins induced IFN production by target cells as potently as wild-type virus. In contrast, Env-deleted or fusion defective HIV-1 mutants were less efficient, suggesting that in addition to TLR7, cytoplasmic cellular sensors may also mediate sensing of infected cells. Furthermore, in a model of TLR7-negative cells, we demonstrate that the IRF3 pathway, through a process requiring access of incoming viral material to the cytoplasm, allows sensing of HIV-infected lymphocytes. Therefore, detection of HIV-infected lymphocytes occurs through both endosomal and cytoplasmic pathways. Characterization of the mechanisms of innate recognition of HIV-infected cells allows a better understanding of the pathogenic and exacerbated immunologic events associated with HIV infection. PMID:21379343

  4. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein immunogens to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sliepen, Kwinten; Sanders, Rogier W

    2016-01-01

    The long pursuit for a vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) has recently been boosted by a number of exciting developments. An HIV-1 subunit vaccine ideally should elicit potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), but raising bNAbs by vaccination has proved extremely difficult because of the characteristics of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). However, the isolation of bNAbs from HIV-1-infected patients demonstrates that the human humoral immune system is capable of making such antibodies. Therefore, a focus of HIV-1 vaccinology is the elicitation of bNAbs by engineered immunogens and by using vaccination strategies aimed at mimicking the bNAb maturation pathways in HIV-infected patients. Important clues can also be taken from the successful subunit vaccines against hepatitis B virus and human papillomavirus. Here, we review the different types of HIV-1 immunogens and vaccination strategies that are being explored in the search for an HIV-1 vaccine that induces bNAbs.

  5. The HIV-1 Vpu protein induces apoptosis in Drosophila via activation of JNK signaling.

    PubMed

    Marchal, Christelle; Vinatier, Gérald; Sanial, Matthieu; Plessis, Anne; Pret, Anne-Marie; Limbourg-Bouchon, Bernadette; Théodore, Laurent; Netter, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    The genome of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) encodes the canonical retroviral proteins, as well as additional accessory proteins that enhance the expression of viral genes, the infectivity of the virus and the production of virions. The accessory Viral Protein U (Vpu), in particular, enhances viral particle production, while also promoting apoptosis of HIV-infected human T lymphocytes. Some Vpu effects rely on its interaction with the ubiquitin-proteasome protein degradation system, but the mechanisms responsible for its pro-apoptotic effects in vivo are complex and remain largely to be elucidated.We took advantage of the Drosophila model to study the effects of Vpu activity in vivo. Expression of Vpu in the developing Drosophila wing provoked tissue loss due to caspase-dependent apoptosis. Moreover, Vpu induced expression of the pro-apoptotic gene reaper, known to down-regulate Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) which are caspase-antagonizing E3 ubiquitin ligases. Indeed, Vpu also reduced accumulation of Drosophila IAP1 (DIAP1). Though our results demonstrate a physical interaction between Vpu and the proteasome-addressing SLIMB/β-TrCP protein, as in mammals, both SLIMB/βTrCP-dependent and -independent Vpu effects were observed in the Drosophila wing. Lastly, the pro-apoptotic effect of Vpu in this tissue was abrogated upon inactivation of the c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) pathway. Our results in the fly thus provide the first functional evidence linking Vpu pro-apoptotic effects to activation of the conserved JNK pathway.

  6. The HIV-1 Vpu Protein Induces Apoptosis in Drosophila via Activation of JNK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Marchal, Christelle; Vinatier, Gérald; Sanial, Matthieu; Plessis, Anne; Pret, Anne-Marie; Limbourg-Bouchon, Bernadette; Théodore, Laurent; Netter, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    The genome of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) encodes the canonical retroviral proteins, as well as additional accessory proteins that enhance the expression of viral genes, the infectivity of the virus and the production of virions. The accessory Viral Protein U (Vpu), in particular, enhances viral particle production, while also promoting apoptosis of HIV-infected human T lymphocytes. Some Vpu effects rely on its interaction with the ubiquitin–proteasome protein degradation system, but the mechanisms responsible for its pro-apoptotic effects in vivo are complex and remain largely to be elucidated. We took advantage of the Drosophila model to study the effects of Vpu activity in vivo. Expression of Vpu in the developing Drosophila wing provoked tissue loss due to caspase-dependent apoptosis. Moreover, Vpu induced expression of the pro-apoptotic gene reaper, known to down-regulate Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) which are caspase-antagonizing E3 ubiquitin ligases. Indeed, Vpu also reduced accumulation of Drosophila IAP1 (DIAP1). Though our results demonstrate a physical interaction between Vpu and the proteasome-addressing SLIMB/β-TrCP protein, as in mammals, both SLIMB/βTrCP-dependent and -independent Vpu effects were observed in the Drosophila wing. Lastly, the pro-apoptotic effect of Vpu in this tissue was abrogated upon inactivation of the c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) pathway. Our results in the fly thus provide the first functional evidence linking Vpu pro-apoptotic effects to activation of the conserved JNK pathway. PMID:22479597

  7. HIV specific responses induced in nonhuman primates with ANRS HIV-Lipo-5 vaccine combined with rMVA-HIV prime or boost immunizations.

    PubMed

    Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Baron, Marie-Laurence; Contreras, Vanessa; Gosse, Leslie; Mangeot, Isabelle; Martinon, Frédéric; Yousfi, Rahima; Clayette, Pascal; Levy, Yves; Le Grand, Roger

    2015-05-11

    We evaluated the immunogenicity of a prime/boost vaccine strategy combining 5 lipopeptides (HIV-Lipo-5) and a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (rMVA-HIV) in cynomolgus macaques. Both of these vaccine components deliver HIV LAI Gag, Pol, and Nef antigens. Systemic and local safety was excellent in all groups. Immunization with HIV-Lipo-5 alone induced significant serum anti-HIV antibody titers which were not modified by rMVA-HIV immunization. However, induction of T-cell responses, as measured by IFNγ and IL-2 producing cells upon short-term stimulation with HIV peptide pools, required combined immunization with rMVA-HIV. Responses were preferentially observed against Gag antigen. Interestingly, HIV-Lipo-5 efficiently primed HIV induced T-cell responses upon the injection of rMVA-HIV, which may help to reduce the required number of vector injections. Our results provide a rationale for the use of a strategy involving HIV-Lipo-5 priming followed by rMVA-HIV booster immunization as a prophylactic or therapeutic vaccine approach against HIV infection and AIDS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoproteins antagonize tetherin through a distinctive mechanism that requires virion incorporation.

    PubMed

    Morrison, James H; Guevara, Rebekah B; Marcano, Adriana C; Saenz, Dyana T; Fadel, Hind J; Rogstad, Daniel K; Poeschla, Eric M

    2014-03-01

    BST2/tetherin inhibits the release of enveloped viruses from cells. Primate lentiviruses have evolved specific antagonists (Vpu, Nef, and Env). Here we characterized tetherin proteins of species representing both branches of the order Carnivora. Comparison of tiger and cat (Feliformia) to dog and ferret (Caniformia) genes demonstrated that the tiger and cat share a start codon mutation that truncated most of the tetherin cytoplasmic tail early in the Feliformia lineage (19 of 27 amino acids, including the dual tyrosine motif). Alpha interferon (IFN-α) induced tetherin and blocked feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) replication in lymphoid and nonlymphoid feline cells. Budding of bald FIV and HIV particles was blocked by carnivore tetherins. However, infectious FIV particles were resistant, and spreading FIV replication was uninhibited. Antagonism mapped to the envelope glycoprotein (Env), which rescued FIV from carnivore tetherin restriction when expressed in trans but, in contrast to known antagonists, did not rescue noncognate particles. Also unlike the primate lentiviral antagonists, but similar to the Ebola virus glycoprotein, FIV Env did not reduce intracellular or cell surface tetherin levels. Furthermore, FIV-enveloped FIV particles actually required tetherin for optimal release from cells. The results show that FIV Envs mediate a distinctive tetherin evasion. Well adapted to a phylogenetically ancient tetherin tail truncation in the Felidae, it requires functional virion incorporation of Env, and it shields the budding particle without downregulating plasma membrane tetherin. Moreover, FIV has evolved dependence on this protein: particles containing FIV Env need tetherin for optimal release from the cell, while Env(-) particles do not. HIV-1 antagonizes the restriction factor tetherin with the accessory protein Vpu, while HIV-2 and the filovirus Ebola use their envelope (Env) glycoproteins for this purpose. It turns out that the FIV tetherin antagonist is

  9. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Envelope Glycoproteins Antagonize Tetherin through a Distinctive Mechanism That Requires Virion Incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Rebekah B.; Marcano, Adriana C.; Saenz, Dyana T.; Fadel, Hind J.; Rogstad, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT BST2/tetherin inhibits the release of enveloped viruses from cells. Primate lentiviruses have evolved specific antagonists (Vpu, Nef, and Env). Here we characterized tetherin proteins of species representing both branches of the order Carnivora. Comparison of tiger and cat (Feliformia) to dog and ferret (Caniformia) genes demonstrated that the tiger and cat share a start codon mutation that truncated most of the tetherin cytoplasmic tail early in the Feliformia lineage (19 of 27 amino acids, including the dual tyrosine motif). Alpha interferon (IFN-α) induced tetherin and blocked feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) replication in lymphoid and nonlymphoid feline cells. Budding of bald FIV and HIV particles was blocked by carnivore tetherins. However, infectious FIV particles were resistant, and spreading FIV replication was uninhibited. Antagonism mapped to the envelope glycoprotein (Env), which rescued FIV from carnivore tetherin restriction when expressed in trans but, in contrast to known antagonists, did not rescue noncognate particles. Also unlike the primate lentiviral antagonists, but similar to the Ebola virus glycoprotein, FIV Env did not reduce intracellular or cell surface tetherin levels. Furthermore, FIV-enveloped FIV particles actually required tetherin for optimal release from cells. The results show that FIV Envs mediate a distinctive tetherin evasion. Well adapted to a phylogenetically ancient tetherin tail truncation in the Felidae, it requires functional virion incorporation of Env, and it shields the budding particle without downregulating plasma membrane tetherin. Moreover, FIV has evolved dependence on this protein: particles containing FIV Env need tetherin for optimal release from the cell, while Env− particles do not. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 antagonizes the restriction factor tetherin with the accessory protein Vpu, while HIV-2 and the filovirus Ebola use their envelope (Env) glycoproteins for this purpose. It turns out that the FIV

  10. Rigid proteins and softening of biological membranes—with application to HIV-induced cell membrane softening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Himani; Zelisko, Matthew; Liu, Liping; Sharma, Pradeep

    2016-05-01

    A key step in the HIV-infection process is the fusion of the virion membrane with the target cell membrane and the concomitant transfer of the viral RNA. Experimental evidence suggests that the fusion is preceded by considerable elastic softening of the cell membranes due to the insertion of fusion peptide in the membrane. What are the mechanisms underpinning the elastic softening of the membrane upon peptide insertion? A broader question may be posed: insertion of rigid proteins in soft membranes ought to stiffen the membranes not soften them. However, experimental observations perplexingly appear to show that rigid proteins may either soften or harden membranes even though conventional wisdom only suggests stiffening. In this work, we argue that regarding proteins as merely non-specific rigid inclusions is flawed, and each protein has a unique mechanical signature dictated by its specific interfacial coupling to the surrounding membrane. Predicated on this hypothesis, we have carried out atomistic simulations to investigate peptide-membrane interactions. Together with a continuum model, we reconcile contrasting experimental data in the literature including the case of HIV-fusion peptide induced softening. We conclude that the structural rearrangements of the lipids around the inclusions cause the softening or stiffening of the biological membranes.

  11. Rigid proteins and softening of biological membranes-with application to HIV-induced cell membrane softening.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Himani; Zelisko, Matthew; Liu, Liping; Sharma, Pradeep

    2016-05-06

    A key step in the HIV-infection process is the fusion of the virion membrane with the target cell membrane and the concomitant transfer of the viral RNA. Experimental evidence suggests that the fusion is preceded by considerable elastic softening of the cell membranes due to the insertion of fusion peptide in the membrane. What are the mechanisms underpinning the elastic softening of the membrane upon peptide insertion? A broader question may be posed: insertion of rigid proteins in soft membranes ought to stiffen the membranes not soften them. However, experimental observations perplexingly appear to show that rigid proteins may either soften or harden membranes even though conventional wisdom only suggests stiffening. In this work, we argue that regarding proteins as merely non-specific rigid inclusions is flawed, and each protein has a unique mechanical signature dictated by its specific interfacial coupling to the surrounding membrane. Predicated on this hypothesis, we have carried out atomistic simulations to investigate peptide-membrane interactions. Together with a continuum model, we reconcile contrasting experimental data in the literature including the case of HIV-fusion peptide induced softening. We conclude that the structural rearrangements of the lipids around the inclusions cause the softening or stiffening of the biological membranes.

  12. HIV-infected microglia mediate cathepsin B induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zenón, Frances; Cantres-Rosario, Yisel; Adiga, Radhika; Gonzalez, Mariangeline; Rodriguez-Franco, Eillen; Langford, Dianne; Melendez, Loyda M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND HIV-1-infected mononuclear phagocytes release soluble factors that affect the homeostasis in tissue. HIV-1 can prompt metabolic encephalopathy with the addition of neuronal dysfunction and apoptosis. Recently, we reported that HIV-1 enhances the expression and secretion of bioactive cathepsin B in monocyte-derived macrophages, ultimately contributing to neuronal apoptosis. In this research, we request if microglia respond to HIV infection similarly by modifying the expression, secretion, neurotoxic potential of cathepsin B and the in vivo relevance of these findings. METHODS HIV-ADA infected human primary microglia and CHME-5 were assessed for expression and activity of cathepsin B, its inhibitors, cystatins B and C, and neurotoxicity associated with these changes. Human primary neurons were exposed to supernatants from HIV-infected and uninfected microglia in the presence of cathepsin B inhibitors and apoptosis was assessed by TUNEL. Microglial expression of cathepsin B was validated in brain tissue from HIVE patients. RESULTS HIV-infected microglia secreted significantly greater levels of cathepsin B, cystatin B, and cystatin C compared to uninfected cells. Increased apoptosis was observed in neurons exposed to supernatants from HIV-1 infected microglia at days 12 post-infection. The cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074 and cathepsin B antibody prevented neuronal apoptosis. Increased microglia-derived cathepsin B, cystatin B, and cystatin C and caspase-3+ neurons were detected in HIVE brains compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that HIV-1-induced cathepsin B production in microglia contributes to neuronal apoptosis and may be an important factor in neuronal death associated with HIVE. PMID:26092112

  13. TIM-family proteins inhibit HIV-1 release

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minghua; Ablan, Sherimay D.; Miao, Chunhui; Zheng, Yi-Min; Fuller, Matthew S.; Rennert, Paul D.; Maury, Wendy; Johnson, Marc C.; Freed, Eric O.; Liu, Shan-Lu

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that T-cell immunoglobulin (Ig) and mucin domain (TIM) proteins play critical roles in viral infections. Herein, we report that the TIM-family proteins strongly inhibit HIV-1 release, resulting in diminished viral production and replication. Expression of TIM-1 causes HIV-1 Gag and mature viral particles to accumulate on the plasma membrane. Mutation of the phosphatidylserine (PS) binding sites of TIM-1 abolishes its ability to block HIV-1 release. TIM-1, but to a much lesser extent PS-binding deficient mutants, induces PS flipping onto the cell surface; TIM-1 is also found to be incorporated into HIV-1 virions. Importantly, TIM-1 inhibits HIV-1 replication in CD4-positive Jurkat cells, despite its capability of up-regulating CD4 and promoting HIV-1 entry. In addition to TIM-1, TIM-3 and TIM-4 also block the release of HIV-1, as well as that of murine leukemia virus (MLV) and Ebola virus (EBOV); knockdown of TIM-3 in differentiated monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) enhances HIV-1 production. The inhibitory effects of TIM-family proteins on virus release are extended to other PS receptors, such as Axl and RAGE. Overall, our study uncovers a novel ability of TIM-family proteins to block the release of HIV-1 and other viruses by interaction with virion- and cell-associated PS. Our work provides new insights into a virus-cell interaction that is mediated by TIMs and PS receptors. PMID:25136083

  14. Safety and immunogenicity of adjuvanted inactivated split-virion and whole-virion influenza A (H5N1) vaccines in children: a phase I-II randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang; Liu, Shu-Zhen; Dong, Shan-Shan; Dong, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Wu-Li; Lu, Min; Li, Chang-Gui; Zhou, Ji-Chen; Fang, Han-Hua; Liu, Yan; Liu, Li-Ying; Qiu, Yuan-Zheng; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Jiang-Ting; Zhong, Xiang; Yin, Wei-Dong; Feng, Zi-Jian

    2010-08-31

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus H5N1 has the potential to cause a pandemic. Many prototype pandemic influenza A (H5N1) vaccines had been developed and well evaluated in adults in recent years. However, data in children are limited. Herein we evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of adjuvanted split-virion and whole-virion H5N1 vaccines in children. An open-labelled phase I trial was conducted in children aged 3-11 years to receive aluminum-adjuvated, split-virion H5N1 vaccine (5-30 microg) and in children aged 12-17 years to receive aluminum-adjuvated, whole-virion H5N1 vaccine (5-15 microg). Safety of the two formulations was assessed. Then a randomized phase II trial was conducted, in which 141 children aged 3-11 years received the split-virion vaccine (10 or 15 microg) and 280 children aged 12-17 years received the split-virion vaccine (10-30 microg) or the whole-virion vaccine (5 microg). Serum samples were collected for hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assays. 5-15 microg adjuvated split-virion vaccines were well tolerated in children aged 3-11 years and 5-30 microg adjuvated split-virion vaccines and 5 microg adjuvated whole-virion vaccine were well tolerated in children aged 12-17 years. Most local and systemic reactions were mild or moderate. Before vaccination, all participants were immunologically naïve to H5N1 virus. Immune responses were induced after the first dose and significantly boosted after the second dose. In 3-11 years children, the 10 and 15 microg split-virion vaccine induced similar responses with 55% seroconversion and seroprotection (HI titer >or=1:40) rates. In 12-17 years children, the 30 microg split-virion vaccine induced the highest immune response with 71% seroconversion and seroprotection rates. The 5 microg whole-virion vaccine induced higher response than the 10 microg split-virion vaccine did. The aluminum-adjuvanted, split-virion prototype pandemic influenza A (H5N1) vaccine showed good safety and immunogenicity in

  15. Identification of benzazole compounds that induce HIV-1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Michaels, Daniel; Chen, Guangming; Schiralli Lester, Gillian M.; Nodder, Sarah; Weetall, Marla; Karp, Gary M.; Gu, Zhengxian; Colacino, Joseph M.; Henderson, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Despite advances in antiretroviral therapy, HIV-1 infection remains incurable in patients and continues to present a significant public health burden worldwide. While a number of factors contribute to persistent HIV-1 infection in patients, the presence of a stable, long-lived reservoir of latent provirus represents a significant hurdle in realizing an effective cure. One potential strategy to eliminate HIV-1 reservoirs in patients is reactivation of latent provirus with latency reversing agents in combination with antiretroviral therapy, a strategy termed “shock and kill”. This strategy has shown limited clinical effectiveness thus far, potentially due to limitations of the few therapeutics currently available. We have identified a novel class of benzazole compounds effective at inducing HIV-1 expression in several cellular models. These compounds do not act via histone deacetylase inhibition or T cell activation, and show specificity in activating HIV-1 in vitro. Initial exploration of structure-activity relationships and pharmaceutical properties indicates that these compounds represent a potential scaffold for development of more potent HIV-1 latency reversing agents. PMID:28658263

  16. Virions of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates resistant to soluble CD4 (sCD4) neutralization differ in sCD4 binding and glycoprotein gp120 retention from sCD4-sensitive isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J P; McKeating, J A; Huang, Y X; Ashkenazi, A; Ho, D D

    1992-01-01

    Primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are much less sensitive to neutralization by soluble CD4 (sCD4) and sCD4-immunoglobulin (Ig) chimeras (CD4-IgG) than are HIV-1 strains adapted to growth in cell culture. We demonstrated that there are significant reductions (10- to 30-fold) in the binding of sCD4 and CD4-IgG to intact virions of five primary isolates compared with sCD4-sensitive, cell culture-adapted isolates RF and IIIB. However, soluble envelope glycoproteins (gp120) derived from the primary isolate virions, directly by detergent solubilization or indirectly by recombinant DNA technology, differed in affinity from RF and IIIB gp120 by only one- to threefold. The reduced binding of sCD4 to these primary isolate virions must therefore be a consequence of the tertiary or quaternary structure of the envelope glycoproteins in their native, oligomeric form on the viral surface. In addition, the rate and extent of sCD4-induced gp120 shedding from these primary isolates was lower than that from RF. We suggest that reduced sCD4 binding and increased gp120 retention together account for the relative resistance of these primary isolates to neutralization by sCD4 and CD4-IgG and that virions of different HIV-1 isolates vary both in the mechanism of sCD4 binding and in subsequent conformational changes in their envelope glycoproteins. PMID:1727487

  17. Toll-Like Receptor 7 Agonist GS-9620 Induces HIV Expression and HIV-Specific Immunity in Cells from HIV-Infected Individuals on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Angela; Irrinki, Alivelu; Kaur, Jasmine; Cihlar, Tomas; Kukolj, George; Sloan, Derek D; Murry, Jeffrey P

    2017-04-15

    Antiretroviral therapy can suppress HIV replication to undetectable levels but does not eliminate latent HIV, thus necessitating lifelong therapy. Recent efforts to target this persistent reservoir have focused on inducing the expression of latent HIV so that infected cells may be recognized and eliminated by the immune system. Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation stimulates antiviral immunity and has been shown to induce HIV from latently infected cells. Activation of TLR7 leads to the production of several stimulatory cytokines, including type I interferons (IFNs). In this study, we show that the selective TLR7 agonist GS-9620 induced HIV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HIV-infected individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. GS-9620 increased extracellular HIV RNA 1.5- to 2-fold through a mechanism that required type I IFN signaling. GS-9620 also activated HIV-specific T cells and enhanced antibody-mediated clearance of HIV-infected cells. Activation by GS-9620 in combination with HIV peptide stimulation increased CD8 T cell degranulation, production of intracellular cytokines, and cytolytic activity. T cell activation was again dependent on type I IFNs produced by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. GS-9620 induced phagocytic cell maturation and improved effector-mediated killing of HIV-infected CD4 T cells by the HIV envelope-specific broadly neutralizing antibody PGT121. Collectively, these data show that GS-9620 can activate HIV production and improve the effector functions that target latently infected cells. GS-9620 may effectively complement orthogonal therapies designed to stimulate antiviral immunity, such as therapeutic vaccines or broadly neutralizing antibodies. Clinical studies are under way to determine if GS-9620 can target HIV reservoirs.IMPORTANCE Though antiretroviral therapies effectively suppress viral replication, they do not eliminate integrated proviral DNA. This stable intermediate of viral infection is persistently

  18. Toll-Like Receptor 7 Agonist GS-9620 Induces HIV Expression and HIV-Specific Immunity in Cells from HIV-Infected Individuals on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Angela; Irrinki, Alivelu; Kaur, Jasmine; Cihlar, Tomas; Kukolj, George

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antiretroviral therapy can suppress HIV replication to undetectable levels but does not eliminate latent HIV, thus necessitating lifelong therapy. Recent efforts to target this persistent reservoir have focused on inducing the expression of latent HIV so that infected cells may be recognized and eliminated by the immune system. Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation stimulates antiviral immunity and has been shown to induce HIV from latently infected cells. Activation of TLR7 leads to the production of several stimulatory cytokines, including type I interferons (IFNs). In this study, we show that the selective TLR7 agonist GS-9620 induced HIV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HIV-infected individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. GS-9620 increased extracellular HIV RNA 1.5- to 2-fold through a mechanism that required type I IFN signaling. GS-9620 also activated HIV-specific T cells and enhanced antibody-mediated clearance of HIV-infected cells. Activation by GS-9620 in combination with HIV peptide stimulation increased CD8 T cell degranulation, production of intracellular cytokines, and cytolytic activity. T cell activation was again dependent on type I IFNs produced by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. GS-9620 induced phagocytic cell maturation and improved effector-mediated killing of HIV-infected CD4 T cells by the HIV envelope-specific broadly neutralizing antibody PGT121. Collectively, these data show that GS-9620 can activate HIV production and improve the effector functions that target latently infected cells. GS-9620 may effectively complement orthogonal therapies designed to stimulate antiviral immunity, such as therapeutic vaccines or broadly neutralizing antibodies. Clinical studies are under way to determine if GS-9620 can target HIV reservoirs. IMPORTANCE Though antiretroviral therapies effectively suppress viral replication, they do not eliminate integrated proviral DNA. This stable intermediate of viral infection is

  19. Immunotherapy of HIV-infected patients with Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Ushijima, Naofumi; Koga, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D3-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of HIV-infected patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein is deglycosylated by alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from HIV-infected cells. Therefore, macrophages of HIV-infected patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Since Nagalase is the intrinsic component of the envelope protein gp120, serum Nagalase activity is the sum of enzyme activities carried by both HIV virions and envelope proteins. These Nagalase carriers were already complexed with anti-HIV immunoglobulin G (IgG) but retained Nagalase activity that is required for infectivity. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent macrophage activating factor (termed GcMAF), which produces no side effects in humans. Macrophages activated by administration of 100 ng GcMAF develop a large amount of Fc-receptors as well as an enormous variation of receptors that recognize IgG-bound and unbound HIV virions. Since latently HIV-infected cells are unstable and constantly release HIV virions, the activated macrophages rapidly intercept the released HIV virions to prevent reinfection resulting in exhaustion of infected cells. After less than 18 weekly administrations of 100 ng GcMAF for nonanemic patients, they exhibited low serum Nagalase activities equivalent to healthy controls, indicating eradication of HIV-infection, which was also confirmed by no infectious center formation by provirus inducing agent-treated patient PBMCs. No recurrence occurred and their healthy CD + cell counts were maintained for 7 years.

  20. Virion basic phosphoprotein from human cytomegalovirus contains O-linked N-acetylglucosamine.

    PubMed Central

    Benko, D M; Haltiwanger, R S; Hart, G W; Gibson, W

    1988-01-01

    A 149-kDa virion protein of human strains of cytomegalovirus is the principal acceptor for galactose added in vitro by bovine milk galactosyltransferase. Peptide comparisons with other biochemical characteristics of the galactosylated protein identified it as the virus-encoded basic phosphoprotein. This protein is an abundant constituent of the virion and is located in the tegument region, between the capsid and the envelope, rather than in the envelope layer with the recognized virion glycoproteins. The galactosylated carbohydrate was resistant to a commercial preparation of endoglycosidase F but was sensitive to removal by alkali-induced beta-elimination, indicating an O-linkage to the protein. Chromatographic and electrophoretic determinations identified the beta-eliminated material as the alditol of Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc, establishing that the human cytomegalovirus virion basic phosphoprotein contains single O-linked residues of N-acetylglucosamine. Images PMID:2833746

  1. Total HIV-1 DNA, a Marker of Viral Reservoir Dynamics with Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hocqueloux, Laurent; Ghosn, Jade; Cheret, Antoine; Frange, Pierre; Melard, Adeline; Viard, Jean-Paul; Rouzioux, Christine

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY HIV-1 DNA persists in infected cells despite combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), forming viral reservoirs. Recent trials of strategies targeting latent HIV reservoirs have rekindled hopes of curing HIV infection, and reliable markers are thus needed to evaluate viral reservoirs. Total HIV DNA quantification is simple, standardized, sensitive, and reproducible. Total HIV DNA load influences the course of the infection and is therefore clinically relevant. In particular, it is predictive of progression to AIDS and death, independently of HIV RNA load and the CD4 cell count. Baseline total HIV DNA load is predictive of the response to cART. It declines during cART but remains quantifiable, at a level that reflects both the history of infection (HIV RNA zenith, CD4 cell count nadir) and treatment efficacy (residual viremia, cumulative viremia, immune restoration, immune cell activation). Total HIV DNA load in blood is also predictive of the presence and severity of some HIV-1-associated end-organ disorders. It can be useful to guide individual treatment, notably, therapeutic de-escalation. Although it does not distinguish between replication-competent and -defective latent viruses, the total HIV DNA load in blood, tissues, and cells provides insights into HIV pathogenesis, probably because all viral forms participate in host cell activation and HIV pathogenesis. Total HIV DNA is thus a biomarker of HIV reservoirs, which can be defined as all infected cells and tissues containing all forms of HIV persistence that participate in pathogenesis. This participation may occur through the production of new virions, creating new cycles of infection and disseminating infected cells; maintenance or amplification of reservoirs by homeostatic cell proliferation; and viral transcription and synthesis of viral proteins without new virion production. These proteins can induce immune activation, thus participating in the vicious circle of HIV pathogenesis. PMID:27559075

  2. Stochastic theory of early viral infection: continuous versus burst production of virions.

    PubMed

    Pearson, John E; Krapivsky, Paul; Perelson, Alan S

    2011-02-03

    Viral production from infected cells can occur continuously or in a burst that generally kills the cell. For HIV infection, both modes of production have been suggested. Standard viral dynamic models formulated as sets of ordinary differential equations can not distinguish between these two modes of viral production, as the predicted dynamics is identical as long as infected cells produce the same total number of virions over their lifespan. Here we show that in stochastic models of viral infection the two modes of viral production yield different early term dynamics. Further, we analytically determine the probability that infections initiated with any number of virions and infected cells reach extinction, the state when both the population of virions and infected cells vanish, and show this too has different solutions for continuous and burst production. We also compute the distributions of times to establish infection as well as the distribution of times to extinction starting from both a single virion as well as from a single infected cell for both modes of virion production.

  3. Drug induced superinfection in HIV and the evolution of drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Leontiev, Vladimir V; Maury, Wendy J; Hadany, Lilach

    2008-01-01

    The rapid evolution of HIV drug resistance is a major cause of AIDS treatment failure. Superinfection, the infection of an already infected cell by additional virions, can be a major factor contributing to the evolution of drug resistance. However, the pattern and consequences of superinfection in HIV populations are far from fully understood. In this paper we study the implications of the fact that superinfection is regulated by HIV. We propose that superinfection is negatively associated with the success of the virus, so that more successful viruses are less likely to allow superinfection. We use computational models to investigate the effect that regulated superinfection would have on the evolution of drug resistance in HIV population. We find that regulated, fitness-associated superinfection can provide a distinct advantage to the virus in adapting to anti-HIV drugs in comparison with unregulated superinfection. Based on the results of the computational models and on current biological evidence, we suggest that the mechanism of fitness-associated regulation of coinfection in HIV is plausible, and that its investigation can lead to new ways to fight viral drug resistance.

  4. Suppression of APOBEC3-mediated restriction of HIV-1 by Vif

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yuqing; Baig, Tayyba T.; Love, Robin P.; Chelico, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The APOBEC3 restriction factors are a family of deoxycytidine deaminases that are able to suppress replication of viruses with a single-stranded DNA intermediate by inducing mutagenesis and functional inactivation of the virus. Of the seven human APOBEC3 enzymes, only APOBEC3-D, -F, -G, and -H appear relevant to restriction of HIV-1 in CD4+ T cells and will be the focus of this review. The restriction of HIV-1 occurs most potently in the absence of HIV-1 Vif that induces polyubiquitination and degradation of APOBEC3 enzymes through the proteasome pathway. To restrict HIV-1, APOBEC3 enzymes must be encapsidated into budding virions. Upon infection of the target cell during reverse transcription of the HIV-1 RNA into (-)DNA, APOBEC3 enzymes deaminate cytosines to form uracils in single-stranded (-)DNA regions. Upon replication of the (-)DNA to (+)DNA, the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase incorporates adenines opposite to the uracils thereby inducing C/G to T/A mutations that can functionally inactivate HIV-1. APOBEC3G is the most studied APOBEC3 enzyme and it is known that Vif attempts to thwart APOBEC3 function not only by inducing its proteasomal degradation but also by several degradation-independent mechanisms, such as inhibiting APOBEC3G virion encapsidation, mRNA translation, and for those APOBEC3G molecules that still become virion encapsidated, Vif can inhibit APOBEC3G mutagenic activity. Although most Vif variants can induce efficient degradation of APOBEC3-D, -F, and -G, there appears to be differential sensitivity to Vif-mediated degradation for APOBEC3H. This review examines APOBEC3-mediated HIV restriction mechanisms, how Vif acts as a substrate receptor for a Cullin5 ubiquitin ligase complex to induce degradation of APOBEC3s, and the determinants and functional consequences of the APOBEC3 and Vif interaction from a biological and biochemical perspective. PMID:25206352

  5. The Interferon-Inducible Host Factor Bone Marrow Stromal Antigen 2/Tetherin Restricts Virion Release, but Is It Actually a Viral Restriction Factor?

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Viruses face a variety of obstacles when infecting a new host. The past few years have brought exciting new insights into the function of restriction factors, which form part of the host's innate immune system. One of the most recently identified restriction factors is bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST-2)/tetherin. BST-2 is an interferon-inducible gene whose expression dramatically reduces the release of viruses from infected cells. This effect of BST-2 is not specific to human immunodeficiency virus but affects a broad range of enveloped viruses. Since the identification of BST-2 as a restriction factor in 2008, much progress has been made in understanding the molecular properties and functional characteristics of this host factor. The goal of this review was to provide an update on our current understanding of the role of BST-2 in regulating virus release and to discuss its role in controlling virus spread during productive infection with special emphasis on human immunodeficiency virus-1. PMID:21166593

  6. Glutathione is required for efficient production of infectious picornavirus virions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Allen D. . E-mail: smitha@ba.ars.usda.gov; Dawson, Harry . E-mail: dawsonh@ba.ars.usda.gov

    2006-09-30

    Glutathione is an intracellular reducing agent that helps maintain the redox potential of the cell and is important for immune function. The drug L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) selectively inhibits glutathione synthesis. Glutathione has been reported to block replication of HIV, HSV-1, and influenza virus, whereas cells treated with BSO exhibit increased replication of Sendai virus. Pre-treatment of HeLa cell monolayers with BSO inhibited replication of CVB3, CVB4, and HRV14 with viral titers reduced by approximately 6, 5, and 3 log{sub 1}, respectively. The addition of glutathione ethyl ester, but not dithiothreitol or 2-mercaptoethanol, to the culture medium reversed the inhibitory effect of BSO. Viral RNA and protein synthesis were not inhibited by BSO treatment. Fractionation of lysates from CVB3-infected BSO-treated cells on cesium chloride and sucrose gradients revealed that empty capsids but not mature virions were being produced. The levels of the 5S and 14S assembly intermediates, however, were not affected by BSO treatment. These results demonstrate that glutathione is important for production of mature infectious picornavirus virions.

  7. T cell antigen discovery using soluble vaccinia proteome reveals recognition of antigens with both virion and non-virion association*

    PubMed Central

    Davies, D. Huw; Chun, Sookhee; Hermanson, Gary; Tucker, Jo Anne; Jain, Aarti; Nakajima, Rie; Pablo, Jozelyn; Felgner, Philip L.; Liang, Xiaowu

    2014-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a useful model system for understanding the immune response to a complex pathogen. Proteome-wide antibody profiling studies reveal the humoral response to be strongly biased towards virion associated antigens, and several membrane proteins induce antibody-mediated protection against VACV challenge in mice. Some studies have indicated the CD4 response is also skewed toward proteins with virion association, whereas the CD8 response is more biased toward proteins with early expression. In this study, we have leveraged a VACV-WR plasmid expression library, produced previously for proteome microarrays for antibody profiling, to make a solubilized full VACV-WR proteome for T cell antigen profiling. Splenocytes from VACV-WR-infected mice were assayed without prior expansion against the soluble proteome in assays for Th1 and Th2 signature cytokines. The response to infection was polarized toward a Th1 response, with the distribution of reactive T cell antigens comprising both early and late VACV proteins. Interestingly, the proportions of different functional subsets were similar to that present in the whole proteome. In contrast, the targets of antibodies from the same mice were enriched for membrane and other virion components, as described previously. We conclude that a ‘non-biasing’ approach to T cell antigen discovery reveals a T cell antigen profile in VACV that is broader and less skewed to virion-association than the antibody profile. The T cell antigen mapping method developed here should be applicable to other organisms where expressible ‘ORFeome’ libraries are also available, and is readily scalable for larger pathogens. PMID:25024392

  8. Conserved and host-specific features of influenza virion architecture.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Edward C; Charles, Philip D; Hester, Svenja S; Thomas, Benjamin; Trudgian, David; Martínez-Alonso, Mónica; Fodor, Ervin

    2014-09-16

    Viruses use virions to spread between hosts, and virion composition is therefore the primary determinant of viral transmissibility and immunogenicity. However, the virions of many viruses are complex and pleomorphic, making them difficult to analyse in detail. Here we address this by identifying and quantifying virion proteins with mass spectrometry, producing a complete and quantified model of the hundreds of host-encoded and viral proteins that make up the pleomorphic virions of influenza viruses. We show that a conserved influenza virion architecture is maintained across diverse combinations of virus and host. This 'core' architecture, which includes substantial quantities of host proteins as well as the viral protein NS1, is elaborated with abundant host-dependent features. As a result, influenza virions produced by mammalian and avian hosts have distinct protein compositions. Finally, we note that influenza virions share an underlying protein composition with exosomes, suggesting that influenza virions form by subverting microvesicle production.

  9. Conserved and host-specific features of influenza virion architecture

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Edward C; Charles, Philip D; Hester, Svenja S; Thomas, Benjamin; Trudgian, David; Martínez-Alonso, Mónica; Fodor, Ervin

    2014-01-01

    Viruses use virions to spread between hosts, and virion composition is therefore the primary determinant of viral transmissibility and immunogenicity. However, the virions of many viruses are complex and pleomorphic, making them difficult to analyse in detail. Here we address this by identifying and quantifying virion proteins with mass spectrometry, producing a complete and quantified model of the hundreds of viral and host-encoded proteins that make up the pleomorphic virions of influenza viruses. We show that a conserved influenza virion architecture is maintained across diverse combinations of virus and host. This ‘core’ architecture, which includes substantial quantities of host proteins as well as the viral protein NS1, is elaborated with abundant host-dependent features. As a result, influenza virions produced by mammalian and avian hosts have distinct protein compositions. Finally we note that influenza virions share an underlying protein composition with exosomes, suggesting that influenza virions form by subverting microvesicle production. PMID:25226414

  10. Creatine protects against mitochondrial dysfunction associated with HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal injury

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Patrick R.; Gawryluk, Jeremy W.; Hui, Liang; Chen, Xuesong; Geiger, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 infected individuals are living longer but experiencing a prevalence rate of over 50% for HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) for which no effective treatment is available. Viral and cellular factors secreted by HIV-1 infected cells leads to neuronal injury and HIV-1 Tat continues to be implicated in the pathogenesis of HAND. Here we tested the hypothesis that creatine protected against HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal injury by preventing mitochondrial bioenergetic crisis and/or redox catastrophe. Creatine blocked HIV-1 Tat1-72-induced increases in neuron cell death and synaptic area loss. Creatine protected against HIV-1 Tat-induced decreases in ATP. Creatine and creatine plus HIV-1 Tat increased cellular levels of creatine, and creatine plus HIV-1 Tat further decreased ratios of phosphocreatine to creatine observed with creatine or HIV-1 Tat treatments alone. Additionally, creatine protected against HIV-1 Tat-induced mitochondrial hypopolarization and HIV-1 Tat-induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening. Thus, creatine may be a useful adjunctive therapy against HAND. PMID:25613139

  11. BCG vaccination induces HIV target cell activation in HIV-exposed infants in a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Gasper, Melanie A.; Hesseling, Anneke C.; Mohar, Isaac; Myer, Landon; Azenkot, Tali; Passmore, Jo-Ann S.; Hanekom, Willem; Cotton, Mark F.; Crispe, I. Nicholas; Sodora, Donald L.; Jaspan, Heather B.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is administered at birth to protect infants against tuberculosis throughout Africa, where most perinatal HIV-1 transmission occurs. We examined whether BCG vaccination alters the levels of activated HIV target T cells in HIV-exposed South African infants. METHODS. HIV-exposed infants were randomized to receive routine (at birth) or delayed (at 8 weeks) BCG vaccination. Activated and CCR5-expressing peripheral blood CD4+ T cell, monocyte, and NK cell frequencies were evaluated by flow cytometry and immune gene expression via PCR using Biomark (Fluidigm). RESULTS. Of 149 infants randomized, 92% (n = 137) were retained at 6 weeks: 71 in the routine BCG arm and 66 in the delayed arm. Routine BCG vaccination led to a 3-fold increase in systemic activation of HIV target CD4+CCR5+ T cells (HLA-DR+CD38+) at 6 weeks (0.25% at birth versus 0.08% in delayed vaccination groups; P = 0.029), which persisted until 8 weeks of age when the delayed arm was vaccinated. Vaccination of the infants in the delayed arm at 8 weeks resulted in a similar increase in activated CD4+CCR5+ T cells. The increase in activated T cells was associated with increased levels of MHC class II transactivator (CIITA), IL12RB1, and IFN-α1 transcripts within peripheral blood mononuclear cells but minimal changes in innate cells. CONCLUSION. BCG vaccination induces immune changes in HIV-exposed infants, including an increase in the proportion of activated CCR5+CD4+ HIV target cells. These findings provide insight into optimal BCG vaccine timing to minimize the risks of HIV transmissions to exposed infants while preserving potential benefits conferred by BCG vaccination. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02062580. FUNDING. This trial was sponsored by the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (MV-00-9-900-01871-0-00) and the Thrasher Foundation (NR-0095); for details, see Acknowledgments. PMID:28405623

  12. Naturally Occurring Fc-Dependent Antibody From HIV-Seronegative Individuals Promotes HIV-Induced IFN-α Production

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Thomas; Green, Jon A.

    2016-01-01

    A majority of adults without HIV infection and with a low risk of HIV-exposure have plasma IgG antibodies that enhance the rate and magnitude of HIV-induced interferon alpha (IFN-α) production. Fc-dependent IgG-HIV complexes induce IFN-α rapidly and in high titers in response to HIV concentrations that are too low to otherwise stimulate an effective IFN-α response. IFN-α promoting antibody (IPA) counters HIV-specific inhibition of IFN-α production, and compensates for the inherent delay in IFN-α production common to HIV infection and other viruses. Naturally occurring IPA has the potential to initiate a potent IFN-α response early in the course of HIV mucosal invasion in time to terminate infection prior to the creation of a pool of persistently infected cells. The current study adds IPA as a mediator of an Fc-dependent antiviral state capable of preventing HIV infection. PMID:27881846

  13. Structural Basis for Inhibitor-Induced Aggregation of HIV Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Sherrill-Mix, Scott; Hwang, Young; Eilers, Grant; McDanal, Charlene; Wang, Ping; Temelkoff, David

    2016-01-01

    The allosteric inhibitors of integrase (termed ALLINIs) interfere with HIV replication by binding to the viral-encoded integrase (IN) protein. Surprisingly, ALLINIs interfere not with DNA integration but with viral particle assembly late during HIV replication. To investigate the ALLINI inhibitory mechanism, we crystallized full-length HIV-1 IN bound to the ALLINI GSK1264 and determined the structure of the complex at 4.4 Å resolution. The structure shows GSK1264 buried between the IN C-terminal domain (CTD) and the catalytic core domain. In the crystal lattice, the interacting domains are contributed by two different dimers so that IN forms an open polymer mediated by inhibitor-bridged contacts; the N-terminal domains do not participate and are structurally disordered. Engineered amino acid substitutions at the inhibitor interface blocked ALLINI-induced multimerization. HIV escape mutants with reduced sensitivity to ALLINIs commonly altered amino acids at or near the inhibitor-bound interface, and these substitutions also diminished IN multimerization. We propose that ALLINIs inhibit particle assembly by stimulating inappropriate polymerization of IN via interactions between the catalytic core domain and the CTD and that understanding the interface involved offers new routes to inhibitor optimization. PMID:27935939

  14. Architecture and Regulation of the HIV-1 Assembly and Holding Compartment in Macrophages ▿

    PubMed Central

    Welsch, Sonja; Groot, Fedde; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Keppler, Oliver T.; Sattentau, Quentin J.

    2011-01-01

    Productive infection of macrophages is central to HIV-1 pathogenesis. Newly formed virions bud into a tubular membranous compartment that is contiguous with the plasma membrane. However, little is known about the structure of this compartment and its potential regulation by infection. Here we characterized this compartment in macrophages using electron tomography and electron microscopy with stereology. We found an intricate, interconnected membrane network that constitutes a preexisting physiologic structure in macrophages but which expands in size upon HIV-1 infection. Membranes required for this expansion were apparently derived from preexisting pools of plasma membrane. Physical connections between this compartment and the extracellular milieu were frequently made by tube-like structures of insufficient diameter for virion passage. We conclude that HIV-1 induces the expansion of a complex membranous labyrinth in macrophages in which the virus buds and can be retained, with potential consequences for transmission and immune evasion. PMID:21613397

  15. Architecture and regulation of the HIV-1 assembly and holding compartment in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Sonja; Groot, Fedde; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Keppler, Oliver T; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2011-08-01

    Productive infection of macrophages is central to HIV-1 pathogenesis. Newly formed virions bud into a tubular membranous compartment that is contiguous with the plasma membrane. However, little is known about the structure of this compartment and its potential regulation by infection. Here we characterized this compartment in macrophages using electron tomography and electron microscopy with stereology. We found an intricate, interconnected membrane network that constitutes a preexisting physiologic structure in macrophages but which expands in size upon HIV-1 infection. Membranes required for this expansion were apparently derived from preexisting pools of plasma membrane. Physical connections between this compartment and the extracellular milieu were frequently made by tube-like structures of insufficient diameter for virion passage. We conclude that HIV-1 induces the expansion of a complex membranous labyrinth in macrophages in which the virus buds and can be retained, with potential consequences for transmission and immune evasion.

  16. Expression of the highly conserved vaccinia virus E6 protein is required for virion morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Resch, Wolfgang; Weisberg, Andrea S.; Moss, Bernard

    2009-04-10

    The vaccinia virus E6R gene (VACVWR062) is conserved in all members of the poxvirus family and encodes a protein associated with the mature virion. We confirmed this association and provided evidence for an internal location. An inducible mutant that conditionally expresses E6 was constructed. In the absence of inducer, plaque formation and virus production were severely inhibited in several cell lines, whereas some replication occurred in others. This difference could be due to variation in the stringency of repression, since we could not isolate a stable deletion mutant even in the more 'permissive' cells. Under non-permissive conditions, viral late proteins were synthesized but processing of core proteins was inefficient, indicative of an assembly block. Transmission electron microscopy of sections of cells infected with the mutant in the absence of inducer revealed morphogenetic defects with crescents and empty immature virions adjacent to dense inclusions of viroplasm. Mature virions were infrequent and cores appeared to have lucent centers.

  17. HIV Tat protein inhibits hERG K+ channels: a potential mechanism of HIV infection induced LQTs.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yun-Long; Liu, Hui-Bin; Sun, Bo; Zhang, Ying; Li, Qi; Hu, Chao-Wei; Zhu, Jiu-Xin; Gong, Dong-Mei; Teng, Xue; Zhang, Qin; Yang, Bao-Feng; Dong, De-Li

    2011-11-01

    HIV-infected patients have a high prevalence of long QT syndrome (LQTs). hERG K(+) channel encoded by human ether-a-go-go related gene contributes to IKr K(+) currents responsible for the repolarization of cardiomyocytes. Inhibition of hERG K(+) channels leads to LQTs. HIV Tat protein, the virus transactivator protein, plays a pivotal role in AIDS. The aim of the present study is to examine the effects of HIV Tat protein on hERG K(+) channels stably expressed in HEK293 cells. The hERG K(+) currents were recorded by whole-cell patch-clamp technique and the hERG channel expression was measured by real-time PCR and Western blot techniques. HIV Tat protein at 200 ng/ml concentration showed no acute effect on hERG currents, but HIV Tat protein (200 ng/ml) incubation for 24 h significantly inhibited hERG currents. In HIV Tat incubated cells, the inactivation and the recovery time from inactivation of hERG channels were significantly changed. HIV Tat protein incubation (200 ng/ml) for 24h had no effect on the hERG mRNA expression, but dose-dependently inhibited hERG protein expression. The MTT assay showed that HIV Tat protein at 50 ng/ml and 200 ng/ml had no effect on the cell viability. HIV Tat protein increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and the inhibition of hERG channel protein expression by HIV Tat protein was prevented by antioxidant tempol. HIV Tat protein in vivo treatment reduced IKr currents and prolonged action potential duration of guinea pig cardiomyocytes. We conclude that HIV Tat protein inhibits hERG K(+) currents through the inhibition of hERG protein expression, which might be the potential mechanism of HIV infection induced LQTs.

  18. A new approach to an AIDS vaccine: creating antibodies to HIV vif will enable apobec3G to turn HIV-infection into a benign problem.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey Fessel, W

    2005-01-01

    For a decade, attempts to produce a vaccine that prevents HIV infection have been fruitless, and fresh approaches are required. Apobec3G is a natural defensin and a cytidine deaminase. Apobec3G induces a high rate of dC to dU mutation in the first minus strand of cDNA, causing degradation throughout the HIV genome that renders the virus effete. The viral infectivity factor (vif) of HIV is essential for efficient replication of that virus. Vif binds to apobec3G and induces its polyubiquitination, which enables HIV to evade apobec3G. This suggests that a vif-based vaccine which induced anti-vif antibodies, would prevent the neutralizing action of vif upon apobec3G. Then, with HIV-vif ineffective, apobec3G could act without hindrance to create a less aggressive, non-lethal HIV infection. Mutated vif impedes HIV infection. Slow progressors with vif 132S had 4-fold lower viral loads than those with vif 132R; and introducing vif 132S into HIV-1 caused a 5-fold decrease in viral replication. And in the absence of vif, HIV virions accumulate multiple defects in structural, enzymatic, and regulatory viral proteins. The success of a vif-based vaccine depends upon (1) a vif-antibody response, and (2) vif antibodies entering the cells that harbor HIV. First, antibodies to vif have been seen in frequencies ranging between 25% and 100% in patients infected with HIV-1. Second, transport of anti-vif antibodies into cells might occur via several mechanisms. Likeliest is that in viremic persons, antibodies would attach to cell-free virions which would piggyback the antibodies into CD4+ cells. Alternatively, a fusion protein between vif and a cell-surface receptor, e.g., CD4 or CCR5, might be used as vaccine antigen. Also, anti-vif antibodies might internalize after ligation of HIV virions budding on the cell surface, in the same way as monoclonal antibodies against porcine pseudorabies virus induced viral glycoproteins on the cell surface to internalize. Finally, monoclonal

  19. HIV vaccine-induced sero-reactivity: a challenge for trial participants, researchers, and physicians.

    PubMed

    Voronin, Yegor; Zinszner, Helene; Karg, Carissa; Brooks, Katie; Coombs, Robert; Hural, John; Holt, Renee; Fast, Pat; Allen, Mary

    2015-03-03

    Antibody-inducing vaccines are a major focus in the preventive HIV vaccine field. Because the most common tests for HIV infection rely on detecting antibodies to HIV, they may also detect antibodies induced by a candidate HIV vaccine. The detection of vaccine-induced antibodies to HIV by serological tests is most commonly referred to as vaccine-induced sero-reactivity (VISR). VISR can be misinterpreted as a sign of HIV infection in a healthy study participant. In a participant who has developed vaccine-induced antibodies, accurate diagnosis of HIV infection (or lack thereof) may require specialized tests and algorithms (differential testing) that are usually not available in community settings. Organizations sponsoring clinical testing of preventive HIV vaccine candidates have an ethical obligation not only to inform healthy volunteers about the potential problems associated with participating in a clinical trial but also to help manage any resulting issues. This article explores the scope of VISR-related issues that become increasingly prevalent as the search for an effective HIV vaccine continues and will be paramount once a preventive vaccine is deployed. We also describe ways in which organizations conducting HIV vaccine trials have addressed these issues and outline areas where more work is needed. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. HIV Vaccine-Induced Sero-Reactivity: A Challenge for Trial Participants, Researchers, and Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Voronin, Yegor; Zinszner, Helene; Karg, Carissa; Brooks, Katie; Coombs, Robert; Hural, John; Holt, Renee; Fast, Pat; Allen, Mary; Allen, Mary; Busch, Michael; Fast, Pat; Fruth, Ulrich; Golding, Hana; Khurana, Surender; Mulenga, Joseph; Peel, Sheila; Schito, Marco; Voronin, Yegor; Barnabas, Nomampondo; Bentsen, Christopher; Graham, Barney; Gray, Glenda; Levin, Andrew; McCluskey, Margaret; O'Connell, Robert; Snow, Bill; Ware, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-inducing vaccines are a major focus in the preventive HIV vaccine field. Because the most common tests for HIV infection rely on detecting antibodies to HIV, they may also detect antibodies induced by a candidate HIV vaccine. The detection of vaccine-induced antibodies to HIV by serological tests is most commonly referred to as vaccine-induced sero-reactivity (VISR). VISR can be misinterpreted as a sign of HIV infection in a healthy study participant. In a participant who has developed vaccine-induced antibodies, accurate diagnosis of HIV infection (or lack thereof) may require specialized tests and algorithms (differential testing) that are usually not available in community settings. Organizations sponsoring clinical testing of preventive HIV vaccine candidates have an ethical obligation not only to inform healthy volunteers about the potential problems associated with participating in a clinical trial but also to help manage any resulting issues. This article explores the scope of VISR-related issues that become increasingly prevalent as the search for an effective HIV vaccine continues and will be paramount once a preventive vaccine is deployed. We also describe ways in which organizations conducting HIV vaccine trials have addressed these issues and outline areas where more work is needed. PMID:25649349

  1. Topical oestrogen keratinises the human foreskin and may help prevent HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Pask, Andrew J; McInnes, Kerry J; Webb, David R; Short, Roger V

    2008-06-04

    With the growing incidence of HIV, there is a desperate need to develop simple, cheap and effective new ways of preventing HIV infection. Male circumcision reduces the risk of infection by about 60%, probably because of the removal of the Langerhans cells which are abundant in the inner foreskin and are the primary route by which HIV enters the penis. Langerhans cells form a vital part of the body's natural defence against HIV and only cause infection when they are exposed to high levels of HIV virions. Rather than removing this natural defence mechanism by circumcision, it may be better to enhance it by thickening the layer of keratin overlying the Langerhans cells, thereby reducing the viral load to which they are exposed. We have investigated the ability of topically administered oestrogen to induce keratinization of the epithelium of the inner foreskin. Histochemically, the whole of the foreskin is richly supplied with oestrogen receptors. The epithelium of the inner foreskin, like the vagina, responds within 24 hours to the topical administration of oestriol by keratinization, and the response persists for at least 5 days after the cessation of the treatment. Oestriol, a cheap, readily available natural oestrogen metabolite, rapidly keratinizes the inner foreskin, the site of HIV entry into the penis. This thickening of the overlying protective layer of keratin should reduce the exposure of the underlying Langerhans cells to HIV virions. This simple treatment could become an adjunct or alternative to surgical circumcision for reducing the incidence of HIV infection in men.

  2. HIV-1 VACCINES. Diversion of HIV-1 vaccine-induced immunity by gp41-microbiota cross-reactive antibodies.

    PubMed

    Williams, Wilton B; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B; Alam, S Munir; Gao, Feng; Wiehe, Kevin; Trama, Ashley M; Jones, Kathryn; Zhang, Ruijun; Song, Hongshuo; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Sawatzki, Kaitlin; Hua, Axin; Liu, Pinghuang; Tay, Matthew Z; Seaton, Kelly E; Shen, Xiaoying; Foulger, Andrew; Lloyd, Krissey E; Parks, Robert; Pollara, Justin; Ferrari, Guido; Yu, Jae-Sung; Vandergrift, Nathan; Montefiori, David C; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E; Hammer, Scott; Karuna, Shelly; Gilbert, Peter; Grove, Doug; Grunenberg, Nicole; McElrath, M Juliana; Mascola, John R; Koup, Richard A; Corey, Lawrence; Nabel, Gary J; Morgan, Cecilia; Churchyard, Gavin; Maenza, Janine; Keefer, Michael; Graham, Barney S; Baden, Lindsey R; Tomaras, Georgia D; Haynes, Barton F

    2015-08-14

    An HIV-1 DNA prime vaccine, with a recombinant adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) boost, failed to protect from HIV-1 acquisition. We studied the nature of the vaccine-induced antibody (Ab) response to HIV-1 envelope (Env). HIV-1-reactive plasma Ab titers were higher to Env gp41 than to gp120, and repertoire analysis demonstrated that 93% of HIV-1-reactive Abs from memory B cells responded to Env gp41. Vaccine-induced gp41-reactive monoclonal antibodies were non-neutralizing and frequently polyreactive with host and environmental antigens, including intestinal microbiota (IM). Next-generation sequencing of an immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region repertoire before vaccination revealed an Env-IM cross-reactive Ab that was clonally related to a subsequent vaccine-induced gp41-reactive Ab. Thus, HIV-1 Env DNA-rAd5 vaccine induced a dominant IM-polyreactive, non-neutralizing gp41-reactive Ab repertoire response that was associated with no vaccine efficacy. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Early events in herpes simplex virus type 1 infection: photosensitivity of fluorescein isothiocyanate-treated virions

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, N.; Bzik, D.; Person, S.; Snipes, W.

    1981-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is photosensitized by treatment with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). The inactivation of FITC-treated virions upon subsequent exposure to light is inhibited by the presence of sodium azide, suggesting the involvement of singlet oxygen in the process. Sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that treatment with FITC plus light induces crosslinks in viral envelope glycoproteins. Treatment of virions with high concentrations of FITC (50 ..mu..g/ml) plus light causes a reduction in the adsorption of the virus to monolayers of human embryonic lung cells. For lower concentrations of FITC (10 ..mu..g/ml) plus light, treated virions adsorb to the host cells, but remain sensitive to light until entry occurs. The loss of light sensitivity coincides with the development of resistance to antibodies. These results are most consistent with a mechanism of entry for herpes simplex virus involving fusion of the viral membrane with the plasma membrane of the host cell.

  4. Generation and Characterization of a Defective HIV-1 Virus as an Immunogen for a Therapeutic Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    García-Pérez, Javier; García, Felipe; Blanco, Julia; Escribà-García, Laura; Gatell, Jose Maria; Alcamí, Jose; Plana, Montserrat; Sánchez-Palomino, Sonsoles

    2012-01-01

    Background The generation of new immunogens able to elicit strong specific immune responses remains a major challenge in the attempts to obtain a prophylactic or therapeutic vaccine against HIV/AIDS. We designed and constructed a defective recombinant virus based on the HIV-1 genome generating infective but non-replicative virions able to elicit broad and strong cellular immune responses in HIV-1 seropositive individuals. Results Viral particles were generated through transient transfection in producer cells (293-T) of a full length HIV-1 DNA carrying a deletion of 892 base pairs (bp) in the pol gene encompassing the sequence that codes for the reverse transcriptase (NL4-3/ΔRT clone). The viral particles generated were able to enter target cells, but due to the absence of reverse transcriptase no replication was detected. The immunogenic capacity of these particles was assessed by ELISPOT to determine γ-interferon production in a cohort of 69 chronic asymptomatic HIV-1 seropositive individuals. Surprisingly, defective particles produced from NL4-3/ΔRT triggered stronger cellular responses than wild-type HIV-1 viruses inactivated with Aldrithiol-2 (AT-2) and in a larger proportion of individuals (55% versus 23% seropositive individuals tested). Electron microscopy showed that NL4-3/ΔRT virions display immature morphology. Interestingly, wild-type viruses treated with Amprenavir (APV) to induce defective core maturation also induced stronger responses than the same viral particles generated in the absence of protease inhibitors. Conclusions We propose that immature HIV-1 virions generated from NL4-3/ΔRT viral clones may represent new prototypes of immunogens with a safer profile and stronger capacity to induce cellular immune responses than wild-type inactivated viral particles. PMID:23144996

  5. Virion Background and Efficiency of Virion Incorporation Determine Susceptibility of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Env-Driven Viral Entry to Inhibition by IFITM Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wrensch, Florian; Hoffmann, Markus; Gärtner, Sabine; Nehlmeier, Inga; Winkler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) can inhibit the cellular entry of several enveloped viruses, including simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). The blockade of SIV by IFITMs is isolate specific, raising the question of which parameters impact sensitivity to IFITM. We show that the virion context in which SIV-Env is presented and the efficiency of virion incorporation determine Env susceptibility to inhibition by IFITMs. Thus, determinants other than the nature of the envelope protein can impact the IFITM sensitivity of viral entry. IMPORTANCE The host cell-encoded IFITM proteins can block viral entry and are an important component of the innate defenses against viral infection. However, the determinants controlling whether a virus is susceptible to blockade by IFITM proteins are incompletely understood. Our study shows that the amount of envelope proteins incorporated into virions as well as the nature of the virion particle itself can impact the sensitivity of viral entry to IFITMs. These results show for the first time that determinants other than the viral envelope protein can impact sensitivity to IFITM and have implications for the interpretation of previously published data on inhibition of viruses by IFITM proteins. Moreover, our findings might help to define the mechanism underlying the antiviral activity of IFITM proteins. PMID:27807233

  6. Virion Background and Efficiency of Virion Incorporation Determine Susceptibility of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Env-Driven Viral Entry to Inhibition by IFITM Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wrensch, Florian; Hoffmann, Markus; Gärtner, Sabine; Nehlmeier, Inga; Winkler, Michael; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2017-01-15

    Interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) can inhibit the cellular entry of several enveloped viruses, including simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). The blockade of SIV by IFITMs is isolate specific, raising the question of which parameters impact sensitivity to IFITM. We show that the virion context in which SIV-Env is presented and the efficiency of virion incorporation determine Env susceptibility to inhibition by IFITMs. Thus, determinants other than the nature of the envelope protein can impact the IFITM sensitivity of viral entry. The host cell-encoded IFITM proteins can block viral entry and are an important component of the innate defenses against viral infection. However, the determinants controlling whether a virus is susceptible to blockade by IFITM proteins are incompletely understood. Our study shows that the amount of envelope proteins incorporated into virions as well as the nature of the virion particle itself can impact the sensitivity of viral entry to IFITMs. These results show for the first time that determinants other than the viral envelope protein can impact sensitivity to IFITM and have implications for the interpretation of previously published data on inhibition of viruses by IFITM proteins. Moreover, our findings might help to define the mechanism underlying the antiviral activity of IFITM proteins. Copyright © 2017 Wrensch et al.

  7. Nonneutralizing Antibodies Induced by the HIV-1 gp41 NHR Domain Gain Neutralizing Activity in the Presence of the HIV Fusion Inhibitor Enfuvirtide: a Potential Therapeutic Vaccine Strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Bi, Wenwen; Zhu, Xiaojie; Li, Haoyang; Qi, Qianqian; Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo

    2015-07-01

    A key barrier against developing preventive and therapeutic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines is the inability of viral envelope glycoproteins to elicit broad and potent neutralizing antibodies. However, in the presence of fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide, we show that the nonneutralizing antibodies induced by the HIV type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) domain (N63) exhibit potent and broad neutralizing activity against laboratory-adapted HIV-1 strains, including the drug-resistant variants, and primary HIV-1 isolates with different subtypes, suggesting the potential of developing gp41-targeted HIV therapeutic vaccines.

  8. Induced degradation of Tat by nucleocapsid (NC) via the proteasome pathway and its effect on HIV transcription.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hye-Won; Lee, Seong-Wook; Myung, Heejoon

    2013-04-23

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV-1 Tat protein upregulates transcriptional transactivation. The nucleocapsid protein NC of HIV-1 is a component of virion and plays a key role in genome packaging. Herein, we have demonstrated the interaction between NC and Tat by means of a yeast two-hybrid assay, GST pull-down analysis, co-immunoprecipitation and subcellular colocalization analysis. We observed that the level of Tat was significantly reduced in the presence of NC. But NC did not affect mRNA expression level of Tat. The level of Tat in the presence of NC was increased by treating cells with a proteasome inhibitor, MG132. The ubiquitination state of Tat was not seen to increase in the presence of NC, suggesting the proteasomal degradation was independent of ubiquitination. Lowered level of Tat in the presence of NC led to a decrease in Tat-mediated transcriptional transactivation.

  9. Dendritic Cells Exposed to MVA-Based HIV-1 Vaccine Induce Highly Functional HIV-1-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses in HIV-1-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Climent, Núria; Guerra, Susana; García, Felipe; Rovira, Cristina; Miralles, Laia; Gómez, Carmen Elena; Piqué, Núria; Gil, Cristina; Gatell, José María; Esteban, Mariano; Gallart, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Currently, MVA virus vectors carrying HIV-1 genes are being developed as HIV-1/AIDS prophylactic/therapeutic vaccines. Nevertheless, little is known about the impact of these vectors on human dendritic cells (DC) and their capacity to present HIV-1 antigens to human HIV-specific T cells. This study aimed to characterize the interaction of MVA and MVA expressing the HIV-1 genes Env-Gag-Pol-Nef of clade B (referred to as MVA-B) in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC) and the subsequent processes of HIV-1 antigen presentation and activation of memory HIV-1-specific T lymphocytes. For these purposes, we performed ex vivo assays with MDDC and autologous lymphocytes from asymptomatic HIV-infected patients. Infection of MDDC with MVA-B or MVA, at the optimal dose of 0.3 PFU/MDDC, induced by itself a moderate degree of maturation of MDDC, involving secretion of cytokines and chemokines (IL1-ra, IL-7, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, IL-15, IL-8, MCP-1, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES, IP-10, MIG, and IFN-α). MDDC infected with MVA or MVA-B and following a period of 48 h or 72 h of maturation were able to migrate toward CCL19 or CCL21 chemokine gradients. MVA-B infection induced apoptosis of the infected cells and the resulting apoptotic bodies were engulfed by the uninfected MDDC, which cross-presented HIV-1 antigens to autologous CD8+ T lymphocytes. MVA-B-infected MDDC co-cultured with autologous T lymphocytes induced a highly functional HIV-specific CD8+ T cell response including proliferation, secretion of IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, MIP-1β, MIP-1α, RANTES and IL-6, and strong cytotoxic activity against autologous HIV-1-infected CD4+ T lymphocytes. These results evidence the adjuvant role of the vector itself (MVA) and support the clinical development of prophylactic and therapeutic anti-HIV vaccines based on MVA-B. PMID:21625608

  10. Structural Lability of Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus Virions

    PubMed Central

    Semenyuk, Pavel I.; Abashkin, Dmitry A.; Kalinina, Natalya O.; Arutyunyan, Alexsandr M.; Solovyev, Andrey G.; Dobrov, Eugeny N.

    2013-01-01

    Virions of Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) were neglected for more than thirty years after their basic properties were determined. In this paper, the physicochemical characteristics of BSMV virions and virion-derived viral capsid protein (CP) were analyzed, namely, the absorption and intrinsic fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism spectra, differential scanning calorimetry curves, and size distributions by dynamic laser light scattering. The structural properties of BSMV virions proved to be intermediate between those of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a well-characterized virus with rigid rod-shaped virions, and flexuous filamentous plant viruses. The BSMV virions were found to be considerably more labile than expected from their rod-like morphology and a distant sequence relation of the BSMV and TMV CPs. The circular dichroism spectra of BSMV CP subunits incorporated into the virions, but not subunits of free CP, demonstrated a significant proportion of beta-structure elements, which were proposed to be localized mostly in the protein regions exposed on the virion outer surface. These beta-structure elements likely formed during virion assembly can comprise the N- and C-terminal protein regions unstructured in the non-virion CP and can mediate inter-subunit interactions. Based on computer-assisted structure modeling, a model for BSMV CP subunit structural fold compliant with the available experimental data was proposed. PMID:23613760

  11. MX2 is an interferon-induced inhibitor of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Kane, Melissa; Yadav, Shalini S; Bitzegeio, Julia; Kutluay, Sebla B; Zang, Trinity; Wilson, Sam J; Schoggins, John W; Rice, Charles M; Yamashita, Masahiro; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2013-10-24

    HIV-1 replication can be inhibited by type I interferon (IFN), and the expression of a number of gene products with anti-HIV-1 activity is induced by type I IFN. However, none of the known antiretroviral proteins can account for the ability of type I IFN to inhibit early, preintegration phases of the HIV-1 replication cycle in human cells. Here, by comparing gene expression profiles in cell lines that differ in their ability to support the inhibitory action of IFN-α at early steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle, we identify myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2) as an interferon-induced inhibitor of HIV-1 infection. Expression of MX2 reduces permissiveness to a variety of lentiviruses, whereas depletion of MX2 using RNA interference reduces the anti-HIV-1 potency of IFN-α. HIV-1 reverse transcription proceeds normally in MX2-expressing cells, but 2-long terminal repeat circular forms of HIV-1 DNA are less abundant, suggesting that MX2 inhibits HIV-1 nuclear import, or destabilizes nuclear HIV-1 DNA. Consistent with this notion, mutations in the HIV-1 capsid protein that are known, or suspected, to alter the nuclear import pathways used by HIV-1 confer resistance to MX2, whereas preventing cell division increases MX2 potency. Overall, these findings indicate that MX2 is an effector of the anti-HIV-1 activity of type-I IFN, and suggest that MX2 inhibits HIV-1 infection by inhibiting capsid-dependent nuclear import of subviral complexes.

  12. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-11-15

    (IR) increases HIV-1 transcription in latently-infected cells. • IR enhances activating effect of bryostatin 1 on HIV-1 transcription in monocytes. • IR induces apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells via phosphorylation of p53 Ser46. • IR of HIV-1 infected humanized mice increases HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain.

  13. Cocaine enhances HIV-1 gp120-induced lymphatic endothelial dysfunction in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Jiang, Susan; Yu, Jinlong; Kuzontkoski, Paula M; Groopman, Jerome E

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are common in both AIDS patients and cocaine users. We addressed the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which HIV and cocaine may partner to induce their deleterious effects. Using primary lung lymphatic endothelial cells (L-LECs), we examined how cocaine and HIV-1 gp120, alone and together, modulate signaling and functional properties of L-LECs. We found that brief cocaine exposure activated paxillin and induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, while sustained exposure increased fibronectin (FN) expression, decreased Robo4 expression, and enhanced the permeability of L-LEC monolayers. Moreover, incubating L-LECs with both cocaine and HIV-1 gp120 exacerbated hyperpermeability, significantly enhanced apoptosis, and further impaired in vitro wound healing as compared with cocaine alone. Our studies also suggested that the sigma-1 receptor (Sigma-1R) and the dopamine-4 receptor (D4R) are involved in cocaine-induced pathology in L-LECs. Seeking clinical correlation, we found that FN levels in sera and lung tissue of HIV+ donors were significantly elevated as compared to HIV− donors. Our in vitro data demonstrate that cocaine and HIV-1 gp120 induce dysfunction and damage of lung lymphatics, and suggest that cocaine use may exacerbate pulmonary edema and fibrosis associated with HIV infection. Continued exploration of the interplay between cocaine and HIV should assist the design of therapeutics to ameliorate HIV-induced pulmonary disorders within the drug using population. PMID:26311830

  14. Development of benzimidazole derivatives to inhibit HIV-1 replication through protecting APOBEC3G protein.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ting; He, Xin; Chen, Bing; Chen, Hui; Geng, Guannan; Luo, Haihua; Zhang, Hui; Bai, Chuan

    2015-05-05

    Human APOBEC3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3G, A3G) is a potent restriction factor against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by inducing hypermutation of G to A in viral genome after its incorporation into virions. HIV-1 Vif (Virion Infectivity Factor) counteracts A3G by inducing ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of A3G protein. Vif-A3G axis therefore is a promising therapeutic target of HIV-1. Here we report the screening, synthesis and SAR studies of benzimidazole derivatives as potent inhibitors against HIV-1 replication via protecting A3G protein. Based on the steep SAR of the benzimidazole scaffold, we identified compound 14 and 26 which provided the best potency, with IC50 values of 3.45 nM and 58.03 nM respectively in the anti-HIV-1 replication assay in H9 cells. Compound 14 and 26 also afforded protective effects on A3G protein level. Both compounds have been proved to be safe in acute toxicological studies. Taken together, we suggest that these two benzimidazole derivatives can be further developed as a new category of anti-HIV-1 leads.

  15. Differential Incorporation of CD45, CD80 (B7-1), CD86 (B7-2), and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I and II Molecules into Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Virions and Microvesicles: Implications for Viral Pathogenesis and Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Mark T.; Graham, David R.; Coren, Lori V.; Trubey, Charles M.; Bess, Julian W.; Arthur, Larry O.; Ott, David E.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.

    2001-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection results in a functional impairment of CD4+ T cells long before a quantitative decline in circulating CD4+ T cells is evident. The mechanism(s) responsible for this functional unresponsiveness and eventual depletion of CD4+ T cells remains unclear. Both direct effects of cytopathic infection of CD4+ cells and indirect effects in which uninfected “bystander” cells are functionally compromised or killed have been implicated as contributing to the immunopathogenesis of HIV infection. Because T-cell receptor engagement of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules in the absence of costimulation mediated via CD28 binding to CD80 (B7-1) or CD86 (B7-2) can lead to anergy or apoptosis, we determined whether HIV type 1 (HIV-1) virions incorporated MHC class I (MHC-I), MHC-II, CD80, or CD86. Microvesicles produced from matched uninfected cells were also evaluated. HIV infection increased MHC-II expression on T- and B-cell lines, macrophages, and peripheral blood mononclear cells (PBMC) but did not significantly alter the expression of CD80 or CD86. HIV virions derived from all MHC-II-positive cell types incorporated high levels of MHC-II, and both virions and microvesicles preferentially incorporated CD86 compared to CD80. CD45, expressed at high levels on cells, was identified as a protein present at high levels on microvesicles but was not detected on HIV-1 virions. Virion-associated, host cell-derived molecules impacted the ability of noninfectious HIV virions to trigger death in freshly isolated PBMC. These results demonstrate the preferential incorporation or exclusion of host cell proteins by budding HIV-1 virions and suggest that host cell proteins present on HIV-1 virions may contribute to the overall pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. PMID:11390619

  16. Palmitoylations on murine coronavirus spike proteins are essential for virion assembly and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Thorp, Edward B; Boscarino, Joseph A; Logan, Hillary L; Goletz, Jeffrey T; Gallagher, Thomas M

    2006-02-01

    Coronavirus spike (S) proteins are palmitoylated at several cysteine residues clustered near their transmembrane-spanning domains. This is achieved by cellular palmitoyl acyltransferases (PATs), which can modify newly synthesized S proteins before they are assembled into virion envelopes at the intermediate compartment of the exocytic pathway. To address the importance of these fatty acylations to coronavirus infection, we exposed infected cells to 2-bromopalmitate (2-BP), a specific PAT inhibitor. 2-BP profoundly reduced the specific infectivities of murine coronaviruses at very low, nontoxic doses that were inert to alphavirus and rhabdovirus infections. 2-BP effected only two- to fivefold reductions in S palmitoylation, yet this correlated with reduced S complexing with virion membrane (M) proteins and consequent exclusion of S from virions. At defined 2-BP doses, underpalmitoylated S proteins instead trafficked to infected cell surfaces and elicited cell-cell membrane fusions, suggesting that the acyl chain adducts are more critical to virion assembly than to S-induced syncytial developments. These studies involving pharmacologic inhibition of S protein palmitoylation were complemented with molecular genetic analyses in which cysteine acylation substrates were mutated. Notably, some mutations (C1347F and C1348S) did not interfere with S incorporation into virions, indicating that only a subset of the cysteine-rich region provides the essential S-assembly functions. However, the C1347F/C1348S mutant viruses exhibited relatively low specific infectivities, similar to virions secreted from 2-BP-treated cultures. Our collective results indicate that the palmitate adducts on coronavirus S proteins are necessary in assembly and also in positioning the assembled envelope proteins for maximal infectivity.

  17. Lifetime induced abortion: a comparison between women living and not living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Pilecco, Flávia Bulegon; Teixeira, Luciana Barcellos; Vigo, Alvaro; Dewey, Michael E; Knauth, Daniela Riva

    2014-01-01

    Studies aimed at understanding the association between induced abortion and HIV are scarce and differ on the direction of the association. This paper aims to show the prevalence of induced abortion in a sample of pregnancies of women living and not living with HIV/Aids, determining variables associated with pregnancy termination and linked to the life course of women and to the specific context of the pregnancy. Data came from a cross-sectional study, using interviewer-administered questionnaire, developed with women that attended public health services in Porto Alegre, Brazil. A generalized estimating equation model with logit link measured the association between determinants and abortion. The final sample was composed of 684 women living with HIV/Aids (2,039 pregnancies) and 639 women not living with HIV/Aids (1,539 pregnancies). The prevalence of induced abortion among pregnancies in women living with HIV/Aids was 6.5%, while in women not living with HIV/Aids was 2.9%. Among women living with HIV/Aids, the following were associated with induced abortion in the multivariable analysis: being older, having a higher education level, having had more sexual partners (i.e., variables linked to the life course of women), having had children prior to the index pregnancy and living with a sexual partner during pregnancy (i.e., variables linked to the context of each pregnancy). On the other hand, among women not living with HIV/Aids, only having a higher education level and having had more sexual partners (i.e., determinants linked to the life course of women) were associated with voluntary pregnancy termination in multivariable analysis. Although determinants are similar between women living and not living with HIV/Aids, prevalence of induced abortion is higher among pregnancies in women living with HIV/Aids, pointing to their greater social vulnerability and to the need for public policy to address prevention and treatment of HIV associated with reproductive issues.

  18. Pharmacologic Inhibition of Nedd8 Activation Enzyme Exposes CD4-Induced Epitopes within Env on Cells Expressing HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Tokarev, Andrey; Stoneham, Charlotte; Lewinski, Mary K; Mukim, Amey; Deshmukh, Savitha; Vollbrecht, Thomas; Spina, Celsa A; Guatelli, John

    2015-12-16

    HIV-1 Vpu decreases the exposure of epitopes within the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) on the surface of infected cells by downregulating both BST2 and CD4. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting Vpu activity would increase the exposure of these epitopes and sensitize infected cells to antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), we treated cells with the Nedd8 activation enzyme (NAE) inhibitor MLN4924, which inhibits the cullin1-based ubiquitin ligase complex coopted by Vpu to degrade cellular targets. Treatment of HeLa cells with MLN4924 or expression of a dominant negative mutant of cullin1 inhibited the Vpu-mediated downregulation of CD4 but not the downregulation of BST2. NAE inhibition also increased the surface exposure of CD4-induced epitopes within Env on HEK293 cells containing an inducible HIV genome, on infected CEM T cells, and on infected primary T cells. In contrast, the Vpu-mediated downregulation of BST2 was substantially inhibited by MLN4924 only when T cells were treated with alpha interferon (IFN-α) to induce high levels of BST2 expression. As reported previously, the absence of vpu or nef and even more so the combined absence of these two genes sensitized infected cells to ADCC. However, NAE inhibition affected ADCC minimally. Paradoxically, even in infected, IFN-treated cells in which NAE inhibition substantially rescued the surface level of BST2, the surface level of Env detected with an antibody recognizing a CD4-independent epitope (2G12) was minimally increased. Mutation of the C-terminal Vpu residue W76, which supports the ability of Vpu to stimulate virion release by displacing BST2 from assembly sites on the plasma membrane by a cullin1-independent mechanism, increased the exposure of Env detected by 2G12 on infected T cells. Thus, inhibiting the displacement function of Vpu together with its ability to degrade CD4 and BST2 may be required to sensitize infected cells to ADCC. Pathogenic viruses encode gene products that enable

  19. Scaling, crumpled wires, and genome packing in virions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Holanda, V. H.; Gomes, M. A. F.

    2016-12-01

    The packing of a genome in virions is a topic of intense current interest in biology and biological physics. The area is dominated by allometric scaling relations that connect, e.g., the length of the encapsulated genome and the size of the corresponding virion capsid. Here we report scaling laws obtained from extensive experiments of packing of a macroscopic wire within rigid three-dimensional spherical and nonspherical cavities that can shed light on the details of the genome packing in virions. We show that these results obtained with crumpled wires are comparable to those from a large compilation of biological data from several classes of virions.

  20. Increased iron export by ferroportin induces restriction of HIV-1 infection in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Namita; Ammosova, Tatiana; Diaz, Sharmin; Lin, Xionghao; Niu, Xiaomei; Ivanov, Andrey; Jerebtsova, Marina; Dhawan, Subhash; Oneal, Patricia; Nekhai, Sergei

    2017-01-01

    The low incidence of HIV-1 infection in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and inhibition of HIV-1 replication in vitro under the conditions of low intracellular iron or heme treatment suggests a potential restriction of HIV-1 infection in SCD. We investigated HIV-1 ex vivo infection of SCD peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and found that HIV-1 replication was inhibited at the level of reverse transcription (RT) and transcription. We observed increased expression of heme and iron-regulated genes, previously shown to inhibit HIV-1, including ferroportin, IKBα, HO-1, p21, and SAM domain and HD domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1). HIV-1 inhibition was less pronounced in hepcidin-treated SCD PBMCs and more pronounced in the iron or iron chelators treated, suggesting a key role of iron metabolism. In SCD PBMCs, labile iron levels were reduced and protein levels of ferroportin, HIF-1α, IKBα, and HO-1 were increased. Hemin treatment induced ferroportin expression and inhibited HIV-1 in THP-1 cells, mimicking the HIV-1 inhibition in SCD PBMCs, especially as hepcidin similarly prevented HIV-1 inhibition. In THP-1 cells with knocked down ferroportin, IKBα, or HO-1 genes but not HIF-1α or p21, HIV-1 was not inhibited by hemin. Activity of SAMHD1-regulatory CDK2 was decreased, and SAMHD1 phosphorylation was reduced in SCD PBMCs and hemin-treated THP-1 cells, suggesting SAMHD1-mediated HIV-1 restriction in SCD. Our findings point to ferroportin as a trigger of HIV-1 restriction in SCD settings, linking reduced intracellular iron levels to the inhibition of CDK2 activity, reduction of SAMHD1 phosphorylation, increased IKBα expression, and inhibition of HIV-1 RT and transcription. PMID:28203649

  1. HIV-1 infection induces strong production of IP-10 through TLR7/9-dependent pathways

    PubMed Central

    SIMMONS, Rachel P.; SCULLY, Eileen P.; GRODEN, Erin E.; BENEDICT, Kelly F.; CHANG, J. Judy; LANE, Kim; LIFSON, Jeff; ROSENBERG, Eric; LAUFFENBURGER, Douglas A.; ALTFELD, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the cytokine/chemokine profiles in response to HIV-1 viremia, and elucidate the pathways leading to HIV-1-induced inflammation. Design/Methods Plasma levels of 19 cytokines in individuals with early HIV-1 infection and individuals undergoing treatment interruptions were evaluated via multiplex assay. To investigate the cellular sources of relevant cytokines, sorted cells from HIV-1 infected individuals were assessed for mRNA expression. Relevant signaling pathways were assessed by comparing cytokine production patterns of PBMCs stimulated with intact HIV-1 or specific TLR stimulants with and without a TLR7/9 antagonist. Results IP-10 plasma concentration was most significantly associated with HIV-1 viral load and was the most significant contributor in a multivariate model. IP-10 mRNA was highly expressed in monocytes and mDCs and these cells were the dominant producers after in vitro stimulation with TLR7/8 ligands (CL097 and ssRNAGag1166), AT-2 HIV-1, and HIV-1NL43 virus. Partial least square discriminant analysis of culture supernatants revealed distinct cytokine/chemokine secretion profiles associated with intact viruses compared to TLR7/8 ligands alone, with IP-10 production linked to the former. A TLR7/9 antagonist blocked IP-10 production following whole virus stimulation, suggesting the involvement of TLR7/9 in the recognition of HIV-1 by these cells. Conclusions Monocytes and mDCs produce significant amounts of IP-10 in response to HIV-1 viremia and after in vitro stimulation with HIV-1. Stimulation with HIV-1-derived TLR7/8-ligands versus HIV-1 resulted in distinct cytokine/chemokine profiles, indicating additional pathways other than TLR7/8 that lead to the activation of innate immune cells by HIV-1. PMID:24096630

  2. Interaction of virions with membrane glycolipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, M.; Dimitrievski, K.; Larson, G.; Zhdanov, V. P.; Höök, F.

    2012-04-01

    Cellular membranes contain various lipids including glycolipids (GLs). The hydrophilic head groups of GLs extend from the membrane into the aqueous environment outside the cell where they act as recognition sites for specific interactions. The first steps of interaction of virions with cells often include contacts with GLs. To clarify the details of such contacts, we have used the total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to explore the interaction of individual unlabelled virus-like particles (or, more specifically, norovirus protein capsids), which are firmly bound to a lipid bilayer, and fluorescent vesicles containing glycosphingolipids (these lipids form a subclass of GLs). The corresponding binding kinetics were earlier found to be kinetically limited, while the detachment kinetics were logarithmic over a wide range of time. Here, the detachment rate is observed to dramatically decrease with increasing concentration of glycosphingolipids from 1% to 8%. This effect has been analytically explained by using a generic model describing the statistics of bonds in the contact area between a virion and a lipid membrane. Among other factors, the model takes the formation of GL domains into account. Our analysis indicates that in the system under consideration, such domains, if present, have a characteristic size smaller than the contact area between the vesicle and the virus-like particle.

  3. Antigenic Properties of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Gp120 on Virions Bound to Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mengistu, Meron; Ray, Krishanu; Lewis, George K.; DeVico, Anthony L.

    2015-01-01

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, undergoes multiple molecular interactions and structural rearrangements during the course of host cell attachment and viral entry, which are being increasingly defined at the atomic level using isolated proteins. In comparison, antigenic markers of these dynamic changes are essentially unknown for single HIV-1 particles bound to target cells. Such markers should indicate how neutralizing and/or non-neutralizing antibodies might interdict infection by either blocking infection or sensitizing host cells for elimination by Fc-mediated effector function. Here we address this deficit by imaging fluorescently labeled CCR5-tropic HIV-1 pseudoviruses using confocal and superresolution microscopy to track the exposure of neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitopes as they appear on single HIV-1 particles bound to target cells. Epitope exposure was followed under conditions permissive or non-permissive for viral entry to delimit changes associated with virion binding from those associated with post-attachment events. We find that a previously unexpected array of gp120 epitopes is exposed rapidly upon target cell binding. This array comprises both neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitopes, the latter being hidden on free virions yet capable of serving as potent targets for Fc-mediated effector function. Under non-permissive conditions for viral entry, both neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitope exposures were relatively static over time for the majority of bound virions. Under entry-permissive conditions, epitope exposure patterns changed over time on subsets of virions that exhibited concurrent variations in virion contents. These studies reveal that bound virions are distinguished by a broad array of both neutralizing and non-neutralizing gp120 epitopes that potentially sensitize a freshly engaged target cell for destruction by Fc-mediated effector function and/or for direct neutralization at a post-binding step. The elucidation of

  4. Interaction with the p6 Domain of the Gag Precursor Mediates Incorporation into Virions of Vpr and Vpx Proteins from Primate Lentiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Selig, L.; Pages, J.-C.; Tanchou, V.; Prévéral, S.; Berlioz-Torrent, C.; Liu, L. X.; Erdtmann, L.; Darlix, J.-L.; Benarous, R.; Benichou, S.

    1999-01-01

    Vpr and Vpx proteins from human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV) are incorporated into virions in quantities equivalent to those of the viral Gag proteins. We demonstrate here that Vpr and Vpx proteins from distinct lineages of primate lentiviruses were able to bind to their respective Gag precursors. The capacity of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) Vpr mutants to bind to Pr55Gag was correlated with their incorporation into virions. Molecular analysis of these interactions revealed that they required the C-terminal p6 domain of the Gag precursors. While the signal for HIV-1 Vpr binding lies in the leucine triplet repeat region of the p6 domain reported to be essential for incorporation, SIVsm Gag lacking the equivalent region still bound to SIVsm Vpr and Vpx, indicating that the determinants for Gag binding are located upstream of this region of the p6 domain. Binding to Gag cleavage products showed that HIV-1 Vpr interacted directly with the nucleocapsid protein (NC), whereas SIVsm Vpr and Vpx did not interact with NC but with the p6 protein. These results (i) reveal differences between HIV-1 and SIVsm for the p6 determinants required for Vpr and Vpx binding to Gag and (ii) suggest that HIV-1 Vpr and SIVsm Vpr and Vpx interact with distinct cleavage products of the precursor following proteolytic processing in the virions. PMID:9847364

  5. Impaired NK Cell Activation and Chemotaxis toward Dendritic Cells Exposed to Complement-Opsonized HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Ellegård, Rada; Crisci, Elisa; Andersson, Jonas; Shankar, Esaki M; Nyström, Sofia; Hinkula, Jorma; Larsson, Marie

    2015-08-15

    Mucosa resident dendritic cells (DCs) may represent one of the first immune cells that HIV-1 encounters during sexual transmission. The virions in body fluids can be opsonized with complement factors because of HIV-mediated triggering of the complement cascade, and this appears to influence numerous aspects of the immune defense targeting the virus. One key attribute of host defense is the ability to attract immune cells to the site of infection. In this study, we investigated whether the opsonization of HIV with complement (C-HIV) or a mixture of complement and Abs (CI-HIV) affected the cytokine and chemokine responses generated by DCs, as well as their ability to attract other immune cells. We found that the expression levels of CXCL8, CXCL10, CCL3, and CCL17 were lowered after exposure to either C-HIV or CI-HIV relative to free HIV (F-HIV). DCs exposed to F-HIV induced higher cell migration, consisting mainly of NK cells, compared with opsonized virus, and the chemotaxis of NK cells was dependent on CCL3 and CXCL10. NK cell exposure to supernatants derived from HIV-exposed DCs showed that F-HIV induced phenotypic activation (e.g., increased levels of TIM3, CD69, and CD25) and effector function (e.g., production of IFNγ and killing of target cells) in NK cells, whereas C-HIV and CI-HIV did not. The impairment of NK cell recruitment by DCs exposed to complement-opsonized HIV and the lack of NK activation may contribute to the failure of innate immune responses to control HIV at the site of initial mucosa infection.

  6. [Lipid disorders in patients with HIV-induced diseases].

    PubMed

    Chanu, B; Valensi, P

    2005-09-10

    Before the availability of protease inhibitors, elevated triglyceride levels were frequently observed in patients with advanced-stage HIV infection. Since the addition of protease inhibitors to combination treatments, metabolic side effects (alterations in distribution of adipose tissue and metabolic disorders combining dyslipidemia, insulin-resistance and glucose intolerance) have been observed in HIV-positive patients receiving these treatments. Reverse transcriptase nucleoside inhibitors also provoke metabolic disorders. Dyslipidemia is defined by an increase in triglyceride levels of varying and sometimes major intensity, either isolated or combined with a more moderate increase in LDL-cholesterol, while HDL-cholesterol levels may decrease or remain unchanged. These metabolic alterations are potentially atherogenic and may explain these patients' increased risk of cardiovascular disorders. Their mechanism is complex and not yet clearly elucidated. The infection, the improvement in patients' general health and immune status, and individual predisposing factors are probably involved. Treatment probably plays a major role, since the different drugs in these two classes show effects of clearly different intensity. In vitro and ex vivo studies suggest that protease inhibitors alter adipocyte differentiation and induce insulin resistance. Reverse transcriptase nucleoside inhibitors modify adipocyte metabolism too, promoting tissue atrophy. Endocrine factors (cortisol and growth hormones) are also likely to have a role in this hypertrophy of adipose, especially visceral, tissue. These metabolic abnormalities result mainly from the effects of the antiretroviral drugs, notably protease inhibitors, on the hepatic lipid metabolism and on tissue sensitivity to insulin. Lipodystrophy contributes to these abnormalities, as does the reduction in cytokine secretion by adipose tissue. Management of these metabolic disorders is based primarily on a change in the drug regimen

  7. A clue to unprecedented strategy to HIV eradication: “Lock-in and apoptosis”

    DOE PAGES

    Tateishi, Hiroshi; Monde, Kazuaki; Anraku, Kensaku; ...

    2017-08-21

    Despite the development of antiretroviral therapy against HIV, eradication of the virus from the body, as a means to a cure, remains in progress. A “kick and kill” strategy proposes “kick” of the latent HIV to an active HIV to eventually be “killed”. Latency-reverting agents that can perform the “kick” function are under development and have shown promise. Management of the infected cells not to produce virions after the “kick” step is important to this strategy. Here we show that a newly synthesized compound, L-HIPPO, captures the HIV-1 protein Pr55Gag and intercepts its function to translocate the virus from themore » cytoplasm to the plasma membrane leading to virion budding. The infecting virus thus “locked-in” subsequently induces apoptosis of the host cells. This “lock-in and apoptosis” approach performed by our novel compound in HIV-infected cells provides a means to bridge the gap between the “kick” and “kill” steps of this eradication strategy. By building upon previous progress in latency reverting agents, our compound appears to provide a promising step toward the goal of HIV eradication from the body« less

  8. HIV-1 Tat induces DNMT over-expression through microRNA dysregulation in HIV-related non Hodgkin lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Luzzi, Anna; Morettini, Federica; Gazaneo, Sara; Mundo, Lucia; Onnis, Anna; Mannucci, Susanna; Rogena, Emily A; Bellan, Cristiana; Leoncini, Lorenzo; De Falco, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    A close association between HIV infection and the development of cancer exists. Although the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy has changed the epidemiology of AIDS-associated malignancies, a better understanding on how HIV can induce malignant transformation will help the development of novel therapeutic agents. HIV has been reported to induce the expression of DNMT1 in vitro, but still no information is available about the mechanisms regulating DNMT expression in HIV-related B-cell lymphomas. In this paper, we investigated the expression of DNMT family members (DNMT1, DNMT3a/b) in primary cases of aggressive B-cell lymphomas of HIV-positive subjects. Our results confirmed the activation of DNMT1 by HIV in vivo, and reported for the first time a marked up-regulation of DNMT3a and DNMT3b in HIV-positive aggressive B-cell lymphomas. DNMT up-regulation in HIV-positive tumors correlated with down-regulation of specific microRNAs, as the miR29 family, the miR148-152 cluster, known to regulate their expression. Literature reports the activation of DNMTs by the human polyomavirus BKV large T-antigen and adenovirus E1a, through the pRb/E2F pathway. We have previously demonstrated that the HIV Tat protein is able to bind to the pocket proteins and to inactivate their oncosuppressive properties, resulting in uncontrolled cell proliferation. Therefore, we focused on the role of Tat, due to its capability to be released from infected cells and to dysregulate uninfected ones, using an in vitro model in which Tat was ectopically expressed in B-cells. Our findings demonstrated that the ectopic expression of Tat was per se sufficient to determine DNMT up-regulation, based on microRNA down-regulation, and that this results in aberrant hypermethylation of target genes and microRNAs. These results point at a direct role for Tat in participating in uninfected B-cell lymphomagenesis, through dysregulation of the epigenetical control of gene expression.

  9. Iopamidol-induced meningoencephalopathy in an HIV-seropositive patient.

    PubMed

    Stroup, Jeffrey S; Stephens, Johnny R; Baker, Damon L

    2007-01-01

    Central nervous system infectious and metabolic abnormalities are common in HIV-positive patients. Drug therapy, opportunistic infections, the clinical course of HIV disease itself, and very rarely iodinated radiographic contrast agents can all be linked to these abnormalities. The following case describes an HIV-seropositive patient who developed encephalopathy after undergoing a cervical myelogram that utilized iopamidol dye (Isovue-M 300 mg/mL).

  10. Iopamidol-induced meningoencephalopathy in an HIV-seropositive patient

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Johnny R.; Baker, Damon L.

    2007-01-01

    Central nervous system infectious and metabolic abnormalities are common in HIV-positive patients. Drug therapy, opportunistic infections, the clinical course of HIV disease itself, and very rarely iodinated radiographic contrast agents can all be linked to these abnormalities. The following case describes an HIV-seropositive patient who developed encephalopathy after undergoing a cervical myelogram that utilized iopamidol dye (Isovue-M 300 mg/mL). PMID:17256042

  11. CCTTT-repeat polymorphism of the inducible nitric oxide synthase is not associated with HIV pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    HERSBERGER, M; BONHOEFFER, S; RAMPINI, S K; OPRAVIL, M; MARTI-JAUN, J; TELENTI, A; HÄNSELER, E; LEDERGERBER, B; Speck, R F

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) has bactericidal and virocidal effects. Although NO synthesis and iNOS expression in macrophages affect several aspects of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type-1 pathogenesis, their role in HIV disease remains largely unknown. In humans, the expression of iNOS is influenced by a functional CCTTT-repeat polymorphism in the promoter region of the gene. We investigated the association of this polymorphism with HIV pathogenesis in naive HIV-infected patients before the initiation of antiretroviral therapy. The allele frequencies of the iNOS CCTTT-repeat polymorphism were assessed by PCR in 857 patients from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study, including rapid progressors and long-term nonprogressors, and in 240 healthy volunteers. In HIV-infected patients, the initial viral load and the decline in total CD4 cells was calculated to estimate disease progression. Allele frequencies of the iNOS CCTTT-repeat polymorphism were similar between the HIV-infected and noninfected blood donors. In treatment-naive HIV-positive patients, there was no association of the iNOS polymorphism with viral load or with the course of CD4 cells. Regulation of iNOS expression by the functional CCTTT-polymorphism does not modify HIV pathogenesis. PMID:15320907

  12. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells promote HIV-1–induced group 3 innate lymphoid cell depletion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng; Cheng, Liang; Zhao, Juanjuan; Li, Guangming; Zhang, Liguo; Chen, Weiwei; Nie, Weiming; Reszka-Blanco, Natalia J.; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Su, Lishan

    2015-01-01

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) have demonstrated roles in promoting antibacterial immunity, maintaining epithelial barrier function, and supporting tissue repair. ILC3 alterations are associated with chronic inflammation and inflammatory disease; however, the characteristics and relevant regulatory mechanisms of this cell population in HIV-1 infection are poorly understood due in part to a lack of a robust model. Here, we determined that functional human ILC3s develop in lymphoid organs of humanized mice and that persistent HIV-1 infection in this model depletes ILC3s, as observed in chronic HIV-1–infected patients. In HIV-1–infected mice, effective antiretroviral therapy reversed the loss of ILC3s. HIV-1–dependent reduction of ILC3s required plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), IFN-I, and the CD95/FasL pathway, as targeted depletion or blockade of these prevented HIV-1–induced ILC3 depletion in vivo and in vitro, respectively. Finally, we determined that HIV-1 infection induces CD95 expression on ILC3s via a pDC- and IFN-I–dependent mechanism that sensitizes ILC3s to undergo CD95/FasL-mediated apoptosis. We conclude that chronic HIV-1 infection depletes ILC3s through pDC activation, induction of IFN-I, and CD95-mediated apoptosis. PMID:26301812

  13. HIV infection and HERV expression: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The human genome contains multiple copies of retrovirus genomes known as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) that have entered the germ-line at some point in evolution. Several of these proviruses have retained (partial) coding capacity, so that a number of viral proteins or even virus particles are expressed under various conditions. Human ERVs (HERVs) belong to the beta-, gamma-, or spuma- retrovirus groups. Endogenous delta- and lenti- viruses are notably absent in humans, although endogenous lentivirus genomes have been found in lower primates. Exogenous retroviruses that currently form a health threat to humans intriguingly belong to those absent groups. The best studied of the two infectious human retroviruses is the lentivirus human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) which has an overwhelming influence on its host by infecting cells of the immune system. One HIV-induced change is the induction of HERV transcription, often leading to induced HERV protein expression. This review will discuss the potential HIV-HERV interactions. Several studies have suggested that HERV proteins are unlikely to complement defective HIV virions, nor is HIV able to package HERV transcripts, probably due to low levels of sequence similarity. It is unclear whether the expression of HERVs has a negative, neutral, or positive influence on HIV-AIDS disease progression. A positive effect was recently reported by the specific expression of HERVs in chronically HIV-infected patients, which results in the presentation of HERV-derived peptides to CD8+ T-cells. These cytotoxic T-cells were not tolerant to HERV peptides, as would be expected for self-antigens, and consequently lysed the HIV-infected, HERV-presenting cells. This novel mechanism could control HIV replication and result in a low plasma viral load. The possibility of developing a vaccination strategy based on these HERV peptides will be discussed. PMID:22248111

  14. Analysis of the Role of Vaccinia Virus H7 in Virion Membrane Biogenesis with an H7-Deletion Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Wu, Xiang; Yan, Bo; Deng, Junpeng

    2013-01-01

    Essential vaccinia virus genes are often studied with conditional-lethal inducible mutants. Here, we constructed a deletion mutant lacking the essential H7R gene (the ΔH7 mutant) with an H7-expressing cell line. Compared to an inducible H7 mutant, the ΔH7 mutant showed a defect at an earlier step of virion membrane biogenesis, before the development of short crescent-shaped precursors of the viral envelope. Our studies refine the role of H7 in virion membrane biogenesis and highlight the values of analyzing deletion mutants. PMID:23678177

  15. Stimulation of Liver X Receptor Has Potent Anti-HIV Effects in a Humanized Mouse Model of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Ali; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Sviridov, Dmitri; Karandish, Sara; Raj, Dominic S.; Fitzgerald, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that liver X receptor (LXR) agonists inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by upregulating cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1), suppressing HIV production, and reducing infectivity of produced virions. In this study, we extended these observations by analyzing the effect of the LXR agonist T0901317 [N-[4-(1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)phenyl]-N-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)benzenesulfonamide] on the ongoing HIV infection and investigating the possibility of using LXR agonist for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection in a humanized mouse model. Pre-exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages to T0901317 reduced susceptibility of these cells to HIV infection in vitro. This protective effect lasted for up to 4 days after treatment termination and correlated with upregulated expression of ABCA1, reduced abundance of lipid rafts, and reduced fusion of the cells with HIV. Pre-exposure of peripheral blood leukocytes to T0901317 provided only a short-term protection against HIV infection. Treatment of HIV-exposed humanized mice with LXR agonist starting 2 weeks postinfection substantially reduced viral load. When eight humanized mice were pretreated with LXR agonist prior to HIV infection, five animals were protected from infection, two had viral load at the limit of detection, and one had viral load significantly reduced relative to mock-treated controls. T0901317 pretreatment also reduced HIV-induced dyslipidemia in infected mice. In conclusion, these results reveal a novel link between LXR stimulation and cell resistance to HIV infection and suggest that LXR agonists may be good candidates for development as anti-HIV agents, in particular for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection. PMID:26126533

  16. Stimulation of Liver X Receptor Has Potent Anti-HIV Effects in a Humanized Mouse Model of HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Ali; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Sviridov, Dmitri; Karandish, Sara; Raj, Dominic S; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that liver X receptor (LXR) agonists inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by upregulating cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1), suppressing HIV production, and reducing infectivity of produced virions. In this study, we extended these observations by analyzing the effect of the LXR agonist T0901317 [N-[4-(1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)phenyl]-N-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)benzenesulfonamide] on the ongoing HIV infection and investigating the possibility of using LXR agonist for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection in a humanized mouse model. Pre-exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages to T0901317 reduced susceptibility of these cells to HIV infection in vitro. This protective effect lasted for up to 4 days after treatment termination and correlated with upregulated expression of ABCA1, reduced abundance of lipid rafts, and reduced fusion of the cells with HIV. Pre-exposure of peripheral blood leukocytes to T0901317 provided only a short-term protection against HIV infection. Treatment of HIV-exposed humanized mice with LXR agonist starting 2 weeks postinfection substantially reduced viral load. When eight humanized mice were pretreated with LXR agonist prior to HIV infection, five animals were protected from infection, two had viral load at the limit of detection, and one had viral load significantly reduced relative to mock-treated controls. T0901317 pretreatment also reduced HIV-induced dyslipidemia in infected mice. In conclusion, these results reveal a novel link between LXR stimulation and cell resistance to HIV infection and suggest that LXR agonists may be good candidates for development as anti-HIV agents, in particular for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection.

  17. The E6 protein from vaccinia virus is required for the formation of immature virions

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Olga; Turner, Peter C.; Moyer, Richard W.; Condit, Richard C.; Moussatche, Nissin

    2010-04-10

    An IPTG-inducible mutant in the E6R gene of vaccinia virus was used to study the role of the E6 virion core protein in viral replication. In the absence of the inducer, the mutant exhibited a normal pattern DNA replication, concatemer resolution and late gene expression, but it showed an inhibition of virion structural protein processing it failed to produce infectious particles. Electron microscopic analysis showed that in the absence of IPTG viral morphogenesis was arrested before IV formation: crescents, aberrant or empty IV-like structures, and large aggregated virosomes were observed throughout the cytoplasm. The addition of IPTG to release a 12-h block showed that virus infectious particles could be formed in the absence of de novo DNA synthesis. Our observations show that in the absence of E6 the association of viroplasm with viral membrane crescents is impaired.

  18. Pharmacological, behavioural and mechanistic analysis of HIV-1 gp120 induced painful neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Victoria C J; Blackbeard, Julie; Pheby, Timothy; Segerdahl, Andrew R; Davies, Meirion; Hasnie, Fauzia; Hall, Susan; McMahon, Stephen B; Rice, Andrew S C

    2007-12-15

    A painful neuropathy is frequently observed in people living with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The HIV coat protein, glycoprotein 120 (gp120), implicated in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders associated with HIV, is capable of initiating neurotoxic cascades via an interaction with the CXCR4 and/or CCR5 chemokine receptors, which may underlie the pathogenesis of HIV-associated peripheral neuropathic pain. In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying HIV-induced painful peripheral neuropathy, we have characterised pathological events in the peripheral and central nervous system following application of HIV-1 gp120 to the rat sciatic nerve. Perineural HIV-1 gp120 treatment induced a persistent mechanical hypersensitivity (44% decrease from baseline), but no alterations in sensitivity to thermal or cold stimuli, and thigmotactic (anxiety-like) behaviour in the open field. The mechanical hypersensitivity was sensitive to systemic treatment with gabapentin, morphine and the cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2, but not with amitriptyline. Immunohistochemical studies reveal: decreased intraepidermal nerve fibre density, macrophage infiltration into the peripheral nerve at the site of perineural HIV-1 gp120; changes in sensory neuron phenotype including expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) in 27% of cells, caspase-3 in 25% of cells, neuropeptide Y (NPY) in 12% of cells and galanin in 13% of cells and a spinal gliosis. These novel findings suggest that this model is not only useful for the elucidation of mechanisms underlying HIV-1-related peripheral neuropathy but may prove useful for preclinical assessment of drugs for the treatment of HIV-1 related peripheral neuropathic pain.

  19. Pharmacological, behavioural and mechanistic analysis of HIV-1 gp120 induced painful neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Victoria C.J.; Blackbeard, Julie; Pheby, Timothy; Segerdahl, Andrew R.; Davies, Meirion; Hasnie, Fauzia; Hall, Susan; McMahon, Stephen B.; Rice, Andrew S.C.

    2007-01-01

    A painful neuropathy is frequently observed in people living with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The HIV coat protein, glycoprotein 120 (gp120), implicated in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders associated with HIV, is capable of initiating neurotoxic cascades via an interaction with the CXCR4 and/or CCR5 chemokine receptors, which may underlie the pathogenesis of HIV-associated peripheral neuropathic pain. In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying HIV-induced painful peripheral neuropathy, we have characterised pathological events in the peripheral and central nervous system following application of HIV-1 gp120 to the rat sciatic nerve. Perineural HIV-1 gp120 treatment induced a persistent mechanical hypersensitivity (44% decrease from baseline), but no alterations in sensitivity to thermal or cold stimuli, and thigmotactic (anxiety-like) behaviour in the open field. The mechanical hypersensitivity was sensitive to systemic treatment with gabapentin, morphine and the cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2, but not with amitriptyline. Immunohistochemical studies reveal: decreased intraepidermal nerve fibre density, macrophage infiltration into the peripheral nerve at the site of perineural HIV-1 gp120; changes in sensory neuron phenotype including expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) in 27% of cells, caspase-3 in 25% of cells, neuropeptide Y (NPY) in 12% of cells and galanin in 13% of cells and a spinal gliosis. These novel findings suggest that this model is not only useful for the elucidation of mechanisms underlying HIV-1-related peripheral neuropathy but may prove useful for preclinical assessment of drugs for the treatment of HIV-1 related peripheral neuropathic pain. PMID:17433546

  20. Electron Tomography of HIV-1 Infection in Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ladinsky, Mark S.; Kieffer, Collin; Olson, Gregory; Deruaz, Maud; Vrbanac, Vladimir; Tager, Andrew M.; Kwon, Douglas S.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    Critical aspects of HIV-1 infection occur in mucosal tissues, particularly in the gut, which contains large numbers of HIV-1 target cells that are depleted early in infection. We used electron tomography (ET) to image HIV-1 in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) of HIV-1–infected humanized mice, the first three-dimensional ultrastructural examination of HIV-1 infection in vivo. Human immune cells were successfully engrafted in the mice, and following infection with HIV-1, human T cells were reduced in GALT. Virions were found by ET at all stages of egress, including budding immature virions and free mature and immature viruses. Immuno-electron microscopy verified the virions were HIV-1 and showed CD4 sequestration in the endoplasmic reticulum of infected cells. Observation of HIV-1 in infected GALT tissue revealed that most HIV-1–infected cells, identified by immunolabeling and/or the presence of budding virions, were localized to intestinal crypts with pools of free virions concentrated in spaces between cells. Fewer infected cells were found in mucosal regions and the lamina propria. The preservation quality of reconstructed tissue volumes allowed details of budding virions, including structures interpreted as host-encoded scission machinery, to be resolved. Although HIV-1 virions released from infected cultured cells have been described as exclusively mature, we found pools of both immature and mature free virions within infected tissue. The pools could be classified as containing either mostly mature or mostly immature particles, and analyses of their proximities to the cell of origin supported a model of semi-synchronous waves of virion release. In addition to HIV-1 transmission by pools of free virus, we found evidence of transmission via virological synapses. Three-dimensional EM imaging of an active infection within tissue revealed important differences between cultured cell and tissue infection models and furthered the ultrastructural understanding

  1. Diversion of HIV-1 Vaccine-induced Immunity by gp41-Microbiota Cross-reactive Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Wilton B; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M. Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B.; Alam, S Munir; Gao, Feng; Wiehe, Kevin; Trama, Ashley M.; Jones, Kathryn; Zhang, Ruijun; Song, Hongshuo; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Sawatzki, Kaitlin; Hua, Axin; Liu, Pinghuang; Tay, Matthew Z; Seaton, Kelly; Shen, Xiaoying; Foulger, Andrew; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Parks, Robert; Pollara, Justin; Ferrari, Guido; Yu, Jae-Sung; Vandergrift, Nathan; Montefiori, David C.; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E; Hammer, Scott; Karuna, Shelly; Gilbert, Peter; Grove, Doug; Grunenberg, Nicole; McElrath, Julie; Mascola, John R.; Koup, Richard A; Corey, Lawrence; Nabel, Gary J.; Morgan, Cecilia; Churchyard, Gavin; Maenza, Janine; Keefer, Michael; Graham, Barney S.; Baden, Lindsey R.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    A HIV-1 DNA prime-recombinant Adenovirus Type 5 (rAd5) boost vaccine failed to protect from HIV-1 acquisition. We studied the nature of the vaccine-induced antibody (Ab) response to HIV-1 envelope (Env). HIV-1-reactive plasma Ab titers were higher to Env gp41 than gp120, and repertoire analysis demonstrated that 93% of HIV-1-reactive Abs from memory B cells was to Env gp41. Vaccine-induced gp41-reactive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were non-neutralizing, and frequently polyreactive with host and environmental antigens including intestinal microbiota (IM). Next generation sequencing of an IGHV repertoire prior to vaccination revealed an Env-IM cross-reactive Ab that was clonally-related to a subsequent vaccine-induced gp41-reactive Ab. Thus, HIV-1 Env DNA-rAd5 vaccine induced a dominant IM-polyreactive, non-neutralizing gp41-reactive Ab repertoire response that was associated with no vaccine efficacy. PMID:26229114

  2. Highly potent, synthetically accessible prostratin analogs induce latent HIV expression in vitro and ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Beans, Elizabeth J.; Fournogerakis, Dennis; Gauntlett, Carolyn; Heumann, Lars V.; Kramer, Rainer; Marsden, Matthew D.; Murray, Danielle; Zack, Jerome A.; Wender, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) decreases plasma viremia below the limits of detection in the majority of HIV-infected individuals, thus serving to slow disease progression. However, HAART targets only actively replicating virus and is unable to eliminate latently infected, resting CD4+ T cells. Such infected cells are potentially capable of reinitiating virus replication upon cessation of HAART, thus leading to viral rebound. Agents that would eliminate these reservoirs, when used in combination with HAART, could thus provide a strategy for the eradication of HIV. Prostratin is a preclinical candidate that induces HIV expression from latently infected CD4+ T cells, potentially leading to their elimination through a virus-induced cytopathic effect or host anti-HIV immunity. Here, we report the synthesis of a series of designed prostratin analogs and report in vitro and ex vivo studies of their activity relevant to induction of HIV expression. Members of this series are up to 100-fold more potent than the preclinical lead (prostratin) in binding to cell-free PKC, and in inducing HIV expression in a latently infected cell line and prostratin-like modulation of cell surface receptor expression in primary cells from HIV-negative donors. Significantly, selected members were also tested for HIV induction in resting CD4+ T cells isolated from infected individuals receiving HAART and were found to exhibit potent induction activity. These more potent agents and by extension related tunable analogs now accessible through the studies described herein should facilitate research and preclinical advancement of this strategy for HIV/AIDS eradication. PMID:23812750

  3. Highly potent, synthetically accessible prostratin analogs induce latent HIV expression in vitro and ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Beans, Elizabeth J; Fournogerakis, Dennis; Gauntlett, Carolyn; Heumann, Lars V; Kramer, Rainer; Marsden, Matthew D; Murray, Danielle; Chun, Tae-Wook; Zack, Jerome A; Wender, Paul A

    2013-07-16

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) decreases plasma viremia below the limits of detection in the majority of HIV-infected individuals, thus serving to slow disease progression. However, HAART targets only actively replicating virus and is unable to eliminate latently infected, resting CD4(+) T cells. Such infected cells are potentially capable of reinitiating virus replication upon cessation of HAART, thus leading to viral rebound. Agents that would eliminate these reservoirs, when used in combination with HAART, could thus provide a strategy for the eradication of HIV. Prostratin is a preclinical candidate that induces HIV expression from latently infected CD4(+) T cells, potentially leading to their elimination through a virus-induced cytopathic effect or host anti-HIV immunity. Here, we report the synthesis of a series of designed prostratin analogs and report in vitro and ex vivo studies of their activity relevant to induction of HIV expression. Members of this series are up to 100-fold more potent than the preclinical lead (prostratin) in binding to cell-free PKC, and in inducing HIV expression in a latently infected cell line and prostratin-like modulation of cell surface receptor expression in primary cells from HIV-negative donors. Significantly, selected members were also tested for HIV induction in resting CD4(+) T cells isolated from infected individuals receiving HAART and were found to exhibit potent induction activity. These more potent agents and by extension related tunable analogs now accessible through the studies described herein should facilitate research and preclinical advancement of this strategy for HIV/AIDS eradication.

  4. HIV Protease Inhibitor-Induced Cathepsin Modulation Alters Antigen Processing and Cross-Presentation.

    PubMed

    Kourjian, Georgio; Rucevic, Marijana; Berberich, Matthew J; Dinter, Jens; Wambua, Daniel; Boucau, Julie; Le Gall, Sylvie

    2016-05-01

    Immune recognition by T cells relies on the presentation of pathogen-derived peptides by infected cells, but the persistence of chronic infections calls for new approaches to modulate immune recognition. Ag cross-presentation, the process by which pathogen Ags are internalized, degraded, and presented by MHC class I, is crucial to prime CD8 T cell responses. The original degradation of Ags is performed by pH-dependent endolysosomal cathepsins. In this article, we show that HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) prescribed to HIV-infected persons variably modulate cathepsin activities in human APCs, dendritic cells and macrophages, and CD4 T cells, three cell subsets infected by HIV. Two HIV PIs acted in two complementary ways on cathepsin hydrolytic activities: directly on cathepsins and indirectly on their regulators by inhibiting Akt kinase activities, reducing NADPH oxidase 2 activation, and lowering phagolysosomal reactive oxygen species production and pH, which led to enhanced cathepsin activities. HIV PIs modified endolysosomal degradation and epitope production of proteins from HIV and other pathogens in a sequence-dependent manner. They altered cross-presentation of Ags by dendritic cells to epitope-specific T cells and T cell-mediated killing. HIV PI-induced modulation of Ag processing partly changed the MHC self-peptidome displayed by primary human cells. This first identification, to our knowledge, of prescription drugs modifying the regulation of cathepsin activities and the MHC-peptidome may provide an alternate therapeutic approach to modulate immune recognition in immune disease beyond HIV.

  5. HIV-1 gp120 induces NFAT nuclear translocation in resting CD4+ T-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cicala, Claudia . E-mail: ccicala@nih.gov; Arthos, James; Censoplano, Nina; Cruz, Catherine; Chung, Eva; Martinelli, Elena; Lempicki, Richard A.; Natarajan, Ven; VanRyk, Donald; Daucher, Marybeth; Fauci, Anthony S.

    2006-02-05

    The replication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in CD4+ T-cells is strongly dependent upon the state of activation of infected cells. Infection of sub-optimally activated cells is believed to play a critical role in both the transmission of virus and the persistence of CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. There is accumulating evidence that HIV can modulate signal-transduction pathways in a manner that may facilitate replication in such cells. We previously demonstrated that HIV gp120 induces virus replication in resting CD4+ T cells isolated from HIV-infected individuals. Here, we show that in resting CD4+ T-cells, gp120 activates NFATs and induces their translocation into the nucleus. The HIV LTR encodes NFAT recognition sites, and NFATs may play a critical role in promoting viral replication in sub-optimally activated cells. These observations provide insight into a potential mechanism by which HIV is able to establish infection in resting cells, which may have implications for both transmission of HIV and the persistence of viral reservoirs.

  6. Ethambutol induced toxic optic neuropathy in HIV positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Mustak, Hamzah; Rogers, Graeme; Cook, Colin

    2013-01-01

    AIM To determine whether HIV and the use of antiretroviral therapy is a risk factor for the development of ethambutol toxic optic neuropathy. To describe the clinical course of ethambutol toxic optic neuropathy in patients with HIV and to identify prognostic factors. METHODS The case notes of 14 consecutive patients referred to the neuro-ophthalmology clinic were reviewed. Data regarding HIV status, antiretroviral therapy, visual function, ethambutol therapy dosage, and ethambutol therapy duration were collected and analysed. RESULTS Eleven of the 14 patients were HIV positive. Ten of the HIV positive patients were receiving antiretroviral therapy. The mean dose of ethambutol was 17.25mg/kg/day. No statistically significant difference in mean dose, duration of therapy, age or CD4 count was found between those who showed visual improvement and those who did not. Delay in presentation of more than one month post symptom onset was correlated with poor visual outcome (P=0.001). CONCLUSION HIV and, perhaps more importantly, the potential mitochondrial toxic effects of Nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) may be a risk factor for the development of toxic optic neuropathy from ethambutol therapy via a multiple hit effect. Delay in presentation results in poor visual outcome. Regular monitoring is recommended for HIV positive patients receiving antiretrovirals and requiring ethambutol therapy in order to avoid permanent visual loss. PMID:23991394

  7. Designed, synthetically accessible bryostatin analogues potently induce activation of latent HIV reservoirs in vitro.

    PubMed

    DeChristopher, Brian A; Loy, Brian A; Marsden, Matthew D; Schrier, Adam J; Zack, Jerome A; Wender, Paul A

    2012-09-01

    Bryostatin is a unique lead in the development of potentially transformative therapies for cancer, Alzheimer's disease and the eradication of HIV/AIDS. However, the clinical use of bryostatin has been hampered by its limited supply, difficulties in accessing clinically relevant derivatives, and side effects. Here, we address these problems through the step-economical syntheses of seven members of a new family of designed bryostatin analogues using a highly convergent Prins-macrocyclization strategy. We also demonstrate for the first time that such analogues effectively induce latent HIV activation in vitro with potencies similar to or better than bryostatin. Significantly, these analogues are up to 1,000-fold more potent in inducing latent HIV expression than prostratin, the current clinical candidate for latent virus induction. This study provides the first demonstration that designed, synthetically accessible bryostatin analogues could serve as superior candidates for the eradication of HIV/AIDS through induction of latent viral reservoirs in conjunction with current antiretroviral therapy.

  8. Designed, synthetically accessible bryostatin analogues potently induce activation of latent HIV reservoirs in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechristopher, Brian A.; Loy, Brian A.; Marsden, Matthew D.; Schrier, Adam J.; Zack, Jerome A.; Wender, Paul A.

    2012-09-01

    Bryostatin is a unique lead in the development of potentially transformative therapies for cancer, Alzheimer's disease and the eradication of HIV/AIDS. However, the clinical use of bryostatin has been hampered by its limited supply, difficulties in accessing clinically relevant derivatives, and side effects. Here, we address these problems through the step-economical syntheses of seven members of a new family of designed bryostatin analogues using a highly convergent Prins-macrocyclization strategy. We also demonstrate for the first time that such analogues effectively induce latent HIV activation in vitro with potencies similar to or better than bryostatin. Significantly, these analogues are up to 1,000-fold more potent in inducing latent HIV expression than prostratin, the current clinical candidate for latent virus induction. This study provides the first demonstration that designed, synthetically accessible bryostatin analogues could serve as superior candidates for the eradication of HIV/AIDS through induction of latent viral reservoirs in conjunction with current antiretroviral therapy.

  9. RNA polymerase activity in purified virions of avian reticuloendotheliosis viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, S; Temin, H M

    1976-01-01

    An RNA polymerase activity that synthesizes a U-rich RNA hydrogen bonded to a large viral RNA molecule was found in the cores of virions of avian reticuloendotheliosis viruses (REV). The RNA polymerase activity was separable from the DNA polymerase activity of REV virions. The 5'-terminus of the newly synthesized RNA was A. In addition, a tRNA nucleotidyl transferase activity, which added -CpCpA ends to tRNA, appears to be present in the REV virions. Images PMID:183017

  10. Drug-Induced Reactivation of Apoptosis Abrogates HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hanauske-Abel, Hartmut M.; Saxena, Deepti; Palumbo, Paul E.; Hanauske, Axel-Rainer; Luchessi, Augusto D.; Cambiaghi, Tavane D.; Hoque, Mainul; Spino, Michael; Gandolfi, Darlene D'Alliessi; Heller, Debra S.; Singh, Sukhwinder; Park, Myung Hee; Cracchiolo, Bernadette M.; Tricta, Fernando; Connelly, John; Popowicz, Anthony M.; Cone, Richard A.; Holland, Bart; Pe’ery, Tsafi; Mathews, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 blocks apoptosis, programmed cell death, an innate defense of cells against viral invasion. However, apoptosis can be selectively reactivated in HIV-infected cells by chemical agents that interfere with HIV-1 gene expression. We studied two globally used medicines, the topical antifungal ciclopirox and the iron chelator deferiprone, for their effect on apoptosis in HIV-infected H9 cells and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected with clinical HIV-1 isolates. Both medicines activated apoptosis preferentially in HIV-infected cells, suggesting that the drugs mediate escape from the viral suppression of defensive apoptosis. In infected H9 cells, ciclopirox and deferiprone enhanced mitochondrial membrane depolarization, initiating the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis to execution, as evidenced by caspase-3 activation, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase proteolysis, DNA degradation, and apoptotic cell morphology. In isolate-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells, ciclopirox collapsed HIV-1 production to the limit of viral protein and RNA detection. Despite prolonged monotherapy, ciclopirox did not elicit breakthrough. No viral re-emergence was observed even 12 weeks after drug cessation, suggesting elimination of the proviral reservoir. Tests in mice predictive for cytotoxicity to human epithelia did not detect tissue damage or activation of apoptosis at a ciclopirox concentration that exceeded by orders of magnitude the concentration causing death of infected cells. We infer that ciclopirox and deferiprone act via therapeutic reclamation of apoptotic proficiency (TRAP) in HIV-infected cells and trigger their preferential elimination. Perturbations in viral protein expression suggest that the antiretroviral activity of both drugs stems from their ability to inhibit hydroxylation of cellular proteins essential for apoptosis and for viral infection, exemplified by eIF5A. Our findings identify ciclopirox and deferiprone as prototypes of selectively cytocidal

  11. Major histocompatibility complex class-II molecules promote targeting of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 virions in late endosomes by enhancing internalization of nascent particles from the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Finzi, Andrés; Perlman, Mira; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude; Thibodeau, Jacques; Cohen, Éric A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Productive assembly of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) takes place, primarily, at the plasma membrane. However, depending on the cell types, a significant proportion of nascent virus particles are internalized and routed to late endosomes. We previously reported that expression of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR promoted a redistribution of Gag in late endosomes and an increased detection of mature virions in these compartments in HeLa and human embryonic kidney 293T model cell lines. Although this redistribution of Gag resulted in a marked decrease of HIV-1 release, the underlying mechanism remained undefined. Here, we provide evidence that expression of HLA-DR at the cell surface induces a redistribution of mature Gag products into late endosomes by enhancing nascent HIV-1 particle internalization from the plasma membrane through a process that relies on the presence of intact HLA-DR α and β-chain cytosolic tails. These findings raise the possibility that major histocompatibility complex class-II molecules might influence endocytic events at the plasma membrane and as a result promote endocytosis of progeny HIV-1 particles. PMID:23170932

  12. Release of HIV-1 sequestered in the vesicles of oral and genital mucosal epithelial cells by epithelial-lymphocyte interaction

    PubMed Central

    Yasen, Aizezi; Herrera, Rossana; Rosbe, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Oropharyngeal mucosal epithelia of fetuses/neonates/infants and the genital epithelia of adults play a critical role in HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission and sexual transmission of virus, respectively. To study the mechanisms of HIV-1 transmission through mucosal epithelium, we established polarized tonsil, cervical and foreskin epithelial cells. Analysis of HIV-1 transmission through epithelial cells showed that approximately 0.05% of initially inoculated virions transmigrated via epithelium. More than 90% of internalized virions were sequestered in the endosomes of epithelial cells, including multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and vacuoles. Intraepithelial HIV-1 remained infectious for 9 days without viral release. Release of sequestered intraepithelial HIV-1 was induced by the calcium ionophore ionomycin and by cytochalasin D, which increase intracellular calcium and disrupt the cortical actin of epithelial cells, respectively. Cocultivation of epithelial cells containing HIV-1 with activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and CD4+ T lymphocytes led to the disruption of epithelial cortical actin and spread of virus from epithelial cells to lymphocytes. Treatment of epithelial cells with proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon gamma also induced reorganization of cortical actin and release of virus. Inhibition of MVB formation by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of its critical protein hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) expression reduced viral sequestration in epithelial cells and its transmission from epithelial cells to lymphocytes by ~60–70%. Furthermore, inhibition of vacuole formation of epithelial cells by siRNA-inactivated rabankyrin-5 expression also significantly reduced HIV-1 sequestration in epithelial cells and spread of virus from epithelial cells to lymphocytes. Interaction of the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 of epithelial cells with the function-associated antigen-1

  13. Full-Length HIV-1 Immunogens Induce Greater Magnitude and Comparable Breadth of T Lymphocyte Responses to Conserved HIV-1 Regions Compared with Conserved-Region-Only HIV-1 Immunogens in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; SanMiguel, Adam; Simmons, Nathaniel L.; Smith, Kaitlin; Lewis, Mark G.; Szinger, James J.; Korber, Bette

    2012-01-01

    A global HIV-1 vaccine will likely need to induce immune responses against conserved HIV-1 regions to contend with the profound genetic diversity of HIV-1. Here we evaluated the capacity of immunogens consisting of only highly conserved HIV-1 sequences that are aimed at focusing cellular immune responses on these potentially critical regions. We assessed in rhesus monkeys the breadth and magnitude of T lymphocyte responses elicited by adenovirus vectors expressing either full-length HIV-1 Gag/Pol/Env immunogens or concatenated immunogens consisting of only highly conserved HIV-1 sequences. Surprisingly, we found that the full-length immunogens induced comparable breadth (P = 1.0) and greater magnitude (P = 0.01) of CD8+ T lymphocyte responses against conserved HIV-1 regions compared with the conserved-region-only immunogens. Moreover, the full-length immunogens induced a 5-fold increased total breadth of HIV-1-specific T lymphocyte responses compared with the conserved-region-only immunogens (P = 0.007). These results suggest that full-length HIV-1 immunogens elicit a substantially increased magnitude and breadth of cellular immune responses compared with conserved-region-only HIV-1 immunogens, including greater magnitude and comparable breadth of responses against conserved sequences. PMID:22896617

  14. Lifetime Induced Abortion: A Comparison between Women Living and Not Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Pilecco, Flávia Bulegon; Teixeira, Luciana Barcellos; Vigo, Álvaro; Dewey, Michael E.; Knauth, Daniela Riva

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies aimed at understanding the association between induced abortion and HIV are scarce and differ on the direction of the association. This paper aims to show the prevalence of induced abortion in a sample of pregnancies of women living and not living with HIV/Aids, determining variables associated with pregnancy termination and linked to the life course of women and to the specific context of the pregnancy. Methods Data came from a cross-sectional study, using interviewer-administered questionnaire, developed with women that attended public health services in Porto Alegre, Brazil. A generalized estimating equation model with logit link measured the association between determinants and abortion. Findings The final sample was composed of 684 women living with HIV/Aids (2,039 pregnancies) and 639 women not living with HIV/Aids (1,539 pregnancies). The prevalence of induced abortion among pregnancies in women living with HIV/Aids was 6.5%, while in women not living with HIV/Aids was 2.9%. Among women living with HIV/Aids, the following were associated with induced abortion in the multivariable analysis: being older, having a higher education level, having had more sexual partners (i.e., variables linked to the life course of women), having had children prior to the index pregnancy and living with a sexual partner during pregnancy (i.e., variables linked to the context of each pregnancy). On the other hand, among women not living with HIV/Aids, only having a higher education level and having had more sexual partners (i.e., determinants linked to the life course of women) were associated with voluntary pregnancy termination in multivariable analysis. Conclusion Although determinants are similar between women living and not living with HIV/Aids, prevalence of induced abortion is higher among pregnancies in women living with HIV/Aids, pointing to their greater social vulnerability and to the need for public policy to address prevention and treatment of HIV

  15. Both necrosis and apoptosis contribute to HIV-1-induced killing of CD4 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plymale, D. R.; Tang, D. S.; Comardelle, A. M.; Fermin, C. D.; Lewis, D. E.; Garry, R. F.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data currently available on HIV-1-induced cytopathology is unclear regarding the mechanism of cell killing. OBJECTIVE: To clarify the extent to which apoptosis or necrosis is involved in HIV-1-induced cell death in view of conflicting existing data. METHODS: T lymphoblastoid cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells were infected by various strains of HIV-1 and the numbers of apoptotic or necrotic cells were quantified at various times after infection using video-image analysis techniques; the results were compared with the amount of fragmented DNA using a quantitative method. Measurement of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (deltapsi(m)) and intracellular calcium concentrations [Ca2+]i was performed with fluorescent probes and fluorescence concentration analysis (FCA). RESULTS: Although lymphoblastoid and monocytoid cells acutely infected by HIV-1 had increased levels of fragmented DNA, a marker of apoptotic cell death, few (<12%) had condensed chromatin and fragmented nuclei, the morphological features of apoptosis. The predominant alterations in acutely infected cells were distended endoplasmic reticulum and abnormal mitochondria; these ultrastructural changes are consistent with necrosis, although some infected cells simultaneously displayed features of both necrosis and apoptosis. Viability of cells persistently infected by HIV-1 was only minimally reduced from that of uninfected cells. This reduction was accounted for by an increased propensity of the persistently infected cells to die by apoptosis. Alterations in [Ca2+]i and deltapsi(m) occurred in both acutely and persistently infected cells. CONCLUSION: Both necrosis and apoptosis contribute to HIV-1-induced killing of CD4 cells.

  16. Both necrosis and apoptosis contribute to HIV-1-induced killing of CD4 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plymale, D. R.; Tang, D. S.; Comardelle, A. M.; Fermin, C. D.; Lewis, D. E.; Garry, R. F.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data currently available on HIV-1-induced cytopathology is unclear regarding the mechanism of cell killing. OBJECTIVE: To clarify the extent to which apoptosis or necrosis is involved in HIV-1-induced cell death in view of conflicting existing data. METHODS: T lymphoblastoid cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells were infected by various strains of HIV-1 and the numbers of apoptotic or necrotic cells were quantified at various times after infection using video-image analysis techniques; the results were compared with the amount of fragmented DNA using a quantitative method. Measurement of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (deltapsi(m)) and intracellular calcium concentrations [Ca2+]i was performed with fluorescent probes and fluorescence concentration analysis (FCA). RESULTS: Although lymphoblastoid and monocytoid cells acutely infected by HIV-1 had increased levels of fragmented DNA, a marker of apoptotic cell death, few (<12%) had condensed chromatin and fragmented nuclei, the morphological features of apoptosis. The predominant alterations in acutely infected cells were distended endoplasmic reticulum and abnormal mitochondria; these ultrastructural changes are consistent with necrosis, although some infected cells simultaneously displayed features of both necrosis and apoptosis. Viability of cells persistently infected by HIV-1 was only minimally reduced from that of uninfected cells. This reduction was accounted for by an increased propensity of the persistently infected cells to die by apoptosis. Alterations in [Ca2+]i and deltapsi(m) occurred in both acutely and persistently infected cells. CONCLUSION: Both necrosis and apoptosis contribute to HIV-1-induced killing of CD4 cells.

  17. Rab3a-Bound CD63 Is Degraded and Rab3a-Free CD63 Is Incorporated into HIV-1 Particles.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Yoshinao; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Izumida, Mai; Kakoki, Katsura; Hayashi, Hideki; Matsuyama, Toshifumi

    2017-01-01

    CD63, a member of the tetraspanin family, is involved in virion production by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), but its mechanism is unknown. In this study, we showed that a small GTP-binding protein, Rab3a, interacts with CD63. When Rab3a was exogenously expressed, the amounts of CD63 decreased in cells. The Rab3a-mediated reduction of CD63 was suppressed by lysosomal and proteasomal inhibitors. The amount of CD63 was increased by reducing the endogenous Rab3a level using a specific shRNA. These results indicate that Rab3a binds to CD63 to induce the degradation of CD63. Rab3a is thought to be involved in exocytosis, but we found that another function of Rab3a affects the fate of CD63 in lysosomes. CD63 interacted with Rab3a and was incorporated into HIV-1 particles. However, Rab3a was not detected in HIV-1 virions, thereby indicating that Rab3a-free CD63, but not Rab3a-bound CD63, is incorporated into HIV-1 particles. Overexpression or silencing of Rab3a moderately reduced HIV-1 virion formation. Overexpression of Rab3a decreased CD63 levels, but did not affect the incorporation of CD63 into HIV-1 particles. This study showed that Rab3a binds to CD63 to induce the degradation of CD63, and only Rab3a-free CD63 is incorporated into HIV-1 particles.

  18. Rab3a-Bound CD63 Is Degraded and Rab3a-Free CD63 Is Incorporated into HIV-1 Particles

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Yoshinao; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Izumida, Mai; Kakoki, Katsura; Hayashi, Hideki; Matsuyama, Toshifumi

    2017-01-01

    CD63, a member of the tetraspanin family, is involved in virion production by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), but its mechanism is unknown. In this study, we showed that a small GTP-binding protein, Rab3a, interacts with CD63. When Rab3a was exogenously expressed, the amounts of CD63 decreased in cells. The Rab3a-mediated reduction of CD63 was suppressed by lysosomal and proteasomal inhibitors. The amount of CD63 was increased by reducing the endogenous Rab3a level using a specific shRNA. These results indicate that Rab3a binds to CD63 to induce the degradation of CD63. Rab3a is thought to be involved in exocytosis, but we found that another function of Rab3a affects the fate of CD63 in lysosomes. CD63 interacted with Rab3a and was incorporated into HIV-1 particles. However, Rab3a was not detected in HIV-1 virions, thereby indicating that Rab3a-free CD63, but not Rab3a-bound CD63, is incorporated into HIV-1 particles. Overexpression or silencing of Rab3a moderately reduced HIV-1 virion formation. Overexpression of Rab3a decreased CD63 levels, but did not affect the incorporation of CD63 into HIV-1 particles. This study showed that Rab3a binds to CD63 to induce the degradation of CD63, and only Rab3a-free CD63 is incorporated into HIV-1 particles. PMID:28900422

  19. Sialoadhesin Expressed on IFN-Induced Monocytes Binds HIV-1 and Enhances Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, Hans; Calosing, Cyrus; Sun, Bing; Pulliam, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Background HIV-1 infection dysregulates the immune system and alters gene expression in circulating monocytes. Differential gene expression analysis of CD14+ monocytes from subjects infected with HIV-1 revealed increased expression of sialoadhesin (Sn, CD169, Siglec 1), a cell adhesion molecule first described in a subset of macrophages activated in chronic inflammatory diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed sialoadhesin expression on CD14+ monocytes by flow cytometry and found significantly higher expression in subjects with elevated viral loads compared to subjects with undetectable viral loads. In cultured CD14+ monocytes isolated from healthy individuals, sialoadhesin expression was induced by interferon-α and interferon-γ but not tumor necrosis factor-α. Using a stringent binding assay, sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes adsorbed HIV-1 through interaction with the sialic acid residues on the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120. Furthermore, monocytes expressing sialoadhesin facilitated HIV-1 trans infection of permissive cells, which occurred in the absence of monocyte self-infection. Conclusions/Significance Increased sialoadhesin expression on CD14+ monocytes occurred in response to HIV-1 infection with maximum expression associated with high viral load. We show that interferons induce sialoadhesin in primary CD14+ monocytes, which is consistent with an antiviral response during viremia. Our findings suggest that circulating sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes are capable of binding HIV-1 and effectively delivering virus to target cells thereby enhancing the distribution of HIV-1. Sialoadhesin could disseminate HIV-1 to viral reservoirs during monocyte immunosurveillance or migration to sites of inflammation and then facilitate HIV-1 infection of permissive cells. PMID:18414664

  20. A Single Amino Acid Mutation in the Carnation Ringspot Virus Capsid Protein Allows Virion Formation but Prevents Systemic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sit, Tim L.; Haikal, Patrick R.; Callaway, Anton S.; Lommel, Steven A.

    2001-01-01

    A Carnation ringspot virus (CRSV) variant (1.26) was identified that accumulates virions but is incapable of forming a systemic infection. The 1.26 capsid protein gene possesses a Ser→Pro mutation at amino acid 282. Conversion of 1.26 amino acid 282 to Ser restored systemic infection, while the reciprocal mutation in wild-type CRSV abolished systemic infection. Similar mutations introduced into the related Red clover necrotic mosaic virus capsid protein gene failed to induce the packaging but nonsystemic movement phenotype. These results provide additional support for the theory that virion formation is necessary but not sufficient for systemic movement with the dianthoviruses. PMID:11533217

  1. Structure of Hepatitis E Virion-Sized Particle Reveals an RNA-Dependent Viral Assembly Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, L.; Wall, J.; Li, T.-C.; Mayazaki, N.; Simon, M. N.; Moore, M.; Wang, C.-Y.; Takeda, N.; Wakita, T.; Miyamura, T.; Cheng, R. H.

    2010-10-22

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) induces acute hepatitis in humans with a high fatality rate in pregnant women. There is a need for anti-HEV research to understand the assembly process of HEV native capsid. Here, we produced a large virion-sized and a small T=1 capsid by expressing the HEV capsid protein in insect cells with and without the N-terminal 111 residues, respectively, for comparative structural analysis. The virion-sized capsid demonstrates a T=3 icosahedral lattice and contains RNA fragment in contrast to the RNA-free T=1 capsid. However, both capsids shared common decameric organization. The in vitro assembly further demonstrated that HEV capsid protein had the intrinsic ability to form decameric intermediate. Our data suggest that RNA binding is the extrinsic factor essential for the assembly of HEV native capsids.

  2. Performance of a Redesigned HIV Selectest Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Optimized To Minimize Vaccine-Induced Seropositivity in HIV Vaccine Trial Participants

    PubMed Central

    Penezina, Oksana; Krueger, Neil X.; Rodriguez-Chavez, Isaac R.; Busch, Michael P.; Hural, John; Kim, Jerome H.; O'Connell, Robert J.; Hunter, Eric; Aboud, Said; Higgins, Keith; Kovalenko, Victor; Clapham, David; Crane, David

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine-induced seropositivity (VISP) or seroreactivity (VISR), defined as the reaction of antibodies elicited by HIV vaccines with antigens used in HIV diagnostic immunoassays, can result in reactive assay results for vaccinated but uninfected individuals, with subsequent misclassification of their infection status. The eventual licensure of a vaccine will magnify this issue and calls for the development of mitigating solutions in advance. An immunoassay that discriminates between antibodies elicited by vaccine antigens and those elicited by infection has been developed to address this laboratory testing need. The HIV Selectest is based on consensus and clade-specific HIV peptides that are omitted in many HIV vaccine constructs. The assay was redesigned to enhance performance across worldwide clades and to simplify routine use via a standard kit format. The redesigned assay was evaluated with sera from vaccine trial participants, HIV-infected and uninfected individuals, and healthy controls. The HIV Selectest exhibited specificities of 99.5% with sera from uninfected recipients of 6 different HIV vaccines and 100% with sera from normal donors, while detecting HIV-1 infections, including intercurrent infections, with 95 to 100% sensitivity depending on the clade, with the highest sensitivities for clades A and C. HIV Selectest sensitivity decreased in very early seroconversion specimens, which possibly explains the slightly lower sensitivity observed for asymptomatic blood donors than for clinical HIV cases. Thus, the HIV Selectest provides a new laboratory tool for use in vaccine settings to distinguish the immune response to HIV vaccine antigens from that due to true infection. PMID:24403525

  3. Infant HIV-1 Infection Severely Impairs the Bacille Calmette-Guerin Vaccine-Induced Immune Response1

    PubMed Central

    Mansoor, Nazma; Scriba, Thomas J.; de Kock, Marwou; Tameris, Michele; Abel, Brian; Keyser, Alana; Little, Francesca; Soares, Andreia; Gelderbloem, Sebastian; Mlenjeni, Silvia; Denation, Lea; Hawkridge, Anthony; Boom, W. Henry; Kaplan, Gilla; Hussey, Gregory D.; Hanekom, Willem A.

    2010-01-01

    Background World-wide, most infants born to HIV-infected mothers receive BCG. Tuberculosis is a major cause of death of HIV-infected infants in sub-Saharan Africa, and should be prevented. However, BCG may itself cause disease (BCGosis) in these infants. Information regarding the immunogenicity of BCG is imperative for the risk/benefit assessment of BCG vaccination in HIV-infected infants; however, no such data exists. Methods We compared BCG-induced CD4 and CD8 T cell responses, assessed by flow cytometry, in HIV-infected (n = 20), HIV-exposed but uninfected (n = 25), and HIV-unexposed (n = 23) infants, over their first year of life. Results BCG vaccination of the 2 HIV-uninfected groups induced a robust response, characterized by IFN-γ, TNF-α, and/or IL-2-expressing CD4 T cells. In contrast, HIV-infected infants had a markedly lower response, throughout the first year of life. These infants also had significantly reduced numbers of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 co-expressing polyfunctional CD4 T cells, thought to indicate T cell quality. Conclusions HIV-1 infection severely impairs the BCG-specific T cell response during the first year of life. BCG may therefore provide little, if any, vaccine-induced benefit in HIV-infected infants. Considering the significant risk of BCGosis, these data strongly support not giving BCG to HIV-infected infants. PMID:19236280

  4. Nigella sativa concoction induced sustained seroreversion in HIV patient.

    PubMed

    Onifade, Abdulfatah Adekunle; Jewell, Andrew Paul; Adedeji, Waheed Adeola

    2013-01-01

    Nigella sativa had been documented to possess many therapeutic functions in medicine but the least expected is sero-reversion in HIV infection which is very rare despite extensive therapy with highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). This case presentation is to highlight the complete recovery and sero-reversion of adult HIV patient after treatment with Nigella sativa concoction for the period of six months. The patient presented to the herbal therapist with history of chronic fever, diarrhoea, weight loss and multiple papular pruritic lesions of 3 months duration. Examination revealed moderate weight loss, and the laboratory tests of ELISA (Genscreen) and western blot (new blot 1 & 2) confirmed sero-positivity to HIV infection with pre-treatment viral (HIV-RNA) load and CD4 count of 27,000 copies/ml and CD4 count of 250 cells/ mm(3) respectively. The patient was commenced on Nigella sativa concoction 10 mls twice daily for 6 months.. He was contacted daily to monitor side-effects and drug efficacy. Fever, diarrhoea and multiple pruritic lesions disappeared on 5th, 7th and 20th day respectively on Nigella sativa therapy. The CD4 count decreased to 160 cells/ mm3 despite significant reduction in viral load (≤1000 copies/ml) on 30th day on N. sativa. Repeated EIA and Western blot tests on 187th day on Nigella sativa therapy was sero-negative. The post therapy CD4 count was 650 cells/ mm(3) with undetectable viral (HIV-RNA) load. Several repeats of the HIV tests remained sero-negative, aviraemia and normal CD4 count since 24 months without herbal therapy. This case report reflects the fact that there are possible therapeutic agents in Nigella sativa that may effectively control HIV infection.

  5. Exploring the relationship between induced abortion and HIV infection in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Regina M; Pinho, Adriana A; Santos, Naila S; Villela, Wilza V

    2012-12-01

    The impact of HIV on the decision to interrupt pregnancy remains an understudied topic in Brazil and the world. The technical means to implement HIV prevention and treatment interventions are widely available in Brazil. Although Brazil has restrictive abortion laws, induced abortion occurs frequently. This qualitative study investigates the extent to which Brazilian women are motivated to seek abortion as a consequence of having HIV disease, and the extent to which the decision is part of a larger reproductive decision-making context. Researchers interviewed 30 women who were living with HIV and had terminated pregnancies or attempted to do so. Many women identified their HIV status as an important aspect of their decision-making regarding abortion. Women also took into account issues such as the stage of life when the pregnancy occurred and the absence of support from partners and families. Contraceptive practices, pregnancy and abortion in this population are influenced by multiple factors that act on the structural, social, interpersonal and individual levels. We hypothesize that HIV infection and abortion are sometimes associated with similar contexts of vulnerability. Health services therefore should address HIV and reproductive issues together, with reproductive and sexual rights serving as the fundamental basis of health care.

  6. The HIV matrix protein p17 induces hepatic lipid accumulation via modulation of nuclear receptor transcriptoma

    PubMed Central

    Renga, Barbara; Francisci, Daniela; Carino, Adriana; Marchianò, Silvia; Cipriani, Sabrina; Chiara Monti, Maria; Del Sordo, Rachele; Schiaroli, Elisabetta; Distrutti, Eleonora; Baldelli, Franco; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Liver disease is the second most common cause of mortality in HIV-infected persons. Exactly how HIV infection per se affects liver disease progression is unknown. Here we have investigated mRNA expression of 49 nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) and 35 transcriptional coregulators in HepG2 cells upon stimulation with the HIV matrix protein p17. This viral protein regulated mRNA expression of some NRs among which LXRα and its transcriptional co-activator MED1 were highly induced at mRNA level. Dissection of p17 downstream intracellular pathway demonstrated that p17 mediated activation of Jak/STAT signaling is responsible for the promoter dependent activation of LXR. The treatment of both HepG2 as well as primary hepatocytes with HIV p17 results in the transcriptional activation of LXR target genes (SREBP1c and FAS) and lipid accumulation. These effects are lost in HepG2 cells pre-incubated with a serum from HIV positive person who underwent a vaccination with a p17 peptide as well as in HepG2 cells pre-incubated with the natural LXR antagonist gymnestrogenin. These results suggest that HIV p17 affects NRs and their related signal transduction thus contributing to the progression of liver disease in HIV infected patients. PMID:26469385

  7. The HIV matrix protein p17 induces hepatic lipid accumulation via modulation of nuclear receptor transcriptoma.

    PubMed

    Renga, Barbara; Francisci, Daniela; Carino, Adriana; Marchianò, Silvia; Cipriani, Sabrina; Chiara Monti, Maria; Del Sordo, Rachele; Schiaroli, Elisabetta; Distrutti, Eleonora; Baldelli, Franco; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2015-10-15

    Liver disease is the second most common cause of mortality in HIV-infected persons. Exactly how HIV infection per se affects liver disease progression is unknown. Here we have investigated mRNA expression of 49 nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) and 35 transcriptional coregulators in HepG2 cells upon stimulation with the HIV matrix protein p17. This viral protein regulated mRNA expression of some NRs among which LXRα and its transcriptional co-activator MED1 were highly induced at mRNA level. Dissection of p17 downstream intracellular pathway demonstrated that p17 mediated activation of Jak/STAT signaling is responsible for the promoter dependent activation of LXR. The treatment of both HepG2 as well as primary hepatocytes with HIV p17 results in the transcriptional activation of LXR target genes (SREBP1c and FAS) and lipid accumulation. These effects are lost in HepG2 cells pre-incubated with a serum from HIV positive person who underwent a vaccination with a p17 peptide as well as in HepG2 cells pre-incubated with the natural LXR antagonist gymnestrogenin. These results suggest that HIV p17 affects NRs and their related signal transduction thus contributing to the progression of liver disease in HIV infected patients.

  8. Genetic Signatures of HIV-1 Envelope-mediated Bystander Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Anjali; Lee, Raphael T. C.; Mohl, Jonathan; Sedano, Melina; Khong, Wei Xin; Ng, Oon Tek; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Garg, Himanshu

    2014-01-01

    The envelope (Env) glycoprotein of HIV is an important determinant of viral pathogenesis. Several lines of evidence support the role of HIV-1 Env in inducing bystander apoptosis that may be a contributing factor in CD4+ T cell loss. However, most of the studies testing this phenomenon have been conducted with laboratory-adapted HIV-1 isolates. This raises the question of whether primary Envs derived from HIV-infected patients are capable of inducing bystander apoptosis and whether specific Env signatures are associated with this phenomenon. We developed a high throughput assay to determine the bystander apoptosis inducing activity of a panel of primary Envs. We tested 38 different Envs for bystander apoptosis, virion infectivity, neutralizing antibody sensitivity, and putative N-linked glycosylation sites along with a comprehensive sequence analysis to determine if specific sequence signatures within the viral Env are associated with bystander apoptosis. Our studies show that primary Envs vary considerably in their bystander apoptosis-inducing potential, a phenomenon that correlates inversely with putative N-linked glycosylation sites and positively with virion infectivity. By use of a novel phylogenetic analysis that avoids subtype bias coupled with structural considerations, we found specific residues like Arg-476 and Asn-425 that were associated with differences in bystander apoptosis induction. A specific role of these residues was also confirmed experimentally. These data demonstrate for the first time the potential of primary R5 Envs to mediate bystander apoptosis in CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, we identify specific genetic signatures within the Env that may be associated with the bystander apoptosis-inducing phenotype. PMID:24265318

  9. Tetraspanins CD9 and CD81 modulate HIV-1-induced membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Gordón-Alonso, Mónica; Yañez-Mó, María; Barreiro, Olga; Alvarez, Susana; Muñoz-Fernández, M Angeles; Valenzuela-Fernández, Agustín; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2006-10-15

    Protein organization on the membrane of target cells may modulate HIV-1 transmission. Since the tetraspanin CD81 is associated to CD4, the receptor of HIV-1 envelope protein (Env; gp120/gp41), we have explored the possibility that this molecule may modulate the initial steps of HIV-1 infection. On the other hand, CD81 belongs to the tetraspanin family, which has been described as organizers of protein microdomains on the plasma membrane. Therefore, the role of CD81 and other related tetraspanin, CD9, on the cell-to-cell fusion process mediated by HIV-1 was studied. We found that anti-tetraspanin Abs enhanced the syncytia formation induced by HIV-1 envelope proteins and viral entry in human T lymphoblasts. In addition, anti-CD81 Abs triggered its clustering in patches, where CD4 and CXCR4 were included. Moreover, the knocking down of CD81 and CD9 expression resulted in an increase in syncytia formation and viral entry. Accordingly, overexpression of CD81 and CD9 rendered cells less susceptible to Env-mediated syncytia formation. These data indicate that CD9 and CD81 have an important role in membrane fusion induced by HIV-1 envelope.

  10. HIV infection induces morphometrical changes on the oral (buccal mucosa and tongue) epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pompermayer, Adriane Bastos; Gil, Francisca Berenice Dias; França, Beatriz Helena Sottile; Machado, Maria Ângela Naval; Trevilatto, Paula Cristina; Fernandes, Angela; de Lima, Antônio Adilson Soares

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess morphological and morphometrical alterations of oral squamous epithelial cells in type 1 HIV infected individuals. Oral smears were collected from tongue and buccal mucosa of 30 HIV infected (experimental) and 30 non-infected (control) individuals by liquid-based exfoliative cytology. The cells were morphologically analyzed and the nuclear area (NA), the cytoplasmic area (CA) and the nucleus-to-cytoplasm area ratio (NA/CA) were calculated. No morphological differences were found between the groups. The mean values of CA were decreased in tongue (P=.00006) and buccal mucosa (P=.00242) in HIV infected individual, while mean values of NA were increased (P=.00308 and .00095, respectively) in the same group. NA/CA ratio for experimental group was increased in both collected places, with P=.00001 (tongue) and P=.00000 (buccal mucosa). This study revealed that HIV infection was able to induce morphometrical changes on the oral epithelial cells.

  11. Interacting partners of macrophage-secreted cathepsin B contribute to HIV-induced neuronal apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    CANTRES-ROSARIO, Yisel M.; HERNANDEZ, Natalia; NEGRON, Karla; PEREZ-LASPIUR, Juliana; LESZYK, John; SHAFFER, Scott A.; MELENDEZ, Loyda M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective HIV-1 infection of macrophages increases cathepsin B secretion and induces neuronal apoptosis, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. Design We identified macrophage secreted cathepsin B protein interactions extracellularly and their contribution to neuronal death in vitro. Methods Cathepsin B was immunoprecipitated from monocyte-derived macrophage supernatants after 12 days post-infection. The cathepsin B interactome was quantified by label-free tandem mass spectrometry and compared to uninfected supernatants. Proteins identified were validated by western blot. Neurons were exposed to macrophage-conditioned media in presence or absence of antibodies against cathepsin B and interacting proteins. Apoptosis was measured using TUNEL labeling. Immunohistochemistry of post-mortem brain tissue samples from healthy, HIV-infected, and Alzheimer’s disease patients was performed to observe the ex vivo expression of the proteins identified. Results Nine proteins co-immunoprecipitated differentially with cathepsin B between uninfected and HIV-infected macrophages. Serum amyloid p component (SAPC) -cathepsin B interaction increased in HIV-infected macrophage supernatants, while matrix metalloprotease 9 (MMP-9) -cathepsin B interaction decreased. Pre-treatment of HIV-infected macrophage-conditioned media with antibodies against cathepsin B and SAPC decreased neuronal apoptosis. The addition of MMP-9 antibodies was not protective. SAPC was over-expressed in post-mortem brain tissue from HIV-positive neurocognitive impaired patients compared to HIV positive with normal cognition and healthy controls, while MMP-9 expression was similar in all tissues. Conclusions Inhibiting SAPC-cathepsin B interaction protects against HIV–induced neuronal death and may help to find alternative treatments for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. PMID:26208400

  12. Trichomonas vaginalis-Induced Epithelial Monolayer Disruption and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Replication: Implications for the Sexual Transmission of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Guenthner, Patricia C.; Secor, W. Evan; Dezzutti, Charlene S.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate potential mechanisms of Trichomonas vaginalis involvement in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission. Polarized monolayer integrity of primary cervical and prostate epithelial cells or cell lines cultured with T. vaginalis was measured by monitoring transepithelium resistance. The effect of T. vaginalis isolates on HIV-1 passage through polarized epithelial cell monolayers was evaluated for HIV-1 p24gag in the basolateral supernatants. Coincubation with T. vaginalis isolates induced disruption of monolayer integrity and resulted in passage of virus to the basolateral side of the monolayer. Furthermore, there was isolate variability in which two isolates induced greater monolayer damage and increased HIV-1 passage than did the other two isolates. Coincubation of T. vaginalis isolates with acutely HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells enhanced HIV-1 replication. This enhancement was associated with cellular proliferation and activation, as well as with tumor necrosis factor alpha production. In contrast to the monolayer disruption, the effect of T. vaginalis on HIV-1 replication was not isolate dependent. Thus, two mechanisms have been identified that could contribute to the epidemiologic association of trichomoniasis with the sexual transmission of HIV-1. (i) T. vaginalis disruption of urogenital epithelial monolayers could facilitate passage of HIV-1 to underlying layers. (ii) Activation of local immune cells by T. vaginalis in the presence of infectious HIV-1 might lead to increased viral replication. Collectively, these data suggest the need for more vigilant efforts in the diagnosis and treatment of T. vaginalis in women and men, especially in countries with a high prevalence of HIV-1. PMID:15972505

  13. Trichomonas vaginalis-induced epithelial monolayer disruption and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication: implications for the sexual transmission of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, Patricia C; Secor, W Evan; Dezzutti, Charlene S

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate potential mechanisms of Trichomonas vaginalis involvement in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission. Polarized monolayer integrity of primary cervical and prostate epithelial cells or cell lines cultured with T. vaginalis was measured by monitoring transepithelium resistance. The effect of T. vaginalis isolates on HIV-1 passage through polarized epithelial cell monolayers was evaluated for HIV-1 p24gag in the basolateral supernatants. Coincubation with T. vaginalis isolates induced disruption of monolayer integrity and resulted in passage of virus to the basolateral side of the monolayer. Furthermore, there was isolate variability in which two isolates induced greater monolayer damage and increased HIV-1 passage than did the other two isolates. Coincubation of T. vaginalis isolates with acutely HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells enhanced HIV-1 replication. This enhancement was associated with cellular proliferation and activation, as well as with tumor necrosis factor alpha production. In contrast to the monolayer disruption, the effect of T. vaginalis on HIV-1 replication was not isolate dependent. Thus, two mechanisms have been identified that could contribute to the epidemiologic association of trichomoniasis with the sexual transmission of HIV-1. (i) T. vaginalis disruption of urogenital epithelial monolayers could facilitate passage of HIV-1 to underlying layers. (ii) Activation of local immune cells by T. vaginalis in the presence of infectious HIV-1 might lead to increased viral replication. Collectively, these data suggest the need for more vigilant efforts in the diagnosis and treatment of T. vaginalis in women and men, especially in countries with a high prevalence of HIV-1.

  14. Recombinant multi-epitope vaccine induce predefined epitope-specific antibodies against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Liu, Zu-Qiang; Ding, Jian; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2002-11-01

    Monoclonal antibody 2F5 recognizing ELDKWA-epitope on HIV-1 gp41 has significant neutralization potency against 90% of the investigated viruses of African, Asia, American and European strains, but antibodies responses to ELDKWA-epitope in HIV-1 infected individuals were very low. Based on the epitope-vaccine strategy suggested by us, a recombinant glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein (GST-MELDKWAGELDKWAGELDKWAVDIGPGRAFYGPGRAFYGPGRAFY) as vaccine antigen containing three repeats of neutralizing epitope ELDKWA on gp41 and GPGRAFY on gp120 was designed and expressed in Escherichia coli. After vaccination course, the recombinant multi-epitope vaccine could induce high levels of predefined multi-epitope-specific antibodies in mice. These antibodies in sera could bind to both neutralizing epitopes on gp41 peptide, V3 loop peptide and recombinant soluble gp41 (aa539-684) in ELISA assay (antisera dilution: 1:1,600-25,600), while normal sera did not. Moreover, these antibodies in sera could recognize the CHO-WT cells which expressed HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein on the cell surfaces, indicating that the predefined epitope-specific antibodies could recognize natural envelope protein of HIV-1 though these antibodies were induced by recombinant multi-epitope-vaccine. These experimental results suggested a possible way to develop recombinant multi-epitope vaccine inducing multi-antiviral activities against HIV-1.

  15. Protein Primary Structure of the Vaccinia Virion at Increased Resolution

    PubMed

    Ngo, Tuan; Mirzakhanyan, Yeva; Moussatche, Nissin; Gershon, Paul David

    2016-11-01

    Here we examine the protein covalent structure of the vaccinia virus virion. Within two virion preparations, >88% of the theoretical vaccinia virus-encoded proteome was detected with high confidence, including the first detection of products from 27 open reading frames (ORFs) previously designated "predicted," "uncharacterized," "inferred," or "hypothetical" polypeptides containing as few as 39 amino acids (aa) and six proteins whose detection required nontryptic proteolysis. We also detected the expression of four short ORFs, each of which was located within an ORF ("ORF-within-ORF"), including one not previously recognized or known to be expressed. Using quantitative mass spectrometry (MS), between 58 and 74 proteins were determined to be packaged. A total of 63 host proteins were also identified as candidates for packaging. Evidence is provided that some portion of virion proteins are "nicked" via a combination of endoproteolysis and concerted exoproteolysis in a manner, and at sites, independent of virus origin or laboratory procedures. The size of the characterized virion phosphoproteome was doubled from 189 (J. Matson, W. Chou, T. Ngo, and P. D. Gershon, Virology 452-453:310-323, 2014, doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virol.2014.01.012) to 396 confident, unique phosphorylation sites, 268 of which were within the packaged proteome. This included the unambiguous identification of phosphorylation "hot spots" within virion proteins. Using isotopically enriched ATP, 23 sites of intravirion kinase phosphorylation were detected within nine virion proteins, all at sites already partially occupied within the virion preparations. The clear phosphorylation of proteins RAP94 and RP19 was consistent with the roles of these proteins in intravirion early gene transcription. In a blind search for protein modifications, cysteine glutathionylation and O-linked glycosylation featured prominently. We provide evidence for the phosphoglycosylation of vaccinia virus proteins.

  16. Importance of Autophagy in Mediating Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Morphine-Induced Metabolic Dysfunction and Inflammation in Human Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Myosotys; Estrada-Bueno, Hary; Dever, Seth M.; Gewirtz, David A.; Kashanchi, Fatah; El-Hage, Nazira

    2017-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, the function of astrocytes in providing brain metabolic support is compromised under pathophysiological conditions caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and opioids. Herein, we examined the role of autophagy, a lysosomal degradation pathway important for cellular homeostasis and survival, as a potential regulatory mechanism during pathophysiological conditions in primary human astrocytes. Blocking autophagy with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting BECN1, but not the Autophagy-related 5 (ATG5) gene, caused a significant decrease in HIV and morphine-induced intracellular calcium release. On the contrary, inducing autophagy pharmacologically with rapamycin further enhanced calcium release and significantly reverted HIV and morphine-decreased glutamate uptake. Furthermore, siBeclin1 caused an increase in HIV-induced nitric oxide (NO) release, while viral-induced NO in astrocytes exposed to rapamycin was decreased. HIV replication was significantly attenuated in astrocytes transfected with siRNA while significantly induced in astrocytes exposed to rapamycin. Silencing with siBeclin1, but not siATG5, caused a significant decrease in HIV and morphine-induced interleukin (IL)-8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) release, while secretion of IL-8 was significantly induced with rapamycin. Mechanistically, the effects of siBeclin1 in decreasing HIV-induced calcium release, viral replication, and viral-induced cytokine secretion were associated with a decrease in activation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway. PMID:28788100

  17. Herpes simplex virus VP16 forms a complex with the virion host shutoff protein vhs.

    PubMed Central

    Smibert, C A; Popova, B; Xiao, P; Capone, J P; Smiley, J R

    1994-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) virions contain at least two regulatory proteins that modulate gene expression in infected cells: the transcriptional activator VP16 and the virion host shutoff protein vhs. VP16 stimulates transcription of the HSV immediate-early genes, and vhs suppresses host protein synthesis and induces accelerated turnover of cellular and viral mRNAs. We report here that vhs binds directly to VP16: vhs and VP16 were coprecipitated from infected cells by an anti-vhs antiserum, and vhs and VP16 protein A fusions each bound intact versions of the other protein in a solid-phase capture assay. In addition, vhs and VP16 interacted in the two-hybrid activator system when coexpressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. vhs residues 238 to 344 were sufficient for the interaction, and the VP16 acidic transcriptional activation domain was not required. vhs blocked the ability of VP16 to enter a multiprotein complex on an immediate-early TAATGARATTC consensus sequence, indicating that vhs interacts with one or more regions of VP16 required for promoter recognition. We suggest that this interaction may play a structural role in the assembly of HSV virions and modulate the activity of vhs during infection. Images PMID:8139019

  18. The Envelope Gene of Transmitted HIV-1 Resists a Late Interferon Gamma-Induced Block

    PubMed Central

    Rihn, Suzannah J.; Foster, Toshana L.; Busnadiego, Idoia; Aziz, Muhamad Afiq; Hughes, Joseph; Neil, Stuart J. D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type I interferon (IFN) signaling engenders an antiviral state that likely plays an important role in constraining HIV-1 transmission and contributes to defining subsequent AIDS pathogenesis. Type II IFN (IFN-γ) also induces an antiviral state but is often primarily considered to be an immunomodulatory cytokine. We report that IFN-γ stimulation can induce an antiviral state that can be both distinct from that of type I interferon and can potently inhibit HIV-1 in primary CD4+ T cells and a number of human cell lines. Strikingly, we find that transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1 viruses can resist a late block that is induced by type II IFN, and the use of chimeric IFN-γ-sensitive/resistant viruses indicates that interferon resistance maps to the env gene. Simultaneously, in vitro evolution also revealed that just a single amino acid substitution in the envelope can confer substantial resistance to IFN-mediated inhibition. Thus, the env gene of transmitted HIV-1 confers resistance to a late block that is phenotypically distinct from blocks previously described to be resisted by env and is therefore mediated by unknown IFN-γ-stimulated factor(s) in human CD4+ T cells and cell lines. This important unidentified block could play a key role in constraining HIV-1 transmission. IMPORTANCE The human immune system can hinder invading pathogens through interferon (IFN) signaling. One consequence of this signaling is that cells enter an antiviral state, increasing the levels of hundreds of defenses that can inhibit the replication and spread of viruses. The majority of HIV-1 infections result from a single virus particle (the transmitted/founder) that makes it past these defenses and colonizes the host. Thus, the founder virus is hypothesized to be a relatively interferon-resistant entity. Here, we show that certain HIV-1 envelope genes have the unanticipated ability to resist specific human defenses mediated by different types of interferons. Strikingly, the envelope

  19. Endotoxin-induced cytokine and chemokine expression in the HIV-1 transgenic rat

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Repeated exposure to a low dose of a bacterial endotoxin such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) causes immune cells to become refractory to a subsequent endotoxin challenge, a phenomenon known as endotoxin tolerance (ET). During ET, there is an imbalance in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, leading to a dysregulated immune response. HIV-1 viral proteins are known to have an adverse effect on the immune system. However, the effects of HIV-1 viral proteins during ET have not been investigated. Methods In this study, HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg) rats and control F344 rats (n = 12 ea) were randomly treated with 2 non-pyrogenic doses of LPS (LL) to induce ET, or saline (SS), followed by a high challenge dose of LPS (LL+L, SS+L) or saline (LL+S, SS+S). The gene expression of 84 cytokines, chemokines, and their receptors in the brain and spleen was examined by relative quantitative PCR using a PCR array, and protein levels in the brain, spleen, and serum of 7 of these 84 genes was determined using an electrochemiluminescent assay. Results In the spleen, there was an increase in key pro-inflammatory (IL1α, IL-1β, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines, and inflammatory chemokines (Ccl2, Ccl7, and Ccl9,) in response to LPS in the SS+L and LL+L (ET) groups of both the HIV-1Tg and F344 rats, but was greater in the HIV-1Tg rats than in the F344. In the ET HIV-1Tg and F344 (LL+L) rats in the spleen, the LPS-induced increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines was diminished and that of the anti-inflammatory cytokine was enhanced compared to the SS+L group rats. In the brain, IL-1β, as well as the Ccl2, Ccl3, and Ccl7 chemokines were increased to a greater extent in the HIV-1Tg rats compared to the F344; whereas Cxcl1, Cxcl10, and Cxcl11 were increased to a greater extent in the F344 rats compared to the HIV-1Tg rats in the LL+L and SS+L groups. Conclusion Our data indicate that the continuous presence of HIV-1 viral proteins can have tissue

  20. HIV-1 Vpr potently induces programmed cell death in the CNS in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaodong; Cheng, Xiandong; Mukhtar, Muhammad; Acheampong, Edward A; Srinivasan, Algarsamy; Rafi, Mohammad; Pomerantz, Roger J; Parveen, Zahida

    2007-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) accessory protein Vpr has been associated with the induction of programmed cell death (apoptosis) and cell-cycle arrest. Studies have shown the apoptotic effect of Vpr on primary and established cell lines and on diverse tissues including the central nervous system (CNS) in vitro. However, the relevance of the effect of Vpr observed in vitro to HIV-1 neuropathogenesis in vivo, remains unknown. Due to the narrow host range of HIV-1 infection, no animal model is currently available. This has prompted us to consider a small animal model to evaluate the effects of Vpr on CNS in vivo through surrogate viruses expressing HIV-1Vpr. A single round of replication competent viral vectors, expressing Vpr, were used to investigate the apoptosis-inducing capabilities of HIV-1Vpr in vivo. Viral particles pseudotyped with VSV-G or N2c envelopes were generated from spleen necrosis virus (SNV) and HIV-1-based vectors to transduce CNS cells. The in vitro studies have demonstrated that Vpr generated by SNV vectors had less apoptotic effects on CNS cells compared with Vpr expressed by HIV-1 vectors. The in vivo study has suggested that viral particles, expressing Vpr generated by HIV-1-based vectors, when delivered through the ventricle, caused loss of neurons and dendritic processes in the cortical region. The apoptotic effect was extended beyond the cortical region and affected the hippocampus neurons, the lining of the choroids plexus, and the cerebellum. However, the effect of Vpr, when delivered through the cortex, showed neuronal damage only around the site of injection. Interestingly, the number of apoptotic neurons were significantly higher with HIV-1 vectors expressing Vpr than by the SNV vectors. This may be due to the differences in the proteins expressed by these viral vectors. These results suggest that Vpr induces apoptosis in CNS cells in vitro and in vivo. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the

  1. Teriflunomide and monomethylfumarate target HIV-induced neuroinflammation and neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ambrosius, Björn; Faissner, Simon; Guse, Kirsten; von Lehe, Marec; Grunwald, Thomas; Gold, Ralf; Grewe, Bastian; Chan, Andrew

    2017-03-11

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) affect about 50% of infected patients despite combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). Ongoing compartmentalized inflammation mediated by microglia which are activated by HIV-infected monocytes has been postulated to contribute to neurotoxicity independent from viral replication. Here, we investigated effects of teriflunomide and monomethylfumarate on monocyte/microglial activation and neurotoxicity. Human monocytoid cells (U937) transduced with a minimal HIV-Vector were co-cultured with human microglial cells (HMC3). Secretion of pro-inflammatory/neurotoxic cytokines (CXCL10, CCL5, and CCL2: p < 0.001; IL-6: p < 0.01) by co-cultures was strongly increased compared to microglia in contact with HIV-particles alone. Upon treatment with teriflunomide, cytokine secretion was decreased (CXCL10, 3-fold; CCL2, 2.5-fold; IL-6, 2.2-fold; p < 0.001) and monomethylfumarate treatment led to 2.9-fold lower CXCL10 secretion (p < 0.001). Reduced toxicity of co-culture conditioned media on human fetal neurons by teriflunomide (29%, p < 0.01) and monomethylfumarate (27%, p < 0.05) indicated functional relevance. Modulation of innate immune functions by teriflunomide and monomethylfumarate may target neurotoxic inflammation in the context of HAND.

  2. Stepping toward a Macaque Model of HIV-1 Induced AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Kimata, Jason T.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 exhibits a narrow host range, hindering the development of a robust animal model of pathogenesis. Past studies have demonstrated that the restricted host range of HIV-1 may be largely due to the inability of the virus to antagonize and evade effector molecules of the interferon response in other species. They have also guided the engineering of HIV-1 clones that can replicate in CD4 T-cells of Asian macaque species. However, while replication of these viruses in macaque hosts is persistent, it has been limited and without progression to AIDS. In a new study, Hatziioannou et al., demonstrate for the first time that adapted macaque-tropic HIV-1 can persistently replicate at high levels in pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina), but only if CD8 T-cells are depleted at the time of inoculation. The infection causes rapid disease and recapitulates several aspects of AIDS in humans. Additionally, the virus undergoes genetic changes to further escape innate immunity in association with disease progression. Here, the importance of these findings is discussed, as they relate to pathogenesis and model development. PMID:25256394

  3. The role of autophagy in THP-1 macrophages resistance to HIV- vpr-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hua-Ying; Zheng, Yu-Huang; He, Yan; Chen, Zi; He, Bo

    2017-02-01

    Macrophages are resistant to cell death and are one of HIV reservoirs. HIV viral protein Vpr has the potential to promote infection of and survival of macrophages, which could be a highly significant factor in the development and/or maintenance of macrophage viral reservoirs. However, the impact of vpr on macrophages resistance to apoptosis is yet to be comprehended. Autophagy is a cell survival mechanism under stress state. In this study, we investigated whether autophagy is involved in macrophages resistant to vpr-induced apoptosis. Using the THP1 macrophages, we studied the interconnection between macrophages resistance to apoptosis and autophagy. We found that vpr is able to trigger autophagy in transfected THP-1 macrophages confirmed by electron microscopy (EM) and western blot analysis, and inhibition of autophagy with 3MA increased vpr-induced apoptosis. The results indicate that autophagy may be responsible for maintenance of macrophage HIV reservoirs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Induced Degradation of Tat by Nucleocapsid (NC) via the Proteasome Pathway and Its Effect on HIV Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hye-Won; Lee, Seong-Wook; Myung, Heejoon

    2013-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV-1 Tat protein upregulates transcriptional transactivation. The nucleocapsid protein NC of HIV-1 is a component of virion and plays a key role in genome packaging. Herein, we have demonstrated the interaction between NC and Tat by means of a yeast two-hybrid assay, GST pull-down analysis, co-immunoprecipitation and subcellular colocalization analysis. We observed that the level of Tat was significantly reduced in the presence of NC. But NC did not affect mRNA expression level of Tat. The level of Tat in the presence of NC was increased by treating cells with a proteasome inhibitor, MG132. The ubiquitination state of Tat was not seen to increase in the presence of NC, suggesting the proteasomal degradation was independent of ubiquitination. Lowered level of Tat in the presence of NC led to a decrease in Tat-mediated transcriptional transactivation. PMID:23611845

  5. miR-34a is a common link in both HIV- and antiretroviral therapy-induced vascular aging

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lili; Hu, Xiamin; Zhou, Jun; Sun, Yeying; Yang, Jian; Liu, Ying; Wang, Zunzhe; Tan, Ning; Chen, Jiyan; Zhang, Chunxiang

    2016-01-01

    Both HIV and antiretroviral therapy could induce vascular aging with unclear mechanisms. In this study, via microarray analysis, we identified, for the first time, that miR-34a expression was significantly increased in both HIV-infected, and antiretroviral agents-treated vessels and vascular endothelial cells (ECs) from these vessels. In cultured ECs, miR-34a expression was significantly increased by HIV-Tat protein and by the antiretroviral agents, lopinavir/ritonavir. Both HIV-Tat protein and antiretroviral agents could induce EC senescence, which was inhibited by miR-34a inhibition. In contrast, EC senescence was exacerbated by miR-34a overexpression. In addition, the vascular ECs isolated from miR-34a knockout mice were resistant to HIV and antiretroviral agents-mediated senescence. In vivo, miR-34a expression in mouse vascular walls and their ECs was increased by antiretroviral therapy and by HIV-1 Tat transgenic approach. miR-34a inhibition could effectively inhibit both HIV-Tat protein and antiretroviral therapy-induced vascular aging in mice. The increased miR-34a was induced via p53, whereas Sirt1 was a downstream target gene of miR-34a in both HIV-Tat protein and antiretroviral agents-treated ECs and vessels. The study has demonstrated that miR-34a is a common link in both HIV and antiretroviral therapy-mediated vascular aging. PMID:27889708

  6. MSM ameliorates HIV-1 Tat induced neuronal oxidative stress via rebalance of the glutathione cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seol-hee; Smith, Adam J; Tan, Jun; Shytle, R Douglas; Giunta, Brian

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat protein is a key neuropathological element in HIV associated neurogcognitive disorders (HAND); a type of cognitive syndrome thought to be at least partially mediated by increased levels of brain reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a sulfur-containing compound known to reduce oxidative stress. This study was conducted to determine whether administration of MSM attenuates HIV-1 Tat induced oxidative stress in mouse neuronal cells. MSM treatment significantly decreased neuronal cell NO and ROS secretion. Further, MSM significantly reversed HIV-1 Tat mediated reductions in reduced glutathione (GSH) as well as HIV-1 Tat mediated increases in oxidized glutathione (GSSG). In addition, Tat reduced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a key nuclear promoter of antioxidant activity, while MSM increased its translocation to the nucleus in the presence of Tat. These results suggest that HIV-1 Tat reduces the resiliency of neuron cells to oxidative stress which can be reversed by MSM. Given the clinical safety of MSM, future preclinical in vivo studies will be required to further confirm these results in effort to validate MSM as a neuroprotectant in patients at risk of, or who are already diagnosed with, HAND. PMID:25893035

  7. HIV-1 Vpr Protein Induces Proteasomal Degradation of Chromatin-associated Class I HDACs to Overcome Latent Infection of Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Romani, Bizhan; Baygloo, Nima Shaykh; Hamidi-Fard, Mojtaba; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Allahbakhshi, Elham

    2016-02-05

    Mechanisms underlying HIV-1 latency remain among the most crucial questions that need to be answered to adopt strategies for purging the latent viral reservoirs. Here we show that HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr induces depletion of class I HDACs, including HDAC1, 2, 3, and 8, to overcome latency in macrophages. We found that Vpr binds and depletes chromatin-associated class I HDACs through a VprBP-dependent mechanism, with HDAC3 as the most affected class I HDAC. De novo expression of Vpr in infected macrophages induced depletion of HDAC1 and 3 on the HIV-1 LTR that was associated with hyperacetylation of histones on the HIV-1 LTR. As a result of hyperacetylation of histones on HIV-1 promotor, the virus established an active promotor and this contributed to the acute infection of macrophages. Collectively, HIV-1 Vpr down-regulates class I HDACs on chromatin to counteract latent infections of macrophages.

  8. HIV infection does not prevent the metabolic benefits of diet-induced weight loss in women with obesity.

    PubMed

    Reeds, Dominic N; Pietka, Terri A; Yarasheski, Kevin E; Cade, W Todd; Patterson, Bruce W; Okunade, Adewole; Abumrad, Nada A; Klein, Samuel

    2017-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that HIV infection impairs the beneficial effects of weight loss on insulin sensitivity, adipose tissue inflammation, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. A prospective clinical trial evaluated the effects of moderate diet-induced weight loss on body composition, metabolic function, and adipose tissue biology in women with obesity who were HIV-seronegative (HIV-) or HIV-positive (HIV+). Body composition, multiorgan insulin sensitivity (assessed by using a two-stage hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure with stable isotopically labeled tracer infusions), and adipose tissue expression of markers of inflammation, autophagy, and ER stress were evaluated in 8 HIV- and 20 HIV+ women with obesity before and after diet-induced weight loss of 6% to 8%. Although weight loss was not different between groups (∼7.5%), the decrease in fat-free mass was greater in HIV+ than HIV- subjects (-4.4 ± 0.7% vs. -1.7 ± 1.0%, P < 0.05). Weight loss improved insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue (suppression of palmitate rate of appearance [Ra]), liver (suppression of glucose Ra), and muscle (glucose disposal) similarly in both groups. Weight loss did not affect adipose tissue expression of markers of inflammation or ER stress in either group. Moderate diet-induced weight loss improves multiorgan insulin sensitivity in HIV+ women to the same extent as women who are HIV-. However, weight loss causes a greater decline in fat-free mass in HIV+ than HIV- women. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  9. HIV DNA-Adenovirus Multiclade Envelope Vaccine Induces Gp41 Antibody Immunodominance in Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Han, Qifeng; Williams, Wilton B; Saunders, Kevin O; Seaton, Kelly E; Wiehe, Kevin J; Vandergrift, Nathan; Von Holle, Tarra; Trama, Ashley M; Parks, Robert J; Luo, Kan; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Kepler, Thomas B; Marshall, Dawn J; Montefiori, David C; Sutherland, Laura L; Alam, Munir S; Whitesides, John F; Bowman, Cindy; Permar, Sallie R; Graham, Barney S; Mascola, John R; Seed, Patrick C; Van Rompay, Koen K A; Tomaras, Georgia D; Moody, Michael A; Haynes, Barton F

    2017-08-09

    Dominant antibody responses in vaccinees who received the multiclade (A, B and C) envelope (Env) DNA/rAd5 vaccine studied in the HIV-1 vaccine trials network (HVTN) efficacy trial 505 (HVTN 505), targeted Env gp41 and cross-reacted with microbial antigens. In this study, we asked if the DNA/rAd5 vaccine induced a similar antibody response in rhesus macaques (RMs) that are commonly used as an animal model for human HIV-1 infections and for testing candidate HIV-1 vaccines. We also asked if gp41 immunodominance could be avoided by immunization of neonatal RMs during the early stages of microbial colonization. We found that the DNA/rAd5 vaccine elicited a higher frequency of gp41-reactive memory B cells compared to gp120-memory B cells in adult and neonatal RMs. Analysis of the vaccine-induced Env-reactive B cell repertoire revealed that the majority of HIV-1 Env-reactive antibodies in both adult and neonatal RMs were targeted to gp41. Interestingly, a subset of gp41-reactive antibodies isolated from RMs cross-reacted with host antigens, including autologous intestinal microbiota. Thus, gp41-containing DNA/rAd5 vaccine induced dominant gp41-microbiota cross-reactive antibodies derived from blood memory B cells in RMs as observed in the HVTN 505 efficacy trial. These data demonstrated that RMs can be used to investigate the gp41 immunodominance in candidate HIV-1 vaccines. Moreover, colonization of neonatal RMs occurred within the first week of life, and immunization of neonatal RMs during this time also induced a dominant gp41-reactive antibody response.IMPORTANCE Our results are critical to current work in the HIV-1 vaccine field evaluating the phenomenon of gp41 immunodominance induced by HIV-1 Env gp140 in RMs and humans. Our data demonstrate that RMs are an appropriate animal model to study this phenomenon and to determine the immunogenicity in new HIV-1 Env trimer vaccine designs. The demonstration of gp41 immunodominance in memory B cells of both adult and

  10. CD4- and dynamin-dependent endocytosis of HIV-1 into plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pritschet, Kathrin; Donhauser, Norbert; Schuster, Philipp; Ries, Moritz; Haupt, Sabrina; Kittan, Nicolai A.; Korn, Klaus; Poehlmann, Stefan; Holland, Gudrun; Bannert, Norbert; Bogner, Elke; Schmidt, Barbara

    2012-02-20

    Chronic immune activation, triggered by plasmacytoid dendritic cell (PDC) interferon (IFN)-alpha production, plays an important role in HIV-1 pathogenesis. As the entry of HIV-1 seems to be important for the activation of PDC, we directly characterized the viral entry into these cells using immuno-electron microscopy, cellular fractionation, confocal imaging, and functional experiments. After attachment to PDC, viruses were taken up in an energy-dependent manner. The virions were located in compartments positive for caveolin; early endosomal antigen 1; Rab GTPases 5, 7 and 9; lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1. PDC harbored more virus in endocytic vesicles than CD4+ T cells (p < 0.05). Blocking CD4 inhibited the uptake of virions into cytosolic and endosomal compartments. Dynasore, an inhibitor of dynamin-dependent endocytosis, not the fusion inhibitor T-20, reduced the HIV-1 induced IFN-alpha production. Altogether, our morphological and functional data support the role of endocytosis for the entry and IFN-alpha induction of HIV-1 in PDC.

  11. HIV enteropathy: crypt stem and transit cell hyperproliferation induces villous atrophy in HIV/Microsporidia-infected jejunal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Batman, Philip A; Kotler, Donald P; Kapembwa, Moses S; Booth, Dawn; Potten, Christopher S; Orenstein, Jan M; Scally, Andrew J; Griffin, George E

    2007-02-19

    The study aim was to analyse the kinetics of stem and transit cells in the crypts of jejunal mucosa infected with HIV and Microsporidia. The size of villi, depth of crypts and proliferative activity of transit and stem cells in jejunal mucosa were measured using morphometric techniques. The surface area/volume ratio (S/V) of jejunal biopsies was estimated under light microscopy using a Weibel graticule. Crypt length was measured by counting enterocytes along the crypt side from the base to the villus junction, and the mean crypt length was calculated. The S/V and crypt lengths of the jejunal mucosa of 21 HIV and Microsporidia-infected test cases were compared with 14 control cases. The labelling index in relation to the crypt cell position of 10 of the test cases was analysed compared with 13 control cases. Differences were found in the S/V and crypt length, and there was a negative correlation between S/V and crypt length in test and control cases combined. Cell labelling indices fell into low and high proliferation groups. There were significant differences in labelling indices between low proliferation test cases and controls, between high proliferation test cases and controls, and between high and low proliferation test cases. Villous atrophy induced by HIV and Microsporidia is attributed to crypt cell hyperplasia and the encroachment of crypt cells onto villi. These infections induce crypt hypertrophy by stimulating cell mitosis predominantly in transit cells but also in stem cells. Increased stem cell proliferation occurs only in high proliferation cases.

  12. Retroviral env glycoprotein trafficking and incorporation into virions.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Together with the Gag protein, the Env glycoprotein is a major retroviral structural protein and is essential for forming infectious virus particles. Env is synthesized, processed, and transported to certain microdomains at the plasma membrane and takes advantage of the same host machinery for its trafficking as that used by cellular glycoproteins. Incorporation of Env into progeny virions is probably mediated by the interaction between Env and Gag, in some cases with the additional involvement of certain host factors. Although several general models have been proposed to explain the incorporation of retroviral Env glycoproteins into virions, the actual mechanism for this process is still unclear, partly because structural data on the Env protein cytoplasmic tail is lacking. This paper presents the current understanding of the synthesis, trafficking, and virion incorporation of retroviral Env proteins.

  13. Incorporation of Spike and Membrane Glycoproteins into Coronavirus Virions

    PubMed Central

    Ujike, Makoto; Taguchi, Fumihiro

    2015-01-01

    The envelopes of coronaviruses (CoVs) contain primarily three proteins; the two major glycoproteins spike (S) and membrane (M), and envelope (E), a non-glycosylated protein. Unlike other enveloped viruses, CoVs bud and assemble at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC). For efficient virion assembly, these proteins must be targeted to the budding site and to interact with each other or the ribonucleoprotein. Thus, the efficient incorporation of viral envelope proteins into CoV virions depends on protein trafficking and protein–protein interactions near the ERGIC. The goal of this review is to summarize recent findings on the mechanism of incorporation of the M and S glycoproteins into the CoV virion, focusing on protein trafficking and protein–protein interactions. PMID:25855243

  14. Hog cholera virus: molecular composition of virions from a pestivirus.

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, H J; Stark, R; Weiland, E; Rümenapf, T; Meyers, G

    1991-01-01

    Virions from hog cholera virus (HCV), a member of the genus Pestivirus, were analyzed by using specific antibodies. The nucleocapsid protein was found to be a 14-kDa molecule (HCV p14). An equivalent protein could also be demonstrated for virions from another pestivirus, bovine viral diarrhea virus. The HCV envelope is composed of three glycoproteins, HCV gp44/48, gp33, and gp55. All three exist in the form of disulfide-linked dimers in virus-infected cells and in virions; HCV gp44/48 and gp55 each form homodimers, whereas gp55 is also found dimerized with gp33. Such complex covalent interactions between structural glycoproteins have not been described so far for any RNA virus. Images PMID:1870198

  15. RNAs in the virion of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, Jill; Grundhoff, Adam; Ganem, Don

    2005-08-01

    De novo infection of cultured cells with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) typically results in a latent infection. Recently, however, it has been reported that a subset of lytic mRNAs can be detected in cells shortly after KSHV infection; this expression is transient and eventually subsides, leading to latent infection (H. H. Krishnan et al., J. Virol 78:3601-3620, 2004). Since it has been shown that viral RNAs can be packaged into other herpesvirus virions, we sought to determine if KSHV virions contained RNAs and, if so, whether these RNAs contributed to the pool of lytic transcripts detected immediately after infection. Using DNA microarray, reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, and Northern blotting analyses, we identified 11 virally encoded RNAs in KSHV virions. These corresponded in size to the full-length mRNAs found in cytoplasmic RNA, and at least one was directly demonstrated to be translated upon infection in the presence of actinomycin D. Ten of these RNAs correspond to transcripts reported by Krishnan et al. at early times of infection, representing ca. 30% of such RNAs. Thus, import of RNAs in virions can account for some but not all of the early-appearing lytic transcripts. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of infected-cell RNA demonstrated that most of the virion RNAs were very abundant at late times of infection, consistent with nonspecific incorporation during budding. However, the intracellular levels of one virion mRNA, encoding the viral protease, were much lower than those of transcripts not packaged in the virus particle, strongly suggesting that it may be incorporated by a specific mechanism.

  16. Ribonucleic Acid Polymerase Activity in Sendai Virions and Nucleocapsid

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, William S.

    1971-01-01

    After dissociation of purified Sendai virus with the neutral detergent Nonidet P-40 and 2-mercaptoethanol, it catalyzed the incorporation of ribonucleoside triphosphates into an acid-insoluble product. The enzyme activity was associated with viral nucleocapsid as well as whole virions. The reaction product was ribonucleic acid (RNA) which annealed specifically with virion RNA. Sedimentation of the 3H-RNA reaction product revealed two components, a 45S component with properties of double-stranded RNA and 4 to 6S component which appeared to be mostly single-stranded RNA. PMID:4328418

  17. Inhibition of the receptor-mediated virion attachment to a lipid membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2012-10-01

    The forefront of the anti-viral defence is sometimes aimed at virion attachment to a host membrane. This step or, more specifically, virion contacts with cellular membrane receptors (or, e.g., glycolipids) can be inhibited by antibodies (or specially chosen or designed compounds) via their association with virions. In this case, the full-scale attachment of virions to a host membrane occurs via a subtle interplay of the formation and rupture of multiple virion-inhibitor and virion-receptor bonds. We present a kinetic model describing this interplay and illustrating general trends in the process under consideration.

  18. BCA2/Rabring7 Interferes with HIV-1 Proviral Transcription by Enhancing the SUMOylation of IκBα

    PubMed Central

    Colomer-Lluch, Marta

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT BCA2/Rabring7 is a BST2 cofactor that promotes the lysosomal degradation of trapped HIV-1 virions but also functions as a BST2-independent anti-HIV factor by targeting Gag for lysosomal degradation. Since many antiviral factors regulate the NF-κB innate signaling pathway, we investigated whether BCA2 is also connected to this proinflammatory cascade. Here, we show for the first time that BCA2 is induced by NF-κB-activating proinflammatory cytokines and that upregulation of BCA2 provides regulatory negative feedback on NF-κB. Specifically, BCA2 serves as an E3 SUMO ligase in the SUMOylation of IκBα, which in turn enhances the sequestration of NF-κB components in the cytoplasm. Since HIV-1 utilizes NF-κB to promote proviral transcription, the BCA2-mediated inhibition of NF-κB significantly decreases the transcriptional activity of HIV-1 (up to 4.4-fold in CD4+ T cells). Therefore, our findings indicate that BCA2 poses an additional barrier to HIV-1 infection: not only does BCA2 prevent assembly and release of nascent virions, it also significantly restricts HIV-1 transcription by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway. IMPORTANCE Understanding the interactions between HIV-1 and its host cells is highly relevant to the design of new drugs aimed at eliminating HIV-1 from infected individuals. We have previously shown that BCA2, a cofactor of BST2 in the restriction of HIV-1, also prevents virion assembly in a BST2-independent manner. In this study, we found that BCA2 negatively regulates the NF-κB pathway—a signaling cascade necessary for HIV-1 replication and infectivity—which in turn detrimentally affects proviral transcription and virus propagation. Thus, our results indicate that, besides its previously described functions as an antiviral factor, BCA2 poses an additional barrier to HIV-1 replication at the transcriptional level. PMID:28122985

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Vpr Induces Apoptosis through Caspase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Sheila A.; Poon, Betty; Song, Joo Y.; Chen, Irvin S. Y.

    2000-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vpr is a 96-amino-acid protein that is found associated with the HIV-1 virion. Vpr induces cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, and this arrest is followed by apoptosis. We examined the mechanism of Vpr-induced apoptosis and found that HIV-1 Vpr-induced apoptosis requires the activation of a number of cellular cysteinyl aspartate-specific proteases (caspases). We demonstrate that ectopic expression of anti-apoptotic viral proteins, which inhibit caspase activity, and addition of synthetic peptides, which represent caspase cleavage sites, can inhibit Vpr-induced apoptosis. Finally, inhibition of caspase activity and subsequent inhibition of apoptosis results in increased viral expression, suggesting that therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing Vpr-induced apoptosis in vivo require careful consideration. PMID:10708425

  20. Plasma Interferon-Gamma-Inducible Protein 10 Level Associates With Abnormal Memory B Cells Phenotypes in Perinatal HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Contreras, German A; Murphy, James R; Heresi, Gloria P

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate for perinatally HIV-infected children and adolescents receiving combined antiretroviral therapy and in good clinical status with respect to HIV disease that high concentrations of interferon-gamma-inducible protein 10 associate with increased exhausted memory B cells.

  1. Synergistic effect of combined HIV/HCV immunogens: a combined HIV-1/HCV candidate vaccine induces a higher level of CD8+ T cell-immune responses in HLA-A2.1 mice.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Ali; Ghorbani, Masoud; Soare, Catalina; Mojibian, Majid; Diaz-Mitoma, Francisco

    2007-03-01

    Dual infections with HIV-1 and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) may proceed in concert to cause severe disease. HIV positive individuals that become infected with HCV advance more rapidly to AIDS than those that are infected with HIV-1 alone. In this study, HLA-A2.1 mice were immunized with a combination vaccine including HIV and HCV immunogens (polycistronic DNA + proteins) or vaccine containing either HIV or HCV immunogens. Mice immunized with the combined HIV/HCV regimen had similar antibody titers as the group receiving either the HIV-1 or HCV only regimen. Proliferative immune responses showed that mice receiving the combined HIV/HCV vaccine exhibited a three fold higher stimulation index (SI) to gp120 than mice immunized with the vaccine containing HIV alone. To determine whether our vaccine strategy induced Th1 or Th2 immune responses, IFN-gamma and IL-4/IL-5 were measured. The combined HIV/HCV vaccine induced a higher level of Th1 responses to HIV-1 gag protein compared with the other groups, as measured by IFN-gamma production. Interestingly, detection of IFN-gamma by ELISPOT assay demonstrated that the combined HIV/HCV vaccine group had increased numbers of spot forming cells (SFC) to HIV-gp120 peptides when compared to that of the HIV-1 only vaccine group. The combined HIV/HCV vaccine group also showed an increase in SFC to HCV-core peptides in comparison with the group receiving the HCV only vaccine. Intracellular IFN-gamma staining confirmed the ELISPOT results and demonstrated that the combined HIV/HCV group had significantly higher percentages of HIV and HCV-specific CD8+ T cells in comparison to the groups receiving the HIV or HCV vaccines. These results suggest a new approach to maximize vaccine efficacy against HIV and HCV.

  2. During Infection, Theiler's Virions Are Cleaved by Caspases and Disassembled into Pentamers

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Sevim Yildiz; Son, Kyung-No

    2016-01-01

    spinal cord that undergo apoptosis and in turn may facilitate viral spread via infected apoptotic blebs. Infection of murine macrophages in culture results in restricted virus yields late in infection. Here it is shown that the early steps of the virus life cycle in infected macrophages in vitro do not differ from these processes in TMEV-infected BHK-21 cells, which undergo necroptosis. However, the findings late in infection suggest that caspases cleave sites in exposed capsid loops and possibly internal sites of assembled virions occurring contemporaneously with onset and progression of apoptosis. Mechanistically, this would explain the dramatic loss in virus yields during TMEV-induced apoptosis and attenuate the virus, enabling persistence. PMID:26792734

  3. A Wnt5a signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 gp120-induced pain.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Su-Bo; Ji, Guangchen; Li, Bei; Andersson, Tommy; Neugebauer, Volker; Tang, Shao-Jun

    2015-07-01

    Pathological pain is one of the most common neurological complications in patients with HIV-1/AIDS. However, the pathogenic process is unclear. Our recent studies show that Wnt5a is upregulated in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SDH) of the patients with HIV who develop pain and that HIV-1 gp120, a potential causal factor of the HIV-associated pain, rapidly upregulates Wnt5a in the mouse SDH. Using a mouse model, we show here that a specific Wnt5a antagonist, Box-5, attenuated gp120-induced mechanical allodynia. Conversely, a Wnt5a agonist, Foxy5, facilitated the allodynia. To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which Wnt5a regulates gp120-induced allodynia, we tested the role of the JNK/TNF-α pathway. We observed that the JNK-specific inhibitor SP600125 blocked either gp120- or Foxy5-induced allodynia. Similarly, the TNF-α-specific antagonist Enbrel also reversed either gp120- or Foxy5-induced allodynia. These data suggest that JNK and TNF-α mediate the biological effects of Wnt5a in regulating gp120-induced allodynia. To investigate the cellular mechanism, we performed extracellular single-unit recording from SDH neurons in anesthetized mice. Both Box-5 and SP600125 negated gp120-induced potentiation of SDH neuron spiking evoked by mechanical stimulation of the hind paw. Furthermore, while Foxy5 potentiated spike frequency of SDH neurons, either SP600125 or Enbrel blocked the potentiation. The data indicate that Wnt5a potentiates the activity of SDH neurons through the JNK-TNF-α pathway. Collectively, our findings suggest that Wnt5a regulates the pathogenesis of gp120-induced pain, likely by sensitizing pain-processing SDH neurons through JNK/TNF-α signaling.

  4. A Wnt5a signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 gp120-induced pain

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Su-Bo; Ji, Guangchen; Li, Bei; Andersson, Tommy; Neugebauer, Volker; Tang, Shao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Pathological pain is one of the most common neurological complications in HIV-1/AIDS patients. However, the pathogenic process is unclear. Our recent studies show that Wnt5a is up-regulated in the spinal cord dorsal horn of the HIV patients who develop pain and that HIV-1 gp120, a potential causal factor of the HIV-associated pain, rapidly up-regulates Wnt5a in the mouse SDH. Using a mouse model, we show here that a specific Wnt5a antagonist, Box-5, attenuated gp120-induced mechanical allodynia. Conversely, a Wnt5a agonist, Foxy5, facilitated the allodynia. To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which Wnt5a regulates gp120-induced allodynia, we tested the role of the JNK/TNF-α pathway. We observed that the JNK-specific inhibitor SP600125 blocked either gp120- or Foxy5-induced allodynia. Similarly, the TNF-α-specific antagonist Enbrel also reversed either gp120- or Foxy5-induced allodynia. These data suggest that JNK and TNF-α mediate the biological effects of Wnt5a in regulating gp120-induced allodynia. To investigate the cellular mechanism, we performed extracellular single-unit recording from SDH neurons in anesthetized mice. Both Box5 and SP600125 negated gp120-induced potentiation of SDH neuron spiking evoked by mechanical stimulation of the hindpaw. Furthermore, while Foxy5 potentiated spike frequency of SDH neurons, either SP600125 or Enbrel blocked the potentiation. The data indicate that Wnt5a potentiates the activity of SDH neurons via the JNK-TNF-α pathway. Collectively, our findings suggest that Wnt5a regulates the pathogenesis of gp120-induced pain, likely by sensitizing pain-processing SDH neurons via JNK/TNF-α signaling. PMID:25840108

  5. Mechanism of Human Influenza Virus RNA Persistence and Virion Survival in Feces: Mucus Protects Virions From Acid and Digestive Juices.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Ryohei; Nakaya, Takaaki; Naito, Yuji; Daidoji, Tomo; Watanabe, Yohei; Yasuda, Hiroaki; Konishi, Hideyuki; Itoh, Yoshito

    2017-07-01

    Although viral RNA or infectious virions have been detected in the feces of individuals infected with human influenza A and B viruses (IAV/IBV), the mechanism of viral survival in the gastrointestinal tract remains unclear. We developed a model that attempts to recapitulate the conditions encountered by a swallowed virus. While IAV/IBV are vulnerable to simulated digestive juices (gastric acid and bile/pancreatic juice), highly viscous mucus protects viral RNA and virions, allowing the virus to retain its infectivity. Our results suggest that virions and RNA present in swallowed mucus are not inactivated or degraded by the gastrointestinal environment, allowing their detection in feces. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The HIV-1 antisense protein (ASP) induces CD8 T cell responses during chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Bet, Anne; Maze, Emmanuel Atangana; Bansal, Anju; Sterrett, Sarah; Gross, Antoine; Graff-Dubois, Stéphanie; Samri, Assia; Guihot, Amélie; Katlama, Christine; Theodorou, Ioannis; Mesnard, Jean-Michel; Moris, Arnaud; Goepfert, Paul A; Cardinaud, Sylvain

    2015-02-10

    CD8+ T cells recognize HIV-1 epitopes translated from a gene's primary reading frame (F1) and any one of its five alternative reading frames (ARFs) in the forward (F2, F3) or reverse (R1-3) directions. The 3' end of HIV-1's proviral coding strand contains a conserved sequence that is directly overlapping but antiparallel to the env gene (ARF R2) and encodes for a putative antisense HIV-1 protein called ASP. ASP expression has been demonstrated in vitro using HIV-transfected cell lines or infected cells. Although antibodies to ASP were previously detected in patient sera, T cell recognition of ASP-derived epitopes has not been evaluated. We therefore investigated the ex vivo and in vitro induction of ASP-specific T cell responses as a measure of immune recognition and protein expression during HIV-1 infection. A panel of overlapping peptides was initially designed from the full-length ASP sequence to perform a global assessment of T cell responses. Recognition of ASP-derived antigens was evaluated in an IFN-γELISpot assay using PBMCs from HIV-1 seropositive and seronegative individuals. Eight of 25 patients had positive responses to ASP antigens and none of the seronegative donors responded. As a complimentary approach, a second set of antigens was designed using HLA-I binding motifs and affinities. Two ASP-derived peptides with high predicted binding affinities for HLA-A*02 (ASP-YL9) and HLA-B*07 (ASP-TL10) were tested using PBMCs from HIV-1 seropositive and seronegative individuals who expressed the matching HLA-I-restricting allele. We found that HLA-I-restricted ASP peptides were only recognized by CD8+ T cells from patients with the relevant HLA-I and did not induce responses in any of the seronegative donors or patients who do not express the restrictive HLA alleles. Further, ASP-YL9-specific CD8+ T cells had functional profiles that were similar to a previously described HLA-A*02-restricted epitope (Gag-SL9). Specific recognition of ASP-YL9 by CD8+ T cells

  7. Anti-Leu3a induces combining site-related anti-idiotypic antibody without inducing anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Reeves, J P; Buck, D; Berkower, I; Murphy, D; Epstein, S L

    1991-01-01

    Development of a vaccine for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has proven difficult, and so alternative approaches such as idiotypic manipulation have been suggested. As applied to AIDS, this approach could involve immunizing with an anti-CD4 antibody resembling gp120, to induce anti-idiotypic antibodies which would bind to gp120. The CD4 binding site on gp120 is conserved, and so, such an immune response should protect against all variants. Induction of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immunity has been reported using anti-Leu3a, and this result has led to testing in humans. Negative results obtained by others have been attributed to differences in immunization protocols. Because of the importance of this question, we reinvestigated the potential of anti-Leu3a to induce anti-HIV antibodies, compared with control immunizations with OKT4A (another anti-CD4 antibody) and the irrelevant Ig MOPC-21. Responses to anti-Leu3a showed induction of high-titer anti-idiotypic activity, and included combining-site-related activity. Yet sera showed no binding to gp160 above controls and no detectable neutralizing activity in a sensitive HIV plaque assay, so the anti-idiotypes induced were not internal images of CD4. We conclude that the pronounced anti-HIV responses reported with anti-Leu3a cannot be generalized, and thus that anti-Leu3a does not offer promise as an HIV vaccine. However, these results do not negate the promise of the idiotypic approach, and a vaccine for AIDS based on idiotype manipulation remains a possibility.

  8. DNA driven self-assembly of micron-sized rods using DNA-grafted bacteriophage fd virions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, R. R.; Cabanas, R. A.; Yanagishima, T.; Blower, T. R.; Takahashi, H.; Salmond, G. P. C.; Edwardson, J. M.; Fraden, S.; Eiser, E.

    We have functionalized the sides of fd bacteriophage virions with oligonucleotides to induce DNA hybridization driven self-assembly of high aspect ratio filamentous particles. Potential impacts of this new structure range from an entirely new building block in DNA origami structures, inclusion of virions in DNA nanostructures and nanomachines, to a new means of adding thermotropic control to lyotropic liquid crystal systems. A protocol for producing the virions in bulk is reviewed. Thiolated oligonucleotides are attached to the viral capsid using a heterobifunctional chemical linker. A commonly used system is utilized, where a sticky, single-stranded DNA strand is connected to an inert double-stranded spacer to increase inter-particle connectivity. Solutions of fd virions carrying complementary strands are mixed, annealed, and their aggregation is studied using dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence microscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Aggregation is clearly observed on cooling, with some degree of local order, and is reversible when temperature is cycled through the DNA hybridization transition.

  9. Recombinant influenza virus expressing HIV-1 p24 capsid protein induces mucosal HIV-specific CD8 T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hyon-Xhi; Gilbertson, Brad P; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Alcantara, Sheilajen; Amarasena, Thakshila; Stambas, John; McAuley, Julie L; Kent, Stephen J; De Rose, Robert

    2016-02-24

    Influenza viruses are promising mucosal vaccine vectors for HIV but their use has been limited by difficulties in engineering the expression of large amounts of foreign protein. We developed recombinant influenza viruses incorporating the HIV-1 p24 gag capsid into the NS-segment of PR8 (H1N1) and X31 (H3N2) influenza viruses with the use of multiple 2A ribosomal skip sequences. Despite the insertion of a sizable HIV-1 gene into the influenza genome, recombinant viruses were readily rescued to high titers. Intracellular expression of p24 capsid was confirmed by in vitro infection assays. The recombinant influenza viruses were subsequently tested as mucosal vaccines in BALB/c mice. Recombinant viruses were attenuated and safe in immunized mice. Systemic and mucosal HIV-specific CD8 T-cell responses were elicited in mice that were immunized via intranasal route with a prime-boost regimen. Isolated HIV-specific CD8 T-cells displayed polyfunctional cytokine and degranulation profiles. Mice boosted via intravaginal route induced recall responses from the distal lung mucosa and developed heightened HIV-specific CD8 T-cell responses in the vaginal mucosa. These findings demonstrate the potential utility of recombinant influenza viruses as vaccines for mucosal immunity against HIV-1 infection.

  10. Bacteriophage virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases: potential new enzybiotics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases (VAPGH) are phage-encoded lytic enzymes that locally degrade the peptidoglycan (PG) of the bacterial cell wall during infection. Their action usually generates a small hole through which the phage tail crosses the cell envelope to inject the phage genetic m...

  11. Cellular Immune Responses Induced with Dose-Sparing Intradermal Administration of HIV Vaccine to HIV-Uninfected Volunteers in the ANRS VAC16 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Launay, Odile; Durier, Christine; Desaint, Corinne; Silbermann, Benjamin; Jackson, Angela; Pialoux, Gilles; Bonnet, Bénédicte; Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Gonzalez-Canali, Gustavo; Cuzin, Lise; Figuereido, Suzanne; Surenaud, Mathieu; Hamouda, Nadine Ben; Gahery, Hanne; Choppin, Jeannine; Salmon, Dominique; Guérin, Corinne; Villada, Isabelle Bourgault; Guillet, Jean-Gérard

    2007-01-01

    Objective The objective was to compare the safety and cellular immunogenicity of intradermal versus intramuscular immunization with an HIV-lipopeptide candidate vaccine (LIPO-4) in healthy volunteers. Methodology A randomized, open-label trial with 24 weeks of follow-up was conducted in France at six HIV-vaccine trial sites. Sixty-eight healthy 21– to 55–year-old HIV-uninfected subjects were randomized to receive the LIPO-4 vaccine (four HIV lipopeptides linked to a T-helper–stimulating epitope of tetanus-toxin protein) at weeks 0, 4 and 12, either intradermally (0.1 ml, 100 µg of each peptide) or intramuscularly (0.5 ml, 500 µg of each peptide). Comparative safety of both routes was evaluated. CD8+ T-cell immune responses to HIV epitopes (ELISpot interferon-γ assay) and tetanus toxin-specific CD4+ T-cell responses (lymphoproliferation) were assessed at baseline, two weeks after each injection, and at week 24. Results and Conclusion No severe, serious or life-threatening adverse events were observed. Local pain was significantly more frequent after intramuscular injection, but local inflammatory reactions were more frequent after intradermal immunization. At weeks 2, 6, 14 and 24, the respective cumulative percentages of induced CD8+ T-cell responses to at least one HIV peptide were 9, 33, 39 and 52 (intradermal group) or 14, 20, 26 and 37 (intramuscular group), and induced tetanus toxin-specific CD4+ T-cell responses were 6, 27, 33 and 39 (intradermal), or 9, 46, 54 and 63 (intramuscular). In conclusion, intradermal LIPO-4 immunization was well tolerated, required one-fifth of the intramuscular dose, and induced similar HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. Moreover, the immunization route influenced which antigen-specific T-cells (CD4+ or CD8+) were induced. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00121121 PMID:17712402

  12. HIV-1-infected blood mononuclear cells form an integrin- and agrin-dependent viral synapse to induce efficient HIV-1 transcytosis across epithelial cell monolayer.

    PubMed

    Alfsen, Annette; Yu, Huifeng; Magérus-Chatinet, Aude; Schmitt, Alain; Bomsel, Morgane

    2005-09-01

    The heparan sulfate proteoglycan agrin and adhesion molecules are key players in the formation of neuronal and immune synapses that evolved for efficient communication at the sites of cell-cell contact. Transcytosis of infectious virus across epithelial cells upon contact between HIV-1-infected cells and the mucosal pole of the epithelial cells is one mechanism for HIV-1 entry at mucosal sites. In contrast, transcytosis of cell-free HIV-1 is not efficient. A synapse between HIV-1-infected cells and the mucosal epithelial surface that resembles neuronal and immune synapses is visualized by electron microscopy. We have termed this the "viral synapse." Similarities of the viral synapse also extend to the functional level. HIV-1-infected cell-induced transcytosis depends on RGD-dependent integrins and efficient cell-free virus transcytosis is inducible upon RGD-dependent integrin cross-linking. Agrin appears differentially expressed at the apical epithelial surface and acts as an HIV-1 attachment receptor. Envelope glycoprotein subunit gp41 binds specifically to agrin, reinforcing the interaction of gp41 to its epithelial receptor galactosyl ceramide.

  13. HIV-1-infected Blood Mononuclear Cells Form an Integrin- and Agrin-dependent Viral Synapse to Induce Efficient HIV-1 Transcytosis across Epithelial Cell Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Alfsen, Annette; Yu, Huifeng; Magérus-Chatinet, Aude; Schmitt, Alain; Bomsel, Morgane

    2005-01-01

    The heparan sulfate proteoglycan agrin and adhesion molecules are key players in the formation of neuronal and immune synapses that evolved for efficient communication at the sites of cell-cell contact. Transcytosis of infectious virus across epithelial cells upon contact between HIV-1-infected cells and the mucosal pole of the epithelial cells is one mechanism for HIV-1 entry at mucosal sites. In contrast, transcytosis of cell-free HIV-1 is not efficient. A synapse between HIV-1-infected cells and the mucosal epithelial surface that resembles neuronal and immune synapses is visualized by electron microscopy. We have termed this the “viral synapse.” Similarities of the viral synapse also extend to the functional level. HIV-1-infected cell-induced transcytosis depends on RGD-dependent integrins and efficient cell-free virus transcytosis is inducible upon RGD-dependent integrin cross-linking. Agrin appears differentially expressed at the apical epithelial surface and acts as an HIV-1 attachment receptor. Envelope glycoprotein subunit gp41 binds specifically to agrin, reinforcing the interaction of gp41 to its epithelial receptor galactosyl ceramide. PMID:15975901

  14. Complex Interplay between HIV-1 Capsid and MX2-Independent Alpha Interferon-Induced Antiviral Factors.

    PubMed

    Bulli, Lorenzo; Apolonia, Luis; Kutzner, Juliane; Pollpeter, Darja; Goujon, Caroline; Herold, Nikolas; Schwarz, Sarah-Marie; Giernat, Yannick; Keppler, Oliver T; Malim, Michael H; Schaller, Torsten

    2016-08-15

    Type I interferons (IFNs), including IFN-α, upregulate an array of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) and potently suppress Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infectivity in CD4(+) T cells, monocyte-derived macrophages, and dendritic cells. Recently, we and others identified ISG myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2) as an inhibitor of HIV-1 nuclear entry. However, additional antiviral blocks exist upstream of nuclear import, but the ISGs that suppress infection, e.g., prior to (or during) reverse transcription, remain to be defined. We show here that the HIV-1 CA mutations N74D and A105T, both of which allow escape from inhibition by MX2 and the truncated version of cleavage and polyadenylation specific factor 6 (CPSF6), as well as the cyclophilin A (CypA)-binding loop mutation P90A, all increase sensitivity to IFN-α-mediated inhibition. Using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 technology, we demonstrate that the IFN-α hypersensitivity of these mutants in THP-1 cells is independent of MX2 or CPSF6. As expected, CypA depletion had no additional effect on the behavior of the P90A mutant but modestly increased the IFN-α sensitivity of wild-type virus. Interestingly, the infectivity of wild-type or P90A virus could be rescued from the MX2-independent IFN-α-induced blocks in THP-1 cells by treatment with cyclosporine (Cs) or its nonimmunosuppressive analogue SDZ-NIM811, indicating that Cs-sensitive host cell cyclophilins other than CypA contribute to the activity of IFN-α-induced blocks. We propose that cellular interactions with incoming HIV-1 capsids help shield the virus from recognition by antiviral effector mechanisms. Thus, the CA protein is a fulcrum for the dynamic interplay between cell-encoded functions that inhibit or promote HIV-1 infection. HIV-1 is the causative agent of AIDS. During acute HIV-1 infection, numerous proinflammatory cytokines are produced, including type I interferons (IFNs). IFNs can limit HIV-1

  15. Somatic Hypermutation-Induced Changes in the Structure and Dynamics of HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Thaddeus M; Gorman, Jason; Joyce, M Gordon; Zhou, Tongqing; Soto, Cinque; Guttman, Miklos; Moquin, Stephanie; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Mascola, John R; Kwong, Peter D; Lee, Kelly K

    2016-07-20

    Antibody somatic hypermutation (SHM) and affinity maturation enhance antigen recognition by modifying antibody paratope structure to improve its complementarity with the target epitope. SHM-induced changes in paratope dynamics may also contribute to antibody maturation, but direct evidence of this is limited. Here, we examine two classes of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) for SHM-induced changes in structure and dynamics, and delineate the effects of these changes on interactions with the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env). In combination with new and existing structures of unmutated and affinity matured antibody Fab fragments, we used hydrogen/deuterium exchange with mass spectrometry to directly measure Fab structural dynamics. Changes in antibody structure and dynamics were positioned to improve complementarity with Env, with changes in dynamics primarily observed at the paratope peripheries. We conclude that SHM optimizes paratope complementarity to conserved HIV-1 epitopes and restricts the mobility of paratope-peripheral residues to minimize clashes with variable features on HIV-1 Env.

  16. HIV-1 Tat modulates T-bet expression and induces Th1 type of immune response

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Asavari; Ravi, Dyavar S.; Singh, Kamini; Rampalli, Shravanti; Parekh, Vrajesh; Mitra, Debashis; Chattopadhyay, Samit . E-mail: samit@nccs.res.in

    2005-04-08

    The HIV-1 transactivator Tat performs various viral and cellular functions. Primarily, it induces processive transcription from the HIV-1 LTR promoter. However, Tat secreted from infected cells is known to activate uninfected lymphocytes through receptors. To further delineate the specific target genes, extracellular Tat was expressed on the cell membrane of stimulator cells and co-cultured with human PBMCs. Along with induced CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation and IFN-{gamma} secretion, there was strong upregulation of T-bet expression which is majorly implicated in generating T{sub H}1 type of immune response. To further delineate the effect of extracellular Tat on HIV replication, both p24 analysis and in vivo GFP expression were performed. There was a significant inhibition of HIV-1 replication in human CEM-GFP cell line and hPBMCs. Thus, for the first time we report that apart from its transactivation activity, extracellular Tat acts as a costimulatory molecule that affects viral replication by modulating host immune response through induction of T-bet expression and IFN-{gamma} secretion.

  17. Designed, Synthetically Accessible Bryostatin Analogues Potently Induce Activation of Latent HIV Reservoirs in vitro

    PubMed Central

    DeChristopher, Brian A.; Loy, Brian A.; Marsden, Matthew D.; Schrier, Adam J.; Zack, Jerome A.

    2012-01-01

    Bryostatin is a unique lead in the development of potentially transformative therapies for cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, and the eradication of HIV/AIDS. However, the clinical use of bryostatin has been hampered by its limited supply, difficulties in accessing clinically-relevant derivatives, and side effects. Herein, we address these problems through the step-economical syntheses of seven members of a new family of designed bryostatin analogues utilizing a highly convergent Prins-macrocyclization strategy. We also demonstrate for the first time that such analogues effectively induce latent HIV activation in vitro with potencies similar to or better than bryostatin. Significantly, these analogues are up to 1000-fold more potent in inducing latent HIV expression than prostratin, the current clinical candidate for latent virus induction. This study provides the first demonstration that designed, synthetically-accessible bryostatin analogues could serve as superior candidates for the eradication of HIV/AIDS through induction of latent viral reservoirs in conjunction with current antiretroviral therapy. PMID:22914190

  18. HIV-1-infected macrophages induce astrogliosis by SDF-1{alpha} and matrix metalloproteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Mika; Wang, Xin; Baba, Masanori . E-mail: baba@m.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp

    2005-11-04

    Brain macrophages/microglia and astrocytes are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD). To clarify their interaction and contribution to the pathogenesis, HIV-1-infected or uninfected macrophages were used as a model of brain macrophages/microglia, and their effects on human astrocytes in vitro were examined. The culture supernatants of HIV-1-infected or uninfected macrophages induced significant astrocyte proliferation, which was annihilated with a neutralizing antibody to stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1{alpha} or a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor. In these astrocytes, CXCR4, MMP, and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase mRNA expression and SDF-1{alpha} production were significantly up-regulated. The supernatants of infected macrophages were always more effective than those of uninfected cells. Moreover, the enhanced production of SDF-1{alpha} was suppressed by the MMP inhibitor. These results indicate that the activated and HIV-1-infected macrophages can indirectly induce astrocyte proliferation through up-regulating SDF-1{alpha} and MMP production, which implies a mechanism of astrogliosis in HAD.

  19. Presence of nucleoside triphosphate phosphohydrolase activity in purified virions of reovirus.

    PubMed

    Borsa, J; Grover, J; Chapman, J D

    1970-09-01

    A nucleoside triphosphate phosphohydrolase activity has been discovered in reovirus virions. This activity converts nucleoside triphosphates to nucleoside diphosphates in vitro. Properties of this enzyme are presented, with evidence that this activity is an integral part of the virion core.

  20. HIV-1 infection in infants severely impairs the immune response induced by Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccine.

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Nazma; Scriba, Thomas J; de Kock, Marwou; Tameris, Michele; Abel, Brian; Keyser, Alana; Little, Francesca; Soares, Andreia; Gelderbloem, Sebastian; Mlenjeni, Silvia; Denation, Lea; Hawkridge, Anthony; Boom, W Henry; Kaplan, Gilla; Hussey, Gregory D; Hanekom, Willem A

    2009-04-01

    Worldwide, most infants born to mothers infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) receive bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. Tuberculosis is a major cause of death among infants infected with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, and it should be prevented. However, BCG may itself cause disease (known as "BCGosis") in these infants. Information regarding the immunogenicity of BCG is imperative for the risk/benefit assessment of BCG vaccination in HIV-infected infants; however, no such data exist. We compared BCG-induced CD4 and CD8 T cell responses, as assessed by flow cytometry, in HIV-infected (n=20), HIV-exposed but uninfected (n=25), and HIV-unexposed (n=23) infants, during their first year of life. BCG vaccination of the 2 HIV-uninfected groups induced a robust response, which was characterized by CD4 T cells expressing interferon (IFN)-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and/or interleukin (IL)-2. In contrast, HIV-infected infants demonstrated a markedly lower response throughout the first year of life. These infants also had significantly reduced numbers of polyfunctional CD4 T cells coexpressing IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-2, a finding that is thought to indicate T cell quality. Infection with HIV severely impairs the BCG-specific T cell response during the first year of life. BCG may therefore provide little, if any, vaccine-induced benefit in HIV-infected infants. Considering the significant risk of BCGosis, these data strongly support not giving BCG to HIV-infected infants.

  1. Early type I Interferon response induces upregulation of human β-defensin 1 during acute HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Corleis, Björn; Lisanti, Antonella C; Körner, Christian; Schiff, Abigail E; Rosenberg, Eric S; Allen, Todd M; Altfeld, Marcus; Kwon, Douglas S

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 is able to evade innate antiviral responses during acute infection to establish a chronic systemic infection which, in the absence of antiretroviral therapy (ART), typically progresses to severe immunodeficiency. Understanding these early innate immune responses against HIV-1 and their mechanisms of failure is relevant to the development of interventions to better prevent HIV-1 transmission. Human beta defensins (HBDs) are antibacterial peptides but have recently also been associated with control of viral replication. HBD1 and 2 are expressed in PBMCs as well as intestinal tissue, but their expression in vivo during HIV-1 infection has not been characterized. We demonstrate that during acute HIV-1 infection, HBD1 but not HBD2 is highly upregulated in circulating monocytes but returns to baseline levels during chronic infection. HBD1 expression in monocytes can be induced by HIV-1 in vitro, although direct infection may not entirely account for the increase in HBD1 during acute infection. We provide evidence that HIV-1 triggers antiviral IFN-α responses, which act as a potent inducer of HBD1. Our results show the first characterization of induction of an HBD during acute and chronic viral infection in humans. HBD1 has been reported to have low activity against HIV-1 compared to other defensins, suggesting that in vivo induced defensins may not significantly contribute to the robust early antiviral response against HIV-1. These data provide important insight into the in vivo kinetics of HBD expression, the mechanism of HBD1 induction by HIV-1, and the role of HBDs in the early innate response to HIV-1 during acute infection.

  2. Early type I Interferon response induces upregulation of human β-defensin 1 during acute HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Lisanti, Antonella C.; Körner, Christian; Schiff, Abigail E.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Allen, Todd M.; Altfeld, Marcus; Kwon, Douglas S.

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 is able to evade innate antiviral responses during acute infection to establish a chronic systemic infection which, in the absence of antiretroviral therapy (ART), typically progresses to severe immunodeficiency. Understanding these early innate immune responses against HIV-1 and their mechanisms of failure is relevant to the development of interventions to better prevent HIV-1 transmission. Human beta defensins (HBDs) are antibacterial peptides but have recently also been associated with control of viral replication. HBD1 and 2 are expressed in PBMCs as well as intestinal tissue, but their expression in vivo during HIV-1 infection has not been characterized. We demonstrate that during acute HIV-1 infection, HBD1 but not HBD2 is highly upregulated in circulating monocytes but returns to baseline levels during chronic infection. HBD1 expression in monocytes can be induced by HIV-1 in vitro, although direct infection may not entirely account for the increase in HBD1 during acute infection. We provide evidence that HIV-1 triggers antiviral IFN-α responses, which act as a potent inducer of HBD1. Our results show the first characterization of induction of an HBD during acute and chronic viral infection in humans. HBD1 has been reported to have low activity against HIV-1 compared to other defensins, suggesting that in vivo induced defensins may not significantly contribute to the robust early antiviral response against HIV-1. These data provide important insight into the in vivo kinetics of HBD expression, the mechanism of HBD1 induction by HIV-1, and the role of HBDs in the early innate response to HIV-1 during acute infection. PMID:28253319

  3. Vaccine-Induced HIV-1 Envelope gp120 Constant Region 1-Specific Antibodies Expose a CD4-Inducible Epitope and Block the Interaction of HIV-1 gp140 with Galactosylceramide

    PubMed Central

    Dennison, S. Moses; Anasti, Kara M.; Jaeger, Frederick H.; Stewart, Shelley M.; Pollara, Justin; Liu, Pinghuang; Kunz, Erika L.; Zhang, Ruijun; Vandergrift, Nathan; Permar, Sallie; Ferrari, Guido; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Bonsignori, Mattia; Michael, Nelson L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Liao, Hua-Xin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mucosal epithelial cell surface galactosylceramide (Galcer) has been postulated to be a receptor for HIV-1 envelope (Env) interactions with mucosal epithelial cells. Disruption of the HIV-1 Env interaction with such alternate receptors could be one strategy to prevent HIV-1 entry through the mucosal barrier. To study antibody modulation of HIV-1 Env-Galcer interactions, we used Galcer-containing liposomes to assess whether natural- and vaccine-induced monoclonal antibodies can block HIV-1 Env binding to Galcer. HIV-1 Env gp140 proteins bound to Galcer liposomes with Kds (dissociation constants) in the nanomolar range. Several HIV-1 ALVAC/AIDSVAX vaccinee-derived monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the gp120 first constant (C1) region blocked Galcer binding of a transmitted/founder HIV-1 Env gp140. Among the C1-specific MAbs that showed Galcer blocking, the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity-mediating CH38 IgG and its natural IgA isotype were the most potent blocking antibodies. C1-specific IgG monoclonal antibodies that blocked Env binding to Galcer induced upregulation of the gp120 CD4-inducible (CD4i) epitope bound by MAb 17B, demonstrating that a conformational change in gp120 may be required for Galcer blocking. However, the MAb 17B itself did not block Env-Galcer binding, suggesting that the C1 antibody-induced gp120 conformational changes resulted in alteration in a Galcer binding site distant from the CD4i 17B MAb binding site. IMPORTANCE Galactosyl ceramide, a glycosphingolipid, has been postulated to be a receptor for the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) interaction with mucosal epithelial cells. Here, we have mimicked this interaction by using an artificial membrane containing synthetic Galcer and recombinant HIV-1 Env proteins to identify antibodies that would block the HIV-1 Env-Galcer interaction. Our study revealed that a class of vaccine-induced human antibodies potently blocks HIV-1 Env-Galcer binding by perturbing the HIV-1

  4. A metal-induced conformational change and activation of HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Asante-Appiah, E; Skalka, A M

    1997-06-27

    Retroviral integrases are composed of three independently folding domains whose organization relevant to one another is largely unknown. As an approach to understanding its structure, we have investigated the effect of the required metal cofactor(s), Mn2+ or Mg2+, on the conformation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase (IN) using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that are specific for each of these three domains. Upon the addition of increasing concentrations of the divalent cations to immobilized HIV-1 IN in ELISA assays, binding of mAbs specific for either the C-terminal domain or for an epitope in the catalytic core domain was lost, whereas binding of an N terminus-specific mAb was unaffected. Size exclusion chromatography of a nonaggregating derivative of HIV-1 IN showed that the oligomeric state of the protein did not change under conditions in which recognition of the core and C terminus-specific mAbs was lost. Preincubation with Mn2+ increased the resistance of HIV-1 IN to proteolytic digestion and produced a digestion pattern that was significantly different from that observed with the apoprotein. A derivative that lacked the N-terminal domain, IN(50-288), exhibited the same metal-dependent changes observed with the full-length protein, whereas the isolated catalytic core domain IN(50-212) did not. From this we conclude that the metal-induced conformational change comprises a reorganization of the core and C-terminal domains. Preincubation with Mn2+ increased the specific activity of HIV-1 IN 5-fold. Enzymatic activity was inhibited by the conformation-sensitive C terminus-specific mAb, but this inhibition was reduced greatly if the enzyme was first preincubated with metal ions. Thus, it appears that apo-HIV-1 IN exists predominantly in an inactive conformation that is converted into a catalytically competent form upon the addition of metal ions.

  5. Chloroquine modulates HIV-1-induced plasmacytoid dendritic cell alpha interferon: implication for T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Martinson, Jeffrey A; Montoya, Carlos J; Usuga, Xiomara; Ronquillo, Rollie; Landay, Alan L; Desai, Seema N

    2010-02-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) contribute to antiviral immunity mainly through recognition of microbial products and viruses via intracellular Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) or TLR9, resulting in the production of type I interferons (IFNs). Although interferons reduce the viral burden in the acute phase of infection, their role in the chronic phase is unclear. The presence of elevated plasma IFN-alpha levels in advanced HIV disease and its association with microbial translocation in chronic HIV infection lead us to hypothesize that IFN-alpha could contribute to immune activation. Blocking of IFN-alpha production using chloroquine, an endosomal inhibitor, was tested in a novel in vitro model system with the aim of characterizing the effects of chloroquine on HIV-1-mediated TLR signaling, IFN-alpha production, and T-cell activation. Our results indicate that chloroquine blocks TLR-mediated activation of pDC and MyD88 signaling, as shown by decreases in the levels of the downstream signaling molecules IRAK-4 and IRF-7 and by inhibition of IFN-alpha synthesis. Chloroquine decreased CD8 T-cell activation induced by aldrithiol-2-treated HIV-1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. In addition to blocking pDC activation, chloroquine also blocked negative modulators of the T-cell response, such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and programmed death ligand 1 (PDL-1). Our results indicate that TLR stimulation and production of IFN-alpha by pDC contribute to immune activation and that blocking of these pathways using chloroquine may interfere with events contributing to HIV pathogenesis. Our results suggests that a safe, well-tolerated drug such as chloroquine can be proposed as an adjuvant therapeutic candidate along with highly active antiretroviral therapy to control immune activation in HIV-1 infection.

  6. Chloroquine Modulates HIV-1-Induced Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Alpha Interferon: Implication for T-Cell Activation▿

    PubMed Central

    Martinson, Jeffrey A.; Montoya, Carlos J.; Usuga, Xiomara; Ronquillo, Rollie; Landay, Alan L.; Desai, Seema N.

    2010-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) contribute to antiviral immunity mainly through recognition of microbial products and viruses via intracellular Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) or TLR9, resulting in the production of type I interferons (IFNs). Although interferons reduce the viral burden in the acute phase of infection, their role in the chronic phase is unclear. The presence of elevated plasma IFN-α levels in advanced HIV disease and its association with microbial translocation in chronic HIV infection lead us to hypothesize that IFN-α could contribute to immune activation. Blocking of IFN-α production using chloroquine, an endosomal inhibitor, was tested in a novel in vitro model system with the aim of characterizing the effects of chloroquine on HIV-1-mediated TLR signaling, IFN-α production, and T-cell activation. Our results indicate that chloroquine blocks TLR-mediated activation of pDC and MyD88 signaling, as shown by decreases in the levels of the downstream signaling molecules IRAK-4 and IRF-7 and by inhibition of IFN-α synthesis. Chloroquine decreased CD8 T-cell activation induced by aldrithiol-2-treated HIV-1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. In addition to blocking pDC activation, chloroquine also blocked negative modulators of the T-cell response, such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and programmed death ligand 1 (PDL-1). Our results indicate that TLR stimulation and production of IFN-α by pDC contribute to immune activation and that blocking of these pathways using chloroquine may interfere with events contributing to HIV pathogenesis. Our results suggests that a safe, well-tolerated drug such as chloroquine can be proposed as an adjuvant therapeutic candidate along with highly active antiretroviral therapy to control immune activation in HIV-1 infection. PMID:19949061

  7. An Ensemble Method to Distinguish Bacteriophage Virion from Non-Virion Proteins Based on Protein Sequence Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Chengjin; Gao, Rui; Yang, Runtao

    2015-09-09

    Bacteriophage virion proteins and non-virion proteins have distinct functions in biological processes, such as specificity determination for host bacteria, bacteriophage replication and transcription. Accurate identification of bacteriophage virion proteins from bacteriophage protein sequences is significant to understand the complex virulence mechanism in host bacteria and the influence of bacteriophages on the development of antibacterial drugs. In this study, an ensemble method for bacteriophage virion protein prediction from bacteriophage protein sequences is put forward with hybrid feature spaces incorporating CTD (composition, transition and distribution), bi-profile Bayes, PseAAC (pseudo-amino acid composition) and PSSM (position-specific scoring matrix). When performing on the training dataset 10-fold cross-validation, the presented method achieves a satisfactory prediction result with a sensitivity of 0.870, a specificity of 0.830, an accuracy of 0.850 and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.701, respectively. To evaluate the prediction performance objectively, an independent testing dataset is used to evaluate the proposed method. Encouragingly, our proposed method performs better than previous studies with a sensitivity of 0.853, a specificity of 0.815, an accuracy of 0.831 and MCC of 0.662 on the independent testing dataset. These results suggest that the proposed method can be a potential candidate for bacteriophage virion protein prediction, which may provide a useful tool to find novel antibacterial drugs and to understand the relationship between bacteriophage and host bacteria. For the convenience of the vast majority of experimental Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16,21735 scientists, a user-friendly and publicly-accessible web-server for the proposed ensemble method is established.

  8. An Ensemble Method to Distinguish Bacteriophage Virion from Non-Virion Proteins Based on Protein Sequence Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Chengjin; Gao, Rui; Yang, Runtao

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophage virion proteins and non-virion proteins have distinct functions in biological processes, such as specificity determination for host bacteria, bacteriophage replication and transcription. Accurate identification of bacteriophage virion proteins from bacteriophage protein sequences is significant to understand the complex virulence mechanism in host bacteria and the influence of bacteriophages on the development of antibacterial drugs. In this study, an ensemble method for bacteriophage virion protein prediction from bacteriophage protein sequences is put forward with hybrid feature spaces incorporating CTD (composition, transition and distribution), bi-profile Bayes, PseAAC (pseudo-amino acid composition) and PSSM (position-specific scoring matrix). When performing on the training dataset 10-fold cross-validation, the presented method achieves a satisfactory prediction result with a sensitivity of 0.870, a specificity of 0.830, an accuracy of 0.850 and Matthew’s correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.701, respectively. To evaluate the prediction performance objectively, an independent testing dataset is used to evaluate the proposed method. Encouragingly, our proposed method performs better than previous studies with a sensitivity of 0.853, a specificity of 0.815, an accuracy of 0.831 and MCC of 0.662 on the independent testing dataset. These results suggest that the proposed method can be a potential candidate for bacteriophage virion protein prediction, which may provide a useful tool to find novel antibacterial drugs and to understand the relationship between bacteriophage and host bacteria. For the convenience of the vast majority of experimental scientists, a user-friendly and publicly-accessible web-server for the proposed ensemble method is established. PMID:26370987

  9. HIV infection of macrophages is enhanced in the presence of increased expression of CD163 induced by substance P.

    PubMed

    Tuluc, Florin; Meshki, John; Spitsin, Sergei; Douglas, Steven D

    2014-07-01

    Activation of NK1R by SP contributes to increased HIV-1 infection in macrophages. The scavenger receptor CD163 is expressed on cells of monocyte-macrophage origin. Our main goal was to determine if there is interplay among SP, CD163 expression, and HIV infection in macrophages. We showed that SP triggers intracellular calcium elevation and increased CD163 expression in human monocytes in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The role of CD163 on HIV infection was examined by RT-PCR in sorted monocytes (CD163(low) and CD163(high)) and in macrophages having CD163 knocked down using siRNA. We found that the productivity of HIV infection was higher in CD163(high) cells. Additionally, in macrophages with CD163 expression knocked down, we found a significant decrease of HIV infection. Furthermore, Hb-Hp complexes, which function as an endogenous ligand for CD163, decreased HIV infection in macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, we demonstrate that SP induces higher levels of CD163 in monocytes and that high expression of CD163 is associated with increases HIV infection in macrophages. Thus, in addition to being a prognostic marker of HIV infection, the expression of CD163 on macrophages may be critical in HIV immunopathogenesis.

  10. HIV infection of macrophages is enhanced in the presence of increased expression of CD163 induced by substance P

    PubMed Central

    Tuluc, Florin; Meshki, John; Spitsin, Sergei; Douglas, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of NK1R by SP contributes to increased HIV-1 infection in macrophages. The scavenger receptor CD163 is expressed on cells of monocyte-macrophage origin. Our main goal was to determine if there is interplay among SP, CD163 expression, and HIV infection in macrophages. We showed that SP triggers intracellular calcium elevation and increased CD163 expression in human monocytes in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The role of CD163 on HIV infection was examined by RT-PCR in sorted monocytes (CD163low and CD163high) and in macrophages having CD163 knocked down using siRNA. We found that the productivity of HIV infection was higher in CD163high cells. Additionally, in macrophages with CD163 expression knocked down, we found a significant decrease of HIV infection. Furthermore, Hb-Hp complexes, which function as an endogenous ligand for CD163, decreased HIV infection in macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, we demonstrate that SP induces higher levels of CD163 in monocytes and that high expression of CD163 is associated with increases HIV infection in macrophages. Thus, in addition to being a prognostic marker of HIV infection, the expression of CD163 on macrophages may be critical in HIV immunopathogenesis. PMID:24577568

  11. [The characteristics of the interaction of the proteins comprising the virions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1].

    PubMed

    Sharova, N K; Bukrinskaia, A G

    1990-01-01

    Treatment of virions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with ionic and nonionic detergents (NP-40, octylglucoside, sodium deoxycholate) exerted an effect on the virus uncommon for enveloped viruses: instead of solubilization, both glycoproteins (gp120 and gp41) were found in subviral particles, whereas the core protein p24 was found in the supernatant fluid after the removal of subviral particles by centrifugation. The matrix protein p17 and unprocessed molecules of the precursor protein p55 were associated with subviral particles. The above data confirm the proposed model of the HIV-I structural organization according to which glycoproteins are incorporated into the isometric matrix formed by protein p17. Our data indicate that the core protein p24 is not incorporated into the matrix and not associated with nucleocapsid proteins.

  12. Visualization of HIV-1 interactions with penile and foreskin epithelia: clues for female-to-male HIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Minh H; Anderson, Meegan R; McRaven, Michael D; Cianci, Gianguido C; McCoombe, Scott G; Kelley, Z L; Gioia, Casey J; Fought, Angela J; Rademaker, Alfred W; Veazey, Ronald S; Hope, Thomas J

    2015-03-01

    To gain insight into female-to-male HIV sexual transmission and how male circumcision protects against this mode of transmission, we visualized HIV-1 interactions with foreskin and penile tissues in ex vivo tissue culture and in vivo rhesus macaque models utilizing epifluorescent microscopy. 12 foreskin and 14 cadaveric penile specimens were cultured with R5-tropic photoactivatable (PA)-GFP HIV-1 for 4 or 24 hours. Tissue cryosections were immunofluorescently imaged for epithelial and immune cell markers. Images were analyzed for total virions, proportion of penetrators, depth of virion penetration, as well as immune cell counts and depths in the tissue. We visualized individual PA virions breaching penile epithelial surfaces in the explant and macaque model. Using kernel density estimated probabilities of localizing a virion or immune cell at certain tissue depths revealed that interactions between virions and cells were more likely to occur in the inner foreskin or glans penis (from local or cadaveric donors, respectively). Using statistical models to account for repeated measures and zero-inflated datasets, we found no difference in total virions visualized at 4 hours between inner and outer foreskins from local donors. At 24 hours, there were more virions in inner as compared to outer foreskin (0.0495 +/- 0.0154 and 0.0171 +/- 0.0038 virions/image, p = 0.001). In the cadaveric specimens, we observed more virions in inner foreskin (0.0507 +/- 0.0079 virions/image) than glans tissue (0.0167 +/- 0.0033 virions/image, p<0.001), but a greater proportion was seen penetrating uncircumcised glans tissue (0.0458 +/- 0.0188 vs. 0.0151 +/- 0.0100 virions/image, p = 0.099) and to significantly greater mean depths (29.162 +/- 3.908 vs. 12.466 +/- 2.985 μm). Our in vivo macaque model confirmed that virions can breach penile squamous epithelia in a living model. In summary, these results suggest that the inner foreskin and glans epithelia may be important sites for HIV

  13. Vpx-containing Dendritic Cell Vaccine Vectors Induce CTLs and Reactivate Latent HIV-1 in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Thomas D.; Miller, Elizabeth A.; Bhardwaj, Nina; Landau, Nathaniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Eradication of HIV-1 from an infected individual requires a means of inducing production of virus from latently infected cells and stimulating an immune response against the infected cells. We report the development of lentiviral vectors that transduce dendritic cells (DCs) to both induce production of virus from latently infected cells and stimulate antigen-specific CTLs. The vectors package Vpx, a lentiviral accessory protein that counteracts the SAMHD1-mediated block to DC transduction, allowing for long-term expression of vector-encoded proteins. The vectors encode influenza or HIV-1-derived epitopes fused via a self-cleaving peptide to CD40L that releases the peptide into the endoplasmic reticulum for entry into the antigen presentation pathway. Expression of CD40L caused transduced DCs to mature and produce Th1-skewing cytokines. The DCs presented antigen to CD8 T cells, enhancing antigen-specific CTLs. Coculture of the transduced DCs with latently infected cells induced high level virus production, an effect that was mediated by TNF-α. The ability of a DC vaccine to reactivate latent HIV-1 and stimulate an adaptive immune response provides a means to reduce the size of the latent reservoir in patients. This strategy can also be applied to develop DC vaccines for other diseases. PMID:25567537

  14. Murine Antibody Responses to Cleaved Soluble HIV-1 Envelope Trimers Are Highly Restricted in Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Joyce K.; Crampton, Jordan C.; Cupo, Albert; Ketas, Thomas; van Gils, Marit J.; Sliepen, Kwinten; de Taeye, Steven W.; Sok, Devin; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Deresa, Isaiah; Stanfield, Robyn; Ward, Andrew B.; Burton, Dennis R.; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Moore, John P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Generating neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) is a major goal of many current HIV-1 vaccine efforts. To be of practical value, these nAbs must be both potent and cross-reactive in order to be capable of preventing the transmission of the highly diverse and generally neutralization resistant (Tier-2) HIV-1 strains that are in circulation. The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) spike is the only target for nAbs. To explore whether Tier-2 nAbs can be induced by Env proteins, we immunized conventional mice with soluble BG505 SOSIP.664 trimers that mimic the native Env spike. Here, we report that it is extremely difficult for murine B cells to recognize the Env epitopes necessary for inducing Tier-2 nAbs. Thus, while trimer-immunized mice raised Env-binding IgG Abs and had high-quality T follicular helper (Tfh) cell and germinal center (GC) responses, they did not make BG505.T332N nAbs. Epitope mapping studies showed that Ab responses in mice were specific to areas near the base of the soluble trimer. These areas are not well shielded by glycans and likely are occluded on virions, which is consistent with the lack of BG505.T332N nAbs. These data inform immunogen design and suggest that it is useful to obscure nonneutralizing epitopes presented on the base of soluble Env trimers and that the glycan shield of well-formed HIV Env trimers is virtually impenetrable for murine B cell receptors (BCRs). IMPORTANCE Human HIV vaccine efficacy trials have not generated meaningful neutralizing antibodies to circulating HIV strains. One possible hindrance has been the lack of immunogens that properly mimic the native conformation of the HIV envelope trimer protein. Here, we tested the first generation of soluble, native-like envelope trimer immunogens in a conventional mouse model. We attempted to generate neutralizing antibodies to neutralization-resistant circulating HIV strains. Various vaccine strategies failed to induce neutralizing antibodies to a neutralization

  15. HIV-2 genomic RNA accumulates in stress granules in the absence of active translation.

    PubMed

    Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Valiente-Echeverria, Fernando; Rubilar, Paulina S; Garcia-de-Gracia, Francisco; Ricci, Emiliano P; Limousin, Taran; Décimo, Didier; Mouland, Andrew J; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2014-11-10

    During the post-transcriptional events of the HIV-2 replication cycle, the full-length unspliced genomic RNA (gRNA) is first used as an mRNA to synthesize Gag and Gag-Pol proteins and then packaged into progeny virions. However, the mechanisms responsible for the coordinate usage of the gRNA during these two mutually exclusive events are poorly understood. Here, we present evidence showing that HIV-2 expression induces stress granule assembly in cultured cells. This contrasts with HIV-1, which interferes with stress granules assembly even upon induced cellular stress. Moreover, we observed that the RNA-binding protein and stress granules assembly factor TIAR associates with the gRNA to form a TIAR-HIV-2 ribonucleoprotein (TH2RNP) complex localizing diffuse in the cytoplasm or aggregated in stress granules. Although the assembly of TH2RNP in stress granules did not require the binding of the Gag protein to the gRNA, we observed that increased levels of Gag promoted both translational arrest and stress granule assembly. Moreover, HIV-2 Gag also localizes to stress granules in the absence of a 'packageable' gRNA. Our results indicate that the HIV-2 gRNA is compartmentalized in stress granules in the absence of active translation prior to being selected for packaging by the Gag polyprotein.

  16. HIV-2 genomic RNA accumulates in stress granules in the absence of active translation

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Valiente-Echeverria, Fernando; Rubilar, Paulina S.; Garcia-de-Gracia, Francisco; Ricci, Emiliano P.; Limousin, Taran; Décimo, Didier; Mouland, Andrew J.; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2014-01-01

    During the post-transcriptional events of the HIV-2 replication cycle, the full-length unspliced genomic RNA (gRNA) is first used as an mRNA to synthesize Gag and Gag-Pol proteins and then packaged into progeny virions. However, the mechanisms responsible for the coordinate usage of the gRNA during these two mutually exclusive events are poorly understood. Here, we present evidence showing that HIV-2 expression induces stress granule assembly in cultured cells. This contrasts with HIV-1, which interferes with stress granules assembly even upon induced cellular stress. Moreover, we observed that the RNA-binding protein and stress granules assembly factor TIAR associates with the gRNA to form a TIAR-HIV-2 ribonucleoprotein (TH2RNP) complex localizing diffuse in the cytoplasm or aggregated in stress granules. Although the assembly of TH2RNP in stress granules did not require the binding of the Gag protein to the gRNA, we observed that increased levels of Gag promoted both translational arrest and stress granule assembly. Moreover, HIV-2 Gag also localizes to stress granules in the absence of a ‘packageable’ gRNA. Our results indicate that the HIV-2 gRNA is compartmentalized in stress granules in the absence of active translation prior to being selected for packaging by the Gag polyprotein. PMID:25352557

  17. Time-Dependent, HIV-Tat-Induced Perturbation of Human Neurons In Vitro: Towards a Model for the Molecular Pathology of HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gurwitz, Kim T.; Burman, Richard J.; Murugan, Brandon D.; Garnett, Shaun; Ganief, Tariq; Soares, Nelson C.; Raimondo, Joseph V.; Blackburn, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    A significant proportion of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV)-positive individuals are affected by the cognitive, motor and behavioral dysfunction that characterizes HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). While the molecular etiology of HAND remains largely uncharacterized, HIV transactivator of transcription (HIV-Tat) is thought to be an important etiological cause. Here we have used mass spectrometry (MS)-based discovery proteomics to identify the quantitative, cell-wide changes that occur when non-transformed, differentiated human neurons are treated with HIV-Tat over time. We identified over 4000 protein groups (false discovery rate <0.01) in this system with 131, 118 and 45 protein groups differentially expressed at 6, 24 and 48 h post treatment, respectively. Alterations in the expression of proteins involved in gene expression and cytoskeletal maintenance were particularly evident. In tandem with proteomic evidence of cytoskeletal dysregulation we observed HIV-Tat induced functional alterations, including a reduction of neuronal intrinsic excitability as assessed by patch-clamp electrophysiology. Our findings may be relevant for understanding in vivo molecular mechanisms in HAND. PMID:28611588

  18. Vaccine-delivered HIV envelope inhibits CD4+ T-cell activation, a mechanism for poor HIV vaccine responses

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Kathy; Hu, Haitao; Ni, Houping; Hoxie, James A.

    2007-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes impairment of the immune system in part by targeting CD4+ T cells for infection and dysfunction. HIV envelope (Env) present on free virions and infected cells causes dysfunction of uninfected bystander CD4+ T cells via interaction with both CD4 and coreceptors. Env is commonly used as part of a cocktail of HIV antigens in current vaccines. In DNA and viral vector vaccine approaches, antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and non-APCs in the vicinity of the vaccine delivery site and draining lymph node express vaccine-derived antigens. The studies here demonstrate that cell-surface expression of Env on APCs and non-APCs as part of the vaccine action causes an inhibition of antigen-induced CD4+ T-cell activation and proliferation mediated by CD4 binding and suggests a potential mechanism for reduced activity of Env-containing HIV vaccines. Similar studies using a functional Env lacking CD4 binding circumvented suppression, suggesting an alternative and potentially superior approach to HIV vaccine design. PMID:17158230

  19. Antiviral Functions of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)-Specific IgG Antibodies: Effects of Antiretroviral Therapy and Implications for Therapeutic HIV-1 Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    French, Martyn A.; Tjiam, M. Christian; Abudulai, Laila N.; Fernandez, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Contemporary antiretroviral therapy (ART) is effective and tolerable for long periods of time but cannot eradicate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection by either elimination of viral reservoirs or enhancement of HIV-1-specific immune responses. Boosting “protective” HIV-1-specific immune responses by active or passive immunization will therefore be necessary to control or eradicate HIV-1 infection and is currently the topic of intense investigation. Recently reported studies conducted in HIV patients and non-human primate (NHP) models of HIV-1 infection suggest that HIV-1-specific IgG antibody responses may contribute to the control of HIV-1 infection. However, production of IgG antibodies with virus neutralizing activity by vaccination remains problematic and while vaccine-induced natural killer cell-activating IgG antibodies have been shown to prevent the acquisition of HIV-1 infection, they may not be sufficient to control or eradicate established HIV-1 infection. It is, therefore, important to consider other functional characteristics of IgG antibody responses. IgG antibodies to viruses also mediate opsonophagocytic antibody responses against virions and capsids that enhance the function of phagocytic cells playing critical roles in antiviral immune responses, particularly conventional dendritic cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Emerging evidence suggests that these antibody functions might contribute to the control of HIV-1 infection. In addition, IgG antibodies contribute to the intracellular degradation of viruses via binding to the cytosolic fragment crystallizable (Fc) receptor tripartite motif containing-21 (TRIM21). The functional activity of an IgG antibody response is influenced by the IgG subclass content, which affects binding to antigens and to Fcγ receptors on phagocytic cells and to TRIM21. The IgG subclass content and avidity of IgG antibodies is determined by germinal center (GC) reactions in follicles of lymphoid

  20. PPARα and PPARγ attenuate HIV-induced dysregulation of tight junction proteins by modulations of matrix metalloproteinase and proteasome activities

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen; Eum, Sung Yong; András, Ibolya E; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in HIV trafficking into the brain and the development of the central nervous system complications in HIV infection. Tight junctions are the main structural and functional elements that regulate the BBB integrity. Exposure of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3 cell line) to HIV-infected monocytes resulted in decreased expression of tight junction proteins, such as junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM)-A, occludin, and zonula occludens (ZO)-1. Control experiments involved exposure to uninfected monocytes. Alterations of tight junction protein expression were associated with increased endothelial permeability and elevated transendothelial migration of HIV-infected monocytes across an in vitro model of the BBB. Notably, overexpression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α or PPARγ attenuated HIV-mediated dysregulation of tight junction proteins. With the use of exogenous PPARγ agonists and silencing of PPARα or PPARγ, these protective effects were connected to down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and proteasome activities. Indeed, the HIV-induced decrease in the expression of JAM-A and occludin was restored by inhibition of MMP activity. Moreover, both MMP and proteasome inhibitors attenuated HIV-mediated altered expression of ZO-1. The present data indicate that down-regulation of MMP and proteasome activities constitutes a novel mechanism of PPAR-induced protections against HIV-induced disruption of brain endothelial cells.—Huang, W., Eum, S. Y., András, I. E., Hennig, B., Toborek, M. PPARα and PPARγ attenuate HIV-induced dysregulation of tight junction proteins by modulations of matrix metalloproteinase and proteasome activities. PMID:19141539

  1. Role of Human Cytomegalovirus Tegument Proteins in Virion Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rebecca Marie; Kosuri, Srivenkat; Kerry, Julie Anne

    2014-01-01

    Like other herpesviruses, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) contains a unique proteinaceous layer between the virion envelope and capsid, termed the tegument. Upon infection, the contents of the tegument layer are delivered to the host cell, along with the capsid and the viral genome, where they facilitate the initial stages of virus replication. The tegument proteins also play important roles in virion assembly and this dual nature makes them attractive potential targets for antiviral therapies. While our knowledge regarding tegument protein function during the initiation of infection has been the subject of intense study, their roles in assembly are much less well understood. In this review, we will focus on recent studies that highlight the functions of HCMV tegument proteins during assembly, and pose key questions for further investigation. PMID:24509811

  2. Vaccinia virions deficient in transcription enzymes lack a nucleocapsid

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, Baron D.H.; Moussatche, Nissin; Kelley, Karen; Kang, Byung-Ho; Condit, Richard C.

    2012-12-05

    The poxvirus virion contains an inner tubular nucleocapsid structure. The nucleocapsid is apparently labile to conventional electron microscopy fixation procedures and has therefore been largely ignored for decades. Advancements in electron microscopy sample preparation, notably high pressure freezing, better preserve the nucleocapsid structure. Using high pressure freezing and electron microscopy, we have compared the virion structures of wt virus and mutant viruses known to be deficient in packaging of viral transcription enzymes. We show that the mutant viruses lack a defined nucleocapsid. These results support the hypothesis that the nucleocapsid contains the viral DNA genome complexed with viral transcription enzymes and structural proteins. The studies open the door to further investigation of the composition and ultrastructure of the poxvirus nucleocapsid.

  3. The vaccinia virus E6 protein influences virion protein localization during virus assembly

    PubMed Central

    Condit, Richard C.; Moussatche, Nissin

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinia virus mutants in which expression of the virion core protein gene E6R is repressed are defective in virion morphogenesis. E6 deficient infections fail to properly package viroplasm into viral membranes, resulting in an accumulation of empty immature virions and large aggregates of viroplasm. We have used immunogold electron microscopy and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy to assess the intracellular localization of several virion structural proteins and enzymes during E6R mutant infections. We find that during E6R mutant infections virion membrane proteins and virion transcription enzymes maintain a normal localization within viral factories while several major core and lateral body proteins accumulate in aggregated virosomes. The results support a model in which vaccinia virions are assembled from at least three substructures, the membrane, the viroplasm and a “pre-nucleocapsid”, and that the E6 protein is essential for maintaining proper localization of the seven-protein complex and the viroplasm during assembly. PMID:25863879

  4. Protein Composition of the Vaccinia Virus Mature Virion

    SciTech Connect

    Resch, Wolfgang; Hixson, Kim K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Lipton, Mary S.; Moss, Bernard

    2007-02-05

    The protein content of vaccinia virus mature virions, purified by rate zonal and isopycnic centrifugation and solubilized by SDS or a solution of urea and thiourea, was determined by the accurate mass and time tag technology which uses both tandem mass spectrometry and Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry to detect tryptic peptides separated by high-resolution liquid chromatography. Eighty vaccinia virus-encoded proteins representing 37% of the 218 genes annotated in the complete genome sequence were detected in at least three analyses. Ten proteins accounted for approximately 80% of the mass, while the least abundant proteins made up 1% or less of the mass. Thirteen identified proteins were not previously reported as components of virions. On the other hand, 8 previously described virion proteins were not detected here, presumably due to technical reasons including small size and hydrophobicity. In addition to vaccinia virus-encoded proteins, 24 host proteins omitting isoforms were detected. The most abundant of these were cytoskeletal proteins, heat shock proteins, and proteins involved in translation.

  5. A rodent model of HIV protease inhibitor indinavir induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenlong; Calvo, Margarita; Pheby, Tim; Bennett, David L H; Rice, Andrew S C

    2017-01-01

    HIV-associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN) is the most frequent manifestation of HIV disease. It often presents with significant neuropathic pain and is associated with previous exposure to neurotoxic nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. However, HIV-SN prevalence remains high even in resource-rich settings where these drugs are no longer used. Previous evidence suggests that exposure to indinavir, a protease inhibitor commonly used in antiretroviral therapy, may link to elevated HIV-SN risk. Here, we investigated whether indinavir treatment was associated with the development of a "dying back" axonal neuropathy and changes in pain-relevant limb withdrawal and thigmotactic behaviours. After 2 intravenous injections of indinavir (50 mg/kg, 4 days apart), adult rats developed hind paw mechanical hypersensitivity, which peaked around 2 weeks post first injection (44% reduction from baseline). At this time, animals also had (1) significantly changed thigmotactic behaviour (62% reduction in central zone entries) comparing with the controls and (2) a significant reduction (45%) in hind paw intraepidermal nerve fibre density. Treatment with gabapentin, but not amitriptyline, was associated with a complete attenuation of hind paw mechanical hypersensitivity observed with indinavir treatment. Furthermore, we found a small but significant increase in microglia with the effector morphology in the lumbar spinal dorsal horn in indinavir-treated animals, coupled with significantly increased expression of phospho-p38 in microglia. In summary, we have reported neuropathic pain-related sensory and behavioural changes accompanied by a significant loss of hind paw skin sensory innervation in a rat model of indinavir-induced peripheral neuropathy that is suitable for further pathophysiological investigation and preclinical evaluation of novel analgesics.

  6. Increased Sensitivity to Binge Alcohol-Induced Gut Leakiness and Inflammatory Liver Disease in HIV Transgenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Atrayee; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Jang, Sehwan; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of alcohol-mediated advanced liver injury in HIV-infected individuals are poorly understood. Thus, this study was aimed to investigate the effect of binge alcohol on the inflammatory liver disease in HIV transgenic rats as a model for simulating human conditions. Female wild-type (WT) or HIV transgenic rats were treated with three consecutive doses of binge ethanol (EtOH) (3.5 g/kg/dose oral gavages at 12-h intervals) or dextrose (Control). Blood and liver tissues were collected at 1 or 6-h following the last dose of ethanol or dextrose for the measurements of serum endotoxin and liver pathology, respectively. Compared to the WT, the HIV rats showed increased sensitivity to alcohol-mediated gut leakiness, hepatic steatosis and inflammation, as evidenced with the significantly elevated levels of serum endotoxin, hepatic triglycerides, histological fat accumulation and F4/80 staining. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that hepatic levels of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), leptin and the downstream target monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were significantly up-regulated in the HIV-EtOH rats, compared to all other groups. Subsequent experiments with primary cultured cells showed that both hepatocytes and hepatic Kupffer cells were the sources of the elevated MCP-1 in HIV-EtOH rats. Further, TLR4 and MCP-1 were found to be upregulated by leptin. Collectively, these results show that HIV rats, similar to HIV-infected people being treated with the highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), are more susceptible to binge alcohol-induced gut leakiness and inflammatory liver disease than the corresponding WT, possibly due to additive or synergistic interaction between binge alcohol exposure and HIV infection. Based on these results, HIV transgenic rats can be used as a surrogate model to study the molecular mechanisms of many disease states caused by heavy alcohol intake in HIV-infected people on HAART. PMID:26484872

  7. Increased Sensitivity to Binge Alcohol-Induced Gut Leakiness and Inflammatory Liver Disease in HIV Transgenic Rats.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Atrayee; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A; Jang, Sehwan; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of alcohol-mediated advanced liver injury in HIV-infected individuals are poorly understood. Thus, this study was aimed to investigate the effect of binge alcohol on the inflammatory liver disease in HIV transgenic rats as a model for simulating human conditions. Female wild-type (WT) or HIV transgenic rats were treated with three consecutive doses of binge ethanol (EtOH) (3.5 g/kg/dose oral gavages at 12-h intervals) or dextrose (Control). Blood and liver tissues were collected at 1 or 6-h following the last dose of ethanol or dextrose for the measurements of serum endotoxin and liver pathology, respectively. Compared to the WT, the HIV rats showed increased sensitivity to alcohol-mediated gut leakiness, hepatic steatosis and inflammation, as evidenced with the significantly elevated levels of serum endotoxin, hepatic triglycerides, histological fat accumulation and F4/80 staining. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that hepatic levels of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), leptin and the downstream target monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were significantly up-regulated in the HIV-EtOH rats, compared to all other groups. Subsequent experiments with primary cultured cells showed that both hepatocytes and hepatic Kupffer cells were the sources of the elevated MCP-1 in HIV-EtOH rats. Further, TLR4 and MCP-1 were found to be upregulated by leptin. Collectively, these results show that HIV rats, similar to HIV-infected people being treated with the highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), are more susceptible to binge alcohol-induced gut leakiness and inflammatory liver disease than the corresponding WT, possibly due to additive or synergistic interaction between binge alcohol exposure and HIV infection. Based on these results, HIV transgenic rats can be used as a surrogate model to study the molecular mechanisms of many disease states caused by heavy alcohol intake in HIV-infected people on HAART.

  8. HIV-associated disruption of tight and adherens junctions of oral epithelial cells facilitates HSV-1 infection and spread.

    PubMed

    Sufiawati, Irna; Tugizov, Sharof M

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 are the most common opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS. In these immunocompromised individuals, HSV-1 reactivates and replicates in oral epithelium, leading to oral disorders such as ulcers, gingivitis, and necrotic lesions. Although the increased risk of HSV infection may be mediated in part by HIV-induced immune dysfunction, direct or indirect interactions of HIV and HSV at the molecular level may also play a role. In this report we show that prolonged interaction of the HIV proteins tat and gp120 and cell-free HIV virions with polarized oral epithelial cells leads to disruption of tight and adherens junctions of epithelial cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. HIV-induced disruption of oral epithelial junctions facilitates HSV-1 paracellular spread between the epithelial cells. Furthermore, HIV-associated disruption of adherens junctions exposes sequestered nectin-1, an adhesion protein and critical receptor for HSV envelope glycoprotein D (gD). Exposure of nectin-1 facilitates binding of HSV-1 gD, which substantially increases HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells with disrupted junctions over that of cells with intact junctions. Exposed nectin-1 from disrupted adherens junctions also increases the cell-to-cell spread of HSV-1 from infected to uninfected oral epithelial cells. Antibodies to nectin-1 and HSV-1 gD substantially reduce HSV-1 infection and cell-to-cell spread, indicating that HIV-promoted HSV infection and spread are mediated by the interaction of HSV gD with HIV-exposed nectin-1. Our data suggest that HIV-associated disruption of oral epithelial junctions may potentiate HSV-1 infection and its paracellular and cell-to-cell spread within the oral mucosal epithelium. This could be one of the possible mechanisms of rapid development of HSV-associated oral lesions in HIV-infected individuals.

  9. HIV-Associated Disruption of Tight and Adherens Junctions of Oral Epithelial Cells Facilitates HSV-1 Infection and Spread

    PubMed Central

    Sufiawati, Irna; Tugizov, Sharof M.

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 are the most common opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS. In these immunocompromised individuals, HSV-1 reactivates and replicates in oral epithelium, leading to oral disorders such as ulcers, gingivitis, and necrotic lesions. Although the increased risk of HSV infection may be mediated in part by HIV-induced immune dysfunction, direct or indirect interactions of HIV and HSV at the molecular level may also play a role. In this report we show that prolonged interaction of the HIV proteins tat and gp120 and cell-free HIV virions with polarized oral epithelial cells leads to disruption of tight and adherens junctions of epithelial cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. HIV-induced disruption of oral epithelial junctions facilitates HSV-1 paracellular spread between the epithelial cells. Furthermore, HIV-associated disruption of adherens junctions exposes sequestered nectin-1, an adhesion protein and critical receptor for HSV envelope glycoprotein D (gD). Exposure of nectin-1 facilitates binding of HSV-1 gD, which substantially increases HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells with disrupted junctions over that of cells with intact junctions. Exposed nectin-1 from disrupted adherens junctions also increases the cell-to-cell spread of HSV-1 from infected to uninfected oral epithelial cells. Antibodies to nectin-1 and HSV-1 gD substantially reduce HSV-1 infection and cell-to-cell spread, indicating that HIV-promoted HSV infection and spread are mediated by the interaction of HSV gD with HIV-exposed nectin-1. Our data suggest that HIV-associated disruption of oral epithelial junctions may potentiate HSV-1 infection and its paracellular and cell-to-cell spread within the oral mucosal epithelium. This could be one of the possible mechanisms of rapid development of HSV-associated oral lesions in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:24586397

  10. HIV-1 matrix protein p17 misfolding forms toxic amyloidogenic assemblies that induce neurocognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Zeinolabediny, Yasmin; Caccuri, Francesca; Colombo, Laura; Morelli, Federica; Romeo, Margherita; Rossi, Alessandro; Schiarea, Silvia; Ciaramelli, Carlotta; Airoldi, Cristina; Weston, Ria; Donghui, Liu; Krupinski, Jerzy; Corpas, Rubén; García-Lara, Elisa; Sarroca, Sara; Sanfeliu, Coral; Slevin, Mark; Caruso, Arnaldo; Salmona, Mario; Diomede, Luisa

    2017-09-04

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) remains an important neurological manifestation that adversely affects a patient's quality of life. HIV-1 matrix protein p17 (p17) has been detected in autoptic brain tissue of HAND individuals who presented early with severe AIDS encephalopathy. We hypothesised that the ability of p17 to misfold may result in the generation of toxic assemblies in the brain and may be relevant for HAND pathogenesis. A multidisciplinary integrated approach has been applied to determine the ability of p17 to form soluble amyloidogenic assemblies in vitro. To provide new information into the potential pathogenic role of soluble p17 species in HAND, their toxicological capability was evaluated in vivo. In C. elegans, capable of recognising toxic assemblies of amyloidogenic proteins, p17 induces a specific toxic effect which can be counteracted by tetracyclines, drugs able to hinder the formation of large oligomers and consequently amyloid fibrils. The intrahippocampal injection of p17 in mice reduces their cognitive function and induces behavioral deficiencies. These findings offer a new way of thinking about the possible cause of neurodegeneration in HIV-1-seropositive patients, which engages the ability of p17 to form soluble toxic assemblies.

  11. Role of incidence function in vaccine-induced backward bifurcation in some HIV models.

    PubMed

    Sharomi, O; Podder, C N; Gumel, A B; Elbasha, E H; Watmough, James

    2007-12-01

    The phenomenon of backward bifurcation in disease models, where a stable endemic equilibrium co-exists with a stable disease-free equilibrium when the associated reproduction number is less than unity, has important implications for disease control. In such a scenario, the classical requirement of the reproduction number being less than unity becomes only a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for disease elimination. This paper addresses the role of the choice of incidence function in a vaccine-induced backward bifurcation in HIV models. Several examples are given where backward bifurcations occur using standard incidence, but not with their equivalents that employ mass action incidence. Furthermore, this result is independent of the type of vaccination program adopted. These results emphasize the need for further work on the incidence functions used in HIV models.

  12. Asymptomatic Tuberculosis-Induced Ileal Perforation in an HIV- Infected Individual; A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tahmasebi, Sedigheh; Moslemi, Sam; Tahamtan, Maryam; Taheri, Lohrasb; Davarpanah, Mohammad Ali

    2013-01-01

    The co-existence of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and tuberculosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality because of a widespread organ involvement. The gastrointestinal tract is a common site for localization of opportunistic microorganisms in AIDS. However, surgical abdominal emergencies such as intestinal perforation resulted from tuberculosis are uncommon in these patients. The asymptomatic occurrence of such intestinal perforation has not been reported our knowledge. We represent an HIV and HCV co-infected man with miliary tuberculosis and an incidentally detected free air under  diaphragm in the chest X-ray eventually resulting in exploratory laparotomy which then revealed two tubercular-induced intestinal perforations. It seems that as the tuberculosis is increasing in incidence, mostly due to reactivation in HIV-infected patients especially in developing countries, we should not underestimate its acute abdominal emergencies such as bowel perforation. PMID:27162854

  13. Structural Constraints of Vaccine-Induced Tier-2 Autologous HIV Neutralizing Antibodies Targeting the Receptor-Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Todd; Fera, Daniela; Bhiman, Jinal; Eslamizar, Leila; Lu, Xiaozhi; Anasti, Kara; Zhang, Ruijung; Sutherland, Laura L; Scearce, Richard M; Bowman, Cindy M; Stolarchuk, Christina; Lloyd, Krissey E; Parks, Robert; Eaton, Amanda; Foulger, Andrew; Nie, Xiaoyan; Karim, Salim S Abdool; Barnett, Susan; Kelsoe, Garnett; Kepler, Thomas B; Alam, S Munir; Montefiori, David C; Moody, M Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Morris, Lynn; Santra, Sampa; Harrison, Stephen C; Haynes, Barton F

    2016-01-05

    Antibodies that neutralize autologous transmitted/founder (TF) HIV occur in most HIV-infected individuals and can evolve to neutralization breadth. Autologous neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) against neutralization-resistant (Tier-2) viruses are rarely induced by vaccination. Whereas broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb)-HIV-Envelope structures have been defined, the structures of autologous nAbs have not. Here, we show that immunization with TF mutant Envs gp140 oligomers induced high-titer, V5-dependent plasma neutralization for a Tier-2 autologous TF evolved mutant virus. Structural analysis of autologous nAb DH427 revealed binding to V5, demonstrating the source of narrow nAb specificity and explaining the failure to acquire breadth. Thus, oligomeric TF Envs can elicit autologous nAbs to Tier-2 HIVs, but induction of bnAbs will require targeting of precursors of B cell lineages that can mature to heterologous neutralization.

  14. UV-induced transcription from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat and UV-induced secretion of an extracellular factor that induces HIV-1 transcription in nonirradiated cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, B; Krämer, M; Rahmsdorf, H J; Ponta, H; Herrlich, P

    1989-01-01

    UV irradiation, but not visible sunlight, induces the transcription of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Chimeric constructs carrying all or parts of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat linked to an indicator gene were transfected into HeLa cells or murine and human T-cell lines, and their response to irradiation was tested. The cis-acting element conferring UV responsiveness is identical to the sequence binding transcription factor NF kappa B. UV irradiation enhances NF kappa B binding activity as assayed by gel retardation experiments. Interestingly, the requirement for UV irradiation can be replaced by cocultivation of transfected cells with UV-irradiated nontransfected (HIV-1-negative) cells. A UV-induced extracellular protein factor is detected in the culture medium conditioned by UV-treated cells. The factor is produced upon UV irradiation by several murine and human cell lines, including HeLa, Molt-4, and Jurkat, and acts on several cells. These data suggest that the UV response of keratinocytes in human skin can be magnified and spread to deeper layers that are more shielded, including the Langerhans cells, and that this indirect UV response may contribute to the activation of HIV-1 in humans. Images PMID:2795711

  15. cis Expression of the F12 Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Nef Allele Transforms the Highly Productive NL4-3 HIV Type 1 to a Replication-Defective Strain: Involvement of both Env gp41 and CD4 Intracytoplasmic Tails

    PubMed Central

    Olivetta, Eleonora; Pugliese, Katherina; Bona, Roberta; D'Aloja, Paola; Ferrantelli, Flavia; Santarcangelo, Anna Claudia; Mattia, Gianfranco; Verani, Paola; Federico, Maurizio

    2000-01-01

    F12 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nef is a naturally occurring nef mutant cloned from the provirus of a nonproductive, nondefective, and interfering HIV-1 variant (F12-HIV). We have already shown that cells stably transfected with a vector expressing the F12-HIV nef allele do not downregulate CD4 receptors and, more peculiarly, become resistant to the replication of wild type (wt) HIV. In order to investigate the mechanism of action of such an HIV inhibition, the F12-HIV nef gene was expressed in the context of the NL4-3 HIV-1 infectious molecular clone by replacing the wt nef gene (NL4-3/chi). Through this experimental approach we established the following. First, NL4-3/chi and nef-defective (Δnef) NL4-3 viral particles behave very similarly in terms of viral entry and HIV protein production during the first replicative cycle. Second, no viral particles were produced from cells infected with NL4-3/chi virions, whatever the multiplicity of infection used. The viral inhibition apparently occurs at level of viral assembling and/or release. Third, this block could not be relieved by in-trans expression of wt nef. Finally, NL4-3/chi reverts to a producer HIV strain when F12-HIV Nef is deprived of its myristoyl residue. Through a CD4 downregulation competition assay, we demonstrated that F12-HIV Nef protein potently inhibits the CD4 downregulation induced by wt Nef. Moreover, we observed a redistribution of CD4 receptors at the cell margin induced by F12-HIV Nef. These observations strongly suggest that F12-HIV Nef maintains the ability to interact with the intracytoplasmic tail of the CD4 receptor molecule. Remarkably, we distinguished the intracytoplasmic tails of Env gp41 and CD4 as, respectively, viral and cellular targets of the F12-HIV Nef-induced viral retention. For the first time, the inhibition of the viral life cycle by means of in-cis expression of a Nef mutant is here reported. Delineation of the F12-HIV Nef mechanism of action may offer

  16. TLR9-adjuvanted pneumococcal conjugate vaccine induces antibody-independent memory responses in HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Offersen, Rasmus; Melchjorsen, Jesper; Paludan, Søren R; Østergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Søgaard, Ole S

    2012-08-01

    HIV-patients have excess of pneumococcal infection. We immunized 40 HIV-patients twice with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (Prevnar, Pfizer) +/- a TLR9 agonist (CPG 7909). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with pneumococcal polysaccharides and cytokine concentrations measured. The CPG 7909 adjuvant group had significantly higher relative cytokine responses than the placebo group for IL-1β, IL-2R, IL-6, IFN-γ and MIP-β, which, did not correlate with IgG antibody responses. These findings suggests that CPG 7909 as adjuvant to pneumococcal conjugate vaccine induces cellular memory to pneumococcal polysaccharides in HIV-patients, independently of the humoral response.

  17. Immunogenicity studies of bivalent inactivated virions of EV71/CVA16 formulated with submicron emulsion systems.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Wei; Liu, Chia-Chyi; Lu, Tsung-Chun; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chow, Yen-Hung; Chong, Pele; Huang, Ming-Hsi

    2014-01-01

    We assessed two strategies for preparing candidate vaccines against hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) caused mainly by infections of enterovirus (EV) 71 and coxsackievirus (CV) A16. We firstly design and optimize the potency of adjuvant combinations of emulsion-based delivery systems, using EV71 candidate vaccine as a model. We then perform immunogenicity studies in mice of EV71/CVA16 antigen combinations formulated with PELC/CpG. A single dose of inactivated EV71 virion (0.2 μg) emulsified in submicron particles was found (i) to induce potent antigen-specific neutralizing antibody responses and (ii) consistently to elicit broad antibody responses against EV71 neutralization epitopes. A single dose immunogenicity study of bivalent activated EV71/CVA16 virion formulated with either Alum or PELC/CpG adjuvant showed that CVA16 antigen failed to elicit CVA16 neutralizing antibody responses and did not affect EV71-specific neutralizing antibody responses. A boosting dose of emulsified EV71/CVA16 bivalent vaccine candidate was found to be necessary to achieve high seroconversion of CVA16-specific neutralizing antibody responses. The current results are important for the design and development of prophylactic vaccines against HFMD and other emerging infectious diseases.

  18. Human β defensin-3 induces chemokines from monocytes and macrophages: diminished activity in cells from HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Velizar; Funderburg, Nicholas; Weinberg, Aaron; Sieg, Scott

    2013-12-01

    Human β defensin-3 (hBD-3) is an antimicrobial peptide with diverse functionality. We investigated the capacity of hBD-3 and, for comparison, Pam3CSK4 and LL-37 to induce co-stimulatory molecules and chemokine expression in monocytes. These stimuli differentially induced CD80 and CD86 on the surface of monocytes and each stimulant induced a variety of chemokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), Gro-α, macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP1β), while only hBD-3 and Pam3CSK4 significantly induced the angiogenesis factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Human BD-3 induced similar chemokines in monocyte-derived macrophages and additionally induced expression of Regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and presumably secreted (RANTES) in these cells. Comparison of monocytes from HIV(+) and HIV(-) donors indicated that monocytes from HIV(+) donors were more likely to spontaneously express certain chemokines (MIP-1α, MIP-1β and MCP-1) and less able to increase expression of other molecules in response to hBD-3 (MDC, Gro-α and VEGF). Chemokine receptor expression (CCR5, CCR2 and CXCR2) was relatively normal in monocytes from HIV(+) donors compared with cells from HIV(-) donors with the exception of diminished expression of the receptor for MDC, CCR4, which was reduced in the patrolling monocyte subset (CD14(+)  CD16(++) ) of HIV(+) donors. These observations implicate chemokine induction by hBD-3 as a potentially important mechanism for orchestrating cell migration into inflamed tissues. Alterations in chemokine production or their receptors in monocytes of HIV-infected persons could influence cell migration and modify the effects of hBD-3 at sites of inflammation.

  19. Celastrol ameliorates HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via NF-kappaB and AP-1 inhibition and heme oxygenase-1 induction in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Youn, Gi Soo; Kwon, Dong-Joo; Ju, Sung Mi; Rhim, Hyangshuk; Bae, Yong Soo; Choi, Soo Young; Park, Jinseu

    2014-10-01

    HIV-1 Tat causes extensive neuroinflammation that may progress to AIDS-related encephalitis and dementia. Celastrol possesses various biological activities such as anti-oxidant, anti-tumor, and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we investigated the modulatory effects of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses and the molecular mechanisms underlying its action in astrocytes. Pre-treatment of CRT-MG human astroglioma cells with celastrol significantly inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of ICAM-1/VCAM-1 and subsequent monocyte adhesiveness in CRT-MG cells. In addition, celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines, such as CXCL10, IL-8, and MCP-1. Celastrol decreased HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of JNK MAPK, AP-1, and NF-κB. Furthermore, celastrol induced mRNA and protein expression of HO-1 as well as Nrf2 activation. Blockage of HO-1 expression using siRNA reversed the inhibitory effect of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses. These results suggest that celastrol has regulatory effects on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses by blocking the JNK MAPK-AP-1/NF-κB signaling pathways and inducing HO-1 expression in astrocytes. - Highlights: • Celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory genes. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat -induced activation of JNK MAPK. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of both NF-κB and AP-1. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via HO-1 induction.

  20. HIV-1 Vpu Accessory Protein Induces Caspase-mediated Cleavage of IRF3 Transcription Factor*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Yoon; Waheed, Abdul A.; Zhang, Zai-Rong; Freed, Eric O.; Bonifacino, Juan S.

    2014-01-01

    Vpu is an accessory protein encoded by HIV-1 that interferes with multiple host-cell functions. Herein we report that expression of Vpu by transfection into 293T cells causes partial proteolytic cleavage of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), a key transcription factor in the innate anti-viral response. Vpu-induced IRF3 cleavage is mediated by caspases and occurs mainly at Asp-121. Cleavage produces a C-terminal fragment of ∼37 kDa that comprises the IRF dimerization and transactivation domains but lacks the DNA-binding domain. A similar cleavage is observed upon infection of the Jurkat T-cell line with vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein (VSV-G)-pseudotyped HIV-1. Two other HIV-1 accessory proteins, Vif and Vpr, also contribute to the induction of IRF3 cleavage in both the transfection and the infection systems. The C-terminal IRF3 fragment interferes with the transcriptional activity of full-length IRF3. Cleavage of IRF3 under all of these conditions correlates with cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, an indicator of apoptosis. We conclude that Vpu contributes to the attenuation of the anti-viral response by partial inactivation of IRF3 while host cells undergo apoptosis. PMID:25352594

  1. Syncytial apoptosis signaling network induced by the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Nardacci, R; Perfettini, J-L; Grieco, L; Thieffry, D; Kroemer, G; Piacentini, M

    2015-01-01

    Infection by human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is associated with a progressive decrease in CD4 T-cell numbers and the consequent collapse of host immune defenses. The major pathogenic mechanism of AIDS is the massive apoptotic destruction of the immunocompetent cells, including uninfected cells. The latter process, also known as by-stander killing, operates by various mechanisms one of which involves the formation of syncytia which undergo cell death by following a complex pathway. We present here a detailed and curated map of the syncytial apoptosis signaling network, aimed at simplifying the whole mechanism that we have characterized at the molecular level in the last 15 years. The map was created using Systems Biology Graphical Notation language with the help of CellDesigner software and encompasses 36 components (proteins/genes) and 54 interactions. The simplification of this complex network paves the way for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to eradicate HIV-1 infection. Agents that induce the selective death of HIV-1-elicited syncytia might lead to the elimination of viral reservoirs and hence constitute an important complement to current antiretroviral therapies. PMID:26247731

  2. Cannabinoids Occlude the HIV-1 Tat-Induced Decrease in GABAergic Neurotransmission in Prefrontal Cortex Slices.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changqing; Hermes, Douglas J; Mackie, Ken; Lichtman, Aron H; Ignatowska-Jankowska, Bogna M; Fitting, Sylvia

    2016-06-01

    In the era of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is now considered a chronic disease that specifically targets the brain and causes HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Endocannabinoids exhibit neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties in several central nervous system (CNS) disease models, but their effects in HAND are poorly understood. To address this issue, whole-cell recordings were performed on young (14-24 day old) C57BL/6J mice. We investigated the actions of the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 (1 μM) and the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anandamide; AEA, 1 μM) in the presence of HIV-1 Tat on GABAergic neurotransmission in mouse prefrontal cortex (PFC) slices. We found a Tat concentration-dependent (5-50 nM) decrease in the frequency and amplitude of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs). The cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) antagonist rimonabant (1 μM) and zero extracellular calcium prevented the significant Tat-induced decrease in mIPSCs. Further, bath-applied WIN55,212-2 or AEA by itself, significantly decreased the frequency, but not amplitude of mIPSCs and/or spontaneous IPSCs (sIPSCs), and occluded a further downregulation of IPSCs by Tat. Pretreatment with rimonabant but not the CB2R antagonist AM630 (1 μM) prevented the WIN55,212-2- and AEA-induced decrease in IPSCs frequency without any further Tat effect. Results indicated a Tat-induced decrease in GABAergic neurotransmission, which was occluded by cannabinoids via a CB1R-related mechanism. Understanding the relationship between Tat toxicity and endocannabinoid signaling has the potential to identify novel therapeutic interventions to benefit individuals suffering from HAND and other cognitive impairments.

  3. Cannabinoids occlude the HIV-1 Tat-induced decrease in GABAergic neurotransmission in prefrontal cortex slices

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Changqing; Hermes, Douglas J; Mackie, Ken; Lichtman, Aron H; Ignatowska-Jankowska, Bogna M; Fitting, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    In the era of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is now considered a chronic disease that specifically targets the brain and causes HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Endocannabinoids exhibit neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties in several central nervous system (CNS) disease models, but their effects in HAND are poorly understood. To address this issue, whole-cell recordings were performed on young (14 – 21 day old) C57BL/6J mice. We investigated the actions of the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 (1 μM) and the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anandamide; AEA, 1 μM) in the presence of HIV-1 Tat on GABAergic neurotransmission in mouse prefrontal cortex (PFC) slices. We found a Tat concentration dependent (5 – 50 nM) decrease in the frequency and amplitude of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs). The cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) antagonist rimonabant (1 μM) and zero extracellular calcium prevented the significant Tat-induced decrease in mIPSCs. Further, bath-applied WIN55,212-2 or AEA by itself, significantly decreased the frequency, but not amplitude of mIPSCs and/or spontaneous IPSCs (sIPSCs), and occluded a further down-regulation of IPSCs by Tat. Pretreatment with rimonabant but not the CB2R antagonist AM630 (1 μM) prevented the WIN55,212-2- and AEA-induced decrease in IPSCs frequency without any further Tat effect. Results indicated a Tat-induced decrease in GABAergic neurotransmission, which was occluded by cannabinoids via a CB1R-related mechanism. Understanding the relationship between Tat toxicity and endocannabinoid signaling has the potential to identify novel therapeutic interventions to benefit individuals suffering from HAND and other cognitive impairments. PMID:26993829

  4. High Incidence of Zidovudine Induced Anaemia in HIV Infected Patients in Southern Odisha.

    PubMed

    Dash, Kaibalya Ranjan; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Hui, P K; Behera, S K; Nayak, S N

    2015-06-01

    Zidovudine (AZT), a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor was the first breakthrough in AIDS therapy in 1990.This study was conducted with an aim to determine prevalence of AZT induced anaemia in HIV infected patients initiated on AZT containing anti retroviral therapy(ART) regimen and also to find out any risk factor for causing AZT induced anaemia. Study was carried out in ART centre, M.K.C.G, MCH, Berhampur between Jan 2009 and Dec 2011. HIV infected patients registered at ART centre were treated according to National AIDS Control Organisation (NACO) guidelines. Patients (n = 1221) with Hb >8 gm/dl were prescribed AZT based ART regimen. Patients having anaemia (<8 gm/dl) were excluded from the study. Correlation of baseline characteristics (age, sex, weight, Hb level, CD4 count, World Health Organization (WHO) clinical stage) with risk of developing anaemia was also calculated. 178 (14.6 %) patients on AZT regimen developed anaemia. Patients with low CD4 count were more prone to develop severe anaemia. Age, sex, weight, WHO clinical stage had no relation with development of anaemia. Incidence of AZT induced anaemia was very high and patients having low CD4 count were more susceptible to develop anaemia.

  5. Are Structural Changes Induced by Lithium in the HIV Brain Accompanied by Changes in Functional Connectivity?

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Christoph; Lehmann, Thomas; Zhu, Tong; Zhong, Jianhui; Leistritz, Lutz; Schifitto, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Lithium therapy has been shown to affect imaging measures of brain function and microstructure in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected subjects with cognitive impairment. The aim of this proof-of-concept study was to explore whether changes in brain microstructure also entail changes in functional connectivity. Functional MRI data of seven cognitively impaired HIV infected individuals enrolled in an open-label lithium study were included in the connectivity analysis. Seven regions of interest (ROI) were defined based on previously observed lithium induced microstructural changes measured by Diffusion Tensor Imaging. Generalized partial directed coherence (gPDC), based on time-variant multivariate autoregressive models, was used to quantify the degree of connectivity between the selected ROIs. Statistical analyses using a linear mixed model showed significant differences in the average node strength between pre and post lithium therapy conditions. Specifically, we found that lithium treatment in this population induced changes suggestive of increased strength in functional connectivity. Therefore, by exploiting the information about the strength of functional interactions provided by gPDC we can quantify the connectivity changes observed in relation to a given intervention. Furthermore, in conditions where the intervention is associated with clinical changes, we suggest that this methodology could enable an interpretation of such changes in the context of disease or treatment induced modulations in functional networks. PMID:26436895

  6. Assembly and architecture of HIV.

    PubMed

    Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K; Yeager, Mark; Pornillos, Owen

    2012-01-01

    HIV forms spherical, membrane-enveloped, pleomorphic virions, 1,000-1,500 Å in diameter, which contain two copies of its single-stranded, positive-sense RNA genome. Virus particles initially bud from host cells in a noninfectious or immature form, in which the genome is further encapsulated inside a spherical protein shell composed of around 2,500 copies of the virally encoded Gag polyprotein. The Gag molecules are radially arranged, adherent to the inner leaflet of the viral membrane, and closely associated as a hexagonal, paracrystalline lattice. Gag comprises three major structural domains called MA, CA, and NC. For immature virions to become infectious, they must undergo a maturation process that is initiated by proteolytic processing of Gag by the viral protease. The new Gag-derived proteins undergo dramatic rearrangements to form the mature virus. The mature MA protein forms a "matrix" layer and remains attached to the viral envelope, NC condenses with the genome, and approximately 1,500 copies of CA assemble into a new cone-shaped protein shell, called the mature capsid, which surrounds the genomic ribonucleoprotein complex. The HIV capsid conforms to the mathematical principles of a fullerene shell, in which the CA subunits form about 250 CA hexamers arrayed on a variably curved hexagonal lattice, which is closed by incorporation of exactly 12 pentamers, seven pentamers at the wide end and five at the narrow end of the cone. This chapter describes our current understanding of HIV's virion architecture and its dynamic transformations: the process of virion assembly as orchestrated by Gag, the architecture of the immature virion, the virus maturation process, and the structure of the mature capsid.

  7. Gp120 binding with DC-SIGN induces reactivation of HIV-1 provirus via the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Jin, Changzhong; Li, Jie; Cheng, Linfang; Liu, Fumin; Wu, Nanping

    2016-03-01

    The reactivation mechanism of latent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is unclear, especially in dendritic cells (DC). DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) binds with HIV-1 and other pathogens to activate the extracellular regulated protein kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathways and regulate cytokine expression. We hypothesized that DC-SIGN-induced signaling pathways may activate HIV-1 provirus. To investigate this hypothesis, we generated a model by transfecting 293T cells with a DC-SIGN expression plasmid and an HIV-1 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) reporter plasmid, and then stimulated the 293T cells with HIV-1 gp120 protein, wild-type HIV-1 or VSV-G-pNL4.3 pseudotype virus (without gp120 protein). It was found that the HIV-1 5'LTR was reactivated by HIV-1 gp120 in DC-SIGN-expressing 293T cells. Then the HIV-1 chronically infected CEM-Bru cells were transfected with DC-SIGN expression plasmid and stimulated by HIV-1 gp120 protein. It was found that early and late HIV-1 provirus replication was reactivated by the HIV-1 gp120/DC-SIGN stimulation. We then investigated the involvement of the ERK, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and NF-κB signaling pathways in HIV-1 gp120/DC-SIGN-induced activation of HIV-1 provirus by inhibiting the pathways specifically. Our results indicated that HIV-1 gp120/DC-SIGN stimulation reactivates latent HIV-1 provirus via the NF-κB signal pathway.

  8. Gp120 binding with DC-SIGN induces reactivation of HIV-1 provirus via the NF-κB signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Changzhong; Li, Jie; Cheng, Linfang; Liu, Fumin; Wu, Nanping

    2016-01-01

    The reactivation mechanism of latent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is unclear, especially in dendritic cells (DC). DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) binds with HIV-1 and other pathogens to activate the extracellular regulated protein kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathways and regulate cytokine expression. We hypothesized that DC-SIGN-induced signaling pathways may activate HIV-1 provirus. To investigate this hypothesis, we generated a model by transfecting 293T cells with a DC-SIGN expression plasmid and an HIV-1 5′ long terminal repeat (LTR) reporter plasmid, and then stimulated the 293T cells with HIV-1 gp120 protein, wild-type HIV-1 or VSV-G-pNL4.3 pseudotype virus (without gp120 protein). It was found that the HIV-1 5′LTR was reactivated by HIV-1 gp120 in DC-SIGN-expressing 293T cells. Then the HIV-1 chronically infected CEM-Bru cells were transfected with DC-SIGN expression plasmid and stimulated by HIV-1 gp120 protein. It was found that early and late HIV-1 provirus replication was reactivated by the HIV-1 gp120/DC-SIGN stimulation. We then investigated the involvement of the ERK, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and NF-κB signaling pathways in HIV-1 gp120/DC-SIGN-induced activation of HIV-1 provirus by inhibiting the pathways specifically. Our results indicated that HIV-1 gp120/DC-SIGN stimulation reactivates latent HIV-1 provirus via the NF-κB signal pathway. PMID:26837416

  9. Modeling HIV-1 Induced Neuroinflammation in Mice: Role of Platelets in Mediating Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Letitia D.; Jackson, Joseph W.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.

    2016-01-01

    The number of HIV-1 positive individuals developing some form of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is increasing. In these individuals, the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is compromised due to an increase in exposure to pro-inflammatory mediators, viral proteins, and virus released from infected cells. It has been shown that soluble CD40L (sCD40L) is released upon platelet activation and is an important mediator of the pathogenesis of HAND but the underlying mechanisms are unclear, emphasizing the need of an effective animal model. Here, we have utilized a novel animal model in which wild-type (WT) mice were infected with EcoHIV; a derivative of HIV-1 that contains a substitution of envelope protein gp120 with that of gp80 derived from murine leukemia virus-1 (MuLV-1). As early as two-weeks post-infection, EcoHIV led to increased permeability of the BBB associated with decreased expression of tight junction protein claudin-5, in CD40L and platelet activation-dependent manner. Treatment with an antiplatelet drug, eptifibatide, in EcoHIV-infected mice normalized BBB function, sCD40L release and platelet activity, thus implicating platelet activation and platelet-derived CD40L in virally induced BBB dysfunction. Our results also validate and underscore the importance of EcoHIV infection mouse model as a tool to explore therapeutic targets for HAND. PMID:26986758

  10. Delivery of DNA HIV-1 Vaccine to the Liver Induces High and Long-lasting Humoral Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Raska, Milan; Moldoveanu, Zina; Novak, Jan; Hel, Zdenek; Bozja, Jadranka; Compans, Richard W.; Yang, Chinglai; Mestecky, Jiri

    2008-01-01

    The quality of immune responses induced by DNA vaccination depends on the site of DNA administration, the expression, and the properties of the encoded antigen. In the present study we demonstrate that intravenous hydrodynamic HIV-1 envelope DNA injection resulted in high levels of expression of HIV-1 envelope antigen in the liver. When compared to the administration of DNA by i.n., i.d., i.m., and i.splenic routes, hydrodynamic vaccination induced, upon DNA boosting, 40 times increase of HIV-1 envelope-specific antibodies over the preimmune levels. Hydrodynamic vaccination with 1 μg DNA induced higher humoral responses than 100 μg DNA given intramuscularly in the prime – boost regimen. High levels of envelope-specific IgG and IgA antibodies were induced in genital tract secretions after two doses of DNA followed by intranasal boosting with recombinant HIV-1 gp120 protein. Furthermore, two doses of 100 μg DNA generated interferon-gamma production in ~ 4.3 ± 1.7 % of CD8+ splenocytes after in vitro stimulation with HIV-1 envelope peptides. These results demonstrate that DNA vaccines targeted to tissues with high proteosynthetic activity, such as the liver, results in enhanced immune responses. PMID:18304708

  11. Anti-HIV B Cell Lines As Candidate Vaccine Biosensors1

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Takayuki; Doyle-Cooper, Colleen; Cooper, Anthony B.; Huber, Michael; Falkowska, Emilia; Doores, Katherine J.; Hangartner, Lars; Le, Khoa; Sok, Devin; Jardine, Joseph; Lifson, Jeffrey; Wu, Xueling; Mascola, John R.; Poignard, Pascal; Binley, James M.; Chakrabarti, Bimal K.; Schief, William R.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Burton, Dennis R.; Nemazee, David

    2012-01-01

    Challenge studies following passive immunization with neutralizing antibodies suggest that an HIV vaccine could be efficacious were it able to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs4). To better understand the requirements for activation of B cells producing bNAbs, we generated cell lines expressing bNAbs or their germline-reverted versions (gl-bNAbs) as BCRs. We then tested the abilities of the bNAb-expressing cells to recognize HIV pseudovirions and vaccine candidate proteins by binding and activation assays. The results suggest that HIV Env antigen-expressing, infection-competent virions are poorly recognized by high affinity bNAb-expressing cells, as measured by the inability of antigens to induce rapid increases in intracellular calcium levels. Other antigen forms appear to be highly stimulatory: in particular, soluble gp140 trimers and a multimerized, scaffolded epitope protein. Virions failed to efficiently activate bNAb-expressing B cells owing to delayed or inefficient BCR recognition, most likely caused by the low density of Env spikes. Importantly, B cells carrying gl-bNAb BCRs were not stimulated by any of the tested vaccine candidates. These data provide insight into why many HIV immunogens, and natural HIV infections, fail to rapidly stimulate bNAb responses and suggest that bNAb-expressing cell lines might be useful tools in evaluation of vaccine antigens for infectious diseases. As soluble Env trimers or multimerized scaffolded epitopes are best at activating B cell expressing bNAbs, these antigenic forms should be considered as preferred vaccine components, though they should be modified to better target naïve gl-bNAb B cells. PMID:23066156

  12. Bathophenanthroline disulfonate and soluble CD4 as probes for early events of HIV type 1 entry.

    PubMed

    Demaria, S; Tilley, S A; Pinter, A; Bushkin, Y

    1995-01-01

    We report here that a metalloprotease inhibitor, bathophenanthroline disulfonate (Bphe-ds), neutralizes both laboratory-adapted and primary strains of HIV-1. Presaturation of Bphe-ds with zinc does not alter its neutralizing activity, suggesting that the metal-chelating ability of Bphe-ds is not required for neutralization. Bphe-ds blocks infection of CD4+ cells at the stage of viral entry, not through a direct viricidal effect, but by interfering with both binding and postbinding events. This drug interacts with HIV-1 envelope, blocking almost completely the binding of three MAbs that recognize epitopes overlapping the CD4-binding site on gp120, but has no effect on the binding of MAbs directed to the cellular receptor CD4. The exposure of epitopes in the V2 and V3 but not C5 domains of gp120 is partially decreased in the presence of Bphe-ds, suggesting that the drug induces conformational changes in the envelope glycoprotein(s). Binding of both virions and soluble gp120 to CD4+ cells is inhibited by this drug in a dose-dependent manner. This contrasted with the effects of soluble CD4, which actually increased binding of virions to cells at 4 degrees C, while inhibiting the binding of soluble gp120. Bphe-ds also increases shedding of gp120 from cells infected with HIV-1IIIB. Thus, Bphe-ds appears to be an envelope-directed inhibitor of HIV-1 that neutralizes HIV-1 infectivity via multiple mechanisms.

  13. T cells detect intracellular DNA but fail to induce type I IFN responses: implications for restriction of HIV replication.

    PubMed

    Berg, Randi K; Rahbek, Stine H; Kofod-Olsen, Emil; Holm, Christian K; Melchjorsen, Jesper; Jensen, David G; Hansen, Anne Louise; Jørgensen, Louise B; Ostergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Larsen, Carsten S; Paludan, Søren R; Jakobsen, Martin R; Mogensen, Trine H

    2014-01-01

    HIV infects key cell types of the immune system, most notably macrophages and CD4+ T cells. Whereas macrophages represent an important viral reservoir, activated CD4+ T cells are the most permissive cell types supporting high levels of viral replication. In recent years, it has been appreciated that the innate immune system plays an important role in controlling HIV replication, e.g. via interferon (IFN)-inducible restriction factors. Moreover, innate immune responses are involved in driving chronic immune activation and the pathogenesis of progressive immunodeficiency. Several pattern recognition receptors detecting HIV have been reported, including Toll-like receptor 7 and Retinoic-inducible gene-I, which detects viral RNA. Here we report that human primary T cells fail to induce strong IFN responses, despite the fact that this cell type does express key molecules involved in DNA signaling pathways. We demonstrate that the DNA sensor IFI16 migrates to sites of foreign DNA localization in the cytoplasm and recruits the signaling molecules stimulator of IFN genes and Tank-binding kinase, but this does not result in expression of IFN and IFN-stimulated genes. Importantly, we show that cytosolic DNA fails to affect HIV replication. However, exogenous treatment of activated T cells with type I IFN has the capacity to induce expression of IFN-stimulated genes and suppress HIV replication. Our data suggest the existence of an impaired DNA signaling machinery in T cells, which may prevent this cell type from activating cell-autonomous anti-HIV responses. This phenomenon could contribute to the high permissiveness of CD4+ T cells for HIV-1.

  14. Suppression of HIV-1 Nef translation by Sam68 mutant-induced stress granules and nef mRNA sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Henao-Mejia, Jorge; Liu, Ying; Park, In-Woo; Zhang, Jizhong; Sanford, Jeremy; He, Johnny J.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY HIV-1 Nef plays important roles in HIV-1 replication and pathogenesis. It is translated from completely spliced HIV-1 RNA, its expression is inherently regulated at the levels of viral DNA transcription and RNA splicing. Here we show that Sam68 cytoplasmic mutants potently suppress Nef expression. The suppression requires Sam68 domain aa269-321 and is correlated with its ability to induce stress granules. In addition, the suppression is specific to Nef, and direct binding to nef mRNA 3′UTR confers the suppression specificity. Furthermore, nef mRNA is targeted to and enriched in these induced stress granules. Importantly, Nef suppression occurs in the context of HIV-1 infection of CD4+ T lymphocytes with little MHC I and CD4 down-regulation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that stress granule induction and nef mRNA sequestration account for this translational suppression of Nef expression and offers a new strategy for development of anti-HIV therapeutics to buttress our fight against HIV/AIDS. PMID:19150430

  15. Programming of neurotoxic cofactor CXCL-10 in HIV-1-associated dementia: abrogation of CXCL-10-induced neuro-glial toxicity in vitro by PKC activator

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background More than 50% of patients undergoing lifelong suppressive antiviral treatment for HIV-1 infection develop minor HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. Neurological complications during HIV-1 infection are the result of direct neuronal damage by proinflammatory products released from HIV-1-infected or -uninfected activated lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages, microglia and astrocytes. The specific pro-inflammatory products and their roles in neurotoxicity are far from clear. We investigated proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of HIV-demented (HIV-D) and HIV-nondemented (HIV-ND) patients and studied their affect on neuroglial toxicity. Methods and results Bioplex array showed elevated levels of signatory chemokines or cytokines (IL-6, IFN-γ, CXCL10, MCP-1 and PDGF) in the CSF of HIV-D patients (n = 7) but not in that of HIV-ND patients (n = 7). Among the signatory cytokines and chemokines, CXCL10 was distinctly upregulated in-vitro in HIV-1 (NLENG1)-activated human fetal astrocytes, HIV-1 (Ba-L)-infected macrophages, and HIV-1 (NLENG1)-infected lymphocytes. Virus-infected macrophages also had increased levels of TNF-α. Consistently, human fetal astrocytes treated with HIV-1 and TNF-α induced the signatory molecules. CXCL10 in combination with HIV-1 synergistically enhanced neuronal toxicity and showed chemotactic activity (~ 40 fold) for activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), suggesting the intersection of signaling events imparted by HIV-1 and CXCL10 after binding to their respective surface receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR3, on neurons. Blocking CXCR3 and its downstream MAP kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway suppressed combined CXCL10 and HIV-1-induced neurotoxicity. Bryostatin, a PKC modulator and suppressor of CXCR4, conferred neuroprotection against combined insult with HIV-1 and CXCL10. Bryostatin also suppressed HIV-1 and CXCL10-induced PBMC chemotaxis. Although, therapeutic targeting of chemokines in

  16. Running Loose or Getting Lost: How HIV-1 Counters and Capitalizes on APOBEC3-Induced Mutagenesis through Its Vif Protein

    PubMed Central

    Münk, Carsten; Jensen, Björn-Erik O.; Zielonka, Jörg; Häussinger, Dieter; Kamp, Christel

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) dynamics reflect an intricate balance within the viruses’ host. The virus relies on host replication factors, but must escape or counter its host’s antiviral restriction factors. The interaction between the HIV-1 protein Vif and many cellular restriction factors from the APOBEC3 protein family is a prominent example of this evolutionary arms race. The viral infectivity factor (Vif) protein largely neutralizes APOBEC3 proteins, which can induce in vivo hypermutations in HIV-1 to the extent of lethal mutagenesis, and ensures the production of viable virus particles. HIV-1 also uses the APOBEC3-Vif interaction to modulate its own mutation rate in harsh or variable environments, and it is a model of adaptation in a coevolutionary setting. Both experimental evidence and the substantiation of the underlying dynamics through coevolutionary models are presented as complementary views of a coevolutionary arms race. PMID:23202519

  17. Sublingual immunization with an HIV subunit vaccine induces antibodies and cytotoxic T cells in the mouse female genital tract.

    PubMed

    Hervouet, Catherine; Luci, Carmelo; Cuburu, Nicolas; Cremel, Magali; Bekri, Selma; Vimeux, Lene; Marañon, Concepcion; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Hosmalin, Anne; Anjuère, Fabienne

    2010-08-02

    A vaccine against heterosexual transmission by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) should generate cytotoxic and antibody responses in the female genital tract and in extra-genital organs. We report that sublingual immunization with HIV-1 gp41 and a reverse transcriptase polypeptide coupled to the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) induced gp41-specific IgA antibodies and antibody-secreting cells, as well as reverse transcriptase-specific CD8 T cells in the genital mucosa, contrary to intradermal immunization. Conjugation of the reverse transcriptase peptide to CTB favored its cross-presentation by human dendritic cells to a T cell line from an HIV(+) patient. Sublingual vaccination could represent a promising vaccine strategy against heterosexual transmission of HIV-1.

  18. Uukuniemi Phlebovirus assembly and secretion leave a functional imprint on the virion glycome.

    PubMed

    Crispin, Max; Harvey, David J; Bitto, David; Halldorsson, Steinar; Bonomelli, Camille; Edgeworth, Matthew; Scrivens, James H; Huiskonen, Juha T; Bowden, Thomas A

    2014-09-01

    Uukuniemi virus (UUKV) is a model system for investigating the genus Phlebovirus of the Bunyaviridae. We report the UUKV glycome, revealing differential processing of the Gn and Gc virion glycoproteins. Both glycoproteins display poly-N-acetyllactosamines, consistent with virion assembly in the medial Golgi apparatus, whereas oligomannose-type glycans required for DC-SIGN-dependent cellular attachment are predominant on Gc. Local virion structure and the route of viral egress from the cell leave a functional imprint on the phleboviral glycome.

  19. Differential expression of HERV-K (HML-2) proviruses in cells and virions of the teratocarcinoma cell line Tera-1.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Neeru; Montesion, Meagan; Roy, Farrah; Coffin, John M

    2015-03-04

    Human endogenous retrovirus (HERV-K (HML-2)) proviruses are among the few endogenous retroviral elements in the human genome that retain coding sequence. HML-2 expression has been widely associated with human disease states, including different types of cancers as well as with HIV-1 infection. Understanding of the potential impact of this expression requires that it be annotated at the proviral level. Here, we utilized the high throughput capabilities of next-generation sequencing to profile HML-2 expression at the level of individual proviruses and secreted virions in the teratocarcinoma cell line Tera-1. We identified well-defined expression patterns, with transcripts emanating primarily from two proviruses located on chromosome 22, only one of which was efficiently packaged. Interestingly, there was a preference for transcripts of recently integrated proviruses, over those from other highly expressed but older elements, to be packaged into virions. We also assessed the promoter competence of the 5' long terminal repeats (LTRs) of expressed proviruses via a luciferase assay following transfection of Tera-1 cells. Consistent with the RNASeq results, we found that the activity of most LTRs corresponded to their transcript levels.

  20. Differential Expression of HERV-K (HML-2) Proviruses in Cells and Virions of the Teratocarcinoma Cell Line Tera-1

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Neeru; Montesion, Meagan; Roy, Farrah; Coffin, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Human endogenous retrovirus (HERV-K (HML-2)) proviruses are among the few endogenous retroviral elements in the human genome that retain coding sequence. HML-2 expression has been widely associated with human disease states, including different types of cancers as well as with HIV-1 infection. Understanding of the potential impact of this expression requires that it be annotated at the proviral level. Here, we utilized the high throughput capabilities of next-generation sequencing to profile HML-2 expression at the level of individual proviruses and secreted virions in the teratocarcinoma cell line Tera-1. We identified well-defined expression patterns, with transcripts emanating primarily from two proviruses located on chromosome 22, only one of which was efficiently packaged. Interestingly, there was a preference for transcripts of recently integrated proviruses, over those from other highly expressed but older elements, to be packaged into virions. We also assessed the promoter competence of the 5’ long terminal repeats (LTRs) of expressed proviruses via a luciferase assay following transfection of Tera-1 cells. Consistent with the RNASeq results, we found that the activity of most LTRs corresponded to their transcript levels. PMID:25746218

  1. HIV antiretroviral drug combination induces endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction and reactive oxygen species production, but not apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Bo; Hebert, Valeria Y.; Li, Yuchi; Mathis, J. Michael; Alexander, J. Steven; Dugas, Tammy R.

    2007-10-01

    Numerous reports now indicate that HIV patients administered long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) are at a greater risk for developing cardiovascular diseases. Endothelial dysfunction is an initiating event in atherogenesis and may contribute to HIV-associated atherosclerosis. We previously reported that ART induces direct endothelial dysfunction in rodents. In vitro treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with ART indicated endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction and a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we determined whether ART-induced endothelial dysfunction is mediated via mitochondria-derived ROS and whether this mitochondrial injury culminates in endothelial cell apoptosis. Two major components of ART combination therapy, a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a protease inhibitor, were tested, using AZT and indinavir as representatives for each. Microscopy utilizing fluorescent indicators of ROS and mitochondria demonstrated the mitochondrial localization of ART-induced ROS. MnTBAP, a cell-permeable metalloporphyrin antioxidant, abolished ART-induced ROS production. As a final step in confirming the mitochondrial origin of the ART-induced ROS, HUVEC were transduced with a cytosolic- compared to a mitochondria-targeted catalase. Transduction with the mitochondria-targeted catalase was more effective than cytoplasmic catalase in inhibiting the ROS and 8-isoprostane (8-iso-PGF{sub 2{alpha}}) produced after treatment with either AZT or indinavir. However, both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic catalase attenuated ROS and 8-iso-PGF{sub 2{alpha}} production induced by the combination treatment, suggesting that in this case, the formation of cytoplasmic ROS may also occur, and thus, that the mechanism of toxicity in the combination treatment group may be different compared to treatment with AZT or indinavir alone. Finally, to determine whether ART-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and

  2. DC immunotherapy in HIV-1 infection induces a major blood transcriptome shift.

    PubMed

    de Goede, Anna L; Andeweg, Arno C; van den Ham, Henk-Jan; Bijl, Maarten A; Zaaraoui-Boutahar, Fatiha; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Wilgenhof, Sofie; Aerts, Joeri L; Gruters, Rob A; Osterhaus, Albert D M E

    2015-06-09

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of dendritic cell (DC) vaccination against HIV-1 on host gene expression profiles. Longitudinal PBMC samples were collected from participants of the DC-TRN trial for immunotherapy against HIV. Microarray-assisted gene expression profiling was performed to evaluate the effects of vaccination and subsequent interruption of antiretroviral therapy on host genome expression. Data from the DC-TRN trial were compared with results from other vaccination trials. We used Affymetrix GeneChips for microarray gene expression analysis. Data were analyzed by principal component analysis and differential gene expression was assessed using linear modeling. Gene ontology enrichment and gene set analysis were used to characterize differentially expressed genes. Transcriptome analysis included comparison with PBMCs obtained from DC-vaccinated melanoma patients and of healthy individuals who received seasonal influenza vaccination. DC-TRN immunotherapy in HIV-infected individuals resulted in a major shift in the transcriptome. Longitudinal analysis demonstrated that changes in the transcriptome sustained also during interruption of antiretroviral therapy. After DC-vaccination, the transcriptome was enriched for cellular immunity associated genes that were also induced in healthy adults who received live attenuated influenza virus vaccination. These beneficial responses were accompanied by detrimental signals of general immune activation. The DC-TRN induced changes in the transcriptome were profound, lasting, and consisted of both protective signals and signatures of inflammation and immune exhaustion, with a net result of decreased viral load, without clinical benefit. Thus transcriptome analysis provides useful information, dissecting both positive and negative effects, for the evaluation of safety and efficacy of immunotherapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Chromosome of the mature virion of simian virus 40 contains H1 histone.

    PubMed Central

    Nedospasov, S A; Bakayev, V V; Georgiev, G P

    1978-01-01

    In addition to free SV40 minichromosomes in the compact form, complete virions were obtained from the nuclear extract of productively infected cells. Capsid proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3, as well as histones, were observed on electrophoregrams of proteins prepared from virions. In contrast to the widely accepted view, histone H1 was found in virions in stoichiometric amounts with respect to other histones. The same is true for virions isolated by a conventional method. Free minichromosomes present in infected cells contain all histones and practically no viral proteins. Images PMID:211487

  4. HIV-1 Tat protein binds to TLR4-MD2 and signals to induce TNF-α and IL-10.

    PubMed

    Ben Haij, Nawal; Leghmari, Kaoutar; Planès, Rémi; Thieblemont, Nathalie; Bahraoui, Elmostafa

    2013-10-28

    HIV-1 infection results in hyper-immune activation and immunological disorders as early as the asymptomatic stage. Here, we hypothesized that during early HIV-1 infection, HIV-1 Tat protein acts on monocytes/macrophages to induce anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory cytokines and participates in immune dysregulation. In this work we showed that Tat protein: i) by its N-terminal domain induces production of both IL-10 and TNF-α in a TLR4-MD2 dependent manner, ii) interacts specifically with TLR4-MD2 and MD2 with high affinity but not with CD14, iii) induces in vivo TNF-α and IL-10 in a TLR4 dependent manner. Collectively, our data showed for the first time that, HIV-1 Tat interacts physically with high affinity with TLR4-MD2 to promote proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α) and the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 both involved in immune dysregulation during early HIV-1 infection and AIDS progression.

  5. HIV-1 gp120 Mannoses Induce Immunosuppressive Responses from Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Meimei; Klasse, Per Johan; Banerjee, Kaustuv; Dey, Antu K; Iyer, Sai Prasad N; Dionisio, Robert; Charles, Dustin; Campbell-Gardener, Lila; Olson, William C; Sanders, Rogier W; Moore, John P

    2007-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 is a vaccine immunogen that can signal via several cell surface receptors. To investigate whether receptor biology could influence immune responses to gp120, we studied its interaction with human, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) in vitro. Gp120 from the HIV-1 strain JR-FL induced IL-10 expression in MDDCs from 62% of donors, via a mannose C-type lectin receptor(s) (MCLR). Gp120 from the strain LAI was also an IL-10 inducer, but gp120 from the strain KNH1144 was not. The mannose-binding protein cyanovirin-N, the 2G12 mAb to a mannose-dependent gp120 epitope, and MCLR-specific mAbs inhibited IL-10 expression, as did enzymatic removal of gp120 mannose moieties, whereas inhibitors of signaling via CD4, CCR5, or CXCR4 were ineffective. Gp120-stimulated IL-10 production correlated with DC-SIGN expression on the cells, and involved the ERK signaling pathway. Gp120-treated MDDCs also responded poorly to maturation stimuli by up-regulating activation markers inefficiently and stimulating allogeneic T cell proliferation only weakly. These adverse reactions to gp120 were MCLR-dependent but independent of IL-10 production. Since such mechanisms might suppress immune responses to Env-containing vaccines, demannosylation may be a way to improve the immunogenicity of gp120 or gp140 proteins. PMID:17983270

  6. Prevalence and Gene Characteristics of Antibodies with Cofactor-induced HIV-1 Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Lecerf, Maxime; Scheel, Tobias; Pashov, Anastas D.; Jarossay, Annaelle; Ohayon, Delphine; Planchais, Cyril; Mesnage, Stephane; Berek, Claudia; Kaveri, Srinivas V.; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Dimitrov, Jordan D.

    2015-01-01

    The healthy immune repertoire contains a fraction of antibodies that bind to various biologically relevant cofactors, including heme. Interaction of heme with some antibodies results in induction of new antigen binding specificities and acquisition of binding polyreactivity. In vivo, extracellular heme is released as a result of hemolysis or tissue damage; hence the post-translational acquisition of novel antigen specificities might play an important role in the diversification of the immunoglobulin repertoire and host defense. Here, we demonstrate that seronegative immune repertoires contain antibodies that gain reactivity to HIV-1 gp120 upon exposure to heme. Furthermore, a panel of human recombinant antibodies was cloned from different B cell subpopulations, and the prevalence of antibodies with cofactor-induced specificity for gp120 was determined. Our data reveal that upon exposure to heme, ∼24% of antibodies acquired binding specificity for divergent strains of HIV-1 gp120. Sequence analyses reveal that heme-sensitive antibodies do not differ in their repertoire of variable region genes and in most of the molecular features of their antigen-binding sites from antibodies that do not change their antigen binding specificity. However, antibodies with cofactor-induced gp120 specificity possess significantly lower numbers of somatic mutations in their variable region genes. This study contributes to the understanding of the significance of cofactor-binding antibodies in immunoglobulin repertoires and of the influence that the tissue microenvironment might have in shaping adaptive immune responses. PMID:25564611

  7. Altered T cell surface glycosylation in HIV-1 infection results in increased susceptibility to galectin-1-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Lantéri, Marion; Giordanengo, Valérie; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Fuzibet, Jean-Gabriel; Auberger, Patrick; Fukuda, Minoru; Baum, Linda G; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude

    2003-12-01

    The massive T cell death that occurs in HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infection contributes profoundly to the pathophysiology associated with AIDS. The mechanisms controlling cell death of both infected and uninfected T cells ("bystander" death) are not completely understood. We have shown that HIV-1 infection of T cells results in altered glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins; specifically, it decreased sialylation and increased expression of core 2 O-glycans. Galectin-1 is an endogenous human lectin that recognizes these types of glycosylation changes and induces cell death of activated lymphocytes. Therefore we studied the possible contribution of galectin-1 in the pathophysiology of AIDS. O-glycan modifications were investigated on peripheral lymphocytes from AIDS patients. Oligosaccharides from CD43 and CD45 of CEM cells latently infected with HIV-1 were chemically analyzed. Consistent with our previous results, we show that HIV-1 infection results in accumulation of exposed lactosamine residues, oligosaccharides recognized by galectin-1 on cell surface glycoproteins. Both latently HIV-1-infected T cell lines and peripheral CD4 and CD8 T cells from AIDS patients exhibited exposed lactosamine residues and demonstrated marked susceptibility to galectin-1-induced cell death, in contrast to control cultures or cells from uninfected donors. The fraction of cells that died in response to galectin-1 exceeded the fraction of infected cells, indicating that death of uninfected cells occurred. Altered cell surface glycosylation of T cells during HIV-1 infection increases the susceptibility to galectin-1-induced cell death, and this death pathway can contribute to loss of both infected and uninfected T cells in AIDS.

  8. A Growth Factor Attenuates HIV-1 Tat and Morphine Induced Damage to Human Neurons: Implication in HIV/AIDS-Drug Abuse Cases

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Shaily; Khalique, Hena; Buch, Shilpa; Seth, Pankaj

    2011-01-01

    The neuropathological abnormalities of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 patients abusing illicit drugs suggest extensive interactions between the two agents, thereby leading to increased rate of progression to neurodegeneration. The role of HIV-1 transactivating protein, Tat has been elucidated in mediating neuronal damage via apoptosis, a hallmark of HIV-associated dementia (HAD), however the underlying mechanisms involved in enhanced neurodegeneration by illicit drugs remain elusive. In this study, we demonstrated that morphine enhances HIV-Tat induced toxicity in human neurons and neuroblastoma cells. Enhanced toxicity by Tat and morphine was accompanied by increased numbers of TUNEL positive apoptotic neurons, elevated caspase-3 levels and decreased ratio of anti- and pro-apoptotic proteins, Bcl2/Bax. Tat and morphine together elicited high levels of reactive oxygen species that were NADPH dependent. Significant alterations in mitochondrial membrane homeostasis were also observed with co-exposure of these agents. Extensive studies of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways revealed the involvement of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2) pathways in enhanced toxicity of Tat and morphine. In addition to this, we found that pre-treatment of cells with platelet derived growth factor (PDGF-BB) protected neurons from HIV-Tat and morphine induced damage. PDGF-BB alleviated ROS production, maintained mitochondrial membrane potential, decreased caspase-3 activation and hence protected the cells from undergoing apoptosis. PDGF-BB mediated protection against Tat and morphine involved the phosphatidylinositol–3 kinase (PI3K) pathway, as specific inhibitor of PI3K abrogated the protection conferred by PDGF-BB. This study demonstrates the mechanism of enhanced toxicity in human neurons subjected to co-exposure of HIV protein Tat and morphine, thus implying its importance in HIV positive drug abusers

  9. HIV-1 viral protein r induces ERK and caspase-8 dependent apoptosis in renal tubular epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Alexandra; Alsauskas, Zygimantas C.; Leventhal, Jeremy S.; Rosenstiel, Paul E.; Gong, Pengfei; Chan, Justin JK; Barley, Kevin; He, John C.; Klotman, Mary E.; Ross, Michael J.; Klotman, Paul E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective HIV-associated nephropathy is the most common cause of end stage renal disease in persons with HIV/AIDS and is characterized by focal glomerulosclerosis and dysregulated renal tubular epithelial cell (RTEC) proliferation and apoptosis. HIV-1 viral protein r (Vpr) has been implicated in HIV-induced RTEC apoptosis but the mechanisms of Vpr-induced RTEC apoptosis are unknown. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the mechanisms of Vpr-induced apoptosis in RTEC. Methods Apoptosis and caspase activation were analyzed in human RTEC cells (HK2) after transduction with Vpr-expressing and control lentiviral vectors. Bax and BID were inhibited with lentiviral shRNA, and ERK activation was blocked with the MEK1,2 inhibitor, U0126. Results Vpr induced apoptosis as indicated by caspase 3/7 activation, PARP-1 cleavage and mitochondrial injury. Vpr activated both caspases-8 and 9. Inhibition of Bax reduced Vpr-induced apoptosis, as reported in other cell types. Additionally, Vpr induced cleavage of BID to tBID and suppression of BID expression prevented Vpr-induced apoptosis. Since sustained ERK activation can activate caspase-8 in some cell types, we studied the role of ERK in Vpr-induced caspase-8 activation. Vpr induced sustained ERK activation in HK2 cells and incubation with U0126 reduced Vpr-induced caspase-8 activation, BID cleavage and apoptosis. We detected phosphorylated ERK in RTEC in HIVAN biopsy specimens by immunohistochemistry. Conclusions These studies delineate a novel pathway of Vpr-induced apoptosis in RTEC, which is mediated by sustained ERK activation, resulting in caspase 8-mediated cleavage of BID to tBID, thereby facilitating Bax-mediated mitochondrial injury and apoptosis. PMID:20404718

  10. Science challenging HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Rao, R R; Lakshi, V

    1993-04-01

    The first accepted report of a novel human, slow virus disease belonging to "lentivirus" known as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome can be traced to reports of June 1981. HIV-1 and HIV-2 were later found over the period 1984-86 to be unequivocally associated with AIDS. They are two serologically distinct viruses belonging to the same family with the unique properties of integration and latency in the host cell genome and the presence of reverse transcriptase. Typical of all retroviruses, the HIV genome comprises three genes governing the synthesis of all core proteins, replication protein encoding, and envelope proteins. HIV uses the CD4 antigen on T-helper cells, and about 40% of blood monocytes and tissue macrophages as a cell surface receptor. HIV may, however, also infect cells which contain no CD4. Macrophages serve as the main reservoir of HIV and may carry the virus to different organs. Very recently a rare type of white blood cell called the dendritic cell has been found to allow for direct infection by HIV during sexual intercourse. These cells are prominently present in the anal and vaginal mucosa. The authors discuss facts and figures on the HIV epidemic, the Indian scenario, classification of the clinical spectrum, the enzyme immunoassay HIV testing format, Western blot, immunofluorescence antibody, HIV culture, flow cytometry, radio immuno precipitation assay, and the detection of HIV DNA. Significant advances have been made over the last ten years in understanding the pathogenesis of HIV infection and accurately diagnosing infected individuals, with recombinant technology, polymerase chain reaction, and the construction of synthetic hybrid virus rapidly becoming part of routine diagnostics. More sensitive, specific, and rapid techniques are, however, needed for the early diagnosis and management of AIDS cases. The need for more ideal antibody incorporating both regulatory and structural proteins of the virion, preferably manufactured using

  11. Role of fever in infection: has induced fever any therapeutic potential in HIV infection?

    PubMed Central

    Morton, R S; Rashid, S

    1997-01-01

    Ancient societies had no rational understanding of fever. The Greeks were the first to recognise that it may be part of nature's method of effecting cure in some diseases. How best to assist nature went through many trials and errors. Appreciation of the prognostic value of fever and how it may be controlled was slow to appear. That there was a place in the therapeutic arsenal for induced fever came only with the 20th century. Finding a suitable, safe, and satisfactory means came slowly. The curative power of well controlled and reproducible levels of fever was proved by the arrest of one deadly and incurable complication of a sexually transmitted disease in the first half of this century. The purpose of this review is to promote discussion and, hopefully, well ordered laboratory and clinical trials aimed at learning whether or not induced fevers have a place in the care of patients with HIV/AIDS. Images PMID:9306904

  12. Astrocytes as an HIV Reservoir: Mechanism of HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Guan-Han; Henderson, Lisa; Nath, Avindra

    2016-01-01

    If we have any hope of achieving a cure for HIV infection, close attention to the cell types capable of getting infected with HIV is necessary. Of these cell types, astrocytes are the most ideal cell type for the formation of such a reservoir. These are long-lived cells with a very low turnover rate and are found in the brain and the gastrointestinal tract. Although astrocytes are evidently resistant to infection of cell-free HIV in vitro, these cells are efficiently infected via cell-tocell contact by which immature HIV virions bud off lymphocytes and have the ability to directly bind to CXCR4, triggering the process of fusion in the absence of CD4. In this review, we closely examine the evidence for HIV infection of astrocytes in the brain and the mechanisms for viral entry and regulation in this cell type, and discuss an approach for controlling this viral reservoir.

  13. A conditionally replicating HIV-1 vector interferes with wild-type HIV-1 replication and spread.

    PubMed Central

    Dropulić, B; Hĕrmánková, M; Pitha, P M

    1996-01-01

    Defective-interfering viruses are known to modulate virus pathogenicity. We describe conditionally replicating HIV-1 (crHIV) vectors that interfere with wild-type HIV-1 (wt-HIV) replication and spread. crHIV vectors are defective-interfering HIV genomes that do not encode viral proteins and replicate only in the presence of wt-HIV helper virus. In cells that contain both wt-HIV and crHIV genomes, the latter are shown to have a selective advantage for packaging into progeny virions because they contain ribozymes that cleave wt-HIV RNA but not crHIV RNA. A crHIV vector containing a triple anti-U5 ribozyme significantly interferes with wt-HIV replication and spread. crHIV vectors are also shown to undergo the full viral replicative cycle after complementation with wt-HIV helper-virus. The application of defective interfering crHIV vectors may result in competition with wt-HIVs and decrease pathogenic viral loads in vivo. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8855316

  14. Undue inducement, or unfair exclusion: considering a case study of pregnancy in an HIV prevention trial.

    PubMed

    Haire, Bridget G; Folayan, Morenike Oluwatoyin

    2017-07-24

    In their recent paper' Undue inducement: a case study in CAPRISA 008', Mngadi et al conclude that a participant in an HIV prevention study who deliberately concealed her pregnancy was not'unduly induced' to participate by the offer of an experimental product. This paper argues that while the authors' conclusion is sound, the framing of this case study is consistent with the preoccupation in research ethics with the concept of undue inducement, coupled with a highly risk-averse attitude to pregnancy (regardless of whether those risks may be willingly assumed by pregnant women themselves). We suggest that the critical research ethics question raised by Mngadi et al's case study is not 'undue inducement', but the exclusion of pregnant women from research studies where the risks are acceptable to the potential participant, and benefits likely. We also suggest that current regulatory paradigms regarding pregnancy are both overly paternalistic and value the fetus over the mother. In order to ensure timely provision of new HIV prevention agents, we argue that there is a need for expeditious testing of proven effective agents in pregnancy, with due consideration given to situations where preliminary efficacy data exist but fall short of licensure standards. This requires a paradigm shift from researchers, funders, regulators and ethical review bodies towards practices that critically examine the legitimacy of the exclusion of pregnant women on a study-by-study basis. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. A Glutaredoxin, Encoded by the G4L Gene of Vaccinia Virus, Is Essential for Virion Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    White, Christine L.; Weisberg, Andrea S.; Moss, Bernard

    2000-01-01

    Vaccinia virus encodes two glutaredoxins, O2L and G4L, both of which exhibit thioltransferase and dehydroascorbate reductase activities in vitro. Although O2L was previously found to be dispensable for virus replication, we now show that G4L is necessary for virion morphogenesis. RNase protection and Western blotting assays indicated that G4L was expressed at late times after infection and was incorporated into mature virus particles. Attempts to isolate a mutant virus with a deleted G4L gene were unsuccessful, suggesting that the protein was required for virus replication. This interpretation was confirmed by the construction and characterization of a conditional lethal recombinant virus with an inducible copy of the G4L gene replacing the original one. Expression of G4L was proportional to the concentration of inducer, and the amount of glutaredoxin could be varied from barely detectable to greater than normal amounts of protein. Immunogold labeling revealed that the induced G4L protein was associated with immature and mature virions and adjacent cytoplasmic depots. In the absence of inducer, the production of infectious virus was severely inhibited, though viral late protein synthesis appeared unaffected except for decreased maturation-dependent proteolytic processing of certain core components. Electron microscopy of cells infected under nonpermissive conditions revealed an accumulation of crescent membranes on the periphery of electron-dense globular masses but few mature particles. We concluded that the two glutaredoxin homologs encoded by vaccinia virus have different functions and that G4L has a role in virion morphogenesis, perhaps by acting as a redox protein. PMID:10982364

  16. Genetically modified anthrax lethal toxin safely delivers whole HIV protein antigens into the cytosol to induce T cell immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yichen; Friedman, Rachel; Kushner, Nicholas; Doling, Amy; Thomas, Lawrence; Touzjian, Neal; Starnbach, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2000-07-01

    Bacillus anthrax lethal toxin can be engineered to deliver foreign proteins to the cytosol for antigen presentation to CD8 T cells. Vaccination with modified toxins carrying 8-9 amino acid peptide epitopes induces protective immunity in mice. To evaluate whether large protein antigens can be used with this system, recombinant constructs encoding several HIV antigens up to 500 amino acids were produced. These candidate HIV vaccines are safe in animals and induce CD8 T cells in mice. Constructs encoding gag p24 and nef stimulate gag-specific CD4 proliferation and a secondary cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in HIV-infected donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. These results lay the foundation for future clinical vaccine studies.

  17. A cytoplasmic tail determinant in HIV-1 Vpu mediates targeting of tetherin for endosomal degradation and counteracts interferon-induced restriction.

    PubMed

    Kueck, Tonya; Neil, Stuart J D

    2012-01-01

    The HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu counteracts tetherin (BST-2/CD317) by preventing its incorporation into virions, reducing its surface expression, and ultimately promoting its degradation. Here we characterize a putative trafficking motif, EXXXLV, in the second alpha helix of the subtype-B Vpu cytoplasmic tail as being required for efficient tetherin antagonism. Mutation of this motif prevents ESCRT-dependent degradation of tetherin/Vpu complexes, tetherin cell surface downregulation, but not its physical interaction with Vpu. Importantly, this motif is required for efficient cell-free virion release from CD4+ T cells, particularly after their exposure to type-1 interferon, indicating that the ability to reduce surface tetherin levels and promote its degradation is important to counteract restriction under conditions that the virus likely encounters in vivo. Vpu EXXXLV mutants accumulate with tetherin at the cell surface and in endosomal compartments, but retain the ability to bind both β-TrCP2 and HRS, indicating that this motif is required for a post-binding trafficking event that commits tetherin for ESCRT-dependent degradation and prevents its transit to the plasma membrane and viral budding zones. We further found that while Vpu function is dependent on clathrin, and the entire second alpha helix of the Vpu tail can be functionally complemented by a clathrin adaptor binding peptide derived from HIV-1 Nef, none of the canonical clathrin adaptors nor retromer are required for this process. Finally we show that residual activity of Vpu EXXXLV mutants requires an intact endocytic motif in tetherin, suggesting that physical association of Vpu with tetherin during its recycling may be sufficient to compromise tetherin activity to some degree.

  18. A virus capsid component mediates virion retention and transmission by its insect vector

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Angel Y. S.; Walker, Gregory P.; Carter, David; Ng, James C. K.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous pathogens of humans, animals, and plants are transmitted by specific arthropod vectors. However, understanding the mechanisms governing these pathogen–vector interactions is hampered, in part, by the lack of easy-to-use analytical tools. We investigated whitefly transmission of Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV) by using a unique immunofluorescent localization approach in which we fed virions or recombinant virus capsid components to whiteflies, followed by feeding them antibodies to the virions or capsid components, respectively. Fluorescent signals, indicating the retention of virions, were localized in the anterior foregut or cibarium of a whitefly vector biotype but not within those of a whitefly nonvector biotype. Retention of virions in these locations strongly corresponded with the whitefly vector transmission of LIYV. When four recombinant LIYV capsid components were individually fed to whitefly vectors, significantly more whiteflies retained the recombinant minor coat protein (CPm). As demonstrated previously and in the present study, whitefly vectors failed to transmit virions preincubated with anti-CPm antibodies but transmitted virions preincubated with antibodies recognizing the major coat protein (CP). Correspondingly, the number of insects that specifically retained virions preincubated with anti-CPm antibodies were significantly reduced compared with those that specifically retained virions preincubated with anti-CP antibodies. Notably, a transmission-defective CPm mutant was deficient in specific virion retention, whereas the CPm-restored virus showed WT levels of specific virion retention and transmission. These data provide strong evidence that transmission of LIYV is determined by a CPm-mediated virion retention mechanism in the anterior foregut or cibarium of whitefly vectors. PMID:21930903

  19. A virus capsid component mediates virion retention and transmission by its insect vector.

    PubMed

    Chen, Angel Y S; Walker, Gregory P; Carter, David; Ng, James C K

    2011-10-04

    Numerous pathogens of humans, animals, and plants are transmitted by specific arthropod vectors. However, understanding the mechanisms governing these pathogen-vector interactions is hampered, in part, by the lack of easy-to-use analytical tools. We investigated whitefly transmission of Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV) by using a unique immunofluorescent localization approach in which we fed virions or recombinant virus capsid components to whiteflies, followed by feeding them antibodies to the virions or capsid components, respectively. Fluorescent signals, indicating the retention of virions, were localized in the anterior foregut or cibarium of a whitefly vector biotype but not within those of a whitefly nonvector biotype. Retention of virions in these locations strongly corresponded with the whitefly vector transmission of LIYV. When four recombinant LIYV capsid components were individually fed to whitefly vectors, significantly more whiteflies retained the recombinant minor coat protein (CPm). As demonstrated previously and in the present study, whitefly vectors failed to transmit virions preincubated with anti-CPm antibodies but transmitted virions preincubated with antibodies recognizing the major coat protein (CP). Correspondingly, the number of insects that specifically retained virions preincubated with anti-CPm antibodies were significantly reduced compared with those that specifically retained virions preincubated with anti-CP antibodies. Notably, a transmission-defective CPm mutant was deficient in specific virion retention, whereas the CPm-restored virus showed WT levels of specific virion retention and transmission. These data provide strong evidence that transmission of LIYV is determined by a CPm-mediated virion retention mechanism in the anterior foregut or cibarium of whitefly vectors.

  20. Interaction between HIV-1 Nef and calnexin: from modeling to small molecule inhibitors reversing HIV-induced lipid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Hunegnaw, Ruth; Vassylyeva, Marina; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Sviridov, Dmitri; Anashkina, Anastasia A.; Üren, Aykut; Brichacek, Beda; Vassylyev, Dmitry; Adzhubei, Alexei A.; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective HIV-infected patients are at an increased risk of developing atherosclerosis, in part due to downmodulation and functional impairment of ATP-Binding Cassette A1 (ABCA1) cholesterol transporter by the HIV-1 protein Nef. The mechanism of this effect involves Nef interacting with an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone calnexin and disrupting calnexin binding to ABCA1, leading to ABCA1 retention in ER, its degradation and resulting suppression of cholesterol efflux. However, molecular details of Nef-calnexin interaction remained unknown, limiting translational impact of this finding. Approach and results Here, we used molecular modeling and mutagenesis to characterize Nef-calnexin interaction and to identify small molecule compounds that could block it. We demonstrated that interaction between Nef and calnexin is direct and can be reconstituted using recombinant proteins in vitro with a binding affinity of 89.1 nM measured by surface plasmon resonance. The cytoplasmic tail of calnexin is essential and sufficient for interaction with Nef, and binds Nef with affinity of 9.4 nM. Replacing lysine residues in positions 4 and 7 of Nef with alanines abrogates Nef-calnexin interaction, prevents ABCA1 downregulation by Nef, and preserves cholesterol efflux from HIV-infected cells. Through virtual screening of the NCI library of compounds, we identified a compound, 1[(7-Oxo-7H-benz[de]anthracene-3-yl)amino]anthraquinone, which blocked Nef-calnexin interaction, partially restored ABCA1 activity in HIV-infected cells, and reduced foam cell formation in a culture of HIV-infected macrophages. Conclusion This study identifies potential targets that can be exploited to block the pathogenic effect of HIV infection on cholesterol metabolism and prevent atherosclerosis in HIV-infected subjects. PMID:27470515

  1. Nature, Decay, and Spiraling of the Effects of Fear-Inducing Arguments and HIV Counseling and Testing: A Meta-Analysis of the Short- and Long-Term Outcomes of HIV-Prevention Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Earl, Allison; Albarracín, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the long-term efficacy of both fear-inducing arguments and HIV counseling and testing at encouraging and maintaining knowledge about HIV transmission and prevention, as well as condom use. Design Analyses were conducted with a sample of 150 treatment groups and 34 controls and included measures of change at an immediate follow-up and a delayed follow-up. Main outcome measures The main outcome measures were perceived risk of HIV infection, knowledge about HIV, and condom use. Results Results indicated that receiving fear-inducing arguments increased perceptions of risk at the immediate follow-up but decreased knowledge and condom use, whereas resolving fear via HIV counseling and testing decreased perceptions of risk and increased knowledge and condom use at both the immediate and delayed follow-ups. The effects on perceived risk and knowledge decreased over time, but the effects on condom use became more pronounced. Conclusion Inducing fear is not an effective way to promote HIV-relevant learning or condom use either immediately following the intervention or later on. However, HIV counseling and testing can provide an outlet for HIV-related anxiety and, subsequently, gains in both knowledge and behavior change immediately and longitudinally. PMID:17605570

  2. Nature, decay, and spiraling of the effects of fear-inducing arguments and HIV counseling and testing: a meta-analysis of the short- and long-term outcomes of HIV-prevention interventions.

    PubMed

    Earl, Allison; Albarracín, Dolores

    2007-07-01

    To examine the long-term efficacy of both fear-inducing arguments and HIV counseling and testing at encouraging and maintaining knowledge about HIV transmission and prevention, as well as condom use. Analyses were conducted with a sample of 150 treatment groups and 34 controls and included measures of change at an immediate follow-up and a delayed follow-up. The main outcome measures were perceived risk of HIV infection, knowledge about HIV, and condom use. Results indicated that receiving fear-inducing arguments increased perceptions of risk at the immediate follow-up but decreased knowledge and condom use, whereas resolving fear via HIV counseling and testing decreased perceptions of risk and increased knowledge and condom use at both the immediate and delayed follow-ups. The effects on perceived risk [corrected] decreased over time, but the effects on knowledge [corrected] condom use became more pronounced. Inducing fear is not an effective way to promote HIV-relevant learning or condom use either immediately following the intervention or later on. However, HIV counseling and testing can provide an outlet for HIV-related anxiety and, subsequently, gains in both knowledge and behavior change immediately and longitudinally. Copyright 2007 APA.

  3. Celastrol ameliorates HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via NF-kappaB and AP-1 inhibition and heme oxygenase-1 induction in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Youn, Gi Soo; Kwon, Dong-Joo; Ju, Sung Mi; Rhim, Hyangshuk; Bae, Yong Soo; Choi, Soo Young; Park, Jinseu

    2014-10-01

    HIV-1 Tat causes extensive neuroinflammation that may progress to AIDS-related encephalitis and dementia. Celastrol possesses various biological activities such as anti-oxidant, anti-tumor, and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we investigated the modulatory effects of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses and the molecular mechanisms underlying its action in astrocytes. Pre-treatment of CRT-MG human astroglioma cells with celastrol significantly inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of ICAM-1/VCAM-1 and subsequent monocyte adhesiveness in CRT-MG cells. In addition, celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines, such as CXCL10, IL-8, and MCP-1. Celastrol decreased HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of JNK MAPK, AP-1, and NF-κB. Furthermore, celastrol induced mRNA and protein expression of HO-1 as well as Nrf2 activation. Blockage of HO-1 expression using siRNA reversed the inhibitory effect of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses. These results suggest that celastrol has regulatory effects on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses by blocking the JNK MAPK-AP-1/NF-κB signaling pathways and inducing HO-1 expression in astrocytes.

  4. Morphogenesis and morphology of HIV. Structure-function relations.

    PubMed

    Gelderblom, H R; Ozel, M; Pauli, G

    1989-01-01

    Fine structure and antigenic make-up analysis of HIV were combined in a 2D model, from which functional aspects can be deduced. On the envelope 72 probably trimeric surface knobs (gp120) are connected to the virion via the transmembrane protein gp41. Gp120 is shed during ageing of the virion, but host cell antigens stay firmly anchored to the envelope. Underneath the envelope, p17 forms the matrix protein layer, while the capsid of the double cone shaped core is built up of p24. The relation between biochemical findings and morphogenesis and maturation of HIV as well as aspects of pathogenesis and vaccination are discussed.

  5. Synthetic consensus HIV-1 DNA induces potent cellular immune responses and synthesis of granzyme B, perforin in HIV infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Matthew P; Tebas, Pablo; Yan, Jian; Ramirez, Lorenzo; Slager, Anna; Kraynyak, Kim; Diehl, Malissa; Shah, Divya; Khan, Amir; Lee, Jessica; Boyer, Jean; Kim, J Joseph; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of PENNVAX-B in 12 HIV infected individuals. PENNVAX-B is a combination of three optimized synthetic plasmids encoding for multiclade HIV Gag and Pol and a consensus CladeB Env delivered by electroporation. HIV infected individuals whose virus was effectively suppressed using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) received PENNVAX-B DNA followed by electroporation with CELLECTRA-5P at study weeks 0, 4, 8, and 16. Local administration site and systemic reactions to PENNVAX-B were recorded after each treatment along with any adverse events. Pain of the treatment procedure was assessed using a Visual Analog Scale. Whole PBMCs were isolated for use in IFN ELISpot and Flow Cytometric assays. PENNVAX-B was generally safe and well tolerated. Overall, the four dose regimen was not associated with any serious adverse events or severe local or systemic reactions. A rise in antigen-specific SFU was detected in the INFγ ELISpot assay in all 12 participants. T cells from 8/12 participants loaded with both granzyme B and perforin in response to HIV antigen, an immune finding characteristic of long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) and elite controllers (ECs). Thus administration of PENNVAX-B may prove useful adjunctive therapy to ART for treatment and control of HIV infection.

  6. Synthetic Consensus HIV-1 DNA Induces Potent Cellular Immune Responses and Synthesis of Granzyme B, Perforin in HIV Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Matthew P; Tebas, Pablo; Yan, Jian; Ramirez, Lorenzo; Slager, Anna; Kraynyak, Kim; Diehl, Malissa; Shah, Divya; Khan, Amir; Lee, Jessica; Boyer, Jean; Kim, J Joseph; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of PENNVAX-B in 12 HIV infected individuals. PENNVAX-B is a combination of three optimized synthetic plasmids encoding for multiclade HIV Gag and Pol and a consensus CladeB Env delivered by electroporation. HIV infected individuals whose virus was effectively suppressed using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) received PENNVAX-B DNA followed by electroporation with CELLECTRA-5P at study weeks 0, 4, 8, and 16. Local administration site and systemic reactions to PENNVAX-B were recorded after each treatment along with any adverse events. Pain of the treatment procedure was assessed using a Visual Analog Scale. Whole PBMCs were isolated for use in IFN ELISpot and Flow Cytometric assays. PENNVAX-B was generally safe and well tolerated. Overall, the four dose regimen was not associated with any serious adverse events or severe local or systemic reactions. A rise in antigen-specific SFU was detected in the INFγ ELISpot assay in all 12 participants. T cells from 8/12 participants loaded with both granzyme B and perforin in response to HIV antigen, an immune finding characteristic of long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) and elite controllers (ECs). Thus administration of PENNVAX-B may prove useful adjunctive therapy to ART for treatment and control of HIV infection. PMID:25531694

  7. HIV-Nef and ADAM17-Containing Plasma Extracellular Vesicles Induce and Correlate with Immune Pathogenesis in Chronic HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Hyun; Schierer, Stephan; Blume, Katja; Dindorf, Jochen; Wittki, Sebastian; Xiang, Wei; Ostalecki, Christian; Koliha, Nina; Wild, Stefan; Schuler, Gerold; Fackler, Oliver T.; Saksela, Kalle; Harrer, Thomas; Baur, Andreas S.

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) efficiently suppresses HIV replication but immune activation and low CD4 T cell counts often persist. The underlying mechanism of this ART-resistant pathogenesis is not clear. We observed that levels of plasma extracellular vesicles (pEV) are strongly elevated in HIV infection and do not decline during ART. Surprisingly, these vesicles contained the viral accessory proteins Nef and Vpu, which are assumed to be not expressed under efficient ART, as well as pro-inflammatory effectors, including activated ADAM17. HIV pEV were characterized by the presence of activated αvβ3 and absence of CD81 and Tsg101. Correlating with immune activation, peripheral monocytes ingested large amounts of pEV, giving rise to an increased population of CD1c+ CD14+ cells that secreted inflammatory cytokines. Importantly, the pro-inflammatory content, particularly ADAM17 activity, correlated with low T cell counts. Preliminary evidence suggested that HIV pEV derived from peripheral mononuclear cells and from an unknown myeloid cell population. In summary we propose an important role of pro-inflammatory pEV in chronic HIV infection due to ongoing viral Nef activity. PMID:27211553

  8. HIV-Nef and ADAM17-Containing Plasma Extracellular Vesicles Induce and Correlate with Immune Pathogenesis in Chronic HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hyun; Schierer, Stephan; Blume, Katja; Dindorf, Jochen; Wittki, Sebastian; Xiang, Wei; Ostalecki, Christian; Koliha, Nina; Wild, Stefan; Schuler, Gerold; Fackler, Oliver T; Saksela, Kalle; Harrer, Thomas; Baur, Andreas S

    2016-04-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) efficiently suppresses HIV replication but immune activation and low CD4 T cell counts often persist. The underlying mechanism of this ART-resistant pathogenesis is not clear. We observed that levels of plasma extracellular vesicles (pEV) are strongly elevated in HIV infection and do not decline during ART. Surprisingly, these vesicles contained the viral accessory proteins Nef and Vpu, which are assumed to be not expressed under efficient ART, as well as pro-inflammatory effectors, including activated ADAM17. HIV pEV were characterized by the presence of activated αvβ3 and absence of CD81 and Tsg101. Correlating with immune activation, peripheral monocytes ingested large amounts of pEV, giving rise to an increased population of CD1c(+) CD14(+) cells that secreted inflammatory cytokines. Importantly, the pro-inflammatory content, particularly ADAM17 activity, correlated with low T cell counts. Preliminary evidence suggested that HIV pEV derived from peripheral mononuclear cells and from an unknown myeloid cell population. In summary we propose an important role of pro-inflammatory pEV in chronic HIV infection due to ongoing viral Nef activity.

  9. Programmed neuronal cell death induced by HIV-1 tat and methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Qi, Li; Gang, Lu; Hang, Kwong Wing; Ling, Choi Heung; Xiaofeng, Zeng; Zhen, Li; Wai, Yew David; Sang, Poon Wai

    2011-12-01

    Apoptosis and autophagy are the two major types of programmed cell death (PCD) in neurons. Homeostatic autophagy often precedes apoptosis, and when apoptosis is blocked, the failure to keep homeostasis will lead to necrosis instead. It has been reported that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected methamphetamine (Meth) abusers represent greater neuropathological abnormalities than Meth abusers or HIV-positive non-Meth users. Recent publications suggest that Tat and Meth when administered together result in greater neuronal damage than when administered separately. However, the cellular events of the combined Tat-Meth effect have not yet been fully characterized. Therefore, we investigated the effects of Tat and/or Meth on apoptosis and autophagy to elucidate whether PCD was involved in Tat and/or Meth-induced neuronal damage. Annexin-V-FITC/PI staining assay was used to detect cellular apoptosis using a neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Cellular ultrastructural changes were observed under transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Flow-cytometric data showed apoptosis following Meth treatment, and more extensive apoptosis with Tat + Meth treatment. The most important finding was that the autophagosome and/or multilamellar bodies (MLBs) were most pronounced with Tat + Meth treatment, were less so with Meth treatment, and infrequent with Tat treatment. This suggests the involvement of autophagy and apoptosis in Tat with Meth-elicited cell damage. However, the relation between apoptosis and autophagy remains unknown in this experiment. Further research is needed to analyze the relation among related molecules. A thorough understanding of this multifaceted relationship will be critical for the assessment of therapeutic modalities for patients with HIV with drug abuse. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Energetics of mutation-induced changes in potency of lersivirine against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Kar, Parimal; Knecht, Volker

    2012-06-07

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are key components of highly active antiretroviral therapy for the treatment of HIV-1. A common problem with the first generation NNRTIs is the emergence of mutations in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), in particular, K103N and Y181C, which lead to resistance to the entire class of inhibitor. Here we have evaluated the relative affinity of the newly designed NNRTI lersivirine (LRV) against drug-resistant mutations in HIV-1 RT using the molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) method. Eight single and one double mutant variants of RT are considered. Our results are in good agreement with experimental results and yield insights into the mechanisms underlying mutation-induced changes in the potency of LRV against RT. The strongest (54-fold) increase in the dissociation constant is found for the mutant F227C, originating from reduced electrostatic and van der Waals interactions between LRV and RT as well as a higher energetic penalty from the desolvation of polar groups. For the mutants K103N and Y181C only a moderate (2-fold) increase in the dissociation constant is found, due to a balance of opposite changes in the polar solvation as well as the electrostatic and van der Waals interactions between LRV and RT. The dissociation constant is decreased for the Y188C and G190A (2-fold), the M184V (5-fold), and the Y188C/Y188C mutant (10-fold), due to stronger electrostatic interactions between LRV and RT. Our results thus suggest that LRV is a highly potent and selective NNRTI, with excellent efficacy against NNRTI-resistant viruses, which is in agreement with experimental observations.

  11. The Race against Protease Activation Defines the Role of ESCRTs in HIV Budding.

    PubMed

    Bendjennat, Mourad; Saffarian, Saveez

    2016-06-01

    HIV virions assemble on the plasma membrane and bud out of infected cells using interactions with endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs). HIV protease activation is essential for maturation and infectivity of progeny virions, however, the precise timing of protease activation and its relationship to budding has not been well defined. We show that compromised interactions with ESCRTs result in delayed budding of virions from host cells. Specifically, we show that Gag mutants with compromised interactions with ALIX and Tsg101, two early ESCRT factors, have an average budding delay of ~75 minutes and ~10 hours, respectively. Virions with inactive proteases incorporated the full Gag-Pol and had ~60 minutes delay in budding. We demonstrate that during budding delay, activated proteases release critical HIV enzymes back to host cytosol leading to production of non-infectious progeny virions. To explain the molecular mechanism of the observed budding delay, we modulated the Pol size artificially and show that virion release delays are size-dependent and also show size-dependency in requirements for Tsg101 and ALIX. We highlight the sensitivity of HIV to budding "on-time" and suggest that budding delay is a potent mechanism for inhibition of infectious retroviral release.

  12. The Race against Protease Activation Defines the Role of ESCRTs in HIV Budding

    PubMed Central

    Bendjennat, Mourad; Saffarian, Saveez

    2016-01-01

    HIV virions assemble on the plasma membrane and bud out of infected cells using interactions with endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs). HIV protease activation is essential for maturation and infectivity of progeny virions, however, the precise timing of protease activation and its relationship to budding has not been well defined. We show that compromised interactions with ESCRTs result in delayed budding of virions from host cells. Specifically, we show that Gag mutants with compromised interactions with ALIX and Tsg101, two early ESCRT factors, have an average budding delay of ~75 minutes and ~10 hours, respectively. Virions with inactive proteases incorporated the full Gag-Pol and had ~60 minutes delay in budding. We demonstrate that during budding delay, activated proteases release critical HIV enzymes back to host cytosol leading to production of non-infectious progeny virions. To explain the molecular mechanism of the observed budding delay, we modulated the Pol size artificially and show that virion release delays are size-dependent and also show size-dependency in requirements for Tsg101 and ALIX. We highlight the sensitivity of HIV to budding “on-time” and suggest that budding delay is a potent mechanism for inhibition of infectious retroviral release. PMID:27280284

  13. APOBEC3G ubiquitination by Nedd4-1 favors its packaging into HIV-1 particles.

    PubMed

    Dussart, Sylvie; Douaisi, Marc; Courcoul, Marianne; Bessou, Gilles; Vigne, Robert; Decroly, Etienne

    2005-01-21

    APOBEC3G is a cytidine deaminase that limits the replication of many retroviruses. This antiviral host factor is packaged into retrovirus particles, where it targets single-stranded DNA generated during reverse transcription and induces up to 2% of G-to-A mutations, which are lethal for the HIV-1 provirus. Vif protein counteracts this antiviral factor by decreasing its packaging into lentivirus particles. Here, we demonstrate that Nedd4-1, an HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase, interacts with APOBEC3G, through its WW2 and WW3 domains. As a result of this interaction, APOBEC3G undergoes post-translational modification by addition of ubiquitin moieties. Accordingly, we demonstrate that the dominant negative Nedd4-1 C/S form prevents APOBEC3G ubiquitination. Moreover, the packaging of APOBEC3G into Pr55 Gag virus-like particles and into HIV-1 virions is reduced when Nedd4-1 C/S is expressed. During HIV-1 viral production in the presence of APOBEC3G, Nedd4-1 C/S restores partially the infectivity of Deltavif HIV-1. We conclude that the ubiquitination of APOBEC3G by Nedd4-1 favors its targeting to the virus assembly site where APOBEC3G interacts with Gag and is packaged into HIV-1 particles in the absence of Vif.

  14. A Novel Class of HIV-1 Antiviral Agents Targeting HIV via a SUMOylation-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Madu, Ikenna G.; Li, Shirley; Li, Baozong; Li, Haitang; Chang, Tammy; Li, Yi-Jia; Vega, Ramir; Rossi, John; Yee, Jiing-Kuan; Zaia, John; Chen, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    We have recently identified a chemotype of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-specific protease (SENP) inhibitors. Prior to the discovery of their SENP inhibitory activity, these compounds were found to inhibit HIV replication, but with an unknown mechanism. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of how these compounds inhibit HIV-1. We found that they do not affect HIV-1 viral production, but significantly inhibited the infectivity of the virus. Interestingly, virions produced from cells treated with these compounds could gain entry and carry out reverse transcription, but could not efficiently integrate into the host genome. This phenotype is different from the virus produced from cells treated with the class of anti-HIV-1 agents that inhibit HIV protease. Upon removal of the SUMO modification sites in the HIV-1 integrase, the compound no longer alters viral infectivity, indicating that the effect is related to SUMOylation of the HIV integrase. This study identifies a novel mechanism for inhibiting HIV-1 integration and a new class of small molecules that inhibits HIV-1 via such mechanism that may contribute a new strategy for cure of HIV-1 by inhibiting the production of infectious virions upon activation from latency. PMID:26643614

  15. Fine structure of the vaccinia virion determined by controlled degradation and immunolocalization

    SciTech Connect

    Moussatche, Nissin Condit, Richard C.

    2015-01-15

    The vaccinia virion is a membraned, slightly flattened, barrel-shaped particle, with a complex internal structure featuring a biconcave core flanked by lateral bodies. Although the architecture of the purified mature virion has been intensely characterized by electron microscopy, the distribution of the proteins within the virion has been examined primarily using biochemical procedures. Thus, it has been shown that non-ionic and ionic detergents combined or not with a sulfhydryl reagent can be used to disrupt virions and, to a limited degree, separate the constituent proteins in different fractions. Applying a controlled degradation technique to virions adsorbed on EM grids, we were able to immuno-localize viral proteins within the virion particle. Our results show after NP40 and DTT treatment, membrane proteins are removed from the virion surface revealing proteins that are associated with the lateral bodies and the outer layer of the core wall. Combined treatment using high salt and high DTT removed lateral body proteins and exposed proteins of the internal core wall. Cores treated with proteases could be disrupted and the internal components were exposed. Cts8, a mutant in the A3 protein, produces aberrant virus that, when treated with NP-40 and DTT, releases to the exterior the virus DNA associated with other internal core proteins. With these results, we are able to propose a model for the structure the vaccinia virion.

  16. VirD - A Virion Display Array For Profiling Functional Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shaohui; Feng, Yingzhu; Henson, Brandon; Wang, Bochu; Huang, Xiaofang; Li, Min; Desai, Prashant; Zhu, Heng

    2013-01-01

    To facilitate high-throughput biochemical analyses of membrane proteins, we have developed a novel display technology in a microarray format. Both a single-pass (CD4) and a multiple-pass (GPR77) human transmembrane proteins were engineered to be displayed in the membrane envelop of herpes simplex virions. These viruses produce large spherical virions displaying multiple copies of envelop proteins. Our aim was to engineer this virus to express these human proteins during the virus productive cycle and incorporate the human proteins into the virion during the assembly process. Another strategy presented includes engineering a fusion of glycoprotein C (gC), a major constituent of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) virions, by hijacking the cis-acting signals to direct incorporation of the chimeric protein into the virion. The expression of the human proteins in infected cells, at the cell surface and in purified virions, is in the correct transmembrane orientation and the proteins are biochemically functional. Purified virions printed on glass slides form a high-density Virion Display (VirD) Array and the displayed proteins were demonstrated to retain their native conformations and interactions on the VirD Array judging by similar assays, such as antibody staining, as well as lectin and ligand binding. This method can be readily scaled or tailored for different modalities including to a high-content, high-throughput platform for screening ligands and drugs of human membrane proteins. PMID:23941274

  17. Fine structure of the vaccinia virion determined by controlled degradation and immunolocalization

    PubMed Central

    Moussatche, Nissin; Condit, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    The vaccinia virion is a membraned, slightly flattened, barrel-shaped particle, with a complex internal structure featuring a biconcave core flanked by lateral bodies. Although the architecture of the purified mature virion has been intensely characterized by electron microscopy, the distribution of the proteins within the virion has been examined primarily using biochemical procedures. Thus, it has been shown that non-ionic and ionic detergents combined or not with a sulfhydryl reagent can be used to disrupt virions and, to a limited degree, separate the constituent proteins in different fractions. Applying a controlled degradation technique to virions adsorbed on EM grids, we were able to immuno-localize viral proteins within the virion particle. Our results show after NP40 and DTT treatment, membrane proteins are removed from the virion surface revealing proteins that are associated with the lateral bodies and the outer layer of the core wall. Combined treatment using high salt and high DTT removed lateral body proteins and exposed proteins of the internal core wall. Cores treated with proteases could be disrupted and the internal components were exposed. Cts8, a mutant in the A3 protein, produces aberrant virus that, when treated with NP-40 and DTT, release to the exterior the virus DNA associated with other internal core proteins. With these results, we are able to propose a model for the structure the vaccinia virion. PMID:25486587

  18. Localization of the Houdinisome (Ejection Proteins) inside the Bacteriophage P22 Virion by Bubblegram Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weimin; Leavitt, Justin C.; Cheng, Naiqian; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Motwani, Tina; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Casjens, Sherwood R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The P22 capsid is a T=7 icosahedrally symmetric protein shell with a portal protein dodecamer at one 5-fold vertex. Extending outwards from that vertex is a short tail, and putatively extending inwards is a 15-nm-long α-helical barrel formed by the C-terminal domains of portal protein subunits. In addition to the densely packed genome, the capsid contains three “ejection proteins” (E-proteins [gp7, gp16, and gp20]) destined to exit from the tightly sealed capsid during the process of DNA delivery into target cells. We estimated their copy numbers by quantitative SDS-PAGE as approximately 12 molecules per virion of gp16 and gp7 and 30 copies of gp20. To localize them, we used bubblegram imaging, an adaptation of cryo-electron microscopy in which gaseous bubbles induced in proteins by prolonged irradiation are used to map the proteins’ locations. We applied this technique to wild-type P22, a triple mutant lacking all three E-proteins, and three mutants each lacking one E-protein. We conclude that all three E-proteins are loosely clustered around the portal axis, in the region displaced radially inwards from the portal crown. The bubblegram data imply that approximately half of the α-helical barrel seen in the portal crystal structure is disordered in the mature virion, and parts of the disordered region present binding sites for E-proteins. Thus positioned, the E-proteins are strategically placed to pass down the shortened barrel and through the portal ring and the tail, as they exit from the capsid during an infection. PMID:27507825

  19. Extensive pulmonary involvement with raltegravir-induced DRESS syndrome in a postpartum woman with HIV.

    PubMed

    Yee, Brittany Elizabeth; Nguyen, Nghia Hoang; Lee, Daniel

    2014-05-05

    An 18-year-old postpartum woman with HIV, on lamivudine-zidovudine, lopinavir-ritonavir and raltegravir, presented with a 1-week history of rash and fevers. Initially admitted to obstetrics and gynaecology service for treatment of possible endometritis, she was transferred to the HIV medicine service for high fever, respiratory distress, hypotension and tachycardia. On admission, she was febrile (102°F) with findings of cervical and submandibular lymphadenopathy, diffuse morbilliform rash, generalised pruritus, facial oedema, and oedematous hands and feet. Consultations to various specialty services were initiated to rule out infectious, dermatological, rheumatological and drug-induced aetiologies. On the fourth day of hospitalisation, laboratory findings of significant eosinophilia and hepatitis (alanine aminotransferase 147 IU/L and aspartate aminotransferase 124 IU/L), in conjunction with the identification of the timing of medication use, led to a diagnosis of DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) syndrome secondary to raltegravir. After discontinuing raltegravir and starting prednisone, her DRESS symptoms completely resolved.

  20. Observation of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein induced TAR DNA melting at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosa, Gonzalo; Harbron, Elizabeth; O'Connor, Donald; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Barbara, Paul

    2003-03-01

    Reverse transcription of the HIV-1 RNA genome involves several nucleic acid rearrangement steps, and the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a key role in this process. NC is a nucleic acid chaperone protein, which facilitates the formation of the most stable nucleic acid structures. Single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (SM-FRET) measurements enable us to observe the NC-induced conformational fluctuations of a transactivation response region (TAR) DNA hairpin, which is part of the initial product of reverse transcription known as minus-strand strong-stop DNA. SM-FRET studies show that the majority of conformational fluctuations of the fluorescently-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the presence of NC occur in <100 ms. A single molecule explores a wide range of confomations unpon NC binding, with fluctuations encompassing as many as 40 bases in both arms of the hairpin. No conformational fluctuations are observed with the dye-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the absence of NC or when a labeled TAR DNA hairpin variant lacking bulges and internal loops is analyzed in the presence of NC. This study represents the first real-time observation of NC-mediated nucleic acid conformational fluctuations, revealing new insights into NC's nucleic acid chaperone activity.

  1. Quantitative real-time single particle analysis of virions

    PubMed Central

    Heider, Susanne; Metzner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Providing information about single virus particles has for a long time been mainly the domain of electron microscopy. More recently, technologies have been developed—or adapted from other fields, such as nanotechnology—to allow for the real-time quantification of physical virion particles, while supplying additional information such as particle diameter concomitantly. These technologies have progressed to the stage of commercialization increasing the speed of viral titer measurements from hours to minutes, thus providing a significant advantage for many aspects of virology research and biotechnology applications. Additional advantages lie in the broad spectrum of virus species that may be measured and the possibility to determine the ratio of infectious to total particles. A series of disadvantages remain associated with these technologies, such as a low specificity for viral particles. In this review we will discuss these technologies by comparing four systems for real-time single virus particle analysis and quantification. PMID:24999044

  2. Cytomegalovirus UL103 controls virion and dense body egress.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Jenny; Mocarski, Edward

    2011-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus UL103 encodes a tegument protein that is conserved across herpesvirus subgroups. Mutant viruses lacking this gene product exhibit dramatically reduced accumulation of cell-free virus progeny and poor cell-to-cell spread. Given that viral proteins and viral DNA accumulate with normal kinetics in cells infected with mutant virus, UL103 appears to function during the late phase of replication, playing a critical role in egress of capsidless dense bodies and virions. Few dense bodies were observed in the extracellular space in mutant virus-infected cells in the presence or absence of the DNA encapsidation inhibitor 2-bromo-5,6-dichloro-1-(β-d-ribofuranosyl)benzimidazole. Upon reversal of encapsidation inhibition, UL103 had a striking impact on accumulation of cell-free virus, but not on accumulation of cell-associated virus. Thus, UL103 plays a novel and important role during maturation, regulating virus particle and dense body egress from infected cells.

  3. Warfarin-induced skin necrosis in HIV-1-infected patients with tuberculosis and venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bhaijee, F; Wainwright, H; Meintjes, G; Wilkinson, R J; Todd, G; De Vries, E; Pepper, D J

    2010-06-01

    At the turn of the century, only 300 cases of warfarin-induced skin necrosis (WISN) had been reported. WISN is a rare but potentially fatal complication of warfarin therapy. There are no published reports of WISN occurring in patients with HIV-1 infection or tuberculosis (TB). We retrospectively reviewed cases of WISN presenting from April 2005 to July 2008 at a referral hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. Six cases of WISN occurred in 973 patients receiving warfarin therapy for venous thrombosis (0.62%, 95% CI 0.25 - 1.37%). All 6 cases occurred in HIV-1-infected women (median age 30 years, range 27 - 42) with microbiologically confirmed TB and venous thrombosis. All were profoundly immunosuppressed (median CD4+ count at TB diagnosis 49 cells/microl, interquartile range 23 - 170). Of the 3 patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy, 2 had TB-IRIS (immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome). The median interval from initiation of antituberculosis treatment to venous thrombosis was 37 days (range 0 - 150). The median duration of parallel heparin and warfarin therapy was 2 days (range 1 - 6). WISN manifested 6 days (range 4 - 8) after initiation of warfarin therapy. The international normalised ratio (INR) at WISN onset was supra-therapeutic, median 6.2 (range 3.8 - 6.6). Sites of WISN included breasts, buttocks and thighs. Four of 6 WISN sites were secondarily infected with drug-resistant nosocomial bacteria (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Acinetobacter, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) 17 - 37 days after WISN onset. In 4 patients, the median interval from WISN onset to death was 43 days (range 25 - 45). One of the 2 patients who survived underwent bilateral mastectomies and extensive skin grafting at a specialist centre. This is one of the largest case series of WISN. We report a novel clinical entity: WISN in HIV-1 infected patients with TB and venous thrombosis. The

  4. Sample preparation for single virion atomic force microscopy and super-resolution fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Jeffery A; Saffarian, Saveez

    2014-01-02

    Immobilization of virions to glass surfaces is a critical step in single virion imaging. Here we present a technique adopted from single molecule imaging assays which allows adhesion of single virions to glass surfaces with specificity. This preparation is based on grafting the surface of the glass with a mixture of PLL-g-PEG and PLL-g-PEG-Biotin, adding a layer of avidin, and finally creating virion anchors through attachment of biotinylated virus specific antibodies. We have applied this technique across a range of experiments including atomic force microscopy (AFM) and super-resolution fluorescence imaging. This sample preparation method results in a control adhesion of the virions to the surface.

  5. Isolation of a herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant with a deletion in the virion host shutoff gene and identification of multiple forms of the vhs (UL41) polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Read, G S; Karr, B M; Knight, K

    1993-01-01

    The virion host shutoff (vhs) gene (UL41) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) encodes a virion component that induces degradation of host mRNAs and the shutoff of most host protein synthesis. Subsequently, the vhs protein accelerates the turnover of all kinetic classes of viral mRNA. To identify the vhs (UL41) polypeptide within infected cells and virions, antisera raised against a UL41-lacZ fusion protein were used to characterize the polypeptides encoded by wild-type HSV-1 and two mutants: vhs1, a previously characterized mutant that lacks detectable virion host shutoff activity, and vhs-delta Sma, a newly constructed mutant containing a deletion of 196 codons from UL41. Two forms of the vhs (UL41) polypeptide were identified in cells infected with the wild-type virus or vhs1. Wild-type HSV-1 produced a major 58-kDa polypeptide, as well as a less abundant 59.5-kDa form of the protein, while vhs1 produced 57- and 59-kDa polypeptides that were approximately equally abundant. Although for either virus, both forms of the protein were phosphorylated, they differed in the extent of phosphorylation. While both vhs polypeptides were found in infected cells, only the faster migrating, less phosphorylated form was incorporated into virions. vhs-delta Sma encoded a smaller, 31-kDa polypeptide which, although present in infected cells, was not incorporated into virions. The results identify multiple forms of the vhs (UL41) polypeptide and suggest that posttranslational processing affects its packaging into virions, as well as its ability to induce mRNA degradation. Images PMID:8230437

  6. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Type 1 Vpu Induces the Expression of CD40 in Endothelial Cells and Regulates HIV-Induced Adhesion of B-Lymphoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Winnie W.; Ruhl, Rebecca; Lewis, Paul; Bentley, Matthew; Nelson, Jay A.; Moses, Ashlee V.

    2004-01-01

    AIDS-related B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (AIDS-NHL) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). AIDS-NHL is clinically and histologically heterogeneous, but common features include an aggressive clinical course and frequent extranodal presentation. HIV-1 infection of nonimmune cells that interact with malignant B cells at extranodal sites may influence both the development and the clinical presentation of disease. Our previous studies have shown that coculture of B-lymphoma (BL) cells with HIV-1-infected endothelial cells (EC) leads to contact activation of EC and firm BL-cell adhesion. The key event promoting EC-BL-cell adhesion was HIV-1 upregulation of endothelial CD40, which allowed induction of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) in a CD40-dependent manner. The present study was designed to identify the HIV-1 protein(s) that influence EC-BL-cell adhesion. When HIV-1 proteins were individually expressed in EC by using recombinant adenoviruses, cultured BL cells adhered exclusively to Vpu-transduced EC. As with HIV-infected EC, adhesive properties were linked to the capacity of Vpu to upregulate CD40, which in turn allowed efficient expression of VCAM-1. When EC were infected with an HIV-1 pseudotype lacking the Vpu gene, CD40 upregulation and BL-cell adhesive properties were lost, indicating an essential role for Vpu in EC-BL-cell interactions. Thus, these data reveal a novel function for HIV-1 Vpu and further suggest a role for Vpu in the development of AIDS-NHL at EC-rich extranodal sites. PMID:15078922

  7. Curcumin improves synaptic plasticity impairment induced by HIV-1gp120 V3 loop

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ling-ling; Jiang, Ming-liang; Liu, Si-si; Cai, Min-chun; Hong, Zhong-qiu; Lin, Li-qing; Xing, Yan-yan; Chen, Gui-lin; Pan, Rui; Yang, Li-juan; Xu, Ying; Dong, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin has been shown to significantly improve spatial memory impairment induced by HIV-1 gp120 V3 in rats, but the electrophysiological mechanism remains unknown. Using extracellular microelectrode recording techniques, this study confirmed that the gp120 V3 loop could suppress long-term potentiation in the rat hippocampal CA1 region and synaptic plasticity, and that curcumin could antagonize these inhibitory effects. Using a Fura-2/AM calcium ion probe, we found that curcumin resisted the effects of the gp120 V3 loop on hippocampal synaptosomes and decreased Ca2+ concentration in synaptosomes. This effect of curcumin was identical to nimodipine, suggesting that curcumin improved the inhibitory effects of gp120 on synaptic plasticity, ameliorated damage caused to the central nervous system, and might be a potential neuroprotective drug. PMID:26199609

  8. HIV enteropathy: HAART reduces HIV-induced stem cell hyperproliferation and crypt hypertrophy to normal in jejunal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Batman, Philip A; Kapembwa, Moses S; Belmonte, Liliana; Tudor, Gregory; Kotler, Donald P; Potten, Christopher S; Booth, Catherine; Cahn, Pedro; Griffin, George E

    2014-01-01

    To analyse the structural and kinetic response of small intestinal crypt epithelial cells including stem cells to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Crypt size and proliferative activity of transit and stem cells in jejunal mucosa were quantified using morphometric techniques. Crypt length was measured by counting the number of enterocytes along one side of a number of crypts in each biopsy specimen and the mean crypt length was calculated. Proliferating crypt cells were identified with MIB-1 monoclonal antibody, and the percentage of crypt cells in proliferation was calculated at each cell position along the length of the crypt (proliferation index). Data were obtained from 9 HIV-positive test patients co-infected with microsporidia, 34 HIV-positive patients receiving HAART and 13 control cases. Crypt length was significantly greater in test patients than in controls, but crypt length in patients receiving HAART was normal. The proliferation index was greater in test subjects than in controls in stem and transit cell compartments, and was decreased in patients treated with HAART only in the stem cell region of the crypt. Villous atrophy in HIV enteropathy is attributed to crypt hypertrophy and encroachment of crypt cells onto villi. HAART restores normal crypt structure by inhibition of HIV-driven stem cell hyperproliferation at the crypt bases.

  9. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells.

    PubMed

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-11-01

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4(+) T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4(+) T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4(+) T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the "Shock and Kill" strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells.

  10. HIV-1 protease inhibitor induced oxidative stress suppresses glucose stimulated insulin release: protection with thymoquinone.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Surabhi; Mondal, Debasis; Agrawal, Krishna C

    2009-04-01

    The highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) regimen has considerably reduced the mortality rate in HIV-1 positive patients. However, long-term exposure to HAART is associated with a metabolic syndrome manifesting cardiovascular dysfunction, lipodystrophy, and insulin resistance syndrome (IRS). The inclusion of HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) in HAART has been linked to the induction of IRS. Although several molecular mechanisms of PI-induced effects on insulin action have been postulated, the deleterious effects of PIs on insulin production by pancreatic beta-cells have not been fully investigated and therapeutic strategies to ameliorate insulin dysregulation at this level have not been targeted. The present study showed that exposure to several different PIs, nelfinavir (5-10 microM), saquinavir (5-10 microM) and atazanavir (8-20 microM), decreases glucose stimulated insulin secretion from rat pancreatic beta-cells (INS-1). Nelfinavir significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and suppressed cytosolic, but not mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels. Nelfinvair also decreased both glutathione and ATP and increased UCP2 levels in these cells. Simultaneous treatment with thymoquinone (TQ) (2.5 microM), an active ingredient of black seed oil, significantly inhibited the effect of nelfinavir on augmented ROS production and suppressed SOD levels. Both TQ and black seed oil exposure increased glucose stimulated insulin secretion and ameliorated the suppressive effect of nelfinavir. The present findings imply a direct role of ROS in PI induced deleterious effects on pancreatic beta-cells. Our findings also suggest that TQ may be used as a potential therapeutic agent to normalize the dysregulated insulin production observed in HAART treated patients.

  11. Paucity of Intact Non-Induced Provirus with Early, Long-Term Antiretroviral Therapy of Perinatal HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Douglas; Luzuriaga, Katherine; Siberry, George; Petru, Ann; Chen, YaHui; Uprety, Priyanka; Ho, Ya-Chi; Persaud, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    The latent reservoir is a major barrier to HIV eradication. Reservoir size is emerging as an important biomarker to assess the likelihood of HIV remission in the absence of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and may be reduced by earlier initiation of ART that restricts HIV spread into CD4+ T cells. Reservoir size is traditionally measured with a quantitative viral outgrowth assay (QVOA) that induces replication-competent HIV production through in vitro stimulation of resting CD4+ T cells. However, the recent identification of replication-intact, non-induced proviral genomes (NIPG) suggests the QVOA significantly underestimates (by 62-fold) latent reservoir size in chronically-infected adults. Whether formation and persistence of Intact, NIPG is thwarted by early ART initiation and long-term virologic suppression in perinatal infection is unclear. Here, we show that the latent reservoir in 11 early treated, long-term suppressed perinatally infected children and adolescents was not inducible by QVOA and dominated by defective, NIPG. Single genome analysis of 164 NIPG from 232 million cultured resting CD4+ T cells revealed no replication-intact, near-full length sequences. Forty-three (26%) NIPG contained APOBEC3G-mediated hypermutation, 115 (70%) NIPG contained large internal deletions, one NIPG contained nonsense mutations and indels, and 5 (3%) NIPG were assigned as “Not Evaluable” due to multiple failed sequencing attempts that precluded further classification. The lack of replication competent inducible provirus and intact NIPG in this cohort indicate early, long-term ART of perinatal infection leads to marked diminution of replication-competent HIV-1 reservoirs, creating a favorable state towards interventions aimed at virologic remission. PMID:28178277

  12. Paucity of Intact Non-Induced Provirus with Early, Long-Term Antiretroviral Therapy of Perinatal HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Rainwater-Lovett, Kaitlin; Ziemniak, Carrie; Watson, Douglas; Luzuriaga, Katherine; Siberry, George; Petru, Ann; Chen, YaHui; Uprety, Priyanka; McManus, Margaret; Ho, Ya-Chi; Lamers, Susanna L; Persaud, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    The latent reservoir is a major barrier to HIV eradication. Reservoir size is emerging as an important biomarker to assess the likelihood of HIV remission in the absence of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and may be reduced by earlier initiation of ART that restricts HIV spread into CD4+ T cells. Reservoir size is traditionally measured with a quantitative viral outgrowth assay (QVOA) that induces replication-competent HIV production through in vitro stimulation of resting CD4+ T cells. However, the recent identification of replication-intact, non-induced proviral genomes (NIPG) suggests the QVOA significantly underestimates (by 62-fold) latent reservoir size in chronically-infected adults. Whether formation and persistence of Intact, NIPG is thwarted by early ART initiation and long-term virologic suppression in perinatal infection is unclear. Here, we show that the latent reservoir in 11 early treated, long-term suppressed perinatally infected children and adolescents was not inducible by QVOA and dominated by defective, NIPG. Single genome analysis of 164 NIPG from 232 million cultured resting CD4+ T cells revealed no replication-intact, near-full length sequences. Forty-three (26%) NIPG contained APOBEC3G-mediated hypermutation, 115 (70%) NIPG contained large internal deletions, one NIPG contained nonsense mutations and indels, and 5 (3%) NIPG were assigned as "Not Evaluable" due to multiple failed sequencing attempts that precluded further classification. The lack of replication competent inducible provirus and intact NIPG in this cohort indicate early, long-term ART of perinatal infection leads to marked diminution of replication-competent HIV-1 reservoirs, creating a favorable state towards interventions aimed at virologic remission.

  13. HIV-specific CD4-induced Antibodies Mediate Broad and Potent Antibody-dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Activity and are Commonly Detected in Plasma from HIV-infected Humans

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Katherine L.; Cortez, Valerie; Dingens, Adam S.; Gach, Johannes S.; Rainwater, Stephanie; Weis, Julie F.; Chen, Xuemin; Spearman, Paul; Forthal, Donald N.; Overbaugh, Julie

    2015-01-01

    HIV-specific antibodies (Abs) can reduce viral burden by blocking new rounds of infection or by destroying infected cells via activation of effector cells through Fc–FcR interaction. This latter process, referred to as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), has been associated with viral control and improved clinical outcome following both HIV and SIV infections. Here we describe an HIV viral-like particle (VLP)-based sorting strategy that led to identification of HIV-specific memory B cells encoding Abs that mediate ADCC from a subtype A-infected Kenyan woman at 914 days post-infection. Using this strategy, 12 HIV-envelope-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were isolated and three mediated potent ADCC activity when compared to well-characterized ADCC mAbs. The ADCC-mediating Abs also mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI), which provides a net measure of Fc receptor-triggered effects against replicating virus. Two of the three ADCC-mediating Abs targeted a CD4-induced (CD4i) epitope also bound by the mAb C11; the third antibody targeted the N-terminus of V3. Both CD4i Abs identified here demonstrated strong cross-clade breadth with activity against 10 of 11 envelopes tested, including those from clades A, B, C, A/D and C/D, whereas the V3-specific antibody showed more limited breadth. Variants of these CD4i, C11-like mAbs engineered to interrupt binding to FcγRs inhibited a measurable percentage of the donor's ADCC activity starting as early as 189 days post-infection. C11-like antibodies also accounted for between 18–78% of ADCC activity in 9 chronically infected individuals from the same cohort study. Further, the two CD4i Abs originated from unique B cells, suggesting that antibodies targeting this epitope can be commonly produced. Taken together, these data provide strong evidence that CD4i, C11-like antibodies develop within the first 6 months of infection and they can arise from unique B-cell lineages in the

  14. HIV-1-triggered release of type I IFN by plasmacytoid dendritic cells induces BAFF production in monocytes.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Alejandro M; Ouellet, Michel; Tremblay, Michel J

    2015-03-01

    HIV-1 infection leads to numerous B cell abnormalities, including hypergammaglobulinemia, nonspecific B cell activation, nonspecific class switching, increased cell turnover, breakage of tolerance, increased immature/transitional B cells, B cell malignancies, as well as a loss of capacity to generate and maintain memory, all of which contribute to a global impairment of the immune humoral compartment. Several cytokines and soluble factors, which are increased in sera of HIV-1-infected individuals, have been suggested to directly or indirectly contribute to these B cell dysfunctions, and one of these is the B cell-activating factor (BAFF). We report in this study that HIV-1 (X4- and R5-tropic) upregulates BAFF expression and secretion by human monocytes. Moreover, we show that the virus-mediated production of BAFF by monocytes relies on a type I IFN response by a small percentage of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) present in the monocyte cultures. HIV-1-induced type I IFN by pDCs triggers BAFF production in both classical and intermediate monocytes, but not in nonclassical monocytes, which nonetheless display a very strong basal BAFF production. We report also that basal BAFF secretion was higher in monocytes obtained from females compared with those from male donors. This study provides a novel mechanistic explanation for the increased BAFF levels observed during HIV-1 infection and highlights the importance of pDC/monocyte crosstalk to drive BAFF secretion. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Architectural Insight into Inovirus-Associated Vectors (IAVs) and Development of IAV-Based Vaccines Inducing Humoral and Cellular Responses: Implications in HIV-1 Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hassapis, Kyriakos A.; Stylianou, Dora C.; Kostrikis, Leondios G.

    2014-01-01

    Inovirus-associated vectors (IAVs) are engineered, non-lytic, filamentous bacteriophages that are assembled primarily from thousands of copies of the major coat protein gp8 and just five copies of each of the four minor coat proteins gp3, gp6, gp7 and gp9. Inovirus display studies have shown that the architecture of inoviruses makes all coat proteins of the inoviral particle accessible to the outside. This particular feature of IAVs allows foreign antigenic peptides to be displayed on the outer surface of the virion fused to its coat proteins and for more than two decades has been exploited in many applications including antibody or peptide display libraries, drug design, and vaccine development against infectious and non-infectious diseases. As vaccine carriers, IAVs have been shown to elicit both a cellular and humoral response against various pathogens through the display of antibody epitopes on their coat proteins. Despite their high immunogenicity, the goal of developing an effective vaccine against HIV-1 has not yet materialized. One possible limitation of previous efforts was the use of broadly neutralizing antibodies, which exhibited autoreactivity properties. In the past five years, however, new, more potent broadly neutralizing antibodies that do not exhibit autoreactivity properties have been isolated from HIV-1 infected individuals, suggesting that vaccination strategies aimed at producing such broadly neutralizing antibodies may confer protection against infection. The utilization of these new, broadly neutralizing antibodies in combination with the architectural traits of IAVs have driven the current developments in the design of an inovirus-based vaccine against HIV-1. This article reviews the applications of IAVs in vaccine development, with particular emphasis on the design of inoviral-based vaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25525909

  16. Architectural insight into inovirus-associated vectors (IAVs) and development of IAV-based vaccines inducing humoral and cellular responses: implications in HIV-1 vaccines.

    PubMed

    Hassapis, Kyriakos A; Stylianou, Dora C; Kostrikis, Leondios G

    2014-12-17

    Inovirus-associated vectors (IAVs) are engineered, non-lytic, filamentous bacteriophages that are assembled primarily from thousands of copies of the major coat protein gp8 and just five copies of each of the four minor coat proteins gp3, gp6, gp7 and gp9. Inovirus display studies have shown that the architecture of inoviruses makes all coat proteins of the inoviral particle accessible to the outside. This particular feature of IAVs allows foreign antigenic peptides to be displayed on the outer surface of the virion fused to its coat proteins and for more than two decades has been exploited in many applications including antibody or peptide display libraries, drug design, and vaccine development against infectious and non-infectious diseases. As vaccine carriers, IAVs have been shown to elicit both a cellular and humoral response against various pathogens through the display of antibody epitopes on their coat proteins. Despite their high immunogenicity, the goal of developing an effective vaccine against HIV-1 has not yet materialized. One possible limitation of previous efforts was the use of broadly neutralizing antibodies, which exhibited autoreactivity properties. In the past five years, however, new, more potent broadly neutralizing antibodies that do not exhibit autoreactivity properties have been isolated from HIV-1 infected individuals, suggesting that vaccination strategies aimed at producing such broadly neutralizing antibodies may confer protection against infection. The utilization of these new, broadly neutralizing antibodies in combination with the architectural traits of IAVs have driven the current developments in the design of an inovirus-based vaccine against HIV-1. This article reviews the applications of IAVs in vaccine development, with particular emphasis on the design of inoviral-based vaccines against HIV-1.

  17. Interferon-α Subtypes in an Ex Vivo Model of Acute HIV-1 Infection: Expression, Potency and Effector Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Harper, Michael S; Guo, Kejun; Gibbert, Kathrin; Lee, Eric J; Dillon, Stephanie M; Barrett, Bradley S; McCarter, Martin D; Hasenkrug, Kim J; Dittmer, Ulf; Wilson, Cara C; Santiago, Mario L

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 is transmitted primarily across mucosal surfaces and rapidly spreads within the intestinal mucosa during acute infection. The type I interferons (IFNs) likely serve as a first line of defense, but the relative expression and antiviral properties of the 12 IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection of mucosal tissues remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the expression of all IFNα subtypes in HIV-1-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells by next-generation sequencing. We then determined the relative antiviral potency of each IFNα subtype ex vivo using the human intestinal Lamina Propria Aggregate Culture model. IFNα subtype transcripts from the centromeric half of the IFNA gene complex were highly expressed in pDCs following HIV-1 exposure. There was an inverse relationship between IFNA subtype expression and potency. IFNα8, IFNα6 and IFNα14 were the most potent in restricting HIV-1 infection. IFNα2, the clinically-approved subtype, and IFNα1 were both highly expressed but exhibited relatively weak antiviral activity. The relative potencies correlated with binding affinity to the type I IFN receptor and the induction levels of HIV-1 restriction factors Mx2 and Tetherin/BST-2 but not APOBEC3G, F and D. However, despite the lack of APOBEC3 transcriptional induction, the higher relative potency of IFNα8 and IFNα14 correlated with stronger inhibition of virion infectivity, which is linked to deaminase-independent APOBEC3 restriction activity. By contrast, both potent (IFNα8) and weak (IFNα1) subtypes significantly induced HIV-1 GG-to-AG hypermutation. The results unravel non-redundant functions of the IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection, with strong implications for HIV-1 mucosal immunity, viral evolution and IFNα-based functional cure strategies.

  18. Interferon-α Subtypes in an Ex Vivo Model of Acute HIV-1 Infection: Expression, Potency and Effector Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Michael S.; Guo, Kejun; Gibbert, Kathrin; Lee, Eric J.; Dillon, Stephanie M.; Barrett, Bradley S.; McCarter, Martin D.; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Dittmer, Ulf; Wilson, Cara C.; Santiago, Mario L.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 is transmitted primarily across mucosal surfaces and rapidly spreads within the intestinal mucosa during acute infection. The type I interferons (IFNs) likely serve as a first line of defense, but the relative expression and antiviral properties of the 12 IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection of mucosal tissues remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the expression of all IFNα subtypes in HIV-1-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells by next-generation sequencing. We then determined the relative antiviral potency of each IFNα subtype ex vivo using the human intestinal Lamina Propria Aggregate Culture model. IFNα subtype transcripts from the centromeric half of the IFNA gene complex were highly expressed in pDCs following HIV-1 exposure. There was an inverse relationship between IFNA subtype expression and potency. IFNα8, IFNα6 and IFNα14 were the most potent in restricting HIV-1 infection. IFNα2, the clinically-approved subtype, and IFNα1 were both highly expressed but exhibited relatively weak antiviral activity. The relative potencies correlated with binding affinity to the type I IFN receptor and the induction levels of HIV-1 restriction factors Mx2 and Tetherin/BST-2 but not APOBEC3G, F and D. However, despite the lack of APOBEC3 transcriptional induction, the higher relative potency of IFNα8 and IFNα14 correlated with stronger inhibition of virion infectivity, which is linked to deaminase-independent APOBEC3 restriction activity. By contrast, both potent (IFNα8) and weak (IFNα1) subtypes significantly induced HIV-1 GG-to-AG hypermutation. The results unravel non-redundant functions of the IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection, with strong implications for HIV-1 mucosal immunity, viral evolution and IFNα-based functional cure strategies. PMID:26529416

  19. A Novel Prime and Boost Regimen of HIV Virus-Like Particles with TLR4 Adjuvant MPLA Induces Th1 Oriented Immune Responses against HIV

    PubMed Central

    Poteet, Ethan; Lewis, Phoebe; Li, Feng; Zhang, Sheng; Gu, Jianhua; Chen, Changyi; Ho, Sam On; Do, Thai; Chiang, SuMing; Fujii, Gary; Yao, Qizhi

    2015-01-01

    HIV virus-like particles (VLPs) present the HIV envelope protein in its native conformation, providing an ideal vaccine antigen. To enhance the immunogenicity of the VLP vaccine, we sought to improve upon two components; the route of administration and the additional adjuvant. Using HIV VLPs, we evaluated sub-cheek as a novel route of vaccine administration when combined with other conventional routes of immunization. Of five combinations of distinct prime and boost sequences, which included sub-cheek, intranasal, and intradermal routes of administration, intranasal prime and sub-cheek boost (IN+SC) resulted in the highest HIV-specific IgG titers among the groups tested. Using the IN+SC regimen we tested the adjuvant VesiVax Conjugatable Adjuvant Lipid Vesicles (CALV) + monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) at MPLA concentrations of 0, 7.5, 12.5, and 25 μg/dose in combination with our VLPs. Mice that received 12.5 or 25 μg/dose MPLA had the highest concentrations of Env-specific IgG2c (20.7 and 18.4 μg/ml respectively), which represents a Th1 type of immune response in C57BL/6 mice. This was in sharp contrast to mice which received 0 or 7.5 μg MPLA adjuvant (6.05 and 5.68 μg/ml of IgG2c respectively). In contrast to IgG2c, MPLA had minor effects on Env-specific IgG1; therefore, 12.5 and 25 μg/dose of MPLA induced the optimal IgG1/IgG2c ratio of 1.3. Additionally, the percentage of germinal center B cells increased significantly from 15.4% in the control group to 31.9% in the CALV + 25 μg MPLA group. These mice also had significantly more IL-2 and less IL-4 Env-specific CD8+ T cells than controls, correlating with an increased percentage of Env-specific central memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Our study shows the strong potential of IN+SC as an efficacious route of administration and the effectiveness of VLPs combined with MPLA adjuvant to induce Env specific Th1-oriented HIV-specific immune responses. PMID:26312747

  20. The RNA Binding Specificity of Human APOBEC3 Proteins Resembles That of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid

    PubMed Central

    Errando, Manel; Bieniasz, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    The APOBEC3 (A3) cytidine deaminases are antiretroviral proteins, whose targets include human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Their incorporation into viral particles is critical for antiviral activity and is driven by interactions with the RNA molecules that are packaged into virions. However, it is unclear whether A3 proteins preferentially target RNA molecules that are destined to be packaged and if so, how. Using cross-linking immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq), we determined the RNA binding preferences of the A3F, A3G and A3H proteins. We found that A3 proteins bind preferentially to RNA segments with particular properties, both in cells and in virions. Specifically, A3 proteins target RNA sequences that are G-rich and/or A-rich and are not scanned by ribosomes during translation. Comparative analyses of HIV-1 Gag, nucleocapsid (NC) and A3 RNA binding to HIV-1 RNA in cells and virions revealed the striking finding that A3 proteins partially mimic the RNA binding specificity of the HIV-1 NC protein. These findings suggest a model for A3 incorporation into HIV-1 virions in which an NC-like RNA binding specificity is determined by nucleotide composition rather than sequence. This model reconciles the promiscuity of A3 RNA binding that has been observed in previous studies with a presumed advantage that would accompany selective binding to RNAs that are destined to be packaged into virions. PMID:27541140

  1. Identification of bacteriophage virion proteins by the ANOVA feature selection and analysis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Feng, Peng-Mian; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2014-08-01

    The bacteriophage virion proteins play extremely important roles in the fate of host bacterial cells. Accurate identification of bacteriophage virion proteins is very important for understanding their functions and clarifying the lysis mechanism of bacterial cells. In this study, a new sequence-based method was developed to identify phage virion proteins. In the new method, the protein sequences were initially formulated by the g-gap dipeptide compositions. Subsequently, the analysis of variance (ANOVA) with incremental feature selection (IFS) was used to search for the optimal feature set. It was observed that, in jackknife cross-validation, the optimal feature set including 160 optimized features can produce the maximum accuracy of 85.02%. By performing feature analysis, we found that the correlation between two amino acids with one gap was more important than other correlations for phage virion protein prediction and that some of the 1-gap dipeptides were important and mainly contributed to the virion protein prediction. This analysis will provide novel insights into the function of phage virion proteins. On the basis of the proposed method, an online web-server, PVPred, was established and can be freely accessed from the website (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/PVPred). We believe that the PVPred will become a powerful tool to study phage virion proteins and to guide the related experimental validations.

  2. Mass Determination of Rous Sarcoma Virus Virions by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Volker M.; Simon, Martha N.

    1999-01-01

    The internal structural protein of retroviruses, Gag, comprises most of the mass of the virion, and Gag itself can give rise to virus-like particles when expressed in appropriate cells. Previously the stoichiometry of Gag in virions was inferred from indirect measurements carried out 2 decades ago. We now have directly determined the masses of individual particles of the prototypic avian retrovirus, Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), by using scanning transmission electron microscopy. In this technique, the number of scattered electrons in the dark-field image integrated over an individual freeze-dried virus particle on a grid is directly proportional to its mass. The RSV virions had a mean mass of 2.5 × 108 Da, corresponding to about 1,500 Gag molecules per virion. The population of virions was not homogeneous, with about one-third to two-thirds of the virions deviating from the mean by more than 10% of the mass in two respective preparations. The mean masses for virions carrying genomes of 7.4 or 9.3 kb were indistinguishable, suggesting that mass variability is not due to differences in RNA incorporation. PMID:10400808

  3. The vaccinia virus E6 protein influences virion protein localization during virus assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Condit, Richard C. Moussatche, Nissin

    2015-08-15

    Vaccinia virus mutants in which expression of the virion core protein gene E6R is repressed are defective in virion morphogenesis. E6 deficient infections fail to properly package viroplasm into viral membranes, resulting in an accumulation of empty immature virions and large aggregates of viroplasm. We have used immunogold electron microscopy and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy to assess the intracellular localization of several virion structural proteins and enzymes during E6R mutant infections. We find that during E6R mutant infections virion membrane proteins and virion transcription enzymes maintain a normal localization within viral factories while several major core and lateral body proteins accumulate in aggregated virosomes. The results support a model in which vaccinia virions are assembled from at least three substructures, the membrane, the viroplasm and a “pre-nucleocapsid”, and that the E6 protein is essential for maintaining proper localization of the seven-protein complex and the viroplasm during assembly. - Highlights: • Mutation of E6 disrupts association of viral membranes with viral core proteins • Mutation of E6 does not perturb viral membrane biosynthesis • Mutation of E6 does not perturb localization of viral transcription enzymes • Mutation of E6 causes mis-localization and aggregation of viral core proteins • Vaccinia assembly uses three subassemblies: membranes, viroplasm, prenucleocapsid.

  4. Hepatitis A virus subviral particles: purification, accumulation, and relative infectivity of virions, provirions and procapsids.

    PubMed

    Bishop, N E; Anderson, D A

    1997-01-01

    Virus-specific particles were isolated from hepatitis A virus (HAV)-infected cells and the role of each particle type in the replicative cycle assessed. Mature virions, provirions (immature virions) and empty capsids (procapsids) were detected in cell lysates, and both virions and provirions were found in the culture supernatant. Particle types were separated by isopycnic caesium chloride gradient or linear sucrose density gradient-ultracentrifugation, and their capsid proteins characterised. Virions, provirions and procapsids containing both VP1 and varying levels of the VP1 precursor protein PX were found, suggesting that trimming of PX is not essential for particle formation. Provirions (containing VP0) and virions (containing VP2) could not be clearly separated with these techniques, but sucrose gradients allowed greater separation of particle pools with distinct VP0 contents and specific infectivities which could be used for further studies of the biological role of VP0 cleavage. Virions, with a higher sedimentation coefficient and buoyant density presumably reflecting a more compact structure, had a higher relative infectivity when compared to provirions. HAV-infected cells therefore contain a heterogenous mixture of RNA-containing viral particles with characteristics between those of true provirions and virions, but all such particles are released from the cell and can participate in further rounds of infection.

  5. Exploring the membrane fusion mechanism through force-induced disassembly of HIV-1 six-helix bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Kai; Zhang, Yong; Lou, Jizhong

    2016-05-13

    Enveloped virus, such as HIV-1, employs membrane fusion mechanism to invade into host cell. HIV-1 gp41 ectodomain uses six-helix bundle configuration to accomplish this process. Using molecular dynamic simulations, we confirmed the stability of this six-helix bundle by showing high occupancy of hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. Key residues and interactions important for the bundle integration were characterized by force-induced unfolding simulations of six-helix bundle, exhibiting the collapse order of these groups of interactions. Moreover, our results in some way concerted with a previous theory that the formation of coiled-coil choose a route which involved cooperative interactions between the N-terminal and C-terminal helix. -- Highlights: •Unfolding of HIV-1 gp41 six-helix bundle is studied by molecular dynamics simulations. •Specific interactions responsible for the stability of HIV-1 envelope post-fusion conformation were identified. •The gp41 six-helix bundle transition inducing membrane fusion might be a cooperative process of the three subunits.

  6. GP3 is a structural component of the PRRSV type II (US) virion

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, M. de; Ansari, I.H.; Das, P.B.; Ku, B.J.; Martinez-Lobo, F.J.; Pattnaik, A.K.; Osorio, F.A.

    2009-07-20

    Glycoprotein 3 (GP3) is a highly glycosylated PRRSV envelope protein which has been reported as being present in the virions of PRRSV type I, while missing in the type II PRRSV (US) virions. We herein present evidence that GP3 is indeed incorporated in the virus particles of a North American strain of PRRSV (FL12), at a density that is consistent with the minor structural role assigned to GP3 in members of the Arterivirus genus. Two 15aa peptides corresponding to two different immunodominant linear epitopes of GP3 derived from the North American strain of PRRSV (FL12) were used as antigen to generate a rabbit monospecific antiserum to this protein. The specificity of this anti-GP3 antiserum was confirmed by radioimmunoprecipitation (RIP) assay using BHK-21 cells transfected with GP3 expressing plasmid, MARC-145 cells infected with FL12 PRRSV, as well as by confocal microscopy on PRRSV-infected MARC-145 cells. To test if GP3 is a structural component of the virion, {sup 35}S-labelled PRRSV virions were pelleted through a 30% sucrose cushion, followed by a second round of purification on a sucrose gradient (20-60%). Virions were detected in specific gradient fractions by radioactive counts and further confirmed by viral infectivity assay in MARC 145 cells. The GP3 was detected in gradient fractions containing purified virions by RIP using anti-GP3 antiserum. Predictably, the GP3 was less abundant in purified virions than other major structural envelope proteins such as GP5 and M. Further evidence of the presence of GP3 at the level of PRRSV FL12 envelope was obtained by immunogold staining of purified virions from the supernatant of infected cells with anti-GP3 antiserum. Taken together, these results indicate that GP3 is a minor structural component of the PRRSV type II (FL12 strain) virion, as had been previously described for PRRSV type I.

  7. Virion Structure of Israeli Acute Bee Paralysis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Mullapudi, Edukondalu; Přidal, Antonín; Pálková, Lenka; de Miranda, Joachim R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pollination services provided by the western honeybee (Apis mellifera) are critical for agricultural production and the diversity of wild flowering plants. However, honeybees suffer from environmental pollution, habitat loss, and pathogens, including viruses that can cause fatal diseases. Israeli acute bee paralysis virus (IAPV), from the family Dicistroviridae, has been shown to cause colony collapse disorder in the United States. Here, we present the IAPV virion structure determined to a resolution of 4.0 Å and the structure of a pentamer of capsid protein protomers at a resolution of 2.7 Å. IAPV has major capsid proteins VP1 and VP3 with noncanonical jellyroll β-barrel folds composed of only seven instead of eight β-strands, as is the rule for proteins of other viruses with the same fold. The maturation of dicistroviruses is connected to the cleavage of precursor capsid protein VP0 into subunits VP3 and VP4. We show that a putative catalytic site formed by the residues Asp-Asp-Phe of VP1 is optimally positioned to perform the cleavage. Furthermore, unlike many picornaviruses, IAPV does not contain a hydrophobic pocket in capsid protein VP1 that could be targeted by capsid-binding antiviral compounds. IMPORTANCE Honeybee pollination is required for agricultural production and to sustain the biodiversity of wild flora. However, honeybee populations in Europe and North America are under pressure from pathogens, including viruses that cause colony losses. Viruses from the family Dicistroviridae can cause honeybee infections that are lethal, not only to individual honeybees, but to whole colonies. Here, we present the virion structure of an Aparavirus, Israeli acute bee paralysis virus (IAPV), a member of a complex of closely related viruses that are distributed worldwide. IAPV exhibits unique structural features not observed in other picorna-like viruses. Capsid protein VP1 of IAPV does not contain a hydrophobic pocket, implying that capsid

  8. Virion Structure of Israeli Acute Bee Paralysis Virus.

    PubMed

    Mullapudi, Edukondalu; Přidal, Antonín; Pálková, Lenka; de Miranda, Joachim R; Plevka, Pavel

    2016-09-15

    The pollination services provided by the western honeybee (Apis mellifera) are critical for agricultural production and the diversity of wild flowering plants. However, honeybees suffer from environmental pollution, habitat loss, and pathogens, including viruses that can cause fatal diseases. Israeli acute bee paralysis virus (IAPV), from the family Dicistroviridae, has been shown to cause colony collapse disorder in the United States. Here, we present the IAPV virion structure determined to a resolution of 4.0 Å and the structure of a pentamer of capsid protein protomers at a resolution of 2.7 Å. IAPV has major capsid proteins VP1 and VP3 with noncanonical jellyroll β-barrel folds composed of only seven instead of eight β-strands, as is the rule for proteins of other viruses with the same fold. The maturation of dicistroviruses is connected to the cleavage of precursor capsid protein VP0 into subunits VP3 and VP4. We show that a putative catalytic site formed by the residues Asp-Asp-Phe of VP1 is optimally positioned to perform the cleavage. Furthermore, unlike many picornaviruses, IAPV does not contain a hydrophobic pocket in capsid protein VP1 that could be targeted by capsid-binding antiviral compounds. Honeybee pollination is required for agricultural production and to sustain the biodiversity of wild flora. However, honeybee populations in Europe and North America are under pressure from pathogens, including viruses that cause colony losses. Viruses from the family Dicistroviridae can cause honeybee infections that are lethal, not only to individual honeybees, but to whole colonies. Here, we present the virion structure of an Aparavirus, Israeli acute bee paralysis virus (IAPV), a member of a complex of closely related viruses that are distributed worldwide. IAPV exhibits unique structural features not observed in other picorna-like viruses. Capsid protein VP1 of IAPV does not contain a hydrophobic pocket, implying that capsid-binding antiviral compounds

  9. Envelope Conformational Changes Induced by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Attachment Inhibitors Prevent CD4 Binding and Downstream Entry Events

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Hsu-Tso; Fan, Li; Nowicka-Sans, Beata; McAuliffe, Brian; Li, Chang-Ben; Yamanaka, Gregory; Zhou, Nannan; Fang, Hua; Dicker, Ira; Dalterio, Richard; Gong, Yi-Fei; Wang, Tao; Yin, Zhiwei; Ueda, Yasutsugu; Matiskella, John; Kadow, John; Clapham, Paul; Robinson, James; Colonno, Richard; Lin, Pin-Fang

    2006-01-01

    BMS-488043 is a small-molecule human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) CD4 attachment inhibitor with demonstrated clinical efficacy. The compound inhibits soluble CD4 (sCD4) binding to the 11 distinct HIV envelope gp120 proteins surveyed. Binding of BMS-488043 and that of sCD4 to gp120 are mutually exclusive, since increased concentrations of one can completely block the binding of the other without affecting the maximal gp120 binding capacity. Similarly, BMS-488043 inhibited virion envelope trimers from binding to sCD4-immunoglobulin G (IgG), with decreasing inhibition as the sCD4-IgG concentration increased, and BMS-488043 blocked the sCD4-induced exposure of the gp41 groove in virions. In both virion binding assays, BMS-488043 was active only when added prior to sCD4. Collectively, these results indicate that obstruction of gp120-sCD4 interactions is the primary inhibition mechanism of this compound and that compound interaction with envelope must precede CD4 binding. By three independent approaches, BMS-488043 was further shown to induce conformational changes within gp120 in both the CD4 and CCR5 binding regions. These changes likely prevent gp120-CD4 interactions and downstream entry events. However, BMS-488043 could only partially inhibit CD4 binding to an HIV variant containing a specific envelope truncation and altered gp120 conformation, despite effectively inhibiting the pseudotyped virus infection. Taken together, BMS-488043 inhibits viral entry primarily through altering the envelope conformation and preventing CD4 binding, and other downstream entry events could also be inhibited as a result of these induced conformational changes. PMID:16571818

  10. Herpes simplex virus VP16 rescues viral mRNA from destruction by the virion host shutoff function.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Q; Smibert, C A; Koop, K E; Lavery, C; Capone, J P; Weinheimer, S P; Smiley, J R

    1996-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) virions contain two regulatory proteins that facilitate the onset of the lytic cycle: VP16 activates transcription of the viral immediate-early genes, and vhs triggers shutoff of host protein synthesis and accelerated turnover of cellular and viral mRNAs. VP16 and vhs form a complex in infected cells, raising the possibility of a regulatory link between them. Here we show that viral protein synthesis and mRNA levels undergo a severe decline at intermediate times after infection with a VP16 null mutant, culminating in virtually complete translational arrest. This phenotype was rescued by a transcriptionally incompetent derivative of VP16 that retains vhs binding activity, and was eliminated by inactivating the vhs gene. These results indicate that VP16 dampens vhs activity, allowing HSV mRNAs to persist in infected cells. Further evidence supporting this hypothesis came from the demonstration that a stably transfected cell line expressing VP16 was resistant to host shutoff induced by superinfecting HSV virions. Thus, in addition to its well known function as a transcriptional activator, VP16 stimulates viral gene expression at a post-transcriptional level, by sparing viral mRNAs from degradation by one of the virus-induced host shutoff mechanisms. Images PMID:8665865

  11. Architects of assembly: roles of Flaviviridae non-structural proteins in virion morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Murray, Catherine L; Jones, Christopher T; Rice, Charles M

    2008-09-01

    Viruses of the Flaviviridae family, including hepatitis C, dengue and bovine viral diarrhoea, are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent advances in our understanding of virion assembly have uncovered commonalities among distantly related members of this family. We discuss the emerging hypothesis that physical virion components are not alone in forming the infectious particle, but that non-structural proteins are intimately involved in orchestrating morphogenesis. Pinpointing the roles of Flaviviridae proteins in virion production could reveal new avenues for antiviral therapeutics.

  12. Quantitation of Endogenous C-type Virion Production in Several Murine Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Luftig, Ronald B.; Mcmillan, Paul N.; Gudger, Mollie

    1974-01-01

    Quantitation by enumeration of virion particles, measurement of absorbancy at 260 nm, and densitometry on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels has shown that mouse L-M cells yielded 7- to 10-fold less endogenous C-type virions than the parental lines, L or L929. The previously noted stimulation of L-M cell virion production by a concomitant 10% increase in fetal calf serum concentration (D. A. Kindig, R. Karp, and W. H. Kirsten, 1968), was not observed. Images PMID:4371663

  13. Trans-Cellular Introduction of HIV-1 Protein Nef Induces Pathogenic Response in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Nazir, Aamir; Sammi, Shreesh Raj; Singh, Pankaj; Tripathi, Raj Kamal

    2010-01-01

    Background Caenorhabditis elegans has emerged as a very powerful model for studying the host pathogen interactions. Despite the absence of a naturally occurring viral infection for C. elegans, the model is now being exploited experimentally to study the basic aspects of virus-host interplay. The data generated from recent studies suggests that the virus that infects mammalian cells does infect, replicate and accumulate in C. elegans. Methodology/Principal Findings We took advantage of the easy-to-achieve protein introduction in C. elegans and employing the methodology, we administered HIV-1 protein Nef into live worms. Nef is known to be an important protein for exacerbating HIV-1 pathogenesis in host by enhancing viral replication. The deletion of nef from the viral genome has been reported to inhibit its replication in the host, thereby leading to delayed pathogenesis. Our studies, employing Nef introduction into C. elegans, led to creation of an in-vivo model that allowed us to study, whether or not, the protein induces effect in the whole organism. We observed a marked lipodystrophy, effect on neuromuscular function, impaired fertility and reduced longevity in the worms exposed to Nef. The observed effects resemble to those observed in Nef transgenic mice and most interestingly the effects also relate to some of the pathogenic aspects exhibited by human AIDS patients. Conclusions/Significance Our studies underline the importance of this in vivo model for studying the interactions of Nef with host proteins, which could further be used for identifying possible inhibitors of such interactions. PMID:21179446

  14. A small molecule compound IMB-LA inhibits HIV-1 infection by preventing viral Vpu from antagonizing the host restriction factor BST-2

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Zeyun; Ding, Jiwei; Zhang, Quan; Zhao, Jianyuan; Ma, Ling; Yu, Haisheng; Liu, Zhenlong; Shan, Guangzhi; Li, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Jinming; Wei, Tao; Zhang, Liguo; Guo, Fei; Liang, Chen; Cen, Shan

    2015-01-01

    Human BST-2 inhibits HIV-1 replication by tethering nascent virions to the cell surface. HIV-1 codes Vpu that counteracts BST-2 by down-regulating this restriction factor from the cell surface. This important function makes Vpu a potential therapeutic target. Yet, no agents have been reported to block Vpu from antagonizing BST-2. In this study, we report a small molecule compound IMB-LA that abrogates the function of Vpu and thereby strongly suppresses HIV-1 replication by sensitizing the virus to BST-2 restriction. Further studies revealed that IMB-LA specifically inhibits Vpu-mediated degradation of BST-2 and restores the expression of BST-2 at the cell surface. Although IMB-LA does not prevent Vpu from interacting with BST-2 or β-TrCP2-containing ubiquitin E3 ligase, sorting of BST-2 into lysosomes in Vpu-expressing cells is blocked by IMB-LA. Most importantly, HIV-1 release and infection is inhibited by IMB-LA only in BST-2-expressing cells. In summary, results herein demonstrated that IMB-LA could specifically inhibit the degradation of BST-2 induced by Vpu, and impair HIV-1 replication in a BST-2 dependent manner, suggesting the feasibility of utilizing small molecule compounds to disable the antagonist function of Vpu and thereby expose HIV-1 to the restriction by BST-2. PMID:26669976

  15. Residues in the gp41 Ectodomain Regulate HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Conformational Transitions Induced by gp120-Directed Inhibitors.