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Sample records for hiv virological suppression

  1. HIV DNA loads, plasma residual viraemia and risk of virological rebound in heavily treated, virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, N; Canducci, F; Galli, L; Cossarini, F; Salpietro, S; Poli, A; Nozza, S; Spagnuolo, V; Clementi, M; Sampaolo, M; Ceresola, E R; Racca, S; Lazzarin, A; Castagna, A

    2015-01-01

    In this single-centre, retrospective study, we analyzed data of 194 patients receiving antiretroviral therapy with <50 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA copies/mL in plasma and 318 HIV RNA/DNA paired samples. By kinetic polymerase chain reaction (kPCR) molecular system analysis, 104 (54%) subjects had undetectable HIV RNA and 90 (46%) had residual viraemia. Median (interquartile range) HIV DNA load was 780 (380-1930) copies/10(6) peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), and HIV DNA loads were independently associated with residual viraemia (p 0.002). Virological rebound occurred in 29/194 (15%) patients over a median (interquartile range) follow-up of 17.5 (13.5-31.5) months. Residual viraemia (p 0.002), but not HIV DNA load, was independently associated with virological rebound.

  2. Comparable sustained virologic suppression between community and academic-based HIV care settings

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Carolyn; Heo, Moonseong; Peshansky, Alex; Umanski, Galina; Meissner, Paul; Voss, Cindy; Selwyn, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States is evolving due to factors including aging and geographical diffusion. Provider shortages are also driving the restructuring of HIV care delivery away from specialized settings, and family medicine providers may play a larger role in the future. We attempted to compare the effectiveness of HIV treatment delivered at community versus hospital care settings. Methods The outcome of interest was sustained virologic suppression defined as two consecutive HIV-1 RNA measurements ≤ 400 copies/mL within one year after antiretroviral initiation. We used data from the multi-state HIV Research Network cohort to compare sustained virologic suppression outcomes among 15,047 HIV-infected adults followed from 2000–2008 at five community- and eight academic hospital-based ambulatory care sites. Community-based sites were mostly staffed by family medicine and general internal medicine physicians with HIV expertise whereas hospital sites were primarily staffed by infectious disease subspecialists. Multivariate mixed-effects logistic regression controlling for potential confounding variables was applied to account for clustering effects of study sites. Results In an unadjusted analysis, the rate of sustained virologic suppression was significantly higher among subjects treated in the community-based care settings: 1,646/2,314 (71.1%) vs. 8,416/12,733 (66.1%) (p < 0.01). In the adjusted multivariate model with potential confounding variables, the rate was higher, although not statistically significant, in the community-based settings (AOR = 1.26, 95% CI 0.73–2.16). Conclusion Antiretroviral therapy can be delivered effectively through community-based treatment settings. This finding is potentially important for new program development to shift HIV care into community-based settings as the landscape of accountable care, health reform, and HIV funding and resources evolves. PMID:25567825

  3. Coinfection with Human Herpesvirus 8 Is Associated with Persistent Inflammation and Immune Activation in Virologically Suppressed HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Masiá, Mar; Robledano, Catalina; Ortiz de la Tabla, Victoria; Antequera, Pedro; Lumbreras, Blanca; Hernández, Ildefonso; Gutiérrez, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Infection with co-pathogens is one of the postulated factors contributing to persistent inflammation and non-AIDS events in virologically-suppressed HIV-infected patients. We aimed to investigate the relationship of human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8), a vasculotropic virus implicated in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma, with inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis in HIV-infected patients. Methods Prospective study including virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients. Several blood biomarkers (highly-sensitive C-reactive protein [hsCRP], tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1, malondialdehyde, plasminogen activator inhibitor [PAI-1], D-dimer, sCD14, sCD163, CD4/CD38/HLA-DR, and CD8/CD38/HLA-DR), serological tests for HHV-8 and the majority of herpesviruses, carotid intima-media thickness, and endothelial function through flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery were measured. Results A total of 136 patients were included, 34.6% of them infected with HHV-8. HHV-8-infected patients were more frequently co-infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) (P<0.001), and less frequently with hepatitis C virus (HCV) (P = 0.045), and tended to be older (P = 0.086). HHV-8-infected patients had higher levels of hsCRP (median [interquartile range], 3.63 [1.32–7.54] vs 2.08 [0.89–4.11] mg/L, P = 0.009), CD4/CD38/HLA-DR (7.67% [4.10–11.86]% vs 3.86% [2.51–7.42]%, P = 0.035) and CD8/CD38/HLA-DR (8.02% [4.98–14.09]% vs 5.02% [3.66–6.96]%, P = 0.018). After adjustment for the traditional cardiovascular risk factors, HCV and HSV-2 infection, the associations remained significant: adjusted difference between HHV-8 positive and negative patients (95% confidence interval) for hsCRP, 74.19% (16.65–160.13)%; for CD4/CD38/HLA-DR, 89.65% (14.34–214.87)%; and for CD8/CD38/HLA-DR, 58.41% (12.30–123.22)%. Flow

  4. A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Abacavir Intensification in HIV-1–Infected Adults With Virologic Suppression on a Protease Inhibitor–Containing Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Scott M.; Ribaudo, Heather; Bassett, Roland; Mellors, John W.; Demeter, Lisa M.; Coombs, Robert W.; Currier, Judith; Morse, Gene D.; Gerber, John G.; Martinez, Ana I.; Spreen, William; Fischl, Margaret A.; Squires, Kathleen E.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective Maximizing the durability of viral suppression is a key goal of antiretroviral therapy. The objective of AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study 372A was to determine whether the intensification strategy of adding abacavir to an effective indinavir-dual nucleoside regimen would delay the time to virologic failure. Methods Zidovudine-experienced subjects (n=229) on therapy with indinavir + zidovudine + lamivudine with plasma HIV-1 RNA levels <500 copies/mL were randomized to abacavir 300 mg twice daily or placebo. The primary endpoint was the time to treatment failure, defined as a composite of confirmed virologic failure (2 consecutive HIV-1 RNAs >200 copies/mL) and treatment discontinuation. Results At baseline, the study population was 88% male with a median age of 41 years and median CD4 cell count of 250/mm3. Median follow-up was 4.4 years. The primary endpoint was reached in 61/116 of abacavir versus 62/113 of placebo recipients (P = .77); virologic failure occurred in 34/116 and 42/113 patients, respectively (P = .22). There were no differences in the proportions of subjects with plasma HIV-1 RNA levels below 50 copies/mL, in CD4 cell count increases, nor adverse events between the arms. In the study, 17% of subjects developed nephrolithiasis, 2% experienced abacavir hypersensitivity, and 4.8% experienced at least 1 serious cardiovascular event (7 [6%] in the abacavir arm, 4 [3.5%] in the placebo arm). In additional secondary and post hoc analyses, rates of intermittent viremia, suppression below a plasma HIV-1 RNA level of 6 copies/mL, and HIV-1 proviral DNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were not significantly different in the 2 arms. Conclusions The strategy of intensification with abacavir in patients who are virologically suppressed on a stable antiretroviral regimen does not confer a clinical or virologic benefit. As antiretroviral regimens have become more potent since this trial was completed, it will be even more

  5. Persistently Elevated C-Reactive Protein Level in the First Year of Antiretroviral Therapy, Despite Virologic Suppression, Is Associated With HIV Disease Progression in Resource-Constrained Settings.

    PubMed

    Shivakoti, Rupak; Yang, Wei-Teng; Berendes, Sima; Mwelase, Noluthando; Kanyama, Cecilia; Pillay, Sandy; Samaneka, Wadzanai; Santos, Breno; Poongulali, Selvamuthu; Tripathy, Srikanth; Riviere, Cynthia; Lama, Javier R; Cardoso, Sandra W; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Balagopal, Ashwin; Gupte, Nikhil; Semba, Richard D; Campbell, Thomas B; Bollinger, Robert C; Gupta, Amita

    2016-04-01

    A case-cohort analysis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) was performed within a multicountry randomized trial (PEARLS) to assess the prevalence of persistently elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, based on serial measurements of CRP levels, and their association with HIV clinical failure. A persistently elevated CRP level in plasma (defined as ≥ 5 mg/L at both baseline and 24 weeks after ART initiation) was observed in 50 of 205 individuals (24%). A persistently elevated CRP level but not an elevated CRP level only at a single time point was independently associated with increased clinical failure, compared with a persistently low CRP level, despite achievement of virologic suppression. Serial monitoring of CRP levels could identify individuals who are at highest risk of HIV progression and may benefit from future adjunct antiinflammatory therapies. PMID:26621909

  6. Efficacy and safety of switching to abacavir/lamivudine (ABC/3TC) plus rilpivirine (RPV) in virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients on HAART.

    PubMed

    Palacios, R; Pérez-Hernández, I A; Martínez, M A; Mayorga, M L; González-Domenech, C M; Omar, M; Olalla, J; Romero, A; Romero, J M; Pérez-Camacho, I; Hernández-Quero, J; Santos, J

    2016-05-01

    We analysed the efficacy and safety of switching from a regimen based on nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) or integrase inhibitors (INI) to ABC/3TC + RPV in virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients. This multicentre, retrospective study comprised asymptomatic HIV-infected patients who switched from 2 NRTI + NNRTI or 2 NRTI + INI to ABC/3TC + RPV between February 2013 and December 2013; all had undetectable HIV viral load prior to switching. Efficacy and safety, and changes in lipids and cardiovascular risk (CVR) were analysed at 48 weeks. Of 85 patients (74.1 % men, mean age 49.5 years), 83 (97.6 %) switched from a regimen based on NNRTI (EFV 74, RPV 5, ETV 2, NVP 2), and 45 (53 %) switched from TDF/FTC to ABC/3TC. The main reasons for switching were toxicity (58.8 %) and convenience (29.4 %). At 48 weeks, 78 (91.8 %) patients continued taking the same regimen; efficacy was 88 % by intention to treat, and 96 % by per protocol. Two patients were lost to follow-up and five ceased the new regimen (4 due to adverse effects and 1 virologic failure). Mean CD4 cell counts increased (744 vs. 885 cells/μL; p = 0.0001), and there were mean decreases in fasting total cholesterol (-15.9 mg/dL; p < 0.0001) and LDL-cholesterol (-11.0 mg/dL; p < 0.004), with no changes in HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, total cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol ratio, and CVR. ABC/3TC + RPV is effective and safe in virologically-suppressed patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Forty-eight weeks after switching the lipid profile improved with decreases in total and LDL cholesterol. PMID:26879392

  7. Early Initiation of Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-1–Infected Newborns Can Achieve Sustained Virologic Suppression With Low Frequency of CD4+ T Cells Carrying HIV in Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Bitnun, Ari; Samson, Lindy; Chun, Tae-Wook; Kakkar, Fatima; Brophy, Jason; Murray, Danielle; Justement, Shawn; Soudeyns, Hugo; Ostrowski, Mario; Mujib, Shariq; Harrigan, P. Richard; Kim, John; Sandstrom, Paul; Read, Stanley E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. A human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)–infected infant started on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) at 30 hours of life was recently reported to have no detectable plasma viremia after discontinuing cART. The current study investigated the impact of early cART initiation on measures of HIV-1 reservoir size in HIV-1–infected children with sustained virologic suppression. Methods. Children born to HIV-1–infected mothers and started on cART within 72 hours of birth at 3 Canadian centers were assessed. HIV serology, HIV-1–specific cell-mediated immune responses, plasma viremia, cell-associated HIV-1 DNA and RNA, presence of replication-competent HIV-1, and HLA genotype were determined for HIV-1–infected children with sustained virologic suppression. Results. Of 136 cART-treated children, 12 were vertically infected (8.8%). In the 4 who achieved sustained virologic suppression, HIV serology, HIV-1–specific cell-mediated immune responses (Gag, Nef), and ultrasensitive viral load were negative. HIV-1 DNA was not detected in enriched CD4+ T cells of the 4 children (<2.6 copies/106 CD4+ T cells), whereas HIV-1 RNA was detected (19.5–130 copies/1.5 µg RNA). No virion-associated HIV-1 RNA was detected following mitogenic stimulation of peripheral blood CD4+ T cells (5.4–8.0 million CD4+ T cells) in these 4 children, but replication competent virus was detected by quantitative co-culture involving a higher number of cells in 1 of 2 children tested (0.1 infectious units/106 CD4+ T cells). Conclusions. In perinatally HIV-1–infected newborns, initiation of cART within 72 hours of birth may significantly reduce the size of the HIV-1 reservoirs. Cessation of cART may be necessary to determine whether functional HIV cure can be achieved in such children. PMID:24917662

  8. Brief Report: Switch to Ritonavir-Boosted Atazanavir Plus Raltegravir in Virologically Suppressed Patients With HIV-1 Infection: A Randomized Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    van Lunzen, Jan; Pozniak, Anton; Gatell, Jose M.; Antinori, Andrea; Serrano, Oscar; Baakili, Adyb; Osiyemi, Olayemi; Sevinsky, Heather; Girard, Pierre-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: This open-label, multinational, pilot study randomized (1:2 ratio) adults with HIV-1 RNA <40 copies per milliliter and nucleos(t)ide-related safety/tolerability issues to switch to ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATV/r) plus tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine (n = 37) or the nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing regimen of ATV/r plus raltegravir (RAL) (n = 72). At 24 weeks, 35/37 (94.6%) and 58/72 (80.6%) of patients, respectively, maintained virological suppression, the primary endpoint, and 1 (2.7%) and 7 (9.7%), respectively, experienced virological rebound. Corresponding 48-week proportions were 86.5%, 69.4%, 2.7%, and 12.5%, respectively. Adherence was lower and treatment discontinuation was higher with ATV/r+RAL. In conclusion, switching to ATV/r+RAL resulted in a higher virological rebound rate than switching to ATV/r plus tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine. PMID:26605505

  9. Brief Report: Switch to Ritonavir-Boosted Atazanavir Plus Raltegravir in Virologically Suppressed Patients With HIV-1 Infection: A Randomized Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    van Lunzen, Jan; Pozniak, Anton; Gatell, Jose M; Antinori, Andrea; Klauck, Isabelle; Serrano, Oscar; Baakili, Adyb; Osiyemi, Olayemi; Sevinsky, Heather; Girard, Pierre-Marie

    2016-04-15

    This open-label, multinational, pilot study randomized (1:2 ratio) adults with HIV-1 RNA <40 copies per milliliter and nucleos(t)ide-related safety/tolerability issues to switch to ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATV/r) plus tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine (n = 37) or the nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing regimen of ATV/r plus raltegravir (RAL) (n = 72). At 24 weeks, 35/37 (94.6%) and 58/72 (80.6%) of patients, respectively, maintained virological suppression, the primary endpoint, and 1 (2.7%) and 7 (9.7%), respectively, experienced virological rebound. Corresponding 48-week proportions were 86.5%, 69.4%, 2.7%, and 12.5%, respectively. Adherence was lower and treatment discontinuation was higher with ATV/r+RAL. In conclusion, switching to ATV/r+RAL resulted in a higher virological rebound rate than switching to ATV/r plus tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine. PMID:26605505

  10. Administration of a Toll-like receptor 9 agonist decreases the proviral reservoir in virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Winckelmann, Anni A; Munk-Petersen, Lærke V; Rasmussen, Thomas A; Melchjorsen, Jesper; Hjelholt, Thomas J; Montefiori, David; Østergaard, Lars; Søgaard, Ole S; Tolstrup, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists can reactivate HIV from latently infected cells in vitro. We aimed to investigate the TLR-9 agonist, CPG 7909's in vivo effect on the proviral HIV reservoir and HIV-specific immunity. This was a post-hoc analysis of a double-blind randomized controlled vaccine trial. HIV-infected adults were randomized 1:1 to receive pneumococcal vaccines with or without 1 mg CPG 7909 as adjuvant at 0, 3 and 9 months. In patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy we quantified proviral DNA at 0, 3, 4, 9, and 10 months (31 subjects in the CPG group and 37 in the placebo-adjuvant group). Furthermore, we measured HIV-specific antibodies, characterized T cell phenotypes and HIV-specific T cell immunity. We observed a mean reduction in proviral DNA in the CPG group of 12.6% (95% CI: -23.6-0.0) following each immunization whereas proviral DNA in the placebo-adjuvant group remained largely unchanged (6.7% increase; 95% CI: -4.2-19.0 after each immunization, p = 0.02). Among participants with additional cryo-preserved PBMCs, HIV-specific CD8+ T cell immunity as indicated by increased expression of degranulation marker CD107a and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP1β) tended to be up-regulated following immunization with CPG 7909 compared with placebo as adjuvant. Further, increasing proportion of HIV-specific CD107a and MIP1β-expressing CD8+ T cells were strongly correlated with decreasing proviral load. No changes were observed in T cell phenotype distribution, HIV-specific CD4+ T cell immunity, or HIV-specific antibodies. TLR9-adjuvanted pneumococcal vaccination decreased proviral load. Reductions in proviral load correlated with increasing levels of HIV specific CD8+ T cells. Further investigation into the potential effect of TLR9 agonists on HIV latency is warranted. PMID:23637967

  11. Switch to Stribild versus continuation of NVP or RPV with FTC and TDF in virologically suppressed HIV adults: a STRATEGY-NNRTI subgroup analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stellbrink, Hans-Juergen; Antinori, Andrea; Pozniak, Anton; Flamm, Jason; Bredeek, Fritz; Patel, Kiran; Garner, Will; Piontkowsky, David

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Switch to Stribild (STB) was non-inferior to continuation of a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) with emtricitabine and tenofovir DF (FTC/TDF) at week 48 in virologically suppressed HIV adults [1]. We report the Week 48 efficacy and safety of STB versus nevirapine (NVP) or rilpivirine (RPV) with FTC/TDF in suppressed subjects. Materials and Methods Virologically suppressed subjects on an NNRTI with FTC/TDF regimens for ≥6 months were randomized (2:1) to switch to STB versus continue their NNRTI regimen. Eligibility criteria included no documented resistance to FTC and TDF, no history of virologic failure and eGFR ≥70 mL/min. The primary endpoint was the proportion of subjects in the modified ITT population who maintained HIV-1 RNA <50 copies(c)/mL at Week 48 by FDA snapshot algorithm (12% non-inferiority margin). Subgroup analysis by non-EFV NNRTI use (NVP [74]; RPV [19]; etravirine [3]) at screening was pre-specified. Results The mITT population included 433 subjects who were randomized and treated. In the non-EFV NNRTI subgroup, 59 switched to STB; 37 continued a non-EFV NNRTI (27 NVP, 10 RPV) with FTC/TDF. At week 48, 97% STB versus 95% non-EFV NNRTI maintained HIV-1 RNA <50 c/mL. No emergent resistance was detected in either group. No difference in median increases from baseline in CD4 count at week 48 (cells/µL): 25 STB versus 55 non-EFV NNRTI (p=0.78). No discontinuation due to adverse events; no cases of proximal renal tubulopathy. As expected, there were no significant changes in the frequency of neuropsychiatric symptoms (i.e. anxiety, insomnia, dizziness, vivid dreams, weird/intense dreams, and nightmares) reported on the HIV Symptom Index at week 48 compared to baseline after switching to STB. There was a greater but non-progressive decrease from baseline in eGFR in the STB versus non-EFV NNRTI group; median changes (mL/min) at week 48: −9.1 versus −1.4. Switch to STB was associated with a higher treatment ease

  12. Omega-3 fatty acids do not improve endothelial function in virologically suppressed HIV-infected men: a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hileman, Corrilynn O; Carman, Teresa L; Storer, Norma J; Labbato, Danielle E; White, Cynthia A; McComsey, Grace A

    2012-07-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids decrease cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality possibly due to antiinflammatory effect. Inflammation and endothelial dysfunction likely play a role in the heightened CVD risk in HIV. Our goal was to evaluate the effect of omega-3 fatty acids primarily on endothelial function and inflammation in HIV-infected adults with moderate CVD risk on stable antiretroviral therapy. We conducted a 24-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the effect of omega-3-acid ethyl esters 1 g twice a day. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery, lipoproteins and markers of inflammation, endothelial activation, coagulation, and insulin resistance were measured at entry and week 24. There were no within- or between-group differences in change in FMD over 24 weeks (mean change in FMD -0.13% vs. 1.5% for treatment vs. placebo; p=0.21). There were no between-group differences in changes in lipoprotein levels or biomarkers tested, except soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-I, which favored omega-3-acid ethyl esters. Omega-3 fatty acids did not improve endothelial function or activation, coagulation, or insulin resistance in virologically suppressed, HIV-infected men with moderate CVD risk; however, inflammation tended to improve. This suggests that omega-3 fatty acids may not be potent enough to counteract the enhanced inflammation and endothelial dysfunction due to HIV and antiretrovirals.

  13. When to Monitor CD4 Cell Count and HIV RNA to Reduce Mortality and AIDS-Defining Illness in Virologically Suppressed HIV-Positive Persons on Antiretroviral Therapy in High-Income Countries: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Caniglia, Ellen C.; Sabin, Caroline; Robins, James M.; Logan, Roger; Cain, Lauren E.; Abgrall, Sophie; Mugavero, Michael J.; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia; Meyer, Laurence; Seng, Remonie; Drozd, Daniel R.; Seage, George R.; Bonnet, Fabrice; Dabis, Francois; Moore, Richard R.; Reiss, Peter; van Sighem, Ard; Mathews, William C.; del Amo, Julia; Moreno, Santiago; Deeks, Steven G.; Muga, Roberto; Boswell, Stephen L.; Ferrer, Elena; Eron, Joseph J.; Napravnik, Sonia; Jose, Sophie; Phillips, Andrew; Olson, Ashley; Justice, Amy C.; Tate, Janet P.; Bucher, Heiner C.; Egger, Matthias; Touloumi, Giota; Sterne, Jonathan A.; Costagliola, Dominique; Saag, Michael; Hernán, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To illustrate an approach to compare CD4 cell count and HIV-RNA monitoring strategies in HIV-positive individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Design: Prospective studies of HIV-positive individuals in Europe and the USA in the HIV-CAUSAL Collaboration and The Center for AIDS Research Network of Integrated Clinical Systems. Methods: Antiretroviral-naive individuals who initiated ART and became virologically suppressed within 12 months were followed from the date of suppression. We compared 3 CD4 cell count and HIV-RNA monitoring strategies: once every (1) 3 ± 1 months, (2) 6 ± 1 months, and (3) 9–12 ± 1 months. We used inverse-probability weighted models to compare these strategies with respect to clinical, immunologic, and virologic outcomes. Results: In 39,029 eligible individuals, there were 265 deaths and 690 AIDS-defining illnesses or deaths. Compared with the 3-month strategy, the mortality hazard ratios (95% CIs) were 0.86 (0.42 to 1.78) for the 6 months and 0.82 (0.46 to 1.47) for the 9–12 month strategy. The respective 18-month risk ratios (95% CIs) of virologic failure (RNA >200) were 0.74 (0.46 to 1.19) and 2.35 (1.56 to 3.54) and 18-month mean CD4 differences (95% CIs) were −5.3 (−18.6 to 7.9) and −31.7 (−52.0 to −11.3). The estimates for the 2-year risk of AIDS-defining illness or death were similar across strategies. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that monitoring frequency of virologically suppressed individuals can be decreased from every 3 months to every 6, 9, or 12 months with respect to clinical outcomes. Because effects of different monitoring strategies could take years to materialize, longer follow-up is needed to fully evaluate this question. PMID:26895294

  14. Efficacy and safety in clinical practice of a rilpivirine, tenofovir and emtricitabine single-tablet regimen in virologically suppressed HIV-positive patients on stable antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gianotti, Nicola; Poli, Andrea; Nozza, Silvia; Spagnuolo, Vincenzo; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Bossolasco, Simona; Cinque, Paola; Maillard, Myriam; Cernuschi, Massimo; Galli, Laura; Lazzarin, Adriano; Castagna, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Switching to a rilpivirine, tenofovir and emtricitabine (RTE) single-tablet regimen (STR) has been evaluated in a limited number of virologically suppressed patients. The aim of this study was to describe clinical outcomes in HIV-positive patients switched from a suppressive antiretroviral regimen to RTE STR in routine clinical practice. Methods In this retrospective study of antiretroviral-treated patients with <50 copies of HIV RNA/mL switched to RTE STR, virological failure (VF) was defined as two consecutive measurements of ≥50 copies/mL or a single measurement of ≥50 copies/mL followed by any change in treatment. Treatment failure (TF) was defined as VF or discontinuation of the STR for any reason. Univariate mixed-linear models were used to identify differences in laboratory parameters over time. Results and discussion The analysis involved 307 patients (83% males) with a median age of 45.8 years (interquartile range (IQR 39.3–50.9), who were followed up for a median of 7.4 months (IQR 4.6–10.9). VF occurred in three patients (1%) switched from a protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimen, after a median of 2.6 months (IQR 1.6–3.0), and TF in 34 patients (11%) after a median of three months (IQR 1.4–5.8), 24 of whom (71%) were receiving a PI-based regimen at baseline. Overall, there was a slight but statistically significant improvement in the mean monthly change from baseline in CD4+ cell counts (p=0.027), the CD4+/CD8+ ratio (p=0.0001), and Hb (p=0.024), alanine amino transferase (ALT) (p=0.009), total bilirubin (p<0.0001), indirect bilirubin (p<0.0001), total cholesterol (p<0.0001) and triglyceride (p<0.0001) levels. There was also a slight but statistically significant increase in serum creatinine (p=0.0004), aspartate amino transferase (AST) (p=0.001) and liver fibrosis index (FIB-4) (p=0.002), and a decrease in eGFRcreat (p<0.0001) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (p<0.0001) values. The study limitations include its

  15. Reducing Viral Load Measurements to Once a Year in Patients on Stable, Virologically Suppressive Cart Regimen: Findings from the Australian HIV Observational Database

    PubMed Central

    Rafiee, Mahshid; Kariminia, Azar; Wright, Stephen; Mills, Graham; Woolley, Ian; Smith, Don; Templeton, David J.; Law, Matthew G.; Petoumenos, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Reducing viral-load measurements to annual testing in virologically suppressed patients increases the estimated mean time those patients remain on a failing regimen by 6 months. This translates to an increase in the proportion of patients with at least one Thymidine Analogue Mutation from 10% to 32% over one year. PMID:26618053

  16. Relationships Among Neurocognitive Status, Medication Adherence Measured by Pharmacy Refill Records, and Virologic Suppression in HIV-infected Persons

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Adriana S.A.; Deutsch, Reena; Celano, Shivaun; Duarte, Nichole A.; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Umlauf, Anya; Atkinson, J. Hampton; McCutchan, J. Allen; Franklin, Donald; Alexander, Terry J.; McArthur, Justin; Marra, Christina; Grant, Igor; Collier, Ann C

    2013-01-01

    Background Optimal antiretroviral therapy (ART) effectiveness depends upon medication adherence, which is a complex behavior with many contributing factors including neurocognitive function. Pharmacy refill records offer a promising and practical tool to assess adherence. Methods A substudy of the CHARTER (CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research) study was conducted at the Johns Hopkins University (JHU) and the University of Washington (UW). Pharmacy refill records were the primary method to measure ART adherence, indexed to a “sentinel” drug with the highest central nervous system penetration effectiveness score. Standardized neuromedical, neuropsychological, psychiatric and substance use assessments were performed at enrollment and at 6 months. Regression models were used to determine factors associated with adherence and the relationships between adherence and change in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid HIV RNA concentrations between visits. Results Among 80 (33 JHU, 47 UW) participants, the mean adherence score was 86.4% with no difference by site. In the final multivariable model, better neurocognitive function was associated with better adherence, especially among participants who were at JHU, male, and HIV-infected for a longer time-period. Worse performance on working memory tests was associated with worse adherence. Better adherence predicted greater decreases in cerebrospinal fluid HIV RNA between visits. Conclusion Poorer global neurocognitive functioning and deficits in working memory were associated with lower adherence defined by a pharmacy refill record measure, suggesting that assessments of cognitive function, and working memory in particular, may identify patients at risk for poor ART adherence who would benefit from adherence support. PMID:23202813

  17. Simplification to atazanavir/ritonavir+lamivudine in virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients: 24-weeks interim analysis from ATLAS-M trial

    PubMed Central

    Fabbiani, Massimiliano; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Quiros-Roldan, Eugenia; Latini, Alessandra; Vullo, Vincenzo; Antinori, Andrea; Castagna, Antonella; Orofino, Giancarlo; Francisci, Daniela; Grilli, Elisabetta; Madeddu, Giordanu; Grima, Pierfrancesco; Rusconi, Stefano; Del Pin, Barbara; Mondi, Annalisa; Borghetti, Alberto; Focà, Emanuele; Colafigli, Manuela; De Luca, Andrea; Cauda, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We report interim 24-weeks efficacy data of ATLAS-M trial, a phase IV, multicentre, open-label, randomized study designed to show 48-weeks, non-inferior efficacy (margin of −12%) of treatment simplification to atazanavir/ritonavir (ATV/r)+lamivudine (3TC) versus maintaining 3-drugs ATV/r-based cART. Methods Subjects on ATV/r+2 NRTIs, without previous treatment failure (TF), with HIV-RNA <50copies/mL for >3 months and CD4>200 cells/mm3 for >6 months were eligible. At baseline, patients were randomized to switch to ATV/r+3TC (arm one) or to maintain the original 3-drug regimen (arm two). Primary endpoint: proportion of patients free of TF at week 48. TF was defined as treatment modification for any reason, including virological failure (VF=two consecutive HIV-RNA>50 copies/mL or a single value >1000 copies/mL). Enrollment of 266 patients was planned. Results A total of 266 patients (78% males, median age 44 years, median CD4 603 cells/µL, 79% treated with a tenofovir-containing backbone) were enrolled. At the time of analysis, 24 weeks data were available for 84 and 87 patients in arm one and two, respectively. At baseline, subjects in the two arms did not differ for the main characteristics. At 24 weeks, at the intention to treat analysis the proportion of patients free of TF was 91.7% (95% CI 85.8–97.6) and 85.1% (95% CI 77.6–92.6) in arm one and two, respectively (difference +6.6%, 95% CI −2.9/+16.1). VF was observed in two patients randomized to arm one (one at baseline, before treatment simplification) and one to arm two without resistance mutations. Clinical and laboratory adverse events occurred at similar rates in the two arms. At week 24, patients in arm one showed a greater increase in CD4 (mean change +90 vs +10 cells/µL, p=0.007). A greater increase in total cholesterol (+18 vs −2 mg/dL, p<0.001), HDL (+4 vs +0 mg/dL, p=0.001) and LDL (+12 vs +0 mg/dL, p=0.001) was also observed in arm one without differences in other lipid

  18. Dual Therapy Treatment Strategies for the Management of Patients Infected with HIV: A Systematic Review of Current Evidence in ARV-Naive or ARV-Experienced, Virologically Suppressed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baril, Jean-Guy; Angel, Jonathan B.; Gill, M. John; Gathe, Joseph; Cahn, Pedro; van Wyk, Jean; Walmsley, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Objective We reviewed the current literature regarding antiretroviral (ARV)-sparing therapy strategies to determine whether these novel regimens can be considered appropriate alternatives to standard regimens for the initial treatment of ARV-naive patients or as switch therapy for those patients with virologically suppressed HIV infection. Methods A search for studies related to HIV dual therapy published from January 2000 through April 2014 was performed using Biosis, Derwent Drug File, Embase, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Medline, Pascal, SciSearch, and TOXNET databases; seven major trial registries, and the abstracts of major conferences. Using predetermined criteria for inclusion, an expert review committee critically reviewed and qualitatively evaluated all identified trials for efficacy and safety results and potential limitations. Results Sixteen studies of dual therapy regimens were critiqued for the ARV-naive population. Studies of a protease inhibitor/ritonavir in combination with the integrase inhibitor raltegravir or the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor lamivudine provided the most definitive evidence supporting a role for dual therapy. In particular, lopinavir/ritonavir or darunavir/ritonavir combined with raltegravir and lopinavir/ritonavir combined with lamivudine demonstrated noninferiority to standard of care triple therapy after 48 weeks of treatment. Thirteen trials were critiqued in ARV-experienced, virologically suppressed patients. The virologic efficacy outcomes were mixed. Although overall data regarding toxicity are limited, when compared with standard triple therapy, certain dual therapy regimens may offer advantages in renal function, bone mineral density, and limb fat changes; however, some dual combinations may elevate lipid or bilirubin levels. Conclusions The potential benefits of dual therapy regimens include reduced toxicity, improved tolerability and adherence, and reduced cost. Although the data reviewed here

  19. Monotherapy with lopinavir/ritonavir versus standard of care in HIV-infected patients virologically suppressed while on treatment with protease inhibitor-based regimens: results from the MoLo study.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, Nicola; Poli, Andrea; Galli, Massimo; Pan, Angelo; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Soria, Alessandro; Viale, Pierluigi; Di Biagio, Antonio; Quirino, Tiziana; Viganò, Paolo; Bonfanti, Paolo; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Fortino, Ida; Lazzarin, Adriano

    2014-10-01

    This study compared the cost-efficacy ratios of lopinavir/ritonavir monotherapy (LPV/r-MT) and of standard of care in virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients. The results of the efficacy and safety analyses are presented. We conducted a multicentre, randomised, open-label trial of HIV-infected adults on stable treatment, with HIV- RNA <50 copies/mL, randomised to continue the ongoing regimen (cART-arm) or to switch to LPV/r (400/100 mg BID) MT (MT-arm). Time to virological rebound (VR = confirmed HIV-RNA ?50 copies/mL) was estimated by Ka- plan-Meier method and changes in laboratory values during follow-up were evaluated by univariate mixed-linear models. Ninety-four patients were randomised and analysed (43 in the MT-arm and 51 in the cART-arm). Five (four in the MT and 1 in the cART-arm; p=0.175) had VR, but time to VR did not statistically differ between the two arms (p=0.143). Major PI mutations were not detected at VR. Patients on MT had significant increases in total choles- terol [difference in mean change between MT and cART arm: 0.77 (±0.30) mg/dL per month; p=0.012] and eGFR [difference in mean change between MT and cART arm: 0.24 (±0.11) mL/min/1.73 m2 per month; p=0.029]. LPV/r-MT seems safe in most patients and should be considered in patients who have developed kidney toxicity from tenofovir.

  20. Lipid Changes in Virologically Suppressed HIV-Infected Patients Switching from any Antiretroviral Therapy to the Emtricitabine/Rilpivirine/Tenofovir Single Tablet: GeSida Study 8114.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Rosario; Mayorga, Marisa; Pérez-Hernández, Isabel A; Rivero, Antonio; Arco, Alfonso Del; Lozano, Fernando; Santos, Jesús

    2016-05-01

    We carried out a retrospective, multicenter study of a cohort of 298 asymptomatic HIV-infected patients who switched from a regimen based on 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors + protease inhibitor (PI)/nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor or ritonavir-boosted PI monotherapy to emtricitabine/rilpivirine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (FTC/RPV/TDF) to analyze lipid changes. At 24 weeks, 284 (95.3%) patients were still taking the same regimen, maintaining similar CD4 counts as at baseline (651 versus 672 cells/mm(3), P = .08), and 98.9% of them with an undetectable viral load. Eight of the other 14 patients were lost to follow up and 6 (2.0%) ceased the new regimen: 3 due to adverse effects, 2 due to virologic failure, and 1 due to abandonment. The mean levels of fasting total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides fell at 12 and 24 weeks, with no changes detected in the TC to HDL-C ratio. PMID:26858314

  1. Lipid Changes in Virologically Suppressed HIV-Infected Patients Switching from any Antiretroviral Therapy to the Emtricitabine/Rilpivirine/Tenofovir Single Tablet: GeSida Study 8114.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Rosario; Mayorga, Marisa; Pérez-Hernández, Isabel A; Rivero, Antonio; Arco, Alfonso Del; Lozano, Fernando; Santos, Jesús

    2016-05-01

    We carried out a retrospective, multicenter study of a cohort of 298 asymptomatic HIV-infected patients who switched from a regimen based on 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors + protease inhibitor (PI)/nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor or ritonavir-boosted PI monotherapy to emtricitabine/rilpivirine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (FTC/RPV/TDF) to analyze lipid changes. At 24 weeks, 284 (95.3%) patients were still taking the same regimen, maintaining similar CD4 counts as at baseline (651 versus 672 cells/mm(3), P = .08), and 98.9% of them with an undetectable viral load. Eight of the other 14 patients were lost to follow up and 6 (2.0%) ceased the new regimen: 3 due to adverse effects, 2 due to virologic failure, and 1 due to abandonment. The mean levels of fasting total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides fell at 12 and 24 weeks, with no changes detected in the TC to HDL-C ratio.

  2. HIV controllers with different viral load cut-off levels have distinct virologic and immunologic profiles

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Gonzalo; Teixeira, Sylvia LM; Vorsatz, Carla; Babic, Dunja; Sharkey, Mark; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdilea; Stevenson, Mario; Morgado, Mariza G

    2015-01-01

    Background The mechanisms behind natural control of HIV replication are still unclear, and several studies pointed that elite controllers are a heterogeneous group. Methods We performed analyses of virologic, genetic and immunologic parameters of HIV-1 controllers groups: 1) Elite Controllers (EC; VL <80 copies/mL); 2) Ebbing Elite Controllers (EEC; transient viremia/blips); and Viremic Controllers (VC; detectable viremia <5,000 copies/mL). Untreated non-controllers (NC), patients under suppressive HAART and HIV-1 negative individuals were analyzed as controls. Results Total and integrated HIV-1 DNA for EC were significantly lower than for NC and HAART groups. 2-LTR circles were detected in EEC (3/5) and VC (6/7) but not in EC. While EC and EEC maintain normal T cell counts over time, some VC displayed negative CD4+ T cells slopes. VC and EEC showed a higher percentage of activated CD8+ T cells and microbial translocation than HIV-1 negative controls. EC displayed a weaker Gag/Nef IFN-γ T cell response and a significantly lower proportion of anti-HIV IgG antibodies than EEC, VC and NC groups. Conclusion Transient/persistent low level viremia in HIV controllers may have an impact on immunologic and virologic profiles. Classify HIV controllers patients taking into account their virologic profile may decrease the heterogeneity of HIV controllers cohorts, which may help to clarify the mechanisms associated to the elite control of HIV. PMID:25564106

  3. A Switch in Therapy to a Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Sparing Combination of Lopinavir/Ritonavir and Raltegravir in Virologically Suppressed HIV-Infected Patients: A Pilot Randomized Trial to Assess Efficacy and Safety Profile: The KITE Study

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Anandi N.; Sanford, Sara E.; Easley, Kirk A.; Shenvi, Neeta; White, Kelly; Eaton, Molly E.; Del Rio, Carlos; Lennox, Jeffrey L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) backbone is a recommended component of standard highly active antiretroviral therapy (sHAART). However, long-term NRTI exposure can be limited by toxicities. NRTI class-sparing alternatives are warranted in select patient populations. This is a 48-week single-center, open-label pilot study in which 60 HIV-infected adults with plasma HIV-1 RNA (<50 copies/ml) on sHAART were randomized (2:1) to lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) 400/100 mg BID+raltegravir (RAL) 400 mg BID switch (LPV-r/RAL arm) or to continue on sHAART. The primary endpoint was the proportion of subjects with HIV-RNA<50 copies/ml at week 48. Secondary efficacy and immunologic and safety endpoints were evaluated. Demographics and baseline lipid profile were similar across arms. Mean entry CD4 T cell count was 493 cells/mm3. At week 48, 92% [95% confidence interval (CI): 83–100%] of the LPV-r/RAL arm and 88% (95% CI: 75–100%) of the sHAART arm had HIV-RNA<50 copies/ml (p=0.70). Lipid profile (mean±SEM, mg/dl, LPV-r/RAL vs. sHAART) at week 24 was total-cholesterol 194±5 vs. 176±9 (p=0.07), triglycerides 234±30 vs. 133±27 (p=0.003), and LDL-cholesterol 121±6 vs. 110±8 (p=0.27). There were no serious adverse events (AEs) in either arm. Regimen change occurred in three LPV-r/RAL subjects (n=1, due to LPV-r/RAL-related AEs) vs. 0 in sHAART. There were no differences between arms in bone mineral density, total body fat composition, creatinine clearance, or CD4 T cell counts at week 48. In virologically suppressed patients on HAART, switching therapy to the NRTI-sparing LPV-r/RAL combination produced similar sustained virologic suppression and immunologic profile as sHAART. AEs were comparable between arms, but the LPV-r/RAL arm experienced higher triglyceridemia. PMID:22364141

  4. Virologic suppression among HIV-infected US Air Force members in a highly-structured programme with free access to care.

    PubMed

    Matthews, P E; Le, T; Delmar, J; Okulicz, J F

    2015-11-01

    SummaryThe United States Air Force HIV programme has several features that may enhance antiretroviral therapy outcomes, including free access to healthcare and mandatory clinical visits every six months at a single centre. We evaluated viral load suppression (<50 copies/ml) after 12 months of initial antiretroviral therapy, with extension to 18 and 24 months. Active duty Air Force members were categorised by year of antiretroviral therapy initiation: 2000-2005 (n = 95, 36.1%) and 2006-2011 (n = 168, 63.9%). The median months from HIV diagnosis to initial antiretroviral therapy were shorter in the 2000-2005 group (2.4, IQR 1.2-5.9) compared with the 2006-2011 group (12.6, IQR 2.6-29.0; p < 0.001). Viral load suppression was greater in the 2006-2011 group compared with the 2000-2005 group at 12 months (93.2% versus 78.6%, p = 0.002) and 18 months (91.8% versus 80.3%, p = 0.03), and trended higher at 24 months (90.8% versus 82.5%; p = 0.15). Factors associated with viral load suppression at 12 months in multivariate models included antiretroviral therapy initiation during 2006-2011 (OR 5.22, 95% CI 1.50-18.18) and CD4 count at antiretroviral therapy initiation (OR 2.29, 95% CI 1.19-14.43 per 100 cells/µl increase). Structured programmes that minimise traditional barriers to care combined with the use of contemporary antiretroviral therapy regimens can achieve clinic-wide viral load suppression in >90% of patients.

  5. Virological efficacy of PI monotherapy for HIV-1 in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    El Bouzidi, Kate; Collier, Dami; Nastouli, Eleni; Copas, Andrew J.; Miller, Robert F.; Gupta, Ravindra K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical trials of PI monotherapy indicate that most participants maintain viral suppression and emergent protease resistance is rare. However, outcomes among patients receiving PI monotherapy for clinical reasons, such as toxicity or adherence issues, are less well studied. Methods An observational study of patients attending an HIV treatment centre in London, UK, who had received PI monotherapy between 2004 and 2013, was conducted using prospectively collected clinical data and genotypic resistance reports. Survival analysis techniques were used to examine the times to virological failure and treatment discontinuation. Results Ninety-five patients had PI monotherapy treatment for a median duration of 126 weeks. Virological failure occurred during 64% of episodes and 8% of patients developed emergent protease mutations. We estimate failure occurs in half of episodes within 2 years following initiation. Where PI monotherapy was continued following virological failure, 68% of patients achieved viral re-suppression. Despite a high incidence of virological failure, many patients continued PI monotherapy and 79% of episodes were ongoing at the end of the study. The type of PI used, the presence of baseline protease mutations and the plasma HIV RNA at initiation did not have a significant impact on treatment outcomes. Conclusions There was a higher incidence of virological failure and emerging resistance in our UK clinical setting than described in PI monotherapy clinical trials and other European observational studies. Despite this, many patients continued PI monotherapy and regained viral suppression, indicating this strategy remains a viable option in certain individuals following careful clinical evaluation. PMID:27402006

  6. Clinical Outcome of HIV-Infected Patients with Discordant Virological and Immunological Response to Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zoufaly, A.; an der Heiden, M.; Kollan, C.; Bogner, J. R.; Fätkenheuer, G.; Wasmuth, J. C.; Stoll, M.; Hamouda, O.

    2011-01-01

    Background. A subgroup of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)–infected patients with severe immunodeficiency show persistently low CD4+ cell counts despite sustained viral suppression. It is unclear whether this immuno-virological discordance translates into an increased risk for clinical events. Methods. Data analysis from a large multicenter cohort incorporating 14,433 HIV-1–infected patients in Germany. Treatment-naive patients beginning antiretroviral therapy (ART) with CD4+ cell counts <200 cells/μL who achieved complete and sustained viral suppression <50 copies/mL (n = 1318) were stratified according to the duration of immuno-virological discordance (failure to achieve a CD4+ cell count ≥200 cells/μL). Groups were compared by descriptive and Poisson statistics. The time-varying discordance status was analyzed in a multivariable Cox model. Results. During a total of 5038 person years of follow-up, 42 new AIDS events occurred. The incidence rate of new AIDS events was highest in the initial 6 months of complete viral suppression (immuno-virological discordance group, 55.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 30.82–90.82; and immune responder group, 24.54; 95% CI, 10.59–48.35) and decreased significantly by 65% per year in patients with immuno-virological discordance (incidence risk ratio, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.14–0.92; P = .03). Immuno-virological discordance and prior AIDS diagnosis were independently associated with new AIDS events (hazard ratio, 3.10; 95% CI, 1.09–8.82; P = .03). Conclusion. Compared with immune responders, patients with immuno-virological discordance seem to remain at increased risk for AIDS. Absolute risk is greatly reduced after the first 6 months of complete viral suppression. PMID:21208929

  7. Magnitude of Virologic Blips Is Associated With a Higher Risk for Virologic Rebound in HIV-Infected Individuals: A Recurrent Events Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grennan, J. Troy; Loutfy, Mona R.; Su, DeSheng; Harrigan, P. Richard; Cooper, Curtis; Klein, Marina; Machouf, Nima; Montaner, Julio S. G.; Rourke, Sean; Tsoukas, Christos; Hogg, Bob

    2012-01-01

    (See the editorial commentary by Taiwo and Bosch, on pages 1189–91.) Background. The importance of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) blip magnitude on virologic rebound has been raised in clinical guidelines relating to viral load assays. Methods. Antiretroviral-naive individuals initiating combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) after 1 January 2000 and achieving virologic suppression were studied. Negative binomial models were used to identify blip correlates. Recurrent event models were used to determine the association between blips and rebound by incorporating multiple periods of virologic suppression per individual. Results. 3550 participants (82% male; median age, 40 years) were included. In a multivariable negative binomial regression model, the Amplicor assay was associated with a lower blip rate than branched DNA (rate ratio, 0.69; P < .01), controlling for age, sex, region, baseline HIV-1 RNA and CD4 count, AIDS-defining illnesses, year of cART initiation, cART type, and HIV-1 RNA testing frequency. In a multivariable recurrent event model controlling for age, sex, intravenous drug use, cART start year, cART type, assay type, and HIV-1 RNA testing frequency, blips of 500–999 copies/mL were associated with virologic rebound (hazard ratio, 2.70; P = .002), whereas blips of 50–499 were not. Conclusions. HIV-1 RNA assay was an important determinant of blip rates and should be considered in clinical guidelines. Blips ≥500 copies/mL were associated with increased rebound risk. PMID:22438396

  8. CD4:CD8 ratio as a frontier marker for clinical outcome, immune dysfunction and viral reservoir size in virologically suppressed HIV-positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Mehraj, Vikram; Vyboh, Kishanda; Cao, Wei; Li, Taisheng; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Absolute CD4 T cell count and plasma viral load have been established as predictors of HIV disease progression, and CD4 T cell count is used as an indicator for initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Following long-term therapy, patients generally present with significant CD4 T cell recovery contrasting with persistently elevated CD8 T cell counts, which leads to a partial restoration of CD4:CD8 ratio. This review focuses on the relevance of the CD4:CD8 ratio on clinical outcomes, immune dysfunction and HIV reservoir size in long-term treated patients. Method We conducted a comprehensive literature review of publications in English language using major electronic databases. Our search was focused on factors contributing to CD4:CD8 T cell ratio and clinical outcome in adult HIV-positive patients in the context of treated infection. Discussion Low CD4:CD8 ratio has been linked to ageing and acts as a predictor of mortality in the general population. This ratio may represent the combined effects of inflammation and immunological changes called “inflammaging.” Although the mechanisms underlying partial correction of the CD4:CD8 ratio and persistently elevated CD8 T cell count in long-term treated patients remain poorly understood, it has been recently indicated that patients with optimal CD4 T cell recovery and low CD4:CD8 ratio still harbour increased immune activation, an immune senescent phenotype and have a higher risk of non-AIDS morbidity and mortality. This review reconsiders CD4:CD8 ratio in the light of advances in the understanding of immune dysfunction and examines its pathophysiological features and implications on clinical outcome and HIV reservoir size in long-term treated HIV-positive adults. Conclusion The CD4:CD8 ratio can contribute to the immunological evaluation of treated patients in a long-term follow-up and may be applied for monitoring both immune dysfunction and viral reservoir size in immune-based clinical trials. PMID:26130226

  9. Age at Virologic Control Influences Peripheral Blood HIV Reservoir Size and Serostatus in Perinatally-Infected Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Persaud, Deborah; Patel, Kunjal; Karalius, Brad; Rainwater-Lovett, Kaitlin; Ziemniak, Carrie; Ellis, Angela; Chen, Ya Hui; Richman, Douglas; Siberry, George K.; Van Dyke, Russell B.; Burchett, Sandra; Seage, George R.; Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Importance Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) initiated within several weeks of HIV infection in adults limits proviral reservoirs that preclude HIV cure. Biomarkers of restricted proviral reservoirs may aid in the monitoring of HIV remission or cure. Objectives To quantify peripheral blood proviral reservoir size in perinatally HIV-infected adolescents and to identify correlates of limited proviral reservoirs. Design, Setting, and Participants A cross-sectional study including 144 perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) youth (median age: 14.3 years), enrolled in the US-based Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study, on durable (median: 10.2 years) cART, stratified by age at virologic control. Main Outcome and Measures The primary endpoint was peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proviral load following virologic control at different ages. Correlations between proviral load and markers of active HIV production (HIV-specific antibodies, 2-long terminal repeat (2-LTR) circles), and markers of immune activation and inflammation were also assessed. Results Proviral reservoir size was markedly reduced in the PHIV+ youth who achieved virologic control by age 1 year (4.2 [interquartile range, 2.6-8 6] copies per 1 million PBMCs) compared to those who achieved virologic control between 1-5 years of age (19.4 [interquartile range, 5.5-99.8] copies per 1 million PBMCs) or after age 5 years (−(70.7 [interquartile range, 23.2-209.4] copies per 1 million PBMCs; P < .00l). A proviral burden <10 copies/million PBMCs was measured in 11 (79%), 20 (40%), and 13 (18%) participants with virologic control at ages <1 year, 1-5 years, and >5 years, respectively (p<0.001). Lower proviral load was associated with undetectable 2-LTR circles (p<0.001) and HIV negative or indeterminate serostatus (p<0.001), but not with concentrations of soluble immune activation markers CD14 and CD163. Conclusions and Relevance Early effective cART along with prolonged virologic suppression after perinatal HIV

  10. Unboosted atazanavir with lamivudine/emtricitabine for patients with long-lasting virological suppression

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Alessia; Galli, Laura; Bigoloni, Alba; Bossolasco, Simona; Guffanti, Monica; Maillard, Miriam; Carini, Elisabetta; Salpietro, Stefania; Spagnuolo, Vincenzo; Gianotti, Nicola; Lazzarin, Adriano; Castagna, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Unboosted atazanavir (ATV) including regimens have been investigated as a ritonavir-sparing simplification strategy. No data are available on removal of one NRTI in subjects effectively treated with unboosted atazanavir+2NRTIs. We present the 48-week virological efficacy and safety of unboosted atazanavir plus lamivudine (3TC) or emtricitabine (FTC) (lamivudine/emtricitabine/Reyataz©, LAREY Study). Materials and Methods Single arm, prospective, pilot study on HIV-treated patients, HBsAg negative, with HIV-RNA<50 cps/mL since at least 2 years, who switched from ATV+2NRTIs to ATV 400 mg QD +3TC or FTC. Virological failure was defined as 2 consecutive values of HIV-RNA>50 cps/ml; viral blip was defined as a single HIV-RNA value>50 cps/ml not subsequently confirmed. Results as median (IQR). Changes between baseline (BL) and week 48 assessed by the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results Forty patients enrolled: 75% males, 51 (47–54) years, 14% HCV co-infected, infected with HIV since 16 (9–21) years, on antiretroviral therapy since 13 (5–16) years, with a nadir CD4+ of 254 (157–307) cells/mm3, virologically suppressed since 4.2 (2.2–5.4) years; 53 patients switched from a tenofovir (TDF)-based regimens; ATV was associated with 3TC in 83% patients. No virological failures or discontinuations were observed; three patients had a single viral blip in the range 50–250 copies/mL; CD4+ increased from 610 (518–829) cells/mm3 at BL to 697 (579–858) cells/mm3 at week 48 [48-week change: 39 (−63/+160) cells/mm3 p=0.081]. Three clinical events were observed (one herpes zoster, one pneumonia, one syphilis) in absence of renal lithiasis, AIDS-defining or drug-related events or death. Overall, significant 48-week amelioration of ALP [BL: 83 (71–107) mg/dL; 48-week change: −15 (−27/−8) mg/dL p<0.0001] and CKD-EPI [BL: 100 (86–108) ml/min/1.73 m2; 48-week change: 1.5 (−3/+8) ml/min/1.73 m2, p=0.042] were observed. Patients switching from TDF

  11. Factors Influencing Antiretroviral Adherence and Virological Outcomes in People Living with HIV in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Gare, Janet; Kelly-Hanku, Angela; Ryan, Claire E; David, Matthew; Kaima, Petronia; Imara, Ulato; Lote, Namarola; Crowe, Suzanne M; Hearps, Anna C

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is paramount for virological suppression and positive treatment outcomes. ART has been rapidly scaled up in Papua New Guinea (PNG) in recent years, however clinical monitoring of HIV+ individuals on ART is limited. A cross-sectional study was conducted at two major sexual health clinics in high HIV prevalence provinces in the Highlands Region of PNG to assess ART adherence, factors affecting adherence and the relationship between ART adherence and virological outcomes. Ninety-five HIV+ individuals were recruited and administered a questionnaire to gather demographic and ART adherence information whilst clinical data and pill counts were extracted from patient charts and blood was collected for viral load testing. Bivariate analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of ART adherence. Fourteen percent (n = 12) of participants showed evidence of virological failure. Although the majority of participants self-reported excellent ART adherence in the last seven days (78.9%, 75/91), pill count measurements indicated only 40% (34/84) with >95% adherence in the last month. Taking other medications while on ART (p = 0.01) and taking ART for ≥1 year (p = 0.037) were positively associated with adherence by self-report and pill count, respectively. Participants who had never heard of drug resistance were more likely to show virological failure (p = 0.033). Misconception on routes of HIV transmission still persists in the studied population. These findings indicate that non-adherence to ART is high in this region of PNG and continued education and strategies to improve adherence are required to ensure the efficacy of ART and prevent HIV drug resistance.

  12. Factors Influencing Antiretroviral Adherence and Virological Outcomes in People Living with HIV in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Gare, Janet; Kelly-Hanku, Angela; Ryan, Claire E; David, Matthew; Kaima, Petronia; Imara, Ulato; Lote, Namarola; Crowe, Suzanne M; Hearps, Anna C

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is paramount for virological suppression and positive treatment outcomes. ART has been rapidly scaled up in Papua New Guinea (PNG) in recent years, however clinical monitoring of HIV+ individuals on ART is limited. A cross-sectional study was conducted at two major sexual health clinics in high HIV prevalence provinces in the Highlands Region of PNG to assess ART adherence, factors affecting adherence and the relationship between ART adherence and virological outcomes. Ninety-five HIV+ individuals were recruited and administered a questionnaire to gather demographic and ART adherence information whilst clinical data and pill counts were extracted from patient charts and blood was collected for viral load testing. Bivariate analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of ART adherence. Fourteen percent (n = 12) of participants showed evidence of virological failure. Although the majority of participants self-reported excellent ART adherence in the last seven days (78.9%, 75/91), pill count measurements indicated only 40% (34/84) with >95% adherence in the last month. Taking other medications while on ART (p = 0.01) and taking ART for ≥1 year (p = 0.037) were positively associated with adherence by self-report and pill count, respectively. Participants who had never heard of drug resistance were more likely to show virological failure (p = 0.033). Misconception on routes of HIV transmission still persists in the studied population. These findings indicate that non-adherence to ART is high in this region of PNG and continued education and strategies to improve adherence are required to ensure the efficacy of ART and prevent HIV drug resistance. PMID:26244516

  13. Factors Influencing Antiretroviral Adherence and Virological Outcomes in People Living with HIV in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Gare, Janet; Kelly-Hanku, Angela; Ryan, Claire E.; David, Matthew; Kaima, Petronia; Imara, Ulato; Lote, Namarola; Crowe, Suzanne M.; Hearps, Anna C.

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is paramount for virological suppression and positive treatment outcomes. ART has been rapidly scaled up in Papua New Guinea (PNG) in recent years, however clinical monitoring of HIV+ individuals on ART is limited. A cross-sectional study was conducted at two major sexual health clinics in high HIV prevalence provinces in the Highlands Region of PNG to assess ART adherence, factors affecting adherence and the relationship between ART adherence and virological outcomes. Ninety-five HIV+ individuals were recruited and administered a questionnaire to gather demographic and ART adherence information whilst clinical data and pill counts were extracted from patient charts and blood was collected for viral load testing. Bivariate analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of ART adherence. Fourteen percent (n = 12) of participants showed evidence of virological failure. Although the majority of participants self-reported excellent ART adherence in the last seven days (78.9%, 75/91), pill count measurements indicated only 40% (34/84) with >95% adherence in the last month. Taking other medications while on ART (p = 0.01) and taking ART for ≥1 year (p = 0.037) were positively associated with adherence by self-report and pill count, respectively. Participants who had never heard of drug resistance were more likely to show virological failure (p = 0.033). Misconception on routes of HIV transmission still persists in the studied population. These findings indicate that non-adherence to ART is high in this region of PNG and continued education and strategies to improve adherence are required to ensure the efficacy of ART and prevent HIV drug resistance. PMID:26244516

  14. Long-term effectiveness of unboosted atazanavir plus abacavir/lamivudine in subjects with virological suppression

    PubMed Central

    Llibre, Josep M.; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Pedersen, Court; Ristola, Matti; Losso, Marcelo; Mocroft, Amanda; Mitsura, Viktar; Falconer, Karolin; Maltez, Fernando; Beniowski, Marek; Vullo, Vincenzo; Hassoun, Gamal; Kuzovatova, Elena; Szlavik, János; Kuznetsova, Anastasiia; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Duvivier, Claudine; Edwards, Simon; Laut, Kamilla; Paredes, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Effectiveness data of an unboosted atazanavir (ATV) with abacavir/lamivudine (ABC/3TC) switch strategy in clinical routine are scant. We evaluated treatment outcomes of ATV + ABC/3TC in pretreated subjects in the EuroSIDA cohort when started with undetectable plasma HIV-1 viral load (pVL), performing a time to loss of virological response (TLOVR <50 copies/mL) and a snapshot analysis at 48, 96, and 144 weeks. Virological failure (VF) was defined as confirmed pVL >50 copies/mL. We included 285 subjects, 67% male, with median baseline CD4 530 cells, and 44 months with pVL ≤50 copies/mL. The third drug in the previous regimen was ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATV/r) in 79 (28%), and another ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (PI/r) in 29 (10%). Ninety (32%) had previously failed with a PI. Proportions of people with virological success at 48/96/144 weeks were 90%/87%/88% (TLOVR) and 74%/67%/59% (snapshot analysis), respectively. The rates of VF were 8%/8%/6%. Rates of adverse events leading to study discontinuation were 0.4%/1%/2%. The multivariable adjusted analysis showed an association between VF and nadir CD4+ (hazard ratio [HR] 0.63 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.42–0.93] per 100 cells higher), time with pVL ≤50 copies/mL (HR 0.87 [95% CI: 0.79–0.96] per 6 months longer), and previous failure with a PI (HR 2.78 [95% CI: 1.28–6.04]). Resistance selection at failure was uncommon. A switch to ATV + ABC/3TC in selected subjects with suppressed viremia was associated with low rates of VF and discontinuation due to adverse events, even in subjects not receiving ATV/r. The strategy might be considered in those with long-term suppression and no prior PI failure. PMID:27749561

  15. HIV Treatment Adherence, Drug Resistance, Virologic Failure: Evolving Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Nachega, Jean B.; Marconi, Vincent C.; van Zyl, Gert U.; Gardner, Edward M.; Preiser, Wolfgang; Hong, Steven Y.; Mills, Edward J.; Gross, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Poor adherence to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) has been shown to be a major determinant of virologic failure, emergence of drug resistant virus, disease progression, hospitalizations, mortality, and health care costs. While high adherence levels can be achieved in both resource-rich and resource-limited settings following initiation of cART, long-term adherence remains a challenge regardless of available resources. Barriers to optimal adherence may originate from individual (biological, socio-cultural, behavioral), pharmacological, and societal factors. Although patients and providers should continuously strive for maximum adherence to cART, there is accumulating evidence that each class of antiretroviral therapy has specific adherence-drug resistance relationship characteristics allowing certain regimens more flexibility than others. There is not a universally accepted measure for cART adherence, since each method has distinct advantages and disadvantages including cost, complexity, accuracy, precision, intrusiveness and bias. Development of a real-time cART adherence monitoring tool will enable the development of novel, pre-emptive adherence-improving strategies. The application of these strategies may ultimately prove to be the most cost-effective method to reduce morbidity and mortality for the individual and decrease the likelihood of HIV transmission and emergence of resistance in the community. PMID:21406048

  16. Virology, Immunology, and Clinical Course of HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutchan, J. Allen

    1990-01-01

    Presents overview of medical aspects of human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 (HIV-1) disease. Addresses structure and replication of virus, current methods for detecting HIV-1 in infected persons, effects of the virus on immune system, and clinical course of HIV-1 disease. Emphasizes variable causes of progression through HIV-1 infection stages;…

  17. Virologic and immunologic effects of adding maraviroc to suppressive ART in subjects with suboptimal CD4+ T-cell recovery

    PubMed Central

    Cillo, Anthony R.; Hilldorfer, Benedict B.; Lalama, Christina M.; McKinnon, John E.; Coombs, Robert W.; Tenorio, Allan R.; Fox, Lawrence; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Ribaudo, Heather; Currier, Judith S.; Gulick, Roy M.; Wilkin, Timothy J.; Mellors, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) suppresses HIV-1 replication, but does not restore CD4+ T-cell counts in all subjects. To investigate the effects of maraviroc on HIV-1 persistence and the relations between virologic and immunologic parameters in subjects with incomplete CD4+ T-cell recovery, we performed a prospective, open-label pilot trial in which maraviroc was added to a suppressive ART regimen for 24 weeks. Design A5256 was a single-arm trial in which subjects on suppressive ART with incomplete CD4+ T-cell recovery added maraviroc for 24 weeks. Methods We quantified low-level, residual viremia in plasma and total HIV-1 DNA and 2-LTR circles in peripheral blood mononuclear cells before and after maraviroc intensification. We also evaluated markers of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell immune activation (%CD38+HLA-DR+) and apoptosis (%caspase3+/Bcl-2−). Results No effect of maraviroc was found on the probability of detectable plasma viremia (≥1 copy/mL; n=31, exact McNemar p=1.0) or detectable 2-LTR circles (n=28, p=0.25) or on total HIV-1 DNA (n=28, 90% confidence interval: −0.1, +0.3 log10 copies/106 CD4+ T-cells). Pre-maraviroc HIV-1 DNA levels were inversely related to pre-maraviroc %CD38+HLA-DR+ CD4+ T-cells (Spearman=−0.52, p=0.004), and lower pre-maraviroc HIV-1 DNA levels were associated with larger decreases in %CD38+HLA-DR+ CD4+ T-cells during maraviroc intensification (Spearman=0.44, p=0.018). Conclusions In subjects on suppressive ART with incomplete CD4+ T-cell recovery, maraviroc intensification did not affect measures of HIV-1 persistence but did decrease persistent CD4+ T-cell immune activation especially in subjects with low pre-intensification levels of HIV-1 DNA. PMID:26544577

  18. HIV-1 DNA predicts disease progression and post-treatment virological control.

    PubMed

    Williams, James P; Hurst, Jacob; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Cooper, David; Schechter, Mauro; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Fidler, Sarah; Carrington, Mary; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan; Koelsch, Kersten K; Kelleher, Anthony D; Phillips, Rodney E; Frater, John

    2014-01-01

    In HIV-1 infection, a population of latently infected cells facilitates viral persistence despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). With the aim of identifying individuals in whom ART might induce a period of viraemic control on stopping therapy, we hypothesised that quantification of the pool of latently infected cells in primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) would predict clinical progression and viral replication following ART. We measured HIV-1 DNA in a highly characterised randomised population of individuals with PHI. We explored associations between HIV-1 DNA and immunological and virological markers of clinical progression, including viral rebound in those interrupting therapy. In multivariable analyses, HIV-1 DNA was more predictive of disease progression than plasma viral load and, at treatment interruption, predicted time to plasma virus rebound. HIV-1 DNA may help identify individuals who could safely interrupt ART in future HIV-1 eradication trials. PMID:25217531

  19. HIV-1 DNA predicts disease progression and post-treatment virological control.

    PubMed

    Williams, James P; Hurst, Jacob; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Cooper, David; Schechter, Mauro; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Fidler, Sarah; Carrington, Mary; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan; Koelsch, Kersten K; Kelleher, Anthony D; Phillips, Rodney E; Frater, John

    2014-09-12

    In HIV-1 infection, a population of latently infected cells facilitates viral persistence despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). With the aim of identifying individuals in whom ART might induce a period of viraemic control on stopping therapy, we hypothesised that quantification of the pool of latently infected cells in primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) would predict clinical progression and viral replication following ART. We measured HIV-1 DNA in a highly characterised randomised population of individuals with PHI. We explored associations between HIV-1 DNA and immunological and virological markers of clinical progression, including viral rebound in those interrupting therapy. In multivariable analyses, HIV-1 DNA was more predictive of disease progression than plasma viral load and, at treatment interruption, predicted time to plasma virus rebound. HIV-1 DNA may help identify individuals who could safely interrupt ART in future HIV-1 eradication trials.

  20. A Randomized Switch From Nevirapine-Based Antiretroviral Therapy to Single Tablet Rilpivirine/Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate in Virologically Suppressed Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1-Infected Rwandans

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Sean E.; Grant, Philip M.; Uwinkindi, Francois; Talbot, Annie; Seruyange, Eric; Slamowitz, Deborah; Mugeni, Adeline; Remera, Eric; Niyonsenga, Simon Pierre; Nyirimigabo, Josbert; Uwizihiwe, Jean Paul; Dongier, Pierre; Muhayimpundu, Ribakare; Mazarati, Jean-Baptiste; Zolopa, Andrew; Nsanzimana, Sabin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Many human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients remain on nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) despite safety and efficacy concerns. Switching to a rilpivirine-based regimen is an alternative, but there is little experience with rilpivirine in sub-Saharan Africa where induction of rilpivirine metabolism by nevirapine, HIV subtype, and dietary differences could potentially impact efficacy. Methods. We conducted an open-label noninferiority study of virologically suppressed (HIV-1 ribonucleic acid [RNA] < 50 copies/mL) HIV-1-infected Rwandan adults taking nevirapine plus 2 nucleos(t)ide reverse-transcriptase inhibitors. One hundred fifty participants were randomized 2:1 to switch to coformulated rilpivirine-emtricitabine-tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (referenced as the Switch Arm) or continue current therapy. The primary efficacy endpoint was HIV-1 RNA < 200 copies/mL at week 24 assessed by the US Food and Drug Administration Snapshot algorithm with a noninferiority margin of 12%. Results. Between April and September 2014, 184 patients were screened, and 150 patients were enrolled; 99 patients switched to rilpivirine-emtricitabine-tenofovir, and 51 patients continued their nevirapine-based ART. The mean age was 42 years and 43% of participants were women. At week 24, virologic suppression (HIV-1 RNA level <200 copies/mL) was maintained in 93% and 92% in the Switch Arm versus the continuation arm, respectively. The Switch Arm was noninferior to continued nevirapine-based ART (efficacy difference 0.8%; 95% confidence interval, −7.5% to +12.0%). Both regimens were generally safe and well tolerated, although 2 deaths, neither attributed to study medications, occurred in participants in the Switch Arm. Conclusions. A switch from nevirapine-based ART to rilpivirine-emtricitabine-tenofovir disoproxil fumarate had similar virologic efficacy to continued nevirapine-based ART after 24 weeks with few adverse events. PMID:27704000

  1. Ezrin Is a Component of the HIV-1 Virological Presynapse and Contributes to the Inhibition of Cell-Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Nathan H.; Lambelé, Marie; Chan, Jany; Symeonides, Menelaos

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT During cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1, viral and cellular proteins transiently accumulate at the contact zone between infected (producer) and uninfected (target) cells, forming the virological synapse. Rearrangements of the cytoskeleton in producer and target cells are required for proper targeting of viral and cellular components during synapse formation, yet little is known about how these processes are regulated, particularly within the producer cell. Since ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins connect F-actin with integral and peripheral membrane proteins, are incorporated into virions, and interact with cellular components of the virological presynapse, we hypothesized that they play roles during the late stage of HIV-1 replication. Here we document that phosphorylated (i.e., active) ezrin specifically accumulates at the HIV-1 presynapse in T cell lines and primary CD4+ lymphocytes. To investigate whether ezrin supports virus transmission, we sought to ablate ezrin expression in producer cells. While cells did not tolerate a complete knockdown of ezrin, even a modest reduction of ezrin expression (∼50%) in HIV-1-producing cells led to the release of particles with impaired infectivity. Further, when cocultured with uninfected target cells, ezrin-knockdown producer cells displayed reduced accumulation of the tetraspanin CD81 at the synapse and fused more readily with target cells, thus forming syncytia. Such an outcome likely is not optimal for virus dissemination, as evidenced by the fact that, in vivo, only relatively few infected cells form syncytia. Thus, ezrin likely helps secure efficient virus spread not only by enhancing virion infectivity but also by preventing excessive membrane fusion at the virological synapse. IMPORTANCE While viruses, in principal, can propagate through successions of syncytia, HIV-1-infected cells in the majority of cases do not fuse with potential target cells during viral transmission. This mode of spread is

  2. Clinical and Virological Outcome of European Patients Infected With HIV

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-29

    HIV; Hepatitis B; Hepatitis C; AIDS; Coinfection; Cardiovascular Diseases; Diabetes Mellitus; Acidosis, Lactic; Renal Insufficiency; Fractures, Bone; End Stage Liver Disease; Kidney Failure, Chronic; Proteinuria

  3. Abacavir/Lamivudine Versus Tenofovir/Emtricitabine in Virologically Suppressed Patients Switching from Ritonavir-Boosted Protease Inhibitors to Raltegravir

    PubMed Central

    d'Albuquerque, Polyana M.; Pérez, Ignacio; Pich, Judit; Gatell, José M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract There are few clinical data on the combination abacavir/lamivudine plus raltegravir. We compared the outcomes of patients from the SPIRAL trial receiving either abacavir/lamivudine or tenofovir/emtricitabine at baseline who had taken at least one dose of either raltegravir or ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors. For the purpose of this analysis, treatment failure was defined as virological failure (confirmed HIV-1 RNA ≥50 copies/ml) or discontinuation of abacavir/lamivudine or tenofovir/emtricitabine because of adverse events, consent withdrawal, or lost to follow-up. There were 143 (72.59%) patients with tenofovir/emtricitabine and 54 (27.41%) with abacavir/lamivudine. In the raltegravir group, there were three (11.11%) treatment failures with abacavir/lamivudine and eight (10.96%) with tenofovir/emtricitabine (estimated difference 0.15%; 95% CI −17.90 to 11.6). In the ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor group, there were four (14.81%) treatment failures with abacavir/lamivudine and 12 (17.14%) with tenofovir/emtricitabine (estimated difference −2.33%; 95% CI −16.10 to 16.70). Triglycerides decreased and HDL cholesterol increased through the study more pronouncedly with abacavir/lamivudine than with tenofovir/emtricitabine and differences in the total-to-HDL cholesterol ratio between both combinations of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) tended to be higher in the raltegravir group, although differences at 48 weeks were not significant. While no patient discontinued abacavir/lamivudine due to adverse events, four (2.80%) patients (all in the ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor group) discontinued tenofovir/emtricitabine because of adverse events (p=0.2744). The results of this analysis do not suggest that outcomes of abacavir/lamivudine are worse than those of tenofovir/emtricitabine when combined with raltegravir in virologically suppressed HIV-infected adults. PMID:22916715

  4. Abacavir/lamivudine versus tenofovir/emtricitabine in virologically suppressed patients switching from ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors to raltegravir.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Esteban; d'Albuquerque, Polyana M; Pérez, Ignacio; Pich, Judit; Gatell, José M

    2013-02-01

    There are few clinical data on the combination abacavir/lamivudine plus raltegravir. We compared the outcomes of patients from the SPIRAL trial receiving either abacavir/lamivudine or tenofovir/emtricitabine at baseline who had taken at least one dose of either raltegravir or ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors. For the purpose of this analysis, treatment failure was defined as virological failure (confirmed HIV-1 RNA ≥50 copies/ml) or discontinuation of abacavir/lamivudine or tenofovir/emtricitabine because of adverse events, consent withdrawal, or lost to follow-up. There were 143 (72.59%) patients with tenofovir/emtricitabine and 54 (27.41%) with abacavir/lamivudine. In the raltegravir group, there were three (11.11%) treatment failures with abacavir/lamivudine and eight (10.96%) with tenofovir/emtricitabine (estimated difference 0.15%; 95% CI -17.90 to 11.6). In the ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor group, there were four (14.81%) treatment failures with abacavir/lamivudine and 12 (17.14%) with tenofovir/emtricitabine (estimated difference -2.33%; 95% CI -16.10 to 16.70). Triglycerides decreased and HDL cholesterol increased through the study more pronouncedly with abacavir/lamivudine than with tenofovir/emtricitabine and differences in the total-to-HDL cholesterol ratio between both combinations of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) tended to be higher in the raltegravir group, although differences at 48 weeks were not significant. While no patient discontinued abacavir/lamivudine due to adverse events, four (2.80%) patients (all in the ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor group) discontinued tenofovir/emtricitabine because of adverse events (p=0.2744). The results of this analysis do not suggest that outcomes of abacavir/lamivudine are worse than those of tenofovir/emtricitabine when combined with raltegravir in virologically suppressed HIV-infected adults. PMID:22916715

  5. Lopinavir Plasma Concentrations and Virological Outcome with Lopinavir-Ritonavir Monotherapy in HIV-1-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Valderas, Rosa; Sánchez-Rivas, Elena; Lluch, Amparo; Gutierrez-Valencia, Alicia; Torres-Cornejo, Almudena; BenMarzouk-Hidalgo, Omar J.; Viciana, Pompeyo

    2013-01-01

    There is significant intra- and intersubject variability in lopinavir (LPV) plasma concentrations after standard dosing; thus, this prospective study was conducted to determine whether low plasma LPV concentrations could be associated with virological outcome throughout lopinavir-ritonavir maintenance monotherapy (mtLPVr) in the clinical practice setting. If this hypothesis would be confirmed, LPV drug monitoring could improve the efficacy of mtLPVr regimens. Patients with previous virological failure (VF) on protease inhibitor-based regimens were also included if the genotypic resistance tests showed no major resistance mutation associated with reduced susceptibility to lopinavir-ritonavir. VF was defined as 2 consecutive determinations of HIV RNA levels of >200 copies/ml. Efficacy was analyzed by per-protocol analysis. Plasma LPV trough concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography using a UV detector. A total of 127 patients were included (22% with previous failure on protease inhibitors). After 96 weeks, the efficacy rate was 82.3% (95% confidence interval [CI95], 75.3 to 89.3%). Virological efficacy was independent of LPV plasma concentrations even when LPVr was given once daily. An adherence of <90% (HR, 4.4 [CI95, 1.78 to 10.8; P = 0.001]) and the presence of blips in the preceding 12 months (HR, 3.06 [CI95, 1.17 to 8.01; P = 0.022]) were the only variables independently associated with time to VF. These findings suggest that the LPV concentrations achieved with the standard doses of LPVr are sufficient to maintain virological control during monotherapy and that measurement of LPV concentrations is not useful for predicting virological outcome. Tight control of viral replication in the previous months and strict adherence throughout the mtLPVr regimen could improve the virological efficacy of this maintenance regimen. PMID:23716055

  6. HIV-1 DNA predicts disease progression and post-treatment virological control

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James P; Hurst, Jacob; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Cooper, David; Schechter, Mauro; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Fidler, Sarah; Carrington, Mary; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    In HIV-1 infection, a population of latently infected cells facilitates viral persistence despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). With the aim of identifying individuals in whom ART might induce a period of viraemic control on stopping therapy, we hypothesised that quantification of the pool of latently infected cells in primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) would predict clinical progression and viral replication following ART. We measured HIV-1 DNA in a highly characterised randomised population of individuals with PHI. We explored associations between HIV-1 DNA and immunological and virological markers of clinical progression, including viral rebound in those interrupting therapy. In multivariable analyses, HIV-1 DNA was more predictive of disease progression than plasma viral load and, at treatment interruption, predicted time to plasma virus rebound. HIV-1 DNA may help identify individuals who could safely interrupt ART in future HIV-1 eradication trials. Clinical trial registration: ISRCTN76742797 and EudraCT2004-000446-20 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03821.001 PMID:25217531

  7. [Virological diagnosis and follow-up of HIV infection. State of the art and situation in Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Ben Mamou, Myriam; Slim, Amine; Garbouj, Mounira; Ben Redjeb, Saida

    2006-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus infecting approximatively 40 million people worldwide. HIV is characterized by a great variability with epidemiological, diagnostic and therapeutic implications. The course of infection goes through three stages (acute infection, clinical latency and AIDS) with the evolution of virological markers (anti-HIV antibodies, p24 antigenemia, plasma RNA and proviral DNA). Direct virological diagnosis is mainly based on molecular tools allowing viral genome detection and amplification with specific primers and nucleic probes besides p24 antigenemia detection, and more rarely viral culture. Antigenic properties of viral proteins elicit in infected patients antibody synthesis, which is detected using serology (ELISA and Western blot tests). The follow-up of infected patients is carried out with plasma HIV-1 RNA quantitation and phenotypic or genotypic characterization of variant isolates. Virological tests are prescribed according to clinical presentation (screening, acute infection, newborn from HIV-infected mother). Most of these virological tools are available in Tunisia, allowing both diagnosis of HIV infection and monitoring of infected individuals. Regarding diagnostic tests indication and interpretation, multidisciplinary concertation is hopeful in order to optimize patient management.

  8. Multiple proviral integration events after virological synapse-mediated HIV-1 spread

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Rebecca A.; Martin, Nicola; Mitar, Ivonne; Jones, Emma; Sattentau, Quentin J.

    2013-08-15

    HIV-1 can move directly between T cells via virological synapses (VS). Although aspects of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this mode of spread have been elucidated, the outcomes for infection of the target cell remain incompletely understood. We set out to determine whether HIV-1 transfer via VS results in productive, high-multiplicity HIV-1 infection. We found that HIV-1 cell-to-cell spread resulted in nuclear import of multiple proviruses into target cells as seen by fluorescence in-situ hybridization. Proviral integration into the target cell genome was significantly higher than that seen in a cell-free infection system, and consequent de novo viral DNA and RNA production in the target cell detected by quantitative PCR increased over time. Our data show efficient proviral integration across VS, implying the probability of multiple integration events in target cells that drive productive T cell infection. - Highlights: • Cell-to-cell HIV-1 infection delivers multiple vRNA copies to the target cell. • Cell-to-cell infection results in productive infection of the target cell. • Cell-to-cell transmission is more efficient than cell-free HIV-1 infection. • Suggests a mechanism for recombination in cells infected with multiple viral genomes.

  9. T-Cell Phenotypes, Apoptosis and Inflammation in HIV+ Patients on Virologically Effective cART with Early Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Suardi, Elisa; Barassi, Alessandra; Cerrone, Maddalena; Martínez, Javier Sánchez; Bai, Francesca; D’Eril, Gian Vico Melzi; Monforte, Antonella D’Arminio; Marchetti, Giulia

    2012-01-01

    Objective We investigated the potential relationship between T-cell phenotype, inflammation, endotoxemia, and atherosclerosis evaluated by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in a cohort of HIV-positive patients undergoing long-term virologically suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Design We studied 163 patients receiving virologically suppressive cART. Methods We measured IMT (carotid ultrasound); CD4+/CD8+ T-cell activation (CD38, CD45R0), differentiation (CD127), apoptosis (CD95), and senescence (CD28, CD57) (flow cytometry); plasma sCD14, IL-6, TNF- α, sVCAM-1, hs-CRP, anti-CMV IgG (ELISA); LPS (LAL). The results were compared by Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis or Chi-square tests, and factors associated with IMT were evaluated by multivariable logistic regression. Results Of 163 patients, 112 demonstrated normal IMT (nIMT), whereas 51 (31.3%) had pathological IMT (pIMT: ≥1 mm). Of the patients with pIMT, 22 demonstrated an increased IMT (iIMT), and 29 were shown to have plaques. These patient groups had comparable nadir and current CD4+, VLs and total length of time on cART. Despite similar proportions of CD38-expressing CD8+ cells (p = .95), pIMT patients exhibited higher activated memory CD8+CD38+CD45R0+ cells (p = .038) and apoptotic CD4+CD95+ (p = .01) and CD8+CD95+ cells (p = .003). In comparison to nIMT patients, iIMT patients tended to have lower numbers of early differentiated CD28+CD57− memory CD4+ (p = .048) and CD28–CD57−CD8+ cells (p = .006), both of which are associated with a higher proliferative potential. Despite no differences in plasma LPS levels, pIMT patients showed significantly higher circulating levels of sCD14 than did nIMT patients (p = .046). No differences in anti-CMV IgG was shown. Although circulating levels of sCD14 seemed to be associated with a risk of ATS in an unadjusted analysis, this effect was lost after adjusting for classical cardiovascular predictors. Conclusions

  10. Low-frequency drug-resistant HIV-1 and risk of virological failure to first-line NNRTI-based ART: a multicohort European case–control study using centralized ultrasensitive 454 pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Noguera-Julian, Marc; Di Giallonardo, Francesca; Schuurman, Rob; Däumer, Martin; Aitken, Sue; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Geretti, Anna Maria; Booth, Clare L.; Kaiser, Rolf; Michalik, Claudia; Jansen, Klaus; Masquelier, Bernard; Bellecave, Pantxika; Kouyos, Roger D.; Castro, Erika; Furrer, Hansjakob; Schultze, Anna; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Brun-Vezinet, Francoise; Paredes, Roger; Metzner, Karin J.; Paredes, Roger; Metzner, Karin J.; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Schuurman, Rob; Brun-Vezinet, Francoise; Günthard, Huldrych; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Kaiser, Rolf; Geretti, Anna Maria; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Masquelier, Bernard; Dabis, F.; Bruyand, M.; Chêne, G.; Dabis, F.; Lawson-Ayayi, S.; Thiébaut, R.; Wittkop, L.; André, K.; Bonnal, F.; Bonnet, F.; Bernard, N.; Caunègre, L.; Cazanave, C.; Ceccaldi, J.; Chossat, I.; Courtaud, K.; Dauchy, F. A.; De Witte, S.; Dupon, M.; Dupont, A.; Duffau, P.; Dutronc, H.; Farbos, S.; Gaborieau, V.; Gemain, M. C.; Gerard, Y.; Greib, C.; Hessamfar, M.; Lacoste, D.; Lataste, P.; Lazaro, E.; Longy-Boursier, M.; Malvy, D.; Meraud, J. P.; Mercié, P.; Monlun, E.; Morlat, P.; Neau, D.; Ochoa, A.; Pellegrin, J. L.; Pistone, T.; Receveur, M. C.; Schmeltz, J. Roger; Tchamgoué, S.; Vandenhende, M. A.; Vareil, M.O.; Viallard, J. F.; Moreau, J. F.; Pellegrin, I.; Fleury, H.; Lafon, M. E.; Masquelier, B.; Reigadas, S.; Trimoulet, P.; Bouchet, S.; Breilh, D.; Molimard, M.; Titier, K.; Haramburu, F.; Miremont-Salamé., G.; Blaizeau, M. J.; Decoin, M.; Delaune, J.; Delveaux, S.; D'Ivernois, C.; Hanapier, C.; Leleux, O.; Lenaud, E.; Uwamaliya-Nziyumvira, B.; Sicard, X.; Geffard, S.; Le Marec, F.; Conte, V.; Frosch, A.; Leray, J.; Palmer, G.; Touchard, D.; Bonnet, F.; Breilh, D.; Chêne, G.; Dabis, F.; Dupon, M.; Fleury, H.; Malvy, D.; Mercié, P.; Morlat, P.; Neau, D.; Pellegrin, I.; Pellegrin, J. L.; Bouchet, S.; Gaborieau, V.; Lacoste, D.; Tchamgoué, S.; Thiébaut, R.; Losso, M.; Kundro, M.; Ramos Mejia, J. M.; Vetter, N.; Zangerle, R.; Karpov, I.; Vassilenko, A.; Mitsura, V. M.; Suetnov, O.; Clumeck, N.; De Wit, S.; Delforge, M.; Florence, E.; Vandekerckhove, L.; Hadziosmanovic, V.; Kostov, K.; Begovac, J.; Machala, L.; Jilich, D.; Sedlacek, D.; Nielsen, J.; Kronborg, G.; Benfield, T.; Larsen, M.; Gerstoft, J.; Katzenstein, T.; Hansen, A.-B. E.; Skinhøj, P.; Pedersen, C.; Ostergaard, L.; Dragsted, U. B.; Nielsen, L. N.; Zilmer, K.; Smidt, Jelena; Ristola, M.; Katlama, C.; Viard, J. P.; Girard, P. M.; Vanhems, P.; Pradier, C.; Dabis, F.; Neau, D.; Duvivier, C.; Rockstroh, J.; Schmidt, R.; van Lunzen, J.; Degen, O.; Stellbrink, H. J.; Bickel, M.; Bogner, J.; Fätkenheuer, G.; Kosmidis, J.; Gargalianos, P.; Xylomenos, G.; Perdios, J.; Sambatakou, H.; Banhegyi, D.; Gottfredsson, M.; Mulcahy, F.; Yust, I.; Turner, D.; Burke, M.; Pollack, S.; HassounRambam, G.; Elinav, H.; HaouziHadassah, M.; EspositoI, R.; Mazzotta, F.; Vullo, V.; Moroni, M.; Andreoni, M.; Angarano, G.; Antinori, A.; Castelli, F.; Cauda, R.; Di Perri, G.; Galli, M.; Iardino, R.; Ippolito, G.; Lazzarin, A.; Perno, C. F.; von Schloesser, F.; Viale, P.; Monforte, A. D'Arminio; Antinori, A.; Castagna, A.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Girardi, E.; Lo Caputo, S.; Mussini, C.; Puoti, M.; Andreoni, M.; Ammassari, A.; Antinori, A.; Balotta, C.; Bonfanti, P.; Bonora, S.; Borderi, M.; Capobianchi, M. R.; Castagna, A.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Cingolani, A.; Cinque, P.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; De Luca, A.; Di Biagio, A.; Girardi, E.; Gianotti, N.; Gori, A.; Guaraldi, G.; Lapadula, G.; Lichtner, M.; Lo Caputo, S.; Madeddu, G.; Maggiolo, F.; Marchetti, G.; Marcotullio, S.; Monno, L.; Mussini, C.; Puoti, M.; Quiros Roldan, E.; Rusconi, S.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Cicconi, P.; Fanti, I.; Formenti, T.; Galli, L.; Lorenzini, P.; Carletti, F.; Carrara, S.; Castrogiovanni, A.; Di Caro, A.; Petrone, F.; Prota, G.; Quartu, S.; Giacometti, A.; Costantini, A.; Mazzoccato, S.; Angarano, G.; Monno, L.; Santoro, C.; Maggiolo, F.; Suardi, C.; Viale, P.; Vanino, E.; Verucchi, G.; Castelli, F.; Quiros Roldan, E.; Minardi, C.; Quirino, T.; Abeli, C.; Manconi, P. E.; Piano, P.; Vecchiet, J.; Falasca, K.; Sighinolfi, L.; Segala, D.; Mazzotta, F.; Lo Caputo, S.; Cassola, G.; Viscoli, C.; Alessandrini, A.; Piscopo, R.; Mazzarello, G.; Mastroianni, C.; Belvisi, V.; Bonfanti, P.; Caramma, I.; Chiodera, A.; Castelli, A. P.; Galli, M.; Lazzarin, A.; Rizzardini, G.; Puoti, M.; D'Arminio Monforte, A.; Ridolfo, A. L.; Piolini, R.; Castagna, A.; Salpietro, S.; Carenzi, L.; Moioli, M. C.; Tincati, C.; Marchetti, G.; Mussini, C.; Puzzolante, C.; Gori, A.; Lapadula, G.; Abrescia, N.; Chirianni, A.; Guida, M. G.; Gargiulo, M.; Baldelli, F.; Francisci, D.; Parruti, G.; Ursini, T.; Magnani, G.; Ursitti, M. A.; Cauda, R.; Andreoni, M.; Antinori, A.; Vullo, V.; Cingolani, A.; d'Avino, A.; Gallo, L.; Nicastri, E.; Acinapura, R.; Capozzi, M.; Libertone, R.; Tebano, G.; Cattelan, A.; Sasset, L.; Mura, M. S.; Madeddu, G.; De Luca, A.; Rossetti, B.; Caramello, P.; Di Perri, G.; Orofino, G. C.; Bonora, S.; Sciandra, M.; Bassetti, M.; Londero, A.; Pellizzer, G.; Manfrin, V.; Brockmeyer, N. H.; Skaletz-Rorowski, A.; Dupke, S.; Baumgarten, A.; Carganico, A.; Köppe, S.; Kreckel, P.; Lauenroth-Mai, E.; Freiwald-Rausch, M.; Gölz, J.; Moll, A.; Zeitz, M.; Hower, M.; Reuter, S.; Jensen, B.; Harrer, T.; Esser, S.; Brodt, H. R.; Plettenberg, A.; Stöhr, A.; Buhk, T.; Stellbrink, H. J.; Stoll, M.; Schmidt, R.; Kuhlmann, B.; Mosthaf, F. A.; Rieke, A.; Becker, W.; Volkert, R.; Jäger, H.; Hartl, H.; Mutz, A.; Ulmer, A.; Müller, M.; Aubert, V.; Barth, J.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Bucher, H. C.; Burton-Jeangros, C.; Calmy, A.; Cavassini, M.; Egger, M.; Elzi, L.; Fehr, J.; Fellay, J.; Furrer, H.; Fux, C. A.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Haerry, D.; Hasse, B.; Hirsch, H. H.; Hösli, I.; Kahlert, C.; Kaiser, L.; Keiser, O.; Klimkait, T.; Kovari, H.; Kouyos, R.; Ledergerber, B.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez de Tejada, B.; Metzner, K.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Pantaleo, G.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schöni-Affolter, F.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Staehelin, C.; Tarr, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Weber, R.; Yerly, S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It is still debated if pre-existing minority drug-resistant HIV-1 variants (MVs) affect the virological outcomes of first-line NNRTI-containing ART. Methods This Europe-wide case–control study included ART-naive subjects infected with drug-susceptible HIV-1 as revealed by population sequencing, who achieved virological suppression on first-line ART including one NNRTI. Cases experienced virological failure and controls were subjects from the same cohort whose viraemia remained suppressed at a matched time since initiation of ART. Blinded, centralized 454 pyrosequencing with parallel bioinformatic analysis in two laboratories was used to identify MVs in the 1%–25% frequency range. ORs of virological failure according to MV detection were estimated by logistic regression. Results Two hundred and sixty samples (76 cases and 184 controls), mostly subtype B (73.5%), were used for the analysis. Identical MVs were detected in the two laboratories. 31.6% of cases and 16.8% of controls harboured pre-existing MVs. Detection of at least one MV versus no MVs was associated with an increased risk of virological failure (OR = 2.75, 95% CI = 1.35–5.60, P = 0.005); similar associations were observed for at least one MV versus no NRTI MVs (OR = 2.27, 95% CI = 0.76–6.77, P = 0.140) and at least one MV versus no NNRTI MVs (OR = 2.41, 95% CI = 1.12–5.18, P = 0.024). A dose–effect relationship between virological failure and mutational load was found. Conclusions Pre-existing MVs more than double the risk of virological failure to first-line NNRTI-based ART. PMID:25336166

  11. Virological and Immunological Status of the People Living with HIV/AIDS Undergoing ART Treatment in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Dumre, Shyam Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has increased the life span of the people living with HIV (PLHIV), but their virological and immunological outcomes are not well documented in Nepal. The study was conducted at a tertiary care center including 826 HIV-1 seropositive individuals undergoing ART for at least six months. Plasma viral load (HIV-1 RNA) was detected by Real Time PCR and CD4+ T-lymphocyte (CD4+) counts were estimated by flow cytometry. The mean CD4+ count of patients was 501 (95% CI = 325–579) cells/cumm, but about 35% of patients had CD4+ T cell counts below 350 cells/cumm. With increasing age, average CD4+ count was found to be decreasing (p = 0.005). Of the total cases, 82 (9.92%) were found to have virological failure (viral load: >1000 copies/ml). Tenofovir/Lamivudine/Efavirenz (TDF/3TC/EFV), the frequently used ART regimen in Nepal, showed virological failure in 11.34% and immunological failure in 37.17% of patients. Virological failure rate was higher among children < 15 years (14.5%) (p = 0.03); however, no association was observed between ART outcomes and gender or route of transmission. The study suggests there are still some chances of virological and immunological failures despite the success of highly active ART (HAART). PMID:27547761

  12. LFA-1 Engagement Triggers T Cell Polarization at the HIV-1 Virological Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Starling, Shimona

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 efficiently disseminates by cell-cell spread at intercellular contacts called virological synapses (VS), where the virus preferentially assembles and buds. Cell-cell contact triggers active polarization of organelles and viral proteins within infected cells to the contact site to support efficient VS formation and HIV-1 spread; critically, however, which cell surface protein triggers contact-induced polarization at the VS remains unclear. Additionally, the mechanism by which the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) is recruited to the VS remains ill defined. Here, we use a reductionist bead-coupled antibody assay as a model of the VS and show that cross-linking the integrin LFA-1 alone is sufficient to induce active T cell polarization and recruitment of the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) in HIV-1-infected cells. Mutant cell lines coupled with inhibitors demonstrated that LFA-1-induced polarization was dependent on the T cell kinase ZAP70. Notably, immunofluorescent staining of viral proteins revealed an accumulation of surface Env at sites of LFA-1 engagement, with intracellular Env localized to a Golgi compartment proximal to the polarized MTOC. Furthermore, blocking LFA-1-induced MTOC polarization through ZAP70 inhibition prevented intracellular Env polarization. Taken together, these data reveal that LFA-1 is a key determinant in inducing dynamic T cell remodeling to the VS and suggest a model in which LFA-1 engagement triggers active polarization of the MTOC and the associated Env-containing secretory apparatus to sites of cell-cell contact to support polarized viral assembly and egress for efficient cell-cell spread. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 causes AIDS by spreading within immune cells and depletion of CD4 T lymphocytes. Rapid spread between these cells occurs by highly efficient cell-cell transmission that takes place at virological synapses (VS). VS are characterized by striking T cell remodeling that is spatially associated with polarized virus

  13. HIV suppression with stavudine 30 mg versus 40 mg in adults over 60 kg on antiretroviral therapy in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Christopher J; Charalambous, Salome; Fielding, Katherine L; Innes, Craig; Chaisson, Richard E; Grant, Alison D; Churchyard, Gavin J

    2009-08-24

    In 2007, the WHO recommended a maximum stavudine dose of 30 mg. We compared virologic suppression among patients weighing more than 60 kg and receiving stavudine 30 mg (n = 110) versus 40 mg (n = 508) in community HIV clinics in South Africa, before and after guidelines changed. At 6 months, HIV RNA less than 400 copies/ml was achieved in 79% and 81% receiving 30 and 40 mg stavudine, respectively (chi2, P = 0.6). In regression modeling, including baseline HIV RNA and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor agent, stavudine dose remained unassociated with suppression.

  14. Temporary treatment during primary HIV infection does not affect virologic response to subsequent long-term treatment.

    PubMed

    Grijsen, Marlous L; Wit, Ferdinand W N M; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Kroon, Frank P; Schippers, Emile F; Koopmans, Peter; Gras, Luuk; Lange, Joep M A; Prins, Jan M

    2014-01-01

    Temporary cART during primary HIV-infection (PHI) did not select for drug resistance mutations after treatment interruption and did not affect the subsequent virological response to long-term cART. Our data demonstrate that fear of drug resistance development is not a valid argument to refrain from temporary early treatment during PHI.

  15. Repeated HIV-1 resistance genotyping external quality assessments improve virology laboratory performance.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Diane; Delaugerre, Constance; Masquelier, Bernard; Ruffault, Annick; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Izopet, Jacques; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Calvez, Vincent; Brun-Vézinet, Françoise; Costagliola, Dominique

    2006-02-01

    The performance of French virology laboratories belonging to the ANRS network has been assessed annually for 3 years. The performance of these laboratories was compared between the years 2002 and 2003. Ten and 7 coded samples were sent to 38 virology laboratories in 2002 and 45 virology laboratories in 2003, respectively. Each panel of coded samples included at least one HIV-negative control, a pair of duplicate specimens, samples with a wide range of viral loads, and samples with a large number of resistance mutations. The laboratories used their standard sequencing procedures and were asked to report the amino acids at codons associated with resistance mutations, based on the IAS-USA expert panel list. The reference amino acid sequences were defined as those most frequently reported by the participants. The specificity of detection of RT mutations was significantly better in 2003 (99.9%) than in 2002 (99.7%) (P = 0.05). There was no difference between 2002 and 2003 in the specificity of detection of protease mutations (99.6% and 99.8%) or the sensitivity of detection of RT mutations (98.8% and 98.2%). The sensitivity of detection of protease mutations improved significantly between 2002 and 2003 (97.6% and 99.0%, respectively; P = 0.037). The proportion of laboratories reporting fully accurate results, in terms of amplification, specificity, sensitivity, and reproducibility, tended to increase between 2002 and 2003 (P = 0.077). No errors were made by 19% of laboratories in 2002, compared to 42% in 2003. These results show the value of repeated external quality assessments.

  16. NRTI Sparing Therapy in Virologically Controlled HIV-1 Infected Subjects: Results of a Controlled, Randomized Trial (Probe).

    PubMed

    Maggiolo, Franco; Di Filippo, Elisa; Valenti, Daniela; Ortega, Paula S; Callegaro, Annapaola

    2016-05-01

    Dual treatments could help clinicians to avoid drawbacks and toxicities due to the nucleosidic backbone, while maintaining the efficacy and convenience of robust combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). We explored the combination of rilpivirine plus boosted darunavir (DRV) as an option when switching from standard cART in patients who are virologically suppressed. In this randomized, open-label, proof-of-concept, noninferiority trial, we recruited patients aged 18 years or older with chronic HIV-1 infection and on a stable, effective (>6 months) protease inhibitor-based cART including a nucleosidic backbone. The primary endpoint was noninferiority of the virological response between treatment groups, according to FDA snapshot approach. Sixty patients were randomly allocated to dual treatment with rilpivirine plus boosted DRV or to continue their ongoing triple treatment. Noninferiority was shown at the prespecified level of -12% both at 24 and 48 weeks. At week 24, 100% of patients in the dual arm presented a blood HIV-RNA level <50 copies per milliliter compared with 90.1% in the triple drug arm (difference 9.9%, 95% CI: -0.7 to 20.7), whereas, at 48 weeks, the same proportions were 96.7% and 93.4%, respectively (difference 3.3%, 95% CI: -7.15 to 13.5). The mean change in CD4 cell count from baseline was 6.0 cells per microliter (SD, 184) for dual treatment and 16.5 cells per microliter (SD, 142) for triple treatment. A relevant decrement in CD838HLADR cells was observed in both arms. The reduction was, however, significantly more pronounced in the dual-therapy arm. At week 48, the CD838HLADR cell count was 3.4% (SD, 2.2) in the dual-therapy arm and 5.2% (SD, 3.1) in the triple arm (P = 0.018). None of the patients developed severe adverse events nor had to stop treatment because of adverse events or presented grade 3-4 laboratory abnormalities. A greater reduction of bone stiffness (-2.25; SD, 7.1) was observed in patients randomized to continue triple therapy

  17. Comparison of adherence monitoring tools and correlation to virologic failure in a pediatric HIV clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Intasan, Jintana; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Vonthanak, Saphonn; Kosalaraksa, Pope; Hansudewechakul, Rawiwan; Kanjanavanit, Suparat; Ngampiyaskul, Chaiwat; Wongsawat, Jurai; Luesomboon, Wicharn; Apornpong, Tanakorn; Kerr, Stephen; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Puthanakit, Thanyawee

    2014-06-01

    There is no consensus on a gold standard for monitoring adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). We compared different adherence monitoring tools in predicting virologic failure as part of a clinical trial. HIV-infected Thai and Cambodian children aged 1-12 years (N=207) were randomized to immediate-ART or deferred-ART until CD4% <15%. Virologic failure (VF) was defined as HIV-RNA >1000 copies/mL after ≥6 months of ART. Adherence monitoring tools were: (1) announced pill count, (2) PACTG adherence questionnaire (form completed by caregivers), and (3) child self-report (self-reporting from children or caregivers to direct questioning by investigators during the clinic visit) of any missed doses in the last 3 days and in the period since the last visit. The Kappa statistic was used to describe agreement between each tool. The median age at ART initiation was 7 years with median CD4% 17% and HIV-RNA 5.0 log(10)copies/mL and 92% received zidovudine/lamivudine/nevirapine. Over 144 weeks, 13% had VF. Mean adherence by announced pill count before VF in VF children was 92% compared to 98% in children without VF (p=0.03). Kappa statistics indicated slight to fair agreement between tools. In multivariate analysis adjusting for gender, treatment arm ethnicity and caregiver education, significant predictors of VF were poor adherence by announced pill count (OR 4.56; 95%CI 1.78-11.69), reporting any barrier to adherence in the PACTG adherence questionnaire (OR 7.08; 95%CI 2.42-20.73), and reporting a missed dose in the 24 weeks since the last HIV-RNA assessment (OR 8.64; 95%CI 1.96-38.04). In conclusion, we recommend the child self-report of any missed doses since last visit for use in HIV research and in routine care settings, because it is easy and quick to administer and a strong association with development of VF. PMID:24901463

  18. Impact of HIV type 1 drug resistance mutations and phenotypic resistance profile on virologic response to salvage therapy.

    PubMed

    Ross, L; Liao, Q; Gao, H; Pham, S; Tolson, J; Hertogs, K; Larder, B; Saag, M S

    2001-10-10

    This study examines the association between presence of drug resistance mutations and phenotypic resistance at baseline to virologic response to salvage therapy in a community setting. The study population consisted of 58 antiretroviral drug-experienced patients with HIV-1 infection who had recently switched therapy because of virologic failure. Drug resistance mutations in the reverse transcriptase- and protease-coding regions and phenotypic susceptibility to 13 antiretroviral drugs were assessed at baseline. Plasma HIV-1 RNA levels were assessed at baseline and at subsequent clinic visits. Results showed that three variables were significant in predicting virologic response: HIV-1 levels at baseline, number of protease mutations, and phenotypic sensitivity score for the regimen at baseline. For four drugs there was a significant association between the presence of specific drug resistance mutations and >10-fold phenotypic resistance to that drug. With phenotypic resistance defined as >4-fold resistance, the association between specific drug resistance mutations and phenotypic resistance was significant for seven drugs. Overall, these data show that phenotypic susceptibility and absence of drug resistance mutations, particularly protease mutations, are significant predictors of virologic response. For several drugs, specific combinations of drug resistance mutations are associated with decreased phenotypic susceptibility and might provide useful clinical guidelines in selecting therapeutic options.

  19. Prevalence of HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance and Its Impacts on HIV-1 Virological Failures in Jiangsu, China: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Lu, Jing; Wang, Jinge; Yan, Hongjing; Li, Jianjun; Xu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Zhi; Qiu, Tao; Ding, Ping; Huan, Xiping

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been shown to improve survival of patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and to reduce HIV-1 transmission. Therefore, the Chinese central government initiated a national program to provide ART free of charge to HIV-1 patients. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in Jiangsu province to determine the level of drug resistance (DR) in HIV-1 infected patients and the correlates of DR in virological failures in 2012. Approximately 10.4% of the HIV-1 patients in the study experienced virological failure after one year of ART and were divided into drug sensitive and drug resistant groups based on genotype determination. The viral loads (VLs) in the drug resistant group were significantly lower than the drug sensitive group. There were two independent predictors of virological failure: male gender and increasing duration of treatment. The primary mutations observed in the study were against nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) which were M184V (79.45%) and K103N (33.70%) in nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). The overall rate of DR in Jiangsu province is still relatively low among treated patients. However, close monitoring of drug resistance in male patients in the early stages of treatment is vital to maintaining and increasing the benefits of HIV ART achieved to date. PMID:27807537

  20. Predicting the duration of antiviral treatment needed to suppress plasma HIV-1 RNA

    PubMed Central

    Rizzardi, G. Paolo; De Boer, Rob J.; Hoover, Shelley; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Chapuis, Aude; Halkic, Nermin; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Miller, Veronica; Staszewski, Schlomo; Notermans, Daan W.; Perrin, Luc; Fox, Cecil H.; Lange, Joep M.A.; Lazzarin, Adriano; Pantaleo, Giuseppe

    2000-01-01

    Effective therapeutic interventions and clinical care of adults infected with HIV-1 require an understanding of factors that influence time of response to antiretroviral therapy. We have studied a cohort of 118 HIV-1–infected subjects naive to antiretroviral therapy and have correlated the time of response to treatment with a series of virological and immunological measures, including levels of viral load in blood and lymph node, percent of CD4 T cells in lymph nodes, and CD4 T-cell count in blood at study entry. Suppression of viremia below the limit of detection, 50 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL of plasma, served as a benchmark for a successful virological response. We employed these correlations to predict the length of treatment required to attain a virological response in each patient. Baseline plasma viremia emerged as the factor most tightly correlated with the duration of treatment required, allowing us to estimate the required time as a function of this one measure. PMID:10727446

  1. Clinical and Virological Efficacy of Etravirine Plus Two Active Nucleos(t)ide Analogs in an Heterogeneous HIV-Infected Population

    PubMed Central

    López-Cortés, Luis F.; Viciana, Pompeyo; Girón-González, José A.; Romero-Palacios, Alberto; Márquez-Solero, Manuel; Martinez-Perez, Maria A.; López-Ruz, Miguel A.; de la Torre-Lima, Javier; Téllez-Pérez, Francisco; Delgado-Fernández, Marcial; Garcia-Lázaro, Milagros; Lozano, Fernando; Mohamed-Balghata, Mohamed O.

    2014-01-01

    Etravirine (ETV) is recommended in combination with a boosted protease inhibitor plus an optimized background regimen for salvage therapy, but there is limited experience with its use in combination with two nucleos(t)ide reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). This multicenter study aimed to assess the efficacy of this combination in two scenarios: group A) subjects without virologic failure on or no experience with non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) switched due to adverse events and group B) subjects switched after a virologic failure on an efavirenz- or nevirapine-based regimen. The primary endpoint was efficacy at 52 weeks analysed by intention-to-treat. Virologic failure was defined as the inability to suppress plasma HIV-RNA to <50 copies/mL after 24 weeks on treatment, or a confirmed viral load >200 copies/mL in patients who had previously achieved a viral suppression or had an undetectable viral load at inclusion. Two hundred eighty seven patients were included. Treatment efficacy rates in group A and B were 88.0% (CI95, 83.9–92.1%) and 77.4% (CI95, 65.0–89.7%), respectively; the rates reached 97.2% (CI95, 95.1–99.3%) and 90.5% (CI95, 81.7–99.3), by on-treatment analysis. The once-a-day ETV treatment was as effective as the twice daily dosing regimen. Grade 1–2 adverse events were observed motivating a treatment switch in 4.2% of the subjects. In conclusion, ETV (once- or twice daily) plus two analogs is a suitable, well-tolerated combination both as a switching strategy and after failure with first generation NNRTIs, ensuring full drug activity. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01437241 PMID:24836963

  2. Mortality and virologic outcomes following access to antiretroviral therapy among a cohort of HIV-infected women who received single-dose nevirapine in Lusaka, Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Louise; Semrau, Katherine; Ramachandran, Shobana; Sinkala, Moses; Scott, Nancy; Kasonde, Prisca; Mwiya, Mwiya; Kankasa, Chipepo; Decker, Don; Thea, Donald M.; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Single-dose nevirapine (SDNVP) for prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission selects mutations conferring resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based therapy. We investigated mortality and virologic and clinical outcomes following introduction of antiretroviral treatment (ART) among a cohort of women given SDNVP. Methods When ART programs were introduced in 2004 in Lusaka, Zambia, we were completing a trial of infant feeding which involved following HIV-infected women who received SDNVP between 2001 and 2005. Women still in follow-up or who could be contacted were evaluated for eligibility for ART (CD4 count <200 or <350 and WHO stage ≥ 3) and started on NNRTI-based therapy if eligible. We compared mortality in the cohort of women before and after ART access, and examined, among women initiating ART, whether virologic response was better allowing a longer time to elapse between SDNVP and treatment initiation. Results In the cohort of 872 women, mortality more than halved after ART became available (relative hazard [RH] = 0.46 95% CI: 0.23–0.91 p=0.03). Of 161 SDNVP-exposed women followed on NNRTI-based ART, 70.8% suppressed (viral load <400 copies/ml). Only 3/8 (37.5%) women SDNVP-exposed <6 months of starting therapy suppressed compared to 13/22 (59.1%) who started 6–12 months, 44/61 (72.1 %) 12–24 months, and 54/70 (77.1%) >24 months post-exposure (chi-square trend p=0.01). Conclusions Most SDNVP-exposed women respond well to NNRTI-based therapy but there was an attenuation of therapy efficacy that persisted to 12 months after exposure. Women should be screened for ART eligibility during pregnancy and started on effective regimens before delivery. PMID:19506483

  3. Full Viral Suppression, Low-Level Viremia, and Quantifiable Plasma HIV-RNA at the End of Pregnancy in HIV-Infected Women on Antiretroviral Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Baroncelli, Silvia; Pirillo, Maria F.; Tamburrini, Enrica; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Pinnetti, Carmela; Antoni, Anna Degli; Galluzzo, Clementina M.; Stentarelli, Chiara; Amici, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is limited information on full viral suppression and low-level HIV-RNA viremia in HIV-infected women at the end of pregnancy. We investigated HIV-RNA levels close to delivery in women on antiretroviral treatment in order to define rates of complete suppression, low-level viremia, and quantifiable HIV-RNA, exploring as potential determinants some clinical and viroimmunological variables. Plasma samples from a national study in Italy, collected between 2003 and 2012, were used. According to plasma HIV-RNA levels, three groups were defined: full suppression (target not detected), low-level viremia (target detected but <37 copies/ml), and quantifiable HIV-RNA (≥37 copies/ml). Multivariable logistic regression was used to define determinants of full viral suppression and of quantifiable HIV-RNA. Among 107 women evaluated at a median gestational age of 35 weeks, 90 (84.1%) had HIV-RNA <37 copies/ml. Most of them (59/90, 65.6%) had full suppression, with the remaining (31/90, 34.4%) showing low-level viremia (median: 11.9 copies/ml; IQR 7.4–16.3). Among the 17 women with quantifiable viral load, median HIV-RNA was 109 copies/ml (IQR 46–251), with only one case showing resistance (mutation M184V; rate: 9.1%). In multivariable analyses, women with higher baseline HIV-RNA levels and with hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection were significantly more likely to have quantifiable HIV-RNA in late pregnancy. Full viral suppression was significantly more likely with nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimens and significantly less likely with higher HIV-RNA in early pregnancy. No cases of HIV transmission occurred. In conclusion, HIV-infected pregnant women showed a high rate of viral suppression and a low resistance rate before delivery. In most cases no target HIV-RNA was detected in plasma, suggesting a low risk of subsequent virological rebound and development of resistance. Women with high levels of HIV-RNA in early pregnancy and

  4. Suppression of plasma virus load below the detection limit of a human immunodeficiency virus kit is associated with longer virologic response than suppression below the limit of quantitation.

    PubMed

    Raboud, J M; Rae, S; Hogg, R S; Yip, B; Sherlock, C H; Harrigan, P R; O'Shaughnessy, M V; Montaner, J S

    1999-10-01

    Suppression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 plasma virus load (PVL) to <20 copies/mL is associated with a longer virologic response after initiation of antiretroviral therapy. The relationship between duration of virologic response and PVL nadir according to a less sensitive assay was explored. When compared with subjects with a PVL nadir >500 copies/mL, the relative risks of PVL rising above 1000 copies/mL for participants in the INCAS trial and the British Columbia Drug Treatment Program with a PVL nadir below the limit of detection (LOD) were 0.04 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.02-0.09) and 0.06 (95% CI, 0.03-0.12), respectively. The corresponding relative risks for persons with a detectable but not quantifiable PVL nadir were 0.25 (95% CI, 0.13-0.50) and 0.54 (95% CI, 0.25-1.19). The relative risks of virologic failure associated with a PVL nadir detectable but not quantifiable and a PVL nadir below the LOD were statistically different (P<.0001) in both data sets.

  5. Virological Response and Drug Resistance 1 and 2 Years Post-Partum in HIV-Infected Women Initiated on Life-Long Antiretroviral Therapy in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Mancinelli, Sandro; Galluzzo, Clementina Maria; Andreotti, Mauro; Liotta, Giuseppe; Jere, Haswel; Sagno, Jean-Baptiste; Amici, Roberta; Pirillo, Maria Franca; Scarcella, Paola; Marazzi, Maria Cristina; Vella, Stefano; Palombi, Leonardo; Giuliano, Marina

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the virological response and the possible emergence of drug resistance at 1 and 2 years postpartum in HIV-positive pregnant women enrolled under the Option B approach and meeting the criteria for treatment. In the study, women with baseline CD4(+) <350/mm(3) received a combination of stavudine, lamivudine, and nevirapine during pregnancy (from week 25 of gestation) and continued it indefinitely after delivery. HIV-RNA was measured at 12 and 24 months postpartum. Drug resistance mutations were assessed in those with HIV-RNA >50 copies/ml. Baseline resistance mutations were assessed in the entire cohort. A total of 107 women were studied. At baseline, resistance mutations were seen in 6.6% of the women. At 12 months, 26.7% of the women had >50 copies/ml and among them 12.9% had virological failure (HIV-RNA >1,000 copies/ml). At 24 months, detectable HIV-RNA was seen in 28.3% of the women and virological failure in 10.1% of the women. Resistance mutations (mainly non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors mutations) were seen in 40% of the women with detectable HIV-RNA. Baseline mutations did not correlate with virological failure or the emergence of resistance at later time points. Virological failure 2 years postpartum and emergence of resistance were rare in this cohort of HIV-infected women. These findings are reassuring in the light of the new strategies for the prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission, recommending life-long antiretroviral therapy administration. PMID:27067142

  6. “Risk factors associated with virologic failure in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy at a public hospital in Peru”

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Alave R; Jorge, Paz B; Elsa, Gonzalez L; Miguel, Campos S; Rodriguez, Martin; Willig, James; Juan, Echevarría Z

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe clinical and biological characteristics of subjects with virologic failure who participated in the sexually transmitted diseases HIV/AIDS National Program from a Peruvian public hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS An exploratory descriptive study was performed with data from subjects older than 18 who started high activity antiretroviral therapy (HAART) between May 2004 and December 2009 and who had a viral load control after 24 weeks of HAART. Virologic failure was defined as a viral load value above 1000 copies/mL on follow up after 24 weeks on HAART. RESULTS Of 1 478 records of patients on HAART analized, the median age was 35 years [IQR, 29-41] and 69.6% were male. Also, virologic failure occurred in 24% and 3.7% died. Of subjects with virologic failure, 9.5% died. On multivariate analysis, age, history of antiretroviral use before starting HAART, change of antiretroviral therapy due to toxicity, opportunistic infections during HAART, level of CD4 + lymphocytes below 100 cells/ml at start of HAART, adherence and clinical stage were independently associated with virologic failure. In the group of patient with no history of antiretroviral use before starting HAART, age, opportunistic infections during HAART were associated with virologic failure. CONCLUSION This study identified factors associated with virologic failure. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether the use of these factors can help to identify prospectively patients at high risk of failure, and to design interventions aimed to reduce this risk. PMID:23450408

  7. Impact of HIV infection on sustained virological response to treatment against hepatitis C virus with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Monje-Agudo, P; Castro-Iglesias, A; Rivero-Juárez, A; Martínez-Marcos, F; Ortega-González, E; Real, L M; Pernas, B; Merchante, N; Cid, P; Macías, J; Merino, M D; Rivero, A; Mena, A; Neukam, K; Pineda, J A

    2015-10-01

    It is commonly accepted that human immunodeficiency (HIV) coinfection negatively impacts on the rates of sustained virological response (SVR) to therapy with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin (PR). However, this hypothesis is derived from comparing different studies. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of HIV coinfection on SVR to PR in one single population. In a multicentric, prospective study conducted between 2000 and 2013, all previously naïve hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients who started PR in five Spanish hospitals were analyzed. SVR was evaluated 24 weeks after the scheduled end of therapy. Of the 1046 patients included in this study, 413 (39%) were coinfected with HIV. Three hundred and forty-one (54%) HCV-monoinfected versus 174 (42%) HIV/HCV-coinfected patients achieved SVR (p < 0.001). The corresponding figures for undetectable HCV RNA at treatment week 4 were 86/181 (47%) versus 59/197 (30%), p < 0.001. SVR was observed in 149 (69%) HCV genotype 2/3-monoinfected subjects versus 91 (68%) HIV/HCV genotype 2/3-coinfected subjects (p = 0.785). In the HCV genotype 1/4-infected population, 188 (46%) monoinfected patients versus 82 (30%) with HIV coinfection (p < 0.001) achieved SVR. In this subgroup, absence of HIV coinfection was independently associated with higher SVR [adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 2.127 (1.135-3.988); p = 0.019] in a multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex, baseline HCV RNA load, IL28B genotype, fibrosis stage, and type of pegylated interferon. HIV coinfection impacts on the rates of SVR to PR only in HCV genotype 1/4-infected patients, while it has no effect on SVR in the HCV genotype 2/3-infected subpopulation.

  8. The Perilous Road from HIV Diagnosis in the Hospital to Viral Suppression in the Outpatient Clinic.

    PubMed

    Colasanti, Jonathan; Goswami, Neela D; Khoubian, Jonathan J; Pennisi, Eugene; Root, Christin; Ziemer, Dorothy; Armstrong, Wendy S; Del Rio, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    The HIV care continuum has received considerable attention in recent years, however, few care continua focus on the population of patients who are diagnosed during an inpatient hospital admission. We aimed to describe the HIV care continuum for patients newly diagnosed during hospitalization through 24-month follow-up. A retrospective chart review of HIV patients diagnosed at Grady Memorial Hospital from 2011 to 2012 was performed and records were matched to Georgia Department of Public Health HIV/AIDS surveillance data. Descriptive statistics and statistical tests of independence were utilized. Ninety-four new diagnoses were confirmed during the 2-year study period. Median age was 43 years (interquartile range [IQR] 30-51), 77% were male, 72% were non-Hispanic Black, 31% were men who have sex with men (MSM), and 77% were uninsured. Median CD4 count at diagnosis was 134 cells/μL (IQR 30-307). Eighty-four percent received their diagnosis before hospital discharge, 68% linked to care by 90 days, 73% were retained for 12 months, 48% were virologically suppressed by 12 months, 58% were retained for 24 continuous months, and 38% achieved continuous viral suppression (VS) during the initial 24 months after diagnosis. Late diagnosis is a persistent problem in hospitalized patients. Despite relative success with linkage to care and 12-month retention in care, a minority of patients maintained retention and VS for 24 continuous months. PMID:27005488

  9. Clinical Outcome of HIV-Infected Patients with Sustained Virologic Response to Antiretroviral Therapy: Long-Term Follow-Up of a Multicenter Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Félix; Padilla, Sergio; Masiá, Mar; Iribarren, José A.; Moreno, Santiago; Viciana, Pompeyo; Muñoz, Leopoldo; Sirvent, José L. Gómez; Vidal, Francesc; López-Aldeguer, José; Blanco, José R.; Leal, Manuel; Rodríguez-Arenas, María Angeles; Hoyos, Santiago Perez

    2006-01-01

    Background Limited information exists on long-term prognosis of patients with sustained virologic response to antiretroviral therapy. We aimed to assess predictors of unfavorable clinical outcome in patients who maintain viral suppression with HAART. Methods Using data collected from ten clinic-based cohorts in Spain, we selected all antiretroviral-naive adults who initiated HAART and maintained plasma HIV-1 RNA levels <500 copies/mL throughout follow-up. Factors associated with disease progression were determined by Cox proportional-hazards models. Results Of 2,613 patients who started HAART, 757 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. 61% of them initiated a protease inhibitor-based HAART regimen, 29.7% a nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor-based regimen, and 7.8% a triple-nucleoside regimen. During 2,556 person-years of follow-up, 22 (2.9%) patients died (mortality rate 0.86 per 100 person-years), and 40 (5.3%) died or developed a new AIDS-defining event. The most common causes of death were neoplasias and liver failure. Mortality was independently associated with a CD4-T cell response <50 cells/L after 12 months of HAART (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 4.26 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.68–10.83]; P = .002), and age at initiation of HAART (AHR, 1.06 per year; 95% CI, 1.02–1.09; P = .001). Initial antiretroviral regimen chosen was not associated with different risk of clinical progression. Conclusions Patients with sustained virologic response on HAART have a low mortality rate over time. Long-term outcome of these patients is driven by immunologic response at the end of the first year of therapy and age at the time of HAART initiation, but not by the initial antiretroviral regimen selected. PMID:17183720

  10. Low rate of sustained virological response in an outbreak of acute hepatitis C in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Laguno, Montserrat; Martínez-Rebollar, Maria; Perez, Iñaki; Costa, Josep; Larrousse, Maria; Calvo, Marta; Loncá, Montse; Muñoz, Ana; González-Cordón, Ana; Blanco, José Luís; Martínez, Esteban; Gatell, Josep Maria; Mallolas, Josep

    2012-10-01

    Recent reports have suggested an increased risk of acute hepatitis C (AHC) infection in homosexual HIV-infected men and that early treatment with interferon-alfa, alone or associated with ribavirin, significantly reduces the risk of chronic evolution. A retrospective analysis of 38 HIV-infected patients who were consecutively diagnosed as developing AHC, defined by both seroconversion of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies and detection of serum HCV-RNA in those with previous negative results. Thirty-six patients were men with history of unprotected sexual intercourse with men and two were women with sexual and nosocomial risk factors. AHC infection was asymptomatic in 26 patients; asthenia and jaundice were the most frequent symptoms. HCV genotype 1 was present in 19 patients and genotype 4 in 14 patients. Thirty-five patients received early antiviral treatment with pegylated interferon-alfa associated with ribavirin; 15 of the 32 patients who completed the follow-up (47%) achieved a sustained virological response, as defined by undetectable HCV-RNA 6 months after the end of therapy. There is a risk of sexual transmission of HCV in HIV-infected men who have sex with men. In our experience, early treatment of AHC with pegylated interferon-alfa plus ribavirin in HIV patients achieves poor results. PMID:22428909

  11. Elevated CD8 T-cell counts and virological failure in HIV-infected patients after combination antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Ku, Nam Su; Jiamsakul, Awachana; Ng, Oon Tek; Yunihastuti, Evy; Cuong, Do Duy; Lee, Man Po; Sim, Benedict Lim Heng; Phanuphak, Praphan; Wong, Wing-Wai; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Zhang, Fujie; Pujari, Sanjay; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Oka, Shinichi; Mustafa, Mahiran; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Van Nguyen, Kinh; Ditangco, Rossana; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Merati, Tuti Parwati; Durier, Nicolas; Choi, Jun Yong

    2016-08-01

    Elevated CD8 counts with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) initiation may be an early warning indicator for future treatment failure. Thus, we investigated whether elevated CD8 counts were associated with virological failure (VF) in the first 4 years of cART in Asian HIV-infected patients in a multicenter regional cohort.We included patients from the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD). Patients were included in the analysis if they started cART between 1996 and 2013 with at least one CD8 measurement within 6 months prior to cART initiation and at least one CD8 and viral load (VL) measurement beyond 6 months after starting cART. We defined VF as VL ≥400 copies/mL after 6 months on cART. Elevated CD8 was defined as CD8 ≥1200 cells/μL. Time to VF was modeled using Cox regression analysis, stratified by site.In total, 2475 patients from 19 sites were included in this analysis, of whom 665 (27%) experienced VF in the first 4 years of cART. The overall rate of VF was 12.95 per 100 person-years. In the multivariate model, the most recent elevated CD8 was significantly associated with a greater hazard of VF (HR = 1.35, 95% CI 1.14-1.61; P = 0.001). However, the sensitivity analysis showed that time-lagged CD8 measured at least 6 months prior to our virological endpoint was not statistically significant (P = 0.420).This study indicates that the relationship between the most recent CD8 count and VF was possibly due to the CD8 cells reacting to the increase in VL rather than causing the VL increase itself. However, CD8 levels may be a useful indicator for VF in HIV-infected patients after starting cART.

  12. Evolution of HIV Resistance Mutations in Patients Maintained on a Stable Treatment Regimen After Virologic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Ferguson, Monique R.; Han, Xueliang; McMillan, Greg; St. Clair, Marty; Pappa, Keith A.; McClernon, Daniel R.; O’Brien, William A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective We compared the rate of emergence of thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs) and major protease inhibitor mutations in adherent patients who remained on stable treatment with a thymidine analogue and/or protease inhibitor after the onset of virologic failure. Design Follow-up genotypic resistance testing was done using archived plasma obtained from patients having 0 or 1 TAM and/or 0 or 1 major protease inhibitor resistance mutation at the onset of virologic failure. Results The median duration of observed failure was 691 days. There were 41 thymidine analogue regimens and 34 protease inhibitor regimens; concomitant ritonavir was used 4 times. New major protease inhibitor mutations emerged more rapidly than did new TAMs (P = 0.0019); new TAMs emerged more rapidly in thymidine analogue regimens that did not include lamivudine (P = 0.0073). The emergence of TAMs and major protease inhibitor mutations did not differ if lamivudine was not part of the thymidine analogue regimen. The evolution of CD4+ cell counts and plasma viral loads (pVLs) during virologic failure was similar regardless of whether or not a new TAM or major protease inhibitor mutations emerged or, for thymidine analogue–containing regimens, whether lamivudine was or was not used. Conclusions Major protease inhibitor mutations arose more frequently and rapidly than did TAMs in patients with sustained virologic failure who received lamivudine. PMID:17075391

  13. Brief Report: Food Insufficiency Is Associated With Lack of Sustained Viral Suppression Among HIV-Infected Pregnant and Breastfeeding Ugandan Women

    PubMed Central

    Natureeba, Paul; Nyafwono, Dorcas; Plenty, Albert; Mwesigwa, Julia; Nzarubara, Bridget; Clark, Tamara D.; Ruel, Theodore D.; Achan, Jane; Charlebois, Edwin D.; Cohan, Deborah; Kamya, Moses R.; Havlir, Diane V.; Young, Sera L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Food insecurity is associated with poor virologic outcomes, but this has not been studied during pregnancy and breastfeeding. We assessed sustained viral suppression from 8 weeks on antiretroviral therapy to 48 weeks postpartum among 171 pregnant and breastfeeding Ugandan women; 74.9% experienced food insufficiency. In multivariable analysis, food insufficiency [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.38, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.16 to 0.91], higher pretreatment HIV-1 RNA (aOR 0.55 per 10-fold increase, 95% CI: 0.37 to 0.82), and lopinavir/ritonavir versus efavirenz (aOR 0.49, 95% CI: 0.24 to 0.96) were associated with lower odds of sustained viral suppression. Interventions to address food security may improve virologic outcomes among HIV-infected women. PMID:26397935

  14. Pretreatment HIV Drug Resistance and HIV-1 Subtype C Are Independently Associated With Virologic Failure: Results From the Multinational PEARLS (ACTG A5175) Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Rami; Smeaton, Laura; Vardhanabhuti, Saran; Hudelson, Sarah E.; Wallis, Carol L.; Tripathy, Srikanth; Morgado, Mariza G.; Saravanan, Shanmugham; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Reitsma, Marissa; Hart, Stephen; Mellors, John W.; Halvas, Elias; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Kumwenda, Johnstone; La Rosa, Alberto; Lalloo, Umesh G.; Lama, Javier R.; Rassool, Mohammed; Santos, Breno R.; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai; Hakim, James; Flanigan, Timothy; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Campbell, Thomas B.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Evaluation of pretreatment HIV genotyping is needed globally to guide treatment programs. We examined the association of pretreatment (baseline) drug resistance and subtype with virologic failure in a multinational, randomized clinical trial that evaluated 3 antiretroviral treatment (ART) regimens and included resource-limited setting sites. Methods. Pol genotyping was performed in a nested case-cohort study including 270 randomly sampled participants (subcohort), and 218 additional participants failing ART (case group). Failure was defined as confirmed viral load (VL) >1000 copies/mL. Cox proportional hazards models estimated resistance–failure association. Results. In the representative subcohort (261/270 participants with genotypes; 44% women; median age, 35 years; median CD4 cell count, 151 cells/µL; median VL, 5.0 log10 copies/mL; 58% non-B subtypes), baseline resistance occurred in 4.2%, evenly distributed among treatment arms and subtypes. In the subcohort and case groups combined (466/488 participants with genotypes), used to examine the association between resistance and treatment failure, baseline resistance occurred in 7.1% (9.4% with failure, 4.3% without). Baseline resistance was significantly associated with shorter time to virologic failure (hazard ratio [HR], 2.03; P = .035), and after adjusting for sex, treatment arm, sex–treatment arm interaction, pretreatment CD4 cell count, baseline VL, and subtype, was still independently associated (HR, 2.1; P = .05). Compared with subtype B, subtype C infection was associated with higher failure risk (HR, 1.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04–2.35), whereas non-B/C subtype infection was associated with longer time to failure (HR, 0.47; 95% CI, .22–.98). Conclusions. In this global clinical trial, pretreatment resistance and HIV-1 subtype were independently associated with virologic failure. Pretreatment genotyping should be considered whenever feasible. Clinical Trials

  15. Neutralization resistance of virological synapse-mediated HIV-1 Infection is regulated by the gp41 cytoplasmic tail.

    PubMed

    Durham, Natasha D; Yewdall, Alice W; Chen, Ping; Lee, Rebecca; Zony, Chati; Robinson, James E; Chen, Benjamin K

    2012-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection can spread efficiently from infected to uninfected T cells through adhesive contacts called virological synapses (VSs). In this process, cell-surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) initiates adhesion and viral transfer into an uninfected recipient cell. Previous studies have found some HIV-1-neutralizing patient sera to be less effective at blocking VS-mediated infection than infection with cell-free virus. Here we employ sensitive flow cytometry-based infection assays to measure the inhibitory potency of HIV-1-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAb) and HIV-1-neutralizing patient sera against cell-free and VS-mediated infection. To various degrees, anti-Env MAbs exhibited significantly higher 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)s) against VS-mediated infection than cell-free infection. Notably, the MAb 17b, which binds a CD4-induced (CD4i) epitope on gp120, displayed a 72-fold reduced efficacy against VS-mediated inocula compared to cell-free inocula. A mutant with truncation mutation in the gp41 cytoplasmic tail (CT) which is unable to modulate Env fusogenicity in response to virus particle maturation but which can still engage in cell-to-cell infection was tested for the ability to resist neutralizing antibodies. The ΔCT mutation increased cell surface staining by neutralizing antibodies, significantly enhanced neutralization of VS-mediated infection, and had reduced or no effect on cell-free infection, depending upon the antibody. Our results suggest that the gp41 CT regulates the exposure of key neutralizing epitopes during cell-to-cell infection and plays an important role in immune evasion. Vaccine strategies should consider immunogens that reflect Env conformations exposed on the infected cell surface to enhance protection against VS-mediated HIV-1 spread. PMID:22553332

  16. A Prognostic Model for Estimating the Time to Virologic Failure in HIV-1 Infected Patients Undergoing a New Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Regimen

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV-1 genotypic susceptibility scores (GSSs) were proven to be significant prognostic factors of fixed time-point virologic outcomes after combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) switch/initiation. However, their relative-hazard for the time to virologic failure has not been thoroughly investigated, and an expert system that is able to predict how long a new cART regimen will remain effective has never been designed. Methods We analyzed patients of the Italian ARCA cohort starting a new cART from 1999 onwards either after virologic failure or as treatment-naïve. The time to virologic failure was the endpoint, from the 90th day after treatment start, defined as the first HIV-1 RNA > 400 copies/ml, censoring at last available HIV-1 RNA before treatment discontinuation. We assessed the relative hazard/importance of GSSs according to distinct interpretation systems (Rega, ANRS and HIVdb) and other covariates by means of Cox regression and random survival forests (RSF). Prediction models were validated via the bootstrap and c-index measure. Results The dataset included 2337 regimens from 2182 patients, of which 733 were previously treatment-naïve. We observed 1067 virologic failures over 2820 persons-years. Multivariable analysis revealed that low GSSs of cART were independently associated with the hazard of a virologic failure, along with several other covariates. Evaluation of predictive performance yielded a modest ability of the Cox regression to predict the virologic endpoint (c-index≈0.70), while RSF showed a better performance (c-index≈0.73, p < 0.0001 vs. Cox regression). Variable importance according to RSF was concordant with the Cox hazards. Conclusions GSSs of cART and several other covariates were investigated using linear and non-linear survival analysis. RSF models are a promising approach for the development of a reliable system that predicts time to virologic failure better than Cox regression. Such models might represent a

  17. Short communication: prospective comparison of qualitative versus quantitative polymerase chain reaction for monitoring virologic treatment failure in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Su Jin; Kim, Min Hyung; Song, Je Eun; Ahn, Jin Young; Kim, Sun Bean; Ann, Hea Won; Kim, Jae Kyung; Choi, Heun; Ku, Nam Su; Han, Sang Hoon; Kim, June Myung; Smith, Davey M; Kim, Hyon-Suk; Choi, Jun Yong

    2014-08-01

    Less costly but still accurate methods for monitoring HIV treatment response are needed. We prospectively evaluated if a qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification assay for virologic monitoring could maintain accuracy while reducing costs in Seoul, South Korea. We conducted the first prospective study comparing a qualitative PCR amplification of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) versus a commercial real time PCR assay (i.e., viral load) for virologic monitoring of 150 patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) between November 2011 and August 2012 at an urban hospital in Seoul, South Korea. A total of 215 blood plasma samples from 150 patients receiving ART for more than 6 months were evaluated. Using the individual viral load assay, 12 of 215 (5.6%) plasma samples had more than 500 HIV RNA copies/ml. The qualitative PCR amplification assay detected individual samples with ≥500 HIV RNA copies/ml with 100% sensitivity. The specificities of the qualitative PCR amplification of the HIV-1 RT assay were 94.1%, 93.6%, and 93.2% compared to the real time PCR at 500, 1,000, and 5,000 threshold of HIV RNA copies/ml, respectively, and $24,940 USD would have been saved for 150 patients during 10 months. The qualitative PCR amplification of the HIV-1 RT assay might be a useful approach to effectively monitor patients receiving ART and save resources.

  18. The association of clinical follow-up intervals in HIV-infected persons with viral suppression on subsequent viral suppression.

    PubMed

    Buscher, April; Mugavero, Michael; Westfall, Andrew O; Keruly, Jeanne; Moore, Richard; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn; Sullivan, Meg; Wilson, Tracey E; Rodriguez, Allan; Metsch, Lisa; Gardner, Lytt; Marks, Gary; Malitz, Faye; Giordano, Thomas P

    2013-08-01

    The recommendation for the frequency for routine clinical monitoring of persons with well-controlled HIV infection is based on evidence that relies on observed rather than intended follow-up intervals. We sought to determine if the scheduled follow-up interval is associated with subsequent virologic failure. Participants in this 6-clinic retrospective cohort study had an index clinic visit in 2008 and HIV viral load (VL) ≤400 c/mL. Univariate and multivariate tests evaluated if scheduling the next follow-up appointment at 3, 4, or 6 months predicted VL >400 c/mL at 12 months (VF). Among 2171 participants, 66%, 26%, and 8% were scheduled next follow-up visits at 3, 4, and 6 months, respectively. With missing 12-month VL considered VF, 25%, 25%, and 24% of persons scheduled at 3, 4, and 6 months had VF, respectively (p=0.95). Excluding persons with missing 12-month VL, 7.1%, 5.7%, and 4.5% had VF, respectively (p=0.35). Multivariable models yielded nonsignificant odds of VF by scheduled follow-up interval both when missing 12-month VL were considered VF and when persons with missing 12-month VL were excluded. We conclude that clinicians are able to make safe decisions extending follow-up intervals in persons with viral suppression, at least in the short-term.

  19. Immunocytochemical and virological characteristics of HIV-associated inflammatory myopathies: similarities with seronegative polymyositis.

    PubMed

    Illa, I; Nath, A; Dalakas, M

    1991-05-01

    We performed an immunoperoxidase study on muscle biopsy specimens from 19 patients with polymyositis who were seropositive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (21 specimens) and 5 HIV-seronegative patients with polymyositis and compared the findings. A quantitative analysis of T cells and T-cell subsets, B cells, natural killer cells, interleukin-2 receptor-positive cells, and macrophages was performed on serial sections from all the specimens. Localization of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I and -II antigens, alpha and gamma interferon, and HIV antigens (p24, gp120, and gp41) was performed using specific antisera. In specimens from HIV-positive and seronegative patients, the predominant cell population was CD8+ cells and macrophages invading or surrounding healthy muscle fibers that expressed MHC-I antigen on their surface. The endomysial infiltrates in specimens from HIV-positive patients differed from those seen in specimens from the seronegative patients only by a significant reduction of the CD4+ cells (12.6 +/- 3.2% versus 21.1 +/- 4.2%). HIV antigens were seen in occasional interstitial mononuclear cells (but not in muscle fibers) in 6 of the 21 specimens from HIV-positive patients. Interferon was not localized. We conclude that the development of HIV-associated polymyositis does not appear to be related to direct infection of the muscle fibers by HIV but rather is due to a T-cell-mediated and MHC-I-restricted cytotoxic process, perhaps triggered by HIV. Because this immunopathological mechanism is common in both HIV-associated polymyositis and polymyositis alone, it is suggested that viruses may also be responsible in triggering polymyositis.

  20. Elevated CD8 T-cell counts and virological failure in HIV-infected patients after combination antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Nam Su; Jiamsakul, Awachana; Ng, Oon Tek; Yunihastuti, Evy; Cuong, Do Duy; Lee, Man Po; Sim, Benedict Lim Heng; Phanuphak, Praphan; Wong, Wing-Wai; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Zhang, Fujie; Pujari, Sanjay; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Oka, Shinichi; Mustafa, Mahiran; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Van Nguyen, Kinh; Ditangco, Rossana; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Merati, Tuti Parwati; Durier, Nicolas; Choi, Jun Yong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Elevated CD8 counts with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) initiation may be an early warning indicator for future treatment failure. Thus, we investigated whether elevated CD8 counts were associated with virological failure (VF) in the first 4 years of cART in Asian HIV-infected patients in a multicenter regional cohort. We included patients from the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD). Patients were included in the analysis if they started cART between 1996 and 2013 with at least one CD8 measurement within 6 months prior to cART initiation and at least one CD8 and viral load (VL) measurement beyond 6 months after starting cART. We defined VF as VL ≥400 copies/mL after 6 months on cART. Elevated CD8 was defined as CD8 ≥1200 cells/μL. Time to VF was modeled using Cox regression analysis, stratified by site. In total, 2475 patients from 19 sites were included in this analysis, of whom 665 (27%) experienced VF in the first 4 years of cART. The overall rate of VF was 12.95 per 100 person-years. In the multivariate model, the most recent elevated CD8 was significantly associated with a greater hazard of VF (HR = 1.35, 95% CI 1.14–1.61; P = 0.001). However, the sensitivity analysis showed that time-lagged CD8 measured at least 6 months prior to our virological endpoint was not statistically significant (P = 0.420). This study indicates that the relationship between the most recent CD8 count and VF was possibly due to the CD8 cells reacting to the increase in VL rather than causing the VL increase itself. However, CD8 levels may be a useful indicator for VF in HIV-infected patients after starting cART. PMID:27512885

  1. Elevated CD8 T-cell counts and virological failure in HIV-infected patients after combination antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Ku, Nam Su; Jiamsakul, Awachana; Ng, Oon Tek; Yunihastuti, Evy; Cuong, Do Duy; Lee, Man Po; Sim, Benedict Lim Heng; Phanuphak, Praphan; Wong, Wing-Wai; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Zhang, Fujie; Pujari, Sanjay; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Oka, Shinichi; Mustafa, Mahiran; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Van Nguyen, Kinh; Ditangco, Rossana; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Merati, Tuti Parwati; Durier, Nicolas; Choi, Jun Yong

    2016-08-01

    Elevated CD8 counts with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) initiation may be an early warning indicator for future treatment failure. Thus, we investigated whether elevated CD8 counts were associated with virological failure (VF) in the first 4 years of cART in Asian HIV-infected patients in a multicenter regional cohort.We included patients from the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD). Patients were included in the analysis if they started cART between 1996 and 2013 with at least one CD8 measurement within 6 months prior to cART initiation and at least one CD8 and viral load (VL) measurement beyond 6 months after starting cART. We defined VF as VL ≥400 copies/mL after 6 months on cART. Elevated CD8 was defined as CD8 ≥1200 cells/μL. Time to VF was modeled using Cox regression analysis, stratified by site.In total, 2475 patients from 19 sites were included in this analysis, of whom 665 (27%) experienced VF in the first 4 years of cART. The overall rate of VF was 12.95 per 100 person-years. In the multivariate model, the most recent elevated CD8 was significantly associated with a greater hazard of VF (HR = 1.35, 95% CI 1.14-1.61; P = 0.001). However, the sensitivity analysis showed that time-lagged CD8 measured at least 6 months prior to our virological endpoint was not statistically significant (P = 0.420).This study indicates that the relationship between the most recent CD8 count and VF was possibly due to the CD8 cells reacting to the increase in VL rather than causing the VL increase itself. However, CD8 levels may be a useful indicator for VF in HIV-infected patients after starting cART. PMID:27512885

  2. Suppression of HIV-1 Infectivity by Human Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Tanaka, Atsushi; Islam, Salequl; Ahsan, Gias Uddin; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infection to the central nervous system (CNS) is very common in AIDS patients. The predominant cell types infected in the brain are monocytes and macrophages, which are surrounded by several HIV-1-resistant cell types, such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and microvascular cells. The effect of these HIV-1-resistant cells on HIV-1 infection is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the stability of HIV-1 cultured with several human glioblastoma cell lines, for example, NP-2, U87MG, T98G, and A172, to determine whether these HIV-1-resistant brain cells could enhance or suppress HIV-1 infection and thus modulate HIV-1 infection in the CNS. The HIV-1 titer was determined using the MAGIC-5A indicator cell line as well as naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells. We found that the stability of HIV-1 incubated with NP-2 or U87MG cells at 37°C was significantly shorter (half-life, 2.5-4 h) compared to that of HIV-1 incubated with T98G or A172 cells or in culture medium without cells (half-life, 8-18 h). The spent culture media (SCM) of NP-2 and U87MG cells had the ability to suppress both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection by inhibiting HIV-1 attachment to target cells. This inhibitory effect was eliminated by the treatment of the SCM with chondroitinase ABC but not heparinase, suggesting that the inhibitory factor(s) secreted by NP-2 and U87MG cells was chiefly mediated by chondroitin sulfate (CS) or CS-like moiety. Thus, this study reveals that some but not all glioma cells secrete inhibitory molecules to HIV-1 infection that may contribute in lowering HIV-1 infection in the CNS in vivo. PMID:26650729

  3. Suppression of HIV-1 Infectivity by Human Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Tanaka, Atsushi; Islam, Salequl; Ahsan, Gias Uddin; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infection to the central nervous system (CNS) is very common in AIDS patients. The predominant cell types infected in the brain are monocytes and macrophages, which are surrounded by several HIV-1-resistant cell types, such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and microvascular cells. The effect of these HIV-1-resistant cells on HIV-1 infection is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the stability of HIV-1 cultured with several human glioblastoma cell lines, for example, NP-2, U87MG, T98G, and A172, to determine whether these HIV-1-resistant brain cells could enhance or suppress HIV-1 infection and thus modulate HIV-1 infection in the CNS. The HIV-1 titer was determined using the MAGIC-5A indicator cell line as well as naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells. We found that the stability of HIV-1 incubated with NP-2 or U87MG cells at 37°C was significantly shorter (half-life, 2.5-4 h) compared to that of HIV-1 incubated with T98G or A172 cells or in culture medium without cells (half-life, 8-18 h). The spent culture media (SCM) of NP-2 and U87MG cells had the ability to suppress both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection by inhibiting HIV-1 attachment to target cells. This inhibitory effect was eliminated by the treatment of the SCM with chondroitinase ABC but not heparinase, suggesting that the inhibitory factor(s) secreted by NP-2 and U87MG cells was chiefly mediated by chondroitin sulfate (CS) or CS-like moiety. Thus, this study reveals that some but not all glioma cells secrete inhibitory molecules to HIV-1 infection that may contribute in lowering HIV-1 infection in the CNS in vivo.

  4. Characterizing HIV medication adherence for virologic success among individuals living with HIV/AIDS: Experience with the CNS HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) cohort

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, B.; Spitznagel, E.; Collier, A.C.; Gelman, B.B.; McArthur, J.C.; Morgello, S.; McCutchan, J. A.; Clifford, D.B.

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has changed HIV related illness from terminal to chronic by suppressing viral load which results in immunologic and clinical improvement. Success with ART is dependent on optimal adherence, commonly categorized as >95%. As medication type, class and frequency of use continue to evolve, we assessed adherence levels related to viral suppression. Using a cross-sectional analysis with secondary data (n = 381) from an ongoing multi-site study on impact of ART on the Central Nervous System (CNS), we compared self-reported adherence rates with biological outcomes of HIV-RNA copies/ml, and CD4 cell/mm3. Adherence to ART measures included taking all prescribed medication as directed on schedule and following dietary restrictions. While depression was a barrier to adherence, undetectable viral suppression was achieved at pill adherence percentages lower than 95%. Practice, research and policy implications are discussed in the context of patient-, provider-, and system-level factors influencing adherence to ART. PMID:24678283

  5. Biochemical and virological analysis of the 18-residue C-terminal tail of HIV-1 integrase

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Mohd J; Monel, Blandine; Krishnan, Lavanya; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Di Nunzio, Francesca; Helland, Dag E; Engelman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Background The 18 residue tail abutting the SH3 fold that comprises the heart of the C-terminal domain is the only part of HIV-1 integrase yet to be visualized by structural biology. To ascertain the role of the tail region in integrase function and HIV-1 replication, a set of deletion mutants that successively lacked three amino acids was constructed and analyzed in a variety of biochemical and virus infection assays. HIV-1/2 chimers, which harbored the analogous 23-mer HIV-2 tail in place of the HIV-1 sequence, were also studied. Because integrase mutations can affect steps in the replication cycle other than integration, defective mutant viruses were tested for integrase protein content and reverse transcription in addition to integration. The F185K core domain mutation, which increases integrase protein solubility, was furthermore analyzed in a subset of mutants. Results Purified proteins were assessed for in vitro levels of 3' processing and DNA strand transfer activities whereas HIV-1 infectivity was measured using luciferase reporter viruses. Deletions lacking up to 9 amino acids (1-285, 1-282, and 1-279) displayed near wild-type activities in vitro and during infection. Further deletion yielded two viruses, HIV-11-276 and HIV-11-273, that displayed approximately two and 5-fold infectivity defects, respectively, due to reduced integrase function. Deletion mutant HIV-11-270 and the HIV-1/2 chimera were non-infectious and displayed approximately 3 to 4-fold reverse transcription in addition to severe integration defects. Removal of four additional residues, which encompassed the C-terminal β strand of the SH3 fold, further compromised integrase incorporation into virions and reverse transcription. Conclusion HIV-11-270, HIV-11-266, and the HIV-1/2 chimera were typed as class II mutant viruses due to their pleiotropic replication defects. We speculate that residues 271-273 might play a role in mediating the known integrase-reverse transcriptase interaction, as

  6. Sustained virological response to peginterferon therapy in patients infected with HCV (genotypes 2 and 3), with or without HIV

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV infection leads to a faster progression of liver disease in subjects infected with HCV, as compared with HCV mono-infected patients. Previous reports suggest that sustained virological response (SVR) rates are lower in HIV/HCV coinfection than in HCV monoinfection. We aimed to compare SVR rates of these two populations. Methods We retrospectively analyzed clinical, biochemical and virological data of HCV and HIV/HCV infected patients with HCV genotypes 2 and 3 who started anti-HCV treatment between March 2004 and November 2012, at a single large center. Intention-to-treat (ITT) and per-protocol (PP) analysis were performed. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess predictors of SVR. Results 461 patients were analyzed: 307 (66.6%) males, 76 (16.5%) infected with HIV. Several differences at baseline between HCV monoinfected and HIV/HCV coinfected patients were observed. HCV monoinfected group was characterized by higher prevalence of genotype 2 (53% vs 5.3%), higher baseline HCV viral load (50% vs 35%), shorter mean duration of treatment (19 vs 41 weeks), more frequent use of peginterferon alfa-2a (84.5% vs 69.7%), lower prevalence of cirrhosis (6% vs 31.6%). Globally, SVR was achieved by 353 (76.6%) patients and 321 (83.8%) in the PP analysis. No statistically relevant differences were found in SVR rates between the two groups, either in ITT [78.2% (n = 301/385) vs 68.4% (n = 52/76), p =0.066, respectively] than in PP analysis [83.6% (n = 276/330) vs 84.9% (n = 45/53), p = 0.8]. ITT analysis At univariate and multivariate analysis, baseline HCV-RNA >500.000 IU/ml [OR 0.4 (0.24-0.66), p = 0.0004], use of peginterferon alfa-2b [OR 0.5 (0.27-0.93) p = 0.033], platelets count <130.000/mm3 [OR 0.45 (0.2-0.99), p = 0.045], interruption of peginterferon therapy [OR 0.2 (0.1-0.4), p<0.0001], interruption of ribavirin treatment [OR 0.34 (0.17-0.69), p = 0.0026] were related with lower rate of SVR. PP analysis Only HCV

  7. CD4+ and viral load outcomes of antiretroviral therapy switch strategies after virologic failure of combination antiretroviral therapy in perinatally HIV-infected youth in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Fairlie, Lee; Karalius, Brad; Patel, Kunjal; van Dyke, Russell B.; Hazra, Rohan; Hernán, Miguel A.; Siberry, George K.; Seage, George R.; Agwu, Allison; Wiznia, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study compared 12-month CD4+ and viral load outcomes in HIV-infected children and adolescents with virological failure, managed with four treatment switch strategies. Design: This observational study included perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) children in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS) and Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials (PACTG) Protocol 219C. Methods: Treatment strategies among children with virologic failure were compared: continue failing combination antiretroviral therapy (cART); switch to new cART; switch to drug-sparing regimen; and discontinue all ART. Mean changes in CD4+% and viral load from baseline (time of virologic failure) to 12 months follow-up in each group were evaluated using weighted linear regression models. Results: Virologic failure occurred in 939 out of 2373 (40%) children. At 12 months, children switching to new cART (16%) had a nonsignificant increase in CD4+% from baseline, 0.59 percentage points [95% confidence interval (95% CI) −1.01 to 2.19], not different than those who continued failing cART (71%) (−0.64 percentage points, P = 0.15) or switched to a drug-sparing regimen (5%) (1.40 percentage points, P = 0.64). Children discontinuing all ART (7%) experienced significant CD4+% decline −3.18 percentage points (95% CI −5.25 to −1.11) compared with those initiating new cART (P = 0.04). All treatment strategies except discontinuing ART yielded significant mean decreases in log10VL by 12 months, the new cART group having the largest drop (−1.15 log10VL). Conclusion: In PHIV children with virologic failure, switching to new cART was associated with the best virological response, while stopping all ART resulted in the worst immunologic and virologic outcomes and should be avoided. Drug-sparing regimens and continuing failing regimens may be considered with careful monitoring. PMID:26182197

  8. (1→3)-β-D-Glucan Levels Correlate With Neurocognitive Functioning in HIV-Infected Persons on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hoenigl, Martin; de Oliveira, Michelli Faria; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Zhang, Yonglong; Morris, Sheldon; McCutchan, Allen J; Finkelman, Malcolm; Marcotte, Thomas D; Ellis, Ronald J; Gianella, Sara

    2016-03-01

    Microbial translocation from the gut is associated with immune dysfunction, persistent inflammation, and likely plays a role in the pathogenesis of neurocognitive dysfunction during HIV infection. (1→3)-β-D-Glucan (BDG) is a component of most fungal cell walls and might be a useful indicator of gut mucosal barrier impairment. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether higher blood BDG levels correlate with impaired neurocognitive functioning in a cohort of HIV-infected adults with suppressed levels of HIV RNA in blood plasma. In this cross-sectional cohort study, we measured levels of BDG in blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) supernatant samples in a cohort of adults with acute/early HIV infection, who initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART) during the earliest phase of infection and achieved suppressed levels of HIV RNA in blood plasma (<50 copies/mL) thereafter. We compared BDG with established biomarkers of microbial translocation, immune activation, and cognitive dysfunction (evaluated by global deficit score). We found that higher blood BDG levels were significantly related to higher global deficit scores, reflecting worse neurocognitive performance (Spearman r = 0.47; P = 0.042) among HIV-infected adults with suppressed viral loads who initiated ART early in infection. Two CSF samples presented elevated BDG levels. Interestingly, these 2 samples originated from the 2 subjects with the highest global deficit scores of the cohort. BDG may be a promising independent biomarker associated with neurocognitive functioning in virologically suppressed HIV-infected individuals.

  9. Lack of association between plasma levels of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors & virological outcomes during rifampicin co-administration in HIV-infected TB patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Geetha; Kumar, A.K. Hemanth; Ponnuraja, C.; Ramesh, K.; Rajesh, Lakshmi; Chandrasekharan, C.; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Among patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis (TB), reduced plasma non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) concentrations during rifampicin (RMP) co-administration could lead to HIV treatment failure. This study was undertaken to examine the association between plasma nevirapine (NVP) and efavirenz (EFV) concentrations and virological outcomes in patients infected with HIV-1 and TB. Methods: This was a nested study undertaken in a clinical trial of patients with HIV-1 and TB, randomized to two different once-daily antiretroviral treatment (ART) regimens along with anti-TB treatment (ATT). Trough concentrations of plasma NVP and EFV were estimated at months 1 (during ATT and ART) and 6 months (ART only) by HPLC. Plasma HIV-1 RNA level >400 copies/ml or death within 6 months of ART were considered as unfavourable outcomes. Genotyping of CYP2B6 516G>T polymorphism was performed. Results: Twenty nine per cent of patients in NVP arm had an unfavourable outcome at 6 months compared to 9 per cent in EFV arm (P<0.08). The mean NVP and EFV levels estimated at 1 and 6 months did not significantly differ between favourable and unfavourable responders. Logistic regression analysis showed CYP2B6 516G>T polymorphism significantly associated with virologic outcome in patients receiving EFV–based regimen. Interpretation & conclusions: Trough plasma concentrations of NVP and EFV did not show any association with response to ART in patients on ATT and once-daily ART. CYP2B6 516G>T polymorphism was associated with virologic outcome among patients on EFV. PMID:24521642

  10. Antiretroviral adherence and virological outcomes in HIV-positive patients in Ugu district, KwaZulu-Natal province.

    PubMed

    Kapiamba, Germain; Masango, Thembekile; Mphuthi, Ditaba

    2016-09-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy is crucial to ensure viral suppression. In the scientific community it is widely accepted that an adherence level of at least 90% is necessary to achieve viral suppression. This study uses pharmacy refill records to describe antiretroviral adherence in HIV-positive patients in Ugu District, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa and to describe pharmacy refill records as reliable monitoring method of antiretroviral therapy. In total, 61 patients' records were reviewed. Overall, 50 (82%) of the patients achieved an optimum adherence level of at least 90%, whereas 19 (38%) of these patients did not show any related viral suppression. A statistically significant relationship between adherence and viral suppression was not demonstrated. Therefore, pharmacy refill records cannot be recommended as an alternative method of monitoring response to antiretroviral therapy, but laboratory tests including CD4 cell count and or viral load must be combined with the pharmacy refill method for monitoring of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-positive patients. PMID:27681144

  11. Early Viral Suppression Improves Neurocognitive Outcomes in HIV-infected Children

    PubMed Central

    CROWELL, Claudia S.; HUO, Yanling; TASSIOPOULOS, Katherine; MALEE, Kathleen M.; YOGEV, Ram; HAZRA, Rohan; RUTSTEIN, Richard M.; NICHOLS, Sharon L.; SMITH, Renee A.; WILLIAMS, Paige L.; OLESKE, James; MULLER, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the association of age of viral suppression and central nervous system penetration effectiveness (CPE) score with neurocognitive functioning among school-age children with perinatally-acquired HIV infection (PHIV+). Design We analyzed data from two U.S.-based multisite prospective cohort studies. Methods Multivariable general linear regression models were used to evaluate associations of age at viral suppression and CPE scores [of initial ART regimen and weighted average] with WISC-III or WISC-IV neurocognitive assessments [full scale IQ (FSIQ); performance IQ/ perceptual reasoning index (PIQ/PRI); and verbal IQ/ verbal comprehension index (VIQ/VCI)], adjusted for demographic and clinical covariates. Sensitivity analyses were stratified by birth cohort (before vs after 1996). Results 396 PHIV+ children were included. Estimated differences in mean FSIQ (comparing virally suppressed vs. unsuppressed children) by each age cutoff were 3.7, 2.2, 3.2, 4.4, and 3.9 points at ages 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. For PIQ/PRI, estimated mean differences were 3.7, 2.4, 2.2, 4.6, and 4.5 at ages 1 through 5 respectively. In both cases, these differences were significant only at the age 4 and 5 thresholds. After stratifying by birth cohort the association between age at suppression and cognitive function persisted only among those born after 1996. Age at viral suppression was not associated with VIQ/VCI; CPE score was not associated with FSIQ, verbal comprehension or perceptual reasoning indices. Conclusions Virologic suppression during infancy or early childhood is associated with improved neurocognitive outcomes in school-aged PHIV+ children. In contrast, CPE scores showed no association with neurocognitive outcomes. PMID:25686678

  12. Influence of Hepatitis C Virus Sustained Virological Response on Immunosuppressive Tryptophan Catabolism in ART-Treated HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Mehraj, Vikram; Costiniuk, Cecilia T.; Vyboh, Kishanda; Kema, Ido; Rollet, Kathleen; Paulino Ramirez, Robert; Klein, Marina B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: We previously reported an association between tryptophan (Trp) catabolism and immune dysfunction in HIV monoinfection. Coinfection with HIV is associated with more rapid evolution of hepatitis C virus (HCV)–associated liver disease despite antiretroviral therapy (ART), possibly due to immune dysregulation. We hypothesized that liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV coinfection would be associated with immune dysfunction and alterations in Trp metabolism. Methods: Trp catabolism and inflammatory soluble markers were assessed in plasma samples from ART-treated HIV/HCV-coinfected patients (n = 90) compared with ART-treated HIV-monoinfected patients and noninfected subjects. Furthermore, 17 additional coinfected patients with sustained virological response (SVR) were assessed longitudinally 6 months after completion of interferon-α/ribavirin treatment. Results: HIV/HCV patients had higher Trp catabolism compared with HIV-monoinfected and healthy individuals. Elevated kynurenine levels in HIV/HCV patients with liver fibrosis correlated with the prognostic aspartate aminotransaminase to platelet ratio (APRI scores) and insulin levels. Furthermore, HIV/HCV patients had elevated levels of disease progression markers interleukin-6 and induced protein 10 and shared similar levels of markers of microbial translocation (intestinal fatty acid-binding protein, soluble CD14 and lipopolysaccharide-binding protein) compared with HIV-monoinfected and healthy individuals. Successful HCV treatment improved APRI score and markers of disease progression and microbial translocation although elevated Trp catabolism remained unchanged 6 months after SVR. Conclusion: ART-treated HIV/HCV-coinfected patients had elevated immunosuppressive Trp catabolism when compared with monoinfected HIV-treated patients, which did not normalize after SVR. These findings suggest that a necroinflammatory liver syndrome persists through inflammation by Trp catabolism after 6 month of SVR. PMID:26436613

  13. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Insufficiency and Deficiency is Associated With HIV Disease Progression and Virological Failure Post-Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation in Diverse Multinational Settings

    PubMed Central

    Havers, Fiona; Smeaton, Laura; Gupte, Nikhil; Detrick, Barbara; Bollinger, Robert C.; Hakim, James; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Andrade, Adriana; Christian, Parul; Lama, Javier R.; Campbell, Thomas B.; Gupta, Amita

    2014-01-01

    Background. Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) has been associated with increased HIV mortality, but prospective studies assessing treatment outcomes after combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) initiation in resource-limited settings are lacking. Methods. A case-cohort study (N = 411) was nested within a randomized cART trial of 1571 cART-naive adults in 8 resource-limited settings and the United States. The primary outcome (WHO stage 3/4 disease or death within 96 weeks of cART initiation) was met by 192 cases, and 152 and 29 cases met secondary outcomes of virologic and immunologic failure. We studied prevalence and risk factors for baseline low 25(OH)D (<32 ng/mL) and examined associated outcomes using proportional hazard models. Results. Low 25(OH)D prevalence was 49% and ranged from 27% in Brazil to 78% in Thailand. Low 25(OH)D was associated with high body mass index (BMI), winter/spring season, country-race group, and lower viral load. Baseline low 25(OH)D was associated with increased risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) progression and death (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 2.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09–4.18) and virologic failure (aHR 2.42; 95% CI, 1.33–4.41). Conclusions. Low 25(OH)D is common in diverse HIV-infected populations and is an independent risk factor for clinical and virologic failure. Studies examining the potential benefit of vitamin D supplementation among HIV patients initiating cART are warranted. PMID:24799602

  14. A lymphomagenic role for HIV beyond immune suppression?

    PubMed

    Dolcetti, Riccardo; Gloghini, Annunziata; Caruso, Arnaldo; Carbone, Antonino

    2016-03-17

    Despite the immune reconstitution promoted by combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), lymphomas still represent the most common type of cancer in HIV-infected individuals. Cofactors related to immunodeficiency such as oncogenic viruses, chronic antigenic stimulation, and cytokine overproduction are thought to be the main drivers of HIV lymphomagenesis, although the current scenario does not convincingly explain the still-high incidence of lymphomas and the occurrence of peculiar lymphoma histotypes in HIV-infected patients under cART. Recent findings are challenging the current view of a mainly indirect role of HIV in lymphoma development and support the possibility that HIV may directly contribute to lymphomagenesis. In fact, mechanisms other than immune suppression involve biologic effects mediated by HIV products that are secreted and accumulate in lymphoid tissues, mainly within lymph node germinal centers. Notably, HIV-infected patients with lymphomas, but not those not affected by these tumors, were recently shown to carry HIV p17 protein variants with enhanced B-cell clonogenic activity. HIV p17 protein variants were characterized by the presence of distinct insertions at the C-terminal region of the protein responsible for a structural destabilization and the acquisition of novel biologic properties. These data are changing the current paradigm assuming that HIV is only indirectly related to lymphomagenesis. Furthermore, these recent findings are consistent with a role of HIV as a critical microenvironmental factor promoting lymphoma development and pave the way for further studies that may lead to the design of more effective strategies for an early identification and improved control of lymphomas in the HIV setting.

  15. The Effect of Malnutrition on the Pharmacokinetics and Virologic Outcomes of Lopinavir, Efavirenz and Nevirapine in Food Insecure HIV-Infected Children in Tororo, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Bartelink, Imke H.; Savic, Rada M.; Dorsey, Grant; Ruel, Theodore; Gingrich, David; Scherpbier, Henriette J.; Capparelli, Edmund; Jullien, Vincent; Young, Sera L.; Achan, Jane; Plenty, Albert; Charlebois, Edwin; Kamya, Moses; Havlir, Diane; Aweeka, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Background Malnutrition may impact the pharmacokinetics (PK) of antiretroviral medications and virologic responses in HIV-infected children. We therefore evaluated the PK of nevirapine (NVP), efavirenz (EFV) and lopinavir (LPV) in associations with nutritional status in a cohort of HIV-infected Ugandan children. Methods Sparse dried blood spot (DBS) samples from Ugandan children were used to estimate plasma concentrations. Historical PK data from children from three resource-rich countries (RRC) were utilized to develop the PK models. Results Concentrations in 330 DBS from 163 Ugandan children aged 0.7–7 years were analyzed in reference to plasma PK data (1189 samples) from 204 children from RRC aged 0.5–12 years. Among Ugandan children 48% was malnourished (underweight, thin or stunted). Compared to RRC, Ugandan children exhibited reduced bioavailability of EFV and LPV; 11% (P=0.045) and 18% (P=0.008) respectively. In contrast, NVP bioavailability was 46% higher in Ugandan children (P<0.001) with a trend towards greater bioavailability when malnourished. Children receiving LPV, EFV or NVP had comparable risk of virologic failure. Among children on NVP, low height and weight for age Z-scores were associated with reduced risk of virologic failure (p=0.034, p=0.068 respectively). Conclusions Ugandan children demonstrated lower EFV and LPV and higher NVP exposure compared to children in RRC, perhaps reflecting the consequence of malnutrition on bioavailability. In children receiving NVP, the relation between exposure, malnutrition and outcome turned out to be marginally significant. Further investigations are warranted using more intensive PK measurements and adequate adherence assessements, to further assess causes of virologic failure in Ugandan children. PMID:25742090

  16. High rates of virological failure and drug resistance in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving lifelong antiretroviral therapy in routine clinics in Togo

    PubMed Central

    Salou, Mounerou; Dagnra, Anoumou Y; Butel, Christelle; Vidal, Nicole; Serrano, Laetitia; Takassi, Elom; Konou, Abla A; Houndenou, Spero; Dapam, Nina; Singo-Tokofaï, Assetina; Pitche, Palokinam; Atakouma, Yao; Prince-David, Mireille; Delaporte, Eric; Peeters, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral treatment (ART) has been scaled up over the last decade but compared to adults, children living with HIV are less likely to receive ART. Moreover, children and adolescents are more vulnerable than adults to virological failure (VF) and emergence of drug resistance. In this study we determined virological outcome in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving ART in Togo. Methods HIV viral load (VL) testing was consecutively proposed to all children and adolescents who were on ART for at least 12 months when attending HIV healthcare services for their routine follow-up visit (June to September 2014). Plasma HIV-1 VL was measured using the m2000 RealTime HIV-1 assay (Abbott Molecular, Des Plaines, IL, USA). Genotypic drug resistance was done for all samples with VL>1000 copies/ml. Results and discussion Among 283 perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents included, 167 (59%) were adolescents and 116 (41%) were children. The median duration on ART was 48 months (interquartile range: 28 to 68 months). For 228 (80.6%), the current ART combination consisted of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) (zidovudine and lamivudine) and one non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) (nevirapine or efavirenz). Only 28 (9.9%) were on a protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimen. VL was below the detection limit (i.e. 40 copies/ml) for 102 (36%), between 40 and 1000 copies/ml for 35 (12.4%) and above 1000 copies/ml for 146 (51.6%). Genotypic drug-resistance testing was successful for 125/146 (85.6%); 110/125 (88.0%) were resistant to both NRTIs and NNRTIs, 1/125 (0.8%) to NRTIs only, 4/125 (3.2%) to NNRTIs only and three harboured viruses resistant to reverse transcriptase and PIs. Overall, 86% (108/125) of children and adolescents experiencing VF and successfully genotyped, corresponding thus to at least 38% of the study population, had either no effective ART or had only a single effective drug in

  17. GADD45 proteins inhibit HIV-1 replication through specific suppression of HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhibin; Liu, Ruikang; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Suzhen; Hu, Xiaomei; Tan, Juan; Liang, Chen; Qiao, Wentao

    2016-06-01

    GADD45 proteins are a group of stress-induced proteins and participate in various cellular pathways including cell cycle regulation, cell survival and death, DNA repair and demethylation. It was recently shown that HIV-1 infection induces the expression of GADD45 proteins. However, the effect of GADD45 on HIV-1 replication has not been studied. Here, we report that overexpression of GADD45 proteins reduces HIV-1 production through suppressing transcription from the HIV-1 LTR promoter. This inhibitory effect is specific to HIV-1, since GADD45 proteins neither inhibit the LTR promoters from other retroviruses nor reduce the production of these viruses. Knockdown of endogenous GADD45 modestly activates HIV-1 in the J-Lat A72 latency cell line, which suggests GADD45 proteins might play a role in maintaining HIV-1 latency.

  18. Performance of HIV-1 Drug Resistance Testing at Low-Level Viremia and Its Ability to Predict Future Virologic Outcomes and Viral Evolution in Treatment-Naive Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Serna, A.; Min, J. E.; Woods, C.; Chan, D.; Lima, V. D.; Montaner, J. S. G.; Harrigan, P. R.; Swenson, L. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Low-level viremia (LLV; human immunodeficiency virus [HIV-1] RNA 50–999 copies/mL) occurs frequently in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), but there are few or no data available demonstrating that HIV-1 drug resistance testing at a plasma viral load (pVL) <1000 copies/mL provides potentially clinically useful information. Here, we assess the ability to perform resistance testing by genotyping at LLV and whether it is predictive of future virologic outcomes in patients beginning ART. Methods. Resistance testing by genotyping at LLV was attempted on 4915 plasma samples from 2492 patients. A subset of previously ART-naive patients was analyzed who achieved undetectable pVL and subsequently rebounded with LLV (n = 212). A genotypic sensitivity score (GSS) was calculated based on therapy and resistance testing results by genotyping, and stratified according to number of active drugs. Results. Eighty-eight percent of LLV resistance assays produced useable sequences, with higher success at higher pVL. Overall, 16 of 212 (8%) patients had pretherapy resistance. Thirty-eight of 196 (19%) patients without pretherapy resistance evolved resistance to 1 or more drug classes, primarily the nucleoside reverse transcriptase (14%) and/or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (9%) inhibitors. Patients with resistance at LLV (GSS <3) had a 2.1-fold higher risk of virologic failure (95% confidence interval, 1.2- to 3.7-fold) than those without resistance (P = .007). Progressively lower GSS scores at LLV were associated with a higher increase in pVL over time (P < .001). Acquisition of additional resistance mutations to a new class of antiretroviral drugs during LLV was not found in a subset of patients. Conclusions. Routine HIV-1 genotyping of LLV samples can be performed with a reasonably high success rate, and the results appear predictive of future virologic outcomes. PMID:24429436

  19. Association of inflammatory cytokines and endothelial adhesion molecules with immunological, virological, and cardiometabolic disease in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Heloísa Ramos; Falcão, Maria da Conceição Correia; de Albuquerque, Valéria Maria Gonçalves; Zírpoli, Josefina Claudia; Miranda-Filho, Demócrito de Barros; de Albuquerque, Maria de Fátima Pessoa Militão; Montarroyos, Ulisses; Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar

    2014-05-01

    Elevated levels of inflammatory and endothelial biomarkers are related to chronic diseases, cancers, and cardiovascular disease. This study aimed at evaluating the association of inflammatory cytokines and endothelial adhesion molecules with immunological, virological, and cardiometabolic disease in HIV-infected individuals. A cross-sectional study was initiated to evaluate the association of CD4 lymphocyte count, viral load, antiretroviral therapy, and metabolic and cardiovascular disease with inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)], adhesion molecules [soluble intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (sICAM) and soluble Vascular Adhesion Molecule 1 (sVCAM)], and highsensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels in 125 HIV-infected patients. The associations between independent variables and biomarkers were analyzed by means of multivariate logistic regression. A viral load ≥100,000 copies/mL had a stronger association with high levels of sVCAM-1 (P=0.026; OR=2.54; CI=1.12-5.78) and TNF-α (P=0.048; OR=2.42; CI=1.01-5.85) than the current viral load using a multivariate analysis. Antiretroviral treatment was associated with lower levels of sVCAM-1 (P=0.20; OR=0.20; CI=0.05-0.78), TNF-α (P=0.060; OR=0.22; CI=0.05-1.07), and hs-CRP (P=0.093; OR=0.44; CI=0.17-1.15). CD4 counts <200 cells/mm(3) were associated with high IL-6 levels (P=0.013; OR=3.17; CI=1.27-7.91); however, antiretroviral treatment was not associated with IL-6 levels. Metabolic syndrome was associated with high hs-CRP levels, systolic hypertension was associated with IL-6 levels, and family history of coronary disease was associated with TNF-α levels. High biomarker levels were associated not only with viral and immunological characteristics but also with cardiometabolic factors. The maximum viral load attained was an important risk factor for high levels of TNF-α and sVCAM-1. Treatment protected patients from high biomarker levels, except IL-6.

  20. Rapid suppression of HIV-RNA is associated with improved control of immune activation in Mozambican adults initiating antiretroviral therapy with low CD4 counts.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Jose M; Letang, Emilio; Nhampossa, Tacilta; Ayala, Edgar; David, Catarina; Menendez, Clara; Gascon, Joaquim; Alonso, Pedro; Naniche, Denise

    2011-07-01

    The rapidity of HIV-RNA suppression after initiation of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) may impact immune reconstitution in developing countries, where patients initiate cART at low CD4 T cell counts. One hundred and thirty-five HIV-1 Mozambican adults initiating cART were prospectively followed over 16 months within a larger observational study. Plasma HIV-RNA, CD4 counts, and CD8 T cell activation were monitored at the pre-cART visit and at 4, 10, and 16 months during cART. Of the 89 patients with available HIV-RNA data at pre-cART and 4 and 10 months post-cART, 68% (60/89) suppressed HIV-RNA at 4 months and were defined as "early virological controllers"(EC). Twenty of the 29 remaining patients who did not control HIV-RNA at 4 months did so at 10 months and were classified as "late virological controllers"(LC). Nine (10%) patients did not control HIV-RNA at either time point. Both initiating an EFV-containing cART regimen and having pre-cART tuberculosis were significantly associated with early HIV-RNA suppression if locked into a multivariate model [EFV OR: 13.6 (95% CI 1.7; 108.1) p = 0.014) tuberculosis OR: 11.0 (95% CI 1.4; 87.9) p = 0.024]. EC demonstrated significantly lower median activated CD8 T cells at 4, 10, and 16 months post-cART than did LC. Approximately 63% (12/19) of LC experienced reappearance of detectable HIV-RNA at 6 months postcontrol as compared to 15% (2/60) of EC (p = 0.001). This study suggests that rapid suppression of HIV-RNA may lead to a lower rate of reappearance of HIV-RNA, which could impact CD8 T cell activation levels in patients initiating cART at low CD4 counts.

  1. Rapid HIV Viral Load Suppression in those Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy at First Visit after HIV Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hoenigl, Martin; Chaillon, Antoine; Moore, David J; Morris, Sheldon R; Mehta, Sanjay R; Gianella, Sara; Amico, K Rivet; Little, Susan J

    2016-01-01

    Expert guidelines for antiretroviral therapy (ART) now recommend ART as soon as possible in all HIV infected persons to reduce the risk of disease progression and prevent transmission. The goal of this observational study was to evaluate the impact of very early ART initiation and regimen type on time to viral suppression. We evaluated time to viral suppression among 86 persons with newly-diagnosed HIV infection who initiated ART within 30 days of diagnosis. A total of 36 (42%) had acute, 27 (31%) early, and 23 (27%) had established HIV infection. The median time from an offer of immediate ART to starting ART was 8 days. A total of 56/86 (65%) initiated an integrase inhibitor-based regimen and 30/86 (35%) a protease inhibitor-based regimen. The time to viral suppression was significantly shorter in those receiving an integrase inhibitor- versus a protease inhibitor-based regimen (p = 0.022). Twenty-two (26%) initiated ART at their HIV care intake visit and 79% of these participants achieved viral suppression at week 12, 82% at week 24 and 88% at week 48. ART initiated at the intake visit led to rapid and reliable viral suppression in acute, early and chronic HIV infection, in particular when integrase inhibitor-based regimens were used. PMID:27597312

  2. Rapid HIV Viral Load Suppression in those Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy at First Visit after HIV Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hoenigl, Martin; Chaillon, Antoine; Moore, David J.; Morris, Sheldon R.; Mehta, Sanjay R.; Gianella, Sara; Amico, K. Rivet; Little, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Expert guidelines for antiretroviral therapy (ART) now recommend ART as soon as possible in all HIV infected persons to reduce the risk of disease progression and prevent transmission. The goal of this observational study was to evaluate the impact of very early ART initiation and regimen type on time to viral suppression. We evaluated time to viral suppression among 86 persons with newly-diagnosed HIV infection who initiated ART within 30 days of diagnosis. A total of 36 (42%) had acute, 27 (31%) early, and 23 (27%) had established HIV infection. The median time from an offer of immediate ART to starting ART was 8 days. A total of 56/86 (65%) initiated an integrase inhibitor-based regimen and 30/86 (35%) a protease inhibitor-based regimen. The time to viral suppression was significantly shorter in those receiving an integrase inhibitor- versus a protease inhibitor-based regimen (p = 0.022). Twenty-two (26%) initiated ART at their HIV care intake visit and 79% of these participants achieved viral suppression at week 12, 82% at week 24 and 88% at week 48. ART initiated at the intake visit led to rapid and reliable viral suppression in acute, early and chronic HIV infection, in particular when integrase inhibitor-based regimens were used. PMID:27597312

  3. Risk factors, CD4 long-term evolution and mortality of HIV-infected patients who persistently maintain low CD4 counts, despite virological response to HAART.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Yolanda M; Jarrín, Inmaculada; Del Amo, Julia; Moreno, Santiago; Iribarren, José A; Viciana, Pompeyo; Parra, Jorge; Gomez-Sirvent, Juan L; Gutierrez, Félix; Blanco, José R; Vidal, Francesc; Leal, Manuel

    2009-11-01

    A proportion of HIV-patients does not normally restore their CD4 counts despite virological response to HAART. Those whose CD4 counts persistently remain closed to the critical threshold for opportunistic infections deserve special interest. To study the risk factors, the long-term CD4 counts evolution, and the risk of death of patients who persistently maintain low CD4 counts, despite virological response to HAART, within a multicenter, hospital-based cohort study. A total of 147 patients were selected from CoRIS-MD and classified into a "Low-Group" or a "High-Group", depending on their CD4 counts after two-years of effective HAART (threshold 250 cells/microL). Associated risk factors were analysed by logistic regression, the CD4 dynamics were evaluated over a total period of 7.70 years (IQR, 6.70-9.00), and mortality was estimated by Cox proportional hazard. A total of 40 patients (27%) were classified into the "Low-Group". The odds ratio for this group increased with age, being 4.56 (2.23-9.33) for over 40, and was also higher among IDU, 3.63 (1.04-12.68). Six years thereafter, among these patients, only a 30% exceeded 350 CD4 cells/microL and a 12% exceeded 500 CD4 cells/microL. Furthermore, the "Low-Group" had a death rate of 2.42 per 100 persons/year (95%CI, 1.01-5.81), although once adjusted by age the estimates were no longer significant [4.14 (0.87-19.72)]. Our results suggest that those HIV patients who have not overcome the critical threshold of 250 CD4 cells/microL after a two years period of virologically effective HAART do persist with the aforementioned failure of CD4 restoration for a much longer time.

  4. Trends on epidemiological, virological, and clinical features among newly diagnosed HIV-1 persons in Northwest Spain over the last 10 years.

    PubMed

    Pernas, B; Mena, A; Cañizares, A; Grandal, M; Castro-Iglesias, A; Pértega, S; Pedreira, J D; Poveda, E

    2015-08-01

    To describe temporal trend and characteristics of newly HIV-diagnosed patients in a medical care area in Northwest Spain over the last 10 years. All newly diagnosed patients for HIV-infection from 2004 to 2013 at a reference medical care area in Northwest of Spain were identified. Epidemiological, virological, immunological, and clinical data, as well as HIV genotype and drug resistance information were recorded. A total of 565 newly HIV-diagnosed patients were identified. The number of new cases increased in the last 5 years (66 cases/year). Overall, 53.1% had a median CD4 counts < 350 cells/µl and 33.6% had an AIDS defining criteria. Non-B variants were found in 34.4% of patients being subtype F (25.8%) the most common non-B subtype. The rate of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) over the study period was 3.7%, but a decreased to 2.6% was observed in the last 5 years. The most prevalent TDR mutations were: T215 revertants (1.5%), K219QENR (1.2%), for NRTIs; K103N (1.9%), for NNRTIs; L90M (0.3%), for PIs. Overall, 73.2% of patients started antiretroviral treatment and 9.9% of patients died during follow-up. The number of newly HIV diagnosed patients increased since year 2009. There is a high prevalence of late diagnosis (53%) and 33% had an AIDS defining criteria. Interestingly, the most prevalent non-B subtype in our population was F (25.8%). These findings support the need to facilitate the access for HIV testing to reduce the rate of late HIV diagnosis, improve the clinical outcome and prevent HIV transmission.

  5. Increased antiretroviral therapy prescription and HIV viral suppression among persons receiving clinical care for HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Heather; Mattson, Christine L.; Beer, Linda; Huang, Ping; Shouse, R. Luke

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess trends during 2009–2013 in antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription and viral suppression among adults receiving HIV clinical care in the United States. Design We used data from the Medical Monitoring Project, a surveillance system producing national estimates of characteristics of HIV-infected adults receiving clinical care in the United States. Methods We estimated weighted proportions of persons receiving HIV medical care who were prescribed ART and achieved HIV viral suppression (<200 copies/ml) at both last test and at all tests in the previous 12 months during 2009–2013. We assessed trends overall and by gender, age, race/ethnicity, and sexual behavior/orientation. Results ART prescription and viral suppression increased significantly during 2009–2013, overall and in subgroups. ART prescription increased from 89 to 94% (P for trend <0.01). Viral suppression at last measurement increased from 72 to 80% (P for trend <0.01). The largest increases were among 18–29 year olds (56–68%), 30–39 year olds (62–75%), and non-Hispanic blacks (64–76%). Sustained viral suppression increased from 58 to 68% (P for trend <0.01). The largest increases were among 18–29 year olds (32–51%), 30–39 year olds (47–63%), and non-Hispanic blacks (49–61%). Conclusion Adults receiving HIV medical care are increasingly likely to be prescribed ART and achieve viral suppression. Recent efforts to promote early antiretroviral therapy use may have contributed to these increases, bringing us closer to realizing key goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy. PMID:27465279

  6. The efficacy and safety of maraviroc addition to a stable antiretroviral regimen in subjects with suppressed plasma HIV-RNA is not influenced by age.

    PubMed

    Blanco, José-Ramón; Arroyo-Manzano, David; Rojas-Liévano, John F; Crespo, Manuel; Bravo, Isa; Pasquau, Juan; Garcia Del Toro, Miguel; Herrero, Cristina; Rivero, Antonio; Moreno, Santiago; Llibre, Josep Maria

    2015-09-01

    There are few data about the immunovirological efficacy, safety/tolerability, and durability of maraviroc (MVC) addition to aging patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (cART) and undetectable viral load (<50 copies/ml). The aging population is underrepresented in most HIV clinical trials. This study included 80 patients aged ≥50 years and 161 aged <50 years and showed that after 48 weeks of treatment, there was no between-group differences in the median increase of CD4(+) T cells or the virological suppression rate. Safety and tolerability were also comparable. In multivariable analysis, the effect of age was not modified and was independent of the response to MVC. An immunological recovery of ≥100 CD4(+) T cells was significantly less common in those with a longer HIV history (≥15 years) (OR 0.43; p=0.016) or having <200/mm(3) CD4(+) T cells at MVC initiation (OR 0.27; p=0.004). Meanwhile, achieving a CD4/CD8 ratio ≥0.5 at week 48 was less likely in those with CD4(+) T cell counts <200 at MVC initiation (OR 0.09; p<0.0001) or with a previous AIDS event (OR 0.43; p=0.028). In summary, the immunovirological efficacy, safety/tolerability, and durability of MVC addition in patients virologically suppressed were independent of the patient's age at treatment onset.

  7. Pharmacology and immuno-virologic efficacy of once-a-day HAART in African HIV-infected children: ANRS 12103 phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Nacro, Boubacar; Zoure, Emmanuelle; Hien, Hervé; Tamboura, Hassane; Rouet, François; Ouiminga, Adama; Drabo, Ali; Yameogo, Souleymane; Hien, Alain; Peyriere, Hélène; Mathieu, Olivier; Hirt, Deborah; Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Nicolas, Joëlle; Foulongne, Vincent; Segondy, Michel; van de Perre, Philippe; Diagbouga, Serge

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess 12-month survival, pharmacokinetics, immunologic and virologic efficacy, tolerance, compliance and drug resistance in HIV-infected children in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso, receiving once-daily highly-active antiretroviral therapy as a combination of didanosine (DDI), lamivudine (3TC) and efavirenz (EFV). Methods In the ANRS 12103 open phase II trial, HIV-infected children were examined at inclusion and monthly thereafter. CD4+ T-lymphocyte (CD4) count, plasma concentration of ribonucleic acid (RNA) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and haematologic and biochemical parameters were measured at baseline and every trimester. HIV-1 resistance testing was performed in case of viral escape. Drug plasma concentrations were determined with high-performance liquid chromatography. Findings From February 2006 to November 2007, 51 children (39% girls) with a mean age of 6.8 years were enrolled and treated for 12 months. At baseline, Z scores for mean weight-for-age and mean height-for-age were −2.01 and −2.12, respectively. Mean CD4% was 9.0. Median plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load was 5.51 log10 copies per millilitre (cp/ml). Two children (3.9%) died and another 11 (22%) suffered 13 severe clinical events. At month 12, mean WAZ had improved by 0.63 (P < 0.001) and mean HAZ by 0.57 (P < 0.001). Mean CD4% had risen to 24 (P < 0.001). Viral load was below 300 RNA cp/ml in 81% of the children; HIV resistance mutations were detected in 11 (21.6%). Conclusion The once-a-day combination of DDI + 3TC + EFV is an alternative first-line treatment for HIV-1-infected children. Dose adjustment should further improve efficacy. PMID:21673861

  8. Undergraduate Virology Exercises Demonstrate Conventional and Real-Time PCR Using Commercially Available HIV Primers and Noninfectious Target

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulzinski, Michael A.; Wasilewski, Melissa A.; Farrell, James C.; Glick, David L.

    2009-01-01

    It is an extraordinary challenge to offer an undergraduate laboratory course in virology that teaches hands-on, relevant molecular biology techniques using nonpathogenic models of human virus detection. To our knowledge, there exists no inexpensive kits or reagent sets that are appropriate for demonstrating real-time PCR (RT-PCR) in an…

  9. Effect of directly observed antiretroviral therapy compared to self-administered antiretroviral therapy on adherence and virological outcomes among HIV-infected prisoners: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    White, Becky L; Golin, Carol E; Grodensky, Catherine A; Kiziah, C Nichole; Richardson, Amy; Hudgens, Michael G; Wohl, David A; Kaplan, Andrew H

    2015-01-01

    The effect of directly observed therapy (DOT) versus self-administered therapy (SAT) on antiretroviral (ART) adherence and virological outcomes in prison has never been assessed in a randomized, controlled trial. Prisoners were randomized to receive ART by DOT or SAT. The primary outcome was medication adherence [percent of ART doses measured by the medication event monitoring system (MEMS) and pill counts] at the end of 24 weeks. The changes in the plasma viral loads from baseline and proportion of participants virological suppressed (<400 copies/mL) at the end of 24 weeks were assessed. Sixty-six percent (90/136) of eligible prisoners declined participation. Participants in the DOT arm (n = 20) had higher viral loads than participants in the SAT (n = 23) arm (p = 0.23). Participants, with complete data at 24 weeks, were analyzed as randomized. There were no significant differences in median ART adherence between the DOT (n = 16, 99% MEMS [IQR 93.9, 100], 97.1 % pill count [IQR 95.1, 99.3]) and SAT (n = 21, 98.3 % MEMS [IQR 96.0, 100], 98.5 % pill count [95.8, 100]) arms (p = 0.82 MEMS, p = 0.40 Pill Count) at 24 weeks. Participants in the DOT arm had a greater reduction in viral load of approximately -1 log 10 copies/mL [IQR -1.75, -0.05] compared to -0.05 [IQR -0.45, 0.51] in the SAT arm (p value = 0.02) at 24 weeks. The proportion of participants achieving virological suppression in the DOT vs SAT arms was not statistically different at 24 weeks (53 % vs 32 %, p = 0.21). These findings suggest that DOT ART programs in prison settings may not offer any additional benefit on adherence than SAT programs. PMID:25055766

  10. Disparities in achieving and sustaining viral suppression among a large cohort of HIV-infected persons in care - Washington, DC.

    PubMed

    Castel, Amanda D; Kalmin, Mariah M; Hart, Rachel L D; Young, Heather A; Hays, Harlen; Benator, Debra; Kumar, Princy; Elion, Richard; Parenti, David; Ruiz, Maria Elena; Wood, Angela; D'Angelo, Lawrence; Rakhmanina, Natella; Rana, Sohail; Bryant, Maya; Hebou, Annick; Fernández, Ricardo; Abbott, Stephen; Peterson, James; Wood, Kathy; Subramanian, Thilakavathy; Binkley, Jeffrey; Happ, Lindsey Powers; Kharfen, Michael; Masur, Henry; Greenberg, Alan E

    2016-11-01

    One goal of the HIV care continuum is achieving viral suppression (VS), yet disparities in suppression exist among subpopulations of HIV-infected persons. We sought to identify disparities in both the ability to achieve and sustain VS among an urban cohort of HIV-infected persons in care. Data from HIV-infected persons enrolled at the 13 DC Cohort study clinical sites between January 2011 and June 2014 were analyzed. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were conducted to identify factors associated with achieving VS (viral load < 200 copies/ml) at least once, and Kaplan-Meier (KM) curves and Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify factors associated with sustaining VS and time to virologic failure (VL ≥ 200 copies/ml after achievement of VS). Among the 4311 participants, 95.4% were either virally suppressed at study enrollment or able to achieve VS during the follow-up period. In multivariate analyses, achieving VS was significantly associated with age (aOR: 1.04; 95%CI: 1.03-1.06 per five-year increase) and having a higher CD4 (aOR: 1.05, 95% CI 1.04-1.06 per 100 cells/mm(3)). Patients infected through perinatal transmission were less likely to achieve VS compared to MSM patients (aOR: 0.63, 95% CI 0.51-0.79). Once achieved, most participants (74.4%) sustained VS during follow-up. Blacks and perinatally infected persons were less likely to have sustained VS in KM survival analysis (log rank chi-square p ≤ .001 for both) compared to other races and risk groups. Earlier time to failure was observed among females, Blacks, publically insured, perinatally infected, those with longer standing HIV infection, and those with diagnoses of mental health issues or depression. Among this HIV-infected cohort, most people achieved and maintained VS; however, disparities exist with regard to patient age, race, HIV transmission risk, and co-morbid conditions. Identifying populations with disparate outcomes allows for appropriate targeting

  11. HIV Type 1 (HIV-1) Proviral Reservoirs Decay Continuously Under Sustained Virologic Control in HIV-1–Infected Children Who Received Early Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Luzuriaga, Katherine; Tabak, Barbara; Garber, Manuel; Chen, Ya Hui; Ziemniak, Carrie; McManus, Margaret M.; Murray, Danielle; Strain, Matthew C.; Richman, Douglas D.; Chun, Tae-Wook; Cunningham, Coleen K.; Persaud, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Background. Early initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)–infected infants controls HIV-1 replication and reduces mortality. Methods. Plasma viremia (lower limit of detection, <2 copies/mL), T-cell activation, HIV-1–specific immune responses, and the persistence of cells carrying replication-competent virus were quantified during long-term effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in 4 perinatally HIV-1–infected youth who received treatment early (the ET group) and 4 who received treatment late (the LT group). Decay in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proviral DNA levels was also measured over time in the ET youth. Results. Plasma viremia was not detected in any ET youth but was detected in all LT youth (median, 8 copies/mL; P = .03). PBMC proviral load was significantly lower in ET youth (median, 7 copies per million PBMCs) than in LT youth (median, 181 copies; P = .03). Replication-competent virus was recovered from all LT youth but only 1 ET youth. Decay in proviral DNA was noted in all 4 ET youth in association with limited T-cell activation and with absent to minimal HIV-1–specific immune responses. Conclusions. Initiation of early effective cART during infancy significantly limits circulating levels of proviral and replication-competent HIV-1 and promotes continuous decay of viral reservoirs. Continued cART with reduction in HIV-1 reservoirs over time may facilitate HIV-1 eradication strategies. PMID:24850788

  12. Reduction of HIV-1 in blood and lymph nodes following potent antiretroviral therapy and the virologic correlates of treatment failure

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Joseph K.; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Havlir, Diane V.; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Haase, Ashley T.; Ignacio, Caroline C.; Kwok, Shirley; Emini, Emilio; Richman, Douglas D.

    1997-01-01

    Potent antiretroviral therapy can reduce plasma HIV RNA levels below the threshold of detection for periods of a year or more. The magnitude of HIV RNA reduction in the lymphoid tissue in patients with suppression of HIV RNA levels in plasma beyond 6 months has not been determined. We evaluated levels of HIV RNA and DNA and characterized resistance mutations in blood and inguinal lymph node biopsies obtained from 10 HIV-infected subjects who received 36–52 weeks of indinavir (IDV)/zidovudine (ZDV)/lamivudine (3TC), IDV, or ZDV/3TC. After 1 year of therapy, viral RNA levels in LN of individuals remained detectable but were log10 = 4 lower than in subjects on the triple drug regimen with interruption of therapy or in those treated with ZDV/3TC alone, who had viral loads in their lymph nodes indistinguishable from those expected for untreated patients. In all cases viral DNA remained detectable in lymph nodes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). When plasma virus suppression was incomplete, lymph node and PBMC cultures were positive and drug resistance developed. These studies indicate that pronounced and sustained suppression of plasma viremia by a potent antiretroviral combination is associated with low HIV RNA levels in the lymph nodes 1 year after treatment. Conversely, the persistence of even modest levels of plasma virus after 1 year of treatment reflects ongoing viral replication, the emergence of drug resistance, and the maintenance of high burdens of virus in the lymph nodes. PMID:9356491

  13. Suppression of HIV Replication by Lymphoid Tissue CD8+ Cells Correlates with the Clinical State of HIV-Infected Individuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackbourn, David J.; Mackewicz, Carl E.; Barker, Edward; Hunt, Thomas K.; Herndier, Brian; Haase, Ashley T.; Levy, Jay A.

    1996-11-01

    Lymphoid tissues from asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals, as compared with symptomatic HIV-infected subjects, show limited histopathological changes and lower levels of HIV expression. In this report we correlate the control of HIV replication in lymph nodes to the non-cytolytic anti-HIV activity of lymphoid tissue CD8+ cells. Five subjects at different stages of HIV-related disease were studied and the ability of their CD8+ cells, isolated from both lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood, to inhibit HIV replication was compared. CD8+ cells from lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood of two HIV-infected long-term survivors suppressed HIV replication at a low CD8+:CD4+ cell ratio of 0.1. The CD8+ cells from the lymphoid tissue of a third asymptomatic subject suppressed HIV replication at a CD8+:CD4+ cell ratio of 0.25; the subject's peripheral blood CD8+ cells showed this antiviral response at a lower ratio of 0.05. The lymphoid tissue CD8+ cells from two AIDS patients were not able to suppress HIV replication, and the peripheral blood CD8+ cells of only one of them suppressed HIV replication. The plasma viremia, cellular HIV load as well as the extent of pathology and virus expression in the lymphoid tissue of the two long-term survivors, were reduced compared with these parameters in the three other subjects. The data suggest that the extent of anti-HIV activity by CD8+ cells from lymphoid tissue relative to peripheral blood correlates best with the clinical state measured by lymphoid tissue pathology and HIV burden in lymphoid tissues and blood. The results and further emphasis to the importance of this cellular immune response in controlling HIV pathogenesis.

  14. Exploring the limits of optical microscopy: live cell and superresolution fluorescence microscopy of HIV-1 Transfer Between T lymphocytes Across the Virological Synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNerney, Gregory Paul

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) is a human retrovirus that efficiently, albeit gradually, overruns the immune system. An already infected T lymphocyte can latch onto another T lymphocyte whereby creating a virological synapse (VS); this junction drives viral assembly and transfer to the target cell in batches in an efficient, protective manor. My Ph.D. doctoral thesis focused on studying this transmission mechanism using advanced optical imaging modalities and the fully infectious fluorescent clone HIV Gag-iGFP. T lymphocytes are non-adherent cells (˜10 um thick) and the viral transmission process is fairly dynamic, hence we employed a custom spinning disk confocal microscope that revealed many interesting characteristics of this cooperative event. This methodology has low throughput as cell contact and transfer is at random. Optical tweezers was then added to the microscope to directly initiate cell contact at will. To assess when viral maturation occurs post-transfer, an optical assay based off of Forster resonance energy transfer was developed to monitor maturation. Structured illumination microscopy was further used to image the process at higher resolution and it showed that viral particles are not entering existing degradative compartments. Non-HIV-1 applications of the optical technologies are also reviewed.

  15. Evaluation of atazanavir Ctrough, atazanavir genotypic inhibitory quotient, and baseline HIV genotype as predictors of a 24-week virological response in highly drug-experienced, HIV-infected patients treated with unboosted atazanavir.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, Nicola; Seminari, Elena; Guffanti, Monica; Boeri, Enzo; Villani, Paola; Regazzi, Mario; Bigoloni, Alba; Schira, Giulia; Tiberi, Simon; Fusetti, Giuliana; Lazzarin, Adriano; Castagna, Antonella

    2005-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate virological and pharmacological determinants of a 24-week virological response to unboosted atazanavir (ATV) in highly drug-experienced HIV-infected patients. Among patients enrolled in the ATV Expanded Access Program, those with HIV-RNA >1000 copies/mL, a genotype performed within three months from the baseline (BL), and who completed 24 weeks of treatment, were included. They received at least three antiretrovirals, including ATV 400 mg once daily without boosting. ATV plasma levels were evaluated after four weeks of treatment by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). ATV genotypic inhibitory quotient (GIQ) was calculated as the ratio between ATV Ctrough and the number of the BL ATV-related protease resistance mutations (among the following: 10I/V/F, 20R/M/I, 24I, 331/F/V, 36I/L/V, 46I/L, 48V, 54V/L, 63P, 71V/T/I, 73C/S/T/A, 82A/F/S/T, 84V, and 90M). Thirty-five subjects were included. At baseline, median (interquartile range) CD4+ T-lymphocytes, HIV-RNA, and ATV resistance mutations were 232.5 (106-303)/microL, 4.7 (4.2-5.1) log10 copies/mL, 2 (1-6), respectively. Thirteen (37.1%) subjects were off-therapy and 11 (31.4%) showed no PI mutation at baseline. Median steady-state ATV Ctrough was 230 ng/mL (87-520), for an ATV GIQ of 86.5 (25.5-165.5). Median HIV-RNA changes from baseline at weeks 4, 12 and 24 were -1.76 (from -0.44 to -2.12), -1.41 (from -0.41 to -2.81) and -1.44 (from -0.42 to -2.71) log10, respectively. The HIV-RNA changes were correlated to the number of ATV resistance mutations at each time point (P < 0.05), whereas no correlation was found between ATV Ctrough or ATV GIQ and HIV-RNA changes. In conclusion, the number of ATV resistance mutations is the only correlate to virological response through 24 weeks of treatment with unboosted atazanavir 400 mg once daily.

  16. Abacavir/Lamivudine plus Rilpivirine Is an Effective and Safe Strategy for HIV-1 Suppressed Patients: 48 Week Results of the SIMRIKI Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Troya, Jesús; Ryan, Pablo; Ribera, Esteban; Podzamczer, Daniel; Hontañón, Victor; Terrón, Jose Alberto; Boix, Vicente; Moreno, Santiago; Barrufet, Pilar; Castaño, Manuel; Carrero, Ana; Galindo, María José; Suárez-Lozano, Ignacio; Knobel, Hernando; Raffo, Miguel; Solís, Javier; Yllescas, María; Esteban, Herminia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Based on data from clinical practice, we evaluated the effectiveness and safety of switching to abacavir/lamivudine plus rilpivirine (ABC/3TC+RPV) treatment in virologically suppressed HIV-1-infected patients. Methods We performed a multicenter, non-controlled, retrospective study of HIV-1-infected patients who switched treatment to ABC/3TC+RPV. Patients had an HIV-RNA <50 copies/mL for at least 24 weeks prior to changing treatments. The primary objective was HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL at week 48. Effectiveness was analyzed by intention-to-treat (ITT), missing = failure and on-treatment (OT) analyses. The secondary objectives analyzed were adverse effects changes in renal, hepatic or lipid profiles, changes in CD4+ cell count and treatment discontinuations. Results Of the 205 patients included, 75.6% were men and the median age was 49. At baseline, before switching to ABC/3TC+RPV, median time since HIV diagnosis was 13.1 years, median time with undetectable HIV-1 RNA was 6.2 years and median time of previous antiretroviral regimen was 3.1 years (48.3% patients were taking efavirenz and ABC/3TC was the most frequent backbone coformulation in 69.7% of patients). The main reasons for switching were drug toxicity/poor tolerability (60.5%) and simplification (20%). At week 48, the primary objective was achieved by 187 out of 205 (91.2%) patients by ITT analysis, and 187 out of 192 (97.4%) patients by OT analysis. The CD4+ lymphocyte count and CD4+ percentage increased significantly from baseline to week 48 by a median of 48 cells/μL (−50 to 189) and 1.2% (−1.3% to 4.1%), respectively, P<0.001. Thirty-eight adverse events (AE) were detected in 32 patients. Of these, 25 had no clear association with treatment. Three patients interrupted therapy due to AE. We observed a decrease in all lipid parameters, P<0.001, and a slight improvement in the glomerular filtration rate, P<0.01. Therapy was considered to have failed in 18 patients owing to virological failure

  17. Randomized trial of DRV/r or LPV/r QD monotherapy vs maintaining a PI/r-based antiretroviral regimen in persons with suppressed HIV replication

    PubMed Central

    Pinnetti, Carmela; Lorenzini, Patrizia; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Sandrine, Ottou; Tommasi, Chiara; Zaccarelli, Mauro; Federico Perno, Carlo; Rosaria Capobianchi, Maria; Girardi, Enrico; Antinori, Andrea; Ammassari, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Introduction PI/r monotherapy has been suggested as an attainable maintenance strategy in patients achieving stable HIV suppression in plasma. The objective of trial was to compare the virological outcome of two different PI/r QD monotherapy strategies (LPV/r or DRV/r) with maintaining a triple PI/r-based ARV regimen. Material and Methods Phase III, open-label, non-inferiority (−12% margin), randomized trial of HIV adults with HIV-RNA <50 cp/mL for at least 48 weeks while on PI/r-based cART, CD4 nadir >100 cell/mm3, without previous PIs virological failure. Eligible patients were randomized to continue PI/r+2NRTIs (Arm A), to switch to LPV/r 800/200 mg QD monotherapy (Arm B), or to switch to DRV/r 800/100 mg QD monotherapy (Arm C). Primary endpoint was proportion of patients with plasma HIV-1 RNA <50 cp/mL (TLOVR) at 48w by intent to treat (ITT) analysis (missing/re-induction=failure). FDA snapshot and ITT switch-included analysis (ITT-SI) were also used. In ITT-SI, patients who had <50 copies/mL at 96w were counted as successes even if they had confirmed HIV-RNA elevations and had subsequently successfully intensified by NRTI. Results Due to slow recruitment, only 103 patients were included. No differences were observed between the three arms with respect to gender, age, HIV transmission, CD4 nadir and at screening. At randomization, 61 patients were receiving TDF/FTC (60%), 19 ZDV/3TC (18%), 8 ABV/3TC (8%), 75 LPV/r (73%), 13 ATV/r (13%), 4 DRV/r (4%). Differences in proportion of virological success by groups using Arm A as comparator according to FDA TLOVR were reported in Figure 1. Similar results were obtained by Snapshot analysis. Of 14 patients with virological failure, 8 patients restarted triple therapy with 2NRTI and 7/8 regained a VL <50 cp/mL over time. According to ITT-SI analysis, 96 week differences [95% CI] were −5.7 [−29.6; +18.2] in Arm B, and +19.6 [−1.6; +40.8] in Arm C. A GRT was performed in 6/14 patients (one not amplifiable; four

  18. Potential Impact of a Free Online HIV Treatment Response Prediction System for Reducing Virological Failures and Drug Costs after Antiretroviral Therapy Failure in a Resource-Limited Setting

    PubMed Central

    Revell, Andrew D.; Wang, Dechao; Pozniak, Anton; Montaner, Julio S.; Lane, H. Clifford; Larder, Brendan A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Antiretroviral drug selection in resource-limited settings is often dictated by strict protocols as part of a public health strategy. The objective of this retrospective study was to examine if the HIV-TRePS online treatment prediction tool could help reduce treatment failure and drug costs in such settings. Methods. The HIV-TRePS computational models were used to predict the probability of response to therapy for 206 cases of treatment change following failure in India. The models were used to identify alternative locally available 3-drug regimens, which were predicted to be effective. The costs of these regimens were compared to those actually used in the clinic. Results. The models predicted the responses to treatment of the cases with an accuracy of 0.64. The models identified alternative drug regimens that were predicted to result in improved virological response and lower costs than those used in the clinic in 85% of the cases. The average annual cost saving was $364 USD per year (41%). Conclusions. Computational models that do not require a genotype can predict and potentially avoid treatment failure and may reduce therapy costs. The use of such a system to guide therapeutic decision-making could confer health economic benefits in resource-limited settings. PMID:24175292

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF HIV-1 SUBTYPES C, CRF31_BC AND B ON DISEASE PROGRESSION AND INITIAL VIROLOGIC RESPONSE TO HAART IN A SOUTHERN BRAZILIAN COHORT

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Cynara Carvalho; Matte, Maria Cristina Cotta; Dias, Claudia Fontoura; Araújo, Leonardo Augusto Luvison; Guimarães, Luciano Santos Pinto; Almeida, Sabrina; Brígido, Luis Fernando Macedo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although most HIV-1 infections in Brazil are due to subtype B, Southern Brazil has a high prevalence of subtype C and recombinant forms, such as CRF31_BC. This study assessed the impact of viral diversity on clinical progression in a cohort of newly diagnosed HIV-positive patients. Methods: From July/2004 to December/2005, 135 HIV-infected patients were recruited. The partial pol region was subtyped by phylogeny. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) model was used to examine the relationship between viral subtype, CD4+ T cell count and viral load levels before antiretroviral therapy. Hazard ratio (Cox regression) was used to evaluate factors associated with viral suppression (viral load < 50 copies/mL at six months). Results: Main HIV-1 subtypes included B (29.4%), C (28.2%), and CRF31_BC (23.5%). Subtypes B and C showed a similar trend in CD4+ T cell decline. Comparison of non-B (C and CRF31_BC) and B subtypes revealed no significant difference in the proportion of patients with viral suppression at six months (week 24). Higher CD4+ T cell count and lower viral load were independently associated with viral suppression. Conclusion: No significant differences were found between subtypes; however, lower viral load and higher CD4+ T cell count before therapy were associated with better response. PMID:24878998

  20. Virologic and Immunologic Correlates With the Magnitude of Antibody Responses to the Hepatitis A Vaccine in HIV-Infected Children on Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Adriana; Huang, Sharon; Fenton, Terence; Patterson-Bartlett, Julie; Gona, Philimon; Read, Jennifer S.; Dankner, Wayne M.; Nachman, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Background HIV-infected individuals mount poor antibody responses to vaccines. We sought to identify the immunologic and virologic factors associated with a robust response to hepatitis Avirus (HAV) vaccine in children on highly active antiretroviral treatment. Methods One hundred fifty-two pediatric highly active antiretroviral treatment recipients immunized against HAV at weeks 0 and 24 had anti-HAV antibodies, CD4+, CD8+, and CD19+ cell percent assessed at weeks 0 and 32. Subgroups had HIV viremia, B- and T-cell subpopulations, and cell-mediated immunity (CMI) to HAV and other stimulants measured. Results Anti-HAV antibodies after complete vaccination correlated positively with CD4+ percent and CD19+ percent and negatively with viremia and CD8+ percent at baseline, but not at 32 weeks. There were no significant correlations between anti-HAV antibodies and B- or T-cell-naïve, memory, or activated subpopulations or non-HAV CMI. Compared with children who remained HAV-CMI-negative, those who mounted HAV-CMI in response to vaccination had higher anti-HAV antibody titers and CD19+ CD21+ CD27+ memory B cell percent at 32 weeks, but no other differences. Conclusions In HIV-infected children on highly active antiretroviral treatment, control of viral replication and conserved or reconstituted CD19+ and CD4+ cell numbers and function determine a robust antibody response to anti-HAV primary immunization. Our data support a bidirectional B- and T-cell cooperation in the response to the HAV vaccine. PMID:19617848

  1. Short Communication: CXCL12 rs1029153 Polymorphism Is Associated with the Sustained Virological Response in HIV/Hepatitis C Virus-Coinfected Patients on Hepatitis C Virus Therapy.

    PubMed

    Pineda-Tenor, Daniel; Jiménez-Sousa, María A; Rallón, Norma; Berenguer, Juan; Soriano, Vicente; Aldámiz-Echevarria, Teresa; García-Álvarez, Mónica; Diez, Cristina; Fernández-Rodríguez, Amanda; Benito, Jose Miguel; Resino, Salvador

    2016-03-01

    The immune response against HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection partly depends on chemokine-mediated recruitment of specific T cells. CXCL12 polymorphisms have been associated with AIDS progression and survival, but there are no data related to HCV infection. The aim of this study was to determine whether CXCL12 polymorphisms are related so as to achieve sustained virological response (SVR) after HCV therapy with pegylated-interferon-alpha/ribavirin (pegIFN-α/ribavirin) in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. We carried out a retrospective study in 319 naive patients who started HCV treatment. The CXCL12 (rs266093, rs1029153, and rs1801157) and IL28B (rs12980275) polymorphisms were genotyped by using the GoldenGate assay. Genetic data were analyzed under an additive inheritance model. The overall rates of the SVR were 54.9% (175/319) and 41.5% (90/217) in GT1/4 patients and 83.2% (84/101) in GT2/3 patients. Patients with a favorable CXCL12 rs1029153 T allele had higher SVR rates than patients with the rs1029153 CC genotype (44% CC, 49% CT, and 61.3% TT; p = 0.025). No significant results for the rs266093 and rs1801157 polymorphisms were found. Patients harboring the favorable rs1029153 T allele had significantly increased odds of achieving SVR [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.55; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.01; 2.40; p = 0.047]. Moreover, no significant association was found when the study population was stratified by HCV genotype (data not shown), possibly due to the low number of patients in each group. In conclusion, in this study we found that the favorable CXCL12 rs1029153 T allele seems to be related so as to achieve an SVR in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients on pegIFN-α/ribavirin therapy. PMID:26499461

  2. Higher Levels of Osteoprotegerin and Immune Activation/Immunosenescence Markers Are Correlated with Concomitant Bone and Endovascular Damage in HIV-Suppressed Patients

    PubMed Central

    D’Abramo, Alessandra; Zingaropoli, Maria Antonella; Oliva, Alessandra; D’Agostino, Claudia; Al Moghazi, Samir; De Luca, Giulia; Iannetta, Marco; d’Ettorre, Gabriella; Ciardi, Maria Rosa; Mastroianni, Claudio Maria; Vullo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    HIV-infected patients appear to have a significantly greater risk of non-AIDS comorbidities such as osteoporosis and atherosclerosis. Subjects with osteoporosis are at a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease than those with normal bone mass, therefore a possible relation between these two conditions can be hypothesized. In the setting of HIV infection, several factors might contribute to bone disease and endothelial dysfunction. The aim of our study was to evaluate the relationship between bone and cardiovascular disease and to investigate the role of traditional factors, T-cell phenotype and osteoprotegerin in HIV positive subjects on effective antiretroviral therapy. We included 94 HIV positive subjects on antiretroviral therapy with virological suppression and 41 healthy subjects matched for age and gender as a control group. Carotid-Intima Media Thickness (c-IMT) and bone mineral density (BMD) were performed by ultrasound and DEXA, respectively. CD4+/CD8+ T-cell activation, senescence and osteoprotegerin plasma levels were measured by flow-cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Among HIV positive patients, 56.4% had osteopenia/osteoporosis and 45.7% had pathological c-IMT (>0.9mm). Subjects with pathological c-IMT and BMD exhibited higher CD4+ and CD8+ activated, CD8+ senescent and osteoprotegerin than subjects with normal c-IMT and BMD. HIV positive subjects with osteopenia/osteoporosis had higher c-IMT than subjects with normal BMD, and linear regression analysis showed a negative correlation between BMD and c-IMT. Several factors are implicated in the pathogenesis of non-AIDS comorbidities in HIV positive patients. Osteoprotegerin together with inflammation and immunosenescence in HIV positive patients could affect bone and vascular system and could be considered as a possible common link between these two diseases. PMID:26913505

  3. Higher Levels of Osteoprotegerin and Immune Activation/Immunosenescence Markers Are Correlated with Concomitant Bone and Endovascular Damage in HIV-Suppressed Patients.

    PubMed

    D'Abramo, Alessandra; Zingaropoli, Maria Antonella; Oliva, Alessandra; D'Agostino, Claudia; Al Moghazi, Samir; De Luca, Giulia; Iannetta, Marco; d'Ettorre, Gabriella; Ciardi, Maria Rosa; Mastroianni, Claudio Maria; Vullo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    HIV-infected patients appear to have a significantly greater risk of non-AIDS comorbidities such as osteoporosis and atherosclerosis. Subjects with osteoporosis are at a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease than those with normal bone mass, therefore a possible relation between these two conditions can be hypothesized. In the setting of HIV infection, several factors might contribute to bone disease and endothelial dysfunction. The aim of our study was to evaluate the relationship between bone and cardiovascular disease and to investigate the role of traditional factors, T-cell phenotype and osteoprotegerin in HIV positive subjects on effective antiretroviral therapy. We included 94 HIV positive subjects on antiretroviral therapy with virological suppression and 41 healthy subjects matched for age and gender as a control group. Carotid-Intima Media Thickness (c-IMT) and bone mineral density (BMD) were performed by ultrasound and DEXA, respectively. CD4+/CD8+ T-cell activation, senescence and osteoprotegerin plasma levels were measured by flow-cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Among HIV positive patients, 56.4% had osteopenia/osteoporosis and 45.7% had pathological c-IMT (>0.9 mm). Subjects with pathological c-IMT and BMD exhibited higher CD4+ and CD8+ activated, CD8+ senescent and osteoprotegerin than subjects with normal c-IMT and BMD. HIV positive subjects with osteopenia/osteoporosis had higher c-IMT than subjects with normal BMD, and linear regression analysis showed a negative correlation between BMD and c-IMT. Several factors are implicated in the pathogenesis of non-AIDS comorbidities in HIV positive patients. Osteoprotegerin together with inflammation and immunosenescence in HIV positive patients could affect bone and vascular system and could be considered as a possible common link between these two diseases. PMID:26913505

  4. Sustained virological response after ten days of triple anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy with telaprevir plus pegylated interferon and ribavirin in an HIV/HCV co-infected cirrhotic woman.

    PubMed

    Hasson, Hamid; Messina, Emanuela; Merli, Marco; Della Torre, Liviana; Morsica, Giulia; Bagaglio, Sabrina; Lazzarin, Adriano; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina

    2014-12-01

    The introduction of first-generation protease inhibitors for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C in subjects infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 has significantly improved the sustained virological response (SVR) rate. As liver cirrhosis reduces the probability of achieving SVR, current guidelines discourage response-guided therapy in cirrhotic patients. We report the first case of a cirrhotic woman with chronic HCV and HIV co-infection achieving virological response after an ultra-short course of therapy. A 40-year-old HIV/HCV co-infected woman with compensated liver cirrhosis was treated with anti-HCV triple therapy containing telaprevir plus pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Baseline plasma HCV RNA was 3.6 log IU/ml and transaminases were within the normal range. She harboured IL28B rs12979860C/C alleles. Ten days after starting therapy, the patient stopped treatment because of mild anorexia and nausea. Virological response was detected at treatment discontinuation and was maintained up to 24 weeks. This case describes an unexpected SVR after a 10-day course of antiviral therapy in a cirrhotic HIV/HCV co-infected woman presenting positive predictive factors for a response (low viral load, IL28B genotype). Nonetheless, there is no evidence to suggest a shorter duration of treatment in this subset of patients.

  5. The HIV Care Continuum: Changes over Time in Retention in Care and Viral Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Yehia, Baligh R.; Stephens-Shields, Alisa J.; Fleishman, John A.; Berry, Stephen A.; Agwu, Allison L.; Metlay, Joshua P.; Moore, Richard D.; Christopher Mathews, W.; Nijhawan, Ank; Rutstein, Richard; Gaur, Aditya H.; Gebo, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The HIV care continuum (diagnosis, linkage to care, retention in care, receipt of antiretroviral therapy (ART), viral suppression) has been used to identify opportunities for improving the delivery of HIV care. Continuum steps are typically calculated in a conditional manner, with the number of persons completing the prior step serving as the base population for the next step. This approach may underestimate the prevalence of viral suppression by excluding patients who are suppressed but do not meet standard definitions of retention in care. Understanding how retention in care and viral suppression interact and change over time may improve our ability to intervene on these steps in the continuum. Methods We followed 17,140 patients at 11 U.S. HIV clinics between 2010-2012. For each calendar year, patients were classified into one of five categories: (1) retained/suppressed, (2) retained/not-suppressed, (3) not-retained/suppressed, (4) not-retained/not-suppressed, and (5) lost to follow-up (for calendar years 2011 and 2012 only). Retained individuals were those completing ≥2 HIV medical visits separated by ≥90 days in the year. Persons not retained completed ≥1 HIV medical visit during the year, but did not meet the retention definition. Persons lost to follow-up had no HIV medical visits in the year. HIV viral suppression was defined as HIV-1 RNA ≤200 copies/mL at the last measure in the year. Multinomial logistic regression was used to determine the probability of patients’ transitioning between retention/suppression categories from 2010 to 2011 and 2010 to 2012, adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, HIV risk factor, insurance status, CD4 count, and use of ART. Results Overall, 65.8% of patients were retained/suppressed, 17.4% retained/not-suppressed, 10.0% not-retained/suppressed, and 6.8% not-retained/not-suppressed in 2010. 59.5% of patients maintained the same status in 2011 (kappa=0.458) and 53.3% maintained the same status in 2012

  6. Immuno-Virological Discordance and the Risk of Non-AIDS and AIDS Events in a Large Observational Cohort of HIV-Patients in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Zoufaly, Alexander; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Reekie, Joanne; Kirk, Ole; Lundgren, Jens; Reiss, Peter; Jevtovic, Djordje; Machala, Ladislav; Zangerle, Robert; Mocroft, Amanda; Van Lunzen, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of immunosuppression despite virological suppression (immuno-virological discordance, ID) on the risk of developing fatal and non-fatal AIDS/non-AIDS events is unclear and remains to be elucidated. Methods Patients in EuroSIDA starting at least 1 new antiretroviral drug with CD4<350 cells/µl and viral load (VL)>500 copies/mL were followed-up from the first day of VL< = 50 copies/ml until a new fatal/non-fatal non-AIDS/AIDS event. Considered non-AIDS events included non-AIDS malignancies, pancreatitis, severe liver disease with hepatic encephalopathy (>grade 3), cardio- and cerebrovascular events, and end-stage renal disease. Patients were classified over time according to whether current CD4 count was above (non-ID) or below (ID) baseline level. Relative rates (RR) of events were calculated for ID vs. non-ID using adjusted Poisson regression models. Results 2,913 patients contributed 11,491 person-years for the analysis of non-AIDS. 241 pre-specified non-AIDS events (including 84 deaths) and 89 AIDS events (including 10 deaths) occurred. The RR of developing pre-specified non-AIDS events for ID vs. non-ID was 1.96 (95% CI 1.37–2.81, p<0.001) in unadjusted analysis and 1.43 (0.94–2.17, p = 0.095) after controlling for current CD4 count. ID was not associated with the risk of AIDS events (aRR 0.76, 95% CI 0.41–1.38, p = 0.361). Conclusion Compared to CD4 responders, patients with immuno-virological discordance may be at increased risk of developing non-AIDS events. Further studies are warranted to establish whether in patients with ID, strategies to directly modify CD4 count response may be needed besides the use of ART. PMID:24498036

  7. Increased risk of virologic failure to the first antiretroviral regimen in HIV-infected migrants compared to natives: data from the ICONA cohort.

    PubMed

    Saracino, A; Lorenzini, P; Lo Caputo, S; Girardi, E; Castelli, F; Bonfanti, P; Rusconi, S; Caramello, P; Abrescia, N; Mussini, C; Monno, L; d'Arminio Monforte, A

    2016-03-01

    Migrant and Italian HIV-infected patients (n = 5773) enrolled in the ICONA cohort in 2004-2014 were compared for disparities in access to an initial antiretroviral regimen and/or risk of virologic failure (VF), and determinants of failure were evaluated. Variables associated with initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) were analysed. Primary endpoint was time to failure after at least 6 months of ART and was defined as: VF, first of two consecutive virus loads (VL) >200 copies/mL; treatment discontinuation (TD) for any reason; and treatment failure as confirmed VL >200 copies/mL or TD. A Poisson multivariable analysis was performed to control for confounders. Migrants presented significantly lower CD4 counts and more frequent AIDS events at baseline. When adjusting for baseline confounders, migrants presented a lower likelihood to begin ART (odds ratio 0.80, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.67-0.95, p 0.012). After initiating ART, the incidence VF rate was 6.4 per 100 person-years (95% CI 4.8-8.5) in migrants and 2.7 in natives (95% CI 2.2-3.3). Multivariable analysis confirmed that migrants had a higher risk of VF (incidence rate ratio 1.90, 95% CI 1.25-2.91, p 0.003) and treatment failure (incidence rate ratio 1.16, 95% CI 1.01-1.33, p 0.031), with no differences for TD. Among migrants, variables associated with VF were age, unemployment and use of a boosted protease inhibitor-based regimen versus nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Despite the use of more potent and safer drugs in the last 10 years, and even in a universal health care setting, migrants living with HIV still present barriers to initiating ART and an increased risk of VF compared to natives.

  8. Increased risk of virologic failure to the first antiretroviral regimen in HIV-infected migrants compared to natives: data from the ICONA cohort.

    PubMed

    Saracino, A; Lorenzini, P; Lo Caputo, S; Girardi, E; Castelli, F; Bonfanti, P; Rusconi, S; Caramello, P; Abrescia, N; Mussini, C; Monno, L; d'Arminio Monforte, A

    2016-03-01

    Migrant and Italian HIV-infected patients (n = 5773) enrolled in the ICONA cohort in 2004-2014 were compared for disparities in access to an initial antiretroviral regimen and/or risk of virologic failure (VF), and determinants of failure were evaluated. Variables associated with initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) were analysed. Primary endpoint was time to failure after at least 6 months of ART and was defined as: VF, first of two consecutive virus loads (VL) >200 copies/mL; treatment discontinuation (TD) for any reason; and treatment failure as confirmed VL >200 copies/mL or TD. A Poisson multivariable analysis was performed to control for confounders. Migrants presented significantly lower CD4 counts and more frequent AIDS events at baseline. When adjusting for baseline confounders, migrants presented a lower likelihood to begin ART (odds ratio 0.80, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.67-0.95, p 0.012). After initiating ART, the incidence VF rate was 6.4 per 100 person-years (95% CI 4.8-8.5) in migrants and 2.7 in natives (95% CI 2.2-3.3). Multivariable analysis confirmed that migrants had a higher risk of VF (incidence rate ratio 1.90, 95% CI 1.25-2.91, p 0.003) and treatment failure (incidence rate ratio 1.16, 95% CI 1.01-1.33, p 0.031), with no differences for TD. Among migrants, variables associated with VF were age, unemployment and use of a boosted protease inhibitor-based regimen versus nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Despite the use of more potent and safer drugs in the last 10 years, and even in a universal health care setting, migrants living with HIV still present barriers to initiating ART and an increased risk of VF compared to natives. PMID:26551839

  9. Physical virology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, W. H.; Bruinsma, R.; Wuite, G. J. L.

    2010-10-01

    Viruses are nanosized, genome-filled protein containers with remarkable thermodynamic and mechanical properties. They form by spontaneous self-assembly inside the crowded, heterogeneous cytoplasm of infected cells. Self-assembly of viruses seems to obey the principles of thermodynamically reversible self-assembly but assembled shells (`capsids') strongly resist disassembly. Following assembly, some viral shells pass through a sequence of coordinated maturation steps that progressively strengthen the capsid. Nanoindentation measurements by atomic force microscopy enable tests of the strength of individual viral capsids. They show that concepts borrowed from macroscopic materials science are surprisingly relevant to viral shells. For example, viral shells exhibit `materials fatigue' and the theory of thin-shell elasticity can account - in part - for atomic-force-microscopy-measured force-deformation curves. Viral shells have effective Young's moduli ranging from that of polyethylene to that of plexiglas. Some of them can withstand internal osmotic pressures that are tens of atmospheres. Comparisons with thin-shell theory also shed light on nonlinear irreversible processes such as plastic deformation and failure. Finally, atomic force microscopy experiments can quantify the mechanical effects of genome encapsidation and capsid protein mutations on viral shells, providing virological insight and suggesting new biotechnological applications.

  10. Association of Efavirenz Hypersusceptibility with Virologic Response in ACTG 368, a Randomized Trial of Abacavir (ABC) in Combination with Efavirenz (EFV) and Indinavir (IDV) in HIV-infected Subjects with Prior Nucleoside Analog Experience

    PubMed Central

    Demeter, Lisa M.; DeGruttola, Victor; Lustgarten, Stephanie; Bettendorf, Daniel; Fischl, Margaret; Eshleman, Susan; Spreen, William; Nguyen, Bach-Yen; Koval, Christine E.; Eron, Joseph J.; Hammer, Scott; Squires, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the association of efavirenz hypersusceptibility (EFV-HS) with clinical outcome in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial of EFV plus indinavir (EFV+IDV) vs. EFV+IDV plus abacavir (ABC) in 283 nucleoside-experienced HIV-infected patients. Methods and Results Rates of virologic failure were similar in the 2 arms at week 16 (p=0.509). Treatment discontinuations were more common in the ABC arm (p=0.001). Using logistic regression, there was no association between virologic failure and either baseline ABC resistance or regimen sensitivity score. Using 3 different genotypic scoring systems, EFV-HS was significantly associated with reduced virologic failure at week 16, independent of treatment assignment. In some patients on the nucleoside-sparing arm, the nucleoside-resistant mutant L74V was selected for in combination with the uncommonly occurring EFV-resistant mutant K103N+L100I; L74V was not detected as a minority variant, using clonal sequence analysis, when the nucleoside-sparing regimen was initiated. Conclusions Premature treatment discontinuations in the ABC arm and the presence of EFV-hypersusceptible HIV variants in this patient population likely made it difficult to detect a benefit of adding ABC to EFV+IDV. In addition, L74V, when combined with K103N+L100I, may confer a selective advantage to the virus that is independent of its effects on nucleoside resistance. PMID:18215978

  11. Young age at start of antiretroviral therapy and negative HIV antibody results in HIV-infected children when suppressed

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Louise; Schramm, Diana B.; Shiau, Stephanie; Strehlau, Renate; Pinillos, Francoise; Technau, Karl; Coovadia, Ashraf; Abrams, Elaine J.; Puren, Adrian; Tiemessen, Caroline T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Negative results on standard HIV antibody tests have been described among HIV-infected children suppressed on antiretroviral therapy (ART) started early in life. Here we describe the frequency and predictors of this phenomenon in a well-characterized cohort of treated children. Methods We selected samples from 103 HIV-infected children who started ART ≤ 14 months of age and from 122 children who started ≤ 6 months of age followed as part of two sequential clinical trials in Johannesburg, South Africa. Children had attained viral suppression on ART and had received ART for between 3 and 6.4 years (mean 4.3 years) when tested for HIV antibody using a standard ELISA (Genescreen™ HIV1/2 version 2; Bio-rad). Results Only children ≤6 months of age when ART was started had negative antibody results when tested after suppression on ART several years later. Negative or low-positive antibody results were observed in 40.0%, 37.0% and 27.8% of children starting ART <2 months of age, or starting during month 2 or 3, respectively. This dropped to 5.9%, 3.5%, and 5.3% if ART was started during month 4, 5, and 6, respectively. Higher CD4 percentage prior to ART initiation and no recorded intermittent viremia also predicted negative antibody results. Conclusion Testing negative on standard HIV antibody tests occurs fairly commonly among HIV-infected children who started ART ≤ 3 months of age and are virally-suppressed. It would be prudent in clinical practice to avoid HIV antibody tests among virally-suppressed, early-treated children to prevent unnecessary confusion. PMID:25870988

  12. Postpartum Loss to HIV Care and HIV Viral Suppression among Previously Diagnosed HIV-Infected Women with a Live Birth in New York State

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mother-to-child-transmission of HIV in the United States has been greatly reduced, with clear benefits for the child. However, little is known about factors that predict maternal loss to HIV care in the postpartum year. This retrospective cohort study included 980 HIV-positive women, diagnosed with HIV at least one year before pregnancy, who had a live birth during 2008–2010 in New York State. Women who did not meet the following criterion in the 12 months after the delivery-related hospital discharge were considered to be lost to HIV care: two or more laboratory tests (CD4 or HIV viral load), separated by at least 90 days. Adjusted relative risks (aRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for predictors of postpartum loss to HIV care were identified with Poisson regression, solved using generalized estimating equations. Having an unsuppressed (>200 copies/mL) HIV viral load in the postpartum year was also evaluated. Overall, 24% of women were loss to HIV care during the postpartum year. Women with low participation in HIV care during preconception were more likely to be lost to HIV care during the postpartum year (aRR: 2.70; 95% CI: 2.09–3.49). In contrast, having a low birth weight infant was significantly associated with a decreased likelihood of loss to HIV care (aRR: 0.72; 95% CI: 0.53–0.98). While 75% of women were virally suppressed at the last viral load before delivery only 44% were continuously suppressed in the postpartum year; 12% had no viral load test reported in the postpartum year and 44% had at least one unsuppressed viral load test. Lack of engagement in preconception HIV-related health care predicts postpartum loss to HIV care for HIV-positive parturient women. Many women had poor viral control during the postpartum period, increasing the risk of disease progression and infectivity. PMID:27513953

  13. Monkey Study Hints at Drug-Free Suppression of HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to treat HIV -- known as combined antiretroviral therapy (ART) -- have changed the face of the HIV/AIDS ... bone density loss. And, Ansari said, people on ART eventually develop ... others. A therapy that could essentially send HIV into remission, and ...

  14. Activation of HIV Transcription with Short-Course Vorinostat in HIV-Infected Patients on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Ajantha; Ghneim, Khader; Ahlers, Jeffrey; Cameron, Mark J.; Smith, Miranda Z.; Spelman, Tim; McMahon, James; Velayudham, Pushparaj; Brown, Gregor; Roney, Janine; Watson, Jo; Prince, Miles H.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Chomont, Nicolas; Fromentin, Rémi; Procopio, Francesco A.; Zeidan, Joumana; Palmer, Sarah; Odevall, Lina; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Martin, Ben P.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Deeks, Steven G.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Cameron, Paul U.; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persistence in latently infected resting memory CD4+ T-cells is the major barrier to HIV cure. Cellular histone deacetylases (HDACs) are important in maintaining HIV latency and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) may reverse latency by activating HIV transcription from latently infected CD4+ T-cells. We performed a single arm, open label, proof-of-concept study in which vorinostat, a pan-HDACi, was administered 400 mg orally once daily for 14 days to 20 HIV-infected individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). The primary endpoint was change in cell associated unspliced (CA-US) HIV RNA in total CD4+ T-cells from blood at day 14. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01365065). Vorinostat was safe and well tolerated and there were no dose modifications or study drug discontinuations. CA-US HIV RNA in blood increased significantly in 18/20 patients (90%) with a median fold change from baseline to peak value of 7.4 (IQR 3.4, 9.1). CA-US RNA was significantly elevated 8 hours post drug and remained elevated 70 days after last dose. Significant early changes in expression of genes associated with chromatin remodeling and activation of HIV transcription correlated with the magnitude of increased CA-US HIV RNA. There were no statistically significant changes in plasma HIV RNA, concentration of HIV DNA, integrated DNA, inducible virus in CD4+ T-cells or markers of T-cell activation. Vorinostat induced a significant and sustained increase in HIV transcription from latency in the majority of HIV-infected patients. However, additional interventions will be needed to efficiently induce virus production and ultimately eliminate latently infected cells. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01365065 PMID:25393648

  15. Highly active antiretroviral therapy potently suppresses HIV infection in humanized Rag2-/-gammac-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Sango, Kaori; Joseph, Aviva; Patel, Mahesh; Osiecki, Kristin; Dutta, Monica; Goldstein, Harris

    2010-07-01

    Humanized Rag2(-/-)gamma(c)(-/-) mice (Hu-DKO mice) become populated with functional human T cells, B cells, and dendritic cells following transplantation with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and represent an improved model for studying HIV infection in vivo. In the current study we demonstrated that intrasplenic inoculation of hu-DKO mice with HIV-1 initiated a higher level of HIV infection than intravenous or intraperitoneal inoculation, associated with a reciprocal decrease in peripheral CD4(+) T cells and increase in peripheral CD8(+) T cells. HIV infection by intrasplenic injection increased serum levels of human IgG and IgM including human IgM and IgG specific for HIV-1 gp120. There was a significant inverse correlation between the level of HIV-1 infection and the extent of CD4(+) T cell depletion. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiated 1 week after HIV-1 inoculation markedly suppressed HIV-1 infection and prevented CD4(+) T cell depletion. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that intrasplenic injection of hu-DKO mice with HIV is a more efficient route of HIV infection than intravenous or intraperitoneal injection and generates increased infection associated with an increased anti-HIV humoral response. This animal model can serve as a valuable in vivo model to study the efficacy of anti-HIV therapies.

  16. CD8+ Lymphocytes Can Control HIV Infection in vitro by Suppressing Virus Replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Christopher M.; Moody, Dewey J.; Stites, Daniel P.; Levy, Jay A.

    1986-12-01

    Lymphocytes bearing the CD8 marker were shown to suppress replication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The effect was dose-dependent and most apparent with autologous lymphocytes; it did not appear to be mediated by a cytotoxic response. This suppression of HIV replication could be demonstrated by the addition of CD8+ cells at the initiation of virus production as well as after several weeks of virus replication by cultured cells. The observations suggest a potential approach to therapy in which autologous CD8 lymphocytes could be administered to individuals to inhibit HIV replication and perhaps progression of disease.

  17. Substance abuse, violence, and HIV/AIDS (SAVA) syndemic effects on viral suppression among HIV positive women of color.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kristen A; Messer, Lynne C; Quinlivan, E Byrd

    2015-01-01

    The combined epidemics of substance abuse, violence, and HIV/AIDS, known as the SAVA syndemic, contribute to the disproportionate burden of disease among people of color in the US. To examine the association between HIV viral load suppression and SAVA syndemic variables, we used baseline data from 563 HIV+ women of color treated at nine HIV medical and ancillary care sites participating in HRSA's Special Project of National Significance Women of Color (WOC) Initiative. Just under half the women (n=260) were virally suppressed. Five psychosocial factors contributing to the SAVA syndemic were examined in this study: substance abuse, binge drinking, intimate partner violence, poor mental health, and sexual risk taking. Associations among the psychosocial factors were assessed and clustering confirmed. A SAVA score was created by summing the dichotomous (present/absent) psychosocial measures. Using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models to account for site-level clustering and individual-covariates, a higher SAVA score (0 to 5) was associated with reduced viral suppression; OR (adjusted)=0.81, 95% CI: 0.66, 0.99. The syndemic approach represents a viable framework for understanding viral suppression among HIV positive WOC, and suggests the need for comprehensive interventions that address the social/environmental contexts of patients' lives.

  18. The impact of transient combination antiretroviral treatment in early HIV infection on viral suppression and immunologic response in later treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pantazis, Nikos; Touloumi, Giota; Meyer, Laurence; Olson, Ashley; Costagliola, Dominique; Kelleher, Anthony D.; Lutsar, Irja; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Fisher, Martin; Moreno, Santiago; Porter, Kholoud

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Effects of transient combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) initiated during early HIV infection (EHI) remain unclear. We investigate whether this intervention affects viral suppression and CD4+ cell count increase following its reinitiation in chronic infection (CHI). Design: Longitudinal observational study. Methods: We identified adult patients from Concerted Action of Seroconversion to AIDS and Death in Europe who seroconverted after 1/1/2000, had a 12 months or less HIV test interval and initiated cART from naive. We classified individuals as ‘pretreated in EHI’ if treated within 6 months of seroconversion, interrupted for at least 12 weeks, and reinitiated during CHI. Statistical analysis was performed using survival analysis methods and mixed models. Results: Pretreated and initiated in CHI groups comprised 202 and 4263 individuals, with median follow-up after CHI treatment 4.5 and 3 years, respectively. Both groups had similar virologic response and relapse rates (P = 0.585 and P = 0.206) but pretreated individuals restarted treatment with higher baseline CD4+ cell count (∼80 cells/μl; P < 0.001) and retained significantly higher CD4+ cell count for more than 3 years after treatment (re)initiation. Assuming common baseline CD4+ cell count, differences in CD4+ cell count slopes were nonsignificant. Immunovirologic response to CHI treatment was not associated with timing or duration of the transient treatment. Conclusion: Although treatment interruptions are not recommended, stopping cART initiated in EHI does not seem to reduce the chance of a successful outcome of treatment in CHI. PMID:26636925

  19. Medication possession ratio associated with short-term virologic response in individuals initiating antiretroviral therapy in Namibia.

    PubMed

    Hong, Steven Y; Jerger, Logan; Jonas, Anna; Badi, Alfons; Cohen, Steven; Nachega, Jean B; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Tang, Alice M; Wanke, Christine; Terrin, Norma; Pereko, Dawn; Blom, Abraham; Trotter, Andrew B; Jordan, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    The visual-analogue scale (VAS), Likert item (rating scale), pills identification test (PIT), and medication possession ratio (MPR) provide estimates of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence which correlate with HIV viral suppression. These simple adherence measures are inexpensive and easy to administer; however, require validation and adjustment prior to implementation. The objective of this study was to define the optimal adherence assessment measure in Namibia to identify patients at risk for sub-optimal adherence and poor virologic response 6 months after ART initiation. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in HIV-infected adults receiving ART for 6-12 months prior to the adherence assessment. Adherence measures included 30-day VAS, 30-day Likert item, self-reported treatment interruptions, PIT, and MPR. Association of adherence measures with 6-month HIV-1 RNA level was assessed using two thresholds (1000 copies/mL and 5000 copies/mL). Adherence was assessed in 236 patients, mean age 37.3 years, 54% female. Mean adherence was 98.1% by 30-day VAS, 84.7% by 30-day Likert item, 97.0% by self-reported treatment interruptions, 90.6% by PIT, and 98.8% by MPR. Agreement between adherence measures was poor using kappa statistic. 76% had HIV-1 RNA <1000 copies/ml, and 88% had HIV-1 RNA <5000 copies/ml. MPR (continuous) was associated with viral suppression <5000 copies/ml (p = 0.036). MPR <75% was associated with virologic failure at ≥5000 copies/ml with OR 3.89 (1.24, 12.21), p = 0.013. Adherence was high with all measures. Only MPR, was associated with short-term virologic response, suggesting its cross-culturally utility for early identification of patients at high risk for virologic failure.

  20. Virological and Immunological Characterization of Novel NYVAC-Based HIV/AIDS Vaccine Candidates Expressing Clade C Trimeric Soluble gp140(ZM96) and Gag(ZM96)-Pol-Nef(CN54) as Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Perdiguero, Beatriz; Gómez, Carmen Elena; Cepeda, Victoria; Sánchez-Sampedro, Lucas; García-Arriaza, Juan; Mejías-Pérez, Ernesto; Jiménez, Victoria; Sánchez, Cristina; Sorzano, Carlos Óscar S.; Oliveros, Juan Carlos; Delaloye, Julie; Roger, Thierry; Calandra, Thierry; Asbach, Benedikt; Wagner, Ralf; Kibler, Karen V.; Jacobs, Bertram L.; Pantaleo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The generation of vaccines against HIV/AIDS able to induce long-lasting protective immunity remains a major goal in the HIV field. The modest efficacy (31.2%) against HIV infection observed in the RV144 phase III clinical trial highlighted the need for further improvement of HIV vaccine candidates, formulation, and vaccine regimen. In this study, we have generated two novel NYVAC vectors, expressing HIV-1 clade C gp140(ZM96) (NYVAC-gp140) or Gag(ZM96)-Pol-Nef(CN54) (NYVAC-Gag-Pol-Nef), and defined their virological and immunological characteristics in cultured cells and in mice. The insertion of HIV genes does not affect the replication capacity of NYVAC recombinants in primary chicken embryo fibroblast cells, HIV sequences remain stable after multiple passages, and HIV antigens are correctly expressed and released from cells, with Env as a trimer (NYVAC-gp140), while in NYVAC-Gag-Pol-Nef-infected cells Gag-induced virus-like particles (VLPs) are abundant. Electron microscopy revealed that VLPs accumulated with time at the cell surface, with no interference with NYVAC morphogenesis. Both vectors trigger specific innate responses in human cells and show an attenuation profile in immunocompromised adult BALB/c and newborn CD1 mice after intracranial inoculation. Analysis of the immune responses elicited in mice after homologous NYVAC prime/NYVAC boost immunization shows that recombinant viruses induced polyfunctional Env-specific CD4 or Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses. Antibody responses against gp140 and p17/p24 were elicited. Our findings showed important insights into virus-host cell interactions of NYVAC vectors expressing HIV antigens, with the activation of specific immune parameters which will help to unravel potential correlates of protection against HIV in human clinical trials with these vectors. IMPORTANCE We have generated two novel NYVAC-based HIV vaccine candidates expressing HIV-1 clade C trimeric soluble gp140 (ZM96) and Gag(ZM96)-Pol

  1. A Single Quantifiable Viral Load Is Predictive of Virological Failure in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected Patients on Combination Antiretroviral Therapy: The Austrian HIV Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Leierer, Gisela; Grabmeier-Pfistershammer, Katharina; Steuer, Andrea; Sarcletti, Mario; Geit, Maria; Haas, Bernhard; Taylor, Ninon; Kanatschnig, Manfred; Rappold, Michaela; Ledergerber, Bruno; Zangerle, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background. Viral loads (VLs) detectable at low levels are not uncommon in patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). We investigated whether a single quantifiable VL predicted virological failure (VF). Methods. We analyzed patients receiving standard regimens with at least 1 VL measurement below the limit of quantification (BLQ) in their treatment history. The first VL measurement after 6 months of unmodified cART served as baseline VL for the subsequent analyses of the time to reach single VL levels of ≥200, ≥400, and ≥1000 copies/mL. Roche TaqMan 2.0 was used to quantify human immunodeficiency virus-1 ribonucleic acid. Factors associated with VF were determined by Cox proportional hazards models. Results. Of 1614 patients included in the study, 68, 44, and 34 experienced VF ≥200, ≥400, and ≥1000 copies/mL, respectively. In multivariable analyses, compared with patients who were BLQ, a detectable VL ≤ 50 and VL 51–199 copies/mL predicted VF ≥ 200 copies/mL (hazards ratio [HR] = 2.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06–4.55 and HR = 4.21, 95% CI = 2.15–8.22, respectively). In those with VL 51–199 copies/mL, a trend for an increased risk of VF ≥400 and VF ≥1000 copies/mL could be found (HR = 2.13, 95% CI = 0.84–5.39 and HR = 2.52, 95% CI = 0.96–6.60, respectively). Conclusions. These findings support closer monitoring and adherence counseling for patients with a single measurement of quantifiable VL <200 copies/mL. PMID:27419163

  2. Factors associated with retention and viral suppression among a cohort of HIV+ women of color.

    PubMed

    Blank, Arthur E; Fletcher, Jason; Verdecias, Niko; Garcia, Iliana; Blackstock, Oni; Cunningham, Chinazo

    2015-01-01

    Access to sustained HIV medical care is critical to achieving viral suppression. However, a variety of factors may impede or facilitate retention in care or becoming virally suppressed. Though retention and suppression are often treated separately, this study examined both in a cohort of 921 HIV+ women of color who participated in eight demonstration programs across the US. For women who met the inclusion criteria, 83% (n = 587) were retained and 73% (n = 357) were virally suppressed. Average age of women retained was 40.9, and 41.9 for those virally suppressed. The majority were African American/Black or Hispanic/Latina, single, and had no children less than 18 years of age, had health insurance, a high school degree or higher, were stably housed, and unemployed. Some factors associated with retention in care were indecision about seeking HIV medical care (AOR = 0.42) and having children under the age of 18 (AOR = 0.59). Some factors associated with being virally suppressed were living with others (AOR = 0.58), current substance abuse (AOR = 0.38), and fair/poor health (AOR = 0.40). The findings suggest different processes and social mechanisms may influence retention and viral suppression. Interventions seeking to improve retention in care may require tailored program components and strategies that focus on improving viral suppression. PMID:25458205

  3. Factors Associated with Retention and Viral Suppression Among a Cohort of HIV+ Women of Color

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Jason; Verdecias, Niko; Garcia, Iliana; Blackstock, Oni; Cunningham, Chinazo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Access to sustained HIV medical care is critical to achieving viral suppression. However, a variety of factors may impede or facilitate retention in care or becoming virally suppressed. Though retention and suppression are often treated separately, this study examined both in a cohort of 921 HIV+ women of color who participated in eight demonstration programs across the US. For women who met the inclusion criteria, 83% (n=587) were retained and 73% (n=357) were virally suppressed. Average age of women retained was 40.9, and 41.9 for those virally suppressed. The majority were African American/Black or Hispanic/Latina, single, and had no children less than 18 years of age, had health insurance, a high school degree or higher, were stably housed, and unemployed. Some factors associated with retention in care were indecision about seeking HIV medical care (AOR=0.42) and having children under the age of 18 (AOR=0.59). Some factors associated with being virally suppressed were living with others (AOR=0.58), current substance abuse (AOR=0.38), and fair/poor health (AOR=0.40). The findings suggest different processes and social mechanisms may influence retention and viral suppression. Interventions seeking to improve retention in care may require tailored program components and strategies that focus on improving viral suppression. PMID:25458205

  4. Factors associated with retention and viral suppression among a cohort of HIV+ women of color.

    PubMed

    Blank, Arthur E; Fletcher, Jason; Verdecias, Niko; Garcia, Iliana; Blackstock, Oni; Cunningham, Chinazo

    2015-01-01

    Access to sustained HIV medical care is critical to achieving viral suppression. However, a variety of factors may impede or facilitate retention in care or becoming virally suppressed. Though retention and suppression are often treated separately, this study examined both in a cohort of 921 HIV+ women of color who participated in eight demonstration programs across the US. For women who met the inclusion criteria, 83% (n = 587) were retained and 73% (n = 357) were virally suppressed. Average age of women retained was 40.9, and 41.9 for those virally suppressed. The majority were African American/Black or Hispanic/Latina, single, and had no children less than 18 years of age, had health insurance, a high school degree or higher, were stably housed, and unemployed. Some factors associated with retention in care were indecision about seeking HIV medical care (AOR = 0.42) and having children under the age of 18 (AOR = 0.59). Some factors associated with being virally suppressed were living with others (AOR = 0.58), current substance abuse (AOR = 0.38), and fair/poor health (AOR = 0.40). The findings suggest different processes and social mechanisms may influence retention and viral suppression. Interventions seeking to improve retention in care may require tailored program components and strategies that focus on improving viral suppression.

  5. HIV reservoirs as obstacles and opportunities for an HIV cure.

    PubMed

    Chun, Tae-Wook; Moir, Susan; Fauci, Anthony S

    2015-06-01

    The persistence of HIV reservoirs remains a formidable obstacle to achieving sustained virologic remission in HIV-infected individuals after antiretroviral therapy (ART) is discontinued, even if plasma viremia has been successfully suppressed for prolonged periods of time. Numerous approaches aimed at eradicating the virus, as well as maintaining its prolonged suppression in the absence of ART, have had little success. A better understanding of the pathophysiologic nature of HIV reservoirs and the impact of various interventions on their persistence is essential for the development of successful therapeutic strategies against HIV or the long-term control of infection. Here, we discuss the persistent HIV reservoir as a barrier to cure as well as the current therapeutic strategies aimed at eliminating or controlling the virus in the absence of ART.

  6. HIV suppression by host restriction factors and viral immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaofei; Zhao, Qi; Xiong, Yong

    2015-04-01

    Antiviral restriction factors are an integral part of the host innate immune system that protects cells from viral pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Studies of the interactions between restriction factors and HIV have greatly advanced our understanding of both the viral life cycle and basic cell biology, as well as provided new opportunities for therapeutic intervention of viral infection. Here we review the recent developments towards establishing the structural and biochemical bases of HIV inhibition by, and viral countermeasures of, the restriction factors TRIM5, MxB, APOBEC3, SAMHD1, and BST2/tetherin.

  7. HIV prevention: integrating biomedical and behevioral interventions.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Carlos

    Recommendations for HIV prevention in clinical care settings by an IAS-USA panel were recently published. They include recommendations on HIV testing, antiretroviral therapy initiation, risk-reduction counseling, and antiretroviral therapy adherence counseling for HIV-infected individuals. For individuals at risk for HIV infection, recommendations for preexposure prophylaxis, other risk-reduction strategies, adherence counseling, and postexposure prophylaxis are included. Many HIV-infected individuals in the United States are not fully engaged in HIV care and are not virologically suppressed, thus a crucial component of efforts to reduce HIV transmission is moving patients through the HIV care continuum. This article summarizes an IAS-USA continuing education webinar presented by Carlos del Rio, MD, in September 2014.

  8. Decreased HIV Type 1 Transcription in CCR5-Δ32 Heterozygotes During Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Charlene; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Strain, Matthew C.; Lada, Steven M.; Yukl, Steven; Cockerham, Leslie R.; Pilcher, Christopher D.; Hecht, Frederick M.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Liegler, Teri; Richman, Douglas D.; Deeks, Steven G.; Pillai, Satish K.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals who are heterozygous for the CCR5-Δ32 mutation provide a natural model to examine the effects of reduced CCR5 expression on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persistence. We evaluated the HIV reservoir in 18 CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes and 54 CCR5 wild-type individuals during suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Cell-associated HIV RNA levels (P = .035), RNA to DNA transcriptional ratios (P = .013), and frequency of detectable HIV 2–long terminal repeat circular DNA (P = .013) were significantly lower in CD4+ T cells from CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes. Cell-associated HIV RNA was significantly correlated with CCR5 surface expression on CD4+ T cells (r2 = 0.136; P = .002). Our findings suggest that curative strategies should further explore manipulation of CCR5. PMID:24935955

  9. Decreased HIV type 1 transcription in CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes during suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Charlene; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Strain, Matthew C; Lada, Steven M; Yukl, Steven; Cockerham, Leslie R; Pilcher, Christopher D; Hecht, Frederick M; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Liegler, Teri; Richman, Douglas D; Deeks, Steven G; Pillai, Satish K

    2014-12-01

    Individuals who are heterozygous for the CCR5-Δ32 mutation provide a natural model to examine the effects of reduced CCR5 expression on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persistence. We evaluated the HIV reservoir in 18 CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes and 54 CCR5 wild-type individuals during suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Cell-associated HIV RNA levels (P=.035), RNA to DNA transcriptional ratios (P=.013), and frequency of detectable HIV 2-long terminal repeat circular DNA (P=.013) were significantly lower in CD4+ T cells from CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes. Cell-associated HIV RNA was significantly correlated with CCR5 surface expression on CD4+ T cells (r2=0.136; P=.002). Our findings suggest that curative strategies should further explore manipulation of CCR5.

  10. Influence of Jail Incarceration and Homelessness Patterns on Engagement in HIV Care and HIV Viral Suppression among New York City Adults Living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sungwoo; Nash, Denis; Hollod, Laura; Harris, Tiffany G.; Lennon, Mary Clare; Thorpe, Lorna E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Both homelessness and incarceration are associated with housing instability, which in turn can disrupt continuity of HIV medical care. Yet, their impacts have not been systematically assessed among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Methods We studied a retrospective cohort of 1,698 New York City PLWHA with both jail incarceration and homelessness during 2001–05 to evaluate whether frequent transitions between jail incarceration and homelessness were associated with a lower likelihood of continuity of HIV care during a subsequent one-year follow-up period. Using matched jail, single-adult homeless shelter, and HIV registry data, we performed sequence analysis to identify trajectories of these events and assessed their influence on engagement in HIV care and HIV viral suppression via marginal structural modeling. Results Sequence analysis identified four trajectories; 72% of the cohort had sporadic experiences of both brief incarceration and homelessness, whereas others experienced more consistent incarceration or homelessness during early or late months. Trajectories were not associated with differential engagement in HIV care during follow-up. However, compared with PLWHA experiencing early bouts of homelessness and later minimal incarceration/homelessness events, we observed a lower prevalence of viral suppression among PLWHA with two other trajectories: those with sporadic, brief occurrences of incarceration/homelessness (0.67, 95% CI = 0.50,0.90) and those with extensive incarceration experiences (0.62, 95% CI = 0.43,0.88). Conclusions Housing instability due to frequent jail incarceration and homelessness or extensive incarceration may exert negative influences on viral suppression. Policies and services that support housing stability should be strengthened among incarcerated and sheltered PLWHA to reduce risk of adverse health conditions. PMID:26599877

  11. Psychiatric Distress, Drug Use, and HIV Viral Load Suppression in Russia.

    PubMed

    Ustinov, A; Suvorova, A; Belyakov, A; Makhamatova, A; Levina, O; Krupitsky, E; Lioznov, D; Niccolai, L; Heimer, R

    2016-08-01

    To explore the influence of psychiatric distress and substance use on viral load suppression in HIV-infected patients taking ART we analyzed socio-demographic characteristics, CD4+ cells count and viral loads, the Symptom Check List-90 and the Addiction Severity Index of 75 patients who had taken ART for at least 6 month. Using viral load data as the marker of ART success, we divided the sample into two groups. Comparison of the groups showed that education, marriage, and female gender are predictors of optimal viral load suppression. Overall results failed to demonstrate substance use and psychiatric distress as predictors of viral load suppression. PMID:26809193

  12. Functional Mechanisms of Treg in the Context of HIV Infection and the Janus Face of Immune Suppression

    PubMed Central

    López-Abente, Jacobo; Correa-Rocha, Rafael; Pion, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in infections, by modulating host immune responses and avoiding the overreactive immunity that in the case of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection leads to a marked erosion and deregulation of the entire immune system. Therefore, the suppressive function of Treg in HIV-infected patients is critical because of their implication on preventing the immune hyperactivation, even though it could also have a detrimental effect by suppressing HIV-specific immune responses. In recent years, several studies have shown that HIV-1 can directly infect Treg, disturbing their phenotype and suppressive capacity via different mechanisms. These effects include Foxp3 and CD25 downregulation, and the impairment of suppressive capacity. This review describes the functional mechanisms of Treg to modulate immune activation during HIV infection, and how such control is no longer fine-tune orchestrated once Treg itself get infected. We will review the current knowledge about the HIV effects on the Treg cytokine expression, on pathways implying the participation of different ectoenzymes (i.e., CD39/CD73 axis), transcription factors (ICER), and lastly on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), one of the keystones in Treg-suppressive function. To define which are the HIV effects upon these regulatory mechanisms is crucial not only for the comprehension of immune deregulation in HIV-infected patients but also for the correct understanding of the role of Tregs in HIV infection. PMID:27242797

  13. Speaking of sex workers: How suppression of research has distorted the United States' domestic HIV response.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Anna

    2015-05-01

    Sex workers remain a vulnerable population at risk for HIV acquisition and transmission. Research suggests that interventions at the individual level, such as condom distribution, are less effective in preventing HIV among sex workers than structural changes such as allowing safer work settings and reducing the harassment and abuse of sex workers by clients and police. In the US, HIV incidence has not declined in the last decade. This may be due in part to its policy of wilful ignorance about sex work, but the data to resolve the question simply do not exist. Political actions such as PEPFAR's prostitution pledge and a congressional campaign against "waste, fraud and abuse" in research are products of an ideological environment that suppresses research on HIV prevention and treatment needs of sex workers. Even basic prevalence data are missing because there is no "sex worker" category in the US National HIV Behavior Surveillance System. However, international efforts are taking a public health approach and are calling for decriminalization of sex work, as the most effective public health strategy for reducing HIV incidence among sex workers. Although such an approach is not yet politically feasible in the US, some urgent practical policy changes can be implemented to improve data collection and generation of evidence to support HIV prevention and treatment programs targeting sex workers. PMID:26278830

  14. 3BNC117 a Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Suppresses Viremia in HIV-1-Infected Humans

    PubMed Central

    Caskey, Marina; Klein, Florian; Lorenzi, Julio C. C.; Seaman, Michael S.; West, Anthony P.; Buckley, Noreen; Kremer, Gisela; Nogueira, Lilian; Braunschweig, Malte; Scheid, Johannes F.; Horwitz, Joshua A.; Shimeliovich, Irina; Ben Avraham-Shulman, Sivan; Witmer-Pack, Maggi; Platten, Martin; Lehmann, Clara; Burke, Leah A.; Hawthorne, Thomas; Gorelick, Robert J.; Walker, Bruce D.; Keler, Tibor; Gulick, Roy M.; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Schlesinger, Sarah J.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 immunotherapy with a combination of first generation monoclonal antibodies was largely ineffective in pre-clinical and clinical settings and was therefore abandoned1–3. However, recently developed single cell based antibody cloning methods have uncovered a new generation of far more potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) to HIV-14,5. These antibodies can prevent infection and suppress viremia in humanized mice (hu-mice) and nonhuman primates, but their potential for human HIV-1 immunotherapy has not been evaluated6–10. Here we report the results of a first-in-man dose escalation phase 1 clinical trial of 3BNC117, a potent human CD4 binding site antibody11, in uninfected and HIV-1-infected individuals. 3BNC117 infusion was well tolerated and demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetics. A single 30 mg/kg infusion of 3BNC117 reduced the viral load (VL) in HIV-1-infected individuals by 0.8 – 2.5 log10 and viremia remained significantly reduced for 28 days. Emergence of resistant viral strains was variable, with some individuals remaining sensitive to 3BNC117 for a period of 28 days. We conclude that as a single agent 3BNC117 is safe and effective in reducing HIV-1 viremia, and that immunotherapy should be explored as a new modality for HIV-1 prevention, therapy, and cure. PMID:25855300

  15. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy and Virologic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Bezabhe, Woldesellassie M.; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R.; Peterson, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The often cited need to achieve ≥95% (nearly perfect) adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for successful virologic outcomes in HIV may present a barrier to initiation of therapy in the early stages of HIV. This meta-analysis synthesized 43 studies (27,905 participants) performed across >26 countries, to determine the relationship between cut-off point for optimal adherence to ART and virologic outcomes. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effect model to calculate pooled odds ratios with corresponding 95% confidence intervals. The mean rate of patients reporting optimal adherence was 63.4%. Compared with suboptimal adherence, optimal adherence was associated with a lower risk of virologic failure (0.34; 95% CI: 0.26–0.44). There were no significant differences in the pooled odds ratios among different optimal adherence thresholds (≥98–100%, ≥95%, ≥80–90%). Study design (randomized controlled trial vs observational study) (regression coefficient 0.74, 95% CI: 0.04–1.43, P < 0.05) and study region (developing vs developed countries; regression coefficient 0.56, 95% CI: 0.01–1.12, P < 0.05) remained as independent predictors of between-study heterogeneity, with more patients with optimal adherence from developing countries or randomized controlled trials experiencing virologic failure. The threshold for optimal adherence to achieve better virologic outcomes appears to be wider than the commonly used cut-off point (≥95% adherence). The cut-off point for optimal adherence could be redefined to a slightly lower level to encourage the prescribing ART at an early stage of HIV infection. PMID:27082595

  16. Predictors of Virologic and Clinical Response to Nevirapine versus Lopinavir/Ritonavir-Based Antiretroviral Therapy in Young Children with and without Prior Nevirapine Exposure for the Prevention of Mother-To-Child HIV Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Jane C.; Hughes, Michael D.; Violari, Avy; Eshleman, Susan H.; Abrams, Elaine J.; Bwakura-Dangarembizi, Mutsa; Barlow-Mosha, Linda; Kamthunzi, Portia; Sambo, Pauline M.; Cotton, Mark F.; Moultrie, Harry; Khadse, Sandhya; Schimana, Werner; Bobat, Raziya; Zimmer, Bonnie; Petzold, Elizabeth; Mofenson, Lynne M.; Jean-Philippe, Patrick; Palumbo, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background In a randomized trial comparing nevirapine (NVP)- versus lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r)– based antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected children (primary endpoint discontinuation of study treatment for any reason or virologic failure (VF) by week 24) aged two months to three years, we assessed whether clinical, virologic, immunologic and safety outcomes varied by prior single-dose NVP exposure (PrNVP) for prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission and other covariates. Methods Efficacy was assessed by time to ART discontinuation or VF, VF/death, and death; safety by time to ART discontinuation due to a protocol-defined toxicity and first ≥ grade 3 adverse event; immunology and growth by changes in CD4%, weight/height WHO z-scores from entry to week 48. Cox proportional hazards and linear regression models were used to test whether treatment differences depended on PrNVP exposure and other covariates. Results Over a median follow-up of 48 (PrNVP) and 72 (No PrNVP) weeks, there was no evidence of differential treatment effects by PrNVP exposure or any other covariates. LPV/r – based ART was superior to NVP-based ART for efficacy and safety outcomes but those on NVP had larger improvements in CD4%, weight and height z-scores. Lower pre-treatment CD4% and higher HIV-1 RNA levels were associated with reduced efficacy, lower pre-treatment CD4% with shorter time to ART discontinuation due to a protocol-defined toxicity, and no PrNVP with shorter time to first grade ≥3 adverse event. Conclusions Differences between LPV/r and NVP ART in efficacy, safety, immunologic and growth outcomes did not depend on PrNVP exposure, prior breastfeeding, sex, HIV-1 subtype, age, pre-treatment CD4%, HIV-1 RNA or WHO disease stage. This finding should be considered when selecting an ART regimen for young children. PMID:25222305

  17. Suppression of HIV Replication by CD8+ Regulatory T-Cells in Elite Controllers

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Chen, Song; Lai, Chunhui; Lai, Mingyue; Fang, Hua; Dao, Hong; Kang, Jun; Fan, Jianhua; Guo, Weizhong; Fu, Linchun; Andrieu, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated in the Chinese macaque model that an oral vaccine made of inactivated SIV and Lactobacillus plantarum induced CD8+ regulatory T-cells, which suppressed the activation of SIV+CD4+ T-cells, prevented SIV replication, and protected macaques from SIV challenges. Here, we sought whether a similar population of CD8+ T-regs would induce the suppression of HIV replication in elite controllers (ECs), a small population (3‰) of HIV-infected patients with undetectable HIV replication. For that purpose, we investigated the in vitro antiviral activity of fresh CD8+ T-cells on HIV-infected CD4+ T-cells taken from 10 ECs. The 10 ECs had a classical genomic profile: all of them carried the KIR3DL1 gene and 9 carried at least 1 allele of HLA-B:Bw4-80Ile (i.e., with an isoleucine residue at position 80). In the nine HLA-B:Bw4-80Ile-positive patients, we demonstrated a strong viral suppression by KIR3DL1-expressing CD8+ T-cells that required cell-to-cell contact to switch off the activation signals in infected CD4+ T-cells. KIR3DL1-expressing CD8+ T-cells withdrawal and KIR3DL1 neutralization by a specific anti-killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) antibody inhibited the suppression of viral replication. Our findings provide the first evidence for an instrumental role of KIR-expressing CD8+ regulatory T-cells in the natural control of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27148256

  18. Suppression of HIV Replication by CD8(+) Regulatory T-Cells in Elite Controllers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Chen, Song; Lai, Chunhui; Lai, Mingyue; Fang, Hua; Dao, Hong; Kang, Jun; Fan, Jianhua; Guo, Weizhong; Fu, Linchun; Andrieu, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated in the Chinese macaque model that an oral vaccine made of inactivated SIV and Lactobacillus plantarum induced CD8(+) regulatory T-cells, which suppressed the activation of SIV(+)CD4(+) T-cells, prevented SIV replication, and protected macaques from SIV challenges. Here, we sought whether a similar population of CD8(+) T-regs would induce the suppression of HIV replication in elite controllers (ECs), a small population (3‰) of HIV-infected patients with undetectable HIV replication. For that purpose, we investigated the in vitro antiviral activity of fresh CD8(+) T-cells on HIV-infected CD4(+) T-cells taken from 10 ECs. The 10 ECs had a classical genomic profile: all of them carried the KIR3DL1 gene and 9 carried at least 1 allele of HLA-B:Bw4-80Ile (i.e., with an isoleucine residue at position 80). In the nine HLA-B:Bw4-80Ile-positive patients, we demonstrated a strong viral suppression by KIR3DL1-expressing CD8(+) T-cells that required cell-to-cell contact to switch off the activation signals in infected CD4(+) T-cells. KIR3DL1-expressing CD8(+) T-cells withdrawal and KIR3DL1 neutralization by a specific anti-killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) antibody inhibited the suppression of viral replication. Our findings provide the first evidence for an instrumental role of KIR-expressing CD8(+) regulatory T-cells in the natural control of HIV-1 infection.

  19. Structural Determinants of Antiretroviral Therapy Use, HIV Care Attendance, and Viral Suppression among Adolescents and Young Adults Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Kahana, Shoshana Y.; Jenkins, Richard A.; Bruce, Douglas; Fernandez, Maria I.; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.; Bauermeister, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The authors examined associations between structural characteristics and HIV disease management among a geographically diverse sample of behaviorally and perinatally HIV-infected adolescents and young adults in the United States. Methods The sample included 1891 adolescents and young adults living with HIV (27.8% perinatally infected; 72.2% behaviorally infected) who were linked to care through 20 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions Units. All completed audio computer–assisted self-interview surveys. Chart abstraction or blood draw provided viral load data. Geographic-level variables were extracted from the United States Census Bureau (e.g., socioeconomic disadvantage, percent of Black and Latino households, percent rural) and Esri Crime (e.g., global crime index) databases as Zip Code Tabulation Areas. AIDSVu data (e.g., prevalence of HIV among youth) were extracted at the county-level. Using HLM v.7, the authors conducted means-as-outcomes random effects multi-level models to examine the association between structural-level and individual-level factors and (1) being on antiretroviral therapy (ART) currently; (2) being on ART for at least 6 months; (3) missed HIV care appointments (not having missed any vs. having missed one or more appointments) over the past 12 months; and (4) viral suppression (defined by the corresponding assay cutoff for the lower limit of viral load at each participating site which denoted nondetectability vs. detectability). Results Frequencies for the 4 primary outcomes were as follows: current ART use (n = 1120, 59.23%); ART use for ≥6 months (n = 861, 45.53%); at least one missed HIV care appointment (n = 936, 49.50); and viral suppression (n = 577, 30.51%). After adjusting for individual-level factors, youth living in more disadvantaged areas (defined by a composite score derived from 2010 Census indicators including percent poverty, percent receiving public assistance, percent of female, single

  20. Hormonal Contraception and HIV-1 Infection: Medroxyprogesterone Acetate Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immune Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Huijbregts, Richard P. H.; Helton, E. Scott; Michel, Katherine G.; Sabbaj, Steffanie; Richter, Holly E.; Goepfert, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent observational studies indicate an association between the use of hormonal contraceptives and acquisition and transmission of HIV-1. The biological and immunological mechanisms underlying the observed association are unknown. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is a progestin-only injectable contraceptive that is commonly used in regions with high HIV-1 prevalence. Here we show that medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) suppresses the production of key regulators of cellular and humoral immunity involved in orchestrating the immune response to invading pathogens. MPA inhibited the production of interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12, TNFα, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α), and other cytokines and chemokines by peripheral blood cells and activated T cells and reduced the production of IFNα and TNFα by plasmacytoid dendritic cells in response to Toll-like receptor-7, -8, and -9 ligands. Women using DMPA displayed lower levels of IFNα in plasma and genital secretions compared with controls with no hormonal contraception. In addition, MPA prevented the down-regulation of HIV-1 coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5 on the surface of T cells after activation and increased HIV-1 replication in activated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. The presented results suggest that MPA suppresses both innate and adaptive arms of the immune system resulting in a reduction of host resistance to invading pathogens. PMID:23354099

  1. Design and Implementation of an External Quality Assessment Program for HIV Viral Load Measurements Using Dried Blood Spots

    PubMed Central

    Prach, Lisa M.; Puren, Adrian; Lippman, Sheri A.; Carmona, Sergio; Stephenson, Sophie; Cutler, Ewalde; Barnhart, Scott

    2014-01-01

    An external quality assurance program was developed for HIV-1 RNA viral load measurements taken from dried blood spots using a reference panel and field-collected specimens. The program demonstrated that accurate and reproducible quantitation can be obtained from field-collected specimens. Residual proviral DNA may confound interpretation in virologically suppressed subjects. PMID:25520449

  2. Physician experience and rates of plasma HIV-1 RNA suppression among illicit drug users: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART), suboptimal treatment outcomes have been observed among HIV-seropositive illicit drug users. As there is an urgent need to improve responses to antiretroviral therapy among this population, we undertook this study to evaluate the role of physician experience on rates of plasma HIV-1 RNA suppression following initiation of ART. Methods Using data from a community-recruited cohort of HIV-positive illicit drug users, we used Cox proportional hazards regression to model the time to plasma viral HIV RNA < 500 copies/mL among antiretroviral-naïve subjects initiating ART. Physician experience was defined as a continuous variable measured per 100 HIV-infected patients previously enrolled in the province-wide HIV treatment registry by that physician at the time a patient was enrolled. Results Between May 1996 and December 2008, 267 individuals initiated ART among whom 227 (85%) achieved a plasma HIV RNA < 500 copies/mL during the study period. In a multivariate analysis, greater physician experience was independently associated with higher rates of plasma HIV RNA suppression (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 1.17, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-1.34) after adjustment for adherence to ART. Other factors associated with viral suppression included engagement in methadone maintenance therapy (AHR = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.23-2.09), ≥ 95% adherence to ART (AHR = 2.42, 95% CI: 1.80-3.26), baseline CD4 count (AHR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.83-0.96) and baseline plasma HIV-1 RNA (AHR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.53-0.81). Conclusions In this setting of universal HIV/AIDS care, illicit drug users with more experienced physicians exhibited faster rates of plasma viral load suppression. These findings argue for specialized services to help optimize HIV treatment outcomes among this population. PMID:22276960

  3. Sexual risk behaviour and viral suppression among HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Christine L.; Freedman, Mark; Fagan, Jennifer L.; Frazier, Emma L.; Beer, Linda; Huang, Ping; Valverde, Eduardo E.; Johnson, Christopher; Sanders, Catherine; McNaghten, A.D.; Sullivan, Patrick; Lansky, Amy; Mermin, Jonathan; Heffelfinger, James; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the prevalence and association of sexual risk behaviours and viral suppression among HIV-infected adults in the United States. Design: Cross-sectional analysis of weighted data from a probability sample of HIV-infected adults receiving outpatient medical care. The facility and patient response rates were 76 and 51%, respectively. Methods: We analysed 2009 interview and medical record data. Sexual behaviours were self-reported in the past 12 months. Viral suppression was defined as all viral load measurements in the medical record during the past 12 months less than 200 copies/ml. Results: An estimated 98 022 (24%) HIV-infected adults engaged in unprotected vaginal or anal sex; 50 953 (12%) engaged in unprotected vaginal or anal sex with at least one partner of negative or unknown HIV status; 23 933 (6%) did so while not virally suppressed. Persons who were virally suppressed were less likely than persons who were not suppressed to engage in vaginal or anal sex [prevalence ratio, 0.88; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.82–0.93]; unprotected vaginal or anal sex (prevalence ratio, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.73–0.98); and unprotected vaginal or anal sex with a partner of negative or unknown HIV status (prevalence ratio, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.64–0.99). Conclusion: The majority of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the U.S. did not engage in sexual risk behaviours that have the potential to transmit HIV, and of the 12% who did, approximately half were not virally suppressed. Persons who were virally suppressed were less likely than persons who were not suppressed to engage in sexual risk behaviours. PMID:25000558

  4. Characteristics of HIV-1 Discordant Couples Enrolled in a Trial of HSV-2 Suppression to Reduce HIV-1 Transmission: The Partners Study

    PubMed Central

    Lingappa, Jairam R.; Kahle, Erin; Mugo, Nelly; Mujugira, Andrew; Magaret, Amalia; Baeten, Jared; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; Cohen, Craig R.; Katabira, Elly; Ronald, Allan; Kiarie, James; Farquhar, Carey; Stewart, Grace John; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, M.; Were, Edwin; Fife, Kenneth; deBruyn, Guy; Gray, Glenda; McIntyre, James; Manongi, Rachel; Kapiga, Saidi; Coetzee, David; Allen, Susan; Inambao, Mubiana; Kayitenkore, Kayitesi; Karita, Etienne; Kanweka, William; Delany, Sinead; Rees, Helen; Vwalika, Bellington; Coombs, Robert W.; Morrow, Rhoda; Whittington, William; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna; Celum, Connie

    2009-01-01

    Background The Partners HSV-2/HIV-1 Transmission Study (Partners Study) is a phase III, placebo-controlled trial of daily acyclovir for genital herpes (HSV-2) suppression among HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infected persons to reduce HIV-1 transmission to their HIV-1 susceptible partners, which requires recruitment of HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual couples. We describe the baseline characteristics of this cohort. Methods HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual couples, in which the HIV-1 infected partner was HSV-2 seropositive, had a CD4 count ≥250 cells/mcL and was not on antiretroviral therapy, were enrolled at 14 sites in East and Southern Africa. Demographic, behavioral, clinical and laboratory characteristics were assessed. Results Of the 3408 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples enrolled, 67% of the HIV-1 infected partners were women. Couples had cohabitated for a median of 5 years (range 2–9) with 28% reporting unprotected sex in the month prior to enrollment. Among HIV-1 susceptible participants, 86% of women and 59% of men were HSV-2 seropositive. Other laboratory-diagnosed sexually transmitted infections were uncommon (<5%), except for Trichomonas vaginalis in 14% of HIV-1 infected women. Median baseline CD4 count for HIV-1 infected participants was 462cells/mcL and median HIV-1 plasma RNA was 4.2 log10 copies/mL. After adjusting for age and African region, correlates of HIV-1 RNA level included male gender (+0.24 log10 copies/mL; p<0.001) and CD4 count (−0.25 and −0.55 log10 copies/mL for CD4 350–499 and >500 relative to <350, respectively, p<0.001). Conclusions The Partners Study successfully enrolled a cohort of 3408 heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in Africa at high risk for HIV-1 transmission. Follow-up of this cohort will evaluate the efficacy of acyclovir for HSV-2 suppression in preventing HIV-1 transmission and provide insights into biological and behavioral factors determining heterosexual HIV-1 transmission. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  5. HIV-1 antibody 3BNC117 suppresses viral rebound in humans during treatment interruption

    PubMed Central

    Scheid, Johannes F.; Horwitz, Joshua A.; Bar-On, Yotam; Kreider, Edward F.; Lu, Ching-Lan; Lorenzi, Julio C. C.; Feldmann, Anna; Braunschweig, Malte; Nogueira, Lilian; Oliveira, Thiago; Shimeliovich, Irina; Patel, Roshni; Burke, Leah; Cohen, Yehuda Z.; Hadrigan, Sonya; Settler, Allison; Witmer-Pack, Maggi; West, Anthony P.; Juelg, Boris; Keler, Tibor; Hawthorne, Thomas; Zingman, Barry; Gulick, Roy M.; Pfeifer, Nico; Learn, Gerald H.; Seaman, Michael S.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Klein, Florian; Schlesinger, Sarah J.; Walker, Bruce D.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Caskey, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Interruption of combination antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected individuals leads to rapid viral rebound. Here we report the results of a phase IIa open label clinical trial evaluating 3BNC117, a broad and potent neutralizing antibody (bNAb) against the CD4 binding site of HIV-1 Env1, in the setting of analytical treatment interruption in 13 HIV-1-infected individuals. Participants with 3BNC117-sensitive virus outgrowth cultures were enrolled. Two or four 30 mg kg−1 infusions of 3BNC117, separated by 3 or 2 weeks, respectively, are generally well tolerated. Infusions are associated with a delay in viral rebound for 5–9 weeks after two infusions, and up to 19 weeks after four infusions, or an average of 6.7 and 9.9 weeks respectively, compared with 2.6 weeks for historical controls (P < 0.00001). Rebound viruses arise predominantly from a single provirus. In most individuals, emerging viruses show increased resistance, indicating escape. However, 30% of participants remained suppressed until antibody concentrations waned below 20 μg ml−1, and the viruses emerging in all but one of these individuals showed no apparent resistance to 3BCN117, suggesting failure to escape over a period of 9–19 weeks. We conclude that administration of 3BNC117 exerts strong selective pressure on HIV-1 emerging from latent reservoirs during analytical treatment interruption in humans. PMID:27338952

  6. HIV-1 antibody 3BNC117 suppresses viral rebound in humans during treatment interruption.

    PubMed

    Scheid, Johannes F; Horwitz, Joshua A; Bar-On, Yotam; Kreider, Edward F; Lu, Ching-Lan; Lorenzi, Julio C C; Feldmann, Anna; Braunschweig, Malte; Nogueira, Lilian; Oliveira, Thiago; Shimeliovich, Irina; Patel, Roshni; Burke, Leah; Cohen, Yehuda Z; Hadrigan, Sonya; Settler, Allison; Witmer-Pack, Maggi; West, Anthony P; Juelg, Boris; Keler, Tibor; Hawthorne, Thomas; Zingman, Barry; Gulick, Roy M; Pfeifer, Nico; Learn, Gerald H; Seaman, Michael S; Bjorkman, Pamela J; Klein, Florian; Schlesinger, Sarah J; Walker, Bruce D; Hahn, Beatrice H; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-07-28

    Interruption of combination antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected individuals leads to rapid viral rebound. Here we report the results of a phase IIa open label clinical trial evaluating 3BNC117,a broad and potent neutralizing antibody against the CD4 binding site of the HIV-1 Env protein, during analytical treatment interruption in 13 HIV-1-infected individuals. Participants with 3BNC117-sensitive virus outgrowth cultures were enrolled. Results show that two or four 30 mg kg(-1) 3BNC117 infusions,separated by 3 or 2 weeks, respectively, are generally well tolerated.Infusions are associated with a delay in viral rebound of 5-9 weeks after two infusions, and up to 19 weeks after four infusions, or an average of 6.7 and 9.9 weeks, respectively, compared with 2.6 weeks for historical controls (P < 0.00001). Rebound viruses arise predominantly from a single provirus. In most individuals,emerging viruses show increased resistance, indicating escape.However, 30% of participants remained suppressed until antibody concentrations waned below 20 μg ml(-1), and the viruses emerging in all but one of these individuals showed no apparent resistance to 3BCN117, suggesting failure to escape over a period of 9-19 weeks.We conclude that the administration of 3BNC117 exerts strong selective pressure on HIV-1 emerging from latent reservoirs during analytical treatment interruption in humans. PMID:27338952

  7. Robust Suppression of HIV Replication by Intracellularly Expressed Reverse Transcriptase Aptamers Is Independent of Ribozyme Processing

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Margaret J; Sharma, Tarun K; Whatley, Angela S; Landon, Linda A; Tempesta, Michael A; Johnson, Marc C; Burke, Donald H

    2012-01-01

    RNA aptamers that bind human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) also inhibit viral replication, making them attractive as therapeutic candidates and potential tools for dissecting viral pathogenesis. However, it is not well understood how aptamer-expression context and cellular RNA pathways govern aptamer accumulation and net antiviral bioactivity. Using a previously-described expression cassette in which aptamers were flanked by two “minimal core” hammerhead ribozymes, we observed only weak suppression of pseudotyped HIV. To evaluate the importance of the minimal ribozymes, we replaced them with extended, tertiary-stabilized hammerhead ribozymes with enhanced self-cleavage activity, in addition to noncleaving ribozymes with active site mutations. Both the active and inactive versions of the extended hammerhead ribozymes increased inhibition of pseudotyped virus, indicating that processing is not necessary for bioactivity. Clonal stable cell lines expressing aptamers from these modified constructs strongly suppressed infectious virus, and were more effective than minimal ribozymes at high viral multiplicity of infection (MOI). Tertiary stabilization greatly increased aptamer accumulation in viral and subcellular compartments, again regardless of self-cleavage capability. We therefore propose that the increased accumulation is responsible for increased suppression, that the bioactive form of the aptamer is one of the uncleaved or partially cleaved transcripts, and that tertiary stabilization increases transcript stability by reducing exonuclease degradation. PMID:22948672

  8. Relationship between hunger, adherence to antiretroviral therapy and plasma HIV RNA suppression among HIV-positive illicit drug users in a Canadian setting.

    PubMed

    Anema, Aranka; Kerr, Thomas; Milloy, M-J; Feng, Cindy; Montaner, Julio S G; Wood, Evan

    2014-04-01

    Food insecurity may be a barrier to achieving optimal HIV treatment-related outcomes among illicit drug users. This study therefore, aimed to assess the impact of severe food insecurity, or hunger, on plasma HIV RNA suppression among illicit drug users receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). A cross-sectional Multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess the potential relationship between hunger and plasma HIV RNA suppression. A sample of n = 406 adults was derived from a community-recruited open prospective cohort of HIV-positive illicit drug users, in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC), Canada. A total of 235 (63.7%) reported "being hungry and unable to afford enough food," and 241 (59.4%) had plasma HIV RNA < 50 copies/ml. In unadjusted analyses, self-reported hunger was associated with lower odds of plasma HIV RNA suppression (Odds Ratio = 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.39-0.90, p = 0.015). In multivariate analyses, this association was no longer significant after controlling for socio-demographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics, including 95% adherence (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.37-1.10, p = 0.105). Multivariate models stratified by 95% adherence found that the direction and magnitude of this association was not significantly altered by the adherence level. Hunger was common among illicit drug users in this setting. Although, there was an association between hunger and lower likelihood of plasma HIV RNA suppression, this did not persist in adjusted analyses. Further research is warranted to understand the social-structural, policy, and physical factors shaping the HIV outcomes of illicit drug users.

  9. Monocytes from HIV+ individuals show impaired cholesterol efflux and increased foam cell formation after transendothelial migration

    PubMed Central

    MAISA, Anna; HEARPS, Anna C.; ANGELOVICH, Thomas A.; PEREIRA, Candida F.; ZHOU, Jingling; SHI, Margaret D.Y.; PALMER, Clovis S.; MULLER, William A.; CROWE, Suzanne M.; JAWOROWSKI, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Design HIV+ individuals have an increased risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease which is independent of antiretroviral therapy and traditional risk factors. Monocytes play a central role in the development of atherosclerosis, and HIV-related chronic inflammation and monocyte activation may contribute to increased atherosclerosis, but the mechanisms are unknown. Methods Using an in vitro model of atherosclerotic plaque formation, we measured the transendothelial migration of purified monocytes from age-matched HIV+ and uninfected donors and examined their differentiation into foam cells. Cholesterol efflux and the expression of cholesterol metabolism genes were also assessed. Results Monocytes from HIV+ individuals showed increased foam cell formation compared to controls (18.9% vs 0% respectively, p=0.004) and serum from virologically suppressed HIV+ individuals potentiated foam cell formation by monocytes from both uninfected and HIV+ donors. Plasma TNF levels were increased in HIV+ vs control donors (5.9 vs 3.5 pg/ml, p=0.02) and foam cell formation was inhibited by blocking antibodies to TNF receptors, suggesting a direct effect on monocyte differentiation to foam cells. Monocytes from virologically suppressed HIV+ donors showed impaired cholesterol efflux and decreased expression of key genes regulating cholesterol metabolism, including the cholesterol transporter ABCA1 (p=0.02). Conclusions Monocytes from HIV+ individuals show impaired cholesterol efflux and are primed for foam cell formation following trans-endothelial migration. Factors present in HIV+ serum, including elevated TNF levels, further enhance foam cell formation. The pro-atherogenic phenotype of monocytes persists in virologically suppressed HIV+ individuals and may contribute mechanistically to increased atherosclerosis in this population. PMID:26244384

  10. Viral Suppression and Resistance in a Cohort of Perinatally-HIV Infected (PHIV+) Pregnant Women.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Maria Letícia; Santos, Edwiges; Benamor Teixeira, Maria de Lourdes; Poletti, Monica; Sousa, Carolina; Gouvea, Maria Isabel; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; João, Esaú

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to describe viral suppression and antiretroviral (ARV) resistance mutations in an ongoing cohort of perinatally-infected HIV+ (PHIV+) pregnant women. Descriptive analysis was performed using SPSS 18.0. From 2011 to 2014, we followed 22 PHIV+ pregnant women. Median age at prenatal entry was 19 years (Interquartile range (IQR) 17.6-21.0); 86% had an AIDS diagnosis; 81% had disclosed their HIV status to partner 11. The median age at HIV diagnosis was 8.3 y (IQR 4.0-13.6), the median age at sexual debut was 16 years (IQR 14-18). At the time of prenatal care initiation, four (18%) were on their first antiretroviral treatment (ART), eight (36%) in their second regimen and nine (41%) in their third regimen or beyond, and one had no data. Seventeen of 22 (77%) had HIV-viral load (VL) > 50 copies/mL at prenatal care entry, 16 had a genotyping exam performed. Seventeen of 22 PHIV+ had VL results near delivery: 7/17 (41%) had VL < 50 copies/mL. Among those who had genotyping at prenatal entry, 11/16 (69%) had mutations associated with ARV resistance. The most frequent major mutations were K103N, M184V, T215, M41L, D67N at reverse transcriptase gene and M46, I54V and V82A at protease gene. No vertical transmissions occurred. Management of pregnancy among PHIV+ is challenging. Individualized ART are needed to achieve viral suppression in a highly ART-exposed subpopulation. PMID:27338425

  11. Updates and achievements in virology.

    PubMed

    Buonaguro, Franco M; Campadelli-Fiume, Gabriella; De Giuli Morghen, Carlo; Palù, Giorgio

    2010-07-01

    The 4th European Congress of Virology, hosted by the Italian Society for Virology, attracted approximately 1300 scientists from 46 countries worldwide. It also represented the first conference of the European Society for Virology, which was established in Campidoglio, Rome, Italy in 2009. The main goal of the meeting was to share research activities and results achieved in European virology units/institutes and to strengthen collaboration with colleagues from both western and developing countries. The worldwide representation of participants is a testament to the strength and attraction of European virology. The 5-day conference brought together the best of current virology; topics covered all three living domains (bacteria, archaea and eucarya), with special sessions on plant and veterinary virology as well as human virology, including two oral presentations on mimiviruses. The conference included five plenary sessions, 31 workshops, one hepatitis C virus roundtable, ten special workshops and three poster sessions, as well as 45 keynote lectures, 191 oral presentations and 845 abstracts. Furthermore, the Gesellschaft fur Virologie Loeffler-Frosch medal award was given to Peter Vogt for his long-standing career and achievements; the Gardner Lecture of the European Society for Clinical Virology was presented by Yoshihiro Kawaoka, and the Pioneer in Virology Lecture of the Italian Society for Virology was presented by Ulrich Koszinowski.

  12. Therapies for HIV and viral hepatitis coinfection.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Curtis L

    2005-02-01

    The natural history of chronic viral hepatitis is altered by HIV coinfection. Liver fibrosis rates and clinical features of liver disease develop more rapidly. Although HIV-hepatitis C virus coinfected subjects may progress more rapidly to AIDS, this is probably explained by comorbid illness, substance abuse and socioeconomic circumstances. Safe and virologically active treatment of HIV-hepatitis B virus coinfection can be concurrently achieved by the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens containing lamivudine and/or tenofovir. In most cases, highly active antiretroviral therapy represents the most beneficial initial pharmaceutical intervention for HIV-hepatitisC virus coinfection. HepatitisC virus antiviral therapy should, in most cases, be reserved for those achieving HIV RNA suppression and immune restoration from highly active antiretroviral therapy or with nadir CD4 T-lymphocytes above 350 cells/microl. PMID:15757459

  13. PHARMACOKINETIC EXPOSURE AND VIROLOGIC RESPONSE IN HIV-1 INFECTED PREGNANT WOMEN TREATED WITH LOPINAVIR/RITONAVIR: AIDS CLINICAL TRIALS GROUP PROTOCOL A5153S: A SUBSTUDY TO A5150

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Beverly E.; Tierney, Camlin; Sun, Xin; Stek, Alice; Cohn, Susan E.; Coombs, Robert W.; Bastow, Barbara; Aweeka, Francesca T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We studied the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of boosted soft-gel lopinavir/ritonavir to assess if the area under the plasma concentration versus time curve (AUC) is altered in pregnancy and whether changes in AUC impacted HIV-1 control. Methods We enrolled pregnant women ≥13 years of age between 22 to 30 weeks gestation who expected to be on stable lopinavir/ritonavir for ≥8 weeks pre-delivery and ≥24 weeks post-delivery. Pharmacokinetic evaluations for lopinavir and ritonavir occurred at 36 weeks gestation and 6 and 24 weeks postpartum. Results Ten women underwent intensive pharmacokinetic evaluations for lopinavir and ritonavir at 36 weeks gestation and at 6 and 24 weeks postpartum. Estimated geometric mean (GM) AUC 0–6h (95% CI) for lopinavir were not significantly different at 26.5 (17.0, 41.4) and 41.9 (26.1, 67.5) mcg*hr/mL at 36 weeks gestation and 6 weeks postpartum, respectively (within-subject GM ratio 0.60 (0.25, 1.43); p=0.19). At 36 weeks gestation, 5 of 10 women had viral load <50 copies/mL and at 6 weeks postpartum 5 of 9 had viral load <50 copies/mL. Nine of ten infants for whom data were available were HIV negative. Conclusion Despite below target lopinavir levels (< 52 mcg*hr/mL except at 2 postpartum measurements), women maintained virologic control postpartum. Higher doses of lopinavir/ritonavir during pregnancy may not be necessary in all women. PMID:26878071

  14. Increased Intrathecal Immune Activation in Virally Suppressed HIV-1 Infected Patients with Neurocognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Edén, Arvid; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Heaton, Robert K.; Nilsson, Staffan; Zetterberg, Henrik; Fuchs, Dietmar; Franklin, Donald; Price, Richard W.; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L.; Gisslén, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although milder forms of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) remain prevalent, a correlation to neuronal injury has not been established in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined the relationship between mild HAND and CSF neurofilament light protein (NFL), a biomarker of neuronal injury; and CSF neopterin, a biomarker of CNS immunoactivation, in virally suppressed patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Design and Methods We selected 99 subjects on suppressive ART followed longitudinally from the CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) study. Based on standardized comprehensive neurocognitive performance (NP) testing, subjects were classified as neurocognitively normal (NCN; n = 29) or impaired (NCI; n = 70). The NCI group included subjects with asymptomatic (ANI; n = 37) or mild (MND; n = 33) HAND. CSF biomarkers were analyzed on two occasions. Results Geometric mean CSF neopterin was 25% higher in the NCI group (p = 0.04) and NFL and neopterin were significantly correlated within the NCI group (r = 0.30; p<0.001) but not in the NCN group (r = -0.13; p = 0.3). Additionally, a trend towards higher NFL was seen in the NCI group (p = 0.06). Conclusions Mild HAND was associated with increased intrathecal immune activation, and the correlation between neopterin and NFL found in NCI subjects indicates an association between neurocognitive impairment, CNS inflammation and neuronal damage. Together these findings suggest that NCI despite ART may represent an active pathological process within the CNS that needs further characterization in prospective studies. PMID:27295036

  15. Violence screening and viral load suppression among HIV-positive women of color.

    PubMed

    Espino, Susan Ryerson; Fletcher, Jason; Gonzalez, Marisol; Precht, Allison; Xavier, Jessica; Matoff-Stepp, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Recent research suggests intimate partner violence (IPV) is commonly experienced by many people living with HIV/AIDS, which can complicate their care. We introduce a novel approach to screening for history of violence among 102 women of color living with HIV and receiving care at an outpatient public health clinic. Using a composite measure composed of data from a variety of screening tools, we were able to determine that 70.6% of the women had a history of violence using the composite measure, and that 43% screened positive using multiple screening tools. Although overall viral load suppression rate was high at 81.4%, women with a history of violence were less likely to be virally suppressed when compared to those without such a history (76.4% versus 93.3%, p<0.05). Our findings suggest using a variety of screening questions at entry and at follow-up care appointments may be key to identifying and supporting women survivors who may not disclose violence when first asked. Future research should foster further development, analysis, and use of a variety of screening tools such as those used in this study.

  16. Violence Screening and Viral Load Suppression Among HIV-Positive Women of Color

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Jason; Precht, Allison; Matoff-Stepp, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent research suggests intimate partner violence (IPV) is commonly experienced by many people living with HIV/AIDS, which can complicate their care. We introduce a novel approach to screening for history of violence among 102 women of color living with HIV and receiving care at an outpatient public health clinic. Using a composite measure composed of data from a variety of screening tools, we were able to determine that 70.6% of the women had a history of violence using the composite measure, and that 43% screened positive using multiple screening tools. Although overall viral load suppression rate was high at 81.4%, women with a history of violence were less likely to be virally suppressed when compared to those without such a history (76.4% versus 93.3%, p<0.05). Our findings suggest using a variety of screening questions at entry and at follow-up care appointments may be key to identifying and supporting women survivors who may not disclose violence when first asked. Future research should foster further development, analysis, and use of a variety of screening tools such as those used in this study. PMID:25561308

  17. Atazanavir/ritonavir monotherapy as maintenance strategy in HIV-1 treated subjects with viral suppression: 96-week analysis results of the MODAT study

    PubMed Central

    Spagnuolo, Vincenzo; Galli, Laura; Bigoloni, Alba; Nozza, Silvia; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Antinori, Andrea; Di Biagio, Antonio; Rusconi, Stefano; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Lazzarin, Adriano; Castagna, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The 48-week interim analysis of the MODAT study showed that confirmed virologic failure (CVF) was more frequent in patients simplifying to ATV/r monotherapy compared to maintaining ATV/r-based triple therapy. The DSMB recommended stopping study enrollment but continuing follow-up of enrolled patients. We present the 96-week efficacy analysis. Material and Methods Multicentre, randomized, open-label, non-inferiority trial (non-inferiority margin −10%). Treatment failure (TF) was defined as CVF (two consecutive HIV-RNA >50 cp/mL) or discontinuation for any cause. In the monotherapy arm, patients with CVF re-introduced their previous NRTIs and remained in the study if HIV-RNA <50 copies/mL within 12 weeks of re-intensification. Results 101 patients evaluated (Figure 1): 85% males, 21% HCV-positive, median (IQR) age of 42 (36–48) years, baseline CD4+ 576 (447–743) cells/µL. In the 96-week analysis (ITT; TF=failure), efficacy was 64% (32/50) in the monotherapy arm and 63% (32/51) in the triple-therapy arm (difference +1.3%, 95% CI −17.5–20.1). Fourteen patients in monotherapy and two in triple-therapy arm had CVF; median HIV-RNA was 136 (72–376) copies/mL. In monotherapy arm, no PI or NRTI associated resistance mutations were observed at CVF. All patients who re-intensified re-suppressed. In monotherapy arm, TF was more frequent in HCV-co-infected patients (64% vs 28%; p=0.041). In the secondary analysis (ITT; re-intensification=success), 82% (41/50) in monotherapy arm and 63% (32/51) in triple-therapy arm were on study at week 96 (difference +19.3%, 95% CI 2.2–36.3). SAEs occurred in four (8%) patients in the monotherapy arm (one left basal pneumonia, one acute coronary stenosis, one traumatic lesion, one nephrolithiasis) and two (4%) in the triple therapy arm (one sepsis, one renal failure). Drug-related adverse events (AEs) leading to discontinuation were three (6%) in the monotherapy arm (two AEs occurred in patients after successful re

  18. Retention in Care and Viral Suppression Among Persons Living With HIV/AIDS in New York City, 2006–2010

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qiang; Wiewel, Ellen W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated the proportions of persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in New York City (NYC) retained in care and virally suppressed. Methods. We used routinely reported laboratory surveillance data to measure trends in retention in care and viral suppression in PLWHA in NYC from 2006 through 2010. Our denominator excluded persons lacking any HIV-related laboratory tests during the 5 years prior to the year of analysis. Results. The proportion of patients retained in care (≥ 1 care visit in a calendar year) was stable, at 82.5% in 2006 and 81.8% in 2010. However, the proportion of persons with evidence of viral suppression increased significantly, from 44.3% to 59.1%. Blacks were least likely to have viral suppression (adjusted prevalence ratio [APR] = 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.87, 0.90). A U-shaped relationship between age and viral suppression was observed, with the 20- to 29-year age group least likely to have a suppressed viral load. Conclusions. Higher and more plausible proportions retained in care and virally suppressed than national estimates may reflect the difference in methodology and our comprehensive HIV-related laboratory reporting system. PMID:25033144

  19. Gender Differences in Clinical Outcomes among HIV-Positive Individuals on Antiretroviral Therapy in Canada: A Multisite Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Cescon, Angela; Patterson, Sophie; Chan, Keith; Palmer, Alexis K.; Margolese, Shari; Burchell, Ann N.; Cooper, Curtis; Klein, Marina B.; Machouf, Nima; Montaner, Julio S. G.; Tsoukas, Chris; Hogg, Robert S.; Raboud, Janet M.; Loutfy, Mona R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cohort data examining differences by gender in clinical responses to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) remain inconsistent and have yet to be explored in a multi-province Canadian setting. This study investigates gender differences by injection drug use (IDU) history in virologic responses to ART and mortality. Methods Data from the Canadian Observational Cohort (CANOC) collaboration, a multisite cohort study of HIV-positive individuals initiating ART after January 1, 2000, were included. This analysis was restricted to participants with a follow-up HIV-RNA plasma viral load measure and known IDU history. Weibull hazard regression evaluated time to virologic suppression (2 consecutive measures <50 copies/mL), rebound (>1000 copies/mL after suppression), and all-cause mortality. Sensitivity analyses explored the impact of presumed ART use in pregnancy on virologic outcomes. Results At baseline, women (1120 of 5442 participants) were younger (median 36 vs. 41 years) and more frequently reported IDU history (43.5% vs. 28.8%) (both p<0.001). Irrespective of IDU history, in adjusted multivariable analyses women were significantly less likely to virologically suppress after ART initiation and were at increased risk of viral load rebound. In adjusted time to death analysis, no differences by gender were noted. After adjusting for presumed ART use in pregnancy, observed gender differences in time to virologic suppression for non-IDU, and time to virologic rebound for IDU, became insignificant. Conclusions HIV-positive women in CANOC are at heightened risk for poor clinical outcomes. Further understanding of the intersections between gender and other factors augmenting risk is needed to maximize the benefits of ART. PMID:24391803

  20. Natural conception in HIV-serodiscordant couples with the infected partner in suppressive antiretroviral therapy: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Del Romero, Jorge; Baza, María Begoña; Río, Isabel; Jerónimo, Adrián; Vera, Mar; Hernando, Victoria; Rodríguez, Carmen; Castilla, Jesús

    2016-07-01

    The potential of antiretroviral treatment (ART) to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV has increased the number of serodiscordant couples who are considering natural conception. We aim to describe the results of a protocol for reproductive counseling aimed at HIV serodiscordant couples who desire natural conception, in which the infected partner, the index case, is receiving suppressive antiretroviral treatment.A prospective cohort included all HIV serodiscordant couples attended a counseling program in the period 2002 to 2013 who opted for natural conception and met the following criteria: index case on ART with persistent plasma viral suppression for at least the previous 6 months, ART compliance over 95%, preserved immune status, undetectable HIV viral and proviral load in semen in male index cases, and absence of genitourinary infections and fertility problems in both members of the couple.Of the 161 HIV serodiscordant couples included, 133 with male index cases, 66% achieved at least 1 pregnancy, 18% a second one, and 5% a third pregnancy. A total of 144 natural pregnancies occurred and 107 babies were born. The pregnancy rate was 1.9 for each 100 acts of vaginal intercourse, and the mean time to conception was 6.1 months, both independently of the sex of the index case. No case of sexual or vertical HIV transmission occurred.In the absence of fertility problems and under controlled conditions, natural conception might be a safe and effective reproductive method for those HIV serodiscordant couples who choose this reproductive option.

  1. Natural conception in HIV-serodiscordant couples with the infected partner in suppressive antiretroviral therapy: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Del Romero, Jorge; Baza, María Begoña; Río, Isabel; Jerónimo, Adrián; Vera, Mar; Hernando, Victoria; Rodríguez, Carmen; Castilla, Jesús

    2016-07-01

    The potential of antiretroviral treatment (ART) to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV has increased the number of serodiscordant couples who are considering natural conception. We aim to describe the results of a protocol for reproductive counseling aimed at HIV serodiscordant couples who desire natural conception, in which the infected partner, the index case, is receiving suppressive antiretroviral treatment.A prospective cohort included all HIV serodiscordant couples attended a counseling program in the period 2002 to 2013 who opted for natural conception and met the following criteria: index case on ART with persistent plasma viral suppression for at least the previous 6 months, ART compliance over 95%, preserved immune status, undetectable HIV viral and proviral load in semen in male index cases, and absence of genitourinary infections and fertility problems in both members of the couple.Of the 161 HIV serodiscordant couples included, 133 with male index cases, 66% achieved at least 1 pregnancy, 18% a second one, and 5% a third pregnancy. A total of 144 natural pregnancies occurred and 107 babies were born. The pregnancy rate was 1.9 for each 100 acts of vaginal intercourse, and the mean time to conception was 6.1 months, both independently of the sex of the index case. No case of sexual or vertical HIV transmission occurred.In the absence of fertility problems and under controlled conditions, natural conception might be a safe and effective reproductive method for those HIV serodiscordant couples who choose this reproductive option. PMID:27472733

  2. Short Communication: Viral Suppression Is Associated with Increased Likelihood of Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Persons Living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Burkholder, Greer A; Tamhane, Ashutosh R; Appell, Lauren E; Willig, James H; Saag, Michael S; Raper, James L; Westfall, Andrew O; Mugavero, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    With improved survival and aging, more persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) are at risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). This retrospective longitudinal study evaluated patient characteristics associated with CRC screening in our HIV cohort. Patients were followed beginning at age 50 years during a study period from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2010 (n=265). During a median follow-up time of 1.7 years, only 30% of patients underwent CRC screening. The majority of screened patients received endoscopic screening (colonoscopy, 86%; sigmoidoscopy, 8%); among these patients, results were available for 68/75, and adenomatous polyps were found in 13%. No cases of CRC were reported. Among unscreened patients, only 23% had an external primary care provider, indicating an HIV provider was the expected source for CRC screening referral in the majority. Patients with time-varying suppressed HIV viral load were more likely to receive screening (HRadjusted=1.74; 95% CI: 1.05-2.87), independent of CD4 count. Our findings suggest HIV providers are more likely to address non-HIV-related healthcare maintenance when HIV is controlled. In addition, a significant number of neoplastic lesions are likely being missed in PLWHA who have not been screened for CRC. Provision of evidence-based preventive care in addition to HIV care is required for the aging population of PLWHA.

  3. Alarming rates of virological failure and drug resistance in patients on long-term antiretroviral treatment in routine HIV clinics in Togo.

    PubMed

    Konou, Abla A; Dagnra, Anoumou Y; Vidal, Nicole; Salou, Mounerou; Adam, Zakillatou; Singo-Tokofai, Assétina; Delaporte, Eric; Prince-David, Mireille; Peeters, Martine

    2015-11-28

    Information on efficacy of long-term antiretroviral treatment (ART) exposure in resource-limited countries is still scarce. In 767 patients attending routine HIV centers in Togo and receiving first-line ART for more than four years, 42% had viral load greater than 1000 copies/ml and either were on a completely ineffective ART regime or were with only a single drug active. The actual conditions to ensure lifelong ART in resource-limited countries can have dramatic long-term outcomes. PMID:26558549

  4. Alarming rates of virological failure and drug resistance in patients on long-term antiretroviral treatment in routine HIV clinics in Togo.

    PubMed

    Konou, Abla A; Dagnra, Anoumou Y; Vidal, Nicole; Salou, Mounerou; Adam, Zakillatou; Singo-Tokofai, Assétina; Delaporte, Eric; Prince-David, Mireille; Peeters, Martine

    2015-11-28

    Information on efficacy of long-term antiretroviral treatment (ART) exposure in resource-limited countries is still scarce. In 767 patients attending routine HIV centers in Togo and receiving first-line ART for more than four years, 42% had viral load greater than 1000 copies/ml and either were on a completely ineffective ART regime or were with only a single drug active. The actual conditions to ensure lifelong ART in resource-limited countries can have dramatic long-term outcomes.

  5. Management of HIV Infection during Pregnancy in the United States: Updated Evidence-Based Recommendations and Future Potential Practices.

    PubMed

    Rimawi, Bassam H; Haddad, Lisa; Badell, Martina L; Chakraborty, Rana

    2016-01-01

    All HIV-infected women contemplating pregnancy should initiate combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), with a goal to achieve a maternal serum HIV RNA viral load beneath the laboratory level of detection prior to conceiving, as well as throughout their pregnancy. Successfully identifying HIV infection during pregnancy through screening tests is essential in order to prevent in utero and intrapartum transmission of HIV. Perinatal HIV transmission can be less than 1% when effective cART, associated with virologic suppression of HIV, is given during the ante-, intra-, and postpartum periods. Perinatal HIV guidelines, developed by organizations such as the World Health Organization, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the US Department of Health and Human Services, are constantly evolving, and hence the aim of our review is to provide a useful concise review for medical providers caring for HIV-infected pregnant women, summarizing the latest and current recommendations in the United States. PMID:27504071

  6. Management of HIV Infection during Pregnancy in the United States: Updated Evidence-Based Recommendations and Future Potential Practices

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Lisa; Chakraborty, Rana

    2016-01-01

    All HIV-infected women contemplating pregnancy should initiate combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), with a goal to achieve a maternal serum HIV RNA viral load beneath the laboratory level of detection prior to conceiving, as well as throughout their pregnancy. Successfully identifying HIV infection during pregnancy through screening tests is essential in order to prevent in utero and intrapartum transmission of HIV. Perinatal HIV transmission can be less than 1% when effective cART, associated with virologic suppression of HIV, is given during the ante-, intra-, and postpartum periods. Perinatal HIV guidelines, developed by organizations such as the World Health Organization, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the US Department of Health and Human Services, are constantly evolving, and hence the aim of our review is to provide a useful concise review for medical providers caring for HIV-infected pregnant women, summarizing the latest and current recommendations in the United States. PMID:27504071

  7. Raltegravir use prospectively assessed in a major HIV outpatient clinic in Italy: sample population, virological-immunological activity, and tolerability profile.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Roberto; Calza, Leonardo; Marinacci, Ginevra; Cascavilla, Alessandra; Colangeli, Vincenzo; Salvadori, Caterina; Martelli, Giulia; Appolloni, Lucia; Puggioli, Cristina; Viale, Pierluigi

    2014-12-01

    Raltegravir, as the first HIV integrase inhibitor, has been used and prospectively monitored since 2010 in our HIV outpatient centre, where over 1,200 patients are monitored. The aim of our report is to perform an interim assessment of the background, the safety profile and the clinical-laboratory monitoring of all patients treated with a combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) including raltegravir, for at least 12 months. In all, 109 pretreated patients started a raltegravir-containing cART when aged 44.8 plus or minus 19.2 years, with a history of HIV infection lasting 13.4 plus or minus 9.7 years. All subjects were monitored for at least 12 months (mean 17.2 plus or minus 10.3 months). In the vast majority of cases (93 of 109: 85.3%), multiple (3-16) prior cART changes prompted raltegravir introduction in advanced-salvage lines: 72 of 109 (66.1%) patients had even developed a concurrent triple-class resistance to anti-HIV compounds. The most frequent companion antiretroviral agents were: darunavir/ritonavir (75 cases), maraviroc (47 subjects), and etravirine (38 cases). The most common underlying conditions were: AIDS (46 patients), liver cirrhosis (31 cases), AIDS-related or other malignancies (23 cases), and major cardio-cerebro-vascular events (18 cases). A chronic HCV and HBV hepatitis were of concern in 48 and 23 patients, respectively. The adjunct of raltegravir favourably affected all clinical-laboratory markers of HIV disease progression, and those of the broad spectrum of comorbidities, except for two patients who failed the raltegravir-containing cART due to insufficient adherence. Despite the already compromised clinical situation, a minority of subjects experienced mild-transient clinical-laboratory untoward events possibly attributable to raltegravir, such that no patients discontinued raltegravir during the observation period. Only three AIDS-defining conditions became apparent during raltegravir-based cART; chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy

  8. Estimating the fraction of progeny virions that must incorporate APOBEC3G for suppression of productive HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Thangavelu, Pulari U.; Gupta, Vipul; Dixit, Narendra M.

    2014-01-20

    The contest between the host factor APOBEC3G (A3G) and the HIV-1 protein Vif presents an attractive target of intervention. The extent to which the A3G–Vif interaction must be suppressed to tilt the balance in favor of A3G remains unknown. We employed stochastic simulations and mathematical modeling of the within-host dynamics and evolution of HIV-1 to estimate the fraction of progeny virions that must incorporate A3G to render productive infection unsustainable. Using three different approaches, we found consistently that a transition from sustained infection to suppression of productive infection occurred when the latter fraction exceeded ∼0.8. The transition was triggered by A3G-induced hypermutations that led to premature stop codons compromising viral production and was consistent with driving the basic reproductive number, R{sub 0}, below unity. The fraction identified may serve as a quantitative guideline for strategies targeting the A3G–Vif axis. - Highlights: • We perform simulations and mathematical modeling of the role of APOBEC3G in suppressing HIV-1 infection. • In three distinct ways, we estimate that when over 80% of progeny virions carry APOBEC3G, productive HIV-1 infection would be suppressed. • Our estimate of this critical fraction presents quantitative guidelines for strategies targeting the APOBEC3G–Vif axis.

  9. Food insecurity, CD4 counts, and incomplete viral suppression among HIV+ patients from Texas Children's Hospital: A pilot study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our goal was to determine the relationship between food insecurity and CD4 counts and viral suppression among pediatric HIV-positive patients. Food insecurity was assessed by validated survey. CD4 counts and viral load were abstracted from patients’ charts. We used linear regression for the dependen...

  10. Early diagnosis and retention in care of HIV-infected patients through rapid salivary testing: a test-and-treat fast track pilot study.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Maria Rita; Soldini, Laura; Negri, Silvia; Vidoni, Gian Marino; Gianotti, Nicola; Nozza, Silvia; Schlusnus, Karin; Dorigatti, Fernanda; Lazzarin, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and the retention-in-care of individuals diagnosed during six years of salivary HIV testing (EASY-test project). Among those linked-to-care at the Infectious Diseases Department of San Raffaele Hospital (Milan, Italy), the proportion of patients engaged, retained in care and virologically suppressed after the antiretroviral treatment was 96%, 100% and 95.2%, respectively. Results from our study suggest that salivary HIV testing may help bring to light cases of HIV infection otherwise undiagnosed, and thus favour a more rapid and wider reduction of the HIV infection burden at the population level.

  11. Early diagnosis and retention in care of HIV-infected patients through rapid salivary testing: a test-and-treat fast track pilot study.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Maria Rita; Soldini, Laura; Negri, Silvia; Vidoni, Gian Marino; Gianotti, Nicola; Nozza, Silvia; Schlusnus, Karin; Dorigatti, Fernanda; Lazzarin, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and the retention-in-care of individuals diagnosed during six years of salivary HIV testing (EASY-test project). Among those linked-to-care at the Infectious Diseases Department of San Raffaele Hospital (Milan, Italy), the proportion of patients engaged, retained in care and virologically suppressed after the antiretroviral treatment was 96%, 100% and 95.2%, respectively. Results from our study suggest that salivary HIV testing may help bring to light cases of HIV infection otherwise undiagnosed, and thus favour a more rapid and wider reduction of the HIV infection burden at the population level. PMID:26922986

  12. Antiretroviral Therapy and Viral Suppression Among Foreign-Born HIV-Infected Persons Receiving Medical Care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Tanya R.; Lin, Xia; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Immigrants to the United States are more likely to be diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection compared with native-born persons. Navigating access to healthcare in the United States can be challenging for foreign-born persons, and HIV treatment outcomes may be suboptimal for these persons. We compared characteristics of and assessed disparities in clinical outcomes of foreign-born persons in care for HIV in the United States. The Medical Monitoring Project is a complex sample, cross-sectional survey designed to be nationally representative of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Using data from 2009, 2010, and 2011, we conducted descriptive analyses and multivariable logistic regression to assess associations between foreign-born status and antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription, and between foreign-born status and viral suppression. In all, 13.4% of HIV-infected persons were self-identified as foreign-born; the most common regions of birth were Central America and Mexico (45.4%) and the Caribbean (16.0%). Nearly 90% of foreign-born persons were diagnosed with HIV after entry into the United States. Compared with US-born persons, foreign-born persons were more likely to be younger, Hispanic, less educated, and uninsured. The prevalence of ART prescription (prevalence ratio 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.98–1.02) was not significantly different between foreign-born and US-born persons. A higher percentage of foreign-born persons achieved viral suppression compared with US-born persons (prevalence ratio 1.05; 95% confidence interval 1.00–1.09). No major disparities in ART prescription and viral suppression were found between foreign-born and US-born HIV-infected persons receiving medical care, despite higher percentages being uninsured. PMID:26986128

  13. Combating HIV resistance – focus on darunavir

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Cécile L

    2008-01-01

    Darunavir is a second-generation protease inhibitor designed to have antiviral efficacy against HIV-1 isolates harboring multiple resistance mutations to protease inhibitors. Pivotal trials conducted in treatment-experienced HIV-infected individuals have demonstrated significantly greater virological suppression when darunavir was added to an optimized background treatment compared with a control protease inhibitor. This virological suppression was associated with an increase in CD4 counts and was sustained over time. Darunavir resistance-associated mutations have been defined as V11I, V32I, L33F, I47V, I50V, I54L/M, G73S, L76V, I84V, and L89V. In clinical trials, baseline darunavir susceptibility was a strong predictor of virological response. Prior use of fosamprenavir was associated with darunavir resistance mutations. Darunavir has a high genetic barrier and has a distinct resistance profile. Although some cross-resistance exists with other second-generation protease inhibitors such as tipranavir, different resistance mutation patterns have been observed upon failure to these regimens. It was found that mutations at 47V, 54M, 85V, and 73T were most prevalent in isolates resistant to both PIs. Mutations 48V, 50V, and 54L were associated with resistance to darunavir but not to tipranavir. 82S and 82T were associated with resistance to tipranavir but not to darunavir. Therefore, darunavir provides potent virological efficacy as well as high genetic barrier that can be useful to preserve treatment options in HIV-infected, treatment-experienced individuals. PMID:19209258

  14. Dextran Sulfate Suppression of Viruses in the HIV Family: Inhibition of Virion Binding to CD4+ Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Looney, David J.; Kuno, Sachiko; Ueno, Ryuji; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Broder, Samuel

    1988-04-01

    The first step in the infection of human T lymphocytes by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is attachment to the target cell receptor, the CD4 antigen. This step may be vulnerable to attack by antibodies, chemicals, or small peptides. Dextran sulfate (molecular weight approximately 8000), which has been given to patients as an anticoagulant or antilipemic agent for more than two decades, was found to block the binding of virions to various target T lymphocytes, inhibit syncytia formation, and exert a potent inhibitory effect against HIV-1 in vitro at concentrations that may be clinically attainable in human beings. This drug also suppressed the replication of HIV-2 in vitro. These observations could have theoretical and clinical implications in the strategy to develop drugs against HIV types 1 and 2.

  15. Deep sequencing: becoming a critical tool in clinical virology.

    PubMed

    Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E; Avila, Santiago; Reyes-Teran, Gustavo; Martinez, Miguel A

    2014-09-01

    Population (Sanger) sequencing has been the standard method in basic and clinical DNA sequencing for almost 40 years; however, next-generation (deep) sequencing methodologies are now revolutionizing the field of genomics, and clinical virology is no exception. Deep sequencing is highly efficient, producing an enormous amount of information at low cost in a relatively short period of time. High-throughput sequencing techniques have enabled significant contributions to multiples areas in virology, including virus discovery and metagenomics (viromes), molecular epidemiology, pathogenesis, and studies of how viruses to escape the host immune system and antiviral pressures. In addition, new and more affordable deep sequencing-based assays are now being implemented in clinical laboratories. Here, we review the use of the current deep sequencing platforms in virology, focusing on three of the most studied viruses: human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and influenza virus.

  16. New Antiretroviral Treatment for HIV.

    PubMed

    Badowski, Melissa E; Pérez, Sarah E; Biagi, Mark; Littler, John A

    2016-09-01

    The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) has set the global goal of ending the AIDS world epidemic by 2030. In order to end this epidemic they have established a 90-90-90 goal to be achieved by 2020, which may be problematic, especially in low- and middle-income countries. This goal includes 90% of individuals with HIV globally being diagnosed, on treatment, and virologically suppressed. Based on global estimates from 2014-2015, approximately 36.9 million individuals are living with HIV. Of those, 53% have been diagnosed with HIV, 41% are on antiretroviral therapy (ART), and 32% have viral suppression with <1000 copies/ml. Comprehensive approaches are needed to improve the number of people living with HIV (PLWH) who are diagnosed, linked, and engaged in care. Once PLWH are retained in care, treatment is key to both HIV prevention and transmission. The development and advancement of new ART is necessary to assist in reaching these goals by improving safety profiles, decreasing pill burden, improving quality of life and life expectancy, and creating new mechanisms to overcome resistance. The focus of this review is to highlight and review data for antiretroviral agents recently added to the market as well as discuss agents in various stages of development (new formulations and mechanisms of action). PMID:27539455

  17. Informal Caregiver Characteristics Associated with Viral Load Suppression Among Current or Former Injection Drug Users Living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Mary M; Robinson, Allysha C; Nguyen, Trang Q; Knowlton, Amy R

    2015-11-01

    Few studies have examined the association between having an informal (unpaid) caregiver and viral suppression among persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) who are on antiretroviral therapy. The current study examined relationships between caregivers' individual and social network characteristics and care recipient viral suppression. Baseline data were from the BEACON study caregivers and their HIV seropositive former or current drug using care recipients, of whom 89 % were African American (N = 258 dyads). Using adjusted logistic regression, care recipient's undetectable viral load was positively associated with caregiver's limited physical functioning and negatively associated with caregivers having few family members to turn to for problem solving, a greater number of current drug users in their network, and poorer perceptions of the care recipient's mental health. Results further understandings of interpersonal relationship factors important to PLHIV's health outcomes, and the need for caregiving relationship-focused intervention to promote viral suppression among PLHIV. PMID:25969180

  18. Informal Caregiver Characteristics Associated with Viral Load Suppression Among Current or Former Injection Drug Users Living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Mary M; Robinson, Allysha C; Nguyen, Trang Q; Knowlton, Amy R

    2015-11-01

    Few studies have examined the association between having an informal (unpaid) caregiver and viral suppression among persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) who are on antiretroviral therapy. The current study examined relationships between caregivers' individual and social network characteristics and care recipient viral suppression. Baseline data were from the BEACON study caregivers and their HIV seropositive former or current drug using care recipients, of whom 89 % were African American (N = 258 dyads). Using adjusted logistic regression, care recipient's undetectable viral load was positively associated with caregiver's limited physical functioning and negatively associated with caregivers having few family members to turn to for problem solving, a greater number of current drug users in their network, and poorer perceptions of the care recipient's mental health. Results further understandings of interpersonal relationship factors important to PLHIV's health outcomes, and the need for caregiving relationship-focused intervention to promote viral suppression among PLHIV.

  19. HIV outcomes at a Canadian remand centre.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Yazhini; Khan, Muhammad Naeem; Berger, Sara; Foisy, Michelle; Singh, Ameeta; Woods, Dan; Pyne, Diane; Ahmed, Rabia

    2016-09-12

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of short-term incarceration on antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, virologic suppression, and engagement and retention in community care post-release. Design/methodology/approach A retrospective chart review of patients who attended the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Outreach Clinic at a Canadian remand center between September 2007 and December 2011 was carried out. Data extraction included CD4 lymphocyte count, HIV viral load, ART prescription refills, and community engagement and retention during and one-year pre- and post-incarceration. Findings Outpatient engagement increased by 23 percent ( p=0.01), as did ART adherence (55.2-70.7 percent, p=0.01), following incarceration. Retention into community care did not significantly improve following incarceration (22.4 percent pre-incarceration to 25.9 percent post-release, p=0.8). There was a trend toward improved virologic suppression (less than 40 copies/ml; 50-77.8 percent ( p=0.08)) during incarceration and 70. 4 percent sustained this one-year post-incarceration ( p=0.70). Originality/value The impact of short-term incarceration in a Canadian context of universal health coverage has not been previously reported and could have significant implications in optimizing HIV patient outcomes given the large number of HIV-positive patients cycling through short-term remand centers. PMID:27548017

  20. Prevalence of low bone mineral density among HIV patients on long-term suppressive antiretroviral therapy in resource limited setting of western India

    PubMed Central

    Dravid, Ameet; Kulkarni, Milind; Borkar, Amit; Dhande, Sachin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Bone mineral density (BMD) assessment in HIV patients is sparsely done in resource limited settings. Materials and Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of BMD amongst HIV patients following up in our clinic from 1 June to 1 December 2013 by performing dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan (Lunar Prodigy Advanced DXA System, GE Healthcare) of lumbar spine and hip. Patients on long term (≥12 months), virologically suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) were included. Patients who were ART naïve were included as control population. Virologic failures were excluded. Low BMD was defined by WHO T-score criteria (normal: T score ≥−1;osteopenia: T score between −1 and −2.5 SD; osteoporosis: T score ≤−2.5 SD). Baseline risk factors associated with low BMD like age, low BMI, lipoatrophy, diabetes mellitus, current smoking, current alcohol intake, steroid exposure and menopause were recorded. ART-related factors associated with low BMD like ART duration, exposure to tenofovir and exposure to protease inhibitors (PI) were studied. Results A total of 536 patients (66% males, 496 ART experienced and 40 ART naïve) were included in this analysis. Median age was 42 years, mean BMI 23.35 kg/m2 and median CD4 count 146 cells/mm3. All ART experienced patients had plasma viral load<400 copies/ml. Prevalence of low BMD amongst ART naive and ART experienced patients was 67% (osteopenia: 70.4%, osteoporosis: 29.6%) and 80.4% (osteopenia: 63.4%, osteoporosis: 36.6%), respectively (p=0.05). Mean T scores at lumbar spine and hip for ART naive and ART experienced patients were −1.37 and −0.9 versus −1.56 and −1.48 (p=0.05), respectively. Age, low BMI, current smoking, menopause, baseline CD4 count and exposure to ART were factors significantly associated with low overall BMD on univariate regression analysis. On multivariable logistic regression analysis age (p<0.001), low BMI (p<0.001), current smoking (0.05) and menopause (0.03) were associated

  1. HIV Subspecialty Care in Correctional Facilities Using Telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Young, Jeremy D; Patel, Mahesh

    2015-04-01

    In the United States, prisons and jails contain a population at high risk for HIV infection with a relatively large proportion known to be HIV positive. However, many incarcerated persons lack access to subspecialty HIV care due to barriers of geography and travel. Telemedicine clinics can remove these barriers, increasing access to expert, multidisciplinary care. With telemedicine, correctional facilities can provide up-to-date, evidence-based HIV management, which may lead to improved compliance, greater virologic suppression, improved CD4 T-cell counts, fewer adverse drug interactions, and decreased transmission in the community. While HIV care in prisons is an example of harnessing this technology, telemedicine can be used for the diagnosis and management of multiple acute and chronic diseases for underserved populations.

  2. Evolution of Phenotypic Drug Susceptibility and Viral Replication Capacity during Long-Term Virologic Failure of Protease Inhibitor Therapy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, Jason D.; Wrin, Terri; Grant, Robert M.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Segal, Mark R.; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Deeks, Steven G.

    2002-01-01

    Continued use of antiretroviral therapy despite the emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been associated with the durable maintenance of plasma HIV RNA levels below pretherapy levels. The factors that may account for this partial control of viral replication were assessed in a longitudinal observational study of 20 HIV-infected adults who remained on a stable protease inhibitor-based regimen despite ongoing viral replication (plasma HIV RNA levels consistently >500 copies/ml). Longitudinal plasma samples (n = 248) were assayed for drug susceptibility and viral replication capacity (measured by using a single-cycle recombinant-virus assay). The initial treatment-mediated decrease in plasma viremia was directly proportional to the reduction in replicative capacity (P = 0.01). Early virologic rebound was associated the emergence of a virus population exhibiting increased protease inhibitor phenotypic resistance, while replicative capacity remained low. During long-term virologic failure, plasma HIV RNA levels often remained stable or increased slowly, while phenotypic resistance continued to increase and replicative capacity decreased slowly. The emergence of primary genotypic mutations within protease (particularly V82A, I84V, and L90M) was temporally associated with increasing phenotypic resistance and decreasing replicative capacity, while the emergence of secondary mutations within protease was associated with more-gradual changes in both phenotypic resistance and replicative capacity. We conclude that HIV may be constrained in its ability to become both highly resistant and highly fit and that this may contribute to the continued partial suppression of plasma HIV RNA levels that is observed in some patients with drug-resistant viremia. PMID:12368352

  3. HIV-1 Genital Shedding is Suppressed in the Setting of High Genital Antiretroviral Drug Concentrations Throughout the Menstrual Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Anandi N.; Evans-Strickfaden, Tammy; Haaland, Richard; Martin, Amy; Gatcliffe, Chelsea; Adesoye, Adebola; Omondi, Michael W.; Lupo, L. Davis; Danavall, Damien; Easley, Kirk; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Pau, Chou-Pong; Hart, Clyde; Ofotokun, Igho

    2014-01-01

    Background. It is not known if fluctuations in genital tract antiretroviral drug concentrations correlate with genital virus shedding in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected women on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods. Among 20 HIV-infected women on ART (tenofovir [TFV], emtricitabine [FTC], and ritonavir-boosted atazanavir [ATV]) with suppressed plasma virus loads, blood and cervicovaginal samples collected twice weekly for 3 weeks were tested for antiretroviral concentrations, HIV-1 RNA, and proviral DNA. Results. Cervicovaginal:plasma antiretroviral concentration ratios were highest for FTC (11.9, 95% confidence interval [CI], 8.66–16.3), then TFV (3.52, 95% CI, 2.27–5.48), and ATV (2.39, 95% CI, 1.69–3.38). Within- and between-person variations in plasma and genital antiretroviral concentrations were observed. Low amounts of genital HIV-1 RNA (<50 copies/mL) were detected in 45% of women at 16% of visits. Genital HIV-1 DNA was detected in 70% of women at 35% of visits. Genital virus detection was associated with higher concentrations of mucosal leukocytes but not with genital antiretroviral concentrations, menstrual cycle phase, bacterial vaginosis, genital bleeding, or plasma virus detection. Conclusions. Standard doses of ART achieved higher genital than plasma concentrations across the menstrual cycle. Therapeutic ART suppresses genital virus shedding throughout the menstrual cycle, even in the presence of factors reported to increase virus shedding. PMID:24643223

  4. Summary of the 9th annual meeting of the Italian Society for Virology.

    PubMed

    Salata, Cristiano; Calistri, Arianna; Parolin, Cristina; Palù, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    The 9th annual meeting of the Italian Society for Virology (SIV) comprised seven plenary sessions focused on: General virology and viral genetics; Virus-Host interaction and pathogenesis; Viral oncology; Emerging viruses and zoonotic, foodborne, and environmental pathways of transmission; Viral immunology and vaccines; Medical virology and antiviral therapy; Viral biotechnologies and gene therapy. Moreover, four hot topics were discussed in special lectures: the Pioneer in human virology lecture regarding the control of viral epidemics with particular emphasis on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the Pioneer in plant virology lecture focused on cell responses to plant virus infection, a Keynote lecture on the epidemiology and genetic diversity of Crimea-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever virus, and the G.B. Rossi lecture on the molecular basis and clinical implications of human cytomegalovirus tropism for endothelial/epithelial cells. The meeting had an attendance of about 160 virologists. A summary of the plenary lectures and oral selected presentations is reported.

  5. HIV Disease: Current Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    Describes human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), newly characterized human retrovirus which causes chronic, progressive, immune deficiency disease, the most severe phase of which is Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Reviews most important current epidemiologic, clinical, and virologic information about HIV and HIV disease and provides…

  6. The HIV Care Cascade Before, During, and After Incarceration: A Systematic Review and Data Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Iroh, Princess A; Mayo, Helen; Nijhawan, Ank E

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a systematic literature review of the data on HIV testing, engagement in care, and treatment in incarcerated persons, and estimated the care cascade in this group. We identified 2706 titles in MEDLINE, EBSCO, and Cochrane Library databases for studies indexed to January 13, 2015, and included 92 for analysis. We summarized HIV testing results by type (blinded, opt-out, voluntary); reviewed studies on HIV care engagement, treatment, and virological suppression; and synthesized these results into an HIV care cascade before, during, and after incarceration. The HIV care cascade following diagnosis increased during incarceration and declined substantially after release, often to levels lower than before incarceration. Incarceration provides an opportunity to address HIV care in hard-to-reach individuals, though new interventions are needed to improve postrelease care continuity. PMID:25973818

  7. The HIV Care Cascade Before, During, and After Incarceration: A Systematic Review and Data Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Iroh, Princess A.; Mayo, Helen

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a systematic literature review of the data on HIV testing, engagement in care, and treatment in incarcerated persons, and estimated the care cascade in this group. We identified 2706 titles in MEDLINE, EBSCO, and Cochrane Library databases for studies indexed to January 13, 2015, and included 92 for analysis. We summarized HIV testing results by type (blinded, opt-out, voluntary); reviewed studies on HIV care engagement, treatment, and virological suppression; and synthesized these results into an HIV care cascade before, during, and after incarceration. The HIV care cascade following diagnosis increased during incarceration and declined substantially after release, often to levels lower than before incarceration. Incarceration provides an opportunity to address HIV care in hard-to-reach individuals, though new interventions are needed to improve postrelease care continuity. PMID:25973818

  8. Is frequent CD4+ T-lymphocyte count monitoring necessary for persons with counts >=300 cells/μL and HIV-1 suppression?

    PubMed

    Gale, Howard B; Gitterman, Steven R; Hoffman, Heather J; Gordin, Fred M; Benator, Debra A; Labriola, Ann M; Kan, Virginia L

    2013-05-01

    Among patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), those with HIV-1 RNA <200 copies/mL and CD4 counts ≥300 cells/µL had a 97.1% probability of maintaining durable CD4 ≥200 cells/µL for 4 years. When non-HIV causes of CD4 lymphopenia were excluded, the probability rose to 99.2%. Our data support less frequent CD4 monitoring during viral suppression.

  9. HIV Infection Care and Viral Suppression Among People Who Inject Drugs, 28 U.S. Jurisdictions, 2012-2013

    PubMed Central

    Karch, Debra L.; Gray, Kristen Mahle; Shi, Jing; Hall, H. Irene

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Assess outcomes along the care continuum for HIV-infected people who inject drugs (PWID), by type of facility and stage of infection at diagnosis. Methods: Data reported by 28 jurisdictions to the National HIV Surveillance System by December 2014 were used to identify PWID aged ≥13 years, diagnosed with HIV infection before December 31, 2013. Analyses used the CDC definition of linkage to care (LTC), retention in care (RIC), and viral suppression (VS), and are stratified by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and type of facility and stage of HIV infection at diagnosis. Results: Of 1,409 PWID diagnosed with HIV in 2013, 1,116 (79.2%) were LTC with the lowest percentages among males (78.4%); blacks (77.5%) ages 13-24 years (69.0%); those diagnosed in early stage infection (71.6%); and at screening, diagnostic, or referral agencies (60.0%). Of 80,958 PWID living with HIV in 2012, 40,234 (49.7%) were RIC and 34,665 (42.8%) achieved VS. The lowest percentages for RIC and VS were among males (47.1% and 41.3% respectively); those diagnosed with late stage disease (47.1% and 42.4%); and young people. Whites had the lowest RIC (47.0%) while blacks had the lowest VS (41.1%). Conclusion: Enhanced LTC activities are needed for PWID diagnosed at screening, diagnostic or referral agencies versus those diagnosed at inpatient or outpatient settings, especially among young people and blacks diagnosed in early stage infection. Less than half of PWID are retained in care or reach viral suppression indicating the need for continued engagement and return to care activities over the long term. PMID:27386014

  10. Predictors of virologic response to ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Marcelin, Anne-Genevieve; Flandre, Philippe; Peytavin, Gilles; Calvez, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    The primary mechanism of resistance to protease inhibitors involves the stepwise accumulation of mutations that alter and block the substrate binding site of HIV protease. The large degree of cross-resistance among the different protease inhibitors is a source of considerable concern for the management of patients after treatment failure. Although the output of HIV-resistance tests has been based on therapeutically arbitrary criteria, there is now an ongoing move towards correlating test interpretation with virologic outcomes on treatment. This approach is undeniably superior, in principle, for tests intended to guide drug choices. However, the predictive accuracy of a given stratagem that links genotype or phenotype to drug response is strongly influenced by the study design, data capture and the analytical methodology used to derive it. There is no definitively superior methodology for generating a genotype-response association for use in interpreting a resistance test, and the various approaches used to date all have their strengths and weaknesses. Combining the information of therapeutic drug monitoring and resistance tests is likely to be of greatest clinical utility in antiretroviral-experienced patients harboring HIV strains with reduced susceptibility. The combination of pharmacologic and virologic parameters as a predictor of the virologic response has been merged into the parameter known as "inhibitory quotient". This article discusses the potential interest of the use of inhibitory quotients as an approach for enhancing the potency and durability of boosted protease inhibitors against protease inhibitor-resistant viruses. PMID:16425962

  11. Ciliocytophthoria in clinical virology.

    PubMed

    Hadziyannis, E; Yen-Lieberman, B; Hall, G; Procop, G W

    2000-08-01

    Direct immunofluorescence assays (DFAs) are used in the clinical virology laboratory for the rapid detection of viruses. An assessment of the cellularity of specimens submitted for DFA is necessary for the most effective use of this assay. This assessment ensures that an adequate number of the appropriate cells are present for examination. During this assessment, clinical virologists may encounter unfamiliar cellular elements or cellular fragments. One of these elements, ciliocytophthoria, has been misinterpreted as a parasite in specimens submitted for cytologic testing. We describe a similar case in which a technologist thought that ciliocytophthoria possibly represented a ciliated parasite in a nasopharyngeal specimen sent for respiratory syncytial virus DFA. After a thorough morphologic examination, the staff dismissed the possibility of a ciliated parasite. We confirmed this entity as ciliocytophthoria using morphologic criteria and the Diff-Quik stain. This near misidentification of ciliocytophthoria as a ciliated parasite affords us the opportunity to raise the awareness of clinical virologists about ciliocytophthoria. Additionally, we briefly review useful features for differentiating ciliocytophthoria from the only ciliate parasitic for humans, Balantidium coli. Finally, we present the utility of a commonly used cytologic stain, the Diff-Quik stain, for the confirmation of ciliocytophthoria.

  12. Ciliocytophthoria in clinical virology.

    PubMed

    Hadziyannis, E; Yen-Lieberman, B; Hall, G; Procop, G W

    2000-08-01

    Direct immunofluorescence assays (DFAs) are used in the clinical virology laboratory for the rapid detection of viruses. An assessment of the cellularity of specimens submitted for DFA is necessary for the most effective use of this assay. This assessment ensures that an adequate number of the appropriate cells are present for examination. During this assessment, clinical virologists may encounter unfamiliar cellular elements or cellular fragments. One of these elements, ciliocytophthoria, has been misinterpreted as a parasite in specimens submitted for cytologic testing. We describe a similar case in which a technologist thought that ciliocytophthoria possibly represented a ciliated parasite in a nasopharyngeal specimen sent for respiratory syncytial virus DFA. After a thorough morphologic examination, the staff dismissed the possibility of a ciliated parasite. We confirmed this entity as ciliocytophthoria using morphologic criteria and the Diff-Quik stain. This near misidentification of ciliocytophthoria as a ciliated parasite affords us the opportunity to raise the awareness of clinical virologists about ciliocytophthoria. Additionally, we briefly review useful features for differentiating ciliocytophthoria from the only ciliate parasitic for humans, Balantidium coli. Finally, we present the utility of a commonly used cytologic stain, the Diff-Quik stain, for the confirmation of ciliocytophthoria. PMID:10923088

  13. Linkage and retention in care and the time to HIV viral suppression and viral rebound - New York City.

    PubMed

    Robertson, McKaylee; Laraque, Fabienne; Mavronicolas, Heather; Braunstein, Sarah; Torian, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The success of antiretroviral therapy (ART) as treatment for the individual patient and as prevention requires the achievment and maintenance of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral suppression. Linkage to and retention in care are required for access to ART. We describe the impact of care on viral suppression using routinely reported surveillance data. We included New York City residents ≥13 years of age, diagnosed with HIV/AIDS from 1 July 2005 to 30 June 2009 with a viral load (VL) or CD4 reported within six months of diagnosis and ≥1 VL reported from 1 July 2005 to 30 June 2011. To examine viral rebound, we restricted the analysis to those who achieved viral suppression and had a subsequent VL measure reported by 30 June 2011. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate factors associated with time to viral suppression (VL ≤ 400 copies/mL) and rebound (VL > 1000 copies/mL). Initiation of care within three months of diagnosis (CD4/VL report within three months of diagnosis), female sex, and an initial CD4 < 350 (cells/mm(3)) at diagnosis significantly increased the likelihood of viral suppression. Irregular care (no CD4/VL reported every six months), younger age, non-white race/ethnicity, having an initial CD4 ≥ 350 at diagnosis, and AIDS diagnosis by 2010 increased the likelihood of rebound. These findings lend support to interventions for improving linkage to and maintenance in regular care as a way to achieve and maintain suppression. Surveillance data represent an ideal means for monitoring engagement in care and viral suppression at the population level.

  14. Assessing the HIV Care Continuum in Latin America: progress in clinical retention, cART use and viral suppression

    PubMed Central

    Rebeiro, Peter F; Cesar, Carina; Shepherd, Bryan E; De Boni, Raquel B; Cortés, Claudia P; Rodriguez, Fernanda; Belaunzarán-Zamudio, Pablo; Pape, Jean W; Padgett, Denis; Hoces, Daniel; McGowan, Catherine C; Cahn, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We assessed trends in HIV Care Continuum outcomes associated with delayed disease progression and reduced transmission within a large Latin American cohort over a decade: clinical retention, combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) use and viral suppression (VS). Methods Adults from Caribbean, Central and South America network for HIV epidemiology clinical cohorts in seven countries contributed data between 2003 and 2012. Retention was defined as two or more HIV care visits annually, >90 days apart. cART was defined as prescription of three or more antiretroviral agents annually. VS was defined as HIV-1 RNA <200 copies/mL at last measurement annually. cART and VS denominators were subjects with at least one visit annually. Multivariable modified Poisson regression was used to assess temporal trends and examine associations between age, sex, HIV transmission mode, cohort, calendar year and time in care. Results Among 18,799 individuals in retention analyses, 14,380 in cART analyses and 13,330 in VS analyses, differences existed between those meeting indicator definitions versus those not by most characteristics. Retention, cART and VS significantly improved from 2003 to 2012 (63 to 77%, 74 to 91% and 53 to 82%, respectively; p<0.05, each). Female sex (risk ratio (RR)=0.97 vs. males) and injection drug use as HIV transmission mode (RR=0.83 vs. male sexual contact with males (MSM)) were significantly associated with lower retention, but unrelated with cART or VS. MSM (RR=0.96) significantly decreased the probability of cART compared with heterosexual transmission. Conclusions HIV Care Continuum outcomes improved over time in Latin America, though disparities for vulnerable groups remain. Efforts must be made to increase retention, cART and VS, while engaging in additional research to sustain progress in these settings. PMID:27065108

  15. Off-label use of maraviroc in HIV-1-infected paediatric patients in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Palladino, Claudia; Gómez, María Luisa Navarro; Soler-Palacín, Pere; González-Tomé, María Isabel; De Ory, Santiago J; Espiau, María; Hoyos, Santiago Pérez; León-Leal, Juan Antonio; Méndez, María; Moreno-Pérez, David; Guasch, Claudia Fortuny; Sierra, Antoni Mur; Guruceta, Itziar Pocheville; Guillén, Santiago Moreno; Briz, Verónica

    2015-10-23

    Maraviroc (MVC) is not approved for HIV-1-infected paediatric patients. This is the first assessment of the use of MVC-based salvage therapy in vertically HIV-1-infected paediatric patients in clinical settings. The results suggest that MVC-based salvage therapy is useful in children and adolescents with extensive resistance profile leading to maintained virological suppression in up to 88% of the patients with CCR5-tropic virus. The likelihood of treatment success might increase when MVC is combined with other active drugs.

  16. Off-label use of maraviroc in HIV-1-infected paediatric patients in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Palladino, Claudia; Gómez, María Luisa Navarro; Soler-Palacín, Pere; González-Tomé, María Isabel; De Ory, Santiago J; Espiau, María; Hoyos, Santiago Pérez; León-Leal, Juan Antonio; Méndez, María; Moreno-Pérez, David; Guasch, Claudia Fortuny; Sierra, Antoni Mur; Guruceta, Itziar Pocheville; Guillén, Santiago Moreno; Briz, Verónica

    2015-10-23

    Maraviroc (MVC) is not approved for HIV-1-infected paediatric patients. This is the first assessment of the use of MVC-based salvage therapy in vertically HIV-1-infected paediatric patients in clinical settings. The results suggest that MVC-based salvage therapy is useful in children and adolescents with extensive resistance profile leading to maintained virological suppression in up to 88% of the patients with CCR5-tropic virus. The likelihood of treatment success might increase when MVC is combined with other active drugs. PMID:26544580

  17. 42 CFR 493.919 - Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Virology. 493.919 Section 493.919 Public Health... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.919 Virology. (a) Types of services offered by laboratories. In virology, there are two types of laboratories for proficiency testing...

  18. 42 CFR 493.919 - Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Virology. 493.919 Section 493.919 Public Health... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.919 Virology. (a) Types of services offered by laboratories. In virology, there are two types of laboratories for proficiency testing...

  19. 42 CFR 493.1205 - Condition: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: Virology. 493.1205 Section 493.1205 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1205 Condition: Virology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Virology,...

  20. 42 CFR 493.1205 - Condition: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Virology. 493.1205 Section 493.1205 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1205 Condition: Virology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Virology,...

  1. 42 CFR 493.919 - Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Virology. 493.919 Section 493.919 Public Health... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.919 Virology. (a) Types of services offered by laboratories. In virology, there are two types of laboratories for proficiency testing...

  2. 42 CFR 493.1205 - Condition: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Virology. 493.1205 Section 493.1205 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1205 Condition: Virology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Virology,...

  3. 42 CFR 493.919 - Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Virology. 493.919 Section 493.919 Public Health... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.919 Virology. (a) Types of services offered by laboratories. In virology, there are two types of laboratories for proficiency testing...

  4. 42 CFR 493.1205 - Condition: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Virology. 493.1205 Section 493.1205 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1205 Condition: Virology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Virology,...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1205 - Condition: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition: Virology. 493.1205 Section 493.1205 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....1205 Condition: Virology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Virology,...

  6. D-Dimer Levels before HIV Seroconversion Remain Elevated Even after Viral Suppression and Are Associated with an Increased Risk of Non-AIDS Events

    PubMed Central

    Freiberg, Matthew S.; Bebu, Ionut; Tracy, Russell; So-Armah, Kaku; Okulicz, Jason; Ganesan, Anuradha; Armstrong, Adam; O’Bryan, Thomas; Rimland, David; Justice, Amy C.; Agan, Brian K.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the excess risk of non-AIDS diseases among HIV infected people is unclear. HIV associated inflammation/hypercoagulability likely plays a role. While antiretroviral therapy (ART) may return this process to pre-HIV levels, this has not been directly demonstrated. We analyzed data/specimens on 249 HIV+ participants from the US Military HIV Natural History Study, a prospective, multicenter observational cohort of >5600 active duty military personnel and beneficiaries living with HIV. We used stored blood specimens to measure D-dimer and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) at three time points: pre-HIV seroconversion, ≥6 months post-HIV seroconversion but prior to ART initiation, and ≥6 months post-ART with documented HIV viral suppression on two successive evaluations. We evaluated the changes in biomarker levels between time points, and the association between these biomarker changes and future non-AIDS events. During a median follow-up of 3.7 years, there were 28 incident non-AIDS diseases. At ART initiation, the median CD4 count was 361cells/mm3; median duration of documented HIV infection 392 days; median time on ART was 354 days. Adjusted mean percent increase in D-dimer levels from pre-seroconversion to post-ART was 75.1% (95% confidence interval 24.6–148.0, p = 0.002). This increase in D-dimer was associated with a significant 22% increase risk of future non-AIDS events (p = 0.03). Changes in IL-6 levels across time points were small and not associated with future non-AIDS events. In conclusion, ART initiation and HIV viral suppression does not eliminate HIV associated elevation in D-dimer levels. This residual pathology is associated with an increased risk of future non-AIDS diseases. PMID:27088215

  7. D-Dimer Levels before HIV Seroconversion Remain Elevated Even after Viral Suppression and Are Associated with an Increased Risk of Non-AIDS Events.

    PubMed

    Freiberg, Matthew S; Bebu, Ionut; Tracy, Russell; So-Armah, Kaku; Okulicz, Jason; Ganesan, Anuradha; Armstrong, Adam; O'Bryan, Thomas; Rimland, David; Justice, Amy C; Agan, Brian K

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the excess risk of non-AIDS diseases among HIV infected people is unclear. HIV associated inflammation/hypercoagulability likely plays a role. While antiretroviral therapy (ART) may return this process to pre-HIV levels, this has not been directly demonstrated. We analyzed data/specimens on 249 HIV+ participants from the US Military HIV Natural History Study, a prospective, multicenter observational cohort of >5600 active duty military personnel and beneficiaries living with HIV. We used stored blood specimens to measure D-dimer and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) at three time points: pre-HIV seroconversion, ≥6 months post-HIV seroconversion but prior to ART initiation, and ≥6 months post-ART with documented HIV viral suppression on two successive evaluations. We evaluated the changes in biomarker levels between time points, and the association between these biomarker changes and future non-AIDS events. During a median follow-up of 3.7 years, there were 28 incident non-AIDS diseases. At ART initiation, the median CD4 count was 361cells/mm3; median duration of documented HIV infection 392 days; median time on ART was 354 days. Adjusted mean percent increase in D-dimer levels from pre-seroconversion to post-ART was 75.1% (95% confidence interval 24.6-148.0, p = 0.002). This increase in D-dimer was associated with a significant 22% increase risk of future non-AIDS events (p = 0.03). Changes in IL-6 levels across time points were small and not associated with future non-AIDS events. In conclusion, ART initiation and HIV viral suppression does not eliminate HIV associated elevation in D-dimer levels. This residual pathology is associated with an increased risk of future non-AIDS diseases.

  8. D-Dimer Levels before HIV Seroconversion Remain Elevated Even after Viral Suppression and Are Associated with an Increased Risk of Non-AIDS Events.

    PubMed

    Freiberg, Matthew S; Bebu, Ionut; Tracy, Russell; So-Armah, Kaku; Okulicz, Jason; Ganesan, Anuradha; Armstrong, Adam; O'Bryan, Thomas; Rimland, David; Justice, Amy C; Agan, Brian K

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the excess risk of non-AIDS diseases among HIV infected people is unclear. HIV associated inflammation/hypercoagulability likely plays a role. While antiretroviral therapy (ART) may return this process to pre-HIV levels, this has not been directly demonstrated. We analyzed data/specimens on 249 HIV+ participants from the US Military HIV Natural History Study, a prospective, multicenter observational cohort of >5600 active duty military personnel and beneficiaries living with HIV. We used stored blood specimens to measure D-dimer and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) at three time points: pre-HIV seroconversion, ≥6 months post-HIV seroconversion but prior to ART initiation, and ≥6 months post-ART with documented HIV viral suppression on two successive evaluations. We evaluated the changes in biomarker levels between time points, and the association between these biomarker changes and future non-AIDS events. During a median follow-up of 3.7 years, there were 28 incident non-AIDS diseases. At ART initiation, the median CD4 count was 361cells/mm3; median duration of documented HIV infection 392 days; median time on ART was 354 days. Adjusted mean percent increase in D-dimer levels from pre-seroconversion to post-ART was 75.1% (95% confidence interval 24.6-148.0, p = 0.002). This increase in D-dimer was associated with a significant 22% increase risk of future non-AIDS events (p = 0.03). Changes in IL-6 levels across time points were small and not associated with future non-AIDS events. In conclusion, ART initiation and HIV viral suppression does not eliminate HIV associated elevation in D-dimer levels. This residual pathology is associated with an increased risk of future non-AIDS diseases. PMID:27088215

  9. Evolution of drug resistance after virologic failure of a first highly active antiretroviral therapy regimen in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Steven J.; Kityo, Cissy; Mbamanya, Frank; Dewar, Robin; Ssali, Francis; Quinn, Thomas C.; Mugyenyi, Peter; Dybul, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent of viral resistance over time among non-clade B HIV-1 infected patients in Uganda maintained on first line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) following virologic failure. Methods Genotyping was performed on sixteen patients with virologic failure who were enrolled in an open label randomized clinical trial of short-cycle treatment interruption. Results All patients receiving efavirenz containing HAART had at least 1 efavirenz resistance mutation develop during follow-up. The majority 13/15 (86%) developed lamivudine resistance during follow-up but no thymidine analogue mutations (TAMS) developed during a median duration of virologic failure of 325.5 days. Conclusions Genotypic resistance to both efavirenz and lamivudine developed early during the course of treatment after virologic failure. TAMs did not emerge early despite moderate exposure time to thymidine analogs during virologic failure. PMID:19430104

  10. HIV-1 Suppressive Sequences Are Modulated by Rev Transport of Unspliced RNA and Are Required for Efficient HIV-1 Production

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Kousei; Ishibashi, Keisuke; Miyokawa, Kaori; Hokari, Manami; Kanno, Tomoyuki; Hirano, Tomoya; Yamamoto, Norio; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The unspliced human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNAs are translated as Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins or packaged as genomes into viral particles. Efficient translation is necessary before the transition to produce infective virions. The viral protein Rev exports all intron-containing viral RNAs; however, it also appears to enhance translation. Cellular microRNAs target cellular and viral mRNAs to silence their translation and enrich them at discrete cytoplasmic loci that overlap with the putative interim site of Gag and the genome. Here, we analyzed how Rev-mediated transport and the splicing status of the mRNA influenced the silencing status imposed by microRNA. Through identification and mutational analysis of the silencing sites in the HIV-1 genome, we elucidated the effect of silencing on virus production. Renilla luciferase mRNA, which contains a let-7 targeting site in its 3′ untranslated region, was mediated when it was transported by Rev and not spliced, but it was either not mediated when it was spliced even in a partial way or it was Rev-independent. The silencing sites in the pol and env-nef regions of the HIV-1 genome, which were repressed in T cells and other cell lines, were Drosha-dependent and could also be modulated by Rev in an unspliced state. Mutant viruses that contained genomic mutations that reflect alterations to show more derepressive effects in the 3′ untranslated region of the Renilla luciferase gene replicated more slowly than wild-type virus. These findings yield insights into the HIV-1 silencing sites that might allow the genome to avoid translational machinery and that might be utilized in coordinating virus production during initial virus replication. However, the function of Rev to modulate the silencing sites of unspliced RNAs would be advantageous for the efficient translation that is required to support protein production prior to viral packaging and particle production. PMID:23251516

  11. Initiation of antiretroviral therapy and viral suppression after home HIV testing and counselling in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, and Mbarara district, Uganda: a prospective, observational intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Barnabas, Ruanne V.; van Rooyen, Heidi; Tumwesigye, Elioda; Murnane, Pamela M.; Baeten, Jared M.; Humphries, Hilton; Turyamureeba, Bosco; Joseph, Philip; Krows, Meighan; Hughes, James P; Celum, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Objective Antiretroviral therapy (ART) significantly decreases HIV-associated morbidity, mortality, and HIV transmission through HIV viral load suppression. In high HIV prevalence settings, outreach strategies are needed to find asymptomatic HIV positive persons, link them to HIV care and ART, and achieve viral suppression. Methods We conducted a prospective intervention study in two rural communities in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, and Mbabara district, Uganda. The intervention included home HIV testing and counseling (HTC), point-of-care CD4 count testing for HIV positive persons, referral to care, and one month then quarterly lay counselor follow-up visits. The outcomes at 12 months were linkage to care, and ART initiation and viral suppression among HIV positive persons eligible for ART (CD4≤350 cells/μL). Findings 3,393 adults were tested for HIV (96% coverage), of whom 635 (19%) were HIV positive. At baseline, 36% of HIV positive persons were newly identified (64% were previously known to be HIV positive) and 40% were taking ART. By month 12, 619 (97%) of HIV positive persons visited an HIV clinic, and of 123 ART eligible participants, 94 (76%) initiated ART by 12 months. Of the 77 participants on ART by month 9, 59 (77%) achieved viral suppression by month 12. Among all HIV positive persons, the proportion with viral suppression (<1,000 copies/mL) increased from 50% to 65% (p=<0.001) at 12 months. Interpretation Community-based HTC in rural South Africa and Uganda achieved high testing coverage and linkage to care. Among those eligible for ART, a high proportion initiated ART and achieved viral suppression, indicating high adherence. Implementation of this HTC approach by existing community health workers in Africa should be evaluated to determine effectiveness and costs. PMID:25601912

  12. Effects of CD4 monitoring frequency on clinical endpoints in clinically stable HIV-infected patients with viral suppression

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jin Young; Boettiger, David; Law, Matthew; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Yunihastuti, Evy; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Lee, Man Po; Sim, Benedict LH; Oka, Shinichi; Wong, Wingwai; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Kantipong, Pacharee; Phanuphak, Praphan; Ng, Oon Tek; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Zhang, Fujie; Pujari, Sanjay; Ditangco, Rossana; Ratanasuwan, Winai; Merati, Tuti Parwati; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Sohn, Annette H.; Choi, Jun Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Current treatment guidelines for HIV infection recommend routine CD4+ lymphocyte (CD4) count monitoring in patients with viral suppression. This may have a limited impact on influencing care as clinically meaningful CD4 decline rarely occurs during viral suppression. Methods In a regional HIV observational cohort in the Asia-Pacific, patients with viral suppression (2 consecutive viral loads <400 copies/mL) and a CD4 count ≥200 cells/μL who had CD4 testing 6 monthly were analyzed. Main study endpoints were occurrence of one CD4 count <200 cells/μL (single CD4<200) and two CD4 counts <200 cells/μL within a 6-month period (confirmed CD4<200). A comparison of time to single and confirmed CD4<200 with biannual or annual CD4 assessment was performed by generating a hypothetical group comprised of the same patients with annual CD4 testing by removing every second CD4 count. Results Among 1538 patients, the rate of single CD4<200 was 3.45/100 patient-years, and of confirmed CD4<200 was 0.77/100 patient-years. During 5 years of viral suppression, patients with baseline CD4 200-249 cells/μL were significantly more likely to experience confirmed CD4<200 compared with patients with higher baseline CD4 (hazard ratio 55.47 [95% confidence interval 7.36–418.20], p<0.001 versus baseline CD4 ≥500 cells/μL). Cumulative probabilities of confirmed CD4<200 was also higher in patients with baseline CD4 200-249 cells/μL compared with patients with higher baseline CD4. There was no significant difference in time to confirmed CD4<200 between biannual and annual CD4 measurement (p=0.336). Conclusions Annual CD4 monitoring in virally suppressed HIV patients with a baseline CD4 ≥250 cells/μL may be sufficient for clinical management. PMID:25850606

  13. The HIV care continuum in Latin America: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Piñeirúa, Alicia; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Cahn, Pedro; Guevara Palmero, Rafael Napoleón; Martínez Buitrago, Ernesto; Young, Benjamin; Del Rio, Carlos

    2015-07-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), also known as highly active antiretroviral therapy, provides clinical and immunological benefits for people living with HIV and is an effective strategy to prevent HIV transmission at the individual level. Early initiation of ART as part of a test and treat approach might decrease HIV transmission at the population level, but to do so the HIV continuum of care, from diagnosis to viral suppression, should be optimised. Access to ART has improved greatly in Latin America, and about 600,000 people are on treatment. However, health-care systems are deficient in different stages of the HIV continuum of care, and in some cases only a small proportion of individuals achieve the desired outcome of virological suppression. At present, data for most Latin American countries are not sufficient to build reliable metrics. Available data and estimates show that many people living with HIV in Latin America are unaware of their status, are diagnosed late, and enter into care late. Stigma, administrative barriers, and economic limitations seem to be important determinants of late diagnosis and failure to be linked to and retained in care. Policy makers need reliable data to optimise the HIV care continuum and improve individual-based and population-based outcomes of ART in Latin America.

  14. Estimating the fraction of progeny virions that must incorporate APOBEC3G for suppression of productive HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Thangavelu, Pulari U; Gupta, Vipul; Dixit, Narendra M

    2014-01-20

    The contest between the host factor APOBEC3G (A3G) and the HIV-1 protein Vif presents an attractive target of intervention. The extent to which the A3G-Vif interaction must be suppressed to tilt the balance in favor of A3G remains unknown. We employed stochastic simulations and mathematical modeling of the within-host dynamics and evolution of HIV-1 to estimate the fraction of progeny virions that must incorporate A3G to render productive infection unsustainable. Using three different approaches, we found consistently that a transition from sustained infection to suppression of productive infection occurred when the latter fraction exceeded ~0.8. The transition was triggered by A3G-induced hypermutations that led to premature stop codons compromising viral production and was consistent with driving the basic reproductive number, R0, below unity. The fraction identified may serve as a quantitative guideline for strategies targeting the A3G-Vif axis.

  15. Cross-sectional study of virological failure and multinucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance at 12 months of antiretroviral therapy in Western India.

    PubMed

    Karade, Santosh K; Ghate, Manisha V; Chaturbhuj, Devidas N; Kadam, Dileep B; Shankar, Subramanian; Gaikwad, Nitin; Gurav, Shraddha; Joshi, Rajneesh; Sane, Suvarna S; Kulkarni, Smita S; Kurle, Swarali N; Paranjape, Ramesh S; Rewari, Bharat B; Gangakhedkar, Raman R

    2016-09-01

    The free antiretroviral therapy (ART) program in India has scaled up to register second largest number of people living with HIV/AIDS across the globe. To assess the effectiveness of current first-line regimen we estimated virological suppression on completion of 1 year of ART. The study describes the correlates of virological failure (VF) and multinucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) drug resistance mutations (DRMs).In this cross-sectional study conducted between June and August 2014, consecutive adults from 4 State sponsored ART clinics of western India were recruited for plasma viral load screening at 12 ± 2 months of ART initiation. Individuals with plasma viral load >1000 copies/mL were selected for HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) genotyping. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess factors associated with VF and multi-NRTI resistance mutations. Criteria adopted for multi-NRTI resistance mutation were either presence of K65R or 3 or more thymidine analog mutations (TAMs) or presence of M184V along with 2 TAMs.Of the 844 study participants, virological suppression at 1 year was achieved in 87.7% of individuals. Factors significantly associated with VF (P < 0.005) were 12 months CD4 count of ≤100 cells/μL (adjusted OR -7.11), low reported adherence (adjusted OR -4.44), and those living without any partner (adjusted OR -1.98). In patients with VF, the prevalence of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) DRM (78.75%) were higher as compared to NRTI (58.75%). Multi-NRTI DRMs were present in 32.5% of sequences and were significantly associated with CD4 count of ≤100 cells/μL at baseline (adjusted OR -13.00) and TDF-based failing regimen (adjusted OR -20.43). Additionally, low reported adherence was negatively associated with multi-NRTI resistance (adjusted OR -0.11, P = 0.015). K65R mutation was significantly associated with tenofovir (TDF)-based failing regimen (P < 0.001).The study supports early

  16. Histone deacetylase inhibitor romidepsin induces HIV expression in CD4 T cells from patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy at concentrations achieved by clinical dosing.

    PubMed

    Wei, Datsen George; Chiang, Vicki; Fyne, Elizabeth; Balakrishnan, Mini; Barnes, Tiffany; Graupe, Michael; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Irrinki, Alivelu; Murry, Jeffrey P; Stepan, George; Stray, Kirsten M; Tsai, Angela; Yu, Helen; Spindler, Jonathan; Kearney, Mary; Spina, Celsa A; McMahon, Deborah; Lalezari, Jacob; Sloan, Derek; Mellors, John; Geleziunas, Romas; Cihlar, Tomas

    2014-04-01

    Persistent latent reservoir of replication-competent proviruses in memory CD4 T cells is a major obstacle to curing HIV infection. Pharmacological activation of HIV expression in latently infected cells is being explored as one of the strategies to deplete the latent HIV reservoir. In this study, we characterized the ability of romidepsin (RMD), a histone deacetylase inhibitor approved for the treatment of T-cell lymphomas, to activate the expression of latent HIV. In an in vitro T-cell model of HIV latency, RMD was the most potent inducer of HIV (EC50 = 4.5 nM) compared with vorinostat (VOR; EC50 = 3,950 nM) and other histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors in clinical development including panobinostat (PNB; EC50 = 10 nM). The HIV induction potencies of RMD, VOR, and PNB paralleled their inhibitory activities against multiple human HDAC isoenzymes. In both resting and memory CD4 T cells isolated from HIV-infected patients on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), a 4-hour exposure to 40 nM RMD induced a mean 6-fold increase in intracellular HIV RNA levels, whereas a 24-hour treatment with 1 µM VOR resulted in 2- to 3-fold increases. RMD-induced intracellular HIV RNA expression persisted for 48 hours and correlated with sustained inhibition of cell-associated HDAC activity. By comparison, the induction of HIV RNA by VOR and PNB was transient and diminished after 24 hours. RMD also increased levels of extracellular HIV RNA and virions from both memory and resting CD4 T-cell cultures. The activation of HIV expression was observed at RMD concentrations below the drug plasma levels achieved by doses used in patients treated for T-cell lymphomas. In conclusion, RMD induces HIV expression ex vivo at concentrations that can be achieved clinically, indicating that the drug may reactivate latent HIV in patients on suppressive cART.

  17. Genotypic resistance profiles of HIV-2-treated patients in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Charpentier, Charlotte; Eholié, Serge; Anglaret, Xavier; Bertine, Mélanie; Rouzioux, Christine; Avettand-Fenoël, Véronique; Messou, Eugène; Minga, Albert; Damond, Florence; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Dabis, François; Peytavin, Gilles; Brun-Vézinet, Françoise; Ekouevi, Didier K.

    2014-01-01

    plasma concentrations and virological suppression in a high proportion of HIV-2-infected patients. However, in cases of virological failure, the limited HIV-2 therapeutic arsenal and cross-resistance dramatically reduced treatment options. PMID:24583671

  18. Methamphetamine Use in HIV-infected Individuals Affects T-cell Function and Viral Outcome during Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Massanella, Marta; Gianella, Sara; Schrier, Rachel; Dan, Jennifer M.; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Oliveira, Michelli F.; Richman, Douglas D.; Little, Susan J.; Benson, Constance A.; Daar, Eric S.; Dube, Michael P.; Haubrich, Richard H.; Smith, Davey M.; Morris, Sheldon R.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the associations between methamphetamine (meth) use, immune function, and the dynamics of HIV and cytomegalovirus [CMV] in the blood and genital tract of HIV-infected ART-suppressed subjects. Self-reported meth use was associated with increased CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell proliferation (Ki67+, p < 0.005), CD4+ T-cell activation (CD45RA–CD38+, p = 0.005) and exhaustion (PD-1+, p = 0.0004) in blood, compared to non-meth users. Meth use was also associated with a trend towards higher blood HIV DNA levels (p = 0.09) and more frequent shedding of CMV in seminal plasma (p = 0.002). To explore possible mechanisms, we compared ex vivo spontaneous and antigen-specific proliferation in PBMC collected from subjects with and without positive meth detection in urine (Utox+ vs. Utox-). Despite higher levels of spontaneous proliferation, lymphocytes from Utox+ meth users had a significantly lower proliferative capacity after stimulation with a number of pathogens (CMV, candida, mycobacterium, toxoplasma, HIV, p < 0.04 in all cases), compared to Utox- participants. Our findings suggest that meth users have greater proliferation and exhaustion of the immune system. Meth use is also associated with a loss of control of CMV replication, which could be related to loss of immune response to pathogens. Future studies should consider meth use as a potential modulator of T-cell responses. PMID:26299251

  19. Effectiveness of Ritonavir-Boosted Protease Inhibitor Monotherapy in Clinical Practice Even with Previous Virological Failures to Protease Inhibitor-Based Regimens

    PubMed Central

    López-Cortés, Luis F.; Castaño, Manuel A.; López-Ruz, Miguel A.; Rios-Villegas, María J.; Hernández-Quero, José; Merino, Dolores; Jiménez-Aguilar, Patricia; Marquez-Solero, Manuel; Terrón-Pernía, Alberto; Tellez-Pérez, Francisco; Viciana, Pompeyo; Orihuela-Cañadas, Francisco; Palacios-Baena, Zaira; Vinuesa-Garcia, David; Fajardo-Pico, Jose M.; Romero-Palacios, Alberto; Ojeda-Burgos, Guillermo; Pasquau-Liaño, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Significant controversy still exists about ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor monotherapy (mtPI/rtv) as a simplification strategy that is used up to now to treat patients that have not experienced previous virological failure (VF) while on protease inhibitor (PI) -based regimens. We have evaluated the effectiveness of two mtPI/rtv regimens in an actual clinical practice setting, including patients that had experienced previous VF with PI-based regimens. Methods This retrospective study analyzed 1060 HIV-infected patients with undetectable viremia that were switched to lopinavir/ritonavir or darunavir/ritonavir monotherapy. In cases in which the patient had previously experienced VF while on a PI-based regimen, the lack of major HIV protease resistance mutations to lopinavir or darunavir, respectively, was mandatory. The primary endpoint of this study was the percentage of participants with virological suppression after 96 weeks according to intention-to-treat analysis (non-complete/missing = failure). Results A total of 1060 patients were analyzed, including 205 with previous VF while on PI-based regimens, 90 of whom were on complex therapies due to extensive resistance. The rates of treatment effectiveness (intention-to-treat analysis) and virological efficacy (on-treatment analysis) at week 96 were 79.3% (CI95, 76.8−81.8) and 91.5% (CI95, 89.6–93.4), respectively. No relationships were found between VF and earlier VF while on PI-based regimens, the presence of major or minor protease resistance mutations, the previous time on viral suppression, CD4+ T-cell nadir, and HCV-coinfection. Genotypic resistance tests were available in 49 out of the 74 patients with VFs and only four patients presented new major protease resistance mutations. Conclusion Switching to mtPI/rtv achieves sustained virological control in most patients, even in those with previous VF on PI-based regimens as long as no major resistance mutations are present for

  20. Maraviroc intensification in patients with suppressed HIV viremia has limited effects on CD4+ T cell recovery and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Jain, Sonia; Woelk, Christopher H.; Witt, Mallory D.; Sun, Xiaoying; Lada, Steven M.; Spina, Celsa A.; Goicoechea, Miguel; Rought, Steffney E.; Haubrich, Richard; Dubé, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Addition of the CCR5 inhibitor Maraviroc (MVC) to ongoing antiretroviral therapy increases CD4+ T cell counts in some virologically suppressed patients with suboptimal CD4+ T cell recovery. To understand the mechanisms by which MVC elicits increases in CD4+ T cell counts, the present study was undertaken to identify host factors (i.e. genes) that are modulated and are correlated with CD4+ T cell recovery during the 24 weeks of MVC intensification in 32 subjects. Median changes of CD4+ T cell counts over 24 weeks of MVC compared to baseline were 38 cells/mm3 (p < 0.001). The median slope of CD4+ T cell recovery was 39 cells/mm3 per year before initiation of MVC and 76 cells/mm3 per year during MVC intensification, however, this increase was not statistically significant (p = 0.33). Microarray analysis (N = 31,426 genes) identified a single differentially expressed gene, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF), which was modestly (1.44-fold, p < 0.001) downregulated by MVC at week 24 compared to baseline. TNF differential expression was evaluated using an independent method of droplet digital PCR, but the difference was not significant (p = 0.6). Changes in gene expression did not correlate with CD4+ T cell recovery or any changes in the CD4+ T cell maturation, proliferation and activation phenotypes. In summary, our data suggest that modest improvements of CD4+ T cell counts during MVC intensification cannot be explained by changes in gene expression elicited by MVC. However, the modest changes in T cell composition, including reduction of the percentages of Tregs, proliferating CD4+ T cells and senescent CD8+ T cells, suggest immunologically favorable effects of MVC. PMID:24769244

  1. Cascade of HIV care and population viral suppression in a high-burden region of Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Maman, David; Zeh, Clement; Mukui, Irene; Kirubi, Beatrice; Masson, Sophie; Opolo, Valarie; Szumilin, Elisabeth; Riche, Benjamin; Etard, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Direct measurement of antiretroviral treatment (ART) program indicators essential for evidence-based planning and evaluation – especially HIV incidence, population viral load, and ART eligibility – is rare in sub-Saharan Africa. Design/methods: To measure key indicators in rural western Kenya, an area with high HIV burden, we conducted a population survey in September to November 2012 via multistage cluster sampling, recruiting everyone aged 15–59 years living in 3330 randomly selected households. Consenting individuals were interviewed and tested for HIV at home. Participants testing positive were assessed for CD4+ cell count and viral load, and their infections classified as either recent or long term based on Limiting Antigen Avidity assays. HIV-negative participants were tested by nucleic acid amplification to detect acute infections. Results: Of 6833 household members eligible for the study, 6076 (94.7% of all women and 81.0% of men) agreed to participate. HIV prevalence and incidence were 24.1% [95% confidence interval [CI] 23.0–25.2] and 1.9 new cases/100 person-years (95% CI 1.1–2.7), respectively. Among HIV-positive participants, 59.4% (95% CI 56.8–61.9) were previously diagnosed, 53.1% (95% CI 50.5–55.7) were receiving care, and 39.7% (95% CI 37.1–42.4) had viral load less than 1000 copies/ml. Applying 2013 WHO recommendations for ART initiation increased the proportion of ART-eligible people from 60.0% (based on national guidelines in place during the survey; 95% CI 57.3–62.7) to 82.0% (95% CI 79.5–84.5). Among HIV-positive people not receiving ART, viral load increased with decreasing CD4+ cell count (500–749 vs. ≥750 cells/μl, adjusted mean difference, 0.40 log10 copies/ml, 95% CI 0.20–0.60, P < 0.01). Conclusion: This study demonstrates how population-level data can help optimize HIV programs. Based on these results, new regional programs are prioritizing diagnosis and expanding ART eligibility

  2. Oligomerization Requirements for MX2-Mediated Suppression of HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dicks, Matthew D. J.; Goujon, Caroline; Pollpeter, Darja; Betancor, Gilberto; Apolonia, Luis; Bergeron, Julien R. C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2/MXB) is an interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) and was recently identified as a late postentry suppressor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, inhibiting the nuclear accumulation of viral cDNAs. Although the HIV-1 capsid (CA) protein is believed to be the viral determinant of MX2-mediated inhibition, the precise mechanism of antiviral action remains unclear. The MX family of dynamin-like GTPases also includes MX1/MXA, a well-studied inhibitor of a range of RNA and DNA viruses, including influenza A virus (FLUAV) and hepatitis B virus but not retroviruses. MX1 and MX2 are closely related and share similar domain architectures and structures. However, MX2 possesses an extended N terminus that is essential for antiviral function and confers anti-HIV-1 activity on MX1 [MX1(NMX2)]. Higher-order oligomerization is required for the antiviral activity of MX1 against FLUAV, with current models proposing that MX1 forms ring structures that constrict around viral nucleoprotein complexes. Here, we performed structure-function studies to investigate the requirements for oligomerization of both MX2 and chimeric MX1(NMX2) for the inhibition of HIV-1 infection. The oligomerization state of mutated proteins with amino acid substitutions at multiple putative oligomerization interfaces was assessed using a combination of covalent cross-linking and coimmunoprecipitation. We show that while monomeric MX2 and MX1(NMX2) mutants are not antiviral, higher-order oligomerization does not appear to be required for full antiviral activity of either protein. We propose that lower-order oligomerization of MX2 is sufficient for the effective inhibition of HIV-1. IMPORTANCE Interferon plays an important role in the control of virus replication during acute infection in vivo. Recently, cultured cell experiments identified human MX2 as a key effector in the interferon-mediated postentry block to HIV-1 infection. MX2 is a member of a family

  3. Vpu Exploits the Cross-Talk between BST2 and the ILT7 Receptor to Suppress Anti-HIV-1 Responses by Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bego, Mariana G.; Côté, Édouard; Aschman, Nick; Mercier, Johanne; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Cohen, Éric A.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) constitute a major source of type-I interferon (IFN-I) production during acute HIV infection. Their activation results primarily from TLR7-mediated sensing of HIV-infected cells. However, the interactions between HIV-infected T cells and pDCs that modulate this sensing process remain poorly understood. BST2/Tetherin is a restriction factor that inhibits HIV release by cross-linking virions onto infected cell surface. BST2 was also shown to engage the ILT7 pDC-specific inhibitory receptor and repress TLR7/9-mediated IFN-I production by activated pDCs. Here, we show that Vpu, the HIV-1 antagonist of BST2, suppresses TLR7-mediated IFN-I production by pDC through a mechanism that relies on the interaction of BST2 on HIV-producing cells with ILT7. Even though Vpu downregulates surface BST2 as a mean to counteract the restriction on HIV-1 release, we also find that the viral protein re-locates remaining BST2 molecules outside viral assembly sites where they are free to bind and activate ILT7 upon cell-to-cell contact. This study shows that through a targeted regulation of surface BST2, Vpu promotes HIV-1 release and limits pDC antiviral responses upon sensing of infected cells. This mechanism of innate immune evasion is likely to be important for an efficient early viral dissemination during acute infection. PMID:26172439

  4. Select Host Restriction Factors Are Associated with HIV Persistence During Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    ABDEL-MOHSEN, Mohamed; WANG, Charlene; STRAIN, Matthew C.; LADA, Steven M.; DENG, Xutao; COCKERHAM, Leslie R.; PILCHER, Christopher D.; HECHT, Frederick M.; LIEGLER, Teri; RICHMAN, Douglas D.; DEEKS, Steven G.; PILLAI, Satish K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The eradication of HIV necessitates elimination of the HIV latent reservoir. Identifying host determinants governing latency and reservoir size in the setting of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is an important step in developing strategies to cure HIV infection. We sought to determine the impact of cell-intrinsic immunity on the HIV latent reservoir. Design We investigated the relevance of a comprehensive panel of established anti-HIV-1 host restriction factors to multiple established virologic and immunologic measures of viral persistence in HIV-1-infected, ART-suppressed individuals. Methods We measured the mRNA expression of 42 anti-HIV-1 host restriction factors, levels of cell-associated HIV-1 RNA, levels of total pol and 2-LTR circle HIV-1 DNA, and immunophenotypes of CD4+ T cells in 72 HIV-1-infected subjects on suppressive ART (23 subjects initiated ART <1 year post-infection, and 49 subjects initiated ART >1 year post-infection). Correlations were analyzed using non-parametric tests. Results The enhanced expression of a few select host restriction factors, p21, schlafen 11, and PAF1, was strongly associated with reduced CD4+ T cell-associated HIV RNA during ART (p<0.001). In addition, our data suggested that ART perturbs the regulatory relationship between CD4+ T cell activation and restriction factor expression. Lastly, cell-intrinsic immune responses were significantly enhanced in subjects who initiated ART during early versus chronic infection, and may contribute to the reduced reservoir size observed in these individuals. Conclusions Intrinsic immune responses modulate HIV persistence during suppressive ART, and may be manipulated to enhance the efficacy of ART and promote viral eradication through reversal of latency in vivo. PMID:25602681

  5. Finding our roots and celebrating our shoots: Plant virology in Virology, 1955-1964.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, Karen-Beth G

    2015-05-01

    To celebrate the sixtieth anniversary of Virology a survey is made of the plant viruses, virologists and their institutions, and tools and technology described in the first decade of plant virus publications in Virology. This was a period when plant viruses increasingly became tools of discovery as epistemic objects and plant virology became a discipline discrete from plant pathology and other life sciences.

  6. Suppression of HIV replication in the resting CD4+ T cell reservoir by autologous CD8+ T cells: Implications for the development of therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Tae-Wook; Justement, J. Shawn; Moir, Susan; Hallahan, Claire W.; Ehler, Linda A.; Liu, Shuying; McLaughlin, Mary; Dybul, Mark; Mican, JoAnn M.; Fauci, Anthony S.

    2001-01-01

    CD8+ T cell-mediated antiviral activity against HIV has been described consistently in infected individuals; however, the role of this activity in controlling replication of HIV in the latently infected, resting CD4+ T cell reservoir is unclear. By using an ex vivo system, we show that replication of HIV in this viral reservoir is effectively suppressed in coculture by autologous CD8+ T cells in long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) and in patients whose viremia was controlled by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), but not in therapy-naive patients who had substantial levels of plasma viremia. This antiviral activity was largely independent of cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTL). When the role of soluble CD8+ T cell-derived factors was examined, we found that CC-chemokines played a major role in inhibition of viral replication in the latent viral reservoir in some LTNPs and patients receiving HAART, but not in chronically infected patients who were not receiving antiretroviral therapy. Potent antiviral activity, independent of CC-chemokines, was found mainly in patients in whom HAART was initiated shortly after the acute phase of HIV infection. These results indicate that CD8+ T cells provide potent suppressive activity against HIV replication in the latent viral reservoir via direct cellular contact in patients who are naturally LTNPs or in those who are treated with HAART. Furthermore, the profound antiviral activity exerted by non-CC-chemokine soluble factors in infected patients who began HAART early in HIV infection suggests that preservation of this HIV-suppressive mechanism by early initiation of therapy may play an important role in the containment of viral replication in infected patients following interruption of therapy. PMID:11136258

  7. Antiretroviral Therapy and Viral Suppression Among Foreign-Born HIV-Infected Persons Receiving Medical Care in the United States: A Complex Sample, Cross-Sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Myers, Tanya R; Lin, Xia; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    Immigrants to the United States are more likely to be diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection compared with native-born persons. Navigating access to healthcare in the United States can be challenging for foreign-born persons, and HIV treatment outcomes may be suboptimal for these persons. We compared characteristics of and assessed disparities in clinical outcomes of foreign-born persons in care for HIV in the United States. The Medical Monitoring Project is a complex sample, cross-sectional survey designed to be nationally representative of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Using data from 2009, 2010, and 2011, we conducted descriptive analyses and multivariable logistic regression to assess associations between foreign-born status and antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription, and between foreign-born status and viral suppression. In all, 13.4% of HIV-infected persons were self-identified as foreign-born; the most common regions of birth were Central America and Mexico (45.4%) and the Caribbean (16.0%). Nearly 90% of foreign-born persons were diagnosed with HIV after entry into the United States. Compared with US-born persons, foreign-born persons were more likely to be younger, Hispanic, less educated, and uninsured. The prevalence of ART prescription (prevalence ratio 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.98-1.02) was not significantly different between foreign-born and US-born persons. A higher percentage of foreign-born persons achieved viral suppression compared with US-born persons (prevalence ratio 1.05; 95% confidence interval 1.00-1.09). No major disparities in ART prescription and viral suppression were found between foreign-born and US-born HIV-infected persons receiving medical care, despite higher percentages being uninsured. PMID:26986128

  8. Antiretroviral Therapy and Viral Suppression Among Foreign-Born HIV-Infected Persons Receiving Medical Care in the United States: A Complex Sample, Cross-Sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Myers, Tanya R; Lin, Xia; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    Immigrants to the United States are more likely to be diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection compared with native-born persons. Navigating access to healthcare in the United States can be challenging for foreign-born persons, and HIV treatment outcomes may be suboptimal for these persons. We compared characteristics of and assessed disparities in clinical outcomes of foreign-born persons in care for HIV in the United States. The Medical Monitoring Project is a complex sample, cross-sectional survey designed to be nationally representative of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Using data from 2009, 2010, and 2011, we conducted descriptive analyses and multivariable logistic regression to assess associations between foreign-born status and antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription, and between foreign-born status and viral suppression. In all, 13.4% of HIV-infected persons were self-identified as foreign-born; the most common regions of birth were Central America and Mexico (45.4%) and the Caribbean (16.0%). Nearly 90% of foreign-born persons were diagnosed with HIV after entry into the United States. Compared with US-born persons, foreign-born persons were more likely to be younger, Hispanic, less educated, and uninsured. The prevalence of ART prescription (prevalence ratio 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.98-1.02) was not significantly different between foreign-born and US-born persons. A higher percentage of foreign-born persons achieved viral suppression compared with US-born persons (prevalence ratio 1.05; 95% confidence interval 1.00-1.09). No major disparities in ART prescription and viral suppression were found between foreign-born and US-born HIV-infected persons receiving medical care, despite higher percentages being uninsured.

  9. HIV-1 Rev protein specifies the viral RNA export pathway by suppressing TAP/NXF1 recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Ichiro; Mabuchi, Naoto; Ohno, Mutsuhito

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear RNA export pathways in eukaryotes are often linked to the fate of a given RNA. Therefore, the choice of export pathway should be well-controlled to avoid an unfavorable effect on gene expression. Although some RNAs could be exported by more than one pathway, little is known about how the choice is regulated. This issue is highlighted when the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Rev protein induces the export of singly spliced and unspliced HIV-1 transcripts. How these RNAs are exported is not well understood because such transcripts should have the possibility of utilizing CRM1-dependent export via Rev or cellular TAP/NXF1-dependent export via the transcription/export (TREX) complex, or both. Here we found that Rev suppressed TAP/NXF1-dependent export of model RNA substrates that recapitulated viral transcripts. In this effect, Rev interacted with the cap-binding complex and inhibited the recruitment of the TREX complex. Thus, Rev controls the identity of the factor occupying the cap-proximal region that determines the RNA export pathway. This ribonucleoprotein remodeling activity of Rev may favor viral gene expression. PMID:24753416

  10. The history of tumor virology.

    PubMed

    Javier, Ronald T; Butel, Janet S

    2008-10-01

    In the century since its inception, the field of tumor virology has provided groundbreaking insights into the causes of human cancer. Peyton Rous founded this scientific field in 1911 by discovering an avian virus that induced tumors in chickens; however, it took 40 years for the scientific community to comprehend the effect of this seminal finding. Later identification of mammalian tumor viruses in the 1930s by Richard Shope and John Bittner, and in the 1950s by Ludwik Gross, sparked the first intense interest in tumor virology by suggesting the possibility of a similar causal role for viruses in human cancers. This change in attitude opened the door in the 1960s and 1970s for the discovery of the first human tumor viruses--EBV, hepatitis B virus, and the papillomaviruses. Such knowledge proved instrumental to the development of the first cancer vaccines against cancers having an infectious etiology. Tumor virologists additionally recognized that viruses could serve as powerful discovery tools, leading to revolutionary breakthroughs in the 1970s and 1980s that included the concept of the oncogene, the identification of the p53 tumor suppressor, and the function of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor. The subsequent availability of more advanced molecular technologies paved the way in the 1980s and 1990s for the identification of additional human tumor viruses--human T-cell leukemia virus type 1, hepatitis C virus, and Kaposi's sarcoma virus. In fact, current estimates suggest that viruses are involved in 15% to 20% of human cancers worldwide. Thus, viruses not only have been shown to represent etiologic agents for many human cancers but have also served as tools to reveal mechanisms that are involved in all human malignancies. This rich history promises that tumor virology will continue to contribute to our understanding of cancer and to the development of new therapeutic and preventive measures for this disease in the 21st century.

  11. Protein in St. John's Wort may suppress HIV-1 gene expression. Research suggests interesting possibilities.

    PubMed

    2005-12-01

    St. John's Wort contains a protein that inhibits HIV-1 replication, according to new research. Investigators who have spent more than a decade studying the mechanism of development of neurological disorders in AIDS patients decided to look at the impact St. John's Wort might have on neuronal cells, says Kamel Khalili, PhD, director of the Center for Neurovirology, professor, and acting chair of the department of neuroscience at Temple University's School of Medicine in Philadelphia, PA. PMID:16397939

  12. Amniocentesis in the HIV-infected pregnant woman: Is there still cause for concern in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Andany, Nisha; Letchumanan, Michelle; Bondy, Lise; Murphy, Kellie; Loutfy, Mona R

    2013-01-01

    The current standard of care in Canadian obstetrical practice is to offer pregnant women the opportunity for prenatal investigation to diagnose congenital abnormalities. Prenatal amniocentesis is Canada’s most commonly practiced invasive procedure for the diagnosis of chromosomal and single gene disorders. The potential risk of intrapartum HIV transmission during amniocentesis raises several ethical concerns and limits the availability of prenatal genetic testing for HIV-positive pregnant women. Complete virological suppression with antiretroviral therapy may alleviate the risk of mother-to-child transmission during amniocentesis and increase accessibility of this important diagnostic tool in the HIV-positive population. The present report describes a case involving a 32-year-old HIV-positive pregnant woman whose plasma viral load was undetectable on antiretroviral therapy; she underwent successful prenatal amniocentesis without transmission of HIV to her infant. PMID:24421839

  13. Amniocentesis in the HIV-infected pregnant woman: Is there still cause for concern in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy?

    PubMed

    Andany, Nisha; Letchumanan, Michelle; Bondy, Lise; Murphy, Kellie; Loutfy, Mona R

    2013-01-01

    The current standard of care in Canadian obstetrical practice is to offer pregnant women the opportunity for prenatal investigation to diagnose congenital abnormalities. Prenatal amniocentesis is Canada's most commonly practiced invasive procedure for the diagnosis of chromosomal and single gene disorders. The potential risk of intrapartum HIV transmission during amniocentesis raises several ethical concerns and limits the availability of prenatal genetic testing for HIV-positive pregnant women. Complete virological suppression with antiretroviral therapy may alleviate the risk of mother-to-child transmission during amniocentesis and increase accessibility of this important diagnostic tool in the HIV-positive population. The present report describes a case involving a 32-year-old HIV-positive pregnant woman whose plasma viral load was undetectable on antiretroviral therapy; she underwent successful prenatal amniocentesis without transmission of HIV to her infant.

  14. The Clinical Impact of Continuing to Prescribe Antiretroviral Therapy in Patients with Advanced AIDS Who Manifest No Virologic or Immunologic Benefit

    PubMed Central

    Wohl, David A.; Kendall, Michelle A.; Feinberg, Judith; Alston-Smith, Beverly; Owens, Susan; Chafey, Suzette; Marco, Michael; Maxwell, Sharon; Benson, Constance; Keiser, Philip; van der Horst, Charles; Jacobson, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Despite the efficacy and tolerability of modern antiretroviral therapy (ART), many patients with advanced AIDS prescribed these regimens do not achieve viral suppression or immune reconstitution as a result of poor adherence, drug resistance, or both. The clinical outcomes of continued ART prescription for such patients have not been well characterized. Methods We examined the causes and predictors of all-cause mortality, AIDS-defining conditions, and serious non-AIDS-defining events among a cohort of participants in a clinical trial of pre-emptive therapy for CMV disease. We focused on participants who, despite ART had failed to achieve virologic suppression and substantive immune reconstitution. Results 233 ART-receiving participants entered with a median baseline CD4+ T cell count of 30/mm3 and plasma HIV RNA of 5 log10 copies/mL. During a median 96 weeks of follow-up, 24.0% died (a mortality rate of 10.7/100 patient-years); 27.5% reported a new AIDS-defining condition, and 22.3% a new serious non-AIDS event. Of the deaths, 42.8% were due to an AIDS-defining condition, 44.6% were due to a non-AIDS-defining condition, and 12.5% were of unknown etiology. Decreased risk of mortality was associated with baseline CD4+ T cell count ≥25/mm3 and lower baseline HIV RNA. Conclusions Among patients with advanced AIDS prescribed modern ART who achieve neither virologic suppression nor immune reconstitution, crude mortality percentages appear to be lower than reported in cohorts of patients studied a decade earlier. Also, in contrast to the era before modern ART became available, nearly half of the deaths in our modern-era study were caused by serious non-AIDS-defining events. Even among the most advanced AIDS patients who were not obtaining apparent immunologic and virologic benefit from ART, continued prescription of these medications appears to alter the natural history of AIDS—improving survival and shifting the causes of death from AIDS- to non

  15. 42 CFR 493.1265 - Standard: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard: Virology. 493.1265 Section 493.1265 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 493.1265 Standard: Virology. (a) When using cell culture to isolate or identify viruses,...

  16. 42 CFR 493.1265 - Standard: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard: Virology. 493.1265 Section 493.1265 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 493.1265 Standard: Virology. (a) When using cell culture to isolate or identify viruses,...

  17. 42 CFR 493.831 - Standard; Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Virology. 493.831 Section 493.831 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Tests § 493.831 Standard; Virology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event score of at least...

  18. 42 CFR 493.831 - Standard; Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard; Virology. 493.831 Section 493.831 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Tests § 493.831 Standard; Virology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event score of at least...

  19. 42 CFR 493.1265 - Standard: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard: Virology. 493.1265 Section 493.1265 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 493.1265 Standard: Virology. (a) When using cell culture to isolate or identify viruses,...

  20. Integrative Virology for Senior Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koment, Roger W.

    1991-01-01

    The article describes a senior elective in virology developed at the University of South Dakota School of Medicine. Students work independently through a series of course units, selecting 12 study topics from a catalog of 35 topics in medical virology and discussing their reading daily with the professor. (DB)

  1. 42 CFR 493.831 - Standard; Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard; Virology. 493.831 Section 493.831 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Tests § 493.831 Standard; Virology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event score of at least...

  2. 42 CFR 493.1265 - Standard: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard: Virology. 493.1265 Section 493.1265 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 493.1265 Standard: Virology. (a) When using cell culture to isolate or identify viruses,...

  3. 42 CFR 493.831 - Standard; Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard; Virology. 493.831 Section 493.831 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Tests § 493.831 Standard; Virology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event score of at least...

  4. 42 CFR 493.831 - Standard; Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard; Virology. 493.831 Section 493.831 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Tests § 493.831 Standard; Virology. (a) Failure to attain an overall testing event score of at least...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1265 - Standard: Virology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: Virology. 493.1265 Section 493.1265 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 493.1265 Standard: Virology. (a) When using cell culture to isolate or identify viruses,...

  6. Hepatitis B and C Co-Infection in HIV Patients from the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database: Analysis of Risk Factors and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Marcelo; Wong, Wing-Wai; Law, Matthew G.; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Yunihastuti, Evy; Merati, Tuti Parwati; Lim, Poh Lian; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Phanuphak, Praphan; Lee, Man Po; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Ditangco, Rossana; Sim, Benedict L. H.; Nguyen, Kinh Van; Pujari, Sanjay; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Zhang, Fujie; Pham, Thuy Thanh; Choi, Jun Yong; Oka, Shinichi; Kantipong, Pacharee; Mustafa, Mahiran; Ratanasuwan, Winai; Durier, Nicolas; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Background We assessed the effects of hepatitis B (HBV) or hepatitis C (HCV) co-infection on outcomes of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected patients enrolled in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD), a multi-center cohort of HIV-infected patients in the Asia-Pacific region. Methods Patients testing HBs antigen (Ag) or HCV antibody (Ab) positive within enrollment into TAHOD were considered HBV or HCV co-infected. Factors associated with HBV and/or HCV co-infection were assessed by logistic regression models. Factors associated with post-ART HIV immunological response (CD4 change after six months) and virological response (HIV RNA <400 copies/ml after 12 months) were also determined. Survival was assessed by the Kaplan-Meier method and log rank test. Results A total of 7,455 subjects were recruited by December 2012. Of patients tested, 591/5656 (10.4%) were HBsAg positive, 794/5215 (15.2%) were HCVAb positive, and 88/4966 (1.8%) were positive for both markers. In multivariate analysis, HCV co-infection, age, route of HIV infection, baseline CD4 count, baseline HIV RNA, and HIV-1 subtype were associated with immunological recovery. Age, route of HIV infection, baseline CD4 count, baseline HIV RNA, ART regimen, prior ART and HIV-1 subtype, but not HBV or HCV co-infection, affected HIV RNA suppression. Risk factors affecting mortality included HCV co-infection, age, CDC stage, baseline CD4 count, baseline HIV RNA and prior mono/dual ART. Shortest survival was seen in subjects who were both HBV- and HCV-positive. Conclusion In this Asian cohort of HIV-infected patients, HCV co-infection, but not HBV co-infection, was associated with lower CD4 cell recovery after ART and increased mortality. PMID:26933963

  7. Highlights from the 5th Annual Meeting of the Italian Society of Virology.

    PubMed

    Salata, Cristiano; Calistri, Arianna; Palù, Giorgio

    2006-07-01

    The 5th National Congress of the Italian Society of Virology (SIV) was attended by junior- and senior-level virologists to promote interactions and scientific collaborations among the different areas of Virology and allied sciences. The invited and selected lecturers covered the following topics: General Virology and Viral Genetics; Virus-host Interaction and Pathogenesis; Viral Oncogenesis; Viral Immunology and Vaccines; Anti-viral Therapy; Innovative Diagnostics; Viral Biotechnologies and Cell and Gene Therapy. As in the previous editions (Salata and Palù, 2004; Salata et al., 2005), a specific topic was thoroughly covered in a roundtable. This year the elected subject was "HIV: determinants of pathogenicity and clinical implications." The final program and the abstract book can be found at the web site http://www.siv-virologia.it. This report summarizes the lessons learned from the plenary lectures and the selected oral presentations of the 2005 meeting.

  8. Early Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Limits Exposure to HIV-1 Replication and Cell-Associated HIV-1 DNA Levels in Infants

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Margaret; Mick, Eric; Hudson, Richard; Mofenson, Lynne M.; Sullivan, John L.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to measure HIV-1 persistence following combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in infants and children. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) HIV-1 DNA was quantified prior to and after 1 year of cART in 30 children, stratified by time of initiation (early, age <3 months, ET; late, age >3 months-2 years, LT). Pre-therapy PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels correlated with pre-therapy plasma HIV-1 levels (r = 0.59, p<0.001), remaining statistically significant (p = 0.002) after adjustment for prior perinatal antiretroviral exposure and age at cART initiation. PBMC HIV-1 DNA declined significantly after 1 year of cART (Overall: -0.91±0.08 log10 copies per million PBMC, p<0.001; ET: -1.04±0.11 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC, p<0.001; LT: -0.74 ±0.13 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC, p<0.001) but rates of decline did not differ significantly between ET and LT. HIV-1 replication exposure over the first 12 months of cART, estimated as area-under-the-curve (AUC) of circulating plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, was significantly associated with PBMC HIV-1 DNA at one year (r = 0.51, p = 0.004). In 21 children with sustained virologic suppression after 1 year of cART, PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels continued to decline between years 1 and 4 (slope -0.21 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC per year); decline slopes did not differ significantly between ET and LT. PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels at 1 year and 4 years of cART correlated with age at cART initiation (1 year: p = 0.04; 4 years: p = 0.03) and age at virologic control (1 and 4 years, p = 0.02). Altogether, these data indicate that reducing exposure to HIV-1 replication and younger age at cART initiation are associated with lower HIV-1 DNA levels at and after one year of age, supporting the concept that HIV-1 diagnosis and cART initiation in infants should occur as early as possible. PMID:27104621

  9. ART influences HIV persistence in the female reproductive tract and cervicovaginal secretions

    PubMed Central

    Olesen, Rikke; Swanson, Michael D.; Kovarova, Martina; Nochi, Tomonori; Chateau, Morgan; Honeycutt, Jenna B.; Long, Julie M.; Denton, Paul W.; Hudgens, Michael G.; Richardson, Amy; Tolstrup, Martin; Østergaard, Lars; Wahl, Angela; Garcia, J. Victor

    2016-01-01

    The recently completed HIV prevention trials network study 052 is a landmark collaboration demonstrating that HIV transmission in discordant couples can be dramatically reduced by treating the infected individual with antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, the cellular and virological events that occur in the female reproductive tract (FRT) during ART that result in such a drastic decrease in transmission were not studied and remain unknown. Here, we implemented an in vivo model of ART in BM/liver/thymus (BLT) humanized mice in order to better understand the ability of ART to prevent secondary HIV transmission. We demonstrated that the entire FRT of BLT mice is reconstituted with human CD4+ cells that are shed into cervicovaginal secretions (CVS). A high percentage of the CD4+ T cells in the FRT and CVS expressed CCR5 and therefore are potential HIV target cells. Infection with HIV increased the numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in CVS of BLT mice. Furthermore, HIV was present in CVS during infection. Finally, we evaluated the effect of ART on HIV levels in the FRT and CVS and demonstrated that ART can efficiently suppress cell-free HIV-RNA in CVS, despite residual levels of HIV-RNA+ cells in both the FRT and CVS. PMID:26854925

  10. Hemorrhagic Stroke in an Adolescent Female with HIV-Associated Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Rakhmanina, Natella; Wong, Edward CC; Davis, Jeremiah C; Ray, Patricio E

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 infection can trigger acute episodes of Idiopathic Thrombocytoponic Purpura (ITP), and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP), particularly in populations with advanced disease and poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). These diseases should be distinguished because they respond to different treatments. Previous studies done in adults with HIV-TTP have recommended the prompt initiation or re-initiation of ART in parallel with plasma exchange therapy to improve the clinical outcome of these patients. Here, we describe a case of HIV-TTP resulting in an acute hemorrhagic stroke in a 16 year old female with perinatally acquired HIV infection and non-adherence to ART, who presented with severe thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and a past medical history of HIV-ITP. Both differential diagnosis and treatments for HIV-ITP and HIV-TTP were considered simultaneously. A decrease in plasma ADAMTS13 activity (<5%) without detectable inhibitory antibodies confirmed the diagnosis of HIV-TTP. Re-initiation of ART and plasma exchange resulted in a marked decrease in the HIV-RNA viral load, recovery of the platelet count, and complete recovery was achieved with sustained virologic suppression. PMID:25429351

  11. CD8+ T cell-mediated suppressive activity inhibits HIV-1 after virus entry with kinetics indicating effects on virus gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tomaras, G D; Lacey, S F; McDanal, C B; Ferrari, G; Weinhold, K J; Greenberg, M L

    2000-03-28

    Individuals infected with HIV-1 have varying rates of progression to AIDS. Cellular immune responses, comprised of cytolytic and noncytolytic CD8(+) T cell effector functions, are considered important for controlling viremia and maintaining the clinically asymptomatic state. Although there is general agreement regarding CD8(+) T lymphocyte cytotoxic functions, considerable controversy exists over the nature of the noncytolytic antiviral activity of CD8(+) cells. The discovery that RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted), MIP-1alpha, and MIP-1beta (macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha and beta) could inhibit HIV-1 replication by blocking viral entry processes led to the notion that these molecules are responsible for the CD8(+) cell suppressive activity. However, T tropic HIV isolates requiring the CXCR4 coreceptor for entry are insensitive to the antiviral effects of these beta-chemokines. Using a CXCR4-dependent virus, we determined that the mechanism of CD8(+) T cell-mediated activity did act after viral entry into the host cell. We also define the kinetics of the HIV life cycle in primary activated human CD4(+)-enriched T cells by using an HIV-1 reporter virus system pseudotyped with the CXCR4-dependent HIV-1 envelope gene of NL4-3. Analysis of these kinetic data indicates that CD8(+) T cell-mediated suppressive activity acts at a stage in the viral life cycle after entry and independently of the HIV envelope. Additionally, we show that the antiviral activity targets stages of the virus life cycle correlating with transcription and early proviral gene expression. These findings not only provide a range of possible targets for the CD8(+) T cell-mediated activity but also support the notion that this antiviral activity is multifactorial in nature.

  12. Challenges and opportunities for the implementation of virological testing in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Teri; Bygrave, Helen; Fajardo, Emmanuel; Ford, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Though the advantages of routine virological monitoring for patients on anti-retroviral therapy have been established, cost and complexity limit its full implementation. Monitoring is important for diagnosing virological failure early on, before the development of drug resistance mutations, and to trigger early adherence interventions. Simple and cost-effective viral load tests that facilitate simplification and decentralization of testing and strategies, such as the use of dried blood spots and pooled sample testing, which further aid simplification, are becoming available. In addition, replacing immunological monitoring with virological monitoring in non-viremic patients in a phased manner will reduce the costs associated with dual immuno-virological monitoring. Going forward, the simplification of testing paired with price reducing strategies that will allow for healthy competition between multiple manufacturers will enable the implementation of viral load testing in resource-poor settings. It is important that future HIV and AIDS treatment guidelines provide clear recommendations for routine virological monitoring and that governments and donors fund the implementation of accurate and operationally proven testing platforms in a comprehensive manner. PMID:23078767

  13. Understanding Cross-Sectional Racial, Ethnic, and Gender Disparities in Antiretroviral Use and Viral Suppression Among HIV Patients in the United States.

    PubMed

    Beer, Linda; Mattson, Christine L; Bradley, Heather; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    To examine racial/ethnic and gender disparities in antiretroviral (ART) use and viral suppression among HIV-infected persons in care and identify factors that might account for observed disparities. The Medical Monitoring Project (MMP) is a complex sample survey of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. We used weighted interview and medical record data collected 06/2009 to 05/2012 to estimate the prevalence of ART use and viral suppression among gender-stratified racial/ethnic groups. We used χ² tests to identify significant differences in outcomes between white men versus other groups, and logistic regression models to identify the most parsimonious set of factors that could account for each observed difference. We found no significant disparity in ART use between white and Hispanic men, and no disparities between white men and white and Hispanic women after adjustment for disease stage, age, and poverty. Disparities in ART use between white men and black persons persisted after adjusting for other factors, but the observed differences were relatively small. Differences in ART use and adherence, demographic characteristics, and social determinants of health such as poverty, education, and insurance accounted for the observed disparities in viral suppression between white men and all groups except black men. In our model, accounting for these factors reduced the prevalence difference in viral suppression between white and black men by almost half. We found that factors associated with disparities differed among men and women of the same race/ethnicity, lending support to the assertion that gender affects access to care and health status among HIV-infected patients. In addition to supporting efforts to increase ART use and adherence among persons living with HIV, our analysis provides evidence for the importance of social determinants of health in understanding racial/ethnic and gender differences in ART use and viral suppression. PMID

  14. Understanding Cross-Sectional Racial, Ethnic, and Gender Disparities in Antiretroviral Use and Viral Suppression Among HIV Patients in the United States.

    PubMed

    Beer, Linda; Mattson, Christine L; Bradley, Heather; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    To examine racial/ethnic and gender disparities in antiretroviral (ART) use and viral suppression among HIV-infected persons in care and identify factors that might account for observed disparities. The Medical Monitoring Project (MMP) is a complex sample survey of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. We used weighted interview and medical record data collected 06/2009 to 05/2012 to estimate the prevalence of ART use and viral suppression among gender-stratified racial/ethnic groups. We used χ² tests to identify significant differences in outcomes between white men versus other groups, and logistic regression models to identify the most parsimonious set of factors that could account for each observed difference. We found no significant disparity in ART use between white and Hispanic men, and no disparities between white men and white and Hispanic women after adjustment for disease stage, age, and poverty. Disparities in ART use between white men and black persons persisted after adjusting for other factors, but the observed differences were relatively small. Differences in ART use and adherence, demographic characteristics, and social determinants of health such as poverty, education, and insurance accounted for the observed disparities in viral suppression between white men and all groups except black men. In our model, accounting for these factors reduced the prevalence difference in viral suppression between white and black men by almost half. We found that factors associated with disparities differed among men and women of the same race/ethnicity, lending support to the assertion that gender affects access to care and health status among HIV-infected patients. In addition to supporting efforts to increase ART use and adherence among persons living with HIV, our analysis provides evidence for the importance of social determinants of health in understanding racial/ethnic and gender differences in ART use and viral suppression.

  15. Understanding Cross-Sectional Racial, Ethnic, and Gender Disparities in Antiretroviral Use and Viral Suppression Among HIV Patients in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Linda; Mattson, Christine L.; Bradley, Heather; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To examine racial/ethnic and gender disparities in antiretroviral (ART) use and viral suppression among HIV-infected persons in care and identify factors that might account for observed disparities. The Medical Monitoring Project (MMP) is a complex sample survey of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. We used weighted interview and medical record data collected 06/2009 to 05/2012 to estimate the prevalence of ART use and viral suppression among gender-stratified racial/ethnic groups. We used χ2 tests to identify significant differences in outcomes between white men versus other groups, and logistic regression models to identify the most parsimonious set of factors that could account for each observed difference. We found no significant disparity in ART use between white and Hispanic men, and no disparities between white men and white and Hispanic women after adjustment for disease stage, age, and poverty. Disparities in ART use between white men and black persons persisted after adjusting for other factors, but the observed differences were relatively small. Differences in ART use and adherence, demographic characteristics, and social determinants of health such as poverty, education, and insurance accounted for the observed disparities in viral suppression between white men and all groups except black men. In our model, accounting for these factors reduced the prevalence difference in viral suppression between white and black men by almost half. We found that factors associated with disparities differed among men and women of the same race/ethnicity, lending support to the assertion that gender affects access to care and health status among HIV-infected patients. In addition to supporting efforts to increase ART use and adherence among persons living with HIV, our analysis provides evidence for the importance of social determinants of health in understanding racial/ethnic and gender differences in ART use and viral suppression

  16. Establishment and Replenishment of the Viral Reservoir in Perinatally HIV-1-infected Children Initiating Very Early Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Bonet, Marta; Puertas, Maria Carmen; Fortuny, Claudia; Ouchi, Dan; Mellado, Maria José; Rojo, Pablo; Noguera-Julian, Antoni; Muñoz-Fernández, Ma Angeles; Martinez-Picado, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) generally suppresses the replication of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) but does not cure the infection, because proviruses persist in stable latent reservoirs. It has been proposed that low-level proviral reservoirs might predict longer virologic control after discontinuation of treatment. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of very early initiation of cART and temporary treatment interruption on the size of the latent HIV-1 reservoir in vertically infected children. Methods. This retrospective study included 23 perinatally HIV-1-infected children who initiated very early treatment within 12 weeks after birth (n = 14), or early treatment between week 12 and 1 year (n = 9). We measured the proviral reservoir (CD4+ T-cell–associated HIV-1 DNA) in blood samples collected beyond the first year of sustained virologic suppression. Results. There is a strong positive correlation between the time to initiation of cART and the size of the proviral reservoir. Children who initiated cART within the first 12 weeks of life showed a proviral reservoir 6-fold smaller than children initiating cART beyond this time (P < .01). Rapid virologic control after initiation of cART also limits the size of the viral reservoir. However, patients who underwent transient treatment interruptions showed a dramatic increase in the size of the viral reservoir after discontinuation. Conclusions. Initiation of cART during the first 12 weeks of life in perinatally HIV-1-infected children limits the size of the viral reservoir. Treatment interruptions should be undertaken with caution, as they might lead to fast and irreversible replenishment of the viral reservoir. PMID:26063721

  17. Implementation and Operational Research: Engagement in HIV Care Among Persons Enrolled in a Clinical HIV Cohort in Ontario, Canada, 2001–2011

    PubMed Central

    Burchell, Ann N.; Gardner, Sandra; Light, Lucia; Ellis, Brooke M.; Antoniou, Tony; Bacon, Jean; Benoit, Anita; Cooper, Curtis; Kendall, Claire; Loutfy, Mona; McGee, Frank; Raboud, Janet; Rachlis, Anita; Wobeser, Wendy; Rourke, Sean B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ensuring that people living with HIV are accessing and staying in care is vital to achieving optimal health outcomes including antiretroviral therapy (ART) success. We sought to characterize engagement in HIV care among participants of a large clinical cohort in Ontario, Canada, from 2001 to 2011. Methods: The Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study (OCS) is a multisite HIV clinical cohort, which conducts record linkage with the provincial public health laboratory for viral load tests. We estimated the annual proportion meeting criteria for being in care (≥1 viral load per year), in continuous care (≥2 viral load per year ≥90 days apart), on ART, and with suppressed viral load <200 copies per milliliter. Ratios of proportions according to socio-demographic and clinical characteristics were examined using multivariable generalized estimating equations with a log-link. Results: A total of 5380 participants were followed over 44,680 person-years. From 2001 to 2011, we observed high and constant proportions of patients in HIV care (86.3%–88.8%) and in continuous care (76.4%–79.5%). There were statistically significant rises over time in the proportions on ART and with suppressed viral load; by 2011, a majority of patients were on ART (77.3%) and had viral suppression (76.2%). There was minimal variation in HIV engagement indicators by socio-demographic and HIV risk characteristics. Conclusions: In a setting with universal health care, we observed high proportions of HIV care engagement over time and an increased proportion of patients attaining successful virologic suppression, likely due to improvements in ART regimens and changing guidelines. PMID:26322672

  18. Suppression of Foxo1 Activity and Down-Modulation of CD62L (L-Selectin) in HIV-1 Infected Resting CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trinité, Benjamin; Chan, Chi N.; Lee, Caroline S.; Mahajan, Saurabh; Luo, Yang; Muesing, Mark A.; Folkvord, Joy M.; Pham, Michael; Connick, Elizabeth; Levy, David N.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 hijacks and disrupts many processes in the cells it infects in order to suppress antiviral immunity and to facilitate its replication. Resting CD4 T cells are important early targets of HIV-1 infection in which HIV-1 must overcome intrinsic barriers to viral replication. Although resting CD4 T cells are refractory to infection in vitro, local environmental factors within lymphoid and mucosal tissues such as cytokines facilitate viral replication while maintaining the resting state. These factors can be utilized in vitro to study HIV-1 replication in resting CD4 T cells. In vivo, the migration of resting naïve and central memory T cells into lymphoid tissues is dependent upon expression of CD62L (L-selectin), a receptor that is subsequently down-modulated following T cell activation. CD62L gene transcription is maintained in resting T cells by Foxo1 and KLF2, transcription factors that maintain T cell quiescence and which regulate additional cellular processes including survival, migration, and differentiation. Here we report that HIV-1 down-modulates CD62L in productively infected naïve and memory resting CD4 T cells while suppressing Foxo1 activity and the expression of KLF2 mRNA. Partial T cell activation was further evident as an increase in CD69 expression. Several other Foxo1- and KLF2-regulated mRNA were increased or decreased in productively infected CD4 T cells, including IL-7rα, Myc, CCR5, Fam65b, S1P1 (EDG1), CD52, Cyclin D2 and p21CIP1, indicating a profound reprogramming of these cells. The Foxo1 inhibitor AS1842856 accelerated de novo viral gene expression and the sequella of infection, supporting the notion that HIV-1 suppression of Foxo1 activity may be a strategy to promote replication in resting CD4 T cells. As Foxo1 is an investigative cancer therapy target, the development of Foxo1 interventions may assist the quest to specifically suppress or activate HIV-1 replication in vivo. PMID:25330112

  19. CCR5-Δ32 Heterozygosity, HIV-1 Reservoir Size, and Lymphocyte Activation in Individuals Receiving Long-term Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Timothy J; Hanhauser, Emily; Harrison, Linda J; Palmer, Christine D; Romero-Tejeda, Marisol; Jost, Stephanie; Bosch, Ronald J; Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a case-controlled study of the associations of CCR5-Δ32 heterozygosity with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reservoir size, lymphocyte activation, and CCR5 expression in 114 CCR5(Δ32/WT) and 177 wild-type CCR5 AIDS Clinical Trials Group participants receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Overall, no significant differences were found between groups for any of these parameters. However, higher levels of CCR5 expression correlated with lower amounts of cell-associated HIV-1 RNA. The relationship between CCR5-Δ32 heterozygosity, CCR5 expression, and markers of HIV-1 persistence is likely to be complex and may be influenced by factors such as the duration of ART.

  20. Five years' real-life experience with raltegravir in a large HIV centre.

    PubMed

    van Halsema, Clare; Whitfield, Thomas; Lin, Naomi; Ashton, Kathryn; Torkington, Adele; Ustianowski, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Raltegravir was the first licensed integrase inhibitor. Real-life experience is informative and complements trial data. We therefore evaluated raltegravir use in adults in a large HIV treatment centre. From pharmacy and departmental HIV database records, we identified all adults taking ≥1 dose of raltegravir from first availability to the end of November 2012. Data were collected using a standardised case report form. Two hundred and fifteen individuals provided 502 patient-years (median 2.6 years/person) of raltegravir use. Of 215 individuals, 166 (77%) were male, median age 43 years; 189 (88%) were antiretroviral therapy (ART)-experienced and 26 (12%) ART-naive, with median baseline CD4 counts of 324 and 54 cells/µL, respectively. Of ten individuals using once-daily raltegravir, four, with good adherence remained virologically suppressed after a median 28 months, four stopped against medical advice, one stopped to simplify and one failed virologically. In hepatitis co-infection, 35 individuals (92 patient-years) took raltegravir without evidence of hepatotoxicity. Six women started raltegravir during pregnancy for intensification (5/6) or switch for tolerability without complications. Of ten individuals stopping raltegravir after virological failure, 2/4 with successful sequencing showed resistance. Raltegravir appears safe and effective, without evidence of toxicity above that in published trials, including in pregnancy and co-infections. Once-daily dosing seems effective where adherence is good. PMID:25931236

  1. Deep sequencing of HIV: clinical and research applications.

    PubMed

    Chabria, Shiven B; Gupta, Shaili; Kozal, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exhibits remarkable diversity in its genomic makeup and exists in any given individual as a complex distribution of closely related but nonidentical genomes called a viral quasispecies, which is subject to genetic variation, competition, and selection. This viral diversity clinically manifests as a selection of mutant variants based on viral fitness in treatment-naive individuals and based on drug-selective pressure in those on antiretroviral therapy (ART). The current standard-of-care ART consists of a combination of antiretroviral agents, which ensures maximal viral suppression while preventing the emergence of drug-resistant HIV variants. Unfortunately, transmission of drug-resistant HIV does occur, affecting 5% to >20% of newly infected individuals. To optimize therapy, clinicians rely on viral genotypic information obtained from conventional population sequencing-based assays, which cannot reliably detect viral variants that constitute <20% of the circulating viral quasispecies. These low-frequency variants can be detected by highly sensitive genotyping methods collectively grouped under the moniker of deep sequencing. Low-frequency variants have been correlated to treatment failures and HIV transmission, and detection of these variants is helping to inform strategies for vaccine development. Here, we discuss the molecular virology of HIV, viral heterogeneity, drug-resistance mutations, and the application of deep sequencing technologies in research and the clinical care of HIV-infected individuals. PMID:24821496

  2. Introducing Virological Concepts Using an Insect Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Roger F.

    1980-01-01

    A technique is presented which utilizes wax moth larvae in a laboratory investigation of an insect virus. Describes how an insect virus can be used to introduce undergraduate biology students to laboratory work on viruses and several virological concepts. (SA)

  3. Recovery of CD4+ T Cells in HIV patients with a stable virologic response to antiretroviral therapy is associated with polymorphisms of interleukin-6 and central major histocompatibility complex genes.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Sonia; Rosenow, Ann A; James, Ian R; Roberts, Steven G; Nolan, Richard C; French, Martyn A; Price, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether polymorphisms in genes associated with HIV disease progression and/or immune activation affect CD4+ T-cell recovery in HIV patients who began combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) with advanced immunodeficiency and achieved stable control of plasma viremia. Patients with CD4 T-cell counts <300 cells/microL (n = 33) and >400 cells/microL (n = 37) on ART were compared. A multiple case-control logistic regression associated carriage of BAT1(1,2) or interleukin (IL)6-174(2,2) with low CD4 T-cell counts (P = 0.012). BAT1*2 uniquely marks the central major histocompatibility complex region of a conserved haplotype (HLA-A1,B8,BAT1*2,TNFA-308*2,DR3,DQ2). There was no association between alleles carried at CCR5Delta32, CCR5 59029, CCR5 59353, CCR2+190 (V64I), SDF1 3'UTR, IL1A+4845, IL1B+3953, IL4-589, IL10-592, IL10-R1+536, IL10-R1+1112, IL12B 3'UTR, TNFA-308, or TNFA-1031 and CD4 T-cell counts. We suggest that immune activation and/or CD4 T-cell apoptosis in HIV patients on effective ART is influenced by genetic factors.

  4. HIV

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Sumit; Sahoo, Soumya Swaroop; Jain, Rambilas; Khanna, Pardeep; Mehta, Bharti; Singh, Inderjeet

    2014-01-01

    Getting to zero: zero new HIV infections, zero deaths from AIDS-related illness, zero discrimination is the theme of World AIDS Day 2012. Given the spread of the epidemic today, getting to zero may sound difficult, but significant progress is underway. The total annual loss for the entire country due to HIV is 7% of GDP, which exceeds India’s annual health expenditure in 2004. The additional loss due to loss of labor income and increased medical expenditure as measured by the external transfers, account for 5% of the country’s health expenditure and 0.23% of GDP. Given that the HIV incidence rate is only 0.27% in India, these losses are quite staggering. Despite the remarkable achievements in development of anti-retroviral therapies against HIV and the recent advances in new prevention technologies, the rate of new HIV infections continue to outpace efforts on HIV prevention and control. Thus, the development of a safe and effective vaccine for prevention and control of AIDS remains a global public health priority and the greatest opportunity to eventually end the AIDS pandemic. PMID:24056755

  5. HMBA Enhances Prostratin-Induced Activation of Latent HIV-1 via Suppressing the Expression of Negative Feedback Regulator A20/TNFAIP3 in NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Duchu; Wang, Huiping; Aweya, Jude Juventus; Chen, Yanheng; Chen, Meihua; Wu, Xiaomeng; Chen, Xiaonan; Lu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, much emphasis has been put on the transcriptional activation of HIV-1, which is proposed as a promised strategy for eradicating latent HIV-1 provirus. Two drugs, prostratin and hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA), have shown potent effects as inducers for releasing HIV-1 latency when used alone or in combination, although their cellular target(s) are currently not well understood, especially under drug combination. Here, we have shown that HMBA and prostratin synergistically release HIV-1 latency via different mechanisms. While prostratin strongly stimulates HMBA-induced HIV-1 transcription via improved P-TEFb activation, HMBA is capable of boosting NF-κB-dependent transcription initiation by suppressing prostratin-induced expression of the deubiquitinase A20, a negative feedback regulator in the NF-κB signaling pathway. In addition, HMBA was able to increase prostratin-induced phosphorylation and degradation of NF-κB inhibitor IκBα, thereby enhancing and prolonging prostratin-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB, a prerequisite for stimulation of transcription initiation. Thus, by blocking the negative feedback circuit, HMBA functions as a signaling enhancer of the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:27529070

  6. Factors Associated with Immunological Discordance in HIV-Infected Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy with Complete Viral Suppression in a Resource-Limited Setting.

    PubMed

    Mingbunjerdsuk, Pornpimol; Asdamongkol, Nakhon; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek

    2015-01-01

    "Immunological discordance," i.e., immunological failure despite complete viral suppression in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), is associated with increased risk of AIDS or death. To evaluate risk factors for immunological discordance in a resource-limited setting in which patients usually present late with low CD4 cell counts, we conducted a case-control study among HIV-infected patients receiving ART and having undetectable HIV RNA. The study included patients with immunological discordance (cases), which was defined as CD4 cell count < 30% above baseline and absolute CD4 cell count < 200 cells/mm(3) at the first 12 months of undetectable HIV RNA (<50 copies/mL). Patients without immunological discordance were included as controls. Of 142 patients (44 cases; 98 controls), the mean age was 38.6 ± 9.4 years and 67.6% were men; 65.5% had history of opportunistic infections. In multivariate analysis, only baseline CD4 cell count < 100 cells/mm(3) (odd ratio [OR], 2.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-6.14; P = 0.040) and history of lost to follow-up (OR, 11.04; 95% CI, 2.87-42.46; P < 0.001) were significantly associated with immunological discordance. Early initiation of ART and intervention to improve regular clinic visit compliance and adherence to ART are crucial to prevent immunological discordance among HIV-infected patients.

  7. Effect of HIV Housing Services on Engagement in Care and Treatment, New York City, 2011.

    PubMed

    Terzian, Arpi S; Irvine, Mary K; Hollod, Laura M; Lim, Sungwoo; Rojas, John; Shepard, Colin W

    2015-11-01

    The federal Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) program addresses housing needs of low-income persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). The New York City (NYC) Department of Health and Mental Hygiene oversees 22 HOPWA contracts for over 2,400 clients, and manages the NYC HIV Registry. HOPWA clients (N = 1,357) were matched to a random 20 % sample of other PLWHA (N = 13,489). Groups were compared on HIV care retention, viral suppression, and rebound. HOPWA clients were, on average, 3 years younger and more likely to be concurrently diagnosed with HIV and AIDS. While HOPWA clients were more likely to be retained in care (94 vs. 82 %; mOR = 2.97, 95 % CI 2.35-3.74), they were no more likely to achieve suppression (84 vs. 86 %; mOR = 0.85, 95 % 0.70-1.03) and were more likely to rebound (11 vs. 7 %; mOR = 1.45; 95 % CI 1.10-1.91). HIV care retention does not fully translate to virologic suppression in this low-income service population. PMID:25631320

  8. Protein bioinformatics applied to virology.

    PubMed

    Mohabatkar, Hassan; Keyhanfar, Mehrnaz; Behbahani, Mandana

    2012-09-01

    Scientists have united in a common search to sequence, store and analyze genes and proteins. In this regard, rapidly evolving bioinformatics methods are providing valuable information on these newly-discovered molecules. Understanding what has been done and what we can do in silico is essential in designing new experiments. The unbalanced situation between sequence-known proteins and attribute-known proteins, has called for developing computational methods or high-throughput automated tools for fast and reliably predicting or identifying various characteristics of uncharacterized proteins. Taking into consideration the role of viruses in causing diseases and their use in biotechnology, the present review describes the application of protein bioinformatics in virology. Therefore, a number of important features of viral proteins like epitope prediction, protein docking, subcellular localization, viral protease cleavage sites and computer based comparison of their aspects have been discussed. This paper also describes several tools, principally developed for viral bioinformatics. Prediction of viral protein features and learning the advances in this field can help basic understanding of the relationship between a virus and its host.

  9. HCV RNA decline in the first 24 hours exhibits high negative predictive value of sustained virologic response in HIV/HCV genotype 1 co-infected patients treated with peginterferon and ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Laufer, N; Bolcic, F; Rolón, MJ; Martinez, A; Reynoso, R; Pérez, H; Salomón, H; Cahn, P; Quarleri, J

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Treatment with Peg-interferon and ribavirin (PEG-IFN/RBV) for HIV patients co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 has suboptimal rates of response. Viral kinetics has emerged as one of the best prognostic factors of treatment outcome. Methods Twenty HIV/HCV genotype 1 co-infected patients in treatment with PEG-IFN/RBV, had blood drawn at baseline, 24h, 4, 12, 24, 48, and 72 weeks. HCV-RNA levels were evaluated at each time point. ROC curves were used to evaluate the log10 HCV-RNA decay at 24h that exhibits the best predictive value of achieving response. Genomic characterization of HCV NS5A at both interferon sensitivity-determining region (ISDR) and protein-kinase binding (PKRBD) domains were performed in order to evaluate its heterogeneity and association with 24h HCV-RNA decay and SVR. Results Non-responder patients exhibited a mean of 0.7log10 (SD 0.74log10) HCV-RNA decay at 24h, whereas responder-patients presented 1.6log10 (SD 0.28log10), p=0.04. A reduction in HCV viral load from baseline to 24h of <1.4 had a negative predictive value for achieving SVR of 100% and a positive predictive value of 50%. HCV genotype 1 isolates from patients with a decrease of HCV-RNA at 24h >1.4log10, exhibited 3.1(SD 1.5) amino acids substitutions in ISDR and 4.8(SD 2.3) in PKRBD regions and 1.6(SD 0.7) and 2.4(SD1.3), respectively, in those patients presenting lower reduction in HCV-RNA. Conclusions HIV/HCV genotype 1 co-infected patients with a decrease in HCV-VL at 24h >1.4 log10 are more likely to achieve SVR when treated with PEG-IFN/RBV than those with lower levels of HCV-RNA decay. Along with other host-related and viral-related prognostic factors in HIV/HCV co-infected patients, this very early time point of evaluation could be of relevance in the management of HCV-specific treatment. PMID:21376083

  10. Molecular biological assessment methods and understanding the course of the HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Katzenstein, Terese L

    2003-01-01

    describing virological response might yield different results, and it is recommended that the pros and cons of the various methods be investigated. In a cohort of patients who had obtained good virological suppression on antiretroviral therapy followed prospectively for two years we found that only few patients experienced high-grade viremia. Furthermore, baseline HIV DNA differed between the patients with various longitudinal HIV RNA profiles. The patients with the most pronounced HIV RNA suppression had lowest proviral load at baseline, with a clear gradient across the groups. The interplay between proviral load and treatment response deserves further investigations. Resistance can develop against all the available antiretrovirals. The high turnover rate of HIV along with the error-prone reverse transcriptase leads to the possibility of steady accumulation of resistance mutations if the viremic suppression is incomplete. While the interplay between viremia and resistance development is clear-cut for some antiretrovirals i.e. Lamivudine, the pattern is more complex for i.e. Zidovudine. With the availability of assays for resistances testing the knowledge on this issue has been ever evolving. How to use resistance testing in the clinical monitoring of patients remains to be clarified. Resistance testing can aid in the process of choosing salvage therapy for patients experiencing virological failure. Whether resistance testing will be of clinical benefit in other situations remains to be determined. Investigation of the viral sequences and evolution herein has not only been used for resistance analyses, but also for tracing the spread of the infection. HIV-1 exists in many subtypes, with various geographic distributions. Hence subtype analyses have been used to investigate the introduction and spread of the HIV infection into many countries. Phylogenetic analyses have also been used to investigate nosocomial transmission events. We used analyses of env and gag sequences to

  11. HIV-1 integrase inhibitor resistance and its clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Jose-Luis; Varghese, Vici; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Gatell, Jose M; Shafer, Robert W

    2011-05-01

    With the approval in 2007 of the first integrase inhibitor (INI), raltegravir, clinicians became better able to suppress virus replication in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) who were harboring many of the most highly drug-resistant viruses. Raltegravir also provided clinicians with additional options for first-line therapy and for the simplification of regimens in patients with stable virological suppression. Two additional INIs in advanced clinical development-elvitegravir and S/GSK1349572-may prove equally versatile. However, the INIs have a relatively low genetic barrier to resistance in that 1 or 2 mutations are capable of causing marked reductions in susceptibility to raltegravir and elvitegravir, the most well-studied INIs. This perspective reviews the genetic mechanisms of INI resistance and their implications for initial INI therapy, the treatment of antiretroviral-experienced patients, and regimen simplification.

  12. HIV chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Douglas D.

    2001-04-01

    The use of chemotherapy to suppress replication of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has transformed the face of AIDS in the developed world. Pronounced reductions in illness and death have been achieved and healthcare utilization has diminished. HIV therapy has also provided many new insights into the pathogenesis and the viral and cellular dynamics of HIV infection. But challenges remain. Treatment does not suppress HIV replication in all patients, and the emergence of drug-resistant virus hinders subsequent treatment. Chronic therapy can also result in toxicity. These challenges prompt the search for new drugs and new therapeutic strategies to control chronic viral replication.

  13. Clinical validation and applicability of different tipranavir/ritonavir genotypic scores in HIV-1 protease inhibitor-experienced patients.

    PubMed

    Saracino, Annalisa; Monno, Laura; Tartaglia, Alessandra; Tinelli, Carmine; Seminari, Elena; Maggiolo, Franco; Bonora, Stefano; Rusconi, Stefano; Micheli, Valeria; Lo Caputo, Sergio; Lazzaroni, Laura; Ferrara, Sergio; Ladisa, Nicoletta; Nasta, Paola; Parruti, Giustino; Bellagamba, Rita; Forbici, Federica; Angarano, Gioacchino

    2009-07-01

    Tipranavir, a non-peptidic protease inhibitor which shows in vitro efficacy against some HIV-1-resistant strains, can be used in salvage therapies for multi-experienced HIV patients due to its peculiar resistance profile including 21 mutations at 16 protease positions according to International AIDS Society (IAS). Other genotypic scores, however, which attribute a different weight to single amino-acid substitutions, have been recently proposed. To validate the clinical utility of four different genotypic scores for selecting tipranavir responders, the baseline resistance pattern of 176 HIV heavily experienced patients was correlated with virological success (HIV-RNA<50 copies/ml) after 24 weeks of a new treatment based on tipranavir/ritonavir. Virological suppression after 24 weeks was reached by 42.5% of patients. With univariate analysis, genotypic scores were all associated with outcome but showed a low accuracy with ROC analysis, with the weighted score (WS) by Scherer et al. demonstrating the best performance with an AUC of 68%. Only 52% of patients classified as susceptible (WS< or =3) responded to the new therapy. The following variables were significantly associated (p<0.05) to failure with multivariate analysis: WS, log peak of HIV-RNA, IAS mutations: L33F, I54AMV, Q58E, and non-IAS mutation: N37DES. On the contrary, the use of T20 in T20-naïve patients and the V82AFSI and F53LY non-IAS mutations were associated with virological success. The study suggests that even if the "weighted" scores are able to interpret correctly the antiretroviral resistance profile of multi-experienced patients, it is difficult to individuate a cut-off which can be easily applied to this population for discriminating responders.

  14. Frequencies of Circulating MAIT Cells Are Diminished in Chronic HCV, HIV and HCV/HIV Co-Infection and Do Not Recover during Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Spaan, Michelle; Hullegie, Sebastiaan J.; Beudeker, Boris J. B.; Kreefft, Kim; van Oord, Gertine W.; Groothuismink, Zwier M. A.; van Tilborg, Marjolein; Rijnders, Bart; de Knegt, Robert J.; Claassen, Mark A. A.; Boonstra, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells comprise a subpopulation of T cells that can be activated by bacterial products and cytokines to produce IFN-γ. Since little is known on MAIT cells during HCV infection, we compared their phenotype and function in comparison to HIV and HCV/HIV co-infected patients, and determined the effect of IFN-α-based and direct-acting antiviral therapy on MAIT cells of HCV patients. Methods Blood samples from patients with chronic HCV (CHCV), virologically suppressed HIV, acute HCV/HIV co-infection (AHCV/HIV) and healthy individuals were examined by flowcytometry for phenotype and function of MAIT and NK cells. Results and Conclusions Compared to healthy individuals, the frequency of CD161+Vα7.2+ MAIT cells was significantly decreased in patients with CHCV, HIV and AHCV/HIV co-infection. CD38 expression on MAIT cells was increased in AHCV/HIV patients. MAIT cells were responsive to IFN-α in vitro as evidenced by enhanced frequencies of IFN-γ producing cells. IFN-α-based therapy for CHCV decreased the frequency of IFN-γ+ MAIT cells, which was still observed 24 weeks after successful therapy. Importantly, even after successful IFN-α-based as well as IFN-α-free therapy for CHCV, decreased frequencies of MAIT cells persisted. We show that the frequencies of MAIT cells are reduced in blood of patients with CHCV, HIV and in AHCV/HIV co-infection compared to healthy individuals. Successful therapy for CHCV did not normalize MAIT cell frequencies at 24 weeks follow up. The impact of HIV and HCV infection on the numbers and function of MAIT cells warrant further studies on the impact of viral infections and the antimicrobial function of MAIT cells. PMID:27416100

  15. Emerging Role and Characterization of Immunometabolism: Relevance to HIV Pathogenesis, Serious Non-AIDS Events, and a Cure.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Clovis S; Henstridge, Darren C; Yu, Di; Singh, Amit; Balderson, Brad; Duette, Gabriel; Cherry, Catherine L; Anzinger, Joshua J; Ostrowski, Matias; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2016-06-01

    Immune cells cycle between a resting and an activated state. Their metabolism is tightly linked to their activation status and, consequently, functions. Ag recognition induces T lymphocyte activation and proliferation and acquisition of effector functions that require and depend on cellular metabolic reprogramming. Likewise, recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by monocytes and macrophages induces changes in cellular metabolism. As obligate intracellular parasites, viruses manipulate the metabolism of infected cells to meet their structural and functional requirements. For example, HIV-induced changes in immune cell metabolism and redox state are associated with CD4(+) T cell depletion, immune activation, and inflammation. In this review, we highlight how HIV modifies immunometabolism with potential implications for cure research and pathogenesis of comorbidities observed in HIV-infected patients, including those with virologic suppression. In addition, we highlight recently described key methods that can be applied to study the metabolic dysregulation of immune cells in disease states. PMID:27207806

  16. HIV-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/serine-threonine kinase activation in APCs leads to programmed death-1 ligand upregulation and suppression of HIV-specific CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    Muthumani, Karuppiah; Shedlock, Devon J; Choo, Daniel K; Fagone, Paolo; Kawalekar, Omkar U; Goodman, Jonathan; Bian, Chaoran B; Ramanathan, Aarti A; Atman, Parikh; Tebas, Pablo; Chattergoon, Michael A; Choo, Andrew Y; Weiner, David B

    2011-09-15

    Recent evidence demonstrates that HIV-1 infection leads to the attenuation of cellular immune responses, which has been correlated with the increased expression of programmed death (PD)-1 on virus-specific CD8(+) T cells. PD-1 is induced upon T cell activation, and its prolonged expression facilitates CD8(+) T cell inhibitory signals when bound to its B7 family ligands, PD-ligand (L)1/2, which are expressed on APCs. Importantly, early reports demonstrated that blockade of the PD-1/PD-L interaction by Abs may help to counter the development of immune exhaustion driven by HIV viral persistence. To better understand the regulation of the PD-1 pathway during HIV infection, we examined the ability of the virus to induce PD-L expression on macrophages and dendritic cells. We found a direct relationship between the infection of APCs and the expression of PD-L1 in which virus-mediated upregulation induced a state of nonresponsiveness in uninfected HIV-specific T cells. Furthermore, this exhaustion phenotype was revitalized by the blockade of PD-L1, after which T cells regained their capacity for proliferation and the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-12 upon restimulation. In addition, we identify a critical role for the PI3K/serine-threonine kinase signaling pathway in PD-L1 upregulation of APCs by HIV, because inhibition of these intracellular signal transducer enzymes significantly reduced PD-L1 induction by infection. These data identify a novel mechanism by which HIV exploits the immunosuppressive PD-1 pathway and suggest a new role for virus-infected cells in the local corruption of immune responses required for viral suppression.

  17. Clinical management considerations for dyslipidemia in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Jeffrey T

    2012-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is common in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and may result in significant morbidity, including coronary heart disease (CHD). Treatment of dyslipidemia in these patients is generally based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III goals for individuals without HIV. For individuals with ≥ 2 cardiovascular risk factors, the risk of CHD should be evaluated using the Framingham risk calculator and managed accordingly. Switching to an antiretroviral regimen with a favorable lipid profile should be considered before pharmacologic management if virologic suppression can be maintained. Statins are the first-choice therapy for elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, but in HIV-infected individuals, special consideration must be given to drug-drug interactions, specifically those between protease inhibitors and statins. Management of dyslipidemia in HIV-infected individuals is a challenging but important aspect of chronic disease management. Additional research, specifically related to the role of chronic inflammation, is needed to better define the relationship between HIV infection and cardiovascular disease.

  18. Transmitted Drug Resistance in Persons with Acute/Early HIV-1 in San Francisco, 2002-2009

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Vivek; Liegler, Teri; Vittinghoff, Eric; Hartogensis, Wendy; Bacchetti, Peter; Poole, Lauren; Loeb, Lisa; Pilcher, Christopher D.; Grant, Robert M.; Deeks, Steven G.; Hecht, Frederick M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance (TDR) is an ongoing public health problem, representing 10–20% of new HIV infections in many geographic areas. TDR usually arises from two main sources: individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) who are failing to achieve virologic suppression, and individuals who acquired TDR and transmit it while still ART-naïve. TDR rates can be impacted when novel antiretroviral medications are introduced that allow for greater virologic suppression of source patients. Although several new HIV medications were introduced starting in late 2007, including raltegravir, maraviroc, and etravirine, it is not known whether the prevalence of TDR was subsequently affected in 2008–2009. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed population sequence genotyping on individuals who were diagnosed with acute or early HIV (<6 months duration) and who enrolled in the Options Project, a prospective cohort, between 2002 and 2009. We used logistic regression to compare the odds of acquiring drug-resistant HIV before versus after the arrival of new ART (2005–2007 vs. 2008–2009). From 2003–2007, TDR rose from 7% to 24%. Prevalence of TDR was then 15% in 2008 and in 2009. While the odds of acquiring TDR were lower in 2008–2009 compared to 2005–2007, this was not statistically significant (odds ratio 0.65, 95% CI 0.31–1.38; p = 0.27). Conclusions Our study suggests that transmitted drug resistance rose from 2003–2007, but this upward trend did not continue in 2008 and 2009. Nevertheless, the TDR prevalence in 2008–2009 remained substantial, emphasizing that improved management strategies for drug-resistant HIV are needed if TDR is to be further reduced. Continued surveillance for TDR will be important in understanding the full impact of new antiretroviral medications. PMID:21170322

  19. Predictors of Antiretroviral Treatment Failure in an Urban HIV Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Gregory K.; Daniels, Brock; Zheng, Hui; Chueh, Henry; Meigs, James B.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Predictors of antiretroviral treatment (ART) failure are not well characterized for heterogeneous clinic populations. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted of HIV-infected patients followed in an urban HIV clinic with an HIV RNA measurement ≤400 copies/mL on ART between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2004. The primary endpoint was treatment failure, defined as virologic failure (≥1 HIV RNA measurement >400 copies/mL), unsanctioned stopping of ART, or loss to follow-up. Prior ART adherence and other baseline patient characteristics, determined at the time of the first suppressed HIV RNA load on or after January 1, 2003, were extracted from the electronic health record (EHR). Predictors of failure were assessed using proportional hazards modeling. Results Of 829 patients in the clinic, 614 had at least 1 HIV RNA measurement ≤400 copies/mL during the study period. Of these, 167 (27.2%) experienced treatment failure. Baseline characteristics associated with treatment failure in the multivariate model were: poor adherence (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.44; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.34 to 5.05), absolute neutrophil count <1000/mm3 (HR = 2.90, 95% CI: 1.26 to 6.69), not suppressed on January 1, 2003 (HR = 2.69, 95% CI: 1.78 to 4.07) or <12 months of suppression (HR = 1.64, 95% CI: 1.10 to 2.45), CD4 count <200 cells/mm3 (HR = 1.90, 95% CI: 1.31 to 2.76), nucleoside-only regimen (HR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.08 to 2.82), prior virologic failure (HR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.22 to 2.39) and ≥1 missed visit in the prior year (HR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.13 to 2.16). Conclusions More than one quarter of patients in a heterogeneous clinic population had treatment failure over a 2-year period. Prior ART adherence and other EHR data readily identify patient characteristics that could trigger specific interventions to improve ART outcomes. PMID:17106280

  20. Association of individual and systemic barriers to optimal medical care in people living with HIV/AIDS in Miami-Dade County.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyniak, Andrew J; Rodríguez, Allan E; Falcon, Anthony E; Chakrabarti, Anindita; Parra, Alexa; Park, Jane; Mercogliano, Kathleen; Villamizar, Kira; Kolber, Michael A; Feaster, Daniel J; Metsch, Lisa R

    2015-05-01

    Barriers to retention in HIV care are detrimental to patients' progress along the HIV continuum of care. Previous literature has focused on individual, client-level barriers, and interventions to address them. In contrast, less work has examined the role of system-level barriers on HIV care outcomes. This study seeks to understand how individual and systemic barriers individually are associated with clinic appointment attendance and virologic suppression in HIV-infected patients attending the largest HIV clinic in Miami-Dade, FL. In addition, we examined the synergistic effects of these barriers as potential syndemic factors on these health outcomes. Barriers to clinic attendance were determined in a face-to-face study interview with 444 HIV-infected outpatients (187 regular attenders, 191 irregular attenders, and 66 nonattenders) identified from electronic medical records. Compared with the other attendance groups, nonattenders had higher viral loads, were less likely to be virologically suppressed, had lower CD4 counts, had higher depressive symptoms, life chaos, lower quality of life, and higher rates of food insecurity, and recent drug use. Additionally, nonattenders compared with regular attenders had lower physician relationship ratings, had lower medical information clarity and more often reported transportation as a barrier to clinic attendance. When viewed as a syndemic, compared with patients not reporting any barriers, patients with 3 or more individual-level barriers were more likely to have a detectable viral load (odds ratio = 3.60, 95% CI: 1.71 to 7.61). Our findings suggest that patients presenting to the clinic with multiple barriers should be prioritized for assistance and future interventions to improve retention in care. Interventions should address multiple individual and system-level barriers simultaneously with particular attention to addressing depressive symptoms, organizational skills, relationship with the physician, and HIV

  1. The Association of Individual and Systemic Barriers to Optimal Medical Care in People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Miami-Dade County

    PubMed Central

    Wawrzyniak, Andrew J.; Rodríguez, Allan E.; Falcon, Anthony E.; Chakrabarti, Anindita; Parra, Alexa; Park, Jane; Mercogliano, Kathleen; Villamizar, Kira; Kolber, Michael A.; Feaster, Daniel J.; Metsch, Lisa R.

    2015-01-01

    Barriers to retention in HIV care are detrimental to patients’ progress along the HIV continuum of care. Previous literature has focused on individual, client-level barriers and interventions to address them. In contrast, less work has examined the role of system-level barriers on HIV care outcomes. The present study seeks to understand how individual and systemic barriers individually are associated with clinic appointment attendance and virologic suppression in HIV-infected patients attending the largest HIV clinic in Miami-Dade, Florida. In addition, we examined the synergistic effects of these barriers as potential syndemic factors on these health outcomes. Barriers to clinic attendance were determined in a face-to-face study interview with 444 HIV-infected outpatients (187 regular attenders, 191 irregular attenders, 66 non-attenders) identified from electronic medical records. Compared to the other attendance groups, non-attenders had higher viral loads, were less likely to be virologically suppressed, had lower CD4 counts, had higher depressive symptoms, life chaos, lower quality of life, and higher rates of food insecurity and recent drug use. Additionally, non-attenders compared to regular attenders had lower physician relationship ratings, had lower medical information clarity, and more often reported transportation as a barrier to clinic attendance. When viewed as a syndemic, compared to patients not reporting any barriers, patients with three or more individual-level barriers were more likely to have a detectable viral load (OR = 3.60, 95%CI [1.71, 7.61]). Our findings suggest that patients presenting to the clinic with multiple barriers should be prioritized for assistance and future interventions to improve retention in care. Interventions should address multiple individual and system level barriers simultaneously with particular attention to addressing depressive symptoms, organizational skills, relationship with the physician, and HIV

  2. Biological Aspects of Computer Virology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, Vasileios; Spinellis, Diomidis; Androutsellis-Theotokis, Stefanos

    Recent malware epidemics proved beyond any doubt that frightful predictions of fast-spreading worms have been well founded. While we can identify and neutralize many types of malicious code, often we are not able to do that in a timely enough manner to suppress its uncontrolled propagation. In this paper we discuss the decisive factors that affect the propagation of a worm and evaluate their effectiveness.

  3. Elevated Plasma Viral Loads in Romidepsin-Treated Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaques on Suppressive Combination Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Gregory Q; Oswald, Kelli; Lara, Abigail; Shoemaker, Rebecca; Smedley, Jeremy; Macallister, Rhonda; Coalter, Vicky; Wiles, Adam; Wiles, Rodney; Li, Yuan; Fast, Randy; Kiser, Rebecca; Lu, Bing; Zheng, Jim; Alvord, W Gregory; Trubey, Charles M; Piatak, Michael; Deleage, Claire; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Geleziunas, Romas; Lifson, Jeffrey D

    2016-03-01

    Replication-competent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persists in infected people despite suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), and it represents a major obstacle to HIV functional cure or eradication. We have developed a model of cART-mediated viral suppression in simian human immunodeficiency virus (SIV) mac239-infected Indian rhesus macaques and evaluated the impact of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) romidepsin (RMD) on viremia in vivo. Eight macaques virologically suppressed to clinically relevant levels (<30 viral RNA copies/ml of plasma), using a three-class five-drug cART regimen, received multiple intravenous infusions of either RMD (n = 5) or saline (n = 3) starting 31 to 54 weeks after cART initiation. In vivo RMD treatment resulted in significant transient increases in acetylated histone levels in CD4(+) T cells. RMD-treated animals demonstrated plasma viral load measurements for each 2-week treatment cycle that were significantly higher than those in saline control-treated animals during periods of treatment, suggestive of RMD-induced viral reactivation. However, plasma virus rebound was indistinguishable between RMD-treated and control-treated animals for a subset of animals released from cART. These findings suggest that HDACi drugs, such as RMD, can reactivate residual virus in the presence of suppressive antiviral therapy and may be a valuable component of a comprehensive HIV functional cure/eradication strategy. PMID:26711758

  4. Elevated Plasma Viral Loads in Romidepsin-Treated Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaques on Suppressive Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Del Prete, Gregory Q.; Oswald, Kelli; Lara, Abigail; Shoemaker, Rebecca; Smedley, Jeremy; Macallister, Rhonda; Coalter, Vicky; Wiles, Adam; Wiles, Rodney; Li, Yuan; Fast, Randy; Kiser, Rebecca; Lu, Bing; Zheng, Jim; Alvord, W. Gregory; Trubey, Charles M.; Piatak, Michael; Deleage, Claire; Keele, Brandon F.; Estes, Jacob D.; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Geleziunas, Romas

    2015-01-01

    Replication-competent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persists in infected people despite suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), and it represents a major obstacle to HIV functional cure or eradication. We have developed a model of cART-mediated viral suppression in simian human immunodeficiency virus (SIV) mac239-infected Indian rhesus macaques and evaluated the impact of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) romidepsin (RMD) on viremia in vivo. Eight macaques virologically suppressed to clinically relevant levels (<30 viral RNA copies/ml of plasma), using a three-class five-drug cART regimen, received multiple intravenous infusions of either RMD (n = 5) or saline (n = 3) starting 31 to 54 weeks after cART initiation. In vivo RMD treatment resulted in significant transient increases in acetylated histone levels in CD4+ T cells. RMD-treated animals demonstrated plasma viral load measurements for each 2-week treatment cycle that were significantly higher than those in saline control-treated animals during periods of treatment, suggestive of RMD-induced viral reactivation. However, plasma virus rebound was indistinguishable between RMD-treated and control-treated animals for a subset of animals released from cART. These findings suggest that HDACi drugs, such as RMD, can reactivate residual virus in the presence of suppressive antiviral therapy and may be a valuable component of a comprehensive HIV functional cure/eradication strategy. PMID:26711758

  5. Elevated Plasma Viral Loads in Romidepsin-Treated Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaques on Suppressive Combination Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Gregory Q; Oswald, Kelli; Lara, Abigail; Shoemaker, Rebecca; Smedley, Jeremy; Macallister, Rhonda; Coalter, Vicky; Wiles, Adam; Wiles, Rodney; Li, Yuan; Fast, Randy; Kiser, Rebecca; Lu, Bing; Zheng, Jim; Alvord, W Gregory; Trubey, Charles M; Piatak, Michael; Deleage, Claire; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Geleziunas, Romas; Lifson, Jeffrey D

    2015-12-28

    Replication-competent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persists in infected people despite suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), and it represents a major obstacle to HIV functional cure or eradication. We have developed a model of cART-mediated viral suppression in simian human immunodeficiency virus (SIV) mac239-infected Indian rhesus macaques and evaluated the impact of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) romidepsin (RMD) on viremia in vivo. Eight macaques virologically suppressed to clinically relevant levels (<30 viral RNA copies/ml of plasma), using a three-class five-drug cART regimen, received multiple intravenous infusions of either RMD (n = 5) or saline (n = 3) starting 31 to 54 weeks after cART initiation. In vivo RMD treatment resulted in significant transient increases in acetylated histone levels in CD4(+) T cells. RMD-treated animals demonstrated plasma viral load measurements for each 2-week treatment cycle that were significantly higher than those in saline control-treated animals during periods of treatment, suggestive of RMD-induced viral reactivation. However, plasma virus rebound was indistinguishable between RMD-treated and control-treated animals for a subset of animals released from cART. These findings suggest that HDACi drugs, such as RMD, can reactivate residual virus in the presence of suppressive antiviral therapy and may be a valuable component of a comprehensive HIV functional cure/eradication strategy.

  6. Prevalence and Outcomes of Recycling NNRTIs Despite Documented NNRTI Resistance in HIV-Infected Children and Youth

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jennifer Y.; Wiegand, Ryan E.; Wheeling, John T.; Bohannon, Beverly A.; Dominguez, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are commonly used in pediatric patients; however, rapid development of resistance, due to non-adherence and cross-resistance, results in their discontinuation and limits their recycling. We evaluated the clinical experience of recycling NNRTIs despite documented NNRTI resistance (NNRTI-R), and examined virologic and CD4 cell count outcomes among participants enrolled in Longitudinal Epidemiologic Study to Gain Insight into HIV/AIDS in Children and Youth (LEGACY), a national HIV-infected pediatric cohort. We conducted a retrospective analysis of LEGACY participants with major NNRTI-R. Using chi-square analyses and logistic regression, we examined demographic and clinical factors associated with prescription of NNRTIs despite documented NNRTI-R, and associated changes in plasma HIV RNA viral load and CD4 cell counts. Sixteen of 133 (12%) participants with documented NNRTI-R re-started NNRTIs for a median of 370 days (IQR 105–919) with a median 402 days (IQR 70–841) between documentation of NNRTI-R to NNRTI recycling. Participants recycling NNRTIs were less likely to have documented past non-adherence (40.0% vs. 69.2%; p=0.02). Among twelve patients with virologic data at 24 (±8) weeks; seven (58.3%) experienced virologic suppression while on the recycled NNRTI-based regimens. Of the five who failed to suppress, three with subsequent genotyping developed additional NNRTI-R mutations compromising higher generation NNRTIs. While NNRTI's were recycled in only a small fraction of LEGACY participants harboring NNRTI-R mutations, such recycling increased the risk of inducing further resistance mutations that compromised use of higher generation NNRTIs. PMID:24428795

  7. Antiretroviral Treatment Interruptions Induced by the Kenyan Postelection Crisis Are Associated With Virological Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kemboi, Emmanuel; Mambo, Fidelis; Rono, Mary; Injera, Wilfred; Delong, Allison; Schreier, Leeann; Kaloustian, Kara W.; Sidle, John; Buziba, Nathan; Kantor, Rami

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral treatment interruptions (TIs) cause suboptimal clinical outcomes. Data on TIs during social disruption are limited. Methods We determined effects of unplanned TIs after the 2007–2008 Kenyan postelection violence on virological failure, comparing viral load (VL) outcomes in HIV-infected adults with and without conflict-induced TI. Results Two hundred and one patients were enrolled, median 2.2 years after conflict and 4.3 years on treatment. Eighty-eight patients experienced conflict-related TIs and 113 received continuous treatment. After adjusting for preconflict CD4, patients with TIs were more likely to have detectable VL, VL >5,000 and VL >10,000. Conclusions Unplanned conflict-related TIs are associated with increased likelihood of virological failure. PMID:24047971

  8. Estimates of global research productivity in virology.

    PubMed

    Falagas, Matthew E; Karavasiou, Antonia I; Bliziotis, Ioannis A

    2005-06-01

    The quantity and quality of published research in the field of Virology by different world regions was estimated in this study. Using the PubMed database, articles from journals included in the "Virology" category of the "Journal Citation Reports" database of the Institute for Scientific Information for the period 1995-2003 were retrieved. The world was divided into nine regions based on geographic, economic, and scientific criteria. Data on the country of origin of the research was available for 33,425 out of 33,712 articles (99.2% of all articles from the included journals). USA exceeds all other world regions in research production for the period studied (42% of total articles), with Western Europe ranking second (35.7%). The mean impact factor in articles published in Virology journals was highest for the USA (4.60), while it was 3.90 for Western Europe and 3.22 for the rest of the world (seven regions combined). USA and Canada ranked first in research productivity when both gross national income per capita (GNIPC) and population were taken into account. The results of this analysis show a distressing fact; the absolute and relative production of research in the field of Virology by the developing regions is very low, although viral diseases cause considerable morbidity and mortality in these areas. It is evident from this study that developing regions need more help from the developed regions to enhance research infrastructure. PMID:15834885

  9. Virological Consequences of Early Events following Cell-Cell Contact between Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected and Uninfected CD4+ Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Eliana; Bona, Roberta; Muratori, Claudia; Federico, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected cells transmit viral products to uninfected CD4+ cells very rapidly. However, the natures of the transmitted viral products and the mechanism of transmission, as well as the relative virological consequences, have not yet been fully clarified. We studied the virological events occurring a few hours after contact between HIV-1-infected and uninfected CD4+ cells using a coculture cell system in which the virus expression in target cells could be monitored through the induction of a green fluorescent protein reporter gene driven by HIV-1 long terminal repeats. Within 16 h of coculture, we observed two phenomena not related to the cell-free virus infection, i.e., the formation of donor-target cell fusions and a fusion-independent internalization of viral particles likely occurring at least in part through intercellular connections. Both events depended on the expression of Env and CD4 in donor and target cells, respectively, whereas the HIV-1 internalization required clathrin activity in target cells. Importantly, both phenomena were also observed in cocultures of primary CD4+ lymphocytes, while primary macrophages supported only HIV-1 endocytosis. By investigating the virological consequences of these events, we noticed that while fused cells released infectious HIV-1 particles, albeit with reduced efficiency compared with donor cells, no virus expression was detectable upon HIV-1 endocytosis in target cells. In sum, the HIV-1 transmission following contact between an HIV-1-infected and an uninfected CD4+ cell can occur through different mechanisms, leading to distinguishable virological outcomes. PMID:18508887

  10. HIV Drug Resistance Mutations in Proviral DNA from a Community Treatment Program

    PubMed Central

    Derache, Anne; Shin, Hyoung-Shik; Balamane, Maya; White, Elizabeth; Israelski, Dennis; Klausner, Jeffrey D.; Freeman, Alexandra H.; Katzenstein, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug resistance mutations archived in resting memory CD4+ cells may persist despite suppression of HIV RNA to <50 copies/ml. We sequenced pol gene from proviral DNA among viremic and suppressed patients to identify drug resistance mutations. Methods The Peninsula AIDS Research Cohort study enrolled and followed over 2 years 120 HIV infected patients from San Mateo and San Francisco Counties. HIV-1 pol genotyping by bulk sequencing was performed on 38 DNA and RNA from viremic patients and DNA only among 82 suppressed patients at baseline. Antiretroviral susceptibility was predicted by HIVDB.stanford.edu. Results Among 120 subjects, 81% were on antiretroviral therapy and had been treated for a median time of 7 years. Thirty-two viremic patients showed concordant RNA and DNA genotypes (84%); the discordant profiles were mainly observed in patients with low-level viremia. Among suppressed patients, 21 had drug resistance mutations in proviral DNA (26%) with potential resistance to one, two or three ARV classes in 16, 4 and 1 samples respectively. Conclusions The high level of genotype concordance between DNA and RNA in viremic patients suggested that DNA genotyping might be used to assess drug resistance in resource-limited settings, and further investigation of extracted DNA from dried blood spots is needed. Drug resistance mutations in proviral DNA in 26% of subjects with less than 50 copies/ml pose a risk for the transmission of drug resistant virus with virologic failure, treatment interruption or decreased adherence. PMID:25635815

  11. HIV-1 p24 antigen is a significant inverse correlate of CD4 T-cell change in patients with suppressed viremia under long-term antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Schüpbach, Jörg; Böni, Jürg; Bisset, Leslie R; Tomasik, Zuzana; Fischer, Marek; Günthard, Huldrych F; Ledergerber, Bruno; Opravil, Milos

    2003-07-01

    An HIV-1 p24 antigen test involving signal amplification-boosted ELISA of heat-denatured plasma was evaluated prospectively in 55 patients whose viral RNA in plasma had previously been suppressed for at least 6 months under antiretroviral combination therapy. During a median follow-up of 504 days, CD4 counts increased by a median of 62 cells per year. By univariate and multivariate linear regression analysis, the level of p24 antigen as expressed by the absorbance/cutoff ratio was a significant inverse correlate of both the CD4 count in a sample (p =.013) and its annual change in a patient (p <.0001). The p24 antigen retained significance even among 48 individuals whose HIV-1 RNA, apart from occasional blips, remained below 400 copies/mL. Batch-wise retesting of 70 samples from 5 such patients with a further improved procedure showed measurable p24 antigen in all but 1 sample and an inverse correlation with both the CD4 count (p =.0331) and percentage (p <.0001), thus confirming the prospectively generated data. Comparison of p24 antigen and HIV-1 RNA concentrations indicate that the p24 antigen detected in these samples is not associated with viral RNA-containing particles and may originate from other compartments of virus expression.

  12. Brief Report: Apparent Antiretroviral Overadherence by Pill Count is Associated With HIV Treatment Failure in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Okatch, Harriet; Beiter, Kaylin; Eby, Jessica; Chapman, Jennifer; Marukutira, Tafireyi; Tshume, Ontibile; Matshaba, Mogomotsi; Anabwani, Gabriel M; Gross, Robert; Lowenthal, Elizabeth

    2016-08-15

    Pill counts with calculated adherence percentages are used in many settings to monitor adherence, but can be undermined by patients discarding pills to hide nonadherence. Pill counts suggesting that >100% of prescribed doses were taken can signal "pill dumping." We defined "overadherence" among a cohort of 300 HIV-infected adolescents as having greater than one-third of pill counts with >100% adherence during a year of follow-up. Apparent overadherence was more common in those with virologic failure than in those with suppressed viral loads (33% vs 13%, χ P = 0.001). Pill count adherence repeatedly >100% may identify HIV-infected adolescents at increased risk of treatment failure. PMID:26990822

  13. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) polymorphism 172K suppresses the effect of clinically relevant drug resistance mutations to both nucleoside and non-nucleoside RT inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hachiya, Atsuko; Marchand, Bruno; Kirby, Karen A; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Tu, Xiongying; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Ong, Yee Tsuey; Li, Zhe; Griffin, Daniel T; Schuckmann, Matthew M; Tanuma, Junko; Oka, Shinichi; Singh, Kamalendra; Kodama, Eiichi N; Sarafianos, Stefan G

    2012-08-24

    Polymorphisms have poorly understood effects on drug susceptibility and may affect the outcome of HIV treatment. We have discovered that an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) polymorphism (RT(172K)) is present in clinical samples and in widely used laboratory strains (BH10), and it profoundly affects HIV-1 susceptibility to both nucleoside (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) when combined with certain mutations. Polymorphism 172K significantly suppressed zidovudine resistance caused by excision (e.g. thymidine-associated mutations) and not by discrimination mechanism mutations (e.g. Q151M complex). Moreover, it attenuated resistance to nevirapine or efavirenz imparted by NNRTI mutations. Although 172K favored RT-DNA binding at an excisable pre-translocation conformation, it decreased excision by thymidine-associated mutation-containing RT. 172K affected DNA handling and decreased RT processivity without significantly affecting the k(cat)/K(m) values for dNTP. Surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed that RT(172K) decreased DNA binding by increasing the dissociation rate. Hence, the increased zidovudine susceptibility of RT(172K) results from its increased dissociation from the chain-terminated DNA and reduced primer unblocking. We solved a high resolution (2.15 Å) crystal structure of RT mutated at 172 and compared crystal structures of RT(172R) and RT(172K) bound to NNRTIs or DNA/dNTP. Our structural analyses highlight differences in the interactions between α-helix E (where 172 resides) and the active site β9-strand that involve the YMDD loop and the NNRTI binding pocket. Such changes may increase dissociation of DNA, thus suppressing excision-based NRTI resistance and also offset the effect of NNRTI resistance mutations thereby restoring NNRTI binding. PMID:22761416

  14. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase (RT) Polymorphism 172K Suppresses the Effect of Clinically Relevant Drug Resistance Mutations to Both Nucleoside and Non-nucleoside RT Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Hachiya, Atsuko; Marchand, Bruno; Kirby, Karen A.; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Tu, Xiongying; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Ong, Yee Tsuey; Li, Zhe; Griffin, Daniel T.; Schuckmann, Matthew M.; Tanuma, Junko; Oka, Shinichi; Singh, Kamalendra; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphisms have poorly understood effects on drug susceptibility and may affect the outcome of HIV treatment. We have discovered that an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) polymorphism (RT172K) is present in clinical samples and in widely used laboratory strains (BH10), and it profoundly affects HIV-1 susceptibility to both nucleoside (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) when combined with certain mutations. Polymorphism 172K significantly suppressed zidovudine resistance caused by excision (e.g. thymidine-associated mutations) and not by discrimination mechanism mutations (e.g. Q151M complex). Moreover, it attenuated resistance to nevirapine or efavirenz imparted by NNRTI mutations. Although 172K favored RT-DNA binding at an excisable pre-translocation conformation, it decreased excision by thymidine-associated mutation-containing RT. 172K affected DNA handling and decreased RT processivity without significantly affecting the kcat/Km values for dNTP. Surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed that RT172K decreased DNA binding by increasing the dissociation rate. Hence, the increased zidovudine susceptibility of RT172K results from its increased dissociation from the chain-terminated DNA and reduced primer unblocking. We solved a high resolution (2.15 Å) crystal structure of RT mutated at 172 and compared crystal structures of RT172R and RT172K bound to NNRTIs or DNA/dNTP. Our structural analyses highlight differences in the interactions between α-helix E (where 172 resides) and the active site β9-strand that involve the YMDD loop and the NNRTI binding pocket. Such changes may increase dissociation of DNA, thus suppressing excision-based NRTI resistance and also offset the effect of NNRTI resistance mutations thereby restoring NNRTI binding. PMID:22761416

  15. High-risk oncogenic HPV genotype infection associates with increased immune activation and T cell exhaustion in ART-suppressed HIV-1-infected women.

    PubMed

    Papasavvas, Emmanouil; Surrey, Lea F; Glencross, Deborah K; Azzoni, Livio; Joseph, Jocelin; Omar, Tanvier; Feldman, Michael D; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Siminya, Maureen; Swarts, Avril; Yin, Xiangfan; Liu, Qin; Firnhaber, Cynthia; Montaner, Luis J

    2016-05-01

    Persistence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical disease in the context of HIV co-infection can be influenced by introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and sustained immune activation despite ART. We conducted a cross-sectional study in order to evaluate immune activation/exhaustion in ART-suppressed HIV(+) women with or without high-risk (HR) HPV-related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). 55 South African women were recruited in three groups: HR (-) (n = 16) and HR (+) (n = 15) HPV with negative cervical histopathology, and HR (+) HPV with CIN grade 1/2/3 (n = 24). Sampling included endocervical brushing (HPV DNA genotyping), Pap smear (cytology), colposcopic punch biopsy (histopathology, histochemical evaluation of immune cells), and peripheral blood (clinical assessment, flow cytometry-based immune subset characterization). Statistics were done using R2.5.1. Irrespective of the presence of CIN, HR (+) HPV women had higher circulating levels of T cells expressing markers of activation/exhaustion (CD38, PD1, CTLA-4, BTLA, CD160), Tregs, and myeloid subsets expressing corresponding ligands (PDL1, PDL2, CD86, CD40, HVEM) than HR (-) HPV women. A decrease in circulating NK cells was associated with CIN grade. CD4(+) T cell count associated negatively with T cell exhaustion and expression of negative regulators on myeloid cells. Women with CIN when compared to HR (-) HPV women, had higher cervical cell density in stroma and epithelium for CD4(+), CD68(+), and CD11c(+) cells, and only in stroma for CD8(+) cells. We conclude that in ART-suppressed HIV-infected women with HPV co-infection the levels of T and myeloid cell activation/exhaustion are associated with the presence of HR HPV genotypes. PMID:27467943

  16. Novel Assays for Measurement of Total Cell-Associated HIV-1 DNA and RNA

    PubMed Central

    Aga, Evgenia; Cillo, Anthony R.; Yates, Aarika L.; Besson, Guillaume; Fyne, Elizabeth; Koontz, Dianna L.; Jennings, Cheryl; Zheng, Lu; Mellors, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Although a number of PCR-based quantitative assays for measuring HIV-1 persistence during suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) have been reported, a simple, sensitive, reproducible method is needed for application to large clinical trials. We developed novel quantitative PCR assays for cell-associated (CA) HIV-1 DNA and RNA, targeting a highly conserved region in HIV-1 pol, with sensitivities of 3 to 5 copies/1 million cells. We evaluated the performance characteristics of the assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 5 viremic patients and 20 patients receiving effective ART. Total and resting CD4+ T cells were isolated from a subset of patients and tested for comparison with PBMCs. The estimated standard deviations including interassay variability and intra-assay variability of the assays were modest, i.e., 0.15 and 0.10 log10 copies/106 PBMCs, respectively, for CA HIV-1 DNA and 0.40 and 0.19 log10 copies/106 PBMCs for CA HIV-1 RNA. Testing of longitudinally obtained PBMC samples showed little variation for either viremic patients (median fold differences of 0.80 and 0.88 for CA HIV-1 DNA and RNA, respectively) or virologically suppressed patients (median fold differences of 1.14 and 0.97, respectively). CA HIV-1 DNA and RNA levels were strongly correlated (r = 0.77 to 1; P = 0.0001 to 0.037) for assays performed using PBMCs from different sources (phlebotomy versus leukapheresis) or using total or resting CD4+ T cells purified by either bead selection or flow cytometric sorting. Their sensitivity, reproducibility, and broad applicability to small numbers of mononuclear cells make these assays useful for observational and interventional studies that examine longitudinal changes in the numbers of HIV-1-infected cells and their levels of transcription. PMID:26763968

  17. Positioning of HIV-protease inhibitors in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Andreoni, M; Perno, C F

    2012-01-01

    The availability of more than 20 drugs for the treatment of HIV infection, and the success of the current antiretroviral regimens, should not overlook the difficulty of long-term maintaining the control of viral replication. The therapy needs to be continued for decades, if not for lifetime, and there are clear evidences that, even in patients fully suppressed for many years, HIV starts again its replication cycles in case antiviral pressure is removed. The development of resistance is a natural event at the time of virological failure, that needs to be taken into account in the global strategy against HIV in each particular patient. Taking all together, therapeutic regiments must be embedded, since the beginning, in a long-term strategy whose main task is the stable control of the replication of HIV. To do so, the choice of the first antiviral regimen has to be highly appropriate to keep the virus in check, and at the same time maintain future therapeutic options. Change of therapy at the time of failure has to be also appropriate, in term of timing, diagnostic strategy, and selection of drugs. Under these circumstances, the use of protease inhibitors in the first line acquires a strong rationale, that balances the greater pure potency of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI), and makes them a valuable options for many patients that need to start antiviral therapy.

  18. Innate Lymphoid Cells Are Depleted Irreversibly during Acute HIV-1 Infection in the Absence of Viral Suppression.

    PubMed

    Kløverpris, Henrik N; Kazer, Samuel W; Mjösberg, Jenny; Mabuka, Jenniffer M; Wellmann, Amanda; Ndhlovu, Zaza; Yadon, Marisa C; Nhamoyebonde, Shepherd; Muenchhoff, Maximilian; Simoni, Yannick; Andersson, Frank; Kuhn, Warren; Garrett, Nigel; Burgers, Wendy A; Kamya, Philomena; Pretorius, Karyn; Dong, Krista; Moodley, Amber; Newell, Evan W; Kasprowicz, Victoria; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Goulder, Philip; Shalek, Alex K; Walker, Bruce D; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Leslie, Alasdair

    2016-02-16

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) play a central role in the response to infection by secreting cytokines crucial for immune regulation, tissue homeostasis, and repair. Although dysregulation of these systems is central to pathology, the impact of HIV-1 on ILCs remains unknown. We found that human blood ILCs were severely depleted during acute viremic HIV-1 infection and that ILC numbers did not recover after resolution of peak viremia. ILC numbers were preserved by antiretroviral therapy (ART), but only if initiated during acute infection. Transcriptional profiling during the acute phase revealed upregulation of genes associated with cell death, temporally linked with a strong IFN acute-phase response and evidence of gut barrier breakdown. We found no evidence of tissue redistribution in chronic disease and remaining circulating ILCs were activated but not apoptotic. These data provide a potential mechanistic link between acute HIV-1 infection, lymphoid tissue breakdown, and persistent immune dysfunction. PMID:26850658

  19. Immune Compromise in HIV-1/HTLV-1 Coinfection With Paradoxical Resolution of CD4 Lymphocytosis During Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rockwood, N.; Cook, L.; Kagdi, H.; Basnayake, S.; Bangham, C.R.M.; Pozniak, A.L.; Taylor, G.P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infections have complex effects on adaptive immunity, with specific tropism for, but contrasting effects on, CD4 T lymphocytes: depletion with HIV-1, proliferation with HTLV-1. Impaired T lymphocyte function occurs early in HIV-1 infection but opportunistic infections (OIs) rarely occur in the absence of CD4 lymphopenia. In the unusual case where a HIV-1 infected individual with a high CD4 count presents with recurrent OIs, a clinician is faced with the possibility of a second underlying comorbidity. We present a case of pseudo-adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in HIV-1/HTLV-1 coinfection where the individual fulfilled Shimoyama criteria for chronic ATLL and had pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii, despite a high CD4 lymphocyte count. However, there was no evidence of clonal T-cell proliferation by T-cell receptor gene rearrangement studies nor of monoclonal HTLV-1 integration by high-throughput sequencing. Mutually beneficial interplay between HIV-1 and HTLV-1, maintaining high level HIV-1 and HTLV-1 viremia and proliferation of poorly functional CD4 cells despite chronicity of infection is a postulated mechanism. Despite good microbiological response to antimycobacterial therapy, the patient remained systemically unwell with refractory anemia. Subsequent initiation of combined antiretroviral therapy led to paradoxical resolution of CD4 T lymphocytosis as well as HIV-1 viral suppression and decreased HTLV-1 proviral load. This is proposed to be the result of attenuation of immune activation post-HIV virological control. This case illustrates the importance of screening for HTLV-1 in HIV-1 patients with appropriate clinical presentation and epidemiological risk factors and explores mechanisms for the complex interactions on HIV-1/HTLV-1 adaptive immunity. PMID:26683952

  20. Dressing up Nanoparticles: A Membrane Wrap to Induce Formation of the Virological Synapse.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinwei; Xu, Fangda; Ramirez, Nora-Guadalupe P; Kijewski, Suzanne D G; Akiyama, Hisashi; Gummuluru, Suryaram; Reinhard, Björn M

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems require the ability to target specific organelles or subcellular regions in selected target cells. Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) particles are evolutionarily optimized nanocarriers that have evolved to avoid intracellular degradation and achieve enrichment at the synapse between mature dendritic cells (mDCs) and T cells by subverting cellular trafficking mechanisms. This study demonstrates that integration of the glycosphingolipid, GM3, in a membrane around a solid nanoparticle (NP) core is sufficient to recapitulate key aspects of the virus particle trafficking in mDCs. GM3-presenting artificial virus NPs (GM3-AVNs) accumulate in CD169(+) and CD81(+) nonlysosomal compartments in an actin-dependent process that mimics the sequestration of HIV-1. Live-cell optical tracking studies reveal a preferential recruitment and arrest of surface scanning CD4(+) T cells in direct vicinity to the AVN-enriched compartments. The formed mDC-T cell conjugates exhibit strong morphological similarities between the GM3-AVN-containing mDC-T cell synapse and the HIV-1 virological synapse, indicating that GM3-CD169 interactions alone are sufficient for establishing the mDC-T cell virological synapse. These results emphasize the potential of the GM3-AVN approach for providing therapeutic access to a key step of the host immune response--formation of the synaptic junction between an antigen-presenting cell (mDC) and T cells--for modulating and controlling immune responses.

  1. Longitudinal analysis of HIV-1 coreceptor tropism by single and triplicate HIV-1 RNA and DNA sequencing in patients undergoing successful first-line antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Meini, Genny; Rossetti, Barbara; Bianco, Claudia; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Sighinolfi, Laura; Monno, Laura; Castagna, Antonella; Rozera, Gabriella; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Zazzi, Maurizio; De Luca, Andrea; Moroni, M.; Angarano, G.; Antinori, A.; Armignacco, O.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Castelli, F.; Cauda, R.; Di Perri, G.; Galli, M.; Iardino, R.; Ippolito, G.; Lazzarin, A.; Perno, C. F.; von Schloesser, F.; Viale, P.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Antinori, A.; Castagna, A.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Girardi, E.; Lo Caputo, S.; Mussini, C.; Puoti, M.; Andreoni, M.; Ammassari, A.; Antinori, A.; Balotta, C.; Bonfanti, P.; Bonora, S.; Borderi, M.; Capobianchi, M. R.; Castagna, A.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Cingolani, A.; Cinque, P.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; d'Arminio Monforte, A; De Luca, A.; Di Biagio, A.; Girardi, E.; Gianotti, N.; Gori, A.; Guaraldi, G.; Lapadula, G.; Lichtner, M.; Lo Caputo, S.; Madeddu, G.; Maggiolo, F.; Marchetti, G.; Marcotullio, S.; Monno, L.; Mussini, C.; Puoti, M.; Quiros Roldan, E.; Rusconi, S.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Cicconi, P.; Fanti, I.; Formenti, T.; Galli, L.; Lorenzini, P.; Giacometti, A.; Costantini, A.; Angarano, G.; Monno, L.; Santoro, C.; Maggiolo, F.; Suardi, C.; Viale, P.; Vanino, E.; Verucchi, G.; Castelli, F.; Quiros Roldan, E.; Minardi, C.; Quirino, T.; Abeli, C.; Manconi, P.E.; Piano, P.; Vecchiet, J.; Falasca, K.; Sighinolfi, L.; Segala, D.; Mazzotta, F.; Lo Caputo, S.; Cassola, G.; Viscoli, G.; Alessandrini, A.; Piscopo, R.; Mazzarello, G.; Mastroianni, C.; Belvisi, V.; Bonfanti, P.; Caramma, I.; Castelli, A. P.; Galli, M.; Lazzarin, A.; Rizzardini, G.; Puoti, M.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Ridolfo, A. L.; Piolini, R.; Castagna, A.; Salpietro, S.; Carenzi, L.; Moioli, M. C.; Cicconi, P.; Marchetti, G.; Mussini, C.; Puzzolante, C.; Gori, A.; Lapadula, G.; Abrescia, N.; Chirianni, A.; Guida, M. G.; Gargiulo, M.; Baldelli, F.; Francisci, D.; Parruti, G.; Ursini, T.; Magnani, G.; Ursitti, M. A.; Cauda, R.; Andreoni, M.; Antinori, A.; Vullo, V.; Cingolani, A.; d'Avino, A.; Ammassari, A.; Gallo, L.; Nicastri, E.; Acinapura, R.; Capozzi, M.; Libertone, R.; Tebano, G.; Cattelan, A.; Mura, M. S.; Madeddu, G.; Caramello, P.; Di Perri, G.; Orofino, G. C.; Bonora, S.; Sciandra, M.; Pellizzer, G.; Manfrin, V.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Maraviroc has been shown to be effective in patients harbouring CCR5-tropic HIV-1. While this CCR5 antagonist has initially been used in salvage therapy, its excellent safety profile makes it ideal for antiretroviral treatment simplification strategies in patients with suppressed plasma viraemia. The aim of this study was to compare HIV-1 tropism as detected in baseline plasma RNA and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) DNA prior to first-line therapy and to analyse tropism evolution while on successful treatment. Methods HIV-1 tropism was determined using triplicate genotypic testing combined with geno2pheno[coreceptor] analysis at a 10% false positive rate in 42 patients. Paired pre-treatment plasma RNA and PBMC DNA and two subsequent PBMC DNA samples (the first obtained after reaching undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA and the second after at least 2 years of suppression of plasma viraemia) were evaluated. Results Coreceptor tropism was completely concordant in paired pre-treatment RNA and DNA, with 26.2% of HIV-1 sequences predicted to be non-CCR5-tropic. During follow-up, coreceptor tropism switches were detected in 4 (9.5%) patients without any preferential direction. Although false positive rate discrepancies within triplicates were common, the rate of discordance of coreceptor tropism assignment among triplicate results in this mostly CCR5-tropic dataset was only 2.1%, questioning the added value of triplicate testing compared with single testing. Conclusions HIV-1 coreceptor tropism changes during virologically successful first-line treatment are infrequent. HIV-1 DNA analysis may thus support the choice of a CCR5 antagonist in treatment switch strategies; however, maraviroc treatment outcome data are required to confirm this option. PMID:24155059

  2. Comparative virology and AIDS (review).

    PubMed

    Kodama, M; Kodama, T

    1996-03-01

    The scientific debate between pros and cons of the HIV criminal theory of AIDS still remains unsettled. The purpose of this review is to promote resolution of the problem by extracting a common principle of the host-virus relation using data resources for each of 4 viruses as follows: a) polyoma virus, b) Marek's disease virus, c) Ebola virus, d) Korean hemorrhagic fever virus. Conclusions drawn from this study are given as follows: i) Environment emerged as the cardinal factor to modify the process of virus infection in all of the 4 viruses studied. Above all, an accelerating effect of environmental stress on the progression of virus infection was noted in vivo in the majority of viral diseases. ii) Evidence is available to indicate that a healthy cell (or a healthy individual) may harbor virus genes of multiple species without manifesting any pathologic sign. iii) Evidence also suggests that the biological property as well as morphological structure of a virus may vary in reponse to a change of the bioenvironment. On the basis of the above information, we propose to renounce 2 assumptions of classical infection model: a) the hereditarily determined virulence of a microorganism (including virus) be the sole determinant of infection to the effect that its invasion into the host should automatically complete the programmed course of infection; b) virus, a quasi-living creature, should reserve its behavioral independence irrespective of a change of the bioenvironment. The new infection model was constructed on the basis of the selfish gene concept that had been invented by Richard Dawkins to explain the altruistic behavior of an individual. That is, the fate of an exogenous or endogenous virus is under the dual control of the host genome (selfish gene) and the outer environment. The progression of virus infection is conditioned by a crosstalk between them. The selfish gene may use virus (a lifeless substance) as a magic bullet to induce a designated host response. In

  3. Comparative virology and AIDS (review).

    PubMed

    Kodama, M; Kodama, T

    1996-03-01

    The scientific debate between pros and cons of the HIV criminal theory of AIDS still remains unsettled. The purpose of this review is to promote resolution of the problem by extracting a common principle of the host-virus relation using data resources for each of 4 viruses as follows: a) polyoma virus, b) Marek's disease virus, c) Ebola virus, d) Korean hemorrhagic fever virus. Conclusions drawn from this study are given as follows: i) Environment emerged as the cardinal factor to modify the process of virus infection in all of the 4 viruses studied. Above all, an accelerating effect of environmental stress on the progression of virus infection was noted in vivo in the majority of viral diseases. ii) Evidence is available to indicate that a healthy cell (or a healthy individual) may harbor virus genes of multiple species without manifesting any pathologic sign. iii) Evidence also suggests that the biological property as well as morphological structure of a virus may vary in reponse to a change of the bioenvironment. On the basis of the above information, we propose to renounce 2 assumptions of classical infection model: a) the hereditarily determined virulence of a microorganism (including virus) be the sole determinant of infection to the effect that its invasion into the host should automatically complete the programmed course of infection; b) virus, a quasi-living creature, should reserve its behavioral independence irrespective of a change of the bioenvironment. The new infection model was constructed on the basis of the selfish gene concept that had been invented by Richard Dawkins to explain the altruistic behavior of an individual. That is, the fate of an exogenous or endogenous virus is under the dual control of the host genome (selfish gene) and the outer environment. The progression of virus infection is conditioned by a crosstalk between them. The selfish gene may use virus (a lifeless substance) as a magic bullet to induce a designated host response. In

  4. Applying proteomic technology to clinical virology.

    PubMed

    Mancone, C; Ciccosanti, F; Montaldo, C; Perdomo, A B; Piacentini, M; Alonzi, T; Fimia, G M; Tripodi, M

    2013-01-01

    Developing antiviral drugs, vaccines and diagnostic markers is still the most ambitious challenge in clinical virology. In the past few decades, data from high-throughput technologies have allowed for the rapid development of new antiviral therapeutic strategies, thus making a profound impact on translational research. Most of the current preclinical studies in virology are aimed at evaluating the dynamic composition and localization of the protein platforms involved in various host-virus interactions. Among the different possible approaches, mass spectrometry-based proteomics is increasingly being used to define the protein composition in subcellular compartments, quantify differential protein expression among samples, characterize protein complexes, and analyse protein post-translational modifications. Here, we review the current knowledge of the most useful proteomic approaches in the study of viral persistence and pathogenicity, with a particular focus on recent advances in hepatitis C research.

  5. CD38+CD8+ and CD38+CD4+ T Cells and IFN Gamma (+874) Polymorphism Are Associated with a Poor Virological Outcome.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Paulo Germano; de Oliveira Rodrigues, Raphael; Ribeiro da Silva, Silvia Fernandes; Ribeiro, Ilana Farias; de Miranda Lucena, Herene Barros; Martins, Lilian Roberta Costa; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena; de Arruda, Érico Antônio Gomes; Nagao-Dias, Aparecida Tiemi

    2016-05-01

    The main objective of the work was to evaluate the use of CD38 on T lymphocytes, IFNγ (+874 A/T), and IL-10 (-1082 A/G) polymorphisms in HIV-infected patients under antiretroviral (ARV) therapy. Sixty-one patients were selected at the outpatient clinic for HIV infection at the Hospital São José de Doenças Infecciosas, Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. The patients were classified into two groups, according to viral load after one year of ARV therapy. In the aviremic group (group I), a reduction of 35.5% of CD38+CD4+ T cells was observed (p = 0.02) and 49.3% of CD38+CD8+ T cells (p = 0.001). In the viremic group (group II), a reduction of 37.2% of CD38+CD4+ T cells (p = 0.067), and 21.4% of CD38+CD8+ T cells (p = 0.60) occurred. No association was found between IL-10 (-1082) polymorphism and the type of response to ARV therapy. Regarding the gene polymorphism on IFNγ (+874 T/A), 73.34% of group I and 33.3% of group II presented the AA genotype. The relative risk of the individuals carrying AA genotype or the A allele and not being able to suppress the viral load level after one year of ARV therapy was 3.44 (1.25-9.45; p = 0.014) or 2.35 (1.05-5.26; p = 0.027), respectively. Our data suggested that an augmented frequency of activated CD38+CD8+ T cells as well as the presence of the A allele of IFNγ polymorphism could contribute to a reduced virological suppression in patients under antiretroviral therapy.

  6. Association of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Opa(CEA) with dendritic cells suppresses their ability to elicit an HIV-1-specific T cell memory response.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qigui; Chow, Edith M C; McCaw, Shannon E; Hu, Ningjie; Byrd, Daniel; Amet, Tohti; Hu, Sishun; Ostrowski, Mario A; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2013-01-01

    Infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (N. gonorrhoeae) can trigger an intense local inflammatory response at the site of infection, yet there is little specific immune response or development of immune memory. Gonococcal surface epitopes are known to undergo antigenic variation; however, this is unlikely to explain the weak immune response to infection since individuals can be re-infected by the same serotype. Previous studies have demonstrated that the colony opacity-associated (Opa) proteins on the N. gonorrhoeae surface can bind human carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) on CD4⁺ T cells to suppress T cell activation and proliferation. Interesting in this regard, N. gonorrhoeae infection is associated with impaired HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1)-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses and with transient increases in plasma viremia in HIV-1-infected patients, suggesting that N. gonorrhoeae may also subvert immune responses to co-pathogens. Since dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) that play a key role in the induction of an adaptive immune response, we investigated the effects of N. gonorrhoeae Opa proteins on human DC activation and function. While morphological changes reminiscent of DC maturation were evident upon N. gonorrhoeae infection, we observed a marked downregulation of DC maturation marker CD83 when the gonococci expressing CEACAM1-specific Opa(CEA), but not other Opa variants. Consistent with a gonococcal-induced defect in maturation, Opa(CEA) binding to CEACAM1 reduced the DCs' capacity to stimulate an allogeneic T cell proliferative response. Moreover, Opa(CEA)-expressing N. gonorrhoeae showed the potential to impair DC-dependent development of specific adaptive immunity, since infection with Opa(CEA)-positive gonococci suppressed the ability of DCs to stimulate HIV-1-specific memory CTL responses. These results reveal a novel mechanism to explain why

  7. Virus burden in long-term survivors of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a determinant of anti-HIV CD8+ lymphocyte activity.

    PubMed

    Ferbas, J; Kaplan, A H; Hausner, M A; Hultin, L E; Matud, J L; Liu, Z; Panicali, D L; Nerng-Ho, H; Detels, R; Giorgi, J V

    1995-08-01

    Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) for > 8 years were studied to delineate virologic and immunologic attributes of long-term survival. Whereas those with 300-700 CD4+ cells/microL often had circulating cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against HIV antigens, those with > 1000 CD4+ cells/microL did not. The subjects with > 1000 CD4+ cells/microL had low virus burden, low levels of Gag-specific CTL precursors, and minimal CD8+ cell activation. Overall, elevated levels of CD8+ cells, CD38 antigen expression on CD8+ cells, and anti-HIV functions were correlated with increased virus burden, provirus load, and HIV plasma RNA levels. A factor that suppressed HIV replication was spontaneously secreted from CD8+ cells of most subjects but not from those with high CD4+ cell counts. CD8+ cell activities, therefore, may reflect chronic viral stimulation of the immune system. Long-term survivors with high levels of CD4+ cells maintained control of viral replication but lacked the CD8+ cell activities.

  8. 'I Know that I Do Have HIV but Nobody Saw Me': Oral HIV Self-Testing in an Informal Settlement in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Martínez Pérez, Guillermo; Cox, Vivian; Ellman, Tom; Moore, Ann; Patten, Gabriela; Shroufi, Amir; Stinson, Kathryn; Van Cutsem, Gilles; Ibeto, Maryrene

    2016-01-01

    Reaching universal HIV-status awareness is crucial to ensure all HIV-infected patients access antiretroviral treatment (ART) and achieve virological suppression. Opportunities for HIV testing could be enhanced by offering self-testing in populations that fear stigma and discrimination when accessing conventional HIV Counselling and Testing (HCT) in health care facilities. This qualitative research aims to examine the feasibility and acceptability of unsupervised oral self-testing for home use in an informal settlement of South Africa. Eleven in-depth interviews, two couple interviews, and two focus group discussions were conducted with seven healthcare workers and thirteen community members. Thematic analysis was done concurrently with data collection. Acceptability to offer home self-testing was demonstrated in this research. Home self-testing might help this population overcome barriers to accepting HCT; this was particularly expressed in the male and youth groups. Nevertheless, pilot interventions must provide evidence of potential harm related to home self-testing, intensify efforts to offer quality counselling, and ensure linkage to HIV/ART-care following a positive self-test result. PMID:27044006

  9. ‘I Know that I Do Have HIV but Nobody Saw Me’: Oral HIV Self-Testing in an Informal Settlement in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Vivian; Ellman, Tom; Moore, Ann; Patten, Gabriela; Shroufi, Amir; Stinson, Kathryn; Van Cutsem, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Reaching universal HIV-status awareness is crucial to ensure all HIV-infected patients access antiretroviral treatment (ART) and achieve virological suppression. Opportunities for HIV testing could be enhanced by offering self-testing in populations that fear stigma and discrimination when accessing conventional HIV Counselling and Testing (HCT) in health care facilities. This qualitative research aims to examine the feasibility and acceptability of unsupervised oral self-testing for home use in an informal settlement of South Africa. Eleven in-depth interviews, two couple interviews, and two focus group discussions were conducted with seven healthcare workers and thirteen community members. Thematic analysis was done concurrently with data collection. Acceptability to offer home self-testing was demonstrated in this research. Home self-testing might help this population overcome barriers to accepting HCT; this was particularly expressed in the male and youth groups. Nevertheless, pilot interventions must provide evidence of potential harm related to home self-testing, intensify efforts to offer quality counselling, and ensure linkage to HIV/ART-care following a positive self-test result. PMID:27044006

  10. Single-Cell Genomics for Virology

    PubMed Central

    Ciuffi, Angela; Rato, Sylvie; Telenti, Amalio

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell sequencing technologies, i.e., single cell analysis followed by deep sequencing investigate cellular heterogeneity in many biological settings. It was only in the past year that single-cell sequencing analyses has been applied in the field of virology, providing new ways to explore viral diversity and cell response to viral infection, which are summarized in the present review. PMID:27153082

  11. Single-Cell Genomics for Virology.

    PubMed

    Ciuffi, Angela; Rato, Sylvie; Telenti, Amalio

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell sequencing technologies, i.e., single cell analysis followed by deep sequencing investigate cellular heterogeneity in many biological settings. It was only in the past year that single-cell sequencing analyses has been applied in the field of virology, providing new ways to explore viral diversity and cell response to viral infection, which are summarized in the present review. PMID:27153082

  12. Relevance of Interleukin-6 and D-Dimer for Serious Non-AIDS Morbidity and Death among HIV-Positive Adults on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jason V; Deeks, Steven G.; Wolfson, Julian; Wentworth, Deborah; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Cohen, Calvin J.; Phillips, Andrew; Lundgren, Jens D.; Neaton, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite effective antiretroviral treatment (ART), HIV-positive individuals are at increased risk of serious non-AIDS conditions (cardiovascular, liver and renal disease, and cancers), perhaps due in part to ongoing inflammation and/or coagulation. To estimate the potential risk reduction in serious non-AIDS conditions or death from any cause that might be achieved with treatments that reduce inflammation and/or coagulation, we examined associations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), D-dimer, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels with serious non-AIDS conditions or death in 3 large cohorts. Methods In HIV-positive adults on suppressive ART, associations of IL-6, D-dimer, and hsCRP levels at study entry with serious non-AIDS conditions or death were studied using Cox regression. Hazard ratios (HR) adjusted for age, gender, study, and regression dilution bias (due to within-person biomarker variability) were used to predict risk reductions in serious non-AIDS conditions or death associated with lower “usual” levels of IL-6 and D-dimer. Results Over 4.9 years of mean follow-up, 260 of the 3766 participants experienced serious non-AIDS conditions or death. IL-6, D-dimer and hsCRP were each individually associated with risk of serious non-AIDS conditions or death, HR = 1.45 (95% CI: 1.30 to 1.63), 1.28 (95% CI: 1.14 to 1.44), and 1.17 (95% CI: 1.09 to 1.26) per 2x higher biomarker levels, respectively. In joint models, IL-6 and D-dimer were independently associated with serious non-AIDS conditions or death, with consistent results across the 3 cohorts and across serious non-AIDS event types. The association of IL-6 and D-dimer with serious non-AIDS conditions or death was graded and persisted throughout follow-up. For 25% lower “usual” IL-6 and D-dimer levels, the joint biomarker model estimates a 37% reduction (95% CI: 28 to 46%) in the risk of serious non-AIDS conditions or death if the relationship is causal. Conclusions Both IL-6 and D

  13. HIV-1 Vpr suppresses the cytomegalovirus promoter in a CRL4(DCAF1) E3 ligase independent manner.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianjun; Guo, Haoran; Wang, Hong; Markham, Richard; Wei, Wei; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2015-04-01

    Although the Vpr protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been shown to act as a transcriptional activator of the HIV-1 LTR and certain host genes, the current study demonstrates that it can also function as a potent inhibitor of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. Previous studies have shown that the cell cycle arrest and apoptotic functions of Vpr required recruitment of the CRL4(DCAF1) E3 ligase, but this complex is shown not to be required for inhibition of the CMV promoter. We identified conserved sites (A30/V31) from diverse Vpr from HIV/SIV that were critical for blocking the CMV promoter activity. Interestingly, the Vpr mutant A30S/V31S protein also impaired the ability of Vpr to down-regulate transcription of the host UNG2 gene. Our findings shed light on the dual functions of Vpr on the transcription of HIV-1, other viruses and host genes which may contribute to viral replication and disease progression in vivo.

  14. HIV-1 suppression and durable control by combining single broadly neutralizing antibodies and antiretroviral drugs in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, Joshua A.; Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Mouquet, Hugo; Gitlin, Alexander D.; Tretiakova, Anna; Eisenreich, Thomas R.; Malbec, Marine; Gravemann, Sophia; Billerbeck, Eva; Dorner, Marcus; Büning, Hildegard; Schwartz, Olivier; Knops, Elena; Kaiser, Rolf; Seaman, Michael S.; Wilson, James M.; Rice, Charles M.; Ploss, Alexander; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Klein, Florian; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2013-01-01

    Effective control of HIV-1 infection in humans is achieved using combinations of antiretroviral therapy (ART) drugs. In humanized mice (hu-mice), control of viremia can be achieved using either ART or by immunotherapy using combinations of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). Here we show that treatment of HIV-1–infected hu-mice with a combination of three highly potent bNAbs not only resulted in complete viremic control but also led to a reduction in cell-associated HIV-1 DNA. Moreover, lowering the initial viral load by coadministration of ART and immunotherapy enabled prolonged viremic control by a single bNAb after ART was withdrawn. Similarly, a single injection of adeno-associated virus directing expression of one bNAb produced durable viremic control after ART was terminated. We conclude that immunotherapy reduces plasma viral load and cell-associated HIV-1 DNA and that decreasing the initial viral load enables single bNAbs to control viremia in hu-mice. PMID:24043801

  15. Face up to challenge of virology world.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaoli Lilly

    2012-02-12

    Welcome to the World Journal of Virology (WJV), a new member of the World Journal Series. The World Journal Series was first launched as a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering aspects of research, diagnostics and clinical practice in biomedicine in 1995. WJV is an online and open-access peer-reviewed periodical focusing on virology. WJV covers a variety of topics in different areas of virology, including advances in basic research, updates in nomenclature, the development of novel diagnostic assays, the epidemiology of viral disorders and, new developments in the clinical management of viral diseases, including new vaccines and antiviral therapeutics. The purpose in launching the WJV is to promote knowledge exchange related to the classic human viruses as well as newly emerging viruses and their associated clinical disorders. Continually updating knowledge in a timely manner in this field where information related to the unceasing evolution of viruses is becoming available at a rapid pace is challenging. Thanks to the World-Wide-Web we are able to provide a podium for all authors and readers of WJV to address this challenge. I would like to acknowledge the Baishideng publisher, the members of the editorial board, and all contributing authors involved in this inaugural issue of the WJV. I sincerely hope all readers, i.e. future contributing authors, will like WJV and we look forward to your input in assisting WJV to grow and mature.

  16. Second-line protease inhibitor-based highly active antiretroviral therapy after failing non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors-based regimens in Asian HIV-infected children

    PubMed Central

    Bunupuradah, Torsak; Puthanakit, Thanyawee; Fahey, Paul; Kariminia, Azar; Yusoff, Nik Khairulddin Nik; Khanh, Truong Huu; Sohn, Annette H.; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Lumbiganon, Pagakrong; Hansudewechakul, Rawiwan; Razali, Kamarul; Kurniati, Nia; Huy, Bui Vu; Sudjaritruk, Tavitiya; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Fong, Siew Moy; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2013-01-01

    Background The WHO recommends boosted protease inhibitor (bPI)-based highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) after failing non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) treatment. We examined outcomes of this regimen in Asian HIV-infected children. Methods Children from five Asian countries in the TREAT Asia Pediatric HIV Observational Database (TApHOD) with ≥24 weeks of NNRTI-based HAART followed by ≥24 weeks of bPI-based HAART were eligible. Primary outcomes were the proportions with virologic suppression (HIV-RNA <400 copies/ml) and immune recovery (CD4% ≥25% if age <5 years and CD4 count ≥500 cells/mm3 if age ≥5 years) at 48 and 96 weeks. Results Of 3422 children, 153 were eligible; 52% were female. At switch, median age was 10 years, 26% were in WHO stage 4. Median weight-for-age z-score (WAZ) was −1.9 (n=121), CD4% was 12.5% (n=106), CD4 count was 237 (n=112) cells/mm3, and HIV-RNA was 4.6 log10copies/ml (n=61). The most common PI was lopinavir/ritonavir (83%). At 48 weeks, 61% (79/129) had immune recovery, 60% (26/43) had undetectable HIV-RNA and 73% (58/79) had fasting triglycerides ≥130mg/dl. By 96 weeks, 70% (57/82) achieved immune recovery, 65% (17/26) virologic suppression, and hypertriglyceridemia occurred in 66% (33/50). Predictors for virologic suppression at week 48 were longer duration of NNRTI-based HAART (p=0.006), younger age (p=0.007), higher WAZ (p=0.020), and HIV-RNA at switch <10,000 copies/ml (p=0.049). Conclusion In this regional cohort of Asian children on bPI-based second-line HAART, 60% of children tested had immune recovery by one year, and two-thirds had hyperlipidemia, highlighting difficulties in optimizing second-line HAART with limited drug options. PMID:23296119

  17. Retention in Early Care at an HIV Outpatient Clinic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Silva, Daniel S; De Boni, Raquel B; Lake, Jordan E; Cardoso, Sandra W; Ribeiro, Sayonara; Moreira, Ronaldo I; Clark, Jesse L; Veloso, Valdilea G; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Luz, Paula M

    2016-05-01

    Retention in early HIV care has been associated with virologic suppression and improved survival, but remains understudied in Brazil. We estimated retention in early HIV care for the period 2000-2013, and identified socio-demographic and clinical factors associated with good retention in an urban cohort from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Antiretroviral therapy-naïve, HIV-infected persons ≥18 years old linked to care between 2000 and 2011 were included. Retention in the first 2 years post-linkage (i.e. early care) was defined by the proportion of 6-month intervals with ≥1 HIV laboratory result. "Good" retention was defined as ≥1 HIV laboratory result recorded in at least three intervals. Overall, 80 % of participants met criteria for good retention and retention significantly improved over the study period. Older age, higher education level and early antiretroviral therapy initiation were associated with good retention. Efforts to improve retention in early care in this population should target younger and less-educated HIV-infected persons.

  18. End-Stage Renal Disease Among HIV-Infected Adults in North America

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Alison G.; Althoff, Keri N.; Jing, Yuezhou; Estrella, Michelle M.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Wester, C. William; Bosch, Ronald J.; Crane, Heidi; Eron, Joseph; Gill, M. John; Horberg, Michael A.; Justice, Amy C.; Klein, Marina; Mayor, Angel M.; Moore, Richard D.; Palella, Frank J.; Parikh, Chirag R.; Silverberg, Michael J.; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Napravnik, Sonia; Lucas, Gregory M.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Benson, Constance A.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Collier, Ann C.; Boswell, Stephen; Grasso, Chris; Mayer, Ken; Hogg, Robert S.; Harrigan, Richard; Montaner, Julio; Cescon, Angela; Brooks, John T.; Buchacz, Kate; Gebo, Kelly A.; Moore, Richard D.; Moore, Richard D.; Carey, John T.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Horberg, Michael A.; Silverberg, Michael J.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Goedert, James J.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Klein, Marina B.; Rourke, Sean B.; Burchell, Ann; Rachlis, Anita R.; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F.; Mayor, Angel M.; Gill, M. John; Deeks, Steven G.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Saag, Michael S.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Willig, James; Eron, Joseph J.; Napravnik, Sonia; Kitahata, Mari M.; Crane, Heidi M.; Justice, Amy C.; Dubrow, Robert; Fiellin, David; Sterling, Timothy R.; Haas, David; Bebawy, Sally; Turner, Megan; Gange, Stephen J.; Anastos, Kathryn; Moore, Richard D.; Saag, Michael S.; Gange, Stephen J.; Althoff, Keri N.; Kitahata, Mari M.; McKaig, Rosemary G.; Justice, Amy C.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Moore, Richard D.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Lent, Carol; Kitahata, Mari M.; Van Rompaey, Stephen E.; Crane, Heidi M.; Webster, Eric; Morton, Liz; Simon, Brenda; Gange, Stephen J.; Althoff, Keri N.; Abraham, Alison G.; Lau, Bryan; Zhang, Jinbing; Jing, Jerry; Golub, Elizabeth; Modur, Shari; Hanna, David B.; Rebeiro, Peter; Wong, Cherise; Mendes, Adell

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, particularly those of black race, are at high-risk for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but contributing factors are evolving. We hypothesized that improvements in HIV treatment have led to declines in risk of ESRD, particularly among HIV-infected blacks. Methods. Using data from the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration for Research and Design from January 2000 to December 2009, we validated 286 incident ESRD cases using abstracted medical evidence of dialysis (lasting >6 months) or renal transplant. A total of 38 354 HIV-infected adults aged 18–80 years contributed 159 825 person-years (PYs). Age- and sex-standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were estimated by race. Poisson regression was used to identify predictors of ESRD. Results. HIV-infected ESRD cases were more likely to be of black race, have diabetes mellitus or hypertension, inject drugs, and/or have a prior AIDS-defining illness. The overall SIR was 3.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8–3.6) but was significantly higher among black patients (4.5 [95% CI, 3.9–5.2]). ESRD incidence declined from 532 to 303 per 100 000 PYs and 138 to 34 per 100 000 PYs over the time period for blacks and nonblacks, respectively, coincident with notable increases in both the prevalence of viral suppression and the prevalence of ESRD risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and hepatitis C virus coinfection. Conclusions. The risk of ESRD remains high among HIV-infected individuals in care but is declining with improvements in virologic suppression. HIV-infected black persons continue to comprise the majority of cases, as a result of higher viral loads, comorbidities, and genetic susceptibility. PMID:25409471

  19. CD4+ T-cell-independent mechanisms suppress reactivation of latent tuberculosis in a macaque model of HIV coinfection.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Taylor W; Mehra, Smriti; LoBato, Denae N; Malek, Adel; Alvarez, Xavier; Golden, Nadia A; Bucşan, Allison N; Didier, Peter J; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E; Roy, Chad J; Blanchard, James; Kuroda, Marcelo J; Lackner, Andrew A; Chan, John; Khader, Shabaana A; Jacobs, William R; Kaushal, Deepak

    2016-09-20

    The synergy between Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and HIV in coinfected patients has profoundly impacted global mortality because of tuberculosis (TB) and AIDS. HIV significantly increases rates of reactivation of latent TB infection (LTBI) to active disease, with the decline in CD4(+) T cells believed to be the major causality. In this study, nonhuman primates were coinfected with Mtb and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), recapitulating human coinfection. A majority of animals exhibited rapid reactivation of Mtb replication, progressing to disseminated TB and increased SIV-associated pathology. Although a severe loss of pulmonary CD4(+) T cells was observed in all coinfected macaques, a subpopulation of the animals was still able to prevent reactivation and maintain LTBI. Investigation of pulmonary immune responses and pathology in this cohort demonstrated that increased CD8(+) memory T-cell proliferation, higher granzyme B production, and expanded B-cell follicles correlated with protection from reactivation. Our findings reveal mechanisms that control SIV- and TB-associated pathology. These CD4-independent protective immune responses warrant further studies in HIV coinfected humans able to control their TB infection. Moreover, these findings will provide insight into natural immunity to Mtb and will guide development of novel vaccine strategies and immunotherapies. PMID:27601645

  20. Antigen-driven C–C Chemokine-mediated HIV-1 Suppression by CD4+ T Cells from Exposed Uninfected Individuals Expressing the Wild-type CCR-5 Allele

    PubMed Central

    Furci, Lucinda; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Burastero, Samuele; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Colognesi, Claudia; Quillent, Caroline; Longhi, Renato; Loverro, Patrizia; Borgonovo, Barbara; Gaffi, Davide; Carrow, Emily; Malnati, Mauro; Lusso, Paolo; Siccardi, Antonio G.; Lazzarin, Adriano; Beretta, Alberto

    1997-01-01

    Despite repeated exposure to HIV-1, certain individuals remain persistently uninfected. Such exposed uninfected (EU) people show evidence of HIV-1–specific T cell immunity and, in rare cases, selective resistance to infection by macrophage-tropic strains of HIV-1. The latter has been associated with a 32–base pair deletion in the C–C chemokine receptor gene CCR-5, the major coreceptor of macrophage-tropic strains of HIV-1. We have undertaken an analysis of the HIV-specific T cell responses in 12 EU individuals who were either homozygous for the wild-type CCR-5 allele or heterozygous for the deletion allele (CCR-5Δ32). We have found evidence of an oligoclonal T cell response mediated by helper T cells specific for a conserved region of the HIV-1 envelope. These cells produce very high levels of C–C chemokines when stimulated by the specific antigen and suppress selectively the replication of macrophage-tropic, but not T cell–tropic, strains of HIV-1. These chemokine-producing helper cells may be part of a protective immune response that could be potentially exploited for vaccine development. PMID:9236198

  1. The effect of efavirenz versus nevirapine-containing regimens on immunologic, virologic and clinical outcomes in a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare regimens consisting of either efavirenz or nevirapine and two or more nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) among HIV-infected, antiretroviral-naive, and AIDS-free individuals with respect to clinical, immunologic, and virologic outcomes. Design Prospective studies of HIV-infected individuals in Europe and the US included in the HIV-CAUSAL Collaboration. Methods Antiretroviral therapy-naive and AIDS-free individuals were followed from the time they started an NRTI, efavirenz or nevirapine, classified as following one or both types of regimens at baseline, and censored when they started an ineligible drug or at 6 months if their regimen was not yet complete. We estimated the ‘intention-to-treat’ effect for nevirapine versus efavirenz regimens on clinical, immunologic, and virologic outcomes. Our models included baseline covariates and adjusted for potential bias introduced by censoring via inverse probability weighting. Results A total of 15 336 individuals initiated an efavirenz regimen (274 deaths, 774 AIDS-defining illnesses) and 8129 individuals initiated a nevirapine regimen (203 deaths, 441 AIDS-defining illnesses). The intention-to-treat hazard ratios [95% confidence interval (CI)] for nevirapine versus efavirenz regimens were 1.59 (1.27, 1.98) for death and 1.28 (1.09, 1.50) for AIDS-defining illness. Individuals on nevirapine regimens experienced a smaller 12-month increase in CD4 cell count by 11.49 cells/μl and were 52% more likely to have virologic failure at 12 months as those on efavirenz regimens. Conclusions Our intention-to-treat estimates are consistent with a lower mortality, a lower incidence of AIDS-defining illness, a larger 12-month increase in CD4 cell count, and a smaller risk of virologic failure at 12 months for efavirenz compared with nevirapine. PMID:22546987

  2. Impact of HIV-1 tropism on the emergence of non-AIDS events in HIV-infected patients receiving fully suppressive antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Maffongelli, Gaetano; Alteri, Claudia; Gentilotti, Elisa; Bertoli, Ada; Ricciardi, Alessandra; Malagnino, Vincenzo; Svicher, Valentina; Santoro, Maria M.; Dori, Luca; Perno, Carlo F.; Andreoni, Massimo; Sarmati, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The impact of HIV-1 tropism on the emergence of non-AIDS events was evaluated in a cohort of 116 antiretroviral therapy (ART) responder patients. Methods: The patients were followed for the emergence of hypertension, renal impairment, metabolic and bone disorders (defined as non-AIDS events) each 8 weeks at standard visits. A V3 plasma sequence genotype analysis was performed at the time of ART initiation and the geno2pheno algorithm with the results that defines the false-positive rate (FPR) was used to infer HIV tropism. The associations between the non-AIDS events and the FPR at baseline were evaluated using the χ2 test for trend. A Cox-regression analysis using the counting process formulation of Andersen and Gill was performed to define whether the emergence of non-AIDS events was correlated to FPR. Results: The prevalence of at least one non-AIDS event resulted higher in patients with a FPR below 10% than in patients with a R5 virus (P = 0.033). Patients with a FPR below 5.0% most frequently developed non-AIDS events during ART (P = 0.01). A higher prevalence of patients with at least two AIDS events was found in the group of patients with a FPR below 5.0% with respect to the others (P < 0.001). At multivariate Cox-regression analysis, having an X4 virus and age were independently associated with a higher probability of non-AIDS event development. Conclusion: This study shows that an X4 virus, particularly a FPR less than 5%, is related to non-AIDS events development. Further studies are warranted to understand the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. PMID:26595543

  3. Keeping kids in care: virological failure in a paediatric antiretroviral clinic and suggestions for improving treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Purchase, Susan; Cunningham, Jayne; Esser, Monika; Skinner, Donald

    2016-09-01

    The burden of paediatric HIV in South Africa is extremely high. Antiretrovirals (ARVs) are now widely accessible in the country and the clinical emphasis has shifted from initiation of treatment to retention in care. This study describes the cumulative virological failure rate amongst children on ARVs in a peri-urban clinic, and suggests ways in which clinics and partners could improve treatment outcomes. The study was conducted by the non-profit organisation HOPE Cape Town Association. A retrospective file audit determined the cumulative virological failure rate, that is, the sum of all children with a viral load >1000 copies/ml, children on monotherapy, children who had stopped treatment, children lost to follow-up (LTFU) and children who had died. Interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 12 staff members and a random sample of 21 caregivers and 4 children attending care. Cumulative virological failure rate was 42%, with most of those children having been LTFU. Both staff and caregivers consistently identified pharmacy queues, ongoing stigma and unpalatable ARVs as barriers to adherence. Staff suggestions included use of adherence aids, and better education and support groups for caregivers. Caregivers also requested support groups, as well as "same day" appointments for caregivers and children, but rejected the idea of home visits. Simple, acceptable and cost-effective strategies exist whereby clinics and their partners could significantly reduce the cumulative virological failure rate in paediatric ARV clinics. These include actively tracing defaulters, improving education, providing support groups, and campaigning for palatable ARV formulations.

  4. Gender-specific risk factors for virologic failure in KwaZulu-Natal: Automobile ownership and financial insecurity

    PubMed Central

    HARE, Anna Q.; ORDÓÑEZ, Claudia E.; JOHNSON, Brent A.; RIO, Carlos DEL; KEARNS, Rachel A.; WU, Baohua; HAMPTON, Jane; WU, Peng; SUNPATH, Henry; MARCONI, Vincent C.

    2014-01-01

    We sought to examine which socioeconomic indicators are risk factors for virologic failure among HIV-1 infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. A case-control study of virologic failure was conducted among patients recruited from the outpatient clinic at McCord Hospital in Durban, South Africa between October 1, 2010 and June 30, 2012. Cases were those failing first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART), defined as viral load > 1000 copies/mL. Univariate logistic regression was performed on sociodemographic data for the outcome of virologic failure. Variables found significant (p<.05) were used in multivariate models and all models were stratified by gender. Of 158 cases and 300 controls, 35% were male and median age was 40 years. Gender stratification of models revealed automobile ownership was a risk factor among males, while variables of financial insecurity (unemployment, non-spouse family paying for care, staying with family) were risk factors for women. In this cohort, financial insecurity among women and automobile ownership among men were risk factors for virologic failure. Risk factor differences between genders demonstrate limitations of generalized risk factor analysis. PMID:25037488

  5. Gender-specific risk factors for virologic failure in KwaZulu-Natal: automobile ownership and financial insecurity.

    PubMed

    Hare, Anna Q; Ordóñez, Claudia E; Johnson, Brent A; Del Rio, Carlos; Kearns, Rachel A; Wu, Baohua; Hampton, Jane; Wu, Peng; Sunpath, Henry; Marconi, Vincent C

    2014-11-01

    We sought to examine which socioeconomic indicators are risk factors for virologic failure among HIV-1 infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. A case-control study of virologic failure was conducted among patients recruited from the outpatient clinic at McCord Hospital in Durban, South Africa between October 1, 2010 and June 30, 2012. Cases were those failing first-line ART, defined as viral load >1,000 copies/mL. Univariate logistic regression was performed on sociodemographic data for the outcome of virologic failure. Variables found significant (p < 0.05) were used in multivariate models and all models were stratified by gender. Of 158 cases and 300 controls, 35 % were male and median age was 40 years. Gender stratification of models revealed automobile ownership was a risk factor among males, while variables of financial insecurity (unemployment, non-spouse family paying for care, staying with family) were risk factors for women. In this cohort, financial insecurity among women and automobile ownership among men were risk factors for virologic failure. Risk factor differences between genders demonstrate limitations of generalized risk factor analysis.

  6. Efavirenz versus boosted atazanavir-containing regimens and immunologic, virologic, and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Lauren E.; Caniglia, Ellen C.; Phillips, Andrew; Olson, Ashley; Muga, Roberto; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Abgrall, Sophie; Costagliola, Dominique; Rubio, Rafael; Jarrín, Inma; Bucher, Heiner; Fehr, Jan; van Sighem, Ard; Reiss, Peter; Dabis, François; Vandenhende, Marie-Anne; Logan, Roger; Robins, James; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.; Justice, Amy; Tate, Janet; Touloumi, Giota; Paparizos, Vasilis; Esteve, Anna; Casabona, Jordi; Seng, Rémonie; Meyer, Laurence; Jose, Sophie; Sabin, Caroline; Hernán, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To compare regimens consisting of either ritonavir-boosted atazanavir or efavirenz and a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) backbone with respect to clinical, immunologic, and virologic outcomes. Design: Prospective studies of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals in Europe and the United States included in the HIV-CAUSAL Collaboration. Methods: HIV-positive, antiretroviral therapy-naive, and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-free individuals were followed from the time they started an atazanavir or efavirenz regimen. We estimated an analog of the “intention-to-treat” effect for efavirenz versus atazanavir regimens on clinical, immunologic, and virologic outcomes with adjustment via inverse probability weighting for time-varying covariates. Results: A total of 4301 individuals started an atazanavir regimen (83 deaths, 157 AIDS-defining illnesses or deaths) and 18,786 individuals started an efavirenz regimen (389 deaths, 825 AIDS-defining illnesses or deaths). During a median follow-up of 31 months, the hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 0.98 (0.77, 1.24) for death and 1.09 (0.91, 1.30) for AIDS-defining illness or death comparing efavirenz with atazanavir regimens. The 5-year survival difference was 0.1% (95% confidence interval: −0.7%, 0.8%) and the AIDS-free survival difference was −0.3% (−1.2%, 0.6%). After 12 months, the mean change in CD4 cell count was 20.8 (95% confidence interval: 13.9, 27.8) cells/mm3 lower and the risk of virologic failure was 20% (14%, 26%) lower in the efavirenz regimens. Conclusion: Our estimates are consistent with a smaller 12-month increase in CD4 cell count, and a smaller risk of virologic failure at 12 months for efavirenz compared with atazanavir regimens. No overall differences could be detected with respect to 5-year survival or AIDS-free survival. PMID:27741139

  7. Immune Compromise in HIV-1/HTLV-1 Coinfection With Paradoxical Resolution of CD4 Lymphocytosis During Antiretroviral Therapy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rockwood, N; Cook, L; Kagdi, H; Basnayake, S; Bangham, C R M; Pozniak, A L; Taylor, G P

    2015-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infections have complex effects on adaptive immunity, with specific tropism for, but contrasting effects on, CD4 T lymphocytes: depletion with HIV-1, proliferation with HTLV-1. Impaired T lymphocyte function occurs early in HIV-1 infection but opportunistic infections (OIs) rarely occur in the absence of CD4 lymphopenia. In the unusual case where a HIV-1 infected individual with a high CD4 count presents with recurrent OIs, a clinician is faced with the possibility of a second underlying comorbidity. We present a case of pseudo-adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in HIV-1/HTLV-1 coinfection where the individual fulfilled Shimoyama criteria for chronic ATLL and had pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii, despite a high CD4 lymphocyte count. However, there was no evidence of clonal T-cell proliferation by T-cell receptor gene rearrangement studies nor of monoclonal HTLV-1 integration by high-throughput sequencing. Mutually beneficial interplay between HIV-1 and HTLV-1, maintaining high level HIV-1 and HTLV-1 viremia and proliferation of poorly functional CD4 cells despite chronicity of infection is a postulated mechanism. Despite good microbiological response to antimycobacterial therapy, the patient remained systemically unwell with refractory anemia. Subsequent initiation of combined antiretroviral therapy led to paradoxical resolution of CD4 T lymphocytosis as well as HIV-1 viral suppression and decreased HTLV-1 proviral load. This is proposed to be the result of attenuation of immune activation post-HIV virological control. This case illustrates the importance of screening for HTLV-1 in HIV-1 patients with appropriate clinical presentation and epidemiological risk factors and explores mechanisms for the complex interactions on HIV-1/HTLV-1 adaptive immunity.

  8. Immune Compromise in HIV-1/HTLV-1 Coinfection With Paradoxical Resolution of CD4 Lymphocytosis During Antiretroviral Therapy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rockwood, N; Cook, L; Kagdi, H; Basnayake, S; Bangham, C R M; Pozniak, A L; Taylor, G P

    2015-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infections have complex effects on adaptive immunity, with specific tropism for, but contrasting effects on, CD4 T lymphocytes: depletion with HIV-1, proliferation with HTLV-1. Impaired T lymphocyte function occurs early in HIV-1 infection but opportunistic infections (OIs) rarely occur in the absence of CD4 lymphopenia. In the unusual case where a HIV-1 infected individual with a high CD4 count presents with recurrent OIs, a clinician is faced with the possibility of a second underlying comorbidity. We present a case of pseudo-adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in HIV-1/HTLV-1 coinfection where the individual fulfilled Shimoyama criteria for chronic ATLL and had pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii, despite a high CD4 lymphocyte count. However, there was no evidence of clonal T-cell proliferation by T-cell receptor gene rearrangement studies nor of monoclonal HTLV-1 integration by high-throughput sequencing. Mutually beneficial interplay between HIV-1 and HTLV-1, maintaining high level HIV-1 and HTLV-1 viremia and proliferation of poorly functional CD4 cells despite chronicity of infection is a postulated mechanism. Despite good microbiological response to antimycobacterial therapy, the patient remained systemically unwell with refractory anemia. Subsequent initiation of combined antiretroviral therapy led to paradoxical resolution of CD4 T lymphocytosis as well as HIV-1 viral suppression and decreased HTLV-1 proviral load. This is proposed to be the result of attenuation of immune activation post-HIV virological control. This case illustrates the importance of screening for HTLV-1 in HIV-1 patients with appropriate clinical presentation and epidemiological risk factors and explores mechanisms for the complex interactions on HIV-1/HTLV-1 adaptive immunity. PMID:26683952

  9. Asymptomatic HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment increases risk for symptomatic decline

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Donald R.; Deutsch, Reena; Woods, Steven P.; Vaida, Florin; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott L.; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Atkinson, J.H.; Collier, Ann C.; Marra, Christina M.; Clifford, David B.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; McArthur, Justin C.; Morgello, Susan; Simpson, David M.; McCutchan, John A.; Abramson, Ian; Gamst, Anthony; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Smith, Davey M.; Heaton, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: While HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remain prevalent despite combination antiretroviral therapy (CART), the clinical relevance of asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment (ANI), the most common HAND diagnosis, remains unclear. We investigated whether HIV-infected persons with ANI were more likely than those who were neurocognitively normal (NCN) to experience a decline in everyday functioning (symptomatic decline). Methods: A total of 347 human participants from the CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) cohort were NCN (n = 226) or had ANI (n = 121) at baseline. Neurocognitive assessments occurred approximately every 6 months, with median (interquartile range) follow-up of 45.2 (28.7–63.7) months. Symptomatic decline was based on self-report (SR) or objective, performance-based (PB) problems in everyday functioning. Proportional hazards modeling was used to generate risk ratios for progression to symptomatic HAND after adjusting for baseline and time-dependent covariates, including CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (CD4), virologic suppression, CART, and mood. Results: The ANI group had a shorter time to symptomatic HAND than the NCN after adjusting for baseline predictors: adjusted risk ratios for symptomatic HAND were 2.0 (confidence interval [CI] 1.1–3.6; p = 0.02) for SR, 5.8 (CI 3.2–10.7; p < 0.0001) for PB, and 3.2 (CI 2.0–5.0; p < 0.0001) for either SR or PB. Current CD4 and depression were significant time-dependent covariates, but antiretroviral regimen, virologic suppression, and substance abuse or dependence were not. Conclusions: This longitudinal study demonstrates that ANI conveys a 2-fold to 6-fold increase in risk for earlier development of symptomatic HAND, supporting the prognostic value of the ANI diagnosis in clinical settings. Identifying those at highest risk for symptomatic decline may offer an opportunity to modify treatment to delay progression. PMID:24814848

  10. Engagement in HIV care and sexual transmission risk behavior among MSM using online social/sexual networking in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Magidson, Jessica F.; Biello, Katie B.; Safren, Steven A.; Rosenberger, Joshua G.; Novak, David S.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    HIV/AIDS in Latin America is concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM). However, accurate estimates of engagement in HIV care in this population can be difficult to ascertain because many do not self-identify as MSM. Given evidence of decreased HIV transmissibility in the context of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, identifying individuals not in care who are engaging in HIV transmission risk behavior is crucial for secondary prevention. Primary aims of this study were to examine engagement in care from testing to ART adherence among MSM using online social/sexual networking across Latin America, and whether individuals not in care at each step reported greater sexual transmission risk behavior than those in care. In the overall sample (n=28,779), approximately 75% reported ever being tested for HIV and 9% reported having received an HIV diagnosis. Among known HIV-infected individuals, 20% reported not being in care, 30% reported not taking ART, and 55% reported less than 100% ART adherence. Over one-third of HIV-infected individuals reported sexual HIV transmission risk behavior, defined as unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) with a male partner of different/unknown HIV serostatus in the past three months. HIV-infected individuals not engaged in care more often reported UAI compared to those in care (OR=1.29; 95%CI=1.01–1.66). Although not statistically significant, HIV-infected individuals not on ART more often reported UAI compared to those on ART (OR=1.18; 95%CI=0.94–1.47). Individuals who reported less than 100% ART adherence more often reported UAI compared to individuals with 100% adherence (OR=1.55; 95%CI=1.26–1.90). Findings demonstrate that a substantial portion of HIV-infected MSM in Latin America who are likely not virologically suppressed from lack of ART use or adherence report sexual HIV transmission risk. Tailoring secondary HIV prevention for MSM in Latin America who are not in HIV care or adherent to ART may be warranted. PMID

  11. Gender Differences in Psychosocial Factors Associated with HIV Viral Suppression Among African-American Injection Drug Users.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Allysha C; Knowlton, Amy R

    2016-02-01

    Research suggests gender differences exist in achieving undetectable viral load (UVL) among persons living with HIV (PLHIV), and that psychosocial health factors may play a role. The present study examined these factors among African-American PLHIV enrolled in the BEACON study. Participants completed self-report surveys and gave biomarker data. Poisson regression with robust standard errors was implemented. Men with moderate religious activity had 1.3 times the likelihood of UVL as men with low religious activity (p < 0.10; N = 199). Men with 1-2 mental illness diagnoses had 1.3 times the likelihood of UVL as men with none (p < 0.05). Women using 1-2 substances had 28 % lower likelihood of UVL than non-using women (N = 122; p < 0.10). Finally, women with frequent doctor-patient communication had 35 % higher likelihood of UVL as women with less doctor-patient communication (p < 0.05). Results suggest that social support, substance use, and mental illness function differently among men and women. Healthcare professionals should employ gender-specific interventions to address and improve HIV health outcomes. PMID:26143248

  12. Gender Differences in Psychosocial Factors Associated with HIV Viral Suppression Among African-American Injection Drug Users.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Allysha C; Knowlton, Amy R

    2016-02-01

    Research suggests gender differences exist in achieving undetectable viral load (UVL) among persons living with HIV (PLHIV), and that psychosocial health factors may play a role. The present study examined these factors among African-American PLHIV enrolled in the BEACON study. Participants completed self-report surveys and gave biomarker data. Poisson regression with robust standard errors was implemented. Men with moderate religious activity had 1.3 times the likelihood of UVL as men with low religious activity (p < 0.10; N = 199). Men with 1-2 mental illness diagnoses had 1.3 times the likelihood of UVL as men with none (p < 0.05). Women using 1-2 substances had 28 % lower likelihood of UVL than non-using women (N = 122; p < 0.10). Finally, women with frequent doctor-patient communication had 35 % higher likelihood of UVL as women with less doctor-patient communication (p < 0.05). Results suggest that social support, substance use, and mental illness function differently among men and women. Healthcare professionals should employ gender-specific interventions to address and improve HIV health outcomes.

  13. Raman spectroscopy: the gateway into tomorrow's virology.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Phelps J; Whitman, Audy G; Dyson, Ossie F; Akula, Shaw M

    2006-06-28

    In the molecular world, researchers act as detectives working hard to unravel the mysteries surrounding cells. One of the researchers' greatest tools in this endeavor has been Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy is a spectroscopic technique that measures the unique Raman spectra for every type of biological molecule. As such, Raman spectroscopy has the potential to provide scientists with a library of spectra that can be used to unravel the makeup of an unknown molecule. However, this technique is limited in that it is not able to manipulate particular structures without disturbing their unique environment. Recently, a novel technology that combines Raman spectroscopy with optical tweezers, termed Raman tweezers, evades this problem due to its ability to manipulate a sample without physical contact. As such, Raman tweezers has the potential to become an incredibly effective diagnostic tool for differentially distinguishing tissue, and therefore holds great promise in the field of virology for distinguishing between various virally infected cells. This review provides an introduction for a virologist into the world of spectroscopy and explores many of the potential applications of Raman tweezers in virology.

  14. Paediatric Virology in the Hippocratic Corpus

    PubMed Central

    Mammas, Ioannis N.; Spandidos, Demetrios A.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocrates (Island of Kos, 460 B.C.-Larissa, 370 B.C.) is the founder of the most famous Medical School of the classical antiquity. In acknowledgement of his pioneering contribution to the new scientific field of Paediatric Virology, this article provides a systematic analysis of the Hippocratic Corpus, with particular focus on viral infections predominating in neonates and children. A mumps epidemic, affecting the island of Thasos in the 5th century B.C., is described in detail. ‘Herpes’, a medical term derived from the ancient Greek word ‘ἕρπειν’, meaning ‘to creep’ or ‘crawl’, is used to describe the spreading of cutaneous lesions in both childhood and adulthood. Cases of children with exanthema ‘resembling mosquito bites’ are presented in reference to varicella or smallpox infection. A variety of upper and lower respiratory tract viral infections are described with impressive accuracy, including rhinitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, laryngitis, bronchiolitis and bronchitis. The ‘cough of Perinthos’ epidemic, an influenza-like outbreak in the 5th century B.C., is also recorded and several cases complicated with pneumonia or fatal outcomes are discussed. Hippocrates, moreover, describes conjunctivitis, otitis, lymphadenitis, meningoencephalitis, febrile convulsions, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, poliomyelitis and skin warts, along with proposed treatment directions. Almost 2,400 years later, Hippocrates' systematic approach and methodical innovations can inspire paediatric trainees and future Paediatric Virology subspecialists. PMID:27446241

  15. Raman spectroscopy: the gateway into tomorrow's virology

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Phelps J; Whitman, Audy G; Dyson, Ossie F; Akula, Shaw M

    2006-01-01

    In the molecular world, researchers act as detectives working hard to unravel the mysteries surrounding cells. One of the researchers' greatest tools in this endeavor has been Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy is a spectroscopic technique that measures the unique Raman spectra for every type of biological molecule. As such, Raman spectroscopy has the potential to provide scientists with a library of spectra that can be used to unravel the makeup of an unknown molecule. However, this technique is limited in that it is not able to manipulate particular structures without disturbing their unique environment. Recently, a novel technology that combines Raman spectroscopy with optical tweezers, termed Raman tweezers, evades this problem due to its ability to manipulate a sample without physical contact. As such, Raman tweezers has the potential to become an incredibly effective diagnostic tool for differentially distinguishing tissue, and therefore holds great promise in the field of virology for distinguishing between various virally infected cells. This review provides an introduction for a virologist into the world of spectroscopy and explores many of the potential applications of Raman tweezers in virology. PMID:16805914

  16. Synthetic virology: engineering viruses for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Caitlin M; Kuypers, Brianna E; Lam, Michael T; Robinson, Tawana M; Zhao, Julia; Suh, Junghae

    2014-01-01

    The success of gene therapy relies heavily on the performance of vectors that can effectively deliver transgenes to desired cell populations. As viruses have evolved to deliver genetic material into cells, a prolific area of research has emerged over the last several decades to leverage the innate properties of viruses as well as to engineer new features into them. Specifically, the field of synthetic virology aims to capitalize on knowledge accrued from fundamental virology research in order to design functionally enhanced gene delivery vectors. The enhanced viral vectors, or 'bionic' viruses, feature engineered components, or 'parts', that are natural (intrinsic to viruses or from other organisms) and synthetic (such as man-made polymers or inorganic nanoparticles). Various design strategies--rational, combinatorial, and pseudo-rational--have been pursued to create the hybrid viruses. The gene delivery vectors of the future will likely criss-cross the boundaries between natural and synthetic domains to harness the unique strengths afforded by the various functional parts that can be grafted onto virus capsids. Such research endeavors will further expand and enable enhanced control over the functional capacity of these nanoscale devices for biomedicine.

  17. Synthetic Virology: Engineering Viruses for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Guenther, Caitlin M.; Kuypers, Brianna E.; Lam, Michael T.; Robinson, Tawana M.; Zhao, Julia; Suh, Junghae

    2014-01-01

    The success of gene therapy relies heavily on the performance of vectors that can effectively deliver transgenes to desired cell populations. As viruses have evolved to deliver genetic material into cells, a prolific area of research has emerged over the last several decades to leverage the innate properties of viruses as well as to engineer new features into them. Specifically, the field of synthetic virology aims to capitalize on knowledge accrued from fundamental virology research in order to design functionally enhanced gene delivery vectors. The enhanced viral vectors, or “bionic” viruses, feature engineered components, or “parts”, that are natural (intrinsic to viruses or from other organisms) and synthetic (such as man-made polymers or inorganic nanoparticles). Various design strategies – rational, combinatorial, and pseudo-rational – have been pursued to create the hybrid viruses. The gene delivery vectors of the future will likely criss-cross the boundaries between natural and synthetic domains to harness the unique strengths afforded by the various functional parts that can be grafted onto virus capsids. Such research endeavours will further expand and enable enhanced control over the functional capacity of these nanoscale devices for biomedicine. PMID:25195922

  18. Transgender women, hormonal therapy and HIV treatment: a comprehensive review of the literature and recommendations for best practices

    PubMed Central

    Radix, Asa; Sevelius, Jae; Deutsch, Madeline B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Studies have shown that transgender women (TGW) are disproportionately affected by HIV, with an estimated HIV prevalence of 19.1% among TGW worldwide. After receiving a diagnosis, HIV-positive TGW have challenges accessing effective HIV treatment, as demonstrated by lower rates of virologic suppression and higher HIV-related mortality. These adverse HIV outcomes have been attributed to the multiple sociocultural and structural barriers that negatively affect their engagement within the HIV care continuum. Guidelines for feminizing hormonal therapy among TGW recommend combinations of oestrogens and androgen blockers. Pharmacokinetic studies have shown that certain antiretroviral therapy (ART) agents, such as protease inhibitors (PIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) and cobicistat, interact with ethinyl estradiol, the key oestrogen component of oral contraceptives (OCPs). The goal of this article is to provide an overview of hormonal regimens used by TGW, to summarize the known drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between feminizing hormonal regimens and ART, and to provide clinical care recommendations. Methods The authors identified English language articles examining DDIs between oestrogen therapy, androgen blockers and ART published between 1995 and 2015 using PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature and EBSCOhost. Results and Discussion Published articles predominantly addressed interactions between ethinyl estradiol and NNRTIs and PIs. No studies examined interactions between ART and the types and doses of oestrogens found in feminizing regimens. DDIs that may have the potential to result in loss of virologic suppression included ethinyl estradiol and amprenavir, unboosted fosamprenavir and stavudine. No clinically significant DDIs were noted with other anti-retroviral agents or androgen blockers Conclusions There are insufficient data to address DDIs between ART and feminizing hormone regimens used by TGW

  19. Predicting virological decay in patients starting combination antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Model trajectories of viral load measurements from time of starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), and use the model to predict whether patients will achieve suppressed viral load (≤200 copies/ml) within 6-months of starting cART. Design: Prospective cohort study including HIV-positive adults (UK Collaborative HIV Cohort Study). Methods: Eligible patients were antiretroviral naive and started cART after 1997. Random effects models were used to estimate viral load trends. Patients were randomly selected to form a validation dataset with those remaining used to fit the model. We evaluated predictions of suppression using indices of diagnostic test performance. Results: Of 9562 eligible patients 6435 were used to fit the model and 3127 for validation. Mean log10 viral load trajectories declined rapidly during the first 2 weeks post-cART, moderately between 2 weeks and 3 months, and more slowly thereafter. Higher pretreatment viral load predicted steeper declines, whereas older age, white ethnicity, and boosted protease inhibitor/non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors based cART-regimen predicted a steeper decline from 3 months onwards. Specificity of predictions and the diagnostic odds ratio substantially improved when predictions were based on viral load measurements up to the 4-month visit compared with the 2 or 3-month visits. Diagnostic performance improved when suppression was defined by two consecutive suppressed viral loads compared with one. Conclusions: Viral load measurements can be used to predict if a patient will be suppressed by 6-month post-cART. Graphical presentations of this information could help clinicians decide the optimum time to switch treatment regimen during the first months of cART. PMID:27124894

  20. Discordant responses to cART in HIV-1 patients in the era of high potency antiretroviral drugs: clinical evaluation, classification, management prospects.

    PubMed

    Cenderello, Giovanni; De Maria, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The goal of antiretroviral treatment (ART) in HIV-1 patients is immune reconstitution following control of viral replication. CD4+ cell number/proportions are a crude but essential correlate of immune reconstitution. Despite suppression of HIV replication, a fraction of ART-treated patients still fails to fully reconstitute CD4+ T cell numbers (immunological nonresponders, INRs). New drugs, regimens and treatment strategies led to increased efficacy, lower side effects and higher virological success rates in clinical practice. The multitude of described immune defects and clinical events accompanying INR opposed to the marginal effect of antiretroviral intensification or immunotherapy trials underline the need for continuing efforts at understanding the mechanisms that underlie INR. Here, we reassess INR definition, frequency, and the achievements of active clinical and translational research suggesting a shared definition for insufficient, partial and complete CD4+ cell number recovery thus improving homogeneity in patient selection and mechanism identification.

  1. Overview of HIV.

    PubMed

    Klimas, Nancy; Koneru, Anne O'Brien; Fletcher, Mary Ann

    2008-06-01

    This article provides an overview and reviews the HIV pandemic, the basic biology and immunology of the virus (e.g., genetic diversity of HIV and the viral life cycle), the phases of disease progression, modes of HIV transmission, HIV testing, immune response to the infection, and current therapeutic strategies. HIV is occurring in epidemic proportions, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. In the US, men who have sex with men account for over half of AIDS diagnoses; racial and ethnic minorities are disproportionally affected. Factors influencing the progression and severity of HIV infection include type of immune response, coinfection (e.g., another sexually transmitted infection, including hepatitis B or C), age and behavioral and psychosocial factors. Antiretroviral therapies can achieve reduction in blood levels of the HIV virus below the limits of detection by current technology. However, effective treatment requires adherence to therapy. Patient failure to adhere to treatment regimens results in detectible circulating virus and in HIV disease progression, and is the primary cause of drug resistance. In addition to research on the immunology and virology of the disease, other studies focus on behavioral and psychosocial factors that may affect medication adherence and risk behaviors. PMID:18541903

  2. Update and New Directions in Therapeutics for Neurological Complications of HIV Infections.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Ronald; Letendre, Scott L

    2016-07-01

    The pace of therapeutic developments in HIV presents unique challenges to the neurologist caring for patients. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is remarkably effective in suppressing viral replication, preventing, and often even reversing disease progression. Still, not every patient benefits from cART for a variety of reasons, ranging from the cost of therapy and the burden of lifelong daily treatment to side effects and inadequate access to medical care. Treatment failure inevitably leads to disease progression and opportunistic complications. Many of these complications, even those that are treatable, produce permanent neurological disability. With ART, immune recovery itself may paradoxically lead to severe neurological disease; strategies for managing so-called immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome are beginning to show benefits. Effective cART may nevertheless leave in its wake persistent neurocognitive impairment. Treatments for persistent impairment despite virologic suppression and good immune recovery are being tested but are not yet proven. As we shall see, these treatments target several proposed mechanisms including cerebral small vessel disease, which is highly prevalent in HIV. Most recently, an ambitious initiative has been undertaken to develop interventions to eradicate HIV. This will require elimination of all infectious forms of viral nucleic acid throughout the body. The influence of these interventions on the brain remains to be characterized. Meanwhile, clinical investigators continue to develop antiretroviral treatments that optimize effectiveness, convenience, and tolerability, while minimizing long-term toxicities. PMID:27383150

  3. Glucose Metabolism in T Cells and Monocytes: New Perspectives in HIV Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Clovis S.; Cherry, Catherine L.; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Singh, Amit; Crowe, Suzanne M.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the immune system occurs in response to the recognition of foreign antigens and receipt of optimal stimulatory signals by immune cells, a process that requires energy. Energy is also needed to support cellular growth, differentiation, proliferation, and effector functions of immune cells. In HIV-infected individuals, persistent viral replication, together with inflammatory stimuli contributes to chronic immune activation and oxidative stress. These conditions remain even in subjects with sustained virologic suppression on antiretroviral therapy. Here we highlight recent studies demonstrating the importance of metabolic pathways, particularly those involving glucose metabolism, in differentiation and maintenance of the activation states of T cells and monocytes. We also discuss how changes in the metabolic status of these cells may contribute to ongoing immune activation and inflammation in HIV- infected persons and how this may contribute to disease progression, establishment and persistence of the HIV reservoir, and the development of co-morbidities. We provide evidence that other viruses such as Epstein–Barr and Flu virus also disrupt the metabolic machinery of their host cells. Finally, we discuss how redox signaling mediated by oxidative stress may regulate metabolic responses in T cells and monocytes during HIV infection. PMID:27211546

  4. Total quality management in clinical virology laboratories.

    PubMed

    Tibbets, M W; Gomez, R; Kannangai, R; Sridharan, G

    2006-10-01

    The diagnostic laboratories in India are progressively promoting higher standards and are moving towards accreditation and international acceptance. Hence, the concept of "Quality" will need to be understood and implemented. Total quality management (TQM) in a laboratory is an integrated program involving all laboratory staff and management. TQM is a framework to operate and it is aiming for integration, consistency, increase in efficiency and a continuous drive for improvement. A well structured clinical virology service will include serology setup, cell culture facility and capacity for molecular diagnosis. The quality of results from the laboratory is significantly influenced by many pre-analytical and post-analytical factors which needed attention. The end goal of the TQM should be to provide the best care possible for the patient.

  5. Aptamers in virology: recent advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Binning, Jennifer M; Leung, Daisy W; Amarasinghe, Gaya K

    2012-01-01

    Aptamers generated from randomized libraries of nucleic acids have found utility in a wide variety of fields and in the clinic. Aptamers can be used to target both intracellular and extracellular components, including small molecules, proteins, cells, and viruses. With recent technological developments in stringent selection and rapid isolation strategies, it is likely that aptamers will continue to make an impact as useful tools and reagents. Although many recently developed aptamers are intended for use as therapeutic and diagnostic agents, use of aptamers for basic research, including target validation, remains an active area with high potential to impact our understanding of molecular mechanisms and for drug discovery. In this brief review, we will discuss recent aptamer discoveries, their potential role in structural virology, as well as challenges and future prospects.

  6. Factors associated with high transmission risk and detectable plasma HIV RNA in HIV-infected MSM on ART.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Jill; Haubrich, Richard; Jain, Sonia; Sun, Xiaoying; Dube, Michael; Daar, Eric; Milam, Joel; Morris, Sheldon

    2014-09-01

    Summary HIV transmission risk is increased during antiretroviral therapy (ART) use if individuals are not virologically suppressed and engage in high risk transmission behaviour. Baseline data of HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) with recent history of risky behaviour on ART for ≥3 months (n = 139) were evaluated to assess predictors of detectable viraemia and HIV transmission risk-taking behaviour. Twenty-four subjects had viral load (VL) >75 copies/mL and 12 had VL >1000 copies/mL. In multivariable regression analyses, subjects with VL >75 copies/mL were more likely to be Black (OR = 4.48, p = 0.007), have lower CD4 cell counts (OR = 0.727, p = 0.005) and have used methamphetamines in the last month (OR = 6.64, p = 0.019). Subjects with VL >1000 copies/mL were more likely to have lower CD4 cell counts (OR = 0.494, p = 0.004), report <90% adherence (OR = 7.94; p = 0.046) and have used methamphetamines in the last month (OR = 10.01, p = 0.034). Subjects with VL >75 copies/mL with the greatest transmission risk behaviour (n = 14) were more likely to be Black (OR = 8.00, p = 0.006), have lower CD4 cell counts (OR = 0.657, p = 0.009) and have used methamphetamines in the last month (OR = 5.20, p = 0.042). High risk HIV transmission behaviour with viraemia occurred in 10% of the cohort. Future efforts to reduce HIV transmission among MSM on ART will require combined interventions that target risk-taking behaviours and substance use.

  7. Discordance between peripheral and colonic markers of inflammation during suppressive ART

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, Richard M.; Vujkovic-Cvijin, Ivan; Yukl, Steven A.; Broadhurst, Mara J.; Loke, P’ng; Albright, Rebecca G.; Wong, Joseph K.; Lederman, Michael M.; Somsouk, Ma; Hunt, Peter W.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; McCune, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Persistent systemic inflammation is associated with the inability of some HIV-infected patients to normalize circulating CD4+ T-cell levels after years of suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). In this work, we sought to understand whether such systemic inflammation is also associated with detectable signs of inflammation in biopsies from the rectosigmoid colon. Design Immunologic and virologic parameters were studied in in the peripheral blood and in rectosigmoid colon biopsies from individuals with viral suppression for at least two years and with peripheral CD4+ T-cell levels <350 cell/mm3 (immunologic nonresponders, n=18) or >500 cell/mm3 (immunologic responders, n=16). Methods Peripheral blood and rectosigmoid colon biopsies were analyzed by flow cytometry, ELISA, and quantitative PCR. Results Non-responders had elevated T-cell activation and inflammatory cytokines in the circulation, but inflammatory gene expression in colon biopsies was not different as compared to responders and there was little relationship between blood and colon markers of inflammation. Blood inflammatory markers were positively associated with sCD14 levels indicative of monocyte activation. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that, in the context of treated HIV disease, it is easier to detect parameters of inflammation (including blood monocyte activation) in the peripheral blood than in isolated rectosigmoid colon biopsies. Accordingly, interventions to block such inflammation in this population might be most conveniently and accurately assessed in blood. PMID:24121758

  8. Optimizing treatment outcomes in HIV-infected patients with substance abuse issues.

    PubMed

    Celentano, David D; Lucas, Greg

    2007-12-15

    Drug abuse is associated with poorer virologic and clinical outcomes for patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Limited evidence, primarily from in vitro and animal studies, shows that some abused drugs (e.g., opioids) may have direct effects on HIV pathology and the immune response to infection, but the clinical effects are not known. Clinical data indicate that the primary effect of drug abuse on HIV disease progression is mediated via factors that may limit access and/or adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Drug abuse is associated with reduced adherence to HAART, which is strongly correlated with poorer virologic and clinical outcomes. However, the virologic and clinical effects of HAART are generally equivalent among drug abusers and non-drug abusers who adhere to therapy. These results underscore the importance of integrating medical and substance abuse interventions for HIV-positive drug abusers, to improve adherence to HAART and optimize outcomes of treatment for HIV infection.

  9. Characterizing Class-Specific Exposure-Viral Load Suppression Response of HIV Antiretrovirals Using A Model-Based Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Li, Y F; Zhang, D; Dockendorf, M; Tetteh, E; Rizk, M L; Grobler, J A; Lai, M-T; Gobburu, J; Ankrom, W

    2016-08-01

    We applied model-based meta-analysis of viral suppression as a function of drug exposure and in vitro potency for short-term monotherapy in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected treatment-naïve patients to set pharmacokinetic targets for development of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) and integrase strand transfer inhibitors (InSTIs). We developed class-specific models relating viral load kinetics from monotherapy studies to potency normalized steady-state trough plasma concentrations. These models were integrated with a literature assessment of doses which demonstrated to have long-term efficacy in combination therapy, in order to set steady-state trough concentration targets of 6.17- and 2.15-fold above potency for NNRTIs and InSTIs, respectively. Both the models developed and the pharmacokinetic targets derived can be used to guide compound selection during preclinical development and to predict the dose-response of new antiretrovirals to inform early clinical trial design. PMID:27171172

  10. TB-HIV co-infection: a catastrophic comradeship.

    PubMed

    Narendran, G; Swaminathan, S

    2016-04-01

    The symbiotic association of tuberculosis (TB) and HIV poses a challenge to human survival. HIV complicates every aspect of TB including presentation, diagnosis and treatment. HIV-TB patients encounter unique problems like drug-drug interactions, cumulative toxicity, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), lower plasma drug levels and emergence of drug resistance during treatment despite adherence. TB may also be overdiagnosed in HIV due to a number of diseases that closely resemble TB. Notable among them are non-tuberculous mycobacteria, Pneumocystis Jirovecii and Nocardia. Even though diagnostic procedures have improved over the years, patients in developing countries usually seek health care at later stage of the disease. Research data ascertains the duration of therapy for TB to be 6 months with rifampicin and isoniazid, reinforced with ethambutol and pyrazinamide in the first 2 months. The schedule of therapy is still debatable with daily regimens being preferred in the context of HIV. Many reasons exist for persistence of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis (M.TB) in sputum, or delayed-clearance of TB from sputum smears in HIV, apart from emergence of drug resistance and non-compliance. Acquired rifampicin resistance (ARR) is a unique phenomenon complicating HIV-associated TB when an intermittent regimen of antituberculosis therapy (ATT) is used without timely initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), especially in patients harbouring isoniazid-resistant strains Immune restoration is often incomplete ('swiss cheese' pattern) even with effective HAART if not started early. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is the paradoxical worsening of the patient's condition often with radiological deterioration, due to an enhanced immune response with HAART. IRIS occurs despite an effective virological suppression and a favourable response to ATT. The incidence of IRIS in HIV has reached up to 54%, requiring utilization of experts

  11. TB-HIV co-infection: a catastrophic comradeship.

    PubMed

    Narendran, G; Swaminathan, S

    2016-04-01

    The symbiotic association of tuberculosis (TB) and HIV poses a challenge to human survival. HIV complicates every aspect of TB including presentation, diagnosis and treatment. HIV-TB patients encounter unique problems like drug-drug interactions, cumulative toxicity, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), lower plasma drug levels and emergence of drug resistance during treatment despite adherence. TB may also be overdiagnosed in HIV due to a number of diseases that closely resemble TB. Notable among them are non-tuberculous mycobacteria, Pneumocystis Jirovecii and Nocardia. Even though diagnostic procedures have improved over the years, patients in developing countries usually seek health care at later stage of the disease. Research data ascertains the duration of therapy for TB to be 6 months with rifampicin and isoniazid, reinforced with ethambutol and pyrazinamide in the first 2 months. The schedule of therapy is still debatable with daily regimens being preferred in the context of HIV. Many reasons exist for persistence of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis (M.TB) in sputum, or delayed-clearance of TB from sputum smears in HIV, apart from emergence of drug resistance and non-compliance. Acquired rifampicin resistance (ARR) is a unique phenomenon complicating HIV-associated TB when an intermittent regimen of antituberculosis therapy (ATT) is used without timely initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), especially in patients harbouring isoniazid-resistant strains Immune restoration is often incomplete ('swiss cheese' pattern) even with effective HAART if not started early. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is the paradoxical worsening of the patient's condition often with radiological deterioration, due to an enhanced immune response with HAART. IRIS occurs despite an effective virological suppression and a favourable response to ATT. The incidence of IRIS in HIV has reached up to 54%, requiring utilization of experts

  12. Simultaneous ultrasensitive subpopulation staining/hybridization in situ (SUSHI) in HIV-1 disease monitoring.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Bruce K

    2010-01-01

    The field of virology is undergoing a revolution as diagnostic tests and new therapies are allowing clinicians to treat, monitor, and predict outcomes of viral diseases. The majority of these techniques, however, destroy the factory of viral production and the information inherent in the reservoir - the cell. In this chapter, we describe a technique that combines cell surface immunophenotyping (to unequivocally identify cell types) and ultrasensitive fluorescence in situ hybridization (U-FISH) for HIV-1 to detect productively infected cells. Identification of virus and host (cells) allows earlier detection of changes in viral production and viral suppression but most importantly allows clinicians to monitor response to anti-viral therapy on a cell-by-cell and tissue-by-tissue basis taking into account the fact that the human body consists of very different, distinct compartments with unique selection pressures exerted on the viral life cycle.

  13. Engagement in HIV care and sexual transmission risk behavior among men who have sex with men using online social/sexual networking in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Magidson, Jessica F; Biello, Katie B; Safren, Steven A; Rosenberger, Joshua G; Novak, David S; Mayer, Kenneth H; Mimiaga, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    HIV/AIDS in Latin America is concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM). However, accurate estimates of engagement in HIV care in this population can be difficult to ascertain because many do not self-identify as MSM. Given evidence of decreased HIV transmissibility in the context of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, identifying individuals not in care who are engaging in HIV transmission risk behavior is crucial for secondary prevention. Primary aims of this study were to examine engagement in care from testing to ART adherence among MSM using online social/sexual networking across Latin America, and whether individuals not in care at each step reported greater sexual transmission risk behavior than those in care. In the overall sample (n=28,779), approximately 75% reported ever being tested for HIV, and 9% reported having received an HIV diagnosis. Among known HIV-infected individuals, 20% reported not being in care, 30% reported not taking ART, and 55% reported less than 100% ART adherence. Over one-third of HIV-infected individuals reported sexual HIV transmission risk behavior, defined as unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) with a male partner of different/unknown HIV serostatus in the past three months. HIV-infected individuals not engaged in care more often reported UAI compared to those in care (OR=1.29; 95% CI=1.01-1.66). Although not statistically significant, HIV-infected individuals not on ART more often reported UAI compared to those on ART (OR=1.18; 95% CI=0.94-1.47). Individuals who reported less than 100% ART adherence more often reported UAI compared to individuals with 100% adherence (OR=1.55; 95% CI=1.26-1.90). Findings demonstrate that a substantial portion of HIV-infected MSM in Latin America who are likely not virologically suppressed from lack of ART use or adherence report sexual HIV transmission risk. Tailoring secondary HIV prevention for MSM in Latin America who are not in HIV care or adherent to ART may be warranted.

  14. Occurrence of etravirine/rilpivirine-specific resistance mutations selected by efavirenz and nevirapine in Kenyan patients with non-B HIV-1 subtypes failing antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Keith W; Njeru, Dorothy; Maswai, Jonah; Omondi, Milton; Apollo, Duncan; Kimetto, Jane; Gitonga, Lawrence; Munyao, James; Langat, Raphael; Aoko, Appolonia; Tarus, Jemutai; Khamadi, Samoel; Hamm, Tiffany E

    2014-01-28

    Resistance to efavirenz and nevirapine has not been associated with mutations at position 138 of reverse transcriptase. In an evaluation of virologic suppression rates in PEPFAR (President's Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief) clinics in Kenya among patients on first-line therapy (RV288), 63% (617/975) of randomly selected patients on antiretroviral therapy were suppressed (HIV RNA<400 copies/ml). Among those with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance (n = 101), 14 (13.8%) had substitutions at 138 (A, G, K or Q), mutations selected only by etravirine and rilpivirine in subtype B viruses. All 14 patients received efavirenz or nevirapine, not etravirine or rilpivirine, and were predominantly subtype A1. This may be the first report of efavirenz and nevirapine selecting these mutations in these subtypes. PMID:24670527

  15. Occurrence of etravirine/rilpivirine-specific resistance mutations selected by efavirenz and nevirapine in Kenyan patients with non-B HIV-1 subtypes failing antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Keith W; Njeru, Dorothy; Maswai, Jonah; Omondi, Milton; Apollo, Duncan; Kimetto, Jane; Gitonga, Lawrence; Munyao, James; Langat, Raphael; Aoko, Appolonia; Tarus, Jemutai; Khamadi, Samoel; Hamm, Tiffany E

    2014-01-28

    Resistance to efavirenz and nevirapine has not been associated with mutations at position 138 of reverse transcriptase. In an evaluation of virologic suppression rates in PEPFAR (President's Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief) clinics in Kenya among patients on first-line therapy (RV288), 63% (617/975) of randomly selected patients on antiretroviral therapy were suppressed (HIV RNA<400 copies/ml). Among those with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance (n = 101), 14 (13.8%) had substitutions at 138 (A, G, K or Q), mutations selected only by etravirine and rilpivirine in subtype B viruses. All 14 patients received efavirenz or nevirapine, not etravirine or rilpivirine, and were predominantly subtype A1. This may be the first report of efavirenz and nevirapine selecting these mutations in these subtypes.

  16. Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Günthard, Huldrych F.; Saag, Michael S.; Benson, Constance A.; del Rio, Carlos; Eron, Joseph J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Sax, Paul E.; Thompson, Melanie A.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Landovitz, Raphael J.; Smith, Davey M.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE New data and therapeutic options warrant updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to treat or to prevent HIV infection in adults. OBJECTIVE To provide updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral therapy in adults (aged ≥18 years) with established HIV infection, including when to start treatment, initial regimens, and changing regimens, along with recommendations for using ARVs for preventing HIV among those at risk, including preexposure and postexposure prophylaxis. EVIDENCE REVIEW A panel of experts in HIV research and patient care convened by the International Antiviral Society-USA reviewed data published in peer-reviewed journals, presented by regulatory agencies, or presented as conference abstracts at peer-reviewed scientific conferences since the 2014 report, for new data or evidence that would change previous recommendations or their ratings. Comprehensive literature searches were conducted in the PubMed and EMBASE databases through April 2016. Recommendations were by consensus, and each recommendation was rated by strength and quality of the evidence. FINDINGS Newer data support the widely accepted recommendation that antiretroviral therapy should be started in all individuals with HIV infection with detectable viremia regardless of CD4 cell count. Recommended optimal initial regimens for most patients are 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (InSTI). Other effective regimens include nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or boosted protease inhibitors with 2 NRTIs. Recommendations for special populations and in the settings of opportunistic infections and concomitant conditions are provided. Reasons for switching therapy include convenience, tolerability, simplification, anticipation of potential new drug interactions, pregnancy or plans for pregnancy, elimination of food restrictions, virologic failure, or drug toxicities. Laboratory

  17. Profile of cabotegravir and its potential in the treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection: evidence to date

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Thomas; Torkington, Adele; van Halsema, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Modern antiretroviral therapy has demonstrated effectiveness in preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and treatment of HIV infection. There is a demand for prevention and treatment regimens that could overcome challenges of improving adherence, toxicity, and dosing convenience. Cabotegravir is an integrase strand transfer inhibitor and an analog of dolutegravir. Unlike dolutegravir, cabotegravir has a long half-life and can be formulated into a long-acting nanosuspension for parenteral administration. Initial pharmokinetic studies in humans have demonstrated adequate drug levels with intramuscular (IM) administration at 4 weekly and 8 weekly intervals, with few interactions with commonly used concomitant medications. Preliminary animal PrEP studies have shown that IM cabotegravir can prevent simian/HIV acquisition from rectal, vaginal, and intravenous challenge. Currently, there are two ongoing Phase II studies assessing cabotegravir as a PrEP agent in humans: ÉCLAIR and HPTN077. Cabotegravir has been studied in combination with rilpivirine as long-acting IM maintenance therapy. The Long-Acting Antiretroviral Treatment Enabling study demonstrated that those switching to oral cabotegravir/rilpivirine once virologically suppressed were more likely to maintain suppression than those continuing standard efavirenz-based therapy (82% vs 71% at 24 weeks). Initial results of the Long-Acting Antiretroviral Treatment Enabling-2 study of parenteral regimens found that 12 weeks after randomization to parenteral or oral regimens, there was no difference in proportions virologically suppressed on cabotegravir/rilpivirine daily orally vs IM every 4 weeks or 8 weeks (91% vs 94% vs 95%). The injections were well tolerated as, although they caused injection site pain in most recipients, most participants reported satisfaction with parenteral therapy. Cabotegravir offers a new member of the integrase strand transfer inhibitor class with potential for alternative mode of delivery. We await

  18. Significance and clinical management of persistent low-level viremia and very-low-level viremia in HIV-1-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Ryscavage, Patrick; Kelly, Sean; Li, Jonathan Z; Harrigan, P Richard; Taiwo, Babafemi

    2014-07-01

    A goal of HIV therapy is to sustain suppression of the plasma viral load below the detection limits of clinical assays. However, widely followed treatment guidelines diverge in their interpretation and recommended management of persistent viremia of low magnitude, reflecting the limited evidence base for this common clinical finding. Here, we review the incidence, risk factors, and potential consequences of low-level HIV viremia (LLV; defined in this review as a viremia level of 50 to 500 copies/ml) and very-low-level viremia (VLLV; defined as a viremia level of <50 copies/ml detected by clinical assays that have quantification cutoffs of <50 copies/ml). Using this framework, we discuss practical issues related to the diagnosis and management of patients experiencing persistent LLV and VLLV. Compared to viral suppression at <50 or 40 copies/ml, persistent LLV is associated with increased risk of antiretroviral drug resistance and overt virologic failure. Higher immune activation and HIV transmission may be additional undesirable consequences in this population. It is uncertain whether LLV of <200 copies/ml confers independent risks, as this level of viremia may reflect assay-dependent artifacts or biologically meaningful events during suppression. Resistance genotyping should be considered in patients with persistent LLV when feasible, and treatment should be modified if resistance is detected. There is a dearth of clinical evidence to guide management when genotyping is not feasible. Increased availability of genotypic assays for samples with viral loads of <400 copies/ml is needed.

  19. Verification and validation of diagnostic laboratory tests in clinical virology.

    PubMed

    Rabenau, Holger F; Kessler, Harald H; Kortenbusch, Marhild; Steinhorst, Andreas; Raggam, Reinhard B; Berger, Annemarie

    2007-10-01

    This review summarizes major issues of verification and validation procedures and describes minimum requirements for verification and validation of diagnostic assays in clinical virology including instructions for CE/IVD-labeled as well as for self-developed ("home-brewed") tests or test systems. It covers techniques useful for detection of virus specific antibodies, for detection of viral antigens, for detection of viral nucleic acids, and for isolation of viruses on cell cultures in the routine virology laboratory.

  20. Central nervous system HIV infection in "less-drug regimen" antiretroviral therapy simplification strategies.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Francesca; Gianotti, Nicola; Lazzarin, Adriano; Cinque, Paola

    2014-02-01

    Less-drug regimens (LDR) refer to combinations of either two antiretroviral drugs or ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (PI) monotherapy. They may represent a simplification strategy in patients with persistently suppressed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viremia, with the main benefits of reducing drug-related toxicities and costs. Systemic virological efficacy of LDR is slightly lower as compared with combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), but patients with failure do not usually develop drug resistance and resuppress HIV replication after reintensification. A major concern of LDR is the lower efficacy in the virus reservoirs, especially in the central nervous system (CNS), where viral compartmentalization and independent evolution of infection may lead to CNS viral escape, often associated with neurologic symptoms. The authors reviewed studies of virological and functional CNS efficacy of LDR, particularly of boosted PI monotherapy regimens, for which more information is available. Symptomatic viral CSF escape was observed mainly in PI/r monotherapy patients with plasma failure and low nadir CD4+ cell counts, and resolved upon reintroduction of triple drug cART, whereas asymptomatic viral failure in CSF was not significantly more frequent in patients on PI/r monotherapy compared with patients on standard cART. In addition, there was no difference in functional outcomes between PI monotherapy and cART patients, irrespective of CSF viral escape. More data are needed on the CNS effect of dual ART regimens and, in general, on long-term efficacy of LDR. Simplification with LDR may be an attractive option in patients with suppressed viral load, if they are well selected and monitored for potential CNS complications.

  1. A Case Cluster Demonstrating the Relationship between HLA Concordance and Virologic and Disease Outcomes in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chaillon, A.; Gianella, S.; Luna, M. Massanella; Little, S.J.; Richman, D.D.; Mehta, S.R.

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of sexual HIV transmission from one source partner to two recipients. The HLA haplotypes between the source partner and one recipient were very similar with 7 out of 8 HLA alleles from four loci (HLA A, B C and DRB) shared, while the other recipient shared only one allele. The immunologic outcomes between the two recipients differed dramatically, despite the absence of apparent virologic differences in their inoculums. We suggest that non-viral factors, which might be related to differences in the HLA profile, played a role in determining different CD4+ T-cells dynamics for these two recipients. PMID:24418543

  2. Evaluation of patient care cascade for HIV-positive patients diagnosed in La Romana, Dominican Republic in 2011: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Alex S; Lerebours, Leonel; Amesty, Silvia; de la Rosa, Milagros; Gil, Elizabeth; Halpern, Mina; Nicholas, Stephen; Lamb, Matthew R

    2016-04-01

    The Caribbean has the highest adult HIV prevalence in the world after sub-Saharan Africa (2011). One sub-population in the Dominican Republic is the migratory Batey community primarily comprised of Haitian immigrants with limited access to healthcare and HIV prevalence rates of between 3.0% and 9.0%, compared to 0.7% nationally. This retrospective cohort study describes the cumulative retention from diagnosis to virological suppression for newly-diagnosed HIV-infected adults presenting to the Clínica de Familia and its Batey programme in La Romana, during 2011. Of the patients diagnosed with HIV, 65% entered into care, 59% completed immunologic testing, 53% were eligible for antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation, 36% initiated ART within three months of eligibility and 27% were retained in care. Seventeen per cent of those retained on ART with a 12-month viral load measure had undetectable viral load. Attrition primarily occurred before ART initiation. The Batey programme had a first step lost-to-follow-up of 88% compared to 20% at the clinic (p < 0.001). This retrospective study details the continuum of care and indicates where structural changes must occur to increase continuity between steps. The manuscript results are important to help implement programmes to enhance engagement and retention in HIV primary care.

  3. Switch to Rilpivirine/Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Single-Tablet Regimen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 RNA-Suppressed Patients, Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA et les Hépatites Virales CO3 Aquitaine Cohort, 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    Cazanave, Charles; Reigadas, Sandrine; Mazubert, Cyril; Bellecave, Pantxika; Hessamfar, Mojgan; Le Marec, Fabien; Lazaro, Estibaliz; Peytavin, Gilles; Bruyand, Mathias; Fleury, Hervé; Dabis, François; Neau, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Background.  The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 virologically suppressed patients who switched to rilpivirine (RPV)/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)/emtricitabine (FTC) as a single-tablet regimen (STR). Methods.  A retrospective multicenter cohort study was performed between September 2012 and February 2014 in Bordeaux University Hospital-affiliated clinics. Patients with a plasma HIV viral load (VL) lower than 50 copies/mL and switching to STR were evaluated at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months from switch time (M3, M6, M9, M12) for VL and other biological parameters. Change from baseline in CD4 cell counts was evaluated at M6 and M12. Virological failure (VF) was defined as 2 consecutive VL >50 copies/mL. Results.  Three hundred four patients were included in the analysis. Single-tablet regimen switch was proposed to 116 patients with adverse events, mostly efavirenz (EFV)-based (n = 59), and to 224 patients for cART simplification. Thirty of 196 patients with available genotype resistance test results displayed virus with ≥1 drug resistance mutation on reverse-transcriptase gene. After 12 months of follow-up, 93.4% (95.5% confidence interval, 89.9-96.2) of patients remained virologically suppressed. There was no significant change in CD4 cell count. During the study period, 5 patients experienced VF, one of them harboring RPV resistance mutation. Clinical cART tolerability improved in 79 patients overall (29.9%) at M6, especially neurological symptoms related to EFV. Fasting serum lipid profiles improved, but a significant estimated glomerular function rate decrease (-11 mL/min/1.73 m(2); P < 10(-4)) was observed. Conclusions.  Overall, virologic suppression was maintained in patients after switching to RPV/TDF/ FTC. This STR strategy was associated with improved tolerability. PMID:26034768

  4. Switch to Rilpivirine/Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Single-Tablet Regimen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 RNA-Suppressed Patients, Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA et les Hépatites Virales CO3 Aquitaine Cohort, 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    Cazanave, Charles; Reigadas, Sandrine; Mazubert, Cyril; Bellecave, Pantxika; Hessamfar, Mojgan; Le Marec, Fabien; Lazaro, Estibaliz; Peytavin, Gilles; Bruyand, Mathias; Fleury, Hervé; Dabis, François; Neau, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Background.  The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 virologically suppressed patients who switched to rilpivirine (RPV)/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)/emtricitabine (FTC) as a single-tablet regimen (STR). Methods.  A retrospective multicenter cohort study was performed between September 2012 and February 2014 in Bordeaux University Hospital-affiliated clinics. Patients with a plasma HIV viral load (VL) lower than 50 copies/mL and switching to STR were evaluated at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months from switch time (M3, M6, M9, M12) for VL and other biological parameters. Change from baseline in CD4 cell counts was evaluated at M6 and M12. Virological failure (VF) was defined as 2 consecutive VL >50 copies/mL. Results.  Three hundred four patients were included in the analysis. Single-tablet regimen switch was proposed to 116 patients with adverse events, mostly efavirenz (EFV)-based (n = 59), and to 224 patients for cART simplification. Thirty of 196 patients with available genotype resistance test results displayed virus with ≥1 drug resistance mutation on reverse-transcriptase gene. After 12 months of follow-up, 93.4% (95.5% confidence interval, 89.9-96.2) of patients remained virologically suppressed. There was no significant change in CD4 cell count. During the study period, 5 patients experienced VF, one of them harboring RPV resistance mutation. Clinical cART tolerability improved in 79 patients overall (29.9%) at M6, especially neurological symptoms related to EFV. Fasting serum lipid profiles improved, but a significant estimated glomerular function rate decrease (-11 mL/min/1.73 m(2); P < 10(-4)) was observed. Conclusions.  Overall, virologic suppression was maintained in patients after switching to RPV/TDF/ FTC. This STR strategy was associated with improved tolerability.

  5. The road to success. Long-term prognosis for persons living with HIV in Denmark - time trends and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Nicolai

    2016-02-01

    The work on this thesis began in 2003 when the global HIV epidemic was out of control. A minority of persons with HIV were benefitting fully from the recently introduced highly efficacious antiretroviral therapy (ART) combinations. Among the global challenges were lack of access to good healthcare, drug toxicity, and emergence of drug-resistant virus. It was unknown how long the drugs could maintain their efficacy in the individual even if administered as intended, and there was a fear that the increased drug pressure would increase the prevalence of drug resistance, subsequently leading to transmission of resistant virus from one individual to another, and thereby waning the treatment options available. Hence, we were far from the ideal conditions where an HIV-infected individual gets to know immediately that he/she is infected, has access to specialized medical and social support, receives a drug combination which effectively suppresses the virus and has no side effects, and is free of co-morbid conditions both before and after he/she gets infected. The nine papers on which this thesis is based each aimed to provide new knowledge to aspects of the above. Late diagnosis and late presentation to clinical care continue to be major barriers to improved HIV management. We used nation-wide hospital registries to explore the potential for an indicator disease-based HIV testing strategy. A range of conditions that were manifestations of the HIV infection itself were found to be associated with highly increased risk of HIV diagnosis during the coming year, but less so three to five years later. Other conditions were associated with an almost constant five-year long increased risk of being diagnosed with HIV because they share behavioural risk factors with HIV, making them indicators of not only current HIV but also of future HIV acquisition. Hence, indicator condition-based testing should be adapted to the local epidemic and could be a valuable addition to the existing

  6. The road to success. Long-term prognosis for persons living with HIV in Denmark - time trends and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Nicolai

    2016-02-01

    The work on this thesis began in 2003 when the global HIV epidemic was out of control. A minority of persons with HIV were benefitting fully from the recently introduced highly efficacious antiretroviral therapy (ART) combinations. Among the global challenges were lack of access to good healthcare, drug toxicity, and emergence of drug-resistant virus. It was unknown how long the drugs could maintain their efficacy in the individual even if administered as intended, and there was a fear that the increased drug pressure would increase the prevalence of drug resistance, subsequently leading to transmission of resistant virus from one individual to another, and thereby waning the treatment options available. Hence, we were far from the ideal conditions where an HIV-infected individual gets to know immediately that he/she is infected, has access to specialized medical and social support, receives a drug combination which effectively suppresses the virus and has no side effects, and is free of co-morbid conditions both before and after he/she gets infected. The nine papers on which this thesis is based each aimed to provide new knowledge to aspects of the above. Late diagnosis and late presentation to clinical care continue to be major barriers to improved HIV management. We used nation-wide hospital registries to explore the potential for an indicator disease-based HIV testing strategy. A range of conditions that were manifestations of the HIV infection itself were found to be associated with highly increased risk of HIV diagnosis during the coming year, but less so three to five years later. Other conditions were associated with an almost constant five-year long increased risk of being diagnosed with HIV because they share behavioural risk factors with HIV, making them indicators of not only current HIV but also of future HIV acquisition. Hence, indicator condition-based testing should be adapted to the local epidemic and could be a valuable addition to the existing

  7. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy for the Success of Emerging Interventions to Prevent HIV Transmission: A Wake up Call

    PubMed Central

    Nachega, Jean B; Uthman, Olalekan A; Mills, Edward J; Quinn, Thomas C

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent successes in several HIV prevention trials, the epidemic continues to increase in many countries. The most successful biomedical interventions to prevent HIV have been the use of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) to Prevent Mother-To-Child Transmission (PMTCT), and sexual transmission via microbicides, PreExposure Prophylaxis (PrEP), and treatment of the infected person within discordant couples. In addition medical male circumcision has also been shown to be highly effective in prevention of HIV acquisition. However, emerging data demonstrate that adherence to several of these prevention interventions is critical. ART adherence during and after pregnancy has been shown to be significantly below that recommended for adequate virologic suppression, particularly during the postpartum period. Five recent PrEP trials also demonstrate that the success of PrEP as a public health intervention will necessitate monitoring ART adherence and will include additional interventions to improve or maintain adherence to optimal levels. New successes in HIV prevention research have been tempered by suboptimal adherence. There is a critical need to define practical and effective adherence monitoring strategies as well as controlled trials of adherence interventions in the era of PrEP, Treatment as Prevention (TasP), and PMTCT to maximize their benefit. PMID:24032088

  8. Evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic HIV vaccines through analytical treatment interruptions

    PubMed Central

    Graziani, Gina M; Angel, Jonathan B

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The development of an effective therapeutic HIV vaccine that induces immunologic control of viral replication, thereby eliminating or reducing the need for antiretroviral therapy (ART), would be of great value. Besides the obvious challenges of developing a therapeutic vaccine that would generate effective, sustained anti-HIV immunity in infected individuals is the issue of how to best assess the efficacy of vaccine candidates. Discussion This review discusses the various outcome measures assessed in therapeutic HIV vaccine clinical trials involving individuals receiving suppressive ART, with a particular focus on the role of analytical treatment interruption (ATI) as a way to assess the virologic control induced by an immunotherapy. This strategy is critical given that there are otherwise no readily available measures to determine the ability of a vaccine-induced immune response to effectively control HIV replication. The various outcome measures that have been used to assess vaccine efficacy in published therapeutic HIV vaccine clinical trials will also be discussed. Outcome measures have included the kinetics of viral rebound, the new viral set point and changes in the size of the viral reservoir. Clinically relevant outcomes such as the CD4 decline, the time to resume therapy or the time to meet the criterion to resume therapy, the proportion of participants who resume therapy and/or the development of clinical symptoms such as acute retroviral syndrome are also measures of vaccine efficacy. Conclusions Given the lack of consistency between therapeutic HIV vaccine trials in how efficacy is assessed, comparing vaccines has been difficult. It would, therefore, be beneficial to determine the most clinically relevant measure for use in future studies. Other recommendations for future clinical trials also include studying compartments in addition to blood and replacing ATIs with single-copy assays in situations in which the use of an ATI is not ideal

  9. Acceptance of the Use of HIV Surveillance Data for Care Engagement: National and Local Community Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Evans, David; Van Gorder, Dana; Morin, Stephen F.; Steward, Wayne T.; Gaffney, Stuart; Charlebois, Edwin D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Use of surveillance data including laboratory results (e.g. CD4 and HIV RNA) by public health departments to facilitate linkage, retention, and re-engagement of HIV-infected individuals in health care is on the rise. This is part of the goal of increasing the proportion of infected persons achieving virologic suppression. However, this use of surveillance data is not without controversy, particularly among some providers and people living with HIV. Methods We conducted informal discussions with key stakeholders and a literature search, and held a national think tank in November 2012, bringing together 31 representatives of the federal government, county and state officials, health care providers, and community-based organizations. A follow-up community consultation specific to San Francisco was held January 24, 2014, with 10 participants. Notes from these activities were used as data for this analysis. Results The think tank identified three strategies utilizing HIV surveillance data to aid in care engagement: 1) provider-mediated – where health department staff work with the provider of record on re-engagement, 2) electronic linkages between surveillance databases and medical records databases, and 3) direct outreach – where trained health department staff reach out to persons out of care. Participants also developed recommendations for minimizing harm, guidance on meaningful stakeholder involvement, and a consensus statement in support of the use of HIV surveillance data in care engagement. Conclusions Acceptance of the use of surveillance data for HIV care linkage, retention, and re-engagement is achievable, particularly if stakeholders have been engaged in the design, conduct, and evaluation of programs. PMID:25867776

  10. Keeping kids in care: virological failure in a paediatric antiretroviral clinic and suggestions for improving treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Purchase, Susan; Cunningham, Jayne; Esser, Monika; Skinner, Donald

    2016-09-01

    The burden of paediatric HIV in South Africa is extremely high. Antiretrovirals (ARVs) are now widely accessible in the country and the clinical emphasis has shifted from initiation of treatment to retention in care. This study describes the cumulative virological failure rate amongst children on ARVs in a peri-urban clinic, and suggests ways in which clinics and partners could improve treatment outcomes. The study was conducted by the non-profit organisation HOPE Cape Town Association. A retrospective file audit determined the cumulative virological failure rate, that is, the sum of all children with a viral load >1000 copies/ml, children on monotherapy, children who had stopped treatment, children lost to follow-up (LTFU) and children who had died. Interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 12 staff members and a random sample of 21 caregivers and 4 children attending care. Cumulative virological failure rate was 42%, with most of those children having been LTFU. Both staff and caregivers consistently identified pharmacy queues, ongoing stigma and unpalatable ARVs as barriers to adherence. Staff suggestions included use of adherence aids, and better education and support groups for caregivers. Caregivers also requested support groups, as well as "same day" appointments for caregivers and children, but rejected the idea of home visits. Simple, acceptable and cost-effective strategies exist whereby clinics and their partners could significantly reduce the cumulative virological failure rate in paediatric ARV clinics. These include actively tracing defaulters, improving education, providing support groups, and campaigning for palatable ARV formulations. PMID:27681154

  11. Self-reported non-adherence to ART and virological outcome in a multiclinic UK study.

    PubMed

    Sherr, L; Lampe, F C; Clucas, C; Johnson, M; Fisher, M; Leake Date, H; Anderson, J; Edwards, S; Smith, C J; Hill, T; Harding, R

    2010-08-01

    Adherence is of fundamental importance to ART success. We examined the association of self-reported non-adherence with demographic factors, health and behaviour issues, and virological outcome, in a multi-clinic study. Seven hundred and seventy-eight HIV patients in five clinics in London and Brighton completed a questionnaire on adherence and HIV/health issues at baseline in 2005/6. For 486 subjects taking ART, non-adherence in the past week was defined as: (A)>or=1 dose missed or taken incorrectly (wrong time/circumstances); (B)>or=1 dose missed; (C)>or=2 doses missed. Questionnaire data were matched with routine treatment and virology data for consenting subjects (61.4%). We assessed four virological outcomes in 307 of 486 patients: (i) VL>50c/mL using latest VL at the questionnaire and excluding patients starting HAART<24 weeks ago; (ii) VL>50c/mL using the first VL from 6 to 12 months post-questionnaire; (iii) any VL>50c/mL from 6 to 12 months post-questionnaire; (iv) among patients with VL<50c/mL at questionnaire, time to first subsequent VL>50c/mL over two years follow up. Non-adherence was reported by 278 (57.2%), 102 (21.0%) and 49 (10.1%) of 486 patients, for definitions A, B and C, respectively. Non-adherence declined markedly with older age, and tended to be more commonly reported by Black patients, those born outside the UK, those with greater psychological symptoms and those with suicidal thoughts. There was a weaker association with physical symptoms and no association with gender/sexuality, education, unemployment, or risk behaviour (p>0.1). In logistic regression analyses, younger age, non-UK birth and psychological variables were independent predictors of non-adherence [e.g., for non-adherence B: odds ratios (95% CI) were 0.95 (0.92, 0.98) for every year older age; 1.6 (1.0, 2.5) for non-UK born; 2.3 (1.5, 3.7) for suicidal thoughts]. Non-adherence was associated with poorer virological outcome; the most consistent association was for definition C

  12. Application perspectives of localization microscopy in virology.

    PubMed

    Cremer, C; Kaufmann, R; Gunkel, M; Polanski, F; Müller, P; Dierkes, R; Degenhard, S; Wege, C; Hausmann, M; Birk, U

    2014-07-01

    Localization microscopy approaches allowing an optical resolution down to the single-molecule level in fluorescence-labeled biostructures have already found a variety of applications in cell biology, as well as in virology. Here, we focus on some perspectives of a special localization microscopy embodiment, spectral precision distance/position determination microscopy (SPDM). SPDM permits the use of conventional fluorophores or fluorescent proteins together with standard sample preparation conditions employing an aqueous buffered milieu and typically monochromatic excitation. This allowed superresolution imaging and studies on the aggregation state of modified tobacco mosaic virus particles on the nanoscale with a single-molecule localization accuracy of better than 8 nm, using standard fluorescent dyes in the visible spectrum. To gain a better understanding of cell entry mechanisms during influenza A virus infection, SPDM was used in conjunction with algorithms for distance and cluster analyses to study changes in the distribution of virus particles themselves or in the distribution of infection-related proteins, the hepatocyte growth factor receptors, in the cell membrane on the single-molecule level. Not requiring TIRF (total internal reflection) illumination, SPDM was also applied to study the molecular arrangement of gp36.5/m164 glycoprotein (essentially associated with murine cytomegalovirus infection) in the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear membrane inside cells with single-molecule resolution. On the basis of the experimental evidence so far obtained, we finally discuss additional application perspectives of localization microscopy approaches for the fast detection and identification of viruses by multi-color SPDM and combinatorial oligonucleotide fluorescence in situ hybridization, as well as SPDM techniques for optimization of virus-based nanotools and biodetection devices.

  13. Virological rebound in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with or without residual viraemia: results from an extended follow-up.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, N; Galli, L; Salpietro, S; Cernuschi, M; Bossolasco, S; Maillard, M; Spagnuolo, V; Canducci, F; Clementi, M; Lazzarin, A; Castagna, A

    2013-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -infected patients with HIV RNA loads of < 50 copies/mL were followed-up for a median (interquartile range) of 30.8 (11.7-32.9) months to study the effect of residual viraemia (RV) on virological rebound (VR). At baseline, 446 (60.3%) patients had undetectable HIV RNA (group A) and 293 (39.7%) had RV (1-49 HIV RNA copies/mL, group B) by kinetic PCR. VR occurred in 4 (0.9%) patients in group A and in 12 (4.1%) patients in group B (p 0.007). Time to VR was shorter among patients of group B (Log-rank test: p 0.003). However, the proportion of VR was extremely low also among patients with RV.

  14. Kaposi's-sarcoma-associated-herpesvirus-activated dendritic cells promote HIV-1 trans-infection and suppress CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wan; Qin, Yan; Bai, Lei; Lan, Ke; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2013-06-05

    Infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is commonly occurred in AIDS patients. KSHV and HIV-1 act cooperatively in regulating infection with each other and in human carcinogenesis. Dendritic cells (DCs), as the pivotal cells in host immunity, may be modulated by both viruses, for immunoevasion and dissemination, therefore, the interaction between DCs and each virus has been a prior focus for pathogenesis elucidation. Here, we assessed the potential effect of KSHV on DC–HIV-1 interaction. We found that KSHV stimulation could promote maturation of monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) and impaired the ability of MDDCs to drive proliferation of resting CD4{sup +} T cells, demonstrating the immunosuppression induced by KSHV. More importantly, KSHV-stimulated MDDCs could capture more HIV-1 and efficiently transferred these infectious viruses to Hut/CCR5 T cell line. Our results reveal the novel modulation of DC-mediated HIV-1 dissemination by KSHV, and highlight the importance of studying DC–HIV-1 interaction to elucidate HIV/AIDS pathogenesis. - Highlights: ► KSHV impaired the ability of MDDCs to drive proliferation of resting CD4{sup +} T cells. ► KSHV stimulation matured MDDCs and enhanced HIV-1 endocytosis. ► KSHV stimulated MDDCs increased ICAM-1 expression and tighten contact with T cells. ► KSHV-stimulated MDDCs promoted HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4{sup +} T cells.

  15. In vitro suppression of HIV-1 replication by ajoene [(e)-(z)-4,5,9-trithiadodeca-1,6,11-triene-9 oxide].

    PubMed

    Walder, R; Kalvatchev, Z; Garzaro, D; Barrios, M; Apitz-Castro, R

    1997-01-01

    Studies were performed to establish whether synthetic ajoene exhibited differential inhibitory activity against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 (IIIB) and to clarify the mechanism of its antiviral effects. Our results demonstrate that ajoene protected acutely infected Molt-4 cells against HIV-1 and blocked further destruction of CD4 T-cells in vitro. Ajoene showed dose-dependent inhibition, with 50% cytotoxic concentration (CTC50%) and 50% effective inhibitory concentration (EIC50%) values of 1.88 microM and about 0.35 microM, respectively, when the test compound was added before or after HIV-1 infection and incubation carried out at 37 degrees C for 4 days. Ajoene proved relatively more active than dextran sulfate in blocking HIV-1 virus-cell attachment. The mode of anti-HIV action of ajoene can be ascribed to the inhibition of early events of viral replication, particularly virus adsorption.

  16. Integrated Delivery of Antiretroviral Treatment and Pre-exposure Prophylaxis to HIV-1–Serodiscordant Couples: A Prospective Implementation Study in Kenya and Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Baeten, Jared M.; Heffron, Renee; Kidoguchi, Lara; Mugo, Nelly R.; Katabira, Elly; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; Asiimwe, Stephen; Haberer, Jessica E.; Ngure, Kenneth; Bulya, Nulu; Odoyo, Josephine; Hendrix, Craig; Marzinke, Mark A.; Ware, Norma C.; Wyatt, Monique A.; Morrison, Susan; Mujugira, Andrew; Donnell, Deborah; Celum, Connie

    2016-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral-based interventions for HIV-1 prevention, including antiretroviral therapy (ART) to reduce the infectiousness of HIV-1 infected persons and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to reduce the susceptibility of HIV-1 uninfected persons, showed high efficacy for HIV-1 protection in randomized clinical trials. We conducted a prospective implementation study to understand the feasibility and effectiveness of these interventions in delivery settings. Methods and Findings Between November 5, 2012, and January 5, 2015, we enrolled and followed 1,013 heterosexual HIV-1-serodiscordant couples in Kenya and Uganda in a prospective implementation study. ART and PrEP were offered through a pragmatic strategy, with ART promoted for all couples and PrEP offered until 6 mo after ART initiation by the HIV-1 infected partner, permitting time to achieve virologic suppression. One thousand thirteen couples were enrolled, 78% of partnerships initiated ART, and 97% used PrEP, during a median follow-up of 0.9 years. Objective measures of adherence to both prevention strategies demonstrated high use (≥85%). Given the low HIV-1 incidence observed in the study, an additional analysis was added to compare observed incidence to incidence estimated under a simulated counterfactual model constructed using data from a prior prospective study of HIV-1-serodiscordant couples. Counterfactual simulations predicted 39.7 HIV-1 infections would be expected in the population at an incidence of 5.2 per 100 person-years (95% CI 3.7–6.9). However, only two incident HIV-1 infections were observed, at an incidence of 0.2 per 100 person-years (95% CI 0.0–0.9, p < 0.0001 versus predicted). The use of a non-concurrent comparison of HIV-1 incidence is a potential limitation of this approach; however, it would not have been ethical to enroll a contemporaneous population not provided access to ART and PrEP. Conclusions Integrated delivery of time-limited PrEP until sustained ART use in

  17. The Future of Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction in Virology.

    PubMed

    Vynck, Matthijs; Trypsteen, Wim; Thas, Olivier; Vandekerckhove, Linos; De Spiegelaere, Ward

    2016-10-01

    Driven by its potential benefits over currently available methods, and the recent development of commercial platforms, digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) has received increasing attention in virology research and diagnostics as a tool for the quantification of nucleic acids. The current technologies are more precise and accurate, but may not be much more sensitive, compared with quantitative PCR (qPCR) applications. The most promising applications with the current technology are the analysis of mutated sequences, such as emerging drug-resistant mutations. Guided by the recent literature, this review focuses on three aspects that demonstrate the potential of dPCR for virology researchers and clinicians: the applications of dPCR within both virology research and clinical virology, the benefits of the technique over the currently used real-time qPCR, and the importance and availability of specific data analysis approaches for dPCR. Comments are provided on current drawbacks and often overlooked pitfalls that need further attention to allow widespread implementation of dPCR as an accurate and precise tool within the field of virology.

  18. Relapse of visceral leishmaniasis in an HIV-infected patient successfully treated with a combination of miltefosine and amphotericin B.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, Shauna; Kasper, Ken; Moffatt, Dana C; Marko, Daniel; Keynan, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The present report documents a 49-year-old HIV-infected man receiving antiretroviral therapy with a suboptimal immune response and a CD4 count of 95 cells/mm(3), despite virological suppression. Investigation of bone marrow was conducted and yielded a diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis. The clinical course was complicated by gastrointestinal involvment and relapse occurred after amphotericin B therapy. With the addition of miltefosine, the patient no longer presented with bone marrow amastigotes, and displayed an increased CD4 count and negative Leishmania polymerase chain reaction results. The present case highlights atypical presentation of visceral leishmaniasis, including poor immune reconstitution and gastrointestinal involvement. The high likelihood of relapse and response to combination therapy are illustrated.

  19. Long-Term Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Response to Lamivudine-Containing Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-HBV Co-Infected Patients in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Khamduang, Woottichai; Gaudy-Graffin, Catherine; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Jourdain, Gonzague; Moreau, Alain; Luekamlung, Nuananong; Halue, Guttiga; Buranawanitchakorn, Yuwadee; Kunkongkapan, Sura; Buranabanjasatean, Sudanee; Lallemant, Marc; Sirirungsi, Wasna; Goudeau, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Background Approximately 4 million of people are co-infected with HIV and Hepatitis B virus (HBV). In resource-limited settings, the majority of HIV-infected patients initiate first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy containing lamivudine (3TC-containing-HAART) and long-term virological response of HBV to lamivudine-containing HAART in co-infected patients is not well known. Methodology/Principal Finding HIV-HBV co-infected patients enrolled in the PHPT cohort (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00433030) and initiating a 3TC-containing-HAART regimen were included. HBV-DNA, HIV-RNA, CD4+ T-cell counts and alanine transaminase were measured at baseline, 3 months, 12 months and then every 6 months up to 5 years. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate the cumulative rates of patients who achieved and maintained HBV-DNA suppression. Of 30 co-infected patients, 19 were positive for HBe antigen (HBeAg). At initiation of 3TC-containing-HAART, median HBV DNA and HIV RNA levels were 7.35 log10 IU/mL and 4.47 log10 copies/mL, respectively. At 12 months, 67% of patients achieved HBV DNA suppression: 100% of HBeAg-negative patients and 47% of HBeAg-positive. Seventy-three percent of patients had HIV RNA below 50 copies/mL. The cumulative rates of maintained HBV-DNA suppression among the 23 patients who achieved HBV-DNA suppression were 91%, 87%, and 80% at 1, 2, and 4 years respectively. Of 17 patients who maintained HBV-DNA suppression while still on 3TC, 4 (24%) lost HBsAg and 7 of 8 (88%) HBeAg-positive patients lost HBeAg at their last visit (median duration, 59 months). HBV breakthrough was observed only in HBeAg-positive patients and 6 of 7 patients presenting HBV breakthrough had the rtM204I/V mutations associated with 3TC resistance along with rtL180M and/or rtV173L. Conclusions All HBeAg-negative patients and 63% of HBeAg-positive HIV-HBV co-infected patients achieved long-term HBV DNA suppression while on 3TC-containing-HAART. This study provides information useful for

  20. Cost-effectiveness of the once-daily efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir tablet compared with the once-daily elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir tablet as first-line antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected adults in the US

    PubMed Central

    Juday, Timothy; Correll, Todd; Anene, Ayanna; Broder, Michael S; Ortendahl, Jesse; Bentley, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    Background February 2013 US treatment guidelines recommend the once-daily tablet of efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir (Atripla®) as a preferred regimen and the once-daily tablet of elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir (Stribild™) as an alternative regimen for first-line treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This study assessed the clinical and economic trade-offs involved in using Atripla compared with Stribild as first-line antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected US adults. Methods A Markov cohort model was developed to project lifetime health-related outcomes, costs, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and cost-effectiveness of Stribild compared with Atripla as first-line antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected US patients. Patients progressed in 12-week cycles through second-line, third-line, and nonsuppressive therapies, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and death. Baseline characteristics and first-line virologic suppression, change in CD4 count, and adverse effects (lipid, central nervous system, rash, renal) were based on 48-week clinical trial results. These results demonstrated equivalent virologic suppression between the two regimens. Point estimates for virologic suppression (favoring Stribild) were used in the base case, and equivalency was used in the scenario analysis. Published sources and expert opinion were used to estimate costs, utilities, risk of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, mortality, subsequent-line CD4 count, clinical efficacy, and adverse events. Costs were reported in 2012 US dollars. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess robustness of results. Results Compared with patients initiating Atripla, patients initiating Stribild were estimated to have higher lifetime costs. Stribild added 0.041 QALYs over a lifetime at an additional cost of $6,886, producing an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $166,287/QALY gained. Results were most sensitive to first-line response rates, product costs, and

  1. Origin of Rebound Plasma HIV Includes Cells with Identical Proviruses That Are Transcriptionally Active before Stopping of Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wiegand, Ann; Shao, Wei; Coffin, John M.; Mellors, John W.; Lederman, Michael; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Keele, Brandon F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding the origin of HIV variants during viral rebound may provide insight into the composition of the HIV reservoir and has implications for the design of curative interventions. HIV single-genome sequences were obtained from 10 AIDS Clinical Trials Group participants who underwent analytic antiretroviral therapy (ART) interruption (ATI). Rebounding variants were compared with those in pre-ART plasma in all 10 participants and with on-ART peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-associated DNA and RNA (CA-RNA) in 7/10 participants. The highest viral diversities were found in the DNA and CA-RNA populations. In 3 of 7 participants, we detected multiple, identical DNA and CA-RNA sequences during suppression on ART that exactly matched plasma HIV sequences. Hypermutated DNA and CA-RNA were detected in four participants, contributing to diversities in these compartments that were higher than in the pre-ART and post-ATI plasma. Shifts in the viral rebound populations could be detected in some participants over the 2- to 3-month observation period. These findings suggest that a source of initial rebound viremia could be populations of infected cells that clonally expanded prior to and/or during ART, some of which were already expressing HIV RNA before treatment was interrupted. These clonally expanding populations of HIV-infected cells may represent an important target for strategies aimed at achieving reservoir reduction and sustained virologic remission. IMPORTANCE Antiretroviral therapy alone cannot eradicate the HIV reservoir, and viral rebound is generally rapid after treatment interruption. It has been suggested that clonal expansion of HIV-infected cells is an important mechanism of HIV reservoir persistence, but the contribution of these clonally proliferating cells to the rebounding virus is unknown. We report a study of AIDS Clinical Trials Group participants who underwent treatment interruption and compared rebounding plasma virus with that

  2. Genotypic Susceptibility Scores and HIV Type 1 RNA Responses in Treatment-Experienced Subjects with HIV Type 1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Jiang, Hongyu; Ding, Xiao; Petch, Leslie; Journigan, Terri; Fiscus, Susan A.; Haubrich, Richard; Katzenstein, David; Swanstrom, Ronald; Gulick, Roy M.

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the role of genotypic susceptibility scores (GSS) as a predictor of virologic response in a group (n = 234) of HIV-infected, protease inhibitor (PI)-experienced subjects. Two scoring methods [discrete genotypic susceptibility score (dGSS) and continuous genotypic susceptibility score (cGSS)] were developed. Each drug in the subject's regimen was given a binary susceptibility score using Stanford inferred drug resistance scores to calculate the dGSS. In contrast to the dGSS, the cGSS model was designed to reflect partial susceptibility to a drug. Both GSS were independent predictors of week 16 virologic response. We also compared the GSS to a phenotypic susceptibility score (PSS) model on a subset of subjects that had both GSS and PSS performed, and found that both models were predictive of virologic response. Genotypic analyses at enrollment showed that subjects who were virologic nonresponders at week 16 revealed enrichment of several mutated codons associated with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) (codons 67, 69, 70, 118, 215, and 219) or PI resistance (codons 10, 24, 71, 73, and 88) compared to subjects who were virologic responders. Regression analyses revealed that protease mutations at codons 24 and 90 were most predictive of poor virologic response, whereas mutations at 82 were associated with enhanced virologic response. Certain NNRTI-associated mutations, such as K103N, were rapidly selected in the absence of NRTIs. These data indicate that GSS may be a useful tool in selecting drug regimens in HIV-1-infected subjects to maximize virologic response and improve treatment outcomes. PMID:18462083

  3. Monitoring of the lactonase activity of paraoxonase-1 enzyme in HIV-1-infection.

    PubMed

    Dias, Clara; Marinho, Aline; Morello, Judit; Almeida, Gabriela; Caixas, Umbelina; Soto, Karina; Monteiro, Emilia; Pereira, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Paraoxonase-1 (PON1) is a high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated enzyme known as a free radical scavenging system (1). PON-1 has three main activities, responsible for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential: paraoxonase, arylesterase and lactonase (LACase), the latest to be discovered and pointed out to be its native activity (2). Among other physiological roles, the LACase might minimize the deleterious effects of hyperhomocysteinaemia in infection, by detoxifying the highly reactive metabolite homocysteine-thiolactone (HcyTL) (3),4. In the present work, we have developed and applied a method to quantify LACase activity and to explore the role of this enzyme in HIV-infection and virological response. The LACase activity was monitored in a cohort of HIV-1-infected patients, through the titration of 3-(o-hydroxyphenyl) propionic acid, formed upon the LACase-mediated hydrolysis of the substrate dihydrocoumarin. The study protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central and Hospital Prof. Doutor Fernando Fonseca. All patients gave their written informed consent and were adults with documented HIV-1-infection, regardless of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) use. Naïve patients and patients who had received continuous antiretroviral treatment for more than one month were included. A total of 179 HIV-1-infected patients were included on this study (51% Men, 39% non-Caucasian, 45±13 years old). Patients with non-suppressed viraemia, either from the non-cART (n=89, 12±4 kU/L, p<0.01) or from the cART with detectable viral load (n=11, 10±5 kU/L, p<0.05) groups, had lower activity than the cART with suppressed viraemia (n=79, 15±7 kU/L) (Kruskal-Wallis test). Among naïve patients, higher viral load (> 31,500 cps/mL, Spearman r=-0.535, p=0.003) and lower CD4+ T-cells count (< 500 cell/mm(3), Pearson r=0.326, p=0.024) were associated with the LACase activity. The present study suggests that lower LACase activity is

  4. Long-Term Efficacy, Tolerability, and Renal Safety of Atazanavir/Ritonavir-based Antiretroviral Therapy in a Cohort of Treatment-Naïve Patients with HIV-1 Infection: the REMAIN Study

    PubMed Central

    Teófilo, Eugénio; Rocha-Pereira, Nuno; Kuhlmann, Birger; Antela, Antonio; Knechten, Heribert; Santos, Jesús; Jiménez-Expósito, Maria Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Background: Boosted protease inhibitors (PIs), including ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATV/r), are a recommended option for the initial treatment of HIV-1 infection based upon clinical trial data; however, long-term real-life clinical data are limited. Objective: We evaluated the long-term use of ATV/r as a component of antiretroviral combination therapy in the real-life setting in the REMAIN study. Methods: This was an observational cohort study conducted at sites across Germany, Portugal, and Spain. Retrospective historical and prospective longitudinal follow-up data were extracted every six months from medical records of HIV-infected treatment-naïve patients aged ≥ 18 years initiating a first-line ATV/r-containing regimen. Results: Eligible patients (n = 517) were followed up for a median of 3.4 years. The proportion remaining on ATV/r at 5 years was 51.5% with an estimated Kaplan-Meier median time to treatment discontinuation of 4.9 years. Principal reasons for discontinuation were adverse events (15.9%; 8.9% due to hyperbilirubinemia) and virologic failure (6.8%). The Kaplan-Meier probability of not having virologic failure (HIV-1 RNA < 50 copies/mL) was 0.79 (95% CI: 0.75, 0.83) at five years. No treatment-emergent major PI resistance occurred. ATV/r was generally well tolerated during long-term treatment with no significant changes in estimated glomerular filtration rate over five years. Conclusions: In a real-life clinical setting over five years, treatment-naïve patients with HIV-1 infection initiating an ATV/r-based regimen showed sustained virologic suppression, an overall treatment persistence rate of 51.5%, an absence of treatment-emergent major PI resistance mutations at virologic failure, a long-term safety profile consistent with that observed in clinical trials, and no significant decline in renal function. PMID:26899539

  5. Shamba Maisha: Randomized controlled trial of an agricultural and finance intervention to improve HIV health outcomes in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    WEISER, Sheri D.; BUKUSI, Elizabeth A.; STEINFELD, Rachel L.; FRONGILLO, Edward A.; WEKE, Elly; DWORKIN, Shari L.; PUSATERI, Kyle; SHIBOSKI, Stephen; SCOW, Kate; BUTLER, Lisa M.; COHEN, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Food insecurity and HIV/AIDS outcomes are inextricably linked in sub-Saharan Africa. We report on health and nutritional outcomes of a multisectoral agricultural intervention trial among HIV-infected adults in rural Kenya. Design Pilot cluster randomized controlled trial Methods The intervention included a human-powered water pump, a microfinance loan to purchase farm commodities, and education in sustainable farming practices and financial management. Two health facilities in Nyanza Region, Kenya were randomly assigned as intervention or control. HIV-infected adults 18 to 49 years old who were on antiretroviral therapy and had access to surface water and land were enrolled beginning in April 2012 and followed quarterly for one year. Data were collected on nutritional parameters, CD4 T lymphocyte counts, and HIV RNA. Difference in difference fixed-effects regression models were used to test whether patterns in health outcomes differed over time from baseline between the intervention and control arms. Results We enrolled 72 and 68 participants in the intervention and control groups, respectively. At 12 months follow-up, we found a statistically significant increase in CD4 cell counts (165 cells/mm3, p<0.001) and proportion virologically suppressed in the intervention arm compared to the control arm (comparative improvement in proportion of 0.33 suppressed, OR 7.6, 95% CI: 2.2–26.8). Intervention participants experienced significant improvements in food security (3.6 scale points higher, p<0.001) and frequency of food consumption (9.4 times per week greater frequency, p=0.013) compared to controls. Conclusion Livelihood interventions may be a promising approach to tackle the intersecting problems of food insecurity, poverty and HIV/AIDS morbidity. PMID:26214684

  6. Thank you to Virology Journal's peer reviewers in 2013

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The editors of Virology Journal would like to thank all our reviewers who have contributed to the journal in Volume 10 (2013). The success of any scientific journal depends on an effective and strict peer review process and Virology Journal could not operate without your contribution. We are grateful to the large number of reviewers (1026 to be exact!), who have done a great job in not only lifting the quality of the journal’s scientific peer reviewing process, but also helped us to achieve our goal of a median time to first decision of just 35 days. Our record time from submission to online, open access, publication in 2013 was 22 days for a Research Article [1] and 28 days for a Review [2]. This is a great achievement by any standard. We look forward to your continuous support of Virology Journal either as an invited reviewer or a contributing author in the years to come.

  7. How the American Society for Virology was founded.

    PubMed

    Joklik, Wolfang K; Grossberg, Sidney E

    2006-01-01

    The American Society for Virology, the very first such Society to be formed anywhere, was founded at a meeting of some 40 virologists at Chicago O'Hare International airport on June 9, 1981. They met after a decade and a half of intense discussion that originated at the 9th International Congress of Microbiology in Moscow in 1966 when a small group of virologists requested the International Association of Microbiological Societies to form a Virology Section within IAMS, and this request was rejected. Virologists therefore held their own First International Congress of Virology in Helsinki in 1968 which was very successful and generated intense informal discussion among leading virologists in this country as to the desirability of founding an American society for virologists. Proposals were circulated and discussed which resulted in the informal Chicago meeting that created the mechanism for founding the ASV and organizing its 1st Annual Meeting at Cornell in Ithaca in August 1982.

  8. HIV-1 Infection-Induced Suppression of the Let-7i/IL-2 Axis Contributes to CD4+ T Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yijun; Yin, Yue; Zhang, Shaoying; Luo, Haihua; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying HIV-1-mediated CD4+ T cell depletion are highly complicated. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a key cytokine that maintains the survival and proliferation of activated CD4+ T cells. IL-2 levels are disturbed during HIV-1 infection, but the underlying mechanism(s) requires further investigation. We have reported that cellular microRNA (miRNA) let-7i upregulates IL-2 expression by targeting the promoter TATA-box region, which functions as a positive regulator. In this study, we found that HIV-1 infection decreases the expression of let-7i in CD4+ T cells by attenuating its promoter activity. The reduced let-7i miRNA expression led to a decline in IL-2 levels. A let-7i mimic increased IL-2 expression and subsequently enhanced the resistance of CD4+ T cells to HIV-1-induced apoptosis. By contrast, the blockage of let-7i with a specific inhibitor resulted in elevated CD4+ T cell apoptosis during HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, by knocking down the expression of IL-2, we found that the let-7i-mediated CD4+ T cell resistance to apoptosis during HIV-1 infection was dependent on IL-2 signaling rather than an alternative CD95-mediated cell-death pathway. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel pathway for HIV-1-induced dysregulation of IL-2 cytokines and depletion of CD4+ T-lymphocytes. PMID:27145859

  9. Evaluation of two HIV antibody confirmatory assays: Geenius™ HIV1/2 Confirmatory Assay and the recomLine HIV-1 & HIV-2 IgG Line Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, I; Buus, C; Berger, A; Keppler, O T; Rabenau, H F

    2015-11-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of an HIV infection mainly depends on the detection of HIV-specific antibodies/HIV p24 antigen whereby different algorithms for the confirmation of reactive screening assays exist. The objective of the present study was to compare the performance of two supplemental HIV antibody confirmatory assays: the Geenius™ HIV1/2 Confirmatory Assay and the recomLine HIV-1 & HIV-2 IgG Line Immunoassay. Therefore 279 serum samples previously analyzed for HIV during routine diagnostics at the Institute for Medical Virology, National Reference Center for Retroviruses, University Hospital Frankfurt, were analyzed retrospectively. 96.8% samples had concordant results in both HIV confirmatory assays, whereby the Geenius Assay showed a discrimination rate of 100% while two HIV-1 samples were not typeable with the recomLine Assay. Overall assay sensitivity was 100% in both assays and specificity was 99.0% (recomLine Assay) and 93.4% (Geenius Assay), respectively. The κ-values for both assays indicated high agreement. Overall nine samples had discordant results from which four were from acutely EBV/CMV-infected patients and one from a patient with primary HIV-1 infection during seroconversion. In conclusion, both assays are well suited for the detection, confirmation and discrimination of HIV-1- and -2-specific antibodies.

  10. Therapeutic Immunization with HIV-1 Tat Reduces Immune Activation and Loss of Regulatory T-Cells and Improves Immune Function in Subjects on HAART

    PubMed Central

    Ensoli, Barbara; Bellino, Stefania; Tripiciano, Antonella; Longo, Olimpia; Francavilla, Vittorio; Marcotullio, Simone; Cafaro, Aurelio; Picconi, Orietta; Paniccia, Giovanni; Scoglio, Arianna; Arancio, Angela; Ariola, Cristina; Ruiz Alvarez, Maria J.; Campagna, Massimo; Scaramuzzi, Donato; Iori, Cristina; Esposito, Roberto; Mussini, Cristina; Ghinelli, Florio; Sighinolfi, Laura; Palamara, Guido; Latini, Alessandra; Angarano, Gioacchino; Ladisa, Nicoletta; Soscia, Fabrizio; Mercurio, Vito S.; Lazzarin, Adriano; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Visintini, Raffaele; Mazzotta, Francesco; Di Pietro, Massimo; Galli, Massimo; Rusconi, Stefano; Carosi, Giampiero; Torti, Carlo; Di Perri, Giovanni; Bonora, Stefano; Ensoli, Fabrizio; Garaci, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Although HAART suppresses HIV replication, it is often unable to restore immune homeostasis. Consequently, non-AIDS-defining diseases are increasingly seen in treated individuals. This is attributed to persistent virus expression in reservoirs and to cell activation. Of note, in CD4+ T cells and monocyte-macrophages of virologically-suppressed individuals, there is continued expression of multi-spliced transcripts encoding HIV regulatory proteins. Among them, Tat is essential for virus gene expression and replication, either in primary infection or for virus reactivation during HAART, when Tat is expressed, released extracellularly and exerts, on both the virus and the immune system, effects that contribute to disease maintenance. Here we report results of an ad hoc exploratory interim analysis (up to 48 weeks) on 87 virologically-suppressed HAART-treated individuals enrolled in a phase II randomized open-label multicentric clinical trial of therapeutic immunization with Tat (ISS T-002). Eighty-eight virologically-suppressed HAART-treated individuals, enrolled in a parallel prospective observational study at the same sites (ISS OBS T-002), served for intergroup comparison. Immunization with Tat was safe, induced durable immune responses, and modified the pattern of CD4+ and CD8+ cellular activation (CD38 and HLA-DR) together with reduction of biochemical activation markers and persistent increases of regulatory T cells. This was accompanied by a progressive increment of CD4+ T cells and B cells with reduction of CD8+ T cells and NK cells, which were independent from the type of antiretroviral regimen. Increase in central and effector memory and reduction in terminally-differentiated effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were accompanied by increases of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses against Env and recall antigens. Of note, more immune-compromised individuals experienced greater therapeutic effects. In contrast, these changes were opposite, absent or partial in the

  11. Assessing the Performance of a Computer-Based Policy Model of HIV and AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Rydzak, Chara E.; Cotich, Kara L.; Sax, Paul E.; Hsu, Heather E.; Wang, Bingxia; Losina, Elena; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Weinstein, Milton C.; Goldie, Sue J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Model-based analyses, conducted within a decision analytic framework, provide a systematic way to combine information about the natural history of disease and effectiveness of clinical management strategies with demographic and epidemiological characteristics of the population. Among the challenges with disease-specific modeling include the need to identify influential assumptions and to assess the face validity and internal consistency of the model. Methods and Findings We describe a series of exercises involved in adapting a computer-based simulation model of HIV disease to the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) cohort and assess model performance as we re-parameterized the model to address policy questions in the U.S. relevant to HIV-infected women using data from the WIHS. Empiric calibration targets included 24-month survival curves stratified by treatment status and CD4 cell count. The most influential assumptions in untreated women included chronic HIV-associated mortality following an opportunistic infection, and in treated women, the ‘clinical effectiveness’ of HAART and the ability of HAART to prevent HIV complications independent of virologic suppression. Good-fitting parameter sets required reductions in the clinical effectiveness of 1st and 2nd line HAART and improvements in 3rd and 4th line regimens. Projected rates of treatment regimen switching using the calibrated cohort-specific model closely approximated independent analyses published using data from the WIHS. Conclusions The model demonstrated good internal consistency and face validity, and supported cohort heterogeneities that have been reported in the literature. Iterative assessment of model performance can provide information about the relative influence of uncertain assumptions and provide insight into heterogeneities within and between cohorts. Description of calibration exercises can enhance the transparency of disease-specific models. PMID:20844741

  12. Addressing the Achilles' Heel in the HIV Care Continuum for the Success of a Test-and-Treat Strategy to Achieve an AIDS-Free Generation

    PubMed Central

    Nachega, Jean B.; Uthman, Olalekan A.; del Rio, Carlos; Mugavero, Michael J.; Rees, Helen; Mills, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models and recent data from ecological, observational, and experimental studies show that antiretroviral therapy (ART) is effective for both treatment and prevention of HIV, validating the treatment as prevention (TasP) approach. Data from a variety of settings, including resource-rich and -limited sites, show that patient attrition occurs at each stage of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment cascade, starting with the percent unaware of their HIV infection in a population and linkage to care after diagnosis, assessment of ART readiness, receipt of ART, and finally long-term virologic suppression. Therefore, in order to implement TasP, we must first define practical and effective linkage to care, acceptability of treatment, and adherence and retention monitoring strategies, as well as the cost-effectiveness of such strategies. Ending this pandemic will require the combination of political will, resources, and novel effective interventions that are not only feasible and cost effective but also likely to be used in combination across successive steps on the HIV treatment cascade. PMID:24926028

  13. Standardization of sensitive human immunodeficiency virus coculture procedures and establishment of a multicenter quality assurance program for the AIDS Clinical Trials Group. The NIH/NIAID/DAIDS/ACTG Virology Laboratories.

    PubMed Central

    Hollinger, F B; Bremer, J W; Myers, L E; Gold, J W; McQuay, L

    1992-01-01

    An independent quality assurance program has been established by the Division of AIDS, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, for monitoring virologic assays performed by nearly 40 laboratories participating in multicenter clinical trials in the United States. Since virologic endpoints are important in evaluating the timing and efficacy of therapeutic interventions, it is imperative that virologic measurements be accurate and uniform. When the quality assurance program was initially created, fewer than 40% of the laboratories could consistently recover human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HIV-infected patients. By comparing coculture procedures in the more competent laboratories with those in laboratories who were struggling to isolate virus, optimal conditions were established and nonessential reagents and practices were eliminated. Changes were rapidly introduced into a laboratory when experience dictated that such modifications would result in a favorable outcome. Isolation of HIV was enhanced by optimizing the numbers and ratios of patient and donor cells used in cultures, by standardizing PBMC separation procedures, by using fresh rather than frozen donor PBMCs, by processing whole blood within 24 h, and by using natural delectinated interleukin 2 instead of recombinant interleukin 2 products in existence at that time. Delays of more than 8 h in the addition of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated donor cells to freshly separated patient PBMCs reduced recovery. Phytohemagglutinin in cocultures and the addition of Polybrene and anti-human alpha interferon to media were not important in HIV isolation. The introduction of a consensus protocol based on this information brought most laboratories quickly into compliance. In addition, monthly monitoring has successfully maintained proficiency among the laboratories, a process that is critical for the scientific integrity of collaborative multicenter trials

  14. Integrated Design of a Virology Course Develops Lifelong Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mester, Joseph C.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the author's first attempt at integrated course design. Students in the author's virology course helped set the learning goals, and the design and content of the exams, and developed rubrics for individual and group projects. The result was that they learned how to direct their own learning. Integrated course design and…

  15. HIV cell-to-cell transmission: effects on pathogenesis and antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Agosto, Luis M.; Uchil, Pradeep D.; Mothes, Walther

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) spreads more efficiently in vitro when infected cells directly contact uninfected cells to form virological synapses. A hallmark of virological synapses is that viruses can be transmitted at a higher multiplicity of infection (MOI) that, in vitro, results in a higher number of proviruses. Whether HIV also spreads by cell-cell contact in vivo is a matter of debate. Here we discuss recent data that suggest that contact-mediated transmission largely manifests itself in vivo as CD4+ T cell depletion. The assault of a cell by a large number of incoming particles is likely efficiently sensed by the innate cellular surveillance to trigger cell death. The large number of particles transferred across virological synapses has also been implicated in reduced efficacy of antiretroviral therapies. Thus, antiretroviral therapies must remain effective against the high MOI observed during cell-to-cell transmission to inhibit both viral replication and the pathogenesis associated with HIV infection. PMID:25766144

  16. Alcohol use predicts elevation in inflammatory marker soluble CD14 in men living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Monnig, Mollie A; Kahler, Christopher W; Cioe, Patricia A; Tucker, Lynne; Monti, Peter M; Mayer, Kenneth H; Ramratnam, Bharat

    2016-11-01

    Independently, HIV infection and heavy alcohol use increase microbial translocation (MT) of gut products into systemic circulation. MT and consequent immune response have been linked to chronic inflammation and a host of negative health outcomes in individuals living with HIV. However, previous research has not systematically investigated the immune correlates of heavy drinking specifically within the HIV-positive population. This pilot study investigated MT and immune activation as a function of alcohol use in 21 HIV-positive men who met NIAAA criteria for heavy drinking. Participants averaged 46.7 ± 8.5 (mean ± standard deviation) years of age, 12.2 ± 9.2 years since HIV diagnosis, 337 ± 158 CD4 nadir, and 643 ± 245 current CD4 count. All participants were virologically suppressed on antiretroviral therapy. Data on alcohol use and immune function were collected at baseline and three-month follow-up. Plasma concentrations of markers of MT and immune activation (lipopolysaccharide (LPS), soluble CD14 (sCD14), endotoxin core antibody immunoglobulin M (EndoCAb)) were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Generalized estimating equation models tested alcohol use variables as predictors of LPS, sCD14, and EndoCAb levels. Greater quantity and frequency of drinking significantly predicted higher sCD14 levels (p's < .01). Conversely, longer duration of abstinence from alcohol significantly predicted lower sCD14 levels (p < .001). These results remained significant after controlling for age, HIV duration, smoking status, current CD4 count, CD4 nadir, and antiretroviral drug type. In addition, participants with ≥50% relative reduction in drinks per week showed a significant decrease (p < .05) in sCD14 from baseline to three-month follow-up. This pilot study provides preliminary evidence that heavy drinking may increase a key inflammatory marker in HIV-infected individuals with suppressed infection.

  17. Late presentation and loss to follow-up of immigrants newly diagnosed with HIV in the HAART era.

    PubMed

    Saracino, A; Tartaglia, A; Trillo, G; Muschitiello, C; Bellacosa, C; Brindicci, G; Monno, L; Angarano, G

    2014-08-01

    To compare clinical characteristics and therapeutic management of newly HIV-diagnosed immigrants to natives. Patients with a first HIV diagnosis from 1996 to 2010 were included. Of 716 new diagnoses, 85 (12 %) were immigrants. Migrants were younger, more frequently females and sexually infected, less likely to voluntarily request testing, and less HCV-coinfected. Late presenters (CD4 <350 or AIDS) were 76 % among migrants versus 56 % in natives (p = 0.006) with an increasing trend over time. HAART was initiated in 76.5 % of natives and 72.4 % of immigrants; the number/type of adverse events and treatment discontinuation were similar. Immigrants received more NNRTIs-based regimens. A similar proportion of patients reached virological suppression at month 1-3-6 after HAART initiation, but 43 % of immigrants versus 27 % of natives resulted lost to follow-up (p < 0.001). Diagnosis of HIV was often delayed among migrants, who also presented a higher rate of lost to follow-up.

  18. Changes in HIV Outcomes Following Depression Care in a Resource-Limited Setting: Results from a Pilot Study in Bamenda, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Gaynes, Bradley N.; Pence, Brian W.; Atashili, Julius; O’Donnell, Julie K.; Njamnshi, Alfred K.; Tabenyang, Mbu Eyongetah; Arrey, Charles Kefie; Whetten, Rachel; Whetten, Kathryn; Ndumbe, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about how improved depression care affects HIV-related outcomes in Africa. In a sample of depressed HIV patients in a low income, sub-Saharan country, we explored how implementing measurement-based antidepressant care (MBC) affected HIV outcomes over 4 months of antidepressant treatment. Methods As part of a project adapting MBC for use in Cameroon, we enrolled 41 depressed HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy in a pilot study in which a depression care manager (DCM) provided an outpatient HIV clinician with evidence-based decision support for antidepressant treatment. Acute depression management was provided for the first 12 weeks, with DCM contact every 2 weeks and HIV clinician appointments every 4 weeks. We measured HIV clinical and psychiatric outcomes at 4 months. Results Participants were moderately depressed at baseline (mean Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ] score = 14.4, range 13.1, 15.6). All HIV clinical outcomes improved by four month follow-up: mean (range) CD4 count improved from 436 (2, 860) to 452 (132, 876), mean (range) log-viral load decreased from 4.02 (3.86, 4.17) to 3.15 (2.81, 3.49), the proportion with virologic suppression improved from 0% to 18%, mean (range) HIV symptoms decreased from 6.4 (5.5, 7.3) to 3.1 (2.5, 3.7), the proportion reporting good or excellent health improved from 18% to 70%, and the proportion reporting any missed ARV doses in the past month decreased from 73% to 55%. Concurrently, psychiatric measures improved. The mean (range) PHQ score decreased from 14.4 (13.1, 15.6) to 1.6 (0.8, 2.4) and 90% achieved depression remission, while mean maladaptive coping style scores decreased and mean adaptive coping scores and self-efficacy scores improved. Conclusion In this pilot study of an evidence-based depression treatment intervention for HIV-infected patients in Cameroon, a number of HIV behavioral and non-behavioral health outcomes improved over 4 months of effective depression treatment

  19. The Diagnosis of HIV Infection in Infants and Children.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, Alireza; Saffar, Hana

    2016-01-01

    It is estimated that the number of HIV infected children globally has increased from 1.6 million in 2001 to 3.3 million in 2012. The number of children below 15 years of age living with HIV has increased worldwide. Published data from recent studies confirmed dramatic survival benefit for infants started anti-retroviral therapy (ART) as early as possible after diagnosis of HI. Early confirmation of HIV diagnosis is required in order to identify infants who need immediate ART. WHO has designed recommendations to improve programs for both early diagnoses of HIV infection and considering ART whenever indicated? It is strongly recommended that HIV virologocal assays for diagnosis of HIV have sensitivity of at least 95% and ideally greater than 98% and specificity of 98% or more under standardized and validated conditions. Timing of virological testing is also important. Infants infected at or around delivery may take short time to have detectable virus. Therefore, sensitivity of virological tests is lower at birth. In utero HIV infection, HIV DNA or RNA can be detected within 48 h of birth and in infants with peripartum acquisition it needs one to two weeks. Finally it is emphasized that all laboratories performing HIV tests should follow available services provided by WHO or CDC for quality assurance programs. Both clinicians and staffs providing laboratory services need regular communications, well-defined SOPs and nationally validated algorithms for optimal use of laboratory tests. Every country should use assays that have been validated by national reference laboratory. PMID:27499768

  20. HIV-1 Genetic Variation Resulting in the Development of New Quasispecies Continues to Be Encountered in the Peripheral Blood of Well-Suppressed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dampier, Will; Nonnemacher, Michael R.; Mell, Joshua; Earl, Joshua; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Pirrone, Vanessa; Aiamkitsumrit, Benjamas; Zhong, Wen; Kercher, Katherine; Passic, Shendra; Williams, Jean W.; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Wigdahl, Brian

    2016-01-01

    As a result of antiretroviral therapeutic strategies, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection has become a long-term clinically manageable chronic disease for many infected individuals. However, despite this progress in therapeutic control, including undetectable viral loads and CD4+ T-cell counts in the normal range, viral mutations continue to accumulate in the peripheral blood compartment over time, indicating either low level reactivation and/or replication. Using patients from the Drexel Medicine CNS AIDS Research and Eradication Study (CARES) Cohort, whom have been sampled longitudinally for more than 7 years, genetic change was modeled against to the dominant integrated proviral quasispecies with respect to selection pressures such as therapeutic interventions, AIDS defining illnesses, and other factors. Phylogenetic methods based on the sequences of the LTR and tat exon 1 of the HIV-1 proviral DNA quasispecies were used to obtain an estimate of an average mutation rate of 5.3 nucleotides (nt)/kilobasepair (kb)/year (yr) prior to initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Following ART the baseline mutation rate was reduced to an average of 1.02 nt/kb/yr. The post-ART baseline rate of genetic change, however, appears to be unique for each patient. These studies represent our initial steps in quantifying rates of genetic change among HIV-1 quasispecies using longitudinally sampled sequences from patients at different stages of disease both before and after initiation of combination ART. Notably, while long-term ART reduced the estimated mutation rates in the vast majority of patients studied, there was still measurable HIV-1 mutation even in patients with no detectable virus by standard quantitative assays. Determining the factors that affect HIV-1 mutation rates in the peripheral blood may lead to elucidation of the mechanisms associated with changes in HIV-1 disease severity. PMID:27195985

  1. Computational virology: From the inside out.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Tyler; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-07-01

    Viruses typically pack their genetic material within a protein capsid. Enveloped viruses also have an outer membrane made up of a lipid bilayer and membrane-spanning glycoproteins. X-ray diffraction and cryoelectron microscopy provide high resolution static views of viral structure. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations may be used to provide dynamic insights into the structures of viruses and their components. There have been a number of simulations of viral capsids and (in some cases) of the inner core of RNA or DNA packaged within them. These simulations have generally focussed on the structural integrity and stability of the capsid and/or on the influence of the nucleic acid core on capsid stability. More recently there have been a number of simulation studies of enveloped viruses, including HIV-1, influenza A, and dengue virus. These have addressed the dynamic behaviour of the capsid, the matrix, and/or of the outer envelope. Analysis of the dynamics of the lipid bilayer components of the envelopes of influenza A and of dengue virus reveals a degree of biophysical robustness, which may contribute to the stability of virus particles in different environments. Significant computational challenges need to be addressed to aid simulation of complex viruses and their membranes, including the need to integrate structural data from a range of sources to enable us to move towards simulations of intact virions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov.

  2. HIV-1 Drug Resistance and Second-line Treatment in Children Randomized to Switch at Low versus Higher RNA Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Linda; Melvin, Ann; Fiscus, Susan; Saidi, Yacine; Nastouli, Eleni; Harper, Lynda; Compagnucci, Alexandra; Babiker, Abdel; McKinney, Ross; Gibb, Diana; Tudor-Williams, Gareth

    2015-01-01

    Background The PENPACT-1 trial compared virologic thresholds to determine when to switch to second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART). Using PENPACT-1 data, we aimed to describe HIV-1 drug resistance accumulation on first-line ART by virologic threshold. Methods PENPACT-1 had a 2x2 factorial design, randomizing HIV-infected children to start protease inhibitor (PI) versus non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) based ART, and switch at a 1000c/ml versus 30000c/ml threshold. Switch-criteria were: not achieving the threshold by week 24, confirmed rebound above the threshold thereafter, or CDC-C event. Resistance tests were performed on samples ≥1000c/ml before switch, re-suppression and at 4-year/trial-end. Results Sixty-seven children started PI-based ART and were randomized to switch at 1000c/ml (PI-1000), 64 PIs and 30000c/ml (PI-30000), 67 NNRTIs and 1000c/ml (NNRTI-1000), and 65 NNRTI and 30000c/ml (NNRTI-30000). Ninety-four (36%) children reached the 1000c/ml switch-criteria during 5 years follow-up. In 30000c/ml threshold arms, median time from 1000c/ml to 30000c/ml switch-criteria was 58 (PI) versus 80 (NNRTI) weeks (P=0.81). In NNRTI-30000 more NRTI resistance mutations accumulated than other groups. NNRTI mutations were selected before switching at 1000c/ml (23% NNRTI-1000, 27% NNRTI-30000). Sixty-two children started abacavir+lamivudine, 166 lamivudine+zidovudine or stavudine, and 35 other NRTIs. The abacavir+lamivudine group acquired fewest NRTI mutations. Of 60 switched to second-line, 79% PI-1000, 63% PI-30000, 64% NNRTI-1000 and 100% NNRTI-30000 were <400c/ml 24 weeks later. Conclusion Children on first-line NNRTI-based ART who were randomized to switch at a higher virologic threshold developed the most resistance, yet re-suppressed on second-line. An abacavir+lamivudine NRTI combination seemed protective against development of NRTI resistance. PMID:26322666

  3. GRL-0519, a Novel Oxatricyclic Ligand-Containing Nonpeptidic HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor (PI), Potently Suppresses Replication of a Wide Spectrum of Multi-PI-Resistant HIV-1 Variants In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Masayuki; Tojo, Yasushi; Salcedo-Gómez, Pedro Miguel; Campbell, Joseph Richard; Das, Debananda; Aoki, Manabu; Xu, Chun-Xiao; Rao, Kalapala Venkateswara; Ghosh, Arun K.

    2013-01-01

    We report that GRL-0519, a novel nonpeptidic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitor (PI) containing tris-tetrahydrofuranylurethane (tris-THF) and a sulfonamide isostere, is highly potent against laboratory HIV-1 strains and primary clinical isolates (50% effective concentration [EC50], 0.0005 to 0.0007 μM) with minimal cytotoxicity (50% cytotoxic concentration [CC50], 44.6 μM). GRL-0519 blocked the infectivity and replication of HIV-1NL4-3 variants selected by up to a 5 μM concentration of ritonavir, lopinavir, or atazanavir (EC50, 0.0028 to 0.0033 μM). GRL-0519 was also potent against multi-PI-resistant clinical HIV-1 variants isolated from patients who no longer responded to existing antiviral regimens after long-term antiretroviral therapy, highly darunavir (DRV)-resistant variants, and HIV-2ROD. The development of resistance against GRL-0519 was substantially delayed compared to other PIs, including amprenavir (APV) and DRV. The effects of nonspecific binding of human serum proteins on GRL-0519's antiviral activity were insignificant. Our analysis of the crystal structures of GRL-0519 (3OK9) and DRV (2IEN) with protease suggested that the tris-THF moiety, compared to the bis-THF moiety present in DRV, has greater water-mediated polar interactions with key active-site residues of protease and that the tris-THF moiety and paramethoxy group effectively fill the S2 and S2′ binding pockets, respectively, of the protease. The present data demonstrate that GRL-0519 has highly favorable features as a potential therapeutic agent for treating patients infected with wild-type and/or multi-PI-resistant variants and that the tris-THF moiety is critical for strong binding of GRL-0519 to the HIV protease substrate binding site and appears to be responsible for its favorable antiretroviral characteristics. PMID:23403426

  4. Molecular virology in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Josko, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    As one can see by the tests listed at www.amp.org, molecular diagnostic techniques have enab