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Sample records for hiv-1 protease inhibitor

  1. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  2. Novel pseudosymmetric inhibitors of HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, A.; Roesel, J.; Gruetter, M.; Tintelnot-Blomley, M.; Alteri, E.; Bold, G.; Lang, M.

    1993-12-31

    Taking into account the unique C-2 symmetric nature of the HIV-1 protease homodimer, the authors have designed and synthesized novel inhibitors featuring an almost symmetric structure. Compounds containing the easily accessible Phe[CH(OH)CH{sub 2}N(NH)]Cha dipeptide isostere as a nonhydrolyzable replacement of the scissile amide bond of the natural substrate are potent inhibitors in vitro with IC{sub 50} values of 9 to 50 nM. The antiviral activity depends mainly on the nature of the anylated valine residues linked to the dipeptide mimic. In this series, CGP 53820 combines both high potency and excellent specificity. Its predicted symmetric binding pattern is illustrated by the X-ray structure analysis performed with the corresponding enzyme-inhibitor complex.

  3. Epsilon substituted lysinol derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kristen L G; Holloway, M Katharine; Su, Hua-Poo; Carroll, Steven S; Burlein, Christine; Touch, Sinoeun; DiStefano, Daniel J; Sanchez, Rosa I; Williams, Theresa M; Vacca, Joseph P; Coburn, Craig A

    2010-07-15

    A series of HIV-1 protease inhibitors containing an epsilon substituted lysinol backbone was synthesized. Two novel synthetic routes using N-boc-L-glutamic acid alpha-benzyl ester and 2,6-diaminopimelic acid were developed. Incorporation of this epsilon substituent enabled access to the S2 pocket of the enzyme, affording high potency inhibitors. Modeling studies and synthetic efforts suggest the potency increase is due to both conformational bias and van der Waals interactions with the S2 pocket.

  4. Prediction of HIV-1 protease inhibitor resistance using a protein-inhibitor flexible docking approach.

    PubMed

    Jenwitheesuk, Ekachai; Samudrala, Ram

    2005-01-01

    Emergence of drug resistance remains one of the most challenging issues in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Here we focus on resistance to HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) at a molecular level, which can be analysed genotypically or phenotypically. Genotypic assays are based on the analysis of mutations associated with reduced drug susceptibility, but are problematic because of the numerous mutations and mutational patterns that confer drug resistance. Phenotypic resistance or susceptibility can be experimentally evaluated by measuring the amount of free drug bound to HIV-1 protease molecules, but this procedure is expensive and time-consuming. To overcome these problems, we have developed a docking protocol that takes protein-inhibitor flexibility into account to predict phenotypic drug resistance. For six FDA-approved Pls and a total of 1792 HIV-1 protease sequence mutants, we used a combination of inhibitor flexible docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to calculate protein-inhibitor binding energies. Prediction results were expressed as fold changes of the calculated inhibitory constant (Ki), and the samples predicted to have fold-increase in calculated Ki above the fixed cut-off were defined as drug resistant. Our combined docking and MD protocol achieved accuracies ranging from 72-83% in predicting resistance/susceptibility for five of the six drugs evaluated. Evaluating the method only on samples where our predictions concurred with established knowledge-based methods resulted in increased accuracies of 83-94% for the six drugs. The results suggest that a physics-based approach, which is readily applicable to any novel PI and/or mutant, can be used judiciously with knowledge-based approaches that require experimental training data to devise accurate models of HIV-1 Pl resistance prediction.

  5. Fluorogenic Assay for Inhibitors of HIV-1 Protease with Sub-picomolar Affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windsor, Ian W.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2015-08-01

    A fluorogenic substrate for HIV-1 protease was designed and used as the basis for a hypersensitive assay. The substrate exhibits a kcat of 7.4 s-1, KM of 15 μM, and an increase in fluorescence intensity of 104-fold upon cleavage, thus providing sensitivity that is unmatched in a continuous assay of HIV-1 protease. These properties enabled the enzyme concentration in an activity assay to be reduced to 25 pM, which is close to the Kd value of the protease dimer. By fitting inhibition data to Morrison’s equation, Ki values of amprenavir, darunavir, and tipranavir were determined to be 135, 10, and 82 pM, respectively. This assay, which is capable of measuring Ki values as low as 0.25 pM, is well-suited for characterizing the next generation of HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

  6. Coevolutionary analysis of resistance-evading peptidomimetic inhibitors of HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Rosin, C D; Belew, R K; Morris, G M; Olson, A J; Goodsell, D S

    1999-02-16

    We have developed a coevolutionary method for the computational design of HIV-1 protease inhibitors selected for their ability to retain efficacy in the face of protease mutation. For HIV-1 protease, typical drug design techniques are shown to be ineffective for the design of resistance-evading inhibitors: An inhibitor that is a direct analogue of one of the natural substrates will be susceptible to resistance mutation, as will inhibitors designed to fill the active site of the wild-type or a mutant enzyme. Two design principles are demonstrated: (i) For enzymes with broad substrate specificity, such as HIV-1 protease, resistance-evading inhibitors are best designed against the immutable properties of the active site-the properties that must be conserved in any mutant protease to retain the ability to bind and cleave all of the native substrates. (ii) Robust resistance-evading inhibitors can be designed by optimizing activity simultaneously against a large set of mutant enzymes, incorporating as much of the mutational space as possible.

  7. Coevolutionary analysis of resistance-evading peptidomimetic inhibitors of HIV-1 protease

    PubMed Central

    Rosin, Christopher D.; Belew, Richard K.; Morris, Garrett M.; Olson, Arthur J.; Goodsell, David S.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a coevolutionary method for the computational design of HIV-1 protease inhibitors selected for their ability to retain efficacy in the face of protease mutation. For HIV-1 protease, typical drug design techniques are shown to be ineffective for the design of resistance-evading inhibitors: An inhibitor that is a direct analogue of one of the natural substrates will be susceptible to resistance mutation, as will inhibitors designed to fill the active site of the wild-type or a mutant enzyme. Two design principles are demonstrated: (i) For enzymes with broad substrate specificity, such as HIV-1 protease, resistance-evading inhibitors are best designed against the immutable properties of the active site—the properties that must be conserved in any mutant protease to retain the ability to bind and cleave all of the native substrates. (ii) Robust resistance-evading inhibitors can be designed by optimizing activity simultaneously against a large set of mutant enzymes, incorporating as much of the mutational space as possible. PMID:9990030

  8. Virtual Screening of Indonesian Herbal Database as HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Yanuar, Arry; Suhartanto, Heru; Mun׳im, Abdul; Anugraha, Bram Hik; Syahdi, Rezi Riadhi

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 (Human immunodeficiency virus type 1)׳s infection is considered as one of most harmful disease known by human, the survivability rate of the host reduced significantly when it developed into AIDS. HIV drug resistance is one of the main problems of its treatment and several drug designs have been done to find new leads compound as the cure. In this study, in silico virtual screening approach was used to find lead molecules from the library or database of natural compounds as HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Virtual screening against Indonesian Herbal Database with AutoDock was performed on HIV-1 protease. From the virtual screening, top ten compounds obtained were 8-Hydroxyapigenin 8-(2",4"-disulfatoglucuronide), Isoscutellarein 4'-methyl ether, Amaranthin, Torvanol A, Ursonic acid, 5-Carboxypyranocyanidin 3-O-(6"-O-malonyl-beta-glucopyranoside), Oleoside, Jacoumaric acid, Platanic acid and 5-Carboxypyranocyanidin 3-O-beta-glucopyranoside. PMID:24616554

  9. Synthesis of N-glyoxylyl peptides and their in vitro evaluation as HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Qasmi, D; de Rosny, E; René, L; Badet, B; Vergely, I; Boggetto, N; Reboud-Ravaux, M

    1997-04-01

    A series of novel synthetic peptides containing an N-terminal glyoxylyl function (CHOCO-) have been tested as inhibitors of HIV-1 protease. The N-glyoxylyl peptide CHOCO-Pro-Ile-Val-NH2, which fulfills the specificity requirements of the MA/CA protease cleavage site together with the criteria of transition state analogue of the catalyzed reaction, was found to be a moderate competitive inhibitor although favorable interactions were visualized between its hydrated form and the catalytic aspartates using molecular modeling. Increasing the length of the peptide sequence led to compounds acting only as substrates.

  10. Computational mutation scanning and drug resistance mechanisms of HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ge-Fei; Yang, Guang-Fu; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2010-07-29

    The drug resistance of various clinically available HIV-1 protease inhibitors has been studied using a new computational protocol, that is, computational mutation scanning (CMS), leading to valuable insights into the resistance mechanisms and structure-resistance correction of the HIV-1 protease inhibitors associated with a variety of active site and nonactive site mutations. By using the CMS method, the calculated mutation-caused shifts of the binding free energies linearly correlate very well with those derived from the corresponding experimental data, suggesting that the CMS protocol may be used as a generalized approach to predict drug resistance associated with amino acid mutations. Because it is essentially important for understanding the structure-resistance correlation and for structure-based drug design to develop an effective computational protocol for drug resistance prediction, the reasonable and computationally efficient CMS protocol for drug resistance prediction should be valuable for future structure-based design and discovery of antiresistance drugs in various therapeutic areas.

  11. Design, Synthesis, Biological and Structural Evaluations of Novel HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors to Combat Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Parai, Maloy Kumar; Huggins, David J.; Cao, Hong; Nalam, Madhavi N. L.; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Tidor, Bruce; Rana, Tariq M.

    2012-01-01

    A series of new HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) were designed using a general strategy that combines computational structure-based design with substrate-envelope constraints. The PIs incorporate various alcohol-derived P2 carbamates with acyclic and cyclic heteroatomic functionalities into the (R)-hydroxyethylamine isostere. Most of the new PIs show potent binding affinities against wild-type HIV-1 protease and three multidrug resistant (MDR) variants, in particular inhibitors containing 2,2-dichloroacetamide, pyrrolidinone, imidazolidinone, and oxazolidinone moieties at P2 are the most potent with Ki values in the picomolar range. Several new PIs exhibit nanomolar antiviral potencies against patient-derived wild-type viruses from HIV-1 clades A, B, and C and two MDR variants. Crystal structure analyses of four potent inhibitors revealed that carbonyl groups of the new P2 moieties promote extensive hydrogen bond interactions with the invariant Asp-29 residue of the protease. These structure-activity relationship findings can be utilized to design new PIs with enhanced enzyme inhibitory and antiviral potencies. PMID:22708897

  12. Relation between flexibility and positively selected HIV-1 protease mutants against inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Braz, Antônio S K; Tufanetto, Patrícia; Perahia, David; Scott, Luis P B

    2012-12-01

    The antiretroviral chemotherapy helps to reduce the mortality of HIVs infected patients. However, RNA dependant virus replication has a high mutation rate. Human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 protease plays an essential role in viral replication cycle. This protein is an important target for therapy with viral protein inhibitors. There are few works using normal mode analysis to investigate this problem from the structural changes viewpoint. The investigation of protein flexibility may be important for the study of processes associated with conformational changes and state transitions. The normal mode analysis allowed us to investigate structural changes in the protease (such as flexibility) in a straightforward way and try to associate these changes with the increase of fitness for each positively selected HIV-1 mutant protease of patients treated with several protease inhibitors (saquinavir, indinavir, ritonavir, nelfinavir, lopinavir, fosamprenavir, atazanavir, darunavir, and tripanavir) in combination or separately. These positively selected mutations introduce significant flexibility in important regions such as the active site cavity and flaps. These mutations were also able to cause changes in accessible solvent area. This study showed that the majority of HIV-1 protease mutants can be grouped into two main classes of protein flexibility behavior. We presented a new approach to study structural changes caused by positively selected mutations in a pathogen protein, for instance the HIV-1 protease and their relationship with their resistance mechanism against known inhibitors. The method can be applied to any pharmaceutically relevant pathogen proteins and could be very useful to understand the effects of positively selected mutations in the context of structural changes.

  13. Limited HIV-1 Reactivation in Resting CD4+ T cells from Aviremic Patients under Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Abbas, Wasim; Bouchat, Sophie; Gatot, Jean-Stéphane; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Kabeya, Kabamba; Clumeck, Nathan; De Wit, Stéphane; Van Lint, Carine; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    A latent viral reservoir that resides in resting CD4+ T cells represents a major barrier for eradication of HIV infection. We test here the impact of HIV protease inhibitor (PI) based combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) over nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based cART on HIV-1 reactivation and integration in resting CD4+ T cells. This is a prospective cohort study of patients with chronic HIV-1 infection treated with conventional cART with an undetectable viremia. We performed a seven-year study of 47 patients with chronic HIV-infection treated with cART regimens and with undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA levels for at least 1 year. Of these 47 patients treated with cART, 24 were treated with a PI-based regimen and 23 with a NNRTI-based regimen as their most recent treatment for more than one year. We evaluated the HIV-1 reservoir using reactivation assay and integrated HIV-1 DNA, respectively, in resting CD4+ T cells. Resting CD4+ T cells isolated from PI-treated patients compared to NNRTI-treated patients showed a limited HIV-1 reactivation upon T-cell stimulation (p = 0·024) and a lower level of HIV-1 integration (p = 0·024). Our study indicates that PI-based cART could be more efficient than NNRTI-based cART for limiting HIV-1 reactivation in aviremic chronically infected patients. PMID:27922055

  14. Protonation state and free energy calculation of HIV-1 protease-inhibitor complex based on electrostatic polarisation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Maoyou; Jiang, Xiaonan; Jiang, Ning

    2014-06-01

    The protonation states of catalytic Asp25/25‧ residues remarkably affect the binding mechanism of the HIV-1 protease-inhibitor complex. Here we report a molecular dynamics simulation study, which includes electrostatic polarisation effect, to investigate the influence of Asp25/25‧ protonation states upon the binding free energy of the HIV-1 protease and a C2-symmetric inhibitor. Good agreements are obtained on inhibitor structure, hydrogen bond network, and binding free energy between our theoretical calculations and the experimental data. The calculations show that the Asp25 residue is deprotonated, and the Asp25‧ residue is protonated. Our results reveal that the Asp25/25‧ residues can have different protonation states when binding to different inhibitors although the protease and the inhibitors have the same symmetry. This study offers some insights into understanding the protonation state of HIV-1 protease-inhibitor complex, which could be helpful in designing new inhibitor molecules.

  15. In vitro selection and characterization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates with reduced sensitivity to hydroxyethylamino sulfonamide inhibitors of HIV-1 aspartyl protease.

    PubMed

    Partaledis, J A; Yamaguchi, K; Tisdale, M; Blair, E E; Falcione, C; Maschera, B; Myers, R E; Pazhanisamy, S; Futer, O; Cullinan, A B

    1995-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants with reduced sensitivity to the hydroxyethylamino sulfonamide protease inhibitors VB-11,328 and VX-478 have been selected in vitro by two independent serial passage protocols with HIV-1 in CEM-SS and MT-4 cell lines. Virus populations with greater than 100-fold-increased resistance to both inhibitors compared with the parental virus have been obtained. DNA sequence analyses of the protease genes from VB-11,328- and VX-478-resistant variants reveal a sequential accumulation of point mutations, with similar resistance patterns occurring for the two inhibitors. The deduced amino acid substitutions in the resistant protease are Leu-10-->Phe, Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val. This is the first observation in HIV protease resistance studies of an Ile-50-->Val mutation, a mutation that appears to arise uniquely against the sulfonamide inhibitor class. When the substitutions observed were introduced as single mutations into an HIV-1 infectious clone (HXB2), only the Ile-50-->Val mutant showed reduced sensitivity (two- to threefold) to VB-11,328 and VX-478. A triple protease mutant infectious clone carrying the mutations Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val, however, showed much greater reduction in sensitivity (14- to 20-fold) to VB-11,328 and VX-478. The same mutations were studied in recombinant HIV protease. The mutant protease Ile-50-->Val displays a much lower affinity for the inhibitors than the parent enzyme (< or = 80-fold). The protease triply mutated at Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val shows an even greater decrease in inhibitor binding (< or = 270-fold). The sulfonamide-resistant HIV protease variants remain sensitive to inhibitors from other chemical classes (Ro 31-8959 and L-735,524), suggesting possibilities for clinical use of HIV protease inhibitors in combination or serially.

  16. In vitro selection and characterization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates with reduced sensitivity to hydroxyethylamino sulfonamide inhibitors of HIV-1 aspartyl protease.

    PubMed Central

    Partaledis, J A; Yamaguchi, K; Tisdale, M; Blair, E E; Falcione, C; Maschera, B; Myers, R E; Pazhanisamy, S; Futer, O; Cullinan, A B

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants with reduced sensitivity to the hydroxyethylamino sulfonamide protease inhibitors VB-11,328 and VX-478 have been selected in vitro by two independent serial passage protocols with HIV-1 in CEM-SS and MT-4 cell lines. Virus populations with greater than 100-fold-increased resistance to both inhibitors compared with the parental virus have been obtained. DNA sequence analyses of the protease genes from VB-11,328- and VX-478-resistant variants reveal a sequential accumulation of point mutations, with similar resistance patterns occurring for the two inhibitors. The deduced amino acid substitutions in the resistant protease are Leu-10-->Phe, Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val. This is the first observation in HIV protease resistance studies of an Ile-50-->Val mutation, a mutation that appears to arise uniquely against the sulfonamide inhibitor class. When the substitutions observed were introduced as single mutations into an HIV-1 infectious clone (HXB2), only the Ile-50-->Val mutant showed reduced sensitivity (two- to threefold) to VB-11,328 and VX-478. A triple protease mutant infectious clone carrying the mutations Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val, however, showed much greater reduction in sensitivity (14- to 20-fold) to VB-11,328 and VX-478. The same mutations were studied in recombinant HIV protease. The mutant protease Ile-50-->Val displays a much lower affinity for the inhibitors than the parent enzyme (< or = 80-fold). The protease triply mutated at Met-46-->Ile, Ile-47-->Val, and Ile-50-->Val shows an even greater decrease in inhibitor binding (< or = 270-fold). The sulfonamide-resistant HIV protease variants remain sensitive to inhibitors from other chemical classes (Ro 31-8959 and L-735,524), suggesting possibilities for clinical use of HIV protease inhibitors in combination or serially. PMID:7636964

  17. Design and synthesis of HIV-1 protease inhibitors for a long-acting injectable drug application.

    PubMed

    Kesteleyn, Bart; Amssoms, Katie; Schepens, Wim; Hache, Geerwin; Verschueren, Wim; Van De Vreken, Wim; Rombauts, Klara; Meurs, Greet; Sterkens, Patrick; Stoops, Bart; Baert, Lieven; Austin, Nigel; Wegner, Jörg; Masungi, Chantal; Dierynck, Inge; Lundgren, Stina; Jönsson, Daniel; Parkes, Kevin; Kalayanov, Genadiy; Wallberg, Hans; Rosenquist, Asa; Samuelsson, Bertil; Van Emelen, Kristof; Thuring, Jan Willem

    2013-01-01

    The design and synthesis of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) (1-22), which display high potency against HIV-1 wild-type and multi-PI-resistant HIV-mutant clinical isolates, is described. Lead optimization was initiated from compound 1, a Phe-Phe hydroxyethylene peptidomimetic PI, and was directed towards the discovery of new PIs suitable for a long-acting (LA) injectable drug application. Introducing a heterocyclic 6-methoxy-3-pyridinyl or a 6-(dimethylamino)-3-pyridinyl moiety (R(3)) at the para-position of the P1' benzyl fragment generated compounds with antiviral potency in the low single digit nanomolar range. Halogenation or alkylation of the metabolic hot spots on the various aromatic rings resulted in PIs with high stability against degradation in human liver microsomes and low plasma clearance in rats. Replacing the chromanolamine moiety (R(1)) in the P2 protease binding site by a cyclopentanolamine or a cyclohexanolamine derivative provided a series of high clearance PIs (16-22) with EC(50)s on wild-type HIV-1 in the range of 0.8-1.8 nM. PIs 18 and 22, formulated as nanosuspensions, showed gradual but sustained and complete release from the injection site over two months in rats, and were therefore identified as interesting candidates for a LA injectable drug application for treating HIV/AIDS.

  18. HIV-1 replication in central nervous system increases over time on only protease inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Donath, Maximilian; Wolf, Timo; Stürmer, Martin; Herrmann, Eva; Bickel, Markus; Khaykin, Pavel; Göpel, Siri; Gute, Peter; Haberl, Annette; de Leuw, Philipp; Schüttfort, Gundolf; Berger, Annemarie; Stephan, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    There are concerns about central nervous system (CNS)-replication of HIV-1 in patients on boosted protease inhibitors. Purpose of this study was to compare HIV-1 viral loads (VLs) from patients treated with only boosted dual protease inhibitor (bdPI), versus combination antiretroviral therapy (cART group), containing two nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) and a third partner. All patients from a large German HIV-treatment cohort with available medication, clinical and demographic data, including results from simultaneous HIV-1 viral load (VL) assessments in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood plasma, were retrospectively evaluated as controlled cross-sectional study. CSF had been obtained from patients with variable neurological symptoms during 2005-2014. Statistical analysis comprised nonparametric tests, regression and correlation techniques accounting for undetectable quantifications. Statistical analysis comprised nonparametric tests, regression and correlation techniques accounting for undetectable quantifications. Overall, 155 patients were evaluable (bdPI: 24; cART: 131). At time of CSF-collection, both groups were comparable in age, gender, CD4-cell counts, or primary HIV-transmission risks, though bdPI patients were clinically more advanced. The proportion of patients with undetectable HIV-1 (<50 copies/ml) in CSF was lower for bdPI group (25 vs 49.6 %; p = 0.026), but similar in plasma (46 vs 41 %). Median CSF-VL was higher in bdPI group (600 vs 50 copies/ml; p = 0.027) and similar in plasma. Mean VL CSF/plasma ratio was 342.91 for bdPI- and 54.48 for cART patients (p < 0.001). Pearson's regression analysis revealed a trend for an elevated VL-ratio over time within bdPI group. HIV-1 replication was higher and more frequently detectable in CSF from bdPI patients, indicating a worse CNS penetration effectiveness of used boosted PI. Within bdPI group, measured CNS-viral replication was increasing over time, suggesting an over

  19. Novel two-round phenotypic assay for protease inhibitor susceptibility testing of recombinant and primary HIV-1 isolates.

    PubMed

    Puertas, Maria C; Buzón, Maria J; Ballestero, Mònica; Van Den Eede, Peter; Clotet, Bonaventura; Prado, Julia G; Martinez-Picado, Javier

    2012-12-01

    Antiretroviral drug susceptibility tests facilitate therapeutic management of HIV-1-infected patients. Although genotyping systems are affordable, inaccuracy in the interpretation of complex mutational patterns may limit their usefulness. Currently available HIV-1 phenotypic assays are based on the generation of recombinant viruses in which the specific viral gene of interest, derived from a patient plasma sample, is cloned into a susceptible genetic viral backbone prior to in vitro drug susceptibility evaluation. Nevertheless, in the case of protease inhibitors, not only are mutations in the HIV-1 protease-coding region involved in resistance, but the role of Gag in drug susceptibility has also recently been reported. In order to avoid the inherent limitations resulting from partial cloning of the viral genome, we designed and evaluated a new experimental strategy to test the in vitro susceptibility of primary viral isolates to protease inhibitors. Our protocol, which is based on a two-round infection protocol using the reporter TZM-bl cell line, showed a good correlation with genotypic resistance prediction and with the Antivirogram phenotypic assay, in both protease-recombinant viruses and primary viral isolates. The protocol is suitable for any HIV-1 subtype and enables rapid in-house measurement of protease inhibitor susceptibility, thus making it possible to evaluate the concomitant effects of both patient-derived gag and protease-coding regions.

  20. Complexity in modeling and understanding protonation states: computational titration of HIV-1-protease-inhibitor complexes.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Ashutosh; Fornabaio, Micaela; Spyrakis, Francesca; Mozzarelli, Andrea; Cozzini, Pietro; Kellogg, Glen E

    2007-11-01

    The computational-titration (CT) algorithm based on the 'natural' Hydropathic INTeractions (HINT) force field is described. The HINT software model is an empirical, non-Newtonian force field derived from experimentally measured partition coefficients for solvent transfer between octanol and H(2)O (log P(o/w)). The CT algorithm allows the identification, modeling, and optimization of multiple protonation states of residues and ligand functional groups at the protein-ligand active site. The importance of taking into account pH and ionization states of residues, which strongly affect the process of ligand binding, for correctly predicting binding free energies is discussed. The application of the CT protocol to a set of six cyclic inhibitors in their complexes with HIV-1 protease is presented, and the advance of HINT as a virtual-screening tool is outlined.

  1. Computational study of the resistance shown by the Subtype B / HIV-1 Protease to currently known inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Genoni, Alessandro; Morra, Giulia; Merz, Kenneth M.; Colombo, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 Protease (HIV-1 PR) is an essential enzyme in the HIV-1 life cycle. As such, this protein represents a major drug target in AIDS therapy, but emerging resistance to anti-retroviral inhibitor cocktails, due to high viral mutation rates, represents a significant challenge in AIDS treatment. Many mutations are not located within the active site or binding pocket, nor they do significantly modify the 3D structural organization of the enzyme; hence, the mechanism(s) by which they alter inhibitor affinity for the Protease remains uncertain. In this article, we present an all-atom computational analysis of the dynamic residue-residue coordination between the active site residues and the rest of the protein and of the energetic properties of different HIV-1 PR complexes. We analyze both the wild type form and mutated forms that induce drug resistance. In particular, the results show differences between the wild type and the mutants in their mechanism of dynamic coordination, in the signal propagation between the active site residues and the rest of the protein and in the energy-networks responsible for the stabilization of the bound inhibitor conformation. Finally, we propose a dynamic and energetic explanation for HIV-1 Protease drug resistance and, through this model, we identify a possible new site that could be helpful in the design of a new family of HIV-1 PR allosteric inhibitors. PMID:20415450

  2. The QSAR and docking calculations of fullerene derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Noha A.

    2015-02-01

    The inhibition of HIV-1 protease is considered as one of the most important targets for drug design and the deactivation of HIV-1. In the present work, the fullerene surface (C60) is modified by adding oxygen atoms as well as hydroxymethylcarbonyl (HMC) groups to form 6 investigated fullerene derivative compounds. These compounds have one, two, three, four or five O atoms + HMC groups at different positions on phenyl ring. The effect of the repeating of these groups on the ability of suggested compounds to inhibit the HIV protease is studied by calculating both Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) properties and docking simulation. Based on the QSAR descriptors, the solubility and the hydrophilicity of studied fullerene derivatives increased with increasing the number of oxygen atoms + HMC groups in the compound. While docking calculations indicate that, the compound with two oxygen atoms + HMC groups could interact and binds with HIV-1 protease active site. This is could be attributed to the active site residues of HIV-1 protease are hydrophobic except the two aspartic acids. So that, the increase in the hydrophilicity and polarity of the compound is preventing and/or decreasing the hydrophobic interaction between the compound and HIV-1 protease active site.

  3. Structure-based design of carbon nanotubes as HIV-1 protease inhibitors: atomistic and coarse-grained simulations.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan; Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua; Shi, Xinghua; Gao, Huajian

    2010-09-01

    Nanoparticles such as fullerenes and carbon nanotubes have been extensively studied for biomedical applications. In this paper, we report the design of carbon nanotubes as HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Docking and molecular dynamics calculations are performed using an atomistic model to explore the optimal interaction structure and free energy between the nanotube and HIV-1 protease. A coarse-grained model is then developed based on the atomistic model, allowing us to investigate the dynamic behaviors of the protease in the bound and unbound states. The dynamic process reveals that the carbon nanotube is able to bind to the active site of the protease and prevent the active flaps from opening up, thus blocking the function of the protease. This process is strongly influenced by the size of the nanotube. The binding of carbon nanotubes to an alternative binding site other than the active site is also explored. Therefore, carbon nanotube-based inhibitors have great potential for application as HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

  4. Effect of Biomolecular Conformation on Docking Simulation: A Case Study on a Potent HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Razzaghi-Asl, Nima; Sepehri, Saghi; Ebadi, Ahmad; Miri, Ramin; Shahabipour, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is a disease pertained to the human immune system. Given its crucial role in viral replication, HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) is a prime therapeutic target in AIDS therapy. In this regard, the dynamic aspects of ligand-enzyme interactions may indicate an important role of conformational variability in HIV-1 PR inhibitor/drug design. In the present contribution, the effect of HIV-1 PR flexibility (within multiple crystallographic structures of HIV-1 PR) on binding to the Amprenavir was elucidated via an ensemble docking approach. Molecular docking studies were performed via advanced AutoDock4.2 software. Ensemble docking of Amprenavir into the active site of various conformations of HIV-1 PR predicted different interaction modes/energies. Analysis of binding factors in terms of docking false negatives/positives revealed a determinant role of enzyme conformational variation in prediction of optimum induced fit (PDB ID: 1HPV). The outcomes of this study demonstrated that conformation of receptor may significantly affect the accuracy of docking/binding results in structure-based rational design of anti HIV-1 PR agents. Furthermore; some strategies to re-score the docking results in HIV-1 PR targeted docking studies were proposed. PMID:26330867

  5. A preference-based free-energy parameterization of enzyme-inhibitor binding. Applications to HIV-1-protease inhibitor design.

    PubMed Central

    Wallqvist, A.; Jernigan, R. L.; Covell, D. G.

    1995-01-01

    The interface between protein receptor-ligand complexes has been studied with respect to their binary interatomic interactions. Crystal structure data have been used to catalogue surfaces buried by atoms from each member of a bound complex and determine a statistical preference for pairs of amino-acid atoms. A simple free energy model of the receptor-ligand system is constructed from these atom-atom preferences and used to assess the energetic importance of interfacial interactions. The free energy approximation of binding strength in this model has a reliability of about +/- 1.5 kcal/mol, despite limited knowledge of the unbound states. The main utility of such a scheme lies in the identification of important stabilizing atomic interactions across the receptor-ligand interface. Thus, apart from an overall hydrophobic attraction (Young L, Jernigan RL, Covell DG, 1994, Protein Sci 3:717-729), a rich variety of specific interactions is observed. An analysis of 10 HIV-1 protease inhibitor complexes is presented that reveals a common binding motif comprised of energetically important contacts with a rather limited set of atoms. Design improvements to existing HIV-1 protease inhibitors are explored based on a detailed analysis of this binding motif. PMID:8528086

  6. Critical differences in HIV-1 and HIV-2 protease specificity for clinical inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Tie, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Boross, Peter I.; Chiu, Ting-Yi; Ghosh, Arun K.; Tozser, Jozsef; Louis, John M.; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2012-03-15

    Clinical inhibitor amprenavir (APV) is less effective on HIV-2 protease (PR{sub 2}) than on HIV-1 protease (PR{sub 1}). We solved the crystal structure of PR{sub 2} with APV at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution to identify structural changes associated with the lowered inhibition. Furthermore, we analyzed the PR{sub 1} mutant (PR{sub 1M}) with substitutions V32I, I47V, and V82I that mimic the inhibitor binding site of PR{sub 2}. PR{sub 1M} more closely resembled PR{sub 2} than PR{sub 1} in catalytic efficiency on four substrate peptides and inhibition by APV, whereas few differences were seen for two other substrates and inhibition by saquinavir (SQV) and darunavir (DRV). High resolution crystal structures of PR{sub 1M} with APV, DRV, and SQV were compared with available PR{sub 1} and PR{sub 2} complexes. Val/Ile32 and Ile/Val47 showed compensating interactions with SQV in PR{sub 1M} and PR{sub 1}, however, Ile82 interacted with a second SQV bound in an extension of the active site cavity of PR{sub 1M}. Residues 32 and 82 maintained similar interactions with DRV and APV in all the enzymes, whereas Val47 and Ile47 had opposing effects in the two subunits. Significantly diminished interactions were seen for the aniline of APV bound in PR{sub 1M} and PR{sub 2} relative to the strong hydrogen bonds observed in PR{sub 1}, consistent with 15- and 19-fold weaker inhibition, respectively. Overall, PR{sub 1M} partially replicates the specificity of PR{sub 2} and gives insight into drug resistant mutations at residues 32, 47, and 82. Moreover, this analysis provides a structural explanation for the weaker antiviral effects of APV on HIV-2.

  7. HIV-1 protease inhibitor induced oxidative stress suppresses glucose stimulated insulin release: protection with thymoquinone.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Surabhi; Mondal, Debasis; Agrawal, Krishna C

    2009-04-01

    The highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) regimen has considerably reduced the mortality rate in HIV-1 positive patients. However, long-term exposure to HAART is associated with a metabolic syndrome manifesting cardiovascular dysfunction, lipodystrophy, and insulin resistance syndrome (IRS). The inclusion of HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) in HAART has been linked to the induction of IRS. Although several molecular mechanisms of PI-induced effects on insulin action have been postulated, the deleterious effects of PIs on insulin production by pancreatic beta-cells have not been fully investigated and therapeutic strategies to ameliorate insulin dysregulation at this level have not been targeted. The present study showed that exposure to several different PIs, nelfinavir (5-10 microM), saquinavir (5-10 microM) and atazanavir (8-20 microM), decreases glucose stimulated insulin secretion from rat pancreatic beta-cells (INS-1). Nelfinavir significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and suppressed cytosolic, but not mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels. Nelfinvair also decreased both glutathione and ATP and increased UCP2 levels in these cells. Simultaneous treatment with thymoquinone (TQ) (2.5 microM), an active ingredient of black seed oil, significantly inhibited the effect of nelfinavir on augmented ROS production and suppressed SOD levels. Both TQ and black seed oil exposure increased glucose stimulated insulin secretion and ameliorated the suppressive effect of nelfinavir. The present findings imply a direct role of ROS in PI induced deleterious effects on pancreatic beta-cells. Our findings also suggest that TQ may be used as a potential therapeutic agent to normalize the dysregulated insulin production observed in HAART treated patients.

  8. 3D-QSAR studies on chromone derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn; Samee, Weerasak; Pimthon, Jutarat

    2004-02-01

    The three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) approach using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) was applied to a series of 30 chromone derivatives, a new class of HIV-1 protease inhibitors. The best predictive CoMFA model gives cross-validated r2 ( q2)=0.763, non-cross-validated r2=0.967, standard error of estimate ( S)=5.092, F=90.701. The best CoMSIA model has q2=0.707, non-cross-validated r2=0.943, S=7.018, F=51.734, included steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic, and hydrogen bond donor fields. The predictive ability of these models was validated by a set of five compounds that were not included in the training set. The calculated (predicted) and experimental inhibitory activities were well correlated. The contour maps obtained from CoMFA and CoMSIA models were in agreement with the previous docking study for this chromone series.

  9. [Dysmetabolic syndrome related to HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Review of the literature and personal data].

    PubMed

    Urso, R; Croce, G F; Tubili, C; De Marco, M; La Scala, P; Luglio, D; Narciso, P

    2000-02-01

    HIV-positive patients receiving antiretroviral therapy with HIV-1 protease-inhibitors (PI) frequently show insulin-resistance, impaired glucose tolerance, hypertriglyceridaemia and lipodystrophy (LD). LD has often been reported only after the beginning of PI therapy. Some authors link LD to HIV chronic infection, some others suggest that PIs increase pre-existent disturb. Preliminary data of an observational study drawn in IV day-hospital of Spallanzani Institute in Rome showed hypertriglyceridaemia in 36.4% and hyperglycaemia in 11.2% of patients treated with PI. Carr suggests that such drugs should have this lipid-increasing effect because of their inhibition of low density lipoprotein-receptor-related protein, cytoplasmic retinoic-acid binding protein type 1 and P450 3A cytochrome. This theory doesn't explain why both untreated patients and treated with only reverse transcriptase inhibitors show sometimes the same disorders. According to another hypothesis Tumor necrosis factor-alpha, through inhibition of lipoprotein-lipase, would determine high fat-storage in the adipose tissue. Cardiovascular risk factors have always to be assessed before starting a therapy with PI. Glycaemia, triglyceridaemia, cholesterolaemia have to be performed every three months during the treatment and, if necessary, C-Peptide and insulinaemia too. A treatment with lipid-lowering drugs is always recommended in patients with hypertriglyceridaemia > 500 mg/dl and/or hypercholesterolaemia LDL > 190 mg/dl in two following checks. Fibrates have proven to be effective in reducing hypertriglyceridaemia, but there is no certainty that such therapies could have good effects on the LD itself too.

  10. Design, Synthesis, and Biological and Structural Evaluations of Novel HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors To Combat Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Parai, Maloy Kumar; Huggins, David J.; Cao, Hong; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Tidor, Bruce; Rana, Tariq M.

    2012-09-11

    A series of new HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) were designed using a general strategy that combines computational structure-based design with substrate-envelope constraints. The PIs incorporate various alcohol-derived P2 carbamates with acyclic and cyclic heteroatomic functionalities into the (R)-hydroxyethylamine isostere. Most of the new PIs show potent binding affinities against wild-type HIV-1 protease and three multidrug resistant (MDR) variants. In particular, inhibitors containing the 2,2-dichloroacetamide, pyrrolidinone, imidazolidinone, and oxazolidinone moieties at P2 are the most potent with Ki values in the picomolar range. Several new PIs exhibit nanomolar antiviral potencies against patient-derived wild-type viruses from HIV-1 clades A, B, and C and two MDR variants. Crystal structure analyses of four potent inhibitors revealed that carbonyl groups of the new P2 moieties promote extensive hydrogen bond interactions with the invariant Asp29 residue of the protease. These structure-activity relationship findings can be utilized to design new PIs with enhanced enzyme inhibitory and antiviral potencies.

  11. A cell-free enzymatic activity assay for the evaluation of HIV-1 drug resistance to protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Satoko; Masaoka, Takashi; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Morishita, Ryo; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Tatsumi, Masashi; Endo, Yaeta; Yamamoto, Naoki; Sugiura, Wataru; Ryo, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Due to their high frequency of genomic mutations, human retroviruses often develop resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a significant obstacle to the effective long-term treatment of HIV infection. The development of a rapid and versatile drug-susceptibility assay would enable acquisition of phenotypic information and facilitate determination of the appropriate choice of antiretroviral agents. In this study, we developed a novel in vitro method, termed the Cell-free drug susceptibility assay (CFDSA), for monitoring phenotypic information regarding the drug resistance of HIV-1 protease (PR). The CFDSA utilizes a wheat germ cell-free protein production system to synthesize enzymatically active HIV-1 PRs directly from PCR products amplified from HIV-1 molecular clones or clinical isolates in a rapid one-step procedure. Enzymatic activity of PRs can be readily measured by AlphaScreen (Amplified Luminescent Proximity Homogeneous Assay Screen) in the presence or absence of clinically used protease inhibitors (PIs). CFDSA measurement of drug resistance was based on the fold resistance to the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of various PIs. The CFDSA could serve as a non-infectious, rapid, accessible, and reliable alternative to infectious cell-based phenotypic assays for evaluation of PI-resistant HIV-1. PMID:26583013

  12. Combinations of reverse transcriptase, protease, and integrase inhibitors can be synergistic in vitro against drug-sensitive and RT inhibitor-resistant molecular clones of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Beale, K K; Robinson, W E

    2000-06-01

    Combinations of anti-HIV agents including one or two reverse transcriptase inhibitors with a protease inhibitor are potent and effective. However, toxicities, costs and the emergence of drug-resistant organisms have compromised their long-term efficacy in people. A next, likely, target for anti-HIV therapy is HIV-1 integrase. Viral integration, catalyzed by integrase, is absolutely required for HIV replication. L-chicoric acid is a potent and selective inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase that also inhibits HIV-1 replication in cell culture. As a first step in understanding the potential role for integrase inhibitors in clinical medicine, the activities of L-chicoric acid alone and in combination with 2', 3'-dideoxycytidine, zidovudine, and a protease inhibitor, nelfinavir, were tested in vitro against molecular clones of HIV-1 resistant to reverse transcriptase inhibitors. L-chicoric acid was equally effective against a wild-type clone of HIV-1, HIV(NL4-3), or against HIV-1 resistant to either zidovudine or dideoxycytidine. L-chicoric acid was largely synergistic with zidovudine and synergistic with both dideoxycytidine and nelfinavir.

  13. Comparison of azacyclic urea A-98881 as HIV-1 protease inhibitor with cage dimeric N-benzyl 4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,4- dihydropyridine as representative of a novel class of HIV-1 protease inhibitors: A molecular modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgeroth, Andreas; Fleischer, Romy; Wiese, Michael; Heinemann, Frank W.

    1999-05-01

    The functional groups of cage dimeric N-alkyl substituted 3,5-bis(hydroxymethyl)-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,4-dihydropyridines are similar to those of cyclic and azacyclic ureas that are potent inhibitors of HIV-1 protease of the dihydroxyethylene- and hydroxyethylene type, respectively. In the following study the conformity of common functional groups is investigated concerning their orientation in space as well as in the enzyme HIV-1 protease. Starting from X-ray crystal data of the centrosymmetric cage dimeric N-benzyl derivative with ester groups, the derivative with hydroxymethylene groups was built and a systematic conformational search was performed for the conformationally important torsion angles considering electrostatic and van der Waals interactions. From the huge number of conformations those comprising centrosymmetrical and C2-symmetrical energy minima were selected and minimized. The three remaining conformers were fitted to the azacyclic urea A-98881 selected from the HIV-1 protease enzyme- inhibitor complex using the centroids of the corresponding aromatic residues and additionally by the field fit option of the Advanced CoMFA module of SYBYL. Interestingly, the energetically most favourable one, which, additionally, possesses C2-symmetry like the active site cavity of HIV-1 protease, showed the best fit. Comparing the electrostatic potential (EP) of the latter with the EP of A-98881 the aromatic residues show excellent accordance. Slight differences in the extent of the EP were found in the areas of the hydroxymethylene groups of the cage dimer and the single hydroxy group as well as the urea carbonyl group of A- 98881, respectively. In order to compare the binding possibilities to the enzyme HIV-1 protease for the cage dimer and A-98881, their interaction fields with certain probes (CH3 for alkyl, NHamide, and carbonyl, O- of COO-), representing the decisive functional groups of the active site, have been calculated using GRID and projected into the

  14. Novel HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors (PIs) Containing a Bicyclic P2 Functional Moiety, Tetrahydropyrano-Tetrahydrofuran, That Are Potent against Multi-PI-Resistant HIV-1 Variants▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Kazuhiko; Aoki, Manabu; Amano, Masayuki; Koh, Yasuhiro; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Das, Debananda; Leschenko, Sofiya; Chapsal, Bruno; Ghosh, Arun K.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    We identified GRL-1388 and -1398, potent nonpeptidic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors (PIs) containing a bicyclic P2 functional moiety, tetrahydropyrano-tetrahydrofuran (Tp-THF). GRL-1388 was as potent as darunavir (DRV) against various drug-resistant HIV-1 laboratory strains with 50% effective concentration (EC50s) of 2.6 to 32.6 nM. GRL-1398 was significantly more potent against such variants than DRV with EC50s of 0.1 to 5.7 nM. GRL-1388 and -1398 were also potent against multiple-PI-resistant clinical HIV-1 variants (CLHIV-1MDR) with EC50s ranging from 2.7 to 21.3 nM and from 0.3 to 4.8 nM, respectively. A highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 variant selected in vitro remained susceptible to GRL-1398 with the EC50 of 21.9 nM, while the EC50 of DRV was 214.1 nM. When HIV-1NL4-3 was selected with GRL-1398, four amino acid substitutions—leucine to phenylalanine at a position 10 (L10F), A28S, L33F, and M46I—emerged, ultimately enabling the virus to replicate in the presence of >1.0 μM the compound beyond 57 weeks of selection. When a mixture of 10 different CLHIV-1MDR strains was selected, the emergence of resistant variants was more substantially delayed with GRL-1398 than with GRL-1388 and DRV. Modeling analyses revealed that GRL-1398 had greater overall hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions than GRL-1388 and DRV and that GRL-1388 and -1398 had hydrogen bonding interactions with the main chain of the active-site amino acids (Asp29 and Asp30) of protease. The present findings warrant that GRL-1398 be further developed as a potential drug for treating individuals with HIV-1 infection. PMID:21282450

  15. Design of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with C3-Substituted Hexahydrocyclopentafuranyl Urethanes as P2-Ligands: Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Protein-Ligand X-ray Crystal Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K; Chapsal, Bruno D; Parham, Garth L; Steffey, Melinda; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2011-11-07

    We report the design, synthesis, biological evaluation, and the X-ray crystal structure of a novel inhibitor bound to the HIV-1 protease. Various C3-functionalized cyclopentanyltetrahydrofurans (Cp-THF) were designed to interact with the flap Gly48 carbonyl or amide NH in the S2-subsite of the HIV-1 protease. We investigated the potential of those functionalized ligands in combination with hydroxyethylsulfonamide isosteres. Inhibitor 26 containing a 3-(R)-hydroxyl group on the Cp-THF core displayed the most potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity. Our studies revealed a preference for the 3-(R)-configuration over the corresponding 3-(S)-derivative. Inhibitor 26 exhibited potent activity against a panel of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants. A high resolution X-ray structure of 26-bound HIV-1 protease revealed important molecular insight into the ligand-binding site interactions.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of resistance: free energy calculations of mutation effects on inhibitor binding to HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed Central

    Rick, S. W.; Topol, I. A.; Erickson, J. W.; Burt, S. K.

    1998-01-01

    The changes in the inhibitor binding constants due to the mutation of isoleucine to valine at position 84 of HIV-1 protease are calculated using molecular dynamics simulations. The calculations are done for three potent inhibitors--KNI-272, L-735,524 (indinavir or MK-639), and Ro 31-8959 (saquinavir). The calculations agree with the experimental data both in terms of an overall trend and in the magnitude of the resulting free energy change. HIV-1 protease is a homodimer, so each mutation causes two changes in the enzyme. The decrease in the binding free energy from each mutated side chain differs among the three inhibitors and correlates well with the size of the cavities induced in the protein interior near the mutated residue. The cavities are created as a result of a mutation to a smaller side chain, but the cavities are less than would be predicted from the wild-type structures, indicating that there is significant relaxation to partially fill the cavities. PMID:10082371

  17. Effect of polarization on HIV-1protease and fluoro-substituted inhibitors binding energies by large scale molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Li L.; Zhu, T.; Li, Yu C.; Zhang, Qing G.; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water are carried out to study the binding of six inhibitors to HIV-1 protease (PR) for up to 700 ns using the standard AMBER force field and polarized protein-specific charge (PPC). PPC is derived from quantum mechanical calculation for protein in solution and therefore it includes electronic polarization effect. Our results show that in all six systems, the bridging water W301 drifts away from the binding pocket in AMBER simulation. However, it is very stable in all six complexes systems using PPC. Especially, intra-protease, protease-inhibitor hydrogen bonds are dynamic stabilized in MD simulation. The computed binding free energies of six complexes have a significantly linear correlation with those experiment values and the correlation coefficient is found to be 0.91 in PPC simulation. However, the result from AMBER simulation shows a weaker correlation with the correlation coefficient of −0.51 due to the lack of polarization effect. Detailed binding interactions of W301, inhibitors with PR are further analyzed and discussed. The present study provides important information to quantitative understanding the interaction mechanism of PR-inhibitor and PR-W301 and these data also emphasizes the importance of both the electronic polarization and the bridging water molecule in predicting precisely binding affinities. PMID:28155907

  18. Nelfinavir, an HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor, Induces Oxidative Stress–Mediated, Caspase-Independent Apoptosis in Leishmania Amastigotes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pranav; Lodge, Robert; Trudel, Nathalie; Ouellet, Michel; Ouellette, Marc; Tremblay, Michel J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis has now emerged as an important opportunistic disease in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Although the effectiveness of HIV-1 protease inhibitors, such as nelfinavir, in antiretroviral therapies is well documented, little is known of the impact of these drugs on Leishmania in coinfected individuals. Methodology and Principal Findings Here, we show that nelfinavir generates oxidative stress in the parasite, leading to altered physiological parameters such as an increase in the sub-G1 DNA content, nuclear DNA fragmentation and loss of mitochondrial potential, which are all characteristics of apoptosis. Pretreatment of axenic amastigotes with the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not inhibit the increase in sub-G1 DNA content in nelfinavir-treated parasites, suggesting therefore that this antiviral agent does not kill Leishmania amastigotes in a caspase-dependent manner. Furthermore, we observed that the mitochondrial resident protein endonuclease G is involved. We also demonstrate that parasites overexpressing GSH1 (the rate limiting enzyme of glutathione biosynthesis) were more resistant to nelfinavir when compared to untransfected controls. Conclusions and Significance These data suggest that nelfinavir induces oxidative stress in Leishmania amastigotes, culminating in caspase-independent apoptosis, in which DNA is degraded by endonuclease G. This study provides a rationale for future, long-term design of new therapeutic strategies to test nelfinavir as a potential antileishmanial agent as well as for possible future use in Leishmania/HIV-1 coinfections. PMID:20361030

  19. Highly Potent HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with Novel Tricyclic P2-ligands: Design, Synthesis, and Protein-ligand X-Ray Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Parham, Garth L.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Nyalapatla, Prasanth R.; Osswald, Heather L.; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of HIV-1 protease inhibitors incorporating stereochemically defined fused tricyclic P2-ligands are described. Various substituent effects were investigated in order to maximize the ligand-binding site interactions in the protease active site. Inhibitors 16a and 16f showed excellent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity while incorporation of sulfone functionality resulted in a decrease in potency. Both inhibitors 16a and 16f have maintained activity against a panel of multidrug resistant HIV-1 variants. A high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of 16a-bound HIV-1 protease revealed important molecular insights into the ligand-binding site interactions which may account for the inhibitor’s potent antiviral activity and excellent resistance profiles. PMID:23947685

  20. Highly Potent HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with Novel Tricyclic P2 Ligands: Design, Synthesis, and Protein-Ligand X-ray Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Parham, Garth L.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Nyalapatla, Prasanth R.; Osswald, Heather L.; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2013-10-08

    The design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of HIV-1 protease inhibitors incorporating stereochemically defined fused tricyclic P2 ligands are described. Various substituent effects were investigated to maximize the ligand-binding site interactions in the protease active site. Inhibitors 16a and 16f showed excellent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity, although the incorporation of sulfone functionality resulted in a decrease in potency. Both inhibitors 16a and 16f maintained activity against a panel of multidrug resistant HIV-1 variants. A high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of 16a-bound HIV-1 protease revealed important molecular insights into the ligand-binding site interactions, which may account for the inhibitor’s potent antiviral activity and excellent resistance profiles.

  1. Docking and 3-D QSAR studies on the binding of tetrahydropyrimid-2-one HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Shashidhar N.; Balaji, Govardhan A.; Balaji, Vitukudi N.

    2013-06-01

    We present molecular docking and 3-D QSAR studies on a series of tetrahydropyrimid-2-one HIV-1 protease inhibitors whose binding affinities to the enzyme span nearly 6 orders of magnitude. The docking investigations have been carried out with Surflex (GEOM, GEOMX) and Glide (SP and XP) methodologies available through Tripos and Schrodinger suite of tools in the context of Sybyl-X and Maestro interfaces, respectively. The alignments for 3-D QSAR studies were obtained by using the automated Surflex-SIM methodology in Sybyl-X and the analyses were performed using the CoMFA and CoMSIA methods. Additionally, the top-ranked poses obtained from various docking protocols were also employed to generate CoMFA and CoMSIA models to evaluate the qualitative consistency of the docked models with experimental data. Our studies demonstrate that while there are a number of common features in the docked models obtained from Surflex-dock and Glide methodologies, the former sets of models are generally better correlated with deduced experimental binding modes based on the X-ray structures of known HIV-1 protease complexes with cyclic ureas. The urea moiety common to all the ligands are much more tightly aligned in Surflex docked structures than in the models obtained from Glide SP and XP dockings. The 3-D QSAR models are qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those previously reported, suggesting the utility of automatically generated alignments from Surflex-SIM methodology.

  2. The Folding Free Energy Surface of HIV-1 Protease: Insights into the Thermodynamic Basis for Resistance to Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Amanda F.; Bilsel, Osman; Kundu, Agnita; Wu, Ying; Zitzewitz, Jill A.; Matthews, C. Robert

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous mutations at numerous sites distant from the active site of HIV-1 protease enable resistance to inhibitors while retaining enzymatic activity. As a benchmark for probing the effects of these mutations on the conformational adaptability of this dimeric β-barrel protein, the folding free energy surface of a pseudo wild-type variant, HIV-PR*, was determined by a combination of equilibrium and kinetic experiments on the urea-induced unfolding/refolding reactions. The equilibrium unfolding reaction was well-described by a two-state model involving only the native dimeric form and the unfolded monomer. The global analysis of the kinetic folding mechanism reveals the presence of a fully-folded monomeric intermediate that associates to form the native dimeric structure. Independent analysis of a stable monomeric version of the protease demonstrated that a small amplitude fluorescence phase in refolding and unfolding, not included in the global analysis of the dimeric protein, reflects the presence of a transient intermediate in the monomer folding reaction. The partially-folded and fully-folded monomers are only marginally stable with respect to the unfolded state, and the dimerization reaction provides a modest driving force at micromolar concentrations of protein. The thermodynamic properties of this system are such that mutations can readily shift the equilibrium from the dimeric native state towards weakly-folded states that have a lower affinity for inhibitors, but that could be induced to bind to their target proteolytic sites. Presumably, subsequent secondary mutations increase the stability of the native dimeric state in these variants and, thereby, optimize the catalytic properties of the resistant HIV-1 protease. PMID:19150359

  3. Design, Synthesis, and X-ray Structure of Substituted Bis-tetrahydrofuran (Bis-THF)-Derived Potent HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Steffey, Melinda; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Agniswamy, Johnson; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2012-06-18

    We investigated substituted bis-THF-derived HIV-1 protease inhibitors in order to enhance ligand-binding site interactions in the HIV-1 protease active site. In this context, we have carried out convenient syntheses of optically active bis-THF and C4-substituted bis-THF ligands using a [2,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement as the key step. The synthesis provided convenient access to a number of substituted bis-THF derivatives. Incorporation of these ligands led to a series of potent HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Inhibitor 23c turned out to be the most potent (K{sub i} = 2.9 pM; IC{sub 50} = 2.4 nM) among the inhibitors. An X-ray structure of 23c-bound HIV-1 protease showed extensive interactions of the inhibitor with the protease active site, including a unique water-mediated hydrogen bond to the Gly-48 amide NH in the S2 site.

  4. Identification of Novel HIV 1- Protease Inhibitors: Application of Ligand and Structure Based Pharmacophore Mapping and Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Divya; Paliwal, Sarvesh; Yadav, Rakesh; Pal, Mahima; Pandey, Anubhuti

    2012-01-01

    A combined ligand and structure-based drug design approach provides a synergistic advantage over either methods performed individually. Present work bestows a good assembly of ligand and structure-based pharmacophore generation concept. Ligand-oriented study was accomplished by employing the HypoGen module of Catalyst in which we have translated the experimental findings into 3-D pharmacophore models by identifying key features (four point pharmacophore) necessary for interaction of the inhibitors with the active site of HIV-1 protease enzyme using a training set of 33 compounds belonging to the cyclic cyanoguanidines and cyclic urea derivatives. The most predictive pharmacophore model (hypothesis 1), consisting of four features, namely, two hydrogen bond acceptors and two hydrophobic, showed a correlation (r) of 0.90 and a root mean square of 0.71 and cost difference of 56.59 bits between null cost and fixed cost. The model was validated using CatScramble technique, internal and external test set prediction. In the second phase of our study, a structure-based five feature pharmacophore hypothesis was generated which signifies the importance of hydrogen bond donor, hydrogen bond acceptors and hydrophobic interaction between the HIV-1 protease enzyme and its inhibitors. This work has taken a significant step towards the full integration of ligand and structure-based drug design methodologies as pharmacophoric features retrieved from structure-based strategy complemented the features from ligand-based study hence proving the accuracy of the developed models. The ligand-based pharmacophore model was used in virtual screening of Maybridge and NCI compound database resulting in the identification of four structurally diverse druggable compounds with nM activities. PMID:23145032

  5. Interactions of Pluronic Block Copolymers on P-gp Efflux Activity: Experience With HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    SHAIK, NAVEED; PAN, GUOYU; ELMQUIST, WILLIAM F.

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to examine the influence of Pluronic block-copolymers on the interaction between the drug efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein and HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs). The ATPase assay determined the effect of various Pluronics on PI-stimulated P-gp ATPase activity. Cellular accumulation studies were conducted using MDCKII and LLC-PK1 cells transfected with human MDR1 to assess Pluronic modulation of PI efflux. Pluronic P85 inhibited both basal and nelfinavir-stimulated P-gp ATPase activity, while Pluronic F127 had no effect. In cell accumulation studies, Pluronic P85 restored the accumulation of nelfinavir in MDCKII-MDR1 cells while Pluronic F127 and F88 had no effect. Pluronic P85 increased saquinavir accumulation in wild-type and MDR1-transfected cells in both the MDCKII and LLC-PK1 cell models, suggesting inhibition of multiple transporters, including MRPs. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that a block-copolymer, Pluronic P85, effectively inhibits the interaction of P-gp with nelfinavir and saquinavir. These data indicate that effective inhibition of HIV-1 PI efflux by Pluronic P85 may influence the distribution of antiretroviral agents to sites protected by efflux mechanisms, such as the blood–brain barrier, and possibly increase the brain exposure of these drugs resulting in suppression of viral replication and reduction in the incidence of drug resistant mutants. PMID:18393290

  6. Design, Synthesis, Evaluation, and Crystallographic-Based Structural Studies of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with Reduced Response to the V82A Mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente,J.; Robbins, A.; Grana, P.; Paleo, M.; Correa, J.; Villaverde, M.; Sardina, F.; Govindasamy, L.; Agbandje-McKenna, M.; et al

    2008-01-01

    In our quest for HIV-1 protease inhibitors that are not affected by the V82A resistance mutation, we have synthesized and tested a second generation set of C2-symmetric HIV-1 protease inhibitors that contain a cyclohexane group at P1 and/or P1'. The binding affinity results indicate that these compounds have an improved response to the appearance of the V82A mutation than the parent compound. The X-ray structure of one of these compounds with the V82A HIV-1 PR variant provides the structural rationale for the better resistance profile of these compounds. Moreover, scrutiny of the X-ray structure suggests that the ring of the Cha side chain might be in a boat rather than in the chair conformation, a result supported by molecular dynamics simulations.

  7. Free energy calculation of single molecular interaction using Jarzynski's identity method: the case of HIV-1 protease inhibitor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, De-Chang; Ji, Bao-Hua

    2012-06-01

    Jarzynski' identity (JI) method was suggested a promising tool for reconstructing free energy landscape of biomolecular interactions in numerical simulations and experiments. However, JI method has not yet been well tested in complex systems such as ligand-receptor molecular pairs. In this paper, we applied a huge number of steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to dissociate the protease of human immunodeficiency type I virus (HIV-1 protease) and its inhibitors. We showed that because of intrinsic complexity of the ligand-receptor system, the energy barrier predicted by JI method at high pulling rates is much higher than experimental results. However, with a slower pulling rate and fewer switch times of simulations, the predictions of JI method can approach to the experiments. These results suggested that the JI method is more appropriate for reconstructing free energy landscape using the data taken from experiments, since the pulling rates used in experiments are often much slower than those in SMD simulations. Furthermore, we showed that a higher loading stiffness can produce higher precision of calculation of energy landscape because it yields a lower mean value and narrower bandwidth of work distribution in SMD simulations.

  8. Prediction of HIV-1 protease inhibitor resistance by Molecular Modeling Protocols (MMPs) using GenMol software.

    PubMed

    Pèpe, G; Courcambeck, J; Perbost, R; Jouanna, P; Halfon, P

    2008-11-01

    This paper investigates the contribution of Molecular Modeling to (i) predict and (ii) understand more fundamentally HIV drug resistance. Based on a new automated GenMol module, these goals are approached by Molecular Modeling Protocols (MMPs), respectively, (i) the Molecular Modeling Phenotype Protocol (MMPP) and (ii) the Molecular Modeling Phenotype-Genotype Protocol (MMGPP). Section 2 recalls clinical practice with a reference case study and Section 3 presents atomistic simulation tools. Section 4 is the heart of the paper. In Section 4.1, MMPP drug resistance prediction is based on correlations between fold resistances versus binding energies on 2959 HIV-1 complexes with 6 protease inhibitors. Based on a drug sensitivity twofold criterion, modeling prediction is able to replace long and costly phenotype tests. In Section 4.2, MMGPP enlightens drug resistance by investigating steric and energetic residues/inhibitor interaction. Section 5 gives a synthesis on modeling contribution to drug resistance prediction. In conclusion, the most promising trend consists of MMP automats that are able to suggest a real time diagnosis taking into account the history of each patient, to enrich databases and to develop therapy strategy and new drugs.

  9. Design, synthesis and evaluation of a potent substrate analog inhibitor identified by scanning Ala/Phe mutagenesis, mimicking substrate co-evolution, against multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Muhuhi, Joseck M.; Liu, Zhigang; Bencze, Krisztina Z.; Koupparis, Kyriacos; O’Connor, Carrie E.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Spaller, Mark R.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Inhibitors against MDR HIV-1 protease were designed, synthesized and evaluated. •Lead peptide (6a) showed potent inhibition (IC{sub 50}: 4.4 nM) of MDR HIV-1 protease. •(6a) Showed favorable binding isotherms against NL4-3 and MDR proteases. •(6a) Induced perturbations in the {sup 15}N-HSQC spectrum of MDR HIV-1 protease. •Molecular modeling suggested that (6a) may induce total flap closure inMDR protease. -- Abstract: Multidrug-resistant (MDR) clinical isolate-769, human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease (PDB ID: (1TW7)), was shown to exhibit wide-open flaps and an expanded active site cavity, causing loss of contacts with protease inhibitors. In the current study, the expanded active site cavity of MDR769 HIV-1 protease was screened with a series of peptide-inhibitors that were designed to mimic the natural substrate cleavage site, capsid/p2. Scanning Ala/Phe chemical mutagenesis approach was incorporated into the design of the peptide series to mimic the substrate co-evolution. Among the peptides synthesized and evaluated, a lead peptide (6a) with potent activity (IC{sub 50}: 4.4 nM) was identified against the MDR769 HIV-1 protease. Isothermal titration calorimetry data showed favorable binding profile for 6aagainst both wild type and MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of {sup 15}N-labeled MDR769 HIV-1 protease in complex with 6a showed some major perturbations in chemical shift, supporting the peptide induced conformational changes in protease. Modeling analysis revealed multiple contacts between 6a and MDR769 HIV-1 protease. The lead peptide-inhibitor, 6a, with high potency and good binding profile can be used as the basis for developing potent small molecule inhibitors against MDR variants of HIV.

  10. C-5-Modified Tetrahydropyrano-Tetrahydofuran-Derived Protease Inhibitors (PIs) Exert Potent Inhibition of the Replication of HIV-1 Variants Highly Resistant to Various PIs, including Darunavir

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Manabu; Hayashi, Hironori; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Takamatsu, Yuki; Aoki-Ogata, Hiromi; Nakamura, Teruya; Nakata, Hirotomo; Das, Debananda; Yamagata, Yuriko; Ghosh, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We identified three nonpeptidic HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs), GRL-015, -085, and -097, containing tetrahydropyrano-tetrahydrofuran (Tp-THF) with a C-5 hydroxyl. The three compounds were potent against a wild-type laboratory HIV-1 strain (HIV-1WT), with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of 3.0 to 49 nM, and exhibited minimal cytotoxicity, with 50% cytotoxic concentrations (CC50) for GRL-015, -085, and -097 of 80, >100, and >100 μM, respectively. All the three compounds potently inhibited the replication of highly PI-resistant HIV-1 variants selected with each of the currently available PIs and recombinant clinical HIV-1 isolates obtained from patients harboring multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants (HIVMDR). Importantly, darunavir (DRV) was >1,000 times less active against a highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 variant (HIV-1DRVRP51); the three compounds remained active against HIV-1DRVRP51 with only a 6.8- to 68-fold reduction. Moreover, the emergence of HIV-1 variants resistant to the three compounds was considerably delayed compared to the case of DRV. In particular, HIV-1 variants resistant to GRL-085 and -097 did not emerge even when two different highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 variants were used as a starting population. In the structural analyses, Tp-THF of GRL-015, -085, and -097 showed strong hydrogen bond interactions with the backbone atoms of active-site amino acid residues (Asp29 and Asp30) of HIV-1 protease. A strong hydrogen bonding formation between the hydroxyl moiety of Tp-THF and a carbonyl oxygen atom of Gly48 was newly identified. The present findings indicate that the three compounds warrant further study as possible therapeutic agents for treating individuals harboring wild-type HIV and/or HIVMDR. IMPORTANCE Darunavir (DRV) inhibits the replication of most existing multidrug-resistant HIV-1 strains and has a high genetic barrier. However, the emergence of highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 strains (HIVDRVR) has recently been observed in vivo and in

  11. Design, Synthesis, Biological Evaluation and X-ray Structural Studies of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors Containing Substituted Fused-Tetrahydropyranyl Tetrahydrofuran as P2-Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Kassekert, Luke A.; Nyalapatla, Prasanth R.; Steffey, Melinda; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Weber, Irene T.; Amano, Masayuki; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Design, synthesis, biological and X-ray crystallographic studies of a series of potent HIV-1 protease inhibitors are described. Various polar functionalities have been incorporated on the tetrahydropyranyl-tetrahydrofuran-derived P2 ligand to interact with the backbone atoms in the S2 subsite. The majority of the inhibitors showed very potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity. Two high-resolution X-ray structures of 30b- and 30j-bound HIV-1 protease provide insight into ligand-binding site interactions. In particular, the polar functionalities on the P2 ligand appear to form unique hydrogen bonds with Gly48 amide NH and amide carbonyl groups in the flap region. PMID:26462551

  12. Factors Associated with the Development of Drug Resistance Mutations in HIV-1 Infected Children Failing Protease Inhibitor-Based Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Melikian, George; van Dyk, Gisela; Thomas, Winifred; du Plessis, Nicolette M.; Avenant, Theunis

    2015-01-01

    Objective Limited data are available from the developing world on antiretroviral drug resistance in HIV-1 infected children failing protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy, especially in the context of a high tuberculosis burden. We describe the proportion of children with drug resistance mutations after failed protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy as well as associated factors. Methods Data from children initiated on protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy with subsequent virological failure referred for genotypic drug resistance testing between 2008 and 2012 were retrospectively analysed. Frequencies of drug resistance mutations were determined and associations with these mutations identified through logistic regression analysis. Results The study included 65 young children (median age 16.8 months [IQR 7.8; 23.3]) with mostly advanced clinical disease (88.5% WHO stage 3 or 4 disease), severe malnutrition (median weight-for-age Z-score -2.4 [IQR -3.7;-1.5]; median height-for-age Z-score -3.1 [IQR -4.3;-2.4]), high baseline HIV viral load (median 6.04 log10, IQR 5.34;6.47) and frequent tuberculosis co-infection (66%) at antiretroviral therapy initiation. Major protease inhibitor mutations were found in 49% of children and associated with low weight-for-age and height-for-age (p = 0.039; p = 0.05); longer duration of protease inhibitor regimens and virological failure (p = 0.001; p = 0.005); unsuppressed HIV viral load at 12 months of antiretroviral therapy (p = 0.001); tuberculosis treatment at antiretroviral therapy initiation (p = 0.048) and use of ritonavir as single protease inhibitor (p = 0.038). On multivariate analysis, cumulative months on protease inhibitor regimens and use of ritonavir as single protease inhibitor remained significant (p = 0.008; p = 0.033). Conclusion Major protease inhibitor resistance mutations were common in this study of HIV-1-infected children, with the timing of tuberculosis treatment and subsequent

  13. Design of HIV-1 protease inhibitors with pyrrolidinones and oxazolidinones as novel P1'-ligands to enhance backbone-binding interactions with protease: synthesis, biological evaluation, and protein-ligand X-ray studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Leshchenko-Yashchuk, Sofiya; Anderson, David D.; Baldridge, Abigail; Noetzel, Marcus; Miller, Heather B.; Tie, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Koh, Yasuhiro; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2009-09-02

    Structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors are described. In an effort to enhance interactions with protease backbone atoms, we have incorporated stereochemically defined methyl-2-pyrrolidinone and methyl oxazolidinone as the P1{prime}-ligands. These ligands are designed to interact with Gly-27{prime} carbonyl and Arg-8 side chain in the S1{prime}-subsite of the HIV protease. We have investigated the potential of these ligands in combination with our previously developed bis-tetrahydrofuran (bis-THF) and cyclopentanyltetrahydrofuran (Cp-THF) as the P2-ligands. Inhibitor 19b with a (R)-aminomethyl-2-pyrrolidinone and a Cp-THF was shown to be the most potent compound. This inhibitor maintained near full potency against multi-PI-resistant clinical HIV-1 variants. A high resolution protein-ligand X-ray crystal structure of 19b-bound HIV-1 protease revealed that the P1{prime}-pyrrolidinone heterocycle and the P2-Cp-ligand are involved in several critical interactions with the backbone atoms in the S1{prime} and S2 subsites of HIV-1 protease.

  14. Flexible Cyclic Ethers/Polyethers as Novel P2-Ligands for HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors: Design, Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Protein-Ligand X-Ray Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun; Gemma, Sandra; Baldridge, Abigal; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Koh, Yashiro; Weber, Irene; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2008-12-05

    We report the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors. The inhibitors incorporate stereochemically defined flexible cyclic ethers/polyethers as high affinity P2-ligands. Inhibitors containing small ring 1,3-dioxacycloalkanes have shown potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity. Inhibitors 3d and 3h are the most active inhibitors. Inhibitor 3d maintains excellent potency against a variety of multi-PI-resistant clinical strains. Our structure-activity studies indicate that the ring size, stereochemistry, and position of oxygens are important for the observed activity. Optically active synthesis of 1,3-dioxepan-5-ol along with the syntheses of various cyclic ether and polyether ligands have been described. A protein-ligand X-ray crystal structure of 3d-bound HIV-1 protease was determined. The structure revealed that the P2-ligand makes extensive interactions including hydrogen bonding with the protease backbone in the S2-site. In addition, the P2-ligand in 3d forms a unique water-mediated interaction with the NH of Gly-48.

  15. Lead expansion and virtual screening of Indinavir derivate HIV-1 protease inhibitors using pharmacophoric - shape similarity scoring function

    PubMed Central

    Shityakov, Sergey; Dandekar, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Indinavir (Crivaxan®) is a potent inhibitor of the HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) protease. This enzyme has an important role in viral replication and is considered to be very attractive target for new antiretroviral drugs. However, it becomes less effective due to highly resistant new viral strains of HIV, which have multiple mutations in their proteases. For this reason, we used a lead expansion method to create a new set of compounds with a new mode of action to protease binding site. 1300 compounds chemically diverse from the initial hit were generated and screened to determine their ability to interact with protease and establish their QSAR properties. Further computational analyses revealed one unique compound with different protease binding ability from the initial hit and its role for possible new class of protease inhibitors is discussed in this report. PMID:20978602

  16. Lignan, sesquilignans and dilignans, novel HIV-1 protease and cytopathic effect inhibitors purified from the rhizomes of Saururus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jisuk; Huh, Myoung Sook; Kim, Young Choong; Hattori, Masao; Otake, Toru

    2010-02-01

    Five lignans were isolated from the ethyl acetate extracts of Saururus chinensis rhizomes and evaluated for anti-HIV-1 activity. Their structures were elucidated as two dilignans, manassantin A (1), manassantin B (2), two sesquilignans, saucerneol B (3) and saucerneol C (4), and a new lignan, saururin B (5) by spectroscopic analysis. Of these components, manassantin A (1) and saururin B (5) showed dose-dependent inhibitory activities on HIV-1 protease with IC(50) values of 38.9 and 5.6 microM. In addition, manassantins A (1), B (2) and saucerneol B (3) inhibited HIV-1-induced cytopathic effects in a human T lymphoblastoid cell line with IC(100) values of 1.0, 1.0 and 0.2 microM, respectively. Of these active constituents, saucerneol B (3) showed the most potent and selective anti-HIV-1 activity (IC(100) of 0.2 microM, CC(0) of >125.0 microM, and SI of >520.8).

  17. Strength of hydrogen bond network takes crucial roles in the dissociation process of inhibitors from the HIV-1 protease binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Huang, Yonggang

    2011-04-29

    To understand the underlying mechanisms of significant differences in dissociation rate constant among different inhibitors for HIV-1 protease, we performed steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to analyze the entire dissociation processes of inhibitors from the binding pocket of protease at atomistic details. We found that the strength of hydrogen bond network between inhibitor and the protease takes crucial roles in the dissociation process. We showed that the hydrogen bond network in the cyclic urea inhibitors AHA001/XK263 is less stable than that of the approved inhibitor ABT538 because of their large differences in the structures of the networks. In the cyclic urea inhibitor bound complex, the hydrogen bonds often distribute at the flap tips and the active site. In contrast, there are additional accessorial hydrogen bonds formed at the lateral sides of the flaps and the active site in the ABT538 bound complex, which take crucial roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network. In addition, the water molecule W301 also plays important roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network through its flexible movement by acting as a collision buffer and helping the rebinding of hydrogen bonds at the flap tips. Because of its high stability, the hydrogen bond network of ABT538 complex can work together with the hydrophobic clusters to resist the dissociation, resulting in much lower dissociation rate constant than those of cyclic urea inhibitor complexes. This study may provide useful guidelines for design of novel potent inhibitors with optimized interactions.

  18. Reprint of "Crystal structure of chemically synthesized HIV-1 protease and a ketomethylene isostere inhibitor based on the p2/NC cleavage site" [Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett. 18 (2008) 4554-4557].

    PubMed

    Torbeev, Vladimir Yu; Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Terechko, Valentina A; Kent, Stephen B H

    2008-11-15

    Here we report the X-ray structures of chemically synthesized HIV-1 protease and the inactive [D25N]HIV-1 protease complexed with the ketomethylene isostere inhibitor Ac-Thr-Ile-Nlepsi[CO-CH(2)]Nle-Gln-Arg.amide at 1.4 and 1.8A resolution, respectively. In complex with the active enzyme, the keto-group was found to be converted into the hydrated gem-diol, while the structure of the complex with the inactive D25N enzyme revealed an intact keto-group. These data support the general acid-general base mechanism for HIV-1 protease catalysis.

  19. A Sensitive Assay Using a Native Protein Substrate For Screening HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitors Targeting the Protease Cleavage Site between Matrix and Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sook-Kyung; Cheng, Nancy; Hull-Ryde, Emily; Potempa, Marc; Schiffer, Celia A.; Janzen, William; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    The matrix/capsid processing site in the HIV-1 Gag precursor is likely the most sensitive target to inhibit HIV-1 replication. We have previously shown that modest incomplete processing at the site leads to a complete loss of virion infectivity. In the current study, a sensitive assay based on fluorescence polarization is described that can monitor cleavage at the MA/CA site in the context of the folded protein substrate. The substrate, an MA/CA fusion protein, was labeled with the fluorescein-based FlAsH (Fluorescein Arsenical Hairpin) reagent which binds to a tetracysteine motif (CCGPCC) that was introduced within the N-terminal domain of CA. By limiting the size of CA and increasing the size of MA (with an N-terminal GST fusion), significant differences in polarization values were measurable as a function of HIV-1 protease cleavage. The sensitivity of the assay was tested in the presence of increasing amounts of an HIV-1 PR inhibitor, which resulted in a gradual decrease in the FP values demonstrating that the assay is sensitive discerning changes in protease processing. The high-throughput screening assay validation in 384-well plates showed that the assay is reproducible and robust with an average Z'–value of 0.79 and average coefficient of variation values less than 3%. The robustness and reproducibility of the assay was further validated using the LOPAC1280 compound library, demonstrating that the assay provides a sensitive high-throughput screening platform that can be used with large compound libraries for identifying novel maturation inhibitors targeting the MA/CA site of the HIV-1 Gag polyprotein. PMID:23763575

  20. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This “shock” approach is then followed by “kill” of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  1. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This "shock" approach is then followed by "kill" of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells.

  2. Authentic HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R; Pommier, Yves; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is indispensable for HIV-1 replication and has become a validated target for developing anti-AIDS agents. In two decades of development of IN inhibition-based anti-HIV therapeutics, a significant number of compounds were identified as IN inhibitors, but only some of them showed antiviral activity. This article reviews a number of patented HIV-1 IN inhibitors, especially those that possess high selectivity for the strand transfer reaction. These compounds generally have a polar coplanar moiety, which is assumed to chelate two magnesium ions in the binding site. Resistance to those compounds, when given to patients, can develop as a result of IN mutations. We refer to those compounds as authentic IN inhibitors. Continued drug development has so far delivered one authentic IN inhibitor to the market (raltegravir in 2007). Current and future attention will be focused on the development of novel authentic IN inhibitors with the goal of overcoming viral resistance. PMID:21426159

  3. HIV-1 protease-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is one of the presumptive causes of CD4+ T cell depletion during HIV infection and progression to AIDS. However, the precise role of HIV-1 in this process remains unexplained. HIV-1 protease (PR) has been suggested as a possible factor, but a direct link between HIV-1 PR enzymatic activity and apoptosis has not been established. Results Here, we show that expression of active HIV-1 PR induces death in HeLa and HEK-293 cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. This conclusion is based on in vivo observations of the direct localization of HIV-1 PR in mitochondria, a key player in triggering apoptosis. Moreover, we observed an HIV-1 PR concentration-dependent decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and the role of HIV-1 PR in activation of caspase 9, PARP cleavage and DNA fragmentation. In addition, in vitro data demonstrated that HIV-1 PR mediates cleavage of mitochondrial proteins Tom22, VDAC and ANT, leading to release of AIF and Hsp60 proteins. By using yeast two-hybrid screening, we also identified a new HIV-1 PR interaction partner, breast carcinoma-associated protein 3 (BCA3). We found that BCA3 accelerates p53 transcriptional activity on the bax promoter, thus elevating the cellular level of pro-apoptotic Bax protein. Conclusion In summary, our results describe the involvement of HIV-1 PR in apoptosis, which is caused either by a direct effect of HIV-1 PR on mitochondrial membrane integrity or by its interaction with cellular protein BCA3. PMID:24886575

  4. Severe Impairment of Endothelial Function with the HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor Indinavir is not Mediated by Insulin Resistance in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Michael P.; Gorski, J. Christopher; Shen, Changyu

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction may contribute to increased cardiovascular events among HIV-1 infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. The HIV-1 protease inhibitor indinavir causes both vascular dysfunction and insulin resistance, but the relationship between the two disturbances is not established. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDV), insulin-mediated vasodilation (IMV), and whole body and leg glucose uptake during a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp (40 mU/m2/min) were measured before and after four weeks of indinavir in nine healthy men. EDV fell from 270 ± 67% above basal to 124 ± 30% (p=0.04) and IMV from 56 ± 14% above basal to 8 ± 8% (p=0.001) with indinavir. During the clamp, arteriovenous glucose difference and leg glucose uptake were not significantly different after indinavir and whole-body glucose uptake was only modestly reduced (8.0 ± 0.8 vs 7.2 ± 0.8 mg/kg/min, p=0.04). The change in EDV did not correlate with the change in whole-body glucose uptake after indinavir (r=0.21, p=0.6). Despite marked impairment of endothelial function and IMV with indinavir, only modest, inconsistent reductions in measures of insulin stimulated glucose uptake occurred. This suggests that indinavir's effects on glucose metabolism are not directly related to indinavir-associated endothelial dysfunction. Studies of the vascular effects of newer protease inhibitors are needed. PMID:18172783

  5. A multifaceted analysis of HIV-1 protease multidrug resistance phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Great strides have been made in the effective treatment of HIV-1 with the development of second-generation protease inhibitors (PIs) that are effective against historically multi-PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Nevertheless, mutation patterns that confer decreasing susceptibility to available PIs continue to arise within the population. Understanding the phenotypic and genotypic patterns responsible for multi-PI resistance is necessary for developing PIs that are active against clinically-relevant PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Results In this work, we use globally optimal integer programming-based clustering techniques to elucidate multi-PI phenotypic resistance patterns using a data set of 398 HIV-1 protease sequences that have each been phenotyped for susceptibility toward the nine clinically-approved HIV-1 PIs. We validate the information content of the clusters by evaluating their ability to predict the level of decreased susceptibility to each of the available PIs using a cross validation procedure. We demonstrate the finding that as a result of phenotypic cross resistance, the considered clinical HIV-1 protease isolates are confined to ~6% or less of the clinically-relevant phenotypic space. Clustering and feature selection methods are used to find representative sequences and mutations for major resistance phenotypes to elucidate their genotypic signatures. We show that phenotypic similarity does not imply genotypic similarity, that different PI-resistance mutation patterns can give rise to HIV-1 isolates with similar phenotypic profiles. Conclusion Rather than characterizing HIV-1 susceptibility toward each PI individually, our study offers a unique perspective on the phenomenon of PI class resistance by uncovering major multidrug-resistant phenotypic patterns and their often diverse genotypic determinants, providing a methodology that can be applied to understand clinically-relevant phenotypic patterns to aid in the design of novel inhibitors that

  6. Multiple receptor conformation docking and dock pose clustering as tool for CoMFA and CoMSIA analysis - a case study on HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2012-02-01

    Multiple receptors conformation docking (MRCD) and clustering of dock poses allows seamless incorporation of receptor binding conformation of the molecules on wide range of ligands with varied structural scaffold. The accuracy of the approach was tested on a set of 120 cyclic urea molecules having HIV-1 protease inhibitory activity using 12 high resolution X-ray crystal structures and one NMR resolved conformation of HIV-1 protease extracted from protein data bank. A cross validation was performed on 25 non-cyclic urea HIV-1 protease inhibitor having varied structures. The comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) models were generated using 60 molecules in the training set by applying leave one out cross validation method, r (loo) (2) values of 0.598 and 0.674 for CoMFA and CoMSIA respectively and non-cross validated regression coefficient r(2) values of 0.983 and 0.985 were obtained for CoMFA and CoMSIA respectively. The predictive ability of these models was determined using a test set of 60 cyclic urea molecules that gave predictive correlation (r (pred) (2) ) of 0.684 and 0.64 respectively for CoMFA and CoMSIA indicating good internal predictive ability. Based on this information 25 non-cyclic urea molecules were taken as a test set to check the external predictive ability of these models. This gave remarkable out come with r (pred) (2) of 0.61 and 0.53 for CoMFA and CoMSIA respectively. The results invariably show that this method is useful for performing 3D QSAR analysis on molecules having different structural motifs.

  7. Potent Antiviral HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor GRL-02031 Adapts to the Structures of Drug Resistant Mutants with Its P1;#8242;-Pyrrolidinone Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yu-Chung E.; Yu, XiaXia; Zhang, Ying; Tie, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Yashchuk, Sofiya; Ghosh, Arun K.; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2012-11-14

    GRL-02031 (1) is an HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitor containing a novel P1' (R)-aminomethyl-2-pyrrolidinone group. Crystal structures at resolutions of 1.25-1.55 {angstrom} were analyzed for complexes of 1 with the PR containing major drug resistant mutations, PR{sub I47V}, PR{sub L76V}, PR{sub V82A}, and PR{sub N88D}. Mutations of I47V and V82A alter residues in the inhibitor-binding site, while L76V and N88D are distal mutations having no direct contact with the inhibitor. Substitution of a smaller amino acid in PR{sub I47V} and PR{sub L76V} and the altered charge of PR{sub N88D} are associated with significant local structural changes compared to the wild-type PR{sub WT}, while substitution of alanine in PR{sub V82A} increases the size of the S1' subsite. The P1' pyrrolidinone group of 1 accommodates to these local changes by assuming two different conformations. Overall, the conformation and interactions of 1 with PR mutants resemble those of PR{sub WT} with similar inhibition constants in good agreement with the antiviral potency on multidrug resistant HIV-1.

  8. Commentary on the role of treatment-related HIV compensatory mutations on increasing virulence: new discoveries twenty years since the clinical testing of protease inhibitors to block HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Arts, Eric J

    2012-10-03

    Approximately 20 years has passed since the first human trial with HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Protease inhibitors set the stage for combination therapy in the mid-1990s but are now rarely used in first-line combination therapy and reserved for salvage therapy. Initially, resistance to protease inhibitors was deemed unlikely due to the small enzymatic target with limited genetic diversity, the extended drug binding site in protease, and the need to cleave multiple sites in the HIV-1 precursor proteins. However, a highly protease inhibitor-resistant virus can emerge during treatment and is found to harbor a collection of primary drug-resistant mutations near the drug and/or substrate binding site as well as secondary mutations that compensate for fitness loss. For years, the research field has debated the impact of these secondary mutations on the emergence rates of high-level protease inhibitor resistance. A recent study poses a more pertinent question, related to disease progression in patients newly infected with a virus harboring secondary protease inhibitor-associated polymorphisms. The authors of that study show that increased rates of disease progression, inferred by increased viral loads and decreased CD4 cell counts, correlate with a fitness score of the infecting virus. The modeled fitness scores increased with an accumulation of these secondary protease inhibitors mutations, and not because of any one specific polymorphism.

  9. Nine Crystal Structures Determine the Substrate Envelope of the MDR HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Brunzelle, Joseph; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2012-03-27

    Under drug selection pressure, emerging mutations render HIV-1 protease drug resistant, leading to the therapy failure in anti-HIV treatment. It is known that nine substrate cleavage site peptides bind to wild type (WT) HIV-1 protease in a conserved pattern. However, how the multidrug-resistant (MDR) HIV-1 protease binds to the substrate cleavage site peptides is yet to be determined. MDR769 HIV-1 protease (resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84, and 90) was selected for present study to understand the binding to its natural substrates. MDR769 HIV-1 protease was co-crystallized with nine substrate cleavage site hepta-peptides. Crystallographic studies show that MDR769 HIV-1 protease has an expanded substrate envelope with wide open flaps. Furthermore, ligand binding energy calculations indicate weaker binding in MDR769 HIV-1 protease-substrate complexes. These results help in designing the next generation of HIV-1 protease inhibitors by targeting the MDR HIV-1 protease.

  10. In Vitro Characterization of GS-8374, a Novel Phosphonate-Containing Inhibitor of HIV-1 Protease with a Favorable Resistance Profile ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Callebaut, Christian; Stray, Kirsten; Tsai, Luong; Williams, Matt; Yang, Zheng-Yu; Cannizzaro, Carina; Leavitt, Stephanie A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Kelly; Murray, Bernard P.; Mulato, Andrew; Hatada, Marcos; Priskich, Tina; Parkin, Neil; Swaminathan, Swami; Lee, William; He, Gong-Xin; Xu, Lianhong; Cihlar, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    GS-8374 is a novel bis-tetrahydrofuran HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitor (PI) with a unique diethylphosphonate moiety. It was selected from a series of analogs containing various di(alkyl)phosphonate substitutions connected via a linker to the para position of a P-1 phenyl ring. GS-8374 inhibits HIV-1 PR with high potency (Ki = 8.1 pM) and with no known effect on host proteases. Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of GS-8374 binding to PR demonstrated an extremely slow off rate for the inhibitor and favorable contributions of both the enthalpic and entropic components to the total free binding energy. GS-8374 showed potent antiretroviral activity in T-cell lines, primary CD4+ T cells (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 3.4 to 11.5 nM), and macrophages (EC50 = 25.5 nM) and exhibited low cytotoxicity in multiple human cell types. The antiviral potency of GS-8374 was only moderately affected by human serum protein binding, and its combination with multiple approved antiretrovirals showed synergistic effects. When it was tested in a PhenoSense assay against a panel of 24 patient-derived viruses with high-level PI resistance, GS-8374 showed lower mean EC50s and lower fold resistance than any of the clinically approved PIs. Similar to other PIs, in vitro hepatic microsomal metabolism of GS-8374 was efficiently blocked by ritonavir, suggesting a potential for effective pharmacokinetic boosting in vivo. In summary, results from this broad in vitro pharmacological profiling indicate that GS-8374 is a promising candidate to be further assessed as a new antiretroviral agent with potential for clinical efficacy in both treatment-naïve and -experienced patients. PMID:21245449

  11. L-chicoric acid, an inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase, improves on the in vitro anti-HIV-1 effect of Zidovudine plus a protease inhibitor (AG1350).

    PubMed

    Robinson, W E

    1998-08-01

    Combinations of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drugs, including reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors, have proven immensely potent in the therapy of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). To determine whether HIV integrase is a suitable target for combination therapy, the ability of an HIV integrase inhibitor, L-chicoric acid, to work in combination with a protease inhibitor and Zidovudine was tested in vitro. The addition of L-chicoric acid to either Zidovudine or protease inhibitor improved upon the observed anti-HIV activity of either compound alone. When all three drugs were combined, the anti-HIV activity was substantially better than either of the three compounds alone or any combination of two inhibitors. Doses of both Zidovudine and protease inhibitor could be reduced by more than 33% for an equivalent anti-HIV effect if L-chicoric acid was added. The improved anti-HIV activity was observed with a tissue culture adapted strain of HIV (HIV(LAI)) and with limited passage clinical isolates of HIV (HIV(R19) and HIV(R45)). These data demonstrate that a first generation HIV integrase inhibitor, L-chicoric acid, is at least additive in combination with existing multi-drug regimens and suggest that HIV integrase will be an excellent target for combination therapy of HIV infection.

  12. Potent HIV-1 protease inhibitors incorporating meso-bicyclic urethanes as P2-ligands: structure-based design, synthesis, biological evaluation and protein-ligand X-ray studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun; Gemma, Sandra; Takayama, Jun; Baldridge, Abigail; Leshchenko-Yashchuk, Sofiya; Miller, Heather; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Koh, Yashiro; Weber, Irene; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2008-12-05

    Recently, we designed a series of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors incorporating a stereochemically defined bicyclic fused cyclopentyl (Cp-THF) urethane as the high affinity P2-ligand. Inhibitor 1 with this P2-ligand has shown very impressive potency against multi-drug-resistant clinical isolates. Based upon the 1-bound HIV-1 protease X-ray structure, we have now designed and synthesized a number of meso-bicyclic ligands which can conceivably interact similarly to the Cp-THF ligand. The design of meso-ligands is quite attractive as they do not contain any stereocenters. Inhibitors incorporating urethanes of bicyclic-1,3-dioxolane and bicyclic-1,4-dioxane have shown potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activities. Inhibitor 2 (K{sub i} = 0.11 nM; IC{sub 50} = 3.8 nM) displayed very potent antiviral activity in this series. While inhibitor 3 showed comparable enzyme inhibitory activity (K{sub i} = 0.18 nM) its antiviral activity (IC{sub 50} = 170 nM) was significantly weaker than inhibitor 2. Inhibitor 2 maintained an antiviral potency against a series of multi-drug resistant clinical isolates comparable to amprenavir. A protein-ligand X-ray structure of 3-bound HIV-1 protease revealed a number of key hydrogen bonding interactions at the S2-subsite. We have created an active model of inhibitor 2 based upon this X-ray structure.

  13. Design of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with Amino-bis-tetrahydrofuran Derivatives as P2-Ligands to Enhance Backbone-Binding Interactions. Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Protein-Ligand X-ray Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Osswald, Heather L.; Sheri, Venkat Reddy; Kassekert, Luke A.; Chen, Shujing; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Hayashi, Hironori; Aoki, Manabu; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2015-10-30

    Structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of very potent HIV-1 protease inhibitors are described. In an effort to improve backbone ligand–binding site interactions, we have incorporated basic-amines at the C4 position of the bis-tetrahydrofuran (bis-THF) ring. We speculated that these substituents would make hydrogen bonding interactions in the flap region of HIV-1 protease. Synthesis of these inhibitors was performed diastereoselectively. A number of inhibitors displayed very potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity. Inhibitors 25f, 25i, and 25j were evaluated against a number of highly-PI-resistant HIV-1 strains, and they exhibited improved antiviral activity over darunavir. Two high resolution X-ray structures of 25f- and 25g-bound HIV-1 protease revealed unique hydrogen bonding interactions with the backbone carbonyl group of Gly48 as well as with the backbone NH of Gly48 in the flap region of the enzyme active site. These ligand–binding site interactions are possibly responsible for their potent activity.

  14. Hydrophobic Core Flexibility Modulates Enzyme Activity in HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Bolon, Daniel N.A.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-09-11

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from the active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity.

  15. Single Genome Analysis for the Detection of Linked Multiclass Drug Resistance Mutations in HIV-1-Infected Children After Failure of Protease Inhibitor-Based First-Line Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lange, Camille Marie; Hué, Stéphane; Violari, Avy; Cotton, Mark; Gibb, Diana; Babiker, Abdel; Otwombe, Kennedy; Panchia, Ravindre; Dobbels, Els; Jean-Philippe, Patrick; McIntyre, James A; Pillay, Deenan; Gupta, Ravindra Kumar

    2015-06-01

    The WHO recommends protease inhibitor (PI)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) for vertically infected children after failed nevirapine (NVP) prophylaxis. Emergence of PI resistance on the backdrop of preexisting non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance could compromise long-term treatment options in such children. We characterized multiclass drug resistance using single genome sequencing (SGS) in children with viremia while receiving PI-based ART. We applied SGS of HIV-1 protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase to longitudinal samples from a cohort of the Children with HIV Early Antiretroviral Therapy trial with viral loads >1000 copies per milliliter after 40 weeks of early ART. Bulk sequencing revealed NVP-selected resistance in 50% of these children, whereas SGS revealed NVP-selected resistance in 70%. Two children had baseline NRTI and PI mutations, suggesting previous maternal ART. Linked multiclass drug resistance after PI-based ART was detected by SGS in 2 of 10 children. In one child, the majority species contained M184V in reverse transcriptase linked to L10F, M46I/L, I54V, and V82A in PR and a triple-class drug-resistant variant with these mutations linked to the NNRTI mutation V108I. In the second child, the majority species contained M184V and V82A linked within viral genomes. We conclude that when PI-based ART is initiated soon after birth after single dose-NVP prophylaxis, PI and NRTI resistance can occur in the majority species as expected and also be selected on the same genomes as preexisting NNRTI-resistant mutations. These observations highlight a future therapeutic challenge for vertically infected children where antiretroviral drug classes are limited.

  16. Insights into the mechanism of drug resistance. X-ray structure analysis of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease ritonavir complex

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhigang; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Wang, Yong; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Reiter, Samuel J.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2013-01-08

    Ritonavir (RTV) is a first generation HIV-1 protease inhibitor with rapidly emerging drug resistance. Mutations at residues 46, 54, 82 and 84 render the HIV-1 protease drug resistant against RTV. We report the crystal structure of multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (carrying resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84 and 90) complexed with RTV and the in vitro enzymatic IC50 of RTV against MDR HIV-1 protease. The structural and functional studies demonstrate significant drug resistance of MDR HIV-1 protease against RTV, arising from reduced hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals interactions between RTV and MDR HIV-1 protease.

  17. Conserved hydrogen bonds and water molecules in MDR HIV-1 protease substrate complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Yedidi, Ravikiran S; Dewdney, Tamaria G; Reiter, Samuel J; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Kovari, Iulia A; Kovari, Ladislau C

    2013-01-18

    The success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in anti-HIV therapy is severely compromised by the rapidly developing drug resistance. HIV-1 protease inhibitors, part of HAART, are losing their potency and efficacy in inhibiting the target. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84, 90) was selected for the present study to understand the binding to its natural substrates. The nine crystal structures of MDR769 HIV-1 protease substrate hepta-peptide complexes were analyzed in order to reveal the conserved structural elements for the purpose of drug design against MDR HIV-1 protease. Our structural studies demonstrated that highly conserved hydrogen bonds between the protease and substrate peptides, together with the conserved crystallographic water molecules, played a crucial role in the substrate recognition, substrate stabilization and protease stabilization. In addition, the absence of the key flap-ligand bridging water molecule might imply a different catalytic mechanism of MDR769 HIV-1 protease compared to that of wild type (WT) HIV-1 protease.

  18. Conserved hydrogen bonds and water molecules in MDR HIV-1 protease substrate complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Reiter, Samuel J.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2012-12-19

    Success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in anti-HIV therapy is severely compromised by the rapidly developing drug resistance. HIV-1 protease inhibitors, part of HAART, are losing their potency and efficacy in inhibiting the target. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84, 90) was selected for the present study to understand the binding to its natural substrates. The nine crystal structures of MDR769 HIV-1 protease substrate hepta-peptide complexes were analyzed in order to reveal the conserved structural elements for the purpose of drug design against MDR HIV-1 protease. Our structural studies demonstrated that highly conserved hydrogen bonds between the protease and substrate peptides, together with the conserved crystallographic water molecules, played a crucial role in the substrate recognition, substrate stabilization and protease stabilization. Additionally, the absence of the key flap-ligand bridging water molecule might imply a different catalytic mechanism of MDR769 HIV-1 protease compared to that of wild type (WT) HIV-1 protease.

  19. Contribution of the 80s loop of HIV-1 protease to the multidrug-resistance mechanism: crystallographic study of MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants

    PubMed Central

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Proteasa, Georghe; Martinez, Jorge L.; Vickrey, John F.; Martin, Philip D.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Liu, Zhigang; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2011-01-01

    The flexible flaps and the 80s loops (Pro79–Ile84) of HIV-1 protease are crucial in inhibitor binding. Previously, it was reported that the crystal structure of multidrug-resistant 769 (MDR769) HIV-1 protease shows a wide-open conformation of the flaps owing to conformational rigidity acquired by the accumulation of mutations. In the current study, the effect of mutations on the conformation of the 80s loop of MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants is reported. Alternate conformations of Pro81 (proline switch) with a root-mean-square deviation of 3–4.8 Å in the Cα atoms of the I10V mutant and a side chain with a ‘flipped-out’ conformation in the A82F mutant cause distortion in the S1/S1′ binding pockets that affects inhibitor binding. The A82S and A82T mutants show local changes in the electrostatics of inhibitor binding owing to the mutation from nonpolar to polar residues. In summary, the crystallo­graphic studies of four variants of MDR769 HIV-1 protease presented in this article provide new insights towards understanding the drug-resistance mechanism as well as a basis for design of future protease inhibitors with enhanced potency. PMID:21636892

  20. Contribution of the 80s loop of HIV-1 protease to the multidrug-resistance mechanism: crystallographic study of MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants

    SciTech Connect

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Proteasa, Georghe; Martinez, Jorge L.; Vickrey, John F.; Martin, Philip D.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Liu, Zhigang; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2011-09-06

    The flexible flaps and the 80s loops (Pro79-Ile84) of HIV-1 protease are crucial in inhibitor binding. Previously, it was reported that the crystal structure of multidrug-resistant 769 (MDR769) HIV-1 protease shows a wide-open conformation of the flaps owing to conformational rigidity acquired by the accumulation of mutations. In the current study, the effect of mutations on the conformation of the 80s loop of MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants is reported. Alternate conformations of Pro81 (proline switch) with a root-mean-square deviation of 3-4.8 {angstrom} in the C{alpha} atoms of the I10V mutant and a side chain with a 'flipped-out' conformation in the A82F mutant cause distortion in the S1/S1' binding pockets that affects inhibitor binding. The A82S and A82T mutants show local changes in the electrostatics of inhibitor binding owing to the mutation from nonpolar to polar residues. In summary, the crystallographic studies of four variants of MDR769 HIV-1 protease presented in this article provide new insights towards understanding the drug-resistance mechanism as well as a basis for design of future protease inhibitors with enhanced potency.

  1. Flap Conformations in HIV-1 Protease are Altered by Mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanucci, Gail; Blackburn, Mandy; Veloro, Angelo; Galiano, Luis; Fangu, Ding; Simmerling, Carlos

    2009-03-01

    HIV-1 protease (PR) is an enzyme that is a major drug target in the treatment of AIDS. Although the structure and function of HIV-1 PR have been studied for over 20 years, questions remain regarding the conformations and dynamics of the β-hairpin turns (flaps) that cover the active site cavity. Distance measurements with pulsed EPR spectroscopy of spin labeled constructs of HIV-1 PR have been used to characterize the flap conformations in the apo and inhibitor bound states. From the most probably distances and the breadth of the distance distribution profiles from analysis of the EPR data, insights regarding the flap conformations and flexibility are gained. The EPR results clearly show how drug pressure selected mutations alter the average conformation of the flaps and the degree of opening of the flaps. Molecular dynamics simulations successfully regenerate the experimentally determined distance distribution profiles, and more importantly, provide structural models for full interpretation of the EPR results. By combining experiment and theory to understand the role that altered flap flexibility/conformations play in the mechanism of drug resistance, key insights are gained toward the rational development of new inhibitors of this important enzyme.

  2. Symmetry-based inhibitors of HIV-1 protease. Design, synthesis and preliminary structure-activity studies of acylated 2,3-diamino-1-hydroxypropanes and 2,4 diamino-1-hydroxybutanes.

    PubMed

    Marastoni, M; Bazzaro, M; Bortolotti, F; Salvadori, S; Tomatis, R

    1999-01-01

    Two series of peptidomimetics containing a novel C(2) pseudosymmetrical hydroxyalkyldiamino core structure were prepared from amino acid starting materials and tested for inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 Pr) and the virus in cell culture. In the 2,3-diamino-1-hydroxypropane series, compound 6a, containing P1/P1(I) benzyl and P2/P2(I) Fmoc substituents, displayed modest HIV-1 Pr inhibition (IC(50) = 430 nM). The corresponding 2,4-diamino-1-hydroxybutane derivative (6b) was the best inhibitor of the series (IC(50) = 160 nM). Interestingly, 6a and 6b showed satisfactory inhibition of HIV replication in cell culture (ED(50) = 340 and 110 nM, respectively), a result which suggests good cell membrane penetration by this class of compounds.

  3. The higher barrier of darunavir and tipranavir resistance for HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Zhigang; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Reiter, Samuel J.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2011-11-17

    Darunavir and tipranavir are two inhibitors that are active against multi-drug resistant (MDR) HIV-1 protease variants. In this study, the invitro inhibitory efficacy was tested against a MDR HIV-1 protease variant, MDR 769 82T, containing the drug resistance mutations of 46L/54V/82T/84V/90M. Crystallographic and enzymatic studies were performed to examine the mechanism of resistance and the relative maintenance of potency. The key findings are as follows: (i) The MDR protease exhibits decreased susceptibility to all nine HIV-1 protease inhibitors approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), among which darunavir and tipranavir are the most potent; (ii) the threonine 82 mutation on the protease greatly enhances drug resistance by altering the hydrophobicity of the binding pocket; (iii) darunavir or tipranavir binding facilitates closure of the wide-open flaps of the MDR protease; and (iv) the remaining potency of tipranavir may be preserved by stabilizing the flaps in the inhibitor-protease complex while darunavir maintains its potency by preserving protein main chain hydrogen bonds with the flexible P2 group. These results could provide new insights into drug design strategies to overcome multi-drug resistance of HIV-1 protease variants.

  4. Cloning and Expression of Soluble Recombinant HIV-1 CRF35 Protease-HP Thioredoxin Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Azarnezhad, Asaad; Sharifi, Zohreh; Seyedabadi, Rahmatollah; Hosseini, Arshad; Johari, Behrooz; Sobhani Fard, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    Background: As a drug target and an antigenic agent, HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) is at the center of attention for designing anti-AIDS inhibitors and diagnostic tests. In previous studies, the production of the recombinant protease has been faced with several difficulties; therefore, the aims of this study were the easy production, purification of the soluble form of protease in E. coli and investigation of its immunoreactivity. Methods: Protease coding region was isolated from the serum of an infected individual, amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into PTZ57R using TA-cloning. Protease coding frame was isolated by PCR and cloned in pET102/D. TOPO expression vector and cloned protease was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) BL21. Produced recombinant protein was purified by affinity Ni-NTA column and protein concentration was checked by BCA protein assay kit. Subsequently, immunoreactivity of recombinant protease (rPR) was assayed by Western blotting and ELISA. Results: Cloning of the HIV protease by TOPO cloning system in pET102/D.TOPO was confirmed with PCR and sequencing. The concentration range of purified recombinant protein was 85 to 100 μg/ml. Immunogenicity of rPR was confirmed by Western blotting and ELISA. Conclusion: Soluble production of recombinant HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 rPR) was performed successfully. This recombinant protein disclosed 86% specificity and 90% sensitivity in immunoassay tests. PMID:27920885

  5. Fullerene Derivatives Strongly Inhibit HIV-1 Replication by Affecting Virus Maturation without Impairing Protease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Zachary S.; Castro, Edison; Seong, Chang-Soo; Cerón, Maira R.

    2016-01-01

    Three compounds (1, 2, and 3) previously reported to inhibit HIV-1 replication and/or in vitro activity of reverse transcriptase were studied, but only fullerene derivatives 1 and 2 showed strong antiviral activity on the replication of HIV-1 in human CD4+ T cells. However, these compounds did not inhibit infection by single-round infection vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G (VSV-G)-pseudotyped viruses, indicating no effect on the early steps of the viral life cycle. In contrast, analysis of single-round infection VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 produced in the presence of compound 1 or 2 showed a complete lack of infectivity in human CD4+ T cells, suggesting that the late stages of the HIV-1 life cycle were affected. Quantification of virion-associated viral RNA and p24 indicates that RNA packaging and viral production were unremarkable in these viruses. However, Gag and Gag-Pol processing was affected, as evidenced by immunoblot analysis with an anti-p24 antibody and the measurement of virion-associated reverse transcriptase activity, ratifying the effect of the fullerene derivatives on virion maturation of the HIV-1 life cycle. Surprisingly, fullerenes 1 and 2 did not inhibit HIV-1 protease in an in vitro assay at the doses that potently blocked viral infectivity, suggesting a protease-independent mechanism of action. Highlighting the potential therapeutic relevance of fullerene derivatives, these compounds block infection by HIV-1 resistant to protease and maturation inhibitors. PMID:27431232

  6. Extreme entropy-enthalpy compensation in a drug-resistant variant of HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    King, Nancy M; Prabu-Jeyabalan, Moses; Bandaranayake, Rajintha M; Nalam, Madhavi N L; Nalivaika, Ellen A; Özen, Ayşegül; Haliloğlu, Türkan; Yilmaz, Neşe Kurt; Schiffer, Celia A

    2012-09-21

    The development of HIV-1 protease inhibitors has been the historic paradigm of rational structure-based drug design, where structural and thermodynamic analyses have assisted in the discovery of novel inhibitors. While the total enthalpy and entropy change upon binding determine the affinity, often the thermodynamics are considered in terms of inhibitor properties only. In the current study, profound changes are observed in the binding thermodynamics of a drug-resistant variant compared to wild-type HIV-1 protease, irrespective of the inhibitor bound. This variant (Flap+) has a combination of flap and active site mutations and exhibits extremely large entropy-enthalpy compensation compared to wild-type protease, 5-15 kcal/mol, while losing only 1-3 kcal/mol in total binding free energy for any of six FDA-approved inhibitors. Although entropy-enthalpy compensation has been previously observed for a variety of systems, never have changes of this magnitude been reported. The co-crystal structures of Flap+ protease with four of the inhibitors were determined and compared with complexes of both the wild-type protease and another drug-resistant variant that does not exhibit this energetic compensation. Structural changes conserved across the Flap+ complexes, which are more pronounced for the flaps covering the active site, likely contribute to the thermodynamic compensation. The finding that drug-resistant mutations can profoundly modulate the relative thermodynamic properties of a therapeutic target independent of the inhibitor presents a new challenge for rational drug design.

  7. Comparison of drug resistance scores for tipranavir in protease inhibitor-naive patients infected with HIV-1 B and non-B subtypes.

    PubMed

    Stürmer, Martin; Stephan, Christoph; Gute, Peter; Knecht, Gaby; Bickel, Markus; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Doerr, Hans W; Gürtler, Lutz; Lecocq, Pierre; van Houtte, Margriet

    2011-11-01

    Genotypes of samples from protease inhibitor-naïve patients in Frankfurt's HIV Cohort were analyzed with five tipranavir resistance prediction algorithms. Mean scores were higher in non-B than in B subtypes. The proportion of non-B subtypes increased with increasing scores, except in weighted algorithms. Virtual and in vitro phenotype analyses of samples with increased scores showed no reduced tipranavir susceptibility. Current algorithms appear suboptimal for interpretation of resistance to tipranavir in non-B subtypes; increased scores might reflect algorithm bias rather than "natural resistance."

  8. An inhibitor of HIV-1 protease modulates constitutive eIF2α dephosphorylation to trigger a specific integrated stress response.

    PubMed

    De Gassart, Aude; Bujisic, Bojan; Zaffalon, Léa; Decosterd, Laurent A; Di Micco, Antonia; Frera, Gianluca; Tallant, Rémy; Martinon, Fabio

    2016-01-12

    Inhibitors of the HIV aspartyl protease [HIV protease inhibitors (HIV-PIs)] are the cornerstone of treatment for HIV. Beyond their well-defined antiretroviral activity, these drugs have additional effects that modulate cell viability and homeostasis. However, little is known about the virus-independent pathways engaged by these molecules. Here we show that the HIV-PI Nelfinavir decreases translation rates and promotes a transcriptional program characteristic of the integrated stress response (ISR). Mice treated with Nelfinavir display hallmarks of this stress response in the liver, including α subunit of translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) phosphorylation, activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4) induction, and increased expression of known downstream targets. Mechanistically, Nelfinavir-mediated ISR bypassed direct activation of the eIF2α stress kinases and instead relied on the inhibition of the constitutive eIF2α dephosphorylation and down-regulation of the phophatase cofactor CReP (Constitutive Repressor of eIF2α Phosphorylation; also known as PPP1R15B). These findings demonstrate that the modulation of eIF2α-specific phosphatase cofactor activity can be a rheostat of cellular homeostasis that initiates a functional ISR and suggest that the HIV-PIs could be repositioned as therapeutics in human diseases to modulate translation rates and stress responses.

  9. An inhibitor of HIV-1 protease modulates constitutive eIF2α dephosphorylation to trigger a specific integrated stress response

    PubMed Central

    De Gassart, Aude; Bujisic, Bojan; Zaffalon, Léa; Decosterd, Laurent A.; Di Micco, Antonia; Frera, Gianluca; Tallant, Rémy; Martinon, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of the HIV aspartyl protease [HIV protease inhibitors (HIV-PIs)] are the cornerstone of treatment for HIV. Beyond their well-defined antiretroviral activity, these drugs have additional effects that modulate cell viability and homeostasis. However, little is known about the virus-independent pathways engaged by these molecules. Here we show that the HIV-PI Nelfinavir decreases translation rates and promotes a transcriptional program characteristic of the integrated stress response (ISR). Mice treated with Nelfinavir display hallmarks of this stress response in the liver, including α subunit of translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) phosphorylation, activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4) induction, and increased expression of known downstream targets. Mechanistically, Nelfinavir-mediated ISR bypassed direct activation of the eIF2α stress kinases and instead relied on the inhibition of the constitutive eIF2α dephosphorylation and down-regulation of the phophatase cofactor CReP (Constitutive Repressor of eIF2α Phosphorylation; also known as PPP1R15B). These findings demonstrate that the modulation of eIF2α-specific phosphatase cofactor activity can be a rheostat of cellular homeostasis that initiates a functional ISR and suggest that the HIV-PIs could be repositioned as therapeutics in human diseases to modulate translation rates and stress responses. PMID:26715744

  10. Development of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors targeting gp41.

    PubMed

    Lu, K; Asyifah, M R; Shao, F; Zhang, D

    2014-06-01

    The HIV-1 envelope protein glycoprotein 41 (gp41) is crucial in the HIV-1 infection process, therefore gp41 has emerged as an attractive target for drug design against AIDS. During the past few decades, tremendous efforts have been made on developing inhibitors that can prevent the HIV-1 entry process via suppressing functional gp41. In this review, the development of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors targeting gp41 including peptide inhibitors, small molecule inhibitors, vaccines and neutralized antibodies will be discussed.

  11. Cold Denaturation of the HIV-1 Protease Monomer.

    PubMed

    Rösner, Heike I; Caldarini, Martina; Prestel, Andreas; Vanoni, Maria A; Broglia, Ricardo A; Aliverti, Alessandro; Tiana, Guido; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2017-02-28

    The human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) protease is a complex protein that in its active form adopts a homodimer dominated by β-sheet structures. We have discovered a cold-denatured state of the monomeric subunit of HIV-1 protease that is populated above 0 °C and therefore directly accessible to various spectroscopic approaches. Using nuclear magnetic resonance secondary chemical shifts, temperature coefficients, and protein dynamics, we suggest that the cold-denatured state populates a compact wet globule containing transient non-native-like α-helical elements. From the linearity of the temperature coefficients and the hydrodynamic radii, we propose that the overall architecture of the cold-denatured state is maintained over the temperature range studied.

  12. Full quantum mechanical study of binding of HIV-1 protease drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da W.; Zhang, John Z. H.

    Fully quantum mechanical studies of detailed binding interactions between HIV-1 protease and six FDA (Food and Drug Administration)-approved drugs (saquinavir, indinavir, ritonavir, nelfinavir, amprenavir, and lopinavir) are carried out using a recently developed MFCC (molecular fractionation with conjugate caps) method. The MFCC calculation produces a quantum mechanical interaction spectrum for any protease drug binding complex. Detailed quantitative analysis on binding of lopinavir to specific residues of the protease is given from the current study. The present calculation shows that the dominant binding of lopinavir to the protease is through the formation of a strong hydrogen bond between the central hydroxyl group of the drug to the aspartate oxygen of Asp25 in one of the two chains of the protease (A chain). This is closely followed by hydrogen binding of the drug to Asp29 in the B chain and somewhat weak hydrogen bonding to Asp30, Gly27, Gly48, and Ile50 in both chains. By partitioning all six drugs into four building blocks besides the central component containing the hydroxyl group, MFCC calculation finds that block III has essentially no binding interaction with the protease and the major binding interactions of these drugs are from blocks II and IV, in addition to the dominant central hydroxyl group. This detailed quantitative information on drug binding to the protease is very useful in rational design of new and improved inhibitors of HIV-1 protease and its mutants.

  13. Inhibition of the HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases by a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Lescar, J.; Brynda, J.; Rezacova, P.; Stouracova, R.; Riottot, M. M.; Chitarra, V.; Fabry, M.; Horejsi, M.; Sedlacek, J.; Bentley, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody 1696, directed against the HIV-1 protease, displays strong inhibitory effects toward the catalytic activity of the enzyme of both the HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates. This antibody cross-reacts with peptides that include the N-terminus of the enzyme, a region that is well conserved in sequence among different viral strains and which, furthermore, is crucial for homodimerization to the active enzymatic form. This observation, as well as antigen-binding studies in the presence of an active site inhibitor, suggest that 1696 inhibits the HIV protease by destabilizing its active homodimeric form. To characterize further how the antibody 1696 inhibits the HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases, we have solved the crystal structure of its Fab fragment by molecular replacement and refined it at 3.0 A resolution. The antigen binding site has a deep cavity at its center, which is lined mainly by acidic and hydrophobic residues, and is large enough to accommodate several antigen residues. The structure of the Fab 1696 could form a starting basis for the design of alternative HIV protease-inhibiting molecules of broad specificity. PMID:10631984

  14. Natural polymorphisms and unusual mutations in HIV-1 protease with potential antiretroviral resistance: a bioinformatic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The correlations of genotypic and phenotypic tests with treatment, clinical history and the significance of mutations in viruses of HIV-infected patients are used to establish resistance mutations to protease inhibitors (PIs). Emerging mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease confer resistance to PIs by inducing structural changes at the ligand interaction site. The aim of this study was to establish an in silico structural relationship between natural HIV-1 polymorphisms and unusual HIV-1 mutations that confer resistance to PIs. Results Protease sequences isolated from 151 Mexican HIV-1 patients that were naïve to, or subjected to antiretroviral therapy, were examined. We identified 41 unrelated resistance mutations with a prevalence greater than 1%. Among these mutations, nine exhibited positive selection, three were natural polymorphisms (L63S/V/H) in a codon associated with drug resistance, and six were unusual mutations (L5F, D29V, L63R/G, P79L and T91V). The D29V mutation, with a prevalence of 1.32% in the studied population, was only found in patients treated with antiretroviral drugs. Using in silico modelling, we observed that D29V formed unstable protease complexes when were docked with lopinavir, saquinavir, darunavir, tipranavir, indinavir and atazanavir. Conclusions The structural correlation of natural polymorphisms and unusual mutations with drug resistance is useful for the identification of HIV-1 variants with potential resistance to PIs. The D29V mutation likely confers a selection advantage in viruses; however, in silico, presence of this mutation results in unstable enzyme/PI complexes, that possibly induce resistance to PIs. PMID:24629078

  15. Structural, kinetic, and thermodynamic studies of specificity designed HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Alvizo, Oscar; Mittal, Seema; Mayo, Stephen L.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-10-23

    HIV-1 protease recognizes and cleaves more than 12 different substrates leading to viral maturation. While these substrates share no conserved motif, they are specifically selected for and cleaved by protease during viral life cycle. Drug resistant mutations evolve within the protease that compromise inhibitor binding but allow the continued recognition of all these substrates. While the substrate envelope defines a general shape for substrate recognition, successfully predicting the determinants of substrate binding specificity would provide additional insights into the mechanism of altered molecular recognition in resistant proteases. We designed a variant of HIV protease with altered specificity using positive computational design methods and validated the design using X-ray crystallography and enzyme biochemistry. The engineered variant, Pr3 (A28S/D30F/G48R), was designed to preferentially bind to one out of three of HIV protease's natural substrates; RT-RH over p2-NC and CA-p2. In kinetic assays, RT-RH binding specificity for Pr3 increased threefold compared to the wild-type (WT), which was further confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Crystal structures of WT protease and the designed variant in complex with RT-RH, CA-p2, and p2-NC were determined. Structural analysis of the designed complexes revealed that one of the engineered substitutions (G48R) potentially stabilized heterogeneous flap conformations, thereby facilitating alternate modes of substrate binding. Our results demonstrate that while substrate specificity could be engineered in HIV protease, the structural pliability of protease restricted the propagation of interactions as predicted. These results offer new insights into the plasticity and structural determinants of substrate binding specificity of the HIV-1 protease.

  16. Crystal structures of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease in complex with two potent anti-malarial compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Woster, Patrick M.; Kovari, Ladislau C.; Gupta, Deepak

    2012-06-19

    Two potent inhibitors (compounds 1 and 2) of malarial aspartyl protease, plasmepsin-II, were evaluated against wild type (NL4-3) and multidrug-resistant clinical isolate 769 (MDR) variants of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) aspartyl protease. Enzyme inhibition assays showed that both 1 and 2 have better potency against NL4-3 than against MDR protease. Crystal structures of MDR protease in complex with 1 and 2 were solved and analyzed. Crystallographic analysis revealed that the MDR protease exhibits a typical wide-open conformation of the flaps (Gly48 to Gly52) causing an overall expansion in the active site cavity, which, in turn caused unstable binding of the inhibitors. Due to the expansion of the active site cavity, both compounds showed loss of direct contacts with the MDR protease compared to the docking models of NL4-3. Multiple water molecules showed a rich network of hydrogen bonds contributing to the stability of the ligand binding in the distorted binding pockets of the MDR protease in both crystal structures. Docking analysis of 1 and 2 showed a decrease in the binding affinity for both compounds against MDR supporting our structure-function studies. Thus, compounds 1 and 2 show promising inhibitory activity against HIV-1 protease variants and hence are good candidates for further development to enhance their potency against NL4-3 as well as MDR HIV-1 protease variants.

  17. Anatomic dissociation between HIV-1 and its endogenous inhibitor in mucosal tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, S. M.; Worley, P.; Jin, W.; McNeely, T. B.; Eisenberg, S.; Fasching, C.; Orenstein, J. M.; Janoff, E. N.

    1997-01-01

    The rarity of oral transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 by saliva suggests the absence of HIV-1 in the oral cavity and/or the presence of viral inhibitory molecules. We analyzed salivary gland tissues from 55 individuals with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) for the presence of HIV-1 by in situ hybridization and detected the virus in more than 30% of these salivary glands. These data, together with previous demonstrations of HIV-1 in oral secretions, implicate a key role for an anti-viral molecule(s) in suppressing transmission. Thus, we focused on the characterization and localization of the endogenous antiviral molecule secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), which inhibits HIV-1 infection in vitro. Expression of SLPI transcripts was evident in submandibular, parotid, and minor salivary glands from both HIV-1-infected and seronegative subjects. Gene expression was reflected by similar levels of SLPI protein by immunohistochemical analysis in the tissues and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in the saliva. However, although SLPI accumulated in acinar cells or ductal epithelium, HIV-1 transcripts did not, and these viral transcripts were identified only in mononuclear cells within the salivary gland stroma. By in situ hybridization, we found no evidence of productive HIV-1 infection of salivary gland epithelium. Thus, HIV-1 was frequently identified in salivary gland tissue, but the virus was found in interstitial mononuclear cells only and did not co-localize with SLPI. Once within the oral cavity, HIV-1 exposure to antiviral levels of SLPI may impede infection of additional target cells, contributing to the virtual absence of oral transmission of HIV-1 by saliva. These studies emphasize the importance of innate, endogenous inhibitors of HIV-1, particularly SLPI, as effective inhibitors of HIV-1 transmission. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9094984

  18. Fucoidans as potential inhibitors of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Prokofjeva, Maria M; Imbs, Tatyana I; Shevchenko, Natalya M; Spirin, Pavel V; Horn, Stefan; Fehse, Boris; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N; Prassolov, Vladimir S

    2013-08-19

    The antiviral activity of different structure fucoidans (α-l-fucans and galactofucans) was studied using two model viral systems based on a lentiviral vectors and a replication competent Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV). It was found that investigated fucoidans have no cytotoxic effects on Jurkat and SC-1cell at the concentration range of 0.001-100 µg/mL. Fucoidans with different efficiency suppressed transduction of Jurkat cell line by pseudo-HIV-1 particles carrying the envelope protein of HIV-1 and infection of SC-1 cells by Mo-MuLV. According to our data, all natural fucoidans can be considered as potential anti-HIV agents regardless of their carbohydrate backbone and degree of sulfating, since their activity is shown at low concentrations (0.001-0.05 µg/mL). High molecular weight fucoidans isolated from Saccharina cichorioides (1.3-α-l-fucan), and S. japonica (galactofucan) were the most effective inhibitors.

  19. A Modified P1 Moiety Enhances in vitro Antiviral Activity against Various Multi-Drug-Resistant HIV-1 Variants and in vitro CNS Penetration Properties of a Novel Nonpeptidic Protease Inhibitor, GRL-10413

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, Masayuki; Salcedo-Gómez, Pedro Miguel; Zhao, Rui; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Das, Debananda; Bulut, Haydar; Delino, Nicole S.; Reddy, Sheri Venkata; Ghosh, Arun K.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2016-09-12

    We here report that GRL-10413, a novel non-peptidic HIV-1 protease inhibitor (PI) containing a modified P1 moiety and a sulfonamide isostere, is highly active against laboratory HIV-1 strains and primary clinical isolates (EC50: 0.00035 - 0.0018 μM) with minimal cytotoxicity (CC50: 35.7 μM). GRL-10413 blocked the infectivity and replication of HIV-1NL4-3variants selected by up to 5 μM concentrations of atazanavir, lopinavir, or amprenavir (EC50: 0.0021 - 0.0023 μM). GRL-10413 also maintained its strong antiviral activity against multi-drug-resistant clinical HIV-1 variants isolated from patients, who no longer responded to various antiviral regimens after long-term antiretroviral therapy. The development of resistance against GRL-10413 was significantly delayed compared to that of APV. In addition, GRL-10413 showed a favorable central nervous system (CNS) penetration property as assessed with anin vitroblood brain barrier (BBB) reconstruction system. Analysis of the crystal structure of HIV-1 protease in complex with GRL-10413 demonstrated that the modified P1 moiety of GRL-10413 has a greater hydrophobic surface area and makes greater van der Waals contacts with active-site amino acids of protease than in the case of darunavir. Moreover, the chlorine substituent in the P1 moiety interacts with protease in two distinct configurations. The present data demonstrate that GRL-10413 has desirable features for treating patients infected with wild-type and/or multi-drug-resistant HIV-1 variants with favorable CNS-penetration capability and that the newly modified P1-moiety may confer desirable features in designing novel anti-HIV-1 PIs.

  20. Inhibition of HIV-1 by fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Eggink, Dirk; Berkhout, Ben; Sanders, Rogier W

    2010-01-01

    The envelope glycoprotein complex (Env) is responsible for entry of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) into cells by mediating attachment to target cells and subsequent membrane fusion. Env consists of three gp120 subunits that mediate receptor and co-receptor attachment and three gp41 subunits responsible for membrane fusion. Several steps of the entry process can serve as drug targets. Receptor antagonists prevent attachment of gp120 to the receptor or co-receptor and conformational changes within gp41 required for membrane fusion can be inhibited by fusion inhibitors. Enfuvirtide (T20, Fuzeon) is a peptide based on the gp41 sequence and is the only approved fusion inhibitor. It prevents membrane fusion by competitively binding to gp41 and blocking the formation of the post-fusion structure. New generations of T20-like peptides have been developed with improved potency and stability. Besides T20 and derivatives, other fusion inhibitors have been developed that target different domains of gp41. Here we discuss the development of fusion inhibitors, their mode of action and their potential for incorporation in future drug regimens.

  1. Insights into the activity of maturation inhibitor PF-46396 on HIV-1 clade C

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Dibya; Timilsina, Uddhav; Srivastava, Tryambak Pratap; Gaur, Ritu

    2017-01-01

    HIV maturation inhibitors are an emerging class of anti-retroviral compounds that inhibit the viral protease-mediated cleavage of the Gag, CA-SP1 (capsid-spacer peptide 1) peptide to mature CA. The first-in-class maturation inhibitor bevirimat (BVM) displayed potent activity against HIV-1 clade B but was ineffective against other HIV-1 clades including clade C. Another pyridone-based maturation inhibitor, PF-46396 displayed potent activity against HIV-1 clade B. In this study, we aimed at determining the activity of PF-46396 against HIV-1 clade C. We employed various biochemical and virological assays to demonstrate that PF-46396 is effective against HIV-1 clade C. We observed a dose dependent accumulation of CA-SP1 intermediate in presence of the compound. We carried out mutagenesis in the CA- SP1 region of HIV-1 clade C Gag and observed that the mutations conferred resistance against the compound. Many mutations inhibited Gag processing thereby reducing virus release in the absence of the compound. However, presence of PF-46396 rescued these defects and enhanced virus release, replication capacity and infectivity of HIV-1 clade C. These results put together identify PF-46396 as a broadly active maturation inhibitor against HIV-1 clade B and C and help in rational designing of novel analogs with reduced toxicity and increased efficacy for its potential use in clinics. PMID:28252110

  2. Effects of PRE and POST Therapy Drug-Pressure Selected Mutations on HIV-1 Protease Conformational Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jeffrey D.; Gonzales, Estrella G.; Huang, Xi; Smith, Adam N.; deVera, Ian Mitchelle S.; D’Amore, Peter W.; Rocca, James R.; Goodenow, Maureen; Dunn, Ben M.; Fanucci, Gail E.

    2015-01-01

    Conformational sampling of pre- and post-therapy subtype B HIV-1 protease sequences derived from a pediatric subject infected via maternal transmission with HIV-1 were characterized by double electron-electron resonance spectroscopy. The conformational ensemble of the PRE construct resembles native-like inhibitor bound states. In contrast, the POST construct, which contains accumulated drug-pressure selected mutations, has a predominantly semi-open conformational ensemble, with increased populations of open-like states. The single point mutant L63P, which is contained in PRE and POST, has decreased dynamics, particularly in the flap region, and also displays a closed-like conformation of inhibitor-bound states. These findings support our hypothesis that secondary mutations accumulate in HIV-1 protease to shift conformational sampling to stabilize open-like conformations, while maintaining the predominant semi-open conformation for activity. PMID:24983495

  3. Sparse Representation for Prediction of HIV-1 Protease Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaxia; Weber, Irene T; Harrison, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    HIV rapidly evolves drug resistance in response to antiviral drugs used in AIDS therapy. Estimating the specific resistance of a given strain of HIV to individual drugs from sequence data has important benefits for both the therapy of individual patients and the development of novel drugs. We have developed an accurate classification method based on the sparse representation theory, and demonstrate that this method is highly effective with HIV-1 protease. The protease structure is represented using our newly proposed encoding method based on Delaunay triangulation, and combined with the mutated amino acid sequences of known drug-resistant strains to train a machine-learning algorithm both for classification and regression of drug-resistant mutations. An overall cross-validated classification accuracy of 97% is obtained when trained on a publically available data base of approximately 1.5×10(4) known sequences (Stanford HIV database http://hivdb.stanford.edu/cgi-bin/GenoPhenoDS.cgi). Resistance to four FDA approved drugs is computed and comparisons with other algorithms demonstrate that our method shows significant improvements in classification accuracy.

  4. Chicoric acid analogues as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z; Neamati, N; Zhao, H; Kiryu, Y; Turpin, J A; Aberham, C; Strebel, K; Kohn, K; Witvrouw, M; Pannecouque, C; Debyser, Z; De Clercq, E; Rice, W G; Pommier, Y; Burke, T R

    1999-04-22

    The present study was undertaken to examine structural features of L-chicoric acid (3) which are important for potency against purified HIV-1 integrase and for reported cytoprotective effects in cell-based systems. Through a progressive series of analogues, it was shown that enantiomeric D-chicoric acid (4) retains inhibitory potency against purified integrase equal to its L-counterpart and further that removal of either one or both carboxylic functionalities results in essentially no loss of inhibitory potency. Additionally, while two caffeoyl moieties are required, attachment of caffeoyl groups to the central linking structure can be achieved via amide or mixed amide/ester linkages. More remarkable is the finding that blockage of the catechol functionality through conversion to tetraacetate esters results in almost no loss of potency, contingent on the presence of at least one carboxyl group on the central linker. Taken as a whole, the work has resulted in the identification of new integrase inhibitors which may be regarded as bis-caffeoyl derivatives of glycidic acid and amino acids such as serine and beta-aminoalanine. The present study also examined the reported ability of chicoric acid to exert cytoprotective effects in HIV-infected cells. It was demonstrated in target and cell-based assays that the chicoric acids do not significantly inhibit other targets associated with HIV-1 replication, including reverse transcription, protease function, NCp7 zinc finger function, or replication of virus from latently infected cells. In CEM cells, for both the parent chicoric acid and selected analogues, antiviral activity was observable under specific assay conditions and with high dependence on the multiplicity of viral infection. However, against HIV-1- and HIV-2-infected MT-4 cells, the chicoric acids and their tetraacetylated esters exhibited antiviral activity (50% effective concentration (EC50) ranging from 1.7 to 20 microM and 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50

  5. HIV-1 Protease, Reverse Transcriptase, and Integrase Variation

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Kris; Varghese, Vici; Winters, Mark A.; Hurt, Christopher B.; Eron, Joseph J.; Parkin, Neil; Holmes, Susan P.; Holodniy, Mark; Shafer, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN) variability presents a challenge to laboratories performing genotypic resistance testing. This challenge will grow with increased sequencing of samples enriched for proviral DNA such as dried blood spots and increased use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to detect low-abundance HIV-1 variants. We analyzed PR and RT sequences from >100,000 individuals and IN sequences from >10,000 individuals to characterize variation at each amino acid position, identify mutations indicating APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing, and identify mutations resulting from selective drug pressure. Forty-seven percent of PR, 37% of RT, and 34% of IN positions had one or more amino acid variants with a prevalence of ≥1%. Seventy percent of PR, 60% of RT, and 60% of IN positions had one or more variants with a prevalence of ≥0.1%. Overall 201 PR, 636 RT, and 346 IN variants had a prevalence of ≥0.1%. The median intersubtype prevalence ratios were 2.9-, 2.1-, and 1.9-fold for these PR, RT, and IN variants, respectively. Only 5.0% of PR, 3.7% of RT, and 2.0% of IN variants had a median intersubtype prevalence ratio of ≥10-fold. Variants at lower prevalences were more likely to differ biochemically and to be part of an electrophoretic mixture compared to high-prevalence variants. There were 209 mutations indicative of APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing and 326 mutations nonpolymorphic treatment selected. Identification of viruses with a high number of APOBEC-associated mutations will facilitate the quality control of dried blood spot sequencing. Identifying sequences with a high proportion of rare mutations will facilitate the quality control of NGS. IMPORTANCE Most antiretroviral drugs target three HIV-1 proteins: PR, RT, and IN. These proteins are highly variable: many different amino acids can be present at the same position in viruses from different individuals. Some of the amino acid variants cause drug

  6. Recovery of the wild type atomic flexibility in the HIV-1 protease double mutants.

    PubMed

    De Conto, Valderes; Braz, Antônio S K; Perahia, David; Scott, Luis P B

    2015-06-01

    The emergence of drug resistant mutations due to the selective pressure exerted by antiretrovirals, including protease inhibitors (PIs), remains a major problem in the treatment of AIDS. During PIs therapy, the occurrence of primary mutations in the wild type HIV-1 protease reduces both the affinity for the inhibitors and the viral replicative capacity compared to the wild type (WT) protein, but additional mutations compensate for this reduced viral fitness. To investigate this phenomenon from the structural point of view, we combined Molecular Dynamics and Normal Mode Analysis to analyze and compare the variations of the flexibility of C-alpha atoms and the differences in hydrogen bond (h-bond) network between the WT and double mutants. In most cases, the flexibility profile of the double mutants was more often similar to that of the WT than to that of the related single base mutants. All single mutants showed a significant alteration in h-bond formation compared to WT. Most of the significant changes occur in the border between the flap and cantilever regions. We found that all the considered double mutants have their h-bond pattern significantly altered in comparison to the respective single base mutants affecting their flexibility profile that becomes more similar to that of WT. This WT flexibility restoration in the double mutants appears as an important factor for the HIV-1 fitness recovery observed in patients.

  7. Drug-resistant molecular mechanism of CRF01_AE HIV-1 protease due to V82F mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Xiu, Zhilong; Hao, Ce

    2009-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (HIV-1 PR) is one of the major targets of anti-AIDS drug discovery. The circulating recombinant form 01 A/E (CRF01_AE, abbreviated AE) subtype is one of the most common HIV-1 subtypes, which is infecting more humans and is expanding rapidly throughout the world. It is, therefore, necessary to develop inhibitors against subtype AE HIV-1 PR. In this work, we have performed computer simulation of subtype AE HIV-1 PR with the drugs lopinavir (LPV) and nelfinavir (NFV), and examined the mechanism of resistance of the V82F mutation of this protease against LPV both structurally and energetically. The V82F mutation at the active site results in a conformational change of 79's loop region and displacement of LPV from its proper binding site, and these changes lead to rotation of the side-chains of residues D25 and I50'. Consequently, the conformation of the binding cavity is deformed asymmetrically and some interactions between PR and LPV are destroyed. Additionally, by comparing the interactive mechanisms of LPV and NFV with HIV-1 PR we discovered that the presence of a dodecahydroisoquinoline ring at the P1' subsite, a [2-(2,6-dimethylphenoxy)acetyl]amino group at the P2' subsite, and an N2 atom at the P2 subsite could improve the binding affinity of the drug with AE HIV-1 PR. These findings are helpful for promising drug design.

  8. An efficient procedure for the expression and purification of HIV-1 protease from inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hong-Loan Thi; Nguyen, Thuy Thi; Vu, Quy Thi; Le, Hang Thi; Pham, Yen; Trinh, Phuong Le; Bui, Thuan Phuong; Phan, Tuan-Nghia

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have focused on HIV-1 protease for developing drugs for treating AIDS. Recombinant HIV-1 protease is used to screen new drugs from synthetic compounds or natural substances. However, large-scale expression and purification of this enzyme is difficult mainly because of its low expression and solubility. In this study, we constructed 9 recombinant plasmids containing a sequence encoding HIV-1 protease along with different fusion tags and examined the expression of the enzyme from these plasmids. Of the 9 plasmids, pET32a(+) plasmid containing the HIV-1 protease-encoding sequence along with sequences encoding an autocleavage site GTVSFNF at the N-terminus and TEV plus 6× His tag at the C-terminus showed the highest expression of the enzyme and was selected for further analysis. The recombinant protein was isolated from inclusion bodies by using 2 tandem Q- and Ni-Sepharose columns. SDS-PAGE of the obtained HIV-1 protease produced a single band of approximately 13 kDa. The enzyme was recovered efficiently (4 mg protein/L of cell culture) and had high specific activity of 1190 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) at an optimal pH of 4.7 and optimal temperature of 37 °C. This procedure for expressing and purifying HIV-1 protease is now being scaled up to produce the enzyme on a large scale for its application.

  9. A novel and rapid assay for HIV-1 protease detection using magnetic bead mediation.

    PubMed

    Esseghaier, Chiheb; Ng, Andy; Zourob, Mohammed

    2013-03-15

    A simple sensing assay was established for label-free detection of HIV-1 protease. HIV-1 protease peptide substrate conjugated to magnetic beads via its N-terminus is directly fixed onto the sensor gold surface through the sulphur atom of cysteine. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was used to study the peptide substrate cleavage efficiency of the protease with magnetic beads of different sizes (1 μm and 30 nm). Cyclic voltammetry and faradic impedance spectroscopy were employed in order to characterize the functionalized gold electrode. It was found that the nano-sized beads are a more efficient sensing probe for the protease. Electrochemical biosensing showed a gradual decrease in charge transfer resistance after injection of the HIV-1 protease. The experimental data established a detection limit of 10 pg/ml, as well as demonstrated a drug screening assay. This HIV-1 protease biosensor represents a new detection approach which will lead to low-cost point-of-care devices for sensitive HIV-1 diagnosis, as well as high-throughput drug screening platforms.

  10. Transition states of native and drug-resistant HIV-1 protease are the same

    PubMed Central

    Kipp, D. Randal; Hirschi, Jennifer S.; Wakata, Aya; Goldstein, Harris; Schramm, Vern L.

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 protease is an important target for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. However, drug resistance is a persistent problem and new inhibitors are needed. An approach toward understanding enzyme chemistry, the basis of drug resistance, and the design of powerful inhibitors is to establish the structure of enzymatic transition states. Enzymatic transition structures can be established by matching experimental kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) with theoretical predictions. However, the HIV-1 protease transition state has not been previously resolved using these methods. We have measured primary 14C and 15N KIEs and secondary 3H and 18O KIEs for native and multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease (I84V). We observed 14C KIEs (14V/K) of 1.029 ± 0.003 and 1.025 ± 0.005, 15N KIEs (15V/K) of 0.987 ± 0.004 and 0.989 ± 0.003, 18O KIEs (18V/K) of 0.999 ± 0.003 and 0.993 ± 0.003, and 3H KIEs (3V/K) KIEs of 0.968 ± 0.001 and 0.976 ± 0.001 for the native and I84V enzyme, respectively. The chemical reaction involves nucleophilic water attack at the carbonyl carbon, proton transfer to the amide nitrogen leaving group, and C-N bond cleavage. A transition structure consistent with the KIE values involves proton transfer from the active site Asp-125 (1.32 Å) with partial hydrogen bond formation to the accepting nitrogen (1.20 Å) and partial bond loss from the carbonyl carbon to the amide leaving group (1.52 Å). The KIEs measured for the native and I84V enzyme indicate nearly identical transition states, implying that a true transition-state analogue should be effective against both enzymes. PMID:22493227

  11. Energetic basis for drug resistance of HIV-1 protease mutants against amprenavir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Parimal; Knecht, Volker

    2012-02-01

    Amprenavir (APV) is a high affinity (0.15 nM) HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitor. However, the affinities of the drug resistant protease variants V32I, I50V, I54V, I54M, I84V and L90M to amprenavir are decreased 3 to 30-fold compared to the wild-type. In this work, the popular molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area method has been used to investigate the effectiveness of amprenavir against the wild-type and these mutated protease variants. Our results reveal that the protonation state of Asp25/Asp25' strongly affects the dynamics, the overall affinity and the interactions of the inhibitor with individual residues. We emphasize that, in contrast to what is often assumed, the protonation state may not be inferred from the affinities but requires pKa calculations. At neutral pH, Asp25 and Asp25' are ionized or protonated, respectively, as suggested from pKa calculations. This protonation state was thus mainly considered in our study. Mutation induced changes in binding affinities are in agreement with the experimental findings. The decomposition of the binding free energy reveals the mechanisms underlying binding and drug resistance. Drug resistance arises from an increase in the energetic contribution from the van der Waals interactions between APV and PR (V32I, I50V, and I84V mutant) or a rise in the energetic contribution from the electrostatic interactions between the inhibitor and its target (I54M and I54V mutant). For the V32I mutant, also an increased free energy for the polar solvation contributes to the drug resistance. For the L90M mutant, a rise in the van der Waals energy for APV-PR interactions is compensated by a decrease in the polar solvation free energy such that the net binding affinity remains unchanged. Detailed understanding of the molecular forces governing binding and drug resistance might assist in the design of new inhibitors against HIV-1 PR variants that are resistant against current drugs.

  12. HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors: Recent Development and Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Timothy J.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review provides an overview of HIV-1 entry inhibitors, with a focus on drugs in the later stages of clinical development. Recent findings Entry of HIV-1 into target cells involves viral attachment, co-receptor binding and fusion. Antiretroviral drugs that interact with each step in the entry process have been developed, but only two are currently approved for clinical use. The small molecule attachment inhibitor BMS-663068 has shown potent antiviral activity in early phase studies, and phase 2b trials are currently underway. The post-attachment inhibitor ibalizumab has shown antiviral activity in phase 1 and 2 trials; further studies, including subcutaneous delivery of drug to healthy individuals, are anticipated. The CCR5 antagonist maraviroc is approved for use in treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced patients. Cenicriviroc, a small-molecule CCR5 antagonist that also has activity as a CCR2 antagonist, has entered phase 2b studies. No CXCR4 antagonists are currently in clinical trials, but once daily, next-generation injectable peptide fusion inhibitors have entered human trials. Both maraviroc and ibalizumab are being studied for prevention of HIV-1 transmission and/or for use in nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing antiretroviral regimens. Summary Inhibition of HIV-1 entry continues to be a promising target for antiretroviral drug development. PMID:23290628

  13. Sequence and structure based models of HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Successful management of chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection with a cocktail of antiretroviral medications can be negatively affected by the presence of drug resistant mutations in the viral targets. These targets include the HIV-1 protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) proteins, for which a number of inhibitors are available on the market and routinely prescribed. Protein mutational patterns are associated with varying degrees of resistance to their respective inhibitors, with extremes that can range from continued susceptibility to cross-resistance across all drugs. Results Here we implement statistical learning algorithms to develop structure- and sequence-based models for systematically predicting the effects of mutations in the PR and RT proteins on resistance to each of eight and eleven inhibitors, respectively. Employing a four-body statistical potential, mutant proteins are represented as feature vectors whose components quantify relative environmental perturbations at amino acid residue positions in the respective target structures upon mutation. Two approaches are implemented in developing sequence-based models, based on use of either relative frequencies or counts of n-grams, to generate vectors for representing mutant proteins. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported study on structure- and sequence-based predictive models of HIV-1 PR and RT drug resistance developed by implementing a four-body statistical potential and n-grams, respectively, to generate mutant attribute vectors. Performance of the learning methods is evaluated on the basis of tenfold cross-validation, using previously assayed and publicly available in vitro data relating mutational patterns in the targets to quantified inhibitor susceptibility changes. Conclusion Overall performance results are competitive with those of a previously published study utilizing a sequence-based strategy, while our structure- and sequence

  14. Copper inhibits the HIV-1 protease by both oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Karlstroem, A.R.; Levine, R.L. )

    1991-03-11

    The protease encoded by HIV-1 is essential for the processing of the viral polyproteins encoded by the gag and pol genes into mature viral proteins. Mutation or deletion of the protease gene blocks replication of the virus, making the protease an attractive target for antiviral therapy. The authors found that the HIV-1 protease is inhibited by micromolar concentrations of Cu{sup 2+}. Protease was 50% inhibited by exposure to 5 {mu}M copper for 5 min while exposure to 25 {mu}M caused complete inhibition. This inhibition was not oxygen-dependent and was not reversed by treatment with EDTA, presumably due to the slow off-rate of copper from the protease. Consistent with this interpretation, enzyme activity was recovered after denaturation and refolding of the copper exposed protease. Titration of the inactivated enzyme with Ellman's reagent demonstrated a loss of one of the two sulfhydryl groups present in the molecule, suggesting that copper inhibition was mediated through binding to a cysteine. This was confirmed in studies with a chemically synthesize, mutant protease in which the two cysteine residues were replaced by {alpha}-amino butyrate: The mutant protease was not inhibited by copper. However, both the wild-type and mutant protease were inactivated when exposed to copper, oxygen, and dithiothreitol. This inactivation required oxygen. Thus, the protease can also be inactivated by metal catalyzed oxidation (MCO), a presumably irreversible covalent modification.

  15. Alkyl Amine Bevirimat Derivatives Are Potent and Broadly Active HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Emiko; Ablan, Sherimay D.; Mandt, Rebecca; Pauly, Gary T.; Sigano, Dina M.; Schneider, Joel P.; Martin, David E.; Nitz, Theodore J.; Wild, Carl T.

    2015-01-01

    Concomitant with the release of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) particles from the infected cell, the viral protease cleaves the Gag polyprotein precursor at a number of sites to trigger virus maturation. We previously reported that a betulinic acid-derived compound, bevirimat (BVM), blocks HIV-1 maturation by disrupting a late step in protease-mediated Gag processing: the cleavage of the capsid-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1) intermediate to mature CA. BVM was shown in multiple clinical trials to be safe and effective in reducing viral loads in HIV-1-infected patients. However, naturally occurring polymorphisms in the SP1 region of Gag (e.g., SP1-V7A) led to a variable response in some BVM-treated patients. The reduced susceptibility of SP1-polymorphic HIV-1 to BVM resulted in the discontinuation of its clinical development. To overcome the loss of BVM activity induced by polymorphisms in SP1, we carried out an extensive medicinal chemistry campaign to develop novel maturation inhibitors. In this study, we focused on alkyl amine derivatives modified at the C-28 position of the BVM scaffold. We identified a set of derivatives that are markedly more potent than BVM against an HIV-1 clade B clone (NL4-3) and show robust antiviral activity against a variant of NL4-3 containing the V7A polymorphism in SP1. One of the most potent of these compounds also strongly inhibited a multiclade panel of primary HIV-1 isolates. These data demonstrate that C-28 alkyl amine derivatives of BVM can, to a large extent, overcome the loss of susceptibility imposed by polymorphisms in SP1. PMID:26482309

  16. Multimodal mechanism of action of allosteric HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jurado, Kellie Ann; Engelman, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is required for lentivirus replication and is a proven drug target for the prevention of AIDS in HIV-1 infected patients. While clinical strand transfer inhibitors disarm the IN active site, allosteric inhibition of enzyme activity through the disruption of IN-IN protein interfaces holds great therapeutic potential. A promising class of allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs), 2-(quinolin-3-yl) acetic acid derivatives, engage the IN catalytic core domain dimerization interface at the binding site for the host integration co-factor LEDGF/p75. ALLINIs promote IN multimerization and, independent of LEDGF/p75 protein, block the formation of the active IN-DNA complex, as well as inhibit the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction in vitro. Yet, rather unexpectedly, the full inhibitory effect of these compounds is exerted during the late phase of HIV-1 replication. ALLINIs impair particle core maturation as well as reverse transcription and integration during the subsequent round of virus infection. Recapitulating the pleiotropic phenotypes observed with numerous IN mutant viruses, ALLINIs provide insight into underlying aspects of IN biology that extend beyond its catalytic activity. Therefore, in addition to the potential to expand our repertoire of HIV-1 antiretrovirals, ALLINIs afford important structural probes to dissect the multifaceted nature of the IN protein throughout the course of HIV-1 replication. PMID:24274067

  17. Development of a novel anti-HIV-1 agent from within: Effect of chimeric Vpr-containing protease cleavage site residues on virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Serio, D.; Rizvi, T. A.; Cartas, M.; Kalyanaraman, V. S.; Weber, I. T.; Koprowski, H.; Srinivasan, A.

    1997-01-01

    Effective antiviral agents will be of great value in controlling virus replication and delaying the onset of HIV-1-related disease symptoms. Current therapy involves the use of antiviral agents that target the enzymatic functions of the virus, resulting in the emergence of resistant viruses to these agents, thus lowering their effectiveness. To overcome this problem, we have considered the idea of developing novel agents from within HIV-1 as inhibitors of virus replication. The specificity of the Vpr protein for the HIV-1 virus particle makes it an attractive molecule for the development of antiviral agents targeting the events associated with virus maturation. We have generated chimeric Vpr proteins containing HIV-1-specific sequences added to the C terminus of Vpr. These sequences correspond to nine cleavage sites of the Gag and Gag–Pol precursors of HIV-1. The chimeric Vpr constructs were introduced into HIV-1 proviral DNA to assess their effect on virus infectivity using single- and multiple-round replication assays. The virus particles generated exhibited a variable replication pattern depending on the protease cleavage site used as a fusion partner. Interestingly, the chimeric Vpr containing the cleavage sequences from the junction of p24 and p2, 24/2, completely abolished virus infectivity. These results show that chimeric proteins generated from within HIV-1 have the ability to suppress HIV-1 replication and make ideal agents for gene therapy or intracellular immunization to treat HIV-1 infection. PMID:9096396

  18. In vitro protease cleavage and computer simulations reveal the HIV-1 capsid maturation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Jiying; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Yufenyuy, Ernest L.; Wagner, Jef; Himes, Benjamin A.; Zhao, Gongpu; Aiken, Christopher; Zandi, Roya; Zhang, Peijun

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 virions assemble as immature particles containing Gag polyproteins that are processed by the viral protease into individual components, resulting in the formation of mature infectious particles. There are two competing models for the process of forming the mature HIV-1 core: the disassembly and de novo reassembly model and the non-diffusional displacive model. To study the maturation pathway, we simulate HIV-1 maturation in vitro by digesting immature particles and assembled virus-like particles with recombinant HIV-1 protease and monitor the process with biochemical assays and cryoEM structural analysis in parallel. Processing of Gag in vitro is accurate and efficient and results in both soluble capsid protein and conical or tubular capsid assemblies, seemingly converted from immature Gag particles. Computer simulations further reveal probable assembly pathways of HIV-1 capsid formation. Combining the experimental data and computer simulations, our results suggest a sequential combination of both displacive and disassembly/reassembly processes for HIV-1 maturation. PMID:27958264

  19. In vitro protease cleavage and computer simulations reveal the HIV-1 capsid maturation pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Jiying; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Yufenyuy, Ernest L.; Wagner, Jef; Himes, Benjamin A.; Zhao, Gongpu; Aiken, Christopher; Zandi, Roya; Zhang, Peijun

    2016-12-01

    HIV-1 virions assemble as immature particles containing Gag polyproteins that are processed by the viral protease into individual components, resulting in the formation of mature infectious particles. There are two competing models for the process of forming the mature HIV-1 core: the disassembly and de novo reassembly model and the non-diffusional displacive model. To study the maturation pathway, we simulate HIV-1 maturation in vitro by digesting immature particles and assembled virus-like particles with recombinant HIV-1 protease and monitor the process with biochemical assays and cryoEM structural analysis in parallel. Processing of Gag in vitro is accurate and efficient and results in both soluble capsid protein and conical or tubular capsid assemblies, seemingly converted from immature Gag particles. Computer simulations further reveal probable assembly pathways of HIV-1 capsid formation. Combining the experimental data and computer simulations, our results suggest a sequential combination of both displacive and disassembly/reassembly processes for HIV-1 maturation.

  20. Terminal Interface Conformations Modulate Dimer Stability Prior to Amino Terminal Autoprocessing of HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Agniswamy, Johnson; Sayer, Jane M.; Weber, Irene T.; Louis, John M.

    2012-04-17

    The HIV-1 protease (PR) mediates its own release (autoprocessing) from the polyprotein precursor, Gag-Pol, flanked by the transframe region (TFR) and reverse transcriptase at its N- and C-termini, respectively. Autoprocessing at the N-terminus of PR mediates stable dimer formation essential for catalytic activity, leading to the formation of infectious virus. An antiparallel {beta}-sheet interface formed by the four N- and C-terminal residues of each subunit is important for dimer stability. Here, we present the first high-resolution crystal structures of model protease precursor-clinical inhibitor (PI darunavir or saquinavir) complexes, revealing varying conformations of the N-terminal flanking (S{sup -4}FNF{sup -1}) and interface residues (P{sup 1}QIT{sup 4}). A 180{sup o} rotation of the T{sup 4}-L{sup 5} peptide bond is accompanied by a new Q{sup 2}-L{sup 5} hydrogen bond and complete disengagement of PQIT from the {beta}-sheet dimer interface, which may be a feature for intramolecular autoprocessing. This result is consistent with drastically lower thermal stability by 14-20 C of PI complexes of precursors and the mature PR lacking its PQIT residues (by 18.3 C). Similar to the TFR-PR precursor, this deletion also results in a darunavir dissociation constant (2 x 10{sup 4})-fold higher and a markedly increased dimer dissociation constant relative to the mature PR. The terminal {beta}-sheet perturbations of the dimeric structure likely account for the drastically poorer inhibition of autoprocessing of TFR-PR relative to the mature PR, even though significant differences in active site-PI interactions in these structures were not observed. The novel conformations of the dimer interface may be exploited to target selectively the protease precursor prior to its N-terminal cleavage.

  1. Developments of indoles as anti-HIV-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Lv, Min

    2009-01-01

    Since the first case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was reported in 1981, AIDS has always been a global health threat and the leading cause of deaths due to the rapid emergence of drug-resistance and unwanted metabolic side effects. Every day in 2007 an estimated 6850 people were newly infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Over the past 28 years the rapid worldwide spread of AIDS has prompted an intense research effort to discover compounds that could effectively inhibit HIV. The development of new, selective and safe inhibitors for the treatment of HIV, therefore, still remains a high priority for medical research. To the best of our knowledge, the indole derivatives have been considered as one class of promising HIV-1 inhibitors, such as delavirdine approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1997 for use in combination with other antiretrovirals in adults with HIV infection. In this review we focus on the synthesis and anti-HIV-1 activity of indole derivatives, in the meantime, the structure-activity relationship (SAR) for some derivatives are also surveyed. It will pave the way for the design of indole derivatives as anti-HIV-1 drugs in the future.

  2. Cellular aspartyl proteases promote the unconventional secretion of biologically active HIV-1 matrix protein p17

    PubMed Central

    Caccuri, Francesca; Iaria, Maria Luisa; Campilongo, Federica; Varney, Kristen; Rossi, Alessandro; Mitola, Stefania; Schiarea, Silvia; Bugatti, Antonella; Mazzuca, Pietro; Giagulli, Cinzia; Fiorentini, Simona; Lu, Wuyuan; Salmona, Mario; Caruso, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    The human immune deficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) matrix protein p17 (p17), although devoid of a signal sequence, is released by infected cells and detected in blood and in different organs and tissues even in HIV-1-infected patients undergoing successful combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). Extracellularly, p17 deregulates the function of different cells involved in AIDS pathogenesis. The mechanism of p17 secretion, particularly during HIV-1 latency, still remains to be elucidated. A recent study showed that HIV-1-infected cells can produce Gag without spreading infection in a model of viral latency. Here we show that in Gag-expressing cells, secretion of biologically active p17 takes place at the plasma membrane and occurs following its interaction with phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate and its subsequent cleavage from the precursor Gag (Pr55Gag) operated by cellular aspartyl proteases. These enzymes operate a more complex Gag polypeptide proteolysis than the HIV-1 protease, thus hypothetically generating slightly truncated or elongated p17s in their C-terminus. A 17 C-terminal residues excised p17 was found to be structurally and functionally identical to the full-length p17 demonstrating that the final C-terminal region of p17 is irrelevant for the protein’s biological activity. These findings offer new opportunities to identify treatment strategies for inhibiting p17 release in the extracellular microenvironment. PMID:27905556

  3. Design of second generation HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jinxia; Dayam, Raveendra; Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q; Neamati, Nouri

    2007-01-01

    The prospect of HIV-1 integrase (IN) as a therapeutically viable retroviral drug target is on the verge of realization. The observed preclinical and clinical performance of beta-diketo containing and naphthyridine carboxamide compounds provides direct proof for the clinical application of IN inhibition. These validated lead compounds are useful in the design and development of second generation IN inhibitors. The results from preclinical and clinical studies on the first generation IN inhibitors reiterate a demand for novel second generation inhibitors with improved pharmacokinetic and metabolic properties. Pharmacophore-based drug design techniques facilitate the discovery of novel compounds on the basis of validated lead compounds specific for a drug target. In this article we have comprehensively reviewed the application of pharmacophore-based drug design methods in the field of IN inhibitor discovery.

  4. Fast and accurate determination of the relative binding affinities of small compounds to HIV-1 protease using non-equilibrium work.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Son Tung; Hung, Huynh Minh; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2016-12-05

    The fast pulling ligand (FPL) out of binding cavity using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations was demonstrated to be a rapid, accurate and low CPU demand method for the determination of the relative binding affinities of a large number of HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitors. In this approach, the ligand is pulled out of the binding cavity of the protein using external harmonic forces, and the work of pulling force corresponds to the relative binding affinity of HIV-1 PR inhibitor. The correlation coefficient between the pulling work and the experimental binding free energy of R=-0.95 shows that FPL results are in good agreement with experiment. It is thus easier to rank the binding affinities of HIV-1 PR inhibitors, that have similar binding affinities because the mean error bar of pulling work amounts to δW=7%. The nature of binding is discovered using the FPL approach. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Hybrid Ty1/HIV-1 elements used to detect inhibitors and monitor the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Nissley, Dwight V.; Boyer, Paul L.; Garfinkel, David J.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Strathern, Jeffrey N.

    1998-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that hybrid retrotransposons composed of the yeast Ty1 element and the reverse transcriptase (RT) of HIV-1 are active in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The RT activity of these hybrid Ty1/HIV-1 (his3AI/AIDS RT; HART) elements can be monitored by using a simple genetic assay. HART element reverse transcription depends on both the polymerase and RNase H domains of HIV-1 RT. Here we demonstrate that the HART assay is sensitive to inhibitors of HIV-1 RT. (−)-(S)-8-Chloro-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-5-methyl-6-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)imidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thione monohydrochloride (8 Cl-TIBO), a well characterized non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) of HIV-1 RT, blocks propagation of HART elements. HART elements that express NNRTI-resistant RT variants of HIV-1 are insensitive to 8 Cl-TIBO, demonstrating the specificity of inhibition in this assay. HART elements carrying NNRTI-resistant variants of HIV-1 RT can be used to identify compounds that are active against drug-resistant viruses. PMID:9811899

  6. Protein conformational dynamics in the mechanism of HIV-1 protease catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Torbeev, Vladimir Yu.; Raghuraman, H.; Hamelberg, Donald; Tonelli, Marco; Westler, William M.; Perozo, Eduardo; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2013-09-17

    We have used chemical protein synthesis and advanced physical methods to probe dynamics-function correlations for the HIV-1 protease, an enzyme that has received considerable attention as a target for the treatment of AIDS. Chemical synthesis was used to prepare a series of unique analogues of the HIV-1 protease in which the flexibility of the 'flap' structures (residues 37-61 in each monomer of the homodimeric protein molecule) was systematically varied. These analogue enzymes were further studied by X-ray crystallography, NMR relaxation, and pulse-EPR methods, in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations. We show that conformational isomerization in the flaps is correlated with structural reorganization of residues in the active site, and that it is preorganization of the active site that is a rate-limiting factor in catalysis.

  7. Screening of the Pan-African natural product library identifies ixoratannin A-2 and boldine as novel HIV-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tietjen, Ian; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Mwimanzi, Philip; Onguéné, Pascal Amoa; Scull, Margaret A; Idowu, Thomas Oyebode; Ogundaini, Abiodun Oguntuga; Meva'a, Luc Mbaze; Abegaz, Berhanu M; Rice, Charles M; Andrae-Marobela, Kerstin; Brockman, Mark A; Brumme, Zabrina L; Fedida, David

    2015-01-01

    The continued burden of HIV in resource-limited regions such as parts of sub-Saharan Africa, combined with adverse effects and potential risks of resistance to existing antiretroviral therapies, emphasize the need to identify new HIV inhibitors. Here we performed a virtual screen of molecules from the pan-African Natural Product Library, the largest collection of medicinal plant-derived pure compounds on the African continent. We identified eight molecules with structural similarity to reported interactors of Vpu, an HIV-1 accessory protein with reported ion channel activity. Using in vitro HIV-1 replication assays with a CD4+ T cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we confirmed antiviral activity and minimal cytotoxicity for two compounds, ixoratannin A-2 and boldine. Notably, ixoratannin A-2 retained inhibitory activity against recombinant HIV-1 strains encoding patient-derived mutations that confer resistance to protease, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase, or integrase inhibitors. Moreover, ixoratannin A-2 was less effective at inhibiting replication of HIV-1 lacking Vpu, supporting this protein as a possible direct or indirect target. In contrast, boldine was less effective against a protease inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 strain. Both ixoratannin A-2 and boldine also inhibited in vitro replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, BIT-225, a previously-reported Vpu inhibitor, demonstrated antiviral activity but also cytotoxicity in HIV-1 and HCV replication assays. Our work identifies pure compounds derived from African plants with potential novel activities against viruses that disproportionately afflict resource-limited regions of the world.

  8. Screening of the Pan-African Natural Product Library Identifies Ixoratannin A-2 and Boldine as Novel HIV-1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tietjen, Ian; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Mwimanzi, Philip; Onguéné, Pascal Amoa; Scull, Margaret A.; Idowu, Thomas Oyebode; Ogundaini, Abiodun Oguntuga; Meva’a, Luc Mbaze; Abegaz, Berhanu M.; Rice, Charles M.; Andrae-Marobela, Kerstin; Brockman, Mark A.; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Fedida, David

    2015-01-01

    The continued burden of HIV in resource-limited regions such as parts of sub-Saharan Africa, combined with adverse effects and potential risks of resistance to existing antiretroviral therapies, emphasize the need to identify new HIV inhibitors. Here we performed a virtual screen of molecules from the pan-African Natural Product Library, the largest collection of medicinal plant-derived pure compounds on the African continent. We identified eight molecules with structural similarity to reported interactors of Vpu, an HIV-1 accessory protein with reported ion channel activity. Using in vitro HIV-1 replication assays with a CD4+ T cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we confirmed antiviral activity and minimal cytotoxicity for two compounds, ixoratannin A-2 and boldine. Notably, ixoratannin A-2 retained inhibitory activity against recombinant HIV-1 strains encoding patient-derived mutations that confer resistance to protease, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase, or integrase inhibitors. Moreover, ixoratannin A-2 was less effective at inhibiting replication of HIV-1 lacking Vpu, supporting this protein as a possible direct or indirect target. In contrast, boldine was less effective against a protease inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 strain. Both ixoratannin A-2 and boldine also inhibited in vitro replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, BIT-225, a previously-reported Vpu inhibitor, demonstrated antiviral activity but also cytotoxicity in HIV-1 and HCV replication assays. Our work identifies pure compounds derived from African plants with potential novel activities against viruses that disproportionately afflict resource-limited regions of the world. PMID:25830320

  9. Pressure-induced structural transition of mature HIV-1 Protease from a combined NMR/MD simulation approach

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Julien; Louis, John M.; Bax, Ad; Best, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the pressure-induced structural changes in the mature human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease dimer (HIV-1 PR), using residual dipolar coupling (RDC) measurements in a weakly oriented solution. 1DNH RDCs were measured under high-pressure conditions for an inhibitor-free PR and an inhibitor-bound complex, as well as for an inhibitor-free multidrug resistant protease bearing 20 mutations (PR20). While PR20 and the inhibitor-bound PR were little affected by pressure, inhibitor-free PR showed significant differences in the RDCs measured at 600 bar compared to 1 bar. The structural basis of such changes was investigated by MD simulations using the experimental RDC restraints, revealing substantial conformational perturbations, specifically a partial opening of the flaps and the penetration of water molecules into the hydrophobic core of the subunits at high-pressure. This study highlights the exquisite sensitivity of RDCs to pressure-induced conformational changes and illustrates how RDCs combined with MD simulations can be used to determine the structural properties of metastable intermediate states on the folding energy landscape. PMID:26385843

  10. Albumin-conjugated C34 Peptide HIV-1 Fusion Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Stoddart, Cheryl A.; Nault, Geneviève; Galkina, Sofiya A.; Thibaudeau, Karen; Bakis, Peter; Bousquet-Gagnon, Nathalie; Robitaille, Martin; Bellomo, Maryanne; Paradis, Véronique; Liscourt, Patricia; Lobach, Alexandra; Rivard, Marie-Ève; Ptak, Roger G.; Mankowski, Marie K.; Bridon, Dominique; Quraishi, Omar

    2008-01-01

    Entry inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) have been the focus of much recent research. C34, a potent fusion inhibitor derived from the HR2 region of gp41, was engineered into a 1:1 human serum albumin conjugate through stable covalent attachment of a maleimido-C34 analog onto cysteine 34 of albumin. This bioconjugate, PC-1505, was designed to require less frequent dosing and less peptide than T-20 and was assessed for its antifusogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo in the SCID-hu Thy/Liv mouse model. PC-1505 was essentially equipotent to the original C34 peptide and to T-20 in vitro. In HIV-1-infected SCID-hu Thy/Liv mice, T-20 lost activity with infrequent dosing, whereas the antiviral potency of PC-1505 was sustained, and PC-1505 was active against T-20-resistant (“DIV”) virus with a G36D substitution in gp41. The in vivo results are the direct result of a significantly improved pharmacokinetic profile for the C34 peptide following albumin conjugation. Contrary to previous reports that the gp41 NHR trimer is poorly accessible to C34 fused to protein cargoes of increasing size (Hamburger, A. E., Kim, S., Welch, B. D., and Kay, M. S. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 12567–12572), these results are the first demonstration of the capacity for a large, endogenous serum protein to gain unobstructed access to the transient gp41 intermediates that exist during the HIV fusion process, and it supports further development of albumin conjugation as a promising approach to inhibit HIV-1 entry. PMID:18809675

  11. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-08-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo.

  12. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-01-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO 140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo. PMID:18519143

  13. Enzymatic Triggered Release of an HIV-1 Entry Inhibitor from Prostate Specific Antigen Degradable Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Meredith R.; Aliyar, Hyder A.; Lee, Chang-won; Jay, Julie I.; Gupta, Kavita M.; Watson, Karen M.; Stewart, Russell J.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Kiser, Patrick F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the design, construction and characterization of the first anti-HIV drug delivery system that is triggered to release its contents in the presence of human semen. Microgel particles were synthesized with a crosslinker containing a peptide substrate for the seminal serine protease prostate specific antigen (PSA) and were loaded with the HIV-1 entry inhibitor sodium poly(styrene-4-sulfonate) (pSS). The particles were composed of N-2-hydroxyproplymethacrylamide and bis-methacrylamide functionalized peptides based on the PSA substrates GISSFYSSK and GISSQYSSK. Exposure to human seminal plasma (HSP) degraded the microgel network and triggered the release of the entrapped antiviral polymer. Particles with the crosslinker composed of the substrate GISSFYSSK showed 17 times faster degradation in seminal plasma than that of the crosslinker composed of GISSQYSSK. The microgel particles containing 1 mol% GISSFYSSK peptide crosslinker showed complete degradation in 30 hours in the presence of HSP at 37 °C and pSS released from the microgels within 30 minutes reached a concentration of 10 µg/mL, equivalent to the published IC90 for pSS. The released pSS inactivated HIV-1 in the presence of HSP. The solid phase synthesis of the crosslinkers, preparation of the particles by inverse microemulsion polymerization, HSP-triggered release of pSS and inactivation of HIV-1 studies are described. PMID:21511017

  14. A Genomic Analysis of Rat Proteases and Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Puente, Xose S.; López-Otín, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Proteases perform important roles in multiple biological and pathological processes. The availability of the rat genome sequence has facilitated the analysis of the complete protease repertoire or degradome of this model organism. The rat degradome consists of at least 626 proteases and homologs, which are distributed into 24 aspartic, 160 cysteine, 192 metallo, 221 serine, and 29 threonine proteases. This distribution is similar to that of the mouse degradome but is more complex than that of the human degradome composed of 561 proteases and homologs. This increased complexity of rat proteases mainly derives from the expansion of several families, including placental cathepsins, testases, kallikreins, and hematopoietic serine proteases, involved in reproductive or immunological functions. These protease families have also evolved differently in rat and mouse and may contribute to explain some functional differences between these closely related species. Likewise, genomic analysis of rat protease inhibitors has shown some differences with mouse protease inhibitors and the expansion of families of cysteine and serine protease inhibitors in rodents with respect to human. These comparative analyses may provide new views on the functional diversity of proteases and inhibitors and contribute to the development of innovative strategies for treating proteolysis diseases. PMID:15060002

  15. Resistance mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 protease to inhibitors: A molecular dynamic approach

    PubMed Central

    Dayer, Mohammad Reza; Dayer, Mohammad Saaid

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors comprise an important class of drugs used in HIV treatments. However, mutations of protease genes accelerated by low fidelity of reverse transcriptase yield drug resistant mutants of reduced affinities for the inhibitors. This problem is considered to be a serious barrier against HIV treatment for the foreseeable future. In this study, molecular dynamic simulation method was used to examine the combinational and additive effects of all known mutations involved in drug resistance against FDA approved inhibitors. Results showed that drug resistant mutations are not randomly distributed along the protease sequence; instead, they are localized on flexible or hot points of the protein chain. Substitution of more hydrophobic residues in flexible points of protease chains tends to increase the folding, lower the flexibility and decrease the active site area of the protease. The reduced affinities of HIV-1 protease for inhibitors seemed to be due to substantial decrease in the size of the active site and flap mobility. A correlation was found between the binding energy of inhibitors and their affinities for each mutant suggesting the distortion of the active site geometry in drug resistance by preventing effective fitting of inhibitors into the enzymes' active site. To overcome the problem of drug resistance of HIV-1 protease, designing inhibitors of variable functional groups and configurations is proposed. PMID:27843989

  16. Nelfinavir: fourth protease inhibitor approved.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted accelerated approval to nelfinavir in both adult and pediatric formulations. Agouron, the manufacturer, used innovative computerized drug design techniques to discover, design, and refine the nelfinavir molecule. Nelfinavir is marketed under the trade name Viracept, and costs $5,000 per year. Early clinical trials find it to be as powerful as the other protease inhibitors, but with a different resistance profile. The drug has relatively few drug indications; however, several compounds have been contraindicated.

  17. Recent patents and emerging therapeutics for HIV infections: a focus on protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mitesh; Mandava, Nanda K; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-07-01

    The inclusion of protease inhibitors (PIs) in highly active antiretroviral therapy has significantly improved clinical outcomes in HIV-1-infected patients. To date, PIs are considered to be the most important therapeutic agents for the treatment of HIV infections. Despite high anti-HIV-1 potency, poor oral bioavailability of PIs has been a major concern. For achieving therapeutic concentrations, large doses of PIs are administered, which results in unacceptable systemic toxicities. Such severe and long-term toxicities necessitate the development of safer and potentially promising PIs. Recently, considerable attention has been paid to the development of newer compounds capable of inhibiting wild-type and resistant HIV-1 protease. Some of these PIs have displayed potent HIV-1 protease inhibitory activity. In this review, we have made an attempt to provide an overview on clinically approved and newly developing PIs, and related recent patents in the development of novel PIs.

  18. Cross-resistance analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants individually selected for resistance to five different protease inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Tisdale, M; Myers, R E; Maschera, B; Parry, N R; Oliver, N M; Blair, E D

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitor-resistant variants, isolated on passage of HIV-1HXB2 in MT-4 cells with five different protease inhibitors, have been examined for cross-resistance to five inhibitors. The protease inhibitors studied were Ro 31-8959, A-77003, XM323, L-735,524, and VX-478. Resistant variants with two to four mutations within their protease sequence and 9- to 40-fold-decreased susceptibility were selected for all five inhibitors within six to eight passes in cell culture. Passage of a zidovudine-resistant mutant in Ro 31-8959 generated a dual reverse transcriptase- and protease-resistant virus. Variants were cloned directly into a modified pHXB2-D infectious clone for cross-resistance analysis. Although the resistant variants selected possessed different combinations of protease mutations for each inhibitor, many showed cross-resistance to the other inhibitors, and one showed cross-resistance to all five inhibitors. Interestingly, some mutants showed increased susceptibility to some inhibitors. Further HIV passage studies in the combined presence of two protease inhibitors demonstrated that in vitro it was possible to delay significantly selection of mutations producing resistance to one or both inhibitors. These studies indicate that there may be some rationale for combining different protease inhibitors as well as protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitors in HIV combination therapy. PMID:7486905

  19. Insights into the structural function of the complex of HIV-1 protease with TMC-126: molecular dynamics simulations and free-energy calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dan; Han, Ju-Guang; Chen, Hang; Li, Liang; Zhao, Run-Ning Zhao; Liu, Guang; Duan, Yuhua

    2012-05-01

    The binding properties of the protein-inhibitor complex of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease with the inhibitor TMC-126 are investigated by combining computational alanine scanning (CAS) mutagenesis with binding free-energy decomposition (BFED). The calculated results demonstrate that the flap region (residues 38-58) and the active site region (residues 23-32) in HIV-1 protease contribute 63.72% of the protease to the binding of the inhibitor. In particular, the mechanisms for the interactions of key residues of these species are fully explored and analyzed. Interestingly, the regression analyses show that both CAS and BFED based on the generalized Born model yield similar results, with a correlation coefficient of 0.94. However, compared to CAS, BFED is faster and can decompose the per-residue binding free-energy contributions into backbone and sidechain contributions. The results obtained in this study are useful for studying the binding mechanism between receptor and ligand and for designing potent inhibitors that can combat diseases.

  20. Progress in HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors: A Review of their Chemical Structure Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Hajimahdi, Zahra; Zarghi, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) enzyme, one of the three main enzymes of HIV-1, catalyzed the insertion of the viral DNA into the genome of host cells. Because of the lack of its homologue in human cells and its essential role in HIV-1 replication, IN inhibition represents an attractive therapeutic target for HIV-1 treatment. Since identification of IN as a promising therapeutic target, a major progress has been made, which has facilitated and led to the approval of three drugs. This review focused on the structural features of the most important IN inhibitors and categorized them structurally in 10 scaffolds. We also briefly discussed the structural and functional properties of HIV-1 IN and binding modes of IN inhibitors. The SAR analysis of the known IN inhibitors provides some useful clues to the possible future discovery of novel IN inhibitors. PMID:28243261

  1. TOE1 is an inhibitor of HIV-1 replication with cell-penetrating capability

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Sabina; Barat, Corinne; Cabrita, Miguel A.; Gargaun, Ana; Berezovski, Maxim V.; Tremblay, Michel J.; de Belle, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Target of Egr1 (TOE1) is a nuclear protein localized primarily in nucleoli and Cajal bodies that was identified as a downstream target of the immediate early gene Egr1. TOE1 displays a functional deadenylation domain and has been shown to participate in spliceosome assembly. We report here that TOE1 can function as an inhibitor of HIV-1 replication and show evidence that supports a direct interaction of TOE1 with the viral specific transactivator response element as part of the inhibitory mechanism. In addition, we show that TOE1 can be secreted by activated CD8+ T lymphocytes and can be cleaved by the serine protease granzyme B, one of the main components of cytotoxic granules. Both full-length and cleaved TOE1 can spontaneously cross the plasma membrane and penetrate cells in culture, retaining HIV-1 inhibitory activity. Antiviral potency of TOE1 and its cell-penetrating capability have been identified to lie within a 35-amino-acid region containing the nuclear localization sequence. PMID:26056259

  2. Design of dimerization inhibitors of HIV-1 aspartic proteinase: A computer-based combinatorial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caflisch, Amedeo; Schramm, Hans J.; Karplus, Martin

    2000-02-01

    Inhibition of dimerization to the active form of the HIV-1 aspartic proteinase (HIV-1 PR) may be a way to decrease the probability of escape mutations for this viral protein. The Multiple Copy Simultaneous Search (MCSS) methodology was used to generate functionality maps for the dimerization interface of HIV-1 PR. The positions of the MCSS minima of 19 organic fragments, once postprocessed to take into account solvation effects, are in good agreement with experimental data on peptides that bind to the interface. The MCSS minima combined with an approach for computational combinatorial ligand design yielded a set of modified HIV-1 PR C-terminal peptides that are similar to known nanomolar inhibitors of HIV-1 PR dimerization. A number of N-substituted 2,5-diketopiperazines are predicted to be potential dimerization inhibitors of HIV-1 PR.

  3. Dynamic and Electrostatic Effects on the Reaction Catalyzed by HIV-1 Protease.

    PubMed

    Krzemińska, Agnieszka; Moliner, Vicent; Świderek, Katarzyna

    2016-12-21

    HIV-1 Protease (HIV-1 PR) is one of the three enzymes essential for the replication process of HIV-1 virus, which explains why it has been the main target for design of drugs against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). This work is focused on exploring the proteolysis reaction catalyzed by HIV-1 PR, with special attention to the dynamic and electrostatic effects governing its catalytic power. Free energy surfaces for all possible mechanisms have been computed in terms of potentials of mean force (PMFs) within hybrid QM/MM potentials, with the QM subset of atoms described at semiempirical (AM1) and DFT (M06-2X) level. The results suggest that the most favorable reaction mechanism involves formation of a gem-diol intermediate, whose decomposition into the product complex would correspond to the rate-limiting step. The agreement between the activation free energy of this step with experimental data, as well as kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), supports this prediction. The role of the protein dynamic was studied by protein isotope labeling in the framework of the Variational Transition State Theory. The predicted enzyme KIEs, also very close to the values measured experimentally, reveal a measurable but small dynamic effect. Our calculations show how the contribution of dynamic effects to the effective activation free energy appears to be below 1 kcal·mol(-1). On the contrary, the electric field created by the protein in the active site of the enzyme emerges as being critical for the electronic reorganization required during the reaction. These electrostatic properties of the active site could be used as a mold for future drug design.

  4. HIV-1 Gag as an Antiviral Target: Development of Assembly and Maturation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Spearman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Gag is the master orchestrator of particle assembly. The central role of Gag at multiple stages of the HIV lifecycle has led to efforts to develop drugs that directly target Gag and prevent the formation and release of infectious particles. Until recently, however, only the catalytic site protease inhibitors have been available to inhibit late stages of HIV replication. This review summarizes the current state of development of antivirals that target Gag or disrupt late events in the retrovirus lifecycle such as maturation of the viral capsid. Maturation inhibitors represent an exciting new series of antiviral compounds, including those that specifically target CA-SP1 cleavage and the allosteric integrase inhibitors that inhibit maturation by a completely different mechanism. Numerous small molecules and peptides targeting CA have been studied in attempts to disrupt steps in assembly. Efforts to target CA have recently gained have considerable momentum from the development of small molecules that bind CA and alter capsid stability at the post-entry stage of the lifecycle. Efforts to develop antivirals that inhibit incorporation of genomic RNA or to inhibit late budding events remain in preliminary stages of development. Overall, the development of novel antivirals targeting Gag and the late stages in HIV replication appears much closer to success than ever, with the new maturation inhibitors leading the way. PMID:26329615

  5. Synthesis of macrocyclic trypanosomal cysteine protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen Ting; Lira, Ricardo; Hansell, Elizabeth; McKerrow, James H; Roush, William R

    2008-11-15

    The importance of cysteine proteases in parasites, compounded with the lack of redundancy compared to their mammalian hosts makes proteases attractive targets for the development of new therapeutic agents. The binding mode of K11002 to cruzain, the major cysteine protease of Trypanosoma cruzi was used in the design of conformationally constrained inhibitors. Vinyl sulfone-containing macrocycles were synthesized via olefin ring-closing metathesis and evaluated against cruzain and the closely related cysteine protease, rhodesain.

  6. Crystal structures of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: N-benzyl-4-methyl-benzimidazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2009-07-01

    HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are potentially specific and effective drugs in AIDS therapy. The presence of two aromatic systems with an angled orientation in the molecule of the inhibitor is crucial for interactions with HIV-1 RT. The inhibitor drives like a wedge into the cluster of aromatic residues of RT HIV-1 and restrains the enzyme in a conformation that blocks the chemical step of nucleotide incorporation. Structural studies provide useful information for designing new, more active inhibitors. The crystal structures of four NNRTIs are presented here. The investigated compounds are derivatives of N-benzyl-4-methyl-benzimidazole with various aliphatic and aromatic substituents at carbon 2 positions and a 2,6-dihalogeno-substituted N-benzyl moiety. Structural data reported here show that the conformation of the investigated compounds is relatively rigid. Such feature is important for the nonnucleoside inhibitor binding to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  7. How conformational changes can affect catalysis, inhibition and drug resistance of enzymes with induced-fit binding mechanism such as the HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Weikl, Thomas R; Hemmateenejad, Bahram

    2013-05-01

    A central question is how the conformational changes of proteins affect their function and the inhibition of this function by drug molecules. Many enzymes change from an open to a closed conformation upon binding of substrate or inhibitor molecules. These conformational changes have been suggested to follow an induced-fit mechanism in which the molecules first bind in the open conformation in those cases where binding in the closed conformation appears to be sterically obstructed such as for the HIV-1 protease. In this article, we present a general model for the catalysis and inhibition of enzymes with induced-fit binding mechanism. We derive general expressions that specify how the overall catalytic rate of the enzymes depends on the rates for binding, for the conformational changes, and for the chemical reaction. Based on these expressions, we analyze the effect of mutations that mainly shift the conformational equilibrium on catalysis and inhibition. If the overall catalytic rate is limited by product unbinding, we find that mutations that destabilize the closed conformation relative to the open conformation increase the catalytic rate in the presence of inhibitors by a factor exp(ΔΔGC/RT) where ΔΔGC is the mutation-induced shift of the free-energy difference between the conformations. This increase in the catalytic rate due to changes in the conformational equilibrium is independent of the inhibitor molecule and, thus, may help to understand how non-active-site mutations can contribute to the multi-drug-resistance that has been observed for the HIV-1 protease. A comparison to experimental data for the non-active-site mutation L90M of the HIV-1 protease indicates that the mutation slightly destabilizes the closed conformation of the enzyme. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The emerging dynamic view of proteins: Protein plasticity in allostery, evolution and self-assembly.

  8. Mechanism of Drug Resistance Revealed by the Crystal Structure of the Unliganded HIV-1 Protease with F53L Mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fengling; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Louis, John M.; Boross, Peter I.; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2010-12-03

    Mutations in HIV-1 protease (PR) that produce resistance to antiviral PR inhibitors are a major problem in AIDS therapy. The mutation F53L arising from antiretroviral therapy was introduced into the flexible flap region of the wild-type PR to study its effect and potential role in developing drug resistance. Compared to wild-type PR, PR{sub F53L} showed lower (15%) catalytic efficiency, 20-fold weaker inhibition by the clinical drug indinavir, and reduced dimer stability, while the inhibition constants of two peptide analog inhibitors were slightly lower than those for PR. The crystal structure of PR{sub F53L} was determined in the unliganded form at 1.35 {angstrom} resolution in space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2. The tips of the flaps in PR{sub F53L} had a wider separation than in unliganded wild-type PR, probably due to the absence of hydrophobic interactions of the side-chains of Phe53 and Ile50{prime}. The changes in interactions between the flaps agreed with the reduced stability of PR{sub F53L} relative to wild-type PR. The altered flap interactions in the unliganded form of PR{sub F53L} suggest a distinct mechanism for drug resistance, which has not been observed in other common drug-resistant mutants.

  9. In Vitro Selection and Characterization of HIV-1 Variants with Increased Resistance to Sifuvirtide, a Novel HIV-1 Fusion Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhonghua; Shan, Mei; Li, Li; Lu, Lu; Meng, Shu; Chen, Cheng; He, Yuxian; Jiang, Shibo; Zhang, Linqi

    2011-01-01

    Sifuvirtide, a novel fusion inhibitor against human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1), which is more potent than enfuvirtide (T20) in cell culture, is currently under clinical investigation for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. We now report that in vitro selection of HIV-1 variants resistant to sifuvirtide in the presence of increasing concentrations of sifuvirtide has led to several specific mutations in the gp41 region that had not been previously reported. Many of these substitutions were confined to the N-terminal heptad repeat region at positions 37, 38, 41, and 43, either singly or in combination. A downstream substitution at position 126 (N126K) in the C-terminal heptad repeat region was also found. Site-directed mutagenesis studies have further identified the critical amino acid substitutions and combinations thereof in conferring the resistant genotypes. Furthermore, the mutant viruses demonstrated variable degrees of cross-resistance to enfuvirtide, some of which are preferentially more resistant to sifuvirtide. Impaired infectivity was also found for many of the mutant viruses. Biophysical and structural analyses of the key substitutions have revealed several potential novel mechanisms against sifuvirtide. Our results may help to predict potential resistant patterns in vivo and facilitate the further clinical development and therapeutic utility of sifuvirtide. PMID:21098485

  10. Elucidating the inhibiting mode of AHPBA derivatives against HIV-1 protease and building predictive 3D-QSAR models.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xaioqin; Xu, Liaosa; Luo, Xiaomin; Fan, Kangnian; Ji, Ruyun; Pei, Gang; Chen, Kaixian; Jiang, Hualiang

    2002-01-17

    The Lamarckian genetic algorithm of AutoDock 3.0 has been used to dock 27 3(S)-amino-2(S)-hydroxyl-4-phenylbutanoic acids (AHPBAs) into the active site of HIV-1 protease (HIVPR). The binding mode was demonstrated in the aspects of the inhibitor's conformation, subsite interaction, and hydrogen bonding. The data of geometrical parameters (tau(1), tau(2), and tau(3) listed in Table 2) and root mean square deviation values as compared with the known inhibitor, kni272,(28) show that both kinds of inhibitors interact with HIVPR in a very similar way. The r(2) value of 0.860 indicates that the calculated binding free energies correlate well with the inhibitory activities. The structural and energetic differences in inhibitory potencies of AHPBAs were reasonably explored. Using the binding conformations of AHPBAs, consistent and highly predictive 3D-QSAR models were developed by performing CoMFA, CoMSIA, and HQSAR analyses. The reasonable r(corss)(2) values were 0.613, 0.530, and 0.717 for CoMFA, CoMSIA, and HQSAR models, respectively. The predictive ability of these models was validated by kni272 and a set of nine compounds that were not included in the training set. Mapping these models back to the topology of the active site of HIVPR leads to a better understanding of vital AHPBA-HIVPR interactions. Structural-based investigations and the final 3D-QSAR results provide clear guidelines and accurate activity predictions for novel HIVPR inhibitors.

  11. Novel theoretically designed HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors derived from nevirapine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinfeng; He, Xiao; Zhang, John Z H

    2014-10-01

    A common problem with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) of HIV-1 is the emergence of mutations in the HIV-1 RT, in particular Lys103 → Asn (K103N) and Tyr181 → Cys (Y181C), which lead to resistance to this entire class of inhibitors. In this study, we theoretically designed two new non-nucleoside HIV-1 RT inhibitors, Mnev-1 and Mnev-2, derived from nevirapine, in order to reduce the resistance caused by those HIV-1 RT mutations. The binding modes of Mnev-1 and Mnev-2 with the wild-type HIV-1 RT and its mutants (K103N and Y181C) were suggested by molecular docking followed by 20-ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit water of those binding complexes (HIV-1 RTs with the new inhibitors). A molecular mechanics/generalized Born surface area (MM/GBSA) calculation was carried out for multiple snapshots extracted from the MD trajectory to estimate the binding free energy. The results of the calculations show that each of the new inhibitors forms a stable hydrogen bond with His235 during the MD simulations, leading to tighter binding of the new inhibitors with their targets. In addition, the repulsive interaction with Cys181 in the Y181C-nevirapine complex is not present in the novel inhibitors. The binding affinities predicted using the MM/GBSA calculations indicate that the new inhibitors could be effective at bypassing the drug resistance of these HIV-1 RT mutants.

  12. In Vitro Reactivation of Replication-Competent and Infectious HIV-1 by Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Banga, Riddhima; Procopio, Francesco Andrea; Cavassini, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The existence of long-lived HIV-1-infected resting memory CD4 T cells is thought to be the primary obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. In the search for novel therapeutic approaches that may reverse HIV-1 latency, inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACis) have been tested to reactivate HIV-1 replication with the objective of rendering HIV-1-infected cells susceptible to elimination either by HIV-specific CD8 T cells or through virus-mediated cytopathicity. In the present study, we evaluated the efficiency of HDACis to reactivate HIV-1 replication from resting memory CD4 T cells isolated from aviremic long-term-treated HIV-1-infected subjects. We demonstrate that following prolonged/repeated treatment of resting memory CD4 T cells with HDACis, HIV-1 replication may be induced from primary resting memory CD4 T cells isolated from aviremic long-term-treated HIV-1-infected subjects. More importantly, we demonstrate that HIV-1 reactivated in the cell cultures was not only replication competent but also infectious. Interestingly, givinostat, an HDACi that has not been investigated in clinical trials, was more efficient than vorinostat, panobinostat, and romidepsin in reversing HIV-1 latency in vitro. Taken together, these results support further evaluation of givinostat as a latency-reversing agent (LRA) in aviremic long-term-treated HIV-1-infected subjects. IMPORTANCE The major barrier to HIV cure is the existence of long-lived latently HIV-1-infected resting memory CD4 T cells. Latently HIV-1-infected CD4 T cells are transcriptionally silent and are therefore not targeted by conventional antiretroviral therapy (ART) or the immune system. In this context, one strategy to target latently infected cells is based on pharmacological molecules that may force the virus to replicate and would therefore render HIV-1-infected cells susceptible to elimination either by HIV-specific CD8 T cells or through virus-mediated cytopathicity. In this context, we developed an

  13. Design, synthesis and biological activity of aromatic diketone derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liming; Li, Zhipeng; Wang, Zhanyang; Liu, Gengxin; He, Xianzhuo; Wang, Xiaoli; Zeng, Chengchu

    2015-01-01

    A series of aromatic diketone derivatives were designed and synthesized as potential HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors and evaluated to determine their ability to inhibit the strand transfer process of HIV-1 integrase. The results indicate that (Z)-1-(3-acetyl-2-hydroxy-4,6-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-hydroxy-3-(substituted)phenylprop-2-en-1-one (5a-5d) can moderately inhibit HIV-1 integrase. The cyclization and condensation products (6a-6c and 7e-7f) of compounds 5a-5d show poor inhibitory activity against HIV-1 integrase. The molecular docking results indicate that the different types of compounds act on HIV-1 integrase in different ways, and these results can explain the differences in the inhibitory activities.

  14. Identification of mechanistically distinct inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase through fragment screening

    PubMed Central

    La, Jennifer; Latham, Catherine F.; Tinetti, Ricky N.; Johnson, Adam; Tyssen, David; Huber, Kelly D.; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas; Simpson, Jamie S.; Headey, Stephen J.; Chalmers, David K.; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based screening methods can be used to discover novel active site or allosteric inhibitors for therapeutic intervention. Using saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR and in vitro activity assays, we have identified fragment-sized inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with distinct chemical scaffolds and mechanisms compared to nonnucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) and nucleoside/nucleotide RT inhibitors (NRTIs). Three compounds were found to inhibit RNA- and DNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity of HIV-1 RT in the micromolar range while retaining potency against RT variants carrying one of three major NNRTI resistance mutations: K103N, Y181C, or G190A. These compounds also inhibit Moloney murine leukemia virus RT but not the Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I. Steady-state kinetic analyses demonstrate that one of these fragments is a competitive inhibitor of HIV-1 RT with respect to deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) substrate, whereas a second compound is a competitive inhibitor of RT polymerase activity with respect to the DNA template/primer (T/P), and consequently also inhibits RNase H activity. The dNTP competing RT inhibitor retains activity against the NRTI-resistant mutants K65R and M184V, demonstrating a drug resistance profile distinct from the nucleotide competing RT inhibitors indolopyridone-1 (INDOPY-1) and 4-dimethylamino-6-vinylpyrimidine-1 (DAVP-1). In antiviral assays, the T/P competing compound inhibits HIV-1 replication at a step consistent with an RT inhibitor. Screening of additional structurally related compounds to the three fragments led to the discovery of molecules with improved potency against HIV-1 RT. These fragment inhibitors represent previously unidentified scaffolds for development of novel drugs for HIV-1 prevention or treatment. PMID:26038551

  15. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal.

    PubMed

    Stoszko, Mateusz; De Crignis, Elisa; Rokx, Casper; Khalid, Mir Mubashir; Lungu, Cynthia; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Kan, Tsung Wai; Boucher, Charles; Verbon, Annelies; Dykhuizen, Emily C; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2016-01-01

    Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's) for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4 + T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal.

  16. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal

    PubMed Central

    Stoszko, Mateusz; De Crignis, Elisa; Rokx, Casper; Khalid, Mir Mubashir; Lungu, Cynthia; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Kan, Tsung Wai; Boucher, Charles; Verbon, Annelies; Dykhuizen, Emily C.; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2015-01-01

    Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's) for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4 + T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal. PMID:26870822

  17. Serine protease inhibitors suppress pancreatic endogenous proteases and modulate bacterial neutral proteases.

    PubMed

    Nduaguibe, Chikodili C; Bentsi-Barnes, Kwamina; Mullen, Yoko; Kandeel, Fouad; Al-Abdullah, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Pefabloc, Trasylol and Urinary Trypsin Inhibitor (UTI) have been reported to be effective serine protease inhibitors that impair pancreatic endogenous proteases resulting in improved islet yield. Here we evaluated the effect of these inhibitors on endogenous proteases (trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase), bacterial neutral proteases (thermolysin and neutral protease) and islet isolation digestion samples. Protease activity was measured using a fluorimetric assay and islet function was assessed by dynamic perifusion. Trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase were significantly inhibited by Pefabloc and UTI. Trasylol showed strong inhibitory effects on trypsin and chymotrypsin but also decreased thermolysin activity. UTI was found to inhibit the activity of endogenous proteases and increase the activity of bacterial neutral proteases. Human islets exposed to Pefabloc had reduced insulin response, unlike Trasylol or UTI, which had no detrimental effect on insulin secretion. Although Trasylol was an effective inhibitor of endogenous proteases, FDA regulatory issues preclude its use in clinical application and thus in the isolation process. UTI has the greatest potential because it impairs endogenous pancreatic proteases and enhances digestion enzymes.

  18. Polyurethane intravaginal ring for controlled delivery of dapivirine, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kavita M; Pearce, Serena M; Poursaid, Azadeh E; Aliyar, Hyder A; Tresco, Patrick A; Mitchnik, Mark A; Kiser, Patrick F

    2008-10-01

    Women-controlled methods for prevention of male-to-female sexual transmission of HIV-1 are urgently needed. Providing inhibitory concentrations of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors to impede the replication of the virus in the female genital tissue offers a mechanism for prophylaxis of HIV-1. To this end, an intravaginal ring device that can provide long duration delivery of dapivirine, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of HIV-1, was developed utilizing a medical-grade polyether urethane. Monolithic intravaginal rings were fabricated and sustained release with cumulative flux linear with time was demonstrated under sink conditions for a period of 30 days. The release rate was directly proportional to the amount of drug loaded. Another release study conducted for a week utilizing liposome dispersions as sink conditions, to mimic the partitioning of dapivirine into vaginal tissue, also demonstrated release rates constant with time. These results qualify polyether urethanes for development of intravaginal rings for sustained delivery of microbicidal agents.

  19. Design of cell-permeable stapled peptides as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Long, Ya-Qiu; Huang, Shao-Xu; Zawahir, Zahrah; Xu, Zhong-Liang; Li, Huiyuan; Sanchez, Tino W; Zhi, Ying; De Houwer, Stephanie; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Neamati, Nouri

    2013-07-11

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of viral DNA into the host genome, involving several interactions with the viral and cellular proteins. We have previously identified peptide IN inhibitors derived from the α-helical regions along the dimeric interface of HIV-1 IN. Herein, we show that appropriate hydrocarbon stapling of these peptides to stabilize their helical structure remarkably improves the cell permeability, thus allowing inhibition of the HIV-1 replication in cell culture. Furthermore, the stabilized peptides inhibit the interaction of IN with the cellular cofactor LEDGF/p75. Cellular uptake of the stapled peptide was confirmed in four different cell lines using a fluorescein-labeled analogue. Given their enhanced potency and cell permeability, these stapled peptides can serve as not only lead IN inhibitors but also prototypical biochemical probes or "nanoneedles" for the elucidation of HIV-1 IN dimerization and host cofactor interactions within their native cellular environment.

  20. Design of new potent HTLV-1 protease inhibitors: in silico study.

    PubMed

    Kheirabadi, Mitra; Maleki, Javad; Soufian, Safieh; Hosseini, Samaneh

    2016-03-01

    HTLV-1 and HIV-1 are two major causes for severe T-cell leukemia disease and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). HTLV-1 protease, a member of aspartic acid protease family, plays important roles in maturation during virus replication cycle. The impairment of these proteases results in uninfectious HTLV-1virions.Similar to HIV-1protease deliberate mutations that confer drug resistance on HTLV-1 are frequently seen in this protease. Therefore, inhibition of HTLV-1 protease activity is expected to disrupt HTLV-1's ability to replicate and infect additional cells. In this study, we initially designed fifteen inhibitory compounds based on the conformations of a class of HIV-1 aspartyl protease inhibitors, sulfonamid-peptoid. Five compounds were chosen based on the goodness of their Drug-Likeness scoreusing "Lipinsk's rule of five". Here, using protein-ligand docking approach we compared the inhibitory constants of these compounds to those available in literatures and observed significantly higher inhibition for two compounds, SP-4 and SP-5. Our data suggest that the addition of two cyclic hydrocarbons to both ends of sulfonamide peptoids leads to the formation of new hydrophobic interactions due to the semi-circular form of these compounds, connecting the first chain of protease to the two ends of tested ligands via Hydrophobic interactions. We conclude that hydrophobic force plays an important role in suppressing protease activity especially for HTLV-1 protease, which in turn prevents the virus maturity. Therefore, designing and development of new ligands based on aromatic hydrocarbons in both ends of inhibitors is very promising for efficient treatment.

  1. Design of new potent HTLV-1 protease inhibitors: in silico study

    PubMed Central

    Kheirabadi, Mitra; Maleki, Javad; Soufian, Safieh; Hosseini, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    HTLV-1 and HIV-1 are two major causes for severe T-cell leukemia disease and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). HTLV-1 protease, a member of aspartic acid protease family, plays important roles in maturation during virus replication cycle. The impairment of these proteases results in uninfectious HTLV-1virions.Similar to HIV-1protease deliberate mutations that confer drug resistance on HTLV-1 are frequently seen in this protease. Therefore, inhibition of HTLV-1 protease activity is expected to disrupt HTLV-1’s ability to replicate and infect additional cells. In this study, we initially designed fifteen inhibitory compounds based on the conformations of a class of HIV-1 aspartyl protease inhibitors, sulfonamid-peptoid. Five compounds were chosen based on the goodness of their Drug-Likeness scoreusing “Lipinsk’s rule of five”. Here, using protein-ligand docking approach we compared the inhibitory constants of these compounds to those available in literatures and observed significantly higher inhibition for two compounds, SP-4 and SP-5. Our data suggest that the addition of two cyclic hydrocarbons to both ends of sulfonamide peptoids leads to the formation of new hydrophobic interactions due to the semi-circular form of these compounds, connecting the first chain of protease to the two ends of tested ligands via Hydrophobic interactions. We conclude that hydrophobic force plays an important role in suppressing protease activity especially for HTLV-1 protease, which in turn prevents the virus maturity. Therefore, designing and development of new ligands based on aromatic hydrocarbons in both ends of inhibitors is very promising for efficient treatment. PMID:27844017

  2. Revealing Origin of Decrease in Potency of Darunavir and Amprenavir against HIV-2 relative to HIV-1 Protease by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianzhong; Liang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Wei; Yi, Changhong; Zhang, Shaolong; Zhang, Qinggang

    2014-11-01

    Clinical inhibitors Darunavir (DRV) and Amprenavir (APV) are less effective on HIV-2 protease (PR2) than on HIV-1 protease (PR1). To identify molecular basis associated with the lower inhibition, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) calculations were performed to investigate the effectiveness of the PR1 inhibitors DRV and APV against PR1/PR2. The rank of predicted binding free energies agrees with the experimental determined one. Moreover, our results show that two inhibitors bind less strongly to PR2 than to PR1, again in agreement with the experimental findings. The decrease in binding free energies for PR2 relative to PR1 is found to arise from the reduction of the van der Waals interactions induced by the structural adjustment of the triple mutant V32I, I47V and V82I. This result is further supported by the difference between the van der Waals interactions of inhibitors with each residue in PR2 and in PR1. The results from the principle component analysis suggest that inhibitor binding tends to make the flaps of PR2 close and the one of PR1 open. We expect that this study can theoretically provide significant guidance and dynamics information for the design of potent dual inhibitors targeting PR1/PR2.

  3. Intervention for hyperlipidemia associated with protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Melroe, N H; Kopaczewski, J; Henry, K; Huebsch, J

    1999-01-01

    In the past 3 years, treatment for HIV infection has significantly improved the prognosis for HIV-infected persons. The administration of protease inhibitors for the treatment of HIV infection has had a significant role in the reduction of AIDS-related complications. Recent findings have indicated that protease inhibitors may significantly increase lipids to levels that pose a health risk that may be greater than the illness itself. This article reviews the initial findings of a study that investigated the impact of interventions for the treatment of protease inhibitor-related hyperlipidemia. The purpose of the study was to determine if initiation of interventions based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Guidelines would be effective in lowering protease inhibitor-related hyperlipidemia without disrupting the effectiveness of the HIV therapy. A total of 45 HIV-infected individuals who were taking a protease inhibitor and had abnormally elevated lipids were enrolled into this study. Mean serum cholesterol level prior to initiation of a protease inhibitor regimen was 170 mg/dl as compared to a mean cholesterol at time of enrollment of 289 mg/dl and triglycerides of 879 mg/dl. Interventions included diet and exercise and the prescription of gemfibrozil alone or in combination with atorvatstatin. During the course of the study, overall intervention significantly reduced serum cholesterol level to 201 mg/dl (p. 01) over a study period of ten months. Case studies of five medical events related to hyperlipidemia are included. Currently, 26 participants continue in the study. Sixteen participants discontinued protease inhibitor therapy during the course of the study and thus ended their participation.

  4. Ebselen, a Small-Molecule Capsid Inhibitor of HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Thenin-Houssier, Suzie; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S.; Pedro-Rosa, Laura; Brady, Angela; Richard, Audrey; Konnick, Briana; Opp, Silvana; Buffone, Cindy; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Kota, Smitha; Billack, Blase; Pietka-Ottlik, Magdalena; Tellinghuisen, Timothy; Choe, Hyeryun; Spicer, Timothy; Scampavia, Louis; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Kojetin, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid plays crucial roles in HIV-1 replication and thus represents an excellent drug target. We developed a high-throughput screening method based on a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (HTS-TR-FRET) assay, using the C-terminal domain (CTD) of HIV-1 capsid to identify inhibitors of capsid dimerization. This assay was used to screen a library of pharmacologically active compounds, composed of 1,280 in vivo-active drugs, and identified ebselen [2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one], an organoselenium compound, as an inhibitor of HIV-1 capsid CTD dimerization. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis confirmed the direct interaction of ebselen with the HIV-1 capsid CTD and dimer dissociation when ebselen is in 2-fold molar excess. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry revealed that ebselen covalently binds the HIV-1 capsid CTD, likely via a selenylsulfide linkage with Cys198 and Cys218. This compound presents anti-HIV activity in single and multiple rounds of infection in permissive cell lines as well as in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Ebselen inhibits early viral postentry events of the HIV-1 life cycle by impairing the incoming capsid uncoating process. This compound also blocks infection of other retroviruses, such as Moloney murine leukemia virus and simian immunodeficiency virus, but displays no inhibitory activity against hepatitis C and influenza viruses. This study reports the use of TR-FRET screening to successfully identify a novel capsid inhibitor, ebselen, validating HIV-1 capsid as a promising target for drug development. PMID:26810656

  5. Blocking HIV-1 entry by a gp120 surface binding inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Lun K.; Chen, Chin-Ho; Dutschman, Ginger E.

    2012-01-01

    We report the mode of action of a proteomimetic compound that binds to the exterior surface of gp120 and blocks HIV-1 entry into cells. Using a one cycle time-of-addition study and antibody competition binding studies, we have determined that the compound blocks HIV-1 entry through modulation of key protein-protein interactions mediated by gp120. The compound exhibits anti-HIV-1 replication activities against several pseudotype viruses derived from primary isolates and the resistant strains isolated from existing drug candidates with equal potency. Together, these data provide evidence that the proteomimetic compound represents a novel class of HIV-1 viral entry inhibitor that functions through protein surface recognition in analogy to an antibody. PMID:22487177

  6. HIV-1 IN Inhibitors: 2010 Update and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Marchand, Christophe; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Metifiot, Mathieu; Pommier, Yves

    2010-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is the newest validated target against AIDS and retroviral infections. The remarkable activity of raltegravir (Isentress®) led to its rapid approval by the FDA in 2007 as the first IN inhibitor. Several other IN strand transfer inhibitors (STIs) are in development with the primary goal to overcome resistance due to the rapid occurrence of IN mutations in raltegravir-treated patients. Thus, many scientists and drug companies are actively pursuing clinically useful IN inhibitors. The objective of this review is to provide an update on the IN inhibitors reported in the last two years, including second generation strand transfer inhibitors (STI), recently developed hydroxylated aromatics, natural products, peptide, antibody and oligonucleotide inhibitors. Additionally, the targeting of IN cofactors such as LEDGF and Vpr will be discussed as novel strategies for the treatment of AIDS. PMID:19747122

  7. Current and Novel Inhibitors of HIV Protease

    PubMed Central

    Pokorná, Jana; Machala, Ladislav; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Konvalinka, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The design, development and clinical success of HIV protease inhibitors represent one of the most remarkable achievements of molecular medicine. This review describes all nine currently available FDA-approved protease inhibitors, discusses their pharmacokinetic properties, off-target activities, side-effects, and resistance profiles. The compounds in the various stages of clinical development are also introduced, as well as alternative approaches, aiming at other functional domains of HIV PR. The potential of these novel compounds to open new way to the rational drug design of human viruses is critically assessed. PMID:21994591

  8. Seminal and colostral protease inhibitors on leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Veselský, L; Cechová, D; Hruban, V; Klaudy, J

    1982-01-01

    For detection of protease inhibitors from cow colostrum (CTI) and bull seminal plasma (BUSI I and BUSI II) on the surface of leukocytes, immunological methods were used. An agglutination and an immunofluorescence test demonstrated components on the surface of bovine, porcine and ovine granulocytes and lymphocytes which were immunologically identical with the protease inhibitors isolated from cow colostrum and bull seminal plasma. When antisera against (CTI, BUSI and BUSI II were absorbed by bovine and porcine liver, kidney and spleen homogenate or by bovine and porcine granulocytes or lymphocytes, the immunological tests were negative.

  9. Insights into the mechanism of drug resistance: X-ray structure analysis of G48V/C95F tethered HIV-1 protease dimer/saquinavir complex

    SciTech Connect

    Prashar, Vishal; Bihani, Subhash C.; Das, Amit; Rao, D.R.; Hosur, M.V.

    2010-06-11

    The mutation G48V in HIV-1 protease is a major resistance mutation against the drug saquinavir. Recently, G48V mutation is found to co-exist with the mutation C95F in AIDS patients treated with saquinavir. We report here the three-dimensional crystal structure of G48V/C95F tethered HIV-1 protease/saquinavir complex. The structure indicates following as the possible causes of drug resistance: (1) loss of direct van der Waals interactions between saquinavir and enzyme residues PHE-53 and PRO-1081, (2) loss of water-mediated hydrogen bonds between the carbonyl oxygen atoms in saquinavir and amide nitrogen atoms of flap residues 50 and 1050, (3) changes in inter-monomer interactions, which could affect the energetics of domain movements associated with inhibitor-binding, and (4) significant reduction in the stability of the mutant dimer. The present structure also provides a rationale for the clinical observation that the resistance mutations C95F/G48V/V82A occur as a cluster in AIDS patients.

  10. Synthesis of a Vpr-Binding Derivative for Use as a Novel HIV-1 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Kyoji; Ishii, Hideki; Murakami, Tomoyuki; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn; Kodama, Eiichi N; Kawaji, Kumi; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Honda, Kaori; Osada, Hiroyuki; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko; Suzuki, Masaaki; Aida, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant viruses compromises the efficacy of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) therapy and limits treatment options. Therefore, new targets that can be used to develop novel antiviral agents need to be identified. We previously identified a potential parent compound, hematoxylin, which suppresses the nuclear import of HIV-1 via the Vpr-importin α interaction and inhibits HIV-1 replication in a Vpr-dependent manner by blocking nuclear import of the pre-integration complex. However, it was unstable. Here, we synthesized a stable derivative of hematoxylin that bound specifically and stably to Vpr and inhibited HIV-1 replication in macrophages. Furthermore, like hematoxylin, the derivative inhibited nuclear import of Vpr in an in vitro nuclear import assay, but had no effect on Vpr-induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest or caspase activity. Interestingly, this derivative bound strongly to amino acid residues 54-74 within the C-terminal α-helical domain (αH3) of Vpr. These residues are highly conserved among different HIV strains, indicating that this region is a potential target for drug-resistant HIV-1 infection. Thus, we succeeded in developing a stable hematoxylin derivative that bound directly to Vpr, suggesting that specific inhibitors of the interaction between cells and viral accessory proteins may provide a new strategy for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  11. Protease Inhibitors Targeting Coronavirus and Filovirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanchen; Vedantham, Punitha; Lu, Kai; Agudelo, Juliet; Carrion, Ricardo; Nunneley, Jerritt W.; Barnard, Dale; Pöhlmann, Stefan; McKerrow, James H.; Renslo, Adam R.; Simmons, Graham

    2016-01-01

    In order to gain entry into cells, diverse viruses, including Ebola virus, SARS-coronavirus and the emerging MERS-coronavirus, depend on activation of their envelope glycoproteins by host cell proteases. The respective enzymes are thus excellent targets for antiviral intervention. In cell culture, activation of Ebola virus, as well as SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can be accomplished by the endosomal cysteine proteases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and cathepsin B (CTSB). In addition, SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can use serine proteases localized at the cell surface, for their activation. However, it is currently unclear which protease(s) facilitate viral spread in the infected host. We report here that the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777, ((2S)-N-[(1E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]-2-{[(E)-4-methylpiperazine-1-carbonyl]amino}-3-phenylpropanamide) and closely-related vinylsulfones act as broad-spectrum antivirals by targeting cathepsin-mediated cell entry. K11777 is already in advanced stages of development for a number of parasitic diseases, such as Chagas disease, and has proven to be safe and effective in a range of animal models. K11777 inhibition of SARS-CoV and Ebola virus entry was observed in the sub-nanomolar range. In order to assess, whether cysteine or serine proteases promote viral spread in the host, we compared the antiviral activity of an optimized K11777-derivative with that of camostat, an inhibitor of TMPRSS2 and related serine proteases. Employing a pathogenic animal model of SARS-CoV infection, we demonstrated that viral spread and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV is driven by serine rather than cysteine proteases and can be effectively prevented by camostat. Camostat has been clinically used to treat chronic pancreatitis, and thus represents an exciting potential therapeutic for respiratory coronavirus infections. Our results indicate that camostat, or similar serine protease inhibitors, might be an effective option for treatment of SARS and

  12. Tetrahydrofuran, tetrahydropyran, triazoles and related heterocyclic derivatives as HIV protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arun K; Anderson, David D

    2011-01-01

    HIV/AIDS remains a formidable disease with millions of individuals inflicted worldwide. Although treatment regimens have improved considerably, drug resistance brought on by viral mutation continues to erode their effectiveness. Intense research efforts are currently underway in search of new and improved therapies. This review is concerned with the design of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors that incorporate heterocyclic scaffolds and which have been reported within the recent literature (2005–2010). Various examples in this review showcase the essential role heterocycles play as scaffolds and bioisosteres in HIV-1 protease inhibitor drug development. This review will hopefully stimulate the widespread application of these heterocycles in the design of other therapeutic agents. PMID:21806380

  13. Approaches for identification of HIV-1 entry inhibitors targeting gp41 pocket.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Du, Lanying; Zhu, Xiaojie; Debnath, Asim K; Jiang, Shibo

    2013-01-11

    The hydrophobic pocket in the HIV-1 gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) domain plays an important role in viral fusion and entry into the host cell, and serves as an attractive target for development of HIV-1 fusion/entry inhibitors. The peptide anti-HIV drug targeting gp41 NHR, T-20 (generic name: enfuvirtide; brand name: Fuzeon), was approved by the U.S. FDA in 2003 as the first HIV fusion/entry inhibitor for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients who fail to respond to the current antiretroviral drugs. However, because T20 lacks the pocket-binding domain (PBD), it exhibits low anti-HIV-1 activity and short half-life. Therefore, several next-generation HIV fusion inhibitory peptides with PBD have been developed. They possess longer half-life and more potent antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of HIV-1 strains, including the T-20-resistant variants. Nonetheless, the clinical application of these peptides is still limited by the lack of oral availability and the high cost of production. Thus, development of small molecule compounds targeting the gp41 pocket with oral availability has been promoted. This review describes the main approaches for identification of HIV fusion/entry inhibitors targeting the gp41 pocket and summarizes the latest progress in developing these inhibitors as a new class of anti-HIV drugs.

  14. Interaction of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H with an acylhydrazone inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gong, Qingguo; Menon, Lakshmi; Ilina, Tatiana; Miller, Lena G; Ahn, Jinwoo; Parniak, Michael A; Ishima, Rieko

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase is a bifunctional enzyme, having both DNA polymerase (RNA- and DNA-dependent) and ribonuclease H activities. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has been an exceptionally important target for antiretroviral therapeutic development, and nearly half of the current clinically used antiretrovirals target reverse transcriptase DNA polymerase. However, no inhibitors of reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H are on the market or in preclinical development. Several drug-like small molecule inhibitors of reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H have been described, but little structural information is available about the interactions between reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H and inhibitors that exhibit antiviral activity. In this report, we describe NMR studies of the interaction of a new ribonuclease H inhibitor, BHMP07, with a catalytically active HIV-1 reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H domain fragment. We carried out solution NMR experiments to identify the interaction interface of BHMP07 with the ribonuclease H domain fragment. Chemical shift changes of backbone amide signals at different BHMP07 concentrations clearly demonstrate that BHMP07 mainly recognizes the substrate handle region in the ribonuclease H fragment. Using ribonuclease H inhibition assays and reverse transcriptase mutants, the binding specificity of BHMP07 was compared with another inhibitor, dihydroxy benzoyl naphthyl hydrazone. Our results provide a structural characterization of the ribonuclease H inhibitor interaction and are likely to be useful for further improvements of the inhibitors.

  15. Investigational protease inhibitors as antiretroviral therapies

    PubMed Central

    Midde, Narasimha M.; Patters, Benjamin J.; Rao, PSS; Cory, Theodore J.; Kumar, Santosh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) has tremendously improved the life expectancy of the HIV-infected population over the past three decades. Protease inhibitors have been one of the major classes of drugs in HAART regimens that are effective in treating HIV. However, the emergence of resistance and cross-resistance against protease inhibitors encourages researchers to develop new PIs with broad-spectrum activity, as well as novel means of enhancing the efficacy of existing PIs. Areas covered In this article we discuss recent advances in HIV protease inhibitor (PI) development, focusing on both investigational and experimental agents. We also include a section on pharmacokinetic booster drugs for improved bioavailability of protease inhibitors. Further, we discuss novel drug delivery systems using a variety of nanocarriers for the delivery of PIs across the blood-brain barrier to treat the HIV in the brain. Expert opinion We discuss our opinion on the promises and challenges on the development of novel investigational and experimental PIs that are less toxic and more effective in combating drug-resistance. Further, we discuss the future of novel nanocarriers that have been developed to deliver PIs to the brain cells. Although these are promising findings, many challenges need to be overcome prior to making them a viable option. PMID:27415449

  16. Management of protease inhibitor-associated hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Penzak, Scott R; Chuck, Susan K

    2002-01-01

    Dyslipidemia, characterized by elevated serum levels of triglycerides and reduced levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, has been recognized in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. It is thought that elevated levels of circulating cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-alpha, may alter lipid metabolism in patients with HIV infection. Protease inhibitors, such as saquinavir, indinavir and ritonavir, have been found to decrease mortality and improve quality of life in patients with HIV infection. However, these drugs have been associated with a syndrome of fat redistribution, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia. Elevations in serum total cholesterol and triglyceride levels, along with dyslipidemia that typically occurs in patients with HIV infection, may predispose patients to complications such as premature atherosclerosis and pancreatitis. It has been estimated that hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia occur in greater than 50% of protease inhibitor recipients after 2 years of therapy, and that the risk of developing hyperlipidemia increases with the duration of treatment with protease inhibitors. In general, treatment of hyperlipidemia should follow National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines; efforts should be made to modify/control coronary heart disease risk factors (i.e. smoking; hypertension; diabetes mellitus) and maximize lifestyle modifications, primarily dietary intervention and exercise, in these patients. Where indicated, treatment usually consists of either pravastatin or atorvastatin for patients with elevated serum levels of LDL-C and/or total cholesterol. Atorvastatin is more potent in lowering serum total cholesterol and triglycerides compared with other hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, but it is also associated with more drug interactions compared with pravastatin. Simvastatin

  17. Discovery and crystallography of bicyclic arylaminoazines as potent inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Gil; Frey, Kathleen M; Gallardo-Macias, Ricardo; Spasov, Krasimir A; Chan, Albert H; Anderson, Karen S; Jorgensen, William L

    2015-11-01

    Non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT) are reported that incorporate a 7-indolizinylamino or 2-naphthylamino substituent on a pyrimidine or 1,3,5-triazine core. The most potent compounds show below 10 nanomolar activity towards wild-type HIV-1 and variants bearing Tyr181Cys and Lys103Asn/Tyr181Cys resistance mutations. The compounds also feature good aqueous solubility. Crystal structures for two complexes enhance the analysis of the structure-activity data.

  18. The use of hairpin DNA duplexes as HIV-1 fusion inhibitors: synthesis, characterization, and activity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Jiang, Xifeng; Xu, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Baohua; Chen, Xueliang; Zhang, Tao; Gao, Fang; Cai, Lifeng; Cheng, Maosheng; Keliang Liu

    2014-07-23

    Discovery of new drugs for the treatment of AIDS that possess unique structures associated with novel mechanisms of action are of great importance due the rapidity with which drug-resistant HIV-1 strains evolve. Recently we reported on a novel class of DNA duplex-based HIV-1 fusion inhibitors modified with hydrophobic groups. The present study describes a new category of hairpin fusion inhibitor DNA duplexes bearing a 3 nucleotide loop located at either the hydrophobic or hydrophilic end. The new loop structures were designed to link 2 separate duplex-forming oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) to make helix-assembly easier and more thermally stable resulting in a more compact form of DNA duplex based HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. A series of new hairpin duplexes were tested for anti-HIV-1 cell-cell membrane fusion activity. In addition, Tm, CD, fluorescent resonance energy transfer assays, and molecular modeling analyses were carried out to define their structural activity relationships and possible mechanisms of action.

  19. Identification of novel HIV-1 integrase inhibitors using shape-based screening, QSAR, and docking approach.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pawan; Garg, Prabha; Roy, Nilanjan

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study is to identify novel HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors. Here, shape-based screening and QSAR have been successfully implemented to identify the novel inhibitors for HIV-1 IN, and in silico validation is performed by docking studies. The 2D QSAR model of benzodithiazine derivatives was built using genetic function approximation (GFA) method with good internal (cross-validated r(2)  = 0.852) and external prediction (). Best docking pose of highly active molecule of the benzodithiazine derivatives was used as a template for shape-based screening of ZINC database. Toxicity prediction was also performed using Deductive Estimation of Risk from Existing Knowledge (DEREK) program to filter non-toxic molecules. Inhibitory activities of screened non-toxic molecules were predicted using derived QSAR models. Active, non-toxic screened molecules were also docked into the active site of HIV-1 IN using AutoDock and dock program. Some molecules docked similarly as highly active molecule of the benzodithiazine derivatives. These molecules also followed the same docking interactions in both the programs. Finally, four benzodithiazine derivatives were identified as novel HIV-1 integrase inhibitors based on QSAR predictions and docking interactions. ADME properties of these molecules were also computed using Discovery Studio.

  20. Three-dimensional structure of a simian immunodeficiency virus protease/inhibitor complex. Implications for the design of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and 2 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, B; Winborne, E; Minnich, M D; Culp, J S; Debouck, C; Abdel-Meguid, S S

    1993-12-07

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) proteins have considerable amino acid sequence homology to those from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); thus monkeys are considered useful models for the preclinical evaluation of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) therapeutics. We have crystallized and determined the three-dimensional structure of SIV protease bound to the hydroxyethylene isostere inhibitor SKF107457. Crystals of the complex were grown from 25-32% saturated sodium chloride, by the hanging drop method of vapor diffusion. They belong to the orthorhombic space group I222, with a = 46.3 A, b = 101.5 A, and c = 118.8 A. The structure has been determined at 2.5-A resolution by molecular replacement and refined to a crystallographic discrepancy factor, R (= sigma parallel Fo magnitude of - magnitude of Fc parallel/sigma magnitude of Fo magnitude of), of 0.189. The overall structure of the complex is very similar to previously reported structures of HIV-1 protease bound to inhibitors. The inhibitor is bound in a conformation that is almost identical to that found for the same inhibitor bound to HIV-1 protease, except for an overall translation of the inhibitor, varying along the backbone atoms from about 1.0 A at the termini to about 0.5 A around the scissile bond surrogate. The structures of the SIV and HIV-1 proteins vary significantly only in three surface loops composed of amino acids 15-20, 34-45, and 65-70. Superposition of the 1188 protein backbone atoms from the two structures gives an rms deviation of 1.0 A; this number is reduced to 0.6 A when atoms from the three surface loops are eliminated from the rms calculation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Punica granatum (Pomegranate) juice provides an HIV-1 entry inhibitor and candidate topical microbicide

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, A Robert; Strick, Nathan; Li, Yun-Yao; Debnath, Asim K

    2004-01-01

    Background For ≈ 24 years the AIDS pandemic has claimed ≈ 30 million lives, causing ≈ 14,000 new HIV-1 infections daily worldwide in 2003. About 80% of infections occur by heterosexual transmission. In the absence of vaccines, topical microbicides, expected to block virus transmission, offer hope for controlling the pandemic. Antiretroviral chemotherapeutics have decreased AIDS mortality in industrialized countries, but only minimally in developing countries. To prevent an analogous dichotomy, microbicides should be: acceptable; accessible; affordable; and accelerative in transition from development to marketing. Already marketed pharmaceutical excipients or foods, with established safety records and adequate anti-HIV-1 activity, may provide this option. Methods Fruit juices were screened for inhibitory activity against HIV-1 IIIB using CD4 and CXCR4 as cell receptors. The best juice was tested for inhibition of: (1) infection by HIV-1 BaL, utilizing CCR5 as the cellular coreceptor; and (2) binding of gp120 IIIB and gp120 BaL, respectively, to CXCR4 and CCR5. To remove most colored juice components, the adsorption of the effective ingredient(s) to dispersible excipients and other foods was investigated. A selected complex was assayed for inhibition of infection by primary HIV-1 isolates. Results HIV-1 entry inhibitors from pomegranate juice adsorb onto corn starch. The resulting complex blocks virus binding to CD4 and CXCR4/CCR5 and inhibits infection by primary virus clades A to G and group O. Conclusion These results suggest the possibility of producing an anti-HIV-1 microbicide from inexpensive, widely available sources, whose safety has been established throughout centuries, provided that its quality is adequately standardized and monitored. PMID:15485580

  2. Comparative study on the protease inhibitors from fish eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustadi; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, S. M.

    2005-07-01

    The protease inhibitor was purified from five different fish eggs. The molecular weights of Pacific herring, chum salmon, pond smelt, glassfish, and Alaska pollock egg protease inhibitors were 120, 89, 84.5, 17, and l6.8kDa, respectively. The specific inhibitory activity of glassfish egg protease inhibitor was the highest followed by those of Pacific herring and Alaska pollock in order. The specific inhibitory activity and purity of glassfish egg protease inhibitor were 19.70 Umg-1 protein and 164.70 folds of purification, respectively. Glassfish egg protease inhibitor was reasonably stable at 50-65°C and pH 8, which was more stable at high temperature and pH than protease inhibitors from the other fish species. Glassfish egg protease inhibitor was noncompetitive with inhibitor constant ( K i) of 4.44 nmolL-1.

  3. Mechanistic Studies and Modeling Reveal the Origin of Differential Inhibition of Gag Polymorphic Viruses by HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zeyu; Cantone, Joseph; Lu, Hao; Protack, Tricia; Yuan, Tian; Yang, Hong; Liu, Zheng; Drexler, Dieter; Regueiro-Ren, Alicia; Meanwell, Nicholas A.; Cockett, Mark; Krystal, Mark; Lataillade, Max; Dicker, Ira B.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 maturation inhibitors (MIs) disrupt the final step in the HIV-1 protease-mediated cleavage of the Gag polyprotein between capsid p24 capsid (CA) and spacer peptide 1 (SP1), leading to the production of infectious virus. BMS-955176 is a second generation MI with improved antiviral activity toward polymorphic Gag variants compared to a first generation MI bevirimat (BVM). The underlying mechanistic reasons for the differences in polymorphic coverage were studied using antiviral assays, an LC/MS assay that quantitatively characterizes CA/SP1 cleavage kinetics of virus like particles (VLPs) and a radiolabel binding assay to determine VLP/MI affinities and dissociation kinetics. Antiviral assay data indicates that BVM does not achieve 100% inhibition of certain polymorphs, even at saturating concentrations. This results in the breakthrough of infectious virus (partial antagonism) regardless of BVM concentration. Reduced maximal percent inhibition (MPI) values for BVM correlated with elevated EC50 values, while rates of HIV-1 protease cleavage at CA/SP1 correlated inversely with the ability of BVM to inhibit HIV-1 Gag polymorphic viruses: genotypes with more rapid CA/SP1 cleavage kinetics were less sensitive to BVM. In vitro inhibition of wild type VLP CA/SP1 cleavage by BVM was not maintained at longer cleavage times. BMS-955176 exhibited greatly improved MPI against polymorphic Gag viruses, binds to Gag polymorphs with higher affinity/longer dissociation half-lives and exhibits greater time-independent inhibition of CA/SP1 cleavage compared to BVM. Virological (MPI) and biochemical (CA/SP1 cleavage rates, MI-specific Gag affinities) data were used to create an integrated semi-quantitative model that quantifies CA/SP1 cleavage rates as a function of both MI and Gag polymorph. The model outputs are in accord with in vitro antiviral observations and correlate with observed in vivo MI efficacies. Overall, these findings may be useful to further understand antiviral

  4. 6,7-Dihydroxy-1-oxoisoindoline-4-sulfonamide-containing HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Smith, Steven J.; Métifiot, Mathieu; Johnson, Barry C.; Marchand, Christophe; Hughes, Stephen H.; Pommier, Yves; Burke, Terrence R.

    2012-01-01

    Although an extensive body of scientific and patent literature exists describing the development of HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors, Merck’s raltegravir and Gilead’s elvitegravir remain the only IN inhibitors FDA-approved for the treatment of AIDS. The emergence of raltegravir-resistant strains of HIV-1 containing mutated forms of IN underlies the need for continued efforts to enhance the efficacy of IN inhibitors against resistant mutants. We have previously described bicyclic 6,7-dihydroxyoxoisoindolin-1-ones that show good IN inhibitory potency. This report describes the effects of introducing substituents into the 4- and 5- positions of the parent 6,7-dihydroxyoxoisoindolin-1-one platform. We have developed several sulfonamide-containing analogs that enhance potency in cell-based HIV assays by more than two orders-of-magnitude and we describe several compounds that are more potent than raltegravir against the clinically relevant Y143R IN mutant. PMID:23149229

  5. Insect response to plant defensive protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhu-Salzman, Keyan; Zeng, Rensen

    2015-01-07

    Plant protease inhibitors (PIs) are natural plant defense proteins that inhibit proteases of invading insect herbivores. However, their anti-insect efficacy is determined not only by their potency toward a vulnerable insect system but also by the response of the insect to such a challenge. Through the long history of coevolution with their host plants, insects have developed sophisticated mechanisms to circumvent antinutritional effects of dietary challenges. Their response takes the form of changes in gene expression and the protein repertoire in cells lining the alimentary tract, the first line of defense. Research in insect digestive proteases has revealed the crucial roles they play in insect adaptation to plant PIs and has brought about a new appreciation of how phytophagous insects employ this group of molecules in both protein digestion and counterdefense. This review provides researchers in related fields an up-to-date summary of recent advances.

  6. Computational and synthetic approaches for developing Lavendustin B derivatives as allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase

    PubMed Central

    Agharbaoui, Fatima E.; Hoyte, Ashley C.; Ferro, Stefania; Gitto, Rosaria; Buemi, Maria Rosa; Fuchs, James R.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; De Luca, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Through structure-based virtual screening and subsequent activity assays of selected natural products, Lavendustin B was previously identified as an inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase (IN) interaction with its cognate cellular cofactor, lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75). In order to improve the inhibitory potency we have employed in silico-based approaches. Particularly, a series of new analogues was designed and docked into the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket of HIV-1 IN. To identify promising leads we used the Molecular Mechanics energies combined with the Generalized Born and Surface Area continuum solvation (MM-GBSA) method, molecular dynamics simulations and analysis of hydrogen bond occupancies. On the basis of these studies, six analogues of Lavendustine B, containing the benzylamino-hydroxybenzoic scaffold, were selected for synthesis and structure activity-relationship (SAR) studies. Our results demonstrated a good correlation between computational and experimental data, and all six analogues displayed an improved potency for inhibiting IN binding to LEDGF/p75 in vitro to respect to the parent compound Lavendustin B. Additionally, these analogs show to inhibit weakly LEDGF/p75-independent IN catalytic activity suggesting a multimodal allosteric mechanism of action. Nevertheless, for the synthesized compounds similar profiles for HIV-1 inhibition and cytoxicity were highlighted. Taken together, our studies elucidated the mode of action of Lavendustin B analogs and provided a path for their further development as a new promising class of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. PMID:27517812

  7. Design, synthesis and activity evaluation of novel peptide fusion inhibitors targeting HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianjun; Su, Min; Zeng, Yi; Wang, Cunxin

    2016-01-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the pathogen of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), causes about 2 million people to death every year. Fusion inhibitors targeted the envelope protein (gp41) represent a novel and alternative approach for anti-AIDS therapy, which terminates the HIV-1 life cycle at an early stage. Using CP621-652 as a template, a series of peptides were designed, synthesized and evaluated in vitro assays. An interesting phenomenon was found that the substitution of hydrophobic residues at solvent accessible sites could increase the anti-HIV activity when the C-terminal sequence was extended with an enough numbers of amino acids. After the active peptides was synthesized and evaluated, peptide 8 showed the best anti-HIV-1 IIIB whole cell activity (MAGI IC50=53.02 nM). Further study indicated that peptide 8 bound with the gp41 NHR helix, and then blocked the conformation of 6-helix, thus inhibited virus-cell membrane fusion. The results would be helpful for the design of peptide fusion inhibitors against HIV-1 infection.

  8. Computational and synthetic approaches for developing Lavendustin B derivatives as allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Agharbaoui, Fatima E; Hoyte, Ashley C; Ferro, Stefania; Gitto, Rosaria; Buemi, Maria Rosa; Fuchs, James R; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; De Luca, Laura

    2016-11-10

    Through structure-based virtual screening and subsequent activity assays of selected natural products, Lavendustin B was previously identified as an inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase (IN) interaction with its cognate cellular cofactor, lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75). In order to improve the inhibitory potency we have employed in silico-based approaches. Particularly, a series of new analogues was designed and docked into the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket of HIV-1 IN. To identify promising leads we used the Molecular Mechanics energies combined with the Generalized Born and Surface Area continuum solvation (MM-GBSA) method, molecular dynamics simulations and analysis of hydrogen bond occupancies. On the basis of these studies, six analogues of Lavendustine B, containing the benzylamino-hydroxybenzoic scaffold, were selected for synthesis and structure activity-relationship (SAR) studies. Our results demonstrated a good correlation between computational and experimental data, and all six analogues displayed an improved potency for inhibiting IN binding to LEDGF/p75 in vitro to respect to the parent compound Lavendustin B. Additionally, these analogs show to inhibit weakly LEDGF/p75-independent IN catalytic activity suggesting a multimodal allosteric mechanism of action. Nevertheless, for the synthesized compounds similar profiles for HIV-1 inhibition and cytoxicity were highlighted. Taken together, our studies elucidated the mode of action of Lavendustin B analogs and provided a path for their further development as a new promising class of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

  9. Structure-activity relationship studies on a novel family of specific HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bonache, María-Cruz; Chamorro, Cristina; Lobatón, Esther; De Clercq, Erik; Balzarini, Jan; Velázquez, Sonsoles; Camarasa, María-José; San-Félix, Ana

    2003-09-01

    We have previously reported the discovery and preliminary structure-activity relationships of a new class of specific HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors whose prototype compound is the 1-[2',5'-bis-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-beta-D-ribofuranosyl]-3-N-[(carboxy) methyl]-thymine. In an attempt to increase the inhibitory efficacy against HIV-1 RT of this new class of nucleosides, and to further explore the structural features required for anti-HIV-1 activity, different types of modifications have been carried out on the prototype compound. These include substitution of the tert-butyldimethylsilyl groups by other liphophilic groups, replacement of the carboxy group at the N-3 position of the nucleobase by other functional groups, change in the length of the spacer between the thymine and the carboxylic acid residue and substitution of the thymine moiety by other pyrimidine (uracil, 5-ethyluracil) or purine (hypoxanthine) nucleobases. In addition, the most salient structural features of this new class of HIV-1-specific nucleosides have been incorporated into classical HIV RT nucleoside inhibitors such as ddl, AZT, d4T. Our studies demonstrate that both the carboxymethyl moiety at the nucleobase and tert-butyldimethylsilyl groups at the sugar are important structural components since deletion of either of them is detrimental to the antiviral activity.

  10. Structural investigation of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: 2-Aryl-substituted benzimidazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2009-11-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is one of the most destructive epidemics in history. Inhibitors of HIV enzymes are the main targets to develop drugs against that disease. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of HIV-1 (NNRTIs) are potentially effective and nontoxic. Structural studies provide information necessary to design more active compounds. The crystal structures of four NNRTI derivatives of 2-aryl-substituted N-benzyl-benzimidazole are presented here. Analysis of the geometrical parameters shows that the structures of the investigated inhibitors are rigid. The important geometrical parameter is the dihedral angle between the planes of the π-electron systems of the benzymidazole and benzyl moieties. The values of these dihedral angles are in a narrow range for all investigated inhibitors. There is no significant difference between the structure of the free inhibitor and the inhibitor in the complex with RT HIV-1. X-ray structures of the investigated inhibitors are a good basis for modeling enzyme-inhibitor interactions in rational drug design.

  11. Extracts from Acacia catechu suppress HIV-1 replication by inhibiting the activities of the viral protease and Tat

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acacia catechu (Mimosa family) stem bark extracts have been used traditionally as a dietary supplement as well as a folk medicine given its reported anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, hepatoprotective, antioxidant, anti-microbial and anti-tumor activities. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the anti-HIV-1 activity of the extracts from stem bark of A. catechu. Methods The aqueous and 50% ethanolic extracts of A. catechu stem bark were prepared and 50% ethanolic extract was further fractioned by successively partitioning with petroleum ether, chloroform and n-butanol. All the extracts and fractions were evaluated for cytotoxicity and anti-HIV-1 activity using different in vitro assays. The active n-butanol fraction was evaluated for its inhibition against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, integrase, protease, pro-viral genome integration and viral Tat protein mediated transactivation. The effect of n-butanol fraction on the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion in Vk2/E6E7 cells and transepithelial resistance in Caco-2 and HEC-1A cells was investigated. Results The aqueous and 50% ethanolic extracts of A. catechu showed IC50 values of 1.8 ± 0.18 μg/ml and 3.6 ± 0.31 μg/ml, respectively in cell-free virus based assay using TZM-bl cells and HIV-1NL4.3 (X-4 tropic). In the above assay, n-butanol fraction exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity with an IC50 of 1.7 ± 0.12 μg/ml. The n-butanol fraction showed a dose-dependent inhibition against HIV-1NL4.3 infection of the peripheral blood lymphocytes and against HIV-1BaL(R-5-tropic) as well as two different primary viral isolates of HIV-1 infection of TZM-bl cells. The n-butanol fraction demonstrates a potent inhibitory activity against the viral protease (IC50 = 12.9 μg/ml), but not reverse transcriptase or integrase. Further, in Alu-PCR no effect on viral integration was observed. The n-butanol fraction interfered with the Tat-mediated Long Terminal Repeat transactivation in

  12. Lipid metabolism and lipodystrophy in HIV-1-infected patients: the role played by nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sension, Michael; Deckx, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Dyslipidemia and lipodystrophy represent significant healthcare concerns in HIV-infected patients due to their association with diabetes mellitus and increased cardiovascular disease risk. Since the lipid effects of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are not well characterized, we systematically summarized the effects of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor treatment on dyslipidemia and lipodystrophy in HIV-1 infection. As with other classes of antiretroviral agents, the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are associated with lipid changes, although individual agents exhibit differing effects on lipid profiles. Comparative trials have shown that the risk for hypertriglyceridemia is lower with efavirenz than with the use of ritonavir-boosted lopinavir, but there is a greater likelihood of hypercholesterolemia compared to ritonavir-boosted atazanavir. Data also suggest that efavirenz results in greater increases in plasma lipid levels than integrase inhibitors and CC-chemokine-receptor-5 antagonists. Lipid disturbances are less frequent with the newer nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors than with efavirenz. However, in most cases, no change in the total:high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ratio was seen between the efavirenz and comparator groups. Switching from efavirenz to etravirine or rilpivirine, or the integrase inhibitors raltegravir or elvitegravir, resulted in significant reductions in lipid levels. There appears to be minimal potential for efavirenz or rilpivirine to result in development of lipodystrophy. Overall, nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors have a smaller impact on plasma lipids than ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors, with the newer agents exhibiting more favorable lipid profiles than efavirenz. When considering antiretroviral regimens, awareness of the different lipid effect profiles of the third agent is important, without forgetting the critical contribution of the background

  13. Structural Basis of Potent and Broad HIV-1 Fusion Inhibitor CP32M*

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xue; Chong, Huihui; Zhang, Chao; Qiu, Zonglin; Qin, Bo; Han, Ruiyun; Waltersperger, Sandro; Wang, Meitian; He, Yuxian; Cui, Sheng

    2012-01-01

    CP32M is a newly designed peptide fusion inhibitor possessing potent anti-HIV activity, especially against T20-resistant HIV-1 strains. In this study, we show that CP32M can efficiently inhibit a large panel of diverse HIV-1 variants, including subtype B′, CRF07_BC, and CRF01_AE recombinants and naturally occurring or induced T20-resistant viruses. To elucidate its mechanism of action, we determined the crystal structure of CP32M complexed with its target sequence. Differing from its parental peptide, CP621-652, the 621VEWNEMT627 motif of CP32M folds into two α-helix turns at the N terminus of the pocket-binding domain, forming a novel layer in the six-helix bundle structure. Prominently, the residue Asn-624 of the 621VEWNEMT627 motif is engaged in the polar interaction with a hydrophilic ridge that borders the hydrophobic pocket on the N-terminal coiled coil. The original inhibitor design of CP32M provides several intra- and salt bridge/hydrogen bond interactions favoring the stability of the helical conformation of CP32M and its interactions with N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) targets. We identified a novel salt bridge between Arg-557 on the NHR and Glu-648 of CP32M that is critical for the binding of CP32M and resistance against the inhibitor. Therefore, our data present important information for developing novel HIV-1 fusion inhibitors for clinical use. PMID:22679024

  14. Rapid Release of Protease Inhibitors from Soybeans

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, David L.; Yang, Wen-Kuang; Foard, Donald E.; Lin, K.-T. -Davis

    1978-01-01

    Specific antisera were prepared against the Bowman-Birk trypsin inhibitor and four other trypsin inhibitors of low molecular weight isolated from soybeans (Glycine max L. cv. Tracy). These antisera were used to detect the presence and amount of the inhibitors in: (a) seeds and protein extracts of soybean meal; (b) seedlings; and (c) the water surrounding the seeds and roots of seedlings. Lectin activities in seeds, seedlings, and water were also determined at the same time as the protease inhibitor activities. By competitive inhibition of immunoprecipitation, the combined five low molecular weight protease inhibitors were found to constitute the following percentages of proteins (w/w): 6.3% in defatted soybean meal; 8.1% of the protein extracted from the meal by a buffer of pH 8.6; 8.3, 14.7, 15.2, 16.1, 17.2, and 18.9% of the protein in a lyophilisate of water in which seeds were incubated for 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 hours, respectively; 8.2% in a lyophilisate of water in which roots of seedlings grew for 20 days; 1.5% in cotyledons; and less than 0.1% in epicotyls, hypocotyls, and roots of 12-day-old seedlings. Hemagglutination activities, expressed as the lowest amount of protein required to give a positive agglutination of 0.2 ml of 2% rabbit red blood cells, were as follows: purified soybean lectin, 0.08 μg; lyophilisate of water in which seeds were incubated for 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 hours, 10, 2.5, 5, 5, and 2.5 μg, respectively; lyophilisate of water in which roots grew for 20 days, 5 μg; 12-day-old cotyledons, roots, epicotyls, and hypocotyls, 12.5, 100, >1,000, and >500 μg, respectively. The results indicate that a large amount of protease inhibitors as well as lectins are released from seeds during the first 8 hours of imbibition. Neither lima bean trypsin inhibitor (mol wt, 10,000) nor Kunitz soybean trypsin inhibitor (mol wt, 21,500) showed competitive inhibition in tests with antisera against low molecular weight soybean protease inhibitors

  15. Inhibition Profiling of Retroviral Protease Inhibitors Using an HIV-2 Modular System

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Mohamed; Szojka, Zsófia; Mótyán, János András; Tőzsér, József

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral protease inhibitors (PIs) are fundamental pillars in the treatment of HIV infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Currently used PIs are designed against HIV-1, and their effect on HIV-2 is understudied. Using a modular HIV-2 protease cassette system, inhibition profiling assays were carried out for protease inhibitors both in enzymatic and cell culture assays. Moreover, the treatment-associated resistance mutations (I54M, L90M) were introduced into the modular system, and comparative inhibition assays were performed to determine their effect on the susceptibility of the protease. Our results indicate that darunavir, saquinavir, indinavir and lopinavir were very effective HIV-2 protease inhibitors, while tipranavir, nelfinavir and amprenavir showed a decreased efficacy. I54M, L90M double mutation resulted in a significant reduction in the susceptibility to most of the inhibitors with the exception of tipranavir. To our knowledge, this modular system constitutes a novel approach in the field of HIV-2 protease characterization and susceptibility testing. PMID:26633459

  16. The current status and challenges in the development of fusion inhibitors as therapeutics for HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jian Jun; Ma, Xue Ting; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Xiao Yi; Wang, Cun Xin

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 membrane fusion as a part of the process of viral entry in the target cells is facilitated by gp41 and gp120, which are encoded by Env gene of HIV-1. Based on the structure and the mechanism researches, new treatment options targeting HIV-1 entry process have been proposed. Enfuvirtide, which mimics amino acid sequences of viral envelope glycoprotein gp41, is the first HIV-1 fusion inhibitor approved by FDA. Although it fulfills vital functions by binding to gp41 and abolishing the membrane fusion reaction when used in combination, it could induce drug resistant virus variants. Currently, a number of design and modification schemes have been presented, a large number of prospective fusion peptides have emerged. For these fusion inhibitors, multiple mutations in gp41 have been associated with the loss of susceptibility to agents. This review reported the current developments and innovative designs of HIV-1 membrane fusion inhibitors.

  17. Crystal structures of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase complexes with thiocarbamate non-nucleoside inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Spallarossa, Andrea; Cesarini, Sara; Ranise, Angelo; Ponassi, Marco; Unge, Torsten; Bolognesi, Martino

    2008-01-25

    O-Phthalimidoethyl-N-arylthiocarbamates (TCs) have been recently identified as a new class of potent HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs), by means of computer-aided drug design techniques [Ranise A. Spallarossa, S. Cesarini, F. Bondavalli, S. Schenone, O. Bruno, G. Menozzi, P. Fossa, L. Mosti, M. La Colla, et al., Structure-based design, parallel synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and molecular modeling studies of thiocarbamates, new potent non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor isosteres of phenethylthiazolylthiourea derivatives, J. Med. Chem. 48 (2005) 3858-3873]. To elucidate the atomic details of RT/TC interaction and validate an earlier TC docking model, the structures of three RT/TC complexes were determined at 2.8-3.0A resolution by X-ray crystallography. The conformations adopted by the enzyme-bound TCs were analyzed and compared with those of bioisosterically related NNRTIs.

  18. Intermolecular interactions in the crystal structures of potential HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Majerz-Maniecka, Katarzyna; Musiol, Robert; Nitek, Wojciech; Oleksyn, Barbara J; Mouscadet, Jean-Francois; Le Bret, Marc; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2006-02-15

    2-[(2,5-dichloro-4-nitro-phenylamino)-methoxy-methyl]-8-hydroxy-quinoline 1 and 2-methyl-quinoline-5,8-dione-5-oxime 2 were obtained as potential HIV-1 integrase inhibitors and analyzed by X-ray crystallography. Semiempirical theoretical calculations of energy preferred conformations were also carried out. The crystal structures of both compounds are stabilized via hydrogen bonds and pi-pi stacking interactions. The planarity of compound 1 is caused by intramolecular hydrogen bonds.

  19. Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors: roles in synaptic function and behavior.

    PubMed

    Almonte, Antoine G; Sweatt, J David

    2011-08-17

    Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors have been intensively investigated in the periphery and their roles in a wide range of processes-coagulation, inflammation, and digestion, for example-have been well characterized (see Coughlin, 2000; Macfarlane et al., 2001; Molinari et al., 2003; Wang et al., 2008; Di Cera, 2009 for reviews). A growing number of studies demonstrate that these protein systems are widely expressed in many cell types and regions in mammalian brains. Accumulating lines of evidence suggest that the brain has co-opted the activities of these interesting proteins to regulate various processes underlying synaptic activity and behavior. In this review, we discuss emerging roles for serine proteases in the regulation of mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity and memory formation.

  20. Proteases of Stored Product Insects and Their Inhibition by Specific Protease Inhibitors from Soybeans and Wheat Grain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-15

    PROTEASES; PROTEASE INHIBITORS; STORED-PRODUCT INISECTS; TRIBOLIUM CASIANEUH; MIDGUT PROTEASES; TENEBRIO MOLITOR MIDGUT-PROTEASES; LOCUST CAECAL...separation and identification of numerous midgut proteases in Tenebrio and Tribolium . The PAGE-gelatin matrix revealed the inhibitory effect of BBI...the proteinaceous trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitor from soybeans) on several Tribolium proteases - an effect which was not detectable in inhibition

  1. Diarylaniline Derivatives as a Distinct Class of HIV-1 Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Bingjie; Jiang, Xingkai; Lu, Hong; Tian, Xingtao; Barbault, Florent; Huang, Li; Qian, Keduo; Chen, Chin-Ho; Huang, Rong; Jiang, Shibo; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Xie, Lan

    2010-01-01

    By using structure-based drug design and isosteric replacement, diarylaniline and 1,5-diarylbenzene-1,2-diamine derivatives were synthesized and evaluated against wild type HIV-1 and drug-resistant viral strains, resulting in the discovery of diarylaniline derivatives as a distinct class of next-generation HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) agents. The most promising compound 37 showed significant EC50 values of 0.003-0.032 μM against HIV-1 wild-type strains and of 0.005-0.604 μM against several drug-resistant strains. Current results also revealed important structure-activity relationship (SAR) conclusions for diarylanilines and strongly support our hypothesis that an NH2 group on the central benzene ring ortho to the aniline moiety is crucial for interaction with K101 of the NNRTI binding site in HIV-1 RT, likely by forming H-bonds with K101. Furthermore, molecular modeling studies with molecular mechanism/general born surface area (MM/GBSA) technology demonstrated the rationality of our hypothesis. PMID:20527972

  2. Prevalence of transmitted nucleoside analogue-resistant HIV-1 strains and pre-existing mutations in pol reverse transcriptase and protease region: outcome after treatment in recently infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Balotta, C; Berlusconi, A; Pan, A; Violin, M; Riva, C; Colombo, M C; Gori, A; Papagno, L; Corvasce, S; Mazzucchelli, R; Facchi, G; Velleca, R; Saporetti, G; Galli, M; Rusconi, S; Moroni, M

    2000-03-01

    We retrospectively studied 38 Italian recently HIV-1-infected subjects who seroconverted from 1994 to 1997 to investigate: (i) the prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI)-related mutations at primary infection; (ii) the proportion of naturally occurring mutations in reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease regions of patients naive for non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) and protease inhibitors (PIs); (iii) the drug-susceptibility to NRTIs and PIs in subjects with NRTI- and/or PI-related mutations; and (iv) the outcome of seroconverters treated with various NRTIs or NRTI/PI regimens. Baseline HIV-1 plasma viraemia and absolute CD4 count at baseline could not be used to distinguish patients with NRTI- and/or PI-related pre-existing mutations from those with wild-type virus (P = 0.693 and P = 0.542, respectively). The frequency of zidovudine-related mutations was 21% in the study period. The response to treatment was not significantly different in subjects with or without genotypic zidovudine-related mutations at primary infection (P = 0.744 for HIV-1 RNA and P = 0.102 for CD4 cells). Some natural variation (2.6%) was present within regions 98-108 and 179-190 of RT involved in NNRTI resistance. The high natural polymorphism in the protease region present in our patients was similar to that reported by others. In our study some PI-associated substitutions, thought to be compensatory in protease enzymatic function, could confer intermediate to high PI-resistance. As discrepancies between genotypic and phenotypic results may exist in recent seroconverters, our data suggest that the role of transmitted NRTI- and PI-resistant variants remain to be fully elucidated in vivo.

  3. Multi-drug resistance profile of PR20 HIV-1 protease is attributed to distorted conformational and drug binding landscape: molecular dynamics insights.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Sarentha; Bhakat, Soumendranath; Martin, Alberto J M; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2016-01-01

    The PR20 HIV-1 protease, a variant with 20 mutations, exhibits high levels of multi-drug resistance; however, to date, there has been no report detailing the impact of these 20 mutations on the conformational and drug binding landscape at a molecular level. In this report, we demonstrate the first account of a comprehensive study designed to elaborate on the impact of these mutations on the dynamic features as well as drug binding and resistance profile, using extensive molecular dynamics analyses. Comparative MD simulations for the wild-type and PR20 HIV proteases, starting from bound and unbound conformations in each case, were performed. Results showed that the apo conformation of the PR20 variant of the HIV protease displayed a tendency to remain in the open conformation for a longer period of time when compared to the wild type. This led to a phenomena in which the inhibitor seated at the active site of PR20 tends to diffuse away from the binding site leading to a significant change in inhibitor-protein association. Calculating the per-residue fluctuation (RMSF) and radius of gyration, further validated these findings. MM/GBSA showed that the occurrence of 20 mutations led to a drop in the calculated binding free energies (ΔGbind) by ~25.17 kcal/mol and ~5 kcal/mol for p2-NC, a natural peptide substrate, and darunavir, respectively, when compared to wild type. Furthermore, the residue interaction network showed a diminished inter-residue hydrogen bond network and changes in inter-residue connections as a result of these mutations. The increased conformational flexibility in PR20 as a result of loss of intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bond interactions and other prominent binding forces led to a loss of protease grip on ligand. It is interesting to note that the difference in conformational flexibility between PR20 and WT conformations was much higher in the case of substrate-bound conformation as compared to DRV. Thus, developing analogues of DRV by

  4. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  5. Structure of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors derivatives of N-benzyl-benzimidazole with different substituents in position 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2010-01-01

    The constant development of new drugs against HIV-1 is necessary due to global expansion of AIDS and HIV-1 drug resistance. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of HIV-1 (NNRTIs) are potentially effective and nontoxic drugs in AIDS therapy. The crystal structures of six nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) derivatives of N-benzyl-benzimidazole are reported here. The investigated compounds belong to the group of so called "butterfly like" inhibitors with characteristic two π-electron moieties with an angled orientation. The structural data show the influence of the substituents of the benzimidazole ring on the geometry of the molecule and correlation between the structure of the inhibitor and its biological activity.

  6. Interaction of small molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 entry with CCR5

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, Christoph . E-mail: seiberc@mail.rockefeller.edu; Ying Weiwen; Gavrilov, Svetlana; Tsamis, Fotini; Kuhmann, Shawn E.; Palani, Anandan; Tagat, Jayaram R.; Clader, John W.; McCombie, Stuart W.; Baroudy, Bahige M.; Smith, Steven O.; Dragic, Tatjana; Moore, John P.; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2006-05-25

    The CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is the major coreceptor for macrophage-tropic (R5) HIV-1 strains. Several small molecule inhibitors of CCR5 that block chemokine binding and HIV-1 entry are being evaluated as drug candidates. Here we define how CCR5 antagonists TAK-779, AD101 (SCH-350581) and SCH-C (SCH-351125), which inhibit HIV-1 entry, interact with CCR5. Using a mutagenesis approach in combination with a viral entry assay to provide a direct functional read out, we tested predictions based on a homology model of CCR5 and analyzed the functions of more than 30 amino acid residues. We find that a key set of aromatic and aliphatic residues serves as a hydrophobic core for the ligand binding pocket, while E283 is critical for high affinity interaction, most likely by acting as the counterion for a positively charged nitrogen atom common to all three inhibitors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding how specific antagonists interact with CCR5, and may be useful for the rational design of new, improved CCR5 ligands.

  7. Screening of HIV-1 Protease Using a Combination of an Ultra-High-Throughput Fluorescent-Based Assay and RapidFire Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Meng, Juncai; Lai, Ming-Tain; Munshi, Vandna; Grobler, Jay; McCauley, John; Zuck, Paul; Johnson, Eric N; Uebele, Victor N; Hermes, Jeffrey D; Adam, Gregory C

    2015-06-01

    HIV-1 protease (PR) represents one of the primary targets for developing antiviral agents for the treatment of HIV-infected patients. To identify novel PR inhibitors, a label-free, high-throughput mass spectrometry (HTMS) assay was developed using the RapidFire platform and applied as an orthogonal assay to confirm hits identified in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based primary screen of > 1 million compounds. For substrate selection, a panel of peptide substrates derived from natural processing sites for PR was evaluated on the RapidFire platform. As a result, KVSLNFPIL, a new substrate measured to have a ~ 20- and 60-fold improvement in k cat/K m over the frequently used sequences SQNYPIVQ and SQNYPIV, respectively, was identified for the HTMS screen. About 17% of hits from the FRET-based primary screen were confirmed in the HTMS confirmatory assay including all 304 known PR inhibitors in the set, demonstrating that the HTMS assay is effective at triaging false-positives while capturing true hits. Hence, with a sampling rate of ~7 s per well, the RapidFire HTMS assay enables the high-throughput evaluation of peptide substrates and functions as an efficient tool for hits triage in the discovery of novel PR inhibitors.

  8. Synthesis and Structure-activity Analysis of Diphenylpyrazolodiazene Inhibitors of the HIV-1 Nef Virulence Factor

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Prema C.; Zhao, Jielu; Emert-Sedlak, Lori A.; Moore, Kerry; Smithgall, Thomas E.; Day, Billy W.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 Nef is a critical AIDS progression factor yet underexplored target for antiretroviral drug discovery. A recent high-throughput screen for pharmacological inhibitors of Nef-dependent Src-family kinase activation identified a diphenylpyrazolodiazene hit compound with submicromolar potency in HIV-1 replication assays against a broad range of primary Nef variants. This compound, known as ‘B9’, binds directly to Nef and inhibits is dimerization in cells as a possible mechanism of action. Here were synthesized a diverse set of B9 analogs and identified structural features essential to antiretroviral activity. Chemical modifications to each of the three rings present in the parent compound were identified that did not compromise antiviral action. These analogs will guide the development of next-generation compounds with appropriate pharmacological profiles for assessment of antiretroviral activity in vivo. PMID:24650642

  9. A Multifunctional Protease Inhibitor To Regulate Endolysosomal Function

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Proteases constitute a major class of drug targets. Endosomal compartments harbor several protease families whose attenuation may be beneficial to a number of biological processes, including inflammation, cancer metastasis, antigen presentation, and parasite clearance. As a step toward the goal of generalized but targeted protease inhibition in the endocytic pathway, we describe here the synthesis, characterization, and cellular application of a novel multifunctional protease inhibitor. We show that pepstatin A, a potent but virtually insoluble inhibitor of cathepsins D and E, can be conjugated to a single site on cystatin C, a potent inhibitor of the papain-like cysteine proteases (PLCP) and of asparagine endopeptidease (AEP), to create a highly soluble compound capable of suppressing the activity of all 3 principal protease families found in endosomes and lysosomes. We demonstrate that this cystatin–pepstatin inhibitor (CPI) can be taken up by cells to modulate protease activity and affect biological responses. PMID:21910425

  10. Structure-activity relationship of pyrrolyl diketo acid derivatives as dual inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase and reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H domain.

    PubMed

    Cuzzucoli Crucitti, Giuliana; Métifiot, Mathieu; Pescatori, Luca; Messore, Antonella; Madia, Valentina Noemi; Pupo, Giovanni; Saccoliti, Francesco; Scipione, Luigi; Tortorella, Silvano; Esposito, Francesca; Corona, Angela; Cadeddu, Marta; Marchand, Christophe; Pommier, Yves; Tramontano, Enzo; Costi, Roberta; Di Santo, Roberto

    2015-02-26

    The development of HIV-1 dual inhibitors is a highly innovative approach aimed at reducing drug toxic side effects as well as therapeutic costs. HIV-1 integrase (IN) and reverse transcriptase-associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) are both selective targets for HIV-1 chemotherapy, and the identification of dual IN/RNase H inhibitors is an attractive strategy for new drug development. We newly synthesized pyrrolyl derivatives that exhibited good potency against IN and a moderate inhibition of the RNase H function of RT, confirming the possibility of developing dual HIV-1 IN/RNase H inhibitors and obtaining new information for the further development of more effective dual HIV-1 inhibitors.

  11. Development of a phenotypic susceptibility assay for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Heger, Eva; Theis, Alexandra Andrée; Remmel, Klaus; Walter, Hauke; Pironti, Alejandro; Knops, Elena; Di Cristanziano, Veronica; Jensen, Björn; Esser, Stefan; Kaiser, Rolf; Lübke, Nadine

    2016-12-01

    Phenotypic resistance analysis is an indispensable method for determination of HIV-1 resistance and cross-resistance to novel drug compounds. Since integrase inhibitors are essential components of recent antiretroviral combination therapies, phenotypic resistance data, in conjunction with the corresponding genotypes, are needed for improving rules-based and data-driven tools for resistance prediction, such as HIV-Grade and geno2pheno[integrase]. For generation of phenotypic resistance data to recent integrase inhibitors, a recombinant phenotypic integrase susceptibility assay was established. For validation purposes, the phenotypic resistance to raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir of nine subtype-B virus strains, isolated from integrase inhibitor-naïve and raltegravir-treated patients was determined. Genotypic resistance analysis identified four virus strains harbouring RAL resistance-associated mutations. Phenotypic resistance analysis was performed as follows. The HIV-1 integrase genes were cloned into a modified pNL4-3 vector and transfected into 293T cells for the generation of recombinant virus. The integrase-inhibitor susceptibility of the recombinant viruses was determined via an indicator cell line. While raltegravir resistance profiles presented a high cross-resistance to elvitegravir, dolutegravir maintained in-vitro activity in spite of the Y143R and N155H mutations, confirming the strong activity of dolutegravir against raltegravir-resistant viruses. Solely a Q148H+G140S variant presented reduced susceptibility to dolutegravir. In conclusion, our phenotypic susceptibility assay permits resistance analysis of the integrase gene of patient-derived viruses for integrase inhibitors by replication-competent recombinants. Thus, this assay can be used to analyze phenotypic drug resistance of integrase inhibitors in vitro. It provides the possibility to determine the impact of newly appearing mutational patterns to drug resistance of recent integrase

  12. Activation of HIV-1 from latent infection via synergy of RUNX1 inhibitor Ro5-3335 and SAHA.

    PubMed

    Klase, Zachary; Yedavalli, Venkat S R K; Houzet, Laurent; Perkins, Molly; Maldarelli, Frank; Brenchley, Jason; Strebel, Klaus; Liu, Paul; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2014-03-01

    A major barrier to the elimination of HIV-1 infection is the presence of a pool of long-lived, latently infected CD4+ memory T-cells. The search for treatments to re-activate latent HIV to aid in clearance is hindered by the incomplete understanding of the mechanisms that lead to transcriptional silencing of viral gene expression in host cells. Here we identify a previously unknown role for RUNX1 in HIV-1 transcriptional latency. The RUNX proteins, in combination with the co-factor CBF-β, are critical transcriptional regulators in T-cells. RUNX1 strongly modulates CD4 expression and contributes to CD4+ T-cell function. We show that RUNX1 can bind DNA sequences within the HIV-1 LTR and that this binding represses transcription. Using patient samples we show a negative correlation between RUNX1 expression and viral load. Furthermore, we find that pharmacologic inhibition of RUNX1 by a small molecule inhibitor, Ro5-3335, synergizes with the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor SAHA (Vorinostat) to enhance the activation of latent HIV-1 in both cell lines and PBMCs from patients. Our findings indicate that RUNX1 and CBF-β cooperate in cells to modulate HIV-1 replication, identifying for the first time RUNX1 as a cellular factor involved in HIV-1 latency. This work highlights the therapeutic potential of inhibitors of RUNX1 to re-activate virus and aid in clearance of HIV-1.

  13. A broad HIV-1 inhibitor blocks envelope glycoprotein transitions critical for entry

    PubMed Central

    Herschhorn, Alon; Gu, Christopher; Espy, Nicole; Richard, Jonathan; Finzi, Andrés; Sodroski, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    Binding to the primary receptor, CD4, triggers conformational changes in the metastable envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer (gp1203/gp413) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) that are important for virus entry into host cells. These changes include an “opening” of the trimer, creation of a binding site for the CCR5 coreceptor, and formation/exposure of a gp41 coiled coil. Here we identify a new compound, 18A (1), that specifically inhibits the entry of a wide range of HIV-1 isolates. 18A does not interfere with CD4 or CCR5 binding, but inhibits the CD4-induced disruption of quaternary structures at the trimer apex and the formation/exposure of the gp41 HR1 coiled coil. Analysis of HIV-1 variants exhibiting increased or reduced sensitivity to 18A suggests that the inhibitor can distinguish distinct conformational states of gp120 in the unliganded Env trimer. The broad-range activity and observed hypersensitivity of resistant mutants to antibody neutralization support further investigation of 18A. PMID:25174000

  14. Microwave assisted organic synthesis (MAOS) of small molecules as potential HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Stefania; Grazia, Sara De; De Luca, Laura; Gitto, Rosaria; Faliti, Caterina Elisa; Debyzer, Zeger; Chimirri, Alba

    2011-08-11

    Integrase (IN) represents a clinically validated target for the development of antivirals against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In recent years our research group has been engaged in the stucture-function study of this enzyme and in the development of some three-dimensional pharmacophore models which have led to the identification of a large series of potent HIV-1 integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) bearing an indole core. To gain a better understanding of the structure-activity relationships (SARs), herein we report the design and microwave-assisted synthesis of a novel series of 1-H-benzylindole derivatives.

  15. Fluctuating partially native-like topologies in the acid denatured ensemble of autolysis resistant HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Rout, Manoj Kumar; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2009-02-01

    Folding, in-vivo, starts from a denatured state and thus the nature of the denatured state would play an important role in directing the folding of a protein. We report here NMR characterization of the acid-denatured state of a mutant of HIV-1 protease, designed to prevent autolysis (Q7K, L33I, L63I) and to prevent cysteine oxidation (C67A and C95A). Secondary chemical shifts, TALOS analysis of chemical shifts and (15)N relaxation data (R(1), R(2), NOE) coupled with AABUF and hydrophobicity calculations, suggest formation of hydrophobic clusters and possibility of some partially native-like topologies in the acid denatured state of the protease. The structural and dynamics characteristics of the acid denatured PR seem to be considerably different from those of the guanidine or urea denatured states of some variants of PR. These would have implications for the folding and auto-processing of the enzyme in-vivo.

  16. Identification of a small-molecule inhibitor of HIV-1 assembly that targets the phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate binding site of the HIV-1 matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Zentner, Isaac; Sierra, Luz-Jeannette; Fraser, Ayesha K; Maciunas, Lina; Mankowski, Marie K; Vinnik, Andrei; Fedichev, Peter; Ptak, Roger G; Martín-García, Julio; Cocklin, Simon

    2013-03-01

    The development of drug resistance remains a critical problem for current HIV-1 antiviral therapies, creating a need for new inhibitors of HIV-1 replication. We previously reported on a novel anti-HIV-1 compound, N(2)-(phenoxyacetyl)-N-[4-(1-piperidinylcarbonyl)benzyl]glycinamide (14), that binds to the highly conserved phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P(2)) binding pocket of the HIV-1 matrix (MA) protein. In this study, we re-evaluate the hits from the virtual screen used to identify compound 14 and test them directly in an HIV-1 replication assay using primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This study resulted in the identification of three new compounds with antiviral activity; 2-(4-{[3-(4-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]methyl})-1-piperazinyl)-N-(4-methylphenyl)acetamide (7), 3-(2-ethoxyphenyl)-5-[[4-(4-nitrophenyl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl]-1,2,4-oxadiazole (17), and N-[4-ethoxy-3-(1-piperidinylsulfonyl)phenyl]-2-(imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]thiazol-6-yl)acetamide (18), with compound 7 being the most potent of these hits. Mechanistic studies on 7 demonstrated that it directly interacts with and functions through HIV-1 MA. In accordance with our drug target, compound 7 competes with PI(4,5)P(2) for MA binding and, as a result, diminishes the production of new virus. Mutation of residues within the PI(4,5)P(2) binding site of MA decreased the antiviral effect of compound 7. Additionally, compound 7 displays a broadly neutralizing anti-HIV activity, with IC(50) values of 7.5-15.6 μM for the group M isolates tested. Taken together, these results point towards a novel chemical probe that can be used to more closely study the biological role of MA and could, through further optimization, lead to a new class of anti-HIV-1 therapeutics.

  17. The Tat Inhibitor Didehydro-Cortistatin A Prevents HIV-1 Reactivation from Latency

    PubMed Central

    Mousseau, Guillaume; Kessing, Cari F.; Fromentin, Rémi; Trautmann, Lydie; Chomont, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antiretroviral therapy (ART) inhibits HIV-1 replication, but the virus persists in latently infected resting memory CD4+ T cells susceptible to viral reactivation. The virus-encoded early gene product Tat activates transcription of the viral genome and promotes exponential viral production. Here we show that the Tat inhibitor didehydro-cortistatin A (dCA), unlike other antiretrovirals, reduces residual levels of viral transcription in several models of HIV latency, breaks the Tat-mediated transcriptional feedback loop, and establishes a nearly permanent state of latency, which greatly diminishes the capacity for virus reactivation. Importantly, treatment with dCA induces inactivation of viral transcription even after its removal, suggesting that the HIV promoter is epigenetically repressed. Critically, dCA inhibits viral reactivation upon CD3/CD28 or prostratin stimulation of latently infected CD4+ T cells from HIV-infected subjects receiving suppressive ART. Our results suggest that inclusion of a Tat inhibitor in current ART regimens may contribute to a functional HIV-1 cure by reducing low-level viremia and preventing viral reactivation from latent reservoirs. PMID:26152583

  18. Development of a receptor model for efficient in silico screening of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Quevedo, Mario A; Ribone, Sergio R; Briñón, Margarita C; Dehaen, Wim

    2014-07-01

    Integrase (IN) is a key viral enzyme for the replication of the type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), and as such constitutes a relevant therapeutic target for the development of anti-HIV agents. However, the lack of crystallographic data of HIV IN complexed with the corresponding viral DNA has historically hindered the application of modern structure-based drug design techniques to the discovery of new potent IN inhibitors (INIs). Consequently, the development and validation of reliable HIV IN structural models that may be useful for the screening of large databases of chemical compounds is of particular interest. In this study, four HIV-1 IN homology models were evaluated respect to their capability to predict the inhibition potency of a training set comprising 36 previously reported INIs with IC50 values in the low nanomolar to the high micromolar range. Also, 9 inactive structurally related compounds were included in this training set. In addition, a crystallographic structure of the IN-DNA complex corresponding to the prototype foamy virus (PFV) was also evaluated as structural model for the screening of inhibitors. The applicability of high throughput screening techniques, such as blind and ligand-guided exhaustive rigid docking was assessed. The receptor models were also refined by molecular dynamics and clustering techniques to assess protein sidechain flexibility and solvent effect on inhibitor binding. Among the studied models, we conclude that the one derived from the X-ray structure of the PFV integrase exhibited the best performance to rank the potencies of the compounds in the training set, with the predictive power being further improved by explicitly modeling five water molecules within the catalytic side of IN. Also, accounting for protein sidechain flexibility enhanced the prediction of inhibition potencies among the studied compounds. Finally, an interaction fingerprint pattern was established for the fast identification of potent IN

  19. Rational Design of Novel HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors by RANTES Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Vangelista, Luca; Secchi, Massimiliano

    2008-01-01

    The discovery that the CC chemokines RANTES, MIP-1α and MIP-1β act as potent natural inhibitors of HIV-1, the causative agent of AIDS, and the subsequent identification of CCR5 as a major virus coreceptor have triggered a wealth of basic and applied research approaches aimed at developing safe and effective viral entry inhibitors. Some of these efforts have focused on RANTES engineering with the goal of enhancing the antiviral activity of the native molecule while reducing or abrogating its inflammatory properties. The wavefront generated a decade ago is still on its course, with a flow of promising leads constantly emerging and being evaluated in preclinical studies. Here, we present an overview of this rapidly evolving field, highlighting the most important features of RANTES molecular architecture and structure-function relationships. PMID:18243436

  20. Raltegravir, elvitegravir, and metoogravir: the birth of "me-too" HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Erik; Odde, Srinivas; Ramkumar, Kavya; Neamati, Nouri

    2009-01-01

    Merck's MK-0518, known as raltegravir, has recently become the first FDA-approved HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitor and has since risen to blockbuster drug status. Much research has in turn been conducted over the last few years aimed at recreating but optimizing the compound's interactions with the protein. Resulting me-too drugs have shown favorable pharmacokinetic properties and appear drug-like but, as expected, most have a highly similar interaction with IN to that of raltegravir. We propose that, based upon conclusions drawn from our docking studies illustrated herein, most of these me-too MK-0518 analogues may experience a low success rate against raltegravir-resistant HIV strains. As HIV has a very high mutational competence, the development of drugs with new mechanisms of inhibitory action and/or new active substituents may be a more successful route to take in the development of second- and third-generation IN inhibitors. PMID:19265512

  1. Identification of a human protein-derived HIV-1 fusion inhibitor targeting the gp41 fusion core structure.

    PubMed

    Chao, Lijun; Lu, Lu; Yang, Hengwen; Zhu, Yun; Li, Yuan; Wang, Qian; Yu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Shibo; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp41 plays a crucial role in the viral fusion process. The peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) of gp41 are potent HIV fusion inhibitors. However, the activity of these anti-HIV-1 peptides in vivo may be attenuated by their induction of anti-gp41 antibodies. Thus, it is essential to identify antiviral peptides or proteins with low, or no, immunogenicity to humans. Here, we found that the C-terminal fragment (aa 462-521) of the human POB1 (the partner of RalBP1), designated C60, is an HIV-1 fusion inhibitor. It bound to N36, the peptide derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) of gp41, and to the six-helix bundle (6-HB) formed by N36 and C34, a CHR-peptide, but it did not bind to C34. Unlike the CHR-peptides, C60 did not block gp41 6-HB formation. Rather, results suggest that C60 inhibits HIV-1 fusion by binding to the 6-HB, in particular, the residues in the gp41 NHR domain that are exposed on the surface of 6-HB. Since 6-HB plays a crucial role in the late stage of fusion between the viral envelope and endosomal membrane during the endocytic process of HIV-1, C60 may serve as a host restriction factor to suppress HIV-1 entry into CD4+ T lymphocytes. Taken together, it can be concluded from these results that C60 can be used as a lead for the development of anti-HIV-1 therapeutics or microbicides for the treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection, as well as a molecular probe to study the fusogenic mechanism of HIV-1.

  2. Identification and Characterization of BMS-955176, a Second-Generation HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitor with Improved Potency, Antiviral Spectrum, and Gag Polymorphic Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Nowicka-Sans, Beata; Protack, Tricia; Lin, Zeyu; Li, Zhufang; Zhang, Sharon; Sun, Yongnian; Samanta, Himadri; Terry, Brian; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Yan; Sin, Ny; Sit, Sing-Yuen; Swidorski, Jacob J.; Chen, Jie; Venables, Brian L.; Healy, Matthew; Meanwell, Nicholas A.; Cockett, Mark; Hanumegowda, Umesh; Regueiro-Ren, Alicia; Krystal, Mark

    2016-01-01

    BMS-955176 is a second-generation human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) maturation inhibitor (MI). A first-generation MI, bevirimat, showed clinical efficacy in early-phase studies, but ∼50% of subjects had viruses with reduced susceptibility associated with naturally occurring polymorphisms in Gag near the site of MI action. MI potency was optimized using a panel of engineered reporter viruses containing site-directed polymorphic changes in Gag that reduce susceptibility to bevirimat (including V362I, V370A/M/Δ, and T371A/Δ), leading incrementally to the identification of BMS-955176. BMS-955176 exhibits potent activity (50% effective concentration [EC50], 3.9 ± 3.4 nM [mean ± standard deviation]) toward a library (n = 87) of gag/pr recombinant viruses representing 96.5% of subtype B polymorphic Gag diversity near the CA/SP1 cleavage site. BMS-955176 exhibited a median EC50 of 21 nM toward a library of subtype B clinical isolates assayed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Potent activity was maintained against a panel of reverse transcriptase, protease, and integrase inhibitor-resistant viruses, with EC50s similar to those for the wild-type virus. A 5.4-fold reduction in EC50 occurred in the presence of 40% human serum plus 27 mg/ml of human serum albumin (HSA), which corresponded well to an in vitro measurement of 86% human serum binding. Time-of-addition and pseudotype reporter virus studies confirm a mechanism of action for the compound that occurs late in the virus replication cycle. BMS-955176 inhibits HIV-1 protease cleavage at the CA/SP1 junction within Gag in virus-like particles (VLPs) and in HIV-1-infected cells, and it binds reversibly and with high affinity to assembled Gag in purified HIV-1 VLPs. Finally, in vitro combination studies showed no antagonistic interactions with representative antiretrovirals (ARVs) of other mechanistic classes. In conclusion, BMS-955176 is a second-generation MI with potent in vitro anti-HIV-1

  3. Cell-permeable stapled peptides based on HIV-1 integrase inhibitors derived from HIV-1 gene products.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Wataru; Aikawa, Haruo; Ohashi, Nami; Urano, Emiko; Métifiot, Mathieu; Fujino, Masayuki; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Ozaki, Taro; Nozue, Ami; Narumi, Tetsuo; Hashimoto, Chie; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Pommier, Yves; Yamamoto, Naoki; Komano, Jun A; Murakami, Tsutomu; Tamamura, Hirokazu

    2013-10-18

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an enzyme which is indispensable for the stable infection of host cells because it catalyzes the insertion of viral DNA into the genome and thus is an attractive target for the development of anti-HIV agents. Earlier, we found Vpr-derived peptides with inhibitory activity against HIV-1 IN. These Vpr-derived peptides are originally located in an α-helical region of the parent Vpr protein. Addition of an octa-arginyl group to the inhibitory peptides caused significant inhibition against HIV replication associated with an increase in cell permeability but also relatively high cytotoxicity. In the current study, stapled peptides, a new class of stabilized α-helical peptidomimetics were adopted to enhance the cell permeability of the above lead peptides. A series of stapled peptides, which have a hydrocarbon link formed by a ruthenium-catalyzed ring-closing metathesis reaction between successive turns of α-helix, were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for biological activity. In cell-based assays some of the stapled peptides showed potent anti-HIV activity comparable with that of the original octa-arginine-containing peptide (2) but with lower cytotoxicity. Fluorescent imaging experiments revealed that these stapled peptides are significantly cell permeable, and CD analysis showed they form α-helical structures, whereas the unstapled congeners form β-sheet structures. The application of this stapling strategy to Vpr-derived IN inhibitory peptides led to a remarkable increase in their potency in cells and a significant reduction of their cytotoxicity.

  4. Design of a modular tetrameric scaffold for the synthesis of membrane-localized D-peptide inhibitors of HIV-1 entry

    PubMed Central

    Francis, J. Nicholas; Redman, Joseph S.; Eckert, Debra M.; Kay, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    The highly conserved HIV-1 gp41 “pocket” region is a promising target for inhibiting viral entry. PIE12-trimer is a protease-resistant trimeric D-peptide inhibitor that binds to this pocket and potently blocks HIV entry. PIE12-trimer also possesses a reserve of binding energy that provides it with a strong genetic barrier to resistance (“resistance capacitor”). Here we report the design of a modular scaffold employing PEGs of discrete lengths for the efficient optimization and synthesis of PIE12-trimer. This scaffold also allows us to conjugate PIE12-trimer to several membrane-localizing cargoes, resulting in dramatically improved potency and retention of PIE12-trimer’s ability to absorb the impact of resistance mutations. This scaffold design strategy should be of broad utility for the rapid prototyping of multimeric peptide inhibitors attached to potency- or pharmacokinetic-enhancing groups. PMID:22545664

  5. Structural Basis of the Allosteric Inhibitor Interaction on the HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase RNase H domain

    PubMed Central

    Christen, Martin T.; Menon, Lakshmi; Myshakina, Nataliya A.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Parniak, Michael A.; Ishima, Rieko

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) has been an attractive target for the development of antiretroviral agents. Although this enzyme is bi-functional, having both DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H (RNH) activities, there is no clinically approved inhibitor of the RNH activity. Here, we characterize the structural basis and molecular interaction of an allosteric site inhibitor, BHMP07, with the wild type (WT) RNH fragment. Solution NMR experiments for inhibitor titration on WT RNH showed relatively wide chemical shift perturbations, suggesting a long-range conformational effect on the inhibitor interaction. Comparisons of the inhibitor-induced NMR chemical-shift changes of RNH with those of RNH dimer, in the presence and absence of Mg2+, were performed to determine and verify the interaction site. The NMR results, with assistance of molecular docking, indicate that BHMP07 preferentially binds to a site that is located between the RNH active site and the region encompassing helices B and D (the “substrate-handle region”). The interaction site is consistent with the previous proposed site, identified using a chimeric RNH (p15-EC) [Gong, el (2011) Chem. Biol. Drug Des. 77, 39-47], but with slight differences that reflect the characteristics of the amino acid sequences in p15-EC compared to the WT RNH. PMID:22846652

  6. Preclinical profile of BI 224436, a novel HIV-1 non-catalytic-site integrase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Craig; Amad, Ma'an; Bailey, Murray D; Bethell, Richard; Bös, Michael; Bonneau, Pierre; Cordingley, Michael; Coulombe, René; Duan, Jianmin; Edwards, Paul; Fader, Lee D; Faucher, Anne-Marie; Garneau, Michel; Jakalian, Araz; Kawai, Stephen; Lamorte, Louie; LaPlante, Steven; Luo, Laibin; Mason, Steve; Poupart, Marc-André; Rioux, Nathalie; Schroeder, Patricia; Simoneau, Bruno; Tremblay, Sonia; Tsantrizos, Youla; Witvrouw, Myriam; Yoakim, Christiane

    2014-06-01

    BI 224436 is an HIV-1 integrase inhibitor with effective antiviral activity that acts through a mechanism that is distinct from that of integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). This 3-quinolineacetic acid derivative series was identified using an enzymatic integrase long terminal repeat (LTR) DNA 3'-processing assay. A combination of medicinal chemistry, parallel synthesis, and structure-guided drug design led to the identification of BI 224436 as a candidate for preclinical profiling. It has antiviral 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of <15 nM against different HIV-1 laboratory strains and cellular cytotoxicity of >90 μM. BI 224436 also has a low, ∼2.1-fold decrease in antiviral potency in the presence of 50% human serum and, by virtue of a steep dose-response curve slope, exhibits serum-shifted EC95 values ranging between 22 and 75 nM. Passage of virus in the presence of inhibitor selected for either A128T, A128N, or L102F primary resistance substitutions, all mapping to a conserved allosteric pocket on the catalytic core of integrase. BI 224436 also retains full antiviral activity against recombinant viruses encoding INSTI resistance substitutions N155S, Q148H, and E92Q. In drug combination studies performed in cellular antiviral assays, BI 224436 displays an additive effect in combination with most approved antiretrovirals, including INSTIs. BI 224436 has drug-like in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties, including Caco-2 cell permeability, solubility, and low cytochrome P450 inhibition. It exhibited excellent pharmacokinetic profiles in rat (clearance as a percentage of hepatic flow [CL], 0.7%; bioavailability [F], 54%), monkey (CL, 23%; F, 82%), and dog (CL, 8%; F, 81%). Based on the excellent biological and pharmacokinetic profile, BI 224436 was advanced into phase 1 clinical trials.

  7. A Novel Aspartic Protease with HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activity from Fresh Fruiting Bodies of the Wild Mushroom Xylaria hypoxylon

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qing-Xiu; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Zhang, Rui-Ying; Hu, Dan-Dan; Wang, He-Xiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2012-01-01

    A novel aspartic protease with HIV-1 RT inhibitory activity was isolated and characterized from fruiting bodies of the wild mushroom Xylaria hypoxylon. The purification protocol comprised distilled water homogenization and extraction step, three ion exchange chromatographic steps (on DEAE-cellulose, Q-Sepharose, and CM-cellulose in succession), and final purification was by FPLC on Superdex 75. The protease was adsorbed on all the three ion exchangers. It was a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 43 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE and FPLC. Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was HYTELLSQVV, which exhibited no sequence homology to other proteases reported. The activity of the protease was adversely affected by Pepstatin A, indicating that it is an aspartic protease. The protease activity was maximal or nearly so in the pH range 6–8 and in the temperature range 35–60°C. The purified enzyme exhibited HIV-1 RT inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 8.3 μM, but was devoid of antifungal, ribonuclease, and hemagglutinating activities. PMID:22675256

  8. Sequential treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and deacetylase inhibitors reactivates HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Bouchat, Sophie; Delacourt, Nadège; Kula, Anna; Darcis, Gilles; Van Driessche, Benoit; Corazza, Francis; Gatot, Jean-Stéphane; Melard, Adeline; Vanhulle, Caroline; Kabeya, Kabamba; Pardons, Marion; Avettand-Fenoel, Véronique; Clumeck, Nathan; De Wit, Stéphane; Rohr, Olivier; Rouzioux, Christine; Van Lint, Carine

    2015-12-17

    Reactivation of HIV gene expression in latently infected cells together with an efficient cART has been proposed as an adjuvant therapy aimed at eliminating/decreasing the reservoir size. Results from HIV clinical trials using deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) question the efficiency of these latency-reversing agents (LRAs) used alone and underline the need to evaluate other LRAs in combination with HDACIs. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of a demethylating agent (5-AzadC) in combination with clinically tolerable HDACIs in reactivating HIV-1 from latency first in vitro and next ex vivo. We showed that a sequential treatment with 5-AzadC and HDACIs was more effective than the corresponding simultaneous treatment both in vitro and ex vivo. Interestingly, only two of the sequential LRA combinatory treatments tested induced HIV-1 particle recovery in a higher manner than the drugs alone ex vivo and at concentrations lower than the human tolerable plasmatic concentrations. Taken together, our data reveal the benefit of using combinations of 5-AzadC with an HDACI and, for the first time, the importance of treatment time schedule for LRA combinations in order to reactivate HIV.

  9. Inhibitor Ranking through QM Based Chelation Calculations for Virtual Screening of HIV-1 RNase H Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Steinmann, Casper; Kongsted, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations have been used to predict the binding affinity of a set of ligands towards HIV-1 RT associated RNase H (RNH). The QM based chelation calculations show improved binding affinity prediction for the inhibitors compared to using an empirical scoring function. Furthermore, full protein fragment molecular orbital (FMO) calculations were conducted and subsequently analysed for individual residue stabilization/destabilization energy contributions to the overall binding affinity in order to better understand the true and false predictions. After a successful assessment of the methods based on the use of a training set of molecules, QM based chelation calculations were used as filter in virtual screening of compounds in the ZINC database. By this, we find, compared to regular docking, QM based chelation calculations to significantly reduce the large number of false positives. Thus, the computational models tested in this study could be useful as high throughput filters for searching HIV-1 RNase H active-site molecules in the virtual screening process. PMID:24897431

  10. Nitrogen positional scanning in tetramines active against HIV-1 as potential CXCR4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Puig de la Bellacasa, Raimon; Gibert, Albert; Planesas, Jesús M; Ros-Blanco, Laia; Batllori, Xavier; Badía, Roger; Clotet, Bonaventura; Esté, José; Teixidó, Jordi; Borrell, José I

    2016-01-28

    The paradigm, derived from bicyclams and other cyclams, by which it is necessary to use the p-phenylene moiety as the central core in order to achieve high HIV-1 antiviral activities has been reexamined for the more flexible and less bulky structures 4, previously described by our group as potent HIV-1 inhibitors. The symmetrical compounds 7{x,x} and the non-symmetrical compounds 8{x,y} were designed, synthesized and biologically evaluated in order to explore the impact on the biological activity of the distance between the phenyl ring and the first nitrogen atom of the side chains. EC50 exactly followed the order 7{x,x} < 8{x,x} < 4{x,x} indicating that, for such flexible tetramines, the presence of two methylene units on each side of the central phenyl ring increases the biological activity contrary to AMD3100. A computational study of the interactions of 4{3,3}, 7{3,3} and 8{3,3} with CXCR4 revealed interactions in the same pocket region with similar binding modes for 4{3,3} and 7{3,3} but a different one for 8{3,3}.

  11. Methods for the Analyses of Inhibitor-Induced Aberrant Multimerization of HIV-1 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Kessl, Jacques J.; Sharma, Amit; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an important therapeutic target as its function is essential for the viral lifecycle. The discovery of multifunctional allosteric IN inhibitors or ALLINIs, which potently impair viral replication by promoting aberrant, higher order IN multimerization as well as inhibit IN interactions with its cellular cofactor, LEDGF/p75, has opened new venues to exploit IN multimerization as a therapeutic target. Furthermore, the recent discovery of multimerization selective IN inhibitors or MINIs, has provided new investigational probes to study the direct effects of aberrant IN multimerization in vitro and in infected cells. Here we describe three complementary methods designed to detect and quantify the effects of these new classes of inhibitors on IN multimerization. These methods include a homogenous time-resolved fluorescence-based assay which allows for measuring EC50 values for the inhibitor-induced aberrant IN multimerization, a dynamic light scattering-based assay which allows for monitoring the formation and sizes of oligomeric IN particles in a time-dependent manner, and a chemical cross-linking-based assay of interacting IN subunits which allows for the determination of IN oligomers in viral particles. PMID:26714710

  12. Synthesis and biological evaluation of imidazole thioacetanilides as novel non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong; Zhu, Junjie; Fang, Zengjun; Li, Zhenyu; Pannecouque, Christophe; Clercq, Erik De

    2009-08-15

    A series of 2-(1-aryl-1H-imidazol-2-ylthio)acetamide [imidazole thioacetanilide (ITA)] derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as potent inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Among them, the most potent HIV-1 inhibitors were 4a5 (EC(50)=0.18microM), and 4a2 (EC(50)=0.20microM), which were more effective than the lead compound L1 (EC(50)=2.053microM) and the reference drugs nevirapine and delavirdine. The preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) of the newly synthesized congeners is discussed.

  13. Cystatins, serpins and other families of protease inhibitors in plants.

    PubMed

    Volpicella, Mariateresa; Leoni, Claudia; Costanza, Alessandra; De Leo, Francesca; Gallerani, Raffaele; Ceci, Luigi R

    2011-08-01

    Plant protease inhibitors (PIs) are generally small proteins present in high concentrations in storage tissues (tubers and seeds), and to a lower level in leaves. Even if most of them are active against serine and cysteine proteases, PIs active against aspartic proteases and carboxypeptidases have also been identified. Inhibitors of serine proteases are further classifiable in several families on the basis of their structural features. They comprise the families known as Bowman-Birk, Kunitz, Potato I and Potato II, which are the subject of review articles included in this special issue. In the present article we aim to give an overview of other families of plant PIs, active either against serine proteases or other class of proteases, describing their distribution, activity and main structural characteristics.

  14. Discovery of a new HIV-1 inhibitor scaffold and synthesis of potential prodrugs of indazoles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Ho; Markovitz, Benjamin; Trovato, Richard; Murphy, Brett R; Austin, Harry; Willardsen, Adam J; Baichwal, Vijay; Morham, Scott; Bajji, Ashok

    2013-05-15

    A new oxazole scaffold showing great promise in HIV-1 inhibition has been discovered by cell-based screening of an in-house library and scaffold modification. Follow-up SAR study focusing on the 5-aryl substituent of the oxazole core has identified 4k (EC50=0.42μM, TI=50) as a potent inhibitor. However, the analogues suffered from poor aqueous solubility. To address this issue, we have developed broadly applicable potential prodrugs of indazoles. Among them, N-acyloxymethyl analogue 11b displayed promising results (i.e., increased aqueous solubility and susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis). Further studies are warranted to fully evaluate the analogues as the potential prodrugs with improved physiochemical and PK properties.

  15. α1Proteinase Inhibitor Regulates CD4+ Lymphocyte Levels and Is Rate Limiting in HIV-1 Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, Cynthia L.; Babayeva, Mariya A.; LaBrunda, Michelle; Mullen, Michael P.; Winston, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Background The regulation of adult stem cell migration through human hematopoietic tissue involves the chemokine CXCL12 (SDF-1) and its receptor CXCR4 (CD184). In addition, human leukocyte elastase (HLE) plays a key role. When HLE is located on the cell surface (HLECS), it acts not as a proteinase, but as a receptor for α1proteinase inhibitor (α1PI, α1antitrypsin, SerpinA1). Binding of α1PI to HLECS forms a motogenic complex. We previously demonstrated that α1PI deficiency attends HIV-1 disease and that α1PI augmentation produces increased numbers of immunocompetent circulating CD4+ lymphocytes. Herein we investigated the mechanism underlying the α1PI deficiency that attends HIV-1 infection. Methods and Findings Active α1PI in HIV-1 subjects (median 17 µM, n = 35) was significantly below normal (median 36 µM, p<0.001, n = 30). In HIV-1 uninfected subjects, CD4+ lymphocytes were correlated with the combined factors α1PI, HLECS+ lymphocytes, and CXCR4+ lymphocytes (r2 = 0.91, p<0.001, n = 30), but not CXCL12. In contrast, in HIV-1 subjects with >220 CD4 cells/µl, CD4+ lymphocytes were correlated solely with active α1PI (r2 = 0.93, p<0.0001, n = 26). The monoclonal anti-HIV-1 gp120 antibody 3F5 present in HIV-1 patient blood is shown to bind and inactivate human α1PI. Chimpanzee α1PI differs from human α1PI by a single amino acid within the 3F5-binding epitope. Unlike human α1PI, chimpanzee α1PI did not bind 3F5 or become depleted following HIV-1 challenge, consistent with the normal CD4+ lymphocyte levels and benign syndrome of HIV-1 infected chimpanzees. The presence of IgG-α1PI immune complexes correlated with decreased CD4+ lymphocytes in HIV-1 subjects. Conclusions This report identifies an autoimmune component of HIV-1 disease that can be overcome therapeutically. Importantly, results identify an achievable vaccine modification with the novel objective to protect against AIDS as opposed to the current objective to

  16. Evaluation of proteases and protease inhibitors in Heterodera glycines cysts obtained from laboratory and field populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteases and proteases inhibitors were evaluated in a number of preparations of Heterodera glycines cysts obtained from glasshouse cultures (GH) and field (LR) populations. Using a FRET-peptide library comprising 512 peptide substrate pools that detect 4 endoprotease types (aspartic, cysteine, meta...

  17. [Research progress of dual inhibitors targeting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and integrase].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xin-Yong

    2013-04-01

    Both reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase (IN) play crucial roles in the life cycle of HIV-1, which are also key targets in the area of anti-HIV drug research. Reverse transcriptase inhibitors are involved in the most employed drugs used to treat AIDS patients and HIV-infected people, while one of the integrase inhibitors has already been approved by US FDA to appear on the market. Great achievement has been made in the research on both, separately. Recently, much more attention of medicinal chemistry researchers has been attracted to the strategies of multi-target drugs. Compounds with excellent potency against both HIV RT and IN, evidently defined as dual inhibitors targeting both enzymes, have been obtained through considerable significant exploration, which can be classified into two categories according to different strategies. Combinatorial chemistry approach together with high throughput screening methods and multi-target-based virtual screening strategy have been useful tools for identifying selective anti-HIV compounds for long times; Rational drug design based on pharmacophore combination has also led to remarkable results. In this paper, latest progress of both categories in the discovery and structural modification will be covered, with a view to contribute to the career of anti-HIV research.

  18. Protease inhibitors and proteolytic signalling cascades in insects.

    PubMed

    Gubb, David; Sanz-Parra, Arantza; Barcena, Laura; Troxler, Laurent; Fullaondo, Ane

    2010-12-01

    Proteolytic signalling cascades control a wide range of physiological responses. In order to respond rapidly, protease activity must be maintained at a basal level: the component zymogens must be sequentially activated and actively degraded. At the same time, signalling cascades must respond precisely: high target specificity is required. The insects have a wide range of trapping- and tight-binding protease inhibitors, which can regulate the activity of individual proteases. In addition, the interactions between component proteases of a signalling cascade can be modified by serine protease homologues. The suicide-inhibition mechanism of serpin family inhibitors gives rapid turnover of both protease and inhibitor, but target specificity is inherently broad. Similarly, the TEP/macroglobulins have extremely broad target specificity, which suits them for roles as hormone transport proteins and sensors of pathogenic virulence factors. The tight-binding inhibitors, on the other hand, have a lock-and-key mechanism capable of high target specificity. In addition, proteins containing multiple tight-binding inhibitory domains may act as scaffolds for the assembly of signalling complexes. Proteolytic cascades regulated by combinations of different types of inhibitor could combine the rapidity of suicide-inhibitors with the specificity lock-and-key inhibitors. This would allow precise control of physiological responses and may turn out to be a general rule.

  19. High-level expression and purification of mature HIV-1 protease in Escherichia coli under control of the araBAD promoter.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A; Brown, D P; Kadam, S; Maus, M; Kohlbrenner, W E; Weigl, D; Turon, M C; Katz, L

    1992-05-01

    A 1.3-kb segment of Escherichia coli DNA containing the regulatory gene, araC, and the promoter of the araBAD operon was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into pUC18, resulting in plasmid pKB130 that produced the alpha fragment of beta-galactosidase upon addition of L-arabinose (L-ara). A synthetic gene for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 preprotease was placed downstream of the ara-BAD promoter in pKB130 to create a translational fusion inducible by addition of L-ara. The fusion protein correctly autoprocessed in vivo to yield a mature 99-amino-acid HIV-1 protease, which was found predominantly in inclusion bodies. This material could be refolded to an active form, which was purified to homogeneity. A small fraction of the protease was expressed in vivo as a soluble active form, which allowed the monitoring of expression during fermentation by a rapid and simple whole cell assay employing an HIV-1 protease-specific fluorogenic substrate.

  20. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Structure with RNase H Inhibitor dihydroxy benzoyl naphthyl Hydrazone Bound at a Novel Site

    SciTech Connect

    Himmel,D.; Sarafianos, S.; Dharmasena, S.; Hossain, M.; McCoy-Simandle, K.; Ilina, T.; Clark, A.; Knight, J.; Julias, J.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    The rapid emergence of drug-resistant variants of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1), has limited the efficacy of anti-acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) treatments, and new lead compounds that target novel binding sites are needed. We have determined the 3.15 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) complexed with dihydroxy benzoyl naphthyl hydrazone (DHBNH), an HIV-1 RT RNase H (RNH) inhibitor (RNHI). DHBNH is effective against a variety of drug-resistant HIV-1 RT mutants. While DHBNH has little effect on most aspects of RT-catalyzed DNA synthesis, at relatively high concentrations it does inhibit the initiation of RNA-primed DNA synthesis. Although primarily an RNHI, DHBNH binds >50 {angstrom} away from the RNH active site, at a novel site near both the polymerase active site and the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) binding pocket. When DHBNH binds, both Tyr181 and Tyr188 remain in the conformations seen in unliganded HIV-1 RT. DHBNH interacts with conserved residues (Asp186, Trp229) and has substantial interactions with the backbones of several less well-conserved residues. On the basis of this structure, we designed substituted DHBNH derivatives that interact with the NNRTI-binding pocket. These compounds inhibit both the polymerase and RNH activities of RT.

  1. A new member of the plasma protease inhibitor gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Ragg, H

    1986-01-01

    A 2.1-kb cDNA clone representing a new member of the protease inhibitor family was isolated from a human liver cDNA library. The inhibitor, named human Leuserpin 2 (hLS2), comprises 480 amino acids and contains a leucine residue at its putative reactive center. HLS2 is about 25-28% homologous to three human members of the plasma protease inhibitor family: antithrombin III, alpha 1-antitrypsin and alpha 1-antichymotrypsin. A comparison with published partial amino acid sequences shows that hLS2 is closely related to the thrombin inhibitor heparin cofactor II. Images PMID:3003690

  2. Structure of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase with the Inhibitor β-thujaplicinol Bound at the RNase H Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Himmel, Daniel M.; Maegley, Karen A.; Pauly, Tom A.; Bauman, Joseph D.; Das, Kalyan; Dharia, Chhaya; Clark, Arthur D.; Ryan, Kevin; Hickey, Michael J.; Love, Robert A.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Bergqvist, Simon; Arnold, Eddy

    2012-01-01

    Summary Novel inhibitors are needed to counteract the rapid emergence of drug-resistant HIV variants. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) has both DNA polymerase and RNase H (RNH) enzymatic activities, but approved drugs that inhibit RT target the polymerase. Inhibitors that act against new targets, like RNH, would be effective against all of the current drug-resistant variants. Here, we present 2.80 Å and 2.04 Å resolution crystal structures of an RNH inhibitor, β-thujaplicinol, bound at the RNH active site of both HIV-1 RT and an isolated RNH domain. β-thujaplicinol chelates two divalent metal ions at the RNH active site. We provide biochemical evidence that β-thujaplicinol is a slow-binding RNH inhibitor with non-competitive kinetics and suggest that it forms a tropylium ion that interacts favorably with RT and the RNA:DNA substrate. PMID:20004166

  3. Identification of a 3-aminoimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), there remains an urgent need to develop new human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) inhibitors with better pharmacokinetic properties that are well tolerated, and that block common drug resistant virus strains. Methods Here we screened an in-house small molecule library for novel inhibitors of HIV-1 replication. Results An active compound containing a 3-aminoimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine scaffold was identified and quantitatively characterized as a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI). Conclusions The potency of this compound coupled with its inexpensive chemical synthesis and tractability for downstream SAR analysis make this inhibitor a suitable lead candidate for further development as an antiviral drug. PMID:23231773

  4. 3D-QSAR and molecular modeling of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhija, Mahindra T.; Kulkarni, Vithal M.

    2002-03-01

    Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR) methods were applied on a series of inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase with respect to their inhibition of 3'-processing and 3'-end joining steps in vitro.The training set consisted of 27 compounds belonging to the class of thiazolothiazepines. The predictive ability of each model was evaluated using test set I consisting of four thiazolothiazepines and test set II comprised of seven compounds belonging to an entirely different structural class of coumarins. Maximum Common Substructure (MCS) based method was used to align the molecules and this was compared with other known methods of alignment. Two methods of 3D QSAR: comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) were analyzed in terms of their predictive abilities. CoMSIA produced significantly better results for all correlations. The results indicate a strong correlation between the inhibitory activity of these compounds and the steric and electrostatic fields around them. CoMSIA models with considerable internal as well as external predictive ability were obtained. A poor correlation obtained with hydrophobic field indicates that the binding of thiazolothiazepines to HIV-1 integrase is mainly enthalpic in nature. Further the most active compound of the series was docked into the active site using the crystal structure of integrase. The binding site was formed by the amino acid residues 64-67, 116, 148, 151-152, 155-156, and 159. The comparison of coefficient contour maps with the steric and electrostatic properties of the receptor shows high level of compatibility.

  5. A uniquely prevalent nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutation in Russian subtype A HIV-1 viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kolomeets, Anna N.; Varghese, Vici; Lemey, Philippe; Bobkova, Marina R.; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Background The subtype A variant in the Former Soviet Union (AFSU) causes most of Russia’s HIV-1 infections. However, the spectrum of drug-resistance mutations (DRMs) in antiretroviral experienced patients with this variant has not been studied. Methods Between 2010 and 2013, genotypic resistance testing was performed on plasma samples from 366 antiretroviral-experienced patients in Siberia. Results Three-hundred patients (82%) had subtype AFSU and 55 (15%) had CRF02_AG viruses. The pattern of DRMs was consistent with patient antiretroviral history with one exception. G190S was the most common nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance mutation, occurring in 55 (33%) subtype AFSU viruses from 167 NNRTI-experienced patients compared with none of 37 CRF02_AG viruses from NNRTI-experienced patients (P < 0.001). The next most common subtype AFSU NNRTI-resistance mutation, K103N, occurred in 25 (15%) viruses. Wild-type glycine (G) at position 190 is encoded by GGC in more than 99% of published AFSU strains. By contrast, G190 is encoded by GGA or GGG in 97% of other subtypes and in subtype A strains outside of the FSU. Therefore, G190S results from a single G→A transition: G (GGC) → S (AGC) almost exclusively in subtype AFSU viruses. Conclusion The predisposition of subtype AFSU to G190S is concerning because G→A is the most common HIV-1 mutation and because G190S causes higher levels of nevirapine and efavirenz resistance than K103N. This study exemplifies the need for characterizing the genetic mechanisms of resistance in diverse populations and warrants studies to verify that NRTI/NNRTI regimens are as efficacious in treating subtype AFSU as viruses belonging to other subtypes. PMID:25259833

  6. Contribution of Gag and protease to variation in susceptibility to protease inhibitors between different strains of subtype B human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Katherine A; Mbisa, Jean L; Cane, Patricia A; Pillay, Deenan; Parry, Chris M

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag can directly affect susceptibility to protease inhibitors (PIs) in the absence of known resistance mutations in protease. Inclusion of co-evolved Gag alongside protease in phenotypic drug susceptibility assays can alter PI susceptibility in comparison with protease with a WT Gag. Using a single-replication-cycle assay encompassing full-length Gag together with protease we demonstrated significant variation in PI susceptibility between a number of PI-naïve subtype B viruses. Six publicly available subtype B molecular clones, namely HXB2, NL4-3, SF2, YU2, JRFL and 89.6, displayed up to nine-fold reduced PI susceptibility in comparison with the assay reference strain. For two molecular clones, YU2 and JRFL, Gag contributed solely to the observed reduction in susceptibility, with the N-terminal region of Gag contributing significantly. Gag and protease from treatment-naïve, patient-derived viruses also demonstrated significant variation in susceptibility, with up to a 17-fold reduction to atazanavir in comparison with the assay reference strain. In contrast to the molecular clones, protease was the main determinant of the reduced susceptibility. Common polymorphisms in protease, including I13V, L63P and A71T, were shown to contribute to this reduction in PI susceptibility, in the absence of major resistance mutations. This study demonstrated significant variation in PI susceptibility of treatment-naïve patient viruses, and provided further evidence of the independent role of Gag, the protease substrate and in particular the N-terminus of Gag in PI susceptibility. It also highlighted the importance of considering co-evolved Gag and protease when assessing PI susceptibility.

  7. 2,6-Bis(3,4,5-trihydroxybenzylydene) derivatives of cyclohexanone: novel potent HIV-1 integrase inhibitors that prevent HIV-1 multiplication in cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Costi, Roberta; Santo, Roberto Di; Artico, Marino; Massa, Silvio; Ragno, Rino; Loddo, Roberta; La Colla, Massimiliano; Tramontano, Enzo; La Colla, Paolo; Pani, Alessandra

    2004-01-02

    A number of 2,6-bisbenzylidenecyclohexane-1-one derivatives have been synthesized and tested as HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors with the aim of obtaining compounds capable to elicit antiviral activity at non-cytotoxic concentrations in cell-based assays. 3,5-Bis(3,4,5-trihydroxybenzylidene)-4-oxocyclohexaneacetic acid (20d) resulted one of the most potent and selective derivatives in acutely infected MT-4 cells (EC(50) and CC(50) values of 2 and 40 microM, respectively). In enzyme assays with recombinant HIV-1 integrase (rIN), this compound proved able to inhibit both 3'-processing and disintegration with IC(50) values of 0.2 and 0.5 microM, respectively. In order to develop a model capable to predict the anti HIV-IN activity and useful to design novel derivatives, we performed a comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) like 3-D-QSAR. In our model the ligands were described quantitatively in the GRID program, and the model was optimized by selecting only the most informative variables in the GOLPE program. We found the predictive ability of the model to increase significantly when the number of variables was reduced from 20,925 to 1327. A Q(2) of 0.73 was obtained with the final model, confirming the predictive ability of the model. By studying the PLS coefficients in informative 3-D contour plots, ideas for the synthesis of new compounds could be generated.

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of geminal disulfones as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Meadows, D Christopher; Mathews, Timothy B; North, Thomas W; Hadd, Michael J; Kuo, Chih Lin; Neamati, Nouri; Gervay-Hague, Jacquelyn

    2005-07-14

    Integration of HIV-1 viral DNA into the host genome is carried out by HIV-integrase (IN) and is a critical step in viral replication. Although several classes of compounds have been reported to inhibit IN in enzymatic assays, inhibition is not always correlated with antiviral activity. Moreover, potent antiviral IN inhibitors such as the chicoric acids do not act upon the intended enzymatic target but behave as entry inhibitors instead. The charged nature of the chicoric acids contributes to poor cellular uptake, and these compounds are further plagued by rapid ester hydrolysis in vivo. To address these critical deficiencies, we designed neutral, nonhydrolyzable analogues of the chicoric acids. Herein, we report the synthesis, enzyme inhibition studies, and cellular antiviral data for a series of geminal disulfones. Of the 10 compounds evaluated, 8 showed moderate to high inhibition of IN in purified enzyme assays. The purified enzyme data correlated with antiviral assays for all but two compounds, suggesting alternative modes of inhibition. Time-of-addition studies were performed on these analogues, and the results indicate that they inhibit an early stage in the replication process, perhaps entry. In contrast, the most potent member of the correlative group shows behavior consistent with IN being the cellular target.

  9. The evaluation of statins as potential inhibitors of the LEDGF/p75-HIV-1 integrase interaction.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Angela T; Kriel, Frederik H; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A; Mosebi, Salerwe; Abrahams, Shaakira; Hewer, Raymond

    2015-03-01

    Lovastatin was identified through virtual screening as a potential inhibitor of the LEDGF/p75-HIV-1 integrase interaction. In an AlphaScreen assay, lovastatin inhibited the purified recombinant protein-protein interaction (IC50 = 1.97 ± 0.45 μm) more effectively than seven other tested statins. None of the eight statins, however, yielded antiviral activity in vitro, while only pravastatin lactone yielded detectable inhibition of HIV-1 integrase strand transfer activity (31.65% at 100 μm). A correlation between lipophilicity and increased cellular toxicity of the statins was observed.

  10. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Macrocyclized Betulin Derivatives as a Novel Class of Anti-HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Jones, Stacey A; Jeffery, Jerry L; Miranda, Sonia R; Galardi, Cristin M; Irlbeck, David M; Brown, Kevin W; McDanal, Charlene B; Han, Nianhe; Gao, Daxin; Wu, Yongyong; Shen, Bin; Liu, Chunyu; Xi, Caiming; Yang, Heping; Li, Rui; Yu, Yajun; Sun, Yufei; Jin, Zhimin; Wang, Erjuan; Johns, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    A macrocycle provides diverse functionality and stereochemical complexity in a conformationally preorganized ring structure, and it occupies a unique chemical space in drug discovery. However, the synthetic challenge to access this structural class is high and hinders the exploration of macrocycles. In this study, efficient synthetic routes to macrocyclized betulin derivatives have been established. The macrocycle containing compounds showed equal potency compared to bevirimat in multiple HIV-1 antiviral assays. The synthesis and biological evaluation of this novel series of HIV-1 maturation inhibitors will be discussed.

  11. Caffeoylglycolic and caffeoylamino acid derivatives, halfmers of L-chicoric acid, as new HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Uk; Shin, Cha-Gyun; Lee, Chong-Kyo; Lee, Yong Sup

    2007-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of HIV DNA copy into the host cell DNA. L-Chicoric acid (1) has been found to be one of the most potent HIV-1 integrase inhibitor. Caffeoylglycolic and caffeoylamino acid derivatives' halfmeric structures of L-chicoric acid 2 were synthesized for the purpose of simplifying the structure of L-chicoric acid. Among synthesized, compounds 2c and 3f showed HIV-1 IN inhibitory activities with IC(50) values of 10.5 and 12.0 microM, respectively, comparable to that of parent compound L-chicoric acid (IC(50)=15.7 microM).

  12. Botulinum neurotoxin A protease: discovery of natural product exosite inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Silhár, Peter; Capková, Katerina; Salzameda, Nicholas T; Barbieri, Joseph T; Hixon, Mark S; Janda, Kim D

    2010-03-10

    A new mechanistic class of BoNT/A zinc metalloprotease inhibitors, from Echinacea, exemplified by the natural product d-chicoric acid (I1) is disclosed. A detailed evaluation of chicoric acid's mechanism of inhibition reveals that the inhibitor binds to an exosite, displays noncompetitive partial inhibition, and is synergistic with a competitive active site inhibitor when used in combination. Other components found in Echinacea, I3 and I4, were also inhibitors of the protease.

  13. Proteases and Protease Inhibitors of Urinary Extracellular Vesicles in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tataruch, Dorota; Gu, Dongfeng; Liu, Xinyu; Forsblom, Carol; Groop, Per-Henrik; Holthofer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus (DM), leads to chronic kidney disease (CKD), and, ultimately, is the main cause for end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Beyond urinary albumin, no reliable biomarkers are available for accurate early diagnostics. Urinary extracellular vesicles (UEVs) have recently emerged as an interesting source of diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers. Here we used a protease and respective protease inhibitor array to profile urines of type 1 diabetes patients at different stages of kidney involvement. Urine samples were divided into groups based on the level of albuminuria and UEVs isolated by hydrostatic dialysis and screened for relative changes of 34 different proteases and 32 protease inhibitors, respectively. Interestingly, myeloblastin and its natural inhibitor elafin showed an increase in the normo- and microalbuminuric groups. Similarly, a characteristic pattern was observed in the array of protease inhibitors, with a marked increase of cystatin B, natural inhibitor of cathepsins L, H, and B as well as of neutrophil gelatinase-associated Lipocalin (NGAL) in the normoalbuminuric group. This study shows for the first time the distinctive alterations in comprehensive protease profiles of UEVs in diabetic nephropathy and uncovers intriguing mechanistic, prognostic, and diagnostic features of kidney damage in diabetes. PMID:25874235

  14. SYBR Green II Dye-Based Real-Time Assay for Measuring Inhibitor Activity Against HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Kokkula, Chakradhar; Palanisamy, Navaneethan; Ericstam, Malin; Lennerstrand, Johan

    2016-10-01

    There are arrays of in vitro assays to quantify the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT). These assays utilize either chemically customized/labelled nucleotides, or TaqMan probes, or radiolabeled nucleotides/primers. Although several real-time PCR assays exist commercially for measuring the RT activity, which are usually used for quantifying the viral titres, these assays are not optimized for measuring the inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of HIV-1 RT inhibitors. Moreover, a recently established inorganic pyrophosphate-coupled enzyme assay cannot be employed for studying nonphosphorylated nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). In the present study, we have developed a novel one-step assay with native nucleotide substrates and SYBR Green II dye to determine IC50 values of triphosphorylated NRTIs against HIV-1 RT. Using exact batches of wild-type and mutant RT, and triphosphorylated NRTIs, we showed that our method gave IC50 values for inhibitors similar to that of an earlier published colorimetric assay with BrdUTP substrate (CABS). Our assay should be suitable for high-throughput screening of antiretroviral drugs and could also be suitable for studying drug resistance profiles. Additionally, we also used our assay to study inhibition by AZT in its nonphosphorylated form by supplementing the reaction mixture with necessary kinases and ATP.

  15. Molecular docking guided structure based design of symmetrical N,N'-disubstituted urea/thiourea as HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Sree Kanth; Vangala, Radhika; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2013-08-01

    Induced fit molecular docking studies were performed on BMS-806 derivatives reported as small molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding. Comprehensive study of protein-ligand interactions guided in identification and design of novel symmetrical N,N'-disubstituted urea and thiourea as HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding inhibitors. These molecules were synthesized in aqueous medium using microwave irradiation. Synthesized molecules were screened for their inhibitory ability by HIV-1 gp120-CD4 capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Designed compounds were found to inhibit HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding in micromolar (0.013-0.247 μM) concentrations.

  16. AMD3100, a small molecule inhibitor of HIV-1 entry via the CXCR4 co-receptor.

    PubMed

    Donzella, G A; Schols, D; Lin, S W; Esté, J A; Nagashima, K A; Maddon, P J; Allaway, G P; Sakmar, T P; Henson, G; De Clercq, E; Moore, J P

    1998-01-01

    The bicyclam AMD3100 (formula weight 830) blocks HIV-1 entry and membrane fusion via the CXCR4 co-receptor, but not via CCR5. AMD3100 prevents monoclonal antibody 12G5 from binding to CXCR4, but has no effect on binding of monoclonal antibody 2D7 to CCR5. It also inhibits binding of the CXC-chemokine, SDF-1alpha, to CXCR4 and subsequent signal transduction, but does not itself cause signaling and has no effect on RANTES signaling via CCR5. Thus, AMD3100 prevents CXCR4 functioning as both a HIV-1 co-receptor and a CXC-chemokine receptor. Development of small molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 entry is feasible.

  17. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Diarylpyridines and Diarylanilines as Potent Non-nucleoside HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xingtao; Qin, Bingjie; Wu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Lu, Hong; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Chen, Chin Ho; Jiang, Shibo; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Xie, Lan

    2010-01-01

    Based on the structures and activities of our previously identified non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), we designed and synthesized two sets of derivatives, diarylpyridines (A) and diarylanilines (B), and tested their anti-HIV-1 activity against infection by HIV-1 NL4-3 and IIIB in TZM-bl and MT-2 cells, respectively. The results showed that most compounds exhibited potent anti-HIV-1 activity with low nanomolar EC50 values, and some of them, such as 13m, 14c, and 14e, displayed high potency with subnanomolar EC50 values, which were more potent than etravirine (TMC125, 1) in the same assays. Notably, these compounds were also highly effective against infection by multi-RTI-resistant strains, suggesting a high potential to further develop these compounds as a novel class of NNRTIs with improved antiviral efficacy and resistance profile. PMID:21049929

  18. In vitro anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activities of transition state mimetic HIV protease inhibitors containing allophenylnorstatine.

    PubMed Central

    Kageyama, S; Mimoto, T; Murakawa, Y; Nomizu, M; Ford, H; Shirasaka, T; Gulnik, S; Erickson, J; Takada, K; Hayashi, H

    1993-01-01

    Transition state mimetic tripeptide human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors containing allophenylnorstatine [(2S,3S)-3-amino-2-hydroxy-4-phenylbutyric acid] were synthesized and tested for activity against HIV in vitro. Two compounds, KNI-227 and KNI-272, which were highly potent against HIV protease with little inhibition of other aspartic proteases, showed the most potent activity against the infectivity and cytopathic effect of a wide spectrum of HIV strains. As tested in target CD4+ ATH8 cells, the 50% inhibitory concentrations of KNI-227 against HIV type 1 LAI (HIV-1LAI), HIV-1RF, HIV-1MN, and HIV-2ROD were 0.1, 0.02, 0.03, and 0.1 microM, respectively, while those of KNI-272 were 0.1, 0.02, 0.04, and 0.1 microM, respectively. Both agents completely blocked the replication of 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine-sensitive and -insensitive clinical HIV-1 isolates at 0.08 microM as tested in target phytohemagglutinin-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The ratios of 50% cytotoxic concentrations to 50% inhibitory concentrations for KNI-227 and KNI-272 were approximately 2,500 and > 4,000, respectively, as assessed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Both compounds blocked the posttranslational cleavage of the p55 precursor protein to generate the mature p24 Gag protein in stably HIV-1-infected cells. The n-octanol-water partition coefficients of KNI-227 and KNI-272 were high, with log Po/w values of 3.79 and 3.56, respectively. Degradation of KNI-227 and KNI-272 in the presence of pepsin (1 mg/ml, pH 2.2) at 37 degrees C for 24 h was negligible. Current data warrant further careful investigations toward possible clinical application of these two novel compounds. Images PMID:8494379

  19. A Lipopeptide HIV-1/2 Fusion Inhibitor with Highly Potent in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo Antiviral Activity.

    PubMed

    Chong, Huihui; Xue, Jing; Xiong, Shengwen; Cong, Zhe; Ding, Xiaohui; Zhu, Yuanmei; Liu, Zixuan; Chen, Ting; Feng, Yifan; He, Lei; Guo, Yan; Wei, Qiang; Zhou, Yusen; Qin, Chuan; He, Yuxian

    2017-03-29

    Peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) region of the HIV-1 fusogenic protein gp41 are potent viral entry inhibitors, and currently enfuvirtide (T-20) is the only one for clinical use; however, emerging drug-resistance largely limits its efficacy. In this study, we generated a novel lipopeptide inhibitor, named LP-19, by integrating multiple design strategies, including an N-terminal M-T hook structure, HIV-2 sequence, intra-helical salt-bridges, and a membrane-anchoring lipid tail. LP-19 showed stable binding affinity and highly potent, broad and long-lasting antiviral activity. In in vitro studies, LP-19 efficiently inhibited HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV-mediated cell fusion, viral entry and infection, and it was highly active against diverse subtypes of primary HIV-1 isolates and inhibitor-resistant mutants. The ex vivo studies demonstrated that LP-19 exhibited dramatically increased anti-HIV activity and extended half-life in rhesus macaques. In short-term monotherapy, LP-19 reduced the viral loads to undetectable levels in acutely and chronically SHIV-infected monkeys. Therefore, this study offers an ideal HIV-1/2 fusion inhibitor for clinical development and emphasizes the importance of the viral fusion step as a drug target.IMPORTANCE The peptide drug T-20 is the only viral fusion inhibitor in clinic, which is used in combination therapy of HIV-1 infection; however, it requires high dosage and easily induces drug-resistance, calling for a new drug with significantly improved pharmaceutical profiles. Here, we have developed a short lipopeptide-based fusion inhibitor termed LP-19, which mainly targets the conserved gp41 pocket site and shows highly potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1, HIV-2 and even SIV isolates. LP-19 exhibits dramatically increased antiviral activity and extended half-life in rhesus macaques, and it has potent therapeutic efficacy in SHIV-infected monkeys, highlighting its high potential as a new viral fusion inhibitor for clinical

  20. Genetic correlates of in vivo viral resistance to indinavir, a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Condra, J H; Holder, D J; Schleif, W A; Blahy, O M; Danovich, R M; Gabryelski, L J; Graham, D J; Laird, D; Quintero, J C; Rhodes, A; Robbins, H L; Roth, E; Shivaprakash, M; Yang, T; Chodakewitz, J A; Deutsch, P J; Leavitt, R Y; Massari, F E; Mellors, J W; Squires, K E; Steigbigel, R T; Teppler, H; Emini, E A

    1996-01-01

    Indinavir (IDV) (also called CRIXIVAN, MK-639, or L-735,524) is a potent and selective inhibitor of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease. During early clinical trials, in which patients initiated therapy with suboptimal dosages of IDV, we monitored the emergence of viral resistance to the inhibitor by genotypic and phenotypic characterization of primary HIV-1 isolates. Development of resistance coincided with variable patterns of multiple substitutions among at least 11 protease amino acid residues. No single substitution was present in all resistant isolates, indicating that resistance evolves through multiple genetic pathways. Despite this complexity, all of 29 resistant isolates tested exhibited alteration of residues M-46 (to I or L) and/or V-82 (to A, F, or T), suggesting that screening of these residues may be useful in predicting the emergence of resistance. We also extended our previous finding that IDV-resistant viral variants exhibit various patterns of cross-resistance to a diverse panel of HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Finally, we noted an association between the number of protease amino acid substitutions and the observed level of IDV resistance. No single substitution or pair of substitutions tested gave rise to measurable viral resistance to IDV. The evolution of this resistance was found to be cumulative, indicating the need for ongoing viral replication in this process. These observations strongly suggest that therapy should be initiated with the most efficacious regimen available, both to suppress viral spread and to inhibit the replication that is required for the evolution of resistance. PMID:8970946

  1. Impaired fitness of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants with high-level resistance to protease inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Croteau, G; Doyon, L; Thibeault, D; McKercher, G; Pilote, L; Lamarre, D

    1997-01-01

    One hope to maintain the benefits of antiviral therapy against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), despite the development of resistance, is the possibility that resistant variants will show decreased viral fitness. To study this possibility, HIV-1 variants showing high-level resistance (up to 1,500-fold) to the substrate analog protease inhibitors BILA 1906 BS and BILA 2185 BS have been characterized. Active-site mutations V32I and I84V/A were consistently observed in the protease of highly resistant viruses, along with up to six other mutations. In vitro studies with recombinant mutant proteases demonstrated that these mutations resulted in up to 10(4)-fold increases in the Ki values toward BILA 1906 BS and BILA 2185 BS and a concomitant 2,200-fold decrease in catalytic efficiency of the enzymes toward a synthetic substrate. When introduced into viral molecular clones, the protease mutations impaired polyprotein processing, consistent with a decrease in enzyme activity in virions. Despite these observations, however, most mutations had little effect on viral replication except when the active-site mutations V32I and I84V/A were coexpressed in the protease. The latter combinations not only conferred a significant growth reduction of viral clones on peripheral blood mononuclear cells but also caused the complete disappearance of mutated clones when cocultured with wild-type virus on T-cell lines. Furthermore, the double nucleotide mutation I84A rapidly reverted to I84V upon drug removal, confirming its impact on viral fitness. Therefore, high-level resistance to protease inhibitors can be associated with impaired viral fitness, suggesting that antiviral therapies with such inhibitors may maintain some clinical benefits. PMID:8995629

  2. Protease inhibitors from several classes work synergistically against Callosobruchus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Amirhusin, Bahagiawati; Shade, Richard E; Koiwa, Hisashi; Hasegawa, Paul M; Bressan, Ray A; Murdock, Larry L; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2007-07-01

    Targeting multiple digestive proteases may be more effective in insect pest control than inhibition of a single enzyme class. We therefore explored possible interactions of three antimetabolic protease inhibitors fed to cowpea bruchids in artificial diets, using a recombinant soybean cysteine protease inhibitor scN, an aspartic protease inhibitor pepstatin A, and soybean Kunitz trypsin inhibitor KI. scN and pepstatin, inhibiting major digestive cysteine and aspartic proteases, respectively, significantly prolonged the developmental time of cowpea bruchids individually. When combined, the anti-insect effect was synergistic, i.e., the toxicity of the mixture was markedly greater than that of scN or pepstatin alone. KI alone did not impact insect development even at relatively high concentrations, but its anti-insect properties became apparent when acting jointly with scN or scN plus pepstatin. Incubating KI with bruchid midgut extract showed that it was partially degraded. This instability may explain its lack of anti-insect activity. However, this proteolytic degradation was inhibited by scN and/or pepstatin. Protection of KI from proteolysis in the insect digestive tract thus could be the basis for the synergistic effect. These observations support the concept that cowpea bruchid gut proteases play a dual role; digesting protein for nutrient needs and protecting insects by inactivating dietary proteins that may otherwise be toxic. Our results also suggest that transgenic resistance strategies that involve multigene products are likely to have enhanced efficacy and durability.

  3. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of chicoric acid analogs as inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Charvat, Trevor T; Lee, Deborah J; Robinson, W Edward; Chamberlin, A Richard

    2006-07-01

    A series of analogs of the potent HIV-1 integrase (HIV IN) inhibitor chicoric acid (CA) was designed with the intention of ameliorating some of the parent natural product's undesirable properties, in particular its toxicity, instability, and poor membrane permeability. More than 70 analogs were synthesized and assayed for three types of activity: (1) the ability to inhibit 3'-end processing and strand transfer reactions using recombinant HIV IN in vitro, (2) toxicity against the CD4+ lymphoblastoid cell line, MT2, and (3) anti-HIV activity against HIV(LAI). CA analogs lacking one of the carboxyl groups of CA and with 3,4,5-trihydroxycinnamoyl sidechains in place of the caffeoyl group of CA exhibited the most potent inhibition of HIV replication and end-processing activity. Galloyl-substituted derivatives also displayed very potent in vitro and in vivo activities, in most cases exceeding the inhibitory effects of CA itself. Conversely, analogous monocarboxy caffeoyl analogs exhibited only modest inhibition, while the corresponding 3,4-dihydroxybenzoyl-substituted compounds were devoid of activity.

  4. Entry inhibitor-based microbicides are active in vitro against HIV-1 isolates from multiple genetic subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Ketas, Thomas J.; Schader, Susan M.; Zurita, Juan; Teo, Esther; Polonis, Victoria; Lu Min; Klasse, Per Johan; Moore, John P. . E-mail: jpm2003@med.cornell.edu

    2007-08-01

    Inhibitors of viral entry are under consideration as topical microbicides to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission. Small molecules targeting HIV-1 gp120 (BMS-378806) or CCR5 (CMPD167), and a peptide fusion inhibitor (C52L), each blocks vaginal infection of macaques by a SHIV. A microbicide, however, must be active against multiple HIV-1 variants. We therefore tested BMS-C (a BMS-378806 derivative), CMPD167, C52L and the CXCR4 ligand AMD3465, alone and in combination, against 25 primary R5, 12 X4 and 7 R5X4 isolates from subtypes A-G. At high concentrations (0.1-1 {mu}M), the replication of most R5 isolates in human donor lymphocytes was inhibited by > 90%. At lower concentrations, double and triple combinations were more effective than individual inhibitors. Similar results were obtained with X4 viruses when AMD3465 was substituted for CMPD167. The R5X4 viruses were inhibited by combining AMD3465 with CMPD167, or by the coreceptor-independent compounds. Thus, combining entry inhibitors may improve microbicide effectiveness.

  5. The complex folding behavior of HIV-1-protease monomer revealed by optical-tweezer single-molecule experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Caldarini, M; Sonar, P; Valpapuram, I; Tavella, D; Volonté, C; Pandini, V; Vanoni, M A; Aliverti, A; Broglia, R A; Tiana, G; Cecconi, C

    2014-12-01

    We have used optical tweezers and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the unfolding and refolding process of a stable monomeric form of HIV-1-protease (PR). We have characterized the behavior under tension of the native state (N), and that of the ensemble of partially folded (PF) conformations the protein visits en route to N, which collectively act as a long-lived state controlling the slow kinetic phase of the folding process. Our results reveal a rich network of unfolding events, where the native state unfolds either in a two-state manner or by populating an intermediate state I, while the PF state unravels through a multitude of pathways, underscoring its structural heterogeneity. Refolding of mechanically denatured HIV-1-PR monomers is also a multiple-pathway process. Molecular dynamics simulations allowed us to gain insight into possible conformations the protein adopts along the unfolding pathways, and provide information regarding possible structural features of the PF state.

  6. Pnserpin: A Novel Serine Protease Inhibitor from Extremophile Pyrobaculum neutrophilum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huan; Fei, Rui; Xue, Baigong; Yu, Shanshan; Zhang, Zuoming; Zhong, Sheng; Gao, Yuanqi; Zhou, Xiaoli

    2017-01-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are native inhibitors of serine proteases, constituting a large protein family with members spread over eukaryotes and prokaryotes. However, only very few prokaryotic serpins, especially from extremophiles, have been characterized to date. In this study, Pnserpin, a putative serine protease inhibitor from the thermophile Pyrobaculum neutrophilum, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli for purification and characterization. It irreversibly inhibits chymotrypsin-, trypsin-, elastase-, and subtilisin-like proteases in a temperature range from 20 to 100 °C in a concentration-dependent manner. The stoichiometry of inhibition (SI) of Pnserpin for proteases decreases as the temperature increases, indicating that the inhibitory activity of Pnserpin increases with the temperature. SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) showed that Pnserpin inhibits proteases by forming a SDS-resistant covalent complex. Homology modeling and molecular dynamic simulations predicted that Pnserpin can form a stable common serpin fold. Results of the present work will help in understanding the structural and functional characteristics of thermophilic serpin and will broaden the current knowledge about serpins from extremophiles. PMID:28067849

  7. d(GGGT)4 and r(GGGU)4 are both HIV-1 inhibitors and interleukin-6 receptor aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Magbanua, Eileen; Zivkovic, Tijana; Hansen, Björn; Beschorner, Niklas; Meyer, Cindy; Lorenzen, Inken; Grötzinger, Joachim; Hauber, Joachim; Torda, Andrew E.; Mayer, Günter; Rose-John, Stefan; Hahn, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Aptamers are oligonucleotides that bind targets with high specificity and affinity. They have become important tools for biosensing, target detection, drug delivery and therapy. We selected the quadruplex-forming 16-mer DNA aptamer AID-1 [d(GGGT)4] with affinity for the interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) and identified single nucleotide variants that showed no significant loss of binding ability. The RNA counterpart of AID-1 [r(GGGU)4] also bound IL-6R as quadruplex structure. AID-1 is identical to the well-known HIV inhibitor T30923, which inhibits both HIV infection and HIV-1 integrase. We also demonstrated that IL-6R specific RNA aptamers not only bind HIV-1 integrase and inhibit its 3′ processing activity in vitro, but also are capable of preventing HIV de novo infection with the same efficacy as the established inhibitor T30175. All these aptamer target interactions are highly dependent on formation of quadruplex structure. PMID:23235494

  8. Discovery of diarylpyridine derivatives as novel non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xingtao; Qin, Bingjie; Lu, Hong; Lai, Weihong; Jiang, Shibo; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Ho Chen, Chin; Xie, Lan

    2009-01-01

    Two series (4 and 5) of diarylpyridine derivatives were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for anti-HIV-1 activity. The most promising compound, 5e, inhibited HIV-1 IIIB, NL4-3, and RTMDR1 with low nanomolar EC50 values and selectivity indexes of >10,000. The results of this study indicate that diarylpyridine can be used as a novel scaffold to derive a new class of potent NNRTIs, active against both wild-type and drug resistant HIV-1 strains. PMID:19666220

  9. New therapeutic strategies in HCV: second-generation protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Clark, Virginia C; Peter, Joy A; Nelson, David R

    2013-02-01

    Telaprevir and boceprevir are the first direct-acting antiviral agents approved for use in HCV treatment and represent a significant advance in HCV therapy. However, these first-generation drugs also have significant limitations related to thrice-daily dosing, clinically challenging side-effect profiles, low barriers to resistance and a lack of pan-genotype activity. A second wave of protease inhibitors are in phase II and III trials and promise to provide a drug regimen with a better dosing schedule and improved tolerance. These second-wave protease inhibitors will probably be approved in combination with PEG-IFN and Ribavirin (RBV), as well as future all-oral regimens. The true second-generation protease inhibitors are in earlier stages of development and efficacy data are anxiously awaited as they may provide pan-genotypic antiviral activity and a high genetic barrier to resistance.

  10. Prevalence of Transmitted Drug-Resistance Mutations and Polymorphisms in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase, Protease, and gp41 Sequences Among Recent Seroconverters in Southern Poland

    PubMed Central

    Smoleń-Dzirba, Joanna; Rosińska, Magdalena; Kruszyński, Piotr; Bratosiewicz-Wąsik, Jolanta; Wojtyczka, Robert; Janiec, Janusz; Szetela, Bartosz; Beniowski, Marek; Bociąga-Jasik, Monika; Jabłonowska, Elżbieta; Wąsik, Tomasz J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Monitoring of drug resistance-related mutations among patients with recent HIV-1 infection offers an opportunity to describe current patterns of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations. Material/Methods Of 298 individuals newly diagnosed from March 2008 to February 2014 in southern Poland, 47 were deemed to have recent HIV-1 infection by the limiting antigen avidity immunoassay. Proviral DNA was amplified and sequenced in the reverse transcriptase, protease, and gp41 coding regions. Mutations were interpreted according to the Stanford Database algorithm and/or the International Antiviral Society USA guidelines. TDR mutations were defined according to the WHO surveillance list. Results Among 47 patients with recent HIV-1 infection only 1 (2%) had evidence of TDR mutation. No major resistance mutations were found, but the frequency of strains with ≥1 accessory resistance-associated mutations was high, at 98%. Accessory mutations were present in 11% of reverse transcriptase, 96% of protease, and 27% of gp41 sequences. Mean number of accessory resistance mutations in the reverse transcriptase and protease sequences was higher in viruses with no compensatory mutations in the gp41 HR2 domain than in strains with such mutations (p=0.031). Conclusions Despite the low prevalence of strains with TDR mutations, the frequency of accessory mutations was considerable, which may reflect the history of drug pressure among transmitters or natural viral genetic diversity, and may be relevant for future clinical outcomes. The accumulation of the accessory resistance mutations within the pol gene may restrict the occurrence of compensatory mutations related to enfuvirtide resistance or vice versa. PMID:28167814

  11. Prevalence of Transmitted Drug-Resistance Mutations and Polymorphisms in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase, Protease, and gp41 Sequences Among Recent Seroconverters in Southern Poland.

    PubMed

    Smoleń-Dzirba, Joanna; Rosińska, Magdalena; Kruszyński, Piotr; Bratosiewicz-Wąsik, Jolanta; Wojtyczka, Robert; Janiec, Janusz; Szetela, Bartosz; Beniowski, Marek; Bociąga-Jasik, Monika; Jabłonowska, Elżbieta; Wąsik, Tomasz J; The Cascade Collaboration In EuroCoord, And

    2017-02-07

    BACKGROUND Monitoring of drug resistance-related mutations among patients with recent HIV-1 infection offers an opportunity to describe current patterns of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations. MATERIAL AND METHODS Of 298 individuals newly diagnosed from March 2008 to February 2014 in southern Poland, 47 were deemed to have recent HIV-1 infection by the limiting antigen avidity immunoassay. Proviral DNA was amplified and sequenced in the reverse transcriptase, protease, and gp41 coding regions. Mutations were interpreted according to the Stanford Database algorithm and/or the International Antiviral Society USA guidelines. TDR mutations were defined according to the WHO surveillance list. RESULTS Among 47 patients with recent HIV-1 infection only 1 (2%) had evidence of TDR mutation. No major resistance mutations were found, but the frequency of strains with ≥1 accessory resistance-associated mutations was high, at 98%. Accessory mutations were present in 11% of reverse transcriptase, 96% of protease, and 27% of gp41 sequences. Mean number of accessory resistance mutations in the reverse transcriptase and protease sequences was higher in viruses with no compensatory mutations in the gp41 HR2 domain than in strains with such mutations (p=0.031). CONCLUSIONS Despite the low prevalence of strains with TDR mutations, the frequency of accessory mutations was considerable, which may reflect the history of drug pressure among transmitters or natural viral genetic diversity, and may be relevant for future clinical outcomes. The accumulation of the accessory resistance mutations within the pol gene may restrict the occurrence of compensatory mutations related to enfuvirtide resistance or vice versa.

  12. Structure-Activity Relationships of Synthetic Coumarins as HIV-1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kostova, I.; Raleva, S.; Genova, P.; Argirova, R.

    2006-01-01

    HIV/AIDS pandemics is a serious threat to health and development of mankind, and searching for effective anti-HIV agents remains actual. Considerable progress has been made in recent years in the field of drug development against HIV. A lot of structurally different coumarins were found to display potent anti-HIV activity. The current review demonstrates the variety of synthetic coumarins having unique mechanism of action referring to the different stages of HIV replication. Recent studies based on the account of various synthetic coumarins seem to indicate that some of them serve as potent non-nucleoside RT-inhibitors, another as inhibitors of HIV-integrase or HIV-protease. The merits of selecting potential anti-HIV agents to be used in rational combination drugs design and structure-activity relationships are discussed.The scientific community is looking actively for new drugs and combinations for treatment of HIV infection effective for first-line treatment, as well as against resistant mutants. The investigation on chemical anti-HIV agents gives hope and optimism about it. This review article describes recent progress in the discovery, structure modification, and structure-activity relationship studies of potent anti-HIV coumarin derivatives. PMID:17497014

  13. The L76V Drug Resistance Mutation Decreases the Dimer Stability and Rate of Autoprocessing of HIV-1 Protease by Reducing Internal Hydrophobic Contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, John M.; Zhang, Ying; Sayer, Jane M.; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2011-09-06

    The mature HIV-1 protease (PR) bearing the L76V drug resistance mutation (PR{sub L76V}) is significantly less stable, with a >7-fold higher dimer dissociation constant (K{sub d}) of 71 {+-} 24 nM and twice the sensitivity to urea denaturation (UC{sub 50} = 0.85 M) relative to those of PR. Differential scanning calorimetry showed decreases in T{sub m} of 12 C for PR{sub L76V} in the absence of inhibitors and 5-7 C in the presence of inhibitors darunavir (DRV), saquinavir (SQV), and lopinavir (LPV), relative to that of PR. Isothermal titration calorimetry gave a ligand dissociation constant of 0.8 nM for DRV, {approx}160-fold higher than that of PR, consistent with DRV resistance. Crystal structures of PR{sub L76V} in complexes with DRV and SQV were determined at resolutions of 1.45-1.46 {angstrom}. Compared to the corresponding PR complexes, the mutated Val76 lacks hydrophobic interactions with Asp30, Lys45, Ile47, and Thr74 and exhibits closer interactions with Val32 and Val56. The bound DRV lacks one hydrogen bond with the main chain of Asp30 in PR{sub L76V} relative to PR, possibly accounting for the resistance to DRV. SQV shows slightly improved polar interactions with PR{sub L76V} compared to those with PR. Although the L76V mutation significantly slows the N-terminal autoprocessing of the precursor TFR-PR{sub L76V} to give rise to the mature PR{sub L76V}, the coselected M46I mutation counteracts the effect by enhancing this rate but renders the TFR-PRM46I/L76V precursor less responsive to inhibition by 6 {micro}M LPV while preserving inhibition by SQV and DRV. The correlation of lowered stability, higher K{sub d}, and impaired autoprocessing with reduced internal hydrophobic contacts suggests a novel molecular mechanism for drug resistance.

  14. Differential responses of human hepatocytes to the non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor nevirapine.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jia-Long; Beland, Frederick A

    2013-01-01

    Nevirapine is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor used for the treatment of AIDS and the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1. Despite its therapeutic benefits, treatment with nevirapine has been associated with significant incidences of liver and dermal toxicity. The present study examined the effects of nevirapine on cell growth and death in human hepatocyte HepG2 cells and THLE2 cells and the possible pathways involved in these effects. The concentrations of nevirapine inhibiting 50% cell growth were similar for both cell lines. Nevirapine (0-250 µM) treatment caused a slight increase in the amount of lactate dehydrogenase released into the medium. Apoptotic cell death did not contribute to the decrease in viable cells. Exposing of HepG2 cells to nevirapine caused G2/M phase arrest, and the activity of senescence-associated β-galactosidase was not altered. In THLE2 cells, the percentage of cells in G1/G0 phase was increased and cellular senescence was induced in a concentration-dependent manner. Endogenous non-telomeric RT activity was not detected in either cell line. Western blot analysis indicated lower levels of p53 and phospho-p53 (ser15) in HepG2 cells as compared to THLE2 cells; no significant changes in p53 or phospho-p53 (ser15) were noted with nevirapine treatment. These data demonstrate that nevirapine inhibits cell growth, induces cell cycle arrest at different phases, and has different effects on cellular senescence in HepG2 cells and THLE2 cells. The differential responses appear to be related to differences in the basal levels of p53 in the HepG2 cells and THLE2 cells.

  15. Variable selection based QSAR modeling on Bisphenylbenzimidazole as Inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Surendra; Tiwari, Meena

    2013-11-01

    The emergence of mutant virus in drug therapy for HIV-1 infection has steadily risen in the last decade. Inhibition of reverse transcriptase enzyme has emerged as a novel target for the treatment of HIV infection. The aim to decipher the structural features that interact with receptor, we report a quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) study on a dataset of thirty seven compounds belonging to bisphenylbenzimidazoles (BPBIs) as reverse transcriptase inhibitors using enhanced replacement method (ERM), stepwise multiple linear regression (Stepwise-MLR) and genetic function approximation (GFA) method for selecting a subset of relevant descriptors, developing the best multiple linear regression model and defining the QSAR model applicability domain boundaries. The enhanced replacement method was found to give better results r²=0.8542, Q²(loo) = 0.7917, r²pred = 0.7812) at five variables as compared to stepwise MLR and GFA method, evidenced by internal and external validation parameters. The modified r² (r²m) of the training set, test set and whole data set were calculated and are in agreement with the enhanced replacement method. The results of QSAR study rationalize the structural requirement for optimum binding of ligands. The developed QSAR model shows that hydrophobicity, flexibility, three dimensional surface area, volume and shape of molecule are important parameters to be considered for designing new compounds and to decipher reverse transcriptase enzyme inhibition activity of these compounds at molecular level. The applicability domain was defined to find the similar analogs with better prediction power.

  16. Activity of the HIV-1 Attachment Inhibitor BMS-626529, the Active Component of the Prodrug BMS-663068, against CD4-Independent Viruses and HIV-1 Envelopes Resistant to Other Entry Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhufang; Zhou, Nannan; Sun, Yongnian; Ray, Neelanjana; Lataillade, Max; Hanna, George J.

    2013-01-01

    BMS-626529 is a novel small-molecule HIV-1 attachment inhibitor active against both CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic viruses. BMS-626529 functions by preventing gp120 from binding to CD4. A prodrug of this compound, BMS-663068, is currently in clinical development. As a theoretical resistance pathway to BMS-663068 could be the development of a CD4-independent phenotype, we examined the activity of BMS-626529 against CD4-independent viruses and investigated whether resistance to BMS-626529 could be associated with a CD4-independent phenotype. Finally, we evaluated whether cross-resistance exists between BMS-626529 and other HIV-1 entry inhibitors. Two laboratory-derived envelopes with a CD4-independent phenotype (one CXCR4 tropic and one CCR5 tropic), five envelopes from clinical isolates with preexisting BMS-626529 resistance, and several site-specific mutant BMS-626529-resistant envelopes were examined for their dependence on CD4 for infectivity or susceptibility to BMS-626529. Viruses resistant to other entry inhibitors (enfuvirtide, maraviroc, and ibalizumab) were also examined for susceptibility to BMS-626529. Both CD4-independent laboratory isolates retained sensitivity to BMS-626529 in CD4− cells, while HIV-1 envelopes from viruses resistant to BMS-626529 exhibited no evidence of a CD4-independent phenotype. BMS-626529 also exhibited inhibitory activity against ibalizumab- and enfuvirtide-resistant envelopes. While there appeared to be some association between maraviroc resistance and reduced susceptibility to BMS-626529, an absolute correlation cannot be presumed, since some CCR5-tropic maraviroc-resistant envelopes remained sensitive to BMS-626529. Clinical use of the prodrug BMS-663068 is unlikely to promote resistance via generation of CD4-independent virus. No cross-resistance between BMS-626529 and other HIV entry inhibitors was observed, which could allow for sequential or concurrent use with different classes of entry inhibitors. PMID:23774428

  17. Activity of the HIV-1 attachment inhibitor BMS-626529, the active component of the prodrug BMS-663068, against CD4-independent viruses and HIV-1 envelopes resistant to other entry inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhufang; Zhou, Nannan; Sun, Yongnian; Ray, Neelanjana; Lataillade, Max; Hanna, George J; Krystal, Mark

    2013-09-01

    BMS-626529 is a novel small-molecule HIV-1 attachment inhibitor active against both CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic viruses. BMS-626529 functions by preventing gp120 from binding to CD4. A prodrug of this compound, BMS-663068, is currently in clinical development. As a theoretical resistance pathway to BMS-663068 could be the development of a CD4-independent phenotype, we examined the activity of BMS-626529 against CD4-independent viruses and investigated whether resistance to BMS-626529 could be associated with a CD4-independent phenotype. Finally, we evaluated whether cross-resistance exists between BMS-626529 and other HIV-1 entry inhibitors. Two laboratory-derived envelopes with a CD4-independent phenotype (one CXCR4 tropic and one CCR5 tropic), five envelopes from clinical isolates with preexisting BMS-626529 resistance, and several site-specific mutant BMS-626529-resistant envelopes were examined for their dependence on CD4 for infectivity or susceptibility to BMS-626529. Viruses resistant to other entry inhibitors (enfuvirtide, maraviroc, and ibalizumab) were also examined for susceptibility to BMS-626529. Both CD4-independent laboratory isolates retained sensitivity to BMS-626529 in CD4(-) cells, while HIV-1 envelopes from viruses resistant to BMS-626529 exhibited no evidence of a CD4-independent phenotype. BMS-626529 also exhibited inhibitory activity against ibalizumab- and enfuvirtide-resistant envelopes. While there appeared to be some association between maraviroc resistance and reduced susceptibility to BMS-626529, an absolute correlation cannot be presumed, since some CCR5-tropic maraviroc-resistant envelopes remained sensitive to BMS-626529. Clinical use of the prodrug BMS-663068 is unlikely to promote resistance via generation of CD4-independent virus. No cross-resistance between BMS-626529 and other HIV entry inhibitors was observed, which could allow for sequential or concurrent use with different classes of entry inhibitors.

  18. Protease inhibitor from Moringa oleifera with potential for use as therapeutic drug and as seafood preservative

    PubMed Central

    Bijina, B.; Chellappan, Sreeja; Krishna, Jissa G.; Basheer, Soorej M.; Elyas, K.K.; Bahkali, Ali H.; Chandrasekaran, M.

    2011-01-01

    Protease inhibitors are well known to have several applications in medicine and biotechnology. Several plant sources are known to return potential protease inhibitors. In this study plants belonging to different families of Leguminosae, Malvaceae, Rutaceae, Graminae and Moringaceae were screened for the protease inhibitor. Among them Moringa oleifera, belonging to the family Moringaceae, recorded high level of protease inhibitor activity after ammonium sulfate fractionation. M. oleifera, which grows throughout most of the tropics and having several industrial and medicinal uses, was selected as a source of protease inhibitor since so far no reports were made on isolation of the protease inhibitor. Among the different parts of M. oleifera tested, the crude extract isolated from the mature leaves and seeds showed the highest level of inhibition against trypsin. Among the various extraction media evaluated, the crude extract prepared in phosphate buffer showed maximum recovery of the protease inhibitor. The protease inhibitor recorded high inhibitory activity toward the serine proteases thrombin, elastase, chymotrypsin and the cysteine proteases cathepsin B and papain which have more importance in pharmaceutical industry. The protease inhibitor also showed complete inhibition of activities of the commercially available proteases of Bacillus licheniformis and Aspergillus oryzae. However, inhibitory activities toward subtilisin, esperase, pronase E and proteinase K were negligible. Further, it was found that the protease inhibitor could prevent proteolysis in a commercially valuable shrimp Penaeus monodon during storage indicating the scope for its application as a seafood preservative. This is the first report on isolation of a protease inhibitor from M. oleifera. PMID:23961135

  19. Investigation on the mechanism for the binding and drug resistance of wild type and mutations of G86 residue in HIV-1 protease complexed with Darunavir by molecular dynamic simulation and free energy calculation.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Run-Ning; Fan, Song; Han, Ju-Guang

    2014-02-01

    Residue Gly86 is considered as the highly conversed residue in the HIV-1 protease. In our work, the detailed binding free energies for the wild-type (WT) and mutated proteases binding to the TMC-114 are estimated to investigate the protein-inhibitor binding and drug resistance mechanism by molecule dynamic simulations and molecular mechanics Poisson Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method. The binding affinities between the mutants and inhibitor are different than that in the wild-type complex and the major resistance to Darunavir (DRV) of G86A and G86S originate from the electrostatic energy and entropy, respectively. Furthermore, free energy decomposition analysis for the WT and mutated complexes on the basis of per-residue indicates that the mutagenesis influences the energy contribution of the residue located at three regions: active site region (residue 24-32), the flap region, and the region around the mutated residue G86 (residue 79-88), especially the flap region. Finally, further hydrogen bonds and structure analysis are carried out to detect the relationship between the energy and conformation. In all, the G86 mutations change the flap region's conformation. The experimental results are in good agreement with available results.

  20. Detection of Legume Protease Inhibitors by the Gel-X-ray Film Contact Print Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulimani, Veerappa H.; Sudheendra, Kulkarni; Giri, Ashok P.

    2002-01-01

    Redgram (Cajanus cajan L.) extracts have been analyzed for the protease inhibitors using a new, sensitive, simple, and rapid method for detection of electrophoretically separated protease inhibitors. The detection involves equilibrating the gel successively in the protease assay buffer and protease solution, rinsing the gel in assay buffer, and…

  1. HIV-protease inhibitors block the replication of both vesicular stomatitis and influenza viruses at an early post-entry replication step

    SciTech Connect

    Federico, Maurizio

    2011-08-15

    The inhibitors of HIV-1 protease (PIs) have been designed to block the activity of the viral aspartyl-protease. However, it is now accepted that this family of inhibitors can also affect the activity of cell proteases. Since the replication of many virus species requires the activity of host cell proteases, investigating the effects of PIs on the life cycle of viruses other than HIV would be of interest. Here, the potent inhibition induced by saquinavir and nelfinavir on the replication of both vesicular stomatitis and influenza viruses is described. These are unrelated enveloped RNA viruses infecting target cells upon endocytosis and intracellular fusion. The PI-induced inhibition was apparently a consequence of a block at the level of the fusion between viral envelope and endosomal membranes. These findings would open the way towards the therapeutic use of PIs against enveloped RNA viruses other than HIV.

  2. Guanylate Binding Protein (GBP) 5 Is an Interferon-Inducible Inhibitor of HIV-1 Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Krapp, Christian; Hotter, Dominik; Gawanbacht, Ali; McLaren, Paul J; Kluge, Silvia F; Stürzel, Christina M; Mack, Katharina; Reith, Elisabeth; Engelhart, Susanne; Ciuffi, Angela; Hornung, Veit; Sauter, Daniel; Telenti, Amalio; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2016-04-13

    Guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are an interferon (IFN)-inducible subfamily of guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) with well-established activity against intracellular bacteria and parasites. Here we show that GBP5 potently restricts HIV-1 and other retroviruses. GBP5 is expressed in the primary target cells of HIV-1, where it impairs viral infectivity by interfering with the processing and virion incorporation of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). GBP5 levels in macrophages determine and inversely correlate with infectious HIV-1 yield over several orders of magnitude, which may explain the high donor variability in macrophage susceptibility to HIV. Antiviral activity requires Golgi localization of GBP5, but not its GTPase activity. Start codon mutations in the accessory vpu gene from macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strains conferred partial resistance to GBP5 inhibition by increasing Env expression. Our results identify GBP5 as an antiviral effector of the IFN response and may explain the increased frequency of defective vpu genes in primary HIV-1 strains.

  3. A novel serine protease inhibitor from Bungarus fasciatus venom.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jia; Yang, Hailong; Yu, Haining; Gao, Weikai; Lai, Ren; Liu, Jingze; Liang, Xingcai

    2008-03-01

    By Sephadex G-50 gel filtration, cation-exchange CM-Sephadex C-25 chromatography and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), a novel serine protease inhibitor named bungaruskunin was purified and characterized from venom of Bungarus fasciatus. Its cDNA was also cloned from the cDNA library of B. fasciatus venomous glands. The predicted precursor is composed of 83 amino acid (aa) residues including a 24-aa signal peptide and a 59-aa mature bungaruskunin. Bungaruskunin showed maximal similarity (64%) with the predicted serine protease inhibitor blackelin deduced from the cDNA sequence of the red-bellied black snake Pseudechis porphyriacus. Bungaruskunin is a Kunitz protease inhibitor with a conserved Kunitz domain and could exert inhibitory activity against trypsin, chymotrypsin, and elastase. By screening the cDNA library, two new B chains of beta-bungarotoxin are also identified. The overall structures of bungaruskunin and beta-bungarotoxin B chains are similar; especially they have highly conserved signal peptide sequences. These findings strongly suggest that snake Kunitz/BPTI protease inhibitors and neurotoxic homologs may have originated from a common ancestor.

  4. Protease inhibitors interfere with the necessary factors of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Troll, W

    1989-05-01

    Many tumor promoters are inflammatory agents that stimulate the formation of oxygen radicals (.O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in phagocytic neutrophils. The neutrophils use the oxygen radicals to kill bacteria, which are recognized by the cell membrane of phagocytic cells causing a signal to mount the oxygen response. The tumor promoter isolated from croton oil, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), mimics the signal, causing an oxygen radical release that is intended to kill bacteria; instead, it injures cells in the host. Oxygen radicals cause single strand breaks in DNA and modify DNA bases. These damaging reactions appear to be related to tumor promotion, as three types of chemopreventive agents, retinoids, onion oil, and protease inhibitors, suppress the induction of oxygen radicals in phagocytic neutrophils and suppress tumor promotion in skin cancer in mice. Protease inhibitors also suppress breast and colon cancers in mice. Protease inhibitors capable of inhibiting chymotrypsin show a greater suppression of the oxygen effect and are better suppressors of tumor promotion. In addition, oxygen radicals may be one of the many agents that cause activation of oncogenes. Since retinoids and protease inhibitors suppress the expression of the ras oncogene in NIH 3T3 cells, NIH 3T3 cells may serve as a relatively facile model for finding and measuring chemopreventive agents that interfere with the carcinogenic process.

  5. Proteases.

    PubMed

    Barrett, A J

    2001-05-01

    The processes of growth and remodeling of cells and tissues in multicellular organisms require the breakdown of old protein molecules, in concert with the synthesis of new ones. For example, many newly-synthesized molecules require proteolytic processing to convert them to biologically active forms. Proteolysis can terminate the activity of a protein--e.g., capsases mediate apoptosis, which is a vital step in the life cycle of the cell. Proteolysis contributes to defense systems too, as the recognition of peptide fragments of foreign proteins triggers the immune response. Proteases are the class of enzymes involved in these important reactions. This unit discusses the general categories of proteases, and sets the stage for addition of overview units on cysteine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases, as well as protocol units featuring techniques for analyzing mammalian and yeast proteasomes and protease inhibitors, among other topics.

  6. Antiviral Activity of Bictegravir (GS-9883), a Novel Potent HIV-1 Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitor with an Improved Resistance Profile

    PubMed Central

    Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg S.; Goldsmith, Joshua; Mulato, Andrew; Hansen, Derek; Kan, Elaine; Tsai, Luong; Bam, Rujuta A.; Stepan, George; Stray, Kirsten M.; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Yant, Stephen R.; Yu, Helen; Kukolj, George; Cihlar, Tomas; Lazerwith, Scott E.; Jin, Haolun

    2016-01-01

    Bictegravir (BIC; GS-9883), a novel, potent, once-daily, unboosted inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase (IN), specifically targets IN strand transfer activity (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 7.5 ± 0.3 nM) and HIV-1 integration in cells. BIC exhibits potent and selective in vitro antiretroviral activity in both T-cell lines and primary human T lymphocytes, with 50% effective concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 2.4 nM and selectivity indices up to 8,700 relative to cytotoxicity. BIC exhibits synergistic in vitro antiviral effects in pairwise combinations with tenofovir alafenamide, emtricitabine, or darunavir and maintains potent antiviral activity against HIV-1 variants resistant to other classes of antiretrovirals. BIC displayed an in vitro resistance profile that was markedly improved compared to the integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) raltegravir (RAL) and elvitegravir (EVG), and comparable to that of dolutegravir (DTG), against nine INSTI-resistant site-directed HIV-1 mutants. BIC displayed statistically improved antiviral activity relative to EVG, RAL, and DTG against a panel of 47 patient-derived HIV-1 isolates with high-level INSTI resistance; 13 of 47 tested isolates exhibited >2-fold lower resistance to BIC than DTG. In dose-escalation experiments conducted in vitro, BIC and DTG exhibited higher barriers to resistance than EVG, selecting for HIV-1 variants with reduced phenotypic susceptibility at days 71, 87, and 20, respectively. A recombinant virus with the BIC-selected M50I/R263K dual mutations in IN exhibited only 2.8-fold reduced susceptibility to BIC compared to wild-type virus. All BIC-selected variants exhibited low to intermediate levels of cross-resistance to RAL, DTG, and EVG (<8-fold) but remained susceptible to other classes of antiretrovirals. A high barrier to in vitro resistance emergence for both BIC and DTG was also observed in viral breakthrough studies in the presence of constant clinically relevant drug concentrations. The

  7. Antibacterial, anti-HIV-1 protease and cytotoxic activities of aqueous ethanolic extracts from Combretum adenogonium Steud. Ex A. Rich (Combretaceae)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Records have shown that Combretum adenogonium Steud. Ex A. Rich (Combretaceae) is used in traditional medicine systems of several tribes in Tanzania. This study focused on the investigation of antibacterial activity, anti-HIV-1 protease activity, toxicity properties and classes of phytochemicals in extracts from C. adenogonium Steud. Ex A. Rich (Combretaceae) to evaluate potential of these extracts for development as herbal remedies. Methods Dried plant material were ground to fine powder and extracted using 80% aqueous ethanol to afford root, leaf and stem bark extracts. The extracts were assayed for anti-HIV-1 protease activities, antibacterial activities using microdilution methods and cytotoxicity using brine shrimps lethality assay. Screening for major phytochemical classes was carried out using standard chemical tests. Results All extracts exhibited antibacterial activity to at least one of the test bacteria with MIC-values ranging from 0.31-5.0 mg/ml. Two extracts, namely, root and stem bark exhibited anti-HIV-1 PR activity with IC50 values of 24.7 and 26.5 μg/ml, respectively. Stem bark and leaf extracts showed mild toxicity with LC50 values of 65.768 μg/ml and 76.965 μg/ml, respectively, whereas roots were relatively non-toxic (LC50 = 110.042 μg/ml). Phytochemical screening of the extracts indicated presence of flavonoids, terpenoids, alkaloids, tannins, glycosides and saponins. Conclusion These results provide promising baseline information for the potential development of C. adenogonium extracts in treatment of bacterial and HIV/AIDS-related opportunistic infections. PMID:23013240

  8. Tropism-independent protection of macaques against vaginal transmission of three SHIVs by the HIV-1 fusion inhibitor T-1249.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Ronald S; Ketas, Thomas A; Klasse, Per Johan; Davison, Donna K; Singletary, Morgan; Green, Linda C; Greenberg, Michael L; Moore, John P

    2008-07-29

    We have assessed the potential of the fusion inhibitory peptide T-1249 for development as a vaginal microbicide to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission. When formulated as a simple gel, T-1249 provided dose-dependent protection to macaques against high-dose challenge with three different SHIVs that used either CCR5 or CXCR4 for infection (the R5 virus SHIV-162P3, the X4 virus SHIV-KU1 and the R5X4 virus SHIV-89.6P), and it also protected against SIVmac251 (R5). Protection of half of the test animals was estimated by interpolation to occur at T-1249 concentrations of approximately 40-130 muM, whereas complete protection was observed at 0.1-2 mM. In vitro, T-1249 had substantial breadth of activity against HIV-1 strains from multiple genetic subtypes and in a coreceptor-independent manner. Thus, at 1 muM in a peripheral blood mononuclear cell-based replication assay, T-1249 inhibited all 29 R5 viruses, all 12 X4 viruses and all 7 R5X4 viruses in the test panel, irrespective of their genetic subtype. Combining lower concentrations of T-1249 with other entry inhibitors (CMPD-167, BMS-C, or AMD3465) increased the proportion of test viruses that could be blocked. In the PhenoSense assay, T-1249 was active against 636 different HIV-1 Env-pseudotyped viruses of varying tropism and derived from clinical samples, with IC(50) values typically clustered in a 10-fold range approximately 10 nM. Overall, these results support the concept of using T-1249 as a component of an entry inhibitor-based combination microbicide to prevent the sexual transmission of diverse HIV-1 variants.

  9. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki

    2015-10-23

    The structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å in space group P321. Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2–β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol.

  10. Conformational analysis of nevirapine, a non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor, based on quantum mechanical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannongbua, Supa; Prasithichokekul, Sirikanok; Pungpo, Pornpan

    2001-11-01

    The structure and the conformational behavior of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor, 11-cyclopropyl-5,11-dihydro-4-methyl-6H-dipyrido[3,2-b2',3'-e][1,4]diazepin-6-one (nevirapine), is investigated by semiempirical (MNDO, AM1 and PM3) method, ab initio at the HF/3-21G and HF/6-31G** levels and density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. The fully optimized structure and rotational potential of the nitrogen and carbon bond in the cyclopropyl ring were examined in detail. A similar geometrical minimum is obtained from all methods which shows an almost identical structure to the geometry of the molecule in the complex structure with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. To get some information on the structure in solution, NMR chemical shift calculations were also performed by a density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31G** level, using GIAO approximation. The calculated 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR spectra for the energy minimum geometry agree well with the experimental results, which indicated that the geometry of nevirapine in solution is very similar to that of the molecule in the inhibition complex. Furthermore, the obtained results are compared to the conformational studies of other non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and reveal a common agreement of the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The specific butterfly-like shape and conformational flexibility within the side chain of the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors play an important role inducing conformational change of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase structure and are essential for the association at the inhibition pocket.

  11. Bioavailable inhibitors of HIV-1 RNA biogenesis identified through a Rev-based screen.

    PubMed

    Prado, Silvia; Beltrán, Manuela; Coiras, Mayte; Bedoya, Luis M; Alcamí, José; Gallego, José

    2016-05-01

    New antiretroviral agents with alternative mechanisms are needed to complement the combination therapies used to treat HIV-1 infections. Here we report the identification of bioavailable molecules that interfere with the gene expression processes of HIV-1. The compounds were detected by screening a small library of FDA-approved drugs with an assay based on measuring the displacement of Rev, and essential virus-encoded protein, from its high-affinity RNA binding site. The antiretroviral activity of two hits was based on interference with post-integration steps of the HIV-1 cycle. Both hits inhibited RRE-Rev complex formation in vitro, and blocked LTR-dependent gene expression and viral transcription in cellular assays. The best compound altered the splicing pattern of HIV-1 transcripts in a manner consistent with Rev inhibition. This mechanism of action is different from those used by current antiretroviral agents. The screening hits recognized the Rev binding site in the viral RNA, and the best compound did so with substantial selectivity, allowing the identification of a new RNA-binding scaffold. These results may be used for developing novel antiretroviral drugs.

  12. Proteases of Stored Product Insects and Their Inhibition by Specific Protease Inhibitors from Soybeans and Wheat Grain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-16

    Tenebria molitor MIDGUT PROTEASES; LOCUST CAECAL PROTEASES; BOWMAN-BIRK TRYPSIN-CHMOTRYPSIN INHIBITOR (SOYBEANS) CHICKPEAS TRYPSIN-CHYMOTRYPSIN...and Kunitz (STI) from soybeans, CI from chickpeas , chicken ovomucoid and turkey ovomucoid. It was Jnactivated by phenylemthvsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF...soybeans and Cl from chickpeas , by chicken ovomucoid and turkey overmucoid, as well as by the Kunitz (STI) soybean trypsin inhibitor that hardly

  13. Residues in the gp41 Ectodomain Regulate HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Conformational Transitions Induced by gp120-Directed Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Beatriz; Alsahafi, Nirmin; Debbeche, Olfa; Prévost, Jérémie; Ding, Shilei; Chapleau, Jean-Philippe; Herschhorn, Alon; Madani, Navid; Princiotto, Amy; Melillo, Bruno; Gu, Christopher; Zeng, Xin; Mao, Youdong; Smith, Amos B; Sodroski, Joseph; Finzi, Andrés

    2017-03-01

    Interactions between the gp120 and gp41 subunits of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer maintain the metastable unliganded form of the viral spike. Binding of gp120 to the receptor, CD4, changes the Env conformation to promote gp120 interaction with the second receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4. CD4 binding also induces the transformation of Env into the prehairpin intermediate, in which the gp41 heptad repeat 1 (HR1) coiled coil is assembled at the trimer axis. In nature, HIV-1 Envs must balance the requirements to maintain the noncovalent association of gp120 with gp41 and to evade the host antibody response with the need to respond to CD4 binding. Here we show that the gp41 HR1 region contributes to gp120 association with the unliganded Env trimer. Changes in particular amino acid residues in the gp41 HR1 region decreased the efficiency with which Env moved from the unliganded state. Thus, these gp41 changes decreased the sensitivity of HIV-1 to cold inactivation and ligands that require Env conformational changes to bind efficiently. Conversely, these gp41 changes increased HIV-1 sensitivity to small-molecule entry inhibitors that block Env conformational changes induced by CD4. Changes in particular gp41 HR1 amino acid residues can apparently affect the relative stability of the unliganded state and CD4-induced conformations. Thus, the gp41 HR1 region contributes to the association with gp120 and regulates Env transitions from the unliganded state to downstream conformations.IMPORTANCE The development of an efficient vaccine able to prevent HIV infection is a worldwide priority. Knowledge of the envelope glycoprotein structure and the conformational changes that occur after receptor engagement will help researchers to develop an immunogen able to elicit antibodies that block HIV-1 transmission. Here we identify residues in the HIV-1 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein that stabilize the unliganded state by modulating the

  14. Effects of sequence changes in the HIV-1 gp41 fusion peptide on CCR5 inhibitor resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Johan Klasse, Per; Moore, John P.

    2012-07-05

    A rare pathway of HIV-1 resistance to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors such as Vicriviroc (VCV) involves changes solely in the gp41 fusion peptide (FP). Here, we show that the G516V change is critical to VCV resistance in PBMC and TZM-bl cells, although it must be accompanied by either M518V or F519I to have a substantial impact. Modeling VCV inhibition data from the two cell types indicated that G516V allows both double mutants to use VCV-CCR5 complexes for entry. The model further identified F519I as an independent determinant of preference for the unoccupied, high-VCV affinity form of CCR5. From inhibitor-free reversion cultures, we also identified a substitution in the inner domain of gp120, T244A, which appears to counter the resistance phenotype created by the FP substitutions. Examining the interplay of these changes will enhance our understanding of Env complex interactions that influence both HIV-1 entry and resistance to CCR5 inhibitors.

  15. Metal-dependent inhibition of HIV-1 integrase by 5CITEP inhibitor: A theoretical QM/MM approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, Josenaide P.; Araújo Silva, José Rogério; Lameira, Jerônimo; Alves, Cláudio N.

    2013-09-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is a potential target for developing drugs against AIDS. In this letter, QM/MM approach was used to study the inhibition of IN by 5CITEP inhibitor in presence of divalent cations (Mg2+ or Mn2+). In addition, the main interactions occurring in 5CITEP-IN complex and the influence of divalent cations (Mg2+ or Mn2+) in enzymatic inhibition were investigated using B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p)/MM. The results suggest that the Asp64, Asp116 and four crystal water molecules plays a crucial role in cation (Mg2+ or Mn2+) coordination sphere.

  16. Docking of anti-HIV-1 oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone derivatives as potential HSV-1 DNA polymerase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Julliane Diniz; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; Leal, Kátia Zaccur; Santos, Fernanda da Costa; Batalha, Pedro Netto; Brozeguini, Leonardo; Seidl, Peter R.; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; Cunha, Anna Cláudia; de Souza, Maria Cecília B. V.; Ferreira, Vitor F.; Giongo, Viveca A.; Cirne-Santos, Cláudio; Paixão, Izabel C. P.

    2014-09-01

    Although there are many antiviral drugs available for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, still the synthesis of new anti-HSV candidates is an important strategy to be pursued, due to the emergency of resistant HSV strains mainly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infected patients. Some 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinolines, such as PNU-183792 (1), show a broad spectrum antiviral activity against human herpes viruses, inhibiting the viral DNA polymerase (POL) without affecting the human POLs. Thus, on an ongoing antiviral research project, our group has synthesized ribonucleosides containing the 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline (quinolone) heterocyclic moiety, such as the 6-Cl derivative (2), which is a dual antiviral agent (HSV-1 and HIV-1). Molecular dynamics simulations of the complexes of 1 and 2 with the HSV-1 POL suggest that structural modifications of 2 should increase its experimental anti-HSV-1 activity, since its ribosyl and carboxyl groups are highly hydrophilic to interact with a hydrophobic pocket of this enzyme. Therefore, in this work, comparative molecular docking simulations of 1 and three new synthesized oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone HIV-1 inhibitors (3-5), which do not contain those hydrophilic groups, were carried out, in order to access these modifications in the proposition of new potential anti-HSV-1 agents, but maintaining the anti-HIV-1 activity. Among the docked compounds, the oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 3 is the best candidate for an anti-HSV-1 agent, and, in addition, it showed anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50 = 3.4 ± 0.3 μM). Compounds 2 and 3 were used as templates in the design of four new oxoquinoline-acylhydrazones (6-9) as potential anti-HSV-1 agents to increase the antiviral activity of 2. Among the docked compounds, oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 7 was selected as the best candidate for further development of dual anti-HIV/HSV activity.

  17. A novel bispecific peptide HIV-1 fusion inhibitor targeting the N-terminal heptad repeat and fusion peptide domains in gp41.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xifeng; Jia, Qiyan; Lu, Lu; Yu, Fei; Zheng, Jishen; Shi, Weiguo; Cai, Lifeng; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Keliang

    2016-12-01

    HIV-1 fusion with the target cell is initiated by the insertion of the gp41 fusion peptide (FP) into the target cell membrane and the interaction between the gp41 N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR), followed by the formation of the six-helix bundle (6-HB) fusion core. Therefore, both FP and NHR are important targets for HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Here, we designed and synthesized a dual-target peptidic HIV-1 fusion inhibitor, 4HR-LBD-VIRIP, in which 4HR-LBD is able to bind to the gp41 NHR domain, while VIRIP is able to interact with gp41 FP. We found that 4HR-LBD-VIRIP is about tenfold more potent than 4HR-LBD and VIRIP in inhibiting HIV-1IIIB infection and HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env)-mediated cell-cell fusion, suggesting that this dual-target HIV-1 fusion inhibitor possesses a strong synergistic antiviral effect. A biophysical analysis indicates that 4HR-LBD-VIRIP can interact with N70 peptide that contains the gp41 NHR and FP domains and binds with lipid membrane. This study provides a new approach for designing novel viral fusion inhibitors against HIV and other enveloped viruses with class I membrane fusion proteins.

  18. Nonneutralizing Antibodies Induced by the HIV-1 gp41 NHR Domain Gain Neutralizing Activity in the Presence of the HIV Fusion Inhibitor Enfuvirtide: a Potential Therapeutic Vaccine Strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Bi, Wenwen; Zhu, Xiaojie; Li, Haoyang; Qi, Qianqian; Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo

    2015-07-01

    A key barrier against developing preventive and therapeutic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines is the inability of viral envelope glycoproteins to elicit broad and potent neutralizing antibodies. However, in the presence of fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide, we show that the nonneutralizing antibodies induced by the HIV type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) domain (N63) exhibit potent and broad neutralizing activity against laboratory-adapted HIV-1 strains, including the drug-resistant variants, and primary HIV-1 isolates with different subtypes, suggesting the potential of developing gp41-targeted HIV therapeutic vaccines.

  19. The HIVdb system for HIV-1 genotypic resistance interpretation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Michele W; Liu, Tommy F; Shafer, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    The Stanford HIV Drug Resistance Database hosts a freely available online genotypic resistance interpretation system called HIVdb to help clinicians and laboratories interpret HIV-1 genotypic resistance tests. These tests are designed to assess susceptibility to nucleoside and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI and NNRTI), protease inhibitors and integrase inhibitors. The HIVdb genotypic resistance interpretation system output consists of (1) a list of penalty scores for each antiretroviral (ARV) resistance mutation in a submitted sequence, (2) estimates of decreased NRTI, NNRTI, protease and integrase inhibitor susceptibility, and (3) comments about each ARV resistance mutation in the submitted sequence. The application's strengths are its convenience for submitting sequences, its quality control analysis, its transparency and its extensive comments. The Sierra Web service is an extension that enables laboratories analyzing many sequences to individualize the format of their results. The algorithm specification interface compiler makes it possible for HIVdb to provide results using a variety of different HIV-1 genotypic resistance interpretation algorithms.

  20. Solution structure of a hydrocarbon stapled peptide inhibitor in complex with monomeric C-terminal domain of HIV-1 capsid.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Shibani; Zhang, Hongtao; Debnath, Asim K; Cowburn, David

    2008-06-13

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid protein plays a critical role in virus core particle assembly and is an important target for novel therapeutic strategies. In a previous study, we characterized the binding affinity of a hydrocarbon stapled helical peptide, NYAD-1, for the capsid protein (K(d) approximately 1 mum) and demonstrated its ability to penetrate the cell membrane (Zhang, H., Zhao, Q., Bhattacharya, S., Waheed, A. A., Tong, X., Hong, A., Heck, S., Goger, M., Cowburn, D., Freed, E. O., and Debnath, A. K. (2008) J. Mol. Biol. 378, 565-580). In cell-based assays, NYAD-1 colocalized with the Gag polyprotein during traffic to the plasma membrane and disrupted the formation of mature and immature virus particles in vitro systems. Here, we complement the cellular and biochemical data with structural characterization of the interactions between the capsid and a soluble peptide analogue, NYAD-13. Solution NMR methods were used to determine a high resolution structure of the complex between the inhibitor and a monomeric form of the C-terminal domain of the capsid protein (mCA-CTD). The intermolecular interactions are mediated by the packing of hydrophobic side chains at the buried interface and unperturbed by the presence of the olefinic chain on the solvent-exposed surface of the peptide. The results of the structural analysis provide valuable insight into the determinants for high affinity and selective inhibitors for HIV-1 particle assembly.

  1. Structure–Activity Relationship Studies of Indole-Based Compounds as Small Molecule HIV-1 Fusion Inhibitors Targeting Glycoprotein 41

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We previously described indole-containing compounds with the potential to inhibit HIV-1 fusion by targeting the hydrophobic pocket of transmembrane glycoprotein gp41. Here we report optimization and structure–activity relationship studies on the basic scaffold, defining the role of shape, contact surface area, and molecular properties. Thirty new compounds were evaluated in binding, cell–cell fusion, and viral replication assays. Below a 1 μM threshold, correlation between binding and biological activity was diminished, indicating an amphipathic requirement for activity in cells. The most active inhibitor 6j exhibited 0.6 μM binding affinity and 0.2 μM EC50 against cell–cell fusion and live virus replication and was active against T20 resistant strains. Twenty-two compounds with the same connectivity displayed a consensus pose in docking calculations, with rank order matching the biological activity. The work provides insight into requirements for small molecule inhibition of HIV-1 fusion and demonstrates a potent low molecular weight fusion inhibitor. PMID:24856833

  2. Emergence of protease inhibitor resistance mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates from patients and rapid screening procedure for their detection.

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevachari, M B; Zhang, Y M; Imamichi, H; Imamichi, T; Falloon, J; Salzman, N P

    1996-01-01

    Patient human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates that are resistant to protease inhibitors may contain amino acid substitutions L10I/V, M46L/I, G-48V, L63P, V82A/F/T, I84V, and L90M in the protease gene. Substitutions at positions 82 and/or 90 occur in variants that display high levels of resistance to certain protease inhibitors. Nucleotide substitutions at these two sites also lead to the loss of two HindII restriction enzyme digestion sites, and these changes make possible a rapid procedure for the detection of drug-resistant variants in patients on protease inhibitor therapy. This procedure was used to detect the emergence of mutated viruses at various times after the initiation of therapy with the HIV-1 protease inhibitor indinavir. The method includes viral RNA isolation from plasma and reverse transcription PCR amplification of the protease gene with fluorescence-tagged primers. The PCR product is digested with HindII, the cleavage products are separated on a urea-acrylamide gel in a DNA sequencer, and the extent of cleavage is automatically analyzed with commercially available software. In viruses from 34 blood samples from four patients, mutations leading to an amino acid change at residue 82 appeared as early as 6 weeks after the start of therapy and persisted throughout the course of the study period (48 weeks). Mutations leading to double substitutions at residues 82 and 90 were seen at a lower frequency and appeared later than the change at position 82. The changes detected by restriction enzyme cleavage were confirmed by DNA sequencing of the cloned protease genes by reverse transcription PCR amplification of viral RNA from isolates in plasma. In addition to the changes at positions 82 and 90, we have identified M46L/I, G48V, and I54V substitutions in isolates derived from indinavir-treated patients. HindII analysis of uncloned, PCR-amplified DNA offers a rapid screening procedure for the detection of virus isolates containing mutations at

  3. Docking, molecular dynamics and quantitative structure-activity relationship studies for HEPTs and DABOs as HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yating; Li, Yan; Hao, Ming; Zhang, Shuwei; Ai, Chunzhi

    2012-05-01

    As a key component in combination therapy for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) have been proven to be an essential way in stopping HIV-1 replication. In the present work, in silico studies were conducted on a series of 119 NNRTIs, including 1-(2-hydroxyethoxymethyl)-6-(phenylthio)thymine (HEPT) and dihydroalkoxybenzyloxopyrimidine (DABO) derivatives by using the comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA), docking simulations and molecular dynamics (MD). The statistical results of the optimal model, the ligand-based CoMSIA one (Q(2) = 0.48, R(ncv)(2) =0.847, R(pre)(2) = 0.745) validates its satisfactory predictive capacity both internally and externally. The contour maps, docking and MD results correlate well with each other, drawing conclusions as follows: 1) Compounds with bulky substituents in position-6 of ring A, hydrophobic groups around position- 1, 2, 6 are preferable to the biological activities; 2) Two hydrogen bonds between RT inhibitor and the Tyr 318, Lys 101 residues, respectively, and a π-π bond between the inhibitor and Trp 188 are formed and crucial to the orientation of the active conformation of the molecules; 3) The binding pocket is essentially hydrophobic, which are determined by residues such as Trp 229, Tyr 318, Val 179, Tyr 188 and Val 108, and hydrophobic substituents may bring an improvement to the biological activity; 4) DABO and HEPT derivatives have different structures but take a similar mechanism to inhibit RT. The potency difference between two isomers in HEPTs can be explained by the distinct locations of the 6-naphthylmethyl substituent and the reasons are explained in details. All these results could be employed to alter the structural scaffold in order to develop new HIV-1 RT inhibitors that have an improved biological property. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3D

  4. Identification of MK-944a: a second clinical candidate from the hydroxylaminepentanamide isostere series of HIV protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, B D; McDonough, C; McDaniel, S L; Levin, R B; Newton, C L; Hoffman, J M; Darke, P L; Zugay-Murphy, J A; Emini, E A; Schleif, W A; Olsen, D B; Stahlhut, M W; Rutkowski, C A; Kuo, L C; Lin, J H; Chen, I W; Michelson, S R; Holloway, M K; Huff, J R; Vacca, J P

    2000-09-07

    Recent results from human clinical trials have established the critical role of HIV protease inhibitors in the treatment of acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, the emergence of viral resistance, demanding treatment protocols, and adverse side effects have exposed the urgent need for a second generation of HIV protease inhibitors. The continued exploration of our hydroxylaminepentanamide (HAPA) transition-state isostere series of HIV protease inhibitors, which initially resulted in the identification of Crixivan (indinavir sulfate, MK-639, L-735,524), has now yielded MK-944a (L-756,423). This compound is potent, is selective, and competitively inhibits HIV-1 PR with a K(i) value of 0.049 nM. It stops the spread of the HIV(IIIb)-infected MT4 lymphoid cells at 25.0-50.0 nM, even in the presence of alpha(1) acid glycoprotein, human serum albumin, normal human serum, or fetal bovine serum. MK-944a has a longer half-life in several animal models (rats, dogs, and monkeys) than indinavir sulfate and is currently in advanced human clinical trials.

  5. New water-soluble prodrugs of HIV protease inhibitors based on O-->N intramolecular acyl migration.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoshio; Ohtake, Jun; Sohma, Youhei; Kimura, Tooru; Hayashi, Yoshio; Kiso, Yoshiaki

    2002-12-01

    To improve the low water-solubility of HIV protease inhibitors, we synthesized water-soluble prodrugs of KNI-272 and KNI-279 which are potent HIV-1 protease inhibitors consisting of an Apns-Thz core structure (Apns; allophenylnorstatine, Thz; thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid) as an inhibitory machinery. The prodrugs, which contained an O-acyl peptidomimetic structure with an ionized amino group leading to the increase of water-solubility, were designed to regenerate the corresponding parent drugs based on the O-->N intramolecular acyl migration reaction at the alpha-hydroxy-beta-amino acid residue, that is allophenylnorstatine. The synthetic prodrugs 3, 4, 6, and 7 improved the water-solubility (>300mg/mL) more than 4000-fold in comparison with the parent compounds, which is the practically acceptable value as water-soluble drugs. These prodrugs were stable as an HCl salt and in a strongly acidic solution corresponding to gastric juice (pH 2.0), and could be converted to the parent compounds promptly in the aqueous condition from slightly acidic to basic pH at 37 degrees C, with the suitable migration rate, via a five-membered ring intermediate. Using a similar method, we synthesized a prodrug (12) of ritonavir, a clinically useful HIV-1 protease inhibitor as an anti-AIDS drug. In contrast to the prodrugs 3, 4, 6, and 7, the prodrug 12 was very slowly converted to ritonavir probably through a six-membered ring intermediate, with the t(1/2) value of 32h that may not be suitable for practical use.

  6. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Still Remains a New Drug Target: Structure, Function, Classical Inhibitors, and New Inhibitors with Innovative Mechanisms of Actions

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Francesca; Corona, Angela; Tramontano, Enzo

    2012-01-01

    During the retrotranscription process, characteristic of all retroviruses, the viral ssRNA genome is converted into integration-competent dsDNA. This process is accomplished by the virus-coded reverse transcriptase (RT) protein, which is a primary target in the current treatments for HIV-1 infection. In particular, in the approved therapeutic regimens two classes of drugs target RT, namely, nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs). Both classes inhibit the RT-associated polymerase activity: the NRTIs compete with the natural dNTP substrate and act as chain terminators, while the NNRTIs bind to an allosteric pocket and inhibit polymerization noncompetitively. In addition to these two classes, other RT inhibitors (RTIs) that target RT by distinct mechanisms have been identified and are currently under development. These include translocation-defective RTIs, delayed chain terminators RTIs, lethal mutagenesis RTIs, dinucleotide tetraphosphates, nucleotide-competing RTIs, pyrophosphate analogs, RT-associated RNase H function inhibitors, and dual activities inhibitors. This paper describes the HIV-1 RT function and molecular structure, illustrates the currently approved RTIs, and focuses on the mechanisms of action of the newer classes of RTIs. PMID:22778958

  7. Molecular Dynamics Approaches Estimate the Binding Energy of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors and Correlate with In Vitro Activity

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Barry C.; Métifiot, Mathieu; Pommier, Yves

    2012-01-01

    The design of novel integrase (IN) inhibitors has been aided by recent crystal structures revealing the binding mode of these compounds with a full-length prototype foamy virus (PFV) IN and synthetic viral DNA ends. Earlier docking studies relied on incomplete structures and did not include the contribution of the viral DNA to inhibitor binding. Using the structure of PFV IN as the starting point, we generated a model of the corresponding HIV-1 complex and developed a molecular dynamics (MD)-based approach that correlates with the in vitro activities of novel compounds. Four well-characterized compounds (raltegravir, elvitegravir, MK-0536, and dolutegravir) were used as a training set, and the data for their in vitro activity against the Y143R, N155H, and G140S/Q148H mutants were used in addition to the wild-type (WT) IN data. Three additional compounds were docked into the IN-DNA complex model and subjected to MD simulations. All three gave interaction potentials within 1 standard deviation of values estimated from the training set, and the most active compound was identified. Additional MD analysis of the raltegravir- and dolutegravir-bound complexes gave internal and interaction energy values that closely match the experimental binding energy of a compound related to raltegravir that has similar activity. These approaches can be used to gain a deeper understanding of the interactions of the inhibitors with the HIV-1 intasome and to identify promising scaffolds for novel integrase inhibitors, in particular, compounds that retain activity against a range of drug-resistant mutants, making it possible to streamline synthesis and testing. PMID:22037850

  8. Identification of novel malarial cysteine protease inhibitors using structure-based virtual screening of a focused cysteine protease inhibitor library.

    PubMed

    Shah, Falgun; Mukherjee, Prasenjit; Gut, Jiri; Legac, Jennifer; Rosenthal, Philip J; Tekwani, Babu L; Avery, Mitchell A

    2011-04-25

    Malaria, in particular that caused by Plasmodium falciparum , is prevalent across the tropics, and its medicinal control is limited by widespread drug resistance. Cysteine proteases of P. falciparum , falcipain-2 (FP-2) and falcipain-3 (FP-3), are major hemoglobinases, validated as potential antimalarial drug targets. Structure-based virtual screening of a focused cysteine protease inhibitor library built with soft rather than hard electrophiles was performed against an X-ray crystal structure of FP-2 using the Glide docking program. An enrichment study was performed to select a suitable scoring function and to retrieve potential candidates against FP-2 from a large chemical database. Biological evaluation of 50 selected compounds identified 21 diverse nonpeptidic inhibitors of FP-2 with a hit rate of 42%. Atomic Fukui indices were used to predict the most electrophilic center and its electrophilicity in the identified hits. Comparison of predicted electrophilicity of electrophiles in identified hits with those in known irreversible inhibitors suggested the soft-nature of electrophiles in the selected target compounds. The present study highlights the importance of focused libraries and enrichment studies in structure-based virtual screening. In addition, few compounds were screened against homologous human cysteine proteases for selectivity analysis. Further evaluation of structure-activity relationships around these nonpeptidic scaffolds could help in the development of selective leads for antimalarial chemotherapy.

  9. Novel HIV-1 Therapeutics through Targeting Altered Host Cell Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Coley, William; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Van Duyne, Rachel; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) strains presents a challenge for the design of new drugs. Anti-HIV compounds currently in use are the subject of advanced clinical trials using either HIV-1 reverse-transcriptase, viral protease, or integrase inhibitors. Recent studies show an increase in the number of HIV-1 variants resistant to anti-retroviral agents in newly infected individuals. Targeting host cell factors involved in the regulation of HIV-1 replication might be one way to combat HIV-1 resistance to the currently available anti-viral agents. A specific inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression could be expected from the development of compounds targeting host cell factors that participate in the activation of the HIV-1 LTR promoter. Here we will discuss how targeting the host can be accomplished either by using small molecules to alter the function of the host’s proteins such as p53 or cdk9, or by utilizing new advances in siRNA therapies to knock down essential host factors such as CCR5 and CXCR4. Finally, we will discuss how the viral protein interactomes should be performed to better design therapeutics against HIV-1. PMID:19732026

  10. A novel assay for screening inhibitors targeting HIV-1 integrase dimerization based on Ni-NTA magnetic agarose beads

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dawei; He, Hongqiu; Liu, Mengmeng; Meng, Zhixia; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN), which mediates integration of viral cDNA into the cellular chromosome, is a validated antiviral drug target. Three IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir, have been clinically approved since 2008. However, drug resistance have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment using these drugs which share the same mechanism of action and have a low genetic barrier for resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop drugs with novel mechanism. IN requires a precise and dynamic equilibrium between several oligomeric species for its activities. The modulation of the process which is termed as IN oligomerization, presents an interesting allosteric target for drug development. In this research, we developed a magnetic beads based approach to assay the IN dimerization. Then, using the assay we screened a library of 1000 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs for IN dimerization inhibitors and identified dexlansoprazole as a potential IN dimerization inhibitor. In conclusion, the assay presented here has been proven to be sensitive and specific for the detection of IN dimerization as well as for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting IN dimerization. Moreover, a FDA-approved proton-pump inhibitors, dexlansoprazole, was identified as a potential inhibitor for IN dimerization. PMID:27137477

  11. Nanogel-Conjugated Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors and Their Combinations as Novel Antiviral Agents with Increased Efficacy against HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, T H; Gorantla, S; Makarov, E; Lu, Y; Warren, G; Vinogradov, S V

    2015-12-07

    Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) are an integral part of the current antiretroviral therapy (ART), which dramatically reduced the mortality from AIDS and turned the disease from lethal to chronic. The further steps in curing the HIV-1 infection must include more effective targeting of infected cells and virus sanctuaries inside the body and modification of drugs and treatment schedules to reduce common complications of the long-term treatment and increase patient compliancy. Here, we describe novel NRTI prodrugs synthesized from cholesteryl-ε-polylysine (CEPL) nanogels by conjugation with NRTI 5'-succinate derivatives (sNRTI). Biodegradability, small particle size, and high NRTI loading (30% by weight) of these conjugates; extended drug release, which would allow a weekly administration schedule; high therapeutic index (>1000) with a lower toxicity compared to NRTIs; and efficient accumulation in macrophages known as carriers for HIV-1 infection are among the most attractive properties of new nanodrugs. Nanogel conjugates of zidovudine (AZT), lamivudine (3TC), and abacavir (ABC) have been investigated individually and in formulations similar to clinical NRTI cocktails. Nanodrug formulations demonstrated 10-fold suppression of reverse transcriptase activity (EC90) in HIV-infected macrophages at 2-10, 2-4, and 1-2 μM drug levels, respectively, for single nanodrugs and dual and triple nanodrug cocktails. Nanogel conjugate of lamivudine was the most effective single nanodrug (EC90 2 μM). Nanodrugs showed a more favorable pharmacokinetics compared to free NRTIs. Infrequent iv injections of PEGylated CEPL-sAZT alone could efficiently suppress HIV-1 RT activity to background level in humanized mouse (hu-PBL) HIV model.

  12. Progress of bis(heteroaryl)piperazines (BHAPs) as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Since the first case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was reported in 1981, AIDS, as the global disease affecting 33.2 million people in 2007, has always been an unsolved problem worldwide. Reverse transcriptase (RT) is a crucial enzyme in the life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and thereby has been the prime drugs target for antiretroviral (ARV) therapy against AIDS. To date, two classes of RT inhibitors (RTIs), e.g., nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), and a lot of compounds tested as RTIs have been described. To our knowledge, bis(heteroaryl)piperazines (BHAPs) have been considered as one class of promising NNRTIs, such as structurally and chemically related NNRTI delavirdine, which was approved by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in 1997. In this mini-review, we make attempts to report the progress of synthesis and structure-activity relationship (SAR) of BHAPs, in the meantime, the synergistic inhibition of HIV-1 replication by combining delavirdine with other HIV-1 inhibitors is also discussed. It will pave the way for the design and development of BHAPs as anti-HIV-1 agents in AIDS chemotherapy in the future.

  13. Amino Acid Prodrugs: An Approach to Improve the Absorption of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor, Lopinavir

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mitesh; Mandava, Nanda; Gokulgandhi, Mitan; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2014-01-01

    Poor systemic concentrations of lopinavir (LPV) following oral administration occur due to high cellular efflux by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) and extensive metabolism by CYP3A4 enzymes. In this study, amino acid prodrugs of LPV were designed and investigated for their potential to circumvent efflux processes and first pass effects. Three amino acid prodrugs were synthesized by conjugating isoleucine, tryptophan and methionine to LPV. Prodrug formation was confirmed by the LCMS/MS and NMR technique. Interaction of LPV prodrugs with efflux proteins were carried out in P-gp (MDCK-MDR1) and MRP2 (MDCK-MRP2) transfected cells. Aqueous solubility studies demonstrated that prodrugs generate higher solubility relative to LPV. Prodrugs displayed higher stability under acidic conditions and degraded significantly with rise in pH. Uptake and transport data suggested that prodrugs carry significantly lower affinity towards P-gp and MRP2 relative to LPV. Moreover, prodrugs exhibited higher liver microsomal stability relative to LPV. Hence, amino acid prodrug modification might be a viable approach for enhancing LPV absorption across intestinal epithelial and brain endothelial cells which expresses high levels of P-gp and MRP2. PMID:24727459

  14. Proteases of Stored Product Insects and their Inhibition by Specific Protease Inhibitors from Soybeans and Wheat Grain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-31

    CHYMOTRYPSINS; BOWMAN-BIRK TRYPSIN-CHYMOTRYPSIN INHIBITOR (SOYBEANS); CHICKPEAS TRYPSIN-CHYMOTRYPSIN INHIBITOR; SOYBEAN PROTEASE INHIBITORS 20. ABSTRACT...could be fully inhibited at a 1:1 molar ratio by the naturally-occuring proteinaceous trypsin inhibitors BBI from soybeans and CI from chickpeas ...substrates. These activities were fully inhibited by the proteinaceous trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitors BBI from soybeans and CI from chickpeas when assayed

  15. From the traditional Chinese medicine plant Schisandra chinensis new scaffolds effective on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase resistant to non-nucleoside inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lijia; Grandi, Nicole; Del Vecchio, Claudia; Mandas, Daniela; Corona, Angela; Piano, Dario; Esposito, Francesca; Parolin, Cristina; Tramontano, Enzo

    2015-04-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is still an extremely attractive pharmaceutical target for the identification of new inhibitors possibly active on drug resistant strains. Medicinal plants are a rich source of chemical diversity and can be used to identify novel scaffolds to be further developed by chemical modifications. We investigated the ability of the main lignans from Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill. fruits, commonly used in Traditional Chinese Medicine, to affect HIV-1 RT functions. We purified 6 lignans from Schisandra chinensis fruits and assayed their effects on HIV-1 RT and viral replication. Among the S. chinensis fruit lignans, Schisandrin B and Deoxyschizandrin selectively inhibited the HIV-1 RT-associated DNA polymerase activity. Structure activity relationship revealed the importance of cyclooctadiene ring substituents for efficacy. In addition, Schisandrin B was also able to impair HIV-1 RT drug resistant mutants and the early phases of viral replication. We identified Schisandrin B and Deoxyschizandrin as new scaffold for the further development of novel HIV-1 RT inhibitors.

  16. A Culture-Based Method for Determining the Production of Secreted Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, David; Bermudes, David

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a culture-based method for determining the production of secreted protease inhibitors. The assay utilizes standard proteolysis detection plates to support microbial growth followed by infiltrating the plate with a protease and subsequently detecting the remaining protein by trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation, or by bromocreosol green (BCG) or Ponseau S (PS) staining. The presence of a protease inhibitor can be observed in the form of a protected zone of protein around the protease inhibitor-producing strain. Using the protease inhibitors α-2-macroglobulin, aprotinin, leupeptin, and bestatin and the primary and secondary forms of Photorhabdus luminescens in combination with the protease trypsin, we were able to demonstrate that the assay is specific for the cognate inhibitor of the protease and for bacteria secreting protease inhibitors. In addition, when casein-containing plates were used, the size of the diffusion zone was inversely correlated with the molecular weight of the inhibitor allowing a relative estimation of the protease inhibitor molecular weight. This assay is useful for detecting the presence of microbial secreted protease inhibitors and may reveal their production by microorganisms that were not previously recognized to produce them. PMID:24632514

  17. Escape from Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Entry Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    De Feo, Christopher J.; Weiss, Carol D.

    2012-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) enters cells through a series of molecular interactions between the HIV envelope protein and cellular receptors, thus providing many opportunities to block infection. Entry inhibitors are currently being used in the clinic, and many more are under development. Unfortunately, as is the case for other classes of antiretroviral drugs that target later steps in the viral life cycle, HIV can become resistant to entry inhibitors. In contrast to inhibitors that block viral enzymes in intracellular compartments, entry inhibitors interfere with the function of the highly variable envelope glycoprotein as it continuously adapts to changing immune pressure and available target cells in the extracellular environment. Consequently, pathways and mechanisms of resistance for entry inhibitors are varied and often involve mutations across the envelope gene. This review provides a broad overview of entry inhibitor resistance mechanisms that inform our understanding of HIV entry and the design of new inhibitors and vaccines. PMID:23342377

  18. Structure-Based Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Dual Hotspot Small-Molecule HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    LaLonde, Judith M.; Kwon, Young Do; Jones, David M.; Sun, Alexander W.; Courter, Joel R.; Soeta, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Toyoharu; Princiotto, Amy M.; Wu, Xueling; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Sodroski, Joseph; Madani, Navid; Smith, III, Amos B.

    2012-06-19

    Cellular infection by HIV-1 is initiated with a binding event between the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 and the cellular receptor protein CD4. The CD4-gp120 interface is dominated by two hotspots: a hydrophobic gp120 cavity capped by Phe43{sub CD4} and an electrostatic interaction between residues Arg59{sub CD4} and Asp368{sub gp120}. The CD4 mimetic small-molecule NBD-556 (1) binds within the gp120 cavity; however, 1 and related congeners demonstrate limited viral neutralization breadth. Herein, we report the design, synthesis, characterization, and X-ray structures of gp120 in complex with small molecules that simultaneously engage both binding hotspots. The compounds specifically inhibit viral infection of 42 tier 2 clades B and C viruses and are shown to be antagonists of entry into CD4-negative cells. Dual hotspot design thus provides both a means to enhance neutralization potency of HIV-1 entry inhibitors and a novel structural paradigm for inhibiting the CD4-gp120 protein-protein interaction.

  19. Design and Validation of Novel Chikungunya Virus Protease Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Das, Pratyush Kumar; Puusepp, Laura; Varghese, Finny S; Utt, Age; Ahola, Tero; Kananovich, Dzmitry G; Lopp, Margus; Merits, Andres; Karelson, Mati

    2016-12-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV; genus Alphavirus) is the causative agent of chikungunya fever. CHIKV replication can be inhibited by some broad-spectrum antiviral compounds; in contrast, there is very little information about compounds specifically inhibiting the enzymatic activities of CHIKV replication proteins. These proteins are translated in the form of a nonstructural (ns) P1234 polyprotein precursor from the CHIKV positive-strand RNA genome. Active forms of replicase enzymes are generated using the autoproteolytic activity of nsP2. The available three-dimensional (3D) structure of nsP2 protease has made it a target for in silico drug design; however, there is thus far little evidence that the designed compounds indeed inhibit the protease activity of nsP2 and/or suppress CHIKV replication. In this study, a set of 12 compounds, predicted to interact with the active center of nsP2 protease, was designed using target-based modeling. The majority of these compounds were shown to inhibit the ability of nsP2 to process recombinant protein and synthetic peptide substrates. Furthermore, all compounds found to be active in these cell-free assays also suppressed CHIKV replication in cell culture, the 50% effective concentration (EC50) of the most potent inhibitor being ∼1.5 μM. Analysis of stereoisomers of one compound revealed that inhibition of both the nsP2 protease activity and CHIKV replication depended on the conformation of the inhibitor. Combining the data obtained from different assays also indicates that some of the analyzed compounds may suppress CHIKV replication using more than one mechanism.

  20. Inhibition of the ribonuclease H activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by GSK5750 correlates with slow enzyme-inhibitor dissociation.

    PubMed

    Beilhartz, Greg L; Ngure, Marianne; Johns, Brian A; DeAnda, Felix; Gerondelis, Peter; Götte, Matthias

    2014-06-06

    Compounds that efficiently inhibit the ribonuclease (RNase) H activity of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) have yet to be developed. Here, we demonstrate that GSK5750, a 1-hydroxy-pyridopyrimidinone analog, binds to the enzyme with an equilibrium dissociation constant (K(d)) of ~400 nM. Inhibition of HIV-1 RNase H is specific, as DNA synthesis is not affected. Moreover, GSK5750 does not inhibit the activity of Escherichia coli RNase H. Order-of-addition experiments show that GSK5750 binds to the free enzyme in an Mg(2+)-dependent fashion. However, as reported for other active site inhibitors, binding of GSK5750 to a preformed enzyme-substrate complex is severely compromised. The bound nucleic acid prevents access to the RNase H active site, which represents a possible biochemical hurdle in the development of potent RNase H inhibitors. Previous studies suggested that formation of a complex with the prototypic RNase H inhibitor β-thujaplicinol is slow, and, once formed, it dissociates rapidly. This unfavorable kinetic behavior can limit the potency of RNase H active site inhibitors. Although the association kinetics of GSK5750 remains slow, our data show that this compound forms a long lasting complex with HIV-1 RT. We conclude that slow dissociation of the inhibitor and HIV-1 RT improves RNase H active site inhibitors and may circumvent the obstacle posed by the inability of these compounds to bind to a preformed enzyme-substrate complex.

  1. Optimization of 2,4-Diarylanilines as Non-nucleoside HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lian-Qi; Qin, Bingjie; Huang, Li; Qian, Keduo; Chen, Chin-Ho; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Xie, Lan

    2012-01-01

    The current optimization of 2,4-diarylaniline analogs (DAANs) on the central phenyl ring provided a series of new active DAAN derivatives 9a–9e, indicating an accessible modification approach that could improve anti-HIV potency against wild-type and resistant strains, aqueous solubility, and metabolic stability. A new compound 9e not only exhibited extremely high potency against wild-type virus (EC50 0.53 nM) and several resistant viral strains (EC50 0.36 – 3.9 nM), but also showed desirable aqueous solubility and metabolic stability, which were comparable or better than those of the anti-HIV-1 drug TMC278 (2). Thus, new compound 9e might be a potential drug candidate for further development of novel next-generation NNRTIs. PMID:22406117

  2. Modulations of 92kDa gelatinase B and its inhibitors are associated with HIV-1 infection in human macrophage cultures.

    PubMed

    Chapel, C; Camara, V; Clayette, P; Salvat, S; Mabondzo, A; Leblond, V; Marcé, D; Lafuma, C; Dormont, D

    1994-11-15

    The macrophage-secreted 92-kDa type IV collagenase and metalloproteinases play a critical role in cell microenvironment regulation and cell movement. HIV infection of macrophages might be capable of deregulating the expression of these gelatinases. Hence, human monocyte-derived-macrophages were infected by lymphotropic HIV-1/Lai and monocytropic HIV-1/DAS isolates. Gelatinase activity and gelatinase and inhibitor (TIMP, alpha 2M) biosyntheses were evaluated in supernatants and cellular extracts. Our data suggest that HIV infection facilitates gelatinase secretion and intracellular inhibitor retention. These argue for the increase of free proteinase that could degrade barriers, which would permit cell movement and viral dissemination into tissues.

  3. Kunitz-type protease inhibitors group B from Solanum palustre.

    PubMed

    Speransky, Anna S; Cimaglia, Fabio; Krinitsina, Anastasya A; Poltronieri, Palmiro; Fasano, Pasqua; Bogacheva, Anna M; Valueva, Tatiana A; Halterman, Dennis; Shevelev, Alexei B; Santino, Angelo

    2007-11-01

    Five Kunitz protease inhibitor group B genes were isolated from the genome of the diploid non-tuber-forming potato species Solanum palustre. Three of five new genes share 99% identity to the published KPI-B genes from various cultivated potato accessions, while others exhibit 96% identity. Spls-KPI-B2 and Spls-KPI-B4 proteins contain unique substitutions of the most conserved residues usually involved to trypsin and chymotrypsin-specific binding sites of Kunitz-type protease inhibitor (KPI)-B, respectively. To test the inhibition of trypsin and chymotrypsin by Spls-KPI proteins, five of them were produced in E. coli purified using a Ni-sepharose resin and ion-exchange chromatography. All recombinant Spls-KPI-B inhibited trypsin; K(i) values ranged from 84.8 (Spls-KPI-B4), 345.5 (Spls-KPI-B1), and 1310.6 nM (Spls-KPI-B2) to 3883.5 (Spls-KPI-B5) and 8370 nM (Spls-KPI-B3). In addition, Spls-KPI-B1 and Spls-KPI-B4 inhibited chymotrypsin. These data suggest that regardless of substitutions of key active-center residues both Spls-KPI-B4 and Spls-KPI-B1 are functional trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitors.

  4. Design of HIV Protease Inhibitors Based on Inorganic Polyhedral Metallacarboranes

    SciTech Connect

    Rezacova, Pavlina; Pokorna, Jana; Brynda, Ji; Kozisek, Milan; Cigler, Petr; Lesik, Martin; Fanfrlik, Jindrich; Rezac, Jan; Saskova, Klara Grantz; Sieglova, Irena; Plesek, Jaromir; Sicha, Vaclav; Gruner, Bohumir; Oberwinkler, Heike; Sedlacek, Juraj; Krausslich, Hans-Georg; Hobza, Pavel; Kral, Vladimir; Konvalinka, Jan

    2010-04-19

    HIV protease (HIV PR) is a primary target for anti-HIV drug design. We have previously identified and characterized substituted metallacarboranes as a new class of HIV protease inhibitors. In a structure-guided drug design effort, we connected the two cobalt bis(dicarbollide) clusters with a linker to substituted ammonium group and obtained a set of compounds based on a lead formula [H{sub 2}N-(8-(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O){sub 2}-1,2-C{sub 2}B{sub 9}H{sub 10})(1',2'-C{sub 2}B{sub 9}H{sub 11})-3,3'-Co){sub 2}]Na. We explored inhibition properties of these compounds with various substitutions, determined the HIV PR:inhibitor crystal structure, and computationally explored the conformational space of the linker. Our results prove the capacity of linker-substituted dual-cage cobalt bis(dicarbollides) as lead compounds for design of more potent inhibitors of HIV PR.

  5. A New Class of Serine and Cysteine Protease Inhibitor with Chemotherapeutic Potential

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-01

    also be used to produce a serine protease inhibitor. Similar to the cysteine inhibitors, a dipeptide side chain is attached to the ring which is...which relieves the 7 strain (Figure 3). Serine and cysteine proteases use a mechanism to cleave peptide bonds which involves addition of a catalytic...serine and cysteine proteases share a similar mechanism for hydrolyzing amide bonds , we expect that 4-heterocyclohexanones should be good inhibitors

  6. An intravaginal ring for the simultaneous delivery of an HIV-1 maturation inhibitor and reverse transcriptase inhibitor for prophylaxis of HIV transmission

    PubMed Central

    Ugaonkar, Shweta R.; Clark, Justin T.; English, Lexie B.; Johnson, Todd J.; Buckheit, Karen W.; Bahde, Robert J.; Appella, Daniel H.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Kiser, Patrick F.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleocapsid 7 (NCp7) inhibitors have been investigated extensively for their role in impeding the function of HIV-1 replication machinery and their ability to directly inactivate the virus. A class of NCp7 zinc finger inhibitors, S-acyl-2-mercaptobenzamide thioesters (SAMTs), was investigated for topical drug delivery. SAMTs are inherently unstable due to their hydrolytically labile thioester bond thus requiring formulation approaches that can lend stability. We describe the delivery of N-[2-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoylthio)benzoyl]-β-alanine amide (SAMT-10), as a single agent antiretroviral (ARV) therapeutic and in combination with the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor pyrimidinedione IQP-0528, from a hydrophobic polyether urethane (PEU) intravaginal ring (IVR) for a month. The physicochemical stability of the ARV-loaded IVRs was confirmed after 3 months at 40°C/75% relative humidity (RH). In vitro, 25 ± 3 mg/IVR of SAMT-10 and 86 ± 13 mg/IVR of IQP-0528 were released. No degradation of the hydrolytically labile SAMT-10 was observed within the matrix. The combination of ARVs had synergistic antiviral activity when tested in in vitro cell based assays. Toxicological evaluations performed on an organotypic EpiVaginal™ tissue model demonstrated a lack of formulation toxicity. Overall, SAMT-10 and IQP-0528 were formulated in a stable PEU IVR for sustained release. Our findings support the need for further preclinical evaluation. PMID:26149293

  7. Ergotism associated with HIV antiviral protease inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Zachary K; Ceraldi, Chris C

    2003-03-01

    Ergotism is a rare condition of acute vasospasm found classically in young and middle-aged women taking ergot alkaloid agents to treat migraine headache. We report the case of a young man with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positivity and describe the drug interaction between protease inhibitors and ergot alkaloid agents, which most likely predisposed to development of ergot toxicity. The HIV-positive population receiving antiviral therapy may be an under-recognized group at risk for ergotism through decreased hepatic metabolism of ergot preparations.

  8. Decoding distinct membrane interactions of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors using a combined atomic force and fluorescence microscopy approach.

    PubMed

    Franquelim, Henri G; Gaspar, Diana; Veiga, A Salomé; Santos, Nuno C; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2013-08-01

    Enfuvirtide and T-1249 are two potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitor peptides. Recent studies indicate that lipids play an important role in the mode of action of those bioactive molecules. Using a combined tandem atomic force microscopy (AFM)-epifluorescence microscopy approach, we studied the interaction of both enfuvirtide and T-1249 with supported lipid bilayers. Fluid (ld)-gel (so) and ld-liquid ordered (lo) phase-separated membrane systems were tested. Results, especially for T-1249, show significant lipid membrane activity at a 15μM peptide concentration. T-1249, in opposition to enfuvirtide, induces an increase in membrane surface roughness, decrease in membrane fluidity, bilayer thinning at ld domains and disruption of the so domain borders. In terms of structural properties, both enfuvirtide and T-1249 possess distinct functional hydrophobic and amphipathic domains of HIV gp41. While enfuvirtide only yields the tryptophan-rich domain (TRD), T-1249 possesses both TRD and pocket-binding domain (PBD). TRD increases the hydrophobicity of the peptide while PBD enhances the amphipathic characteristics. As such, the enhanced membrane activity of T-1249 may be explained by a synergism between its amphipathic N-terminal segment and its hydrophophic C-terminal. Our findings provide valuable insights on the molecular-level mode of action of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors, unraveling the correlation between their structural properties and membrane interactions as a factor influencing their antiviral activity. Ultimately, this work validates the applicability of a combined AFM and fluorescence approach to evaluate the mechanic and structural properties of supported lipid bilayers upon interaction with membrane-active peptides.

  9. Pharmacotherapy of HIV-1 Infection: Focus on CCR5 Antagonist Maraviroc

    PubMed Central

    Latinovic, Olga; Kuruppu, Janaki; Davis, Charles; Le, Nhut; Heredia, Alonso

    2009-01-01

    Sustained inhibition of HIV-1, the goal of antiretroviral therapy, is often impeded by the emergence of viral drug resistance. For patients infected with HIV-1 resistant to conventional drugs from the viral reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitor classes, the recently approved entry and integration inhibitors effectively suppress HIV-1 and offer additional therapeutic options. Entry inhibitors are particularly attractive because, unlike conventional antiretrovirals, they target HIV-1 extracellularly, thereby sparing cells from both viral- and drug-induced toxicities. The fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide and the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc are the first entry inhibitors licensed for patients with drug-resistant HIV-1, with maraviroc restricted to those infected with CCR5-tropic HIV-1 (R5 HIV-1) only. Vicriviroc (another CCR5 antagonist) is in Phase III clinical trials, whereas the CCR5 antibodies PRO 140 and HGS 004 are in early stages of clinical development. Potent antiviral synergy between maraviroc and CCR5 antibodies, coupled with distinct patterns of resistance, suggest their combinations might be particularly effective in patients. In addition, given that oral administration of maraviroc achieves high drug levels in cervicovaginal fluid, combinations of maraviroc and other CCR5 inhibitors could be effective in preventing HIV-1 transmission. Moreover, since CCR5 antagonists prevent rejection of transplanted organs, maraviroc could both suppress HIV-1 and prolong organ survival for the growing number of HIV-1 patients with kidney or liver failure necessitating organ transplantation. Thus, maraviroc offers an important treatment option for patients with drug-resistant R5 HIV-1, who presently account for >50% of drug-resistance cases. PMID:19920876

  10. Structural studies of series HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors 1-(2,6-difluorobenzyl)-2-(2,6-difluorophenyl)-benzimidazoles with different 4-substituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2010-03-01

    Over the past 10 years, several anti-viral drugs have become available to fight the HIV infection. Antiretroviral treatment reduces the mortality of AIDS. Nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase are specific and potentially nontoxic drugs against AIDS. The crystal structures of five nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase are presented here. The structural parameters, especially those describing the angular orientation of the π-electron systems and influencing biological activity, were determined for all of the investigated inhibitors. The chemical character and orientation of the substituent at C4 position of the benzimidazole moiety substantially influences the anti-viral activity. The structural data of the investigated inhibitors is a good basis for modeling enzyme-inhibitor interactions for structure-assisted drug design.

  11. Proteases of Stored Product Insects and their Inhibition by Specific Protease Inhibitors from Soybeans and Wheat Grain.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-30

    CHMOTRYPSIN INHIBITOR (SOYBEANS) CHICKPEAS TRYPSIN-CHYMOTRYPSIN INHIBITOR; SOYBEAN PROTEASE INHIBITORS 20. ABSTRACT (Coninue, on reverse aide It necessary...CI from chickpeas . Attempts are now in progress to separate and isolate these trypsin-and chymotrypsin-like enzymes. (3) Locust proteinases...and from chickpeas (CI). In addition, a specific Tribolium proteinase inhibitor from soybeans was separated. SIGNIFICANT FINDINGS A. The detection of

  12. Proteases of Stored Product Insects and their Inhibition by Specific Protease Inhibitors from Soybeans and Wheat Grain.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-31

    PROTEASES; INSECT TRYPSINS and CHYMOTRYPSINS; BOWMAN-BIRK TRYPSIN-CHYMOTRYPSIN INHIBITOR (SOYBEANS); CHICKPEAS TRYPSIN-CHYMOTRYPSIN INHIBLTOR; SOYBEAN...inhibitors from legume .seeds, such as the Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) from soybeans and CI from chickpeas . The purified and partially-characterized insect DD...inhibited by the trypsin - chymotrypsin inhibitors BBI from soybeans and CI from chickpeas . Separation and purification of these enzymes by gel

  13. Plant Protease Inhibitors in Therapeutics-Focus on Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Srikanth, Sandhya; Chen, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Plants are known to have many secondary metabolites and phytochemical compounds which are highly explored at biochemical and molecular genetics level and exploited enormously in the human health care sector. However, there are other less explored small molecular weight proteins, which inhibit proteases/proteinases. Plants are good sources of protease inhibitors (PIs) which protect them against diseases, insects, pests, and herbivores. In the past, proteinaceous PIs were considered primarily as protein-degrading enzymes. Nevertheless, this view has significantly changed and PIs are now treated as very important signaling molecules in many biological activities such as inflammation, apoptosis, blood clotting and hormone processing. In recent years, PIs have been examined extensively as therapeutic agents, primarily to deal with various human cancers. Interestingly, many plant-based PIs are also found to be effective against cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, inflammatory diseases and neurological disorders. Several plant PIs are under further evaluation in in vitro clinical trials. Among all types of PIs, Bowman-Birk inhibitors (BBI) have been studied extensively in the treatment of many diseases, especially in the field of cancer prevention. So far, crops such as beans, potatoes, barley, squash, millet, wheat, buckwheat, groundnut, chickpea, pigeonpea, corn, and pineapple have been identified as good sources of PIs. The PI content of such foods has a significant influence on human health disorders, particularly in the regions where people mostly depend on these kind of foods. These natural PIs vary in concentration, protease specificity, heat stability, and sometimes several PIs may be present in the same species or tissue. However, it is important to carry out individual studies to identify the potential effects of each PI on human health. PIs in plants make them incredible sources to determine novel PIs with specific pharmacological and therapeutic effects due

  14. Plant Protease Inhibitors in Therapeutics-Focus on Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Sandhya; Chen, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Plants are known to have many secondary metabolites and phytochemical compounds which are highly explored at biochemical and molecular genetics level and exploited enormously in the human health care sector. However, there are other less explored small molecular weight proteins, which inhibit proteases/proteinases. Plants are good sources of protease inhibitors (PIs) which protect them against diseases, insects, pests, and herbivores. In the past, proteinaceous PIs were considered primarily as protein-degrading enzymes. Nevertheless, this view has significantly changed and PIs are now treated as very important signaling molecules in many biological activities such as inflammation, apoptosis, blood clotting and hormone processing. In recent years, PIs have been examined extensively as therapeutic agents, primarily to deal with various human cancers. Interestingly, many plant-based PIs are also found to be effective against cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, inflammatory diseases and neurological disorders. Several plant PIs are under further evaluation in in vitro clinical trials. Among all types of PIs, Bowman-Birk inhibitors (BBI) have been studied extensively in the treatment of many diseases, especially in the field of cancer prevention. So far, crops such as beans, potatoes, barley, squash, millet, wheat, buckwheat, groundnut, chickpea, pigeonpea, corn, and pineapple have been identified as good sources of PIs. The PI content of such foods has a significant influence on human health disorders, particularly in the regions where people mostly depend on these kind of foods. These natural PIs vary in concentration, protease specificity, heat stability, and sometimes several PIs may be present in the same species or tissue. However, it is important to carry out individual studies to identify the potential effects of each PI on human health. PIs in plants make them incredible sources to determine novel PIs with specific pharmacological and therapeutic effects due

  15. Targeting the AKT pathway: Repositioning HIV protease inhibitors as radiosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Goda, Jayant S; Pachpor, Tejaswini; Basu, Trinanjan; Chopra, Supriya; Gota, Vikram

    2016-02-01

    Cellular resistance in tumour cells to different therapeutic approaches has been a limiting factor in the curative treatment of cancer. Resistance to therapeutic radiation is a common phenomenon which significantly reduces treatment options and impacts survival. One of the mechanisms of acquiring resistance to ionizing radiation is the overexpression or activation of various oncogenes like the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), RAS (rat sarcoma) oncogene or loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue) which in turn activates the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3-K)/AKT pathway responsible for radiation resistance in various tumours. Blocking the pathway enhances the radiation response both in vitro and in vivo. Due to the differential activation of this pathway (constitutively activated in tumour cells and not in the normal host cells), it is an excellent candidate target for molecular targeted therapy to enhance radiation sensitivity. In this regard, HIV protease inhibitors (HPIs) known to interfere with PI3-K/AKT signaling in tumour cells, have been shown to sensitize various tumour cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo. As a result, HPIs are now being investigated as possible radiosensitizers along with various chemotherapeutic drugs. This review describes the mechanisms by which PI3-K/AKT pathway causes radioresistance and the role of HIV protease inhibitors especially nelfinavir as a potential candidate drug to target the AKT pathway for overcoming radioresistance and its use in various clinical trials for different malignancies.

  16. Targeting the AKT pathway: Repositioning HIV protease inhibitors as radiosensitizers

    PubMed Central

    Goda, Jayant S.; Pachpor, Tejaswini; Basu, Trinanjan; Chopra, Supriya; Gota, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Cellular resistance in tumour cells to different therapeutic approaches has been a limiting factor in the curative treatment of cancer. Resistance to therapeutic radiation is a common phenomenon which significantly reduces treatment options and impacts survival. One of the mechanisms of acquiring resistance to ionizing radiation is the overexpression or activation of various oncogenes like the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), RAS (rat sarcoma) oncogene or loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue) which in turn activates the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3-K)/AKT pathway responsible for radiation resistance in various tumours. Blocking the pathway enhances the radiation response both in vitro and in vivo. Due to the differential activation of this pathway (constitutively activated in tumour cells and not in the normal host cells), it is an excellent candidate target for molecular targeted therapy to enhance radiation sensitivity. In this regard, HIV protease inhibitors (HPIs) known to interfere with PI3-K/AKT signaling in tumour cells, have been shown to sensitize various tumour cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo. As a result, HPIs are now being investigated as possible radiosensitizers along with various chemotherapeutic drugs. This review describes the mechanisms by which PI3-K/AKT pathway causes radioresistance and the role of HIV protease inhibitors especially nelfinavir as a potential candidate drug to target the AKT pathway for overcoming radioresistance and its use in various clinical trials for different malignancies. PMID:27121513

  17. Safe and sustained vaginal delivery of pyrimidinedione HIV-1 inhibitors from polyurethane intravaginal rings.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Todd J; Srinivasan, Priya; Albright, Theodore H; Watson-Buckheit, Karen; Rabe, Lorna; Martin, Amy; Pau, Chou-Pong; Hendry, R Michael; Otten, Ron; McNicholl, Janet; Buckheit, Robert; Smith, James; Kiser, Patrick F

    2012-03-01

    The potent antiretroviral pyrimidinediones IQP-0528 (PYD1) and IQP-0532 (PYD2) were formulated in polyurethane intravaginal rings (IVRs) as prophylactic drug delivery systems to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV-1. To aid in the selection of a pyrimidinedione candidate and the optimal loading of the drug in the IVR delivery system, four pyrimidinedione IVR formulations (PYD1 at 0.5 wt% [PYD1(0.5 wt%)], PYD1(1 wt%), PYD2(4 wt%), and PYD2(14 wt%)) were evaluated in pigtail macaques over 28 days for safety and pyrimidinedione vaginal biodistribution. Kinetic analysis of vaginal proinflammatory cytokines, native microflora, and drug levels suggested that all formulations were safe, but only the high-loaded PYD2(14 wt%) IVR demonstrated consistently high pyrimidinedione vaginal fluid and tissue levels over the 28-day study. This formulation delivered drug in excess of 10 μg/ml to vaginal fluid and 1 μg/g to vaginal tissue, a level over 1,000 times the in vitro 50% effective concentration. The in vitro release of PYD1 and PYD2 under nonsink conditions correlated well with in vivo release, both in amount and in kinetic profile, and therefore may serve as a more biologically relevant means of evaluating release in vitro than typically employed sink conditions. Lastly, the pyrimidinediones in the IVR formulation were chemically stable after 90 days of storage at elevated temperature, and the potent nanomolar-level antiviral activity of both molecules was retained after in vitro release. Altogether, these results point to the successful IVR formulation and vaginal biodistribution of the pyrimidinediones and demonstrate the usefulness of the pigtail macaque model in evaluating and screening antiretroviral IVR formulations prior to preclinical and clinical evaluation.

  18. QSAR Modeling Using Large-Scale Databases: Case Study for HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tarasova, Olga A; Urusova, Aleksandra F; Filimonov, Dmitry A; Nicklaus, Marc C; Zakharov, Alexey V; Poroikov, Vladimir V

    2015-07-27

    Large-scale databases are important sources of training sets for various QSAR modeling approaches. Generally, these databases contain information extracted from different sources. This variety of sources can produce inconsistency in the data, defined as sometimes widely diverging activity results for the same compound against the same target. Because such inconsistency can reduce the accuracy of predictive models built from these data, we are addressing the question of how best to use data from publicly and commercially accessible databases to create accurate and predictive QSAR models. We investigate the suitability of commercially and publicly available databases to QSAR modeling of antiviral activity (HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibition). We present several methods for the creation of modeling (i.e., training and test) sets from two, either commercially or freely available, databases: Thomson Reuters Integrity and ChEMBL. We found that the typical predictivities of QSAR models obtained using these different modeling set compilation methods differ significantly from each other. The best results were obtained using training sets compiled for compounds tested using only one method and material (i.e., a specific type of biological assay). Compound sets aggregated by target only typically yielded poorly predictive models. We discuss the possibility of "mix-and-matching" assay data across aggregating databases such as ChEMBL and Integrity and their current severe limitations for this purpose. One of them is the general lack of complete and semantic/computer-parsable descriptions of assay methodology carried by these databases that would allow one to determine mix-and-matchability of result sets at the assay level.

  19. Identification of Genotypic Changes in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease That Correlate with Reduced Susceptibility to the Protease Inhibitor Lopinavir among Viral Isolates from Protease Inhibitor-Experienced Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Dale J.; Isaacson, Jeffrey D.; King, Martin S.; Brun, Scott C.; Xu, Yi; Real, Kathryn; Bernstein, Barry M.; Japour, Anthony J.; Sun, Eugene; Rode, Richard A.

    2001-01-01

    The association of genotypic changes in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease with reduced in vitro susceptibility to the new protease inhibitor lopinavir (previously ABT-378) was explored using a panel of viral isolates from subjects failing therapy with other protease inhibitors. Two statistical tests showed that specific mutations at 11 amino acid positions in protease (L10F/I/R/V, K20M/R, L24I, M46I/L, F53L, I54L/T/V, L63P, A71I/L/T/V, V82A/F/T, I84V, and L90M) were associated with reduced susceptibility. Mutations at positions 82, 54, 10, 63, 71, and 84 were most closely associated with relatively modest (4- and 10-fold) changes in phenotype, while the K20M/R and F53L mutations, in conjunction with multiple other mutations, were associated with >20- and >40-fold-reduced susceptibility, respectively. The median 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of lopinavir against isolates with 0 to 3, 4 or 5, 6 or 7, and 8 to 10 of the above 11 mutations were 0.8-, 2.7-, 13.5-, and 44.0-fold higher, respectively, than the IC50 against wild-type HIV. On average, the IC50 of lopinavir increased by 1.74-fold per mutation in isolates containing three or more mutations. Each of the 16 viruses that displayed a >20-fold change in susceptibility contained mutations at residues 10, 54, 63, and 82 and/or 84, along with a median of three mutations at residues 20, 24, 46, 53, 71, and 90. The number of protease mutations from the 11 identified in these analyses (the lopinavir mutation score) may be useful for the interpretation of HIV genotypic resistance testing with respect to lopinavir-ritonavir (Kaletra) regimens and may provide insight into the genetic barrier to resistance to lopinavir-ritonavir in both antiretroviral therapy-naive and protease inhibitor-experienced patients. PMID:11462018

  20. An in silico approach for identification of novel inhibitors as a potential therapeutics targeting HIV-1 viral infectivity factor.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Chanda; Nischal, Anuradha; Bandaru, Srinivas; Kasera, Priyadarshani; Rajput, Ashish; Nayarisseri, Anuraj; Khattri, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Currently available antiviral drugs target the pol-encoded retroviral enzymes or integrases, in addition, inhibitors that target HIV-1 envelope-receptor interactions have also been recently approved. Recent understanding of the interactions between HIV-1 and host restriction factors has provided fresh avenues for development of novel antiviral drugs. For example, viral infectivity factor (Vif) now surfaced as an important therapeutic target in treatment of HIV infection. Vif suppresses A3G antiviral activity by targeting these proteins for polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. In the present study we analyzed the inhibitory potential of VEC5 and RN18 to inhibit the Vif-A3G interaction through protein- protein docking studies. Perusal of the study showed that, VEC5 and RN18 though inhibits the interaction however showed sub optimal potential. To overcome this set back, we identified 35 structural analogues of VEC5 and 18 analogues of RN18 through virtual screening approach. Analogue with PubCID 71624757 and 55358204 (AKOS006479723) -structurally akin to VEC5 and RN18 respectively showed much appreciable interaction than their respective parent compound. Evident from Vif-A3G; protein - protein docking studies, analogue PubCID 71624757 demonstrated 1.08 folds better inhibitory potential than its parent compound VEC5 while analogue PubCID 55358204 was 1.15 folds better than RN18. Further these analogues passed drug likeness filters and predicted to be non- toxic. We expect these analogues can be put to pharmacodynamic studies that can pave way the breakthrough in HIV therapeutics.

  1. Estimation of the Binding Free Energy of AC1NX476 to HIV-1 Protease Wild Type and Mutations Using Free Energy Perturbation Method.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Son Tung; Mai, Binh Khanh; Hiep, Dinh Minh; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-10-01

    The binding mechanism of AC1NX476 to HIV-1 protease wild type and mutations was studied by the docking and molecular dynamics simulations. The binding free energy was calculated using the double-annihilation binding free energy method. It is shown that the binding affinity of AC1NX476 to wild type is higher than not only ritonavir but also darunavir, making AC1NX476 become attractive candidate for HIV treatment. Our theoretical results are in excellent agreement with the experimental data as the correlation coefficient between calculated and experimentally measured binding free energies R = 0.993. Residues Asp25-A, Asp29-A, Asp30-A, Ile47-A, Gly48-A, and Val50-A from chain A, and Asp25-B from chain B play a crucial role in the ligand binding. The mutations were found to reduce the receptor-ligand interaction by widening the binding cavity, and the binding propensity is mainly driven by the van der Waals interaction. Our finding may be useful for designing potential drugs to combat with HIV.

  2. Novel Dengue Virus NS2B/NS3 Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hongmei; Bock, Stefanie; Snitko, Mariya; Berger, Thilo; Weidner, Thomas; Holloway, Steven; Kanitz, Manuel; Diederich, Wibke E.; Steuber, Holger; Walter, Christof; Hofmann, Daniela; Weißbrich, Benedikt; Spannaus, Ralf; Acosta, Eliana G.; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Engels, Bernd; Schirmeister, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever is a severe, widespread, and neglected disease with more than 2 million diagnosed infections per year. The dengue virus NS2B/NS3 protease (PR) represents a prime target for rational drug design. At the moment, there are no clinical PR inhibitors (PIs) available. We have identified diaryl (thio)ethers as candidates for a novel class of PIs. Here, we report the selective and noncompetitive inhibition of the serotype 2 and 3 dengue virus PR in vitro and in cells by benzothiazole derivatives exhibiting 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) in the low-micromolar range. Inhibition of replication of DENV serotypes 1 to 3 was specific, since all substances influenced neither hepatitis C virus (HCV) nor HIV-1 replication. Molecular docking suggests binding at a specific allosteric binding site. In addition to the in vitro assays, a cell-based PR assay was developed to test these substances in a replication-independent way. The new compounds inhibited the DENV PR with IC50s in the low-micromolar or submicromolar range in cells. Furthermore, these novel PIs inhibit viral replication at submicromolar concentrations. PMID:25487800

  3. In Vitro Selection of HIV-1 CRF08_BC Variants Resistant to Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Zhang, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Hao-Jie; Zhang, Qiwei; Chen, Zhiwei; Huang, Jian-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) circulating recombinant form 08_BC (CRF08_BC), carrying the recombinant reverse transcriptase (RT) gene from subtypes B and C, has recently become highly prevalent in Southern China. As the number of patients increases, it is important to characterize the drug resistance mutations of CRF08_BC, especially against widely used antiretrovirals. In this study, clinically isolated virus (2007CNGX-HK), confirmed to be CRF08_BC with its sequence deposited in GenBank (KF312642), was propagated in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with increasing concentrations of nevirapine (NVP), efavirenz (EFV), or lamivudine (3TC). Three different resistance patterns led by initial mutations of Y181C, E138G, and Y188C were detected after the selection with NVP. Initial mutations, in combination with other previously reported substitutions (K20R, D67N, V90I, K101R/E, V106I/A, V108I, F116L, E138R, A139V, V189I, G190A, D218E, E203K, H221Y, F227L, N348I, and T369I) or novel mutations (V8I, S134N, C162Y, L228I, Y232H, E396G, and D404N), developed during NVP selection. EFV-associated variations contained two initial mutations (L100I and Y188C) and three other mutations (V106L, F116Y, and A139V). Phenotypic analyses showed that E138R, Y181C, and G190A contributed high-level resistance to NVP, while L100I and V106L significantly reduced virus susceptibility to EFV. Y188C was 20-fold less sensitive to both NVP and EFV. As expected, M184I alone, or with V90I or D67N, decreased 3TC susceptibility by over 1,000-fold. Although the mutation profile obtained in culture may be different from the patients, these results may still provide useful information to monitor and optimize the antiretroviral regimens. PMID:25482475

  4. A Spider-Derived Kunitz-Type Serine Protease Inhibitor That Acts as a Plasmin Inhibitor and an Elastase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hu; Lee, Kwang Sik; Kim, Bo Yeon; Zou, Feng Ming; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Je, Yeon Ho; Li, Jianhong; Jin, Byung Rae

    2013-01-01

    Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors are involved in various physiological processes, such as ion channel blocking, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammation. While spider-derived Kunitz-type proteins show activity in trypsin or chymotrypsin inhibition and K+ channel blocking, no additional role for these proteins has been elucidated. In this study, we identified the first spider (Araneus ventricosus) Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor (AvKTI) that acts as a plasmin inhibitor and an elastase inhibitor. AvKTI possesses a Kunitz domain consisting of a 57-amino-acid mature peptide that displays features consistent with Kunitz-type inhibitors, including six conserved cysteine residues and a P1 lysine residue. Recombinant AvKTI, expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells, showed a dual inhibitory activity against trypsin (Ki 7.34 nM) and chymotrypsin (Ki 37.75 nM), defining a role for AvKTI as a spider-derived Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor. Additionally, AvKTI showed no detectable inhibitory effects on factor Xa, thrombin, or tissue plasminogen activator; however, AvKTI inhibited plasmin (Ki 4.89 nM) and neutrophil elastase (Ki 169.07 nM), indicating that it acts as an antifibrinolytic factor and an antielastolytic factor. These findings constitute molecular evidence that AvKTI acts as a plasmin inhibitor and an elastase inhibitor and also provide a novel view of the functions of a spider-derived Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor. PMID:23308198

  5. Discovery of MK-8718, an HIV Protease Inhibitor Containing a Novel Morpholine Aspartate Binding Group.

    PubMed

    Bungard, Christopher J; Williams, Peter D; Ballard, Jeanine E; Bennett, David J; Beaulieu, Christian; Bahnck-Teets, Carolyn; Carroll, Steve S; Chang, Ronald K; Dubost, David C; Fay, John F; Diamond, Tracy L; Greshock, Thomas J; Hao, Li; Holloway, M Katharine; Felock, Peter J; Gesell, Jennifer J; Su, Hua-Poo; Manikowski, Jesse J; McKay, Daniel J; Miller, Mike; Min, Xu; Molinaro, Carmela; Moradei, Oscar M; Nantermet, Philippe G; Nadeau, Christian; Sanchez, Rosa I; Satyanarayana, Tummanapalli; Shipe, William D; Singh, Sanjay K; Truong, Vouy Linh; Vijayasaradhi, Sivalenka; Wiscount, Catherine M; Vacca, Joseph P; Crane, Sheldon N; McCauley, John A

    2016-07-14

    A novel HIV protease inhibitor was designed using a morpholine core as the aspartate binding group. Analysis of the crystal structure of the initial lead bound to HIV protease enabled optimization of enzyme potency and antiviral activity. This afforded a series of potent orally bioavailable inhibitors of which MK-8718 was identified as a compound with a favorable overall profile.

  6. Identifying binding hot spots on protein surfaces by mixed-solvent molecular dynamics: HIV-1 protease as a test case.

    PubMed

    Ung, Peter M U; Ghanakota, Phani; Graham, Sarah E; Lexa, Katrina W; Carlson, Heather A

    2016-01-01

    Mixed-solvent molecular dynamics (MixMD) simulations use full protein flexibility and competition between water and small organic probes to achieve accurate hot-spot mapping on protein surfaces. In this study, we improved MixMD using human immunodeficiency virus type-1 protease (HIVp) as the test case. We used three probe-water solutions (acetonitrile-water, isopropanol-water, and pyrimidine-water), first at 50% w/w concentration and later at 5% v/v. Paradoxically, better mapping was achieved by using fewer probes; 5% simulations gave a superior signal-to-noise ratio and far fewer spurious hot spots than 50% MixMD. Furthermore, very intense and well-defined probe occupancies were observed in the catalytic site and potential allosteric sites that have been confirmed experimentally. The Eye site, an allosteric site underneath the flap of HIVp, has been confirmed by the presence of a 5-nitroindole fragment in a crystal structure. MixMD also mapped two additional hot spots: the Exo site (between the Gly16-Gly17 and Cys67-Gly68 loops) and the Face site (between Glu21-Ala22 and Val84-Ile85 loops). The Exo site was observed to overlap with crystallographic additives such as acetate and dimethyl sulfoxide that are present in different crystal forms of the protein. Analysis of crystal structures of HIVp in different symmetry groups has shown that some surface sites are common interfaces for crystal contacts, which means that they are surfaces that are relatively easy to desolvate and complement with organic molecules. MixMD should identify these sites; in fact, their occupancy values help establish a solid cut-off where "druggable" sites are required to have higher occupancies than the crystal-packing faces.

  7. Diketoacid-genre HIV-1 integrase inhibitors containing enantiomeric arylamide functionality.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Marchand, Christophe; Pommier, Yves; Burke, Terrence R

    2009-07-15

    Using our recently disclosed 2,3-dihydro-6,7-dihydroxy-1H-isoindol-1-one and 4,5-dihydroxy-1H-isoindole-1,3(2H)-dione integrase inhibitors, we report differential effects on inhibitory potency induced by introduction of an alpha-chiral center into a key aryl substituent. We show that introduction of the chiral center is uniformly deleterious to binding, with the (R)-enantiomer being more deleterious than the (S)-enantiomer. A greater enantiomeric difference in potency is shown by inhibitors that have restricted rotation of the aryl ring, with the larger difference being due to poorer potency of the (R)-enantiomer rather than higher potency of the (S)-enantiomer. The potency difference for enantiomers based on the isoindoline-1,3-dione ring system is less than for those derived from the isoindol-1-one ring system. Our findings provide useful information that should aid in understanding molecular binding interactions of DKA-derived IN inhibitors.

  8. Synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling of 4,6-diarylpyrimidines and diarylbenzenes as novel non-nucleosides HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ribone, Sergio R; Leen, Volker; Madrid, Marcela; Dehaen, Wim; Daelemans, Dirk; Pannecouque, Christophe; Briñón, Margarita C

    2012-12-01

    A series of novel 4,6-diarylpyrimidines (4,6-DAPY) and diarylbenzenes (DABE) compounds were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Among them, the most potent HIV-1 inhibitors were 8b, 8d, 14b and 18 (EC(50) = 0.049, 0.381, 0.599 and 0.398 μM, respectively), with HIV-1 inhibitory activity improved or similar to nevirapine (NVP, EC(50) = 0.097 μM) and delavirdine (DEV, EC(50) = 0.55 μM). The other compounds displayed moderate activity (8c, EC(50) = 5.25 μM) or were inactive (8a and 14a) against HIV-1 replication. Molecular modeling studies were performed with the synthesized compounds in complex with the wild-type reverse transcriptase (RT). A correlation was found between the anti-HIV activity and the electrostatic energy of interaction with Lys101 residue. These findings enrich the SAR of these Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NNRTIs) families.

  9. Molecular design, synthesis and biological evaluation of BP-O-DAPY and O-DAPY derivatives as non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shiqiong; Pannecouque, Christophe; Daelemans, Dirk; Ma, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Yang; Chen, Fen-Er; De Clercq, Erik

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports the synthesis and antiviral evaluation of a series of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) that combine the peculiar structural features of diarylpyrimidine derivatives (DAPYs) and benzophenone derivatives (BPs). The DAPY derivatives bearing benzoyl or alkoxyl substitutes on the A-ring showed the inhibitory activity against wild-type HIV-1 at the cellular level within the range of EC50 values from micromolar to nanomolar. Among these compounds, 1u exhibited the most potent anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50 = 0.06 ± 0.01 μM, SI > 6260), which were about 1.8-fold more active than nevirapine (NVP) and delavirdine (DLV). In addition, the binding modes with HIV-1 RT and the preliminary SAR studies of these derivatives were also considered for further investigation.

  10. Protease inhibitor in scorpion (Mesobuthus eupeus) venom prolongs the biological activities of the crude venom.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hakim; Xiao-Peng, Tang; Yang, Shi-Long; Lu, Qiu-Min; Lai, Ren

    2016-08-01

    It is hypothesized that protease inhibitors play an essential role in survival of venomous animals through protecting peptide/protein toxins from degradation by proteases in their prey or predators. However, the biological function of protease inhibitors in scorpion venoms remains unknown. In the present study, a trypsin inhibitor was purified and characterized from the venom of scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus, which enhanced the biological activities of crude venom components in mice when injected in combination with crude venom. This protease inhibitor, named MeKTT-1, belonged to Kunitz-type toxins subfamily. Native MeKTT-1 selectively inhibited trypsin with a Kivalue of 130 nmol·L(-1). Furthermore, MeKTT-1 was shown to be a thermo-stable peptide. In animal behavioral tests, MeKTT-1 prolonged the pain behavior induced by scorpion crude venom, suggesting that protease inhibitors in scorpion venom inhibited proteases and protect the functionally important peptide/protein toxins from degradation, consequently keeping them active longer. In conclusion, this was the first experimental evidence about the natural existence of serine protease inhibitor in the venom of scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus, which preserved the activity of venom components, suggests that scorpions may use protease inhibitors for survival.

  11. Autoantibodies directed against the protease inhibitor calpastatin in psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Y; Shimada, Y; Kawara, S; Takehara, K; Sato, S

    2005-01-01

    Psoriasis is believed to be a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease, but also exhibits autoantibody production. Calpastatin is an endogenous inhibitor of calpain, a ubiquitous protease that regulates inflammatory processes. Anti-calpastatin autoantibody was first identified as an autoantibody specific to rheumatoid arthritis, but has been also detected in other autoimmune diseases. In this study, we examined the presence and levels of anti-calpastatin antibody in 77 psoriasis patients by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Compared with normal controls, psoriasis patients exhibited significantly elevated IgG anti-calpastatin antibody levels that were similar to those found in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Remarkably, IgG anti-calpastatin autoantibody in sera from psoriasis patients inhibited calpastatin activity. Calpain II expression was up-regulated in psoriasis skin lesions compared with normal skin while calpastatin expression was normal. The results of this study reveal the presence of anti-calpastatin autoantibody in psoriasis. PMID:15654835

  12. Cardiovascular considerations in patients treated with HIV protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Colagreco, Joseph P

    2004-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has dramatically reduced mortality from HIV infection, transforming it in many cases to a chronic condition. However, protease inhibitors (PIs), which are integral components of most HAART regimens, are commonly associated with a host of metabolic disturbances that may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with HIV infection, potentially counteracting some of the positive health effects of PIs. Dyslipidemia is of particular concern. The Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group has established preliminary guidelines to evaluate and treat PI-associated dyslipidemia. A number of strategies exist for the management of PI-based dyslipidemia in HAART recipients; their advantages and disadvantages should be considered when treating patients with HIV infection.

  13. Mechanism-Based Inhibitors of Serine Proteases with High Selectivity Through Optimization of S’ Subsite Binding

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Dou, Dengfeng; He, Guijia; Lushington, Gerald H.; Groutas, William C.

    2009-01-01

    A series of mechanism-based inhibitors designed to interact with the S’ subsites of serine proteases was synthesized and their inhibitory activity toward the closely-related serine proteases human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and proteinase 3 (PR 3) was investigated. The compounds were found to be time-dependent inhibitors of HNE and were devoid of any inhibitory activity toward PR 3. The results suggest that highly selective inhibitors of serine proteases whose primary substrate specificity and active sites are similar can be identified by exploiting differences in their S’ subsites. The best inhibitor (compound 16) had a kinact/KI value of 4580 M−1 s−1. PMID:19394830

  14. Strategic use of dual regimens of boosted protease inhibitors plus maraviroc in poorly adherent subjects in view of long-acting drugs

    PubMed Central

    Capetti, Amedeo Ferdinando; Micale, Mariangela; Carenzi, Laura; Niero, Fosca; Landonio, Simona; Vimercati, Stefania; Dedivitiis, Gianfranco; Rizzardini, Giuliano

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In view of the forthcoming long-acting antiretrovirals, measures should be taken to prevent the selection of HIV drug resistance mutations. All subjects who had been switched to boosted protease inhibitors plus maraviroc (bPIs/MVC) with baseline HIV-1 RNA >50 copies/mL between June, 2014, and April, 2015, were retrospectively evaluated. HIV-1 RNA, CD4+ T-cells, serum glucose, creatinine, ALT, and adverse events were controlled every 3 to 4 months. We retrospectively analyzed 44 patients: 18 were taking darunavir/ritonavir (DRV/r) and 26 atazanavir/ritonavir (ATV/r) once daily, plus MVC 300 mg once daily. Seven subjects were in CDC stage C. All had a follow-up of at least 24 weeks, 28 exceeded 48 weeks, and 21 exceeded 72 weeks. All had experienced at least 1 viral failure and had selected at least 1 resistance-associated mutation (RAM). At baseline, 38 had plasma HIV-1 RNA 50-499 copies/mL and 6 had ≥500. At week 24, none had viremia >500 and 30 (68.2%) had suppressed HIV-1 RNA below 50 copies/mL. Of the subgroup with 48 weeks’ follow-up, 23 had HIV-1 RNA 50-499 copies/mL, 5 had ≥500, and 20/28 suppressed to <50 copies/mL. Of the longest observed subgroup (72 weeks), 17 had HIV-1 RNA 50-499 copies/mL, and 4 had ≥500 copies/mL and 15/21 (71.4%) suppressed to <50 copies/mL. This combination allowed fair suppression of viral replication, with minor genotypic evolution in 6 subjects, and seems to be a feasible strategy to prevent damaging future options. PMID:28207500

  15. High-throughput screening of improved protease inhibitors using a yeast cell surface display system and a yeast cell chip.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Wataru; Yoshino, Yuichi; Morisaka, Hironobu; Tsunetomo, Keiji; Koyo, Hirotaka; Kamiya, Shinji; Kawata, Noriyuki; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Protease-targeted inhibitors have been promising pharmaceuticals. Here, we combined a yeast cell surface display system with a yeast cell chip for the high-throughput screening of protease inhibitors, and succeeded in improving the activity of a protease inhibitor.

  16. Non-aqueous silicone elastomer gels as a vaginal microbicide delivery system for the HIV-1 entry inhibitor maraviroc

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Claire J.; Lowry, Deborah; Geer, Leslie; Veazey, Ronald S.; Shattock, Robin J.; Klasse, Per Johan; Mitchnick, Mark; Goldman, Laurie; Doyle, Lara A.; Muldoon, Brendan C.O.; Woolfson, A. David; Moore, John P.; Malcolm, R. Karl

    2011-01-01

    Aqueous semi-solid polymeric gels, such as those based on hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) and polyacrylic acid (e.g. Carbopol®), have a long history of use in vaginal drug delivery. However, despite their ubiquity, they often provide sub-optimal clinical performance, due to poor mucosal retention and limited solubility for poorly water-soluble actives. These issues are particularly pertinent for vaginal HIV microbicides, since many lead candidates are poorly water-soluble and where a major goal is the development of a coitally independent, once daily gel product. In this study, we report the use of a non-aqueous silicone elastomer gel for vaginal delivery of the HIV-1 entry inhibitor maraviroc. In vitro rheological, syringeability and retention studies demonstrated enhanced performance for silicone gels compared with a conventional aqueous HEC gel, while testing of the gels in the slug model confirmed a lack of mucosal irritancy. Pharmacokinetic studies following single dose vaginal administration of a maraviroc silicone gel in rhesus macaques showed higher and sustained MVC levels in vaginal fluid, vaginal tissue and plasma compared with a HEC gel containing the same maraviroc loading. The results demonstrate that non-aqueous silicone gels have potential as a formulation platform for coitally independent vaginal HIV microbicides. PMID:21864598

  17. NMR-assisted computational studies of peptidomimetic inhibitors bound in the hydrophobic pocket of HIV-1 glycoprotein 41

    PubMed Central

    Gochin, Miriam; Whitby, Landon R.; Phillips, Aaron H.; Boger, Dale L.

    2013-01-01

    Due to the inherently flexible nature of a protein – protein interaction surface, it is difficult both to inhibit the association with a small molecule, and to predict how it might bind to the surface. In this study, we have examined small molecules that mediate the interaction between a WWI motif on the C-helix of HIV-1 glycoprotein-41 and a deep hydrophobic pocket contained in the interior N-helical trimer. Association between these two components of gp41 leads to virus–cell and cell–cell fusion, which could be abrogated in the presence of an inhibitor that binds tightly in the pocket. We have studied a comprehensive combinatorial library of α-helical peptidomimetics, and found that compounds with strongly hydrophobic side chains had the highest affinity. Computational docking studies produced multiple possible binding modes due to the flexibility of both the binding site and the peptidomimetic compounds. We applied a transferred paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) experiment to two selected members of the library, and showed that addition of a few experimental constraints enabled definitive identification of unique binding poses. Computational docking results were extremely sensitive to side chain conformations, and slight variations could preclude observation of the experimentally validated poses. Different receptor structures were required for docking simulations to sample the correct pose for the two compounds. The study demonstrated the sensitivity of predicted poses to receptor structure and indicated the importance of experimental verification when docking to a malleable protein – protein interaction surface. PMID:23893342

  18. NMR-assisted computational studies of peptidomimetic inhibitors bound in the hydrophobic pocket of HIV-1 glycoprotein 41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gochin, Miriam; Whitby, Landon R.; Phillips, Aaron H.; Boger, Dale L.

    2013-07-01

    Due to the inherently flexible nature of a protein-protein interaction surface, it is difficult both to inhibit the association with a small molecule, and to predict how it might bind to the surface. In this study, we have examined small molecules that mediate the interaction between a WWI motif on the C-helix of HIV-1 glycoprotein-41 (gp41) and a deep hydrophobic pocket contained in the interior N-helical trimer. Association between these two components of gp41 leads to virus-cell and cell-cell fusion, which could be abrogated in the presence of an inhibitor that binds tightly in the pocket. We have studied a comprehensive combinatorial library of α-helical peptidomimetics, and found that compounds with strongly hydrophobic side chains had the highest affinity. Computational docking studies produced multiple possible binding modes due to the flexibility of both the binding site and the peptidomimetic compounds. We applied a transferred paramagnetic relaxation enhancement experiment to two selected members of the library, and showed that addition of a few experimental constraints enabled definitive identification of unique binding poses. Computational docking results were extremely sensitive to side chain conformations, and slight variations could preclude observation of the experimentally validated poses. Different receptor structures were required for docking simulations to sample the correct pose for the two compounds. The study demonstrated the sensitivity of predicted poses to receptor structure and indicated the importance of experimental verification when docking to a malleable protein-protein interaction surface.

  19. HIV gp120 H375 is unique to HIV-1 subtype CRF01_AE and confers strong resistance to the entry inhibitor BMS-599793, a candidate microbicide drug.

    PubMed

    Schader, Susan M; Colby-Germinario, Susan P; Quashie, Peter K; Oliveira, Maureen; Ibanescu, Ruxandra-Ilinca; Moisi, Daniela; Mespléde, Thibault; Wainberg, Mark A

    2012-08-01

    BMS-599793 is a small molecule entry inhibitor that binds to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120, resulting in the inhibition of CD4-dependent entry into cells. Since BMS-599793 is currently considered a candidate microbicide drug, we evaluated its efficacy against a number of primary patient HIV isolates from different subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) and showed that activity varied between ∼3 ρM and 7 μM at 50% effective concentrations (EC(50)s). Interestingly, CRF01_AE HIV-1 isolates consistently demonstrated natural resistance against this compound. Genotypic analysis of >1,600 sequences (Los Alamos HIV sequence database) indicated that a single amino acid polymorphism in Env, H375, may account for the observed BMS-599793 resistance in CRF01_AE HIV-1. Results of site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirmed this hypothesis, and in silico drug docking simulations identified a drug resistance mechanism at the molecular level. In addition, CRF01_AE viruses were shown to be resistant to multiple broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. Thus, our results not only provide insight into how Env polymorphisms may contribute to entry inhibitor resistance but also may help to elucidate how HIV can evade some broadly neutralizing antibodies. Furthermore, the high frequency of H375 in CRF01_AE HIV-1, and its apparent nonoccurrence in other subtypes, could serve as a means for rapid identification of CRF01_AE infections.

  20. Amelioration of immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis by synthetic protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jennette, J C; Tidwell, R R; Geratz, J D; Bing, D H; Falk, R J

    1987-06-01

    Proteases are involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases by participating in the activation of mediator systems and by producing proteolytic tissue injury. Homeostatic control of inflammation is accomplished in part by physiologic protease inhibitors. The authors investigated the effectiveness of a number of synthetic protease inhibitors in ameliorating the glomerular injury induced by immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis in mice. Two amidine-type protease inhibitors, bis (5-amidino-2-benzimidazolyl)methane and 1,2-bis (5-amidino-2-benzimidazolyl)ethane, had the greatest effects. They caused a marked reduction in glomerular necrosis (P less than 0.001) but did not affect the amount or site of immune complex localization or leukocyte influx. The inhibition constants of the protease inhibitors against nine purified physiologic proteases were determined. These results were discussed in relation to the effectiveness of the protease inhibitors in reducing glomerular injury. This investigation indicates that the administration of synthetic protease inhibitors can have a beneficial effect on immune-mediated inflammatory injury.

  1. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Siklos, Marton; BenAissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy. PMID:26713267

  2. PlantPIs--an interactive web resource on plant protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Consiglio, Arianna; Grillo, Giorgio; Licciulli, Flavio; Ceci, Luigi R; Liuni, Sabino; Losito, Nicola; Volpicella, Mariateresa; Gallerani, Raffaele; De Leo, Francesca

    2011-08-01

    PlantPIs is a web querying system for a database collection of plant protease inhibitors data. Protease inhibitors in plants are naturally occurring proteins that inhibit the function of endogenous and exogenous proteases. In this paper the design and development of a web framework providing a clear and very flexible way of querying plant protease inhibitors data is reported. The web resource is based on a relational database, containing data of plants protease inhibitors publicly accessible, and a graphical user interface providing all the necessary browsing tools, including a data exporting function. PlantPIs contains information extracted principally from MEROPS database, filtered, annotated and compared with data stored in other protein and gene public databases, using both automated techniques and domain expert evaluations. The data are organized to allow a flexible and easy way to access stored information. The database is accessible at http://www.plantpis.ba.itb.cnr.it/.

  3. Model-Based Phase 3 Dose Selection for HIV-1 Attachment Inhibitor Prodrug BMS-663068 in HIV-1-Infected Patients: Population Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics of the Active Moiety, BMS-626529

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Ishani; Zhu, Li; Abu Tarif, Malaz; Hruska, Matthew; Sadler, Brian M.; Pitsiu, Maria; Joshi, Samit; Hanna, George J.; Lataillade, Max; Boulton, David W.

    2016-01-01

    BMS-663068 is an oral prodrug of the HIV-1 attachment inhibitor BMS-626529, which prevents viral attachment to host CD4+ T cells by binding to HIV-1 gp120. To guide dose selection for the phase 3 program, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling was performed using data from two phase 2 studies with HIV-1-infected subjects (n = 244). BMS-626529 population pharmacokinetics were described by a two-compartment model with first-order elimination from the central compartment, zero-order release of prodrug from the extended-release formulation into a hypothetical absorption compartment, and first-order absorption into the central compartment. The covariates of BMS-663068 formulation type, lean body mass, baseline CD8+ T-cell percentage, and ritonavir coadministration were found to be significant contributors to intersubject variability. Exposure-response analyses showed a relationship between the loge-transformed concentration at the end of a dosing interval (Ctau) normalized for the protein binding-adjusted BMS-626529 half-maximal (50%) inhibitory concentration (PBAIC50) and the change in the HIV-1 RNA level from the baseline level after 7 days of BMS-663068 monotherapy. The probability of achieving a decline in HIV-1 RNA level of >0.5 or >1.0 log10 copies/ml as a function of the loge-transformed PBAIC50-adjusted Ctau after 7 days of monotherapy was 99 to 100% and 57 to 73%, respectively, for proposed BMS-663068 doses of 400 mg twice daily (BID), 600 mg BID (not studied in the phase 2b study), 800 mg BID, 600 mg once daily (QD), and 1,200 mg QD. On the basis of a slight advantage in efficacy of BID dosing over QD dosing, similar responses for the 600- and 800-mg BID doses, and prior clinical observations, BMS-663068 at 600 mg BID was predicted to have the optimal benefit-risk profile and selected for further clinical investigation. (The phase 2a proof-of-concept study AI438006 and the phase 2b study AI438011 are registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under numbers NCT01009814

  4. Synergistic Activation of Latent HIV-1 Expression by Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors and Bryostatin-1

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Bonet, Marta; Isabel Clemente, Maria; Jesús Serramía, Maria; Muñoz, Eduardo; Moreno, Santiago; Ángeles Muñoz-Fernández, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Viral reactivation from latently infected cells has become a promising therapeutic approach to eradicate HIV. Due to the complexity of the viral latency, combinations of efficient and available drugs targeting different pathways of latency are needed. In this work, we evaluated the effect of various combinations of bryostatin-1 (BRY) and novel histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) on HIV-reactivation and on cellular phenotype. The lymphocyte (J89GFP) or monocyte/macrophage (THP89GFP) latently infected cell lines were treated with BRY, panobinostat (PNB) and romidepsin (RMD) either alone or in combination. Thus, the effect on the viral reactivation was evaluated. We calculated the combination index for each drug combination; the BRY/HDACIs showed a synergistic HIV-reactivation profile in the majority of the combinations tested, whereas non-synergistic effects were observed when PNB was mixed with RMD. Indeed, the 75% effective concentrations of BRY, PNB and RMD were reduced in these combinations. Moreover, primary CD4 T cells treated with such drug combinations presented similar activation and proliferation profiles in comparison with single drug treated cells. Summing up, combinations between BRY, PNB and/or RMD presented a synergistic profile by inducing virus expression in HIV-latently infected cells, rendering these combinations an attractive novel and safe option for future clinical trials. PMID:26563568

  5. A multivalent inhibitor of the DC-SIGN dependent uptake of HIV-1 and Dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Varga, Norbert; Sutkeviciute, Ieva; Ribeiro-Viana, Renato; Berzi, Angela; Ramdasi, Rasika; Daghetti, Anna; Vettoretti, Gerolamo; Amara, Ali; Clerici, Mario; Rojo, Javier; Fieschi, Franck; Bernardi, Anna

    2014-04-01

    DC-SIGN is a C-type lectin receptor on antigen presenting cells (dendritic cells) which has an important role in some viral infection, notably by HIV and Dengue virus (DV). Multivalent presentation of carbohydrates on dendrimeric scaffolds has been shown to inhibit DC-SIGN binding to HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120, thus blocking viral entry. This approach has interesting potential applications for infection prophylaxis. In an effort to develop high affinity inhibitors of DC-SIGN mediated viral entry, we have synthesized a group of glycodendrimers of different valency that bear different carbohydrates or glycomimetic DC-SIGN ligands and have studied their DC-SIGN binding activity and antiviral properties both in an HIV and a Dengue infection model. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) competition studies have demonstrated that the materials obtained bind efficiently to DC-SIGN with IC50s in the μm range, which depend on the nature of the ligand and on the valency of the scaffold. In particular, a hexavalent presentation of the DC-SIGN selective antagonist 4 displayed high potency, as well as improved accessibility and chemical stability relative to previously reported dendrimers. At low μm concentration the material was shown to block both DC-SIGN mediated uptake of DV by Raji cells and HIV trans-infection of T cells.

  6. Anti-HIV-1 Activity Prediction of Novel Gp41 Inhibitors Using Structure-Based Virtual Screening and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Saghi; Saghaie, Lotfollah; Fassihi, Afshin

    2017-03-01

    The fusion of viral and host cell membranes is mediated using gp41 subunit of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein. As the HIV-1 enters the host cells, the two helical regions (HR1 and HR2) in the ectodomain of gp41 form a six-helix bundle, which carries the target and viral cell membranes to close proximity. Steps of this process serve as attractive targets for developing HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Identification of some novel HIV fusion inhibitors with the goal of blocking the formation of the six-helix bundle was accomplished by computer-aided drug design techniques. A virtual screening strategy was employed to recognize small molecules presumably able to bind the gp41 at the internal interface of the NHR helices at the core native viral six-helix. This study was carried out in two stages. In the first stage, a library of more than seven thousand compounds was collected from ZINC, PubChem and BindingDB databases and protein data bank. Key contacts of known inhibitors with gp41 binding site residues were considered as the collecting criteria. In the second stage series of filtering processes were performed on this library in subsequent steps to find the potential gp41 inhibitors. The filtering criteria included pharmacokinetic and ADMET properties as well as in silico anti-HIV-1 prediction. Molecular docking simulation was carried out to identify interactions of the filtered molecules with the key residues in the gp41 binding site. Finally, molecular dynamics simulation indicates the superior inhibitory ability of three selected compounds over the known gp41inhibitor, NB-64.

  7. Phages and HIV-1: From Display to Interplay

    PubMed Central

    Delhalle, Sylvie; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Chevigné, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The complex hide-and-seek game between HIV-1 and the host immune system has impaired the development of an efficient vaccine. In addition, the high variability of the virus impedes the long-term control of viral replication by small antiviral drugs. For more than 20 years, phage display technology has been intensively used in the field of HIV-1 to explore the epitope landscape recognized by monoclonal and polyclonal HIV-1-specific antibodies, thereby providing precious data about immunodominant and neutralizing epitopes. In parallel, biopanning experiments with various combinatorial or antibody fragment libraries were conducted on viral targets as well as host receptors to identify HIV-1 inhibitors. Besides these applications, phage display technology has been applied to characterize the enzymatic specificity of the HIV-1 protease. Phage particles also represent valuable alternative carriers displaying various HIV-1 antigens to the immune system and eliciting antiviral responses. This review presents and summarizes the different studies conducted with regard to the nature of phage libraries, target display mode and biopanning procedures. PMID:22606007

  8. Anti-HIV-1 activity of propolis in CD4(+) lymphocyte and microglial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Gekker, Genya; Hu, Shuxian; Spivak, Marla; Lokensgard, James R; Peterson, Phillip K

    2005-11-14

    An urgent need for additional agents to treat human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection led us to assess the anti-HIV-1 activity of the natural product propolis in CD4(+) lymphocytes and microglial cell cultures. Propolis inhibited viral expression in a concentration-dependent manner (maximal suppression of 85 and 98% was observed at 66.6 microg/ml propolis in CD4(+) and microglial cell cultures, respectively). Similar anti-HIV-1 activity was observed with propolis samples from several geographic regions. The mechanism of propolis antiviral property in CD4(+) lymphocytes appeared to involve, in part, inhibition of viral entry. While propolis had an additive antiviral effect on the reverse transcriptase inhibitor zidovudine, it had no noticeable effect on the protease inhibitor indinavir. The results of this in vitro study support the need for clinical trials of propolis or one or more of its components in the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  9. Ribonuclease H/DNA Polymerase HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Dual Inhibitor: Mechanistic Studies on the Allosteric Mode of Action of Isatin-Based Compound RMNC6

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Angela; Meleddu, Rita; Esposito, Francesca; Distinto, Simona; Bianco, Giulia; Masaoka, Takashi; Maccioni, Elias; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Alcaro, Stefano; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.; Tramontano, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H (RNase H) activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are needed for the replication of the viral genome and are validated drug targets. However, there are no approved drugs inhibiting RNase H and the efficiency of DNA polymerase inhibitors can be diminished by the presence of drug resistance mutations. In this context, drugs inhibiting both activities could represent a significant advance towards better anti-HIV therapies. We report on the mechanisms of allosteric inhibition of a newly synthesized isatin-based compound designated as RMNC6 that showed IC50 values of 1.4 and 9.8 μM on HIV-1 RT-associated RNase H and polymerase activities, respectively. Blind docking studies predict that RMNC6 could bind two different pockets in the RT: one in the DNA polymerase domain (partially overlapping the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor [NNRTI] binding pocket), and a second one close to the RNase H active site. Enzymatic studies showed that RMNC6 interferes with efavirenz (an approved NNRTI) in its binding to the RT polymerase domain, although NNRTI resistance-associated mutations such as K103N, Y181C and Y188L had a minor impact on RT susceptibility to RMNC6. In addition, despite being naturally resistant to NNRTIs, the polymerase activity of HIV-1 group O RT was efficiently inhibited by RMNC6. The compound was also an inhibitor of the RNase H activity of wild-type HIV-1 group O RT, although we observed a 6.5-fold increase in the IC50 in comparison with the prototypic HIV-1 group M subtype B enzyme. Mutagenesis studies showed that RT RNase H domain residues Asn474 and Tyr501, and in a lesser extent Ala502 and Ala508, are critical for RMNC6 inhibition of the endonuclease activity of the RT, without affecting its DNA polymerization activity. Our results show that RMNC6 acts as a dual inhibitor with allosteric sites in the DNA polymerase and the RNase H domains of HIV-1 RT. PMID:26800261

  10. Ribonuclease H/DNA Polymerase HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Dual Inhibitor: Mechanistic Studies on the Allosteric Mode of Action of Isatin-Based Compound RMNC6.

    PubMed

    Corona, Angela; Meleddu, Rita; Esposito, Francesca; Distinto, Simona; Bianco, Giulia; Masaoka, Takashi; Maccioni, Elias; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Alcaro, Stefano; Le Grice, Stuart F J; Tramontano, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H (RNase H) activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are needed for the replication of the viral genome and are validated drug targets. However, there are no approved drugs inhibiting RNase H and the efficiency of DNA polymerase inhibitors can be diminished by the presence of drug resistance mutations. In this context, drugs inhibiting both activities could represent a significant advance towards better anti-HIV therapies. We report on the mechanisms of allosteric inhibition of a newly synthesized isatin-based compound designated as RMNC6 that showed IC50 values of 1.4 and 9.8 μM on HIV-1 RT-associated RNase H and polymerase activities, respectively. Blind docking studies predict that RMNC6 could bind two different pockets in the RT: one in the DNA polymerase domain (partially overlapping the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor [NNRTI] binding pocket), and a second one close to the RNase H active site. Enzymatic studies showed that RMNC6 interferes with efavirenz (an approved NNRTI) in its binding to the RT polymerase domain, although NNRTI resistance-associated mutations such as K103N, Y181C and Y188L had a minor impact on RT susceptibility to RMNC6. In addition, despite being naturally resistant to NNRTIs, the polymerase activity of HIV-1 group O RT was efficiently inhibited by RMNC6. The compound was also an inhibitor of the RNase H activity of wild-type HIV-1 group O RT, although we observed a 6.5-fold increase in the IC50 in comparison with the prototypic HIV-1 group M subtype B enzyme. Mutagenesis studies showed that RT RNase H domain residues Asn474 and Tyr501, and in a lesser extent Ala502 and Ala508, are critical for RMNC6 inhibition of the endonuclease activity of the RT, without affecting its DNA polymerization activity. Our results show that RMNC6 acts as a dual inhibitor with allosteric sites in the DNA polymerase and the RNase H domains of HIV-1 RT.

  11. Modulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by bacterial metalloproteases and protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Michael B; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Xiaoning; Shanks, Robert M; Thibodeau, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    The serralysin family of metalloproteases is associated with the virulence of multiple gram-negative human pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens. The serralysin proteases share highly conserved catalytic domains and show evolutionary similarity to the mammalian matrix metalloproteases. Our previous studies demonstrated that alkaline protease (AP) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of activating the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), leading to an increase in sodium absorption in airway epithelia. The serralysin proteases are often co-expressed with endogenous, intracellular or periplasmic inhibitors, which putatively protect the bacterium from unwanted or unregulated protease activities. To evaluate the potential use of these small protein inhibitors in regulating the serralysin induced activation of ENaC, proteases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens were purified for characterization along with a high affinity inhibitor from Pseudomonas. Both proteases showed activity against in vitro substrates and could be blocked by near stoichiometric concentrations of the inhibitor. In addition, both proteases were capable of activating ENaC when added to the apical surfaces of multiple epithelial cells with similar slow activation kinetics. The high-affinity periplasmic inhibitor from Pseudomonas effectively blocked this activation. These data suggest that multiple metalloproteases are capable of activating ENaC. Further, the endogenous, periplasmic bacterial inhibitors may be useful for modulating the downstream effects of the serralysin virulence factors under physiological conditions.

  12. Evidence for Reduced Drug Susceptibility without Emergence of Major Protease Mutations following Protease Inhibitor Monotherapy Failure in the SARA Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Katherine A.; Parry, Chris M.; McCormick, Adele; Kapaata, Anne; Lyagoba, Fred; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Gilks, Charles F.; Goodall, Ruth; Spyer, Moira; Kityo, Cissy; Pillay, Deenan; Gupta, Ravindra K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Major protease mutations are rarely observed following failure with protease inhibitors (PI), and other viral determinants of failure to PI are poorly understood. We therefore characterized Gag-Protease phenotypic susceptibility in subtype A and D viruses circulating in East Africa following viral rebound on PIs. Methods Samples from baseline and treatment failure in patients enrolled in the second line LPV/r trial SARA underwent phenotypic susceptibility testing. Data were expressed as fold-change in susceptibility relative to a LPV-susceptible reference strain. Results We cloned 48 Gag-Protease containing sequences from seven individuals and performed drug resistance phenotyping from pre-PI and treatment failure timepoints in seven patients. For the six patients where major protease inhibitor resistance mutations did not emerge, mean fold-change EC50 to LPV was 4.07 fold (95% CI, 2.08–6.07) at the pre-PI timepoint. Following viral failure the mean fold-change in EC50 to LPV was 4.25 fold (95% CI, 1.39–7.11, p = 0.91). All viruses remained susceptible to DRV. In our assay system, the major PI resistance mutation I84V, which emerged in one individual, conferred a 10.5-fold reduction in LPV susceptibility. One of the six patients exhibited a significant reduction in susceptibility between pre-PI and failure timepoints (from 4.7 fold to 9.6 fold) in the absence of known major mutations in protease, but associated with changes in Gag: V7I, G49D, R69Q, A120D, Q127K, N375S and I462S. Phylogenetic analysis provided evidence of the emergence of genetically distinct viruses at the time of treatment failure, indicating ongoing viral evolution in Gag-protease under PI pressure. Conclusions Here we observe in one patient the development of significantly reduced susceptibility conferred by changes in Gag which may have contributed to treatment failure on a protease inhibitor containing regimen. Further phenotype-genotype studies are required to elucidate genetic

  13. Site-Specific Polymer Attachment to HR2 Peptide Fusion Inhibitors against HIV-1 Decreases Binding Association Rates and Dissociation Rates Rather Than Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Danial, Maarten; Stauffer, Angela N; Wurm, Frederik R; Root, Michael J; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2017-03-15

    A popular strategy for overcoming the limited plasma half-life of peptide heptad repeat 2 (HR2) fusion inhibitors against HIV-1 is conjugation with biocompatible polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). However, despite improved resistance to proteolysis and reduced renal elimination, covalent attachment of polymers often causes a loss in therapeutic potency. In this study, we investigated the molecular origins of the loss in potency upon conjugation of linear, midfunctional, and hyperbranched PEG-like polymers to peptides that inhibit HIV-1-host cell membrane fusion. Fluorescence binding assays revealed that polymer conjugation imparted mass transport limitations that manifested as coexistent slower association and dissociation rates from the gp41 target on HIV-1. Furthermore, reduced association kinetics rather than affinity disruption was responsible for the loss in antiviral potency. Finally, the binding assays indicated that the unmodified HR2-derived peptide demonstrated diffusion-limited binding. The observed high potency of the unmodified peptide in HIV-1 inhibition assays was therefore attributed to rapid peptide conformational changes upon binding to the gp41 prehairpin structure. This study emphasizes that the view in which polymer ligation to therapeutic peptides inadvertently leads to loss in potency due to a loss in binding affinity requires scientific verification on a case-by-case basis and that high peptide potency may be due to rapid target-binding events.

  14. A Novel Class of HIV-1 Antiviral Agents Targeting HIV via a SUMOylation-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Madu, Ikenna G.; Li, Shirley; Li, Baozong; Li, Haitang; Chang, Tammy; Li, Yi-Jia; Vega, Ramir; Rossi, John; Yee, Jiing-Kuan; Zaia, John; Chen, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    We have recently identified a chemotype of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-specific protease (SENP) inhibitors. Prior to the discovery of their SENP inhibitory activity, these compounds were found to inhibit HIV replication, but with an unknown mechanism. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of how these compounds inhibit HIV-1. We found that they do not affect HIV-1 viral production, but significantly inhibited the infectivity of the virus. Interestingly, virions produced from cells treated with these compounds could gain entry and carry out reverse transcription, but could not efficiently integrate into the host genome. This phenotype is different from the virus produced from cells treated with the class of anti-HIV-1 agents that inhibit HIV protease. Upon removal of the SUMO modification sites in the HIV-1 integrase, the compound no longer alters viral infectivity, indicating that the effect is related to SUMOylation of the HIV integrase. This study identifies a novel mechanism for inhibiting HIV-1 integration and a new class of small molecules that inhibits HIV-1 via such mechanism that may contribute a new strategy for cure of HIV-1 by inhibiting the production of infectious virions upon activation from latency. PMID:26643614

  15. In vitro combination of PNU-140690, a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease inhibitor, with ritonavir against ritonavir-sensitive and -resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Chong, K T; Pagano, P J

    1997-01-01

    PNU-140690 (sulfonamide-containing 5,6-dihydro-4-hydroxy-2-pyrone) is a potent, nonpeptidic inhibitor of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease currently under clinical evaluation. PNU-140690 and ritonavir were studied in two-drug combinations against the replication of HIV-1 clinical isolates in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. A ritonavir-sensitive (301-1x) and -resistant (301-6x) isolate pair derived from an individual before and after monotherapy with ritonavir were used. These isolates showed no significant difference in sensitivity to PNU-140690, but isolate 301-6x was more than 50-fold less sensitive to ritonavir than isolate 301-1x. Mathematical analysis showed that the combination of various concentrations of PNU-140690 with ritonavir yielded additive to moderately synergistic antiviral effects against the ritonavir-sensitive isolate and stronger synergy against the ritonavir-resistant isolate. The mechanism of synergy was not investigated, but the results suggested that both the virological and the observed in vitro pharmacological effects may have contributed to the observed synergy. Importantly, no significant antagonism was observed with the drug combinations studied. These data suggest that PNU-140690 may be useful in combination regimens with a structurally unrelated protease inhibitor such as ritonavir. PMID:9371335

  16. Protease-inhibitor interaction predictions: Lessons on the complexity of protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Fortelny, Nikolaus; Butler, Georgina S; Overall, Christopher Mark; Pavlidis, Paul

    2017-04-06

    Protein interactions shape proteome function and thus biology. Identification of protein interactions is a major goal in molecular biology, but biochemical methods, although improving, remain limited in coverage and accuracy. Whereas computational predictions can guide biochemical experiments, low validation rates of predictions remain a major limitation. Here, we investigated computational methods in the prediction of a specific type of interaction, the inhibitory interactions between proteases and their inhibitors. Proteases generate thousands of proteoforms that dynamically shape the functional state of proteomes. Despite the important regulatory role of proteases, knowledge of their inhibitors remains largely incomplete with the vast majority of proteases lacking an annotated inhibitor. To link inhibitors to their target proteases on a large scale, we applied computational methods to predict inhibitory interactions between proteases and their inhibitors based on complementary data including coexpression, phylogenetic similarity, structural information, co-annotation, and colocalization, and also surveyed general protein interaction networks for potential inhibitory interactions. In testing nine predicted interactions biochemically, we validated the inhibition of kallikrein 5 by serpin B12. Despite the use of a wide array of complementary data, we found a high false positive rate of computational predictions in biochemical follow-up. Based on a protease-specific definition of true negatives derived from the biochemical classification of proteases and inhibitors, we analyzed prediction accuracy of individual features. Thereby we identified feature-specific limitations, which also affected general protein interaction prediction methods. Interestingly, proteases were often not coexpressed with most of their functional inhibitors, contrary to what is commonly assumed and extrapolated predominantly from cell culture experiments. Predictions of inhibitory interactions

  17. Adherence and Viral Suppression among Infants and Young Children Initiating Protease Inhibitor-Based Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Teasdale, Chloe A; Abrams, Elaine J; Coovadia, Ashraf; Strehlau, Renate; Martens, Leigh; Kuhn, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background High levels of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) are considered necessary to achieve viral suppression. We analyzed data from a cohort of HIV-infected children who were less than 2 years of age receiving protease inhibitor (PI)-based ART to investigate associations between viral suppression and adherence ascertained using different methods. Methods Data were from the pre-randomization phase of a clinical trial in South Africa of HIV-infected children initiating either ritonavir-boosted lopinavir (LPV/r)- or ritonavir-based ART. At scheduled visits during the first 24 weeks of enrollment, study pharmacists measured quantities of medications returned (MR) to the clinic. Caregivers answered questionnaires on missed doses and adherence barriers. Associations between adherence and viral suppression (HIV-1 RNA <400 copies/mL) were investigated by regimen. Results By 24 weeks, 197/269 (73%) children achieved viral suppression. There was no association between viral suppression and caregiver reported missed doses or adherence barriers. For children receiving the LPV/r-based regimen, MR adherence to each of the three drugs in the regimen (LPV/r, lamivudine or stavudine) individually or together was associated with viral suppression at different adherence thresholds. For example, <85% adherence to any of the three medications significantly increased odds of lack of viral suppression (Odds Ratio [OR] 2.30 [95% CI: 1.30–4.07], p=.004). In contrast, for children receiving the ritonavir-based regimen, there was no consistent pattern of association between MR and viral suppression. Conclusions Caregiver reports of missed doses did not predict virologic response to treatment. Pharmacist medication reconciliation correlated strongly with virologic response for children taking a LPV/r-based regimen and appears to be a valid method for measuring pediatric adherence. PMID:23249913

  18. Probing the molecular mechanism of action of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor 4'-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) using pre-steady-state kinetics.

    PubMed

    Muftuoglu, Yagmur; Sohl, Christal D; Mislak, Andrea C; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Anderson, Karen S

    2014-06-01

    The novel antiretroviral 4'-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) is a potent nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NRTI). Unlike other FDA-approved NRTIs, EFdA contains a 3'-hydroxyl. Pre-steady-state kinetics showed RT preferred incorporating EFdA-TP over native dATP. Moreover, RT slowly inserted nucleotides past an EFdA-terminated primer, resulting in delayed chain termination with unaffected fidelity. This is distinct from KP1212, another 3'-hydroxyl-containing RT inhibitor considered to promote viral lethal mutagenesis. New mechanistic features of RT inhibition by EFdA are revealed.

  19. Interspecific Differences between D. pulex and D. magna in Tolerance to Cyanobacteria with Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kuster, Christian J.; Von Elert, Eric

    2013-01-01

    It is known that cyanobacteria negatively affect herbivores due to their production of toxins such as protease inhibitors. In the present study we investigated potential interspecific differences between two major herbivores, Daphnia magna and Daphnia pulex, in terms of their tolerance to cyanobacteria with protease inhibitors. Seven clones each of D. magna and of D. pulex were isolated from different habitats in Europe and North America. To test for interspecific differences in the daphnids’ tolerance to cyanobacteria, their somatic and population growth rates were determined for each D. magna and D. pulex clone after exposure to varying concentrations of two Microcystis aeruginosa strains. The M. aeruginosa strains NIVA and PCC− contained either chymotrypsin or trypsin inhibitors, but no microcystins. Mean somatic and population growth rates on a diet with 20% NIVA were significantly more reduced in D. pulex than in D. magna. On a diet with 10% PCC−, the population growth of D. pulex was significantly more reduced than that of D. magna. This indicates that D. magna is more tolerant to cyanobacteria with protease inhibitors than D. pulex. The reduction of growth rates was possibly caused by an interference of cyanobacterial inhibitors with proteases in the gut of Daphnia, as many other conceivable factors, which might have been able to explain the reduced growth, could be excluded as causal factors. Protease assays revealed that the sensitivities of chymotrypsins and trypsins to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors did not differ between D. magna and D. pulex. However, D. magna exhibited a 2.3-fold higher specific chymotrypsin activity than D. pulex, which explains the observed higher tolerance to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors of D. magna. The present study suggests that D. magna may control the development of cyanobacterial blooms more efficiently than D. pulex due to differences in their tolerance to cyanobacteria with protease inhibitors. PMID:23650523

  20. Assessment of the relative contribution of different protease inhibitors to the inhibition of plasmin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Levi, M; Roem, D; Kamp, A M; de Boer, J P; Hack, C E; ten Cate, J W

    1993-02-01

    It has been shown that the most important inhibitor of plasmin is alpha 2-antiplasmin, however, other protease inhibitors are able to inhibit this proteolytic enzyme as well. The contribution of the various protease inhibitors to the inhibition of plasmin in vivo has never been quantitatively assessed. To assess the relative contribution of the different protease inhibitors on the inhibition of plasmin we developed a series of sensitive immunoassays for the detection of complexes between plasmin and the protease inhibitors alpha 2-antiplasmin, alpha 2-macroglobulin, antithrombin III, alpha 1-antitrypsin and C1-inhibitor, utilizing monoclonal antibodies that are specifically directed against complexed protease inhibitors and a monoclonal antibody against plasmin. It was confirmed that alpha 2-antiplasmin is the most important inhibitor of plasmin in vivo, however, complexes of plasmin with alpha 2-macroglobulin, antithrombin III, alpha 1-antitrypsin- and C1-inhibitor were also detected. Particularly during activation of fibrinolysis complexes between plasmin and inhibitors other than alpha 2-antiplasmin were detected. It was observed that during different situations the inhibition profile of plasmin was not constant e.g. in patients with diffuse intravascular coagulation plasma levels of plasmin-alpha 1-antitrypsin and plasmin-C1-inhibitor were increased whereas in plasma from patients who were treated with thrombolytic agents complexes of plasmin with alpha 2-macroglobulin and with antithrombin III were significantly elevated. In conclusion, we confirmed the important role of alpha 2-antiplasmin in the inhibition of plasmin, however, in situations in which fibrinolysis is activated other protease inhibitors also account for the inhibition of plasmin in vivo.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. A Phase III Comparative Study of the Efficacy and Tolerability of Three Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Sparing Antiretroviral Regimens for Treatment-Naïve HIV-1-Infected Volunteers: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lennox, Jeffrey L.; Landovitz, Raphael J.; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Ofotokun, Ighovwerha; Na, Lumine H.; Godfrey, Catherine; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Sagar, Manish; Brown, Todd T.; Cohn, Susan E.; McComsey, Grace A.; Aweeka, Francesca; Fichtenbaum, Carl J.; Presti, Rachel M.; Koletar, Susan L.; Haas, David W.; Patterson, Kristine B.; Benson, Constance A.; Baugh, Bryan P.; Leavitt, Randi Y.; Rooney, James F.; Seekins, Daniel; Currier, Judith S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase (NNRTI) inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy is not suitable for all treatment-naïve HIV-infected persons. Objective Perform a rigorous evaluation of three NNRTI-sparing initial antiretroviral regimens to demonstrate equivalence for virologic efficacy and tolerability. Design Phase-III, 1:1:1 randomized, open label, >96 week study. Setting Fifty-seven sites in United States and Puerto Rico. Patients Treatment naïve, ≥18 years, HIV-1 RNA >1000 copies/mL, no nucleoside reverse transcriptase or protease inhibitor resistance. Intervention Atazanavir 300 mg with ritonavir 100 mg, daily; or raltegravir 400 mg twice daily; or darunavir 800 mg with ritonavir 100 mg, daily; plus emtricitabine 200 mg + tenofovir disoproxil fumarate 300 mg daily. Measurements Virologic failure defined as confirmed HIV-1 RNA >1000 copies/mL between 16 and 24 weeks, or >200 copies/mL at or after 24 weeks; tolerability failure defined as discontinuation of atazanavir, raltegravir or darunavir for toxicity. A secondary endpoint was a combination of virologic efficacy and tolerability. Results Among 1,809 participants all pairwise comparisons of incidence of virologic failure over 96-weeks demonstrated equivalence within ±10%. Raltegravir and ritonavir-boosted darunavir were equivalent for tolerability, whereas ritonavir-boosted atazanavir resulted in a 12.7% and a 9.2% higher incidence of tolerability discontinuation than raltegravir and ritonavir-boosted darunavir respectively, primarily due to hyperbilirubinemia. For combined virologic efficacy and tolerability ritonavir-boosted darunavir was superior to ritonavir-boosted atazanavir, and raltegravir was superior to both protease inhibitors. Antiretroviral resistance at time of virologic failure was rare but more likely with raltegravir. Limitations Open label; ritonavir not provided Conclusions Over 2 years all three regimens attain high and equivalent rates of virologic control. Regimens

  2. Structural Studies of a Rationally Selected Multi-Drug Resistant HIV-1 Protease Reveal Synergistic Effect of Distal Mutations on Flap Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Agniswamy, Johnson; Louis, John M; Roche, Julien; Harrison, Robert W; Weber, Irene T

    2016-01-01

    We report structural analysis of HIV protease variant PRS17 which was rationally selected by machine learning to represent wide classes of highly drug-resistant variants. Crystal structures were solved of PRS17 in the inhibitor-free form and in complex with antiviral inhibitor, darunavir. Despite its 17 mutations, PRS17 has only one mutation (V82S) in the inhibitor/substrate binding cavity, yet exhibits high resistance to all clinical inhibitors. PRS17 has none of the major mutations (I47V, I50V, I54ML, L76V and I84V) associated with darunavir resistance, but has 10,000-fold weaker binding affinity relative to the wild type PR. Comparable binding affinity of 8000-fold weaker than PR is seen for drug resistant mutant PR20, which bears 3 mutations associated with major resistance to darunavir (I47V, I54L and I84V). Inhibitor-free PRS17 shows an open flap conformation with a curled tip correlating with G48V flap mutation. NMR studies on inactive PRS17 D25N unambiguously confirm that the flaps adopt mainly an open conformation in solution very similar to that in the inhibitor-free crystal structure. In PRS17, the hinge loop cluster of mutations, E35D, M36I and S37D, contributes to the altered flap dynamics by a mechanism similar to that of PR20. An additional K20R mutation anchors an altered conformation of the hinge loop. Flap mutations M46L and G48V in PRS17/DRV complex alter the Phe53 conformation by steric hindrance between the side chains. Unlike the L10F mutation in PR20, L10I in PRS17 does not break the inter-subunit ion pair or diminish the dimer stability, consistent with a very low dimer dissociation constant comparable to that of wild type PR. Distal mutations A71V, L90M and I93L propagate alterations to the catalytic site of PRS17. PRS17 exhibits a molecular mechanism whereby mutations act synergistically to alter the flap dynamics resulting in significantly weaker binding yet maintaining active site contacts with darunavir.

  3. Structural Studies of a Rationally Selected Multi-Drug Resistant HIV-1 Protease Reveal Synergistic Effect of Distal Mutations on Flap Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Agniswamy, Johnson; Louis, John M.; Roche, Julien; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas

    2016-12-16

    We report structural analysis of HIV protease variant PRS17 which was rationally selected by machine learning to represent wide classes of highly drug-resistant variants. Crystal structures were solved of PRS17 in the inhibitor-free form and in complex with antiviral inhibitor, darunavir. Despite its 17 mutations, PRS17 has only one mutation (V82S) in the inhibitor/substrate binding cavity, yet exhibits high resistance to all clinical inhibitors. PRS17 has none of the major mutations (I47V, I50V, I54ML, L76V and I84V) associated with darunavir resistance, but has 10,000-fold weaker binding affinity relative to the wild type PR. Comparable binding affinity of 8000-fold weaker than PR is seen for drug resistant mutant PR20, which bears 3 mutations associated with major resistance to darunavir (I47V, I54L and I84V). Inhibitor-free PRS17 shows an open flap conformation with a curled tip correlating with G48V flap mutation. NMR studies on inactive PRS17 D25N unambiguously confirm that the flaps adopt mainly an open conformation in solution very similar to that in the inhibitor-free crystal structure. In PRS17, the hinge loop cluster of mutations, E35D, M36I and S37D, contributes to the altered flap dynamics by a mechanism similar to that of PR20. An additional K20R mutation anchors an altered conformation of the hinge loop. Flap mutations M46L and G48V in PRS17/DRV complex alter the Phe53 conformation by steric hindrance between the side chains. Unlike the L10F mutation in PR20, L10I in PRS17 does not break the inter-subunit ion pair or diminish the dimer stability, consistent with a very low dimer dissociation constant comparable to that of wild type PR. Distal mutations A71V, L90M and I93L propagate alterations to the catalytic site of PRS17. PRS17 exhibits a molecular mechanism whereby mutations act synergistically to alter the flap dynamics resulting in significantly weaker binding yet maintaining active site contacts with darunavir.

  4. Structural Studies of a Rationally Selected Multi-Drug Resistant HIV-1 Protease Reveal Synergistic Effect of Distal Mutations on Flap Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Agniswamy, Johnson; Louis, John M.; Roche, Julien; Harrison, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    We report structural analysis of HIV protease variant PRS17 which was rationally selected by machine learning to represent wide classes of highly drug-resistant variants. Crystal structures were solved of PRS17 in the inhibitor-free form and in complex with antiviral inhibitor, darunavir. Despite its 17 mutations, PRS17 has only one mutation (V82S) in the inhibitor/substrate binding cavity, yet exhibits high resistance to all clinical inhibitors. PRS17 has none of the major mutations (I47V, I50V, I54ML, L76V and I84V) associated with darunavir resistance, but has 10,000-fold weaker binding affinity relative to the wild type PR. Comparable binding affinity of 8000-fold weaker than PR is seen for drug resistant mutant PR20, which bears 3 mutations associated with major resistance to darunavir (I47V, I54L and I84V). Inhibitor-free PRS17 shows an open flap conformation with a curled tip correlating with G48V flap mutation. NMR studies on inactive PRS17 D25N unambiguously confirm that the flaps adopt mainly an open conformation in solution very similar to that in the inhibitor-free crystal structure. In PRS17, the hinge loop cluster of mutations, E35D, M36I and S37D, contributes to the altered flap dynamics by a mechanism similar to that of PR20. An additional K20R mutation anchors an altered conformation of the hinge loop. Flap mutations M46L and G48V in PRS17/DRV complex alter the Phe53 conformation by steric hindrance between the side chains. Unlike the L10F mutation in PR20, L10I in PRS17 does not break the inter-subunit ion pair or diminish the dimer stability, consistent with a very low dimer dissociation constant comparable to that of wild type PR. Distal mutations A71V, L90M and I93L propagate alterations to the catalytic site of PRS17. PRS17 exhibits a molecular mechanism whereby mutations act synergistically to alter the flap dynamics resulting in significantly weaker binding yet maintaining active site contacts with darunavir. PMID:27992544

  5. Identification of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase dual inhibitors by a combined shape-, 2D-fingerprint- and pharmacophore-based virtual screening approach.

    PubMed

    Distinto, Simona; Esposito, Francesca; Kirchmair, Johannes; Cardia, M Cristina; Gaspari, Marco; Maccioni, Elias; Alcaro, Stefano; Markt, Patrick; Wolber, Gerhard; Zinzula, Luca; Tramontano, Enzo

    2012-04-01

    We report the first application of ligand-based virtual screening (VS) methods for discovering new compounds able to inhibit both human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT)-associated functions, DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H (RNase H) activities. The overall VS campaign consisted of two consecutive screening processes. In the first, the VS platform Rapid Overlay of Chemical Structures (ROCS) was used to perform in silico shape-based similarity screening on the NCI compounds database in which a hydrazone derivative, previously shown to inhibit the HIV-1 RT, was chosen. As a result, 34 hit molecules were selected and assayed on both RT-associated functions. In the second, the 4 most potent RT inhibitors identified were selected as queries for parallel VS performed by combining shape-based, 2D-fingerprint and 3D-pharmacophore VS methods. Overall, a set of molecules characterized by new different scaffolds were identified as novel inhibitors of both HIV-1 RT-associated activities in the low micromolar range.

  6. Synthesis, Biological Activity, and Crystal Structure of Potent Nonnucleoside Inhibitors of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase That Retain Activity against Mutant Forms of the Enzyme†

    PubMed Central

    Morningstar, Marshall L.; Roth, Thomas; Farnsworth, David W.; Smith, Marilyn Kroeger; Watson, Karen; Buckheit, Robert W.; Das, Kalyan; Zhang, Wanyi; Arnold, Eddy; Julias, John G.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Michejda, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    In an ongoing effort to develop novel and potent nonnucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors that are effective against the wild type (WT) virus and clinically observed mutants, 1,2-bis-substituted benzimidazoles were synthesized and tested. Optimization of the N1 and C2 positions of benzimidazole led to the development of 1-(2,6-difluorobenzyl)-2-(2,6-difluorophenyl)-4-methylbenzimidazole (1) (IC50 = 0.2 μM, EC50 = 0.44 μM, and TC50 ≥ 100 against WT). This paper describes how substitution on the benzimidazole ring profoundly affects activity. Substituents at the benzimidazole C4 dramatically enhanced potency, while at C5 or C6 substituents were generally detrimental or neutral to activity, respectively. A 7-methyl analogue did not inhibit HIV-1 RT. Determination of the crystal structure of 1 bound to RT provided the basis for accurate modeling of additional analogues, which were synthesized and tested. Several derivatives were nanomolar inhibitors of wild-type virus and were effective against clinically relevant HIV-1 mutants. PMID:17663538

  7. Juggling jobs: roles and mechanisms of multifunctional protease inhibitors in plants.

    PubMed

    Grosse-Holz, Friederike M; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2016-05-01

    Multifunctional protease inhibitors juggle jobs by targeting different enzymes and thereby often controlling more than one biological process. Here, we discuss the biological functions, mechanisms and evolution of three types of multifunctional protease inhibitors in plants. The first type is double-headed inhibitors, which feature two inhibitory sites targeting proteases with different specificities (e.g. Bowman-Birk inhibitors) or even different hydrolases (e.g. α-amylase/protease inhibitors preventing both early germination and seed predation). The second type consists of multidomain inhibitors which evolved by intragenic duplication and are released by processing (e.g. multicystatins and potato inhibitor II, implicated in tuber dormancy and defence, respectively). The third type consists of promiscuous inhibitory folds which resemble mouse traps that can inhibit different proteases cleaving the bait they offer (e.g. serpins, regulating cell death, and α-macroglobulins). Understanding how multifunctional inhibitors juggle biological jobs increases our knowledge of the connections between the networks they regulate. These examples show that multifunctionality evolved independently from a remarkable diversity of molecular mechanisms that can be exploited for crop improvement and provide concepts for protein design.

  8. Design and Synthesis of Novel N-Arylsulfonyl-3-(2-yl-ethanone)-6-methylindole Derivatives as Inhibitors of HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Che, Zhiping; Liu, Shengming; Tian, Yuee; Hu, Zhenjie; Chen, Yingwu; Chen, Genqiang

    2015-01-01

    Seven novel N-arylsulfonyl-3-(2-yl-ethanone)-6-methylindole derivatives 4a–f and 6 were readily synthesized and have been identified as inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) replication. Initial biological studies indicated that among these derivatives, N-(p-ethyl)phenylsulfonyl-3-[2-morpholinoethanone]-6-methylindole (4f) and N-(p-ethyl)phenylsulfonyl-3-[2-(5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-yl-thio)ethanone]-6-methylindole (6) showed the most promising activity against HIV-1 replication. The effective concentration (EC50) and therapeutic index (TI) values of 4f and 6 were 9.42/4.62 μM, and >49.77/66.95, respectively. The cytotoxicity of these compounds has also been assessed. No significant cytotoxicities were found for any of these compounds. PMID:26110320

  9. Design and SAR of new substituted purines bearing aryl groups at N9 position as HIV-1 Tat-TAR interaction inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pang, Ruifang; Zhang, Chunlei; Yuan, Dekai; Yang, Ming

    2008-09-01

    Twenty-four purine derivatives bearing aryl groups at N9 position were designed and synthesized as HIV-1 Tat-TAR interaction inhibitors. All the compounds showed high antiviral activities in inhibiting the formation of SIV-induced syncytium in CEM174 cells. Ten of them with low cytotoxicities were evaluated by Tat dependent HIV-1 LTR-driven CAT gene expression colorimetric enzyme assay in human 293T cells at a concentration of 30 microM, indicating effective inhibitory activities of blocking the Tat-TAR interaction. The aryl groups at N9 position affected the binding affinities between compounds and TAR RNA, showing some specificities of aryl groups to TAR RNA.

  10. A novel class of cysteine protease inhibitors: solution structure of staphostatin A from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Dubin, Grzegorz; Krajewski, Marcin; Popowicz, Grzegorz; Stec-Niemczyk, Justyna; Bochtler, Matthias; Potempa, Jan; Dubin, Adam; Holak, Tad A

    2003-11-25

    A series of secreted proteases are included among the virulence factors documented for Staphylococcus aureus. In light of increasing antibiotic resistance of this dangerous human pathogen, these proteases are considered as suitable targets for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. The recent discovery of staphostatins, endogenous, highly specific, staphylococcal cysteine protease inhibitors, opened a possibility for structure-based design of low molecular weight analogues. Moreover, the crystal structure of staphostatin B revealed a distinct folding pattern and an unexpected, substrate-like binding mode. The solution structure of staphostatin A reported here confirms that staphostatins constitute a novel, distinct class of cysteine protease inhibitors. In addition, the structure knowledge-based mutagenesis studies shed light on individual structural features of staphostatin A, the inhibition mechanism, and the determinants of distinct specificity of staphostatins toward their target proteases.

  11. Metabolic Disorders in HIV-Infected Adolescents Receiving Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Santiprabhob, Jeerunda; Tanchaweng, Surapong; Maturapat, Sirinoot; Lermankul, Watcharee; Sricharoenchai, Sirintip; Wittawatmongkol, Orasri; Lapphra, Keswadee; Phongsamart, Wanatpreeya

    2017-01-01

    Protease inhibitor (PI) may cause abnormal glucose metabolism, abnormal lipid metabolism, and metabolic syndrome in HIV-infected adults but less well studied in Asian adolescents. This cross-sectional study evaluated anthropometric factors, oral glucose tolerance test, and lipid profiles of perinatally HIV-infected Thai adolescents who had received PI-based antiretroviral therapy for at least 6 months. Eighty adolescents were enrolled [median (IQR) age 16.7 (14.6–18.0) years, 42 males]. Metabolic syndrome, prediabetes, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were found in 8 (10%), 17 (22.1%), and 3 (3.8%) adolescents, respectively. Dyslipidemia was found in 56 (70%) adolescents, with hypertriglyceridemia being the most common type. In multivariate analysis, presence of lipohypertrophy (OR: 25.7, 95% CI: 3.2–202.8; p = 0.002) and longer duration of PI use (OR: 1.04, 95% CI: 1.00–1.08; p = 0.023) were associated with metabolic syndrome. Obesity (OR: 7.71, 95% CI: 1.36–43.7; p = 0.021), presence of lipohypertrophy (OR: 62.9, 95% CI: 4.97–795.6; p = 0.001), and exposure to stavudine for ≥6 months (OR: 8.18, 95% CI: 1.37–48.7; p = 0.021) were associated with prediabetes/T2DM, while exposure to tenofovir for ≥6 months reduced the risk (OR: 0.17, 95% CI: 0.04–0.78; p = 0.022). Metabolic disorders were commonly found in adolescents receiving PI. Careful monitoring and early intervention to modify cardiovascular risk should be systematically implemented in this population particularly those with exposure to stavudine. PMID:28293638

  12. Cysteine Proteases Inhibitors with immunoglobulin-like fold in protozoan parasites and their role in pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Sandoval, Pedro; Lopez-Castillo, Laura Margarita; Trasviña-Arenas, Carlos H; Brieba, Luis G

    2016-08-13

    The number of protein folds in nature is limited, thus is not surprising that proteins with the same fold are able to exert different functions. The cysteine protease inhibitors that adopt an immunoglobulin-like fold (Ig-ICPs) are inhibitors encoded in bacteria and protozoan parasites. Structural studies indicate that these inhibitors resemble the structure of archetypical proteins with an Ig fold, like antibodies, cadherins or cell receptors. The structure of Ig-ICPs from four different protozoan parasites clearly shows the presence of three loops that form part of a protein-ligand interaction surface that resembles the antigen binding sites of antibodies. Thus, Ig-ICPs bind to different cysteine proteases using a tripartite mechanism in which their BC, DE and FG loops are responsible for the main interactions with the target cysteine protease. Ig-ICPs from different protozoan parasites regulate the enzymatic activity of host or parasite's proteases and thus regulate virulence and pathogenesis.

  13. Rational improvement of gp41-targeting HIV-1 fusion inhibitors: an innovatively designed Ile-Asp-Leu tail with alternative conformations

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yun; Su, Shan; Qin, Lili; Wang, Qian; Shi, Lei; Ma, Zhenxuan; Tang, Jianchao; Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu; Ye, Sheng; Zhang, Rongguang

    2016-01-01

    Peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) of HIV gp41 have been developed as effective fusion inhibitors against HIV-1, but facing the challenges of enhancing potency and stability. Here, we report a rationally designed novel HIV-1 fusion inhibitor derived from CHR-derived peptide (Trp628~Gln653, named CP), but with an innovative Ile-Asp-Leu tail (IDL) that dramatically increased the inhibitory activity by up to 100 folds. We also determined the crystal structures of artificial fusion peptides N36- and N43-L6-CP-IDL. Although the overall structures of both fusion peptides share the canonical six-helix bundle (6-HB) configuration, their IDL tails adopt two different conformations: a one-turn helix with the N36, and a hook-like structure with the longer N43. Structural comparison showed that the hook-like IDL tail possesses a larger interaction interface with NHR than the helical one. Further molecular dynamics simulations of the two 6-HBs and isolated CP-IDL peptides suggested that hook-like form of IDL tail can be stabilized by its binding to NHR trimer. Therefore, CP-IDL has potential for further development as a new HIV fusion inhibitor, and this strategy could be widely used in developing artificial fusion inhibitors against HIV and other enveloped viruses. PMID:27666394

  14. Rational improvement of gp41-targeting HIV-1 fusion inhibitors: an innovatively designed Ile-Asp-Leu tail with alternative conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yun; Su, Shan; Qin, Lili; Wang, Qian; Shi, Lei; Ma, Zhenxuan; Tang, Jianchao; Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu; Ye, Sheng; Zhang, Rongguang

    2016-09-01

    Peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) of HIV gp41 have been developed as effective fusion inhibitors against HIV-1, but facing the challenges of enhancing potency and stability. Here, we report a rationally designed novel HIV-1 fusion inhibitor derived from CHR-derived peptide (Trp628~Gln653, named CP), but with an innovative Ile-Asp-Leu tail (IDL) that dramatically increased the inhibitory activity by up to 100 folds. We also determined the crystal structures of artificial fusion peptides N36- and N43-L6-CP-IDL. Although the overall structures of both fusion peptides share the canonical six-helix bundle (6-HB) configuration, their IDL tails adopt two different conformations: a one-turn helix with the N36, and a hook-like structure with the longer N43. Structural comparison showed that the hook-like IDL tail possesses a larger interaction interface with NHR than the helical one. Further molecular dynamics simulations of the two 6-HBs and isolated CP-IDL peptides suggested that hook-like form of IDL tail can be stabilized by its binding to NHR trimer. Therefore, CP-IDL has potential for further development as a new HIV fusion inhibitor, and this strategy could be widely used in developing artificial fusion inhibitors against HIV and other enveloped viruses.

  15. Peptide inhibitors of Dengue virus NS3 protease. Part 1: Warhead.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zheng; Patel, Sejal J; Wang, Wei-Ling; Wang, Gang; Chan, Wai-Ling; Rao, K R Ranga; Alam, Jenefer; Jeyaraj, Duraiswamy A; Ngew, Xinyi; Patel, Viral; Beer, David; Lim, Siew Pheng; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Keller, Thomas H

    2006-01-01

    Substrate-based tetrapeptide inhibitors with various warheads were designed, synthesized, and evaluated against the Dengue virus NS3 protease. Effective inhibition was achieved by peptide inhibitors with electrophilic warheads such as aldehyde, trifluoromethyl ketone, and boronic acid. A boronic acid has the highest affinity, exhibiting a K(i) of 43 nM.

  16. Identification of non-peptidic cysteine reactive fragments as inhibitors of cysteine protease rhodesain.

    PubMed

    McShan, Danielle; Kathman, Stefan; Lowe, Brittiney; Xu, Ziyang; Zhan, Jennifer; Statsyuk, Alexander; Ogungbe, Ifedayo Victor

    2015-10-15

    Rhodesain, the major cathepsin L-like cysteine protease in the protozoan Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, is a well-validated drug target. In this work, we used a fragment-based approach to identify inhibitors of this cysteine protease, and identified inhibitors of T. brucei. To discover inhibitors active against rhodesain and T. brucei, we screened a library of covalent fragments against rhodesain and conducted preliminary SAR studies. We envision that in vitro enzymatic assays will further expand the use of the covalent tethering method, a simple fragment-based drug discovery technique to discover covalent drug leads.

  17. Design of HIV Protease Inhibitors Targeting Protein Backbone: An Effective Strategy for Combating Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Chapsal, Bruno D.; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2008-06-03

    The discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (PIs) and their utilization in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have been a major turning point in the management of HIV/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, despite the successes in disease management and the decrease of HIV/AIDS-related mortality, several drawbacks continue to hamper first-generation protease inhibitor therapies. The rapid emergence of drug resistance has become the most urgent concern because it renders current treatments ineffective and therefore compels the scientific community to continue efforts in the design of inhibitors that can efficiently combat drug resistance.

  18. HIV-1 tropism for the central nervous system: Brain-derived envelope glycoproteins with lower CD4 dependence and reduced sensitivity to a fusion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Garcia, Julio . E-mail: julio.martin-garcia@drexelmed.edu; Cao, Wei; Varela-Rohena, Angel; Plassmeyer, Matthew L.; Gonzalez-Scarano, Francisco

    2006-03-01

    We previously described envelope glycoproteins of an HIV-1 isolate adapted in vitro for growth in microglia that acquired a highly fusogenic phenotype and lower CD4 dependence, as well as resistance to inhibition by anti-CD4 antibodies. Here, we investigated whether similar phenotypic changes are present in vivo. Envelope clones from the brain and spleen of an HIV-1-infected individual with neurological disease were amplified, cloned, and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated clustering of sequences according to the tissue of origin, as expected. Functional clones were then used in cell-to-cell fusion assays to test for CD4 and co-receptor utilization and for sensitivity to various antibodies and inhibitors. Both brain- and spleen-derived envelope clones mediated fusion in cells expressing both CD4 and CCR5 and brain envelopes also used CCR3 as co-receptor. We found that the brain envelopes had a lower CD4 dependence, since they efficiently mediated fusion in the presence of low levels of CD4 on the target cell membrane, and they were significantly more resistant to blocking by anti-CD4 antibodies than the spleen-derived envelopes. In contrast, we observed no difference in sensitivity to the CCR5 antagonist TAK-779. However, brain-derived envelopes were significantly more resistant than those from spleen to the fusion inhibitor T-1249 and concurrently showed slightly greater fusogenicity. Our results suggest an increased affinity for CD4 of brain-derived envelopes that may have originated from in vivo adaptation to replication in microglial cells. Interestingly, we note the presence of envelopes more resistant to a fusion inhibitor in the brain of an untreated, HIV-1-infected individual.

  19. Degradation of immunoglobulins, protease inhibitors, and interleukin-1 by a secretory proteinase of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Na, Byoung-Kuk; Cho, Jong-Hwa; Song, Chul-Yong; Kim, Tong-Soo

    2002-01-01

    The effect of a secretory proteinase from the pathogenic amoebae Acanthamoeba castellanii on host's defense-oriented or regulatory proteins such as immunoglobulins, interleukin-1, and protease inhibitors was investigated. The enzyme was found to degrade secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), IgG, and IgM. It also degraded interleukin-1α (IL-1α) and IL-1β. Its activity was not inhibited by endogenous protease inhibitors, such as α2-macroglobulin, α1-trypsin inhibitor, and α2-antiplasmin. Furthermore, the enzyme rapidly degraded those endogenous protease inhibitors as well. The degradation of host's defense-oriented or regulatory proteins by the Acanthamoeba proteinase suggested that the enzyme might be an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba infection. PMID:12073735

  20. Functional proteomics-aided selection of protease inhibitors for herbivore insect control

    PubMed Central

    Rasoolizadeh, Asieh; Munger, Aurélie; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Sainsbury, Frank; Cloutier, Conrad; Michaud, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Studies have reported the potential of protease inhibitors to engineer insect resistance in transgenic plants but the general usefulness of this approach in crop protection still remains to be established. Insects have evolved strategies to cope with dietary protease inhibitors, such as the use of proteases recalcitrant to inhibition, that often make the selection of effective inhibitors very challenging. Here, we used a functional proteomics approach for the ‘capture’ of Cys protease targets in crude protein extracts as a tool to identify promising cystatins for plant improvement. Two cystatins found to differ in their efficiency to capture Cys proteases of the coleopteran pest Leptinotarsa decemlineata also differed in their usefulness to produce transgenic potato lines resistant to this insect. Plants expressing the most potent cystatin at high level had a strong repressing effect on larval growth and leaf intake, while plants expressing the weakest cystatin showed no effect on both two parameters compared to untransformed parental line used for genetic transformation. Our data underline the relevance of considering the whole range of possible protease targets when selecting an inhibitor for plant pest control. They also confirm the feasibility of developing cystatin-expressing transgenics resistant to a major pest of potato. PMID:27958307

  1. Second locus involved in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 resistance to protease inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Doyon, L; Croteau, G; Thibeault, D; Poulin, F; Pilote, L; Lamarre, D

    1996-01-01

    Protease inhibitors are potent antiviral agents against human immunodeficiency virus type 1. As with reverse transcriptase inhibitors, however, resistance to protease inhibitors can develop and is attributed to the appearance of mutations in the protease gene. With the substrate analog protease inhibitors BILA 1906 BS and BILA 2185 BS, 350- to 1,500-fold-resistant variants have been selected in vitro and were found not only to contain mutations in the protease gene but also to contain mutations in Gag precursor p1/p6 and/or NC (p7)/p1 cleavage sites. Mutations in cleavage sites give rise to better peptide substrates for the protease in vitro and to improved processing of p15 precursors in drug-resistant clones. Importantly, removal of cleavage site mutations in resistant clones leads to a decrease or even an absence of viral growth, confirming their role in viral fitness. Therefore, these second-locus mutations indicate that cleavage of p15 is a rate-limiting step in polyprotein processing in highly resistant viruses. The functional constraint of p15 processing also suggests that additional selective pressure could further compromise viral fitness and maintain the benefits of antiviral therapies. PMID:8648711

  2. Structures of HIV Protease Guide Inhibitor Design to Overcome Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Irene T.; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Harrison, Robert W.

    2008-06-03

    The HIV/AIDS infection continues to be a major epidemic worldwide despite the initial promise of antiviral drugs. Current therapy includes a combination of drugs that inhibit two of the virally-encoded enzymes, the reverse transcriptase and the protease. The first generation of HIV protease inhibitors that have been in clinical use for treatment of AIDS since 1995 was developed with the aid of structural analysis of protease-inhibitor complexes. These drugs were successful in improving the life span of HIV-infected people. Subsequently, the rapid emergence of drug resistance has necessitated the design of new inhibitors that target mutant proteases. This second generation of antiviral protease inhibitors has been developed with the aid of data from medicinal chemistry, kinetics, and X-ray crystallographic analysis. Traditional computational methods such as molecular mechanics and dynamics can be supplemented with intelligent data mining approaches. One approach, based on similarities to the protease interactions with substrates, is to incorporate additional interactions with main chain atoms that cannot easily be eliminated by mutations. Our structural and inhibition data for darunavir have helped to understand its antiviral activity and effectiveness on drug resistant HIV and demonstrate the success of this approach.

  3. Chelation Motifs Affecting Metal-dependent Viral Enzymes: N′-acylhydrazone Ligands as Dual Target Inhibitors of HIV-1 Integrase and Reverse Transcriptase Ribonuclease H Domain

    PubMed Central

    Carcelli, Mauro; Rogolino, Dominga; Gatti, Anna; Pala, Nicolino; Corona, Angela; Caredda, Alessia; Tramontano, Enzo; Pannecouque, Christophe; Naesens, Lieve; Esposito, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, still represent a serious global health emergency. The chronic toxicity derived from the current anti-retroviral therapy limits the prolonged use of several antiretroviral agents, continuously requiring the discovery of new antiviral agents with innovative strategies of action. In particular, the development of single molecules targeting two proteins (dual inhibitors) is one of the current main goals in drug discovery. In this contest, metal-chelating molecules have been extensively explored as potential inhibitors of viral metal-dependent enzymes, resulting in some important classes of antiviral agents. Inhibition of HIV Integrase (IN) is, in this sense, paradigmatic. HIV-1 IN and Reverse Transcriptase-associated Ribonuclease H (RNase H) active sites show structural homologies, with the presence of two Mg(II) cofactors, hence it seems possible to inhibit both enzymes by means of chelating ligands with analogous structural features. Here we present a series of N′-acylhydrazone ligands with groups able to chelate the Mg(II) hard Lewis acid ions in the active sites of both the enzymes, resulting in dual inhibitors with micromolar and even nanomolar activities. The most interesting identified N′-acylhydrazone analog, compound 18, shows dual RNase H-IN inhibition and it is also able to inhibit viral replication in cell-based antiviral assays in the low micromolar range. Computational modeling studies were also conducted to explore the binding attitudes of some model ligands within the active site of both the enzymes. PMID:28373864

  4. Impact of protease inhibitors on the evolution of urinary markers

    PubMed Central

    Bonjoch, Anna; Puig, Jordi; Pérez-Alvarez, Nuria; Juega, Javier; Echeverría, Patricia; Clotet, Bonaventura; Romero, Ramón; Bonet, J.; Negredo, E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Kidney injury (defined as the presence of albuminuria, proteinuria, glycosuria [without hyperglycemia], hematuria, and/or renal hypophosphatemia) is an emerging problem in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, although few data are available on the role of protease inhibitors (PIs) in this condition. To determine the time to kidney injury in a cohort of HIV-infected patients receiving a PI-containing regimen. We report the results of a subanalysis of a published cross-sectional study. The subanalysis included only patients receiving PI-containing regimens for more than 6 months (377 of the overall 970 patients). We determined associated factors and constructed receiver operating characteristic curves to estimate time to kidney injury depending on the PI used. The percentage of patients with kidney injury was 27.7% for darunavir, 27.9% for lopinavir, and 30% for atazanavir. Time to kidney injury was as follows: 229 days for atazanavir/ritonavir (area under the curve [AUC], 0.639; sensitivity, 0.89; specificity, 0.41); 332 days for atazanavir/ritonavir plus tenofovir (AUC, 0.603; sensitivity, 0.75; and specificity, 0.29); 318 days for nonboosted atazanavir (AUC, 0.581; sensitivity, 0.89; and specificity, 0.29); 478 days for lopinavir/ritonavir (AUC, 0.566; sensitivity, 0.864; and specificity, 0.44); 1339 days for lopinavir/ritonavir plus tenofovir (AUC, 0.667; sensitivity, 0.86; and specificity, 0.77); 283 days for darunavir/ritonavir (AUC, 0.523; sensitivity, 0.80; and specificity, 0.261); and 286 days for darunavir/ritonavir plus tenofovir (AUC, 0.446; sensitivity, 0.789; and specificity, 0.245). The use of lopinavir/ritonavir without tenofovir was a protective factor (odds ratio = 1.772; 95%CI, 1.070–2.93; P = 0.026). For all PIs, the percentage of patients with kidney injury exceeded 27%, irrespective of tenofovir use. The longest time to kidney injury was recorded with lopinavir/ritonavir. These results demonstrate the need for

  5. Protease inhibitors, part 13: Specific, weakly basic thrombin inhibitors incorporating sulfonyl dicyandiamide moieties in their structure.

    PubMed

    Clare, B W; Scozzafava, A; Supuran, C T

    2001-01-01

    A series of compounds has been prepared by reaction of dicyandiamide with alkyl/arylsulfonyl halides as well as arylsulfonylisocyanates to locate a lead for obtaining weakly basic thrombin inhibitors with sulfonyldicyandiamide moieties as the S1 anchoring group. The detected lead was sulfanilyl-dicyandiamide (K1 of 3 microM against thrombin, and 15 microM against trypsin), which has been further derivatized at the 4-amino group by incorporating arylsulfonylureido as well as amino acyl/dipeptidyl groups protected at the amino terminal moiety with benzyloxycarbonyl or tosylureido moieties. The best compound obtained (ts-D-Phe-Pro-sulfanilyl-dicyandiamide) showed inhibition constants of 9 nM against thrombin and 1400 nM against trypsin. pKa measurements showed that the new derivatives reported here do indeed possess a reduced basicity, with the pKa of the modified guanidine moieties in the range 7.9-8.3 pKa units. Molecular mechanics calculations showed that the preferred tautomeric form of these compounds is of the type ArSO2N=C(NH2) NH-CN, probably allowing for the formation of favorable interaction between this new anchoring group and the active site amino acid residue Asp 189, critical for substrate/inhibitor binding to this type of serine protease. Thus, the main finding of the present paper is that the sulfonyldicyandiamide group may constitute an interesting alternative for obtaining weakly basic, potent thrombin inhibitors, which bind with less affinity to trypsin.

  6. Design and synthesis of a series of serine derivatives as small molecule inhibitors of the SARS coronavirus 3CL protease.

    PubMed

    Konno, Hiroyuki; Wakabayashi, Masaki; Takanuma, Daiki; Saito, Yota; Akaji, Kenichi

    2016-03-15

    Synthesis of serine derivatives having the essential functional groups for the inhibitor of SARS 3CL protease and evaluation of their inhibitory activities using SARS 3CL R188I mutant protease are described. The lead compounds, functionalized serine derivatives, were designed based on the tetrapeptide aldehyde and Bai's cinnamoly inhibitor, and additionally performed with simulation on GOLD softwear. Structure activity relationship studies of the candidate compounds were given reasonable inhibitors ent-3 and ent-7k against SARS 3CL R188I mutant protease. These inhibitors showed protease selectivity and no cytotoxicity.

  7. Identifying Recombination Hot Spots in the HIV-1 Genome

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Redmond P.; Schlub, Timothy E.; Grimm, Andrew J.; Waugh, Caryll; Ellenberg, Paula; Chopra, Abha; Mallal, Simon; Cromer, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 infection is characterized by the rapid generation of genetic diversity that facilitates viral escape from immune selection and antiretroviral therapy. Despite recombination's crucial role in viral diversity and evolution, little is known about the genomic factors that influence recombination between highly similar genomes. In this study, we use a minimally modified full-length HIV-1 genome and high-throughput sequence analysis to study recombination in gag and pol in T cells. We find that recombination is favored at a number of recombination hot spots, where recombination occurs six times more frequently than at corresponding cold spots. Interestingly, these hot spots occur near important features of the HIV-1 genome but do not occur at sites immediately around protease inhibitor or reverse transcriptase inhibitor drug resistance mutations. We show that the recombination hot and cold spots are consistent across five blood donors and are independent of coreceptor-mediated entry. Finally, we check common experimental confounders and find that these are not driving the location of recombination hot spots. This is the first study to identify the location of recombination hot spots between two similar viral genomes with great statistical power and under conditions that closely reflect natural recombination events among HIV-1 quasispecies. IMPORTANCE The ability of HIV-1 to evade the immune system and antiretroviral therapy depends on genetic diversity within the viral quasispecies. Retroviral recombination is an important mechanism that helps to generate and maintain this genetic diversity, but little is known about how recombination rates vary within the HIV-1 genome. We measured recombination rates in gag and pol and identified recombination hot and cold spots, demonstrating that recombination is not random but depends on the underlying gene sequence. The strength and location of these recombination hot and cold spots can be used to improve models of

  8. Drug-drug interactions between HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and antiviral protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chauvin, Benoit; Drouot, Sylvain; Barrail-Tran, Aurélie; Taburet, Anne-Marie

    2013-10-01

    The HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are a class of drugs also known as statins. These drugs are effective and widely prescribed for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and prevention of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Seven statins are currently available: atorvastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pitavastatin, pravastatin, rosuvastatin and simvastatin. Although these drugs are generally well tolerated, skeletal muscle abnormalities from myalgia to severe lethal rhabdomyolysis can occur. Factors that increase statin concentrations such as drug-drug interactions can increase the risk of these adverse events. Drug-drug interactions are dependent on statins' pharmacokinetic profile: simvastatin, lovastatin and atorvastatin are metabolized through cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A, while the metabolism of the other statins is independent of this CYP. All statins are substrate of organic anion transporter polypeptide 1B1, an uptake transporter expressed in hepatocyte membrane that may also explain some drug-drug interactions. Many HIV-infected patients have dyslipidemia and comorbidities that may require statin treatment. HIV-protease inhibitors (HIV PIs) are part of recommended antiretroviral treatment in combination with two reverse transcriptase inhibitors. All HIV PIs except nelfinavir are coadministered with a low dose of ritonavir, a potent CYP3A inhibitor to improve their pharmacokinetic properties. Cobicistat is a new potent CYP3A inhibitor that is combined with elvitegravir and will be combined with HIV-PIs in the future. The HCV-PIs boceprevir and telaprevir are both, to different extents, inhibitors of CYP3A. This review summarizes the pharmacokinetic properties of statins and PIs with emphasis on their metabolic pathways explaining clinically important drug-drug interactions. Simvastatin and lovastatin metabolized through CYP3A have the highest potency for drug-drug interaction with potent CYP3A inhibitors such as ritonavir- or cobicistat-boosted HIV-PI or the

  9. Synthesis and Anti-HIV-1 Evaluation of Some Novel MC-1220 Analogs as Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Loksha, Yasser M; Pedersen, Erik B; Loddo, Roberta; La Colla, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Some novel MC-1220 analogs were synthesized by condensation of 4,6-dichloro-N-methylpyrimidin-2-amine derivatives (1a,b and 15) and/or 4-chloro-6-methoxy-N,N,5-trimethylpyrimidin-2-amine (2a) with the sodium salt of 2,6-difluorophenylacetonitrile followed by treatment with aqueous sodium hydroxide in methanol, alkylation, reduction, halogenation, and/or acidic hydrolysis. All synthesized compounds were evaluated for their activity against HIV-1. The most active compound in this study was compound 7, which showed activity against HIV-1 comparable to that of MC-1220. The only difference in structure between compound 7 and MC-1220 is a fluoro atom instead of a CH3 group.

  10. Regulation of factor XIa activity by platelets and alpha 1-protease inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, P N; Sinha, D; Kueppers, F; Seaman, F S; Blankstein, K B

    1987-01-01

    We have studied the complex interrelationships between platelets, Factor XIa, alpha 1-protease inhibitor and Factor IX activation. Platelets were shown to secrete an inhibitor of Factor XIa, and to protect Factor XIa from inactivation in the presence of alpha 1-protease inhibitor and the secreted platelet inhibitor. This protection of Factor XIa did not arise from the binding of Factor XIa to platelets, the presence of high molecular weight kininogen, or the inactivation of alpha 1-protease inhibitor by platelets. The formation of a complex between alpha 1-protease inhibitor and the active-site-containing light chain of Factor XIa was inhibited by activated platelets and by platelet releasates, but not by high molecular weight kininogen. These results support the hypothesis that platelets can regulate Factor XIa-catalyzed Factor IX activation by secreting an inhibitor of Factor XIa that may act primarily outside the platelet microenvironment and by protecting Factor XIa from inhibition, thereby localizing Factor IX activation to the platelet plug. Images PMID:3500185

  11. Crystal structure of a novel cysteinless plant Kunitz-type protease inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Daiane; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Verissimo, Paula; Yoo Im, Sonia; Sampaio, Misako Uemura; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela . E-mail: olivaml.bioq@epm.br

    2007-09-07

    Bauhinia bauhinioides Cruzipain Inhibitor (BbCI) is a cysteine protease inhibitor highly homologous to plant Kunitz-type inhibitors. However, in contrast to classical Kunitz family inhibitors it lacks cysteine residues and therefore disulfide bridges. BbCI is also distinct in the ability to inactivate enzymes belonging to two different classes, cysteine and serine proteases. Besides inhibiting the cysteine protease cruzipain, BbCI also inhibits cathepsin L and the serine proteases HNE (human neutrophil elastase) and PPE (porcine pancreatic elastase). Monoclinic crystals of the recombinant inhibitor that diffract to 1.7 A resolution were obtained using hanging drop method by vapor diffusion at 18 {sup o}C. The refined structure shows the conservative {beta}-trefoil fold features of the Kunitz inhibitors. In BbCI, one of the two characteristic S-S bonds is replaced by the water-mediated interaction between Tyr125 and Gly132. In this work we explore the structural differences between Kunitz-type inhibitors and analyze the essential interactions that maintain the protein structural stability preserving its biological function.

  12. Potent inhibitors of HCV-NS3 protease derived from boronic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatraman, Srikanth; Wu, Wanli; Prongay, Andrew; Girijavallabhan, Viyyoor; Njoroge, F. George

    2009-07-23

    Chronic hepatitis C infection is the leading causes for cirrhosis of the liver and hepatocellular carcinoma, leading to liver failure and liver transplantation. The etiological agent, HCV virus produces a single positive strand of RNA that is processed with the help of serine protease NS3 to produce mature virus. Inhibition of NS3 protease can be potentially used to develop effective drugs for HCV infections. Numerous efforts are now underway to develop potent inhibitors of HCV protease that contain ketoamides as serine traps. Herein we report the synthesis of a series of potent inhibitors that contain a boronic acid as a serine trap. The activity of these compounds were optimized to 200 pM. X-ray structure of compound 17 bound to NS3 protease is also discussed.

  13. TLR7 Agonist GS-9620 Is a Potent Inhibitor of Acute HIV-1 Infection in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bam, Rujuta A.; Hansen, Derek; Irrinki, Alivelu; Mulato, Andrew; Jones, Gregg S.; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Frey, Christian R.; Cihlar, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT GS-9620 is a potent and selective oral Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) agonist that directly activates plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). GS-9620 suppressed hepatitis B virus (HBV) in animal models of chronic infection and transiently activated HIV expression ex vivo in latently infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from virally suppressed patients. Currently, GS-9620 is under clinical evaluation for treating chronic HBV infection and for reducing latent reservoirs in virally suppressed HIV-infected patients. Here, we investigated the in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of GS-9620. GS-9620 potently inhibited viral replication in PBMCs, particularly when it was added 24 to 48 h prior to HIV infection (50% effective concentration = 27 nM). Depletion of pDCs but not other immune cell subsets from PBMC cultures suppressed GS-9620 antiviral activity. Although GS-9620 was inactive against HIV in purified CD4+ T cells and macrophages, HIV replication was potently inhibited by conditioned medium derived from GS-9620-treated pDC cultures when added to CD4+ T cells prior to infection. This suggests that GS-9620-mediated stimulation of PBMCs induced the production of a soluble factor(s) inhibiting HIV replication in trans. GS-9620-treated PBMCs primarily showed increased production of interferon alpha (IFN-α), and cotreatment with IFN-α-blocking antibodies reversed the HIV-1-inhibitory effect of GS-9620. Additional studies demonstrated that GS-9620 inhibited a postentry event in HIV replication at a step coincident with or prior to reverse transcription. The simultaneous activation of HIV-1 expression and inhibition of HIV-1 replication are important considerations for the clinical evaluation of GS-9620 since these antiviral effects may help restrict potential local HIV spread upon in vivo latency reversal. PMID:27799218

  14. Function-oriented development of CXCR4 antagonists as selective human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 entry inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Huang; Wang, Chuan-Jen; Chang, Chun-Ping; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Song, Jen-Shin; Jan, Jiing-Jyh; Chou, Ming-Chen; Ke, Yi-Yu; Ma, Jing; Wong, Ying-Chieh; Hsieh, Tsung-Chih; Tien, Yun-Chen; Gullen, Elizabeth A; Lo, Chen-Fu; Cheng, Chia-Yi; Liu, Yu-Wei; Sadani, Amit A; Tsai, Chia-Hua; Hsieh, Hsin-Pang; Tsou, Lun K; Shia, Kak-Shan

    2015-02-12

    Motivated by the pivotal role of CXCR4 as an HIV entry co-receptor, we herein report a de novo hit-to-lead effort on the identification of subnanomolar purine-based CXCR4 antagonists against HIV-1 infection. Compound 24, with an EC50 of 0.5 nM against HIV-1 entry into host cells and an IC50 of 16.4 nM for inhibition of radioligand stromal-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) binding to CXCR4, was also found to be highly selective against closely related chemokine receptors. We rationalized that compound 24 complementarily interacted with the critical CXCR4 residues that are essential for binding to HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop and subsequent viral entry. Compound 24 showed a 130-fold increase in anti-HIV activity compared to that of the marketed CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100 (Plerixafor), whereas both compounds exhibited similar potency in mobilization of CXCR4(+)/CD34(+) stem cells at a high dose. Our study offers insight into the design of anti-HIV therapeutics devoid of major interference with SDF-1α function.

  15. Molecular Docking Studies of Marine Diterpenes as Inhibitors of Wild-Type and Mutants HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Miceli, Leonardo A.; Teixeira, Valéria L.; Castro, Helena C.; Rodrigues, Carlos R.; Mello, Juliana F. R.; Albuquerque, Magaly G.; Cabral, Lucio M.; de Brito, Monique A.; de Souza, Alessandra M. T.

    2013-01-01

    AIDS is a pandemic responsible for more than 35 million deaths. The emergence of resistant mutations due to drug use is the biggest cause of treatment failure. Marine organisms are sources of different molecules, some of which offer promising HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitory activity, such as the diterpenes dolabelladienotriol (THD, IC50 = 16.5 µM), (6R)-6-hydroxydichotoma-3,14-diene-1,17-dial (HDD, IC50 = 10 µM) and (6R)-6-acetoxydichotoma-3,14-diene-1,17-dial (ADD, IC50 = 35 µM), isolated from a brown algae of the genus Dictyota, showing low toxicity. In this work, we evaluated the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of THD, HDD and ADD as anti HIV-1 RT, using a molecular modeling approach. The analyses of stereoelectronic parameters revealed a direct relationship between activity and HOMO (Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital)-LUMO (Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital) gap (ELUMO–EHOMO), where antiviral profile increases with larger HOMO-LUMO gap values. We also performed molecular docking studies of THD into HIV-1 RT wild-type and 12 different mutants, which showed a seahorse conformation, hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds with important residues of the binding pocket. Based on in vitro experiments and docking studies, we demonstrated that mutations have little influence in positioning and interactions of THD. Following a rational drug design, we suggest a modification of THD to improve its biological activity. PMID:24172210

  16. Michael Acceptor-Based Peptidomimetic Inhibitor of Main Protease from Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fenghua; Chen, Cheng; Yang, Kailin; Xu, Yang; Liu, Xiaomei; Gao, Fan; Liu, He; Chen, Xia; Zhao, Qi; Liu, Xiang; Cai, Yan; Yang, Haitao

    2017-03-13

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) causes high mortality in pigs. PEDV main protease (Mpro) plays an essential role in viral replication. We solved the structure of PEDV Mpro complexed with peptidomimetic inhibitor N3 carrying a Michael acceptor warhead, revealing atomic level interactions. We further designed a series of 17 inhibitors with altered side groups. Inhibitors M2 and M17 demonstrated enhanced specificity against PEDV Mpro. These compounds have potential as future therapeutics to combat PEDV infection.

  17. Hydroxytyrosol: a new class of microbicide displaying broad anti-HIV-1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Bedoya, Luis M.; Beltrán, Manuela; Obregón-Calderón, Patricia; García-Pérez, Javier; de la Torre, Humberto E.; González, Nuria; Pérez-Olmeda, Mayte; Auñón, David; Capa, Laura; Gómez-Acebo, Eduardo; Alcamí, José

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the toxicity and activity against HIV of 5-hydroxytyrosol as a potential microbicide. Design: The anti-HIV-1 activity of 5-hydroxytyrosol, a polyphenolic compound, was tested against wild-type HIV-1 and viral clones resistant to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), protease inhibitors and integrase inhibitors. In addition to its activity against founder viruses, different viral subtypes and potential synergy with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, lamivudine and emtricitabine was also tested. 5-Hydroxytyrosol toxicity was evaluated in vivo in rabbit vaginal mucosa. Methods: We have cloned pol gene from drug-resistant HIV-1 isolated from infected patients and env gene from Fiebeg III/IV patients or A, C, D, E, F and G subtypes in the NL4.3-Ren backbone. 5-Hydroxytyrosol anti-HIV-1 activity was evaluated in infections of MT-2, U87-CCR5 or peripheral blood mononuclear cells preactivated with phytohemagglutinin + interleukin-2 with viruses obtained through 293T transfections. Inhibitory concentration 50% and cytotoxic concentration 50% were calculated. Synergy was analysed according to Chou and Talalay method. In-vivo toxicity was evaluated for 14 days in rabbit vaginal mucosa. Results: 5-Hydroxytyrosol inhibited HIV-1 infections of recombinant or wild-type viruses in all the target cells tested. Moreover, 5-hydroxytyrosol showed similar inhibitory concentration 50% values for infections with NRTIs, NNRTIs, protease inhibitors and INIs resistant viruses; founder viruses and all the subtypes tested. Combination of 5-hydroxytyrosol with tenofovir was found to be synergistic, whereas it was additive with lamivudine and emtricitabine. In-vivo toxicity of 5-hydroxytyrosol was very low even at the highest tested doses. Conclusion: 5-Hydroxytyrosol displayed a broad anti-HIV-1 activity in different cells systems in the absent of in-vivo toxicity, therefore supporting its

  18. Molecular dynamics studies of the inhibitor C34 binding to the wild-type and mutant HIV-1 gp41: inhibitory and drug resistant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xueting; Tan, Jianjun; Su, Min; Li, Chunhua; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Wang, Cunxin

    2014-01-01

    Mutations on NHR (N-terminal heptad repeat) associated with resistance to fusion inhibitor were observed. In addition, mutations on CHR (C-terminal heptad repeat) accompanied NHR mutations of gp41 are noted in many cases, like N43D/S138A double mutation. In this work, we explored the drug resistant mechanism of N43D mutation and the role of S138A second mutation in drug resistance. The binding modes of the wild type gp41 and the two mutants, N43D and N43D/S138A, with the HIV-1 fusion inhibitor C34, a 34-residue peptide mimicking CHR of gp41, were carried out by using molecular dynamics simulations. Based on the MD simulations, N43D mutation affects not only the stability of C34 binding, but also the binding energy of the inhibitor C34. Because N43D mutation may also affect the stable conformation of 6-HB, we introduced S138A second mutation into CHR of gp41 and determined the impact of this mutation. Through the comparative analysis of MD results of the N43D mutant and the N43D/S138A mutant, we found that CHR with S138A mutation shown more favorable affinity to NHR. Compelling differences in structures have been observed for these two mutants, particularly in the binding modes and in the hydrophobic interactions of the CHR (C34) located near the hydrophobic groove of the NHR. Because the conformational stability of 6-HB is important to HIV-1 infection, we suggested a hypothetical mechanism for the drug resistance: N43D single mutation not only impact the binding of inhibitor, but also affect the affinity between NHR and CHR of gp41, thus may reduce the rate of membrane fusion; compensatory mutation S138A would induce greater hydrophobic interactions between NHR and CHR, and render the CHR more compatible to NHR than inhibitors.

  19. Biochemical characterization of a multi-drug resistant HIV-1 subtype AG reverse transcriptase: antagonism of AZT discrimination and excision pathways and sensitivity to RNase H inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Anna; Corona, Angela; Spöring, Imke; Jordan, Mareike; Buchholz, Bernd; Maccioni, Elias; Di Santo, Roberto; Bodem, Jochen; Tramontano, Enzo; Wöhrl, Birgitta M.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed a multi-drug resistant (MR) HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), subcloned from a patient-derived subtype CRF02_AG, harboring 45 amino acid exchanges, amongst them four thymidine analog mutations (TAMs) relevant for high-level AZT (azidothymidine) resistance by AZTMP excision (M41L, D67N, T215Y, K219E) as well as four substitutions of the AZTTP discrimination pathway (A62V, V75I, F116Y and Q151M). In addition, K65R, known to antagonize AZTMP excision in HIV-1 subtype B was present. Although MR-RT harbored the most significant amino acid exchanges T215Y and Q151M of each pathway, it exclusively used AZTTP discrimination, indicating that the two mechanisms are mutually exclusive and that the Q151M pathway is obviously preferred since it confers resistance to most nucleoside inhibitors. A derivative was created, additionally harboring the TAM K70R and the reversions M151Q as well as R65K since K65R antagonizes excision. MR-R65K-K70R-M151Q was competent of AZTMP excision, whereas other combinations thereof with only one or two exchanges still promoted discrimination. To tackle the multi-drug resistance problem, we tested if the MR-RTs could still be inhibited by RNase H inhibitors. All MR-RTs exhibited similar sensitivity toward RNase H inhibitors belonging to different inhibitor classes, indicating the importance of developing RNase H inhibitors further as anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26850643

  20. Oxadiazole-Based Cell Permeable Macrocyclic Transition State Inhibitors of Norovirus 3CL Protease.

    PubMed

    Damalanka, Vishnu C; Kim, Yunjeong; Alliston, Kevin R; Weerawarna, Pathum M; Galasiti Kankanamalage, Anushka C; Lushington, Gerald H; Mehzabeen, Nurjahan; Battaile, Kevin P; Lovell, Scott; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Groutas, William C

    2016-03-10

    Human noroviruses are the primary causative agents of acute gastroenteritis and a pressing public health burden worldwide. There are currently no vaccines or small molecule therapeutics available for the treatment or prophylaxis of norovirus infections. Norovirus 3CL protease plays a vital role in viral replication by generating structural and nonstructural proteins via the cleavage of the viral polyprotein. Thus, molecules that inhibit the viral protease may have potential therapeutic value. We describe herein the structure-based design, synthesis, and in vitro and cell-based evaluation of the first class of oxadiazole-based, permeable macrocyclic inhibitors of norovirus 3CL protease.

  1. The allosteric HIV-1 integrase inhibitor BI-D affects virion maturation but does not influence packaging of a functional RNA genome.

    PubMed

    van Bel, Nikki; van der Velden, Yme; Bonnard, Damien; Le Rouzic, Erwann; Das, Atze T; Benarous, Richard; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-01-01

    The viral integrase (IN) is an essential protein for HIV-1 replication. IN inserts the viral dsDNA into the host chromosome, thereby aided by the cellular co-factor LEDGF/p75. Recently a new class of integrase inhibitors was described: allosteric IN inhibitors (ALLINIs). Although designed to interfere with the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction to block HIV DNA integration during the early phase of HIV-1 replication, the major impact was surprisingly found on the process of virus maturation during the late phase, causing a reverse transcription defect upon infection of target cells. Virus particles produced in the presence of an ALLINI are misformed with the ribonucleoprotein located outside the virus core. Virus assembly and maturation are highly orchestrated and regulated processes in which several viral proteins and RNA molecules closely interact. It is therefore of interest to study whether ALLINIs have unpredicted pleiotropic effects on these RNA-related processes. We confirm that the ALLINI BI-D inhibits virus replication and that the produced virus is non-infectious. Furthermore, we show that the wild-type level of HIV-1 genomic RNA is packaged in virions and these genomes are in a dimeric state. The tRNAlys3 primer for reverse transcription was properly placed on this genomic RNA and could be extended ex vivo. In addition, the packaged reverse transcriptase enzyme was fully active when extracted from virions. As the RNA and enzyme components for reverse transcription are properly present in virions produced in the presence of BI-D, the inhibition of reverse transcription is likely to reflect the mislocalization of the components in the aberrant virus particle.

  2. Ultrasensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric methodologies for quantification of five HIV-1 integrase inhibitors in plasma for a microdose clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Li, Hankun; Willson, Kenneth; Breidinger, Sheila; Rizk, Matthew L; Wenning, Larissa; Woolf, Eric J

    2012-10-16

    HIV-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitors are an important class of compounds targeted for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Microdosing has emerged as an attractive tool to assist in drug candidate screening for clinical development, but necessitates extremely sensitive bioanalytical assays, typically in the pg/mL concentration range. Currently, accelerator mass spectrometry is the predominant tool for microdosing support, which requires a specialized facility and synthesis of radiolabeled compounds. There have been few studies attempted to comprehensively assess a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) approach in the context of microdosing applications. Herein, we describe the development of automated LC-MS/MS methods to quantify five integrase inhibitors in plasma with the limits of quantification at 1 pg/mL for raltegravir and 2 pg/mL for four proprietary compounds. The assays involved double extractions followed by UPLC coupled with negative ion electrospray MS/MS analysis. All methods were fully validated to the rigor of regulated bioanalysis requirements, with intraday precision between 1.20 and 14.1% and accuracy between 93.8 and 107% at the standard curve concentration range. These methods were successfully applied to a human microdose study and demonstrated to be accurate, reproducible, and cost-effective. Results of the study indicate that raltegravir displayed linear pharmacokinetics between a microdose and a pharmacologically active dose.

  3. Pharmacophore modelling and atom-based 3D-QSAR studies on N-methyl pyrimidones as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Karnati Konda; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Dessalew, Nigus; Tripathi, Sunil Kumar; Selvaraj, Chandrabose

    2012-06-01

    Pharmacophore modelling and atom-based 3D-QSAR studies were carried out for a series of compounds belonging to N-methyl pyrimidones as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. Based on the ligand-based pharmacophore model, we got 5-point pharmacophore model AADDR, with two hydrogen bond acceptors (A), two hydrogen bond donors (D) and one aromatic ring (R). The generated pharmacophore-based alignment was used to derive a predictive atom-based 3D-QSAR model for the training set (r(2) = 0.92, SD = 0.16, F = 84.8, N = 40) and for test set (Q(2) = 0.71, RMSE = 0.06, Pearson R = 0.90, N = 10). From these results, AADDR pharmacophore feature was selected as best common pharmacophore hypothesis, and atom-based 3D-QSAR results also support the outcome by means of favourable and unfavourable regions of hydrophobic and electron-withdrawing groups for the most potent compound 30. These results can be useful for further design of new and potent HIV-1 IN inhibitors.

  4. Prevalence of HIV-1 resistant strains in recent seroconverters.

    PubMed

    Balotta, C; Berlusconi, A; Pan, A; Violin, M; Riva, C; Gori, A; Corvasce, S; Mazzucchelli, R; Facchi, G; Velleca, R; Senese, D; Dehò, L; Galli, M; Rusconi, S; Moroni, M

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-nine HIV-1 recently infected subjects were retrospectively studied to investigate both the prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI)-related mutations at primary infection and the proportion of naturally occurring mutations in protease inhibitor (PI)-naive patients. Neither HIV-1 plasma viremia nor CD4 absolute count at baseline could distinguish patients with NRTI pre-existing mutations from those with wild-type virus. An increasing proportion of ZDV-related mutations was observed over time with an overall frequency of 20.7% in the study period. Only 1 out of 6 patients (16.7%) with ZDV-related mutations showed a phenotypically ZDV resistant isolate. A striking proportion of polymorphic changes was present in the protease region of pol gene in newly infected individuals. As many as 80% of seroconverters presented at least one naturally occurring substitution. Some PI-associated substitutions, thought to be compensatory in protease enzymatic function, could confer intermediate to high PI-resistance. Their role following PI administration remains to be elucidated. Our data suggest that the choice of drugs should be oriented by both genotypic and phenotypic evaluations to tailor individual regimens in seroconverters.

  5. Preclinical pharmacokinetics and distribution to tissue of AG1343, an inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease.

    PubMed

    Shetty, B V; Kosa, M B; Khalil, D A; Webber, S

    1996-01-01

    AG1343, a potent inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease (Ki = 2 nM), was designed by protein structure-based drug design techniques. AG1343 has potent antiviral activity (95% effective dose = 0.04 microgram/ml) against a number of HIV-1 strains in acute and chronic models of infection. As part of its preclinical development, the oral bioavailability of AG1343