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Sample records for hiv-1 non-nucleoside reverse

  1. Substituted indoles as HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: a patent evaluation (WO2015044928).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Gao, Ping; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-05-01

    The invention described in this patent (WO2015044928) is related to compounds based on the substituted indole scaffold, their synthetic process and application to inhibit HIV-1 replication as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Some of the newly claimed compounds presented improved potency against wild-type (WT) HIV-1 strain in comparison to previously disclosed indole-based NNRTIs and were also shown to be effective against common resistant HIV-1 strains. In light of their novel structural characteristics, simple synthetic route and improved anti-HIV activity, these compounds deserve further study as promising NNRTIs.

  2. Crystal structures of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase complexes with thiocarbamate non-nucleoside inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Spallarossa, Andrea Cesarini, Sara; Ranise, Angelo; Ponassi, Marco; Unge, Torsten; Bolognesi, Martino

    2008-01-25

    O-Phthalimidoethyl-N-arylthiocarbamates (TCs) have been recently identified as a new class of potent HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs), by means of computer-aided drug design techniques [Ranise A. Spallarossa, S. Cesarini, F. Bondavalli, S. Schenone, O. Bruno, G. Menozzi, P. Fossa, L. Mosti, M. La Colla, et al., Structure-based design, parallel synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and molecular modeling studies of thiocarbamates, new potent non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor isosteres of phenethylthiazolylthiourea derivatives, J. Med. Chem. 48 (2005) 3858-3873]. To elucidate the atomic details of RT/TC interaction and validate an earlier TC docking model, the structures of three RT/TC complexes were determined at 2.8-3.0 A resolution by X-ray crystallography. The conformations adopted by the enzyme-bound TCs were analyzed and compared with those of bioisosterically related NNRTIs.

  3. Mass Spectrometric Characterization of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Interactions with Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Thammaporn, Ratsupa; Ishii, Kentaro; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Uchiyama, Susumu; Hannongbua, Supa; Kato, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) have been developed for the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV-1 RT binding to NNRTIs has been characterized by various biophysical techniques. However, these techniques are often hampered by the low water solubility of the inhibitors, such as the current promising diarylpyrimidine-based inhibitors rilpivirine and etravirine. Hence, a conventional and rapid method that requires small sample amounts is desirable for studying NNRTIs with low water solubility. Here we successfully applied a recently developed mass spectrometric technique under non-denaturing conditions to characterize the interactions between the heterodimeric HIV-1 RT enzyme and NNRTIs with different inhibitory activities. Our data demonstrate that mass spectrometry serves as a semi-quantitative indicator of NNRTI binding affinity for HIV-1 RT using low and small amounts of samples, offering a new high-throughput screening tool for identifying novel RT inhibitors as anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26934936

  4. [RILPIVIRINE -- a novel HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Snopková, Svatava; Havlíčková, Kateřina; Polák, Pavel; Šlesinger, Pavel; Husa, Petr

    2013-03-01

    The article summarizes the basic facts about the pharmacokinetic profile, metabolism and drug interactions of rilpivirine (RPV). This is the latest orally administered second-generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) for antiretroviral-naive patients with HIV-1 infection. Conformational flexibility and adaptability are the factors that dominantly determine the high resistance barrier of RPV and are the unique features of diarylpyrimidine inhibitors (DAPY inhibitors - 2nd generation NNRTIs). Multicentre studies ECHO and THRIVE are also reviewed. Current guidelines for the treatment of HIV/AIDS are mentioned as well as the role of RPV in current therapeutic regimens.

  5. Discovery, characterization, and lead optimization of 7-azaindole non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Richard A; Lu, Xiao; Detorio, Mervi; Montero, Catherine; Hammond, Emily T; Ehteshami, Maryam; Domaoal, Robert A; Nettles, James H; Feraud, Michel; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2016-08-15

    A library of 585 compounds built off a 7-azaindole core was evaluated for anti-HIV-1 activity, and ten hits emerged with submicromolar potency and therapeutic index >100. Of these, three were identified as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors and were assayed against relevant resistant mutants. Lead compound 8 inhibited RT with submicromolar potency (IC50=0.73μM) and also maintained some activity against the clinically important RT mutants K103N and Y181C (IC50=9.2, 3.5μM) in cell-free assays. Free energy perturbation guided lead optimization resulted in the development of a compound with a two-fold increase in potency against RT (IC50=0.36μM). These data highlight the discovery of a unique scaffold with the potential to move forward as next-generation anti-HIV-1 agents. PMID:27390064

  6. Complete inactivation of HIV-1 using photo-labeled non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rios, Adan; Quesada, Jorge; Anderson, Dallas; Goldstein, Allan; Fossum, Theresa; Colby-Germinario, Susan; Wainberg, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that a photo-labeled derivative of the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) dapivirine termed DAPY, when used together with exposure to ultraviolet light, was able to completely and irreversibly inactivate both HIV-1 RT activity as well as infectiousness in each of a T cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Control experiments using various concentrations of DAPY revealed that a combination of exposure to ultraviolet light together with use of the specific, high affinity photo-labeled compound was necessary for complete inactivation to occur. This method of HIV RT inactivation may have applicability toward preservation of an intact viral structure and warrants further investigation in regard to the potential of this approach to elicit a durable, broad protective immune response. PMID:20937333

  7. NMR characterization of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase binding to various non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors with different activities

    PubMed Central

    Thammaporn, Ratsupa; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Yamaguchi, Takumi; Boonsri, Pornthip; Saparpakorn, Patchreenart; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Techasakul, Supanna; Kato, Koichi; Hannongbua, Supa

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) is an important target for antiviral therapy against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. However, the efficiency of available drugs is impaired most typically by drug-resistance mutations in this enzyme. In this study, we applied a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic technique to the characterization of the binding of HIV-1 RT to various non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with different activities, i.e., nevirapine, delavirdine, efavirenz, dapivirine, etravirine, and rilpivirine. 1H-13C heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC) spectral data of HIV-1 RT, in which the methionine methyl groups of the p66 subunit were selectively labeled with 13C, were collected in the presence and absence of these NNRTIs. We found that the methyl 13C chemical shifts of the M230 resonance of HIV-1 RT bound to these drugs exhibited a high correlation with their anti-HIV-1 RT activities. This methionine residue is located in proximity to the NNRTI-binding pocket but not directly involved in drug interactions and serves as a conformational probe, indicating that the open conformation of HIV-1 RT was more populated with NNRTIs with higher inhibitory activities. Thus, the NMR approach offers a useful tool to screen for novel NNRTIs in developing anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26510386

  8. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Diarylpyridines and Diarylanilines as Potent Non-nucleoside HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xingtao; Qin, Bingjie; Wu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Lu, Hong; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Chen, Chin Ho; Jiang, Shibo; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Xie, Lan

    2010-01-01

    Based on the structures and activities of our previously identified non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), we designed and synthesized two sets of derivatives, diarylpyridines (A) and diarylanilines (B), and tested their anti-HIV-1 activity against infection by HIV-1 NL4-3 and IIIB in TZM-bl and MT-2 cells, respectively. The results showed that most compounds exhibited potent anti-HIV-1 activity with low nanomolar EC50 values, and some of them, such as 13m, 14c, and 14e, displayed high potency with subnanomolar EC50 values, which were more potent than etravirine (TMC125, 1) in the same assays. Notably, these compounds were also highly effective against infection by multi-RTI-resistant strains, suggesting a high potential to further develop these compounds as a novel class of NNRTIs with improved antiviral efficacy and resistance profile. PMID:21049929

  9. Thermodynamics of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in action elucidates the mechanism of action of non-nucleoside inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bec, Guillaume; Meyer, Benoit; Gerard, Marie-Aline; Steger, Jessica; Fauster, Katja; Wolff, Philippe; Burnouf, Dominique; Micura, Ronald; Dumas, Philippe; Ennifar, Eric

    2013-07-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a heterodimeric enzyme that converts the genomic viral RNA into proviral DNA. Despite intensive biochemical and structural studies, direct thermodynamic data regarding RT interactions with its substrates are still lacking. Here we addressed the mechanism of action of RT and of non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Using a new incremental-ITC approach, a step-by-step thermodynamic dissection of the RT polymerization activity showed that most of the driving force for DNA synthesis is provided by initial dNTP binding. Surprisingly, thermodynamic and kinetic data led to a reinterpretation of the mechanism of inhibition of NNRTIs. Binding of NNRTIs to preformed RT/DNA complexes is hindered by a kinetic barrier and NNRTIs mostly interact with free RT. Once formed, RT/NNRTI complexes bind DNA either in a seemingly polymerase-competent orientation or form high-affinity dead-end complexes, both RT/NNRTI/DNA complexes being unable to bind the incoming nucleotide substrate.

  10. ELUCIDATING THE INHIBITION MECHANISM OF HIV-1 NON-NUCLEOSIDE REVERSE TRANSCRIPTASE INHIBITORS THROUGH MULTI-COPY MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Ivetac, Anthony; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibition is a major focus of current anti-AIDS drug discovery and development programs, comprising 17 of the 31 FDA-approved compounds. The emergence of the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) class of compounds provides a highly specific and structurally diverse set of drugs, which act non-competitively to perturb normal RT function. Despite a relatively rich set of crystallographic data of RT in various states, details of the allosteric modulation of RT dynamics by NNRTIs are lacking. Capturing this inhibitory mechanism could fuel the design of more effective inhibitors at the NNRTI site and also drive the identification of novel allosteric sites. To address this, we have performed multi-copy molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of RT in the presence and absence of the NNRTI nevirapine (cumulative total simulation time 360 ns). By comparing the collective motions of both the MD and crystallographic structures, we demonstrate that the chief effect of NNRTIs is to constrain a key rigid-body motion between the “fingers” and “thumb” subdomains of the p66 subunit. We show that the NNRTI binding pocket (NNIBP) is proximal to the hinge points for this essential motion and NNRTIs therefore act as “molecular wedges”, sterically blocking the full range of motion. To explain how this impaired movement might result in the experimentally observed loss of polymerase activity, we show that the motion influences the geometry of key catalytic residues on opposite faces of the NNIBP. From a methodological point of view, our results suggest that the multi-copy MD simulation approach is very useful when studying proteins which perform such large conformational changes. PMID:19324058

  11. Systematic evaluation of methyl ester bioisosteres in the context of developing alkenyldiarylmethanes (ADAMs) as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) for anti-HIV-1 chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Ayako; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Takayama, Jun; Xuan, Meiyan; Okazaki, Mari; Hartman, Tracy L; Buckheit, Robert W; Pannecouque, Christophe; Cushman, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The alkenyldiarylmethanes (ADAMs) are a class of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) targeting HIV-1. Four chemically and metabolically stabilized ADAMs incorporating N-methoxyimidoyl halide replacements of the methyl esters of the lead compound were previously reported. In this study, twenty-five new ADAMs were synthesized in order to investigate the biological consequences of installing nine different methyl ester bioisosteres at three different locations. Attempts to define a universal rank order of methyl ester bioisosteres and discover the 'best' one in terms of inhibitory activity versus HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) led to the realization that the potencies are critically dependent on the surrounding structure at each location, and therefore the definition of universal rank order is impossible. This investigation produced several new non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in which all three of the three methyl esters of the lead compound were replaced by methyl ester bioisosteres, resulting in compounds that are more potent as HIV-1 RT inhibitors and antiviral agents than the lead compound itself and are expected to also be more metabolically stable than the lead compound. PMID:27234889

  12. Synthesis, Anti-HIV Activity, and Metabolic Stability of New Alkenyldiarylmethane (ADAM) HIV-1 Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NNRTIs)

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Bo-Liang; Hartman, Tracy L.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Pannecouque, Christophe; De Clercq, Erik; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Cushman, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (NNRTIs) are part of the combination therapy currently used to treat HIV infection. Based on analogy with known HIV-1 NNRT inhibitors, eighteen novel alkenyldiarylmethanes (ADAMs) containing 5-chloro-2-methoxyphenyl, 3-cyanophenyl or 3-fluoro-5-trifluoromethylphenyl groups were synthesized and evaluated as HIV inhibitors. Their stabilities in rat plasma have also been investigated. Although introducing 5-chloro-2-methoxyphenyl, or 3-fluoro-5-trifluoromethylphenyl groups into alkenyldiarylmethanes does not maintain the antiviral potency, the structural modification of alkenyldiarylmethanes with a 3-cyanophenyl substituent can be made without a large decrease in activity. The oxazolidinonyl group was introduced into the alkenyldiarylmethane framework and found to confer enhanced metabolic stability in rat plasma. PMID:16162014

  13. 2,4,5-Trisubstituted thiazole derivatives: a novel and potent class of non-nucleoside inhibitors of wild type and mutant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhongliang; Ba, Mingyu; Zhou, Hua; Cao, Yingli; Tang, Chaojun; Yang, Ying; He, Ricai; Liang, Yu; Zhang, Xuemei; Li, Zhenzhong; Zhu, Lihong; Guo, Ying; Guo, Changbin

    2014-10-01

    Novel 2,4,5-trisubstituted thiazole derivatives (TSTs) were designed and synthesized as HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Among the thirty-eight synthesized target compounds, thirty TSTs showed potent inhibition against HIV-1 replication in wild type HIV-1 at submicromolar concentrations (from 0.046 to 9.59 μM). Compounds 21, 23 and 24 were also tested on seven NNRTI-resistant HIV-1 strains, and all exhibited inhibitory effects with fold changes in IC50 ranging from 2.6 to 111, which were better than those of nevirapine (15.6-fold-371-fold). Docking simulations of compound 24 revealed a reasonable mechanism for the binding mode, and three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3-DQSAR) studies on this novel series of TST further elucidated the structure-activity relationship (SAR). The results suggested the great potential of TSTs as a novel class of NNRTIs with antiviral efficacy and a good resistance profile.

  14. Effect of template secondary structure on the inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by a pyridinone non-nucleoside inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, D B; Carroll, S S; Culberson, J C; Shafer, J A; Kuo, L C

    1994-01-01

    The importance of RNA secondary structure on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase catalyzed polymerization and on the potency of the pyridin-2-one inhibitor 3-(4,7-dichlorobenzoxazol-2-ylmethylamino)-5-ethyl-6-meth ylpyridin-2(1H)-one, L-697,661, were investigated by employing heteromeric primer-template systems. Our data revealed that a stem-loop hairpin secondary structure in the RNA template could lead to strong hindrance of reverse transcription in the reaction catalyzed by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase resulting in the build up of intermediate-length (pause) polymerization products. The presence of L-697,661 greatly enhanced the accumulation of the pause products suggesting that the rate of enzyme translocation from the pause product might be more potently inhibited than polymerization up to the pause site. Model experiments using a synthetic RNA template containing a stem-loop hairpin revealed that the inhibitory potency of L-697, 661 increased 2-fold upon polymerization to within four bases of the secondary structure. Inhibitor potency was enhanced over 6-fold when primer-extension proceeded through the duplex region of the stem-loop. Images PMID:7514786

  15. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Thiophene[3,2-d]pyrimidine Derivatives as HIV-1 Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors with Significantly Improved Drug Resistance Profiles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongwei; Fang, Zengjun; Li, Zhenyu; Huang, Boshi; Zhang, Heng; Lu, Xueyi; Xu, Haoran; Zhou, Zhongxia; Ding, Xiao; Daelemans, Dirk; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-09-01

    We designed and synthesized a series of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with a piperidine-substituted thiophene[3,2-d]pyrimidine scaffold, employing a strategy of structure-based molecular hybridization and substituent decorating. Most of the synthesized compounds exhibited broad-spectrum activity with low (single-digit) nanomolar EC50 values toward a panel of wild-type (WT), single-mutant, and double-mutant HIV-1 strains. Compound 27 was the most potent; compared with ETV, its antiviral efficacy was 3-fold greater against WT, 5-7-fold greater against Y181C, Y188L, E138K, and F227L+V106A, and nearly equipotent against L100I and K103N, though somewhat weaker against K103N+Y181C. Importantly, 27 has lower cytotoxicity (CC50 > 227 μM) and a huge selectivity index (SI) value (ratio of CC50/EC50) of >159101. 27 also showed favorable, drug-like pharmacokinetic and safety properties in rats in vivo. Molecular docking studies and the structure-activity relationships provide important clues for further molecular elaboration. PMID:27541578

  16. Complete and repeatable inactivation of HIV-1 viral particles in suspension using a photo-labeled non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Marin-Muller, C; Rios, A; Anderson, D; Siwak, E; Yao, Q

    2013-04-01

    A method is described for achieving repeatable, complete inactivation of HIV, based on photo-inactivation of HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) with a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), photoactive 4-[[4-[(4-azido-2,6-dimethylphenyl) amino]-2-pyrimidinyl]amino]benzonitrile (PA-DAPYa). These results show that PA-DAPYa inactivated completely a suspension of cell-free HIV-1 viral particles in a dose and time-dependent manner. Using an ELISA assay for p24, it is demonstrated that a 500nM concentration of PA-DAPYa is able to inactivate 500 TCID50 of HIV viral particles in suspension when irradiated with non-microbicidal wavelength UV light for 30min. No active p24 was detected on days 7, 14, and 21 days after culturing the inactivated HIV in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Several batches of large quantities of HIV viral particles were demonstrated to be inactivated completely and repeatedly by this method. Therefore, a reliable method has been developed to inactivate HIV viral particles in a reproducible manner using an optimal concentration of PA-DAPYa and duration of UV exposure time of the treated particles. The inactivation of viral particles in suspension allows for large-scale production of an injectable formulation of inactivated HIV viral particles for vaccine development which should preserve the conformational and antigenic integrity of viral surface proteins. PMID:23384676

  17. Structural modifications of CH(OH)-DAPYs as new HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zi-Hong; Huang, Xia-Yun; Wu, Hai-Qiu; Chen, Wen-Xue; He, Qiu-Qin; Chen, Fen-Er; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe

    2014-04-15

    A series of CR2(OH)-diarylpyrimidine derivatives (CR2(OH)-DAPYs) featuring a hydrophobic group at CH(OH) linker between wing I and the central pyrimidine were synthesized and evaluated for their anti-HIV activity in MT-4 cell cultures. All the target compounds except for compound 3k displayed inhibitory activity against HIV-1 wild-type with EC50 values ranging from 7.21±1.99 to 0.067±0.006 μM. Among them, compound 3d showed the most potent anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50=0.067±0.006 μM, SI>592), which was approximately 2-fold more potent than the reference drugs nevirapine (NVP) and delaviridine (DLV) in the same assay. In addition, the binding modes with HIV-1 RT and the preliminary SAR studies of these new derivatives were also investigated. PMID:24680058

  18. Effects of the protonation state in the interaction of an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) amino acid, Lys101, and a non nucleoside RT inhibitor, GW420867X.

    PubMed

    Galembeck, Sérgio E; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Galembeck, Eduardo

    2014-07-01

    Interactions between an inhibitor and amino acids from a binding pocket could help not only to understand the nature of these interactions, but also to support the design of new inhibitors. In this paper, we explore the key interaction between a second generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), GW420867X, and HIV-1 RT amino acid Lys101 (K101), by quantum mechanical methods. The neutral, protonated, and zwitterionic complexes of GW420867X-K101 were studied. The interaction energies were determined by SCS-MP2/def2-cc-pVQZ, and the electron density was analyzed by natural bond orbital (NBO), atoms in molecules (AIM) and reduced gradient analysis. A large increase in the interaction was observed with the tautomerization of neutral or neutral protonated species. The monomers interact by two medium-strength hydrogen bonds, one partially covalent and another noncovalent. There are some van der Waals intramolecular interactions that are topologically unstable. The nature of the intermolecular interactions was also analyzed using quantitative molecular orbital (MO) theory in combination with an energy decomposition analysis (EDA) based on dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT) at BLYP-D/TZ2P. PMID:24965933

  19. Synthesis and Anti-HIV-1 Evaluation of Some Novel MC-1220 Analogs as Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Loksha, Yasser M; Pedersen, Erik B; Loddo, Roberta; La Colla, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Some novel MC-1220 analogs were synthesized by condensation of 4,6-dichloro-N-methylpyrimidin-2-amine derivatives (1a,b and 15) and/or 4-chloro-6-methoxy-N,N,5-trimethylpyrimidin-2-amine (2a) with the sodium salt of 2,6-difluorophenylacetonitrile followed by treatment with aqueous sodium hydroxide in methanol, alkylation, reduction, halogenation, and/or acidic hydrolysis. All synthesized compounds were evaluated for their activity against HIV-1. The most active compound in this study was compound 7, which showed activity against HIV-1 comparable to that of MC-1220. The only difference in structure between compound 7 and MC-1220 is a fluoro atom instead of a CH3 group. PMID:26996241

  20. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) polymorphism 172K suppresses the effect of clinically relevant drug resistance mutations to both nucleoside and non-nucleoside RT inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hachiya, Atsuko; Marchand, Bruno; Kirby, Karen A; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Tu, Xiongying; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Ong, Yee Tsuey; Li, Zhe; Griffin, Daniel T; Schuckmann, Matthew M; Tanuma, Junko; Oka, Shinichi; Singh, Kamalendra; Kodama, Eiichi N; Sarafianos, Stefan G

    2012-08-24

    Polymorphisms have poorly understood effects on drug susceptibility and may affect the outcome of HIV treatment. We have discovered that an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) polymorphism (RT(172K)) is present in clinical samples and in widely used laboratory strains (BH10), and it profoundly affects HIV-1 susceptibility to both nucleoside (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) when combined with certain mutations. Polymorphism 172K significantly suppressed zidovudine resistance caused by excision (e.g. thymidine-associated mutations) and not by discrimination mechanism mutations (e.g. Q151M complex). Moreover, it attenuated resistance to nevirapine or efavirenz imparted by NNRTI mutations. Although 172K favored RT-DNA binding at an excisable pre-translocation conformation, it decreased excision by thymidine-associated mutation-containing RT. 172K affected DNA handling and decreased RT processivity without significantly affecting the k(cat)/K(m) values for dNTP. Surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed that RT(172K) decreased DNA binding by increasing the dissociation rate. Hence, the increased zidovudine susceptibility of RT(172K) results from its increased dissociation from the chain-terminated DNA and reduced primer unblocking. We solved a high resolution (2.15 Å) crystal structure of RT mutated at 172 and compared crystal structures of RT(172R) and RT(172K) bound to NNRTIs or DNA/dNTP. Our structural analyses highlight differences in the interactions between α-helix E (where 172 resides) and the active site β9-strand that involve the YMDD loop and the NNRTI binding pocket. Such changes may increase dissociation of DNA, thus suppressing excision-based NRTI resistance and also offset the effect of NNRTI resistance mutations thereby restoring NNRTI binding. PMID:22761416

  1. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase (RT) Polymorphism 172K Suppresses the Effect of Clinically Relevant Drug Resistance Mutations to Both Nucleoside and Non-nucleoside RT Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Hachiya, Atsuko; Marchand, Bruno; Kirby, Karen A.; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Tu, Xiongying; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Ong, Yee Tsuey; Li, Zhe; Griffin, Daniel T.; Schuckmann, Matthew M.; Tanuma, Junko; Oka, Shinichi; Singh, Kamalendra; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphisms have poorly understood effects on drug susceptibility and may affect the outcome of HIV treatment. We have discovered that an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) polymorphism (RT172K) is present in clinical samples and in widely used laboratory strains (BH10), and it profoundly affects HIV-1 susceptibility to both nucleoside (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) when combined with certain mutations. Polymorphism 172K significantly suppressed zidovudine resistance caused by excision (e.g. thymidine-associated mutations) and not by discrimination mechanism mutations (e.g. Q151M complex). Moreover, it attenuated resistance to nevirapine or efavirenz imparted by NNRTI mutations. Although 172K favored RT-DNA binding at an excisable pre-translocation conformation, it decreased excision by thymidine-associated mutation-containing RT. 172K affected DNA handling and decreased RT processivity without significantly affecting the kcat/Km values for dNTP. Surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed that RT172K decreased DNA binding by increasing the dissociation rate. Hence, the increased zidovudine susceptibility of RT172K results from its increased dissociation from the chain-terminated DNA and reduced primer unblocking. We solved a high resolution (2.15 Å) crystal structure of RT mutated at 172 and compared crystal structures of RT172R and RT172K bound to NNRTIs or DNA/dNTP. Our structural analyses highlight differences in the interactions between α-helix E (where 172 resides) and the active site β9-strand that involve the YMDD loop and the NNRTI binding pocket. Such changes may increase dissociation of DNA, thus suppressing excision-based NRTI resistance and also offset the effect of NNRTI resistance mutations thereby restoring NNRTI binding. PMID:22761416

  2. From the traditional Chinese medicine plant Schisandra chinensis new scaffolds effective on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase resistant to non-nucleoside inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lijia; Grandi, Nicole; Del Vecchio, Claudia; Mandas, Daniela; Corona, Angela; Piano, Dario; Esposito, Francesca; Parolin, Cristina; Tramontano, Enzo

    2015-04-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is still an extremely attractive pharmaceutical target for the identification of new inhibitors possibly active on drug resistant strains. Medicinal plants are a rich source of chemical diversity and can be used to identify novel scaffolds to be further developed by chemical modifications. We investigated the ability of the main lignans from Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill. fruits, commonly used in Traditional Chinese Medicine, to affect HIV-1 RT functions. We purified 6 lignans from Schisandra chinensis fruits and assayed their effects on HIV-1 RT and viral replication. Among the S. chinensis fruit lignans, Schisandrin B and Deoxyschizandrin selectively inhibited the HIV-1 RT-associated DNA polymerase activity. Structure activity relationship revealed the importance of cyclooctadiene ring substituents for efficacy. In addition, Schisandrin B was also able to impair HIV-1 RT drug resistant mutants and the early phases of viral replication. We identified Schisandrin B and Deoxyschizandrin as new scaffold for the further development of novel HIV-1 RT inhibitors.

  3. Design, discovery, modelling, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel and small, low toxicity s-triazine derivatives as HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Viira, Birgit; Selyutina, Anastasia; García-Sosa, Alfonso T; Karonen, Maarit; Sinkkonen, Jari; Merits, Andres; Maran, Uko

    2016-06-01

    A set of top-ranked compounds from a multi-objective in silico screen was experimentally tested for toxicity and the ability to inhibit the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in cell-free assay and in cell-based assay using HIV-1 based virus-like particles. Detailed analysis of a commercial sample that indicated specific inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcription revealed that a minor component that was structurally similar to that of the main compound was responsible for the strongest inhibition. As a result, novel s-triazine derivatives were proposed, modelled, discovered, and synthesised, and their antiviral activity and cellular toxicity were tested. Compounds 18a and 18b were found to be efficient HIV-1 RT inhibitors, with an IC50 of 5.6±1.1μM and 0.16±0.05μM in a cell-based assay using infectious HIV-1, respectively. Compound 18b also had no detectable toxicity for different human cell lines. Their binding mode and interactions with the RT suggest that there was strong and adaptable binding in a tight (NNRTI) hydrophobic pocket. In summary, this iterative study produced structural clues and led to a group of non-toxic, novel compounds to inhibit HIV-RT with up to nanomolar potency. PMID:27108399

  4. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel 5-Alkyl-6-Adamantylmethylpyrimidin-4(3H)-ones as HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenxin; Huang, Boshi; Kang, Dongwei; De Clercq, Erik; Daelemans, Dirk; Pannecouque, Christophe; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-09-01

    A series of novel 5-alkyl-6-Adamantylmethylpyrimidin-4(3H)-ones bearing various substituents at the C-2 position of the pyrimidinone ring were synthesized using a facile route and evaluated for their anti-HIV activity in MT-4 cells. The biological results demonstrated that the majority of the newly designed compounds possessed moderate efficiency in inhibiting the replication of the wild-type (WT) HIV-1 strain (IIIB ) with EC50 values in the range from 0.10 to 5.39 μm. Among them, 5b1 and 5b3 proved to be the two most active inhibitors against WT HIV-1 with EC50 values of 0.10 and 0.12 μm, respectively, which were more active than nevirapine (NVP) in the same assay. In addition, HIV-1 reverse-transcriptase (RT) inhibition assay indicated that the representative compound 5b1 showed affinity to WT HIV-1 RT, and inhibited the activity of RT with an IC50 value superior to the reference drug NVP. Moreover, the preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) and the molecular modeling analysis of these new derivatives are also discussed. PMID:27062197

  5. Crystal structures of clinically relevant Lys103Asn/Tyr181Cys double mutant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in complexes with ATP and non-nucleoside inhibitor HBY 097.

    PubMed

    Das, Kalyan; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Clark, Arthur D; Boyer, Paul L; Hughes, Stephen H; Arnold, Eddy

    2007-01-01

    Lys103Asn and Tyr181Cys are the two mutations frequently observed in patients exposed to various non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor drugs (NNRTIs). Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) strains containing both reverse transcriptase (RT) mutations are resistant to all of the approved NNRTI drugs. We have determined crystal structures of Lys103Asn/Tyr181Cys mutant HIV-1 RT with and without a bound non-nucleoside inhibitor (HBY 097, (S)-4-isopropoxycarbonyl-6-methoxy-3-(methylthio-methyl)-3,4-dihydroquinoxalin-2(1H)-thione) at 3.0 A and 2.5 A resolution, respectively. The structure of the double mutant RT/HBY 097 complex shows a rearrangement of the isopropoxycarbonyl group of HBY 097 compared to its binding with wild-type RT. HBY 097 makes a hydrogen bond with the thiol group of Cys181 that helps the drug retain potency against the Tyr181Cys mutation. The structure of the unliganded double mutant HIV-1 RT showed that Lys103Asn mutation facilitates coordination of a sodium ion with Lys101 O, Asn103 N and O(delta1), Tyr188 O(eta), and two water molecules. The formation of the binding pocket requires the removal of the sodium ion. Although the RT alone and the RT/HBY 097 complex were crystallized in the presence of ATP, only the RT has an ATP coordinated with two Mn(2+) at the polymerase active site. The metal coordination mimics a reaction intermediate state in which complete octahedral coordination was observed for both metal ions. Asp186 coordinates at an axial position whereas the carboxylates of Asp110 and Asp185 are in the planes of coordination of both metal ions. The structures provide evidence that NNRTIs restrict the flexibility of the YMDD loop and prevent the catalytic aspartate residues from adopting their metal-binding conformations.

  6. Molecular docking and 3D-QSAR studies on triazolinone and pyridazinone, non-nucleoside inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2010-06-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are allosteric inhibitors of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Recently a series of Triazolinone and Pyridazinone were reported as potent inhibitors of HIV-1 wild type reverse transcriptase. In the present study, docking and 3D quantitative structure activity relationship (3D QSAR) studies involving comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) were performed on 31 molecules. Ligands were built and minimized using Tripos force field and applying Gasteiger-Hückel charges. These ligands were docked into protein active site using GLIDE 4.0. The docked poses were analyzed; the best docked poses were selected and aligned. CoMFA and CoMSIA fields were calculated using SYBYL6.9. The molecules were divided into training set and test set, a PLS analysis was performed and QSAR models were generated. The model showed good statistical reliability which is evident from the r2 nv, q2 loo and r2 pred values. The CoMFA model provides the most significant correlation of steric and electrostatic fields with biological activities. The CoMSIA model provides a correlation of steric, electrostatic, acceptor and hydrophobic fields with biological activities. The information rendered by 3D QSAR model initiated us to optimize the lead and design new potential inhibitors.

  7. Structure-based virtual screening efforts against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase to introduce the new potent non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Yaser; Mollica, Adriano; Mirzaie, Sako

    2016-12-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) which is strictly related to the development of AIDS, is treated by a cocktail of drugs, but due its high propensity gain drug resistance, the rational development of new medicine is highly desired. Among the different mechanism of action we selected the reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibition, for our studies. With the aim to identify new chemical entities to be used for further rational drug design, a set of 3000 molecules from the Zinc Database have been screened by docking experiments using AutoDock Vina software. The best ranked compounds with respect of the crystallographic inhibitor MK-4965 resulted to be five compounds, and the best among them was further tested by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Our results indicate that comp1 has a stronger interaction with the subsite p66 of RT than MK-4965 and that both are able to stabilize specific conformational changes of the RT 3D structure, which may explain their activity as inhibitors. Therefore comp1 could be a good candidate for biological tests and further development.

  8. Hybrid chemistry. Part 4: Discovery of etravirine-VRX-480773 hybrids as potent HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zheng-Yong; Tao, Yuan; Wang, Ya-Feng; Mao, Tian-Qi; Yin, Hong; Chen, Fen-Er; Piao, Hu-Ri; De Clercq, Erik; Daelemans, Dirk; Pannecouque, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    A novel series of etravirine-VRX-480773 hybrids were designed using structure-guided molecular hybridization strategy and fusing the pharmacophore templates of etravirine and VRX-480773. The anti-HIV-1 activity and cytotoxicity was evaluated in MT-4 cell cultures. The most active hybrid compound in this series, N-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-((4-(4-cyano-2,6-dimethylphenoxy)pyrimidin-2-yl)thio)acetamide 3d (EC50=0.24 , SI>1225), was more potent than delavirdine (EC50=0.66 μM, SI>67) in the anti-HIV-1 in vitro cellular assay. Studies of structure-activity relationships established a correlation between anti-HIV activity and the substitution pattern of the acetanilide group. PMID:26162497

  9. Hybrid chemistry. Part 4: Discovery of etravirine-VRX-480773 hybrids as potent HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zheng-Yong; Tao, Yuan; Wang, Ya-Feng; Mao, Tian-Qi; Yin, Hong; Chen, Fen-Er; Piao, Hu-Ri; De Clercq, Erik; Daelemans, Dirk; Pannecouque, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    A novel series of etravirine-VRX-480773 hybrids were designed using structure-guided molecular hybridization strategy and fusing the pharmacophore templates of etravirine and VRX-480773. The anti-HIV-1 activity and cytotoxicity was evaluated in MT-4 cell cultures. The most active hybrid compound in this series, N-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-((4-(4-cyano-2,6-dimethylphenoxy)pyrimidin-2-yl)thio)acetamide 3d (EC50=0.24 , SI>1225), was more potent than delavirdine (EC50=0.66 μM, SI>67) in the anti-HIV-1 in vitro cellular assay. Studies of structure-activity relationships established a correlation between anti-HIV activity and the substitution pattern of the acetanilide group.

  10. Novel (2,6-difluorophenyl)(2-(phenylamino)pyrimidin-4-yl)methanones with restricted conformation as potent non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Šimon, Petr; Baszczyňski, Ondřej; Šaman, David; Stepan, George; Hu, Eric; Lansdon, Eric B; Jansa, Petr; Janeba, Zlatko

    2016-10-21

    To elucidate the structure-geometry-activity relationship in diarylpyrimidine family (DAPYs) containing carbonyl linker between the central pyrimidine core and phenyl type B-arm, a series of (2,6-difluorophenyl)(2-(phenylamino)pyrimidin-4-yl)methanones was designed, prepared and tested for their anti-HIV-1 activity. The carbonyl linker bearing B phenyl arm was successfully attached at both C-2 and C-4 positions of the central pyrimidine ring using a new synthetic approach. Further modifications of target compounds are present at C-5 position of the pyrimidine ring. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity study performed on a series of 22 compounds confirmed the crucial importance of both conformational rigidity between phenyl B arm and the pyrimidine core linked through the carbonyl bridge, as well as presence of fluoro substituents in ortho-positions of phenyl B moiety. The most potent derivative of the series, compound 17, having almost perpendicular angle within the two planes made from the B aromatic arm and the pyrimidine ring, exhibited low nanomolar anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50 = 4 nM) with no significant toxicity (CC50 > 57.1 μM). PMID:27371922

  11. Pre-incubation of cell-free HIV-1 group M isolates with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors blocks subsequent viral replication in co-cultures of dendritic cells and T cells.

    PubMed

    Njai, Harr F; Lewi, Paul J; Janssen, Cornelus G M; Garcia, Sergio; Fransen, Katrien; Kestens, Luc; Vanham, Guido; Janssen, Paul A J

    2005-01-01

    In order to study the inhibitory effect of various reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs) on cell-free HIV, we adapted a recently described in vitro system, based on co-cultures of dendritic cells and resting CD4 T cells, modelling early target cells during sexual transmission. The compounds tested included the second-generation non-nucleoside RTI (NNRTI) TMC-120 (R147681, dapivirine) and TMC-125 (R165335, travertine), as well as the reference nucleoside RTI AZT (zidovudine), the nucleotide RTI PMPA (tenofovir) and the NNRTI UC-781. The virus strains included the reference strain HIV-1Ba-L and six primary isolates, representative of the HIV-1 group M pandemic. They all display the non-syncytium-inducing and CCR5 receptor-using (NSI/R5) phenotype, important in transmission. Cell-free virus was immobilized on a poly-L-lysine (PLL)-treated microwell plate and incubated with compound for 1 h. Afterwards, the compound was thoroughly washed away; target cells were added and cultured for 2 weeks, followed by an extended culture with highly susceptible mitogen-activated T cells. Viral production in the cultures was measured on supernatant with HIV antigen ELISA. Negative results were confirmed by showing absence of proviral DNA in the cells. TMC-120 and TMC-125 inhibited replication of HIV-1Ba-L with average EC50 values of 38 nM and 117 nM, respectively, whereas the EC50 of UC-781 was 517 nM. Complete suppression of virus and provirus was observed at compound concentrations of 100, 300 and 1000 nM, respectively. Inhibition of all primary isolates followed the same pattern as HIV-1Ba-L. In contrast, pre-treating the virus with the nucleotide RTI PMPA and AZT failed to inhibit infection even at a concentration of 100000 nM. These data clearly suggest that NNRTIs inactivate RT enzymatic activity of different viral clades (predominant in the epidemic) and might be proposed for further testing as a sterilizing microbicide worldwide. PMID:15865220

  12. Concordance between allele-specific PCR and ultra-deep pyrosequencing for the detection of HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Gillian M; Morris, Lynn; Moorthy, Anitha; Coovadia, Ashraf; Abrams, Elaine J; Strehlau, Renate; Kuhn, Louise; Persaud, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in genotyping technologies have allowed for detection of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations present at low levels. The presence and percentage of Y181C and K103N drug-resistant variants in the blood of 105 subtype C HIV-infected infants who failed single-dose nevirapine prophylaxis for HIV transmission were compared using two highly sensitive genotyping methods, allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) and ultra-deep pyrosequencing. Significant correlations in detection between both methods were found for both Y181C (correlation coefficients of 0.94 [95% CI 0.91-0.96]) and K103N (0.89 [95% CI 0.84 – 0.92]) mutations. The majority of discordant specimens (3/5 Y181C and 8/11 K103N) had wild-type variants when population sequencing was used, but mutant variants were detectable at very low levels (≤5%) with either assay. This difference is most likely due to stochastic variations in the appearance of mutant variants. Overall, both AS-PCR and ultra-deep pyrosequencing methods have proven to be sensitive and accurate, and may confidently be used where feasible. PMID:25034127

  13. Steady state kinetics and inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by a non-nucleoside dipyridodiazepinone, BI-RG-587, using a heteropolymeric template.

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, E B; Miglietta, J J; Shrutkowski, A G; Shih, C K; Grob, P M; Skoog, M T

    1991-01-01

    Steady state kinetics and inhibition by a dipyridodiazepinone of the reverse transcriptase from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) were studied using a heteropolymeric RNA template with a sequence from the authentic initiation site on the HIV genome. For addition of the first deoxynucleotide to primer, kcat/KM is 0.05 (nM-min)-1 and KM is 10 nM. When all 4 deoxynucleotide triphosphates are present and processive synthesis occurs, catalysis is less efficient; kcat/KM = .0077 (nM-min)-1 and KM = 100 nM for dATP. These results are consistent with a rate determining conformation change involved in translocation of the enzyme along the template. Inhibition by the dipyridodiazepinone BI-RG-587 is noncompetitive with respect to both nucleotide and template-primer; this compound decreases Vmax but does not affect KM. Thus, this inhibitor binds to a site distinct from the substrate binding sites with Ki of 220 nM. Inhibition by BI-RG-587 results in a uniform decrease in amount of products of all lengths rather than a shift from longer to shorter products, suggesting the inhibitor does not affect processivity of reverse transcriptase. Images PMID:1711678

  14. Crystal structure of tert-butyldimethylsilyl-spiroaminooxathioledioxide-thymine (TSAO-T) in complex with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) redefines the elastic limits of the non-nucleoside inhibitor-binding pocket

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kalyan; Bauman, Joseph D.; Rim, Angela S.; Dharia, Chhaya; Clark, Arthur D.; Camarasa, María-José; Balzarini, Jan; Arnold, Eddy

    2012-01-01

    Tert-butyldimethylsilyl-spiroaminooxathioledioxide (TSAO) compounds have an embedded thymidine-analog backbone; however, TSAO compounds invoke non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance mutations. Our crystal structure of RT:7 (TSAO-T) complex shows that 7 binds inside the NNRTI-binding pocket assuming a “dragon” shape, and interacts extensively with almost all the pocket residues. The structure also explains the structure-activity relationships and resistance data for TSAO compounds. The binding of 7 causes hyper-expansion of the pocket and significant rearrangement of RT subdomains. This non-optimal complex formation is apparently responsible (1) for the lower stability of a RT (p66/p51) dimer and (2) for the lower potency of 7 despite of its extensive interactions with RT. However, the HIV-1 RT:7 structure reveals novel design features, such as (1) interactions with the conserved Tyr183 from the YMDD-motif and (2) a possible way for an NNRTI to reach the polymerase active site that may be exploited in designing new NNRTIs. PMID:21446702

  15. Discovery of 3-{5-[(6-Amino-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine-3-yl)methoxy]-2-chlorophenoxy}-5-chlorobenzonitrile (MK-4965): A Potent, Orally Bioavailable HIV-1 Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor with Improved Potency against Key Mutant Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Thomas J.; Sisko, John T.; Tynebor, Robert M.; Williams, Theresa M.; Felock, Peter J.; Flynn, Jessica A.; Lai, Ming-Tain; Liang, Yuexia; McGaughey, Georgia; Liu, Meiquing; Miller, Mike; Moyer, Gregory; Munshi, Vandna; Perlow-Poehnelt, Rebecca; Prasad, Sridhar; Reid, John C.; Sanchez, Rosa; Torrent, Maricel; Vacca, Joseph P.; Wan, Bang-Lin; Yan, Youwei

    2009-07-10

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) have been shown to be a key component of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The use of NNRTIs has become part of standard combination antiviral therapies producing clinical outcomes with efficacy comparable to other antiviral regimens. There is, however, a critical issue with the emergence of clinical resistance, and a need has arisen for novel NNRTIs with a broad spectrum of activity against key HIV-1 RT mutations. Using a combination of traditional medicinal chemistry/SAR analyses, crystallography, and molecular modeling, we have designed and synthesized a series of novel, highly potent NNRTIs that possess broad spectrum antiviral activity and good pharmacokinetic profiles. Further refinement of key compounds in this series to optimize physical properties and pharmacokinetics has resulted in the identification of 8e (MK-4965), which has high levels of potency against wild-type and key mutant viruses, excellent oral bioavailability and overall pharmacokinetics, and a clean ancillary profile.

  16. Emergent HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Were Not Present at Low-Frequency at Baseline in Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Treated Subjects in the STaR Study.

    PubMed

    Porter, Danielle P; Daeumer, Martin; Thielen, Alexander; Chang, Silvia; Martin, Ross; Cohen, Cal; Miller, Michael D; White, Kirsten L

    2015-12-01

    At Week 96 of the Single-Tablet Regimen (STaR) study, more treatment-naïve subjects that received rilpivirine/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF (RPV/FTC/TDF) developed resistance mutations compared to those treated with efavirenz (EFV)/FTC/TDF by population sequencing. Furthermore, more RPV/FTC/TDF-treated subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA >100,000 copies/mL developed resistance compared to subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA ≤100,000 copies/mL. Here, deep sequencing was utilized to assess the presence of pre-existing low-frequency variants in subjects with and without resistance development in the STaR study. Deep sequencing (Illumina MiSeq) was performed on baseline and virologic failure samples for all subjects analyzed for resistance by population sequencing during the clinical study (n = 33), as well as baseline samples from control subjects with virologic response (n = 118). Primary NRTI or NNRTI drug resistance mutations present at low frequency (≥2% to 20%) were detected in 6.6% of baseline samples by deep sequencing, all of which occurred in control subjects. Deep sequencing results were generally consistent with population sequencing but detected additional primary NNRTI and NRTI resistance mutations at virologic failure in seven samples. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations emerging while on RPV/FTC/TDF or EFV/FTC/TDF treatment were not present at low frequency at baseline in the STaR study. PMID:26690199

  17. Emergent HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Were Not Present at Low-Frequency at Baseline in Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Treated Subjects in the STaR Study

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Danielle P.; Daeumer, Martin; Thielen, Alexander; Chang, Silvia; Martin, Ross; Cohen, Cal; Miller, Michael D.; White, Kirsten L.

    2015-01-01

    At Week 96 of the Single-Tablet Regimen (STaR) study, more treatment-naïve subjects that received rilpivirine/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF (RPV/FTC/TDF) developed resistance mutations compared to those treated with efavirenz (EFV)/FTC/TDF by population sequencing. Furthermore, more RPV/FTC/TDF-treated subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA >100,000 copies/mL developed resistance compared to subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA ≤100,000 copies/mL. Here, deep sequencing was utilized to assess the presence of pre-existing low-frequency variants in subjects with and without resistance development in the STaR study. Deep sequencing (Illumina MiSeq) was performed on baseline and virologic failure samples for all subjects analyzed for resistance by population sequencing during the clinical study (n = 33), as well as baseline samples from control subjects with virologic response (n = 118). Primary NRTI or NNRTI drug resistance mutations present at low frequency (≥2% to 20%) were detected in 6.6% of baseline samples by deep sequencing, all of which occurred in control subjects. Deep sequencing results were generally consistent with population sequencing but detected additional primary NNRTI and NRTI resistance mutations at virologic failure in seven samples. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations emerging while on RPV/FTC/TDF or EFV/FTC/TDF treatment were not present at low frequency at baseline in the STaR study. PMID:26690199

  18. Novel indole-3-sulfonamides as potent HIV non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhijian; Wolkenberg, Scott E.; Lu, Meiqing; Munshi, Vandna; Moyer, Gregory; Feng, Meizhen; Carella, Anthony V.; Ecto, Linda T.; Gabryelski, Lori J.; Lai, Ming-Tain; Prasad, Sridar G.; Yan, Youwei; McGaughey, Georgia B.; Miller, Michael D.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Hartman, George D.; Vacca, Joseph P.; Williams, Theresa M.

    2008-09-29

    This Letter describes the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel 3-indole sulfonamides as potent non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with balanced profiles against common HIV RT mutants K103N and Y181C.

  19. Drug interaction profile for GSK2248761, a next generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Piscitelli, Steve; Kim, Joseph; Gould, Elizabeth; Lou, Yu; White, Scott; de Serres, Mark; Johnson, Mark; Zhou, Xiao-Jian; Pietropaolo, Keith; Mayers, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    AIM To evaluate potential drug interactions with antiretroviral therapies or supportive therapies for use in conjunction with the once daily, next generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor GSK2248761 in patients with HIV-1 infection. METHODS A series of phase I drug interaction studies was conducted. RESULTS GSK2248761 was shown to be a weak CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 inhibitor in a clinical study with a probe cocktail. Mean plasma concentration–time profiles for atazanavir, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine (TDF/FTC), darunavir (DRV, administered with ritonavir [RTV]), and drospirenone/ethinylestradiol were similar following co-administration of GSK2248761. Plasma raltegravir AUC(0,τ) and Cmax increased by 18% with no change in Cτ when raltegravir was co-administered with GSK2248761. Lopinavir (LPV) plasma AUC(0,τ), Cmax and Cτ decreased by 23%, 14% and 40%, respectively, following administration of lopinavir/ritonavir with GSK2248761. Atorvastatin, rosuvastatin and simvastatin AUC(0,∞) and Cmax increased following co-administration with GSK2248761, with the largest changes observed for simvastatin (3.7-fold and 4.3-fold). Changes in maximum and extent of GSK2248761 exposure were marginal after co-administration with atazanavir, TDF/FTC and raltegravir compared with GSK2248761 administered alone. Co-administration of GSK2248761 with DRV/RTV and LPV/RTV increased plasma GSK2248761 exposures by 1.25- to ≤2-fold compared with GSK2248761 administered alone, and increases in GSK2248761 exposure were higher following single dose co-administration of DRV/RTV or LPV/RTV compared with multiple doses. There were few drug-related AEs, and no treatment-related trends in blood chemistry, haematology, urinalysis, vital signs or ECG findings. CONCLUSIONS These studies indicate that GSK2248761 was safe and well tolerated in healthy adults treated in these studies at the doses and duration of therapy evaluated. PMID:22288567

  20. Discovery of the Aryl-phospho-indole IDX899, a Highly Potent Anti-HIV Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Dousson, Cyril; Alexandre, François-René; Amador, Agnès; Bonaric, Séverine; Bot, Stéphanie; Caillet, Catherine; Convard, Thierry; da Costa, Daniel; Lioure, Marie-Pierre; Roland, Arlène; Rosinovsky, Elodie; Maldonado, Sébastien; Parsy, Christophe; Trochet, Christophe; Storer, Richard; Stewart, Alistair; Wang, Jingyang; Mayes, Benjamin A; Musiu, Chiara; Poddesu, Barbara; Vargiu, Luana; Liuzzi, Michel; Moussa, Adel; Jakubik, Jocelyn; Hubbard, Luke; Seifer, Maria; Standring, David

    2016-03-10

    Here, we describe the design, synthesis, biological evaluation, and identification of a clinical candidate non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with a novel aryl-phospho-indole (APhI) scaffold. NNRTIs are recommended components of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for the treatment of HIV-1. Since a major problem associated with NNRTI treatment is the emergence of drug resistant virus, this work focused on optimization of the APhI against clinically relevant HIV-1 Y181C and K103N mutants and the Y181C/K103N double mutant. Optimization of the phosphinate aryl substituent led to the discovery of the 3-Me,5-acrylonitrile-phenyl analogue RP-13s (IDX899) having an EC50 of 11 nM against the Y181C/K103N double mutant.

  1. Effect of Host Genetic Variation on the Pharmacokinetics and Clinical Response of Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Akihiko; Spector, Stephen A

    2008-01-01

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) have been used widely for treating human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infected patients as a component of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT). Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B6 is an important hepatic isoenzyme responsible for the metabolism of NNRTIs including efavirenz and nevirapine. Recent pharmacogenetic studies have shown that CYP2B6 genetic variants alter hepatic CYP2B6 protein expression and function, and the pharmacokinetics of several CYP2B6 substrates. In particular, the CYP2B6-G516T polymorphism in exon 4 affects the pharmacokinetics of efavirenz. Other studies have shown associations of the CYP2B6-G516T genotype with nevirapine pharmacokinetics and central nervous system adverse effects related to efavirenz use. In total, CYP2B6 genetic variants are important determinants of efavirenz and nevirapine pharmacokinetics . Further studies are needed to identify the associations of CYP2B6 genetic variants with the development of NNRTI resistant viruses.

  2. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: a review on pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety and tolerability

    PubMed Central

    Usach, Iris; Melis, Virginia; Peris, José-Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type-1 non-nucleoside and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are key drugs of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the clinical management of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)/HIV infection. Discussion First-generation NNRTIs, nevirapine (NVP), delavirdine (DLV) and efavirenz (EFV) are drugs with a low genetic barrier and poor resistance profile, which has led to the development of new generations of NNRTIs. Second-generation NNRTIs, etravirine (ETR) and rilpivirine (RPV) have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and European Union, and the next generation of drugs is currently being clinically developed. This review describes recent clinical data, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, pharmacodynamics, safety and tolerability of commercialized NNRTIs, including the effects of sex, race and age differences on pharmacokinetics and safety. Moreover, it summarizes the characteristics of next-generation NNRTIs: lersivirine, GSK 2248761, RDEA806, BILR 355 BS, calanolide A, MK-4965, MK-1439 and MK-6186. Conclusions This review presents a wide description of NNRTIs, providing useful information for researchers interested in this field, both in clinical use and in research. PMID:24008177

  3. Discovery and crystallography of bicyclic arylaminoazines as potent inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Gil; Frey, Kathleen M; Gallardo-Macias, Ricardo; Spasov, Krasimir A; Chan, Albert H; Anderson, Karen S; Jorgensen, William L

    2015-11-01

    Non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT) are reported that incorporate a 7-indolizinylamino or 2-naphthylamino substituent on a pyrimidine or 1,3,5-triazine core. The most potent compounds show below 10 nanomolar activity towards wild-type HIV-1 and variants bearing Tyr181Cys and Lys103Asn/Tyr181Cys resistance mutations. The compounds also feature good aqueous solubility. Crystal structures for two complexes enhance the analysis of the structure-activity data.

  4. Exploring isoxazole and carboxamide derivatives as potential non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Sudheer S; Joshi, Kaustubh A

    2016-04-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transciptase inhibitors (NNRTI) are a class of drug molecules with a specific target of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). In the present work, we evaluated a set of selected oxazole and carboxamide derivatives to identify potential pharmacophoric features using molecular docking approach. The docking approach employed has been validated by enrichment factor calculation at top 1% (EF1%). It shows a considerable improvement in EF1%value compared to earlier reported study carried out on specific dataset of ligands and decoys for RT, in the directory of useful decoys (DUD). The carboxamide derivatives show better activity as NNRT inhibitors than oxazole derivatives. From this study, four pharmacophoric groups including a triazine ring, an aniline substituent, a benzyl amide moiety and a trimethylphenoxy substituent have been recognized and used for designing new NNRT inhibitors. Newly designed molecules show significant enhancement in docking scores over the native ligand, parent and other training set molecules. In addition, some functional groups have also been identified to assist in improving the activity of these pharmacophores. Thus a nitrile group, an amide and fluoro substitution turn out to be an important requisite for NNRT potential inhibitors. PMID:26973048

  5. Lack of association between plasma levels of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors & virological outcomes during rifampicin co-administration in HIV-infected TB patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Geetha; Kumar, A.K. Hemanth; Ponnuraja, C.; Ramesh, K.; Rajesh, Lakshmi; Chandrasekharan, C.; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Among patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis (TB), reduced plasma non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) concentrations during rifampicin (RMP) co-administration could lead to HIV treatment failure. This study was undertaken to examine the association between plasma nevirapine (NVP) and efavirenz (EFV) concentrations and virological outcomes in patients infected with HIV-1 and TB. Methods: This was a nested study undertaken in a clinical trial of patients with HIV-1 and TB, randomized to two different once-daily antiretroviral treatment (ART) regimens along with anti-TB treatment (ATT). Trough concentrations of plasma NVP and EFV were estimated at months 1 (during ATT and ART) and 6 months (ART only) by HPLC. Plasma HIV-1 RNA level >400 copies/ml or death within 6 months of ART were considered as unfavourable outcomes. Genotyping of CYP2B6 516G>T polymorphism was performed. Results: Twenty nine per cent of patients in NVP arm had an unfavourable outcome at 6 months compared to 9 per cent in EFV arm (P<0.08). The mean NVP and EFV levels estimated at 1 and 6 months did not significantly differ between favourable and unfavourable responders. Logistic regression analysis showed CYP2B6 516G>T polymorphism significantly associated with virologic outcome in patients receiving EFV–based regimen. Interpretation & conclusions: Trough plasma concentrations of NVP and EFV did not show any association with response to ART in patients on ATT and once-daily ART. CYP2B6 516G>T polymorphism was associated with virologic outcome among patients on EFV. PMID:24521642

  6. Resistance to reverse transcriptase inhibitors used in the treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas; Wainberg, Mark A; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors that target the retroviral enzyme reverse transcriptase (RT) have played an indispensable role in the treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection. They can be grouped into two distinct therapeutic groups, namely the nucleoside and nucleotide RT inhibitors (NRTIs), and the non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs). NRTIs form the backbones of most first- and second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens formulated for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. They are also used to prevent mother-to-child transmission, and as pre-exposure prophylaxis in individuals at risk of HIV-1 infection. The NNRTIs nevirapine (NVP), efavirenz and rilpivirine also used to form part of first-line ART regimens, although this is no longer recommended, while etravirine can be used in salvage ART regimens. A single-dose of NVP administered to both mother and child has routinely been used in resource-limited settings to reduce the rate of HIV-1 transmission. Unfortunately, the development of HIV-1 resistance to RT inhibitors can compromise the efficacy of these antiviral drugs in both the treatment and prevention arenas. Here, we provide an up-to-date review on drug-resistance mutations in HIV-1 RT, and discuss their cross-resistance profiles, molecular mechanisms and clinical significance. PMID:26517190

  7. A randomized trial of Raltegravir replacement for protease inhibitor or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor in HIV-infected women with lipohypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Lake, Jordan E; McComsey, Grace A; Hulgan, Todd M; Wanke, Christine A; Mangili, Alexandra; Walmsley, Sharon L; Boger, M Sean; Turner, Ralph R; McCreath, Heather E; Currier, Judith S

    2012-09-01

    Lipohypertrophy in HIV-infected patients is associated with metabolic abnormalities. Raltegravir (RAL) is not known to induce fat changes or severe metabolic perturbations. HIV-infected women with central adiposity and HIV-1 RNA less than 50 copies per milliliter on non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)- or protease inhibitor (PI)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) continued their nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) backbone and were randomized to switch to open label RAL immediately or after 24 weeks. The primary end point was 24-week between-group change in computed tomography (CT)-quantified visceral adipose tissue (AT) volume. Fasting lipids, glucose, C-reactive protein (CRP), anthropometric measurements, and patient-reported quality of life assessments were also measured. Thirty-six subjects provided 80% power to detect a 10% between-group difference in visceral AT over 24 weeks. Thirty-seven of 39 enrolled subjects completed week 24. At entry, subjects were 75% black or Hispanic, and on 62% PI-based and 38% NNRTI-based regimens. The median age was 43 years, CD4 count 558 cells per microliter, and body mass index (BMI) 32 kg/m(2). After 24 weeks, no statistically significant changes in visceral or subcutaneous AT, anthropometrics, BMI, glucose, or CRP were observed. In subjects receiving RAL, significant improvements in total and LDL cholesterol (p=0.04), self-reported belly size (p=0.02) and composite body size (p=0.02) were observed. Body size changes correlated well with percent visceral AT change. No RAL-related adverse events occurred. Compared to continued PI or NNRTI, switch to RAL was associated with statistically significant 24-week improvements in total and LDL cholesterol but not AT volumes. Additional insights into AT and metabolic changes in women on RAL will be provided by 48-week follow-up of the immediate-switch arm.

  8. Mechanistic Study of Common Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Resistant Mutations with K103N and Y181C Substitutions.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ming-Tain; Munshi, Vandna; Lu, Meiqing; Feng, MeiZhen; Hrin-Solt, Renee; McKenna, Philip M; Hazuda, Daria J; Miller, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are a mainstay of therapy for human immunodeficiency type 1 virus (HIV-1) infections. However, their effectiveness can be hampered by the emergence of resistant mutations. To aid in designing effective NNRTIs against the resistant mutants, it is important to understand the resistance mechanism of the mutations. Here, we investigate the mechanism of the two most prevalent NNRTI-associated mutations with K103N or Y181C substitution. Virus and reverse transcriptase (RT) with K103N/Y188F, K103A, or K103E substitutions and with Y181F, Y188F, or Y181F/Y188F substitutions were employed to study the resistance mechanism of the K103N and Y181C mutants, respectively. Results showed that the virus and RT with K103N/Y188F substitutions displayed similar resistance levels to the virus and RT with K103N substitution versus NNRTIs. Virus and RT containing Y181F, Y188F, or Y181F/Y188F substitution exhibited either enhanced or similar susceptibility to NNRTIs compared with the wild type (WT) virus. These results suggest that the hydrogen bond between N103 and Y188 may not play an important role in the resistance of the K103N variant to NNRTIs. Furthermore, the results from the studies with the Y181 or Y188 variant provide the direct evidence that aromatic π-π stacking plays a crucial role in the binding of NNRTIs to RT. PMID:27669286

  9. Mechanistic Study of Common Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Resistant Mutations with K103N and Y181C Substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ming-Tain; Munshi, Vandna; Lu, Meiqing; Feng, MeiZhen; Hrin-Solt, Renee; McKenna, Philip M.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Miller, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are a mainstay of therapy for human immunodeficiency type 1 virus (HIV-1) infections. However, their effectiveness can be hampered by the emergence of resistant mutations. To aid in designing effective NNRTIs against the resistant mutants, it is important to understand the resistance mechanism of the mutations. Here, we investigate the mechanism of the two most prevalent NNRTI-associated mutations with K103N or Y181C substitution. Virus and reverse transcriptase (RT) with K103N/Y188F, K103A, or K103E substitutions and with Y181F, Y188F, or Y181F/Y188F substitutions were employed to study the resistance mechanism of the K103N and Y181C mutants, respectively. Results showed that the virus and RT with K103N/Y188F substitutions displayed similar resistance levels to the virus and RT with K103N substitution versus NNRTIs. Virus and RT containing Y181F, Y188F, or Y181F/Y188F substitution exhibited either enhanced or similar susceptibility to NNRTIs compared with the wild type (WT) virus. These results suggest that the hydrogen bond between N103 and Y188 may not play an important role in the resistance of the K103N variant to NNRTIs. Furthermore, the results from the studies with the Y181 or Y188 variant provide the direct evidence that aromatic π–π stacking plays a crucial role in the binding of NNRTIs to RT. PMID:27669286

  10. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Antiviral Drug Resistance (Part 1 of 2)

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) contributes to the development of resistance to all anti-AIDS drugs by introducing mutations into the viral genome. At the molecular level, mutations in RT result in resistance to RT inhibitors. Eight nucleoside/nucleotide analogs (NRTIs) and five non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs) are approved HIV-1 drugs. Structures of RT have been determined in complexes with substrates and/or inhibitors, and the structures have revealed different conformational and functional states of the enzyme. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of resistance to NRTIs and NNRTIs, and their complex relationships, may help in designing new drugs that are periodically required to overcome existing as well as emerging trends of drug resistance. PMID:23602471

  11. Structure-Based Evaluation of Non-nucleoside Inhibitors with Improved Potency and Solubility That Target HIV Reverse Transcriptase Variants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The development of novel non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs) with activity against variants of HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) is crucial for overcoming treatment failure. The NNRTIs bind in an allosteric pocket in RT ∼10 Å away from the active site. Earlier analogues of the catechol diether compound series have picomolar activity against HIV strains with wild-type RT but lose potency against variants with single Y181C and double K103N/Y181C mutations. As guided by structure-based and computational studies, removal of the 5-Cl substitution of compound 1 on the catechol aryl ring system led to a new analogue compound 2 that maintains greater potency against Y181C and K103N/Y181C variants and better solubility (510 μg/mL). Crystal structures were determined for wild-type, Y181C, and K103N/Y181C RT in complex with both compounds 1 and 2 to understand the structural basis for these findings. Comparison of the structures reveals that the Y181C mutation destabilizes the binding mode of compound 1 and disrupts the interactions with residues in the pocket. Compound 2 maintains the same conformation in wild-type and mutant structures, in addition to several interactions with the NNRTI binding pocket. Comparison of the six crystal structures will assist in the understanding of compound binding modes and future optimization of the catechol diether series. PMID:25700160

  12. Crystallization studies on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Lesley F.; Brick, Peter; Blow, David M.; Mei-Zhen, Lou

    1992-08-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has been crystallized in a variety of forms. Various ligands used for co-crystallization are described and the results presented. All of these crystals showed disorder when examined in the X-ray beam. The best diffraction currently achieved has been approximately 7A˚. The possible reasons for crystal disorder are discussed. An example of another protein, car☐ypeptidase G 2, which initially yielded non-diffracting crystals, is used to illustrate the value of applying random or incomplete factorial screens to sample wider parameter space for conditions to grow well-ordered crystals.

  13. Design and synthesis of tetrahydrophthalimide derivatives as inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are one of the key components in highly active anti-retroviral therapy because of their high specificity and less toxicity. NNRTIs inhibit reverse transcriptase enzyme by binding to the allosteric site, which is 10Å away from the active site. Rapid emergence of resistance is the major problem with all anti-HIV agents. Hence, there is continuous need to develop novel anti-HIV agents active against both drug sensitive and resistance strains. Results All the 16 synthesized 2-(1,3-dioxo-3a,4-dihydro-1H-isoindol-2(3H,7H,7aH)-yl)-N-(substitutedphenyl) acetamide 4(a-p) analogs were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. Lipinski rule of five parameters and molecular parameters like solubility, drug likeness, and drug score were derived for designed analogs using online servers like Molinspiration and Osiris property explorer. Synthesized compounds were evaluated for their HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor activity by HIV-1 RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity assay at 2 and 20 μM concentrations. Conclusions Among the 16 synthesized compounds, 4a, 4b, 4f, 4g, 4k, and 4l showed weak reverse transcriptase inhibitor activity at 20 μM concentration. For the designed compounds, there was no correlation observed between molecular modeling and in vitro studies. PMID:23968361

  14. Structural Aspects of Drug Resistance and Inhibition of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kamalendra; Marchand, Bruno; Kirby, Karen A.; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) has been the target of numerous approved anti-AIDS drugs that are key components of Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapies (HAART). It remains the target of extensive structural studies that continue unabated for almost twenty years. The crystal structures of wild-type or drug-resistant mutant HIV RTs in the unliganded form or in complex with substrates and/or drugs have offered valuable glimpses into the enzyme’s folding and its interactions with DNA and dNTP substrates, as well as with nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTIs) drugs. These studies have been used to interpret a large body of biochemical results and have paved the way for innovative biochemical experiments designed to elucidate the mechanisms of catalysis and drug inhibition of polymerase and RNase H functions of RT. In turn, the combined use of structural biology and biochemical approaches has led to the discovery of novel mechanisms of drug resistance and has contributed to the design of new drugs with improved potency and ability to suppress multi-drug resistant strains. PMID:20376302

  15. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Structure with RNase H Inhibitor dihydroxy benzoyl naphthyl Hydrazone Bound at a Novel Site

    SciTech Connect

    Himmel,D.; Sarafianos, S.; Dharmasena, S.; Hossain, M.; McCoy-Simandle, K.; Ilina, T.; Clark, A.; Knight, J.; Julias, J.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    The rapid emergence of drug-resistant variants of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1), has limited the efficacy of anti-acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) treatments, and new lead compounds that target novel binding sites are needed. We have determined the 3.15 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) complexed with dihydroxy benzoyl naphthyl hydrazone (DHBNH), an HIV-1 RT RNase H (RNH) inhibitor (RNHI). DHBNH is effective against a variety of drug-resistant HIV-1 RT mutants. While DHBNH has little effect on most aspects of RT-catalyzed DNA synthesis, at relatively high concentrations it does inhibit the initiation of RNA-primed DNA synthesis. Although primarily an RNHI, DHBNH binds >50 {angstrom} away from the RNH active site, at a novel site near both the polymerase active site and the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) binding pocket. When DHBNH binds, both Tyr181 and Tyr188 remain in the conformations seen in unliganded HIV-1 RT. DHBNH interacts with conserved residues (Asp186, Trp229) and has substantial interactions with the backbones of several less well-conserved residues. On the basis of this structure, we designed substituted DHBNH derivatives that interact with the NNRTI-binding pocket. These compounds inhibit both the polymerase and RNH activities of RT.

  16. Synthesis, structure-activity relationship and molecular docking of cyclohexenone based analogous as potent non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazar, Muhammad Faizan; Abdullah, Muhammad Imran; Badshah, Amir; Mahmood, Asif; Rana, Usman Ali; Khan, Salah Ud-Din

    2015-04-01

    The chalcones core in compounds is advantageously chosen effective synthons, which offer exciting perspectives in biological and pharmacological research. The present study reports the successful development of eight new cyclohexenone based anti-reverse transcriptase analogous using rational drug design synthesis principles. These new cyclohexenone derivatives (CDs) were synthesized by following a convenient route of Robinson annulation, and the molecular structure of these CDs were later confirmed by various analytical techniques such as 1H NMR, 13C NMR, FT-IR, UV-Vis spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. All the synthesized compounds were screened theoretically and experimentally against reverse transcriptase (RT) and found potentially active reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors. Of the compounds studied, the compound 2FC4 showed high interaction with RT at non-nucleoside binding site, contributing high free binding energy (ΔG -8.01 Kcal) and IC50 (0.207 μg/ml), respectively. Further results revealed that the compounds bearing more halogen groups, with additional hydrophobic character, offered superior anti-reverse transcriptase activity as compared to rest of compounds. It is anticipate that the present study would be very useful for the selection of potential reverse transcriptase inhibitors featuring inclusive pharmacological profiles.

  17. AKAP149 binds to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and is involved in the reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Lemay, Julie; Maidou-Peindara, Priscilla; Cancio, Reynel; Ennifar, Eric; Coadou, Gaël; Maga, Giovanni; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Benarous, Richard; Liu, Lang Xia

    2008-11-21

    Like all retroviruses, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) undergoes reverse transcription during its replication cycle. The cellular cofactors potentially involved in this process still remain to be identified. We show here that A-kinase anchoring protein 149 (AKAP149) interacts with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in both the yeast two-hybrid system and human cells. The AKAP149 binding site has been mapped to the RNase H domain of HIV-1 RT. AKAP149 silencing by RNA interference in HIV-1-infected cells inhibited viral replication at the reverse transcription step. We selected single-point mutants of RT defective for AKAP149 binding and demonstrated that mutant G462R, despite retaining significant intrinsic RT activity in vitro, failed to carry out HIV-1 reverse transcription correctly in infected cells. This suggests that the interaction between RT and AKAP149 in infected cells may play an important role in HIV-1 reverse transcription.

  18. Chemical crosslinking of the subunits of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Debyser, Z.; De Clercq, E.

    1996-01-01

    The reverse transcriptase (RT) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is composed of two subunits of 66 and 51 kDa in a 1 to 1 ratio. Because dimerization is a prerequisite for enzymatic activity, interference with the dimerization process could constitute an alternative antiviral strategy for RT inhibition. Here we describe an in vitro assay for the study of the dimerization state of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase based on chemical crosslinking of the subunits with dimethylsuberimidate. Crosslinking results in the formation of covalent bonds between the subunits, so that the crosslinked species can be resolved by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Crosslinked RT species with molecular weight greater than that of the dimeric form accumulate during a 1-15-min time course. Initial evidence suggests that those high molecular weight species represent trimers and tetramers and may be the result of intramolecular crosslinking of the subunits of a higher-order RT oligomer. A peptide that corresponds to part of the tryptophan repeat motif in the connection domain of HIV-1 RT inhibits crosslink formation as well as enzymatic activity. The crosslinking assay thus allows the investigation of the effect of inhibitors on the dimerization of HIV-1 RT. PMID:8745406

  19. Valproic Acid Inhibits the Release of Soluble CD40L Induced by Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Donna C.; Schifitto, Giovanni; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART), a majority of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV) infected individuals continually develop HIV – Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND), indicating that host inflammatory mediators, in addition to viral proteins, may be contributing to these disorders. Consistent with this notion, we have previously shown that levels of the inflammatory mediator soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) are elevated in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of HIV infected, cognitively impaired individuals, and that excess sCD40L can contribute to blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability in vivo, thereby signifying the importance of this inflammatory mediator in the pathogenesis of HAND. Here we demonstrate that the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) efavirenz (EFV) induces the release of circulating sCD40L in both HIV infected individuals and in an in vitro suspension of washed human platelets, which are the main source of circulating sCD40L. Additionally, EFV was found to activate glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) in platelets, and we now show that valproic acid (VPA), a known GSK3β inhibitor, was able to attenuate the release of sCD40L in HIV infected individuals receiving EFV, and in isolated human platelets. Collectively these results have important implications in determining the pro-inflammatory role that some antiretroviral regimens may have. The use of antiretrovirals remains the best strategy to prevent HIV-associated illnesses, including HAND, however these drugs have clear limitations to this end, and thus, these results underscore the need to develop adjunctive therapies for HAND that can also minimize the undesired negative effects of the antiretrovirals. PMID:23555843

  20. Latency reversal and viral clearance to cure HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Margolis, David M; Garcia, J Victor; Hazuda, Daria J; Haynes, Barton F

    2016-07-22

    Research toward a cure for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection has joined prevention and treatment efforts in the global public health agenda. A major approach to HIV eradication envisions antiretroviral suppression, paired with targeted therapies to enforce the expression of viral antigen from quiescent HIV-1 genomes, and immunotherapies to clear latent infection. These strategies are targeted to lead to viral eradication--a cure for AIDS. Paired testing of latency reversal and clearance strategies has begun, but additional obstacles to HIV eradication may emerge. Nevertheless, there is reason for optimism that advances in long-acting antiretroviral therapy and HIV prevention strategies will contribute to efforts in HIV cure research and that the implementation of these efforts will synergize to markedly blunt the effect of the HIV pandemic on society.

  1. Latency reversal and viral clearance to cure HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Margolis, David M; Garcia, J Victor; Hazuda, Daria J; Haynes, Barton F

    2016-07-22

    Research toward a cure for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection has joined prevention and treatment efforts in the global public health agenda. A major approach to HIV eradication envisions antiretroviral suppression, paired with targeted therapies to enforce the expression of viral antigen from quiescent HIV-1 genomes, and immunotherapies to clear latent infection. These strategies are targeted to lead to viral eradication--a cure for AIDS. Paired testing of latency reversal and clearance strategies has begun, but additional obstacles to HIV eradication may emerge. Nevertheless, there is reason for optimism that advances in long-acting antiretroviral therapy and HIV prevention strategies will contribute to efforts in HIV cure research and that the implementation of these efforts will synergize to markedly blunt the effect of the HIV pandemic on society. PMID:27463679

  2. Conformational Plasticity of the NNRTI-Binding Pocket in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase: A Fluorine Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, Naima G; Ishima, Rieko; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2016-07-19

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a major drug target in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. RT inhibitors currently in use include non-nucleoside, allosteric RT inhibitors (NNRTIs), which bind to a hydrophobic pocket, distinct from the enzyme's active site. We investigated RT-NNRTI interactions by solution (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), using singly (19)F-labeled RT proteins. Comparison of (19)F chemical shifts of fluorinated RT and drug-resistant variants revealed that the fluorine resonance is a sensitive probe for identifying mutation-induced changes in the enzyme. Our data show that in the unliganded enzyme, the NNRTI-binding pocket is highly plastic and not locked into a single conformation. Upon inhibitor binding, the binding pocket becomes rigidified. In the inhibitor-bound state, the (19)F signal of RT is similar to that of drug-resistant mutant enzymes, distinct from what is observed for the free state. Our results demonstrate the power of (19)F NMR spectroscopy to characterize conformational properties using selectively (19)F-labeled protein. PMID:27163463

  3. Conformational Plasticity of the NNRTI-Binding Pocket in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase: A Fluorine Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, Naima G; Ishima, Rieko; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2016-07-19

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a major drug target in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. RT inhibitors currently in use include non-nucleoside, allosteric RT inhibitors (NNRTIs), which bind to a hydrophobic pocket, distinct from the enzyme's active site. We investigated RT-NNRTI interactions by solution (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), using singly (19)F-labeled RT proteins. Comparison of (19)F chemical shifts of fluorinated RT and drug-resistant variants revealed that the fluorine resonance is a sensitive probe for identifying mutation-induced changes in the enzyme. Our data show that in the unliganded enzyme, the NNRTI-binding pocket is highly plastic and not locked into a single conformation. Upon inhibitor binding, the binding pocket becomes rigidified. In the inhibitor-bound state, the (19)F signal of RT is similar to that of drug-resistant mutant enzymes, distinct from what is observed for the free state. Our results demonstrate the power of (19)F NMR spectroscopy to characterize conformational properties using selectively (19)F-labeled protein.

  4. Docking study of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Seal, Abhik; Aykkal, Riju; Babu, Rosana O; Ghosh, Mriganka

    2011-02-15

    Natural products are important sources of drug discovery. In this context groups of different set of phytochemicals were taken and docked into the different cavities of the Reverse transcriptase (PDB ID: 1REV) of Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and results were discussed. Natural compounds such as Curcumin, Geranin, Gallotannin, Tiliroside, Kaempferol-3-o-glucoside and Trachelogenin were found to very effective according to its binding energy and ligand efficiency score. Those compounds also were found to have no adverse effect as carcinogenicity and mutagenicity and favorable drug likeness score. Hence, considering the facts those compounds could use effectively for HIV-1 drug discovery.

  5. Docking study of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Seal, Abhik; Aykkal, Riju; Babu, Rosana O; Ghosh, Mriganka

    2011-01-01

    Natural products are important sources of drug discovery. In this context groups of different set of phytochemicals were taken and docked into the different cavities of the Reverse transcriptase (PDB ID: 1REV) of Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and results were discussed. Natural compounds such as Curcumin, Geranin, Gallotannin, Tiliroside, Kaempferol-3-o-glucoside and Trachelogenin were found to very effective according to its binding energy and ligand efficiency score. Those compounds also were found to have no adverse effect as carcinogenicity and mutagenicity and favorable drug likeness score. Hence, considering the facts those compounds could use effectively for HIV-1 drug discovery. PMID:21423889

  6. Second-line protease inhibitor-based highly active antiretroviral therapy after failing non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors-based regimens in Asian HIV-infected children

    PubMed Central

    Bunupuradah, Torsak; Puthanakit, Thanyawee; Fahey, Paul; Kariminia, Azar; Yusoff, Nik Khairulddin Nik; Khanh, Truong Huu; Sohn, Annette H.; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Lumbiganon, Pagakrong; Hansudewechakul, Rawiwan; Razali, Kamarul; Kurniati, Nia; Huy, Bui Vu; Sudjaritruk, Tavitiya; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Fong, Siew Moy; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2013-01-01

    Background The WHO recommends boosted protease inhibitor (bPI)-based highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) after failing non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) treatment. We examined outcomes of this regimen in Asian HIV-infected children. Methods Children from five Asian countries in the TREAT Asia Pediatric HIV Observational Database (TApHOD) with ≥24 weeks of NNRTI-based HAART followed by ≥24 weeks of bPI-based HAART were eligible. Primary outcomes were the proportions with virologic suppression (HIV-RNA <400 copies/ml) and immune recovery (CD4% ≥25% if age <5 years and CD4 count ≥500 cells/mm3 if age ≥5 years) at 48 and 96 weeks. Results Of 3422 children, 153 were eligible; 52% were female. At switch, median age was 10 years, 26% were in WHO stage 4. Median weight-for-age z-score (WAZ) was −1.9 (n=121), CD4% was 12.5% (n=106), CD4 count was 237 (n=112) cells/mm3, and HIV-RNA was 4.6 log10copies/ml (n=61). The most common PI was lopinavir/ritonavir (83%). At 48 weeks, 61% (79/129) had immune recovery, 60% (26/43) had undetectable HIV-RNA and 73% (58/79) had fasting triglycerides ≥130mg/dl. By 96 weeks, 70% (57/82) achieved immune recovery, 65% (17/26) virologic suppression, and hypertriglyceridemia occurred in 66% (33/50). Predictors for virologic suppression at week 48 were longer duration of NNRTI-based HAART (p=0.006), younger age (p=0.007), higher WAZ (p=0.020), and HIV-RNA at switch <10,000 copies/ml (p=0.049). Conclusion In this regional cohort of Asian children on bPI-based second-line HAART, 60% of children tested had immune recovery by one year, and two-thirds had hyperlipidemia, highlighting difficulties in optimizing second-line HAART with limited drug options. PMID:23296119

  7. EFFECT OF TRANSLOCATION DEFECTIVE REVERSE TRANSCRIPTASE INHIBITORS ON THE ACTIVITY OF N348I, A CONNECTION SUBDOMAIN DRUG RESISTANT HIV-1 REVERSE TRANSCRIPTASE MUTANT

    PubMed Central

    MICHAILIDIS, E.; SINGH, K.; RYAN, E.M.; HACHIYA, A.; ONG, Y.T.; KIRBY, K.A.; MARCHAND, B.; KODAMA, E.N.; MITSUYA, H.; PARNIAK, M.A.; SARAFIANOS, S.G.

    2013-01-01

    4′-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2′-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) is a highly potent inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). We have previously shown that its exceptional antiviral activity stems from a unique mechanism of action that is based primarily on blocking translocation of RT; therefore we named EFdA a Translocation Defective RT Inhibitor (TDRTI). The N348I mutation at the connection subdomain (CS) of HIV-1 RT confers clinically significant resistance to both nucleoside (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs). In this study we tested EFdA-triphosphate (TP) together with a related compound, ENdA-TP (4′-ethynyl-2-amino-2′-deoxyadenosine triphosphate) against HIV-1 RTs that carry clinically relevant drug resistance mutations: N348I, D67N/K70R/L210Q/T215F, D67N/K70R/L210Q/T215F/N348I, and A62V/V75I/F77L/F116Y/Q151M. We demonstrate that these enzymes remain susceptible to TDRTIs. Similar to WT RT, the N348I RT is inhibited by EFdA mainly at the point of incorporation through decreased translocation. In addition, the N348I substitution decreases the RNase H cleavage of DNA terminated with EFdA-MP (T/PEFdA-MP). Moreover, N348I RT unblocks EFdA-terminated primers with similar efficiency as the WT enzyme, and further enhances EFdA unblocking in the background of AZT-resistance mutations. This study provides biochemical insights into the mechanism of inhibition of N348I RT by TDRTIs and highlights the excellent efficacy of this class of inhibitors against WT and drug-resistant HIV-1 RTs. PMID:23273211

  8. Effect of translocation defective reverse transcriptase inhibitors on the activity of N348I, a connection subdomain drug resistant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase mutant.

    PubMed

    Michailidis, E; Singh, K; Ryan, E M; Hachiya, A; Ong, Y T; Kirby, K A; Marchand, B; Kodama, E N; Mitsuya, H; Parniak, M A; Sarafianos, S G

    2012-01-01

    4'-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) is a highly potent inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). We have previously shown that its exceptional antiviral activity stems from a unique mechanism of action that is based primarily on blocking translocation of RT; therefore we named EFdA a Translocation Defective RT Inhibitor (TDRTI). The N348I mutation at the connection subdomain (CS) of HIV-1 RT confers clinically significant resistance to both nucleoside (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs). In this study we tested EFdA-triphosphate (TP) together with a related compound, ENdA-TP (4'-ethynyl-2-amino-2'-deoxdyadenosine triphosphate) against HIV-1 RTs that carry clinically relevant drug resistance mutations: N348I, D67N/K70R/L210Q/T215F, D67N/K70R/L210Q/T215F/N348I, and A62V/V5I/F77L/F116Y/Q151M. We demonstrate that these enzymes remain susceptible to TDRTIs. Similar to WT RT, the N348I RT is inhibited by EFdA mainly at the point of incorporation through decreased translocation. In addition, the N348I substitution decreases the RNase H cleavage of DNA terminated with EFdA-MP (T/P(EFdA-MP)). Moreover, N348I RT unblocks EFdA-terminated primers with similar efficiency as the WT enzyme, and further enhances EFdA unblocking in the background of AZT-resistance mutations. This study provides biochemical insights into the mechanism of inhibition of N348I RT by TDRTIs and highlights the excellent efficacy of this class of inhibitors against WT and drug-resistant HIV-1 RTs. PMID:23273211

  9. HIV-1 Protease, Reverse Transcriptase, and Integrase Variation

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Kris; Varghese, Vici; Winters, Mark A.; Hurt, Christopher B.; Eron, Joseph J.; Parkin, Neil; Holmes, Susan P.; Holodniy, Mark; Shafer, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN) variability presents a challenge to laboratories performing genotypic resistance testing. This challenge will grow with increased sequencing of samples enriched for proviral DNA such as dried blood spots and increased use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to detect low-abundance HIV-1 variants. We analyzed PR and RT sequences from >100,000 individuals and IN sequences from >10,000 individuals to characterize variation at each amino acid position, identify mutations indicating APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing, and identify mutations resulting from selective drug pressure. Forty-seven percent of PR, 37% of RT, and 34% of IN positions had one or more amino acid variants with a prevalence of ≥1%. Seventy percent of PR, 60% of RT, and 60% of IN positions had one or more variants with a prevalence of ≥0.1%. Overall 201 PR, 636 RT, and 346 IN variants had a prevalence of ≥0.1%. The median intersubtype prevalence ratios were 2.9-, 2.1-, and 1.9-fold for these PR, RT, and IN variants, respectively. Only 5.0% of PR, 3.7% of RT, and 2.0% of IN variants had a median intersubtype prevalence ratio of ≥10-fold. Variants at lower prevalences were more likely to differ biochemically and to be part of an electrophoretic mixture compared to high-prevalence variants. There were 209 mutations indicative of APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing and 326 mutations nonpolymorphic treatment selected. Identification of viruses with a high number of APOBEC-associated mutations will facilitate the quality control of dried blood spot sequencing. Identifying sequences with a high proportion of rare mutations will facilitate the quality control of NGS. IMPORTANCE Most antiretroviral drugs target three HIV-1 proteins: PR, RT, and IN. These proteins are highly variable: many different amino acids can be present at the same position in viruses from different individuals. Some of the amino acid variants cause drug

  10. Discovery of novel inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase through virtual screening of experimental and theoretical ensembles.

    PubMed

    Ivetac, Anthony; Swift, Sara E; Boyer, Paul L; Diaz, Arturo; Naughton, John; Young, John A T; Hughes, Stephen H; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are potent anti-HIV chemotherapeutics. Although there are FDA-approved NNRTIs, challenges such as the development of resistance have limited their utility. Here, we describe the identification of novel NNRTIs through a combination of computational and experimental approaches. Based on the known plasticity of the NNRTI binding pocket (NNIBP), we adopted an ensemble-based virtual screening strategy: coupling receptor conformations from 10 X-ray crystal structures with 120 snapshots from a total of 480 ns of molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories. A screening library of 2864 National Cancer Institute (NCI) compounds was built and docked against the ensembles in a hierarchical fashion. Sixteen diverse compounds were tested for their ability to block HIV infection in human tissue cultures using a luciferase-based reporter assay. Three promising compounds were further characterized, using a HIV-1 RT-based polymerase assay, to determine the specific mechanism of inhibition. We found that 2 of the three compounds inhibited the polymerase activity of RT (with potency similar to the positive control, the FDA-approved drug nevirapine). Through a computational approach, we were able to discover two compounds which inhibit HIV replication and block the activity of RT, thus offering the potential for optimization into mature inhibitors.

  11. Molecular modeling of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase drug-resistant mutant strains: implications for the mechanism of polymerase action.

    PubMed

    Kroeger Smith, M B; Michejda, C J; Hughes, S H; Boyer, P L; Janssen, P A; Andries, K; Buckheit, R W; Smith, R H

    1997-12-01

    A computer model of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) either alone, or complexed with a non-nucleoside inhibitor (NNI), was constructed using crystal coordinate data from a subset of the protein surrounding the binding pocket region. Molecular mechanics calculations were carried out on solvated wild-type RT and RT that contained modifications corresponding to resistance-engendering mutations. Results from the calculations revealed that the r.m.s. difference between 12 modified proteins and that of wild-type RT could be qualitatively correlated with the measured polymerase activity of the enzyme in the presence of these mutations. In addition, the level of activity was related to the measured distance between the primer grip and dNTP binding regions of the protein. These data suggest a direct correlation between RT structure and function. Complexes of RT-8-C1 TIBO and RT-alpha-APA were also minimized in models containing modifications corresponding to key drug-resistant mutants. The variant complexes all showed weaker binding than wild-type RT, while giving rise to similar, but critical changes in the protein. Therefore, the design of new inhibitors should center on obtaining stronger binding drugs to key drug-resistant RT variants.

  12. 2´,3´-Dialdehyde of ATP, ADP, and adenosine inhibit HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Schachter, Julieta; Valadao, Ana Luiza Chaves; Aguiar, Renato Santana; Barreto-de-Souza, Victor; Rossi, Atila Duque; Arantes, Pablo Ricardo; Verli, Hugo; Quintana, Paula Gabriela; Heise, Norton; Tanuri, Amilcar; Bou-Habib, Dumith Chequer; Persechini, Pedro Muanis

    2014-01-01

    The 2´3´-dialdehyde of ATP or oxidized ATP (oATP) is a compound known for specifically making covalent bonds with the nucleotide-binding site of several ATP-binding enzymes and receptors. We investigated the effects of oATP and other oxidized purines on HIV-1 infection and we found that this compound inhibits HIV-1 and SIV infection by blocking early steps of virus replication. oATP, oxidized ADP (oADP), and oxidized Adenosine (oADO) impact the natural activity of endogenous reverse transcriptase enzyme (RT) in cell free virus particles and are able to inhibit viral replication in different cell types when added to the cell cultures either before or after infection. We used UFLC-UV to show that both oADO and oATP can be detected in the cell after being added in the extracellular medium. oATP also suppresses RT activity and replication of the HIV-1 resistant variants M184V and T215Y. We conclude that oATP, oADP and oADO display anti HIV-1 activity that is at in least in part due to inhibitory activity on HIV-1 RT.

  13. Asymmetric conformational maturation of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xunhai; Perera, Lalith; Mueller, Geoffrey A; DeRose, Eugene F; London, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase utilizes a metamorphic polymerase domain that is able to adopt two alternate structures that fulfill catalytic and structural roles, thereby minimizing its coding requirements. This ambiguity introduces folding challenges that are met by a complex maturation process. We have investigated this conformational maturation using NMR studies of methyl-labeled RT for the slower processes in combination with molecular dynamics simulations for rapid processes. Starting from an inactive conformation, the p66 precursor undergoes a unimolecular isomerization to a structure similar to its active form, exposing a large hydrophobic surface that facilitates initial homodimer formation. The resulting p66/p66' homodimer exists as a conformational heterodimer, after which a series of conformational adjustments on different time scales can be observed. Formation of the inter-subunit RH:thumb' interface occurs at an early stage, while maturation of the connection' and unfolding of the RH' domains are linked and occur on a much slower time scale. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06359.001 PMID:26037594

  14. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal

    PubMed Central

    Stoszko, Mateusz; De Crignis, Elisa; Rokx, Casper; Khalid, Mir Mubashir; Lungu, Cynthia; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Kan, Tsung Wai; Boucher, Charles; Verbon, Annelies; Dykhuizen, Emily C.; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2015-01-01

    Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's) for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4 + T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal. PMID:26870822

  15. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal.

    PubMed

    Stoszko, Mateusz; De Crignis, Elisa; Rokx, Casper; Khalid, Mir Mubashir; Lungu, Cynthia; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Kan, Tsung Wai; Boucher, Charles; Verbon, Annelies; Dykhuizen, Emily C; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2016-01-01

    Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's) for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4 + T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal. PMID:26870822

  16. Reversal of Latency as Part of a Cure for HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Thomas Aagaard; Tolstrup, Martin; Søgaard, Ole Schmeltz

    2016-02-01

    Here, the use of pharmacological agents to reverse HIV-1 latency will be explored as a therapeutic strategy towards a cure. However, while clinical trials of latency-reversing agents LRAs) have demonstrated their ability to increase production of latent HIV-1, such interventions have not had an effect on the size of the latent HIV-1 reservoir. Plausible explanations for this include insufficient host immune responses against virus-expressing cells, the presence of escape mutations in archived virus, or an insufficient scale of latency reversal. Importantly, these early studies of LRAs were primarily designed to investigate their ability to perturb the state of HIV-1 latency; using the absence of an impact on the size of the HIV-1 reservoir to discard their potential inclusion in curative strategies would be erroneous and premature.

  17. Drugs That Fight HIV-1

    MedlinePlus

    ... program of the National Institutes of Health Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs) NRTIs block reverse transcriptase, an enzyme HIV- ... these products are on last page.) Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NNRTIs) NNRTIs bind to and alter reverse transcriptase, ...

  18. Design of Annulated Pyrazoles As Inhibitors of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Z.K.; Harris, S.F.; Arora, N.; Javanbakht, H.; Li, Y.; Fretland, J.; Davidson, J.P.; Billedeau, J.R.; Gleason, S.; Hirschfeld, D.; Kennedy-Smith, J.J.; Mirzadegan, T.; Roetz, R.; Smith, M.; Sperry, S.; Suh, J.M.; Wu, J.; Tsing, S.; Villasenor, A.G.; Paul, A.; Su, G.

    2009-05-26

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are recommended components of preferred combination antiretroviral therapies used for the treatment of HIV. These regimens are extremely effective in suppressing virus replication. Structure-based optimization of diaryl ether inhibitors led to the discovery of a new series of pyrazolo[3,4-c]pyridazine NNRTIs that bind the reverse transcriptase enzyme of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-RT) in an expanded volume relative to most other inhibitors in this class. The binding mode maintains the {beta}13 and {beta}14 strands bearing Pro236 in a position similar to that in the unliganded reverse transcriptase structure, and the distribution of interactions creates the opportunity for substantial resilience to single point mutations. Several pyrazolopyridazine NNRTIs were found to be highly effective against wild-type and NNRTI-resistant viral strains in cell culture.

  19. HIV-1 antiretroviral drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Arts, Eric J; Hazuda, Daria J

    2012-04-01

    The most significant advance in the medical management of HIV-1 infection has been the treatment of patients with antiviral drugs, which can suppress HIV-1 replication to undetectable levels. The discovery of HIV-1 as the causative agent of AIDS together with an ever-increasing understanding of the virus replication cycle have been instrumental in this effort by providing researchers with the knowledge and tools required to prosecute drug discovery efforts focused on targeted inhibition with specific pharmacological agents. To date, an arsenal of 24 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs are available for treatment of HIV-1 infections. These drugs are distributed into six distinct classes based on their molecular mechanism and resistance profiles: (1) nucleoside-analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), (2) non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), (3) integrase inhibitors, (4) protease inhibitors (PIs), (5) fusion inhibitors, and (6) coreceptor antagonists. In this article, we will review the basic principles of antiretroviral drug therapy, the mode of drug action, and the factors leading to treatment failure (i.e., drug resistance).

  20. The large subunit of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase interacts with beta-actin.

    PubMed Central

    Hottiger, M; Gramatikoff, K; Georgiev, O; Chaponnier, C; Schaffner, W; Hübscher, U

    1995-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase is a dimeric enzyme mainly involved in the replication of the viral genome. A filamentous phage cDNA expression library from human lymphocytes was used to select cellular proteins interacting with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Affinity selections using the bacterially expressed monomeric large subunit of reverse transcriptase (p66) yielded host beta-actin. This clone was expressed as glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein which was identified by using a specific antibody against beta-actin. Furthermore we show that also the eukaryotic beta-actin binds to either the large subunit of reverse transcriptase or to the Pol precursor polyprotein in vitro. The reverse transcriptase/beta-actin interaction might be important for the secretion of HIV-1 virions. Images PMID:7535922

  1. Crystal structures of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: N-benzyl-4-methyl-benzimidazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2009-07-01

    HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are potentially specific and effective drugs in AIDS therapy. The presence of two aromatic systems with an angled orientation in the molecule of the inhibitor is crucial for interactions with HIV-1 RT. The inhibitor drives like a wedge into the cluster of aromatic residues of RT HIV-1 and restrains the enzyme in a conformation that blocks the chemical step of nucleotide incorporation. Structural studies provide useful information for designing new, more active inhibitors. The crystal structures of four NNRTIs are presented here. The investigated compounds are derivatives of N-benzyl-4-methyl-benzimidazole with various aliphatic and aromatic substituents at carbon 2 positions and a 2,6-dihalogeno-substituted N-benzyl moiety. Structural data reported here show that the conformation of the investigated compounds is relatively rigid. Such feature is important for the nonnucleoside inhibitor binding to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  2. Complementary assays reveal a relationship between HIV-1 uncoating and reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Hulme, Amy E; Perez, Omar; Hope, Thomas J

    2011-06-14

    During the early stages of HIV-1 replication the conical capsid composed of p24(CA) protein dissociates from the rest of the cytoplasmic viral complex by a process called uncoating. Although proper uncoating is known to be required for HIV-1 infection, many questions remain about the timing and factors involved in the process. Here we have used two complementary assays to study the process of uncoating in HIV-1-infected cells, specifically looking at the timing of uncoating and its relationship to reverse transcription. We developed a fluorescent microscopy-based uncoating assay that detects the association of p24(CA) with HIV-1 viral complexes in cells. We also used an owl monkey kidney (OMK) cell assay that is based on timed TRIM-CypA-mediated restriction of HIV-1 replication. Results from both assays indicate that uncoating is initiated within 1 h of viral fusion. In addition, treatment with the reverse transcriptase inhibitor nevirapine delayed uncoating in both assays. Analysis of reverse transcription products in OMK cells revealed that the generation of early reverse transcription products coincides with the timing of uncoating in these assays. Collectively, these results suggest that some aspect of reverse transcription has the ability to influence the kinetics of uncoating. PMID:21628558

  3. Slow binding-tight binding interaction between benzimidazol-2-one inhibitors and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase containing the lysine 103 to asparagine mutation.

    PubMed

    Samuele, Alberta; Crespan, Emmanuele; Vitellaro, Samanta; Monforte, Anna-Maria; Logoteta, Patrizia; Chimirri, Alba; Maga, Giovanni

    2010-06-01

    Novel benzimidazol-2-one non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) have been recently identified, through rational structure-based molecular modeling and docking approaches, as highly effective inhibitors of the wild type and drug-resistant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). These compounds also showed potent anti-HIV activities against viral strains, superior to the clinically approved NNRTI efavirenz. However, they were still of limited efficacy towards the K103N mutant. Here we report a detailed enzymatic analysis elucidating the molecular mechanism of interaction between benzimidazol-2-one derivatives and the K103N mutant RT. The loss of potency of these molecules towards the K103N RT was specifically due to a reduction of their association rate to the enzyme. Unexpectedly, these compounds showed a strongly reduced dissociation rate from the K103N mutant, as compared to the wild type enzyme, suggesting that, once occupied by the drug, the mutated binding site could achieve a more stable interaction with these molecules. The characterization of this slow binding-tight binding mutant-specific mechanism of interaction may pave the way to the design of more effective new generation benzimidazol-2-one NNRTIs with promising drug resistant profile and minimal toxicity. PMID:20307579

  4. Aptamer beacons for visualization of endogenous protein HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in living cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yu; Zhang, Zhiping; Wei, Hongping; Hu, Qinxue; Deng, Jiaoyu; Guo, Deyin; Cui, Zongqiang; Zhang, Xian-En

    2011-10-15

    Direct visualization of endogenous proteins in living cells remains a challenge. Aptamer beacon is a promising technique to resolve this problem by combining the excellent protein binding specificity of the aptamer with the sensitive signal transduction mechanism of the molecular beacon. In this study, aptamer 93 del against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) was engineered into aptamer beacons to recognize and image HIV-1 RT. The constructed aptamer beacons could specifically bind to HIV-1 RT and the beacon-RT binding showed effective fluorescence signal transduction in homogeneous solution. In solutions with 1 μM of the aptamer beacon, the effective fluorescence signal increased with increasing concentration of HIV-1 RT from 0.5 μM to 5 μM. When the aptamer beacons were delivered into the living cells that transiently expressed HIV-1 RT, HIV-1 RT could be specifically labeled and imaged. The designed aptamer beacons were further successfully applied for RT imaging in HIV-1 integrated U1 cells. The method developed here may be extended to visualize many other endogenous proteins in living cells using appropriate aptamer beacons.

  5. High-performance liquid chromatographic assay to determine the plasma levels of HIV-protease inhibitors (amprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir and saquinavir) and the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (nevirapine) after liquid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Dailly, E; Thomas, L; Kergueris, M F; Jolliet, P; Bourin, M

    2001-07-15

    A single HPLC assay was developed for therapeutic drug monitoring of 5 HIV protease inhibitors (indinavir, amprenavir, saquinavir, ritonavir, nelfinavir) and a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (nevirapine) in human plasma. After liquid-liquid extraction in a mixture ethyl acetate-hexane, compounds are separated on a C18 column with a gradient elution of solvent A [acetonitrile and 0.025 M tetramethylammonium perchlorate in 0.2% aqueous trifluoroacetic acid (55:45 (v/v))] and solvent B [methanol and 0.025 M tetramethylammonium perchlorate in 0.2% aqueous trifluoroacetic acid (55:45 (v/v))]. The compounds are detected at various wavelengths: 320 nm (nevirapine), 259 nm (indinavir), 254 nm (amprenavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir) and 239 nm (ritonavir). The intra-day and inter-day precision and accuracy are lower than 15%. The limits of quantitation are 0.05 mg/l (amprenavir), 0.2 mg/l (indinavir, saquinavir, nelfinavir) and 0.4 mg/l (ritonavir, nevirapine). This method which allows to estimate simultaneously plasma levels of protease inhibitors and nevirapine can be used for therapeutic drug monitoring.

  6. A Minor Subset of Super Elongation Complexes Plays a Predominant Role in Reversing HIV-1 Latency

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zichong; Lu, Huasong

    2016-01-01

    Promoter-proximal pausing by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a key rate-limiting step in HIV-1 transcription and latency reversal. The viral Tat protein recruits human super elongation complexes (SECs) to paused Pol II to overcome this restriction. Despite the recent progress in understanding the functions of different subsets of SECs in controlling cellular and Tat-activated HIV transcription, little is known about the SEC subtypes that help reverse viral latency in CD4+ T cells. Here, we used the CRISPR-Cas9 genome-editing tool to knock out the gene encoding the SEC subunit ELL2, AFF1, or AFF4 in Jurkat/2D10 cells, a well-characterized HIV-1 latency model. Depletion of these proteins drastically reduced spontaneous and drug-induced latency reversal by suppressing HIV-1 transcriptional elongation. Surprisingly, a low-abundance subset of SECs containing ELL2 and AFF1 was found to play a predominant role in cooperating with Tat to reverse latency. By increasing the cellular level/activity of these Tat-friendly SECs, we could potently activate latent HIV-1 without using any drugs. These results implicate the ELL2/AFF1-SECs as an important target in the future design of a combinatorial therapeutic approach to purge latent HIV-1. PMID:26830226

  7. Deep sequencing analysis of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase at baseline and time of failure in patients receiving rilpivirine in the phase III studies ECHO and THRIVE.

    PubMed

    Van Eygen, Veerle; Thys, Kim; Van Hove, Carl; Rimsky, Laurence T; De Meyer, Sandra; Aerssens, Jeroen; Picchio, Gaston; Vingerhoets, Johan

    2016-05-01

    Minority variants (1.0-25.0%) were evaluated by deep sequencing (DS) at baseline and virological failure (VF) in a selection of antiretroviral treatment-naïve, HIV-1-infected patients from the rilpivirine ECHO/THRIVE phase III studies. Linkage between frequently emerging resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) was determined. DS (llIumina®) and population sequencing (PS) results were available at baseline for 47 VFs and time of failure for 48 VFs; and at baseline for 49 responders matched for baseline characteristics. Minority mutations were accurately detected at frequencies down to 1.2% of the HIV-1 quasispecies. No baseline minority rilpivirine RAMs were detected in VFs; one responder carried 1.9% F227C. Baseline minority mutations associated with resistance to other non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) were detected in 8/47 VFs (17.0%) and 7/49 responders (14.3%). Baseline minority nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) RAMs M184V and L210W were each detected in one VF (none in responders). At failure, two patients without NNRTI RAMs by PS carried minority rilpivirine RAMs K101E and/or E138K; and five additional patients carried other minority NNRTI RAMs V90I, V106I, V179I, V189I, and Y188H. Overall at failure, minority NNRTI RAMs and NRTI RAMs were found in 29/48 (60.4%) and 16/48 VFs (33.3%), respectively. Linkage analysis showed that E138K and K101E were usually not observed on the same viral genome. In conclusion, baseline minority rilpivirine RAMs and other NNRTI/NRTI RAMs were uncommon in the rilpivirine arm of the ECHO and THRIVE studies. DS at failure showed emerging NNRTI resistant minority variants in seven rilpivirine VFs who had no detectable NNRTI RAMs by PS. PMID:26412111

  8. Vaginal microbicide film combinations of two reverse transcriptase inhibitors, EFdA and CSIC, for the prevention of HIV-1 sexual transmission

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Hu, Minlu; Shi, Yuan; Gong, Tiantian; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Moncla, Bernard; Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Parniak, Michael A.; Rohan, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose EFdA is a potent nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) with activity against a wide spectrum of wild-type and drug resistant HIV-1 variants. CSIC is a tight-binding non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) with demonstrated anti-HIV properties important for use in topical prevention of HIV transmission. The objective of this study was to develop and characterize film-formulated EFdA and CSIC for use as a female-controlled vaginal microbicide to prevent sexual transmission of HIV. Methods Assessments of EFdA- and CSIC-loaded films included physicochemical characteristics, in vitro cytotoxicity, epithelia integrity studies, compatibility with the normal vaginal Lactobacillus flora and anti-HIV bioactivity evaluations. Results No significant change in physicochemical properties or biological activity of the combination films were noted during 3 months storage. In vitro cytotoxicity and bioactivity testing showed that 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50) of either EFdA or CSIC was several orders of magnitude higher than the 50% effective concentration (EC50) values. Film-formulated EFdA and CSIC combination showed additive inhibitory activity against wild type and drug-resistant variants of HIV. Epithelial integrity studies demonstrated that the combination vaginal film had a much lower toxicity to HEC-1A monolayers compared to that of VCF®, a commercial vaginal film product containing nonoxynol-9. Polarized ectocervical explants showed films with drug alone or in combination were effective at preventing HIV infection. Conclusions Our data suggest that vaginal microbicide films containing a combination of the NRTI EFdA and the NNRTI CSIC have potential to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission. PMID:25794967

  9. Anti-HIV cytotoxicity enzyme inhibition and molecular docking studies of quinoline based chalcones as potential non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRT).

    PubMed

    Hameed, Asima; Abdullah, Muhammad Imran; Ahmed, Ejaz; Sharif, Ahsan; Irfan, Ahmad; Masood, Sara

    2016-04-01

    A series of fourteen (A1 - A14) qunioline based chalcones were screened for reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RT) and found potentially active against RT. Bioassay, theoretical and dockings studies with RT (the enzyme required for reverse transcription of viral RNA) results showed that the type and positions of the substituents seemed to be critical for their inhibition against RT. The bromo and chloro substituted chalcone displayed high degree of inhibition against RT. The A4 andA6 showed high interaction with RT, contributing high free binding energy (ΔG -9.30 and -9.13kcal) and RT inhibition value (IC50 0.10μg/ml and 0.11μg/ml). PMID:26964017

  10. An HIV-1 replication pathway utilizing reverse transcription products that fail to integrate.

    PubMed

    Trinité, Benjamin; Ohlson, Eric C; Voznesensky, Igor; Rana, Shashank P; Chan, Chi N; Mahajan, Saurabh; Alster, Jason; Burke, Sean A; Wodarz, Dominik; Levy, David N

    2013-12-01

    Integration is a central event in the replication of retroviruses, yet ≥ 90% of HIV-1 reverse transcripts fail to integrate, resulting in accumulation of unintegrated viral DNA in cells. However, understanding what role, if any, unintegrated viral DNA plays in the natural history of HIV-1 has remained elusive. Unintegrated HIV-1 DNA is reported to possess a limited capacity for gene expression restricted to early gene products and is considered a replicative dead end. Although the majority of peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells are refractory to infection, nonactivated CD4 T cells present in lymphoid and mucosal tissues are major targets for infection. Treatment with cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-7, or IL-15 renders CD4(+) T cells permissive to HIV-1 infection in the absence of cell activation and proliferation and provides a useful model for infection of resting CD4(+) T cells. We found that infection of cytokine-treated resting CD4(+) T cells in the presence of raltegravir or with integrase active-site mutant HIV-1 yielded de novo virus production following subsequent T cell activation. Infection with integration-competent HIV-1 naturally generated a population of cells generating virus from unintegrated DNA. Latent infection persisted for several weeks and could be activated to virus production by a combination of a histone deacetylase inhibitor and a protein kinase C activator or by T cell activation. HIV-1 Vpr was essential for unintegrated HIV-1 gene expression and de novo virus production in this system. Bypassing integration by this mechanism may allow the preservation of genetic information that otherwise would be lost.

  11. SAMHD1 restricts HIV-1 reverse transcription in quiescent CD4+ T-cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Quiescent CD4+ T lymphocytes are highly refractory to HIV-1 infection due to a block at reverse transcription. Results Examination of SAMHD1 expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes shows that SAMHD1 is expressed in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells at levels comparable to those found in myeloid cells. Treatment of CD4+ T cells with Virus-Like Particles (VLP) containing Vpx results in the loss of SAMHD1 expression that correlates with an increased permissiveness to HIV-1 infection and accumulation of reverse transcribed viral DNA without promoting transcription from the viral LTR. Importantly, CD4+ T-cells from patients with Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome harboring mutation in the SAMHD1 gene display an increased susceptibility to HIV-1 infection that is not further enhanced by VLP-Vpx-treatment. Conclusion Here, we identified SAMHD1 as the restriction factor preventing efficient viral DNA synthesis in non-cycling resting CD4+ T-cells. These results highlight the crucial role of SAMHD1 in mediating restriction of HIV-1 infection in quiescent CD4+ T-cells and could impact our understanding of HIV-1 mediated CD4+ T-cell depletion and establishment of the viral reservoir, two of the HIV/AIDS hallmarks. PMID:23092122

  12. Role of Ligand Reorganization and Conformational Restraints on the Binding Free Energies of DAPY Non-Nucleoside Inhibitors to HIV Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Gallicchio, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    The results of computer simulations of the binding of etravirine (TMC125) and rilpivirine (TMC278) to HIV reverse transcriptase are reported. It is confirmed that consistent binding free energy estimates are obtained with or without the application of torsional restraints when the free energies of imposing the restraints are taken into account. The restraints have a smaller influence on the thermodynamics and apparent kinetics of binding of TMC125 compared to the more flexible TMC278 inhibitor. The concept of the reorganization free energy of binding is useful to understand and categorize these effects. Contrary to expectations, the use of conformational restraints did not consistently enhance convergence of binding free energy estimates due to suppression of binding/unbinding pathways and due to the influence of rotational degrees of freedom not directly controlled by the restraints. Physical insights concerning the thermodynamic driving forces for binding and the role of “jiggling” and “wiggling” motion of the ligands are discussed. Based on these insights we conclude that an ideal inhibitor, if chemically realizable, would possess the electrostatic charge distribution of TMC125, so as to form strong interactions with the receptor, and the larger and more flexible substituents of TMC278, so as to minimize reorganization free energy penalties and the effects of resistance mutations, suitably modified, as in TMC125, so as to disfavor the formation of non-binding competent extended conformations when free in solution. PMID:22708073

  13. Assembly, purification and crystallization of an active HIV-1 reverse transcriptase initiation complex

    PubMed Central

    Pata, Janice D.; King, Bradford R.; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2002-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) initiates DNA synthesis from the 3′ end of human tRNALys3. We have used cis-acting hammerhead ribozymes to produce homogeneous-length transcribed tRNALys3 and have developed conditions for purifying highly structured RNAs on a modified tube-gel apparatus. Titration experiments show that this RNA can assemble into an initiation complex that contains equimolar amounts of HIV-1 RT, transcribed tRNALys3, and chemically synthesized template RNA. We have purified this complex using gel-filtration chromatography and have found that it is homogeneous with respect to molecular weight, demonstrating that the initiation complex forms a single discrete species at micromolar concentrations. When this initiation complex is supplied with deoxynucleotides, essentially all of the tRNA is used as a primer by HIV-1 RT and is fully extended to the 5′ end of the template. Thus, in vitro transcribed tRNA can be used efficiently as a primer by HIV-1 RT. We have also obtained crystals of the HIV-1 initiation complex that require the precisely defined ends of this in vitro transcribed tRNALys3 to grow. PMID:12433988

  14. Cross-subtype detection of HIV-1 using reverse transcription and recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Lillis, Lorraine; Lehman, Dara A; Siverson, Joshua B; Weis, Julie; Cantera, Jason; Parker, Mathew; Piepenburg, Olaf; Overbaugh, Julie; Boyle, David S

    2016-04-01

    A low complexity diagnostic test that rapidly and reliably detects HIV infection in infants at the point of care could facilitate early treatment, improving outcomes. However, many infant HIV diagnostics can only be performed in laboratory settings. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is an isothermal amplification technology that can rapidly amplify proviral DNA from multiple subtypes of HIV-1 in under twenty minutes without complex equipment. In this study we added reverse transcription (RT) to RPA to allow detection of both HIV-1 RNA and DNA. We show that this RT-RPA HIV-1 assay has a limit of detection of 10-30 copies of an exact sequence matched DNA or RNA, respectively. In addition, at 100 copies of RNA or DNA, the assay detected 171 of 175 (97.7%) sequence variants that represent all the major subtypes and recombinant forms of HIV-1 Groups M and O. This data suggests that the application of RT-RPA for the combined detection of HIV-1 viral RNA and proviral DNA may prove a highly sensitive tool for rapid and accurate diagnosis of infant HIV. PMID:26821087

  15. Cross-subtype detection of HIV-1 using reverse transcription and recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Lillis, Lorraine; Lehman, Dara A; Siverson, Joshua B; Weis, Julie; Cantera, Jason; Parker, Mathew; Piepenburg, Olaf; Overbaugh, Julie; Boyle, David S

    2016-04-01

    A low complexity diagnostic test that rapidly and reliably detects HIV infection in infants at the point of care could facilitate early treatment, improving outcomes. However, many infant HIV diagnostics can only be performed in laboratory settings. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) is an isothermal amplification technology that can rapidly amplify proviral DNA from multiple subtypes of HIV-1 in under twenty minutes without complex equipment. In this study we added reverse transcription (RT) to RPA to allow detection of both HIV-1 RNA and DNA. We show that this RT-RPA HIV-1 assay has a limit of detection of 10-30 copies of an exact sequence matched DNA or RNA, respectively. In addition, at 100 copies of RNA or DNA, the assay detected 171 of 175 (97.7%) sequence variants that represent all the major subtypes and recombinant forms of HIV-1 Groups M and O. This data suggests that the application of RT-RPA for the combined detection of HIV-1 viral RNA and proviral DNA may prove a highly sensitive tool for rapid and accurate diagnosis of infant HIV.

  16. Potent and highly selective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) inhibition by a series of alpha-anilinophenylacetamide derivatives targeted at HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, R; Andries, K; Debyser, Z; Van Daele, P; Schols, D; Stoffels, P; De Vreese, K; Woestenborghs, R; Vandamme, A M; Janssen, C G

    1993-01-01

    In vitro evaluation of a large chemical library of pharmacologically acceptable prototype compounds in a high-capacity, cellular-based screening system has led to the discovery of another family of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) inhibitors. Through optimization of a lead compound, several alpha-anilinophenylacetamide (alpha-APA) derivatives have been identified that inhibit the replication of several HIV-1 strains (IIIB/LAI, RF, NDK, MN, HE) in a variety of host cell types at concentrations that are 10,000- to 100,000-fold lower than their cytotoxic concentrations. The IC50 of the alpha-APA derivative R 89439 for HIV-1 cytopathicity in MT-4 cells was 13 nM. The median 90% inhibitory concentration (IC90) in a variety of host cells was 50-100 nM. Although these alpha-APA derivatives are active against a tetrahydroimidazo [4,5,1-jk][1,4]benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thione-(TIBO)-resistant HIV-1 strain, they do not inhibit replication of HIV-2 (strains ROD and EHO) or simian immunodeficiency virus (strains Mac251, mndGB1, and agm3). An HIV-1 strain containing the Tyr181-->Cys mutation in the reverse transcriptase region displayed reduced sensitivity. alpha-APA derivative R 89439 inhibited virion and recombinant reverse transcriptase of HIV-1 but did not inhibit that of HIV-2. Reverse transcriptase inhibition depended upon the template/primer used. The relatively uncomplicated synthesis of R 89439, its potent anti-HIV-1 activity, and its favorable pharmacokinetic profile make R 89439 a good candidate for clinical studies. PMID:7680476

  17. Identification of mechanistically distinct inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase through fragment screening.

    PubMed

    La, Jennifer; Latham, Catherine F; Tinetti, Ricky N; Johnson, Adam; Tyssen, David; Huber, Kelly D; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas; Simpson, Jamie S; Headey, Stephen J; Chalmers, David K; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2015-06-01

    Fragment-based screening methods can be used to discover novel active site or allosteric inhibitors for therapeutic intervention. Using saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR and in vitro activity assays, we have identified fragment-sized inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with distinct chemical scaffolds and mechanisms compared to nonnucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) and nucleoside/nucleotide RT inhibitors (NRTIs). Three compounds were found to inhibit RNA- and DNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity of HIV-1 RT in the micromolar range while retaining potency against RT variants carrying one of three major NNRTI resistance mutations: K103N, Y181C, or G190A. These compounds also inhibit Moloney murine leukemia virus RT but not the Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I. Steady-state kinetic analyses demonstrate that one of these fragments is a competitive inhibitor of HIV-1 RT with respect to deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) substrate, whereas a second compound is a competitive inhibitor of RT polymerase activity with respect to the DNA template/primer (T/P), and consequently also inhibits RNase H activity. The dNTP competing RT inhibitor retains activity against the NRTI-resistant mutants K65R and M184V, demonstrating a drug resistance profile distinct from the nucleotide competing RT inhibitors indolopyridone-1 (INDOPY-1) and 4-dimethylamino-6-vinylpyrimidine-1 (DAVP-1). In antiviral assays, the T/P competing compound inhibits HIV-1 replication at a step consistent with an RT inhibitor. Screening of additional structurally related compounds to the three fragments led to the discovery of molecules with improved potency against HIV-1 RT. These fragment inhibitors represent previously unidentified scaffolds for development of novel drugs for HIV-1 prevention or treatment. PMID:26038551

  18. Identification of mechanistically distinct inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase through fragment screening

    PubMed Central

    La, Jennifer; Latham, Catherine F.; Tinetti, Ricky N.; Johnson, Adam; Tyssen, David; Huber, Kelly D.; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas; Simpson, Jamie S.; Headey, Stephen J.; Chalmers, David K.; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based screening methods can be used to discover novel active site or allosteric inhibitors for therapeutic intervention. Using saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR and in vitro activity assays, we have identified fragment-sized inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with distinct chemical scaffolds and mechanisms compared to nonnucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) and nucleoside/nucleotide RT inhibitors (NRTIs). Three compounds were found to inhibit RNA- and DNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity of HIV-1 RT in the micromolar range while retaining potency against RT variants carrying one of three major NNRTI resistance mutations: K103N, Y181C, or G190A. These compounds also inhibit Moloney murine leukemia virus RT but not the Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I. Steady-state kinetic analyses demonstrate that one of these fragments is a competitive inhibitor of HIV-1 RT with respect to deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) substrate, whereas a second compound is a competitive inhibitor of RT polymerase activity with respect to the DNA template/primer (T/P), and consequently also inhibits RNase H activity. The dNTP competing RT inhibitor retains activity against the NRTI-resistant mutants K65R and M184V, demonstrating a drug resistance profile distinct from the nucleotide competing RT inhibitors indolopyridone-1 (INDOPY-1) and 4-dimethylamino-6-vinylpyrimidine-1 (DAVP-1). In antiviral assays, the T/P competing compound inhibits HIV-1 replication at a step consistent with an RT inhibitor. Screening of additional structurally related compounds to the three fragments led to the discovery of molecules with improved potency against HIV-1 RT. These fragment inhibitors represent previously unidentified scaffolds for development of novel drugs for HIV-1 prevention or treatment. PMID:26038551

  19. Observations on the inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by catechins.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, P S; Pizza, C

    1992-01-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of the inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by various catechins have been examined. As previously reported, (-)epicatechin 3-gallate inhibits the viral polymerase. However, it is noted here that this inhibition is not observed in the presence of either serum albumin or Triton X-100. Other catechins behave similarly to (-)epicatechin 3-gallate in that they inhibit polymerase activity only in the absence of these reagents. Additionally, other DNA polymerases are inhibited to a similar degree by (-)epicatechin 3-gallate. Taken cumulatively, these results suggest that these catechins, and in particular (-)epicatechin 3-gallate, bind with no apparent selectivity and that the observed inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase is non-specific in nature. PMID:1281981

  20. Fragment Based Strategies for Discovery of Novel HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Latham, Catherine F; La, Jennifer; Tinetti, Ricky N; Chalmers, David K; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains a global health problem. While combined antiretroviral therapy has been successful in controlling the virus in patients, HIV can develop resistance to drugs used for treatment, rendering available drugs less effective and limiting treatment options. Initiatives to find novel drugs for HIV treatment are ongoing, although traditional drug design approaches often focus on known binding sites for inhibition of established drug targets like reverse transcriptase and integrase. These approaches tend towards generating more inhibitors in the same drug classes already used in the clinic. Lack of diversity in antiretroviral drug classes can result in limited treatment options, as cross-resistance can emerge to a whole drug class in patients treated with only one drug from that class. A fresh approach in the search for new HIV-1 drugs is fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD), a validated strategy for drug discovery based on using smaller libraries of low molecular weight molecules (<300 Da) screened using primarily biophysical assays. FBDD is aimed at not only finding novel drug scaffolds, but also probing the target protein to find new, often allosteric, inhibitory binding sites. Several fragment-based strategies have been successful in identifying novel inhibitory sites or scaffolds for two proven drug targets for HIV-1, reverse transcriptase and integrase. While any FBDD-generated HIV-1 drugs have yet to enter the clinic, recent FBDD initiatives against these two well-characterised HIV-1 targets have reinvigorated antiretroviral drug discovery and the search for novel classes of HIV-1 drugs. PMID:26324045

  1. Eukaryotic elongation factor 1 complex subunits are critical HIV-1 reverse transcription cofactors.

    PubMed

    Warren, Kylie; Wei, Ting; Li, Dongsheng; Qin, Fangyun; Warrilow, David; Lin, Min-Hsuan; Sivakumaran, Haran; Apolloni, Ann; Abbott, Catherine M; Jones, Alun; Anderson, Jenny L; Harrich, David

    2012-06-12

    Cellular proteins have been implicated as important for HIV-1 reverse transcription, but whether any are reverse transcription complex (RTC) cofactors or affect reverse transcription indirectly is unclear. Here we used protein fractionation combined with an endogenous reverse transcription assay to identify cellular proteins that stimulated late steps of reverse transcription in vitro. We identified 25 cellular proteins in an active protein fraction, and here we show that the eEF1A and eEF1G subunits of eukaryotic elongation factor 1 (eEF1) are important components of the HIV-1 RTC. eEF1A and eEF1G were identified in fractionated human T-cell lysates as reverse transcription cofactors, as their removal ablated the ability of active protein fractions to stimulate late reverse transcription in vitro. We observed that the p51 subunit of reverse transcriptase and integrase, two subunits of the RTC, coimmunoprecipitated with eEF1A and eEF1G. Moreover eEF1A and eEF1G associated with purified RTCs and colocalized with reverse transcriptase following infection of cells. Reverse transcription in cells was sharply down-regulated when eEF1A or eEF1G levels were reduced by siRNA treatment as a result of reduced levels of RTCs in treated cells. The combined evidence indicates that these eEF1 subunits are critical RTC stability cofactors required for efficient completion of reverse transcription. The identification of eEF1 subunits as unique RTC components provides a basis for further investigations of reverse transcription and trafficking of the RTC to the nucleus.

  2. Differentiation between human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 isolates by nonradioisotopic reverse transcriptase-typing assay.

    PubMed Central

    Urabe, T; Sano, K; Nakano, T; Odawara, F; Lee, M H; Otake, T; Okubo, S; Hayami, M; Misaki, H; Baba, M

    1994-01-01

    We tested whether human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) could be differentiated from HIV-2 by a reverse transcriptase (RT)-typing assay that measured the reduction of enzyme activity owing to specific antibody. RT-inhibiting antibody was examined for HIV type specificity by a new nonradioisotopic RT assay. Antibodies from four rabbits immunized with recombinant HIV-1 RT and from 23 HIV-1-seropositive individuals all specifically inhibited the enzyme activities of two HIV-1 strains (LAV-1 and GH-3), three zidovudine-resistant HIV-1 mutants, and a recombinant HIV-1 RT. However, none of these antisera affected the activities of six HIV-2 strains (GH-1, GH-2, GH-4, GH-5, GH-6, LAV-2ROD), Rous-associated virus type 2, and DNA polymerase I from Escherichia coli. In contrast, HIV-2 antibody from a rabbit immunized with disrupted GH-1 virions blocked the enzyme activities of the six HIV-2 strains but not those of the three HIV-1 strains, Rous-associated virus type 2, or DNA polymerase I. These results indicate that the antigenic domains of HIV-1 and HIV-2 RTs recognized by their inhibiting antibodies are distinct from each other and are highly conserved. Clinical HIV isolates from 18 HIV-1-seropositive individuals and 3 HIV-2-seropositive Ghanaian individuals were identified as HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively, by the nonradioisotopic RT-typing assay. Images PMID:7527425

  3. Potent and selective inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by 5-ethyl-6-phenylthiouracil derivatives through their interaction with the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Baba, M; De Clercq, E; Tanaka, H; Ubasawa, M; Takashima, H; Sekiya, K; Nitta, I; Umezu, K; Nakashima, H; Mori, S

    1991-01-01

    In the search for 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)-methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine (HEPT) derivatives, we have found several 5-ethyl-6-(phenylthio)uracil analogues to be highly potent and selective inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1. 1-Benzyloxymethyl-5-ethyl-6-phenylthiouracil, the most potent congener of the series, inhibits HIV-1 replication in a variety of cell systems, including peripheral blood lymphocytes, at a concentration of 1.5-7.0 nM, which is lower by a factor of 10(3) than the 50% antivirally effective concentration of the parent compound HEPT. The 5-ethyl-6-(phenylthio)uracil analogues, like HEPT itself, do not inhibit HIV-2 replication but do inhibit replication of 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine-resistant mutants of HIV-1. 1-Benzyloxy-methyl-5-ethyl-6-phenylthiouracil and its congeners are targeted at the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). They do not inhibit HIV-2 RT. They do not need to be metabolized to exert their inhibitory effect on HIV-1 RT. Yet this inhibitory effect is competitive with the natural substrate dTTP. The HEPT derivatives represent a group of RT inhibitors with a unique mode of interaction with HIV-1 RT. PMID:1706522

  4. Bifunctional Inhibition of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase: A First Step in Designing a Bifunctional Triphosphate‡

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Dongyuan; Basavapathruni, Aravind; Iyidogan, Pinar; Dai, Guangxiu; Hinz, Wolfgang; Ray, Adrian S.; Murakami, Eisuke; Feng, Joy Y.; You, Fei; Dutschman, Ginger E.; Austin, David J.; Parker, Kathlyn A.; Anderson, Karen S.

    2013-01-01

    The onset of resistance to approved anti-AIDS drugs by HIV necessitates the search for novel inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Developing single molecular agents concurrently occupying the nucleoside and nonnucleoside binding sites in RT is an intriguing idea but the proof-of-concept has so far been elusive. As a first step, we describe molecular modeling to guide focused chemical syntheses of conjugates having nucleoside (d4T) and nonnucleoside (TIBO) moieties tethered by a flexible polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker. A triphosphate of d4T-6PEG-TIBO conjugate was successfully synthesized that is recognized as a substrate by HIV-1 RT and incorporated into a double-stranded DNA. PMID:23380374

  5. Crystal engineering of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase for structure-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Joseph D; Das, Kalyan; Ho, William C; Baweja, Mukta; Himmel, Daniel M; Clark, Arthur D; Oren, Deena A; Boyer, Paul L; Hughes, Stephen H; Shatkin, Aaron J; Arnold, Eddy

    2008-09-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a primary target for anti-AIDS drugs. Structures of HIV-1 RT, usually determined at approximately 2.5-3.0 A resolution, are important for understanding enzyme function and mechanisms of drug resistance in addition to being helpful in the design of RT inhibitors. Despite hundreds of attempts, it was not possible to obtain the structure of a complex of HIV-1 RT with TMC278, a nonnucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) in advanced clinical trials. A systematic and iterative protein crystal engineering approach was developed to optimize RT for obtaining crystals in complexes with TMC278 and other NNRTIs that diffract X-rays to 1.8 A resolution. Another form of engineered RT was optimized to produce a high-resolution apo-RT crystal form, reported here at 1.85 A resolution, with a distinct RT conformation. Engineered RTs were mutagenized using a new, flexible and cost effective method called methylated overlap-extension ligation independent cloning. Our analysis suggests that reducing the solvent content, increasing lattice contacts, and stabilizing the internal low-energy conformations of RT are critical for the growth of crystals that diffract to high resolution. The new RTs enable rapid crystallization and yield high-resolution structures that are useful in designing/developing new anti-AIDS drugs.

  6. Crystal Engineering of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase for structure-Based Drug Design

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman,J.; Das, K.; Ho, W.; Baweja, M.; Himmel, D.; Clark, A.; Oren, D.; Shatkin, A.; Arnold, E.

    2008-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a primary target for anti-AIDS drugs. Structures of HIV-1 RT, usually determined at {approx}2.5-3.0 Angstroms resolution, are important for understanding enzyme function and mechanisms of drug resistance in addition to being helpful in the design of RT inhibitors. Despite hundreds of attempts, it was not possible to obtain the structure of a complex of HIV-1 RT with TMC278, a nonnucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) in advanced clinical trials. A systematic and iterative protein crystal engineering approach was developed to optimize RT for obtaining crystals in complexes with TMC278 and other NNRTIs that diffract X-rays to 1.8 Angstroms resolution. Another form of engineered RT was optimized to produce a high-resolution apo-RT crystal form, reported here at 1.85 Angstroms resolution, with a distinct RT conformation. Engineered RTs were mutagenized using a new, flexible and cost effective method called methylated overlap-extension ligation independent cloning. Our analysis suggests that reducing the solvent content, increasing lattice contacts, and stabilizing the internal low-energy conformations of RT are critical for the growth of crystals that diffract to high resolution. The new RTs enable rapid crystallization and yield high-resolution structures that are useful in designing/developing new anti-AIDS drugs.

  7. FRET-based assay to screen inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kamal K.; Przybilla, Frédéric; Restle, Tobias; Godet, Julien; Mély, Yves

    2016-01-01

    During HIV-1 reverse transcription, the single-stranded RNA genome is converted into proviral double stranded DNA by Reverse Transcriptase (RT) within a reverse transcription complex composed of the genomic RNA and a number of HIV-1 encoded proteins, including the nucleocapsid protein NCp7. Here, we developed a one-step and one-pot RT polymerization assay. In this in vitro assay, RT polymerization is monitored in real-time by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) using a commercially available doubly-labeled primer/template DNA. The assay can monitor and quantify RT polymerization activity as well as its promotion by NCp7. Z-factor values as high as 0.89 were obtained, indicating that the assay is suitable for high-throughput drug screening. Using Nevirapine and AZT as prototypical RT inhibitors, reliable IC50 values were obtained from the changes in the RT polymerization kinetics. Interestingly, the assay can also detect NCp7 inhibitors, making it suitable for high-throughput screening of drugs targeting RT, NCp7 or simultaneously, both proteins. PMID:26762982

  8. Identifying and Characterizing a Functional HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase-binding Site on Integrase*

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Thomas A.; Januszyk, Kurt; Phillips, Martin L.; Tekeste, Shewit S.; Zhang, Min; Miller, Jennifer T.; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.; Clubb, Robert T.; Chow, Samson A.

    2009-01-01

    Integrase (IN) from human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) exerts pleiotropic effects in the viral replication cycle. Besides integration, IN mutations can impact nuclear import, viral maturation, and reverse transcription. IN and reverse transcriptase (RT) interact in vitro, and the IN C-terminal domain (CTD) is both necessary and sufficient for binding RT. We used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to identify a putative RT-binding surface on the IN CTD, and surface plasmon resonance to obtain kinetic parameters and the binding affinity for the IN-RT interaction. An IN K258A substitution that disrupts reverse transcription in infected cells is located at the putative RT-binding surface, and we found that this substitution substantially weakens IN CTD-RT interactions. We also identified two additional IN amino acid substitutions located at the putative RT-binding surface (W243E and V250E) that significantly impair viral replication in tissue culture. These results strengthen the notion that IN-RT interactions are biologically relevant during HIV-1 replication and also provide insights into this interaction at the molecular level. PMID:19150986

  9. Long-term effectiveness of initiating non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor- versus ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy: implications for first-line therapy choice in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Viviane D; Hull, Mark; McVea, David; Chau, William; Harrigan, P Richard; Montaner, Julio SG

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In many resource-limited settings, combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) failure is diagnosed clinically or immunologically. As such, there is a high likelihood that patients may stay on a virologically failing regimen for a substantial period of time. Here, we compared the long-term impact of initiating non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)- versus boosted protease inhibitor (bPI)-based cART in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Methods We followed prospectively 3925 ART-naïve patients who started NNRTIs (N=1963, 50%) or bPIs (N=1962; 50%) from 1 January 2000 until 30 June 2013 in BC. At six months, we assessed whether patients virologically failed therapy (a plasma viral load (pVL) >50 copies/mL), and we stratified them based on the pVL at the time of failure ≤500 versus >500 copies/mL. We then followed these patients for another six months and calculated their probability of achieving subsequent viral suppression (pVL <50 copies/mL twice consecutively) and of developing drug resistance. These probabilities were adjusted for fixed and time-varying factors, including cART adherence. Results At six months, virologic failure rates were 9.5 and 14.3 cases per 100 person-months for NNRTI and bPI initiators, respectively. NNRTI initiators who failed with a pVL ≤500 copies/mL had a 16% higher probability of achieving subsequent suppression at 12 months than bPI initiators (0.81 (25th–75th percentile 0.75–0.83) vs. 0.72 (0.61–0.75)). However, if failing NNRTI initiators had a pVL >500 copies/mL, they had a 20% lower probability of suppressing at 12 months than pVL-matched bPI initiators (0.37 (0.29–0.45) vs. 0.46 (0.38–0.54)). In terms of evolving HIV drug resistance, those who failed on NNRTI performed worse than bPI in all scenarios, especially if they failed with a viral load >500 copies/mL. Conclusions Our results show that patients who virologically failed at six months on NNRTI and continued on the same regimen had a

  10. Energetics of mutation-induced changes in potency of lersivirine against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Kar, Parimal; Knecht, Volker

    2012-06-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are key components of highly active antiretroviral therapy for the treatment of HIV-1. A common problem with the first generation NNRTIs is the emergence of mutations in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), in particular, K103N and Y181C, which lead to resistance to the entire class of inhibitor. Here we have evaluated the relative affinity of the newly designed NNRTI lersivirine (LRV) against drug-resistant mutations in HIV-1 RT using the molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) method. Eight single and one double mutant variants of RT are considered. Our results are in good agreement with experimental results and yield insights into the mechanisms underlying mutation-induced changes in the potency of LRV against RT. The strongest (54-fold) increase in the dissociation constant is found for the mutant F227C, originating from reduced electrostatic and van der Waals interactions between LRV and RT as well as a higher energetic penalty from the desolvation of polar groups. For the mutants K103N and Y181C only a moderate (2-fold) increase in the dissociation constant is found, due to a balance of opposite changes in the polar solvation as well as the electrostatic and van der Waals interactions between LRV and RT. The dissociation constant is decreased for the Y188C and G190A (2-fold), the M184V (5-fold), and the Y188C/Y188C mutant (10-fold), due to stronger electrostatic interactions between LRV and RT. Our results thus suggest that LRV is a highly potent and selective NNRTI, with excellent efficacy against NNRTI-resistant viruses, which is in agreement with experimental observations.

  11. Homodimerization of the p51 Subunit of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, X.; Mueller, G; Cuneo, M; DeRose, E; London, R

    2010-01-01

    The dimerization of HIV reverse transcriptase (RT), required to obtain the active form of the enzyme, is influenced by mutations, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), nucleotide substrates, Mg ions, temperature, and specifically designed dimerization inhibitors. In this study, we have utilized nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of the [methyl-{sup 13}C]methionine-labeled enzyme and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate how several of these factors influence the dimerization behavior of the p51 subunit. The {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C HSQC spectrum of p51 obtained at micromolar concentrations indicates that a significant fraction of the p51 adopts a 'p66-like' conformation. SAXS data obtained for p51 samples were used to determine the fractions of monomer and dimer in the sample and to evaluate the conformation of the fingers/thumb subdomain. All of the p51 monomer observed was found to adopt the compact, 'p51C' conformation observed for the p51 subunit in the RT heterodimer. The NMR and SAXS data indicate that the p51 homodimer adopts a structure that is similar to the p66/p51 heterodimer, with one p51C subunit and a second p51 subunit in an extended, 'p51E' conformation that resembles the p66 subunit of the heterodimer. The fractional dimer concentration and the fingers/thumb orientation are found to depend strongly on the experimental conditions and exhibit a qualitative dependence on nevirapine and ionic strength (KCl) that is similar to the behavior reported for the heterodimer and the p66 homodimer. The L289K mutation interferes with p51 homodimer formation as it does with formation of the heterodimer, despite its location far from the dimer interface. This effect is readily interpreted in terms of a conformational selection model, in which p51{sub L289K} has a much greater preference for the compact, p51C conformation. A reduced level of dimer formation then results from the reduced ratio of the p51E{sub L289K} to p51C

  12. Structure of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors derivatives of N-benzyl-benzimidazole with different substituents in position 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2010-01-01

    The constant development of new drugs against HIV-1 is necessary due to global expansion of AIDS and HIV-1 drug resistance. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of HIV-1 (NNRTIs) are potentially effective and nontoxic drugs in AIDS therapy. The crystal structures of six nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) derivatives of N-benzyl-benzimidazole are reported here. The investigated compounds belong to the group of so called "butterfly like" inhibitors with characteristic two π-electron moieties with an angled orientation. The structural data show the influence of the substituents of the benzimidazole ring on the geometry of the molecule and correlation between the structure of the inhibitor and its biological activity.

  13. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki

    2015-10-23

    The structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å in space group P321. Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2–β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol.

  14. Ultrasensitive in-house reverse transcription-competitive PCR for quantitation of HIV-1 RNA in plasma.

    PubMed

    Venturi, G; Ferruzzi, R; Romano, L; Catucci, M; Valensin, P E; Zazzi, M

    2000-06-01

    An ultrasensitive version of an 'in-house' reverse transcription-competitive polymerase chain reaction assay described previously for quantitation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA in plasma was developed. The increase in sensitivity from 400 to 50 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml was achieved by pelleting virus particles from 1.8 ml plasma by centrifugation prior to RNA extraction, modifying competitor DNA structure and amounts, and redesigning primers. Quantitation of HIV-1 RNA in 130 samples tested previously by the standard assay showed that the two procedures yield comparable results (mean absolute difference, 0.26+/-0.20 log) and that the ultrasensitive version detects HIV-1 RNA below the threshold of sensitivity of the standard method. The ultrasensitive 'in-house assay' and the reference QUANTIPLEX HIV-1 RNA 3.0 had the same sensitivity and gave equivalent results (mean absolute difference, 0.19+/-0.11 log), as shown by parallel blinded testing of 47 plasma samples. Titration experiments with reconstructed plasma samples allowed the determination of a dynamic range of 50-500000 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml for the 'in-house' system. The interassay coefficient of variation for samples nominally containing 200, 4000 and 80000 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml were 33.4, 22.9 and 38.2%, respectively. The performance, turnaround time, and cost-effectiveness of this system make it suitable for medium-scale clinical application.

  15. Crystal structure of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in complex with a polypurine tract RNA:DNA.

    PubMed

    Sarafianos, S G; Das, K; Tantillo, C; Clark, A D; Ding, J; Whitcomb, J M; Boyer, P L; Hughes, S H; Arnold, E

    2001-03-15

    We have determined the 3.0 A resolution structure of wild-type HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in complex with an RNA:DNA oligonucleotide whose sequence includes a purine-rich segment from the HIV-1 genome called the polypurine tract (PPT). The PPT is resistant to ribonuclease H (RNase H) cleavage and is used as a primer for second DNA strand synthesis. The 'RNase H primer grip', consisting of amino acids that interact with the DNA primer strand, may contribute to RNase H catalysis and cleavage specificity. Cleavage specificity is also controlled by the width of the minor groove and the trajectory of the RNA:DNA, both of which are sequence dependent. An unusual 'unzipping' of 7 bp occurs in the adenine stretch of the PPT: an unpaired base on the template strand takes the base pairing out of register and then, following two offset base pairs, an unpaired base on the primer strand re-establishes the normal register. The structural aberration extends to the RNase H active site and may play a role in the resistance of PPT to RNase H cleavage.

  16. Structural investigation of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: 2-Aryl-substituted benzimidazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2009-11-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is one of the most destructive epidemics in history. Inhibitors of HIV enzymes are the main targets to develop drugs against that disease. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of HIV-1 (NNRTIs) are potentially effective and nontoxic. Structural studies provide information necessary to design more active compounds. The crystal structures of four NNRTI derivatives of 2-aryl-substituted N-benzyl-benzimidazole are presented here. Analysis of the geometrical parameters shows that the structures of the investigated inhibitors are rigid. The important geometrical parameter is the dihedral angle between the planes of the π-electron systems of the benzymidazole and benzyl moieties. The values of these dihedral angles are in a narrow range for all investigated inhibitors. There is no significant difference between the structure of the free inhibitor and the inhibitor in the complex with RT HIV-1. X-ray structures of the investigated inhibitors are a good basis for modeling enzyme-inhibitor interactions in rational drug design.

  17. Snapshot of the equilibrium dynamics of a drug bound to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Daniel G.; Bauman, Joseph D.; Challa, J. Reddy; Patel, Disha; Troxler, Thomas; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2013-03-01

    The anti-AIDS drug rilpivirine undergoes conformational changes to bind HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), which is an essential enzyme for the replication of HIV. These changes allow it to retain potency against mutations that otherwise would render the enzyme resistant. Here we report that water molecules play an essential role in this binding process. Femtosecond experiments and theory expose the molecular level dynamics of rilpivirine bound to HIV-1 RT. Two nitrile substituents, one on each arm of the drug, are used as vibrational probes of the structural dynamics within the binding pocket. Two-dimensional vibrational echo spectroscopy reveals that one nitrile group is unexpectedly hydrogen-bonded to a mobile water molecule, not identified in previous X-ray structures. Ultrafast nitrile-water dynamics are confirmed by simulations. A higher (1.51 Å) resolution X-ray structure also reveals a water-drug interaction network. Maintenance of a crucial anchoring hydrogen bond may help retain the potency of rilpivirine against pocket mutations despite the structural variations they cause.

  18. Crystal structure of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in complex with a polypurine tract RNA:DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Das, Kalyan; Tantillo, Chris; Clark, Arthur D.; Ding, Jianping; Whitcomb, Jeannette M.; Boyer, Paul L.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Arnold, Edward

    2001-01-01

    We have determined the 3.0 Å resolution structure of wild-type HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in complex with an RNA:DNA oligonucleotide whose sequence includes a purine-rich segment from the HIV-1 genome called the polypurine tract (PPT). The PPT is resistant to ribonuclease H (RNase H) cleavage and is used as a primer for second DNA strand synthesis. The ‘RNase H primer grip’, consisting of amino acids that interact with the DNA primer strand, may contribute to RNase H catalysis and cleavage specificity. Cleavage specificity is also controlled by the width of the minor groove and the trajectory of the RNA:DNA, both of which are sequence dependent. An unusual ‘unzipping’ of 7 bp occurs in the adenine stretch of the PPT: an unpaired base on the template strand takes the base pairing out of register and then, following two offset base pairs, an unpaired base on the primer strand re-establishes the normal register. The structural aberration extends to the RNase H active site and may play a role in the resistance of PPT to RNase H cleavage. PMID:11250910

  19. A novel dipyridodiazepinone inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase acts through a nonsubstrate binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.C.; Warren, T.C.; Adams, J.; Proudfoot, J.; Skiles, J.; Raghavan, P.; Perry, C.; Potocki, I.; Farina, P.R.; Grob, P.M. )

    1991-02-26

    A novel dipyridodiazepinone, 6,11-dihydro-11-cyclopropyl-4-methyldipyrido(2,3-b:2{prime},3{prime}-e)-(1,4)diazepin-6-one (BI-RG-587), is a selective noncompetitive inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT-1). An azido photoaffinity analogue of BI-RG-587 was synthesized and found to irreversibly inhibit the enzyme upon UV irradiation. BI-RG-587 and close structural analogues competitively protected RT-1 from inactivation by the photoaffinity label. A thiobenzimidazolone (TIBO) derivative, a nonnucleoside inhibitor of RT-1, also protected the enzyme from photoinactivation, which suggests a common binding site for these compounds. Substrates dGTP, template-primer, and tRNA afforded no protection from enzyme inactivation. A tritiated photoaffinity probe was found to stoichiometrically and selectively label p66 such that 1 mol of probe inactivates 1 mol of RT-1.

  20. Reversibility of the Pathological Changes in the Follicular Dendritic Cell Network with Treatment of HIV-1 Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Schuler, Troy; Cavert, Winston; Notermans, Daan W.; Gebhard, Kristin; Henry, Keith; Havlir, Diane V.; Gunthard, Huldrych F.; Wong, Joseph K.; Little, Susan; Feinberg, Mark B.; Polis, Michael A.; Schrager, Lewis K.; Schacker, Timothy W.; Richman, Douglas D.; Corey, Lawrence; Danner, Sven A.; Haase, Ashley T.

    1999-04-01

    Over the course of HIV-1 infection, the lymphoid follicles where the humoral immune response is generated initially increase in size and number and then progressively involute. In advanced disease, the network of the processes of follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) that serve as antigen respositories and anatomical substrate for B and T cells and antigen to interact is destroyed, contributing to the breakdown of the immune system. Because destruction of FDCs is associated with deposition of HIV-1, and much of the virus can be cleared from the network with antiretroviral therapy, we investigated the reversibility of damage. We measured the immunohistochemically stainable FDC compartment by quantitative image analysis, and we documented changes in this compartment at different stages of disease. We show that treatment, initiated even at advanced stages of HIV-1 disease, can slowly reverse pathological changes in the FDC network.

  1. Molecular dynamics study of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor 4-[[4-[[4-[(E)-2-cyanoethenyl]-2,6-dimethylphenyl]amino]-2-pyrimidinyl]amino]benzonitrile (TMC278/rilpivirine) aggregates: correlation between amphiphilic properties of the drug and oral bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, Yulia Volovik; Gallicchio, Emilio; Das, Kalyan; Levy, Ronald M.; Arnold, Eddy

    2009-01-01

    The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) TMC278/rilpivirine is an anti-AIDS therapeutic agent with high oral bioavailability despite its high hydrophobicity. Previous studies established a correlation between ability of the drug molecule to form stable, homogeneous populations of spherical nanoparticles (~100–120 nm in diameter) at low pH in surfactant-independent fashion, and good oral bioavailability. Here, we hypothesize that the drug is able to assume surfactant-like properties under physiologically relevant conditions, thus facilitating formation of nanostructuresin the absence of other surfactants. The results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations indeed show that protonated drug molecules behave as surfactants at the water/aggregate interface while neutral drug molecules assist aggregate packing via conformational variability. Our simulation results suggest that amphiphilic behavior at low pH and intrinsic flexibility influence drug aggregation and are believed to play critical roles in the favorable oral bioavailability of hydrophobic drugs. PMID:19739675

  2. A simple and cost-saving phenotypic drug susceptibility testing of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Weng, Yunceng; Zhang, Ling; Huang, Jianfeng; Zhao, Jin; Luo, Peifang; Bi, Siyuan; Yang, Zhengrong; Zhu, Hai; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Li, Chengyao

    2016-01-01

    It is essential to monitor the occurrence of drug-resistant strains and to provide guidance for clinically adapted antiviral treatment of HIV/AIDS. In this study, an individual patient's HIV-1 pol gene encoding the full length of protease and part of the reverse transcriptase was packaged into a modified lentivirus carrying dual-reporters ZsGreen and luciferase. The optimal coefficient of correlation between drug concentration and luciferase activity was optimized. A clear-cut dose-dependent relationship between lentivirus production and luciferase activity was found in the phenotypic testing system. Fold changes (FC) to a wild-type control HIV-1 strain ratios were determined reflecting the phenotypic susceptibility of treatment-exposed patient's HIV-1 strains to 12 HIV-1 inhibitors including 6 nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), 4 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) and 2 protease inhibitors (PIs). Phenotypic susceptibility calls from 8 HIV-1 infected patients were consistent with 80-90% genotypic evaluations, while phenotypic assessments rectified 10-20% genotypic resistance calls. By a half of replacement with ZsGreen reporter, the consumption of high cost Bright-Glo Luciferase Assay is reduced, making this assay cheaper when a large number of HIV-1 infected individuals are tested. The study provides a useful tool for interpreting meaningful genotypic mutations and guiding tailored antiviral treatment of HIV/AIDS in clinical practice. PMID:27640883

  3. A simple and cost-saving phenotypic drug susceptibility testing of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Yunceng; Zhang, Ling; Huang, Jianfeng; Zhao, Jin; Luo, Peifang; Bi, Siyuan; Yang, Zhengrong; Zhu, Hai; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Li, Chengyao

    2016-01-01

    It is essential to monitor the occurrence of drug-resistant strains and to provide guidance for clinically adapted antiviral treatment of HIV/AIDS. In this study, an individual patient’s HIV-1 pol gene encoding the full length of protease and part of the reverse transcriptase was packaged into a modified lentivirus carrying dual-reporters ZsGreen and luciferase. The optimal coefficient of correlation between drug concentration and luciferase activity was optimized. A clear-cut dose-dependent relationship between lentivirus production and luciferase activity was found in the phenotypic testing system. Fold changes (FC) to a wild-type control HIV-1 strain ratios were determined reflecting the phenotypic susceptibility of treatment-exposed patient’s HIV-1 strains to 12 HIV-1 inhibitors including 6 nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), 4 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) and 2 protease inhibitors (PIs). Phenotypic susceptibility calls from 8 HIV-1 infected patients were consistent with 80–90% genotypic evaluations, while phenotypic assessments rectified 10–20% genotypic resistance calls. By a half of replacement with ZsGreen reporter, the consumption of high cost Bright-Glo Luciferase Assay is reduced, making this assay cheaper when a large number of HIV-1 infected individuals are tested. The study provides a useful tool for interpreting meaningful genotypic mutations and guiding tailored antiviral treatment of HIV/AIDS in clinical practice. PMID:27640883

  4. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2-β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol. PMID:26527265

  5. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2–β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol. PMID:26527265

  6. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2-β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol.

  7. Coevolutionary Analysis Identifies Protein–Protein Interaction Sites between HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Arachchilage, Madara Hetti; Piontkivska, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The replication of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) requires reverse transcription of the viral RNA genome and integration of newly synthesized pro-viral DNA into the host genome. This is mediated by the viral proteins reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase (IN). The formation and stabilization of the pre-integration complex (PIC), which is an essential step for reverse transcription, nuclear import, chromatin targeting, and subsequent integration, involves direct and indirect modes of interaction between RT and IN proteins. While epitope-based treatments targeting IN–viral DNA and IN–RT complexes appear to be a promising combination for an anti-HIV treatment, the mechanisms of IN-RT interactions within the PIC are not well understood due to the transient nature of the protein complex and the intrinsic flexibility of its components. Here, we identify potentially interacting regions between the IN and RT proteins within the PIC through the coevolutionary analysis of amino acid sequences of the two proteins. Our results show that specific regions in the two proteins have strong coevolutionary signatures, suggesting that these regions either experience direct and prolonged interactions between them that require high affinity and/or specificity or that the regions are involved in interactions mediated by dynamic conformational changes and, hence, may involve both direct and indirect interactions. Other regions were found to exhibit weak, but positive correlations, implying interactions that are likely transient and/or have low affinity. We identified a series of specific regions of potential interactions between the IN and RT proteins (e.g., specific peptide regions within the C-terminal domain of IN were identified as potentially interacting with the Connection domain of RT). Coevolutionary analysis can serve as an important step in predicting potential interactions, thus informing experimental studies. These studies can be integrated with structural data

  8. Abasic Phosphorothioate Oligomers Inhibit HIV-1 Reverse Transcription and Block Virus Transmission across Polarized Ectocervical Organ Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Fraietta, Joseph A.; Mueller, Yvonne M.; Lozenski, Karissa L.; Ratner, Deena; Boesteanu, Alina C.; Hancock, Aidan S.; Lackman-Smith, Carol; Zentner, Isaac J.; Chaiken, Irwin M.; Chung, Suhman; LeGrice, Stuart F. J.; Snyder, Beth A.; Mankowski, Marie K.; Jones, Natalie M.; Hope, Jennifer L.; Gupta, Phalguni; Anderson, Sharon H.; Wigdahl, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of universally available antiretroviral (ARV) drugs or a vaccine against HIV-1, microbicides may offer the most immediate hope for controlling the AIDS pandemic. The most advanced and clinically effective microbicides are based on ARV agents that interfere with the earliest stages of HIV-1 replication. Our objective was to identify and characterize novel ARV-like inhibitors, as well as demonstrate their efficacy at blocking HIV-1 transmission. Abasic phosphorothioate 2′ deoxyribose backbone (PDB) oligomers were evaluated in a variety of mechanistic assays and for their ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection and virus transmission through primary human cervical mucosa. Cellular and biochemical assays were used to elucidate the antiviral mechanisms of action of PDB oligomers against both lab-adapted and primary CCR5- and CXCR4-utilizing HIV-1 strains, including a multidrug-resistant isolate. A polarized cervical organ culture was used to test the ability of PDB compounds to block HIV-1 transmission to primary immune cell populations across ectocervical tissue. The antiviral activity and mechanisms of action of PDB-based compounds were dependent on oligomer size, with smaller molecules preventing reverse transcription and larger oligomers blocking viral entry. Importantly, irrespective of molecular size, PDBs potently inhibited virus infection and transmission within genital tissue samples. Furthermore, the PDB inhibitors exhibited excellent toxicity and stability profiles and were found to be safe for vaginal application in vivo. These results, coupled with the previously reported intrinsic anti-inflammatory properties of PDBs, support further investigations in the development of PDB-based topical microbicides for preventing the global spread of HIV-1. PMID:25224013

  9. Rapid and Simultaneous Detection of Major Drug Resistance Mutations in Reverse Transcriptase Gene for HIV-1 CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and Subtype B in China Using Sequenom MassARRAY® System

    PubMed Central

    He, Liufen; Cai, Kanru; Jiang, Qiang; Zhou, Boping; To, Sabrina Wai-Chi; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Liu, Li; Chen, Zhiwei; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The development of a rapid, high-throughput and cost-effective HIV-1 drug resistance (HIV-DR) testing system is a challenge for areas consisting different HIV-1 strains. In this study, we established a broadly reactive multiplex assay that could simultaneously detect major drug resistance mutations at 8 loci, which are associated with resistance to commonly used nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), in specimens of HIV-1 CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and subtype B, the three major circulating strains in China, using the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) provided by Sequenom MassARRAY® system. To establish the assay, pol gene fragments were prepared from the plasma viral RNA of 159 patients by nested PCR and the presence of wild type and mutant alleles at the 8 loci were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS. In terms of loci, the detection rate of the alleles was greater than 97% for M41L, K65R, M184V and G190A, 91.2% for K101E/Q/P, 91.2% for T215F/Y, 89.9% for K103N/S and 80.5% for L210W. In terms of individuals, 80% of the alleles were detected in 95.4% CRF01_AE patients, 100% CRF07_BC patients and 83.3% subtype B patients. Importantly, the MALDI-TOF MS results were concordant to the drug resistance profiles of patients obtained from conventional sequencing analysis after excluded the failed detections. Using plasmid templates, the assay was estimated to be sensitive to detect drug resistant variants at level about 20% of the circulating viral population. The capability of this assay to detect mixed viral populations was further verified by two different patient specimens. In conclusion, this study evaluated the use of Sequenom MassARRAY® system for high-throughput detection of HIV-DR mutations towards the commonly used reverse transcriptase inhibitors in China. PMID:27092551

  10. Rapid and Simultaneous Detection of Major Drug Resistance Mutations in Reverse Transcriptase Gene for HIV-1 CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and Subtype B in China Using Sequenom MassARRAY® System.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ka-Wai; Peng, Qiaoli; He, Liufen; Cai, Kanru; Jiang, Qiang; Zhou, Boping; To, Sabrina Wai-Chi; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Liu, Li; Chen, Zhiwei; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The development of a rapid, high-throughput and cost-effective HIV-1 drug resistance (HIV-DR) testing system is a challenge for areas consisting different HIV-1 strains. In this study, we established a broadly reactive multiplex assay that could simultaneously detect major drug resistance mutations at 8 loci, which are associated with resistance to commonly used nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), in specimens of HIV-1 CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and subtype B, the three major circulating strains in China, using the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) provided by Sequenom MassARRAY® system. To establish the assay, pol gene fragments were prepared from the plasma viral RNA of 159 patients by nested PCR and the presence of wild type and mutant alleles at the 8 loci were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS. In terms of loci, the detection rate of the alleles was greater than 97% for M41L, K65R, M184V and G190A, 91.2% for K101E/Q/P, 91.2% for T215F/Y, 89.9% for K103N/S and 80.5% for L210W. In terms of individuals, 80% of the alleles were detected in 95.4% CRF01_AE patients, 100% CRF07_BC patients and 83.3% subtype B patients. Importantly, the MALDI-TOF MS results were concordant to the drug resistance profiles of patients obtained from conventional sequencing analysis after excluded the failed detections. Using plasmid templates, the assay was estimated to be sensitive to detect drug resistant variants at level about 20% of the circulating viral population. The capability of this assay to detect mixed viral populations was further verified by two different patient specimens. In conclusion, this study evaluated the use of Sequenom MassARRAY® system for high-throughput detection of HIV-DR mutations towards the commonly used reverse transcriptase inhibitors in China. PMID:27092551

  11. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase specifically interacts with the anticodon domain of its cognate primer tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Barat, C; Lullien, V; Schatz, O; Keith, G; Nugeyre, M T; Grüninger-Leitch, F; Barré-Sinoussi, F; LeGrice, S F; Darlix, J L

    1989-01-01

    The virion cores of the replication competent type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), a retrovirus, contain and RNA genome associated with nucleocapsid (NC) and reverse transcriptase (RT p66/p51) molecules. In vitro reconstructions of these complexes with purified components show that NC is required for efficient annealing of the primer tRNALys,3. In the absence of NC, HIV-1 RT is unable to retrotranscribe the viral RNA template from the tRNA primer. We demonstrate that the HIV-1 RT p66/p51 specifically binds to its cognate primer tRNALys,3 even in the presence of a 100-fold molar excess of other tRNAs. Cross-linking analysis of this interaction locates the contact site to a region within the heavily modified anti-codon domain of tRNALys,3. Images PMID:2479543

  12. The 'helix clamp' in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase: a new nucleic acid binding motif common in nucleic acid polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, T; Meier, T; Götte, M; Heumann, H

    1994-01-01

    Amino acid sequences homologous to 259KLVGKL (X)16KLLR284 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) are conserved in several nucleotide polymerizing enzymes. This amino acid motif has been identified in the crystal structure model as an element of the enzyme's nucleic acid binding apparatus. It is part of the helix-turn-helix structure, alpha H-turn-alpha I, within the 'thumb' region of HIV-1 RT. The motif grasps the complexed nucleic acid at one side. Molecular modeling studies on HIV-1 RT in complex with a nucleic acid fragment suggest that the motif has binding function in the p66 subunit as well as in the p51 subunit, acting as a kind of 'helix clamp'. Given its wide distribution within the nucleic acid polymerases, the helix clamp motif is assumed to be a structure of general significance for nucleic acid binding. Images PMID:7527138

  13. Nucleocapsid Protein Annealing of a Primer-Template Enhances (+)-Strand DNA Synthesis and Fidelity by HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase†

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiae; Roberts, Anne; Yuan, Hua; Xiong, Yong; Anderson, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) requires reverse transcriptase (RT) and HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) for proper viral replication. HIV-1 NCp7 has been shown to enhance various steps in reverse transcription including tRNA initiation and strand transfer which may be mediated through interactions with RT as well as RNA and DNA oligonucleotides. With the use of DNA oligonucleotides, we have examined the interaction of NCp7 with RT and the kinetics of reverse transcription during (+)-strand synthesis with an NCp7-facilitated annealed primer-template. Using a pre-steady state kinetics approach, the NCp7-annealed primer-template has a substantial increase (3-7 fold) in the rate of incorporation (kpol) by RT as compared to heat annealed primer-template with single nucleotide incorporation. There was also a 2-fold increase in the binding affinity constant (Kd) of the nucleotide. These differences in kpol and Kd were not through direct interactions between HIV-1 RT and NCp7. When examining extension by RT, the data suggests that the NCp7-annealed primer-template facilitates the formation of a longer product more quickly compared to the heat annealed primer-template. This enhancement in rate is mediated through interactions with NCp7’s zinc fingers and N-terminal domain and nucleic acids. The NCp7-annealed primer-template also enhances the fidelity of RT (3-fold) by slowing the rate of incorporation of an incorrect nucleotide. Taken together, this study elucidates a new role of NCp7 by facilitating DNA-directed DNA synthesis during reverse transcription by HIV-1 RT that may translate into enhanced viral fitness and offers an avenue to exploit for targeted therapeutic intervention against HIV. PMID:22210155

  14. A novel ribonuclease with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity from the edible mushroom Hygrophorus russula.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mengjuan; Xu, Lijing; Chen, Xiao; Ma, Zengqiang; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, T B

    2013-05-01

    A 28-kDa ribonuclease, with an optimum pH of 4.0 and an optimum temperature at 58 °C, was isolated from fruiting bodies of the edible mushroom Hygrophorus russula. It was purified by ion exchange chromatography on carboxymethyl-cellulose, dithyaminoethyl-cellulose, quaternary amine-sepharose and sulphopropyl-sepharose, followed by fast protein liquid chromatography gel filtration on Superdex 75. The N-terminal amino acid sequence was ASAGG which showed homology to those of other fungal RNases to some degree. It exerted the highest RNase activity on poly C and poly U. The Michaelis constant (K(m)) value of the RNase on yeast tRNA was 3.6 μM, and the maximal velocity (V(max)) was 0.6 μM. The RNase activity was suppressed by some ions including Fe(2+) and Zn(2+) ions. The RNase inhibited the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC(50) of 4.64 μM.

  15. Structures of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with pre- and post-translocation AZTMP-terminated DNA.

    PubMed

    Sarafianos, Stefan G; Clark, Arthur D; Das, Kalyan; Tuske, Steve; Birktoft, Jens J; Ilankumaran, Palanichamy; Ramesha, Andagar R; Sayer, Jane M; Jerina, Donald M; Boyer, Paul L; Hughes, Stephen H; Arnold, Eddy

    2002-12-01

    AZT (3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine) resistance involves the enhanced excision of AZTMP from the end of the primer strand by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. This reaction can occur when an AZTMP-terminated primer is bound at the nucleotide-binding site (pre-translocation complex N) but not at the 'priming' site (post-translocation complex P). We determined the crystal structures of N and P complexes at 3.0 and 3.1 A resolution. These structures provide insight into the structural basis of AZTMP excision and the mechanism of translocation. Docking of a dNTP in the P complex structure suggests steric crowding in forming a stable ternary complex that should increase the relative amount of the N complex, which is the substrate for excision. Structural differences between complexes N and P suggest that the conserved YMDD loop is involved in translocation, acting as a springboard that helps to propel the primer terminus from the N to the P site after dNMP incorporation.

  16. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase complex with DNA and nevirapine reveals nonnucleoside inhibition mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kalyan; Martinez, Sergio E.; Bauman, Joseph D.; Arnold, Eddy

    2012-01-01

    Combinations of nucleoside and nonnucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs) of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) are widely used in anti-AIDS therapies. Five NNRTIs including nevirapine are clinical drugs; however, the molecular mechanism of inhibition by NNRTIs is not clear. We determined the crystal structures of RT–DNA–nevirapine, RT–DNA, and RT–DNA–AZT-triphosphate complexes at 2.85, 2.70, and 2.80 Å, respectively. The RT–DNA complex in the crystal could bind nevirapine or AZT-triphosphate; however, not both. Binding of nevirapine led to opening of the NNRTI-binding pocket. The pocket formation caused shifting of the 3’-end of DNA primer by ~5.5 Å away from its polymerase active site position. Nucleic acid interactions with fingers and palm subdomains were reduced, the dNTP-binding pocket was distorted, and the thumb opened up. The structures elucidate complementary roles of nucleoside and nonnucleoside inhibitors in inhibiting RT. PMID:22266819

  17. Structural Maturation of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase—A Metamorphic Solution to Genomic Instability

    PubMed Central

    London, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT)—a critical enzyme of the viral life cycle—undergoes a complex maturation process, required so that a pair of p66 precursor proteins can develop conformationally along different pathways, one evolving to form active polymerase and ribonuclease H (RH) domains, while the second forms a non-functional polymerase and a proteolyzed RH domain. These parallel maturation pathways rely on the structural ambiguity of a metamorphic polymerase domain, for which the sequence–structure relationship is not unique. Recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies utilizing selective labeling techniques, and structural characterization of the p66 monomer precursor have provided important insights into the details of this maturation pathway, revealing many aspects of the three major steps involved: (1) domain rearrangement; (2) dimerization; and (3) subunit-selective RH domain proteolysis. This review summarizes the major structural changes that occur during the maturation process. We also highlight how mutations, often viewed within the context of the mature RT heterodimer, can exert a major influence on maturation and dimerization. It is further suggested that several steps in the RT maturation pathway may provide attractive targets for drug development. PMID:27690082

  18. Targeted HIV-1 Latency Reversal Using CRISPR/Cas9-Derived Transcriptional Activator Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bialek, Julia K.; Dunay, Gábor A.; Voges, Maike; Schäfer, Carola; Spohn, Michael; Stucka, Rolf; Hauber, Joachim; Lange, Ulrike C.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 technology is currently considered the most advanced tool for targeted genome engineering. Its sequence-dependent specificity has been explored for locus-directed transcriptional modulation. Such modulation, in particular transcriptional activation, has been proposed as key approach to overcome silencing of dormant HIV provirus in latently infected cellular reservoirs. Currently available agents for provirus activation, so-called latency reversing agents (LRAs), act indirectly through cellular pathways to induce viral transcription. However, their clinical performance remains suboptimal, possibly because reservoirs have diverse cellular identities and/or proviral DNA is intractable to the induced pathways. We have explored two CRISPR/Cas9-derived activator systems as targeted approaches to induce dormant HIV-1 proviral DNA. These systems recruit multiple transcriptional activation domains to the HIV 5’ long terminal repeat (LTR), for which we have identified an optimal target region within the LTR U3 sequence. Using this target region, we demonstrate transcriptional activation of proviral genomes via the synergistic activation mediator complex in various in culture model systems for HIV latency. Observed levels of induction are comparable or indeed higher than treatment with established LRAs. Importantly, activation is complete, leading to production of infective viral particles. Our data demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9-derived technologies can be applied to counteract HIV latency and may therefore represent promising novel approaches in the quest for HIV elimination. PMID:27341108

  19. Resolution of Specific Nucleotide Mismatches by Wild-Type and AZT-Resistant Reverse Transcriptases during HIV-1 Replication.

    PubMed

    Kharytonchyk, Siarhei; King, Steven R; Ndongmo, Clement B; Stilger, Krista L; An, Wenfeng; Telesnitsky, Alice

    2016-06-01

    A key contributor to HIV-1 genetic variation is reverse transcriptase errors. Some mutations result because reverse transcriptase (RT) lacks 3' to 5' proofreading exonuclease and can extend mismatches. However, RT also excises terminal nucleotides to a limited extent, and this activity contributes to AZT resistance. Because HIV-1 mismatch resolution has been studied in vitro but only indirectly during replication, we developed a novel system to study mismatched base pair resolution during HIV-1 replication in cultured cells using vectors that force template switching at defined locations. These vectors generated mismatched reverse transcription intermediates, with proviral products diagnostic of mismatch resolution mechanisms. Outcomes for wild-type (WT) RT and an AZT-resistant (AZT(R)) RT containing a thymidine analog mutation set-D67N, K70R, D215F, and K219Q-were compared. AZT(R) RT did not excise terminal nucleotides more frequently than WT, and for the majority of tested mismatches, both WT and AZT(R) RTs extended mismatches in more than 90% of proviruses. However, striking enzyme-specific differences were observed for one mispair, with WT RT preferentially resolving dC-rC pairs either by excising the mismatched base or switching templates prematurely, while AZT(R) RT primarily misaligned the primer strand, causing deletions via dislocation mutagenesis. Overall, the results confirmed HIV-1 RT's high capacity for mismatch extension during virus replication and revealed dramatic differences in aberrant intermediate resolution repertoires between WT and AZT(R) RTs on one mismatched replication intermediate. Correlating mismatch extension frequencies observed here with reported viral mutation rates suggests a complex interplay of nucleotide discrimination and mismatch extension drives HIV-1 mutagenesis. PMID:27075671

  20. Exploitation of the Low Fidelity of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Reverse Transcriptase and the Nucleotide Composition Bias in the HIV-1 Genome To Alter the Drug Resistance Development of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Balzarini, Jan; Camarasa, Maria-José; Pérez-Pérez, Maria-Jesus; San-Félix, Ana; Velázquez, Sonsoles; Perno, Carlo-Federico; De Clercq, Erik; Anderson, John N.; Karlsson, Anna

    2001-01-01

    The RNA genome of the lentivirus human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is significantly richer in adenine nucleotides than the statistically equal distribution of the four different nucleotides that is expected. This compositional bias may be due to the guanine-to-adenine (G→A) nucleotide hypermutation of the HIV genome, which has been explained by dCTP pool imbalances during reverse transcription. The adenine nucleotide bias together with the poor fidelity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase markedly enhances the genetic variation of HIV and may be responsible for the rapid emergence of drug-resistant HIV-1 strains. We have now attempted to counteract the normal mutational pattern of HIV-1 in response to anti-HIV-1 drugs by altering the endogenous deoxynucleoside triphosphate pool ratios with antimetabolites in virus-infected cell cultures. We showed that administration of these antimetabolic compounds resulted in an altered drug resistance pattern due to the reversal of the predominant mutational flow of HIV (G→A) to an adenine-to-guanine (A→G) nucleotide pattern in the intact HIV-1-infected lymphocyte cultures. Forcing the virus to change its inherent nucleotide bias may lead to better control of viral drug resistance development. PMID:11390579

  1. Conformational States of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase for Nucleotide Incorporation vs Pyrophosphorolysis-Binding of Foscarnet.

    PubMed

    Das, Kalyan; Balzarini, Jan; Miller, Matthew T; Maguire, Anita R; DeStefano, Jeffrey J; Arnold, Eddy

    2016-08-19

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) catalytically incorporates individual nucleotides into a viral DNA strand complementing an RNA or DNA template strand; the polymerase active site of RT adopts multiple conformational and structural states while performing this task. The states associated are dNTP binding at the N site, catalytic incorporation of a nucleotide, release of a pyrophosphate, and translocation of the primer 3'-end to the P site. Structural characterization of each of these states may help in understanding the molecular mechanisms of drug activity and resistance and in developing new RT inhibitors. Using a 38-mer DNA template-primer aptamer as the substrate mimic, we crystallized an RT/dsDNA complex that is catalytically active, yet translocation-incompetent in crystals. The ability of RT to perform dNTP binding and incorporation in crystals permitted obtaining a series of structures: (I) RT/DNA (P-site), (II) RT/DNA/AZTTP ternary, (III) RT/AZT-terminated DNA (N-site), and (IV) RT/AZT-terminated DNA (N-site)/foscarnet complexes. The stable N-site complex permitted the binding of foscarnet as a pyrophosphate mimic. The Mg(2+) ions dissociated after catalytic addition of AZTMP in the pretranslocated structure III, whereas ions A and B had re-entered the active site to bind foscarnet in structure IV. The binding of foscarnet involves chelation with the Mg(2+) (B) ion and interactions with K65 and R72. The analysis of interactions of foscarnet and the recently discovered nucleotide-competing RT inhibitor (NcRTI) α-T-CNP in two different conformational states of the enzyme provides insights for developing new classes of polymerase active site RT inhibitors. PMID:27192549

  2. Structural features in the HIV-1 repeat region facilitate strand transfer during reverse transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Berkhout, B; Vastenhouw, N L; Klasens, B I; Huthoff, H

    2001-01-01

    Two obligatory DNA strand transfers take place during reverse transcription of a retroviral RNA genome. The first strand transfer is facilitated by terminal repeat (R) elements in the viral genome. This strand-transfer reaction depends on base pairing between the cDNA of the 5'R and the 3'R. There is accumulating evidence that retroviral R regions contain features other than sequence complementarity that stimulate this critical nucleic acid hybridization step. The R region of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is relatively extended (97 nt) and encodes two well-conserved stem-loop structures, the TAR and poly(A) hairpins. The role of these motifs was studied in an in vitro strand-transfer assay with two separate templates, the 5'R donor and the 3'R acceptor, and mutants thereof. The results indicate that the upper part of the TAR hairpin structure in the 5'R donor is critical for efficient strand transfer. This seems to pose a paradox, as the 5'R template is degraded by RNase H before strand transfer occurs. We propose that it is not the RNA hairpin motif in the 5'R donor, but rather the antisense motif in the ssDNA copy, which can also fold a hairpin structure, that is critical for strand transfer. Mutation of the loop sequence in the TAR hairpin of the donor RNA, which is copied in the loop of the cDNA hairpin, reduces the transfer efficiency more than fivefold. It is proposed that the natural strand-transfer reaction is enhanced by interaction of the anti-TAR ssDNA hairpin with the TAR hairpin in the 3'R acceptor. Base pairing can occur between the complementary loops ("loop-loop kissing"), and strand transfer is completed by the subsequent formation of an extended RNA-cDNA duplex. PMID:11497429

  3. Exploring the role of 2-chloro-6-fluoro substitution in 2-alkylthio-6-benzyl-5-alkylpyrimidin-4(3H)-ones: effects in HIV-1-infected cells and in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rotili, Dante; Tarantino, Domenico; Nawrozkij, Maxim B; Babushkin, Alexandre S; Botta, Giorgia; Marrocco, Biagina; Cirilli, Roberto; Menta, Sergio; Badia, Roger; Crespan, Emmanuele; Ballante, Flavio; Ragno, Rino; Esté, José A; Maga, Giovanni; Mai, Antonello

    2014-06-26

    A comparison of the effects of the 6-(2-chloro-6-fluorobenzyl)-2-(alkylthio)pyrimidin-4(3H)-ones (2-Cl-6-F-S-DABOs) 7-12 and the related 6-(2,6-difluorobenzyl) counterparts 13-15 in HIV-1 infected cells and in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) assays is here described. The new 2-Cl-6-F-S-DABOs showed up to picomolar activity against wt HIV-1. Against clinically relevant HIV-1 mutants and in enzyme assays, the simultaneous C5(methyl)/C6(methyl/ethyl) substitution in the 2-Cl-6-F- and 2,6-F2-benzyl series furnished compounds with the highest, wide-spectrum inhibitory activity against HIV-1. Three representative 2-Cl-6-F-S-DABOs carrying two (9c, 10c) or one (10a) stereogenic centers were resolved into their individual stereoisomers and showed a significant diastereo- and enantioselectivity in HIV-1 inhibition, the highest antiviral activity well correlating with the R absolute configuration to the stereogenic center of the C6-benzylic position in both cellular and enzymatic tests. Application of previously reported COMBINEr protocol on 9c and 10c confirmed the influence of the stereogenic centers on their binding modes in the HIV-1 RT.

  4. 8-Modified-2′-Deoxyadenosine Analogues Induce Delayed Polymerization Arrest during HIV-1 Reverse Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Marwan; Smyth, Redmond; Ben Gaied, Nouha; Barhoum, Patrick; Laumond, Géraldine; Bec, Guillaume; Götte, Matthias; Mak, Johnson; Aubertin, Anne-Marie; Burger, Alain; Marquet, Roland

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of resistant viruses to any of the anti-HIV-1 compounds used in the current therapies against AIDS underlies the urge for the development of new drug targets and/or new drugs acting through novel mechanisms. While all anti-HIV-1 nucleoside analogues in clinical use and in clinical trials rely on ribose modifications for activity, we designed nucleosides with a natural deoxyribose moiety and modifications of position 8 of the adenine base. Such modifications might induce a steric clash with helix αH in the thumb domain of the p66 subunit of HIV-1 RT at a distance from the catalytic site, causing delayed chain termination. Eleven new 2′-deoxyadenosine analogues modified on position 8 of the purine base were synthesized and tested in vitro and in cell-based assays. In this paper we demonstrate for the first time that chemical modifications on position 8 of 2′-deoxyadenosine induce delayed chain termination in vitro, and also inhibit DNA synthesis when incorporated in a DNA template strand. Furthermore, one of them had moderate anti-HIV-1 activity in cell-culture. Our results constitute a proof of concept indicating that modification on the base moiety of nucleosides can induce delayed polymerization arrest and inhibit HIV-1 replication. PMID:22087320

  5. Antiretroviral drugs do not interfere with bryostatin-mediated HIV-1 latency reversal.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Bonet, Marta; Clemente, Maria Isabel; Álvarez, Susana; Díaz, Laura; García-Alonso, Dolores; Muñoz, Eduardo; Moreno, Santiago; Muñoz-Fernández, Maria Ángeles

    2015-11-01

    Although an effective combination of antiretroviral therapy (cART) controls HIV-1 viraemia in infected patients, viral latency established soon after infection hinders HIV-1 eradication. It has been shown that bryostatin-1 (BRY) inhibits HIV-infection in vitro and reactivates the latent virus through the protein kinase C-NF-κB pathway. We determined the in vitro potential effect of BRY in combination with currently used antiretroviral drugs. BRY alone or in combination with maraviroc (MVC)/Atripla (ATP) was tested for its capacity to reactivate latent virus and inhibit new infections. JLTRG-R5 cells and two latent HIV-1-infected cell lines, J89GFP and THP89GFP, were used as latency models. To quantify HIV infection, the reporter cell line TZM-bl was used. We found that BRY reactivates HIV-1 even in combination with MVC or ATP. Antiretroviral combinations with BRY do not interfere with BRY activity (i.e., the reactivation of latently infected cells) or with the antiviral activity of antiretroviral drugs. In addition, BRY-mediated down-modulation of surface CD4 and CXCR4 was not affected when it was used in combination with other antiretrovirals, and no hyperactivation or high-proliferation effects were observed in primary T cells. Moreover, the BRY treatment was able to reactivate HIV-1 in CD4+ T cells from HIV-1-infected patients under cART. Thus, we propose the use of BRY to purge the viral reservoir and recommend its combination with current antiretroviral treatments.

  6. Requirements for nucleocapsid-mediated regulation of reverse transcription during the late steps of HIV-1 assembly

    PubMed Central

    Racine, Pierre-Jean; Chamontin, Célia; de Rocquigny, Hugues; Bernacchi, Serena; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Mougel, Marylène

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 is a retrovirus replicating within cells by reverse transcribing its genomic RNA (gRNA) into DNA. Within cells, virus assembly requires the structural Gag proteins with few accessory proteins, notably the viral infectivity factor (Vif) and two copies of gRNA as well as cellular factors to converge to the plasma membrane. In this process, the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of Gag binds to the packaging signal of gRNA which consists of a series of stem-loops (SL1-SL3) ensuring gRNA selection and packaging into virions. Interestingly, mutating NC activates a late-occurring reverse transcription (RT) step in producer cells, leading to the release of DNA-containing HIV-1 particles. In order to decipher the molecular mechanism regulating this late RT, we explored the role of several key partners of NC, such as Vif, gRNA and the cellular cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G that restricts HIV-1 infection by targeting the RT. By studying combinations of deletions of these putative players, we revealed that NC, SL1-SL3 and in lesser extent Vif, but not APOBEC3G, interplay regulates the late RT. PMID:27273064

  7. The differential short- and long-term effects of HIV-1 latency-reversing agents on T cell function

    PubMed Central

    Clutton, G.; Xu, Y.; Baldoni, P. L.; Mollan, K. R.; Kirchherr, J.; Newhard, W.; Cox, Kara; Kuruc, J. D.; Kashuba, A.; Barnard, R.; Archin, N.; Gay, C. L.; Hudgens, M. G.; Margolis, D. M.; Goonetilleke, N.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the extraordinary success of HIV-1 antiretroviral therapy in prolonging life, infected individuals face lifelong therapy because of a reservoir of latently-infected cells that harbor replication competent virus. Recently, compounds have been identified that can reverse HIV-1 latency in vivo. These latency- reversing agents (LRAs) could make latently-infected cells vulnerable to clearance by immune cells, including cytolytic CD8+ T cells. We investigated the effects of two leading LRA classes on CD8+ T cell phenotype and function: the histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) and protein kinase C modulators (PKCms). We observed that relative to HDACis, the PKCms induced much stronger T cell activation coupled with non-specific cytokine production and T cell proliferation. When examining antigen-specific CD8+ T cell function, all the LRAs except the HDACi Vorinostat reduced, but did not abolish, one or more measurements of CD8+ T cell function. Importantly, the extent and timing of these effects differed between LRAs. Panobinostat had detrimental effects within 10 hours of drug treatment, whereas the effects of the other LRAs were observed between 48 hours and 5 days. These observations suggest that scheduling of LRA and CD8+ T cell immunotherapy regimens may be critical for optimal clearance of the HIV-1 reservoir. PMID:27480951

  8. Requirements for nucleocapsid-mediated regulation of reverse transcription during the late steps of HIV-1 assembly.

    PubMed

    Racine, Pierre-Jean; Chamontin, Célia; de Rocquigny, Hugues; Bernacchi, Serena; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Mougel, Marylène

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 is a retrovirus replicating within cells by reverse transcribing its genomic RNA (gRNA) into DNA. Within cells, virus assembly requires the structural Gag proteins with few accessory proteins, notably the viral infectivity factor (Vif) and two copies of gRNA as well as cellular factors to converge to the plasma membrane. In this process, the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of Gag binds to the packaging signal of gRNA which consists of a series of stem-loops (SL1-SL3) ensuring gRNA selection and packaging into virions. Interestingly, mutating NC activates a late-occurring reverse transcription (RT) step in producer cells, leading to the release of DNA-containing HIV-1 particles. In order to decipher the molecular mechanism regulating this late RT, we explored the role of several key partners of NC, such as Vif, gRNA and the cellular cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G that restricts HIV-1 infection by targeting the RT. By studying combinations of deletions of these putative players, we revealed that NC, SL1-SL3 and in lesser extent Vif, but not APOBEC3G, interplay regulates the late RT. PMID:27273064

  9. Particular interaction between efavirenz and the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase binding site as explained by the ONIOM2 method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunrium, Peerapol; Kuno, Mayuso; Saen-oon, Suwipa; Hannongbua, Supa

    2005-03-01

    Particular interaction between efavirenz and the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase binding site was investigated, based on the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and ONIOM2 methods. The interaction between efavirenz and Lys101 was found to be the strongest interaction, typically, -11.29 kcal/mol. The stability of this complex system leads to the foundation of the estimated binding energy of approximately -22.66 kcal/mol. Moreover, two hydrogen bonds between benzoxazin-2-one, and the backbone carbonyl oxygen and the backbone amino hydrogen of Lys101 were observed. These hydrogen bond interactions play an important role in the bound efavirenz/HIV-1 RT complex.

  10. Structure of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase with the Inhibitor -thujaplicinol Bound at the RNase H Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Himmel, D.; Maegley, K; Pauly, T; Bauman, J; Das, K; Dharia, C; Clark, Jr., A; Ryan, K; Hickey, M; et al.

    2009-01-01

    Novel inhibitors are needed to counteract the rapid emergence of drug-resistant HIV variants. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) has both DNA polymerase and RNase H (RNH) enzymatic activities, but approved drugs that inhibit RT target the polymerase. Inhibitors that act against new targets, such as RNH, should be effective against all of the current drug-resistant variants. Here, we present 2.80 {angstrom} and 2.04 {angstrom} resolution crystal structures of an RNH inhibitor, {beta}-thujaplicinol, bound at the RNH active site of both HIV-1 RT and an isolated RNH domain. {beta}-thujaplicinol chelates two divalent metal ions at the RNH active site. We provide biochemical evidence that {beta}-thujaplicinol is a slow-binding RNH inhibitor with noncompetitive kinetics and suggest that it forms a tropylium ion that interacts favorably with RT and the RNA:DNA substrate.

  11. Identification of a putative binding site for [2',5'-bis-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-beta-D-ribofuranosyl]-3'-spiro-5''-(4''-amino-1'',2''-oxathiole-2'',2''-dioxide)thymine (TSAO) derivatives at the p51-p66 interface of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Barrios, F; Pérez, C; Lobatón, E; Velázquez, S; Chamorro, C; San-Félix, A; Pérez-Pérez, M J; Camarasa, M J; Pelemans, H; Balzarini, J; Gago, F

    2001-06-01

    A binding site for TSAO-m(3)T at the interface between the p66 and p51 subunits of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) and distinct from that of "classical" HIV-1 non-nucleoside inhibitors is proposed. The feasibility of the binding mode was assessed by carrying out nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations for the complexes of TSAO-m(3)T with reduced models of both the wild-type enzyme and a more sensitive R172A mutant. The molecular model is in agreement with a previous proposal, with known structure-activity and mutagenesis data for this unique class of inhibitors, and also with recent biochemical evidence indicating that TSAO analogues can affect enzyme dimerization. The relative importance of residues involved in dimer formation and TSAO-RT complex stabilization was assessed by a combination of surface area accessibility, molecular mechanics, and continuum electrostatics calculations. A structure-based modification introduced into the lead compound yielded a new derivative with improved antiviral activity.

  12. Ribonuclease H/DNA Polymerase HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Dual Inhibitor: Mechanistic Studies on the Allosteric Mode of Action of Isatin-Based Compound RMNC6

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Angela; Meleddu, Rita; Esposito, Francesca; Distinto, Simona; Bianco, Giulia; Masaoka, Takashi; Maccioni, Elias; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Alcaro, Stefano; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.; Tramontano, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H (RNase H) activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are needed for the replication of the viral genome and are validated drug targets. However, there are no approved drugs inhibiting RNase H and the efficiency of DNA polymerase inhibitors can be diminished by the presence of drug resistance mutations. In this context, drugs inhibiting both activities could represent a significant advance towards better anti-HIV therapies. We report on the mechanisms of allosteric inhibition of a newly synthesized isatin-based compound designated as RMNC6 that showed IC50 values of 1.4 and 9.8 μM on HIV-1 RT-associated RNase H and polymerase activities, respectively. Blind docking studies predict that RMNC6 could bind two different pockets in the RT: one in the DNA polymerase domain (partially overlapping the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor [NNRTI] binding pocket), and a second one close to the RNase H active site. Enzymatic studies showed that RMNC6 interferes with efavirenz (an approved NNRTI) in its binding to the RT polymerase domain, although NNRTI resistance-associated mutations such as K103N, Y181C and Y188L had a minor impact on RT susceptibility to RMNC6. In addition, despite being naturally resistant to NNRTIs, the polymerase activity of HIV-1 group O RT was efficiently inhibited by RMNC6. The compound was also an inhibitor of the RNase H activity of wild-type HIV-1 group O RT, although we observed a 6.5-fold increase in the IC50 in comparison with the prototypic HIV-1 group M subtype B enzyme. Mutagenesis studies showed that RT RNase H domain residues Asn474 and Tyr501, and in a lesser extent Ala502 and Ala508, are critical for RMNC6 inhibition of the endonuclease activity of the RT, without affecting its DNA polymerization activity. Our results show that RMNC6 acts as a dual inhibitor with allosteric sites in the DNA polymerase and the RNase H domains of HIV-1 RT. PMID:26800261

  13. Does the HIV-1 primer activation signal interact with tRNA3Lys during the initiation of reverse transcription?

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Valérie; Ehresmann, Chantal; Ehresmann, Bernard; Marquet, Roland

    2003-01-01

    Reverse transcription of HIV-1 RNA is primed by a tRNA3Lys molecule bound at the primer binding site (PBS). Complex intermolecular interactions were proposed between tRNA3Lys and the RNA of the HIV-1 Mal isolate. Recently, an alternative interaction was proposed between the TΨC stem of tRNA3Lys and a primer activation signal (PAS) of the Lai and Hxb2 RNAs, suggesting major structural variations in the reverse transcription complex of different HIV-1 strains. Here, we analyzed mutants of the Hxb2 RNA that prevent the interaction between the PAS and tRNA3Lys or/and a complementary sequence in the viral RNA. We compared the kinetics of reverse transcription of the wild type and mutant Hxb2 RNAs, using either tRNA3Lys or an 18mer oligoribonucleotide complementary to the PBS, which cannot interact with the PAS, as primers. We also used chemical probing to test the structure of the mutant and wild type RNAs, as well as the complex formed between the later RNA and tRNA3Lys. These experiments, together with the analysis of long term replication data of mutant viruses obtained by C. Morrow and coworkers (Birmingham, USA) that use alternate tRNAs as primers, strongly suggest that the interaction between the Hxb2 PAS and tRNA3Lys does not exist. Instead, the effects of the vRNA mutations on reverse transcription seem to be linked to incorrect folding of the mutant RNAs. PMID:12560480

  14. Ab initio molecular dynamics studies on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase triphosphate binding site: implications for nucleoside-analog drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Alber, F; Carloni, P

    2000-12-01

    Quantum-chemical methods are used to shed light on the functional role of residues involved in the resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase against nucleoside-analog drugs. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are carried out for models representing the adduct between the triphosphate substrate and the nucleoside binding site. The triphosphate is considered either deprotonated or protonated at the gamma-position. Although the protonated form already experiences large rearrangements in the ps time scale, the fully deprotonated state exhibits a previously unrecognized low-barrier hydrogen bond between Lys65 and gamma-phosphate. Absence of this interaction in Lys65-->Arg HIV-1 RT might play a prominent role in the resistance of this mutant for nucleoside analogs (Gu Z et al., 1994b, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 38:275-281; Zhang D et al., 1994, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 38:282-287). Water molecules present in the active site, not detected in the X-ray structure, form a complex H-bond network. Among these waters, one may be crucial for substrate recognition as it bridges Gln151 and Arg72 with the beta-phosphate. Absence of this stabilizing interaction in Gln151-->Met HIV-1 RT mutant may be a key factor for the known drug resistance of this mutant toward dideoxy-type drugs and AZT (Shirasaka T et al., 1995, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 92:2398-2402: Iversen AK et al., 1996, J Virol 70:1086-1090).

  15. Impact of HIV-1 Subtype and Antiretroviral Therapy on Protease and Reverse Transcriptase Genotype: Results of a Global Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background The genetic differences among HIV-1 subtypes may be critical to clinical management and drug resistance surveillance as antiretroviral treatment is expanded to regions of the world where diverse non-subtype-B viruses predominate. Methods and Findings To assess the impact of HIV-1 subtype and antiretroviral treatment on the distribution of mutations in protease and reverse transcriptase, a binomial response model using subtype and treatment as explanatory variables was used to analyze a large compiled dataset of non-subtype-B HIV-1 sequences. Non-subtype-B sequences from 3,686 persons with well characterized antiretroviral treatment histories were analyzed in comparison to subtype B sequences from 4,769 persons. The non-subtype-B sequences included 461 with subtype A, 1,185 with C, 331 with D, 245 with F, 293 with G, 513 with CRF01_AE, and 618 with CRF02_AG. Each of the 55 known subtype B drug-resistance mutations occurred in at least one non-B isolate, and 44 (80%) of these mutations were significantly associated with antiretroviral treatment in at least one non-B subtype. Conversely, of 67 mutations found to be associated with antiretroviral therapy in at least one non-B subtype, 61 were also associated with antiretroviral therapy in subtype B isolates. Conclusion Global surveillance and genotypic assessment of drug resistance should focus primarily on the known subtype B drug-resistance mutations. PMID:15839752

  16. Basis for Early and Preferential Selection of the E138K Mutation in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    McCallum, Matthew; Oliveira, Maureen; Ibanescu, Ruxandra-Ilinca; Kramer, Victor G.; Moisi, Daniela; Asahchop, Eugene L.; Brenner, Bluma G.; Harrigan, P. Richard; Xu, Hongtao

    2013-01-01

    E138K, a G→A mutation in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), is preferentially selected by etravirine (ETR) and rilpivirine over other substitutions at position E138 that offer greater drug resistance. We hypothesized that there was a mutational bias for the E138K substitution and designed an allele-specific PCR to monitor the emergence of E138A/G/K/Q/R/V during ETR selection experiments. We also performed competition experiments using mutated viruses and quantified the prevalence of E138 minority species in drug-naive patients. E138K, as well as E138G, consistently emerged first during ETR selection experiments, followed by E138A and E138Q; E138R was never selected. Surprisingly, E138K was identified as a tiny minority in 23% of drug-naive subtype B patients, a result confirmed by ultradeep sequencing (UDS). This result could reflect a low fitness cost of E138K; however, E138K was one of the least fit substitutions at codon E138, even after taking into account the deoxynucleoside triphosphate pools of the cells used in competition experiments. Further UDS analysis revealed other minority species in a pattern consistent with the mutational bias of HIV RT. There was no evidence of APOBEC3-hypermutation in these selection experiments or in patients. Our results confirm the mutational bias of HIV-1 in patients and highlight the importance of G→A mutations in HIV-1 drug resistance evolution. PMID:23856772

  17. Mechanisms associated with HIV-1 resistance to acyclovir by the V75I mutation in reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Tchesnokov, Egor P; Obikhod, Aleksandr; Massud, Ivana; Lisco, Andrea; Vanpouille, Christophe; Brichacek, Beda; Balzarini, Jan; McGuigan, Christopher; Derudas, Marco; Margolis, Leonid; Schinazi, Raymond F; Götte, Matthias

    2009-08-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that the anti-herpetic drug acyclovir (ACV) also displays antiviral activity against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The triphosphate form of ACV is accepted by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), and subsequent incorporation leads to classical chain termination. Like all approved nucleoside analogue RT inhibitors (NRTIs), the selective pressure of ACV is associated with the emergence of resistance. The V75I mutation in HIV-1 RT appears to be dominant in this regard. By itself, this mutation is usually not associated with resistance to currently approved NRTIs. Here we studied the underlying biochemical mechanism. We demonstrate that V75I is also selected under the selective pressure of a monophosphorylated prodrug that was designed to bypass the bottleneck in drug activation to the triphosphate form (ACV-TP). Pre-steady-state kinetics reveal that V75I discriminates against the inhibitor at the level of catalysis, whereas binding of the inhibitor remains largely unaffected. The incorporated ACV-monophosphate (ACV-MP) is vulnerable to excision in the presence of the pyrophosphate donor ATP. V75I compromises binding of the next nucleotide that can otherwise provide a certain degree of protection from excision. Collectively, the results of this study suggest that ACV is sensitive to two different resistance pathways, which warrants further investigation regarding the detailed resistance profile of ACV. Such studies will be crucial in assessing the potential clinical utility of ACV and its derivatives in combination with established NRTIs.

  18. High-resolution structures of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase/TMC278 complexes: Strategic flexibility explains potency against resistance mutations

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kalyan; Bauman, Joseph D.; Clark, Arthur D.; Frenkel, Yulia V.; Lewi, Paul J.; Shatkin, Aaron J.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Arnold, Eddy

    2008-01-01

    TMC278 is a diarylpyrimidine (DAPY) nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) that is highly effective in treating wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1 infections in clinical trials at relatively low doses (∼25–75 mg/day). We have determined the structure of wild-type HIV-1 RT complexed with TMC278 at 1.8 Å resolution, using an RT crystal form engineered by systematic RT mutagenesis. This high-resolution structure reveals that the cyanovinyl group of TMC278 is positioned in a hydrophobic tunnel connecting the NNRTI-binding pocket to the nucleic acid-binding cleft. The crystal structures of TMC278 in complexes with the double mutant K103N/Y181C (2.1 Å) and L100I/K103N HIV-1 RTs (2.9 Å) demonstrated that TMC278 adapts to bind mutant RTs. In the K103N/Y181C RT/TMC278 structure, loss of the aromatic ring interaction caused by the Y181C mutation is counterbalanced by interactions between the cyanovinyl group of TMC278 and the aromatic side chain of Y183, which is facilitated by an ∼1.5 Å shift of the conserved Y183MDD motif. In the L100I/K103N RT/TMC278 structure, the binding mode of TMC278 is significantly altered so that the drug conforms to changes in the binding pocket primarily caused by the L100I mutation. The flexible binding pocket acts as a molecular “shrink wrap” that makes a shape complementary to the optimized TMC278 in wild-type and drug-resistant forms of HIV-1 RT. The crystal structures provide a better understanding of how the flexibility of an inhibitor can compensate for drug-resistance mutations. PMID:18230722

  19. High-Resolution Structures of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase/TMC278 Complexes: Strategic Flexibility Explains Potency Against Resistance Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Das,K.; Bauman, J.; Clark, Jr., A.; Frenkel, Y.; Lewi, P.; Shatkin, A.; Hughes, S.; Arnold, E.

    2008-01-01

    TMC278 is a diarylpyrimidine (DAPY) nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) that is highly effective in treating wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1 infections in clinical trials at relatively low doses ({approx}25-75 mg/day). We have determined the structure of wild-type HIV-1 RT complexed with TMC278 at 1.8 Angstroms resolution, using an RT crystal form engineered by systematic RT mutagenesis. This high-resolution structure reveals that the cyanovinyl group of TMC278 is positioned in a hydrophobic tunnel connecting the NNRTI-binding pocket to the nucleic acid-binding cleft. The crystal structures of TMC278 in complexes with the double mutant K103N/Y181C (2.1 Angstroms ) and L100I/K103N HIV-1 RTs (2.9 Angstroms ) demonstrated that TMC278 adapts to bind mutant RTs. In the K103N/Y181C RT/TMC278 structure, loss of the aromatic ring interaction caused by the Y181C mutation is counterbalanced by interactions between the cyanovinyl group of TMC278 and the aromatic side chain of Y183, which is facilitated by an {approx}1.5 Angstroms shift of the conserved Y183MDD motif. In the L100I/K103N RT/TMC278 structure, the binding mode of TMC278 is significantly altered so that the drug conforms to changes in the binding pocket primarily caused by the L100I mutation. The flexible binding pocket acts as a molecular 'shrink wrap' that makes a shape complementary to the optimized TMC278 in wild-type and drug-resistant forms of HIV-1 RT. The crystal structures provide a better understanding of how the flexibility of an inhibitor can compensate for drug-resistance mutations.

  20. Persistence versus reversion of 3TC resistance in HIV-1 determine the rate of emergence of NVP resistance.

    PubMed

    Rath, Barbara A; Olshen, Richard A; Halpern, Jerry; Merigan, Thomas C

    2012-08-01

    When HIV-1 is exposed to lamivudine (3TC) at inhibitory concentrations, resistant variants carrying the reverse transcriptase (RT) substitution M184V emerge rapidly. This substitution confers high-level 3TC resistance and increased RT fidelity. We established a novel in vitro system to study the effect of starting nevirapine (NVP) in 3TC-resistant/NNRTI-naïve clinical isolates, and the impact of maintaining versus dropping 3TC pressure in this setting. Because M184V mutant HIV-1 seems hypersusceptible to adefovir (ADV), we also tested the effect of ADV pressure on the same isolates. We draw four conclusions from our experiments simulating combination therapy in vitro. (1) The presence of low-dose (1 μM) 3TC prevented reversal to wild-type from an M184V mutant background. (2) Adding low-dose 3TC in the presence of NVP delayed the selection of NVP-associated mutations. (3) The presence of ADV, in addition to NVP, led to more rapid reversal to wild-type at position 184 than NVP alone. (4) ADV plus NVP selected for greater numbers of mutations than NVP alone. Inference about the "selection of mutation" is based on two statistical models, one at the viral level, more telling, and the other at the level of predominance of mutation within a population. Multidrug pressure experiments lend understanding to mechanisms of HIV resistance as they bear upon new treatment strategies.

  1. N348I in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Decreases Susceptibility to Tenofovir and Etravirine in Combination with Other Resistance Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas; Moore, Katie; Radzio, Jessica; Sonza, Secondo; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2010-01-01

    Summary We previously demonstrated that N348I in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase confers zidovudine and nevirapine resistance. However, both of these inhibitors are currently infrequently used in developed countries and the impact of N348I on newer RT inhibitors, such as tenofovir and etravirine, is unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that N348I alone confers no resistance to tenofovir and low-level resistance to etravirine. However, N348I significantly decreases tenofovir susceptibility when combined with thymidine analogue mutations and etravirine susceptibility when combined with Y181C. PMID:20010074

  2. Novel diarylpyrimidines and diaryltriazines as potent HIV-1 NNRTIs with dramatically improved solubility: a patent evaluation of US20140378443A1.

    PubMed

    Huang, Boshi; Kang, Dongwei; Yang, Jiapei; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-01-01

    Diarylpyrimidine and diaryltriazine derivatives, two representative structurally related classes of HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with robust potencies against wild-type and several mutant strains of HIV-1, have attracted more and more attention in the last decade. However, they have been suffering from poor aqueous solubility. A series of novel diarylpyrimidines and diaryltriazines with solubilizing substituents attached to the central rings were reported as potent NNRTIs in the patent US20140378443A1. Some compounds exhibited potencies against wild-type HIV-1 which were comparable or even superior to those of dapivirine, etravirine and rilpivirine. In addition, dramatically enhanced solubilities were observed for these new compounds. Moreover, some structure optimization strategies for improving aqueous solubility are detailed in this review, providing new insights into development of next-generation NNRTIs endowed with favorable solubility. We anticipate that application of these strategies will ultimately lead to discovery of new anti-HIV drug candidates.

  3. Development and in Vitro Evaluation of a Microbicide Gel Formulation for a Novel Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Belonging to the N-Dihydroalkyloxybenzyloxopyrimidines (N-DABOs) Family.

    PubMed

    Tintori, Cristina; Brai, Annalaura; Dasso Lang, Maria Chiara; Deodato, Davide; Greco, Antonia Michela; Bizzarri, Bruno Mattia; Cascone, Lorena; Casian, Alexandru; Zamperini, Claudio; Dreassi, Elena; Crespan, Emmanuele; Maga, Giovanni; Vanham, Guido; Ceresola, Elisa; Canducci, Filippo; Ariën, Kevin K; Botta, Maurizio

    2016-03-24

    Preventing HIV transmission by the use of a vaginal microbicide is a topic of considerable interest in the fight against AIDS. Both a potent anti-HIV agent and an efficient formulation are required to develop a successful microbicide. In this regard, molecules able to inhibit the HIV replication before the integration of the viral DNA into the genetic material of the host cells, such as entry inhibitors or reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs), are ideal candidates for prevention purpose. Among RTIs, S- and N-dihydroalkyloxybenzyloxopyrimidines (S-DABOs and N-DABOs) are interesting compounds active at nanomolar concentration against wild type of RT and with a very interesting activity against RT mutations. Herein, novel N-DABOs were synthesized and tested as anti-HIV agents. Furthermore, their mode of binding was studied by molecular modeling. At the same time, a vaginal microbicide gel formulation was developed and tested for one of the most promising candidates. PMID:26898379

  4. Selection of 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoroarabinonucleotide (FANA) aptamers that bind HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with picomolar affinity

    PubMed Central

    Alves Ferreira-Bravo, Irani; Cozens, Christopher; Holliger, Philipp; DeStefano, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Using a Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) protocol capable of selecting xeno-nucleic acid (XNA) aptamers, a 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoroarabinonucleotide (FANA) aptamer (referred to as FA1) to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) was selected. FA1 bound HIV-1 RT with KD,app values in the low pM range under different ionic conditions. Comparisons to published HIV-1 RT RNA and DNA aptamers indicated that FA1 bound at least as well as these aptamers. FA1 contained a 20 nucleotide 5′ DNA sequence followed by a 57 nucleotide region of FANA nucleotides. Removal of the fourteen 5′ DNA nucleotides did not affect binding. FA1's predicted structure was composed of four stems and four loops. All stem nucleotides could be modified to G-C base pairs (14 total changes) with a small effect on binding. Eliminating or altering most loop sequences reduced or abolished tight binding. Overall, results suggested that the structure and the sequence of FA1 were important for binding. FA1 showed strong inhibition of HIV-1 RT in extension assays while no specific binding to avian myeloblastosis or Moloney murine leukemia RTs was detected. A complete DNA version of FA1 showed low binding to HIV-1 RT, emphasizing the unique properties of FANA in HIV-1 RT binding. PMID:26476448

  5. 4'-Ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) inhibits HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Michailidis, Eleftherios; Huber, Andrew D; Ryan, Emily M; Ong, Yee T; Leslie, Maxwell D; Matzek, Kayla B; Singh, Kamalendra; Marchand, Bruno; Hagedorn, Ariel N; Kirby, Karen A; Rohan, Lisa C; Kodama, Eiichi N; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Parniak, Michael A; Sarafianos, Stefan G

    2014-08-29

    4'-Ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) is a nucleoside analog that, unlike approved anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, has a 3'-OH and exhibits remarkable potency against wild-type and drug-resistant HIVs. EFdA triphosphate (EFdA-TP) is unique among nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors because it inhibits HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with multiple mechanisms. (a) EFdA-TP can block RT as a translocation-defective RT inhibitor that dramatically slows DNA synthesis, acting as a de facto immediate chain terminator. Although non-translocated EFdA-MP-terminated primers can be unblocked, they can be efficiently converted back to the EFdA-MP-terminated form. (b) EFdA-TP can function as a delayed chain terminator, allowing incorporation of an additional dNTP before blocking DNA synthesis. In such cases, EFdA-MP-terminated primers are protected from excision. (c) EFdA-MP can be efficiently misincorporated by RT, leading to mismatched primers that are extremely hard to extend and are also protected from excision. The context of template sequence defines the relative contribution of each mechanism and affects the affinity of EFdA-MP for potential incorporation sites, explaining in part the lack of antagonism between EFdA and tenofovir. Changes in the type of nucleotide before EFdA-MP incorporation can alter its mechanism of inhibition from delayed chain terminator to immediate chain terminator. The versatility of EFdA in inhibiting HIV replication by multiple mechanisms may explain why resistance to EFdA is more difficult to emerge. PMID:24970894

  6. Cordysobin, a novel alkaline serine protease with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity from the medicinal mushroom Cordyceps sobolifera.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shou-Xian; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Zhao, Shuang; Xu, Feng; Geng, Xiao-Li; Wang, He-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    A novel serine protease, designated as cordysobin, was purified from dried fruiting bodies of the mushroom Cordyceps sobolifera. The isolation procedure utilized ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and SP-Sepharose followed by gel filtration on Superdex 75. The protease did not adsorb on DEAE-cellulose but bound to SP-Sepharose. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), the protease resolved as a single band with an apparent molecular mass of 31 kDa. Its optimal pH was 10.0, and the optimal temperature was 65°C. The protease displayed a K(m) value of 0.41 μM and 13.44 μM·min⁻¹ using Suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-MCA as substrate at pH 10.0 and 37°C. Protease activity was enhanced by the Fe²⁺ ion at low concentration range of 1.25-10 mM and was strongly inhibited by Hg²⁺ up to 1.25 mM. The protease was strongly inhibited by chymostatin and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), suggesting that it is a serine protease. It manifested significant inhibitory activity toward HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with an IC₅₀ value of 8.2×10⁻³ μM, which is the highest anti-HIV-1 RT activity of reported mushroom proteins. PMID:22014786

  7. Impact of HIV-1 genetic diversity on plasma HIV-1 RNA Quantification: usefulness of the Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA second-generation long terminal repeat-based real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction test.

    PubMed

    Rouet, François; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Nerrienet, Eric; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Burgard, Marianne; Peeters, Martine; Damond, Florence; Ekouevi, Didier Koumavi; Msellati, Philippe; Ferradini, Laurent; Rukobo, Sandra; Maréchal, Valérie; Schvachsa, Nilda; Wakrim, Lahcen; Rafalimanana, Christian; Rakotoambinina, Benjamin; Viard, Jean-Paul; Seigneurin, Jean-Marie; Rouzioux, Christine

    2007-08-01

    The high genetic diversity of HIV-1 has a major impact on the quantification of plasma HIV-1 RNA, representing an increasingly difficult challenge. A total of 898 plasma specimens positive for HIV-1 RNA by commercial assays (Amplicor v1.5; Roche Diagnostic Systems, Alameda, CA or Versant v3.0; Bayer Diagnostics, Emeryville, CA) were tested using the Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA second-generation (G2) real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test: 518 samples containing HIV-1 of known subtype, including 88 from 2 subtype panels and 430 harboring B (n = 266) and non-B (n = 164) group M HIV-1 subtypes from patients followed up in 2002 through 2005 at Necker Hospital (Paris, France), and 380 samples from 10 different countries (Argentina, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, France, Ivory Coast, Madagascar, Morocco, Thailand, and Zimbabwe). HIV-1 RNA values obtained by G2 real-time PCR were highly correlated with those obtained by the Amplicor v1.5 for B and non-B subtypes (R = 0.892 and 0.892, respectively) and for samples from diverse countries (R = 0.867 and 0.893 for real-time PCR vs. Amplicor v1.5 and real-time PCR vs. Versant v3.0, respectively). Approximately 30% of specimens harboring non-B subtypes were underquantified by at least -0.51 log10 in Amplicor v1.5 versus 5% underquantified in G2 real-time PCR. Discrepant results were also obtained with subtype B samples (14% underquantified by Amplicor v1.5 vs. 7% by G2 real-time PCR). Similar percentages were observed when comparing results obtained with the G2 real-time PCR assay with those obtained using the Versant assay. Addressing HIV-1 diversity, continual monitoring of HIV-1 RNA assays, together with molecular epidemiology studies, is required to improve the accuracy of all HIV RNA assays.

  8. Substituted tetrahydroquinolines as potent allosteric inhibitors of reverse transcriptase and its key mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Dai-Shi; Lim, John J.; Tinney, Elizabeth; Wan, Bang-Lin; Young, Mary Beth; Anderson, Kenneth D.; Rudd, Deanne; Munshi, Vandna; Bahnck, Carolyn; Felock, Peter J.; Lu, Meiqing; Lai, Ming-Tain; Touch, Sinoeun; Moyer, Gregory; DiStefano, Daniel J.; Flynn, Jessica A.; Liang, Yuexia; Sanchez, Rosa; Prasad, Sridhar; Yan, Youwei; Perlow-Poehnelt, Rebecca; Torrent, Maricel; Miller, Mike; Vacca, Joe P.; Williams, Theresa M.; Anthony, Neville J.; Merck

    2010-09-27

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are key elements of multidrug regimens, called HAART (Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy), that are used to treat HIV-1 infections. Elucidation of the structure-activity relationships of the thiocarbamate moiety of the previous published lead compound 2 provided a series of novel tetrahydroquinoline derivatives as potent inhibitors of HIV-1 RT with nanomolar intrinsic activity on the WT and key mutant enzymes and potent antiviral activity in infected cells. The SAR optimization, mutation profiles, preparation of compounds, and pharmacokinetic profile of compounds are described.

  9. Sulfonic acid polymers: Highly potent inhibition of HIV-1 and HIV-2 reverse transcriptase and antiviral activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, P.; Verma, S.; Tan, G.T.; Wickramasinghe, A.; Pezzuto, J.M.; Huges, S.H.; Baba, M.

    1993-12-31

    In an extension of the authors` work in the sulfonic acid polymer area they have evaluated the reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitory activity of several varying molecular weight aromatic and aliphatic derivatives. All the polymers possess anti-HIV activity at doses that are non-toxic to the host cells and act by inhibiting viral adsorption. In the RT assay, poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid) exhibited highly potent inhibition with IC{sub 50} values of 0.0008 {mu}M and 0.0007 {mu}M for HIV-1 and HIV-2 RT respectively. The discovery of the anti-RT potential of these derivatives provides the impetus to investigate additional intervention strategies that are coupled with the facilitated cellular penetration of these agents.

  10. Drug targeting of HIV-1 RNA.DNA hybrid structures: thermodynamics of recognition and impact on reverse transcriptase-mediated ribonuclease H activity and viral replication.

    PubMed

    Li, Tsai-Kun; Barbieri, Christopher M; Lin, Hsin-Chin; Rabson, Arnold B; Yang, Gengcheng; Fan, Yupeng; Gaffney, Barbara L; Jones, Roger A; Pilch, Daniel S

    2004-08-01

    RNA degradation via the ribonuclease H (RNase H) activity of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) is a critical component of the reverse transcription process. In this connection, mutations of RT that inactivate RNase H activity result in noninfectious virus particles. Thus, interfering with the RNase H activity of RT represents a potential vehicle for the inhibition of HIV-1 replication. Here, we demonstrate an approach for inhibiting the RNase H activity of HIV-1 RT by targeting its RNA.DNA hybrid substrates. Specifically, we show that the binding of the 4,5-disubstituted 2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycosides, neomycin, paromomycin, and ribostamycin, to two different chimeric RNA-DNA duplexes, which mimic two distinct intermediates in the reverse transcription process, inhibits specific RT-mediated RNase H cleavage, with this inhibition being competitive in nature. UV melting and isothermal titration calorimetry studies reveal a correlation between the relative binding affinities of the three drugs for each of the chimeric RNA-DNA host duplexes and the relative extents to which the drugs inhibit RT-mediated RNase H cleavage of the duplexes. Significantly, this correlation also extends to the relative efficacies with which the drugs inhibit HIV-1 replication. In the aggregate, our results highlight a potential strategy for AIDS chemotherapy that should not be compromised by the unusual genetic diversity of HIV-1.

  11. Fate of HIV-1 cDNA intermediates during reverse transcription is dictated by transcription initiation site of virus genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Takao; Sato, Yoko; Huang, Yu-Lun; Koi, Satoshi; Takahata, Tatsuro; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kawai, Gota; Kannagi, Mari

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcription is accomplished by sequential strand-transfers of partial cDNA intermediates copied from viral genomic RNA. Here, we revealed an unprecedented role of 5′-end guanosine (G) of HIV-1 genomic RNA for reverse transcription. Based on current consensus for HIV-1 transcription initiation site, HIV-1 transcripts possess a single G at 5′-ends (G1-form). However, we found that HIV-1 transcripts with additional Gs at 5′-ends (G2- and G3-forms) were abundantly expressed in infected cells by using alternative transcription initiation sites. The G2- and G3-forms were also detected in the virus particle, although the G1-form predominated. To address biological impact of the 5′-G number, we generated HIV clone DNA to express the G1-form exclusively by deleting the alternative initiation sites. Virus produced from the clone showed significantly higher strand-transfer of minus strong-stop cDNA (-sscDNA). The in vitro assay using synthetic HIV-1 RNAs revealed that the abortive forms of -sscDNA were abundantly generated from the G3-form RNA, but dramatically reduced from the G1-form. Moreover, the strand-transfer of -sscDNA from the G1-form was prominently stimulated by HIV-1 nucleocapsid. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the 5′-G number that corresponds to HIV-1 transcription initiation site was critical for successful strand-transfer of -sscDNA during reverse transcription. PMID:26631448

  12. Specific Interaction between eEF1A and HIV RT Is Critical for HIV-1 Reverse Transcription and a Potential Anti-HIV Target

    PubMed Central

    Rawle, Daniel J.; Qin, Fangyun; Wang, Rui; Soares, Dinesh C.; Jin, Hongping; Sivakumaran, Haran; Lin, Min-Hsuan; Spann, Kirsten; Abbott, Catherine M.; Harrich, David

    2015-01-01

    Reverse transcription is the central defining feature of HIV-1 replication. We previously reported that the cellular eukaryotic elongation factor 1 (eEF1) complex associates with the HIV-1 reverse transcription complex (RTC) and the association is important for late steps of reverse transcription. Here we show that association between the eEF1 and RTC complexes occurs by a strong and direct interaction between the subunit eEF1A and reverse transcriptase (RT). Using biolayer interferometry and co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays, we show that association between the eEF1 and RTC complexes occurs by a strong (KD ~3–4 nM) and direct interaction between eEF1A and reverse transcriptase (RT). Biolayer interferometry analysis of cell lysates with titrated levels of eEF1A indicates it is a predominant cellular RT binding protein. Both the RT thumb and connection domains are required for interaction with eEF1A. A single amino acid mutation, W252A, within the thumb domain impaired co-IP between eEF1A and RT, and also significantly reduced the efficiency of late reverse transcription and virus replication when incorporated into infectious HIV-1. Molecular modeling analysis indicated that interaction between W252 and L303 are important for RT structure, and their mutation to alanine did not impair heterodimerisation, but negatively impacted interaction with eEF1A. Didemnin B, which specifically binds eEF1A, potently inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcription by greater than 2 logs at subnanomolar concentrations, especially affecting reverse transcription late DNA synthesis. Analysis showed reduced levels of RTCs from HIV-1-infected HEK293T treated with didemnin B compared to untreated cells. Interestingly, HIV-1 with a W252A RT mutation was resistant to didemnin B negative effects showing that didemnin B affects HIV-1 by targeting the RT-eEF1A interaction. The combined evidence indicates a direct interaction between eEF1A and RT is crucial for HIV reverse transcription and

  13. Specific Interaction between eEF1A and HIV RT Is Critical for HIV-1 Reverse Transcription and a Potential Anti-HIV Target.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongsheng; Wei, Ting; Rawle, Daniel J; Qin, Fangyun; Wang, Rui; Soares, Dinesh C; Jin, Hongping; Sivakumaran, Haran; Lin, Min-Hsuan; Spann, Kirsten; Abbott, Catherine M; Harrich, David

    2015-12-01

    Reverse transcription is the central defining feature of HIV-1 replication. We previously reported that the cellular eukaryotic elongation factor 1 (eEF1) complex associates with the HIV-1 reverse transcription complex (RTC) and the association is important for late steps of reverse transcription. Here we show that association between the eEF1 and RTC complexes occurs by a strong and direct interaction between the subunit eEF1A and reverse transcriptase (RT). Using biolayer interferometry and co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays, we show that association between the eEF1 and RTC complexes occurs by a strong (KD ~3-4 nM) and direct interaction between eEF1A and reverse transcriptase (RT). Biolayer interferometry analysis of cell lysates with titrated levels of eEF1A indicates it is a predominant cellular RT binding protein. Both the RT thumb and connection domains are required for interaction with eEF1A. A single amino acid mutation, W252A, within the thumb domain impaired co-IP between eEF1A and RT, and also significantly reduced the efficiency of late reverse transcription and virus replication when incorporated into infectious HIV-1. Molecular modeling analysis indicated that interaction between W252 and L303 are important for RT structure, and their mutation to alanine did not impair heterodimerisation, but negatively impacted interaction with eEF1A. Didemnin B, which specifically binds eEF1A, potently inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcription by greater than 2 logs at subnanomolar concentrations, especially affecting reverse transcription late DNA synthesis. Analysis showed reduced levels of RTCs from HIV-1-infected HEK293T treated with didemnin B compared to untreated cells. Interestingly, HIV-1 with a W252A RT mutation was resistant to didemnin B negative effects showing that didemnin B affects HIV-1 by targeting the RT-eEF1A interaction. The combined evidence indicates a direct interaction between eEF1A and RT is crucial for HIV reverse transcription and

  14. Development and Customization of a Color-Coded Microbeads-Based Assay for Drug Resistance in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Lijun; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Shiino, Teiichiro; Nakamura, Hitomi; Koga, Michiko; Kikuchi, Tadashi; Adachi, Eisuke; Koibuchi, Tomohiko; Ishida, Takaomi; Gao, George F.; Matsushita, Masaki; Sugiura, Wataru; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Hosoya, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug resistance (DR) of HIV-1 can be examined genotypically or phenotypically. Although sequencing is the gold standard of the genotypic resistance testing (GRT), high-throughput GRT targeted to the codons responsible for DR may be more appropriate for epidemiological studies and public health research. Methods We used a Japanese database to design and synthesize sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (SSOP) for the detection of wild-type sequences and 6 DR mutations in the clade B HIV-1 reverse transcriptase region. We coupled SSOP to microbeads of the Luminex 100 xMAP system and developed a GRT based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-SSOP-Luminex method. Results Sixteen oligoprobes for discriminating DR mutations from wild-type sequences at 6 loci were designed and synthesized, and their sensitivity and specificity were confirmed using isogenic plasmids. The PCR-SSOP-Luminex DR assay was then compared to direct sequencing using 74 plasma specimens from treatment-naïve patients or those on failing treatment. In the majority of specimens, the results of the PCR-SSOP-Luminex DR assay were concordant with sequencing results: 62/74 (83.8%) for M41, 43/74 (58.1%) for K65, 70/74 (94.6%) for K70, 55/73 (75.3%) for K103, 63/73 (86.3%) for M184 and 68/73 (93.2%) for T215. There were a number of specimens without any positive signals, especially for K65. The nucleotide position of A2723G, A2747G and C2750T were frequent polymorphisms for the wild-type amino acids K65, K66 and D67, respectively, and 14 specimens had the D67N mutation encoded by G2748A. We synthesized 14 additional oligoprobes for K65, and the sensitivity for K65 loci improved from 43/74 (58.1%) to 68/74 (91.9%). Conclusions We developed a rapid high-throughput assay for clade B HIV-1 DR mutations, which could be customized by synthesizing oligoprobes suitable for the circulating viruses. The assay could be a useful tool especially for public health research in both resource-rich and

  15. Mechanism of polyoxometalate-mediated inactivation of DNA polymerases: an analysis with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase indicates specificity for the DNA-binding cleft.

    PubMed Central

    Sarafianos, S G; Kortz, U; Pope, M T; Modak, M J

    1996-01-01

    The anti-DNA polymerase activity of a structural family of polyoxometalates has been determined. Two representative compounds of this family, possessing a saddle-like structure [(O3POPO3)4W12O36]16- (polyoxometalate I) and [(O3PCH2PO3)4W12O36]16- (polyoxometalate II) were found to inhibit all the DNA polymerases tested, with IC50 values ranging from 2 to 10 microM. A comparative study with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) and Klenow polymerase as representative DNA polymerases indicated that protection from inactivation was achieved by inclusion of DNA but not by deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs). Kinetic analysis revealed that the mode of HIV-1 RT inhibition is competitive with respect to DNA, and non-competitive with respect to dNTP binding. Cross-linking experiments confirmed that the inhibitors interfere with the DNA-binding function of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Interestingly, a number of drug-resistant mutants of HIV-1 RT exhibit a sensitivity to polyoxometalate comparable to the wild-type HIV-1 RT, suggesting that these polyoxometalates interact at a novel site. Because different polymerases contain DNA-binding clefts of various dimensions, it should be possible to modify polyoxometalates or to add a link to an enzyme-specific drug so that more effective inhibitors could be developed. Using a computer model of HIV-1 RT we performed docking studies in a binary complex (enzyme-polyoxometalate I) to propose tentatively a possible interacting site in HIV-1 RT consistent with the available biochemical results as well as with the geometric and charge constraints of the two molecules. PMID:8912703

  16. Inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcription by triple-helix forming oligonucleotides with viral RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Volkmann, S; Jendis, J; Frauendorf, A; Moelling, K

    1995-01-01

    Reverse transcription of retroviral RNA into double-stranded DNA is catalyzed by reverse transcriptase (RT). A highly conserved polypurine tract (PPT) on the viral RNA serves as primer for plus-strand DNA synthesis and is a possible target for triple-helix formation. Triple-helix formation during reverse transcription involves either single-stranded RNA or an RNA.DNA hybrid. The effect of triple-helix formation on reverse transcription has been analyzed here in vitro using a three-strand-system consisting of an RNA.DNA hybrid and triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) consisting either of DNA or RNA. Three strand triple-helices inhibit RNase H cleavage of the PPT-RNA.DNA hybrid and initiation of plus-strand DNA synthesis in vitro. Triple-helix formation on a single-stranded RNA target has also been tested in a two-strand-system with TFOs comprising Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base-pairing sequences, both targeted to the PPT-RNA, on a single strand connected by a linker (T)4. TFOs prevent RNase H cleavage of the PPT-RNA and initiation of plus-strand DNA synthesis in vitro. In cell culture experiments one TFO is an efficient inhibitor of retrovirus replication, leading to a block of p24 synthesis and inhibition of syncytia formation in newly infected cells. Images PMID:7537875

  17. Positional adaptability in the design of mutation-resistant nonnucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors: a supramolecular perspective.

    PubMed

    Bruccoleri, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Drug resistance is a key cause of failed treatment of HIV infection. The efficacy of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase-inhibiting (NNRTI) drugs is impaired by the rapid emergence of drug-resistant mutations. The literature supports the idea that purposefully designed flexible NNRTIs at an active site may help overcome drug resistance. It is proposed here that the usual "lock and key" model, with respect to NNRTI drug design, be expanded to consider creating "master keys" that would automatically adjust conformations to fit all of the "locks" mutations may make. The present work introduces the novel perspective of designing and creating supramolecular assemblies as potential NNRTIs (instead of the relatively more rigid single-molecule inhibitors). Specifically, flexible self-assembling quinhydrone supramolecular dimers formed from quinonoid monomers (designed to be highly flexible NNRTIs themselves) will be offered as a working example of this new perspective in NNRTI drug design. Quinonoid compounds have demonstrated binding interactions at various sites of the HIV-1 RT enzyme, including the elusive ribonuclease H area. Quinhydrone self-organized dimers have at some point in their molecular architecture a noncovalently interacting donor-acceptor ring pair complex. This complex is at the heart of the increased torsional, rotational, and translational motion this species will experience at a particular active site. Flexible supramolecular assemblies, together with their flexible monomer components, may offer a critical advantage in retaining potency against a wide range of drug-resistant HIV-1 RTs. This new supramolecular perspective may also have broader implications in the general field of antimicrobial drug design. PMID:22938539

  18. Lamivudine (3TC) resistance in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase involves steric hindrance with beta-branched amino acids.

    PubMed

    Sarafianos, S G; Das, K; Clark, A D; Ding, J; Boyer, P L; Hughes, S H; Arnold, E

    1999-08-31

    An important component of triple-drug anti-AIDS therapy is 2', 3'-dideoxy-3'-thiacytidine (3TC, lamivudine). Single mutations at residue 184 of the reverse transcriptase (RT) in HIV cause high-level resistance to 3TC and contribute to the failure of anti-AIDS combination therapy. We have determined crystal structures of the 3TC-resistant mutant HIV-1 RT (M184I) in both the presence and absence of a DNA/DNA template-primer. In the absence of a DNA substrate, the wild-type and mutant structures are very similar. However, comparison of crystal structures of M184I mutant and wild-type HIV-1 RT with and without DNA reveals repositioning of the template-primer in the M184I/DNA binary complex and other smaller changes in residues in the dNTP-binding site. On the basis of these structural results, we developed a model that explains the ability of the 3TC-resistant mutant M184I to incorporate dNTPs but not the nucleotide analog 3TCTP. In this model, steric hindrance is expected for NRTIs with beta- or L- ring configurations, as with the enantiomer of 3TC that is used in therapy. Steric conflict between the oxathiolane ring of 3TCTP and the side chain of beta-branched amino acids (Val, Ile, Thr) at position 184 perturbs inhibitor binding, leading to a reduction in incorporation of the analog. The model can also explain the 3TC resistance of analogous hepatitis B polymerase mutants. Repositioning of the template-primer as observed in the binary complex (M184I/DNA) may also occur in the catalytic ternary complex (M184I/DNA/3TCTP) and contribute to 3TC resistance by interfering with the formation of a catalytically competent closed complex.

  19. Parameterization of AZT-A widely used nucleoside inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Alexandra T. P.; Fernandes, Pedro A.; Ramos, Maria J.

    Seven nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors are currently used in the clinical treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). These substrate analogues block DNA synthesis by the viral enzyme RT. However, the emergence of resistant variants of RT allied to their long-term toxicity requires the design of new and better RT inhibitors, with long-term in vivo efficacy. In this work we used density functional theory (DFT) calculations to develop a set of molecular mechanics (MM) parameters committed to the AMBER force field for one of the most used in the clinic nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs): zidovudine (AZT). These parameters were tested by comparing the optimized geometries of AZT at both the DFT and MM levels of theory. The ability of the new parameters to reproduce the torsional energy of the azide group was also verified by scanning the surface in MM with the new parameters and comparing the results with the same potential energy surface (PES) at the DFT level. Finally, the parameters were validated through classical MD simulations of AZT in aqueous environment.

  20. Broad-spectrum non-nucleoside inhibitors of human herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    McClain, Lora; Zhi, Yun; Cheng, Hoyee; Ghosh, Ayantika; Piazza, Paolo; Yee, Michael B.; Kumar, Santosh; Milosevic, Jadranka; Bloom, David C.; Arav-Boger, Ravit; Kinchington, Paul R.; Yolken, Robert; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; D’Aiuto, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Herpesvirus infections cause considerable morbidity and mortality through lifelong recurrent cycles of lytic and latent infection in several tissues, including the human nervous system. Acyclovir (ACV) and its prodrug, the current antivirals of choice for herpes simplex virus (HSV) and, to some extent, varicella zoster virus (VZV) infections are nucleoside analogues that inhibit viral DNA replication. Rising viral resistance and the need for more effective second-line drugs have motivated searches for additional antiviral agents, particularly non-nucleoside based agents. We evaluated the antiviral activity of five compounds with predicted lysosomotropic activity using conventional and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuronal (iPSC-neurons) cultures. Their potency and toxicity were compared with ACV and the lysosomotropic agents chloroquine and bafilomycin A1. Out of five compounds tested, micromolar concentrations of 30N12, 16F19, and 4F17 showed antiviral activity comparable to ACV (50μM) during lytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections, reduced viral DNA copy number, and reduced selected HSV-1 protein levels. These compounds also inhibited the reactivation of ‘quiescent’ HSV-1 infection established in iPSC-neurons, but did not inhibit viral entry into host cells. The same compounds had greater potency than ACV against lytic VZV infection; they also inhibited replication of human cytomegalovirus. The anti-herpetic effects of these non-nucleoside agents merit further evaluation in vivo. PMID:26079681

  1. Broad-spectrum non-nucleoside inhibitors of human herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    McClain, Lora; Zhi, Yun; Cheng, Hoyee; Ghosh, Ayantika; Piazza, Paolo; Yee, Michael B; Kumar, Santosh; Milosevic, Jadranka; Bloom, David C; Arav-Boger, Ravit; Kinchington, Paul R; Yolken, Robert; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; D'Aiuto, Leonardo

    2015-09-01

    Herpesvirus infections cause considerable morbidity and mortality through lifelong recurrent cycles of lytic and latent infection in several tissues, including the human nervous system. Acyclovir (ACV) and its prodrug, the current antivirals of choice for herpes simplex virus (HSV) and, to some extent, varicella zoster virus (VZV) infections are nucleoside analogues that inhibit viral DNA replication. Rising viral resistance and the need for more effective second-line drugs have motivated searches for additional antiviral agents, particularly non-nucleoside based agents. We evaluated the antiviral activity of five compounds with predicted lysosomotropic activity using conventional and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuronal (iPSC-neurons) cultures. Their potency and toxicity were compared with ACV and the lysosomotropic agents chloroquine and bafilomycin A1. Out of five compounds tested, micromolar concentrations of 30N12, 16F19, and 4F17 showed antiviral activity comparable to ACV (50μM) during lytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections, reduced viral DNA copy number, and reduced selected HSV-1 protein levels. These compounds also inhibited the reactivation of 'quiescent' HSV-1 infection established in iPSC-neurons, but did not inhibit viral entry into host cells. The same compounds had greater potency than ACV against lytic VZV infection; they also inhibited replication of human cytomegalovirus. The anti-herpetic effects of these non-nucleoside agents merit further evaluation in vivo. PMID:26079681

  2. Arylazolyl(azinyl)thioacetanilides. Part 20: Discovery of novel purinylthioacetanilides derivatives as potent HIV-1 NNRTIs via a structure-based bioisosterism approach.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xueyi; Li, Xiao; Yang, Jiapei; Huang, Boshi; Kang, Dongwei; Zhao, Fabao; Zhou, Zhongxia; De Clercq, Erik; Daelemans, Dirk; Pannecouque, Christophe; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-09-15

    By means of structure-based bioisosterism approach, a series of novel purinylthioacetanilide derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated as potent HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Some of the tested compounds were found to be active against wild-type (WT) HIV-1(IIIB) with EC50 in the range of 0.78-4.46μM. Among them, LAD-8 displayed the most potent anti-HIV activity (EC50=0.78μM, SI=24). In addition, LBD-6 showed moderate activity against L100I mutant (EC50=5.64μM) and double mutant strain RES056 (EC50=22.24μM). Preliminary structure-activity relationships (SARs) were discussed in detail. Molecular modeling study was used to predict the optimal conformation in the NNRTI binding site, which may play a guiding role in further rational optimization. PMID:27501911

  3. Use of reverse-transcriptase-based HIV-1 viral load assessment to confirm low viral loads in newly diagnosed patients in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment-naïve patients newly diagnosed with HIV occasionally present with low viral RNA of ≤1’000 copies/ml, raising concerns about viral load underestimation. Because falsely low or undetectable viral loads might lead to inadvertent virus transmission or treatment delays, confirmation of such cases by a sequence-independent viral load test is recommended in Switzerland. Methods HIV-1 RNA ≤1’000 cp/ml by Roche’s or Abbott’s tests in patients newly diagnosed from 2010 to 2012 in Switzerland were subjected to viral load testing by the product-enhanced-reverse transcriptase (PERT) assay. These investigations were complemented with repeat and/or alternative viral RNA measurements. Results HIV-1 RNA ≤1’000 cp/ml was observed in 71 of 1814 newly diagnosed patients. The PERT assay suggested clinically relevant viral load underestimation in 7 of 32 cases that could be investigated. In four patients, the PERT viral load was 10-1’000-fold higher; this was confirmed by alternative HIV-1 RNA tests. Six of the 7 underestimates had been obtained with meanwhile outdated versions of Roche’s HIV-1 RNA test. In the seventh patient, follow-up revealed similar results for RNA and PERT based viral loads. Conclusion PERT assay revealed occasional severe viral load underestimation by versions of HIV-1 RNA tests meanwhile outdated. Underestimation by contemporary tests appears rare, however. PMID:24524626

  4. Toxicity and in vitro activity of HIV-1 latency-reversing agents in primary CNS cells.

    PubMed

    Gray, Lachlan R; On, Hung; Roberts, Emma; Lu, Hao K; Moso, Michael A; Raison, Jacqueline A; Papaioannou, Catherine; Cheng, Wan-Jung; Ellett, Anne M; Jacobson, Jonathan C; Purcell, Damian F J; Wesselingh, Steve L; Gorry, Paul R; Lewin, Sharon R; Churchill, Melissa J

    2016-08-01

    Despite the success of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), HIV persists in long lived latently infected cells in the blood and tissue, and treatment is required lifelong. Recent clinical studies have trialed latency-reversing agents (LRA) as a method to eliminate latently infected cells; however, the effects of LRA on the central nervous system (CNS), a well-known site of virus persistence on cART, are unknown. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity and potency of a panel of commonly used and well-known LRA (panobinostat, romidepsin, vorinostat, chaetocin, disulfiram, hexamethylene bisacetamide [HMBA], and JQ-1) in primary fetal astrocytes (PFA) as well as monocyte-derived macrophages as a cellular model for brain perivascular macrophages. We show that most LRA are non-toxic in these cells at therapeutic concentrations. Additionally, romidepsin, JQ-1, and panobinostat were the most potent at inducing viral transcription, with greater magnitude observed in PFA. In contrast, vorinostat, chaetocin, disulfiram, and HMBA all demonstrated little or no induction of viral transcription. Together, these data suggest that some LRA could potentially activate transcription in latently infected cells in the CNS. We recommend that future trials of LRA also examine the effects of these agents on the CNS via examination of cerebrospinal fluid.

  5. Unfolding the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase RNase H domain – how to lose a molecular tug-of-war

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xunhai; Pedersen, Lars C.; Gabel, Scott A.; Mueller, Geoffrey A.; DeRose, Eugene F.; London, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Formation of the mature HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) p66/p51 heterodimer requires subunit-specific processing of the p66/p66′ homodimer precursor. Since the ribonuclease H (RH) domain contains an occult cleavage site located near its center, cleavage must occur either prior to folding or subsequent to unfolding. Recent NMR studies have identified a slow, subunit-specific RH domain unfolding process proposed to result from a residue tug-of-war between the polymerase and RH domains on the functionally inactive, p66′ subunit. Here, we describe a structural comparison of the isolated RH domain with a domain swapped RH dimer that reveals several intrinsically destabilizing characteristics of the isolated domain that facilitate excursions of Tyr427 from its binding pocket and separation of helices B and D. These studies provide independent support for the subunit-selective RH domain unfolding pathway in which instability of the Tyr427 binding pocket facilitates its release followed by domain transfer, acting as a trigger for further RH domain destabilization and subsequent unfolding. As further support for this pathway, NMR studies demonstrate that addition of an RH active site-directed isoquinolone ligand retards the subunit-selective RH′ domain unfolding behavior of the p66/p66′ homodimer. This study demonstrates the feasibility of directly targeting RT maturation with therapeutics. PMID:26773054

  6. In vitro antioxidant properties, HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory effects of traditional herbal preparations sold in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Ndhlala, Ashwell R; Finnie, Jeffrey F; Van Staden, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    The antioxidant potentials for fourteen multipurpose traditional herbal preparations sold in South Africa were determined using the DPPH radical scavenging, ferric reducing power and β-carotene-linoleic acid model system, the anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme inhibitory effects using an ELISA kit and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme inhibition using the microtitre plate assay. Nine of the herbal mixtures (Umzimba omubi, Umuthi wekukhwehlela ne zilonda, Mvusa ukunzi, Umpatisa inkosi, Imbiza ephuzwato, Vusa umzimba, Supreme one hundred, Sejeso herbal mixture Ingwe® and Ingwe® special muti) exhibited higher antioxidant potentials, while only four (Imbiza ephuzwato, Ingwe® muthi mixture, Sejeso herbal mixture Ingwe® and African potato extract™ showed potent activity against the RT enzyme. Nine mixtures (Imbiza ephuzwato, Umpatisa inkosi, African potato extract™, Sejeso herbal mixture Ingwe®, Vusa umzimba; Ingwe® muthi mixture, Ibhubezi™, Lion izifozonke Ingwe® and Ingwe® special muti) showed AChE enzyme inhibitory activity greater than 50%. The observed activity exhibited by some of the herbal mixtures gives some credence to the manufacturers' claims and goes part of the way towards validating their use against certain conditions such as oxidative stress, HIV/AIDS proliferation and some mental conditions. It is however, desirable to carry out further studies to determine the effects of mixing plant species/parts in one mixture on the antioxidant potency as well as isolating active constituents from the herbal mixtures. PMID:20938401

  7. A Novel Laccase with Potent Antiproliferative and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activities from Mycelia of Mushroom Coprinus comatus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shuang; Rong, Cheng-Bo; Kong, Chang; Liu, Yu; Xu, Feng; Miao, Qian-Jiang; Wang, Shou-Xian; Wang, He-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    A novel laccase was isolated and purified from fermentation mycelia of mushroom Coprinus comatus with an isolation procedure including three ion-exchange chromatography steps on DEAE-cellulose, CM-cellulose, and Q-Sepharose and one gel-filtration step by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. The purified enzyme was a monomeric protein with a molecular weight of 64 kDa. It possessed a unique N-terminal amino acid sequence of AIGPVADLKV, which has considerably high sequence similarity with that of other fungal laccases, but is different from that of C. comatus laccases reported. The enzyme manifested an optimal pH value of 2.0 and an optimal temperature of 60°C using 2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazolone-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) as the substrate. The laccase displayed, at pH 2.0 and 37°C, Km values of 1.59 mM towards ABTS. It potently suppressed proliferation of tumor cell lines HepG2 and MCF7, and inhibited human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) with an IC50 value of 3.46 μM, 4.95 μM, and 5.85 μM, respectively, signifying that it is an antipathogenic protein. PMID:25540778

  8. Synthesis of the (5Z)-5-Pentacosenoic and 5-Pentacosynoic Acids as Novel HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Lizabeth Giménez; Orellano, Elsie A.; Rosado, Karolyna; Guido, Rafael V. C.; Andricopulo, Adriano D.; Soto, Gabriela O.; Rodríguez, José W.; Sanabria-Ríos, David J.; Carballeira, Néstor M.

    2016-01-01

    The natural fatty acids (5Z)-5-pentacosenoic and (9Z)-9-pentacosenoic acids were synthesized for the first time in eight steps starting from either 4-bromo-1-butanol or 8-bromo-1-butanol and in 20-58% overall yields, while the novel fatty acids 5-pentacosynoic and 9-pentacosynoic acids were also synthesized in six steps and in 34-43% overall yields. The Δ5 acids displayed the best IC50’s (24-38 µM) against the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme, comparable to nervonic acid (IC50 = 12 µM). The Δ9 acids were not as effective towards HIV-RT with the (9Z)-9-pentacosenoic acid displaying an IC50 = 54 µM. Fatty acid chain length and position of the unsaturation was critical for the observed inhibition. Molecular modeling studies indicated the structural determinants underlying the biological activity of the most potent compounds. These results provide new insights into the structural requirements that must be present in fatty acids so as to enhance their inhibitory potential towards HIV-RT. PMID:26345647

  9. Unfolding the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase RNase H domain – how to lose a molecular tug-of-war

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zheng, Xunhai; Pedersen, Lars C.; Gabel, Scott A.; Mueller, Geoffrey A.; DeRose, Eugene F.; London, Robert E.

    2016-01-14

    Formation of the mature HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) p66/p51 heterodimer requires subunit-specific processing of the p66/p66' homodimer precursor. Since the ribonuclease H (RH) domain contains an occult cleavage site located near its center, cleavage must occur either prior to folding or subsequent to unfolding. Recent NMR studies have identified a slow, subunit-specific RH domain unfolding process proposed to result from a residue tug-of-war between the polymerase and RH domains on the functionally inactive, p66' subunit. Here, we describe a structural comparison of the isolated RH domain with a domain swapped RH dimer that reveals several intrinsically destabilizing characteristics of themore » isolated domain that facilitate excursions of Tyr427 from its binding pocket and separation of helices B and D. These studies provide independent support for the subunit-selective RH domain unfolding pathway in which instability of the Tyr427 binding pocket facilitates its release followed by domain transfer, acting as a trigger for further RH domain destabilization and subsequent unfolding. As further support for this pathway, NMR studies demonstrate that addition of an RH active site-directed isoquinolone ligand retards the subunit-selective RH' domain unfolding behavior of the p66/p66' homodimer. As a result, this study demonstrates the feasibility of directly targeting RT maturation with therapeutics.« less

  10. A laccase with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity from the broth of mycelial culture of the mushroom Lentinus tigrinus.

    PubMed

    Xu, LiJing; Wang, HeXiang; Ng, TziBun

    2012-01-01

    A 59 kDa laccase with inhibitory activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (IC(50) = 2.4 μM) was isolated from the broth of mycelial culture of the mushroom Lentinus tigrinus. The isolation procedure involved ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and CM-cellulose, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. The laccase was adsorbed on both types of ion exchangers. About 95-fold purification was achieved with a 25.9% yield of the enzyme. The procedure resulted in a specific enzyme activity of 76.6 U/mg. Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was GIPDLHDLTV, which showed little similarity to other mushroom laccase and other Lentinus tigrinus strain laccase. Its characteristics were different from previously reported laccase of other Lentinus tigrinus strain. Maximal laccase activity was observed at a pH of 4 and at a temperature of 60°C, respectively. This study yielded the information about the potentially exploitable activities of Lentinus tigrinus laccase. PMID:22536022

  11. A Laccase with HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activity from the Broth of Mycelial Culture of the Mushroom Lentinus tigrinus

    PubMed Central

    Xu, LiJing; Wang, HeXiang; Ng, TziBun

    2012-01-01

    A 59 kDa laccase with inhibitory activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (IC50 = 2.4 μM) was isolated from the broth of mycelial culture of the mushroom Lentinus tigrinus. The isolation procedure involved ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and CM-cellulose, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. The laccase was adsorbed on both types of ion exchangers. About 95-fold purification was achieved with a 25.9% yield of the enzyme. The procedure resulted in a specific enzyme activity of 76.6 U/mg. Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was GIPDLHDLTV, which showed little similarity to other mushroom laccase and other Lentinus tigrinus strain laccase. Its characteristics were different from previously reported laccase of other Lentinus tigrinus strain. Maximal laccase activity was observed at a pH of 4 and at a temperature of 60°C, respectively. This study yielded the information about the potentially exploitable activities of Lentinus tigrinus laccase. PMID:22536022

  12. Antimycobacterial and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Activity of Julianaceae and Clusiaceae Plant Species from Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Cansino, Rocio; Espitia-Pinzón, Clara Inés; Campos-Lara, María Guadalupe; Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Silvia Laura; Segura-Salinas, Erika; Echeverría-Valencia, Gabriela; Torras-Claveria, Laura; Cuevas-Figueroa, Xochitl Marisol; Reyes-Chilpa, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    The extracts of 14 Julianaceae and 5 Clusiaceae species growing in Mexico were tested in vitro (50 µg/mL) against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and HIV reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT). The Julianaceae bark and leaf extracts inhibited M. tuberculosis (>84.67%) and HIV-RT (<49.89%). The Clusiaceae leaves extracts also inhibited both targets (>58.3% and >67.6%), respectively. The IC50 values for six selected extracts and their cytotoxicity (50 µg/mL) to human macrophages were then determined. Amphipterygium glaucum, A. molle, and A. simplicifolium fairly inhibited M. tuberculosis with IC50 of 1.87–2.35 µg/mL; but their IC50 against HIV-RT was 59.25–97.83 µg/mL. Calophyllum brasiliense, Vismia baccifera, and Vismia mexicana effect on M. tuberculosis was noteworthy (IC50 3.02–3.64 µg/mL) and also inhibited RT-HIV (IC50 26.24–35.17 µg/mL). These 6 extracts (50 µg/mL) presented low toxicity to macrophages (<23.8%). The HPLC profiles of A. glaucum, A. molle, and A. simplicifolium indicated that their antimycobacterial activity cannot be related to masticadienonic, 3α, or 3β-hydromasticadienonic acids, suggesting that other compounds may be responsible for the observed activity or this might be a synergy result. The anti-HIV-RT and antimycobacterial activities induced by C. brasiliense can be attributed to the content of calanolides A, B, as well as soulatrolide. PMID:25983849

  13. Different Effects of Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Resistance Mutations on Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Recognition between HIV-1 Subtype B and Subtype A/E Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kuse, Nozomi; Rahman, Mohammad Arif; Murakoshi, Hayato; Tran, Giang Van; Chikata, Takayuki; Koyanagi, Madoka; Nguyen, Kinh Van; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Oka, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The effect of antiretroviral drug resistance mutations on cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) recognition has been analyzed in HIV-1 subtype B infections, but it remains unclear in infections by other HIV-1 subtypes that are epidemic in countries where antiretroviral drugs are not effectively used. We investigated the effect of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NNRTI)-resistance mutations (Y181C, Y181I, and Y181V) on epitope recognition by CTLs specific for 3 different HIV-1 epitopes (HLA-A*02:01-restricted IV10, HLA-B*35:01-restricted NY9, and HLA-C*12:02-restricted KY9) in subtype B and subtype A/E infections and the accumulation of these mutations in treatment-naive Japanese and Vietnamese. These NNRTI-resistance mutations critically affected NY9-specific and KY9-specific T cell responses in the subtype B infections, whereas they showed a different effect on IV10-specific T cell responses among the subtype B-infected individuals. These mutations affected IV10-specific T cell responses but weakly affected NY9-specific T cell responses in the subtype A/E infections. The substitution at position 3 of NY9 epitope which was found in the subtype A/E virus differently influenced the peptide binding to HLA-B*35:01, suggesting that the differences in peptide binding may result in the differences in T cell recognition between the subtype B virus and A/E virus infections. The Y181C mutation was found to be accumulating in treatment-naive Vietnamese infected with the subtype A/E virus. The present study demonstrated different effects of NNRTI-resistance RT181 mutations on CTL responses between the 2 subtype infections. The Y181C mutation may influence HIV-1 control by the CTLs in Vietnam, since this mutation has been accumulating in treatment-naive Vietnamese. IMPORTANCE Antiretroviral therapy leads to the emergence of drug-resistant HIV-1, resulting in virological and clinical failures. Though HIV-1-specific CTLs play a critical role in HIV-1 infection

  14. Characteristics of Women Enrolled into a Randomized Clinical Trial of Dapivirine Vaginal Ring for HIV-1 Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Palanee-Phillips, Thesla; Schwartz, Katie; Brown, Elizabeth R.; Govender, Vaneshree; Mgodi, Nyaradzo; Kiweewa, Flavia Matovu; Nair, Gonasagrie; Mhlanga, Felix; Siva, Samantha; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Jeenarain, Nitesha; Gaffoor, Zakir; Martinson, Francis; Makanani, Bonus; Naidoo, Sarita; Pather, Arendevi; Phillip, Jessica; Husnik, Marla J.; van der Straten, Ariane; Soto-Torres, Lydia; Baeten, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Women in sub-Saharan Africa are a priority population for evaluation of new biomedical HIV-1 prevention strategies. Antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis is a promising prevention approach; however, clinical trials among young women using daily or coitally-dependent products have found low adherence. Antiretroviral-containing vaginal microbicide rings, which release medication over a month or longer, may reduce these adherence challenges. Methods ASPIRE (A Study to Prevent Infection with a Ring for Extended Use) is a phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial testing the safety and effectiveness of a vaginal ring containing the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor dapivirine for prevention of HIV-1 infection. We describe the baseline characteristics of African women enrolled in the ASPIRE trial. Results Between August 2012 and June 2014, 5516 women were screened and 2629 HIV-1 seronegative women between 18–45 years of age were enrolled from 15 research sites in Malawi, South Africa, Uganda, and Zimbabwe. The median age was 26 years (IQR 22–31) and the majority (59%) were unmarried. Nearly 100% of participants reported having a primary sex partner in the prior three months but 43% did not know the HIV-1 status of their primary partner; 17% reported additional concurrent partners. Nearly two-thirds (64%) reported having disclosed to primary partners about planned vaginal ring use in the trial. Sexually transmitted infections were prevalent: 12% had Chlamydia trachomatis, 7% Trichomonas vaginalis, 4% Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and 1% syphilis. Conclusions African HIV-1 seronegative women at risk of HIV -1 infection were successfully enrolled into a phase III trial of dapivirine vaginal ring for HIV-1 prevention. PMID:26061040

  15. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel 2H-pyran-2-one derivatives as potential HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Defant, Andrea; Mancini, Ines; Tomazzolli, Rossella; Balzarini, Jan

    2015-01-01

    In search for more effective drugs against HIV infection acting as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), a series of new molecules with hybrid structures based on the natural product (+)-calanolide A and the synthetic molecule α-APA, known as potent and selective inhibitors of this enzyme, were selected by docking calculations. A convergent synthetic strategy gave 21 compounds with a 2H-pyran-2-one structural unit and bearing isosteric modifications, which were tested against HIV-infected CEM cell cultures. Only compound 6 (4-((2-(1H-indol-3-yl)ethyl)amino)-6-methyl-2H-pyran-2-one) displayed inhibitory activity (EC50 : 25-50 µM). However, it was associated with a relatively high cytostatic effect on human T lymphocyte (CEM) cell cultures, not easily predictable, neither by the chemical structure nor by the computational approach. Although this drug design has failed in selecting a novel scaffold for NNRTIs, the results have driven the interest towards new potential antitumor molecules showing activity against L1210 murine leukemia and HeLa cervix carcinoma cells, among which compound 21 (6-methyl-4-((2-(naphthalen-1-yl)ethyl)sulfonyl)-2H-pyran-2-one) was the most effective (IC50 : 0.95 and 2.9 µM, respectively).

  16. Structural studies of series HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors 1-(2,6-difluorobenzyl)-2-(2,6-difluorophenyl)-benzimidazoles with different 4-substituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2010-03-01

    Over the past 10 years, several anti-viral drugs have become available to fight the HIV infection. Antiretroviral treatment reduces the mortality of AIDS. Nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase are specific and potentially nontoxic drugs against AIDS. The crystal structures of five nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase are presented here. The structural parameters, especially those describing the angular orientation of the π-electron systems and influencing biological activity, were determined for all of the investigated inhibitors. The chemical character and orientation of the substituent at C4 position of the benzimidazole moiety substantially influences the anti-viral activity. The structural data of the investigated inhibitors is a good basis for modeling enzyme-inhibitor interactions for structure-assisted drug design.

  17. The HEPT Analogue WPR-6 Is Active against a Broad Spectrum of Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Drug-Resistant HIV-1 Strains of Different Serotypes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weisi; Zhao, Jianxiong; Sun, Jianping; Yin, Qianqian; Wang, Yan; Jiao, Yang; Liu, Junyi; Jiang, Shibo; Shao, Yiming; Wang, Xiaowei; Ma, Liying

    2015-08-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are important components of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) used to treat human immunodeficiency type 1 virus (HIV-1). However, because of the emergence of drug resistance and the adverse effects of current anti-HIV drugs, it is essential to develop novel NNRTIs with an excellent safety profile, improved activity against NNRTI-resistant viruses, and enhanced activity against clinical isolates of different subtypes. Here, we have identified 1-[(benzyloxy)methyl]-6-(3,5-dimethylbenzyl)-5-iodopyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione (WPR-6), a novel NNRTI with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 2 to 4 nM against laboratory-adapted HIV-1 strain SF33 and an EC50 of 7 to 14 nM against nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 strain 7391 with a therapeutic index of >1 × 10(4). A panel of five representative clinical virus isolates of different subtypes circulating predominantly in China was highly sensitive to WPR-6, with EC50s ranging from 1 to 6 nM. In addition, WPR-6 showed excellent antiviral potency against the most prevalent NNRTI-resistant viruses containing the K103N and Y181C mutations. To determine whether WPR-6 selects for novel resistant mutants, in vitro resistance selection was conducted with laboratory-adapted HIV-1 strain SF33 on MT-4 cells. The results demonstrated that V106I and Y188L were the two dominant NNRTI-associated resistance mutations detected in the breakthrough viruses. Taken together, these in vitro data indicate that WPR-6 has greater efficacy than the reference HEPT analogue TNK651 and the marketed drug nevirapine against HIV-1. However, to develop it as a new NNRTI, further improvement of its pharmacological properties is warranted. PMID:26055365

  18. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Drug-Resistance Mutations in Chronically Infected Individuals Receiving or Naïve to HAART in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Burda, Sherri T.; Viswanath, Ragupathy; Zhao, Jiangqin; Kinge, Thompson; Anyangwe, Christopher; Tinyami, Erick T.; Haldar, Bijayesh; Powell, Rebecca L.R.; Jarido, Veronica; Hewlett, Indira K.; Nyambi, Phillipe N.

    2010-01-01

    The most common first-line, highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) received by individuals infected with HIV-1 in Cameroon is the combination therapy Triomune, comprised of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) and one non-NRTI (NNRTI). To examine the efficacy of these drugs in Cameroon, where diverse non-B HIV-1 subtypes and recombinant viruses predominate, the reverse transcriptase (RT) viral sequences in patient plasma were analyzed for the presence of mutations that confer drug resistance. Forty-nine HIV-1-positive individuals were randomly selected from those receiving care in HIV/AIDS outpatient clinics in the South-West and North-West Regions of Cameroon. Among the 28 patients receiving HAART, 39% (11/28) had resistance to NRTIs, and 46% (13/28) to NNRTIs after a median of 12 months from the start of therapy. Among those with drug-resistance mutations, there was a median of 14 months from the start of HAART, versus 9 months for those without; no difference was observed in the average viral load (10,997 copies/ml vs. 8,056 copies/ml). In contrast, drug-naïve individuals had a significantly higher average viral load (27,929 copies/ml) than those receiving HAART (9,527 copies/ml). Strikingly, among the 21 drug-naïve individuals, 24% harbored viruses with drug-resistance mutations, suggesting that HIV-1 drug-resistant variants are being transmitted in Cameroon. Given the high frequency of resistance mutations among those on first-line HAART, coupled with the high prevalence of HIV-1 variants with drug-resistance mutations among drug-naïve individuals, this study emphasizes the need for extensive monitoring of resistance mutations and the introduction of a second-line HAART strategy in Cameroon. PMID:20029816

  19. Antitumor and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activities of a Hemagglutinin and a Protease Inhibitor from Mini-Black Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiu Juan; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2011-01-01

    Protease inhibitors (PIs) and hemagglutinins are defense proteins produced by many organisms. From Chinese mini-black soybeans, a 17.5-kDa PI was isolated using chromatography on Q-Sepharose, SP-Sepharose, and DEAE-cellulose. A 25-kDa hemagglutinin was purified similarly, but using Superdex 75 instead of DEAE-cellulose in the final step. The PI inhibited trypsin and chymotrypsin (IC50 = 7.2 and 8.8 μM). Its trypsin inhibitory activity was stable from pH 2 to pH 13 and from 0°C to 70°C. The hemagglutinin activity of the hemagglutinin was stable from pH 2 to pH 13 and from 0°C to 75°C. The results indicated that both PI and hemagglutinin were relatively thermostable and pH-stable. The trypsin inhibitory activity was inhibited by dithiothreitol, signifying the importance of the disulfide bond to the activity. The hemagglutinating activity was inhibited most potently by D (+)-raffinose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, suggesting that the hemagglutinin was specific for these two sugars. Both PI and hemagglutinin inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (IC50 = 3.2 and 5.5 μM), proliferation of breast cancer cells (IC50 = 9.7 and 3.5 μM), and hepatoma cells (IC50 = 35 and 6.2 μM), with relatively high potencies. PMID:21527979

  20. Antitumor and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activities of a Hemagglutinin and a Protease Inhibitor from Mini-Black Soybean.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiu Juan; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2011-01-01

    Protease inhibitors (PIs) and hemagglutinins are defense proteins produced by many organisms. From Chinese mini-black soybeans, a 17.5-kDa PI was isolated using chromatography on Q-Sepharose, SP-Sepharose, and DEAE-cellulose. A 25-kDa hemagglutinin was purified similarly, but using Superdex 75 instead of DEAE-cellulose in the final step. The PI inhibited trypsin and chymotrypsin (IC(50) = 7.2 and 8.8 μM). Its trypsin inhibitory activity was stable from pH 2 to pH 13 and from 0°C to 70°C. The hemagglutinin activity of the hemagglutinin was stable from pH 2 to pH 13 and from 0°C to 75°C. The results indicated that both PI and hemagglutinin were relatively thermostable and pH-stable. The trypsin inhibitory activity was inhibited by dithiothreitol, signifying the importance of the disulfide bond to the activity. The hemagglutinating activity was inhibited most potently by D (+)-raffinose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, suggesting that the hemagglutinin was specific for these two sugars. Both PI and hemagglutinin inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (IC(50) = 3.2 and 5.5 μM), proliferation of breast cancer cells (IC(50) = 9.7 and 3.5 μM), and hepatoma cells (IC(50) = 35 and 6.2 μM), with relatively high potencies. PMID:21527979

  1. A protein ballet around the viral genome orchestrated by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase leads to an architectural switch: from nucleocapsid-condensed RNA to Vpr-bridged DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lyonnais, Sébastien; Gorelick, Robert J.; Heniche-Boukhalfa, Fatima; Bouaziz, Serge; Parissi, Vincent; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Restle, Tobias; Gatell, Jose Maria; Le Cam, Eric; Mirambeau, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Summary HIV-1 reverse transcription is achieved in the newly infected cell before viral DNA (vDNA) nuclear import. Reverse transcriptase (RT) has previously been shown to function as a molecular motor, dismantling the nucleocapsid complex that binds the viral genome as soon as plus-strand DNA synthesis initiates. We first propose a detailed model of this dismantling in close relationship with the sequential conversion from RNA to double-stranded (ds) DNA, focusing on the nucleocapsid protein (NCp7). The HIV-1 DNA-containing preintegration complex (PIC) resulting from completion of reverse transcription is translocated through the nuclear pore. The PIC nucleoprotein architecture is poorly understood but contains at least two HIV-1 proteins initially from the virion core, namely Integrase (IN) and the viral protein r (Vpr). We next present a set of electron micrographs supporting that Vpr behaves as a DNA architectural protein, initiating multiple DNA bridges over more than 500 base pairs (bp). These complexes are shown to interact with NCp7 bound to single-stranded nucleic acid regions that are thought to maintain IN binding during dsDNA synthesis, concurrently with nucleocapsid complex dismantling. This unexpected binding of Vpr conveniently leads to a compacted but filamentous folding of the vDNA that should favor its nuclear import. Finally, nucleocapsid-like aggregates engaged in dsDNA synthesis appear to efficiently bind to F-actin filaments, a property that may be involved in targeting complexes to the nuclear envelope. More generally, this article highlights unique possibilities offered by in vitro reconstitution approaches combined with macromolecular imaging to gain insights into the mechanisms that alter the nucleoprotein architecture of the HIV-1 genome, ultimately enabling its insertion into the nuclear chromatin. PMID:23017337

  2. Analysis of the Zidovudine Resistance Mutations T215Y, M41L, and L210W in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Paul L.; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy

    2015-01-01

    Although anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) therapies have become more sophisticated and more effective, drug resistance continues to be a major problem. Zidovudine (azidothymidine; AZT) was the first nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NRTI) approved for the treatment of HIV-1 infections and is still being used, particularly in the developing world. This drug targets the conversion of single-stranded RNA to double-stranded DNA by HIV-1 RT. However, resistance to the drug quickly appeared both in viruses replicating in cells in culture and in patients undergoing AZT monotherapy. The primary resistance pathway selects for mutations of T215 that change the threonine to either a tyrosine or a phenylalanine (T215Y/F); this resistance pathway involves an ATP-dependent excision mechanism. The pseudo-sugar ring of AZT lacks a 3′ OH; RT incorporates AZT monophosphate (AZTMP), which blocks the end of the viral DNA primer. AZT-resistant forms of HIV-1 RT use ATP in an excision reaction to unblock the 3′ end of the primer strand, allowing its extension by RT. The T215Y AZT resistance mutation is often accompanied by two other mutations, M41L and L210W. In this study, the roles of these mutations, in combination with T215Y, were examined to determine whether they affect polymerization and excision by HIV-1 RT. The M41L mutation appears to help restore the DNA polymerization activity of RT containing the T215Y mutation and also enhances AZTMP excision. The L210W mutation plays a similar role, but it enhances excision by RTs that carry the T215Y mutation when ATP is present at a low concentration. PMID:26324274

  3. Analysis of the Zidovudine Resistance Mutations T215Y, M41L, and L210W in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Paul L; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy; Hughes, Stephen H

    2015-12-01

    Although anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) therapies have become more sophisticated and more effective, drug resistance continues to be a major problem. Zidovudine (azidothymidine; AZT) was the first nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NRTI) approved for the treatment of HIV-1 infections and is still being used, particularly in the developing world. This drug targets the conversion of single-stranded RNA to double-stranded DNA by HIV-1 RT. However, resistance to the drug quickly appeared both in viruses replicating in cells in culture and in patients undergoing AZT monotherapy. The primary resistance pathway selects for mutations of T215 that change the threonine to either a tyrosine or a phenylalanine (T215Y/F); this resistance pathway involves an ATP-dependent excision mechanism. The pseudo-sugar ring of AZT lacks a 3' OH; RT incorporates AZT monophosphate (AZTMP), which blocks the end of the viral DNA primer. AZT-resistant forms of HIV-1 RT use ATP in an excision reaction to unblock the 3' end of the primer strand, allowing its extension by RT. The T215Y AZT resistance mutation is often accompanied by two other mutations, M41L and L210W. In this study, the roles of these mutations, in combination with T215Y, were examined to determine whether they affect polymerization and excision by HIV-1 RT. The M41L mutation appears to help restore the DNA polymerization activity of RT containing the T215Y mutation and also enhances AZTMP excision. The L210W mutation plays a similar role, but it enhances excision by RTs that carry the T215Y mutation when ATP is present at a low concentration. PMID:26324274

  4. Assessing molecular docking tools for relative biological activity prediction: a case study of triazole HIV-1 NNRTIs.

    PubMed

    Frączek, Tomasz; Siwek, Agata; Paneth, Piotr

    2013-12-23

    Molecular docking is a technique widely used in drug design. Many studies exist regarding the general accuracy of various docking programs, but case studies for a given group of related compounds are rare. In order to facilitate identification of novel triazole HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), several docking and scoring programs were evaluated for their ability to predict relative biological activity of 111 known 1,2,4-triazole and 76 other azole type NNRTIs. Glide, FlexX, Molegro Virtual Docker, AutoDock Vina, and Hyde were used. Different protocols, settings, scoring functions, and interaction terms were analyzed. We have found that the programs performance was dependent on the data set, indicating the importance of choosing good quality target data for any comparative study. The results suggest that after optimization and proper validation, some of the molecular docking programs can help in predicting relative biological activity of azole NNRTIs. PMID:24266618

  5. Novel fluorine-containing DAPY derivatives as potent HIV-1 NNRTIs: a patent evaluation of WO2014072419.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qing; Liu, Na; Huang, Boshi; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2015-01-01

    Diarylpyrimidine (DAPY) derivatives, one family of HIV non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NNRTIs) with superior activities against wild-type (WT) HIV-1 and NNRTI-resistant strains, have attracted much attention in the past decade. A series of DAPY derivatives featuring a fluorine atom on the central ring were reported as novel NNRTIs in the patent WO2014072419. Some compounds exhibited robust potency against both WT and mutant strains, which were approximately equal to or higher than those of the reference drug TMC120. Moreover, it has become evident that fluorinated molecules have a remarkable record in many other potent NNRTIs. Thus, this survey provides a sampling of renowned fluorinated NNRTIs and their mode of action, with an analysis clarifying the functional roles and impact of fluorine substitution on antiviral potency. We envision that fluorinated NNRTIs will play a continuing role in affording anti-HIV drug candidates for therapeutic applications.

  6. Etravirine: a second-generation NNRTI for treatment-experienced adults with resistant HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Minuto, Joshua J; Haubrich, Richard

    2008-11-01

    Etravirine, a second-generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), was approved in the USA in January, 2008, with approval in Europe expected later this year. It is dosed at 200 mg (two 100 mg tablets) twice daily foll owing a meal. It is approved for treatment of HIV-1 infection in adults failing a stable antiretroviral regimen with resistance to other NNRTIs and other antiretroviral agents. Etravirine is active against HIV with single mutations in the reverse transcriptase (e.g., K103N) that confer class resistance to first-generation NNRTIs. Clinical efficacy in Phase III trials has been demonstrated for up to 48 weeks of follow-up. In these Phase III trials, rash was the only adverse event that was significantly more prevalent with etravirine than with placebo. Etravirine has a tolerability and safety profile comparable to placebo with the exception of rash. Rash was generally grade 1 or 2, was not associated with prior NNRTI-related rash, was more common in women than in men, appeared a median of 12 days after treatment initiation and resolved spontaneously with continued therapy. Etravirine is the first agent in the NNRTI class that can be used for HIV-1 virus with resistance to other NNRTIs owing to a higher genetic barrier to resistance.

  7. Etravirine: a second-generation NNRTI for treatment-experienced adults with resistant HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Minuto, Joshua J; Haubrich, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Etravirine, a second-generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), was approved in the USA in January, 2008, with approval in Europe expected later this year. It is dosed at 200 mg (two 100 mg tablets) twice daily foll owing a meal. It is approved for treatment of HIV-1 infection in adults failing a stable antiretroviral regimen with resistance to other NNRTIs and other antiretroviral agents. Etravirine is active against HIV with single mutations in the reverse transcriptase (e.g., K103N) that confer class resistance to first-generation NNRTIs. Clinical efficacy in Phase III trials has been demonstrated for up to 48 weeks of follow-up. In these Phase III trials, rash was the only adverse event that was significantly more prevalent with etravirine than with placebo. Etravirine has a tolerability and safety profile comparable to placebo with the exception of rash. Rash was generally grade 1 or 2, was not associated with prior NNRTI-related rash, was more common in women than in men, appeared a median of 12 days after treatment initiation and resolved spontaneously with continued therapy. Etravirine is the first agent in the NNRTI class that can be used for HIV-1 virus with resistance to other NNRTIs owing to a higher genetic barrier to resistance. PMID:19881888

  8. Second generation bisheteroarylpiperazine (BHAP) HIV-1 reverse transcriptasae inhibitors: Enhancement of antiviral activity and aqueous solubility via 5- and 6-substitution of the indole ring

    SciTech Connect

    Poel, T.; Thomas, R.C.; Romero, D.L.; Hosley, M.J.; Morge, R.A.; Biles, C.; Reusser, F.; Althaus, I.W.; Schinzer, W.C.; Platzer, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    U-87201E, a potent HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) discovered at Upjohn, is currently in Phase II clinical trials. Additional structure-activity studies have identified second-generation BHAPs with enhanced antiviral activity and improved pharmaceutical properties, notably increased aqueous solubility. Capitalizing on initial SAR studies which demonstrated a tolerance for substitution in the indole ring, a series of BHAPs bearing 5- and 6-substituted indoles was evaluated. Substituents such as ethers, sulfonamides, ureas, and sulfamides containing water-solubilizing groups such as polyethers or basic amines provided highly potent BHAPs with greatly enhanced solubility, such as U-93923. The synthesis, antiviral evaluation and solubility properties of these potent HIV-1 RTIs will be detailed.

  9. Failure of Initial Therapy with Two Nucleosides and Efavirenz is Not Associated with Early Emergence of Mutations in the C-Terminus of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, Jessica H.; Lalama, Christina M.; Hughes, Michael D.; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon A.; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas; Mellors, John W.

    2011-01-01

    It is uncertain how often mutations in the connection or RNase H domains of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) emerge with failure of first-line antiretroviral therapy. Full-length RT sequences in plasma obtained pre-therapy and at virologic failure were compared in 53 patients on first-line efavirenz-containing regimens from AIDS Clinical Trials Group study A5142. HIV-1 was mostly subtype B (48/53). Mutations in the polymerase but not in connection or RNase H domains of RT increased in frequency between pre-therapy and failure (K103N, p=0.001; M184I/V, p=0.016). Selection of mutations in C-terminal domains of RT is not common with early failure of efavirenz-containing regimens. PMID:21350368

  10. Failure of initial therapy with two nucleosides and efavirenz is not associated with early emergence of mutations in the C-terminus of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Jessica H; Lalama, Christina M; Hughes, Michael D; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon A; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas; Mellors, John W

    2011-04-01

    It is uncertain how often mutations in the connection or RNase H domains of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) emerge with failure of first-line antiretroviral therapy. Full-length RT sequences in plasma obtained pretherapy and at virologic failure were compared in 53 patients on first-line efavirenz-containing regimens from AIDS Clinical Trials Group study A5142. HIV-1 was mostly subtype B (48 of 53). Mutations in the polymerase but not in connection or RNase H domains of RT increased in frequency between pretherapy and failure (K103N, P = 0.001; M184I/V, P = 0.016). Selection of mutations in C-terminal domains of RT is not common with early failure of efavirenz-containing regimens. PMID:21350368

  11. Screening of the Pan-African Natural Product Library Identifies Ixoratannin A-2 and Boldine as Novel HIV-1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tietjen, Ian; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Mwimanzi, Philip; Onguéné, Pascal Amoa; Scull, Margaret A.; Idowu, Thomas Oyebode; Ogundaini, Abiodun Oguntuga; Meva’a, Luc Mbaze; Abegaz, Berhanu M.; Rice, Charles M.; Andrae-Marobela, Kerstin; Brockman, Mark A.; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Fedida, David

    2015-01-01

    The continued burden of HIV in resource-limited regions such as parts of sub-Saharan Africa, combined with adverse effects and potential risks of resistance to existing antiretroviral therapies, emphasize the need to identify new HIV inhibitors. Here we performed a virtual screen of molecules from the pan-African Natural Product Library, the largest collection of medicinal plant-derived pure compounds on the African continent. We identified eight molecules with structural similarity to reported interactors of Vpu, an HIV-1 accessory protein with reported ion channel activity. Using in vitro HIV-1 replication assays with a CD4+ T cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we confirmed antiviral activity and minimal cytotoxicity for two compounds, ixoratannin A-2 and boldine. Notably, ixoratannin A-2 retained inhibitory activity against recombinant HIV-1 strains encoding patient-derived mutations that confer resistance to protease, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase, or integrase inhibitors. Moreover, ixoratannin A-2 was less effective at inhibiting replication of HIV-1 lacking Vpu, supporting this protein as a possible direct or indirect target. In contrast, boldine was less effective against a protease inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 strain. Both ixoratannin A-2 and boldine also inhibited in vitro replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, BIT-225, a previously-reported Vpu inhibitor, demonstrated antiviral activity but also cytotoxicity in HIV-1 and HCV replication assays. Our work identifies pure compounds derived from African plants with potential novel activities against viruses that disproportionately afflict resource-limited regions of the world. PMID:25830320

  12. Screening of the Pan-African natural product library identifies ixoratannin A-2 and boldine as novel HIV-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tietjen, Ian; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Mwimanzi, Philip; Onguéné, Pascal Amoa; Scull, Margaret A; Idowu, Thomas Oyebode; Ogundaini, Abiodun Oguntuga; Meva'a, Luc Mbaze; Abegaz, Berhanu M; Rice, Charles M; Andrae-Marobela, Kerstin; Brockman, Mark A; Brumme, Zabrina L; Fedida, David

    2015-01-01

    The continued burden of HIV in resource-limited regions such as parts of sub-Saharan Africa, combined with adverse effects and potential risks of resistance to existing antiretroviral therapies, emphasize the need to identify new HIV inhibitors. Here we performed a virtual screen of molecules from the pan-African Natural Product Library, the largest collection of medicinal plant-derived pure compounds on the African continent. We identified eight molecules with structural similarity to reported interactors of Vpu, an HIV-1 accessory protein with reported ion channel activity. Using in vitro HIV-1 replication assays with a CD4+ T cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we confirmed antiviral activity and minimal cytotoxicity for two compounds, ixoratannin A-2 and boldine. Notably, ixoratannin A-2 retained inhibitory activity against recombinant HIV-1 strains encoding patient-derived mutations that confer resistance to protease, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase, or integrase inhibitors. Moreover, ixoratannin A-2 was less effective at inhibiting replication of HIV-1 lacking Vpu, supporting this protein as a possible direct or indirect target. In contrast, boldine was less effective against a protease inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 strain. Both ixoratannin A-2 and boldine also inhibited in vitro replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, BIT-225, a previously-reported Vpu inhibitor, demonstrated antiviral activity but also cytotoxicity in HIV-1 and HCV replication assays. Our work identifies pure compounds derived from African plants with potential novel activities against viruses that disproportionately afflict resource-limited regions of the world.

  13. (Alkylamino) piperidine bis(heteroaryl)piperizine analogs are potent, broad-spectrum nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of drug-resistant isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and select for drug-resistant variants of HIV-1IIIB with reduced replication phenotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Olmsted, R A; Slade, D E; Kopta, L A; Poppe, S M; Poel, T J; Newport, S W; Rank, K B; Biles, C; Morge, R A; Dueweke, T J; Yagi, Y; Romero, D L; Thomas, R C; Sharma, S K; Tarpley, W G

    1996-01-01

    The (alkylamino)piperidine bis(heteroaryl)piperizines (AAP-BHAPs) are a new class of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific inhibitors which were identified by targeted screening of recombinant reverse transcriptase (RT) enzymes carrying key nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance-conferring mutations and NNRTI-resistant variants of HIV-1. Phenotypic profiling of the two most potent AAP-BHAPs, U-95133 and U-104489, against in vitro-selected drug-resistant HIV-1 variants carrying the NNRTI resistance-conferring mutation (Tyr->Cys) at position 181 of the HIV-1 RT revealed submicromolar 90% inhibitory concentration estimates for these compounds. Moreover, U-104489 demonstrated potent activity against BHA-P-resistant HIV-1MF harboring the Pro-236->Leu RT substitution and significantly suppressed the replication of clinical isolates of HIV-1 resistant to both delavirdine (BHAP U-90152T) and zidovudine. Biochemical and phenotypic characterization of AAP-BHAPresistant HIV-1IIIB variants revealed that high-level resistance to the AAP-BHAPs was mediated by a Gly-190->Glu substitution in RT, which had a deleterious effect on the integrity and enzymatic activity of virion-associated RT heterodimers, as well as the replication capacity of these resistant viruses. PMID:8648704

  14. CNS-specific regulatory elements in brain-derived HIV-1 strains affect responses to latency-reversing agents with implications for cure strategies

    PubMed Central

    Gray, L R; Cowley, D; Welsh, C; Lu, H K; Brew, B J; Lewin, S R; Wesselingh, S L; Gorry, P R; Churchill, M J

    2016-01-01

    Latency-reversing agents (LRAs), including histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), are being investigated as a strategy to eliminate latency in HIV-infected patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. The effectiveness of LRAs in activating latent infection in HIV strains derived from the central nervous system (CNS) is unknown. Here we show that CNS-derived HIV-1 strains possess polymorphisms within and surrounding the Sp transcription factor motifs in the long terminal repeat (LTR). These polymorphisms result in decreased ability of the transcription factor specificity protein 1 to bind CNS-derived LTRs, reducing the transcriptional activity of CNS-derived viruses. These mutations result in CNS-derived viruses being less responsive to activation by the HDACi panobinostat and romidepsin compared with lymphoid-derived viruses from the same subjects. Our findings suggest that HIV-1 strains residing in the CNS have unique transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, which impact the regulation of latency, the consideration of which is essential for the development of HIV-1 eradication strategies. PMID:26303660

  15. Impact of Drug Resistance-Associated Amino Acid Changes in HIV-1 Subtype C on Susceptibility to Newer Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Basson, Adriaan E.; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Parry, Chris M.; El-Khatib, Ziad; Charalambous, Salome; De Oliveira, Tulio; Pillay, Deenan; Hoffmann, Christopher; Katzenstein, David; Shafer, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the phenotypic susceptibility of HIV-1 subtype C isolates, with nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance-associated amino acid changes, to newer NNRTIs. A panel of 52 site-directed mutants and 38 clinically derived HIV-1 subtype C clones was created, and the isolates were assessed for phenotypic susceptibility to etravirine (ETR), rilpivirine (RPV), efavirenz (EFV), and nevirapine (NVP) in an in vitro single-cycle phenotypic assay. The amino acid substitutions E138Q/R, Y181I/V, and M230L conferred high-level resistance to ETR, while K101P and Y181I/V conferred high-level resistance to RPV. Y181C, a major NNRTI resistance-associated amino acid substitution, caused decreased susceptibility to ETR and, to a lesser extent, RPV when combined with other mutations. These included N348I and T369I, amino acid changes in the connection domain that are not generally assessed during resistance testing. However, the prevalence of these genotypes among subtype C sequences was, in most cases, <1%. The more common EFV/NVP resistance-associated substitutions, such as K103N, V106M, and G190A, had no major impact on ETR or RPV susceptibility. The low-level resistance to RPV and ETR conferred by E138K was not significantly enhanced in the presence of M184V/I, unlike for EFV and NVP. Among patient samples, 97% were resistant to EFV and/or NVP, while only 24% and 16% were resistant to ETR and RPV, respectively. Overall, only a few, relatively rare NNRTI resistance-associated amino acid substitutions caused resistance to ETR and/or RPV in an HIV-1 subtype C background, suggesting that these newer NNRTIs would be effective in NVP/EFV-experienced HIV-1 subtype C-infected patients. PMID:25421485

  16. Probing the molecular mechanism of action of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor 4'-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) using pre-steady-state kinetics.

    PubMed

    Muftuoglu, Yagmur; Sohl, Christal D; Mislak, Andrea C; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Anderson, Karen S

    2014-06-01

    The novel antiretroviral 4'-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) is a potent nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NRTI). Unlike other FDA-approved NRTIs, EFdA contains a 3'-hydroxyl. Pre-steady-state kinetics showed RT preferred incorporating EFdA-TP over native dATP. Moreover, RT slowly inserted nucleotides past an EFdA-terminated primer, resulting in delayed chain termination with unaffected fidelity. This is distinct from KP1212, another 3'-hydroxyl-containing RT inhibitor considered to promote viral lethal mutagenesis. New mechanistic features of RT inhibition by EFdA are revealed.

  17. Mechanism of Inhibition of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase by 4′-Ethynyl-2-fluoro-2′-deoxyadenosine Triphosphate, a Translocation-defective Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    Michailidis, Eleftherios; Marchand, Bruno; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Singh, Kamlendra; Matsuoka, Masao; Kirby, Karen A.; Ryan, Emily M.; Sawani, Ali M.; Nagy, Eva; Ashida, Noriyuki; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Parniak, Michael A.; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2009-01-01

    Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) are employed in first line therapies for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. They generally lack a 3′-hydroxyl group, and thus when incorporated into the nascent DNA they prevent further elongation. In this report we show that 4′-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2′-deoxyadenosine (EFdA), a nucleoside analog that retains a 3′-hydroxyl moiety, inhibited HIV-1 replication in activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells with an EC50 of 0.05 nm, a potency several orders of magnitude better than any of the current clinically used NRTIs. This exceptional antiviral activity stems in part from a mechanism of action that is different from approved NRTIs. Reverse transcriptase (RT) can use EFdA-5′-triphosphate (EFdA-TP) as a substrate more efficiently than the natural substrate, dATP. Importantly, despite the presence of a 3′-hydroxyl, the incorporated EFdA monophosphate (EFdA-MP) acted mainly as a de facto terminator of further RT-catalyzed DNA synthesis because of the difficulty of RT translocation on the nucleic acid primer possessing 3′-terminal EFdA-MP. EFdA-TP is thus a translocation-defective RT inhibitor (TDRTI). This diminished translocation kept the primer 3′-terminal EFdA-MP ideally located to undergo phosphorolytic excision. However, net phosphorolysis was not substantially increased, because of the apparently facile reincorporation of the newly excised EFdA-TP. Our molecular modeling studies suggest that the 4′-ethynyl fits into a hydrophobic pocket defined by RT residues Ala-114, Tyr-115, Phe-160, and Met-184 and the aliphatic chain of Asp-185. These interactions, which contribute to both enhanced RT utilization of EFdA-TP and difficulty in the translocation of 3′-terminal EFdA-MP primers, underlie the mechanism of action of this potent antiviral nucleoside. PMID:19837673

  18. Bifunctional Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase: Mechanism and Proof-of-Concept as a Novel Therapeutic Design Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Christopher M.; Sullivan, Todd J.; Iyidogan, Pinar; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Chung, Raymond; Ruiz-Caro, Juliana; Mohamed, Ebrahim; Jorgensen, William; Hunter, Roger; Anderson, Karen S.

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) is a major target for currently approved anti-HIV drugs. These drugs are divided into two classes: nucleoside and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and NNRTIs). This study illustrates the synthesis and biochemical evaluation of a novel bifunctional RT inhibitor utilizing d4T (NRTI) and a TMC-derivative (a diarylpyrimidine NNRTI) linked via a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) linker. HIV-1 RT successfully incorporates the triphosphate of d4T-4PEG-TMC bifunctional inhibitor in a base-specific manner. Moreover, this inhibitor demonstrates low nanomolar potency that has 4.3-fold and 4300-fold enhancement of polymerization inhibition in vitro relative to the parent TMC-derivative and d4T, respectively. This study serves as a proof-of-concept for the development and optimization of bifunctional RT inhibitors as potent inhibitors of HIV-1 viral replication. PMID:23659183

  19. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-08-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo.

  20. HIV-1 Capsid Stabilization Assay.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Thomas; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    The stability of the HIV-1 core in the cytoplasm is crucial for productive HIV-1 infection. Mutations that stabilize or destabilize the core showed defects in HIV-1 reverse transcription and infection. We developed a novel and simple assay to measure stability of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. This assay allowed us to demonstrate that cytosolic extracts strongly stabilize the HIV-1 core (Fricke et al., J Virol 87:10587-10597, 2013). By using our novel assay, one can measure the ability of different drugs to modulate the stability of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes, such as PF74, CAP-1, IXN-053, cyclosporine A, Bi2, and the peptide CAI. We also found that purified CPSF6 (1-321) protein stabilizes in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes (Fricke et al., J Virol 87:10587-10597, 2013). Here we describe in detail the use of this capsid stability assay. We believe that our assay can be a powerful tool to assess HIV-1 capsid stability in vitro.

  1. Evolving patterns of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance in Poland in the years 2000-2008.

    PubMed

    Stańczak, Grzegorz P; Stańczak, Janusz J; Marczyńska, Magdalena; Firlag-Burkacka, Ewa; Wiercińska-Drapało, Alicja; Leszczyszyn-Pynka, Magdalena; Jabłonowska, Elzbieta; Małolepsza, Ewa; Dyda, Tomasz; Zabek, Piotr; Horban, Andrzej

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the rate of transmission of drug resistant human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) variants among therapy-naïve HIV positive patients in Poland in the year 2008, to compare the data with the results from the years 2000 to 2007 and to monitor patterns of HIV-1 subtypes present in Polish population and their evolution. Complete protease and part of reverse transcriptase regions were sequenced from the sera of patients directed to the laboratory for drug resistance testing. The Stanford's HIVdb program was used for the interpretation of results and subtyping. The variants scoring at least "intermediate resistance" for at least one drug were considered as resistant. The results obtained were compared to those obtained in the years 2000-2007. A total of 95 patients were enrolled in the 2008 study. Homosexual transmission of infection was documented in more than 55% of all cases. The overall prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) was 5.3% (3.9% in 2007, 5.8% in 2006, and 14.1% in the years 2002-2005). The study from the years 2000 to 2001 revealed 28.7% prevalence. Preliminary analysis of the first half of 2009 shows the ratio of 7.8%. In four (4.2%) cases drug resistance was associated with protease inhibitors class, in one case (1.1%) with resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors class. In four cases (4.2%) non-B subtype was identified (C, G, CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG). An increase of percentage of drug resistant mutants-from 3.9% (2007) to 5.3% (2008)-was recognized. In this study, TDR was limited to single classes of antiretroviral drugs. HIV-1 subtype B prevails in Poland. PMID:20513098

  2. Perinatal acquisition of drug-resistant HIV-1 infection: mechanisms and long-term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Delaugerre, Constance; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Blanche, Stephane; Warszawski, Josiane; Cornet, Dorine; Dollfus, Catherine; Schneider, Veronique; Burgard, Marianne; Faye, Albert; Mandelbrot, Laurent; Tubiana, Roland; Rouzioux, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Background Primary-HIV-1-infection in newborns that occurs under antiretroviral prophylaxis that is a high risk of drug-resistance acquisition. We examine the frequency and the mechanisms of resistance acquisition at the time of infection in newborns. Patients and Methods We studied HIV-1-infected infants born between 01 January 1997 and 31 December 2004 and enrolled in the ANRS-EPF cohort. HIV-1-RNA and HIV-1-DNA samples obtained perinatally from the newborn and mother were subjected to population-based and clonal analyses of drug resistance. If positive, serial samples were obtained from the child for resistance testing. Results Ninety-two HIV-1-infected infants were born during the study period. Samples were obtained from 32 mother-child pairs and from another 28 newborns. Drug resistance was detected in 12 newborns (20%): drug resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was seen in 10 cases, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in two cases, and protease inhibitors in one case. For 9 children, the detection of the same resistance mutations in mothers' samples (6 among 10 available) and in newborn lymphocytes (6/8) suggests that the newborn was initially infected by a drug-resistant strain. Resistance variants were either transmitted from mother-to-child or selected during subsequent temporal exposure under suboptimal perinatal prophylaxis. Follow-up studies of the infants showed that the resistance pattern remained stable over time, regardless of antiretroviral therapy, suggesting the early cellular archiving of resistant viruses. The absence of resistance in the mother of the other three children (3/10) and neonatal lymphocytes (2/8) suggests that the newborns were infected by a wild-type strain without long-term persistence of resistance when suboptimal prophylaxis was stopped. Conclusion This study confirms the importance of early resistance genotyping of HIV-1-infected newborns. In most cases (75%), drug resistance was archived in

  3. Lysine directed cross-linking of viral DNA-RNA:DNA hybrid substrate to the isolated RNase H domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Guaitiao, Juan P; Zúñiga, Roberto A; Roth, Monica J; Leon, Oscar

    2004-02-10

    An isolated ribonuclease H domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase is capable of specifically removing the tRNA primer within an oligonucleotide mimic. The determinants for substrate specificity are located in a region within the terminal octanucleotide of the acceptor stem of the tRNA. Recognition of the substrate by HIV-1 RNase H was analyzed by the introduction of a cross-linking reagent directed toward lysines on the thymine residue complementary to the scissile bond, facing the major groove of the DNA-RNA:DNA substrate. Cross-linking of the modified substrate to RNase H required the presence of Mn(2+). The Mn(2+) titration of cross-linking paralleled the Mn(2+) requirement for activity. Modified substrate quenched with glycine prior to binding of substrate was efficiently cleaved, whereas the RNA within the cross-linked product was intact. Tryptic digestion of the isolated RNase H-nucleic acid covalent complex revealed a main cross-linked peptide whose N-terminal peptide sequence is VVTLTDTTNQ, indicating that the cross-linked lysine corresponds to Lys476. Cross-linking to K476 was confirmed by analysis of K476C RNase H. Mutation of K476C disrupted the chemical cross-linking while maintaining activity. On the basis of the size of the cross-linker arm, the results indicate that K476 is in closer proximity to the tRNA mimic substrate within the isolated RNase H domain than observed for the RNase H-resistant polypurine tract (PPT) substrate within the HIV-1 RT.

  4. 4′-Ethynyl-2-fluoro-2′-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) Inhibits HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase with Multiple Mechanisms*

    PubMed Central

    Michailidis, Eleftherios; Huber, Andrew D.; Ryan, Emily M.; Ong, Yee T.; Leslie, Maxwell D.; Matzek, Kayla B.; Singh, Kamalendra; Marchand, Bruno; Hagedorn, Ariel N.; Kirby, Karen A.; Rohan, Lisa C.; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Parniak, Michael A.; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2014-01-01

    4′-Ethynyl-2-fluoro-2′-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) is a nucleoside analog that, unlike approved anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, has a 3′-OH and exhibits remarkable potency against wild-type and drug-resistant HIVs. EFdA triphosphate (EFdA-TP) is unique among nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors because it inhibits HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with multiple mechanisms. (a) EFdA-TP can block RT as a translocation-defective RT inhibitor that dramatically slows DNA synthesis, acting as a de facto immediate chain terminator. Although non-translocated EFdA-MP-terminated primers can be unblocked, they can be efficiently converted back to the EFdA-MP-terminated form. (b) EFdA-TP can function as a delayed chain terminator, allowing incorporation of an additional dNTP before blocking DNA synthesis. In such cases, EFdA-MP-terminated primers are protected from excision. (c) EFdA-MP can be efficiently misincorporated by RT, leading to mismatched primers that are extremely hard to extend and are also protected from excision. The context of template sequence defines the relative contribution of each mechanism and affects the affinity of EFdA-MP for potential incorporation sites, explaining in part the lack of antagonism between EFdA and tenofovir. Changes in the type of nucleotide before EFdA-MP incorporation can alter its mechanism of inhibition from delayed chain terminator to immediate chain terminator. The versatility of EFdA in inhibiting HIV replication by multiple mechanisms may explain why resistance to EFdA is more difficult to emerge. PMID:24970894

  5. Effect of Mg(2+) and Na(+) on the nucleic acid chaperone activity of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein: implications for reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Vo, My-Nuong; Barany, George; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2009-02-27

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid protein (NC) is an essential protein for retroviral replication. Among its numerous functions, NC is a nucleic acid (NA) chaperone protein that catalyzes NA rearrangements leading to the formation of thermodynamically more stable conformations. In vitro, NC chaperone activity is typically assayed under conditions of low or no Mg(2+), even though reverse transcription requires the presence of divalent cations. Here, the chaperone activity of HIV-1 NC was studied as a function of varying Na(+) and Mg(2+) concentrations by investigating the annealing of complementary DNA and RNA hairpins derived from the trans-activation response domain of the HIV genome. This reaction mimics the annealing step of the minus-strand transfer process in reverse transcription. Gel-shift annealing and sedimentation assays were used to monitor the annealing kinetics and aggregation activity of NC, respectively. In the absence of protein, a limited ability of Na(+) and Mg(2+) cations to facilitate hairpin annealing was observed, whereas NC stimulated the annealing 10(3)- to 10(5)-fold. The major effect of either NC or the cations is on the rate of bimolecular association of the hairpins. This effect is especially strong under conditions wherein NC induces NA aggregation. Titration with NC and NC/Mg(2+) competition studies showed that the annealing kinetics depends only on the level of NA saturation with NC. NC competes with Mg(2+) or Na(+) for sequence-nonspecific NA binding similar to a simple trivalent cation. Upon saturation, NC induces attraction between NA molecules corresponding to approximately 0.3 kcal/mol/nucleotide, in agreement with an electrostatic mechanism of NC-induced NA aggregation. These data provide insights into the variable effects of NC's chaperone activity observed during in vitro studies of divalent metal-dependent reverse transcription reactions and suggest the feasibility of NC-facilitated proviral DNA

  6. Low Frequency of Drug-Resistant Variants Selected by Long-Acting Rilpivirine in Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Containing HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Melody, Kevin; McBeth, Sarah; Kline, Christopher; Kashuba, Angela D. M.; Mellors, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) using antiretroviral drugs is effective in reducing the risk of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, but adherence to the PrEP regimen is needed. To improve adherence, a long-acting injectable formulation of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor rilpivirine (RPV LA) has been developed. However, there are concerns that PrEP may select for drug-resistant mutations during preexisting or breakthrough infections, which could promote the spread of drug resistance and limit options for antiretroviral therapy. To address this concern, we administered RPV LA to macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus containing HIV-1 RT (RT-SHIV). Peak plasma RPV levels were equivalent to those reported in human trials and waned over time after dosing. RPV LA resulted in a 2-log decrease in plasma viremia, and the therapeutic effect was maintained for 15 weeks, until plasma drug concentrations dropped below 25 ng/ml. RT mutations E138G and E138Q were detected in single clones from plasma virus in separate animals only at one time point, and no resistance mutations were detected in viral RNA isolated from tissues. Wild-type and E138Q RT-SHIV displayed similar RPV susceptibilities in vitro, whereas E138G conferred 2-fold resistance to RPV. Overall, selection of RPV-resistant variants was rare in an RT-SHIV macaque model despite prolonged exposure to slowly decreasing RPV concentrations following injection of RPV LA. PMID:26438501

  7. Subtype-Specific Analysis of the K65R Substitution in HIV-1 That Confers Hypersusceptibility to a Novel Nucleotide-Competing Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong-Tao; Colby-Germinario, Susan P.; Quashie, Peter K.; Bethell, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Compound A is a novel nucleotide-competing HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NcRTI) that selects for a unique W153L substitution that confers hypersusceptibility to tenofovir, while the K65R substitution in RT confers resistance against tenofovir and enhances susceptibility to NcRTIs. Although the K65R substitution is more common in subtype C viruses, the impact of subtype variability on NcRTI susceptibility has not been studied. In the present study, we performed experiments with compound A by using purified recombinant RT enzymes and viruses of subtypes B and C and circulating recombinant form CRF_A/G. We confirmed the hypersusceptibility of K65R substitution-containing RTs to compound A for subtype C, CRF_A/G, and subtype B. Steady-state kinetic analysis showed that K65R RTs enhanced the susceptibility to compound A by increasing binding of the inhibitor to the nucleotide binding site of RT in a subtype-independent manner, without significantly discriminating against the natural nucleotide substrate. These data highlight the potential utility of NcRTIs, such as compound A, for treatment of infections with K65R substitution-containing viruses, regardless of HIV-1 subtype. PMID:25779585

  8. Low Frequency of Drug-Resistant Variants Selected by Long-Acting Rilpivirine in Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Containing HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Melody, Kevin; McBeth, Sarah; Kline, Christopher; Kashuba, Angela D M; Mellors, John W; Ambrose, Zandrea

    2015-12-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) using antiretroviral drugs is effective in reducing the risk of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, but adherence to the PrEP regimen is needed. To improve adherence, a long-acting injectable formulation of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor rilpivirine (RPV LA) has been developed. However, there are concerns that PrEP may select for drug-resistant mutations during preexisting or breakthrough infections, which could promote the spread of drug resistance and limit options for antiretroviral therapy. To address this concern, we administered RPV LA to macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus containing HIV-1 RT (RT-SHIV). Peak plasma RPV levels were equivalent to those reported in human trials and waned over time after dosing. RPV LA resulted in a 2-log decrease in plasma viremia, and the therapeutic effect was maintained for 15 weeks, until plasma drug concentrations dropped below 25 ng/ml. RT mutations E138G and E138Q were detected in single clones from plasma virus in separate animals only at one time point, and no resistance mutations were detected in viral RNA isolated from tissues. Wild-type and E138Q RT-SHIV displayed similar RPV susceptibilities in vitro, whereas E138G conferred 2-fold resistance to RPV. Overall, selection of RPV-resistant variants was rare in an RT-SHIV macaque model despite prolonged exposure to slowly decreasing RPV concentrations following injection of RPV LA. PMID:26438501

  9. An intravaginal ring for the simultaneous delivery of an HIV-1 maturation inhibitor and reverse transcriptase inhibitor for prophylaxis of HIV transmission

    PubMed Central

    Ugaonkar, Shweta R.; Clark, Justin T.; English, Lexie B.; Johnson, Todd J.; Buckheit, Karen W.; Bahde, Robert J.; Appella, Daniel H.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Kiser, Patrick F.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleocapsid 7 (NCp7) inhibitors have been investigated extensively for their role in impeding the function of HIV-1 replication machinery and their ability to directly inactivate the virus. A class of NCp7 zinc finger inhibitors, S-acyl-2-mercaptobenzamide thioesters (SAMTs), was investigated for topical drug delivery. SAMTs are inherently unstable due to their hydrolytically labile thioester bond thus requiring formulation approaches that can lend stability. We describe the delivery of N-[2-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoylthio)benzoyl]-β-alanine amide (SAMT-10), as a single agent antiretroviral (ARV) therapeutic and in combination with the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor pyrimidinedione IQP-0528, from a hydrophobic polyether urethane (PEU) intravaginal ring (IVR) for a month. The physicochemical stability of the ARV-loaded IVRs was confirmed after 3 months at 40°C/75% relative humidity (RH). In vitro, 25 ± 3 mg/IVR of SAMT-10 and 86 ± 13 mg/IVR of IQP-0528 were released. No degradation of the hydrolytically labile SAMT-10 was observed within the matrix. The combination of ARVs had synergistic antiviral activity when tested in in vitro cell based assays. Toxicological evaluations performed on an organotypic EpiVaginal™ tissue model demonstrated a lack of formulation toxicity. Overall, SAMT-10 and IQP-0528 were formulated in a stable PEU IVR for sustained release. Our findings support the need for further preclinical evaluation. PMID:26149293

  10. Enzymatic Activities of RNase H Domains of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase with Substrate Binding Domains of Bacterial RNases H1 and H2.

    PubMed

    Permanasari, Etin-Diah; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2015-06-01

    Thermotoga maritima RNase H1 and Bacillus stearothermophilus RNase H2 have an N-terminal substrate binding domain, termed hybrid binding domain (TmaHBD), and N-terminal domain (BstNTD), respectively. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a heterodimer consisting of a P66 subunit and a P51 subunit. The P66 subunit contains a C-terminal RNase H domain, which exhibits RNase H activity either in the presence of Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) ions. The isolated RNase H domain of HIV-1 RT (RNH(HIV)) is inactive, possibly due to the lack of a substrate binding ability, disorder of a loop containing His539, and increased flexibility. To examine whether the activity of RNH(HIV) is restored by the attachment of TmaHBD or BstNTD to its N-terminus, two chimeric proteins, TmaHBD-RNH(HIV) and BstNTD-RNH(HIV), were constructed and characterized. Both chimeric proteins bound to RNA/DNA hybrid more strongly than RNH(HIV) and exhibited enzymatic activity in the presence of Mn(2+) ions. They did not exhibit activity or exhibited very weak activity in the presence of Mg(2+) ions. These results indicate that TmaHBD and BstNTD function as an RNA/DNA hybrid binding tag, and greatly increase the substrate binding affinity and Mn(2+)-dependent activity of RNH(HIV) but do not restore the Mg(2+)-dependent activity of RNH(HIV). PMID:25673083

  11. Substitutions at Phe61 in the beta3-beta4 hairpin of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase reveal a role for the Fingers subdomain in strand displacement DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Timothy S; Darden, Tom; Prasad, Vinayaka R

    2003-01-17

    Unlike most DNA polymerases, retroviral reverse transcriptases (RTs) are capable of strand displacement DNA synthesis in vitro, unassisted by other proteins. While human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RT has been shown to possess this rare ability, the structural determinants responsible are unknown. X-Ray crystallographic and biochemical studies have indicated that the beta3-beta4 hairpin of the fingers subdomain of HIV-1 RT contains key contacts for the incoming template strand. In order to assess the possible role of the fingers subdomain in strand displacement synthesis, a set of substitutions was created at the highly conserved Phe61 residue, which is thought to contact the template strand immediately ahead of the dNTP-binding site. Purified heterodimeric RTs containing Phe61 substitutions displayed altered degrees of strand displacement synthesis on nicked and gapped duplex DNA templates with the relative order being: F61Y > or = F61L > wild-type = F61A > F61W. In order to verify that the effects on strand displacement synthesis were not an indirect effect of alterations in processivity, all Phe61 mutants were tested for processive polymerization. While the strand displacement activity of F61W RT variant was affected severely, it displayed a wild-type-like processivity. In contrast, both F61L and F61Y substitutions, despite showing enhanced strand displacement synthesis, displayed reduced processivity. In contrast, the processivity of F61A mutant, which had displayed nearly wild-type-like strand displacement synthesis, was affected most. These results showed that the effects of Phe61 substitutions on strand displacement are not due to global changes in polymerase processivity. Analysis of pause sites during DNA polymerization on double-stranded templates revealed that the wild-type and the Phe61 mutant RTs interact with the template quite differently. Modeling a 5 nt duplex DNA ahead of the dNTP-binding site of HIV-1 RT suggested a correlation between

  12. Hyperthermia Stimulates HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Meziane, Oussama; Kula, Anna; Nisole, Sébastien; Porrot, Françoise; Anderson, Ian; Mammano, Fabrizio; Fassati, Ariberto; Marcello, Alessandro; Benkirane, Monsef; Schwartz, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42–45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38–40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C) increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity. PMID:22807676

  13. Biochemical characterization of a multi-drug resistant HIV-1 subtype AG reverse transcriptase: antagonism of AZT discrimination and excision pathways and sensitivity to RNase H inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Anna; Corona, Angela; Spöring, Imke; Jordan, Mareike; Buchholz, Bernd; Maccioni, Elias; Di Santo, Roberto; Bodem, Jochen; Tramontano, Enzo; Wöhrl, Birgitta M.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed a multi-drug resistant (MR) HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), subcloned from a patient-derived subtype CRF02_AG, harboring 45 amino acid exchanges, amongst them four thymidine analog mutations (TAMs) relevant for high-level AZT (azidothymidine) resistance by AZTMP excision (M41L, D67N, T215Y, K219E) as well as four substitutions of the AZTTP discrimination pathway (A62V, V75I, F116Y and Q151M). In addition, K65R, known to antagonize AZTMP excision in HIV-1 subtype B was present. Although MR-RT harbored the most significant amino acid exchanges T215Y and Q151M of each pathway, it exclusively used AZTTP discrimination, indicating that the two mechanisms are mutually exclusive and that the Q151M pathway is obviously preferred since it confers resistance to most nucleoside inhibitors. A derivative was created, additionally harboring the TAM K70R and the reversions M151Q as well as R65K since K65R antagonizes excision. MR-R65K-K70R-M151Q was competent of AZTMP excision, whereas other combinations thereof with only one or two exchanges still promoted discrimination. To tackle the multi-drug resistance problem, we tested if the MR-RTs could still be inhibited by RNase H inhibitors. All MR-RTs exhibited similar sensitivity toward RNase H inhibitors belonging to different inhibitor classes, indicating the importance of developing RNase H inhibitors further as anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26850643

  14. Biochemical characterization of a multi-drug resistant HIV-1 subtype AG reverse transcriptase: antagonism of AZT discrimination and excision pathways and sensitivity to RNase H inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Anna; Corona, Angela; Spöring, Imke; Jordan, Mareike; Buchholz, Bernd; Maccioni, Elias; Di Santo, Roberto; Bodem, Jochen; Tramontano, Enzo; Wöhrl, Birgitta M

    2016-03-18

    We analyzed a multi-drug resistant (MR) HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), subcloned from a patient-derived subtype CRF02_AG, harboring 45 amino acid exchanges, amongst them four thymidine analog mutations (TAMs) relevant for high-level AZT (azidothymidine) resistance by AZTMP excision (M41L, D67N, T215Y, K219E) as well as four substitutions of the AZTTP discrimination pathway (A62V, V75I, F116Y and Q151M). In addition, K65R, known to antagonize AZTMP excision in HIV-1 subtype B was present. Although MR-RT harbored the most significant amino acid exchanges T215Y and Q151M of each pathway, it exclusively used AZTTP discrimination, indicating that the two mechanisms are mutually exclusive and that the Q151M pathway is obviously preferred since it confers resistance to most nucleoside inhibitors. A derivative was created, additionally harboring the TAM K70R and the reversions M151Q as well as R65K since K65R antagonizes excision. MR-R65K-K70R-M151Q was competent of AZTMP excision, whereas other combinations thereof with only one or two exchanges still promoted discrimination. To tackle the multi-drug resistance problem, we tested if the MR-RTs could still be inhibited by RNase H inhibitors. All MR-RTs exhibited similar sensitivity toward RNase H inhibitors belonging to different inhibitor classes, indicating the importance of developing RNase H inhibitors further as anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26850643

  15. [d4U]-spacer-[HI-236] double-drug inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse-transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Younis, Yassir; Hunter, Roger; Muhanji, Clare I; Hale, Ian; Singh, Rajinder; Bailey, Christopher M.; Sullivan, Todd S.; Anderson, Karen S.

    2010-01-01

    Four double-drug HIV NRTI / NNRTI inhibitors 15a-d of the type [d4U]-spacer-[HI-236] in which the spacer is varied as 1-butynyl (15a), propargyl-1-PEG (15b), propargyl-2-PEG (15c) and propargyl-4-PEG (15d) have been synthesized and biologically evaluated as RT inhibitors against HIV-1. The key step in their synthesis involved a Sonogashira coupling of 5-iodo d4U's benzoate with an alkynylated tethered HI-236 precursor followed by introduction of the HI-236 thiourea functionality. Biological evaluation in both cell-culture (MT-2 cells) as well as using an in vitro RT assay revealed 15a-c to be all more active than d4T. However, overall the results indicate the derivatives are acting as chain-extended NNRTIs in which for 15b-d the nucleoside component is likely situated outside of the pocket but with no evidence for any synergistic double binding between the NRTI and NNRTI sites. This is attributed, in part, to the lack of phosphorylation of the nucleoside component of the double drug as a result of kinase recognition failure, which is not improved upon with the phosphoramidate of 15d incorporating a 4-PEG spacer. PMID:20605472

  16. Nevirapine and Efavirenz Elicit Different Changes in Lipid Profiles in Antiretroviral- Therapy-Naive Patients Infected with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Patients infected with HIV-1 initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) containing a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) show presumably fewer atherogenic lipid changes than those initiating most ARTs containing a protease inhibitor. We analysed whether lipid changes differed between the two most commonly used NNRTIs, nevirapine (NVP) and efavirenz (EFV). Methods and Findings Prospective analysis of lipids and lipoproteins was performed in patients enrolled in the NVP and EFV treatment groups of the 2NN study who remained on allocated treatment during 48 wk of follow-up. Patients were allocated to NVP (n = 417), or EFV (n = 289) in combination with stavudine and lamivudine. The primary endpoint was percentage change over 48 wk in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), total cholesterol (TC), TC:HDL-c ratio, non-HDL-c, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. The increase of HDL-c was significantly larger for patients receiving NVP (42.5%) than for patients receiving EFV (33.7%; p = 0.036), while the increase in TC was lower (26.9% and 31.1%, respectively; p = 0.073), resulting in a decrease of the TC:HDL-c ratio for patients receiving NVP (−4.1%) and an increase for patients receiving EFV (+5.9%; p < 0.001). The increase of non-HDL-c was smaller for patients receiving NVP (24.7%) than for patients receiving EFV (33.6%; p = 0.007), as were the increases of triglycerides (20.1% and 49.0%, respectively; p < 0.001) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (35.0% and 40.0%, respectively; p = 0.378). These differences remained, or even increased, after adjusting for changes in HIV-1 RNA and CD4+ cell levels, indicating an effect of the drugs on lipids over and above that which may be explained by suppression of HIV-1 infection. The increases in HDL-c were of the same order of magnitude as those seen with the use of the investigational HDL-c-increasing drugs. Conclusion NVP-containing ART shows larger increases in

  17. Inhibition of HIV-1 and M-MLV reverse transcriptases by a major polyphenol (3,4,5 tri-O-galloylquinic acid) present in the leaves of the South African resurrection plant, Myrothamnus flabellifolia.

    PubMed

    Kamng'ona, Arox; Moore, John P; Lindsey, George; Brandt, Wolf

    2011-12-01

    A polyphenol-rich extract of the medicinal resurrection plant Myrothamnus flabellifolia was shown to inhibit viral (M-MLV and HIV-1) reverse transcriptases. Fractionation and purification of this extract yielded the major polyphenol, 3,4,5 tri-O-galloylquinic acid, as the main active compound. A sensitive, ethidium bromide based fluorescent assay, was developed and used to monitor the kinetics of M-MLV and HIV-1 reverse transcriptases in the presence and absence of 3,4,5 tri-O-galloylquinic acid. Kinetic monitoring of these enzymes in the presence of 3,4,5 tri-O-galloylquinic acid revealed non-competitive inhibition with IC(50) values of 5 μM and 34 μM for the M-MLV and HIV-1 enzymes, respectively. We propose that 3,4,5 tri-O-galloylquinic acid and related polymers have potential as indigenous drugs for anti-viral therapy.

  18. HIV-1 Group O Origin, Evolution, Pathogenesis, and Treatment: Unraveling the Complexity of an Outlier 25 Years Later.

    PubMed

    Bush, Shannon; Tebit, Denis M

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago, an aberrant HIV-1 (now classified as HIV-1 group O) was described from a Cameroonian HIV patient living in Belgium. The epicenter of group O was later found to be in Central Africa, overlapping with the geographical location of the central chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) and western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla), the likely original hosts of group O. Although the prevalence of group O has remained low at 1-2% in Cameroon, some European countries (France, Spain, Belgium) with strong colonial ties to Central Africa have reported the highest prevalence out of Africa. The sequence diversity between HIV-1 group O and M strains is huge, reaching 50 and 30% in the envelope and pol, respectively. This diversity has hindered diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of group O-infected patients. Due to the intrinsic presence of the C181 mutation in group O, more than 60% of the approximately 30,000 individuals that live with this virus are faced with the challenge of drug resistance to some currently used antiretroviral therapies, notably the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Despite its susceptibility to most antiretroviral therapies, some group Os show a high variable baseline susceptibility to enfuvirtide (T20) and maraviroc. Group O strains are the least fit among all HIV-1 and -2 and restrict tetherin using their Nef but not Vpu as reported for group M. Although limited follow-up studies indicate that the natural course of group O is similar to that of M, these viruses are dominantly CCR5 tropic even late in infection, suggesting slow disease progression. This review summarizes important findings that marked the discovery, origin, spread, evolution, pathogenesis, and treatment of group O within the last 25 years. PMID:26450803

  19. Fused heterocycles bearing bridgehead nitrogen as potent HIV-1 NNRTIs. Part 3: optimization of [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine core via structure-based and physicochemical property-driven approaches.

    PubMed

    Huang, Boshi; Li, Cuicui; Chen, Wenmin; Liu, Tao; Yu, Mingyan; Fu, Lu; Sun, Yueyue; Liu, Huiqing; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe; Balzarini, Jan; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2015-03-01

    In our arduous efforts to develop new potent HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NNRTIs), novel piperidine-linked [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their antiviral activities in MT-4 cell cultures. Biological results showed that all of the title compounds displayed moderate to excellent activities against wild-type (wt) HIV-1 strain (IIIB) with EC50 values ranging from 8.1 nM to 2284 nM in a cell-based assay. Among them, the most promising analog 7d possessed an EC50 value of 8.1 nM against wt HIV-1, which was much more potent than the reference drugs DDI, 3 TC, NVP and DLV. Additionally, 7d demonstrated weak activity against the double mutant HIV-1 strain (K103N + Y181C), and was more efficient than NVP in a RT inhibition assay. Besides, some measured and calculated physicochemical properties of 7d, like log P and water solubility, as well as the structure-activity relationships (SARs) analysis have been discussed in detail. Furthermore, the binding mode of the active compound 7d was rationalized by molecular simulation studies.

  20. Biochemical, inhibition and inhibitor resistance studies of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Ndongwe, Tanyaradzwa P; Adedeji, Adeyemi O; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Ong, Yee Tsuey; Hachiya, Atsuko; Marchand, Bruno; Ryan, Emily M; Rai, Devendra K; Kirby, Karen A; Whatley, Angela S; Burke, Donald H; Johnson, Marc; Ding, Shilei; Zheng, Yi-Min; Liu, Shan-Lu; Kodama, Ei-Ichi; Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista A; Pathak, Vinay K; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Parniak, Michael A; Singh, Kamalendra; Sarafianos, Stefan G

    2012-01-01

    We report key mechanistic differences between the reverse transcriptases (RT) of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), a gammaretrovirus that can infect human cells. Steady and pre-steady state kinetics demonstrated that XMRV RT is significantly less efficient in DNA synthesis and in unblocking chain-terminated primers. Surface plasmon resonance experiments showed that the gammaretroviral enzyme has a remarkably higher dissociation rate (k(off)) from DNA, which also results in lower processivity than HIV-1 RT. Transient kinetics of mismatch incorporation revealed that XMRV RT has higher fidelity than HIV-1 RT. We identified RNA aptamers that potently inhibit XMRV, but not HIV-1 RT. XMRV RT is highly susceptible to some nucleoside RT inhibitors, including Translocation Deficient RT inhibitors, but not to non-nucleoside RT inhibitors. We demonstrated that XMRV RT mutants K103R and Q190M, which are equivalent to HIV-1 mutants that are resistant to tenofovir (K65R) and AZT (Q151M), are also resistant to the respective drugs, suggesting that XMRV can acquire resistance to these compounds through the decreased incorporation mechanism reported in HIV-1. PMID:21908397

  1. Biochemical, inhibition and inhibitor resistance studies of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Ndongwe, Tanyaradzwa P.; Adedeji, Adeyemi O.; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Ong, Yee Tsuey; Hachiya, Atsuko; Marchand, Bruno; Ryan, Emily M.; Rai, Devendra K.; Kirby, Karen A.; Whatley, Angela S.; Burke, Donald H.; Johnson, Marc; Ding, Shilei; Zheng, Yi-Min; Liu, Shan-Lu; Kodama, Ei-Ichi; Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista A.; Pathak, Vinay K.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Parniak, Michael A.; Singh, Kamalendra; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2012-01-01

    We report key mechanistic differences between the reverse transcriptases (RT) of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), a gammaretrovirus that can infect human cells. Steady and pre-steady state kinetics demonstrated that XMRV RT is significantly less efficient in DNA synthesis and in unblocking chain-terminated primers. Surface plasmon resonance experiments showed that the gammaretroviral enzyme has a remarkably higher dissociation rate (koff) from DNA, which also results in lower processivity than HIV-1 RT. Transient kinetics of mismatch incorporation revealed that XMRV RT has higher fidelity than HIV-1 RT. We identified RNA aptamers that potently inhibit XMRV, but not HIV-1 RT. XMRV RT is highly susceptible to some nucleoside RT inhibitors, including Translocation Deficient RT inhibitors, but not to non-nucleoside RT inhibitors. We demonstrated that XMRV RT mutants K103R and Q190M, which are equivalent to HIV-1 mutants that are resistant to tenofovir (K65R) and AZT (Q151M), are also resistant to the respective drugs, suggesting that XMRV can acquire resistance to these compounds through the decreased incorporation mechanism reported in HIV-1. PMID:21908397

  2. The Need for Development of New HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase Inhibitors in the Aftermath of Antiviral Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wainberg, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) involves combinations of drugs to achieve maximal virological response and reduce the potential for the emergence of antiviral resistance. There are two broad classes of reverse transcriptase inhibitors, the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Since the first classes of such compounds were developed, viral resistance against them has necessitated the continuous development of novel compounds within each class. This paper considers the NRTIs and NNRTIs currently in both preclinical and clinical development or approved for second line therapy and describes the patterns of resistance associated with their use, as well as the underlying mechanisms that have been described. Due to reasons of both affordability and availability, some reverse transcriptase inhibitors with low genetic barrier are more commonly used in resource-limited settings. Their use results to the emergence of specific patterns of antiviral resistance and so may require specific actions to preserve therapeutic options for patients in such settings. More recently, the advent of integrase strand transfer inhibitors represents another major step forward toward control of HIV infection, but these compounds are also susceptible to problems of HIV drug resistance. PMID:24278679

  3. Purification and characterization of a novel antifungal protein with antiproliferation and anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activities from Peganum harmala seeds.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaojin; Liu, Dongliang; Tang, Haishu; Wang, Yan; Wu, Ting; Li, Yang; Yang, Jie; Yang, Jianhua; Sun, Surong; Zhang, Fuchun

    2013-02-01

    A novel antifungal protein, designated as PHP, was isolated from the seeds of Peganum harmala, by cationic exchange chromatography on Resource S column and gel filtration on Sephadex 75 10/300 GL column. PHP was found to form a homodimer of about 16 kDa. Isoelectric focusing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis showed that the isoelectric point of PHP was ∼8.4. The N-terminal 20-amino acid sequence of PHP, ITCPQVTQSLAPCVPYLISG, resembles the non-specific lipid transfer proteins in certain plants. PHP exhibited lipid-binding activity. Furthermore, PHP exerted antifungal activity against Alternaria alternate, Penicillium degitatum, Rhizopus stuolonifer, and Magnaporthe grisea, and its antifungal activity was stable in the temperature range 4-60°C, and in the pH range 4-10. It inhibited the mycelial growth in A. alternate, P. degitatum, R. stuolonifer, and M. grisea with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 1.5, 37.5, 8.44, and 12.19 μM, respectively. PHP was also able to inhibit the proliferation of esophagus carcinoma (Eca-109), cervical carcinoma (HeLa), gastric carcinoma (MGC-7), and melanoma (B16) cells with IC(50) of 0.7, 2.74, 3.13, and 1.47 μM, respectively. Moreover, PHP significantly inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with an IC(50) of 1.26 μM. It did not have hemagglutinating and antibacterial activities. In conclusion, a novel antifungal protein with antiproliferation and anti-HIV-1 RT activities was obtained from P. harmala seeds.

  4. Structural and biochemical study on the inhibitory activity of derivatives of 5-nitro-furan-2-carboxylic acid for RNase H function of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Yanagita, Hiroshi; Urano, Emiko; Matsumoto, Kishow; Ichikawa, Reiko; Takaesu, Yoshihisa; Ogata, Masakazu; Murakami, Tsutomu; Wu, Hongui; Chiba, Joe; Komano, Jun; Hoshino, Tyuji

    2011-01-15

    Rapid emergence of drug-resistant variants is one of the most serious problems in chemotherapy for HIV-1 infectious diseases. Inhibitors acting on a target not addressed by approved drugs are of great importance to suppress drug-resistant viruses. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has two enzymatic functions, DNA polymerase and RNase H activities. The RNase H activity is an attractive target for a new class of antiviral drugs. On the basis of the hit chemicals found in our previous screening with 20,000 small molecular-weight compounds, we synthesized derivatives of 5-nitro-furan-2-carboxylic acid. Inhibition of RNase H enzymatic activity was measured in a biochemical assay with real-time monitoring of florescence emission from the digested RNA substrate. Several derivatives showed higher inhibitory activities that those of the hit chemicals. Modulation of the 5-nitro-furan-2-carboxylic moiety resulted in a drastic decrease in inhibitory potency. In contrast, many derivatives with modulation of other parts retained inhibitory activities to varying degrees. These findings suggest the binding mode of active derivatives, in which three oxygen atoms aligned in a straight form at the nitro-furan moiety are coordinated to two divalent metal ions located at RNase H reaction site. Hence, the nitro-furan-carboxylic moiety is one of the critical scaffolds for RNase H inhibition. Of note, the RNase H inhibitory potency of a derivative was improved by 18-fold compared with that of the original hit compound, and no significant cytotoxicity was observed for most of the derivatives showing inhibitory activity. Since there is still much room for modification of the compounds at the part opposite the nitro-furan moiety, further chemical conversion will lead to improvement of compound potency and specificity. PMID:21193314

  5. Acaconin, a chitinase-like antifungal protein with cytotoxic and anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activities from Acacia confusa seeds.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sze Kwan; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2010-01-01

    From the seeds of Acacia confusa, a chitinase-like antifungal protein designated as acaconin that demonstrated antifungal activity toward Rhizoctonia solani with an IC₅₀ of 30±4 µM was isolated. Acaconin demonstrated an N-terminal sequence with pronounced similarity to chitinases and a molecular mass of 32 kDa. It was isolated by chromatography on Q-Sepharose, SP-Sepharose and Superdex 75 and was not bound by either ion exchanger. Acaconin was devoid of chitinase activity. The antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani was completely preserved from pH 4 to 10 and from 0°C to 70°C. Congo Red staining at the tips of R. solani hyphae indicated inhibition of fungal growth. However, there was no antifungal activity toward Mycosphaerella arachidicola, Fusarium oxysporum, Helminthosporium maydis, and Valsa mali. Acaconin inhibited proliferation of breast cancer MCF-7 cells with an IC₅₀ of 128±9 µM but did not affect hepatoma HepG2 cells. Its IC₅₀ value toward HIV-1 reverse transcriptase was 10±2.3 µM. The unique features of acaconin include relatively high stability when exposed to changes in ambient pH and temperature, specific antifungal and antitumor actions, potent HIV-reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity, and lack of binding by strongly cationic and anionic exchangers. PMID:20725649

  6. Prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations among Spanish prison inmates.

    PubMed

    García-Guerrero, J; Sáiz de la Hoya, P; Portilla, J; Marco, A; Sánchez-Payá, J; Moreno, S

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to analyse the prevalence of HIV-1 drug-resistance mutations among HIV-1-infected prison inmates in Spain. Treatment-naive and treatment-experienced patients with an HIV RNA viral load of >/=2,000 copies/ml were included. To ensure that the study population was representative of the entire HIV-infected Spanish inmate population, a two-stage conglomerate for selection of the sample was used. In the first stage, 15 prisons were randomly selected, and in the second stage, 38 patients (30 treatment-experienced and 8 treatment-naive) per centre were randomly selected. Genotyping was performed by automatic sequencing. Resistance testing was performed on viral strains from 184 inmates from 12 prisons. Valid sequences were obtained from 133 inmates (90 treatment-experienced and 43 treatment-naive inmates). Most (92.5%) were men and had acquired HIV infection by intravenous drug use (91%); their mean age was 35 years. One or more key resistance mutations were detected in 5 (11.6%) treatment-naive and in 35 (38.6%) treatment-experienced patients. Among treatment-naive and treatment-experienced patients, resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was found in 3 (6.9%) and in 20 (22.2%) patients, respectively, resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in 3 (6.9%) and in 21 (23.3%) patients, and resistance to protease inhibitors in 3 (6.9%) and in 14 (15.5%) patients. Multidrug resistance was detected in 1 of the 43 (2.3%) treatment-naive patients. These findings support the use of resistance testing in HIV-infected inmates who must begin antiretroviral therapy, given the high rate of primary resistance to drugs frequently included in the initial treatment regimens. PMID:17043836

  7. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Nucleotide Substitutions in Subtype C Infected Drug Naïve and Treatment Experienced Patients in South India

    PubMed Central

    Saravanan, Shanmugam; Madhavan, Vidya; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Solomon, Sunil S.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Waldrop, Greer; Solomon, Suniti; Smith, Davey M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary In this large cohort of patients infected with HIV-1 subtype C, virologic failure during antiretroviral therapy was associated with high rates of resistance; however, many nucleotide changes were not congruent with previously documented resistance associated mutations. These data may have implications in interpreting genotypic resistance of HIV-1 subtype C during therapy failure. PMID:21876445

  8. The K65R mutation in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase: genetic barriers, resistance profile and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Bluma G; Coutsinos, Dimitrios

    2009-11-01

    Resistance to antiviral therapy is the limiting factor in the successful management of HIV. In general, the K65R mutation is rarely selected (1.7-4%) with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), abacavir (ABC), didanosine (ddI), and stavudine (d4T), as compared with the high incidence (>40%) of thymidine analog mutations associated with zidovudine and d4T. The high barrier to the development of K65R may reflect a combination of factors, including the high potency of K65R-selecting drugs, including recommended TDF/emtricitabine and ABC/lamivudine (ABC/3TC) combinations; the partial (low-intermediate level) profile of cross-resistance conferred by K65R to TDF, ABC and 3TC; the favorable viral fitness constraint imposed by K65R and the 3TC/emtricitabine-associated M184V mutations; the bidirectional antagonism between the K65R and thymidine analog mutation pathways; and unique RNA structural considerations in the region surrounding codon 65. Nevertheless, surprisingly high levels of treatment failures and K65R resistance may be associated with triple nucleoside analog regimens. The use of TDF + ABC, TDF + ddI and ABC + d4T in combination with 3TC or emtricitabine should be avoided. This selection of K65R may be reduced by the inclusion of zidovudine in two-four nucleoside reverse-transcriptase regimens. Clinical studies have demonstrated an increased frequency of K65R in association with suboptimal d4T and ddI regimens, as well as nevirapine and its resistance mutations Y181C and G190A. The potential for the development of the K65R mutation in subtype C is particularly problematic wherein a signature KKK nucleotide motif, at codons 64, 65 and 66 in reverse transcriptase, appear to lead to template pausing, facilitating the selection of K65R. Optimizing regimens may attenuate the emergence of K65R, leading to better long-term treatment management in different geographic settings. TDF-based regimens are the leading candidates for first- and second-line therapy, microbicides

  9. HIV-1 sensitivity to zidovudine: a consensus culture technique validated by genotypic analysis of the reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Brun-Vézinet, F; Ingrand, D; Deforges, L; Gochi, K; Ferchal, F; Schmitt, M P; Jung, M; Masquelier, B; Aubert, J; Buffet-Janvresse, C

    1992-05-01

    In order to select and standardize a reliable assay for the analysis of sensitivity of HIV isolates to AZT, we have compared two culture methods. The first assay (Cell-Associated Isolate Sensitivity Assay: CAISA) quantified AZT-resistant HIV isolates by end-point dilution cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in the presence of various concentrations of AZT. In the second assay (Cell-Free Isolate Sensitivity Assay: CFISA), following a conventional isolation of HIV, dilutions of infected cell-free supernatants were cultivated with fresh normal donor PBMCs in the presence of increasing concentrations of AZT. Samples from 64 untreated and AZT-treated patients were studied by CAISA (41), CFISA (43) or both assays (20). The CFISA, which allows the determination of titration parameters with respect to various kinetics patterns of viral replication was selected, and some of the CFISA phenotypically characterized isolates were further studied by nucleotide sequence analysis of the reverse transcriptase gene. CFISA showed that isolates from untreated patients were susceptible to AZT while the frequency of resistance increased with the duration of therapy. Genotypic analysis of CFISA-resistant isolates exhibited mutations at crucial positions, particularly at residue 215. We consider CFISA as a consensus culture technique for longitudinal studies of isolates from patients receiving AZT or other analogs of nucleosides.

  10. Free Energy-Based Virtual Screening and Optimization of RNase H Inhibitors of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a binding free energy-based virtual screening campaign of a library of 77 α-hydroxytropolone derivatives against the challenging RNase H active site of the reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme of human immunodeficiency virus-1. Multiple protonation states, rotamer states, and binding modalities of each compound were individually evaluated. The work involved more than 300 individual absolute alchemical binding free energy parallel molecular dynamics calculations and over 1 million CPU hours on national computing clusters and a local campus computational grid. The thermodynamic and structural measures obtained in this work rationalize a series of characteristics of this system useful for guiding future synthetic and biochemical efforts. The free energy model identified key ligand-dependent entropic and conformational reorganization processes difficult to capture using standard docking and scoring approaches. Binding free energy-based optimization of the lead compounds emerging from the virtual screen has yielded four compounds with very favorable binding properties, which will be the subject of further experimental investigations. This work is one of the few reported applications of advanced-binding free energy models to large-scale virtual screening and optimization projects. It further demonstrates that, with suitable algorithms and automation, advanced-binding free energy models can have a useful role in early-stage drug-discovery programs. PMID:27713931

  11. A Novel Lectin with Antiproliferative and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activities from Dried Fruiting Bodies of the Monkey Head Mushroom Hericium erinaceum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanrui; Zhang, Guoqing; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wang, Hexiang

    2010-01-01

    A lectin designated as Hericium erinaceum agglutinin (HEA) was isolated from dried fruiting bodies of the mushroom Hericium erinaceum with a chromatographic procedure which entailed DEAE-cellulose, CM-cellulose, Q-Sepharose, and FPLC Superdex 75. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 51 kDa and its N-terminal amino acid sequences was distinctly different from those of other isolated mushroom lectins. The hemagglutinating activity of HEA was inhibited at the minimum concentration of 12.5 mM by inulin. The lectin was stable at pH 1.9–12.1 and at temperatures up to 70°C, but was inhibited by Hg2+, Cu2+, and Fe3+ ions. The lectin exhibited potent mitogenic activity toward mouse splenocytes, and demonstrated antiproliferative activity toward hepatoma (HepG2) and breast cancer (MCF7) cells with an IC50 of 56.1 μM and 76.5 μM, respectively. It manifested HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 31.7 μM. The lectin exhibited potent mitogenic activity toward murine splenocytes but was devoid of antifungal activity. PMID:20625408

  12. Purification and Characterization of a White Laccase with Pronounced Dye Decolorizing Ability and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activity from Lepista nuda.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mengjuan; Zhang, Guoqing; Meng, Li; Wang, Hexiang; Gao, Kexiang; Ng, Tb

    2016-01-01

    A strain LN07 with high laccase yield was identified as basidiomycete fungus Lepista nuda from which a white laccase without type I copper was purified and characterized. The laccase was a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 56 kDa. Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was AIGPAADLHIVNKDISPDGF. Besides, eight inner peptide sequences were determined and lac4, lac5 and lac6 sequences were in the Cu(2+) combination and conservation zones of laccases. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase was inhibited by the laccase with a half-inhibitory concentration of 0.65 μM. Cu(2+) ions (1.5 mM) enhanced the laccase production and the optimal pH and temperature of the laccase were pH 3.0 and 50 °C, respectively. The Km and Vmax of the laccase using ABTS as substrate were respectively 0.19 mM and 195 μM. Several dyes including laboratory dyes and textile dyes used in this study, such as Methyl red, Coomassie brilliant blue, Reactive brilliant blue and so on, were decolorized in different degrees by the purified laccase. By LC-MS analysis, Methyl red was structurally degraded by the laccase. Moreover, the laccase affected the absorbance at the maximum wavelength of many pesticides. Thus, the white laccase had potential commercial value for textile finishing and wastewater treatment. PMID:27023513

  13. Burden of Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Resistance in HIV-1-Infected Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sudharshan, Lavanya; Nedrow, Katherine; Bhanegaonkar, Abhijeet; Simpson, Kit N.; Haider, Seema; Chambers, Richard; Craig, Charles; Stephens, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The prevalence of HIV drug resistance varies with geographic location, year, and treatment exposure. This study generated yearly estimates of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance in treatment-naive (TN) and treatment-experienced (TE) patients in the United States (US), Europe (EU), and Canada. Studies reporting NNRTI resistance identified in electronic databases and 11 conferences were analyzed in three groups: (1) TN patients in one of four geographic regions [US, Canada, EU countries with larger surveillance networks (“EU1”), and EU countries with fewer data (“EU2”)]; (2) TE patients from any region; and (3) TN patients failing NNRTI-based treatments in clinical trials. Analysis data included 158 unique studies from 22 countries representing 84 cohorts of TN patients, 21 cohorts of TE patients, and 8 trials reporting resistance at failure. From 1995 to 2000, resistance prevalence in TN patients increased in US and EU1 from 3.1% to 7.5% and 0.8% to 3.6%, respectively. Resistance in both regions stabilized in 2006 onward. Little resistance was identified in EU2 before 2000, and increased from 2006 (5.0%) to 2010 (13.7%). One TN Canadian study was identified and reported resistance of 8.1% in 2006. Half of TN clinical trial patients had resistance after treatment failure at weeks 48–144. Resistance in TE patients increased from 1998 (10.1%) to 2001 (44.0%), then decreased after 2004. Trends in NNRTI resistance among TN patients show an increased burden in the US and some EU countries compared to others. These findings signify a need for alternate first-line treatments in some regions. PMID:24925216

  14. Differences in resistance mutations among HIV-1 non-subtype B infections: a systematic review of evidence (1996–2008)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Ninety percent of HIV-1-infected people worldwide harbour non-subtype B variants of HIV-1. Yet knowledge of resistance mutations in non-B HIV-1 and their clinical relevance is limited. Although a few reviews, editorials and perspectives have been published alluding to this lack of data among non-B subtypes, no systematic review has been performed to date. With this in mind, we conducted a systematic review (1996–2008) of all published studies performed on the basis of non-subtype B HIV-1 infections treated with antiretroviral drugs that reported genotype resistance tests. Using an established search string, 50 studies were deemed relevant for this review. These studies reported genotyping data from non-B HIV-1 infections that had been treated with either reverse transcriptase inhibitors or protease inhibitors. While most major resistance mutations in subtype B were also found in non-B subtypes, a few novel mutations in non-B subtypes were recognized. The main differences are reflected in the discoveries that: (i) the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutation, V106M, has been seen in subtype C and CRF01_AE, but not in subtype B, (ii) the protease inhibitor mutations L89I/V have been reported in C, F and G subtypes, but not in B, (iii) a nelfinavir selected non-D30N containing pathway predominated in CRF01_AE and CRF02_AG, while the emergence of D30N is favoured in subtypes B and D, (iv) studies on thymidine analog-treated subtype C infections from South Africa, Botswana and Malawi have reported a higher frequency of the K65R resistance mutation than that typically seen with subtype B. Additionally, some substitutions that seem to impact non-B viruses differentially are: reverse transcriptase mutations G196E, A98G/S, and V75M; and protease mutations M89I/V and I93L. Polymorphisms that were common in non-B subtypes and that may contribute to resistance tended to persist or become more frequent after drug exposure. Some, but not all, are

  15. Molecular modeling studies of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase nonnucleoside inhibitors: total energy of complexation as a predictor of drug placement and activity.

    PubMed Central

    Kroeger Smith, M. B.; Rouzer, C. A.; Taneyhill, L. A.; Smith, N. A.; Hughes, S. H.; Boyer, P. L.; Janssen, P. A.; Moereels, H.; Koymans, L.; Arnold, E.

    1995-01-01

    Computer modeling studies have been carried out on three nonnucleoside inhibitors complexed with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT), using crystal coordinate data from a subset of the protein surrounding the binding pocket region. Results from the minimizations of solvated complexes of 2-cyclopropyl-4-methyl-5,11-dihydro-5H-dipyrido[3,2-b :2',3'-e][1,4] diazepin-6-one (nevirapine), alpha-anilino-2, 6-dibromophenylacetamide (alpha-APA), and 8-chloro-tetrahydro-imidazo(4,5,1-jk)(1,4)-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thi one (TIBO) show that all three inhibitors maintain a very similar conformational shape, roughly overlay each other in the binding pocket, and appear to function as pi-electron donors to aromatic side-chain residues surrounding the pocket. However, side-chain residues adapt to each bound inhibitor in a highly specific manner, closing down around the surface of the drug to make tight van der Waals contacts. Consequently, the results from the calculated minimizations reveal that only when the inhibitors are modeled in a site constructed from coordinate data obtained from their particular RT complex can the calculated binding energies be relied upon to predict the correct orientation of the drug in the pocket. In the correct site, these binding energies correlate with EC50 values determined for all three inhibitors in our laboratory. Analysis of the components of the binding energy reveals that, for all three inhibitors, solvation of the drug is endothermic, but solvation of the protein is exothermic, and the sum favors complex formation. In general, the protein is energetically more stable and the drug less stable in their complexes as compared to the reactant conformations. For all three inhibitors, interaction with the protein in the complex is highly favorable. Interactions of the inhibitors with individual residues correlate with crystallographic and site-specific mutational data. pi-Stacking interactions are important in

  16. Molecular modeling studies of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase nonnucleoside inhibitors: total energy of complexation as a predictor of drug placement and activity.

    PubMed

    Kroeger Smith, M B; Rouzer, C A; Taneyhill, L A; Smith, N A; Hughes, S H; Boyer, P L; Janssen, P A; Moereels, H; Koymans, L; Arnold, E

    1995-10-01

    Computer modeling studies have been carried out on three nonnucleoside inhibitors complexed with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT), using crystal coordinate data from a subset of the protein surrounding the binding pocket region. Results from the minimizations of solvated complexes of 2-cyclopropyl-4-methyl-5,11-dihydro-5H-dipyrido[3,2-b :2',3'-e][1,4] diazepin-6-one (nevirapine), alpha-anilino-2, 6-dibromophenylacetamide (alpha-APA), and 8-chloro-tetrahydro-imidazo(4,5,1-jk)(1,4)-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thi one (TIBO) show that all three inhibitors maintain a very similar conformational shape, roughly overlay each other in the binding pocket, and appear to function as pi-electron donors to aromatic side-chain residues surrounding the pocket. However, side-chain residues adapt to each bound inhibitor in a highly specific manner, closing down around the surface of the drug to make tight van der Waals contacts. Consequently, the results from the calculated minimizations reveal that only when the inhibitors are modeled in a site constructed from coordinate data obtained from their particular RT complex can the calculated binding energies be relied upon to predict the correct orientation of the drug in the pocket. In the correct site, these binding energies correlate with EC50 values determined for all three inhibitors in our laboratory. Analysis of the components of the binding energy reveals that, for all three inhibitors, solvation of the drug is endothermic, but solvation of the protein is exothermic, and the sum favors complex formation. In general, the protein is energetically more stable and the drug less stable in their complexes as compared to the reactant conformations. For all three inhibitors, interaction with the protein in the complex is highly favorable. Interactions of the inhibitors with individual residues correlate with crystallographic and site-specific mutational data. pi-Stacking interactions are important in

  17. Design, synthesis and evaluation of pyrazole derivatives as non-nucleoside hepatitis B virus inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jia, Haiyong; Bai, Fuxiang; Liu, Na; Liang, Xiaohong; Zhan, Peng; Ma, Chunhong; Jiang, Xuemei; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-11-10

    In continuation of our efforts toward the discovery of potent non-nucleoside hepatitis B virus (HBV) inhibitors with novel structures, we have employed bioisosterism and hybrid pharmacophore-based strategy to explore the chemically diverse space of bioactive compounds. In this article, the original thiazole platform was replaced with pyrazole scaffold to yield the optimal pharmacophore moieties in order to generate novel non-nucleoside HBV inhibitors with desirable potency. Some of the new compounds were able to inhibit HBV activity in the low micromolar range. In particular, compound 6a3 displayed the most potent activity against the secretion of HBsAg and HBeAg with IC50 of 24.33 μM and 2.22 μM, respectively. The preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) of this new series of compounds was investigated, which may help designing more potent molecules.

  18. Crystal structures of 8-Cl and 9-Cl TIBO complexed with wild-type HIV-1 RT and 8-Cl TIBO complexed with the Tyr181Cys HIV-1 RT drug-resistant mutant.

    PubMed

    Das, K; Ding, J; Hsiou, Y; Clark, A D; Moereels, H; Koymans, L; Andries, K; Pauwels, R; Janssen, P A; Boyer, P L; Clark, P; Smith, R H; Kroeger Smith, M B; Michejda, C J; Hughes, S H; Arnold, E

    1996-12-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) is an important target for chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of AIDS; the TIBO compounds are potent non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 RT (NNRTIs). Crystal structures of HIV-1 RT complexed with 8-Cl TIBO (R86183, IC50 = 4.6 nM) and 9-Cl TIBO (R82913, IC50 = 33 nM) have been determined at 3.0 A resolution. Mutant HIV-1 RT, containing Cys in place of Tyr at position 181 (Tyrl81Cys), is highly resistant to many NNRTIs and HIV-1 variants containing this mutation have been selected in both cell culture and clinical trials. We also report the crystal structure of Tyrl81Cys HIV-1 RT in complex with 8-Cl TIBO (IC50 = 130 nM) determined at 3.2 A resolution. Averaging of the electron density maps computed for different HIV-1 RT/NNRTI complexes and from diffraction datasets obtained using a synchrotron source from frozen (-165 degrees C) and cooled (-10 degrees C) crystals of the same complex was employed to improve the quality of electron density maps and to reduce model bias. The overall locations and conformations of the bound inhibitors in the complexes containing wild-type HIV-1 RT and the two TIBO inhibitors are very similar, as are the overall shapes and volumes of the non-nucleoside inhibitor-binding pocket (NNIBP). The major differences between the two wild-type HIV-1 RT/TIBO complexes occur in the vicinity of the TIBO chlorine substituents and involve the polypeptide segments around the beta5-beta6 connecting loop (residues 95 to 105) and the beta13-beta14 hairpin (residues 235 and 236). In all known structures of HIV-1 RT/NNRTI complexes, including these two, the position of the beta12-beta13 hairpin or the "primer grip" is significantly displaced relative to the position in the structure of HIV-1 RT complexed with a double-stranded DNA and in unliganded HIV-1 RT structures. Since the primer grip helps to position the template-primer, this displacement suggests that binding of NNRTIs

  19. Transmission dynamics of HIV-1 subtype B in the Basque Country, Spain.

    PubMed

    Patiño-Galindo, J A; Thomson, Michael M; Pérez-Álvarez, Lucía; Delgado, Elena; Cuevas, María Teresa; Fernández-García, Aurora; Nájera, Rafael; Iribarren, José A; Cilla, Gustavo; López-Soria, Leyre; Lezaun, María J; Cisterna, Ramón; González-Candelas, F

    2016-06-01

    This work was aimed to study the HIV-1 subtype B epidemics in the Basque Country, Spain. 1727 HIV-1 subtype B sequences comprising protease and reverse transcriptase (PR/RT) coding regions, sampled between 2001 and 2008, were analyzed. 156 transmission clusters were detected by means of phylogenetic analyses. Most of them comprised less than 4 individuals and, in total, they included 441 patients. Six clusters comprised 10 or more patients and were further analyzed in order to study their origin and diversification. Four clusters included men who had unprotected homosexual sex (MSM), one group was formed by intravenous drug users (IDUs), and another included both IDUs and people infected through unprotected heterosexual sex (HTs). Most of these clusters originated from the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s. Only one cluster, formed by MSM, originated after 2000. The time between infections was significantly lower in MSM groups than in those containing IDUs (P-value <0.0001). Nucleoside RT and non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI and NNRTI)-resistance mutations to antiretroviral treatment were found in these six clusters except the most recent MSM group, but only the IDU clusters presented protease inhibitor (PI)-resistance mutations. The most prevalent mutations for each inhibitor class were PI L90M, NRTI T215D/Y/F, and NNRTI K103N, which were also among the most prevalent resistant variants in the whole dataset. In conclusion, while most infections occur as isolated introductions into the population, the number of infections found to be epidemiologically related within the Basque Country is significant. Public health control measures should be reinforced to prevent the further expansion of transmission clusters and resistant mutations occurring within them. PMID:26921800

  20. Transmission dynamics of HIV-1 subtype B in the Basque Country, Spain.

    PubMed

    Patiño-Galindo, J A; Thomson, Michael M; Pérez-Álvarez, Lucía; Delgado, Elena; Cuevas, María Teresa; Fernández-García, Aurora; Nájera, Rafael; Iribarren, José A; Cilla, Gustavo; López-Soria, Leyre; Lezaun, María J; Cisterna, Ramón; González-Candelas, F

    2016-06-01

    This work was aimed to study the HIV-1 subtype B epidemics in the Basque Country, Spain. 1727 HIV-1 subtype B sequences comprising protease and reverse transcriptase (PR/RT) coding regions, sampled between 2001 and 2008, were analyzed. 156 transmission clusters were detected by means of phylogenetic analyses. Most of them comprised less than 4 individuals and, in total, they included 441 patients. Six clusters comprised 10 or more patients and were further analyzed in order to study their origin and diversification. Four clusters included men who had unprotected homosexual sex (MSM), one group was formed by intravenous drug users (IDUs), and another included both IDUs and people infected through unprotected heterosexual sex (HTs). Most of these clusters originated from the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s. Only one cluster, formed by MSM, originated after 2000. The time between infections was significantly lower in MSM groups than in those containing IDUs (P-value <0.0001). Nucleoside RT and non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI and NNRTI)-resistance mutations to antiretroviral treatment were found in these six clusters except the most recent MSM group, but only the IDU clusters presented protease inhibitor (PI)-resistance mutations. The most prevalent mutations for each inhibitor class were PI L90M, NRTI T215D/Y/F, and NNRTI K103N, which were also among the most prevalent resistant variants in the whole dataset. In conclusion, while most infections occur as isolated introductions into the population, the number of infections found to be epidemiologically related within the Basque Country is significant. Public health control measures should be reinforced to prevent the further expansion of transmission clusters and resistant mutations occurring within them.

  1. Herpes simplex virus type-2 stimulates HIV-1 replication in cervical tissues: implications for HIV-1 transmission and efficacy of anti-HIV-1 microbicides.

    PubMed

    Rollenhagen, C; Lathrop, M J; Macura, S L; Doncel, G F; Asin, S N

    2014-09-01

    Herpes Simplex virus Type-2 (HSV-2) increases the risk of HIV-1 acquisition, yet the mechanism for this viral pathogen to regulate the susceptibility of the cervicovaginal mucosa to HIV-1 is virtually unknown. Using ex vivo human ectocervical tissue models, we report greater levels of HIV-1 reverse transcription, DNA integration, RNA expression, and virions release in HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infected tissues compared with HIV-1 only infected tissues (P<0.05). Enhanced HIV-1 replication was associated with increased CD4, CCR5, and CD38 transcription (P<0.05) and increased number of CD4(+)/CCR5(+)/CD38(+) T cells in HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infected tissues compared with tissues infected with HIV-1 alone. Tenofovir (TFV) 1% gel, the leading microbicide candidate, demonstrated only partial protection against HIV-1, when applied vaginally before and after sexual intercourse. It is possible that mucosal inflammation, in particular that induced by HSV-2 infection, may have decreased TFV efficacy. HSV-2 upregulated the number of HIV-1-infected cells and elevated the concentration of TFV needed to decrease HIV-1 infection. Similarly, only high concentrations of TFV inhibited HSV-2 replication in HIV-1/HSV-2-infected tissues. Thus, HSV-2 co-infection and mucosal immune cell activation should be taken into consideration when designing preventative strategies for sexual transmission of HIV-1.

  2. Fused heterocycles bearing bridgehead nitrogen as potent HIV-1 NNRTIs. Part 4: design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazines.

    PubMed

    Huang, Boshi; Liang, Xin; Li, Cuicui; Chen, Wenmin; Liu, Tao; Li, Xiao; Sun, Yueyue; Fu, Lu; Liu, Huiqing; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2015-03-26

    Through a structure-guided core-refining approach, a series of novel imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazine derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated as HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Biological results of antiviral assay in MT-4 cell cultures showed that 12 target compounds displayed moderate activities against wild-type (wt) HIV-1 strain (IIIB) with EC50 values ranging from 0.26 μM to 19 μM. Among them, 4a and 5a were found to be the two most active analogues possessing EC50 values of 0.26 μM and 0.32 μM respectively, comparable to delavirdine (DLV, EC50 = 0.54 μM) and nevirapine (NVP, EC50 = 0.31 μM) in a cell-based assay. Additionally, 9 compounds showed RT inhibitory activity superior to that of NVP. Moreover, some predicted drug-like properties of representative compounds 4a and 5a, as well as the structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis were discussed in detail. The binding mode of compound 4a was investigated by molecular simulation studies.

  3. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Novel 2-(Pyridin-3-yloxy)acetamide Derivatives as Potential Anti-HIV-1 Agents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Boshi; Li, Xiao; Zhan, Peng; De Clercq, Erik; Daelemans, Dirk; Pannecouque, Christophe; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-02-01

    Through a structure-based molecular hybridization and bioisosterism approach, a series of novel 2-(pyridin-3-yloxy)acetamide derivatives were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their anti-HIV activities in MT-4 cell cultures. Biological results showed that three compounds (Ia, Ih, and Ij) exhibited moderate inhibitory activities against wild-type (wt) HIV-1 strain (IIIB ) with EC50 values ranging from 8.18 μm to 41.52 μm. Among them, Ij was the most active analogue possessing an EC50 value of 8.18 μm. To further confirm the binding target, four compounds were selected to implement an HIV-1 RT inhibitory assay. In addition, preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis and some predicted physicochemical properties of three active compounds Ia, Ih, and Ij were discussed in detail. Molecular docking studies were also carried out to investigate the binding modes of Ij and the lead compound GW678248 in the binding pocket of RT, which provided beneficial information for further rational design of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

  4. High-throughput screening using pseudotyped lentiviral particles: a strategy for the identification of HIV-1 inhibitors in a cell-based assay.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Jean-Michel; Gao, Anhui; He, Pei-Lan; Choi, Joyce; Tang, Wei; Bruzzone, Roberto; Schwartz, Olivier; Naya, Hugo; Nan, Fa-Jun; Li, Jia; Altmeyer, Ralf; Zuo, Jian-Ping

    2009-03-01

    Two decades after its discovery the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is still spreading worldwide and killing millions. There are 25 drugs formally approved for HIV currently on the market, but side effects as well as the emergence of HIV strains showing single or multiple resistances to current drug-therapy are causes for concern. Furthermore, these drugs target only 4 steps of the viral cycle, hence the urgent need for new drugs and also new targets. In order to tackle this problem, we have devised a cell-based assay using lentiviral particles to look for post-entry inhibitors of HIV-1. We report here the assay development, validation as well as confirmation of the hits using both wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1 viruses. The screening was performed on an original library, rich in natural compounds and pure molecules from Traditional Chinese Medicine pharmacopoeia, which had never been screened for anti-HIV activity. The identified hits belong to four chemical sub-families that appear to be all non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Secondary tests with live viruses showed that there was good agreement with pseudotyped particles, confirming the validity of this approach for high-throughput drug screens. This assay will be a useful tool that can be easily adapted to screen for inhibitors of viral entry.

  5. (3Z)-3-(2-[4-(aryl)-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]hydrazin-1-ylidene)-2,3-dihydro-1H-indol-2-one derivatives as dual inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Meleddu, Rita; Distinto, Simona; Corona, Angela; Bianco, Giulia; Cannas, Valeria; Esposito, Francesca; Artese, Anna; Alcaro, Stefano; Matyus, Peter; Bogdan, Dora; Cottiglia, Filippo; Tramontano, Enzo; Maccioni, Elias

    2015-03-26

    The HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase (RT) is a validated and deeply explored biological target for the treatment of AIDS. However, only drugs targeting the RT-associated DNA polymerase (DP) function have been approved for clinical use. We designed and synthesised a new generation of HIV-1 RT inhibitors, based on the (3Z)-3-(2-[4-(aryl)-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]hydrazin-1-ylidene)-2,3-dihydro-1H-indol-2-one scaffold. These compounds are active towards both RT-associated functions, DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H. The structure, biological activity and mode of action of the new derivatives have been investigated. In particular, the nature of the aromatic group in the position 4 of the thiazole ring plays a key role in the modulation of the activity towards the two RT-associated functions.

  6. Psychoneuroimmunology and HIV-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antoni, Michael H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents evidence describing benefits of behavioral interventions such as aerobic exercise training on both psychological and immunological functioning among high risk human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) seronegative and very early stage seropositive homosexual men. HIV-1 infection is cast as chronic disease for which early…

  7. Increasing trends in primary NNRTI resistance among newly HIV-1-diagnosed individuals in Buenos Aires, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Rodrigues, Nahuel; Duran, Adriana; Bouzas, María Belen; Zapiola, Ines; Vila, Marcelo; Indyk, Debbie; Bissio, Emiliano; Salomon, Horacio; Dilernia, Dario A

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to estimate primary resistance in an urban setting in a developing country characterized by high antiretroviral (ARV) coverage over the diagnosed population and also by an important proportion of undiagnosed individuals, in order to determine whether any change in primary resistance occurred in the past five years. Design We carried out a multi-site resistance surveillance study according to WHO HIV resistance guidelines, using a weighted sampling technique based on annual HIV case reports per site. Methods Blood samples were collected from 197 drug-naive HIV-1-infected individuals diagnosed between March 2010 and August 2011 at 20 HIV voluntary counselling and testing centres in Buenos Aires. Clinical records of enrolled patients at the time of diagnosis were compiled. Viral load and CD4 counts were performed on all samples. The pol gene was sequenced and the resistance profile determined. Phylogenetic analysis was performed by neighbour-joining (NJ) trees and bootscanning analysis. Results We found that 12 (7.9%) of the 152 successfully sequenced samples harboured primary resistance mutations, of which K103N and G190A were the most prevalent. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) resistance mutations were largely the most prevalent (5.9%), accounting for 75% of all primary resistance and exhibiting a significant increase (p=0.0072) in prevalence during the past 10 years as compared to our previous study performed in 1997–2000 and in 2003–2005. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) and protease inhibitor primary resistance were low and similar to the one previously reported. Conclusions Levels of primary NNRTI resistance in Buenos Aires appear to be increasing in the context of a sustained ARV coverage and a high proportion of undiagnosed HIV-positive individuals. PMID:24093951

  8. High rates of virological failure and drug resistance in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving lifelong antiretroviral therapy in routine clinics in Togo

    PubMed Central

    Salou, Mounerou; Dagnra, Anoumou Y; Butel, Christelle; Vidal, Nicole; Serrano, Laetitia; Takassi, Elom; Konou, Abla A; Houndenou, Spero; Dapam, Nina; Singo-Tokofaï, Assetina; Pitche, Palokinam; Atakouma, Yao; Prince-David, Mireille; Delaporte, Eric; Peeters, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral treatment (ART) has been scaled up over the last decade but compared to adults, children living with HIV are less likely to receive ART. Moreover, children and adolescents are more vulnerable than adults to virological failure (VF) and emergence of drug resistance. In this study we determined virological outcome in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving ART in Togo. Methods HIV viral load (VL) testing was consecutively proposed to all children and adolescents who were on ART for at least 12 months when attending HIV healthcare services for their routine follow-up visit (June to September 2014). Plasma HIV-1 VL was measured using the m2000 RealTime HIV-1 assay (Abbott Molecular, Des Plaines, IL, USA). Genotypic drug resistance was done for all samples with VL>1000 copies/ml. Results and discussion Among 283 perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents included, 167 (59%) were adolescents and 116 (41%) were children. The median duration on ART was 48 months (interquartile range: 28 to 68 months). For 228 (80.6%), the current ART combination consisted of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) (zidovudine and lamivudine) and one non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) (nevirapine or efavirenz). Only 28 (9.9%) were on a protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimen. VL was below the detection limit (i.e. 40 copies/ml) for 102 (36%), between 40 and 1000 copies/ml for 35 (12.4%) and above 1000 copies/ml for 146 (51.6%). Genotypic drug-resistance testing was successful for 125/146 (85.6%); 110/125 (88.0%) were resistant to both NRTIs and NNRTIs, 1/125 (0.8%) to NRTIs only, 4/125 (3.2%) to NNRTIs only and three harboured viruses resistant to reverse transcriptase and PIs. Overall, 86% (108/125) of children and adolescents experiencing VF and successfully genotyped, corresponding thus to at least 38% of the study population, had either no effective ART or had only a single effective drug in

  9. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of RNase H Activity of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase by RNase H Active Site-Directed Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hua-Poo; Yan, Youwei; Prasad, G. Sridhar; Smith, Robert F.; Daniels, Christopher L.; Abeywickrema, Pravien D.; Reid, John C.; Loughran, H. Marie; Kornienko, Maria; Sharma, Sujata; Grobler, Jay A.; Xu, Bei; Sardana, Vinod; Allison, Timothy J.; Williams, Peter D.; Darke, Paul L.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Munshi, Sanjeev

    2010-09-02

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a menace to public health. Several drugs currently on the market have successfully improved the ability to manage the viral burden in infected patients. However, new drugs are needed to combat the rapid emergence of mutated forms of the virus that are resistant to existing therapies. Currently, approved drugs target three of the four major enzyme activities encoded by the virus that are critical to the HIV life cycle. Although a number of inhibitors of HIV RNase H activity have been reported, few inhibit by directly engaging the RNase H active site. Here, we describe structures of naphthyridinone-containing inhibitors bound to the RNase H active site. This class of compounds binds to the active site via two metal ions that are coordinated by catalytic site residues, D443, E478, D498, and D549. The directionality of the naphthyridinone pharmacophore is restricted by the ordering of D549 and H539 in the RNase H domain. In addition, one of the naphthyridinone-based compounds was found to bind at a second site close to the polymerase active site and non-nucleoside/nucleotide inhibitor sites in a metal-independent manner. Further characterization, using fluorescence-based thermal denaturation and a crystal structure of the isolated RNase H domain reveals that this compound can also bind the RNase H site and retains the metal-dependent binding mode of this class of molecules. These structures provide a means for structurally guided design of novel RNase H inhibitors.

  10. Structural basis for the inhibition of RNase H activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by RNase H active site-directed inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Su, Hua-Poo; Yan, Youwei; Prasad, G Sridhar; Smith, Robert F; Daniels, Christopher L; Abeywickrema, Pravien D; Reid, John C; Loughran, H Marie; Kornienko, Maria; Sharma, Sujata; Grobler, Jay A; Xu, Bei; Sardana, Vinod; Allison, Timothy J; Williams, Peter D; Darke, Paul L; Hazuda, Daria J; Munshi, Sanjeev

    2010-08-01

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a menace to public health. Several drugs currently on the market have successfully improved the ability to manage the viral burden in infected patients. However, new drugs are needed to combat the rapid emergence of mutated forms of the virus that are resistant to existing therapies. Currently, approved drugs target three of the four major enzyme activities encoded by the virus that are critical to the HIV life cycle. Although a number of inhibitors of HIV RNase H activity have been reported, few inhibit by directly engaging the RNase H active site. Here, we describe structures of naphthyridinone-containing inhibitors bound to the RNase H active site. This class of compounds binds to the active site via two metal ions that are coordinated by catalytic site residues, D443, E478, D498, and D549. The directionality of the naphthyridinone pharmacophore is restricted by the ordering of D549 and H539 in the RNase H domain. In addition, one of the naphthyridinone-based compounds was found to bind at a second site close to the polymerase active site and non-nucleoside/nucleotide inhibitor sites in a metal-independent manner. Further characterization, using fluorescence-based thermal denaturation and a crystal structure of the isolated RNase H domain reveals that this compound can also bind the RNase H site and retains the metal-dependent binding mode of this class of molecules. These structures provide a means for structurally guided design of novel RNase H inhibitors.

  11. Sentinel Surveillance of HIV-1 Transmitted Drug Resistance, Acute Infection and Recent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Hong-Ha M.; Kellogg, Timothy A.; McFarland, Willi; Louie, Brian; Klausner, Jeffrey D.; Philip, Susan S.; Grant, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV-1 acute infection, recent infection and transmitted drug resistance screening was integrated into voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT) services to enhance the existing surveillance program in San Francisco. This study describes newly-diagnosed HIV cases and characterizes correlates associated with infection. Methodology/Principal Findings A consecutive sample of persons presenting for HIV VCT at the municipal sexually transmitted infections (STI) clinic from 2004 to 2006 (N = 9,868) were evaluated by standard enzyme-linked immunoassays (EIA). HIV antibody-positive specimens were characterized as recent infections using a less-sensitive EIA. HIV-RNA pooled testing was performed on HIV antibody-negative specimens to identify acute infections. HIV antibody-positive and acute infection specimens were evaluated for drug resistance by sequence analysis. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to evaluate associations. The 380 newly-diagnosed HIV cases included 29 acute infections, 128 recent infections, and 47 drug-resistant cases, with no significant increases or decreases in prevalence over the three years studied. HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance prevalence was 11.0% in 2004, 13.4% in 2005 and 14.9% in 2006 (p = 0.36). Resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) was the most common pattern detected, present in 28 cases of resistance (59.6%). Among MSM, recent infection was associated with amphetamine use (AOR = 2.67; p<0.001), unprotected anal intercourse (AOR = 2.27; p<0.001), sex with a known HIV-infected partner (AOR = 1.64; p = 0.02), and history of gonorrhea (AOR = 1.62; p = 0.03). Conclusions New HIV diagnoses, recent infections, acute infections and transmitted drug resistance prevalence remained stable between 2004 and 2006. Resistance to NNRTI comprised more than half of the drug-resistant cases, a worrisome finding given its role as the backbone of first

  12. Telomerase inhibition by non-nucleosidic compound BIBR1532 causes rapid cell death in pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Bashash, Davood; Ghaffari, Seyed H; Mirzaee, Rooholah; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2013-03-01

    Since unlimited proliferative potential has been identified as a major and, to date, therapeutically unexploited phenotypic hallmark of cancer, telomere maintenance mechanisms have been proposed as potential targets for new anticancer interventions. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of BIBR1532, the lead compound of non-nucleosidic inhibition of telomerase, on pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. BIBR1532 caused rapid cell death in Nalm-6 cells probably through transcriptional suppression of survivin-mediated c-Myc and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, our results also suggest that induced p73, up-regulated Bax/Bcl-2 molecular ratio and subsequent activation of caspase-3 may contribute to a direct short-term cytotoxic effect of high doses of BIBR1532, independent of long-term substantial telomere erosion-mediated cell cycle arrest.

  13. Trends in Transmission of Drug Resistance and Prevalence of Non-B Subtypes in Patients with Acute or Recent HIV-1 Infection in Barcelona in the Last 16 Years (1997-2012)

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, David; Parera, Marta; López-Diéguez, María; Romero, Anabel; Agüero, Fernando; Marcos, María Ángeles; Manzardo, Christian; Zamora, Laura; Gómez-Carrillo, Manuel; Gatell, José María; Pumarola, Tomás; Miró, José María

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and non-B subtypes in patients with acute/recent HIV-1 infection in Barcelona during the period 1997-2012. Methods Patients from the “Hospital Clínic Primary HIV-1 Infection Cohort” with a genotyping test performed within 180 days of infection were included. The 2009 WHO List of Mutations for Surveillance of Transmitted HIV-1 Drug Resistance was used for estimating the prevalence of TDR and phylogenetic analysis for subtype determination. Results 189 patients with acute/recent HIV-1 infection were analyzed in 4 time periods (1997-2000, n=28; 2001-4, n=42; 2005-8, n=55 and 2009-12, n=64). The proportion of patients with acute/recent HIV-1 infection with respect to the total of newly HIV-diagnosed patients in our center increased over the time and was 2.18%, 3.82%, 4.15% and 4.55% for the 4 periods, respectively (p=0.005). The global prevalence of TDR was 9%, or 17.9%, 9.5%, 3.6% and 9.4% by study period (p=0.2). The increase in the last period was driven by protease-inhibitor and nucleoside-reverse-transcriptase-inhibitor resistance mutations while non-nucleoside-reverse-transcriptase inhibitor TDR and TDR of more than one family decreased. The overall prevalence of non-B subtypes was 11.1%, or 0%, 4.8%, 9.1% and 20.3 by study period (p=0.01). B/F recombinants, B/G recombinants and subtype F emerged in the last period. We also noticed an increase in the number of immigrant patients (p=0.052). The proportion of men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM) among patients with acute/recent HIV-1 infection increased over the time (p=0.04). Conclusions The overall prevalence of TDR in patients with acute/recent HIV-1 infection in Barcelona was 9%, and it has stayed relatively stable in recent years. Non-B subtypes and immigrants proportions progressively increased. PMID:26039689

  14. Transmitted Drug Resistance Mutations in Antiretroviral-Naïve Injection Drug Users with Chronic HIV-1 Infection in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Memarnejadian, Arash; Menbari, Shahoo; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Abdi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The growing incidence and transmission of drug resistant HIV-1 strains due to widespread use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) can jeopardize the success of first-line ART. While there is a known moderate prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) among newly infected Iranians, no data exist about the rate of these primary resistance mutations among the ART-naïve, chronically infected individuals who are, in fact, the main candidates for ART initiation. To address this issue, we collected blood samples from 40 ART-naïve injection drug-users (IDUs) with chronic HIV-1 infection (seroconversion time ranging from 2 to 9 years) living in Sanandaj, Iran, followed by sequencing of the protease and reverse-transcriptase regions from their HIV-1 genome. Phylogenetic analyses of the sequenced regions revealed that all samples were CRF35_AD. Transmitted resistance mutations were interpreted as surveillance drug-resistant mutations (SDRMs) based on the world health organization (WHO) algorithm. The frequency of SDRMs to any class of antiretroviral drugs was 15%, which included mutations to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs, 10%), with M41L and M184V as the most common (5%), and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs, 5%), with K103N as the only detected mutation (5%). Although not in the WHO SDRMs list, several minor protease inhibitor resistant mutations listed in the International Antiviral Society-USA panel were identified, of which M36I, H69K, L89M/V/I (each one 100%) and K20R/T (92.5%) can be considered as polymorphic signatures for CRF35_AD.The relatively high rate of TDR mutations in our study raises concerns about the risk of treatment failure in chronically infected IDUs of Sanandaj city. These results suggest that routine resistance testing should be considered before the therapy initiation in this area. Additional surveillance studies are required to generalize this deduction to other cities of Iran. PMID:25962088

  15. Transmitted Drug Resistance Mutations in Antiretroviral-Naïve Injection Drug Users with Chronic HIV-1 Infection in Iran.

    PubMed

    Memarnejadian, Arash; Menbari, Shahoo; Mansouri, Seyed Ali; Sadeghi, Leila; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Abdi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The growing incidence and transmission of drug resistant HIV-1 strains due to widespread use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) can jeopardize the success of first-line ART. While there is a known moderate prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) among newly infected Iranians, no data exist about the rate of these primary resistance mutations among the ART-naïve, chronically infected individuals who are, in fact, the main candidates for ART initiation. To address this issue, we collected blood samples from 40 ART-naïve injection drug-users (IDUs) with chronic HIV-1 infection (seroconversion time ranging from 2 to 9 years) living in Sanandaj, Iran, followed by sequencing of the protease and reverse-transcriptase regions from their HIV-1 genome. Phylogenetic analyses of the sequenced regions revealed that all samples were CRF35_AD. Transmitted resistance mutations were interpreted as surveillance drug-resistant mutations (SDRMs) based on the world health organization (WHO) algorithm. The frequency of SDRMs to any class of antiretroviral drugs was 15%, which included mutations to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs, 10%), with M41L and M184V as the most common (5%), and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs, 5%), with K103N as the only detected mutation (5%). Although not in the WHO SDRMs list, several minor protease inhibitor resistant mutations listed in the International Antiviral Society-USA panel were identified, of which M36I, H69K, L89M/V/I (each one 100%) and K20R/T (92.5%) can be considered as polymorphic signatures for CRF35_AD.The relatively high rate of TDR mutations in our study raises concerns about the risk of treatment failure in chronically infected IDUs of Sanandaj city. These results suggest that routine resistance testing should be considered before the therapy initiation in this area. Additional surveillance studies are required to generalize this deduction to other cities of Iran. PMID:25962088

  16. N6-methyladenosine of HIV-1 RNA regulates viral infection and HIV-1 Gag protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Tirumuru, Nagaraja; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Lu, Wuxun; Lu, Zhike; He, Chuan; Wu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The internal N6-methyladenosine (m6A) methylation of eukaryotic nuclear RNA controls post-transcriptional gene expression, which is regulated by methyltransferases (writers), demethylases (erasers), and m6A-binding proteins (readers) in cells. The YTH domain family proteins (YTHDF1–3) bind to m6A-modified cellular RNAs and affect RNA metabolism and processing. Here, we show that YTHDF1–3 proteins recognize m6A-modified HIV-1 RNA and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell lines and primary CD4+ T-cells. We further mapped the YTHDF1–3 binding sites in HIV-1 RNA from infected cells. We found that the overexpression of YTHDF proteins in cells inhibited HIV-1 infection mainly by decreasing HIV-1 reverse transcription, while knockdown of YTHDF1–3 in cells had the opposite effects. Moreover, silencing the m6A writers decreased HIV-1 Gag protein expression in virus-producing cells, while silencing the m6A erasers increased Gag expression. Our findings suggest an important role of m6A modification of HIV-1 RNA in viral infection and HIV-1 protein synthesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15528.001 PMID:27371828

  17. N(6)-methyladenosine of HIV-1 RNA regulates viral infection and HIV-1 Gag protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tirumuru, Nagaraja; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Lu, Wuxun; Lu, Zhike; He, Chuan; Wu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The internal N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) methylation of eukaryotic nuclear RNA controls post-transcriptional gene expression, which is regulated by methyltransferases (writers), demethylases (erasers), and m(6)A-binding proteins (readers) in cells. The YTH domain family proteins (YTHDF1-3) bind to m(6)A-modified cellular RNAs and affect RNA metabolism and processing. Here, we show that YTHDF1-3 proteins recognize m(6)A-modified HIV-1 RNA and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell lines and primary CD4(+) T-cells. We further mapped the YTHDF1-3 binding sites in HIV-1 RNA from infected cells. We found that the overexpression of YTHDF proteins in cells inhibited HIV-1 infection mainly by decreasing HIV-1 reverse transcription, while knockdown of YTHDF1-3 in cells had the opposite effects. Moreover, silencing the m(6)A writers decreased HIV-1 Gag protein expression in virus-producing cells, while silencing the m(6)A erasers increased Gag expression. Our findings suggest an important role of m(6)A modification of HIV-1 RNA in viral infection and HIV-1 protein synthesis. PMID:27371828

  18. Population genomics of intrapatient HIV-1 evolution.

    PubMed

    Zanini, Fabio; Brodin, Johanna; Thebo, Lina; Lanz, Christa; Bratt, Göran; Albert, Jan; Neher, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Many microbial populations rapidly adapt to changing environments with multiple variants competing for survival. To quantify such complex evolutionary dynamics in vivo, time resolved and genome wide data including rare variants are essential. We performed whole-genome deep sequencing of HIV-1 populations in 9 untreated patients, with 6-12 longitudinal samples per patient spanning 5-8 years of infection. The data can be accessed and explored via an interactive web application. We show that patterns of minor diversity are reproducible between patients and mirror global HIV-1 diversity, suggesting a universal landscape of fitness costs that control diversity. Reversions towards the ancestral HIV-1 sequence are observed throughout infection and account for almost one third of all sequence changes. Reversion rates depend strongly on conservation. Frequent recombination limits linkage disequilibrium to about 100 bp in most of the genome, but strong hitch-hiking due to short range linkage limits diversity. PMID:26652000

  19. Population genomics of intrapatient HIV-1 evolution.

    PubMed

    Zanini, Fabio; Brodin, Johanna; Thebo, Lina; Lanz, Christa; Bratt, Göran; Albert, Jan; Neher, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Many microbial populations rapidly adapt to changing environments with multiple variants competing for survival. To quantify such complex evolutionary dynamics in vivo, time resolved and genome wide data including rare variants are essential. We performed whole-genome deep sequencing of HIV-1 populations in 9 untreated patients, with 6-12 longitudinal samples per patient spanning 5-8 years of infection. The data can be accessed and explored via an interactive web application. We show that patterns of minor diversity are reproducible between patients and mirror global HIV-1 diversity, suggesting a universal landscape of fitness costs that control diversity. Reversions towards the ancestral HIV-1 sequence are observed throughout infection and account for almost one third of all sequence changes. Reversion rates depend strongly on conservation. Frequent recombination limits linkage disequilibrium to about 100 bp in most of the genome, but strong hitch-hiking due to short range linkage limits diversity.

  20. Combination genetic therapy to inhibit HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Strayer, David S; Branco, Francisco; Landré, Julien; BouHamdan, Mohamad; Shaheen, Farida; Pomerantz, Roger J

    2002-01-01

    Compared with single agents, combination antilentiviral pharmacotherapy targets multiple HIV-1 functions simultaneously, maximizing efficacy and decreasing chances of escape mutations. Combination genetic therapy could theoretically enhance efficacy similarly, but delivery of even single genes to high percentages of hematopoietic cells or their derivatives has proven problematic. Because of their high efficiency of gene delivery, we tested recombinant SV40-derived vectors (rSV40s) for this purpose. We made six rSV40s, each carrying a different transgene that targeted a different lentiviral function. We tested the ability of these constructs, individually and in double and triple combinations, to protect SupT1 human T lymphoma cells from HIV-1 challenge. Single chain antibodies (SFv) against CXCR4 and against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase (IN) were used, as were polymeric TAR decoys (PolyTAR) and a dominant-negative mutant of HIV-1 Rev (RevM10). Immunostaining showed that virtually all doubly treated cells expressed both transgenes. All transgenes individually protected from HIV-1 but, except for anti-CXCR4 SFv, their effectiveness diminished as challenge doses increased from 40 through 2500 tissue culture infectious dose(50) (TCID(50))/10(6) cells. However, all combinations of transgenes protected target cells better than individual transgenes, even from the highest challenge doses. Thus, combination gene therapies may inhibit HIV-1 better than single agents, and rSV40s may facilitate delivery of multigene therapeutics.

  1. Moderate prevalence of transmitted drug resistance and high HIV-1 genetic diversity in patients from Mato Grosso State, Central Western Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Adriana Santarém; Cardoso, Ludimila Paula Vaz; Stefani, Mariane Martins de Araújo

    2011-08-01

    Few reports have described the molecular characteristics of the AIDS epidemic within the interior regions of Brazil, a country of continental dimensions. To help fill this gap, the prevalence of transmitted antiretroviral drug resistance and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) diversity in Mato Grosso State, central western Brazil are reported. Drug-naïve patients (n = 105) were recruited at a reference center in Cuiabá/Mato Grosso State located across the border with Bolivia and considered a southern gate to the Amazon forest. For 92 HIV-1 isolates, the protease and partial reverse transcriptase fragments were amplified by nested-PCR and sequenced. Drug resistance was analyzed by the Calibrated Population Resistance tool and the International AIDS Society-USA database. HIV-1 subtypes were determined by REGA and phylogenetic analyses. Recombinant viruses were analyzed by SIMPLOT. Drug resistance mutations were observed in 5.4%: nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations M41L (n = 1), D67N (n = 1), and K219E (n = 1), the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutation K103N (n = 1) and the protease inhibitor mutation L90M (n = 1). Around 20% of the isolates were recombinants: different patterns of B/F1 mosaics (n = 11), four B/C, one F1/C/B, one F1/C, and one D/F1. Subtype B(PR) B(RT) represented 71.7%, 5.4% were of subtype C(PR) C(RT) and 3.3% were of subtype F1(PR) F1(RT) . A moderate prevalence of transmitted resistance and the co-circulation of subtypes B, F1, C, different recombinants, including the first report of subtype D, were found in Mato Grosso State, far from the epicenter of the epidemic. These results highlight the importance of monitoring transmitted drug resistance and HIV-1 genetic diversity in the interior regions of Brazil.

  2. Human cytosolic extracts stabilize the HIV-1 core.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Thomas; Brandariz-Nuñez, Alberto; Wang, Xiaozhao; Smith, Amos B; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2013-10-01

    The stability of the HIV-1 core in the cytoplasm is crucial for productive HIV-1 infection. Mutations that stabilize or destabilize the core showed defects on HIV-1 reverse transcription and infection. We developed a novel and simple assay to measure the stability of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. The assay allowed us to demonstrate that cytosolic extracts strongly stabilize the HIV-1 core. Interestingly, stabilization of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes is not due solely to macromolecular crowding, suggesting the presence of specific cellular factors that stabilize the HIV-1 core. By using our novel assay, we measured the abilities of different drugs, such as PF74, CAP-1, IXN-053, cyclosporine, Bi2 (also known as BI-2), and the peptide CAI, to modulate the stability of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. Interestingly, we found that PF74 and Bi2 strongly stabilized HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. On the other hand, the peptide CAI destabilized HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. We also found that purified cyclophilin A destabilizes in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes in the presence of cellular extracts in a cyclosporine-sensitive manner. In agreement with previous observations using the fate-of-the-capsid assay, we also demonstrated the ability of recombinant CPSF6 to stabilize HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. Overall, our findings suggested that cellular extracts specifically stabilize the HIV-1 core. We believe that our assay can be a powerful tool to assess HIV-1 core stability in vitro.

  3. [Effective components against HIV-1 replicative enzymes isolated from plants].

    PubMed

    Peng, Zong-gen; Xu, Li-jia; Ye, Wen-cai; Xiao, Pei-gen; Chen, Hong-shan

    2010-02-01

    Plant active components characterized of many different structures and activities on multiple targets, have made them to be the important sources of inhibitors on HIV-1. For finding leading compounds with new structure against HIV-1, three key HIV-1 replicative enzymes (reverse transcriptase, protease and integrase) were used as screening models. The in vitro activities of 45 plant derived components isolated from Schisandraceae, Rutaceae and Ranunculaceae were reported. Within twelve triterpene components isolated, eight compounds were found to inhibit HIV-1 protease, in these eight active compounds, kadsuranic acid A (7) and nigranoic acid (8), inhibited both HIV-1 protease and integrase; Among fifteen lignans, meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid (15) and kadsurarin (16) were active on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, and 4, 4-di(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenly)-2, 3-dimethylbutanol (13) active on HIV-1 integrase. All of the six alkaloids, seven flavones, and five others compounds were not active or only with low activities against HIV-1 replicative enzymes. Further studies of the triterpene components showing strong inhibitory activities on HIV-1 were warranted.

  4. Simultaneous Detection of Major Drug Resistance Mutations in the Protease and Reverse Transcriptase Genes for HIV-1 Subtype C by Use of a Multiplex Allele-Specific Assay

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guoqing; Cai, Fangping; Zhou, Zhiyong; DeVos, Joshua; Wagar, Nick; Diallo, Karidia; Zulu, Isaac; Wadonda-Kabondo, Nellie; Stringer, Jeffrey S. A.; Weidle, Paul J.; Ndongmo, Clement B.; Sikazwe, Izukanji; Sarr, Abdoulaye; Kagoli, Matthew; Nkengasong, John

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput, sensitive, and cost-effective HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) detection assays are needed for large-scale monitoring of the emergence and transmission of HIVDR in resource-limited settings. Using suspension array technology, we have developed a multiplex allele-specific (MAS) assay that can simultaneously detect major HIVDR mutations at 20 loci. Forty-five allele-specific primers tagged with unique 24-base oligonucleotides at the 5′ end were designed to detect wild-type and mutant alleles at the 20 loci of HIV-1 subtype C. The MAS assay was first established and optimized with three plasmid templates (C-wt, C-mut1, and C-mut2) and then evaluated using 148 plasma specimens from HIV-1 subtype C-infected individuals. All the wild-type and mutant alleles were unequivocally distinguished with plasmid templates, and the limits of detection were 1.56% for K219Q and K219E, 3.13% for L76V, 6.25% for K65R, K70R, L74V, L100I, K103N, K103R, Q151M, Y181C, and I47V, and 12.5% for M41L, K101P, K101E, V106A, V106M, Y115F, M184V, Y188L, G190A, V32I, I47A, I84V, and L90M. Analyses of 148 plasma specimens revealed that the MAS assay gave 100% concordance with conventional sequencing at eight loci and >95% (range, 95.21% to 99.32%) concordance at the remaining 12 loci. The differences observed were caused mainly by 24 additional low-abundance alleles detected by the MAS assay. Ultradeep sequencing analysis confirmed 15 of the 16 low-abundance alleles. This multiplex, sensitive, and straightforward result-reporting assay represents a new efficient genotyping tool for HIVDR surveillance and monitoring. PMID:23985909

  5. The hunt for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lataillade, Max; Kozal, Michael J

    2006-07-01

    Currently, there are three distinct mechanistic classes of antiretrovirals: inhibitors of the HIV- 1 reverse transcriptase and protease enzymes and inhibitors of HIV entry, including receptor and coreceptor binding and cell fusion. A new drug class that inhibits the HIV-1 integrase enzyme (IN) is in development and may soon be available in the clinic. IN is an attractive drug target because it is essential for a stable and productive HIV-1 infection and there is no mammalian homologue of IN. Inhibitors of integrase enzyme (INI) block the integration of viral double-stranded DNA into the host cell's chromosomal DNA. HIV-1 integration has many potential steps that can be inhibited and several new compounds that target specific integration steps have been identified by drug developers. Recently, two INIs, GS-9137 and MK-0518, demonstrated promising early clinical trial results and have been advanced into later stage trials. In this review, we describe how IN facilitates HIV-1 integration, the needed enzyme cofactors, and the resultant byproducts created during integration. Furthermore, we review the different INIs under development, their mechanism of actions, site of IN inhibition, potency, resistance patterns, and discuss the early clinical trial results.

  6. Selective Non-nucleoside Inhibitors of Human DNA Methyltransferases Active in Cancer Including in Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) are important enzymes involved in epigenetic control of gene expression and represent valuable targets in cancer chemotherapy. A number of nucleoside DNMT inhibitors (DNMTi) have been studied in cancer, including in cancer stem cells, and two of them (azacytidine and decitabine) have been approved for treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes. However, only a few non-nucleoside DNMTi have been identified so far, and even fewer have been validated in cancer. Through a process of hit-to-lead optimization, we report here the discovery of compound 5 as a potent non-nucleoside DNMTi that is also selective toward other AdoMet-dependent protein methyltransferases. Compound 5 was potent at single-digit micromolar concentrations against a panel of cancer cells and was less toxic in peripheral blood mononuclear cells than two other compounds tested. In mouse medulloblastoma stem cells, 5 inhibited cell growth, whereas related compound 2 showed high cell differentiation. To the best of our knowledge, 2 and 5 are the first non-nucleoside DNMTi tested in a cancer stem cell line. PMID:24387159

  7. Broad activation of latent HIV-1 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Barton, Kirston; Hiener, Bonnie; Winckelmann, Anni; Rasmussen, Thomas Aagaard; Shao, Wei; Byth, Karen; Lanfear, Robert; Solomon, Ajantha; McMahon, James; Harrington, Sean; Buzon, Maria; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Denton, Paul W; Olesen, Rikke; Østergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Lewin, Sharon R; Søgaard, Ole Schmeltz; Palmer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The 'shock and kill' approach to cure human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) includes transcriptional induction of latent HIV-1 proviruses using latency-reversing agents (LRAs) with targeted immunotherapy to purge infected cells. The administration of LRAs (panobinostat or vorinostat) to HIV-1-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy induces a significant increase in cell-associated unspliced (CA-US) HIV-1 RNA from CD4(+) T cells. However, it is important to discern whether the increases in CA-US HIV-1 RNA are due to limited or broad activation of HIV-1 proviruses. Here we use single-genome sequencing to find that the RNA transcripts observed following LRA administration are genetically diverse, indicating activation of transcription from an extensive range of proviruses. Defective sequences are more frequently found in CA HIV-1 RNA than in HIV-1 DNA, which has implications for developing an accurate measure of HIV-1 reservoir size. Our findings provide insights into the effects of panobinostat and vorinostat as LRAs for latent HIV-1. PMID:27605062

  8. Impaired IL-2 expression in latent HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Shin, YoungHyun; Yoon, Cheol-Hee; Lim, Hoyong; Park, Jihwan; Roh, Tae-Young; Kang, Chun; Choi, Byeong-Sun

    2015-08-01

    Regarding the T cell function in HIV-1 infection, activation of T cells is enhanced in acutely HIV-1-infected T cells upon stimuli. However, T cell immune responses underlying the activation of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling molecules and interleukin (IL)-2 production in latently HIV-1-infected cells are poorly understood. The expression and activation of TCR components and its downstream molecules in acutely and latently HIV-1-infected T cells were compared using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for mRNA expression and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for levels of IL-2 in phytohemagglutinin M (PHA-M). The levels of T cell surface molecules and TCR signaling molecules in latently HIV-1-infected cells were greatly decreased without changes in their mRNA levels. In addition, downstream TCR-signaling molecules in latently HIV-1-infected cells were not activated even in the presence of PHA-M. The phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the presence of PHA-M was weakly induced in latently HIV-1-infected cells but was greater in acutely HIVNL4-3-infected cells. Finally, the production of IL-2 was significantly decreased in latently HIV-1-infected cells compared with uninfected parent cells. Thus, IL-2-related immunological functions in latently HIV-1-infected T cells were markedly impaired even in the presence of stimuli.

  9. Broad activation of latent HIV-1 in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Kirston; Hiener, Bonnie; Winckelmann, Anni; Rasmussen, Thomas Aagaard; Shao, Wei; Byth, Karen; Lanfear, Robert; Solomon, Ajantha; McMahon, James; Harrington, Sean; Buzon, Maria; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Denton, Paul W.; Olesen, Rikke; Østergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Lewin, Sharon R.; Søgaard, Ole Schmeltz; Palmer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The ‘shock and kill' approach to cure human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) includes transcriptional induction of latent HIV-1 proviruses using latency-reversing agents (LRAs) with targeted immunotherapy to purge infected cells. The administration of LRAs (panobinostat or vorinostat) to HIV-1-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy induces a significant increase in cell-associated unspliced (CA-US) HIV-1 RNA from CD4+ T cells. However, it is important to discern whether the increases in CA-US HIV-1 RNA are due to limited or broad activation of HIV-1 proviruses. Here we use single-genome sequencing to find that the RNA transcripts observed following LRA administration are genetically diverse, indicating activation of transcription from an extensive range of proviruses. Defective sequences are more frequently found in CA HIV-1 RNA than in HIV-1 DNA, which has implications for developing an accurate measure of HIV-1 reservoir size. Our findings provide insights into the effects of panobinostat and vorinostat as LRAs for latent HIV-1. PMID:27605062

  10. Broad activation of latent HIV-1 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Barton, Kirston; Hiener, Bonnie; Winckelmann, Anni; Rasmussen, Thomas Aagaard; Shao, Wei; Byth, Karen; Lanfear, Robert; Solomon, Ajantha; McMahon, James; Harrington, Sean; Buzon, Maria; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Denton, Paul W; Olesen, Rikke; Østergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Lewin, Sharon R; Søgaard, Ole Schmeltz; Palmer, Sarah

    2016-09-08

    The 'shock and kill' approach to cure human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) includes transcriptional induction of latent HIV-1 proviruses using latency-reversing agents (LRAs) with targeted immunotherapy to purge infected cells. The administration of LRAs (panobinostat or vorinostat) to HIV-1-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy induces a significant increase in cell-associated unspliced (CA-US) HIV-1 RNA from CD4(+) T cells. However, it is important to discern whether the increases in CA-US HIV-1 RNA are due to limited or broad activation of HIV-1 proviruses. Here we use single-genome sequencing to find that the RNA transcripts observed following LRA administration are genetically diverse, indicating activation of transcription from an extensive range of proviruses. Defective sequences are more frequently found in CA HIV-1 RNA than in HIV-1 DNA, which has implications for developing an accurate measure of HIV-1 reservoir size. Our findings provide insights into the effects of panobinostat and vorinostat as LRAs for latent HIV-1.

  11. Which therapeutic strategy will achieve a cure for HIV-1?

    PubMed

    Cillo, Anthony R; Mellors, John W

    2016-06-01

    Strategies to achieve a cure for HIV-1 infection can be broadly classified into three categories: eradication cure (elimination of all viral reservoirs), functional cure (immune control without reservoir eradication), or a hybrid cure (reservoir reduction with improved immune control). The many HIV-1 cure strategies being investigated include modification of host cells to resist HIV-1, engineered T cells to eliminate HIV-infected cells, broadly HIV-1 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, and therapeutic vaccination, but the 'kick and kill' strategy to expose latent HIV-1 with latency reversing agents (LRAs) and kill the exposed cells through immune effector functions is currently the most actively pursued. It is unknown, however, whether LRAs can deplete viral reservoirs in vivo or whether current LRAs are sufficiently safe for clinical use.

  12. Transmitted drug resistance in nonsubtype B HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Philip A; Kantor, Rami

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 nonsubtype B variants account for the majority of HIV infections worldwide. Drug resistance in individuals who have never undergone antiretroviral therapy can lead to early failure and limited treatment options and, therefore, is an important concern. Evaluation of reported transmitted drug resistance (TDR) is challenging owing to varying definitions and study designs, and is further complicated by HIV-1 subtype diversity. In this article, we discuss the importance of various mutation lists for TDR definition, summarize TDR in nonsubtype B HIV-1 and highlight TDR reporting and interpreting challenges in the context of HIV-1 diversity. When examined carefully, TDR in HIV-1 non-B protease and reverse transcriptase is still relatively low in most regions. Whether it will increase with time and therapy access, as observed in subtype-B-predominant regions, remains to be determined. PMID:20161523

  13. High prevalence and incidence of HIV-1 in a counseling and testing center in the city of Itajaí, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, Gorki; Giron, Leila Bertoni; Knoll, Rosalie Kupka; Galinskas, Juliana; Camargo, Michelle; Arif, Muhammad Shoaib; Samer, Sadia; Janini, Luiz Mario Ramos; Sucupira, Maria Cecilia Araripe; Diaz, Ricardo Sobhie

    2015-01-01

    Itajaí is a port city in southern Brazil with one of the highest incidence and mortality rates from AIDS in the country. The prevalence and incidence of HIV infection were investigated in 1085 of 3196 new HIV-1 infection cases evaluated in the counseling and testing center of Itajaí from January 2002 to August 2008. Recent infections were assessed using the BED™, and pol region sequencing was performed in 76 samples. The prevalence ranged from 3.08% to 6.17% among women and from 10.26% to 17.36% among men. A total of 17% of infections were classified as recent, with annual incidence varying from 1.6% to 4.8 per 100 patient/year among women and from 2.05% to 8.5 per 100 patient/year among men. Pol sequences were obtained from 38 randomly recent infections selected individuals: 71% were infected by subtype C, 24% B, 2% D, and 2% F1. Among 38 subjects with established infection, 76% were subtype C, and 24% B. Transmitted drug resistance was detected in 18.4% of recent infection subjects (7.8% to nucleoside analog reverse-transcriptase inhibitors, 5.2% to non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors, and 5.2% protease inhibitors) and 5.2% of subjects with established infection had nucleoside analog reverse-transcriptase inhibitors resistance. The high prevalence and incidence of HIV infection in this region is unprecedented in studies involving cases evaluated in the counseling and testing centers in Brazil.

  14. Ionic derivatives of betulinic acid exhibit antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2), but not HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Visalli, Robert J; Ziobrowski, Hannah; Badri, Kameswara R; He, Johnny J; Zhang, Xiugen; Arumugam, Sri Ranjini; Zhao, Hua

    2015-08-15

    Betulinic acid (1) has been modified to ionic derivatives (2-5) to improve its water solubility and biological activities. The binding properties of these derivatives with respect to human serum albumin (HSA) was examined and found to be similar to current anti-HIV drugs. These compounds did not inhibit HIV reverse transcriptase, however, 1, 2 and 5 inhibited herpes simplex type 2 (HSV-2) replication at concentrations similar to those reported for acyclovir (IC50 ∼ 0.1-10 μM) and with minimal cellular cytotoxicity. IC50 values for antiviral activity against HSV-2 186 were 1.6, 0.6, 0.9, 7.2, and 0.9 μM for compounds 1-5, respectively.

  15. A full-coordinate model of the polymerase domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and its interaction with a nucleic acid substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlik, R. F.; Meyer, D. J.; Shibata, M.; Roskwitalski, R.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.

    1994-01-01

    We present a full-coordinate model of residues 1-319 of the polymerase domain of HIV-I reverse transcriptase. This model was constructed from the x-ray crystallographic structure of Jacobo-Molina et al. (Jacobo-Molina et al., P.N.A.S. USA 90, 6320-6324 (1993)) which is currently available to the degree of C-coordinates. The backbone and side-chain atoms were constructed using the MAXSPROUT suite of programs (L. Holm and C. Sander, J. Mol. Biol. 218, 183-194 (1991)) and refined through molecular modeling. A seven base pair A-form dsDNA was positioned in the nucleic acid binding cleft to represent the template-primer complex. The orientation of the template-primer complex in the nucleic acid binding cleft was guided by the positions of phosphorus atoms in the crystal structure.

  16. Structural basis for the role of the K65R mutation in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase polymerization, excision antagonism, and tenofovir resistance.

    PubMed

    Das, Kalyan; Bandwar, Rajiv P; White, Kirsten L; Feng, Joy Y; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Tuske, Steven; Tu, Xiongying; Clark, Arthur D; Boyer, Paul L; Hou, Xiaorong; Gaffney, Barbara L; Jones, Roger A; Miller, Michael D; Hughes, Stephen H; Arnold, Eddy

    2009-12-11

    K65R is a primary reverse transcriptase (RT) mutation selected in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients taking antiretroviral regimens containing tenofovir disoproxil fumarate or other nucleoside analog RT drugs. We determined the crystal structures of K65R mutant RT cross-linked to double-stranded DNA and in complexes with tenofovir diphosphate (TFV-DP) or dATP. The crystals permit substitution of TFV-DP with dATP at the dNTP-binding site. The guanidinium planes of the arginines K65R and Arg(72) were stacked to form a molecular platform that restricts the conformational adaptability of both of the residues, which explains the negative effects of the K65R mutation on nucleotide incorporation and on excision. Furthermore, the guanidinium planes of K65R and Arg(72) were stacked in two different rotameric conformations in TFV-DP- and dATP-bound structures that may help explain how K65R RT discriminates the drug from substrates. These K65R-mediated effects on RT structure and function help us to visualize the complex interaction with other key nucleotide RT drug resistance mutations, such as M184V, L74V, and thymidine analog resistance mutations.

  17. Smartphone-Imaged HIV-1 Reverse-Transcription Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (RT-LAMP) on a Chip from Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Damhorst, Gregory L.; Duarte-Guevara, Carlos; Chen, Weili; Ghonge, Tanmay; Cunningham, Brian T.; Bashir, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    Viral load measurements are an essential tool for the long-term clinical care of hum an immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals. The gold standards in viral load instrumentation, however, are still too limited by their size, cost, and sophisticated operation for these measurements to be ubiquitous in remote settings with poor healthcare infrastructure, including parts of the world that are disproportionately affected by HIV infection. The challenge of developing a point-of-care platform capable of making viral load more accessible has been frequently approached but no solution has yet emerged that meets the practical requirements of low cost, portability, and ease-of-use. In this paper, we perform reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) on minimally processed HIV-spiked whole blood samples with a microfluidic and silicon microchip platform, and perform fluorescence measurements with a consumer smartphone. Our integrated assay shows amplification from as few as three viruses in a ~ 60 nL RT-LAMP droplet, corresponding to a whole blood concentration of 670 viruses per µL of whole blood. The technology contains greater power in a digital RT-LAMP approach that could be scaled up for the determination of viral load from a finger prick of blood in the clinical care of HIV-positive individuals. We demonstrate that all aspects of this viral load approach, from a drop of blood to imaging the RT-LAMP reaction, are compatible with lab-on-a-chip components and mobile instrumentation. PMID:26705482

  18. Antiretroviral Resistance After First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy Failure in Diverse HIV-1 Subtypes in the SECOND-LINE Study.

    PubMed

    Lam, Edward P; Moore, Cecilia L; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Nwizu, Chidi; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Chetchotisakd, Ploenchan; van Wyk, Jean; Teppler, Hedy; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Molina, Jean-Michel; Emery, Sean; Cooper, David A; Boyd, Mark A

    2016-09-01

    We investigate mutations and correlates according to HIV-1 subtype after virological failure (VF) of standard first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) (non-nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor [NNRTI] +2 nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor [N(t)RTI]). SECOND-LINE study participants were assessed at baseline for HIV-1 subtype, demographics, HIV-1 history, ART exposure, viral load (VL), CD4(+) count, and genotypic ART resistance. We used backward stepwise multivariate regression (MVR) to assess associations between baseline variables and presence of ≥3 N(t)RTI mutations, ≥1 NNRTI mutation, ≥3 thymidine analog-N(t)RTI [ta-N(t)RTI] mutations (TAMs), the K65/K70 mutation, and predicted etravirine (ETV)/rilpivirine (RPV) activity. The inclusion p-value for MVR was p < .2. The exclusion p-value from stepwise elimination was p > .05. Of 541 participants, 491 (91%) had successfully characterized baseline viral isolates. Subtype distribution: B (n = 123, 25%), C (n = 202, 41%), CRF01_AE (n = 109, 22%), G (n = 25, 5%), and CRF02_AG (n = 27, 5%). Baseline CD4(+) 200-394 cells/mm(3) were associated with <3 N(t)RTI mutations (OR = 0.47; 95% CI 0.29-0.77; p = .003), absence of the K65/K70 mutation (OR = 0.43; 95% CI 0.26-0.73; p = .002), and higher ETV sensitivity (OR = 0.52; 95% CI 0.35-0.78; p = .002). Recent tenofovir (TDF) use was associated with K65/K70 mutations (OR = 8.91; 95% CI 5.00-15.85; p < .001). Subtype CRF01_AE was associated with ≥3 N(t)RTI mutations (OR = 2.34; 95% CI 1.31-4.17; p = .004) and higher RPV resistance (OR = 2.13; 95% CI 1.30-3.49; p = .003), and subtype C was associated with <3 TAMs (OR = 0.45; 95% CI 0.21-0.99; p = .015). Subtypes CRF01_AE (OR = 2.46; 95% CI 1.26-4.78; p = .008) and G (OR = 4.77; 95% CI 1.44-15.76; p = .01) were associated with K65/K70 mutations. Higher VL at confirmed first-line VF was

  19. The triple threat of HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Potempa, Marc; Lee, Sook-Kyung; Wolfenden, Richard; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Newly released human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) particles obligatorily undergo a maturation process to become infectious. The HIV-1 protease (PR) initiates this step, catalyzing the cleavage of the Gag and Gag-Pro-Pol structural polyproteins. Proper organization of the mature virus core requires that cleavage of these polyprotein substrates proceeds in a highly regulated, specific series of events. The vital role the HIV-1 PR plays in the viral life cycle has made it an extremely attractive target for inhibition and has accordingly fostered the development of a number of highly potent substrate-analog inhibitors. Though the PR inhibitors (PIs) inhibit only the HIV-1 PR, their effects manifest at multiple different stages in the life cycle due to the critical importance of the PR in preparing the virus for these subsequent events. Effectively, PIs masquerade as entry inhibitors, reverse transcription inhibitors, and potentially even inhibitors of post-reverse transcription steps. In this chapter, we review the triple threat of PIs: the intermolecular cooperativity in the form of a cooperative dose-response for inhibition in which the apparent potency increases with increasing inhibition; the pleiotropic effects of HIV-1 PR inhibition on entry, reverse transcription, and post-reverse transcription steps; and their potency as transition state analogs that have the potential for further improvement that could lead to an inability of the virus to evolve resistance in the context of single drug therapy. PMID:25778681

  20. HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping from antiretroviral therapy (ART) naïve and first-line treatment failures in Djiboutian patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In this study we report the prevalence of antiretroviral drug resistant HIV-1 genotypes of virus isolated from Djiboutian patients who failed first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) and from ART naïve patients. Patients and methods A total of 35 blood samples from 16 patients who showed first-line ART failure (>1000 viral genome copies/ml) and 19 ART-naïve patients were collected in Djibouti from October 2009 to December 2009. Both the protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) genes were amplified and sequenced using National Agency for AIDS Research (ANRS) protocols. The Stanford HIV database algorithm was used for interpretation of resistance data and genotyping. Results Among the 16 patients with first-line ART failure, nine (56.2%) showed reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 strains: two (12.5%) were resistant to nucleoside (NRTI), one (6.25%) to non-nucleoside (NNRTI) reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and six (37.5%) to both. Analysis of the DNA sequencing data indicated that the most common mutations conferring drug resistance were M184V (38%) for NRTI and K103N (25%) for NNRTI. Only NRTI primary mutations K101Q, K103N and the PI minor mutation L10V were found in ART naïve individuals. No protease inhibitor resistant strains were detected. In our study, we found no detectable resistance in ∼ 44% of all patients who experienced therapeutic failure which was explained by low compliance, co-infection with tuberculosis and malnutrition. Genotyping revealed that 65.7% of samples were infected with subtype C, 20% with CRF02_AG, 8.5% with B, 2.9% with CRF02_AG/C and 2.9% with K/C. Conclusion The results of this first study about drug resistance mutations in first-line ART failures show the importance of performing drug resistance mutation test which guides the choice of a second-line regimen. This will improve the management of HIV-infected Djiboutian patients. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here

  1. Potent inhibition of HIV-1 replication by a Tat mutant.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Luke W; Sivakumaran, Haran; Major, Lee; Suhrbier, Andreas; Harrich, David

    2009-11-10

    Herein we describe a mutant of the two-exon HIV-1 Tat protein, termed Nullbasic, that potently inhibits multiple steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle. Nullbasic was created by replacing the entire arginine-rich basic domain of wild type Tat with glycine/alanine residues. Like similarly mutated one-exon Tat mutants, Nullbasic exhibited transdominant negative effects on Tat-dependent transactivation. However, unlike previously reported mutants, we discovered that Nullbasic also strongly suppressed the expression of unspliced and singly-spliced viral mRNA, an activity likely caused by redistribution and thus functional inhibition of HIV-1 Rev. Furthermore, HIV-1 virion particles produced by cells expressing Nullbasic had severely reduced infectivity, a defect attributable to a reduced ability of the virions to undergo reverse transcription. Combination of these inhibitory effects on transactivation, Rev-dependent mRNA transport and reverse transcription meant that permissive cells constitutively expressing Nullbasic were highly resistant to a spreading infection by HIV-1. Nullbasic and its activities thus provide potential insights into the development of potent antiviral therapeutics that target multiple stages of HIV-1 infection.

  2. HIV-1 evades innate immune recognition through specific cofactor recruitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasaiyaah, Jane; Tan, Choon Ping; Fletcher, Adam J.; Price, Amanda J.; Blondeau, Caroline; Hilditch, Laura; Jacques, David A.; Selwood, David L.; James, Leo C.; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Towers, Greg J.

    2013-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 is able to replicate in primary human macrophages without stimulating innate immunity despite reverse transcription of genomic RNA into double-stranded DNA, an activity that might be expected to trigger innate pattern recognition receptors. We reasoned that if correctly orchestrated HIV-1 uncoating and nuclear entry is important for evasion of innate sensors then manipulation of specific interactions between HIV-1 capsid and host factors that putatively regulate these processes should trigger pattern recognition receptors and stimulate type 1 interferon (IFN) secretion. Here we show that HIV-1 capsid mutants N74D and P90A, which are impaired for interaction with cofactors cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 6 (CPSF6) and cyclophilins (Nup358 and CypA), respectively, cannot replicate in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages because they trigger innate sensors leading to nuclear translocation of NF-κB and IRF3, the production of soluble type 1 IFN and induction of an antiviral state. Depletion of CPSF6 with short hairpin RNA expression allows wild-type virus to trigger innate sensors and IFN production. In each case, suppressed replication is rescued by IFN-receptor blockade, demonstrating a role for IFN in restriction. IFN production is dependent on viral reverse transcription but not integration, indicating that a viral reverse transcription product comprises the HIV-1 pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Finally, we show that we can pharmacologically induce wild-type HIV-1 infection to stimulate IFN secretion and an antiviral state using a non-immunosuppressive cyclosporine analogue. We conclude that HIV-1 has evolved to use CPSF6 and cyclophilins to cloak its replication, allowing evasion of innate immune sensors and induction of a cell-autonomous innate immune response in primary human macrophages.

  3. Epidemiological Surveillance of HIV-1 Transmitted Drug Resistance in Spain in 2004-2012: Relevance of Transmission Clusters in the Propagation of Resistance Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Yolanda; Delgado, Elena; Fernández-García, Aurora; Cuevas, Maria Teresa; Thomson, Michael M.; Montero, Vanessa; Sánchez, Monica; Sánchez, Ana Maria; Pérez-Álvarez, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Our objectives were to carry out an epidemiological surveillance study on transmitted drug resistance (TDR) among individuals newly diagnosed of HIV-1 infection during a nine year period in Spain and to assess the role of transmission clusters (TC) in the propagation of resistant strains. An overall of 1614 newly diagnosed individuals were included in the study from January 2004 through December 2012. Individuals come from two different Spanish regions: Galicia and the Basque Country. Resistance mutations to reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTI) and protease inhibitors (PI) were analyzed according to mutations included in the surveillance drug-resistance mutations list updated in 2009. TC were defined as those comprising viruses from five or more individuals whose sequences clustered in maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees with a bootstrap value ≥90%. The overall prevalence of TDR to any drug was 9.9%: 4.9% to nucleoside RTIs (NRTIs), 3.6% to non-nucleoside RTIs (NNRTIs), and 2.7% to PIs. A significant decrease of TDR to NRTIs over time was observed [from 10% in 2004 to 2% in 2012 (p=0.01)]. Sixty eight (42.2%) of 161 sequences with TDR were included in 25 TC composed of 5 or more individuals. Of them, 9 clusters harbored TDR associated with high level resistance to antiretroviral drugs. T215D revertant mutation was transmitted in a large cluster comprising 25 individuals. The impact of epidemiological networks on TDR frequency may explain its persistence in newly diagnosed individuals. The knowledge of the populations involved in TC would facilitate the design of prevention programs and public health interventions. PMID:26010948

  4. HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Mutations in Treatment Naïve and Experienced Panamanian Subjects: Impact on National Use of EFV-Based Schemes.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Yaxelis; Castillo Mewa, Juan; Martínez, Alexander A; Zaldívar, Yamitzel; Sosa, Néstor; Arteaga, Griselda; Armién, Blas; Bautista, Christian T; García-Morales, Claudia; Tapia-Trejo, Daniela; Ávila-Ríos, Santiago; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Bello, Gonzalo; Pascale, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    The use of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected subjects prevents AIDS-related illness and delayed occurrence of death. In Panama, rollout of ART started in 1999 and national coverage has reached 62.8% since then. The objective of this study was to determine the level and patterns of acquired drug resistance mutations of clinical relevance (ADR-CRM) and surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) from 717 HIV-1 pol gene sequences obtained from 467 ARV drug-experienced and 250 ARV drug-naïve HIV-1 subtypes B infected subjects during 2007-2013, respectively. The overall prevalence of SDRM and of ADR-CRM during the study period was 9.2% and 87.6%, respectively. The majority of subjects with ADR-CRM had a pattern of mutations that confer resistance to at least two classes of ARV inhibitors. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations K103N and P225H were more prevalent in both ARV drug-naïve and ARV drug-experienced subjects. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutation M184V was more frequent in ARV drug-experienced individuals, while T215YFrev and M41L were more frequent in ARV drug-naïve subjects. Prevalence of mutations associated to protease inhibitors (PI) was lower than 4.1% in both types of subjects. Therefore, there is a high level of resistance (>73%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine, Lamivudine and Azidothymidine in ARV drug-experienced subjects, and an intermediate to high level of resistance (5-10%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine in ARV drug-naïve subjects. During the study period, we observed an increasing trend in the prevalence of ADR-CRM in subjects under first-line schemes, but not significant changes in the prevalence of SDRM. These results reinforce the paramount importance of a national surveillance system of ADR-CRM and SDRM for national management policies of subjects living with HIV.

  5. HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Mutations in Treatment Naïve and Experienced Panamanian Subjects: Impact on National Use of EFV-Based Schemes.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Yaxelis; Castillo Mewa, Juan; Martínez, Alexander A; Zaldívar, Yamitzel; Sosa, Néstor; Arteaga, Griselda; Armién, Blas; Bautista, Christian T; García-Morales, Claudia; Tapia-Trejo, Daniela; Ávila-Ríos, Santiago; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Bello, Gonzalo; Pascale, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    The use of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected subjects prevents AIDS-related illness and delayed occurrence of death. In Panama, rollout of ART started in 1999 and national coverage has reached 62.8% since then. The objective of this study was to determine the level and patterns of acquired drug resistance mutations of clinical relevance (ADR-CRM) and surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) from 717 HIV-1 pol gene sequences obtained from 467 ARV drug-experienced and 250 ARV drug-naïve HIV-1 subtypes B infected subjects during 2007-2013, respectively. The overall prevalence of SDRM and of ADR-CRM during the study period was 9.2% and 87.6%, respectively. The majority of subjects with ADR-CRM had a pattern of mutations that confer resistance to at least two classes of ARV inhibitors. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations K103N and P225H were more prevalent in both ARV drug-naïve and ARV drug-experienced subjects. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutation M184V was more frequent in ARV drug-experienced individuals, while T215YFrev and M41L were more frequent in ARV drug-naïve subjects. Prevalence of mutations associated to protease inhibitors (PI) was lower than 4.1% in both types of subjects. Therefore, there is a high level of resistance (>73%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine, Lamivudine and Azidothymidine in ARV drug-experienced subjects, and an intermediate to high level of resistance (5-10%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine in ARV drug-naïve subjects. During the study period, we observed an increasing trend in the prevalence of ADR-CRM in subjects under first-line schemes, but not significant changes in the prevalence of SDRM. These results reinforce the paramount importance of a national surveillance system of ADR-CRM and SDRM for national management policies of subjects living with HIV. PMID:27119150

  6. The Antiviral Activity of Approved and Novel Drugs against HIV-1 Mutations Evaluated under the Consideration of Dose-Response Curve Slope

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shuai; Zhuang, Daomin; Guo, Wei; Li, Lin; Zhang, Wenfu; Liu, Siyang; Li, Hanping; Liu, Yongjian; Bao, Zuoyi; Han, Jingwan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to identify common HIV-1 mutation complexes affecting the slope of inhibition curve, and to propose a new parameter incorporating both the IC50 and the slope to evaluate phenotypic resistance. Methods Utilizing site-directed mutagenesis, we constructed 22 HIV-1 common mutation complexes. IC50 and slope of 10 representative approved drugs and a novel agent against these mutations were measured to determine the resistance phenotypes. The values of new parameter incorporating both the IC50 and the slope of the inhibition curve were calculated, and the correlations between parameters were assessed. Results Depending on the class of drug, there were intrinsic differences in how the resistance mutations affected the drug parameters. All of the mutations resulted in large increases in the IC50s of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The effects of the mutations on the slope were the most apparent when examining their effects on the inhibition of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors. For example, some mutations, such as V82A, had no effect on IC50, but reduced the slope. We proposed a new concept, termed IIPatoxic, on the basis of IC50, slope and the maximum limiting concentrations of the drug. The IIPatoxic values of 10 approved drugs and 1 novel agent were calculated, and were closely related to the IIPmax values (r > 0.95, p < 0.001). Conclusions This study confirms that resistance mutations cannot be accurately assessed by IC50 alone, because it tends to underestimate the degree of resistance. The slope parameter is of very importance in the measurement of drug resistance and the effect can be applied to more complex patterns of resistance. This is the most apparent when testing the effects of the mutations on protease inhibitors activity. We also propose a new index, IIPatoxic, which incorporates both the IC50 and the slope. This new index could complement current IIP indices, thereby

  7. HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Mutations in Treatment Naïve and Experienced Panamanian Subjects: Impact on National Use of EFV-Based Schemes

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Yaxelis; Castillo Mewa, Juan; Martínez, Alexander A.; Zaldívar, Yamitzel; Sosa, Néstor; Arteaga, Griselda; Armién, Blas; Bautista, Christian T.; García-Morales, Claudia; Tapia-Trejo, Daniela; Ávila-Ríos, Santiago; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Bello, Gonzalo; Pascale, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected subjects prevents AIDS-related illness and delayed occurrence of death. In Panama, rollout of ART started in 1999 and national coverage has reached 62.8% since then. The objective of this study was to determine the level and patterns of acquired drug resistance mutations of clinical relevance (ADR-CRM) and surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) from 717 HIV-1 pol gene sequences obtained from 467 ARV drug-experienced and 250 ARV drug-naïve HIV-1 subtypes B infected subjects during 2007–2013, respectively. The overall prevalence of SDRM and of ADR-CRM during the study period was 9.2% and 87.6%, respectively. The majority of subjects with ADR-CRM had a pattern of mutations that confer resistance to at least two classes of ARV inhibitors. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations K103N and P225H were more prevalent in both ARV drug-naïve and ARV drug-experienced subjects. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutation M184V was more frequent in ARV drug-experienced individuals, while T215YFrev and M41L were more frequent in ARV drug-naïve subjects. Prevalence of mutations associated to protease inhibitors (PI) was lower than 4.1% in both types of subjects. Therefore, there is a high level of resistance (>73%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine, Lamivudine and Azidothymidine in ARV drug-experienced subjects, and an intermediate to high level of resistance (5–10%) to Efavirenz/Nevirapine in ARV drug-naïve subjects. During the study period, we observed an increasing trend in the prevalence of ADR-CRM in subjects under first-line schemes, but not significant changes in the prevalence of SDRM. These results reinforce the paramount importance of a national surveillance system of ADR-CRM and SDRM for national management policies of subjects living with HIV. PMID:27119150

  8. Enrichment of intersubtype HIV-1 recombinants in a dual infection system using HIV-1 strain-specific siRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Intersubtype HIV-1 recombinants in the form of unique or stable circulating recombinants forms (CRFs) are responsible for over 20% of infections in the worldwide epidemic. Mechanisms controlling the generation, selection, and transmission of these intersubtype HIV-1 recombinants still require further investigation. All intersubtype HIV-1 recombinants are generated and evolve from initial dual infections, but are difficult to identify in the human population. In vitro studies provide the most practical system to study mechanisms, but the recombination rates are usually very low in dual infections with primary HIV-1 isolates. This study describes the use of HIV-1 isolate-specific siRNAs to enrich intersubtype HIV-1 recombinants and inhibit the parental HIV-1 isolates from a dual infection. Results Following a dual infection with subtype A and D primary HIV-1 isolates and two rounds of siRNA treatment, nearly 100% of replicative virus was resistant to a siRNA specific for an upstream target sequence in the subtype A envelope (env) gene as well as a siRNA specific for a downstream target sequence in the subtype D env gene. Only 20% (10/50) of the replicating virus had nucleotide substitutions in the siRNA-target sequence whereas the remaining 78% (39/50) harbored a recombination breakpoint that removed both siRNA target sequences, and rendered the intersubtype D/A recombinant virus resistant to the dual siRNA treatment. Since siRNAs target the newly transcribed HIV-1 mRNA, the siRNAs only enrich intersubtype env recombinants and do not influence the recombination process during reverse transcription. Using this system, a strong bias is selected for recombination breakpoints in the C2 region, whereas other HIV-1 env regions, most notably the hypervariable regions, were nearly devoid of intersubtype recombination breakpoints. Sequence conservation plays an important role in selecting for recombination breakpoints, but the lack of breakpoints in many conserved

  9. Myelopathy in a previously asymptomatic HIV-1-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Eyer-Silva, W A; Auto, I; Pinto, J F; Morais-de-Sá, C A

    2001-01-01

    A wide variety of disorders of diverse pathogenic mechanisms can trigger spinal cord dysfunction in HIV-1-infected patients. The most common such condition is HIV-1-associated myelopathy (HM) which characteristically complicates advanced HIV-1 disease in patients with low CD4 cell counts and previous AIDS-defining diagnoses. We describe an unusual presentation of HM in a previously asymptomatic patient with a relatively preserved CD4 cell count (458 cells/mm3) who was even unaware of his serological status. The patient presented with a clinically severe, slowly progressive myelopathy and could not walk unassisted. Significant neurological improvement could be obtained as rapidly as within 4 weeks after the institution of an antiretroviral combination of only two nucleoside analog HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors (zidovudine and didanosine). An HIV-1 protease inhibitor was also prescribed at that point but could only be added to intensify the regimen 3 months later, when significant neurological improvement had already been recorded. We also review the disorders reported to derange spinal cord function in previously asymptomatic HIV-1-infected patients.

  10. Authentic HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R; Pommier, Yves; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is indispensable for HIV-1 replication and has become a validated target for developing anti-AIDS agents. In two decades of development of IN inhibition-based anti-HIV therapeutics, a significant number of compounds were identified as IN inhibitors, but only some of them showed antiviral activity. This article reviews a number of patented HIV-1 IN inhibitors, especially those that possess high selectivity for the strand transfer reaction. These compounds generally have a polar coplanar moiety, which is assumed to chelate two magnesium ions in the binding site. Resistance to those compounds, when given to patients, can develop as a result of IN mutations. We refer to those compounds as authentic IN inhibitors. Continued drug development has so far delivered one authentic IN inhibitor to the market (raltegravir in 2007). Current and future attention will be focused on the development of novel authentic IN inhibitors with the goal of overcoming viral resistance. PMID:21426159

  11. Inhibiting early-stage events in HIV-1 replication by small-molecule targeting of the HIV-1 capsid.

    PubMed

    Kortagere, Sandhya; Madani, Navid; Mankowski, Marie K; Schön, Arne; Zentner, Isaac; Swaminathan, Gokul; Princiotto, Amy; Anthony, Kevin; Oza, Apara; Sierra, Luz-Jeannette; Passic, Shendra R; Wang, Xiaozhao; Jones, David M; Stavale, Eric; Krebs, Fred C; Martín-García, Julio; Freire, Ernesto; Ptak, Roger G; Sodroski, Joseph; Cocklin, Simon; Smith, Amos B

    2012-08-01

    The HIV-1 capsid (CA) protein plays essential roles in both early and late stages of virl replication and has emerged as a novel drug target. We report hybrid structure-based virtual screening to identify small molecules with the potential to interact with the N-terminal domain (NTD) of HIV-1 CA and disrupt early, preintegration steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle. The small molecule 4,4'-[dibenzo[b,d]furan-2,8-diylbis(5-phenyl-1H-imidazole-4,2-diyl)]dibenzoic acid (CK026), which had anti-HIV-1 activity in single- and multiple-round infections but failed to inhibit viral replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), was identified. Three analogues of CK026 with reduced size and better drug-like properties were synthesized and assessed. Compound I-XW-053 (4-(4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)benzoic acid) retained all of the antiviral activity of the parental compound and inhibited the replication of a diverse panel of primary HIV-1 isolates in PBMCs, while displaying no appreciable cytotoxicity. This antiviral activity was specific to HIV-1, as I-XW-053 displayed no effect on the replication of SIV or against a panel of nonretroviruses. Direct interaction of I-XW-053 was quantified with wild-type and mutant CA protein using surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. Mutation of Ile37 and Arg173, which are required for interaction with compound I-XW-053, crippled the virus at an early, preintegration step. Using quantitative PCR, we demonstrated that treatment with I-XW-053 inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcription in multiple cell types, indirectly pointing to dysfunction in the uncoating process. In summary, we have identified a CA-specific compound that targets and inhibits a novel region in the NTD-NTD interface, affects uncoating, and possesses broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity.

  12. A Cinnamon-Derived Procyanidin Compound Displays Anti-HIV-1 Activity by Blocking Heparan Sulfate- and Co-Receptor- Binding Sites on gp120 and Reverses T Cell Exhaustion via Impeding Tim-3 and PD-1 Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Bridgette Janine; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Prakash, Ekambaranellore; Yousfi, Rahima; Mohan, Viswaraman; Posch, Wilfried; Wilflingseder, Doris; Moog, Christiane; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Clayette, Pascal; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    Amongst the many strategies aiming at inhibiting HIV-1 infection, blocking viral entry has been recently recognized as a very promising approach. Using diverse in vitro models and a broad range of HIV-1 primary patient isolates, we report here that IND02, a type A procyanidin polyphenol extracted from cinnamon, that features trimeric and pentameric forms displays an anti-HIV-1 activity against CXCR4 and CCR5 viruses with 1–7 μM ED50 for the trimer. Competition experiments, using a surface plasmon resonance-based binding assay, revealed that IND02 inhibited envelope binding to CD4 and heparan sulphate (HS) as well as to an antibody (mAb 17b) directed against the gp120 co-receptor binding site with an IC50 in the low μM range. IND02 has thus the remarkable property of simultaneously blocking gp120 binding to its major host cell surface counterparts. Additionally, the IND02-trimer impeded up-regulation of the inhibitory receptors Tim-3 and PD-1 on CD4+ and CD8+ cells, thereby demonstrating its beneficial effect by limiting T cell exhaustion. Among naturally derived products significantly inhibiting HIV-1, the IND02-trimer is the first component demonstrating an entry inhibition property through binding to the viral envelope glycoprotein. These data suggest that cinnamon, a widely consumed spice, could represent a novel and promising candidate for a cost-effective, natural entry inhibitor for HIV-1 which can also down-modulate T cell exhaustion markers Tim-3 and PD-1. PMID:27788205

  13. In Vitro Reactivation of Replication-Competent and Infectious HIV-1 by Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Banga, Riddhima; Procopio, Francesco Andrea; Cavassini, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The existence of long-lived HIV-1-infected resting memory CD4 T cells is thought to be the primary obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. In the search for novel therapeutic approaches that may reverse HIV-1 latency, inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACis) have been tested to reactivate HIV-1 replication with the objective of rendering HIV-1-infected cells susceptible to elimination either by HIV-specific CD8 T cells or through virus-mediated cytopathicity. In the present study, we evaluated the efficiency of HDACis to reactivate HIV-1 replication from resting memory CD4 T cells isolated from aviremic long-term-treated HIV-1-infected subjects. We demonstrate that following prolonged/repeated treatment of resting memory CD4 T cells with HDACis, HIV-1 replication may be induced from primary resting memory CD4 T cells isolated from aviremic long-term-treated HIV-1-infected subjects. More importantly, we demonstrate that HIV-1 reactivated in the cell cultures was not only replication competent but also infectious. Interestingly, givinostat, an HDACi that has not been investigated in clinical trials, was more efficient than vorinostat, panobinostat, and romidepsin in reversing HIV-1 latency in vitro. Taken together, these results support further evaluation of givinostat as a latency-reversing agent (LRA) in aviremic long-term-treated HIV-1-infected subjects. IMPORTANCE The major barrier to HIV cure is the existence of long-lived latently HIV-1-infected resting memory CD4 T cells. Latently HIV-1-infected CD4 T cells are transcriptionally silent and are therefore not targeted by conventional antiretroviral therapy (ART) or the immune system. In this context, one strategy to target latently infected cells is based on pharmacological molecules that may force the virus to replicate and would therefore render HIV-1-infected cells susceptible to elimination either by HIV-specific CD8 T cells or through virus-mediated cytopathicity. In this context, we developed an

  14. Pin1 liberates the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1): Must we stop it?

    PubMed

    Hou, Hai; Wang, Jing-Zhang; Liu, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Ting

    2015-07-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is mainly caused by the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). To our knowledge, this is the first review focusing on the vital role of Pin1 in the infection of HIV-1 and the development of AIDS. We and others have demonstrated that Pin1, the only known cis-to-trans isomerase recognizing the pThr/pSer-Pro motifs in proteins, plays striking roles in several human diseases. Interestingly, recent evidence gradually indicates that Pin1 regulates several key steps of the life cycle of HIV-1, including the uncoating of the HIV-1 core, the reverse transcription of the RNA genome of HIV-1, and the integration of the HIV-1 cDNA into human chromosomes. Whereas inhibiting Pin1 suppresses all of these key steps and attenuates the replication of HIV-1, at the same time different PIN1 gene variants are correlated with the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, Pin1 potentially promotes HIV-1 infection by activating multiple oncogenes and inactivating multiple tumor suppressors, extending the life span of HIV-infected cells. These descriptions suggest Pin1 as a promising therapeutic target for the prevention of HIV-1 and highlight the possibility of blocking the development of AIDS by Pin1 inhibitors.

  15. Isolation and propagation of HIV-1 on peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    van 't Wout, Angélique B; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Kootstra, Neeltje A

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is characterized by a gradual loss of CD4+ T cells and T-cell function and an ongoing high level of virus replication. The high replication rate and the error-prone nature of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase create a diverse viral quasispecies throughout infection. To study biological properties of HIV-1 quasispecies in relation to the clinical course of infection, the in vitro preservation of phenotypical characteristics of the virus is essential. Here, we describe the method for bulk isolation of the HIV-1 quasispecies and a limiting dilution virus isolation protocol by which single coexisting HIV-1 variants can be obtained using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a healthy donor as target cells. In addition, methods for propagation and titration of HIV-1 are provided.

  16. Purification and Biochemical Characterisation of Rabbit Calicivirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases and Identification of Non-Nucleoside Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Urakova, Nadya; Netzler, Natalie; Kelly, Andrew G.; Frese, Michael; White, Peter A.; Strive, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) is a calicivirus that causes acute infections in both domestic and wild European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). The virus causes significant economic losses in rabbit farming and reduces wild rabbit populations. The recent emergence of RHDV variants capable of overcoming immunity to other strains emphasises the need to develop universally effective antivirals to enable quick responses during outbreaks until new vaccines become available. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is a primary target for the development of such antiviral drugs. In this study, we used cell-free in vitro assays to examine the biochemical characteristics of two rabbit calicivirus RdRps and the effects of several antivirals that were previously identified as human norovirus RdRp inhibitors. The non-nucleoside inhibitor NIC02 was identified as a potential scaffold for further drug development against rabbit caliciviruses. Our experiments revealed an unusually high temperature optimum (between 40 and 45 °C) for RdRps derived from both a pathogenic and a non-pathogenic rabbit calicivirus, possibly demonstrating an adaptation to a host with a physiological body temperature of more than 38 °C. Interestingly, the in vitro polymerase activity of the non-pathogenic calicivirus RdRp was at least two times higher than that of the RdRp of the highly virulent RHDV. PMID:27089358

  17. Purification and Biochemical Characterisation of Rabbit Calicivirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases and Identification of Non-Nucleoside Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Urakova, Nadya; Netzler, Natalie; Kelly, Andrew G; Frese, Michael; White, Peter A; Strive, Tanja

    2016-04-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) is a calicivirus that causes acute infections in both domestic and wild European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). The virus causes significant economic losses in rabbit farming and reduces wild rabbit populations. The recent emergence of RHDV variants capable of overcoming immunity to other strains emphasises the need to develop universally effective antivirals to enable quick responses during outbreaks until new vaccines become available. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is a primary target for the development of such antiviral drugs. In this study, we used cell-free in vitro assays to examine the biochemical characteristics of two rabbit calicivirus RdRps and the effects of several antivirals that were previously identified as human norovirus RdRp inhibitors. The non-nucleoside inhibitor NIC02 was identified as a potential scaffold for further drug development against rabbit caliciviruses. Our experiments revealed an unusually high temperature optimum (between 40 and 45 °C) for RdRps derived from both a pathogenic and a non-pathogenic rabbit calicivirus, possibly demonstrating an adaptation to a host with a physiological body temperature of more than 38 °C. Interestingly, the in vitro polymerase activity of the non-pathogenic calicivirus RdRp was at least two times higher than that of the RdRp of the highly virulent RHDV. PMID:27089358

  18. Discovery and Structure-Based Optimization of 2-Ureidothiophene-3-carboxylic Acids as Dual Bacterial RNA Polymerase and Viral Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Elgaher, Walid A M; Sharma, Kamal K; Haupenthal, Jörg; Saladini, Francesco; Pires, Manuel; Real, Eleonore; Mély, Yves; Hartmann, Rolf W

    2016-08-11

    We are concerned with the development of novel anti-infectives with dual antibacterial and antiretroviral activities for MRSA/HIV-1 co-infection. To achieve this goal, we exploited for the first time the mechanistic function similarity between the bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) "switch region" and the viral non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) binding site. Starting from our previously discovered RNAP inhibitors, we managed to develop potent RT inhibitors effective against several resistant HIV-1 strains with maintained or enhanced RNAP inhibitory properties following a structure-based design approach. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis revealed distinct molecular features necessary for RT inhibition. Furthermore, mode of action (MoA) studies revealed that these compounds inhibit RT noncompetitively, through a new mechanism via closing of the RT clamp. In addition, the novel RNAP/RT inhibitors are characterized by a potent antibacterial activity against S. aureus and in cellulo antiretroviral activity against NNRTI-resistant strains. In HeLa and HEK 293 cells, the compounds showed only marginal cytotoxicity. PMID:27339173

  19. HIV-1 Drug Resistance and Second-line Treatment in Children Randomized to Switch at Low versus Higher RNA Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Linda; Melvin, Ann; Fiscus, Susan; Saidi, Yacine; Nastouli, Eleni; Harper, Lynda; Compagnucci, Alexandra; Babiker, Abdel; McKinney, Ross; Gibb, Diana; Tudor-Williams, Gareth

    2015-01-01

    Background The PENPACT-1 trial compared virologic thresholds to determine when to switch to second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART). Using PENPACT-1 data, we aimed to describe HIV-1 drug resistance accumulation on first-line ART by virologic threshold. Methods PENPACT-1 had a 2x2 factorial design, randomizing HIV-infected children to start protease inhibitor (PI) versus non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) based ART, and switch at a 1000c/ml versus 30000c/ml threshold. Switch-criteria were: not achieving the threshold by week 24, confirmed rebound above the threshold thereafter, or CDC-C event. Resistance tests were performed on samples ≥1000c/ml before switch, re-suppression and at 4-year/trial-end. Results Sixty-seven children started PI-based ART and were randomized to switch at 1000c/ml (PI-1000), 64 PIs and 30000c/ml (PI-30000), 67 NNRTIs and 1000c/ml (NNRTI-1000), and 65 NNRTI and 30000c/ml (NNRTI-30000). Ninety-four (36%) children reached the 1000c/ml switch-criteria during 5 years follow-up. In 30000c/ml threshold arms, median time from 1000c/ml to 30000c/ml switch-criteria was 58 (PI) versus 80 (NNRTI) weeks (P=0.81). In NNRTI-30000 more NRTI resistance mutations accumulated than other groups. NNRTI mutations were selected before switching at 1000c/ml (23% NNRTI-1000, 27% NNRTI-30000). Sixty-two children started abacavir+lamivudine, 166 lamivudine+zidovudine or stavudine, and 35 other NRTIs. The abacavir+lamivudine group acquired fewest NRTI mutations. Of 60 switched to second-line, 79% PI-1000, 63% PI-30000, 64% NNRTI-1000 and 100% NNRTI-30000 were <400c/ml 24 weeks later. Conclusion Children on first-line NNRTI-based ART who were randomized to switch at a higher virologic threshold developed the most resistance, yet re-suppressed on second-line. An abacavir+lamivudine NRTI combination seemed protective against development of NRTI resistance. PMID:26322666

  20. Genotype dependent QSAR for HIV-1 protease inhibition.

    PubMed

    Boutton, Carlo W; De Bondt, Hendrik L; De Jonge, Marc R

    2005-03-24

    The development of drug-resistant viruses limits the therapeutic success of anti-HIV therapies. Some of these genetic HIV-variants display complex mutational patterns in their pol gene that codes for protease and reverse transcriptase, the most investigated molecular targets for antiretroviral therapy. In this paper, we present a computational structure-based approach to predict the resistance of a HIV-1 protease strain to amprenavir by calculating the interaction energy of the drug with HIV-1 protease. By considering the interaction energy per residue, we can identify what residue mutations contribute to drug-resistance. This approach is presented here as a structure-based tool for the prediction of resistance of HIV-1 protease toward amprenavir, with a view to use the drug-protein interaction-energy pattern in a lead-optimization procedure for the discovery of new anti-HIV drugs. PMID:15771454

  1. Synthesis of potent and broad genotypically active NS5B HCV non-nucleoside inhibitors binding to the thumb domain allosteric site 2 of the viral polymerase.

    PubMed

    Pierra Rouvière, Claire; Amador, Agnès; Badaroux, Eric; Convard, Thierry; Da Costa, Daniel; Dukhan, David; Griffe, Ludovic; Griffon, Jean-François; LaColla, Massimiliano; Leroy, Frédéric; Liuzzi, Michel; Loi, Anna Giulia; McCarville, Joe; Mascia, Valeria; Milhau, Julien; Onidi, Loredana; Paparin, Jean-Laurent; Rahali, Rachid; Sais, Efisio; Seifer, Maria; Surleraux, Dominique; Standring, David; Dousson, Cyril

    2016-09-15

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) plays a central role in virus replication. NS5B has no functional equivalent in mammalian cells and, as a consequence, is an attractive target for selective inhibition. This Letter describes the discovery of a new family of HCV NS5B non-nucleoside inhibitors, based on the bioisosterism between amide and phosphonamidate functions. As part of this program, SAR in this new series led to the identification of IDX17119, a potent non-nucleoside inhibitor, active on the genotypes 1b, 2a, 3a and 4a. The structure and binding domain of IDX17119 were confirmed by X-ray co-crystallization study. PMID:27520942

  2. Synthesis of potent and broad genotypically active NS5B HCV non-nucleoside inhibitors binding to the thumb domain allosteric site 2 of the viral polymerase.

    PubMed

    Pierra Rouvière, Claire; Amador, Agnès; Badaroux, Eric; Convard, Thierry; Da Costa, Daniel; Dukhan, David; Griffe, Ludovic; Griffon, Jean-François; LaColla, Massimiliano; Leroy, Frédéric; Liuzzi, Michel; Loi, Anna Giulia; McCarville, Joe; Mascia, Valeria; Milhau, Julien; Onidi, Loredana; Paparin, Jean-Laurent; Rahali, Rachid; Sais, Efisio; Seifer, Maria; Surleraux, Dominique; Standring, David; Dousson, Cyril

    2016-09-15

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) plays a central role in virus replication. NS5B has no functional equivalent in mammalian cells and, as a consequence, is an attractive target for selective inhibition. This Letter describes the discovery of a new family of HCV NS5B non-nucleoside inhibitors, based on the bioisosterism between amide and phosphonamidate functions. As part of this program, SAR in this new series led to the identification of IDX17119, a potent non-nucleoside inhibitor, active on the genotypes 1b, 2a, 3a and 4a. The structure and binding domain of IDX17119 were confirmed by X-ray co-crystallization study.

  3. Characterization of HIV-1 Resistance to Tenofovir Alafenamide In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Margot, Nicolas A; Johnson, Audun; Miller, Michael D; Callebaut, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) is an investigational prodrug of the HIV-1 nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NtRTI) tenofovir (TFV), with improved potency and drug delivery properties over the current prodrug, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF). TAF is currently in phase 3 clinical studies for the treatment of HIV-1 infection, in combination with other antiretroviral agents. Phase 1 and 2 studies have shown that TAF was associated with increased peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) drug loading and increased suppression of HIV-1 replication compared to treatment with TDF. In this study, selection of in vitro resistance to both TAF and the parent compound, TFV, led to the emergence of HIV-1 with the K65R amino acid substitution in RT with 6.5-fold-reduced susceptibility to TAF. Although TAF is more potent than TFV in vitro, the antiviral susceptibilities to TAF and TFV of a large panel of nucleoside/nucleotide RT inhibitor (NRTI)-resistant mutants were highly correlated (R(2) = 0.97), indicating that the two compounds have virtually the same resistance profile when assessed as fold change from the wild type. TAF showed full antiviral activity in PBMCs against primary HIV-1 isolates with protease inhibitor, nonnucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI), or integrase strand transfer inhibitor resistance but reduced activity against isolates with extensive NRTI resistance amino acid substitutions. However, the increased cell loading of TFV with TAF versus TDF observed in vivo suggests that TAF may retain activity against TDF-resistant mutant viruses. PMID:26149983

  4. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  5. CD4+ T cells from elite controllers resist HIV-1 infection by selective upregulation of p21

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huabiao; Li, Chun; Huang, Jinghe; Cung, Thai; Seiss, Katherine; Beamon, Jill; Carrington, Mary F.; Porter, Lindsay C.; Burke, Patrick S.; Yang, Yue; Ryan, Bethany J.; Liu, Ruiwu; Weiss, Robert H.; Pereyra, Florencia; Cress, William D.; Brass, Abraham L.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Walker, Bruce D.; Yu, Xu G.; Lichterfeld, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    Elite controllers represent a unique group of HIV-1–infected persons with undetectable HIV-1 replication in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. However, the mechanisms contributing to effective viral immune defense in these patients remain unclear. Here, we show that compared with HIV-1 progressors and HIV-1–negative persons, CD4+ T cells from elite controllers are less susceptible to HIV-1 infection. This partial resistance to HIV-1 infection involved less effective reverse transcription and mRNA transcription from proviral DNA and was associated with strong and selective upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 (also known as cip-1 and waf-1). Experimental blockade of p21 in CD4+ T cells from elite controllers resulted in a marked increase of viral reverse transcripts and mRNA production and led to higher enzymatic activities of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9), which serves as a transcriptional coactivator of HIV-1 gene expression. This suggests that p21 acts as a barrier against HIV-1 infection in CD4+ T cells from elite controllers by inhibiting a cyclin-dependent kinase required for effective HIV-1 replication. These data demonstrate a mechanism of host resistance to HIV-1 in elite controllers and may open novel perspectives for clinical strategies to prevent or treat HIV-1 infection. PMID:21403397

  6. Generation of HIV-1 and Internal Control Transcripts as Standards for an In-House Quantitative Competitive RT-PCR Assay to Determine HIV-1 Viral Load

    PubMed Central

    Armas Cayarga, Anny; Perea Hernández, Yenitse; González González, Yaimé J.; Dueñas Carrera, Santiago; González Pérez, Idania; Robaina Álvarez, René

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) viral load is useful for monitoring disease progression in HIV-infected individuals. We generated RNA standards of HIV-1 and internal control (IC) by in vitro transcription and evaluated its performance in a quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay. HIV-1 and IC standards were obtained at high RNA concentrations, without DNA contamination. When these transcripts were included as standards in a qRT-PCR assay, it was obtained a good accuracy (±0.5 log10 unit of the expected results) in the quantification of the HIV-1 RNA international standard and controls. The lower limit detection achieved using these standards was 511.0 IU/mL. A high correlation (r = 0.925) was obtained between the in-house qRT-PCR assay and the NucliSens easyQ HIV-1 test (bioMerieux) for HIV-1 RNA quantitation with clinical samples (N = 14). HIV-1 and IC RNA transcripts, generated in this study, proved to be useful as standards in an in-house qRT-PCR assay for determination of HIV-1 viral load. PMID:21766036

  7. Inhibition of Acute-, Latent-, and Chronic-Phase Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Replication by a Bistriazoloacridone Analog That Selectively Inhibits HIV-1 Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Turpin, Jim A.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Derse, David; Hollingshead, Melinda; Williamson, Karen; Palamone, Carla; Osterling, M. Clayton; Hill, Shawn A.; Graham, Lisa; Schaeffer, Catherine A.; Bu, Ming; Huang, Mingjun; Cholody, Wieslaw M.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Rice, William G.

    1998-01-01

    Nanomolar concentrations of temacrazine (1,4-bis[3-(6-oxo-6H-v-triazolo[4,5,1-de]acridin-5-yl)amino-propyl]piperazine) were discovered to inhibit acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections and suppress the production of virus from chronically and latently infected cells containing integrated proviral DNA. This bistriazoloacridone derivative exerted its mechanism of antiviral action through selective inhibition of HIV-1 transcription during the postintegrative phase of virus replication. Mechanistic studies revealed that temacrazine blocked HIV-1 RNA formation without interference with the transcription of cellular genes or with events associated with the HIV-1 Tat and Rev regulatory proteins. Although temacrazine inhibited the in vitro 3′ processing and strand transfer activities of HIV-1 integrase, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of approximately 50 nM, no evidence of an inhibitory effect on the intracellular integration of proviral DNA into the cellular genome during the early phase of infection could be detected. Furthermore, temacrazine did not interfere with virus attachment or fusion to host cells or the enzymatic activities of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase or protease, and the compound was not directly virucidal. Demonstration of in vivo anti-HIV-1 activity by temacrazine identifies bistriazoloacridones as a new class of pharmaceuticals that selectively blocks HIV-1 transcription. PMID:9517921

  8. Regional Differences in Prevalence of HIV-1 Discordance in Africa and Enrollment of HIV-1 Discordant Couples into an HIV-1 Prevention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lingappa, Jairam R.; Lambdin, Barrot; Bukusi, Elizabeth Ann; Ngure, Kenneth; Kavuma, Linda; Inambao, Mubiana; Kanweka, William; Allen, Susan; Kiarie, James N.; Makhema, Joseph; Were, Edwin; Manongi, Rachel; Coetzee, David; de Bruyn, Guy; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Magaret, Amalia; Mugo, Nelly; Mujugira, Andrew; Ndase, Patrick; Celum, Connie

    2008-01-01

    Background Most HIV-1 transmission in Africa occurs among HIV-1-discordant couples (one partner HIV-1 infected and one uninfected) who are unaware of their discordant HIV-1 serostatus. Given the high HIV-1 incidence among HIV-1 discordant couples and to assess efficacy of interventions for reducing HIV-1 transmission, HIV-1 discordant couples represent a critical target population for HIV-1 prevention interventions and prevention trials. Substantial regional differences exist in HIV-1 prevalence in Africa, but regional differences in HIV-1 discordance among African couples, has not previously been reported. Methodology/Principal Findings The Partners in Prevention HSV-2/HIV-1 Transmission Trial (“Partners HSV-2 Study”), the first large HIV-1 prevention trial in Africa involving HIV-1 discordant couples, completed enrollment in May 2007. Partners HSV-2 Study recruitment data from 12 sites from East and Southern Africa were used to assess HIV-1 discordance among couples accessing couples HIV-1 counseling and testing, and to correlate with enrollment of HIV-1 discordant couples. HIV-1 discordance at Partners HSV-2 Study sites ranged from 8–31% of couples tested from the community. Across all study sites and, among all couples with one HIV-1 infected partner, almost half (49%) of couples were HIV-1 discordant. Site-specific monthly enrollment of HIV-1 discordant couples into the clinical trial was not directly associated with prevalence of HIV-1 discordance, but was modestly correlated with national HIV-1 counseling and testing rates and access to palliative care/basic health care (r = 0.74, p = 0.09). Conclusions/Significance HIV-1 discordant couples are a critical target for HIV-1 prevention in Africa. In addition to community prevalence of HIV-1 discordance, national infrastructure for HIV-1 testing and healthcare delivery and effective community outreach strategies impact recruitment of HIV-1 discordant couples into HIV-1 prevention trials. PMID

  9. Geographic and Temporal Trends in the Molecular Epidemiology and Genetic Mechanisms of Transmitted HIV-1 Drug Resistance: An Individual-Patient- and Sequence-Level Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Blanco, Jose Luis; Jordan, Michael R.; Taylor, Jonathan; Lemey, Philippe; Varghese, Vici; Hamers, Raph L.; Bertagnolio, Silvia; de Wit, Tobias F. Rinke; Aghokeng, Avelin F.; Albert, Jan; Avi, Radko; Avila-Rios, Santiago; Bessong, Pascal O.; Brooks, James I.; Boucher, Charles A. B.; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Busch, Michael P.; Bussmann, Hermann; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Chin, Bum Sik; D’Aquin, Toni T.; De Gascun, Cillian F.; Derache, Anne; Descamps, Diane; Deshpande, Alaka K.; Djoko, Cyrille F.; Eshleman, Susan H.; Fleury, Herve; Frange, Pierre; Fujisaki, Seiichiro; Harrigan, P. Richard; Hattori, Junko; Holguin, Africa; Hunt, Gillian M.; Ichimura, Hiroshi; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Katzenstein, David; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Kim, Jerome H.; Kim, Sung Soon; Li, Yanpeng; Lutsar, Irja; Morris, Lynn; Ndembi, Nicaise; NG, Kee Peng; Paranjape, Ramesh S.; Peeters, Martine; Poljak, Mario; Price, Matt A.; Ragonnet-Cronin, Manon L.; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Rolland, Morgane; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Smith, Davey M.; Soares, Marcelo A.; Soriano, Vincent V.; Ssemwanga, Deogratius; Stanojevic, Maja; Stefani, Mariane A.; Sugiura, Wataru; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Tanuri, Amilcar; Tee, Kok Keng; Truong, Hong-Ha M.; van de Vijver, David A. M. C.; Vidal, Nicole; Yang, Chunfu; Yang, Rongge; Yebra, Gonzalo; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Regional and subtype-specific mutational patterns of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance (TDR) are essential for informing first-line antiretroviral (ARV) therapy guidelines and designing diagnostic assays for use in regions where standard genotypic resistance testing is not affordable. We sought to understand the molecular epidemiology of TDR and to identify the HIV-1 drug-resistance mutations responsible for TDR in different regions and virus subtypes. Methods and Findings We reviewed all GenBank submissions of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase sequences with or without protease and identified 287 studies published between March 1, 2000, and December 31, 2013, with more than 25 recently or chronically infected ARV-naïve individuals. These studies comprised 50,870 individuals from 111 countries. Each set of study sequences was analyzed for phylogenetic clustering and the presence of 93 surveillance drug-resistance mutations (SDRMs). The median overall TDR prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), south/southeast Asia (SSEA), upper-income Asian countries, Latin America/Caribbean, Europe, and North America was 2.8%, 2.9%, 5.6%, 7.6%, 9.4%, and 11.5%, respectively. In SSA, there was a yearly 1.09-fold (95% CI: 1.05–1.14) increase in odds of TDR since national ARV scale-up attributable to an increase in non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance. The odds of NNRTI-associated TDR also increased in Latin America/Caribbean (odds ratio [OR] = 1.16; 95% CI: 1.06–1.25), North America (OR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.12–1.26), Europe (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 1.01–1.13), and upper-income Asian countries (OR = 1.33; 95% CI: 1.12–1.55). In SSEA, there was no significant change in the odds of TDR since national ARV scale-up (OR = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.92–1.02). An analysis limited to sequences with mixtures at less than 0.5% of their nucleotide positions—a proxy for recent infection—yielded trends comparable to those obtained using the complete dataset. Four

  10. GACPAT HIV 1 + 2: a simple, inexpensive assay to screen for, and discriminate between, anti-HIV 1 and anti-HIV 2.

    PubMed

    Parry, J V; Connell, J A; Reinbott, P; Garcia, A B; Avillez, F; Mortimer, P P

    1995-01-01

    A simple and cheap assay suitable for screening for anti-HIV 1 and anti-HIV 2 and discriminating between them was evaluated. In it specimens are incubated in U-bottomed microplate wells coated with anti-human IgG for 30 min at room temperature. After washing, 100 microliters of a 1 in 50 dilution of HIV 1-coated gelatin particles (Serodia-HIV 1/2, Fujirebio) are added. Settling patterns are read on the second day: A positive reaction is indicated by adherence of the particles and a negative by a button. The HIV 1 particles are then washed away and HIV 2 particles added. Anti-HIV 2 reaction patterns are read on the third day. To assess the performance of the modified "GACPAT HIV 1 + 2" assay a panel of 1,621 serum/plasma specimens was used. It comprised validated anti-HIV 1 positive (n = 220), anti-HIV 2 positive (n = 214), dual anti-HIV 1/anti-HIV 2 positive (n = 11), and anti-HIV negative (n = 1,176) serum/plasma specimens. All 434 specimens that contained anti-HIV 1 or anti-HIV 2 reacted positively with the homologous particles. The 11 dually positive specimens reacted positively with both HIV 1 and HIV 2 particles. Five (2.3%) anti-HIV 1 and five (2.3%) anti-HIV 2 positive specimens gave positive reactions with both particle types, but none of the five cross-reactive anti-HIV 2 specimens were dually reactive when the order of particle addition was reversed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. The use of dried blood spot specimens for HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping in young children initiating antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Salimo, Anna T.; Ledwaba, Johanna; Coovadia, Ashraf; Abrams, Elaine J.; Technau, Karl-Günter; Kuhn, Louise; Morris, Lynn; Hunt, Gillian M.

    2015-01-01

    Paired plasma and dried blood spots (DBS) from 232 South African HIV-infected children initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) were genotyped for drug resistance mutations, most of who had prior exposure to ART for prevention-of-mother-to-child-transmission. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations were most commonly detected in both specimen types, particularly Y181C/I and K103N/S. Resistance interpretation concordance was achieved in 97% of pairs with 7 children having mutations detected in DBS only. These results validate the preferential use of DBS specimens for HIVDR genotyping in this patient group. PMID:26192603

  12. Accuracy of the TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Robert M.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Johnson, Victoria A.; Mellors, John W.; Sullivan, John L.; Swanstrom, Ronald; D'Aquila, Richard T.; Van Gorder, Mark; Holodniy, Mark; Lloyd, Jr., Robert M.; Reid, Caroline; Morgan, Gillian F.; Winslow, Dean L.

    2003-01-01

    Drug resistance and poor virological responses are associated with well-characterized mutations in the viral reading frames that encode the proteins that are targeted by currently available antiretroviral drugs. An integrated system was developed that includes target gene amplification, DNA sequencing chemistry (TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit), and hardware and interpretative software (the OpenGene DNA Sequencing System) for detection of mutations in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease and reverse transcriptase sequences. The integrated system incorporates reverse transcription-PCR from extracted HIV-1 RNA, a coupled amplification and sequencing step (CLIP), polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, semiautomated analysis of data, and generation of an interpretative report. To assess the accuracy and robustness of the assay system, 270 coded plasma specimens derived from nine patients were sent to six laboratories for blinded analysis. All specimens contained HIV-1 subtype B viruses. Results of 270 independent assays were compared to “gold standard” consensus sequences of the virus populations determined by sequence analysis of 16 to 20 clones of viral DNA amplicons derived from two independent PCRs using primers not used in the kit. The accuracy of the integrated system for nucleotide base identification was 98.7%, and the accuracy for codon identification at 54 sites associated with drug resistance was 97.6%. In a separate analysis of plasma spiked with infectious molecular clones, the assay reproducibly detected all 72 different drug resistance mutations that were evaluated. There were no significant differences in accuracy between laboratories, between technologists, between kit lots, or between days. This integrated assay system for the detection of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations has a high degree of accuracy and reproducibility in several laboratories. PMID:12682149

  13. Shutdown of HIV-1 Transcription in T Cells by Nullbasic, a Mutant Tat Protein

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hongping; Li, Dongsheng; Sivakumaran, Haran; Lor, Mary; Rustanti, Lina; Cloonan, Nicole; Wani, Shivangi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nullbasic is a derivative of the HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein that strongly inhibits HIV-1 replication in lymphocytes. Here we show that lentiviral vectors that constitutively express a Nullbasic-ZsGreen1 (NB-ZSG1) fusion protein by the eEF1α promoter led to robust long-term inhibition of HIV-1 replication in Jurkat cells. Although Jurkat-NB-ZSG1 cells were infected by HIV-1, no virus production could be detected and addition of phorbol ester 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and JQ1 had no effect, while suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA) modestly stimulated virus production but at levels 300-fold lower than those seen in HIV-1-infected Jurkat-ZSG1 cells. Virus replication was not recovered by coculture of HIV-1-infected Jurkat-NB-ZSG1 cells with uninfected Jurkat cells. Latently infected Jurkat latent 6.3 and ACH2 cells treated with latency-reversing agents produced measurable viral capsid (CA), but little or none was made when they expressed NB-ZSG1. When Jurkat cells chronically infected with HIV-1 were transduced with lentiviral virus-like particles conveying NB-ZSG1, a >3-log reduction in CA production was observed. Addition of PMA increased virus CA production but at levels 500-fold lower than those seen in nontransduced Jurkat cells. Transcriptome sequencing analysis confirmed that HIV-1 mRNA was strongly inhibited by NB-ZSG1 but indicated that full-length viral mRNA was made. Analysis of HIV-1-infected Jurkat cells expressing NB-ZSG1 by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that recruitment of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and histone 3 lysine 9 acetylation were inhibited. The reduction of HIV-1 promoter-associated RNAPII and epigenetic changes in viral nucleosomes indicate that Nullbasic can inhibit HIV-1 replication by enforcing viral silencing in cells. PMID:27381288

  14. HIV-1 Vpr—a still “enigmatic multitasker”

    PubMed Central

    Guenzel, Carolin A.; Hérate, Cécile; Benichou, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Like other HIV-1 auxiliary proteins, Vpr is conserved within all the human (HIV-1, HIV-2) and simian (SIV) immunodeficiency viruses. However, Vpr and homologous HIV-2, and SIV Vpx are the only viral auxiliary proteins specifically incorporated into virus particles through direct interaction with the Gag precursor, indicating that this presence in the core of the mature virions is mainly required for optimal establishment of the early steps of the virus life cycle in the newly infected cell. In spite of its small size, a plethora of effects and functions have been attributed to Vpr, including induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, modulation of the fidelity of reverse transcription, nuclear import of viral DNA in macrophages and other non-dividing cells, and transcriptional modulation of viral and host cell genes. Even if some more recent studies identified a few cellular targets that HIV-1 Vpr may utilize in order to perform its different tasks, the real role and functions of Vpr during the course of natural infection are still enigmatic. In this review, we will summarize the main reported functions of HIV-1 Vpr and their significance in the context of the viral life cycle. PMID:24744753

  15. Macrophages and HIV-1: An Unhealthy Constellation.

    PubMed

    Sattentau, Quentin J; Stevenson, Mario

    2016-03-01

    Lentiviruses have a long-documented association with macrophages. Abundant evidence exists for in vitro and, in a tissue-specific manner, in vivo infection of macrophages by the primate lentiviruses HIV-1 and SIV. However, macrophage contribution to aspects of HIV-1 and SIV pathogenesis, and their role in viral persistence in individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy, remains unclear. Here we discuss recent evidence implicating macrophages in HIV-1-mediated disease and highlight directions for further investigation.

  16. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells promote HIV-1-induced group 3 innate lymphoid cell depletion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng; Cheng, Liang; Zhao, Juanjuan; Li, Guangming; Zhang, Liguo; Chen, Weiwei; Nie, Weiming; Reszka-Blanco, Natalia J; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Su, Lishan

    2015-09-01

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) have demonstrated roles in promoting antibacterial immunity, maintaining epithelial barrier function, and supporting tissue repair. ILC3 alterations are associated with chronic inflammation and inflammatory disease; however, the characteristics and relevant regulatory mechanisms of this cell population in HIV-1 infection are poorly understood due in part to a lack of a robust model. Here, we determined that functional human ILC3s develop in lymphoid organs of humanized mice and that persistent HIV-1 infection in this model depletes ILC3s, as observed in chronic HIV-1-infected patients. In HIV-1-infected mice, effective antiretroviral therapy reversed the loss of ILC3s. HIV-1-dependent reduction of ILC3s required plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), IFN-I, and the CD95/FasL pathway, as targeted depletion or blockade of these prevented HIV-1-induced ILC3 depletion in vivo and in vitro, respectively. Finally, we determined that HIV-1 infection induces CD95 expression on ILC3s via a pDC- and IFN-I-dependent mechanism that sensitizes ILC3s to undergo CD95/FasL-mediated apoptosis. We conclude that chronic HIV-1 infection depletes ILC3s through pDC activation, induction of IFN-I, and CD95-mediated apoptosis.

  17. Immunological and pharmacological strategies to reactivate HIV-1 from latently infected cells: a possibility for HIV-1 paediatric patients?

    PubMed

    Martínez-Bonet, M; Clemente, M I; Serramía, M J; Moreno, S; Muñoz, E; Muñoz-Fernández, M A

    2015-07-01

    The limitations to establishing a viral reservoir facilitated by early cART in children could play a critical role in achieving natural control of viral replication upon discontinuation of cART, which could be defined as 'functional cure'. Viral reservoirs could provide a persistent source of recrudescent viraemia after withdrawal of cART, despite temporary remission of HIV-1 infection, as observed in the 'Mississippi baby'. Intensification of cART has been proposed as a strategy to control residual replication and to diminish the reservoirs. The effects of cART intensification with maraviroc persisted after discontinuation of the drug in HIV-1-infected adults. However, in HIV-1-infected children, the emergence of CXCR4-using variants occurs very early, and the use of CCR5 antagonists in these children as intensification therapy may not be the best alternative. New treatments to eradicate HIV-1 are focused on the activation of viral production from latently infected cells to purge and clear HIV-1 reservoirs. This strategy involves the use of a wide range of small molecules called latency-reversing agents (LRAs). Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) such as givinostat, belinostat and panobinostat, and class I-selective HDACis that include oxamflatin, NCH-51 and romidepsin, are the most advanced in clinical testing for HIV-1 LRAs. Panobinostat and romidepsin show an efficient reactivation profile in J89GFP cells, a lymphocyte HIV-1 latently infected cell line considered a relevant model to study post-integration HIV-1 latency and reactivation. Clinical trials with panobinostat and romidepsin have been performed in children with other pathologies and it could be reasonable to design a clinical trial using these drugs in combination with cART in HIV-1-infected children.

  18. Isolation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA from feces by a simple method and difference between HIV-1 subpopulations in feces and serum.

    PubMed Central

    van der Hoek, L; Boom, R; Goudsmit, J; Snijders, F; Sol, C J

    1995-01-01

    A simple method for the isolation and subsequent detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA from feces is described. Viral RNA was isolated by the method developed by Boom et al. (R. Boom, C.J.A. Sol, M.M.M. Salimans, C.L. Jansen, P.M.E. Wertheim-van Dillen, and J. van der Noordaa, J. Clin. Microbiol. 28:495-503, 1990), which was adapted for feces. HIV-1 RNA was detected by reverse transcription (RT) followed by a nested PCR encompassing the V3 region. Reconstruction experiments revealed that the efficiencies of the extraction technique and the subsequent RT-PCR were not considerably affected by the varied composition of feces. The method was applied on fecal specimens from 18 HIV-1-infected individuals, among which were samples that had been stored for 9 years. It appeared that HIV-1 RNA was detectable in the feces of 12 persons (67%). Viral RNA was present in the feces of persons who fulfilled the criteria for CDC class II and CDC class III HIV infection as well as in patients who were diagnosed with AIDS (CDC class IV). Direct sequencing of amplimers obtained from paired fecal and serum specimens showed that differences in sequence heterogeneity existed. In one patient a remarkable difference in the HIV-1 sequences between isolates from feces and serum was observed. In conclusion, HIV-1 RNA is frequently present in the feces of HIV-1-infected individuals, and in some cases the HIV-1 subpopulation in feces differs from the HIV-1 subpopulation in serum. PMID:7751361

  19. Nucleoside inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prem L; Nurpeisov, Viktoria; Hernandez-Santiago, Brenda; Beltran, Thierry; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2004-01-01

    The development of novel compounds that can effectively inhibit both wild type and the most consensus resistant strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the primary focus in HIV disease management. Combination therapy, comprising at least three classes of drugs, has become the standard of care for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or HIV-infected individuals. The drug cocktail can comprise all three classes of HIV inhibitors, including nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) and protease inhibitors (PI). Due to their competitive mode of inhibition and requirement for metabolic activation, almost all NRTI drugs lack the virological potency of NNRTI or PI drugs. However, data from clinical trials indicate that sustained viral suppression could not be achieved with NRTI, NNRTI or PIs alone. Therefore, the NRTIs will remain essential components of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for the foreseeable future, because they enhance the virological potency of the regimen, they do not bind excessively to protein and most regimens are small pills/tablets given once a day. It has become apparent in recent years that the prolonged use of certain NRTIs exhibits adverse events as a class, limiting the length of time for which they can be safely used. Of major clinical concern is their association with the potentially fatal lactic acidaemia and hepatic steatosis. These class events, as well as individual drug effects, such as peripheral neuropathy, are linked to delayed mitochondrial destruction. In addition to toxicity, the development of resistance-conferring mutations against exposure to nucleoside analogs currently in use influences long-term therapeutic benefits. Of critical importance for the evaluation of new NRTIs are recent studies showing that the efficiency of discrimination or excision by pyrophosphorolysis in the presence of nucleotides of a given NRTI is a key

  20. Impact of the Ku complex on HIV-1 expression and latency.

    PubMed

    Manic, Gwenola; Maurin-Marlin, Aurélie; Laurent, Fanny; Vitale, Ilio; Thierry, Sylvain; Delelis, Olivier; Dessen, Philippe; Vincendeau, Michelle; Leib-Mösch, Christine; Hazan, Uriel; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Bury-Moné, Stéphanie

    2013-01-01

    Ku, a cellular complex required for human cell survival and involved in double strand break DNA repair and multiple other cellular processes, may modulate retroviral multiplication, although the precise mechanism through which it acts is still controversial. Recently, Ku was identified as a possible anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) target in human cells, in two global approaches. Here we investigated the role of Ku on the HIV-1 replication cycle by analyzing the expression level of a panel of non-replicative lentiviral vectors expressing the green fluorescent protein in human colorectal carcinoma HCT 116 cells, stably or transiently depleted of Ku. We found that in this cellular model the depletion of Ku did not affect the efficiency of (pre-)integrative steps but decreased the early HIV-1 expression by acting at the transcriptional level. This negative effect was specific of the HIV-1 promoter, required the obligatory step of viral DNA integration and was reversed by transient depletion of p53. We also provided evidence on a direct binding of Ku to HIV-1 LTR in transduced cells. Ku not only promotes the early transcription from the HIV-1 promoter, but also limits the constitution of viral latency. Moreover, in the presence of a normal level of Ku, HIV-1 expression was gradually lost over time, likely due to the counter-selection of HIV-1-expressing cells. On the contrary, the reactivation of transgene expression from HIV-1 by means of trichostatin A- or tumor necrosis factor α-administration was enhanced under condition of Ku haplodepletion, suggesting a phenomenon of provirus latency. These observations plead in favor of the hypothesis that Ku has an impact on HIV-1 expression and latency at early- and mid-time after integration.

  1. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Vpr Functions as an Immediate-Early Protein during HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hrimech, Mohammed; Yao, Xiao-Jian; Bachand, François; Rougeau, Nicole; Cohen, Éric A.

    1999-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vpr is a virion-associated protein which facilitates HIV-1 infection of nondividing cells by contributing to the nuclear transport of the preintegration complex (PIC). Vpr was also shown to induce a cell cycle G2 arrest in infected proliferating cells that optimizes HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR)-directed gene expression and viral production. However, it is unclear whether this activity is mediated primarily early by virion-associated Vpr or alternatively late during infection when Vpr is de novo expressed. We report here that in the absence of de novo expression, virion-associated Vpr induces a transient G2 arrest that can subsequently lead to cell killing by apoptosis. Interestingly, the induction of both cell cycle G2 arrest and apoptosis by virion-associated Vpr requires viral entry but not viral replication, since reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitor treatments do not prevent these Vpr effects. These results raise the possibility that in vivo both infectious and noninfectious viruses contribute to the dysfunction and killing of CD4+ cells. In addition, our results reveal that virion-associated Vpr stimulates viral replication in proliferating cells after establishing a cell cycle G2 arrest by increasing LTR-directed gene expression. Importantly, this Vpr-mediated LTR activation appears to be a requirement for subsequent optimal Tat transactivation. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that in addition to participating in the HIV PIC nuclear transport in nondividing cells, virion-associated Vpr activates HIV-1 LTR-directed gene expression by manipulating the host cell cycle. From this, we conclude that Vpr functions as an immediate-early protein during HIV-1 infection. PMID:10196306

  2. Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity against Reactivated HIV-1-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen Shi; Richard, Jonathan; Lichtfuss, Marit; Smith, Amos B.; Park, Jongwoo; Courter, Joel R.; Melillo, Bruno N.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Kaufmann, Daniel E.; Parsons, Matthew S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-1 does not diminish the established latent reservoir. A possible cure approach is to reactivate the quiescent genome from latency and utilize immune responses to eliminate cells harboring reactivated HIV-1. It is not known whether antibodies within HIV-1-infected individuals can recognize and eliminate cells reactivated from latency through antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). We found that reactivation of HIV-1 expression in the latently infected ACH-2 cell line elicited antibody-mediated NK cell activation but did not result in antibody-mediated killing. The lack of CD4 expression on these HIV-1 envelope (Env)-expressing cells likely resulted in poor recognition of CD4-induced antibody epitopes on Env. To examine this further, cultured primary CD4+ T cells from HIV-1+ subjects were used as targets for ADCC. These ex vivo-expanded primary cells were modestly susceptible to ADCC mediated by autologous or heterologous HIV-1+ serum antibodies. Importantly, ADCC mediated against these primary cells could be enhanced following incubation with a CD4-mimetic compound (JP-III-48) that exposes CD4-induced antibody epitopes on Env. Our studies suggest that with sufficient reactivation and expression of appropriate Env epitopes, primary HIV-1-infected cells can be targets for ADCC mediated by autologous serum antibodies and innate effector cells. The results of this study suggest that further investigation into the potential of ADCC to eliminate reactivated latently infected cells is warranted. IMPORTANCE An HIV-1 cure remains elusive due to the persistence of long-lived latently infected cells. An HIV-1 cure strategy, termed “shock and kill,” aims to reactivate HIV-1 expression in latently infected cells and subsequently eliminate the reactivated cells through immune-mediated killing. While recent research efforts have focused on reversing HIV-1 latency, it remains unclear whether preexisting immune

  3. GADD45 proteins inhibit HIV-1 replication through specific suppression of HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhibin; Liu, Ruikang; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Suzhen; Hu, Xiaomei; Tan, Juan; Liang, Chen; Qiao, Wentao

    2016-06-01

    GADD45 proteins are a group of stress-induced proteins and participate in various cellular pathways including cell cycle regulation, cell survival and death, DNA repair and demethylation. It was recently shown that HIV-1 infection induces the expression of GADD45 proteins. However, the effect of GADD45 on HIV-1 replication has not been studied. Here, we report that overexpression of GADD45 proteins reduces HIV-1 production through suppressing transcription from the HIV-1 LTR promoter. This inhibitory effect is specific to HIV-1, since GADD45 proteins neither inhibit the LTR promoters from other retroviruses nor reduce the production of these viruses. Knockdown of endogenous GADD45 modestly activates HIV-1 in the J-Lat A72 latency cell line, which suggests GADD45 proteins might play a role in maintaining HIV-1 latency.

  4. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of salicylidene acylhydrazide compounds.

    PubMed

    Forthal, Donald N; Phan, Tran B; Slepenkin, Anatoly V; Landucci, Gary; Chu, Hencelyn; Elofsson, Mikael; Peterson, Ellena

    2012-10-01

    Salicylidene acylhydrazide compounds have been shown to inhibit bacterial pathogens, including Chlamydia and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. If such compounds could also target HIV-1, their potential use as topical microbicides to prevent sexually transmitted infections would be considerable. In this study, the in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity, cytotoxicity and mechanism of action of several salicylidene acylhydrazides were determined. Inhibitory activity was assessed using TZM-bl cells and primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as targets for HIV-1 infection. Antiviral activity was measured against cell-free and cell-associated virus and in vaginal fluid and semen simulants. Since the antibacterial activity of salicylidene acylhydrazides is reversible by Fe(2+), the ability of Fe(2+) and other cations to reverse the anti-HIV-1 activity of the compounds was determined. Real-time PCR was also employed to determine the stage affected in the HIV-1 replication cycle. Four compounds with 50% inhibitory concentrations against HIV-1 of 1-7 μM were identified. In vitro toxicity varied but was generally limited. Activity was similar against three R5 clade B primary isolates and whether the target for virus replication was TZM-bl cells or PBMCs. Compounds inhibited cell-free and cell-associated virus and were active in vaginal fluid and semen simulants. Fe(2+), but not other cations, reversed the anti-HIV-1 effect. Finally, the inhibitory effect of the compounds occurred at a post-integration step. In conclusion, salicylidene acylhydrazides were identified with in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity in the micromolar range. The activity of these compounds against other sexually transmitted pathogens makes them potential candidates to formulate for use as a broad-spectrum topical genital microbicide. PMID:22819150

  5. Change in the Prevalence of HIV-1 and the Rate of Transmitted Drug-Resistant HIV-1 in Haiphong, Northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hung Viet; Ishizaki, Azumi; Nguyen, Cuong Hung; Saina, Matilda Chelimo; Hoang, Huyen Thi Thanh; Tran, Vuong Thi; Bi, Xiuqiong; Pham, Thuc Van; Ichimura, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    We previously reported a significant decrease in HIV-1 prevalence, with no increase in drug-resistant HIV-1 among injecting drug users (IDU), female sex workers (FSW), and blood donors (BD), in Haiphong, Vietnam, from 2007 to 2009. In 2012, 388 IDU, 51 FSW, and 200 BD were recruited for further analysis. None had a history of antiretroviral treatment. From 2007 to 2012, HIV-1 prevalence was reduced from 35.9% to 18.6% (p<0.001), 23.1% to 9.8% (p<0.05), and 2.9% to 1% (p=0.29) in IDU, FSW, and BD, respectively. Of 79 anti-HIV-1 antibody-positive samples, 61 were successfully analyzed for the pol-reverse transcriptase (RT) region. All HIV-1 strains were CRF01_AE. Nonnucleoside RT inhibitor-resistant mutations, Y181C/I, were detected in three subjects; one had the nucleoside RT inhibitor-resistant mutations L74V and M184V and one had E138K. The prevalence of transmitted drug-resistant HIV-1 in Haiphong increased slightly from 1.8% in 2007 to 6.6% in 2012 (p=0.06). PMID:25970090

  6. Host Double Strand Break Repair Generates HIV-1 Strains Resistant to CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Kristine E; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing has been proposed as a therapeutic treatment for HIV-1 infection. CRISPR/Cas9 induced double strand breaks (DSBs) targeted to the integrated viral genome have been shown to decrease production of progeny virus. Unfortunately HIV-1 evolves rapidly and may readily produce CRISPR/Cas9 resistant strains. Here we used next-generation sequencing to characterize HIV-1 strains that developed resistance to six different CRISPR/Cas9 guide RNAs (gRNAs). Reverse transcriptase (RT) derived base substitution mutations were commonly found at sites encoding unpaired bases of RNA stem-loop structures. In addition to RT mutations, insertion and/or deletion (indel) mutations were common. Indels localized to the CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage site were major contributors to CRISPR gRNA resistance. While most indels at non-coding regions were a single base pair, 3 base pair indels were observed when a coding region of HIV-1 was targeted. The DSB repair event may preserve the HIV-1 reading frame, while destroying CRISPR gRNA homology. HIV-1 may be successfully edited by CRISPR/Cas9, but the virus remains competent for replication and resistant to further CRISPR/Cas9 targeting at that site. These observations strongly suggest that host DSB repair at CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage sites is a novel and important pathway that may contribute to HIV-1 therapeutic resistance. PMID:27404981

  7. Host Double Strand Break Repair Generates HIV-1 Strains Resistant to CRISPR/Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Kristine E.; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing has been proposed as a therapeutic treatment for HIV-1 infection. CRISPR/Cas9 induced double strand breaks (DSBs) targeted to the integrated viral genome have been shown to decrease production of progeny virus. Unfortunately HIV-1 evolves rapidly and may readily produce CRISPR/Cas9 resistant strains. Here we used next-generation sequencing to characterize HIV-1 strains that developed resistance to six different CRISPR/Cas9 guide RNAs (gRNAs). Reverse transcriptase (RT) derived base substitution mutations were commonly found at sites encoding unpaired bases of RNA stem-loop structures. In addition to RT mutations, insertion and/or deletion (indel) mutations were common. Indels localized to the CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage site were major contributors to CRISPR gRNA resistance. While most indels at non-coding regions were a single base pair, 3 base pair indels were observed when a coding region of HIV-1 was targeted. The DSB repair event may preserve the HIV-1 reading frame, while destroying CRISPR gRNA homology. HIV-1 may be successfully edited by CRISPR/Cas9, but the virus remains competent for replication and resistant to further CRISPR/Cas9 targeting at that site. These observations strongly suggest that host DSB repair at CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage sites is a novel and important pathway that may contribute to HIV-1 therapeutic resistance. PMID:27404981

  8. A Novel Class of HIV-1 Antiviral Agents Targeting HIV via a SUMOylation-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Madu, Ikenna G; Li, Shirley; Li, Baozong; Li, Haitang; Chang, Tammy; Li, Yi-Jia; Vega, Ramir; Rossi, John; Yee, Jiing-Kuan; Zaia, John; Chen, Yuan

    2015-12-08

    We have recently identified a chemotype of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-specific protease (SENP) inhibitors. Prior to the discovery of their SENP inhibitory activity, these compounds were found to inhibit HIV replication, but with an unknown mechanism. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of how these compounds inhibit HIV-1. We found that they do not affect HIV-1 viral production, but significantly inhibited the infectivity of the virus. Interestingly, virions produced from cells treated with these compounds could gain entry and carry out reverse transcription, but could not efficiently integrate into the host genome. This phenotype is different from the virus produced from cells treated with the class of anti-HIV-1 agents that inhibit HIV protease. Upon removal of the SUMO modification sites in the HIV-1 integrase, the compound no longer alters viral infectivity, indicating that the effect is related to SUMOylation of the HIV integrase. This study identifies a novel mechanism for inhibiting HIV-1 integration and a new class of small molecules that inhibits HIV-1 via such mechanism that may contribute a new strategy for cure of HIV-1 by inhibiting the production of infectious virions upon activation from latency.

  9. A Novel Class of HIV-1 Antiviral Agents Targeting HIV via a SUMOylation-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Madu, Ikenna G.; Li, Shirley; Li, Baozong; Li, Haitang; Chang, Tammy; Li, Yi-Jia; Vega, Ramir; Rossi, John; Yee, Jiing-Kuan; Zaia, John; Chen, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    We have recently identified a chemotype of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-specific protease (SENP) inhibitors. Prior to the discovery of their SENP inhibitory activity, these compounds were found to inhibit HIV replication, but with an unknown mechanism. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of how these compounds inhibit HIV-1. We found that they do not affect HIV-1 viral production, but significantly inhibited the infectivity of the virus. Interestingly, virions produced from cells treated with these compounds could gain entry and carry out reverse transcription, but could not efficiently integrate into the host genome. This phenotype is different from the virus produced from cells treated with the class of anti-HIV-1 agents that inhibit HIV protease. Upon removal of the SUMO modification sites in the HIV-1 integrase, the compound no longer alters viral infectivity, indicating that the effect is related to SUMOylation of the HIV integrase. This study identifies a novel mechanism for inhibiting HIV-1 integration and a new class of small molecules that inhibits HIV-1 via such mechanism that may contribute a new strategy for cure of HIV-1 by inhibiting the production of infectious virions upon activation from latency. PMID:26643614

  10. Host Double Strand Break Repair Generates HIV-1 Strains Resistant to CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Kristine E; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2016-07-12

    CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing has been proposed as a therapeutic treatment for HIV-1 infection. CRISPR/Cas9 induced double strand breaks (DSBs) targeted to the integrated viral genome have been shown to decrease production of progeny virus. Unfortunately HIV-1 evolves rapidly and may readily produce CRISPR/Cas9 resistant strains. Here we used next-generation sequencing to characterize HIV-1 strains that developed resistance to six different CRISPR/Cas9 guide RNAs (gRNAs). Reverse transcriptase (RT) derived base substitution mutations were commonly found at sites encoding unpaired bases of RNA stem-loop structures. In addition to RT mutations, insertion and/or deletion (indel) mutations were common. Indels localized to the CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage site were major contributors to CRISPR gRNA resistance. While most indels at non-coding regions were a single base pair, 3 base pair indels were observed when a coding region of HIV-1 was targeted. The DSB repair event may preserve the HIV-1 reading frame, while destroying CRISPR gRNA homology. HIV-1 may be successfully edited by CRISPR/Cas9, but the virus remains competent for replication and resistant to further CRISPR/Cas9 targeting at that site. These observations strongly suggest that host DSB repair at CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage sites is a novel and important pathway that may contribute to HIV-1 therapeutic resistance.

  11. HIV-1 Tat Protein-Induced Rapid and Reversible Decrease in [3H]Dopamine Uptake: Dissociation of [3H]Dopamine Uptake and [3H]2β-Carbomethoxy-3-β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane (WIN 35,428) Binding in Rat Striatal Synaptosomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun; Mactutus, Charles F.; Wallace, David R.; Booze, Rosemarie M.

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 Tat protein plays a key role in the pathogenesis of both HIV-1-associated cognitive-motor disorder and drug abuse. Dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) function is strikingly altered in patients with HIV-1-associated dementia and a history of chronic drug abuse. This study is the first in vitro evaluation of potential mechanisms underlying the effects of Tat protein on DAT function. Rat striatal synaptosomes were incubated with recombinant Tat1–86 protein, and [3H]DA uptake and the binding of [3H]2β-carbomethoxy-3-β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane (WIN 35,428) and [3H]1-[2-(diphenylmethoxy)ethyl]-4-(3-phenylpropyl)-piperazine (GBR 12935) were determined. Tat decreased [3H]DA uptake, [3H]WIN 35,428 binding, and [3H]GBR 12935 binding in a time-dependent manner. The potency of Tat for inhibiting [3H]DA uptake (Ki = 1.2 μM) was the same as that for inhibiting [3H]GBR 12935 binding but 3-fold less than that for inhibiting [3H]WIN 35,428 binding. Mutant Tat proteins did not alter [3H]DA uptake. Kinetic analysis of [3H]DA uptake revealed that Tat (1 or 10 μM) decreased the Vmax value and increased the Km value in a dose-dependent manner. The Vmax value, decreased by Tat (1 μM), returned to the control level after washout of Tat, indicating that the inhibitory effect of Tat on DA uptake was reversible. Saturation studies revealed that Tat decreased the Bmax value and increased the Kd value of [3H]WIN 35,428 binding, whereas Tat decreased the Bmax value of [3H]GBR 12935 binding, without a change in the Kd value. These findings provide new insight into understanding the pharmacological mechanisms of Tat-induced dysfunction of the DAT in the dopaminergic system in HIV-infected patients. PMID:19325033

  12. Citron kinase enhances ubiquitination of HIV-1 Gag protein and intracellular HIV-1 budding.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jiwei; Zhao, Jianyuan; Sun, Lei; Mi, Zeyun; Cen, Shan

    2016-09-01

    Assembly and budding of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) particles is a complex process involving a number of host proteins. We have previously reported that the RhoA effector citron kinase enhances HIV-1 production. However, the underlying mechanism is not clear. In this study, we found that citron kinase interacted with HIV-1 Gag protein via its zinc finger and leucine zipper domains. Electron microscopy analysis revealed that citron kinase induced viral particle assembly in multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Citron kinase enhanced ubiquitination of HIV-1 Gag protein. Knockdown of Nedd4L, a member of the HECT ubiquitin E3 ligase family, partly decreased the ability of citron kinase to enhance HIV-1 production and reduced ubiquitination of HIV-1 Gag. Interestingly, the function of citron kinase to promote HIV-1 budding was severely impaired when endogenous ALIX was knocked down. Overexpression of the AAA-type ATPase VPS4 eliminated citron-kinase-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 production. Our results suggest that citron kinase interacts with HIV-1 Gag and enhances HIV-1 production by promoting Gag ubiquitination and inducing viral release via the MVB pathway. PMID:27339686

  13. HIV-1 RNA quantification in CRF02_AG HIV-1 infection: too easy to make mistakes.

    PubMed

    Tatarelli, Paola; Taramasso, Lucia; Di Biagio, Antonio; Sticchi, Laura; Nigro, Nicola; Barresi, Renata; Viscoli, Claudio; Bruzzone, Bianca

    2016-04-01

    The number of patients newly infected by HIV-1 non-B subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) is increasing worldwide, including in the western countries. We report on a primary HIV-1 infection in a Caucasian patient. A routine quantitative assay (Nuclisens EasyQ HIV-1 2.0, BioMérieux SA) showed 6,700 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml. A combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) consistent with low baseline HIV-1 RNA was started. Few days later, the analysis performed with REGA HIV-1 Subtyping Tool - Version 3.0 attributed the HIV-1 sequence to the CRF02_AG recombinant form. Therefore, a second real-time PCR assay was performed, using the Versant HIV-1 RNA 1.0 Assay (kPCR) (Siemens HealthCare Diagnostics) which revealed a HIV-1 RNA of 230,000 copies/ml. Consequently, the ongoing cART was potentiated. This case suggests that the wide genetic variability of HIV-1 subtypes may affect the capability of the commonly used assays to detect and accurately quantify HIV-1 RNA in non-B subtypes and CRFs. In presence of CRFs different commercial HIV-1 RNA tests should be performed to find the most reliable for viral load quantification at the diagnosis, because it influences the choice of cART, and during the follow-up. Indeed, international guidelines for HIV-1 infection management suggest to monitor patient' HIV-RNA with the same assay over the course of treatment. As different commercial tests can be performed in the same laboratory with considerable difficulty, the laboratory should select an assay that is suitable not only for the more prevalent strain, but also for less frequent ones that, nevertheless, can occur. Then, knowing and investigating the spread of non-B strains has essential clinical and laboratory implications. PMID:27196556

  14. A post-entry role for CD63 in early HIV-1 replication

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guangyu; Dziuba, Natallia; Friedrich, Brian; Murray, James L.; Ferguson, Monique R.

    2011-04-10

    Macrophages and CD4{sup +} lymphocytes are the major reservoirs for HIV-1 infection. CD63 is a tetraspanin transmembrane protein, which has been shown to play an essential role during HIV-1 replication in macrophages. In this study, we further confirm the requirement of CD63 in early HIV-1 replication events in both macrophages and a CD4{sup +} cell line. Further analysis revealed that viral attachment and cell-cell fusion were unaffected by CD63 silencing. However, CD63-depleted macrophages showed a significant decrease in the initiation and completion of HIV-1 reverse transcription, affecting subsequent events of the HIV-1 life cycle. Integration of HIV-1 cDNA as well as the formation of 2-LTR circles was notably reduced. Reporter assays showed that CD63 down regulation reduced production of the early HIV protein Tat. In agreement, CD63 silencing also inhibited production of the late protein p24. These findings suggest that CD63 plays an early post-entry role prior to or at the reverse transcription step.

  15. HIV-1 gene expression: lessons from provirus and non-integrated DNA

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuntao

    2004-01-01

    Replication of HIV-1 involves a series of obligatory steps such as reverse transcription of the viral RNA genome into double-stranded DNA, and subsequent integration of the DNA into the human chromatin. Integration is an essential step for HIV-1 replication; yet the natural process of HIV-1 infection generates both integrated and high levels of non-integrated DNA. Although proviral DNA is the template for productive viral replication, the non-integrated DNA has been suggested to be active for limited viral gene synthesis. In this review, the regulation of viral gene expression from proviral DNA will be summarized and issues relating to non-integrated DNA as a template for transcription will be discussed, as will the possible function of pre-integration transcription in HIV-1 replication cycle. PMID:15219234

  16. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of fucoidan from Sargassum swartzii.

    PubMed

    Dinesh, Subramaniam; Menon, Thangam; Hanna, Luke E; Suresh, V; Sathuvan, M; Manikannan, M

    2016-01-01

    Sargassum swartzii, a marine brown algae with wide range of biological properties belongs to the family Sargassaceae. Bioactive fucoidan fractions (CFF, FF1 and FF2) were isolated from S. swartzii and characterized by linear gradient anion-exchange chromatography and FT-IR. The characterized fucoidan fractions contained mainly sugars, sulfate and uronic acid. In the present study, anti-HIV-1 property of the fucoidan fractions was investigated. Fraction FF2 was found to exhibit significant anti-HIV-1 activity at concentrations of 1.56 and 6.25 μg/ml as observed by >50% reduction in HIV-1 p24 antigen levels and reverse transcriptase activity. Fucoidan fractions have no cytotoxic effects on PBMCs at the concentration range of 1.56-1000 μg/ml. These results suggest that fucoidan fractions could have inhibitory activity against HIV and has potential as an anti-HIV-1 agent.

  17. Roles of HIV-1 capsid in viral replication and immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Le Sage, Valerie; Mouland, Andrew J; Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando

    2014-11-26

    The primary roles of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid (CA) protein are to encapsidate and protect the viral RNA genome. It is becoming increasing apparent that HIV-1 CA is a multifunctional protein that acts early during infection to coordinate uncoating, reverse transcription, nuclear import of the pre-integration complex and integration of double stranded viral DNA into the host genome. Additionally, numerous recent studies indicate that CA is playing a crucial function in HIV-1 immune evasion. Here we summarize the current knowledge on HIV-1 CA and its interactions with the host cell to promote infection. The fact that CA engages in a number of different protein-protein interactions with the host makes it an interesting target for the development of new potent antiviral agents.

  18. Long noncoding RNA NRON contributes to HIV-1 latency by specifically inducing tat protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Chen, Cancan; Ma, Xiancai; Geng, Guannan; Liu, Bingfeng; Zhang, Yijun; Zhang, Shaoyang; Zhong, Fudi; Liu, Chao; Yin, Yue; Cai, Weiping; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play multiple key regulatory roles in various cellular pathways. However, their functions in HIV-1 latent infection remain largely unknown. Here we show that a lncRNA named NRON, which is highly expressed in resting CD4+ T lymphocytes, could be involved in HIV-1 latency by specifically inducing Tat protein degradation. Our results suggest that NRON lncRNA potently suppresses the viral transcription by decreasing the cellular abundance of viral transactivator protein Tat. NRON directly links Tat to the ubiquitin/proteasome components including CUL4B and PSMD11, thus facilitating Tat degradation. Depletion of NRON, especially in combination with a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, significantly reactivates the viral production from the HIV-1-latently infected primary CD4+ T lymphocytes. Our data indicate that lncRNAs play a role in HIV-1 latency and their manipulation could be a novel approach for developing latency-reversing agents. PMID:27291871

  19. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of fucoidan from Sargassum swartzii.

    PubMed

    Dinesh, Subramaniam; Menon, Thangam; Hanna, Luke E; Suresh, V; Sathuvan, M; Manikannan, M

    2016-01-01

    Sargassum swartzii, a marine brown algae with wide range of biological properties belongs to the family Sargassaceae. Bioactive fucoidan fractions (CFF, FF1 and FF2) were isolated from S. swartzii and characterized by linear gradient anion-exchange chromatography and FT-IR. The characterized fucoidan fractions contained mainly sugars, sulfate and uronic acid. In the present study, anti-HIV-1 property of the fucoidan fractions was investigated. Fraction FF2 was found to exhibit significant anti-HIV-1 activity at concentrations of 1.56 and 6.25 μg/ml as observed by >50% reduction in HIV-1 p24 antigen levels and reverse transcriptase activity. Fucoidan fractions have no cytotoxic effects on PBMCs at the concentration range of 1.56-1000 μg/ml. These results suggest that fucoidan fractions could have inhibitory activity against HIV and has potential as an anti-HIV-1 agent. PMID:26472515

  20. Anti HIV-1 flavonoid glycosides from Ochna integerrima.

    PubMed

    Reutrakul, Vichai; Ningnuek, Niwat; Pohmakotr, Manat; Yoosook, Chalobon; Napaswad, Chanita; Kasisit, Jitra; Santisuk, Thawatchai; Tuchinda, Patoomratana

    2007-06-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the anti-HIV-1 active EtOAc extract from leaves and twigs of Ochna integerrima led to the isolation of five new flavonoid glycosides 1 - 5, five known flavonoids 6 - 10, and two known flavonoid glycosides 11 and 12. Structures were determined based on spectroscopic analyses. 6- gamma, gamma-Dimethylallyldihydrokaempferol 7- O- beta-D-glucoside (1), 6-gamma, gamma-dimethylallylquercetin 7- O- beta- D-glucoside (3), 6-(3-hydroxy-3-methylbutyl)taxifolin 7- O- beta-D-glucoside (4), 6-(3-hydroxy-3-methylbutyl)quercetin 7- O-beta-D-glucoside (5), and 6-gamma, gamma-dimethylallyltaxifolin 7-O-beta-D-glucoside (11) showed anti-HIV-1 activities in the syncytium assay using the (Delta Tat/rev)MC99 virus and the 1A2 cell line system with EC(50) values ranging from 14.0 - 102.4 microg/mL. Furthermore, ochnaflavone 7''-O-methyl ether (7) and 2'', 3''-dihydroochnaflavone 7''-O-methyl ether (8) were very active; they exerted activities in the syncytium assay with EC(50) values of 2.0 and 0.9 microg/mL, respectively, and likewise inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with IC(50) values of 2.0 and 2.4 microg/mL, respectively.

  1. Nuclear trafficking of the HIV-1 pre-integration complex depends on the ADAM10 intracellular domain

    SciTech Connect

    Endsley, Mark A.; Somasunderam, Anoma D.; Li, Guangyu; Oezguen, Numan; Thiviyanathan, Varatharasa; Murray, James L.; Rubin, Donald H.; Hodge, Thomas W.; and others

    2014-04-15

    Previously, we showed that ADAM10 is necessary for HIV-1 replication in primary human macrophages and immortalized cell lines. Silencing ADAM10 expression interrupted the HIV-1 life cycle prior to nuclear translocation of viral cDNA. Furthermore, our data indicated that HIV-1 replication depends on the expression of ADAM15 and γ-secretase, which proteolytically processes ADAM10. Silencing ADAM15 or γ-secretase expression inhibits HIV-1 replication between reverse transcription and nuclear entry. Here, we show that ADAM10 expression also supports replication in CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes. The intracellular domain (ICD) of ADAM10 associates with the HIV-1 pre-integration complex (PIC) in the cytoplasm and immunoprecipitates and co-localizes with HIV-1 integrase, a key component of PIC. Taken together, our data support a model whereby ADAM15/γ-secretase processing of ADAM10 releases the ICD, which then incorporates into HIV-1 PIC to facilitate nuclear trafficking. Thus, these studies suggest ADAM10 as a novel therapeutic target for inhibiting HIV-1 prior to nuclear entry. - Highlights: • Nuclear trafficking of the HIV-1 pre-integration complex depends on ADAM10. • ADAM10 associates with HIV-1 integrase in the pre-integration complex. • HIV-1 replication depends on the expression of ADAM15 and γ-secretase. • Silencing ADAM15 or γ-secretase expression inhibits nuclear import of viral cDNA. • ADAM10 is important for HIV-1 replication in human macrophages and CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes.

  2. Dasatinib inhibits HIV-1 replication through the interference of SAMHD1 phosphorylation in CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Mercedes; López-Huertas, María Rosa; García-Pérez, Javier; Climent, Núria; Descours, Benjamin; Ambrosioni, Juan; Mateos, Elena; Rodríguez-Mora, Sara; Rus-Bercial, Lucía; Benkirane, Monsef; Miró, José M; Plana, Montserrat; Alcamí, José; Coiras, Mayte

    2016-04-15

    Massive activation of infected CD4+ T cells during acute HIV-1 infection leads to reservoir seeding and T-cell destruction. During T-cell activation, the antiviral effect of the innate factor SAMHD1 is neutralized through phosphorylation at T592, allowing HIV-1 infection. Dasatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor currently used for treating chronic myeloid leukemia, has been described to control HIV-1 replication through its negative effect on T-cell proliferation and viral entry. We demonstrate that Dasatinib can actually interfere with SAMHD1 phosphorylation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes, preserving its antiviral activity against HIV-1. Dasatinib prevented SAMHD1 phosphorylation in vitro and ex vivo, impairing HIV-1 reverse transcription and proviral integration. This was the major mechanism of action because the presence of Vpx, which degrades SAMHD1, in HIV-1 virions impeded the inhibitory effect of Dasatinib on HIV-1 replication. In fact, infection with VSV-pseudotyped HIV-1 virions and fusion of BlaM-Vpr-containing HIV-1 viruses with activated PBMCs in the presence of Dasatinib suggested that Dasatinib was not acting at fusion level. Finally, PBMCs from patients on chronic treatment with Dasatinib showed a lower level of SAMHD1 phosphorylation in response to activating stimuli and low susceptibility to HIV-1 infection ex vivo. Consequently, Dasatinib is a compound currently used in clinic that preserves the antiviral function of SAMHD1. Using Dasatinib as adjuvant of antiretroviral therapy during early primary HIV-1 infection would contribute to reduce viral replication and spread, prevent reservoir seeding, and preserve CD4 counts and CTL responses. These events would create a more favorable virologic and immunologic environment for future interventional studies aiming at HIV-1 eradication. PMID:26851491

  3. Discovery of Potent Non-Nucleoside Inhibitors of Dengue Viral RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase from a Fragment Hit Using Structure-Based Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Yokokawa, Fumiaki; Nilar, Shahul; Noble, Christian G; Lim, Siew Pheng; Rao, Ranga; Tania, Stefani; Wang, Gang; Lee, Gladys; Hunziker, Jürg; Karuna, Ratna; Manjunatha, Ujjini; Shi, Pei-Yong; Smith, Paul W

    2016-04-28

    The discovery and optimization of non-nucleoside dengue viral RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp) inhibitors are described. An X-ray-based fragment screen of Novartis' fragment collection resulted in the identification of a biphenyl acetic acid fragment 3, which bound in the palm subdomain of RdRp. Subsequent optimization of the fragment hit 3, relying on structure-based design, resulted in a >1000-fold improvement in potency in vitro and acquired antidengue activity against all four serotypes with low micromolar EC50 in cell-based assays. The lead candidate 27 interacts with a novel binding pocket in the palm subdomain of the RdRp and exerts a promising activity against all clinically relevant dengue serotypes. PMID:26984786

  4. Hepatocyte-specific delivery of siRNAs conjugated to novel non-nucleosidic trivalent N-acetylgalactosamine elicits robust gene silencing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G; Nair, Jayaprakash K; Jayaraman, Muthusamy; Charisse, Klaus; Taneja, Nate; O'Shea, Jonathan; Willoughby, Jennifer L S; Yucius, Kristina; Nguyen, Tuyen; Shulga-Morskaya, Svetlana; Milstein, Stuart; Liebow, Abigail; Querbes, William; Borodovsky, Anna; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Maier, Martin A; Manoharan, Muthiah

    2015-04-13

    We recently demonstrated that siRNAs conjugated to triantennary N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) induce robust RNAi-mediated gene silencing in the liver, owing to uptake mediated by the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR). Novel monovalent GalNAc units, based on a non-nucleosidic linker, were developed to yield simplified trivalent GalNAc-conjugated oligonucleotides under solid-phase synthesis conditions. Synthesis of oligonucleotide conjugates using monovalent GalNAc building blocks required fewer synthetic steps compared to the previously optimized triantennary GalNAc construct. The redesigned trivalent GalNAc ligand maintained optimal valency, spatial orientation, and distance between the sugar moieties for proper recognition by ASGPR. siRNA conjugates were synthesized by sequential covalent attachment of the trivalent GalNAc to the 3'-end of the sense strand and resulted in a conjugate with in vitro and in vivo potency similar to that of the parent trivalent GalNAc conjugate design.

  5. Substance abuse, HIV-1 and hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Nirzari; Nonnemacher, Michael R.; Pirrone, Vanessa; Block, Timothy; Mehta, Anand; Wigdahl, Brian

    2013-01-01

    During the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) disease, the virus has been shown to effectively escape the immune response with the subsequent establishment of latent viral reservoirs in specific cell populations within the peripheral blood (PB) and associated lymphoid tissues, bone marrow (BM), brain, and potentially other end organs. HIV-1, along with hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV and HCV), are known to share similar routes of transmission, including intravenous drug use, blood transfusions, sexual intercourse, and perinatal exposure. Substance abuse, including the use of opioids and cocaine, is a significant risk factor for exposure to HIV-1 and the development of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, as well as HBV and HCV exposure, infection, and disease. Thus, coinfection with HIV-1 and HBV or HCV is common and may be impacted by chronic substance abuse during the course of disease. HIV-1 impacts the natural course of HBV and HCV infection by accelerating the progression of HBV/HCV-associated liver disease toward end-stage cirrhosis and quantitative depletion of the CD4+ T-cell compartment. HBV or HCV coinfection with HIV-1 is also associated with increased mortality when compared to either infection alone. This review focuses on the impact of substance abuse and coinfection with HBV and HCV in the PB, BM, and brain on the HIV-1 pathogenic process as it relates to viral pathogenesis, disease progression, and the associated immune response during the course of this complex interplay. The impact of HIV-1 and substance abuse on hepatitis virus-induced disease is also a focal point. PMID:22973853

  6. Detection of Acute HIV-1 Infection by RT-LAMP.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Donna L; Sullivan, Vickie; Owen, S Michele; Curtis, Kelly A

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, cost-effective diagnostic test for the detection of acute HIV-1 infection is highly desired. Isothermal amplification techniques, such as reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP), exhibit characteristics that are ideal for the development of a rapid nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) because they are quick, easy to perform and do not require complex, dedicated equipment and laboratory space. In this study, we assessed the ability of the HIV-1 RT-LAMP assay to detect acute HIV infection as compared to a representative rapid antibody test and several FDA-approved laboratory-based assays. The HIV-1 RT-LAMP assay detected seroconverting individuals one to three weeks earlier than a rapid HIV antibody test and up to two weeks earlier than a lab-based antigen/antibody (Ag/Ab) combo enzyme immunoassay (EIA). RT-LAMP was not as sensitive as a lab-based qualitative RNA assay, which could be attributed to the significantly smaller nucleic acid input volume. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of detecting acute HIV infection using the RT-LAMP assay. The availability of a rapid NAAT, such as the HIV-1 RT-LAMP assay, at the point of care (POC) or in laboratories that do not have access to large platform NAAT could increase the percentage of individuals who receive an acute HIV infection status or confirmation of their HIV status, while immediately linking them to counseling and medical care. In addition, early knowledge of HIV status could lead to reduced high-risk behavior at a time when individuals are at a higher risk for transmitting the virus. PMID:25993381

  7. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Marisa N.; Okeoma, Chioma M.

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission. PMID:26205405

  8. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Madison, Marisa N; Okeoma, Chioma M

    2015-07-20

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission.

  9. HIV-1 transmission linkage in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Thomas; Campbell, Mary S; Mullins, James I; Hughes, James P; Wong, Kim G; Raugi, Dana N; Scrensen, Stefanie

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 sequencing has been used extensively in epidemiologic and forensic studies to investigate patterns of HIV-1 transmission. However, the criteria for establishing genetic linkage between HIV-1 strains in HIV-1 prevention trials have not been formalized. The Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study (ClinicaITrials.gov NCT00194519) enrolled 3408 HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual African couples to determine the efficacy of genital herpes suppression with acyclovir in reducing HIV-1 transmission. The trial analysis required laboratory confirmation of HIV-1 linkage between enrolled partners in couples in which seroconversion occurred. Here we describe the process and results from HIV-1 sequencing studies used to perform transmission linkage determination in this clinical trial. Consensus Sanger sequencing of env (C2-V3-C3) and gag (p17-p24) genes was performed on plasma HIV-1 RNA from both partners within 3 months of seroconversion; env single molecule or pyrosequencing was also performed in some cases. For linkage, we required monophyletic clustering between HIV-1 sequences in the transmitting and seroconverting partners, and developed a Bayesian algorithm using genetic distances to evaluate the posterior probability of linkage of participants sequences. Adjudicators classified transmissions as linked, unlinked, or indeterminate. Among 151 seroconversion events, we found 108 (71.5%) linked, 40 (26.5%) unlinked, and 3 (2.0%) to have indeterminate transmissions. Nine (8.3%) were linked by consensus gag sequencing only and 8 (7.4%) required deep sequencing of env. In this first use of HIV-1 sequencing to establish endpoints in a large clinical trial, more than one-fourth of transmissions were unlinked to the enrolled partner, illustrating the relevance of these methods in the design of future HIV-1 prevention trials in serodiscordant couples. A hierarchy of sequencing techniques, analysis methods, and expert adjudication contributed to the linkage

  10. Structure-activity relationship studies on clinically relevant HIV-1 NNRTIs.

    PubMed

    Rawal, R K; Murugesan, V; Katti, S B

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), protease inhibitors (PIs) and integrase inhibitors (INIs), nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) have contributed significantly in the treatment of HIV-1 infections. More than 60 structurally different classes of compounds have been identified as NNRTIs, which are specifically inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Five NNRTIs (nevirapine, delavirdine, efavirenz, etravirine and rilpivirine) have been approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for clinical use. The NNRTIs bind with a specific 'pocket' site of HIV-1 RT (allosteric site) that is closely associated with the NRTI binding site. Due to mutations of the amino acid residues surrounding the NNRTI-binding site, NNRTIs are notorious for rapidly eliciting resistance. Though, the emergence of resistant HIV strains can be circumvented if the NNRTIs are used either alone or in combination with NRTIs (AZT, 3TC, ddI, ddC, TVD or d4T) and PIs (Indinavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, ritonavir and lopinavir etc.) as shown by both a decrease in plasma HIV-1 RNA levels and increased CD4 T-cells. Here we are going to discuss recent advances in structure activity relationship studies on nevirapine, delavirdine, efavirenz, etravirine, rilpivirine and 4-thiazolidinones (privileged scaffold) HIV-1 NNRTIs.

  11. HIV-1 infection in Juba, southern Sudan.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, M C; Khalid, I O; El Tigani, A

    1995-05-01

    Thirty years of civil war in the Sudan have resulted in the isolation of the southern provinces which border Central and East Africa. Consequently, little is known about the epidemiology of HIV-1 infection in this region. To estimate the prevalence of HIV-1 infection in southern Sudan and the risk factors associated with disease transmission, a seroepidemiologic survey was conducted in the township of Juba. Study subjects invited to participate in this study included medical outpatients, inpatients hospitalized for active tuberculosis, and female prostitutes. A total of 401 subjects participated in the study. HIV-1 infection was confirmed in 25 subjects. The prevalence of HIV-1 infection was 19% (8/42) among tuberculosis patients, 16% (8/50) among prostitutes, and 3% (9/309) among outpatients. A significantly higher prevalence of HIV-1 infection was found among female prostitutes when compared to female outpatients: 16% (8/50) vs. 2% (4/178), P < 0.001. Correspondingly, the prevalence of seropositives was significantly higher among male outpatients reporting a history of sexual relations with prostitutes during the prior 10 years compared to male outpatients denying relations with prostitutes: 14% (5/37) vs. 0% (0/94), P = 0.0011. A history of a sexually transmitted disease (STD) was also associated with HIV-1 infection among male outpatients. The findings of this study indicate that HIV-1 infection is highly prevalent in southern Sudan and that prostitutes and their sexual partners represent a major reservoir of HIV infection in this population. This epidemiologic pattern resembles that seen in the African nations neighboring southern Sudan.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Envelope gene evolution and HIV-1 neuropathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Santiago, Fabián J.; Rivera-Amill, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    In the era of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) account for 40 to 56% of all HIV+ cases. During the acute stage of HIV-1 infection (<6 months), the virus invades and replicates within the central nervous system (CNS). Compared to peripheral tissues, the local CNS cell population expresses distinct levels of chemokine receptors, which levels exert selective pressure on the invading virus. HIV-1 envelope (env) sequences recovered from the brains and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of neurocognitively impaired HIV+ subjects often display higher nucleotide variability as compared to non-impaired HIV+ subjects. Specifically, env evolution provides HIV-1 with the strategies to evade host immune response, to reduce chemokine receptor dependence, to increase co-receptor binding efficiency, and to potentiate neurotoxicity. The evolution of env within the CNS leads to changes that may result in the emergence of novel isolates with neurotoxic and neurovirulent features. However, whether specific factors of HIV-1 evolution lead to the emergence of neurovirulent and neurotropic isolates remains ill-defined. HIV-1 env evolution is an ongoing phenomenon that occurs independently of neurological and neurocognitive disease severity; thus HIV env evolution may play a pivotal and reciprocal role in the etiology of HAND. Despite the use of cART, the reactivation of latent viral reservoirs represents a clinical challenge because of the replenishment of the viral pool that may subsequently lead to persistent infection. Therefore, gaining a more complete understanding of how HIV-1 env evolves over the course of the disease should be considered for the development of future therapies aimed at controlling CNS burden, diminishing persistent viremia, and eradicating viral reservoirs. Here we review the current literature on the role of HIV-1 env evolution in the setting of HAND disease progression and on the impact of cART on the dynamics of

  13. Performance of 3 rapid tests for discrimination between HIV-1 and HIV-2 in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Hønge, Bo Langhoff; Bjarnason Obinah, Magnús Pétur; Jespersen, Sanne; Medina, Candida; Té, David da Silva; da Silva, Zacarias José; Østergaard, Lars; Laursen, Alex Lund; Wejse, Christian; Erikstrup, Christian

    2014-01-01

    As HIV-2 is intrinsically resistant to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, it is mandatory to discriminate between HIV types before initiating antiretroviral treatment. Guinea-Bissau has the world's highest prevalence of HIV-2 and HIV-1/HIV-2 dually infected individuals. We evaluated 3 rapid tests for discrimination between HIV-1, HIV-2, and dual infections among 219 patients from Guinea-Bissau by comparing with the gold standard (INNO-LIA). Genie III HIV-1/HIV-2 was the best performer with regard to discriminatory capacity (agreement 91.8%), followed by Immunoflow HIV1-HIV2 (agreement 90.9%) and SD Bioline HIV-1/2 3.0 (agreement 84.5%). Our results underscore the need for evaluation of tests in relevant populations before implementation.

  14. Quantitation of HIV-1 DNA with a sensitive TaqMan assay that has broad subtype specificity.

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, Renée M; van Montfort, Thijs; Centlivre, Mireille; Schopman, Nick C T; Cornelissen, Marion; Sanders, Rogier W; Berkhout, Ben; Jeeninga, Rienk E; Paxton, William A; Pollakis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    The increasing diversity of HIV-1 isolates makes virus quantitation challenging, especially when diverse isolates co-circulate in a geographical area. Measuring the HIV-1 DNA levels in cells has become a valuable practical tool for fundamental and clinical research. A quantitative HIV-1 DNA assay was developed based on TaqMan(®) technology. Primers that target the highly conserved LTR region were designed to detect a broad array of HIV-1 variants, including viral isolates from many subtypes, with high sensitivity. Introduction of a pre-amplification step prior to the TaqMan(®) reaction allowed the specific amplification of fully reverse transcribed viral DNA. Execution of the pre-amplification step with a second primer set enables for the exclusive quantitation of the 2-LTR circular HIV-1 DNA form. PMID:23059551

  15. Patient-adapted, specific activation of HIV-1 by customized TAL effectors (TALEs), a proof of principle study.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Rene; Hauber, Ilona; Funk, Nancy; Richter, Annekatrin; Behrens, Martina; Renner, Ivonne; Chemnitz, Jan; Hofmann-Sieber, Helga; Baum, Heidi; van Lunzen, Jan; Boch, Jens; Hauber, Joachim; Behrens, Sven-Erik

    2015-12-01

    The major obstacle to cure infections with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) is integrated proviral genomes, which are not eliminated by antiretroviral therapies (ART). Treatment approaches with latency-reversing agents (LRAs) aim at inducing provirus expression to tag latently-infected cells for clearance through viral cytopathic effects or cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses. However, the currently tested LRAs reveal evident drawbacks as gene expression is globally induced and viral outgrowth is insecure. Here, we present transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins as potent tools to activate HIV-1 specifically. The large variety of circulating HIV-1 strains and, accordingly, integrated proviruses was addressed by the programmable DNA-specificity of TALEs. Using customized engineered TALEs, a substantial transcription activation and viral outgrowth was achieved with cells obtained from different HIV-1 patients. Our data suggest that TALEs may be useful tools in future strategies aimed at removing HIV-1 reservoirs. PMID:26474371

  16. Calculating HIV-1 infectious titre using a virtual TCID(50) method.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yong; Nankya, Immaculate; Abraha, Awet; Troyer, Ryan M; Nelson, Kenneth N; Rubio, Andrea; Arts, Eric J

    2009-01-01

    Studies of HIV-1 replication kinetics and fitness require an accurate determination of the level of infectious HIV-1 present in virus stocks. The standard technique for measuring the level of replication-competent infectious virus in culture supernatants or patient samples is the tissue culture dose for 50% infectivity (TCID(50)), which provides an accurate assessment of the level of infectious HIV-1. However, it is a time-consuming technique which typically takes two or more weeks to complete and requires PHA-stimulated PBMC from HIV-1 seronegative donors or an appropriate cell line. Thus rapid, cell-free surrogate measures for TCID(50) are desirable. Here, we introduce the virtual TCID(50) technique: a new cell-free method estimating a surrogate of infectious titer by comparing the reverse transcriptase activity in virus stock to that of reference viruses with a known TCID(50) value. We have demonstrated that the virtual TCID(50) obtained through this technique is comparable to the actual infectious TCID(50). This method greatly simplifies the process of accurate HIV-1 titration and is particularly beneficial for studies which require titration of large number of HIV-1 isolates.

  17. A Computational Model of Inhibition of HIV-1 by Interferon-Alpha.

    PubMed

    Browne, Edward P; Letham, Benjamin; Rudin, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 interferons such as interferon-alpha (IFNα) inhibit replication of Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) by upregulating the expression of genes that interfere with specific steps in the viral life cycle. This pathway thus represents a potential target for immune-based therapies that can alter the dynamics of host-virus interactions to benefit the host. To obtain a deeper mechanistic understanding of how IFNα impacts spreading HIV-1 infection, we modeled the interaction of HIV-1 with CD4 T cells and IFNα as a dynamical system. This model was then tested using experimental data from a cell culture model of spreading HIV-1 infection. We found that a model in which IFNα induces reversible cellular states that block both early and late stages of HIV-1 infection, combined with a saturating rate of conversion to these states, was able to successfully fit the experimental dataset. Sensitivity analysis showed that the potency of inhibition by IFNα was particularly dependent on specific network parameters and rate constants. This model will be useful for designing new therapies targeting the IFNα network in HIV-1-infected individuals, as well as potentially serving as a template for understanding the interaction of IFNα with other viruses. PMID:27010978

  18. LINE-1 retrotransposable element DNA accumulates in HIV-1-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, R Brad; Song, Haihan; Xu, Yang; Garrison, Keith E; Buzdin, Anton A; Anwar, Naveed; Hunter, Diana V; Mujib, Shariq; Mihajlovic, Vesna; Martin, Eric; Lee, Erika; Kuciak, Monika; Raposo, Rui André Saraiva; Bozorgzad, Ardalan; Meiklejohn, Duncan A; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Nixon, Douglas F; Ostrowski, Mario A

    2013-12-01

    Type 1 long-interspersed nuclear elements (L1s) are autonomous retrotransposable elements that retain the potential for activity in the human genome but are suppressed by host factors. Retrotransposition of L1s into chromosomal DNA can lead to genomic instability, whereas reverse transcription of L1 in the cytosol has the potential to activate innate immune sensors. We hypothesized that HIV-1 infection would compromise cellular control of L1 elements, resulting in the induction of retrotransposition events. Here, we show that HIV-1 infection enhances L1 retrotransposition in Jurkat cells in a Vif- and Vpr-dependent manner. In primary CD4(+) cells, HIV-1 infection results in the accumulation of L1 DNA, at least the majority of which is extrachromosomal. These data expose an unrecognized interaction between HIV-1 and endogenous retrotransposable elements, which may have implications for the innate immune response to HIV-1 infection, as well as for HIV-1-induced genomic instability and cytopathicity.

  19. A Computational Model of Inhibition of HIV-1 by Interferon-Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Edward P.; Letham, Benjamin; Rudin, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 interferons such as interferon-alpha (IFNα) inhibit replication of Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) by upregulating the expression of genes that interfere with specific steps in the viral life cycle. This pathway thus represents a potential target for immune-based therapies that can alter the dynamics of host-virus interactions to benefit the host. To obtain a deeper mechanistic understanding of how IFNα impacts spreading HIV-1 infection, we modeled the interaction of HIV-1 with CD4 T cells and IFNα as a dynamical system. This model was then tested using experimental data from a cell culture model of spreading HIV-1 infection. We found that a model in which IFNα induces reversible cellular states that block both early and late stages of HIV-1 infection, combined with a saturating rate of conversion to these states, was able to successfully fit the experimental dataset. Sensitivity analysis showed that the potency of inhibition by IFNα was particularly dependent on specific network parameters and rate constants. This model will be useful for designing new therapies targeting the IFNα network in HIV-1-infected individuals, as well as potentially serving as a template for understanding the interaction of IFNα with other viruses. PMID:27010978

  20. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This “shock” approach is then followed by “kill” of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  1. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This "shock" approach is then followed by "kill" of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells.

  2. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This "shock" approach is then followed by "kill" of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  3. Direct Visualization of HIV-1 Replication Intermediates Shows that Capsid and CPSF6 Modulate HIV-1 Intra-nuclear Invasion and Integration.

    PubMed

    Chin, Christopher R; Perreira, Jill M; Savidis, George; Portmann, Jocelyn M; Aker, Aaron M; Feeley, Eric M; Smith, Miles C; Brass, Abraham L

    2015-11-24

    Direct visualization of HIV-1 replication would improve our understanding of the viral life cycle. We adapted established technology and reagents to develop an imaging approach, ViewHIV, which allows evaluation of early HIV-1 replication intermediates, from reverse transcription to integration. These methods permit the simultaneous evaluation of both the capsid protein (CA) and viral DNA genome (vDNA) components of HIV-1 in both the cytosol and nuclei of single cells. ViewHIV is relatively rapid, uses readily available reagents in combination with standard confocal microscopy, and can be done with virtually any HIV-1 strain and permissive cell lines or primary cells. Using ViewHIV, we find that CA enters the nucleus and associates with vDNA in both transformed and primary cells. We also find that CA's interaction with the host polyadenylation factor, CPSF6, enhances nuclear entry and potentiates HIV-1's depth of nuclear invasion, potentially aiding the virus's integration into gene-dense regions.

  4. HIV-1 Genetic Variability and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Maria Mercedes; Perno, Carlo Federico

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in antiretroviral therapy that have revolutionized HIV disease management, effective control of the HIV infection pandemic remains elusive. Beyond the classic non-B endemic areas, HIV-1 non-B subtype infections are sharply increasing in previous subtype B homogeneous areas such as Europe and North America. As already known, several studies have shown that, among non-B subtypes, subtypes C and D were found to be more aggressive in terms of disease progression. Luckily, the response to antiretrovirals against HIV-1 seems to be similar among different subtypes, but these results are mainly based on small or poorly designed studies. On the other hand, differences in rates of acquisition of resistance among non-B subtypes are already being observed. This different propensity, beyond the type of treatment regimens used, as well as access to viral load testing in non-B endemic areas seems to be due to HIV-1 clade specific peculiarities. Indeed, some non-B subtypes are proved to be more prone to develop resistance compared to B subtype. This phenomenon can be related to the presence of subtype-specific polymorphisms, different codon usage, and/or subtype-specific RNA templates. This review aims to provide a complete picture of HIV-1 genetic diversity and its implications for HIV-1 disease spread, effectiveness of therapies, and drug resistance development. PMID:23844315

  5. Restriction Factors in HIV-1 Disease Progression.

    PubMed

    Merindol, Natacha; Berthoux, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    About 35 million people worldwide were living with HIV-1 at the end of 2013 and over 25 million have already died of AIDS. AIDS patients show high variability in the speed of disease progression in the absence of treatment. While certain immunological traits have been shown to correlate with accelerated or slowed progression in some subjects, including slow progressors, factors controlling HIV-1 replication and disease kinetics remain largely enigmatic. The importance of T lymphocytes and of protective HLA-alleles is undeniable, but not sufficient to explain every attenuated phenotype. A thorough understanding of HIV-1 infection control in these patient subsets may help the development of novel strategies for treatment and prevention. Restriction factors are type I interferon-induced specialized cellular proteins that block viruses at different steps of their life cycle. TRIM5α, Mx2/MxB, TRIM22/Staf50, SAMHD1, p21/CDKN1, tetherin/BST2/CD137, APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F have all been proposed to inhibit HIV-1, often with gene variant- or cellular context-specificity. Recent evidence highlights their possible implication in AIDS disease progression. In this review, we depict their restrictive activity against HIV-1 and recapitulate the latest data on their potential role in vivo, in both normal and slow progressors.

  6. Protease inhibitors effectively block cell-to-cell spread of HIV-1 between T cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) spreads by cell-free diffusion and by direct cell-to-cell transfer, the latter being a significantly more efficient mode of transmission. Recently it has been suggested that cell-to-cell spread may permit ongoing virus replication in the presence of antiretroviral therapy (ART) based on studies performed using Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (RTIs). Protease Inhibitors (PIs) constitute an important component of ART; however whether this class of inhibitors can suppress cell-to-cell transfer of HIV-1 is unexplored. Here we have evaluated the inhibitory effect of PIs during cell-to-cell spread of HIV-1 between T lymphocytes. Results Using quantitative assays in cell line and primary cell systems that directly measure the early steps of HIV-1 infection we find that the PIs Lopinavir and Darunavir are equally potent against both cell-free and cell-to-cell spread of HIV-1. We further show that a protease resistant mutant maintains its resistant phenotype during cell-to-cell spread and is transmitted more efficiently than wild-type virus in the presence of drug. By contrast we find that T cell-T cell spread of HIV-1 is 4–20 fold more resistant to inhibition by the RTIs Nevirapine, Zidovudine and Tenofovir. Notably, varying the ratio of infected and uninfected cells in co-culture impacted on the degree of inhibition, indicating that the relative efficacy of ART is dependent on the multiplicity of infection. Conclusions We conclude that if the variable effects of antiviral drugs on cell-to-cell virus dissemination of HIV-1 do indeed impact on viral replication and maintenance of viral reservoirs this is likely to be influenced by the antiviral drug class, since PIs appear particularly effective against both modes of HIV-1 spread. PMID:24364896

  7. Assessment of mucosal immunity to HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Jespers, Vicky; Harandi, Ali M; Hinkula, Jorma; Medaglini, Donata; Le Grand, Roger; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Bogers, Willy; El Habib, Raphaelle; Wegmann, Frank; Fraser, Carol; Cranage, Martin; Shattock, Robin J; Spetz, Anna-Lena

    2010-04-01

    A key gap in the development and evaluation of HIV-1 vaccines is insufficient knowledge with regard to sampling techniques and assessment of mucosal immune responses required for early prevention and inhibition of viral dissemination. In an attempt to start bridging this gap, the EUROPRISE network of scientists working on HIV-1 vaccine and microbicide research organized a workshop with the aim to review the types of mucosal responses/biomarkers currently measured in mucosal immunology and to define how the mucosal responses/biomarkers are measured and/or the assays and sampling methods used. The Workshop addressed two critical questions: first whether, with current knowledge, it would be possible to define a consensus set of mucosal sampling methods to facilitate cross-species comparisons and ensure standardized implementation in clinical trials; second to determine the remaining challenges (technical and logistical) and their possible solutions for assessing mucosal responses to HIV-1 vaccines. PMID:20370549

  8. Advances in developing HIV-1 viral load assays for resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Wang, ShuQi; Xu, Feng; Demirci, Utkan

    2010-01-01

    Commercial HIV-1 RNA viral load assays have been routinely used in developed countries to monitor antiretroviral treatment (ART). However, these assays require expensive equipment and reagents, well-trained operators, and established laboratory infrastructure. These requirements restrict their use in resource-limited settings where people are most afflicted with the HIV-1 epidemic. Inexpensive alternatives such as the Ultrasensitive p24 assay, the reverse transcriptase (RT) assay and in-house reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) have been developed. However, they are still time-consuming, technologically complex and inappropriate for decentralized laboratories as point-of-care (POC) tests. Recent advances in microfluidics and nanotechnology offer new strategies to develop low-cost, rapid, robust and simple HIV-1 viral load monitoring systems. We review state-of-the-art technologies used for HIV-1 viral load monitoring in both developed and developing settings. Emerging approaches based on microfluidics and nanotechnology, which have potential to be integrated into POC HIV-1 viral load assays, are also discussed.

  9. Specific zinc-finger architecture required for HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein's nucleic acid chaperone function

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Mark C.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2002-01-01

    The nucleocapsid protein (NC) of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) is a nucleic acid chaperone that facilitates the rearrangement of nucleic acid secondary structure during reverse transcription. HIV-1 NC contains two CCHC-type zinc binding domains. Here, we use optical tweezers to stretch single λ-DNA molecules through the helix-to-coil transition in the presence of wild-type and several mutant forms of HIV-1 NC with altered zinc-finger domains. Although all forms of NC lowered the cooperativity of the DNA helix–coil transition, subtle changes in the zinc-finger structures reduced NC's effect on the transition. The change in cooperativity of the DNA helix–coil transition correlates strongly with in vitro nucleic acid chaperone activity measurements and in vivo HIV-1 replication studies using the same NC mutants. Moreover, Moloney murine leukemia virus NC, which contains a single zinc finger, had little effect on transition cooperativity. These results suggest that a specific two-zinc-finger architecture is required to destabilize nucleic acids for optimal chaperone activity during reverse transcription in complex retroviruses such as HIV-1. PMID:12084921

  10. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Quinn, Caitlin M.; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates.

  11. Novel vaccine vectors for HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Picker, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    The ultimate solution to the global HIV-1 epidemic will probably require the development of a safe and effective vaccine. Multiple vaccine platforms have been evaluated in both preclinical and clinical trials, but, given the disappointing results of the clinical efficacy studies so far, novel vaccine approaches are needed. In this Opinion article, we discuss the scientific basis and clinical potential of novel adenovirus and cytomegalovirus vaccine vectors for HIV-1 as two contrasting, but potentially complementary, vector approaches. Both of these vector platforms have demonstrated partial protection against stringent simian immunodeficiency virus challenges in rhesus monkeys using different immunological mechanisms. PMID:25296195

  12. HIV-1 Protease: Structure, Dynamics and Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, John M.; Ishima, R.; Torchia, D.A.; Weber, Irene T.

    2008-06-03

    The HIV-1 protease is synthesized as part of a large Gag-Pol precursor protein. It is responsible for its own release from the precursor and the processing of the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins into the mature structural and functional proteins required for virus maturation. Because of its indispensable role, the mature HIV-1 protease dimer has proven to be a successful target for the development of antiviral agents. In the last 5 years, a major emphasis in protease research has been to improve inhibitor design and treatment regimens.

  13. Cobalamin inhibition of HIV-1 integrase and integration of HIV-1 DNA into cellular DNA.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, J B; Shugars, D C; Sherman, P A; Sauls, D L; Fyfe, J A

    1998-05-19

    Our prior studies showed that certain cobalamins inhibit productive HIV-1 infection of primary cultures of blood lymphocytes and monocytes. We demonstrate here that this antiviral activity may be mediated by an inhibition of HIV-1 integrase, an enzyme required for productive infection. Purified recombinant HIV-1 integrase activity was inhibited in vitro by hydroxocobalamin (OH-Cbl), methylcobalamin (Me-Cbl), adenosylcobalamin (Ado-Cbl), and dicyanocobinamide (CN2-Cbi) with IC50 values of approximately 17, 17, 17, and 4 microM, respectively. The agents inhibited HIV-1 infection of cultured monocytes (IC50 values for OH-Cbl, Me-Cbl, Ado-Cbl, and CN2-Cbi of 6, 7, 4, and 1 microM, respectively) and of cultured lymphocytes (IC50 values of 60, 50, 60, and 11 microM, respectively). Experiments using cultured monocytes or lymphocytes demonstrated that OH-Cbl inhibited integration of HIV-1 DNA into cellular DNA. Thus, cobalamins and cobinamides represent novel inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase. These or related agents may be useful as anti-viral treatments that target HIV-1 integrase. PMID:9610370

  14. HIV-1 Capsid: The Multifaceted Key Player in HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Edward M.; Hope, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    In a mature, infectious HIV-1 virion, the viral genome is housed within a conical capsid core comprised of the viral capsid (CA) protein. The CA protein, and the structure into which it assembles, facilitate virtually every step of infection through a series of interactions with multiple host cell factors. This review describes our understanding of the interactions between the viral capsid core and several cellular factors that enable efficient HIV-1 genome replication, timely core disassembly, nuclear import and the integration of the viral genome into the genome of the target cell. We then discuss how elucidating these interactions can reveal new targets for therapeutic interactions against HIV-1. PMID:26179359

  15. HIV-1 transcription and latency: an update

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy, despite being potent and life-prolonging, is not curative and does not eradicate HIV-1 infection since interruption of treatment inevitably results in a rapid rebound of viremia. Reactivation of latently infected cells harboring transcriptionally silent but replication-competent proviruses is a potential source of persistent residual viremia in cART-treated patients. Although multiple reservoirs may exist, the persistence of resting CD4+ T cells carrying a latent infection represents a major barrier to eradication. In this review, we will discuss the latest reports on the molecular mechanisms that may regulate HIV-1 latency at the transcriptional level, including transcriptional interference, the role of cellular factors, chromatin organization and epigenetic modifications, the viral Tat trans-activator and its cellular cofactors. Since latency mechanisms may also operate at the post-transcriptional level, we will consider inhibition of nuclear RNA export and inhibition of translation by microRNAs as potential barriers to HIV-1 gene expression. Finally, we will review the therapeutic approaches and clinical studies aimed at achieving either a sterilizing cure or a functional cure of HIV-1 infection, with a special emphasis on the most recent pharmacological strategies to reactivate the latent viruses and decrease the pool of viral reservoirs. PMID:23803414

  16. A technique for capturing broad subtypes and circulating recombinant forms of HIV-1 based on anionic polymer-coated magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2012-08-01

    Magnetic beads coated with an anionic polymer, poly(methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydrate) [poly(MVE-MA)], were used in a method to capture human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). The beads were incubated with either HIV-1-infected cell culture medium or plasma from HIV-1 infected individuals and separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field. After thorough washing, adsorption of HIV-1 by the beads was confirmed by reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), real-time PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blotting. The results confirmed the presence of envelope, polymerase, Nef and the viral genome of HIV-1. Furthermore, various subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) of HIV-1 including subtype B, C and CRF01_AE and the immature form of subtype B HIV-1 could be captured. Preincubation with neutralizing antibody against HIV-1 envelope gp41 decreased the capture efficiently, suggesting that poly(MVE-MA) binds HIV-1 via gp41. We believe that this capture procedure will be a valuable tool for detecting various types of HIV-1 in both clinical and experimental samples.

  17. Structural basis of HIV-1 resistance to AZT by excision.

    PubMed

    Tu, Xiongying; Das, Kalyan; Han, Qianwei; Bauman, Joseph D; Clark, Arthur D; Hou, Xiaorong; Frenkel, Yulia V; Gaffney, Barbara L; Jones, Roger A; Boyer, Paul L; Hughes, Stephen H; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Arnold, Eddy

    2010-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) develops resistance to 3'-azido-2',3'-deoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine) by acquiring mutations in reverse transcriptase that enhance the ATP-mediated excision of AZT monophosphate from the 3' end of the primer. The excision reaction occurs at the dNTP-binding site, uses ATP as a pyrophosphate donor, unblocks the primer terminus and allows reverse transcriptase to continue viral DNA synthesis. The excision product is AZT adenosine dinucleoside tetraphosphate (AZTppppA). We determined five crystal structures: wild-type reverse transcriptase-double-stranded DNA (RT-dsDNA)-AZTppppA; AZT-resistant (AZTr; M41L D67N K70R T215Y K219Q) RT-dsDNA-AZTppppA; AZTr RT-dsDNA terminated with AZT at dNTP- and primer-binding sites; and AZTr apo reverse transcriptase. The AMP part of AZTppppA bound differently to wild-type and AZTr reverse transcriptases, whereas the AZT triphosphate part bound the two enzymes similarly. Thus, the resistance mutations create a high-affinity ATP-binding site. The structure of the site provides an opportunity to design inhibitors of AZT-monophosphate excision.

  18. Structural basis of HIV-1 resistance to AZT by excision

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Xiongying; Das, Kalyan; Han, Qianwei; Bauman, Joseph D.; Clark, Jr., Arthur D.; Hou, Xiaorong; Frenkel, Yulia V.; Gaffney, Barbara L.; Jones, Roger A.; Boyer, Paul L.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Arnold, Eddy

    2011-11-23

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) develops resistance to 3'-azido-2',3'-deoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine) by acquiring mutations in reverse transcriptase that enhance the ATP-mediated excision of AZT monophosphate from the 3' end of the primer. The excision reaction occurs at the dNTP-binding site, uses ATP as a pyrophosphate donor, unblocks the primer terminus and allows reverse transcriptase to continue viral DNA synthesis. The excision product is AZT adenosine dinucleoside tetraphosphate (AZTppppA). We determined five crystal structures: wild-type reverse transcriptase-double-stranded DNA (RT-dsDNA)-AZTppppA; AZT-resistant (AZTr; M41L D67N K70R T215Y K219Q) RT-dsDNA-AZTppppA; AZTr RT-dsDNA terminated with AZT at dNTP- and primer-binding sites; and AZTr apo reverse transcriptase. The AMP part of AZTppppA bound differently to wild-type and AZTr reverse transcriptases, whereas the AZT triphosphate part bound the two enzymes similarly. Thus, the resistance mutations create a high-affinity ATP-binding site. The structure of the site provides an opportunity to design inhibitors of AZT-monophosphate excision.

  19. Application of the Huisgen cycloaddition and 'click' reaction toward various 1,2,3-triazoles as HIV non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pribut, Nicole; Veale, Clinton G L; Basson, Adriaan E; van Otterlo, Willem A L; Pelly, Stephen C

    2016-08-01

    The development of novel anti-HIV agents remains an important medicinal chemistry challenge given that no cure for the disease is imminent, and the continued use of current NNRTIs inevitably leads to problems associated with resistance. Inspired by the pyrazole-containing NNRTI lersivirine (LSV), we embarked upon a study to establish whether 1,2,3-triazole heterocycles could be used as a new scaffold for the creation of novel NNRTIs. An especially attractive feature of triazoles used for this purpose is the versatility in accessing variously functionalised systems using either the thermally regulated Huisgen cycloaddition, or the related 'click' reaction. Employing three alternative forms of these reactions, we were able to synthesise a range of triazole compounds and evaluate their efficacy in a phenotypic HIV assay. To our astonishment, even compounds closely mimicking LSV were only moderately effective against HIV. PMID:27287366

  20. Multiple co-circulating HIV-1 subtypes in the Middle East and North Africa

    PubMed Central

    Rolland, Morgane; Modjarrad, Kayvon

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 incidence has been increasing more rapidly in the Middle East and North Africa than in any other global region. Despite this trend, HIV epidemiology in the region remains poorly defined. We conducted an analysis of 3284 publicly available HIV-1 sequences from 15 countries in the Middle East and North Africa to better characterize the regional epidemic. A phylogenetic tree based on the reverse transcriptase gene revealed a complex mosaic of diverse HIV subtypes and circulating recombinant forms across the region. PMID:26091303

  1. Impact of protease inhibitors on intracellular concentration of tenofovir-diphosphate among HIV-1 infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Lahiri, Cecile D.; Tao, Sijia; Jiang, Yong; Sheth, Anandi N.; Acosta, Edward P.; Marconi, Vincent C.; Armstrong, Wendy S.; Schinazi, Raymond F.; Vunnava, Aswani; Sanford, Sara; Ofotokun, Ighovwerha

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) concentrations are associated with plasma HIV-1 response. Coadministration of protease inhibitors with NRTIs can affect intra-cellular concentrations due to protease inhibitor inhibition of efflux transporters. Tenofovir-diphosphate (TFV-DP) concentrations within peripheral blood mononuclear cells were compared among individuals receiving either atazanavir or darunavir-based regimens. There was a trend towards higher TFV-DP concentrations among women and among participants receiving atazanavir. TFV-DP intracellular concentrations were positively associated with undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA. PMID:25870991

  2. Structure-based optimization and derivatization of 2-substituted quinolone-based non-nucleoside HCV NS5B inhibitors with submicromolar cellular replicon potency.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Shen, Jian; Peng, Run-Ze; Wang, Gui-Feng; Zuo, Jian-Ping; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2016-06-15

    HCV NS5B polymerase is an attractive and validated target for anti-HCV therapy. Starting from our previously identified 2-aryl quinolones as novel non-nucleoside NS5B polymerase inhibitors, structure-based optimization furnished 2-alkyl-N-benzyl quinolones with improved antiviral potency by employing privileged fragment hybridization strategy. The N-(4-chlorobenzyl)-2-(methoxymethyl)quinolone derivative 5f proved to be the best compound of this series, exhibiting a selective sub-micromolar antiviral effect (EC50=0.4μM, SI=10.8) in Huh7.5.1 cells carrying a HCV genotype 2a. Considering the undesirable pharmacokinetic property of the highly substituted quinolones, a novel chemotype of 1,6-naphthyridine-4,5-diones were evolved via scaffold hopping, affording brand new structure HCV inhibitors with compound 6h (EC50 (gt2a)=2.5μM, SI=7.2) as a promising hit. Molecular modeling studies suggest that both of 2-alkyl quinolones and 1,6-naphthyridine-4,5-diones function as HCV NS5B thumb pocket II inhibitors. PMID:27133482

  3. Antitumor/Antifungal Celecoxib Derivative AR-12 is a Non-Nucleoside Inhibitor of the ANL-Family Adenylating Enzyme Acetyl CoA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    AR-12/OSU-03012 is an antitumor celecoxib-derivative that has progressed to Phase I clinical trial as an anticancer agent and has activity against a number of infectious agents including fungi, bacteria and viruses. However, the mechanism of these activities has remained unclear. Based on a chemical-genetic profiling approach in yeast, we have found that AR-12 is an ATP-competitive, time-dependent inhibitor of yeast acetyl coenzyme A synthetase. AR-12-treated fungal cells show phenotypes consistent with the genetic reduction of acetyl CoA synthetase activity, including induction of autophagy, decreased histone acetylation, and loss of cellular integrity. In addition, AR-12 is a weak inhibitor of human acetyl CoA synthetase ACCS2. Acetyl CoA synthetase activity is essential in many fungi and parasites. In contrast, acetyl CoA is primarily synthesized by an alternate enzyme, ATP-citrate lyase, in mammalian cells. Taken together, our results indicate that AR-12 is a non-nucleoside acetyl CoA synthetase inhibitor and that acetyl CoA synthetase may be a feasible antifungal drug target. PMID:27088128

  4. HIV-1 therapy with monoclonal antibody 3BNC117 elicits host immune responses against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Schoofs, Till; Klein, Florian; Braunschweig, Malte; Kreider, Edward F; Feldmann, Anna; Nogueira, Lilian; Oliveira, Thiago; Lorenzi, Julio C C; Parrish, Erica H; Learn, Gerald H; West, Anthony P; Bjorkman, Pamela J; Schlesinger, Sarah J; Seaman, Michael S; Czartoski, Julie; McElrath, M Juliana; Pfeifer, Nico; Hahn, Beatrice H; Caskey, Marina; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-05-20

    3BNC117 is a broad and potent neutralizing antibody to HIV-1 that targets the CD4 binding site on the viral envelope spike. When administered passively, this antibody can prevent infection in animal models and suppress viremia in HIV-1-infected individuals. Here we report that HIV-1 immunotherapy with a single injection of 3BNC117 affects host antibody responses in viremic individuals. In comparison to untreated controls that showed little change in their neutralizing activity over a 6-month period, 3BNC117 infusion significantly improved neutralizing responses to heterologous tier 2 viruses in nearly all study participants. We conclude that 3BNC117-mediated immunotherapy enhances host humoral immunity to HIV-1. PMID:27199429

  5. Enhanced clearance of HIV-1-infected cells by broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ching-Lan; Murakowski, Dariusz K; Bournazos, Stylianos; Schoofs, Till; Sarkar, Debolina; Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Horwitz, Joshua A; Nogueira, Lilian; Golijanin, Jovana; Gazumyan, Anna; Ravetch, Jeffrey V; Caskey, Marina; Chakraborty, Arup K; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-05-20

    Antiretroviral drugs and antibodies limit HIV-1 infection by interfering with the viral life cycle. In addition, antibodies also have the potential to guide host immune effector cells to kill HIV-1-infected cells. Examination of the kinetics of HIV-1 suppression in infected individuals by passively administered 3BNC117, a broadly neutralizing antibody, suggested that the effects of the antibody are not limited to free viral clearance and blocking new infection but also include acceleration of infected cell clearance. Consistent with these observations, we find that broadly neutralizing antibodies can target CD4(+) T cells infected with patient viruses and can decrease their in vivo half-lives by a mechanism that requires Fcγ receptor engagement in a humanized mouse model. The results indicate that passive immunotherapy can accelerate elimination of HIV-1-infected cells. PMID:27199430

  6. [Molecular characterization of complex recombinant HIV-1 CRF06_cpx subtype detected in Turkey].

    PubMed

    Sayan, Murat; Kaptan, Figen; Ormen, Bahar; Türker, Nesrin

    2014-01-01

    A major proportion of the global HIV infections is caused by group M of HIV-1 genotype and to date approximately nine subtypes (A, B, C, D, F, G, H, J, K) and 50 circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) have been recognized. Recombinants between different HIV-1 group M subtypes are designated as CRF. The extension 'cpx', for complex, is given if the CRF consists of contributions from three or more different subtypes but the composition of the subtype is not given. The objective of this study was to present, for the first time an HIV-1 positive married couple infected with CRF06_cpx subtype in Izmir, Turkey. A 39-year-old male patient who admitted to hospital with the complaints of oral candidiasis and zona, was found to be anti-HIV positive. CD4+ T lymphocyte count was 21 cells/mm3 and plasma HIV-1 RNA level was 56.380 copies/ml. He reported unprotected heterosexual contact with multiple partners including African women during his stay in Saudi Arabia between 1996 and 2002. After his diagnosis, his 37-year-old wife was screened for HIV infection and she was also found anti-HIV positive, with CD4+ T cell count of 122 cells/mm3. However, her results of basal plasma HIV-1 RNA could not be obtained because of an internal control error. HIV-1 strains were analysed for subtyping, recombination and drug resistance mutations with pol gene region sequencing. HIV-1 sequences were subtyped as CRF06_cpx after phylogenetic analysis using neighbor-joining method. According to the recombination analysis, HIV-1 pol gene regions consisted of group M subtype G, A, D, and B in the male patient and G K, A, F, and D in the female patient. While L10I + L33F mutation associated with protease inhibitor (PI) resistance was detected in both of the patients, K219N mutation associated with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) resistance was detected only in the male patient. In conclusion, HIV-1 molecular epidemiology studies are important tools for tracking transmission patterns and

  7. APOBEC3G restricts early HIV-1 replication in the cytoplasm of target cells

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jenny L.; Hope, Thomas J.

    2008-05-25

    Cellular APOBEC3G (A3G) protein is packaged into human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions in producer cells yet restricts viral replication in target cells. To characterize this restriction in target cells, the effect of A3G on generating various HIV-1 cDNA products was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. A3G decreased cDNA products from Vif-deficient HIV-1, with minor effects on early reverse transcripts and larger declines in late reverse transcripts. However, the greatest decline was typically observed in nuclear 2-LTR circles. Moreover, the magnitude of these declines varied with A3G dose. Adding integration inhibitor did not stop the A3G-mediated loss in 2-LTR circles. Moreover, obstructing HIV-1 nuclear entry using vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein did not stop the A3G-mediated decline in late reverse transcripts. Collectively, these data suggest that A3G has important restriction activity in the cytoplasm and progressively diminishes viral cytoplasmic and nuclear cDNA forms with increasing magnitude during restriction.

  8. Reversals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on special education materials--the bibliography covers nine materials for remediating reversals in handicapped students at the early childhood and elementary levels. Entries are presented in order of NIMIS accession…

  9. Performance Characteristics of the TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and the Opengene DNA Sequencing System

    PubMed Central

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Grant, Robert M.; Feorino, Paul; Griswold, Marshal; Hoover, Marie; Young, Russell; Day, Stephen; Lloyd, Jr., Robert M.; Reid, Caroline; Morgan, Gillian F.; Winslow, Dean L.

    2003-01-01

    The TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and OpenGene DNA Sequencing System are designed to sequence the protease (PR)- and reverse transcriptase (RT)-coding regions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pol. Studies were undertaken to determine the accuracy of this assay system in detecting resistance-associated mutations and to determine the effects of RNA extraction methods, anticoagulants, specimen handling, and potentially interfering substances. Samples were plasma obtained from HIV-infected subjects or seronegative plasma to which viruses derived from wild-type and mutant infectious molecular clones (IMC) of HIV-1 were added. Extraction methods tested included standard and UltraSensitive AMPLICOR HIV-1 MONITOR, QIAGEN viral RNA extraction mini kit, and QIAGEN Ultra HIV extraction kit, and NASBA manual HIV-1 quantitative NucliSens. Sequence data from test sites were compared to a “gold standard” reference sequence to determine the percent agreement. Comparisons between test and reference sequences at the nucleotide level showed 97.5 to 100% agreement. Similar results were obtained regardless of extraction method, regardless of use of EDTA or acid citrate dextrose as anticoagulant, and despite the presence of triglycerides, bilirubin, hemoglobin, antiretroviral drugs, HIV-2, hepatitis C virus (HCV), HBV, cytomegalovirus, human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), or HTLV-2. Samples with HIV-1 RNA titers of ≥1,000 copies/ml gave consistent results. The TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and OpenGene DNA Sequencing System consistently generate highly accurate sequence data when tested with IMC-derived HIV and patient samples. PMID:12682150

  10. Nuclear Retention of Multiply Spliced HIV-1 RNA in Resting CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lassen, Kara G; Ramyar, Kasra X; Bailey, Justin R; Zhou, Yan; Siliciano, Robert F

    2006-01-01

    HIV-1 latency in resting CD4+ T cells represents a major barrier to virus eradication in patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). We describe here a novel post-transcriptional block in HIV-1 gene expression in resting CD4+ T cells from patients on HAART. This block involves the aberrant localization of multiply spliced (MS) HIV-1 RNAs encoding the critical positive regulators Tat and Rev. Although these RNAs had no previously described export defect, we show that they exhibit strict nuclear localization in resting CD4+ T cells from patients on HAART. Overexpression of the transcriptional activator Tat from non-HIV vectors allowed virus production in these cells. Thus, the nuclear retention of MS HIV-1 RNA interrupts a positive feedback loop and contributes to the non-productive nature of infection of resting CD4+ T cells. To define the mechanism of nuclear retention, proteomic analysis was used to identify proteins that bind MS HIV-1 RNA. Polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) was identified as an HIV-1 RNA-binding protein differentially expressed in resting and activated CD4+ T cells. Overexpression of PTB in resting CD4+ T cells from patients on HAART allowed cytoplasmic accumulation of HIV-1 RNAs. PTB overexpression also induced virus production by resting CD4+ T cells. Virus culture experiments showed that overexpression of PTB in resting CD4+ T cells from patients on HAART allowed release of replication-competent virus, while preserving a resting cellular phenotype. Whether through effects on RNA export or another mechanism, the ability of PTB to reverse latency without inducing cellular activation is a result with therapeutic implications. PMID:16839202

  11. Glutamate metabolism in HIV-1 infected macrophages: Role of HIV-1 Vpr.

    PubMed

    Datta, Prasun K; Deshmane, Satish; Khalili, Kamel; Merali, Salim; Gordon, John C; Fecchio, Chiara; Barrero, Carlos A

    2016-09-01

    HIV-1 infected macrophages play a significant role in the neuropathogenesis of AIDS. HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr) not only facilitates HIV-1 infection but also contribute to long-lived persistence in macrophages. Our previous studies using SILAC-based proteomic analysis showed that the expression of critical metabolic enzymes in the glycolytic pathway and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were altered in response to Vpr expression in macrophages. We hypothesized that Vpr-induced modulation of glycolysis and TCA cycle regulates glutamate metabolism and release in HIV-1 infected macrophages. We assessed the amount of specific metabolites induced by Vpr and HIV-1 in macrophages at the intracellular and extracellular level in a time-dependent manner utilizing multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) targeted metabolomics. In addition, stable isotope-labeled glucose and an MRM targeted metabolomics assay were used to evaluate the de novo synthesis and release of glutamate in Vpr overexpressing macrophages and HIV-1 infected macrophages, throughout the metabolic flux of glycolytic pathway and TCA cycle activation. The metabolic flux studies demonstrated an increase in glucose uptake, glutamate release and accumulation of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) and glutamine in the extracellular milieu in Vpr expressing and HIV-1 infected macrophages. Interestingly, glutamate pools and other intracellular intermediates (glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), fructose-6-phosphate (F6P), citrate, malate, α-KG, and glutamine) showed a decreased trend except for fumarate, in contrast to the glutamine accumulation observed in the extracellular space in Vpr overexpressing macrophages. Our studies demonstrate that dysregulation of mitochondrial glutamate metabolism induced by Vpr in HIV-1 infected macrophages commonly seen, may contribute to neurodegeneration via excitotoxic mechanisms in the context of NeuroAIDS. PMID:27245560

  12. Progesterone augments cell susceptibility to HIV-1 and HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infections.

    PubMed

    Ragupathy, Viswanath; Xue, Wang; Tan, Ji; Devadas, Krishnakumar; Gao, Yamei; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-10-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected women, oral or injectable progesterone containing contraceptive pills may enhance HIV-1 acquisition in vivo, and the mechanism by which this occurs is not fully understood. In developing countries, Herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) co-infection has been shown to be a risk for increase of HIV-1 acquisition and, if co-infected women use progesterone pills, infections may increase several fold. In this study, we used an in vitro cell culture system to study the effects of progesterone on HIV-1 replication and to explore the molecular mechanism of progesterone effects on infected cells. In our in vitro model, CEMss cells (lymphoblastoid cell line) were infected with either HIV-1 alone or co-infected with HSV-2. HIV-1 viral load was measured with and without sex hormone treatment. Progesterone-treated cells showed an increase in HIV-1 viral load (1411.2 pg/mL) compared with cells without progesterone treatment (993.1 pg/mL). Increased cell death was noted with HSV-2 co-infection and in progesterone-treated cells. Similar observations were noted in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) cells derived from three female donors. Progesterone-treated cells also showed reduced antiviral efficacy. Inflammatory cytokines and associations with biomarkers of disease progression were explored. Progesterone upregulated inflammatory cytokines and chemokines conversely and downregulated anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 expression. Nuclear protein analysis by electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed the association of progesterone with progesterone response element (PRE), which may lead to downregulation of Bcl-2. These data indicate that progesterone treatment enhances HIV-1 replication in infected cells and co-infection with HSV-2 may further fuel this process. PMID:27538988

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains selected for resistance against the HIV-1-specific [2',5'-bis-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-3'-spiro- 5''-(4''-amino-1'',2''-oxathiole-2'',2''-dioxide)]-beta-D-pentofurano syl (TSAO) nucleoside analogues retain sensitivity to HIV-1-specific nonnucleoside inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Balzarini, J; Karlsson, A; Vandamme, A M; Pérez-Pérez, M J; Zhang, H; Vrang, L; Oberg, B; Bäckbro, K; Unge, T; San-Félix, A

    1993-01-01

    We recently reported that a newly discovered class of nucleoside analogues--[2',5'-bis-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)- 3'-spiro-5''-(4''-amino-1'',2''-oxathiole-2'',2''-dioxide)]-beta-D - pentofuranosyl derivatives of pyrimidines and purines (designated TSAO)--are highly specific inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and targeted at the nonsubstrate binding site of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). We now find that HIV-1 strains selected for resistance against three different TSAO nucleoside derivatives retain sensitivity to the other HIV-1-specific nonnucleoside derivatives (tetrahydroimidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4]benzodiazepin-2(1H)-one and -thione (TIBO), 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-phenylthiothymine, nevirapine, and pyridinone L697,661, as well as to the nucleoside analogues 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine, ddI, ddC, and 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine. Pol gene nucleotide sequence analysis of the TSAO-resistant and -sensitive HIV-1 strains revealed a single amino acid substitution at position 138 (Glu-->Lys) in the RT of all TSAO-resistant HIV-1 strains. HIV-1 RT in which the Glu-138-->Lys substitution was introduced by site-directed mutagenesis and expressed in Escherichia coli could not be purified because of rapid degradation. However, HIV-1 RT containing the Glu-138-->Arg substitution was stable. It lost its sensitivity to the TSAO nucleosides but not to the other HIV-1-specific RT inhibitors (i.e., TIBO and pyridinone). Our findings point to a specific interaction of the 4''-amino group on the 3'-spiro-substituted ribose moiety of the TSAO nucleosides with the carboxylic acid group of glutamic acid at position 138 of HIV-1 RT. PMID:7688467

  14. Antiviral Stratagems Against HIV-1 Using RNA Interference (RNAi) Technology

    PubMed Central

    Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Tsiliki, Georgia; Pavlopoulou, Athanasia; Roubelakis, Maria G.; Champeris Tsaniras, Spyridon; Kossida, Sophia

    2013-01-01

    The versatility of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 and its evolutionary potential to elude antiretroviral agents by mutating may be its most invincible weapon. Viruses, including HIV, in order to adapt and survive in their environment evolve at extremely fast rates. Given that conventional approaches which have been applied against HIV have failed, novel and more promising approaches must be employed. Recent studies advocate RNA interference (RNAi) as a promising therapeutic tool against HIV. In this regard, targeting multiple HIV sites in the context of a combinatorial RNAi-based approach may efficiently stop viral propagation at an early stage. Moreover, large high-throughput RNAi screens are widely used in the fields of drug development and reverse genetics. Computer-based algorithms, bioinformatics, and biostatistical approaches have been employed in traditional medicinal chemistry discovery protocols for low molecular weight compounds. However, the diversity and complexity of RNAi screens cannot be efficiently addressed by these outdated approaches. Herein, a series of novel workflows for both wet- and dry-lab strategies are presented in an effort to provide an updated review of state-of-the-art RNAi technologies, which may enable adequate progress in the fight against the HIV-1 virus. PMID:23761954

  15. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Integration: a Potential Target for Microbicides To Prevent Cell-Free or Cell-Associated HIV-1 Infection ▿

    PubMed Central

    Terrazas-Aranda, Katty; Van Herrewege, Yven; Hazuda, Daria; Lewi, Paul; Costi, Roberta; Di Santo, Roberto; Cara, Andrea; Vanham, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Conceptually, blocking human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integration is the last possibility for preventing irreversible cellular infection. Using cocultures of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and CD4+ T cells, which represent primary targets in sexual transmission, we demonstrated that blocking integration with integrase strand transfer inhibitors (InSTIs), particularly L-870812, could consistently block cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 infection. In a pretreatment setting in which the compound was present before and during infection and was afterwards gradually diluted during the culture period, the naphthyridine carboxamide L-870812 blocked infection with the cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 Ba-L strain at concentrations of, respectively, 1,000 and 10,000 nM. The potency of L-870812 was similar to that of the nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor R-9-(2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl) adenine (PMPA) but one or two orders of magnitude lower than those of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors UC781 and TMC120. In contrast, the diketo acid RDS derivative InSTIs showed clear-cut but weaker antiviral activity than L-870812. Moreover, L-870812 completely blocked subtype C and CRFO2_AG primary isolates, which are prevalent in the African heterosexual epidemic. Furthermore, the addition of micromolar concentrations of L-870812 even 24 h after infection could still block both cell-free and cell-associated Ba-L, opening the prospect of postexposure prophylaxis. Finally, an evaluation of the combined activity of L-870812 with either T20, zidovudine, PMPA, UC781, or TMC120 against replication-deficient HIV-1 Ba-L (env) pseudovirus suggested synergistic activity for all combinations. Importantly, compounds selected for the study by using the coculture model were devoid of acute or delayed cytotoxic effects at HIV-blocking concentrations. Therefore, these findings provide evidence supporting consideration of HIV-1 integration as a target for

  16. Mechanism of Inhibition for BMS-791325, a Novel Non-nucleoside Inhibitor of Hepatitis C Virus NS5B Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Rigat, Karen L.; Lu, Hao; Wang, Ying-Kai; Argyrou, Argyrides; Fanslau, Caroline; Beno, Brett; Wang, Yi; Marcinkeviciene, Jovita; Ding, Min; Gentles, Robert G.; Gao, Min; Abell, Lynn M.; Roberts, Susan B.

    2014-01-01

    HCV infection is an urgent global health problem that has triggered a drive to discover therapies that specifically target the virus. BMS-791325 is a novel direct antiviral agent specifically targeting HCV NS5B, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Robust viral clearance of HCV was observed in infected patients treated with BMS-791325 in combination with other anti-HCV agents in Phase 2 clinical studies. Biochemical and biophysical studies revealed that BMS-791325 is a time-dependent, non-competitive inhibitor of the polymerase. Binding studies with NS5B genetic variants (WT, L30S, and P495L) exposed a two-step, slow binding mechanism, but details of the binding mechanism differed for each of the polymerase variants. For the clinically relevant resistance variant (P495L), the rate of initial complex formation and dissociation is similar to WT, but the kinetics of the second step is significantly faster, showing that this variant impacts the final tight complex. The resulting shortened residence time translates into the observed decrease in inhibitor potency. The L30S variant has a significantly different profile. The rate of initial complex formation and dissociation is 7–10 times faster for the L30S variant compared with WT; however, the forward and reverse rates to form the final complex are not significantly different. The impact of the L30S variant on the inhibition profile and binding kinetics of BMS-791325 provides experimental evidence for the dynamic interaction of fingers and thumb domains in an environment that supports the formation of active replication complexes and the initiation of RNA synthesis. PMID:25301950

  17. Biochemical and virological analysis of the 18-residue C-terminal tail of HIV-1 integrase

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Mohd J; Monel, Blandine; Krishnan, Lavanya; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Di Nunzio, Francesca; Helland, Dag E; Engelman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Background The 18 residue tail abutting the SH3 fold that comprises the heart of the C-terminal domain is the only part of HIV-1 integrase yet to be visualized by structural biology. To ascertain the role of the tail region in integrase function and HIV-1 replication, a set of deletion mutants that successively lacked three amino acids was constructed and analyzed in a variety of biochemical and virus infection assays. HIV-1/2 chimers, which harbored the analogous 23-mer HIV-2 tail in place of the HIV-1 sequence, were also studied. Because integrase mutations can affect steps in the replication cycle other than integration, defective mutant viruses were tested for integrase protein content and reverse transcription in addition to integration. The F185K core domain mutation, which increases integrase protein solubility, was furthermore analyzed in a subset of mutants. Results Purified proteins were assessed for in vitro levels of 3' processing and DNA strand transfer activities whereas HIV-1 infectivity was measured using luciferase reporter viruses. Deletions lacking up to 9 amino acids (1-285, 1-282, and 1-279) displayed near wild-type activities in vitro and during infection. Further deletion yielded two viruses, HIV-11-276 and HIV-11-273, that displayed approximately two and 5-fold infectivity defects, respectively, due to reduced integrase function. Deletion mutant HIV-11-270 and the HIV-1/2 chimera were non-infectious and displayed approximately 3 to 4-fold reverse transcription in addition to severe integration defects. Removal of four additional residues, which encompassed the C-terminal β strand of the SH3 fold, further compromised integrase incorporation into virions and reverse transcription. Conclusion HIV-11-270, HIV-11-266, and the HIV-1/2 chimera were typed as class II mutant viruses due to their pleiotropic replication defects. We speculate that residues 271-273 might play a role in mediating the known integrase-reverse transcriptase interaction, as

  18. Diminished representation of HIV-1 variants containing select drug resistance-conferring mutations in primary HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Turner, Dan; Brenner, Bluma; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Moisi, Daniela; Rosberger, Zeev; Roger, Michel; Wainberg, Mark A

    2004-12-15

    This study compared the incidence of HIV-1 variants harboring mutations conferring resistance to thymidine analogues, ie, thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs), nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NNMs), lamivudine (3TC) (ie, M184V), and protease inhibitors (PIs) acquired in primary HIV infection (PHI) (n = 59) to their observed prevalence in a corresponding potential transmitter (PT) population of persons harboring resistant infections (n = 380). Both of these populations in the context of this cohort analysis possessed similar demographics. Whereas the frequencies of observed TAMs, NNMs, M184V, and protease-associated mutations (PRAMs) were similar in the PT groups, the prevalence of M184V and major PI mutations were significantly lower in the PHI group (PHI/PT ratios of 0.14 and 0.39, respectively). There was a decreased prevalence in the PHI population of resistant viruses co-expressing NNMs or TAMs with M184V compared with viruses that harbored NNMs or TAMs in the absence of M184V (P < 0.0001). It was also observed that individuals in the PT subgroups who harbored RT mutations or PRAMs with M184V had lower levels of plasma viremia than individuals who lacked M184V (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that both decreased viremia and viral fitness in the case of M184V-containing HIV-1 variants may impact on viral transmissibility.

  19. Synthesis and oxidation of 2-hydroxynevirapine, a metabolite of the HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitor nevirapine.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Alexandra M M; Novais, David A; da Silva, J L Ferreira; Santos, Pedro P; Oliveira, M Conceição; Beland, Frederick A; Marques, M Matilde

    2011-10-26

    Nevirapine (11-cyclopropyl-5,11-dihydro-4-methyl-6H-dipyrido[3,2-b:2',3'-e][1,4]diazepin-6-one, NVP) is a non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor used to prevent mother-to-child transmission of the virus. However, severe hepatotoxicity and serious adverse cutaneous effects have raised concerns about the safety of NVP administration. NVP metabolism yields several phenol-type derivatives conceivably capable of undergoing further metabolic oxidation to electrophilic quinoid species that could react with bionucleophiles. The covalent adducts thus formed might be at the genesis of toxic responses. As an initial step to test this hypothesis, we synthesized the phenolic metabolite, 2-hydroxy-NVP, and investigated its oxidation in vitro. Using potassium nitrosodisulfonate and sodium periodate as model oxidants, we obtained evidence for fast generation of an electrophilic quinone-imine, which readily underwent hydrolytic conversion to fully characterized spiro derivatives, 1'-cyclopropyl-4-methyl-1H,1'H-spiro[pyridine-2,2'-pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine]-3,4',6(3'H)-trione in aqueous media and 1'-cyclopropyl-4-methyl-1'H,2H-spiro[pyridine-3,2'-pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine]-2,4',6(1H,3'H)-trione in non-aqueous media. The spiro compound generated in aqueous solution underwent subsequent hydrolytic degradation of the NVP ring system, whereas the one formed in non-aqueous media was stable to hydrolysis. The product profile observed with the chemical oxidants in aqueous solution was replicated using lactoperoxidase-mediated oxidation of 2-hydroxy-NVP. These observations suggest that metabolic activation of NVP, via Phase I oxidation to 2-hydroxy-NVP and subsequent generation of a quinone-imine, could occur in vivo and play a role in NVP-induced toxicity.

  20. The Global Transmission Network of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Wertheim, Joel O.; Leigh Brown, Andrew J.; Hepler, N. Lance; Mehta, Sanjay R.; Richman, Douglas D.; Smith, Davey M.; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L.

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is pandemic, but its contemporary global transmission network has not been characterized. A better understanding of the properties and dynamics of this network is essential for surveillance, prevention, and eventual eradication of HIV. Here, we apply a simple and computationally efficient network-based approach to all publicly available HIV polymerase sequences in the global database, revealing a contemporary picture of the spread of HIV-1 within and between countries. This approach automatically recovered well-characterized transmission clusters and extended other clusters thought to be contained within a single country across international borders. In addition, previously undescribed transmission clusters were discovered. Together, these clusters represent all known modes of HIV transmission. The extent of international linkage revealed by our comprehensive approach demonstrates the need to consider the global diversity of HIV, even when describing local epidemics. Finally, the speed of this method allows for near-real-time surveillance of the pandemic's progression. PMID:24151309

  1. Latency: the hidden HIV-1 challenge

    PubMed Central

    Marcello, Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    Eradication of HIV-1 from an infected individual cannot be achieved by current regimens. Viral reservoirs established early during the infection remain unaffected by anti-retroviral therapy for a long time and are able to replenish systemic infection upon interruption of the treatment. Therapeutic targeting of viral latency will require a better understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying the establishment and long-term maintenance of HIV-1 in resting memory CD4 T cells, the most prominent reservoir of transcriptionally silent provirus. Since the molecular mechanisms that permit long term transcriptional control of proviral gene expression in these cells are still obscure, this review aims at summarizing the various aspects of the problem that need to be considered. In particular, this review will focus the attention on the control of transcription imposed by chromatin through various epigenetic mechanisms. Exploring the molecular details of viral latency will provide new insights for eventual future therapeutics that aim at viral eradication. PMID:16412247

  2. Tertiary Element Interaction in HIV-1 TAR.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Konrad; Sim, Adelene Y L; Knapp, Bernhard; Deane, Charlotte M; Minary, Peter

    2016-09-26

    HIV-1 replication requires binding to occur between Trans-activation Response Element (TAR) RNA and the TAT protein. This TAR-TAT binding depends on the conformation of TAR, and therapeutic development has attempted to exploit this dynamic behavior. Here we simulate TAR dynamics in the context of mutations inhibiting TAR binding. We find that two tertiary elements, the apical loop and the bulge, can interact directly, and this interaction may be linked to the affinity of TAR for TAT. PMID:27500460

  3. Nanochemistry-based immunotherapy for HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Lori, F; Calarota, S A; Lisziewicz, J

    2007-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART), i.e. the combination of three or more drugs against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has greatly improved the clinical outcome of HIV-1-infected individuals. However, HAART is unable to reconstitute HIV-specific immunity and eradicate the virus. Several observations in primate models and in humans support the notion that cell-mediated immunity can control viral replication and slow disease progression. Thus, besides drugs, an immunotherapy that induces long-lasting HIV-specific T-cell responses could play a role in the treatment of HIV/AIDS. To induce such immune responses, DermaVir Patch has been developed. DermaVir consists of an HIV-1 antigen-encoding plasmid DNA that is chemically formulated in a nanoparticle. DermaVir is administered under a patch after a skin preparation that supports the delivery of the nanoparticle to Langerhans cells (LC). Epidermal LC trap and transport the nanomedicine to draining lymph nodes. While in transit, LC mature into dendritic cells (DC), which can efficiently present the DNA-encoded antigens to naïve T-cells for the induction of cellular immunity. Pre-clinical studies and Phase I clinical testing of DermaVir in HIV-1-infected individuals have demonstrated the safety and tolerability of DermaVir Patch. To further modulate cellular immunity, molecular adjuvants might be added into the nanoparticle. DermaVir Patch represents a new nanomedicine platform for immunotherapy of HIV/AIDS. In this review, the antiviral activity of DermaVir-induced cellular immunity is discussed. Furthermore, the action of some cytokines currently being tested as adjuvants are highlighted and the adjuvant effect of cytokine plasmid DNA included in the DermaVir nanoparticle is reviewed.

  4. HIV-1 infection kinetics in tissue cultures.

    PubMed

    Spouge, J I; Shrager, R I; Dimitrov, D S

    1996-11-01

    Despite intensive experimental work on HIV-1, very little theoretical work has focused on HIV-1 spread in tissue culture. This article uses two systems of ordinary differential equations to model two modes of viral spread, cell-free virus and cell-to-cell contact. The two models produce remarkably similar qualitative results. Simulations using realistic parameter regimes showed that starting with a small fraction of cells infected, both cell-free viral spread and direct cell-to-cell transmission give an initial exponential phase of viral growth, followed by either a crash or a gradual decline, extinguishing the culture. Under some conditions, an oscillatory phase may precede the extinction. Some previous models of in vivo HIV-1 infection oscillate, but only in unrealistic parameter regimes. Experimental tissue infections sometimes display several sequential cycles of oscillation, however, so our models can at least mimic them qualitatively. Significantly, the models show that infective oscillations can be explained by infection dynamics; biological heterogeneity is not required. The models also display proportionality between infected cells and cell-free virus, which is reassuringly consistent with assumptions about the equivalence of several measures of viral load, except that the proportionality requires a relatively constant total cell concentration. Tissue culture parameter values can be determined from accurate, controlled experiments. Therefore, if verified, our models should make interpreting experimental data and extrapolating it to in vivo conditions sharper and more reliable.

  5. Progress in HIV-1 Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Barton F.; McElrath, M. Juliana

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the Review In this review, examples of recent progress in HIV-1 vaccine research are discussed. Recent Findings New insights from the immune correlates analyses of the RV144 efficacy trial have accelerated vaccine development with leads to follow in non-human primate studies and improved vaccine designs. Several new vaccine vector approaches offer promise in exquisite control of acute infection and in improving the breadth of T cell responses. New targets of broadly neutralizing antibodies (BnAbs) have been elucidated, and improved understanding of how the human host controls BnAb development have emerged from BnAb knockin mice and from analyses of BnAb maturation and virus evolution in subjects followed from the time of HIV-1 transmission to BnAb induction. Summary Based on these observations, it is clear that development of a successful HIV-1 vaccine will require new vaccine approaches and iterative testing of immunogens in well-designed animal and human trials. PMID:23743722

  6. Nup153 and Nup98 bind the HIV-1 core and contribute to the early steps of HIV-1 replication

    SciTech Connect

    Di Nunzio, Francesca; Fricke, Thomas; Miccio, Annarita; Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos; Perez, Patricio; Souque, Philippe; Rizzi, Ermanno; Severgnini, Marco; Mavilio, Fulvio; Charneau, Pierre; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2013-05-25

    The early steps of HIV-1 replication involve the entry of HIV-1 into the nucleus, which is characterized by viral interactions with nuclear pore components. HIV-1 developed an evolutionary strategy to usurp the nuclear pore machinery and chromatin in order to integrate and efficiently express viral genes. In the current work, we studied the role of nucleoporins 153 and 98 (Nup153 and Nup98) in infection of human Jurkat lymphocytes by HIV-1. We showed that Nup153-depleted cells exhibited a defect in nuclear import, while depletion of Nup 98 caused a slight defect in HIV integration. To explore the biochemical viral determinants for the requirement of Nup153 and Nup98 during HIV-1 infection, we tested the ability of these nucleoporins to interact with HIV-1 cores. Our findings showed that both nucleoporins bind HIV-1 cores suggesting that this interaction is important for HIV-1 nuclear import and/or integration. Distribution analysis of integration sites in Nup153-depleted cells revealed a reduced tendency of HIV-1 to integrate in intragenic sites, which in part could account for the large infectivity defect observed in Nup153-depleted cells. Our work strongly supports a role for Nup153 in HIV-1 nuclear import and integration. - Highlights: ► We studied the role of Nup98 and Nup153 in HIV-1 infection. ► Nup98 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 integration. ► Nup153 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 nuclear import. ► Depletion of Nup153 decreased the integration of HIV-1 in transcriptionally active sites.

  7. Requirements for capsid-binding and an effector function in TRIMCyp-mediated restriction of HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Vandegraaff, Nick; Li Yuan; McGee-Estrada, Kathleen; Stremlau, Matthew; Welikala, Sohanya; Si Zhihai; Engelman, Alan; Sodroski, Joseph . E-mail: joseph_sodroski@dfci.harvard.edu

    2006-08-01

    In owl monkeys, a retrotransposition event replaced the gene encoding the retroviral restriction factor TRIM5{alpha} with one encoding TRIMCyp, a fusion between the RING, B-box 2 and coiled-coil domains of TRIM5 and cyclophilin A. TRIMCyp restricts human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection by a mechanism dependent on the interaction of the cyclophilin A moiety and the HIV-1 capsid protein. Here, we show that infection by retroviruses other than HIV-1 can be restricted by TRIMCyp, providing an explanation for the evolutionary retention of the TRIMCyp gene in owl monkey lineages. The TRIMCyp-mediated block to HIV-1 infection occurs before the earliest step of reverse transcription. TRIMCyp-mediated restriction involves at least two functions: (1) capsid binding, which occurs most efficiently for trimeric TRIMCyp proteins that retain the coiled-coil and cyclophilin A domains, and (2) an effector function that depends upon the B-box 2 domain.

  8. Suppression of HIV-1 Infectivity by Human Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Tanaka, Atsushi; Islam, Salequl; Ahsan, Gias Uddin; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infection to the central nervous system (CNS) is very common in AIDS patients. The predominant cell types infected in the brain are monocytes and macrophages, which are surrounded by several HIV-1-resistant cell types, such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and microvascular cells. The effect of these HIV-1-resistant cells on HIV-1 infection is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the stability of HIV-1 cultured with several human glioblastoma cell lines, for example, NP-2, U87MG, T98G, and A172, to determine whether these HIV-1-resistant brain cells could enhance or suppress HIV-1 infection and thus modulate HIV-1 infection in the CNS. The HIV-1 titer was determined using the MAGIC-5A indicator cell line as well as naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells. We found that the stability of HIV-1 incubated with NP-2 or U87MG cells at 37°C was significantly shorter (half-life, 2.5-4 h) compared to that of HIV-1 incubated with T98G or A172 cells or in culture medium without cells (half-life, 8-18 h). The spent culture media (SCM) of NP-2 and U87MG cells had the ability to suppress both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection by inhibiting HIV-1 attachment to target cells. This inhibitory effect was eliminated by the treatment of the SCM with chondroitinase ABC but not heparinase, suggesting that the inhibitory factor(s) secreted by NP-2 and U87MG cells was chiefly mediated by chondroitin sulfate (CS) or CS-like moiety. Thus, this study reveals that some but not all glioma cells secrete inhibitory molecules to HIV-1 infection that may contribute in lowering HIV-1 infection in the CNS in vivo. PMID:26650729

  9. Suppression of HIV-1 Infectivity by Human Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Tanaka, Atsushi; Islam, Salequl; Ahsan, Gias Uddin; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infection to the central nervous system (CNS) is very common in AIDS patients. The predominant cell types infected in the brain are monocytes and macrophages, which are surrounded by several HIV-1-resistant cell types, such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and microvascular cells. The effect of these HIV-1-resistant cells on HIV-1 infection is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the stability of HIV-1 cultured with several human glioblastoma cell lines, for example, NP-2, U87MG, T98G, and A172, to determine whether these HIV-1-resistant brain cells could enhance or suppress HIV-1 infection and thus modulate HIV-1 infection in the CNS. The HIV-1 titer was determined using the MAGIC-5A indicator cell line as well as naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells. We found that the stability of HIV-1 incubated with NP-2 or U87MG cells at 37°C was significantly shorter (half-life, 2.5-4 h) compared to that of HIV-1 incubated with T98G or A172 cells or in culture medium without cells (half-life, 8-18 h). The spent culture media (SCM) of NP-2 and U87MG cells had the ability to suppress both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection by inhibiting HIV-1 attachment to target cells. This inhibitory effect was eliminated by the treatment of the SCM with chondroitinase ABC but not heparinase, suggesting that the inhibitory factor(s) secreted by NP-2 and U87MG cells was chiefly mediated by chondroitin sulfate (CS) or CS-like moiety. Thus, this study reveals that some but not all glioma cells secrete inhibitory molecules to HIV-1 infection that may contribute in lowering HIV-1 infection in the CNS in vivo.

  10. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-14

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth ofmore » IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research.« less

  11. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-14

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth of IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research.

  12. SAMHD1 Limits HIV-1 Antigen Presentation by Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bruel, Timothée; Cardinaud, Sylvain; Porrot, Françoise; Prado, Julia G.; Moris, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    postentry step. This is due to the presence of SAMHD1, a cellular enzyme that depletes intracellular levels of dNTPs and inhibits viral reverse transcription. We show that the depletion of SAMHD1 in DCs strongly stimulates the presentation of viral antigens derived from newly produced viral proteins, leading to the activation of HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). We further show in real time that the enhanced activation of CTL leads to killing of infected DCs. Our results indicate that the antiviral activity of SAMHD1 not only impacts HIV replication but also impacts antigen presentation by DC. They highlight the link that exists between restriction factors and adaptive immune responses. PMID:25926647

  13. Time-Resolved Imaging of Single HIV-1 Uncoating In Vitro and in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Francis, Ashwanth C; Marin, Mariana; Shi, Jiong; Aiken, Christopher; Melikyan, Gregory B

    2016-06-01

    Disassembly of the cone-shaped HIV-1 capsid in target cells is a prerequisite for establishing a life-long infection. This step in HIV-1 entry, referred to as uncoating, is critical yet poorly understood. Here we report a novel strategy to visualize HIV-1 uncoating using a fluorescently tagged oligomeric form of a capsid-binding host protein cyclophilin A (CypA-DsRed), which is specifically packaged into virions through the high-avidity binding to capsid (CA). Single virus imaging reveals that CypA-DsRed remains associated with cores after permeabilization/removal of the viral membrane and that CypA-DsRed and CA are lost concomitantly from the cores in vitro and in living cells. The rate of loss is modulated by the core stability and is accelerated upon the initiation of reverse transcription. We show that the majority of single cores lose CypA-DsRed shortly after viral fusion, while a small fraction remains intact for several hours. Single particle tracking at late times post-infection reveals a gradual loss of CypA-DsRed which is dependent on reverse transcription. Uncoating occurs both in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear membrane. Our novel imaging assay thus enables time-resolved visualization of single HIV-1 uncoating in living cells, and reveals the previously unappreciated spatio-temporal features of this incompletely understood process. PMID:27322072

  14. The SET complex acts as a barrier to autointegration of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Yan, Nan; Cherepanov, Peter; Daigle, Janet E; Engelman, Alan; Lieberman, Judy

    2009-03-01

    Retroviruses and retrotransposons are vulnerable to a suicidal pathway known as autointegration, which occurs when the 3'-ends of the reverse transcript are activated by integrase and then attack sites within the viral DNA. Retroelements have diverse strategies for suppressing autointegration, but how HIV-1 protects itself from autointegration is not well-understood. Here we show that knocking down any of the components of the SET complex, an endoplasmic reticulum-associated complex that contains 3 DNases (the base excision repair endonuclease APE1, 5'-3' exonuclease TREX1, and endonuclease NM23-H1), inhibits HIV-1 and HIV-2/SIV, but not MLV or ASV, infection. Inhibition occurs at a step in the viral life cycle after reverse transcription but before chromosomal integration. Antibodies to SET complex proteins capture HIV-1 DNA in the cytoplasm, suggesting a direct interaction between the SET complex and the HIV preintegration complex. Cloning of HIV integration sites in cells with knocked down SET complex components revealed an increase in autointegration, which was verified using a novel semi-quantitative nested PCR assay to detect autointegrants. When SET complex proteins are knocked down, autointegration increases 2-3-fold and chromosomal integration correspondingly decreases approximately 3-fold. Therefore, the SET complex facilitates HIV-1 infection by preventing suicidal autointegration. PMID:19266025

  15. Time-Resolved Imaging of Single HIV-1 Uncoating In Vitro and in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Ashwanth C.; Marin, Mariana; Shi, Jiong; Aiken, Christopher; Melikyan, Gregory B.

    2016-01-01

    Disassembly of the cone-shaped HIV-1 capsid in target cells is a prerequisite for establishing a life-long infection. This step in HIV-1 entry, referred to as uncoating, is critical yet poorly understood. Here we report a novel strategy to visualize HIV-1 uncoating using a fluorescently tagged oligomeric form of a capsid-binding host protein cyclophilin A (CypA-DsRed), which is specifically packaged into virions through the high-avidity binding to capsid (CA). Single virus imaging reveals that CypA-DsRed remains associated with cores after permeabilization/removal of the viral membrane and that CypA-DsRed and CA are lost concomitantly from the cores in vitro and in living cells. The rate of loss is modulated by the core stability and is accelerated upon the initiation of reverse transcription. We show that the majority of single cores lose CypA-DsRed shortly after viral fusion, while a small fraction remains intact for several hours. Single particle tracking at late times post-infection reveals a gradual loss of CypA-DsRed which is dependent on reverse transcription. Uncoating occurs both in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear membrane. Our novel imaging assay thus enables time-resolved visualization of single HIV-1 uncoating in living cells, and reveals the previously unappreciated spatio-temporal features of this incompletely understood process. PMID:27322072

  16. Titration of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and quantitative analysis of virus expression in vitro using liquid RNA-RNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Volsky, D J; Pellegrino, M G; Li, G; Logan, K A; Aswell, J E; Lawrence, N P; Decker, S R

    1990-06-01

    An assay is described for titration of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and for quantitative analysis of virus expression in vitro. The assay utilizes a liquid RNA-RNA hybridization method coupled with reversible target capture (RTC) on oligo(dT) derivatized magnetic particles. The assay provides a rapid, specific, and sensitive method for quantitation of HIV-1 RNA molecules present either in cells or in viral particles from cell-free culture media. Chronically infected monocytoid U1.1 cells were found to carry 52 pg HIV-1 RNA per 200,000 cells (160 HIV-1 RNA molecules per cell). In contrast, acutely infected CEM and H9 cells carried 3010 and 4370 pg HIV-1 RNA per 200,000 cells (9040 and 13,110 HIV-1 RNA molecules per cell, respectively). No hybridization was observed with uninfected cells or cells infected with HIV-2, HTLV-I, HTLV-II, or EBV. Use of liquid HIV-1 RNA hybridization in association with HIV-1 protein detection methods permits more complete characterization of HIV-1 expression in host cells than either method alone, and also provides a method for standardizing preparations of virus.

  17. HIV-1 prevalence in selected Tijuana sub-populations.

    PubMed Central

    Güereña-Burgueño, F; Benenson, A S; Sepúlveda-Amor, J

    1991-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus) infection among high-risk populations in Tijuana, Mexico, HIV-1 antibody status was determined and information on risk behavior was obtained from 1,069 individuals in three high-risk groups. The prevalence of HIV-1 among 415 prostitutes was 0.5 percent; 410 prisoners, 1.2 percent; 233 homosexual/bisexual men, 11.6 percent; and 106 intravenous drug abusers, 1.9 percent. The potential for spread of HIV-1 exists in Tijuana despite the current relatively low seroprevalence of HIV-1. PMID:2014864

  18. HIV-1 phylogenetic analysis shows HIV-1 transits through the meninges to brain and peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Lamers, Susanna L; Gray, Rebecca R; Salemi, Marco; Huysentruyt, Leanne C; McGrath, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Brain infection by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been investigated in many reports with a variety of conclusions concerning the time of entry and degree of viral compartmentalization. To address these diverse findings, we sequenced HIV-1 gp120 clones from a wide range of brain, peripheral and meningeal tissues from five patients who died from several HIV-1 associated disease pathologies. High-resolution phylogenetic analysis confirmed previous studies that showed a significant degree of compartmentalization in brain and peripheral tissue subpopulations. Some intermixing between the HI