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Sample records for hiv-1 dna plasmid

  1. Safety and Immunogenicity of an HIV-1 Gag DNA Vaccine with or without IL-12 and/or IL-15 Plasmid Cytokine Adjuvant in Healthy, HIV-1 Uninfected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kalams, Spyros A.; Parker, Scott; Jin, Xia; Elizaga, Marnie; Metch, Barbara; Wang, Maggie; Hural, John; Lubeck, Michael; Eldridge, John; Cardinali, Massimo; Blattner, William A.; Sobieszczyk, Magda; Suriyanon, Vinai; Kalichman, Artur; Weiner, David B.; Baden, Lindsey R.

    2012-01-01

    Background DNA vaccines are a promising approach to vaccination since they circumvent the problem of vector-induced immunity. DNA plasmid cytokine adjuvants have been shown to augment immune responses in small animals and in macaques. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed two first in human HIV vaccine trials in the US, Brazil and Thailand of an RNA-optimized truncated HIV-1 gag gene (p37) DNA derived from strain HXB2 administered either alone or in combination with dose-escalation of IL-12 or IL-15 plasmid cytokine adjuvants. Vaccinations with both the HIV immunogen and cytokine adjuvant were generally well-tolerated and no significant vaccine-related adverse events were identified. A small number of subjects developed asymptomatic low titer antibodies to IL-12 or IL-15. Cellular immunogenicity following 3 and 4 vaccinations was poor, with response rates to gag of 4.9%/8.7% among vaccinees receiving gag DNA alone, 0%/11.5% among those receiving gag DNA+IL-15, and no responders among those receiving DNA+high dose (1500 ug) IL-12 DNA. However, after three doses, 44.4% (4/9) of vaccinees receiving gag DNA and intermediate dose (500 ug) of IL-12 DNA demonstrated a detectable cellular immune response. Conclusions/Significance This combination of HIV gag DNA with plasmid cytokine adjuvants was well tolerated. There were minimal responses to HIV gag DNA alone, and no apparent augmentation with either IL-12 or IL-15 plasmid cytokine adjuvants. Despite the promise of DNA vaccines, newer formulations or methods of delivery will be required to increase their immunogenicity. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00115960 NCT00111605 PMID:22242162

  2. Optimized and enhanced DNA plasmid vector based in vivo construction of a neutralizing anti-HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein Fab.

    PubMed

    Muthumani, Kar; Flingai, Seleeke; Wise, Megan; Tingey, Colleen; Ugen, Kenneth E; Weiner, David B

    2013-10-01

    Monoclonal antibody preparations have demonstrated considerable clinical utility in the treatment of specific malignancies, as well as inflammatory and infectious diseases. Antibodies are conventionally delivered by passive administration, typically requiring costly large-scale laboratory development and production. Additional limitations include the necessity for repeat administrations, and the length of in vivo potency. Therefore, the development of methods to generate therapeutic antibodies and antibody like molecules in vivo, distinct from an active antigen-based immunization strategy, would have considerable clinical utility. In fact, adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector mediated delivery of immunoglobulin genes with subsequent generation of functional antibodies has recently been developed. As well, anon-viral vector mediated nucleic acid based delivery technology could permit the generation of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies in vivo, obviating potential safety issues associated with viral vector based gene delivery. This delivery strategy has limitations as well, mainly due to very low in vivo production and expression of protein from the delivered gene. In the study reported here we have constructed an "enhanced and optimized" DNA plasmid technology to generate immunoglobulin heavy and light chains (i.e., Fab fragments) from an established neutralizing anti-HIV envelope glycoprotein monoclonal antibody (VRC01). This "enhanced" DNA (E-DNA) plasmid technology includes codon/RNA optimization, leader sequence utilization, as well as targeted potentiation of delivery and expression of the Fab immunoglobulin genes through use of "adaptive" in vivo electroporation. The results demonstrate that delivery by this method of a single administration of the optimized Fab expressing constructs resulted in generation of Fab molecules in mouse sera possessing high antigen specific binding and HIV neutralization activity for at least 7 d after injection, against diverse

  3. Plasmid DNA manufacturing technology.

    PubMed

    Carnes, Aaron E; Williams, James A

    2007-01-01

    Today, plasmid DNA is becoming increasingly important as the next generation of biotechnology products (gene medicines and DNA vaccines) make their way into clinical trials, and eventually into the pharmaceutical marketplace. This review summarizes recent patents and patent applications relating to plasmid manufacturing, in the context of a comprehensive description of the plasmid manufacturing intellectual property landscape. Strategies for plasmid manufacturers to develop or in-license key plasmid manufacturing technologies are described with the endpoint of efficiently producing kg quantities of plasmid DNA of a quality that meets anticipated European and FDA quality specifications for commercial plasmid products.

  4. Yeast DNA plasmids.

    PubMed

    Gunge, N

    1983-01-01

    The study of yeast DNA plasmids has been initiated with the discovery of the 2-micron DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This multiple copy plasmid, organized into chromatin structure in vivo, probably exists in the nucleus and provides a good system to obtain information on eukaryotic DNA replication. Yeast transformation with the 2-micron DNA or artificially constructed chimeric plasmids had contributed significantly to the study of the molecular biology of yeast and eukaryotes, allowing the isolation and characterization of various genes, ars, centromeres, and telomeres, and also serving as a tool to study the expression of various heterologous genes. Encouraged by these fruitful results, new yeast plasmids have been screened among phylogenetically distant yeasts. The linear DNA plasmids (pGKl1 and pGKl2) from Kluyveromyces lactis are the first case of yeast plasmids associated with biological function (killer phenotype). This plasmid system would be ideal as a model to study the structure and function of eukaryotic linear chromosomes. The extracellular secretion of protein toxin suggests the plasmids to be an excellent candidate for a secretion vector. The importance of yeasts as suitable materials for the study of eukaryotic cell biology would be much enhanced by the advent of new transformation systems with diverse host yeasts of genetically and phylogenetically distinct properties.

  5. Phytoplasma plasmid DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mark T; Liefting, Lia W

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplasma plasmids have generally been detected from DNA extracted from plants and insects using methods designed for the purification of total phytoplasma DNA. Methods include extraction from tissues that are high in phytoplasma titre, such as the phloem of plants, with the use of CsCl-bisbenzimide gradients that exploit the low G+C content of phytoplasma DNA. Many of the methods employed for phytoplasma purification have been described elsewhere in this book. Here we describe in detail two methods that are specifically aimed at isolating plasmid DNA.

  6. Imaging HIV-1 Genomic DNA from Entry through Productive Infection.

    PubMed

    Stultz, Ryan D; Cenker, Jennifer J; McDonald, David

    2017-05-01

    In order to track the fate of HIV-1 particles from early entry events through productive infection, we developed a method to visualize HIV-1 DNA reverse transcription complexes by the incorporation and fluorescent labeling of the thymidine analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into nascent viral DNA during cellular entry. Monocyte-derived macrophages were chosen as natural targets of HIV-1, as they do not divide and therefore do not incorporate EdU into chromosomal DNA, which would obscure the detection of intranuclear HIV-1 genomes. Using this approach, we observed distinct EdU puncta in the cytoplasm of infected cells within 12 h postinfection and subsequent accumulation of puncta in the nucleus, which remained stable through 5 days. The depletion of the restriction factor SAMHD1 resulted in a markedly increased number of EdU puncta, allowing efficient quantification of HIV-1 reverse transcription events. Analysis of HIV-1 isolates bearing defined mutations in the capsid protein revealed differences in their cytoplasmic and nuclear accumulation, and data from quantitative PCR analysis closely recapitulated the EdU results. RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization identified actively transcribing, EdU-labeled HIV-1 genomes in productively infected cells, and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that CDK9, phosphorylated at serine 175, was recruited to RNA-positive HIV-1 DNA, providing a means to directly observe transcriptionally active HIV-1 genomes in productively infected cells. Overall, this system allows stable labeling and monitoring of HIV genomic DNA within infected cells during cytoplasmic transit, nuclear import, and mRNA synthesis.IMPORTANCE The fates of HIV-1 reverse transcription products within infected cells are not well understood. Although previous imaging approaches identified HIV-1 intermediates during early stages of infection, few have connected these events with the later stages that ultimately lead to proviral transcription and the

  7. Diversity of HIV-1 RNA and DNA in breast milk from HIV-1-infected mothers.

    PubMed

    Becquart, Pierre; Courgnaud, Valerie; Willumsen, Juana; Van de Perre, Philippe

    2007-07-05

    We compared human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA and DNA populations in the different fractions of breast milk (lactoserum, lipid layer, cell pellet) and between right and left breasts in four HIV-1-infected mothers by analyzing the hypervariable env C2-V5 region. Phylogenetic analyses of the viral quasispecies revealed that RNA populations and DNA populations were clearly distinct and that viral RNA sequences were similar in lipid layer and lactoserum in the milk of 3 out of 4 mothers. Comparison of viral DNA between milk from right and left breast showed a differential distribution of variants in three mothers. In contrast, RNA variants detected from milk of the two breasts were mixed in 3 out of 4 mothers. This study suggests that each mammary gland is subjected to microenvironmental pressure that may differ from the contralateral breast.

  8. Chemical adjuvants for plasmid DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Greenland, John R; Letvin, Norman L

    2007-05-10

    Plasmid DNA vaccines are a promising modality for immunization against a variety of human pathogens. Immunization via multiple routes with plasmid DNA can elicit potent cellular immune responses, and these immunogens can be administered repeatedly without inducing anti-vector immunity. Nonetheless, the immunogenicity of plasmid DNA vaccines has been limited by problems associated with delivery. A number of adjuvants have been designed to improve plasmid DNA immunogenicity, either by directly stimulating the immune system or by enhancing plasmid DNA expression. Chemical adjuvants for enhancing plasmid DNA expression include liposomes, polymers, and microparticles, all of which have shown promise for enhancing the expression and immunogenicity of plasmid DNA vaccines in animal models. Micro- and nanoparticles have not been shown to enhance immune responses to plasmid DNA vaccines. However, formulation of plasmid DNA with some non-particulate polymeric adjuvants has led to a statistically significant enhancement of immune responses. Further development of these technologies will significantly improve the utility of plasmid DNA vaccination.

  9. Establishment and stability of the latent HIV-1 DNA reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Brodin, Johanna; Zanini, Fabio; Thebo, Lina; Lanz, Christa; Bratt, Göran; Neher, Richard A; Albert, Jan

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 infection cannot be cured because the virus persists as integrated proviral DNA in long-lived cells despite years of suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). In a previous paper (Zanini et al, 2015) we documented HIV-1 evolution in 10 untreated patients. Here we characterize establishment, turnover, and evolution of viral DNA reservoirs in the same patients after 3–18 years of suppressive ART. A median of 14% (range 0–42%) of the DNA sequences were defective due to G-to-A hypermutation. Remaining DNA sequences showed no evidence of evolution over years of suppressive ART. Most sequences from the DNA reservoirs were very similar to viruses actively replicating in plasma (RNA sequences) shortly before start of ART. The results do not support persistent HIV-1 replication as a mechanism to maintain the HIV-1 reservoir during suppressive therapy. Rather, the data indicate that DNA variants are turning over as long as patients are untreated and that suppressive ART halts this turnover. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18889.001 PMID:27855060

  10. Retroviral Integrase Proteins and HIV-1 DNA Integration*

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Lavanya; Engelman, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Retroviral integrases catalyze two reactions, 3′-processing of viral DNA ends, followed by integration of the processed ends into chromosomal DNA. X-ray crystal structures of integrase-DNA complexes from prototype foamy virus, a member of the Spumavirus genus of Retroviridae, have revealed the structural basis of integration and how clinically relevant integrase strand transfer inhibitors work. Underscoring the translational potential of targeting virus-host interactions, small molecules that bind at the host factor lens epithelium-derived growth factor/p75-binding site on HIV-1 integrase promote dimerization and inhibit integrase-viral DNA assembly and catalysis. Here, we review recent advances in our knowledge of HIV-1 DNA integration, as well as future research directions. PMID:23043109

  11. Early Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Limits Exposure to HIV-1 Replication and Cell-Associated HIV-1 DNA Levels in Infants

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Margaret; Mick, Eric; Hudson, Richard; Mofenson, Lynne M.; Sullivan, John L.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to measure HIV-1 persistence following combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in infants and children. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) HIV-1 DNA was quantified prior to and after 1 year of cART in 30 children, stratified by time of initiation (early, age <3 months, ET; late, age >3 months-2 years, LT). Pre-therapy PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels correlated with pre-therapy plasma HIV-1 levels (r = 0.59, p<0.001), remaining statistically significant (p = 0.002) after adjustment for prior perinatal antiretroviral exposure and age at cART initiation. PBMC HIV-1 DNA declined significantly after 1 year of cART (Overall: -0.91±0.08 log10 copies per million PBMC, p<0.001; ET: -1.04±0.11 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC, p<0.001; LT: -0.74 ±0.13 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC, p<0.001) but rates of decline did not differ significantly between ET and LT. HIV-1 replication exposure over the first 12 months of cART, estimated as area-under-the-curve (AUC) of circulating plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, was significantly associated with PBMC HIV-1 DNA at one year (r = 0.51, p = 0.004). In 21 children with sustained virologic suppression after 1 year of cART, PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels continued to decline between years 1 and 4 (slope -0.21 log10 DNA copies per million PBMC per year); decline slopes did not differ significantly between ET and LT. PBMC HIV-1 DNA levels at 1 year and 4 years of cART correlated with age at cART initiation (1 year: p = 0.04; 4 years: p = 0.03) and age at virologic control (1 and 4 years, p = 0.02). Altogether, these data indicate that reducing exposure to HIV-1 replication and younger age at cART initiation are associated with lower HIV-1 DNA levels at and after one year of age, supporting the concept that HIV-1 diagnosis and cART initiation in infants should occur as early as possible. PMID:27104621

  12. Microwave effects on plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Sagripanti, J L; Swicord, M L; Davis, C C

    1987-05-01

    The exposure of purified plasmid DNA to microwave radiation at nonthermal levels in the frequency range from 2.00 to 8.75 GHz produces single- and double-strand breaks that are detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Microwave-induced damage to DNA depends on the presence of small amounts of copper. This effect is dependent upon both the microwave power and the duration of the exposure. Cuprous, but not cupric, ions were able to mimic the effects produced by microwaves on DNA.

  13. Microwave effects on plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sagripanti, J.L.; Swicord, M.L.; Davis, C.C.

    1987-05-01

    The exposure of purified plasmid DNA to microwave radiation at nonthermal levels in the frequency range from 2.00 to 8.75 GHz produces single- and double-strand breaks that are detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Microwave-induced damage to DNA depends on the presence of small amounts of copper. This effect is dependent upon both the microwave power and the duration of the exposure. Cuprous, but not cupric, ions were able to mimic the effects produced by microwaves on DNA.

  14. Production of Plasmid DNA as Pharmaceutical.

    PubMed

    Schmeer, Marco; Schleef, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical applications of plasmid DNA require certain quality standards, depending on the intended use of the plasmids. That is, for direct gene transfer into human, GMP Grade is mandatory, however, for GMP production of for example viral vectors (AAV or mRNA etc.), the plasmid DNA used has not to be produced under GMP necessarily. Here we summarize important features of producing plasmid DNA, ensuring the required quality for the intended (pharmaceutical) application.

  15. Topological Behavior of Plasmid DNA

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, N. Patrick; Vologodskii, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of the B-form structure of DNA by Watson and Crick led to an explosion of research on nucleic acids in the fields of biochemistry, biophysics, and genetics. Powerful techniques were developed to reveal a myriad of different structural conformations that change B-DNA as it is transcribed, replicated, and recombined and as sister chromosomes are moved into new daughter cell compartments during cell division. This article links the original discoveries of superhelical structure and molecular topology to non-B form DNA structure and contemporary biochemical and biophysical techniques. The emphasis is on the power of plasmids for studying DNA structure and function. The conditions that trigger the formation of alternative DNA structures such as left-handed Z-DNA, inter- and intra-molecular triplexes, triple-stranded DNA, and linked catenanes and hemicatenanes are explained. The DNA dynamics and topological issues are detailed for stalled replication forks and for torsional and structural changes on DNA in front of and behind a transcription complex and a replisome. The complex and interconnected roles of topoisomerases and abundant small nucleoid association proteins are explained. And methods are described for comparing in vivo and in vitro reactions to probe and understand the temporal pathways of DNA and chromosome chemistry that occur inside living cells. PMID:26104708

  16. Topological Behavior of Plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Higgins, N Patrick; Vologodskii, Alexander V

    2015-04-01

    The discovery of the B-form structure of DNA by Watson and Crick led to an explosion of research on nucleic acids in the fields of biochemistry, biophysics, and genetics. Powerful techniques were developed to reveal a myriad of different structural conformations that change B-DNA as it is transcribed, replicated, and recombined and as sister chromosomes are moved into new daughter cell compartments during cell division. This article links the original discoveries of superhelical structure and molecular topology to non-B form DNA structure and contemporary biochemical and biophysical techniques. The emphasis is on the power of plasmids for studying DNA structure and function. The conditions that trigger the formation of alternative DNA structures such as left-handed Z-DNA, inter- and intra-molecular triplexes, triple-stranded DNA, and linked catenanes and hemicatenanes are explained. The DNA dynamics and topological issues are detailed for stalled replication forks and for torsional and structural changes on DNA in front of and behind a transcription complex and a replisome. The complex and interconnected roles of topoisomerases and abundant small nucleoid association proteins are explained. And methods are described for comparing in vivo and in vitro reactions to probe and understand the temporal pathways of DNA and chromosome chemistry that occur inside living cells.

  17. Single-molecule study of DNA polymerization activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase on DNA templates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangjin; Schroeder, Charles M; Xie, X Sunney

    2010-02-05

    HIV-1 RT (human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase) is a multifunctional polymerase responsible for reverse transcription of the HIV genome, including DNA replication on both RNA and DNA templates. During reverse transcription in vivo, HIV-1 RT replicates through various secondary structures on RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) templates without the need for a nucleic acid unwinding protein, such as a helicase. In order to understand the mechanism of polymerization through secondary structures, we investigated the DNA polymerization activity of HIV-1 RT on long ssDNA templates using a multiplexed single-molecule DNA flow-stretching assay. We observed that HIV-1 RT performs fast primer extension DNA synthesis on single-stranded regions of DNA (18.7 nt/s) and switches its activity to slow strand displacement synthesis at DNA hairpin locations (2.3 nt/s). Furthermore, we found that the rate of strand displacement synthesis is dependent on the GC content in hairpin stems and template stretching force. This indicates that the strand displacement synthesis occurs through a mechanism that is neither completely active nor passive: that is, the opening of the DNA hairpin is driven by a combination of free energy released during dNTP (deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate) hydrolysis and thermal fraying of base pairs. Our experimental observations provide new insight into the interchanging modes of DNA replication by HIV-1 RT on long ssDNA templates.

  18. HIV-1 Tropism Determines Different Mutation Profiles in Proviral DNA.

    PubMed

    Nascimento-Brito, Sieberth; Paulo Zukurov, Jean; Maricato, Juliana T; Volpini, Angela C; Salim, Anna Christina M; Araújo, Flávio M G; Coimbra, Roney S; Oliveira, Guilherme C; Antoneli, Fernando; Janini, Luiz Mário R

    2015-01-01

    In order to establish new infections HIV-1 particles need to attach to receptors expressed on the cellular surface. HIV-1 particles interact with a cell membrane receptor known as CD4 and subsequently with another cell membrane molecule known as a co-receptor. Two major different co-receptors have been identified: C-C chemokine Receptor type 5 (CCR5) and C-X-C chemokine Receptor type 4 (CXCR4) Previous reports have demonstrated cellular modifications upon HIV-1 binding to its co-receptors including gene expression modulations. Here we investigated the effect of viral binding to either CCR5 or CXCR4 co-receptors on viral diversity after a single round of reverse transcription. CCR5 and CXCR4 pseudotyped viruses were used to infect non-stimulated and stimulated PBMCs and purified CD4 positive cells. We adopted the SOLiD methodology to sequence virtually the entire proviral DNA from all experimental infections. Infections with CCR5 and CXCR4 pseudotyped virus resulted in different patterns of genetic diversification. CCR5 virus infections produced extensive proviral diversity while in CXCR4 infections a more localized substitution process was observed. In addition, we present pioneering results of a recently developed method for the analysis of SOLiD generated sequencing data applicable to the study of viral quasi-species. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of viral quasi-species evaluation by NGS methodologies. We presented for the first time strong evidence for a host cell driving mechanism acting on the HIV-1 genetic variability under the control of co-receptor stimulation. Additional investigations are needed to further clarify this question, which is relevant to viral diversification process and consequent disease progression.

  19. Broad and potent immune responses to a low dose intradermal HIV-1 DNA boosted with HIV-1 recombinant MVA among healthy adults in Tanzania☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Bakari, Muhammad; Aboud, Said; Nilsson, Charlotta; Francis, Joel; Buma, Deus; Moshiro, Candida; Aris, Eric A.; Lyamuya, Eligius F.; Janabi, Mohamed; Godoy-Ramirez, Karina; Joachim, Agricola; Polonis, Victoria R.; Bråve, Andreas; Earl, Patricia; Robb, Merlin; Marovich, Mary; Wahren, Britta; Pallangyo, Kisali; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Mhalu, Fred; Sandström, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background We conducted a phase I/II randomized placebo-controlled trial with the aim of exploring whether priming with a low intradermal dose of a multiclade, multigene HIV-1 DNA vaccine could improve the immunogenicity of the same vaccine given intramuscularly prior to boosting with a heterologous HIV-1 MVA among healthy adults in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods Sixty HIV-uninfected volunteers were randomized to receive DNA plasmid vaccine 1 mg intradermally (id), n = 20, or 3.8 mg intramuscularly (im), n = 20, or placebo, n = 20, using a needle-free injection device. DNA plasmids encoding HIV-1 genes gp160 subtype A, B, C; rev B; p17/p24 gag A, B and Rtmut B were given at weeks 0, 4 and 12. Recombinant MVA (108 pfu) expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol of CRF01_AE or placebo was administered im at month 9 and 21. Results The vaccines were well tolerated. Two weeks after the third HIV-DNA injection, 22/38 (58%) vaccinees had IFN-γ ELISpot responses to Gag. Two weeks after the first HIV-MVA boost all 35 (100%) vaccinees responded to Gag and 31 (89%) to Env. Two to four weeks after the second HIV-MVA boost, 28/29 (97%) vaccinees had IFN-γ ELISpot responses, 27 (93%) to Gag and 23 (79%) to Env. The id-primed recipients had significantly higher responses to Env than im recipients. Intracellular cytokine staining for Gag-specific IFN-γ/IL-2 production showed both CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses. All vaccinees had HIV-specific lymphoproliferative responses. All vaccinees reacted in diagnostic HIV serological tests and 26/29 (90%) had antibodies against gp160 after the second HIV-MVA boost. Furthermore, while all of 29 vaccinee sera were negative for neutralizing antibodies against clade B, C and CRF01 AE pseudoviruses in the TZM-bl neutralization assay, in a PBMC assay, the response rate ranged from 31% to 83% positives, depending upon the clade B or CRF01_AE virus tested. This vaccine approach is safe and highly immunogenic. Low dose, id HIV-DNA priming elicited higher

  20. SINGLE-MOLECULE STUDY OF DNA POLYMERIZATION ACTIVITY OF HIV-1 REVERSE TRANSCRIPTASE ON DNA TEMPLATES

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangjin; Schroeder, Charles M.; Xie, X. Sunney

    2009-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) is a multifunctional polymerase responsible for reverse transcription of the HIV genome, including DNA replication on both RNA and DNA templates. During reverse transcription in vivo, HIV-1 RT replicates through various secondary structures on RNA and single-stranded DNA templates without the need for a nucleic acid unwinding protein, such as a helicase. In order to understand the mechanism of polymerization through secondary structures, we investigated the DNA polymerization activity of HIV-1 RT on long single-stranded DNA templates using a multiplexed single-molecule DNA flow-stretching assay. We observed that HIV-1 RT performs fast primer extension DNA synthesis on single-stranded regions of DNA (18.7 nt/s) and switches its activity to slow strand displacement synthesis at DNA hairpin locations (2.3 nt/s). Furthermore, we found that the rate of strand displacement synthesis is dependent on the GC content in hairpin stems and template stretching force. This indicates that the strand displacement synthesis occurs through a mechanism that is neither completely active nor passive, i.e. the opening of the DNA hairpin is driven by a combination of free energy released during dNTP hydrolysis and thermal fraying of base pairs. Our experimental observations provide new insight into the interchanging modes of DNA replication by HIV-1 RT on long single-stranded DNA templates. PMID:19968999

  1. Safety and Immunogenicity Study of Multiclade HIV-1 Adenoviral Vector Vaccine Alone or as Boost following a Multiclade HIV-1 DNA Vaccine in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Susan; Than, Soe; Adams, Elizabeth M.; Graham, Barney S.; Koup, Richard A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Smith, Carol; Dally, Len; Tarragona-Fiol, Tony; Bergin, Philip J.; Hayes, Peter; Ho, Martin; Loughran, Kelley; Komaroff, Wendy; Stevens, Gwynneth; Thomson, Helen; Boaz, Mark J.; Cox, Josephine H.; Schmidt, Claudia; Gilmour, Jill; Nabel, Gary J.; Fast, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Background We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase I study of a recombinant replication-defective adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) vector expressing HIV-1 Gag and Pol from subtype B and Env from subtypes A, B and C, given alone or as boost following a DNA plasmid vaccine expressing the same HIV-1 proteins plus Nef, in 114 healthy HIV-uninfected African adults. Methodology/Principal Findings Volunteers were randomized to 4 groups receiving the rAd5 vaccine intramuscularly at dosage levels of 1×1010 or 1×1011 particle units (PU) either alone or as boost following 3 injections of the DNA vaccine given at 4 mg/dose intramuscularly by needle-free injection using Biojector® 2000. Safety and immunogenicity were evaluated for 12 months. Both vaccines were well-tolerated. Overall, 62% and 86% of vaccine recipients in the rAd5 alone and DNA prime - rAd5 boost groups, respectively, responded to the HIV-1 proteins by an interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) ELISPOT. The frequency of immune responses was independent of rAd5 dosage levels. The highest frequency of responses after rAd5 alone was detected at 6 weeks; after DNA prime - rAd5 boost, at 6 months (end of study). At baseline, neutralizing antibodies against Ad5 were present in 81% of volunteers; the distribution was similar across the 4 groups. Pre-existing immunity to Ad5 did not appear to have a significant impact on reactogenicity or immune response rates to HIV antigens by IFN-γ ELISPOT. Binding antibodies against Env were detected in up to 100% recipients of DNA prime - rAd5 boost. One volunteer acquired HIV infection after the study ended, two years after receipt of rAd5 alone. Conclusions/Significance The HIV-1 rAd5 vaccine, either alone or as a boost following HIV-1 DNA vaccine, was well-tolerated and immunogenic in African adults. DNA priming increased the frequency and magnitude of cellular and humoral immune responses, but there was no effect of rAd5 dosage on immunogenicity endpoints. Trial

  2. Early infant diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in Luanda, Angola, using a new DNA PCR assay and dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Martin, Francisco; Palladino, Claudia; Mateus, Rita; Bolzan, Anna; Gomes, Perpétua; Brito, José; Carvalho, Ana Patrícia; Cardoso, Yolanda; Domingos, Cristovão; Lôa Clemente, Vanda Sofia; Taveira, Nuno

    2017-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment reduces HIV-1-related mortality, morbidity and size of viral reservoirs in infants infected perinatally. Commercial molecular tests enable the early diagnosis of infection in infants but the high cost and low sensitivity with dried blood spots (DBS) limit their use in sub-Saharan Africa. To develop and validate a sensitive and cheap qualitative proviral DNA PCR-based assay for early infant diagnosis (EID) in HIV-1-exposed infants using DBS samples. Chelex-based method was used to extract DNA from DBS samples followed by a nested PCR assay using primers for the HIV-1 integrase gene. Limit of detection (LoD) was determined by Probit regression using limiting dilutions of newly produced recombinant plasmids with the integrase gene of all HIV-1 subtypes and ACH-2 cells. Clinical sensitivity and specificity were evaluated on 100 HIV-1 infected adults; 5 infected infants; 50 healthy volunteers; 139 HIV-1-exposed infants of the Angolan Pediatric HIV Cohort (APEHC) with serology at 18 months of life. All subtypes and CRF02_AG were amplified with a LoD of 14 copies. HIV-1 infection in infants was detected at month 1 of life. Sensitivity rate in adults varied with viral load, while diagnostic specificity was 100%. The percentage of HIV-1 MTCT cases between January 2012 and October 2014 was 2.2%. The cost per test was 8-10 USD which is 2- to 4-fold lower in comparison to commercial assays. The new PCR assay enables early and accurate EID. The simplicity and low-cost of the assay make it suitable for generalized implementation in Angola and other resource-constrained countries.

  3. HIV-1 DNA predicts disease progression and post-treatment virological control.

    PubMed

    Williams, James P; Hurst, Jacob; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Cooper, David; Schechter, Mauro; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Fidler, Sarah; Carrington, Mary; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan; Koelsch, Kersten K; Kelleher, Anthony D; Phillips, Rodney E; Frater, John

    2014-09-12

    In HIV-1 infection, a population of latently infected cells facilitates viral persistence despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). With the aim of identifying individuals in whom ART might induce a period of viraemic control on stopping therapy, we hypothesised that quantification of the pool of latently infected cells in primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) would predict clinical progression and viral replication following ART. We measured HIV-1 DNA in a highly characterised randomised population of individuals with PHI. We explored associations between HIV-1 DNA and immunological and virological markers of clinical progression, including viral rebound in those interrupting therapy. In multivariable analyses, HIV-1 DNA was more predictive of disease progression than plasma viral load and, at treatment interruption, predicted time to plasma virus rebound. HIV-1 DNA may help identify individuals who could safely interrupt ART in future HIV-1 eradication trials.

  4. Large-scale preparation of plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Heilig, J S; Elbing, K L; Brent, R

    2001-05-01

    Although the need for large quantities of plasmid DNA has diminished as techniques for manipulating small quantities of DNA have improved, occasionally large amounts of high-quality plasmid DNA are desired. This unit describes the preparation of milligram quantities of highly purified plasmid DNA. The first part of the unit describes three methods for preparing crude lysates enriched in plasmid DNA from bacterial cells grown in liquid culture: alkaline lysis, boiling, and Triton lysis. The second part describes four methods for purifying plasmid DNA in such lysates away from contaminating RNA and protein: CsCl/ethidium bromide density gradient centrifugation, polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation, anion-exchange chromatography, and size-exclusion chromatography.

  5. Accurate Quantification of Episomal HIV-1 Two-Long Terminal Repeat Circles by Use of Optimized DNA Isolation and Droplet Digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Malatinkova, Eva; Kiselinova, Maja; Bonczkowski, Pawel; Trypsteen, Wim; Messiaen, Peter; Vermeire, Jolien; Verhasselt, Bruno; Vervisch, Karen; De Spiegelaere, Ward

    2014-01-01

    Episomal HIV-1 two-long terminal repeat (2-LTR) circles are considered markers for ongoing viral replication. Two sample processing procedures were compared to accurately quantify 2-LTR in patients by using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Here, we show that plasmid isolation with a spiked non-HIV plasmid for normalization enables more accurate 2-LTR quantification than genomic DNA isolation. PMID:25502524

  6. Evaluation in macaques of HIV-1 DNA vaccines containing primate CpG motifs and fowlpoxvirus vaccines co-expressing IFNgamma or IL-12.

    PubMed

    Dale, C Jane; De Rose, Robert; Wilson, Kim M; Croom, Hayley A; Thomson, Scott; Coupar, Barbara E H; Ramsay, Alistair; Purcell, Damian F J; Ffrench, Rosemary; Law, Matthew; Emery, Sean; Cooper, David A; Ramshaw, Ian A; Boyle, David B; Kent, Stephen J

    2004-11-25

    Induction of HIV-specific T-cell responses by vaccines may facilitate efficient control of HIV. Plasmid DNA vaccines and recombinant fowlpoxvirus (rFPV) vaccines are promising HIV-1 vaccine candidates, although either vaccine alone may be insufficient to protect against HIV-1. A consecutive immunisation strategy involving priming with DNA and boosting with rFPV vaccines encoding multiple common HIV-1 antigens was further evaluated in 30 macaques. The DNA vaccine vector included CpG immunostimulatory molecules, and rFPV vaccines were compared with rFPV vaccines co-expressing the pro-T cell cytokines IFNgamma or IL-12. Vaccines expressed multiple HIV-1 genes, mutated to remove active sites of the HIV proteins. The vaccines were well tolerated, and a significant enhancement of DNA-vaccine primed HIV-1 specific T lymphocyte responses was observed following rFPV boosting. Co-expression of IFNgamma or IL-12 by the rFPV vaccines did not further enhance immune responses. Non-sterilising protection from a non-pathogenic HIV-1 challenge was observed. This study provides evidence of a safe, optimised, strategy for the generation of T-cell mediated immunity to HIV-1.

  7. Laboratory indicators of mastitis are not associated with elevated HIV-1 DNA loads or predictive of HIV-1 RNA loads in breast milk.

    PubMed

    Gantt, Soren; Shetty, Avinash K; Seidel, Kristy D; Matasa, Kuda; Musingwini, Georgina; Woelk, Godfrey; Zijenah, Lynn S; Katzenstein, David A; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2007-08-15

    Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1 has been associated with symptomatic and asymptomatic mastitis and with the quantity of HIV-1 RNA and DNA in maternal milk. An improved understanding of the relationship between indicators of inflammation and HIV-1 loads in breast milk could improve MTCT prevention strategies. In a cross-sectional study, laboratory indicators of mastitis (breast milk sodium [Na(+)] concentration, sodium : potassium ratio [Na(+) : K(+)], and leukocyte count) were related to breast milk HIV-1 RNA and DNA loads and were evaluated for predicting viral loads in milk. Mastitis was present in 63 (15%) of 407, 60 (15%) of 407, and 76 (18%) of 412 milk specimens, as defined by Na(+) concentration >12 mmol/L, Na(+) : K(+) >1, and total leukocyte counts > or =10(6) cells/mL, respectively. Each indicator was associated with an increased milk HIV-1 RNA load (P<.05) but not with HIV-1 DNA load. Neutrophils correlated better with milk HIV-1 RNA load than total leukocytes. However, neither neutrophil count, Na(+) concentration, nor Na(+) : K(+) displayed a threshold that was both sensitive and specific for the detection of HIV-1 RNA in milk at thresholds of > or =50 or > or =10(4) copies/mL. HIV-1 DNA loads in breast milk were not increased during mastitis. Neither milk cell counts nor electrolyte concentrations were useful predictors of milk HIV-1 RNA or DNA loads for individual women.

  8. Impact of Chemotherapy for HIV-1 Related Lymphoma on Residual Viremia and Cellular HIV-1 DNA in Patients on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cillo, Anthony R.; Krishnan, Supriya; McMahon, Deborah K.; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T.; Para, Michael F.; Mellors, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The first cure of HIV-1 infection was achieved through complex, multimodal therapy including myeloablative chemotherapy, total body irradiation, anti-thymocyte globulin, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation with a CCR5 delta32 homozygous donor. The contributions of each component of this therapy to HIV-1 eradication are unclear. To assess the impact of cytotoxic chemotherapy alone on HIV-1 persistence, we longitudinally evaluated low-level plasma viremia and HIV-1 DNA in PBMC from patients in the ACTG A5001/ALLRT cohort on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) who underwent chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma without interrupting ART. Plasma HIV-1 RNA, total HIV-1 DNA and 2-LTR circles (2-LTRs) in PBMC were measured using sensitive qPCR assays. In the 9 patients who received moderately intensive chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma with uninterrupted ART, low-level plasma HIV-1 RNA did not change significantly with chemotherapy: median HIV-1 RNA was 1 copy/mL (interquartile range: 1.0 to 20) pre-chemotherapy versus 4 copies/mL (interquartile range: 1.0 to 7.0) post-chemotherapy. HIV-1 DNA levels also did not change significantly, with median pre-chemotherapy HIV-1 DNA of 355 copies/106 CD4+ cells versus 228 copies/106 CD4+ cells post-chemotherapy. 2-LTRs were detectable in 2 of 9 patients pre-chemotherapy and in 3 of 9 patients post-chemotherapy. In summary, moderately intensive chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma in the context of continuous ART did not have a prolonged impact on HIV-1 persistence. Clinical Trials Registration Unique Identifier: NCT00001137 PMID:24638072

  9. Impact of chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma on residual viremia and cellular HIV-1 DNA in patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Cillo, Anthony R; Krishnan, Supriya; McMahon, Deborah K; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T; Para, Michael F; Mellors, John W

    2014-01-01

    The first cure of HIV-1 infection was achieved through complex, multimodal therapy including myeloablative chemotherapy, total body irradiation, anti-thymocyte globulin, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation with a CCR5 delta32 homozygous donor. The contributions of each component of this therapy to HIV-1 eradication are unclear. To assess the impact of cytotoxic chemotherapy alone on HIV-1 persistence, we longitudinally evaluated low-level plasma viremia and HIV-1 DNA in PBMC from patients in the ACTG A5001/ALLRT cohort on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) who underwent chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma without interrupting ART. Plasma HIV-1 RNA, total HIV-1 DNA and 2-LTR circles (2-LTRs) in PBMC were measured using sensitive qPCR assays. In the 9 patients who received moderately intensive chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma with uninterrupted ART, low-level plasma HIV-1 RNA did not change significantly with chemotherapy: median HIV-1 RNA was 1 copy/mL (interquartile range: 1.0 to 20) pre-chemotherapy versus 4 copies/mL (interquartile range: 1.0 to 7.0) post-chemotherapy. HIV-1 DNA levels also did not change significantly, with median pre-chemotherapy HIV-1 DNA of 355 copies/106 CD4+ cells versus 228 copies/106 CD4+ cells post-chemotherapy. 2-LTRs were detectable in 2 of 9 patients pre-chemotherapy and in 3 of 9 patients post-chemotherapy. In summary, moderately intensive chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma in the context of continuous ART did not have a prolonged impact on HIV-1 persistence. Clinical trials registration unique identifier: NCT00001137.

  10. RNA versus DNA (NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 v1.2 versus Amplicor HIV-1 DNA test v1.5) for early diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in infants in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Kébé, K; Ndiaye, O; Ndiaye, H Diop; Mengue, P Mbakob; Guindo, P M M; Diallo, S; Léye, N; Gueye, S B; Diallo, A Gaye; Kane, C Touré; Mboup, S

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the performance of the NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 v1.2 platform (bioMérieux, France) to the Amplicor HIV-1 DNA test v1.5 (Roche Molecular Systems, Switzerland) in detecting HIV-1 infection in infants using venipuncture-derived whole blood in tubes and dried blood spots. A total of 149 dried blood spots and 43 EDTA-anticoagulated peripheral blood samples were collected throughout Dakar and other areas in Senegal from infants and children aged 3 weeks to 24 months who were born to HIV-1-infected mothers. Samples were tested using the NucliSENS and Amplicor technologies. The NucliSENS and Amplicor results were 100% concordant using either EDTA-anticoagulated peripheral blood or dried blood spots. Compared to Amplicor, the sensitivity and specificity of the NucliSENS test were 100%. The NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 RNA assay performed as well as the Amplicor HIV-1 DNA test in detecting HIV-1 infection in infants. In addition, this platform can give an indication of the viral load baseline. The NucliSENS EasyQ platform is a good alternative for early infant diagnosis of HIV-1 infection.

  11. Integrated and Total HIV-1 DNA Predict Ex Vivo Viral Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Kiselinova, Maja; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Buzon, Maria Jose; Malatinkova, Eva; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Vandekerckhove, Linos

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of a reservoir of latently infected CD4 T cells remains one of the major obstacles to cure HIV. Numerous strategies are being explored to eliminate this reservoir. To translate these efforts into clinical trials, there is a strong need for validated biomarkers that can monitor the reservoir over time in vivo. A comprehensive study was designed to evaluate and compare potential HIV-1 reservoir biomarkers. A cohort of 25 patients, treated with suppressive antiretroviral therapy was sampled at three time points, with median of 2.5 years (IQR: 2.4–2.6) between time point 1 and 2; and median of 31 days (IQR: 28–36) between time point 2 and 3. Patients were median of 6 years (IQR: 3–12) on ART, and plasma viral load (<50 copies/ml) was suppressed for median of 4 years (IQR: 2–8). Total HIV-1 DNA, unspliced (us) and multiply spliced HIV-1 RNA, and 2LTR circles were quantified by digital PCR in peripheral blood, at 3 time points. At the second time point, a viral outgrowth assay (VOA) was performed, and integrated HIV-1 DNA and relative mRNA expression levels of HIV-1 restriction factors were quantified. No significant change was found for long- and short-term dynamics of all HIV-1 markers tested in peripheral blood. Integrated HIV-1 DNA was associated with total HIV-1 DNA (p<0.001, R² = 0.85), us HIV-1 RNA (p = 0.029, R² = 0.40), and VOA (p = 0.041, R2 = 0.44). Replication-competent virus was detected in 80% of patients by the VOA and it correlated with total HIV-1 DNA (p = 0.039, R² = 0.54). The mean quantification difference between Alu-PCR and VOA was 2.88 log10, and 2.23 log10 between total HIV-1 DNA and VOA. The levels of usHIV-1 RNA were inversely correlated with mRNA levels of several HIV-1 restriction factors (TRIM5α, SAMHD1, MX2, SLFN11, pSIP1). Our study reveals important correlations between the viral outgrowth and total and integrated HIV-1 DNA measures, suggesting that the total pool of HIV-1 DNA may predict the size of the

  12. Transformation of Bacillus polymyxa with plasmid DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Mallonee, D H; Speckman, R A

    1989-01-01

    A plasmid transformation system was developed for Bacillus polymyxa ATCC 12321 and derivatives of this strain. The method utilizes a penicillin-treated-cell technique to facilitate uptake of the plasmid DNA. Low-frequency transformation (10(-6) per recipient cell) of plasmids pC194, pBD64, and pBC16 was accomplished with this method. Selection for the transformants was accomplished on both hypertonic and nonhypertonic selective media, with the highest rates of recovery occurring on a peptone-glucose-yeast extract medium containing 0.25 M sucrose. Several additional plasmids were shown to be capable of transferring their antibiotic resistance phenotypes to B. polymyxa through the use of a protoplast transformation procedure which allowed for a more efficient transfer of the plasmid DNA. However, cell walls could not be regenerated on the transformed protoplasts, and the transformants could not be subcultured from the original selective media. Images PMID:2604393

  13. Plasmid fermentation process for DNA immunization applications.

    PubMed

    Carnes, Aaron E; Williams, James A

    2014-01-01

    Plasmid DNA for immunization applications must be of the highest purity and quality. The ability of downstream purification to efficiently produce a pure final product is directly influenced by the performance of the upstream fermentation process. While several clinical manufacturing facilities already have validated fermentation processes in place to manufacture plasmid DNA for use in humans, a simple and inexpensive laboratory-scale fermentation process can be valuable for in-house production of plasmid DNA for use in animal efficacy studies. This chapter describes a simple fed-batch fermentation process for producing bacterial cell paste enriched with high-quality plasmid DNA. A constant feeding strategy results in a medium cell density culture with continuously increasing plasmid amplification towards the end of the process. Cell banking and seed culture preparation protocols, which can dramatically influence final product yield and quality, are also described. These protocols are suitable for production of research-grade plasmid DNA at the 100 mg-to-1.5 g scale from a typical 10 L laboratory benchtop fermentor.

  14. A genotypic HIV-1 proviral DNA coreceptor tropism assay: characterization in viremic subjects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV-1 coreceptor tropism testing is used to evaluate eligibility for CCR5 antagonist therapy. However, HIV-1 RNA-based tests are not suitable for virologically suppressed patients, therefore the use of proviral DNA tropism testing has been investigated. We describe a novel proviral DNA-based genotypic tropism assay and compare its performance to that of a sensitive HIV-1 RNA-based genotypic test. Methods Tropism was determined using HIV-1 plasma RNA and proviral DNA from 42 paired samples from patients with plasma viral loads ≥1000 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL. Proviral DNA sample types included whole blood, separated peripheral blood mononuclear cells resuspended in phosphate-buffered saline and peripheral blood mononuclear cells resuspended in spun plasma. The HIV-1 envelope V3 region was PCR-amplified, sequenced in triplicate, and analyzed for tropism with the geno2pheno algorithm using a 10% false-positive rate (FPR). Results Amplicons were obtained from proviral DNA and plasma RNA in 41/42 samples. Tropism predictions were highly concordant (93%–98%) between proviral DNA and plasma RNA, regardless of the proviral DNA isolation method. Non-R5 proviral DNA results were obtained for 100% of patients with detectable non-R5 plasma HIV-1 RNA results. Geno2pheno FPRs for proviral DNA and plasma RNA were highly correlated (Spearman rho = 0.86). Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that proviral DNA tropism determinations from whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells were highly concordant with plasma HIV-1 RNA tropism determinations. This assay may be useful for screening virologically suppressed patients for CCR5-antagonist eligibility and for research purposes. PMID:24904682

  15. Electrotransformation of Yersinia ruckeri by plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Cutrín, J M; Conchas, R F; Barja, J L; Toranzo, A E

    1994-01-01

    Yersinia ruckeri, a fish pathogenic bacterium in aquaculture, was used to evaluate the electroporation as a new transformation method for this species. DNA used for the electrotransformation were plasmids of molecular mass ranging from 2.3 kb to 33 kb, and diverse replicons. To optimize this method we used Y. ruckeri 11.29 strain (from serotype 02) and pSU2718 DNA. The best transformation efficiency (6.0 x 10(5) transformants/micrograms DNA) was obtained with 12.5 kV/cm, 25 microF, 400 omega and 2 hours of incubation after pulse. When these conditions were applied to other strains belonging to different serotypes and other plasmids, we obtained transformants in all strains assayed, but only when using low molecular weight plasmids. Plasmid vectors and resident plasmid were not modified in host strains after electrotransformation. In studies of conformation we confirmed that only circular DNA was able for transformation. The utilization of this technique for direct cloning in Y. ruckeri makes possible further studies on recombinant DNA.

  16. DNA and Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Vaccines Encoding Multiple Cytotoxic and Helper T-Lymphocyte Epitopes of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Are Safe but Weakly Immunogenic in HIV-1-Uninfected, Vaccinia Virus-Naive Adults

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Mark J.; deCamp, Allan; Hay, Christine Mhorag; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Noonan, Elizabeth; Livingston, Brian D.; Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Kalams, Spyros A.; Cassis-Ghavami, Farah L.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated a DNA plasmid-vectored vaccine and a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine (MVA-mBN32), each encoding cytotoxic and helper T-lymphocyte epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial in 36 HIV-1-uninfected adults using a heterologous prime-boost schedule. HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses, measured as interleukin-2 and/or gamma interferon production, were induced in 1 (4%) of 28 subjects after the first MVA-mBN32 immunization and in 3 (12%) of 25 subjects after the second MVA-mBN32 immunization. Among these responders, polyfunctional T-cell responses, including the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha and perforin, were detected. Vaccinia virus-specific antibodies were induced to the MVA vector in 27 (93%) of 29 and 26 (93%) of 28 subjects after the first and second immunizations with MVA-mBN32. These peptide-based vaccines were safe but were ineffective at inducing HIV-1-specific immune responses and induced much weaker responses than MVA vaccines expressing the entire open reading frames of HIV-1 proteins. PMID:22398243

  17. DNA and modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccines encoding multiple cytotoxic and helper T-lymphocyte epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are safe but weakly immunogenic in HIV-1-uninfected, vaccinia virus-naive adults.

    PubMed

    Gorse, Geoffrey J; Newman, Mark J; deCamp, Allan; Hay, Christine Mhorag; De Rosa, Stephen C; Noonan, Elizabeth; Livingston, Brian D; Fuchs, Jonathan D; Kalams, Spyros A; Cassis-Ghavami, Farah L

    2012-05-01

    We evaluated a DNA plasmid-vectored vaccine and a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine (MVA-mBN32), each encoding cytotoxic and helper T-lymphocyte epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial in 36 HIV-1-uninfected adults using a heterologous prime-boost schedule. HIV-1-specific cellular immune responses, measured as interleukin-2 and/or gamma interferon production, were induced in 1 (4%) of 28 subjects after the first MVA-mBN32 immunization and in 3 (12%) of 25 subjects after the second MVA-mBN32 immunization. Among these responders, polyfunctional T-cell responses, including the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha and perforin, were detected. Vaccinia virus-specific antibodies were induced to the MVA vector in 27 (93%) of 29 and 26 (93%) of 28 subjects after the first and second immunizations with MVA-mBN32. These peptide-based vaccines were safe but were ineffective at inducing HIV-1-specific immune responses and induced much weaker responses than MVA vaccines expressing the entire open reading frames of HIV-1 proteins.

  18. HIV-1 DNA predicts disease progression and post-treatment virological control

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James P; Hurst, Jacob; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Cooper, David; Schechter, Mauro; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Fidler, Sarah; Carrington, Mary; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    In HIV-1 infection, a population of latently infected cells facilitates viral persistence despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). With the aim of identifying individuals in whom ART might induce a period of viraemic control on stopping therapy, we hypothesised that quantification of the pool of latently infected cells in primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) would predict clinical progression and viral replication following ART. We measured HIV-1 DNA in a highly characterised randomised population of individuals with PHI. We explored associations between HIV-1 DNA and immunological and virological markers of clinical progression, including viral rebound in those interrupting therapy. In multivariable analyses, HIV-1 DNA was more predictive of disease progression than plasma viral load and, at treatment interruption, predicted time to plasma virus rebound. HIV-1 DNA may help identify individuals who could safely interrupt ART in future HIV-1 eradication trials. Clinical trial registration: ISRCTN76742797 and EudraCT2004-000446-20 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03821.001 PMID:25217531

  19. Impairment of HIV-1 cDNA synthesis by DBR1 knockdown.

    PubMed

    Galvis, Alvaro E; Fisher, Hugh E; Nitta, Takayuki; Fan, Hung; Camerini, David

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies showed that short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown of the RNA lariat debranching enzyme (DBR1) led to a decrease in the production of HIV-1 cDNA. To further characterize this effect, DBR1 shRNA was introduced into GHOST-R5X4 cells, followed by infection at a multiplicity near unity with HIV-1 or an HIV-1-derived vector. DNA and RNA were isolated from whole cells and from cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions at different times postinfection. Inhibition of DBR1 had little or no effect on the formation of minus-strand strong-stop cDNA but caused a significant reduction in the formation of intermediate and full-length cDNA. Moreover, minus-strand strong-stop DNA rapidly accumulated in the cytoplasm in the first 2 h of infection but shifted to the nuclear fraction by 6 h postinfection. Regardless of DBR1 inhibition, greater than 95% of intermediate-length and full-length HIV-1 cDNA was found in the nuclear fraction at all time points. Thus, under these experimental conditions, HIV-1 cDNA synthesis was initiated in the cytoplasm and completed in the nucleus or perinuclear region of the infected cell. When nuclear import of the HIV-1 reverse transcription complex was blocked by expressing a truncated form of the mRNA cleavage and polyadenylation factor CPSF6, the completion of HIV-1 vector cDNA synthesis was detected in the cytoplasm, where it was not inhibited by DBR1 knockdown. Refinement of the cell fractionation procedure indicated that the completion of reverse transcription occurred both within nuclei and in the perinuclear region. Taken together the results indicate that in infections at a multiplicity near 1, HIV-1 reverse transcription is completed in the nucleus or perinuclear region of the infected cell, where it is dependent on DBR1. When nuclear transport is inhibited, reverse transcription is completed in the cytoplasm in a DBR1-independent manner. Thus, there are at least two mechanisms of HIV-1 reverse transcription that require different

  20. DNA Triplex-Based Complexes Display Anti-HIV-1-Cell Fusion Activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Xiaoyu; Chong, Huihui; Lai, Wenqing; Jiang, Xifeng; Wang, Chao; He, Yuxian; Liu, Keliang

    2015-08-01

    DNA triplexes with hydrophobic modifications were designed and evaluated for their activity as inhibitors of the cell fusion of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Triplex inhibitors displayed low micromolar activities in the cell-cell fusion assay and nanomolar activities in the anti-HIV-1 pseudovirus test. Helix structure and the presence of sufficient numbers of hydrophobic regions were essential for the antifusion activity. Results from native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a fluorescent resonance energy transfer-based inhibitory assay indicated that these triplexes may interact with the primary pocket at the glycoprotein 41 (gp41) N-heptad repeat, thereby inhibiting formation of the HIV-1 gp41 6-helical bundle. Triplex-based complexes may represent a novel category of HIV-1 inhibitors in anti-HIV-1 drug discovery.

  1. Electrotransfer of Plasmid Vector DNA into Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Satsuki; Miyazaki, Jun-Ichi

    Wolff et al. (1990) first reported that plasmid DNA injected into skeletal muscle is taken up by muscle cells and the genes in the plasmid are expressed for more than two months thereafter, although the transfected DNA does not usually undergo chromosomal integration (Wolff et al., 1991, 1992). However, the relatively low expression levels attained by this method have hampered its applications for uses other than as a DNA vaccine (Davis et al., 1995). There are a number of reports analyzing the conditions that affect the efficiency of gene transfer by intramuscular DNA injection and assessing the fine structures of expression plasmid vectors that may affect expression levels (Davis et al., 1993; Liang et al., 1996; Norman et al., 1997). Furthermore, various attempts were done to improve the efficiency of gene transfer by intramus cular DNA injection. Consequently, regenerating muscle was shown to produce 80-fold or more protein than did normal muscle, following injection of an expression plas-mid. Muscle regeneration was induced by treatment with cardiotoxin or bupivacaine (Wells, 1993; Vitadello et al., 1994). We previously demonstrated that by combining a strong promoter and bupivacaine pretreatment intramuscular injection of an IL-5 expression plasmid results in IL-5 production in muscle at a level sufficient to induce marked proliferation of eosinophils in the bone marrow and eosinophil infiltration of various organs (Tokui et al., 1997). It was also reported that a single intramuscular injection of an erythropoietin expression plasmid produced physiologically significant elevations in serum erythropoietin levels and increased hematocrits in adult mice (Tripathy et al., 1996). Hematocrits in these animals remained elevated at >60% for at least 90 days after a single injection. However, improvements to this method have not been sufficient to extend its applications including clinical use.

  2. Rapid detection of HIV-1 proviral DNA for early infant diagnosis using recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Boyle, David S; Lehman, Dara A; Lillis, Lorraine; Peterson, Dylan; Singhal, Mitra; Armes, Niall; Parker, Mathew; Piepenburg, Olaf; Overbaugh, Julie

    2013-04-02

    Early diagnosis and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in infants can greatly reduce mortality rates. However, current infant HIV-1 diagnostics cannot reliably be performed at the point of care, often delaying treatment and compromising its efficacy. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is a novel technology that is ideal for an HIV-1 diagnostic, as it amplifies target DNA in <20 min at a constant temperature, without the need for complex thermocycling equipment. Here we tested 63 HIV-1-specific primer and probe combinations and identified two RPA assays that target distinct regions of the HIV-1 genome (long terminal repeat [LTR] and pol) and can reliably detect 3 copies of proviral DNA by the use of fluorescence detection and lateral-flow strip detection. These pol and LTR primers amplified 98.6% and 93%, respectively, of the diverse HIV-1 variants tested. This is the first example of an isothermal assay that consistently detects all of the major HIV-1 global subtypes.

  3. Rapid Detection of HIV-1 Proviral DNA for Early Infant Diagnosis Using Recombinase Polymerase Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, David S.; Lehman, Dara A.; Lillis, Lorraine; Peterson, Dylan; Singhal, Mitra; Armes, Niall; Parker, Mathew; Piepenburg, Olaf; Overbaugh, Julie

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Early diagnosis and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in infants can greatly reduce mortality rates. However, current infant HIV-1 diagnostics cannot reliably be performed at the point of care, often delaying treatment and compromising its efficacy. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is a novel technology that is ideal for an HIV-1 diagnostic, as it amplifies target DNA in <20 min at a constant temperature, without the need for complex thermocycling equipment. Here we tested 63 HIV-1-specific primer and probe combinations and identified two RPA assays that target distinct regions of the HIV-1 genome (long terminal repeat [LTR] and pol) and can reliably detect 3 copies of proviral DNA by the use of fluorescence detection and lateral-flow strip detection. These pol and LTR primers amplified 98.6% and 93%, respectively, of the diverse HIV-1 variants tested. This is the first example of an isothermal assay that consistently detects all of the major HIV-1 global subtypes. PMID:23549916

  4. Hepatitis C Therapy With Interferon-α and Ribavirin Reduces CD4 T-Cell–Associated HIV-1 DNA in HIV-1/Hepatitis C Virus–Coinfected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong; Buzon, Maria J.; Shaw, Amy; Berg, Randi Karteebahn; Yu, Xu G.; Ferrando-Martinez, Sara; Leal, Manuel; Ruiz-Mateos, Ezequiel; Lichterfeld, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Combined treatment with interferon alpha (IFN-α) and ribavirin (RBV) can effectively cure HCV infection in a significant proportion of patients, but effects of this regimen on cellular reservoirs for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are unknown. Here, we show that treatment with IFN-α/RBV led to a moderate but significant and sustained decline of HIV-1 DNA in CD4 T cells from HIV-1/hepatitis C virus–coinfected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (n = 12). However, in vitro experiments failed to demonstrate an effect of pharmacological doses of IFN-α on HIV-1 reactivation. Together, these data suggest that treatment with IFN-α/RBV can moderately reduce the reservoir of HIV-1–infected CD4 T cells that persists despite suppressive antiretroviral therapy. PMID:24277743

  5. Enhanced Immunogenicity of an HIV-1 DNA Vaccine Delivered with Electroporation via Combined Intramuscular and Intradermal Routes

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Paul F.; Fiserova, Anezka; Klein, Katja; Cope, Alethea; Rogers, Paul; Swales, Julie; Seaman, Michael S.; Combadiere, Behazine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is accepted that an effective prophylactic HIV-1 vaccine is likely to have the greatest impact on viral transmission rates. As previous reports have implicated DNA-priming, protein boost regimens to be efficient activators of humoral responses, we sought to optimize this regimen to further augment vaccine immunogenicity. Here we evaluated single versus concurrent intradermal (i.d.) and intramuscular (i.m.) vaccinations as a DNA-priming strategy for their abilities to elicit humoral and cellular responses against a model HIV-1 vaccine antigen, CN54-gp140. To further augment vaccine-elicited T and B cell responses, we enhanced cellular transfection with electroporation and then boosted the DNA-primed responses with homologous protein delivered subcutaneously (s.c.), intranasally (i.n.), i.m., or transcutaneously (t.c.). In mice, the concurrent priming regimen resulted in significantly elevated gamma interferon T cell responses and high-avidity antigen-specific IgG B cell responses, a hallmark of B cell maturation. Protein boosting of the concurrent DNA strategy further enhanced IgG concentrations but had little impact on T cell reactivity. Interestingly protein boosting by the subcutaneous route increased antibody avidity to a greater extent than protein boosting by either the i.m., i.n., or t.c. route, suggesting that this route may be preferential for driving B cell maturation. Using an alternative and larger animal model, the rabbit, we found the concurrent DNA-priming strategy followed by s.c. protein boosting to again be capable of eliciting high-avidity humoral responses and to also be able to neutralize HIV-1 pseudoviruses from diverse clades (clades A, B, and C). Taken together, we show that concurrent multiple-route DNA vaccinations induce strong cellular immunity, in addition to potent and high-avidity humoral immune responses. IMPORTANCE The route of vaccination has profound effects on prevailing immune responses. Due to the insufficient

  6. HIV-1 and HIV-2 exhibit divergent interactions with HLTF and UNG2 DNA repair proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hrecka, Kasia; Hao, Caili; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Kaur, Sarabpreet; Swanson, Selene K.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Skowronski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    HIV replication in nondividing host cells occurs in the presence of high concentrations of noncanonical dUTP, apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing, enzyme-catalytic, polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3) cytidine deaminases, and SAMHD1 (a cell cycle-regulated dNTP triphosphohydrolase) dNTPase, which maintains low concentrations of canonical dNTPs in these cells. These conditions favor the introduction of marks of DNA damage into viral cDNA, and thereby prime it for processing by DNA repair enzymes. Accessory protein Vpr, found in all primate lentiviruses, and its HIV-2/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) SIVsm paralogue Vpx, hijack the CRL4DCAF1 E3 ubiquitin ligase to alleviate some of these conditions, but the extent of their interactions with DNA repair proteins has not been thoroughly characterized. Here, we identify HLTF, a postreplication DNA repair helicase, as a common target of HIV-1/SIVcpz Vpr proteins. We show that HIV-1 Vpr reprograms CRL4DCAF1 E3 to direct HLTF for proteasome-dependent degradation independent from previously reported Vpr interactions with base excision repair enzyme uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG2) and crossover junction endonuclease MUS81, which Vpr also directs for degradation via CRL4DCAF1 E3. Thus, separate functions of HIV-1 Vpr usurp CRL4DCAF1 E3 to remove key enzymes in three DNA repair pathways. In contrast, we find that HIV-2 Vpr is unable to efficiently program HLTF or UNG2 for degradation. Our findings reveal complex interactions between HIV-1 and the DNA repair machinery, suggesting that DNA repair plays important roles in the HIV-1 life cycle. The divergent interactions of HIV-1 and HIV-2 with DNA repair enzymes and SAMHD1 imply that these viruses use different strategies to guard their genomes and facilitate their replication in the host. PMID:27335459

  7. Transformation of Azotobacter vinelandii with plasmid DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Glick, B R; Brooks, H E; Pasternak, J J

    1985-01-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii cells can be transformed at high frequencies with the broad-host-range plasmids pRK2501, RSF1010, and pGSS15, using a modification of the procedure developed by Page and von Tigerstrom (J. Bacteriol. 139:1058-1061, 1979) for chromosomal DNA-mediated transformation. The frequency of transformation per microgram of plasmid DNA per viable cell with pRK2501 and pGSS15 was about 5 X 10(-2) and 2 X 10(-2), respectively. With RSF1010, transformation frequencies ranged from 3 X 10(-4) to 4 X 10(-2). With each plasmid, the frequency of transformation was independent of the phase of the growth cycle. When concentrations of pRK2501 ranging from 0.1 to 51 micrograms of DNA were tested, the frequency of transformation was directly proportional to the amount of DNA. This linear response indicated that, although the uptake of plasmid DNA with this procedure may be inefficient, there is a high probability that once inside a cell the plasmid will be stably maintained. Cells that have been transformed with pRK2501 did not grow well on transforming medium which lacks iron and contains fixed nitrogen. However, on growth medium which contains iron and lacks fixed nitrogen, transformants produced distinctive colonies larger than those of nontransformed cells. Resistance to kanamycin due to transformation by pRK2501 was stably maintained for at least 10 successive generations in the absence of selective pressure. The present protocol should facilitate the molecular cloning of genes in Azotobacter spp. Images PMID:3980437

  8. Indicators of therapeutic effect in FIT-06, a Phase II trial of a DNA vaccine, GTU(®)-Multi-HIVB, in untreated HIV-1 infected subjects.

    PubMed

    Vardas, Eftyhia; Stanescu, Ioana; Leinonen, Mika; Ellefsen, Kim; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Valtavaara, Minna; Ustav, Mart; Reijonen, Kalevi

    2012-06-08

    Combination highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has significantly decreased HIV-1 related morbidity and mortality globally transforming HIV into a controllable condition. HAART has a number of limitations though, including limited access in resource constrained countries, which have driven the search for simpler, affordable HIV-1 treatment modalities. Therapeutic HIV-1 vaccines aim to provide immunological support to slow disease progression and decrease transmission. We evaluated the safety, immunogenicity and clinical effect of a novel recombinant plasmid DNA therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine, GTU(®)-multi-HIVB, containing 6 different genes derived from an HIV-1 subtype B isolate. 63 untreated, healthy, HIV-1 infected, adults between 18 and 40 years were enrolled in a single-blinded, placebo-controlled Phase II trial in South Africa. Subjects were HIV-1 subtype C infected, had never received antiretrovirals, with CD4 ≥ 350 cells/mm(3) and pHIV-RNA ≥ 50 copies/mL at screening. Subjects were allocated to vaccine or placebo groups in a 2:1 ratio either administered intradermally (ID) (0.5mg/dose) or intramuscularly (IM) (1mg/dose) at 0, 4 and 12 weeks boosted at 76 and 80 weeks with 1mg/dose (ID) and 2mg/dose (IM), respectively. Safety was assessed by adverse event monitoring and immunogenicity by HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells using intracellular cytokine staining (ICS), pHIV-RNA and CD4 counts. Vaccine was safe and well tolerated with no vaccine related serious adverse events. Significant declines in log pHIV-RNA (p=0.012) and increases in CD4+ T cell counts (p=0.066) were observed in the vaccine group compared to placebo, more pronounced after IM administration and in some HLA haplotypes (B*5703) maintained for 17 months after the final immunisation. The GTU(®)-multi-HIVB plasmid recombinant DNA therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine is safe, well tolerated and favourably affects pHIV-RNA and CD4 counts in untreated HIV-1 infected individuals after IM

  9. Dendritic cells primed with a chimeric plasmid containing HIV-1-gag associated with lysosomal-associated protein-1 (LAMP/gag) is a potential therapeutic vaccine against HIV.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Carolina G D O; Matassoli, Flavio L; Peçanha, Ligia M T; Santillo, Bruna Tereso; Oliveira, Luanda Mara da Silva; Oshiro, Telma Miyuki; Marques, Ernesto T D A; Oxenius, Annette; de Arruda, Luciana B

    2016-08-01

    The decline in number and function of T cells is a hallmark of HIV infection, and preservation or restoration of HIV-specific cellular immune response is a major goal of AIDS treatment. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in the initiation and maintenance of the immune response, and their use as a vaccine vehicle is a promising strategy for enhancing vaccine efficacy. We evaluated the potential of DC-mediated immunization with a DNA vaccine consisting of HIV-1-p55gag (gag, group-specific antigen) associated to lysosomal associated protein (LAMP) sequence (LAMP/gag vaccine). Immunization of mice with mouse DCs transfected with LAMP/gag (Lg-mDCs) stimulated more potent B- and T-cell responses than naked DNA or DCs pulsed with inactivated HIV. Anti-Gag antibody levels were sustained for at least 3 mo after immunization, and recall T-cell responses were also strongly detected at this time point. Human DCs transfected with LAMP/gag (Lg-hDCs) were also activated and able to stimulate greater T-cell response than native gag-transfected DCs. Coculture between Lg-hDCs and T lymphocytes obtained from patients with HIV resulted in upregulation of CD38, CD69, HLA-DR, and granzyme B by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and increased IFN-γ and TNF-α production. These results indicate that the use of LAMP/gag-DC may be an efficient strategy for enhancing immune function in patients with HIV.-Lucas, C. G. D. O., Matassoli, F. L., Peçanha, L. M. T., Santillo, B. T., Oliveira, L. M. D. S., Oshiro, T. M., Marques, E. T. D. A., Jr., Oxenius, A., de Arruda, L. B. Dendritic cells primed with a chimeric plasmid containing HIV-1-gag associated with lysosomal-associated protein-1 (LAMP/gag) is a potential therapeutic vaccine against HIV.

  10. Plasmid DNA hydrogels for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Costa, Diana; Valente, Artur J M; Miguel, M Graça; Queiroz, João

    2014-03-01

    In the last few years, our research group has focused on the design and development of plasmid DNA (pDNA) based systems as devices to be used therapeutically in the biomedical field. Biocompatible macro and micro plasmid DNA gels were prepared by a cross-linking reaction. For the first time, the pDNA gels have been investigated with respect to their swelling in aqueous solution containing different additives. Furthermore, we clarified the fundamental and basic aspects of the solute release mechanism from pDNA hydrogels and the significance of this information is enormous as a basic tool for the formulation of pDNA carriers for drug/gene delivery applications. The co-delivery of a specific gene and anticancer drugs, combining chemical and gene therapies in the treatment of cancer was the main challenge of our research. Significant progresses have been made with a new p53 encoding pDNA microgel that is suitable for the loading and release of pDNA and doxorubicin. This represents a strong valuable finding in the strategic development of systems to improve cancer cure through the synergetic effect of chemical and gene therapy.

  11. LINE-1 Retrotransposable Element DNA Accumulates in HIV-1-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haihan; Xu, Yang; Garrison, Keith E.; Buzdin, Anton A.; Anwar, Naveed; Hunter, Diana V.; Mujib, Shariq; Mihajlovic, Vesna; Martin, Eric; Lee, Erika; Kuciak, Monika; Raposo, Rui André Saraiva; Bozorgzad, Ardalan; Meiklejohn, Duncan A.; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C.; Nixon, Douglas F.; Ostrowski, Mario A.

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 long-interspersed nuclear elements (L1s) are autonomous retrotransposable elements that retain the potential for activity in the human genome but are suppressed by host factors. Retrotransposition of L1s into chromosomal DNA can lead to genomic instability, whereas reverse transcription of L1 in the cytosol has the potential to activate innate immune sensors. We hypothesized that HIV-1 infection would compromise cellular control of L1 elements, resulting in the induction of retrotransposition events. Here, we show that HIV-1 infection enhances L1 retrotransposition in Jurkat cells in a Vif- and Vpr-dependent manner. In primary CD4+ cells, HIV-1 infection results in the accumulation of L1 DNA, at least the majority of which is extrachromosomal. These data expose an unrecognized interaction between HIV-1 and endogenous retrotransposable elements, which may have implications for the innate immune response to HIV-1 infection, as well as for HIV-1-induced genomic instability and cytopathicity. PMID:24089548

  12. Creation of chimeric human/rabbit APOBEC1 with HIV-1 restriction and DNA mutation activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Terumasa; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Koito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC1 (A1) proteins from lagomorphs and rodents have deaminase-dependent restriction activity against HIV-1, whereas human A1 exerts a negligible effect. To investigate these differences in the restriction of HIV-1 by A1 proteins, a series of chimeric proteins combining rabbit and human A1s was constructed. Homology models of the A1s indicated that their activities derive from functional domains that likely act in tandem through a dimeric interface. The C-terminal region containing the leucine-rich motif and the dimerization domains of rabbit A1 is important for its anti-HIV-1 activity. The A1 chimeras with strong anti-HIV-1 activity were incorporated into virions more efficiently than those without anti-HIV-1 activity, and exhibited potent DNA-mutator activity. Therefore, the C-terminal region of rabbit A1 is involved in both its packaging into the HIV-1 virion and its deamination activity against both viral cDNA and genomic RNA. This study identifies the novel molecular mechanism underlying the target specificity of A1.

  13. LINE-1 retrotransposable element DNA accumulates in HIV-1-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, R Brad; Song, Haihan; Xu, Yang; Garrison, Keith E; Buzdin, Anton A; Anwar, Naveed; Hunter, Diana V; Mujib, Shariq; Mihajlovic, Vesna; Martin, Eric; Lee, Erika; Kuciak, Monika; Raposo, Rui André Saraiva; Bozorgzad, Ardalan; Meiklejohn, Duncan A; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Nixon, Douglas F; Ostrowski, Mario A

    2013-12-01

    Type 1 long-interspersed nuclear elements (L1s) are autonomous retrotransposable elements that retain the potential for activity in the human genome but are suppressed by host factors. Retrotransposition of L1s into chromosomal DNA can lead to genomic instability, whereas reverse transcription of L1 in the cytosol has the potential to activate innate immune sensors. We hypothesized that HIV-1 infection would compromise cellular control of L1 elements, resulting in the induction of retrotransposition events. Here, we show that HIV-1 infection enhances L1 retrotransposition in Jurkat cells in a Vif- and Vpr-dependent manner. In primary CD4(+) cells, HIV-1 infection results in the accumulation of L1 DNA, at least the majority of which is extrachromosomal. These data expose an unrecognized interaction between HIV-1 and endogenous retrotransposable elements, which may have implications for the innate immune response to HIV-1 infection, as well as for HIV-1-induced genomic instability and cytopathicity.

  14. Longitudinal analysis of HIV-1 coreceptor tropism by single and triplicate HIV-1 RNA and DNA sequencing in patients undergoing successful first-line antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Meini, Genny; Rossetti, Barbara; Bianco, Claudia; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Sighinolfi, Laura; Monno, Laura; Castagna, Antonella; Rozera, Gabriella; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Zazzi, Maurizio; De Luca, Andrea; Moroni, M.; Angarano, G.; Antinori, A.; Armignacco, O.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Castelli, F.; Cauda, R.; Di Perri, G.; Galli, M.; Iardino, R.; Ippolito, G.; Lazzarin, A.; Perno, C. F.; von Schloesser, F.; Viale, P.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Antinori, A.; Castagna, A.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Girardi, E.; Lo Caputo, S.; Mussini, C.; Puoti, M.; Andreoni, M.; Ammassari, A.; Antinori, A.; Balotta, C.; Bonfanti, P.; Bonora, S.; Borderi, M.; Capobianchi, M. R.; Castagna, A.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Cingolani, A.; Cinque, P.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; d'Arminio Monforte, A; De Luca, A.; Di Biagio, A.; Girardi, E.; Gianotti, N.; Gori, A.; Guaraldi, G.; Lapadula, G.; Lichtner, M.; Lo Caputo, S.; Madeddu, G.; Maggiolo, F.; Marchetti, G.; Marcotullio, S.; Monno, L.; Mussini, C.; Puoti, M.; Quiros Roldan, E.; Rusconi, S.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Cicconi, P.; Fanti, I.; Formenti, T.; Galli, L.; Lorenzini, P.; Giacometti, A.; Costantini, A.; Angarano, G.; Monno, L.; Santoro, C.; Maggiolo, F.; Suardi, C.; Viale, P.; Vanino, E.; Verucchi, G.; Castelli, F.; Quiros Roldan, E.; Minardi, C.; Quirino, T.; Abeli, C.; Manconi, P.E.; Piano, P.; Vecchiet, J.; Falasca, K.; Sighinolfi, L.; Segala, D.; Mazzotta, F.; Lo Caputo, S.; Cassola, G.; Viscoli, G.; Alessandrini, A.; Piscopo, R.; Mazzarello, G.; Mastroianni, C.; Belvisi, V.; Bonfanti, P.; Caramma, I.; Castelli, A. P.; Galli, M.; Lazzarin, A.; Rizzardini, G.; Puoti, M.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Ridolfo, A. L.; Piolini, R.; Castagna, A.; Salpietro, S.; Carenzi, L.; Moioli, M. C.; Cicconi, P.; Marchetti, G.; Mussini, C.; Puzzolante, C.; Gori, A.; Lapadula, G.; Abrescia, N.; Chirianni, A.; Guida, M. G.; Gargiulo, M.; Baldelli, F.; Francisci, D.; Parruti, G.; Ursini, T.; Magnani, G.; Ursitti, M. A.; Cauda, R.; Andreoni, M.; Antinori, A.; Vullo, V.; Cingolani, A.; d'Avino, A.; Ammassari, A.; Gallo, L.; Nicastri, E.; Acinapura, R.; Capozzi, M.; Libertone, R.; Tebano, G.; Cattelan, A.; Mura, M. S.; Madeddu, G.; Caramello, P.; Di Perri, G.; Orofino, G. C.; Bonora, S.; Sciandra, M.; Pellizzer, G.; Manfrin, V.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Maraviroc has been shown to be effective in patients harbouring CCR5-tropic HIV-1. While this CCR5 antagonist has initially been used in salvage therapy, its excellent safety profile makes it ideal for antiretroviral treatment simplification strategies in patients with suppressed plasma viraemia. The aim of this study was to compare HIV-1 tropism as detected in baseline plasma RNA and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) DNA prior to first-line therapy and to analyse tropism evolution while on successful treatment. Methods HIV-1 tropism was determined using triplicate genotypic testing combined with geno2pheno[coreceptor] analysis at a 10% false positive rate in 42 patients. Paired pre-treatment plasma RNA and PBMC DNA and two subsequent PBMC DNA samples (the first obtained after reaching undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA and the second after at least 2 years of suppression of plasma viraemia) were evaluated. Results Coreceptor tropism was completely concordant in paired pre-treatment RNA and DNA, with 26.2% of HIV-1 sequences predicted to be non-CCR5-tropic. During follow-up, coreceptor tropism switches were detected in 4 (9.5%) patients without any preferential direction. Although false positive rate discrepancies within triplicates were common, the rate of discordance of coreceptor tropism assignment among triplicate results in this mostly CCR5-tropic dataset was only 2.1%, questioning the added value of triplicate testing compared with single testing. Conclusions HIV-1 coreceptor tropism changes during virologically successful first-line treatment are infrequent. HIV-1 DNA analysis may thus support the choice of a CCR5 antagonist in treatment switch strategies; however, maraviroc treatment outcome data are required to confirm this option. PMID:24155059

  15. Excision of HIV-1 DNA by gene editing: a proof-of-concept in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, R; Bella, R; Yin, C; Otte, J; Ferrante, P; Gendelman, H E; Li, H; Booze, R; Gordon, J; Hu, W; Khalili, K

    2016-08-01

    A CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing strategy has been remarkable in excising segments of integrated HIV-1 DNA sequences from the genome of latently infected human cell lines and by introducing InDel mutations, suppressing HIV-1 replication in patient-derived CD4+ T-cells, ex vivo. Here, we employed a short version of the Cas9 endonuclease, saCas9, together with a multiplex of guide RNAs (gRNAs) for targeting the viral DNA sequences within the 5'-LTR and the Gag gene for removing critically important segments of the viral DNA in transgenic mice and rats encompassing the HIV-1 genome. Tail-vein injection of transgenic mice with a recombinant Adeno-associated virus 9 (rAAV9) vector expressing saCas9 and the gRNAs, rAAV:saCas9/gRNA, resulted in the cleavage of integrated HIV-1 DNA and excision of a 978 bp DNA fragment spanning between the LTR and Gag gene in the spleen, liver, heart, lung and kidney as well as in the circulating lymphocytes. Retro-orbital inoculation of rAAV9:saCas9/gRNA in transgenic rats eliminated a targeted segment of viral DNA and substantially decreased the level of viral gene expression in circulating blood lymphocytes. The results from the proof-of-concept studies, for the first time, demonstrate the in vivo eradication of HIV-1 DNA by CRISPR/Cas9 on delivery by an rAAV9 vector in a range of cells and tissues that harbor integrated copies of viral DNA.

  16. Structural Insights into the HIV-1 Minus-strand Strong-stop DNA*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingying; Maskri, Ouerdia; Chaminade, Françoise; René, Brigitte; Benkaroun, Jessica; Godet, Julien; Mély, Yves; Mauffret, Olivier; Fossé, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    An essential step of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcription is the first strand transfer that requires base pairing of the R region at the 3′-end of the genomic RNA with the complementary r region at the 3′-end of minus-strand strong-stop DNA (ssDNA). HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) facilitates this annealing process. Determination of the ssDNA structure is needed to understand the molecular basis of NC-mediated genomic RNA-ssDNA annealing. For this purpose, we investigated ssDNA using structural probes (nucleases and potassium permanganate). This study is the first to determine the secondary structure of the full-length HIV-1 ssDNA in the absence or presence of NC. The probing data and phylogenetic analysis support the folding of ssDNA into three stem-loop structures and the presence of four high-affinity binding sites for NC. Our results support a model for the NC-mediated annealing process in which the preferential binding of NC to four sites triggers unfolding of the three-dimensional structure of ssDNA, thus facilitating interaction of the r sequence of ssDNA with the R sequence of the genomic RNA. In addition, using gel retardation assays and ssDNA mutants, we show that the NC-mediated annealing process does not rely on a single pathway (zipper intermediate or kissing complex). PMID:26668324

  17. Proteolysis in plasmid DNA stable maintenance in bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Karlowicz, Anna; Wegrzyn, Katarzyna; Dubiel, Andrzej; Ropelewska, Malgorzata; Konieczny, Igor

    2016-07-01

    Plasmids, as extrachromosomal genetic elements, need to work out strategies that promote independent replication and stable maintenance in host bacterial cells. Their maintenance depends on constant formation and dissociation of nucleoprotein complexes formed on plasmid DNA. Plasmid replication initiation proteins (Rep) form specific complexes on direct repeats (iterons) localized within the plasmid replication origin. Formation of these complexes along with a strict control of Rep protein cellular concentration, quaternary structure, and activity, is essential for plasmid maintenance. Another important mechanism for maintenance of low-copy-number plasmids are the toxin-antitoxin (TA) post-segregational killing (psk) systems, which prevent plasmid loss from the bacterial cell population. In this mini review we discuss the importance of nucleoprotein complex processing by energy-dependent host proteases in plasmid DNA replication and plasmid type II toxin-antitoxin psk systems, and draw attention to the elusive role of DNA in this process.

  18. Sample displacement chromatography of plasmid DNA isoforms.

    PubMed

    Černigoj, Urh; Martinuč, Urška; Cardoso, Sara; Sekirnik, Rok; Krajnc, Nika Lendero; Štrancar, Aleš

    2015-10-02

    Sample displacement chromatography (SDC) is a chromatographic technique that utilises different relative binding affinities of components in a sample mixture and has been widely studied in the context of peptide and protein purification. Here, we report a use of SDC to separate plasmid DNA (pDNA) isoforms under overloading conditions, where supercoiled (sc) isoform acts as a displacer of open circular (oc) or linear isoform. Since displacement is more efficient when mass transfer between stationary and mobile chromatographic phases is not limited by diffusion, we investigated convective interaction media (CIM) monoliths as stationary phases for pDNA isoform separation. CIM monoliths with different hydrophobicities and thus different binding affinities for pDNA (CIM C4 HLD, CIM-histamine and CIM-pyridine) were tested under hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) conditions. SD efficiency for pDNA isoform separation was shown to be dependent on column selectivity for individual isoform, column efficiency and on ammonium sulfate (AS) concentration in loading buffer (binding strength). SD and negative mode elution often operate in parallel, therefore negative mode elution additionally influences the efficiency of the overall purification process. Optimisation of chromatographic conditions achieved 98% sc pDNA homogeneity and a dynamic binding capacity of over 1mg/mL at a relatively low concentration of AS. SDC was successfully implemented for the enrichment of sc pDNA for plasmid vectors of different sizes, and for separation of linear and and sc isoforms, independently of oc:sc isoform ratio, and flow-rate used. This study therefore identifies SDC as a promising new approach to large-scale pDNA purification, which is compatible with continuous, multicolumn chromatography systems, and could therefore be used to increase productivity of pDNA production in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. DNA Duplexes with Hydrophobic Modifications Inhibit Fusion between HIV-1 and Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Cai, Lifeng; Chen, Xueliang; Jiang, Xifeng; Chong, Huihui; Zheng, Baohua; Wang, Kun; He, Junlin; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Cheng, Maosheng; He, Yuxian

    2013-01-01

    Discovery of new drugs for the treatment of AIDS typically possessing unique structures associated with novel mechanisms of action has been of great importance due to the quick drug-resistant mutations of HIV-1 strains. The work presented in this report describes a novel class of DNA duplex-based HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Hydrophobic groups were introduced into a DNA duplex skeleton either at one end, at both ends, or in the middle. These modified DNA duplexes inhibited fusion between HIV-1 and human cell membranes at micro- or submicromolar concentrations. Respective inhibitors adopted an aptamer pattern instead of a base-pairing interaction pattern. Structure-activity relationship studies of the respective DNA duplexes showed that the rigid and negatively charged DNA skeletons, in addition to the presence of hydrophobic groups, were crucial to the anti-HIV-1 activity of these compounds. A fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based inhibitory assay showed that these duplex inhibitors interacted with the primary pocket in the gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) instead of interacting with the lipid bilayers. PMID:23896466

  20. Performance characteristics of the TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and the Opengene DNA Sequencing System.

    PubMed

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Grant, Robert M; Feorino, Paul; Griswold, Marshal; Hoover, Marie; Young, Russell; Day, Stephen; Lloyd Jr, Robert M; Reid, Caroline; Morgan, Gillian F; Winslow, Dean L

    2003-04-01

    The TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and OpenGene DNA Sequencing System are designed to sequence the protease (PR)- and reverse transcriptase (RT)-coding regions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pol. Studies were undertaken to determine the accuracy of this assay system in detecting resistance-associated mutations and to determine the effects of RNA extraction methods, anticoagulants, specimen handling, and potentially interfering substances. Samples were plasma obtained from HIV-infected subjects or seronegative plasma to which viruses derived from wild-type and mutant infectious molecular clones (IMC) of HIV-1 were added. Extraction methods tested included standard and UltraSensitive AMPLICOR HIV-1 MONITOR, QIAGEN viral RNA extraction mini kit, and QIAGEN Ultra HIV extraction kit, and NASBA manual HIV-1 quantitative NucliSens. Sequence data from test sites were compared to a "gold standard" reference sequence to determine the percent agreement. Comparisons between test and reference sequences at the nucleotide level showed 97.5 to 100% agreement. Similar results were obtained regardless of extraction method, regardless of use of EDTA or acid citrate dextrose as anticoagulant, and despite the presence of triglycerides, bilirubin, hemoglobin, antiretroviral drugs, HIV-2, hepatitis C virus (HCV), HBV, cytomegalovirus, human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), or HTLV-2. Samples with HIV-1 RNA titers of >or=1,000 copies/ml gave consistent results. The TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and OpenGene DNA Sequencing System consistently generate highly accurate sequence data when tested with IMC-derived HIV and patient samples.

  1. A rapid alkaline extraction procedure for screening recombinant plasmid DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Birnboim, H C; Doly, J

    1979-01-01

    A procedure for extracting plasmid DNA from bacterial cells is described. The method is simple enough to permit the analysis by gel electrophoresis of 100 or more clones per day yet yields plasmid DNA which is pure enough to be digestible by restriction enzymes. The principle of the method is selective alkaline denaturation of high molecular weight chromosomal DNA while covalently closed circular DNA remains double-stranded. Adequate pH control is accomplished without using a pH meter. Upon neutralization, chromosomal DNA renatures to form an insoluble clot, leaving plasmid DNA in the supernatant. Large and small plasmid DNAs have been extracted by this method. Images PMID:388356

  2. Kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA and RNA synthesis during primary HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Graziosi, C; Pantaleo, G; Butini, L; Demarest, J F; Saag, M S; Shaw, G M; Fauci, A S

    1993-01-01

    HIV-1 replication and viral burden in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) have been reported to be high in primary infection but generally very low during the prolonged period of clinical latency. It is uncertain precisely when this transition occurs during the HIV-1 infection and what the relationship is between the changes in HIV-1 replication versus the clearance of infected cells in the overall control of viral replication. In the present study, the kinetics of viral burden (i.e., frequency of HIV-1-infected cells) and replication during primary and early-chronic infection were analyzed in PBMC of four acutely infected individuals. High frequencies of HIV-1-infected cells and high levels of virus replication were observed in PBMC after primary HIV-1 infection. Down-regulation of virus replication in PBMC was observed in all four patients coincident with the emergence of HIV-1-specific immune responses. Other parameters of virus replication, such as circulating plasma p24 antigen and plasma viremia showed similar kinetics. In contrast, a significant decline in viral burden in PBMC was observed in only one of four patients. These results indicate that the down-regulation in the levels of virus replication associated with the clinical transition from acute to chronic infection does not necessarily reflect a reduction in viral burden, thus suggesting the involvement of additional factors. Identification of these factors will be important in elucidating the host mechanisms involved in the early control of HIV-1 infection and disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8341646

  3. Quantification of HIV-1 DNA using real-time recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Crannell, Zachary Austin; Rohrman, Brittany; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2014-06-17

    Although recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) has many advantages for the detection of pathogenic nucleic acids in point-of-care applications, RPA has not yet been implemented to quantify sample concentration using a standard curve. Here, we describe a real-time RPA assay with an internal positive control and an algorithm that analyzes real-time fluorescence data to quantify HIV-1 DNA. We show that DNA concentration and the onset of detectable amplification are correlated by an exponential standard curve. In a set of experiments in which the standard curve and algorithm were used to analyze and quantify additional DNA samples, the algorithm predicted an average concentration within 1 order of magnitude of the correct concentration for all HIV-1 DNA concentrations tested. These results suggest that quantitative RPA (qRPA) may serve as a powerful tool for quantifying nucleic acids and may be adapted for use in single-sample point-of-care diagnostic systems.

  4. Human macrophages support persistent transcription from unintegrated HIV-1 DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Jeremy; Beddall, Margaret H.; Yu Dongyang; Iyer, Subashini R.; Marsh, Jon W.; Wu Yuntao

    2008-03-15

    Retroviruses require integration of their RNA genomes for both stability and productive viral replication. In HIV infection of non-dividing, resting CD4 T cells, where integration is greatly impeded, the reverse transcribed HIV DNA has limited biological activity and a short half-life. In metabolically active and proliferating T cells, unintegrated DNA rapidly diminishes with cell division. HIV also infects the non-dividing but metabolically active macrophage population. In an in vitro examination of HIV infection of macrophages, we find that unintegrated viral DNA not only has an unusual stability, but also maintains biological activity. The unintegrated linear DNA, 1-LTR, and 2-LTR circles are stable for at least 30 days. Additionally, there is persistent viral gene transcription, which is selective and skewed towards viral early genes such as nef and tat with highly diminished rev and vif. One viral early gene product Nef was measurably synthesized. We also find that independent of integration, the HIV infection process in macrophages leads to generation of numerous chemokines.

  5. The use of hairpin DNA duplexes as HIV-1 fusion inhibitors: synthesis, characterization, and activity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Jiang, Xifeng; Xu, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Baohua; Chen, Xueliang; Zhang, Tao; Gao, Fang; Cai, Lifeng; Cheng, Maosheng; Keliang Liu

    2014-07-23

    Discovery of new drugs for the treatment of AIDS that possess unique structures associated with novel mechanisms of action are of great importance due the rapidity with which drug-resistant HIV-1 strains evolve. Recently we reported on a novel class of DNA duplex-based HIV-1 fusion inhibitors modified with hydrophobic groups. The present study describes a new category of hairpin fusion inhibitor DNA duplexes bearing a 3 nucleotide loop located at either the hydrophobic or hydrophilic end. The new loop structures were designed to link 2 separate duplex-forming oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) to make helix-assembly easier and more thermally stable resulting in a more compact form of DNA duplex based HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. A series of new hairpin duplexes were tested for anti-HIV-1 cell-cell membrane fusion activity. In addition, Tm, CD, fluorescent resonance energy transfer assays, and molecular modeling analyses were carried out to define their structural activity relationships and possible mechanisms of action. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. HIV-1 Vpr activates the DNA damage response in renal tubule epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rosenstiel, Paul E; Chan, Justin; Snyder, Alexander; Planelles, Vicente; D'Agati, Vivette D; Klotman, Paul E; Klotman, Mary E

    2009-09-24

    HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) is a major cause of HIV-related morbidity and mortality. Pathogenesis involves direct infection of the glomerular and tubular epithelial cells leading to characteristic disorder. Recently, we have shown that HIV-1 Vpr causes hypertrophy, hyperploidy, and apoptosis. Here, we report that Vpr activates the DNA damage response resulting in the observed renal phenotype. Renal sections from the HIVAN transgenic mouse model and human biopsies both show an abundant DNA damage response.

  7. Therapeutic option of plasmid-DNA based gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, Yoshiaki; Azuma, Junya; Kunugiza, Yasuo; Iekushi, Kazuma; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy offers a novel approach for the prevention and treatment of a variety of diseases, but it is not yet a common method in clinical cases because of various problems. Viral vectors show high efficiency of gene transfer, but they have some problems with toxicity and immunity. On the other hand, plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based gene transfer is very safe, but its efficiency is relatively low. Especially, plasmid DNA gene therapy is used for cardiovascular disease because plasmid DNA transfer is possible for cardiac or skeletal muscle. Clinical angiogenic gene therapy using plasmid DNA gene transfer has been attempted in patients with peripheral artery disease, but a phase III clinical trial did not show sufficient efficiency. In this situation, more efficient plasmid DNA gene transfer is needed all over the world. This review focuses on plasmid DNA gene transfer and its enhancement, including ultrasound with microbubbles, electroporation, hydrodynamic method, gene gun, jet injection, cationic lipids and cationic polymers.

  8. Inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression by novel macrophage-tropic DNA enzymes targeted to cleave HIV-1 TAT/Rev RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Unwalla, H; Banerjea, A C

    2001-01-01

    Many regions of the HIV-1 genome have been targeted in earlier studies by RNA-cleaving DNA enzymes possessing the 10-23 catalytic motif, and efficient inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression was reported. All these studies employed charged synthetic lipids to introduce the catalytic DNA into the mammalian cells, which severely limits its practical application and usefulness in vivo. Taking advantage of the ability of G residues to interact directly with the scavenger receptors on the macrophages, we synthesized a DNA enzyme 5970 that contained 10 G residues at the 3' end. With the aim of improving the intracellular stability of the DNA enzyme 5970, we added two short stretches of stem-loop structures that were 12 bases long on either side of the DNA enzyme 5970. DNA enzyme 5970 without the poly-G tracts cleaved the synthetic RNA of HIV-1 TAT/Rev, two important regulatory proteins of HIV, very efficiently in a sequence-specific manner. Addition of 10 G residues at the 3' end of the DNA enzyme affected the cleavage efficiency only marginally whereas the same DNA enzyme with stem-loop structures on either end was significantly less efficient. The DNA enzyme with the poly-G tract at its 3' end was taken up specifically by a human macrophage-specific cell line directly in the absence of Lipofectin and was also able to inhibit HIV-1 gene expression in a transient-expression system as well as when challenged with the virus. The potential applications of these novel macrophage-tropic DNA enzymes are discussed. PMID:11415445

  9. Correlates of mother-to-child human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission: association with maternal plasma HIV-1 RNA load, genital HIV-1 DNA shedding, and breast infections.

    PubMed

    John, G C; Nduati, R W; Mbori-Ngacha, D A; Richardson, B A; Panteleeff, D; Mwatha, A; Overbaugh, J; Bwayo, J; Ndinya-Achola, J O; Kreiss, J K

    2001-01-15

    To determine the effects of plasma, genital, and breast milk human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and breast infections on perinatal HIV-1 transmission, a nested case-control study was conducted within a randomized clinical trial of breast-feeding and formula feeding among HIV-1-seropositive mothers in Nairobi, Kenya. In analyses comparing 92 infected infants with 187 infants who were uninfected at 2 years, maternal viral RNA levels >43,000 copies/mL (cohort median) were associated with a 4-fold increase in risk of transmission (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2-7.2). Maternal cervical HIV-1 DNA (odds ratio [OR], 2.4; 95% CI, 1.3-4.4), vaginal HIV-1 DNA (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.1-4.7), and cervical or vaginal ulcers (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.2-5.8) were significantly associated with infant infection, independent of plasma virus load. Breast-feeding (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.0-2.9) and mastitis (relative risk [RR], 3.9; 95% CI, 1.2-12.7) were associated with increased transmission overall, and mastitis (RR, 21.8; 95% CI, 2.3-211.0) and breast abscess (RR, 51.6; 95% CI, 4.7-571.0) were associated with late transmission (occurring >2 months postpartum). Use of methods that decrease infant exposure to HIV-1 in maternal genital secretions or breast milk may enhance currently recommended perinatal HIV-1 interventions.

  10. HIV-1 Vpr degrades the HLTF DNA translocase in T cells and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lahouassa, Hichem; Blondot, Marie-Lise; Chauveau, Lise; Chougui, Ghina; Morel, Marina; Leduc, Marjorie; Guillonneau, François; Ramirez, Bertha Cecilia; Schwartz, Olivier; Margottin-Goguet, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Viruses often interfere with the DNA damage response to better replicate in their hosts. The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) viral protein R (Vpr) protein has been reported to modulate the activity of the DNA repair structure-specific endonuclease subunit (SLX4) complex and to promote cell cycle arrest. Vpr also interferes with the base-excision repair pathway by antagonizing the uracil DNA glycosylase (Ung2) enzyme. Using an unbiased quantitative proteomic screen, we report that Vpr down-regulates helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF), a DNA translocase involved in the repair of damaged replication forks. Vpr subverts the DDB1–cullin4-associated-factor 1 (DCAF1) adaptor of the Cul4A ubiquitin ligase to trigger proteasomal degradation of HLTF. This event takes place rapidly after Vpr delivery to cells, before and independently of Vpr-mediated G2 arrest. HLTF is degraded in lymphocytic cells and macrophages infected with Vpr-expressing HIV-1. Our results reveal a previously unidentified strategy for HIV-1 to antagonize DNA repair in host cells. PMID:27114546

  11. Effect of ribonucleotides embedded in a DNA template on HIV-1 reverse transcription kinetics and fidelity.

    PubMed

    Daddacha, Waaqo; Noble, Erin; Nguyen, Laura A; Kennedy, Edward M; Kim, Baek

    2013-05-03

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) frequently incorporates ribonucleoside triphosphates (rNTPs) during proviral DNA synthesis, particularly under the limited dNTP conditions found in macrophages. We investigated the mechanistic impacts of an rNMP embedded in DNA templates on HIV-1 RT-mediated DNA synthesis. We observed that the template-embedded rNMP induced pausing of RT and delayed DNA synthesis kinetics at low macrophage dNTP concentrations but not at high T cell dNTP concentrations. Although the binding affinity of RT to the rNMP-containing template-primer was not altered, the dNTP incorporation kinetics of RT were significantly reduced at one nucleotide upstream and downstream of the rNMP site, leading to pause sites. Finally, HIV-1 RT becomes more error-prone at rNMP sites with an elevated mismatch extension capability but not enhanced misinsertion capability. Together these data suggest that rNMPs embedded in DNA templates may influence reverse transcription kinetics and impact viral mutagenesis in macrophages.

  12. Safeguard against DNA sensing: the role of TREX1 in HIV-1 infection and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Maroof; Yan, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Innate immune recognition is crucial for host responses against viral infections, including infection by human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1). Human cells detect such invading pathogens with a collection of pattern recognition receptors that activate the production of antiviral proteins, such as the cytokine interferon-type I, to initiate antiviral responses immediately as well as the adaptive immune response for long-term protection. To establish infection in the host, many viruses have thus evolved strategies for subversion of these mechanisms of innate immunity. For example, acute infection by HIV-1 and other retroviruses have long been thought to be non-immunogenic, signifying suppression of host defenses by these pathogens. Studies in the past few years have begun to uncover a multifaceted scheme of how HIV-1 evades innate immune detection, especially of its DNA, by exploiting host proteins. This review will discuss the host mechanisms of HIV-1 DNA sensing and viral immune evasion, with a particular focus on TREX1, three prime repair exonuclease 1, a host 3' exonuclease (also known as DNase III).

  13. Evaluating metabolic stress and plasmid stability in plasmid DNA production by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Silva, Filomena; Queiroz, João A; Domingues, Fernanda C

    2012-01-01

    In the context of recombinant DNA technology, the development of feasible and high-yielding plasmid DNA production processes has regained attention as more evidence for its efficacy as vectors for gene therapy and DNA vaccination arise. When producing plasmid DNA in Escherichia coli, a number of biological restraints, triggered by plasmid maintenance and replication as well as culture conditions are responsible for limiting final biomass and product yields. This termed "metabolic burden" can also cause detrimental effects on plasmid stability and quality, since the cell machinery is no longer capable of maintaining an active metabolism towards plasmid synthesis and the stress responses elicited by plasmid maintenance can also cause increased plasmid instability. The optimization of plasmid DNA production bioprocesses is still hindered by the lack of information on the host metabolic responses as well as information on plasmid instability. Therefore, systematic and on-line approaches are required not only to characterise this "metabolic burden" and plasmid stability but also for the design of appropriate metabolic engineering and culture strategies. The monitoring tools described to date rapidly evolve from laborious, off-line and at-line monitoring to online monitoring, at a time-scale that enables researchers to solve these bioprocessing problems as they occur. This review highlights major E. coli biological alterations caused by plasmid maintenance and replication, possible causes for plasmid instability and discusses the ability of currently employed bioprocess monitoring techniques to provide information in order to circumvent metabolic burden and plasmid instability, pointing out the possible evolution of these methods towards online bioprocess monitoring.

  14. Enhancement of HIV-1 DNA vaccine immunogenicity by BCG-PSN, a novel adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Hou, Jue; Li, Dingfeng; Liu, Yong; Hu, Ningzhu; Hao, Yanling; Fu, Jingjing; Hu, Yunzhang; Shao, Yiming

    2013-01-07

    Although the importance of DNA vaccines, especially as a priming immunization has been well established in numerous HIV vaccine studies, the immunogenictiy of DNA vaccines is generally moderate. Novel adjuvant is in urgent need for improving the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine. Polysaccharide and nucleic acid fraction extracted by hot phenol method from Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin, known as BCG-PSN, is a widely used immunomodulatory product in China clinical practice. In this study, we evaluated whether the BCG-PSN could serve as a novel adjuvant of DNA vaccine to trigger better cellular and humoral immune responses against the HIV-1 Env antigen in Balb/C mouse model. The BCG-PSN was mixed with 10 μg or 100 μg of pDRVI1.0gp145 (HIV-1 CN54 gp145 gene) DNA vaccine and intramuscularly immunized two or three times. We found that BCG-PSN could significantly improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine when co-administered with DNA vaccine. Further, at the same vaccination schedule, BCG-PSN co-immunization with 10 μg DNA vaccine could elicit cellular and humoral immune responses which were comparable to that induced by 100 μg DNA vaccine alone. Moreover, our results demonstrate that BCG-PSN can activate TLR signaling pathways and induce Th1-type cytokines secretion. These findings suggest that BCG-PSN can serve as a novel and effective adjuvant for DNA vaccination.

  15. RNA dependent DNA replication fidelity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase: evidence of discrimination between DNA and RNA substrates.

    PubMed

    Kerr, S G; Anderson, K S

    1997-11-18

    The RNA dependent DNA replication fidelity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has been investigated using pre-steady-state kinetics under single turnover conditions. In contrast to previous estimates of low replication fidelity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, the present study finds the enzyme to be more highly discriminating when an RNA/DNA template-primer is employed as compared with the corresponding DNA/DNA template-primer. The basis of this selectivity is due to extremely slow polymerization kinetics for incorporation of an incorrect deoxynucleotide. The maximum rates for misincorporation (kpol) of dGTP, dCTP, and dTTP opposite a template uridine were 0.2, 0.03, and 0.003 s-1, respectively. The equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) for the incorrect nucleotide opposite a template uridine were 1.0, 1.1, and 0.7 mM for dGTP, dCTP, and dTTP, respectively. These kinetic values provide fidelity estimates of 26 000 for discrimination against dGTP, 176 000 for dCTP, and 1 x 10(6) for dTTP misincorporation at this position. Similar observations were obtained when incorrect nucleotide misincorporation was examined opposite a template adenine. Thus in a direct comparison of RNA/DNA and DNA/DNA template-primer substrates, HIV-1 RT exhibits approximately a 10-60-fold increase in fidelity. This study augments our current understanding of the similarities and differences of catalytic activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase using RNA and DNA substrates. Moreover, these studies lend further support for a model for nucleotide incorporation by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase involving a two-step binding mechanism governed by a rate-limiting conformational change for correct incorporation.

  16. Gene therapy with plasmids encoding IFN-β or IFN-α14 confers long-term resistance to HIV-1 in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sojan; Choi, Jang-Gi; Ortega, Nora M.; Zhang, Junli; Shankar, Premlata; Swamy, N. Manjunath

    2016-01-01

    Because endogenous interferon type I (IFN-I) produced by HIV-1 infection might complicate the analysis of therapeutically administered IFN-I, we tested different humanized mouse models for induction of IFN-I during HIV-1 infection. While HIV-1 induced high levels of IFN-α in BLT mice, IFN-I was undetectable following infection in the Hu-PBL mouse model, in which only T cells expand. We therefore tested the effect of treatment with Pegylated IFN-2 (pegasys), in Hu-PBL mice. Pegasys prevented CD4 T cell depletion and reduced the viral load for 10 days, but the effect waned thereafter. We next expressed IFN-I subsets (IFN-α2, −α6, −α8, −α14, and −β) in Hu-PBL mice by hydrodynamic injection of plasmids encoding them and 2 days later infected the mice with HIV-1. CD4 T cell depletion was prevented in all subtypes of IFN-I-expressing mice by day 10. However, at day 40 post-infection, protection was seen in IFN-β- and IFN-α14-expressing mice, but not the others. The viral load followed an inverse pattern and was highest in control mice and lowest in IFN-β- and IFN-α14-expressing mice until day 40 after infection. These results show that gene therapy with plasmids encoding IFN-β and −α14, but not the commonly used −α2, confers long-term suppression of HIV-1 replication. PMID:27729616

  17. Degradation of supercoiled plasmid DNA within a capillary device.

    PubMed

    Meacle, F J; Zhang, H; Papantoniou, I; Ward, J M; Titchener-Hooker, N J; Hoare, M

    2007-08-01

    Supercoiled plasmid DNA is susceptible to fluid stress in large-scale manufacturing processes. A capillary device was used to generate controlled shear conditions and the effects of different stresses on plasmid DNA structure were investigated. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was employed to characterize the flow environment in the capillary device and different analytical techniques were used to quantify the DNA breakage. It was found that the degradation of plasmid DNA occurred at the entrance of the capillary and that the shear stress within the capillary did not affect the DNA structure. The degradation rate of plasmids was well correlated with the average elongational strain rate or the pressure drop at the entrance region. The conclusion may also be drawn that laminar shear stress does not play a significant role in plasmid DNA degradation. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Soluble multi-trimeric TNF superfamily ligand adjuvants enhance immune responses to a HIV-1 Gag DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kanagavelu, Saravana K; Snarsky, Victoria; Termini, James M; Gupta, Sachin; Barzee, Suzanne; Wright, Jacqueline A; Khan, Wasif N; Kornbluth, Richard S; Stone, Geoffrey W

    2012-01-17

    DNA vaccines remain an important component of HIV vaccination strategies, typically as part of a prime/boost vaccination strategy with viral vector or protein boost. A number of DNA prime/viral vector boost vaccines are currently being evaluated for both preclinical studies and in Phase I and Phase II clinical trials. These vaccines would benefit from molecular adjuvants that increase correlates of immunity during the DNA prime. While HIV vaccine immune correlates are still not well defined, there are a number of immune assays that have been shown to correlate with protection from viral challenge including CD8+ T cell avidity, antigen-specific proliferation, and polyfunctional cytokine secretion. Recombinant DNA vaccine adjuvants composed of a fusion between Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) and either CD40 Ligand (CD40L) or GITR Ligand (GITRL) were previously shown to enhance HIV-1 Gag DNA vaccines. Here we show that similar fusion constructs composed of the TNF superfamily ligands (TNFSFL) 4-1BBL, OX40L, RANKL, LIGHT, CD70, and BAFF can also enhanced immune responses to a HIV-1 Gag DNA vaccine. BALB/c mice were vaccinated intramuscularly with plasmids expressing secreted Gag and SP-D-TNFSFL fusions. Initially, mice were analyzed 2 weeks or 7 weeks following vaccination to evaluate the relative efficacy of each SP-D-TNFSFL construct. All SP-D-TNFSFL constructs enhanced at least one Gag-specific immune response compared to the parent vaccine. Importantly, the constructs SP-D-4-1BBL, SP-D-OX40L, and SP-D-LIGHT enhanced CD8+ T cell avidity and CD8+/CD4+ T cell proliferation 7 weeks post vaccination. These avidity and proliferation data suggest that 4-1BBL, OX40L, and LIGHT fusion constructs may be particularly effective as vaccine adjuvants. Constructs SP-D-OX40L, SP-D-LIGHT, and SP-D-BAFF enhanced Gag-specific IL-2 secretion in memory T cells, suggesting these adjuvants can increase the number of self-renewing Gag-specific CD8+ and/or CD4+ T cells. Finally adjuvants SP

  19. RNA and DNA binding properties of HIV-1 Vif protein: a fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Bernacchi, Serena; Henriet, Simon; Dumas, Philippe; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2007-09-07

    The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) is a small basic protein essential for viral fitness and pathogenicity. Some "non-permissive" cell lines cannot sustain replication of Vif(-) HIV-1 virions. In these cells, Vif counteracts the natural antiretroviral activity of the DNA-editing enzymes APOBEC3G/3F. Moreover, Vif is packaged into viral particles through a strong interaction with genomic RNA in viral nucleoprotein complexes. To gain insights into determinants of this binding process, we performed the first characterization of Vif/nucleic acid interactions using Vif intrinsic fluorescence. We determined the affinity of Vif for RNA fragments corresponding to various regions of the HIV-1 genome. Our results demonstrated preferential and moderately cooperative binding for RNAs corresponding to the 5'-untranslated region of HIV-1 (5'-untranslated region) and gag (cooperativity parameter omega approximately 65-80, and K(d) = 45-55 nM). In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy allowed us to point out the TAR apical loop and a short region in gag as primary strong affinity binding sites (K(d) = 9.5-14 nM). Interestingly, beside its RNA binding properties, the Vif protein can also bind the corresponding DNA oligonucleotides and their complementary counterparts with an affinity similar to the one observed for the RNA sequences, while other DNA sequences displayed reduced affinity. Taken together, our results suggest that Vif binding to RNA and DNA offers several non-exclusive ways to counteract APOBEC3G/3F factors, in addition to the well documented Vif-induced degradation by the proteasome and to the Vif-mediated repression of translation of these antiviral factors.

  20. Attacking HIV-1 RNA versus DNA by sequence-specific approaches: RNAi versus CRISPR-Cas.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Carrillo, Elena; Berkhout, Ben

    2016-10-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection can be effectively controlled by potent antiviral drugs, but this never results in a cure. The patient should therefore take these drugs for the rest of his/her life, which can cause drug-resistance and adverse effects. Therefore, more durable therapeutic strategies should be considered, such as a stable gene therapy to protect the target T cells against HIV-1 infection. The development of potent therapeutic regimens based on the RNA interference (RNAi) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas) mechanisms will be described, which can be delivered by lentiviral vectors. These mechanisms attack different forms of the viral genome, the RNA and DNA, respectively, but both mechanisms act in a strictly sequence-specific manner. Early RNAi experiments demonstrated profound virus inhibition, but also indicated that viral escape is possible. Such therapy failure can be prevented by the design of a combinatorial RNAi attack on the virus and this gene therapy is currently being tested in a preclinical humanized mouse model. Recent CRISPR-Cas studies also document robust virus inhibition, but suggest a novel viral escape route that is induced by the cellular nonhomologous end joining DNA repair pathway, which is activated by CRISPR-Cas-induced DNA breaks. We will compare these two approaches for durable HIV-1 suppression and discuss the respective advantages and disadvantages. The potential for future clinical applications will be described.

  1. Influenza Plasmid DNA Vaccines: Progress and Prospects.

    PubMed

    Bicho, Diana; Queiroz, João António; Tomaz, Cândida Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines have long been used to fight flu infectious; however, recent advances highlight the importance of produce new alternatives. Even though traditional influenza vaccines are safe and usually effective, they need to be uploaded every year to anticipate circulating flu viruses. This limitation together with the use of embryonated chicken eggs as the substrate for vaccine production, is time-consuming and could involve potential biohazards in growth of new virus strains. Plasmid DNA produced by prokaryote microorganisms and encoding foreign proteins had emerged as a promising therapeutic tool. This technology allows the expression of a gene of interest by eukaryotic cells in order to induce protective immune responses against the pathogen of interest. In this review, we discuss the strategies to choose the best DNA vaccine to be applied in the treatment and prevention of influenza. Specifically, we give an update of influenza DNA vaccines developments, all involved techniques, their main characteristics, applicability and technical features to obtain the best option against influenza infections.

  2. Streamlined purification of plasmid DNA from prokaryotic cultures.

    PubMed

    Pueschel, Laura; Li, Hongshan; Hymes, Matthew

    2011-01-05

    We describe the complete process of AcroPrep Advance Filter Plates for 96 plasmid preparations, starting from prokaryotic culture and ending with high purity DNA. Based on multi-well filtration for bacterial lysate clearance and DNA purification, this method creates a streamlined process for plasmid preparation. Filter plates containing silica-based media can easily be processed by vacuum filtration or centrifuge to yield appreciable quantities of plasmid DNA. Quantitative analyses determine the purified plasmid DNA is consistently of high quality with average OD(260/280;) ratios of 1.97. Overall, plasmid yields offer more pure DNA for downstream applications, such as sequencing and cloning. This streamlined method of using AcroPrep Advance Filter Plates allows for manual, semi-automated or fully-automated processing.

  3. Streamlined Purification of Plasmid DNA From Prokaryotic Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pueschel, Laura; Li, Hongshan; Hymes, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    We describe the complete process of AcroPrep Advance Filter Plates for 96 plasmid preparations, starting from prokaryotic culture and ending with high purity DNA. Based on multi-well filtration for bacterial lysate clearance and DNA purification, this method creates a streamlined process for plasmid preparation. Filter plates containing silica-based media can easily be processed by vacuum filtration or centrifuge to yield appreciable quantities of plasmid DNA. Quantitative analyses determine the purified plasmid DNA is consistently of high quality with average OD260/280 ratios of 1.97. Overall, plasmid yields offer more pure DNA for downstream applications, such as sequencing and cloning. This streamlined method of using AcroPrep Advance Filter Plates allows for manual, semi-automated or fully-automated processing. PMID:21248696

  4. Identifying stabilizers of plasmid DNA for pharmaceutical use.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yuhong; Ramsey, Joshua D; King, Robert; Leviten, Michael; Mcguire, Ruth; Volkin, David B; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Middaugh, C Russell

    2011-03-01

    To better address the need for developing stable formulations of plasmid DNA-based biopharmaceuticals, 37 compounds from a generally regarded as safe library were examined for their potential use as stabilizers. A plasmid DNA-based therapeutic vaccine, BHT-DNA, was used as a model system. Initial studies were performed to compare the biophysical properties of BHT-DNA plasmid from bulk drug substance and finished drug product. An agarose gel electrophoresis-based assay was then employed in excipient compatibility studies for the drug product by monitoring supercoiled plasmid DNA content in various formulations. After incubation at 40 °C for 30 days, eight out of the 37 excipients tested were able to better retain the supercoil content compared to the control. Sodium citrate appeared to be the most effective stabilizer and its protective capability plateaued at an ionic strength of about 0.4. Several other excipients including malic acid, ethanol, and Pluronic F-68 were also identified as promising stabilizers for BHT-DNA plasmid DNA. Additionally, compounds, including ferrous chloride, ascorbic acid, human serum albumin, and PEG 1000, which significantly destabilized the supercoiled plasmid DNA were identified. These data may also be applicable to other plasmid DNA-based pharmaceuticals for storage stability improvement, due to chemical and structural similarities of these macromolecules.

  5. Detection of HIV-1 RNA/DNA and CD4 mRNA in feces and urine from chronic HIV-1 infected subjects with and without anti-retroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Caruso, Lori; Ding, Ming; Shen, Chengli; Buchanan, William; Gupta, Phalguni; Rinaldo, Charles R; Chen, Yue

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 infects gut associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) very early after transmission by multiple routes. The infected GALT consequently serves as the major reservoir for HIV-1 infection and could constantly shed HIV-1 and CD4+ T cells into the intestinal lumen. To examine this hypothesis, we monitored HIV-1 RNA/DNA and CD4 mRNA in fecal samples of chronically infected subjects with and without antiretroviral therapy (ART). We compared this to levels of HIV-1 RNA/DNA in urine and blood from the same subjects. Our results show that HIV-1 DNA, RNA and CD4 mRNA were detected in 8%, 19% and 31% respectively, of feces samples from infected subjects with detectable plasma viral load, and were not detected in any of subjects on ART with undetectable plasma viral load. In urine samples, HIV-1 DNA was detected in 24% of infected subjects with detectable plasma viral load and 23% of subjects on ART with undetectable plasma viral load. Phylogenetic analysis of the envelope sequences of HIV-1 revealed distinct virus populations in concurrently collected serum, feces and urine samples from one subject. In addition, our study demonstrated for the first time the presence of CD4 mRNA in fecal specimens of HIV-1 infected subjects, which could be used to assess GALT pathogenesis in HIV-1 infection. PMID:19799780

  6. HIV-1 replication in human immune cells is independent of TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) expression.

    PubMed

    Nehls, Julia; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Brack-Werner, Ruth; Floss, Thomas; Schindler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43) was originally identified as a host cell factor binding to the HIV-1 LTR and thereby suppressing HIV-1 transcription and gene expression (Ou et al., J.Virol. 1995, 69(6):3584). TDP-43 is a global regulator of transcription, can influence RNA metabolism in many different ways and is ubiquitously expressed. Thus, TDP-43 could be a major factor restricting HIV-1 replication at the level of LTR transcription and gene expression. These facts prompted us to revisit the role of TDP-43 for HIV-1 replication. We utilized established HIV-1 cell culture systems as well as primary cell models and performed a comprehensive analysis of TDP-43 function and investigated its putative impact on HIV-1 gene expression. In HIV-1 infected cells TDP-43 was neither degraded nor sequestered from the nucleus. Furthermore, TDP-43 overexpression as well as siRNA mediated knockdown did not affect HIV-1 gene expression and virus production in T cells and macrophages. In summary, our experiments argue against a restricting role of TDP-43 during HIV-1 replication in immune cells.

  7. HIV-1 Replication in Human Immune Cells Is Independent of TAR DNA Binding Protein 43 (TDP-43) Expression

    PubMed Central

    Nehls, Julia; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Brack-Werner, Ruth; Floss, Thomas; Schindler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43) was originally identified as a host cell factor binding to the HIV-1 LTR and thereby suppressing HIV-1 transcription and gene expression (Ou et al., J.Virol. 1995, 69(6):3584). TDP-43 is a global regulator of transcription, can influence RNA metabolism in many different ways and is ubiquitously expressed. Thus, TDP-43 could be a major factor restricting HIV-1 replication at the level of LTR transcription and gene expression. These facts prompted us to revisit the role of TDP-43 for HIV-1 replication. We utilized established HIV-1 cell culture systems as well as primary cell models and performed a comprehensive analysis of TDP-43 function and investigated its putative impact on HIV-1 gene expression. In HIV-1 infected cells TDP-43 was neither degraded nor sequestered from the nucleus. Furthermore, TDP-43 overexpression as well as siRNA mediated knockdown did not affect HIV-1 gene expression and virus production in T cells and macrophages. In summary, our experiments argue against a restricting role of TDP-43 during HIV-1 replication in immune cells. PMID:25127017

  8. Intradermal naked plasmid DNA immunization: mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Elnekave, Mazal; Furmanov, Karina; Hovav, Avi-Hai

    2011-08-01

    Plasmid DNA is a promising vaccine modality that is regularly examined in prime-boost immunization regimens. Recent advances in skin immunity increased our understanding of the sophisticated cutaneous immune network, which revived scientific interest in delivering vaccines to the skin. Intradermal administration of plasmid DNA via needle injection is a simple and inexpensive procedure that exposes the plasmid and its encoded antigen to the dermal immune surveillance system. This triggers unique mechanisms for eliciting local and systemic immunity that can confer protection against pathogens and tumors. Understanding the mechanisms of intradermal plasmid DNA immunization is essential for enhancing and modulating its immunogenicity. With regard to vaccination, this is of greater importance as this routine injection technique is highly desirable for worldwide immunization. This article will focus on the current understanding of the mechanisms involved in antigen expression and presentation during primary and secondary syringe and needle intradermal plasmid DNA immunization.

  9. Dolutegravir Interactions with HIV-1 Integrase-DNA: Structural Rationale for Drug Resistance and Dissociation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    DeAnda, Felix; Hightower, Kendra E.; Nolte, Robert T.; Hattori, Kazunari; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Kawasuji, Takashi; Underwood, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Signature HIV-1 integrase mutations associated with clinical raltegravir resistance involve 1 of 3 primary genetic pathways, Y143C/R, Q148H/K/R and N155H, the latter 2 of which confer cross-resistance to elvitegravir. In accord with clinical findings, in vitro drug resistance profiling studies with wild-type and site-directed integrase mutant viruses have shown significant fold increases in raltegravir and elvitegravir resistance for the specified viral mutants relative to wild-type HIV-1. Dolutegravir, in contrast, has demonstrated clinical efficacy in subjects failing raltegravir therapy due to integrase mutations at Y143, Q148 or N155, which is consistent with its distinct in vitro resistance profile as dolutegravir’s antiviral activity against these viral mutants is equivalent to its activity against wild-type HIV-1. Kinetic studies of inhibitor dissociation from wild-type and mutant integrase-viral DNA complexes have shown that dolutegravir also has a distinct off-rate profile with dissociative half-lives substantially longer than those of raltegravir and elvitegravir, suggesting that dolutegravir’s prolonged binding may be an important contributing factor to its distinct resistance profile. To provide a structural rationale for these observations, we constructed several molecular models of wild-type and clinically relevant mutant HIV-1 integrase enzymes in complex with viral DNA and dolutegravir, raltegravir or elvitegravir. Here, we discuss our structural models and the posited effects that the integrase mutations and the structural and electronic properties of the integrase inhibitors may have on the catalytic pocket and inhibitor binding and, consequently, on antiviral potency in vitro and in the clinic. PMID:24146996

  10. Diverse fates of uracilated HIV-1 DNA during infection of myeloid lineage cells

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Erik C; Ransom, Monica; Hesselberth, Jay R; Hosmane, Nina N; Capoferri, Adam A; Bruner, Katherine M; Pollack, Ross A; Zhang, Hao; Drummond, Michael Bradley; Siliciano, Janet M; Siliciano, Robert; Stivers, James T

    2016-01-01

    We report that a major subpopulation of monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) contains high levels of dUTP, which is incorporated into HIV-1 DNA during reverse transcription (U/A pairs), resulting in pre-integration restriction and post-integration mutagenesis. After entering the nucleus, uracilated viral DNA products are degraded by the uracil base excision repair (UBER) machinery with less than 1% of the uracilated DNA successfully integrating. Although uracilated proviral DNA showed few mutations, the viral genomic RNA was highly mutated, suggesting that errors occur during transcription. Viral DNA isolated from blood monocytes and alveolar macrophages (but not T cells) of drug-suppressed HIV-infected individuals also contained abundant uracils. The presence of viral uracils in short-lived monocytes suggests their recent infection through contact with virus producing cells in a tissue reservoir. These findings reveal new elements of a viral defense mechanism involving host UBER that may be relevant to the establishment and persistence of HIV-1 infection. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18447.001 PMID:27644592

  11. Observation of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein induced TAR DNA melting at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosa, Gonzalo; Harbron, Elizabeth; O'Connor, Donald; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Barbara, Paul

    2003-03-01

    Reverse transcription of the HIV-1 RNA genome involves several nucleic acid rearrangement steps, and the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a key role in this process. NC is a nucleic acid chaperone protein, which facilitates the formation of the most stable nucleic acid structures. Single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (SM-FRET) measurements enable us to observe the NC-induced conformational fluctuations of a transactivation response region (TAR) DNA hairpin, which is part of the initial product of reverse transcription known as minus-strand strong-stop DNA. SM-FRET studies show that the majority of conformational fluctuations of the fluorescently-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the presence of NC occur in <100 ms. A single molecule explores a wide range of confomations unpon NC binding, with fluctuations encompassing as many as 40 bases in both arms of the hairpin. No conformational fluctuations are observed with the dye-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the absence of NC or when a labeled TAR DNA hairpin variant lacking bulges and internal loops is analyzed in the presence of NC. This study represents the first real-time observation of NC-mediated nucleic acid conformational fluctuations, revealing new insights into NC's nucleic acid chaperone activity.

  12. Delivery of DNA HIV-1 Vaccine to the Liver Induces High and Long-lasting Humoral Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Raska, Milan; Moldoveanu, Zina; Novak, Jan; Hel, Zdenek; Bozja, Jadranka; Compans, Richard W.; Yang, Chinglai; Mestecky, Jiri

    2008-01-01

    The quality of immune responses induced by DNA vaccination depends on the site of DNA administration, the expression, and the properties of the encoded antigen. In the present study we demonstrate that intravenous hydrodynamic HIV-1 envelope DNA injection resulted in high levels of expression of HIV-1 envelope antigen in the liver. When compared to the administration of DNA by i.n., i.d., i.m., and i.splenic routes, hydrodynamic vaccination induced, upon DNA boosting, 40 times increase of HIV-1 envelope-specific antibodies over the preimmune levels. Hydrodynamic vaccination with 1 μg DNA induced higher humoral responses than 100 μg DNA given intramuscularly in the prime – boost regimen. High levels of envelope-specific IgG and IgA antibodies were induced in genital tract secretions after two doses of DNA followed by intranasal boosting with recombinant HIV-1 gp120 protein. Furthermore, two doses of 100 μg DNA generated interferon-gamma production in ~ 4.3 ± 1.7 % of CD8+ splenocytes after in vitro stimulation with HIV-1 envelope peptides. These results demonstrate that DNA vaccines targeted to tissues with high proteosynthetic activity, such as the liver, results in enhanced immune responses. PMID:18304708

  13. DNA vaccine molecular adjuvants SP-D-BAFF and SP-D-APRIL enhance anti-gp120 immune response and increase HIV-1 neutralizing antibody titers.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sachin; Clark, Emily S; Termini, James M; Boucher, Justin; Kanagavelu, Saravana; LeBranche, Celia C; Abraham, Sakhi; Montefiori, David C; Khan, Wasif N; Stone, Geoffrey W

    2015-04-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) specific for conserved epitopes on the HIV-1 envelope (Env) are believed to be essential for protection against multiple HIV-1 clades. However, vaccines capable of stimulating the production of bNAbs remain a major challenge. Given that polyreactivity and autoreactivity are considered important characteristics of anti-HIV bNAbs, we designed an HIV vaccine incorporating the molecular adjuvants BAFF (B cell activating factor) and APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand) with the potential to facilitate the maturation of polyreactive and autoreactive B cells as well as to enhance the affinity and/or avidity of Env-specific antibodies. We designed recombinant DNA plasmids encoding soluble multitrimers of BAFF and APRIL using surfactant protein D as a scaffold, and we vaccinated mice with these molecular adjuvants using DNA and DNA-protein vaccination strategies. We found that immunization of mice with a DNA vaccine encoding BAFF or APRIL multitrimers, together with interleukin 12 (IL-12) and membrane-bound HIV-1 Env gp140, induced neutralizing antibodies against tier 1 and tier 2 (vaccine strain) viruses. The APRIL-containing vaccine was particularly effective at generating tier 2 neutralizing antibodies following a protein boost. These BAFF and APRIL effects coincided with an enhanced germinal center (GC) reaction, increased anti-gp120 antibody-secreting cells, and increased anti-gp120 functional avidity. Notably, BAFF and APRIL did not cause indiscriminate B cell expansion or an increase in total IgG. We propose that BAFF and APRIL multitrimers are promising molecular adjuvants for vaccines designed to induce bNAbs against HIV-1. Recent identification of antibodies that neutralize most HIV-1 strains has revived hopes and efforts to create novel vaccines that can effectively stimulate HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies. However, the multiple immune evasion properties of HIV have hampered these efforts. These include the instability of

  14. Quantification of viral DNA during HIV-1 infection: A review of relevant clinical uses and laboratory methods.

    PubMed

    Alidjinou, E K; Bocket, L; Hober, D

    2015-02-01

    Effective antiretroviral therapy usually leads to undetectable HIV-1 RNA in the plasma. However, the virus persists in some cells of infected patients as various DNA forms, both integrated and unintegrated. This reservoir represents the greatest challenge to the complete cure of HIV-1 infection and its characteristics highly impact the course of the disease. The quantification of HIV-1 DNA in blood samples constitutes currently the most practical approach to measure this residual infection. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) is the most common method used for HIV-DNA quantification and many strategies have been developed to measure the different forms of HIV-1 DNA. In the literature, several "in-house" PCR methods have been used and there is a need for standardization to have comparable results. In addition, qPCR is limited for the precise quantification of low levels by background noise. Among new assays in development, digital PCR was shown to allow an accurate quantification of HIV-1 DNA. Total HIV-1 DNA is most commonly measured in clinical routine. The absolute quantification of proviruses and unintegrated forms is more often used for research purposes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Determination of HIV-1 coreceptor tropism using proviral DNA in women before and after viral suppression.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Russell E; Rogers, Amy A; Hamdan, Hasnah B; Burger, Harold; Weiser, Barbara; Gao, Wei; Anastos, Kathryn; Young, Mary; Meyer, William A; Pesano, Rick L; Kagan, Ron M

    2015-01-01

    An HIV-1 tropism test is recommended prior to CCR5 antagonist administration to exclude patients harboring non-R5 virus from treatment with this class of antiretrovirals. HIV-1 tropism determination based on proviral DNA (pvDNA) may be useful in individuals with plasma viral RNA suppression. We developed a genotypic tropism assay for pvDNA and assessed its performance in a retrospective analysis of samples collected longitudinally. We randomly selected paired plasma/PBMC samples from the Women's Interagency HIV Study with plasma viral load ≥5,000 cp/mL at time 1 (T1), undetectable viral load maintained for ≥1 year and CD4+ >200 cells/μL at time 2 (T2). pvDNA was isolated from cryopreserved PBMCs. Sequences were analyzed in triplicate from 49/50 women, with tropism assigned using the geno2pheno (g2p) algorithm. The median time between T1 and T2 was 4.1 years. CXCR4-using virus was detected in 24% of the RNA samples and 33% of the pvDNA samples at T1, compared to 37% of the pvDNA samples at T2. Concordance between plasma RNA and pvDNA tropism was 88% at T1 and 80% at T2. The g2p scores for RNA (T1) vs DNA (T1, T2) were strongly correlated (Spearman rho: 0.85 (T1); 0.78 (T2)). In women with evidence of tropism switch at T2 (either R5 to non-R5 or non-R5 to R5), there was a correlation between change in tropism and time. Mean pvDNA viral load decreased by 0.4 log10 copies/106 cells between T1 and T2 (p < 0.0001), but this decrease was not significantly associated with tropism status. We demonstrated that pvDNA tropism in women with HIV-1 suppression is concordant with prior RNA tropism results, even after a median time of >4 years. pvDNA tropism testing may be useful to determine eligibility of patients with viral suppression to switch to a CCR5-antagonist based regimen as well as for research purposes.

  16. Tubular cationized pullulan hydrogels as local reservoirs for plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    San Juan, Aurélie; Ducrocq, Grégory; Hlawaty, Hanna; Bataille, Isabelle; Guénin, Erwann; Letourneur, Didier; Feldman, Laurent J

    2007-12-01

    In the present study, we measured the ability of various cationized pullulan tubular hydrogels to retain plasmid DNA, and tested the ability of retained plasmid DNA to transfect vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Cationized pullulans were obtained by grafting at different charge densities ethylamine (EA) or diethylaminoethylamine (DEAE) on the pullulan backbone. Polymers were characterized by elemental analysis, acid-base titration, size exclusion chromatography, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance. The complexation of cationized pullulans in solution with plasmid DNA was evidenced by fluorescence quenching with PicoGreen. Cationized pullulans were then chemically crosslinked with phosphorus oxychloride to obtain tubular cationized pullulan hydrogels. Native pullulan tubes did not retain loaded plasmid DNA. In contrast, the ability of cationized pullulan tubes to retain plasmid DNA was dependent on both the amine content and the type of amine. The functional integrity of plasmid DNA in cationized pullulan tubes was demonstrated by in vitro transfection of VSMCs. Hence, cationized pullulan hydrogels can be designed as tubular structures with high affinity for plasmid DNA, which may provide new biomaterials to enhance the efficiency of local arterial gene transfer strategies.

  17. Electroporation-mediated administration of candidate DNA vaccines against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Vasan, Sandhya

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines to prevent HIV remain desperately needed, but a number of challenges, including retroviral integration, establishment of anatomic reservoir sites, high sequence diversity, and heavy envelope glycosylation. have precluded development of a highly effective vaccine. DNA vaccines have been utilized as candidate HIV vaccines because of their ability to generate cellular and humoral immune responses, the lack of anti-vector response allowing for repeat administration, and their ability to prime the response to viral-vectored vaccines. Because the HIV epidemic has disproportionately affected the developing world, the favorable thermostability profile and relative ease and low cost of manufacture of DNA vaccines offer additional advantages. In vivo electroporation (EP) has been utilized to improve immune responses to DNA vaccines as candidate HIV-1 vaccines in standalone or prime-boost regimens with both proteins and viral-vectored vaccines in several animal models and, more recently, in human clinical trials. This chapter describes the preclinical and clinical development of candidate DNA vaccines for HIV-1 delivered by EP, including challenges to bringing this technology to the developing world.

  18. Peptides derived from the HIV-1 integrase promote HIV-1 infection and multi-integration of viral cDNA in LEDGF/p75-knockdown cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The presence of the cellular Lens Epithelium Derived Growth Factor p75 (LEDGF/p75) protein is essential for integration of the Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) cDNA and for efficient virus production. In the absence of LEDGF/p75 very little integration and virus production can be detected, as was demonstrated using LEDGF/p75-knokdown cells. Results Here we show that the failure to infect LEDGF/p75-knockdown cells has another reason aside from the lack of LEDGF/p75. It is also due to inhibition of the viral integrase (IN) enzymatic activity by an early expressed viral Rev protein. The formation of an inhibitory Rev-IN complex in virus-infected cells can be disrupted by the addition of three IN-derived, cell-permeable peptides, designated INr (IN derived-Rev interacting peptides) and INS (IN derived-integrase stimulatory peptide). The results of the present work confirm previous results showing that HIV-1 fails to infect LEDGF/p75-knockdown cells. However, in the presence of INrs and INS peptides, relatively high levels of viral cDNA integration as well as productive virus infection were obtained following infection by a wild type (WT) HIV-1 of LEDGF/p75-knockdown cells. Conclusions It appears that the lack of integration observed in HIV-1 infected LEDGF/p75-knockdown cells is due mainly to the inhibitory effect of Rev following the formation of a Rev-IN complex. Disruption of this inhibitory complex leads to productive infection in those cells. PMID:20678206

  19. Total HIV-1 DNA, a Marker of Viral Reservoir Dynamics with Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hocqueloux, Laurent; Ghosn, Jade; Cheret, Antoine; Frange, Pierre; Melard, Adeline; Viard, Jean-Paul; Rouzioux, Christine

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY HIV-1 DNA persists in infected cells despite combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), forming viral reservoirs. Recent trials of strategies targeting latent HIV reservoirs have rekindled hopes of curing HIV infection, and reliable markers are thus needed to evaluate viral reservoirs. Total HIV DNA quantification is simple, standardized, sensitive, and reproducible. Total HIV DNA load influences the course of the infection and is therefore clinically relevant. In particular, it is predictive of progression to AIDS and death, independently of HIV RNA load and the CD4 cell count. Baseline total HIV DNA load is predictive of the response to cART. It declines during cART but remains quantifiable, at a level that reflects both the history of infection (HIV RNA zenith, CD4 cell count nadir) and treatment efficacy (residual viremia, cumulative viremia, immune restoration, immune cell activation). Total HIV DNA load in blood is also predictive of the presence and severity of some HIV-1-associated end-organ disorders. It can be useful to guide individual treatment, notably, therapeutic de-escalation. Although it does not distinguish between replication-competent and -defective latent viruses, the total HIV DNA load in blood, tissues, and cells provides insights into HIV pathogenesis, probably because all viral forms participate in host cell activation and HIV pathogenesis. Total HIV DNA is thus a biomarker of HIV reservoirs, which can be defined as all infected cells and tissues containing all forms of HIV persistence that participate in pathogenesis. This participation may occur through the production of new virions, creating new cycles of infection and disseminating infected cells; maintenance or amplification of reservoirs by homeostatic cell proliferation; and viral transcription and synthesis of viral proteins without new virion production. These proteins can induce immune activation, thus participating in the vicious circle of HIV pathogenesis. PMID:27559075

  20. Integrase residues that determine nucleotide preferences at sites of HIV-1 integration: implications for the mechanism of target DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Erik; Krishnan, Lavanya; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Li, Xiang; Cherepanov, Peter; Engelman, Alan; Maertens, Goedele N.

    2014-01-01

    Retroviruses favor target-DNA (tDNA) distortion and particular bases at sites of integration, but the mechanism underlying HIV-1 selectivity is unknown. Crystal structures revealed a network of prototype foamy virus (PFV) integrase residues that distort tDNA: Ala188 and Arg329 interact with tDNA bases, while Arg362 contacts the phosphodiester backbone. HIV-1 integrase residues Ser119, Arg231, and Lys258 were identified here as analogs of PFV integrase residues Ala188, Arg329 and Arg362, respectively. Thirteen integrase mutations were analyzed for effects on integrase activity in vitro and during virus infection, yielding a total of 1610 unique HIV-1 integration sites. Purine (R)/pyrimidine (Y) dinucleotide sequence analysis revealed HIV-1 prefers the tDNA signature (0)RYXRY(4), which accordingly favors overlapping flexible dinucleotides at the center of the integration site. Consistent with roles for Arg231 and Lys258 in sequence specific and non-specific binding, respectively, the R231E mutation altered integration site nucleotide preferences while K258E had no effect. S119A and S119T integrase mutations significantly altered base preferences at positions −3 and 7 from the site of viral DNA joining. The S119A preference moreover mimicked wild-type PFV selectivity at these positions. We conclude that HIV-1 IN residue Ser119 and PFV IN residue Ala188 contact analogous tDNA bases to effect virus integration. PMID:24520116

  1. HIV-1 Tat depresses DNA-PK{sub CS} expression and DNA repair, and sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yi; Huang Yuechen; Xu Qinzhi; Wang Huiping; Bai Bei; Sui Jianli; Zhou Pingkun . E-mail: zhoupk@nic.bmi.ac.cn

    2006-07-01

    Purpose There is accumulating evidence that cancer patients with human immmunodeficiency virus-1/acquired immunodeficency syndrome (HIV-1/AIDS) have more severe tissue reactions and often develop cutaneous toxic effects when subjected to radiotherapy. Here we explored the effects of the HIV-1 Tat protein on cellular responses to ionizing radiation. Methods and Materials Two Tat-expressing cell lines, TT2 and TE671-Tat, were derived from human rhabdomyosarcoma cells by transfecting with the HIV-1 tat gene. Radiosensitivity was determined using colony-forming ability. Gene expression was assessed by cDNA microarray and immunohybridization. The Comet assay and {gamma}-H2AX foci were use to detect DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and repair. Radiation-induced cell cycle changes were detected by flow cytometry. Results The radiosensitivity of TT2 and TE671-Tat cells was significantly increased as compared with parental TE671 cells or the control TE671-pCI cells. Tat also increased proliferation activity. The comet assay and {gamma}H2AX foci detection revealed a decreased capacity to repair radiation-induced DNA DSBs in Tat-expressing cells. Microarray assay demonstrated that the DNA repair gene DNA-PKcs, and cell cycle-related genes Cdc20, Cdc25C, KIF2C and CTS1 were downregulated in Tat-expressing cells. Depression of DNA-PKcs in Tat-expressing cells was further confirmed by RT-PCR and immuno-hybridization analysis. Tat-expressing cells exhibited a prolonged S phase arrest after 4 Gy {gamma}-irradiation, and a noticeable delay in the initiation and elimination of radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest as compared with parental cells. In addition, the G{sub 2}/M arrest was incomplete in TT2 cells. Moreover, HIV-1 Tat resulted in a constitutive overexpression of cyclin B1 protein. Conclusion HIV-1 Tat protein sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation via depressing DNA repair and dysregulating cell cycle checkpoints. These observations provide new insight into the increased

  2. Sustained plasmid DNA release from dissolving mineral coatings

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Siyoung; Murphy, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (Ca-P) minerals such as hydroxyapatite are able to bind a diverse range of biological molecules due to the presence of anions and cations in their crystal structure. The well-characterized ability of Ca-P minerals to bind and release plasmid DNA, coupled with the ability of biodegradable Ca-P coatings to form on the surface of common biomaterials, provides a potential mechanism for controlled release of plasmid DNA from various biomaterials. In this study we hypothesized that the release of plasmid DNA from Ca-P coatings formed on poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) substrates would be dependent on both the intrinsic properties of the Ca-P mineral coating and the surrounding solution conditions. Experiments were designed to consider two general parameters: i) the stability of various Ca-P mineral coatings in solution environments that are relevant to physiological conditions; and ii) the relationship between mineral stability and sustained plasmid DNA release. Our results corroborate previous studies that have demonstrated a direct relationship between intrinsic mineral composition and mineral stability. In addition, we further demonstrate that ion composition and pH of the surrounding solution environment can significantly influence mineral stability. In turn, mineral stability significantly influenced release of plasmid DNA from mineral coatings in vitro, and the DNA release efficiency could be tuned by controlling the mineral properties under various solution environments. These Ca-P mineral coatings may be a useful platform for plasmid DNA delivery applications using various biomaterial platforms. PMID:20304109

  3. Sequence-specific activation of the DNA sensor cGAS by Y-form DNA structures as found in primary HIV-1 cDNA.

    PubMed

    Herzner, Anna-Maria; Hagmann, Cristina Amparo; Goldeck, Marion; Wolter, Steven; Kübler, Kirsten; Wittmann, Sabine; Gramberg, Thomas; Andreeva, Liudmila; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Mertens, Christina; Zillinger, Thomas; Jin, Tengchuan; Xiao, Tsan Sam; Bartok, Eva; Coch, Christoph; Ackermann, Damian; Hornung, Veit; Ludwig, Janos; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther; Schlee, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Cytosolic DNA that emerges during infection with a retrovirus or DNA virus triggers antiviral type I interferon responses. So far, only double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) over 40 base pairs (bp) in length has been considered immunostimulatory. Here we found that unpaired DNA nucleotides flanking short base-paired DNA stretches, as in stem-loop structures of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) derived from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), activated the type I interferon-inducing DNA sensor cGAS in a sequence-dependent manner. DNA structures containing unpaired guanosines flanking short (12- to 20-bp) dsDNA (Y-form DNA) were highly stimulatory and specifically enhanced the enzymatic activity of cGAS. Furthermore, we found that primary HIV-1 reverse transcripts represented the predominant viral cytosolic DNA species during early infection of macrophages and that these ssDNAs were highly immunostimulatory. Collectively, our study identifies unpaired guanosines in Y-form DNA as a highly active, minimal cGAS recognition motif that enables detection of HIV-1 ssDNA.

  4. Separation of plasmid DNA topoisomers by multimodal chromatography.

    PubMed

    Silva-Santos, A Rita; Alves, Cláudia P A; Prazeres, Duarte Miguel F; Azevedo, Ana M

    2016-06-15

    The ability to analyze the distribution of topoisomers in a plasmid DNA sample is important when evaluating the quality of preparations intended for gene therapy and DNA vaccination or when performing biochemical studies on the action of topoisomerases and gyrases. Here, we describe the separation of supercoiled (sc) and open circular (oc) topoisomers by multimodal chromatography. A medium modified with the ligand N-benzyl-N-methyl ethanolamine and an elution scheme with increasing NaCl concentration are used to accomplish the baseline separation of sc and oc plasmid. The utility of the method is demonstrated by quantitating topoisomers in a purified plasmid sample. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Autograft HIV-DNA load predicts HIV-1 peripheral reservoir after stem cell transplantation for AIDS-related lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Zanussi, Stefania; Bortolin, Maria Teresa; Pratesi, Chiara; Tedeschi, Rosamaria; Basaglia, Giancarlo; Abbruzzese, Luciano; Mazzucato, Mario; Spina, Michele; Vaccher, Emanuela; Tirelli, Umberto; Rupolo, Maurizio; Michieli, Mariagrazia; Di Mascio, Michele; De Paoli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is a widely used procedure for AIDS-related lymphomas, and it represents an opportunity to evaluate strategies curing HIV-1 infection. The association of autograft HIV-DNA load with peripheral blood HIV-1 reservoir before ASCT and its contribution in predicting HIV-1 reservoir size and stability during combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) after transplantation are unknown. Aiming to obtain information suggesting new functional cure strategies by ASCT, we retrospectively evaluated HIV-DNA load in autograft and in peripheral blood before and after transplantation in 13 cART-treated HIV-1 relapse/refractoring lymphoma patients. Among them seven discontinued cART after autograft infusion. HIV-DNA was evaluated by a sensitive quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). After debulking chemotherapy/mobilization, the autograft HIV-1 reservoir was higher than and not associated with the peripheral HIV-1 reservoir at baseline [median 215 HIV-DNA copies/10(6) autograft mononuclear cells, range 13-706 vs. 82 HIV-DNA copies/10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), range 13-479, p = 0.03]. After high dose chemotherapy and autograft infusion, HIV-DNA levels reached a plateau between month 6 and 12 of follow-up. No association was found between peripheral HIV-DNA levels at baseline and after infusion in both cART interrupting and not interrupting patients. Only in the last subgroup, a stable significant linear association between autograft and peripheral blood HIV-1 reservoir emerged from month 1 (R(2) = 0.84, p = 0.01) to month 12 follow-up (R(2) = 0.99, p = 0.0005). In summary, autograft HIV-1 reservoir size could be influenced by the mobilization phase and predicts posttransplant peripheral HIV-1 reservoir size in patients on continuous cART. These findings could promote new research on strategies reducing the HIV-1 reservoir by using the ASCT procedure.

  6. Usefulness of Integrase resistance testing in proviral HIV-1 DNA in patients with Raltegravir prior failure.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Caballero, Jose Ángel; Chueca, Natalia; Álvarez, Marta; Mérida, María Dolores; López, Josefa; Sánchez, José Antonio; Vinuesa, David; Martínez, María Ángeles; Hernández, José; García, Federico

    2016-05-13

    In our study, we have hypothesized that proviral DNA may show the history of mutations that emerged at previous failures to a Raltegravir containing regimen, in patients who are currently undetectable and candidates to simplification to a Dolutegravir containing regimen, in order to decide on once a day or twice a day dosing. We have performed a pilot, observational, retrospective, non interventional study, including 7 patients infected by HIV-1, all with a history of previous failure to a RAL containing regimen, that were successfully salvaged and had reached viral suppression. A genotypic viral Integrase region study was available for each patient at the moment of RAL failure. After an average (IQR) time of 48 months (29-53) Integrase resistance mutations in proviral DNA were studied. All the patients were infected by HIV-1 B subtypes, with a mean age of 55 (range 43 to 56), originating from Spain, and 4 were women. Median viral load (log) and CD4 count at the moment of the study on proviral DNA was of 1.3 log cp/ml (range 0-1.47) and 765.5 cells/μL (range; 436.75-1023.75). The median time (IQR) between previous failure to RAL and the study on proviral DNA was 48 (29-53) months. At Raltegravir failure, N155H was detected in four patients, and other secondary mutations were detected in five patients (71.4 %). In proviral DNA, N155H was detected by population sequencing in three patients (42.8 %), and UDS demonstrated a 9.77 % relative abundance of N155H in the remaining patient. Sanger sequencing correctly identified all the secondary mutations. This is a pilot study that demonstrates the possibility of properly identifying N155H and some secondary mutations 29-53 months after failure.

  7. 31P NMR conformational studies of non-palindromic DNA duplexes related to HIV-1 enhancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisne, C.; Simenel, C.; Hantz, E.; Delepierre, M.

    1998-02-01

    Assignment of all 31P resonances of 16 base-pair DNA duplexes, 5' d(CTGGGGACTTTCCAGG)3' 5' d(CCTGGAAAGTCCCCAG)3', related to the DNA kappaB site of the HIV-1 LTR together with a mutated sequence 5' d(CTGCTCACTTTCCAGG)3' 5' d(CCTGGAAAGTGAGCAG)3' was determined by 2D heteronuclear inverse NMR spectroscopy (HSQC-TOCSY and heteronuclear COSY). ^3JH{3'}-P coupling constants for most of the phosphates of the mutated oligomer were obtained using heteronuclear selective COSY. L'attribution des résonances 31P du fragment d'ADN de seize paires de base 5' d(CTGGGGACTTTCCAGG)3' 5' d(CCTGGAAAGTCCCCAG)3' (16N) correspondant au site kappaB du LTR du HIV-1 et de la séquence mutée 5' d(CTGCTCACTTTCCAGG)3' 5' d(CCTGGAAAGTGAGCAG)3' (16M) a été déterminée à l'aide de méthodes 2D hétéronucléaires à détection indirecte (HSQC-TOCSY et COSY hétéronucléaires). Les constantes de couplage ^3JH{3'}-P ont été mesurées pour la plupart des phosphates de 16 M à l'aide d'expérience COSY hétéronucléaires sélectives.

  8. Dialysis purification of integrase-DNA complexes provides high-resolution atomic force microscopy images: dimeric recombinant HIV-1 integrase binding and specific looping on DNA.

    PubMed

    Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Nakai, Tonau; Ohmori, Rei; Ozeki, Munetaka; Tamaki, Keiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2013-01-01

    It remains difficult to obtain high-resolution atomic force microscopy images of HIV-1 integrase bound to DNA in a dimeric or tetrameric fashion. We therefore constructed specific target DNAs to assess HIV-1 integrase binding and purified the complex by dialysis prior to analysis. Our resulting atomic force microscopy analyses indicated precise size of binding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) recombinant integrase in a tetrameric manner, inducing formation of a loop-like or figure-eight-like secondary structure in the target DNA. Our findings regarding the target DNA secondary structure provide new insights into the intermediate states of retroviral integration.

  9. HIV-DNA Given with or without Intradermal Electroporation Is Safe and Highly Immunogenic in Healthy Swedish HIV-1 DNA/MVA Vaccinees: A Phase I Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Charlotta; Hejdeman, Bo; Godoy-Ramirez, Karina; Tecleab, Teghesti; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Bråve, Andreas; Earl, Patricia L.; Stout, Richard R.; Robb, Merlin L.; Shattock, Robin J.; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Sandström, Eric; Wahren, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Background We compared safety and immunogenicity of intradermal (ID) vaccination with and without electroporation (EP) in a phase I randomized placebo-controlled trial of an HIV-DNA prime HIV-MVA boost vaccine in healthy Swedish volunteers. Methods HIV-DNA plasmids encoding HIV-1 genes gp160 subtypes A, B and C; Rev B; Gag A and B and RTmut B were given ID at weeks 0, 6 and 12 in a dose of 0.6 mg. Twenty-five volunteers received vaccine using a needle-free device (ZetaJet) with (n=16) or without (n=9) ID EP (Dermavax). Five volunteers were placebo recipients. Boosting with recombinant MVA-CMDR expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol of CRF01_AE (HIV-MVA) or placebo was performed at weeks 24 and 40. Nine of the vaccinees received a subtype C CN54 gp140 protein boost together with HIV-MVA. Results The ID/EP delivery was very well tolerated. After three HIV-DNA immunizations, no statistically significant difference was seen in the IFN-γ ELISpot response rate to Gag between HIV-DNA ID/EP recipients (5/15, 33%) and HIV-DNA ID recipients (1/7, 14%, p=0.6158). The first HIV-MVA or HIV-MVA+gp140 vaccination increased the IFN-γ ELISpot response rate to 18/19 (95%). CD4+ and/or CD8+ T cell responses to Gag or Env were demonstrable in 94% of vaccinees. A balanced CD4+ and CD8+ T cell response was noted, with 78% and 71% responders, respectively. IFN-γ and IL-2 dominated the CD4+ T cell response to Gag and Env. The CD8+ response to Gag was broader with expression of IFN-γ, IL-2, MIP-1β and/or CD107. No differences were seen between DNA vaccine groups. Binding antibodies were induced after the second HIV-MVA+/-gp140 in 93% of vaccinees to subtype C Env, with the highest titers among EP/gp140 recipients. Conclusion Intradermal electroporation of HIV-DNA was well tolerated. Strong cell- and antibody-mediated immune responses were elicited by the HIV-DNA prime and HIV-MVA boosting regimen, with or without intradermal electroporation use. Trial Registration International Standard

  10. Zinc finger nuclease: a new approach for excising HIV-1 proviral DNA from infected human T cells.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiying; Wang, Pengfei; Ding, Donglin; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Gongmin; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Lin; Zhu, Xiaoli; Zeng, Hanxian; Zhu, Huanzhang

    2014-09-01

    A major reason that Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) cannot be completely cured is the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) provirus integrated into the human genome. Though existing therapies can inhibit replication of HIV-1, they cannot eradicate it. A molecular therapy gains popularity due to its specifically targeting to HIV-1 infected cells and effectively removing the HIV-1, regardless of viral genes being active or dormant. Now, we propose a new method which can excellently delete the HIV provirus from the infected human T cell genome. First, we designed zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) that target a sequence within the long terminal repeat (LTR) U3 region that is highly conserved in whole clade. Then, we screened out one pair of ZFN and named it as ZFN-U3. We discovered that ZFN-U3 can exactly target and eliminate the full-length HIV-1 proviral DNA after the infected human cell lines treated with it, and the frequency of its excision was about 30 % without cytotoxicity. These results prove that ZFN-U3 can efficiently excise integrated HIV-1 from the human genome in infected cells. This method to delete full length HIV-1 in human genome can therefore provide a novel approach to cure HIV-infected individuals in the future.

  11. DNA Assembly Tools and Strategies for the Generation of Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Baek, Chang-Ho; Liss, Michael; Clancy, Kevin; Chesnut, Jonathan; Katzen, Federico

    2014-10-01

    Since the discovery of restriction enzymes and the generation of the first recombinant DNA molecule over 40 years ago, molecular biology has evolved into a multidisciplinary field that has democratized the conversion of a digitized DNA sequence stored in a computer into its biological counterpart, usually as a plasmid, stored in a living cell. In this article, we summarize the most relevant tools that allow the swift assembly of DNA sequences into useful plasmids for biotechnological purposes. We cover the main components and stages in a typical DNA assembly workflow, namely in silico design, de novo gene synthesis, and in vitro and in vivo sequence assembly methodologies.

  12. Interlaboratory quality control of total HIV-1 DNA load measurement for multicenter reservoir studies.

    PubMed

    Gantner, Pierre; Mélard, Adeline; Damond, Florence; Delaugerre, Constance; Dina, Julia; Gueudin, Marie; Maillard, Anne; Sauné, Karine; Rodallec, Audrey; Tuaillon, Edouard; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Rouzioux, Christine; Avettand-Fenoel, Véronique

    2017-11-01

    Viral reservoirs represent an important barrier to HIV cure. Accurate markers of HIV reservoirs are needed to develop multicenter studies. The aim of this multicenter quality control (QC) was to evaluate the inter-laboratory reproducibility of total HIV-1-DNA quantification. Ten laboratories of the ANRS-AC11 working group participated by quantifying HIV-DNA with a real-time qPCR assay (Biocentric) in four samples (QCMD). Good reproducibility was found between laboratories (standard deviation ≤ 0.2 log10 copies/10(6) PBMC) for the three positive QC that were correctly classified by each laboratory (QC1

  13. Plasma-activated air mediates plasmid DNA delivery in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Bulysheva, Anna; Heller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-activated air (PAA) provides a noncontact DNA transfer platform. In the current study, PAA was used for the delivery of plasmid DNA in a 3D human skin model, as well as in vivo. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding luciferase to recellularized dermal constructs was enhanced, resulting in a fourfold increase in luciferase expression over 120 hours compared to injection only (P < 0.05). Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was confirmed in the epidermal layers of the construct. In vivo experiments were performed in BALB/c mice, with skin as the delivery target. PAA exposure significantly enhanced luciferase expression levels 460-fold in exposed sites compared to levels obtained from the injection of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.001). Expression levels were enhanced when the plasma reactor was positioned more distant from the injection site. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding GFP to mouse skin was confirmed by immunostaining, where a 3-minute exposure at a 10 mm distance displayed delivery distribution deep within the dermal layers compared to an exposure at 3 mm where GFP expression was localized within the epidermis. Our findings suggest PAA-mediated delivery warrants further exploration as an alternative approach for DNA transfer for skin targets. PMID:27110584

  14. Plasmid DNA Manufacturing for Indirect and Direct Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Schmeer, Marco; Buchholz, Tatjana; Schleef, Martin

    2017-10-01

    Plasmid DNA is currently gaining increasing importance for clinical research applications in gene therapy and genetic vaccination. For direct gene transfer into humans, good manufacturing practice (GMP)-grade plasmid DNA is mandatory. The same holds true if the drug substance contains a genetically modified cell, for example chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, where these cells as well as the contained plasmids are used. According to the responsible regulatory agencies, they have to be produced under full GMP. On the other hand, for GMP production of, for example, mRNA or viral vectors (lentiviral vectors, adeno-associated virus vectors, etc.), in many cases, High Quality Grade plasmid DNA is accepted as a starting material. The manufacturing process passes through different production steps. To ensure the right conditions are used for the plasmid, a pilot run must be conducted at the beginning. In this step, a followed upscaling with respect to reproducibility and influences on product quality is performed. Subsequently, a cell bank of the transformed productions strain is established and characterized. This cell bank is used for the cultivation process. After cell harvesting and lysis, several chromatography steps are conducted to receive a pure plasmid product. Depending on the respective required quality grade, the plasmid product is subject to several quality controls. The last step consists of formulation and filling of the product.

  15. Preclinical evaluation of the immunogenicity of C-type HIV-1-based DNA and NYVAC vaccines in the Balb/C mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wild, Jens; Bieler, Kurt; Köstler, Josef; Frachette, Marie-Joelle; Jeffs, Simon; Vieira, Sueli; Esteban, Mariano; Liljeström, Peter; Pantaleo, Guiseppe; Wolf, Hans; Wagner, Ralf

    2009-10-01

    As part of a European initiative (EuroVacc), we report the design, construction, and immunogenicity of two HIV-1 vaccine candidates based on a clade C virus strain (CN54) representing the current major epidemic in Asia and parts of Africa. Open reading frames encoding an artificial 160-kDa GagPolNef (GPN) polyprotein and the external glycoprotein gp120 were fully RNA and codon optimized. A DNA vaccine (DNA-GPN and DNA-gp120, referred to as DNA-C), and a replication-deficient vaccinia virus encoding both reading frames (NYVAC-C), were assessed regarding immunogenicity in Balb/C mice. The intramuscular administration of both plasmid DNA constructs, followed by two booster DNA immunizations, induced substantial T-cell responses against both antigens as well as Env-specific antibodies. Whereas low doses of NYVAC-C failed to induce specific CTL or antibodies, high doses generated cellular as well as humoral immune responses, but these did not reach the levels seen following DNA vaccination. The most potent immune responses were detectable using prime:boost protocols, regardless of whether DNA-C or NYVAC-C was used as the priming or boosting agent. These preclinical findings revealed the immunogenic response triggered by DNA-C and its enhancement by combining it with NYVAC-C, thus complementing the macaque preclinical and human phase I clinical studies of EuroVacc.

  16. Interaction of HIV-1 Gag protein components with single DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruceanu, Margareta; Gorelick, Robert J.; Williams, Mark C.

    2003-03-01

    The Gag protein of the HIV-1 retrovirus is cleaved into three major proteins as part of viral maturation: nucleocapsid (NC), capsid, and matrix. NC is the first of these proteins to be cleaved, and it is cleaved in three stages into NCp15, followed by NCp9, and finally NCp7. In this study, we use optical tweezers to investigate the capability of these NC proteins to alter the helix-coil transition of single DNA molecules. We have previously shown that the capability to alter the DNA helix-coil transition is an excellent probe of the nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC proteins, in which the secondary structure of nucleic acids is rearranged to facilitate reverse transcription. By examining the capability of NCp15, NCp9, and NCp7 to alter DNA stretching, the current studies will test the role of proteolytic cleavage of Gag in regulating the nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC. Whereas binding studies suggest that NCp9 and NCp15 bind more strongly to DNA than NCp7, our DNA stretching results indicate that these proteins all have similar effects on DNA stretching.

  17. NLRX1 Sequesters STING to Negatively Regulate the Interferon Response, Thereby Facilitating the Replication of HIV-1 and DNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haitao; König, Renate; Deng, Meng; Riess, Maximilian; Mo, Jinyao; Zhang, Lu; Petrucelli, Alex; Yoh, Sunnie M; Barefoot, Brice; Samo, Melissa; Sempowski, Gregory D; Zhang, Aiping; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M; Feng, Hui; Lemon, Stanley M; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Yanping; Wen, Haitao; Zhang, Zhigang; Damania, Blossom; Tsao, Li-Chung; Wang, Qi; Su, Lishan; Duncan, Joseph A; Chanda, Sumit K; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2016-04-13

    Understanding the negative regulators of antiviral immune responses will be critical for advancing immune-modulated antiviral strategies. NLRX1, an NLR protein that negatively regulates innate immunity, was previously identified in an unbiased siRNA screen as required for HIV infection. We find that NLRX1 depletion results in impaired nuclear import of HIV-1 DNA in human monocytic cells. Additionally, NLRX1 was observed to reduce type-I interferon (IFN-I) and cytokines in response to HIV-1 reverse-transcribed DNA. NLRX1 sequesters the DNA-sensing adaptor STING from interaction with TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), which is a requisite for IFN-1 induction in response to DNA. NLRX1-deficient cells generate an amplified STING-dependent host response to cytosolic DNA, c-di-GMP, cGAMP, HIV-1, and DNA viruses. Accordingly, Nlrx1(-/-) mice infected with DNA viruses exhibit enhanced innate immunity and reduced viral load. Thus, NLRX1 is a negative regulator of the host innate immune response to HIV-1 and DNA viruses.

  18. Functional amyloids as inhibitors of plasmid DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Molina-García, Laura; Gasset-Rosa, Fátima; Moreno-del Álamo, María; Fernández-Tresguerres, M. Elena; Moreno-Díaz de la Espina, Susana; Lurz, Rudi; Giraldo, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication is tightly regulated to constrain the genetic material within strict spatiotemporal boundaries and copy numbers. Bacterial plasmids are autonomously replicating DNA molecules of much clinical, environmental and biotechnological interest. A mechanism used by plasmids to prevent over-replication is ‘handcuffing’, i.e. inactivating the replication origins in two DNA molecules by holding them together through a bridge built by a plasmid-encoded initiator protein (Rep). Besides being involved in handcuffing, the WH1 domain in the RepA protein assembles as amyloid fibres upon binding to DNA in vitro. The amyloid state in proteins is linked to specific human diseases, but determines selectable and epigenetically transmissible phenotypes in microorganisms. Here we have explored the connection between handcuffing and amyloidogenesis of full-length RepA. Using a monoclonal antibody specific for an amyloidogenic conformation of RepA-WH1, we have found that the handcuffed RepA assemblies, either reconstructed in vitro or in plasmids clustering at the bacterial nucleoid, are amyloidogenic. The replication-inhibitory RepA handcuff assembly is, to our knowledge, the first protein amyloid directly dealing with DNA. Built on an amyloid scaffold, bacterial plasmid handcuffs can bring a novel molecular solution to the universal problem of keeping control on DNA replication initiation. PMID:27147472

  19. Plasmid DNA-based gene transfer with ultrasound and microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, Yoshiaki; Azuma, Junya; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2011-12-01

    Gene therapy offers a novel approach for the prevention and treatment of a variety of diseases, but it is not yet a common option in the real world because of various problems. Viral vectors show high efficiency of gene transfer, but they have some problems with toxicity and immunity. On the other hand, plasmid DNA-based gene transfer is very safe, but its efficiency is relatively low. Especially, plasmid DNA gene therapy is used for cardiovascular disease because plasmid DNA transfer is possible for cardiac or skeletal muscle. Clinical angiogenic gene therapy using plasmid DNA gene transfer has been attempted in patients with peripheral artery disease, but a Phase III clinical trial did not show sufficient efficiency. Recently, a Phase III clinical trial of hepatocyte growth factor gene therapy in peripheral artery disease (PAD) showed improvement of ischemic ulcers, but it could not salvage limbs from amputation. In addition, a Phase I/II clinical study of fibroblast growth factor gene therapy in PAD extended amputation-free survival, but it seemed to fail in Phase III. In this situation, we and others have developed plasmid DNA-based gene transfer using ultrasound with microbubbles to enhance its efficiency while maintaining safety. Ultrasound-mediated gene transfer has been reported to augment the gene transfer efficiency and select the target organ using cationic microbubble phospholipids which bind negatively charged DNA. Ultrasound with microbubblesis likely to create new therapeutic options inavariety of diseases.

  20. Expanded breadth of the T-cell response to mosaic HIV-1 envelope DNA vaccination

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, Bette; Fischer, William; Wallstrom, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    An effective AIDS vaccine must control highly diverse circulating strains of HIV-1. Among HIV -I gene products, the envelope (Env) protein contains variable as well as conserved regions. In this report, an informatic approach to the design of T-cell vaccines directed to HIV -I Env M group global sequences was tested. Synthetic Env antigens were designed to express mosaics that maximize the inclusion of common potential Tcell epitope (PTE) 9-mers and minimize the inclusion of rare epitopes likely to elicit strain-specific responses. DNA vaccines were evaluated using intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in inbred mice with a standardized panel of highly conserved 15-mer PTE peptides. I, 2 and 3 mosaic sets were developed that increased theoretical epitope coverage. The breadth and magnitude ofT-cell immunity stimulated by these vaccines were compared to natural strain Env's; additional comparisons were performed on mutant Env's, including gpl60 or gpl45 with or without V regions and gp41 deletions. Among them, the 2 or 3 mosaic Env sets elicited the optimal CD4 and CD8 responses. These responses were most evident in CD8 T cells; the 3 mosaic set elicited responses to an average of 8 peptide pools compared to 2 pools for a set of3 natural Env's. Synthetic mosaic HIV -I antigens can therefore induce T-cell responses with expanded breadth and may facilitate the development of effective T -cell-based HIV -1 vaccines.

  1. Comparative evaluation of Amplicor HIV-1 DNA test, version 1.5, by manual and automated DNA extraction methods using venous blood and dried blood spots for HIV-1 DNA PCR testing.

    PubMed

    Nsojo, Anthony; Aboud, Said; Lyamuya, Eligius

    2010-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test using venous blood sample has been used for many years in low resource settings for early infant diagnosis of HIV infection in children less than 18 months. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the performance characteristics of Amplicor HIV-1 DNA assay version 1.5 following processing of venous blood and dried blood spot (DBS) samples by Roche manual DNA extraction and automated Roche MagNA Pure LC instrument (MP) for HIV-1 DNA PCR testing in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, in order to scale up early infant diagnosis of HIV infection in routine practice. Venous blood samples from children under 18 months born to HIV-infected mothers between January and April 2008 were collected. Venous blood was used to prepare cell pellet and DBS samples. DNA extractions by manual procedure and MP were performed each on cell pellet, venous blood and DBS samples and tested by Amplicor HIV-1 DNA assay. Of 325 samples included, 60 (18.5%) were confirmed HIV-infected by manual extraction performed on cell pellets. Sensitivity of the assay following MP processing of venous blood was 95% (95% CI; 86.1-99.0%) and 98.3% (95% CI; 91.1 to 99.9%) for the manual extraction and processing by MP performed on DBS samples. Specificity of the assay with all DNA extraction methods was 99.6% (95% CI; 97.9 to 100%). Performance of the assay with Roche manual extraction and processing by MP on DBS samples compared well with Roche manual extraction performed on cell pellet samples. The choice of DNA extraction method needs to be individualized based on the level of laboratory facility, volume of testing and cost benefit analysis before it is adopted for use.

  2. Multiple Pathways of Plasmid DNA Transfer in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Rohrer, Stefanie; Holsten, Lea; Weiss, Evelyn; Benghezal, Mohammed; Fischer, Wolfgang; Haas, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Many Helicobacter pylori (Hp) strains carry cryptic plasmids of different size and gene content, the function of which is not well understood. A subgroup of these plasmids (e.g. pHel4, pHel12), contain a mobilisation region, but no cognate type IV secretion system (T4SS) for conjugative transfer. Instead, certain H. pylori strains (e.g. strain P12 carrying plasmid pHel12) can harbour up to four T4SSs in their genome (cag-T4SS, comB, tfs3, tfs4). Here, we show that such indigenous plasmids can be efficiently transferred between H. pylori strains, even in the presence of extracellular DNaseI eliminating natural transformation. Knockout of a plasmid-encoded mobA relaxase gene significantly reduced plasmid DNA transfer in the presence of DNaseI, suggesting a DNA conjugation or mobilisation process. To identify the T4SS involved in this conjugative DNA transfer, each individual T4SS was consecutively deleted from the bacterial chromosome. Using a marker-free counterselectable gene deletion procedure (rpsL counterselection method), a P12 mutant strain was finally obtained with no single T4SS (P12ΔT4SS). Mating experiments using these mutants identified the comB T4SS in the recipient strain as the major mediator of plasmid DNA transfer between H. pylori strains, both in a DNaseI-sensitive (natural transformation) as well as a DNaseI-resistant manner (conjugative transfer). However, transfer of a pHel12::cat plasmid from a P12ΔT4SS donor strain into a P12ΔT4SS recipient strain provided evidence for the existence of a third, T4SS-independent mechanism of DNA transfer. This novel type of plasmid DNA transfer, designated as alternate DNaseI-Resistant (ADR) mechanism, is observed at a rather low frequency under in vitro conditions. Taken together, our study describes for the first time the existence of three distinct pathways of plasmid DNA transfer between H. pylori underscoring the importance of horizontal gene transfer for this species. PMID:23029142

  3. Liquid-Crystalline Mesophases of Plasmid DNA in Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Ziv; Wachtel, Ellen J.; Minsky, Abraham

    1994-06-01

    Bacterial plasmids may often reach a copy number larger than 1000 per cell, corresponding to a total amount of DNA that may exceed the amount of DNA within the bacterial chromosome. This observation highlights the problem of cellular accommodation of large amounts of closed-circular nucleic acids, whose interwound conformation offers negligible DNA compaction. As determined by x-ray scattering experiments conducted on intact bacteria, supercoiled plasmids segregate within the cells into dense clusters characterized by a long-range order. In vitro studies performed at physiological DNA concentrations indicated that interwound DNA spontaneously forms liquid crystalline phases whose macroscopic structural properties are determined by the features of the molecular supercoiling. Because these features respond to cellular factors, DNA supercoiling may provide a sensitive regulatory link between cellular parameters and the packaging modes of interwound DNA in vivo.

  4. Plasmid DNA damage induced by helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Cantrell, William A.; Escobar, Erika E.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is applied to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The resulting fractions of the DNA conformers, which indicate intact molecules or DNA with single- or double-strand breaks, are determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA strand breaks increase with a decrease in the distance between the APPJ and DNA samples under two working conditions of the plasma source with different parameters of applied electric pulses. The damage level induced in the plasmid DNA is also enhanced with increased plasma irradiation time. The reactive species generated in the APPJ are characterized by optical emission spectra, and their roles in possible DNA damage processes occurring in an aqueous environment are also discussed.

  5. Nedd4-Mediated Increase in HIV-1 Gag and Env Proteins and Immunity following DNA-Vaccination of BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Brad; Whitney, Stephen; Hudacik, Lauren; Galmin, Lindsey; Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Cristillo, Anthony D.

    2014-01-01

    The late assembly domain of many viruses is critical for budding. Within these domains, encoded in viral structural proteins, are the conserved motifs PTAP, PPxY and YPxL. These sequences are the key determinants for association of viral proteins with intracellular molecules such as Tsg101, Nedd4 and AIP1/ALIX. While roles for Tsg101 and AIP1/ALIX in HIV-1 budding have been well established, less is known about the role of Nedd4. Recent studies, however, have identified a function for Nedd4-like protein in HIV-1 release. In this study, we investigated post-transcriptional changes of Nedd4 following SHIVSF162P3 infection of rhesus macaques, its role on HIV-1 p24 and gp120 levels in vitro and its potential as an immune modulator in HIV vaccination of BALB/c mice. Increased Nedd4 protein levels were noted in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following SHIVSF162P3-infection of naïve macaques. Transient co-transfection studies in 293 cells with HXB2 and Nedd4 demonstrated a Nedd4-mediated increase in p24 and gp120 levels. This increase was found to be dependent on the Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated phospholipid binding C2 domain and not ubiquitin ligase activity or HIV LTR activity. Co-transfection of Nedd4 with plasmid DNA expressing Gag or Env was further shown to augment both intracellular and extracellular Gag or Env proteins. To assess the potential of Nedd4 as an immune modulator, BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with plasmid DNA encoding HIV gag, env and Nedd4. Nedd4 co-administration was found to increase serum anti-p24 but not anti-gp120 antibodies. Nedd4 co-injection was found to have no affect on Gag- or Env-specific IFNγ but had a trend of increased Gag-specific IL-6, IL-17A and TNFα that was not seen following Env stimulation. Based on our initial findings, Nedd4-mediated changes in HIV protein levels and its potential use in HIV-1 vaccine development warrants further investigation. PMID:24614057

  6. Nedd4-mediated increase in HIV-1 Gag and Env proteins and immunity following DNA-vaccination of BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Brad; Whitney, Stephen; Hudacik, Lauren; Galmin, Lindsey; Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Cristillo, Anthony D

    2014-01-01

    The late assembly domain of many viruses is critical for budding. Within these domains, encoded in viral structural proteins, are the conserved motifs PTAP, PPxY and YPxL. These sequences are the key determinants for association of viral proteins with intracellular molecules such as Tsg101, Nedd4 and AIP1/ALIX. While roles for Tsg101 and AIP1/ALIX in HIV-1 budding have been well established, less is known about the role of Nedd4. Recent studies, however, have identified a function for Nedd4-like protein in HIV-1 release. In this study, we investigated post-transcriptional changes of Nedd4 following SHIVSF162P3 infection of rhesus macaques, its role on HIV-1 p24 and gp120 levels in vitro and its potential as an immune modulator in HIV vaccination of BALB/c mice. Increased Nedd4 protein levels were noted in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following SHIVSF162P3-infection of naïve macaques. Transient co-transfection studies in 293 cells with HXB2 and Nedd4 demonstrated a Nedd4-mediated increase in p24 and gp120 levels. This increase was found to be dependent on the Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated phospholipid binding C2 domain and not ubiquitin ligase activity or HIV LTR activity. Co-transfection of Nedd4 with plasmid DNA expressing Gag or Env was further shown to augment both intracellular and extracellular Gag or Env proteins. To assess the potential of Nedd4 as an immune modulator, BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with plasmid DNA encoding HIV gag, env and Nedd4. Nedd4 co-administration was found to increase serum anti-p24 but not anti-gp120 antibodies. Nedd4 co-injection was found to have no affect on Gag- or Env-specific IFNγ but had a trend of increased Gag-specific IL-6, IL-17A and TNFα that was not seen following Env stimulation. Based on our initial findings, Nedd4-mediated changes in HIV protein levels and its potential use in HIV-1 vaccine development warrants further investigation.

  7. Delivery of double-stranded DNA thioaptamers into HIV-1 infected cells for antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Monique R; Rojo, Daniel R; Somasunderam, Anoma; Thiviyanathan, Varatharasa; Ridley, Bettye D; Yang, Xianbin; Gorenstein, David G

    2006-06-09

    Oligonucleotide agents (ODN) are emerging as attractive alternatives to chemical drugs. However, the clinical use of ODNs as therapeutics has been hindered by their susceptibility to degradation by cellular enzymes and their limited ability to penetrate intact cells. We have used various liposome-mediated transfection agents, for the in vitro delivery of DNA thioaptamers into U373-MAGI-CCR5 cells. Our lead thioaptamer, R12-2, targets the RNase H domain of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) and inhibits viral infection in U373-MAGI-CCR5 cells. R12-2, a 62-base-pair, double-stranded DNA molecule with a monothio-phosphate modified backbone, was selected through a novel combinatorial selection method. We studied the use of oligofectamine (OF), TFX-20, Transmessenger (TM), and Gene Jammer (GJ) for transfection of the thio-modified DNA aptamers. OF-transfected U373-MAGI-CCR5 cells resulted in 68% inhibition of HIV infection in the treated cells compared to the untreated control. Inhibition was observed in a dose-dependent manner with maximal inhibition of 83%. In this report, we demonstrate that monothioate-modified DNA duplex oligonucleotides can be efficiently delivered into cells by liposome-based transfection agents to inhibit HIV replication.

  8. [Chromatographic separation of plasmid DNA by anion-exchange cryogel].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yantao; Shen, Shaochuan; Yun, Junxian; Yao, Kejian

    2012-08-01

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA) is used as an important vector for gene therapy, and its wide application is restricted by the purity and yield. To obtain high-purity pDNA, a chromatographic method based on anion-exchange supermacroporous cryogel was explored. The anion-exchange cryogel was prepared by grafting diethylaminoethyl-dextran to the epoxide groups of polyacrylamide-based matrix and pUC19 plasmid was used as a target to test the method. The plasmid was transferred into Escherichia coli DH5alpha, cultivated, harvested and lysed. The obtained culture was centrifuged and the supernatant was used as the plasmid feedstock, which was loaded into the anion-exchange cryogel bed for chromatographic separation. By optimizing the pH of running buffer and the elution conditions, high-purity pDNA was obtained by elution with 0.5 mol/L sodium chloride solution at pH 6.6. Compared to the traditional methods for purification of pDNA, animal source enzymes and toxic reagents were not involved in the present separation process, ensuring the safety of both the purification operations and the obtained pDNA.

  9. Controlled release of plasmid DNA from hyaluronan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mahor, Sunil; Collin, Estelle; Dash, Biraja C; Pandit, Abhay

    2011-07-01

    Encapsulation of plasmid DNA (pDNA) in nanoparticulate gene delivery systems offers the possibility of control in dosing, enhanced pDNA uptake, increased resistance to nuclease degradation and sustained release of functionally active pDNA over time. Extracellular matrix based biomaterial i.e. hyaluronan (HA) was used to encapsulate pDNA (pCMV-GLuc, Gaussia Luciferase reporter plasmid DNA having CMV promoter) in submicron size particulate system. Nano size range (~400-600 nm) pDNA loaded hyaluronan nanoparticles were formulated by ionic gelation followed by the cross-linking method with high encapsulation efficiency (~75-85%). The particle preparation process was further optimized for molecular weight, cross-linking method, cross-linking time and plasmid/polymer ratio. The entrapped plasmid maintained its structural and functional integrity as revealed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The pDNA was released from the hyaluronan nanoparticles in a controlled manner over a period of one month. In vitro transfection by one-week released pDNA from nanoparticles with transfecting agent branched polyethyleneimine (bPEI) resulted in significantly higher expression levels than those in pDNA alone which demonstrated the functional bioactivity of released pDNA. For cellular localization studies, the hyaluronan nanoparticles encapsulated with FITC-dextran were incubated with adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) and localization in the cellular environment were investigated. The results of this study illustrate that hyaluronan nanoparticles were rapidly internalized by the cells through nonspecific endocytosis and remained intact in the cytosol for up to 24 h.

  10. Activation of the HIV-1 enhancer by the LEF-1 HMG protein on nucleosome-assembled DNA in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, P L; Sheline, C T; Cannon, K; Voz, M L; Pazin, M J; Kadonaga, J T; Jones, K A

    1995-09-01

    Lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF-1) is a regulatory high mobility group (HMG) protein that activates the T cell receptor alpha (TCR alpha) enhancer in a context-restricted manner in T cells. In this paper we demonstrate that the distal region of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) enhancer, which contains DNA-binding sites for LEF-1 and Ets-1, also provides a functional context for activation by LEF-1. First, we show that mutations in the LEF-1-binding site inhibit the activity of multimerized copies of the HIV-1 enhancer in Jurkat T cells, and that LEF-1/GAL4 can activate a GAL4-substituted HIV-1 enhancer 80- to 100-fold in vivo. Second, recombinant LEF-1 is shown to activate HIV-1 transcription on chromatin-assembled DNA in vitro. By using a nucleosome-assembly system derived from Drosophila embryos, we find that the packaging of DNA into chromatin in vitro strongly represses HIV-1 transcription and that repression can be counteracted efficiently by preincubation of the DNA with LEF-1 (or LEF-1 and Ets-1) supplemented with fractions containing the promoter-binding protein, Sp1. Addition of TFE-3, which binds to an E-box motif upstream of the LEF-1 and Ets-1 sites, further augments transcription in this system. Individually or collectively, none of the three enhancer-binding proteins (LEF-1, Ets-1, and TFE-3) could activate transcription in the absence of Sp1. A truncation mutant of LEF-1 (HMG-88), which contains the HMG box but lacks the trans-activation domain, did not activate transcription from nucleosomal DNA, indicating that bending of DNA by the HMG domain is not sufficient to activate transcription in vitro. We conclude that transcription activation by LEF-1 in vitro is a chromatin-dependent process that requires a functional trans-activation domain in addition to the HMG domain.

  11. HIV DNA and Dementia in Treatment-Naïve HIV-1-Infected Individuals in Bangkok, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Shiramizu, Bruce; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Sithinamsuwan, Pasiri; Nidhinandana, Samart; Thitivichianlert, Sataporn; Watt, George; deSouza, Mark; Chuenchitra, Thippawan; Sukwit, Suchitra; Chitpatima, Suwicha; Robertson, Kevin; Paul, Robert; Shikuma, Cecilia; Valcour, Victor

    2007-01-01

    High HIV-1 DNA (HIV DNA) levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) correlate with HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD) in patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). If this relationship also exists among HAART-naïve patients, then HIV DNA may be implicated in the pathogenesis of HAD. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between HIV DNA and cognition in subjects naïve to HAART in a neuro AIDS cohort in Bangkok, Thailand. Subjects with and without HAD were recruited and matched for age, gender, education, and CD4 cell count. PBMC and cellular subsets were analyzed for HIV DNA using real-time PCR. The median log10 HIV DNA copies per 106 PBMC for subjects with HAD (n=15) was 4.27, which was higher than that found in subjects without dementia (ND; n=15), 2.28, p<0.001. This finding was unchanged in a multivariate model adjusting for plasma HIV-1 RNA levels. From a small subset of individuals, in which adequate number of cells were available, more HIV DNA was in monocytes/macrophages from those with HAD compared to those with ND. These results are consistent with a previous report among HAART-experienced subjects, thus further implicating HIV DNA in the pathogenesis of HAD. PMID:17211496

  12. Sequence-specific fluorometric recognition of HIV-1 ds-DNA with zwitterionic zinc(II)-carboxylate polymers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Zhao, Hai-Qing; Xie, Bao-Ping; Bai, Li-Ping; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Chen, Jin-Xiang

    2017-11-01

    Four water-stable zwitterionic zinc-carboxylate polymers are prepared by reacting N-carboxymethyl-(3,5-dicarboxy)-pyridinium bromide (H3CmdcpBr) with zinc(II) nitrate in the presence of NaOH, through adjusting the solvents and ancillary ligands. With H2O as the solvent and the absence of an ancillary ligand, a two-dimensional (2D) polymer network [Zn(Cmdcp)(H2O)]n (1) is formed. In a mixed H2O/DMF solvent and with the presence of chelating ligands 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) and 2-(4-pyridyl)benzimidazole (pbz), a one-dimensional (1D) polymer of {[Zn2(Cmdcp)(bipy)2(H2O)5](NO3)2·3H2O}n (2), a mononuclear ionic species of [Zn(phen)(H2O)4][Cmdcp] (3), and a 2D polymer of {[Zn(Cmdcp)(pbz)][pbz]·7H2O}n (4) are accordingly formed. Compounds 1-4 are characterized by IR, elemental analyses and single crystal X-ray crystallography. Compound 2 strongly adsorbs single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) probe (denoted as P-DNA) labeled with carboxyfluorescein (FAM) and quenches its fluorescence via a photo-induced electron transfer process. If, however, a double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 ds-DNA) is further present, the P-DNA interacts with the major groove in HIV-1 ds-DNA via Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding to form a rigid triplex structure. This results in partial or complete fluorescence recovery depending on the concentration of HIV-1 ds-DNA. The findings are applied in fluorometric sensing of HIV-1 ds-DNA. The calibration plot is linear in the 0-60nM target DNA concentration range, with a 7.4nM detection limit (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3). The assay is highly specific and not interfered by one base pair mutated for complementary target HIV-1 ds-DNA, complementary ss-DNA, single-base pair mutated for complementary ss-DNA, non-specific ss-DNA sequences, and higher-order dimeric G-quadruplexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanism of polyoxometalate-mediated inactivation of DNA polymerases: an analysis with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase indicates specificity for the DNA-binding cleft.

    PubMed Central

    Sarafianos, S G; Kortz, U; Pope, M T; Modak, M J

    1996-01-01

    The anti-DNA polymerase activity of a structural family of polyoxometalates has been determined. Two representative compounds of this family, possessing a saddle-like structure [(O3POPO3)4W12O36]16- (polyoxometalate I) and [(O3PCH2PO3)4W12O36]16- (polyoxometalate II) were found to inhibit all the DNA polymerases tested, with IC50 values ranging from 2 to 10 microM. A comparative study with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) and Klenow polymerase as representative DNA polymerases indicated that protection from inactivation was achieved by inclusion of DNA but not by deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs). Kinetic analysis revealed that the mode of HIV-1 RT inhibition is competitive with respect to DNA, and non-competitive with respect to dNTP binding. Cross-linking experiments confirmed that the inhibitors interfere with the DNA-binding function of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Interestingly, a number of drug-resistant mutants of HIV-1 RT exhibit a sensitivity to polyoxometalate comparable to the wild-type HIV-1 RT, suggesting that these polyoxometalates interact at a novel site. Because different polymerases contain DNA-binding clefts of various dimensions, it should be possible to modify polyoxometalates or to add a link to an enzyme-specific drug so that more effective inhibitors could be developed. Using a computer model of HIV-1 RT we performed docking studies in a binary complex (enzyme-polyoxometalate I) to propose tentatively a possible interacting site in HIV-1 RT consistent with the available biochemical results as well as with the geometric and charge constraints of the two molecules. PMID:8912703

  14. Endogenous CCL2 neutralization restricts HIV-1 replication in primary human macrophages by inhibiting viral DNA accumulation.

    PubMed

    Sabbatucci, Michela; Covino, Daniela Angela; Purificato, Cristina; Mallano, Alessandra; Federico, Maurizio; Lu, Jing; Rinaldi, Arturo Ottavio; Pellegrini, Matteo; Bona, Roberta; Michelini, Zuleika; Cara, Andrea; Vella, Stefano; Gessani, Sandra; Andreotti, Mauro; Fantuzzi, Laura

    2015-01-22

    Macrophages are key targets of HIV-1 infection. We have previously described that the expression of CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) increases during monocyte differentiation to macrophages and it is further up-modulated by HIV-1 exposure. Moreover, CCL2 acts as an autocrine factor that promotes viral replication in infected macrophages. In this study, we dissected the molecular mechanisms by which CCL2 neutralization inhibits HIV-1 replication in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), and the potential involvement of the innate restriction factors protein sterile alpha motif (SAM) histidine/aspartic acid (HD) domain containing 1 (SAMHD1) and apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing, enzyme-catalytic, polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3) family members. CCL2 neutralization potently reduced the number of p24 Gag+ cells during the course of either productive or single cycle infection with HIV-1. In contrast, CCL2 blocking did not modify entry of HIV-1 based Virus Like Particles, thus demonstrating that the restriction involves post-entry steps of the viral life cycle. Notably, the accumulation of viral DNA, both total, integrated and 2-LTR circles, was strongly impaired by neutralization of CCL2. Looking for correlates of HIV-1 DNA accumulation inhibition, we found that the antiviral effect of CCL2 neutralization was independent of the modulation of SAMHD1 expression or function. Conversely, a strong and selective induction of APOBEC3A expression, to levels comparable to those of freshly isolated monocytes, was associated with the inhibition of HIV-1 replication mediated by CCL2 blocking. Interestingly, the CCL2 neutralization mediated increase of APOBEC3A expression was type I IFN independent. Moreover, the transcriptome analysis of the effect of CCL2 blocking on global gene expression revealed that the neutralization of this chemokine resulted in the upmodulation of additional genes involved in the defence response to viruses. Neutralization of endogenous CCL2 determines a profound

  15. Quantitative analysis of the time-course of viral DNA forms during the HIV-1 life cycle.

    PubMed

    Munir, Soundasse; Thierry, Sylvain; Subra, Frédéric; Deprez, Eric; Delelis, Olivier

    2013-08-13

    HIV-1 DNA is found both integrated in the host chromosome and unintegrated in various forms: linear (DNAL) or circular (1-LTRc, 2-LTRc or products of auto-integration). Here, based on pre-established strategies, we extended and characterized in terms of sensitivity two methodologies for quantifying 1-LTRc and DNAL, respectively, the latter being able to discriminate between unprocessed or 3'-processed DNA. Quantifying different types of viral DNA genome individually provides new information about the dynamics of all viral DNA forms and their interplay. For DNAL, we found that the 3'-processing reaction was efficient during the early stage of the replication cycle. Moreover, strand-transfer inhibitors (Dolutegravir, Elvitegravir, Raltegravir) affected 3'-processing differently. The comparisons of 2-LTRc accumulation mediated by either strand-transfer inhibitors or catalytic mutation of integrase indicate that 3'-processing efficiency did not influence the total 2-LTRc accumulation although the nature of the LTR-LTR junction was qualitatively affected. Finally, a significant proportion of 1-LTRc was generated concomitantly with reverse transcription, although most of the 1-LTRc were produced in the nucleus. We describe the fate of viral DNA forms during HIV-1 infection. Our study reveals the interplay between various forms of the viral DNA genome, the distribution of which can be affected by mutations and by inhibitors of HIV-1 viral proteins. In the latter case, the quantification of 3'-processed DNA in infected cells can be informative about the mechanisms of future integrase inhibitors directly in the cell context.

  16. Current trends in separation of plasmid DNA vaccines: a review.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Ashraf; Healey, Robert; Adly, Frady G

    2013-01-14

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA)-based vaccines offer more rapid avenues for development and production if compared to those of conventional virus-based vaccines. They do not rely on time- or labour-intensive cell culture processes and allow greater flexibility in shipping and storage. Stimulating antibodies and cell-mediated components of the immune system are considered as some of the major advantages associated with the use of pDNA vaccines. This review summarizes the current trends in the purification of pDNA vaccines for practical and analytical applications. Special attention is paid to chromatographic techniques aimed at reducing the steps of final purification, post primary isolation and intermediate recovery, in order to reduce the number of steps necessary to reach a purified end product from the crude plasmid.

  17. HIV-1-Specific Antibody Response and Function after DNA Prime and Recombinant Adenovirus 5 Boost HIV Vaccine in HIV-Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gach, Johannes S.; Gorlani, Andrea; Dotsey, Emmanuel Y.; Becerra, Juan C.; Anderson, Chase T. M.; Berzins, Baiba; Felgner, Philip L.; Forthal, Donald N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Wilkin, Timothy J.; Casazza, Joseph P.; Koup, Richard A.; Katlama, Christine; Autran, Brigitte; Murphy, Robert L.; Achenbach, Chad J.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the humoral immune response against DNA prime-recombinant adenovirus 5 (rAd5) boost HIV vaccine among HIV-infected patients on long-term suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). Previous studies emphasized cellular immune responses; however, current research suggests both cellular and humoral responses are likely required for a successful therapeutic vaccine. Thus, we aimed to understand antibody response and function induced by vaccination of ART-treated HIV-1-infected patients with immune recovery. All subjects participated in EraMune 02, an open-label randomized clinical trial of ART intensification followed by a six plasmid DNA prime (envA, envB, envC, gagB, polB, nefB) and rAd5 boost HIV vaccine with matching inserts. Antibody binding levels were determined with a recently developed microarray approach. We also analyzed neutralization efficiency and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). We found that the DNA prime-rAd5 boost vaccine induced a significant cross-clade HIV-specific antibody response, which correlated with antibody neutralization efficiency. However, despite the increase in antibody binding levels, the vaccine did not significantly stimulate neutralization or ADCC responses. This finding was also reflected by a lack of change in total CD4+ cell associated HIV DNA in those who received the vaccine. Our results have important implications for further therapeutic vaccine design and administration, especially in HIV-1 infected patients, as boosting of preexisting antibody responses are unlikely to lead to clearance of latent proviruses in the HIV reservoir. PMID:27500639

  18. HIV-1-Specific Antibody Response and Function after DNA Prime and Recombinant Adenovirus 5 Boost HIV Vaccine in HIV-Infected Subjects.

    PubMed

    Gach, Johannes S; Gorlani, Andrea; Dotsey, Emmanuel Y; Becerra, Juan C; Anderson, Chase T M; Berzins, Baiba; Felgner, Philip L; Forthal, Donald N; Deeks, Steven G; Wilkin, Timothy J; Casazza, Joseph P; Koup, Richard A; Katlama, Christine; Autran, Brigitte; Murphy, Robert L; Achenbach, Chad J

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the humoral immune response against DNA prime-recombinant adenovirus 5 (rAd5) boost HIV vaccine among HIV-infected patients on long-term suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). Previous studies emphasized cellular immune responses; however, current research suggests both cellular and humoral responses are likely required for a successful therapeutic vaccine. Thus, we aimed to understand antibody response and function induced by vaccination of ART-treated HIV-1-infected patients with immune recovery. All subjects participated in EraMune 02, an open-label randomized clinical trial of ART intensification followed by a six plasmid DNA prime (envA, envB, envC, gagB, polB, nefB) and rAd5 boost HIV vaccine with matching inserts. Antibody binding levels were determined with a recently developed microarray approach. We also analyzed neutralization efficiency and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). We found that the DNA prime-rAd5 boost vaccine induced a significant cross-clade HIV-specific antibody response, which correlated with antibody neutralization efficiency. However, despite the increase in antibody binding levels, the vaccine did not significantly stimulate neutralization or ADCC responses. This finding was also reflected by a lack of change in total CD4+ cell associated HIV DNA in those who received the vaccine. Our results have important implications for further therapeutic vaccine design and administration, especially in HIV-1 infected patients, as boosting of preexisting antibody responses are unlikely to lead to clearance of latent proviruses in the HIV reservoir.

  19. Potent Functional Antibody Responses Elicited by HIV-I DNA Priming and Boosting with Heterologous HIV-1 Recombinant MVA in Healthy Tanzanian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Joachim, Agricola; Nilsson, Charlotta; Aboud, Said; Bakari, Muhammad; Lyamuya, Eligius F.; Robb, Merlin L.; Marovich, Mary A.; Earl, Patricia; Moss, Bernard; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Wahren, Britta; Mhalu, Fred; Sandström, Eric; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Ferrari, Guido; Polonis, Victoria R.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine-induced HIV antibodies were evaluated in serum samples collected from healthy Tanzanian volunteers participating in a phase I/II placebo-controlled double blind trial using multi-clade, multigene HIV-DNA priming and recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (HIV-MVA) virus boosting (HIVIS03). The HIV-DNA vaccine contained plasmids expressing HIV-1 gp160 subtypes A, B, C, Rev B, Gag A, B and RTmut B, and the recombinant HIV-MVA boost expressed CRF01_AE HIV-1 Env subtype E and Gag-Pol subtype A. While no neutralizing antibodies were detected using pseudoviruses in the TZM-bl cell assay, this prime-boost vaccination induced neutralizing antibodies in 83% of HIVIS03 vaccinees when a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) assay using luciferase reporter-infectious molecular clones (LucR-IMC) was employed. The serum neutralizing activity was significantly (but not completely) reduced upon depletion of natural killer (NK) cells from PBMC (p=0.006), indicating a role for antibody-mediated Fcγ-receptor function. High levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC)-mediating antibodies against CRF01_AE and/or subtype B were subsequently demonstrated in 97% of the sera of vaccinees. The magnitude of ADCC-mediating antibodies against CM235 CRF01_AE IMC-infected cells correlated with neutralizing antibodies against CM235 in the IMC/PBMC assay. In conclusion, HIV-DNA priming, followed by two HIV-MVA boosts elicited potent ADCC responses in a high proportion of Tanzanian vaccinees. Our findings highlight the potential of HIV-DNA prime HIV-MVA boost vaccines for induction of functional antibody responses and suggest this vaccine regimen and ADCC studies as potentially important new avenues in HIV vaccine development. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials ISRCTN90053831 The Pan African Clinical Trials Registry ATMR2009040001075080 (currently PACTR2009040001075080) PMID:25874723

  20. Nucleocapsid Protein Annealing of a Primer-Template Enhances (+)-Strand DNA Synthesis and Fidelity by HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase†

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiae; Roberts, Anne; Yuan, Hua; Xiong, Yong; Anderson, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) requires reverse transcriptase (RT) and HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) for proper viral replication. HIV-1 NCp7 has been shown to enhance various steps in reverse transcription including tRNA initiation and strand transfer which may be mediated through interactions with RT as well as RNA and DNA oligonucleotides. With the use of DNA oligonucleotides, we have examined the interaction of NCp7 with RT and the kinetics of reverse transcription during (+)-strand synthesis with an NCp7-facilitated annealed primer-template. Using a pre-steady state kinetics approach, the NCp7-annealed primer-template has a substantial increase (3-7 fold) in the rate of incorporation (kpol) by RT as compared to heat annealed primer-template with single nucleotide incorporation. There was also a 2-fold increase in the binding affinity constant (Kd) of the nucleotide. These differences in kpol and Kd were not through direct interactions between HIV-1 RT and NCp7. When examining extension by RT, the data suggests that the NCp7-annealed primer-template facilitates the formation of a longer product more quickly compared to the heat annealed primer-template. This enhancement in rate is mediated through interactions with NCp7’s zinc fingers and N-terminal domain and nucleic acids. The NCp7-annealed primer-template also enhances the fidelity of RT (3-fold) by slowing the rate of incorporation of an incorrect nucleotide. Taken together, this study elucidates a new role of NCp7 by facilitating DNA-directed DNA synthesis during reverse transcription by HIV-1 RT that may translate into enhanced viral fitness and offers an avenue to exploit for targeted therapeutic intervention against HIV. PMID:22210155

  1. Radiosensitivity of plasmid DNA: role of topology and concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustranti, C.; Pérez, C.; Rousset, S.; Balanzat, E.; Sage, E.

    1999-01-01

    Using the plasmid relaxation assay, the induction of single strand breaks (SSB) by ionizing radiation was investigated in two plasmids of different length, pBS and pSP189. The dose-response was linear for both plasmids but pSP189 exhibited a three times higher sensitivity than pBS. This disparity may be explained by a reduced accessibility to hydroxyl radicals due to a different topology of each plasmid, i.e. degree of compaction, as observed with electron microscopy. pBS plasmid was also exposed at various DNA concentrations to rays. The yield of SSB decreased with increasing concentration, suggesting a diminution in the amount of hydroxyl radicals efficient for radiolytic attack. This effect of concentration was also observed with densely ionizing radiation. In conclusion, the accessibility of DNA is a key-parameter in the formation of damage in vitro and in vivo as well. En utilisant la technique de relaxation de plasmide, l'induction de cassures simple brin (SSB) par les radiations ? a été comparée dans deux plasmides de taille différente, pSP189 et pBS. La relation dose-effet est linéaire pour les deux plasmides, mais il se forme trois fois plus de SSB dans pSP189 que dans pBS. Cette disparité semble pouvoir être reliée au degré de compaction différent des plasmides, observé en microscopie électronique. Elle s'expliquerait en terme d'accessibilité aux espèces radicalaires formées lors de la radiolyse de l'eau. Le plasmide pBS, à différentes concentrations, a été ensuite exposé aux radiations γ. Le taux de cassures décroit lorsque la concentration en ADN croit, suggérant une diminution du nombre de radicaux pouvant efficacement réagir avec l'ADN. Cet effet a également été mis en évidence lors d'une irradiation avec des particules de TEL élevé. En conclusion, l'accessibilité de l'ADN est un paramètre- clé dans la formation des dommages, tant in vitro que in vivo.

  2. Correlation between transgen expression and plasmid DNA loss in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Togashi, Ryohei; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Kamiya, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Transgene expression from plasmid DNA is dependent on the expression efficiency per plasmid and the amount of intranuclear plasmid. In the present study, intranuclear dispositions of two types of plasmid DNAs (i.e. the pCpGfree and pLIVE plasmids) that maintain transgene expression in mouse liver were analyzed. In addition, the relationship between transgene expression and plasmid stability in the nucleus was examined. First, the pCpGfree and pLIVE plasmid DNAs, bearing the mouse secreted alkaline phosphatase (Seap) gene, were administered into mouse liver by the hydrodynamics-based method. Next, various Seap-plasmid DNAs containing different promoters, upstream and downstream sequences, and backbones were injected into mice, and both SEAP expression and plasmid DNA amounts were monitored for 28 days. At the 14- and 28-day time points, the amount of the pCpGfree plasmid DNA was one order of magnitude less than that of the pLIVE plasmid. Meanwhile, the expression efficiency per plasmid was one order of magnitude more efficient for the pCpGfree plasmid DNA. Moreover, the administration of various Seap-plasmid DNAs revealed that negative correlations exist between plasmid stability and SEAP expression level. The results obtained suggest that the pCpGfree plasmid is unstable from the viewpoint of quantity and maintains transgene expression by its high expression efficiency and also that transgene expression negatively affects the stability of plasmid DNA. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A Time-Efficient and User-Friendly Method for Plasmid DNA Restriction Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaBanca, Frank; Berg, Claire M.

    1998-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which plasmid DNA is digested with restriction enzymes that cleave the plasmid either once or twice. The DNA is stained, loaded on a gel, electrophoresed, and viewed under normal laboratory conditions during electrophoresis. (DDR)

  4. A Phase IIA Randomized Clinical Trial of a Multiclade HIV-1 DNA Prime Followed by a Multiclade rAd5 HIV-1 Vaccine Boost in Healthy Adults (HVTN204)

    PubMed Central

    Churchyard, Gavin J.; Morgan, Cecilia; Adams, Elizabeth; Hural, John; Graham, Barney S.; Moodie, Zoe; Grove, Doug; Gray, Glenda; Bekker, Linda-Gail; McElrath, M. Juliana; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Goepfert, Paul; Kalams, Spyros; Baden, Lindsey R.; Lally, Michelle; Dolin, Raphael; Blattner, William; Kalichman, Artur; Figueroa, J. Peter; Pape, Jean; Schechter, Mauro; Defawe, Olivier; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Montefiori, David C.; Nabel, Gary J.; Corey, Lawrence; Keefer, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Background The safety and immunogenicity of a vaccine regimen consisting of a 6-plasmid HIV-1 DNA prime (envA, envB, envC, gagB, polB, nefB) boosted by a recombinant adenovirus serotype-5 (rAd5) HIV-1 with matching inserts was evaluated in HIV-seronegative participants from South Africa, United States, Latin America and the Caribbean. Methods 480 participants were evenly randomized to receive either: DNA (4 mg IM by Biojector) at 0, 1 and 2 months, followed by rAd5 (1010 PU IM by needle/syringe) at 6 months; or placebo. Participants were monitored for reactogenicity and adverse events throughout the 12-month study. Peak and duration of HIV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses were evaluated after the prime and boost. Results The vaccine was well tolerated and safe. T-cell responses, detected by interferon-γ (IFN-γ) ELISpot to global potential T-cell epitopes (PTEs) were observed in 70.8% (136/192) of vaccine recipients overall, most frequently to Gag (54.7%) and to Env (54.2%). In U.S. vaccine recipients T-cell responses were less frequent in Ad5 sero-positive versus sero-negative vaccine recipients (62.5% versus 85.7% respectively, p = 0.035). The frequency of HIV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses detected by intracellular cytokine staining were similar (41.8% and 47.2% respectively) and most secreted ≥2 cytokines. The vaccine induced a high frequency (83.7%–94.6%) of binding antibody responses to consensus Group M, and Clades A, B and C gp140 Env oligomers. Antibody responses to Gag were elicited in 46% of vaccine recipients. Conclusion The vaccine regimen was well-tolerated and induced polyfunctional CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells and multi-clade anti-Env binding antibodies. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00125970 PMID:21857901

  5. Using Plasmids as DNA Vaccines for Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tregoning, John S; Kinnear, Ekaterina

    2014-12-01

    DNA plasmids can be used to induce a protective (or therapeutic) immune response by delivering genes encoding vaccine antigens. That naked DNA (without the refinement of coat proteins or host evasion systems) can cross from outside the cell into the nucleus and be expressed is particularly remarkable given the sophistication of the immune system in preventing infection by pathogens. As a result of the ease, low cost, and speed of custom gene synthesis, DNA vaccines dangle a tantalizing prospect of the next wave of vaccine technology, promising individual designer vaccines for cancer or mass vaccines with a rapid response time to emerging pandemics. There is considerable enthusiasm for the use of DNA vaccination as an approach, but this enthusiasm should be tempered by the successive failures in clinical trials to induce a potent immune response. The technology is evolving with the development of improved delivery systems that increase expression levels, particularly electroporation and the incorporation of genetically encoded adjuvants. This review will introduce some key concepts in the use of DNA plasmids as vaccines, including how the DNA enters the cell and is expressed, how it induces an immune response, and a summary of clinical trials with DNA vaccines. The review also explores the advances being made in vector design, delivery, formulation, and adjuvants to try to realize the promise of this technology for new vaccines. If the immunogenicity and expression barriers can be cracked, then DNA vaccines may offer a step change in mass vaccination.

  6. Optimization of HIV-1 Envelope DNA Vaccine Candidates within Three Different Animal Models, Guinea Pigs, Rabbits and Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Borggren, Marie; Vinner, Lasse; Andresen, Betina Skovgaard; Grevstad, Berit; Repits, Johanna; Melchers, Mark; Elvang, Tara Laura; Sanders, Rogier W; Martinon, Frédéric; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Bowles, Emma Joanne; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Biswas, Priscilla; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Jansson, Marianne; Heyndrickx, Leo; Le Grand, Roger; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 DNA vaccines have many advantageous features. Evaluation of HIV-1 vaccine candidates often starts in small animal models before macaque and human trials. Here, we selected and optimized DNA vaccine candidates through systematic testing in rabbits for the induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAb). We compared three different animal models: guinea pigs, rabbits and cynomolgus macaques. Envelope genes from the prototype isolate HIV-1 Bx08 and two elite neutralizers were included. Codon-optimized genes, encoded secreted gp140 or membrane bound gp150, were modified for expression of stabilized soluble trimer gene products, and delivered individually or mixed. Specific IgG after repeated i.d. inoculations with electroporation confirmed in vivo expression and immunogenicity. Evaluations of rabbits and guinea pigs displayed similar results. The superior DNA construct in rabbits was a trivalent mix of non-modified codon-optimized gp140 envelope genes. Despite NAb responses with some potency and breadth in guinea pigs and rabbits, the DNA vaccinated macaques displayed less bNAb activity. It was concluded that a trivalent mix of non-modified gp140 genes from rationally selected clinical isolates was, in this study, the best option to induce high and broad NAb in the rabbit model, but this optimization does not directly translate into similar responses in cynomolgus macaques. PMID:26344115

  7. Genetic immunization with plasmid DNA mediated by electrotransfer.

    PubMed

    Rochard, Alice; Scherman, Daniel; Bigey, Pascal

    2011-07-01

    The concept of DNA immunization was first advanced in the early 1990s, but was not developed because of an initial lack of efficiency. Recent technical advances in plasmid design and gene delivery techniques have allowed renewed interest in the idea. Particularly, a better understanding of genetic immunization has led to construction of optimized plasmids and the use of efficient molecular adjuvants. The field also took great advantage of new delivery techniques such as electrotransfer. This is a simple physical technique consisting of injecting plasmid DNA into a target tissue and applying an electric field, allowing up to a thousandfold more expression of the transgene than naked DNA. DNA immunization mediated by electrotransfer is now effective in a variety of preclinical models against infectious or acquired diseases such as cancer or autoimmune diseases, and is making its way through the clinics in several ongoing phase I human clinical trials. This review will briefly describe genetic immunization mediated by electrotransfer and the main fields of application.

  8. Single step detection of HIV-1 proviral DNA and housekeeping β-actin gene from dried blood spots by a monoplex polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Ipsita; Chimanpure, Vaishali; Patil, Ajit; Mukhopadhyaya, Robin; Paranjape, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing need for developing a simple, rapid, reliable and cost effective method for detection of HIV-1 for early diagnosis of the infection especially in developing countries and in resource limited settings. A method for simultaneous detection of the HIV-1 p17 gene and the house keeping human β-actin gene from dried blood spots (DBS) by a monoplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is described. Genomic DNA was extracted from 40 HIV-1 positive and 40 HIV-1 negative DBS and used as templates to amplify both the HIV-1 p17 and β-actin genes simultaneously under the same cycling condition by a single round PCR. This method of detection of HIV-1 may provide a simple, rapid and cost effective alternative in resource limited settings; however, it would require testing a larger number of samples before widespread use.

  9. APOBEC3B lysine residues are dispensable for DNA cytosine deamination, HIV-1 restriction, and nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Molan, Amy M; Hanson, Heather M; Chweya, Cynthia M; Anderson, Brett D; Starrett, Gabriel J; Richards, Christopher M; Harris, Reuben S

    2017-11-01

    The APOBEC3 DNA cytosine deaminase family comprises a fundamental arm of the innate immune response and is best known for retrovirus restriction. Several APOBEC3 enzymes restrict HIV-1 and related retroviruses by deaminating viral cDNA cytosines to uracils compromising viral genomes. Human APOBEC3B (A3B) shows strong virus restriction activities in a variety of experimental systems, and is subjected to tight post-translational regulation evidenced by cell-specific HIV-1 restriction activity and active nuclear import. Here we ask whether lysines and/or lysine post-translational modifications are required for these A3B activities. A lysine-free derivative of human A3B was constructed and shown to be indistinguishable from the wild-type enzyme in DNA cytosine deamination, HIV-1 restriction, and nuclear localization activities. However, lysine loss did render the protein resistant to degradation by SIV Vif. Taken together, we conclude that lysine side chains and modifications thereof are unlikely to be central to A3B function or regulation in human cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Uracil DNA glycosylase initiates degradation of HIV-1 cDNA containing misincorporated dUTP and prevents viral integration

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Amy F.; Ghosh, Devlina; Zhou, Yan; Seiple, Lauren; McMahon, Moira A.; Spivak, Adam M.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Stivers, James T.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase discriminates poorly between dUTP and dTTP, and accordingly, viral DNA products become heavily uracilated when viruses infect host cells that contain high ratios of dUTP:dTTP. Uracilation of invading retroviral DNA is thought to be an innate immunity barrier to retroviral infection, but the mechanistic features of this immune pathway and the cellular fate of uracilated retroviral DNA products is not known. Here we developed a model system in which the cellular dUTP:dTTP ratio can be pharmacologically increased to favor dUTP incorporation, allowing dissection of this innate immunity pathway. When the virus-infected cells contained elevated dUTP levels, reverse transcription was found to proceed unperturbed, but integration and viral protein expression were largely blocked. Furthermore, successfully integrated proviruses lacked detectable uracil, suggesting that only nonuracilated viral DNA products were integration competent. Integration of the uracilated proviruses was restored using an isogenic cell line that had no detectable human uracil DNA glycosylase (hUNG2) activity, establishing that hUNG2 is a host restriction factor in cells that contain high dUTP. Biochemical studies in primary cells established that this immune pathway is not operative in CD4+ T cells, because these cells have high dUTPase activity (low dUTP), and only modest levels of hUNG activity. Although monocyte-derived macrophages have high dUTP levels, these cells have low hUNG activity, which may diminish the effectiveness of this restriction pathway. These findings establish the essential elements of this pathway and reconcile diverse observations in the literature. PMID:23341616

  11. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet interactions with plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, D.; Cox, L. J.; Hyland, W. B.; McMahon, S. J.; Reuter, S.; Graham, W. G.; Gans, T.; Currell, F. J.

    2011-01-24

    The effect of a cold (<40 deg. C) radio frequency-driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet on plasmid DNA has been investigated. Gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the DNA forms post-treatment. The experimental data are fitted to a rate equation model that allows for quantitative determination of the rates of single and double strand break formation. The formation of double strand breaks correlates well with the atomic oxygen density. Taken with other measurements, this indicates that neutral components in the jet are effective in inducing double strand breaks.

  12. Transformation of vegetative cells of Bacillus thuringiensis by plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Heierson, A; Landén, R; Lövgren, A; Dalhammar, G; Boman, H G

    1987-03-01

    Plasmid DNA-mediated transformation of vegetative cells of Bacillus thuringiensis was studied with the following two plasmids: pBC16 coding for tetracycline resistance and pC194 expressing chloramphenicol resistance. A key step was the induction of competence by treatment of the bacteria with 50 mM Tris hydrochloride buffer (pH 8.9) containing 30% sucrose. Transformation frequency was strongly influenced by culture density during the uptake of DNA and required the presence of polyethylene glycol. Growth in a minimal medium supplemented with Casamino Acids gave 35 times more transformants than growth in a rich medium. The highest frequencies were obtained with covalently closed circular DNA. With all parameters optimized, the frequency was 10(-3) transformants per viable cell or 10(4) transformants per microgram of DNA. Cells previously frozen were also used as recipients in transformation experiments; such cells gave frequencies similar to those obtained with freshly grown cells. The procedure was optimized for B. thuringiensis subsp. gelechiae, but B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki, B. thuringiensis subsp. galleriae, B. thuringiensis subsp. thuringiensis, and B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis were also transformed. Compared with protoplast transformation, our method is much faster and 3 orders of magnitude more efficient per microgram of added DNA.

  13. A new plasmid vector for DNA delivery using lactococci

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Valeria; Innocentin, Sylvia; Chatel, Jean-Marc; Lefèvre, François; Langella, Philippe; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson

    2009-01-01

    Background The use of food-grade lactococci as bacterial carriers to DNA delivery into epithelial cells is a new strategy to develop live oral DNA vaccine. Our goal was to develop a new plasmid, named pValac, for antigen delivery for use in lactococci. The pValac plasmid was constructed by the fusion of: i) a eukaryotic region, allowing the cloning of an antigen of interest under the control of the pCMV eukaryotic promoter to be expressed by a host cell and ii) a prokaryotic region allowing replication and selection of bacteria. In order to evaluate pValac functionality, the gfp ORF was cloned into pValac (pValac:gfp) and was analysed by transfection in PK15 cells. The applicability of pValac was demonstrated by invasiveness assays of Lactococcus lactis inlA+ strains harbouring pValac:gfp into Caco-2 cells. Results After transfection with pValac:gfp, we observed GFP expression in PK15 cells. L. lactis inlA+ were able to invade Caco-2 cells and delivered a functional expression cassette (pCMV:gfp) into epithelial cells. Conclusion We showed the potential of an invasive L. lactis harbouring pValac to DNA delivery and subsequent triggering DNA expression by epithelial cells. Further work will be to examine whether these strains are able to deliver DNA in intestinal cells in vivo. PMID:19208231

  14. Combinatorial CRISPR-Cas9 and RNAi attack on HIV-1 DNA and RNA can lead to cross-resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Wang, Gang; Das, Atze T; Berkhout, Ben

    2017-09-11

    Many potent antiviral drugs have been developed against HIV-1 and their combined action is usually successful in achieving durable virus suppression in infected individuals. This success is based on two effects: additive or even synergistic virus inhibition and an increase in the genetic threshold for development of drug-resistance. More recently, several genetic approaches have been developed to attack the HIV-1 genome in a gene therapy setting. We set out to test the combinatorial possibilities for a therapy based on the CRISPR-Cas9 and RNA interference (RNAi) mechanisms that attack the viral DNA and RNA, respectively. When two different sites in the HIV-1 genome were targeted, either with dual CRISPR-Cas9 antivirals or with a combination of CRISPR-Cas9 and RNAi antivirals, we observed additive inhibition much like what was reported for antiviral drugs. However, when the same or overlapping viral sequence was attacked by the antivirals, rapid escape from a CRISPR-Cas9 antiviral, assisted by the error-prone NHEJ DNA repair machinery, accelerated the development of cross-resistance to the other CRISPR-Cas9 or RNAi antiviral. Thus, genetic antiviral approaches can be combined, but overlap should be avoided. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Crystal structure of the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3F: the catalytically active and HIV-1 Vif-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Markus-Frederik; Shandilya, Shivender M D; Albin, John S; Kouno, Takahide; Anderson, Brett D; McDougle, Rebecca M; Carpenter, Michael A; Rathore, Anurag; Evans, Leah; Davis, Ahkillah N; Zhang, Jingying; Lu, Yongjian; Somasundaran, Mohan; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Harris, Reuben S; Schiffer, Celia A

    2013-06-04

    Human APOBEC3F is an antiretroviral single-strand DNA cytosine deaminase, susceptible to degradation by the HIV-1 protein Vif. In this study the crystal structure of the HIV Vif binding, catalytically active, C-terminal domain of APOBEC3F (A3F-CTD) was determined. The A3F-CTD shares structural motifs with portions of APOBEC3G-CTD, APOBEC3C, and APOBEC2. Residues identified to be critical for Vif-dependent degradation of APOBEC3F all fit within a predominantly negatively charged contiguous region on the surface of A3F-CTD. Specific sequence motifs, previously shown to play a role in Vif susceptibility and virion encapsidation, are conserved across APOBEC3s and between APOBEC3s and HIV-1 Vif. In this structure these motifs pack against each other at intermolecular interfaces, providing potential insights both into APOBEC3 oligomerization and Vif interactions.

  16. Single genome amplification of proviral HIV-1 DNA from dried blood spot specimens collected during early infant screening programs in Lusaka, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Seu, Lillian; Mwape, Innocent; Guffey, M Bradford

    2014-07-01

    The ability to evaluate individual HIV-1 virions from the quasispecies of vertically infected infants was evaluated in a field setting at the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia. Infant heel-prick blood specimens were spotted onto dried blood spot (DBS) filter paper cards at government health clinics. Nucleic acid was extracted and used as a template for HIV-1 proviral DNA detection by a commercial Amplicor HIV-1 PCR test (Roche, version 1.5). On samples that tested positive by commercial diagnostic assay, amplification of DNA was performed using an in-house assay of the 5' and 3' region of the HIV-1 genome. Additionally, fragments covering 1200 nucleotides within pol (full length protease and partial reverse transcriptase) and 1400 nucleotides within env (variable 1-variable 5 region) were further analyzed by single genome amplification (SGA). In summary, we have demonstrated an in-house assay for amplifying the 5' and 3' proviral HIV-1 DNA as well as pol and env proviral DNA fragments from DBS cards collected and analyzed entirely in Zambia. In conclusion, this study shows the feasibility of utilizing DBS cards to amplify the whole proviral HIV-1 genome as well as perform SGA on key HIV-1 genes.

  17. In silico design of a DNA-based HIV-1 multi-epitope vaccine for Chinese populations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Sun, Weilai; Guo, Jingjing; Zhao, Guangyu; Sun, Shihui; Yu, Hong; Guo, Yan; Li, Jungfeng; Jin, Xia; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo; Kou, Zhihua; Zhou, Yusen

    2015-01-01

    The development of an HIV-1 vaccine that is capable of inducing effective and broadly cross-reactive humoral and cellular immune responses remains a challenging task because of the extensive diversity of HIV-1, the difference of virus subtypes (clades) in different geographical regions, and the polymorphism of human leukocyte antigens (HLA). We performed an in silico design of 3 DNA vaccines, designated pJW4303-MEG1, pJW4303-MEG2 and pJW4303-MEG3, encoding multi-epitopes that are highly conserved within the HIV-1 subtypes most prevalent in China and can be recognized through HLA alleles dominant in China. The pJW4303-MEG1-encoded protein consisted of one Th epitope in Env, and one, 2, and 6 epitopes in Pol, Env, and Gag proteins, respectively, with a GGGS linker sequence between epitopes. The pJW4303-MEG2-encoded protein contained similar epitopes in a different order, but with the same linker as pJW4303-MEG1. The pJW4303-MEG3-encoded protein contained the same epitopes in the same order as that of pJW4303-MEG2, but with a different linker sequence (AAY). To evaluate immunogenicity, mice were immunized intramuscularly with these DNA vaccines. Both pJW4303-MEG1 and pJW4303-MEG2 vaccines induced equally potent humoral and cellular immune responses in the vaccinated mice, while pJW4303-MEG3 did not induce immune responses. These results indicate that both epitope and linker sequences are important in designing effective epitope-based vaccines against HIV-1 and other viruses. PMID:25839222

  18. Complexation Between Cationic Diblock Copolymers and Plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Seyoung; Reineke, Theresa; Lodge, Timothy

    Deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA), as polyanions, can spontaneously bind with polycations to form polyelectrolyte complexes. When the polycation is a diblock copolymer with one cationic block and one uncharged hydrophilic block, the polyelectrolyte complexes formed with plasmid DNA (pDNA) are often colloidally stable, and show great promise in the field of polymeric gene therapy. While the resulting properties (size, stability, and toxicity to biological systems) of the complexes have been studied for numerous cationic diblocks, the fundamentals of the pDNA-diblock binding process have not been extensively investigated. Herein, we report how the cationic block content of a diblock influences the pDNA-diblock interactions. pDNA with 7164 base pairs and poly(2-deoxy-2-methacrylamido glucopyranose)-block-poly(N-(2-aminoethyl) methacrylamide) (PMAG-b-PAEMA) are used as the model pDNA and cationic diblock, respectively. To vary the cationic block content, two PMAG-b-PAEMA copolymers with similar PMAG block lengths but distinct PAEMA block lengths and a PAEMA homopolymer are utilized. We show that the enthalpy change from pDNA-diblock interactions is dependent on the cationic diblock composition, and is closely associated with both the binding strength and the pDNA tertiary structure.

  19. Preparation of Plasmid DNA by Alkaline Lysis with Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate: Minipreps.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael R; Sambrook, Joseph

    2016-10-03

    In this protocol, plasmid DNA is isolated from small-scale (1-2 mL) bacterial cultures. Yields vary between 100 and 5 µg of DNA, depending on the copy number of the plasmid. Miniprep DNA is sufficiently pure for use as a substrate or template in many in vitro enzymatic reactions. However, further purification is required if the plasmid DNA is used as the substrate in sequencing reactions.

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proviral DNA load in purified CD4+ cells by LightCycler® Real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kabamba-Mukadi, Benoît; Henrivaux, Philippe; Ruelle, Jean; Delferrière, Nicole; Bodéus, Monique; Goubau, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Background The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proviral DNA persists in infected cells, even after prolonged successful HAART. In the present study, a relative quantification assay of HIV-1 proviral DNA by LightCycler® real-time PCR based on SYBR Green I detection was developed in comparison to the number of purified CD4+ cells as estimated by the quantification of the β-globin gene. Methods The ability of the designed gag primers to quantify HIV-1 Group M and the PCR efficiency were assessed on HIV-1 reference isolate subtypes A, B, C and D. The 8E5 cell line containing a single defective copy of HIV-1 proviral DNA was used as a standard for both the HIV-1 target gene and the β-globin reference gene. The assay was applied on thirty consecutive patient samples received for RNA viral load determinations and on retrospective samples from fifteen patients undergoing 2 years of structured treatment interruption (STI). Results The lower limit of quantification was 50 HIV-1 DNA proviral copies per CD4+ cell sample. The dynamic range was from 50 to 106 HIV-1 DNA copies per CD4+ cell sample with intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variability ranging from 3.1% to 37.1%. The β-globin reference gene was quantified down to a limit of 1.5 pg of DNA/μl (approximately 5 cells) with intra- and interassay coefficients of variability ranging from 1.8% to 21%. DNA proviral load varies widely among HIV-1 infected patients. Proviral load and plasma viral load rebound were high in STI patients who took longer to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load under therapy. A statistically significant correlation was observed between DNA proviral load and RNA steady state viral load in STI patients (p-value = 0,012). Conclusion We have developed a fast, sensitive and specific relative quantification assay of HIV-1 proviral DNA in purified CD4+ cells. The assay enables the monitoring of HIV-1 proviral load, which may be useful to monitor therapy efficacy especially in

  1. Mechanistic studies of mini-TAR RNA/DNA annealing in the absence and presence of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Vo, My-Nuong; Barany, George; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2006-10-13

    HIV-1 reverse transcription involves several nucleic acid rearrangements, which are catalyzed by the nucleocapsid protein (NC). Annealing of the trans-activation response element (TAR) DNA hairpin to a complementary TAR RNA hairpin, resulting in the formation of an extended 98-base-pair duplex, is an essential step in the minus-strand transfer step of reverse transcription. To elucidate the TAR RNA/DNA annealing reaction pathway, annealing kinetics were studied systematically by gel-shift assays performed in the presence or absence of HIV-1 NC. Truncated 27 nucleotide mini-TAR RNA and DNA constructs were used in this work. In the absence of NC, the annealing is slow, and involves the fast formation of an unstable extended "kissing" loop intermediate, followed by a slower strand exchange between the terminal stems. This annealing is very sensitive to loop-loop complementarity, as well as to nucleic acid concentration, ionic strength and temperature. NC stimulates the annealing approximately 5000-fold by stabilizing the bimolecular intermediate approximately 100 to 200-fold, and promoting the subsequent strand exchange reaction approximately 10 to 20-fold. NC concentration dependence studies suggest that there is a direct correlation between the amount of NC required to stabilize the intermediate and the amount needed to induce mini-TAR aggregation. Whereas saturating levels of NC are required to efficiently aggregate nucleic acids, sub-saturating NC is sufficient to significantly enhance duplex destabilization. Equilibrium levels of mini-TAR RNA/DNA annealing were also measured under a variety of conditions. Taken together, the results presented here provide a quantitative accounting of HIV-1 NC's aggregation and duplex destabilizing activity, and provide insights into the universal nucleic acid chaperone activity of this essential viral protein.

  2. Influence of storage temperature on the stability of HIV-1 RNA and HSV-2 DNA in cervicovaginal secretions collected by vaginal washing.

    PubMed

    Legoff, Jerome; Tanton, Clare; Lecerf, Maxime; Grésenguet, Gérard; Nzambi, Khonde; Bouhlal, Hicham; Weiss, Helen; Belec, Laurent

    2006-12-01

    Variability in the handling of samples of genital secretions prior to quantitation of HIV-1 RNA and HSV DNA may profoundly affect both the detection and quantitation of these nucleic acids. Over 144 h, we evaluated, the influence of storage temperature (4 degrees C, 20 degrees C, 30 degrees C) on the quantity of HIV-1 RNA and HSV-2 DNA in HIV and HSV negative cervicovaginal lavage pools spiked with known amounts of HIV-1 and HSV-2 and in HIV-1 and HSV-2 co-infected cervicovaginal lavage pools. The level of viral nucleic acids remained stable at 4 degrees C for 24h but decreased significantly when cervicovaginal lavages were stored at 20 degrees C and 30 degrees C, demonstrating that, cervicovaginal lavages to be quantified for viral RNA or DNA require, at minimum, immediate storage at 4 degrees C.

  3. Integrase-independent HIV-1 infection is augmented under conditions of DNA damage and produces a viral reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Ebina, Hirotaka Kanemura, Yuka; Suzuki, Yasutsugu; Urata, Kozue; Misawa, Naoko; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2012-05-25

    HIV-1 possesses a viral protein, integrase (IN), which is necessary for its efficient integration in target cells. However, it has been reported that an IN-defective HIV strain is still capable of integration. Here, we assessed the ability of wild type (WT) HIV-1 to establish infection in the presence of IN inhibitors. We observed a low, yet clear infection of inhibitor-incubated cells infected with WT HIV which was identical to cells infected with IN-deficient HIV, D64A. Furthermore, the IN-independent integration could be enhanced by the pretreatment of cells with DNA-damaging agents suggesting that integration is mediated by a DNA repair system. Moreover, significantly faster viral replication kinetics with augmented viral DNA integration was observed after infection in irradiated cells treated with IN inhibitor compared to nonirradiated cells. Altogether, our results suggest that HIV DNA has integration potential in the presence of an IN inhibitor and may serve as a virus reservoir.

  4. Structure of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase bound to a novel 38-mer hairpin template-primer DNA aptamer.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew T; Tuske, Steve; Das, Kalyan; DeStefano, Jeffrey J; Arnold, Eddy

    2016-01-01

    The development of a modified DNA aptamer that binds HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with ultra-high affinity has enabled the X-ray structure determination of an HIV-1 RT-DNA complex to 2.3 Å resolution without the need for an antibody Fab fragment or RT-DNA cross-linking. The 38-mer hairpin-DNA aptamer has a 15 base-pair duplex, a three-deoxythymidine hairpin loop, and a five-nucleotide 5'-overhang. The aptamer binds RT in a template-primer configuration with the 3'-end positioned at the polymerase active site and has 2'-O-methyl modifications at the second and fourth duplex template nucleotides that interact with the p66 fingers and palm subdomains. This structure represents the highest resolution RT-nucleic acid structure to date. The RT-aptamer complex is catalytically active and can serve as a platform for studying fundamental RT mechanisms and for development of anti-HIV inhibitors through fragment screening and other approaches. Additionally, the structure allows for a detailed look at a unique aptamer design and provides the molecular basis for its remarkably high affinity for RT. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  5. Biological consequences of strand breaks in plasmid and viral DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Schulte-Frohlinde, D.

    1987-01-01

    Some biological consequences of strand breakage in biologically active single- and double-stranded plasmid and viral DNA are examined. A double-strand break in DNA produced by restriction-endonucleases in aqueous solution is not a 100% lethal damage. The survival depends strongly on the structure of the end groups. Evidence is presented that survival is the result of a balance between degradation and repair. The enzymatically produced double-strand break (dsb) is a potentially lethal damage similar to the irradiation-produced dsb in cells. Results with double-stranded biologically active DNA treated either with gamma-rays, heat, pancrease nuclease or UV-light in aqueous solution suggest that a single-strand damage is also a potentially lethal damage. Mechanisms for conversion of single-strand damage to lethal events are discussed. PMID:3307866

  6. Filter replicas and permanent collections of recombinant DNA plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Gergen, J P; Stern, R H; Wensink, P C

    1979-01-01

    A permanent, ordered collection of 23,000 recombinant DNA plasmids containing Drosophila melanogaster DNA has been established. Simple and practical methods for storing and manipulating this collection were developed. In addition, an improved, simple and inexpensive method for making paper filter replicas of such an ordered collection and of a high density (10,000 colonies/petri dish) unordered collection was developed. These filter replicas are suitable for nucleic acid hybridization screens of recombinant DNA colinies and each filter replica can be used for many (greater than 5) successive screens. The kinetics of this hybridization reaction were examined and allow design of experiments that detect colony complementarity to a nucleic acid that is 0.5% of the hybridization probe. Images PMID:118435

  7. A Combinatorial CRISPR-Cas9 Attack on HIV-1 DNA Extinguishes All Infectious Provirus in Infected T Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Zhao, Na; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T

    2016-12-13

    Current drug therapies effectively suppress HIV-1 replication but do not inactivate the provirus that persists in latent reservoirs. Recent studies have found that the guide RNA (gRNA)-directed CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used for sequence-specific attack on this proviral DNA. Although potent inhibition of virus replication was reported, HIV-1 can escape from a single antiviral gRNA by mutation of the target sequence. Here, we demonstrate that combinations of two antiviral gRNAs delay viral escape, and identify two gRNA combinations that durably block virus replication. When viral escape is prevented, repeated Cas9 cleavage leads to saturation of major mutations in the conserved target sequences that encode critical proteins. This hypermutation coincides with the loss of replication-competent virus as scored in sensitive co-cultures with unprotected cells, demonstrating complete virus inactivation. These results provide a proof-of-principle that HIV-1-infected cells can be functionally cured by dual-gRNA CRISPR/Cas9 treatment.

  8. Docking of anti-HIV-1 oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone derivatives as potential HSV-1 DNA polymerase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Julliane Diniz; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; Leal, Kátia Zaccur; Santos, Fernanda da Costa; Batalha, Pedro Netto; Brozeguini, Leonardo; Seidl, Peter R.; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; Cunha, Anna Cláudia; de Souza, Maria Cecília B. V.; Ferreira, Vitor F.; Giongo, Viveca A.; Cirne-Santos, Cláudio; Paixão, Izabel C. P.

    2014-09-01

    Although there are many antiviral drugs available for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, still the synthesis of new anti-HSV candidates is an important strategy to be pursued, due to the emergency of resistant HSV strains mainly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infected patients. Some 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinolines, such as PNU-183792 (1), show a broad spectrum antiviral activity against human herpes viruses, inhibiting the viral DNA polymerase (POL) without affecting the human POLs. Thus, on an ongoing antiviral research project, our group has synthesized ribonucleosides containing the 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline (quinolone) heterocyclic moiety, such as the 6-Cl derivative (2), which is a dual antiviral agent (HSV-1 and HIV-1). Molecular dynamics simulations of the complexes of 1 and 2 with the HSV-1 POL suggest that structural modifications of 2 should increase its experimental anti-HSV-1 activity, since its ribosyl and carboxyl groups are highly hydrophilic to interact with a hydrophobic pocket of this enzyme. Therefore, in this work, comparative molecular docking simulations of 1 and three new synthesized oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone HIV-1 inhibitors (3-5), which do not contain those hydrophilic groups, were carried out, in order to access these modifications in the proposition of new potential anti-HSV-1 agents, but maintaining the anti-HIV-1 activity. Among the docked compounds, the oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 3 is the best candidate for an anti-HSV-1 agent, and, in addition, it showed anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50 = 3.4 ± 0.3 μM). Compounds 2 and 3 were used as templates in the design of four new oxoquinoline-acylhydrazones (6-9) as potential anti-HSV-1 agents to increase the antiviral activity of 2. Among the docked compounds, oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 7 was selected as the best candidate for further development of dual anti-HIV/HSV activity.

  9. Processing of plasmid DNA with ColE1-like replication origin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhijun; Yuan, Zhenghong; Hengge, Ulrich R

    2004-05-01

    With the increasing utilization of plasmid DNA as a biopharmaceutical drug, there is a rapidly growing need for high quality plasmid DNA for drug applications. Although there are several different kinds of replication origins, ColE1-like replication origin is the most extensively used origin in biotechnology. This review addresses problems in upstream and downstream processing of plasmid DNA with ColE1-like origin as drug applications. In upstream processing of plasmid DNA, regulation of replication of ColE1-like origin was discussed. In downstream processing of plasmid DNA, we analyzed simple, robust, and scalable methods, which can be used in the efficient production of pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA.

  10. Scaling-up recombinant plasmid DNA for clinical trial: current concern, solution and status.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ruzila; Allaudin, Zeenathul Nazariah; Lila, Mohd-Azmi Mohd

    2012-09-07

    Gene therapy and vaccines are rapidly developing field in which recombinant nucleic acids are introduced in mammalian cells for enhancement, restoration, initiation or silencing biochemical function. Beside simplicity in manipulation and rapid manufacture process, plasmid DNA-based vaccines have inherent features that make them promising vaccine candidates in a variety of diseases. This present review focuses on the safety concern of the genetic elements of plasmid such as propagation and expression units as well as their host genome for the production of recombinant plasmid DNA. The highlighted issues will be beneficial in characterizing and manufacturing plasmid DNA for save clinical use. Manipulation of regulatory units of plasmid will have impact towards addressing the safety concerns raised in human vaccine applications. The gene revolution with plasmid DNA by alteration of their plasmid and production host genetics will be promising for safe delivery and obtaining efficient outcomes.

  11. Microneedle-mediated transcutaneous immunization with plasmid DNA coated on cationic PLGA nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Wonganan, Piyanuch; Sandoval, Michael A.; Li, Xinran; Zhu, Saijie; Cui, Zhengrong

    2012-01-01

    Previously, it was shown that microneedle-mediated transcutaneous immunization with plasmid DNA can potentially induce a stronger immune response than intramuscular injection of the same plasmid DNA. In the present study, we showed that the immune responses induced by transcutaneous immunization by applying plasmid DNA onto a skin area pretreated with solid microneedles were significantly enhanced by coating the plasmid DNA on the surface of cationic nanoparticles. In addition, the net surface charge of the DNA-coated nanoparticles significantly affected their in vitro skin permeation and their ability to induce immune responses in vivo. Transcutaneous immunization with plasmid DNA-coated net positively charged anoparticles elicited a stronger immune response than with plasmid DNA-coated net negatively charged nanoparticles or by intramuscular immunization with plasmid DNA alone. Transcutaneous immunization with plasmid DNA-coated net positively charged nanoparticles induced comparable immune responses as intramuscular injection of them, but transcutaneous immunization was able to induce specific mucosal immunity and a more balanced T helper type 1 and type 2 response. The ability of the net positively charged DNA-coated nanoparticles to induce a strong immune response through microneedle-mediated transcutaneous immunization may be attributed to their ability to increase the expression of the antigen gene encoded by the plasmid and to more effectively stimulate the maturation of antigen-presenting cells. PMID:22921518

  12. Hofmeister series salts enhance purification of plasmid DNA by non-ionic detergents.

    PubMed

    Lezin, George; Kuehn, Michael R; Brunelli, Luca

    2011-08-01

    Ion-exchange chromatography is the standard technique used for plasmid DNA purification, an essential molecular biology procedure. Non-ionic detergents (NIDs) have been used for plasmid DNA purification, but it is unclear whether Hofmeister series salts (HSS) change the solubility and phase separation properties of specific NIDs, enhancing plasmid DNA purification. After scaling-up NID-mediated plasmid DNA isolation, we established that NIDs in HSS solutions minimize plasmid DNA contamination with protein. In addition, large-scale NID/HSS solutions eliminated lipopolysaccharides (LPS) contamination of plasmid DNA more effectively than Qiagen ion-exchange columns. Large-scale NID isolation/NID purification generated increased yields of high-quality DNA compared to alkali isolation/column purification. This work characterizes how HSS enhance NID-mediated plasmid DNA purification, and demonstrates that NID phase transition is not necessary for LPS removal from plasmid DNA. Specific NIDs such as IGEPAL CA-520 can be utilized for rapid, inexpensive, and efficient laboratory-based large-scale plasmid DNA purification, outperforming Qiagen-based column procedures.

  13. Hofmeister series salts enhance purification of plasmid DNA by non-ionic detergents

    PubMed Central

    Lezin, George; Kuehn, Michael R.; Brunelli, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Ion-exchange chromatography is the standard technique used for plasmid DNA purification, an essential molecular biology procedure. Non-ionic detergents (NIDs) have been used for plasmid DNA purification, but it is unclear whether Hofmeister series salts (HSS) change the solubility and phase separation properties of specific NIDs, enhancing plasmid DNA purification. After scaling-up NID-mediated plasmid DNA isolation, we established that NIDs in HSS solutions minimize plasmid DNA contamination with protein. In addition, large-scale NID/HSS solutions eliminated LPS contamination of plasmid DNA more effectively than Qiagen ion-exchange columns. Large-scale NID isolation/NID purification generated increased yields of high quality DNA compared to alkali isolation/column purification. This work characterizes how HSS enhance NID-mediated plasmid DNA purification, and demonstrates that NID phase transition is not necessary for LPS removal from plasmid DNA. Specific NIDs such as IGEPAL CA-520 can be utilized for rapid, inexpensive and efficient laboratory-based large-scale plasmid DNA purification, outperforming Qiagen-based column procedures. PMID:21351074

  14. Nanochemistry-based immunotherapy for HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Lori, F; Calarota, S A; Lisziewicz, J

    2007-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART), i.e. the combination of three or more drugs against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has greatly improved the clinical outcome of HIV-1-infected individuals. However, HAART is unable to reconstitute HIV-specific immunity and eradicate the virus. Several observations in primate models and in humans support the notion that cell-mediated immunity can control viral replication and slow disease progression. Thus, besides drugs, an immunotherapy that induces long-lasting HIV-specific T-cell responses could play a role in the treatment of HIV/AIDS. To induce such immune responses, DermaVir Patch has been developed. DermaVir consists of an HIV-1 antigen-encoding plasmid DNA that is chemically formulated in a nanoparticle. DermaVir is administered under a patch after a skin preparation that supports the delivery of the nanoparticle to Langerhans cells (LC). Epidermal LC trap and transport the nanomedicine to draining lymph nodes. While in transit, LC mature into dendritic cells (DC), which can efficiently present the DNA-encoded antigens to naïve T-cells for the induction of cellular immunity. Pre-clinical studies and Phase I clinical testing of DermaVir in HIV-1-infected individuals have demonstrated the safety and tolerability of DermaVir Patch. To further modulate cellular immunity, molecular adjuvants might be added into the nanoparticle. DermaVir Patch represents a new nanomedicine platform for immunotherapy of HIV/AIDS. In this review, the antiviral activity of DermaVir-induced cellular immunity is discussed. Furthermore, the action of some cytokines currently being tested as adjuvants are highlighted and the adjuvant effect of cytokine plasmid DNA included in the DermaVir nanoparticle is reviewed.

  15. Paired quantitative and qualitative assessment of the replication-competent HIV-1 reservoir and comparison with integrated proviral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Julio C. C.; Cohen, Yehuda Z.; Cohn, Lillian B.; Kreider, Edward F.; Oliveira, Thiago; Lavine, Christy L.; Horwitz, Joshua A.; Settler, Allison; Jankovic, Mila; Seaman, Michael S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Caskey, Marina; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1–infected individuals harbor a latent reservoir of infected CD4+ T cells that is not eradicated by antiretroviral therapy (ART). This reservoir presents the greatest barrier to an HIV-1 cure and has remained difficult to characterize, in part, because the vast majority of integrated sequences are defective and incapable of reactivation. To characterize the replication-competent reservoir, we have combined two techniques, quantitative viral outgrowth and qualitative sequence analysis of clonal outgrowth viruses. Leukapheresis samples from four fully ART-suppressed, chronically infected individuals were assayed at two time points separated by a 4- to 6-mo interval. Overall, 54% of the viruses emerging from the latent reservoir showed gp160 env sequences that were identical to at least one other virus. Moreover, 43% of the env sequences from viruses emerging from the reservoir were part of identical groups at the two time points. Groups of identical expanded sequences made up 54% of proviral DNA, and, as might be expected, the sequences of replication-competent viruses in the active reservoir showed limited overlap with integrated proviral DNA, most of which is known to represent defective viruses. Finally, there was an inverse correlation between proviral DNA clone size and the probability of reactivation, suggesting that replication-competent viruses are less likely to be found among highly expanded provirus-containing cell clones. PMID:27872306

  16. Structural determinants of TAR RNA-DNA annealing in the absence and presence of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Kanevsky, Igor; Chaminade, Françoise; Chen, Yingying; Godet, Julien; René, Brigitte; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Mély, Yves; Mauffret, Olivier; Fossé, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Annealing of the TAR RNA hairpin to the cTAR DNA hairpin is required for the minus-strand transfer step of HIV-1 reverse transcription. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a crucial role by facilitating annealing of the complementary hairpins. To gain insight into the mechanism of NC-mediated TAR RNA–DNA annealing, we used structural probes (nucleases and potassium permanganate), gel retardation assays, fluorescence anisotropy and cTAR mutants under conditions allowing strand transfer. In the absence of NC, cTAR DNA-TAR RNA annealing depends on nucleation through the apical loops. We show that the annealing intermediate of the kissing pathway is a loop–loop kissing complex involving six base-pairs and that the apical stems are not destabilized by this loop–loop interaction. Our data support a dynamic structure of the cTAR hairpin in the absence of NC, involving equilibrium between both the closed conformation and the partially open ‘Y’ conformation. This study is the first to show that the apical and internal loops of cTAR are weak and strong binding sites for NC, respectively. NC slightly destabilizes the lower stem that is adjacent to the internal loop and shifts the equilibrium toward the ‘Y’ conformation exhibiting at least 12 unpaired nucleotides in its lower part. PMID:21724607

  17. Paired quantitative and qualitative assessment of the replication-competent HIV-1 reservoir and comparison with integrated proviral DNA.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Julio C C; Cohen, Yehuda Z; Cohn, Lillian B; Kreider, Edward F; Barton, John P; Learn, Gerald H; Oliveira, Thiago; Lavine, Christy L; Horwitz, Joshua A; Settler, Allison; Jankovic, Mila; Seaman, Michael S; Chakraborty, Arup K; Hahn, Beatrice H; Caskey, Marina; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-12-06

    HIV-1-infected individuals harbor a latent reservoir of infected CD4(+) T cells that is not eradicated by antiretroviral therapy (ART). This reservoir presents the greatest barrier to an HIV-1 cure and has remained difficult to characterize, in part, because the vast majority of integrated sequences are defective and incapable of reactivation. To characterize the replication-competent reservoir, we have combined two techniques, quantitative viral outgrowth and qualitative sequence analysis of clonal outgrowth viruses. Leukapheresis samples from four fully ART-suppressed, chronically infected individuals were assayed at two time points separated by a 4- to 6-mo interval. Overall, 54% of the viruses emerging from the latent reservoir showed gp160 env sequences that were identical to at least one other virus. Moreover, 43% of the env sequences from viruses emerging from the reservoir were part of identical groups at the two time points. Groups of identical expanded sequences made up 54% of proviral DNA, and, as might be expected, the sequences of replication-competent viruses in the active reservoir showed limited overlap with integrated proviral DNA, most of which is known to represent defective viruses. Finally, there was an inverse correlation between proviral DNA clone size and the probability of reactivation, suggesting that replication-competent viruses are less likely to be found among highly expanded provirus-containing cell clones.

  18. Quantification of HIV-1 proviral DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells using a high throughput four-competitor competitive PCR.

    PubMed

    Comandini, U V; Sönnerborg, A; Vahlne, A; Yun, Z

    1997-12-01

    A multiple competitor PCR (mcPCR) was developed to quantify HIV-1 proviral DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). DNA extracted from a mixture of HIV infected PBMC and four size-mutated DNA competitors were co-amplified. The Cy5-fluorescence labelled PCR products were denatured by heating, separated using an automated DNA sequencer and quantified by a fragment analysis computer software. An internal standard was generated by plotting the peak areas of the four competitors against their inputs. Based on the internal standard, HIV sample DNA was quantified by extrapolating the corresponding signal. The linear range of the mcPCR was three log wide and the quantitation limit was about 20 copies of HIV DNA/10(6) PBMC. Using the mcPCR, HIV DNA was quantified from 14 long-term non progressors (LTNP) and 14 patients with advanced disease. A significantly lower copy number of HIV DNA was obtained in the LTNP (p = 0.018). These data suggest that the mcPCR is sensitive, reliable and especially useful for HIV DNA quantification of a large number of clinical samples.

  19. Plasmid DNA gene therapy by electroporation: principles and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsufumi; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2011-12-01

    Simple plasmid DNA injection is a safe and feasible gene transfer method, but it confers low transfection efficiency and transgene expression. This non-viral gene transfer method is enhanced by physical delivery methods, such as electroporation and the use of a gene gun. In vivo electroporation has been rapidly developed over the last two decades to deliver DNA to various tissues or organs. It is generally considered that membrane permeabilization and DNA electrophoresis play important roles in electro-gene transfer. Skeletal muscle is a well characterized target tissue for electroporation, because it is accessible and allows for long-lasting gene expression ( > one year). Skin is also a target tissue because of its accessibility and immunogenicity. Numerous studies have been performed using in vivo electroporation in animal models of disease. Clinical trials of DNA vaccines and immunotherapy for cancer treatment using in vivo electroporation have been initiated in patients with melanoma and prostate cancer. Furthermore, electroporation has been applied to DNA vaccines for infectious diseases to enhance immunogenicity, and the relevant clinical trials have been initiated. The gene gun approach is also being applied for the delivery of DNA vaccines against infectious diseases to the skin. Here, we review recent advances in the mechanism of in vivo electroporation, and summarize the findings of recent preclinical and clinical studies using this technology.

  20. Synapsis-Mediated Fusion of Free DNA Ends Forms Inverted Dimer Plasmids in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kunes, S.; Botstein, D.; Fox, M. S.

    1990-01-01

    When yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is transformed with linearized plasmid DNA and the ends of the plasmid do not share homology with the yeast genome, circular inverted (head-to-head) dimer plasmids are the principal product of repair. By measurements of the DNA concentration dependence of transformation with a linearized plasmid, and by transformation with mixtures of genetically marked plasmids, we show that two plasmid molecules are required to form an inverted dimer plasmid. Several observations suggest that homologous pairing accounts for the head-to-head joining of the two plasmid molecules. First, an enhanced frequency of homologous recombination is detected when genetically marked plasmids undergo end-to-end fusion. Second, when a plasmid is linearized within an inverted repeat, such that its ends could undergo head-to-tail homologous pairing, it is repaired by intramolecular head-to-tail joining. Last, in the joining of homologous linearized plasmids of different length, a shorter molecule can acquire a longer plasmid end by homologous recombination. The formation of inverted dimer plasmids may be related to some forms of chromosomal rearrangement. These might include the fusion of broken sister chromatids in the bridge-breakage-fusion cycle and the head-to-head duplication of genomic DNA at the sites of gene amplifications. PMID:2407606

  1. Catalytically-active complex of HIV-1 integrase with a viral DNA substrate binds anti-integrase drugs.

    PubMed

    Alian, Akram; Griner, Sarah L; Chiang, Vicki; Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg; Birkus, Gabriel; Geleziunas, Romas; Leavitt, Andrew D; Stroud, Robert M

    2009-05-19

    HIV-1 integration into the host cell genome is a multistep process catalyzed by the virally-encoded integrase (IN) protein. In view of the difficulty of obtaining a stable DNA-bound IN at high concentration as required for structure determination, we selected IN-DNA complexes that form disulfide linkages between 5'-thiolated DNA and several single mutations to cysteine around the catalytic site of IN. Mild reducing conditions allowed for selection of the most thermodynamically-stable disulfide-linked species. The most stable complexes induce tetramer formation of IN, as happens during the physiological integration reaction, and are able to catalyze the strand transfer step of retroviral integration. One of these complexes also binds strand-transfer inhibitors of HIV antiviral drugs, making it uniquely valuable among the mutants of this set for understanding portions of the integration reaction. This novel complex may help define substrate interactions and delineate the mechanism of action of known integration inhibitors.

  2. Fate of HIV-1 cDNA intermediates during reverse transcription is dictated by transcription initiation site of virus genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Takao; Sato, Yoko; Huang, Yu-Lun; Koi, Satoshi; Takahata, Tatsuro; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kawai, Gota; Kannagi, Mari

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcription is accomplished by sequential strand-transfers of partial cDNA intermediates copied from viral genomic RNA. Here, we revealed an unprecedented role of 5′-end guanosine (G) of HIV-1 genomic RNA for reverse transcription. Based on current consensus for HIV-1 transcription initiation site, HIV-1 transcripts possess a single G at 5′-ends (G1-form). However, we found that HIV-1 transcripts with additional Gs at 5′-ends (G2- and G3-forms) were abundantly expressed in infected cells by using alternative transcription initiation sites. The G2- and G3-forms were also detected in the virus particle, although the G1-form predominated. To address biological impact of the 5′-G number, we generated HIV clone DNA to express the G1-form exclusively by deleting the alternative initiation sites. Virus produced from the clone showed significantly higher strand-transfer of minus strong-stop cDNA (-sscDNA). The in vitro assay using synthetic HIV-1 RNAs revealed that the abortive forms of -sscDNA were abundantly generated from the G3-form RNA, but dramatically reduced from the G1-form. Moreover, the strand-transfer of -sscDNA from the G1-form was prominently stimulated by HIV-1 nucleocapsid. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the 5′-G number that corresponds to HIV-1 transcription initiation site was critical for successful strand-transfer of -sscDNA during reverse transcription. PMID:26631448

  3. Low concentrations of HIV-1 DNA at birth delays diagnosis, complicating identification of infants for antiretroviral therapy to potentially prevent the establishment of viral reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Caroline; Dross, Sandra; Beck, Ingrid A; Micek, Mark A; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2014-04-01

    Among infants exposed to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), detection of viral infection at birth was increased by 39% (95% confidence interval, 19%-47%) by increasing DNA input from dried blood spots into polymerase chain reaction. Infants with low concentrations of HIV-1 at birth may be the best target population to evaluate whether immediate antiretroviral therapy can prevent long-term infection.

  4. Low Concentrations of HIV-1 DNA at Birth Delays Diagnosis, Complicating Identification of Infants for Antiretroviral Therapy to Potentially Prevent the Establishment of Viral Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Caroline; Dross, Sandra; Beck, Ingrid A.; Micek, Mark A.; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Among infants exposed to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), detection of viral infection at birth was increased by 39% (95% confidence interval, 19%–47%) by increasing DNA input from dried blood spots into polymerase chain reaction. Infants with low concentrations of HIV-1 at birth may be the best target population to evaluate whether immediate antiretroviral therapy can prevent long-term infection. PMID:24501389

  5. During Stably Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy Integrated HIV-1 DNA Load in Peripheral Blood is Associated with the Frequency of CD8 Cells Expressing HLA-DR/DP/DQ

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Alessandra; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Kiselinova, Maja; Pollakis, Georgios; Beloukas, Apostolos; Vandekerckhove, Linos; Strain, Matthew; Richman, Douglas; Phillips, Andrew; Geretti, Anna Maria; Vitiello, Paola; Mackie, Nicola; Ainsworth, Jonathan; Waters, Anele; Post, Frank; Edwards, Simon; Fox, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Background Characterising the correlates of HIV persistence improves understanding of disease pathogenesis and guides the design of curative strategies. This study investigated factors associated with integrated HIV-1 DNA load during consistently suppressive first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART). Method Total, integrated, and 2-long terminal repeats (LTR) circular HIV-1 DNA, residual plasma HIV-1 RNA, T-cell activation markers, and soluble CD14 (sCD14) were measured in peripheral blood of 50 patients that had received 1–14 years of efavirenz-based or nevirapine-based therapy. Results Integrated HIV-1 DNA load (per 106 peripheral blood mononuclear cells) was median 1.9 log10 copies (interquartile range 1.7–2.2) and showed a mean difference of 0.2 log10 copies per 10 years of suppressive ART (95% confidence interval − 0.2, 0.6; p = 0.28). It was positively correlated with total HIV-1 DNA load and frequency of CD8+HLA-DR/DP/DQ+ cells, and was also higher in subjects with higher sCD14 levels, but showed no correlation with levels of 2-LTR circular HIV-1 DNA and residual plasma HIV-1 RNA, or the frequency of CD4+CD38+ and CD8+CD38+ cells. Adjusting for pre-ART viral load, duration of suppressive ART, CD4 cell counts, residual plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, and sCD14 levels, integrated HIV-1 DNA load was mean 0.5 log10 copies higher for each 50% higher frequency of CD8+HLA-DR/DP/DQ+ cells (95% confidence interval 0.2, 0.9; p = 0.01). Conclusions The observed positive association between integrated HIV-1 DNA load and frequency of CD8+DR/DP/DQ+ cells indicates that a close correlation between HIV persistence and immune activation continues during consistently suppressive therapy. The inducers of the distinct activation profile warrant further investigation. PMID:26498496

  6. The Safety and Immunogenicity of an Interleukin-12-Enhanced Multiantigen DNA Vaccine Delivered by Electroporation for the Treatment of HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Zheng, Lu; Wilson, Cara C.; Tebas, Pablo; Matining, Roy M.; Egan, Michael A.; Eldridge, John; Landay, Alan L.; Clifford, David B.; Luetkemeyer, Anne F.; Tiu, Jennifer; Martinez, Ana; Janik, Jennifer; Spitz, Teresa A.; Hural, John; McElrath, Juliana; Frahm, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic vaccination is being studied in eradication and “functional cure” strategies for HIV-1. The Profectus Biosciences (Tarrytown, NY) multiantigen (MAG) HIV-1 DNA vaccine encodes HIV-1 Gag/Pol, Nef/Tat/Vif, and Envelope, and interleukin-12 (IL-12) and is delivered by electroporation (EP) combined with intramuscular injection (IM-EP). Methods Sixty-two HIV-1-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (plasma HIV-1 RNA levels ≤200 copies/mL; CD4+ T-cell counts ≥500 cells/mm3) were randomly allocated 5:1 to receive vaccine or placebo. At weeks 0, 4 and 12, four consecutive cohorts received 3000 μg HIV MAG pDNA with 0, 50, 250, or 1000 μg of IL-12 pDNA by IM-EP. A 5th cohort received HIV MAG pDNA plus 1000 μg of IL-12 pDNA by standard IM injection. Results CD4+ T cells expressing IL-2 in response to Gag and Pol and interferon-γ responses to Gag, Pol, and Env increased from baseline to week 14 in the low-dose (50-μg) IL-12 arm vs. placebo (P < 0.05; intracellular cytokine staining). The total increase in the IL-2 expressing CD4+ T-cell responses to any antigen was also higher in the low-dose IL-12 arm vs. placebo (P = 0.04). Cytokine responses by CD8 T cells to HIV antigens were not increased in any vaccine arm relative to placebo. Conclusions HIV-1 MAG/low-dose IL-12 DNA vaccine delivered by IM-EP augmented CD4+ but not CD8+ T-cell responses to multiple HIV-1 antigens. PMID:26761518

  7. The Safety and Immunogenicity of an Interleukin-12-Enhanced Multiantigen DNA Vaccine Delivered by Electroporation for the Treatment of HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Zheng, Lu; Wilson, Cara C; Tebas, Pablo; Matining, Roy M; Egan, Michael A; Eldridge, John; Landay, Alan L; Clifford, David B; Luetkemeyer, Anne F; Tiu, Jennifer; Martinez, Ana L; Janik, Jennifer; Spitz, Teresa A; Hural, John; McElrath, Juliana; Frahm, Nicole

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic vaccination is being studied in eradication and "functional cure" strategies for HIV-1. The Profectus Biosciences multiantigen (MAG) HIV-1 DNA vaccine encodes HIV-1 Gag/Pol, Nef/Tat/Vif, and Envelope, and interleukin-12 (IL-12) and is delivered by electroporation combined with intramuscular injection (IM-EP). Sixty-two HIV-1-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (plasma HIV-1 RNA levels ≤ 200 copies/mL; CD4(+) T-cell counts ≥ 500 cells/mm(3)) were randomly allocated 5:1 to receive vaccine or placebo. At weeks 0, 4, and 12, 4 consecutive cohorts received 3000 μg HIV MAG pDNA with 0, 50, 250, or 1000 μg of IL-12 pDNA by IM-EP. A fifth cohort received HIV MAG pDNA and 1000 μg of IL-12 pDNA by standard IM injection. CD4(+) T cells expressing IL-2 in response to Gag and Pol and interferon-γ responses to Gag, Pol, and Env increased from baseline to week 14 in the low-dose (50-μg) IL-12 arm vs. placebo (P < 0.05; intracellular cytokine staining). The total increase in the IL-2-expressing CD4 T-cell responses to any antigen was also higher in the low-dose IL-12 arm vs. placebo (P = 0.04). Cytokine responses by CD8 T cells to HIV antigens were not increased in any vaccine arm relative to placebo. HIV-1 MAG/low-dose IL-12 DNA vaccine delivered by IM-EP augmented CD4(+) but not CD8(+) T-cell responses to multiple HIV-1 antigens.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Study of HIV-1 RT-DNA-Nevirapine Complexes Explains NNRTI Inhibition, and Resistance by Connection Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, R.S.K.; Arnold, Eddy; Das, Kalyan

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a multifunctional enzyme that is targeted by nucleoside analogs (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs). NNRTIs are allosteric inhibitors of RT, and constitute an integral part of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimen. Under selective pressure, HIV-1 acquires resistance against NNRTIs primarily by selecting mutations around the NNRTI pocket. Complete RT sequencing of clinical isolates revealed that spatially distal mutations arising in connection and the RNase H domain also confer NNRTI resistance and contribute to NRTI resistance. However, the precise structural mechanism by which the connection domain mutations confer NNRTI resistance is poorly understood. We performed 50-ns MD simulations, followed by essential dynamics, free-energy landscape analyses and network analyses of RT-DNA, RT-DNA-nevirapine, and N348I/T369I mutant RT-DNA-nevirapine complexes. MD simulation studies revealed altered global motions and restricted conformational landscape of RT upon nevirapine binding. Analysis of protein structure network parameters demonstrated a dissortative hub pattern in the RT-DNA complex and an assortative hub pattern in the RT-DNA-nevirapine complex suggesting enhanced rigidity of RT upon nevirapine binding. The connection subdomain mutations N348I/T369I did not induce any significant structural change; rather, these mutations modulate the conformational dynamics and alter the long-range allosteric communication network between the connection subdomain and NNRTI pocket. Insights from the present study provide a structural basis for the biochemical and clinical findings on drug resistance caused by the connection and RNase H mutations. PMID:24174331

  9. HIV-1 Treated Patients with Undetectable Viral Loads have Lower Levels of Innate Immune Responses via Cytosolic DNA Sensing Systems Compared with Healthy Uninfected Controls.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Sanjay; Sui, Hongyan; Adelsberger, Joseph W; Chen, Qian; Sneller, Michael; Migueles, Stephen A; Kottilil, Shyamasundaran; Ober, Alexander; Jones, Sara; Rehm, Catherine A; Lane, H Clifford; Imamichi, Tomozumi

    2014-06-01

    After DNA or RNA virus infection, cytosolic foreign DNA or RNA derived from the infecting viruses is recognized by intracellular pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs) and induces activation of the innate immune system. Transfection of DNA has been used as an experimental model for DNA virus-mediated innate responses. We have previously reported that DNA transfection preferentially induces Type-III IFN (IFN-λ1) rather than Type-I IFN (IFN-β). In this study, we compared the DNA-mediated immune response between healthy controls and HIV-1 infected patients with undetectable viral loads and assessed potential innate immune responses in these patients. The study consisted of 50 HIV-1 negative healthy donors, 46 patients on combination antiretroviral therapy with HIV-1 viral loads <50 copies/ml and 7 long term non-progressors (LTNPs). PBMCs were isolated from whole blood using Ficoll-Paque. DNA transfection was performed using Lipofectamine 2000. After 22 hours incubation, total cellular RNA was extracted and real time RT-PCR was performed to determine gene expression level of IFN-λ1, IFN-β and RANTES. Gene induction was compared by fold change. Baseline levels of endogenous gene expression of IFN-λ1, IFN-β and RANTES in HIV-1 patients were higher than in controls. Following DNA transfection, both HIV infected patients and healthy controls induced gene induction, however, the induction in HIV-1 patients was at a significantly lower level compared to uninfected controls. HIV-1 treated patients with undetectable viral loads have lower levels of innate immune responses via cytosolic DNA sensing systems. This may be caused by persistent immune activation.

  10. Keeping your armour intact: how HIV-1 evades detection by the innate immune system: HIV-1 capsid controls detection of reverse transcription products by the cytosolic DNA sensor cGAS.

    PubMed

    Maelfait, Jonathan; Seiradake, Elena; Rehwinkel, Jan

    2014-07-01

    HIV-1 infects dendritic cells (DCs) without triggering an effective innate antiviral immune response. As a consequence, the induction of adaptive immune responses controlling virus spread is limited. In a recent issue of Immunity, Lahaye and colleagues show that intricate interactions of HIV capsid with the cellular cofactor cyclophilin A (CypA) control infection and innate immune activation in DCs. Manipulation of HIV-1 capsid to increase its affinity for CypA results in reduced virus infectivity and facilitates access of the cytosolic DNA sensor cGAS to reverse transcribed DNA. This in turn induces a strong host response. Here, we discuss these findings in the context of recent developments in innate immunity and consider the implications for disease control and vaccine design.

  11. Quantification Bias Caused by Plasmid DNA Conformation in Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Hui; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is the gold standard for the quantification of specific nucleic acid sequences. However, a serious concern has been revealed in a recent report: supercoiled plasmid standards cause significant over-estimation in qPCR quantification. In this study, we investigated the effect of plasmid DNA conformation on the quantification of DNA and the efficiency of qPCR. Our results suggest that plasmid DNA conformation has significant impact on the accuracy of absolute quantification by qPCR. DNA standard curves shifted significantly among plasmid standards with different DNA conformations. Moreover, the choice of DNA measurement method and plasmid DNA conformation may also contribute to the measurement error of DNA standard curves. Due to the multiple effects of plasmid DNA conformation on the accuracy of qPCR, efforts should be made to assure the highest consistency of plasmid standards for qPCR. Thus, we suggest that the conformation, preparation, quantification, purification, handling, and storage of standard plasmid DNA should be described and defined in the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) to assure the reproducibility and accuracy of qPCR absolute quantification. PMID:22194997

  12. Ultrasound enhances in vivo tumor expression of plasmid DNA by PEG-introduced cationized dextran.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2005-11-28

    This study is an investigation to experimentally confirm whether or not ultrasound (US) irradiation is effective in enhancing the in vivo gene expression of plasmid DNA in tumor. Dextran was cationized by introducing spermine to the hydroxyl groups to allow to polyionically complex with a plasmid DNA. The cationized dextran prepared was additionally modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecules which have an active ester and methoxy groups at each terminal, to obtain cationized dextran with different percentages of PEG introduced. Various cationized dextrans with or without PEG introduction were mixed with a plasmid DNA of LacZ to form cationized dextran-plasmid DNA complexes. Electrophoretical examination revealed that the plasmid DNA was complexed both with the cationized dextran and PEG-introduced cationized dextran, irrespective of the PEG introduction percentage, although the higher N/P ratio was needed for plasmid DNA complexation with the latter. By complexation with the cationized dextran, the zeta potential of plasmid DNA was changed to be positive. The charge of PEG-introduced cationized dextran-plasmid DNA complexes became close to 0 mV as their percentage of PEG introduced increased, although the molecular size was about 250 nm, irrespective of the PEG introduction. When cationized dextran-plasmid DNA complexes with or without PEG introduction were intravenously injected to mice carrying a subcutaneous Meth-AR-1 fibrosarcoma mass and the subsequent US irradiation to the tumor mass percutaneously, the PEG-introduced cationized dextran-plasmid DNA complex plus US irradiation enhanced the tumor level of gene expression to a significantly high extent compared with the cationized dextran-plasmid DNA complex and free plasmid DNA with or without US irradiation. The enhanced level depended on the time period and timing of US irradiation. Fluorescent microscopic studies revealed that the localization of plasmid DNA and the gene expression were observed in

  13. [A novel immunization strategy to induce strong humoral responses against HIV-1 using combined DNA, recombinant vaccinia virus and protein vaccines].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Wang, Shu-hui; Ren, Li; Hao, Yan-ling; Zhang, Qi-cheng; Liu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    To optimize the immunization strategy against HIV-1, a DNA vaccine was combined with a recombinant vaccinia virus (rTV) vaccine and a protein vaccine. Immune responses against HIV-1 were detected in 30 female guinea pigs divided into six groups. Three groups of guinea pigs were primed with HIV-1 DNA vaccine three times, boosted with rTV at week 14, and then boosted with gp140 protein at intervals of 4, 8 or 12 weeks. Simultaneously, the other three groups of animals were primed with rTV vaccine once, and then boosted with gp140 after 4, 8 or 12 weeks. The HIV-1 specific binding antibody and neutralizing antibody, in addition to the relative affinity of these antibodies, were detected at different time points after the final administration of vaccine in each group. The DNA-rTV-gp140 immune regimen induced higher titers and affinity levels of HIV-1 gp120/gp140 antibodies and stronger V1V2-gp70 antibodies than the rTV-gp140 regimen. In the guinea pigs that underwent the DNA-rTV-gp140 regimen, the highest V1V2-gp70 antibody was induced in the 12-week-interval group. However, the avidity of antibodies was improved in the 4-week-interval group. Using the rTV-gp140 immunization strategy, guinea pigs boosted at 8 or 12 weeks after rTV priming elicited stronger humoral responses than those boosted at 4 weeks after priming. In conclusion, this study shows that the immunization strategy of HIV-1 DNA vaccine priming, followed by rTV and protein vaccine boosting, could strengthen the humoral response against HIV-1. Longer intervals were better to induce V1V2-gp70-specific antibodies, while shorter intervals were more beneficial to enhance the avidity of antibodies.

  14. A Real Time PCR Platform for the Simultaneous Quantification of Total and Extrachromosomal HIV DNA Forms in Blood of HIV-1 Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Canovari, Benedetta; Scotti, Maddalena; Acetoso, Marcello; Valentini, Massimo; Petrelli, Enzo; Magnani, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Background The quantitative measurement of various HIV-1 DNA forms including total, unintegrated and integrated provirus play an increasingly important role in HIV-1 infection monitoring and treatment-related research. We report the development and validation of a SYBR Green real time PCR (TotUFsys platform) for the simultaneous quantification of total and extrachromosomal HIV-1 DNA forms in patients. This innovative technique makes it possible to obtain both measurements in a single PCR run starting from frozen blood employing the same primers and standard curve. Moreover, due to identical amplification efficiency, it allows indirect estimation of integrated level. To specifically detect 2-LTR a qPCR method was also developed. Methodology/Findings Primers used for total HIV-1 DNA quantification spanning a highly conserved region were selected and found to detect all HIV-1 clades of group M and the unintegrated forms of the same. A total of 195 samples from HIV-1 patients in a wide range of clinical conditions were analyzed with a 100% success rate, even in patients with suppressed plasma viremia, regardless of CD4+ or therapy. No significant correlation was observed between the two current prognostic markers, CD4+ and plasma viremia, while a moderate or high inverse correlation was found between CD4+ and total HIV DNA, with strong values for unintegrated HIV DNA. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, the results support the use of HIV DNA as another tool, in addition to traditional assays, which can be used to estimate the state of viral infection, the risk of disease progression and to monitor the effects of ART. The TotUFsys platform allowed us to obtain a final result, expressed as the total and unintegrated HIV DNA copy number per microgram of DNA or 104 CD4+, for 12 patients within two working days. PMID:25364909

  15. A CRISPR/Cas9 approach reveals that the polymerase activity of DNA polymerase β is dispensable for HIV-1 infection in dividing and nondividing cells.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Russell W; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Schinazi, Raymond F; Kim, Baek

    2017-08-25

    Retrovirus integration into the host genome relies on several host enzymes, potentially including DNA polymerase β (Pol β). However, whether human Pol β is essential for lentivirus replication in human cells is unclear. Here, we abolished DNA polymerase β (Pol β) expression by targeting its DNA polymerase domain with CRISPR/Cas9 in human monocytic THP-1 cells to investigate the role of Pol β in HIV-1 transduction in both dividing and nondividing macrophage stages of THP-1 cells. Pol β-knock-out was confirmed by enhanced sensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate-induced DNA damage. Of note, nuclear extracts from Pol β-knock-out THP-1 cells prepared from both dividing and nondividing stages displayed significantly reduced capability to repair the gapped HIV-1 integration intermediate DNA substrate in a biochemical simulation. However, nuclear extract from both dividing and nondividing stages of the Pol β-KO cells had detectable gap repair activity, suggesting that other host DNA polymerases also repair gapped HIV-1 DNA, particularly in dividing cells. Next, when we compared transduction using HIV-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus in control and Pol β-KO cells, the loss of the Pol β expression did not affect transduction efficiency of these lentiviruses in both dividing and nondividing stages. Finally, the gap repair assay indicated that limited cellular dNTP pools, but not Pol β expression, are a primary factor for HIV-1 DNA gap repair, particularly in nondividing cells. These data support the idea that Pol β polymerase activity is dispensable for HIV-1 infection in both dividing and nondividing stages of human cells targeted by the virus. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Effects of growth medium selection on plasmid DNA production and initial processing steps.

    PubMed

    O'Kennedy, R D; Baldwin, C; Keshavarz-Moore, E

    2000-01-21

    Cultures of recombinant Escherichia coli containing the plasmid pSVbeta were grown in three medium formulations to assess their effects on the characteristics of supercoiled plasmid DNA production for plasmid-based gene therapy. A semi-defined medium containing casamino acids (SDCAS) was found to support higher cell densities and higher plasmid stability than a similar medium containing soya amino acids (SDSOY) or Luria-Bertani medium (LB). Differences were observed in the cell harvest characteristics, plasmid DNA primary recovery, plasmid DNA yield and quality between cells grown on LB and on SDCAS medium. Cells grown on SDCAS medium were more difficult to resuspend after harvest than those grown in LB medium and were less susceptible to alkaline lysis. The plasmid DNA content from SDCAS was predominantly supercoiled and was less contaminated by chromosomal DNA than plasmid DNA extracts derived from cells grown on LB medium. It was hypothesised that the different carbon:nitrogen ratio (C:N) of the medium may have been responsible for changing the cell wall polysaccharide composition resulting in the change in cell harvest and lysis characteristics. Results indicated that changing the C:N ratio of SDCAS medium between 1.21:1 and 12.08:1 resulted in no alteration in cell wall polysaccharide composition or in cell susceptibility to chemical lysis or physical breakage. Plasmid DNA yields increased ten-fold with ten-fold increase in the C:N ratio of SDCAS medium.

  17. Effect of the atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasmas on the conformational changes of plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xu; Zou, Fei; Lu, Xin Pei; He, Guangyuan; Shi, Meng Jun; Xiong, Qing; Gao, Xuan; Xiong, Zilan; Li, Yin; Ma, Feng Yun; Yu, Men; Wang, Chang Dong; Wang, Yuesheng; Yang, Guangxiao

    2009-08-01

    The cold atmospheric pressure plasma, which has been widely used for biomedical applications, may potentially affect the conformation of DNA. In this letter, an atmospheric pressure plasma plume is used to investigate its effects on the conformational changes of DNA of plasmid pAHC25. It is found that the plasma plume could cause plasmid DNA topology alteration, resulting in the percentage of the supercoiled plasmid DNA form decreased while that of the open circular and linearized form of plasmid DNA increased as detected by agrose gel electrophoresis. On the other hand, further investigation by using polymerase chain reaction method shows that the atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatments under proper conditions does not affect the genes of the plasmid DNA, which may have potential application in increasing the transformation frequency by genetic engineering.

  18. Effect of the atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasmas on the conformational changes of plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Xu; He Guangyuan; Shi Mengjun; Gao Xuan; Li Yin; Ma Fengyun; Yu Men; Wang Changdong; Wang Yuesheng; Yang Guangxiao; Zou Fei; Lu Xinpei; Xiong Qing; Xiong Zilan

    2009-08-24

    The cold atmospheric pressure plasma, which has been widely used for biomedical applications, may potentially affect the conformation of DNA. In this letter, an atmospheric pressure plasma plume is used to investigate its effects on the conformational changes of DNA of plasmid pAHC25. It is found that the plasma plume could cause plasmid DNA topology alteration, resulting in the percentage of the supercoiled plasmid DNA form decreased while that of the open circular and linearized form of plasmid DNA increased as detected by agrose gel electrophoresis. On the other hand, further investigation by using polymerase chain reaction method shows that the atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatments under proper conditions does not affect the genes of the plasmid DNA, which may have potential application in increasing the transformation frequency by genetic engineering.

  19. Tn5-mediated transposition of plasmid DNA after transduction to Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed Central

    Downard, J S

    1988-01-01

    After coliphage P1-mediated transfer of Tn5-containing plasmid DNA from Escherichia coli to Myxococcus xanthus, transductants were identified which contained plasmid sequences integrated at many sites on the bacterial chromosome. The unaltered plasmid DNA sequences in these transductants were apparently flanked by intact Tn5 or IS50 sequences. These results suggest that Tn5-mediated transposition has occurred and provide a method for integrating plasmid DNA into the M. xanthus chromosome without the requirement for homologous recombination. Images PMID:2844730

  20. RK2 plasmid dynamics in Caulobacter crescentus cells--two modes of DNA replication initiation.

    PubMed

    Wegrzyn, Katarzyna; Witosinska, Monika; Schweiger, Pawel; Bury, Katarzyna; Jenal, Urs; Konieczny, Igor

    2013-06-01

    Undisturbed plasmid dynamics is required for the stable maintenance of plasmid DNA in bacterial cells. In this work, we analysed subcellular localization, DNA synthesis and nucleoprotein complex formation of plasmid RK2 during the cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus. Our microscopic observations showed asymmetrical distribution of plasmid RK2 foci between the two compartments of Caulobacter predivisional cells, resulting in asymmetrical allocation of plasmids to progeny cells. Moreover, using a quantitative PCR (qPCR) method, we estimated that multiple plasmid particles form a single fluorescent focus and that the number of plasmids per focus is approximately equal in both swarmer and predivisional Caulobacter cells. Analysis of the dynamics of TrfA-oriV complex formation during the Caulobacter cell cycle revealed that TrfA binds oriV primarily during the G1 phase, however, plasmid DNA synthesis occurs during the S and G2 phases of the Caulobacter cell cycle. Both in vitro and in vivo analysis of RK2 replication initiation in C. crescentus cells demonstrated that it is independent of the Caulobacter DnaA protein in the presence of the longer version of TrfA protein, TrfA-44. However, in vivo stability tests of plasmid RK2 derivatives suggested that a DnaA-dependent mode of plasmid replication initiation is also possible.

  1. Biodegradable poly(ethylenimine) for plasmid DNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Cheol-Hee; Chae, Su Young; Bae, You Han; Kim, Sung Wan

    2002-04-23

    Poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) has been known as an efficient gene carrier with the highest cationic charge potential. High transfection efficiency of PEI, along with its cytotoxicity, strongly depends on the molecular weight. Synthesis of cationic copolymers derived from the low molecular weight of PEI and hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), which are water soluble and degradable under physiological conditions, was investigated for plasmid delivery. Hydrophilic PEG is expected to reduce the toxicity of the copolymer, improve the poor solubility of the PEI and DNA complexes, and help to introduce degradable bonds by reaction with the primary amines in the PEI. Considering the dependence of transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity on the molecular weight of the PEI, high transfection efficiency is expected from an increased molecular weight of the copolymer and low cytotoxicity from the introduction of PEG and the degradation of the copolymer into low molecular weight PEIs. Reaction conditions were carefully controlled to produce water soluble copolymers. Results from a gel retardation assay and zetapotentiometer indicated that complete neutralization of the complexes was achieved at the charge ratios of copolymer/pSV-beta-gal plasmid from 0.8 to 1.0 with the mean particle size of the polyplexes ranging from 129.8+/-0.9 to 151.8+/-3.4 nm. In vitro transfection efficiency of the synthesized copolymer increased up to three times higher than that of starting low molecular weight PEI, while the cell viability was maintained over 80%.

  2. Molecular cloning of complementary DNA: preparation of a plasmid vector with low transformation background.

    PubMed

    Leriche, A; Christophe, D; Brocas, H; Vassart, G

    1983-02-15

    A simple method that allows the rapid preparation of oligo dG-tailed plasmid vectors is presented. The procedure involves purification of the tailed molecules by hybridization to oligo dC-cellulose followed by a stepwise thermal elution. The resulting plasmid is virtually devoid of transformation activity in the absence of oligo dC-tailed DNA fragments. It allows construction of cDNA libraries with as low as 1% of colonies harboring wild-type plasmids.

  3. HIV-1 tropism: a comparison between RNA and proviral DNA in routine clinical samples from Chilean patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV in Chile has a notification rate of 0.01%. Coreceptor antagonists are a family of antiretroviral drugs that are used with the prior knowledge of patients HIV-1 tropism. Viral RNA-based tropism detection requires a plasma viral load ≥1000 copies/mL, while proviral DNA-based detection can be performed regardless of plasma viral load. This test is useful in patients with low or undetectable viral loads and would benefit with a proper therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between HIV RNA and proviral genotypic DNA tropism tests. Findings Forty three Chilean patients were examined using population-based V3 sequencing, and a geno2pheno false-positive rate (FPR) cutoff values of 5, 5.75, 10 and 20%. With cutoff 5.75% a concordance of 88.4% in tropism prediction was found after a simultaneous comparison between HIV tropism assessment by RNA and DNA. In total, five discrepancies (11.6%) were found, 3 patients were RNA-R5/DNA-X4 and two were RNA-X4/DNA-R5. Proviral DNA enabled the prediction of tropism in patients with a low or undetectable viral load. For cutoff 5 and 5.75% genotypic testing using proviral DNA showed a similar sensitivity for X4 as RNA. We found that the highest sensitivity for detecting the X4 strain occurred with proviral DNA and cutoff of 10 and 20%. Viral loads were higher among X4 strain carriers than among R5 strain carriers (p < 0.05). Conclusions A high degree of concordance was found between tropism testing with RNA and testing with proviral DNA. Our results suggest that proviral DNA-based genotypic tropism testing is a useful option for patients with low or undetectable viral load who require a different therapy. PMID:24165156

  4. Sequence specific recognition of HIV-1 dsDNA in the large amount of normal dsDNA based upon nicking enzyme signal amplification and triplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Houya; Zhang, Manjun; Zou, Li; Li, Ruimin; Ling, Liansheng

    2017-10-01

    A sensitive fluorescent strategy for sequence specific recognition of HIV dsDNA was established based upon Nicking Enzyme Signal Amplification (NESA) and triplex formation. dsDNA sequence from the site 7960 to site 7991 of the HIV1 dsDNA gene was designed as target dsDNA, which was composed of two complementary strands Oligonucleotide 1 with the sequence of 3'-CTT CCT TAT CTT CTT CTT CCA CCT CTC TCT CT-5' (Oligo-1) and Oligonucleotide 2 with the sequence of 5'-GAA GGA ATA GAA GAA GAA GGT GGA GAG AGA GA-3' (Oligo-2). As a proof of concept, Oligonucleotide 5'-6-FAM-GAG GTG GAG CTG CGC GAC TCC TCC TCT CTC TCT CTC CAC CTC-BHQ-1-3'(Oligo-4) acted as molecular beacon(MB) probe, Oligonucleotide 5'-CTT CCT TAT CTT CTT CTT CCA AAA GGA GTC GCG-3' (Oligo-7) acted as assistant probe. In the presence of target dsDNA, Oligo-4 and Oligo-7 hybridized with target dsDNA through triplex formation and formed Y-shaped structure, NESA occurred with further addition of Nt.BbvCI, accompanied with the release of fluorescent DNA fragment circularly, resulted in the increase of fluorescence intensity. Under the optimum conditions, the fluorescence intensity was linear with the concentration of target dsDNA over the range from 100pM to 200nM, the linear regression equation was I = 1.266 C + 84.3 (C: nmol/L, R(2) = 0.991), with a detection limit of 65pM. Moreover, the effect of coexisted other dsDNA was investigated as well, and satisfactory results were obtained. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Controlled release of plasmid DNA from hydrogels prepared from gelatin cationized by different amine compounds.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Tomoshige, Ryuji; Iwanaga, Kazunori; Kakemi, Masawo; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2006-05-15

    This paper is an investigation to compare the in vivo controlled release of a plasmid DNA from biodegradable hydrogels prepared from gelatin cationized by different amine compounds, ethylenediamine, putrescine, spermidine, and spermine and the consequent profile of gene expression. Cationized gelatin prepared through the chemical introduction of each amine compound was crosslinked by various concentrations of glutaraldehyde to obtain cationized gelatin hydrogels for the carrier of plasmid DNA release. When the cationized gelatin hydrogels incorporating 125I-labeled plasmid DNA were implanted into the femoral muscle of mice, the radioactivity remaining decreased with time and the retention period of radioactivity prolonged with a decrease in the water content of hydrogels. When 125I-labeled cationized gelatin hydrogels with the higher water content was implanted, the radioactivity remaining was decreased faster with time. The remaining time profile of plasmid DNA radioactivity was in good accordance with that of hydrogel radioactivity, irrespective of the type of cationized gelatin. Following intramuscular implantation, any cationized gelatin hydrogel incorporating plasmid DNA enhanced the expression level of plasmid DNA to a significantly higher extent than the free plasmid DNA injection. In addition, prolonged time period of gene expression was observed although there was no significant difference in the expressed period between the cationized gelatin hydrogels. It was concluded that plasmid DNA of biological activity was released from every cationized gelatin hydrogel accompanied with the in vivo degradation, resulting in enhanced and prolonged gene expression.

  6. A Simple and Inexpensive Method for Sending Binary Vector Plasmid DNA by Mail

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We describe a simple cost-effective technique for the transport of plasmid DNA by mail. Our results demonstrate that common multipurpose printing paper is a satisfactory substrate and superior to the more absorbent 3MM chromatography paper for the transport of plasmid DNA through the U.S. first clas...

  7. Low-Cost Fabrication of Centimetre-Scale Periodic Arrays of Single Plasmid DNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kirkland, Brett; Wang, Zhibin; Zhang, Peipei; Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Lenhert, Steven; Gilbert, David M.

    2013-01-01

    We report development of a low-cost method to generate a centimetre-scale periodic array of single plasmid DNA of 11 kilobase pairs. The arrayed DNA is amenable to enzymatic and physical manipulation. PMID:23824041

  8. Four-tiered pi interaction at the dimeric interface of HIV-1 integrase critical for DNA integration and viral infectivity.

    PubMed

    Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q; Hombrouck, Anneleen; Dayam, Raveendra; Debyser, Zeger; Neamati, Nouri

    2008-08-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme for viral infection. Here, we report an extensive pi electron orbital interaction between four amino acids, W132, M178, F181 and F185, located at the dimeric interface of IN that is critical for the strand transfer activity alone. Catalysis of nine different mutant IN proteins at these positions were evaluated. Whereas the 3'-processing activity is predominantly strong, the strand transfer activity of each enzyme was completely dependent on an intact pi electron orbital interaction at the dimeric interface. Four representative IN mutants were constructed in the context of the infectious NL4.3 HIV-1 viral clone. Whereas viruses with an intact pi electron orbital interaction at the IN dimeric interface replicated comparable to wild type, viruses containing an abolished pi interaction were non-infectious. Q-PCR analysis of viral DNA forms during viral replication revealed pleiotropic effects of most mutations. We hypothesize that the pi interaction is a critical contact point for the assembly of functional IN multimeric complexes, and that IN multimerization is required for a functional pre-integration complex. The rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting the disruption of this pi-pi interaction should lead to powerful anti-retroviral drugs.

  9. DNA topoisomerase IIα inhibitory and anti-HIV-1 flavones from leaves and twigs of Gardenia carinata.

    PubMed

    Kongkum, Naowarat; Tuchinda, Patoomratana; Pohmakotr, Manat; Reutrakul, Vichai; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Jariyawat, Surawat; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Yoosook, Chalobon; Kasisit, Jitra; Napaswad, Chanita

    2012-03-01

    Four new flavones, 5,2'-dihydroxy-7,3',4',5'-tetramethoxyflavone (1), 5,2',5'-trihydroxy-7,3',4'-trimethoxyflavone (2), 5,7,2',5'-tetrahydroxy-6,3',4'-trimethoxyflavone (3) and 5,2',5'-trihydroxy-6,7,3',4'-tetramethoxyflavone (4), along with the known 5,3'-dihydroxy-6,7,4',5'-tetramethoxyflavone (5), 5,7,3',5'-tetrahydroxy-6,4'-dimethoxyflavone (6), syringaldehyde, vanillic acid and scopoletin were isolated from the leaves and twigs of Gardenia carinata (Rubiaceae). Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods. Flavone 2 exhibited cytotoxic activity against P-388 and MCF-7 cell lines, while 3, 5 and 6 were active only in P-388 cell line. All active compounds were found to inhibit DNA topoisomerase IIα activity, which may be responsible for the observed cytotoxicity. Flavones 1-3, 5 and 6 also exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity in the anti-syncytium assay using (∆Tat/rev)MC99 virus and 1A2 cell line system; 2 was most potent. Only flavones 1 and 6 showed considerably activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  10. Four-tiered {pi} interaction at the dimeric interface of HIV-1 integrase critical for DNA integration and viral infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q.; Hombrouck, Anneleen; Dayam, Raveendra; Debyser, Zeger; Neamati, Nouri

    2008-08-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme for viral infection. Here, we report an extensive {pi} electron orbital interaction between four amino acids, W132, M178, F181 and F185, located at the dimeric interface of IN that is critical for the strand transfer activity alone. Catalysis of nine different mutant IN proteins at these positions were evaluated. Whereas the 3'-processing activity is predominantly strong, the strand transfer activity of each enzyme was completely dependent on an intact {pi} electron orbital interaction at the dimeric interface. Four representative IN mutants were constructed in the context of the infectious NL4.3 HIV-1 viral clone. Whereas viruses with an intact {pi} electron orbital interaction at the IN dimeric interface replicated comparable to wild type, viruses containing an abolished {pi} interaction were non-infectious. Q-PCR analysis of viral DNA forms during viral replication revealed pleiotropic effects of most mutations. We hypothesize that the {pi} interaction is a critical contact point for the assembly of functional IN multimeric complexes, and that IN multimerization is required for a functional pre-integration complex. The rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting the disruption of this {pi}-{pi} interaction should lead to powerful anti-retroviral drugs.

  11. Effects of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase connection subdomain mutations on polypurine tract removal and initiation of (+)-strand DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Betancor, Gilberto; Álvarez, Mar; Marcelli, Barbara; Andrés, Cristina; Martínez, Miguel A.; Menéndez-Arias, Luis

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) connection subdomain mutations at positions 348, 369 and 376 have been associated with resistance to non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs). N348I may interfere with the initiation of (+)-strand DNA synthesis by reducing polypurine tract (PPT) removal in the presence of nevirapine. The effect of NNRTIs on the RNase H-mediated cleavage of PPT-containing template-primers has been studied with wild-type HIV-1 RT and mutants N348I, T369I, T369V, T376S and N348I/T369I. In the presence of NNRTIs, all RTs were able to stimulate PPT cleavage after primer elongation. The enhancing effects of nevirapine and efavirenz were reduced in RTs carrying mutation N348I, and specially N348I/T369I. However, those mutations had no effect on rilpivirine-mediated cleavage. Prior to elongation, the PPT remains resilient to cleavage, although efavirenz and rilpivirine facilitate RNase H-mediated trimming of its 3′-end. The integrity of the 3′-end is essential for the initiation of (+)-strand DNA synthesis. In the presence of dNTPs, rilpivirine was the most effective inhibitor of (+)-strand DNA synthesis blocking nucleotide incorporation and preventing usage of available PPT primers. The N348I/T369I RT showed reduced ability to generate short RNA products revealing a cleavage window defect. Its lower RNase H activity could be attributed to enhanced rigidity compared to the wild-type enzyme. PMID:25662223

  12. Interlaboratory concordance of DNA sequence analysis to detect reverse transcriptase mutations in HIV-1 proviral DNA. ACTG Sequencing Working Group. AIDS Clinical Trials Group.

    PubMed

    Demeter, L M; D'Aquila, R; Weislow, O; Lorenzo, E; Erice, A; Fitzgibbon, J; Shafer, R; Richman, D; Howard, T M; Zhao, Y; Fisher, E; Huang, D; Mayers, D; Sylvester, S; Arens, M; Sannerud, K; Rasheed, S; Johnson, V; Kuritzkes, D; Reichelderfer, P; Japour, A

    1998-11-01

    Thirteen laboratories evaluated the reproducibility of sequencing methods to detect drug resistance mutations in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Blinded, cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cell pellets were distributed to each laboratory. Each laboratory used its preferred method for sequencing proviral DNA. Differences in protocols included: DNA purification; number of PCR amplifications; PCR product purification; sequence/location of PCR/sequencing primers; sequencing template; sequencing reaction label; sequencing polymerase; and use of manual versus automated methods to resolve sequencing reaction products. Five unknowns were evaluated. Thirteen laboratories submitted 39043 nucleotide assignments spanning codons 10-256 of HIV-1 RT. A consensus nucleotide assignment (defined as agreement among > or = 75% of laboratories) could be made in over 99% of nucleotide positions, and was more frequent in the three laboratory isolates. The overall rate of discrepant nucleotide assignments was 0.29%. A consensus nucleotide assignment could not be made at RT codon 41 in the clinical isolate tested. Clonal analysis revealed that this was due to the presence of a mixture of wild-type and mutant genotypes. These observations suggest that sequencing methodologies currently in use in ACTG laboratories to sequence HIV-1 RT yield highly concordant results for laboratory strains; however, more discrepancies among laboratories may occur when clinical isolates are tested.

  13. Structural basis for HIV-1 DNA integration in the human genome, role of the LEDGF/P75 cofactor

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Fabrice; Crucifix, Corinne; Granger, Florence; Eiler, Sylvia; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Korolev, Sergei; Agapkina, Julia; Ziganshin, Rustam; Gottikh, Marina; Nazabal, Alexis; Emiliani, Stéphane; Benarous, Richard; Moras, Dino; Schultz, Patrick; Ruff, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Integration of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) cDNA into the human genome is catalysed by integrase. Several studies have shown the importance of the interaction of cellular cofactors with integrase for viral integration and infectivity. In this study, we produced a stable and functional complex between the wild-type full-length integrase (IN) and the cellular cofactor LEDGF/p75 that shows enhanced in vitro integration activity compared with the integrase alone. Mass spectrometry analysis and the fitting of known atomic structures in cryo negatively stain electron microscopy (EM) maps revealed that the functional unit comprises two asymmetric integrase dimers and two LEDGF/p75 molecules. In the presence of DNA, EM revealed the DNA-binding sites and indicated that, in each asymmetric dimer, one integrase molecule performs the catalytic reaction, whereas the other one positions the viral DNA in the active site of the opposite dimer. The positions of the target and viral DNAs for the 3′ processing and integration reaction shed light on the integration mechanism, a process with wide implications for the understanding of viral-induced pathologies. PMID:19229293

  14. Sanger and Next-Generation Sequencing data for characterization of CTL epitopes in archived HIV-1 proviral DNA.

    PubMed

    Tumiotto, Camille; Riviere, Lionel; Bellecave, Pantxika; Recordon-Pinson, Patricia; Vilain-Parce, Alice; Guidicelli, Gwenda-Line; Fleury, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    One of the strategies for curing viral HIV-1 is a therapeutic vaccine involving the stimulation of cytotoxic CD8-positive T cells (CTL) that are Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA)-restricted. The lack of efficiency of previous vaccination strategies may have been due to the immunogenic peptides used, which could be different from a patient's virus epitopes and lead to a poor CTL response. To counteract this lack of specificity, conserved epitopes must be targeted. One alternative is to gather as many data as possible from a large number of patients on their HIV-1 proviral archived epitope variants, taking into account their genetic background to select the best presented CTL epitopes. In order to process big data generated by Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) of the DNA of HIV-infected patients, we have developed a software package called TutuGenetics. This tool combines an alignment derived either from Sanger or NGS files, HLA typing, target gene and a CTL epitope list as input files. It allows automatic translation after correction of the alignment obtained between the HxB2 reference and the reads, followed by automatic calculation of the MHC IC50 value for each epitope variant and the HLA allele of the patient by using NetMHCpan 3.0, resulting in a csv file as output result. We validated this new tool by comparing Sanger and NGS (454, Roche) sequences obtained from the proviral DNA of patients at success of ART included in the Provir Latitude 45 study and showed a 90% correlation between the quantitative results of NGS and Sanger. This automated analysis combined with complementary samples should yield more data regarding the archived CTL epitopes according to the patients' HLA alleles and will be useful for screening epitopes that in theory are presented efficiently to the HLA groove, thus constituting promising immunogenic peptides for a therapeutic vaccine.

  15. Separation of topological forms of plasmid DNA by anion-exchange HPLC: shifts in elution order of linear DNA.

    PubMed

    Smith, Clara R; DePrince, Randolph B; Dackor, Jennifer; Weigl, Debra; Griffith, Jack; Persmark, Magnus

    2007-07-01

    We sought to establish a single anion-exchange HPLC method for the separation of linear, open circular and supercoiled plasmid topoisomers using purified topoisomeric forms of three plasmids (3.0, 5.5 and 7.6 kb). However, finding one condition proved elusive as the topoisomer elution order was determined to depend on salt gradient slope. The observed change in selectivity increased with plasmid size and was most pronounced for the linear form. Indeed, the elution order of the linear 7.6 kb plasmid was reversed relative to the supercoiled form. This observation may have implications for methods used in quality control of plasmid DNA.

  16. HIV-1 uses dynamic capsid pores to import nucleotides and fuel encapsidated DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, David A.; McEwan, William A.; Hilditch, Laura; Price, Amanda J.; Towers, Greg J.; James, Leo C.

    2016-01-01

    During the early stages of infection, the HIV-1 capsid protects viral components from cytosolic sensors, such as cGAS, and nucleases, such as TREX, while allowing access to nucleotides for efficient reverse transcription1. Here we show that each capsid hexamer has a size-selective pore bounded by a ring of six arginine residues and a ‘molecular iris’ formed by the N-terminal β-hairpin. The arginine ring creates a strongly positively charged channel that recruits the four nucleotides with on-rates that near diffusion limits. Progressive removal of pore arginines results in a dose-dependent and concomitant decrease in nucleotide affinity, reverse transcription and infectivity. This positively charged channel is universally conserved in lentiviral capsids despite the fact that it is strongly destabilising without nucleotides to counteract charge repulsion. We also describe a channel inhibitor, hexacarboxybenzene, which competes for nucleotide binding and efficiently blocks encapsidated reverse transcription demonstrating the tractability of the pore as a novel drug target. PMID:27509857

  17. HIV-1 uses dynamic capsid pores to import nucleotides and fuel encapsidated DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jacques, David A; McEwan, William A; Hilditch, Laura; Price, Amanda J; Towers, Greg J; James, Leo C

    2016-08-18

    During the early stages of infection, the HIV-1 capsid protects viral components from cytosolic sensors and nucleases such as cGAS and TREX, respectively, while allowing access to nucleotides for efficient reverse transcription. Here we show that each capsid hexamer has a size-selective pore bound by a ring of six arginine residues and a 'molecular iris' formed by the amino-terminal β-hairpin. The arginine ring creates a strongly positively charged channel that recruits the four nucleotides with on-rates that approach diffusion limits. Progressive removal of pore arginines results in a dose-dependent and concomitant decrease in nucleotide affinity, reverse transcription and infectivity. This positively charged channel is universally conserved in lentiviral capsids despite the fact that it is strongly destabilizing without nucleotides to counteract charge repulsion. We also describe a channel inhibitor, hexacarboxybenzene, which competes for nucleotide binding and efficiently blocks encapsidated reverse transcription, demonstrating the tractability of the pore as a novel drug target.

  18. Source identification in two criminal cases using phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Scaduto, Diane I.; Brown, Jeremy M.; Haaland, Wade C.; Zwickl, Derrick J.; Hillis, David M.; Metzker, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis has been widely used to test the a priori hypothesis of epidemiological clustering in suspected transmission chains of HIV-1. Among studies showing strong support for relatedness between HIV samples obtained from infected individuals, evidence for the direction of transmission between epidemiologically related pairs has been lacking. During transmission of HIV, a genetic bottleneck occurs, resulting in the paraphyly of source viruses with respect to those of the recipient. This paraphyly establishes the direction of transmission, from which the source can then be inferred. Here, we present methods and results from two criminal cases, State of Washington v Anthony Eugene Whitfield, case number 04-1-0617-5 (Superior Court of the State of Washington, Thurston County, 2004) and State of Texas v Philippe Padieu, case numbers 219-82276-07, 219-82277-07, 219-82278-07, 219-82279-07, 219-82280-07, and 219-82705-07 (219th Judicial District Court, Collin County, TX, 2009), which provided evidence that direction can be established from blinded case samples. The observed paraphyly from each case study led to the identification of an inferred source (i.e., index case), whose identity was revealed at trial to be that of the defendant. PMID:21078965

  19. HIV vaccine update. DNA vaccination: a promising candidate for a vaccine against HIV-1?

    PubMed

    Van Der Ryst, E

    1996-01-01

    According to animal studies, DNA vaccines employ the genes encoding proteins of pathogens or tumors, in contrast to the more conventional vaccine approaches. In addition, DNA vaccinations do not involve infectious agents, proteins are expressed in their natural form resulting to better recognition of viral proteins by the antibodies, and both strong and durable cellular immune responses as well as neutralizing antibodies are induced. Altogether, this makes DNA vaccinations one of the most promising future candidates in the field of HIV vaccines. However, safety of DNA vaccines should be examined before these vaccines can be considered for large-scale clinical trials in humans. The question of a possible induction of anti-DNA antibodies, with the consequent development of autoimmune manifestations is emphasized. Another is the possible integration of DNA with insertional mutagenesis, which could lead to tumor formation and development of immunologic tolerance of antigen production persists.

  20. High-frequency transformation of Brevibacterium lactofermentum protoplasts by plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, R I; Gil, J A; Martin, J F

    1985-04-01

    An efficient polyethylene glycol-assisted method for transformation of Brevibacterium lactofermentum protoplasts that uses plasmid vectors has been developed. Two small plasmids, pUL330 (5.2 kilobases) and pUL340 (5.8 kilobases), both containing the kanamycin resistance gene from transposon Tn5 and the replication origin of the natural plasmid pBL1 of B. lactofermentum, were selected as vectors. Supercoiled forms of the plasmids yielded a 100-fold higher transformation frequency than did linear forms. The optimal transformation frequency was achieved with 10 ng of DNA in 1 ml of transformation buffer. Higher concentrations of plasmid DNA resulted in a decrease in transformation frequency per microgram of DNA. Optimal transformation was obtained with 25 to 35% polyethylene glycol 6000. Under optimal conditions, 10(6) transformants per microgram of DNA were obtained.

  1. Different Mutagenic Potential of HIV-1 Restriction Factors APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F Is Determined by Distinct Single-Stranded DNA Scanning Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ara, Anjuman; Love, Robin P.; Chelico, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The APOBEC3 deoxycytidine deaminase family functions as host restriction factors that can block replication of Vif (virus infectivity factor) deficient HIV-1 virions to differing degrees by deaminating cytosines to uracils in single-stranded (−)HIV-1 DNA. Upon replication of the (−)DNA to (+)DNA, the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase incorporates adenines opposite the uracils, thereby inducing C/G→T/A mutations that can functionally inactivate HIV-1. Although both APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G are expressed in cell types HIV-1 infects and are suppressed by Vif, there has been no prior biochemical analysis of APOBEC3F, in contrast to APOBEC3G. Using synthetic DNA substrates, we characterized APOBEC3F and found that similar to APOBEC3G; it is a processive enzyme and can deaminate at least two cytosines in a single enzyme-substrate encounter. However, APOBEC3F scanning movement is distinct from APOBEC3G, and relies on jumping rather than both jumping and sliding. APOBEC3F jumping movements were also different from APOBEC3G. The lack of sliding movement from APOBEC3F is due to an 190NPM192 motif, since insertion of this motif into APOBEC3G decreases its sliding movements. The APOBEC3G NPM mutant induced significantly less mutations in comparison to wild-type APOBEC3G in an in vitro model HIV-1 replication assay and single-cycle infectivity assay, indicating that differences in DNA scanning were relevant to restriction of HIV-1. Conversely, mutation of the APOBEC3F 191Pro to 191Gly enables APOBEC3F sliding movements to occur. Although APOBEC3F 190NGM192 could slide, the enzyme did not induce more mutagenesis than wild-type APOBEC3F, demonstrating that the unique jumping mechanism of APOBEC3F abrogates the influence of sliding on mutagenesis. Overall, we demonstrate key differences in the impact of APOBEC3F- and APOBEC3G-induced mutagenesis on HIV-1 that supports a model in which both the processive DNA scanning mechanism and preferred deamination motif (APOBEC3F, 5

  2. Engineering of bacterial strains and vectors for the production of plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Bower, Diana M; Prather, Kristala L J

    2009-04-01

    The demand for plasmid DNA (pDNA) is anticipated to increase significantly as DNA vaccines and non-viral gene therapies enter phase 3 clinical trials and are approved for use. This increased demand, along with renewed interest in pDNA as a therapeutic vector, has motivated research targeting the design of high-yield, cost-effective manufacturing processes. An important aspect of this research is engineering bacterial strains and plasmids that are specifically suited to the production of plasmid biopharmaceuticals. This review will survey recent innovations in strain and vector engineering that aim to improve plasmid stability, enhance product safety, increase yield, and facilitate downstream purification. While these innovations all seek to enhance pDNA production, they can vary in complexity from subtle alterations of the host genome or vector backbone to the investigation of non-traditional host strains for higher pDNA yields.

  3. Plasmid-like replicative intermediates of the Epstein-Barr virus lytic origin of DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Pfüller, R; Hammerschmidt, W

    1996-01-01

    During the lytic phase of herpesviruses, intermediates of viral DNA replication are found as large concatemeric molecules in the infected cells. It is not known, however, what the early events in viral DNA replication that yield these concatemers are. In an attempt to identify these early steps of DNA replication, replicative intermediates derived from the lytic origin of Epstein-Barr virus, oriLyt, were analyzed. As shown by density shift experiments with bromodeoxyuridine, oriLyt replicated semiconservatively soon after induction of the lytic cycle and oriLyt-containing DNA is amplified to yield monomeric plasmid progeny DNA (besides multimeric forms and high-molecular-weight DNA). A new class of plasmid progeny DNA which have far fewer negative supercoils than do plasmids extracted from uninduced cells is present only in cells undergoing the lytic cycle of Epstein-Barr virus. This finding is consistent with plasmid DNAs having fewer nucleosomes before extraction. The newly replicated plasmid DNAs are dependent on a functional oriLyt in cis and support an efficient marker transfer into Escherichia coli as monomeric plasmids. Multimeric forms of presumably circular progeny DNA of oriLyt, as well as detected recombination events, indicate that oriLyt-mediated DNA replication is biphasic: an early theta-like mode is followed by a complex pattern which could result from rolling-circle DNA replication. PMID:8648674

  4. Ultrasound enhancement of in vitro transfection of plasmid DNA by a cationized gelatin.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Aoyama, Teruyoshi; Ogawa, Osamu; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2002-05-01

    In vitro transfection efficiency of a plasmid DNA for rat gastric mucosal (RGM)-1 cells was enhanced by ultrasound (US) irradiation. Ethylenediamine was introduced to the carboxyl groups of gelatin to prepare a cationized gelatin as the vector of plasmid DNA encoding luciferase. An electrophoresis experiment revealed that the cationized gelatin was mixed with plasmid DNA at the weight ratio of 5.0 to form a cationized gelatin-plasmid DNA complex. The complex obtained was about 200nm in diameter with a positive charge. When incubated with the cationized gelatin-plasmid DNA complex and subsequently exposed to US, RGM-1 cells exhibited a significantly enhanced luciferase activity although the extent increased with an increase in the DNA concentration, in contrast to the cationized gelatin alone with or without US irradiation and US irradiation alone. US irradiation was also effective in enhancing the activity by free plasmid DNA although the extent was less than that of the complex. The US-induced enhancement of luciferase activity was influenced by the exposure time period, frequency, and intensity of US. The activity enhancement became higher to be significant at the irradiation time period of 60 s and thereafter decreased. A series of cytotoxicity experiments revealed that an increase in the irradiation time period and intensity of US decreased the viability of cells themselves. It is possible that US irradiation under an appropriate condition enables cells to accelerate the permeation of the cationized gelatin-plasmid DNA complex through the cell membrane, resulted in enhanced transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA. These findings clearly indicate that US exposure is a simple and promising method to enhance the gene expression of plasmid DNA.

  5. Rapid identification of intact bacterial resistance plasmids via optical mapping of single DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Lena K; Quaderi, Saair; Emilsson, Gustav; Karami, Nahid; Lagerstedt, Erik; Müller, Vilhelm; Noble, Charleston; Hammarberg, Susanna; Nilsson, Adam N; Sjöberg, Fei; Fritzsche, Joachim; Kristiansson, Erik; Sandegren, Linus; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-07-27

    The rapid spread of antibiotic resistance - currently one of the greatest threats to human health according to WHO - is to a large extent enabled by plasmid-mediated horizontal transfer of resistance genes. Rapid identification and characterization of plasmids is thus important both for individual clinical outcomes and for epidemiological monitoring of antibiotic resistance. Toward this aim, we have developed an optical DNA mapping procedure where individual intact plasmids are elongated within nanofluidic channels and visualized through fluorescence microscopy, yielding barcodes that reflect the underlying sequence. The assay rapidly identifies plasmids through statistical comparisons with barcodes based on publicly available sequence repositories and also enables detection of structural variations. Since the assay yields holistic sequence information for individual intact plasmids, it is an ideal complement to next generation sequencing efforts which involve reassembly of sequence reads from fragmented DNA molecules. The assay should be applicable in microbiology labs around the world in applications ranging from fundamental plasmid biology to clinical epidemiology and diagnostics.

  6. Replication of a low-copy-number plasmid by a plasmid DNA-membrane complex extracted from minicells of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Firshein, W; Strumph, P; Benjamin, P; Burnstein, K; Kornacki, J

    1982-01-01

    A DNA-membrane complex was extracted from minicells of an Escherichia coli mutant harboring a "miniplasmid" derivative (11.2 kilobases) of the low-copynumber plasmid RK2 (56 kilobases). The complex contained various species of supercoiled and intermediate forms of plasmid DNA, of which approximately 20% was bound firmly to the membrane after centrifugation in a CsCl density gradient. The plasmid DNA-membrane complex synthesized new plasmid DNA without the addition of exogenous template, enzymes, or other proteins. DNA synthesis appeared to proceed semi-conservatively, was dependent on the four deoxynucleoside triphosphates, partially dependent on ribonucleoside triphosphates, and was sensitive to rifampin, an antibiotic known to inhibit initiation of replication. Novobiocin and nalidixic acid also inhibited synthesis, as did the omission of ATP, N-Ethylmaleimide, an inhibitor of DNA polymerase II and III activity, but not DNA polymerase I activity, also partially inhibited the synthetic reaction, as did chloramphenicol. The plasmid DNA synthetic product was analyzed by alkaline sucrose and dye-CsCl gradient centrifugation, as well as by agarose gel electrophoresis. In each case, the product consisted of parental and intermediate forms of plasmid DNA. Some chromosomal DNA was also synthesized by a contaminating bacterial DNA-membrane complex, but this synthesis was rifampin insensitive and could be separated from plasmid DNA synthesis. PMID:7042688

  7. Catalytically-active complex of HIV-1 integrase with a viral DNA substrate binds anti-integrase drugs

    PubMed Central

    Alian, Akram; Griner, Sarah L.; Chiang, Vicki; Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg; Birkus, Gabriel; Geleziunas, Romas; Leavitt, Andrew D.; Stroud, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 integration into the host cell genome is a multistep process catalyzed by the virally-encoded integrase (IN) protein. In view of the difficulty of obtaining a stable DNA-bound IN at high concentration as required for structure determination, we selected IN–DNA complexes that form disulfide linkages between 5′-thiolated DNA and several single mutations to cysteine around the catalytic site of IN. Mild reducing conditions allowed for selection of the most thermodynamically-stable disulfide-linked species. The most stable complexes induce tetramer formation of IN, as happens during the physiological integration reaction, and are able to catalyze the strand transfer step of retroviral integration. One of these complexes also binds strand-transfer inhibitors of HIV antiviral drugs, making it uniquely valuable among the mutants of this set for understanding portions of the integration reaction. This novel complex may help define substrate interactions and delineate the mechanism of action of known integration inhibitors. PMID:19416821

  8. Enhanced recognition of hydroxyl radical modified plasmid DNA by circulating cancer antibodies.

    PubMed

    Khan, F; Ali, A; Ali, R

    2005-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in various human diseases which are also responsible for the elimination of invading pathogens. In disease state and inflammatory responses, the excess of these radicals damage cellular macromolecules. DNA is susceptible to attacks by OH-induced damage. Oxidative DNA damage is an important factor in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In the present study, purified plasmid Bluescript DNA was modified by hydroxyl radical. Modifications incurred in DNA were characterized by physico-chemical techniques. Sera from patients of cancer were studied for their binding to native and hydroxyl radical modified plasmid DNA. Direct binding ELISA and competition binding results indicated that autoantibodies in cancer showed higher recognition to ROS-plasmid DNA as compared to the native form. Retarded mobility of the immune complex formation between IgG isolated from cancer sera using native and ROS-plasmid DNA as antigens reiterated preferential recognition of modified plasmid DNA by cancer autoantibodies. Therefore, it can be concluded that circulating autoantibodies in cancer sera bind preferentially to ROS-plasmid DNA as compared to native polymer. The data presented in the present communication suggest a role of ROS in the etiology of cancer.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroup A Decreases the Risk of Drug Addiction but Conversely Increases the Risk of HIV-1 Infection in Chinese Addicts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A-Mei; Hu, Qiu-Xiang; Liu, Feng-Liang; Bi, Rui; Yang, Bi-Qing; Zhang, Wen; Guo, Hao; Logan, Ian; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-08-01

    Drug addiction is one of the most serious social problems in the world today and addicts are always at a high risk of acquiring HIV infection. Mitochondrial impairment has been reported in both drug addicts and in HIV patients undergoing treatment. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup could affect the risk of drug addiction and HIV-1 infection in Chinese. We analyzed mtDNA sequence variations of 577 Chinese intravenous drug addicts (289 with HIV-1 infection and 288 without) and compared with 2 control populations (n = 362 and n = 850). We quantified the viral load in HIV-1-infected patients with and without haplogroup A status and investigated the potential effect of haplogroup A defining variants m.4824A > G and m.8794C > T on the cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels by using an allotopic expression assay. mtDNA haplogroup A had a protective effect against drug addiction but appeared to confer an increased risk of HIV infection in addicts. HIV-1-infected addicts with haplogroup A had a trend for a higher viral load, although the mean viral load was similar between carriers of haplogroup A and those with other haplogroup. Hela cells overexpressing allele m.8794 T showed significantly decreased ROS levels as compared to cells with the allele m.8794C (P = 0.03). Our results suggested that mtDNA haplogroup A might protect against drug addiction but increase the risk of HIV-1 infection. The contradictory role of haplogroup A might be caused by an alteration in mitochondrial function due to a particular mtDNA ancestral variant.

  10. A protein ballet around the viral genome orchestrated by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase leads to an architectural switch: from nucleocapsid-condensed RNA to Vpr-bridged DNA.

    PubMed

    Lyonnais, Sébastien; Gorelick, Robert J; Heniche-Boukhalfa, Fatima; Bouaziz, Serge; Parissi, Vincent; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Restle, Tobias; Gatell, Jose Maria; Le Cam, Eric; Mirambeau, Gilles

    2013-02-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcription is achieved in the newly infected cell before viral DNA (vDNA) nuclear import. Reverse transcriptase (RT) has previously been shown to function as a molecular motor, dismantling the nucleocapsid complex that binds the viral genome as soon as plus-strand DNA synthesis initiates. We first propose a detailed model of this dismantling in close relationship with the sequential conversion from RNA to double-stranded (ds) DNA, focusing on the nucleocapsid protein (NCp7). The HIV-1 DNA-containing pre-integration complex (PIC) resulting from completion of reverse transcription is translocated through the nuclear pore. The PIC nucleoprotein architecture is poorly understood but contains at least two HIV-1 proteins initially from the virion core, namely integrase (IN) and the viral protein r (Vpr). We next present a set of electron micrographs supporting that Vpr behaves as a DNA architectural protein, initiating multiple DNA bridges over more than 500 base pairs (bp). These complexes are shown to interact with NCp7 bound to single-stranded nucleic acid regions that are thought to maintain IN binding during dsDNA synthesis, concurrently with nucleocapsid complex dismantling. This unexpected binding of Vpr conveniently leads to a compacted but filamentous folding of the vDNA that should favor its nuclear import. Finally, nucleocapsid-like aggregates engaged in dsDNA synthesis appear to efficiently bind to F-actin filaments, a property that may be involved in targeting complexes to the nuclear envelope. More generally, this article highlights unique possibilities offered by in vitro reconstitution approaches combined with macromolecular imaging to gain insights into the mechanisms that alter the nucleoprotein architecture of the HIV-1 genome, ultimately enabling its insertion into the nuclear chromatin.

  11. Comparing Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell DNA and Circulating Plasma viral RNA pol Genotypes of Subtype C HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Banks, Lauren; Gholamin, Sharareh; White, Elizabeth; Zijenah, Lynn; Katzenstein, David A

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Drug resistance mutations (DRM) in viral RNA are important in defining to provide effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-1 infected patients. Detection of DRM in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) DNA is another source of information, although the clinical significance of DRMs in proviral DNA is less clear. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From 25 patients receiving ART at a center in Zimbabwe, 32 blood samples were collected. Dideoxy-sequencing of gag-pol identified subtype and resistance mutations from plasma viral RNA and proviral DNA. Drug resistance was estimated using the calibrated population resistance tool on www.hivdb.stanford.edu database. Numerical resistance scores were calculated for all antiretroviral drugs and for the subjects' reported regimen. Phylogenetic analysis as maximum likelihood was performed to determine the evolutionary distance between sequences. RESULTS: Of the 25 patients, 4 patients (2 of which had given 2 blood samples) were not known to be on ART (NA) and had exclusively wild-type virus, 17 had received Protease inhibitors (PI), 18, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) and 19, two or more nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI). Of the 17 with history of PI, 10 had PI mutations, 5 had minor differences between mutations in RNA and DNA. Eighteen samples had NNRTI mutations, six of which demonstrated some discordance between DNA and RNA mutations. Although NRTI resistance mutations were frequently different between analyses, mutations resulted in very similar estimated phenotypes as measured by resistance scores. The numerical resistance scores from RNA and DNA for PIs differed between 2/10, for NNRTIs between 8/18, and for NRTIs between 17/32 pairs. When calculated resistance scores were collapsed, 3 pairs showed discordance between RNA and DNA for at least one PI, 6 were discordant for at least one NNRTI and 11 for at least one NRTI. Regarding phylogenetic evolutionary analysis, all

  12. Plasmid-Chromosome Recombination of Irradiated Shuttle Vector DNA in African Green Monkey Kidney Cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudgett, John Stuart

    1987-09-01

    An autonomously replicating shuttle vector was used to investigate the enhancement of plasmid-chromosome recombination in mammalian host cells by ultraviolet light and gamma radiation. Sequences homologous to the shuttle vector were stably inserted into the genome of African Green Monkey kidney cells to act as the target substrate for these recombination events. The SV40- and pBR322-derived plasmid DNA was irradiated with various doses of radiation before transfection into the transformed mammalian host cells. The successful homologous transfer of the bacterial ampicillin resistance (amp^{rm r}) gene from the inserted sequences to replace a mutant amp^->=ne on the shuttle vector was identified by plasmid extraction and transformation into E. coli host cells. Ultraviolet light (UV) was found not to induce homologous plasmid-chromosome recombination, while gamma radiation increased the frequency of recombinant plasmids detected. The introduction of specific double -strand breaks in the plasmid or prolonging the time of plasmid residence in the mammalian host cells also enhanced plasmid-chromosome recombination. In contrast, plasmid mutagenesis was found to be increased by plasmid UV irradiation, but not to change with time. Plasmid survival, recombination, and mutagenesis were not affected by treating the mammalian host cells with UV light prior to plasmid transfection. The amp^{rm r} recombinant plasmid molecules analyzed were found to be mostly the result of nonconservative exchanges which appeared to involve both homologous and possibly nonhomologous interactions with the host chromosome. The observation that these recombinant structures were obtained from all of the plasmid alterations investigated suggests a common mechanistic origin for plasmid -chromosome recombination in these mammalian cells.

  13. A simple and rapid DNA extraction method from whole blood for highly sensitive detection and quantitation of HIV-1 proviral DNA by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    McFall, Sally M; Wagner, Robin L; Jangam, Sujit R; Yamada, Douglas H; Hardie, Diana; Kelso, David M

    2015-03-01

    Early diagnosis and access to treatment for infants with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is critical to reduce infant mortality. The lack of simple point-of-care tests impedes the timely initiation of antiretroviral therapy. The development of FINA, filtration isolation of nucleic acids, a novel DNA extraction method that can be performed by clinic personnel in less than 2 min has been reported previously. In this report, significant improvements in the DNA extraction and amplification methods are detailed that allow sensitive quantitation of as little as 10 copies of HIV-1 proviral DNA and detection of 3 copies extracted from 100 μl of whole blood. An internal control to detect PCR inhibition was also incorporated. In a preliminary field evaluation of 61 South African infants, the FINA test demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity. The proviral copy number of the infant specimens was quantified, and it was established that 100 microliters of whole blood is required for sensitive diagnosis of infants.

  14. Quantification of plasmid DNA copies in the nucleus after lipoplex and polyplex transfection.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Richard N; van der Aa, Marieke A E M; Macaraeg, Nichole; Lee, Ai Ping; Szoka, Francis C

    2009-04-17

    Nuclear uptake of plasmid DNA is one of the many cellular barriers that limit the efficiency of non-viral gene delivery systems. We have determined the number of plasmids that reach the nucleus of a transfected cell using an internally standardized quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay. We isolated nuclei using two different protocols: a density gradient technique and a detergent-based method. The density gradient procedure yielded nuclei with substantially less adhering plasmids on the outside of the nuclei. Using the density gradient protocol we determined that cells transfected with Lipofectamine lipoplexes or polyethylenimine polyplexes contained between 75 and 50,000 plasmids/nucleus, depending on the applied plasmid dose. Any increase above 3000 plasmids/nucleus resulted in only marginal increases in transgene expression. Furthermore, lipoplex-delivered plasmids were more efficiently expressed, on the basis of protein expression per plasmid number in the nucleus, than polyplex-delivered plasmids. This indicates that polymer may remain bound to some plasmids in the nucleus. Lastly, by sorting transfected cells into high- and low-expressing sub-populations, we observe that a sub-population of cells contain 3x greater plasmids/nucleus but express nearly 100x more transgene than other cells within a single transfection reaction. Taken together these results suggest the importance of considering the processes downstream from nuclear entry for strategies to improve the efficiency of gene transfer reagents.

  15. 3G vector-primer plasmid for constructing full-length-enriched cDNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dong; Zhou, Yanna; Zhang, Zidong; Li, Zaiyu; Liu, Xuedong

    2008-09-01

    We designed a 3G vector-primer plasmid for the generation of full-length-enriched complementary DNA (cDNA) libraries. By employing the terminal transferase activity of reverse transcriptase and the modified strand replacement method, this plasmid (assembled with a polydT end and a deoxyguanosine [dG] end) combines priming full-length cDNA strand synthesis and directional cDNA cloning. As a result, the number of steps involved in cDNA library preparation is decreased while simplifying downstream gene manipulation, sequencing, and subcloning. The 3G vector-primer plasmid method yields fully represented plasmid primed libraries that are equivalent to those made by the SMART (switching mechanism at 5' end of RNA transcript) approach.

  16. Differential interactions of plasmid DNA, RNA and genomic DNA with amino acid-based affinity matrices.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Angela; Sousa, Fani; Queiroz, João A

    2010-09-01

    The development of a strategy to plasmid DNA (pDNA) purification has become necessary for the development of gene therapy and DNA vaccine production processes in recent years, since this nucleic acid and most of contaminants, such as RNA, genomic DNA and endotoxins, are negatively charged. An ideal separation methodology may be achieved with the use of affinity interactions between immobilized amino acids and nucleic acids. In this study, the binding behaviour of nucleic acids under the influence of different environmental conditions, such as the composition and ionic strength of elution buffer, and the temperature, is compared with various amino acids immobilized on chromatography resins. Supercoiled (sc) plasmid isoform was isolated with all matrices used, but in some cases preferential interactions with other nucleic acids were found. Particularly, lysine chromatography showed to be an ideal technology mainly on RNA purification using low salt concentration. On the other hand, arginine ligands have shown a greater ability to retain the sc isoform comparatively to the other nucleic acids retention, becoming this support more adequate to sc pDNA purification. The temperature variation, competitive elution and oligonucleotides affinity studies also allowed to recognize the dominant interactions inherent to biorecognition of pDNA molecule and the affinity matrices.

  17. Upstream processing of plasmid DNA for vaccine and gene therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Tejeda-Mansir, Armando; Montesinos, Rosa M

    2008-01-01

    The demand for plasmid DNA has increased vastly in response to rapid advances in its use in gene therapy and vaccines. These therapies are based on the same principle, i.e. the introduction of nucleic acids in human/non-human cells receptor to restore, cancel, enhance or introduce a biochemical function. Naked plasmid DNA as a vector has attracted a lot of interest since it offers several advantages over a viral vector, especially weak immunogenicity, better safety and easy to manufacture, but low transfection efficacy. Non-viral gene therapy may require considerable amounts (milligram scale) of pharmaceutical-grade pDNA per patient since the efficacy and duration of gene expression is presently relatively low. Reliance on fermentation, which generates large lysate volumes, for producing the needed quantities of pDNA is becoming more widespread. Through optimization of the biological system, growth environment and the growth mode, improvements can be achieved in biomass productivity, plasmid yield, plasmid quality and production costs. The information on large-scale plasmid production is scarce and usually not available to the scientific community. This review summarizes recent patents and patent applications relating to plasmid upstream processing manufacturing, ranging from plasmid design to growth strategies to produce plasmid-bearing E. coli.

  18. UV-inactivated vaccinia virus (VV) in a multi-envelope DNA-VV-protein (DVP) HIV-1 vaccine protects macaques from lethal challenge with heterologous SHIV.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bart G; Sealy, Robert E; Zhan, Xiaoyan; Freiden, Pamela J; Surman, Sherri L; Blanchard, James L; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2012-05-02

    The pandemic of HIV-1 has continued for decades, yet there remains no licensed vaccine. Previous research has demonstrated the effectiveness of a multi-envelope, multi-vectored HIV-1 vaccine in a macaque-SHIV model, illustrating a potential means of combating HIV-1. Specifically, recombinant DNA, vaccinia virus (VV) and purified protein (DVP) delivery systems were used to vaccinate animals with dozens of antigenically distinct HIV-1 envelopes for induction of immune breadth. The vaccinated animals controlled disease following challenge with a heterologous SHIV. This demonstration suggested that the antigenic cocktail vaccine strategy, which has succeeded in several other vaccine fields (e.g. pneumococcus), might also succeed against HIV-1. The strategy remains untested in an advanced clinical study, in part due to safety concerns associated with the use of replication-competent VV. To address this concern, we designed a macaque study in which psoralen/ultraviolet light-inactivated VV (UV VV) was substituted for replication-competent VV in the multi-envelope DVP protocol. Control animals received a vaccine encompassing no VV, or no vaccine. All VV vaccinated animals generated an immune response toward VV, and all vaccinated animals generated an immune response toward HIV-1 envelope. After challenge with heterologous SHIV 89.6P, animals that received replication-competent VV or UV VV experienced similar outcomes. They exhibited reduced peak viral loads, maintenance of CD4+ T cell counts and improved survival compared to control animals that received no VV or no vaccine; there were 0/15 deaths among all animals that received VV and 5/9 deaths among controls. Results define a practical means of improving VV safety, and encourage advancement of a promising multi-envelope DVP HIV-1 vaccine candidate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Protein expression from unintegrated HIV-1 DNA introduces bias in primary in vitro post-integration latency models.

    PubMed

    Bonczkowski, Pawel; De Scheerder, Marie-Angélique; Malatinkova, Eva; Borch, Alexandra; Melkova, Zora; Koenig, Renate; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Vandekerckhove, Linos

    2016-12-02

    To understand the persistence of latently HIV-1 infected cells in virally suppressed infected patients, a number of in vitro models of HIV latency have been developed. In an attempt to mimic the in vivo situation as closely as possible, several models use primary cells and replication-competent viruses in combination with antiretroviral compounds to prevent ongoing replication. Latency is subsequently measured by HIV RNA and/or protein production after cellular activation. To discriminate between pre- and post-integration latency, integrase inhibitors are routinely used, preventing novel integrations upon cellular activation. Here, we show that this choice of antiretrovirals may still cause a bias of pre-integration latency in these models, as unintegrated HIV DNA can form and directly contribute to the levels of HIV RNA and protein production. We further show that the addition of reverse transcriptase inhibitors effectively suppresses the levels of episomal HIV DNA (as measured by 2-LTR circles) and decreases the levels of HIV transcription. Consequently, we show that latency levels described in models that only use integrase inhibitors may be overestimated. The inclusion of additional control conditions, such as 2-LTR quantification and the addition of reverse transcriptase inhibitors, is crucial to fully elucidate the actual levels of post-integration latency.

  20. Protein expression from unintegrated HIV-1 DNA introduces bias in primary in vitro post-integration latency models

    PubMed Central

    Bonczkowski, Pawel; De Scheerder, Marie-Angélique; Malatinkova, Eva; Borch, Alexandra; Melkova, Zora; Koenig, Renate; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Vandekerckhove, Linos

    2016-01-01

    To understand the persistence of latently HIV-1 infected cells in virally suppressed infected patients, a number of in vitro models of HIV latency have been developed. In an attempt to mimic the in vivo situation as closely as possible, several models use primary cells and replication-competent viruses in combination with antiretroviral compounds to prevent ongoing replication. Latency is subsequently measured by HIV RNA and/or protein production after cellular activation. To discriminate between pre- and post-integration latency, integrase inhibitors are routinely used, preventing novel integrations upon cellular activation. Here, we show that this choice of antiretrovirals may still cause a bias of pre-integration latency in these models, as unintegrated HIV DNA can form and directly contribute to the levels of HIV RNA and protein production. We further show that the addition of reverse transcriptase inhibitors effectively suppresses the levels of episomal HIV DNA (as measured by 2-LTR circles) and decreases the levels of HIV transcription. Consequently, we show that latency levels described in models that only use integrase inhibitors may be overestimated. The inclusion of additional control conditions, such as 2-LTR quantification and the addition of reverse transcriptase inhibitors, is crucial to fully elucidate the actual levels of post-integration latency. PMID:27910923

  1. Mechanistic basis of plasmid-specific DNA binding of the F plasmid regulatory protein, TraM.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yun; Lu, Jun; Wong, Joyce J W; Edwards, Ross A; Frost, Laura S; Mark Glover, J N

    2014-11-11

    The conjugative transfer of bacterial F plasmids relies on TraM, a plasmid-encoded protein that recognizes multiple DNA sites to recruit the plasmid to the conjugative pore. In spite of the high degree of amino acid sequence conservation between TraM proteins, many of these proteins have markedly different DNA binding specificities that ensure the selective recruitment of a plasmid to its cognate pore. Here we present the structure of F TraM RHH (ribbon-helix-helix) domain bound to its sbmA site. The structure indicates that a pair of TraM tetramers cooperatively binds an underwound sbmA site containing 12 base pairs per turn. The sbmA is composed of 4 copies of a 5-base-pair motif, each of which is recognized by an RHH domain. The structure reveals that a single conservative amino acid difference in the RHH β-ribbon between F and pED208 TraM changes its specificity for its cognate 5-base-pair sequence motif. Specificity is also dictated by the positioning of 2-base-pair spacer elements within sbmA; in F sbmA, the spacers are positioned between motifs 1 and 2 and between motifs 3 and 4, whereas in pED208 sbmA, there is a single spacer between motifs 2 and 3. We also demonstrate that a pair of F TraM tetramers can cooperatively bind its sbmC site with an affinity similar to that of sbmA in spite of a lack of sequence similarity between these DNA elements. These results provide a basis for the prediction of the DNA binding properties of the family of TraM proteins.

  2. In vitro transfection of plasmid DNA by cationized gelatin prepared from different amine compounds.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Tomoshige, Ryuji; Iwanaga, Kazunori; Kakemi, Masawo; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare the in vitro transfection efficiency of a luciferase plasmid DNA using cationized gelatin prepared from different amine compounds. The compounds used here were ethylenediamine, putrescine, spermidine and spermine, chemically introduced to the carboxyl group of gelatin for the cationization. Complexation of the cationized gelatin with the plasmid DNA was performed by simply mixing the two materials at various N+/P- mixing ratios (the molar number ratio of amino groups of gelatin to the phosphate groups of DNA) in aqueous solution. Gel retardation studies revealed that the formation of cationized-gelatin-plasmid DNA complexes depended on the N+/P- mixing ratio. The stronger interaction of plasmid DNA with the cationized gelatin of spermine compared to the other cationized gelatins was observed by an ethidium bromide intercalation assay and Scatchard binding analysis. When the transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA complexed with the various cationized gelatins at different N+/P- mixing ratios was evaluated for mouse L929 fibroblasts, the highest transfection efficiency was observed for the complex prepared from the cationized gelatin of spermine at a N+/P- mixing ratio of 2. The present study indicates that there is an optimal N+/P- mixing ratio and a type of amine compound or cationization extent of cationized gelatin to enhance the transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA.

  3. Supercoiled plasmid DNA purification by integrating membrane technology with a monolithic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Catherine; Sousa, Angela; Nunes, José C; Morão, António M; Sousa, Fani; Queiroz, João A

    2014-06-01

    The present study describes the integration of membrane technology with monolithic chromatography to obtain plasmid DNA with high quality. Isolation and clarification of plasmid DNA lysate were first conducted by a microfiltration step, by using a hydrophilic nylon microfiltration membrane, avoiding the need of centrifugation. For the total elimination of the remaining impurities, a suitable purification step is required. Monolithic stationary phases have been successfully applied as an alternative to conventional supports. Thus, the sample recovered from the membrane process was applied into a nongrafted CarbonylDiImidazole disk. Throughout the global procedure, a reduced level of impurities such as proteins and RNA was obtained, and no genomic DNA was detectable in the plasmid DNA sample. The chromatographic process demonstrated an efficient performance on supercoiled plasmid DNA purity and recovery (100 and 84.44%, respectively). Thereby, combining the membrane technology to eliminate some impurities from lysate sample with an efficient chromatographic strategy to purify the supercoiled plasmid DNA arises as a powerful approach for industrial-scale systems aiming at plasmid DNA purification.

  4. The degree of apoptosis as an immunostimulant for a DNA vaccine against HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Yoshitsugu; Jounai, Nao; Takeshita, Fumihiko; Nakazawa, Masatoshi; Okuda, Kentaro; Watabe, Setsuko; Xin, Ke-Qin; Okuda, Kenji

    2007-01-05

    To regulate the expression of the apoptotic gene, we constructed bicistronic DNA vaccines that encode for HIV env and caspase-3 mutant (casp 3m) that are expressed via the encephalomyocarditis virus internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) or cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter-dependent translations. While IRES-casp 3m induced weak apoptosis and caused little reduction in antigen expression, CMV-casp 3m elicited strong apoptosis and led to a marked decrease in the antigen expression. Therefore, IRES-casp 3m augmented HIV-specific immune responses, and IRES-casp 3m induced significant protection against the vaccinia-HIV chimeric virus. These results suggest that the appropriate level of apoptosis is important for DNA vaccine development.

  5. Structure and regulation of gene expression of a Clo DF13 plasmid DNA region involved in plasmid segregation and incompatibility.

    PubMed Central

    van den Elzen, P J; Hakkaart, M J; van Putten, A J; Walters, H H; Veltkamp, E; Nijkamp, H J

    1983-01-01

    The bacteriocinogenic plasmid Clo DF13 contains genetic information involved in the accurate partitioning of the plasmid (parA and parB) as well as in incompatibility phenomena (incA, B, C and D). In this paper we report on the primary structure and regulation of gene expression of the 29% - 50% part of Clo DF13, containing the DNA regions incA, incB and parB as well as genes K and L. According to the results of our DNA sequence analysis, mapping of transposon insertions, RNA blotting and S1 mapping experiments, we conclude that: a) genes K and L are transcribed as one operon; transcription of this operon is initiated at a promoter (P2) located at 32.5% and proceeds in a clockwise direction. b) treatment of cells with mitomycin-C, significantly enhances transcription from P2, although this promoter is probably not directly repressed by lexA protein. c) Termination of transcription of this operon occurs between genes K and L, as well as distal to gene L. The possible role of gene products and/or sites, located within the 29-50% DNA region, in plasmid incompatibility and segregation is discussed. Images PMID:6324101

  6. Premature strand transfer by the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase during strong-stop DNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Klaver, B; Berkhout, B

    1994-01-01

    Reverse transcription of retroviral genomes starts near the 5' end of the viral RNA by use of an associated tRNA primer. According to the current model of reverse transcription, the initial cDNA product, termed minus-strand strong-stop DNA, 'jumps' to a repeated sequence (R region) at the 3' end of the RNA template. The human retroviruses have relatively long R regions (97-247 nucleotides) when compared to murine and avian viruses (16-68 nucleotides). This suggests that the full complement of the R region is not required for strand transfer and that partial cDNA copies of the 5' R can prematurely jump to the 3' R. To test this hypothesis, we generated mutants of the human immunodeficiency virus with R region changes and analyzed whether 5' or 3' R sequences were inherited by the progeny. We found that in most cases, 5' R-encoded sequences are dominant, which is consistent with the model of reverse transcription. Using a selection protocol, however, we were also able to identify progeny viruses with R sequences derived from the original 3' R element. These results suggest that partial strong stop cDNAs can be transferred with R region homologies much shorter than 97 nucleotides. Images PMID:7510065

  7. Reporter gene expression in dendritic cells after gene gun administration of plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Craig; Hopkins, John; Harkiss, Gordon

    2005-07-21

    Dendritic cells (DC) play an integral role in plasmid DNA vaccination. However, the interaction between plasmid DNA and DC in vivo is incompletely understood. In this report, we utilise the sheep pseudoafferent cannulation model to examine the interaction between plasmid DNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (pEGFP) and afferent lymph DC (ALDC) following gene gun administration. The results show that peaks of fluorescent ALDC tended to appear around days 1-4 and 9-13, then erratically thereafter for up to 2 months. Phenotypic analysis showed that EGFP+ ALDC expressed MHC class II, WC6, CD1b, and SIRPalpha markers. Plasmid, detected by PCR, was found in lymph cells and cell-free plasma on a daily basis, and was present variably for up to 2 months. Plasmid was also detected in purified CD1b+ ALDC, but the presence of plasmid did not correlate with EGFP expression by ALDC. Free EGFP in afferent lymph plasma was detectable by luminometry only after three administrations of the plasmid. The results show that gene gun administered pEGFP persisted for extended periods after a single administration, leeching out of skin on a daily basis. The plasmid was associated with both the cellular and fluid components of afferent lymph. EGFP protein appeared in afferent lymph in a pulsatile manner, but associated only with ALDC.

  8. Enhanced purification of plasmid DNA isoforms by exploiting ionic strength effects during ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Currie, David; Zydney, Andrew L

    2016-04-01

    The solution structure of plasmid DNA is known to be a strong function of solution conditions due to intramolecular electrostatic interactions between the charged phosphate groups along the DNA backbone. The objective of this work was to determine whether it was possible to enhance the use of ultrafiltration for separation of different plasmid isoforms by proper selection of the solution ionic strength and ion type. Experiments were performed with a 3.0 kbp plasmid using composite regenerated cellulose ultrafiltration membranes. The transmission of the linear isoform was nearly independent of solution ionic strength, but increased significantly with increasing filtrate flux due to the elongation of the highly flexible plasmid in the converging flow field into the membrane pores. In contrast, the transmission of the open-circular and supercoiled plasmids both increased with increasing NaCl or MgCl2 concentration due to the change in plasmid size and conformational flexibility. The effect of ionic strength was greatest for the supercoiled plasmid, providing opportunities for enhanced purification of this therapeutically active isoform. This behavior was confirmed using experiments performed with binary mixtures of the different isoforms. These results clearly demonstrate the potential for enhancing the performance of membrane systems for plasmid DNA separations by proper selection of the ionic conditions.

  9. Rapid Tracing of Resistance Plasmids in a Nosocomial Outbreak Using Optical DNA Mapping.

    PubMed

    Müller, Vilhelm; Karami, Nahid; Nyberg, Lena K; Pichler, Christoffer; Torche Pedreschi, Paola C; Quaderi, Saair; Fritzsche, Joachim; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Åhrén, Christina; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-05-13

    Resistance to life-saving antibiotics increases rapidly worldwide, and multiresistant bacteria have become a global threat to human health. Presently, the most serious threat is the increasing spread of Enterobacteriaceae carrying genes coding for extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) and carbapenemases on highly mobile plasmids. We here demonstrate how optical DNA maps of single plasmids can be used as fingerprints to trace plasmids, for example, during resistance outbreaks. We use the assay to demonstrate a potential transmission route of an ESBL-carrying plasmid between bacterial strains/species and between patients, during a polyclonal outbreak at a neonatal ward at Sahlgrenska University Hospital (Gothenburg, Sweden). Our results demonstrate that optical DNA mapping is an easy and rapid method for detecting the spread of plasmids mediating resistance. With the increasing prevalence of multiresistant bacteria, diagnostic tools that can aid in solving ongoing routes of transmission, in particular in hospital settings, will be of paramount importance.

  10. Influence of plasma-generated reactive species on the plasmid DNA structure and plasmid-mediated transformation of Escherichia coli cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Geon Joon; Choi, Min Ah; Kim, Daewook; Kim, Jun Young; Ghimire, Bhagirath; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2017-09-01

    The influence of plasma-generated reactive species on the conformation of plasmid DNA (pDNA) and the transformation efficiency of Escherichia coli cells were studied. An atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to generate reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in an aqueous solution. When E. coli cells were transformed, the transformation efficiency of E. coli with the APPJ-treated plasmid was lower than with the APPJ-untreated plasmid. Transformation efficiency was reduced due to structural modification and degradation of the pDNA by the APPJ. Plasma treatment caused structural modification of the plasmid from the supercoiled form to the linear form, and also decreased the amount of plasmid by degrading the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) structure accompanied by disruption of nucleobases and DNA strand breakage. The formation of linear plasmid from supercoiled plasmid by the APPJ treatment was verified through electrophoretic analysis of the NdeI restriction enzyme-cut supercoiled plasmid. The structural modification and/or decrease in the amount of pDNA are attributed to the RONS from the plasma itself and to those derived from the interaction of plasma radicals with the aqueous solution. The effect of plasma treatment on the transformation efficiency of E. coli cells was more pronounced with the linear plasmid than with the supercoiled plasmid, indicating that the linear plasmid is more vulnerable to RONS. Overall, these results revealed that plasma-generated RONS can modify the structural and optical properties of bacterial pDNA, thus affecting its biological function.

  11. Field expansion of DNA polymerase chain reaction for early infant diagnosis of HIV-1: The Ethiopian experience.

    PubMed

    Fonjungo, Peter N; Girma, Mulu; Melaku, Zenebe; Mekonen, Teferi; Tanuri, Amilcar; Hailegiorgis, Bereket; Tegbaru, Belete; Mengistu, Yohannes; Ashenafi, Aytenew; Mamo, Wubshet; Abreha, Tesfay; Tibesso, Gudetta; Ramos, Artur; Ayana, Gonfa; Freeman, Richard; Nkengasong, John N; Zewdu, Solomon; Kebede, Yenew; Abebe, Almaz; Kenyon, Thomas A; Messele, Tsehaynesh

    2013-03-01

    Early diagnosis of infants infected with HIV (EID) and early initiation of treatment significantly reduces the rate of disease progression and mortality. One of the challenges to identification of HIV-1-infected infants is availability and/or access to quality molecular laboratory facilities which perform molecular virologic assays suitable for accurate identification of the HIV status of infants. We conducted a joint site assessment and designed laboratories for the expansion of DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing based on dried blood spot (DBS) for EID in six regions of Ethiopia. Training of appropriate laboratory technologists and development of required documentation including standard operating procedures (SOPs) was carried out. The impact of the expansion of EID laboratories was assessed by the number of tests performed as well as the turn-around time. DNA PCR for EID was introduced in 2008 in six regions. From April 2006 to April 2008, a total of 2848 infants had been tested centrally at the Ethiopian Health and Nutrition Research Institute (EHNRI) in Addis Ababa, and which was then the only laboratory with the capability to perform EID; 546 (19.2%) of the samples were positive. By November 2010, EHNRI and the six laboratories had tested an additional 16 985 HIV-exposed infants, of which 1915 (11.3%) were positive. The median turn-around time for test results was 14 days (range 14-21 days). Expansion of HIV DNA PCR testing facilities that can provide quality and reliable results is feasible in resource-limited settings. Regular supervision and monitoring for quality assurance of these laboratories is essential to maintain accuracy of testing.

  12. Plasmid DNA Vaccine Co-Immunisation Modulates Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses Induced by Intranasal Inoculation in Mice.

    PubMed

    King, Deborah F L; McKay, Paul F; Mann, Jamie F S; Jones, C Bryn; Shattock, Robin J

    2015-01-01

    An effective HIV vaccine will likely require induction of both mucosal and systemic cellular and humoral immune responses. We investigated whether intramuscular (IM) delivery of electroporated plasmid DNA vaccine and simultaneous protein vaccinations by intranasal (IN) and IM routes could be combined to induce mucosal and systemic cellular and humoral immune responses to a model HIV-1 CN54 gp140 antigen in mice. Co-immunisation of DNA with intranasal protein successfully elicited both serum and vaginal IgG and IgA responses, whereas DNA and IM protein co-delivery did not induce systemic or mucosal IgA responses. Cellular IFNγ responses were preserved in co-immunisation protocols compared to protein-only vaccination groups. The addition of DNA to IN protein vaccination reduced the strong Th2 bias observed with IN protein vaccination alone. Luminex analysis also revealed that co-immunisation with DNA and IN protein induced expression of cytokines that promote B-cell function, generation of TFH cells and CCR5 ligands that can reduce HIV infectivity. These data suggest that while IN inoculation alone elicits both cellular and humoral responses, co-administration with homologous DNA vaccination can tailor these towards a more balanced Th1/Th2 phenotype modulating the cellular cytokine profile while eliciting high-levels of antigen-specific antibody. This work provides insights on how to generate differential immune responses within the same vaccination visit, and supports co-immunisation with DNA and protein by a mucosal route as a potential delivery strategy for HIV vaccines.

  13. Plasmid DNA Vaccine Co-Immunisation Modulates Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses Induced by Intranasal Inoculation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    King, Deborah F. L.; McKay, Paul F.; Mann, Jamie F. S.; Jones, C. Bryn; Shattock, Robin J.

    2015-01-01

    Background An effective HIV vaccine will likely require induction of both mucosal and systemic cellular and humoral immune responses. We investigated whether intramuscular (IM) delivery of electroporated plasmid DNA vaccine and simultaneous protein vaccinations by intranasal (IN) and IM routes could be combined to induce mucosal and systemic cellular and humoral immune responses to a model HIV-1 CN54 gp140 antigen in mice. Results Co-immunisation of DNA with intranasal protein successfully elicited both serum and vaginal IgG and IgA responses, whereas DNA and IM protein co-delivery did not induce systemic or mucosal IgA responses. Cellular IFNγ responses were preserved in co-immunisation protocols compared to protein-only vaccination groups. The addition of DNA to IN protein vaccination reduced the strong Th2 bias observed with IN protein vaccination alone. Luminex analysis also revealed that co-immunisation with DNA and IN protein induced expression of cytokines that promote B-cell function, generation of TFH cells and CCR5 ligands that can reduce HIV infectivity. Significance These data suggest that while IN inoculation alone elicits both cellular and humoral responses, co-administration with homologous DNA vaccination can tailor these towards a more balanced Th1/Th2 phenotype modulating the cellular cytokine profile while eliciting high-levels of antigen-specific antibody. This work provides insights on how to generate differential immune responses within the same vaccination visit, and supports co-immunisation with DNA and protein by a mucosal route as a potential delivery strategy for HIV vaccines. PMID:26544970

  14. Requirement of the Escherichia coli dnaA gene product for plasmid F maintenance.

    PubMed Central

    Kline, B C; Kogoma, T; Tam, J E; Shields, M S

    1986-01-01

    There are DnaA protein-binding sites in at least one F origin of replication, and only potentially leaky dnaA(Ts) mutations had ever been used in previous studies indicating that F replication was independent of the dnaA gene product. Here we show that an Escherichia coli dnaA::Tn10 host which does not make a dnaA gene product cannot sustain autonomous or integrated F plasmid maintenance. PMID:3020005

  15. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of plasmid DNA: a perilous journey from the cytoplasm to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lechardeur, Delphine; Lukacs, Gergely L

    2006-09-01

    Nonviral vectors represent a promising approach for the safe delivery of therapeutic DNA in genetic and acquired human diseases. Before synthetic vector systems can be used for clinical applications, their limited efficacy must be addressed. At the cellular level, successful gene transfer is dependent on several additional factors including DNA uptake, release from the DNA-vector complex, and nucleocytoplasmic transport. This paper reviews the major metabolic and physical impediments that plasmid DNA vectorized by synthetic vectors encounters between the cytosol and the nucleus. Plasmid DNA that escapes the endolysosomal compartment encounters the diffusional and metabolic barriers of the cytoplasm, reducing the number of intact plasmids that reach the nuclear envelope. Nuclear translocation of DNA requires either the disassembly of the nuclear envelope during cell division or active nuclear transport via the nuclear pore complex. In the nucleus, plasmid DNA is relatively stable, but its transcription and its fate during cell division are still debated. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of nonviral gene transfer during nucleocytoplasmic trafficking may provide strategies to overcome those obstacles that limit the efficiency of nonviral gene delivery. We review some of the current methods of gene transfer mediated by synthetic vectors, highlighting systems that exploit our actual knowledge of the nucleocytoplasmic transport of plasmid DNA.

  16. Gene delivery in vitro and in vivo from bioreducible multilayered polyelectrolyte films of plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Blacklock, Jenifer; You, Ye-Zi; Zhou, Qing-Hui; Mao, Guangzhao; Oupický, David

    2009-02-01

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) films were assembled on flexible stainless steel substrate using plasmid DNA and reducible hyperbranched poly(amido amine) (RHB) polycation. The films were characterized by XPS and their disassembly in reducing conditions confirmed by ellipsometry. Fibroblast and smooth muscle cell attachment and proliferation on DNA/RHB films were indistinguishable from those on control DNA/poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) films. In vitro transfection activity was evaluated using reporter plasmids encoding for secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) and green fluorescent protein (GFP). DNA/RHB films showed higher and longer lasting transfection activity than control DNA/PEI films using SEAP plasmid. It was revealed through the use of GFP plasmid that DNA/RHB films transfected almost the entire cell population growing on the films. In vivo transfection activity was evaluated by subcutaneously implanting a stainless steel substrate coated with the DNA/RHB films containing SEAP plasmid DNA and measuring the levels of SEAP secreted into the blood circulation of rats. It was found that the plasma levels of SEAP peaked at approximately 160 ng SEAP/mL five days post-implantation.

  17. HIV-1 vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H

    2014-01-01

    The development of a safe and effective preventive HIV-1 vaccine remains a public health priority. Despite scientific difficulties and disappointing results, HIV-1 vaccine clinical development has, for the first time, established proof-of-concept efficacy against HIV-1 acquisition and identified vaccine-associated immune correlates of risk. The correlate of risk analysis showed that IgG antibodies against the gp120 V2 loop correlated with decreased risk of HIV infection, while Env-specific IgA directly correlated with increased risk. The development of vaccine strategies such as improved envelope proteins formulated with potent adjuvants and DNA and vectors expressing mosaics, or conserved sequences, capable of eliciting greater breadth and depth of potentially relevant immune responses including neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ cell-mediated immune responses, mucosal immune responses, and immunological memory, is now proceeding quickly. Additional human efficacy trials combined with other prevention modalities along with sustained funding and international collaboration remain key to bring an HIV-1 vaccine to licensure. PMID:24637946

  18. A BAYESIAN METHOD FOR CALCULATING REAL-TIME QUANTITATIVE PCR CALIBRATION CURVES USING ABSOLUTE PLASMID DNA STANDARDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In real-time quantitative PCR studies using absolute plasmid DNA standards, a calibration curve is developed to estimate an unknown DNA concentration. However, potential differences in the amplification performance of plasmid DNA compared to genomic DNA standards are often ignore...

  19. A BAYESIAN METHOD FOR CALCULATING REAL-TIME QUANTITATIVE PCR CALIBRATION CURVES USING ABSOLUTE PLASMID DNA STANDARDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In real-time quantitative PCR studies using absolute plasmid DNA standards, a calibration curve is developed to estimate an unknown DNA concentration. However, potential differences in the amplification performance of plasmid DNA compared to genomic DNA standards are often ignore...

  20. Characterization of an improved in vitro DNA replication system for Escherichia coli plasmids.

    PubMed

    Conrad, S E; Campbell, J L

    1979-07-25

    A modified in vitro replication system has been characterized and used to catalogue the host proteins required for the replication of plasmid RSF1030. These extracts differ from systems described previously in that endogenous DNA is removed. Replication in vitro therefore requires an exogenouos RSF1030. Synthesis in the in vitro system faithfully mimics in vivo replication with respect to the products synthesized, effects of specific inhibitors, and requirements for RNA polymerase and DNA polymerase I. In addition, we find that proteins encoded by dnaB, dnaC, dnaG, dnaI, dnaP and polC (DNA polymerase III), are required for in vitro plasmid synthesis. The product of dnaA is not required. Extracts prepared from E. coli mutants deficient in in vitro replication can be complemented by addition of purified proteins or of extracts carrying the wild type protein.

  1. Activation of the DNA Damage Response Is a Conserved Function of HIV-1 and HIV-2 Vpr That Is Independent of SLX4 Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Fregoso, Oliver I; Emerman, Michael

    2016-09-13

    There has been extraordinary progress in understanding the roles of lentiviral accessory proteins in antagonizing host antiviral defense proteins. However, the precise primary function of the accessory gene Vpr remains elusive. Here we suggest that engagement with the DNA damage response is an important function of primate lentiviral Vpr proteins because of its conserved function among diverse lentiviral lineages. In contrast, we show that, for HIV-1, HIV-2, and related Vpr isolates and orthologs, there is a lack of correlation between DNA damage response activation and interaction with the host SLX4 protein complex of structure specific endonucleases; some Vpr proteins are able to interact with SLX4, but the majority are not. Using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 method to knock out SLX4, we formally showed that HIV-1 and HIV-2 Vpr orthologs can still activate the DNA damage response and cell cycle arrest in the absence of SLX4. Together, our data suggest that activation of the DNA damage response, but not SLX4 interaction, is conserved and therefore indicative of an important function of Vpr. Our data also indicate that Vpr activates the DNA damage response through an SLX4-independent mechanism that remains uncharacterized. HIV-1 and HIV-2 belong to a family of viruses called lentiviruses that infect at least 40 primate species, including humans. Lentiviruses have been circulating in primates for at least 5 million years. In order to better fight HIV, we must understand the viral and host factors necessary for infection, adaptation, and transmission of these viruses. Using the natural variation of HIV-1, HIV-2, and related lentiviruses, we have investigated the role of the DNA damage response in the viral life cycle. We have found that the ability of lentiviruses to activate the DNA damage response is largely conserved. However, we also found that the SLX4 host factor is not required for this activation, as was

  2. Purification of transfection-grade plasmid DNA from bacterial cells with superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chen-Li; Sung, Ching-Shan

    2006-07-01

    The functionalized magnetic nanobeads were used to develop a rapid protocol for extracting and purifying transfection-grade plasmid DNA from bacterial culture. Nanosized superparamagnetic nanoparticles (Fe 3O 4) were prepared by chemical coprecipitation method using Fe 2+, Fe 3+ salt, and ammonium hydroxide under a nitrogen atmosphere. The surface of Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles was modified by coating with the multivalent cationic agent, polyethylenimine (PEI). The PEI-modified magnetic nanobeads were employed to simplify the purification of plasmid DNA from bacterial cells. We demonstrated a useful plasmid, pRSETB-EGFP, encoding the green fluorescent protein with T7 promoter, was amplified in DE3 strain of Escherichia coli. The loaded nanobeads are recovered by magnetically driven separation and regenerated by exposure to the elution buffer with optimal ionic strength (1.25 M) and pH (9.0). Up to approximately 819 μg of high-purity (A 260/A 280 ratio=1.86) plasmid DNA was isolated from 100 ml of overnight bacterial culture. The eluted plasmid DNA was used directly for restriction enzyme digestion, bacterial cell transformation and animal cell transfection applications with success. The PEI-modified magnetic nanobead delivers significant time-savings, overall higher yields and better transfection efficiencies compared to anion-exchange and other methods. The results presented in this report show that PEI-modified magnetic nanobeads are suitable for isolation and purification of transfection-grade plasmid DNA.

  3. Plasmid segregation: how to survive as an extra piece of DNA.

    PubMed

    Salje, Jeanne

    2010-08-01

    Non-essential extra-chromosomal DNA elements such as plasmids are responsible for their own propagation in dividing host cells, and one means to ensure this is to carry a miniature active segregation system reminiscent of the mitotic spindle. Plasmids that are maintained at low numbers in prokaryotic cells have developed a range of such active partitioning systems, which are characterized by an impressive simplicity and efficiency and which are united by the use of dynamic, nucleotide-driven filaments to separate and position DNA molecules. A comparison of different plasmid segregation systems reveals (i) how unrelated filament-forming and DNA-binding proteins have been adopted and modified to create a range of simple DNA segregating complexes and (ii) how subtle changes in the few components of these DNA segregation machines has led to a remarkable diversity in the molecular mechanisms of closely related segregation systems. Here, our current understanding of plasmid segregation systems is reviewed and compared with other DNA segregation systems, and this is extended by a discussion of basic principles of plasmid segregation systems, evolutionary implications and the relationship between an autonomous DNA element and its host cell.

  4. Structural basis of cooperative DNA recognition by the plasmid conjugation factor, TraM

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Joyce J. W.; Lu, Jun; Edwards, Ross A.; Frost, Laura S.; Glover, J. N. Mark

    2011-01-01

    The conjugative transfer of F-like plasmids such as F, R1, R100 and pED208, between bacterial cells requires TraM, a plasmid-encoded DNA-binding protein. TraM tetramers bridge the origin of transfer (oriT) to a key component of the conjugative pore, the coupling protein TraD. Here we show that TraM recognizes a high-affinity DNA-binding site, sbmA, as a cooperative dimer of tetramers. The crystal structure of the TraM–sbmA complex from the plasmid pED208 shows that binding cooperativity is mediated by DNA kinking and unwinding, without any direct contact between tetramers. Sequence-specific DNA recognition is carried out by TraM’s N-terminal ribbon–helix–helix (RHH) domains, which bind DNA in a staggered arrangement. We demonstrate that both DNA-binding specificity, as well as selective interactions between TraM and the C-terminal tail of its cognate TraD mediate conjugation specificity within the F-like family of plasmids. The ability of TraM to cooperatively bind DNA without interaction between tetramers leaves the C-terminal TraM tetramerization domains free to make multiple interactions with TraD, driving recruitment of the plasmid to the conjugative pore. PMID:21565799

  5. Comparison of two cancer vaccines targeting tyrosinase: plasmid DNA and recombinant alphavirus replicon particles.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Stacie M; Bartido, Shirley M; Gardner, Jason P; Guevara-Patiño, José A; Montgomery, Stephanie C; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Maughan, Maureen F; Dempsey, JoAnn; Donovan, Gerald P; Olson, William C; Houghton, Alan N; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2005-11-15

    Immunization of mice with xenogeneic DNA encoding human tyrosinase-related proteins 1 and 2 breaks tolerance to these self-antigens and leads to tumor rejection. Viral vectors used alone or in heterologous DNA prime/viral boost combinations have shown improved responses to certain infectious diseases. The purpose of this study was to compare viral and plasmid DNA in combination vaccination strategies in the context of a tumor antigen. Using tyrosinase as a prototypical differentiation antigen, we determined the optimal regimen for immunization with plasmid DNA. Then, using propagation-incompetent alphavirus vectors (virus-like replicon particles, VRP) encoding tyrosinase, we tested different combinations of priming with DNA or VRP followed by boosting with VRP. We subsequently followed antibody production, T-cell response, and tumor rejection. T-cell responses to newly identified mouse tyrosinase epitopes were generated in mice immunized with plasmid DNA encoding human (xenogeneic) tyrosinase. In contrast, when VRP encoding either mouse or human tyrosinase were used as single agents, antibody and T-cell responses and a significant delay in tumor growth in vivo were observed. Similarly, a heterologous vaccine regimen using DNA prime and VRP boost showed a markedly stronger response than DNA vaccination alone. Alphavirus replicon particle vectors encoding the melanoma antigen tyrosinase (self or xenogeneic) induce immune responses and tumor protection when administered either alone or in the heterologous DNA prime/VRP boost approaches that are superior to the use of plasmid DNA alone.

  6. First report on vertical transmission of a plasmid DNA in freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Labrechai Mog; Gireesh-Babu, P; Pavan-Kumar, A; Suresh Babu, P P; Chaudhari, Aparna

    2014-09-01

    Outbreak of WSSV disease is one of the major stumbling blocks in shrimp aquaculture. DNA vaccines have shown potential for mass scale vaccination owing to their stability, cost effectiveness and easy maintenance. Development of economically feasible delivery strategies remains to be a major challenge. This study demonstrates vertical transmission of a plasmid DNA in a decapod Macrobrachium rosenbergii for the first time. Females at three different maturation stages (immature, matured and berried) and mature males were injected with a plasmid DNA and allowed to spawn with untreated counterparts. Using specific primers the plasmid DNA could be amplified from the offspring of all groups except that of berried females. For this confirmation genomic DNA was isolated from 3 pools of 10 post larvae in each group. This presents an ideal strategy to protect young ones at zero stress.

  7. Affinity chromatography approaches to overcome the challenges of purifying plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Fani; Prazeres, Duarte M F; Queiroz, João A

    2008-09-01

    The diversity of biomolecules present in plasmid DNA (pDNA)-containing extracts and the structural and chemical similarities between pDNA and impurities are some of the main challenges of improving or establishing novel purification procedures. In view of the unequalled specificity of affinity purification, this technique has recently begun to be applied in downstream processing of plasmids. This paper discusses the progress and importance of affinity chromatography (AC) for the purification of pDNA-based therapeutic products. Several affinity approaches have already been successfully developed for a variety of applications, and we will focus here on highlighting their possible contributions to the pDNA purification challenge. Diverse affinity applications and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed, as well as the most significant results and improvements in the challenging task of purifying plasmids.

  8. Ribonuclease H/DNA Polymerase HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Dual Inhibitor: Mechanistic Studies on the Allosteric Mode of Action of Isatin-Based Compound RMNC6.

    PubMed

    Corona, Angela; Meleddu, Rita; Esposito, Francesca; Distinto, Simona; Bianco, Giulia; Masaoka, Takashi; Maccioni, Elias; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Alcaro, Stefano; Le Grice, Stuart F J; Tramontano, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H (RNase H) activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are needed for the replication of the viral genome and are validated drug targets. However, there are no approved drugs inhibiting RNase H and the efficiency of DNA polymerase inhibitors can be diminished by the presence of drug resistance mutations. In this context, drugs inhibiting both activities could represent a significant advance towards better anti-HIV therapies. We report on the mechanisms of allosteric inhibition of a newly synthesized isatin-based compound designated as RMNC6 that showed IC50 values of 1.4 and 9.8 μM on HIV-1 RT-associated RNase H and polymerase activities, respectively. Blind docking studies predict that RMNC6 could bind two different pockets in the RT: one in the DNA polymerase domain (partially overlapping the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor [NNRTI] binding pocket), and a second one close to the RNase H active site. Enzymatic studies showed that RMNC6 interferes with efavirenz (an approved NNRTI) in its binding to the RT polymerase domain, although NNRTI resistance-associated mutations such as K103N, Y181C and Y188L had a minor impact on RT susceptibility to RMNC6. In addition, despite being naturally resistant to NNRTIs, the polymerase activity of HIV-1 group O RT was efficiently inhibited by RMNC6. The compound was also an inhibitor of the RNase H activity of wild-type HIV-1 group O RT, although we observed a 6.5-fold increase in the IC50 in comparison with the prototypic HIV-1 group M subtype B enzyme. Mutagenesis studies showed that RT RNase H domain residues Asn474 and Tyr501, and in a lesser extent Ala502 and Ala508, are critical for RMNC6 inhibition of the endonuclease activity of the RT, without affecting its DNA polymerization activity. Our results show that RMNC6 acts as a dual inhibitor with allosteric sites in the DNA polymerase and the RNase H domains of HIV-1 RT.

  9. Ribonuclease H/DNA Polymerase HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Dual Inhibitor: Mechanistic Studies on the Allosteric Mode of Action of Isatin-Based Compound RMNC6

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Angela; Meleddu, Rita; Esposito, Francesca; Distinto, Simona; Bianco, Giulia; Masaoka, Takashi; Maccioni, Elias; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Alcaro, Stefano; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.; Tramontano, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H (RNase H) activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are needed for the replication of the viral genome and are validated drug targets. However, there are no approved drugs inhibiting RNase H and the efficiency of DNA polymerase inhibitors can be diminished by the presence of drug resistance mutations. In this context, drugs inhibiting both activities could represent a significant advance towards better anti-HIV therapies. We report on the mechanisms of allosteric inhibition of a newly synthesized isatin-based compound designated as RMNC6 that showed IC50 values of 1.4 and 9.8 μM on HIV-1 RT-associated RNase H and polymerase activities, respectively. Blind docking studies predict that RMNC6 could bind two different pockets in the RT: one in the DNA polymerase domain (partially overlapping the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor [NNRTI] binding pocket), and a second one close to the RNase H active site. Enzymatic studies showed that RMNC6 interferes with efavirenz (an approved NNRTI) in its binding to the RT polymerase domain, although NNRTI resistance-associated mutations such as K103N, Y181C and Y188L had a minor impact on RT susceptibility to RMNC6. In addition, despite being naturally resistant to NNRTIs, the polymerase activity of HIV-1 group O RT was efficiently inhibited by RMNC6. The compound was also an inhibitor of the RNase H activity of wild-type HIV-1 group O RT, although we observed a 6.5-fold increase in the IC50 in comparison with the prototypic HIV-1 group M subtype B enzyme. Mutagenesis studies showed that RT RNase H domain residues Asn474 and Tyr501, and in a lesser extent Ala502 and Ala508, are critical for RMNC6 inhibition of the endonuclease activity of the RT, without affecting its DNA polymerization activity. Our results show that RMNC6 acts as a dual inhibitor with allosteric sites in the DNA polymerase and the RNase H domains of HIV-1 RT. PMID:26800261

  10. Heterologous prime-boost vaccination with DNA and MVA vaccines, expressing HIV-1 subtype C mosaic Gag virus-like particles, is highly immunogenic in mice

    PubMed Central

    Douglass, Nicola; Chege, Gerald; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2017-01-01

    In an effort to make affordable vaccines suitable for the regions most affected by HIV-1, we have constructed stable vaccines that express an HIV-1 subtype C mosaic Gag immunogen (BCG-GagM, MVA-GagM and DNA-GagM). Mosaic immunogens have been designed to address the tremendous diversity of this virus. Here we have shown that GagM buds from cells infected and transfected with MVA-GagM and DNA-GagM respectively and forms virus-like particles. Previously we showed that a BCG-GagM prime MVA-GagM boost generated strong cellular immune responses in mice. In this study immune responses to the DNA-GagM and MVA-GagM vaccines were evaluated in homologous and heterologous prime-boost vaccinations. The DNA homologous prime boost vaccination elicited predominantly CD8+ T cells while the homologous MVA vaccination induced predominantly CD4+ T cells. A heterologous DNA-GagM prime MVA-GagM boost induced strong, more balanced Gag CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses and that were predominantly of an effector memory phenotype. The immunogenicity of the mosaic Gag (GagM) was compared to a naturally occurring subtype C Gag (GagN) using a DNA homologous vaccination regimen. DNA-GagN expresses a natural Gag with a sequence that was closest to the consensus sequence of subtype C viruses sampled in South Africa. DNA-GagM homologous vaccination induced cumulative HIV-1 Gag-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT responses that were 6.5-fold higher than those induced by the DNA-GagN vaccination. Similarly, DNA-GagM vaccination generated 7-fold higher levels of cytokine-positive CD8+ T cells than DNA-GagN, indicating that this subtype C mosaic Gag elicits far more potent immune responses than a consensus-type Gag. Cells transfected and infected with DNA-GagM and MVA-GagM respectively, expressed high levels of GagM and produced budding virus-like particles. Our data indicates that a heterologous prime boost regimen using DNA and MVA vaccines expressing HIV-1 subtype C mosaic Gag is highly immunogenic in mice and

  11. Heterologous prime-boost vaccination with DNA and MVA vaccines, expressing HIV-1 subtype C mosaic Gag virus-like particles, is highly immunogenic in mice.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Ros; Jongwe, Tsungai Ivai; Douglass, Nicola; Chege, Gerald; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2017-01-01

    In an effort to make affordable vaccines suitable for the regions most affected by HIV-1, we have constructed stable vaccines that express an HIV-1 subtype C mosaic Gag immunogen (BCG-GagM, MVA-GagM and DNA-GagM). Mosaic immunogens have been designed to address the tremendous diversity of this virus. Here we have shown that GagM buds from cells infected and transfected with MVA-GagM and DNA-GagM respectively and forms virus-like particles. Previously we showed that a BCG-GagM prime MVA-GagM boost generated strong cellular immune responses in mice. In this study immune responses to the DNA-GagM and MVA-GagM vaccines were evaluated in homologous and heterologous prime-boost vaccinations. The DNA homologous prime boost vaccination elicited predominantly CD8+ T cells while the homologous MVA vaccination induced predominantly CD4+ T cells. A heterologous DNA-GagM prime MVA-GagM boost induced strong, more balanced Gag CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses and that were predominantly of an effector memory phenotype. The immunogenicity of the mosaic Gag (GagM) was compared to a naturally occurring subtype C Gag (GagN) using a DNA homologous vaccination regimen. DNA-GagN expresses a natural Gag with a sequence that was closest to the consensus sequence of subtype C viruses sampled in South Africa. DNA-GagM homologous vaccination induced cumulative HIV-1 Gag-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT responses that were 6.5-fold higher than those induced by the DNA-GagN vaccination. Similarly, DNA-GagM vaccination generated 7-fold higher levels of cytokine-positive CD8+ T cells than DNA-GagN, indicating that this subtype C mosaic Gag elicits far more potent immune responses than a consensus-type Gag. Cells transfected and infected with DNA-GagM and MVA-GagM respectively, expressed high levels of GagM and produced budding virus-like particles. Our data indicates that a heterologous prime boost regimen using DNA and MVA vaccines expressing HIV-1 subtype C mosaic Gag is highly immunogenic in mice and

  12. Quantification of Residual Germinal Center Activity and HIV-1 DNA and RNA Levels Using Fine Needle Biopsies of Lymph Nodes During Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hey-Nguyen, William J; Xu, Yin; Pearson, Chester F; Bailey, Michelle; Suzuki, Kazuo; Tantau, Robyn; Obeid, Solange; Milner, Brad; Field, Andrew; Carr, Andrew; Bloch, Mark; Cooper, David A; Kelleher, Anthony D; Zaunders, John J; Koelsch, Kersten K

    2017-03-13

    HIV-1 reservoirs are most often studied in peripheral blood (PB), but not all lymphocytes recirculate, particularly T follicular helper (Tfh) CD4(+) T cells, as well as germinal center (GC) B cells, in lymph nodes (LNs). Ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsies (FNBs) from inguinal LNs and PB samples were obtained from 10 healthy controls (HCs) and 21 HIV-1-infected subjects [11 antiretroviral therapy (ART) naive and 10 on ART]. Tfh cells and GC B cells were enumerated by flow cytometry. HIV-1 DNA and cell-associated (CA) RNA levels in LNs and PB were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. FNBs were obtained without adverse events. Tfh cells and GC B cells were highly elevated in ART-naive subjects, with a median GC B cell count >300-fold higher than HCs, but also remained higher in 4 out of the 10 subjects on ART. GC B cell counts and Tfh cell counts were highly correlated with each other, and also with activated T cells in LNs but not in blood. Levels of HIV-1 DNA and CA RNA viral burden in highly purified CD4(+) T cells from FNBs were significantly elevated compared with those in CD4(+) T cells from PB in the ART-naive group, but only trended toward an increase in the ART patients. FNBs enabled minimally invasive access to, and parallel measurement of residual activated T and B cells and viral burden within LNs in HIV-1-infected patients. These FNBs revealed significant GC activity that was not apparent from corresponding PB samples.

  13. Conformational transitions of plasmid ds-DNA on ultrathin films of alkylamines on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Caroline; Liang, Hua; Severin, Nikolai; Zhuang, Wei; Zauscher, Stefan; Rabe, Jürgen P.

    2015-03-01

    DNA replication is an important process in the human body. Replication of double-stranded (ds)-DNA requires its local melting into two single strands. DNA, when stretched in solution, overwinds and melts. This was argued to give insight onto the replication mechanism. It is difficult, however, to access the direct conformational changes during stretching in solution. Recent work demonstrated that this transition can be imaged with scanning force microscopy on a graphite surface that is coated with an alkylamine layer. ds-DNA can be controlled by an amphiphilic layer, since the DNA conformation depends on the amphiphile concentration. In particular we analyzed different DNA lengths on the same surface, and we found that at a specific concentration of octadecylamine the ds-DNA pUC19 plasmid ring splits into two single strands at one position. We will discuss methods to mark the DNA to determine the exact location at which the plasmid ring splits.

  14. A cell engineering strategy to enhance supercoiled plasmid DNA production for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Sally; Ward, John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT With the recent revival of the promise of plasmid DNA vectors in gene therapy, a novel synthetic biology approach was used to enhance the quantity, (yield), and quality of the plasmid DNA. Quality was measured by percentage supercoiling and supercoiling density, as well as improving segregational stability in fermentation. We examined the hypothesis that adding a Strong Gyrase binding Site (SGS) would increase DNA gyrase‐mediated plasmid supercoiling. SGS from three different replicons, (the Mu bacteriophage and two plasmids, pSC101 and pBR322) were inserted into the plasmid, pUC57. Different sizes of these variants were transformed into E. coli DH5α, and their supercoiling properties and segregational stability measured. A 36% increase in supercoiling density was found in pUC57‐SGS, but only when SGS was derived from the Mu phage and was the larger sized version of this fragment. These results were also confirmed at fermentation scale. Total percentage supercoiled monomer was maintained to 85–90%. A twofold increase in plasmid yield was also observed for pUC57‐SGS in comparison to pUC57. pUC57‐SGS displayed greater segregational stability than pUC57‐cer and pUC57, demonstrating a further potential advantage of the SGS site. These findings should augment the potential of plasmid DNA vectors in plasmid DNA manufacture. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2064–2071. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26928284

  15. A cell engineering strategy to enhance supercoiled plasmid DNA production for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sally; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli; Ward, John

    2016-09-01

    With the recent revival of the promise of plasmid DNA vectors in gene therapy, a novel synthetic biology approach was used to enhance the quantity, (yield), and quality of the plasmid DNA. Quality was measured by percentage supercoiling and supercoiling density, as well as improving segregational stability in fermentation. We examined the hypothesis that adding a Strong Gyrase binding Site (SGS) would increase DNA gyrase-mediated plasmid supercoiling. SGS from three different replicons, (the Mu bacteriophage and two plasmids, pSC101 and pBR322) were inserted into the plasmid, pUC57. Different sizes of these variants were transformed into E. coli DH5α, and their supercoiling properties and segregational stability measured. A 36% increase in supercoiling density was found in pUC57-SGS, but only when SGS was derived from the Mu phage and was the larger sized version of this fragment. These results were also confirmed at fermentation scale. Total percentage supercoiled monomer was maintained to 85-90%. A twofold increase in plasmid yield was also observed for pUC57-SGS in comparison to pUC57. pUC57-SGS displayed greater segregational stability than pUC57-cer and pUC57, demonstrating a further potential advantage of the SGS site. These findings should augment the potential of plasmid DNA vectors in plasmid DNA manufacture. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2064-2071. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Differential requirement for SUB1 in chromosomal and plasmid double-strand DNA break repair.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lijian; Volkert, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Non homologous end joining (NHEJ) is an important process that repairs double strand DNA breaks (DSBs) in eukaryotic cells. Cells defective in NHEJ are unable to join chromosomal breaks. Two different NHEJ assays are typically used to determine the efficiency of NHEJ. One requires NHEJ of linearized plasmid DNA transformed into the test organism; the other requires NHEJ of a single chromosomal break induced either by HO endonuclease or the I-SceI restriction enzyme. These two assays are generally considered equivalent and rely on the same set of NHEJ genes. PC4 is an abundant DNA binding protein that has been suggested to stimulate NHEJ. Here we tested the role of PC4's yeast homolog SUB1 in repair of DNA double strand breaks using different assays. We found SUB1 is required for NHEJ repair of DSBs in plasmid DNA, but not in chromosomal DNA. Our results suggest that these two assays, while similar are not equivalent and that repair of plasmid DNA requires additional factor(s) that are not required for NHEJ repair of chromosomal double-strand DNA breaks. Possible roles for Sub1 proteins in NHEJ of plasmid DNA are discussed.

  17. A Multiprotein DNA Translocation Complex Directs Intramycelial Plasmid Spreading during Streptomyces Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Thoma, Lina; Dobrowinski, Hyazinth; Finger, Constanze; Guezguez, Jamil; Linke, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Conjugative DNA transfer in mycelial Streptomyces is a unique process involving the transfer of a double-stranded plasmid from the donor into the recipient and the subsequent spreading of the transferred plasmid within the recipient mycelium. This process is associated with growth retardation of the recipient and manifested by the formation of circular inhibition zones, named pocks. To characterize the unique Streptomyces DNA transfer machinery, we replaced each gene of the conjugative 12.1-kbp Streptomyces venezuelae plasmid pSVH1, with the exception of the rep gene required for plasmid replication, with a hexanucleotide sequence. Only deletion of traB, encoding the FtsK-like DNA translocase, affected efficiency of the transfer dramatically and abolished pock formation. Deletion of spdB3, spd79, or spdB2 had a minor effect on transfer but prevented pock formation and intramycelial plasmid spreading. Biochemical characterization of the encoded proteins revealed that the GntR-type regulator TraR recognizes a specific sequence upstream of spdB3, while Orf108, SpdB2, and TraR bind to peptidoglycan. SpdB2 promoted spheroplast formation by T7 lysozyme and formed pores in artificial membranes. Bacterial two-hybrid analyses and chemical cross-linking revealed that most of the pSVH1-encoded proteins interacted with each other, suggesting a multiprotein DNA translocation complex of TraB and Spd proteins which directs intramycelial plasmid spreading. PMID:26015502

  18. Identification of putative DnaN-binding motifs in plasmid replication initiation proteins.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Brian P; Kongsuwan, Kritaya; Wijffels, Gene

    2007-01-01

    Recently the plasmid RK2 replication initiation protein, TrfA, has been shown to bind to the beta subunit of DNA Polymerase III (DnaN) via a short pentapeptide with the consensus QL[S/D]LF. A second consensus peptide, the hexapeptide QLxLxL, has also been demonstrated to mediate binding to DnaN. Here we describe the results of a comprehensive survey of replication initiation proteins encoded by bacterial plasmids to identify putative DnaN-binding sites. Both pentapeptide and hexapeptide motifs have been identified in a number of families of replication initiation proteins. The distribution of sites is sporadic and closely related families of proteins may differ in the presence, location, or type of putative DnaN-binding motif. Neither motif has been identified in replication initiation proteins encoded by plasmids that replicate via rolling circles or strand displacement. The results suggest that the recruitment of DnaN to the origin of replication of a replisome by plasmid replication initiation proteins is not generally required for plasmid replication, but that in some cases it may be beneficial for efficiency of replication initiation.

  19. Proteins encoded by Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti plasmid DNA (T-DNA) in crown gall tumors

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Joan C.; Nester, Eugene W.; Gordon, Milton P.

    1980-01-01

    In order to detect proteins that may be produced in crown gall tumors as a result of expression of incorporated Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti plasmid DNA (T-DNA), we have isolated mRNA complementary to T-DNA and translated this in a protein-synthesizing system derived from wheat germ. mRNA prepared from cultured E1 tumor from Nicotiana tabacum hybridized with HindIII fragment 1 sequences of T-DNA immobilized on cellulose nitrate filters. Two proteins of 30,000 and 16,500 Mr were produced when this selected RNA was released and translated. Other tumor lines from N. tabacum were investigated, and a protein of slightly less than 30,000 Mr was encoded by HindIII fragment 1 sequences of 15955/01 tumor. No products were observed for 15955/1 tumor line, which differs from E1/B6-806 and 15955/01 in that it does not produce octopine. mRNA species of each of the tumor lines hybridized to Bst I fragment 8 sequences of T-DNA and produced a common protein of 15,000 Mr. Because this protein is derived from the region of the T-DNA that is conserved in octopine- and nopaline-type crown gall tumors, it may play a role in oncogenicity. Images PMID:16592819

  20. Possible involvement of distinct phylogenetic clusters of HIV-1 variants in the discrepancies between coreceptor tropism predictions based on viral RNA and proviral DNA.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Hiroshi; Sudo, Koji; Hasegawa, Naoki; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Tomohisa; Iketani, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Mochizuki, Mayumi; Iwata, Satoshi; Kato, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    The coreceptor tropism testing should be conducted prior to commencing a regimen containing a CCR5 antagonist for treatment of HIV-1 infection. For aviremic patients on long antiretroviral therapy, proviral DNA is often used instead of viral RNA in genotypic tropism testing. However, the tropism predictions from RNA and DNA are sometimes different. We examined the cause of the discrepancies between HIV-1 tropism predictions based on viral RNA and proviral DNA. The nucleotide sequence of the env C2V3C3 region was determined using pair samples of plasma RNA and peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA from 50 HIV-1 subtype B-infected individuals using population-based sequencing. The samples with discrepant tropism assessments between RNA and DNA were further analyzed using deep sequencing, followed by phylogenetic analysis. The tropism was assessed using the algorithm geno2pheno with a false-positive rate cutoff of 10 %. In population-based sequencing, five of 50 subjects showed discrepant tropism predictions between their RNA and DNA samples: four exhibited R5 tropism in RNA and X4 tropism in DNA, while one exhibited the opposite pattern. In the deep sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, three subjects had single clusters comprising of RNA- and DNA-derived sequences that were a mixture of R5 and X4 sequences. The other two subjects had two and three distinct phylogenetic clusters of sequences, respectively, each of which was dominated by R5 or X4 sequences; sequences of the R5-dominated cluster were mostly found in RNA, while sequences of the X4-dominated cluster were mostly in DNA. Some of HIV-1 tropism discrepancies between viral RNA and proviral DNA seem to be caused by phylogenetically distinct clusters which resides in plasma and cells in different frequencies. Our findings suggest that the tropism testing using PBMC DNA or deep sequencing may be required when the viral load is not suppressed or rebounds in the course of a CCR5 antagonist-containing regimen.

  1. Iteron Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Konieczny, Igor; Bury, Katarzyna; Wawrzycka, Aleksandra; Wegrzyn, Katarzyna

    2014-12-01

    Iteron-containing plasmids are model systems for studying the metabolism of extrachromosomal genetic elements in bacterial cells. Here we describe the current knowledge and understanding of the structure of iteron-containing replicons, the structure of the iteron plasmid encoded replication initiation proteins, and the molecular mechanisms for iteron plasmid DNA replication initiation. We also discuss the current understanding of control mechanisms affecting the plasmid copy number and how host chaperone proteins and proteases can affect plasmid maintenance in bacterial cells.

  2. Induced mutagenesis of plasmid and chromosomal genes inserted into the plasmid DNA. II. Mutagenic action of chemical factors

    SciTech Connect

    Esipova, V.V.; Vedunova, S.L.; Kriviskii, A.S.

    1986-02-01

    Following the study of the mutagenic action of UV and ..gamma..-radiation on plasmid DNA in vitro, they investigated the induction of mutations under the influence of chemical mutagens on the same DNA of plasmid RSF2124, determining the synthesis of colicine E1 and resistance to ampicillin. The inactivating action of the mutagen was assessed from the yield of transformants resistant to the antibiotic and the mutagenic effect from the loss by colonies of transformants that were capable of releasing colicine into the external medium. In these experiments they mainly used chemical compounds whose mutagenic effect if well known in other systems (transforming and transfecting DNA, microbial viruses). As a result all mutagens tested for their activity were divided into four groups: first group, those exceeding the level of mutagenesis by more than 100-fold above the spontaneous background (hydroxylamine, O-methylhydroxylamine); second group, those exceeding it by a factor of 10 (UV radiation (lambda = 254 nm), W-mutagenesis, ionizing radiation, nitrous acid, mitomycin C); third group, those exceeding it by a factor of <10 (indirect UV mutagenesis, nitrous acid, ..beta..-chloroethyldiethylamine hydrochloride, nitrosoguanidine); fourth group, no mutagenic effect (acridine orange, ethyl methane sulfonate, sodium azide, 0-..beta..-diethylaminoethylhydroxylamine).

  3. Comparative evaluation of a triplex nucleic acid test for detection of HBV DNA, HCV RNA, and HIV-1 RNA, with the Procleix Tigris System.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xinglong; Zhai, Jianxin; Zeng, Jinfeng; Tian, Cong; Wu, Hui; Yu, Yigang

    2013-02-01

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) is valuable for screening blood donors for occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and infection during the window period in countries where HBV is endemic, such as China. An "in-house" NAT (Triplex NAT) was developed for screening for HBV DNA, hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA, and the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA. Using the Triplex NAT, a head-to-head comparative clinical evaluation was carried out against the most common commercial NAT used for blood screening in China: the Procleix Tigris System. A total of 33,025 specimens which were negative for Hepatitis B surface antigen, HCV antibody and HIV-1 antibody/antigen from potential blood donors were tested for HBV DNA, HCV RNA, and HIV-1 RNA by both the in-house Triplex assay and the commercially available Procleix Tigris System. Eleven specimens were detected as HBV positive by both NATs. Twelve specimens were detected as HBV positive by the Procleix Ultrio assay and the discriminatory assays, and not the Triplex. Twenty-eight specimens were detected as HBV positive by the Triplex and not the Procleix Ultrio. This study, combined with other data obtained in China, suggest that at least 50% HBV surface antigen negative but DNA-positive blood donations would be undetected using the current commercial NATs because of their insufficient sensitivity and/or Mini-Pool formatting strategies.

  4. HIV-1 Reverse Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei-Shau; Hughes, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Reverse transcription and integration are the defining features of the Retroviridae; the common name “retrovirus” derives from the fact that these viruses use a virally encoded enzyme, reverse transcriptase (RT), to convert their RNA genomes into DNA. Reverse transcription is an essential step in retroviral replication. This article presents an overview of reverse transcription, briefly describes the structure and function of RT, provides an introduction to some of the cellular and viral factors that can affect reverse transcription, and discusses fidelity and recombination, two processes in which reverse transcription plays an important role. In keeping with the theme of the collection, the emphasis is on HIV-1 and HIV-1 RT. PMID:23028129

  5. Autonomous replication of plasmids bearing monkey DNA origin-enriched sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Frappier, L.; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, M.

    1987-10-01

    Twelve clones of origin-enriched sequences (ORS) isolated from early replicating monkey (CV-1) DNA were examined for transient episomal replication in transfected CV-1, COS-7, and HeLa cells. Plasmid DNA was isolated at time intervals after transfection and screened by the Dpn I resistance assay or by the bromodeoxyuridine substitution assay to differentiate between input and replicated DNA. The authors have identified four monkey ORS (ORS3, -8, -9, and -12) that can support plasmid replication in mammalian cells. This replication is carried out in a controlled and semiconservative manner characteristic of mammalian replicons. ORS replication was most efficient in HeLa cells. Electron microscopy showed ORS8 and ORS12 plasmids of the correct size with replication bubbles. Using a unique restriction site in ORS12, we have mapped the replication bubble within the monkey DNA sequence.

  6. Fabrication of Size-Tunable Metallic Nanoparticles Using Plasmid DNA as a Biomolecular Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Samson, Jacopo; Piscopo, Irene; Yampolski, Alex; Nahirney, Patrick; Parpas, Andrea; Aggarwal, Amit; Saleh, Raihan; Drain, Charles Michael

    2011-01-01

    Plasmid DNA can be used as a template to yield gold, palladium, silver, and chromium nanoparticles of different sizes based on variations in incubation time at 70 °C with gold phosphine complexes, with the acetates of silver or palladium, or chromium acetylacetonate. The employment of mild synthetic conditions, minimal procedural steps, and aqueous solvents makes this method environmentally greener and ensures general feasibility. The use of plasmids exploits the capabilities of the biotechnology industry as a source of nanoreactor materials.

  7. Fabrication of Size-Tunable Metallic Nanoparticles Using Plasmid DNA as a Biomolecular Reactor.

    PubMed

    Samson, Jacopo; Piscopo, Irene; Yampolski, Alex; Nahirney, Patrick; Parpas, Andrea; Aggarwal, Amit; Saleh, Raihan; Drain, Charles Michael

    2011-10-21

    Plasmid DNA can be used as a template to yield gold, palladium, silver, and chromium nanoparticles of different sizes based on variations in incubation time at 70 °C with gold phosphine complexes, with the acetates of silver or palladium, or chromium acetylacetonate. The employment of mild synthetic conditions, minimal procedural steps, and aqueous solvents makes this method environmentally greener and ensures general feasibility. The use of plasmids exploits the capabilities of the biotechnology industry as a source of nanoreactor materials.

  8. A gel-less isolation of untagged plasmid DNA insert from vector backbone in homogeneous format.

    PubMed

    Kalinichenko, Svetlana V; Shepelev, Mikhail V; Korobko, Igor V

    2017-03-15

    Agarose gel electrophoresis with subsequent DNA extraction from gel is routinely used for DNA fragment isolation after plasmid DNA digestion. We describe a gel-less method for DNA fragment isolation after plasmid DNA digestion which is based on in-solution negative selection through depletion of vector backbone bearing LoxP sites by sorption on solid phase-immobilized mutated Cre recombinase. The method might be especially useful in preparation of DNA fragments for transgenic animal generation where residual agarose presence is a concern, and DNA fragments are frequently large in size and thus might be mechanically damaged during purification with conventional affinity-based gel extraction methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Relationship between LTR methylation and gag expression of HIV-1 in human spermatozoa and sperm-derived embryos.

    PubMed

    Li, FangZheng; Li, LianBing; Zhong, Ying; Xie, QingDong; Huang, JiHua; Kang, XiangJin; Wang, Dian; Xu, Lan; Huang, TianHua

    2013-01-01

    Studying the methylation status of long terminal repeats (LTR) and its relationship to gag expression of HIV-1 in order to explore regulation mechanism of HIV-1 gene expression in vertical transmission from sperm to embryo. Sperm samples were collected from a healthy donor and seven patients with HIV/AIDS. Zona-free hamster ova were fertilized by donor's spermatozoa transfected with pIRES2-EGFP-LTR-gag and patient's spermatozoa to obtain zygotes and 2-cell embryos, respectively. Interspecific in vitro fertilization, bisulfite sequencing PCR (BSP), RT-PCR, nested RT-PCR, nested real-time qRT-PCR and 2(-△△Ct) method, indirect immunofluoresence (IF) assay were performed. For donor's samples, the methylation rates of HIV-1 LTR were 0.56%, 1.67%, 0.56%, 0.56% in plasmid, spermatozoa, zygotes and 2-cell embryos, respectively while spermatozoa were transfected with unmethylated plasmid, and were 95.0%, 84.44%, 3.3%, 1.67% while transfected with methylated plasmid. The positive bands for HIV-1 gag cDNA were detected in spermatozoa and 2-cell embryos. The positive signals for HIV-1 p24 Gag protein were detected in 2-cell embryos but not in spermatozoa. For patient's samples, methylation rates of HIV-1 LTR were different in spermatozoa among patients. After fertilization, CpG sites in HIV-1 LTR were highly demethylated in zygotes and 2-cell embryos. The gag transcription levels increased with decreasing of methylation rates of HIV-1 LTR, which showed a strong negative correlations between gag transcription levels and methylation rates of HIV-LTR ether in the spermatozoa (r = -0.9877, P<0.0001) or in the sperm-derived 2-cell embryos (r = -0.9092, P = 0.0045). LTR methylation regulates expression of HIV-1 gag in vertical transmission from sperm to embryo.

  10. Heterologous prime-boost-boost immunisation of Chinese cynomolgus macaques using DNA and recombinant poxvirus vectors expressing HIV-1 virus-like particles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is renewed interest in the development of poxvirus vector-based HIV vaccines due to the protective effect observed with repeated recombinant canarypox priming with gp120 boosting in the recent Thai placebo-controlled trial. This study sought to investigate whether a heterologous prime-boost-boost vaccine regimen in Chinese cynomolgus macaques with a DNA vaccine and recombinant poxviral vectors expressing HIV virus-like particles bearing envelopes derived from the most prevalent clades circulating in sub-Saharan Africa, focused the antibody response to shared neutralising epitopes. Methods Three Chinese cynomolgus macaques were immunised via intramuscular injections using a regimen composed of a prime with two DNA vaccines expressing clade A Env/clade B Gag followed by boosting with recombinant fowlpox virus expressing HIV-1 clade D Gag, Env and cholera toxin B subunit followed by the final boost with recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing HIV-1 clade C Env, Gag and human complement protein C3d. We measured the macaque serum antibody responses by ELISA, enumerated T cell responses by IFN-γ ELISpot and assessed seroneutralisation of HIV-1 using the TZM-bl β-galactosidase assay with primary isolates of HIV-1. Results This study shows that large and complex synthetic DNA sequences can be successfully cloned in a single step into two poxvirus vectors: MVA and FPV and the recombinant poxviruses could be grown to high titres. The vaccine candidates showed appropriate expression of recombinant proteins with the formation of authentic HIV virus-like particles seen on transmission electron microscopy. In addition the b12 epitope was shown to be held in common by the vaccine candidates using confocal immunofluorescent microscopy. The vaccine candidates were safely administered to Chinese cynomolgus macaques which elicited modest T cell responses at the end of the study but only one out of the three macaques elicited an HIV-specific antibody

  11. Targeting of plasmid DNA to renal interstitial fibroblasts by cationized gelatin.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Nagata-Nakajima, Natsuki; Sugai, Manabu; Shimizu, Akira; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2005-10-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis is the common pathway of chronic renal disease, while it causes end-stage renal failure. A lot of cytokines and biologically active substances are well recognized to be the candidates of primary mediators to induce accumulation of extracelluar matrix (ECM) in the interstitial fibrotic area. Interstitial fibroblasts are played a crucial role in the accumulation of excess ECM during renal interstitial fibrogenesis. Therefore, the targeting of therapeutic drugs and genes to interstitial renal fibroblasts is effective in suppressing the progress of interstitial renal failure. However, despite various approaches and techniques, few successful results have been reported on the in vivo targeting for interstitial fibroblasts. The objective of this study is to deliver an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) plasmid DNA, as a model plasmid DNA, into renal interstitial space by a cationized gelatin. After the plasmid DNA with or without complexation of the cationized gelatin was injected to the left kidney of mice via the ureter, unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) was performed for the mice injected to induce the renal interstitial fibrosis. When the EGFP plasmid DNA complexed with the cationized gelatin was injected, EGFP expression was observed in the fibroblasts in the interstitial area of renal cortex. It is concluded that the retrograde injection of EGFP plasmid DNA complexed with the cationized gelatin is available to target the interstitial renal fibroblasts which are currently considered as the cell source responsible for excessive ECM synthesis.

  12. High-throughput isolation of ultra-pure plasmid DNA by a robotic system

    PubMed Central

    Kachel, Volker; Sindelar, Georg; Grimm, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Background With the availability of complete genomes, a systematic inventory of cellular processes becomes achievable. This requires assessing the function of all individual genes. Transfection of plasmid DNA into cell culture cells is an essential technique for this aim as it allows functional overexpression or downregulation of genes. While many robotic systems isolate plasmids for sequencing purposes, for more demanding applications such as transfections there is a shortage of robots for the high-throughput isolation of plasmid DNA. Results Here we describe a custom-made, automated device, which uses a special protocol to isolate plasmid DNAs with a purity sufficient for efficient transfections into mammalian cells. Approximately 1,600 ultra pure plasmids can be isolated in a 96-well plate format within 12 hours. As a unique feature the robot comprises the integration of a centrifuge instead of expensive columns, the use of a custom-made pipetting head with a movable gripper, especially designed shaking platforms and an acetone wash facility. Conclusion Using this robot we demonstrate how centrifugation steps with multiple precipitations, most notably through a precipitation step of SDS in isopropanol, lead to high purity plasmid DNA and make possible high-throughput transfections into mammalian cells for functional gene annotations. PMID:16483377

  13. Homologous recombination between plasmids in mammalian cells can be enhanced by treatment of input DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kucherlapati, R S; Eves, E M; Song, K Y; Morse, B S; Smithies, O

    1984-01-01

    We have used the eukaryotic-prokaryotic shuttle vector pSV2Neo to demonstrate that cultured mammalian somatic cells have the enzymatic machinery to mediate homologous recombination and that the frequency of this recombination can be enhanced by pretreatment of the input DNA. Two nonoverlapping deletion mutants of pSV2Neo were constructed, each affecting the bacterial aminoglycoside 3'-phosphorylase gene (the neo gene), which confers resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics on bacteria and resistance to the antibiotic G418 on mammalian cells. Mammalian cells transfected with either deletion plasmid alone yield no G418 -resistant colonies. Cells cotransfected with both deletion plasmids yield G418 -resistant colonies with high frequency. We show that these resistant colonies result from recombination involving homologous crossing-over or gene conversion between the deletion plasmids by rescuing from the resistant cells both types of reciprocal recombinant, full-length plasmids, and doubly deleted plasmids. Cutting one of the input plasmids to generate a double-stranded gap in the neo gene considerably enhances the frequency of homologous recombination within the gene. This suggests that targeting exogenous DNA to specific sites in mammalian chromosomes could be facilitated by suitable pretreatment of the DNA. Images PMID:6328502

  14. Short direct repeats flank the T-DNA on a nopaline Ti plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Narendra S.; Vanderleyden, Jos; Bennett, Donald R.; Barnes, Wayne M.; Chilton, Mary-Dell

    1982-01-01

    Crown gall disease results from the insertion of a segment of the Agrobacterium Ti plasmid, called T-DNA, into host plant nuclear DNA. We have subjected to sequence analysis the border regions of pTi T37 (ends of T-DNA) and one left T-DNA/plant DNA border fragment isolated from BT37 tobacco teratoma by molecular cloning. These sequence studies, taken together with published sequence of a right T-DNA/plant DNA border fragment, allowed us to identify the positions of left and right borders at the DNA sequence level. Comparison of left and right border regions of the Ti plasmid revealed a “core” direct repeat of 13 of 14 bases (12 contiguous) precisely at the borders of T-DNA. An extended repeat of 21 of 25 bases overlaps this core repeat. T-DNA on the Ti plasmid exhibits no longer direct or inverted repeats in the border regions, based on Southern hybridization studies. The physical structure of T-DNA differs from that of known prokaryotic and eukaryotic transposable elements but bears a structural resemblance to the prophage of bacteriophage λ. Images PMID:16593241

  15. Minicircle DNA is Superior to Plasmid DNA in Eliciting Antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Wynette M; Skinner, Nicole E B; Hamilton, Sara E; Jund, Michelle D; Heitfeld, Suzanne M; Litterman, Adam J; Hwu, Patrick; Chen, Zhi-Ying; Salazar, Andres M; Ohlfest, John R; Blazar, Bruce R; Pennell, Christopher A; Osborn, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials reveal that plasmid DNA (pDNA)–based gene delivery must be improved to realize its potential to treat human disease. Current pDNA platforms suffer from brief transgene expression, primarily due to the spread of transcriptionally repressive chromatin initially deposited on plasmid bacterial backbone sequences. Minicircle (MC) DNA lacks plasmid backbone sequences and correspondingly confers higher levels of sustained transgene expression upon delivery, accounting for its success in preclinical gene therapy models. In this study, we show for the first time that MC DNA also functions as a vaccine platform. We used a luciferase reporter transgene to demonstrate that intradermal delivery of MC DNA, relative to pDNA, resulted in significantly higher and persistent levels of luciferase expression in mouse skin. Next, we immunized mice intradermally with DNA encoding a peptide that, when presented by the appropriate major histocompatibility complex class I molecule, was recognized by endogenous CD8+ T cells. Finally, immunization with peptide-encoding MC DNA, but not the corresponding full-length (FL) pDNA, conferred significant protection in mice challenged with Listeria monocytogenes expressing the model peptide. Together, our results suggest intradermal delivery of MC DNA may prove more efficacious for prophylaxis than traditional pDNA vaccines. PMID:23689601

  16. Mode of degradation of plasmid DNA with ozone.

    PubMed

    Sawadaishi, K; Miura, K; Ohthuka, E; Ueda, T; Ishizaki, K; Shinriki, N

    1984-01-01

    The ozonization of pBR322 closed circular DNA showed the conversion to open circular DNA. The damaged site was investigated by restriction mapping. The results showed the damage and subsequent cleavage of the DNA strand of ccDNA by ozonization may occur at the region sensitive to nuclease S1.

  17. Recovery of recombinant bacterial plasmids from E. coli transformed with DNA from microinjected mouse cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kretschmer, P J; Bowman, A H; Huberman, M H; Sanders-Haigh, L; Killos, L; Anderson, W F

    1981-01-01

    We have previously described the isolation of thymidine kinase positive (TK+), human beta-globin gene-containing colonies following co-microinjection of mouse TK- L cells with two recombinant pBR322 plasmids, one containing the TK gene of herpes simplex virus type I (plasmid pXl), and the second containing a human genomic DNA fragment within which is the human beta-globin gene (plasmid pRKl). DNA isolated from one such clone was used in bacterial transformation experiments with a selection for tetracycline-resistant colonies (that is, for cells containing pRKl). A total of forty-two tetracycline-resistant colonies were isolated, thirty of which contained circular pRK1 molecules identical to those originally injected. The remaining twelve colonies contained unique plasmids that were grouped into five different classes of recombinant molecules. All five of these unique recombinant classes appear to contain a common deletion endpoint occurring at a specific region of the pBR322 segment of pRKl. Four of the unique recombinant classes appear to have arisen from the deletion of a segment of a pRKl trimer or dimer molecule, while the fifth class appears to have resulted from recombination between pRKl and pXl followed by a deletion event within this recombinant. It is uncertain whether these deletions are occurring within the eukaryotic cell or upon subsequent transformation of the bacterial cell. If the latter, then the passage of the plasmid DNA through the eukaryotic cell alters a specific site of the pBR322 DNA in such a way that deletions can occur at a high frequency in this region when the plasmid DNA is introduced back into a bacterial cell. Thus, we have established a prokaryote-eukaryote-prokaryote DNA transfer and recovery system which should be useful in studies on DNA replication and the regulation of gene expression in higher eukaryotes. Images PMID:6273826

  18. Structure of an anti-HIV-1 hammerhead ribozyme complex with a 17-mer DNA substrate analog of HIV-1 gag RNA and a mechanism for the cleavage reaction: 750 MHz NMR and computer experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojha, R. P.; Dhingra, M. M.; Sarma, M. H.; Myer, Y. P.; Setlik, R. F.; Shibata, M.; Kazim, A. L.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.; Turner, C. J.; Sarma, R. H.

    1997-01-01

    The structure of an anti-HIV-1 ribozyme-DNA abortive substrate complex was investigated by 750 MHz NMR and computer modeling experiments. The ribozyme was a chimeric molecule with 30 residues-18 DNA nucleotides, and 12 RNA residues in the conserved core. The DNA substrate analog had 17 residues. The chimeric ribozyme and the DNA substrate formed a shortened ribozyme-abortive substrate complex of 47 nucleotides with two DNA stems (stems I and III) and a loop consisting of the conserved core residues. Circular dichroism spectra showed that the DNA stems assume A-family conformation at the NMR concentration and a temperature of 15 degrees C, contrary to the conventional wisdom that DNA duplexes in aqueous solution populate entirely in the B-form. It is proposed that the A-family RNA residues at the core expand the A-family initiated at the core into the DNA stems because of the large free energy requirement for the formation of A/B junctions. Assignments of the base H8/H6 protons and H1' of the 47 residues were made by a NOESY walk. In addition to the methyl groups of all T's, the imino resonances of stems I and III and AH2's were assigned from appropriate NOESY walks. The extracted NMR data along with available crystallographic data, were used to derive a structural model of the complex. Stems I and III of the final model displayed a remarkable similarity to the A form of DNA; in stem III, a GC base pair was found to be moving into the floor of the minor groove defined by flanking AT pairs; data suggest the formation of a buckled rhombic structure with the adjacent pair; in addition, the base pair at the interface of stem III and the loop region displayed deformed geometry. The loop with the catalytic core, and the immediate region of the stems displayed conformational multiplicity within the NMR time scale. A catalytic mechanism for ribozyme action based on the derived structure, and consistent with biochemical data in the literature, is proposed. The complex

  19. Structure of an anti-HIV-1 hammerhead ribozyme complex with a 17-mer DNA substrate analog of HIV-1 gag RNA and a mechanism for the cleavage reaction: 750 MHz NMR and computer experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojha, R. P.; Dhingra, M. M.; Sarma, M. H.; Myer, Y. P.; Setlik, R. F.; Shibata, M.; Kazim, A. L.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.; Turner, C. J.; hide

    1997-01-01

    The structure of an anti-HIV-1 ribozyme-DNA abortive substrate complex was investigated by 750 MHz NMR and computer modeling experiments. The ribozyme was a chimeric molecule with 30 residues-18 DNA nucleotides, and 12 RNA residues in the conserved core. The DNA substrate analog had 17 residues. The chimeric ribozyme and the DNA substrate formed a shortened ribozyme-abortive substrate complex of 47 nucleotides with two DNA stems (stems I and III) and a loop consisting of the conserved core residues. Circular dichroism spectra showed that the DNA stems assume A-family conformation at the NMR concentration and a temperature of 15 degrees C, contrary to the conventional wisdom that DNA duplexes in aqueous solution populate entirely in the B-form. It is proposed that the A-family RNA residues at the core expand the A-family initiated at the core into the DNA stems because of the large free energy requirement for the formation of A/B junctions. Assignments of the base H8/H6 protons and H1' of the 47 residues were made by a NOESY walk. In addition to the methyl groups of all T's, the imino resonances of stems I and III and AH2's were assigned from appropriate NOESY walks. The extracted NMR data along with available crystallographic data, were used to derive a structural model of the complex. Stems I and III of the final model displayed a remarkable similarity to the A form of DNA; in stem III, a GC base pair was found to be moving into the floor of the minor groove defined by flanking AT pairs; data suggest the formation of a buckled rhombic structure with the adjacent pair; in addition, the base pair at the interface of stem III and the loop region displayed deformed geometry. The loop with the catalytic core, and the immediate region of the stems displayed conformational multiplicity within the NMR time scale. A catalytic mechanism for ribozyme action based on the derived structure, and consistent with biochemical data in the literature, is proposed. The complex

  20. Uracil DNA glycosylase interacts with the p32 subunit of the replication protein A complex to modulate HIV-1 reverse transcription for optimal virus dissemination.

    PubMed

    Herate, Cecile; Vigne, Clarisse; Guenzel, Carolin A; Lambele, Marie; Rouyez, Marie-Christine; Benichou, Serge

    2016-04-12

    Through incorporation into virus particles, the HIV-1 Vpr protein participates in the early steps of the virus life cycle by influencing the reverse transcription process. We previously showed that this positive impact on reverse transcription was related to Vpr binding to the uracil DNA glycosylase 2 enzyme (UNG2), leading to enhancement of virus infectivity in established CD4-positive cell lines via a nonenzymatic mechanism. We report here that Vpr can form a trimolecular complex with UNG2 and the p32 subunit (RPA32) of the replication protein A (RPA) complex and we explore how these cellular proteins can influence virus replication and dissemination in the primary target cells of HIV-1, which express low levels of both proteins. Virus infectivity and replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs), as well as the efficiency of the viral DNA synthesis, were significantly reduced when viruses were produced from cells depleted of endogenous UNG2 or RPA32. Moreover, viruses produced in macrophages failed to replicate efficiently in UNG2- and RPA32-depleted T lymphocytes. Reciprocally, viruses produced in UNG2-depleted T cells did not replicate efficiently in MDMs confirming the positive role of UNG2 for virus dissemination. Our data show the positive effect of UNG2 and RPA32 on the reverse transcription process leading to optimal virus replication and dissemination between the primary target cells of HIV-1.

  1. An improved method for large-scale preparation of negatively and positively supercoiled plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Barth, Marita; Dederich, Debra; Dedon, Peter

    2009-07-01

    A rigorous understanding of the biological function of superhelical tension in cellular DNA requires the development of new tools and model systems for study. To this end, an ethidium bromide[#x02013]free method has been developed to prepare large quantities of either negatively or positively super-coiled plasmid DNA. The method is based upon the known effects of ionic strength on the direction of binding of DNA to an archaeal histone, rHMfB, with low and high salt concentrations leading to positive and negative DNA supercoiling, respectively. In addition to fully optimized conditions for large-scale (>500 microg) supercoiling reactions, the method is advantageous in that it avoids the use of mutagenic ethidium bromide, is applicable to chemically modified plasmid DNA substrates, and produces both positively and negatively supercoiled DNA using a single set of reagents.

  2. Production of single- and double-strand breaks in plasmid DNA by ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Hamelin, C.

    1985-02-01

    Agarose gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy were used to determine the type of lesions produced in DNA by ozone. This strong oxidizing agent was found to relax, linearize, then degrade native plasmid (pAT153) DNA molecules in solution. Ozone, like ionizing radiation, thus produced DNA breakage. To ascertain this point, wild-type and radiosensitive strains of Escherichia coli were transfected with control or ozonated plasmid DNA, and the host cells were selected for antibiotic resistance. A significant reduction in the transforming ability of pAT153 was observed following ozonation. Mutants deficient in the repair of DNA single-strand breaks yielded less ampicillin- or tetracycline-resistant clones than repair-proficient strains. In E. coli, the same gene products are probably involved in the repair of both radiation- and ozone-induced DNA breaks.

  3. Adsorption of plasmid DNA to mineral surfaces and protection against DNase I

    SciTech Connect

    Romanowski, G.; Lorenz, M.G.; Wackernagel, W. )

    1991-04-01

    The adsorption of ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled plasmid DNA (pHC314; 2.4 kb) of different conformations to chemically pure sand was studied in a flowthrough microenvironment. The extent of adsorption was affected by the concentration and valency of cations, indicating a charge-dependent process. Bivalent cations (Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}) were 100-fold more effective than monovalent cations (Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}). Quantitative adsorption of up to 1 {mu}g of negatively supercoiled or linearized plasmid DNA to 0.7 g of sand was observed in the presence of 5 mm MgCl{sub 2} at pH 7. Under these conditions, more than 85% of DNA adsorbed within 60 s. Maximum adsorption was 4 {mu}g of DNA to 0.7 g of sand. Supercoil molecules adsorbed slightly less than linearized or open circular plasmids. An increase of the pH from 5 to 9 decreased adsorption at 0.5 mM MgCl{sub 2} about eightfold. It is concluded that adsorption of plasmid DNA to sand depends on the neutralization of negative charges on the DNA molecules and the mineral surfaces by cations. The results are discussed on the grounds of the polyelectrolyte adsorption model. Sand-adsorbed DNA was 100 times more resistant against DNase I than was DNA free in solution. The data support the idea that plasmid DNA can enter the extracellular bacterial gene pool which is located at mineral surfaces in natural bacterial habitats.

  4. Advances in chromatographic supports for pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA purification.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Angela; Sousa, Fani; Queiroz, João A

    2012-11-01

    Chromatographic technology is undoubtedly one of the most diverse and powerful purification methods for downstream process applications. The diversity and quantity of biomolecules present in crude extracts as well as the similarities between impurities and the target biomolecule are considered the critical challenges in the extraction and purification steps. Thus, it is important to optimize the purification protocol to achieve maximum recovery of the target sample. The structure of chromatographic supports has been continuously developed to afford rapid and efficient separations, as well as, the application of specific ligands to improve the selectivity for the target molecule. The present review discusses the structural progress and evolution of the chromatographic supports that have been used for plasmid DNA purification. Nowadays, the most desirable form of plasmid for gene therapy and DNA vaccination is the supercoiled isoform, due to its stability and higher transfection efficiency over other plasmid topologies. However, the main challenge is not only to produce high quantities of supercoiled plasmid DNA but also to preserve its quality, meeting the strict requirements recommended by the regulatory agencies. Therefore, this review will focus on the chemical and structural classification of the different media and on some of the specific ligands used for plasmid DNA bioseparation.

  5. The pPSU Plasmids for Generating DNA Molecular Weight Markers.

    PubMed

    Henrici, Ryan C; Pecen, Turner J; Johnston, James L; Tan, Song

    2017-05-26

    Visualizing nucleic acids by gel electrophoresis is one of the most common techniques in molecular biology, and reference molecular weight markers or ladders are commonly used for size estimation. We have created the pPSU1 & pPSU2 pair of molecular weight marker plasmids which produce both 100 bp and 1 kb DNA ladders when digested with two common restriction enzymes. The 100 bp ladder fragments have been optimized to migrate appropriately on both agarose and native polyacrylamide, unlike many currently available DNA ladders. Sufficient plasmid DNA can be isolated from 100 ml E. coli cultures for the two plasmids to produce 100 bp or 1 kb ladders for 1000 gels. As such, the pPSU1 and pPSU2 plasmids provide reference fragments from 50 to 10000 bp at a fraction of the cost of commercial DNA ladders. The pPSU1 and pPSU2 plasmids are available without licensing restrictions to nonprofit academic users, affording freely available high-quality, low-cost molecular weight standards for molecular biology applications.

  6. The effects of a low-intensity red laser on bacterial growth, filamentation and plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, C.; Santos, J. N.; Guimarães, O. R.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2013-07-01

    Exposure of nonphotosynthesizing microorganisms to light could increase cell division in cultures, a phenomenon denominated as biostimulation. However, data concerning the importance of the genetic characteristics of cells on this effect are as yet scarce. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of a low-intensity red laser on the growth, filamentation and plasmids in Escherichia coli cells proficient and deficient in DNA repair. E. coli cultures were exposed to a laser (658 nm, 10 mW, 1 and 8 J cm-2) to study bacterial growth and filamentation. Also, bacterial cultures hosting pBSK plasmids were exposed to the laser to study DNA topological forms from the electrophoretic profile in agarose gels. Data indicate the low-intensity red laser: (i) had no effect on the growth of E. coli wild type and exonuclease III deficient cells; (ii) induced bacterial filamentation, (iii) led to no alteration in the electrophoretic profile of plasmids from exonuclease III deficient cells, but plasmids from wild type cells were altered. A low-intensity red laser at the low fluences used in phototherapy has no effect on growth, but induces filamentation and alters the topological forms of plasmid DNA in E. coli cultures depending on the DNA repair mechanisms.

  7. Synthetic consensus HIV-1 DNA induces potent cellular immune responses and synthesis of granzyme B, perforin in HIV infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Matthew P; Tebas, Pablo; Yan, Jian; Ramirez, Lorenzo; Slager, Anna; Kraynyak, Kim; Diehl, Malissa; Shah, Divya; Khan, Amir; Lee, Jessica; Boyer, Jean; Kim, J Joseph; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of PENNVAX-B in 12 HIV infected individuals. PENNVAX-B is a combination of three optimized synthetic plasmids encoding for multiclade HIV Gag and Pol and a consensus CladeB Env delivered by electroporation. HIV infected individuals whose virus was effectively suppressed using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) received PENNVAX-B DNA followed by electroporation with CELLECTRA-5P at study weeks 0, 4, 8, and 16. Local administration site and systemic reactions to PENNVAX-B were recorded after each treatment along with any adverse events. Pain of the treatment procedure was assessed using a Visual Analog Scale. Whole PBMCs were isolated for use in IFN ELISpot and Flow Cytometric assays. PENNVAX-B was generally safe and well tolerated. Overall, the four dose regimen was not associated with any serious adverse events or severe local or systemic reactions. A rise in antigen-specific SFU was detected in the INFγ ELISpot assay in all 12 participants. T cells from 8/12 participants loaded with both granzyme B and perforin in response to HIV antigen, an immune finding characteristic of long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) and elite controllers (ECs). Thus administration of PENNVAX-B may prove useful adjunctive therapy to ART for treatment and control of HIV infection.

  8. Synthetic Consensus HIV-1 DNA Induces Potent Cellular Immune Responses and Synthesis of Granzyme B, Perforin in HIV Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Matthew P; Tebas, Pablo; Yan, Jian; Ramirez, Lorenzo; Slager, Anna; Kraynyak, Kim; Diehl, Malissa; Shah, Divya; Khan, Amir; Lee, Jessica; Boyer, Jean; Kim, J Joseph; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of PENNVAX-B in 12 HIV infected individuals. PENNVAX-B is a combination of three optimized synthetic plasmids encoding for multiclade HIV Gag and Pol and a consensus CladeB Env delivered by electroporation. HIV infected individuals whose virus was effectively suppressed using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) received PENNVAX-B DNA followed by electroporation with CELLECTRA-5P at study weeks 0, 4, 8, and 16. Local administration site and systemic reactions to PENNVAX-B were recorded after each treatment along with any adverse events. Pain of the treatment procedure was assessed using a Visual Analog Scale. Whole PBMCs were isolated for use in IFN ELISpot and Flow Cytometric assays. PENNVAX-B was generally safe and well tolerated. Overall, the four dose regimen was not associated with any serious adverse events or severe local or systemic reactions. A rise in antigen-specific SFU was detected in the INFγ ELISpot assay in all 12 participants. T cells from 8/12 participants loaded with both granzyme B and perforin in response to HIV antigen, an immune finding characteristic of long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) and elite controllers (ECs). Thus administration of PENNVAX-B may prove useful adjunctive therapy to ART for treatment and control of HIV infection. PMID:25531694

  9. Activated air produced by shielded sliding discharge plasma mediates plasmid DNA delivery to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Heller, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Cold plasma is emerging as a potential method for medical applications. The current study assessed the efficacy of a novel cold plasma reactor based on shielded sliding discharge producing cathode-directed streamers generated in ambient air for the delivery of plasmid DNA. Experiments were performed with mouse melanoma cells (B16F10) and human keratinocyte cells (HaCaT) inoculated with plasmid DNA encoding luciferase. Quantitative results measured over a 72-h period displayed luciferase expression levels as high as 5-fold greater in cells exposed to plasma-activated air (PAA) than levels obtained from the inoculation of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). No effect on cell viability was observed. Delivery of plasmid encoding GFP to HaCaT cells seeded on polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds was confirmed by immunostaining. The use of cold plasma for DNA delivery is attractive as it provides a non-viral, non-invasive method where the electrode or the plasma itself never directly contacts the exposed site. The current device design provides localized DNA transfer using a novel technology. Our report suggests PAA warrants further exploration as an alternative or supplemental approach for DNA transfer.

  10. Advances in host and vector development for the production of plasmid DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mairhofer, Juergen; Lara, Alvaro R

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in DNA vaccine research provide a new momentum for this rather young and potentially disruptive technology. Gene-based vaccines are capable of eliciting protective immunity in humans to persistent intracellular pathogens, such as HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis, for which the conventional vaccine technologies have failed so far. The recent identification and characterization of genes coding for tumor antigens has stimulated the development of DNA-based antigen-specific cancer vaccines. Although most academic researchers consider the production of reasonable amounts of plasmid DNA (pDNA) for immunological studies relatively easy to solve, problems often arise during this first phase of production. In this chapter we review the current state of the art of pDNA production at small (shake flasks) and mid-scales (lab-scale bioreactor fermentations) and address new trends in vector design and strain engineering. We will guide the reader through the different stages of process design starting from choosing the most appropriate plasmid backbone, choosing the right Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain for production, and cultivation media and scale-up issues. In addition, we will address some points concerning the safety and potency of the produced plasmids, with special focus on producing antibiotic resistance-free plasmids. The main goal of this chapter is to make immunologists aware of the fact that production of the pDNA vaccine has to be performed with as much as attention and care as the rest of their research.

  11. DNA vaccines expressing soluble CD4-envelope proteins fused to C3d elicit cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, Joseph F.; Green, Thomas D.; Ross, Ted M. . E-mail: tmr15@pitt.edu

    2004-10-25

    DNA vaccines expressing the envelope (Env) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) have been relatively ineffective at generating high-titer, long-lasting, neutralizing antibodies in a variety of animal models. In this study, DNA vaccines were constructed to express a fusion protein of the soluble human CD4 (sCD4) and the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 envelope. To enhance the immunogenicity of the expressed fusion protein, three copies of the murine C3d (mC3d{sub 3}) were added to the carboxyl terminus of the complex. Monoclonal antibodies that recognize CD4-induced epitopes on gp120 efficiently bound to sCD4-gp120 or sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3}. In addition, both sCD4-gp120 and sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3} bound to cells expressing appropriate coreceptors in the absence of cell surface hCD4. Mice (BALB/c) vaccinated with DNA vaccines expressing either gp120-mC3d{sub 3} or sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3} elicited antibodies that neutralized homologous virus infection. However, the use of sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3}-DNA elicited the highest titers of neutralizing antibodies that persisted after depletion of anti-hCD4 antibodies. Interestingly, only mice vaccinated with DNA expressing sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3} had antibodies that elicited cross-protective neutralizing antibodies. The fusion of sCD4 to the HIV-1 envelope exposes neutralizing epitopes that elicit broad protective immunity when the fusion complex is coupled with the molecular adjuvant, C3d.

  12. Priming Immunization with DNA Augments Immunogenicity of Recombinant Adenoviral Vectors for Both HIV-1 Specific Antibody and T-Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Koup, Richard A.; Roederer, Mario; Lamoreaux, Laurie; Fischer, Jennifer; Novik, Laura; Nason, Martha C.; Larkin, Brenda D.; Enama, Mary E.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Bailer, Robert T.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Graham, Barney S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Induction of HIV-1-specific T-cell responses relevant to diverse subtypes is a major goal of HIV vaccine development. Prime-boost regimens using heterologous gene-based vaccine vectors have induced potent, polyfunctional T cell responses in preclinical studies. Methods The first opportunity to evaluate the immunogenicity of DNA priming followed by recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) boosting was as open-label rollover trials in subjects who had been enrolled in prior studies of HIV-1 specific DNA vaccines. All subjects underwent apheresis before and after rAd5 boosting to characterize in depth the T cell and antibody response induced by the heterologous DNA/rAd5 prime-boost combination. Results rAd5 boosting was well-tolerated with no serious adverse events. Compared to DNA or rAd5 vaccine alone, sequential DNA/rAd5 administration induced 7-fold higher magnitude Env-biased HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell responses and 100-fold greater antibody titers measured by ELISA. There was no significant neutralizing antibody activity against primary isolates. Vaccine-elicited CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells expressed multiple functions and were predominantly long-term (CD127+) central or effector memory T cells and that persisted in blood for >6 months. Epitopes mapped in Gag and Env demonstrated partial cross-clade recognition. Conclusion Heterologous prime-boost using vector-based gene delivery of vaccine antigens is a potent immunization strategy for inducing both antibody and T-cell responses. Trial Registration ClinicalTrails.gov NCT00102089, NCT00108654 PMID:20126394

  13. Activation of the DNA Damage Response Is a Conserved Function of HIV-1 and HIV-2 Vpr That Is Independent of SLX4 Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There has been extraordinary progress in understanding the roles of lentiviral accessory proteins in antagonizing host antiviral defense proteins. However, the precise primary function of the accessory gene Vpr remains elusive. Here we suggest that engagement with the DNA damage response is an important function of primate lentiviral Vpr proteins because of its conserved function among diverse lentiviral lineages. In contrast, we show that, for HIV-1, HIV-2, and related Vpr isolates and orthologs, there is a lack of correlation between DNA damage response activation and interaction with the host SLX4 protein complex of structure specific endonucleases; some Vpr proteins are able to interact with SLX4, but the majority are not. Using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 method to knock out SLX4, we formally showed that HIV-1 and HIV-2 Vpr orthologs can still activate the DNA damage response and cell cycle arrest in the absence of SLX4. Together, our data suggest that activation of the DNA damage response, but not SLX4 interaction, is conserved and therefore indicative of an important function of Vpr. Our data also indicate that Vpr activates the DNA damage response through an SLX4-independent mechanism that remains uncharacterized. PMID:27624129

  14. Rapid identification of intact bacterial resistance plasmids via optical mapping of single DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Lena K.; Quaderi, Saair; Emilsson, Gustav; Karami, Nahid; Lagerstedt, Erik; Müller, Vilhelm; Noble, Charleston; Hammarberg, Susanna; Nilsson, Adam N.; Sjöberg, Fei; Fritzsche, Joachim; Kristiansson, Erik; Sandegren, Linus; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antibiotic resistance – currently one of the greatest threats to human health according to WHO – is to a large extent enabled by plasmid-mediated horizontal transfer of resistance genes. Rapid identification and characterization of plasmids is thus important both for individual clinical outcomes and for epidemiological monitoring of antibiotic resistance. Toward this aim, we have developed an optical DNA mapping procedure where individual intact plasmids are elongated within nanofluidic channels and visualized through fluorescence microscopy, yielding barcodes that reflect the underlying sequence. The assay rapidly identifies plasmids through statistical comparisons with barcodes based on publicly available sequence repositories and also enables detection of structural variations. Since the assay yields holistic sequence information for individual intact plasmids, it is an ideal complement to next generation sequencing efforts which involve reassembly of sequence reads from fragmented DNA molecules. The assay should be applicable in microbiology labs around the world in applications ranging from fundamental plasmid biology to clinical epidemiology and diagnostics. PMID:27460437

  15. Reactive oxygen species controllable non-thermal helium plasmas for evaluation of plasmid DNA strand breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young Kim, Jae; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Ballato, John; Cao, Weiguo; Kim, Sung-O.

    2012-11-01

    Non-thermal, oxygen-rich helium plasmas were investigated to achieve an enhanced reactive oxygen species concentration at low voltage driving conditions. A non-thermal plasma device was fabricated based on a theta-shaped tube, and its potential was investigated for use in topological alteration of plasmid DNA. The optical emission spectra of the plasma showed that the oxygen flow affected the plasma properties, even though an oxygen plasma was not produced. The plasmid DNA strand breaks became more significant with the addition of oxygen flow to the helium in a single hollow, theta-shaped tube with other experimental conditions being unchanged.

  16. Transfer of Large Contiguous DNA Fragments onto a Low Copy Plasmid or into the Bacterial Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Analise Z; Lesser, Cammie F

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial pathogenicity islands and other contiguous operons can be difficult to clone using conventional methods due to their large size. Here we describe a robust 3-step method to transfer large defined fragments of DNA from virulence plasmids or cosmids onto smaller autonomously replicating plasmids or directly into defined sites in the bacterial chromosome that incorporates endogenous yeast and λ Red homologous recombination systems. This methodology has been successfully used to isolate and integrate at least 31 kb of contiguous DNA and can be readily adapted for the recombineering of E. coli and its close relatives. PMID:28203614

  17. High degree of concordance between flow cytometry and geno2pheno methods for HIV-1 tropism determination in proviral DNA.

    PubMed

    Torres, Alex José Leite; Brígido, Luis Fernando de Macedo; Abrahão, Marcos Herculano Nunes; Angelo, Ana Luiza Dias; de Jesus Ferreira, Gilcivaldo; Coelho, Luana Portes; Ferreira, João Leandro; Jorge, Célia Regina Mayoral Pedroso; Netto, Eduardo Martins; Brites, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Use of CCR5 antagonists requires previous viral tropism determination. The available methods have high cost, are time-consuming, or require highly trained personnel, and sophisticated equipment. We compared a flow cytometry-based tropism assay with geno2pheno method to determine HIV-1 tropism in AIDS patients, in Bahia, Brazil. We tested peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 102 AIDS patients under antiretroviral therapy by using a cytometry-based tropism assay and geno2pheno assay. Cellular membrane receptors were identified by using CXCR4, CCR5 and CD4 monoclonal antibodies, while detection of cytoplasmic mRNAs for gag and pol HIV regions was achieved by using a labeled probe. Genotypic identification of X4 and R5 tropic viruses was attempted by geno2pheno algorithm. There was a high degree of concordance between cytometry-based tropism assay and geno2pheno algorithm in determination of HIV-1 tropism. Cytometry-based tropism assay demonstrated higher sensitivity and specificity in comparison to geno2pheno, which was used as a gold-standard. One sample could not be amplified by geno2pheno method, but was classified as duotropic by cytometry-based tropism assay. We did not find any association between CD4+ count or plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load and tropism results. The overall performances of cytometry-based tropism assay and geno2pheno assay were almost identical in determination of HIV-1 tropism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. DNA-membrane association is necessary for initiation of chromosomal and plasmid replication in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Winston, S; Sueoka, N

    1980-05-01

    We examined the effect of the inhibition of initiation of DNA replication on the membrane association of the chromosomal origin of replication of Bacillus subtilis and the Staphylococcus aureus-Bacillus pumilus chimeric plasmid pSL103, using temperature-sensitive mutants of B. subtilis that have specifically affected initiation. Inhibition of initiation of the chromosome and pSL103 in the initiation mutant dna-1 results in a decrease in the membrane association of both a marker near the chromosomal origin, purA16, and the plasmid pSL103. The membrane association of both purA16 and pSL103 can be recovered by allowing initiation to resume at the permissive temperature. In another initiation mutant, dnaB19, only the initiation and membrane association of the host chromosome are affected at the nonpermissive temperature, whereas both initiation and membrane association are not affected in the plasmid pSL103. In experiments in vitro, DNA containing the purA16 marker and pSL103 DNA molecules are both selectively released during incubation of purified DNA-membrane complexes prepared from dna-1 cells at the nonpermissive temperature. On the other hand, only purA16 DNA is released in vitro from the DNA-membrane complex prepared from dnaB19 cells. This consistent coupling between initiation and membrane association indicates that DNA-membrane association is critical for the initiation of the B. subtilis chromosome and the plasmid pSL103.

  19. Evaluation of plasmid and genomic DNA calibrants used for the quantification of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Caprioara-Buda, M; Meyer, W; Jeynov, B; Corbisier, P; Trapmann, S; Emons, H

    2012-07-01

    The reliable quantification of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) by real-time PCR requires, besides thoroughly validated quantitative detection methods, sustainable calibration systems. The latter establishes the anchor points for the measured value and the measurement unit, respectively. In this paper, the suitability of two types of DNA calibrants, i.e. plasmid DNA and genomic DNA extracted from plant leaves, for the certification of the GMO content in reference materials as copy number ratio between two targeted DNA sequences was investigated. The PCR efficiencies and coefficients of determination of the calibration curves as well as the measured copy number ratios for three powder certified reference materials (CRMs), namely ERM-BF415e (NK603 maize), ERM-BF425c (356043 soya), and ERM-BF427c (98140 maize), originally certified for their mass fraction of GMO, were compared for both types of calibrants. In all three systems investigated, the PCR efficiencies of plasmid DNA were slightly closer to the PCR efficiencies observed for the genomic DNA extracted from seed powders rather than those of the genomic DNA extracted from leaves. Although the mean DNA copy number ratios for each CRM overlapped within their uncertainties, the DNA copy number ratios were significantly different using the two types of calibrants. Based on these observations, both plasmid and leaf genomic DNA calibrants would be technically suitable as anchor points for the calibration of the real-time PCR methods applied in this study. However, the most suitable approach to establish a sustainable traceability chain is to fix a reference system based on plasmid DNA.

  20. DNA repair in cells sensitive and resistant to cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II): Host cell reactivation of damaged plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sheibani, N.; Jennerwein, M.M.; Eastman, A. )

    1989-04-04

    cis-Diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP) has a broad clinical application as an effective anticancer drug. However, development of resistance to the cytotoxic effects is a limiting factor. In an attempt to understand the mechanism of resistance, the authors have employed a host cell reactivation assay of DNA repair using a cis-DDP-damaged plasmid vector. The efficiency of DNA repair was assayed by measuring the activity of an enzyme coded for by the plasmid vector. The plasmid expression vector pRSV cat contains the bacterial gene coding for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in a configuration which permits expression in mammalian cells. The plasmid was transfected into repair-proficient and -deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells, and CAT activity was subsequently measured in cell lysates. In the repair-deficient cells, one cis-DDP adduct per cat gene was sufficient to eliminate expression. An equivalent inhibition of CAT expression in the repair-proficient cells did not occur until about 8 times the amount of damage was introduced into the plasmid. These results implicate DNA intrastrand cross-links as the lesions responsible for the inhibition of CAT expression. This assay was used to investigate the potential role of DNA repair in mediating cis-DDP resistance in murine leukemia L1210 cells. The assay readily detects the presence or absence of repair and confirms that these resistant L1210 cells have an enhanced capacity for repair of cis-DDP-induced intrastrand cross-links.

  1. Large-scale purification of pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA using tangential flow filtration and multi-step chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Yu, XiangHui; Yin, Yuhe; Liu, Xintao; Wu, Yongge; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Xizhen; Jiang, Chunlai; Kong, Wei

    2013-09-01

    The demand for pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA in vaccine applications and gene therapy has been increasing in recent years. In the present study, a process consisting of alkaline lysis, tangential flow filtration, purification by anion exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography and size exclusion chromatography was developed. The final product met the requirements for pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA. The chromosomal DNA content was <1 μg/mg plasmid DNA, and RNA was not detectable by agarose gel electrophoresis. Moreover, the protein content was <2 μg/mg plasmid DNA, and the endotoxin content was <10 EU/mg plasmid DNA. The process was scaled up to yield 800 mg of pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA from approximately 2 kg of bacterial cell paste. The overall yield of the final plasmid DNA reached 48%. Therefore, we have established a rapid and efficient production process for pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Repair of plasmid and genomic DNA in a rad7 delta mutant of yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, J P; Smerdon, M J

    1995-01-01

    Repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) was examined in a yeast plasmid of known chromatin structure and in genomic DNA in a radiation-sensitive deletion mutant of yeast, rad7 delta, and its isogenic wild-type strain. A whole plasmid repair assay revealed that only approximately 50% of the CPDs in plasmid DNA are repaired after 6 h in this mutant, compared with almost 90% repaired in wild-type. Using a site-specific repair assay on 44 individual CPD sites within the plasmid we found that repair in the rad7 delta mutant occurred primarily in the transcribed regions of each strand of the plasmid, however, the rate of repair at nearly all sites measured was less than in the wild-type. There was no apparent correlation between repair rate and nucleosome position. In addition, approximately 55% of the CPDs in genomic DNA of the mutant are repaired during the 6 h period, compared with > 80% in the wild-type. Images PMID:7567456

  3. Persistence of Free Plasmid DNA in Soil Monitored by Various Methods, Including a Transformation Assay

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Gerd; Lorenz, Michael G.; Sayler, Gary; Wackernagel, Wilfried

    1992-01-01

    The persistence and stability of free plasmid pUC8-ISP DNA introduced into 10-g samples of various soils and kept at 23°C were monitored over a period of 60 days. The soils were sampled at a plant science farm and included a loamy sand soil (no. 1), a clay soil (no. 2), and a silty clay soil (no. 3). Four different methods allowed monitoring of (i) the production of acid-soluble radioactive material from [3H]thymidine-labeled plasmid DNA, (ii) the decrease of hybridizing nucleotide sequences in slot blot analysis, (iii) the loss of plasmid integrity measured by Southern hybridization, and (iv) the decay of the biological activity as determined by transformation of Ca2+-treated Escherichia coli cells with the DNA extracted from soil. Acid-soluble material was not produced within the first 24 h but then increased to 45% (soil no. 1), 27% (soil no. 2), and 77% (soil no. 3) until the end of incubation. A quite parallel loss of material giving a slot blot hybridization signal was observed. Southern hybridization indicated that after 1 h in the soils, plasmid DNA was mostly in the form of circular and full-length linear molecules but that, depending on the soil type, after 2 to 5 days full-length plasmid molecules were hardly detectable. The transforming activity of plasmid DNA reextracted from the soils followed inactivation curves over 2 to 4 orders of magnitude and dropped below the detection limit after 10 days. The inactivation was slower in soil no. 2 (28.2-h half-life time of the transforming activity of a plasmid molecule) than in soils no. 3 (15.1 h) and no. 1 (9.1 h). The studies provide data on the persistence of free DNA molecules in natural bacterial soil habitats. The data suggest that plasmid DNA may persist long enough to be available for uptake by competent recipient cells in situ. Images PMID:16348772

  4. Bacteria capture, lysate clearance, and plasmid DNA extraction using pH-sensitive multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shan, Zhi; Wu, Qi; Wang, Xianxiang; Zhou, Zhongwu; Oakes, Ken D; Zhang, Xu; Huang, Qianming; Yang, Wanshen

    2010-03-01

    A multifunctional magnetic nanoparticle (MNP)-assisted bioseparation method was developed to isolate plasmid DNA (pDNA) from Escherichia coli culture. Using the pH-sensitive carboxyl-modified magnetic nanoparticles, both cell capture and the subsequent removal of genomic DNA/protein complex after lysis can be achieved simply by magnetic separation. Furthermore, the yield and purity of pDNA extracted by MNPs are comparable to those obtained using organic solvents or commercial kits. This time- and cost-effective protocol does not require centrifugation or precipitation steps and has the potential for automated DNA extraction, especially within miniaturized lab chip applications. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Asbestos fibers mediate transformation of monkey cells by exogenous plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, J.D.; Fasy, T.M.; Kohtz, D.S.; Kohtz, J.D.; Johnson, E.M. )

    1988-10-01

    The authors have tested the ability of chrysotile asbestos fibers to introduce plasmid DNA into monkey COS-7 cells and the ability of this DNA to function in both replication and gene expression. Chrysotile fibers are at least as effective as calcium phosphate in standard transfection assays at optimal ratios of asbestos to DNA. After transfection with chrysotile, a minor percentage of introduced plasmid DNA bearing a simian virus 40 origin of replication replicates after 24 hr. Fragmentation of entering DNA is more prominent with asbestos than with calcium phosphate, and after 72 hr most DNA introduced by asbestos is associated with chromosomal DNA. Cells transfected with plasmid p11-4, bearing the p53 protooncogene, express this gene. Cells transfected with pSV2-neo express a gene conferring resistance of antibiotic G418, allowing isolation of colonies of transformed cells after 18 days. The introduction of exogenous DNA into eukaryotic cells could cause mutations in several ways and thus contribute to asbestos-induced oncogenesis.

  6. Conjugative DNA Transfer Is Enhanced by Plasmid R1 Partitioning Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Christian J.; Lang, Silvia; Rajendra, Vinod K. H.; Nuk, Monika; Raffl, Sandra; Schildbach, Joel F.; Zechner, Ellen L.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation is a form of type IV secretion used to transport protein and DNA directly to recipient bacteria. The process is cell contact-dependent, yet the mechanisms enabling extracellular events to trigger plasmid transfer to begin inside the cell remain obscure. In this study of plasmid R1 we investigated the role of plasmid proteins in the initiation of gene transfer. We find that TraI, the central regulator of conjugative DNA processing, interacts physically, and functionally with the plasmid partitioning proteins ParM and ParR. These interactions stimulate TraI catalyzed relaxation of plasmid DNA in vivo and in vitro and increase ParM ATPase activity. ParM also binds the coupling protein TraD and VirB4-like channel ATPase TraC. Together, these protein-protein interactions probably act to co-localize the transfer components intracellularly and promote assembly of the conjugation machinery. Importantly these data also indicate that the continued association of ParM and ParR at the conjugative pore is necessary for plasmid transfer to start efficiently. Moreover, the conjugative pilus and underlying secretion machinery assembled in the absence of Par proteins mediate poor biofilm formation and are completely dysfunctional for pilus specific R17 bacteriophage uptake. Thus, functional integration of Par components at the interface of relaxosome, coupling protein, and channel ATPases appears important for an optimal conformation and effective activation of the transfer machinery. We conclude that low copy plasmid R1 has evolved an active segregation system that optimizes both its vertical and lateral modes of dissemination. PMID:27486582

  7. The immunogenicity of viral haemorragic septicaemia rhabdovirus (VHSV) DNA vaccines can depend on plasmid regulatory sequences.

    PubMed

    Chico, V; Ortega-Villaizan, M; Falco, A; Tafalla, C; Perez, L; Coll, J M; Estepa, A

    2009-03-18

    A plasmid DNA encoding the viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV)-G glycoprotein under the control of 5' sequences (enhancer/promoter sequence plus both non-coding 1st exon and 1st intron sequences) from carp beta-actin gene (pAE6-G(VHSV)) was compared to the vaccine plasmid usually described the gene expression is regulated by the human cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate-early promoter (pMCV1.4-G(VHSV)). We observed that these two plasmids produced a markedly different profile in the level and time of expression of the encoded-antigen, and this may have a direct effect upon the intensity and suitability of the in vivo immune response. Thus, fish genetic immunisation assays were carried out to study the immune response of both plasmids. A significantly enhanced specific-antibody response against the viral glycoprotein was found in the fish immunised with pAE6-G(VHSV). However, the protective efficacy against VHSV challenge conferred by both plasmids was similar. Later analysis of the transcription profile of a set of representative immune-related genes in the DNA immunized fish suggested that depending on the plasmid-related regulatory sequences controlling its expression, the plasmid might activate distinct patterns of the immune system. All together, the results from this study mainly point out that the selection of a determinate encoded-antigen/vector combination for genetic immunisation is of extraordinary importance in designing optimised DNA vaccines that, when required for inducing protective immune response, could elicit responses biased to antigen-specific antibodies or cytotoxic T cells generation.

  8. Biomedical application of plasmid DNA in gene therapy: a new challenge for chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sousa, F; Passarinha, L; Queiroz, J A

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy and DNA vaccination are clinical fields gradually emerging in the last few decades, in particular after the discovery of some gene-related diseases. The increased relevance of biomedical applications of plasmid DNA (pDNA) to induce therapeutic effects has had a great impact on biopharmaceutical research and industry. Although there are several steps involved in the pDNA manufacturing process, the several unit operations must be designed and integrated into a global process. After the plasmid has been designed according to the requirements for clinical administeration to humans, it is biosynthesised mainly by an E. coli host. The overriding priority of the production process is to improve plasmid quantity - the production conditions need to be optimised to guarantee pDNA stability and biological activity. The complexity and diversity of biomolecules present on the pDNA-containing extracts represent the main concern and limitation to achieve pure and biologically active pDNA. There has been a recent intenstification of the improvement of existing purification procedures or the establishment of novel schemes for plasmid purification. This review focuses on the progress and relevance of chromatographic methodologies in the purification of pDNA-based therapeutic products. The review will attempt to assemble their different contributions of the different chromatographic procedures that are being used in the pDNA purification area. The advantages and disadvantages of the different chromatographic techniques, as well as the most significant improvements in response to the challenge of purifying pDNA will be discussed, emphasizing the future directions in this field.

  9. Structural insights into the cTAR DNA recognition by the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein: role of sugar deoxyriboses in the binding polarity of NC.

    PubMed

    Bazzi, Ali; Zargarian, Loussiné; Chaminade, Françoise; Boudier, Christian; De Rocquigny, Hughes; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2011-05-01

    An essential step of the reverse transcription of the HIV-1 genome is the first strand transfer that requires the annealing of the TAR RNA hairpin to the cTAR DNA hairpin. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a crucial role by facilitating annealing of the complementary hairpins. Using nuclear magnetic resonance and gel retardation assays, we investigated the interaction between NC and the top half of the cTAR DNA (mini-cTAR). We show that NC(11-55) binds the TGG sequence in the lower stem that is destabilized by the adjacent internal loop. The 5' thymine interacts with residues of the N-terminal zinc knuckle and the 3' guanine is inserted in the hydrophobic plateau of the C-terminal zinc knuckle. The TGG sequence is preferred relative to the apical and internal loops containing unpaired guanines. Investigation of the DNA-protein contacts shows the major role of hydrophobic interactions involving nucleobases and deoxyribose sugars. A similar network of hydrophobic contacts is observed in the published NC:DNA complexes, whereas NC contacts ribose differently in NC:RNA complexes. We propose that the binding polarity of NC is related to these contacts that could be responsible for the preferential binding to single-stranded nucleic acids. © The Author(s) 2011. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. The Frequency of Cytidine Editing of Viral DNA Is Differentially Influenced by Vpx and Nucleosides during HIV-1 or SIVMAC Infection of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Xuan-Nhi; Barateau, Véronique; Wu, Nannan; Berger, Gregory; Cimarelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Two cellular factors are currently known to modulate lentiviral infection specifically in myeloid cells: SAMHD1 and APOBEC3A (A3A). SAMHD1 is a deoxynucleoside triphosphohydrolase that interferes with viral infection mostly by limiting the intracellular concentrations of dNTPs, while A3A is a cytidine deaminase that has been described to edit incoming vDNA. The restrictive phenotype of myeloid cells can be alleviated through the direct degradation of SAMHD1 by the HIV-2/SIVSM Vpx protein or else, at least in the case of HIV-1, by the exogenous supplementation of nucleosides that artificially overcome the catabolic activity of SAMHD1 on dNTPs. Here, we have used Vpx and dNs to explore the relationship existing between vDNA cytidine deamination and SAMHD1 during HIV-1 or SIVMAC infection of primary dendritic cells. Our results reveal an interesting inverse correlation between conditions that promote efficient infection of DCs and the extent of vDNA editing that may reflect the different susceptibility of vDNA to cytoplasmic effectors during the infection of myeloid cells. PMID:26496699

  11. DNA fusion product of phage P2 with plasmid pBR322 - A new phasmid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicoletti, M.; Bertani, G.

    1983-01-01

    The chromosome of the temperate bacteriophage P2 and that of the plasmid pBR322 have been joined in vitro after treatment with restriction endonuclease EcoRI. The fusion product - a phasmid - can behave as a plasmid, as a phage and as a prophage. It can replicate its DNA under the control of either the specific replication mechanism of the parent phage in a polA mutant or that of the parent plasmid in a rep mutant. Several interesting interactions between the two replication modes are indicated. In particular, phage particles may be produced even when the phage mode of DNA replication is blocked, and this throws new light on the involvement of the early gene A in the regulation of late gene expression in phage P2.

  12. DNA fusion product of phage P2 with plasmid pBR322 - A new phasmid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicoletti, M.; Bertani, G.

    1983-01-01

    The chromosome of the temperate bacteriophage P2 and that of the plasmid pBR322 have been joined in vitro after treatment with restriction endonuclease EcoRI. The fusion product - a phasmid - can behave as a plasmid, as a phage and as a prophage. It can replicate its DNA under the control of either the specific replication mechanism of the parent phage in a polA mutant or that of the parent plasmid in a rep mutant. Several interesting interactions between the two replication modes are indicated. In particular, phage particles may be produced even when the phage mode of DNA replication is blocked, and this throws new light on the involvement of the early gene A in the regulation of late gene expression in phage P2.

  13. In vivo release of plasmid DNA from composites of oligo(poly(ethylene glycol)fumarate) and cationized gelatin microspheres.

    PubMed

    Kasper, F Kurtis; Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Kimura, Yu; Mikos, Antonios G; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2005-10-20

    Composites of cationized gelatin microspheres (CGMS), crosslinked with either 3 mM or 6 mM glutaraldehyde solution, and a novel hydrogel material, oligo(poly(ethylene glycol)fumarate) (OPF) were fabricated and investigated toward prolonging the release of plasmid DNA in vivo relative to the constituent materials. The composites and constituent materials were investigated in a subcutaneous murine model to assess the release of 125I-labeled plasmid DNA and 125I-labeled cationized gelatin in vivo. The time profiles of the radioactivity remaining were employed to compare the profiles of DNA release and cationized gelatin degradation. Both composite formulations (incorporating either 3 mM or 6 mM CGMS) prolonged the bioavailability of plasmid DNA relative to both injected plasmid DNA solution and the respective non-embedded cationized gelatin microspheres. Injected plasmid DNA solution persisted in the subject for only 7-10 days, whereas the persistence of DNA from composites of OPF and either 3 mM or 6 mM CGMS extended to at least day 42. The 3 mM and 6 mM CGMS each increased the persistence of DNA slightly, relative to injection of DNA solution, to between 28 and 35 days. Interestingly, the release profile of plasmid DNA from composites was not significantly different from the release of DNA from OPF alone. The release of plasmid DNA from the composites was in accord with the degradation of the microspheres within the OPF. These results show that composites of OPF and cationized gelatin microspheres are able to prolong the availability of plasmid DNA in vivo relative to cationized gelatin microspheres alone and provide a promising candidate material for the sustained, controlled release of plasmid DNA.

  14. Ca2+ Promoted the Low Transformation Efficiency of Plasmid DNA Exposed to PAH Contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanzheng; Long, Jian; Wang, Qian

    2013-01-01

    The effects of interactions between genetic materials and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on gene expression in the extracellular environment remain to be elucidated and little information is currently available on the effect of ionic strength on the transformation of plasmid DNA exposed to PAHs. Phenanthrene and pyrene were used as representative PAHs to evaluate the transformation of plasmid DNA after PAH exposure and to determine the role of Ca2+ during the transformation. Plasmid DNA exposed to the test PAHs demonstrated low transformation efficiency. In the absence of PAHs, the transformation efficiency was 4.7 log units; however, the efficiency decreased to 3.72–3.14 log units with phenanthrene/pyrene exposures of 50 µg·L–1. The addition of Ca2+ enhanced the low transformation efficiency of DNA exposed to PAHs. Based on the co-sorption of Ca2+ and phenanthrene/pyrene by DNA, we employed Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and mass spectrometry (MS) to determine the mechanisms involved in PAH-induced DNA transformation. The observed low transformation efficiency of DNA exposed to either phenanthrene or pyrene can be attributed to a broken hydrogen bond in the double helix caused by planar PAHs. Added Ca2+ formed strong electrovalent bonds with “–POO––” groups in the DNA, weakening the interaction between PAHs and DNA based on weak molecular forces. This decreased the damage of PAHs to hydrogen bonds in double-stranded DNA by isolating DNA molecules from PAHs and consequently enhanced the transformation efficiency of DNA exposed to PAH contaminants. The findings provide insight into the effects of anthropogenic trace PAHs on DNA transfer in natural environments. PMID:23484001

  15. Evaluation of different buffers on plasmid DNA encapsulation into PLGA microparticles.

    PubMed

    Tse, Man Tsuey; Blatchford, Chris; Oya Alpar, H

    2009-03-31

    Double emulsion solvent evaporation is a widely used method to prepare poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticles encapsulating plasmid DNA. There are inherent problems associated with preparing plasmid DNA in this form, in particular the DNA is liable to degrade during manufacture and the resulting powder has low encapsulation efficiencies. This study compares the use of two buffers, 0.1M NaHCO(3) and 0.07M Na(2)HPO(4) and the effect these have on the encapsulation efficiency and other critical parameters associated with these encapsulated DNA materials. Both buffers preserved the conformation of the original plasmid DNA during the homogenization process, but those made with 0.07M Na(2)HPO(4) had higher encapsulation efficiencies, as well as smaller diameters, compared with those made with 0.1M NaHCO(3) (encapsulation efficiencies of 40.72-45.65%, and mean volume diameters of 2.96-4.45microm). Buffers with a range of pH from 5 to 12 were investigated, and it was demonstrated that pH 9 was the point at which the highest amount of supercoiled DNA was balanced with the highest encapsulation efficiency. To simulate in vitro release, it was shown that microparticles made with 0.07M Na(2)HPO(4) had lower DNA release rates than those made with 0.1M NaHCO(3). These results demonstrate that the use of different buffers can aid in retaining the conformation of plasmid DNA, and can also modulate the amount of DNA encapsulated and the release profiles of microparticles.

  16. Target-assembled ExciProbes: application to DNA detection at the level of PCR product and plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Lindsey; Gbaj, Abdul; Savage, Hannah E; Bacigalupo, M Candelaria Rogert; Bichenkova, Elena V; Douglas, Kenneth T

    2007-12-01

    Recently, we introduced a novel exciplex-based approach for detection of nucleic acids using a model DNA-mounted exciplex system, consisting of two 8-mer ExciProbes hybridized to a complementary 16-mer DNA target. We now show, for the first time, that this approach can be used to detect DNA at the level of PCR product and plasmid, when the target sequence (5'-GCCAAACACAGAATCG-3') was embedded in long DNA molecules (PCR products and approximately 3 Kbp plasmid). A remarkably stringent demand is made of the solvent conditions for this exciplex emission to occur, viz., emission is optimal for DNA at 80% trifluoroethanol, even in the plasmid situations, raising the question of the molecular structural basis of this system. We show that a perfectly matched plasmid target can be differentiated from target containing single nucleotide substitutions; hence, ExciProbes could be applied to SNP analysis. The effect of counter cations (Na(+), K(+), and Mg(2+)) and PCR additives on exciplex emission has been also examined.

  17. Production and purification of plasmid DNA vaccines: is there scope for further innovation?

    PubMed

    Xenopoulos, Alex; Pattnaik, Priyabrata

    2014-12-01

    The demand for plasmid DNA (pDNA) has vastly increased over the past decade in response to significant advances that have been made in its application for gene therapy and vaccine development. Plasmid DNA-based vaccines are experiencing a resurgence due to success with prime-boost immunization strategies. The challenge has always been poor productivity and delivery of pDNA. Plasmid DNA-based vaccines have traditionally required milligram scale of GMP-grade product for vaccination due to the relatively low efficacy and duration of gene expression. However, efforts to increase pDNA vaccine effectiveness are evolving in genetic manipulations of bacterial host, improvements in product recovery and innovative delivery methods. This review summarizes recent advances in large-scale pDNA vaccine manufacturing, ranging from upstream processing, downstream processing and formulation, as such information is usually not available to the scientific community. The article will highlight technology gaps and offer insight on further scope of innovation.

  18. Microneedle delivery of plasmid DNA to living human skin: formulation coating, skin insertion and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Pearton, Marc; Saller, Verena; Coulman, Sion A; Gateley, Chris; Anstey, Alexander V; Zarnitsyn, Vladimir; Birchall, James C

    2012-01-01

    Microneedle delivery of nucleic acids, in particular plasmid DNA (pDNA), to the skin represents a potential new approach for the clinical management of genetic skin diseases and cutaneous cancers, and for intracutaneous genetic immunization. In this study excised human skin explants were used to investigate and optimize key parameters that will determine stable and effective microneedle-facilitated pDNA delivery. These include (i) high dose-loading of pDNA onto microneedle surfaces, (ii) stability and functionality of the coated pDNA, (iii) skin penetration capability of pDNA-coated microneedles, and (iv) efficient gene expression in human skin. Optimization of a dip-coating method enabled significant increases in the loading capacity, up to 100 micrograms of pDNA per 5-microneedle array. Coated microneedles were able to reproducibly perforate human skin at low (<1 Newton) insertion forces. The physical stability of the coated pDNA was partially compromised on storage, although this was improved through the addition of saccharide excipients without detriment to the biological functionality of pDNA. The pDNA-coated microneedles facilitated reporter gene expression in viable human skin. The efficiency of gene expression from coated microneedles will depend upon suitable DNA loading, efficient and reproducible skin puncture and rapid in situ dissolution of the plasmid at the site of delivery. PMID:22516089

  19. Plasmid DNA production combining antibiotic-free selection, inducible high yield fermentation, and novel autolytic purification.

    PubMed

    Carnes, Aaron E; Hodgson, Clague P; Luke, Jeremy M; Vincent, Justin M; Williams, James A

    2009-10-15

    DNA vaccines and gene medicines, derived from bacterial plasmids, are emerging as an important new class of pharmaceuticals. However, the challenges of performing cell lysis processes for plasmid DNA purification at an industrial scale are well known. To address downstream purification challenges, we have developed autolytic Escherichia coli host strains that express endolysin (phage lambdaR) in the cytoplasm. Expression of the endolysin is induced during fermentation by a heat inducible promoter. The endolysin remains in the cytoplasm, where it is separated from its peptidoglycan substrate in the cell wall; hence the cells remain alive and intact and can be harvested by the usual methods. The plasmid DNA is then recovered by autolytic extraction under slightly acidic, low salt buffer conditions and treatment with a low concentration of non-ionic detergent. Under these conditions the E. coli genomic DNA remains associated with the insoluble cell debris and is removed by a solid-liquid separation. Here, we report fermentation, lysis methods, and plasmid purification using autolytic hosts.

  20. TOL plasmid carriage enhances biofilm formation and increases extracellular DNA content in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    D'Alvise, Paul W; Sjøholm, Ole R; Yankelevich, Tatiana; Jin, Yujie; Wuertz, Stefan; Smets, Barth F

    2010-11-01

    Adherent growth of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 with and without the TOL plasmid (pWWO) at the solid-liquid and air-liquid interface was examined. We compared biofilm formation on glass in flow cells, and assayed pellicle (air-liquid interface biofilm) formation in stagnant liquid cultures by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The TOL-carrying strains formed pellicles and thick biofilms, whereas the same strains without the plasmid displayed little adherent growth. Microscopy using fluorescent nucleic acid-specific stains revealed differences in the production of extracellular polymeric substances: TOL carriage leads to more extracellular DNA (eDNA) in pellicles and biofilms. Pellicles were dissolved by DNase I treatment. Enhanced cell lysis due to plasmid carriage was ruled out as the mechanism for eDNA release. We report, for the first time, that carriage of a conjugative plasmid leads to increased biofilm formation by production of eDNA. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasmid DNA damage caused by methylated arsenicals, ascorbic acid and human liver ferritin.

    Arsenic causes cancer in human skin, urinary bladder, lung, liver and kidney and is a significant world-wide public health problem. Although the metabolism of inorganic arsenic is ...

  2. Effect of amine type on the expression of plasmid DNA by cationized dextran.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jun-ichiro; Nagane, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Masaya; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to prepare a non-viral carrier of gene expression from the polysaccharide dextran and evaluate the effect of amine compounds introduced to dextran on the level of gene expression. Dextran with a molecular weight of 74 x 10(3) was cationized by the chemical introduction of different amine compounds. The cationized dextran was complexed with a plasmid DNA and the vitro gene transfection was investigated for HeLa cells. The level of gene expression depended on the amine compound introduced to dextran. The highest level was observed for the complex of spermine-introduced dextran and plasmid DNA. The highest cellular internalization and the best buffering effect were observed among every cationized dextran. Every complex did not show any cytotoxicity. It is concluded that the superior properties of spermine-introduced dextran enabled the plasmid DNA to enhance the expression level to a great extent compared with other cationized dextrans. Cationized dextran is a promising non-viral carrier of plasmid DNA.

  3. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasmid DNA damage caused by methylated arsenicals, ascorbic acid and human liver ferritin.

    Arsenic causes cancer in human skin, urinary bladder, lung, liver and kidney and is a significant world-wide public health problem. Although the metabolism of inorganic arsenic is ...

  4. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAOUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    ABSTRACT

    Both dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) release iron from human liver ferritin (HLF) with or without the presence of ascorbic acid. ...

  5. Plasmids containing the gene for DNA polymerase I from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.; Martinez, S.; Lopez, P.; Espinosa, M.

    1987-08-28

    A method is disclosed for cloning the gene which encodes a DNA polymerase-exonuclease of /und Streptococcus/ /und pneumoniae/. Plasmid pSM22, the vector containing the pneumococcal polA gene, facilitates the expression of 50-fold greater amounts of the PolI enzyme. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Plasmids containing the gene for DNA polymerase I from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.; Martinez, S.; Lopez, P.; Espinosa, M.

    1991-03-26

    A method is disclosed for cloning the gene which encodes a DNA polymerase-exonuclease of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Plasmid pSM22, the vector containing the pneumocccal polA gene, facilitates the expression of 50-fold greater amounts of the PolI enzyme. 1 figure.

  7. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAOUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    ABSTRACT

    Both dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) release iron from human liver ferritin (HLF) with or without the presence of ascorbic acid. ...

  8. Hundreds of Circular Novel Plasmids and DNA Elements Identified in a Rat Cecum Metamobilome

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Tue Sparholt; Xu, Zhuofei; Hansen, Martin Asser; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches are widespread in microbiological research, but so far, the knowledge on extrachromosomal DNA diversity and composition has largely remained dependant on cultivating host organisms. Even with the emergence of metagenomics, complete circular sequences are rarely identified, and have required manual curation. We propose a robust in silico procedure for identifying complete small plasmids in metagenomic datasets from whole genome shotgun sequencing. From one very pure and exhaustively sequenced metamobilome from rat cecum, we identified a total of 616 circular sequences, 160 of which were carrying a gene with plasmid replication domain. Further homology analyses indicated that the majority of these plasmid sequences are novel. We confirmed the circularity of the complete plasmid candidates using an inverse-type PCR approach on a subset of sequences with 95% success, confirming the existence and length of discrete sequences. The implication of these findings is a broadened understanding of the traits of circular elements in nature and the possibility of massive data mining in existing metagenomic datasets to discover novel pools of complete plasmids thus vastly expanding the current plasmid database. PMID:24503942

  9. Plasmid DNA nanogels as photoresponsive materials for multifunctional bio-applications.

    PubMed

    Costa, Diana; Valente, Artur J M; Queiroz, João

    2015-05-20

    This study provides a detailed description on the synthesis and characterization of novel polyamine plasmid DNA nanogels. Ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether was used as cross-linker, in conjugation with polyamines to promote pDNA condensation. The biocompatible nanovectors exhibit a unique swelling behavior in water and salt solutions. These systems are light photodegradable allowing their use in a broad range of biotechnological applications. Different plasmids, pVAX1-LacZ and pcDNA3-FLAG-p53, and anticancer drugs were, thus, efficiently loaded in the nanogels and their controlled release was demonstrated. Furthermore, the dual delivery of pcDNA3-FLAG-p53 gene and anticancer drugs illustrates the possibility of the combination of chemical and gene therapies. This new versatile and easy method of nanohydrogels preparation provides a potential synthetic approach for the design of tunable systems which can display multiple functions, sensitivity to different stimuli and exhibit programmed responses as well.

  10. Size and Base Composition of RNA in Supercoiled Plasmid DNA

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Peter H.; Boyer, Herbert W.; Helinski, Donald R.

    1973-01-01

    The average size and base composition of the covalently integrated RNA segment in supercoiled ColE1 DNA synthesized in Escherichia coli in the presence of chloramphenicol (CM-ColE1 DNA) have been determined by two independent methods. The two approaches yielded similar results, indicating that the RNA segment in CM-ColE1 DNA contains GMP at the 5′ end and comprises on the average 25 to 26 ribonucleotides with a base composition of 10-11 G, 3 A, 5-6 C, and 6-7 U. PMID:4359488

  11. Formation of oligomeric structures from plasmid DNA carrying cos lambda that is packaged into bacteriophage lambda heads.

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, T; Matsubara, K

    1983-01-01

    Plasmids that carry cos lambda, the region necessary for lambda phage packaging and that are as small as four kilobases in size can be packaged into lambda phage heads in head-to-tail tandem oligomeric structures. Multimeric oligomers as large as undecamers have been detected. Oligomer formation depends upon the products of red and gam of lambda, and the general recombination occurs between different plasmids that share homologous DNA regions. The packaging efficiency of plasmids depends on its copy number in cells and its genome size. Upon injection into a cell, the DNA establishes itself as a plasmid in a tandem structure. When such a plasmid in a high oligomeric structure is used as the source of packaging DNA, the packaging efficiency of the plasmids is elevated. The oligomers are stable in recA cells, whereas they drift toward lower oligomers in recA+ cells. Images PMID:6217189

  12. Contribution of Epigenetic Modifications to the Decline in Transgene Expression from Plasmid DNA in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Lei; Nishikawa, Makiya; Ando, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Yuki; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    Short-term expression of transgenes is one of the problems frequently associated with non-viral in vivo gene transfer. To obtain experimental evidence for the design of sustainable transgene expression systems, the contribution of epigenetic modifications to the decline in transgene expression needs to be investigated. Bisulfite sequencing and reactivation by hydrodynamic injection of isotonic solution were employed to investigate methylation statues of CpG in transiently expressing plasmid, pCMV-Luc, in mouse liver after hydrodynamic delivery. The cytosines of CpGs in the promoter region of pCMV-Luc were methylated in mouse liver, but the methylation was much later than the decline in the expression. The expression from pre-methylated pCMV-Luc was insensitive to reactivation. Neither an inhibitor of DNA methylation nor an inhibitor of histone deacetylation had significant effects on transgene expression after hydrodynamic injection of pCMV-Luc. Partial hepatectomy, which reduces the transgene expression from the non-integrated vector into the genome, significantly reduced the transgene expression of human interferon γ from a long-term expressing plasmid pCpG-Huγ, suggesting that the CpG-reduced plasmid was not significantly integrated into the genomic DNA. These results indicate that the CpG-reduced plasmids achieve prolonged transgene expression without integration into the host genome, although the methylation status of CpG sequences in plasmids will not be associated with the prolonged expression. PMID:26262639

  13. Cholesterol-conjugated supramolecular assemblies of low generations polyamidoamine dendrimers for enhanced EGFP plasmid DNA transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkar, Nasim; Samani, Soliman Mohammadi; Tamaddon, Ali Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    Aimed to prepare an enhanced gene delivery system with low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency, various cholesterol-conjugated derivates of low generation polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers were prepared. The conjugates were characterized by TNBS assay, FTIR, and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Self-assembly of the dendrimer conjugates (G1-Chol, G2-Chol, and G3-Chol) was investigated by pyrene assay. Following formation of the complexes between enhanced green fluorescence protein plasmid and the dendrimer conjugates at various N (primary amine)/P (phosphate) mole ratios, plasmid condensation, biologic stability, cytotoxicity, and protein expression were investigated. The conjugates self-assembled into micellar dispersions with the critical micelle concentration values (<50 µg/ml) depending on the dendrimer generation and cholesterol/amine mole ratio. Cholesterol conjugation resulted in higher resistance of the condensed plasmid DNA in a competition assay with heparin sulfate. Also, the transfection efficiency was determined higher for the cholesterol conjugates than unmodified dendrimers in HepG2 cells, showing the highest for G2-Chol at 40 % degree of cholesterol modification (G2-Chol40 %) among various dendrimer generations. Interestingly, such conjugate showed a complete protection of plasmid against serum nucleases. Our results confirmed that the cholesterol conjugation to PAMAM dendrimers of low generations bearing little cytotoxicity improves their several physicochemical and biological characteristics required for an enhanced delivery of plasmid DNA into cells.

  14. Structural insights into the cTAR DNA recognition by the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein: role of sugar deoxyriboses in the binding polarity of NC

    PubMed Central

    Bazzi, Ali; Zargarian, Loussiné; Chaminade, Françoise; Boudier, Christian; De Rocquigny, Hughes; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    An essential step of the reverse transcription of the HIV-1 genome is the first strand transfer that requires the annealing of the TAR RNA hairpin to the cTAR DNA hairpin. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a crucial role by facilitating annealing of the complementary hairpins. Using nuclear magnetic resonance and gel retardation assays, we investigated the interaction between NC and the top half of the cTAR DNA (mini-cTAR). We show that NC(11-55) binds the TGG sequence in the lower stem that is destabilized by the adjacent internal loop. The 5′ thymine interacts with residues of the N-terminal zinc knuckle and the 3′ guanine is inserted in the hydrophobic plateau of the C-terminal zinc knuckle. The TGG sequence is preferred relative to the apical and internal loops containing unpaired guanines. Investigation of the DNA–protein contacts shows the major role of hydrophobic interactions involving nucleobases and deoxyribose sugars. A similar network of hydrophobic contacts is observed in the published NC:DNA complexes, whereas NC contacts ribose differently in NC:RNA complexes. We propose that the binding polarity of NC is related to these contacts that could be responsible for the preferential binding to single-stranded nucleic acids. PMID:21227929

  15. High-Throughput Plasmid cDNA Library Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Kenneth H.; Yu, Charles; George, Reed A.; Carlson, JosephW.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Svirskas, Robert; Stapleton, Mark; Celniker, SusanE.

    2006-05-24

    Libraries of cDNA clones are valuable resources foranalysing the expression, structure, and regulation of genes, as well asfor studying protein functions and interactions. Full-length cDNA clonesprovide information about intron and exon structures, splice junctionsand 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs). Open reading frames (ORFs)derived from cDNA clones can be used to generate constructs allowingexpression of native proteins and N- or C-terminally tagged proteins.Thus, obtaining full-length cDNA clones and sequences for most or allgenes in an organism is critical for understanding genome functions.Expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing samples cDNA libraries at random,which is most useful at the beginning of large-scale screening projects.However, as projects progress towards completion, the probability ofidentifying unique cDNAs via EST sequencing diminishes, resulting in poorrecovery of rare transcripts. We describe an adapted, high-throughputprotocol intended for recovery of specific, full-length clones fromplasmid cDNA libraries in five days.

  16. Fabrication, photoemission studies, and sensor of Hg nanoparticles templated on plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, Subrata; Umananda, M.; Satyam, P. V.; Varma, Shikha; Priyadarshini, M.; Subudhi, U.; Chainy, G. B. N.

    2009-02-16

    Fabrication of Hg nanoparticles (NPs) templated on plasmid DNA has been investigated here. The Hg NPs get embedded inside the DNA scaffold through local melting of double helix due to the strong and exclusive interaction of the NPs with the nitrogen of the nucleic acid bases. The interaction of the Hg NPs with the guanine-cytosine base pair sites is responsible for the formation of two Hg metal-base complexes that can find application as the signature of ion-DNA interactions. The modifications in the transport properties of metal conjugated DNA can be utilized as sensor for mercury contamination.

  17. Dual affinity method for plasmid DNA purification in aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, H S C; Hine, A V; Brocchini, S; Slater, N K H; Marcos, J C

    2010-02-26

    The DNA binding fusion protein, LacI-His6-GFP, together with the conjugate PEG-IDA-Cu(II) (10 kDa) was evaluated as a dual affinity system for the pUC19 plasmid extraction from an alkaline bacterial cell lysate in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)/dextran (DEX) aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS). In a PEG 600-DEX 40 ATPS containing 0.273 nmol of LacI fusion protein and 0.14% (w/w) of the functionalised PEG-IDA-Cu(II), more than 72% of the plasmid DNA partitioned to the PEG phase, without RNA or genomic DNA contamination as evaluated by agarose gel electrophoresis. In a second extraction stage, the elution of pDNA from the LacI binding complex proved difficult using either dextran or phosphate buffer as second phase, though more than 75% of the overall protein was removed in both systems. A maximum recovery of approximately 27% of the pCU19 plasmid was achieved using the PEG-dextran system as a second extraction system, with 80-90% of pDNA partitioning to the bottom phase. This represents about 7.4 microg of pDNA extracted per 1 mL of pUC19 desalted lysate. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Experiences of social harm and changes in sexual practices among volunteers who had completed a phase I/II HIV vaccine trial employing HIV-1 DNA priming and HIV-1 MVA boosting in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Tarimo, Edith A M; Munseri, Patricia; Aboud, Said; Bakari, Muhammad; Mhalu, Fred; Sandstrom, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Volunteers in phase I/II HIV vaccine trials are assumed to be at low risk of acquiring HIV infection and are expected to have normal lives in the community. However, during participation in the trials, volunteers may encounter social harm and changes in their sexual behaviours. The current study aimed to study persistence of social harm and changes in sexual practices over time among phase I/II HIV vaccine immunogenicity (HIVIS03) trial volunteers in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. A descriptive prospective cohort study was conducted among 33 out of 60 volunteers of HIVIS03 trial in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, who had received three HIV-1 DNA injections boosted with two HIV-1 MVA doses. A structured interview was administered to collect data. Analysis was carried out using SPSS and McNemars' chi-square (χ2) was used to test the association within-subjects. Participants reported experiencing negative comments from their colleagues about the trial; but such comments were less severe during the second follow up visits (χ2 = 8.72; P<0.001). Most of the comments were associated with discrimination (χ2 = 26.72; P<0.001), stigma (χ2 = 6.06; P<0.05), and mistrust towards the HIV vaccine trial (χ2 = 4.9; P<0.05). Having a regular sexual partner other than spouse or cohabitant declined over the two follow-up periods (χ2 = 4.45; P<0.05). Participants in the phase I/II HIV vaccine trial were likely to face negative comments from relatives and colleagues after the end of the trial, but those comments decreased over time. In this study, the inherent sexual practice of having extra sexual partners other than spouse declined over time. Therefore, prolonged counselling and support appears important to minimize risky sexual behaviour among volunteers after participation in HIV Vaccine trials.

  19. Detection of HIV-1 Drug Resistance in Women Following Administration of a Single Dose of Nevirapine: Comparison of Plasma RNA to Cellular DNA by Consensus Sequencing and by Oligonucleotide Ligation Assay▿

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Thor A.; Kress, Catherine M.; Beck, Ingrid; Techapornroong, Malee; Wittayapraparat, Pakorn; Tansuphasawasdikul, Somboon; Jourdain, Gonzague; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Lallemant, Marc; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    A single dose of nevirapine (sdNVP) to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 increases the risk of failure of subsequent NVP-containing antiretroviral therapy (ART), especially when initiated within 6 months of sdNVP administration, emphasizing the importance of understanding the decay of nevirapine-resistant mutants. Nevirapine-resistant HIV-1 genotypes (with the mutations K103N, Y181C, and/or G190A) from 21 women were evaluated 10 days and 6 weeks after sdNVP administration and at the initiation of ART. Resistance was assayed by consensus sequencing and by a more sensitive assay (oligonucleotide ligation assay [OLA]) using plasma-derived HIV-1 RNA and cell-associated HIV-1 DNA. OLA detected nevirapine resistance in more specimens than consensus sequencing did (63% versus 33%, P < 0.01). When resistance was detected only by OLA (n = 45), the median mutant concentration was 18%, compared to 61% when detected by both sequencing and OLA (n = 51) (P < 0.0001). The proportion of women whose nevirapine resistance was detected by OLA 10 days after sdNVP administration was higher when we tested their HIV-1 RNA (95%) than when we tested their HIV-1 DNA (88%), whereas at 6 weeks after sdNVP therapy, the proportion was greater with DNA (85%) than with RNA (67%) and remained higher with DNA (33%) than with RNA (11%) at the initiation of antiretroviral treatment (median, 45 weeks after sdNVP therapy). Fourteen women started NVP-ART more than 6 months after sdNVP therapy; resistance was detected by OLA in 14% of the women but only in their DNA. HIV-1 resistance to NVP following sdNVP therapy persists longer in cellular DNA than in plasma RNA, as determined by a sensitive assay using sufficient copies of virus, suggesting that DNA may be superior to RNA for detecting resistance at the initiation of ART. PMID:20181911

  20. Negative pseudo-affinity chromatography for plasmid DNA purification using berenil as ligand.

    PubMed

    Caramelo-Nunes, C; Gabriel, M F; Almeida, P; Marcos, J C; Tomaz, C T

    2014-01-01

    The present study, reports the utilization of berenil as ligand in a negative pseudo-affinity chromatographic step to purify the plasmid pVAX1-LacZ from Escherichia coli clarified lysates. The chromatographic support was prepared by coupling berenil to epoxy-activated Sepharose and was qualitatively and quantitatively characterized using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The clarified lysate was loaded onto the berenil-Sepharose support with 0.55M of ammonium sulphate in the eluent, achieving the immediate elution of plasmid DNA. The impurities tightly bound to the support, were eluted after decreasing the salt concentration to 0M. The overall process enabled the recovery of 87% of loaded plasmid DNA with a HPLC purity of ≫99% and according to FDA specifications. This method represents an alternative approach to the previous utilization of the same chromatographic pseudo-affinity support in a positive mode. It uses lower amounts of salt and one-step chromatographic procedure, resulting in smaller operating time and costs and representing an alternate procedure for plasmid DNA purification. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. High-frequency intermolecular homologous recombination during herpes simplex virus-mediated plasmid DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xinping; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2002-06-01

    Homologous recombination is a prominent feature of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 DNA replication. This has been demonstrated and traditionally studied in experimental settings where repeated sequences are present or are being introduced into a single molecule for subsequent genome isomerization. In the present study, we have designed a pair of unique HSV amplicon plasmids to examine in detail intermolecular homologous recombination (IM-HR) between these amplicon plasmids during HSV-mediated DNA replication. Our data show that IM-HR occurred at a very high frequency: up to 60% of the amplicon concatemers retrieved from virion particles underwent intermolecular homologous recombination. Such a high frequency of IM-HR required that both plasmids be replicated by HSV-mediated replication, as IM-HR events were not detected when either one or both plasmids were replicated by simian virus 40-mediated DNA replication, even with the presence of HSV infection. In addition, the majority of the homologous recombination events resulted in sequence replacement or targeted gene repair, while the minority resulted in sequence insertion. These findings imply that frequent intermolecular homologous recombination may contribute directly to HSV genome isomerization. In addition, HSV-mediated amplicon replication may be an attractive model for studying intermolecular homologous recombination mechanisms in general in a mammalian system. In this regard, the knowledge obtained from such a study may facilitate the development of better strategies for targeted gene correction for gene therapy purposes.

  2. PEGylation enhances tumor targeting of plasmid DNA by an artificial cationized protein with repeated RGD sequences, Pronectin.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2004-05-31

    The objective of this study is to investigate feasibility of a non-viral gene carrier with repeated RGD sequences (Pronectin F+) in tumor targeting for gene expression. The Pronectin F+ was cationized by introducing spermine (Sm) to the hydroxyl groups to allow to polyionically complex with plasmid DNA. The cationized Pronectin F+ prepared was additionally modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecules which have active ester and methoxy groups at the terminal, to form various PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+. The cationized Pronectin F+ with or without PEGylation at different extents was mixed with a plasmid DNA of LacZ to form respective cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes. The plasmid DNA was electrophoretically complexed with cationized Pronectin F+ and PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+, irrespective of the PEGylation extent, although the higher N/P ratio of complexes was needed for complexation with the latter Pronectin F+. The molecular size and zeta potential measurements revealed that the plasmid DNA was reduced in size to about 250 nm and the charge was changed to be positive by the complexation with cationized Pronectin F+. For the complexation with PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+, the charge of complex became neutral being almost 0 mV with the increasing PEGylation extents, while the molecular size was similar to that of cationized Pronectin F+. When cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes with or without PEGylation were intravenously injected to mice carrying a subcutaneous Meth-AR-1 fibrosarcoma mass, the PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complex specifically enhanced the level of gene expression in the tumor, to a significantly high extent compared with the cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes and free plasmid DNA. The enhanced level of gene expression depended on the percentage of PEG introduced, the N/P ratio, and the plasmid DNA dose. A fluorescent microscopic study revealed that the

  3. Nucleosome organization of the yeast 2-micrometer DNA plasmid: a eukaryotic minichromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, R G; Fangman, W L

    1979-01-01

    The eukaryotic microorganism Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains 50-100 copies per cell of a circular plasmid called 2-micrometer DNA. The intracellular structure of these molecules, which represent about 4% of the total DNA, was examined by digestion of total cellular chromatin with micrococcal nuclease (nucleate 3'-oligonucleotidohydrolase, EC 3.1.31.1). Nuclease-resistant DNA fragments were fractionated by gel electrophoresis and 2-micrometer DNA sequences were detected by hybridization. The 2-micrometer and chromosomal DNA digestion patterns were very similar indicating that both types of DNA are condensed into nucleosomes. An analysis of these digestion patterns showed that the kinetics of digestion of 2-micrometer chromatin and total chromatin are similar and that both have the same nucleosome repeat length of about 165 base pairs. Native 2-micrometer plasmids were examined by zone sedimentation in sucrose gradients containing 0.15 M NaCl and were found to have a sedimentation constant of 75 S, about 3 times the sedimentation constant of protein-free 2-micrometer DNA. This sedimentation property is what would be expected for a 2-micrometer DNA minichromosome. We conclude that within the cell 2-micrometer DNA molecules are organized in a chromatin structure very similar to that of the yeast chromosomes. Images PMID:392520

  4. Visualization of alkali-denatured supercoiled plasmid DNA by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Jia; Zhang Zhenfeng; Cao Kou; Huang Xitai

    2008-09-26

    To study the alkali denaturation of supercoiled DNA, plasmid pBR322 was treated with gradient concentrations of NaOH solution. The results of gel electrophoresis showed that the alkali denaturation of the supercoiled DNA occurred in a narrow range of pH value (12.88-12.90). The alkali-denatured supercoiled DNA ran, as a sharp band, faster than the supercoiled DNA. The supercoiled plasmid DNA of pBR322, pACYC184 and pJGX15A were denatured by NaOH, and then visualized by atomic force microscopy. Compared with the supercoiled DNA, the atomic force microscopy images of the alkali-denatured supercoiled DNA showed rough surface with many kinks, bulges on double strands with inhomogeneous diameters. The apparent contour lengths of the denatured DNA were shortened by 16%, 16% and 50% for pBR322, pACYC184 and pJGX15A, respectively. All evidence suggested that the alkali-denatured supercoiled DNA had a stable conformation with unregistered, topologically constrained double strands and intrastrand secondary structure.

  5. Binding and elution strategy for improved performance of arginine affinity chromatography in supercoiled plasmid DNA purification.

    PubMed

    Sousa, F; Prazeres, D M F; Queiroz, J A

    2009-02-01

    New interesting strategies for plasmid DNA (pDNA) purification were designed, exploiting affinity interactions between amino acids and nucleic acids. The potential application of arginine-based chromatography to purify pDNA has been recently described in our work; however, to achieve higher efficiency and selectivity in arginine affinity chromatography, it is essential to characterize the behaviour of binding/elution of supercoiled (sc) isoforms. In this study, two different strategies based on increased sodium chloride (225-250 mm) or arginine (20-70 mm) stepwise gradients are described to purify sc isoforms. Thus, it was proved that well-defined binding/elution conditions are crucial to enhance the purification performance, resulting in an improvement of the final plasmids yields and transfection efficiency, as this could represent a significant impact on therapeutic applications of the purified sc isoform. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Spermine and spermidine protection of plasmid DNA against single-strand breaks induced by singlet oxygen.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, A U; Di Mascio, P; Medeiros, M H; Wilson, T

    1992-01-01

    Oxidative damage to DNA induced by singlet molecular oxygen (1O2*) includes single-strand breaks, which the biologically occurring 1O2* quenchers spermine and spermidine are shown to prevent. These polyamines at a physiological concentration (10 mM) reduce the percentage of the open circular form of pBR322 plasmid DNA, which is generated at the expense of the native supercoiled form when the plasmids are incubated with a chemical source of 1O2*, the water-soluble endoperoxide of 3,3'-(1,4-naphthylidene)dipropionate. Spermine and spermidine can be expected to protect DNA against other damaging effects of 1O2*. Images PMID:1454831

  7. Purification of plasmid DNA from Escherichia coli ferments using anion-exchange membrane and hydrophobic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Germán, Patricia; Montesinos-Cisneros, Rosa Ma; Prazeres, D Miguel F; Tejeda-Mansir, Armando

    2011-01-01

    A novel downstream bioprocess was developed to obtain purified plasmid DNA (pDNA) from Escherichia coli ferments. The intermediate recovery and purification of the pDNA in cell lysate was conducted using hollow-fiber tangential filtration and frontal anion-exchange membrane and elution hydrophobic chromatographies. The purity of the solutions of pDNA obtained during each process stage was investigated. The results show that the pDNA solution purity increased 30-fold and more than 99% of RNA in the lysate was removed during the process operations. The combination of membrane operations and hydrophobic interaction chromatography resulted in an efficient way to recover pDNA from cell lysates. A better understanding of membrane-based technology for the purification of pDNA from clarified E. coli lysate was developed in this research.

  8. Intrathecal Injection of Naked Plasmid DNA Provides Long-term Expression of Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Travis S; Langer, Stephen J; Johnson, Kirk W; Chavez, Raymond A; Watkins, Linda R; Milligan, Erin D; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic benefit has been reported to result from intrathecal (i.t.) injection of transgene vectors, including naked DNA. However, most studies using naked DNA have measured only the transgene expression of intracellular proteins. Here we demonstrate that i.t. injection of naked DNA can result in long-term expression of secreted proteins. Plasmids expressing either secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) or human interleukin-10 (hIL-10) were injected into the i.t. space in rats, and transgene products were repeatedly measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Both SEAP and hIL-10 were maximal at 1 and 2 days after the injection and still detectable at 4 months. The utilization of a plasmid having two features that are hypothesized to increase gene expression (matrix attachment regions (MARs) and lack of CpG dinucleotides) resulted in a significant increase in gene expression. Reinjection of SEAP or hIL-10 plasmids after 4 months significantly increased protein levels at 1 and 14 days after the reinjection. SEAP was uniformly distributed between the DNA delivery site (~vertebral level T13) and the lumbar puncture site (L5/L6 inter-vertebral space), was reduced at the cisterna magna, and was detectable, though at much lower levels, in serum. These data suggest that naked DNA has the potential to be used as a therapeutic tool for applications that require long-term release of transgenes into the CSF. PMID:18941439

  9. Isothermal titration calorimetric analysis of the interaction between cationic lipids and plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Lobo, B A; Davis, A; Koe, G; Smith, J G; Middaugh, C R

    2001-02-01

    The effects of buffer and ionic strength upon the enthalpy of binding between plasmid DNA and a variety of cationic lipids used to enhance cellular transfection were studied using isothermal titration calorimetry at 25.0 degrees C and pH 7.4. The cationic lipids DOTAP (1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethyl ammonium propane), DDAB (dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium bromide), DOTAP:cholesterol (1:1), and DDAB:cholesterol (1:1) bound endothermally to plasmid DNA with a negligible proton exchange with buffer. In contrast, DOTAP: DOPE (L-alpha-dioleoyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine) (1:1) and DDAB:DOPE (1:1) liposomes displayed a negative enthalpy and a significant uptake of protons upon binding to plasmid DNA at neutral pH. These findings are most easily explained by a change in the apparent pKa of the amino group of DOPE upon binding. Complexes formed by reverse addition methods (DNA into lipid) produced different thermograms, sizes, zeta potentials, and aggregation behavior, suggesting that structurally different complexes were formed in each titration direction. Titrations performed in both directions in the presence of increasing ionic strength revealed a progressive decrease in the heat of binding and an increase in the lipid to DNA charge ratio at which aggregation occurred. The unfavorable binding enthalpy for the cationic lipids alone and with cholesterol implies an entropy-driven interaction, while the negative enthalpies observed with DOPE-containing lipid mixtures suggest an additional contribution from changes in protonation of DOPE.

  10. Intrathecal injection of naked plasmid DNA provides long-term expression of secreted proteins.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Travis S; Langer, Stephen J; Johnson, Kirk W; Chavez, Raymond A; Watkins, Linda R; Milligan, Erin D; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic benefit has been reported to result from intrathecal (i.t.) injection of transgene vectors, including naked DNA. However, most studies using naked DNA have measured only the transgene expression of intracellular proteins. Here we demonstrate that i.t. injection of naked DNA can result in long-term expression of secreted proteins. Plasmids expressing either secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) or human interleukin-10 (hIL-10) were injected into the i.t. space in rats, and transgene products were repeatedly measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Both SEAP and hIL-10 were maximal at 1 and 2 days after the injection and still detectable at 4 months. The utilization of a plasmid having two features that are hypothesized to increase gene expression (matrix attachment regions (MARs) and lack of CpG dinucleotides) resulted in a significant increase in gene expression. Reinjection of SEAP or hIL-10 plasmids after 4 months significantly increased protein levels at 1 and 14 days after the reinjection. SEAP was uniformly distributed between the DNA delivery site (approximately vertebral level T13) and the lumbar puncture site (L5/L6 inter-vertebral space), was reduced at the cisterna magna, and was detectable, though at much lower levels, in serum. These data suggest that naked DNA has the potential to be used as a therapeutic tool for applications that require long-term release of transgenes into the CSF.

  11. Homology of pCS1 Plasmid Sequences with Chromosomal DNA in Clavibacter michiganense subsp. sepedonicum: Evidence for the Presence of a Repeated Sequence and Plasmid Integration †

    PubMed Central

    Mogen, Bradley D.; Oleson, Arland E.

    1987-01-01

    Restriction fragments of pCS1, a 50.6-kilobase (kb) plasmid present in many strains of Clavibacter michiganense subsp. sepedonicum (“Corynebacterium sepedonicum”), have been cloned in an M13mp11 phage vector. Radiolabeled forms of these cloned fragments have been used as Southern hybridization probes for the presence of plasmid sequences in chromosomal DNA of this organism. These studies have shown that all tested strains lacking the covalently closed circular form of pCS1 contain the plasmid in integrated form. In each case the site of integration exists on a single plasmid restriction fragment with a size of 5.1 kb. Southern hybridizations with these probes have also revealed the existence of a major repeated sequence in C. michiganense subsp. sepedonicum. Hybridizations of chromosomal DNA with deletion subclones of a 2.9-kb plasmid fragment containing the repeated sequence indicate that the size of the repeated sequence is approximately 1.3 kb. One of the copies of the repeated sequence is on the plasmid fragment containing the site of integration. Images PMID:16347464

  12. Characterization of the endogenous plasmid from Pseudomonas alcaligenes NCIB 9867: DNA sequence and mechanism of transfer.

    PubMed

    Kwong, S M; Yeo, C C; Suwanto, A; Poh, C L

    2000-01-01

    The endogenous plasmid pRA2 from Pseudomonas alcaligenes NCIB 9867 was determined to have 32,743 bp with a G+C content of 59.8%. Sequence analysis predicted a total of 29 open reading frames, with approximately half of them contributing towards the functions of plasmid replication, mobilization, and stability. The Pac25I restriction-modification system and two mobile elements, Tn5563 and IS1633, were physically localized. An additional eight open reading frames with unknown functions were also detected. pRA2 was genetically tagged with the OmegaStr(r)/Spc(r) gene cassette by homologous recombination. Intrastrain transfer of pRA2-encoded genetic markers between isogenic mutants of P. alcaligenes NCIB 9867 were observed at high frequencies (2.4 x 10(-4) per donor). This transfer was determined to be mediated by a natural transformation process that required cell-cell contact and was completely sensitive to DNase I (1 mg/ml). Efficient transformation was also observed when pRA2 DNA was applied directly onto the cells, while transformation with foreign plasmid DNAs was not observed. pRA2 could be conjugally transferred into Pseudomonas putida RA713 and KT2440 recipients only when plasmid RK2/RP4 transfer functions were provided in trans. Plasmid stability analysis demonstrated that pRA2 could be stably maintained in its original host, P. alcaligenes NCIB 9867, as well as in P. putida RA713 after 100 generations of nonselective growth. Disruption of the pRA2 pac25I restriction endonuclease gene did not alter plasmid stability, while the pRA2 minireplicon exhibited only partial stability. This indicates that other pRA2-encoded determinants could have significant roles in influencing plasmid stability.

  13. Damage to dry plasmid DNA induced by nanosecond XUV-laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nováková, Eva; Davídková, Marie; Vyšín, Ludék; Burian, Tomáš; Grisham, Michael E.; Heinbuch, Scott; Rocca, Jorge J.; Juha, Libor

    2011-06-01

    Ionizing radiation induces a variety of DNA damages including single-strand breaks (SSBs), double-strand breaks (DSBs), abasic sites, modified sugar and bases. Most theoretical and experimental studies have been focused on DNA strand scissions, in particular production of DNA double-strand breaks. DSBs have been proven to be a key damage at a molecular level responsible for the formation of chromosomal aberrations, leading often to cell death. The complexity of lesions produced in DNA by ionizing radiations is thought to depend on the amount of energy deposited at the site of each lesion. We have studied the nature of DNA damage induced directly by the pulsed 46.9 nm radiation provided by a capillary-discharge Ne-like Ar laser (CDL). Different surface doses were delivered with a repetition rate of a few Hz and an average pulse energy ~ 1 μJ. A simple model DNA molecule, i.e., dried closed-circular plasmid DNA (pBR322), was irradiated. The agarose gel electrophoresis method was used for determination of both SSB and DSB yields. Results are compared with a previous study of plasmid DNA irradiated with a single sub-nanosecond 1-keV X-ray pulse produced by a large-scale, double-stream gas puff target, illuminated by sub-kJ, near-infrared (NIR) focused laser pulses at the PALS facility (Prague Asterix Laser System).

  14. Construction of a shuttle vector and transformation of Xylella fastidiosa with plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Qin, X; Hartung, J S

    2001-09-01

    We have isolated, cloned, and sequenced a 5823-bp cryptic plasmid from a strain of Xylella fastidiosa. This plasmid encodes five open reading frames (ORF) greater than 400 nucleotides each. ORF 2 encodes a protein with 37% amino acid identity to the replication initiator protein of plasmid pECB2 from Pseudomonas alcaligenes. This RepA protein from X. fastidiosa contains both a leucine zipper and helix turn helix motif characteristic of proteins involved in DNA replication. The sequence 5' of ORF 2 has all of the features characteristic of plasmid origins of replication as well as regulatory elements required for transcription of ORF 2. Open reading frame 2, along with the upstream origin of replication, was cloned as an EcoRI fragment into pUC19 to create a shuttle vector. This construct was introduced into Xylella fastidiosa by electroporation, with selection for carbenicillin resistance. Transformation was verified by both PCR and Southern hybridization experiments. Frequency of transformation was low, but increased ten-fold when the plasmid was grown in X. fastidiosa rather than Escherichia coli prior to transformation. This work represents the first step towards the development of a system for genetic analysis of this important plant pathogen of citrus, grapevines, and other horticultural crops.

  15. Phage type and DNA plasmid profile of Salmonella typhimurium isolates in the area of Isernia, Italy.

    PubMed Central

    Fantasia, M.; Ricci, N.; Manuppella, A.; Martini, A.; Filetici, E.; Laurelli, T.

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-eight Salmonella typhimurium strains isolated from December 1987 to March 1988 in Isernia, Central Italy, were characterized on the basis of their phage type, resistance to antimicrobials and plasmid profiles. According to their phage types, the isolates could be assigned to one of six groups, the prevalent one being PT 195 which accounted for 73.6% of isolates. On the basis of their plasmid content, the isolates could be assigned to one of ten groups. The prevalent plasmid profile (60.0; 6.0; 4.3; 4.0; 3.2 megadaltons) was found in 60.4% of isolates. All the isolates from a particular food (salsicce), and as most of isolates from humans who had consumed this food belonged to phage type 195 and were of the same plasmid profile. The combined use of phage typing and DNA plasmid analysis proved to be a useful tool in identifying epidemiologically related isolates in this investigation. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2209736

  16. 99mTc-labeled HYNIC-DAPI causes plasmid DNA damage with high efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kotzerke, Joerg; Punzet, Robert; Runge, Roswitha; Ferl, Sandra; Oehme, Liane; Wunderlich, Gerd; Freudenberg, Robert

    2014-01-01

    (99m)Tc is the standard radionuclide used for nuclear medicine imaging. In addition to gamma irradiation, (99m)Tc emits low-energy Auger and conversion electrons that deposit their energy within nanometers of the decay site. To study the potential for DNA damage, direct DNA binding is required. Plasmid DNA enables the investigation of the unprotected interactions between molecules and DNA that result in single-strand breaks (SSBs) or double-strand breaks (DSBs); the resulting DNA fragments can be separated by gel electrophoresis and quantified by fluorescent staining. This study aimed to compare the plasmid DNA damage potential of a (99m)Tc-labeled HYNIC-DAPI compound with that of (99m)Tc pertechnetate ((99m)TcO4(-)). pUC19 plasmid DNA was irradiated for 2 or 24 hours. Direct and radical-induced DNA damage were evaluated in the presence or absence of the radical scavenger DMSO. For both compounds, an increase in applied activity enhanced plasmid DNA damage, which was evidenced by an increase in the open circular and linear DNA fractions and a reduction in the supercoiled DNA fraction. The number of SSBs elicited by 99mTc-HYNIC-DAPI (1.03) was twice that caused by (99m)TcO4(-) (0.51), and the number of DSBs increased fivefold in the (99m)Tc-HYNIC-DAPI-treated sample compared with the (99m)TcO4(-) treated sample (0.02 to 0.10). In the presence of DMSO, the numbers of SSBs and DSBs decreased to 0.03 and 0.00, respectively, in the (99m)TcO4(-) treated samples, whereas the numbers of SSBs and DSBs were slightly reduced to 0.95 and 0.06, respectively, in the (99m)Tc-HYNIC-DAPI-treated samples. These results indicated that (99m)Tc-HYNIC-DAPI induced SSBs and DSBs via a direct interaction of the (99m)Tc-labeled compound with DNA. In contrast to these results, (99m)TcO4(-) induced SSBs via radical formation, and DSBs were formed by two nearby SSBs. The biological effectiveness of (99m)Tc-HYNIC-DAPI increased by approximately 4-fold in terms of inducing SSBs and by

  17. 99mTc-Labeled HYNIC-DAPI Causes Plasmid DNA Damage with High Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kotzerke, Joerg; Punzet, Robert; Runge, Roswitha; Ferl, Sandra; Oehme, Liane; Wunderlich, Gerd; Freudenberg, Robert

    2014-01-01

    99mTc is the standard radionuclide used for nuclear medicine imaging. In addition to gamma irradiation, 99mTc emits low-energy Auger and conversion electrons that deposit their energy within nanometers of the decay site. To study the potential for DNA damage, direct DNA binding is required. Plasmid DNA enables the investigation of the unprotected interactions between molecules and DNA that result in single-strand breaks (SSBs) or double-strand breaks (DSBs); the resulting DNA fragments can be separated by gel electrophoresis and quantified by fluorescent staining. This study aimed to compare the plasmid DNA damage potential of a 99mTc-labeled HYNIC-DAPI compound with that of 99mTc pertechnetate (99mTcO4−). pUC19 plasmid DNA was irradiated for 2 or 24 hours. Direct and radical-induced DNA damage were evaluated in the presence or absence of the radical scavenger DMSO. For both compounds, an increase in applied activity enhanced plasmid DNA damage, which was evidenced by an increase in the open circular and linear DNA fractions and a reduction in the supercoiled DNA fraction. The number of SSBs elicited by 99mTc-HYNIC-DAPI (1.03) was twice that caused by 99mTcO4− (0.51), and the number of DSBs increased fivefold in the 99mTc-HYNIC-DAPI-treated sample compared with the 99mTcO4− treated sample (0.02 to 0.10). In the presence of DMSO, the numbers of SSBs and DSBs decreased to 0.03 and 0.00, respectively, in the 99mTcO4– treated samples, whereas the numbers of SSBs and DSBs were slightly reduced to 0.95 and 0.06, respectively, in the 99mTc-HYNIC-DAPI-treated samples. These results indicated that 99mTc-HYNIC-DAPI induced SSBs and DSBs via a direct interaction of the 99mTc-labeled compound with DNA. In contrast to these results, 99mTcO4− induced SSBs via radical formation, and DSBs were formed by two nearby SSBs. The biological effectiveness of 99mTc-HYNIC-DAPI increased by approximately 4-fold in terms of inducing SSBs and by approximately 10-fold in terms of

  18. Plasmid DNA replication and topology as visualized by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Schvartzman, J B; Martínez-Robles, M L; Hernández, P; Krimer, D B

    2010-01-01

    During the last 20 years, two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis combined with other techniques such as Polymerase Chain Reaction, helicase assay and electron microscopy, helped to characterize plasmid DNA replication and topology. Here we describe some of the most important findings that were made using this method including the characterization of uni-directional replication, replication origin interference, DNA breakage at the forks, replication fork blockage, replication knotting, replication fork reversal, the interplay of supercoiling and catenation and other changes in DNA topology that take place as replication progresses.

  19. Model System for DNA Replication of a Plasmid DNA Containing the Autonomously Replicating Sequence from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimi, Yukio; Matsumoto, Ken

    1993-06-01

    A negatively supercoiled plasmid DNA containing autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) 1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was replicated with the proteins required for simian virus 40 DNA replication. The proteins included simian virus 40 large tumor antigen as a DNA helicase, DNA polymerase α^\\cdotprimase, and the multisubunit human single-stranded DNA-binding protein from HeLa cells; DNA gyrase from Escherichia coli, which relaxes positive but not negative supercoils, was included as a "swivelase." DNA replication started from the ARS region, proceeded bidirectionally with the synthesis of leading and lagging strands, and resulted in the synthesis of up to 10% of the input DNA in 1 h. The addition of HeLa DNA topoisomerase I, which relaxes both positive and negative supercoils, to this system inhibited DNA replication, suggesting that negative supercoiling of the template DNA is required for initiation. These results suggest that DNA replication starts from the ARS region where the DNA duplex is unwound by torsional stress; this unwound region can be recognized by a DNA helicase with the assistance of the multisubunit human single-stranded DNA-binding protein.

  20. Tissue-specific Calibration of Real-time PCR Facilitates Absolute Quantification of Plasmid DNA in Biodistribution Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Joan K; White, Paul J; Pouton, Colin W

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the tissue distribution of plasmid DNA after administration of nonviral gene delivery systems is best accomplished using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), although published strategies do not allow determination of the absolute mass of plasmid delivered to different tissues. Generally, data is expressed as the mass of plasmid relative to the mass of genomic DNA (gDNA) in the sample. This strategy is adequate for comparisons of efficiency of delivery to a single site but it does not allow direct comparison of delivery to multiple tissues, as the mass of gDNA extracted per unit mass of each tissue is different. We show here that by constructing qPCR standard curves for each tissue it is possible to determine the dose of intact plasmid remaining in each tissue, which is a more useful parameter when comparing the fates of different formulations of DNA. We exemplify the use of this tissue-specific qPCR method by comparing the delivery of naked DNA, cationic DNA complexes, and neutral PEGylated DNA complexes after intramuscular injection. Generally, larger masses of intact plasmid were present 24 hours after injection of DNA complexes, and neutral complexes resulted in delivery of a larger mass of intact plasmid to the spleen. PMID:27701400

  1. GADD45 proteins inhibit HIV-1 replication through specific suppression of HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhibin; Liu, Ruikang; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Suzhen; Hu, Xiaomei; Tan, Juan; Liang, Chen; Qiao, Wentao

    2016-06-01

    GADD45 proteins are a group of stress-induced proteins and participate in various cellular pathways including cell cycle regulation, cell survival and death, DNA repair and demethylation. It was recently shown that HIV-1 infection induces the expression of GADD45 proteins. However, the effect of GADD45 on HIV-1 replication has not been studied. Here, we report that overexpression of GADD45 proteins reduces HIV-1 production through suppressing transcription from the HIV-1 LTR promoter. This inhibitory effect is specific to HIV-1, since GADD45 proteins neither inhibit the LTR promoters from other retroviruses nor reduce the production of these viruses. Knockdown of endogenous GADD45 modestly activates HIV-1 in the J-Lat A72 latency cell line, which suggests GADD45 proteins might play a role in maintaining HIV-1 latency.

  2. Construction of a recombinant bacterial plasmid containing DNA sequences for a mouse embryonic globin chain.

    PubMed Central

    Fantoni, A; Bozzoni, I; Ullu, E; Farace, M G

    1979-01-01

    Messenger RNAs for mouse embryonic globins were purified from yolk sac derived eyrthroid cells in mouse fetuses. Double stranded DNAs complementary to these messengers were synthesized and blunt end ligated to a EcoRI digested and DNA polymerase I repaired pBR322 plasmid. Of the ampicillin resistant transformants, one contained a plasmid with globin-specific cDNA. The inserted sequence is about 350 base pairs long. It contains one restriction site for EcoRI and one restriction site for HinfI about 170 and 80 base pairs from one end. The insert is not cleaved by HindIII, HindII, BamHI, PstI, SalI, AvaI, TaqI, HpaII, BglI. A mixture of purified messengers coding for alpha chains and for x, y and z embryonic chains was incubated with the recombinant plasmid and the hybridized messenger was translated in a mRNA depleted reticulocyte lysate protein synthesizing system. The product of translation was identified as a z chain by carboxymethylcellulose cromatography. The recombinant plasmid is named "pBR322-egz" after embryonic globin z. Images PMID:493112

  3. Construction of a recombinant bacterial plasmid containing DNA sequences for a mouse embryonic globin chain.

    PubMed

    Fantoni, A; Bozzoni, I; Ullu, E; Farace, M G

    1979-08-10

    Messenger RNAs for mouse embryonic globins were purified from yolk sac derived eyrthroid cells in mouse fetuses. Double stranded DNAs complementary to these messengers were synthesized and blunt end ligated to a EcoRI digested and DNA polymerase I repaired pBR322 plasmid. Of the ampicillin resistant transformants, one contained a plasmid with globin-specific cDNA. The inserted sequence is about 350 base pairs long. It contains one restriction site for EcoRI and one restriction site for HinfI about 170 and 80 base pairs from one end. The insert is not cleaved by HindIII, HindII, BamHI, PstI, SalI, AvaI, TaqI, HpaII, BglI. A mixture of purified messengers coding for alpha chains and for x, y and z embryonic chains was incubated with the recombinant plasmid and the hybridized messenger was translated in a mRNA depleted reticulocyte lysate protein synthesizing system. The product of translation was identified as a z chain by carboxymethylcellulose cromatography. The recombinant plasmid is named "pBR322-egz" after embryonic globin z.

  4. Reduction of electron deficient guanine radical species in plasmid DNA by tyrosine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Mandi; Do, Trinh T; Tang, Vicky J; Aguilera, Joseph A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2010-06-07

    Guanine bases are the most easily oxidized sites in DNA and therefore electron deficient guanine radical species are major intermediates in the direct effect of ionizing radiation (ionization of the DNA itself) on DNA as a consequence of hole migration to guanine. As a model for this process we have used gamma-irradiation in the presence of thiocyanate ions to generate single electron oxidized guanine radicals in a plasmid target in aqueous solution. The stable species formed from these radicals can be detected and quantified by the formation of strand breaks in the plasmid after a post-irradiation incubation using a suitable enzyme. If a tyrosine derivative is also present during irradiation, the production of guanine oxidation products is decreased by electron transfer from tyrosine to the intermediate guanyl radical species. By using cationic tyrosine containing ligands we are able to observe this process when the tyrosine is electrostatically bound to the plasmid. The driving force dependence of this reaction was determined by comparing the reactivity of tyrosine with its 3-nitro analog. The results imply that the electron transfer reaction is coupled to a proton transfer. The experimental conditions used in this model system provide a reasonable approximation to those involved in the radioprotection of DNA by tightly bound proteins in chromatin.

  5. TDAB-induced DNA plasmid condensation on the surface of a reconstructed boron doped silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougin, Antoine; Babak, Valéry G.; Palmino, Frank; Bêche, Eric; Baros, Francis; Hunting, Darel J.; Sanche, Léon; Fromm, Michel

    Our study aims at a better control and understanding of the transfer of a complex [DNA supercoiled plasmid - dodecyltrimethylammonium surfactant] layer from a liquid-vapour water interface onto a silicon surface without any additional cross-linker. The production of the complexed layer and its transfer from the aqueous subphase to the substrate is achieved with a Langmuir-Blodgett device. The substrate consists of a reconstructed boron doped silicon substrate with a nanometer-scale roughness. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements, it is shown that the DNA complexes are stretched in a disorderly manner throughout a 2-4 nm high net-like structure. This architecture is composed of tilted cationic surfactant molecules bound electrostatically to DNA, which exhibits a characteristic network arrangement with a measured average fiber diameter of about 45 ± 15 nm covering the entire surface. The mechanism of transfer of this layer onto the planar surface of the semi-conductor and the parameters of the process are analysed and illustrated by atomic force microscopy snapshots. The molecular layer exhibits the typical characteristics of a spinodal decomposition pattern or dewetting features. Plasmid molecules appear like long flattened fibers covering the surface, forming holes of various shapes and areas. The cluster-cluster aggregation of the complex structure gets very much denser on the substrate edge. The supercoiled DNA plasmids undergo conformational changes and a high degree of condensation and aggregation is observed. Perspectives and potential applications are considered.

  6. Formation of AAV single stranded DNA genome from a circular plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cervelli, Tiziana; Backovic, Ana; Galli, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are promising tools for targeted transfer in gene therapy studies. Many efforts have been accomplished to improve production and purification methods. We thought to develop a simple eukaryotic system allowing AAV replication which could provide an excellent opportunity for studying AAV biology and, more importantly, for AAV vector production. It has been shown that yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to replicate and form the capsid of many viruses. We investigated the ability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to carry out the replication of a recombinant AAV (rAAV). When a plasmid containing a rAAV genome in which the cap gene was replaced with the S. cerevisiae URA3 gene, was co-transformed in yeast with a plasmid expressing Rep68, a significant number of URA3(+) clones were scored (more than 30-fold over controls). Molecular analysis of low molecular weight DNA by Southern blotting revealed that single stranded DNA is formed and that the plasmid is entirely replicated. The ssDNA contains the ITRs, URA3 gene and also vector sequences suggesting the presence of two distinct molecules. Its formation was dependent on Rep68 expression and ITR. These data indicate that DNA is not obtained by the canonical AAV replication pathway.

  7. Formation of AAV Single Stranded DNA Genome from a Circular Plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cervelli, Tiziana; Backovic, Ana; Galli, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are promising tools for targeted transfer in gene therapy studies. Many efforts have been accomplished to improve production and purification methods. We thought to develop a simple eukaryotic system allowing AAV replication which could provide an excellent opportunity for studying AAV biology and, more importantly, for AAV vector production. It has been shown that yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to replicate and form the capsid of many viruses. We investigated the ability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to carry out the replication of a recombinant AAV (rAAV). When a plasmid containing a rAAV genome in which the cap gene was replaced with the S. cerevisiae URA3 gene, was co-transformed in yeast with a plasmid expressing Rep68, a significant number of URA3+ clones were scored (more than 30-fold over controls). Molecular analysis of low molecular weight DNA by Southern blotting revealed that single stranded DNA is formed and that the plasmid is entirely replicated. The ssDNA contains the ITRs, URA3 gene and also vector sequences suggesting the presence of two distinct molecules. Its formation was dependent on Rep68 expression and ITR. These data indicate that DNA is not obtained by the canonical AAV replication pathway. PMID:21853137

  8. Solid lipid nanoparticles mediate non-viral delivery of plasmid DNA to dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penumarthi, Alekhya; Parashar, Deepti; Abraham, Amanda N.; Dekiwadia, Chaitali; Macreadie, Ian; Shukla, Ravi; Smooker, Peter M.

    2017-06-01

    There is an increasing demand for novel DNA vaccine delivery systems, mainly for the non-viral type as they are considered relatively safe. Therefore, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were investigated for their suitability as a non-viral DNA vaccine delivery system. SLNs were synthesised by a modified solvent-emulsification method in order to study their potential to conjugate with plasmid DNA and deliver them in vitro to dendritic cells using eGFP as the reporter plasmid. The DNA-SLN complexes were characterised by electron microscopy, gel retardation assays and dynamic light scattering. The cytotoxicity assay data supported their biocompatibility and was used to estimate safe threshold concentration resulting in high transfection rate. The transfection efficiency of these complexes in a dendritic cell line was shown to increase significantly compared to plasmid alone, and was comparable to that mediated by lipofectamine. Transmission electron microscopy studies delineated the pathway of cellular uptake. Endosomal escape was observed supporting the mechanism of transfection.

  9. The construction and partial characterization of plasmids containing complementary DNA sequences to human calcitonin precursor polyprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, J; Hall, L; MacIntyre, I; Craig, R K

    1981-01-01

    (1) Total poly(A)-containing RNA isolated from human thyroid medullary carcinoma tissue was shown to direct the synthesis in the wheat germ cell-free system of a major (Mr 21000) and several minor forms of human calcitonin precursor polyproteins. Evidence for processing of these precursor(s) by the wheat germ cell-free system is also presented. (2) A small complementary DNA (cDNA) plasmid library has been constructed in the PstI site of the plasmid pAT153, using total human thyroid medullary carcinoma poly(A)-containing RNA as the starting material. (3) Plasmids containing abundant cDNA sequences were selected by hybridization in situ, and two of these (ph T-B3 and phT-B6) were characterized by hybridization--translation and restriction analysis. Each was shown to contain human calcitonin precursor polyprotein cDNA sequences. (4) RNA blotting techniques demonstrate that the human calcitonin precursor polyprotein is encoded within a mRNA containing 1000 bases. (5) The results demonstrate that human calcitonin is synthesized as a precursor polyprotein. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6896146

  10. Hypermutable ligation of plasmid DNA ends in cells from patients with Werner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rünger, T M; Bauer, C; Dekant, B; Möller, K; Sobotta, P; Czerny, C; Poot, M; Martin, G M

    1994-01-01

    Werner Syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by an increased cancer risk and by symptoms suggestive of premature aging. Cells from these patients demonstrate a typical pattern of chromosomal instability and a spontaneous hypermutability with a high rate of unusually large deletions. We have studied the in vivo DNA ligation in three lymphoblast cell lines from Werner syndrome patients and three from normal donors. In our host cell ligation assay we transfected linearized plasmid pZ189 and measured the amount of plasmid DNA ends rejoined by these host cells as the ability of the recovered plasmid to transform bacteria. A mutagenesis marker gene close to the ligation site allowed screening for mutations. Subsequent mutation analysis provided information about the accuracy of the ligation process. The cells from Werner syndrome patients were as effective as normal cells in ligating DNA ends. However, mutation analysis revealed that the three Werner syndrome cell lines introduced 2.4-4.6 times more mutations (p < 0.001) than the normal cell lines during ligation of the DNA ends: the mutation rates were 69.4, 97.2, and 58.7%, as compared to 23.6, 21.7, and 24.4% in the normal cell lines. These increased mutation frequencies in plasmids ligated during passage through Werner syndrome cells were mainly due to a significant (p < 0.001) increase in deletions. This error-prone DNA ligation might be responsible for the spontaneous hypermutability and the genomic instability in Werner syndrome cells and related to the apparently accelerated aging and high cancer risk in affected patients.

  11. Fluoride enhances transfection activity of carbonate apatite by increasing cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, E.H.

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} Cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA is enhanced by fluoride incorporation into carbonate apatite carrier. {yields} Fluoridated carbonate apatite promotes a robust increase in transgene expression. {yields} Controlled dissolution of fluoridated carbonate apatite in endosomal acidic environment might buffer the endosomes and prevent degradation of the released DNA. -- Abstract: Intracellular delivery of a functional gene or a nucleic acid sequence to specifically knockdown a harmful gene is a potential approach to precisely treat a critical human disease. The intensive efforts in the last few decades led to the development of a number of viral and non-viral synthetic vectors. However, an ideal delivery tool in terms of the safety and efficacy has yet to be established. Recently, we have developed pH-sensing inorganic nanocrystals of carbonate apatite for efficient and cell-targeted delivery of gene and gene-silencing RNA. Here we show that addition of very low level of fluoride to the particle-forming medium facilitates a robust increase in transgene expression following post-incubation of the particles with HeLa cells. Confocal microscopic observation and Southern blotting prove the cytoplasmic existence of plasmid DNA delivered by likely formed fluoridated carbonate apatite particles while degradation of plasmid DNA presumably by cytoplasmic nucleases was noticed following delivery with apatite particles alone. The beneficial role of fluoride in enhancing carbonate apatite-mediated gene expression might be due to the buffering potential of generated fluoridated apatite in endosomal acidic environment, thereby increasing the half-life of delivered plasmid DNA.

  12. High Throughput Analyses of Budding Yeast ARSs Reveal New DNA Elements Capable of Conferring Centromere-Independent Plasmid Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Hoggard, Timothy; Liachko, Ivan; Burt, Cassaundra; Meikle, Troy; Jiang, Katherine; Craciun, Gheorghe; Dunham, Maitreya J.; Fox, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of plasmids to propagate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been instrumental in defining eukaryotic chromosomal control elements. Stable propagation demands both plasmid replication, which requires a chromosomal replication origin (i.e., an ARS), and plasmid distribution to dividing cells, which requires either a chromosomal centromere for segregation or a plasmid-partitioning element. While our knowledge of yeast ARSs and centromeres is relatively advanced, we know less about chromosomal regions that can function as plasmid partitioning elements. The Rap1 protein-binding site (RAP1) present in transcriptional silencers and telomeres of budding yeast is a known plasmid-partitioning element that functions to anchor a plasmid to the inner nuclear membrane (INM), which in turn facilitates plasmid distribution to daughter cells. This Rap1-dependent INM-anchoring also has an important chromosomal role in higher-order chromosomal structures that enhance transcriptional silencing and telomere stability. Thus, plasmid partitioning can reflect fundamental features of chromosome structure and biology, yet a systematic screen for plasmid partitioning elements has not been reported. Here, we couple deep sequencing with competitive growth experiments of a plasmid library containing thousands of short ARS fragments to identify new plasmid partitioning elements. Competitive growth experiments were performed with libraries that differed only in terms of the presence or absence of a centromere. Comparisons of the behavior of ARS fragments in the two experiments allowed us to identify sequences that were likely to drive plasmid partitioning. In addition to the silencer RAP1 site, we identified 74 new putative plasmid-partitioning motifs predicted to act as binding sites for DNA binding proteins enriched for roles in negative regulation of gene expression and G2/M-phase associated biology. These data expand our knowledge of chromosomal elements that may function in plasmid

  13. High Throughput Analyses of Budding Yeast ARSs Reveal New DNA Elements Capable of Conferring Centromere-Independent Plasmid Propagation.

    PubMed

    Hoggard, Timothy; Liachko, Ivan; Burt, Cassaundra; Meikle, Troy; Jiang, Katherine; Craciun, Gheorghe; Dunham, Maitreya J; Fox, Catherine A

    2016-04-07

    The ability of plasmids to propagate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been instrumental in defining eukaryotic chromosomal control elements. Stable propagation demands both plasmid replication, which requires a chromosomal replication origin (i.e., an ARS), and plasmid distribution to dividing cells, which requires either a chromosomal centromere for segregation or a plasmid-partitioning element. While our knowledge of yeast ARSs and centromeres is relatively advanced, we know less about chromosomal regions that can function as plasmid partitioning elements. The Rap1 protein-binding site (RAP1) present in transcriptional silencers and telomeres of budding yeast is a known plasmid-partitioning element that functions to anchor a plasmid to the inner nuclear membrane (INM), which in turn facilitates plasmid distribution to daughter cells. This Rap1-dependent INM-anchoring also has an important chromosomal role in higher-order chromosomal structures that enhance transcriptional silencing and telomere stability. Thus, plasmid partitioning can reflect fundamental features of chromosome structure and biology, yet a systematic screen for plasmid partitioning elements has not been reported. Here, we couple deep sequencing with competitive growth experiments of a plasmid library containing thousands of short ARS fragments to identify new plasmid partitioning elements. Competitive growth experiments were performed with libraries that differed only in terms of the presence or absence of a centromere. Comparisons of the behavior of ARS fragments in the two experiments allowed us to identify sequences that were likely to drive plasmid partitioning. In addition to the silencer RAP1 site, we identified 74 new putative plasmid-partitioning motifs predicted to act as binding sites for DNA binding proteins enriched for roles in negative regulation of gene expression and G2/M-phase associated biology. These data expand our knowledge of chromosomal elements that may function in plasmid

  14. Evaluation of Biological and Physical Protection against Nuclease Degradation of Clay-Bound Plasmid DNA

    PubMed Central

    Demanèche, Sandrine; Jocteur-Monrozier, Lucile; Quiquampoix, Hervé; Simonet, Pascal

    2001-01-01

    In order to determine the mechanisms involved in the persistence of extracellular DNA in soils and to monitor whether bacterial transformation could occur in such an environment, we developed artificial models composed of plasmid DNA adsorbed on clay particles. We determined that clay-bound DNA submitted to an increasing range of nuclease concentrations was physically protected. The protection mechanism was mainly related to the adsorption of the nuclease on the clay mineral. The biological potential of the resulting DNA was monitored by transforming the naturally competent proteobacterium Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413, allowing us to demonstrate that adsorbed DNA was only partially available for transformation. This part of the clay-bound DNA which was available for bacteria, was also accessible to nucleases, while the remaining fraction escaped both transformation and degradation. Finally, transformation efficiency was related to the perpetuation mechanism, with homologous recombination being less sensitive to nucleases than autonomous replication, which requires intact molecules. PMID:11133458

  15. HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein Switches the Pathway of TAR RNA/DNA Annealing from Loop-Loop “Kissing” to “Zipper”

    PubMed Central

    Vo, My-Nuong; Barany, George; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Summary The chaperone activity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid protein (NC) facilitates multiple nucleic acid rearrangements that are critical for reverse transcription of the single-stranded RNA genome into double-stranded DNA. Annealing of the trans-activation response element (TAR) RNA hairpin to a complementary TAR DNA hairpin is an essential step in the minus-strand transfer step of reverse transcription. Previously, we used truncated 27-nucleotide (nt) mini-TAR RNA and DNA constructs to investigate this annealing reaction pathway in the presence and absence of HIV-1 NC. In this work, full-length 59-nt TAR RNA and TAR DNA constructs were used to systematically study TAR hairpin annealing kinetics. In the absence of NC, full-length TAR hairpin annealing is ∼10-fold slower than mini-TAR annealing. Similar to mini-TAR annealing, the reaction pathway for TAR in the absence of NC involves the fast formation of an unstable “kissing” loop intermediate, followed by a slower conversion to an extended duplex. NC facilitates the annealing of TAR by ∼105-fold by stabilizing the bimolecular intermediate (∼104-fold) and promoting the subsequent exchange reaction (∼10-fold). In contrast to the mini-TAR annealing pathway, wherein NC-mediated annealing can initiate through both loop-loop kissing and a distinct “zipper” pathway involving nucleation at the 3′/5′ terminal ends, full-length TAR hairpin annealing switches predominantly to the zipper pathway in the presence of saturated NC. PMID:19154737

  16. The construction, identification and partial characterization of plasmids containing guinea-pig milk protein complementary DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, R K; Hall, L; Parker, D; Campbell, P N

    1981-01-01

    A complementary DNA (cDNA) plasmid library has been constructed in the plasmid pAT153, using poly(A)-containing RNA isolated from the lactating guinea-pig mammary gland as the starting material. Double stranded cDNA was inserted into the EcoRI site of the plasmid using poly(dA . dT) tails, then transformed into Escherichia coli HB101. From the resulting colonies we have selected and partially characterized plasmids containing cDNA copies of the mRNAs for casein A, casein B, casein C and alpha-lactalbumin. However, the proportion containing casein C cDNA was exceptionally low, and these contained at best 60% of the mRNA sequence. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:7306038

  17. Dichromatic laser radiation effects on DNA of Escherichia coli and plasmids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, W. A.; Polignano, G. A. C.; Guimarães, O. R.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Dichromatic and consecutive laser radiations have attracted increased attention for clinical applications as offering new tools for the treatment of dysfunctional tissues in situations where monochromatic radiation is not effective. This work evaluated the survival, filamentation and morphology of Escherichia coli cells, and the induction of DNA lesions, in plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity consecutive dichromatic laser radiation. Exponential and stationary wild type and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase/MutM protein deficient E. coli cultures were exposed to consecutive low-intensity dichromatic laser radiation (infrared laser immediately after red laser) to study the survival, filamentation and morphology of bacterial cells. Plasmid DNA samples were exposed to dichromatic radiation to study DNA lesions by electrophoretic profile. Dichromatic laser radiation affects the survival, filamentation and morphology of E. coli cultures depending on the growth phase and the functional repair mechanism of oxidizing lesions in DNA, but does not induce single/double strands breaks or alkali-labile DNA lesions. Results show that low-intensity consecutive dichromatic laser radiation induces biological effects that differ from those induced by monochromatic laser radiation, suggesting that other therapeutic effects could be obtained using dichromatic radiation.

  18. Tissue distribution of a plasmid DNA encoding Hsp65 gene is dependent on the dose administered through intramuscular delivery

    PubMed Central

    Coelho-Castelo, AAM; Trombone, AP; Rosada, RS; Santos, RR; Bonato, VLD; Sartori, A; Silva, CL

    2006-01-01

    In order to assess a new strategy of DNA vaccine for a more complete understanding of its action in immune response, it is important to determine the in vivo biodistribution fate and antigen expression. In previous studies, our group focused on the prophylactic and therapeutic use of a plasmid DNA encoding the Mycobacterium leprae 65-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp65) and achieved an efficient immune response induction as well as protection against virulent M. tuberculosis challenge. In the present study, we examined in vivo tissue distribution of naked DNA-Hsp65 vaccine, the Hsp65 message, genome integration and methylation status of plasmid DNA. The DNA-Hsp65 was detectable in several tissue types, indicating that DNA-Hsp65 disseminates widely throughout the body. The biodistribution was dose-dependent. In contrast, RT-PCR detected the Hsp65 message for at least 15 days in muscle or liver tissue from immunized mice. We also analyzed the methylation status and integration of the injected plasmid DNA into the host cellular genome. The bacterial methylation pattern persisted for at least 6 months, indicating that the plasmid DNA-Hsp65 does not replicate in mammalian tissue, and Southern blot analysis showed that plasmid DNA was not integrated. These results have important implications for the use of DNA-Hsp65 vaccine in a clinical setting and open new perspectives for DNA vaccines and new considerations about the inoculation site and delivery system. PMID:16445866

  19. A Bayesian method for calculating real-time quantitative PCR calibration curves using absolute plasmid DNA standards.

    PubMed

    Sivaganesan, Mano; Seifring, Shawn; Varma, Manju; Haugland, Richard A; Shanks, Orin C

    2008-02-25

    In real-time quantitative PCR studies using absolute plasmid DNA standards, a calibration curve is developed to estimate an unknown DNA concentration. However, potential differences in the amplification performance of plasmid DNA compared to genomic DNA standards are often ignored in calibration calculations and in some cases impossible to characterize. A flexible statistical method that can account for uncertainty between plasmid and genomic DNA targets, replicate testing, and experiment-to-experiment variability is needed to estimate calibration curve parameters such as intercept and slope. Here we report the use of a Bayesian approach to generate calibration curves for the enumeration of target DNA from genomic DNA samples using absolute plasmid DNA standards. Instead of the two traditional methods (classical and inverse), a Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) estimation was used to generate single, master, and modified calibration curves. The mean and the percentiles of the posterior distribution were used as point and interval estimates of unknown parameters such as intercepts, slopes and DNA concentrations. The software WinBUGS was used to perform all simulations and to generate the posterior distributions of all the unknown parameters of interest. The Bayesian approach defined in this study allowed for the estimation of DNA concentrations from environmental samples using absolute standard curves generated by real-time qPCR. The approach accounted for uncertainty from multiple sources such as experiment-to-experiment variation, variability between replicate measurements, as well as uncertainty introduced when employing calibration curves generated from absolute plasmid DNA standards.

  20. LTR real-time PCR for HIV-1 DNA quantitation in blood cells for early diagnosis in infants born to seropositive mothers treated in HAART area (ANRS CO 01).

    PubMed

    Avettand-Fènoël, Véronique; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Blanche, Stéphane; Burgard, Marianne; Floch, Corinne; Toure, Kadidia; Allemon, Marie-Christine; Warszawski, Josiane; Rouzioux, Christine

    2009-02-01

    HIV-1 diagnosis in babies born to seropositive mothers is one of the challenges of HIV epidemics in children. A simple, rapid protocol was developed for quantifying HIV-1 DNA in whole blood samples and was used in the ANRS French pediatric cohort in conditions of prevention of mother-to-child transmission. A quantitative HIV-1 DNA protocol (LTR real-time PCR) requiring small blood volumes was developed. First, analytical reproducibility was evaluated on 172 samples. Results obtained on blood cell pellets and Ficoll-Hypaque separated mononuclear cells were compared in 48 adult HIV-1 samples. Second, the protocol was applied to HIV-1 diagnosis in infants in parallel with plasma HIV-RNA quantitation. This prospective study was performed in children born between May 2005 and April 2007 included in the ANRS cohort. The assay showed good reproducibility. The 95% detection cut-off value was 6 copies/PCR, that is, 40 copies/10(6) leukocytes. HIV-DNA levels in whole blood were highly correlated with those obtained after Ficoll-Hypaque separation (r = 0.900, P < 0.0001). A total of 3,002 specimens from 1,135 infants were tested. The specificity of HIV-DNA and HIV-RNA assays was 100%. HIV-1 infection was diagnosed in nine infants before age 60 days. HIV-DNA levels were low, underlining the need for sensitive assays when highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been given. The performances of this HIV-DNA assay showed that it is adapted to early diagnosis in children. The results were equivalent to those of HIV-RNA assay. HIV-DNA may be used even in masked primary infection in newborns whose mothers have received HAART.

  1. Control of the HIV-1 DNA Reservoir Is Associated In Vivo and In Vitro with NKp46/NKp30 (CD335 CD337) Inducibility and Interferon Gamma Production by Transcriptionally Unique NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Marras, Francesco; Casabianca, Anna; Bozzano, Federica; Ascierto, Maria Libera; Orlandi, Chiara; Di Biagio, Antonio; Pontali, Emanuele; Dentone, Chiara; Orofino, Giancarlo; Nicolini, Laura; Taramasso, Lucia; Magnani, Mauro; Marincola, Francesco M; Wang, Ena; Moretta, Lorenzo; De Maria, Andrea

    2017-09-27

    The size of lentiviral DNA reservoirs reflects effectiveness of immune responses against lentiviruses. So far, abundant information has been gathered on the control of HIV-1 replication, Understanding of innate mechanisms contributing to containment of HIV-DNA reservoir, however, are only partly clarified and are relevant to guide interventions for reservoir containment or eradicationWe studied the contribution of Natural Killer (NK) cell functional features in HIV patients either controlling replication either spontaneously (HIC) or after progression and antiretroviral treatment (PP). An inverse correlation between HIV-DNA copy numbers (either total or integrated) in circulating CD4(+) cells and NK cell function were observed. Induced IFN-γ production and NKp46/NKp30 activating receptor-induced expression correlated inversely with reservoir size. The correlation was present not only when considering a homogeneous cohort of HIC patients, but also when PP patients were included in the analysis. Adaptive (NKG2C(+)CD57(+)) NK cell features were not associated with reservoir size. However a distinct set of 370 differentially expressed transcripts was found to underlie functional differences in NK cells controlling HIV-DNA reservoir size. In proof-of-principle in vitro experiments of CD4(+) cell infection with HIV-1, purified NK cells with the above functional/transcriptional features displayed a 10- and 30-fold higher ability to control HIV replication and DNA burden in vitro, respectively, compared to other NK cells.Thus, NK cells with a specific functional and transcriptional signature contribute to control of HIV reservoir in CD4(+) cells. Their selection, expansion and/or adoptive transfer may support strategies to eradicate HIV-1 infection or to safely deescalate antiretroviral treatment.IMPORTANCE The most relevant feature of HIV-1 infection is represented by its DNA reservoir size in the body that guarantees lifelong infection and resumption of virus

  2. Comparison of four digital PCR platforms for accurate quantification of DNA copy number of a certified plasmid DNA reference material

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lianhua; Meng, Ying; Sui, Zhiwei; Wang, Jing; Wu, Liqing; Fu, Boqiang

    2015-01-01

    Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) is a unique approach to measurement of the absolute copy number of target DNA without using external standards. However, the comparability of different dPCR platforms with respect to measurement of DNA copy number must be addressed before dPCR can be classified fundamentally as an absolute quantification technique. The comparability of four dPCR platforms with respect to accuracy and measurement uncertainty was investigated by using a certified plasmid reference material. Plasmid conformation was found to have a significant effect on droplet-based dPCR (QX100 and RainDrop) not shared with chip-based QuantStudio 12k or BioMark. The relative uncertainty of partition volume was determined to be 0.7%, 0.8%, 2.3% and 2.9% for BioMark, QX100, QuantStudio 12k and RainDrop, respectively. The measurements of the certified pNIM-001 plasmid made using the four dPCR platforms were corrected for partition volume and closely consistent with the certified value within the expended uncertainty. This demonstrated that the four dPCR platforms are of comparable effectiveness in quantifying DNA copy number. These findings provide an independent assessment of this method of determining DNA copy number when using different dPCR platforms and underline important factors that should be taken into consideration in the design of dPCR experiments. PMID:26302947

  3. "Curing" of plasmid DNA in acetogen using microwave or applying an electric pulse improves cell growth and metabolite production as compared to the plasmid-harboring strain.

    PubMed

    Berzin, Vel; Kiriukhin, Michael; Tyurin, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Plasmid-free acetogen Clostridium sp. MT962 electrotransformed with a small cryptic plasmid pMT351 was used to develop time- and cost-effective methods for plasmid elimination. Elimination of pMT351 restored production of acetate and ethanol to the levels of the plasmid-free strain with no dry cell weight changes. Destabilizing cell membrane via microwave at 2.45 GHz, or exposure to a single 12 ms square electric pulse at 35 kV cm⁻¹, eliminated pMT351 in 42-47 % of cells. Plasmid elimination with a single square electric pulse required 10 versus 0.1 J needed to introduce the same 3,202-bp plasmid into the cells as calculated per cell sample of Clostridium sp. MT962. Microwave caused visible changes in repPCR pattern and increased ethanol production at the expense of acetate. This is the first report on microwave of microwave ovens, wireless routers, and mobile devices causing chromosomal DNA aberrations in microbes along with carbon flux change.

  4. Exponential Megapriming PCR (EMP) Cloning—Seamless DNA Insertion into Any Target Plasmid without Sequence Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Alexander; Andersen, Kasper R.; Schwartz, Thomas U.

    2012-01-01

    We present a fast, reliable and inexpensive restriction-free cloning method for seamless DNA insertion into any plasmid without sequence limitation. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP) cloning requires two consecutive PCR steps and can be carried out in one day. We show that EMP cloning has a higher efficiency than restriction-free (RF) cloning, especially for long inserts above 2.5 kb. EMP further enables simultaneous cloning of multiple inserts. PMID:23300917

  5. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP) cloning--seamless DNA insertion into any target plasmid without sequence constraints.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Alexander; Andersen, Kasper R; Schwartz, Thomas U

    2012-01-01

    We present a fast, reliable and inexpensive restriction-free cloning method for seamless DNA insertion into any plasmid without sequence limitation. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP) cloning requires two consecutive PCR steps and can be carried out in one day. We show that EMP cloning has a higher efficiency than restriction-free (RF) cloning, especially for long inserts above 2.5 kb. EMP further enables simultaneous cloning of multiple inserts.

  6. Simple and efficient oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis using one primer and circular plasmid DNA template.

    PubMed

    Marotti, K R; Tomich, C S

    1989-01-01

    A rapid and simple procedure for site-directed mutagenesis is described. This method uses only a single oligonucleotide primer with the double-stranded circular plasmid DNA as the template for mutagenesis. The phage T4 gene 32 product is included during primer extension in vitro to increase efficiency. Single and multiple changes as well as deletions have been obtained at an efficiency of 1-2%.

  7. Safety and immunogenicity of DNA and MVA HIV-1 subtype C vaccine prime-boost regimens: a phase I randomised Trial in HIV-uninfected Indian volunteers.

    PubMed

    Mehendale, Sanjay; Thakar, Madhuri; Sahay, Seema; Kumar, Makesh; Shete, Ashwini; Sathyamurthi, Pattabiraman; Verma, Amita; Kurle, Swarali; Shrotri, Aparna; Gilmour, Jill; Goyal, Rajat; Dally, Len; Sayeed, Eddy; Zachariah, Devika; Ackland, James; Kochhar, Sonali; Cox, Josephine H; Excler, Jean-Louis; Kumaraswami, Vasanthapuram; Paranjape, Ramesh; Ramanathan, Vadakkuppatu Devasenapathi

    2013-01-01

    A randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled phase I trial. The trial was conducted in 32 HIV-uninfected healthy volunteers to assess the safety and immunogenicity of prime-boost vaccination regimens with either 2 doses of ADVAX, a DNA vaccine containing Chinese HIV-1 subtype C env gp160, gag, pol and nef/tat genes, as a prime and 2 doses of TBC-M4, a recombinant MVA encoding Indian HIV-1 subtype C env gp160, gag, RT, rev, tat, and nef genes, as a boost in Group A or 3 doses of TBC-M4 alone in Group B participants. Out of 16 participants in each group, 12 received vaccine candidates and 4 received placebos. Both vaccine regimens were found to be generally safe and well tolerated. The breadth of anti-HIV binding antibodies and the titres of anti-HIV neutralizing antibodies were significantly higher (p<0.05) in Group B volunteers at 14 days post last vaccination. Neutralizing antibodies were detected mainly against Tier-1 subtype B and C viruses. HIV-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT responses were directed mostly to Env and Gag proteins. Although the IFN-γ ELISPOT responses were infrequent after ADVAX vaccinations, the response rate was significantly higher in group A after 1(st) and 2(nd) MVA doses as compared to the responses in group B volunteers. However, the priming effect was short lasting leading to no difference in the frequency, breadth and magnitude of IFN-γELISPOT responses between the groups at 3, 6 and 9 months post-last vaccination. Although DNA priming resulted in enhancement of immune responses after 1(st) MVA boosting, the overall DNA prime MVA boost was not found to be immunologically superior to homologous MVA boosting. Clinical Trial Registry CTRI/2009/091/000051.

  8. Plasmid DNA adsorption on silica: kinetics and conformational changes in monovalent and divalent salts.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh H; Elimelech, Menachem

    2007-01-01

    A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) is used to determine the adsorption rate of a supercoiled plasmid DNA onto a quartz surface and the structure of the resulting adsorbed DNA layer. To better understand the DNA adsorption mechanisms and the adsorbed layer physicochemical properties, the QCM-D data are complemented by dynamic light scattering measurements of diffusion coefficients of the DNA molecules as a function of solution ionic composition. The data from simultaneous monitoring of variations in frequency and dissipation energy with the QCM-D suggest that the adsorbed DNA layer is more rigid in the presence of divalent (calcium) cations compared to monovalent (sodium) cations. Adsorption rates are significantly higher in the presence of calcium, attaining a transport-limited rate at about 1 mM Ca2+. Results further suggest that in low ionic strength solutions containing 1 mM Ca2+ and in moderately high ionic strength solutions containing 300 mM NaCl, plasmid DNA adsorption to negatively charged mineral surfaces is irreversible.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of small DNA plasmids: effects of sequence and supercoiling on intramolecular motions.

    PubMed

    Tan, R K; Sprous, D; Harvey, S C

    1996-08-01

    Small (600 base pair) DNA plasmids were modeled with a simplified representation (3DNA) and the intramolecular motions were studied using molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics techniques. The model is detailed enough to incorporate sequence effects. At the same time, it is simple enough to allow long molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations revealed that large-scale slithering occurs in a homogeneous sequence. In a heterogeneous sequence, containing numerous small intrinsic curves, the centers of the curves are preferentially positioned at the tips of loops. With more curves than loop tips (two in unbranched supercoiled DNA), the heterogeneous sequence plasmid slithers short distances to reposition other curves into the loop tips. However, the DNA is immobilized most of the time, with the loop tips positioned over a few favored curve centers. Branching or looping also appears in the heterogeneous sequence as a new method of repositioning the loop tips. Instead of a smooth progression of increasing writhing with increasing linking difference, theoretical studies have predicted that there is a threshold between unwrithed and writhed DNA at a linking difference between one and two. This has previously been observed in simulations of static structures and is demonstrated here for dynamic homogeneous closed DNA. Such an abrupt transition is not found in the heterogeneous sequence in both the static and dynamic cases.

  10. A comparison of plasmid DNA delivery efficiency and cytotoxicity of two cationic diblock polyoxazoline copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, Roman; Liu, Kegang; Wang, Xueya; Wolf, Marc; Hunziker, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Cationic polymers as non-viral gene delivery carriers are widely used because of their strong condensing properties and long-term safety, but acute cytotoxicity is a persistent challenge. In this study, two types of polyplexes were prepared by co-formulating plasmid DNA and two cationic diblock copolymers PABOXA5-b-PMOXA33-PA (primary amine) and PABOXA5-b-PMOXA33-TA (tertiary amine) to check their transfection efficacies in HeLa cells and HEK293T cells, respectively. The plasmid DNA/PABOXA5-b-PMOXA33-PA polyplex showed higher transfection efficacy compared to the plasmid DNA/PABOXA5-b-PMOXA33-TA polyplex under an N/P ratio of 40. Both polymers exhibited low toxicity, attributed to the shielding effect of a hydrophilic, noncharged block. Mechanistic insight into differential transfection efficiencies of the polymers were gained by visualization and comparison of the condensates via transmission electron and atomic force microscopy. The results provide information suited for further structure optimization of polymers that are aimed for targeted gene delivery.

  11. A comparison of plasmid DNA delivery efficiency and cytotoxicity of two cationic diblock polyoxazoline copolymers.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Roman; Liu, Kegang; Wang, Xueya; Wolf, Marc; Hunziker, Patrick

    2017-04-28

    Cationic polymers as non-viral gene delivery carriers are widely used because of their strong condensing properties and long-term safety, but acute cytotoxicity is a persistent challenge. In this study, two types of polyplexes were prepared by co-formulating plasmid DNA and two cationic diblock copolymers PABOXA5-b-PMOXA33-PA (primary amine) and PABOXA5-b-PMOXA33-TA (tertiary amine) to check their transfection efficacies in HeLa cells and HEK293T cells, respectively. The plasmid DNA/PABOXA5-b-PMOXA33-PA polyplex showed higher transfection efficacy compared to the plasmid DNA/PABOXA5-b-PMOXA33-TA polyplex under an N/P ratio of 40. Both polymers exhibited low toxicity, attributed to the shielding effect of a hydrophilic, noncharged block. Mechanistic insight into differential transfection efficiencies of the polymers were gained by visualization and comparison of the condensates via transmission electron and atomic force microscopy. The results provide information suited for further structure optimization of polymers that are aimed for targeted gene delivery.

  12. Enantioselective cleavage of supercoiled plasmid DNA catalyzed by chiral macrocyclic lanthanide(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Krężel, Artur; Lisowski, Jerzy

    2012-02-01

    The enantiomers of the Sm (III), Eu (III) and Yb (III) complexes [LnL(NO(3))(2)](NO(3)) of a chiral hexaazamacrocycle were tested as catalysts for the hydrolytic cleavage of supercoiled plasmid DNA. The catalytic activity was remarkably enantioselective; while the [LnL(SSSS)(NO(3))(2)](NO(3)) enantiomers promoted the cleavage of plasmid pBR322 from the supercoiled form (SC) to the nicked form (NC), the [LnL(RRRR)(NO(3))(2)](NO(3)) enantiomers were inactive. Kinetics of plasmid DNA hydrolysis was also investigated by agarose electrophoresis and it indicated typical single-exponential cleavage reaction. The hydrolytic mechanism of DNA cleavage was confirmed by the successful ligation of hydrolysis product by T4 ligase. The NMR study of the solutions of the complexes in various buffers indicated that the complexes exist as monomeric cationic complexes [LnL(H(2)O)(3)](3+) in slightly acidic solutions and as dimeric cationic complexes [Ln(2)L(2)(μ-OH)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](4+) in slightly basic 8mM solutions, with the latter form being a possible catalyst for hydrolysis of phosphodiester bonds.

  13. Monolith-based immobilized metal affinity chromatography increases production efficiency for plasmid DNA purification.

    PubMed

    Shin, Min Jae; Tan, Lihan; Jeong, Min Ho; Kim, Ji-Heung; Choe, Woo-Seok

    2011-08-05

    Immobilized metal affinity monolith column as a new class of chromatographic support is shown to be superior to conventional particle-based column as plasmid DNA (pDNA) purification platform. By harnessing the affinity of endotoxin to copper ions in the solution, a majority of endotoxin (90%) was removed from the alkaline cell lysate using CuCl(2)-induced precipitation. RNA and remaining endotoxin were subsequently removed to below detection limit with minimal loss of pDNA using either monolith or particle-based column. Monolith column has the additional advantage of feed concentration and flowrate-independent dynamic binding capacity for RNA molecules, enabling purification process to be conducted at high feed RNA concentration and flowrate. The use of monolith column gives three fold increased productivity of pDNA as compared to particle-based column, providing a more rapid and economical platform for pDNA purification.

  14. Dual recombinant Lactococcus lactis for enhanced delivery of DNA vaccine reporter plasmid pPERDBY.

    PubMed

    Yagnik, Bhrugu; Sharma, Drashya; Padh, Harish; Desai, Priti

    2017-03-04

    Food grade Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) has been widely used as an antigen and DNA delivery vehicle. We had previously reported the use of non-invasive L. lactis for the delivery of newly constructed immunostimulatory DNA vaccine reporter plasmid, pPERDBY. In the present report, we outline the construction of dual recombinant L. lactis expressing Internalin A of Listeria monocytogenes and harbouring pPERDBY (LL InlA+ pPERDBY) to enhance the DNA delivery efficiency of L. lactis. After confirmation and validation of LL InlA+ pPERDBY, its DNA delivery potential was compared with previously developed non-invasive r- L. lactis::pPERDBY. The use of invasive L. lactis resulted in around three fold increase in number of Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein expressing Caco- cells. Thus, these findings reinforce the prospective application of invasive strain of L. lactis in delivery of DNA/RNA and antigens.

  15. Maternal LAMP/p55gagHIV-1 DNA Immunization Induces In Utero Priming and a Long-Lasting Immune Response in Vaccinated Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rigato, Paula Ordonhez; Maciel, Milton; Goldoni, Adriana Letícia; Piubelli, Orlando Guerra; Orii, Noemia Mie; Marques, Ernesto Torres; August, Joseph Thomas; Duarte, Alberto José da Silva; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2012-01-01

    Infants born to HIV-infected mothers are at high risk of becoming infected during gestation or the breastfeeding period. A search is thus warranted for vaccine formulations that will prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission. The LAMP/gag DNA chimeric vaccine encodes the HIV-1 p55gag fused to the lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) and has been shown to enhance anti-Gag antibody (Ab) and cellular immune responses in adult and neonatal mice; such a vaccine represents a new concept in antigen presentation. In this study, we evaluated the effect of LAMP/gag DNA immunization on neonates either before conception or during pregnancy. LAMP/gag immunization of BALB/c mice before conception by the intradermal route led to the transfer of anti-Gag IgG1 Ab through the placenta and via breastfeeding. Furthermore, there were an increased percentage of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+T cells in the spleens of neonates. When offspring were immunized with LAMP/gag DNA, the anti-Gag Ab response and the Gag-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells were decreased. Inhibition of anti-Gag Ab production and cellular responses were not observed six months after immunization, indicating that maternal immunization did not interfere with the long-lasting memory response in offspring. Injection of purified IgG in conjunction with LAMP/gag DNA immunization decreased humoral and cytotoxic T-cell responses. LAMP/gag DNA immunization by intradermal injection prior to conception promoted the transfer of Ab, leading to a diminished response to Gag without interfering with the development of anti-Gag T- and B-cell memory. Finally, we assessed responses after one intravenous injection of LAMP/gag DNA during the last five days of pregnancy. The intravenous injection led to in utero immunization. In conclusion, DNA vaccine enconding LAMP-1 with Gag and other HIV-1 antigens should be considered in the development of a protective vaccine for the maternal/fetal and newborn periods. PMID:22355381

  16. Process considerations related to the microencapsulation of plasmid DNA via ultrasonic atomization.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jenny; Wang, Huanting; Forde, Gareth M

    2008-09-01

    An effective means of facilitating DNA vaccine delivery to antigen presenting cells is through biodegradable microspheres. Microspheres offer distinct advantages over other delivery technologies by providing release of DNA vaccine in its bioactive form in a controlled fashion. In this study, biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres containing polyethylenimine (PEI) condensed plasmid DNA (pDNA) were prepared using a 40 kHz ultrasonic atomization system. Process synthesis parameters, which are important to the scale-up of microspheres that are suitable for nasal delivery (i.e., less than 20 microm), were studied. These parameters include polymer concentration; feed flowrate; volumetric ratio of polymer and pDNA-PEI (plasmid DNA-polyethylenimine) complexes; and nitrogen to phosphorous (N/P) ratio. PDNA encapsulation efficiencies were predominantly in the range 82-96%, and the mean sizes of the particle were between 6 and 15 microm. The ultrasonic synthesis method was shown to have excellent reproducibility. PEI affected morphology of the microspheres, as it induced the formation of porous particles that accelerate the release rate of pDNA. The PLGA microspheres displayed an in vitro release of pDNA of 95-99% within 30 days and demonstrated zero order release kinetics without an initial spike of pDNA. Agarose electrophoresis confirmed conservation of the supercoiled form of pDNA throughout the synthesis and in vitro release stages. It was concluded that ultrasonic atomization is an efficient technique to overcome the key obstacles in scaling-up the manufacture of encapsulated vaccine for clinical trials and ultimately, commercial applications.

  17. Copper(II) facilitates bleomycin-mediated unwinding of plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, M.J.; Hecht, S.M.

    1988-04-19

    The unwinding of plasmid DNA by bleomycin A/sub 2/ (BLM A/sub 2/) was investigated by use of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. It was found that Cu/sup 2 +/ ions greatly facilitated the unwinding of topoisomers of plasmid DNA by BLM A/sub 2/ at concentrations where cupric ions along had no effect on DNA supercoiling. The concentration of BLM A/sub 2/ required for observable unwinding was reduced at least 100-fold in the presence of equimolar Cu/sup 2 +/. A plot of (Cu/sup 2 +/) vs extent of DNA unwinding in the presence of 10/sup -4/ M BLM A/sub 2/ gave a curve consistent with the action of cupric ions on BLM in an allosteric fashion, possibly rearranging the drug into a conformation that facilitates DNA unwinding. The participation of the metal center in enhancing DNA unwinding via direct ionic interaction with one or more negatively charged groups on the DNA duplex also seems possible. Further analysis of the structural factors required for BLM-mediated DNA unwinding was carried out with Cu/sup 2 +/ + BLM demethyl A/sub 2/, the latter of which differs from BLM A/sub 2/ only in that it lacks a methyl group, and associated positive charge, at the C-terminus. Cu(II) x BLM demethyl A/sub 2/ was found to be much less effective than Cu(II) x BLM A/sub 2/ as a DNA unwinding agent, emphasizing the strong dependence of this process on the presence of positively charged groups within the BLM molecule. These findings constitute the first direct evidence that the metal center of BLM can participate in DNA interaction, as well as in the previously recognized role of oxygen binding and activation.

  18. Efficient plasmid DNA cleavage by a mononuclear copper(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Sissi, Claudia; Mancin, Fabrizio; Gatos, Maddalena; Palumbo, Manlio; Tecilla, Paolo; Tonellato, Umberto

    2005-04-04

    The Cu(II) complex of the ligand all-cis-2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-trihydroxycyclohexane (TACI) is a very efficient catalyst of the cleavage of plasmid DNA in the absence of any added cofactor. The maximum rate of degradation of the supercoiled plasmid DNA form, obtained at pH 8.1 and 37 degrees C, in the presence of 48 microM TACI.Cu(II), is 2.3 x 10(-3) s(-1), corresponding to a half-life time of only 5 min for the cleavage of form I (supercoiled) to form II (relaxed circular). The dependence of the rate of plasmid DNA cleavage from the TACI.Cu(II) complex concentration follows an unusual and very narrow bell-like profile, which suggests an high DNA affinity of the complexes but also a great tendency to form unreactive dimers. The reactivity of the TACI.Cu(II) complexes is not affected by the presence of several scavengers for reactive oxygen species or when measured under anaerobic conditions. Moreover, no degradation of the radical reporter Rhodamine B is observed in the presence of such complexes. These results are consistent with the operation of a prevailing hydrolytic pathway under the normal conditions used, although the failure to obtain enzymatic religation of the linearized DNA does not allow one to rule out the occurrence of a nonhydrolytic oxygen-independent cleavage. A concurrent oxidative mechanism becomes competitive upon addition of reductants or in the presence of high levels of molecular oxygen: under such conditions, in fact, a remarkable increase in the rate of DNA cleavage is observed.

  19. The mechanism and control of DNA transfer by the conjugative relaxase of resistance plasmid pCU1

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Rebekah Potts; Habibi, Sohrab; Cheng, Yuan; Lujan, Scott A.; Redinbo, Matthew

    2010-11-15

    Bacteria expand their genetic diversity, spread antibiotic resistance genes, and obtain virulence factors through the highly coordinated process of conjugative plasmid transfer (CPT). A plasmid-encoded relaxase enzyme initiates and terminates CPT by nicking and religating the transferred plasmid in a sequence-specific manner. We solved the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of the relaxase responsible for the spread of the resistance plasmid pCU1 and determined its DNA binding and nicking capabilities. The overall fold of the pCU1 relaxase is similar to that of the F plasmid and plasmid R388 relaxases. However, in the pCU1 structure, the conserved tyrosine residues (Y18,19,26,27) that are required for DNA nicking and religation were displaced up to 14 {angstrom} out of the relaxase active site, revealing a high degree of mobility in this region of the enzyme. In spite of this flexibility, the tyrosines still cleaved the nic site of the plasmid's origin of transfer, and did so in a sequence-specific, metal-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, the pCU1 relaxase lacked the sequence-specific DNA binding previously reported for the homologous F and R388 relaxase enzymes, despite its high sequence and structural similarity with both proteins. In summary, our work outlines novel structural and functional aspects of the relaxase-mediated conjugative transfer of plasmid pCU1.

  20. Structural biology of plasmid partition: uncovering the molecular mechanisms of DNA segregation.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Maria A

    2008-05-15

    DNA segregation or partition is an essential process that ensures stable genome transmission. In prokaryotes, partition is best understood for plasmids, which serve as tractable model systems to study the mechanistic underpinnings of DNA segregation at a detailed atomic level owing to their simplicity. Specifically, plasmid partition requires only three elements: a centromere-like DNA site and two proteins: a motor protein, generally an ATPase, and a centromere-binding protein. In the first step of the partition process, multiple centromere-binding proteins bind co-operatively to the centromere, which typically consists of several tandem repeats, to form a higher-order nucleoprotein complex called the partition complex. The partition complex recruits the ATPase to form the segrosome and somehow activates the ATPase for DNA separation. Two major families of plasmid par systems have been delineated based on whether they utilize ATPase proteins with deviant Walker-type motifs or actin-like folds. In contrast, the centromere-binding proteins show little sequence homology even within a given family. Recent structural studies, however, have revealed that these centromere-binding proteins appear to belong to one of two major structural groups: those that employ helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motifs or those with ribbon-helix-helix DNA-binding domains. The first structure of a higher-order partition complex was recently revealed by the structure of pSK41 centromere-binding protein, ParR, bound to its centromere site. This structure showed that multiple ParR ribbon-helix-helix motifs bind symmetrically to the tandem centromere repeats to form a large superhelical structure with dimensions suitable for capture of the filaments formed by the actinlike ATPases. Surprisingly, recent data indicate that the deviant Walker ATPase proteins also form polymer-like structures, suggesting that, although the par families harbour what initially appeared to be structurally and functionally

  1. Fluorescent Labeling of Plasmid DNA and mRNA: Gains and Losses of Current Labeling Strategies.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, K; Braeckmans, K; Remaut, K

    2016-02-17

    Live-cell imaging has provided the life sciences with insights into the cell biology and dynamics. Fluorescent labeling of target molecules proves to be indispensable in this regard. In this Review, we focus on the current fluorescent labeling strategies for nucleic acids, and in particular mRNA (mRNA) and plasmid DNA (pDNA), which are of interest to a broad range of scientific fields. By giving a background of the available techniques and an evaluation of the pros and cons, we try to supply scientists with all the information needed to come to an informed choice of nucleic acid labeling strategy aimed at their particular needs.

  2. Implementation of an Automated High-Throughput Plasmid DNA Production Pipeline.

    PubMed

    Billeci, Karen; Suh, Christopher; Di Ioia, Tina; Singh, Lovejit; Abraham, Ryan; Baldwin, Anne; Monteclaro, Stephen

    2016-12-01

    Biologics sample management facilities are often responsible for a diversity of large-molecule reagent types, such as DNA, RNAi, and protein libraries. Historically, the management of large molecules was dispersed into multiple laboratories. As methodologies to support pathway discovery, antibody discovery, and protein production have become high throughput, the implementation of automation and centralized inventory management tools has become important. To this end, to improve sample tracking, throughput, and accuracy, we have implemented a module-based automation system integrated into inventory management software using multiple platforms (Hamilton, Hudson, Dynamic Devices, and Brooks). Here we describe the implementation of these systems with a focus on high-throughput plasmid DNA production management.

  3. Transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with linear DNA killer plasmids from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Gunge, N; Murata, K; Sakaguchi, K

    1982-01-01

    Protoplasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were mixed with linear DNA plasmids, pGKl1 and pGKl2, isolated from a Kluyveromyces lactis killer strain and treated with polyethylene glycol. Out of 2,000 colonies regenerated on a nonselective medium, two killer transformants were obtained. The pGKl plasmids and the killer character were stably maintained in one (Pdh-1) of them. Another transformant, Pdl-1, was a weak killer, and the subclones consisted of a mixture of weak and nonkiller cells. The weak killers were characterized by the presence of pGKl1 in a decreased amount, and nonkillers were characterized by the absence of pGKl1. The occurrence of two new plasmids which migrated faster than pGKl1 in an agarose gel was observed in Pdl-1 and its subclones, whether weak or nonkillers. Staining with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole revealed that the pGKl plasmids exist in the cytosol of transformant cells with numerous copy numbers. Images PMID:7045080

  4. Interleukin-12 plasmid DNA delivery using l-thyroxine-conjugated polyethylenimine nanocarriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehshahri, Ali; Sadeghpour, Hossein; Kazemi Oskuee, Reza; Fadaei, Mahin; Sabahi, Zahra; Alhashemi, Samira Hossaini; Mohazabieh, Erfaneh

    2014-05-01

    In this study, l-thyroxine was covalently grafted on 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine (PEI), and the ability of the nano-sized polyplexes for transferring plasmid encoding interleukin-12 (IL-12) gene was evaluated. As there are several problems in systemic administration of recombinant IL-12 protein, local expression of the plasmid encoding IL-12 gene inside the tumor tissue has been considered as an effective alternative approach. The l-thyroxine-conjugated PEI polyplexes were prepared using pUMVC3-hIL12 plasmid, and their transfection activity was determined in HepG2 human liver carcinoma and Neuro2A neuroblastoma cell lines. The polyplexes characterized in terms of DNA condensation ability, particle size, zeta potential, and buffering capacity as well as cytotoxicity and resistance to enzyme digestion. The results revealed that l-thyroxine conjugation of PEI increased gene transfer ability by up to two fold relative to unmodified 25 kDa PEI, the gold standard for non-viral gene delivery, with the highest increase occurring at degrees of conjugation around 10 %. pDNA condensation tests and dynamic light scattering measurements exhibited the ability of PEI conjugates to optimally condense the plasmid DNA into polyplexes in the size range around 200 nm. The modified polymers showed remarkable buffering capacity and protection against enzymatic degradation comparable to that of unmodified PEI. These results suggest that l-thyroxine conjugation of PEI is a simple modification strategy for future investigations aimed at developing a targeting gene vehicle.

  5. Photoinduced interactions of supramolecular ruthenium(II) complexes with plasmid DNA: synthesis and spectroscopic, electrochemical, and DNA photocleavage studies.

    PubMed

    Swavey, Shawn; DeBeer, Madeleine; Li, Kaiyu

    2015-04-06

    Two new bridging ligands have been synthesized by combining substituted benzaldehydes with phenanthrolinopyrrole (php), resulting in new polyazine bridging ligands. The ligands have been characterized by (1)H NMR, mass spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. These new ligands display π-π* transitions above 500 nm with modest molar absorptivities. Upon excitation at the ligand-centered charge-transfer transition, weak emission with a maximum wavelength of 612 nm is observed. When coordinated to two ruthenium(II) bis(bipyridyl) groups, the new bimetallic complexes generated give an overall 4+ charge. The electronic transitions of the bimetallic ruthenium(II) complexes display traditional π-π* transitions at 287 nm and metal-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions at 452 nm with molar absorptivities greater than