Science.gov

Sample records for hiv-1 protease inhibitor

  1. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  2. Novel pseudosymmetric inhibitors of HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, A.; Roesel, J.; Gruetter, M.; Tintelnot-Blomley, M.; Alteri, E.; Bold, G.; Lang, M.

    1993-12-31

    Taking into account the unique C-2 symmetric nature of the HIV-1 protease homodimer, the authors have designed and synthesized novel inhibitors featuring an almost symmetric structure. Compounds containing the easily accessible Phe[CH(OH)CH{sub 2}N(NH)]Cha dipeptide isostere as a nonhydrolyzable replacement of the scissile amide bond of the natural substrate are potent inhibitors in vitro with IC{sub 50} values of 9 to 50 nM. The antiviral activity depends mainly on the nature of the anylated valine residues linked to the dipeptide mimic. In this series, CGP 53820 combines both high potency and excellent specificity. Its predicted symmetric binding pattern is illustrated by the X-ray structure analysis performed with the corresponding enzyme-inhibitor complex.

  3. HIV-1 protease inhibitors in development.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Stefano; La Seta Catamancio, Simona

    2002-03-01

    Several pharmaceutical companies have developed an increasing number of second generation protease inhibitors (PI) during the last few years. Many of these compounds have been in preclinical trials and some are now in clinical use. All drugs in this category have been designed to be well absorbed and overcome the crucial problem of cross-resistance within this class of compounds. Taking into account the rapid occurrence of PI cross-resistance, clinicians who are treating patients with the HIV-1 infection will need new active PIs in the near future. The clinical and antiviral efficacy of the new molecules versus the older PIs will be investigated through comparative trials that are likely to be completed over the next 12 months. These third-generation PIs currently in development will be the subject of our review.

  4. Antimalarial activity of HIV-1 protease inhibitor in chromone series.

    PubMed

    Lerdsirisuk, Pradith; Maicheen, Chirattikan; Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn

    2014-12-01

    Increasing parasite resistance to nearly all available antimalarial drugs becomes a serious problem to human health and necessitates the need to continue the search for new effective drugs. Recent studies have shown that clinically utilized HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) inhibitors can inhibit the in vitro and in vivo growth of Plasmodium falciparum. In this study, a series of chromone derivatives possessing HIV-1 PR inhibitory activity has been tested for antimalarial activity against P. falciparum (K1 multi-drug resistant strain). Chromone 15, the potent HIV-1 PR inhibitor (IC50=0.65μM), was found to be the most potent antimalarial compound with IC50=0.95μM while primaquine and tafenoquine showed IC50=2.41 and 1.95μM, respectively. Molecular docking study of chromone compounds against plasmepsin II, an aspartic protease enzyme important in hemoglobin degradation, revealed that chromone 15 exhibited the higher binding affinity (binding energy=-13.24kcal/mol) than the known PM II inhibitors. Thus, HIV-1 PR inhibitor in chromone series has the potential to be a new class of antimalarial agent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Epsilon substituted lysinol derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kristen L G; Holloway, M Katharine; Su, Hua-Poo; Carroll, Steven S; Burlein, Christine; Touch, Sinoeun; DiStefano, Daniel J; Sanchez, Rosa I; Williams, Theresa M; Vacca, Joseph P; Coburn, Craig A

    2010-07-15

    A series of HIV-1 protease inhibitors containing an epsilon substituted lysinol backbone was synthesized. Two novel synthetic routes using N-boc-L-glutamic acid alpha-benzyl ester and 2,6-diaminopimelic acid were developed. Incorporation of this epsilon substituent enabled access to the S2 pocket of the enzyme, affording high potency inhibitors. Modeling studies and synthetic efforts suggest the potency increase is due to both conformational bias and van der Waals interactions with the S2 pocket.

  6. HIV-1 protease inhibitor mutations affect the development of HIV-1 resistance to the maturation inhibitor bevirimat.

    PubMed

    Fun, Axel; van Maarseveen, Noortje M; Pokorná, Jana; Maas, Renée Em; Schipper, Pauline J; Konvalinka, Jan; Nijhuis, Monique

    2011-08-24

    Maturation inhibitors are an experimental class of antiretrovirals that inhibit Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) particle maturation, the structural rearrangement required to form infectious virus particles. This rearrangement is triggered by the ordered cleavage of the precursor Gag polyproteins into their functional counterparts by the viral enzyme protease. In contrast to protease inhibitors, maturation inhibitors impede particle maturation by targeting the substrate of protease (Gag) instead of the protease enzyme itself. Direct cross-resistance between protease and maturation inhibitors may seem unlikely, but the co-evolution of protease and its substrate, Gag, during protease inhibitor therapy, could potentially affect future maturation inhibitor therapy. Previous studies showed that there might also be an effect of protease inhibitor resistance mutations on the development of maturation inhibitor resistance, but the exact mechanism remains unclear. We used wild-type and protease inhibitor resistant viruses to determine the impact of protease inhibitor resistance mutations on the development of maturation inhibitor resistance. Our resistance selection studies demonstrated that the resistance profiles for the maturation inhibitor bevirimat are more diverse for viruses with a mutated protease compared to viruses with a wild-type protease. Viral replication did not appear to be a major factor during emergence of bevirimat resistance. In all in vitro selections, one of four mutations was selected: Gag V362I, A364V, S368N or V370A. The impact of these mutations on maturation inhibitor resistance and viral replication was analyzed in different protease backgrounds. The data suggest that the protease background affects development of HIV-1 resistance to bevirimat and the replication profiles of bevirimat-selected HIV-1. The protease-dependent bevirimat resistance and replication levels can be explained by differences in CA/p2 cleavage processing by the different

  7. Haloperidol-based irreversible inhibitors of the HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases.

    PubMed

    De Voss, J J; Sui, Z; DeCamp, D L; Salto, R; Babé, L M; Craik, C S; Ortiz de Montellano, P R

    1994-03-04

    The proteases expressed by the HIV-1 and HIV-2 viruses process the polyproteins encoded by the viral genomes into the mature proteins required for virion replication and assembly. Eight analogs of haloperidol have been synthesized that cause time-dependent inactivation of the HIV-1 protease and, in six cases, HIV-2 protease. The IC50 values for the analogues are comparable to that of haloperidol itself. Enzyme inactivation is due to the presence of an epoxide in two of the analogues and carbonyl-conjugated double or triple bonds in the others. Irreversible inactivation is confirmed by the failure to recover activity when one of the inhibitors is removed from the medium. At pH 8.0, the agents inactivate the HIV-1 protease 4-80 times more rapidly than the HIV-2 protease. Faster inactivation of the HIV-1 protease is consistent with alkylation of cysteine residues because the HIV-1 protease has four such residues whereas the HIV-2 protease has none. Inactivation of the HIV-2 protease requires modification of non-cysteine residues. The similarities in the rates of inactivation of the HIV-2 protease by six agents that have intrinsically different reactivities toward nucleophiles suggest that the rate-limiting step in the inactivation process is not the alkylation reaction itself. At least five of the agents inhibit polyprotein processing in an ex vivo cell assay system, but they are also toxic to the cells.

  8. Prediction of HIV-1 protease inhibitor resistance using a protein-inhibitor flexible docking approach.

    PubMed

    Jenwitheesuk, Ekachai; Samudrala, Ram

    2005-01-01

    Emergence of drug resistance remains one of the most challenging issues in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Here we focus on resistance to HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) at a molecular level, which can be analysed genotypically or phenotypically. Genotypic assays are based on the analysis of mutations associated with reduced drug susceptibility, but are problematic because of the numerous mutations and mutational patterns that confer drug resistance. Phenotypic resistance or susceptibility can be experimentally evaluated by measuring the amount of free drug bound to HIV-1 protease molecules, but this procedure is expensive and time-consuming. To overcome these problems, we have developed a docking protocol that takes protein-inhibitor flexibility into account to predict phenotypic drug resistance. For six FDA-approved Pls and a total of 1792 HIV-1 protease sequence mutants, we used a combination of inhibitor flexible docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to calculate protein-inhibitor binding energies. Prediction results were expressed as fold changes of the calculated inhibitory constant (Ki), and the samples predicted to have fold-increase in calculated Ki above the fixed cut-off were defined as drug resistant. Our combined docking and MD protocol achieved accuracies ranging from 72-83% in predicting resistance/susceptibility for five of the six drugs evaluated. Evaluating the method only on samples where our predictions concurred with established knowledge-based methods resulted in increased accuracies of 83-94% for the six drugs. The results suggest that a physics-based approach, which is readily applicable to any novel PI and/or mutant, can be used judiciously with knowledge-based approaches that require experimental training data to devise accurate models of HIV-1 Pl resistance prediction.

  9. HIV-1 evolution under pressure of protease inhibitors: climbing the stairs of viral fitness.

    PubMed

    Berkhout, B

    1999-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) has evolved into a viral quasispecies with a high replication capacity or fitness. Antiretroviral drugs potently inhibit replication of the wild-type virus, but HIV-1 responds by selection of drug-resistant variants. Here we review, in brief, the evolution of resistance to protease inhibitors that is characterized by severe fitness losses and an abundance of subsequent repair strategies. The possibility to restrict HIV-1 fitness is discussed in relation to the control of HIV-1 pathogenesis.

  10. Fluorogenic Assay for Inhibitors of HIV-1 Protease with Sub-picomolar Affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windsor, Ian W.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2015-08-01

    A fluorogenic substrate for HIV-1 protease was designed and used as the basis for a hypersensitive assay. The substrate exhibits a kcat of 7.4 s-1, KM of 15 μM, and an increase in fluorescence intensity of 104-fold upon cleavage, thus providing sensitivity that is unmatched in a continuous assay of HIV-1 protease. These properties enabled the enzyme concentration in an activity assay to be reduced to 25 pM, which is close to the Kd value of the protease dimer. By fitting inhibition data to Morrison’s equation, Ki values of amprenavir, darunavir, and tipranavir were determined to be 135, 10, and 82 pM, respectively. This assay, which is capable of measuring Ki values as low as 0.25 pM, is well-suited for characterizing the next generation of HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

  11. Coevolutionary analysis of resistance-evading peptidomimetic inhibitors of HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Rosin, C D; Belew, R K; Morris, G M; Olson, A J; Goodsell, D S

    1999-02-16

    We have developed a coevolutionary method for the computational design of HIV-1 protease inhibitors selected for their ability to retain efficacy in the face of protease mutation. For HIV-1 protease, typical drug design techniques are shown to be ineffective for the design of resistance-evading inhibitors: An inhibitor that is a direct analogue of one of the natural substrates will be susceptible to resistance mutation, as will inhibitors designed to fill the active site of the wild-type or a mutant enzyme. Two design principles are demonstrated: (i) For enzymes with broad substrate specificity, such as HIV-1 protease, resistance-evading inhibitors are best designed against the immutable properties of the active site-the properties that must be conserved in any mutant protease to retain the ability to bind and cleave all of the native substrates. (ii) Robust resistance-evading inhibitors can be designed by optimizing activity simultaneously against a large set of mutant enzymes, incorporating as much of the mutational space as possible.

  12. Coevolutionary analysis of resistance-evading peptidomimetic inhibitors of HIV-1 protease

    PubMed Central

    Rosin, Christopher D.; Belew, Richard K.; Morris, Garrett M.; Olson, Arthur J.; Goodsell, David S.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a coevolutionary method for the computational design of HIV-1 protease inhibitors selected for their ability to retain efficacy in the face of protease mutation. For HIV-1 protease, typical drug design techniques are shown to be ineffective for the design of resistance-evading inhibitors: An inhibitor that is a direct analogue of one of the natural substrates will be susceptible to resistance mutation, as will inhibitors designed to fill the active site of the wild-type or a mutant enzyme. Two design principles are demonstrated: (i) For enzymes with broad substrate specificity, such as HIV-1 protease, resistance-evading inhibitors are best designed against the immutable properties of the active site—the properties that must be conserved in any mutant protease to retain the ability to bind and cleave all of the native substrates. (ii) Robust resistance-evading inhibitors can be designed by optimizing activity simultaneously against a large set of mutant enzymes, incorporating as much of the mutational space as possible. PMID:9990030

  13. Virtual Screening of Indonesian Herbal Database as HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Yanuar, Arry; Suhartanto, Heru; Mun׳im, Abdul; Anugraha, Bram Hik; Syahdi, Rezi Riadhi

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 (Human immunodeficiency virus type 1)׳s infection is considered as one of most harmful disease known by human, the survivability rate of the host reduced significantly when it developed into AIDS. HIV drug resistance is one of the main problems of its treatment and several drug designs have been done to find new leads compound as the cure. In this study, in silico virtual screening approach was used to find lead molecules from the library or database of natural compounds as HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Virtual screening against Indonesian Herbal Database with AutoDock was performed on HIV-1 protease. From the virtual screening, top ten compounds obtained were 8-Hydroxyapigenin 8-(2",4"-disulfatoglucuronide), Isoscutellarein 4'-methyl ether, Amaranthin, Torvanol A, Ursonic acid, 5-Carboxypyranocyanidin 3-O-(6"-O-malonyl-beta-glucopyranoside), Oleoside, Jacoumaric acid, Platanic acid and 5-Carboxypyranocyanidin 3-O-beta-glucopyranoside. PMID:24616554

  14. Synthesis of N-glyoxylyl peptides and their in vitro evaluation as HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Qasmi, D; de Rosny, E; René, L; Badet, B; Vergely, I; Boggetto, N; Reboud-Ravaux, M

    1997-04-01

    A series of novel synthetic peptides containing an N-terminal glyoxylyl function (CHOCO-) have been tested as inhibitors of HIV-1 protease. The N-glyoxylyl peptide CHOCO-Pro-Ile-Val-NH2, which fulfills the specificity requirements of the MA/CA protease cleavage site together with the criteria of transition state analogue of the catalyzed reaction, was found to be a moderate competitive inhibitor although favorable interactions were visualized between its hydrated form and the catalytic aspartates using molecular modeling. Increasing the length of the peptide sequence led to compounds acting only as substrates.

  15. Computational mutation scanning and drug resistance mechanisms of HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ge-Fei; Yang, Guang-Fu; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2010-07-29

    The drug resistance of various clinically available HIV-1 protease inhibitors has been studied using a new computational protocol, that is, computational mutation scanning (CMS), leading to valuable insights into the resistance mechanisms and structure-resistance correction of the HIV-1 protease inhibitors associated with a variety of active site and nonactive site mutations. By using the CMS method, the calculated mutation-caused shifts of the binding free energies linearly correlate very well with those derived from the corresponding experimental data, suggesting that the CMS protocol may be used as a generalized approach to predict drug resistance associated with amino acid mutations. Because it is essentially important for understanding the structure-resistance correlation and for structure-based drug design to develop an effective computational protocol for drug resistance prediction, the reasonable and computationally efficient CMS protocol for drug resistance prediction should be valuable for future structure-based design and discovery of antiresistance drugs in various therapeutic areas.

  16. Design, Synthesis, Biological and Structural Evaluations of Novel HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors to Combat Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Parai, Maloy Kumar; Huggins, David J.; Cao, Hong; Nalam, Madhavi N. L.; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Tidor, Bruce; Rana, Tariq M.

    2012-01-01

    A series of new HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) were designed using a general strategy that combines computational structure-based design with substrate-envelope constraints. The PIs incorporate various alcohol-derived P2 carbamates with acyclic and cyclic heteroatomic functionalities into the (R)-hydroxyethylamine isostere. Most of the new PIs show potent binding affinities against wild-type HIV-1 protease and three multidrug resistant (MDR) variants, in particular inhibitors containing 2,2-dichloroacetamide, pyrrolidinone, imidazolidinone, and oxazolidinone moieties at P2 are the most potent with Ki values in the picomolar range. Several new PIs exhibit nanomolar antiviral potencies against patient-derived wild-type viruses from HIV-1 clades A, B, and C and two MDR variants. Crystal structure analyses of four potent inhibitors revealed that carbonyl groups of the new P2 moieties promote extensive hydrogen bond interactions with the invariant Asp-29 residue of the protease. These structure-activity relationship findings can be utilized to design new PIs with enhanced enzyme inhibitory and antiviral potencies. PMID:22708897

  17. Relation between flexibility and positively selected HIV-1 protease mutants against inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Braz, Antônio S K; Tufanetto, Patrícia; Perahia, David; Scott, Luis P B

    2012-12-01

    The antiretroviral chemotherapy helps to reduce the mortality of HIVs infected patients. However, RNA dependant virus replication has a high mutation rate. Human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 protease plays an essential role in viral replication cycle. This protein is an important target for therapy with viral protein inhibitors. There are few works using normal mode analysis to investigate this problem from the structural changes viewpoint. The investigation of protein flexibility may be important for the study of processes associated with conformational changes and state transitions. The normal mode analysis allowed us to investigate structural changes in the protease (such as flexibility) in a straightforward way and try to associate these changes with the increase of fitness for each positively selected HIV-1 mutant protease of patients treated with several protease inhibitors (saquinavir, indinavir, ritonavir, nelfinavir, lopinavir, fosamprenavir, atazanavir, darunavir, and tripanavir) in combination or separately. These positively selected mutations introduce significant flexibility in important regions such as the active site cavity and flaps. These mutations were also able to cause changes in accessible solvent area. This study showed that the majority of HIV-1 protease mutants can be grouped into two main classes of protein flexibility behavior. We presented a new approach to study structural changes caused by positively selected mutations in a pathogen protein, for instance the HIV-1 protease and their relationship with their resistance mechanism against known inhibitors. The method can be applied to any pharmaceutically relevant pathogen proteins and could be very useful to understand the effects of positively selected mutations in the context of structural changes.

  18. Limited HIV-1 Reactivation in Resting CD4+ T cells from Aviremic Patients under Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Abbas, Wasim; Bouchat, Sophie; Gatot, Jean-Stéphane; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Kabeya, Kabamba; Clumeck, Nathan; De Wit, Stéphane; Van Lint, Carine; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    A latent viral reservoir that resides in resting CD4+ T cells represents a major barrier for eradication of HIV infection. We test here the impact of HIV protease inhibitor (PI) based combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) over nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based cART on HIV-1 reactivation and integration in resting CD4+ T cells. This is a prospective cohort study of patients with chronic HIV-1 infection treated with conventional cART with an undetectable viremia. We performed a seven-year study of 47 patients with chronic HIV-infection treated with cART regimens and with undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA levels for at least 1 year. Of these 47 patients treated with cART, 24 were treated with a PI-based regimen and 23 with a NNRTI-based regimen as their most recent treatment for more than one year. We evaluated the HIV-1 reservoir using reactivation assay and integrated HIV-1 DNA, respectively, in resting CD4+ T cells. Resting CD4+ T cells isolated from PI-treated patients compared to NNRTI-treated patients showed a limited HIV-1 reactivation upon T-cell stimulation (p = 0·024) and a lower level of HIV-1 integration (p = 0·024). Our study indicates that PI-based cART could be more efficient than NNRTI-based cART for limiting HIV-1 reactivation in aviremic chronically infected patients. PMID:27922055

  19. Protonation state and free energy calculation of HIV-1 protease-inhibitor complex based on electrostatic polarisation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Maoyou; Jiang, Xiaonan; Jiang, Ning

    2014-06-01

    The protonation states of catalytic Asp25/25‧ residues remarkably affect the binding mechanism of the HIV-1 protease-inhibitor complex. Here we report a molecular dynamics simulation study, which includes electrostatic polarisation effect, to investigate the influence of Asp25/25‧ protonation states upon the binding free energy of the HIV-1 protease and a C2-symmetric inhibitor. Good agreements are obtained on inhibitor structure, hydrogen bond network, and binding free energy between our theoretical calculations and the experimental data. The calculations show that the Asp25 residue is deprotonated, and the Asp25‧ residue is protonated. Our results reveal that the Asp25/25‧ residues can have different protonation states when binding to different inhibitors although the protease and the inhibitors have the same symmetry. This study offers some insights into understanding the protonation state of HIV-1 protease-inhibitor complex, which could be helpful in designing new inhibitor molecules.

  20. Targeting dynamic pockets of HIV-1 protease by structure-based computational screening for allosteric inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kunze, Jens; Todoroff, Nickolay; Schneider, Petra; Rodrigues, Tiago; Geppert, Tim; Reisen, Felix; Schreuder, Herman; Saas, Joachim; Hessler, Gerhard; Baringhaus, Karl-Heinz; Schneider, Gisbert

    2014-03-24

    We present the discovery of low molecular weight inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) protease subtype B that were identified by structure-based virtual screening as ligands of an allosteric surface cavity. For pocket identification and prioritization, we performed a molecular dynamics simulation and observed several flexible, partially transient surface cavities. For one of these presumable ligand-binding pockets that are located in the so-called "hinge region" of the identical protease chains, we computed a receptor-derived pharmacophore model, with which we retrieved fragment-like inhibitors from a screening compound pool. The most potent hit inhibited protease activity in vitro in a noncompetitive mode of action. Although attempts failed to crystallize this ligand bound to the enzyme, the study provides proof-of-concept for identifying innovative tool compounds for chemical biology by addressing flexible protein models with receptor pocket-derived pharmacophore screening.

  1. In vitro selection and characterization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates with reduced sensitivity to hydroxyethylamino sulfonamide inhibitors of HIV-1 aspartyl protease.

    PubMed

    Partaledis, J A; Yamaguchi, K; Tisdale, M; Blair, E E; Falcione, C; Maschera, B; Myers, R E; Pazhanisamy, S; Futer, O; Cullinan, A B

    1995-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants with reduced sensitivity to the hydroxyethylamino sulfonamide protease inhibitors VB-11,328 and VX-478 have been selected in vitro by two independent serial passage protocols with HIV-1 in CEM-SS and MT-4 cell lines. Virus populations with greater than 100-fold-increased resistance to both inhibitors compared with the parental virus have been obtained. DNA sequence analyses of the protease genes from VB-11,328- and VX-478-resistant variants reveal a sequential accumulation of point mutations, with similar resistance patterns occurring for the two inhibitors. The deduced amino acid substitutions in the resistant protease are Leu-10-->Phe, Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val. This is the first observation in HIV protease resistance studies of an Ile-50-->Val mutation, a mutation that appears to arise uniquely against the sulfonamide inhibitor class. When the substitutions observed were introduced as single mutations into an HIV-1 infectious clone (HXB2), only the Ile-50-->Val mutant showed reduced sensitivity (two- to threefold) to VB-11,328 and VX-478. A triple protease mutant infectious clone carrying the mutations Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val, however, showed much greater reduction in sensitivity (14- to 20-fold) to VB-11,328 and VX-478. The same mutations were studied in recombinant HIV protease. The mutant protease Ile-50-->Val displays a much lower affinity for the inhibitors than the parent enzyme (< or = 80-fold). The protease triply mutated at Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val shows an even greater decrease in inhibitor binding (< or = 270-fold). The sulfonamide-resistant HIV protease variants remain sensitive to inhibitors from other chemical classes (Ro 31-8959 and L-735,524), suggesting possibilities for clinical use of HIV protease inhibitors in combination or serially.

  2. In vitro selection and characterization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates with reduced sensitivity to hydroxyethylamino sulfonamide inhibitors of HIV-1 aspartyl protease.

    PubMed Central

    Partaledis, J A; Yamaguchi, K; Tisdale, M; Blair, E E; Falcione, C; Maschera, B; Myers, R E; Pazhanisamy, S; Futer, O; Cullinan, A B

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants with reduced sensitivity to the hydroxyethylamino sulfonamide protease inhibitors VB-11,328 and VX-478 have been selected in vitro by two independent serial passage protocols with HIV-1 in CEM-SS and MT-4 cell lines. Virus populations with greater than 100-fold-increased resistance to both inhibitors compared with the parental virus have been obtained. DNA sequence analyses of the protease genes from VB-11,328- and VX-478-resistant variants reveal a sequential accumulation of point mutations, with similar resistance patterns occurring for the two inhibitors. The deduced amino acid substitutions in the resistant protease are Leu-10-->Phe, Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val. This is the first observation in HIV protease resistance studies of an Ile-50-->Val mutation, a mutation that appears to arise uniquely against the sulfonamide inhibitor class. When the substitutions observed were introduced as single mutations into an HIV-1 infectious clone (HXB2), only the Ile-50-->Val mutant showed reduced sensitivity (two- to threefold) to VB-11,328 and VX-478. A triple protease mutant infectious clone carrying the mutations Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val, however, showed much greater reduction in sensitivity (14- to 20-fold) to VB-11,328 and VX-478. The same mutations were studied in recombinant HIV protease. The mutant protease Ile-50-->Val displays a much lower affinity for the inhibitors than the parent enzyme (< or = 80-fold). The protease triply mutated at Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val shows an even greater decrease in inhibitor binding (< or = 270-fold). The sulfonamide-resistant HIV protease variants remain sensitive to inhibitors from other chemical classes (Ro 31-8959 and L-735,524), suggesting possibilities for clinical use of HIV protease inhibitors in combination or serially. PMID:7636964

  3. Design and synthesis of HIV-1 protease inhibitors for a long-acting injectable drug application.

    PubMed

    Kesteleyn, Bart; Amssoms, Katie; Schepens, Wim; Hache, Geerwin; Verschueren, Wim; Van De Vreken, Wim; Rombauts, Klara; Meurs, Greet; Sterkens, Patrick; Stoops, Bart; Baert, Lieven; Austin, Nigel; Wegner, Jörg; Masungi, Chantal; Dierynck, Inge; Lundgren, Stina; Jönsson, Daniel; Parkes, Kevin; Kalayanov, Genadiy; Wallberg, Hans; Rosenquist, Asa; Samuelsson, Bertil; Van Emelen, Kristof; Thuring, Jan Willem

    2013-01-01

    The design and synthesis of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) (1-22), which display high potency against HIV-1 wild-type and multi-PI-resistant HIV-mutant clinical isolates, is described. Lead optimization was initiated from compound 1, a Phe-Phe hydroxyethylene peptidomimetic PI, and was directed towards the discovery of new PIs suitable for a long-acting (LA) injectable drug application. Introducing a heterocyclic 6-methoxy-3-pyridinyl or a 6-(dimethylamino)-3-pyridinyl moiety (R(3)) at the para-position of the P1' benzyl fragment generated compounds with antiviral potency in the low single digit nanomolar range. Halogenation or alkylation of the metabolic hot spots on the various aromatic rings resulted in PIs with high stability against degradation in human liver microsomes and low plasma clearance in rats. Replacing the chromanolamine moiety (R(1)) in the P2 protease binding site by a cyclopentanolamine or a cyclohexanolamine derivative provided a series of high clearance PIs (16-22) with EC(50)s on wild-type HIV-1 in the range of 0.8-1.8 nM. PIs 18 and 22, formulated as nanosuspensions, showed gradual but sustained and complete release from the injection site over two months in rats, and were therefore identified as interesting candidates for a LA injectable drug application for treating HIV/AIDS.

  4. HIV-1 replication in central nervous system increases over time on only protease inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Donath, Maximilian; Wolf, Timo; Stürmer, Martin; Herrmann, Eva; Bickel, Markus; Khaykin, Pavel; Göpel, Siri; Gute, Peter; Haberl, Annette; de Leuw, Philipp; Schüttfort, Gundolf; Berger, Annemarie; Stephan, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    There are concerns about central nervous system (CNS)-replication of HIV-1 in patients on boosted protease inhibitors. Purpose of this study was to compare HIV-1 viral loads (VLs) from patients treated with only boosted dual protease inhibitor (bdPI), versus combination antiretroviral therapy (cART group), containing two nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) and a third partner. All patients from a large German HIV-treatment cohort with available medication, clinical and demographic data, including results from simultaneous HIV-1 viral load (VL) assessments in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood plasma, were retrospectively evaluated as controlled cross-sectional study. CSF had been obtained from patients with variable neurological symptoms during 2005-2014. Statistical analysis comprised nonparametric tests, regression and correlation techniques accounting for undetectable quantifications. Statistical analysis comprised nonparametric tests, regression and correlation techniques accounting for undetectable quantifications. Overall, 155 patients were evaluable (bdPI: 24; cART: 131). At time of CSF-collection, both groups were comparable in age, gender, CD4-cell counts, or primary HIV-transmission risks, though bdPI patients were clinically more advanced. The proportion of patients with undetectable HIV-1 (<50 copies/ml) in CSF was lower for bdPI group (25 vs 49.6 %; p = 0.026), but similar in plasma (46 vs 41 %). Median CSF-VL was higher in bdPI group (600 vs 50 copies/ml; p = 0.027) and similar in plasma. Mean VL CSF/plasma ratio was 342.91 for bdPI- and 54.48 for cART patients (p < 0.001). Pearson's regression analysis revealed a trend for an elevated VL-ratio over time within bdPI group. HIV-1 replication was higher and more frequently detectable in CSF from bdPI patients, indicating a worse CNS penetration effectiveness of used boosted PI. Within bdPI group, measured CNS-viral replication was increasing over time, suggesting an over

  5. Prevalence, mutation patterns, and effects on protease inhibitor susceptibility of the L76V mutation in HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Young, Thomas P; Parkin, Neil T; Stawiski, Eric; Pilot-Matias, Tami; Trinh, Roger; Kempf, Dale J; Norton, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Patterns of HIV-1 protease inhibitor (PI) resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) and effects on PI susceptibility associated with the L76V mutation were studied in a large database. Of 20,501 sequences with ≥1 PI RAM, 3.2% contained L76V; L76V was alone in 0.04%. Common partner mutations included M46I, I54V, V82A, I84V, and L90M. L76V was associated with a 2- to 6-fold decrease in susceptibility to lopinavir, darunavir, amprenavir, and indinavir and a 7- to 8-fold increase in susceptibility to atazanavir and saquinavir.

  6. Novel two-round phenotypic assay for protease inhibitor susceptibility testing of recombinant and primary HIV-1 isolates.

    PubMed

    Puertas, Maria C; Buzón, Maria J; Ballestero, Mònica; Van Den Eede, Peter; Clotet, Bonaventura; Prado, Julia G; Martinez-Picado, Javier

    2012-12-01

    Antiretroviral drug susceptibility tests facilitate therapeutic management of HIV-1-infected patients. Although genotyping systems are affordable, inaccuracy in the interpretation of complex mutational patterns may limit their usefulness. Currently available HIV-1 phenotypic assays are based on the generation of recombinant viruses in which the specific viral gene of interest, derived from a patient plasma sample, is cloned into a susceptible genetic viral backbone prior to in vitro drug susceptibility evaluation. Nevertheless, in the case of protease inhibitors, not only are mutations in the HIV-1 protease-coding region involved in resistance, but the role of Gag in drug susceptibility has also recently been reported. In order to avoid the inherent limitations resulting from partial cloning of the viral genome, we designed and evaluated a new experimental strategy to test the in vitro susceptibility of primary viral isolates to protease inhibitors. Our protocol, which is based on a two-round infection protocol using the reporter TZM-bl cell line, showed a good correlation with genotypic resistance prediction and with the Antivirogram phenotypic assay, in both protease-recombinant viruses and primary viral isolates. The protocol is suitable for any HIV-1 subtype and enables rapid in-house measurement of protease inhibitor susceptibility, thus making it possible to evaluate the concomitant effects of both patient-derived gag and protease-coding regions.

  7. Complexity in modeling and understanding protonation states: computational titration of HIV-1-protease-inhibitor complexes.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Ashutosh; Fornabaio, Micaela; Spyrakis, Francesca; Mozzarelli, Andrea; Cozzini, Pietro; Kellogg, Glen E

    2007-11-01

    The computational-titration (CT) algorithm based on the 'natural' Hydropathic INTeractions (HINT) force field is described. The HINT software model is an empirical, non-Newtonian force field derived from experimentally measured partition coefficients for solvent transfer between octanol and H(2)O (log P(o/w)). The CT algorithm allows the identification, modeling, and optimization of multiple protonation states of residues and ligand functional groups at the protein-ligand active site. The importance of taking into account pH and ionization states of residues, which strongly affect the process of ligand binding, for correctly predicting binding free energies is discussed. The application of the CT protocol to a set of six cyclic inhibitors in their complexes with HIV-1 protease is presented, and the advance of HINT as a virtual-screening tool is outlined.

  8. HIV-1 Protease with 20 Mutations Exhibits Extreme Resistance to Clinical Inhibitors through Coordinated Structural Rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Agniswamy, Johnson; Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Aniana, Annie; Sayer, Jane M.; Louis, John M.; Weber, Irene T.

    2012-06-28

    The escape mutant of HIV-1 protease (PR) containing 20 mutations (PR20) undergoes efficient polyprotein processing even in the presence of clinical protease inhibitors (PIs). PR20 shows >3 orders of magnitude decreased affinity for PIs darunavir (DRV) and saquinavir (SQV) relative to PR. Crystal structures of PR20 crystallized with yttrium, substrate analogue p2-NC, DRV, and SQV reveal three distinct conformations of the flexible flaps and diminished interactions with inhibitors through the combination of multiple mutations. PR20 with yttrium at the active site exhibits widely separated flaps lacking the usual intersubunit contacts seen in other inhibitor-free dimers. Mutations of residues 35-37 in the hinge loop eliminate interactions and perturb the flap conformation. Crystals of PR20/p2-NC contain one uninhibited dimer with one very open flap and one closed flap and a second inhibitor-bound dimer in the closed form showing six fewer hydrogen bonds with the substrate analogue relative to wild-type PR. PR20 complexes with PIs exhibit expanded S2/S2' pockets and fewer PI interactions arising from coordinated effects of mutations throughout the structure, in agreement with the strikingly reduced affinity. In particular, insertion of the large aromatic side chains of L10F and L33F alters intersubunit interactions and widens the PI binding site through a network of hydrophobic contacts. The two very open conformations of PR20 as well as the expanded binding site of the inhibitor-bound closed form suggest possible approaches for modifying inhibitors to target extreme drug-resistant HIV.

  9. Computational study of the resistance shown by the Subtype B / HIV-1 Protease to currently known inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Genoni, Alessandro; Morra, Giulia; Merz, Kenneth M.; Colombo, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 Protease (HIV-1 PR) is an essential enzyme in the HIV-1 life cycle. As such, this protein represents a major drug target in AIDS therapy, but emerging resistance to anti-retroviral inhibitor cocktails, due to high viral mutation rates, represents a significant challenge in AIDS treatment. Many mutations are not located within the active site or binding pocket, nor they do significantly modify the 3D structural organization of the enzyme; hence, the mechanism(s) by which they alter inhibitor affinity for the Protease remains uncertain. In this article, we present an all-atom computational analysis of the dynamic residue-residue coordination between the active site residues and the rest of the protein and of the energetic properties of different HIV-1 PR complexes. We analyze both the wild type form and mutated forms that induce drug resistance. In particular, the results show differences between the wild type and the mutants in their mechanism of dynamic coordination, in the signal propagation between the active site residues and the rest of the protein and in the energy-networks responsible for the stabilization of the bound inhibitor conformation. Finally, we propose a dynamic and energetic explanation for HIV-1 Protease drug resistance and, through this model, we identify a possible new site that could be helpful in the design of a new family of HIV-1 PR allosteric inhibitors. PMID:20415450

  10. Evolution of inhibitor-resistant natural mutant forms of HIV-1 protease probed by pre-steady state kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, Maria Yu; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Kaliberda, Elena N; Dronina, Maria A; Kolesnikov, Alexander V; Kozyr, Arina V; Smirnov, Ivan V; Rumsh, Lev D; Fedorova, Olga S; Knorre, Dmitry G; Gabibov, Alexander G; Kuznetsov, Nikita A

    2017-08-23

    Pre-steady state kinetic analysis of mechanistic features of substrate binding and processing is crucial for insight into the evolution of inhibitor-resistant forms of HIV-1 protease. These data may provide a correct vector for rational drug design assuming possible intrinsic dynamic effects. These data should also give some clues to the molecular mechanism of protease action and resistance to inhibitors. Here we report pre-steady state kinetics of the interaction of wild type or mutant forms of HIV-1 protease with a FRET-labeled peptide. The three-stage "minimal" kinetic scheme with first and second reversible steps of substrate binding and with following irreversible peptide cleavage step adequately described experimental data. For the first time, a set of "elementary" kinetic parameters of wild type HIV-1 protease and its natural mutant inhibitor-resistant forms MDR-HM, ANAM-11 and prDRV4 were compared. Inhibitors of the first and second generation were used to estimate the inhibitory effects on HIV-1 protease activity. The resulting set of kinetic data supported that the mutant forms are kinetically unaffected by inhibitors of the first generation, proving their functional resistance to these compounds. The second generation inhibitor darunavir inhibited mutant forms MDR-HM and ANAM-11, but was ineffective against prDRV4. Our kinetic data revealed that these inhibitors induced different conformational changes in the enzyme and, thereby they have different mode of binding in the enzyme active site. These data confirmed hypothesis that the driving force of the inhibitor-resistance evolution is disruption of enzyme-inhibitor complex by changing of the contact network in the inhibitor binding site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  11. The QSAR and docking calculations of fullerene derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Noha A.

    2015-02-01

    The inhibition of HIV-1 protease is considered as one of the most important targets for drug design and the deactivation of HIV-1. In the present work, the fullerene surface (C60) is modified by adding oxygen atoms as well as hydroxymethylcarbonyl (HMC) groups to form 6 investigated fullerene derivative compounds. These compounds have one, two, three, four or five O atoms + HMC groups at different positions on phenyl ring. The effect of the repeating of these groups on the ability of suggested compounds to inhibit the HIV protease is studied by calculating both Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) properties and docking simulation. Based on the QSAR descriptors, the solubility and the hydrophilicity of studied fullerene derivatives increased with increasing the number of oxygen atoms + HMC groups in the compound. While docking calculations indicate that, the compound with two oxygen atoms + HMC groups could interact and binds with HIV-1 protease active site. This is could be attributed to the active site residues of HIV-1 protease are hydrophobic except the two aspartic acids. So that, the increase in the hydrophilicity and polarity of the compound is preventing and/or decreasing the hydrophobic interaction between the compound and HIV-1 protease active site.

  12. Structure-based design of carbon nanotubes as HIV-1 protease inhibitors: atomistic and coarse-grained simulations.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan; Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua; Shi, Xinghua; Gao, Huajian

    2010-09-01

    Nanoparticles such as fullerenes and carbon nanotubes have been extensively studied for biomedical applications. In this paper, we report the design of carbon nanotubes as HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Docking and molecular dynamics calculations are performed using an atomistic model to explore the optimal interaction structure and free energy between the nanotube and HIV-1 protease. A coarse-grained model is then developed based on the atomistic model, allowing us to investigate the dynamic behaviors of the protease in the bound and unbound states. The dynamic process reveals that the carbon nanotube is able to bind to the active site of the protease and prevent the active flaps from opening up, thus blocking the function of the protease. This process is strongly influenced by the size of the nanotube. The binding of carbon nanotubes to an alternative binding site other than the active site is also explored. Therefore, carbon nanotube-based inhibitors have great potential for application as HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

  13. Multi-step inhibition explains HIV-1 protease inhibitor pharmacodynamics and resistance.

    PubMed

    Rabi, S Alireza; Laird, Gregory M; Durand, Christine M; Laskey, Sarah; Shan, Liang; Bailey, Justin R; Chioma, Stanley; Moore, Richard D; Siliciano, Robert F

    2013-09-01

    HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) are among the most effective antiretroviral drugs. They are characterized by highly cooperative dose-response curves that are not explained by current pharmacodynamic theory. An unresolved problem affecting the clinical use of PIs is that patients who fail PI-containing regimens often have virus that lacks protease mutations, in apparent violation of fundamental evolutionary theory. Here, we show that these unresolved issues can be explained through analysis of the effects of PIs on distinct steps in the viral life cycle. We found that PIs do not affect virion release from infected cells but block entry, reverse transcription, and post-reverse transcription steps. The overall dose-response curves could be reconstructed by combining the curves for each step using the Bliss independence principle, showing that independent inhibition of multiple distinct steps in the life cycle generates the highly cooperative dose-response curves that make these drugs uniquely effective. Approximately half of the inhibitory potential of PIs is manifest at the entry step, likely reflecting interactions between the uncleaved Gag and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Sequence changes in the CT alone, which are ignored in current clinical tests for PI resistance, conferred PI resistance, providing an explanation for PI failure without resistance.

  14. Critical differences in HIV-1 and HIV-2 protease specificity for clinical inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Tie, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Boross, Peter I.; Chiu, Ting-Yi; Ghosh, Arun K.; Tozser, Jozsef; Louis, John M.; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2012-03-15

    Clinical inhibitor amprenavir (APV) is less effective on HIV-2 protease (PR{sub 2}) than on HIV-1 protease (PR{sub 1}). We solved the crystal structure of PR{sub 2} with APV at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution to identify structural changes associated with the lowered inhibition. Furthermore, we analyzed the PR{sub 1} mutant (PR{sub 1M}) with substitutions V32I, I47V, and V82I that mimic the inhibitor binding site of PR{sub 2}. PR{sub 1M} more closely resembled PR{sub 2} than PR{sub 1} in catalytic efficiency on four substrate peptides and inhibition by APV, whereas few differences were seen for two other substrates and inhibition by saquinavir (SQV) and darunavir (DRV). High resolution crystal structures of PR{sub 1M} with APV, DRV, and SQV were compared with available PR{sub 1} and PR{sub 2} complexes. Val/Ile32 and Ile/Val47 showed compensating interactions with SQV in PR{sub 1M} and PR{sub 1}, however, Ile82 interacted with a second SQV bound in an extension of the active site cavity of PR{sub 1M}. Residues 32 and 82 maintained similar interactions with DRV and APV in all the enzymes, whereas Val47 and Ile47 had opposing effects in the two subunits. Significantly diminished interactions were seen for the aniline of APV bound in PR{sub 1M} and PR{sub 2} relative to the strong hydrogen bonds observed in PR{sub 1}, consistent with 15- and 19-fold weaker inhibition, respectively. Overall, PR{sub 1M} partially replicates the specificity of PR{sub 2} and gives insight into drug resistant mutations at residues 32, 47, and 82. Moreover, this analysis provides a structural explanation for the weaker antiviral effects of APV on HIV-2.

  15. Critical differences in HIV-1 and HIV-2 protease specificity for clinical inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tie, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Boross, Peter I; Chiu, Ting-Yi; Ghosh, Arun K; Tozser, Jozsef; Louis, John M; Harrison, Robert W; Weber, Irene T

    2012-03-01

    Clinical inhibitor amprenavir (APV) is less effective on HIV-2 protease (PR₂) than on HIV-1 protease (PR₁). We solved the crystal structure of PR₂ with APV at 1.5 Å resolution to identify structural changes associated with the lowered inhibition. Furthermore, we analyzed the PR₁ mutant (PR(1M) ) with substitutions V32I, I47V, and V82I that mimic the inhibitor binding site of PR₂. PR(1M) more closely resembled PR₂ than PR₁ in catalytic efficiency on four substrate peptides and inhibition by APV, whereas few differences were seen for two other substrates and inhibition by saquinavir (SQV) and darunavir (DRV). High resolution crystal structures of PR(1M) with APV, DRV, and SQV were compared with available PR₁ and PR₂ complexes. Val/Ile32 and Ile/Val47 showed compensating interactions with SQV in PR(1M) and PR₁, however, Ile82 interacted with a second SQV bound in an extension of the active site cavity of PR(1M). Residues 32 and 82 maintained similar interactions with DRV and APV in all the enzymes, whereas Val47 and Ile47 had opposing effects in the two subunits. Significantly diminished interactions were seen for the aniline of APV bound in PR₁ (M) and PR₂ relative to the strong hydrogen bonds observed in PR₁, consistent with 15- and 19-fold weaker inhibition, respectively. Overall, PR(1M) partially replicates the specificity of PR₂ and gives insight into drug resistant mutations at residues 32, 47, and 82. Moreover, this analysis provides a structural explanation for the weaker antiviral effects of APV on HIV-2. Copyright © 2012 The Protein Society.

  16. A preference-based free-energy parameterization of enzyme-inhibitor binding. Applications to HIV-1-protease inhibitor design.

    PubMed Central

    Wallqvist, A.; Jernigan, R. L.; Covell, D. G.

    1995-01-01

    The interface between protein receptor-ligand complexes has been studied with respect to their binary interatomic interactions. Crystal structure data have been used to catalogue surfaces buried by atoms from each member of a bound complex and determine a statistical preference for pairs of amino-acid atoms. A simple free energy model of the receptor-ligand system is constructed from these atom-atom preferences and used to assess the energetic importance of interfacial interactions. The free energy approximation of binding strength in this model has a reliability of about +/- 1.5 kcal/mol, despite limited knowledge of the unbound states. The main utility of such a scheme lies in the identification of important stabilizing atomic interactions across the receptor-ligand interface. Thus, apart from an overall hydrophobic attraction (Young L, Jernigan RL, Covell DG, 1994, Protein Sci 3:717-729), a rich variety of specific interactions is observed. An analysis of 10 HIV-1 protease inhibitor complexes is presented that reveals a common binding motif comprised of energetically important contacts with a rather limited set of atoms. Design improvements to existing HIV-1 protease inhibitors are explored based on a detailed analysis of this binding motif. PMID:8528086

  17. Effect of Biomolecular Conformation on Docking Simulation: A Case Study on a Potent HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Razzaghi-Asl, Nima; Sepehri, Saghi; Ebadi, Ahmad; Miri, Ramin; Shahabipour, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is a disease pertained to the human immune system. Given its crucial role in viral replication, HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) is a prime therapeutic target in AIDS therapy. In this regard, the dynamic aspects of ligand-enzyme interactions may indicate an important role of conformational variability in HIV-1 PR inhibitor/drug design. In the present contribution, the effect of HIV-1 PR flexibility (within multiple crystallographic structures of HIV-1 PR) on binding to the Amprenavir was elucidated via an ensemble docking approach. Molecular docking studies were performed via advanced AutoDock4.2 software. Ensemble docking of Amprenavir into the active site of various conformations of HIV-1 PR predicted different interaction modes/energies. Analysis of binding factors in terms of docking false negatives/positives revealed a determinant role of enzyme conformational variation in prediction of optimum induced fit (PDB ID: 1HPV). The outcomes of this study demonstrated that conformation of receptor may significantly affect the accuracy of docking/binding results in structure-based rational design of anti HIV-1 PR agents. Furthermore; some strategies to re-score the docking results in HIV-1 PR targeted docking studies were proposed. PMID:26330867

  18. HIV-1 protease inhibitor induced oxidative stress suppresses glucose stimulated insulin release: protection with thymoquinone.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Surabhi; Mondal, Debasis; Agrawal, Krishna C

    2009-04-01

    The highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) regimen has considerably reduced the mortality rate in HIV-1 positive patients. However, long-term exposure to HAART is associated with a metabolic syndrome manifesting cardiovascular dysfunction, lipodystrophy, and insulin resistance syndrome (IRS). The inclusion of HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) in HAART has been linked to the induction of IRS. Although several molecular mechanisms of PI-induced effects on insulin action have been postulated, the deleterious effects of PIs on insulin production by pancreatic beta-cells have not been fully investigated and therapeutic strategies to ameliorate insulin dysregulation at this level have not been targeted. The present study showed that exposure to several different PIs, nelfinavir (5-10 microM), saquinavir (5-10 microM) and atazanavir (8-20 microM), decreases glucose stimulated insulin secretion from rat pancreatic beta-cells (INS-1). Nelfinavir significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and suppressed cytosolic, but not mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels. Nelfinvair also decreased both glutathione and ATP and increased UCP2 levels in these cells. Simultaneous treatment with thymoquinone (TQ) (2.5 microM), an active ingredient of black seed oil, significantly inhibited the effect of nelfinavir on augmented ROS production and suppressed SOD levels. Both TQ and black seed oil exposure increased glucose stimulated insulin secretion and ameliorated the suppressive effect of nelfinavir. The present findings imply a direct role of ROS in PI induced deleterious effects on pancreatic beta-cells. Our findings also suggest that TQ may be used as a potential therapeutic agent to normalize the dysregulated insulin production observed in HAART treated patients.

  19. The Effect of Clade-Specific Sequence Polymorphisms on HIV-1 Protease Activity and Inhibitor Resistance Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Bandaranayake, Rajintha M.; Kolli, Madhavi; King, Nancy M.; Nalivaika, Ellen A.; Heroux, Annie; Kakizawa, Junko; Sugiura, Wataru; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2010-09-08

    The majority of HIV-1 infections around the world result from non-B clade HIV-1 strains. The CRF01{_}AE (AE) strain is seen principally in Southeast Asia. AE protease differs by {approx}10% in amino acid sequence from clade B protease and carries several naturally occurring polymorphisms that are associated with drug resistance in clade B. AE protease has been observed to develop resistance through a nonactive-site N88S mutation in response to nelfinavir (NFV) therapy, whereas clade B protease develops both the active-site mutation D30N and the nonactive-site mutation N88D. Structural and biochemical studies were carried out with wild-type and NFV-resistant clade B and AE protease variants. The relationship between clade-specific sequence variations and pathways to inhibitor resistance was also assessed. AE protease has a lower catalytic turnover rate than clade B protease, and it also has weaker affinity for both NFV and darunavir (DRV). This weaker affinity may lead to the nonactive-site N88S variant in AE, which exhibits significantly decreased affinity for both NFV and DRV. The D30N/N88D mutations in clade B resulted in a significant loss of affinity for NFV and, to a lesser extent, for DRV. A comparison of crystal structures of AE protease shows significant structural rearrangement in the flap hinge region compared with those of clade B protease and suggests insights into the alternative pathways to NFV resistance. In combination, our studies show that sequence polymorphisms within clades can alter protease activity and inhibitor binding and are capable of altering the pathway to inhibitor resistance.

  20. 3D-QSAR studies on chromone derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn; Samee, Weerasak; Pimthon, Jutarat

    2004-02-01

    The three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) approach using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) was applied to a series of 30 chromone derivatives, a new class of HIV-1 protease inhibitors. The best predictive CoMFA model gives cross-validated r2 ( q2)=0.763, non-cross-validated r2=0.967, standard error of estimate ( S)=5.092, F=90.701. The best CoMSIA model has q2=0.707, non-cross-validated r2=0.943, S=7.018, F=51.734, included steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic, and hydrogen bond donor fields. The predictive ability of these models was validated by a set of five compounds that were not included in the training set. The calculated (predicted) and experimental inhibitory activities were well correlated. The contour maps obtained from CoMFA and CoMSIA models were in agreement with the previous docking study for this chromone series.

  1. [Dysmetabolic syndrome related to HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Review of the literature and personal data].

    PubMed

    Urso, R; Croce, G F; Tubili, C; De Marco, M; La Scala, P; Luglio, D; Narciso, P

    2000-02-01

    HIV-positive patients receiving antiretroviral therapy with HIV-1 protease-inhibitors (PI) frequently show insulin-resistance, impaired glucose tolerance, hypertriglyceridaemia and lipodystrophy (LD). LD has often been reported only after the beginning of PI therapy. Some authors link LD to HIV chronic infection, some others suggest that PIs increase pre-existent disturb. Preliminary data of an observational study drawn in IV day-hospital of Spallanzani Institute in Rome showed hypertriglyceridaemia in 36.4% and hyperglycaemia in 11.2% of patients treated with PI. Carr suggests that such drugs should have this lipid-increasing effect because of their inhibition of low density lipoprotein-receptor-related protein, cytoplasmic retinoic-acid binding protein type 1 and P450 3A cytochrome. This theory doesn't explain why both untreated patients and treated with only reverse transcriptase inhibitors show sometimes the same disorders. According to another hypothesis Tumor necrosis factor-alpha, through inhibition of lipoprotein-lipase, would determine high fat-storage in the adipose tissue. Cardiovascular risk factors have always to be assessed before starting a therapy with PI. Glycaemia, triglyceridaemia, cholesterolaemia have to be performed every three months during the treatment and, if necessary, C-Peptide and insulinaemia too. A treatment with lipid-lowering drugs is always recommended in patients with hypertriglyceridaemia > 500 mg/dl and/or hypercholesterolaemia LDL > 190 mg/dl in two following checks. Fibrates have proven to be effective in reducing hypertriglyceridaemia, but there is no certainty that such therapies could have good effects on the LD itself too.

  2. Design, Synthesis, and Biological and Structural Evaluations of Novel HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors To Combat Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Parai, Maloy Kumar; Huggins, David J.; Cao, Hong; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Tidor, Bruce; Rana, Tariq M.

    2012-09-11

    A series of new HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) were designed using a general strategy that combines computational structure-based design with substrate-envelope constraints. The PIs incorporate various alcohol-derived P2 carbamates with acyclic and cyclic heteroatomic functionalities into the (R)-hydroxyethylamine isostere. Most of the new PIs show potent binding affinities against wild-type HIV-1 protease and three multidrug resistant (MDR) variants. In particular, inhibitors containing the 2,2-dichloroacetamide, pyrrolidinone, imidazolidinone, and oxazolidinone moieties at P2 are the most potent with Ki values in the picomolar range. Several new PIs exhibit nanomolar antiviral potencies against patient-derived wild-type viruses from HIV-1 clades A, B, and C and two MDR variants. Crystal structure analyses of four potent inhibitors revealed that carbonyl groups of the new P2 moieties promote extensive hydrogen bond interactions with the invariant Asp29 residue of the protease. These structure-activity relationship findings can be utilized to design new PIs with enhanced enzyme inhibitory and antiviral potencies.

  3. A cell-free enzymatic activity assay for the evaluation of HIV-1 drug resistance to protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Satoko; Masaoka, Takashi; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Morishita, Ryo; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Tatsumi, Masashi; Endo, Yaeta; Yamamoto, Naoki; Sugiura, Wataru; Ryo, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Due to their high frequency of genomic mutations, human retroviruses often develop resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a significant obstacle to the effective long-term treatment of HIV infection. The development of a rapid and versatile drug-susceptibility assay would enable acquisition of phenotypic information and facilitate determination of the appropriate choice of antiretroviral agents. In this study, we developed a novel in vitro method, termed the Cell-free drug susceptibility assay (CFDSA), for monitoring phenotypic information regarding the drug resistance of HIV-1 protease (PR). The CFDSA utilizes a wheat germ cell-free protein production system to synthesize enzymatically active HIV-1 PRs directly from PCR products amplified from HIV-1 molecular clones or clinical isolates in a rapid one-step procedure. Enzymatic activity of PRs can be readily measured by AlphaScreen (Amplified Luminescent Proximity Homogeneous Assay Screen) in the presence or absence of clinically used protease inhibitors (PIs). CFDSA measurement of drug resistance was based on the fold resistance to the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of various PIs. The CFDSA could serve as a non-infectious, rapid, accessible, and reliable alternative to infectious cell-based phenotypic assays for evaluation of PI-resistant HIV-1. PMID:26583013

  4. Determination of the absolute binding free energies of HIV-1 protease inhibitors using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Son Tung; Nguyen, Minh Tung; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2017-05-01

    The absolute binding free energy of an inhibitor to HIV-1 Protease (PR) was determined throughout evaluation of the non-bonded interaction energy difference between the two bound and unbound states of the inhibitor and surrounding molecules by the fast pulling of ligand (FPL) process using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. The calculated free energy difference terms help clarifying the nature of the binding. Theoretical binding affinities are in good correlation with experimental data, with R = 0.89. The paradigm used is able to rank two inhibitors having the maximum difference of ∼1.5 kcal/mol in absolute binding free energies.

  5. HIV-1 Protease: Structure, Dynamics and Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, John M.; Ishima, R.; Torchia, D.A.; Weber, Irene T.

    2008-06-03

    The HIV-1 protease is synthesized as part of a large Gag-Pol precursor protein. It is responsible for its own release from the precursor and the processing of the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins into the mature structural and functional proteins required for virus maturation. Because of its indispensable role, the mature HIV-1 protease dimer has proven to be a successful target for the development of antiviral agents. In the last 5 years, a major emphasis in protease research has been to improve inhibitor design and treatment regimens.

  6. Combinations of reverse transcriptase, protease, and integrase inhibitors can be synergistic in vitro against drug-sensitive and RT inhibitor-resistant molecular clones of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Beale, K K; Robinson, W E

    2000-06-01

    Combinations of anti-HIV agents including one or two reverse transcriptase inhibitors with a protease inhibitor are potent and effective. However, toxicities, costs and the emergence of drug-resistant organisms have compromised their long-term efficacy in people. A next, likely, target for anti-HIV therapy is HIV-1 integrase. Viral integration, catalyzed by integrase, is absolutely required for HIV replication. L-chicoric acid is a potent and selective inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase that also inhibits HIV-1 replication in cell culture. As a first step in understanding the potential role for integrase inhibitors in clinical medicine, the activities of L-chicoric acid alone and in combination with 2', 3'-dideoxycytidine, zidovudine, and a protease inhibitor, nelfinavir, were tested in vitro against molecular clones of HIV-1 resistant to reverse transcriptase inhibitors. L-chicoric acid was equally effective against a wild-type clone of HIV-1, HIV(NL4-3), or against HIV-1 resistant to either zidovudine or dideoxycytidine. L-chicoric acid was largely synergistic with zidovudine and synergistic with both dideoxycytidine and nelfinavir.

  7. Design of Gem-difluoro-bis-Tetrahydrofuran as P2-Ligand for HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors to Improve Brain Penetration: Synthesis, X-ray Studies, and Biological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Yashchuk, Sofiya; Mizuno, Akira; Chakraborty, Nilanjana; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Aoki, Manabu; Gomez, Pedro Miguel Salcedo; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Structure-based design, synthesis, biological evaluation and X-ray structural studies of fluorine containing HIV-1 protease inhibitors are described. The synthesis of both enantiomers of the gem-difluoro-bis-THF ligands was carried out in a stereoselective manner using a Reformatskii-Claisen reaction as the key step. Optically active ligands HIV-1LAI were converted to protease inhibitors. Two of these inhibitors (3 and 4) exhibited HIV-1 protease inhibitory Ki’s in picomolar range. Both inhibitors showed very potent antiviral activity with EC50 values of 0.8 nM and 3.1 nM respectively against the laboratory strain HIV-1LAI. Both inhibitors exhibited improved lipophilicity profiles compared to darunavir. Also, both inhibitors showed much improved blood-brain-barrier permeability in an in vitro model. A high resolution X-ray structure of inhibitor 4-bound HIV-1 protease was determined. The X-ray structure revealed that fluoro ligand makes extensive interactions with the HIV-1 protease S2 subsite, including hydrogen-bonding interactions with the protease backbone atoms. Also, both fluorine atoms on the bis-THF ligand formed strong interactions with the flap Gly48 carbonyl oxygen. PMID:25336073

  8. Structural and electronic properties of new fullerene derivatives and their possible application as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Medhat; Saleh, Noha A.; Hameed, Ali Jameel; Elshemey, Wael M.; Elsayed, Anwar A.

    2010-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out at the hybrid Becke 3-Lee-Yang-Parr; B3LYP/3-21G** level of theory to study two series of hydroxy-chalca-acetic acid-(4-pyrrolidin-1-yl-phenyl) ester [C 60-C 2H 4N-(4-XCOCH 2OH)C 6H 4] and hydroxy-chalcoacetic acid-[2-(2-hydroxy-acetylchalcanyl)-4-pyrrolidin-1-yl-phenyl] ester[C 60-C 2H 4N-(3,4-XCOCH 2OH)C 6H 4]. The X atom is O, S or Se for the two series. The vibrational spectra, physical, chemical, thermodynamics and Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) properties of the studied molecules are calculated and discussed. We have evaluated these molecules as HIV-1 protease inhibitors based on the hydrogenation interaction between the hydroxymethylcarbonyl (HMC) groups and the two aspartic acid of the HIV-1 protease active site. Results show that some of the investigated fullerene-based derivatives can be considered promising as HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

  9. Comparison of azacyclic urea A-98881 as HIV-1 protease inhibitor with cage dimeric N-benzyl 4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,4- dihydropyridine as representative of a novel class of HIV-1 protease inhibitors: A molecular modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgeroth, Andreas; Fleischer, Romy; Wiese, Michael; Heinemann, Frank W.

    1999-05-01

    The functional groups of cage dimeric N-alkyl substituted 3,5-bis(hydroxymethyl)-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,4-dihydropyridines are similar to those of cyclic and azacyclic ureas that are potent inhibitors of HIV-1 protease of the dihydroxyethylene- and hydroxyethylene type, respectively. In the following study the conformity of common functional groups is investigated concerning their orientation in space as well as in the enzyme HIV-1 protease. Starting from X-ray crystal data of the centrosymmetric cage dimeric N-benzyl derivative with ester groups, the derivative with hydroxymethylene groups was built and a systematic conformational search was performed for the conformationally important torsion angles considering electrostatic and van der Waals interactions. From the huge number of conformations those comprising centrosymmetrical and C2-symmetrical energy minima were selected and minimized. The three remaining conformers were fitted to the azacyclic urea A-98881 selected from the HIV-1 protease enzyme- inhibitor complex using the centroids of the corresponding aromatic residues and additionally by the field fit option of the Advanced CoMFA module of SYBYL. Interestingly, the energetically most favourable one, which, additionally, possesses C2-symmetry like the active site cavity of HIV-1 protease, showed the best fit. Comparing the electrostatic potential (EP) of the latter with the EP of A-98881 the aromatic residues show excellent accordance. Slight differences in the extent of the EP were found in the areas of the hydroxymethylene groups of the cage dimer and the single hydroxy group as well as the urea carbonyl group of A- 98881, respectively. In order to compare the binding possibilities to the enzyme HIV-1 protease for the cage dimer and A-98881, their interaction fields with certain probes (CH3 for alkyl, NHamide, and carbonyl, O- of COO-), representing the decisive functional groups of the active site, have been calculated using GRID and projected into the

  10. Structure-based Design of Potent HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with Modified P1 - Biphenyl Ligands: Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Enzyme-inhibitor X-ray Structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Yu, Xufen; Osswald, Heather L.; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    We report the design, synthesis, X-ray structural studies, and biological evaluation of a novel series of HIV-1 protease inhibitors. We designed a variety of functionalized biphenyl derivatives to make enhanced van der Waals interactions in the S1 subsite of HIV-1 protease. These biphenyl derivatives were conveniently synthesized using a Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction as the key step. We examined the potential of these functionalized biphenyl-derived P1 ligands in combination with 3-(S)-tetrahydrofuranyl urethane and bis-tetrahydrofuranyl urethane as the P2 ligands. Inhibitor 21e, with a 2-methoxy-1, 1’-biphenyl derivative as P1 ligand and bis-THF as the P2 ligand, displayed the most potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity. This inhibitor also exhibited potent activity against a panel of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants. A high resolution X-ray crystal structure of related Boc-derivative 17a-bound HIV-1 protease provided important molecular insight into the ligand-binding site interactions of the biphenyl core in the S1 subsite of HIV-1 protease. PMID:26107245

  11. Synthesis, in vitro evaluation, and docking studies of novel chromone derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn; Wiwat, Chanpen; Samee, Weerasak; Nunthanavanit, Patcharawee; Phosrithong, Narumol

    2011-08-01

    Novel chromone derivatives with a benzopyran-4-one scaffold have been prepared by the one-pot cyclization reaction. The in vitro inhibitory activity of these new compounds towards HIV-1 protease have been evaluated using stop time HPLC method as the preliminary screening. The most potent compound, 7,8-dihydroxy-2-(3'-trifluoromethyl phenyl)-3-(3″-trifluoromethylbenzoyl)chromone ( 32), showed IC 50 = 0.34 μM. The molecular docking study supported results from experimental activity testing and also provided structure-activity relationship of this series.

  12. Sensitive Deep-Sequencing-Based HIV-1 Genotyping Assay To Simultaneously Determine Susceptibility to Protease, Reverse Transcriptase, Integrase, and Maturation Inhibitors, as Well as HIV-1 Coreceptor Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Richard M.; Meyer, Ashley M.; Winner, Dane; Archer, John; Feyertag, Felix; Ruiz-Mateos, Ezequiel; Leal, Manuel; Robertson, David L.; Schmotzer, Christine L.

    2014-01-01

    With 29 individual antiretroviral drugs available from six classes that are approved for the treatment of HIV-1 infection, a combination of different phenotypic and genotypic tests is currently needed to monitor HIV-infected individuals. In this study, we developed a novel HIV-1 genotypic assay based on deep sequencing (DeepGen HIV) to simultaneously assess HIV-1 susceptibilities to all drugs targeting the three viral enzymes and to predict HIV-1 coreceptor tropism. Patient-derived gag-p2/NCp7/p1/p6/pol-PR/RT/IN- and env-C2V3 PCR products were sequenced using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. Reads spanning the 3′ end of the Gag, protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), integrase (IN), and V3 regions were extracted, truncated, translated, and assembled for genotype and HIV-1 coreceptor tropism determination. DeepGen HIV consistently detected both minority drug-resistant viruses and non-R5 HIV-1 variants from clinical specimens with viral loads of ≥1,000 copies/ml and from B and non-B subtypes. Additional mutations associated with resistance to PR, RT, and IN inhibitors, previously undetected by standard (Sanger) population sequencing, were reliably identified at frequencies as low as 1%. DeepGen HIV results correlated with phenotypic (original Trofile, 92%; enhanced-sensitivity Trofile assay [ESTA], 80%; TROCAI, 81%; and VeriTrop, 80%) and genotypic (population sequencing/Geno2Pheno with a 10% false-positive rate [FPR], 84%) HIV-1 tropism test results. DeepGen HIV (83%) and Trofile (85%) showed similar concordances with the clinical response following an 8-day course of maraviroc monotherapy (MCT). In summary, this novel all-inclusive HIV-1 genotypic and coreceptor tropism assay, based on deep sequencing of the PR, RT, IN, and V3 regions, permits simultaneous multiplex detection of low-level drug-resistant and/or non-R5 viruses in up to 96 clinical samples. This comprehensive test, the first of its class, will be instrumental in the development of new

  13. Crystal structure of chemically synthesized HIV-1 protease and a ketomethylene isostere inhibitor based on the p2/NC cleavage site

    SciTech Connect

    Torbeev, Vladimir Yu.; Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Terechko, Valentina A.; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2009-09-02

    Here we report the X-ray structures of chemically synthesized HIV-1 protease and the inactive [D25N]HIV-1 protease complexed with the ketomethylene isostere inhibitor Ac-Thr-Ile-Nle{psi}[CO-CH{sub 2}]Nle-Gln-Arg.amide at 1.4 and 1.8 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In complex with the active enzyme, the keto-group was found to be converted into the hydrated gem-diol, while the structure of the complex with the inactive D25N enzyme revealed an intact keto-group. These data support the general acid-general base mechanism for HIV-1 protease catalysis.

  14. Novel HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors (PIs) Containing a Bicyclic P2 Functional Moiety, Tetrahydropyrano-Tetrahydrofuran, That Are Potent against Multi-PI-Resistant HIV-1 Variants▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Kazuhiko; Aoki, Manabu; Amano, Masayuki; Koh, Yasuhiro; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Das, Debananda; Leschenko, Sofiya; Chapsal, Bruno; Ghosh, Arun K.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    We identified GRL-1388 and -1398, potent nonpeptidic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors (PIs) containing a bicyclic P2 functional moiety, tetrahydropyrano-tetrahydrofuran (Tp-THF). GRL-1388 was as potent as darunavir (DRV) against various drug-resistant HIV-1 laboratory strains with 50% effective concentration (EC50s) of 2.6 to 32.6 nM. GRL-1398 was significantly more potent against such variants than DRV with EC50s of 0.1 to 5.7 nM. GRL-1388 and -1398 were also potent against multiple-PI-resistant clinical HIV-1 variants (CLHIV-1MDR) with EC50s ranging from 2.7 to 21.3 nM and from 0.3 to 4.8 nM, respectively. A highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 variant selected in vitro remained susceptible to GRL-1398 with the EC50 of 21.9 nM, while the EC50 of DRV was 214.1 nM. When HIV-1NL4-3 was selected with GRL-1398, four amino acid substitutions—leucine to phenylalanine at a position 10 (L10F), A28S, L33F, and M46I—emerged, ultimately enabling the virus to replicate in the presence of >1.0 μM the compound beyond 57 weeks of selection. When a mixture of 10 different CLHIV-1MDR strains was selected, the emergence of resistant variants was more substantially delayed with GRL-1398 than with GRL-1388 and DRV. Modeling analyses revealed that GRL-1398 had greater overall hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions than GRL-1388 and DRV and that GRL-1388 and -1398 had hydrogen bonding interactions with the main chain of the active-site amino acids (Asp29 and Asp30) of protease. The present findings warrant that GRL-1398 be further developed as a potential drug for treating individuals with HIV-1 infection. PMID:21282450

  15. Design of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with C3-Substituted Hexahydrocyclopentafuranyl Urethanes as P2-Ligands: Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Protein-Ligand X-ray Crystal Structure

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Chapsal, Bruno D.; Parham, Garth L.; Steffey, Melinda; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    We report the design, synthesis, biological evaluation, and the X-ray crystal structure of a novel inhibitor-bound HIV-1 protease. Various C3-functionalized cyclopentanyltetrahydrofurans (Cp-THF) were designed to interact with the flap Gly48 carbonyl or amide NH in the S2-subsite of the HIV-1 protease. We investigated the potential of those functionalized ligands in combination with hydroxyethyl sulfonamide isosteres. Inhibitor 26 containing a 3-(R)-hydroxyl group on the Cp-THF core, displayed the most potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity. Our studies revealed a preference for the 3-(R)-configuration over the corresponding 3-(S)-derivative. Inhibitor 26 exhibited potent activity against a panel of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants. A high resolution X-ray structure of 26-bound HIV-1 protease revealed important molecular insight into the ligand-binding site interactions. PMID:21800876

  16. Design of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with C3-Substituted Hexahydrocyclopentafuranyl Urethanes as P2-Ligands: Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Protein-Ligand X-ray Crystal Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K; Chapsal, Bruno D; Parham, Garth L; Steffey, Melinda; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2011-11-07

    We report the design, synthesis, biological evaluation, and the X-ray crystal structure of a novel inhibitor bound to the HIV-1 protease. Various C3-functionalized cyclopentanyltetrahydrofurans (Cp-THF) were designed to interact with the flap Gly48 carbonyl or amide NH in the S2-subsite of the HIV-1 protease. We investigated the potential of those functionalized ligands in combination with hydroxyethylsulfonamide isosteres. Inhibitor 26 containing a 3-(R)-hydroxyl group on the Cp-THF core displayed the most potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity. Our studies revealed a preference for the 3-(R)-configuration over the corresponding 3-(S)-derivative. Inhibitor 26 exhibited potent activity against a panel of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants. A high resolution X-ray structure of 26-bound HIV-1 protease revealed important molecular insight into the ligand-binding site interactions.

  17. Prevalence, Mutation Patterns, and Effects on Protease Inhibitor Susceptibility of the L76V Mutation in HIV-1 Protease▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Young, Thomas P.; Parkin, Neil T.; Stawiski, Eric; Pilot-Matias, Tami; Trinh, Roger; Kempf, Dale J.; Norton, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Patterns of HIV-1 protease inhibitor (PI) resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) and effects on PI susceptibility associated with the L76V mutation were studied in a large database. Of 20,501 sequences with ≥1 PI RAM, 3.2% contained L76V; L76V was alone in 0.04%. Common partner mutations included M46I, I54V, V82A, I84V, and L90M. L76V was associated with a 2- to 6-fold decrease in susceptibility to lopinavir, darunavir, amprenavir, and indinavir and a 7- to 8-fold increase in susceptibility to atazanavir and saquinavir. PMID:20805393

  18. Molecular mechanisms of resistance: free energy calculations of mutation effects on inhibitor binding to HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed Central

    Rick, S. W.; Topol, I. A.; Erickson, J. W.; Burt, S. K.

    1998-01-01

    The changes in the inhibitor binding constants due to the mutation of isoleucine to valine at position 84 of HIV-1 protease are calculated using molecular dynamics simulations. The calculations are done for three potent inhibitors--KNI-272, L-735,524 (indinavir or MK-639), and Ro 31-8959 (saquinavir). The calculations agree with the experimental data both in terms of an overall trend and in the magnitude of the resulting free energy change. HIV-1 protease is a homodimer, so each mutation causes two changes in the enzyme. The decrease in the binding free energy from each mutated side chain differs among the three inhibitors and correlates well with the size of the cavities induced in the protein interior near the mutated residue. The cavities are created as a result of a mutation to a smaller side chain, but the cavities are less than would be predicted from the wild-type structures, indicating that there is significant relaxation to partially fill the cavities. PMID:10082371

  19. Selection of molecular descriptors with artificial intelligence for the understanding of HIV-1 protease peptidomimetic inhibitors-activity.

    PubMed

    Sirois, S; Tsoukas, C M; Chou, Kuo-Chen; Wei, Dongqing; Boucher, C; Hatzakis, G E

    2005-03-01

    Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) techniques are used routinely by computational chemists in drug discovery and development to analyze datasets of compounds. Quantitative numerical methods like Partial Least Squares (PLS) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) have been used on QSAR to establish correlations between molecular properties and bioactivity. However, ANN may be advantageous over PLS because it considers the interrelations of the modeled variables. This study focused on the HIV-1 Protease (HIV-1 Pr) inhibitors belonging to the peptidomimetic class of compounds. The main objective was to select molecular descriptors with the best predictive value for antiviral potency (Ki). PLS and ANN were used to predict Ki activity of HIV-1 Pr inhibitors and the results were compared. To address the issue of dimensionality reduction, Genetic Algorithms (GA) were used for variable selection and their performance was compared against that of ANN. Finally, the structure of the optimum ANN achieving the highest Pearson's-R coefficient was determined. On the basis of Pearson's-R, PLS and ANN were compared to determine which exhibits maximum performance. Training and validation of models was performed on 15 random split sets of the master dataset consisted of 231 compounds. For each compound 192 molecular descriptors were considered. The molecular structure and constant of inhibition (Ki) were selected from the NIAID database. Study findings suggested that non-covalent interactions such as hydrophobicity, shape and hydrogen bonding describe well the antiviral activity of the HIV-1 Pr compounds. The significance of lipophilicity and relationship to HIV-1 associated hyperlipidemia and lipodystrophy syndrome warrant further investigation.

  20. Effect of polarization on HIV-1protease and fluoro-substituted inhibitors binding energies by large scale molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Li L.; Zhu, T.; Li, Yu C.; Zhang, Qing G.; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water are carried out to study the binding of six inhibitors to HIV-1 protease (PR) for up to 700 ns using the standard AMBER force field and polarized protein-specific charge (PPC). PPC is derived from quantum mechanical calculation for protein in solution and therefore it includes electronic polarization effect. Our results show that in all six systems, the bridging water W301 drifts away from the binding pocket in AMBER simulation. However, it is very stable in all six complexes systems using PPC. Especially, intra-protease, protease-inhibitor hydrogen bonds are dynamic stabilized in MD simulation. The computed binding free energies of six complexes have a significantly linear correlation with those experiment values and the correlation coefficient is found to be 0.91 in PPC simulation. However, the result from AMBER simulation shows a weaker correlation with the correlation coefficient of −0.51 due to the lack of polarization effect. Detailed binding interactions of W301, inhibitors with PR are further analyzed and discussed. The present study provides important information to quantitative understanding the interaction mechanism of PR-inhibitor and PR-W301 and these data also emphasizes the importance of both the electronic polarization and the bridging water molecule in predicting precisely binding affinities. PMID:28155907

  1. Nelfinavir, an HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor, Induces Oxidative Stress–Mediated, Caspase-Independent Apoptosis in Leishmania Amastigotes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pranav; Lodge, Robert; Trudel, Nathalie; Ouellet, Michel; Ouellette, Marc; Tremblay, Michel J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis has now emerged as an important opportunistic disease in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Although the effectiveness of HIV-1 protease inhibitors, such as nelfinavir, in antiretroviral therapies is well documented, little is known of the impact of these drugs on Leishmania in coinfected individuals. Methodology and Principal Findings Here, we show that nelfinavir generates oxidative stress in the parasite, leading to altered physiological parameters such as an increase in the sub-G1 DNA content, nuclear DNA fragmentation and loss of mitochondrial potential, which are all characteristics of apoptosis. Pretreatment of axenic amastigotes with the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not inhibit the increase in sub-G1 DNA content in nelfinavir-treated parasites, suggesting therefore that this antiviral agent does not kill Leishmania amastigotes in a caspase-dependent manner. Furthermore, we observed that the mitochondrial resident protein endonuclease G is involved. We also demonstrate that parasites overexpressing GSH1 (the rate limiting enzyme of glutathione biosynthesis) were more resistant to nelfinavir when compared to untransfected controls. Conclusions and Significance These data suggest that nelfinavir induces oxidative stress in Leishmania amastigotes, culminating in caspase-independent apoptosis, in which DNA is degraded by endonuclease G. This study provides a rationale for future, long-term design of new therapeutic strategies to test nelfinavir as a potential antileishmanial agent as well as for possible future use in Leishmania/HIV-1 coinfections. PMID:20361030

  2. Constructing Interconsistent, Reasonable, and Predictive Models for Both the Kinetic and Thermodynamic Properties of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Qu, Sujun; Huang, Shuheng; Pan, Xianchao; Yang, Li; Mei, Hu

    2016-10-24

    Accumulated evidence suggests that the in vivo biological potency of a ligand is more strongly correlated with the binding/unbinding kinetics than the equilibrium thermodynamics of the protein-ligand interaction (PLI). However, the existing experimental and computational techniques are largely insufficient and limited in large-scale measurements or accurate predictions of the kinetic properties of PLI. In this work, elaborate efforts have been made to develop interconsistent, reasonable, and predictive models of the association rate constant (kon), dissociation rate constant (koff), and equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of a series of HIV protease inhibitors with different structural skeletons. The results showed that nine Volsurf descriptors derived from water (OH2) and hydrophobic (DRY) probes are key molecular determinants for the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of HIV-1 protease inhibitors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that interconsistent and reasonable models with strong prediction power have been established for both the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of HIV protease inhibitors.

  3. INTERACTIONS OF DIFFERENT INHIBITORS WITH ACTIVE-SITE ASPARTYL RESIDUES OF HIV-1 PROTEASE AND POSSIBLE RELEVANCE TO PEPSINS

    PubMed Central

    Sayer, Jane M.; Louis, John M.

    2008-01-01

    The importance of the active site region aspartyl residues 25 and 29 of the mature HIV-1 protease (PR) for the binding of five clinical and three experimental protease inhibitors (symmetric cyclic urea inhibitor DMP323, non-hydrolysable substrate analog (RPB) and the generic aspartic protease inhibitor acetyl-pepstatin (Ac-PEP)) was assessed by differential scanning calorimetry. ΔTm values, defined as the difference in Tm for a given protein in the presence and absence of inhibitor, for PR with DRV, ATV, SQV, RTV, APV, DMP323, RPB and Ac-PEP are 22.4, 20.8, 19.3, 15.6, 14.3, 14.7, 8.7, and 6.5 °C, respectively. Binding of APV and Ac-PEP is most sensitive to the D25N mutation, as shown by ΔTm ratios [ΔTm(PR)/ΔTm(PRD25N)] of 35.8 and 16.3, respectively, whereas binding of DMP323 and RPB (ΔTm ratios of 1-2) is least affected. Binding of the substrate-like inhibitors RPB and Ac-PEP is nearly abolished (ΔTm(PR)/ΔTm(PRD29N) ≥ 44) by the D29N mutation, whereas this mutation only moderately affects binding of the smaller inhibitors (ΔTm ratios of 1.4-2.2). Of the 9 FDA approved clinical HIV-1 protease inhibitors screened, APV, RTV and DRV competitively inhibit porcine pepsin with Ki values of 0.3, 0.6 and 2.14 μM, respectively. DSC results were consistent with this relatively weak binding of APV (ΔTm 2.7 °C) compared with the tight binding of AcPEP (ΔTm ≥17 °C). Comparison of superimposed structures of the PR/APV complex with those of PR/Ac-PEP and pepsin/pepstatin A complexes suggests a role for Asp215, Asp32 and Ser219 in pepsin, equivalent to Asp25, Asp25′ and Asp29 in PR, in the binding and stabilization of the pepsin/APV complex. PMID:18951411

  4. Interactions of different inhibitors with active-site aspartyl residues of HIV-1 protease and possible relevance to pepsin.

    PubMed

    Sayer, Jane M; Louis, John M

    2009-05-15

    The importance of the active site region aspartyl residues 25 and 29 of the mature HIV-1 protease (PR) for the binding of five clinical and three experimental protease inhibitors [symmetric cyclic urea inhibitor DMP323, nonhydrolyzable substrate analog (RPB) and the generic aspartic protease inhibitor acetyl-pepstatin (Ac-PEP)] was assessed by differential scanning calorimetry. DeltaT(m) values, defined as the difference in T(m) for a given protein in the presence and absence of inhibitor, for PR with DRV, ATV, SQV, RTV, APV, DMP323, RPB, and Ac-PEP are 22.4, 20.8, 19.3, 15.6, 14.3, 14.7, 8.7, and 6.5 degrees C, respectively. Binding of APV and Ac-PEP is most sensitive to the D25N mutation, as shown by DeltaT(m) ratios [DeltaT(m)(PR)/DeltaT(m)(PR(D25N))] of 35.8 and 16.3, respectively, whereas binding of DMP323 and RPB (DeltaT(m) ratios of 1-2) is least affected. Binding of the substrate-like inhibitors RPB and Ac-PEP is nearly abolished (DeltaT(m)(PR)/DeltaT(m)(PR(D29N)) > or = 44) by the D29N mutation, whereas this mutation only moderately affects binding of the smaller inhibitors (DeltaT(m) ratios of 1.4-2.2). Of the nine FDA-approved clinical HIV-1 protease inhibitors screened, APV, RTV, and DRV competitively inhibit porcine pepsin with K(i) values of 0.3, 0.6, and 2.14 microM, respectively. DSC results were consistent with this relatively weak binding of APV (DeltaT(m) 2.7 degrees C) compared with the tight binding of Ac-PEP (DeltaT(m) > or = 17 degrees C). Comparison of superimposed structures of the PR/APV complex with those of PR/Ac-PEP and pepsin/pepstatin A complexes suggests a role for Asp215, Asp32, and Ser219 in pepsin, equivalent to Asp25, Asp25', and Asp29 in PR in the binding and stabilization of the pepsin/APV complex.

  5. Highly Potent HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with Novel Tricyclic P2-ligands: Design, Synthesis, and Protein-ligand X-Ray Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Parham, Garth L.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Nyalapatla, Prasanth R.; Osswald, Heather L.; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of HIV-1 protease inhibitors incorporating stereochemically defined fused tricyclic P2-ligands are described. Various substituent effects were investigated in order to maximize the ligand-binding site interactions in the protease active site. Inhibitors 16a and 16f showed excellent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity while incorporation of sulfone functionality resulted in a decrease in potency. Both inhibitors 16a and 16f have maintained activity against a panel of multidrug resistant HIV-1 variants. A high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of 16a-bound HIV-1 protease revealed important molecular insights into the ligand-binding site interactions which may account for the inhibitor’s potent antiviral activity and excellent resistance profiles. PMID:23947685

  6. Highly Potent HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with Novel Tricyclic P2 Ligands: Design, Synthesis, and Protein-Ligand X-ray Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Parham, Garth L.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Nyalapatla, Prasanth R.; Osswald, Heather L.; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2013-10-08

    The design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of HIV-1 protease inhibitors incorporating stereochemically defined fused tricyclic P2 ligands are described. Various substituent effects were investigated to maximize the ligand-binding site interactions in the protease active site. Inhibitors 16a and 16f showed excellent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity, although the incorporation of sulfone functionality resulted in a decrease in potency. Both inhibitors 16a and 16f maintained activity against a panel of multidrug resistant HIV-1 variants. A high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of 16a-bound HIV-1 protease revealed important molecular insights into the ligand-binding site interactions, which may account for the inhibitor’s potent antiviral activity and excellent resistance profiles.

  7. Docking and 3-D QSAR studies on the binding of tetrahydropyrimid-2-one HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Shashidhar N.; Balaji, Govardhan A.; Balaji, Vitukudi N.

    2013-06-01

    We present molecular docking and 3-D QSAR studies on a series of tetrahydropyrimid-2-one HIV-1 protease inhibitors whose binding affinities to the enzyme span nearly 6 orders of magnitude. The docking investigations have been carried out with Surflex (GEOM, GEOMX) and Glide (SP and XP) methodologies available through Tripos and Schrodinger suite of tools in the context of Sybyl-X and Maestro interfaces, respectively. The alignments for 3-D QSAR studies were obtained by using the automated Surflex-SIM methodology in Sybyl-X and the analyses were performed using the CoMFA and CoMSIA methods. Additionally, the top-ranked poses obtained from various docking protocols were also employed to generate CoMFA and CoMSIA models to evaluate the qualitative consistency of the docked models with experimental data. Our studies demonstrate that while there are a number of common features in the docked models obtained from Surflex-dock and Glide methodologies, the former sets of models are generally better correlated with deduced experimental binding modes based on the X-ray structures of known HIV-1 protease complexes with cyclic ureas. The urea moiety common to all the ligands are much more tightly aligned in Surflex docked structures than in the models obtained from Glide SP and XP dockings. The 3-D QSAR models are qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those previously reported, suggesting the utility of automatically generated alignments from Surflex-SIM methodology.

  8. The Folding Free Energy Surface of HIV-1 Protease: Insights into the Thermodynamic Basis for Resistance to Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Amanda F.; Bilsel, Osman; Kundu, Agnita; Wu, Ying; Zitzewitz, Jill A.; Matthews, C. Robert

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous mutations at numerous sites distant from the active site of HIV-1 protease enable resistance to inhibitors while retaining enzymatic activity. As a benchmark for probing the effects of these mutations on the conformational adaptability of this dimeric β-barrel protein, the folding free energy surface of a pseudo wild-type variant, HIV-PR*, was determined by a combination of equilibrium and kinetic experiments on the urea-induced unfolding/refolding reactions. The equilibrium unfolding reaction was well-described by a two-state model involving only the native dimeric form and the unfolded monomer. The global analysis of the kinetic folding mechanism reveals the presence of a fully-folded monomeric intermediate that associates to form the native dimeric structure. Independent analysis of a stable monomeric version of the protease demonstrated that a small amplitude fluorescence phase in refolding and unfolding, not included in the global analysis of the dimeric protein, reflects the presence of a transient intermediate in the monomer folding reaction. The partially-folded and fully-folded monomers are only marginally stable with respect to the unfolded state, and the dimerization reaction provides a modest driving force at micromolar concentrations of protein. The thermodynamic properties of this system are such that mutations can readily shift the equilibrium from the dimeric native state towards weakly-folded states that have a lower affinity for inhibitors, but that could be induced to bind to their target proteolytic sites. Presumably, subsequent secondary mutations increase the stability of the native dimeric state in these variants and, thereby, optimize the catalytic properties of the resistant HIV-1 protease. PMID:19150359

  9. Adherence to protease inhibitors, HIV-1 viral load, and development of drug resistance in an indigent population.

    PubMed

    Bangsberg, D R; Hecht, F M; Charlebois, E D; Zolopa, A R; Holodniy, M; Sheiner, L; Bamberger, J D; Chesney, M A; Moss, A

    2000-03-10

    To examine the relationship between adherence, viral suppression and antiretroviral resistance in HIV-infected homeless and marginally housed people on protease inhibitor (PI) therapy. A cross-sectional analysis of subjects in an observational prospective cohort systematically sampled from free meal lines, homeless shelters and low-income, single-room occupancy (SRO) hotels. Thirty-four HIV-infected people with a median of 12 months of PI therapy. Adherence measured by periodic unannounced pill counts, electronic medication monitoring, and self-report; HIV RNA viral load; and HIV-1 genotypic changes associated with drug resistance. Median adherence was 89, 73, and 67% by self-report, pill count, and electronic medication monitor, respectively. Thirty-eight per cent of the population had over 90% adherence by pill count. Depending on the measure, adherence explained 36-65% of the variation in concurrent HIV RNA levels. The three adherence measures were closely related. Of 20 genotyped patients who received a new reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) when starting a PI, three had primary protease gene substitutions. Of 12 genotyped patients who received a PI without a new RTI, six had primary protease gene substitutions (P < 0.03). A substantial proportion of homeless and marginally housed individuals had good adherence to PI therapy. A strong relationship was found between independent methods of measuring adherence and concurrent viral suppression. PI resistance was more closely related to the failure to change RTI when starting a PI than to the level of adherence.

  10. Design, Synthesis, and X-ray Structure of Substituted Bis-tetrahydrofuran (Bis-THF)-Derived Potent HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Steffey, Melinda; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Agniswamy, Johnson; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2012-06-18

    We investigated substituted bis-THF-derived HIV-1 protease inhibitors in order to enhance ligand-binding site interactions in the HIV-1 protease active site. In this context, we have carried out convenient syntheses of optically active bis-THF and C4-substituted bis-THF ligands using a [2,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement as the key step. The synthesis provided convenient access to a number of substituted bis-THF derivatives. Incorporation of these ligands led to a series of potent HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Inhibitor 23c turned out to be the most potent (K{sub i} = 2.9 pM; IC{sub 50} = 2.4 nM) among the inhibitors. An X-ray structure of 23c-bound HIV-1 protease showed extensive interactions of the inhibitor with the protease active site, including a unique water-mediated hydrogen bond to the Gly-48 amide NH in the S2 site.

  11. Identification of Novel HIV 1- Protease Inhibitors: Application of Ligand and Structure Based Pharmacophore Mapping and Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Divya; Paliwal, Sarvesh; Yadav, Rakesh; Pal, Mahima; Pandey, Anubhuti

    2012-01-01

    A combined ligand and structure-based drug design approach provides a synergistic advantage over either methods performed individually. Present work bestows a good assembly of ligand and structure-based pharmacophore generation concept. Ligand-oriented study was accomplished by employing the HypoGen module of Catalyst in which we have translated the experimental findings into 3-D pharmacophore models by identifying key features (four point pharmacophore) necessary for interaction of the inhibitors with the active site of HIV-1 protease enzyme using a training set of 33 compounds belonging to the cyclic cyanoguanidines and cyclic urea derivatives. The most predictive pharmacophore model (hypothesis 1), consisting of four features, namely, two hydrogen bond acceptors and two hydrophobic, showed a correlation (r) of 0.90 and a root mean square of 0.71 and cost difference of 56.59 bits between null cost and fixed cost. The model was validated using CatScramble technique, internal and external test set prediction. In the second phase of our study, a structure-based five feature pharmacophore hypothesis was generated which signifies the importance of hydrogen bond donor, hydrogen bond acceptors and hydrophobic interaction between the HIV-1 protease enzyme and its inhibitors. This work has taken a significant step towards the full integration of ligand and structure-based drug design methodologies as pharmacophoric features retrieved from structure-based strategy complemented the features from ligand-based study hence proving the accuracy of the developed models. The ligand-based pharmacophore model was used in virtual screening of Maybridge and NCI compound database resulting in the identification of four structurally diverse druggable compounds with nM activities. PMID:23145032

  12. Resistance to the most recent protease and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors across HIV-1 non-B subtypes.

    PubMed

    Anta, Lourdes; Blanco, José L; Llibre, Josep M; García, Federico; Pérez-Elías, María J; Aguilera, Antonio; Pérez-Romero, Pilar; Caballero, Estrella; Vidal, Carmen; Cañizares, Angelina; Gutiérrez, Félix; Dalmau, David; Iribarren, José A; Soriano, Vicente; de Mendoza, Carmen

    2013-09-01

    Limited data are available on resistance to etravirine, rilpivirine, darunavir and tipranavir in patients infected with HIV-1 non-B subtypes, in which natural polymorphisms at certain positions could influence the barrier and/or pathways to drug resistance. FASTA format sequences from the reverse transcriptase and protease genes recorded within the Spanish Drug Resistance database (ResRIS) were examined. From 8272 genotypes derived from 5930 different HIV-1 patients included in ResRIS, 5276 genotypes had complete treatment information. Overall, 85% were from antiretroviral-experienced subjects and 7.5% belonged to HIV-1 non-B subtypes: CRF02_AG, C, F and G being the most prevalent variants. For etravirine, only G190A was more prevalent in B than non-B subtypes, whereas V90I and V179E were more frequent in non-B than B subtypes. For rilpivirine, V108I and Y188I were more frequent in B than non-B subtypes, whereas V90I was more prevalent in non-B subtypes. Despite these differences, the overall prevalence of resistance did not differ significantly when comparing etravirine or rilpivirine in B versus non-B subtypes (11.3% versus 7.4%, P = 0.13, and 10.5% versus 7.4%, P = 0.23, respectively). Despite more frequent natural polymorphisms in non-B than B subtypes at tipranavir resistance positions, the prevalence of tipranavir resistance was greater in B than non-B subtypes (11% versus 4.3%, P = 0.004), reflecting a greater antiretroviral exposure in the former. Darunavir resistance did not differ significantly when comparing B and non-B subtypes (5.8% versus 5.5%, P = 0.998). The rate of resistance to the most recently approved protease and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors is low in antiretroviral-experienced patients, regardless of the HIV-1 subtype.

  13. Modulation of HIV-1 Gag NC/p1 cleavage efficiency affects protease inhibitor resistance and viral replicative capacity.

    PubMed

    van Maarseveen, Noortje M; Andersson, Dan; Lepšík, Martin; Fun, Axel; Schipper, Pauline J; de Jong, Dorien; Boucher, Charles A B; Nijhuis, Monique

    2012-04-01

    Mutations in the substrate of HIV-1 protease, especially changes in the NC/p1 cleavage site, can directly contribute to protease inhibitor (PI) resistance and also compensate for defects in viral replicative capacity (RC) due to a drug resistant protease. These NC/p1 changes are known to enhance processing of the Gag protein. To investigate the capacity of HIV-1 to modulate Gag cleavage and its consequences for PI resistance and RC, we performed a detailed enzymatic and virological analysis using a set of PI resistant NC/p1 variants (HXB2431V, HXB2436E+437T, HXB2437T and HXB2437V). Here, we demonstrate that single NC/p1 mutants, which displayed only a slight increase in PI resistance did not show an obvious change in RC. In contrast, the double NC/p1 mutant, which displayed a clear increase in processing efficiency and PI resistance, demonstrated a clear reduction in RC. Cleavage analysis showed that a tridecameric NC/p1 peptide representing the double NC/p1 mutant was cleaved in two specific ways instead of one.The observed decrease in RC for the double NC/p1 mutant (HXB2436E+437T) could (partially) be restored by either reversion of the 436E change or by acquisition of additional changes in the NC/p1 cleavage site at codon 435 or 438 as was revealed during in vitro evolution experiments. These changes not only restored RC but also reduced PI resistance levels. Furthermore these changes normalized Gag processing efficiency and obstructed the novel secondary cleavage site observed for the double NC/p1 mutant. The results of this study clearly demonstrate that HIV-1 can modulate Gag processing and thereby PI resistance. Distinct increases in Gag cleavage and PI resistance result in a reduced RC that can only be restored by amino acid changes in NC/p1 which reduce Gag processing to an optimal rate.

  14. Interactions of Pluronic Block Copolymers on P-gp Efflux Activity: Experience With HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    SHAIK, NAVEED; PAN, GUOYU; ELMQUIST, WILLIAM F.

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to examine the influence of Pluronic block-copolymers on the interaction between the drug efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein and HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs). The ATPase assay determined the effect of various Pluronics on PI-stimulated P-gp ATPase activity. Cellular accumulation studies were conducted using MDCKII and LLC-PK1 cells transfected with human MDR1 to assess Pluronic modulation of PI efflux. Pluronic P85 inhibited both basal and nelfinavir-stimulated P-gp ATPase activity, while Pluronic F127 had no effect. In cell accumulation studies, Pluronic P85 restored the accumulation of nelfinavir in MDCKII-MDR1 cells while Pluronic F127 and F88 had no effect. Pluronic P85 increased saquinavir accumulation in wild-type and MDR1-transfected cells in both the MDCKII and LLC-PK1 cell models, suggesting inhibition of multiple transporters, including MRPs. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that a block-copolymer, Pluronic P85, effectively inhibits the interaction of P-gp with nelfinavir and saquinavir. These data indicate that effective inhibition of HIV-1 PI efflux by Pluronic P85 may influence the distribution of antiretroviral agents to sites protected by efflux mechanisms, such as the blood–brain barrier, and possibly increase the brain exposure of these drugs resulting in suppression of viral replication and reduction in the incidence of drug resistant mutants. PMID:18393290

  15. Design, Synthesis, Evaluation, and Crystallographic-Based Structural Studies of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with Reduced Response to the V82A Mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente,J.; Robbins, A.; Grana, P.; Paleo, M.; Correa, J.; Villaverde, M.; Sardina, F.; Govindasamy, L.; Agbandje-McKenna, M.; et al

    2008-01-01

    In our quest for HIV-1 protease inhibitors that are not affected by the V82A resistance mutation, we have synthesized and tested a second generation set of C2-symmetric HIV-1 protease inhibitors that contain a cyclohexane group at P1 and/or P1'. The binding affinity results indicate that these compounds have an improved response to the appearance of the V82A mutation than the parent compound. The X-ray structure of one of these compounds with the V82A HIV-1 PR variant provides the structural rationale for the better resistance profile of these compounds. Moreover, scrutiny of the X-ray structure suggests that the ring of the Cha side chain might be in a boat rather than in the chair conformation, a result supported by molecular dynamics simulations.

  16. Free energy calculation of single molecular interaction using Jarzynski's identity method: the case of HIV-1 protease inhibitor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, De-Chang; Ji, Bao-Hua

    2012-06-01

    Jarzynski' identity (JI) method was suggested a promising tool for reconstructing free energy landscape of biomolecular interactions in numerical simulations and experiments. However, JI method has not yet been well tested in complex systems such as ligand-receptor molecular pairs. In this paper, we applied a huge number of steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to dissociate the protease of human immunodeficiency type I virus (HIV-1 protease) and its inhibitors. We showed that because of intrinsic complexity of the ligand-receptor system, the energy barrier predicted by JI method at high pulling rates is much higher than experimental results. However, with a slower pulling rate and fewer switch times of simulations, the predictions of JI method can approach to the experiments. These results suggested that the JI method is more appropriate for reconstructing free energy landscape using the data taken from experiments, since the pulling rates used in experiments are often much slower than those in SMD simulations. Furthermore, we showed that a higher loading stiffness can produce higher precision of calculation of energy landscape because it yields a lower mean value and narrower bandwidth of work distribution in SMD simulations.

  17. 2D-QSAR study of fullerene nanostructure derivatives as potent HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzegar, Abolfazl; Jafari Mousavi, Somaye; Hamidi, Hossein; Sadeghi, Mehdi

    2017-09-01

    The protease of human immunodeficiency virus1 (HIV-PR) is an essential enzyme for antiviral treatments. Carbon nanostructures of fullerene derivatives, have nanoscale dimension with a diameter comparable to the diameter of the active site of HIV-PR which would in turn inhibit HIV. In this research, two dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (2D-QSAR) of fullerene derivatives against HIV-PR activity were employed as a powerful tool for elucidation the relationships between structure and experimental observations. QSAR study of 49 fullerene derivatives was performed by employing stepwise-MLR, GAPLS-MLR, and PCA-MLR models for variable (descriptor) selection and model construction. QSAR models were obtained with higher ability to predict the activity of the fullerene derivatives against HIV-PR by a correlation coefficient (R2training) of 0.942, 0.89, and 0.87 as well as R2test values of 0.791, 0.67and 0.674 for stepwise-MLR, GAPLS-MLR, and PCA -MLR models, respectively. Leave-one-out cross-validated correlation coefficient (R2CV) and Y-randomization methods confirmed the models robustness. The descriptors indicated that the HIV-PR inhibition depends on the van der Waals volumes, polarizability, bond order between two atoms and electronegativities of fullerenes derivatives. 2D-QSAR simulation without needing receptor's active site geometry, resulted in useful descriptors mainly denoting ;C60 backbone-functional groups; and ;C60 functional groups; properties. Both properties in fullerene refer to the ligand fitness and improvement van der Waals interactions with HIV-PR active site. Therefore, the QSAR models can be used in the search for novel HIV-PR inhibitors based on fullerene derivatives.

  18. Design and Synthesis of Potent HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors Incorporating Hexahydrofuropyranol-derived High Affinity P2 ligands: Structure-activity Studies and Biological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Chapsal, Bruno D.; Baldridge, Abigail; Steffey, Melinda P.; Walters, D. Eric; Koh, Yasuhiro; Amano, Masayuki; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and evaluation of a new series of hexahydrofuropyran-derived HIV-1 protease inhibitors are described. We have designed a stereochemically defined hexahydrofuropyranol-derived urethane as the P2-ligand. The current ligand is designed based upon the X-ray structure of 1a-bound HIV-1 protease. The synthesis of (3aS,4S,7aR)-hexahydro-2H-furo[2,3-b] pyran-4-ol (−)-7 was carried out in optically active form. Incorporation of this ligand provided inhibitor 35a, which has shown excellent enzyme inhibitory activity and antiviral potency. Our structure activity studies have indicated that the stereochemistry and the position of oxygens in the ligand are important to the observed potency of the inhibitor. Inhibitor 35a has maintained excellent potency against multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants. An active site model of 35a was created based upon the X-ray structure of 1b-bound HIV-1 protease. The model offers molecular insights regarding ligand-binding site interactions of the hexahydrofuropyranol-derived novel P2-ligand. PMID:21194227

  19. Prediction of HIV-1 protease inhibitor resistance by Molecular Modeling Protocols (MMPs) using GenMol software.

    PubMed

    Pèpe, G; Courcambeck, J; Perbost, R; Jouanna, P; Halfon, P

    2008-11-01

    This paper investigates the contribution of Molecular Modeling to (i) predict and (ii) understand more fundamentally HIV drug resistance. Based on a new automated GenMol module, these goals are approached by Molecular Modeling Protocols (MMPs), respectively, (i) the Molecular Modeling Phenotype Protocol (MMPP) and (ii) the Molecular Modeling Phenotype-Genotype Protocol (MMGPP). Section 2 recalls clinical practice with a reference case study and Section 3 presents atomistic simulation tools. Section 4 is the heart of the paper. In Section 4.1, MMPP drug resistance prediction is based on correlations between fold resistances versus binding energies on 2959 HIV-1 complexes with 6 protease inhibitors. Based on a drug sensitivity twofold criterion, modeling prediction is able to replace long and costly phenotype tests. In Section 4.2, MMGPP enlightens drug resistance by investigating steric and energetic residues/inhibitor interaction. Section 5 gives a synthesis on modeling contribution to drug resistance prediction. In conclusion, the most promising trend consists of MMP automats that are able to suggest a real time diagnosis taking into account the history of each patient, to enrich databases and to develop therapy strategy and new drugs.

  20. Design, synthesis and evaluation of a potent substrate analog inhibitor identified by scanning Ala/Phe mutagenesis, mimicking substrate co-evolution, against multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Muhuhi, Joseck M.; Liu, Zhigang; Bencze, Krisztina Z.; Koupparis, Kyriacos; O’Connor, Carrie E.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Spaller, Mark R.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Inhibitors against MDR HIV-1 protease were designed, synthesized and evaluated. •Lead peptide (6a) showed potent inhibition (IC{sub 50}: 4.4 nM) of MDR HIV-1 protease. •(6a) Showed favorable binding isotherms against NL4-3 and MDR proteases. •(6a) Induced perturbations in the {sup 15}N-HSQC spectrum of MDR HIV-1 protease. •Molecular modeling suggested that (6a) may induce total flap closure inMDR protease. -- Abstract: Multidrug-resistant (MDR) clinical isolate-769, human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease (PDB ID: (1TW7)), was shown to exhibit wide-open flaps and an expanded active site cavity, causing loss of contacts with protease inhibitors. In the current study, the expanded active site cavity of MDR769 HIV-1 protease was screened with a series of peptide-inhibitors that were designed to mimic the natural substrate cleavage site, capsid/p2. Scanning Ala/Phe chemical mutagenesis approach was incorporated into the design of the peptide series to mimic the substrate co-evolution. Among the peptides synthesized and evaluated, a lead peptide (6a) with potent activity (IC{sub 50}: 4.4 nM) was identified against the MDR769 HIV-1 protease. Isothermal titration calorimetry data showed favorable binding profile for 6aagainst both wild type and MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of {sup 15}N-labeled MDR769 HIV-1 protease in complex with 6a showed some major perturbations in chemical shift, supporting the peptide induced conformational changes in protease. Modeling analysis revealed multiple contacts between 6a and MDR769 HIV-1 protease. The lead peptide-inhibitor, 6a, with high potency and good binding profile can be used as the basis for developing potent small molecule inhibitors against MDR variants of HIV.

  1. A Novel Tricyclic Ligand-Containing Nonpeptidic HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor, GRL-0739, Effectively Inhibits the Replication of Multidrug-Resistant HIV-1 Variants and Has a Desirable Central Nervous System Penetration Property In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Masayuki; Tojo, Yasushi; Salcedo-Gómez, Pedro Miguel; Parham, Garth L.; Nyalapatla, Prasanth R.; Das, Debananda; Ghosh, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    We report here that GRL-0739, a novel nonpeptidic HIV-1 protease inhibitor containing a tricycle (cyclohexyl-bis-tetrahydrofuranylurethane [THF]) and a sulfonamide isostere, is highly active against laboratory HIV-1 strains and primary clinical isolates (50% effective concentration [EC50], 0.0019 to 0.0036 μM), with minimal cytotoxicity (50% cytotoxic concentration [CC50], 21.0 μM). GRL-0739 blocked the infectivity and replication of HIV-1NL4-3 variants selected by concentrations of up to 5 μM ritonavir or atazanavir (EC50, 0.035 to 0.058 μM). GRL-0739 was also highly active against multidrug-resistant clinical HIV-1 variants isolated from patients who no longer responded to existing antiviral regimens after long-term antiretroviral therapy, as well as against the HIV-2ROD variant. The development of resistance against GRL-0739 was substantially delayed compared to that of amprenavir (APV). The effects of the nonspecific binding of human serum proteins on the anti-HIV-1 activity of GRL-0739 were insignificant. In addition, GRL-0739 showed a desirable central nervous system (CNS) penetration property, as assessed using a novel in vitro blood-brain barrier model. Molecular modeling demonstrated that the tricyclic ring and methoxybenzene of GRL-0739 have a larger surface and make greater van der Waals contacts with protease than in the case of darunavir. The present data demonstrate that GRL-0739 has desirable features as a compound with good CNS-penetrating capability for treating patients infected with wild-type and/or multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants and that the newly generated cyclohexyl-bis-THF moiety with methoxybenzene confers highly desirable anti-HIV-1 potency in the design of novel protease inhibitors with greater CNS penetration profiles. PMID:25691652

  2. HIV-1 protease-substrate coevolution in nelfinavir resistance.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Madhavi; Ozen, Ayşegül; Kurt-Yilmaz, Nese; Schiffer, Celia A

    2014-07-01

    Resistance to various human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors (PIs) challenges the effectiveness of therapies in treating HIV-1-infected individuals and AIDS patients. The virus accumulates mutations within the protease (PR) that render the PIs less potent. Occasionally, Gag sequences also coevolve with mutations at PR cleavage sites contributing to drug resistance. In this study, we investigated the structural basis of coevolution of the p1-p6 cleavage site with the nelfinavir (NFV) resistance D30N/N88D protease mutations by determining crystal structures of wild-type and NFV-resistant HIV-1 protease in complex with p1-p6 substrate peptide variants with L449F and/or S451N. Alterations of residue 30's interaction with the substrate are compensated by the coevolving L449F and S451N cleavage site mutations. This interdependency in the PR-p1-p6 interactions enhances intermolecular contacts and reinforces the overall fit of the substrate within the substrate envelope, likely enabling coevolution to sustain substrate recognition and cleavage in the presence of PR resistance mutations. Resistance to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors challenges the effectiveness of therapies in treating HIV-1-infected individuals and AIDS patients. Mutations in HIV-1 protease selected under the pressure of protease inhibitors render the inhibitors less potent. Occasionally, Gag sequences also mutate and coevolve with protease, contributing to maintenance of viral fitness and to drug resistance. In this study, we investigated the structural basis of coevolution at the Gag p1-p6 cleavage site with the nelfinavir (NFV) resistance D30N/N88D protease mutations. Our structural analysis reveals the interdependency of protease-substrate interactions and how coevolution may restore substrate recognition and cleavage in the presence of protease drug resistance mutations. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. C-5-Modified Tetrahydropyrano-Tetrahydofuran-Derived Protease Inhibitors (PIs) Exert Potent Inhibition of the Replication of HIV-1 Variants Highly Resistant to Various PIs, including Darunavir

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Manabu; Hayashi, Hironori; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Takamatsu, Yuki; Aoki-Ogata, Hiromi; Nakamura, Teruya; Nakata, Hirotomo; Das, Debananda; Yamagata, Yuriko; Ghosh, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We identified three nonpeptidic HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs), GRL-015, -085, and -097, containing tetrahydropyrano-tetrahydrofuran (Tp-THF) with a C-5 hydroxyl. The three compounds were potent against a wild-type laboratory HIV-1 strain (HIV-1WT), with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of 3.0 to 49 nM, and exhibited minimal cytotoxicity, with 50% cytotoxic concentrations (CC50) for GRL-015, -085, and -097 of 80, >100, and >100 μM, respectively. All the three compounds potently inhibited the replication of highly PI-resistant HIV-1 variants selected with each of the currently available PIs and recombinant clinical HIV-1 isolates obtained from patients harboring multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants (HIVMDR). Importantly, darunavir (DRV) was >1,000 times less active against a highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 variant (HIV-1DRVRP51); the three compounds remained active against HIV-1DRVRP51 with only a 6.8- to 68-fold reduction. Moreover, the emergence of HIV-1 variants resistant to the three compounds was considerably delayed compared to the case of DRV. In particular, HIV-1 variants resistant to GRL-085 and -097 did not emerge even when two different highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 variants were used as a starting population. In the structural analyses, Tp-THF of GRL-015, -085, and -097 showed strong hydrogen bond interactions with the backbone atoms of active-site amino acid residues (Asp29 and Asp30) of HIV-1 protease. A strong hydrogen bonding formation between the hydroxyl moiety of Tp-THF and a carbonyl oxygen atom of Gly48 was newly identified. The present findings indicate that the three compounds warrant further study as possible therapeutic agents for treating individuals harboring wild-type HIV and/or HIVMDR. IMPORTANCE Darunavir (DRV) inhibits the replication of most existing multidrug-resistant HIV-1 strains and has a high genetic barrier. However, the emergence of highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 strains (HIVDRVR) has recently been observed in vivo and in

  4. Design, Synthesis, Biological Evaluation and X-ray Structural Studies of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors Containing Substituted Fused-Tetrahydropyranyl Tetrahydrofuran as P2-Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Kassekert, Luke A.; Nyalapatla, Prasanth R.; Steffey, Melinda; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Weber, Irene T.; Amano, Masayuki; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Design, synthesis, biological and X-ray crystallographic studies of a series of potent HIV-1 protease inhibitors are described. Various polar functionalities have been incorporated on the tetrahydropyranyl-tetrahydrofuran-derived P2 ligand to interact with the backbone atoms in the S2 subsite. The majority of the inhibitors showed very potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity. Two high-resolution X-ray structures of 30b- and 30j-bound HIV-1 protease provide insight into ligand-binding site interactions. In particular, the polar functionalities on the P2 ligand appear to form unique hydrogen bonds with Gly48 amide NH and amide carbonyl groups in the flap region. PMID:26462551

  5. Factors Associated with the Development of Drug Resistance Mutations in HIV-1 Infected Children Failing Protease Inhibitor-Based Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Melikian, George; van Dyk, Gisela; Thomas, Winifred; du Plessis, Nicolette M.; Avenant, Theunis

    2015-01-01

    Objective Limited data are available from the developing world on antiretroviral drug resistance in HIV-1 infected children failing protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy, especially in the context of a high tuberculosis burden. We describe the proportion of children with drug resistance mutations after failed protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy as well as associated factors. Methods Data from children initiated on protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy with subsequent virological failure referred for genotypic drug resistance testing between 2008 and 2012 were retrospectively analysed. Frequencies of drug resistance mutations were determined and associations with these mutations identified through logistic regression analysis. Results The study included 65 young children (median age 16.8 months [IQR 7.8; 23.3]) with mostly advanced clinical disease (88.5% WHO stage 3 or 4 disease), severe malnutrition (median weight-for-age Z-score -2.4 [IQR -3.7;-1.5]; median height-for-age Z-score -3.1 [IQR -4.3;-2.4]), high baseline HIV viral load (median 6.04 log10, IQR 5.34;6.47) and frequent tuberculosis co-infection (66%) at antiretroviral therapy initiation. Major protease inhibitor mutations were found in 49% of children and associated with low weight-for-age and height-for-age (p = 0.039; p = 0.05); longer duration of protease inhibitor regimens and virological failure (p = 0.001; p = 0.005); unsuppressed HIV viral load at 12 months of antiretroviral therapy (p = 0.001); tuberculosis treatment at antiretroviral therapy initiation (p = 0.048) and use of ritonavir as single protease inhibitor (p = 0.038). On multivariate analysis, cumulative months on protease inhibitor regimens and use of ritonavir as single protease inhibitor remained significant (p = 0.008; p = 0.033). Conclusion Major protease inhibitor resistance mutations were common in this study of HIV-1-infected children, with the timing of tuberculosis treatment and subsequent

  6. Factors Associated with the Development of Drug Resistance Mutations in HIV-1 Infected Children Failing Protease Inhibitor-Based Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Rossouw, Theresa M; Feucht, Ute D; Melikian, George; van Dyk, Gisela; Thomas, Winifred; du Plessis, Nicolette M; Avenant, Theunis

    2015-01-01

    Limited data are available from the developing world on antiretroviral drug resistance in HIV-1 infected children failing protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy, especially in the context of a high tuberculosis burden. We describe the proportion of children with drug resistance mutations after failed protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy as well as associated factors. Data from children initiated on protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy with subsequent virological failure referred for genotypic drug resistance testing between 2008 and 2012 were retrospectively analysed. Frequencies of drug resistance mutations were determined and associations with these mutations identified through logistic regression analysis. The study included 65 young children (median age 16.8 months [IQR 7.8; 23.3]) with mostly advanced clinical disease (88.5% WHO stage 3 or 4 disease), severe malnutrition (median weight-for-age Z-score -2.4 [IQR -3.7;-1.5]; median height-for-age Z-score -3.1 [IQR -4.3;-2.4]), high baseline HIV viral load (median 6.04 log10, IQR 5.34;6.47) and frequent tuberculosis co-infection (66%) at antiretroviral therapy initiation. Major protease inhibitor mutations were found in 49% of children and associated with low weight-for-age and height-for-age (p = 0.039; p = 0.05); longer duration of protease inhibitor regimens and virological failure (p = 0.001; p = 0.005); unsuppressed HIV viral load at 12 months of antiretroviral therapy (p = 0.001); tuberculosis treatment at antiretroviral therapy initiation (p = 0.048) and use of ritonavir as single protease inhibitor (p = 0.038). On multivariate analysis, cumulative months on protease inhibitor regimens and use of ritonavir as single protease inhibitor remained significant (p = 0.008; p = 0.033). Major protease inhibitor resistance mutations were common in this study of HIV-1-infected children, with the timing of tuberculosis treatment and subsequent protease inhibitor dosing strategy proving

  7. Predictive factors of virological success to salvage regimens containing protease inhibitors in HIV-1 infected children

    PubMed Central

    Larru, Beatriz; de Mendoza, Carmen; Bellón, José Ma; de José, Ma Isabel; Mellado, Ma José; Soriano, Vincent; Muñoz-Fernandez, Ma Angeles; Ramos, José T

    2007-01-01

    Background The impact of HIV drug resistance mutations in salvage therapy has been widely investigated in adults. By contrast, data available of predictive value of resistance mutations in pediatric population is scarce. Methods A multicenter, retrospective, observational study was conducted in children who received rescue salvage antiretroviral therapy after virologic failure. CD4 counts and viral load were determined at baseline and 6 months after rescue intervention. Genotypic HIV-1 resistance test and virtual phenotype were assessed at baseline. Results A total of 33 children met the inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis. The median viral load (VL) and median percentage of CD4+ at baseline was 4.0 HIV-RNA log copies/ml and 23.0% respectively. The median duration that children were taking the new rescue regimen was 24.3 weeks (23.8–30.6). Overall, 47% of the 33 children achieved virological response at 24 weeks. When we compared the group of children who achieved virological response with those who did not, we found out that mean number of PI related mutations among the group of responders was 3.8 vs. 5.4 (p = 0.115). Moreover, the mean number of susceptible drugs according to virtual phenotype clinical cut-off for maximal virologic response was 1.7 vs. 0.8 and mean number of susceptible drugs according to virtual phenotype cut-off for minimal virlologic response was 2.7 vs. 1.3 (p < 0.01 in all cases). Eighteen children were rescued with a regimen containing a boosted-PI and virological response was significantly higher in those subjects compared with the others (61.1% vs. 28.6%, p < 0.01). Conclusion Salvage treatment containing ritonavir boosted-PIs in children with virological failure was very efficient. The use of new tools as virtual phenotype could help to improve virologic success in pediatric population. PMID:17559687

  8. Design of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with Pyrrolidinones and Oxazolidinones as Novel P1’-Ligands to Enhance Backbone-binding interactions with Protease: Synthesis, Biological Evaluation and Protein-ligand X-ray Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Leshchenko-Yashchuk, Sofiya; Anderson, David D.; Baldridge, Abigail; Noetzel, Marcus; Miller, Heather B.; Tie, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Koh, Yasuhiro; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    Structure-based design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors are described. In an effort to enhance interactions with protease backbone atoms, we have incorporated stereochemically defined methyl-2-pyrrolidinone and methyl oxazolidinone as the P1′-ligands. These ligands are designed to interact with Gly-27′ carbonyl and Arg-8 side chain in the S1′-subsite of the HIV protease. We have investigated the potential of these ligands in combination with our previously developed bis-tetrahydrofuran (bis-THF) and cyclopentanyltetrahydrofuran (Cp-THF) as the P2-ligands. Inhibitor 19b with an (S)-aminomethyl-2-pyrrolidinone and a Cp-THF was shown to be the most potent compound. Inhibitor 19b maintained near full potency against multi-PI-resistant clinical HIV-1 variants. A high resolution protein-ligand X-ray crystal structure of 19b–bound HIV-1 protease revealed that the P1′-pyrrolidinone heterocycle and the P2-Cp-ligand are involved in several critical interactions with the backbone atoms in the S1’ and S2-subsites of HIV-1 protease. PMID:19473017

  9. Design of HIV-1 protease inhibitors with pyrrolidinones and oxazolidinones as novel P1'-ligands to enhance backbone-binding interactions with protease: synthesis, biological evaluation, and protein-ligand X-ray studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Leshchenko-Yashchuk, Sofiya; Anderson, David D.; Baldridge, Abigail; Noetzel, Marcus; Miller, Heather B.; Tie, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Koh, Yasuhiro; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2009-09-02

    Structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors are described. In an effort to enhance interactions with protease backbone atoms, we have incorporated stereochemically defined methyl-2-pyrrolidinone and methyl oxazolidinone as the P1{prime}-ligands. These ligands are designed to interact with Gly-27{prime} carbonyl and Arg-8 side chain in the S1{prime}-subsite of the HIV protease. We have investigated the potential of these ligands in combination with our previously developed bis-tetrahydrofuran (bis-THF) and cyclopentanyltetrahydrofuran (Cp-THF) as the P2-ligands. Inhibitor 19b with a (R)-aminomethyl-2-pyrrolidinone and a Cp-THF was shown to be the most potent compound. This inhibitor maintained near full potency against multi-PI-resistant clinical HIV-1 variants. A high resolution protein-ligand X-ray crystal structure of 19b-bound HIV-1 protease revealed that the P1{prime}-pyrrolidinone heterocycle and the P2-Cp-ligand are involved in several critical interactions with the backbone atoms in the S1{prime} and S2 subsites of HIV-1 protease.

  10. Lead expansion and virtual screening of Indinavir derivate HIV-1 protease inhibitors using pharmacophoric - shape similarity scoring function

    PubMed Central

    Shityakov, Sergey; Dandekar, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Indinavir (Crivaxan®) is a potent inhibitor of the HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) protease. This enzyme has an important role in viral replication and is considered to be very attractive target for new antiretroviral drugs. However, it becomes less effective due to highly resistant new viral strains of HIV, which have multiple mutations in their proteases. For this reason, we used a lead expansion method to create a new set of compounds with a new mode of action to protease binding site. 1300 compounds chemically diverse from the initial hit were generated and screened to determine their ability to interact with protease and establish their QSAR properties. Further computational analyses revealed one unique compound with different protease binding ability from the initial hit and its role for possible new class of protease inhibitors is discussed in this report. PMID:20978602

  11. Flexible Cyclic Ethers/Polyethers as Novel P2-Ligands for HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors: Design, Synthesis, Biological Evaluation and Protein-ligand X-ray Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Gemma, Sandra; Baldridge, Abigail; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Kovalevsky, Andrey Yu.; Koh, Yashiro; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    We report the design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors. The inhibitors incorporate stereochemically defined flexible cyclic ethers/polyethers as the high affinity P2-ligands. Inhibitors containing small ring 1,3-dioxacycloalkanes have shown potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity. Inhibitors 3d and 3h are the most active inhibitors. Inhibitor 3d maintains excellent potency against a variety of multi-PI-resistant clinical strains. Our structure-activity studies indicate that the ring size, stereochemistry, and position of oxygens are important for the observed activity. Optically active synthesis of 1,3-dioxepan-5-ol along with the syntheses of various cyclic ether and polyether ligands have been described. A protein-ligand X-ray crystal structure of 3d-bound HIV-1 protease was determined. The structure revealed that the P2-ligand makes extensive interactions including hydrogen bonding with the protease backbone in the S2-site. In addition, the P2-ligand in 3d forms a unique water-mediated interaction with the NH of Gly-48. PMID:18783203

  12. Flexible Cyclic Ethers/Polyethers as Novel P2-Ligands for HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors: Design, Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Protein-Ligand X-Ray Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun; Gemma, Sandra; Baldridge, Abigal; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Koh, Yashiro; Weber, Irene; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2008-12-05

    We report the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors. The inhibitors incorporate stereochemically defined flexible cyclic ethers/polyethers as high affinity P2-ligands. Inhibitors containing small ring 1,3-dioxacycloalkanes have shown potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity. Inhibitors 3d and 3h are the most active inhibitors. Inhibitor 3d maintains excellent potency against a variety of multi-PI-resistant clinical strains. Our structure-activity studies indicate that the ring size, stereochemistry, and position of oxygens are important for the observed activity. Optically active synthesis of 1,3-dioxepan-5-ol along with the syntheses of various cyclic ether and polyether ligands have been described. A protein-ligand X-ray crystal structure of 3d-bound HIV-1 protease was determined. The structure revealed that the P2-ligand makes extensive interactions including hydrogen bonding with the protease backbone in the S2-site. In addition, the P2-ligand in 3d forms a unique water-mediated interaction with the NH of Gly-48.

  13. Design, synthesis and evaluation of a potent substrate analog inhibitor identified by scanning Ala/Phe mutagenesis, mimicking substrate co-evolution, against multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S; Muhuhi, Joseck M; Liu, Zhigang; Bencze, Krisztina Z; Koupparis, Kyriacos; O'Connor, Carrie E; Kovari, Iulia A; Spaller, Mark R; Kovari, Ladislau C

    2013-09-06

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) clinical isolate-769, human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease (PDB ID: 1TW7), was shown to exhibit wide-open flaps and an expanded active site cavity, causing loss of contacts with protease inhibitors. In the current study, the expanded active site cavity of MDR769 HIV-1 protease was screened with a series of peptide-inhibitors that were designed to mimic the natural substrate cleavage site, capsid/p2. Scanning Ala/Phe chemical mutagenesis approach was incorporated into the design of the peptide series to mimic the substrate co-evolution. Among the peptides synthesized and evaluated, a lead peptide (6a) with potent activity (IC50: 4.4nM) was identified against the MDR769 HIV-1 protease. Isothermal titration calorimetry data showed favorable binding profile for 6a against both wild type and MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of (15)N-labeled MDR769 HIV-1 protease in complex with 6a showed some major perturbations in chemical shift, supporting the peptide induced conformational changes in protease. Modeling analysis revealed multiple contacts between 6a and MDR769 HIV-1 protease. The lead peptide-inhibitor, 6a, with high potency and good binding profile can be used as the basis for developing potent small molecule inhibitors against MDR variants of HIV. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Antitumor and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activities of a Hemagglutinin and a Protease Inhibitor from Mini-Black Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiu Juan; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2011-01-01

    Protease inhibitors (PIs) and hemagglutinins are defense proteins produced by many organisms. From Chinese mini-black soybeans, a 17.5-kDa PI was isolated using chromatography on Q-Sepharose, SP-Sepharose, and DEAE-cellulose. A 25-kDa hemagglutinin was purified similarly, but using Superdex 75 instead of DEAE-cellulose in the final step. The PI inhibited trypsin and chymotrypsin (IC50 = 7.2 and 8.8 μM). Its trypsin inhibitory activity was stable from pH 2 to pH 13 and from 0°C to 70°C. The hemagglutinin activity of the hemagglutinin was stable from pH 2 to pH 13 and from 0°C to 75°C. The results indicated that both PI and hemagglutinin were relatively thermostable and pH-stable. The trypsin inhibitory activity was inhibited by dithiothreitol, signifying the importance of the disulfide bond to the activity. The hemagglutinating activity was inhibited most potently by D (+)-raffinose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, suggesting that the hemagglutinin was specific for these two sugars. Both PI and hemagglutinin inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (IC50 = 3.2 and 5.5 μM), proliferation of breast cancer cells (IC50 = 9.7 and 3.5 μM), and hepatoma cells (IC50 = 35 and 6.2 μM), with relatively high potencies. PMID:21527979

  15. Lignan, sesquilignans and dilignans, novel HIV-1 protease and cytopathic effect inhibitors purified from the rhizomes of Saururus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jisuk; Huh, Myoung Sook; Kim, Young Choong; Hattori, Masao; Otake, Toru

    2010-02-01

    Five lignans were isolated from the ethyl acetate extracts of Saururus chinensis rhizomes and evaluated for anti-HIV-1 activity. Their structures were elucidated as two dilignans, manassantin A (1), manassantin B (2), two sesquilignans, saucerneol B (3) and saucerneol C (4), and a new lignan, saururin B (5) by spectroscopic analysis. Of these components, manassantin A (1) and saururin B (5) showed dose-dependent inhibitory activities on HIV-1 protease with IC(50) values of 38.9 and 5.6 microM. In addition, manassantins A (1), B (2) and saucerneol B (3) inhibited HIV-1-induced cytopathic effects in a human T lymphoblastoid cell line with IC(100) values of 1.0, 1.0 and 0.2 microM, respectively. Of these active constituents, saucerneol B (3) showed the most potent and selective anti-HIV-1 activity (IC(100) of 0.2 microM, CC(0) of >125.0 microM, and SI of >520.8).

  16. Reprint of "Crystal structure of chemically synthesized HIV-1 protease and a ketomethylene isostere inhibitor based on the p2/NC cleavage site" [Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett. 18 (2008) 4554-4557].

    PubMed

    Torbeev, Vladimir Yu; Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Terechko, Valentina A; Kent, Stephen B H

    2008-11-15

    Here we report the X-ray structures of chemically synthesized HIV-1 protease and the inactive [D25N]HIV-1 protease complexed with the ketomethylene isostere inhibitor Ac-Thr-Ile-Nlepsi[CO-CH(2)]Nle-Gln-Arg.amide at 1.4 and 1.8A resolution, respectively. In complex with the active enzyme, the keto-group was found to be converted into the hydrated gem-diol, while the structure of the complex with the inactive D25N enzyme revealed an intact keto-group. These data support the general acid-general base mechanism for HIV-1 protease catalysis.

  17. A Sensitive Assay Using a Native Protein Substrate For Screening HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitors Targeting the Protease Cleavage Site between Matrix and Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sook-Kyung; Cheng, Nancy; Hull-Ryde, Emily; Potempa, Marc; Schiffer, Celia A.; Janzen, William; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    The matrix/capsid processing site in the HIV-1 Gag precursor is likely the most sensitive target to inhibit HIV-1 replication. We have previously shown that modest incomplete processing at the site leads to a complete loss of virion infectivity. In the current study, a sensitive assay based on fluorescence polarization is described that can monitor cleavage at the MA/CA site in the context of the folded protein substrate. The substrate, an MA/CA fusion protein, was labeled with the fluorescein-based FlAsH (Fluorescein Arsenical Hairpin) reagent which binds to a tetracysteine motif (CCGPCC) that was introduced within the N-terminal domain of CA. By limiting the size of CA and increasing the size of MA (with an N-terminal GST fusion), significant differences in polarization values were measurable as a function of HIV-1 protease cleavage. The sensitivity of the assay was tested in the presence of increasing amounts of an HIV-1 PR inhibitor, which resulted in a gradual decrease in the FP values demonstrating that the assay is sensitive discerning changes in protease processing. The high-throughput screening assay validation in 384-well plates showed that the assay is reproducible and robust with an average Z'–value of 0.79 and average coefficient of variation values less than 3%. The robustness and reproducibility of the assay was further validated using the LOPAC1280 compound library, demonstrating that the assay provides a sensitive high-throughput screening platform that can be used with large compound libraries for identifying novel maturation inhibitors targeting the MA/CA site of the HIV-1 Gag polyprotein. PMID:23763575

  18. Expected response to protease inhibitors of HIV-1 non-B subtype viruses according to resistance algorithms.

    PubMed

    Champenois, Karen; Bocket, Laurence; Deuffic-Burban, Sylvie; Cotte, Laurent; André, Patrice; Choisy, Philippe; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan

    2008-05-31

    The expected effectiveness of protease inhibitors was assessed according to the Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA (ANRS), Rega and Stanford 2007 resistance algorithms in 93 and 87 antiretroviral therapy-naive patients, respectively, infected with B and non-B subtype viruses. Either B or non-B subtypes were considered fully susceptible to protease inhibitors, except to tipranavir/ritonavir, for which the 2007 ANRS algorithm scored non-B subtypes as naturally resistant when this algorithm was extended to these subtypes.

  19. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This "shock" approach is then followed by "kill" of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells.

  20. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This “shock” approach is then followed by “kill” of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  1. HIV-1 Protease in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Benko, Zsigmond; Elder, Robert T; Li, Ge; Liang, Dong; Zhao, Richard Y

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 protease (PR) is an essential viral enzyme. Its primary function is to proteolyze the viral Gag-Pol polyprotein for production of viral enzymes and structural proteins and for maturation of infectious viral particles. Increasing evidence suggests that PR cleaves host cellular proteins. However, the nature of PR-host cellular protein interactions is elusive. This study aimed to develop a fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) model system and to examine the possible interaction of HIV-1 PR with cellular proteins and its potential impact on cell proliferation and viability. A fission yeast strain RE294 was created that carried a single integrated copy of the PR gene in its chromosome. The PR gene was expressed using an inducible nmt1 promoter so that PR-specific effects could be measured. HIV-1 PR from this system cleaved the same indigenous viral p6/MA protein substrate as it does in natural HIV-1 infections. HIV-1 PR expression in fission yeast cells prevented cell proliferation and induced cellular oxidative stress and changes in mitochondrial morphology that led to cell death. Both these PR activities can be prevented by a PR-specific enzymatic inhibitor, indinavir, suggesting that PR-mediated proteolytic activities and cytotoxic effects resulted from enzymatic activities of HIV-1 PR. Through genome-wide screening, a serine/threonine kinase, Hhp2, was identified that suppresses HIV-1 PR-induced protease cleavage and cell death in fission yeast and in mammalian cells, where it prevented PR-induced apoptosis and cleavage of caspase-3 and caspase-8. This is the first report to show that HIV-1 protease is functional as an enzyme in fission yeast, and that it behaves in a similar manner as it does in HIV-1 infection. HIV-1 PR-induced cell death in fission yeast could potentially be used as an endpoint for mechanistic studies, and this system could be used for developing a high-throughput system for drug screenings.

  2. The HIV-1 protease inhibitor nelfinavir activates PP2 and inhibits MAPK signaling in macrophages: a pathway to reduce inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wallet, Mark A; Reist, Caroline M; Williams, Julie C; Appelberg, Sofia; Guiulfo, Giorgio L; Gardner, Brent; Sleasman, John W; Goodenow, Maureen M

    2012-10-01

    The HIV-1 PI NFV has off-target effects upon host enzymes, including inhibition of the 20S proteasome, resulting in activation of PP1. HIV-1-associated monocyte/macrophage activation, in part a result of systemically elevated levels of microbial products including LPS, is associated with risk of mortality, independent of viremia or CD4 T cell loss. This study tested the hypothesis that activation of protein phosphatases by NFV would reduce activation of monocytes/macrophages through dephosphorylation of signal transduction proteins. NFV uniquely blocked LPS-induced production by human monocyte-derived macrophages of the inflammatory cytokines TNF and IL-6, as well as sCD14. Although NFV failed to modulate NF-κB, NFV treatment reduced phosphorylation of AKT and MAPKs. Inhibition of PP2 with okadaic acid blocked the anti-inflammatory effect of NFV, whereas the PP1 inhibitor calyculin A failed to counter the anti-inflammatory effects of NFV. For in vivo studies, plasma sCD14 and LPS were monitored in a cohort of 31 pediatric HIV-1 patients for over 2 years of therapy. Therapy, including NFV, reduced sCD14 levels significantly compared with IDV or RTV, independent of ΔLPS levels, VL, CD4 T cell frequency, or age. The hypothesis was supported as NFV induced activation of PP2 in macrophages, resulting in disruption of inflammatory cell signaling pathways. In vivo evidence supports that NFV may offer beneficial effects independent of antiviral activity by reducing severity of chronic innate immune activation in HIV-1 infection.

  3. The HIV-1 protease inhibitor nelfinavir activates PP2 and inhibits MAPK signaling in macrophages: a pathway to reduce inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wallet, Mark A.; Reist, Caroline M.; Williams, Julie C.; Appelberg, Sofia; Guiulfo, Giorgio L.; Gardner, Brent; Sleasman, John W.; Goodenow, Maureen M.

    2012-01-01

    The HIV-1 PI NFV has off-target effects upon host enzymes, including inhibition of the 20S proteasome, resulting in activation of PP1. HIV-1-associated monocyte/macrophage activation, in part a result of systemically elevated levels of microbial products including LPS, is associated with risk of mortality, independent of viremia or CD4 T cell loss. This study tested the hypothesis that activation of protein phosphatases by NFV would reduce activation of monocytes/macrophages through dephosphorylation of signal transduction proteins. NFV uniquely blocked LPS-induced production by human monocyte-derived macrophages of the inflammatory cytokines TNF and IL-6, as well as sCD14. Although NFV failed to modulate NF-κB, NFV treatment reduced phosphorylation of AKT and MAPKs. Inhibition of PP2 with okadaic acid blocked the anti-inflammatory effect of NFV, whereas the PP1 inhibitor calyculin A failed to counter the anti-inflammatory effects of NFV. For in vivo studies, plasma sCD14 and LPS were monitored in a cohort of 31 pediatric HIV-1 patients for over 2 years of therapy. Therapy, including NFV, reduced sCD14 levels significantly compared with IDV or RTV, independent of ΔLPS levels, VL, CD4 T cell frequency, or age. The hypothesis was supported as NFV induced activation of PP2 in macrophages, resulting in disruption of inflammatory cell signaling pathways. In vivo evidence supports that NFV may offer beneficial effects independent of antiviral activity by reducing severity of chronic innate immune activation in HIV-1 infection. PMID:22786868

  4. HIV-1 protease-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is one of the presumptive causes of CD4+ T cell depletion during HIV infection and progression to AIDS. However, the precise role of HIV-1 in this process remains unexplained. HIV-1 protease (PR) has been suggested as a possible factor, but a direct link between HIV-1 PR enzymatic activity and apoptosis has not been established. Results Here, we show that expression of active HIV-1 PR induces death in HeLa and HEK-293 cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. This conclusion is based on in vivo observations of the direct localization of HIV-1 PR in mitochondria, a key player in triggering apoptosis. Moreover, we observed an HIV-1 PR concentration-dependent decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and the role of HIV-1 PR in activation of caspase 9, PARP cleavage and DNA fragmentation. In addition, in vitro data demonstrated that HIV-1 PR mediates cleavage of mitochondrial proteins Tom22, VDAC and ANT, leading to release of AIF and Hsp60 proteins. By using yeast two-hybrid screening, we also identified a new HIV-1 PR interaction partner, breast carcinoma-associated protein 3 (BCA3). We found that BCA3 accelerates p53 transcriptional activity on the bax promoter, thus elevating the cellular level of pro-apoptotic Bax protein. Conclusion In summary, our results describe the involvement of HIV-1 PR in apoptosis, which is caused either by a direct effect of HIV-1 PR on mitochondrial membrane integrity or by its interaction with cellular protein BCA3. PMID:24886575

  5. Authentic HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R; Pommier, Yves; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is indispensable for HIV-1 replication and has become a validated target for developing anti-AIDS agents. In two decades of development of IN inhibition-based anti-HIV therapeutics, a significant number of compounds were identified as IN inhibitors, but only some of them showed antiviral activity. This article reviews a number of patented HIV-1 IN inhibitors, especially those that possess high selectivity for the strand transfer reaction. These compounds generally have a polar coplanar moiety, which is assumed to chelate two magnesium ions in the binding site. Resistance to those compounds, when given to patients, can develop as a result of IN mutations. We refer to those compounds as authentic IN inhibitors. Continued drug development has so far delivered one authentic IN inhibitor to the market (raltegravir in 2007). Current and future attention will be focused on the development of novel authentic IN inhibitors with the goal of overcoming viral resistance. PMID:21426159

  6. Severe Impairment of Endothelial Function with the HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor Indinavir is not Mediated by Insulin Resistance in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Michael P.; Gorski, J. Christopher; Shen, Changyu

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction may contribute to increased cardiovascular events among HIV-1 infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. The HIV-1 protease inhibitor indinavir causes both vascular dysfunction and insulin resistance, but the relationship between the two disturbances is not established. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDV), insulin-mediated vasodilation (IMV), and whole body and leg glucose uptake during a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp (40 mU/m2/min) were measured before and after four weeks of indinavir in nine healthy men. EDV fell from 270 ± 67% above basal to 124 ± 30% (p=0.04) and IMV from 56 ± 14% above basal to 8 ± 8% (p=0.001) with indinavir. During the clamp, arteriovenous glucose difference and leg glucose uptake were not significantly different after indinavir and whole-body glucose uptake was only modestly reduced (8.0 ± 0.8 vs 7.2 ± 0.8 mg/kg/min, p=0.04). The change in EDV did not correlate with the change in whole-body glucose uptake after indinavir (r=0.21, p=0.6). Despite marked impairment of endothelial function and IMV with indinavir, only modest, inconsistent reductions in measures of insulin stimulated glucose uptake occurred. This suggests that indinavir's effects on glucose metabolism are not directly related to indinavir-associated endothelial dysfunction. Studies of the vascular effects of newer protease inhibitors are needed. PMID:18172783

  7. A multifaceted analysis of HIV-1 protease multidrug resistance phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Great strides have been made in the effective treatment of HIV-1 with the development of second-generation protease inhibitors (PIs) that are effective against historically multi-PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Nevertheless, mutation patterns that confer decreasing susceptibility to available PIs continue to arise within the population. Understanding the phenotypic and genotypic patterns responsible for multi-PI resistance is necessary for developing PIs that are active against clinically-relevant PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Results In this work, we use globally optimal integer programming-based clustering techniques to elucidate multi-PI phenotypic resistance patterns using a data set of 398 HIV-1 protease sequences that have each been phenotyped for susceptibility toward the nine clinically-approved HIV-1 PIs. We validate the information content of the clusters by evaluating their ability to predict the level of decreased susceptibility to each of the available PIs using a cross validation procedure. We demonstrate the finding that as a result of phenotypic cross resistance, the considered clinical HIV-1 protease isolates are confined to ~6% or less of the clinically-relevant phenotypic space. Clustering and feature selection methods are used to find representative sequences and mutations for major resistance phenotypes to elucidate their genotypic signatures. We show that phenotypic similarity does not imply genotypic similarity, that different PI-resistance mutation patterns can give rise to HIV-1 isolates with similar phenotypic profiles. Conclusion Rather than characterizing HIV-1 susceptibility toward each PI individually, our study offers a unique perspective on the phenomenon of PI class resistance by uncovering major multidrug-resistant phenotypic patterns and their often diverse genotypic determinants, providing a methodology that can be applied to understand clinically-relevant phenotypic patterns to aid in the design of novel inhibitors that

  8. Multiple receptor conformation docking and dock pose clustering as tool for CoMFA and CoMSIA analysis - a case study on HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2012-02-01

    Multiple receptors conformation docking (MRCD) and clustering of dock poses allows seamless incorporation of receptor binding conformation of the molecules on wide range of ligands with varied structural scaffold. The accuracy of the approach was tested on a set of 120 cyclic urea molecules having HIV-1 protease inhibitory activity using 12 high resolution X-ray crystal structures and one NMR resolved conformation of HIV-1 protease extracted from protein data bank. A cross validation was performed on 25 non-cyclic urea HIV-1 protease inhibitor having varied structures. The comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) models were generated using 60 molecules in the training set by applying leave one out cross validation method, r (loo) (2) values of 0.598 and 0.674 for CoMFA and CoMSIA respectively and non-cross validated regression coefficient r(2) values of 0.983 and 0.985 were obtained for CoMFA and CoMSIA respectively. The predictive ability of these models was determined using a test set of 60 cyclic urea molecules that gave predictive correlation (r (pred) (2) ) of 0.684 and 0.64 respectively for CoMFA and CoMSIA indicating good internal predictive ability. Based on this information 25 non-cyclic urea molecules were taken as a test set to check the external predictive ability of these models. This gave remarkable out come with r (pred) (2) of 0.61 and 0.53 for CoMFA and CoMSIA respectively. The results invariably show that this method is useful for performing 3D QSAR analysis on molecules having different structural motifs.

  9. Body habitus changes and metabolic alterations in protease inhibitor-naive HIV-1-infected patients treated with two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Galli, Massimo; Ridolfo, Anna Lisa; Adorni, Fulvio; Gervasoni, Cristina; Ravasio, Laura; Corsico, Laura; Gianelli, Erika; Piazza, Manuela; Vaccarezza, Mauro; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Moroni, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    Cross-sectional and retrospective surveys suggest that nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) contribute to the metabolic and morphologic alterations observed in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). To assess the risk of developing body habitus changes (BHCs) and metabolic abnormalities in protease inhibitor (PI)-naive HIV-1-infected patients treated with two NRTIs, and the risk associated with each of these drugs. Prospective cohort study. The BHCs occurring in 335 patients treated with two NRTIs were evaluated every 3 months. The laboratory tests included determination of CD4 cell counts and the measurement of HIV RNA, serum glucose, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. Cox proportional hazard models were used to describe the factors associated with the development of BHCs. During a median exposure of 747.5 days, 46 patients (13.7%) developed BHCs: nine fat accumulation alone, 12 fat loss alone, and 25 combined fat loss and accumulation in different body regions. Fat loss alone occurred after a significantly longer median duration of treatment than the other two forms (p =.004). The risk of developing any BHC was significantly higher in female patients (p <.0001). Fat loss was the prevalent alteration in males. Hypertriglyceridemia was observed in 76 patients (22.7%), hypercholesterolemia in 35 (10.5%), and hyperglycemia in 48 (14.3%). The adjusted risk of developing hypertriglyceridemia was higher in the stavudine-treated patients (p =.04) and in those who had previously received ART (p =.02). The only independent factor associated with the development of hypercholesterolemia was to be ART experienced at baseline (p =.02), whereas age was associated with the development of hyperglycemia (p =.0096). Treatment with NRTIs may be responsible for the same morphologic alterations as those observed in patients treated with PIs. Moreover, altered triglyceride levels are also frequently observed. The different timing of presentation and gender

  10. Potent Antiviral HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor GRL-02031 Adapts to the Structures of Drug Resistant Mutants with Its P1;#8242;-Pyrrolidinone Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yu-Chung E.; Yu, XiaXia; Zhang, Ying; Tie, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Yashchuk, Sofiya; Ghosh, Arun K.; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2012-11-14

    GRL-02031 (1) is an HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitor containing a novel P1' (R)-aminomethyl-2-pyrrolidinone group. Crystal structures at resolutions of 1.25-1.55 {angstrom} were analyzed for complexes of 1 with the PR containing major drug resistant mutations, PR{sub I47V}, PR{sub L76V}, PR{sub V82A}, and PR{sub N88D}. Mutations of I47V and V82A alter residues in the inhibitor-binding site, while L76V and N88D are distal mutations having no direct contact with the inhibitor. Substitution of a smaller amino acid in PR{sub I47V} and PR{sub L76V} and the altered charge of PR{sub N88D} are associated with significant local structural changes compared to the wild-type PR{sub WT}, while substitution of alanine in PR{sub V82A} increases the size of the S1' subsite. The P1' pyrrolidinone group of 1 accommodates to these local changes by assuming two different conformations. Overall, the conformation and interactions of 1 with PR mutants resemble those of PR{sub WT} with similar inhibition constants in good agreement with the antiviral potency on multidrug resistant HIV-1.

  11. Commentary on the role of treatment-related HIV compensatory mutations on increasing virulence: new discoveries twenty years since the clinical testing of protease inhibitors to block HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Arts, Eric J

    2012-10-03

    Approximately 20 years has passed since the first human trial with HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Protease inhibitors set the stage for combination therapy in the mid-1990s but are now rarely used in first-line combination therapy and reserved for salvage therapy. Initially, resistance to protease inhibitors was deemed unlikely due to the small enzymatic target with limited genetic diversity, the extended drug binding site in protease, and the need to cleave multiple sites in the HIV-1 precursor proteins. However, a highly protease inhibitor-resistant virus can emerge during treatment and is found to harbor a collection of primary drug-resistant mutations near the drug and/or substrate binding site as well as secondary mutations that compensate for fitness loss. For years, the research field has debated the impact of these secondary mutations on the emergence rates of high-level protease inhibitor resistance. A recent study poses a more pertinent question, related to disease progression in patients newly infected with a virus harboring secondary protease inhibitor-associated polymorphisms. The authors of that study show that increased rates of disease progression, inferred by increased viral loads and decreased CD4 cell counts, correlate with a fitness score of the infecting virus. The modeled fitness scores increased with an accumulation of these secondary protease inhibitors mutations, and not because of any one specific polymorphism.

  12. Minor protease inhibitor mutations at baseline do not increase the risk for a virological failure in HIV-1 subtype B infected patients.

    PubMed

    Scherrer, Alexandra U; Ledergerber, Bruno; von Wyl, Viktor; Böni, Jürg; Yerly, Sabine; Klimkait, Thomas; Cellerai, Cristina; Furrer, Hansjakob; Calmy, Alexandra; Cavassini, Matthias; Elzi, Luigia; Vernazza, Pietro L; Bernasconi, Enos; Günthard, Huldrych F

    2012-01-01

    Minor protease inhibitor (PI) mutations often exist as polymorphisms in HIV-1 sequences from treatment-naïve patients. Previous studies showed that their presence impairs the antiretroviral treatment (ART) response. Evaluating these findings in a larger cohort is essential. To study the impact of minor PI mutations on time to viral suppression and time to virological failure, we included patients from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study infected with HIV-1 subtype B who started first-line ART with a PI and two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Cox regression models were performed to compare the outcomes among patients with 0 and ≥ 1 minor PI mutation. Models were adjusted for baseline HIV-1 RNA, CD4 cell count, sex, transmission category, age, ethnicity, year of ART start, the presence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations, and stratified for the administered PIs. We included 1199 patients of whom 944 (78.7%) received a boosted PI. Minor PI mutations associated with the administered PI were common: 41.7%, 16.1%, 4.7% and 1.9% had 1, 2, 3 or ≥ 4 mutations, respectively. The time to viral suppression was similar between patients with 0 (reference) and ≥ 1 minor PI mutation (multivariable hazard ratio (HR): 1.1 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.0-1.3], P = .196). The time to virological failure was also similar (multivariable HR:.9 [95% CI:.5-1.6], P = .765). In addition, the impact of each single minor PI mutation was analyzed separately: none was significantly associated with the treatment outcome. The presence of minor PI mutations at baseline has no effect on the therapy outcome in HIV infected individuals.

  13. Nine Crystal Structures Determine the Substrate Envelope of the MDR HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Brunzelle, Joseph; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2012-03-27

    Under drug selection pressure, emerging mutations render HIV-1 protease drug resistant, leading to the therapy failure in anti-HIV treatment. It is known that nine substrate cleavage site peptides bind to wild type (WT) HIV-1 protease in a conserved pattern. However, how the multidrug-resistant (MDR) HIV-1 protease binds to the substrate cleavage site peptides is yet to be determined. MDR769 HIV-1 protease (resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84, and 90) was selected for present study to understand the binding to its natural substrates. MDR769 HIV-1 protease was co-crystallized with nine substrate cleavage site hepta-peptides. Crystallographic studies show that MDR769 HIV-1 protease has an expanded substrate envelope with wide open flaps. Furthermore, ligand binding energy calculations indicate weaker binding in MDR769 HIV-1 protease-substrate complexes. These results help in designing the next generation of HIV-1 protease inhibitors by targeting the MDR HIV-1 protease.

  14. In Vitro Characterization of GS-8374, a Novel Phosphonate-Containing Inhibitor of HIV-1 Protease with a Favorable Resistance Profile ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Callebaut, Christian; Stray, Kirsten; Tsai, Luong; Williams, Matt; Yang, Zheng-Yu; Cannizzaro, Carina; Leavitt, Stephanie A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Kelly; Murray, Bernard P.; Mulato, Andrew; Hatada, Marcos; Priskich, Tina; Parkin, Neil; Swaminathan, Swami; Lee, William; He, Gong-Xin; Xu, Lianhong; Cihlar, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    GS-8374 is a novel bis-tetrahydrofuran HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitor (PI) with a unique diethylphosphonate moiety. It was selected from a series of analogs containing various di(alkyl)phosphonate substitutions connected via a linker to the para position of a P-1 phenyl ring. GS-8374 inhibits HIV-1 PR with high potency (Ki = 8.1 pM) and with no known effect on host proteases. Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of GS-8374 binding to PR demonstrated an extremely slow off rate for the inhibitor and favorable contributions of both the enthalpic and entropic components to the total free binding energy. GS-8374 showed potent antiretroviral activity in T-cell lines, primary CD4+ T cells (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 3.4 to 11.5 nM), and macrophages (EC50 = 25.5 nM) and exhibited low cytotoxicity in multiple human cell types. The antiviral potency of GS-8374 was only moderately affected by human serum protein binding, and its combination with multiple approved antiretrovirals showed synergistic effects. When it was tested in a PhenoSense assay against a panel of 24 patient-derived viruses with high-level PI resistance, GS-8374 showed lower mean EC50s and lower fold resistance than any of the clinically approved PIs. Similar to other PIs, in vitro hepatic microsomal metabolism of GS-8374 was efficiently blocked by ritonavir, suggesting a potential for effective pharmacokinetic boosting in vivo. In summary, results from this broad in vitro pharmacological profiling indicate that GS-8374 is a promising candidate to be further assessed as a new antiretroviral agent with potential for clinical efficacy in both treatment-naïve and -experienced patients. PMID:21245449

  15. HIV-1 Protease in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Benko, Zsigmond; Elder, Robert T.; Li, Ge; Liang, Dong; Zhao, Richard Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-1 protease (PR) is an essential viral enzyme. Its primary function is to proteolyze the viral Gag-Pol polyprotein for production of viral enzymes and structural proteins and for maturation of infectious viral particles. Increasing evidence suggests that PR cleaves host cellular proteins. However, the nature of PR-host cellular protein interactions is elusive. This study aimed to develop a fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) model system and to examine the possible interaction of HIV-1 PR with cellular proteins and its potential impact on cell proliferation and viability. Results A fission yeast strain RE294 was created that carried a single integrated copy of the PR gene in its chromosome. The PR gene was expressed using an inducible nmt1 promoter so that PR-specific effects could be measured. HIV-1 PR from this system cleaved the same indigenous viral p6/MA protein substrate as it does in natural HIV-1 infections. HIV-1 PR expression in fission yeast cells prevented cell proliferation and induced cellular oxidative stress and changes in mitochondrial morphology that led to cell death. Both these PR activities can be prevented by a PR-specific enzymatic inhibitor, indinavir, suggesting that PR-mediated proteolytic activities and cytotoxic effects resulted from enzymatic activities of HIV-1 PR. Through genome-wide screening, a serine/threonine kinase, Hhp2, was identified that suppresses HIV-1 PR-induced protease cleavage and cell death in fission yeast and in mammalian cells, where it prevented PR-induced apoptosis and cleavage of caspase-3 and caspase-8. Conclusions This is the first report to show that HIV-1 protease is functional as an enzyme in fission yeast, and that it behaves in a similar manner as it does in HIV-1 infection. HIV-1 PR-induced cell death in fission yeast could potentially be used as an endpoint for mechanistic studies, and this system could be used for developing a high-throughput system for drug screenings. PMID:26982200

  16. The HIV-1 late domain-2 S40A polymorphism in antiretroviral (or ART)-exposed individuals influences protease inhibitor susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Susan M; Simon, Viviana; Durham, Natasha D; Kemp, Brittney R; Machihara, Satoshi; Kemal, Kimdar Sherefa; Shi, Binshan; Foley, Brian; Li, Hongru; Chen, Benjamin K; Weiser, Barbara; Burger, Harold; Anastos, Kathryn; Chen, Chaoping; Carter, Carol A

    2016-09-06

    The p6 region of the HIV-1 structural precursor polyprotein, Gag, contains two motifs, P7TAP11 and L35YPLXSL41, designated as late (L) domain-1 and -2, respectively. These motifs bind the ESCRT-I factor Tsg101 and the ESCRT adaptor Alix, respectively, and are critical for efficient budding of virus particles from the plasma membrane. L domain-2 is thought to be functionally redundant to PTAP. To identify possible other functions of L domain-2, we examined this motif in dominant viruses that emerged in a group of 14 women who had detectable levels of HIV-1 in both plasma and genital tract despite a history of current or previous antiretroviral therapy. Remarkably, variants possessing mutations or rare polymorphisms in the highly conserved L domain-2 were identified in seven of these women. A mutation in a conserved residue (S40A) that does not reduce Gag interaction with Alix and therefore did not reduce budding efficiency was further investigated. This mutation causes a simultaneous change in the Pol reading frame but exhibits little deficiency in Gag processing and virion maturation. Whether introduced into the HIV-1 NL4-3 strain genome or a model protease (PR) precursor, S40A reduced production of mature PR. This same mutation also led to high level detection of two extended forms of PR that were fairly stable compared to the WT in the presence of IDV at various concentrations; one of the extended forms was effective in trans processing even at micromolar IDV. Our results indicate that L domain-2, considered redundant in vitro, can undergo mutations in vivo that significantly alter PR function. These may contribute fitness benefits in both the absence and presence of PR inhibitor.

  17. L-chicoric acid, an inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase, improves on the in vitro anti-HIV-1 effect of Zidovudine plus a protease inhibitor (AG1350).

    PubMed

    Robinson, W E

    1998-08-01

    Combinations of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drugs, including reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors, have proven immensely potent in the therapy of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). To determine whether HIV integrase is a suitable target for combination therapy, the ability of an HIV integrase inhibitor, L-chicoric acid, to work in combination with a protease inhibitor and Zidovudine was tested in vitro. The addition of L-chicoric acid to either Zidovudine or protease inhibitor improved upon the observed anti-HIV activity of either compound alone. When all three drugs were combined, the anti-HIV activity was substantially better than either of the three compounds alone or any combination of two inhibitors. Doses of both Zidovudine and protease inhibitor could be reduced by more than 33% for an equivalent anti-HIV effect if L-chicoric acid was added. The improved anti-HIV activity was observed with a tissue culture adapted strain of HIV (HIV(LAI)) and with limited passage clinical isolates of HIV (HIV(R19) and HIV(R45)). These data demonstrate that a first generation HIV integrase inhibitor, L-chicoric acid, is at least additive in combination with existing multi-drug regimens and suggest that HIV integrase will be an excellent target for combination therapy of HIV infection.

  18. Gag Mutations Strongly Contribute to HIV-1 Resistance to Protease Inhibitors in Highly Drug-Experienced Patients besides Compensating for Fitness Loss

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Bärbel; Descamps, Diane; Launay, Odile; Duval, Xavier; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Hance, Allan J.; Clavel, François

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) resistance to protease inhibitors (PI) results from mutations in the viral protease (PR) that reduce PI binding but also decrease viral replicative capacity (RC). Additional mutations compensating for the RC loss subsequently accumulate within PR and in Gag substrate cleavage sites. We examined the respective contribution of mutations in PR and Gag to PI resistance and RC and their interdependence using a panel of HIV-1 molecular clones carrying different sequences from six patients who had failed multiple lines of treatment. Mutations in Gag strongly and directly contributed to PI resistance besides compensating for fitness loss. This effect was essentially carried by the C-terminal region of Gag (containing NC-SP2-p6) with little or no contribution from MA, CA, and SP1. The effect of Gag on resistance depended on the presence of cleavage site mutations A431V or I437V in NC-SP2-p6 and correlated with processing of the NC/SP2 cleavage site. By contrast, reverting the A431V or I437V mutation in these highly evolved sequences had little effect on RC. Mutations in the NC-SP2-p6 region of Gag can be dually selected as compensatory and as direct PI resistance mutations, with cleavage at the NC-SP2 site behaving as a rate-limiting step in PI resistance. Further compensatory mutations render viral RC independent of the A431V or I437V mutations while their effect on resistance persists. PMID:19300491

  19. Potent HIV-1 protease inhibitors incorporating meso-bicyclic urethanes as P2-ligands: structure-based design, synthesis, biological evaluation and protein-ligand X-ray studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun; Gemma, Sandra; Takayama, Jun; Baldridge, Abigail; Leshchenko-Yashchuk, Sofiya; Miller, Heather; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Koh, Yashiro; Weber, Irene; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2008-12-05

    Recently, we designed a series of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors incorporating a stereochemically defined bicyclic fused cyclopentyl (Cp-THF) urethane as the high affinity P2-ligand. Inhibitor 1 with this P2-ligand has shown very impressive potency against multi-drug-resistant clinical isolates. Based upon the 1-bound HIV-1 protease X-ray structure, we have now designed and synthesized a number of meso-bicyclic ligands which can conceivably interact similarly to the Cp-THF ligand. The design of meso-ligands is quite attractive as they do not contain any stereocenters. Inhibitors incorporating urethanes of bicyclic-1,3-dioxolane and bicyclic-1,4-dioxane have shown potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activities. Inhibitor 2 (K{sub i} = 0.11 nM; IC{sub 50} = 3.8 nM) displayed very potent antiviral activity in this series. While inhibitor 3 showed comparable enzyme inhibitory activity (K{sub i} = 0.18 nM) its antiviral activity (IC{sub 50} = 170 nM) was significantly weaker than inhibitor 2. Inhibitor 2 maintained an antiviral potency against a series of multi-drug resistant clinical isolates comparable to amprenavir. A protein-ligand X-ray structure of 3-bound HIV-1 protease revealed a number of key hydrogen bonding interactions at the S2-subsite. We have created an active model of inhibitor 2 based upon this X-ray structure.

  20. Design of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with Amino-bis-tetrahydrofuran Derivatives as P2-Ligands to Enhance Backbone-Binding Interactions. Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Protein-Ligand X-ray Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Osswald, Heather L.; Sheri, Venkat Reddy; Kassekert, Luke A.; Chen, Shujing; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Hayashi, Hironori; Aoki, Manabu; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2015-10-30

    Structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of very potent HIV-1 protease inhibitors are described. In an effort to improve backbone ligand–binding site interactions, we have incorporated basic-amines at the C4 position of the bis-tetrahydrofuran (bis-THF) ring. We speculated that these substituents would make hydrogen bonding interactions in the flap region of HIV-1 protease. Synthesis of these inhibitors was performed diastereoselectively. A number of inhibitors displayed very potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity. Inhibitors 25f, 25i, and 25j were evaluated against a number of highly-PI-resistant HIV-1 strains, and they exhibited improved antiviral activity over darunavir. Two high resolution X-ray structures of 25f- and 25g-bound HIV-1 protease revealed unique hydrogen bonding interactions with the backbone carbonyl group of Gly48 as well as with the backbone NH of Gly48 in the flap region of the enzyme active site. These ligand–binding site interactions are possibly responsible for their potent activity.

  1. Hydrophobic core flexibility modulates enzyme activity in HIV-1 protease

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.; Bolon, Daniel N. A.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity. PMID:22295904

  2. Hydrophobic Core Flexibility Modulates Enzyme Activity in HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Bolon, Daniel N.A.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-09-11

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from the active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity.

  3. Single Genome Analysis for the Detection of Linked Multiclass Drug Resistance Mutations in HIV-1-Infected Children After Failure of Protease Inhibitor-Based First-Line Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lange, Camille Marie; Hué, Stéphane; Violari, Avy; Cotton, Mark; Gibb, Diana; Babiker, Abdel; Otwombe, Kennedy; Panchia, Ravindre; Dobbels, Els; Jean-Philippe, Patrick; McIntyre, James A; Pillay, Deenan; Gupta, Ravindra Kumar

    2015-06-01

    The WHO recommends protease inhibitor (PI)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) for vertically infected children after failed nevirapine (NVP) prophylaxis. Emergence of PI resistance on the backdrop of preexisting non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance could compromise long-term treatment options in such children. We characterized multiclass drug resistance using single genome sequencing (SGS) in children with viremia while receiving PI-based ART. We applied SGS of HIV-1 protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase to longitudinal samples from a cohort of the Children with HIV Early Antiretroviral Therapy trial with viral loads >1000 copies per milliliter after 40 weeks of early ART. Bulk sequencing revealed NVP-selected resistance in 50% of these children, whereas SGS revealed NVP-selected resistance in 70%. Two children had baseline NRTI and PI mutations, suggesting previous maternal ART. Linked multiclass drug resistance after PI-based ART was detected by SGS in 2 of 10 children. In one child, the majority species contained M184V in reverse transcriptase linked to L10F, M46I/L, I54V, and V82A in PR and a triple-class drug-resistant variant with these mutations linked to the NNRTI mutation V108I. In the second child, the majority species contained M184V and V82A linked within viral genomes. We conclude that when PI-based ART is initiated soon after birth after single dose-NVP prophylaxis, PI and NRTI resistance can occur in the majority species as expected and also be selected on the same genomes as preexisting NNRTI-resistant mutations. These observations highlight a future therapeutic challenge for vertically infected children where antiretroviral drug classes are limited.

  4. Efficacy of etravirine combined with darunavir or other ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors in HIV-1-infected patients: an observational study using pooled European cohort data.

    PubMed

    Vingerhoets, J; Calvez, V; Flandre, P; Marcelin, A-G; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F; Perno, C-F; Mercedes Santoro, M; Bateson, R; Nelson, M; Cozzi-Lepri, A; Grarup, J; Lundgren, J; Incardona, F; Kaiser, R; Sonnerborg, A; Clotet, B; Paredes, R; Günthard, H F; Ledergerber, B; Hoogstoel, A; Nijs, S; Tambuyzer, L; Lavreys, L; Opsomer, M

    2015-05-01

    This observational study in antiretroviral treatment-experienced, HIV-1-infected adults explored the efficacy of etravirine plus darunavir/ritonavir (DRV group; n = 999) vs. etravirine plus an alternative boosted protease inhibitor (other PI group; n = 116) using pooled European cohort data. Two international (EuroSIDA; EUResist Network) and five national (France, Italy, Spain, Switzerland and UK) cohorts provided data (collected in 2007-2012). Stratum-adjusted (for confounding factors) Mantel-Haenszel differences in virological responses (viral load < 50 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL) and odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were derived. Baseline characteristics were balanced between groups except for previous use of antiretrovirals (≥ 10: 63% in the DRV group vs. 49% in the other PI group), including previous use of at least three PIs (64% vs. 53%, respectively) and mean number of PI resistance mutations (2.3 vs. 1.9, respectively). Week 24 responses were 73% vs. 75% (observed) and 49% vs. 43% (missing = failure), respectively. Week 48 responses were 75% vs. 73% and 32% vs. 30%, respectively. All 95% CIs around unadjusted and adjusted differences encompassed 0 (difference in responses) or 1 (ORs). While ORs by cohort indicated heterogeneity in response, for pooled data the difference between unadjusted and adjusted for cohort ORs was small. These data do not indicate a difference in response between the DRV and other PI groups, although caution should be applied given the small size of the other PI group and the lack of randomization. This suggests that the efficacy and virology results from DUET can be extrapolated to a regimen of etravirine with a boosted PI other than darunavir/ritonavir. © 2015 British HIV Association.

  5. Insights into the mechanism of drug resistance. X-ray structure analysis of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease ritonavir complex

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhigang; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Wang, Yong; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Reiter, Samuel J.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2013-01-08

    Ritonavir (RTV) is a first generation HIV-1 protease inhibitor with rapidly emerging drug resistance. Mutations at residues 46, 54, 82 and 84 render the HIV-1 protease drug resistant against RTV. We report the crystal structure of multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (carrying resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84 and 90) complexed with RTV and the in vitro enzymatic IC50 of RTV against MDR HIV-1 protease. The structural and functional studies demonstrate significant drug resistance of MDR HIV-1 protease against RTV, arising from reduced hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals interactions between RTV and MDR HIV-1 protease.

  6. Conserved hydrogen bonds and water molecules in MDR HIV-1 protease substrate complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Reiter, Samuel J.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2012-12-19

    Success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in anti-HIV therapy is severely compromised by the rapidly developing drug resistance. HIV-1 protease inhibitors, part of HAART, are losing their potency and efficacy in inhibiting the target. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84, 90) was selected for the present study to understand the binding to its natural substrates. The nine crystal structures of MDR769 HIV-1 protease substrate hepta-peptide complexes were analyzed in order to reveal the conserved structural elements for the purpose of drug design against MDR HIV-1 protease. Our structural studies demonstrated that highly conserved hydrogen bonds between the protease and substrate peptides, together with the conserved crystallographic water molecules, played a crucial role in the substrate recognition, substrate stabilization and protease stabilization. Additionally, the absence of the key flap-ligand bridging water molecule might imply a different catalytic mechanism of MDR769 HIV-1 protease compared to that of wild type (WT) HIV-1 protease.

  7. Conserved hydrogen bonds and water molecules in MDR HIV-1 protease substrate complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Yedidi, Ravikiran S; Dewdney, Tamaria G; Reiter, Samuel J; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Kovari, Iulia A; Kovari, Ladislau C

    2013-01-18

    The success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in anti-HIV therapy is severely compromised by the rapidly developing drug resistance. HIV-1 protease inhibitors, part of HAART, are losing their potency and efficacy in inhibiting the target. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84, 90) was selected for the present study to understand the binding to its natural substrates. The nine crystal structures of MDR769 HIV-1 protease substrate hepta-peptide complexes were analyzed in order to reveal the conserved structural elements for the purpose of drug design against MDR HIV-1 protease. Our structural studies demonstrated that highly conserved hydrogen bonds between the protease and substrate peptides, together with the conserved crystallographic water molecules, played a crucial role in the substrate recognition, substrate stabilization and protease stabilization. In addition, the absence of the key flap-ligand bridging water molecule might imply a different catalytic mechanism of MDR769 HIV-1 protease compared to that of wild type (WT) HIV-1 protease.

  8. Contribution of the 80s loop of HIV-1 protease to the multidrug-resistance mechanism: crystallographic study of MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants

    SciTech Connect

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Proteasa, Georghe; Martinez, Jorge L.; Vickrey, John F.; Martin, Philip D.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Liu, Zhigang; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2011-09-06

    The flexible flaps and the 80s loops (Pro79-Ile84) of HIV-1 protease are crucial in inhibitor binding. Previously, it was reported that the crystal structure of multidrug-resistant 769 (MDR769) HIV-1 protease shows a wide-open conformation of the flaps owing to conformational rigidity acquired by the accumulation of mutations. In the current study, the effect of mutations on the conformation of the 80s loop of MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants is reported. Alternate conformations of Pro81 (proline switch) with a root-mean-square deviation of 3-4.8 {angstrom} in the C{alpha} atoms of the I10V mutant and a side chain with a 'flipped-out' conformation in the A82F mutant cause distortion in the S1/S1' binding pockets that affects inhibitor binding. The A82S and A82T mutants show local changes in the electrostatics of inhibitor binding owing to the mutation from nonpolar to polar residues. In summary, the crystallographic studies of four variants of MDR769 HIV-1 protease presented in this article provide new insights towards understanding the drug-resistance mechanism as well as a basis for design of future protease inhibitors with enhanced potency.

  9. Contribution of the 80s loop of HIV-1 protease to the multidrug-resistance mechanism: crystallographic study of MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants

    PubMed Central

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Proteasa, Georghe; Martinez, Jorge L.; Vickrey, John F.; Martin, Philip D.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Liu, Zhigang; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2011-01-01

    The flexible flaps and the 80s loops (Pro79–Ile84) of HIV-1 protease are crucial in inhibitor binding. Previously, it was reported that the crystal structure of multidrug-resistant 769 (MDR769) HIV-1 protease shows a wide-open conformation of the flaps owing to conformational rigidity acquired by the accumulation of mutations. In the current study, the effect of mutations on the conformation of the 80s loop of MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants is reported. Alternate conformations of Pro81 (proline switch) with a root-mean-square deviation of 3–4.8 Å in the Cα atoms of the I10V mutant and a side chain with a ‘flipped-out’ conformation in the A82F mutant cause distortion in the S1/S1′ binding pockets that affects inhibitor binding. The A82S and A82T mutants show local changes in the electrostatics of inhibitor binding owing to the mutation from nonpolar to polar residues. In summary, the crystallo­graphic studies of four variants of MDR769 HIV-1 protease presented in this article provide new insights towards understanding the drug-resistance mechanism as well as a basis for design of future protease inhibitors with enhanced potency. PMID:21636892

  10. Quantum study of HIV-1 protease-bridge water interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Li L.; Tong, Yan; Mei, Ye; Zhang, Qing G.; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2007-10-01

    We present a fully quantum mechanical calculation for binding interaction between HIV-1 protease (PR) and the water molecule W301 which bridges the flaps of the protease with the inhibitors of PR. The quantum calculation is made possible by applying a recently developed molecular fractionation with conjugate caps (MFCC) method which divides a protein molecule into capped amino acid-based fragments and their conjugate caps. These individual fragments are properly treated to preserve the chemical property of bonds that are cut. Ab initio methods at HF, B3LYP, and MP2 levels with a fixed basis set 6-31+G* have been employed in the present calculation. The MFCC calculation produces a quantum mechanical interaction "map" representing interactions between individual residues of PR and W301. This enables a detailed quantitative analysis on binding of W301 to specific residues of PR at quantum mechanical level.

  11. Flap Conformations in HIV-1 Protease are Altered by Mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanucci, Gail; Blackburn, Mandy; Veloro, Angelo; Galiano, Luis; Fangu, Ding; Simmerling, Carlos

    2009-03-01

    HIV-1 protease (PR) is an enzyme that is a major drug target in the treatment of AIDS. Although the structure and function of HIV-1 PR have been studied for over 20 years, questions remain regarding the conformations and dynamics of the β-hairpin turns (flaps) that cover the active site cavity. Distance measurements with pulsed EPR spectroscopy of spin labeled constructs of HIV-1 PR have been used to characterize the flap conformations in the apo and inhibitor bound states. From the most probably distances and the breadth of the distance distribution profiles from analysis of the EPR data, insights regarding the flap conformations and flexibility are gained. The EPR results clearly show how drug pressure selected mutations alter the average conformation of the flaps and the degree of opening of the flaps. Molecular dynamics simulations successfully regenerate the experimentally determined distance distribution profiles, and more importantly, provide structural models for full interpretation of the EPR results. By combining experiment and theory to understand the role that altered flap flexibility/conformations play in the mechanism of drug resistance, key insights are gained toward the rational development of new inhibitors of this important enzyme.

  12. Symmetry-based inhibitors of HIV-1 protease. Design, synthesis and preliminary structure-activity studies of acylated 2,3-diamino-1-hydroxypropanes and 2,4 diamino-1-hydroxybutanes.

    PubMed

    Marastoni, M; Bazzaro, M; Bortolotti, F; Salvadori, S; Tomatis, R

    1999-01-01

    Two series of peptidomimetics containing a novel C(2) pseudosymmetrical hydroxyalkyldiamino core structure were prepared from amino acid starting materials and tested for inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 Pr) and the virus in cell culture. In the 2,3-diamino-1-hydroxypropane series, compound 6a, containing P1/P1(I) benzyl and P2/P2(I) Fmoc substituents, displayed modest HIV-1 Pr inhibition (IC(50) = 430 nM). The corresponding 2,4-diamino-1-hydroxybutane derivative (6b) was the best inhibitor of the series (IC(50) = 160 nM). Interestingly, 6a and 6b showed satisfactory inhibition of HIV replication in cell culture (ED(50) = 340 and 110 nM, respectively), a result which suggests good cell membrane penetration by this class of compounds.

  13. The higher barrier of darunavir and tipranavir resistance for HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Zhigang; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Reiter, Samuel J.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2011-11-17

    Darunavir and tipranavir are two inhibitors that are active against multi-drug resistant (MDR) HIV-1 protease variants. In this study, the invitro inhibitory efficacy was tested against a MDR HIV-1 protease variant, MDR 769 82T, containing the drug resistance mutations of 46L/54V/82T/84V/90M. Crystallographic and enzymatic studies were performed to examine the mechanism of resistance and the relative maintenance of potency. The key findings are as follows: (i) The MDR protease exhibits decreased susceptibility to all nine HIV-1 protease inhibitors approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), among which darunavir and tipranavir are the most potent; (ii) the threonine 82 mutation on the protease greatly enhances drug resistance by altering the hydrophobicity of the binding pocket; (iii) darunavir or tipranavir binding facilitates closure of the wide-open flaps of the MDR protease; and (iv) the remaining potency of tipranavir may be preserved by stabilizing the flaps in the inhibitor-protease complex while darunavir maintains its potency by preserving protein main chain hydrogen bonds with the flexible P2 group. These results could provide new insights into drug design strategies to overcome multi-drug resistance of HIV-1 protease variants.

  14. Cloning and Expression of Soluble Recombinant HIV-1 CRF35 Protease-HP Thioredoxin Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Azarnezhad, Asaad; Sharifi, Zohreh; Seyedabadi, Rahmatollah; Hosseini, Arshad; Johari, Behrooz; Sobhani Fard, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    Background: As a drug target and an antigenic agent, HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) is at the center of attention for designing anti-AIDS inhibitors and diagnostic tests. In previous studies, the production of the recombinant protease has been faced with several difficulties; therefore, the aims of this study were the easy production, purification of the soluble form of protease in E. coli and investigation of its immunoreactivity. Methods: Protease coding region was isolated from the serum of an infected individual, amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into PTZ57R using TA-cloning. Protease coding frame was isolated by PCR and cloned in pET102/D. TOPO expression vector and cloned protease was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) BL21. Produced recombinant protein was purified by affinity Ni-NTA column and protein concentration was checked by BCA protein assay kit. Subsequently, immunoreactivity of recombinant protease (rPR) was assayed by Western blotting and ELISA. Results: Cloning of the HIV protease by TOPO cloning system in pET102/D.TOPO was confirmed with PCR and sequencing. The concentration range of purified recombinant protein was 85 to 100 μg/ml. Immunogenicity of rPR was confirmed by Western blotting and ELISA. Conclusion: Soluble production of recombinant HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 rPR) was performed successfully. This recombinant protein disclosed 86% specificity and 90% sensitivity in immunoassay tests. PMID:27920885

  15. Contraceptive Efficacy of Oral and Transdermal Hormones When Co-Administered With Protease Inhibitors in HIV-1–Infected Women: Pharmacokinetic Results of ACTG Trial A5188

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Mary A.; Patterson, Kristine; Kamemoto, Lori; Park, Jeong-Gun; Watts, Heather; Aweeka, Francesca; Klingman, Karin L.; Cohn, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions between lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) and transdermally delivered ethinyl estradiol (EE) and norelgestromin (NGMN) are unknown. Methods Using a standard noncompartmental PK analysis, we compared EE area under the time–concentration curve (AUC) and NGMN AUC during transdermal contraceptive patch administration in HIV-1–infected women on stable LPV/r to a control group of women not on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). In addition, EE AUC after a single dose of a combination oral contraceptive pill including EE and norethindrone was measured before patch placement and was compared with patch EE AUC in both groups. Contraceptive effects on LPV/r PKs were estimated by measuring LPV/r AUC at baseline and during week 3 of patch administration. Results Eight women on LPV/r, and 24 women in the control group were enrolled. Patch EE median AUC0–168 h was 45% lower at 6010.36 pg·h·mL−1 in those on LPV/r versus 10911.42 pg·h·mL−1 in those on no HAART (P = 0.064). Pill EE median AUC0–48 hours was similarly 55% lower at 344.67 pg·h·mL−1 in those on LPV/r versus 765.38 pg·h·mL−1 in those on no HAART (P = 0.003). Patch NGMN AUC0–168 h however, was 138.39 ng·h·mL−1, 83% higher in the LPV/r group compared with the control AUC of 75.63 ng·h·mL−1 (P = 0.036). After 3 weeks on the patch, LPVAUC0–8 h decreased by 19%, (P = 0.156). Conclusions Although PKs of contraceptive EE and NGMN are significantly altered with LPV/r, the contraceptive efficacy of the patch is likely to be maintained. Larger studies are indicated to fully assess contraceptive efficacy versus risks of the transdermal contraceptive patch when co-administered with protease inhibitors. PMID:20842042

  16. Fullerene Derivatives Strongly Inhibit HIV-1 Replication by Affecting Virus Maturation without Impairing Protease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Zachary S.; Castro, Edison; Seong, Chang-Soo; Cerón, Maira R.

    2016-01-01

    Three compounds (1, 2, and 3) previously reported to inhibit HIV-1 replication and/or in vitro activity of reverse transcriptase were studied, but only fullerene derivatives 1 and 2 showed strong antiviral activity on the replication of HIV-1 in human CD4+ T cells. However, these compounds did not inhibit infection by single-round infection vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G (VSV-G)-pseudotyped viruses, indicating no effect on the early steps of the viral life cycle. In contrast, analysis of single-round infection VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 produced in the presence of compound 1 or 2 showed a complete lack of infectivity in human CD4+ T cells, suggesting that the late stages of the HIV-1 life cycle were affected. Quantification of virion-associated viral RNA and p24 indicates that RNA packaging and viral production were unremarkable in these viruses. However, Gag and Gag-Pol processing was affected, as evidenced by immunoblot analysis with an anti-p24 antibody and the measurement of virion-associated reverse transcriptase activity, ratifying the effect of the fullerene derivatives on virion maturation of the HIV-1 life cycle. Surprisingly, fullerenes 1 and 2 did not inhibit HIV-1 protease in an in vitro assay at the doses that potently blocked viral infectivity, suggesting a protease-independent mechanism of action. Highlighting the potential therapeutic relevance of fullerene derivatives, these compounds block infection by HIV-1 resistant to protease and maturation inhibitors. PMID:27431232

  17. Serum levels of IgG antibodies against oxidized LDL and atherogenic indices in HIV-1-infected patients treated with protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Joel; Ferreira Maselli, Luciana Morganti; Treitinger, Arício; Monteiro, Andrea Moreira; Gidlund, Magnus; Maranhão, Raul Cavalcanti; Spada, Celso; Bydlowski, Sérgio Paulo

    2013-02-01

    Antibodies against low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) that have been oxidized are associated with development of atherosclerotic lesions. In individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with or without therapy, dyslipidemia and increased cardiovascular risk are observed. Serum levels of IgG antibodies against oxidized LDLs (IgG anti-oxLDL Abs) were determined by assay in 151 HIV-1-infected patients. Of these, 42 patients did not receive anti-retroviral therapy (ART-naïve), whereas 109 received highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) consisting of lopinavir/ritonavir (LOP/r; n=50), efavirenz (EFV; n=30) and nevirapine (NVP; n=29) associated with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. HIV-1 seronegative individuals (n=43) participated in the study. The following parameters were quantified: total cholesterol and its fractions, atherogenic indices (AIs), apolipoproteins A1 and B100, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and HIV-1-RNA. Levels of IgG anti-oxLDL Abs were significantly higher (p<0.05) in the LOP/r group compared with the EFV and/or NVP and the seronegative group: median 0.32 (0.15, 0.58; 95% confidence interval) vs. 0.25 (0.13, 0.53) vs. 0.18 (0.04, 0.38), respectively. HIV-1-infected ART-naïve patients (n=42) presented antibodies levels similar to those observed for the LOP/r group, 0.33 (0.13, 0.63; p>0.05). The levels of IgG anti-oxLDL Abs correlated with an increase in AIs (r=0.216; p=0.036) and triglycerides (r=0.220; p=0.044) in the LOP/r group, and AIs in the ART-naïve group (r=0.300; p=0.046). Patients treated with LOP/r showed higher levels of IgG anti-oxLDL Abs compared with patients treated with EFV or NVP regimens, and these levels were associated with an increase in AIs.

  18. Extreme Entropy-Enthalpy Compensation in a Drug Resistant Variant of HIV-1 Protease

    PubMed Central

    King, Nancy M.; Prabu-Jeyabalan, Moses; Bandaranayake, Rajintha M.; Nalam, Madhavi N. L.; Nalivaika, Ellen A.; Özen, Ayşegül; Haliloglu, Türkan; Yılmaz, Neşe Kurt; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of HIV-1 protease inhibitors has been the historic paradigm of rational structure-based drug design, where structural and thermodynamic analyses have assisted in the discovery of novel inhibitors. While the total enthalpy and entropy change upon binding determine the affinity, often the thermodynamics are considered in terms of inhibitor properties only. In the current study, profound changes are observed in the binding thermodynamics of a drug resistant variant compared to wild-type HIV-1 protease, irrespective of the inhibitor bound. This variant (Flap+) has a combination of flap and active site mutations and exhibits extremely large entropy-enthalpy compensation compared to wild-type protease, 5–15 kcal/mol, while losing only 1–3 kcal/mol in total binding free energy for any of six FDA approved inhibitors. Although entropy-enthalpy compensation has been previously observed for a variety of systems, never have changes of this magnitude been reported. The co-crystal structures of Flap+ protease with four of the inhibitors were determined and compared with complexes of both the wildtype protease and another drug resistant variant that does not exhibit this energetic compensation. Structural changes conserved across the Flap+ complexes, which are more pronounced for the flaps covering the active site, likely contribute to the thermodynamic compensation. The finding that drug resistant mutations can profoundly modulate the relative thermodynamic properties of a therapeutic target independent of the inhibitor presents a new challenge for rational drug design. PMID:22712830

  19. Extreme entropy-enthalpy compensation in a drug-resistant variant of HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    King, Nancy M; Prabu-Jeyabalan, Moses; Bandaranayake, Rajintha M; Nalam, Madhavi N L; Nalivaika, Ellen A; Özen, Ayşegül; Haliloğlu, Türkan; Yilmaz, Neşe Kurt; Schiffer, Celia A

    2012-09-21

    The development of HIV-1 protease inhibitors has been the historic paradigm of rational structure-based drug design, where structural and thermodynamic analyses have assisted in the discovery of novel inhibitors. While the total enthalpy and entropy change upon binding determine the affinity, often the thermodynamics are considered in terms of inhibitor properties only. In the current study, profound changes are observed in the binding thermodynamics of a drug-resistant variant compared to wild-type HIV-1 protease, irrespective of the inhibitor bound. This variant (Flap+) has a combination of flap and active site mutations and exhibits extremely large entropy-enthalpy compensation compared to wild-type protease, 5-15 kcal/mol, while losing only 1-3 kcal/mol in total binding free energy for any of six FDA-approved inhibitors. Although entropy-enthalpy compensation has been previously observed for a variety of systems, never have changes of this magnitude been reported. The co-crystal structures of Flap+ protease with four of the inhibitors were determined and compared with complexes of both the wild-type protease and another drug-resistant variant that does not exhibit this energetic compensation. Structural changes conserved across the Flap+ complexes, which are more pronounced for the flaps covering the active site, likely contribute to the thermodynamic compensation. The finding that drug-resistant mutations can profoundly modulate the relative thermodynamic properties of a therapeutic target independent of the inhibitor presents a new challenge for rational drug design.

  20. Comparison of drug resistance scores for tipranavir in protease inhibitor-naive patients infected with HIV-1 B and non-B subtypes.

    PubMed

    Stürmer, Martin; Stephan, Christoph; Gute, Peter; Knecht, Gaby; Bickel, Markus; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Doerr, Hans W; Gürtler, Lutz; Lecocq, Pierre; van Houtte, Margriet

    2011-11-01

    Genotypes of samples from protease inhibitor-naïve patients in Frankfurt's HIV Cohort were analyzed with five tipranavir resistance prediction algorithms. Mean scores were higher in non-B than in B subtypes. The proportion of non-B subtypes increased with increasing scores, except in weighted algorithms. Virtual and in vitro phenotype analyses of samples with increased scores showed no reduced tipranavir susceptibility. Current algorithms appear suboptimal for interpretation of resistance to tipranavir in non-B subtypes; increased scores might reflect algorithm bias rather than "natural resistance."

  1. HIV-1 protease and HIV-1 integrase inhibitory substances from Eclipta prostrata.

    PubMed

    Tewtrakul, Supinya; Subhadhirasakul, Sanan; Cheenpracha, Sarot; Karalai, Chatchanok

    2007-11-01

    The bioassay-guided fractionation for anti-HIV-1 integrase activity led to the isolation of six compounds from the whole plant extract of Eclipta prostrata extract. They were identified as 5-hydroxymethyl-(2,2':5',2'')-terthienyl tiglate (1), 5-hydroxymethyl-(2,2':5',2'')-terthienyl agelate (2), 5-hydroxymethyl-(2,2':5',2'')-terthienyl acetate (3), ecliptal (4), orobol (5) and wedelolactone (6). Of these, compound 6 showed the highest activity against HIV-1 integrase (IN) with an IC50 value of 4.0+/-0.2 microm, followed by compound 5 (IC50=8.1+/-0.5 microm), whereas the four terthiophene compounds (1-4) were inactive (IC50>100 microm). Regarding HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitory activity, compound 1 exhibited appreciable activity against HIV-1 PR with an IC50 of 58.3+/-0.8 microm, followed by compound 4 (IC50=83.3+/-1.6 microm) and compound 3 (IC50=93.7+/-0.8 microm), while compounds 2, 5 and 6 were inactive against HIV-1 PR (IC50>100 microm). This is the first report of anti-HIV-1 IN activities for wedelolactone (6), a coumarin derivative, and orobol (5), an isoflavone derivative. This study supports the use of E. prostrata in AIDS patients, which is in accord with its traditional use by Thai traditional doctors for curing blood related diseases. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. An inhibitor of HIV-1 protease modulates constitutive eIF2α dephosphorylation to trigger a specific integrated stress response.

    PubMed

    De Gassart, Aude; Bujisic, Bojan; Zaffalon, Léa; Decosterd, Laurent A; Di Micco, Antonia; Frera, Gianluca; Tallant, Rémy; Martinon, Fabio

    2016-01-12

    Inhibitors of the HIV aspartyl protease [HIV protease inhibitors (HIV-PIs)] are the cornerstone of treatment for HIV. Beyond their well-defined antiretroviral activity, these drugs have additional effects that modulate cell viability and homeostasis. However, little is known about the virus-independent pathways engaged by these molecules. Here we show that the HIV-PI Nelfinavir decreases translation rates and promotes a transcriptional program characteristic of the integrated stress response (ISR). Mice treated with Nelfinavir display hallmarks of this stress response in the liver, including α subunit of translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) phosphorylation, activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4) induction, and increased expression of known downstream targets. Mechanistically, Nelfinavir-mediated ISR bypassed direct activation of the eIF2α stress kinases and instead relied on the inhibition of the constitutive eIF2α dephosphorylation and down-regulation of the phophatase cofactor CReP (Constitutive Repressor of eIF2α Phosphorylation; also known as PPP1R15B). These findings demonstrate that the modulation of eIF2α-specific phosphatase cofactor activity can be a rheostat of cellular homeostasis that initiates a functional ISR and suggest that the HIV-PIs could be repositioned as therapeutics in human diseases to modulate translation rates and stress responses.

  3. An inhibitor of HIV-1 protease modulates constitutive eIF2α dephosphorylation to trigger a specific integrated stress response

    PubMed Central

    De Gassart, Aude; Bujisic, Bojan; Zaffalon, Léa; Decosterd, Laurent A.; Di Micco, Antonia; Frera, Gianluca; Tallant, Rémy; Martinon, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of the HIV aspartyl protease [HIV protease inhibitors (HIV-PIs)] are the cornerstone of treatment for HIV. Beyond their well-defined antiretroviral activity, these drugs have additional effects that modulate cell viability and homeostasis. However, little is known about the virus-independent pathways engaged by these molecules. Here we show that the HIV-PI Nelfinavir decreases translation rates and promotes a transcriptional program characteristic of the integrated stress response (ISR). Mice treated with Nelfinavir display hallmarks of this stress response in the liver, including α subunit of translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) phosphorylation, activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4) induction, and increased expression of known downstream targets. Mechanistically, Nelfinavir-mediated ISR bypassed direct activation of the eIF2α stress kinases and instead relied on the inhibition of the constitutive eIF2α dephosphorylation and down-regulation of the phophatase cofactor CReP (Constitutive Repressor of eIF2α Phosphorylation; also known as PPP1R15B). These findings demonstrate that the modulation of eIF2α-specific phosphatase cofactor activity can be a rheostat of cellular homeostasis that initiates a functional ISR and suggest that the HIV-PIs could be repositioned as therapeutics in human diseases to modulate translation rates and stress responses. PMID:26715744

  4. Synthetic, structural mimetics of the β-hairpin flap of HIV-1 protease inhibit enzyme function.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Jay; Chen, Shen-En; Fenstermacher, Katherine J; Naser-Tavakolian, Aurash; Reingewertz, Tali; Salmo, Rosene; Lee, Christian; Williams, Emori; Raje, Mithun; Sundberg, Eric; DeStefano, Jeffrey J; Freire, Ernesto; Fletcher, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Small-molecule mimetics of the β-hairpin flap of HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) were designed based on a 1,4-benzodiazepine scaffold as a strategy to interfere with the flap-flap protein-protein interaction, which functions as a gated mechanism to control access to the active site. Michaelis-Menten kinetics suggested our small-molecules are competitive inhibitors, which indicates the mode of inhibition is through binding the active site or sterically blocking access to the active site and preventing flap closure, as designed. More generally, a new bioactive scaffold for HIV-1PR inhibition has been discovered, with the most potent compound inhibiting the protease with a modest K(i) of 11 μM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors targeting gp41.

    PubMed

    Lu, K; Asyifah, M R; Shao, F; Zhang, D

    2014-06-01

    The HIV-1 envelope protein glycoprotein 41 (gp41) is crucial in the HIV-1 infection process, therefore gp41 has emerged as an attractive target for drug design against AIDS. During the past few decades, tremendous efforts have been made on developing inhibitors that can prevent the HIV-1 entry process via suppressing functional gp41. In this review, the development of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors targeting gp41 including peptide inhibitors, small molecule inhibitors, vaccines and neutralized antibodies will be discussed.

  6. Cold Denaturation of the HIV-1 Protease Monomer.

    PubMed

    Rösner, Heike I; Caldarini, Martina; Prestel, Andreas; Vanoni, Maria A; Broglia, Ricardo A; Aliverti, Alessandro; Tiana, Guido; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2017-02-28

    The human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) protease is a complex protein that in its active form adopts a homodimer dominated by β-sheet structures. We have discovered a cold-denatured state of the monomeric subunit of HIV-1 protease that is populated above 0 °C and therefore directly accessible to various spectroscopic approaches. Using nuclear magnetic resonance secondary chemical shifts, temperature coefficients, and protein dynamics, we suggest that the cold-denatured state populates a compact wet globule containing transient non-native-like α-helical elements. From the linearity of the temperature coefficients and the hydrodynamic radii, we propose that the overall architecture of the cold-denatured state is maintained over the temperature range studied.

  7. Structural basis and distal effects of Gag substrate coevolution in drug resistance to HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Özen, Ayşegül; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Kurt Yilmaz, Nese; Schiffer, Celia A

    2014-11-11

    Drug resistance mutations in response to HIV-1 protease inhibitors are selected not only in the drug target but elsewhere in the viral genome, especially at the protease cleavage sites in the precursor protein Gag. To understand the molecular basis of this protease-substrate coevolution, we solved the crystal structures of drug resistant I50V/A71V HIV-1 protease with p1-p6 substrates bearing coevolved mutations. Analyses of the protease-substrate interactions reveal that compensatory coevolved mutations in the substrate do not restore interactions lost due to protease mutations, but instead establish other interactions that are not restricted to the site of mutation. Mutation of a substrate residue has distal effects on other residues' interactions as well, including through the induction of a conformational change in the protease. Additionally, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that restoration of active site dynamics is an additional constraint in the selection of coevolved mutations. Hence, protease-substrate coevolution permits mutational, structural, and dynamic changes via molecular mechanisms that involve distal effects contributing to drug resistance.

  8. Full quantum mechanical study of binding of HIV-1 protease drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da W.; Zhang, John Z. H.

    Fully quantum mechanical studies of detailed binding interactions between HIV-1 protease and six FDA (Food and Drug Administration)-approved drugs (saquinavir, indinavir, ritonavir, nelfinavir, amprenavir, and lopinavir) are carried out using a recently developed MFCC (molecular fractionation with conjugate caps) method. The MFCC calculation produces a quantum mechanical interaction spectrum for any protease drug binding complex. Detailed quantitative analysis on binding of lopinavir to specific residues of the protease is given from the current study. The present calculation shows that the dominant binding of lopinavir to the protease is through the formation of a strong hydrogen bond between the central hydroxyl group of the drug to the aspartate oxygen of Asp25 in one of the two chains of the protease (A chain). This is closely followed by hydrogen binding of the drug to Asp29 in the B chain and somewhat weak hydrogen bonding to Asp30, Gly27, Gly48, and Ile50 in both chains. By partitioning all six drugs into four building blocks besides the central component containing the hydroxyl group, MFCC calculation finds that block III has essentially no binding interaction with the protease and the major binding interactions of these drugs are from blocks II and IV, in addition to the dominant central hydroxyl group. This detailed quantitative information on drug binding to the protease is very useful in rational design of new and improved inhibitors of HIV-1 protease and its mutants.

  9. Increased Serpin A5 levels in the cervicovaginal fluid of HIV-1 exposed seronegatives suggest that a subtle balance between serine proteases and their inhibitors may determine susceptibility to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Van Raemdonck, Geert; Zegels, Geert; Coen, Edmond; Vuylsteke, Bea; Jennes, Wim; Van Ostade, Xaveer

    2014-06-01

    HIV-exposed seronegative individuals (HESNs) are persons who remain seronegative despite repeated exposure to HIV, suggesting an in vivo resistance mechanism to HIV. Elucidation of endogenous factors responsible for this phenomenon may aid in the development of new classes of microbicides and therapeutics. We compared cervicovaginal protein abundance profiles between high-risk HESN and two control groups: low-risk HESN and HIV-positives. Four iTRAQ-based quantitative experiments were performed using samples classified based on presence/absence of particular gynaecological conditions. After statistical analysis, two proteins were shown to be differentially abundant between high-risk HESNs and control groups. Serpin A5, a serine proteinase inhibitor and Myeloblastin, a serine protease, were up- and downregulated, respectively. Commercially available ELISA assays were used to confirm differential Serpin A5 levels. These results suggest that HIV resistance in CVF of HESNs is the result of a delicate balance between two complementary mechanisms: downregulation of serine proteinases and upregulation of their inhibitors. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Novel Acylguanidine-Based Inhibitor of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Mwimanzi, Philip; Tietjen, Ian; Miller, Scott C.; Shahid, Aniqa; Cobarrubias, Kyle; Kinloch, Natalie N.; Baraki, Bemuluyigza; Richard, Jonathan; Finzi, Andrés; Fedida, David; Brumme, Zabrina L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The emergence of transmissible HIV-1 strains with resistance to antiretroviral drugs highlights a continual need for new therapies. Here we describe a novel acylguanidine-containing compound, 1-(2-(azepan-1-yl)nicotinoyl)guanidine (or SM111), that inhibits in vitro replication of HIV-1, including strains resistant to licensed protease, reverse transcriptase, and integrase inhibitors, without major cellular toxicity. At inhibitory concentrations, intracellular p24Gag production was unaffected, but virion release (measured as extracellular p24Gag) was reduced and virion infectivity was substantially impaired, suggesting that SM111 acts at a late stage of viral replication. SM111-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 was partially overcome by a Vpu I17R mutation alone or a Vpu W22* truncation in combination with Env N136Y. These mutations enhanced virion infectivity and Env expression on the surface of infected cells in the absence and presence of SM111 but also impaired Vpu's ability to downregulate CD4 and BST2/tetherin. Taken together, our results support acylguanidines as a class of HIV-1 inhibitors with a distinct mechanism of action compared to that of licensed antiretrovirals. Further research on SM111 and similar compounds may help to elucidate knowledge gaps related to Vpu's role in promoting viral egress and infectivity. IMPORTANCE New inhibitors of HIV-1 replication may be useful as therapeutics to counteract drug resistance and as reagents to perform more detailed studies of viral pathogenesis. SM111 is a small molecule that blocks the replication of wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1 strains by impairing viral release and substantially reducing virion infectivity, most likely through its ability to prevent Env expression at the infected cell surface. Partial resistance to SM111 is mediated by mutations in Vpu and/or Env, suggesting that the compound affects host/viral protein interactions that are important during viral egress. Further characterization of

  11. Fullerene Derivatives Strongly Inhibit HIV-1 Replication by Affecting Virus Maturation without Impairing Protease Activity.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Zachary S; Castro, Edison; Seong, Chang-Soo; Cerón, Maira R; Echegoyen, Luis; Llano, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Three compounds (1, 2, and 3) previously reported to inhibit HIV-1 replication and/or in vitro activity of reverse transcriptase were studied, but only fullerene derivatives 1 and 2 showed strong antiviral activity on the replication of HIV-1 in human CD4(+) T cells. However, these compounds did not inhibit infection by single-round infection vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G (VSV-G)-pseudotyped viruses, indicating no effect on the early steps of the viral life cycle. In contrast, analysis of single-round infection VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 produced in the presence of compound 1 or 2 showed a complete lack of infectivity in human CD4(+) T cells, suggesting that the late stages of the HIV-1 life cycle were affected. Quantification of virion-associated viral RNA and p24 indicates that RNA packaging and viral production were unremarkable in these viruses. However, Gag and Gag-Pol processing was affected, as evidenced by immunoblot analysis with an anti-p24 antibody and the measurement of virion-associated reverse transcriptase activity, ratifying the effect of the fullerene derivatives on virion maturation of the HIV-1 life cycle. Surprisingly, fullerenes 1 and 2 did not inhibit HIV-1 protease in an in vitro assay at the doses that potently blocked viral infectivity, suggesting a protease-independent mechanism of action. Highlighting the potential therapeutic relevance of fullerene derivatives, these compounds block infection by HIV-1 resistant to protease and maturation inhibitors. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Structural, kinetic, and thermodynamic studies of specificity designed HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Alvizo, Oscar; Mittal, Seema; Mayo, Stephen L.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-10-23

    HIV-1 protease recognizes and cleaves more than 12 different substrates leading to viral maturation. While these substrates share no conserved motif, they are specifically selected for and cleaved by protease during viral life cycle. Drug resistant mutations evolve within the protease that compromise inhibitor binding but allow the continued recognition of all these substrates. While the substrate envelope defines a general shape for substrate recognition, successfully predicting the determinants of substrate binding specificity would provide additional insights into the mechanism of altered molecular recognition in resistant proteases. We designed a variant of HIV protease with altered specificity using positive computational design methods and validated the design using X-ray crystallography and enzyme biochemistry. The engineered variant, Pr3 (A28S/D30F/G48R), was designed to preferentially bind to one out of three of HIV protease's natural substrates; RT-RH over p2-NC and CA-p2. In kinetic assays, RT-RH binding specificity for Pr3 increased threefold compared to the wild-type (WT), which was further confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Crystal structures of WT protease and the designed variant in complex with RT-RH, CA-p2, and p2-NC were determined. Structural analysis of the designed complexes revealed that one of the engineered substitutions (G48R) potentially stabilized heterogeneous flap conformations, thereby facilitating alternate modes of substrate binding. Our results demonstrate that while substrate specificity could be engineered in HIV protease, the structural pliability of protease restricted the propagation of interactions as predicted. These results offer new insights into the plasticity and structural determinants of substrate binding specificity of the HIV-1 protease.

  13. Inhibition of the HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases by a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Lescar, J.; Brynda, J.; Rezacova, P.; Stouracova, R.; Riottot, M. M.; Chitarra, V.; Fabry, M.; Horejsi, M.; Sedlacek, J.; Bentley, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody 1696, directed against the HIV-1 protease, displays strong inhibitory effects toward the catalytic activity of the enzyme of both the HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates. This antibody cross-reacts with peptides that include the N-terminus of the enzyme, a region that is well conserved in sequence among different viral strains and which, furthermore, is crucial for homodimerization to the active enzymatic form. This observation, as well as antigen-binding studies in the presence of an active site inhibitor, suggest that 1696 inhibits the HIV protease by destabilizing its active homodimeric form. To characterize further how the antibody 1696 inhibits the HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases, we have solved the crystal structure of its Fab fragment by molecular replacement and refined it at 3.0 A resolution. The antigen binding site has a deep cavity at its center, which is lined mainly by acidic and hydrophobic residues, and is large enough to accommodate several antigen residues. The structure of the Fab 1696 could form a starting basis for the design of alternative HIV protease-inhibiting molecules of broad specificity. PMID:10631984

  14. Natural polymorphisms and unusual mutations in HIV-1 protease with potential antiretroviral resistance: a bioinformatic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The correlations of genotypic and phenotypic tests with treatment, clinical history and the significance of mutations in viruses of HIV-infected patients are used to establish resistance mutations to protease inhibitors (PIs). Emerging mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease confer resistance to PIs by inducing structural changes at the ligand interaction site. The aim of this study was to establish an in silico structural relationship between natural HIV-1 polymorphisms and unusual HIV-1 mutations that confer resistance to PIs. Results Protease sequences isolated from 151 Mexican HIV-1 patients that were naïve to, or subjected to antiretroviral therapy, were examined. We identified 41 unrelated resistance mutations with a prevalence greater than 1%. Among these mutations, nine exhibited positive selection, three were natural polymorphisms (L63S/V/H) in a codon associated with drug resistance, and six were unusual mutations (L5F, D29V, L63R/G, P79L and T91V). The D29V mutation, with a prevalence of 1.32% in the studied population, was only found in patients treated with antiretroviral drugs. Using in silico modelling, we observed that D29V formed unstable protease complexes when were docked with lopinavir, saquinavir, darunavir, tipranavir, indinavir and atazanavir. Conclusions The structural correlation of natural polymorphisms and unusual mutations with drug resistance is useful for the identification of HIV-1 variants with potential resistance to PIs. The D29V mutation likely confers a selection advantage in viruses; however, in silico, presence of this mutation results in unstable enzyme/PI complexes, that possibly induce resistance to PIs. PMID:24629078

  15. Crystal structures of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease in complex with two potent anti-malarial compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Woster, Patrick M.; Kovari, Ladislau C.; Gupta, Deepak

    2012-06-19

    Two potent inhibitors (compounds 1 and 2) of malarial aspartyl protease, plasmepsin-II, were evaluated against wild type (NL4-3) and multidrug-resistant clinical isolate 769 (MDR) variants of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) aspartyl protease. Enzyme inhibition assays showed that both 1 and 2 have better potency against NL4-3 than against MDR protease. Crystal structures of MDR protease in complex with 1 and 2 were solved and analyzed. Crystallographic analysis revealed that the MDR protease exhibits a typical wide-open conformation of the flaps (Gly48 to Gly52) causing an overall expansion in the active site cavity, which, in turn caused unstable binding of the inhibitors. Due to the expansion of the active site cavity, both compounds showed loss of direct contacts with the MDR protease compared to the docking models of NL4-3. Multiple water molecules showed a rich network of hydrogen bonds contributing to the stability of the ligand binding in the distorted binding pockets of the MDR protease in both crystal structures. Docking analysis of 1 and 2 showed a decrease in the binding affinity for both compounds against MDR supporting our structure-function studies. Thus, compounds 1 and 2 show promising inhibitory activity against HIV-1 protease variants and hence are good candidates for further development to enhance their potency against NL4-3 as well as MDR HIV-1 protease variants.

  16. A Modified P1 Moiety Enhances in vitro Antiviral Activity against Various Multi-Drug-Resistant HIV-1 Variants and in vitro CNS Penetration Properties of a Novel Nonpeptidic Protease Inhibitor, GRL-10413

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, Masayuki; Salcedo-Gómez, Pedro Miguel; Zhao, Rui; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Das, Debananda; Bulut, Haydar; Delino, Nicole S.; Reddy, Sheri Venkata; Ghosh, Arun K.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2016-09-12

    We here report that GRL-10413, a novel non-peptidic HIV-1 protease inhibitor (PI) containing a modified P1 moiety and a sulfonamide isostere, is highly active against laboratory HIV-1 strains and primary clinical isolates (EC50: 0.00035 - 0.0018 μM) with minimal cytotoxicity (CC50: 35.7 μM). GRL-10413 blocked the infectivity and replication of HIV-1NL4-3variants selected by up to 5 μM concentrations of atazanavir, lopinavir, or amprenavir (EC50: 0.0021 - 0.0023 μM). GRL-10413 also maintained its strong antiviral activity against multi-drug-resistant clinical HIV-1 variants isolated from patients, who no longer responded to various antiviral regimens after long-term antiretroviral therapy. The development of resistance against GRL-10413 was significantly delayed compared to that of APV. In addition, GRL-10413 showed a favorable central nervous system (CNS) penetration property as assessed with anin vitroblood brain barrier (BBB) reconstruction system. Analysis of the crystal structure of HIV-1 protease in complex with GRL-10413 demonstrated that the modified P1 moiety of GRL-10413 has a greater hydrophobic surface area and makes greater van der Waals contacts with active-site amino acids of protease than in the case of darunavir. Moreover, the chlorine substituent in the P1 moiety interacts with protease in two distinct configurations. The present data demonstrate that GRL-10413 has desirable features for treating patients infected with wild-type and/or multi-drug-resistant HIV-1 variants with favorable CNS-penetration capability and that the newly modified P1-moiety may confer desirable features in designing novel anti-HIV-1 PIs.

  17. Structural basis and distal effects of Gag substrate coevolution in drug resistance to HIV-1 protease

    PubMed Central

    Özen, Ayşegül; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance mutations in response to HIV-1 protease inhibitors are selected not only in the drug target but elsewhere in the viral genome, especially at the protease cleavage sites in the precursor protein Gag. To understand the molecular basis of this protease–substrate coevolution, we solved the crystal structures of drug resistant I50V/A71V HIV-1 protease with p1-p6 substrates bearing coevolved mutations. Analyses of the protease–substrate interactions reveal that compensatory coevolved mutations in the substrate do not restore interactions lost due to protease mutations, but instead establish other interactions that are not restricted to the site of mutation. Mutation of a substrate residue has distal effects on other residues’ interactions as well, including through the induction of a conformational change in the protease. Additionally, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that restoration of active site dynamics is an additional constraint in the selection of coevolved mutations. Hence, protease–substrate coevolution permits mutational, structural, and dynamic changes via molecular mechanisms that involve distal effects contributing to drug resistance. PMID:25355911

  18. Unique Flap Conformation in an HIV-1 Protease with High-Level Darunavir Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Masaaki; Ode, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Koji; Fujino, Masayuki; Maejima, Masami; Kimura, Yuki; Masaoka, Takashi; Hattori, Junko; Matsuda, Masakazu; Hachiya, Atsuko; Yokomaku, Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Atsuo; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Sugiura, Wataru; Iwatani, Yasumasa

    2016-01-01

    Darunavir (DRV) is one of the most powerful protease inhibitors (PIs) for treating human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection and presents a high genetic barrier to the generation of resistant viruses. However, DRV-resistant HIV-1 infrequently emerges from viruses exhibiting resistance to other protease inhibitors. To address this resistance, researchers have gathered genetic information on DRV resistance. In contrast, few structural insights into the mechanism underlying DRV resistance are available. To elucidate this mechanism, we determined the crystal structure of the ligand-free state of a protease with high-level DRV resistance and six DRV resistance-associated mutations (including I47V and I50V), which we generated by in vitro selection. This crystal structure showed a unique curling conformation at the flap regions that was not found in the previously reported ligand-free protease structures. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that the curled flap conformation altered the flap dynamics. These results suggest that the preference for a unique flap conformation influences DRV binding. These results provide new structural insights into elucidating the molecular mechanism of DRV resistance and aid to develop PIs effective against DRV-resistant viruses. PMID:26870021

  19. Fucoidans as potential inhibitors of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Prokofjeva, Maria M; Imbs, Tatyana I; Shevchenko, Natalya M; Spirin, Pavel V; Horn, Stefan; Fehse, Boris; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N; Prassolov, Vladimir S

    2013-08-19

    The antiviral activity of different structure fucoidans (α-l-fucans and galactofucans) was studied using two model viral systems based on a lentiviral vectors and a replication competent Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV). It was found that investigated fucoidans have no cytotoxic effects on Jurkat and SC-1cell at the concentration range of 0.001-100 µg/mL. Fucoidans with different efficiency suppressed transduction of Jurkat cell line by pseudo-HIV-1 particles carrying the envelope protein of HIV-1 and infection of SC-1 cells by Mo-MuLV. According to our data, all natural fucoidans can be considered as potential anti-HIV agents regardless of their carbohydrate backbone and degree of sulfating, since their activity is shown at low concentrations (0.001-0.05 µg/mL). High molecular weight fucoidans isolated from Saccharina cichorioides (1.3-α-l-fucan), and S. japonica (galactofucan) were the most effective inhibitors.

  20. Inhibition of HIV-1 by fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Eggink, Dirk; Berkhout, Ben; Sanders, Rogier W

    2010-01-01

    The envelope glycoprotein complex (Env) is responsible for entry of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) into cells by mediating attachment to target cells and subsequent membrane fusion. Env consists of three gp120 subunits that mediate receptor and co-receptor attachment and three gp41 subunits responsible for membrane fusion. Several steps of the entry process can serve as drug targets. Receptor antagonists prevent attachment of gp120 to the receptor or co-receptor and conformational changes within gp41 required for membrane fusion can be inhibited by fusion inhibitors. Enfuvirtide (T20, Fuzeon) is a peptide based on the gp41 sequence and is the only approved fusion inhibitor. It prevents membrane fusion by competitively binding to gp41 and blocking the formation of the post-fusion structure. New generations of T20-like peptides have been developed with improved potency and stability. Besides T20 and derivatives, other fusion inhibitors have been developed that target different domains of gp41. Here we discuss the development of fusion inhibitors, their mode of action and their potential for incorporation in future drug regimens.

  1. Insights into the activity of maturation inhibitor PF-46396 on HIV-1 clade C

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Dibya; Timilsina, Uddhav; Srivastava, Tryambak Pratap; Gaur, Ritu

    2017-01-01

    HIV maturation inhibitors are an emerging class of anti-retroviral compounds that inhibit the viral protease-mediated cleavage of the Gag, CA-SP1 (capsid-spacer peptide 1) peptide to mature CA. The first-in-class maturation inhibitor bevirimat (BVM) displayed potent activity against HIV-1 clade B but was ineffective against other HIV-1 clades including clade C. Another pyridone-based maturation inhibitor, PF-46396 displayed potent activity against HIV-1 clade B. In this study, we aimed at determining the activity of PF-46396 against HIV-1 clade C. We employed various biochemical and virological assays to demonstrate that PF-46396 is effective against HIV-1 clade C. We observed a dose dependent accumulation of CA-SP1 intermediate in presence of the compound. We carried out mutagenesis in the CA- SP1 region of HIV-1 clade C Gag and observed that the mutations conferred resistance against the compound. Many mutations inhibited Gag processing thereby reducing virus release in the absence of the compound. However, presence of PF-46396 rescued these defects and enhanced virus release, replication capacity and infectivity of HIV-1 clade C. These results put together identify PF-46396 as a broadly active maturation inhibitor against HIV-1 clade B and C and help in rational designing of novel analogs with reduced toxicity and increased efficacy for its potential use in clinics. PMID:28252110

  2. Virological responses to lamivudine or emtricitabine when combined with tenofovir and a protease inhibitor in treatment-naïve HIV-1-infected patients in the Dutch AIDS Therapy Evaluation in the Netherlands (ATHENA) cohort.

    PubMed

    Rokx, C; Gras, L; van de Vijver, Damc; Verbon, A; Rijnders, Bja

    2016-09-01

    Lamivudine (3TC) and emtricitabine (FTC) are considered interchangeable in recommended tenofovir disoproxil-fumarate (TDF)-containing combination antiretroviral therapies (cARTs). This statement of equivalence has not been systematically studied. We compared the treatment responses to 3TC and FTC combined with TDF in boosted protease inhibitor (PI)-based cART for HIV-1-infected patients. An observational study in the AIDS Therapy Evaluation in the Netherlands (ATHENA) cohort was carried out between 2002 and 2013. Virological failure rates, time to HIV RNA suppression < 400 copies/mL, and time to treatment failure were analysed using multivariable logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard models. Sensitivity analyses included propensity score-adjusted models. A total of 1582 ART-naïve HIV-1-infected patients initiated 3TC or FTC with TDF and ritonavir-boosted darunavir (29.6%), atazanavir (41.5%), lopinavir (27.1%) or another PI (1.8%). Week 48 virological failure rates on 3TC and FTC were comparable (8.9% and 5.6%, respectively; P = 0.208). The multivariable adjusted odds ratio of virological failure when using 3TC instead of FTC with TDF in PI-based cART was 0.75 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.32-1.79; P = 0.51]. Propensity score-adjusted models showed comparable results. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for treatment failure of 3TC compared with FTC was 1.15 (95% CI 0.58-2.27) within 240 weeks after cART initiation. The time to two consecutive HIV RNA measurements < 400 copies/mL within 48 weeks (HR 0.94; 95% CI 0.78-1.16) and the time to treatment failure after suppression < 400 copies/mL (HR 0.94; 95% CI 0.36-2.50) were not significantly influenced by the use of 3TC in TDF/PI-containing cART. The virological responses were not significantly different in treatment-naïve HIV-1-infected patients starting either 3TC/TDF or FTC/TDF and a ritonavir-boosted PI. © 2016 British HIV Association.

  3. Protease inhibitor studies enrolling.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    The protease enzyme is essential for HIV to make copies of itself. So far, research has failed to find a protease inhibitor that works against HIV. It is believed that, regardless of what type of protease inhibitor someone takes, it will need to be supplemented with other anti-HIV drugs. Three protease inhibitors have thus far been found to be safe, although long-term effects are unknown. These drugs are saquinavir, ABT-538, and L-735,524 produced by Hoffman-LaRoche, Abbott, and Merck respectively. Clinical trials of saquinavir are promising but it has not been shown to be the knock-out drug needed. ABT-538 has high bioavailability, but studies are showing it can cause liver and eye damage. L-735,524 studies are showing that resistance develops quite quickly. Future studies at higher doses are expected. To obtain information on protease studies currently looking for participants, contact The Network. Information on other approved, alternative, and experimental drugs is also available.

  4. Drug-resistant HIV-1 protease regains functional dynamics through cleavage site coevolution.

    PubMed

    Özer, Nevra; Özen, Ayşegül; Schiffer, Celia A; Haliloğlu, Türkan

    2015-02-01

    Drug resistance is caused by mutations that change the balance of recognition favoring substrate cleavage over inhibitor binding. Here, a structural dynamics perspective of the regained wild-type functioning in mutant HIV-1 proteases with coevolution of the natural substrates is provided. The collective dynamics of mutant structures of the protease bound to p1-p6 and NC-p1 substrates are assessed using the Anisotropic Network Model (ANM). The drug-induced protease mutations perturb the mechanistically crucial hinge axes that involve key sites for substrate binding and dimerization and mainly coordinate the intrinsic dynamics. Yet with substrate coevolution, while the wild-type dynamic behavior is restored in both p1-p6 ((LP) (1'F)p1-p6D30N/N88D) and NC-p1 ((AP) (2) (V)NC-p1V82A) bound proteases, the dynamic behavior of the NC-p1 bound protease variants (NC-p1V82A and (AP) (2) (V)NC-p1V82A) rather resemble those of the proteases bound to the other substrates, which is consistent with experimental studies. The orientational variations of residue fluctuations along the hinge axes in mutant structures justify the existence of coevolution in p1-p6 and NC-p1 substrates, that is, the dynamic behavior of hinge residues should contribute to the interdependent nature of substrate recognition. Overall, this study aids in the understanding of the structural dynamics basis of drug resistance and evolutionary optimization in the HIV-1 protease system.

  5. Effects of PRE and POST Therapy Drug-Pressure Selected Mutations on HIV-1 Protease Conformational Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jeffrey D.; Gonzales, Estrella G.; Huang, Xi; Smith, Adam N.; deVera, Ian Mitchelle S.; D’Amore, Peter W.; Rocca, James R.; Goodenow, Maureen; Dunn, Ben M.; Fanucci, Gail E.

    2015-01-01

    Conformational sampling of pre- and post-therapy subtype B HIV-1 protease sequences derived from a pediatric subject infected via maternal transmission with HIV-1 were characterized by double electron-electron resonance spectroscopy. The conformational ensemble of the PRE construct resembles native-like inhibitor bound states. In contrast, the POST construct, which contains accumulated drug-pressure selected mutations, has a predominantly semi-open conformational ensemble, with increased populations of open-like states. The single point mutant L63P, which is contained in PRE and POST, has decreased dynamics, particularly in the flap region, and also displays a closed-like conformation of inhibitor-bound states. These findings support our hypothesis that secondary mutations accumulate in HIV-1 protease to shift conformational sampling to stabilize open-like conformations, while maintaining the predominant semi-open conformation for activity. PMID:24983495

  6. Sparse Representation for Prediction of HIV-1 Protease Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaxia; Weber, Irene T; Harrison, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    HIV rapidly evolves drug resistance in response to antiviral drugs used in AIDS therapy. Estimating the specific resistance of a given strain of HIV to individual drugs from sequence data has important benefits for both the therapy of individual patients and the development of novel drugs. We have developed an accurate classification method based on the sparse representation theory, and demonstrate that this method is highly effective with HIV-1 protease. The protease structure is represented using our newly proposed encoding method based on Delaunay triangulation, and combined with the mutated amino acid sequences of known drug-resistant strains to train a machine-learning algorithm both for classification and regression of drug-resistant mutations. An overall cross-validated classification accuracy of 97% is obtained when trained on a publically available data base of approximately 1.5×10(4) known sequences (Stanford HIV database http://hivdb.stanford.edu/cgi-bin/GenoPhenoDS.cgi). Resistance to four FDA approved drugs is computed and comparisons with other algorithms demonstrate that our method shows significant improvements in classification accuracy.

  7. Chicoric acid analogues as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z; Neamati, N; Zhao, H; Kiryu, Y; Turpin, J A; Aberham, C; Strebel, K; Kohn, K; Witvrouw, M; Pannecouque, C; Debyser, Z; De Clercq, E; Rice, W G; Pommier, Y; Burke, T R

    1999-04-22

    The present study was undertaken to examine structural features of L-chicoric acid (3) which are important for potency against purified HIV-1 integrase and for reported cytoprotective effects in cell-based systems. Through a progressive series of analogues, it was shown that enantiomeric D-chicoric acid (4) retains inhibitory potency against purified integrase equal to its L-counterpart and further that removal of either one or both carboxylic functionalities results in essentially no loss of inhibitory potency. Additionally, while two caffeoyl moieties are required, attachment of caffeoyl groups to the central linking structure can be achieved via amide or mixed amide/ester linkages. More remarkable is the finding that blockage of the catechol functionality through conversion to tetraacetate esters results in almost no loss of potency, contingent on the presence of at least one carboxyl group on the central linker. Taken as a whole, the work has resulted in the identification of new integrase inhibitors which may be regarded as bis-caffeoyl derivatives of glycidic acid and amino acids such as serine and beta-aminoalanine. The present study also examined the reported ability of chicoric acid to exert cytoprotective effects in HIV-infected cells. It was demonstrated in target and cell-based assays that the chicoric acids do not significantly inhibit other targets associated with HIV-1 replication, including reverse transcription, protease function, NCp7 zinc finger function, or replication of virus from latently infected cells. In CEM cells, for both the parent chicoric acid and selected analogues, antiviral activity was observable under specific assay conditions and with high dependence on the multiplicity of viral infection. However, against HIV-1- and HIV-2-infected MT-4 cells, the chicoric acids and their tetraacetylated esters exhibited antiviral activity (50% effective concentration (EC50) ranging from 1.7 to 20 microM and 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50

  8. Inference of Epistatic Effects Leading to Entrenchment and Drug Resistance in HIV-1 Protease

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, William F.; Haldane, Allan; Torbett, Bruce E.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Understanding the complex mutation patterns that give rise to drug resistant viral strains provides a foundation for developing more effective treatment strategies for HIV/AIDS. Multiple sequence alignments of drug-experienced HIV-1 protease sequences contain networks of many pair correlations which can be used to build a (Potts) Hamiltonian model of these mutation patterns. Using this Hamiltonian model, we translate HIV-1 protease sequence covariation data into quantitative predictions for the probability of observing specific mutation patterns which are in agreement with the observed sequence statistics. We find that the statistical energies of the Potts model are correlated with the fitness of individual proteins containing therapy-associated mutations as estimated by in vitro measurements of protein stability and viral infectivity. We show that the penalty for acquiring primary resistance mutations depends on the epistatic interactions with the sequence background. Primary mutations which lead to drug resistance can become highly advantageous (or entrenched) by the complex mutation patterns which arise in response to drug therapy despite being destabilizing in the wildtype background. Anticipating epistatic effects is important for the design of future protease inhibitor therapies. PMID:28369521

  9. HIV-1 Protease, Reverse Transcriptase, and Integrase Variation

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Kris; Varghese, Vici; Winters, Mark A.; Hurt, Christopher B.; Eron, Joseph J.; Parkin, Neil; Holmes, Susan P.; Holodniy, Mark; Shafer, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN) variability presents a challenge to laboratories performing genotypic resistance testing. This challenge will grow with increased sequencing of samples enriched for proviral DNA such as dried blood spots and increased use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to detect low-abundance HIV-1 variants. We analyzed PR and RT sequences from >100,000 individuals and IN sequences from >10,000 individuals to characterize variation at each amino acid position, identify mutations indicating APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing, and identify mutations resulting from selective drug pressure. Forty-seven percent of PR, 37% of RT, and 34% of IN positions had one or more amino acid variants with a prevalence of ≥1%. Seventy percent of PR, 60% of RT, and 60% of IN positions had one or more variants with a prevalence of ≥0.1%. Overall 201 PR, 636 RT, and 346 IN variants had a prevalence of ≥0.1%. The median intersubtype prevalence ratios were 2.9-, 2.1-, and 1.9-fold for these PR, RT, and IN variants, respectively. Only 5.0% of PR, 3.7% of RT, and 2.0% of IN variants had a median intersubtype prevalence ratio of ≥10-fold. Variants at lower prevalences were more likely to differ biochemically and to be part of an electrophoretic mixture compared to high-prevalence variants. There were 209 mutations indicative of APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing and 326 mutations nonpolymorphic treatment selected. Identification of viruses with a high number of APOBEC-associated mutations will facilitate the quality control of dried blood spot sequencing. Identifying sequences with a high proportion of rare mutations will facilitate the quality control of NGS. IMPORTANCE Most antiretroviral drugs target three HIV-1 proteins: PR, RT, and IN. These proteins are highly variable: many different amino acids can be present at the same position in viruses from different individuals. Some of the amino acid variants cause drug

  10. HIV-1 Protease, Reverse Transcriptase, and Integrase Variation.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Sankaran, Kris; Varghese, Vici; Winters, Mark A; Hurt, Christopher B; Eron, Joseph J; Parkin, Neil; Holmes, Susan P; Holodniy, Mark; Shafer, Robert W

    2016-07-01

    HIV-1 protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN) variability presents a challenge to laboratories performing genotypic resistance testing. This challenge will grow with increased sequencing of samples enriched for proviral DNA such as dried blood spots and increased use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to detect low-abundance HIV-1 variants. We analyzed PR and RT sequences from >100,000 individuals and IN sequences from >10,000 individuals to characterize variation at each amino acid position, identify mutations indicating APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing, and identify mutations resulting from selective drug pressure. Forty-seven percent of PR, 37% of RT, and 34% of IN positions had one or more amino acid variants with a prevalence of ≥1%. Seventy percent of PR, 60% of RT, and 60% of IN positions had one or more variants with a prevalence of ≥0.1%. Overall 201 PR, 636 RT, and 346 IN variants had a prevalence of ≥0.1%. The median intersubtype prevalence ratios were 2.9-, 2.1-, and 1.9-fold for these PR, RT, and IN variants, respectively. Only 5.0% of PR, 3.7% of RT, and 2.0% of IN variants had a median intersubtype prevalence ratio of ≥10-fold. Variants at lower prevalences were more likely to differ biochemically and to be part of an electrophoretic mixture compared to high-prevalence variants. There were 209 mutations indicative of APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing and 326 mutations nonpolymorphic treatment selected. Identification of viruses with a high number of APOBEC-associated mutations will facilitate the quality control of dried blood spot sequencing. Identifying sequences with a high proportion of rare mutations will facilitate the quality control of NGS. Most antiretroviral drugs target three HIV-1 proteins: PR, RT, and IN. These proteins are highly variable: many different amino acids can be present at the same position in viruses from different individuals. Some of the amino acid variants cause drug resistance and occur mainly

  11. Recovery of the wild type atomic flexibility in the HIV-1 protease double mutants.

    PubMed

    De Conto, Valderes; Braz, Antônio S K; Perahia, David; Scott, Luis P B

    2015-06-01

    The emergence of drug resistant mutations due to the selective pressure exerted by antiretrovirals, including protease inhibitors (PIs), remains a major problem in the treatment of AIDS. During PIs therapy, the occurrence of primary mutations in the wild type HIV-1 protease reduces both the affinity for the inhibitors and the viral replicative capacity compared to the wild type (WT) protein, but additional mutations compensate for this reduced viral fitness. To investigate this phenomenon from the structural point of view, we combined Molecular Dynamics and Normal Mode Analysis to analyze and compare the variations of the flexibility of C-alpha atoms and the differences in hydrogen bond (h-bond) network between the WT and double mutants. In most cases, the flexibility profile of the double mutants was more often similar to that of the WT than to that of the related single base mutants. All single mutants showed a significant alteration in h-bond formation compared to WT. Most of the significant changes occur in the border between the flap and cantilever regions. We found that all the considered double mutants have their h-bond pattern significantly altered in comparison to the respective single base mutants affecting their flexibility profile that becomes more similar to that of WT. This WT flexibility restoration in the double mutants appears as an important factor for the HIV-1 fitness recovery observed in patients.

  12. Drug-resistant molecular mechanism of CRF01_AE HIV-1 protease due to V82F mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Xiu, Zhilong; Hao, Ce

    2009-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (HIV-1 PR) is one of the major targets of anti-AIDS drug discovery. The circulating recombinant form 01 A/E (CRF01_AE, abbreviated AE) subtype is one of the most common HIV-1 subtypes, which is infecting more humans and is expanding rapidly throughout the world. It is, therefore, necessary to develop inhibitors against subtype AE HIV-1 PR. In this work, we have performed computer simulation of subtype AE HIV-1 PR with the drugs lopinavir (LPV) and nelfinavir (NFV), and examined the mechanism of resistance of the V82F mutation of this protease against LPV both structurally and energetically. The V82F mutation at the active site results in a conformational change of 79's loop region and displacement of LPV from its proper binding site, and these changes lead to rotation of the side-chains of residues D25 and I50'. Consequently, the conformation of the binding cavity is deformed asymmetrically and some interactions between PR and LPV are destroyed. Additionally, by comparing the interactive mechanisms of LPV and NFV with HIV-1 PR we discovered that the presence of a dodecahydroisoquinoline ring at the P1' subsite, a [2-(2,6-dimethylphenoxy)acetyl]amino group at the P2' subsite, and an N2 atom at the P2 subsite could improve the binding affinity of the drug with AE HIV-1 PR. These findings are helpful for promising drug design.

  13. In silico prediction of mutant HIV-1 proteases cleaving a target sequence.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jan H; Willemoës, Martin; Winther, Jakob R; De Vico, Luca

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 protease represents an appealing system for directed enzyme re-design, since it has various different endogenous targets, a relatively simple structure and it is well studied. Recently Chaudhury and Gray (Structure (2009) 17: 1636-1648) published a computational algorithm to discern the specificity determining residues of HIV-1 protease. In this paper we present two computational tools aimed at re-designing HIV-1 protease, derived from the algorithm of Chaudhuri and Gray. First, we present an energy-only based methodology to discriminate cleavable and non cleavable peptides for HIV-1 proteases, both wild type and mutant. Secondly, we show an algorithm we developed to predict mutant HIV-1 proteases capable of cleaving a new target substrate peptide, different from the natural targets of HIV-1 protease. The obtained in silico mutant enzymes were analyzed in terms of cleavability and specificity towards the target peptide using the energy-only methodology. We found two mutant proteases as best candidates for specificity and cleavability towards the target sequence.

  14. In Silico Prediction of Mutant HIV-1 Proteases Cleaving a Target Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jan H.; Willemoës, Martin; Winther, Jakob R.; De Vico, Luca

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 protease represents an appealing system for directed enzyme re-design, since it has various different endogenous targets, a relatively simple structure and it is well studied. Recently Chaudhury and Gray (Structure (2009) 17: 1636–1648) published a computational algorithm to discern the specificity determining residues of HIV-1 protease. In this paper we present two computational tools aimed at re-designing HIV-1 protease, derived from the algorithm of Chaudhuri and Gray. First, we present an energy-only based methodology to discriminate cleavable and non cleavable peptides for HIV-1 proteases, both wild type and mutant. Secondly, we show an algorithm we developed to predict mutant HIV-1 proteases capable of cleaving a new target substrate peptide, different from the natural targets of HIV-1 protease. The obtained in silico mutant enzymes were analyzed in terms of cleavability and specificity towards the target peptide using the energy-only methodology. We found two mutant proteases as best candidates for specificity and cleavability towards the target sequence. PMID:24796579

  15. Potent D-Peptide Inhibitors of HIV-1 Entry

    SciTech Connect

    Welch,B.; VanDemark, A.; Heroux, A.; Hill, C.; Kay, M.

    2007-01-01

    During HIV-1 entry, the highly conserved gp41 N-trimer pocket region becomes transiently exposed and vulnerable to inhibition. Using mirror-image phage display and structure-assisted design, we have discovered protease-resistant D-amino acid peptides (D-peptides) that bind the N-trimer pocket with high affinity and potently inhibit viral entry. We also report high-resolution crystal structures of two of these D-peptides in complex with a pocket mimic that suggest sources of their high potency. A trimeric version of one of these peptides is the most potent pocket-specific entry inhibitor yet reported by three orders of magnitude (IC50 = 250 pM). These results are the first demonstration that D-peptides can form specific and high-affinity interactions with natural protein targets and strengthen their promise as therapeutic agents. The D-peptides described here address limitations associated with current L-peptide entry inhibitors and are promising leads for the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of the HIV-1 Protease Inhibit ion Using Fullerene and New Fullerene Derivatives of Carbon Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Barzegar, Abolfazl; Naghizadeh, Esmail; Zakariazadeh, Mostafa; Azamat, Jafar

    2017-01-01

    The water insolubility of fullerene C60 nanostructure greatly hampers its biological applications as an effective HIV-1 protease inhibitor, which suggests to synthesis new C60 derivatives with different functional polar groups. The new carbon nanostructures of fulleropyrrolidines with one and two polar acetoxyhydroxyl (AcH) groups (C60-A and C60-B, respectively) were constructed to evaluate their interactions and binding affinity into HIV-1 protease active site via theoretical molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulations. Data obviously indicated the higher affinity of fulleropyrrolidines derivatives C60-A and C60-B compared to fullerene C60 in interacting with HIV-1 protease active site cavity. The functional groups in C60 caused better residing of C60 derivatives in the center of active site by changing the spherical shape of C60, constructing different stable H-bonds with supporting the main π interactions between C60 and aromatic Phe53/Arg8 in protease active site. Our finding showed that the functionalization of C60 is essential for both increasing solubility and improving different π interactions of C60 with protease. Also, H-bond forming with AcH functional groups and enzyme active site residues is more important to support the van der Waals interactions between C60 fragment of fulleropyrrolidines and enzyme cavity. Since enzyme possesses aspartic acid residues in active site, C60-B with two AcH groups interacted with the active site more efficiently via additional H-bond relative to C60-A. Finally, the results indicate a possible use of the investigated fulleropyrrolidines derivatives as new HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. An efficient procedure for the expression and purification of HIV-1 protease from inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hong-Loan Thi; Nguyen, Thuy Thi; Vu, Quy Thi; Le, Hang Thi; Pham, Yen; Trinh, Phuong Le; Bui, Thuan Phuong; Phan, Tuan-Nghia

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have focused on HIV-1 protease for developing drugs for treating AIDS. Recombinant HIV-1 protease is used to screen new drugs from synthetic compounds or natural substances. However, large-scale expression and purification of this enzyme is difficult mainly because of its low expression and solubility. In this study, we constructed 9 recombinant plasmids containing a sequence encoding HIV-1 protease along with different fusion tags and examined the expression of the enzyme from these plasmids. Of the 9 plasmids, pET32a(+) plasmid containing the HIV-1 protease-encoding sequence along with sequences encoding an autocleavage site GTVSFNF at the N-terminus and TEV plus 6× His tag at the C-terminus showed the highest expression of the enzyme and was selected for further analysis. The recombinant protein was isolated from inclusion bodies by using 2 tandem Q- and Ni-Sepharose columns. SDS-PAGE of the obtained HIV-1 protease produced a single band of approximately 13 kDa. The enzyme was recovered efficiently (4 mg protein/L of cell culture) and had high specific activity of 1190 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) at an optimal pH of 4.7 and optimal temperature of 37 °C. This procedure for expressing and purifying HIV-1 protease is now being scaled up to produce the enzyme on a large scale for its application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. HIV-1 Subtype C Reverse Transcriptase and Protease Genotypes in Zimbabwean Patients Failing Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    KANTOR, RAMI; ZIJENAH, LYNN S.; SHAFER, ROBERT W.; MUTETWA, SOLOMON; JOHNSTON, ELIZABETH; LLOYD, ROBERT; VON LIEVEN, ANDREA; ISRAELSKI, DENNIS; KATZENSTEIN, DAVID A.

    2008-01-01

    HIV-1 drug resistance mutations have been identified and characterized mostly in subtype B HIV-1 infection. The extent to which antiretroviral drugs select for drug resistance mutations in non-subtype B HIV-1 is not known. We obtained HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease sequences from 21 Zimbabwean patients failing antiretroviral drug therapy. We compared these sequences with 56 published RT and protease subtype C sequences from untreated patients, 990 RT and 1140 protease subtype B sequences from treated patients, and 340 RT and 907 protease subtype B sequences from untreated patients and identified four mutation categories of subtype C HIV-1. Seventeen of the 21 patients (81%) had known drug resistance mutations. Mutations at 15 RT and 11 protease positions were more common in subtype C isolates than in subtype B isolates. HIV-1 subtype C-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy develop many of the known subtype B drug resistance mutations. Comparison of subtype C RT and protease sequences with a large database of subtype B sequences identified subtype C-specific polymorphisms and candidate drug resistance mutations. PMID:12512512

  19. Structural basis for the resilience of Darunavir (TMC114) resistance major flap mutations of HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Rituraj; Sethumadhavan, Rao

    2009-12-01

    To understand the origin of the apparent low sensitivity to mutations exhibited by Darunavir, the binding energetics of this inhibitor to the HIV-1 protease was studied. Our research indicates that the observed effectiveness of Darunavir against the wild type HIV-1 protease is due to an extremely high affinity towards the wild-type and a relatively mild effect to the I50V and I54M mutations is due to low affinity towards the inhibitor. Good affinity of Darunavir accounts for the additive effects of well accommodation at binding site, good ligand-receptor electrostatic and van der waals energy while, the low susceptibility to I50V and I54M can be rationalized in terms of flexibility in the binding site residues that do not permit drug accommodation to the binding site distortions created by the mutation. The major flap mutations I50V and I54M lower the binding affinity of Darunavir by altering the position of binding site residues in 3D space. It decreases the electrostatic and van der waals interaction energy and further reduction in total receptor-ligand interaction energy. The results summarized in this paper emphasize the importance of shape complementarity and protein flexibility analysis of binding residual interactions in drug design. These data together with an interaction energy and flexibility analysis have established rigorous guidelines for the design of new and more powerful inhibitors. The principles learned from the HIV-1 protease can be applied to other design problems.

  20. A novel and rapid assay for HIV-1 protease detection using magnetic bead mediation.

    PubMed

    Esseghaier, Chiheb; Ng, Andy; Zourob, Mohammed

    2013-03-15

    A simple sensing assay was established for label-free detection of HIV-1 protease. HIV-1 protease peptide substrate conjugated to magnetic beads via its N-terminus is directly fixed onto the sensor gold surface through the sulphur atom of cysteine. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was used to study the peptide substrate cleavage efficiency of the protease with magnetic beads of different sizes (1 μm and 30 nm). Cyclic voltammetry and faradic impedance spectroscopy were employed in order to characterize the functionalized gold electrode. It was found that the nano-sized beads are a more efficient sensing probe for the protease. Electrochemical biosensing showed a gradual decrease in charge transfer resistance after injection of the HIV-1 protease. The experimental data established a detection limit of 10 pg/ml, as well as demonstrated a drug screening assay. This HIV-1 protease biosensor represents a new detection approach which will lead to low-cost point-of-care devices for sensitive HIV-1 diagnosis, as well as high-throughput drug screening platforms.

  1. Transition states of native and drug-resistant HIV-1 protease are the same

    PubMed Central

    Kipp, D. Randal; Hirschi, Jennifer S.; Wakata, Aya; Goldstein, Harris; Schramm, Vern L.

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 protease is an important target for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. However, drug resistance is a persistent problem and new inhibitors are needed. An approach toward understanding enzyme chemistry, the basis of drug resistance, and the design of powerful inhibitors is to establish the structure of enzymatic transition states. Enzymatic transition structures can be established by matching experimental kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) with theoretical predictions. However, the HIV-1 protease transition state has not been previously resolved using these methods. We have measured primary 14C and 15N KIEs and secondary 3H and 18O KIEs for native and multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease (I84V). We observed 14C KIEs (14V/K) of 1.029 ± 0.003 and 1.025 ± 0.005, 15N KIEs (15V/K) of 0.987 ± 0.004 and 0.989 ± 0.003, 18O KIEs (18V/K) of 0.999 ± 0.003 and 0.993 ± 0.003, and 3H KIEs (3V/K) KIEs of 0.968 ± 0.001 and 0.976 ± 0.001 for the native and I84V enzyme, respectively. The chemical reaction involves nucleophilic water attack at the carbonyl carbon, proton transfer to the amide nitrogen leaving group, and C-N bond cleavage. A transition structure consistent with the KIE values involves proton transfer from the active site Asp-125 (1.32 Å) with partial hydrogen bond formation to the accepting nitrogen (1.20 Å) and partial bond loss from the carbonyl carbon to the amide leaving group (1.52 Å). The KIEs measured for the native and I84V enzyme indicate nearly identical transition states, implying that a true transition-state analogue should be effective against both enzymes. PMID:22493227

  2. Copper inhibits the HIV-1 protease by both oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Karlstroem, A.R.; Levine, R.L. )

    1991-03-11

    The protease encoded by HIV-1 is essential for the processing of the viral polyproteins encoded by the gag and pol genes into mature viral proteins. Mutation or deletion of the protease gene blocks replication of the virus, making the protease an attractive target for antiviral therapy. The authors found that the HIV-1 protease is inhibited by micromolar concentrations of Cu{sup 2+}. Protease was 50% inhibited by exposure to 5 {mu}M copper for 5 min while exposure to 25 {mu}M caused complete inhibition. This inhibition was not oxygen-dependent and was not reversed by treatment with EDTA, presumably due to the slow off-rate of copper from the protease. Consistent with this interpretation, enzyme activity was recovered after denaturation and refolding of the copper exposed protease. Titration of the inactivated enzyme with Ellman's reagent demonstrated a loss of one of the two sulfhydryl groups present in the molecule, suggesting that copper inhibition was mediated through binding to a cysteine. This was confirmed in studies with a chemically synthesize, mutant protease in which the two cysteine residues were replaced by {alpha}-amino butyrate: The mutant protease was not inhibited by copper. However, both the wild-type and mutant protease were inactivated when exposed to copper, oxygen, and dithiothreitol. This inactivation required oxygen. Thus, the protease can also be inactivated by metal catalyzed oxidation (MCO), a presumably irreversible covalent modification.

  3. HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors: Recent Development and Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Timothy J.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review provides an overview of HIV-1 entry inhibitors, with a focus on drugs in the later stages of clinical development. Recent findings Entry of HIV-1 into target cells involves viral attachment, co-receptor binding and fusion. Antiretroviral drugs that interact with each step in the entry process have been developed, but only two are currently approved for clinical use. The small molecule attachment inhibitor BMS-663068 has shown potent antiviral activity in early phase studies, and phase 2b trials are currently underway. The post-attachment inhibitor ibalizumab has shown antiviral activity in phase 1 and 2 trials; further studies, including subcutaneous delivery of drug to healthy individuals, are anticipated. The CCR5 antagonist maraviroc is approved for use in treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced patients. Cenicriviroc, a small-molecule CCR5 antagonist that also has activity as a CCR2 antagonist, has entered phase 2b studies. No CXCR4 antagonists are currently in clinical trials, but once daily, next-generation injectable peptide fusion inhibitors have entered human trials. Both maraviroc and ibalizumab are being studied for prevention of HIV-1 transmission and/or for use in nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing antiretroviral regimens. Summary Inhibition of HIV-1 entry continues to be a promising target for antiretroviral drug development. PMID:23290628

  4. Sequence and structure based models of HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Successful management of chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection with a cocktail of antiretroviral medications can be negatively affected by the presence of drug resistant mutations in the viral targets. These targets include the HIV-1 protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) proteins, for which a number of inhibitors are available on the market and routinely prescribed. Protein mutational patterns are associated with varying degrees of resistance to their respective inhibitors, with extremes that can range from continued susceptibility to cross-resistance across all drugs. Results Here we implement statistical learning algorithms to develop structure- and sequence-based models for systematically predicting the effects of mutations in the PR and RT proteins on resistance to each of eight and eleven inhibitors, respectively. Employing a four-body statistical potential, mutant proteins are represented as feature vectors whose components quantify relative environmental perturbations at amino acid residue positions in the respective target structures upon mutation. Two approaches are implemented in developing sequence-based models, based on use of either relative frequencies or counts of n-grams, to generate vectors for representing mutant proteins. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported study on structure- and sequence-based predictive models of HIV-1 PR and RT drug resistance developed by implementing a four-body statistical potential and n-grams, respectively, to generate mutant attribute vectors. Performance of the learning methods is evaluated on the basis of tenfold cross-validation, using previously assayed and publicly available in vitro data relating mutational patterns in the targets to quantified inhibitor susceptibility changes. Conclusion Overall performance results are competitive with those of a previously published study utilizing a sequence-based strategy, while our structure- and sequence

  5. Purification and characterization of naturally occurring HIV-1 (South African subtype C) protease mutants from inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Sibusiso B; Natarajan, Satheesh; Sharma, Vikas; Bhattacharyya, Neelakshi; Govender, Thavendran; Sayed, Yasien; Maguire, Glenn E M; Lin, Johnson; Kruger, Hendrik G

    2016-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections in sub-Saharan Africa represent about 56% of global infections. Many studies have targeted HIV-1 protease for the development of drugs against AIDS. Recombinant HIV-1 protease is used to screen new drugs from synthetic compounds or natural substances. Along with the wild type (C-SA) we also over-expressed and characterized two mutant forms from patients that had shown resistance to protease inhibitors. Using recombinant DNA technology, we constructed three recombinant plasmids in pGEX-6P-1 and expressed them containing a sequence encoding wild type HIV protease and two mutants (I36T↑T contains 100 amino acids and L38L↑N↑L contains 101 amino acids). These recombinant proteins were isolated from inclusion bodies by using QFF anion exchange and GST trap columns. In SDS-PAGE, we obtained these HIV proteases as single bands of approximately 11.5, 11.6 and 11.7 kDa for the wild type, I36T↑Tand L38L↑N↑L mutants, respectively. The enzyme was recovered efficiently (0.25 mg protein/L of Escherichia coli culture) and had high specific activity of 2.02, 2.20 and 1.33 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) at an optimal pH of 5 and temperature of 37 °C for the wild type, I36T↑T and L38L↑N↑L, respectively. The method employed here provides an easy and rapid purification of the HIV-1(C-SA) protease from the inclusion bodies, with high yield and high specific activities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthesis of a new class of HIV-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Farese-Di Giorgio, A; Pairot, S; Patino, N; Condom, R; Di Giorgio, C; Aumelas, A; Aubertin, A M; Guedj, R

    1999-02-01

    A new family of molecules potentially inhibitors of the HIV-1 Tat-TAR complex was prepared. These compounds are constituted by dinucleotide analogs (PNA dimer) bound, through a linker, to an arginine residue. In this series, several molecules inhibit viral development in cell culture with a micromolar IC50 and without cellular toxicity until 200 microM concentration.

  7. Mutation Patterns and Structural Correlates in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease following Different Protease Inhibitor Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Thomas D.; Schiffer, Celia A.; Gonzales, Matthew J.; Taylor, Jonathan; Kantor, Rami; Chou, Sunwen; Israelski, Dennis; Zolopa, Andrew R.; Fessel, W. Jeffrey; Shafer, Robert W.

    2003-01-01

    Although many human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected persons are treated with multiple protease inhibitors in combination or in succession, mutation patterns of protease isolates from these persons have not been characterized. We collected and analyzed 2,244 subtype B HIV-1 isolates from 1,919 persons with different protease inhibitor experiences: 1,004 isolates from untreated persons, 637 isolates from persons who received one protease inhibitor, and 603 isolates from persons receiving two or more protease inhibitors. The median number of protease mutations per isolate increased from 4 in untreated persons to 12 in persons who had received four or more protease inhibitors. Mutations at 45 of the 99 amino acid positions in the protease—including 22 not previously associated with drug resistance—were significantly associated with protease inhibitor treatment. Mutations at 17 of the remaining 99 positions were polymorphic but not associated with drug treatment. Pairs and clusters of correlated (covarying) mutations were significantly more likely to occur in treated than in untreated persons: 115 versus 23 pairs and 30 versus 2 clusters, respectively. Of the 115 statistically significant pairs of covarying residues in the treated isolates, 59 were within 8 Å of each other—many more than would be expected by chance. In summary, nearly one-half of HIV-1 protease positions are under selective drug pressure, including many residues not previously associated with drug resistance. Structural factors appear to be responsible for the high frequency of covariation among many of the protease residues. The presence of mutational clusters provides insight into the complex mutational patterns required for HIV-1 protease inhibitor resistance. PMID:12663790

  8. Resolution of discordant HIV-1 protease resistance rankings using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Wright, David W; Coveney, Peter V

    2011-10-24

    The emergence of drug resistance is a major challenge for the effective treatment of HIV. In this article, we explore the application of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to quantify the level of resistance of a patient-derived HIV-1 protease sequence to the inhibitor lopinavir. A comparative drug ranking methodology was developed to compare drug resistance rankings produced by the Stanford HIVdb, ANRS, and RegaDB clinical decision support systems. The methodology was used to identify a patient sequence for which the three rival online tools produced differing resistance rankings. Mutations at only three positions ( L10I , A71IV, and L90M ) influenced the resistance level assigned to the sequence. We use ensemble molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the origin of these discrepancies and the mechanism of resistance. By simulating not only the full patient sequences but also systems containing the constituent mutations, we gain insight into why resistance estimates vary and the interactions between the various mutations. In the same way, we also gain valuable knowledge of the mechanistic causes of resistance. In particular, we identify changes in the relative conformation of the two beta sheets that form the protease dimer interface which suggest an explanation of the relative frequency of different amino acids observed in patients at residue 71.

  9. Alkyl Amine Bevirimat Derivatives Are Potent and Broadly Active HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Emiko; Ablan, Sherimay D.; Mandt, Rebecca; Pauly, Gary T.; Sigano, Dina M.; Schneider, Joel P.; Martin, David E.; Nitz, Theodore J.; Wild, Carl T.

    2015-01-01

    Concomitant with the release of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) particles from the infected cell, the viral protease cleaves the Gag polyprotein precursor at a number of sites to trigger virus maturation. We previously reported that a betulinic acid-derived compound, bevirimat (BVM), blocks HIV-1 maturation by disrupting a late step in protease-mediated Gag processing: the cleavage of the capsid-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1) intermediate to mature CA. BVM was shown in multiple clinical trials to be safe and effective in reducing viral loads in HIV-1-infected patients. However, naturally occurring polymorphisms in the SP1 region of Gag (e.g., SP1-V7A) led to a variable response in some BVM-treated patients. The reduced susceptibility of SP1-polymorphic HIV-1 to BVM resulted in the discontinuation of its clinical development. To overcome the loss of BVM activity induced by polymorphisms in SP1, we carried out an extensive medicinal chemistry campaign to develop novel maturation inhibitors. In this study, we focused on alkyl amine derivatives modified at the C-28 position of the BVM scaffold. We identified a set of derivatives that are markedly more potent than BVM against an HIV-1 clade B clone (NL4-3) and show robust antiviral activity against a variant of NL4-3 containing the V7A polymorphism in SP1. One of the most potent of these compounds also strongly inhibited a multiclade panel of primary HIV-1 isolates. These data demonstrate that C-28 alkyl amine derivatives of BVM can, to a large extent, overcome the loss of susceptibility imposed by polymorphisms in SP1. PMID:26482309

  10. Room temperature neutron crystallography of drug resistant HIV-1 protease uncovers limitations of X-ray structural analysis at 100K

    DOE PAGES

    Gerlits, Oksana O.; Keen, David A.; Blakeley, Matthew P.; ...

    2017-02-14

    HIV-1 protease inhibitors are crucial for treatment of HIV-1/AIDS, but their effectiveness is thwarted by rapid emergence of drug resistance. To better understand binding of clinical inhibitors to resistant HIV-1 protease, we used room-temperature joint X-ray/neutron (XN) crystallography to obtain an atomic-resolution structure of the protease triple mutant (V32I/I47V/V82I) in complex with amprenavir. The XN structure reveals a D+ ion located midway between the inner Oδ1 oxygen atoms of the catalytic aspartic acid residues. Comparison of the current XN structure with our previous XN structure of the wild-type HIV-1 protease-amprenavir complex suggests that the three mutations do not significantly altermore » the drug–enzyme interactions. This is in contrast to the observations in previous 100 K X-ray structures of these complexes that indicated loss of interactions by the drug with the triple mutant protease. These findings, thus, uncover limitations of structural analysis of drug binding using X-ray structures obtained at 100 K.« less

  11. Terminal Interface Conformations Modulate Dimer Stability Prior to Amino Terminal Autoprocessing of HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Agniswamy, Johnson; Sayer, Jane M.; Weber, Irene T.; Louis, John M.

    2012-04-17

    The HIV-1 protease (PR) mediates its own release (autoprocessing) from the polyprotein precursor, Gag-Pol, flanked by the transframe region (TFR) and reverse transcriptase at its N- and C-termini, respectively. Autoprocessing at the N-terminus of PR mediates stable dimer formation essential for catalytic activity, leading to the formation of infectious virus. An antiparallel {beta}-sheet interface formed by the four N- and C-terminal residues of each subunit is important for dimer stability. Here, we present the first high-resolution crystal structures of model protease precursor-clinical inhibitor (PI darunavir or saquinavir) complexes, revealing varying conformations of the N-terminal flanking (S{sup -4}FNF{sup -1}) and interface residues (P{sup 1}QIT{sup 4}). A 180{sup o} rotation of the T{sup 4}-L{sup 5} peptide bond is accompanied by a new Q{sup 2}-L{sup 5} hydrogen bond and complete disengagement of PQIT from the {beta}-sheet dimer interface, which may be a feature for intramolecular autoprocessing. This result is consistent with drastically lower thermal stability by 14-20 C of PI complexes of precursors and the mature PR lacking its PQIT residues (by 18.3 C). Similar to the TFR-PR precursor, this deletion also results in a darunavir dissociation constant (2 x 10{sup 4})-fold higher and a markedly increased dimer dissociation constant relative to the mature PR. The terminal {beta}-sheet perturbations of the dimeric structure likely account for the drastically poorer inhibition of autoprocessing of TFR-PR relative to the mature PR, even though significant differences in active site-PI interactions in these structures were not observed. The novel conformations of the dimer interface may be exploited to target selectively the protease precursor prior to its N-terminal cleavage.

  12. Multimodal mechanism of action of allosteric HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jurado, Kellie Ann; Engelman, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is required for lentivirus replication and is a proven drug target for the prevention of AIDS in HIV-1 infected patients. While clinical strand transfer inhibitors disarm the IN active site, allosteric inhibition of enzyme activity through the disruption of IN-IN protein interfaces holds great therapeutic potential. A promising class of allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs), 2-(quinolin-3-yl) acetic acid derivatives, engage the IN catalytic core domain dimerization interface at the binding site for the host integration co-factor LEDGF/p75. ALLINIs promote IN multimerization and, independent of LEDGF/p75 protein, block the formation of the active IN-DNA complex, as well as inhibit the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction in vitro. Yet, rather unexpectedly, the full inhibitory effect of these compounds is exerted during the late phase of HIV-1 replication. ALLINIs impair particle core maturation as well as reverse transcription and integration during the subsequent round of virus infection. Recapitulating the pleiotropic phenotypes observed with numerous IN mutant viruses, ALLINIs provide insight into underlying aspects of IN biology that extend beyond its catalytic activity. Therefore, in addition to the potential to expand our repertoire of HIV-1 antiretrovirals, ALLINIs afford important structural probes to dissect the multifaceted nature of the IN protein throughout the course of HIV-1 replication. PMID:24274067

  13. Cleavage of eIF4G by HIV-1 protease: effects on translation.

    PubMed

    Perales, Celia; Carrasco, Luis; Ventoso, Iván

    2003-01-02

    We have recently reported that HIV-1 protease (PR) cleaves the initiation factor of translation eIF4GI [Ventoso et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98 (2001) 12966-12971]. Here, we analyze the proteolytic activity of HIV-1 PR on eIF4GI and eIF4GII and its implications for the translation of mRNAs. HIV-1 PR efficiently cleaves eIF4GI, but not eIF4GII, in cell-free systems as well as in transfected mammalian cells. This specific proteolytic activity of the retroviral protease on eIF4GI was more selective than that observed with poliovirus 2A(pro). Despite the presence of an intact endogenous eIF4GII, cleavage of eIF4GI by HIV-1 PR was sufficient to impair drastically the translation of capped and uncapped mRNAs. In contrast, poliovirus IRES-driven translation was unaffected or even enhanced by HIV-1 PR after cleavage of eIF4GI. Further support for these in vitro results has been provided by the expression of HIV-1 PR in COS cells from a Gag-PR precursor. Our present findings suggest that eIF4GI intactness is necessary to maintain cap-dependent translation, not only in cell-free systems but also in mammalian cells.

  14. In vitro protease cleavage and computer simulations reveal the HIV-1 capsid maturation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Jiying; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Yufenyuy, Ernest L.; Wagner, Jef; Himes, Benjamin A.; Zhao, Gongpu; Aiken, Christopher; Zandi, Roya; Zhang, Peijun

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 virions assemble as immature particles containing Gag polyproteins that are processed by the viral protease into individual components, resulting in the formation of mature infectious particles. There are two competing models for the process of forming the mature HIV-1 core: the disassembly and de novo reassembly model and the non-diffusional displacive model. To study the maturation pathway, we simulate HIV-1 maturation in vitro by digesting immature particles and assembled virus-like particles with recombinant HIV-1 protease and monitor the process with biochemical assays and cryoEM structural analysis in parallel. Processing of Gag in vitro is accurate and efficient and results in both soluble capsid protein and conical or tubular capsid assemblies, seemingly converted from immature Gag particles. Computer simulations further reveal probable assembly pathways of HIV-1 capsid formation. Combining the experimental data and computer simulations, our results suggest a sequential combination of both displacive and disassembly/reassembly processes for HIV-1 maturation. PMID:27958264

  15. In vitro protease cleavage and computer simulations reveal the HIV-1 capsid maturation pathway.

    PubMed

    Ning, Jiying; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Yufenyuy, Ernest L; Wagner, Jef; Himes, Benjamin A; Zhao, Gongpu; Aiken, Christopher; Zandi, Roya; Zhang, Peijun

    2016-12-13

    HIV-1 virions assemble as immature particles containing Gag polyproteins that are processed by the viral protease into individual components, resulting in the formation of mature infectious particles. There are two competing models for the process of forming the mature HIV-1 core: the disassembly and de novo reassembly model and the non-diffusional displacive model. To study the maturation pathway, we simulate HIV-1 maturation in vitro by digesting immature particles and assembled virus-like particles with recombinant HIV-1 protease and monitor the process with biochemical assays and cryoEM structural analysis in parallel. Processing of Gag in vitro is accurate and efficient and results in both soluble capsid protein and conical or tubular capsid assemblies, seemingly converted from immature Gag particles. Computer simulations further reveal probable assembly pathways of HIV-1 capsid formation. Combining the experimental data and computer simulations, our results suggest a sequential combination of both displacive and disassembly/reassembly processes for HIV-1 maturation.

  16. In vitro protease cleavage and computer simulations reveal the HIV-1 capsid maturation pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Jiying; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Yufenyuy, Ernest L.; Wagner, Jef; Himes, Benjamin A.; Zhao, Gongpu; Aiken, Christopher; Zandi, Roya; Zhang, Peijun

    2016-12-01

    HIV-1 virions assemble as immature particles containing Gag polyproteins that are processed by the viral protease into individual components, resulting in the formation of mature infectious particles. There are two competing models for the process of forming the mature HIV-1 core: the disassembly and de novo reassembly model and the non-diffusional displacive model. To study the maturation pathway, we simulate HIV-1 maturation in vitro by digesting immature particles and assembled virus-like particles with recombinant HIV-1 protease and monitor the process with biochemical assays and cryoEM structural analysis in parallel. Processing of Gag in vitro is accurate and efficient and results in both soluble capsid protein and conical or tubular capsid assemblies, seemingly converted from immature Gag particles. Computer simulations further reveal probable assembly pathways of HIV-1 capsid formation. Combining the experimental data and computer simulations, our results suggest a sequential combination of both displacive and disassembly/reassembly processes for HIV-1 maturation.

  17. Improving Viral Protease Inhibitors to Counter Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Nese Kurt; Swanstrom, Ronald; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem in health care, undermining therapy outcomes and necessitating novel approaches to drug design. Extensive studies on resistance to viral protease inhibitors, particularly those of HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease, revealed a plethora of information on the structural and molecular mechanisms underlying resistance. These insights led to several strategies to improve viral protease inhibitors to counter resistance, such as exploiting the essential biological function and leveraging evolutionary constraints. Incorporation of these strategies into structure-based drug design can minimize vulnerability to resistance, not only for viral proteases but for other quickly evolving drug targets as well, toward designing inhibitors one step ahead of evolution to counter resistance with more intelligent and rational design. PMID:27090931

  18. Development of a novel anti-HIV-1 agent from within: Effect of chimeric Vpr-containing protease cleavage site residues on virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Serio, D.; Rizvi, T. A.; Cartas, M.; Kalyanaraman, V. S.; Weber, I. T.; Koprowski, H.; Srinivasan, A.

    1997-01-01

    Effective antiviral agents will be of great value in controlling virus replication and delaying the onset of HIV-1-related disease symptoms. Current therapy involves the use of antiviral agents that target the enzymatic functions of the virus, resulting in the emergence of resistant viruses to these agents, thus lowering their effectiveness. To overcome this problem, we have considered the idea of developing novel agents from within HIV-1 as inhibitors of virus replication. The specificity of the Vpr protein for the HIV-1 virus particle makes it an attractive molecule for the development of antiviral agents targeting the events associated with virus maturation. We have generated chimeric Vpr proteins containing HIV-1-specific sequences added to the C terminus of Vpr. These sequences correspond to nine cleavage sites of the Gag and Gag–Pol precursors of HIV-1. The chimeric Vpr constructs were introduced into HIV-1 proviral DNA to assess their effect on virus infectivity using single- and multiple-round replication assays. The virus particles generated exhibited a variable replication pattern depending on the protease cleavage site used as a fusion partner. Interestingly, the chimeric Vpr containing the cleavage sequences from the junction of p24 and p2, 24/2, completely abolished virus infectivity. These results show that chimeric proteins generated from within HIV-1 have the ability to suppress HIV-1 replication and make ideal agents for gene therapy or intracellular immunization to treat HIV-1 infection. PMID:9096396

  19. Affinity purification of HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases from recombinant E. coli strains using pepstatin-agarose.

    PubMed

    Rittenhouse, J; Turon, M C; Helfrich, R J; Albrecht, K S; Weigl, D; Simmer, R L; Mordini, F; Erickson, J; Kohlbrenner, W E

    1990-08-31

    A procedure is described which employs pepstatin-agarose for the affinity purification of either HIV-1 or HIV-2 protease from two similar recombinant E. coli constructs that were developed for the expression of these enzymes. HIV-2 protease was routinely expressed at much higher levels than the HIV-1 enzyme and pepstatin-agarose was the only chromatography step required to isolate pure HIV-2 protease from crude bacterial lysates. A Mono S ionic exchange step following pepstatin-agarose chromatography was sufficient to bring the HIV-1 protease to homogeneity. Purification of either enzyme can be completed in several days yielding homogeneous preparations suitable for crystallization and other physical characterization.

  20. A novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for screening HIV-1 fusion inhibitors targeting HIV-1 Gp41 core structure.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wei; Wang, Rui-Rui; Gao, Yue-Dong; Yang, Liu-Meng; Sun, Yi; Huang, Jing-Fei; Tien, Po; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2011-02-01

    The gp41 subunit of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein mediates the fusion of viral and host cell membranes. As the HIV-1 enters the host cells, the 2 helical regions, HR1 and HR2, in the ectodomain of gp41 can form a 6-helix bundle, which brings the viral and target cell membranes to close proximity and serves as an attractive target for developing HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Now, there are several cell- and molecule-based assays to identify potential HIV-1 fusion inhibitors targeting gp41. However, these assays cannot be used universally because they are time-consuming, inconvenient, and expensive. In the present study, the authors expressed and purified GST-HR121 and C43-30a proteins that were derived from the HIV-1 gp41 ectodomain region. GST-HR121 has a function similar to the HR1 peptide of gp41, whereas C43-30a is an HR2-derived peptide that added 50 amino acid residues (aa) in the N-terminal of C43. Further research found they could interact with each other, and a potential HIV-1 fusion inhibitor could inhibit this interaction. On the basis of this fact, a novel, rapid, and economic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was established, which can be developed for high-throughput screening of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors.

  1. Cellular aspartyl proteases promote the unconventional secretion of biologically active HIV-1 matrix protein p17

    PubMed Central

    Caccuri, Francesca; Iaria, Maria Luisa; Campilongo, Federica; Varney, Kristen; Rossi, Alessandro; Mitola, Stefania; Schiarea, Silvia; Bugatti, Antonella; Mazzuca, Pietro; Giagulli, Cinzia; Fiorentini, Simona; Lu, Wuyuan; Salmona, Mario; Caruso, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    The human immune deficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) matrix protein p17 (p17), although devoid of a signal sequence, is released by infected cells and detected in blood and in different organs and tissues even in HIV-1-infected patients undergoing successful combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). Extracellularly, p17 deregulates the function of different cells involved in AIDS pathogenesis. The mechanism of p17 secretion, particularly during HIV-1 latency, still remains to be elucidated. A recent study showed that HIV-1-infected cells can produce Gag without spreading infection in a model of viral latency. Here we show that in Gag-expressing cells, secretion of biologically active p17 takes place at the plasma membrane and occurs following its interaction with phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate and its subsequent cleavage from the precursor Gag (Pr55Gag) operated by cellular aspartyl proteases. These enzymes operate a more complex Gag polypeptide proteolysis than the HIV-1 protease, thus hypothetically generating slightly truncated or elongated p17s in their C-terminus. A 17 C-terminal residues excised p17 was found to be structurally and functionally identical to the full-length p17 demonstrating that the final C-terminal region of p17 is irrelevant for the protein’s biological activity. These findings offer new opportunities to identify treatment strategies for inhibiting p17 release in the extracellular microenvironment. PMID:27905556

  2. Developments of indoles as anti-HIV-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Lv, Min

    2009-01-01

    Since the first case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was reported in 1981, AIDS has always been a global health threat and the leading cause of deaths due to the rapid emergence of drug-resistance and unwanted metabolic side effects. Every day in 2007 an estimated 6850 people were newly infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Over the past 28 years the rapid worldwide spread of AIDS has prompted an intense research effort to discover compounds that could effectively inhibit HIV. The development of new, selective and safe inhibitors for the treatment of HIV, therefore, still remains a high priority for medical research. To the best of our knowledge, the indole derivatives have been considered as one class of promising HIV-1 inhibitors, such as delavirdine approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1997 for use in combination with other antiretrovirals in adults with HIV infection. In this review we focus on the synthesis and anti-HIV-1 activity of indole derivatives, in the meantime, the structure-activity relationship (SAR) for some derivatives are also surveyed. It will pave the way for the design of indole derivatives as anti-HIV-1 drugs in the future.

  3. Inhibition of the HIV-1 protease by fullerene derivatives. Model building studies and experimental verification

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, S.H.; DeCamp, D.L.; Kenyon, G.L. ); Sijbesma, R.P.; Srdanov, G.; Wudl, F. )

    1993-07-28

    The ability of C[sub 60] fullerene ([open quotes]Bucky Ball[close quotes]) derivatives to interact with the active site of HIV-1 protease (HIVP) has been examined through model building and simple physical chemical analysis. The model complexes generated via the program DOCK3 suggest that C[sub 60] derivatives will fit snugly in the active site, thereby removing 298 A[sup 2] of primarily nonpolar surface from solvent exposure and driving ligand/protein association. The prediction that these compounds should bind to the active site and thereby act as inhibitors has been borne out by the experimental evidence. Kinetic analysis of HIVP in the presence of a water-soluble C[sub 60] derivative, bis(phenethylamino-succinate) C[sub 60], suggests a competitive mode of inhibition. This is consistent with and supports the predicted binding mode. Diamino C[sub 60] has been proposed as a [open quotes]second-generation[close quotes] C[sub 60] derivative that will be able to form salt bridges with the catalytic aspartic acids in addition to Van der Waals contacts with the nonpolar HIVP surface, thereby improving the binding relative to the tested compound. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Design of second generation HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jinxia; Dayam, Raveendra; Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q; Neamati, Nouri

    2007-01-01

    The prospect of HIV-1 integrase (IN) as a therapeutically viable retroviral drug target is on the verge of realization. The observed preclinical and clinical performance of beta-diketo containing and naphthyridine carboxamide compounds provides direct proof for the clinical application of IN inhibition. These validated lead compounds are useful in the design and development of second generation IN inhibitors. The results from preclinical and clinical studies on the first generation IN inhibitors reiterate a demand for novel second generation inhibitors with improved pharmacokinetic and metabolic properties. Pharmacophore-based drug design techniques facilitate the discovery of novel compounds on the basis of validated lead compounds specific for a drug target. In this article we have comprehensively reviewed the application of pharmacophore-based drug design methods in the field of IN inhibitor discovery.

  5. Fast and accurate determination of the relative binding affinities of small compounds to HIV-1 protease using non-equilibrium work.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Son Tung; Hung, Huynh Minh; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2016-12-05

    The fast pulling ligand (FPL) out of binding cavity using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations was demonstrated to be a rapid, accurate and low CPU demand method for the determination of the relative binding affinities of a large number of HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitors. In this approach, the ligand is pulled out of the binding cavity of the protein using external harmonic forces, and the work of pulling force corresponds to the relative binding affinity of HIV-1 PR inhibitor. The correlation coefficient between the pulling work and the experimental binding free energy of R=-0.95 shows that FPL results are in good agreement with experiment. It is thus easier to rank the binding affinities of HIV-1 PR inhibitors, that have similar binding affinities because the mean error bar of pulling work amounts to δW=7%. The nature of binding is discovered using the FPL approach. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Protein conformational dynamics in the mechanism of HIV-1 protease catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Torbeev, Vladimir Yu.; Raghuraman, H.; Hamelberg, Donald; Tonelli, Marco; Westler, William M.; Perozo, Eduardo; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2013-09-17

    We have used chemical protein synthesis and advanced physical methods to probe dynamics-function correlations for the HIV-1 protease, an enzyme that has received considerable attention as a target for the treatment of AIDS. Chemical synthesis was used to prepare a series of unique analogues of the HIV-1 protease in which the flexibility of the 'flap' structures (residues 37-61 in each monomer of the homodimeric protein molecule) was systematically varied. These analogue enzymes were further studied by X-ray crystallography, NMR relaxation, and pulse-EPR methods, in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations. We show that conformational isomerization in the flaps is correlated with structural reorganization of residues in the active site, and that it is preorganization of the active site that is a rate-limiting factor in catalysis.

  7. Protein conformational dynamics in the mechanism of HIV-1 protease catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Torbeev, Vladimir Yu.; Raghuraman, H.; Hamelberg, Donald; Tonelli, Marco; Westler, William M.; Perozo, Eduardo; Kent, Stephen B. H.

    2011-01-01

    We have used chemical protein synthesis and advanced physical methods to probe dynamics-function correlations for the HIV-1 protease, an enzyme that has received considerable attention as a target for the treatment of AIDS. Chemical synthesis was used to prepare a series of unique analogues of the HIV-1 protease in which the flexibility of the “flap” structures (residues 37–61 in each monomer of the homodimeric protein molecule) was systematically varied. These analogue enzymes were further studied by X-ray crystallography, NMR relaxation, and pulse-EPR methods, in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations. We show that conformational isomerization in the flaps is correlated with structural reorganization of residues in the active site, and that it is preorganization of the active site that is a rate-limiting factor in catalysis. PMID:22158985

  8. A Genomic Analysis of Rat Proteases and Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Puente, Xose S.; López-Otín, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Proteases perform important roles in multiple biological and pathological processes. The availability of the rat genome sequence has facilitated the analysis of the complete protease repertoire or degradome of this model organism. The rat degradome consists of at least 626 proteases and homologs, which are distributed into 24 aspartic, 160 cysteine, 192 metallo, 221 serine, and 29 threonine proteases. This distribution is similar to that of the mouse degradome but is more complex than that of the human degradome composed of 561 proteases and homologs. This increased complexity of rat proteases mainly derives from the expansion of several families, including placental cathepsins, testases, kallikreins, and hematopoietic serine proteases, involved in reproductive or immunological functions. These protease families have also evolved differently in rat and mouse and may contribute to explain some functional differences between these closely related species. Likewise, genomic analysis of rat protease inhibitors has shown some differences with mouse protease inhibitors and the expansion of families of cysteine and serine protease inhibitors in rodents with respect to human. These comparative analyses may provide new views on the functional diversity of proteases and inhibitors and contribute to the development of innovative strategies for treating proteolysis diseases. PMID:15060002

  9. Hybrid Ty1/HIV-1 elements used to detect inhibitors and monitor the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Nissley, Dwight V.; Boyer, Paul L.; Garfinkel, David J.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Strathern, Jeffrey N.

    1998-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that hybrid retrotransposons composed of the yeast Ty1 element and the reverse transcriptase (RT) of HIV-1 are active in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The RT activity of these hybrid Ty1/HIV-1 (his3AI/AIDS RT; HART) elements can be monitored by using a simple genetic assay. HART element reverse transcription depends on both the polymerase and RNase H domains of HIV-1 RT. Here we demonstrate that the HART assay is sensitive to inhibitors of HIV-1 RT. (−)-(S)-8-Chloro-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-5-methyl-6-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)imidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thione monohydrochloride (8 Cl-TIBO), a well characterized non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) of HIV-1 RT, blocks propagation of HART elements. HART elements that express NNRTI-resistant RT variants of HIV-1 are insensitive to 8 Cl-TIBO, demonstrating the specificity of inhibition in this assay. HART elements carrying NNRTI-resistant variants of HIV-1 RT can be used to identify compounds that are active against drug-resistant viruses. PMID:9811899

  10. Pressure-induced structural transition of mature HIV-1 Protease from a combined NMR/MD simulation approach

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Julien; Louis, John M.; Bax, Ad; Best, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the pressure-induced structural changes in the mature human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease dimer (HIV-1 PR), using residual dipolar coupling (RDC) measurements in a weakly oriented solution. 1DNH RDCs were measured under high-pressure conditions for an inhibitor-free PR and an inhibitor-bound complex, as well as for an inhibitor-free multidrug resistant protease bearing 20 mutations (PR20). While PR20 and the inhibitor-bound PR were little affected by pressure, inhibitor-free PR showed significant differences in the RDCs measured at 600 bar compared to 1 bar. The structural basis of such changes was investigated by MD simulations using the experimental RDC restraints, revealing substantial conformational perturbations, specifically a partial opening of the flaps and the penetration of water molecules into the hydrophobic core of the subunits at high-pressure. This study highlights the exquisite sensitivity of RDCs to pressure-induced conformational changes and illustrates how RDCs combined with MD simulations can be used to determine the structural properties of metastable intermediate states on the folding energy landscape. PMID:26385843

  11. A cross-sectional study to evaluate the association of hyperbilirubinaemia on markers of cardiovascular disease, neurocognitive function, bone mineral density and renal markers in HIV-1 infected subjects on protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Barber, T J; Moyle, G; Hill, A; Jagjit Singh, G; Scourfield, A; Yapa, H M; Waters, L; Asboe, D; Boffito, M; Nelson, M

    2016-05-01

    Ongoing inflammation in controlled HIV infection contributes to non-AIDS comorbidities. High bilirubin appears to exhibit an anti-inflammatory effect in vivo. We therefore examined whether increased bilirubin in persons with HIV was associated with differences in markers of inflammation and cardiovascular, bone, renal disease, and neurocognitive (NC) impairment. This cross-sectional study examined inflammatory markers in individuals with stable HIV infection treated with two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and a boosted protease inhibitor. Individuals recruited were those with a normal bilirubin (NBR; 0-17 μmol/L) or high bilirubin (>2.5 × upper limit of normal). Demographic and anthropological data were recorded. Blood and urine samples were taken for analyses. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) measurement, carotid intimal thickness (CIT), and calcaneal stiffness (CSI) were measured. Males were asked to answer a questionnaire about sexual function; NC testing was performed using CogState. 101 patients were screened, 78 enrolled (43 NBR and 35 HBR). Atazanavir use was significantly higher in HBR. Whilst a trend for lower CIT was seen in those with HBR, no significant differences were seen in PWV, bone markers, calculated cardiovascular risk (Framingham), or erectile dysfunction score. VCAM-1 levels were significantly lower in the HBR group. HBR was associated with lower LDL and triglyceride levels. NBR was associated with a calculated FRAX significantly lower than HBR although no associations were found after adjusting for tenofovir use. No difference in renal markers was observed. Component tests of NC testing revealed differences favouring HBR but overall composite scores were similar. High bilirubin in the context of boosted PI therapy was found not to be associated with differences in with the markers examined in this study. Some trends were noted and, on the basis of these, a larger, clinical end point study is warranted.

  12. Synergistic Combinations of the CCR5 Inhibitor VCH-286 with Other Classes of HIV-1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Asin-Milan, Odalis; Sylla, Mohamed; El-Far, Mohamed; Belanger-Jasmin, Geneviève; Haidara, Alpha; Blackburn, Julie; Chamberland, Annie

    2014-01-01

    Here, we evaluated the in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of the experimental CCR5 inhibitor VCH-286 as a single agent or in combination with various classes of HIV-1 inhibitors. Although VCH-286 used alone had highly inhibitory activity, paired combinations with different drug classes led to synergistic or additive interactions. However, combinations with other CCR5 inhibitors led to effects ranging from synergy to antagonism. We suggest that caution should be exercised when combining CCR5 inhibitors in vivo. PMID:25267674

  13. Nelfinavir: fourth protease inhibitor approved.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted accelerated approval to nelfinavir in both adult and pediatric formulations. Agouron, the manufacturer, used innovative computerized drug design techniques to discover, design, and refine the nelfinavir molecule. Nelfinavir is marketed under the trade name Viracept, and costs $5,000 per year. Early clinical trials find it to be as powerful as the other protease inhibitors, but with a different resistance profile. The drug has relatively few drug indications; however, several compounds have been contraindicated.

  14. Screening of the Pan-African Natural Product Library Identifies Ixoratannin A-2 and Boldine as Novel HIV-1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tietjen, Ian; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Mwimanzi, Philip; Onguéné, Pascal Amoa; Scull, Margaret A.; Idowu, Thomas Oyebode; Ogundaini, Abiodun Oguntuga; Meva’a, Luc Mbaze; Abegaz, Berhanu M.; Rice, Charles M.; Andrae-Marobela, Kerstin; Brockman, Mark A.; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Fedida, David

    2015-01-01

    The continued burden of HIV in resource-limited regions such as parts of sub-Saharan Africa, combined with adverse effects and potential risks of resistance to existing antiretroviral therapies, emphasize the need to identify new HIV inhibitors. Here we performed a virtual screen of molecules from the pan-African Natural Product Library, the largest collection of medicinal plant-derived pure compounds on the African continent. We identified eight molecules with structural similarity to reported interactors of Vpu, an HIV-1 accessory protein with reported ion channel activity. Using in vitro HIV-1 replication assays with a CD4+ T cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we confirmed antiviral activity and minimal cytotoxicity for two compounds, ixoratannin A-2 and boldine. Notably, ixoratannin A-2 retained inhibitory activity against recombinant HIV-1 strains encoding patient-derived mutations that confer resistance to protease, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase, or integrase inhibitors. Moreover, ixoratannin A-2 was less effective at inhibiting replication of HIV-1 lacking Vpu, supporting this protein as a possible direct or indirect target. In contrast, boldine was less effective against a protease inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 strain. Both ixoratannin A-2 and boldine also inhibited in vitro replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, BIT-225, a previously-reported Vpu inhibitor, demonstrated antiviral activity but also cytotoxicity in HIV-1 and HCV replication assays. Our work identifies pure compounds derived from African plants with potential novel activities against viruses that disproportionately afflict resource-limited regions of the world. PMID:25830320

  15. Screening of the Pan-African natural product library identifies ixoratannin A-2 and boldine as novel HIV-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tietjen, Ian; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Mwimanzi, Philip; Onguéné, Pascal Amoa; Scull, Margaret A; Idowu, Thomas Oyebode; Ogundaini, Abiodun Oguntuga; Meva'a, Luc Mbaze; Abegaz, Berhanu M; Rice, Charles M; Andrae-Marobela, Kerstin; Brockman, Mark A; Brumme, Zabrina L; Fedida, David

    2015-01-01

    The continued burden of HIV in resource-limited regions such as parts of sub-Saharan Africa, combined with adverse effects and potential risks of resistance to existing antiretroviral therapies, emphasize the need to identify new HIV inhibitors. Here we performed a virtual screen of molecules from the pan-African Natural Product Library, the largest collection of medicinal plant-derived pure compounds on the African continent. We identified eight molecules with structural similarity to reported interactors of Vpu, an HIV-1 accessory protein with reported ion channel activity. Using in vitro HIV-1 replication assays with a CD4+ T cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we confirmed antiviral activity and minimal cytotoxicity for two compounds, ixoratannin A-2 and boldine. Notably, ixoratannin A-2 retained inhibitory activity against recombinant HIV-1 strains encoding patient-derived mutations that confer resistance to protease, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase, or integrase inhibitors. Moreover, ixoratannin A-2 was less effective at inhibiting replication of HIV-1 lacking Vpu, supporting this protein as a possible direct or indirect target. In contrast, boldine was less effective against a protease inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 strain. Both ixoratannin A-2 and boldine also inhibited in vitro replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, BIT-225, a previously-reported Vpu inhibitor, demonstrated antiviral activity but also cytotoxicity in HIV-1 and HCV replication assays. Our work identifies pure compounds derived from African plants with potential novel activities against viruses that disproportionately afflict resource-limited regions of the world.

  16. Albumin-conjugated C34 Peptide HIV-1 Fusion Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Stoddart, Cheryl A.; Nault, Geneviève; Galkina, Sofiya A.; Thibaudeau, Karen; Bakis, Peter; Bousquet-Gagnon, Nathalie; Robitaille, Martin; Bellomo, Maryanne; Paradis, Véronique; Liscourt, Patricia; Lobach, Alexandra; Rivard, Marie-Ève; Ptak, Roger G.; Mankowski, Marie K.; Bridon, Dominique; Quraishi, Omar

    2008-01-01

    Entry inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) have been the focus of much recent research. C34, a potent fusion inhibitor derived from the HR2 region of gp41, was engineered into a 1:1 human serum albumin conjugate through stable covalent attachment of a maleimido-C34 analog onto cysteine 34 of albumin. This bioconjugate, PC-1505, was designed to require less frequent dosing and less peptide than T-20 and was assessed for its antifusogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo in the SCID-hu Thy/Liv mouse model. PC-1505 was essentially equipotent to the original C34 peptide and to T-20 in vitro. In HIV-1-infected SCID-hu Thy/Liv mice, T-20 lost activity with infrequent dosing, whereas the antiviral potency of PC-1505 was sustained, and PC-1505 was active against T-20-resistant (“DIV”) virus with a G36D substitution in gp41. The in vivo results are the direct result of a significantly improved pharmacokinetic profile for the C34 peptide following albumin conjugation. Contrary to previous reports that the gp41 NHR trimer is poorly accessible to C34 fused to protein cargoes of increasing size (Hamburger, A. E., Kim, S., Welch, B. D., and Kay, M. S. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 12567–12572), these results are the first demonstration of the capacity for a large, endogenous serum protein to gain unobstructed access to the transient gp41 intermediates that exist during the HIV fusion process, and it supports further development of albumin conjugation as a promising approach to inhibit HIV-1 entry. PMID:18809675

  17. Resistance mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 protease to inhibitors: A molecular dynamic approach

    PubMed Central

    Dayer, Mohammad Reza; Dayer, Mohammad Saaid

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors comprise an important class of drugs used in HIV treatments. However, mutations of protease genes accelerated by low fidelity of reverse transcriptase yield drug resistant mutants of reduced affinities for the inhibitors. This problem is considered to be a serious barrier against HIV treatment for the foreseeable future. In this study, molecular dynamic simulation method was used to examine the combinational and additive effects of all known mutations involved in drug resistance against FDA approved inhibitors. Results showed that drug resistant mutations are not randomly distributed along the protease sequence; instead, they are localized on flexible or hot points of the protein chain. Substitution of more hydrophobic residues in flexible points of protease chains tends to increase the folding, lower the flexibility and decrease the active site area of the protease. The reduced affinities of HIV-1 protease for inhibitors seemed to be due to substantial decrease in the size of the active site and flap mobility. A correlation was found between the binding energy of inhibitors and their affinities for each mutant suggesting the distortion of the active site geometry in drug resistance by preventing effective fitting of inhibitors into the enzymes' active site. To overcome the problem of drug resistance of HIV-1 protease, designing inhibitors of variable functional groups and configurations is proposed. PMID:27843989

  18. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-08-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo.

  19. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-01-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO 140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo. PMID:18519143

  20. Protease Cleavage Leads to Formation of Mature Trimer Interface in HIV-1 Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Danxia; Ning, Jiying; DeLucia, Maria; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Aiken, Christopher; Zhang, Peijun

    2012-01-01

    During retrovirus particle maturation, the assembled Gag polyprotein is cleaved by the viral protease into matrix (MA), capsid (CA), and nucleocapsid (NC) proteins. To form the mature viral capsid, CA rearranges, resulting in a lattice composed of hexameric and pentameric CA units. Recent structural studies of assembled HIV-1 CA revealed several inter-subunit interfaces in the capsid lattice, including a three-fold interhexamer interface that is critical for proper capsid stability. Although a general architecture of immature particles has been provided by cryo-electron tomographic studies, the structural details of the immature particle and the maturation pathway remain unknown. Here, we used cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) to determine the structure of tubular assemblies of the HIV-1 CA-SP1-NC protein. Relative to the mature assembled CA structure, we observed a marked conformational difference in the position of the CA-CTD relative to the NTD in the CA-SP1-NC assembly, involving the flexible hinge connecting the two domains. This difference was verified via engineered disulfide crosslinking, revealing that inter-hexamer contacts, in particular those at the pseudo three-fold axis, are altered in the CA-SP1-NC assemblies compared to the CA assemblies. Results from crosslinking analyses of mature and immature HIV-1 particles containing the same Cys substitutions in the Gag protein are consistent with these findings. We further show that cleavage of preassembled CA-SP1-NC by HIV-1 protease in vitro leads to release of SP1 and NC without disassembly of the lattice. Collectively, our results indicate that the proteolytic cleavage of Gag leads to a structural reorganization of the polypeptide and creates the three-fold interhexamer interface, important for the formation of infectious HIV-1 particles. PMID:22927821

  1. An MLP-based feature subset selection for HIV-1 protease cleavage site analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gilhan; Kim, Yeonjoo; Lim, Heuiseok; Kim, Hyeoncheol

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, several machine learning approaches have been applied to modeling the specificity of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease cleavage domain. However, the high dimensional domain dataset contains a small number of samples, which could misguide classification modeling and its interpretation. Appropriate feature selection can alleviate the problem by eliminating irrelevant and redundant features, and thus improve prediction performance. We introduce a new feature subset selection method, FS-MLP, that selects relevant features using multi-layered perceptron (MLP) learning. The method includes MLP learning with a training dataset and then feature subset selection using decompositional approach to analyze the trained MLP. Our method is able to select a subset of relevant features in high dimensional, multi-variate and non-linear domains. Using five artificial datasets that represent four data types, we verified the FS-MLP performance with seven other feature selection methods. Experimental results showed that the FS-MLP is superior at high dimensional, multi-variate and non-linear domains. In experiments with HIV-1 protease cleavage dataset, the FS-MLP selected a set of 14 highly relevant features among 160 original features. On a validation set of 131 test instances, classifiers that used the 14 features showed about 95% accuracy which outperformed other seven methods in terms of accuracy and the number of features. Our experimental results indicate that the FS-MLP is effective in analyzing multi-variate, non-linear and high dimensional datasets such as HIV-1 protease cleavage dataset. The 14 relevant features which were selected by the FS-MLP provide us with useful insights into the HIV-1 cleavage site domain as well. The FS-MLP is a useful method for computational sequence analysis in general. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Evolution of Primary Protease Inhibitor Resistance Mutations during Protease Inhibitor Salvage Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Rami; Fessel, W. Jeffrey; Zolopa, Andrew R.; Israelski, Dennis; Shulman, Nancy; Montoya, Jose G.; Harbour, Michael; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Shafer, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    In order to track the evolution of primary protease inhibitor (PI) resistance mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates, baseline and follow-up protease sequences were obtained from patients undergoing salvage PI therapy who presented initially with isolates containing a single primary PI resistance mutation. Among 78 patients meeting study selection criteria, baseline primary PI resistance mutations included L90M (42% of patients), V82A/F/T (27%), D30N (21%), G48V (6%), and I84V (4%). Despite the switching of treatment to a new PI, primary PI resistance mutations present at the baseline persisted in 66 of 78 (85%) patients. D30N persisted less frequently than L90M (50% versus 100%, respectively; P < 0.001) and V82A/F/T (50% versus 81%, respectively; P = 0.05). HIV-1 isolates from 38 (49%) patients failing PI salvage therapy developed new primary PI resistance mutations including L90M, I84V, V82A, and G48V. Common combinations of primary and secondary PI resistance mutations after salvage therapy included mutations at amino acid positions 10, 82, and 46 and/or 54 in 16 patients; 10, 90, and 71 and/or 73 in 14 patients; 10, 73, 84, 90, and 46 and/or 54 in 5 patients; 10, 48, and 82 in 5 patients; and 30, 88 and 90 in 5 patients. In summary, during salvage PI therapy, most HIV-1 isolates with a single primary PI resistance mutation maintained their original mutations, and 49% developed additional primary PI resistance mutations. The persistence of L90M, V82A/F/T, G48V, and I84V during salvage therapy suggests that these mutations play a role in clinical resistance to multiple PIs. PMID:11897594

  3. Enzymatic triggered release of an HIV-1 entry inhibitor from prostate specific antigen degradable microparticles.

    PubMed

    Clark, Meredith R; Aliyar, Hyder A; Lee, Chang-won; Jay, Julie I; Gupta, Kavita M; Watson, Karen M; Stewart, Russell J; Buckheit, Robert W; Kiser, Patrick F

    2011-07-15

    This paper describes the design, construction and characterization of the first anti-HIV drug delivery system that is triggered to release its contents in the presence of human semen. Microgel particles were synthesized with a crosslinker containing a peptide substrate for the seminal serine protease prostate specific antigen (PSA) and were loaded with the HIV-1 entry inhibitor sodium poly(styrene-4-sulfonate) (pSS). The particles were composed of N-2-hydroxyproplymethacrylamide and bis-methacrylamide functionalized peptides based on the PSA substrates GISSFYSSK and GISSQYSSK. Exposure to human seminal plasma (HSP) degraded the microgel network and triggered the release of the entrapped antiviral polymer. Particles with the crosslinker composed of the substrate GISSFYSSK showed 17 times faster degradation in seminal plasma than that of the crosslinker composed of GISSQYSSK. The microgel particles containing 1 mol% GISSFYSSK peptide crosslinker showed complete degradation in 30 h in the presence of HSP at 37°C and pSS released from the microgels within 30 min reached a concentration of 10 μg/mL, equivalent to the published IC(90) for pSS. The released pSS inactivated HIV-1 in the presence of HSP. The solid phase synthesis of the crosslinkers, preparation of the particles by inverse microemulsion polymerization, HSP-triggered release of pSS and inactivation of HIV-1 studies are described. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Enzymatic Triggered Release of an HIV-1 Entry Inhibitor from Prostate Specific Antigen Degradable Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Meredith R.; Aliyar, Hyder A.; Lee, Chang-won; Jay, Julie I.; Gupta, Kavita M.; Watson, Karen M.; Stewart, Russell J.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Kiser, Patrick F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the design, construction and characterization of the first anti-HIV drug delivery system that is triggered to release its contents in the presence of human semen. Microgel particles were synthesized with a crosslinker containing a peptide substrate for the seminal serine protease prostate specific antigen (PSA) and were loaded with the HIV-1 entry inhibitor sodium poly(styrene-4-sulfonate) (pSS). The particles were composed of N-2-hydroxyproplymethacrylamide and bis-methacrylamide functionalized peptides based on the PSA substrates GISSFYSSK and GISSQYSSK. Exposure to human seminal plasma (HSP) degraded the microgel network and triggered the release of the entrapped antiviral polymer. Particles with the crosslinker composed of the substrate GISSFYSSK showed 17 times faster degradation in seminal plasma than that of the crosslinker composed of GISSQYSSK. The microgel particles containing 1 mol% GISSFYSSK peptide crosslinker showed complete degradation in 30 hours in the presence of HSP at 37 °C and pSS released from the microgels within 30 minutes reached a concentration of 10 µg/mL, equivalent to the published IC90 for pSS. The released pSS inactivated HIV-1 in the presence of HSP. The solid phase synthesis of the crosslinkers, preparation of the particles by inverse microemulsion polymerization, HSP-triggered release of pSS and inactivation of HIV-1 studies are described. PMID:21511017

  5. Recent patents and emerging therapeutics for HIV infections: a focus on protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mitesh; Mandava, Nanda K; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-07-01

    The inclusion of protease inhibitors (PIs) in highly active antiretroviral therapy has significantly improved clinical outcomes in HIV-1-infected patients. To date, PIs are considered to be the most important therapeutic agents for the treatment of HIV infections. Despite high anti-HIV-1 potency, poor oral bioavailability of PIs has been a major concern. For achieving therapeutic concentrations, large doses of PIs are administered, which results in unacceptable systemic toxicities. Such severe and long-term toxicities necessitate the development of safer and potentially promising PIs. Recently, considerable attention has been paid to the development of newer compounds capable of inhibiting wild-type and resistant HIV-1 protease. Some of these PIs have displayed potent HIV-1 protease inhibitory activity. In this review, we have made an attempt to provide an overview on clinically approved and newly developing PIs, and related recent patents in the development of novel PIs.

  6. Structural and Functional Insights into the HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitor Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Waki, Kayoko; Durell, Stewart R.; Soheilian, Ferri; Nagashima, Kunio; Butler, Scott L.; Freed, Eric O.

    2012-01-01

    Processing of the Gag precursor protein by the viral protease during particle release triggers virion maturation, an essential step in the virus replication cycle. The first-in-class HIV-1 maturation inhibitor dimethylsuccinyl betulinic acid [PA-457 or bevirimat (BVM)] blocks HIV-1 maturation by inhibiting the cleavage of the capsid-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1) intermediate to mature CA. A structurally distinct molecule, PF-46396, was recently reported to have a similar mode of action to that of BVM. Because of the structural dissimilarity between BVM and PF-46396, we hypothesized that the two compounds might interact differentially with the putative maturation inhibitor-binding pocket in Gag. To test this hypothesis, PF-46396 resistance was selected for in vitro. Resistance mutations were identified in three regions of Gag: around the CA-SP1 cleavage site where BVM resistance maps, at CA amino acid 201, and in the CA major homology region (MHR). The MHR mutants are profoundly PF-46396-dependent in Gag assembly and release and virus replication. The severe defect exhibited by the inhibitor-dependent MHR mutants in the absence of the compound is also corrected by a second-site compensatory change far downstream in SP1, suggesting structural and functional cross-talk between the HIV-1 CA MHR and SP1. When PF-46396 and BVM were both present in infected cells they exhibited mutually antagonistic behavior. Together, these results identify Gag residues that line the maturation inhibitor-binding pocket and suggest that BVM and PF-46396 interact differentially with this putative pocket. These findings provide novel insights into the structure-function relationship between the CA MHR and SP1, two domains of Gag that are critical to both assembly and maturation. The highly conserved nature of the MHR across all orthoretroviridae suggests that these findings will be broadly relevant to retroviral assembly. Finally, the results presented here provide a framework for increased

  7. Structural and functional insights into the HIV-1 maturation inhibitor binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Waki, Kayoko; Durell, Stewart R; Soheilian, Ferri; Nagashima, Kunio; Butler, Scott L; Freed, Eric O

    2012-01-01

    Processing of the Gag precursor protein by the viral protease during particle release triggers virion maturation, an essential step in the virus replication cycle. The first-in-class HIV-1 maturation inhibitor dimethylsuccinyl betulinic acid [PA-457 or bevirimat (BVM)] blocks HIV-1 maturation by inhibiting the cleavage of the capsid-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1) intermediate to mature CA. A structurally distinct molecule, PF-46396, was recently reported to have a similar mode of action to that of BVM. Because of the structural dissimilarity between BVM and PF-46396, we hypothesized that the two compounds might interact differentially with the putative maturation inhibitor-binding pocket in Gag. To test this hypothesis, PF-46396 resistance was selected for in vitro. Resistance mutations were identified in three regions of Gag: around the CA-SP1 cleavage site where BVM resistance maps, at CA amino acid 201, and in the CA major homology region (MHR). The MHR mutants are profoundly PF-46396-dependent in Gag assembly and release and virus replication. The severe defect exhibited by the inhibitor-dependent MHR mutants in the absence of the compound is also corrected by a second-site compensatory change far downstream in SP1, suggesting structural and functional cross-talk between the HIV-1 CA MHR and SP1. When PF-46396 and BVM were both present in infected cells they exhibited mutually antagonistic behavior. Together, these results identify Gag residues that line the maturation inhibitor-binding pocket and suggest that BVM and PF-46396 interact differentially with this putative pocket. These findings provide novel insights into the structure-function relationship between the CA MHR and SP1, two domains of Gag that are critical to both assembly and maturation. The highly conserved nature of the MHR across all orthoretroviridae suggests that these findings will be broadly relevant to retroviral assembly. Finally, the results presented here provide a framework for increased

  8. Computational titration analysis of a multiprotic HIV-1 protease-ligand complex.

    PubMed

    Spyrakis, Francesca; Fornabaio, Micaela; Cozzini, Pietro; Mozzarelli, Andrea; Abraham, Donald J; Kellogg, Glen E

    2004-09-29

    A new computational method for analyzing the protonation states of protein-ligand complexes with multiple ionizable groups is applied to the structurally characterized complex between the peptide Glu-Asp-Leu and HIV-1 protease. This complex has eight ionizable groups at the active site: four from the ligand and four Asp residues on the protein. Correlation, with an error of ca. 0.6 kcal mol-1, is made between the calculated titration curve and the experimental titration curve. The analysis suggests that between four and five of the eight ionizable groups are protonated at the pH of crystallization.

  9. Antiretroviral activities of protease inhibitors against murine leukemia virus and simian immunodeficiency virus in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Black, P L; Downs, M B; Lewis, M G; Ussery, M A; Dreyer, G B; Petteway, S R; Lambert, D M

    1993-01-01

    Rationally designed synthetic inhibitors of retroviral proteases inhibit the processing of viral polyproteins in cultures of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected T lymphocytes and, as a result, inhibit the infectivity of HIV-1 for such cultures. The ability of HIV-1 protease inhibitors to suppress replication of the C-type retrovirus Rauscher murine leukemia virus (R-MuLV) and the HIV-related lentivirus simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) was examined in plaque reduction assays and syncytium reduction assays, respectively. Three of seven compounds examined blocked production of infectious R-MuLV, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of < or = 1 microM. Little or no cellular cytotoxicity was detectable at concentrations up to 100 microM. The same compounds which inhibited the infectivity of HIV-1 also produced activity against SIV and R-MuLV. Electron microscopic examination revealed the presence of many virions with atypical morphologies in cultures treated with the active compounds. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that the active compounds reduced the number of membrane-associated virus particles. These results demonstrate that synthetic peptide analog inhibitors of retroviral proteases significantly inhibit proteolytic processing of the gag polyproteins of R-MuLV and SIV and inhibit the replication of these retroviruses. These results are similar to those for inhibition of HIV-1 infectivity by these compounds, and thus, R-MuLV and SIV might be suitable models for the in vivo evaluation of the antiretroviral activities of these protease inhibitors.

  10. Antiretroviral activities of protease inhibitors against murine leukemia virus and simian immunodeficiency virus in tissue culture.

    PubMed Central

    Black, P L; Downs, M B; Lewis, M G; Ussery, M A; Dreyer, G B; Petteway, S R; Lambert, D M

    1993-01-01

    Rationally designed synthetic inhibitors of retroviral proteases inhibit the processing of viral polyproteins in cultures of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected T lymphocytes and, as a result, inhibit the infectivity of HIV-1 for such cultures. The ability of HIV-1 protease inhibitors to suppress replication of the C-type retrovirus Rauscher murine leukemia virus (R-MuLV) and the HIV-related lentivirus simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) was examined in plaque reduction assays and syncytium reduction assays, respectively. Three of seven compounds examined blocked production of infectious R-MuLV, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of < or = 1 microM. Little or no cellular cytotoxicity was detectable at concentrations up to 100 microM. The same compounds which inhibited the infectivity of HIV-1 also produced activity against SIV and R-MuLV. Electron microscopic examination revealed the presence of many virions with atypical morphologies in cultures treated with the active compounds. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that the active compounds reduced the number of membrane-associated virus particles. These results demonstrate that synthetic peptide analog inhibitors of retroviral proteases significantly inhibit proteolytic processing of the gag polyproteins of R-MuLV and SIV and inhibit the replication of these retroviruses. These results are similar to those for inhibition of HIV-1 infectivity by these compounds, and thus, R-MuLV and SIV might be suitable models for the in vivo evaluation of the antiretroviral activities of these protease inhibitors. Images PMID:8381640

  11. Cross-resistance analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants individually selected for resistance to five different protease inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Tisdale, M; Myers, R E; Maschera, B; Parry, N R; Oliver, N M; Blair, E D

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitor-resistant variants, isolated on passage of HIV-1HXB2 in MT-4 cells with five different protease inhibitors, have been examined for cross-resistance to five inhibitors. The protease inhibitors studied were Ro 31-8959, A-77003, XM323, L-735,524, and VX-478. Resistant variants with two to four mutations within their protease sequence and 9- to 40-fold-decreased susceptibility were selected for all five inhibitors within six to eight passes in cell culture. Passage of a zidovudine-resistant mutant in Ro 31-8959 generated a dual reverse transcriptase- and protease-resistant virus. Variants were cloned directly into a modified pHXB2-D infectious clone for cross-resistance analysis. Although the resistant variants selected possessed different combinations of protease mutations for each inhibitor, many showed cross-resistance to the other inhibitors, and one showed cross-resistance to all five inhibitors. Interestingly, some mutants showed increased susceptibility to some inhibitors. Further HIV passage studies in the combined presence of two protease inhibitors demonstrated that in vitro it was possible to delay significantly selection of mutations producing resistance to one or both inhibitors. These studies indicate that there may be some rationale for combining different protease inhibitors as well as protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitors in HIV combination therapy. PMID:7486905

  12. Synthesis of macrocyclic trypanosomal cysteine protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen Ting; Lira, Ricardo; Hansell, Elizabeth; McKerrow, James H; Roush, William R

    2008-11-15

    The importance of cysteine proteases in parasites, compounded with the lack of redundancy compared to their mammalian hosts makes proteases attractive targets for the development of new therapeutic agents. The binding mode of K11002 to cruzain, the major cysteine protease of Trypanosoma cruzi was used in the design of conformationally constrained inhibitors. Vinyl sulfone-containing macrocycles were synthesized via olefin ring-closing metathesis and evaluated against cruzain and the closely related cysteine protease, rhodesain.

  13. Insights into the structural function of the complex of HIV-1 protease with TMC-126: molecular dynamics simulations and free-energy calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dan; Han, Ju-Guang; Chen, Hang; Li, Liang; Zhao, Run-Ning Zhao; Liu, Guang; Duan, Yuhua

    2012-05-01

    The binding properties of the protein-inhibitor complex of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease with the inhibitor TMC-126 are investigated by combining computational alanine scanning (CAS) mutagenesis with binding free-energy decomposition (BFED). The calculated results demonstrate that the flap region (residues 38-58) and the active site region (residues 23-32) in HIV-1 protease contribute 63.72% of the protease to the binding of the inhibitor. In particular, the mechanisms for the interactions of key residues of these species are fully explored and analyzed. Interestingly, the regression analyses show that both CAS and BFED based on the generalized Born model yield similar results, with a correlation coefficient of 0.94. However, compared to CAS, BFED is faster and can decompose the per-residue binding free-energy contributions into backbone and sidechain contributions. The results obtained in this study are useful for studying the binding mechanism between receptor and ligand and for designing potent inhibitors that can combat diseases.

  14. A fission yeast cell-based system for multidrug resistant HIV-1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Benko, Zsigmond; Liang, Dong; Li, Ge; Elder, Robert T; Sarkar, Anindya; Takayama, Jun; Ghosh, Arun K; Zhao, Richard Y

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 protease (PR) is an essential enzyme for viral production. Thus, PR inhibitors (PIs) are the most effective class of anti-HIV drugs. However, the main challenge to the successful use of PI drugs in patient treatment is the emergence of multidrug resistant PRs (mdrPRs). This study aimed to develop a fission yeast cell-based system for rapid testing of new PIs that combat mdrPRs. Three mdrPRs were isolated from HIV-infected patients that carried seven (M7PR), ten (M10PR) and eleven (M11PR) PR gene mutations, respectively. They were cloned and expressed in fission yeast under an inducible promoter to allow the measurement of PR-specific proteolysis and drug resistance. The results showed that all three mdrPRs maintained their abilities to proteolyze HIV viral substrates (MA↓CA and p6) and to confer drug resistance. Production of these proteins in the fission yeast caused cell growth inhibition, oxidative stress and altered mitochondrial morphologies that led to cell death. Five investigational PIs were used to test the utility of the established yeast system with an FDA-approved PI drug Darunavir (DRV) as control. All six compounds suppressed the wildtype PR (wtPR) and the M7PR-mediated activities. However, none of them were able to suppress the M10PR or the M11PR. The three clinically isolated mdrPRs maintained their viral proteolytic activities and drug resistance in the fission yeast. Furthermore, those viral mdrPR activities were coupled with the induction of growth inhibition and cell death, which could be used to test the PI activities. Indeed, the five investigational PIs and DRV suppressed the wtPR in fission yeast as they did in mammalian cells. Significantly, two of the high level mdrPRs (M10PR and M11PR) were resistant to all of the existing PI drugs including DRV. This observation underscores the importance of continued searching for new PIs against mdrPRs.

  15. Dynamic and Electrostatic Effects on the Reaction Catalyzed by HIV-1 Protease.

    PubMed

    Krzemińska, Agnieszka; Moliner, Vicent; Świderek, Katarzyna

    2016-12-21

    HIV-1 Protease (HIV-1 PR) is one of the three enzymes essential for the replication process of HIV-1 virus, which explains why it has been the main target for design of drugs against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). This work is focused on exploring the proteolysis reaction catalyzed by HIV-1 PR, with special attention to the dynamic and electrostatic effects governing its catalytic power. Free energy surfaces for all possible mechanisms have been computed in terms of potentials of mean force (PMFs) within hybrid QM/MM potentials, with the QM subset of atoms described at semiempirical (AM1) and DFT (M06-2X) level. The results suggest that the most favorable reaction mechanism involves formation of a gem-diol intermediate, whose decomposition into the product complex would correspond to the rate-limiting step. The agreement between the activation free energy of this step with experimental data, as well as kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), supports this prediction. The role of the protein dynamic was studied by protein isotope labeling in the framework of the Variational Transition State Theory. The predicted enzyme KIEs, also very close to the values measured experimentally, reveal a measurable but small dynamic effect. Our calculations show how the contribution of dynamic effects to the effective activation free energy appears to be below 1 kcal·mol(-1). On the contrary, the electric field created by the protein in the active site of the enzyme emerges as being critical for the electronic reorganization required during the reaction. These electrostatic properties of the active site could be used as a mold for future drug design.

  16. Antiviral Breadth and Combination Potential of Peptide Triazole HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Karyn; Fletcher, Patricia; Rossi, Fiorella; Kantharaju; Umashankara, Muddagowda; Pirrone, Vanessa; Rajagopal, Srivats; Gopi, Hosahudya; Krebs, Fred C.; Martin-Garcia, Julio; Shattock, Robin J.

    2012-01-01

    The first stage of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection involves the fusion of viral and host cellular membranes mediated by viral envelope glycoprotein gp120. Inhibitors that specifically target gp120 are gaining increased attention as therapeutics or preventatives to prevent the spread of HIV-1. One promising new group of inhibitors is the peptide triazoles, which bind to gp120 and simultaneously block its interaction with both CD4 and the coreceptor. In this study, we assessed the most potent peptide triazole, HNG-156, for inhibitory breadth, cytotoxicity, and efficacy, both alone and in combination with other antiviral compounds, against HIV-1. HNG-156 inhibited a panel of 16 subtype B and C isolates of HIV-1 in a single-round infection assay. Inhibition of cell infection by replication-competent clinical isolates of HIV-1 was also observed with HNG-156. We found that HNG-156 had a greater than predicted effect when combined with several other entry inhibitors or the reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir. Overall, we find that HNG-156 is noncytotoxic, has a broad inhibition profile, and provides a positive combination with several inhibitors of the HIV-1 life cycle. These results support the pursuit of efficacy and toxicity analyses in more advanced cell and animal models to develop peptide triazole family inhibitors of HIV-1 into antagonists of HIV-1 infection. PMID:22083481

  17. TOE1 is an inhibitor of HIV-1 replication with cell-penetrating capability

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Sabina; Barat, Corinne; Cabrita, Miguel A.; Gargaun, Ana; Berezovski, Maxim V.; Tremblay, Michel J.; de Belle, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Target of Egr1 (TOE1) is a nuclear protein localized primarily in nucleoli and Cajal bodies that was identified as a downstream target of the immediate early gene Egr1. TOE1 displays a functional deadenylation domain and has been shown to participate in spliceosome assembly. We report here that TOE1 can function as an inhibitor of HIV-1 replication and show evidence that supports a direct interaction of TOE1 with the viral specific transactivator response element as part of the inhibitory mechanism. In addition, we show that TOE1 can be secreted by activated CD8+ T lymphocytes and can be cleaved by the serine protease granzyme B, one of the main components of cytotoxic granules. Both full-length and cleaved TOE1 can spontaneously cross the plasma membrane and penetrate cells in culture, retaining HIV-1 inhibitory activity. Antiviral potency of TOE1 and its cell-penetrating capability have been identified to lie within a 35-amino-acid region containing the nuclear localization sequence. PMID:26056259

  18. Progress in HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors: A Review of their Chemical Structure Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Hajimahdi, Zahra; Zarghi, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) enzyme, one of the three main enzymes of HIV-1, catalyzed the insertion of the viral DNA into the genome of host cells. Because of the lack of its homologue in human cells and its essential role in HIV-1 replication, IN inhibition represents an attractive therapeutic target for HIV-1 treatment. Since identification of IN as a promising therapeutic target, a major progress has been made, which has facilitated and led to the approval of three drugs. This review focused on the structural features of the most important IN inhibitors and categorized them structurally in 10 scaffolds. We also briefly discussed the structural and functional properties of HIV-1 IN and binding modes of IN inhibitors. The SAR analysis of the known IN inhibitors provides some useful clues to the possible future discovery of novel IN inhibitors. PMID:28243261

  19. HIV-1 Gag as an Antiviral Target: Development of Assembly and Maturation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Spearman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Gag is the master orchestrator of particle assembly. The central role of Gag at multiple stages of the HIV lifecycle has led to efforts to develop drugs that directly target Gag and prevent the formation and release of infectious particles. Until recently, however, only the catalytic site protease inhibitors have been available to inhibit late stages of HIV replication. This review summarizes the current state of development of antivirals that target Gag or disrupt late events in the retrovirus lifecycle such as maturation of the viral capsid. Maturation inhibitors represent an exciting new series of antiviral compounds, including those that specifically target CA-SP1 cleavage and the allosteric integrase inhibitors that inhibit maturation by a completely different mechanism. Numerous small molecules and peptides targeting CA have been studied in attempts to disrupt steps in assembly. Efforts to target CA have recently gained have considerable momentum from the development of small molecules that bind CA and alter capsid stability at the post-entry stage of the lifecycle. Efforts to develop antivirals that inhibit incorporation of genomic RNA or to inhibit late budding events remain in preliminary stages of development. Overall, the development of novel antivirals targeting Gag and the late stages in HIV replication appears much closer to success than ever, with the new maturation inhibitors leading the way. PMID:26329615

  20. Design of dimerization inhibitors of HIV-1 aspartic proteinase: A computer-based combinatorial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caflisch, Amedeo; Schramm, Hans J.; Karplus, Martin

    2000-02-01

    Inhibition of dimerization to the active form of the HIV-1 aspartic proteinase (HIV-1 PR) may be a way to decrease the probability of escape mutations for this viral protein. The Multiple Copy Simultaneous Search (MCSS) methodology was used to generate functionality maps for the dimerization interface of HIV-1 PR. The positions of the MCSS minima of 19 organic fragments, once postprocessed to take into account solvation effects, are in good agreement with experimental data on peptides that bind to the interface. The MCSS minima combined with an approach for computational combinatorial ligand design yielded a set of modified HIV-1 PR C-terminal peptides that are similar to known nanomolar inhibitors of HIV-1 PR dimerization. A number of N-substituted 2,5-diketopiperazines are predicted to be potential dimerization inhibitors of HIV-1 PR.

  1. Sargassum fusiforme fraction is a potent and specific inhibitor of HIV-1 fusion and reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Paskaleva, Elena E; Lin, Xudong; Duus, Karen; McSharry, James J; Veille, Jean-Claude L; Thornber, Carol; Liu, Yanze; Lee, David Yu-Wei; Canki, Mario

    2008-01-15

    Sargassum fusiforme (Harvey) Setchell has been shown to be a highly effective inhibitor of HIV-1 infection. To identify its mechanism of action, we performed bioactivity-guided fractionation on Sargassum fusiforme mixture. Here, we report isolation of a bioactive fraction SP4-2 (S. fusiforme), which at 8 mug/ml inhibited HIV-1 infection by 86.9%, with IC50 value of 3.7 mug. That represents 230-fold enhancement of antiretroviral potency as compared to the whole extract. Inhibition was mediated against both CXCR4 (X4) and CCR5 (R5) tropic HIV-1. Specifically, 10 mug/ml SP4-2 blocked HIV-1 fusion and entry by 53%. This effect was reversed by interaction of SP4-2 with sCD4, suggesting that S. fusiforme inhibits HIV-1 infection by blocking CD4 receptor, which also explained observed inhibition of both X4 and R5-tropic HIV-1. SP4-2 also inhibited HIV-1 replication after virus entry, by directly inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in a dose dependent manner by up to 79%. We conclude that the SP4-2 fraction contains at least two distinct and biologically active molecules, one that inhibits HIV-1 fusion by interacting with CD4 receptor, and another that directly inhibits HIV-1 RT. We propose that S. fusiforme is a lead candidate for anti-HIV-1 drug development.

  2. Sargassum fusiforme fraction is a potent and specific inhibitor of HIV-1 fusion and reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Paskaleva, Elena E; Lin, Xudong; Duus, Karen; McSharry, James J; Veille, Jean-Claude L; Thornber, Carol; Liu, Yanze; Lee, David Yu-Wei; Canki, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Sargassum fusiforme (Harvey) Setchell has been shown to be a highly effective inhibitor of HIV-1 infection. To identify its mechanism of action, we performed bioactivity-guided fractionation on Sargassum fusiforme mixture. Here, we report isolation of a bioactive fraction SP4-2 (S. fusiforme), which at 8 μg/ml inhibited HIV-1 infection by 86.9%, with IC50 value of 3.7 μg. That represents 230-fold enhancement of antiretroviral potency as compared to the whole extract. Inhibition was mediated against both CXCR4 (X4) and CCR5 (R5) tropic HIV-1. Specifically, 10 μg/ml SP4-2 blocked HIV-1 fusion and entry by 53%. This effect was reversed by interaction of SP4-2 with sCD4, suggesting that S. fusiforme inhibits HIV-1 infection by blocking CD4 receptor, which also explained observed inhibition of both X4 and R5-tropic HIV-1. SP4-2 also inhibited HIV-1 replication after virus entry, by directly inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in a dose dependent manner by up to 79%. We conclude that the SP4-2 fraction contains at least two distinct and biologically active molecules, one that inhibits HIV-1 fusion by interacting with CD4 receptor, and another that directly inhibits HIV-1 RT. We propose that S. fusiforme is a lead candidate for anti-HIV-1 drug development. PMID:18197976

  3. Structure of the Unbound Form of HIV-1 Subtype A Protease: Comparison with Unbound Forms of Proteases from other HIV Subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, Arthur H.; Coman, Roxana M.; Bracho-Sanchez, Edith; Fernandez, Marty A.; Gilliland, C.Taylor; Li, Mi; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Wlodawer, Alexander; Dunn, Ben M.; McKenna, Robert

    2010-03-12

    The crystal structure of the unbound form of HIV-1 subtype A protease (PR) has been determined to 1.7 {angstrom} resolution and refined as a homodimer in the hexagonal space group P6{sub 1} to an R{sub cryst} of 20.5%. The structure is similar in overall shape and fold to the previously determined subtype B, C and F PRs. The major differences lie in the conformation of the flap region. The flaps in the crystal structures of the unbound subtype B and C PRs, which were crystallized in tetragonal space groups, are either semi-open or wide open. In the present structure of subtype A PR the flaps are found in the closed position, a conformation that would be more anticipated in the structure of HIV protease complexed with an inhibitor. The amino-acid differences between the subtypes and their respective crystal space groups are discussed in terms of the differences in the flap conformations.

  4. Mass-dependent bond vibrational dynamics influence catalysis by HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Kipp, D Randal; Silva, Rafael G; Schramm, Vern L

    2011-12-07

    Protein motions that occur on the microsecond to millisecond time scale have been linked to enzymatic rates observed for catalytic turnovers, but not to transition-state barrier crossing. It has been hypothesized that enzyme motions on the femtosecond time scale of bond vibrations play a role in transition state formation. Here, we perturb femtosecond motion by substituting all nonexchangeable carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen atoms with (13)C, (15)N, and (2)H and observe the catalytic effects in HIV-1 protease. According to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, isotopic substitution alters vibrational frequency with unchanged electrostatic properties. With the use of a fluorescent peptide to report on multiple steps in the reaction, we observe significantly reduced rates in the heavy enzyme relative to the light enzyme. A possible interpretation of our results is that there exists a dynamic link between mass-dependent bond vibrations of the enzyme and events in the reaction coordinate. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  5. Crystal structures of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: N-benzyl-4-methyl-benzimidazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2009-07-01

    HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are potentially specific and effective drugs in AIDS therapy. The presence of two aromatic systems with an angled orientation in the molecule of the inhibitor is crucial for interactions with HIV-1 RT. The inhibitor drives like a wedge into the cluster of aromatic residues of RT HIV-1 and restrains the enzyme in a conformation that blocks the chemical step of nucleotide incorporation. Structural studies provide useful information for designing new, more active inhibitors. The crystal structures of four NNRTIs are presented here. The investigated compounds are derivatives of N-benzyl-4-methyl-benzimidazole with various aliphatic and aromatic substituents at carbon 2 positions and a 2,6-dihalogeno-substituted N-benzyl moiety. Structural data reported here show that the conformation of the investigated compounds is relatively rigid. Such feature is important for the nonnucleoside inhibitor binding to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  6. MX2 is an interferon-induced inhibitor of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Kane, Melissa; Yadav, Shalini S; Bitzegeio, Julia; Kutluay, Sebla B; Zang, Trinity; Wilson, Sam J; Schoggins, John W; Rice, Charles M; Yamashita, Masahiro; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2013-10-24

    HIV-1 replication can be inhibited by type I interferon (IFN), and the expression of a number of gene products with anti-HIV-1 activity is induced by type I IFN. However, none of the known antiretroviral proteins can account for the ability of type I IFN to inhibit early, preintegration phases of the HIV-1 replication cycle in human cells. Here, by comparing gene expression profiles in cell lines that differ in their ability to support the inhibitory action of IFN-α at early steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle, we identify myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2) as an interferon-induced inhibitor of HIV-1 infection. Expression of MX2 reduces permissiveness to a variety of lentiviruses, whereas depletion of MX2 using RNA interference reduces the anti-HIV-1 potency of IFN-α. HIV-1 reverse transcription proceeds normally in MX2-expressing cells, but 2-long terminal repeat circular forms of HIV-1 DNA are less abundant, suggesting that MX2 inhibits HIV-1 nuclear import, or destabilizes nuclear HIV-1 DNA. Consistent with this notion, mutations in the HIV-1 capsid protein that are known, or suspected, to alter the nuclear import pathways used by HIV-1 confer resistance to MX2, whereas preventing cell division increases MX2 potency. Overall, these findings indicate that MX2 is an effector of the anti-HIV-1 activity of type-I IFN, and suggest that MX2 inhibits HIV-1 infection by inhibiting capsid-dependent nuclear import of subviral complexes.

  7. How conformational changes can affect catalysis, inhibition and drug resistance of enzymes with induced-fit binding mechanism such as the HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Weikl, Thomas R; Hemmateenejad, Bahram

    2013-05-01

    A central question is how the conformational changes of proteins affect their function and the inhibition of this function by drug molecules. Many enzymes change from an open to a closed conformation upon binding of substrate or inhibitor molecules. These conformational changes have been suggested to follow an induced-fit mechanism in which the molecules first bind in the open conformation in those cases where binding in the closed conformation appears to be sterically obstructed such as for the HIV-1 protease. In this article, we present a general model for the catalysis and inhibition of enzymes with induced-fit binding mechanism. We derive general expressions that specify how the overall catalytic rate of the enzymes depends on the rates for binding, for the conformational changes, and for the chemical reaction. Based on these expressions, we analyze the effect of mutations that mainly shift the conformational equilibrium on catalysis and inhibition. If the overall catalytic rate is limited by product unbinding, we find that mutations that destabilize the closed conformation relative to the open conformation increase the catalytic rate in the presence of inhibitors by a factor exp(ΔΔGC/RT) where ΔΔGC is the mutation-induced shift of the free-energy difference between the conformations. This increase in the catalytic rate due to changes in the conformational equilibrium is independent of the inhibitor molecule and, thus, may help to understand how non-active-site mutations can contribute to the multi-drug-resistance that has been observed for the HIV-1 protease. A comparison to experimental data for the non-active-site mutation L90M of the HIV-1 protease indicates that the mutation slightly destabilizes the closed conformation of the enzyme. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The emerging dynamic view of proteins: Protein plasticity in allostery, evolution and self-assembly.

  8. Mechanism of Drug Resistance Revealed by the Crystal Structure of the Unliganded HIV-1 Protease with F53L Mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fengling; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Louis, John M.; Boross, Peter I.; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2010-12-03

    Mutations in HIV-1 protease (PR) that produce resistance to antiviral PR inhibitors are a major problem in AIDS therapy. The mutation F53L arising from antiretroviral therapy was introduced into the flexible flap region of the wild-type PR to study its effect and potential role in developing drug resistance. Compared to wild-type PR, PR{sub F53L} showed lower (15%) catalytic efficiency, 20-fold weaker inhibition by the clinical drug indinavir, and reduced dimer stability, while the inhibition constants of two peptide analog inhibitors were slightly lower than those for PR. The crystal structure of PR{sub F53L} was determined in the unliganded form at 1.35 {angstrom} resolution in space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2. The tips of the flaps in PR{sub F53L} had a wider separation than in unliganded wild-type PR, probably due to the absence of hydrophobic interactions of the side-chains of Phe53 and Ile50{prime}. The changes in interactions between the flaps agreed with the reduced stability of PR{sub F53L} relative to wild-type PR. The altered flap interactions in the unliganded form of PR{sub F53L} suggest a distinct mechanism for drug resistance, which has not been observed in other common drug-resistant mutants.

  9. Role of semen in HIV-1 transmission: inhibitor or facilitator?

    PubMed

    Doncel, Gustavo F; Joseph, Theresa; Thurman, Andrea R

    2011-03-01

    Sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) accounts for 60-90% of new infections, especially in developing countries. During male-to-female transmission, the virus is typically deposited in the vagina as cell-free and cell-associated virions carried by semen. But semen is more than just a carrier for HIV-1. Evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies supports both inhibitory and enhancing effects. Intrinsic antiviral activity mediated by cationic antimicrobial peptides, cytotoxicity, and blockage of HIV-dendritic cell interactions are seminal plasma properties that inhibit HIV-1 infection. On the contrary, neutralization of vaginal acidic pH, enhanced virus-target cell attachment by seminal amyloid fibrils, opsonization by complement fragments, and electrostatic interactions are factors that facilitate HIV-1 infection. The end result, i.e., inhibition or enhancement of HIV mucosal infection, in vivo, likely depends on the summation of all these biological effects. More research is needed, especially in animal models, to dissect the role of these factors and establish their relevance in HIV-1 transmission. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Serine protease inhibitors suppress pancreatic endogenous proteases and modulate bacterial neutral proteases.

    PubMed

    Nduaguibe, Chikodili C; Bentsi-Barnes, Kwamina; Mullen, Yoko; Kandeel, Fouad; Al-Abdullah, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Pefabloc, Trasylol and Urinary Trypsin Inhibitor (UTI) have been reported to be effective serine protease inhibitors that impair pancreatic endogenous proteases resulting in improved islet yield. Here we evaluated the effect of these inhibitors on endogenous proteases (trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase), bacterial neutral proteases (thermolysin and neutral protease) and islet isolation digestion samples. Protease activity was measured using a fluorimetric assay and islet function was assessed by dynamic perifusion. Trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase were significantly inhibited by Pefabloc and UTI. Trasylol showed strong inhibitory effects on trypsin and chymotrypsin but also decreased thermolysin activity. UTI was found to inhibit the activity of endogenous proteases and increase the activity of bacterial neutral proteases. Human islets exposed to Pefabloc had reduced insulin response, unlike Trasylol or UTI, which had no detrimental effect on insulin secretion. Although Trasylol was an effective inhibitor of endogenous proteases, FDA regulatory issues preclude its use in clinical application and thus in the isolation process. UTI has the greatest potential because it impairs endogenous pancreatic proteases and enhances digestion enzymes.

  11. Elucidating the inhibiting mode of AHPBA derivatives against HIV-1 protease and building predictive 3D-QSAR models.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xaioqin; Xu, Liaosa; Luo, Xiaomin; Fan, Kangnian; Ji, Ruyun; Pei, Gang; Chen, Kaixian; Jiang, Hualiang

    2002-01-17

    The Lamarckian genetic algorithm of AutoDock 3.0 has been used to dock 27 3(S)-amino-2(S)-hydroxyl-4-phenylbutanoic acids (AHPBAs) into the active site of HIV-1 protease (HIVPR). The binding mode was demonstrated in the aspects of the inhibitor's conformation, subsite interaction, and hydrogen bonding. The data of geometrical parameters (tau(1), tau(2), and tau(3) listed in Table 2) and root mean square deviation values as compared with the known inhibitor, kni272,(28) show that both kinds of inhibitors interact with HIVPR in a very similar way. The r(2) value of 0.860 indicates that the calculated binding free energies correlate well with the inhibitory activities. The structural and energetic differences in inhibitory potencies of AHPBAs were reasonably explored. Using the binding conformations of AHPBAs, consistent and highly predictive 3D-QSAR models were developed by performing CoMFA, CoMSIA, and HQSAR analyses. The reasonable r(corss)(2) values were 0.613, 0.530, and 0.717 for CoMFA, CoMSIA, and HQSAR models, respectively. The predictive ability of these models was validated by kni272 and a set of nine compounds that were not included in the training set. Mapping these models back to the topology of the active site of HIVPR leads to a better understanding of vital AHPBA-HIVPR interactions. Structural-based investigations and the final 3D-QSAR results provide clear guidelines and accurate activity predictions for novel HIVPR inhibitors.

  12. In Vitro Selection and Characterization of HIV-1 Variants with Increased Resistance to Sifuvirtide, a Novel HIV-1 Fusion Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhonghua; Shan, Mei; Li, Li; Lu, Lu; Meng, Shu; Chen, Cheng; He, Yuxian; Jiang, Shibo; Zhang, Linqi

    2011-01-01

    Sifuvirtide, a novel fusion inhibitor against human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1), which is more potent than enfuvirtide (T20) in cell culture, is currently under clinical investigation for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. We now report that in vitro selection of HIV-1 variants resistant to sifuvirtide in the presence of increasing concentrations of sifuvirtide has led to several specific mutations in the gp41 region that had not been previously reported. Many of these substitutions were confined to the N-terminal heptad repeat region at positions 37, 38, 41, and 43, either singly or in combination. A downstream substitution at position 126 (N126K) in the C-terminal heptad repeat region was also found. Site-directed mutagenesis studies have further identified the critical amino acid substitutions and combinations thereof in conferring the resistant genotypes. Furthermore, the mutant viruses demonstrated variable degrees of cross-resistance to enfuvirtide, some of which are preferentially more resistant to sifuvirtide. Impaired infectivity was also found for many of the mutant viruses. Biophysical and structural analyses of the key substitutions have revealed several potential novel mechanisms against sifuvirtide. Our results may help to predict potential resistant patterns in vivo and facilitate the further clinical development and therapeutic utility of sifuvirtide. PMID:21098485

  13. Intervention for hyperlipidemia associated with protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Melroe, N H; Kopaczewski, J; Henry, K; Huebsch, J

    1999-01-01

    In the past 3 years, treatment for HIV infection has significantly improved the prognosis for HIV-infected persons. The administration of protease inhibitors for the treatment of HIV infection has had a significant role in the reduction of AIDS-related complications. Recent findings have indicated that protease inhibitors may significantly increase lipids to levels that pose a health risk that may be greater than the illness itself. This article reviews the initial findings of a study that investigated the impact of interventions for the treatment of protease inhibitor-related hyperlipidemia. The purpose of the study was to determine if initiation of interventions based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Guidelines would be effective in lowering protease inhibitor-related hyperlipidemia without disrupting the effectiveness of the HIV therapy. A total of 45 HIV-infected individuals who were taking a protease inhibitor and had abnormally elevated lipids were enrolled into this study. Mean serum cholesterol level prior to initiation of a protease inhibitor regimen was 170 mg/dl as compared to a mean cholesterol at time of enrollment of 289 mg/dl and triglycerides of 879 mg/dl. Interventions included diet and exercise and the prescription of gemfibrozil alone or in combination with atorvatstatin. During the course of the study, overall intervention significantly reduced serum cholesterol level to 201 mg/dl (p. 01) over a study period of ten months. Case studies of five medical events related to hyperlipidemia are included. Currently, 26 participants continue in the study. Sixteen participants discontinued protease inhibitor therapy during the course of the study and thus ended their participation.

  14. Design of new potent HTLV-1 protease inhibitors: in silico study.

    PubMed

    Kheirabadi, Mitra; Maleki, Javad; Soufian, Safieh; Hosseini, Samaneh

    2016-03-01

    HTLV-1 and HIV-1 are two major causes for severe T-cell leukemia disease and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). HTLV-1 protease, a member of aspartic acid protease family, plays important roles in maturation during virus replication cycle. The impairment of these proteases results in uninfectious HTLV-1virions.Similar to HIV-1protease deliberate mutations that confer drug resistance on HTLV-1 are frequently seen in this protease. Therefore, inhibition of HTLV-1 protease activity is expected to disrupt HTLV-1's ability to replicate and infect additional cells. In this study, we initially designed fifteen inhibitory compounds based on the conformations of a class of HIV-1 aspartyl protease inhibitors, sulfonamid-peptoid. Five compounds were chosen based on the goodness of their Drug-Likeness scoreusing "Lipinsk's rule of five". Here, using protein-ligand docking approach we compared the inhibitory constants of these compounds to those available in literatures and observed significantly higher inhibition for two compounds, SP-4 and SP-5. Our data suggest that the addition of two cyclic hydrocarbons to both ends of sulfonamide peptoids leads to the formation of new hydrophobic interactions due to the semi-circular form of these compounds, connecting the first chain of protease to the two ends of tested ligands via Hydrophobic interactions. We conclude that hydrophobic force plays an important role in suppressing protease activity especially for HTLV-1 protease, which in turn prevents the virus maturity. Therefore, designing and development of new ligands based on aromatic hydrocarbons in both ends of inhibitors is very promising for efficient treatment.

  15. Design of new potent HTLV-1 protease inhibitors: in silico study

    PubMed Central

    Kheirabadi, Mitra; Maleki, Javad; Soufian, Safieh; Hosseini, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    HTLV-1 and HIV-1 are two major causes for severe T-cell leukemia disease and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). HTLV-1 protease, a member of aspartic acid protease family, plays important roles in maturation during virus replication cycle. The impairment of these proteases results in uninfectious HTLV-1virions.Similar to HIV-1protease deliberate mutations that confer drug resistance on HTLV-1 are frequently seen in this protease. Therefore, inhibition of HTLV-1 protease activity is expected to disrupt HTLV-1’s ability to replicate and infect additional cells. In this study, we initially designed fifteen inhibitory compounds based on the conformations of a class of HIV-1 aspartyl protease inhibitors, sulfonamid-peptoid. Five compounds were chosen based on the goodness of their Drug-Likeness scoreusing “Lipinsk’s rule of five”. Here, using protein-ligand docking approach we compared the inhibitory constants of these compounds to those available in literatures and observed significantly higher inhibition for two compounds, SP-4 and SP-5. Our data suggest that the addition of two cyclic hydrocarbons to both ends of sulfonamide peptoids leads to the formation of new hydrophobic interactions due to the semi-circular form of these compounds, connecting the first chain of protease to the two ends of tested ligands via Hydrophobic interactions. We conclude that hydrophobic force plays an important role in suppressing protease activity especially for HTLV-1 protease, which in turn prevents the virus maturity. Therefore, designing and development of new ligands based on aromatic hydrocarbons in both ends of inhibitors is very promising for efficient treatment. PMID:27844017

  16. Novel theoretically designed HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors derived from nevirapine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinfeng; He, Xiao; Zhang, John Z H

    2014-10-01

    A common problem with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) of HIV-1 is the emergence of mutations in the HIV-1 RT, in particular Lys103 → Asn (K103N) and Tyr181 → Cys (Y181C), which lead to resistance to this entire class of inhibitors. In this study, we theoretically designed two new non-nucleoside HIV-1 RT inhibitors, Mnev-1 and Mnev-2, derived from nevirapine, in order to reduce the resistance caused by those HIV-1 RT mutations. The binding modes of Mnev-1 and Mnev-2 with the wild-type HIV-1 RT and its mutants (K103N and Y181C) were suggested by molecular docking followed by 20-ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit water of those binding complexes (HIV-1 RTs with the new inhibitors). A molecular mechanics/generalized Born surface area (MM/GBSA) calculation was carried out for multiple snapshots extracted from the MD trajectory to estimate the binding free energy. The results of the calculations show that each of the new inhibitors forms a stable hydrogen bond with His235 during the MD simulations, leading to tighter binding of the new inhibitors with their targets. In addition, the repulsive interaction with Cys181 in the Y181C-nevirapine complex is not present in the novel inhibitors. The binding affinities predicted using the MM/GBSA calculations indicate that the new inhibitors could be effective at bypassing the drug resistance of these HIV-1 RT mutants.

  17. In Vitro Reactivation of Replication-Competent and Infectious HIV-1 by Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Banga, Riddhima; Procopio, Francesco Andrea; Cavassini, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The existence of long-lived HIV-1-infected resting memory CD4 T cells is thought to be the primary obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. In the search for novel therapeutic approaches that may reverse HIV-1 latency, inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACis) have been tested to reactivate HIV-1 replication with the objective of rendering HIV-1-infected cells susceptible to elimination either by HIV-specific CD8 T cells or through virus-mediated cytopathicity. In the present study, we evaluated the efficiency of HDACis to reactivate HIV-1 replication from resting memory CD4 T cells isolated from aviremic long-term-treated HIV-1-infected subjects. We demonstrate that following prolonged/repeated treatment of resting memory CD4 T cells with HDACis, HIV-1 replication may be induced from primary resting memory CD4 T cells isolated from aviremic long-term-treated HIV-1-infected subjects. More importantly, we demonstrate that HIV-1 reactivated in the cell cultures was not only replication competent but also infectious. Interestingly, givinostat, an HDACi that has not been investigated in clinical trials, was more efficient than vorinostat, panobinostat, and romidepsin in reversing HIV-1 latency in vitro. Taken together, these results support further evaluation of givinostat as a latency-reversing agent (LRA) in aviremic long-term-treated HIV-1-infected subjects. IMPORTANCE The major barrier to HIV cure is the existence of long-lived latently HIV-1-infected resting memory CD4 T cells. Latently HIV-1-infected CD4 T cells are transcriptionally silent and are therefore not targeted by conventional antiretroviral therapy (ART) or the immune system. In this context, one strategy to target latently infected cells is based on pharmacological molecules that may force the virus to replicate and would therefore render HIV-1-infected cells susceptible to elimination either by HIV-specific CD8 T cells or through virus-mediated cytopathicity. In this context, we developed an

  18. Design, synthesis and biological activity of aromatic diketone derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liming; Li, Zhipeng; Wang, Zhanyang; Liu, Gengxin; He, Xianzhuo; Wang, Xiaoli; Zeng, Chengchu

    2015-01-01

    A series of aromatic diketone derivatives were designed and synthesized as potential HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors and evaluated to determine their ability to inhibit the strand transfer process of HIV-1 integrase. The results indicate that (Z)-1-(3-acetyl-2-hydroxy-4,6-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-hydroxy-3-(substituted)phenylprop-2-en-1-one (5a-5d) can moderately inhibit HIV-1 integrase. The cyclization and condensation products (6a-6c and 7e-7f) of compounds 5a-5d show poor inhibitory activity against HIV-1 integrase. The molecular docking results indicate that the different types of compounds act on HIV-1 integrase in different ways, and these results can explain the differences in the inhibitory activities.

  19. Identification of mechanistically distinct inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase through fragment screening

    PubMed Central

    La, Jennifer; Latham, Catherine F.; Tinetti, Ricky N.; Johnson, Adam; Tyssen, David; Huber, Kelly D.; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas; Simpson, Jamie S.; Headey, Stephen J.; Chalmers, David K.; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based screening methods can be used to discover novel active site or allosteric inhibitors for therapeutic intervention. Using saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR and in vitro activity assays, we have identified fragment-sized inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with distinct chemical scaffolds and mechanisms compared to nonnucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) and nucleoside/nucleotide RT inhibitors (NRTIs). Three compounds were found to inhibit RNA- and DNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity of HIV-1 RT in the micromolar range while retaining potency against RT variants carrying one of three major NNRTI resistance mutations: K103N, Y181C, or G190A. These compounds also inhibit Moloney murine leukemia virus RT but not the Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I. Steady-state kinetic analyses demonstrate that one of these fragments is a competitive inhibitor of HIV-1 RT with respect to deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) substrate, whereas a second compound is a competitive inhibitor of RT polymerase activity with respect to the DNA template/primer (T/P), and consequently also inhibits RNase H activity. The dNTP competing RT inhibitor retains activity against the NRTI-resistant mutants K65R and M184V, demonstrating a drug resistance profile distinct from the nucleotide competing RT inhibitors indolopyridone-1 (INDOPY-1) and 4-dimethylamino-6-vinylpyrimidine-1 (DAVP-1). In antiviral assays, the T/P competing compound inhibits HIV-1 replication at a step consistent with an RT inhibitor. Screening of additional structurally related compounds to the three fragments led to the discovery of molecules with improved potency against HIV-1 RT. These fragment inhibitors represent previously unidentified scaffolds for development of novel drugs for HIV-1 prevention or treatment. PMID:26038551

  20. Accurate ensemble molecular dynamics binding free energy ranking of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Sadiq, S Kashif; Wright, David W; Kenway, Owain A; Coveney, Peter V

    2010-05-24

    Accurate calculation of important thermodynamic properties, such as macromolecular binding free energies, is one of the principal goals of molecular dynamics simulations. However, single long simulation frequently produces incorrectly converged quantitative results due to inadequate sampling of conformational space in a feasible wall-clock time. Multiple short (ensemble) simulations have been shown to explore conformational space more effectively than single long simulations, but the two methods have not yet been thermodynamically compared. Here we show that, for end-state binding free energy determination methods, ensemble simulations exhibit significantly enhanced thermodynamic sampling over single long simulations and result in accurate and converged relative binding free energies that are reproducible to within 0.5 kcal/mol. Completely correct ranking is obtained for six HIV-1 protease variants bound to lopinavir with a correlation coefficient of 0.89 and a mean relative deviation from experiment of 0.9 kcal/mol. Multidrug resistance to lopinavir is enthalpically driven and increases through a decrease in the protein-ligand van der Waals interaction, principally due to the V82A/I84V mutation, and an increase in net electrostatic repulsion due to water-mediated disruption of protein-ligand interactions in the catalytic region. Furthermore, we correctly rank, to within 1 kcal/mol of experiment, the substantially increased chemical potency of lopinavir binding to the wild-type protease compared to saquinavir and show that lopinavir takes advantage of a decreased net electrostatic repulsion to confer enhanced binding. Our approach is dependent on the combined use of petascale computing resources and on an automated simulation workflow to attain the required level of sampling and turn around time to obtain the results, which can be as little as three days. This level of performance promotes integration of such methodology with clinical decision support systems for

  1. Revealing Origin of Decrease in Potency of Darunavir and Amprenavir against HIV-2 relative to HIV-1 Protease by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianzhong; Liang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Wei; Yi, Changhong; Zhang, Shaolong; Zhang, Qinggang

    2014-11-01

    Clinical inhibitors Darunavir (DRV) and Amprenavir (APV) are less effective on HIV-2 protease (PR2) than on HIV-1 protease (PR1). To identify molecular basis associated with the lower inhibition, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) calculations were performed to investigate the effectiveness of the PR1 inhibitors DRV and APV against PR1/PR2. The rank of predicted binding free energies agrees with the experimental determined one. Moreover, our results show that two inhibitors bind less strongly to PR2 than to PR1, again in agreement with the experimental findings. The decrease in binding free energies for PR2 relative to PR1 is found to arise from the reduction of the van der Waals interactions induced by the structural adjustment of the triple mutant V32I, I47V and V82I. This result is further supported by the difference between the van der Waals interactions of inhibitors with each residue in PR2 and in PR1. The results from the principle component analysis suggest that inhibitor binding tends to make the flaps of PR2 close and the one of PR1 open. We expect that this study can theoretically provide significant guidance and dynamics information for the design of potent dual inhibitors targeting PR1/PR2.

  2. Bryostatin-1 synergizes with histone deacetylase inhibitors to reactivate HIV-1 from latency.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Moisés; de Vinuesa, Amaya García; Sanchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; Marquez, Nieves; Bellido, M Luz; Muñoz-Fernandez, M Angeles; Moreno, Santiago; Castor, Trevor P; Calzado, Marco A; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2010-09-01

    The persistence of latent HIV-infected cellular reservoirs represents the major hurdle to virus eradication on patients treated with HAART. It has been suggested that successful depletion of such latent reservoirs will require a combination of therapeutic agents that can specifically and efficiently act on cells harboring latent HIV-1 provirus. Using Jurkat-LAT-GFP cells, a tractable model of HIV-1 latency, we have found that bryostatin -1 reactivates HIV-1 through a classical PKC-dependent pathway. Bryostatin-1 also activates MAPKs and NF-κB pathways and synergizes with HDAC inhibitors to reactivate HIV-1 from latency. Bryostatin-1 downregulates the expression of the HIV-1 co-receptors CD4 and CXCR4 and prevented de novo HIV-1 infection in susceptible cells. We applied proteomic methods to investigate major changes in protein expression in Jurkat-LAT-GFP under latency and reactivation conditions. We identified up-regulation of proteins that may be involved in the innate anti-HIV-1 response (NKEF-A and MHD2) and in different cell functions (i.e. cofilin-1 and transgelin-2) of the host cells. PKC agonists may represent a valuable pharmacological approach to purge latent HIV from cellular reservoirs and at the moment, the only clinically available PKC agonist is bryostatin-1. This drug has been tested in numerous clinical trials and its pharmacokinetics and toxicity in humans is well known. Moreover, bryostatin-1 potently synergizes with other HDAC inhibitors commonly used in the medical practice such as valproic acid. Therefore, bryostatin-1, alone or in combination with HDAC inhibitors, could be used in HAART treated patients to validate the hypothesis that reactivating HIV-1 from latency could purge HIV-1 reservoirs.

  3. The prototype HIV-1 maturation inhibitor, bevirimat, binds to the CA-SP1 cleavage site in immature Gag particles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bevirimat, the prototype Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) maturation inhibitor, is highly potent in cell culture and efficacious in HIV-1 infected patients. In contrast to inhibitors that target the active site of the viral protease, bevirimat specifically inhibits a single cleavage event, the final processing step for the Gag precursor where p25 (CA-SP1) is cleaved to p24 (CA) and SP1. Results In this study, photoaffinity analogs of bevirimat and mass spectrometry were employed to map the binding site of bevirimat to Gag within immature virus-like particles. Bevirimat analogs were found to crosslink to sequences overlapping, or proximal to, the CA-SP1 cleavage site, consistent with previous biochemical data on the effect of bevirimat on Gag processing and with genetic data from resistance mutations, in a region predicted by NMR and mutational studies to have α-helical character. Unexpectedly, a second region of interaction was found within the Major Homology Region (MHR). Extensive prior genetic evidence suggests that the MHR is critical for virus assembly. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of a direct interaction between the maturation inhibitor, bevirimat, and its target, Gag. Information gained from this study sheds light on the mechanisms by which the virus develops resistance to this class of drug and may aid in the design of next-generation maturation inhibitors. PMID:22151792

  4. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal

    PubMed Central

    Stoszko, Mateusz; De Crignis, Elisa; Rokx, Casper; Khalid, Mir Mubashir; Lungu, Cynthia; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Kan, Tsung Wai; Boucher, Charles; Verbon, Annelies; Dykhuizen, Emily C.; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2015-01-01

    Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's) for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4 + T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal. PMID:26870822

  5. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal.

    PubMed

    Stoszko, Mateusz; De Crignis, Elisa; Rokx, Casper; Khalid, Mir Mubashir; Lungu, Cynthia; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Kan, Tsung Wai; Boucher, Charles; Verbon, Annelies; Dykhuizen, Emily C; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2016-01-01

    Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's) for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4 + T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal.

  6. Polyurethane intravaginal ring for controlled delivery of dapivirine, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kavita M; Pearce, Serena M; Poursaid, Azadeh E; Aliyar, Hyder A; Tresco, Patrick A; Mitchnik, Mark A; Kiser, Patrick F

    2008-10-01

    Women-controlled methods for prevention of male-to-female sexual transmission of HIV-1 are urgently needed. Providing inhibitory concentrations of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors to impede the replication of the virus in the female genital tissue offers a mechanism for prophylaxis of HIV-1. To this end, an intravaginal ring device that can provide long duration delivery of dapivirine, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of HIV-1, was developed utilizing a medical-grade polyether urethane. Monolithic intravaginal rings were fabricated and sustained release with cumulative flux linear with time was demonstrated under sink conditions for a period of 30 days. The release rate was directly proportional to the amount of drug loaded. Another release study conducted for a week utilizing liposome dispersions as sink conditions, to mimic the partitioning of dapivirine into vaginal tissue, also demonstrated release rates constant with time. These results qualify polyether urethanes for development of intravaginal rings for sustained delivery of microbicidal agents.

  7. Design of cell-permeable stapled peptides as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Long, Ya-Qiu; Huang, Shao-Xu; Zawahir, Zahrah; Xu, Zhong-Liang; Li, Huiyuan; Sanchez, Tino W; Zhi, Ying; De Houwer, Stephanie; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Neamati, Nouri

    2013-07-11

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of viral DNA into the host genome, involving several interactions with the viral and cellular proteins. We have previously identified peptide IN inhibitors derived from the α-helical regions along the dimeric interface of HIV-1 IN. Herein, we show that appropriate hydrocarbon stapling of these peptides to stabilize their helical structure remarkably improves the cell permeability, thus allowing inhibition of the HIV-1 replication in cell culture. Furthermore, the stabilized peptides inhibit the interaction of IN with the cellular cofactor LEDGF/p75. Cellular uptake of the stapled peptide was confirmed in four different cell lines using a fluorescein-labeled analogue. Given their enhanced potency and cell permeability, these stapled peptides can serve as not only lead IN inhibitors but also prototypical biochemical probes or "nanoneedles" for the elucidation of HIV-1 IN dimerization and host cofactor interactions within their native cellular environment.

  8. Accurate sampling and deep sequencing of the HIV-1 protease gene using a Primer ID.

    PubMed

    Jabara, Cassandra B; Jones, Corbin D; Roach, Jeffrey; Anderson, Jeffrey A; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2011-12-13

    Viruses can create complex genetic populations within a host, and deep sequencing technologies allow extensive sampling of these populations. Limitations of these technologies, however, potentially bias this sampling, particularly when a PCR step precedes the sequencing protocol. Typically, an unknown number of templates are used in initiating the PCR amplification, and this can lead to unrecognized sequence resampling creating apparent homogeneity; also, PCR-mediated recombination can disrupt linkage, and differential amplification can skew allele frequency. Finally, misincorporation of nucleotides during PCR and errors during the sequencing protocol can inflate diversity. We have solved these problems by including a random sequence tag in the initial primer such that each template receives a unique Primer ID. After sequencing, repeated identification of a Primer ID reveals sequence resampling. These resampled sequences are then used to create an accurate consensus sequence for each template, correcting for recombination, allelic skewing, and misincorporation/sequencing errors. The resulting population of consensus sequences directly represents the initial sampled templates. We applied this approach to the HIV-1 protease (pro) gene to view the distribution of sequence variation of a complex viral population within a host. We identified major and minor polymorphisms at coding and noncoding positions. In addition, we observed dynamic genetic changes within the population during intermittent drug exposure, including the emergence of multiple resistant alleles. These results provide an unprecedented view of a complex viral population in the absence of PCR resampling.

  9. HIV-1 protease inhibits its homologous reverse transcriptase by protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, M; Grosse, F

    1997-01-01

    The reading frame of the HIV-1 pol gene, encoding protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT), including RNase H as well as integrase, was fused to the bacterialbeta-galactosidase gene and overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells. The resulting fusion protein was cleaved autocatalytically leading to PR, RT and integrase. Immunoprecipitations of bacterial crude extracts with anti-RT antibodies precipitated both RT and PR. Co-precipitation of PR and RT was also observed with anti-PR antibodies, strongly suggesting a physical interaction between fully processed RT and PR within the bacterial cell. Physical interactions were confirmed with purified components by means of an ELISA assay. Furthermore, purified PR inhibited the DNA synthesis activity of purified RT, while its RNase H activity remained unaffected. The type of inhibition was uncompetitive with respect to poly(rA).oligo(dT); the inhibition constant was 50-100 nM. A possible physiological significance of this type of interaction is discussed. PMID:9108151

  10. Seminal and colostral protease inhibitors on leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Veselský, L; Cechová, D; Hruban, V; Klaudy, J

    1982-01-01

    For detection of protease inhibitors from cow colostrum (CTI) and bull seminal plasma (BUSI I and BUSI II) on the surface of leukocytes, immunological methods were used. An agglutination and an immunofluorescence test demonstrated components on the surface of bovine, porcine and ovine granulocytes and lymphocytes which were immunologically identical with the protease inhibitors isolated from cow colostrum and bull seminal plasma. When antisera against (CTI, BUSI and BUSI II were absorbed by bovine and porcine liver, kidney and spleen homogenate or by bovine and porcine granulocytes or lymphocytes, the immunological tests were negative.

  11. Saquinavir, the pioneer antiretroviral protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    la Porte, Charles J L

    2009-10-01

    The treatment of HIV infection underwent a major change in 1995 when saquinavir was the first protease inhibitor introduced into the market. This drug made the use of combination therapy in the treatment of HIV possible and increased the success rate of treatment. This article will review recent literature on saquinavir to define its current role in HIV treatment, among the newer antiretroviral drugs. Scientific literature and conference presentations were evaluated for relevant information pertaining to saquinavir. Although underused, saquinavir has good efficacy and tolerability when compared to other protease inhibitors. The film-coated tablet formulation improved pill burden. Saquinavir still has potential in the treatment of adults, children and pregnant women.

  12. Current and Novel Inhibitors of HIV Protease

    PubMed Central

    Pokorná, Jana; Machala, Ladislav; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Konvalinka, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The design, development and clinical success of HIV protease inhibitors represent one of the most remarkable achievements of molecular medicine. This review describes all nine currently available FDA-approved protease inhibitors, discusses their pharmacokinetic properties, off-target activities, side-effects, and resistance profiles. The compounds in the various stages of clinical development are also introduced, as well as alternative approaches, aiming at other functional domains of HIV PR. The potential of these novel compounds to open new way to the rational drug design of human viruses is critically assessed. PMID:21994591

  13. Ebselen, a Small-Molecule Capsid Inhibitor of HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Thenin-Houssier, Suzie; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S.; Pedro-Rosa, Laura; Brady, Angela; Richard, Audrey; Konnick, Briana; Opp, Silvana; Buffone, Cindy; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Kota, Smitha; Billack, Blase; Pietka-Ottlik, Magdalena; Tellinghuisen, Timothy; Choe, Hyeryun; Spicer, Timothy; Scampavia, Louis; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Kojetin, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid plays crucial roles in HIV-1 replication and thus represents an excellent drug target. We developed a high-throughput screening method based on a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (HTS-TR-FRET) assay, using the C-terminal domain (CTD) of HIV-1 capsid to identify inhibitors of capsid dimerization. This assay was used to screen a library of pharmacologically active compounds, composed of 1,280 in vivo-active drugs, and identified ebselen [2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one], an organoselenium compound, as an inhibitor of HIV-1 capsid CTD dimerization. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis confirmed the direct interaction of ebselen with the HIV-1 capsid CTD and dimer dissociation when ebselen is in 2-fold molar excess. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry revealed that ebselen covalently binds the HIV-1 capsid CTD, likely via a selenylsulfide linkage with Cys198 and Cys218. This compound presents anti-HIV activity in single and multiple rounds of infection in permissive cell lines as well as in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Ebselen inhibits early viral postentry events of the HIV-1 life cycle by impairing the incoming capsid uncoating process. This compound also blocks infection of other retroviruses, such as Moloney murine leukemia virus and simian immunodeficiency virus, but displays no inhibitory activity against hepatitis C and influenza viruses. This study reports the use of TR-FRET screening to successfully identify a novel capsid inhibitor, ebselen, validating HIV-1 capsid as a promising target for drug development. PMID:26810656

  14. Protease Inhibitors Targeting Coronavirus and Filovirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanchen; Vedantham, Punitha; Lu, Kai; Agudelo, Juliet; Carrion, Ricardo; Nunneley, Jerritt W.; Barnard, Dale; Pöhlmann, Stefan; McKerrow, James H.; Renslo, Adam R.; Simmons, Graham

    2016-01-01

    In order to gain entry into cells, diverse viruses, including Ebola virus, SARS-coronavirus and the emerging MERS-coronavirus, depend on activation of their envelope glycoproteins by host cell proteases. The respective enzymes are thus excellent targets for antiviral intervention. In cell culture, activation of Ebola virus, as well as SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can be accomplished by the endosomal cysteine proteases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and cathepsin B (CTSB). In addition, SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can use serine proteases localized at the cell surface, for their activation. However, it is currently unclear which protease(s) facilitate viral spread in the infected host. We report here that the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777, ((2S)-N-[(1E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]-2-{[(E)-4-methylpiperazine-1-carbonyl]amino}-3-phenylpropanamide) and closely-related vinylsulfones act as broad-spectrum antivirals by targeting cathepsin-mediated cell entry. K11777 is already in advanced stages of development for a number of parasitic diseases, such as Chagas disease, and has proven to be safe and effective in a range of animal models. K11777 inhibition of SARS-CoV and Ebola virus entry was observed in the sub-nanomolar range. In order to assess, whether cysteine or serine proteases promote viral spread in the host, we compared the antiviral activity of an optimized K11777-derivative with that of camostat, an inhibitor of TMPRSS2 and related serine proteases. Employing a pathogenic animal model of SARS-CoV infection, we demonstrated that viral spread and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV is driven by serine rather than cysteine proteases and can be effectively prevented by camostat. Camostat has been clinically used to treat chronic pancreatitis, and thus represents an exciting potential therapeutic for respiratory coronavirus infections. Our results indicate that camostat, or similar serine protease inhibitors, might be an effective option for treatment of SARS and

  15. Inhibition of Tat-mediated HIV-1 replication and neurotoxicity by novel GSK3-beta inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Guendel, Irene; Carpio, Lawrence; Skaltsounis, Leandros; Meijer, Laurent; Al-Harthi, Lena; Steiner, Joseph P; Nath, Avindra; Kutsch, Olaf; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2011-06-20

    The HIV-1 protein Tat is a critical regulator of viral transcription and has also been implicated as a mediator of HIV-1 induced neurotoxicity. Here using a high throughput screening assay, we identified the GSK-3 inhibitor 6BIO, as a Tat-dependent HIV-1 transcriptional inhibitor. Its ability to inhibit HIV-1 transcription was confirmed in TZM-bl cells, with an IC(50) of 40nM. Through screening 6BIO derivatives, we identified 6BIOder, which has a lower IC(50) of 4nM in primary macrophages and 0.5nM in astrocytes infected with HIV-1. 6BIOder displayed an IC(50) value of 0.03nM through in vitro GSK-3β kinase inhibition assays. Finally, we demonstrated 6BIO and 6BIOder have neuroprotective effects on Tat induced cell death in rat mixed hippocampal cultures. Therefore 6BIO and its derivatives are unique compounds which, due to their complex mechanisms of action, are able to inhibit HIV-1 transcription as well as to protect against Tat induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Inhibition of Tat-mediated HIV-1 replication and neurotoxicity by novel GSK3-beta inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Guendel, Irene; Carpio, Lawrence; Skaltsounis, Leandros; Meijer, Laurent; Al-Harthi, Lena; Steiner, Joseph P.; Nath, Avindra; Kutsch, Olaf; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 protein Tat is a critical regulator of viral transcription and has also been implicated as a mediator of HIV-1 induced neurotoxicity. Here using a high throughput screening assay, we identified the GSK-3 inhibitor 6BIO, as a Tat-dependent HIV-1 transcriptional inhibitor. Its ability to inhibit HIV-1 transcription was confirmed in TZM-bl cells, with an IC50 of 40 nM. Through screening 6BIO derivatives, we identified 6BIOder, which has a lower IC50 of 4 nM in primary macrophages and 0.5 nM in astrocytes infected with HIV-1. 6BIOder displayed an IC50 value of 0.03 nM through in vitro GSK-3β kinase inhibition assays. Finally, we demonstrated 6BIO and 6BIOder have neuroprotective effects on Tat induced cell death in rat mixed hippocampal cultures. Therefore 6BIO and its derivatives are unique compounds which, due to their complex mechanisms of action, are able to inhibit HIV-1 transcription as well as to protect against Tat induced neurotoxicity. PMID:21514616

  17. Investigational protease inhibitors as antiretroviral therapies

    PubMed Central

    Midde, Narasimha M.; Patters, Benjamin J.; Rao, PSS; Cory, Theodore J.; Kumar, Santosh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) has tremendously improved the life expectancy of the HIV-infected population over the past three decades. Protease inhibitors have been one of the major classes of drugs in HAART regimens that are effective in treating HIV. However, the emergence of resistance and cross-resistance against protease inhibitors encourages researchers to develop new PIs with broad-spectrum activity, as well as novel means of enhancing the efficacy of existing PIs. Areas covered In this article we discuss recent advances in HIV protease inhibitor (PI) development, focusing on both investigational and experimental agents. We also include a section on pharmacokinetic booster drugs for improved bioavailability of protease inhibitors. Further, we discuss novel drug delivery systems using a variety of nanocarriers for the delivery of PIs across the blood-brain barrier to treat the HIV in the brain. Expert opinion We discuss our opinion on the promises and challenges on the development of novel investigational and experimental PIs that are less toxic and more effective in combating drug-resistance. Further, we discuss the future of novel nanocarriers that have been developed to deliver PIs to the brain cells. Although these are promising findings, many challenges need to be overcome prior to making them a viable option. PMID:27415449

  18. HIV-1 IN Inhibitors: 2010 Update and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Marchand, Christophe; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Metifiot, Mathieu; Pommier, Yves

    2010-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is the newest validated target against AIDS and retroviral infections. The remarkable activity of raltegravir (Isentress®) led to its rapid approval by the FDA in 2007 as the first IN inhibitor. Several other IN strand transfer inhibitors (STIs) are in development with the primary goal to overcome resistance due to the rapid occurrence of IN mutations in raltegravir-treated patients. Thus, many scientists and drug companies are actively pursuing clinically useful IN inhibitors. The objective of this review is to provide an update on the IN inhibitors reported in the last two years, including second generation strand transfer inhibitors (STI), recently developed hydroxylated aromatics, natural products, peptide, antibody and oligonucleotide inhibitors. Additionally, the targeting of IN cofactors such as LEDGF and Vpr will be discussed as novel strategies for the treatment of AIDS. PMID:19747122

  19. Blocking HIV-1 entry by a gp120 surface binding inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Lun K.; Chen, Chin-Ho; Dutschman, Ginger E.

    2012-01-01

    We report the mode of action of a proteomimetic compound that binds to the exterior surface of gp120 and blocks HIV-1 entry into cells. Using a one cycle time-of-addition study and antibody competition binding studies, we have determined that the compound blocks HIV-1 entry through modulation of key protein-protein interactions mediated by gp120. The compound exhibits anti-HIV-1 replication activities against several pseudotype viruses derived from primary isolates and the resistant strains isolated from existing drug candidates with equal potency. Together, these data provide evidence that the proteomimetic compound represents a novel class of HIV-1 viral entry inhibitor that functions through protein surface recognition in analogy to an antibody. PMID:22487177

  20. Management of protease inhibitor-associated hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Penzak, Scott R; Chuck, Susan K

    2002-01-01

    Dyslipidemia, characterized by elevated serum levels of triglycerides and reduced levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, has been recognized in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. It is thought that elevated levels of circulating cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-alpha, may alter lipid metabolism in patients with HIV infection. Protease inhibitors, such as saquinavir, indinavir and ritonavir, have been found to decrease mortality and improve quality of life in patients with HIV infection. However, these drugs have been associated with a syndrome of fat redistribution, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia. Elevations in serum total cholesterol and triglyceride levels, along with dyslipidemia that typically occurs in patients with HIV infection, may predispose patients to complications such as premature atherosclerosis and pancreatitis. It has been estimated that hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia occur in greater than 50% of protease inhibitor recipients after 2 years of therapy, and that the risk of developing hyperlipidemia increases with the duration of treatment with protease inhibitors. In general, treatment of hyperlipidemia should follow National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines; efforts should be made to modify/control coronary heart disease risk factors (i.e. smoking; hypertension; diabetes mellitus) and maximize lifestyle modifications, primarily dietary intervention and exercise, in these patients. Where indicated, treatment usually consists of either pravastatin or atorvastatin for patients with elevated serum levels of LDL-C and/or total cholesterol. Atorvastatin is more potent in lowering serum total cholesterol and triglycerides compared with other hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, but it is also associated with more drug interactions compared with pravastatin. Simvastatin

  1. Engineering human immunodeficiency virus 1 protease heterodimers as macromolecular inhibitors of viral maturation.

    PubMed Central

    McPhee, F; Good, A C; Kuntz, I D; Craik, C S

    1996-01-01

    Dimerization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (HIV-1 PR) monomers is an essential prerequisite for viral proteolytic activity and the subsequent generation of infectious virus particles. Disruption of the dimer interface inhibits this activity as does formation of heterodimers between wild-type and defective monomers. A structure-based approach was used to identify amino acid substitutions at the dimer interface of HIV-1 PR that facilitate preferential association of heterodimers and inhibit self-association of the defective monomers. Expression of the designed PR monomers inhibits activity of wild-type HIV-1 PR and viral infectivity when assayed in an ex vivo model system. These results show that it is possible to design PR monomers as macromolecular inhibitors that may provide an alternative to small molecule inhibitors for the treatment of HIV infection. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8876160

  2. Insights into the mechanism of drug resistance: X-ray structure analysis of G48V/C95F tethered HIV-1 protease dimer/saquinavir complex

    SciTech Connect

    Prashar, Vishal; Bihani, Subhash C.; Das, Amit; Rao, D.R.; Hosur, M.V.

    2010-06-11

    The mutation G48V in HIV-1 protease is a major resistance mutation against the drug saquinavir. Recently, G48V mutation is found to co-exist with the mutation C95F in AIDS patients treated with saquinavir. We report here the three-dimensional crystal structure of G48V/C95F tethered HIV-1 protease/saquinavir complex. The structure indicates following as the possible causes of drug resistance: (1) loss of direct van der Waals interactions between saquinavir and enzyme residues PHE-53 and PRO-1081, (2) loss of water-mediated hydrogen bonds between the carbonyl oxygen atoms in saquinavir and amide nitrogen atoms of flap residues 50 and 1050, (3) changes in inter-monomer interactions, which could affect the energetics of domain movements associated with inhibitor-binding, and (4) significant reduction in the stability of the mutant dimer. The present structure also provides a rationale for the clinical observation that the resistance mutations C95F/G48V/V82A occur as a cluster in AIDS patients.

  3. Tetrahydrofuran, tetrahydropyran, triazoles and related heterocyclic derivatives as HIV protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arun K; Anderson, David D

    2011-01-01

    HIV/AIDS remains a formidable disease with millions of individuals inflicted worldwide. Although treatment regimens have improved considerably, drug resistance brought on by viral mutation continues to erode their effectiveness. Intense research efforts are currently underway in search of new and improved therapies. This review is concerned with the design of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors that incorporate heterocyclic scaffolds and which have been reported within the recent literature (2005–2010). Various examples in this review showcase the essential role heterocycles play as scaffolds and bioisosteres in HIV-1 protease inhibitor drug development. This review will hopefully stimulate the widespread application of these heterocycles in the design of other therapeutic agents. PMID:21806380

  4. Maraviroc, as a Switch Option, in HIV-1-infected Individuals With Stable, Well-controlled HIV Replication and R5-tropic Virus on Their First Nucleoside/Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Plus Ritonavir-boosted Protease Inhibitor Regimen: Week 48 Results of the Randomized, Multicenter MARCH Study.

    PubMed

    Pett, Sarah Lilian; Amin, Janaki; Horban, Andrejz; Andrade-Villanueva, Jaime; Losso, Marcelo; Porteiro, Norma; Sierra Madero, Juan; Belloso, Waldo; Tu, Elise; Silk, David; Kelleher, Anthony; Harrigan, Richard; Clark, Andrew; Sugiura, Wataru; Wolff, Marcelo; Gill, John; Gatell, Jose; Fisher, Martin; Clarke, Amanda; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Prazuck, Thierry; Kaiser, Rolf; Woolley, Ian; Arnaiz, Juan Alberto; Cooper, David; Rockstroh, Jürgen K; Mallon, Patrick; Emery, Sean

    2016-07-01

    Alternative combination antiretroviral therapies in virologically suppressed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients experiencing side effects and/or at ongoing risk of important comorbidities from current therapy are needed. Maraviroc (MVC), a chemokine receptor 5 antagonist, is a potential alternative component of therapy in those with R5-tropic virus. The Maraviroc Switch Study is a randomized, multicenter, 96-week, open-label switch study in HIV type 1-infected adults with R5-tropic virus, virologically suppressed on a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (PI/r) plus double nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (2 N(t)RTI) backbone. Participants were randomized 1:2:2 to current combination antiretroviral therapy (control), or replacing the protease inhibitor (MVC + 2 N(t)RTI arm) or the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor backbone (MVC + PI/r arm) with twice-daily MVC. The primary endpoint was the difference (switch minus control) in proportion with plasma viral load (VL) <200 copies/mL at 48 weeks. The switch arms were judged noninferior if the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval (CI) for the difference in the primary endpoint was < -12% in the intention-to-treat (ITT) population. The ITT population comprised 395 participants (control, n = 82; MVC + 2 N(t)RTI, n = 156; MVC + PI/r, n = 157). Baseline characteristics were well matched. At week 48, noninferior rates of virological suppression were observed in those switching away from a PI/r (93.6% [95% CI, -9.0% to 2.2%] and 91.7% [95% CI, -9.6% to 3.8%] with VL <200 and <50 copies/mL, respectively) compared to the control arm (97.6% and 95.1% with VL <200 and <50 copies/mL, respectively). In contrast, MVC + PI/r did not meet noninferiority bounds and was significantly inferior (84.1% [95% CI, -19.8% to -5.8%] and 77.7% [95% CI, -24.9% to -8.4%] with VL <200 and <50 copies/mL, respectively) to the control arm in the ITT analysis. These data support MVC as a switch

  5. Significant Reductions in Gag-Protease-Mediated HIV-1 Replication Capacity during the Course of the Epidemic in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Shigeru; Hosoya, Noriaki; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Brockman, Mark A.; Kikuchi, Tadashi; Koga, Michiko; Nakamura, Hitomi; Koibuchi, Tomohiko; Fujii, Takeshi; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Heckerman, David; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Iwamoto, Aikichi

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) evolves rapidly in response to host immune selection pressures. As a result, the functional properties of HIV-1 isolates from earlier in the epidemic may differ from those of isolates from later stages. However, few studies have investigated alterations in viral replication capacity (RC) over the epidemic. In the present study, we compare Gag-Protease-associated RC between early and late isolates in Japan (1994 to 2009). HIV-1 subtype B sequences from 156 antiretroviral-naïve Japanese with chronic asymptomatic infection were used to construct a chimeric NL4-3 strain encoding plasma-derived gag-protease. Viral replication capacity was examined by infecting a long terminal repeat-driven green fluorescent protein-reporter T cell line. We observed a reduction in the RC of chimeric NL4-3 over the epidemic, which remained significant after adjusting for the CD4+ T cell count and plasma virus load. The same outcome was seen when limiting the analysis to a single large cluster of related sequences, indicating that our results are not due to shifts in the molecular epidemiology of the epidemic in Japan. Moreover, the change in RC was independent of genetic distance between patient-derived sequences and wild-type NL4-3, thus ruling out potential temporal bias due to genetic similarity between patient and historic viral backbone sequences. Collectively, these data indicate that Gag-Protease-associated HIV-1 replication capacity has decreased over the epidemic in Japan. Larger studies from multiple geographical regions will be required to confirm this phenomenon. PMID:23152532

  6. [Integrase inhibitors - new challenges for the treatment of HIV-1 infections].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2013-12-01

    Integrase inhibitors are a promising new group of antiretroviral drugs that suppress the integrase yielded by human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) via inhibiting the ,,integration" of the viral deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) into the hosts' DNA genome. In 2007, raltegravir was the first integrase inhibitor that has been approved for the treatment of HIV-1 infections in antiretroviral-pretreated (-experienced) and antiretroviral-naive patients. Recently, elvitegravir, as a fixed coformulation with cobicistat, tenofovir und emtricitabine, has been approved for the treatment of HIV-1-infected antiretroviral-naive patients. InAugust of 2013, dolutegravir, a third integrase inhibitor, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Adiministation (FDA) for the treatment of HIV-1 infections in adults and children aged 12 years and older. Raltegravir has to be applied twice daily without a boosting agent. Elvitegravir and dolutegravir are applied once daily in the presence of a booster (elvitegravir) or unboosted (dolutegravir). In contrast to raltegravir and elvitegravir, dolutegravir shows a high genetic barrier to resistance, and is also applicable for the treatment of several HIV-1 infections with raltegravir and elvitegravir-resistant HIV variants. During the last years, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir have been proven and established in the antiretroviral treatment of HIV-1 infections as effective, safe and well-tolerated agents. However, reliable statement forecasts of long-term toxicity of these substances can not yet be made.

  7. [Virtual screening of small molecular HIV-1 entry inhibitor NC-2 targeting gp120 and its action mechanism].

    PubMed

    Duan, Heng; Wang, Yuqin; Song, Deshou; Chen, Zhipeng; Qiu, Jiayin; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Shuwen; Tan, Suiyi

    2013-06-01

    To screen the HIV-1 entry inhibitors targeting HIV-1 gp120 from the IBS natural product database by virtual screening based on the binding mode of the neutralizing antibody VRC01 with HIV-1 gp120 and investigate the anti-viral activities of the inhibitors and their action mechanisms. The binding interaction of the candidate molecules binding gp120 and changes of the binding free energy were analyzed by MM-PBSA calculation. The anti-HIV-1 activities of the tested compounds were detected by HIV-1 pseudotyped virus, laboratory-adapted HIV-1 and a cell-cell fusion assay. The cytotoxicity of the studied molecules was examined by XTT colorimetric assay. The mechanisms of the anti-viral activities of the candidate molecules were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A total of 19 molecules with distinct reduction of the binding free energy after binding with gp120 were screened from 40000 molecules. Among them, NC-2 showed anti-HIV-1 activities against HIV-1 pseudotyped virus and laboratory-adapted HIV-1, and was capable of blocking HIV-1 envelope-mediated cell-cell fusion. The IC50 of NC-2 for inhibiting HIV-1IIIB and pseudotyped HIV-1JRFL infection were 1.95∓0.44 µmol/L and 10.58∓0.13 µmol/L, respectively. The results of ELISA suggested that NC-2 could inhibit the binding of HIV-1 gp120 to CD4 without blocking the formation of gp41 six-helix bundle in vitro. This computer-based virtual screening method can be used to screen HIV-1 entry inhibitors targeting gp120. Using this virtual screening approach combined with anti-viral activity screening, we obtained a potent HIV-1 entry inhibitor NC-2 with novel structure.

  8. Comparative study on the protease inhibitors from fish eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustadi; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, S. M.

    2005-07-01

    The protease inhibitor was purified from five different fish eggs. The molecular weights of Pacific herring, chum salmon, pond smelt, glassfish, and Alaska pollock egg protease inhibitors were 120, 89, 84.5, 17, and l6.8kDa, respectively. The specific inhibitory activity of glassfish egg protease inhibitor was the highest followed by those of Pacific herring and Alaska pollock in order. The specific inhibitory activity and purity of glassfish egg protease inhibitor were 19.70 Umg-1 protein and 164.70 folds of purification, respectively. Glassfish egg protease inhibitor was reasonably stable at 50-65°C and pH 8, which was more stable at high temperature and pH than protease inhibitors from the other fish species. Glassfish egg protease inhibitor was noncompetitive with inhibitor constant ( K i) of 4.44 nmolL-1.

  9. Synthesis of a Vpr-Binding Derivative for Use as a Novel HIV-1 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Kyoji; Ishii, Hideki; Murakami, Tomoyuki; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn; Kodama, Eiichi N; Kawaji, Kumi; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Honda, Kaori; Osada, Hiroyuki; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko; Suzuki, Masaaki; Aida, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant viruses compromises the efficacy of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) therapy and limits treatment options. Therefore, new targets that can be used to develop novel antiviral agents need to be identified. We previously identified a potential parent compound, hematoxylin, which suppresses the nuclear import of HIV-1 via the Vpr-importin α interaction and inhibits HIV-1 replication in a Vpr-dependent manner by blocking nuclear import of the pre-integration complex. However, it was unstable. Here, we synthesized a stable derivative of hematoxylin that bound specifically and stably to Vpr and inhibited HIV-1 replication in macrophages. Furthermore, like hematoxylin, the derivative inhibited nuclear import of Vpr in an in vitro nuclear import assay, but had no effect on Vpr-induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest or caspase activity. Interestingly, this derivative bound strongly to amino acid residues 54-74 within the C-terminal α-helical domain (αH3) of Vpr. These residues are highly conserved among different HIV strains, indicating that this region is a potential target for drug-resistant HIV-1 infection. Thus, we succeeded in developing a stable hematoxylin derivative that bound directly to Vpr, suggesting that specific inhibitors of the interaction between cells and viral accessory proteins may provide a new strategy for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  10. Examining structural analogs of elvitegravir as potential inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kavita; Gupta, Saumya; Mishra, Hirdyesh; Sharma, Prashant K; Jayaswal, Amit

    2014-08-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a major health problem in many parts of the world. The human immunodeficiency virus-1 integrase (HIV-1 IN) enzyme has been targeted in HIV patients for therapy. Several integrase inhibitors have been reported, but only elvitegravir (EVG), a new-generation drug, is clinically approved for HIV treatment. In the present work, we investigated two structural analogs of EVG as potential inhibitors of the target molecule, HIV-1 IN. The ligand binding site on HIV-1 IN was identified using Q-SiteFinder, and the HIV-1 IN protein was docked with ligand (EVG and/or analogs) using AutoDock 4. The results suggest that Lys173, Thr125, and His171 are involved in enzyme-substrate binding through hydrogen bonds. Single mutations carried out at Lys173, viz. Lys173Leu (polar > nonpolar) and Lys173Gln (polar > polar), in chain B using PyMOL showed the mutants to have lower binding energy when docked with analog 2, suggesting it to be more stable than analog 1. In conclusion, the mutant HIV-1 IN can bind EVG and its analogs. The physicochemical and pharmacokinetic parameters also show analog 2 to be a promising molecule that can be developed as an alternative to EVG to help overcome the problem of drug resistance by HIV to this inhibitor. Analog 2 may be used as an HIV-1 IN inhibitor with similar potential to that of EVG. Further validation through wet-lab studies, however, is required for future applications.

  11. Three-dimensional structure of a simian immunodeficiency virus protease/inhibitor complex. Implications for the design of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and 2 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, B; Winborne, E; Minnich, M D; Culp, J S; Debouck, C; Abdel-Meguid, S S

    1993-12-07

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) proteins have considerable amino acid sequence homology to those from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); thus monkeys are considered useful models for the preclinical evaluation of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) therapeutics. We have crystallized and determined the three-dimensional structure of SIV protease bound to the hydroxyethylene isostere inhibitor SKF107457. Crystals of the complex were grown from 25-32% saturated sodium chloride, by the hanging drop method of vapor diffusion. They belong to the orthorhombic space group I222, with a = 46.3 A, b = 101.5 A, and c = 118.8 A. The structure has been determined at 2.5-A resolution by molecular replacement and refined to a crystallographic discrepancy factor, R (= sigma parallel Fo magnitude of - magnitude of Fc parallel/sigma magnitude of Fo magnitude of), of 0.189. The overall structure of the complex is very similar to previously reported structures of HIV-1 protease bound to inhibitors. The inhibitor is bound in a conformation that is almost identical to that found for the same inhibitor bound to HIV-1 protease, except for an overall translation of the inhibitor, varying along the backbone atoms from about 1.0 A at the termini to about 0.5 A around the scissile bond surrogate. The structures of the SIV and HIV-1 proteins vary significantly only in three surface loops composed of amino acids 15-20, 34-45, and 65-70. Superposition of the 1188 protein backbone atoms from the two structures gives an rms deviation of 1.0 A; this number is reduced to 0.6 A when atoms from the three surface loops are eliminated from the rms calculation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Insect response to plant defensive protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhu-Salzman, Keyan; Zeng, Rensen

    2015-01-07

    Plant protease inhibitors (PIs) are natural plant defense proteins that inhibit proteases of invading insect herbivores. However, their anti-insect efficacy is determined not only by their potency toward a vulnerable insect system but also by the response of the insect to such a challenge. Through the long history of coevolution with their host plants, insects have developed sophisticated mechanisms to circumvent antinutritional effects of dietary challenges. Their response takes the form of changes in gene expression and the protein repertoire in cells lining the alimentary tract, the first line of defense. Research in insect digestive proteases has revealed the crucial roles they play in insect adaptation to plant PIs and has brought about a new appreciation of how phytophagous insects employ this group of molecules in both protein digestion and counterdefense. This review provides researchers in related fields an up-to-date summary of recent advances.

  13. Approaches for identification of HIV-1 entry inhibitors targeting gp41 pocket.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Du, Lanying; Zhu, Xiaojie; Debnath, Asim K; Jiang, Shibo

    2013-01-11

    The hydrophobic pocket in the HIV-1 gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) domain plays an important role in viral fusion and entry into the host cell, and serves as an attractive target for development of HIV-1 fusion/entry inhibitors. The peptide anti-HIV drug targeting gp41 NHR, T-20 (generic name: enfuvirtide; brand name: Fuzeon), was approved by the U.S. FDA in 2003 as the first HIV fusion/entry inhibitor for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients who fail to respond to the current antiretroviral drugs. However, because T20 lacks the pocket-binding domain (PBD), it exhibits low anti-HIV-1 activity and short half-life. Therefore, several next-generation HIV fusion inhibitory peptides with PBD have been developed. They possess longer half-life and more potent antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of HIV-1 strains, including the T-20-resistant variants. Nonetheless, the clinical application of these peptides is still limited by the lack of oral availability and the high cost of production. Thus, development of small molecule compounds targeting the gp41 pocket with oral availability has been promoted. This review describes the main approaches for identification of HIV fusion/entry inhibitors targeting the gp41 pocket and summarizes the latest progress in developing these inhibitors as a new class of anti-HIV drugs.

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of novel quinolinones as HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Patel, M; McHugh, R J; Cordova, B C; Klabe, R M; Bacheler, L T; Erickson-Viitanen, S; Rodgers, J D

    2001-07-23

    A series of 4,4-disubstituted quinolinones was prepared and evaluated as HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The C-3 substituted compound 9h displayed improved antiviral activity against clinically significant single (K103N) and double (K103N/L100I) mutant viruses.

  15. Identification of a D-amino acid decapeptide HIV-1 entry inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Boggiano, Cesar; Jiang Shibo; Lu Hong; Zhao Qian; Liu Shuwen; Binley, James; Blondelle, Sylvie E. . E-mail: sylvieb@burnham.org

    2006-09-08

    Entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virion into host cells involves three major steps, each being a potential target for the development of entry inhibitors: gp120 binding to CD4, gp120-CD4 complex interacting with a coreceptor, and gp41 refolding to form a six-helix bundle. Using a D-amino acid decapeptide combinatorial library, we identified peptide DC13 as having potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitory activity, and effectively inhibiting infection by several laboratory-adapted and primary HIV-1 strains. While DC13 did not block binding of gp120 to CD4, nor disrupt the gp41 six-helix bundle formation, it effectively blocked the binding of an anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibody and chemokine SDF-1{alpha} to CXCR4-expressing cells. However, because R5-using primary viruses were also neutralized, the antiviral activity of DC13 implies additional mode(s) of action. These results suggest that DC13 is a useful HIV-1 coreceptor antagonist for CXCR4 and, due to its biostability and simplicity, may be of value for developing a new class of HIV-1 entry inhibitors.

  16. Interaction of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H with an acylhydrazone inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gong, Qingguo; Menon, Lakshmi; Ilina, Tatiana; Miller, Lena G; Ahn, Jinwoo; Parniak, Michael A; Ishima, Rieko

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase is a bifunctional enzyme, having both DNA polymerase (RNA- and DNA-dependent) and ribonuclease H activities. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has been an exceptionally important target for antiretroviral therapeutic development, and nearly half of the current clinically used antiretrovirals target reverse transcriptase DNA polymerase. However, no inhibitors of reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H are on the market or in preclinical development. Several drug-like small molecule inhibitors of reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H have been described, but little structural information is available about the interactions between reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H and inhibitors that exhibit antiviral activity. In this report, we describe NMR studies of the interaction of a new ribonuclease H inhibitor, BHMP07, with a catalytically active HIV-1 reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H domain fragment. We carried out solution NMR experiments to identify the interaction interface of BHMP07 with the ribonuclease H domain fragment. Chemical shift changes of backbone amide signals at different BHMP07 concentrations clearly demonstrate that BHMP07 mainly recognizes the substrate handle region in the ribonuclease H fragment. Using ribonuclease H inhibition assays and reverse transcriptase mutants, the binding specificity of BHMP07 was compared with another inhibitor, dihydroxy benzoyl naphthyl hydrazone. Our results provide a structural characterization of the ribonuclease H inhibitor interaction and are likely to be useful for further improvements of the inhibitors.

  17. HIV-1 Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors with Reduced Susceptibility to Drug Resistant Mutant Integrases | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Mutant forms of HIV-1 IN reduce the therapeutic effectiveness of integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). The cover figure shows the IN of prototype foamy virus complexed to a novel INSTI (gold) that retains potency against resistant mutants of HIV-1 IN. Overlain are the host and viral DNA substrates (blue and green, respectively), showing substrate mimicry by the inhibitor.

  18. Crystal Structures of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase with Picomolar Inhibitors Reveal Key Interactions for Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Kathleen M.; Bollini, Mariela; Mislak, Andrea C.; Cisneros, José A.; Gallardo-Macias, Ricardo; Jorgensen, William L.; Anderson, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray crystal structures at 2.9 Å resolution are reported for complexes of catechol diethers 1 and 2 with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. The results help elucidate the structural origins of the extreme antiviral activity of the compounds. The possibility of halogen bonding between the inhibitors and Pro95 is addressed. Structural analysis reveals key interactions with conserved residues P95 and W229 of importance for design of inhibitors with high potency and favorable resistance profiles. PMID:23163887

  19. Rapid Release of Protease Inhibitors from Soybeans

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, David L.; Yang, Wen-Kuang; Foard, Donald E.; Lin, K.-T. -Davis

    1978-01-01

    Specific antisera were prepared against the Bowman-Birk trypsin inhibitor and four other trypsin inhibitors of low molecular weight isolated from soybeans (Glycine max L. cv. Tracy). These antisera were used to detect the presence and amount of the inhibitors in: (a) seeds and protein extracts of soybean meal; (b) seedlings; and (c) the water surrounding the seeds and roots of seedlings. Lectin activities in seeds, seedlings, and water were also determined at the same time as the protease inhibitor activities. By competitive inhibition of immunoprecipitation, the combined five low molecular weight protease inhibitors were found to constitute the following percentages of proteins (w/w): 6.3% in defatted soybean meal; 8.1% of the protein extracted from the meal by a buffer of pH 8.6; 8.3, 14.7, 15.2, 16.1, 17.2, and 18.9% of the protein in a lyophilisate of water in which seeds were incubated for 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 hours, respectively; 8.2% in a lyophilisate of water in which roots of seedlings grew for 20 days; 1.5% in cotyledons; and less than 0.1% in epicotyls, hypocotyls, and roots of 12-day-old seedlings. Hemagglutination activities, expressed as the lowest amount of protein required to give a positive agglutination of 0.2 ml of 2% rabbit red blood cells, were as follows: purified soybean lectin, 0.08 μg; lyophilisate of water in which seeds were incubated for 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 hours, 10, 2.5, 5, 5, and 2.5 μg, respectively; lyophilisate of water in which roots grew for 20 days, 5 μg; 12-day-old cotyledons, roots, epicotyls, and hypocotyls, 12.5, 100, >1,000, and >500 μg, respectively. The results indicate that a large amount of protease inhibitors as well as lectins are released from seeds during the first 8 hours of imbibition. Neither lima bean trypsin inhibitor (mol wt, 10,000) nor Kunitz soybean trypsin inhibitor (mol wt, 21,500) showed competitive inhibition in tests with antisera against low molecular weight soybean protease inhibitors

  20. Discovery and crystallography of bicyclic arylaminoazines as potent inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Gil; Frey, Kathleen M; Gallardo-Macias, Ricardo; Spasov, Krasimir A; Chan, Albert H; Anderson, Karen S; Jorgensen, William L

    2015-11-01

    Non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT) are reported that incorporate a 7-indolizinylamino or 2-naphthylamino substituent on a pyrimidine or 1,3,5-triazine core. The most potent compounds show below 10 nanomolar activity towards wild-type HIV-1 and variants bearing Tyr181Cys and Lys103Asn/Tyr181Cys resistance mutations. The compounds also feature good aqueous solubility. Crystal structures for two complexes enhance the analysis of the structure-activity data.

  1. Identification of novel HIV-1 integrase inhibitors using shape-based screening, QSAR, and docking approach.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pawan; Garg, Prabha; Roy, Nilanjan

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study is to identify novel HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors. Here, shape-based screening and QSAR have been successfully implemented to identify the novel inhibitors for HIV-1 IN, and in silico validation is performed by docking studies. The 2D QSAR model of benzodithiazine derivatives was built using genetic function approximation (GFA) method with good internal (cross-validated r(2)  = 0.852) and external prediction (). Best docking pose of highly active molecule of the benzodithiazine derivatives was used as a template for shape-based screening of ZINC database. Toxicity prediction was also performed using Deductive Estimation of Risk from Existing Knowledge (DEREK) program to filter non-toxic molecules. Inhibitory activities of screened non-toxic molecules were predicted using derived QSAR models. Active, non-toxic screened molecules were also docked into the active site of HIV-1 IN using AutoDock and dock program. Some molecules docked similarly as highly active molecule of the benzodithiazine derivatives. These molecules also followed the same docking interactions in both the programs. Finally, four benzodithiazine derivatives were identified as novel HIV-1 integrase inhibitors based on QSAR predictions and docking interactions. ADME properties of these molecules were also computed using Discovery Studio. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. The use of hairpin DNA duplexes as HIV-1 fusion inhibitors: synthesis, characterization, and activity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Jiang, Xifeng; Xu, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Baohua; Chen, Xueliang; Zhang, Tao; Gao, Fang; Cai, Lifeng; Cheng, Maosheng; Keliang Liu

    2014-07-23

    Discovery of new drugs for the treatment of AIDS that possess unique structures associated with novel mechanisms of action are of great importance due the rapidity with which drug-resistant HIV-1 strains evolve. Recently we reported on a novel class of DNA duplex-based HIV-1 fusion inhibitors modified with hydrophobic groups. The present study describes a new category of hairpin fusion inhibitor DNA duplexes bearing a 3 nucleotide loop located at either the hydrophobic or hydrophilic end. The new loop structures were designed to link 2 separate duplex-forming oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) to make helix-assembly easier and more thermally stable resulting in a more compact form of DNA duplex based HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. A series of new hairpin duplexes were tested for anti-HIV-1 cell-cell membrane fusion activity. In addition, Tm, CD, fluorescent resonance energy transfer assays, and molecular modeling analyses were carried out to define their structural activity relationships and possible mechanisms of action. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Inhibition Profiling of Retroviral Protease Inhibitors Using an HIV-2 Modular System

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Mohamed; Szojka, Zsófia; Mótyán, János András; Tőzsér, József

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral protease inhibitors (PIs) are fundamental pillars in the treatment of HIV infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Currently used PIs are designed against HIV-1, and their effect on HIV-2 is understudied. Using a modular HIV-2 protease cassette system, inhibition profiling assays were carried out for protease inhibitors both in enzymatic and cell culture assays. Moreover, the treatment-associated resistance mutations (I54M, L90M) were introduced into the modular system, and comparative inhibition assays were performed to determine their effect on the susceptibility of the protease. Our results indicate that darunavir, saquinavir, indinavir and lopinavir were very effective HIV-2 protease inhibitors, while tipranavir, nelfinavir and amprenavir showed a decreased efficacy. I54M, L90M double mutation resulted in a significant reduction in the susceptibility to most of the inhibitors with the exception of tipranavir. To our knowledge, this modular system constitutes a novel approach in the field of HIV-2 protease characterization and susceptibility testing. PMID:26633459

  4. Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors: roles in synaptic function and behavior.

    PubMed

    Almonte, Antoine G; Sweatt, J David

    2011-08-17

    Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors have been intensively investigated in the periphery and their roles in a wide range of processes-coagulation, inflammation, and digestion, for example-have been well characterized (see Coughlin, 2000; Macfarlane et al., 2001; Molinari et al., 2003; Wang et al., 2008; Di Cera, 2009 for reviews). A growing number of studies demonstrate that these protein systems are widely expressed in many cell types and regions in mammalian brains. Accumulating lines of evidence suggest that the brain has co-opted the activities of these interesting proteins to regulate various processes underlying synaptic activity and behavior. In this review, we discuss emerging roles for serine proteases in the regulation of mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity and memory formation.

  5. Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors: roles in synaptic function and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Almonte, Antoine G.; Sweatt, J. David

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors have been intensively investigated in the periphery and their roles in a wide range of processes—coagulation, inflammation, and digestion, for example—have been well characterized (see Coughlin, 2000; Macfarlane et al., 2001; Molinari et al., 2003; Wang et al., 2008; Di Cera, 2009 for reviews). A growing number of studies demonstrate that these protein systems are widely expressed in many cell types and regions in mammalian brains. Accumulating lines of evidence suggest that the brain has co-opted the activities of these interesting proteins to regulate various processes underlying synaptic activity and behavior. In this review, we discuss emerging roles for serine proteases in the regulation of mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity and memory formation. PMID:21782155

  6. Proteases of Stored Product Insects and Their Inhibition by Specific Protease Inhibitors from Soybeans and Wheat Grain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-15

    PROTEASES; PROTEASE INHIBITORS; STORED-PRODUCT INISECTS; TRIBOLIUM CASIANEUH; MIDGUT PROTEASES; TENEBRIO MOLITOR MIDGUT-PROTEASES; LOCUST CAECAL...separation and identification of numerous midgut proteases in Tenebrio and Tribolium . The PAGE-gelatin matrix revealed the inhibitory effect of BBI...the proteinaceous trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitor from soybeans) on several Tribolium proteases - an effect which was not detectable in inhibition

  7. Punica granatum (Pomegranate) juice provides an HIV-1 entry inhibitor and candidate topical microbicide

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, A Robert; Strick, Nathan; Li, Yun-Yao; Debnath, Asim K

    2004-01-01

    Background For ≈ 24 years the AIDS pandemic has claimed ≈ 30 million lives, causing ≈ 14,000 new HIV-1 infections daily worldwide in 2003. About 80% of infections occur by heterosexual transmission. In the absence of vaccines, topical microbicides, expected to block virus transmission, offer hope for controlling the pandemic. Antiretroviral chemotherapeutics have decreased AIDS mortality in industrialized countries, but only minimally in developing countries. To prevent an analogous dichotomy, microbicides should be: acceptable; accessible; affordable; and accelerative in transition from development to marketing. Already marketed pharmaceutical excipients or foods, with established safety records and adequate anti-HIV-1 activity, may provide this option. Methods Fruit juices were screened for inhibitory activity against HIV-1 IIIB using CD4 and CXCR4 as cell receptors. The best juice was tested for inhibition of: (1) infection by HIV-1 BaL, utilizing CCR5 as the cellular coreceptor; and (2) binding of gp120 IIIB and gp120 BaL, respectively, to CXCR4 and CCR5. To remove most colored juice components, the adsorption of the effective ingredient(s) to dispersible excipients and other foods was investigated. A selected complex was assayed for inhibition of infection by primary HIV-1 isolates. Results HIV-1 entry inhibitors from pomegranate juice adsorb onto corn starch. The resulting complex blocks virus binding to CD4 and CXCR4/CCR5 and inhibits infection by primary virus clades A to G and group O. Conclusion These results suggest the possibility of producing an anti-HIV-1 microbicide from inexpensive, widely available sources, whose safety has been established throughout centuries, provided that its quality is adequately standardized and monitored. PMID:15485580

  8. Mechanistic Studies and Modeling Reveal the Origin of Differential Inhibition of Gag Polymorphic Viruses by HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zeyu; Cantone, Joseph; Lu, Hao; Nowicka-Sans, Beata; Protack, Tricia; Yuan, Tian; Yang, Hong; Liu, Zheng; Drexler, Dieter; Regueiro-Ren, Alicia; Meanwell, Nicholas A; Cockett, Mark; Krystal, Mark; Lataillade, Max; Dicker, Ira B

    2016-11-01

    HIV-1 maturation inhibitors (MIs) disrupt the final step in the HIV-1 protease-mediated cleavage of the Gag polyprotein between capsid p24 capsid (CA) and spacer peptide 1 (SP1), leading to the production of infectious virus. BMS-955176 is a second generation MI with improved antiviral activity toward polymorphic Gag variants compared to a first generation MI bevirimat (BVM). The underlying mechanistic reasons for the differences in polymorphic coverage were studied using antiviral assays, an LC/MS assay that quantitatively characterizes CA/SP1 cleavage kinetics of virus like particles (VLPs) and a radiolabel binding assay to determine VLP/MI affinities and dissociation kinetics. Antiviral assay data indicates that BVM does not achieve 100% inhibition of certain polymorphs, even at saturating concentrations. This results in the breakthrough of infectious virus (partial antagonism) regardless of BVM concentration. Reduced maximal percent inhibition (MPI) values for BVM correlated with elevated EC50 values, while rates of HIV-1 protease cleavage at CA/SP1 correlated inversely with the ability of BVM to inhibit HIV-1 Gag polymorphic viruses: genotypes with more rapid CA/SP1 cleavage kinetics were less sensitive to BVM. In vitro inhibition of wild type VLP CA/SP1 cleavage by BVM was not maintained at longer cleavage times. BMS-955176 exhibited greatly improved MPI against polymorphic Gag viruses, binds to Gag polymorphs with higher affinity/longer dissociation half-lives and exhibits greater time-independent inhibition of CA/SP1 cleavage compared to BVM. Virological (MPI) and biochemical (CA/SP1 cleavage rates, MI-specific Gag affinities) data were used to create an integrated semi-quantitative model that quantifies CA/SP1 cleavage rates as a function of both MI and Gag polymorph. The model outputs are in accord with in vitro antiviral observations and correlate with observed in vivo MI efficacies. Overall, these findings may be useful to further understand antiviral

  9. Mechanistic Studies and Modeling Reveal the Origin of Differential Inhibition of Gag Polymorphic Viruses by HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zeyu; Cantone, Joseph; Lu, Hao; Protack, Tricia; Yuan, Tian; Yang, Hong; Liu, Zheng; Drexler, Dieter; Regueiro-Ren, Alicia; Meanwell, Nicholas A.; Cockett, Mark; Krystal, Mark; Lataillade, Max; Dicker, Ira B.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 maturation inhibitors (MIs) disrupt the final step in the HIV-1 protease-mediated cleavage of the Gag polyprotein between capsid p24 capsid (CA) and spacer peptide 1 (SP1), leading to the production of infectious virus. BMS-955176 is a second generation MI with improved antiviral activity toward polymorphic Gag variants compared to a first generation MI bevirimat (BVM). The underlying mechanistic reasons for the differences in polymorphic coverage were studied using antiviral assays, an LC/MS assay that quantitatively characterizes CA/SP1 cleavage kinetics of virus like particles (VLPs) and a radiolabel binding assay to determine VLP/MI affinities and dissociation kinetics. Antiviral assay data indicates that BVM does not achieve 100% inhibition of certain polymorphs, even at saturating concentrations. This results in the breakthrough of infectious virus (partial antagonism) regardless of BVM concentration. Reduced maximal percent inhibition (MPI) values for BVM correlated with elevated EC50 values, while rates of HIV-1 protease cleavage at CA/SP1 correlated inversely with the ability of BVM to inhibit HIV-1 Gag polymorphic viruses: genotypes with more rapid CA/SP1 cleavage kinetics were less sensitive to BVM. In vitro inhibition of wild type VLP CA/SP1 cleavage by BVM was not maintained at longer cleavage times. BMS-955176 exhibited greatly improved MPI against polymorphic Gag viruses, binds to Gag polymorphs with higher affinity/longer dissociation half-lives and exhibits greater time-independent inhibition of CA/SP1 cleavage compared to BVM. Virological (MPI) and biochemical (CA/SP1 cleavage rates, MI-specific Gag affinities) data were used to create an integrated semi-quantitative model that quantifies CA/SP1 cleavage rates as a function of both MI and Gag polymorph. The model outputs are in accord with in vitro antiviral observations and correlate with observed in vivo MI efficacies. Overall, these findings may be useful to further understand antiviral

  10. 6,7-Dihydroxy-1-oxoisoindoline-4-sulfonamide-containing HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Smith, Steven J.; Métifiot, Mathieu; Johnson, Barry C.; Marchand, Christophe; Hughes, Stephen H.; Pommier, Yves; Burke, Terrence R.

    2012-01-01

    Although an extensive body of scientific and patent literature exists describing the development of HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors, Merck’s raltegravir and Gilead’s elvitegravir remain the only IN inhibitors FDA-approved for the treatment of AIDS. The emergence of raltegravir-resistant strains of HIV-1 containing mutated forms of IN underlies the need for continued efforts to enhance the efficacy of IN inhibitors against resistant mutants. We have previously described bicyclic 6,7-dihydroxyoxoisoindolin-1-ones that show good IN inhibitory potency. This report describes the effects of introducing substituents into the 4- and 5- positions of the parent 6,7-dihydroxyoxoisoindolin-1-one platform. We have developed several sulfonamide-containing analogs that enhance potency in cell-based HIV assays by more than two orders-of-magnitude and we describe several compounds that are more potent than raltegravir against the clinically relevant Y143R IN mutant. PMID:23149229

  11. Potent Inhibitor of Drug-Resistant HIV-1 Strains Identified from the Medicinal Plant Justicia gendarussa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Jie; Rumschlag-Booms, Emily; Guan, Yi-Fu; Wang, Dong-Ying; Liu, Kang-Lun; Li, Wan-Fei; Nguyen, Van H; Cuong, Nguyen M; Soejarto, Djaja D; Fong, Harry H S; Rong, Lijun

    2017-06-23

    Justicia gendarussa, a medicinal plant collected in Vietnam, was identified as a potent anti-HIV-1 active lead from the evaluation of over 4500 plant extracts. Bioassay-guided separation of the extracts of the stems and roots of this plant led to the isolation of an anti-HIV arylnaphthalene lignan (ANL) glycoside, patentiflorin A (1). Evaluation of the compound against both the M- and T-tropic HIV-1 isolates showed it to possess a significantly higher inhibition effect than the clinically used anti-HIV drug AZT. Patentiflorin A and two congeners were synthesized, de novo, as an efficient strategy for resupply as well as for further structural modification of the anti-HIV ANL glycosides in the search for drug leads. Subsequently, it was determined that the presence of a quinovopyranosyloxy group in the structure is likely essential to retain the high degree of anti-HIV activity of this type of compounds. Patentiflorin A was further investigated against the HIV-1 gene expression of the R/U5 and U5/gag transcripts, and the data showed that the compound acts as a potential inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcription. Importantly, the compound displayed potent inhibitory activity against drug-resistant HIV-1 isolates of both the nucleotide analogue (AZT) and non-nucleotide analogue (nevaripine). Thus, the ANL glycosides have the potential to be developed as novel anti-HIV drugs.

  12. Amprenavir complexes with HIV-1 protease and its drug-resistant mutants altering hydrophobic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2010-10-22

    The structural and kinetic effects of amprenavir (APV), a clinical HIV protease (PR) inhibitor, were analyzed with wild-type enzyme and mutants with single substitutions of V32I, I50V, I54V, I54M, I84V and L90M that are common in drug resistance. Crystal structures of the APV complexes at resolutions of 1.02-1.85 {angstrom} reveal the structural changes due to the mutations. Substitution of the larger side chains in PR{sub V32I}, PR{sub I54M} and PR{sub L90M} resulted in the formation of new hydrophobic contacts with flap residues, residues 79 and 80, and Asp25, respectively. Mutation to smaller side chains eliminated hydrophobic interactions in the PR{sub I50V} and PR{sub I54V} structures. The PR{sub I84V}-APV complex had lost hydrophobic contacts with APV, the PR{sub V32I}-APV complex showed increased hydrophobic contacts within the hydrophobic cluster and the PR{sub I50V} complex had weaker polar and hydrophobic interactions with APV. The observed structural changes in PR{sub I84V}-APV, PR{sub V32I}-APV and PR{sub I50V}-APV were related to their reduced inhibition by APV of six-, 10- and 30-fold, respectively, relative to wild-type PR. The APV complexes were compared with the corresponding saquinavir complexes. The PR dimers had distinct rearrangements of the flaps and 80's loops that adapt to the different P1{prime} groups of the inhibitors, while maintaining contacts within the hydrophobic cluster. These small changes in the loops and weak internal interactions produce the different patterns of resistant mutations for the two drugs.

  13. Discovery of Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitors of LIM Domain Kinase for Inhibiting HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Fei; Guo, Jia; Dabbagh, Deemah; Spear, Mark; He, Sijia; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Fontenot, Jacque; Yin, Yan; Bibian, Mathieu; Park, Chul Min; Zheng, Ke; Park, Ha Jeung; Soloveva, Veronica; Gharaibeh, Dima; Retterer, Cary; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Pitt, Margaret L.; Naughton, John; Jiang, Yongjun; Shang, Hong; Hakami, Ramin M.; Ling, Binhua; Young, John A. T.; Bavari, Sina; Xu, Xuehua

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A dynamic actin cytoskeleton is necessary for viral entry, intracellular migration, and virion release. For HIV-1 infection, during entry, the virus triggers early actin activity by hijacking chemokine coreceptor signaling, which activates a host dependency factor, cofilin, and its kinase, the LIM domain kinase (LIMK). Although knockdown of human LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1) with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) inhibits HIV infection, no specific small-molecule inhibitor of LIMK has been available. Here, we describe the design and discovery of novel classes of small-molecule inhibitors of LIMK for inhibiting HIV infection. We identified R10015 as a lead compound that blocks LIMK activity by binding to the ATP-binding pocket. R10015 specifically blocks viral DNA synthesis, nuclear migration, and virion release. In addition, R10015 inhibits multiple viruses, including Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV), Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), suggesting that LIMK inhibitors could be developed as a new class of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs. IMPORTANCE The actin cytoskeleton is a structure that gives the cell shape and the ability to migrate. Viruses frequently rely on actin dynamics for entry and intracellular migration. In cells, actin dynamics are regulated by kinases, such as the LIM domain kinase (LIMK), which regulates actin activity through phosphorylation of cofilin, an actin-depolymerizing factor. Recent studies have found that LIMK/cofilin are targeted by viruses such as HIV-1 for propelling viral intracellular migration. Although inhibiting LIMK1 expression blocks HIV-1 infection, no highly specific LIMK inhibitor is available. This study describes the design, medicinal synthesis, and discovery of small-molecule LIMK inhibitors for blocking HIV-1 and several other viruses and emphasizes the feasibility of developing LIMK inhibitors as broad-spectrum antiviral drugs. PMID:28381571

  14. Discovery of Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitors of LIM Domain Kinase for Inhibiting HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fei; Guo, Jia; Dabbagh, Deemah; Spear, Mark; He, Sijia; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Fontenot, Jacque; Yin, Yan; Bibian, Mathieu; Park, Chul Min; Zheng, Ke; Park, Ha Jeung; Soloveva, Veronica; Gharaibeh, Dima; Retterer, Cary; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Pitt, Margaret L; Naughton, John; Jiang, Yongjun; Shang, Hong; Hakami, Ramin M; Ling, Binhua; Young, John A T; Bavari, Sina; Xu, Xuehua; Feng, Yangbo; Wu, Yuntao

    2017-07-01

    A dynamic actin cytoskeleton is necessary for viral entry, intracellular migration, and virion release. For HIV-1 infection, during entry, the virus triggers early actin activity by hijacking chemokine coreceptor signaling, which activates a host dependency factor, cofilin, and its kinase, the LIM domain kinase (LIMK). Although knockdown of human LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1) with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) inhibits HIV infection, no specific small-molecule inhibitor of LIMK has been available. Here, we describe the design and discovery of novel classes of small-molecule inhibitors of LIMK for inhibiting HIV infection. We identified R10015 as a lead compound that blocks LIMK activity by binding to the ATP-binding pocket. R10015 specifically blocks viral DNA synthesis, nuclear migration, and virion release. In addition, R10015 inhibits multiple viruses, including Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV), Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), suggesting that LIMK inhibitors could be developed as a new class of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs.IMPORTANCE The actin cytoskeleton is a structure that gives the cell shape and the ability to migrate. Viruses frequently rely on actin dynamics for entry and intracellular migration. In cells, actin dynamics are regulated by kinases, such as the LIM domain kinase (LIMK), which regulates actin activity through phosphorylation of cofilin, an actin-depolymerizing factor. Recent studies have found that LIMK/cofilin are targeted by viruses such as HIV-1 for propelling viral intracellular migration. Although inhibiting LIMK1 expression blocks HIV-1 infection, no highly specific LIMK inhibitor is available. This study describes the design, medicinal synthesis, and discovery of small-molecule LIMK inhibitors for blocking HIV-1 and several other viruses and emphasizes the feasibility of developing LIMK inhibitors as broad-spectrum antiviral drugs. Copyright © 2017 Yi et al.

  15. Extracts from Acacia catechu suppress HIV-1 replication by inhibiting the activities of the viral protease and Tat

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acacia catechu (Mimosa family) stem bark extracts have been used traditionally as a dietary supplement as well as a folk medicine given its reported anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, hepatoprotective, antioxidant, anti-microbial and anti-tumor activities. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the anti-HIV-1 activity of the extracts from stem bark of A. catechu. Methods The aqueous and 50% ethanolic extracts of A. catechu stem bark were prepared and 50% ethanolic extract was further fractioned by successively partitioning with petroleum ether, chloroform and n-butanol. All the extracts and fractions were evaluated for cytotoxicity and anti-HIV-1 activity using different in vitro assays. The active n-butanol fraction was evaluated for its inhibition against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, integrase, protease, pro-viral genome integration and viral Tat protein mediated transactivation. The effect of n-butanol fraction on the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion in Vk2/E6E7 cells and transepithelial resistance in Caco-2 and HEC-1A cells was investigated. Results The aqueous and 50% ethanolic extracts of A. catechu showed IC50 values of 1.8 ± 0.18 μg/ml and 3.6 ± 0.31 μg/ml, respectively in cell-free virus based assay using TZM-bl cells and HIV-1NL4.3 (X-4 tropic). In the above assay, n-butanol fraction exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity with an IC50 of 1.7 ± 0.12 μg/ml. The n-butanol fraction showed a dose-dependent inhibition against HIV-1NL4.3 infection of the peripheral blood lymphocytes and against HIV-1BaL(R-5-tropic) as well as two different primary viral isolates of HIV-1 infection of TZM-bl cells. The n-butanol fraction demonstrates a potent inhibitory activity against the viral protease (IC50 = 12.9 μg/ml), but not reverse transcriptase or integrase. Further, in Alu-PCR no effect on viral integration was observed. The n-butanol fraction interfered with the Tat-mediated Long Terminal Repeat transactivation in

  16. Lipid metabolism and lipodystrophy in HIV-1-infected patients: the role played by nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sension, Michael; Deckx, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Dyslipidemia and lipodystrophy represent significant healthcare concerns in HIV-infected patients due to their association with diabetes mellitus and increased cardiovascular disease risk. Since the lipid effects of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are not well characterized, we systematically summarized the effects of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor treatment on dyslipidemia and lipodystrophy in HIV-1 infection. As with other classes of antiretroviral agents, the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are associated with lipid changes, although individual agents exhibit differing effects on lipid profiles. Comparative trials have shown that the risk for hypertriglyceridemia is lower with efavirenz than with the use of ritonavir-boosted lopinavir, but there is a greater likelihood of hypercholesterolemia compared to ritonavir-boosted atazanavir. Data also suggest that efavirenz results in greater increases in plasma lipid levels than integrase inhibitors and CC-chemokine-receptor-5 antagonists. Lipid disturbances are less frequent with the newer nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors than with efavirenz. However, in most cases, no change in the total:high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ratio was seen between the efavirenz and comparator groups. Switching from efavirenz to etravirine or rilpivirine, or the integrase inhibitors raltegravir or elvitegravir, resulted in significant reductions in lipid levels. There appears to be minimal potential for efavirenz or rilpivirine to result in development of lipodystrophy. Overall, nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors have a smaller impact on plasma lipids than ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors, with the newer agents exhibiting more favorable lipid profiles than efavirenz. When considering antiretroviral regimens, awareness of the different lipid effect profiles of the third agent is important, without forgetting the critical contribution of the background

  17. Design, synthesis and activity evaluation of novel peptide fusion inhibitors targeting HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianjun; Su, Min; Zeng, Yi; Wang, Cunxin

    2016-01-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the pathogen of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), causes about 2 million people to death every year. Fusion inhibitors targeted the envelope protein (gp41) represent a novel and alternative approach for anti-AIDS therapy, which terminates the HIV-1 life cycle at an early stage. Using CP621-652 as a template, a series of peptides were designed, synthesized and evaluated in vitro assays. An interesting phenomenon was found that the substitution of hydrophobic residues at solvent accessible sites could increase the anti-HIV activity when the C-terminal sequence was extended with an enough numbers of amino acids. After the active peptides was synthesized and evaluated, peptide 8 showed the best anti-HIV-1 IIIB whole cell activity (MAGI IC50=53.02 nM). Further study indicated that peptide 8 bound with the gp41 NHR helix, and then blocked the conformation of 6-helix, thus inhibited virus-cell membrane fusion. The results would be helpful for the design of peptide fusion inhibitors against HIV-1 infection.

  18. Computational and synthetic approaches for developing Lavendustin B derivatives as allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase

    PubMed Central

    Agharbaoui, Fatima E.; Hoyte, Ashley C.; Ferro, Stefania; Gitto, Rosaria; Buemi, Maria Rosa; Fuchs, James R.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; De Luca, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Through structure-based virtual screening and subsequent activity assays of selected natural products, Lavendustin B was previously identified as an inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase (IN) interaction with its cognate cellular cofactor, lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75). In order to improve the inhibitory potency we have employed in silico-based approaches. Particularly, a series of new analogues was designed and docked into the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket of HIV-1 IN. To identify promising leads we used the Molecular Mechanics energies combined with the Generalized Born and Surface Area continuum solvation (MM-GBSA) method, molecular dynamics simulations and analysis of hydrogen bond occupancies. On the basis of these studies, six analogues of Lavendustine B, containing the benzylamino-hydroxybenzoic scaffold, were selected for synthesis and structure activity-relationship (SAR) studies. Our results demonstrated a good correlation between computational and experimental data, and all six analogues displayed an improved potency for inhibiting IN binding to LEDGF/p75 in vitro to respect to the parent compound Lavendustin B. Additionally, these analogs show to inhibit weakly LEDGF/p75-independent IN catalytic activity suggesting a multimodal allosteric mechanism of action. Nevertheless, for the synthesized compounds similar profiles for HIV-1 inhibition and cytoxicity were highlighted. Taken together, our studies elucidated the mode of action of Lavendustin B analogs and provided a path for their further development as a new promising class of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. PMID:27517812

  19. Computational and synthetic approaches for developing Lavendustin B derivatives as allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Agharbaoui, Fatima E; Hoyte, Ashley C; Ferro, Stefania; Gitto, Rosaria; Buemi, Maria Rosa; Fuchs, James R; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; De Luca, Laura

    2016-11-10

    Through structure-based virtual screening and subsequent activity assays of selected natural products, Lavendustin B was previously identified as an inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase (IN) interaction with its cognate cellular cofactor, lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75). In order to improve the inhibitory potency we have employed in silico-based approaches. Particularly, a series of new analogues was designed and docked into the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket of HIV-1 IN. To identify promising leads we used the Molecular Mechanics energies combined with the Generalized Born and Surface Area continuum solvation (MM-GBSA) method, molecular dynamics simulations and analysis of hydrogen bond occupancies. On the basis of these studies, six analogues of Lavendustine B, containing the benzylamino-hydroxybenzoic scaffold, were selected for synthesis and structure activity-relationship (SAR) studies. Our results demonstrated a good correlation between computational and experimental data, and all six analogues displayed an improved potency for inhibiting IN binding to LEDGF/p75 in vitro to respect to the parent compound Lavendustin B. Additionally, these analogs show to inhibit weakly LEDGF/p75-independent IN catalytic activity suggesting a multimodal allosteric mechanism of action. Nevertheless, for the synthesized compounds similar profiles for HIV-1 inhibition and cytoxicity were highlighted. Taken together, our studies elucidated the mode of action of Lavendustin B analogs and provided a path for their further development as a new promising class of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

  20. Structure-activity relationship studies on a novel family of specific HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bonache, María-Cruz; Chamorro, Cristina; Lobatón, Esther; De Clercq, Erik; Balzarini, Jan; Velázquez, Sonsoles; Camarasa, María-José; San-Félix, Ana

    2003-09-01

    We have previously reported the discovery and preliminary structure-activity relationships of a new class of specific HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors whose prototype compound is the 1-[2',5'-bis-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-beta-D-ribofuranosyl]-3-N-[(carboxy) methyl]-thymine. In an attempt to increase the inhibitory efficacy against HIV-1 RT of this new class of nucleosides, and to further explore the structural features required for anti-HIV-1 activity, different types of modifications have been carried out on the prototype compound. These include substitution of the tert-butyldimethylsilyl groups by other liphophilic groups, replacement of the carboxy group at the N-3 position of the nucleobase by other functional groups, change in the length of the spacer between the thymine and the carboxylic acid residue and substitution of the thymine moiety by other pyrimidine (uracil, 5-ethyluracil) or purine (hypoxanthine) nucleobases. In addition, the most salient structural features of this new class of HIV-1-specific nucleosides have been incorporated into classical HIV RT nucleoside inhibitors such as ddl, AZT, d4T. Our studies demonstrate that both the carboxymethyl moiety at the nucleobase and tert-butyldimethylsilyl groups at the sugar are important structural components since deletion of either of them is detrimental to the antiviral activity.

  1. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors: potential use and safety considerations in HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Coiras, Mayte; Ambrosioni, Juan; Cervantes, Francisco; Miró, José M; Alcamí, José

    2017-05-01

    Infection caused by HIV-1 is nowadays a chronic disease due to a highly efficient antiretroviral treatment that is nevertheless, unable to eliminate the virus from the organism. New strategies are necessary in order to impede the formation of the viral reservoirs, responsible for the failure of the antiretroviral treatment to cure the infection. Areas covered: The purpose of this review is to discuss the possibility of using tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. These inhibitors are successfully used in patients with distinct cancers such as chronic myeloid leukemia. The most relevant papers have been selected and commented. Expert opinion: The family of TKIs are directed against the activation of tyrosine kinases from the Src family. Some of these kinases are essential for the activation of CD4 + T cells, the major target of HIV-1. During acute or primary infection the CD4 + T cells are massively activated, which is mostly responsible for the generation of the reservoirs, the spread of the infection and the destruction of activated CD4 + T cells, infected or not. Consequently, we discuss the possibility of using TKIs as adjuvant of the antiretroviral treatment against HIV-1 infection mostly, but not exclusively, during the acute/recent phase.

  2. Gyrase B Inhibitor Impairs HIV-1 Replication by Targeting Hsp90 and the Capsid Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Vozzolo, Luciano; Loh, Belinda; Gane, Paul J.; Tribak, Maryame; Zhou, Lihong; Anderson, Ian; Nyakatura, Elisabeth; Jenner, Richard G.; Selwood, David; Fassati, Ariberto

    2010-01-01

    Chemical genetics is an emerging approach to investigate the biology of host-pathogen interactions. We screened several inhibitors of ATP-dependent DNA motors and detected the gyrase B inhibitor coumermycin A1 (C-A1) as a potent antiretroviral. C-A1 inhibited HIV-1 integration and gene expression from acutely infected cell, but the two activities mapped to distinct targets. Target discovery identified Hsp90 as the C-A1 target affecting viral gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that Hsp90 associates with the viral promoter and may directly regulate gene expression. Molecular docking suggested that C-A1 binds to two novel pockets at the C terminal domain of Hsp90. C-A1 inhibited Hsp90 dimer formation, suggesting that it impairs viral gene expression by preventing Hsp90 dimerization at the C terminus. The inhibition of HIV-1 integration imposed by C-A1 was independent of Hsp90 and mapped to the capsid protein, and a point mutation at residue 105 made the virus resistant to this block. HIV-1 susceptibility to the integration block mediated by C-A1 was influenced by cyclophilin A. Our chemical genetic approach revealed an unexpected function of capsid in HIV-1 integration and provided evidence for a role of Hsp90 in regulating gene expression in mammalian cells. Both activities were amenable to inhibition by small molecules and represent novel antiretroviral drug targets. PMID:20937817

  3. Structural investigation of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: 2-Aryl-substituted benzimidazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2009-11-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is one of the most destructive epidemics in history. Inhibitors of HIV enzymes are the main targets to develop drugs against that disease. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of HIV-1 (NNRTIs) are potentially effective and nontoxic. Structural studies provide information necessary to design more active compounds. The crystal structures of four NNRTI derivatives of 2-aryl-substituted N-benzyl-benzimidazole are presented here. Analysis of the geometrical parameters shows that the structures of the investigated inhibitors are rigid. The important geometrical parameter is the dihedral angle between the planes of the π-electron systems of the benzymidazole and benzyl moieties. The values of these dihedral angles are in a narrow range for all investigated inhibitors. There is no significant difference between the structure of the free inhibitor and the inhibitor in the complex with RT HIV-1. X-ray structures of the investigated inhibitors are a good basis for modeling enzyme-inhibitor interactions in rational drug design.

  4. Impact of HIV-1 Subtype and Antiretroviral Therapy on Protease and Reverse Transcriptase Genotype: Results of a Global Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Rami; Katzenstein, David A; Efron, Brad; Carvalho, Ana Patricia; Wynhoven, Brian; Cane, Patricia; Clarke, John; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Soares, Marcelo A; Snoeck, Joke; Pillay, Candice; Rudich, Hagit; Rodrigues, Rosangela; Holguin, Africa; Ariyoshi, Koya; Bouzas, Maria Belen; Cahn, Pedro; Sugiura, Wataru; Soriano, Vincent; Brigido, Luis F; Grossman, Zehava; Morris, Lynn; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Tanuri, Amilcar; Phanuphak, Praphan; Weber, Jonathan N; Pillay, Deenan; Harrigan, P. Richard; Camacho, Ricardo; Schapiro, Jonathan M; Shafer, Robert W

    2005-01-01

    Background The genetic differences among HIV-1 subtypes may be critical to clinical management and drug resistance surveillance as antiretroviral treatment is expanded to regions of the world where diverse non-subtype-B viruses predominate. Methods and Findings To assess the impact of HIV-1 subtype and antiretroviral treatment on the distribution of mutations in protease and reverse transcriptase, a binomial response model using subtype and treatment as explanatory variables was used to analyze a large compiled dataset of non-subtype-B HIV-1 sequences. Non-subtype-B sequences from 3,686 persons with well characterized antiretroviral treatment histories were analyzed in comparison to subtype B sequences from 4,769 persons. The non-subtype-B sequences included 461 with subtype A, 1,185 with C, 331 with D, 245 with F, 293 with G, 513 with CRF01_AE, and 618 with CRF02_AG. Each of the 55 known subtype B drug-resistance mutations occurred in at least one non-B isolate, and 44 (80%) of these mutations were significantly associated with antiretroviral treatment in at least one non-B subtype. Conversely, of 67 mutations found to be associated with antiretroviral therapy in at least one non-B subtype, 61 were also associated with antiretroviral therapy in subtype B isolates. Conclusion Global surveillance and genotypic assessment of drug resistance should focus primarily on the known subtype B drug-resistance mutations. PMID:15839752

  5. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  6. HIV-1 Protease Function and Structure Studies with the Simplicial Neighborhood Analysis of Protein Packing (SNAPP) Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuxing; Kaplan, Andrew H.; Tropsha, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The Simplicial Neighborhood Analysis of Protein Packing (SNAPP) method was used to predict the effect of mutagenesis on the enzymatic activity of the HIV-1 protease (HIVP). SNAPP relies on a four-body statistical scoring function derived from the analysis of spatially nearest neighbor residue compositional preferences in a diverse and representative subset of protein structures from the Protein Data Bank. The method was applied to the analysis of HIVP mutants with residue substitutions in the hydrophobic core as well as at the interface between the two protease monomers. Both wild type and tethered structures were employed in the calculations. We obtained a strong correlation, with R2 as high as 0.96, between ΔSNAPP score (i.e., the difference in SNAPP scores between wild type and mutant proteins) and the protease catalytic activity for tethered structures. A weaker but significant correlation was also obtained for non-tethered structures as well. Our analysis identified residues both in the hydrophobic core and at the dimeric interface (DI) that are very important for the protease function. This study demonstrates a potential utility of the SNAPP method for rational design of mutagenesis studies and protein engineering. PMID:18498108

  7. Structural Basis of Potent and Broad HIV-1 Fusion Inhibitor CP32M*

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xue; Chong, Huihui; Zhang, Chao; Qiu, Zonglin; Qin, Bo; Han, Ruiyun; Waltersperger, Sandro; Wang, Meitian; He, Yuxian; Cui, Sheng

    2012-01-01

    CP32M is a newly designed peptide fusion inhibitor possessing potent anti-HIV activity, especially against T20-resistant HIV-1 strains. In this study, we show that CP32M can efficiently inhibit a large panel of diverse HIV-1 variants, including subtype B′, CRF07_BC, and CRF01_AE recombinants and naturally occurring or induced T20-resistant viruses. To elucidate its mechanism of action, we determined the crystal structure of CP32M complexed with its target sequence. Differing from its parental peptide, CP621-652, the 621VEWNEMT627 motif of CP32M folds into two α-helix turns at the N terminus of the pocket-binding domain, forming a novel layer in the six-helix bundle structure. Prominently, the residue Asn-624 of the 621VEWNEMT627 motif is engaged in the polar interaction with a hydrophilic ridge that borders the hydrophobic pocket on the N-terminal coiled coil. The original inhibitor design of CP32M provides several intra- and salt bridge/hydrogen bond interactions favoring the stability of the helical conformation of CP32M and its interactions with N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) targets. We identified a novel salt bridge between Arg-557 on the NHR and Glu-648 of CP32M that is critical for the binding of CP32M and resistance against the inhibitor. Therefore, our data present important information for developing novel HIV-1 fusion inhibitors for clinical use. PMID:22679024

  8. Molecular dynamics study of carbon nanotube as a potential dual-functional inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhishun; Wang, Bingqiang; Wan, Bo; Yu, Long; Huang, Qiang

    2013-07-12

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) plays an important role in integrating viral DNA into human genome, which has been considered as the drug target for anti-AIDS therapy. The appearance of drug-resistance mutants urgently requires novel inhibitors that act on non-active site of HIV-1 IN. Nanoparticles have such unique geometrical and chemical properties, which inspires us that nanoparticles like nanotubes may serve as better HIV-1 IN inhibitors than the conventional inhibitors. To test this hypothesis, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to study the binding of a carbon nanotube (CNT) to a full-length HIV-1 IN. The results showed that the CNT could stably bind to the C-terminal domain (CTD) of HIV-1 IN. The CNT also induced a domain-shift which disrupted the binding channel for viral DNA. Further MD simulation showed that a HIV-1 IN inhibitor, 5ClTEP was successfully sealed inside the uncapped CNT. These results indicate that the CNT may serve as a potential dual-functional HIV-1 IN inhibitor, not only inducing conformation change as an allosteric inhibitor but also carrying small-molecular inhibitors as a drug delivery system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Crystal structures of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase complexes with thiocarbamate non-nucleoside inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Spallarossa, Andrea; Cesarini, Sara; Ranise, Angelo; Ponassi, Marco; Unge, Torsten; Bolognesi, Martino

    2008-01-25

    O-Phthalimidoethyl-N-arylthiocarbamates (TCs) have been recently identified as a new class of potent HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs), by means of computer-aided drug design techniques [Ranise A. Spallarossa, S. Cesarini, F. Bondavalli, S. Schenone, O. Bruno, G. Menozzi, P. Fossa, L. Mosti, M. La Colla, et al., Structure-based design, parallel synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and molecular modeling studies of thiocarbamates, new potent non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor isosteres of phenethylthiazolylthiourea derivatives, J. Med. Chem. 48 (2005) 3858-3873]. To elucidate the atomic details of RT/TC interaction and validate an earlier TC docking model, the structures of three RT/TC complexes were determined at 2.8-3.0A resolution by X-ray crystallography. The conformations adopted by the enzyme-bound TCs were analyzed and compared with those of bioisosterically related NNRTIs.

  10. Crystal structures of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase complexes with thiocarbamate non-nucleoside inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Spallarossa, Andrea Cesarini, Sara; Ranise, Angelo; Ponassi, Marco; Unge, Torsten; Bolognesi, Martino

    2008-01-25

    O-Phthalimidoethyl-N-arylthiocarbamates (TCs) have been recently identified as a new class of potent HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs), by means of computer-aided drug design techniques [Ranise A. Spallarossa, S. Cesarini, F. Bondavalli, S. Schenone, O. Bruno, G. Menozzi, P. Fossa, L. Mosti, M. La Colla, et al., Structure-based design, parallel synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and molecular modeling studies of thiocarbamates, new potent non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor isosteres of phenethylthiazolylthiourea derivatives, J. Med. Chem. 48 (2005) 3858-3873]. To elucidate the atomic details of RT/TC interaction and validate an earlier TC docking model, the structures of three RT/TC complexes were determined at 2.8-3.0 A resolution by X-ray crystallography. The conformations adopted by the enzyme-bound TCs were analyzed and compared with those of bioisosterically related NNRTIs.

  11. The current status and challenges in the development of fusion inhibitors as therapeutics for HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jian Jun; Ma, Xue Ting; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Xiao Yi; Wang, Cun Xin

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 membrane fusion as a part of the process of viral entry in the target cells is facilitated by gp41 and gp120, which are encoded by Env gene of HIV-1. Based on the structure and the mechanism researches, new treatment options targeting HIV-1 entry process have been proposed. Enfuvirtide, which mimics amino acid sequences of viral envelope glycoprotein gp41, is the first HIV-1 fusion inhibitor approved by FDA. Although it fulfills vital functions by binding to gp41 and abolishing the membrane fusion reaction when used in combination, it could induce drug resistant virus variants. Currently, a number of design and modification schemes have been presented, a large number of prospective fusion peptides have emerged. For these fusion inhibitors, multiple mutations in gp41 have been associated with the loss of susceptibility to agents. This review reported the current developments and innovative designs of HIV-1 membrane fusion inhibitors.

  12. Multi-drug resistance profile of PR20 HIV-1 protease is attributed to distorted conformational and drug binding landscape: molecular dynamics insights.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Sarentha; Bhakat, Soumendranath; Martin, Alberto J M; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2016-01-01

    The PR20 HIV-1 protease, a variant with 20 mutations, exhibits high levels of multi-drug resistance; however, to date, there has been no report detailing the impact of these 20 mutations on the conformational and drug binding landscape at a molecular level. In this report, we demonstrate the first account of a comprehensive study designed to elaborate on the impact of these mutations on the dynamic features as well as drug binding and resistance profile, using extensive molecular dynamics analyses. Comparative MD simulations for the wild-type and PR20 HIV proteases, starting from bound and unbound conformations in each case, were performed. Results showed that the apo conformation of the PR20 variant of the HIV protease displayed a tendency to remain in the open conformation for a longer period of time when compared to the wild type. This led to a phenomena in which the inhibitor seated at the active site of PR20 tends to diffuse away from the binding site leading to a significant change in inhibitor-protein association. Calculating the per-residue fluctuation (RMSF) and radius of gyration, further validated these findings. MM/GBSA showed that the occurrence of 20 mutations led to a drop in the calculated binding free energies (ΔGbind) by ~25.17 kcal/mol and ~5 kcal/mol for p2-NC, a natural peptide substrate, and darunavir, respectively, when compared to wild type. Furthermore, the residue interaction network showed a diminished inter-residue hydrogen bond network and changes in inter-residue connections as a result of these mutations. The increased conformational flexibility in PR20 as a result of loss of intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bond interactions and other prominent binding forces led to a loss of protease grip on ligand. It is interesting to note that the difference in conformational flexibility between PR20 and WT conformations was much higher in the case of substrate-bound conformation as compared to DRV. Thus, developing analogues of DRV by

  13. Intermolecular interactions in the crystal structures of potential HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Majerz-Maniecka, Katarzyna; Musiol, Robert; Nitek, Wojciech; Oleksyn, Barbara J; Mouscadet, Jean-Francois; Le Bret, Marc; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2006-02-15

    2-[(2,5-dichloro-4-nitro-phenylamino)-methoxy-methyl]-8-hydroxy-quinoline 1 and 2-methyl-quinoline-5,8-dione-5-oxime 2 were obtained as potential HIV-1 integrase inhibitors and analyzed by X-ray crystallography. Semiempirical theoretical calculations of energy preferred conformations were also carried out. The crystal structures of both compounds are stabilized via hydrogen bonds and pi-pi stacking interactions. The planarity of compound 1 is caused by intramolecular hydrogen bonds.

  14. Possible allosteric interactions of monoindazole-substituted P2 cyclic urea analogues with wild-type and mutant HIV-1 protease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Rajni; Bhhatarai, Barun

    2008-10-01

    Our ongoing efforts to understand the difference in the binding pattern of HIV-1 protease inhibitor (HIVPI) with the wild-type and mutant HIV-1 protease (HIVPR) and to provide mechanistic insight are continued further. We report here the results of a recent quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study on monoindazole-substituted P2 analogues of cyclic urea HIVPIs. The QSAR models revealed an inverted parabolic relationship between biological activity and calculated molar refractivity (CMR). That is, biological activity first decreases with increase in CMR and at a certain minimum point (inversion point) it suddenly changes and increases with further increase in CMR. CMR is a measure of volume-dependent-polarizability and is an indication of the polar interactions between ligand and receptor. The results seem to be best rationalized by larger molecules inducing a change in a receptor unit that allows for a new mode of interaction. Similar QSAR models were also observed for the biological activity of these molecules tested against a panel of mutant viruses including mutant strains with single amino acid substitution (I84V), double amino acid substitutions (I84V/V82F), and multiple amino acid changes corresponding to mutations observed in clinical isolates of patients treated with Ritonavir®. Interestingly the inversion points for these mutant strains were found larger than for wild-type. The subtle but significant difference in the inversion point indicates change in the shape and size of the binding pocket. Earlier QSAR studies have shown that the correlation of biological activity with an inverted parabola is an indicative of the `allosteric interaction' of the ligands with the receptor. This report presents a detail analysis of these observations.

  15. A Multifunctional Protease Inhibitor To Regulate Endolysosomal Function

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Proteases constitute a major class of drug targets. Endosomal compartments harbor several protease families whose attenuation may be beneficial to a number of biological processes, including inflammation, cancer metastasis, antigen presentation, and parasite clearance. As a step toward the goal of generalized but targeted protease inhibition in the endocytic pathway, we describe here the synthesis, characterization, and cellular application of a novel multifunctional protease inhibitor. We show that pepstatin A, a potent but virtually insoluble inhibitor of cathepsins D and E, can be conjugated to a single site on cystatin C, a potent inhibitor of the papain-like cysteine proteases (PLCP) and of asparagine endopeptidease (AEP), to create a highly soluble compound capable of suppressing the activity of all 3 principal protease families found in endosomes and lysosomes. We demonstrate that this cystatin–pepstatin inhibitor (CPI) can be taken up by cells to modulate protease activity and affect biological responses. PMID:21910425

  16. A multifunctional protease inhibitor to regulate endolysosomal function.

    PubMed

    van Kasteren, Sander I; Berlin, Ilana; Colbert, Jeff D; Keane, Doreen; Ovaa, Huib; Watts, Colin

    2011-11-18

    Proteases constitute a major class of drug targets. Endosomal compartments harbor several protease families whose attenuation may be beneficial to a number of biological processes, including inflammation, cancer metastasis, antigen presentation, and parasite clearance. As a step toward the goal of generalized but targeted protease inhibition in the endocytic pathway, we describe here the synthesis, characterization, and cellular application of a novel multifunctional protease inhibitor. We show that pepstatin A, a potent but virtually insoluble inhibitor of cathepsins D and E, can be conjugated to a single site on cystatin C, a potent inhibitor of the papain-like cysteine proteases (PLCP) and of asparagine endopeptidease (AEP), to create a highly soluble compound capable of suppressing the activity of all 3 principal protease families found in endosomes and lysosomes. We demonstrate that this cystatin-pepstatin inhibitor (CPI) can be taken up by cells to modulate protease activity and affect biological responses.

  17. Prevalence of transmitted nucleoside analogue-resistant HIV-1 strains and pre-existing mutations in pol reverse transcriptase and protease region: outcome after treatment in recently infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Balotta, C; Berlusconi, A; Pan, A; Violin, M; Riva, C; Colombo, M C; Gori, A; Papagno, L; Corvasce, S; Mazzucchelli, R; Facchi, G; Velleca, R; Saporetti, G; Galli, M; Rusconi, S; Moroni, M

    2000-03-01

    We retrospectively studied 38 Italian recently HIV-1-infected subjects who seroconverted from 1994 to 1997 to investigate: (i) the prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI)-related mutations at primary infection; (ii) the proportion of naturally occurring mutations in reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease regions of patients naive for non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) and protease inhibitors (PIs); (iii) the drug-susceptibility to NRTIs and PIs in subjects with NRTI- and/or PI-related mutations; and (iv) the outcome of seroconverters treated with various NRTIs or NRTI/PI regimens. Baseline HIV-1 plasma viraemia and absolute CD4 count at baseline could not be used to distinguish patients with NRTI- and/or PI-related pre-existing mutations from those with wild-type virus (P = 0.693 and P = 0.542, respectively). The frequency of zidovudine-related mutations was 21% in the study period. The response to treatment was not significantly different in subjects with or without genotypic zidovudine-related mutations at primary infection (P = 0.744 for HIV-1 RNA and P = 0.102 for CD4 cells). Some natural variation (2.6%) was present within regions 98-108 and 179-190 of RT involved in NNRTI resistance. The high natural polymorphism in the protease region present in our patients was similar to that reported by others. In our study some PI-associated substitutions, thought to be compensatory in protease enzymatic function, could confer intermediate to high PI-resistance. As discrepancies between genotypic and phenotypic results may exist in recent seroconverters, our data suggest that the role of transmitted NRTI- and PI-resistant variants remain to be fully elucidated in vivo.

  18. Effect of the active site D25N mutation on the structure, stability, and ligand binding of the mature HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Sayer, Jane M; Liu, Fengling; Ishima, Rieko; Weber, Irene T; Louis, John M

    2008-05-09

    All aspartic proteases, including retroviral proteases, share the triplet DTG critical for the active site geometry and catalytic function. These residues interact closely in the active, dimeric structure of HIV-1 protease (PR). We have systematically assessed the effect of the D25N mutation on the structure and stability of the mature PR monomer and dimer. The D25N mutation (PR(D25N)) increases the equilibrium dimer dissociation constant by a factor >100-fold (1.3 +/- 0.09 microm) relative to PR. In the absence of inhibitor, NMR studies reveal clear structural differences between PR and PR(D25N) in the relatively mobile P1 loop (residues 79-83) and flap regions, and differential scanning calorimetric analyses show that the mutation lowers the stabilities of both the monomer and dimer folds by 5 and 7.3 degrees C, respectively. Only minimal differences are observed in high resolution crystal structures of PR(D25N) complexed to darunavir (DRV), a potent clinical inhibitor, or a non-hydrolyzable substrate analogue, Ac-Thr-Ile-Nle-r-Nle-Gln-Arg-NH(2) (RPB), as compared with PR.DRV and PR.RPB complexes. Although complexation with RPB stabilizes both dimers, the effect on their T(m) is smaller for PR(D25N) (6.2 degrees C) than for PR (8.7 degrees C). The T(m) of PR(D25N).DRV increases by only 3 degrees C relative to free PR(D25N), as compared with a 22 degrees C increase for PR.DRV, and the mutation increases the ligand dissociation constant of PR(D25N).DRV by a factor of approximately 10(6) relative to PR.DRV. These results suggest that interactions mediated by the catalytic Asp residues make a major contribution to the tight binding of DRV to PR.

  19. Effect of the Active Site D25N Mutation on the Structure, Stability, and Ligand Binding of the Mature HIV-1 Protease*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sayer, Jane M.; Liu, Fengling; Ishima, Rieko; Weber, Irene T.; Louis, John M.

    2008-01-01

    All aspartic proteases, including retroviral proteases, share the triplet DTG critical for the active site geometry and catalytic function. These residues interact closely in the active, dimeric structure of HIV-1 protease (PR). We have systematically assessed the effect of the D25N mutation on the structure and stability of the mature PR monomer and dimer. The D25N mutation (PRD25N) increases the equilibrium dimer dissociation constant by a factor >100-fold (1.3 ± 0.09 μm) relative to PR. In the absence of inhibitor, NMR studies reveal clear structural differences between PR and PRD25N in the relatively mobile P1 loop (residues 79-83) and flap regions, and differential scanning calorimetric analyses show that the mutation lowers the stabilities of both the monomer and dimer folds by 5 and 7.3 °C, respectively. Only minimal differences are observed in high resolution crystal structures of PRD25N complexed to darunavir (DRV), a potent clinical inhibitor, or a non-hydrolyzable substrate analogue, Ac-Thr-Ile-Nle-r-Nle-Gln-Arg-NH2 (RPB), as compared with PR·DRV and PR·RPB complexes. Although complexation with RPB stabilizes both dimers, the effect on their Tm is smaller for PRD25N (6.2 °C) than for PR (8.7 °C). The Tm of PRD25N·DRV increases by only 3 °C relative to free PRD25N, as compared with a 22 °C increase for PR·DRV, and the mutation increases the ligand dissociation constant of PRD25N·DRV by a factor of ∼106 relative to PR·DRV. These results suggest that interactions mediated by the catalytic Asp residues make a major contribution to the tight binding of DRV to PR. PMID:18281688

  20. Enhanced antibody-mediated neutralization of HIV-1 variants that are resistant to fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Alam, Muntasir; Kuwata, Takeo; Shimura, Kazuya; Yokoyama, Masaru; Ramirez Valdez, Kristel Paola; Tanaka, Kazuki; Maruta, Yasuhiro; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka; Sato, Hironori; Matsuoka, Masao; Matsushita, Shuzo

    2016-09-27

    HIV-1 typically develops resistance to any single antiretroviral agent. Combined anti-retroviral therapy to reduce drug-resistance development is necessary to control HIV-1 infection. Here, to assess the utility of a combination of antibody and fusion inhibitor treatments, we investigated the potency of monoclonal antibodies at neutralizing HIV-1 variants that are resistant to fusion inhibitors. Mutations that confer resistance to four fusion inhibitors, enfuvirtide, C34, SC34, and SC34EK, were introduced into the envelope of HIV-1JR-FL, a CCR5-tropic tier 2 strain. Pseudoviruses with these mutations were prepared and used for the assessment of neutralization sensitivity to an array of antibodies. The resulting neutralization data indicate that the potencies of some antibodies, especially of those against the CD4 binding site, V3 loop, and membrane-proximal external region epitopes, were increased by the mutations in gp41 that conferred resistance to the fusion inhibitors. C34-, SC34-, and SC34EK-resistant mutants showed more sensitivity to monoclonal antibodies than enfuvirtide-resistant mutants. An analysis of C34-resistant mutations revealed that the I37K mutation in gp41 HR1 is a key mutation for C34 resistance, low infectivity, neutralization sensitivity, epitope exposure, and slow fusion kinetics. The N126K mutation in the gp41 HR2 domain contributed to C34 resistance and neutralization sensitivity to anti-CD4 binding site antibodies. In the absence of L204I, the effect of N126K was antagonistic to that of I37K. The results of a molecular dynamic simulation of the envelope trimer confirmation suggest that an I37K mutation induces the augmentation of structural fluctuations prominently in the interface between gp41 and gp120. Our observations indicate that the "conformational unmasking" of envelope glycoprotein by an I37K mutation is one of the mechanisms of neutralization sensitivity enhancement. Furthermore, the enhanced neutralization of C34-resistant

  1. A pièce de resistance: how HIV-1 escapes small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Moore, John P.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Small molecule inhibitors targeting the CCR5 coreceptor represent a new class of drugs for treating HIV-1 infection. Maraviroc has received regulatory approvals, and vicriviroc is in phase 3 trials. Understanding how resistance to these drugs develops and is diagnosed is essential to guide clinical practice. We review what has been learned from in vitro resistance studies, and how this relates to what is being seen, or can be anticipated, in clinical studies. Recent findings The principal resistance pathway in vitro involves continued use of CCR5 in an inhibitor-insensitive manner; the resistant viruses recognize the inhibitor-CCR5 complex, as well as free CCR5. Switching to use the CXCR4 coreceptor is rare. The principal genetic pathway involves accumulating 2–4 sequence changes in the gp120 V3 region, but a non-V3 pathway is also known. The limited information available from clinical studies suggests that a similar escape process is followed in vivo. However, the most common change associated with virologic failure involves expansion of pre-existing, CXCR4-using viruses that are insensitive to CCR5 inhibitors. Summary HIV-1 escapes small molecule CCR5 inhibitors by continuing to use CCR5 in an inhibitor-insensitive manner, or evades them by expanding naturally insensitive, CXCR4-using variants. PMID:19339950

  2. Diarylaniline Derivatives as a Distinct Class of HIV-1 Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Bingjie; Jiang, Xingkai; Lu, Hong; Tian, Xingtao; Barbault, Florent; Huang, Li; Qian, Keduo; Chen, Chin-Ho; Huang, Rong; Jiang, Shibo; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Xie, Lan

    2010-01-01

    By using structure-based drug design and isosteric replacement, diarylaniline and 1,5-diarylbenzene-1,2-diamine derivatives were synthesized and evaluated against wild type HIV-1 and drug-resistant viral strains, resulting in the discovery of diarylaniline derivatives as a distinct class of next-generation HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) agents. The most promising compound 37 showed significant EC50 values of 0.003-0.032 μM against HIV-1 wild-type strains and of 0.005-0.604 μM against several drug-resistant strains. Current results also revealed important structure-activity relationship (SAR) conclusions for diarylanilines and strongly support our hypothesis that an NH2 group on the central benzene ring ortho to the aniline moiety is crucial for interaction with K101 of the NNRTI binding site in HIV-1 RT, likely by forming H-bonds with K101. Furthermore, molecular modeling studies with molecular mechanism/general born surface area (MM/GBSA) technology demonstrated the rationality of our hypothesis. PMID:20527972

  3. Screening of HIV-1 Protease Using a Combination of an Ultra-High-Throughput Fluorescent-Based Assay and RapidFire Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Meng, Juncai; Lai, Ming-Tain; Munshi, Vandna; Grobler, Jay; McCauley, John; Zuck, Paul; Johnson, Eric N; Uebele, Victor N; Hermes, Jeffrey D; Adam, Gregory C

    2015-06-01

    HIV-1 protease (PR) represents one of the primary targets for developing antiviral agents for the treatment of HIV-infected patients. To identify novel PR inhibitors, a label-free, high-throughput mass spectrometry (HTMS) assay was developed using the RapidFire platform and applied as an orthogonal assay to confirm hits identified in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based primary screen of > 1 million compounds. For substrate selection, a panel of peptide substrates derived from natural processing sites for PR was evaluated on the RapidFire platform. As a result, KVSLNFPIL, a new substrate measured to have a ~ 20- and 60-fold improvement in k cat/K m over the frequently used sequences SQNYPIVQ and SQNYPIV, respectively, was identified for the HTMS screen. About 17% of hits from the FRET-based primary screen were confirmed in the HTMS confirmatory assay including all 304 known PR inhibitors in the set, demonstrating that the HTMS assay is effective at triaging false-positives while capturing true hits. Hence, with a sampling rate of ~7 s per well, the RapidFire HTMS assay enables the high-throughput evaluation of peptide substrates and functions as an efficient tool for hits triage in the discovery of novel PR inhibitors.

  4. Structure of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors derivatives of N-benzyl-benzimidazole with different substituents in position 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2010-01-01

    The constant development of new drugs against HIV-1 is necessary due to global expansion of AIDS and HIV-1 drug resistance. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of HIV-1 (NNRTIs) are potentially effective and nontoxic drugs in AIDS therapy. The crystal structures of six nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) derivatives of N-benzyl-benzimidazole are reported here. The investigated compounds belong to the group of so called "butterfly like" inhibitors with characteristic two π-electron moieties with an angled orientation. The structural data show the influence of the substituents of the benzimidazole ring on the geometry of the molecule and correlation between the structure of the inhibitor and its biological activity.

  5. Gene expression and activity of digestive proteases in Daphnia: effects of cyanobacterial protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The frequency of cyanobacterial blooms has increased worldwide, and these blooms have been claimed to be a major factor leading to the decline of the most important freshwater herbivores, i.e. representatives of the genus Daphnia. This suppression of Daphnia is partly attributed to the presence of biologically active secondary metabolites in cyanobacteria. Among these metabolites, protease inhibitors are found in almost every natural cyanobacterial bloom and have been shown to specifically inhibit Daphnia's digestive proteases in vitro, but to date no physiological responses of these serine proteases to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors in Daphnia have been reported in situ at the protein and genetic levels. Results Nine digestive proteases were detected in D. magna using activity-stained SDS-PAGE. Subsequent analyses by LC-MS/MS and database search led to the identification of respective protease genes. D. magna responded to dietary protease inhibitors by up-regulation of the expression of these respective proteases at the RNA-level and by the induction of new and less sensitive protease isoforms at the protein level. The up-regulation in response to dietary trypsin- and chymotrypsin-inhibitors ranged from 1.4-fold to 25.6-fold. These physiological responses of Daphnia, i.e. up-regulation of protease expression and the induction of isoforms, took place even after feeding on 20% cyanobacterial food for only 24 h. These physiological responses proved to be independent from microcystin effects. Conclusion Here for the first time it was shown in situ that a D. magna clone responds physiologically to dietary cyanobacterial protease inhibitors by phenotypic plasticity of the targets of these specific inhibitors, i.e. Daphnia gut proteases. These regulatory responses are adaptive for D. magna, as they increase the capacity for protein digestion in the presence of dietary protease inhibitors. The type and extent of these responses in protease expression might

  6. Role of Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors in HIV-1-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Guendel, Irene; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Sampey, Gavin C; Van Duyne, Rachel; Calvert, Valerie; Petricoin, Emanuel; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-06-01

    Many cellular cofactors have been documented to be critical for various stages of viral replication. Using high-throughput proteomic assays, we have previously identified Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) as a host protein that was uniquely upregulated in the plasma membrane of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-infected T cells. Here, we have further characterized the BTK expression in HIV-1 infection and show that this cellular factor is specifically expressed in infected myeloid cells. Significant upregulation of the phosphorylated form of BTK was observed in infected cells. Using size exclusion chromatography, we found BTK to be virtually absent in the uninfected U937 cells; however, new BTK protein complexes were identified and distributed in both high molecular weight (∼600 kDa) and a small molecular weight complex (∼60-120 kDa) in the infected U1 cells. BTK levels were highest in cells either chronically expressing virus or induced/infected myeloid cells and that BTK translocated to the membrane following induction of the infected cells. BTK knockdown in HIV-1-infected cells using small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in selective death of infected, but not uninfected, cells. Using BTK-specific antibody and small-molecule inhibitors including LFM-A13 and a FDA-approved compound, ibrutinib (PCI-32765), we have found that HIV-1-infected cells are sensitive to apoptotic cell death and result in a decrease in virus production. Overall, our data suggests that HIV-1-infected cells are sensitive to treatments targeting BTK expressed in infected cells.

  7. Role of Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase inhibitors in HIV-1 infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Guendel, Irene; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Sampey, Gavin C; Van Duyne, Rachel; Calvert, Valerie; Petricoin, Emanuel; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-01-01

    Many cellular cofactors have been documented to be critical for various stages of viral replication. Using high throughput proteomic assays, we have previously identified Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) as a host protein that was uniquely up-regulated in the plasma membrane of HIV-1 infected T-cells. Here, we have further characterized the BTK expression in HIV-1 infection and show that this cellular factor is specifically expressed in infected myeloid cells. Significant up-regulation of the phosphorylated form of BTK was observed in infected cells. Using size exclusion chromatography, we found BTK to be virtually absent in the uninfected U937 cells, however new BTK protein complexes were identified and distributed in both high molecular weight (~600 kDa) and a small molecular weight complex (~60–120 kDa) in the infected U1 cells. BTK levels were highest in cells either chronically expressing virus or induced/infected myeloid cells and that BTK translocated to the membrane following induction of the infected cells. BTK knockdown in HIV-1 infected cells using siRNA resulted in selective death of infected, but not uninfected, cells. Using BTK specific antibody and small molecule inhibitors including LFM-A13 and a FDA approved compound, Ibrutinib (PCI – 32765), we have found that HIV-1 infected cells are sensitive to apoptotic cell death and result in a decrease in virus production. Overall, our data suggests that HIV-1 infected cells are sensitive to treatments targeting BTK expressed in infected cells. PMID:25672887

  8. Interaction of small molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 entry with CCR5

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, Christoph . E-mail: seiberc@mail.rockefeller.edu; Ying Weiwen; Gavrilov, Svetlana; Tsamis, Fotini; Kuhmann, Shawn E.; Palani, Anandan; Tagat, Jayaram R.; Clader, John W.; McCombie, Stuart W.; Baroudy, Bahige M.; Smith, Steven O.; Dragic, Tatjana; Moore, John P.; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2006-05-25

    The CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is the major coreceptor for macrophage-tropic (R5) HIV-1 strains. Several small molecule inhibitors of CCR5 that block chemokine binding and HIV-1 entry are being evaluated as drug candidates. Here we define how CCR5 antagonists TAK-779, AD101 (SCH-350581) and SCH-C (SCH-351125), which inhibit HIV-1 entry, interact with CCR5. Using a mutagenesis approach in combination with a viral entry assay to provide a direct functional read out, we tested predictions based on a homology model of CCR5 and analyzed the functions of more than 30 amino acid residues. We find that a key set of aromatic and aliphatic residues serves as a hydrophobic core for the ligand binding pocket, while E283 is critical for high affinity interaction, most likely by acting as the counterion for a positively charged nitrogen atom common to all three inhibitors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding how specific antagonists interact with CCR5, and may be useful for the rational design of new, improved CCR5 ligands.

  9. Synthesis and Structure-activity Analysis of Diphenylpyrazolodiazene Inhibitors of the HIV-1 Nef Virulence Factor

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Prema C.; Zhao, Jielu; Emert-Sedlak, Lori A.; Moore, Kerry; Smithgall, Thomas E.; Day, Billy W.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 Nef is a critical AIDS progression factor yet underexplored target for antiretroviral drug discovery. A recent high-throughput screen for pharmacological inhibitors of Nef-dependent Src-family kinase activation identified a diphenylpyrazolodiazene hit compound with submicromolar potency in HIV-1 replication assays against a broad range of primary Nef variants. This compound, known as ‘B9’, binds directly to Nef and inhibits is dimerization in cells as a possible mechanism of action. Here were synthesized a diverse set of B9 analogs and identified structural features essential to antiretroviral activity. Chemical modifications to each of the three rings present in the parent compound were identified that did not compromise antiviral action. These analogs will guide the development of next-generation compounds with appropriate pharmacological profiles for assessment of antiretroviral activity in vivo. PMID:24650642

  10. Structure-activity correlation study of HIV-1 inhibitors: Electronic and molecular parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannongbua, Supa; Lawtrakul, Luckhana; Limtrakul, Jumras

    1996-04-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for 40 HIV-1 inhibitors, 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)-methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine and its derivatives, were studied. Fully optimized geometries, based on the semiempirical AM1 method, were used to calculate electronic and molecular properties of all compounds. In order to examine the relation between biological activities and structural properties, multiple linear regression models were employed. A suitable QSAR model was obtained, showing not only statistical significance, but also predictive ability. The significant molecular descriptors used were atomic charges of two substituted carbon atoms in the thymine ring, hydration energies and molar refractivities of the molecules. These descriptors allowed a physical explanation of electronic and molecular properties contributing to HIV-1 inhibitory potency.

  11. Rosuvastatin vs. protease inhibitor switching for hypercholesterolaemia: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, F J; Monteiro, P; Baker, D; Bloch, M; Roth, N; Finlayson, R; Moore, R; Hoy, J; Martinez, E; Carr, A

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy and safety of rosuvastatin initiation with those of switching of ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors (PI/rs) in HIV-1-infected adults with hypercholesterolaemia and increased cardiovascular risk scores. In this open-label, multicentre study, HIV-1-infected adults on PI/r-based therapy with viral load < 50 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL, fasting total cholesterol ≥ 5.5 mmol/L (both for ≥ 6 months) and elevated cardiovascular risk (Framingham score ≥ 8% or diabetes or family history), and not on lipid-lowering therapy, were randomized to open-label rosuvastatin 10 mg/day or to PI/r switching, both with standardized diet/exercise advice. The primary endpoint was change in total cholesterol at week 12 (intention to treat). There were 43 participants (23 on rosuvastatin). Baseline characteristics were: mean [± standard deviation (SD)] age 55 (8.5) years, 42 (98%) male, 41 (95%) white race, and mean (± SD) total cholesterol 6.2 (1.2) mmol/L. At enrolment, PI/rs were lopinavir/ritonavir (n = 22; 51%), atazanavir/ritonavir (n = 12; 28%) and darunavir/ritonavir (n = 9; 21%). The commonest PI/r substitutes were raltegravir (n = 9; 45%) and rilpivirine (n = 4; 20%). All participants were adherent through to week 12. Rosuvastatin yielded greater declines than PI/r switching in total (- 21.4% vs. - 8.7%, respectively; P = 0.003) and low-density lipoprotein (- 29.9% vs. - 1.0%, respectively; P < 0.001) cholesterol, but smaller declines in very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides (P < 0.01). Cholesterol lowering was greater in participants on atazanavir/ritonavir or once-daily darunavir/ritonavir (vs. lopinavir/ritonavir). More study drug-related adverse events (mostly grade 1 nausea/diarrhoea; 10 vs. one, respectively; P = 0.001) occurred with PI/r switching than with rosuvastatin. In adults receiving a PI/r, rosuvastatin 10 mg/day for 12 weeks yielded larger decreases in total and low-density lipoprotein

  12. Structural Evidence for Effectiveness of Darunavir and Two Related Antiviral Inhibitors against HIV-2 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Louis, John M.; Aniana, Annie; Ghosh, Arun K.; Weber, Irene T.

    2008-12-08

    No drug has been targeted specifically for HIV-2 (human immunodeficiency virus type 2) infection despite its increasing prevalence worldwide. The antiviral HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1) protease (PR) inhibitor darunavir and the chemically related GRL98065 and GRL06579A were designed with the same chemical scaffold and different substituents at P2 and P2' to optimize polar interactions for HIV-1 PR (PR1). These inhibitors are also effective antiviral agents for HIV-2-infected cells. Therefore, crystal structures of HIV-2 PR (PR2) complexes with the three inhibitors have been solved at 1.2-{angstrom} resolution to analyze the molecular basis for their antiviral potency. Unusually, the crystals were grown in imidazole and zinc acetate buffer, which formed interactions with the PR2 and the inhibitors. Overall, the structures were very similar to the corresponding inhibitor complexes of PR1 with an RMSD of 1.1 {angstrom} on main-chain atoms. Most hydrogen-bond and weaker C-H...O interactions with inhibitors were conserved in the PR2 and PR1 complexes, except for small changes in interactions with water or disordered side chains. Small differences were observed in the hydrophobic contacts for the darunavir complexes, in agreement with relative inhibition of the two PRs. These near-atomic-resolution crystal structures verify the inhibitor potency for PR1 and PR2 and will provide the basis for the development of antiviral inhibitors targeting PR2.

  13. Sequence requirements of the HIV-1 protease flap region determined by saturation mutagenesis and kinetic analysis of flap mutants

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Wei; Everitt, Lorraine; Manchester, Marianne; Loeb, Daniel D.; Hutchison, Clyde A.; Swanstrom, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    The retroviral proteases (PRs) have a structural feature called the flap, which consists of a short antiparallel β-sheet with a turn. The flap extends over the substrate binding cleft and must be flexible to allow entry and exit of the polypeptide substrates and products. We analyzed the sequence requirements of the amino acids within the flap region (positions 46–56) of the HIV-1 PR. The phenotypes of 131 substitution mutants were determined using a bacterial expression system. Four of the mutant PRs with mutations in different regions of the flap were selected for kinetic analysis. Our phenotypic analysis, considered in the context of published structures of the HIV-1 PR with a bound substrate analogs, shows that: (i) Met-46 and Phe-53 participate in hydrophobic interactions on the solvent-exposed face of the flap; (ii) Ile-47, Ile-54, and Val-56 participate in hydrophobic interactions on the inner face of the flap; (iii) Ile-50 has hydrophobic interactions at the distance of both the δ and γ carbons; (iv) the three glycine residues in the β-turn of the flap are virtually intolerant of substitutions. Among these mutant PRs, we have identified changes in both kcat and Km. These results establish the nature of the side chain requirements at each position in the flap and document a role for the flap in both substrate binding and catalysis. PMID:9122179

  14. CGP 53437, an orally bioavailable inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease with potent antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Alteri, E; Bold, G; Cozens, R; Faessler, A; Klimkait, T; Lang, M; Lazdins, J; Poncioni, B; Roesel, J L; Schneider, P

    1993-10-01

    CGP 53437 is a peptidomimetic inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease containing a hydroxyethylene isostere. The compound inhibited recombinant HIV-1 protease with a Ki of 0.2 nM. The inhibition constant versus human cathepsin D and human cathepsin E was 4 nM. Human pepsin and gastricsin were inhibited with Kis of 8 and 500 nM, respectively, and human renin was inhibited with a Ki of 190 microM. The replication of HIV-1/LAV, HIV-1/Z-84, and HIV-1/pLAI was inhibited with a 90% effective dose of 0.1 microM in acutely infected MT-2 cells. The 50% cytotoxic dose was 100 microM. Similar antiviral activity was observed when the compound was added up to 10 h after infection. At the effective concentration, processing of Gag precursor protein p55 was greatly reduced, confirming an action on the late stage of the virus life cycle, as expected. The efficacy of the inhibitor was also demonstrated by using primary human peripheral blood lymphocytes infected with the HIV-1/LAV strain, low-passage clinical isolates obtained from HIV-1-seropositive individuals (including a zidovudine-resistant strain), and HIV-2/ROD. In these cells, CGP 53437 delayed the onset of HIV replication in a dose-dependent fashion (substantial effects with concentrations of > or = 0.1 microM) as long as the inhibitor was maintained in the culture. CGP 53437 was orally bioavailable in mice. Concentrations in plasma 10-fold in excess of the in vitro antiviral 90% effective dose could be sustained for several hours after oral application of 120 mg/kg. Therefore, CGP 53437 has the potential to be a therapeutically useful anti-HIV agent for the treatment of AIDS.

  15. CGP 53437, an orally bioavailable inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease with potent antiviral activity.

    PubMed Central

    Alteri, E; Bold, G; Cozens, R; Faessler, A; Klimkait, T; Lang, M; Lazdins, J; Poncioni, B; Roesel, J L; Schneider, P

    1993-01-01

    CGP 53437 is a peptidomimetic inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease containing a hydroxyethylene isostere. The compound inhibited recombinant HIV-1 protease with a Ki of 0.2 nM. The inhibition constant versus human cathepsin D and human cathepsin E was 4 nM. Human pepsin and gastricsin were inhibited with Kis of 8 and 500 nM, respectively, and human renin was inhibited with a Ki of 190 microM. The replication of HIV-1/LAV, HIV-1/Z-84, and HIV-1/pLAI was inhibited with a 90% effective dose of 0.1 microM in acutely infected MT-2 cells. The 50% cytotoxic dose was 100 microM. Similar antiviral activity was observed when the compound was added up to 10 h after infection. At the effective concentration, processing of Gag precursor protein p55 was greatly reduced, confirming an action on the late stage of the virus life cycle, as expected. The efficacy of the inhibitor was also demonstrated by using primary human peripheral blood lymphocytes infected with the HIV-1/LAV strain, low-passage clinical isolates obtained from HIV-1-seropositive individuals (including a zidovudine-resistant strain), and HIV-2/ROD. In these cells, CGP 53437 delayed the onset of HIV replication in a dose-dependent fashion (substantial effects with concentrations of > or = 0.1 microM) as long as the inhibitor was maintained in the culture. CGP 53437 was orally bioavailable in mice. Concentrations in plasma 10-fold in excess of the in vitro antiviral 90% effective dose could be sustained for several hours after oral application of 120 mg/kg. Therefore, CGP 53437 has the potential to be a therapeutically useful anti-HIV agent for the treatment of AIDS. Images PMID:8257128

  16. Structure-activity relationship of pyrrolyl diketo acid derivatives as dual inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase and reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H domain.

    PubMed

    Cuzzucoli Crucitti, Giuliana; Métifiot, Mathieu; Pescatori, Luca; Messore, Antonella; Madia, Valentina Noemi; Pupo, Giovanni; Saccoliti, Francesco; Scipione, Luigi; Tortorella, Silvano; Esposito, Francesca; Corona, Angela; Cadeddu, Marta; Marchand, Christophe; Pommier, Yves; Tramontano, Enzo; Costi, Roberta; Di Santo, Roberto

    2015-02-26

    The development of HIV-1 dual inhibitors is a highly innovative approach aimed at reducing drug toxic side effects as well as therapeutic costs. HIV-1 integrase (IN) and reverse transcriptase-associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) are both selective targets for HIV-1 chemotherapy, and the identification of dual IN/RNase H inhibitors is an attractive strategy for new drug development. We newly synthesized pyrrolyl derivatives that exhibited good potency against IN and a moderate inhibition of the RNase H function of RT, confirming the possibility of developing dual HIV-1 IN/RNase H inhibitors and obtaining new information for the further development of more effective dual HIV-1 inhibitors.

  17. Development of a phenotypic susceptibility assay for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Heger, Eva; Theis, Alexandra Andrée; Remmel, Klaus; Walter, Hauke; Pironti, Alejandro; Knops, Elena; Di Cristanziano, Veronica; Jensen, Björn; Esser, Stefan; Kaiser, Rolf; Lübke, Nadine

    2016-12-01

    Phenotypic resistance analysis is an indispensable method for determination of HIV-1 resistance and cross-resistance to novel drug compounds. Since integrase inhibitors are essential components of recent antiretroviral combination therapies, phenotypic resistance data, in conjunction with the corresponding genotypes, are needed for improving rules-based and data-driven tools for resistance prediction, such as HIV-Grade and geno2pheno[integrase]. For generation of phenotypic resistance data to recent integrase inhibitors, a recombinant phenotypic integrase susceptibility assay was established. For validation purposes, the phenotypic resistance to raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir of nine subtype-B virus strains, isolated from integrase inhibitor-naïve and raltegravir-treated patients was determined. Genotypic resistance analysis identified four virus strains harbouring RAL resistance-associated mutations. Phenotypic resistance analysis was performed as follows. The HIV-1 integrase genes were cloned into a modified pNL4-3 vector and transfected into 293T cells for the generation of recombinant virus. The integrase-inhibitor susceptibility of the recombinant viruses was determined via an indicator cell line. While raltegravir resistance profiles presented a high cross-resistance to elvitegravir, dolutegravir maintained in-vitro activity in spite of the Y143R and N155H mutations, confirming the strong activity of dolutegravir against raltegravir-resistant viruses. Solely a Q148H+G140S variant presented reduced susceptibility to dolutegravir. In conclusion, our phenotypic susceptibility assay permits resistance analysis of the integrase gene of patient-derived viruses for integrase inhibitors by replication-competent recombinants. Thus, this assay can be used to analyze phenotypic drug resistance of integrase inhibitors in vitro. It provides the possibility to determine the impact of newly appearing mutational patterns to drug resistance of recent integrase

  18. Illustration of HIV-1 protease folding through a molten-globule-like intermediate using an experimental model that implicates alpha-crystallin and calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Dash, Chandravanu; Sastry, Murali; Rao, Mala

    2005-03-15

    The folding of HIV-1 protease to its active form involves the coordination of structure formation and dimerization, which follows a hierarchy consisting of folding nuclei spanning from the active site, hinge region, and dimerization domain. However, the biochemical characteristics of the folding intermediates of this protein remain to be elucidated. In an experimental model, the denaturation of the tethered dimer of HIV-1 protease by guanidine hydrochloride revealed an alternative conformation resembling the molten-globule state. The molten-globule state binds to the molecular chaperone alpha-crystallin and prevents its aggregation; however, the chaperone alone failed to reconstitute HIV-1 protease into its active form. Calcium ion assisted in the release of active enzyme from the chaperone complex. Alpha-crystallin, a member of the small heat-shock protein, assists proteins to fold correctly; however, the underlying principle of signals responsible for chaperone-mediated protein folding remains enigmatic. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been employed to provide the evidence of calcium binding to alpha-crystallin and to decipher the effect of calcium binding on the chaperone-mediated refolding of HIV-1 protease. On the basis of our spectroscopic data, we propose that calcium ions interact with the carboxyl groups of the surface-exposed acidic amino acids of alpha-crystallin bringing electrostatic interference, which plays a pivotal role in inducing conformational changes in the chaperone responsible for the release of the active enzyme.

  19. Activation of HIV-1 from latent infection via synergy of RUNX1 inhibitor Ro5-3335 and SAHA.

    PubMed

    Klase, Zachary; Yedavalli, Venkat S R K; Houzet, Laurent; Perkins, Molly; Maldarelli, Frank; Brenchley, Jason; Strebel, Klaus; Liu, Paul; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2014-03-01

    A major barrier to the elimination of HIV-1 infection is the presence of a pool of long-lived, latently infected CD4+ memory T-cells. The search for treatments to re-activate latent HIV to aid in clearance is hindered by the incomplete understanding of the mechanisms that lead to transcriptional silencing of viral gene expression in host cells. Here we identify a previously unknown role for RUNX1 in HIV-1 transcriptional latency. The RUNX proteins, in combination with the co-factor CBF-β, are critical transcriptional regulators in T-cells. RUNX1 strongly modulates CD4 expression and contributes to CD4+ T-cell function. We show that RUNX1 can bind DNA sequences within the HIV-1 LTR and that this binding represses transcription. Using patient samples we show a negative correlation between RUNX1 expression and viral load. Furthermore, we find that pharmacologic inhibition of RUNX1 by a small molecule inhibitor, Ro5-3335, synergizes with the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor SAHA (Vorinostat) to enhance the activation of latent HIV-1 in both cell lines and PBMCs from patients. Our findings indicate that RUNX1 and CBF-β cooperate in cells to modulate HIV-1 replication, identifying for the first time RUNX1 as a cellular factor involved in HIV-1 latency. This work highlights the therapeutic potential of inhibitors of RUNX1 to re-activate virus and aid in clearance of HIV-1.

  20. A broad HIV-1 inhibitor blocks envelope glycoprotein transitions critical for entry.

    PubMed

    Herschhorn, Alon; Gu, Christopher; Espy, Nicole; Richard, Jonathan; Finzi, Andrés; Sodroski, Joseph G

    2014-10-01

    Binding to the primary receptor, CD4, triggers conformational changes in the metastable HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer ((gp120-gp41)3) that are important for virus entry into host cells. These changes include an 'opening' of the trimer, creation of a binding site for the CCR5 co-receptor and formation and/or exposure of a gp41 coiled coil. Here we identify a new compound, 18A (1), that specifically inhibits the entry of a wide range of HIV-1 isolates. 18A does not interfere with CD4 or CCR5 binding, but it inhibits the CD4-induced disruption of quaternary structures at the trimer apex and the exposure of the gp41 HR1 coiled coil. Analysis of HIV-1 variants with increased or reduced sensitivity to 18A suggests that the inhibitor can distinguish distinct conformational states of gp120 in the unliganded Env trimer. The broad-range activity and observed hypersensitivity of resistant mutants to antibody neutralization support further investigation of 18A.

  1. A broad HIV-1 inhibitor blocks envelope glycoprotein transitions critical for entry

    PubMed Central

    Herschhorn, Alon; Gu, Christopher; Espy, Nicole; Richard, Jonathan; Finzi, Andrés; Sodroski, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    Binding to the primary receptor, CD4, triggers conformational changes in the metastable envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer (gp1203/gp413) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) that are important for virus entry into host cells. These changes include an “opening” of the trimer, creation of a binding site for the CCR5 coreceptor, and formation/exposure of a gp41 coiled coil. Here we identify a new compound, 18A (1), that specifically inhibits the entry of a wide range of HIV-1 isolates. 18A does not interfere with CD4 or CCR5 binding, but inhibits the CD4-induced disruption of quaternary structures at the trimer apex and the formation/exposure of the gp41 HR1 coiled coil. Analysis of HIV-1 variants exhibiting increased or reduced sensitivity to 18A suggests that the inhibitor can distinguish distinct conformational states of gp120 in the unliganded Env trimer. The broad-range activity and observed hypersensitivity of resistant mutants to antibody neutralization support further investigation of 18A. PMID:25174000

  2. Dolutegravir, a second-generation integrase inhibitor for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Rathbun, R Chris; Lockhart, Staci M; Miller, Misty M; Liedtke, Michelle D

    2014-03-01

    To review the pharmacology, safety, and efficacy of dolutegravir, an integrase strand-transfer inhibitor (INSTI), and to discuss its role in the treatment of HIV-1-infected patients. PubMed articles indexed through August 2013 were identified using the search terms S/GSK1349572, dolutegravir, and integrase inhibitor. Information was also identified from the package insert, cited publication references, professional meeting abstracts, and the ClinicalTrials.gov registry. English language articleswere selected for evaluation, with preference given to safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetic studies conducted in HIV-1-infected patients. Dolutegravir is a new INSTI approved for combination treatment in HIV-1-infected adults and adolescent children. Four phase 3 studies provide the basis for current labeling in antiretroviral-naïve and antiretroviral-experienced adults. Results from these studies demonstrate that dolutegravir is noninferior in efficacy to raltegravir in antiretroviral-naïve patients and superior in antiretroviral-experienced patients. Superiority to efavirenz and darunavir/ritonavir was also demonstrated in antiretroviral-naïve patients. Dolutegravir is well tolerated, exhibits low potential for drug-drug interactions, and has a long serum half-life, allowing it to be administered once-daily in patients without preexisting INSTI resistance. Twice-daily administration is recommended in patients with known or suspected resistance mutations to first-generation INSTIs. Mild elevations in serum creatinine occur following dolutegravir initiation from inhibition of renal organic cation transporter 2 but do not reflect changes in glomerular filtration. Dolutegravir is the first second-generation INSTI and exhibits several advantages over current integrase inhibitors and other preferred antiretrovirals. Long-term efficacy and safety are needed to define dolutegravir's role in treatment.

  3. Fluctuating partially native-like topologies in the acid denatured ensemble of autolysis resistant HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Rout, Manoj Kumar; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2009-02-01

    Folding, in-vivo, starts from a denatured state and thus the nature of the denatured state would play an important role in directing the folding of a protein. We report here NMR characterization of the acid-denatured state of a mutant of HIV-1 protease, designed to prevent autolysis (Q7K, L33I, L63I) and to prevent cysteine oxidation (C67A and C95A). Secondary chemical shifts, TALOS analysis of chemical shifts and (15)N relaxation data (R(1), R(2), NOE) coupled with AABUF and hydrophobicity calculations, suggest formation of hydrophobic clusters and possibility of some partially native-like topologies in the acid denatured state of the protease. The structural and dynamics characteristics of the acid denatured PR seem to be considerably different from those of the guanidine or urea denatured states of some variants of PR. These would have implications for the folding and auto-processing of the enzyme in-vivo.

  4. Use of a hexasubstituted benzene scaffold in the development of multivalent HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tupchiangmai, Wipa; Choksakulporn, Saowanaporn; Tewtrakul, Supinya; Pianwanit, Somsak; Sritana-anant, Yongsak

    2014-01-01

    The highly directional hexasubstituted benzene moiety was used as the central scaffold to create new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase inhibitors through the attachment of multiple active groups. A series of potential inhibitors having substituted polyhydroxylated mono, bis and tris-cinnamoyl derivatives connected on the scaffold were prepared through Claisen-Schmidt condensations with substituted benzaldehydes, followed by partial demethylation to uncover the active phenolic groups required for the interactions with the integrase enzyme active sites. Using a multiplate integration assay method, four compounds carrying at least two sets of interacting moieties were found to be relatively potent integrase inhibitors with IC50 values in the low micromolar range. The results confirmed that multiple polyhydroxylated groups were required on the platform in order to effectively interact with the enzyme. The results from molecular docking studies consistently complemented the experimental results and revealed the nature of the potential key binding interactions responsible for the apparent activity of the active compounds.

  5. Antiviral and resistance studies of AG1343, an orally bioavailable inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus protease.

    PubMed Central

    Patick, A K; Mo, H; Markowitz, M; Appelt, K; Wu, B; Musick, L; Kalish, V; Kaldor, S; Reich, S; Ho, D; Webber, S

    1996-01-01

    AG1343 ([3S-(3R*,4aR*,8aR*,2'S*,3'S*)]-2-[2' hydroxy-3'-phenylthiomethyl-4'-aza-5'-oxo-5'-(2''-methyl-3''-hydro xy-phenyl) pentyl]-decahydroiso-quinoline-3-N-t-butylcarboxamide methanesulfonic acid) is a selective, nonpeptidic inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease (Ki = 2 nM) that was discovered by protein structure-based drug design methodologies. AG1343 was effective against the replication of several laboratory and clinical HIV type 1 (HIV-1) or HIV-2 isolates including pyridinone- and zidovudine-resistant strains, with 50% effective concentrations ranging from 9 to 60 nM. In reversibility studies, inhibition of gag (p55) proteolytic processing in HIV-1 particles from cells treated with AG1343 was maintained for up to 36 h after drug removal. The ability of virus to develop resistance to AG1343 was studied by serial passage of HIV-1 NL4.3 in the presence of increasing concentrations of drug. After 28 passages, a variant with a 30-fold reduction in susceptibility to AG1343 was isolated. Molecular analysis of the protease from this variant indicated a double change from a Met to Ile at residue 46 and an Ile to Val or Ala at residue 84 (M46I+I84V, A). Consistent with these findings, reductions in susceptibility were observed for recombinant viruses constructed to contain the single I84V change or the double M46I+I84V substitutions. Resistance, however, was not detected for recombinant viruses containing other key mutations in HIV-1 protease, including a Val to Ile change at residue 32 or a Val to Ala or Phe at residue 82. The potent anti-HIV activity of AG1343 against several isolates suggests that AG1343 should perform well during ongoing human phase II clinical trials. PMID:8834868

  6. Microwave assisted organic synthesis (MAOS) of small molecules as potential HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Stefania; Grazia, Sara De; De Luca, Laura; Gitto, Rosaria; Faliti, Caterina Elisa; Debyzer, Zeger; Chimirri, Alba

    2011-08-11

    Integrase (IN) represents a clinically validated target for the development of antivirals against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In recent years our research group has been engaged in the stucture-function study of this enzyme and in the development of some three-dimensional pharmacophore models which have led to the identification of a large series of potent HIV-1 integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) bearing an indole core. To gain a better understanding of the structure-activity relationships (SARs), herein we report the design and microwave-assisted synthesis of a novel series of 1-H-benzylindole derivatives.

  7. Discovery of a small-molecule HIV-1 integrase inhibitor-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q.; Fikkert, Valery; Dayam, Raveendra; Witvrouw, Myriam; Burke, Terrence R.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Neamati, Nouri

    2006-01-01

    Herein, we report the identification of a unique HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitor-binding site using photoaffinity labeling and mass spectrometric analysis. We chemically incorporated a photo-activatable benzophenone moiety into a series of coumarin-containing IN inhibitors. A representative of this series was covalently photo-crosslinked with the IN core domain and subjected to HPLC purification. Fractions were subsequently analyzed by using MALDI-MS and electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS to identify photo-crosslinked products. In this fashion, a single binding site for an inhibitor located within the tryptic peptide 128AACWWAGIK136 was identified. Site-directed mutagenesis followed by in vitro inhibition assays resulted in the identification of two specific amino acid residues, C130 and W132, in which substitutions resulted in a marked resistance to the IN inhibitors. Docking studies suggested a specific disruption in functional oligomeric IN complex formation. The combined approach of photo-affinity labeling/MS analysis with site-directed mutagenesis/molecular modeling is a powerful approach for elucidating inhibitor-binding sites of proteins at the atomic level. This approach is especially important for the study of proteins that are not amenable to traditional x-ray crystallography and NMR techniques. This type of structural information can help illuminate processes of inhibitor resistance and thereby facilitate the design of more potent second-generation inhibitors. PMID:16785440

  8. Mutations Located outside the Integrase Gene Can Confer Resistance to HIV-1 Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Malet, Isabelle; Subra, Frédéric; Charpentier, Charlotte; Collin, Gilles; Descamps, Diane; Calvez, Vincent; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Delelis, Olivier

    2017-09-26

    Resistance to the integrase strand transfer inhibitors raltegravir and elvitegravir is often due to well-identified mutations in the integrase gene. However, the situation is less clear for patients who fail dolutegravir treatment. Furthermore, most in vitro experiments to select resistance to dolutegravir have resulted in few mutations of the integrase gene. We performed an in vitro dolutegravir resistance selection experiment by using a breakthrough method. First, MT4 cells were infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Lai. After integration into the host cell genome, cells were washed to remove unbound virus and 500 nM dolutegravir was added to the cell medium. This high concentration of the drug was maintained throughout selection. At day 80, we detected a virus highly resistant to dolutegravir, raltegravir, and elvitegravir that remained susceptible to zidovudine. Sequencing of the virus showed no mutations in the integrase gene but highlighted the emergence of five mutations, all located in the nef region, of which four were clustered in the 3' polypurine tract (PPT). Mutations selected in vitro by dolutegravir, located outside the integrase gene, can confer a high level of resistance to all integrase inhibitors. Thus, HIV-1 can use an alternative mechanism to develop resistance to integrase inhibitors by selecting mutations in the 3' PPT region. Further studies are required to determine to what extent these mutations may explain virological failure during integrase inhibitor therapy.IMPORTANCE Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are increasingly used both as first-line drugs and in rescue therapy because of their low toxicity and high efficacy in both treatment-naive and treatment-experienced patients. Until now, resistance mutations selected by INSTI exposure have either been described in patients or selected in vitro and involve the integrase gene. Most mutations selected by raltegravir, elvitegravir, or dolutegravir exposure

  9. Identification of a small-molecule inhibitor of HIV-1 assembly that targets the phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate binding site of the HIV-1 matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Zentner, Isaac; Sierra, Luz-Jeannette; Fraser, Ayesha K; Maciunas, Lina; Mankowski, Marie K; Vinnik, Andrei; Fedichev, Peter; Ptak, Roger G; Martín-García, Julio; Cocklin, Simon

    2013-03-01

    The development of drug resistance remains a critical problem for current HIV-1 antiviral therapies, creating a need for new inhibitors of HIV-1 replication. We previously reported on a novel anti-HIV-1 compound, N(2)-(phenoxyacetyl)-N-[4-(1-piperidinylcarbonyl)benzyl]glycinamide (14), that binds to the highly conserved phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P(2)) binding pocket of the HIV-1 matrix (MA) protein. In this study, we re-evaluate the hits from the virtual screen used to identify compound 14 and test them directly in an HIV-1 replication assay using primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This study resulted in the identification of three new compounds with antiviral activity; 2-(4-{[3-(4-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]methyl})-1-piperazinyl)-N-(4-methylphenyl)acetamide (7), 3-(2-ethoxyphenyl)-5-[[4-(4-nitrophenyl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl]-1,2,4-oxadiazole (17), and N-[4-ethoxy-3-(1-piperidinylsulfonyl)phenyl]-2-(imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]thiazol-6-yl)acetamide (18), with compound 7 being the most potent of these hits. Mechanistic studies on 7 demonstrated that it directly interacts with and functions through HIV-1 MA. In accordance with our drug target, compound 7 competes with PI(4,5)P(2) for MA binding and, as a result, diminishes the production of new virus. Mutation of residues within the PI(4,5)P(2) binding site of MA decreased the antiviral effect of compound 7. Additionally, compound 7 displays a broadly neutralizing anti-HIV activity, with IC(50) values of 7.5-15.6 μM for the group M isolates tested. Taken together, these results point towards a novel chemical probe that can be used to more closely study the biological role of MA and could, through further optimization, lead to a new class of anti-HIV-1 therapeutics.

  10. Computational Analysis of Molecular Interaction Networks Underlying Change of HIV-1 Resistance to Selected Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kierczak, Marcin; Dramiński, Michał; Koronacki, Jacek; Komorowski, Jan

    2010-12-12

    Despite more than two decades of research, HIV resistance to drugs remains a serious obstacle in developing efficient AIDS treatments. Several computational methods have been developed to predict resistance level from the sequence of viral proteins such as reverse transcriptase (RT) or protease. These methods, while powerful and accurate, give very little insight into the molecular interactions that underly acquisition of drug resistance/hypersusceptibility. Here, we attempt at filling this gap by using our Monte Carlo feature selection and interdependency discovery method (MCFS-ID) to elucidate molecular interaction networks that characterize viral strains with altered drug resistance levels. We analyzed a number of HIV-1 RT sequences annotated with drug resistance level using the MCFS-ID method. This let us expound interdependency networks that characterize change of drug resistance to six selected RT inhibitors: Abacavir, Lamivudine, Stavudine, Zidovudine, Tenofovir and Nevirapine. The networks consider interdependencies at the level of physicochemical properties of mutating amino acids, eg,: polarity. We mapped each network on the 3D structure of RT in attempt to understand the molecular meaning of interacting pairs. The discovered interactions describe several known drug resistance mechanisms and, importantly, some previously unidentified ones. Our approach can be easily applied to a whole range of problems from the domain of protein engineering. A portable Java implementation of our MCFS-ID method is freely available for academic users and can be obtained at: http://www.ipipan.eu/staff/m.draminski/software.htm.

  11. The Tat Inhibitor Didehydro-Cortistatin A Prevents HIV-1 Reactivation from Latency

    PubMed Central

    Mousseau, Guillaume; Kessing, Cari F.; Fromentin, Rémi; Trautmann, Lydie; Chomont, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antiretroviral therapy (ART) inhibits HIV-1 replication, but the virus persists in latently infected resting memory CD4+ T cells susceptible to viral reactivation. The virus-encoded early gene product Tat activates transcription of the viral genome and promotes exponential viral production. Here we show that the Tat inhibitor didehydro-cortistatin A (dCA), unlike other antiretrovirals, reduces residual levels of viral transcription in several models of HIV latency, breaks the Tat-mediated transcriptional feedback loop, and establishes a nearly permanent state of latency, which greatly diminishes the capacity for virus reactivation. Importantly, treatment with dCA induces inactivation of viral transcription even after its removal, suggesting that the HIV promoter is epigenetically repressed. Critically, dCA inhibits viral reactivation upon CD3/CD28 or prostratin stimulation of latently infected CD4+ T cells from HIV-infected subjects receiving suppressive ART. Our results suggest that inclusion of a Tat inhibitor in current ART regimens may contribute to a functional HIV-1 cure by reducing low-level viremia and preventing viral reactivation from latent reservoirs. PMID:26152583

  12. Development of a receptor model for efficient in silico screening of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Quevedo, Mario A; Ribone, Sergio R; Briñón, Margarita C; Dehaen, Wim

    2014-07-01

    Integrase (IN) is a key viral enzyme for the replication of the type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), and as such constitutes a relevant therapeutic target for the development of anti-HIV agents. However, the lack of crystallographic data of HIV IN complexed with the corresponding viral DNA has historically hindered the application of modern structure-based drug design techniques to the discovery of new potent IN inhibitors (INIs). Consequently, the development and validation of reliable HIV IN structural models that may be useful for the screening of large databases of chemical compounds is of particular interest. In this study, four HIV-1 IN homology models were evaluated respect to their capability to predict the inhibition potency of a training set comprising 36 previously reported INIs with IC50 values in the low nanomolar to the high micromolar range. Also, 9 inactive structurally related compounds were included in this training set. In addition, a crystallographic structure of the IN-DNA complex corresponding to the prototype foamy virus (PFV) was also evaluated as structural model for the screening of inhibitors. The applicability of high throughput screening techniques, such as blind and ligand-guided exhaustive rigid docking was assessed. The receptor models were also refined by molecular dynamics and clustering techniques to assess protein sidechain flexibility and solvent effect on inhibitor binding. Among the studied models, we conclude that the one derived from the X-ray structure of the PFV integrase exhibited the best performance to rank the potencies of the compounds in the training set, with the predictive power being further improved by explicitly modeling five water molecules within the catalytic side of IN. Also, accounting for protein sidechain flexibility enhanced the prediction of inhibition potencies among the studied compounds. Finally, an interaction fingerprint pattern was established for the fast identification of potent IN

  13. Cystatins, serpins and other families of protease inhibitors in plants.

    PubMed

    Volpicella, Mariateresa; Leoni, Claudia; Costanza, Alessandra; De Leo, Francesca; Gallerani, Raffaele; Ceci, Luigi R

    2011-08-01

    Plant protease inhibitors (PIs) are generally small proteins present in high concentrations in storage tissues (tubers and seeds), and to a lower level in leaves. Even if most of them are active against serine and cysteine proteases, PIs active against aspartic proteases and carboxypeptidases have also been identified. Inhibitors of serine proteases are further classifiable in several families on the basis of their structural features. They comprise the families known as Bowman-Birk, Kunitz, Potato I and Potato II, which are the subject of review articles included in this special issue. In the present article we aim to give an overview of other families of plant PIs, active either against serine proteases or other class of proteases, describing their distribution, activity and main structural characteristics.

  14. Raltegravir, elvitegravir, and metoogravir: the birth of "me-too" HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Erik; Odde, Srinivas; Ramkumar, Kavya; Neamati, Nouri

    2009-01-01

    Merck's MK-0518, known as raltegravir, has recently become the first FDA-approved HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitor and has since risen to blockbuster drug status. Much research has in turn been conducted over the last few years aimed at recreating but optimizing the compound's interactions with the protein. Resulting me-too drugs have shown favorable pharmacokinetic properties and appear drug-like but, as expected, most have a highly similar interaction with IN to that of raltegravir. We propose that, based upon conclusions drawn from our docking studies illustrated herein, most of these me-too MK-0518 analogues may experience a low success rate against raltegravir-resistant HIV strains. As HIV has a very high mutational competence, the development of drugs with new mechanisms of inhibitory action and/or new active substituents may be a more successful route to take in the development of second- and third-generation IN inhibitors. PMID:19265512

  15. Rational Design of Novel HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors by RANTES Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Vangelista, Luca; Secchi, Massimiliano

    2008-01-01

    The discovery that the CC chemokines RANTES, MIP-1α and MIP-1β act as potent natural inhibitors of HIV-1, the causative agent of AIDS, and the subsequent identification of CCR5 as a major virus coreceptor have triggered a wealth of basic and applied research approaches aimed at developing safe and effective viral entry inhibitors. Some of these efforts have focused on RANTES engineering with the goal of enhancing the antiviral activity of the native molecule while reducing or abrogating its inflammatory properties. The wavefront generated a decade ago is still on its course, with a flow of promising leads constantly emerging and being evaluated in preclinical studies. Here, we present an overview of this rapidly evolving field, highlighting the most important features of RANTES molecular architecture and structure-function relationships. PMID:18243436

  16. Discovery of a small-molecule HIV-1 integrase inhibitor-binding site | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The lowest energy-binding conformation of an inhibitor bound to the dimeric interface of HIV-1 integrase core domain. The yellow region represents a unique allosteric binding site identified by affinity labeling and mass spectrometry and validated through mutagenesis. This site can provide a potential platform for the rational design of inhibitors selective for disruption of integrase multimerization.

  17. Identification of a human protein-derived HIV-1 fusion inhibitor targeting the gp41 fusion core structure.

    PubMed

    Chao, Lijun; Lu, Lu; Yang, Hengwen; Zhu, Yun; Li, Yuan; Wang, Qian; Yu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Shibo; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp41 plays a crucial role in the viral fusion process. The peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) of gp41 are potent HIV fusion inhibitors. However, the activity of these anti-HIV-1 peptides in vivo may be attenuated by their induction of anti-gp41 antibodies. Thus, it is essential to identify antiviral peptides or proteins with low, or no, immunogenicity to humans. Here, we found that the C-terminal fragment (aa 462-521) of the human POB1 (the partner of RalBP1), designated C60, is an HIV-1 fusion inhibitor. It bound to N36, the peptide derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) of gp41, and to the six-helix bundle (6-HB) formed by N36 and C34, a CHR-peptide, but it did not bind to C34. Unlike the CHR-peptides, C60 did not block gp41 6-HB formation. Rather, results suggest that C60 inhibits HIV-1 fusion by binding to the 6-HB, in particular, the residues in the gp41 NHR domain that are exposed on the surface of 6-HB. Since 6-HB plays a crucial role in the late stage of fusion between the viral envelope and endosomal membrane during the endocytic process of HIV-1, C60 may serve as a host restriction factor to suppress HIV-1 entry into CD4+ T lymphocytes. Taken together, it can be concluded from these results that C60 can be used as a lead for the development of anti-HIV-1 therapeutics or microbicides for the treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection, as well as a molecular probe to study the fusogenic mechanism of HIV-1.

  18. Identification and Characterization of BMS-955176, a Second-Generation HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitor with Improved Potency, Antiviral Spectrum, and Gag Polymorphic Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Nowicka-Sans, Beata; Protack, Tricia; Lin, Zeyu; Li, Zhufang; Zhang, Sharon; Sun, Yongnian; Samanta, Himadri; Terry, Brian; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Yan; Sin, Ny; Sit, Sing-Yuen; Swidorski, Jacob J.; Chen, Jie; Venables, Brian L.; Healy, Matthew; Meanwell, Nicholas A.; Cockett, Mark; Hanumegowda, Umesh; Regueiro-Ren, Alicia; Krystal, Mark

    2016-01-01

    BMS-955176 is a second-generation human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) maturation inhibitor (MI). A first-generation MI, bevirimat, showed clinical efficacy in early-phase studies, but ∼50% of subjects had viruses with reduced susceptibility associated with naturally occurring polymorphisms in Gag near the site of MI action. MI potency was optimized using a panel of engineered reporter viruses containing site-directed polymorphic changes in Gag that reduce susceptibility to bevirimat (including V362I, V370A/M/Δ, and T371A/Δ), leading incrementally to the identification of BMS-955176. BMS-955176 exhibits potent activity (50% effective concentration [EC50], 3.9 ± 3.4 nM [mean ± standard deviation]) toward a library (n = 87) of gag/pr recombinant viruses representing 96.5% of subtype B polymorphic Gag diversity near the CA/SP1 cleavage site. BMS-955176 exhibited a median EC50 of 21 nM toward a library of subtype B clinical isolates assayed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Potent activity was maintained against a panel of reverse transcriptase, protease, and integrase inhibitor-resistant viruses, with EC50s similar to those for the wild-type virus. A 5.4-fold reduction in EC50 occurred in the presence of 40% human serum plus 27 mg/ml of human serum albumin (HSA), which corresponded well to an in vitro measurement of 86% human serum binding. Time-of-addition and pseudotype reporter virus studies confirm a mechanism of action for the compound that occurs late in the virus replication cycle. BMS-955176 inhibits HIV-1 protease cleavage at the CA/SP1 junction within Gag in virus-like particles (VLPs) and in HIV-1-infected cells, and it binds reversibly and with high affinity to assembled Gag in purified HIV-1 VLPs. Finally, in vitro combination studies showed no antagonistic interactions with representative antiretrovirals (ARVs) of other mechanistic classes. In conclusion, BMS-955176 is a second-generation MI with potent in vitro anti-HIV-1

  19. Identification and Characterization of BMS-955176, a Second-Generation HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitor with Improved Potency, Antiviral Spectrum, and Gag Polymorphic Coverage.

    PubMed

    Nowicka-Sans, Beata; Protack, Tricia; Lin, Zeyu; Li, Zhufang; Zhang, Sharon; Sun, Yongnian; Samanta, Himadri; Terry, Brian; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Yan; Sin, Ny; Sit, Sing-Yuen; Swidorski, Jacob J; Chen, Jie; Venables, Brian L; Healy, Matthew; Meanwell, Nicholas A; Cockett, Mark; Hanumegowda, Umesh; Regueiro-Ren, Alicia; Krystal, Mark; Dicker, Ira B

    2016-07-01

    BMS-955176 is a second-generation human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) maturation inhibitor (MI). A first-generation MI, bevirimat, showed clinical efficacy in early-phase studies, but ∼50% of subjects had viruses with reduced susceptibility associated with naturally occurring polymorphisms in Gag near the site of MI action. MI potency was optimized using a panel of engineered reporter viruses containing site-directed polymorphic changes in Gag that reduce susceptibility to bevirimat (including V362I, V370A/M/Δ, and T371A/Δ), leading incrementally to the identification of BMS-955176. BMS-955176 exhibits potent activity (50% effective concentration [EC50], 3.9 ± 3.4 nM [mean ± standard deviation]) toward a library (n = 87) of gag/pr recombinant viruses representing 96.5% of subtype B polymorphic Gag diversity near the CA/SP1 cleavage site. BMS-955176 exhibited a median EC50 of 21 nM toward a library of subtype B clinical isolates assayed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Potent activity was maintained against a panel of reverse transcriptase, protease, and integrase inhibitor-resistant viruses, with EC50s similar to those for the wild-type virus. A 5.4-fold reduction in EC50 occurred in the presence of 40% human serum plus 27 mg/ml of human serum albumin (HSA), which corresponded well to an in vitro measurement of 86% human serum binding. Time-of-addition and pseudotype reporter virus studies confirm a mechanism of action for the compound that occurs late in the virus replication cycle. BMS-955176 inhibits HIV-1 protease cleavage at the CA/SP1 junction within Gag in virus-like particles (VLPs) and in HIV-1-infected cells, and it binds reversibly and with high affinity to assembled Gag in purified HIV-1 VLPs. Finally, in vitro combination studies showed no antagonistic interactions with representative antiretrovirals (ARVs) of other mechanistic classes. In conclusion, BMS-955176 is a second-generation MI with potent in vitro anti-HIV-1

  20. Design of a modular tetrameric scaffold for the synthesis of membrane-localized D-peptide inhibitors of HIV-1 entry

    PubMed Central

    Francis, J. Nicholas; Redman, Joseph S.; Eckert, Debra M.; Kay, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    The highly conserved HIV-1 gp41 “pocket” region is a promising target for inhibiting viral entry. PIE12-trimer is a protease-resistant trimeric D-peptide inhibitor that binds to this pocket and potently blocks HIV entry. PIE12-trimer also possesses a reserve of binding energy that provides it with a strong genetic barrier to resistance (“resistance capacitor”). Here we report the design of a modular scaffold employing PEGs of discrete lengths for the efficient optimization and synthesis of PIE12-trimer. This scaffold also allows us to conjugate PIE12-trimer to several membrane-localizing cargoes, resulting in dramatically improved potency and retention of PIE12-trimer’s ability to absorb the impact of resistance mutations. This scaffold design strategy should be of broad utility for the rapid prototyping of multimeric peptide inhibitors attached to potency- or pharmacokinetic-enhancing groups. PMID:22545664

  1. A Novel Aspartic Protease with HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activity from Fresh Fruiting Bodies of the Wild Mushroom Xylaria hypoxylon

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qing-Xiu; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Zhang, Rui-Ying; Hu, Dan-Dan; Wang, He-Xiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2012-01-01

    A novel aspartic protease with HIV-1 RT inhibitory activity was isolated and characterized from fruiting bodies of the wild mushroom Xylaria hypoxylon. The purification protocol comprised distilled water homogenization and extraction step, three ion exchange chromatographic steps (on DEAE-cellulose, Q-Sepharose, and CM-cellulose in succession), and final purification was by FPLC on Superdex 75. The protease was adsorbed on all the three ion exchangers. It was a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 43 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE and FPLC. Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was HYTELLSQVV, which exhibited no sequence homology to other proteases reported. The activity of the protease was adversely affected by Pepstatin A, indicating that it is an aspartic protease. The protease activity was maximal or nearly so in the pH range 6–8 and in the temperature range 35–60°C. The purified enzyme exhibited HIV-1 RT inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 8.3 μM, but was devoid of antifungal, ribonuclease, and hemagglutinating activities. PMID:22675256

  2. Cell-permeable stapled peptides based on HIV-1 integrase inhibitors derived from HIV-1 gene products.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Wataru; Aikawa, Haruo; Ohashi, Nami; Urano, Emiko; Métifiot, Mathieu; Fujino, Masayuki; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Ozaki, Taro; Nozue, Ami; Narumi, Tetsuo; Hashimoto, Chie; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Pommier, Yves; Yamamoto, Naoki; Komano, Jun A; Murakami, Tsutomu; Tamamura, Hirokazu

    2013-10-18

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an enzyme which is indispensable for the stable infection of host cells because it catalyzes the insertion of viral DNA into the genome and thus is an attractive target for the development of anti-HIV agents. Earlier, we found Vpr-derived peptides with inhibitory activity against HIV-1 IN. These Vpr-derived peptides are originally located in an α-helical region of the parent Vpr protein. Addition of an octa-arginyl group to the inhibitory peptides caused significant inhibition against HIV replication associated with an increase in cell permeability but also relatively high cytotoxicity. In the current study, stapled peptides, a new class of stabilized α-helical peptidomimetics were adopted to enhance the cell permeability of the above lead peptides. A series of stapled peptides, which have a hydrocarbon link formed by a ruthenium-catalyzed ring-closing metathesis reaction between successive turns of α-helix, were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for biological activity. In cell-based assays some of the stapled peptides showed potent anti-HIV activity comparable with that of the original octa-arginine-containing peptide (2) but with lower cytotoxicity. Fluorescent imaging experiments revealed that these stapled peptides are significantly cell permeable, and CD analysis showed they form α-helical structures, whereas the unstapled congeners form β-sheet structures. The application of this stapling strategy to Vpr-derived IN inhibitory peptides led to a remarkable increase in their potency in cells and a significant reduction of their cytotoxicity.

  3. Evaluation of proteases and protease inhibitors in Heterodera glycines cysts obtained from laboratory and field populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Proteases and proteases inhibitors were evaluated in a number of preparations of Heterodera glycines cysts obtained from glasshouse cultures (GH) and field (LR) populations. Using a FRET-peptide library comprising 512 peptide substrate pools that detect 4 endoprotease types (aspartic, cysteine, meta...

  4. Effect of the Active Site D25N Mutation on the Structure, Stability and Ligand Binding of the Mature HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Sayer, Jane M.; Liu, Fengling; Ishima, Rieko; Weber, Irene T.; Louis, John M.

    2008-09-03

    All aspartic proteases, including retroviral proteases, share the triplet DTG critical for the active site geometry and catalytic function. These residues interact closely in the active, dimeric structure of HIV-1 protease (PR). We have systematically assessed the effect of the D25N mutation on the structure and stability of the mature PR monomer and dimer. The D25N mutation (PR{sub D25N}) increases the equilibrium dimer dissociation constant by a factor >100-fold (1.3 {+-} 0.09 {mu}m) relative to PR. In the absence of inhibitor, NMR studies reveal clear structural differences between PR and PR{sub D25N} in the relatively mobile P1 loop (residues 79-83) and flap regions, and differential scanning calorimetric analyses show that the mutation lowers the stabilities of both the monomer and dimer folds by 5 and 7.3 C, respectively. Only minimal differences are observed in high resolution crystal structures of PR{sub D25N} complexed to darunavir (DRV), a potent clinical inhibitor, or a non-hydrolyzable substrate analogue, Ac-Thr-Ile-Nle-r-Nle-Gln-Arg-NH{sub 2} (RPB), as compared with PR{center_dot}DRV and PR{center_dot}RPB complexes. Although complexation with RPB stabilizes both dimers, the effect on their T{sub m} is smaller for PR{sub D25N} (6.2 C) than for PR (8.7 C). The T{sub m} of PR{sub D25N}{center_dot}DRV increases by only 3 C relative to free PR{sub D25N}, as compared with a 22 C increase for PR{center_dot}DRV, and the mutation increases the ligand dissociation constant of PR{sub D25N}{center_dot}DRV by a factor of {approx}10{sup 6} relative to PR{center_dot}DRV. These results suggest that interactions mediated by the catalytic Asp residues make a major contribution to the tight binding of DRV to PR.

  5. Structural Basis of the Allosteric Inhibitor Interaction on the HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase RNase H domain

    PubMed Central

    Christen, Martin T.; Menon, Lakshmi; Myshakina, Nataliya A.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Parniak, Michael A.; Ishima, Rieko

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) has been an attractive target for the development of antiretroviral agents. Although this enzyme is bi-functional, having both DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H (RNH) activities, there is no clinically approved inhibitor of the RNH activity. Here, we characterize the structural basis and molecular interaction of an allosteric site inhibitor, BHMP07, with the wild type (WT) RNH fragment. Solution NMR experiments for inhibitor titration on WT RNH showed relatively wide chemical shift perturbations, suggesting a long-range conformational effect on the inhibitor interaction. Comparisons of the inhibitor-induced NMR chemical-shift changes of RNH with those of RNH dimer, in the presence and absence of Mg2+, were performed to determine and verify the interaction site. The NMR results, with assistance of molecular docking, indicate that BHMP07 preferentially binds to a site that is located between the RNH active site and the region encompassing helices B and D (the “substrate-handle region”). The interaction site is consistent with the previous proposed site, identified using a chimeric RNH (p15-EC) [Gong, el (2011) Chem. Biol. Drug Des. 77, 39-47], but with slight differences that reflect the characteristics of the amino acid sequences in p15-EC compared to the WT RNH. PMID:22846652

  6. Protease inhibitors and proteolytic signalling cascades in insects.

    PubMed

    Gubb, David; Sanz-Parra, Arantza; Barcena, Laura; Troxler, Laurent; Fullaondo, Ane

    2010-12-01

    Proteolytic signalling cascades control a wide range of physiological responses. In order to respond rapidly, protease activity must be maintained at a basal level: the component zymogens must be sequentially activated and actively degraded. At the same time, signalling cascades must respond precisely: high target specificity is required. The insects have a wide range of trapping- and tight-binding protease inhibitors, which can regulate the activity of individual proteases. In addition, the interactions between component proteases of a signalling cascade can be modified by serine protease homologues. The suicide-inhibition mechanism of serpin family inhibitors gives rapid turnover of both protease and inhibitor, but target specificity is inherently broad. Similarly, the TEP/macroglobulins have extremely broad target specificity, which suits them for roles as hormone transport proteins and sensors of pathogenic virulence factors. The tight-binding inhibitors, on the other hand, have a lock-and-key mechanism capable of high target specificity. In addition, proteins containing multiple tight-binding inhibitory domains may act as scaffolds for the assembly of signalling complexes. Proteolytic cascades regulated by combinations of different types of inhibitor could combine the rapidity of suicide-inhibitors with the specificity lock-and-key inhibitors. This would allow precise control of physiological responses and may turn out to be a general rule.

  7. Impact of resistance mutations on inhibitor binding to HIV-1 integrase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qi; Buolamwini, John K.; Smith, Jeremy C.; Li, Aixiu; Xu, Qin; Cheng, Xiaolin; Wei, Dongqing

    2013-11-08

    Here, HIV-1 integrase (IN) is essential for HIV-1 replication, catalyzing two key reaction steps termed 3' processing and strand transfer. Therefore, IN has become an important target for antiviral drug discovery. However, mutants have emerged, such as E92Q/N155H and G140S/Q148H, which confer resistance to raltegravir (RAL), the first IN strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) approved by the FDA, and to the recently approved elvitegravir (EVG). To gain insights into the molecular mechanisms of ligand binding and drug resistance, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of homology models of the HIV-1 IN and four relevant mutants complexed with viral DNA and RAL. The results show that the structure and dynamics of the 140s loop, comprising residues 140 to 149, are strongly influenced by the IN mutations. In the simulation of the G140S/Q148H double mutant, we observe spontaneous dissociation of RAL from the active site, followed by an intrahelical swing-back of the 3' -OH group of nucleotide A17, consistent with the experimental observation that the G140S/Q148H mutant exhibits the highest resistance to RAL compared to other IN mutants. An important hydrogen bond between residues 145 and 148 is present in the wild-type IN but not in the G140S/Q148H mutant, accounting for the structural and dynamical differences of the 140s' loop and ultimately impairing RAL binding in the double mutant. End-point free energy calculations that broadly capture the experimentally known RAL binding profiles elucidate the contributions of the 140s' loop to RAL binding free energies and suggest possible approaches to overcoming drug resistance.

  8. Analysis of structural water and CH···π interactions in HIV-1 protease and PTP1B complexes using a hydrogen bond prediction tool, HBPredicT.

    PubMed

    Yesudas, Joshy P; Sayyed, Fareed Bhasha; Suresh, Cherumuttathu H

    2011-02-01

    A hydrogen bond prediction tool HBPredicT is developed for detecting structural water molecules and CH···π interactions in PDB files of protein-ligand complexes. The program adds the missing hydrogen atoms to the protein, ligands, and oxygen atoms of water molecules and subsequently all the hydrogen bonds in the complex are located using specific geometrical criteria. Hydrogen bonds are classified into various types based on (i) donor and acceptor atoms, and interactions such as (ii) protein-protein, (iii) protein-ligand, (iv) protein-water, (v) ligand-water, (vi) water-water, and (vii) protein-water-ligand. Using the information in category (vii), the water molecules which form hydrogen bonds with the ligand and the protein simultaneously-the structural water-is identified and retrieved along with the associated ligand and protein residues. For CH···π interactions, the relevant portions of the corresponding structures are also extracted in the output. The application potential of this program is tested using 19 HIV-1 protease and 11 PTP1B inhibitor complexes. All the systems showed presence of structural water molecules and in several cases, the CH···π interaction between ligand and protein are detected. A rare occurrence of CH···π interactions emanating from both faces of a phenyl ring of the inhibitor is identified in HIV-1 protease 1D4L.

  9. Preclinical profile of BI 224436, a novel HIV-1 non-catalytic-site integrase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Craig; Amad, Ma'an; Bailey, Murray D; Bethell, Richard; Bös, Michael; Bonneau, Pierre; Cordingley, Michael; Coulombe, René; Duan, Jianmin; Edwards, Paul; Fader, Lee D; Faucher, Anne-Marie; Garneau, Michel; Jakalian, Araz; Kawai, Stephen; Lamorte, Louie; LaPlante, Steven; Luo, Laibin; Mason, Steve; Poupart, Marc-André; Rioux, Nathalie; Schroeder, Patricia; Simoneau, Bruno; Tremblay, Sonia; Tsantrizos, Youla; Witvrouw, Myriam; Yoakim, Christiane

    2014-06-01

    BI 224436 is an HIV-1 integrase inhibitor with effective antiviral activity that acts through a mechanism that is distinct from that of integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). This 3-quinolineacetic acid derivative series was identified using an enzymatic integrase long terminal repeat (LTR) DNA 3'-processing assay. A combination of medicinal chemistry, parallel synthesis, and structure-guided drug design led to the identification of BI 224436 as a candidate for preclinical profiling. It has antiviral 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of <15 nM against different HIV-1 laboratory strains and cellular cytotoxicity of >90 μM. BI 224436 also has a low, ∼2.1-fold decrease in antiviral potency in the presence of 50% human serum and, by virtue of a steep dose-response curve slope, exhibits serum-shifted EC95 values ranging between 22 and 75 nM. Passage of virus in the presence of inhibitor selected for either A128T, A128N, or L102F primary resistance substitutions, all mapping to a conserved allosteric pocket on the catalytic core of integrase. BI 224436 also retains full antiviral activity against recombinant viruses encoding INSTI resistance substitutions N155S, Q148H, and E92Q. In drug combination studies performed in cellular antiviral assays, BI 224436 displays an additive effect in combination with most approved antiretrovirals, including INSTIs. BI 224436 has drug-like in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties, including Caco-2 cell permeability, solubility, and low cytochrome P450 inhibition. It exhibited excellent pharmacokinetic profiles in rat (clearance as a percentage of hepatic flow [CL], 0.7%; bioavailability [F], 54%), monkey (CL, 23%; F, 82%), and dog (CL, 8%; F, 81%). Based on the excellent biological and pharmacokinetic profile, BI 224436 was advanced into phase 1 clinical trials.

  10. On the nature of the reaction intermediate in the HIV-1 protease: a quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnevale, V.; Raugei, S.; Piana, S.; Carloni, P.

    2008-07-01

    Several mechanistic aspects of Aspartic Proteases' enzymatic reaction are currently highly controversial. There is general consensus that the first step of the reaction involves a nucleophilic attack of a water molecule to the substrate carbonyl carbon with subsequent formation of a metastable intermediate (INT). However, the exact nature of this intermediate is subject of debate. While ab initio and QM/MM calculations predict that INT is a neutral gem-diol specie, empirical valence bond calculations suggest that the protein frame can stabilize a charged oxyanion intermediate. Here the relative stability of the gem diol and oxyanion intermediate is calculated by performing density functional and post-Hartree-Fock calculations. The robustness of the results is assessed by increasing the size of the system and of the basis set and by performing QM/MM calculations that explicitly include protein/solvent electrostatic effects. Our results suggest that the neutral gem-diol intermediate is 20-30 kcal/mol more stable than the charged oxyanion. It is therefore concluded that only the neutral specie is populated during the enzymatic reaction.

  11. SJ-3366, a Unique and Highly Potent Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) That Also Inhibits HIV-2

    PubMed Central

    Buckheit, Robert W.; Watson, Karen; Fliakas-Boltz, Valerie; Russell, Julie; Loftus, Tracy L.; Osterling, Mark C.; Turpin, Jim A.; Pallansch, Luke A.; White, E. Lucile; Lee, J.-W.; Lee, S.-H.; Oh, J.-W.; Kwon, H.-S.; Chung, S.-G.; Cho, E.-H.

    2001-01-01

    We have identified and characterized a potent new nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NNRTI) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) that also is active against HIV-2 and which interferes with virus replication by two distinct mechanisms. 1-(3-Cyclopenten-1-yl)methyl-6-(3,5-dimethylbenzoyl)-5-ethyl-2,4-pyrimidinedione (SJ-3366) inhibits HIV-1 replication at concentrations of approximately 1 nM, with a therapeutic index of greater than 4 × 106. The efficacy and toxicity of SJ-3366 are consistent when evaluated with established or fresh human cells, and the compound is equipotent against all strains of HIV-1 evaluated, including syncytium-inducing, non-syncytium-inducing, monocyte/macrophage-tropic, and subtype virus strains. Distinct from other members of the pharmacologic class of NNRTIs, SJ-3366 inhibited laboratory and clinical strains of HIV-2 at a concentration of approximately 150 nM, yielding a therapeutic index of approximately 20,000. Like most NNRTIs, the compound was less active when challenged with HIV-1 strains possessing the Y181C, K103N, and Y188C amino acid changes in the RT and selected for a virus with a Y181C amino acid change in the RT after five tissue culture passages in the presence of the compound. In combination anti-HIV assays with nucleoside and nonnucleoside RT and protease inhibitors, additive interactions occurred with all compounds tested with the exception of dideoxyinosine, with which a synergistic interaction was found. Biochemically, SJ-3366 exhibited a Ki value of 3.2 nM, with a mixed mechanism of inhibition against HIV-1 RT, but it did not inhibit HIV-2 RT. SJ-3366 also inhibited the entry of both HIV-1 and HIV-2 into target cells. On the basis of its therapeutic index and multiple mechanisms of anti-HIV action, SJ-3366 represents an exciting new compound for use in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:11158731

  12. Protease inhibitor monotherapy is effective in controlling human immunodeficiency virus 1 shedding in the male genital tract.

    PubMed

    Torres-Cornejo, A; BenMarzouk-Hidalgo, O J; Viciana, P; Sánchez, B; López-Ruz, M A; López-Cortés, L F; Gutiérrez-Valencia, A

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional study comparing seminal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) shedding in patients receiving boosted protease inhibitor monotherapy (mtPI/rtv) (n = 66) versus triple therapy (TT) (n = 61). Seminal HIV-1 shedding rates in patients with undetectable plasma HIV-RNA were 16.0% on mtPI/rtv compared with 28.6% on TT (p 0.173). Aviraemic status and time on viral suppression were independently associated with lack of seminal HIV-1 shedding. During TT, non PI/rtv-based regimens were associated with a better control of HIV infection in semen despite similar time on viral suppression. The use of mtPI/rtv in well-controlled patients is not associated with increased seminal HIV excretion compared with TT. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Inhibitor Ranking through QM Based Chelation Calculations for Virtual Screening of HIV-1 RNase H Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Steinmann, Casper; Kongsted, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations have been used to predict the binding affinity of a set of ligands towards HIV-1 RT associated RNase H (RNH). The QM based chelation calculations show improved binding affinity prediction for the inhibitors compared to using an empirical scoring function. Furthermore, full protein fragment molecular orbital (FMO) calculations were conducted and subsequently analysed for individual residue stabilization/destabilization energy contributions to the overall binding affinity in order to better understand the true and false predictions. After a successful assessment of the methods based on the use of a training set of molecules, QM based chelation calculations were used as filter in virtual screening of compounds in the ZINC database. By this, we find, compared to regular docking, QM based chelation calculations to significantly reduce the large number of false positives. Thus, the computational models tested in this study could be useful as high throughput filters for searching HIV-1 RNase H active-site molecules in the virtual screening process. PMID:24897431

  14. Sequential treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and deacetylase inhibitors reactivates HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Bouchat, Sophie; Delacourt, Nadège; Kula, Anna; Darcis, Gilles; Van Driessche, Benoit; Corazza, Francis; Gatot, Jean-Stéphane; Melard, Adeline; Vanhulle, Caroline; Kabeya, Kabamba; Pardons, Marion; Avettand-Fenoel, Véronique; Clumeck, Nathan; De Wit, Stéphane; Rohr, Olivier; Rouzioux, Christine; Van Lint, Carine

    2015-12-17

    Reactivation of HIV gene expression in latently infected cells together with an efficient cART has been proposed as an adjuvant therapy aimed at eliminating/decreasing the reservoir size. Results from HIV clinical trials using deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) question the efficiency of these latency-reversing agents (LRAs) used alone and underline the need to evaluate other LRAs in combination with HDACIs. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of a demethylating agent (5-AzadC) in combination with clinically tolerable HDACIs in reactivating HIV-1 from latency first in vitro and next ex vivo. We showed that a sequential treatment with 5-AzadC and HDACIs was more effective than the corresponding simultaneous treatment both in vitro and ex vivo. Interestingly, only two of the sequential LRA combinatory treatments tested induced HIV-1 particle recovery in a higher manner than the drugs alone ex vivo and at concentrations lower than the human tolerable plasmatic concentrations. Taken together, our data reveal the benefit of using combinations of 5-AzadC with an HDACI and, for the first time, the importance of treatment time schedule for LRA combinations in order to reactivate HIV.

  15. Design and synthesis of novel distamycin-modified nucleoside analogues as HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Ma, Chunying; Zhang, Jin; Qian, Ning; Ding, Jingjing; Qiao, Renzhong; Zhao, Yufen

    2014-02-01

    Design and synthesis of nucleoside analogues have persistently attracted extensive interest because of their potential application in the field of antiviral therapy, and its study also receives additional impetus for improvement in the ProTide technology. Previous studies have made great strides in the design and discovery of monophosphorylated nucleoside analogues as potential kinase-independent antiretrovirals. In this work, a series of nucleoside phosphoramidates modified by distamycin analogues was synthesized and evaluated as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in HIV-1-infected MT-4 and CEM cells, including variations in nucleoside, alkyl moiety, and the structure of distamycin analogues. These compounds exhibited modest potency with the EC50 value in the range of 1.3- to 6.5-fold lower than their corresponding parent drugs in MT-4 cells, which may be attributed to increasing intracellular availability due to the existence of distamycin analogue with favorable hydrophilic-lipophilic equilibrium. Meanwhile, the length of distamycin analogue was considered and assessed as an important factor that could affect antiviral activity and cytotoxicity. Enzymatic and metabolic stability studies have been performed in order to better understand the antiviral behavior of these compounds. The present work revealed the compounds to have a favorable and selective anti-HIV-1 activity in MT-4 and CEM cells, and helped to develop strategies for design and synthesis of effective monophosphorylated nucleoside analogues, which may be applied to antiretroviral research as NRTIs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Nitrogen positional scanning in tetramines active against HIV-1 as potential CXCR4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Puig de la Bellacasa, Raimon; Gibert, Albert; Planesas, Jesús M; Ros-Blanco, Laia; Batllori, Xavier; Badía, Roger; Clotet, Bonaventura; Esté, José; Teixidó, Jordi; Borrell, José I

    2016-01-28

    The paradigm, derived from bicyclams and other cyclams, by which it is necessary to use the p-phenylene moiety as the central core in order to achieve high HIV-1 antiviral activities has been reexamined for the more flexible and less bulky structures 4, previously described by our group as potent HIV-1 inhibitors. The symmetrical compounds 7{x,x} and the non-symmetrical compounds 8{x,y} were designed, synthesized and biologically evaluated in order to explore the impact on the biological activity of the distance between the phenyl ring and the first nitrogen atom of the side chains. EC50 exactly followed the order 7{x,x} < 8{x,x} < 4{x,x} indicating that, for such flexible tetramines, the presence of two methylene units on each side of the central phenyl ring increases the biological activity contrary to AMD3100. A computational study of the interactions of 4{3,3}, 7{3,3} and 8{3,3} with CXCR4 revealed interactions in the same pocket region with similar binding modes for 4{3,3} and 7{3,3} but a different one for 8{3,3}.

  17. Molecular modeling study on the allosteric inhibition mechanism of HIV-1 integrase by LEDGF/p75 binding site inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weiwei; Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is essential for the integration of viral DNA into the host genome and an attractive therapeutic target for developing antiretroviral inhibitors. LEDGINs are a class of allosteric inhibitors targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site of HIV-1 IN. Yet, the detailed binding mode and allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs to HIV-1 IN is only partially understood, which hinders the structure-based design of more potent anti-HIV agents. A molecular modeling study combining molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation were performed to investigate the interaction details of HIV-1 IN catalytic core domain (CCD) with two recently discovered LEDGINs BI-1001 and CX14442, as well as the LEDGF/p75 protein. Simulation results demonstrated the hydrophobic domain of BI-1001 and CX14442 engages one subunit of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer through hydrophobic interactions, and the hydrophilic group forms hydrogen bonds with HIV-1 IN CCD residues from other subunit. CX14442 has a larger tert-butyl group than the methyl of BI-1001, and forms better interactions with the highly hydrophobic binding pocket of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer interface, which can explain the stronger affinity of CX14442 than BI-1001. Analysis of the binding mode of LEDGF/p75 with HIV-1 IN CCD reveals that the LEDGF/p75 integrase binding domain residues Ile365, Asp366, Phe406 and Val408 have significant contributions to the binding of the LEDGF/p75 to HIV1-IN. Remarkably, we found that binding of BI-1001 and CX14442 to HIV-1 IN CCD induced the structural rearrangements of the 140 s loop and oration displacements of the side chains of the three conserved catalytic residues Asp64, Asp116, and Glu152 located at the active site. These results we obtained will be valuable not only for understanding the allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs but also for the rational design of allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 IN targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site.

  18. Methods for the Analyses of Inhibitor-Induced Aberrant Multimerization of HIV-1 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Kessl, Jacques J.; Sharma, Amit; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an important therapeutic target as its function is essential for the viral lifecycle. The discovery of multifunctional allosteric IN inhibitors or ALLINIs, which potently impair viral replication by promoting aberrant, higher order IN multimerization as well as inhibit IN interactions with its cellular cofactor, LEDGF/p75, has opened new venues to exploit IN multimerization as a therapeutic target. Furthermore, the recent discovery of multimerization selective IN inhibitors or MINIs, has provided new investigational probes to study the direct effects of aberrant IN multimerization in vitro and in infected cells. Here we describe three complementary methods designed to detect and quantify the effects of these new classes of inhibitors on IN multimerization. These methods include a homogenous time-resolved fluorescence-based assay which allows for measuring EC50 values for the inhibitor-induced aberrant IN multimerization, a dynamic light scattering-based assay which allows for monitoring the formation and sizes of oligomeric IN particles in a time-dependent manner, and a chemical cross-linking-based assay of interacting IN subunits which allows for the determination of IN oligomers in viral particles. PMID:26714710

  19. Synthesis and biological evaluation of imidazole thioacetanilides as novel non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong; Zhu, Junjie; Fang, Zengjun; Li, Zhenyu; Pannecouque, Christophe; Clercq, Erik De

    2009-08-15

    A series of 2-(1-aryl-1H-imidazol-2-ylthio)acetamide [imidazole thioacetanilide (ITA)] derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as potent inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Among them, the most potent HIV-1 inhibitors were 4a5 (EC(50)=0.18microM), and 4a2 (EC(50)=0.20microM), which were more effective than the lead compound L1 (EC(50)=2.053microM) and the reference drugs nevirapine and delavirdine. The preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) of the newly synthesized congeners is discussed.

  20. Discovery of a new HIV-1 inhibitor scaffold and synthesis of potential prodrugs of indazoles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Ho; Markovitz, Benjamin; Trovato, Richard; Murphy, Brett R; Austin, Harry; Willardsen, Adam J; Baichwal, Vijay; Morham, Scott; Bajji, Ashok

    2013-05-15

    A new oxazole scaffold showing great promise in HIV-1 inhibition has been discovered by cell-based screening of an in-house library and scaffold modification. Follow-up SAR study focusing on the 5-aryl substituent of the oxazole core has identified 4k (EC50=0.42μM, TI=50) as a potent inhibitor. However, the analogues suffered from poor aqueous solubility. To address this issue, we have developed broadly applicable potential prodrugs of indazoles. Among them, N-acyloxymethyl analogue 11b displayed promising results (i.e., increased aqueous solubility and susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis). Further studies are warranted to fully evaluate the analogues as the potential prodrugs with improved physiochemical and PK properties.

  1. Contribution of Gag and protease to variation in susceptibility to protease inhibitors between different strains of subtype B human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Katherine A; Mbisa, Jean L; Cane, Patricia A; Pillay, Deenan; Parry, Chris M

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag can directly affect susceptibility to protease inhibitors (PIs) in the absence of known resistance mutations in protease. Inclusion of co-evolved Gag alongside protease in phenotypic drug susceptibility assays can alter PI susceptibility in comparison with protease with a WT Gag. Using a single-replication-cycle assay encompassing full-length Gag together with protease we demonstrated significant variation in PI susceptibility between a number of PI-naïve subtype B viruses. Six publicly available subtype B molecular clones, namely HXB2, NL4-3, SF2, YU2, JRFL and 89.6, displayed up to nine-fold reduced PI susceptibility in comparison with the assay reference strain. For two molecular clones, YU2 and JRFL, Gag contributed solely to the observed reduction in susceptibility, with the N-terminal region of Gag contributing significantly. Gag and protease from treatment-naïve, patient-derived viruses also demonstrated significant variation in susceptibility, with up to a 17-fold reduction to atazanavir in comparison with the assay reference strain. In contrast to the molecular clones, protease was the main determinant of the reduced susceptibility. Common polymorphisms in protease, including I13V, L63P and A71T, were shown to contribute to this reduction in PI susceptibility, in the absence of major resistance mutations. This study demonstrated significant variation in PI susceptibility of treatment-naïve patient viruses, and provided further evidence of the independent role of Gag, the protease substrate and in particular the N-terminus of Gag in PI susceptibility. It also highlighted the importance of considering co-evolved Gag and protease when assessing PI susceptibility.

  2. Proteases and Protease Inhibitors of Urinary Extracellular Vesicles in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tataruch, Dorota; Gu, Dongfeng; Liu, Xinyu; Forsblom, Carol; Groop, Per-Henrik; Holthofer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus (DM), leads to chronic kidney disease (CKD), and, ultimately, is the main cause for end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Beyond urinary albumin, no reliable biomarkers are available for accurate early diagnostics. Urinary extracellular vesicles (UEVs) have recently emerged as an interesting source of diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers. Here we used a protease and respective protease inhibitor array to profile urines of type 1 diabetes patients at different stages of kidney involvement. Urine samples were divided into groups based on the level of albuminuria and UEVs isolated by hydrostatic dialysis and screened for relative changes of 34 different proteases and 32 protease inhibitors, respectively. Interestingly, myeloblastin and its natural inhibitor elafin showed an increase in the normo- and microalbuminuric groups. Similarly, a characteristic pattern was observed in the array of protease inhibitors, with a marked increase of cystatin B, natural inhibitor of cathepsins L, H, and B as well as of neutrophil gelatinase-associated Lipocalin (NGAL) in the normoalbuminuric group. This study shows for the first time the distinctive alterations in comprehensive protease profiles of UEVs in diabetic nephropathy and uncovers intriguing mechanistic, prognostic, and diagnostic features of kidney damage in diabetes. PMID:25874235

  3. Botulinum neurotoxin A protease: discovery of natural product exosite inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Silhár, Peter; Capková, Katerina; Salzameda, Nicholas T; Barbieri, Joseph T; Hixon, Mark S; Janda, Kim D

    2010-03-10

    A new mechanistic class of BoNT/A zinc metalloprotease inhibitors, from Echinacea, exemplified by the natural product d-chicoric acid (I1) is disclosed. A detailed evaluation of chicoric acid's mechanism of inhibition reveals that the inhibitor binds to an exosite, displays noncompetitive partial inhibition, and is synergistic with a competitive active site inhibitor when used in combination. Other components found in Echinacea, I3 and I4, were also inhibitors of the protease.

  4. Phage display as a powerful tool to engineer protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zani, Marie-Louise; Moreau, Thierry

    2010-11-01

    Since its introduction by Georges Smith some 25 years ago, phage display has proved to be a powerful molecular technique for selecting proteins with desired biological properties from huge libraries. Early on, various protease inhibitor scaffolds were displayed at the surface of filamentous phages to select new inhibitors with shifted specificities and enhanced affinities towards one or more target protease(s). The past two decades have seen a number of natural protease inhibitors subjected to phage display, mostly to shift and increase their inhibitory specificity, but also to explore the molecular mechanisms by which they interact with their cognate enzymes with low or very high selectivity. This review focuses on the major uses of phage display in the field of protein protease inhibitors. The exquisite molecular mechanisms by which natural protease inhibitors prevent unwanted or excessive proteolysis in cells and tissues are also examined along with some of the general principles underlying the way phage display is applied to these molecules. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. α1Proteinase Inhibitor Regulates CD4+ Lymphocyte Levels and Is Rate Limiting in HIV-1 Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, Cynthia L.; Babayeva, Mariya A.; LaBrunda, Michelle; Mullen, Michael P.; Winston, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Background The regulation of adult stem cell migration through human hematopoietic tissue involves the chemokine CXCL12 (SDF-1) and its receptor CXCR4 (CD184). In addition, human leukocyte elastase (HLE) plays a key role. When HLE is located on the cell surface (HLECS), it acts not as a proteinase, but as a receptor for α1proteinase inhibitor (α1PI, α1antitrypsin, SerpinA1). Binding of α1PI to HLECS forms a motogenic complex. We previously demonstrated that α1PI deficiency attends HIV-1 disease and that α1PI augmentation produces increased numbers of immunocompetent circulating CD4+ lymphocytes. Herein we investigated the mechanism underlying the α1PI deficiency that attends HIV-1 infection. Methods and Findings Active α1PI in HIV-1 subjects (median 17 µM, n = 35) was significantly below normal (median 36 µM, p<0.001, n = 30). In HIV-1 uninfected subjects, CD4+ lymphocytes were correlated with the combined factors α1PI, HLECS+ lymphocytes, and CXCR4+ lymphocytes (r2 = 0.91, p<0.001, n = 30), but not CXCL12. In contrast, in HIV-1 subjects with >220 CD4 cells/µl, CD4+ lymphocytes were correlated solely with active α1PI (r2 = 0.93, p<0.0001, n = 26). The monoclonal anti-HIV-1 gp120 antibody 3F5 present in HIV-1 patient blood is shown to bind and inactivate human α1PI. Chimpanzee α1PI differs from human α1PI by a single amino acid within the 3F5-binding epitope. Unlike human α1PI, chimpanzee α1PI did not bind 3F5 or become depleted following HIV-1 challenge, consistent with the normal CD4+ lymphocyte levels and benign syndrome of HIV-1 infected chimpanzees. The presence of IgG-α1PI immune complexes correlated with decreased CD4+ lymphocytes in HIV-1 subjects. Conclusions This report identifies an autoimmune component of HIV-1 disease that can be overcome therapeutically. Importantly, results identify an achievable vaccine modification with the novel objective to protect against AIDS as opposed to the current objective to

  6. [Research progress of dual inhibitors targeting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and integrase].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xin-Yong

    2013-04-01

    Both reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase (IN) play crucial roles in the life cycle of HIV-1, which are also key targets in the area of anti-HIV drug research. Reverse transcriptase inhibitors are involved in the most employed drugs used to treat AIDS patients and HIV-infected people, while one of the integrase inhibitors has already been approved by US FDA to appear on the market. Great achievement has been made in the research on both, separately. Recently, much more attention of medicinal chemistry researchers has been attracted to the strategies of multi-target drugs. Compounds with excellent potency against both HIV RT and IN, evidently defined as dual inhibitors targeting both enzymes, have been obtained through considerable significant exploration, which can be classified into two categories according to different strategies. Combinatorial chemistry approach together with high throughput screening methods and multi-target-based virtual screening strategy have been useful tools for identifying selective anti-HIV compounds for long times; Rational drug design based on pharmacophore combination has also led to remarkable results. In this paper, latest progress of both categories in the discovery and structural modification will be covered, with a view to contribute to the career of anti-HIV research.

  7. The tyrosine kinase Hck is an inhibitor of HIV-1 replication counteracted by the viral vif protein.

    PubMed

    Hassaïne, G; Courcoul, M; Bessou, G; Barthalay, Y; Picard, C; Olive, D; Collette, Y; Vigne, R; Decroly, E

    2001-05-18

    The virus infectivity factor (Vif) protein facilitates the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in primary lymphocytes and macrophages. Its action is strongly dependent on the cellular environment, and it has been proposed that the Vif protein counteracts cellular activities that would otherwise limit HIV-1 replication. Using a glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay, we identified that Vif binds specifically to the Src homology 3 domain of Hck, a tyrosine kinase from the Src family. The interaction between Vif and the full-length Hck was further assessed by co-precipitation assays in vitro and in human cells. The Vif protein repressed the kinase activity of Hck and was not itself a substrate for Hck phosphorylation. Within one single replication cycle of HIV-1, Hck was able to inhibit the production and the infectivity of vif-deleted virus but not that of wild-type virus. Accordingly, HIV-1 vif- replication was delayed in Jurkat T cell clones stably expressing Hck. Our data demonstrate that Hck controls negatively HIV-1 replication and that this inhibition is suppressed by the expression of Vif. Hck, which is present in monocyte-macrophage cells, represents the first identified cellular inhibitor of HIV-1 replication overcome by Vif.

  8. Cysteine Protease Inhibitors as Chemotherapy: Lessons from a Parasite Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzer, Paul M.; Pingel, Sabine; Hsieh, Ivy; Ugele, Bernhard; Chan, Victor J.; Engel, Juan C.; Bogyo, Matthew; Russell, David G.; Sakanari, Judy A.; McKerrow, James H.

    1999-09-01

    Papain family cysteine proteases are key factors in the pathogenesis of cancer invasion, arthritis, osteoporosis, and microbial infections. Targeting this enzyme family is therefore one strategy in the development of new chemotherapy for a number of diseases. Little is known, however, about the efficacy, selectivity, and safety of cysteine protease inhibitors in cell culture or in vivo. We now report that specific cysteine protease inhibitors kill Leishmania parasites in vitro, at concentrations that do not overtly affect mammalian host cells. Inhibition of Leishmania cysteine protease activity was accompanied by defects in the parasite's lysosome/endosome compartment resembling those seen in lysosomal storage diseases. Colocalization of anti-protease antibodies with biotinylated surface proteins and accumulation of undigested debris and protease in the flagellar pocket of treated parasites were consistent with a pathway of protease trafficking from flagellar pocket to the lysosome/endosome compartment. The inhibitors were sufficiently absorbed and stable in vivo to ameliorate the pathology associated with a mouse model of Leishmania infection.

  9. Protease inhibitors from several classes work synergistically against Callosobruchus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Amirhusin, Bahagiawati; Shade, Richard E; Koiwa, Hisashi; Hasegawa, Paul M; Bressan, Ray A; Murdock, Larry L; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2007-07-01

    Targeting multiple digestive proteases may be more effective in insect pest control than inhibition of a single enzyme class. We therefore explored possible interactions of three antimetabolic protease inhibitors fed to cowpea bruchids in artificial diets, using a recombinant soybean cysteine protease inhibitor scN, an aspartic protease inhibitor pepstatin A, and soybean Kunitz trypsin inhibitor KI. scN and pepstatin, inhibiting major digestive cysteine and aspartic proteases, respectively, significantly prolonged the developmental time of cowpea bruchids individually. When combined, the anti-insect effect was synergistic, i.e., the toxicity of the mixture was markedly greater than that of scN or pepstatin alone. KI alone did not impact insect development even at relatively high concentrations, but its anti-insect properties became apparent when acting jointly with scN or scN plus pepstatin. Incubating KI with bruchid midgut extract showed that it was partially degraded. This instability may explain its lack of anti-insect activity. However, this proteolytic degradation was inhibited by scN and/or pepstatin. Protection of KI from proteolysis in the insect digestive tract thus could be the basis for the synergistic effect. These observations support the concept that cowpea bruchid gut proteases play a dual role; digesting protein for nutrient needs and protecting insects by inactivating dietary proteins that may otherwise be toxic. Our results also suggest that transgenic resistance strategies that involve multigene products are likely to have enhanced efficacy and durability.

  10. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Structure with RNase H Inhibitor dihydroxy benzoyl naphthyl Hydrazone Bound at a Novel Site

    SciTech Connect

    Himmel,D.; Sarafianos, S.; Dharmasena, S.; Hossain, M.; McCoy-Simandle, K.; Ilina, T.; Clark, A.; Knight, J.; Julias, J.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    The rapid emergence of drug-resistant variants of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1), has limited the efficacy of anti-acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) treatments, and new lead compounds that target novel binding sites are needed. We have determined the 3.15 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) complexed with dihydroxy benzoyl naphthyl hydrazone (DHBNH), an HIV-1 RT RNase H (RNH) inhibitor (RNHI). DHBNH is effective against a variety of drug-resistant HIV-1 RT mutants. While DHBNH has little effect on most aspects of RT-catalyzed DNA synthesis, at relatively high concentrations it does inhibit the initiation of RNA-primed DNA synthesis. Although primarily an RNHI, DHBNH binds >50 {angstrom} away from the RNH active site, at a novel site near both the polymerase active site and the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) binding pocket. When DHBNH binds, both Tyr181 and Tyr188 remain in the conformations seen in unliganded HIV-1 RT. DHBNH interacts with conserved residues (Asp186, Trp229) and has substantial interactions with the backbones of several less well-conserved residues. On the basis of this structure, we designed substituted DHBNH derivatives that interact with the NNRTI-binding pocket. These compounds inhibit both the polymerase and RNH activities of RT.

  11. Gag-Pol Transframe Domain p6* Is Essential for HIV-1 Protease-Mediated Virus Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fu-Hsien; Chou, Ting-An; Liao, Wei-Hao; Huang, Kuo-Jung; Wang, Chin-Tien

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 protease (PR) is encoded by pol, which is initially translated as a Pr160gag-pol polyprotein by a ribosomal frameshift event. Within Gag-Pol, truncated p6gag is replaced by a transframe domain (referred to as p6* or p6pol) located directly upstream of PR. p6* has been proposed as playing a role in modulating PR activation. Overlapping reading frames between p6* and p6gag present a challenge to researchers using genetic approaches to studying p6* biological functions. To determine the role of p6* in PR activation without affecting the gag reading frame, we constructed a series of Gag/Gag-Pol expression vectors by duplicating PR with or without p6* between PR pairs, and observed that PR duplication eliminated virus production due to significant Gag cleavage enhancement. This effect was mitigated when p6* was placed between the two PRs. Further, Gag cleavage enhancement was markedly reduced when either one of the two PRs was mutationally inactivated. Additional reduction in Gag cleavage efficiency was noted following the removal of p6* from between the two PRs. The insertion of a NC domain (wild-type or mutant) directly upstream of PR or p6*PR did not significantly improve Gag processing efficiency. With the exception of those containing p6* directly upstream of an active PR, all constructs were either noninfectious or weakly infectious. Our results suggest that (a) p6* is essential for triggering PR activation, (b) p6* has a role in preventing premature virus processing, and (c) the NC domain within Gag-Pol is not a major determinant of PR activation. PMID:26030443

  12. 3D-QSAR and molecular modeling of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhija, Mahindra T.; Kulkarni, Vithal M.

    2002-03-01

    Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR) methods were applied on a series of inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase with respect to their inhibition of 3'-processing and 3'-end joining steps in vitro.The training set consisted of 27 compounds belonging to the class of thiazolothiazepines. The predictive ability of each model was evaluated using test set I consisting of four thiazolothiazepines and test set II comprised of seven compounds belonging to an entirely different structural class of coumarins. Maximum Common Substructure (MCS) based method was used to align the molecules and this was compared with other known methods of alignment. Two methods of 3D QSAR: comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) were analyzed in terms of their predictive abilities. CoMSIA produced significantly better results for all correlations. The results indicate a strong correlation between the inhibitory activity of these compounds and the steric and electrostatic fields around them. CoMSIA models with considerable internal as well as external predictive ability were obtained. A poor correlation obtained with hydrophobic field indicates that the binding of thiazolothiazepines to HIV-1 integrase is mainly enthalpic in nature. Further the most active compound of the series was docked into the active site using the crystal structure of integrase. The binding site was formed by the amino acid residues 64-67, 116, 148, 151-152, 155-156, and 159. The comparison of coefficient contour maps with the steric and electrostatic properties of the receptor shows high level of compatibility.

  13. A uniquely prevalent nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutation in Russian subtype A HIV-1 viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kolomeets, Anna N.; Varghese, Vici; Lemey, Philippe; Bobkova, Marina R.; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Background The subtype A variant in the Former Soviet Union (AFSU) causes most of Russia’s HIV-1 infections. However, the spectrum of drug-resistance mutations (DRMs) in antiretroviral experienced patients with this variant has not been studied. Methods Between 2010 and 2013, genotypic resistance testing was performed on plasma samples from 366 antiretroviral-experienced patients in Siberia. Results Three-hundred patients (82%) had subtype AFSU and 55 (15%) had CRF02_AG viruses. The pattern of DRMs was consistent with patient antiretroviral history with one exception. G190S was the most common nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance mutation, occurring in 55 (33%) subtype AFSU viruses from 167 NNRTI-experienced patients compared with none of 37 CRF02_AG viruses from NNRTI-experienced patients (P < 0.001). The next most common subtype AFSU NNRTI-resistance mutation, K103N, occurred in 25 (15%) viruses. Wild-type glycine (G) at position 190 is encoded by GGC in more than 99% of published AFSU strains. By contrast, G190 is encoded by GGA or GGG in 97% of other subtypes and in subtype A strains outside of the FSU. Therefore, G190S results from a single G→A transition: G (GGC) → S (AGC) almost exclusively in subtype AFSU viruses. Conclusion The predisposition of subtype AFSU to G190S is concerning because G→A is the most common HIV-1 mutation and because G190S causes higher levels of nevirapine and efavirenz resistance than K103N. This study exemplifies the need for characterizing the genetic mechanisms of resistance in diverse populations and warrants studies to verify that NRTI/NNRTI regimens are as efficacious in treating subtype AFSU as viruses belonging to other subtypes. PMID:25259833

  14. Structure of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase with the Inhibitor β-thujaplicinol Bound at the RNase H Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Himmel, Daniel M.; Maegley, Karen A.; Pauly, Tom A.; Bauman, Joseph D.; Das, Kalyan; Dharia, Chhaya; Clark, Arthur D.; Ryan, Kevin; Hickey, Michael J.; Love, Robert A.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Bergqvist, Simon; Arnold, Eddy

    2012-01-01

    Summary Novel inhibitors are needed to counteract the rapid emergence of drug-resistant HIV variants. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) has both DNA polymerase and RNase H (RNH) enzymatic activitie