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Sample records for hiv-1 transmitting couples

  1. Sexually Transmitted Infections among HIV-1-Discordant Couples

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Brandon L.; Kiarie, James N.; Morrison, Susan; John-Stewart, Grace C.; Kinuthia, John; Whittington, William L. H.; Farquhar, Carey

    2009-01-01

    Introduction More new HIV-1 infections occur within stable HIV-1-discordant couples than in any other group in Africa, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) may increase transmission risk among discordant couples, accounting for a large proportion of new HIV-1 infections. Understanding correlates of STIs among discordant couples will aid in optimizing interventions to prevent HIV-1 transmission in these couples. Methods HIV-1-discordant couples in which HIV-1-infected partners were HSV-2-seropositive were tested for syphilis, chlamydia, gonorrhea, and trichomoniasis, and HIV-1-uninfected partners were tested for HSV-2. We assessed sociodemographic, behavioral, and biological correlates of a current STI. Results Of 416 couples enrolled, 16% were affected by a treatable STI, and among these both partners were infected in 17% of couples. A treatable STI was found in 46 (11%) females and 30 (7%) males. The most prevalent infections were trichomoniasis (5.9%) and syphilis (2.6%). Participants were 5.9-fold more likely to have an STI if their partner had an STI (P<0.01), and STIs were more common among those reporting any unprotected sex (OR = 2.43; P<0.01) and those with low education (OR = 3.00; P<0.01). Among HIV-1-uninfected participants with an HSV-2-seropositive partner, females were significantly more likely to be HSV-2-seropositive than males (78% versus 50%, P<0.01). Conclusions Treatable STIs were common among HIV-1-discordant couples and the majority of couples affected by an STI were discordant for the STI, with relatively high HSV-2 discordance. Awareness of STI correlates and treatment of both partners may reduce HIV-1 transmission. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00194519 PMID:20011596

  2. HIV-1 Prevention for HIV-1 Serodiscordant Couples

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Kathryn; Baeten, Jared M.; Coates, Thomas J.; Kurth, Ann; Mugo, Nelly R.

    2013-01-01

    A substantial proportion of HIV-1-infected individuals in sub-Saharan Africa are in stable relationships with HIV-1-uninfected partners, and HIV-1 serodiscordant couples thus represent an important target population for HIV-1 prevention. Couple-based HIV-1 testing and counseling facilitates identification of HIV-1 serodiscordant couples, counseling about risk reduction, and referrals to HIV-1 treatment, reproductive health services, and support services. Maximizing HIV-1 prevention for HIV-1 serodiscordant couples requires a combination of strategies, including counseling about condoms, sexual risk, fertility, contraception, and the clinical and prevention benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for the HIV-1-infected partner; provision of clinical care and ART for the HIV-1-infected partner; antenatal care and services to prevent mother to child transmission for HIV-1- infected pregnant women; male circumcision for HIV-1-uninfected men; and, pending guidelines and demonstration projects, oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV-1-uninfected partners. PMID:22415473

  3. [Identification and characterization of HIV-1 transmitted /founder viruses].

    PubMed

    Jianyuan, Zhao; Jiwei, Ding; Zeyun, Mi; Tao, Wei; Shan, Cen

    2015-05-01

    During the spread of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the mucosa, the entire genetic diversity of the viruses is significantly reduced. The vast majority of HIV-1 mucosal infections are established by one or a few viruses and ultimately develop into systemic infections, thus the initial virus is called transmitted/founder virus (T/F virus). The study of T/F virus will benefit understanding its key characteristics resulting in successful viral replication in the new host body, which may provide novel strategies for the development of AIDS vaccines, pre-exposure prophylaxis and other therapeutic interventions. In this review, we summarize the discovery and evolutionary characteristics of T/F virus as well as early immune response after HIV-1 infection, which will establish the basis to explore the features of T/F viruses.

  4. Persistence of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance mutations.

    PubMed

    Castro, Hannah; Pillay, Deenan; Cane, Patricia; Asboe, David; Cambiano, Valentina; Phillips, Andrew; Dunn, David T

    2013-11-01

    There are few data on the persistence of individual human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations in the absence of selective drug pressure. We studied 313 patients in whom TDR mutations were detected at their first resistance test and who had a subsequent test performed while ART-naive. The rate at which mutations became undetectable was estimated using exponential regression accounting for interval censoring. Most thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs) and T215 revertants (but not T215F/Y) were found to be highly stable, with NNRTI and PI mutations being relatively less persistent. Our estimates are important for informing HIV transmission models.

  5. Willingness of Kenyan HIV-1 serodiscordant couples to use antiretroviral based HIV-1 prevention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Heffron, Renee; Ngure, Kenneth; Mugo, Nelly; Celum, Connie; Kurth, Ann; Curran, Kathryn; Baeten, Jared M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral treatment (ART) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) have demonstrated efficacy as new HIV-1 prevention approaches for HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. Methods Among Kenyan HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual couples participating in a clinical trial of PrEP, we conducted a cross-sectional study and used descriptive statistical methods to explore couples' willingness to use antiretrovirals for HIV-1 prevention. The study was conducted prior to July 2011, when studies among heterosexual populations reported that ART and PrEP reduced HIV-1 risk. Results For 181 couples in which the HIV-1 infected partner had a CD4 count ≥350 cells/μL and had not yet initiated ART (and thus did not qualify for ART under Kenyan guidelines), 60.2% of HIV-1 infected partners (69.4% of men and 57.9% of women) were willing to use early ART (at CD4 ≥350 cells/μL) for HIV-1 prevention. Among HIV-1 uninfected partners, 92.7% (93.8% of men and 86.1% of women) reported willingness to use PrEP. When given a hypothetical choice of early ART or PrEP for HIV-1 prevention, 52.5% of HIV-1 infected participants would prefer to initiate ART early and 56.9% of HIV-1 uninfected participants would prefer to use PrEP. Conclusions Nearly 40% of Kenyan HIV-1 infected individuals in known HIV-1 serodiscordant partnerships reported reservations about early ART initiation for HIV-1 prevention. PrEP interest in this PrEP-experienced population was high. Strategies to achieve high uptake and sustained adherence to ART and PrEP for HIV-1 prevention in HIV-1 serodiscordant couples will require responding to couples' preferences for prevention strategies. PMID:22595872

  6. Quantifying Ongoing HIV-1 Exposure in HIV-1–Serodiscordant Couples to Identify Individuals With Potential Host Resistance to HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Mackelprang, Romel D.; Baeten, Jared M.; Donnell, Deborah; Celum, Connie; Farquhar, Carey; de Bruyn, Guy; Essex, Max; McElrath, M. Juliana; Nakku-Joloba, Edith; Lingappa, Jairam R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Immunogenetic correlates of resistance to HIV-1 in HIV-1–exposed seronegative (HESN) individuals with consistently high exposure may inform HIV-1 prevention strategies. We developed a novel approach for quantifying HIV-1 exposure to identify individuals remaining HIV-1 uninfected despite persistent high exposure. Methods. We used longitudinal predictors of HIV-1 transmission in HIV-1 serodiscordant couples to score HIV-1 exposure and define HESN clusters with persistently high, low, and decreasing risk trajectories. The model was validated in an independent cohort of serodiscordant couples. We describe a statistical tool that can be applied to other HESN cohorts to identify individuals with high exposure to HIV-1. Results. HIV-1 exposure was best quantified by frequency of unprotected sex with, plasma HIV-1 RNA levels among, and presence of genital ulcer disease among HIV-1–infected partners and by age, pregnancy status, herpes simplex virus 2 serostatus, and male circumcision status among HESN participants. Overall, 14% of HESN individuals persistently had high HIV-1 exposure and exhibited a declining incidence of HIV-1 infection over time. Conclusions. A minority of HESN individuals from HIV-1–discordant couples had persistent high HIV-1 exposure over time. Decreasing incidence of infection in this group suggests these individuals were selected for resistance to HIV-1 and may be most appropriate for identifying biological correlates of natural host resistance to HIV-1 infection. PMID:22926009

  7. Zinc coupling potentiates anti-HIV-1 activity of baicalin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Wang, Yu-Tian; Pu, Shao-Ping; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2004-11-12

    Baicalin (BA) has been shown with anti-HIV-1 activity. Zinc is a nutrient element. The anti-HIV-1 activity of zinc complex of baicalin (BA-Zn) in vitro was studied and compared with the anti-HIV-1 activities between BA and BA-Zn in the present study. Our results suggested that BA-Zn has lower cytotoxicity and higher anti-HIV-1 activity compared with those of BA in vitro. The CC50s of BA-Zn and BA were 221.52 and 101.73 microM, respectively. The cytotoxicity of BA-Zn was about 1.2-fold lower than that of BA. The BA and BA-Zn inhibited HIV-1 induced syncytium formation, HIV-1 p24 antigen and HIV-1 RT production. The EC50s of BA-Zn on inhibiting HIV-1 induced syncytium formation (29.08 microM) and RT production (31.17 microM) were lower than those of BA (43.27 and 47.34 microM, respectively). BA-Zn was more effective than BA in inhibiting the activities of recombinant RT and HIV-1 entry into host cells. Zinc coupling enhanced the anti-HIV-1 activity of baicalin.

  8. The Envelope Gene of Transmitted HIV-1 Resists a Late Interferon Gamma-Induced Block

    PubMed Central

    Rihn, Suzannah J.; Foster, Toshana L.; Busnadiego, Idoia; Aziz, Muhamad Afiq; Hughes, Joseph; Neil, Stuart J. D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type I interferon (IFN) signaling engenders an antiviral state that likely plays an important role in constraining HIV-1 transmission and contributes to defining subsequent AIDS pathogenesis. Type II IFN (IFN-γ) also induces an antiviral state but is often primarily considered to be an immunomodulatory cytokine. We report that IFN-γ stimulation can induce an antiviral state that can be both distinct from that of type I interferon and can potently inhibit HIV-1 in primary CD4+ T cells and a number of human cell lines. Strikingly, we find that transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1 viruses can resist a late block that is induced by type II IFN, and the use of chimeric IFN-γ-sensitive/resistant viruses indicates that interferon resistance maps to the env gene. Simultaneously, in vitro evolution also revealed that just a single amino acid substitution in the envelope can confer substantial resistance to IFN-mediated inhibition. Thus, the env gene of transmitted HIV-1 confers resistance to a late block that is phenotypically distinct from blocks previously described to be resisted by env and is therefore mediated by unknown IFN-γ-stimulated factor(s) in human CD4+ T cells and cell lines. This important unidentified block could play a key role in constraining HIV-1 transmission. IMPORTANCE The human immune system can hinder invading pathogens through interferon (IFN) signaling. One consequence of this signaling is that cells enter an antiviral state, increasing the levels of hundreds of defenses that can inhibit the replication and spread of viruses. The majority of HIV-1 infections result from a single virus particle (the transmitted/founder) that makes it past these defenses and colonizes the host. Thus, the founder virus is hypothesized to be a relatively interferon-resistant entity. Here, we show that certain HIV-1 envelope genes have the unanticipated ability to resist specific human defenses mediated by different types of interferons. Strikingly, the envelope

  9. Transmission of HIV-1 and HLA-B allele-sharing within serodiscordant heterosexual Zambian couples.

    PubMed

    Dorak, M Tevfik; Tang, Jianming; Penman-Aguilar, Ana; Westfall, Andrew O; Zulu, Isaac; Lobashevsky, Elena S; Kancheya, Nzali G; Schaen, Margaret M; Allen, Susan A; Kaslow, Richard A

    2004-06-26

    Factors that might increase risk of HIV-1 transmission include age, sex, and amount of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, but findings for HLA allele-sharing are not in agreement. We tested the hypothesis that allele sharing at HLA loci is associated with increased risk of transmission of HIV-1 infection in cohabiting heterosexual Zambian couples. We studied 125 initially serodiscordant partners with sequence-confirmed interpartner HIV-1 transmission and 104 couples who were persistently serodiscordant, and we analysed relations with molecularly typed HLA-A, B, and C alleles by survival techniques. After adjustment for other genetic and non-genetic risk factors seen with heterosexual transmission of HIV-1 in this cohort, sharing of HLA-B alleles was independently associated with accelerated intracouple transmission (relative hazard 2.23, 95% CI 1.52-3.26, p<0.0001). Selective pressure by HLA-B alleles on transmitted viruses accords with current understanding of the effect of B locus polymorphism in HIV-1 and perhaps other infections.

  10. Estimation of the HIV-1 backward mutation rate from transmitted drug-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Kitayimbwa, J M; Mugisha, J Y T; Saenz, R A

    2016-12-01

    One of the serious threats facing the administration of antiretroviral therapy to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infected patients is the reported increasing prevalence of transmitted drug resistance. However, given that HIV-1 drug-resistant strains are often less fit than the wild-type strains, it is expected that drug-resistant strains that are present during the primary phase of the HIV-1 infection are replaced by the fitter wild-type strains. This replacement of HIV-1 resistant mutations involves the emergence of wild-type strains by a process of backward mutation. How quickly the replacement happens is dependent on the class of HIV-1 mutation group. We estimate the backward mutation rates and relative fitness of various mutational groups known to confer HIV-1 drug resistance. We do this by fitting a stochastic model to data for individuals who were originally infected by an HIV-1 strain carrying any one of the known drug resistance-conferring mutations and observed over a period of time to see whether the resistant strain is replaced. To do this, we seek a distribution, generated from simulations of the stochastic model, that best describes the observed (clinical data) replacement times of a given mutation. We found that Lamivudine/Emtricitabine-associated mutations have a distinctly higher, backward mutation rate and low relative fitness compared to the other classes (as has been reported before) while protease inhibitors-associated mutations have a slower backward mutation rate and high relative fitness. For the other mutation classes, we found more uncertainty in their estimates.

  11. Change in the Prevalence of HIV-1 and the Rate of Transmitted Drug-Resistant HIV-1 in Haiphong, Northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hung Viet; Ishizaki, Azumi; Nguyen, Cuong Hung; Saina, Matilda Chelimo; Hoang, Huyen Thi Thanh; Tran, Vuong Thi; Bi, Xiuqiong; Pham, Thuc Van; Ichimura, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    We previously reported a significant decrease in HIV-1 prevalence, with no increase in drug-resistant HIV-1 among injecting drug users (IDU), female sex workers (FSW), and blood donors (BD), in Haiphong, Vietnam, from 2007 to 2009. In 2012, 388 IDU, 51 FSW, and 200 BD were recruited for further analysis. None had a history of antiretroviral treatment. From 2007 to 2012, HIV-1 prevalence was reduced from 35.9% to 18.6% (p<0.001), 23.1% to 9.8% (p<0.05), and 2.9% to 1% (p=0.29) in IDU, FSW, and BD, respectively. Of 79 anti-HIV-1 antibody-positive samples, 61 were successfully analyzed for the pol-reverse transcriptase (RT) region. All HIV-1 strains were CRF01_AE. Nonnucleoside RT inhibitor-resistant mutations, Y181C/I, were detected in three subjects; one had the nucleoside RT inhibitor-resistant mutations L74V and M184V and one had E138K. The prevalence of transmitted drug-resistant HIV-1 in Haiphong increased slightly from 1.8% in 2007 to 6.6% in 2012 (p=0.06).

  12. Cloning and characterization of functional subtype A HIV-1 envelope variants transmitted through breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Rainwater, Stephanie M J; Wu, Xueling; Nduati, Ruth; Nedellec, Rebecca; Mosier, Donald; John-Stewart, Grace; Mbori-Ngacha, Dorothy; Overbaugh, Julie

    2007-03-01

    Previous studies of HIV-1 variants transmitted from mother-to-infant have focused primarily on computational analyses of partial envelope gene sequences, rather than analyses of functional envelope variants. There are very few examples of well-characterized functional envelope clones from mother-infant pairs, especially from envelope variants representing the most prevalent subtypes worldwide. To address this, we amplified the envelope variants present in 4 mother-infant transmission pairs, all of whom were infected with subtype A and three of whom presumably transmitted HIV-1 during the breastfeeding period. Functional envelope clones were constructed, either encoding full-length envelope sequences from the mother and baby or by making chimeric envelope clones in a common backbone sequence. The infant envelope sequences were genetically homogeneous compared to the maternal viruses, and pseudoviruses bearing these envelopes all used CCR5 as a coreceptor. The infant viruses were generally resistant to neutralization by maternal antibodies present near the time of transmission. There were no notable differences in sensitivity of the mother and infant envelope variants to neutralization by heterologous plasma or monoclonal antibodies 2G12 and b12, or to inhibition by sCD4, PSC-RANTES or TAK779. This collection of viral envelopes, which can be used for making pseudotyped viruses, may be useful for examining the efficacy of interventions to block mother-infant transmission, including sera from vaccine candidates, purified antibodies under consideration for passive immunization and viral entry inhibitors.

  13. Successful increase in contraceptive uptake among Kenyan HIV-1-serodiscordant couples enrolled in an HIV-1 prevention trial.

    PubMed

    Ngure, Kenneth; Heffron, Renee; Mugo, Nelly; Irungu, Elizabeth; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared M

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate a multipronged approach to promote dual contraceptive use by women within heterosexual HIV-1-serodiscordant partnerships. For 213 HIV-1-serodiscordant couples in Thika, Kenya, participating in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial, contraceptive promotion was initiated through a multipronged intervention that included staff training, couples family planning sessions, and free provision of hormonal contraception on-site. Contraceptive use and pregnancy incidence were compared between two time periods (before versus after June 2007, when the intervention was initiated) and between Thika and other Kenyan trial sites (Eldoret, Kisumu, and Nairobi). Generalized estimating equations and Andersen-Gill proportional hazards modeling were used. Nonbarrier contraceptive use increased after implementation of the intervention: from 31.5 to 64.7% of visits among HIV-1-seropositive women [odds ratio 4.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.0-5.3] and from 28.6 to 46.7% of visits among HIV-1-seronegative women (odds ratio 2.2, 95% CI 1.4-3.5). In comparison, at the other Kenyan sites, where the intervention was not implemented, contraceptive use changed minimally, from 15.6 to 22.3% of visits for HIV-1-seropositive women and from 13.6 to 12.7% among HIV-1-seronegative women. Self-reported condom use remained high during follow-up. Pregnancy incidence at the Thika was significantly lower after compared with before June 2007 (hazard ratio 0.2, 95% CI 0.1-0.6) and was approximately half that at other Kenyan sites during the intervention period (hazard ratio 0.5, 95% CI 0.3-0.8). A multipronged family planning intervention can lead to high nonbarrier contraceptive uptake and reduced pregnancy incidence among women in HIV-1-serodiscordant partnerships.

  14. Successful increase in contraceptive uptake among Kenyan HIV-1 serodiscordant couples enrolled in an HIV-1 prevention trial

    PubMed Central

    Ngure, Kenneth; Heffron, Renee; Mugo, Nelly; Irungu, Elizabeth; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate a multi-pronged approach to promote dual contraceptive use by women within heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant partnerships. Methods For 213 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in Thika, Kenya participating in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial, contraceptive promotion was initiated through a multi-pronged intervention that included staff training, couples family planning sessions, and free provision of hormonal contraception on-site. Contraceptive use and pregnancy incidence were compared between two time periods (before versus after June 2007, when the intervention was initiated) and between Thika and other Kenyan trial sites (Eldoret, Kisumu, and Nairobi). Generalized estimating equations and Andersen-Gill proportional hazards modeling were used. Results Non-barrier contraceptive use increased after implementation of the intervention: from 31.5% to 64.7% of visits among HIV-1 seropositive women (odds ratio [OR] 4.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.0–5.3) and from 28.6% to 46.7% of visits among HIV-1 seronegative women (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.4–3.5). In comparison, at the other Kenyan sites, where the intervention was not implemented, contraceptive use changed minimally, from 15.6% to 22.3% of visits for HIV-1 seropositive women and from 13.6% to 12.7% among HIV-1 seronegative women. Self-reported condom use remained high during follow-up. Pregnancy incidence at the Thika was significantly lower after compared with before June 2007 (hazard ratio [HR] 0.2, 95% CI 0.1–0.6), and was approximately half that at other Kenyan sites during the intervention period (HR 0.5, 95% CI 0.3–0.8). Conclusions A multi-pronged family planning intervention can lead to high non-barrier contraceptive uptake and reduced pregnancy incidence among women in HIV-1 serodiscordant partnerships. PMID:20081393

  15. Use of Dried Blood Spots to Elucidate Full-Length Transmitted/Founder HIV-1 Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Salazar, Maria G.; Tully, Damien C.; Ogilvie, Colin B.; Learn, Gerald H.; Allen, Todd M.; Heath, Sonya L.; Goepfert, Paul; Bar, Katharine J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of HIV-1 genomes responsible for establishing clinical infection in newly infected individuals is fundamental to prevention and pathogenesis research. Processing, storage, and transportation of the clinical samples required to perform these virologic assays in resource-limited settings requires challenging venipuncture and cold chain logistics. Here, we validate the use of dried-blood spots (DBS) as a simple and convenient alternative to collecting and storing frozen plasma. Methods We performed parallel nucleic acid extraction, single genome amplification (SGA), next generation sequencing (NGS), and phylogenetic analyses on plasma and DBS. Results We demonstrated the capacity to extract viral RNA from DBS and perform SGA to infer the complete nucleotide sequence of the transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1 envelope gene and full-length genome in two acutely infected individuals. Using both SGA and NGS methodologies, we showed that sequences generated from DBS and plasma display comparable phylogenetic patterns in both acute and chronic infection. SGA was successful on samples with a range of plasma viremia, including samples as low as 1,700 copies/ml and an estimated ∼50 viral copies per blood spot. Further, we demonstrated reproducible efficiency in gp160 env sequencing in DBS stored at ambient temperature for up to three weeks or at -20°C for up to five months. Conclusions These findings support the use of DBS as a practical and cost-effective alternative to frozen plasma for clinical trials and translational research conducted in resource-limited settings. PMID:27819061

  16. Genetic identity, biological phenotype, and evolutionary pathways of transmitted/founder viruses in acute and early HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Salazar, Maria G.; Keele, Brandon F.; Learn, Gerald H.; Giorgi, Elena E.; Li, Hui; Decker, Julie M.; Wang, Shuyi; Baalwa, Joshua; Kraus, Matthias H.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Shaw, Katharina S.; Guffey, M. Brad; Bar, Katharine J.; Davis, Katie L.; Ochsenbauer-Jambor, Christina; Kappes, John C.; Saag, Michael S.; Cohen, Myron S.; Mulenga, Joseph; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Allen, Susan; Hunter, Eric; Markowitz, Martin; Hraber, Peter; Perelson, Alan S.; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Haynes, Barton F.; Korber, Bette T.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2009-01-01

    Identification of full-length transmitted HIV-1 genomes could be instrumental in HIV-1 pathogenesis, microbicide, and vaccine research by enabling the direct analysis of those viruses actually responsible for productive clinical infection. We show in 12 acutely infected subjects (9 clade B and 3 clade C) that complete HIV-1 genomes of transmitted/founder viruses can be inferred by single genome amplification and sequencing of plasma virion RNA. This allowed for the molecular cloning and biological analysis of transmitted/founder viruses and a comprehensive genome-wide assessment of the genetic imprint left on the evolving virus quasispecies by a composite of host selection pressures. Transmitted viruses encoded intact canonical genes (gag-pol-vif-vpr-tat-rev-vpu-env-nef) and replicated efficiently in primary human CD4+ T lymphocytes but much less so in monocyte-derived macrophages. Transmitted viruses were CD4 and CCR5 tropic and demonstrated concealment of coreceptor binding surfaces of the envelope bridging sheet and variable loop 3. 2 mo after infection, transmitted/founder viruses in three subjects were nearly completely replaced by viruses differing at two to five highly selected genomic loci; by 12–20 mo, viruses exhibited concentrated mutations at 17–34 discrete locations. These findings reveal viral properties associated with mucosal HIV-1 transmission and a limited set of rapidly evolving adaptive mutations driven primarily, but not exclusively, by early cytotoxic T cell responses. PMID:19487424

  17. Role of Transmitted Gag CTL Polymorphisms in Defining Replicative Capacity and Early HIV-1 Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Jonathan M.; Schaefer, Malinda; Yu, Tianwei; Lahki, Shabir; Prentice, Heather A.; Yue, Ling; Vishwanathan, Sundaram A.; Kilembe, William; Goepfert, Paul; Price, Matthew A.; Gilmour, Jill; Mulenga, Joseph; Farmer, Paul; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Tang, Jiaming; Heckerman, David; Kaslow, Richard A.; Allen, Susan A.; Hunter, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Initial studies of 88 transmission pairs in the Zambia Emory HIV Research Project cohort demonstrated that the number of transmitted HLA-B associated polymorphisms in Gag, but not Nef, was negatively correlated to set point viral load (VL) in the newly infected partners. These results suggested that accumulation of CTL escape mutations in Gag might attenuate viral replication and provide a clinical benefit during early stages of infection. Using a novel approach, we have cloned gag sequences isolated from the earliest seroconversion plasma sample from the acutely infected recipient of 149 epidemiologically linked Zambian transmission pairs into a primary isolate, subtype C proviral vector, MJ4. We determined the replicative capacity (RC) of these Gag-MJ4 chimeras by infecting the GXR25 cell line and quantifying virion production in supernatants via a radiolabeled reverse transcriptase assay. We observed a statistically significant positive correlation between RC conferred by the transmitted Gag sequence and set point VL in newly infected individuals (p = 0.02). Furthermore, the RC of Gag-MJ4 chimeras also correlated with the VL of chronically infected donors near the estimated date of infection (p = 0.01), demonstrating that virus replication contributes to VL in both acute and chronic infection. These studies also allowed for the elucidation of novel sites in Gag associated with changes in RC, where rare mutations had the greatest effect on fitness. Although we observed both advantageous and deleterious rare mutations, the latter could point to vulnerable targets in the HIV-1 genome. Importantly, RC correlated significantly (p = 0.029) with the rate of CD4+ T cell decline over the first 3 years of infection in a manner that is partially independent of VL, suggesting that the replication capacity of HIV-1 during the earliest stages of infection is a determinant of pathogenesis beyond what might be expected based on set point VL alone. PMID:23209412

  18. Use of a risk scoring tool to identify higher-risk HIV-1 serodiscordant couples for an antiretroviral-based HIV-1 prevention intervention.

    PubMed

    Irungu, Elizabeth M; Heffron, Renee; Mugo, Nelly; Ngure, Kenneth; Katabira, Elly; Bulya, Nulu; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Odoyo, Josephine; Asiimwe, Stephen; Tindimwebwa, Edna; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared M

    2016-10-17

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) reduce HIV-1 transmission within heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. Prioritizing couples at highest HIV-1 transmission risk for ART and PrEP would maximize impact and minimize costs. The Partners Demonstration Project is an open-label, delivery study of integrated PrEP and ART for HIV-1 prevention among high risk HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in Kenya and Uganda. We evaluated the feasibility of using a validated risk score that weighs a combination of easily measurable factors (age, children, marital status, male circumcision status, condom use, plasma HIV-1 levels) to identify couples at highest risk for HIV-1 transmission for enrollment. Couples scoring ≥5 met the risk score eligibility criteria. We screened 1694 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples and enrolled 1013. Of the screened couples, 1331 (78.6 %) scored ≥5 (with an expected incidence >3 % per year) and 76 % of these entered the study. The median age of the HIV-1 uninfected partner was 29 years [IQR 26, 36] and 20 % were <25 years of age. The HIV-1 uninfected partner was male in 67 % of partnerships, 33 % of whom were uncircumcised, 57 % of couples had no children, and 65 % reported unprotected sex in the month prior to enrollment. Among HIV-1 infected partners, 41 % had plasma viral load >50,000 copies/ml. A risk scoring tool identified HIV-1 serodiscordant couples for a demonstration project of PrEP and ART with high HIV-1 risk. The tool may be feasible for research and public health settings to maximize efficiency and minimize HIV-1 prevention costs.

  19. Initial HIV-1 antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in acute HIV-1 infection inhibit transmitted/founder virus replication.

    PubMed

    Freel, Stephanie A; Picking, Ralph A; Ferrari, Guido; Ding, Haitao; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C; Kirchherr, Jennifer L; Soderberg, Kelly A; Weinhold, Kent J; Cunningham, Coleen K; Denny, Thomas N; Crump, John A; Cohen, Myron S; McMichael, Andrew J; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2012-06-01

    CD8-mediated virus inhibition can be detected in HIV-1-positive subjects who naturally control virus replication. Characterizing the inhibitory function of CD8(+) T cells during acute HIV-1 infection (AHI) can elucidate the nature of the CD8(+) responses that can be rapidly elicited and that contribute to virus control. We examined the timing and HIV-1 antigen specificity of antiviral CD8(+) T cells during AHI. Autologous and heterologous CD8(+) T cell antiviral functions were assessed longitudinally during AHI in five donors from the CHAVI 001 cohort using a CD8(+) T cell-mediated virus inhibition assay (CD8 VIA) and transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses. Potent CD8(+) antiviral responses against heterologous T/F viruses appeared during AHI at the first time point sampled in each of the 5 donors (Fiebig stages 1/2 to 5). Inhibition of an autologous T/F virus was durable to 48 weeks; however, inhibition of heterologous responses declined concurrent with the resolution of viremia. HIV-1 viruses from 6 months postinfection were more resistant to CD8(+)-mediated virus inhibition than cognate T/F viruses, demonstrating that the virus escapes early from CD8(+) T cell-mediated inhibition of virus replication. CD8(+) T cell antigen-specific subsets mediated inhibition of T/F virus replication via soluble components, and these soluble responses were stimulated by peptide pools that include epitopes that were shown to drive HIV-1 escape during AHI. These data provide insights into the mechanisms of CD8-mediated virus inhibition and suggest that functional analyses will be important for determining whether similar antigen-specific virus inhibition can be induced by T cell-directed vaccine strategies.

  20. Male Circumcision and Risk of Male-to-Female HIV-1 Transmission: A Multinational Prospective Study in African HIV-1 Serodiscordant Couples

    PubMed Central

    Baeten, Jared M.; Donnell, Deborah; Kapiga, Saidi H.; Ronald, Allan; John-Stewart, Grace; Inambao, Mubiana; Manongi, Rachel; Vwalika, Bellington; Celum, Connie

    2010-01-01

    Objective Male circumcision reduces female-to-male HIV-1 transmission risk by approximately 60%. Data assessing the effect of circumcision on male-to-female HIV-1 transmission are conflicting, with one observational study among HIV-1 serodiscordant couples showing reduced transmission but a randomized trial suggesting no short-term benefit of circumcision. Design/Methods Data collected as part of a prospective study among African HIV-1 serodiscordant couples were analyzed for the relationship between circumcision status of HIV-1 seropositive men and risk of HIV-1 acquisition among their female partners. Circumcision status was determined by physical examination. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used. Results 1096 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in which the male partner was HIV-1 infected were followed for a median of 18 months; 374 (34%) male partners were circumcised. Sixty-four female partners seroconverted to HIV-1 (incidence 3.8 per 100 person-years). Circumcision of the male partner was associated with a non-statistically significant ∼40% lower risk of HIV-1 acquisition by the female partner (hazard ratio [HR] 0.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.35-1.10, p=0.10). The magnitude of this effect was similar when restricted to the subset of HIV-1 transmission events confirmed by viral sequencing to have occurred within the partnership (n=50, HR 0.57, p=0.11), after adjustment for male partner plasma HIV-1 concentrations (HR 0.60, p=0.13), and when excluding follow-up time for male partners who initiated antiretroviral therapy (HR 0.53, p=0.07). Conclusions Among HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in which the HIV-1 seropositive partner was male, we observed no increased risk and potentially decreased risk from circumcision on male-to-female transmission of HIV-1. PMID:20042848

  1. Infection of monkeys by simian-human immunodeficiency viruses with transmitted/founder clade C HIV-1 envelopes.

    PubMed

    Asmal, Mohammed; Luedemann, Corinne; Lavine, Christy L; Mach, Linh V; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Brinkley, Christie; Denny, Thomas N; Lewis, Mark G; Anderson, Hanne; Pal, Ranajit; Sok, Devin; Le, Khoa; Pauthner, Matthias; Hahn, Beatrice H; Shaw, George M; Seaman, Michael S; Letvin, Norman L; Burton, Dennis R; Sodroski, Joseph G; Haynes, Barton F; Santra, Sampa

    2015-01-15

    Simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) that mirror natural transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses in man are needed for evaluation of HIV-1 vaccine candidates in nonhuman primates. Currently available SHIVs contain HIV-1 env genes from chronically-infected individuals and do not reflect the characteristics of biologically relevant HIV-1 strains that mediate human transmission. We chose to develop clade C SHIVs, as clade C is the major infecting subtype of HIV-1 in the world. We constructed 10 clade C SHIVs expressing Env proteins from T/F viruses. Three of these ten clade C SHIVs (SHIV KB9 C3, SHIV KB9 C4 and SHIV KB9 C5) replicated in naïve rhesus monkeys. These three SHIVs are mucosally transmissible and are neutralized by sCD4 and several HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies. However, like natural T/F viruses, they exhibit low Env reactivity and a Tier 2 neutralization sensitivity. Of note, none of the clade C T/F SHIVs elicited detectable autologous neutralizing antibodies in the infected monkeys, even though antibodies that neutralized a heterologous Tier 1 HIV-1 were generated. Challenge with these three new clade C SHIVs will provide biologically relevant tests for vaccine protection in rhesus macaques.

  2. HIV-1 and other sexually transmitted infections in a cohort of female sex workers in Chiang Rai, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Limpakarnjanarat, K.; Mastro, T. D.; Saisorn, S.; Uthaivoravit, W.; Kaewkungwal, J.; Korattana, S.; Young, N. L.; Morse, S. A.; Schmid, D. S.; Weniger, B. G.; Nieburg, P.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine demographic and behavioural factors and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) associated with prevalent HIV-1 infection among brothel based and other female sex workers (FSWs) in Chiang Rai, northern Thailand. METHODS: Data were collected from questionnaires, physical examinations, and laboratory evaluations on Thai FSWs enrolled in a prospective cohort study in Chiang Rai, Thailand, from 1991 to the end of 1994. RESULTS: HIV-1 seroprevalence was 32% among 500 women: 47% for 280 brothel workers and 13% for 220 other FSWs (p < 0.001); 96% of infections were due to HIV-1 subtype E. At enrolment, other STIs were common: chlamydia, 20%; gonorrhoea, 15%; active syphilis (serological diagnosis), 9%; genital ulcer, 12%; seroreactivity to Haemophilus ducreyi, 21%, and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), 76%. On multiple logistic regression analysis, HIV-1 was associated with brothel work, birth in upper northern Thailand, initiation of commercial sex at < 15 years of age, syphilis, HSV-2 seropositivity, and genital ulcer. CONCLUSIONS: Young Thai FSWs working in brothels in northern Thailand in the early phase of the HIV epidemic have been at very high risk for HIV-1 infection and several other STIs. Programmes are needed to prevent girls and young women from entering the sex industry and to reduce the risk of infection with HIV-1 and other STIs. 


 PMID:10448339

  3. Infection of Monkeys by Simian-human Immunodeficiency Viruses with Transmitted/ founder Clade C HIV-1 Envelopes

    PubMed Central

    Asmal, Mohammed; Luedemann, Corinne; Lavine, Christy L.; Mach, Linh V.; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Brinkley, Christie; Denny, Thomas N.; Lewis, Mark G.; Anderson, Hanne; Pal, Ranajit; Sok, Devin; Le, Khoa; Pauthner, Matthias; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.; Seaman, Michael S.; Letvin, Norman L.; Burton, Dennis R.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Haynes, Barton F.; Santra, Sampa

    2014-01-01

    Simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) that mirror natural transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses in man are needed for evaluation of HIV-1 vaccine candidates in nonhuman primates. Currently available SHIVs contain HIV-1 env genes from chronically-infected individuals and do not reflect the characteristics of biologically relevant HIV-1 strains that mediate human transmission. We chose to develop clade C SHIVs, as clade C is the major infecting subtype of HIV-1 in the world. We constructed ten clade C SHIVs expressing Env proteins from T/F viruses. Three of these ten clade C SHIVs (SHIV KB9 C3, SHIV KB9 C4 and SHIV KB9 C5) replicated in naïve rhesus monkeys. These three SHIVs are mucosally transmissible and are neutralized by sCD4 and several HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies. However, like natural T/F viruses, they exhibit low Env reactivity and a Tier 2 neutralization sensitivity. Of note, none of the clade C T/F SHIVs elicited detectable autologous neutralizing antibodies in the infected monkeys, even though antibodies that neutralized a heterologous Tier 1 HIV-1 were generated. Challenge with these three new clade C SHIVs will provide biologically relevant tests for vaccine protection in rhesus macaques. PMID:25462344

  4. Recent trends and patterns in HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Tostevin, A; White, E; Dunn, D; Croxford, S; Delpech, V; Williams, I; Asboe, D; Pozniak, A; Churchill, D; Geretti, A M; Pillay, D; Sabin, C; Leigh-Brown, A; Smit, E

    2017-03-01

    Transmission of drug-resistant HIV-1 has decreased in the UK since the early 2000s. This analysis reports recent trends and characteristics of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in the UK from 2010 to 2013. Resistance tests conducted in antiretroviral treatment (ART)-naïve individuals between 2010 and 2013 were analysed for the presence of transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRMs), defined as any mutations from a modified 2009 World Health Organization surveillance list, or a modified 2013 International Antiviral Society-USA list for integrase tests. Logistic regression was used to examine associations between demographics and the prevalence of TDRMs. TDRMs were observed in 1223 (7.5%) of 16 425 individuals; prevalence declined from 8.1% in 2010 to 6.6% in 2013 (P = 0.02). The prevalence of TDRMs was higher among men who have sex with men (MSM) compared with heterosexual men and women (8.7% versus 6.4%, respectively) with a trend for decreasing TDRMs among MSM (P = 0.008) driven by a reduction in nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-related mutations. The most frequently detected TDRMs were K103N (2.2%), T215 revertants (1.6%), M41L (0.9%) and L90M (0.7%). Predicted phenotypic resistance to first-line ART was highest to the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) rilpivirine and efavirenz (6.2% and 3.4%, respectively) but minimal to NRTIs, including tenofovir, and protease inhibitors (PIs). No major integrase TDRMs were detected among 101 individuals tested while ART-naïve. We observed a decrease in TDRMs in recent years. However, this was confined to the MSM population and rates remained stable in those with heterosexually acquired HIV infection. Resistance to currently recommended first-line ART, including integrase inhibitors, remained reassuringly low. © 2016 The Authors. HIV Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British HIV Association.

  5. Highly complex neutralization determinants on a monophyletic lineage of newly transmitted subtype C HIV-1 Env clones from India

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Smita S.; Lapedes, Alan; Tang, Haili; Gnanakaran, S.; Daniels, Marcus G.; Zhang, Ming; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Li, Ming; Polonis, Victoria R.; McCutchan, Francine E.; Morris, Lynn; Ellenberger, Dennis; Butera, Salvatore T.; Bollinger, Robert C.; Korber, Bette T.; Paranjape, Ramesh S.; Montefiori, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the neutralization properties of HIV-1 in India to optimally design and test vaccines. For this reason, a functional Env clone was obtained from each of ten newly acquired, heterosexually transmitted HIV-1 infections in Pune, Maharashtra. These clones formed a phylogenetically distinct genetic lineage within subtype C. As Env-pseudotyped viruses the clones were mostly resistant to IgG1b12, 2G12 and 2F5 but all were sensitive to 4E10. When compared to a large multi-subtype panel of Env-pseudotyped viruses (subtypes B, C and CRF02_AG) in neutralization assays with a multi-subtype panel of HIV-1-positive plasma samples, the Indian Envs were remarkably complex antigenically. With the exception of the Indian Envs, results of a hierarchical clustering analysis showed a strong subtype association with the patterns of neutralization susceptibility. From these patterns we were able to identify 19 neutralization cluster-associated amino acid signatures in gp120 and 14 signatures in the ectodomain and cytoplasmic tail of gp41. We conclude that newly transmitted Indian Envs are antigenically complex in spite of close genetic similarity. Delineation of neutralization-associated amino acid signatures provides a deeper understanding of the antigenic structure of HIV-1 Env. PMID:19167740

  6. Prevalence of sexually transmitted infections in HIV-1 infected pregnant women in Europe.

    PubMed

    Landes, Megan; Thorne, Claire; Barlow, Patricia; Fiore, Simona; Malyuta, Ruslan; Martinelli, Pasquale; Posokhova, Svetlana; Savasi, Valeria; Semenenko, Igor; Stelmah, Andrej; Tibaldi, Cecilia; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2007-01-01

    We investigated prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STI) in a cohort of HIV-1-infected pregnant women and described factors associated with STI diagnosis, as a nested study within the European Collaborative Study (ECS). The ECS is a cohort study in which HIV-infected pregnant women are enrolled and their children followed from birth, according to standard clinical and laboratory protocols. Information on STIs diagnosed during pregnancy was collected retrospectively from the antenatal records of women enrolling between January 1999 and October 2005; other variables were obtained from the ECS prospective database. A total of 1,050 women were included: 530 in Western Europe and 520 in Ukraine. Syphilis was the most common bacterial STI (2% prevalence, 95% CI 1.2-3.0). Prevalence of HPV-related genital lesions was 8.6% (95%CI 6.9-10.4) and prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis was 12.1% (95%CI 10.2-14.2). Women in Ukraine (AOR 10.7, 95%CI 3.7-30.5), single women (AOR 3.9, 95%CI 1.2-12.7), sexual partners of injecting drug users (AOR 3.8, 95%CI 1.4-10.4) and women with CD4 counts <200 cells/mm(3) (AOR 5.4, 95%CI 1.0-28.1) were at increased risk of diagnosis with Chlamydia trachomatis, syphilis or Trichomonas vaginalis. African origin (AOR 1.9, 95%CI 1.1-3.3) and CD4 count <200 cells/mm(3) (AOR 3.4, 95%CI 1.5-7.8) were associated with HSV-2 and/or HPV-related genital lesions. Antenatal screening should be considered an effective tool for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of further transmission of STIs. HIV-infected women should receive adequate screening for STIs during pregnancy together with appropriate counseling and follow-up for treatment and prevention.

  7. Identification of full-length transmitted/founder viruses and their progeny in primary HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, Bette; Hraber, Peter; Giorgi, Elena; Bhattacharya, T

    2009-01-01

    Identification of transmitted/founder virus genomes and their progeny by is a novel strategy for probing the molecular basis of HIV-1 transmission and for evaluating the genetic imprint of viral and host factors that act to constrain or facilitate virus replication. Here, we show in a cohort of twelve acutely infected subjects (9 clade B; 3 clade C), that complete genomic sequences of transmitted/founder viruses could be inferred using single genome amplification of plasma viral RNA, direct amplicon sequencing, and a model of random virus evolution. This allowed for the precise identification, chemical synthesis, molecular cloning, and biological analysis of those viruses actually responsible for productive clinical infection and for a comprehensive mapping of sequential viral genomes and proteomes for mutations that are necessary or incidental to the establishment of HIV-1 persistence. Transmitted/founder viruses were CD4 and CCR5 tropic, replicated preferentially in activated primary T-Iymphocytes but not monocyte-derived macrophages, and were effectively shielded from most heterologous or broadly neutralizing antibodies. By 3 months of infection, the evolving viral quasispecies in three subjects showed mutational fixation at only 2-5 discreet genomic loci. By 6-12 months, mutational fixation was evident at 18-27 genomic loci. Some, but not all, of these mutations were attributable to virus escape from cytotoxic Tlymphocytes or neutralizing antibodies, suggesting that other viral or host factors may influence early HIV -1 fitness.

  8. Generation and Characterization of HIV-1 Transmitted and Founder Virus Consensus Sequence from Intravenous Drug Users in Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Fan; Ma, Liying; Feng, Yi; Hu, Jing; Ni, Na; Ruan, Yuhua; Shao, Yiming

    2017-03-02

    HIV-1 transmission in intravenous drug users (IDUs) has been characterized by high genetic multiplicity and suggests a greater challenge for HIV-1 infection blocking. We investigated a total of 749 sequences of full-length gp160 gene obtained by single genome sequencing (SGS) from 22 HIV-1 early infected IDUs in Xinjiang province, northwest China, and generated a transmitted and founder virus (T/F virus) consensus sequence (IDU.CON). The T/F virus was classified as subtype CRF07_BC and predicted to be CCR5-tropic virus. The variable region (V1, V2, and V4 loop) of IDU.CON showed length variation compared with the heterosexual T/F virus consensus sequence (HSX.CON) and homosexual T/F virus consensus sequence (MSM.CON). A total of 26 N-linked glycosylation sites were discovered in the IDU.CON sequence, which is less than that of MSM.CON and HSX.CON. Characterization of T/F virus from IDUs highlights the genetic make-up and complexity of virus near the moment of transmission or in early infection preceding systemic dissemination and is important toward the development of an effective HIV-1 preventive methods, including vaccines.

  9. Bacterial Vaginosis Associated with Increased Risk of Female-to-Male HIV-1 Transmission: A Prospective Cohort Analysis among African Couples

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Craig R.; Lingappa, Jairam R.; Baeten, Jared M.; Ngayo, Musa O.; Spiegel, Carol A.; Hong, Ting; Donnell, Deborah; Celum, Connie; Kapiga, Saidi; Delany, Sinead; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a disruption of the normal vaginal flora, has been associated with a 60% increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition in women and higher concentration of HIV-1 RNA in the genital tract of HIV-1–infected women. However, whether BV, which is present in up to half of African HIV-1–infected women, is associated with an increase in HIV-1 transmission to male partners has not been assessed in previous studies. Methods and Findings We assessed the association between BV on female-to-male HIV-1 transmission risk in a prospective study of 2,236 HIV-1–seropositive women and their HIV-1 uninfected male partners from seven African countries from a randomized placebo-controlled trial that enrolled heterosexual African adults who were seropositive for both HIV-1 and herpes simplex virus (HSV)-2, and their HIV-1–seronegative partners. Participants were followed for up to 24 months; every three months, vaginal swabs were obtained from female partners for Gram stain and male partners were tested for HIV-1. BV and normal vaginal flora were defined as a Nugent score of 7–10 and 0–3, respectively. To reduce misclassification, HIV-1 sequence analysis of viruses from seroconverters and their partners was performed to determine linkage of HIV-1 transmissions. Overall, 50 incident HIV-1 infections occurred in men in which the HIV-1–infected female partner had an evaluable vaginal Gram stain. HIV-1 incidence in men whose HIV-1–infected female partners had BV was 2.91 versus 0.76 per 100 person-years in men whose female partners had normal vaginal flora (hazard ratio 3.62, 95% CI 1.74–7.52). After controlling for sociodemographic factors, sexual behavior, male circumcision, sexually transmitted infections, pregnancy, and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels in female partners, BV was associated with a greater than 3-fold increased risk of female-to-male HIV-1 transmission (adjusted hazard ratio 3.17, 95% CI 1.37–7.33). Conclusions This study identified an

  10. HIV-1 genetic diversity and transmitted drug resistance frequency among Iranian treatment-naive, sexually infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Kalantari, Saeed; Garshasbi, Saba; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Esghaei, Maryam; Memarnejadian, Arash; Fakhim, Atousa; Keyvani, Hossein

    2017-02-08

    In recent years, the patterns of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) transmission in Iran have been changing gradually from drug injection to unprotected sexual contact. This study sought to investigate the phylogenetic trends and characteristics of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations of HIV-1 in a population that is mainly infected through homo/heterosexual contacts. Sixty newly diagnosed antiretroviral-naive individuals with HIV infection living in Tehran were recruited to this survey, and among them, 42 subjects were established to be infected through sexual intercourse. Following amplification and sequencing of the main part of the HIV-1 pol region, phylogenetic and drug-resistance mutation (DRM) analysis was successfully performed on these 42 patients. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the majority of the subjects were infected with subtype CRF35_AD (88%), followed by subtype B, with 7.1%, and subtype CRF01_AE, with 4.7%. A total of 7.1% of the subjects were found to be infected with HIV-1 variants with surveillance drug-resistant mutations (SDRMs) according to the last world health organisation (WHO) algorithm. All of the identified SDRMs belonged to the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) class, including K103 N and V106A, which were found in three patients. Two minor HIV protease-inhibitor-related mutations (L10I and G73S) were detected in two patients, but these mutations are not included in the WHO SDRMs list. The dominance of HIV-1 subtype CRF35_AD was observed among subjects of this study who were infected through sexual contact. The moderate prevalence of SDRMs (7.1%) in this population emphasises the fact that the risk of treatment failure in HIV-infected individuals might increase in the future, and preventive measures should be considered by health authorities.

  11. Combining prevention of HIV-1, other sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancies: Development of dual-protection technologies.

    PubMed

    Friend, David R; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2010-12-01

    A significant number of women, especially in developing countries, need protection against more than one sexually transmitted infection (STIs), for instance HIV-1 and HSV-2, and family planning methods to prevent unwanted pregnancies. Dual protection technologies (DPTs; also known as multipurpose technologies) are designed to address two different indications with one product. Examples of DPTs are vaginal products capable of preventing transmission of HIV-1 in women while simultaneously providing contraceptive properties and a vaginal product capable of reducing HIV-1 transmission while preventing transmission of a second STI. DPTs can be categorized into three main approaches: 1) physical barriers, 2) chemical barriers, and 3) a combination of physical and chemical barriers. Examples of physical barriers are male and female condoms, diaphragms and cervical caps. Chemical barriers include use of a single drug with two mechanisms of action (viz., dual-activity compounds with microbicidal and contraceptive properties or activity against HIV-1 and a second STI pathogen such as HSV-2) or a combination of two drugs each targeted against separate mechanisms for achieving contraception and inhibition of HIV-1. Combinations of chemical and physical barriers are based on physical barriers such as a diaphragm along with a microbicide. Examples of each approach and current prototypes (such as vaginal gels and intravaginal rings) under development are described in this paper. Challenges facing development and regulatory approval of DPTs are also reviewed. This article forms part of a special supplement on a presentation covering DPTs, based on the symposium "Trends in Microbicide Formulations", held on 25 and 26 January 2010, Arlington, VA.

  12. Uterine Epithelial Cell Regulation of DC-SIGN Expression Inhibits Transmitted/Founder HIV-1 Trans Infection by Immature Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ochiel, Daniel O.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C.; Ghosh, Mimi; Fahey, John V.; Wira, Charles R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Sexual transmission accounts for the majority of HIV-1 infections. In over 75% of cases, infection is initiated by a single variant (transmitted/founder virus). However, the determinants of virus selection during transmission are unknown. Host cell-cell interactions in the mucosa may be critical in regulating susceptibility to infection. We hypothesized in this study that specific immune modulators secreted by uterine epithelial cells modulate susceptibility of dendritic cells (DC) to infection with HIV-1. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report that uterine epithelial cell secretions (i.e. conditioned medium, CM) decreased DC-SIGN expression on immature dendritic cells via a transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) mechanism. Further, CM inhibited dendritic cell-mediated trans infection of HIV-1 expressing envelope proteins of prototypic reference. Similarly, CM inhibited trans infection of HIV-1 constructs expressing envelopes of transmitted/founder viruses, variants that are selected during sexual transmission. In contrast, whereas recombinant TGF- β1 inhibited trans infection of prototypic reference HIV-1 by dendritic cells, TGF-β1 had a minimal effect on trans infection of transmitted/founder variants irrespective of the reporter system used to measure trans infection. Conclusions/Significance Our results provide the first direct evidence for uterine epithelial cell regulation of dendritic cell transmission of infection with reference and transmitted/founder HIV-1 variants. These findings have immediate implications for designing strategies to prevent sexual transmission of HIV-1. PMID:21179465

  13. Sexually-Transmitted/Founder HIV-1 Cannot Be Directly Predicted from Plasma or PBMC-Derived Viral Quasispecies in the Transmitting Partner

    PubMed Central

    Frange, Pierre; Meyer, Laurence; Jung, Matthieu; Goujard, Cecile; Zucman, David; Abel, Sylvie; Hochedez, Patrick; Gousset, Marine; Gascuel, Olivier; Rouzioux, Christine; Chaix, Marie-Laure

    2013-01-01

    Objective Characterization of HIV-1 sequences in newly infected individuals is important for elucidating the mechanisms of viral sexual transmission. We report the identification of transmitted/founder viruses in eight pairs of HIV-1 sexually-infected patients enrolled at the time of primary infection (“recipients”) and their transmitting partners (“donors”). Methods Using a single genome-amplification approach, we compared quasispecies in donors and recipients on the basis of 316 and 376 C2V5 env sequences amplified from plasma viral RNA and PBMC-associated DNA, respectively. Results Both DNA and RNA sequences indicated very homogeneous viral populations in all recipients, suggesting transmission of a single variant, even in cases of recent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in donors (n = 2) or recipients (n = 3). In all pairs, the transmitted/founder virus was derived from an infrequent variant population within the blood of the donor. The donor variant sequences most closely related to the recipient sequences were found in plasma samples in 3/8 cases and/or in PBMC samples in 6/8 cases. Although donors were exclusively (n = 4) or predominantly (n = 4) infected by CCR5-tropic (R5) strains, two recipients were infected with highly homogeneous CXCR4/dual-mixed-tropic (X4/DM) viral populations, identified in both DNA and RNA. The proportion of X4/DM quasispecies in donors was higher in cases of X4/DM than R5 HIV transmission (16.7–22.0% versus 0–2.6%), suggesting that X4/DM transmission may be associated with a threshold population of X4/DM circulating quasispecies in donors. Conclusions These suggest that a severe genetic bottleneck occurs during subtype B HIV-1 heterosexual and homosexual transmission. Sexually-transmitted/founder virus cannot be directly predicted by analysis of the donor’s quasispecies in plasma and/or PBMC. Additional studies are required to fully understand the traits that confer the capacity to transmit and

  14. Features of Recently Transmitted HIV-1 Clade C Viruses that Impact Antibody Recognition: Implications for Active and Passive Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Rademeyer, Cecilia; Korber, Bette; Seaman, Michael S.; Giorgi, Elena E.; Thebus, Ruwayhida; Robles, Alexander; Sheward, Daniel J.; Wagh, Kshitij; Carey, Brittany R.; Gao, Hongmei; Greene, Kelli M.; Tang, Haili; Marais, Jinny C.; Diphoko, Thabo E.; Hraber, Peter; Tumba, Nancy; Moore, Penny L.; Gray, Glenda E.; Kublin, James; McElrath, M. Juliana; Vermeulen, Marion; Middelkoop, Keren; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Hoelscher, Michael; Maboko, Leonard; Makhema, Joseph; Robb, Merlin L.; Abdool Karim, Salim; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Kim, Jerome H.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Gao, Feng; Swanstrom, Ronald; Morris, Lynn; Montefiori, David C.; Williamson, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    The development of biomedical interventions to reduce acquisition of HIV-1 infection remains a global priority, however their potential effectiveness is challenged by very high HIV-1 envelope diversity. Two large prophylactic trials in high incidence, clade C epidemic regions in southern Africa are imminent; passive administration of the monoclonal antibody VRC01, and active immunization with a clade C modified RV144-like vaccines. We have created a large representative panel of C clade viruses to enable assessment of antibody responses to vaccines and natural infection in Southern Africa, and we investigated the genotypic and neutralization properties of recently transmitted clade C viruses to determine how viral diversity impacted antibody recognition. We further explore the implications of these findings for the potential effectiveness of these trials. A panel of 200 HIV-1 Envelope pseudoviruses was constructed from clade C viruses collected within the first 100 days following infection. Viruses collected pre-seroconversion were significantly more resistant to serum neutralization compared to post-seroconversion viruses (p = 0.001). Over 13 years of the study as the epidemic matured, HIV-1 diversified (p = 0.0009) and became more neutralization resistant to monoclonal antibodies VRC01, PG9 and 4E10. When tested at therapeutic levels (10ug/ml), VRC01 only neutralized 80% of viruses in the panel, although it did exhibit potent neutralization activity against sensitive viruses (IC50 titres of 0.42 μg/ml). The Gp120 amino acid similarity between the clade C panel and candidate C-clade vaccine protein boosts (Ce1086 and TV1) was 77%, which is 8% more distant than between CRF01_AE viruses and the RV144 CRF01_AE immunogen. Furthermore, two vaccine signature sites, K169 in V2 and I307 in V3, associated with reduced infection risk in RV144, occurred less frequently in clade C panel viruses than in CRF01_AE viruses from Thailand. Increased resistance of pre

  15. Features of Recently Transmitted HIV-1 Clade C Viruses that Impact Antibody Recognition: Implications for Active and Passive Immunization.

    PubMed

    Rademeyer, Cecilia; Korber, Bette; Seaman, Michael S; Giorgi, Elena E; Thebus, Ruwayhida; Robles, Alexander; Sheward, Daniel J; Wagh, Kshitij; Garrity, Jetta; Carey, Brittany R; Gao, Hongmei; Greene, Kelli M; Tang, Haili; Bandawe, Gama P; Marais, Jinny C; Diphoko, Thabo E; Hraber, Peter; Tumba, Nancy; Moore, Penny L; Gray, Glenda E; Kublin, James; McElrath, M Juliana; Vermeulen, Marion; Middelkoop, Keren; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Hoelscher, Michael; Maboko, Leonard; Makhema, Joseph; Robb, Merlin L; Abdool Karim, Salim; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Kim, Jerome H; Hahn, Beatrice H; Gao, Feng; Swanstrom, Ronald; Morris, Lynn; Montefiori, David C; Williamson, Carolyn

    2016-07-01

    The development of biomedical interventions to reduce acquisition of HIV-1 infection remains a global priority, however their potential effectiveness is challenged by very high HIV-1 envelope diversity. Two large prophylactic trials in high incidence, clade C epidemic regions in southern Africa are imminent; passive administration of the monoclonal antibody VRC01, and active immunization with a clade C modified RV144-like vaccines. We have created a large representative panel of C clade viruses to enable assessment of antibody responses to vaccines and natural infection in Southern Africa, and we investigated the genotypic and neutralization properties of recently transmitted clade C viruses to determine how viral diversity impacted antibody recognition. We further explore the implications of these findings for the potential effectiveness of these trials. A panel of 200 HIV-1 Envelope pseudoviruses was constructed from clade C viruses collected within the first 100 days following infection. Viruses collected pre-seroconversion were significantly more resistant to serum neutralization compared to post-seroconversion viruses (p = 0.001). Over 13 years of the study as the epidemic matured, HIV-1 diversified (p = 0.0009) and became more neutralization resistant to monoclonal antibodies VRC01, PG9 and 4E10. When tested at therapeutic levels (10ug/ml), VRC01 only neutralized 80% of viruses in the panel, although it did exhibit potent neutralization activity against sensitive viruses (IC50 titres of 0.42 μg/ml). The Gp120 amino acid similarity between the clade C panel and candidate C-clade vaccine protein boosts (Ce1086 and TV1) was 77%, which is 8% more distant than between CRF01_AE viruses and the RV144 CRF01_AE immunogen. Furthermore, two vaccine signature sites, K169 in V2 and I307 in V3, associated with reduced infection risk in RV144, occurred less frequently in clade C panel viruses than in CRF01_AE viruses from Thailand. Increased resistance of pre

  16. HIV-1 Genetic Characteristics and Transmitted Drug Resistance among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Kunming, China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Ma, Yanling; Su, Yingzhen; Yang, Li; Zhang, Renzhong; Yang, Chaojun; Chen, Huichao; Yan, Wenyun; Shi, Yuhua; Dong, Lijuan; Chen, Ling; Jia, Manhong; Lu, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Background Yunnan has been severely affected by HIV/AIDS in China. Recently, the reported prevalence of HIV-1 among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Yunnan was high in China. To monitor dynamic HIV-1 epidemic among Yunnan MSM, HIV-1 genetic characteristics and transmitted drug resistance (TDR) were investigated. Methods Blood samples from 131 newly HIV-1 diagnosed MSM were continuously collected at fixed sites from January 2010 to December 2012 in Kunming City, Yunnan Province. Partial gag, pol and env genes were sequenced. Phylogenetic, evolutionary and genotypic drug resistance analyses were performed. Results Multiple genotypes were identified among MSM in Kunming, including CRF01_AE (64.9%), CRF07_BC (25.2%), unique recombinant forms (URFs, 5.3%), subtype B (3.1%) and CRF08_BC (1.5%). CRF01_AE and CRF07_BC were the predominant strains. The mean of genetic distance within CRF01_AE were larger than that within CRF07_BC. The estimated introducing time of CRF01_AE in Yunnan MSM (1996.9) is earlier than that of CRF07_BC (2002.8). In this study, subtype B was first identified in Yunnan MSM. CRF08_BC seems to be the distinctive strain in Yunnan MSM, which was seldom found among MSM outside Yunnan. The proportion of URFs increased, which further contributed to genetic diversity among MSM. Strikingly, genetic relatedness was found among these strains with MSM isolates from multiple provinces, which suggested that a nationwide transmission network may exist. TDR-associated mutations were identified in 4.6% individuals. The multivariate analysis revealed that non-native MSM and divorced/widowed MSM were independently associated with a higher TDR rate. Conclusion This work revealed diverse HIV-1 genetics, national transmission networks and a baseline level of TDR in MSM. These findings enhance our understanding of the distribution and evolution of HIV-1 in MSM, and are valuable for developing HIV prevention strategies for MSM. PMID:24489829

  17. Transmitted virus fitness and host T cell responses collectively define divergent infection outcomes in two HIV-1 recipients

    DOE PAGES

    Yue, Ling; Pfafferott, Katja J.; Baalwa, Joshua; ...

    2015-01-08

    Control of virus replication in HIV-1 infection is critical to delaying disease progression. While cellular immune responses are a key determinant of control, relatively little is known about the contribution of the infecting virus to this process. To gain insight into this interplay between virus and host in viral control, we conducted a detailed analysis of two heterosexual HIV-1 subtype A transmission pairs in which female recipients sharing three HLA class I alleles exhibited contrasting clinical outcomes: R880F controlled virus replication while R463F experienced high viral loads and rapid disease progression. Near full-length single genome amplification defined the infecting transmitted/foundermore » (T/F) virus proteome and subsequent sequence evolution over the first year of infection for both acutely infected recipients. T/F virus replicative capacities were compared in vitro, while the development of the earliest cellular immune response was defined using autologous virus sequence-based peptides. The R880F T/F virus replicated significantly slower in vitro than that transmitted to R463F. While neutralizing antibody responses were similar in both subjects, during acute infection R880F mounted a broad T cell response, the most dominant components of which targeted epitopes from which escape was limited. In contrast, the primary HIV-specific T cell response in R463F was focused on just two epitopes, one of which rapidly escaped. This comprehensive study highlights both the importance of the contribution of the lower replication capacity of the transmitted/founder virus and an associated induction of a broad primary HIV-specific T cell response, which was not undermined by rapid epitope escape, to long-term viral control in HIV-1 infection. It underscores the importance of the earliest CD8 T cell response targeting regions of the virus proteome that cannot mutate without a high fitness cost, further emphasizing the need for vaccines that elicit a breadth of

  18. Transmitted virus fitness and host T cell responses collectively define divergent infection outcomes in two HIV-1 recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Ling; Pfafferott, Katja J.; Baalwa, Joshua; Conrod, Karen; Dong, Catherine C.; Chui, Cecilia; Rong, Rong; Claiborne, Daniel T.; Prince, Jessica L.; Tang, Jianming; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Cormier, Emmanuel; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Shaw, George M.; Karita, Etienne; Gilmour, Jill; Goepfert, Paul; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Allen, Susan A.; Borrow, Persephone; Hunter, Eric; Douek, Daniel C.

    2015-01-08

    Control of virus replication in HIV-1 infection is critical to delaying disease progression. While cellular immune responses are a key determinant of control, relatively little is known about the contribution of the infecting virus to this process. To gain insight into this interplay between virus and host in viral control, we conducted a detailed analysis of two heterosexual HIV-1 subtype A transmission pairs in which female recipients sharing three HLA class I alleles exhibited contrasting clinical outcomes: R880F controlled virus replication while R463F experienced high viral loads and rapid disease progression. Near full-length single genome amplification defined the infecting transmitted/founder (T/F) virus proteome and subsequent sequence evolution over the first year of infection for both acutely infected recipients. T/F virus replicative capacities were compared in vitro, while the development of the earliest cellular immune response was defined using autologous virus sequence-based peptides. The R880F T/F virus replicated significantly slower in vitro than that transmitted to R463F. While neutralizing antibody responses were similar in both subjects, during acute infection R880F mounted a broad T cell response, the most dominant components of which targeted epitopes from which escape was limited. In contrast, the primary HIV-specific T cell response in R463F was focused on just two epitopes, one of which rapidly escaped. This comprehensive study highlights both the importance of the contribution of the lower replication capacity of the transmitted/founder virus and an associated induction of a broad primary HIV-specific T cell response, which was not undermined by rapid epitope escape, to long-term viral control in HIV-1 infection. It underscores the importance of the earliest CD8 T cell response targeting regions of the virus proteome that cannot mutate without a high fitness cost, further emphasizing the need for vaccines that elicit a

  19. Transmitted Virus Fitness and Host T Cell Responses Collectively Define Divergent Infection Outcomes in Two HIV-1 Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Ling; Pfafferott, Katja J.; Baalwa, Joshua; Conrod, Karen; Dong, Catherine C.; Chui, Cecilia; Rong, Rong; Claiborne, Daniel T.; Prince, Jessica L.; Tang, Jianming; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Cormier, Emmanuel; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Shaw, George M.; Karita, Etienne; Gilmour, Jill; Goepfert, Paul; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Allen, Susan A.; Borrow, Persephone; Hunter, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Control of virus replication in HIV-1 infection is critical to delaying disease progression. While cellular immune responses are a key determinant of control, relatively little is known about the contribution of the infecting virus to this process. To gain insight into this interplay between virus and host in viral control, we conducted a detailed analysis of two heterosexual HIV-1 subtype A transmission pairs in which female recipients sharing three HLA class I alleles exhibited contrasting clinical outcomes: R880F controlled virus replication while R463F experienced high viral loads and rapid disease progression. Near full-length single genome amplification defined the infecting transmitted/founder (T/F) virus proteome and subsequent sequence evolution over the first year of infection for both acutely infected recipients. T/F virus replicative capacities were compared in vitro, while the development of the earliest cellular immune response was defined using autologous virus sequence-based peptides. The R880F T/F virus replicated significantly slower in vitro than that transmitted to R463F. While neutralizing antibody responses were similar in both subjects, during acute infection R880F mounted a broad T cell response, the most dominant components of which targeted epitopes from which escape was limited. In contrast, the primary HIV-specific T cell response in R463F was focused on just two epitopes, one of which rapidly escaped. This comprehensive study highlights both the importance of the contribution of the lower replication capacity of the transmitted/founder virus and an associated induction of a broad primary HIV-specific T cell response, which was not undermined by rapid epitope escape, to long-term viral control in HIV-1 infection. It underscores the importance of the earliest CD8 T cell response targeting regions of the virus proteome that cannot mutate without a high fitness cost, further emphasizing the need for vaccines that elicit a breadth of T cell

  20. Current trends in negative immuno-synergy between two sexually transmitted infectious viruses: HIV-1 and HSV-1/2.

    PubMed

    Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; Dervillez, Xavier; Rubbo, Pierre-Alain; Kuo, Tiffany; Zhang, Xiuli; Nagot, Nicolas; Tuaillon, Edouard; Van De Perre, Philippe; Nesburn, Anthony B; Benmohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    In the current era of effective anti-retroviral therapy, immuno-compromised patients with HIV-1 infection do live long enough to suffer diseases caused by many opportunistic infections, such as herpes simplex virus type 1 and/or type 2 (HSV-1/2). An estimated two-third of the 40 million individuals that have contracted HIV-1 worldwide are co-infected with HSV-1/2 viruses, the causative agents of ocular oro-facial and genital herpes. The highest prevalence of HIV and HSV-1/2 infections are confined to the same regions of Sub-Saharan Africa. HSV-1/2 infections affect HIV-1 immunity, and vice versa. While important research gains have been made in understanding herpes and HIV immunity, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the crosstalk between HSV-1/2 and HIV co-infection remain to be fully elucidated. Understanding the mechanisms behind the apparent HSV/HIV negative immuno-synergy maybe the key to successful HSV and HIV vaccines; both are currently unavailable. An effective herpes immunotherapeutic vaccine would in turn - indirectly - contribute in reducing HIV epidemic. The purpose of this review is: (i) to summarize the current trends in understanding the negative immuno-crosstalk between HIV and HSV-1/2 infections; and (ii) to discuss the possibility of developing a novel mucosal herpes immunotherapeutic strategy or even a combined or chimeric immunotherapeutic vaccine that simultaneously targets HIV and HSV-1/2 infections. These new trends in immunology of HSV-1/2 and HIV co-infections should become part of current efforts in preventing sexually transmitted infections. The alternative is needed to balance the ethical and financial concerns associated with the rising number of unsuccessful mono-valent clinical vaccine trials.

  1. Current trends in negative immuno-synergy between two sexually transmitted infectious viruses: HIV-1 and HSV-1/2

    PubMed Central

    Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; Dervillez, Xavier; Rubbo, Pierre-Alain; Kuo, Tiffany; Zhang, Xiuli; Nagot, Nicolas; Tuaillon, Edouard; Van De Perre, Philippe; Nesburn, Anthony B.; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    In the current era of effective anti-retroviral therapy, immuno-compromised patients with HIV-1 infection do live long enough to suffer diseases caused by many opportunistic infections, such as herpes simplex virus type 1 and/or type 2 (HSV-1/2). An estimated two-third of the 40 million individuals that have contracted HIV-1 worldwide are co-infected with HSV-1/2 viruses, the causative agents of ocular oro-facial and genital herpes. The highest prevalence of HIV and HSV-1/2 infections are confined to the same regions of Sub-Saharan Africa. HSV-1/2 infections affect HIV-1 immunity, and vice versa. While important research gains have been made in understanding herpes and HIV immunity, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the crosstalk between HSV-1/2 and HIV co-infection remain to be fully elucidated. Understanding the mechanisms behind the apparent HSV/HIV negative immuno-synergy maybe the key to successful HSV and HIV vaccines; both are currently unavailable. An effective herpes immunotherapeutic vaccine would in turn - indirectly - contribute in reducing HIV epidemic. The purpose of this review is: (i) to summarize the current trends in understanding the negative immuno-crosstalk between HIV and HSV-1/2 infections; and (ii) to discuss the possibility of developing a novel mucosal herpes immunotherapeutic strategy or even a combined or chimeric immunotherapeutic vaccine that simultaneously targets HIV and HSV-1/2 infections. These new trends in immunology of HSV-1/2 and HIV co-infections should become part of current efforts in preventing sexually transmitted infections. The alternative is needed to balance the ethical and financial concerns associated with the rising number of unsuccessful mono-valent clinical vaccine trials. PMID:23355766

  2. The prevalence of HSV-2 infection in HIV-1 discordant couples.

    PubMed

    Duan, S; Ding, Y; Wu, Z; Rou, K; Yang, Y; Wang, J; Gao, M; Ye, R; Xiang, L; He, N

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the prevalence and associated factors of HSV-2 discordance and concordance in HIV-1-discordant couples. This study used the baseline data from a cohort study of HIV-1-discordant couples in Dehong prefecture of Yunnan province, China. Of 954 participating couples, 42·4% were affected by HSV-2, of which 20·4% were HSV-2-concordant positive, 7·6% were HSV-2-discordant where the male was HSV-2 positive, and 14·4% were HSV-2 discordant where the female was HSV-2 positive. Compared to HSV-2-negative concordance, HSV-2 discordance with an HSV-2-positive male spouse was significantly associated with characteristics of the male spouse, including Han ethnicity and being in a second marriage. HSV-2 discordance with an HSV-2-positive female spouse was significantly associated with characteristics of the female spouse, including Han ethnicity, having engaged in commercial sex, having a sexual relationship of <3 years and being HIV-1 infected. Compared to HSV-2 discordance, HSV-2-positive concordance was significantly associated with an education level of middle school or higher for both spouses, a sexual relationship of ⩾3 years, more frequent sex and having an HIV-1-infected male spouse. The findings highlight the need for HSV-2 prevention and treatment efforts to reduce HSV-2 transmission in this population, and emphasize the importance of implementing prevention interventions early in couples' relationships.

  3. Transmitted Drug Resistance Mutations in Antiretroviral-Naïve Injection Drug Users with Chronic HIV-1 Infection in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Memarnejadian, Arash; Menbari, Shahoo; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Abdi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The growing incidence and transmission of drug resistant HIV-1 strains due to widespread use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) can jeopardize the success of first-line ART. While there is a known moderate prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) among newly infected Iranians, no data exist about the rate of these primary resistance mutations among the ART-naïve, chronically infected individuals who are, in fact, the main candidates for ART initiation. To address this issue, we collected blood samples from 40 ART-naïve injection drug-users (IDUs) with chronic HIV-1 infection (seroconversion time ranging from 2 to 9 years) living in Sanandaj, Iran, followed by sequencing of the protease and reverse-transcriptase regions from their HIV-1 genome. Phylogenetic analyses of the sequenced regions revealed that all samples were CRF35_AD. Transmitted resistance mutations were interpreted as surveillance drug-resistant mutations (SDRMs) based on the world health organization (WHO) algorithm. The frequency of SDRMs to any class of antiretroviral drugs was 15%, which included mutations to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs, 10%), with M41L and M184V as the most common (5%), and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs, 5%), with K103N as the only detected mutation (5%). Although not in the WHO SDRMs list, several minor protease inhibitor resistant mutations listed in the International Antiviral Society-USA panel were identified, of which M36I, H69K, L89M/V/I (each one 100%) and K20R/T (92.5%) can be considered as polymorphic signatures for CRF35_AD.The relatively high rate of TDR mutations in our study raises concerns about the risk of treatment failure in chronically infected IDUs of Sanandaj city. These results suggest that routine resistance testing should be considered before the therapy initiation in this area. Additional surveillance studies are required to generalize this deduction to other cities of Iran. PMID:25962088

  4. HIV-1 Genetic Diversity and Transmitted Drug Resistance Among Recently Infected Individuals at Men Who Have Sex with Men Sentinel Surveillance Points in Hebei Province, China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinli; Kang, Xianjiang; Chen, Suliang; Zhao, Hongru; Liu, Yongjian; Zhao, Cuiying; Zhang, Yuqi; Li, Jingyun; Cui, Ze; Wang, Xianfeng

    2015-10-01

    For this study, 50 HIV-1 plasma samples of recently infected men who have sex with men (MSM) were amplified and sequenced. Multiple subtypes were identified by phylogenetic analyses of HIV-1 gag, env, and pol gene regions, including CRF01_AE (56.0%), CRF07_BC (30.0%), subtype B (12.0%), and unique recombinant forms (URFs, 6.0%). CRF01_AE was the most frequent genotype in the epidemic. Three recombination patterns of URFs were identified: 01BC, 01B, and 01C. The rate of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutation (M46L) was 2.08% (1/48). URFs and TDR first identified in this study suggest that HIV-1 prevalence is more and more complicated, and HIV-1 drug-resistant strains have begun to spread among at risk populations in Hebei. Our findings can provide vital information for an efficient surveillance system and strategic HIV prevention and control measures in China by revealing the evolutionary status and HIV-1 TDR of HIV-1 strains among recently infected MSM in Hebei Province.

  5. Prevalence, Incidence, and Residual Risks for Transfusion Transmitted HIV-1/2 Infection among Chinese Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingxing; Liu, Jing; Yao, Fuzhu; Wen, Guoxin; Li, Julin; Huang, Yi; Lv, Yunlai; Wen, Xiuqiong; Wright, David; Yu, Qilu; Guo, Nan; Ness, Paul; Shan, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Background There is little data on HIV prevalence, incidence or residual risks for transfusion transmitted HIV infection among Chinese blood donors. Methods Donations from five Chinese blood centers in 2008–2010 were screened using two rounds of ELISA testing for anti-HIV-1/2. A reactive result in either or both rounds led to Western Blot confirmatory testing. HIV prevalence and demographic correlates among first time donors, incidence rate and demographic correlates among repeat donors were examined. Weighted multivariable logistic regression analysis examined correlates of HIV confirmatory status among first time donors. Residual risks for transfusion transmitted HIV infection were evaluated based on incidence among repeat donors. Results Among 821,320 donations, 40% came from repeat donors.1,837 (0.34%) first time and 577 (0.17%) repeat donations screened reactive for anti-HIV-1/2, among which 1,310 and 419 were tested by Western Blot. 233 (17.7%) first time and 44 (10.5%) repeat donations were confirmed positive. Estimated prevalence was 66 infections per 100,000 (95% CI: 59–74) first time donors. Estimated incidence was 9/100,000 (95% CI: 7–12) person-years among repeat donors. Weighted multivariable logistic regression analysis indicate that first time donors 26–45 years old were 1.6–1.8 times likely to be HIV positive than those 25 years and younger. Donors with some college or above education were less likely to be HIV positive than those with middle school education, ORs ranging from 0.35 to 0.60. Minority were 1.6 times likely to be HIV positive than Han majority donors (OR: 1.6; CI: 1.2–2.1). No difference in prevalence was found between gender. Current HIV TTI residual risk was 5.4 (1.2–12.5) infections per million whole blood donations. Conclusion Despite the declining HIV epidemic China, estimated residual risks for transfusion transmitted HIV infection are still high, highlighting the potential blood safety yield of NAT implementation

  6. Occurrence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance among Drug-naïve pregnant women in selected HIV-care centres in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Martin-Odoom, Alexander; Adiku, Theophilus; Delgado, Elena; Lartey, Margaret; Ampofo, William K

    2017-03-01

    Access to antiretroviral therapy in Ghana has been scaled up across the country over the last decade. This study sought to determine the occurrence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance in pregnant HIV-1 positive women yet to initiate antiretroviral therapy at selected HIV Care Centres in Ghana. Plasma specimens from twenty-six (26) HIV seropositive pregnant women who were less than 28weeks pregnant with their first pregnancy and ART naïve were collected from selected HIV care centres in three (3) regions in Ghana. Genotypic testing was done for the reverse transcriptase gene and the sequences generated were analyzed for HIV-1 drug resistance mutations using the Stanford University HIV Drug Resistance Database. Resistance mutations associated with the reverse transcriptase gene were detected in 4 (15.4%) of the participants. At least one major drug resistance mutation in the reverse transcriptase gene was found in 3 (11.5%) of the women. The detection of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance in this drug-naïve group in two regional HIV care sites is an indication of the need for renewed action in monitoring the emergence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance in Ghana. None declared.

  7. Prevalence of transmitted antiretroviral resistance and distribution of HIV-1 subtypes among patients with recent infection in Catalonia (Spain) between 2003 and 2005.

    PubMed

    Romero, Anabel; Sued, Omar; Puig, Teresa; Esteve, Anna; Pumarola, Tomàs; Casabona, Jordi; González, Victoria; Matas, Lurdes; Tural, Cristina; Rodrigo, Isabel; Margall, Núria; Domingo, Pere; Casanova, Aurora; Ferrer, Elena; Caballero, Estrella; Ribera, Esteve; Farré, Joan; Puig, Teresa; Amengual, M José; Navarro, Gemma; Prat, Josep M; Masabeu, Angels; Simó, Josep M; Villaverde, Carlos A; Barrufet, Pilar; Sauca, M Goretti; Ortin, Xavier; Ortí, Amat; Navarro, Rosa; Euras, Josep M; Vilaró, Josep; Villà, M Carme; Montull, Santiago; Vilanova, Conrad; Pujol, Ferran; Díaz, Olga; Miró, Jose M

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistances (TDR) and HIV-1 subtypes in recently infected patients in Catalonia between 2003 and 2005 and to describe the characteristics of these patients according to the presence or absence of TDR and HIV-1 subtype. After application of the Serological Testing Algorithm for Recent HIV Seroconversion (STARHS), residual aliquots of serum samples from recently infected antiretroviral-naïve individuals were genotyped. FASTA sequences were analyzed using the HIVDB Program. The World Health Organization 2009 List of Mutations for Surveillance of Transmitted HIV-1 Drug Resistant HIV Strains was used to estimate the prevalence of TDR. Of 182 recently infected patients, 14 (7.7%) presented TDR. Seven (3.8%) had genotypic evidence of TDR against non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, 6 (3.3%) against nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, 3 (1.6%) against protease inhibitors (PIs), and only 2 individuals (1.1%) presented TDR against more than one class of drugs. Thirty-five (19.2%) patients were infected with a non-B HIV-1 subtype. This is the first study to estimate the prevalence of TDR in recently infected patients in Catalonia. The results are similar to those of studies performed in other Spanish regions. Correct monitoring of these parameters requires systematic epidemiologic surveillance of transmitted resistance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Low Prevalence of Transmitted Drug Resistance in Patients Newly Diagnosed with HIV-1 Infection in Sweden 2003–2010

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Annika; Björkman, Per; Bratt, Göran; Ekvall, Håkan; Gisslén, Magnus; Sönnerborg, Anders; Mild, Mattias; Albert, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Transmitted drug resistance (TDR) is a clinical and epidemiological problem because it may contribute to failure of antiretroviral treatment. The prevalence of TDR varies geographically, and its prevalence in Sweden during the last decade has not been reported. Plasma samples from 1,463 patients newly diagnosed with HIV-1 infection between 2003 and 2010, representing 44% of all patients diagnosed in Sweden during this period, were analyzed using the WHO 2009 list of mutations for surveillance of TDR. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses were used to determine genetic subtype and to investigate the relatedness of the sequences. Eighty-two patients showed evidence of TDR, representing a prevalence of 5.6% (95% CI: 4.5%–6.9%) without any significant time trends or differences between patients infected in Sweden or abroad. Multivariable logistic regression showed that TDR was positively associated with men who have sex with men (MSM) and subtype B infection and negatively associated with CD4 cell counts. Among patients with TDR, 54 (68%) had single resistance mutations, whereas five patients had multi-drug resistant HIV-1. Phylogenetic analyses identified nine significantly supported clusters involving 29 of the patients with TDR, including 23 of 42 (55%) of the patients with TDR acquired in Sweden. One cluster contained 18 viruses with a M41L resistance mutation, which had spread among MSM in Stockholm over a period of at least 16 years (1994–2010). Another cluster, which contained the five multidrug resistant viruses, also involved MSM from Stockholm. The prevalence of TDR in Sweden 2003–2010 was lower than in many other European countries. TDR was concentrated among MSM, where clustering of TDR strains was observed, which highlights the need for continued and improved measures for targeted interventions. PMID:22448246

  9. Update on HIV-1 acquired and transmitted drug resistance in Africa.

    PubMed

    Ssemwanga, Deogratius; Lihana, Raphael W; Ugoji, Chinenye; Abimiku, Alash'le; Nkengasong, John; Dakum, Patrick; Ndembi, Nicaise

    2015-01-01

    The last ten years have witnessed a significant scale-up and access to antiretroviral therapy in Africa, which has improved patient quality of life and survival. One major challenge associated with increased access to antiretroviral therapy is the development of antiretroviral resistance due to inconsistent drug supply and/or poor patient adherence. We review the current state of both acquired and transmitted drug resistance in Africa over the past ten years (2001-2011) to identify drug resistance associated with the different drug regimens used on the continent and to help guide affordable strategies for drug resistance surveillance. A total of 161 references (153 articles, six reports and two conference abstracts) were reviewed. Antiretroviral resistance data was available for 40 of 53 African countries. A total of 5,541 adult patients from 99 studies in Africa were included in this analysis. The pooled prevalence of drug resistance mutations in Africa was 10.6%, and Central Africa had the highest prevalence of 54.9%. The highest prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations was in the west (55.3%) and central (54.8%) areas; nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations were highest in East Africa (57.0%) and protease inhibitors mutations highest in Southern Africa (16.3%). The major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutation in all four African regions was M184V. Major nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor as well as protease inhibitor mutations varied by region. The prevalence of drug resistance has remained low in several African countries although the emergence of drug resistance mutations varied across countries. Continued surveillance of antiretroviral therapy resistance remains crucial in gauging the effectiveness of country antiretroviral therapy programs and strategizing on effective and affordable strategies for successful treatment.

  10. Optimal Uses of Antiretrovirals for Prevention in HIV-1 Serodiscordant Heterosexual Couples in South Africa: A Modelling Study

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, Timothy B.; Baeten, Jared M.; Heffron, Renee; Barnabas, Ruanne; de Bruyn, Guy; Cremin, Íde; Delany, Sinead; Garnett, Geoffrey P.; Gray, Glenda; Johnson, Leigh; McIntyre, James; Rees, Helen; Celum, Connie

    2011-01-01

    Background Antiretrovirals have substantial promise for HIV-1 prevention, either as antiretroviral treatment (ART) for HIV-1–infected persons to reduce infectiousness, or as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV-1–uninfected persons to reduce the possibility of infection with HIV-1. HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in long-term partnerships (one member is infected and the other is uninfected) are a priority for prevention interventions. Earlier ART and PrEP might both reduce HIV-1 transmission in this group, but the merits and synergies of these different approaches have not been analyzed. Methods and Findings We constructed a mathematical model to examine the impact and cost-effectiveness of different strategies, including earlier initiation of ART and/or PrEP, for HIV-1 prevention for serodiscordant couples. Although the cost of PrEP is high, the cost per infection averted is significantly offset by future savings in lifelong treatment, especially among couples with multiple partners, low condom use, and a high risk of transmission. In some situations, highly effective PrEP could be cost-saving overall. To keep couples alive and without a new infection, providing PrEP to the uninfected partner could be at least as cost-effective as initiating ART earlier in the infected partner, if the annual cost of PrEP is <40% of the annual cost of ART and PrEP is >70% effective. Conclusions Strategic use of PrEP and ART could substantially and cost-effectively reduce HIV-1 transmission in HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. New and forthcoming data on the efficacy of PrEP, the cost of delivery of ART and PrEP, and couples behaviours and preferences will be critical for optimizing the use of antiretrovirals for HIV-1 prevention. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:22110407

  11. Rare HIV-1 transmitted/founder lineages identified by deep viral sequencing contribute to rapid shifts in dominant quasispecies during acute and early infection

    PubMed Central

    Sanders-Buell, Eric; Chenine, Agnes-Laurence; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Thomas, Rasmi; Harbolick, Elizabeth A.; Bose, Meera; Pham, Phuc; Oropeza, Celina; Poltavee, Kultida; O’Sullivan, Anne Marie; Costanzo, Margaret C.; Warren, Joanna A.; Slike, Bonnie; Li, Hui; Peachman, Kristina K.; Gao, Feng; Cicala, Claudia; Arthos, James; O’Connell, Robert J.; Sinei, Samuel; Maganga, Lucas; Rao, Mangala; Marovich, Mary A.; Krebs, Shelly J.; Rolland, Morgane; Shaw, George M.

    2017-01-01

    In order to inform the rational design of HIV-1 preventive and cure interventions it is critical to understand the events occurring during acute HIV-1 infection (AHI). Using viral deep sequencing on six participants from the early capture acute infection RV217 cohort, we have studied HIV-1 evolution in plasma collected twice weekly during the first weeks following the advent of viremia. The analysis of infections established by multiple transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses revealed novel viral profiles that included: a) the low-level persistence of minor T/F variants, b) the rapid replacement of the major T/F by a minor T/F, and c) an initial expansion of the minor T/F followed by a quick collapse of the same minor T/F to low frequency. In most participants, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) escape was first detected at the end of peak viremia downslope, proceeded at higher rates than previously measured in HIV-1 infection, and usually occurred through the exploration of multiple mutational pathways within an epitope. The rapid emergence of CTL escape variants suggests a strong and early CTL response. Minor T/F viral strains can contribute to rapid and varied profiles of HIV-1 quasispecies evolution during AHI. Overall, our results demonstrate that early, deep, and frequent sampling is needed to investigate viral/host interaction during AHI, which could help identify prerequisites for prevention and cure of HIV-1 infection. PMID:28759651

  12. Time trends in HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance mutation frequency in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Parczewski, Milosz; Witak-Jedra, Magdalena; Maciejewska, Katarzyna; Bociaga-Jasik, Monika; Skwara, Pawel; Garlicki, Aleksander; Grzeszczuk, Anna; Rogalska, Magdalena; Jankowska, Maria; Lemanska, Malgorzata; Hlebowicz, Maria; Baralkiewicz, Grazyna; Mozer-Lisewska, Iwona; Mazurek, Renata; Lojewski, Wladyslaw; Grabczewska, Edyta; Olczak, Anita; Jablonowska, Elzbieta; Rymer, Weronika; Szymczak, Aleksandra; Szetela, Bartosz; Gasiorowski, Jacek; Knysz, Brygida; Urbanska, Anna; Leszczyszyn-Pynka, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In Poland, the HIV epidemic has shifted recently from being predominantly related to injection drug use (IDU) to being driven by transmissions among men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM). The number of new HIV cases has increased in the recent years, while no current data on the transmitted drug resistance associated mutations (tDRM) frequency trend over time are available from 2010. In this study, we analyze the temporal trends in the spread of tDRM from 2008 to 2013. Materials and Methods Partial pol sequences from 833 antiretroviral treatment-naive individuals of European descent (Polish origin) linked to care in 9 of 17 Polish HIV treatment centres were analyzed. Drug resistance interpretation was performed according to WHO surveillance recommendations, subtyping with REGA genotyping 2.0 tool. Time trends were examined for the frequency of t-DRM across subtypes and transmission groups using logistic regression (R statistical platform, v. 3.1.0). Results Frequency of tDRM proved stable over time, with mutation frequency change from 11.3% in 2008 to 8.3% in 2013 [OR: 0.91 (95% CI 0.80–1,05), p=0.202] (Figure 1a). Also, no significant differences over time were noted for the subtype B (decrease from 8.4% 2008 to 6.2% in 2013 [OR: 0.94 (95% CI 0.79–1.11), p=0.45] and across non-B variants [change from 22.6% 2008 to 23.1% in 2013, OR: 0.94 (95% CI 0.75–1.19), p=0.62]. When patient groups were stratified according to transmission route, in MSM there was a trend for a NNRTI t-DRM decrease (from 6.8% 2008 to 1% in 2013, OR: 0.61 (95% CI 0.34–1.02), p=0.0655, slope −0.74%/year) (Figure 1b), related to the subtype B infected MSM (decrease from 7% 2008 to 1% in 2013, OR: 0.61 (95% CI 0.34–1.03), p=0.0662, slope −0.75%/year). Overall tDRM frequency decrease was also noted for the heterosexually infected patients [from 17.6% 2008 to 10.3% in 2013, OR: 0.83 (95% CI 0.67–1.02, p=0.077, slope −2.041%/year)] but did not associate with drug class (Figure

  13. Evidence of marked sexual behavior change associated with low HIV-1 seroconversion in 149 married couples with discordant HIV-1 serostatus: experience at an HIV counselling center in Zaire.

    PubMed

    Kamenga, M; Ryder, R W; Jingu, M; Mbuyi, N; Mbu, L; Behets, F; Brown, C; Heyward, W L

    1991-01-01

    To determine the effect of an HIV-1 counselling program on 149 married Zairian couples with discordant HIV-1 serology, the rates of HIV-1 seroconversion and reported condom utilization have been observed during 382.4 person-years of follow-up (minimum follow-up time per couple of 6 months). Before determination of HIV-1 serostatus and counselling, less than 5% of these couples had ever used a condom. One month after notification of HIV-1 serostatus and counselling, 70.7% of couples reported using condoms during all episodes of sexual intercourse. At 18 months follow-up, 77.4% of the 140 couples still being followed reported continued use of condoms during all episodes of sexual intercourse. At the time of notification of HIV-1 serostatus, 18 couples experienced acute psychological distress. Home-based counselling by trained nurses resolved these difficulties in all but three couples who subsequently divorced. Intensive counselling following notification of HIV-1 serostatus led to low rates of HIV-1 seroconversion (3.1% per 100 person-years of observation) in Zairian married couples with discordant HIV-1 serostatus who voluntarily attended an HIV counselling center.

  14. The initial antibody response to HIV-1: induction of ineffective early B cell responses against GP41 by the transmitted/founder virus

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Leslie L; Perelson, Alan

    2008-01-01

    A window of opportunity for immune responses to extinguish HIV -1 exists from the moment of transmission through establishment of the latent pool of HIV -I-infected cells. A critical time to study the initial immune responses to the transmitted/founder virus is the eclipse phase of HIV-1 infection (time from transmission to the first appearance of plasma virus) but, to date, this period has been logistically difficult to analyze. Studies in non-human primates challenged with chimeric simianhuman immunodeficiency virus have shown that neutralizing antibodies, when present at the time of infection, can prevent virus infection.

  15. Disparities in HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance detected by ultradeep sequencing between men who have sex with men and heterosexual populations.

    PubMed

    Todesco, E; Charpentier, C; Bertine, M; Wirden, M; Storto, A; Desire, N; Grude, M; Nguyen, T; Sayon, S; Yazdanpanah, Y; Katlama, C; Descamps, D; Calvez, V; Marcelin, A G

    2017-10-01

    Transmitted drug resistance (TDR) can impair the response to first-line antiretroviral therapy. In treatment-naïve patients chronically infected with HIV type 1 (HIV-1), it was previously shown through Sanger sequencing that TDR was more common in men who have sex with men (MSM) than in other transmission risk groups. We aimed to compare two HIV-1 transmission groups in terms of the presence of TDR mutations. We investigated, through Sanger sequencing and ultradeep sequencing (UDS), the presence of resistance mutations, both in majority (> 20%) and in minority (1-20%) proportions, in 70 treatment-naïve MSM and 70 treatment-naïve heterosexual patients who recently screened positive for HIV-1. The global prevalence of TDR was not significantly different between the two groups, either by Sanger or by UDS. Nevertheless, a higher frequency of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor TDR was observed among heterosexual patients (P = 0.04). There was also a trend for a higher frequency of TDR among MSM infected with HIV-1 subtype B compared with MSM infected with HIV-1 non-B subtypes (P = 0.06). Ultradeep sequencing UDS allowed sensitive monitoring of TDR, and highlighted some disparities between transmission groups. © 2017 British HIV Association.

  16. Transmission of Multiple HIV-1 Subtype C Transmitted/founder Viruses into the Same Recipients Was not Determined by Modest Phenotypic Differences

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hongshuo; Hora, Bhavna; Giorgi, Elena E.; Kumar, Amit; Cai, Fangping; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Perelson, Alan S.; Gao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A severe bottleneck exists during HIV-1 mucosal transmission. However, viral properties that determine HIV-1 transmissibility are not fully elucidated. We identified multiple transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses in six HIV-1-infected subjects by analyzing whole genome sequences. Comparison of biological phenotypes of different T/F viruses from the same individual allowed us to more precisely identify critical determinants for viral transmissibility since they were transmitted under similar conditions. All T/F viruses used coreceptor CCR5, while no T/F viruses used CXCR4 or GPR15. However, the efficiency for different T/F viruses from the same individual to use CCR5 was significantly variable, and the differences were even more significant for usage of coreceptors FPRL1, CCR3 and APJ. Resistance to IFN-α was also different between T/F viruses in 2 of 3 individuals. The relative fitness between T/F viruses from the same subject was highly variable (2–6%). Importantly, the levels of coreceptor usage efficiency, resistance to IFN-α and viral fitness were not associated with proportions of T/F viruses in each individual during acute infection. Our results show that the modest but significant differences in coreceptor usage efficiency, IFN-α sensitivity and viral fitness each alone may not play a critical role in HIV-1 transmission. PMID:27909304

  17. Replicative fitness of transmitted HIV-1 drives acute immune activation, proviral load in memory CD4+ T cells, and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Claiborne, Daniel T; Prince, Jessica L; Scully, Eileen; Macharia, Gladys; Micci, Luca; Lawson, Benton; Kopycinski, Jakub; Deymier, Martin J; Vanderford, Thomas H; Nganou-Makamdop, Krystelle; Ende, Zachary; Brooks, Kelsie; Tang, Jianming; Yu, Tianwei; Lakhi, Shabir; Kilembe, William; Silvestri, Guido; Douek, Daniel; Goepfert, Paul A; Price, Matthew A; Allen, Susan A; Paiardini, Mirko; Altfeld, Marcus; Gilmour, Jill; Hunter, Eric

    2015-03-24

    HIV-1 infection is characterized by varying degrees of chronic immune activation and disruption of T-cell homeostasis, which impact the rate of disease progression. A deeper understanding of the factors that influence HIV-1-induced immunopathology and subsequent CD4(+) T-cell decline is critical to strategies aimed at controlling or eliminating the virus. In an analysis of 127 acutely infected Zambians, we demonstrate a dramatic and early impact of viral replicative capacity (vRC) on HIV-1 immunopathogenesis that is independent of viral load (VL). Individuals infected with high-RC viruses exhibit a distinct inflammatory cytokine profile as well as significantly elevated T-cell activation, proliferation, and CD8(+) T-cell exhaustion, during the earliest months of infection. Moreover, the vRC of the transmitted virus is positively correlated with the magnitude of viral burden in naive and central memory CD4(+) T-cell populations, raising the possibility that transmitted viral phenotypes may influence the size of the initial latent viral reservoir. Taken together, these findings support an unprecedented role for the replicative fitness of the founder virus, independent of host protective genes and VL, in influencing multiple facets of HIV-1-related immunopathology, and that a greater focus on this parameter could provide novel approaches to clinical interventions.

  18. Cost-effectiveness of improved treatment services for sexually transmitted diseases in preventing HIV-1 infection in Mwanza Region, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Gilson, L; Mkanje, R; Grosskurth, H; Mosha, F; Picard, J; Gavyole, A; Todd, J; Mayaud, P; Swai, R; Fransen, L; Mabey, D; Mills, A; Hayes, R

    Improved management of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) is consistently advocated as an effective strategy for HIV prevention. The impact, cost, and cost-effectiveness of this approach were evaluated in a prospective, comparative study of six communities in Tanzania's Mwanza Region in which primary health care center workers were trained to provide improved STD treatment and six matched non-intervention communities. The baseline prevalence of HIV was 4% in both groups. During the 2-year study period, 11,632 cases of STDs were treated in the intervention health units. The HIV seroconversion rate was 1.16% in the intervention communities and 1.86% in the comparison communities--a difference in HIV incidence of 0.70 (95% confidence interval, 0.37-1.09) and a reduction of about 40%. The total annual cost of the intervention was US$59,060 ($0.39 per person served). The cost of STD treatment was $10.15 per case. An estimated 252 HIV-1 infections were averted each year. The incremental annual cost of the program was $54,839, equivalent to $217.62 per HIV infection averted and $10.33 per disability-adjusted-life-year (DALY) saved. The estimated cost-effectiveness compares favorably with that of childhood immunization programs ($12-17 per DALY saved) and could be further enhanced through implementation of the intervention on a wider scale. The intervention subsequently has been expanded to encompass 65 health units in Mwanza Region, with no increase in investment costs.

  19. Characteristics of Transmitted Drug-Resistant HIV-1 in Recently Infected Treatment-Naive Patients in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Junko; Shiino, Teiichiro; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Mori, Haruyo; Minami, Rumi; Uchida, Kazue; Sadamasu, Kenji; Kondo, Makiko; Sugiura, Wataru

    2016-04-01

    Progress in antiretroviral treatment has led to fewer virological failure cases, but 10%-20% of treatment-naive HIV/AIDS cases are reported to harbor drug-resistant strains, suggesting transmission of drug-resistant HIV. We aimed to determine the trend in prevalence of transmitted drug-resistant (TDR) HIV in Japan, particularly in recently infected patients. Drug-resistance test was performed on 3904 HIV-1-infected cases newly diagnosed between 2007 and 2012. The number of cases infected within 6 months [recent seroconverters (RS)] was estimated by BED assay of 2700 plasma samples. Characteristics of RS cases were further analyzed. The overall prevalence of TDR was 9.1%, ranging from 7.3% in 2008% to 12.5% in 2010. Among 1403 subtype B/E/D cases with >50 CD4 T cell counts and >1000 HIV copies per milliliter, 468 (33.4%) were estimated to be RS. The prevalence of RS was significantly higher among cases who were male, Japanese, and men who have sex with men. The prevalence of TDR did not differ significantly between recent and long-term seroconverters (8.5% vs. 9.2%, respectively, P = 0.68). Common mutations in both groups were M46I/L and T215 revertants. Furthermore, sequences with these mutations, K103N and D30N/N88D formed clusters on phylogenetic trees. Our study clarified an increase in prevalence of TDR in Japan from 2007 to 2012. The phylogenetic clustering of cases with M46I/L or T215 revertants suggests that HIV with these mutations have become circulating strains. Furthermore, detailed analyses showed that Japanese men who have sex with men are more aware of their risk of HIV infection.

  20. HIV-1, sexually transmitted infections, and sexual behavior trends among men who have sex with men in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Jorge; Lama, Javier R; Kusunoki, Lourdes; Manrique, Hugo; Goicochea, Pedro; Lucchetti, Aldo; Rouillon, Manuel; Pun, Monica; Suarez, Luis; Montano, Silvia; Sanchez, Jose L; Tabet, Stephen; Hughes, James P; Celum, Connie

    2007-04-15

    To assess and estimate trends in HIV, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and sexual behavior among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Lima, Peru. Second-generation HIV sentinel surveillance surveys conducted in 1996, 1998, 2000, and 2002. Adult men reporting sex with at least 1 man during the previous year were eligible to participate. Sexual behavior and serum HIV-1 and syphilis antibodies were assessed. HIV seroincidence was estimated by a sensitive/less-sensitive enzyme immunoassay strategy. Rectal and pharyngeal swabs for Neisseria gonorrhoeae culture and a first-void urine sample for urethral leukocytes for presumptive diagnosis of urethritis were obtained. Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) antibodies were measured in 2002. Although HIV prevalence increased from 18.5% to 22.3% from 1996 through 2002, bacterial prevalence declined significantly for syphilis (16.0% to 12.4%), early syphilis (8.6% to 3.4%), and rectal gonorrhea (5.1% to 0.2%). High HIV seroincidence was estimated, with the lowest (4.8%) incidence in 1998. In 2002, HSV-2 seroprevalence was 51.0%. After adjustment for age, education, and self-reported sexual identity, our data suggest that a yearly increase by 6% in the prevalence of HIV occurred among MSM in Lima, with a corresponding decline in syphilis (by 9%), early syphilis (by 18%), and rectal gonorrhea (by 64%). Condom use during last sexual intercourse increased by 26% each year with the most recent male steady partner and, among non-sex workers, by 11% with the most recent casual partner. HIV continued to spread among MSM in Lima even when a decline in bacterial STIs and increase in condom use were estimated to occur. Intensification of medical and behavior prevention interventions is warranted for MSM in Peru.

  1. Genetic diversity of HIV-1 and transmitted drug resistance among newly diagnosed individuals with HIV infection in Hangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiafeng; Guo, Zhihong; Yang, Jiezhe; Pan, Xiaohong; Jiang, Jun; Ding, Xiaobei; Zhang, Wenjun; Xia, Yan; Xu, Yun; Huang, Jingjing

    2015-10-01

    HIV transmitted drug resistance (TDR) can compromise antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited countries like China where ART has been scaled up and thus leads to an important public health concern. The aim of the study was to elucidate the HIV-1 genetic characteristics and TDR in Hangzhou, China. Two-hundred eleven ART-naive, newly diagnosed individuals were enrolled during January and August 2013. Specimens were classified as recent or chronic infections using the BED capture enzyme immunoassay (BED-CEIA). The pol fragment covering the entire protease and the first 300 codons of the reverse transcriptase gene was amplified by RT-PCR and nested PCR. Genotypic drug resistance (DR) and phylogenetic analysis were performed on the 200 obtained sequences. Multiple genotypes were identified, including CRF01_AE (62.0%), CRF07_BC (31.0%), subtype B (2.0%), CRF08_BC (1.5%), CRF55_01B (1.0%), CRF18_cpx (0.5%), and unique recombinant forms (URFs, 2.0%). All the four URFs were found in men who have sex with men, consisting of a recombination of CRF01_AE with subtype B or CRF07_BC. The prevalence of primary DR in newly diagnosed individuals in Hangzhou was low (4.0%). The proportion of DR mutation to protease inhibitors (PIs), nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) was 1.5%, 1.5%, and 1.0%, respectively. BED-CEIA revealed that 21.8% (45/211) of the specimens were associated with recent infections. The prevalence of TDR in recent infections was moderate (6.5%). High HIV diversity and relatively high prevalence of TDR in new infections has been found in Hangzhou, indicating an increasing challenge for future HIV prevention and treatment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A continuous enzyme-coupled assay for triphosphohydrolase activity of HIV-1 restriction factor SAMHD1.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Laurence H; Kunzelmann, Simone; Webb, Martin R; Taylor, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    The development of deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP)-based drugs requires a quantitative understanding of any inhibition, activation, or hydrolysis by off-target cellular enzymes. SAMHD1 is a regulatory dNTP-triphosphohydrolase that inhibits HIV-1 replication in human myeloid cells. We describe here an enzyme-coupled assay for quantifying the activation, inhibition, and hydrolysis of dNTPs, nucleotide analogues, and nucleotide analogue inhibitors by triphosphohydrolase enzymes. The assay facilitates mechanistic studies of triphosphohydrolase enzymes and the quantification of off-target effects of nucleotide-based antiviral and chemotherapeutic agents. Copyright © 2015, Arnold et al.

  3. Postnatally-transmitted HIV-1 Envelope variants have similar neutralization-sensitivity and function to that of nontransmitted breast milk variants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Breastfeeding is a leading cause of infant HIV-1 infection in the developing world, yet only a minority of infants exposed to HIV-1 via breastfeeding become infected. As a genetic bottleneck severely restricts the number of postnatally-transmitted variants, genetic or phenotypic properties of the virus Envelope (Env) could be important for the establishment of infant infection. We examined the efficiency of virologic functions required for initiation of infection in the gastrointestinal tract and the neutralization sensitivity of HIV-1 Env variants isolated from milk of three postnatally-transmitting mothers (n=13 viruses), five clinically-matched nontransmitting mothers (n=16 viruses), and seven postnatally-infected infants (n = 7 postnatally-transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses). Results There was no difference in the efficiency of epithelial cell interactions between Env virus variants from the breast milk of transmitting and nontransmitting mothers. Moreover, there was similar efficiency of DC-mediated trans-infection, CCR5-usage, target cell fusion, and infectivity between HIV-1 Env-pseudoviruses from nontransmitting mothers and postnatal T/F viruses. Milk Env-pseudoviruses were generally sensitive to neutralization by autologous maternal plasma and resistant to breast milk neutralization. Infant T/F Env-pseudoviruses were equally sensitive to neutralization by broadly-neutralizing monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies as compared to nontransmitted breast milk Env variants. Conclusion Postnatally-T/F Env variants do not appear to possess a superior ability to interact with and cross a mucosal barrier or an exceptional resistance to neutralization that define their capability to initiate infection across the infant gastrointestinal tract in the setting of preexisting maternal antibodies. PMID:23305422

  4. Surveillance of HIV-1 pol transmitted drug resistance in acutely and recently infected antiretroviral drug-naïve persons in rural western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Onywera, Harris; Maman, David; Inzaule, Seth; Auma, Erick; Were, Kennedy; Fredrick, Harrison; Owiti, Prestone; Opollo, Valarie; Etard, Jean-François; Mukui, Irene; Kim, Andrea A; Zeh, Clement

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance (TDR) is of increasing public health concern in sub-Saharan Africa with the rollout of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy. Such data are, however, limited in Kenya, where HIV-1 drug resistance testing is not routinely performed. From a population-based household survey conducted between September and November 2012 in rural western Kenya, we retrospectively assessed HIV-1 TDR baseline rates, its determinants, and genetic diversity among drug-naïve persons aged 15-59 years with acute HIV-1 infections (AHI) and recent HIV-1 infections (RHI) as determined by nucleic acid amplification test and both Limiting Antigen and BioRad avidity immunoassays, respectively. HIV-1 pol sequences were scored for drug resistance mutations using Stanford HIVdb and WHO 2009 mutation guidelines. HIV-1 subtyping was computed in MEGA6. Eighty seven (93.5%) of the eligible samples were successfully sequenced. Of these, 8 had at least one TDR mutation, resulting in a TDR prevalence of 9.2% (95% CI 4.7-17.1). No TDR was observed among persons with AHI (n = 7). TDR prevalence was 4.6% (95% CI 1.8-11.2) for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), 6.9% (95% CI 3.2-14.2) for non- nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), and 1.2% (95% CI 0.2-6.2) for protease inhibitors. Three (3.4% 95% CI 0.8-10.1) persons had dual-class NRTI/NNRTI resistance. Predominant TDR mutations in the reverse transcriptase included K103N/S (4.6%) and M184V (2.3%); only M46I/L (1.1%) occurred in the protease. All the eight persons were predicted to have different grades of resistance to the ARV regimens, ranging from potential low-level to high-level resistance. HIV-1 subtype distribution was heterogeneous: A (57.5%), C (6.9%), D (21.8%), G (2.3%), and circulating recombinant forms (11.5%). Only low CD4 count was associated with TDR (p = 0.0145). Our findings warrant the need for enhanced HIV-1 TDR monitoring in order to inform on population-based therapeutic guidelines

  5. Surveillance of HIV-1 pol transmitted drug resistance in acutely and recently infected antiretroviral drug-naïve persons in rural western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Maman, David; Auma, Erick; Were, Kennedy; Fredrick, Harrison; Owiti, Prestone; Opollo, Valarie; Etard, Jean-François; Mukui, Irene; Kim, Andrea A.; Zeh, Clement

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance (TDR) is of increasing public health concern in sub-Saharan Africa with the rollout of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy. Such data are, however, limited in Kenya, where HIV-1 drug resistance testing is not routinely performed. From a population-based household survey conducted between September and November 2012 in rural western Kenya, we retrospectively assessed HIV-1 TDR baseline rates, its determinants, and genetic diversity among drug-naïve persons aged 15–59 years with acute HIV-1 infections (AHI) and recent HIV-1 infections (RHI) as determined by nucleic acid amplification test and both Limiting Antigen and BioRad avidity immunoassays, respectively. HIV-1 pol sequences were scored for drug resistance mutations using Stanford HIVdb and WHO 2009 mutation guidelines. HIV-1 subtyping was computed in MEGA6. Eighty seven (93.5%) of the eligible samples were successfully sequenced. Of these, 8 had at least one TDR mutation, resulting in a TDR prevalence of 9.2% (95% CI 4.7–17.1). No TDR was observed among persons with AHI (n = 7). TDR prevalence was 4.6% (95% CI 1.8–11.2) for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), 6.9% (95% CI 3.2–14.2) for non- nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), and 1.2% (95% CI 0.2–6.2) for protease inhibitors. Three (3.4% 95% CI 0.8–10.1) persons had dual-class NRTI/NNRTI resistance. Predominant TDR mutations in the reverse transcriptase included K103N/S (4.6%) and M184V (2.3%); only M46I/L (1.1%) occurred in the protease. All the eight persons were predicted to have different grades of resistance to the ARV regimens, ranging from potential low-level to high-level resistance. HIV-1 subtype distribution was heterogeneous: A (57.5%), C (6.9%), D (21.8%), G (2.3%), and circulating recombinant forms (11.5%). Only low CD4 count was associated with TDR (p = 0.0145). Our findings warrant the need for enhanced HIV-1 TDR monitoring in order to inform on population

  6. HIV-1 RNA Rectal Shedding Is Reduced in Men With Low Plasma HIV-1 RNA Viral Loads and Is Not Enhanced by Sexually Transmitted Bacterial Infections of the Rectum

    PubMed Central

    Haaland, Richard E.; Patel, Pragna; Evans-Strickfaden, Tammy; Farshy, Carol; Hanson, Debra; Mayer, Kenneth; Lennox, Jeffrey L.; Brooks, John T.; Hart, Clyde E.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected men who have sex with men (MSM) taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), the impact of rectal sexually transmitted infections (STIs) on rectal HIV-1 shedding is unknown. Methods. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA was quantified from rectal swabs collected for Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) screening of HIV-1-infected MSM. Correlations of STIs with rectal viral load were explored using multinomial regression modeling. HIV-1 coreceptor tropism was predicted from sequencing in a subset of men. Results. Thirty-one (39%) of 80 men (59 prescribed combination antiretroviral therapy [cART]) had HIV detected in 38 (42%) of 91 rectal swabs. Rectal HIV detection was associated with plasma virus loads above 3.15 log10 copies/mL (95% confidence limit [CL] 2.73, 3.55) and paired rectal viral loads and plasma viral loads were correlated (Kendall’s tau [τ] 0.68, Spearman rho [P] = .77). Rectal STIs and abnormal anal cytology were not associated with rectal viral load. HIV coreceptor distribution was very similar between the plasma and rectum in 3 of 4 men. Conclusions. Plasma and rectal viral load were correlated, and rectal STIs did not increase the likelihood of detecting HIV in the rectal secretions in MSM, including those with low or undetectable plasma viral load. Suppressing plasma viral load is likely to reduce risk of HIV transmission to insertive partners. PMID:21844302

  7. Genotypes and Transmitted Drug Resistance among Treatment-Naive HIV-1-Infected Patients in a Northwestern Province, China: Trends from 2003 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingquan; Li, Yuan; Liu, Qing; Jiang, Wei; Zhuang, Yan; Guo, Zisheng; Yu, Zhuoran; Li, Xinhong; Wang, Chunfu; Yao, Na; Sun, Yongtao

    2014-01-01

    Background Transmitted drug resistance (TDR) reduces the efficacy of initial antiretroviral treatment and has become a public health concern. Little information is available regarding the genetic diversity of HIV-1 and the prevalence of TDR among treatment-naïve patients in a northwestern province of China since the implementation of national free antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods Blood samples from 372 HIV-1 treatment-naive patients were collected between 2003 and 2013 in Shaanxi province. Viral RNA was extracted for nested PCR, and phylogenetic reconstruction and recombination analyses were performed to characterize patterns of the HIV-1 subtypes. Genotypic drug resistance testing was performed using an in-house assay to determine trends in the prevalence of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance. Results Multiple genotypes were identified among the patients in Shaanxi, including B (25.0%), C (0.3%), G (0.3%), and CRF01_AE (39.2%), CRF07_BC (32.7%), CRF08_BC (0.8%), CRF55_01B (1.1%), and URFs (0.6%). The subtypes were associated with the transmission routes (χ2 = 77.113, p<0.01). In this study, a low baseline CD4+ T cell count and a high viral load were found among CRF01_AE-infected patients compared with patients who were infected with non-CRF01_AE (p<0.01) through sexual transmission; however, the CRF01_AE subtype was not associated with a low baseline CD4+ T cell count or a high viral load in Chinese patients infected through blood transmission (p = 0.249). The overall TDR rate in this population was 4.4% between 2003 and 2013. A univariate logistic regression model revealed that a low CD4 T cell count (≤100 cells/µL) was associated with the development of drug-resistant strains. Conclusion Our work revealed diverse HIV-1 subtype distributions in Shaanxi province. We identified a low and stable TDR time trend among ART-naive patients. These findings enhance our understanding of HIV-1 genetic diversity and provide some guidelines for the improvement

  8. High HIV-1 Diversity and Prevalence of Transmitted Drug Resistance Among Antiretroviral-Naive HIV-Infected Pregnant Women from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Delatorre, Edson; Silva-de-Jesus, Carlos; Couto-Fernandez, José Carlos; Pilotto, Jose H; Morgado, Mariza G

    2017-01-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) resistance mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection may reduce the efficacy of prophylactic therapy to prevent mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) and future treatment options. This study evaluated the diversity and the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) regions of HIV-1 pol gene among 87 ARV-naive HIV-1-infected pregnant women from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, between 2012 and 2015. The viral diversity comprised HIV-1 subtypes B (67.8%), F1 (17.2%), and C (4.6%); the circulating recombinant forms 12_BF (2.3%), 28/29_BF, 39_BF, 02_AG (1.1% each) and unique recombinants forms (4.5%). The overall prevalence of any TDR was 17.2%, of which 5.7% for nucleoside RT inhibitors, 5.7% for non-nucleoside RT inhibitors, and 8% for PR inhibitors. The TDR prevalence found in this population may affect the virological outcome of the standard PMTCT ARV-regimens, reinforcing the importance of continuous monitoring.

  9. Primary human epithelial cell culture system for studying interactions between female upper genital tract and sexually transmitted viruses, HSV-2 and HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Kaushic, Charu; Nazli, Aisha; Ferreira, Victor H; Kafka, Jessica K

    2011-10-01

    Evidence from clinical and epidemiological studies indicates that women are disproportionately susceptible to sexually transmitted viral infections. To understand the underlying biological basis for this increased susceptibility, more studies are needed to examine the acute events in the female reproductive tract following exposure to viruses during sexual transmission. The epithelial lining of the female reproductive tract is the primary barrier that sexually transmitted viruses, such as HIV-1 and HSV-2 need to infect or traverse, in order to initiate and establish productive infection. We have established an ex-vivo primary culture system to grow genital epithelial cells from upper reproductive tract tissues of women. Using these cultures, we have extensively examined the interactions between epithelial cells of the female genital tract and HSV-2 and HIV-1. In this review, we describe in detail the experimental protocol to grow these cultures, monitor their differentiation and inoculate with HSV-2 and HIV-1. Prospective use of these cultures to re-create the microenvironment in the reproductive tract is discussed.

  10. Prevalence of Drug-Resistant Minority Variants in Untreated HIV-1-Infected Individuals With and Those Without Transmitted Drug Resistance Detected by Sanger Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Clutter, Dana S; Zhou, Shuntai; Varghese, Vici; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Pinsky, Benjamin A; Jeffrey Fessel, W; Klein, Daniel B; Spielvogel, Ean; Holmes, Susan P; Hurley, Leo B; Silverberg, Michael J; Swanstrom, Ronald; Shafer, Robert W

    2017-08-01

    Minority variant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance mutations are associated with an increased risk of virological failure during treatment with NNRTI-containing regimens. To determine whether individuals to whom variants with isolated NNRTI-associated drug resistance were transmitted are at increased risk of virological failure during treatment with a non-NNRTI-containing regimen, we identified minority variant resistance mutations in 33 individuals with isolated NNRTI-associated transmitted drug resistance and 49 matched controls. We found similar proportions of overall and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-associated minority variant resistance mutations in both groups, suggesting that isolated NNRTI-associated transmitted drug resistance may not be a risk factor for virological failure during treatment with a non-NNRTI-containing regimen. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. HIV-1 transmission linkage in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Thomas; Campbell, Mary S; Mullins, James I; Hughes, James P; Wong, Kim G; Raugi, Dana N; Scrensen, Stefanie

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 sequencing has been used extensively in epidemiologic and forensic studies to investigate patterns of HIV-1 transmission. However, the criteria for establishing genetic linkage between HIV-1 strains in HIV-1 prevention trials have not been formalized. The Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study (ClinicaITrials.gov NCT00194519) enrolled 3408 HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual African couples to determine the efficacy of genital herpes suppression with acyclovir in reducing HIV-1 transmission. The trial analysis required laboratory confirmation of HIV-1 linkage between enrolled partners in couples in which seroconversion occurred. Here we describe the process and results from HIV-1 sequencing studies used to perform transmission linkage determination in this clinical trial. Consensus Sanger sequencing of env (C2-V3-C3) and gag (p17-p24) genes was performed on plasma HIV-1 RNA from both partners within 3 months of seroconversion; env single molecule or pyrosequencing was also performed in some cases. For linkage, we required monophyletic clustering between HIV-1 sequences in the transmitting and seroconverting partners, and developed a Bayesian algorithm using genetic distances to evaluate the posterior probability of linkage of participants sequences. Adjudicators classified transmissions as linked, unlinked, or indeterminate. Among 151 seroconversion events, we found 108 (71.5%) linked, 40 (26.5%) unlinked, and 3 (2.0%) to have indeterminate transmissions. Nine (8.3%) were linked by consensus gag sequencing only and 8 (7.4%) required deep sequencing of env. In this first use of HIV-1 sequencing to establish endpoints in a large clinical trial, more than one-fourth of transmissions were unlinked to the enrolled partner, illustrating the relevance of these methods in the design of future HIV-1 prevention trials in serodiscordant couples. A hierarchy of sequencing techniques, analysis methods, and expert adjudication contributed to the linkage

  12. Prevalence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance among female sex workers and men who have sex with men in El Salvador, Central America.

    PubMed

    Murillo, Wendy; Lorenzana de Rivera, Ivette; Albert, Jan; Guardado, María Elena; Nieto, Ana Isabel; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2012-10-01

    Transmitted drug resistance has important implications for the successful use and management of therapy among persons infected with HIV. We estimated the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance in 145 samples from female sex workers (n = 47) and men who have sex with men (n = 98) in El Salvador. Samples were collected during March to September 2008, using a respondent driven sampling. The HIV-1 pol gene was sequenced to identify drug resistance mutations and transmitted drug resistance was scored as recommended by World Health Organization. Specimens were classified as recent or established infections using the Immunoglobulin G-Capture BED-Enzyme Immunoassay. The overall prevalence of transmitted drug resistance was 9.4% (95% CI: 4.7-16.1%), and was 5.9% for non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, 4.2% for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and 0.8% for protease inhibitors. Transmitted drug resistance prevalence was 10.3% (95% CI: 2.8-24.2%) among female sex workers, and 9.0% (95% CI: 3.6-17.6%) among men who have sex with men. Nineteen patients were classified as having recent infection (16.2%, 95% CI: 10.1-24.2%), while 98 patients (83.8%, 95% CI: 75.8-89.9%) were classified as having established infections. Transmitted drug resistance among recent and established infections was similar at 10.5% and 9.2%, respectively. This study shows that the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance is moderate among female sex workers and men who have sex with men in El Salvador. These results highlight the importance of transmitted drug resistance surveillance in a representative sample of recently infected patients following the World Health Organization guidelines. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Decreased incidence of syphilis in both men and women associated with male circumcision: a prospective study among HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual African couples

    PubMed Central

    Pintye, Jillian; Baeten, Jared M.; Manhart, Lisa; Celum, Connie; Ronald, Allan; Mugo, Nelly; Mujugira, Andrew; Cohen, Craig; Were, Edwin; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Kiarie, James; Heffron, Renee

    2014-01-01

    Background Male circumcision is a primary HIV-1 prevention intervention for men. It is uncertain whether male circumcision reduces the risk of syphilis among men and their female partners. Methods Using data from a prospective study among HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual couples from Kenya and Uganda, we assessed whether male circumcision was associated with incident syphilis in men and in their female partners. Multivariate Andersen-Gill survival methods were used, adjusted for age, sexual behavior, and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels of the HIV-1 infected partner. Findings 4716 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples (37·5% with an HIV-1 infected male) were followed for a median of 2·75 years. At enrollment, 1575 (53·5%) HIV-1 uninfected and 560 (32·4%) HIV-1 infected men were circumcised; an additional 69 (4·2%) HIV-1 infected and 132 (4·8%) HIV-1 uninfected men became circumcised during study follow up. 221 incident syphilis infections were observed: 46 among HIV-1 infected men (incidence 1·10 per 100 person-years), 76 among HIV-1 uninfected men (1·09 per 100 person-years), 54 among HIV-1 infected women (0·77 per 100 person-years) and 45 among HIV-1 uninfected women (1·11 per 100 person-years). Male circumcision was associated with a 42% reduction in incident syphilis in men (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.58 95% CI 0·37–0·91) including a 62% reduction among HIV-1 infected men (aHR 0·38, 95% CI 0·18–0·81) and a non-significant reduction in incident syphilis among HIV-1 uninfected men (aHR 0·64, 95% CI 0·36–1·11). Among women, circumcision of their male partners was associated with a 59% reduction in incident syphilis (aHR 0.41 95% CI 0.25–0.69), including a 75% reduction among HIV-1 uninfected women (aHR 0·25, 95% CI 0·08–0·76) and a 48% reduction among HIV-1 infected women (aHR 0·52, 95% CI 0·27–0·97). Interpretation In this large prospective cohort study among HIV-1 serodiscordant couples, male circumcision was associated with decreased risk

  14. Prevalence of Transmitted Drug-Resistance Mutations and Polymorphisms in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase, Protease, and gp41 Sequences Among Recent Seroconverters in Southern Poland

    PubMed Central

    Smoleń-Dzirba, Joanna; Rosińska, Magdalena; Kruszyński, Piotr; Bratosiewicz-Wąsik, Jolanta; Wojtyczka, Robert; Janiec, Janusz; Szetela, Bartosz; Beniowski, Marek; Bociąga-Jasik, Monika; Jabłonowska, Elżbieta; Wąsik, Tomasz J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Monitoring of drug resistance-related mutations among patients with recent HIV-1 infection offers an opportunity to describe current patterns of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations. Material/Methods Of 298 individuals newly diagnosed from March 2008 to February 2014 in southern Poland, 47 were deemed to have recent HIV-1 infection by the limiting antigen avidity immunoassay. Proviral DNA was amplified and sequenced in the reverse transcriptase, protease, and gp41 coding regions. Mutations were interpreted according to the Stanford Database algorithm and/or the International Antiviral Society USA guidelines. TDR mutations were defined according to the WHO surveillance list. Results Among 47 patients with recent HIV-1 infection only 1 (2%) had evidence of TDR mutation. No major resistance mutations were found, but the frequency of strains with ≥1 accessory resistance-associated mutations was high, at 98%. Accessory mutations were present in 11% of reverse transcriptase, 96% of protease, and 27% of gp41 sequences. Mean number of accessory resistance mutations in the reverse transcriptase and protease sequences was higher in viruses with no compensatory mutations in the gp41 HR2 domain than in strains with such mutations (p=0.031). Conclusions Despite the low prevalence of strains with TDR mutations, the frequency of accessory mutations was considerable, which may reflect the history of drug pressure among transmitters or natural viral genetic diversity, and may be relevant for future clinical outcomes. The accumulation of the accessory resistance mutations within the pol gene may restrict the occurrence of compensatory mutations related to enfuvirtide resistance or vice versa. PMID:28167814

  15. Reduced potency and incomplete neutralization of broadly neutralizing antibodies against cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1 with transmitted founder Envs.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongru; Zony, Chati; Chen, Ping; Chen, Benjamin K

    2017-02-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) have been isolated from HIV-1 patients and can potently block infection of a wide spectrum of HIV-1 subtypes. These antibodies define common epitopes shared by many viral isolates. While bNAbs potently antagonize infection with cell-free virus, inhibition of HIV-1 transmission from infected to uninfected CD4(+) T cells through virological synapses (VS), has been found to require greater amounts of antibody. In this study, we examined two well-studied molecular clones and two transmitted founder (T/F) viruses for their sensitivities to a panel of bNAbs in cell-free and cell-to-cell infection assays. We observed a relative resistance of cell-to-cell transmission to antibody neutralization that is reflected not only by reductions of antibody potency, but also by decreases in maximum neutralization capacity relative to cell-free infections. BNAbs targeting different epitopes exhibited incomplete neutralization against cell-associated virus with T/F Envs, which was not observed with cell-free form of the same virus. We further identified the membrane proximal internal tyrosine-based sorting motif as a determinant that can affect the incomplete neutralization of these T/F clones in cell-to-cell infection. These findings indicate that the signal that affects surface expression and/or internalization of Env from the plasma membrane can modulate the presentation of neutralizing epitopes on infected cells. These findings highlight that a fraction of virus can escape from high concentrations of antibody through cell-to-cell infection while maintaining sensitivity to neutralization in cell-free infection. The ability to fully inhibit cell-to-cell transmission may represent an important consideration in development of antibodies for treatment or prophylaxis.

  16. Association of age at first sex with HIV-1, HSV-2, and other sexual transmitted infections among women in northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ghebremichael, Musie; Larsen, Ulla; Paintsil, Elijah

    2009-09-01

    To examine the association between age at first sex and the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV-1 and HSV-2, in women in Moshi urban district, northern Tanzania. A total of 2019 women aged 20 to 44 were randomly selected in a 2-stage sampling from Moshi urban district, northern Tanzania. Information on demographics and sexual behaviors were obtained. Blood and urine samples were drawn for testing of HIV-1, HSV-2, and other STIs. Women who had their first sexual intercourse at age between 18 and 19 (OR = 0.66; 95% CI = 0.50-0.86) or 20+ (OR = 0.46; 95% CI = 0.36-0.60) were less likely to have STIs, including HIV-1 and HSV-2, than women who had their first intercourse before their 18th birthday. The hazards of having had first sex at an earlier age were significantly higher for women who tested positive for STIs (HR = 1.52; 95% CI: 1.37-1.69) or had STI symptoms (HR = 1.17; 95% CI: 1.05-1.30). Early age at first sex was associated with having a regular noncohabiting partner (HR = 1.40; 95% CI: 1.23-1.58), female circumcision (HR = 1.20; 95% CI: 1.02-1.40), and coercion at first intercourse (HR = 1.47; 95% CI: 1.15-1.89). In sub-Saharan Africa, where the prevalence of HIV and other STIs is high, a better understanding of the determinants of the age at first sex is crucial for HIV/STI prevention programs. Prevention programs should not only aim at delaying the age at first sex but also address factors leading to early age at first sex.

  17. Association of Age at First Sex with HIV-1, HSV-2 and other Sexual Transmitted Infections among Women in Northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Ghebremichael, Musie; Larsen, Ulla; Paintsil, Elijah

    2012-01-01

    Background To examine the association between age at first sex and the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including, HIV-1, and HSV-2 in women in Moshi urban district, northern Tanzania. Methods A total of 2,019 women aged 20–44 were randomly selected in a two-stage sampling from Moshi urban district, northern Tanzania. Information on demographics and sexual behaviors were obtained. Blood and urine samples were drawn for testing of HIV-1, HSV-2 and other STIs. Results Women who had their first sexual intercourse at age 18–19 (OR=0.66; 95% CI=0.50–0.86) or 20+ (OR=0.46; 95% CI=0.36–0.60) were less likely to have STIs, including HIV-1 and HSV-2, than women who had their first intercourse before their 18th birthday. The hazards of having had first sex at an earlier age were significantly higher for women who tested positive for STIs (HR=1.52; 95% CI: 1.37–1.69) or had STI symptoms (HR=1.17; 95% CI: 1.05–1.30). Early age at first sex was associated with having a regular non-cohabiting partner (HR=1.40; 95% CI: 1.23–1.58), female circumcision (HR=1.20; 95% CI: 1.02–1.40), and coercion at first intercourse (HR=1.47; 95% CI: 1.15–1.89). Conclusions In sub-Saharan Africa, where the prevalence of HIV and other STIs is high, a better understanding of the determinants of the age at first sex is crucial for HIV/STI prevention programs. Prevention programs should not only aim at delaying the age at first sex but also address factors leading to early age at first sex. PMID:19707109

  18. Prevalence of Transmitted Drug-Resistance Mutations and Polymorphisms in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase, Protease, and gp41 Sequences Among Recent Seroconverters in Southern Poland.

    PubMed

    Smoleń-Dzirba, Joanna; Rosińska, Magdalena; Kruszyński, Piotr; Bratosiewicz-Wąsik, Jolanta; Wojtyczka, Robert; Janiec, Janusz; Szetela, Bartosz; Beniowski, Marek; Bociąga-Jasik, Monika; Jabłonowska, Elżbieta; Wąsik, Tomasz J; The Cascade Collaboration In EuroCoord, And

    2017-02-07

    BACKGROUND Monitoring of drug resistance-related mutations among patients with recent HIV-1 infection offers an opportunity to describe current patterns of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations. MATERIAL AND METHODS Of 298 individuals newly diagnosed from March 2008 to February 2014 in southern Poland, 47 were deemed to have recent HIV-1 infection by the limiting antigen avidity immunoassay. Proviral DNA was amplified and sequenced in the reverse transcriptase, protease, and gp41 coding regions. Mutations were interpreted according to the Stanford Database algorithm and/or the International Antiviral Society USA guidelines. TDR mutations were defined according to the WHO surveillance list. RESULTS Among 47 patients with recent HIV-1 infection only 1 (2%) had evidence of TDR mutation. No major resistance mutations were found, but the frequency of strains with ≥1 accessory resistance-associated mutations was high, at 98%. Accessory mutations were present in 11% of reverse transcriptase, 96% of protease, and 27% of gp41 sequences. Mean number of accessory resistance mutations in the reverse transcriptase and protease sequences was higher in viruses with no compensatory mutations in the gp41 HR2 domain than in strains with such mutations (p=0.031). CONCLUSIONS Despite the low prevalence of strains with TDR mutations, the frequency of accessory mutations was considerable, which may reflect the history of drug pressure among transmitters or natural viral genetic diversity, and may be relevant for future clinical outcomes. The accumulation of the accessory resistance mutations within the pol gene may restrict the occurrence of compensatory mutations related to enfuvirtide resistance or vice versa.

  19. Molecular identification, cloning and characterization of transmitted/founder HIV-1 subtype A, D and A/D infectious molecular clones

    PubMed Central

    Baalwa, Joshua; Wang, Shuyi; Parrish, Nicholas; Decker, Julie M.; Keele, Brandon F.; Learn, Gerald H.; Yue, Ling; Ruzagira, Eugene; Ssemwanga, Deogratius; Kamali, Anatoli; Amornkul, Pauli N.; Price, Matt A.; Kappes, John C.; Karita, Etienne; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Sanders, Eduard; Gilmour, Jill; Allen, Susan; Hunter, Eric; Montefiori, David C.; Haynes, Barton F.; Cormier, Emmanuel; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.

    2012-01-01

    We report the molecular identification, cloning and initial biological characterization of 12 full-length HIV-1 subtype A, D and A/D recombinant transmitted/founder (T/F) genomes. T/F genomes contained intact canonical open reading frames and all T/F viruses were replication competent in primary human T-cells, although subtype D virus replication was more efficient (p<0.05). All 12 viruses utilized CCR5 but not CXCR4 as a co-receptor for entry and exhibited a neutralization profile typical of tier 2 primary virus strains, with significant differences observed between subtype A and D viruses with respect to sensitivity to monoclonal antibodies VRC01, PG9 and PG16 and polyclonal subtype C anti-HIV IgG (p<0.05 for each). The present report doubles the number of T/F HIV-1 clones available for pathogenesis and vaccine research and extends their representation to include subtypes A, B, C and D. PMID:23123038

  20. AIDS in rural Africa: a paradigm for HIV-1 prevention.

    PubMed

    Hudson, C P

    1996-07-01

    Networks of concurrent sexual partnerships may be the primary cause of epidemic spread of HIV-1 in parts of sub-Saharan Africa. This pattern of sexual behaviour increases the likelihood that individuals experiencing primary HIV-1 infection transmit the virus to other persons. Networks of concurrent partnerships are likely to be important in both the early ('epidemic') and late ('endemic') phases of HIV-1 transmission. Interventions should aim to break the sexual networks, whatever the stage of the epidemic. However, prevention of transmission in the endemic phase also requires a greater awareness of early clinical manifestations of HIV-1 infection in the general population. Such awareness, coupled with the availability of condoms and access to HIV-1 testing facilities, may reduce transmission in discordant couples.

  1. Surveillance of Transmitted HIV-1 Drug Resistance in Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal Provinces, South Africa, 2005–2009

    PubMed Central

    Ledwaba, J.; Basson, A. E.; Moyes, J.; Cohen, C.; Singh, B.; Bertagnolio, S.; Jordan, M. R.; Puren, A.; Morris, L.

    2012-01-01

    Surveillance of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmitted drug resistance (TDR) was conducted among pregnant women in South Africa over a 5-year period after the initiation of a large national antiretroviral treatment program. Analysis of TDR data from 9 surveys conducted between 2005 and 2009 in 2 provinces of South Africa suggests that while TDR remains low (<5%) in Gauteng Province, it may be increasing in KwaZulu-Natal, with the most recent survey showing moderate (5%–15%) levels of resistance to the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor drug class. PMID:22544199

  2. Estimating the Cost-Effectiveness of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis to Reduce HIV-1 and HSV-2 Incidence in HIV-Serodiscordant Couples in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Jewell, Britta L.; Cremin, Ide; Pickles, Michael; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared M.; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Hallett, Timothy B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate the cost-effectiveness of daily oral tenofovir-based PrEP, with a protective effect against HSV-2 as well as HIV-1, among HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in South Africa. Methods We incorporated HSV-2 acquisition, transmission, and interaction with HIV-1 into a microsimulation model of heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in South Africa, with use of PrEP for the HIV-1 uninfected partner prior to ART initiation for the HIV-1 1infected partner, and for one year thereafter. Results We estimate the cost per disability-adjusted life-year (DALY) averted for two scenarios, one in which PrEP has no effect on reducing HSV-2 acquisition, and one in which there is a 33% reduction. After a twenty-year intervention, the cost per DALY averted is estimated to be $10,383 and $9,757, respectively – a 6% reduction, given the additional benefit of reduced HSV-2 acquisition. If all couples are discordant for both HIV-1 and HSV-2, the cost per DALY averted falls to $1,445, which shows that the impact is limited by HSV-2 concordance in couples. Conclusion After a 20-year PrEP intervention, the cost per DALY averted with a reduction in HSV-2 is estimated to be modestly lower than without any effect, providing an increase of health benefits in addition to HIV-1 prevention at no extra cost. The small degree of the effect is in part due to a high prevalence of HSV-2 infection in HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in South Africa. PMID:25616135

  3. Integrated Delivery of Antiretroviral Treatment and Pre-exposure Prophylaxis to HIV-1–Serodiscordant Couples: A Prospective Implementation Study in Kenya and Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Baeten, Jared M.; Heffron, Renee; Kidoguchi, Lara; Mugo, Nelly R.; Katabira, Elly; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; Asiimwe, Stephen; Haberer, Jessica E.; Ngure, Kenneth; Bulya, Nulu; Odoyo, Josephine; Hendrix, Craig; Marzinke, Mark A.; Ware, Norma C.; Wyatt, Monique A.; Morrison, Susan; Mujugira, Andrew; Donnell, Deborah; Celum, Connie

    2016-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral-based interventions for HIV-1 prevention, including antiretroviral therapy (ART) to reduce the infectiousness of HIV-1 infected persons and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to reduce the susceptibility of HIV-1 uninfected persons, showed high efficacy for HIV-1 protection in randomized clinical trials. We conducted a prospective implementation study to understand the feasibility and effectiveness of these interventions in delivery settings. Methods and Findings Between November 5, 2012, and January 5, 2015, we enrolled and followed 1,013 heterosexual HIV-1-serodiscordant couples in Kenya and Uganda in a prospective implementation study. ART and PrEP were offered through a pragmatic strategy, with ART promoted for all couples and PrEP offered until 6 mo after ART initiation by the HIV-1 infected partner, permitting time to achieve virologic suppression. One thousand thirteen couples were enrolled, 78% of partnerships initiated ART, and 97% used PrEP, during a median follow-up of 0.9 years. Objective measures of adherence to both prevention strategies demonstrated high use (≥85%). Given the low HIV-1 incidence observed in the study, an additional analysis was added to compare observed incidence to incidence estimated under a simulated counterfactual model constructed using data from a prior prospective study of HIV-1-serodiscordant couples. Counterfactual simulations predicted 39.7 HIV-1 infections would be expected in the population at an incidence of 5.2 per 100 person-years (95% CI 3.7–6.9). However, only two incident HIV-1 infections were observed, at an incidence of 0.2 per 100 person-years (95% CI 0.0–0.9, p < 0.0001 versus predicted). The use of a non-concurrent comparison of HIV-1 incidence is a potential limitation of this approach; however, it would not have been ethical to enroll a contemporaneous population not provided access to ART and PrEP. Conclusions Integrated delivery of time-limited PrEP until sustained ART use in

  4. Integrated Delivery of Antiretroviral Treatment and Pre-exposure Prophylaxis to HIV-1-Serodiscordant Couples: A Prospective Implementation Study in Kenya and Uganda.

    PubMed

    Baeten, Jared M; Heffron, Renee; Kidoguchi, Lara; Mugo, Nelly R; Katabira, Elly; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Asiimwe, Stephen; Haberer, Jessica E; Morton, Jennifer; Ngure, Kenneth; Bulya, Nulu; Odoyo, Josephine; Tindimwebwa, Edna; Hendrix, Craig; Marzinke, Mark A; Ware, Norma C; Wyatt, Monique A; Morrison, Susan; Haugen, Harald; Mujugira, Andrew; Donnell, Deborah; Celum, Connie

    2016-08-01

    Antiretroviral-based interventions for HIV-1 prevention, including antiretroviral therapy (ART) to reduce the infectiousness of HIV-1 infected persons and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to reduce the susceptibility of HIV-1 uninfected persons, showed high efficacy for HIV-1 protection in randomized clinical trials. We conducted a prospective implementation study to understand the feasibility and effectiveness of these interventions in delivery settings. Between November 5, 2012, and January 5, 2015, we enrolled and followed 1,013 heterosexual HIV-1-serodiscordant couples in Kenya and Uganda in a prospective implementation study. ART and PrEP were offered through a pragmatic strategy, with ART promoted for all couples and PrEP offered until 6 mo after ART initiation by the HIV-1 infected partner, permitting time to achieve virologic suppression. One thousand thirteen couples were enrolled, 78% of partnerships initiated ART, and 97% used PrEP, during a median follow-up of 0.9 years. Objective measures of adherence to both prevention strategies demonstrated high use (≥85%). Given the low HIV-1 incidence observed in the study, an additional analysis was added to compare observed incidence to incidence estimated under a simulated counterfactual model constructed using data from a prior prospective study of HIV-1-serodiscordant couples. Counterfactual simulations predicted 39.7 HIV-1 infections would be expected in the population at an incidence of 5.2 per 100 person-years (95% CI 3.7-6.9). However, only two incident HIV-1 infections were observed, at an incidence of 0.2 per 100 person-years (95% CI 0.0-0.9, p < 0.0001 versus predicted). The use of a non-concurrent comparison of HIV-1 incidence is a potential limitation of this approach; however, it would not have been ethical to enroll a contemporaneous population not provided access to ART and PrEP. Integrated delivery of time-limited PrEP until sustained ART use in African HIV-1-serodiscordant couples was feasible

  5. Trends and predictors of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and clusters with TDR in a local Belgian HIV-1 epidemic.

    PubMed

    Pineda-Peña, Andrea-Clemencia; Schrooten, Yoeri; Vinken, Lore; Ferreira, Fossie; Li, Guangdi; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Khouri, Ricardo; Derdelinckx, Inge; De Munter, Paul; Kücherer, Claudia; Kostrikis, Leondios G; Nielsen, Claus; Littsola, Kirsi; Wensing, Annemarie; Stanojevic, Maja; Paredes, Roger; Balotta, Claudia; Albert, Jan; Boucher, Charles; Gomez-Lopez, Arley; Van Wijngaerden, Eric; Van Ranst, Marc; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to study epidemic trends and predictors for transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in our region, its clinical impact and its association with transmission clusters. We included 778 patients from the AIDS Reference Center in Leuven (Belgium) diagnosed from 1998 to 2012. Resistance testing was performed using population-based sequencing and TDR was estimated using the WHO-2009 surveillance list. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using maximum likelihood and Bayesian techniques. The cohort was predominantly Belgian (58.4%), men who have sex with men (MSM) (42.8%), and chronically infected (86.5%). The overall TDR prevalence was 9.6% (95% confidence interval (CI): 7.7-11.9), 6.5% (CI: 5.0-8.5) for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), 2.2% (CI: 1.4-3.5) for non-NRTI (NNRTI), and 2.2% (CI: 1.4-3.5) for protease inhibitors. A significant parabolic trend of NNRTI-TDR was found (p = 0.019). Factors significantly associated with TDR in univariate analysis were male gender, Belgian origin, MSM, recent infection, transmission clusters and subtype B, while multivariate and Bayesian network analysis singled out subtype B as the most predictive factor of TDR. Subtype B was related with transmission clusters with TDR that included 42.6% of the TDR patients. Thanks to resistance testing, 83% of the patients with TDR who started therapy had undetectable viral load whereas half of the patients would likely have received a suboptimal therapy without this test. In conclusion, TDR remained stable and a NNRTI up-and-down trend was observed. While the presence of clusters with TDR is worrying, we could not identify an independent, non-sequence based predictor for TDR or transmission clusters with TDR that could help with guidelines or public health measures.

  6. Trends and Predictors of Transmitted Drug Resistance (TDR) and Clusters with TDR in a Local Belgian HIV-1 Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Pineda-Peña, Andrea-Clemencia; Schrooten, Yoeri; Vinken, Lore; Ferreira, Fossie; Li, Guangdi; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Khouri, Ricardo; Derdelinckx, Inge; De Munter, Paul; Kücherer, Claudia; Kostrikis, Leondios G.; Nielsen, Claus; Littsola, Kirsi; Wensing, Annemarie; Stanojevic, Maja; Paredes, Roger; Balotta, Claudia; Albert, Jan; Boucher, Charles; Gomez-Lopez, Arley; Van Wijngaerden, Eric; Van Ranst, Marc; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to study epidemic trends and predictors for transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in our region, its clinical impact and its association with transmission clusters. We included 778 patients from the AIDS Reference Center in Leuven (Belgium) diagnosed from 1998 to 2012. Resistance testing was performed using population-based sequencing and TDR was estimated using the WHO-2009 surveillance list. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using maximum likelihood and Bayesian techniques. The cohort was predominantly Belgian (58.4%), men who have sex with men (MSM) (42.8%), and chronically infected (86.5%). The overall TDR prevalence was 9.6% (95% confidence interval (CI): 7.7–11.9), 6.5% (CI: 5.0–8.5) for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), 2.2% (CI: 1.4–3.5) for non-NRTI (NNRTI), and 2.2% (CI: 1.4–3.5) for protease inhibitors. A significant parabolic trend of NNRTI-TDR was found (p = 0.019). Factors significantly associated with TDR in univariate analysis were male gender, Belgian origin, MSM, recent infection, transmission clusters and subtype B, while multivariate and Bayesian network analysis singled out subtype B as the most predictive factor of TDR. Subtype B was related with transmission clusters with TDR that included 42.6% of the TDR patients. Thanks to resistance testing, 83% of the patients with TDR who started therapy had undetectable viral load whereas half of the patients would likely have received a suboptimal therapy without this test. In conclusion, TDR remained stable and a NNRTI up-and-down trend was observed. While the presence of clusters with TDR is worrying, we could not identify an independent, non-sequence based predictor for TDR or transmission clusters with TDR that could help with guidelines or public health measures. PMID:25003369

  7. Treatment-naive individuals are the major source of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance in men who have sex with men in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Drescher, Sara M; von Wyl, Viktor; Yang, Wan-Lin; Böni, Jürg; Yerly, Sabine; Shah, Cyril; Aubert, Vincent; Klimkait, Thomas; Taffé, Patrick; Furrer, Hansjakob; Battegay, Manuel; Ambrosioni, Juan; Cavassini, Matthias; Bernasconi, Enos; Vernazza, Pietro L; Ledergerber, Bruno; Günthard, Huldrych F; Kouyos, Roger D

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmitted drug resistance (TDR) can compromise antiretroviral therapy (ART) and thus represents an important public health concern. Typically, sources of TDR remain unknown, but they can be characterized with molecular epidemiologic approaches. We used the highly representative Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS) and linked drug resistance database (SHCS-DRDB) to analyze sources of TDR. ART-naive men who have sex with men with infection date estimates between 1996 and 2009 were chosen for surveillance of TDR in HIV-1 subtype B (N = 1674), as the SHCS-DRDB contains pre-ART genotypic resistance tests for >69% of this surveillance population. A phylogeny was inferred using pol sequences from surveillance patients and all subtype B sequences from the SHCS-DRDB (6934 additional patients). Potential sources of TDR were identified based on phylogenetic clustering, shared resistance mutations, genetic distance, and estimated infection dates. One hundred forty of 1674 (8.4%) surveillance patients carried virus with TDR; 86 of 140 (61.4%) were assigned to clusters. Potential sources of TDR were found for 50 of 86 (58.1%) of these patients. ART-naive patients constitute 56 of 66 (84.8%) potential sources and were significantly overrepresented among sources (odds ratio, 6.43 [95% confidence interval, 3.22-12.82]; P < .001). Particularly large transmission clusters were observed for the L90M mutation, and the spread of L90M continued even after the near cessation of antiretroviral use selecting for that mutation. Three clusters showed evidence of reversion of K103N or T215Y/F. Many individuals harboring viral TDR belonged to transmission clusters with other Swiss patients, indicating substantial domestic transmission of TDR in Switzerland. Most TDR in clusters could be linked to sources, indicating good surveillance of TDR in the SHCS-DRDB. Most TDR sources were ART naive. This, and the presence of long TDR transmission chains, suggests

  8. Epidemiological Surveillance of HIV-1 Transmitted Drug Resistance in Spain in 2004-2012: Relevance of Transmission Clusters in the Propagation of Resistance Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Yolanda; Delgado, Elena; Fernández-García, Aurora; Cuevas, Maria Teresa; Thomson, Michael M.; Montero, Vanessa; Sánchez, Monica; Sánchez, Ana Maria; Pérez-Álvarez, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Our objectives were to carry out an epidemiological surveillance study on transmitted drug resistance (TDR) among individuals newly diagnosed of HIV-1 infection during a nine year period in Spain and to assess the role of transmission clusters (TC) in the propagation of resistant strains. An overall of 1614 newly diagnosed individuals were included in the study from January 2004 through December 2012. Individuals come from two different Spanish regions: Galicia and the Basque Country. Resistance mutations to reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTI) and protease inhibitors (PI) were analyzed according to mutations included in the surveillance drug-resistance mutations list updated in 2009. TC were defined as those comprising viruses from five or more individuals whose sequences clustered in maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees with a bootstrap value ≥90%. The overall prevalence of TDR to any drug was 9.9%: 4.9% to nucleoside RTIs (NRTIs), 3.6% to non-nucleoside RTIs (NNRTIs), and 2.7% to PIs. A significant decrease of TDR to NRTIs over time was observed [from 10% in 2004 to 2% in 2012 (p=0.01)]. Sixty eight (42.2%) of 161 sequences with TDR were included in 25 TC composed of 5 or more individuals. Of them, 9 clusters harbored TDR associated with high level resistance to antiretroviral drugs. T215D revertant mutation was transmitted in a large cluster comprising 25 individuals. The impact of epidemiological networks on TDR frequency may explain its persistence in newly diagnosed individuals. The knowledge of the populations involved in TC would facilitate the design of prevention programs and public health interventions. PMID:26010948

  9. Epidemiological Surveillance of HIV-1 Transmitted Drug Resistance in Spain in 2004-2012: Relevance of Transmission Clusters in the Propagation of Resistance Mutations.

    PubMed

    Vega, Yolanda; Delgado, Elena; Fernández-García, Aurora; Cuevas, Maria Teresa; Thomson, Michael M; Montero, Vanessa; Sánchez, Monica; Sánchez, Ana Maria; Pérez-Álvarez, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Our objectives were to carry out an epidemiological surveillance study on transmitted drug resistance (TDR) among individuals newly diagnosed of HIV-1 infection during a nine year period in Spain and to assess the role of transmission clusters (TC) in the propagation of resistant strains. An overall of 1614 newly diagnosed individuals were included in the study from January 2004 through December 2012. Individuals come from two different Spanish regions: Galicia and the Basque Country. Resistance mutations to reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTI) and protease inhibitors (PI) were analyzed according to mutations included in the surveillance drug-resistance mutations list updated in 2009. TC were defined as those comprising viruses from five or more individuals whose sequences clustered in maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees with a bootstrap value ≥90%. The overall prevalence of TDR to any drug was 9.9%: 4.9% to nucleoside RTIs (NRTIs), 3.6% to non-nucleoside RTIs (NNRTIs), and 2.7% to PIs. A significant decrease of TDR to NRTIs over time was observed [from 10% in 2004 to 2% in 2012 (p=0.01)]. Sixty eight (42.2%) of 161 sequences with TDR were included in 25 TC composed of 5 or more individuals. Of them, 9 clusters harbored TDR associated with high level resistance to antiretroviral drugs. T215D revertant mutation was transmitted in a large cluster comprising 25 individuals. The impact of epidemiological networks on TDR frequency may explain its persistence in newly diagnosed individuals. The knowledge of the populations involved in TC would facilitate the design of prevention programs and public health interventions.

  10. Clinical efficacy of a combination of Percoll continuous density gradient and swim-up techniques for semen processing in HIV-1 serodiscordant couples.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Osamu; Kuji, Naoaki; Ito, Hiroe; Yamada, Mitsutoshi; Hamatani, Toshio; Oyadomari, Aimi; Kato, Shingo; Hanabusa, Hideji; Isaka, Keiichi; Tanaka, Mamoru

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of a procedure comprising a combination of Percoll continuous density gradient and modified swim-up techniques for the removal of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from the semen of HIV-1 infected males, a total of 129 couples with an HIV-1 positive male partner and an HIV-1 negative female partner (serodiscordant couples) who were treated at Keio University Hospital between January 2002 and April 2012 were examined. A total of 183 ejaculates from 129 HIV-1 infected males were processed. After swim-up, we successfully collected motile sperms at a recovery rate as high as 100.0% in cases of normozoospermia (126/126 ejaculates), oligozoospermia (6/6), and asthenozoospermia (36/36). The recovery rate of oligoasthenozoospermia was 86.7% (13/15). In processed semen only four ejaculates (4/181:2.2%) showed viral nucleotide sequences consistent with those in the blood of the infected males. After using these sperms, no horizontal infections of the female patients and no vertical infections of the newborns were observed. Furthermore, no obvious adverse effects were observed in the offspring. This protocol allowed us to collect HIV-1 negative motile sperms at a high rate, even in male factor cases. We concluded that our protocol is clinically effective both for decreasing HIV-1 infections and for yielding a healthy child.

  11. Clinical efficacy of a combination of Percoll continuous density gradient and swim-up techniques for semen processing in HIV-1 serodiscordant couples

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Osamu; Kuji, Naoaki; Ito, Hiroe; Yamada, Mitsutoshi; Hamatani, Toshio; Oyadomari, Aimi; Kato, Shingo; Hanabusa, Hideji; Isaka, Keiichi; Tanaka, Mamoru

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of a procedure comprising a combination of Percoll continuous density gradient and modified swim-up techniques for the removal of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from the semen of HIV-1 infected males, a total of 129 couples with an HIV-1 positive male partner and an HIV-1 negative female partner (serodiscordant couples) who were treated at Keio University Hospital between January 2002 and April 2012 were examined. A total of 183 ejaculates from 129 HIV-1 infected males were processed. After swim-up, we successfully collected motile sperms at a recovery rate as high as 100.0% in cases of normozoospermia (126/126 ejaculates), oligozoospermia (6/6), and asthenozoospermia (36/36). The recovery rate of oligoasthenozoospermia was 86.7% (13/15). In processed semen only four ejaculates (4/181:2.2%) showed viral nucleotide sequences consistent with those in the blood of the infected males. After using these sperms, no horizontal infections of the female patients and no vertical infections of the newborns were observed. Furthermore, no obvious adverse effects were observed in the offspring. This protocol allowed us to collect HIV-1 negative motile sperms at a high rate, even in male factor cases. We concluded that our protocol is clinically effective both for decreasing HIV-1 infections and for yielding a healthy child. PMID:26908065

  12. Geographic and Temporal Trends in the Molecular Epidemiology and Genetic Mechanisms of Transmitted HIV-1 Drug Resistance: An Individual-Patient- and Sequence-Level Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Blanco, Jose Luis; Jordan, Michael R.; Taylor, Jonathan; Lemey, Philippe; Varghese, Vici; Hamers, Raph L.; Bertagnolio, Silvia; de Wit, Tobias F. Rinke; Aghokeng, Avelin F.; Albert, Jan; Avi, Radko; Avila-Rios, Santiago; Bessong, Pascal O.; Brooks, James I.; Boucher, Charles A. B.; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Busch, Michael P.; Bussmann, Hermann; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Chin, Bum Sik; D’Aquin, Toni T.; De Gascun, Cillian F.; Derache, Anne; Descamps, Diane; Deshpande, Alaka K.; Djoko, Cyrille F.; Eshleman, Susan H.; Fleury, Herve; Frange, Pierre; Fujisaki, Seiichiro; Harrigan, P. Richard; Hattori, Junko; Holguin, Africa; Hunt, Gillian M.; Ichimura, Hiroshi; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Katzenstein, David; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Kim, Jerome H.; Kim, Sung Soon; Li, Yanpeng; Lutsar, Irja; Morris, Lynn; Ndembi, Nicaise; NG, Kee Peng; Paranjape, Ramesh S.; Peeters, Martine; Poljak, Mario; Price, Matt A.; Ragonnet-Cronin, Manon L.; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Rolland, Morgane; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Smith, Davey M.; Soares, Marcelo A.; Soriano, Vincent V.; Ssemwanga, Deogratius; Stanojevic, Maja; Stefani, Mariane A.; Sugiura, Wataru; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Tanuri, Amilcar; Tee, Kok Keng; Truong, Hong-Ha M.; van de Vijver, David A. M. C.; Vidal, Nicole; Yang, Chunfu; Yang, Rongge; Yebra, Gonzalo; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Regional and subtype-specific mutational patterns of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance (TDR) are essential for informing first-line antiretroviral (ARV) therapy guidelines and designing diagnostic assays for use in regions where standard genotypic resistance testing is not affordable. We sought to understand the molecular epidemiology of TDR and to identify the HIV-1 drug-resistance mutations responsible for TDR in different regions and virus subtypes. Methods and Findings We reviewed all GenBank submissions of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase sequences with or without protease and identified 287 studies published between March 1, 2000, and December 31, 2013, with more than 25 recently or chronically infected ARV-naïve individuals. These studies comprised 50,870 individuals from 111 countries. Each set of study sequences was analyzed for phylogenetic clustering and the presence of 93 surveillance drug-resistance mutations (SDRMs). The median overall TDR prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), south/southeast Asia (SSEA), upper-income Asian countries, Latin America/Caribbean, Europe, and North America was 2.8%, 2.9%, 5.6%, 7.6%, 9.4%, and 11.5%, respectively. In SSA, there was a yearly 1.09-fold (95% CI: 1.05–1.14) increase in odds of TDR since national ARV scale-up attributable to an increase in non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance. The odds of NNRTI-associated TDR also increased in Latin America/Caribbean (odds ratio [OR] = 1.16; 95% CI: 1.06–1.25), North America (OR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.12–1.26), Europe (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 1.01–1.13), and upper-income Asian countries (OR = 1.33; 95% CI: 1.12–1.55). In SSEA, there was no significant change in the odds of TDR since national ARV scale-up (OR = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.92–1.02). An analysis limited to sequences with mixtures at less than 0.5% of their nucleotide positions—a proxy for recent infection—yielded trends comparable to those obtained using the complete dataset. Four

  13. Mucosal Immunization of Lactating Female Rhesus Monkeys with a Transmitted/Founder HIV-1 Envelope Induces Strong Env-Specific IgA Antibody Responses in Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Fouda, Genevieve G. A.; Amos, Joshua D.; Wilks, Andrew B.; Pollara, Justin; Ray, Caroline A.; Chand, Anjali; Kunz, Erika L.; Liebl, Brooke E.; Whitaker, Kaylan; Carville, Angela; Smith, Shannon; Colvin, Lisa; Pickup, David J.; Staats, Herman F.; Overman, Glenn; Eutsey-Lloyd, Krissey; Parks, Robert; Chen, Haiyan; LaBranche, Celia; Barnett, Susan; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Ferrari, Guido; Montefiori, David C.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Letvin, Norman L.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that vaccination of lactating rhesus monkeys with a DNA prime/vector boost strategy induces strong T-cell responses but limited envelope (Env)-specific humoral responses in breast milk. To improve vaccine-elicited antibody responses in milk, hormone-induced lactating rhesus monkeys were vaccinated with a transmitted/founder (T/F) HIV Env immunogen in a prime-boost strategy modeled after the moderately protective RV144 HIV vaccine. Lactating rhesus monkeys were intramuscularly primed with either recombinant DNA (n = 4) or modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) poxvirus vector (n = 4) expressing the T/F HIV Env C.1086 and then boosted twice intramuscularly with C.1086 gp120 and the adjuvant MF59. The vaccines induced Env-binding IgG and IgA as well as neutralizing and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) responses in plasma and milk of most vaccinated animals. Importantly, plasma neutralization titers against clade C HIV variants MW965 (P = 0.03) and CAP45 (P = 0.04) were significantly higher in MVA-primed than in DNA-primed animals. The superior systemic prime-boost regimen was then compared to a mucosal-boost regimen, in which animals were boosted twice intranasally with C.1086 gp120 and the TLR 7/8 agonist R848 following the same systemic prime. While the systemic and mucosal vaccine regimens elicited comparable levels of Env-binding IgG antibodies, mucosal immunization induced significantly stronger Env-binding IgA responses in milk (P = 0.03). However, the mucosal regimen was not as potent at inducing functional IgG responses. This study shows that systemic MVA prime followed by either intranasal or systemic protein boosts can elicit strong humoral responses in breast milk and may be a useful strategy to interrupt postnatal HIV-1 transmission. PMID:23596289

  14. Prevalence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance and the role of resistance algorithms: data from seroconverters in the CASCADE collaboration from 1987 to 2003.

    PubMed

    Masquelier, Bernard; Bhaskaran, Krishnan; Pillay, Deenan; Gifford, Robert; Balestre, Eric; Jørgensen, Louise Bruun; Pedersen, Court; van der Hoek, Lia; Prins, Maria; Balotta, Claudia; Longo, Benedetta; Kücherer, Claudia; Poggensee, Gabriele; Ortiz, Marta; de Mendoza, Carmen; Gill, John; Fleury, Hervé; Porter, Kholoud

    2005-12-15

    To examine factors influencing the rate of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) among seroconverters, with particular emphasis on 3 widely used genotypic drug resistance algorithms. The study used data from CASCADE (Concerted Action on Seroconversion to AIDS and Death in Europe), a collaboration of seroconverter cohorts in Europe and Canada. Genotypic resistance data were derived within 18 months of the last seronegative test or date of laboratory evidence of acute infection and before the initiation of antiretroviral therapy. The Stanford algorithm was used to analyze each individual's nucleotide sequence. A multivariate logistic model was used to assess independent relationships between the presence of TDR and exposure category, sex, age at seroconversion, and year of seroconversion. The paper also describes 3 alternative definitions of resistance: the Stanford algorithm, the key resistance mutations defined by the International AIDS Society, and the Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le Sida (ANRS) algorithm. Forty-five of 438 patients (10.3%) seroconverting between 1987 and 2003 were infected with a drug-resistant HIV-1 variant. Forty patients (9.1%) showed resistance mutations to only 1 class of antiretroviral drugs, 2 (0.5%) to 2 classes, and 3 (0.7%) to 3 classes of antiretroviral therapy. It was suggested that individuals seroconverting later in calendar time were more likely to have TDR (relative risk 3.89 and 95% CI: 0.84 to 18.02, and relative risk 4.69 and 95% CI: 1.03 to 21.31, for 1996-1999 and 2000-2003, respectively, compared with pre-1996; P trend = 0.08). This trend was apparent regardless of the definition of TDR used. The total estimated proportion of individuals with TDR varied between 10.3% and 15.5% according to which definition was used. Evidence was found for the rise of TDR over time. A specific definition of what constitutes TDR rather than a simple list of mutations is needed.

  15. Modeling Endovascular MRI Coil Coupling with Transmit RF Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Venkateswaran, Madhav; Unal, Orhan; Hurley, Samuel; Samsonov, Alexey; Wang, Peng; Fain, Sean; Kurpad, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Objective To model inductive coupling of endovascular coils with transmit RF excitation for selecting coils for MRI-guided interventions. Methods Independent and computationally efficient FEM models are developed for the endovascular coil, cable, transmit excitation and imaging domain. Electromagnetic and circuit solvers are coupled to simulate net B1+ fields and induced currents and voltages. Our models are validated using the Bloch Siegert B1+ mapping sequence for a series-tuned multimode coil, capable of tracking, wireless visualization and high resolution endovascular imaging. Results Validation shows good agreement at 24, 28 and 34 μT background RF excitation within experimental limitations. Quantitative coil performance metrics agree with simulation. A parametric study demonstrates trade off in coil performance metrics when varying number of coil turns. Tracking, imaging and wireless marker multimode coil features and their integration is demonstrated in a pig study. Conclusion Developed models for the multimode coil were successfully validated. Modeling for geometric optimization and coil selection serves as a precursor to time-consuming and expensive experiments. Specific applications demonstrated include parametric optimization, coil selection for a cardiac intervention and an animal imaging experiment. Significance Our modular, adaptable and computationally efficient modeling approach enables rapid comparison, selection and optimization of inductively-coupled coils for MRI-guided interventions. PMID:26960218

  16. Transformer coupling for transmitting direct current through a barrier

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Ralph L.; Guilford, Richard P.; Stichman, John H.

    1988-01-01

    The transmission system for transmitting direct current from an energy source on one side of an electrical and mechanical barrier to a load on the other side of the barrier utilizes a transformer comprising a primary core on one side of the transformer and a secondary core on the other side of the transformer. The cores are magnetically coupled selectively by moving a magnetic ferrite coupler in and out of alignment with the poles of the cores. The direct current from the energy source is converted to a time varying current by an oscillating circuit, which oscillating circuit is optically coupled to a secondary winding on the secondary core to interrupt oscillations upon the voltage in the secondary winding exceeding a preselected level.

  17. Transformer coupling for transmitting direct current through a barrier

    DOEpatents

    Brown, R.L.; Guilford, R.P.; Stichman, J.H.

    1987-06-29

    The transmission system for transmitting direct current from an energy source on one side of an electrical and mechanical barrier to a load on the other side of the barrier utilizes a transformer comprising a primary core on one side of the transformer and a secondary core on the other side of the transformer. The cores are magnetically coupled selectively by moving a magnetic ferrite coupler in and out of alignment with the poles of the cores. The direct current from the energy source is converted to a time varying current by an oscillating circuit, which oscillating circuit is optically coupled to a secondary winding on the secondary core to interrupt oscillations upon the voltage in the secondary winding exceeding a preselected level. 4 figs.

  18. High viremia and low level of transmitted drug resistance in anti-retroviral therapy-naïve perinatally-infected children and adolescents with HIV-1 subtype C infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High plasma viremia in HIV-1 infection is associated with rapid CD4 cell decline and faster disease progression. Children with HIV infection have high viral loads, particularly in early childhood. In this study we sought to understand the relationship between duration of HIV-1 infection and viral dynamics among perinatally-infected children and adolescents in India along with transmitted drug resistance in this population. Methods During 2007–2011, cross-sectional samples were collected from ART-naïve children (n = 105) with perinatally-acquired HIV infection, aged 2–16 years from Bangalore, India. CD4 counts, viral load and in-house genotyping were performed and transmitted drug resistance mutations were identified using the World Health Organization recommendations for Surveillance of Drug Resistance Mutations (SDRM_2009) list. Results Among 105 children studied, 73.3% (77/105) were asymptomatic, but had a median viral load of 5.24 log copies/mL (IQR 4.62-5.66). In the adolescent age group, 54% (21/39) had high levels of viremia (median 5.14 log copies/mL) but were asymptomatic. HIV-1 subtyping identified 98% strains (103/105) as subtype C; one A1 and one unique recombinant form (URF). Transmitted NRTI resistance was 1.9% (2/105); NNRTI resistance was 4.8% (5/105) and overall prevalence of transmitted drug resistance was 5.7% (6/105). Conclusions The high burden of plasma viremia found among untreated asymptomatic adolescents needs to be addressed both from an individual angle to halt disease progression, and from a public health perspective to arrest horizontal transmission. The low level of transmitted drug resistance among perinatally-infected children is reassuring; however with improving ART access globally, regular genotyping surveillance is indicated. PMID:23171203

  19. Analysis of transmitted drug resistance and HIV-1 subtypes using dried serum spots of recently HIV-infected individuals in 2013 in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Andrea, Hauser; Alexandra, Hofmann; Claudia, Santos-Hoevener; Ruth, Zimmermann; Osamah, Hamouda; Norbert, Bannert; Claudia, Kuecherer

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Robert Koch Institute (RKI) aimed to assess a molecular surveillance strategy based on filter-dried serum spots (DSS) of all newly diagnosed HIV infections in Germany. In 2013, diagnostic laboratories sent DSS to the RKI representing 55% of the newly diagnosed HIV infections reported to the RKI (protection against infection act). DSS were first tested serologically to identify recently acquired infections (<140 days duration of infection); those classified as “recent infection” were processed for HIV-1 genotyping. The aim of this study was to assess the level of TDR and the current HIV-1 subtypes in the main HIV transmission group categories (TrGrpC) in 2013: men who have sex with men (MSM), women/men with heterosexual contacts (HET) and injecting drug users (IDUs). Materials and Methods DSS were tested for recency of infection using the BED capture EIA. Viral RNA from “recent infections” was amplified by HIV-1 group M generic pol-RT-PCR covering all resistance-associated positions in the HIV-1 protease (AS1-99) and reverse transcriptase (AS1-252) if viral loads were ≥6,500 copies/mL. PCR amplicons were sequenced (Sanger) to analyze genotypic resistance and the HIV-1 subtype. Results were merged to data from the HIV report, i.e. the TrGrpC. Results In 2013, 1027 DSS were classified as recent HIV infections (506 MSM, 118 HET, 31 IDUs, 6 others, 366 unknown). RNA was extracted from 703 recent cases and 389/503 samples with sufficient viral load were PCR-positive. By June 2014, 276/389 samples were sequenced: TDR was identified in 13% (35/276) of the recent infections including single (PI, NRTI, NNRTI) and dual drug class resistant strains (NRTI/NNRTI; NNRTI/PI). 18% (51/276) of recent HIV-1 infections were caused by non-B subtypes (A1, C, CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG, D, F, G, URFs). TDR was observed at comparable levels in all TrGrpC. Proportions of non-B infections were significantly higher in HET (78%; 14/18) and IDUs (60%; 3/5) compared to MSM (8

  20. Analysis of transmitted drug resistance and HIV-1 subtypes using dried serum spots of recently HIV-infected individuals in 2013 in Germany.

    PubMed

    Andrea, Hauser; Alexandra, Hofmann; Claudia, Santos-Hoevener; Ruth, Zimmermann; Osamah, Hamouda; Norbert, Bannert; Claudia, Kuecherer

    2014-01-01

    The Robert Koch Institute (RKI) aimed to assess a molecular surveillance strategy based on filter-dried serum spots (DSS) of all newly diagnosed HIV infections in Germany. In 2013, diagnostic laboratories sent DSS to the RKI representing 55% of the newly diagnosed HIV infections reported to the RKI (protection against infection act). DSS were first tested serologically to identify recently acquired infections (<140 days duration of infection); those classified as "recent infection" were processed for HIV-1 genotyping. The aim of this study was to assess the level of TDR and the current HIV-1 subtypes in the main HIV transmission group categories (TrGrpC) in 2013: men who have sex with men (MSM), women/men with heterosexual contacts (HET) and injecting drug users (IDUs). DSS were tested for recency of infection using the BED capture EIA. Viral RNA from "recent infections" was amplified by HIV-1 group M generic pol-RT-PCR covering all resistance-associated positions in the HIV-1 protease (AS1-99) and reverse transcriptase (AS1-252) if viral loads were ≥6,500 copies/mL. PCR amplicons were sequenced (Sanger) to analyze genotypic resistance and the HIV-1 subtype. RESULTS were merged to data from the HIV report, i.e. the TrGrpC. In 2013, 1027 DSS were classified as recent HIV infections (506 MSM, 118 HET, 31 IDUs, 6 others, 366 unknown). RNA was extracted from 703 recent cases and 389/503 samples with sufficient viral load were PCR-positive. By June 2014, 276/389 samples were sequenced: TDR was identified in 13% (35/276) of the recent infections including single (PI, NRTI, NNRTI) and dual drug class resistant strains (NRTI/NNRTI; NNRTI/PI). 18% (51/276) of recent HIV-1 infections were caused by non-B subtypes (A1, C, CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG, D, F, G, URFs). TDR was observed at comparable levels in all TrGrpC. Proportions of non-B infections were significantly higher in HET (78%; 14/18) and IDUs (60%; 3/5) compared to MSM (8%; 14/169) (p<0.01). The proportion of TDR was

  1. Kinetically coupled folding of a single HIV-1 glycoprotein 41 complex in viral membrane fusion and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Junyi; Rebane, Aleksander A; Ma, Lu; Gao, Ying; Zhang, Yongli

    2015-06-02

    HIV-1 glycoprotein 41 (gp41) mediates viral entry into host cells by coupling its folding energy to membrane fusion. Gp41 folding is blocked by fusion inhibitors, including the commercial drug T20, to treat HIV/AIDS. However, gp41 folding intermediates, energy, and kinetics are poorly understood. Here, we identified the folding intermediates of a single gp41 trimer-of-hairpins and measured their associated energy and kinetics using high-resolution optical tweezers. We found that folding of gp41 hairpins was energetically independent but kinetically coupled: Each hairpin contributed a folding energy of ∼-23 kBT, but folding of one hairpin successively accelerated the folding rate of the next one by ∼20-fold. Membrane-mimicking micelles slowed down gp41 folding and reduced the stability of the six-helix bundle. However, the stability was restored by cooperative folding of the membrane-proximal external region. Surprisingly, T20 strongly inhibited gp41 folding by actively displacing the C-terminal hairpin strand in a force-dependent manner. The inhibition was abolished by a T20-resistant gp41 mutation. The energetics and kinetics of gp41 folding established by us provides a basis to understand viral membrane fusion, infection, and therapeutic intervention.

  2. Synthesis of 3' '-substituted TSAO derivatives with anti-HIV-1 and anti-HIV-2 activity through an efficient palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling approach.

    PubMed

    Lobatón, Esther; Rodríguez-Barrios, Fátima; Gago, Federico; Pérez-Pérez, María-Jesús; De Clercq, Erik; Balzarini, Jan; Camarasa, María-José; Velázquez, Sonsoles

    2002-08-29

    Various synthetic studies for the introduction of several functional groups at position 3' ' of the spiro moiety of TSAO derivatives have been explored. Among them, Stille cross-coupling of 3' '-iodo-TSAO derivatives with different stannanes provided an efficient and straightforward route for the direct and selective functionalization of the 3' '-position of the sultone spiro moiety via carbon-carbon bond formation. The compounds synthesized were evaluated for their inhibitory effect on HIV-1 and HIV-2 replication in cell culture. The introduction of a bromine and particularly an iodine at the 3' '-position conferred the highest anti-HIV-1 activity. In contrast, the presence at this position of (un)substituted vinyl, alkynyl, phenyl, or thienyl groups markedly diminished the anti-HIV-1 activity. Surprisingly, several of the 3' '-alkenyl-substituted TSAO derivatives also gained anti-HIV-2 activity at subtoxic concentrations, an observation that is very unusual for NNRTIs and never observed before for TSAO derivatives. Finally, the anti-HIV-1 activity of some of the 3' '-substituted TSAO derivatives is discussed in light of our recently proposed molecular model of interaction of TSAO derivatives with the interphase between the two subunits of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  3. Molecular diversity of HIV-1 and surveillance of transmitted drug resistance variants among treatment Naïve patients, 5 years after active introduction of HAART in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ong, Lai Yee; Razak, Siti Nur Humaira; Lee, Yeat Mei; Sri La Sri Ponnampalavanar, Sasheela; Syed Omar, Sharifah Faridah; Azwa, Raja Iskandar; Tee, Kok Keng; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba

    2014-01-01

    Expansion of antiretroviral treatment programs have led to the growing concern for the development of antiretroviral drug resistance. The aims were to assess the prevalence of drug resistant HIV-1 variants and to identify circulating subtypes among HAART-naïve patients. Plasma specimens from N = 100 HIV+ HAART-naïve adult were collected between March 2008 and August 2010 and viral RNA were extracted for nested PCR and sequenced. PR-RT sequences were protein aligned and checked for transmitted drug resistance mutations. Phylogenetic reconstruction and recombination analysis were performed to determine the genotypes. Based on the WHO consensus guidelines, none of the recruited patients had any transmitted drug resistance mutations. When analyzed against the Stanford guidelines, 35% of patients had at least one reported mutation that may reduce drug susceptibility to PI (24%), NRTI (5%), and NNRTI (14%). The commonly detected mutation that may affect current first line therapy was V179D (3%), which may lead to reduced susceptibility to NNRTI. The predominant circulating HIV-1 genotypes were CRF01_AE (51%) and CRF33_01B (17%). The prevalence of unique recombinant forms (URF) was 7%; five distinct recombinant structures involving CRF01_AE and subtype B' were observed, among them a cluster of three isolates that could form a novel circulating recombinant form (CRF) candidate. Transmitted drug resistance prevalence among HAART-naïve patients was low in this cohort of patients in Kuala Lumpur despite introduction of HAART 5 years ago. Owing to the high genetic diversity, continued molecular surveillance can identify the persistent emergence of HIV-1 URF and novel CRF with significant epidemiological impact. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Shedding of HIV-1 subtype E in semen and cervico-vaginal fluid.

    PubMed

    Sutthent, R; Chaisilwattana, P; Roongpisuthipong, A; Wirachsilp, P; Samrangsarp, K; Chaiyakul, P; Puthavathana, P; Wasi, C

    1997-06-01

    The uneven expansion of HIV-1 subtypes in each transmitted group raises the possibility that some viruses have less/more potential by qualitative/quantitative for heterosexual transmission compared to others. In Thailand, HIV-1 subtype E is mainly spread via heterosexual route and accounts for about 95 per cent of the infected cases. To determine whether high sexual infectivity of HIV-1 subtype E is due to the presence of a virus in genital fluid, we conducted a study to characterize shedding of HIV-1 in seminal and cervico-vaginal fluids of 30 HIV-1 subtype E infected Thai couples by PCR and virus isolation methods. All subjects had no HIV-associated diseases and other sexually transmitted diseases. HIV-1 subtype E DNA was detected in 22/30 (77.33%) of cervico-vaginal and also 22/30 (77.33%) of seminal fluid samples. The isolation rate of HIV-1 from semen and cervico-vaginal secretion was 36.67 per cent and 16.67 per cent, respectively. Number of HIV-1 subtype E DNA copies in the blood is reversely correlated with the number of blood CD4+ T cells, while that in genital fluid was not related to CD4+ T cell count. An increase in shedding of HIV- DNA subtype E in female genital tract compared to other HIV subtypes reported by other investigators might be one reason to explain the rapid spread of subtype E by heterosexual transmission in Thailand.

  5. Prevalence of drug resistance among HIV-1 treatment-naive patients in Greece during 2003-2015: Transmitted drug resistance is due to onward transmissions.

    PubMed

    Paraskevis, D; Kostaki, E; Magiorkinis, G; Gargalianos, P; Xylomenos, G; Magiorkinis, E; Lazanas, M; Chini, M; Nikolopoulos, G; Skoutelis, A; Papastamopoulos, V; Antoniadou, A; Papadopoulos, A; Psichogiou, M; Daikos, G L; Oikonomopoulou, M; Zavitsanou, A; Chrysos, G; Paparizos, V; Kourkounti, S; Sambatakou, H; Sipsas, N V; Lada, M; Panagopoulos, P; Maltezos, E; Drimis, S; Hatzakis, A

    2017-10-01

    The prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistance among treatment-naïve patients ranges between 8.3% and 15% in Europe and North America. Previous studies showed that subtypes A and B were the most prevalent in the Greek HIV-1 epidemic. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of resistance among drug naïve patients in Greece and to investigate the levels of transmission networking among those carrying resistant strains. HIV-1 sequences were determined from 3428 drug naïve HIV-1 patients, in Greece sampled during 01/01/2003-30/6/2015. Transmission clusters were estimated by means of phylogenetic analysis including as references sequences from patients failing antiretroviral treatment in Greece and sequences sampled globally. The proportion of sequences with SDRMs was 5.98% (n=205). The most prevalent SDRMs were found for NNRTIs (3.76%), followed by N(t)RTIs (2.28%) and PIs (1.02%). The resistance prevalence was 22.2% based on all mutations associated with resistance estimated using the HIVdb resistance interpretation algorithm. Resistance to NNRTIs was the most common (16.9%) followed by PIs (4.9%) and N(t)RTIs (2.8%). The most frequently observed NNRTI resistant mutations were E138A (7.7%), E138Q (4.0%), K103N (2.3%) and V179D (1.3%). The majority of subtype A sequences (89.7%; 245 out of 273) with the dominant NNRTI resistance mutations (E138A, K103N, E138Q, V179D) were found to belong to monophyletic clusters suggesting regional dispersal. For subtype B, 68.1% (139 out of 204) of resistant strains (E138A, K103N, E138Q V179D) belonged to clusters. For N(t)RTI-resistance, evidence for regional dispersal was found for 27.3% and 21.6% of subtype A and B sequences, respectively. The TDR rate based on the prevalence of SDRM is lower than the average rate in Europe. However, the prevalence of NNRTI resistance estimated using the HIVdb approach, is high in Greece and it is mostly due to onward transmissions among drug-naïve patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  6. Comparison of Immunogenicity in Rhesus Macaques of Transmitted-Founder, HIV-1 Group M Consensus, and Trivalent Mosaic Envelope Vaccines Formulated as a DNA Prime, NYVAC, and Envelope Protein Boost

    PubMed Central

    Hulot, Sandrine L.; Korber, Bette; Giorgi, Elena E.; Vandergrift, Nathan; Saunders, Kevin O.; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Mach, Linh V.; Lifton, Michelle A.; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Tartaglia, Jim; Phogat, Sanjay; Jacobs, Bertram; Kibler, Karen; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Gomez, Carmen E.; Esteban, Mariano; Rosati, Margherita; Felber, Barbara K.; Pavlakis, George N.; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey; Sutherland, Laura; Scearce, Richard; Letvin, Norman L.; Seaman, Michael S.; Alam, S. Munir; Montefiori, David; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT An effective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine must induce protective antibody responses, as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, that can be effective despite extraordinary diversity of HIV-1. The consensus and mosaic immunogens are complete but artificial proteins, computationally designed to elicit immune responses with improved cross-reactive breadth, to attempt to overcome the challenge of global HIV diversity. In this study, we have compared the immunogenicity of a transmitted-founder (T/F) B clade Env (B.1059), a global group M consensus Env (Con-S), and a global trivalent mosaic Env protein in rhesus macaques. These antigens were delivered using a DNA prime-recombinant NYVAC (rNYVAC) vector and Env protein boost vaccination strategy. While Con-S Env was a single sequence, mosaic immunogens were a set of three Envs optimized to include the most common forms of potential T cell epitopes. Both Con-S and mosaic sequences retained common amino acids encompassed by both antibody and T cell epitopes and were central to globally circulating strains. Mosaics and Con-S Envs expressed as full-length proteins bound well to a number of neutralizing antibodies with discontinuous epitopes. Also, both consensus and mosaic immunogens induced significantly higher gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay (ELISpot) responses than B.1059 immunogen. Immunization with these proteins, particularly Con-S, also induced significantly higher neutralizing antibodies to viruses than B.1059 Env, primarily to tier 1 viruses. Both Con-S and mosaics stimulated more potent CD8-T cell responses against heterologous Envs than did B.1059. Both antibody and cellular data from this study strengthen the concept of using in silico-designed centralized immunogens for global HIV-1 vaccine development strategies. IMPORTANCE There is an increasing appreciation for the importance of vaccine-induced anti-Env antibody responses for preventing HIV-1

  7. Comparison of Immunogenicity in Rhesus Macaques of Transmitted-Founder, HIV-1 Group M Consensus, and Trivalent Mosaic Envelope Vaccines Formulated as a DNA Prime, NYVAC, and Envelope Protein Boost.

    PubMed

    Hulot, Sandrine L; Korber, Bette; Giorgi, Elena E; Vandergrift, Nathan; Saunders, Kevin O; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Mach, Linh V; Lifton, Michelle A; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Tartaglia, Jim; Phogat, Sanjay; Jacobs, Bertram; Kibler, Karen; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Gomez, Carmen E; Esteban, Mariano; Rosati, Margherita; Felber, Barbara K; Pavlakis, George N; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey; Sutherland, Laura; Scearce, Richard; Letvin, Norman L; Seaman, Michael S; Alam, S Munir; Montefiori, David; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Santra, Sampa

    2015-06-01

    An effective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine must induce protective antibody responses, as well as CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses, that can be effective despite extraordinary diversity of HIV-1. The consensus and mosaic immunogens are complete but artificial proteins, computationally designed to elicit immune responses with improved cross-reactive breadth, to attempt to overcome the challenge of global HIV diversity. In this study, we have compared the immunogenicity of a transmitted-founder (T/F) B clade Env (B.1059), a global group M consensus Env (Con-S), and a global trivalent mosaic Env protein in rhesus macaques. These antigens were delivered using a DNA prime-recombinant NYVAC (rNYVAC) vector and Env protein boost vaccination strategy. While Con-S Env was a single sequence, mosaic immunogens were a set of three Envs optimized to include the most common forms of potential T cell epitopes. Both Con-S and mosaic sequences retained common amino acids encompassed by both antibody and T cell epitopes and were central to globally circulating strains. Mosaics and Con-S Envs expressed as full-length proteins bound well to a number of neutralizing antibodies with discontinuous epitopes. Also, both consensus and mosaic immunogens induced significantly higher gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay (ELISpot) responses than B.1059 immunogen. Immunization with these proteins, particularly Con-S, also induced significantly higher neutralizing antibodies to viruses than B.1059 Env, primarily to tier 1 viruses. Both Con-S and mosaics stimulated more potent CD8-T cell responses against heterologous Envs than did B.1059. Both antibody and cellular data from this study strengthen the concept of using in silico-designed centralized immunogens for global HIV-1 vaccine development strategies. There is an increasing appreciation for the importance of vaccine-induced anti-Env antibody responses for preventing HIV-1 acquisition. This

  8. Functional Coupling between HIV-1 Integrase and the SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeling Complex for Efficient in vitro Integration into Stable Nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Lesbats, Paul; Botbol, Yair; Chevereau, Guillaume; Vaillant, Cédric; Calmels, Christina; Arneodo, Alain; Andreola, Marie-Line; Lavigne, Marc; Parissi, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Establishment of stable HIV-1 infection requires the efficient integration of the retroviral genome into the host DNA. The molecular mechanism underlying the control of this process by the chromatin structure has not yet been elucidated. We show here that stably associated nucleosomes strongly inhibit in vitro two viral-end integration by decreasing the accessibility of DNA to integrase. Remodeling of the chromatinized template by the SWI/SNF complex, whose INI1 major component interacts with IN, restores and redirects the full-site integration into the stable nucleosome region. These effects are not observed after remodeling by other human remodeling factors such as SNF2H or BRG1 lacking the integrase binding protein INI1. This suggests that the restoration process depends on the direct interaction between IN and the whole SWI/SNF complex, supporting a functional coupling between the remodeling and integration complexes. Furthermore, in silico comparison between more than 40,000 non-redundant cellular integration sites selected from literature and nucleosome occupancy predictions also supports that HIV-1 integration is promoted in the genomic region of weaker intrinsic nucleosome density in the infected cell. Our data indicate that some chromatin structures can be refractory for integration and that coupling between nucleosome remodeling and HIV-1 integration is required to overcome this natural barrier. PMID:21347347

  9. Prevalence of transmitted nucleoside analogue-resistant HIV-1 strains and pre-existing mutations in pol reverse transcriptase and protease region: outcome after treatment in recently infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Balotta, C; Berlusconi, A; Pan, A; Violin, M; Riva, C; Colombo, M C; Gori, A; Papagno, L; Corvasce, S; Mazzucchelli, R; Facchi, G; Velleca, R; Saporetti, G; Galli, M; Rusconi, S; Moroni, M

    2000-03-01

    We retrospectively studied 38 Italian recently HIV-1-infected subjects who seroconverted from 1994 to 1997 to investigate: (i) the prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI)-related mutations at primary infection; (ii) the proportion of naturally occurring mutations in reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease regions of patients naive for non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) and protease inhibitors (PIs); (iii) the drug-susceptibility to NRTIs and PIs in subjects with NRTI- and/or PI-related mutations; and (iv) the outcome of seroconverters treated with various NRTIs or NRTI/PI regimens. Baseline HIV-1 plasma viraemia and absolute CD4 count at baseline could not be used to distinguish patients with NRTI- and/or PI-related pre-existing mutations from those with wild-type virus (P = 0.693 and P = 0.542, respectively). The frequency of zidovudine-related mutations was 21% in the study period. The response to treatment was not significantly different in subjects with or without genotypic zidovudine-related mutations at primary infection (P = 0.744 for HIV-1 RNA and P = 0.102 for CD4 cells). Some natural variation (2.6%) was present within regions 98-108 and 179-190 of RT involved in NNRTI resistance. The high natural polymorphism in the protease region present in our patients was similar to that reported by others. In our study some PI-associated substitutions, thought to be compensatory in protease enzymatic function, could confer intermediate to high PI-resistance. As discrepancies between genotypic and phenotypic results may exist in recent seroconverters, our data suggest that the role of transmitted NRTI- and PI-resistant variants remain to be fully elucidated in vivo.

  10. Comparison between next-generation and Sanger-based sequencing for the detection of transmitted drug-resistance mutations among recently infected HIV-1 patients in Israel, 2000-2014.

    PubMed

    Moscona, Roy; Ram, Daniela; Wax, Marina; Bucris, Efrat; Levy, Itzchak; Mendelson, Ella; Mor, Orna

    2017-08-11

    Transmitted drug-resistance mutations (TDRM) may hamper successful anti-HIV-1 therapy and impact future control of the HIV-1 epidemic. Recently infected, therapy-naïve individuals are best suited for surveillance of such TDRM. In this study, TDRM, detected by next-generation sequencing (NGS) were compared to those identified by Sanger-based population sequencing (SBS) in recently infected HIV-1 patients. Historical samples from 80 recently infected HIV-1 patients, diagnosed between 2000 and 2014, were analysed by MiSeq (NGS) and ABI (SBS). DeepChek-HIV (ABL) was used for interpretation of the results. Most patients were males (80%); Men who have sex with men (MSM) was the major transmission group (58.8%). Overall, TDRM were detected in 31.3% of patients by NGS and 8.8% by SBS, with SBS TDRM restricted to persons infected with subtype B. All SBS-detected TDRM were identified by NGS. The prevalence of TDRM impacting protease inhibitors (PI), nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) was 11.3, 26.2 7.5%, respectively, in NGS analyses and 0, 3.8 and 5%, respectively, in SBS analyses. More patients with NGS and SBS TDRM were identified in 2008-2014 (37.2% or 13.9%, respectively) compared to 2000-2007 (24.3% or 2.7%, respectively), and a significantly greater number of these patients had multiple NGS TDRM. The most abundant, albeit, minor-frequency RT TDRM, were the K65R and D67N, while K103N, M184V and T215S were high-frequency mutations. Minor TDRM did not become a major variant in later samples and did not hinder successful treatment. NGS can replace SBS for mutation detection and allows for the detection of low-frequency TDRM not identified by SBS. Although rates of TDRM in Israel continued to increase from 2000 to 2014, minor TDRM did not become major species. The need for ongoing surveillance of low-frequency TDRM should be revisited in a larger study.

  11. Adherence to Early Antiretroviral Therapy: Results From HPTN 052, a Phase III, Multinational Randomized Trial of ART to Prevent HIV-1 Sexual Transmission in Serodiscordant Couples.

    PubMed

    Safren, Steven A; Mayer, Kenneth H; Ou, San-San; McCauley, Marybeth; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Gamble, Theresa; Hoffman, Irving; Celentano, David; Chen, Ying Qing; Cohen, Myron S

    2015-06-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-1-infected individuals prevents sexual transmission if viral load is suppressed. Participants were HIV-1-infected partners randomized to early ART (CD4 350-550) in HPTN052 (n = 886, median follow-up = 2.1 years), a clinical trial of early ART to prevent sexual transmission of HIV-1 in serodiscordant couples at 13 sites in 9 countries. Adherence was assessed through pill count (dichotomized at <95%) and through self-report items. Predictors of adherence were mental health and general health perceptions, substance use, binge drinking, social support, sexual behaviors, and demographics. Viral suppression was defined as HIV plasma viral load <400 copies per milliliter. Adherence counseling and couples' counseling about safer sex were provided. Logistic and linear regression models using generalized estimating equation for repeated measurements were used. Through pill count, 82% of participants were adherent at 1 month and 83.3% at 1 year. Mental health was the only psychosocial variable associated with adherence [pill count, odds ratios (OR) = 1.05, 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 1.00 to 1.11; self-report parameter estimate, OR = 0.02, 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.04], although regional differences emerged. Pill count (OR = 1.19, 95% CI: 1.10 to 1.30) and self-report (OR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.14 to 1.77) adherence were associated with viral suppression. Although adherence was high among individuals in stable relationships taking ART for prevention, mental health and adherence covaried. Assessing and intervening on mental health in the context of promoting adherence to ART as prevention should be explored. Adherence and couples' counseling, feedback about viral suppression, and/or altruism may also help explain the magnitude of adherence observed.

  12. Adherence to Early Antiretroviral Therapy: Results from HPTN 052, A Phase III, Multinational Randomized Trial of ART to Prevent HIV-1 Sexual Transmission in Serodiscordant Couples

    PubMed Central

    Safren, Steven A.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Ou, San-San; McCauley, Marybeth; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Gamble, Theresa; Hoffman, Irving; Celentano, David; Chen, Ying Qing; Cohen, Myron S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-1 infected individuals prevents sexual transmission if viral load is suppressed. Methods Participants were HIV-1 infected partners randomized to early ART (CD4 350-550) in HPTN052 (n=886, median follow-up = 2.1 years), a clinical trial of early ART to prevent sexual transmission of HIV-1 in serodiscordant couples at 13 sites in 9 countries. Adherence was assessed via pill-count (dichotomized at <95%) and via self-report items. Predictors of adherence were mental health and general health perceptions, substance use, binge drinking, social support, sexual behaviors, and demographics. Viral suppression was defined as HIV plasma viral load <400 copies/ml. Adherence counseling and couples counseling about safer sex was provided. Logistic and linear regression models using generalized estimating equation for repeated measurements were employed. Findings Via pill-count, 82% of participants were adherent at 1 month and 83.3% at 1 year. Mental health was the only psychosocial variable associated with adherence (pill-count OR=1.05: 95% CI: 1.00 – 1.11; self-report parameter estimate (b)=0.02, 95% CI: 0.01 –0.04), though regional differences emerged. Pill-count (OR=1.19, 95% CI: 1.10-1.30) and self-report (OR=1.42, 95% CI: 1.14-1.77) adherence were associated with viral suppression. Interpretation While adherence was high among individuals in stable relationships taking ART for prevention, mental health and adherence co-varied. Assessing and intervening on mental health in the context of promoting adherence to ART as prevention should be explored. Adherence and couples counseling, feedback about viral suppression, and/or altruism may also help explain the magnitude of adherence observed. PMID:26009832

  13. Key-and-keyway coupling for transmitting torque

    DOEpatents

    Blue, S.C.; Curtis, M.T.; Orthwein, W.C.; Stitt, D.H.

    1975-11-18

    The design of an improved key-and-keyway coupling for the transmission of torque is given. The coupling provides significant reductions in stress concentrations in the vicinity of the key and keyway. The keyway is designed with a flat-bottomed u-shaped portion whose inboard end terminates in a ramp which is dished transversely, so that the surface of the ramp as viewed in transverse section defines an outwardly concave arc.

  14. Human immunodeficiency type-1 virus (HIV-1) infection in serodiscordant couples (SDCs) does not have an impact on embryo quality or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) outcome.

    PubMed

    Melo, Marco Antonio Barreto; Meseguer, Marcos; Bellver, José; Remohí, José; Pellicer, Antonio; Garrido, Nicolás

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the embryo quality in our program for human immunodeficiency type-1 virus (HIV-1) serodiscordant couples (SDCs) with the male infected in comparison with a tubal-factor infertility control group. Retrospective case-control study. Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad, Valencia, Spain. Thirty SDC and 79 control couples without HIV-1 infection attending for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Only first cycles were considered. Controlled ovarian hyperstimulation and ICSI in both groups; sperm wash, nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in semen sample, and capacitation by swim-up after thawing the semen sample in the SDC group; and sperm capacitation by swim-up after thawing the semen sample in the control group. ICSI procedure and embryo characteristics (fertilization, cleavage, embryo morphology, and development) and cycle outcome (ongoing pregnancy and miscarriage rates). Fertilization and cleavage rates were similar between the groups. On days 2 and 3 of embryo development, very similar embryo features were found between the groups. There was no difference in mean number of optimal embryos on day 3. When embryos were cultured up to 5-6 days, a significant increase in embryo blockage was found in the SDC group compared with the control group. The mean number of optimal blastocysts on day 6 was comparable in both groups. No difference was found regarding the number of cryopreserved and transferred embryos or implantation, pregnancy, multiple pregnancy, or miscarriage rates between the groups. HIV-1 infection in SDCs with infected males does not appear to have a significantly negative impact on embryo development or ICSI outcome.

  15. Male Sex Workers in Moscow, Russia: A Pilot Study of Demographics, Substance Use Patterns, and Prevalence of HIV-1 and Sexually Transmitted Infections

    PubMed Central

    Baral, Stefan; Kizub, Darya; Masenior, Nicole Franck; Peryskina, Alena; Stachowiak, Julie; Stibich, Mark; Moguilny, Vladimir; Beyrer, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Background To explore demographic characteristics, substance use patters, and estimate the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STI) and high-risk behaviors among male sex workers (MSW) in Moscow and to assess the feasibility of prospective cohort recruitment and retention among this population. Methods Longitudinal study of 50 men with 6 month follow up period. Participants were recruited through venue based and snowball sampling. Results HIV prevalence at baseline was 16% and 1 male seroconverted during the follow up period. 24 % were diagnosed with at least one STI: 12% had syphilis; 8% had HPV;, and 4% had HSV-2. Three (6%) of the study participants had evidence of previous HCV exposure at baseline. Conclusions This was the first study to evaluate baseline demographics, substance use patterns, and prevalence of infectious disease among MSW in Moscow. Identification, and recruitment of this population appears to be feasible, but retention rates were poor with higher retention significantly associated with older men. While the sample size in the current study was small, the results also suggested that this is a population at considerable high risk for HIV. Male sex workers in Moscow may be an important at risk population in the Russian HIV epidemic and further research is urgently required to address their needs and explore prevention strategies. PMID:20390488

  16. High Frequency of Transmitted HIV-1 Gag HLA Class I-Driven Immune Escape Variants but Minimal Immune Selection over the First Year of Clade C Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gounder, Kamini; Padayachi, Nagavelli; Mann, Jaclyn K.; Radebe, Mopo; Mokgoro, Mammekwa; van der Stok, Mary; Mkhize, Lungile; Mncube, Zenele; Jaggernath, Manjeetha; Reddy, Tarylee; Walker, Bruce D.; Ndung’u, Thumbi

    2015-01-01

    In chronic HIV infection, CD8+ T cell responses to Gag are associated with lower viral loads, but longitudinal studies of HLA-restricted CD8+ T cell-driven selection pressure in Gag from the time of acute infection are limited. In this study we examined Gag sequence evolution over the first year of infection in 22 patients identified prior to seroconversion. A total of 310 and 337 full-length Gag sequences from the earliest available samples (median = 14 days after infection [Fiebig stage I/II]) and at one-year post infection respectively were generated. Six of 22 (27%) individuals were infected with multiple variants. There was a trend towards early intra-patient viral sequence diversity correlating with viral load set point (p = 0.07, r = 0.39). At 14 days post infection, 59.7% of Gag CTL epitopes contained non-consensus polymorphisms and over half of these (35.3%) comprised of previously described CTL escape variants. Consensus and variant CTL epitope proportions were equally distributed irrespective of the selecting host HLA allele and most epitopes remained unchanged over 12 months post infection. These data suggest that intrapatient diversity during acute infection is an indicator of disease outcome. In this setting, there is a high rate of transmitted CTL escape variants and limited immune selection in Gag during the first year of infection. These data have relevance for vaccine strategies designed to elicit effective CD8+ T cell immune responses. PMID:25781986

  17. Association between male circumcision and incidence of syphilis in men and women: a prospective study in HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual African couples.

    PubMed

    Pintye, Jillian; Baeten, Jared M; Manhart, Lisa E; Celum, Connie; Ronald, Allan; Mugo, Nelly; Mujugira, Andrew; Cohen, Craig; Were, Edwin; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Kiarie, James; Heffron, Renee

    2014-11-01

    Male circumcision is a primary HIV-1 prevention intervention for men, but whether the procedure reduces the risk of syphilis among men and their female partners is uncertain. We aimed to assess whether male circumcision was associated with incident syphilis in men and in their female partners. In this large prospective cohort study, participants were members of Kenyan and Ugandan HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual couples enrolled in a randomised safety and efficacy clinical trial of pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV-1 prevention (the Partners PrEP Study). Participants attended monthly or quarterly follow-up visits for up to 36 months. Annually, syphilis serology testing was done and male circumcision status was assessed. We used multivariate Andersen-Gill survival methods, adjusted for age, sexual behaviour, and plasma HIV RNA levels of the HIV-infected partner. 4716 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples (38%) with a man with HIV were followed for a median of 2·75 years. At enrolment, 1575 (53%) men with HIV and 560 (32%) men without HIV were circumcised; an additional 69 (4%) men with HIV and 132 (5%) men without HIV were circumcised during study follow-up. 221 incident syphilis infections were reported: 46 (21%) in men with HIV (incidence 1·10 per 100 person-years), 76 (34%) in men without HIV (1·09), 54 (24%) in women with HIV (0·77), and 45 (24%) in women without HIV (1·11). Male circumcision was associated with a 42% reduction in incident syphilis in men (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0·58, 95% CI 0·37-0·91) including a 62% reduction in men with HIV (0·38, 0·18-0·81), and a non-significant reduction in incident syphilis in men without HIV (0·64, 0·36-1·11). In women, circumcision of their male partners was associated with a 59% reduction in incident syphilis (aHR 0·41, 95% CI 0·25-0·69), including a 75% reduction in women without HIV (0·25, 0·08-0·76) and a 48% reduction in women with HIV (0·52, 0·27-0·97). Male circumcision was associated with

  18. Passively transmitted gp41 antibodies in babies born from HIV-1 subtype C-seropositive women: correlation between fine specificity and protection.

    PubMed

    Diomede, L; Nyoka, S; Pastori, C; Scotti, L; Zambon, A; Sherman, G; Gray, C M; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, M; Lopalco, L

    2012-04-01

    HIV-exposed, uninfected (EUN) babies born to HIV-infected mothers are examples of natural resistance to HIV infection. In this study, we evaluated the titer and neutralizing potential of gp41-specific maternal antibodies and their correlation with HIV transmission in HIV-infected mother-child pairs. Specific gp41-binding and -neutralizing antibodies were determined in a cohort of 74 first-time mother-child pairs, of whom 40 mothers were infected with HIV subtype C. Within the infected mother cohort, 16 babies were born infected and 24 were PCR negative and uninfected at birth (i.e., exposed but uninfected). Thirty-four HIV-uninfected and HIV-unexposed mother-child pairs were included as controls. All HIV-positive mothers and their newborns showed high IgG titers to linear epitopes within the HR1 region and to the membrane-proximal (MPER) domain of gp41; most sera also recognized the disulfide loop immunodominant epitope (IDE). Antibody titers to the gp41 epitopes were significantly lower in nontransmitting mothers (P < 0.01) and in the EUN babies (P < 0.005) than in HIV-positive mother-child pairs. Three domains of gp41, HR1, IDE, and MPER, elicited antibodies that were effectively transmitted to EUN babies. Moreover, in EUN babies, epitopes overlapping the 2F5 epitope (ELDKWAS), but not the 4E10 epitope, were neutralization targets in two out of four viruses tested. Our findings highlight important epitopes in gp41 that appear to be associated with exposure without infection and would be important to consider for vaccine design.

  19. Population Pharmacokinetics of Tenofovir in HIV-1-Uninfected Members of Serodiscordant Couples and Effect of Dose Reporting Methods

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yanhui; Goti, Vineet; Haberer, Jessica E.; Fossler, Michael J.; Sale, Mark E.; Bangsberg, David; Baeten, Jared M.; Celum, Connie L.; Hendrix, Craig W.

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with once-daily dosing of tenofovir and tenofovir-emtricitabine was shown to be effective for preventing HIV-1 infection in individuals who had HIV-1-seropositive partners (the Partners PrEP Study). We developed a population pharmacokinetic model for tenofovir and investigated the impacts of different dose reporting methods. Dosing information was collected as patient-reported dosing information (PRDI) from 404 subjects (corresponding to 1,280 drug concentration records) from the main trial and electronic monitoring-based adherence data collected from 211 subjects (corresponding to 327 drug concentration records) in an ancillary adherence study. Model development was conducted with NONMEM (7.2), using PRDI with a steady-state assumption or using PRDI replaced with electronic monitoring records where available. A two-compartment model with first-order absorption was the best model in both modeling approaches, with the need for an absorption lag time when electronic monitoring-based dosing records were included in the analysis. Age, body weight, and creatinine clearance were significant covariates on clearance, but only creatinine clearance was retained in the final models per stepwise selection. Sex was not a significant covariate on clearance. Tenofovir population pharmacokinetic parameter estimates and the precisions of the parameters from the two final models were comparable with the point estimates of the parameters, differing from 0% to 35%, and bootstrap confidence intervals widely overlapped. These findings indicate that PRDI was sufficient for population pharmacokinetic model development in this study, with a high level of adherence per multiple measures. PMID:27353269

  20. The HIV-1 epidemic in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Puren, A J

    2002-01-01

    The first reported cases of HIV-1 infection in South Africa occurred in 1982. Two distinct HIV-1 epidemic patterns were recognized. Initially the infection was prevalent in white males who had sex with males. The HIV-1 clade B was associated with this group. By 1989, the second epidemic was recognized primarily in the black population. Infections in this case were mainly heterosexual in origin. The HIV-1 clade involved was mainly C. The national HIV-1 sero-prevalence in antenatal attendees was less than 1% in 1990 and by 1994 this figure had risen to 7.5%. The most recent antenatal surveillance for HIV-1 sero-prevalence in 1999 revealed the following. The national prevalence rate for 1999 was 22.4% compared with the 1998 rate of 22.8%. The data highlighted the profound effect the epidemic had and will have on the disease burden in South Africa and by extension on the social and economic fronts. This view was emphasised by the impact HIV-1 infection had on tuberculosis. For example, sentinel surveys have attributed 44% of tuberculosis cases to HIV-1 infection. Moreover, the high prevalence of sexually transmitted infections will certainly exacerbate the HIV-1 epidemic.

  1. An Agile Beam Transmit Array Using Coupled Oscillator Phase Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, Ronald S.; Scaramastra, Rocco P.; Huang, John; Beckon, Robert J.; Petree, Steve M.; Chavez, Cosme

    1993-01-01

    A few years ago York and colleagues suggested that injection locking of voltage controlled oscillators could be used to implement beam steering in a phased array [I]. The scheme makes use of the fact that when an oscillator is injection locked to an external signal, the phase difference between the output of the oscillator and the injection signal is governed by the difference between the injection frequency and the free running frequency of the oscillator (the frequency to which the oscillator is tuned). Thus, if voltage controlled oscillators (VCOs) are used, this phase difference is controlled by an applied voltage. Now, if a set of such oscillators are coupled to nearest neighbors, they can be made to mutually injection lock and oscillate as an ensemble. If they are all tuned to the same frequency, they will all oscillate in phase. Thus, if the outputs are connected to radiating elements forming a linear array, the antenna will radiate normal to the line of elements. Scanning is accomplished by antisymmetrically detuning the end oscillators in the array by application of a pair of appropriate voltages to their tuning ports. This results in a linear phase progression across the array which is just the phasing required to scan the beam. The scan angle is determined by the degree of detuning. We have constructed a seven element one dimensional agile beam array at S-band based on the above principle. Although, a few such arrays have been built in the past, this array possesses two unique features. First, the VCO MMICs have buffer amplifiers which isolate the output from the tuning circuit, and second, the oscillators are weakly coupled to each other at their resonant circuits rather than their outputs. This results in a convenient isolation between the oscillator array design and the radiating aperture design. An important parameter in the design is the so called coupling phase which determines the phase shift of the signals passing from one oscillator to its

  2. Analytical Model and Optimized Design of Power Transmitting Coil for Inductively Coupled Endoscope Robot.

    PubMed

    Ke, Quan; Luo, Weijie; Yan, Guozheng; Yang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    A wireless power transfer system based on the weakly inductive coupling makes it possible to provide the endoscope microrobot (EMR) with infinite power. To facilitate the patients' inspection with the EMR system, the diameter of the transmitting coil is enlarged to 69 cm. Due to the large transmitting range, a high quality factor of the Litz-wire transmitting coil is a necessity to ensure the intensity of magnetic field generated efficiently. Thus, this paper builds an analytical model of the transmitting coil, and then, optimizes the parameters of the coil by enlarging the quality factor. The lumped model of the transmitting coil includes three parameters: ac resistance, self-inductance, and stray capacitance. Based on the exact two-dimension solution, the accurate analytical expression of ac resistance is derived. Several transmitting coils of different specifications are utilized to verify this analytical expression, being in good agreements with the measured results except the coils with a large number of strands. Then, the quality factor of transmitting coils can be well predicted with the available analytical expressions of self- inductance and stray capacitance. Owing to the exact estimation of quality factor, the appropriate coil turns of the transmitting coil is set to 18-40 within the restrictions of transmitting circuit and human tissue issues. To supply enough energy for the next generation of the EMR equipped with a Ø9.5×10.1 mm receiving coil, the coil turns of the transmitting coil is optimally set to 28, which can transfer a maximum power of 750 mW with the remarkable delivering efficiency of 3.55%.

  3. Breast milk transmission of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Nduati, R; John, G

    1995-12-01

    Breast milk provides infants and children immunologic, nutritional, and child spacing benefits. Yet it also transmits some viruses, for example, HIV-1. The World Health Organization recommends that, in conditions with poor access to breast milk substitutes, HIV-positive women should still breast feed due to the nutritional and infectious risk of artificial feeding. It appears that breast fed infants experience a slower progression of AIDS and death. Vertical transmission of HIV-1 may occur during pregnancy, at delivery, or through breast milk. The HIV-1 transmission rate via breast milk from acutely infected women is estimated to be 29-36%. A meta-analysis of case reports and small case series of women with chronic HIV-1 infection indicated a breast feeding transmission rate of 14%. Studies suggest that the likelihood of HIV-1 transmission via breast milk increases as duration of breast feeding increases. Infants with detectable HIV-1 DNA tend to have mothers whose absolute CD4 counts are less than 400 and have severe vitamin A deficiency. Breast milk has HIV-1 specific immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, and IgM). It appears that HIV-1 elicits a local immune response. Breast milk of HIV-1 positive mothers with non-infected children tends to still have IgM and IgA until 18 months. Potential risk factors for breast milk transmission of HIV-1 include cracked nipples and mastitis in the mother; oral thrush, malnutrition, inflammation of the lips, and mucosal compromise in the infant; and vigorous suction of the neonate and use of the wrong equipment for suctioning. Inhibiting factors of HIV-1 in breast milk are bovine and human lactoferrin and a membrane associated protein that attaches to the CD4 receptor and thus prevents attachment of the HIV antigen gp120 to the CD4 receptor on T-cells.

  4. Studies of the Characteristics of a Densely-Coupled Array of Underwater Acoustic Transmitting Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhengyao; Ma, Yuanliang

    2010-09-01

    The characteristics of a densely-coupled array of underwater acoustic transmitting transducers are studied. At first, the electro-acoustic characteristics such as the admittance, the resonant frequency and the transmitting voltage response, of a low frequency barrel-stave flextensional transducer and a densely-coupled compact array composed of three identical transducers uniformly distributed on a circle with spacing much less than half wavelength, are measured by experiments. Then, the radiation impedances of a single transducer and of transducers in the compact array are calculated by the boundary element model together with the finite element model. Based on the above results, the transducer's equivalent circuit model parameters are calculated in different cases, which include a single transducer in air and in water, and a densely-coupled array of three transducers parallel connected in water. The characteristics of the transducers and array are analyzed by the equivalent circuit model that was obtained. The research results show that when the transducers make up a densely-coupled compact array, the resonant frequency decreases and the transmitting bandwidth broadens. It is also shown that the mutual interactions among elements are significant for the compact array. The mutual radiation resistance between two transducers is close to the self-radiation resistance of the transducers. The vibration velocities of the transducers in the compact array are nearly 1/3 as those of a single transducer, and the radiation acoustic power and transmitting voltage response of the array are nearly the same as those of a single transducer, when the driving voltages of the array and single transducer are unchanged. Furthermore, the transmitting source level of the 3-element compact array is 8.9dB higher than that of the single transducer if the vibration velocities of the transducers in the array are the same as those of the single transducer. The proposed technique can be used

  5. Development of an X-Band Coupled-Oscillator Transmit/Receive Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, J.; Pogorzelski, R.

    2007-08-01

    The development of an 8.4 GHz (X-band) coupled-oscillator phased array employing full-duplex transmit and receive capability is described. Attractive features of phased arrays for deep-space communication include enabling high-data-rate communication and providing low-mass electronic beam steering. The coupled-oscillator phased-array concept seeks to reduce the cost and power consumption incurred in a conventional phased array by simplifying the beam-steering mechanism of the array. In this article, the overall system-level architecture of a full-duplex transmit and receive coupled-oscillator array is described, and the progress made in designing various specific components of a linear 1 x 7 coupled-oscillator array is also detailed.

  6. Comparison of Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk between Two HIV-1 Serodiscordant Couple Cohorts: The CHAVI 002 Study

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Adam J.; Kuldanek, Kristin; Moodie, Zoe; Wang, Z. Maggie; Fox, Julie; Nsubuga, Rebecca N.; Legg, Kenneth; Birabwa, Esther F.; Kaleebu, Pontiano; McMichael, Andrew J.; Watera, Christine; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Fidler, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Background The CHAVI002 study was designed to characterize immune responses, particularly HIV-specific T-cell responses, amongst 2 cohorts of HIV-exposed seronegative (HESN) individuals. The absence of a clear definition of HESNs has impaired comparison of research within and between such cohorts. This report describes two distinct HESN cohorts and attempts to quantify HIV exposure using a ‘HIV risk index’ (RI) model. Methods HIV serodiscordant couples (UK; 24, Uganda; 72) and HIV unexposed seronegative (HUSN) controls (UK; 14, Uganda; 26 couples, 3 individuals) completed sexual behavior questionnaires every 3 months over a 9 month period. The two cohorts were heterogeneous, with most HESNs in the UK men who have sex with men (MSM), while all HESNs in Uganda were in heterosexual relationships. Concordance of responses between partners was determined. Each participant’s sexual behavior score (SBS) was estimated based on the number and type of unprotected sex acts carried out in defined time periods. Independent HIV acquisition risk factors (partner plasma viral load, STIs, male circumcision, pregnancy) were integrated with the SBS, generating a RI for each HESN. Results 96 HIV serodiscordant couples completed 929 SBQs. SBSs remained relatively stable amongst the UK cohort, whilst decreasing from Visit 1 to 2 in the Ugandan cohort. Compared to the Ugandan cohort, SBSs and RIs in the UK cohort were lower at visit 1, and generally higher at later visits. Differences between the cohorts, with lower rates of ART use in Uganda and higher risk per-act sex in the UK, had major impacts on the SBSs and RIs of each cohort. There was one HIV transmission event in the UK cohort. Conclusions Employment of a risk quantification model facilitated quantification and comparison of HIV acquisition risk across two disparate HIV serodiscordant couple cohorts. PMID:22629447

  7. Comparison of sexual behavior and HIV risk between two HIV-1 serodiscordant couple cohorts: the CHAVI 002 study.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Adam J; Kuldanek, Kristin; Moodie, Zoe; Wang, Z Maggie; Fox, Julie; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Legg, Kenneth; Birabwa, Esther F; Kaleebu, Pontiano; McMichael, Andrew J; Watera, Christine; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Fidler, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The CHAVI002 study was designed to characterize immune responses, particularly HIV-specific T-cell responses, amongst 2 cohorts of HIV-exposed seronegative (HESN) individuals. The absence of a clear definition of HESNs has impaired comparison of research within and between such cohorts. This report describes two distinct HESN cohorts and attempts to quantify HIV exposure using a 'HIV risk index' (RI) model. HIV serodiscordant couples (UK; 24, Uganda; 72) and HIV unexposed seronegative (HUSN) controls (UK; 14, Uganda; 26 couples, 3 individuals) completed sexual behavior questionnaires every 3 months over a 9 month period. The two cohorts were heterogeneous, with most HESNs in the UK men who have sex with men (MSM), while all HESNs in Uganda were in heterosexual relationships. Concordance of responses between partners was determined. Each participant's sexual behavior score (SBS) was estimated based on the number and type of unprotected sex acts carried out in defined time periods. Independent HIV acquisition risk factors (partner plasma viral load, STIs, male circumcision, pregnancy) were integrated with the SBS, generating a RI for each HESN. 96 HIV serodiscordant couples completed 929 SBQs. SBSs remained relatively stable amongst the UK cohort, whilst decreasing from Visit 1 to 2 in the Ugandan cohort. Compared to the Ugandan cohort, SBSs and RIs in the UK cohort were lower at visit 1, and generally higher at later visits. Differences between the cohorts, with lower rates of ART use in Uganda and higher risk per-act sex in the UK, had major impacts on the SBSs and RIs of each cohort. There was one HIV transmission event in the UK cohort. Employment of a risk quantification model facilitated quantification and comparison of HIV acquisition risk across two disparate HIV serodiscordant couple cohorts.

  8. Viral Determinants of HIV-1 Macrophage Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Christopher J. A.; Sattentau, Quentin J.

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages are important target cells for HIV-1 infection that play significant roles in the maintenance of viral reservoirs and other aspects of pathogenesis. Understanding the determinants of HIV-1 tropism for macrophages will inform HIV-1 control and eradication strategies. Tropism for macrophages is both qualitative (infection or not) and quantitative (replication capacity). For example many R5 HIV-1 isolates cannot infect macrophages, but for those that can the macrophage replication capacity can vary by up to 1000-fold. Some X4 viruses are also capable of replication in macrophages, indicating that cellular tropism is partially independent of co-receptor preference. Preliminary data obtained with a small number of transmitted/founder viruses indicate inefficient macrophage infection, whereas isolates from later in disease are more frequently tropic for macrophages. Thus tropism may evolve over time, and more macrophage tropic viruses may be implicated in the pathogenesis of advanced HIV-1 infection. Compartmentalization of macrophage-tropic brain-derived envelope glycoproteins (Envs), and non-macrophage tropic non-neural tissue-derived Envs points to adaptation of HIV-1 quasi-species in distinct tissue microenvironments. Mutations within and adjacent to the Env-CD4 binding site have been identified that determine macrophage tropism at the entry level, but post-entry molecular determinants of macrophage replication capacity involving HIV-1 accessory proteins need further definition. PMID:22163344

  9. Women's barriers to HIV-1 testing and disclosure: challenges for HIV-1 voluntary counselling and testing.

    PubMed

    Maman, S; Mbwambo, J; Hogan, N M; Kilonzo, G P; Sweat, M

    2001-10-01

    In view of the ever-increasing HIV/AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa, the expansion of HIV-1 voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) as an integral part of prevention strategies and medical research is both a reality and an urgent need. As the availability of HIV-1 VCT grows two limitations need to be addressed, namely: low rates of HIV-1 serostatus disclosure to sexual partners and negative outcomes of serostatus disclosure. Results from a study among men, women and couples at an HIV-1 VCT clinic in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania are presented. The individual, relational and environmental factors that influence the decision to test for HIV-1 and to share test results with partners are described. The most salient barriers to HIV-1 testing and serostatus disclosure described by women include fear of partners' reaction, decision-making and communication patterns between partners, and partners' attitudes towards HIV-1 testing. Perception of personal risk for HIV-1 is the major factor driving women to overcome barriers to HIV-1 testing. The implications of findings for the promotion of HIV-1 VCT programmes, the implementation of partner notification policies and the development of post-test support services are discussed.

  10. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein

    DOEpatents

    Caulfield, Michael; Cupo, Albert; Dean, Hansi; Hoffenberg, Simon; King, C. Richter; Klasse, P. J.; Marozsan, Andre; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ward, Andrew; Wilson, Ian; Julien, Jean-Philippe

    2017-08-22

    The present application relates to novel HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, which may be utilized as HIV-1 vaccine immunogens, and antigens for crystallization, electron microscopy and other biophysical, biochemical and immunological studies for the identification of broad neutralizing antibodies. The present invention encompasses the preparation and purification of immunogenic compositions, which are formulated into the vaccines of the present invention.

  11. Psychoneuroimmunology and HIV-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antoni, Michael H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents evidence describing benefits of behavioral interventions such as aerobic exercise training on both psychological and immunological functioning among high risk human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) seronegative and very early stage seropositive homosexual men. HIV-1 infection is cast as chronic disease for which early…

  12. Semen Bacterial Concentrations and HIV-1 RNA Shedding Among HIV-1–Seropositive Kenyan Men

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Huang, Dandi; Ko, Daisy L.; Sanders, Eduard J.; Peshu, Norbert M.; Krieger, John N.; Muller, Charles H.; Coombs, Robert W.; Fredricks, David N.; Graham, Susan M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: HIV-1 is transmitted through semen from men to their sexual partners. Genital infections can increase HIV-1 RNA shedding in semen, but shedding also occurs in the absence of typical pathogens. We hypothesized that higher bacterial concentrations in semen would be associated with higher HIV-1 RNA levels. Methods: We analyzed semen samples from 42 HIV-1–seropositive Kenyan men using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to assess bacterial concentrations and real-time PCR to measure HIV-1 RNA levels. Generalized estimation equations were used to evaluate associations between these 2 measures. Broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR with pyrosequencing was performed on a subset of 13 samples to assess bacterial community composition. Results: Bacteria were detected in 96.6% of 88 samples by quantitative PCR. Semen bacterial concentration and HIV-1 RNA levels were correlated 0.30 (P = 0.01). The association between bacterial concentration and HIV-1 RNA detection was not significant after adjustment for antiretroviral therapy (ART) (adjusted odds ratio: 1.27, 95% CI: 0.84 to 1.91). Factors associated with semen bacterial concentration included insertive anal sex (adjusted beta 0.92, 95% CI: 0.12 to 1.73) and ART use (adjusted beta: −0.77, 95% CI: −1.50 to 0.04). Among 13 samples with pyrosequencing data, Corynebacterium spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp. were most frequently detected. Conclusion: Most of these HIV-1–infected men had bacteria in their semen. ART use was associated with undetectable semen HIV-1 RNA and lower semen bacterial concentrations, whereas insertive anal sex was associated with higher bacterial concentrations. Additional studies evaluating the relationship between semen bacteria, inflammation, mucosal immunity, and HIV-1 shedding are needed to understand implications for HIV-1 transmission. PMID:27861240

  13. Effect of the HIV-1 fusion peptide on the mechanical properties and leaflet coupling of lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchelokovskyy, P.; Tristram-Nagle, S.; Dimova, R.

    2011-02-01

    The fusion peptide (FP) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is part of the N-terminus of the viral envelope glycoprotein gp41 and is believed to play an important role in the viral entry process. To understand the immediate effect of this peptide on the cell membrane, we have studied the influence of the synthetic FP sequence FP23 on the mechanical properties of model lipid bilayers. For this purpose, giant unilamellar vesicles were prepared from the unsaturated lipid dioleoylphosphatidylcholine mixed in various molar ratios with FP23. The bending stiffness of the vesicles was measured with two different methods: fluctuation analysis and aspiration with micropipettes. The data obtained from both of these approaches show that the bending stiffness of the membrane decreases gradually with increasing concentration of the FP23 in the bilayer. Low concentrations of only a few mol% FP23 are sufficient to decrease the bending stiffness of the lipid bilayer by about a factor of 2. Finally, data obtained for the stretching elasticity modulus of the membrane suggest that the peptide insertion decreases the coupling between the two leaflets of the bilayer.

  14. Effect of the HIV-1 fusion peptide on the mechanical properties and leaflet coupling of lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Shchelokovskyy, P; Tristram-Nagle, S; Dimova, R

    2013-01-01

    The fusion peptide (FP) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is part of the N-terminus of the viral envelope glycoprotein gp41 and is believed to play an important role in the viral entry process. To understand the immediate effect of this peptide on the cell membrane, we have studied the influence of the synthetic FP sequence FP23 on the mechanical properties of model lipid bilayers. For this purpose, giant unilamellar vesicles were prepared from the unsaturated lipid dioleoylphosphatidylcholine mixed in various molar ratios with FP23. The bending stiffness of the vesicles was measured with two different methods: fluctuation analysis and aspiration with micropipettes. The data obtained from both of these approaches show that the bending stiffness of the membrane decreases gradually with increasing concentration of the FP23 in the bilayer. Low concentrations of only a few mol% FP23 are sufficient to decrease the bending stiffness of the lipid bilayer by about a factor of 2. Finally, data obtained for the stretching elasticity modulus of the membrane suggest that the peptide insertion decreases the coupling between the two leaflets of the bilayer. PMID:23505334

  15. Diversification in the HIV-1 Envelope Hyper-variable Domains V2, V4, and V5 and Higher Probability of Transmitted/Founder Envelope Glycosylation Favor the Development of Heterologous Neutralization Breadth

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S. Abigail; Burton, Samantha L.; Kilembe, William; Lakhi, Shabir; Karita, Etienne; Allen, Susan; Hunter, Eric; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    A recent study of plasma neutralization breadth in HIV-1 infected individuals at nine International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) sites reported that viral load, HLA-A*03 genotype, and subtype C infection were strongly associated with the development of neutralization breadth. Here, we refine the findings of that study by analyzing the impact of the transmitted/founder (T/F) envelope (Env), early Env diversification, and autologous neutralization on the development of plasma neutralization breadth in 21 participants identified during recent infection at two of those sites: Kigali, Rwanda (n = 9) and Lusaka, Zambia (n = 12). Single-genome analysis of full-length T/F Env sequences revealed that all 21 individuals were infected with a highly homogeneous population of viral variants, which were categorized as subtype C (n = 12), A1 (n = 7), or recombinant AC (n = 2). An extensive amino acid sequence-based analysis of variable loop lengths and glycosylation patterns in the T/F Envs revealed that a lower ratio of NXS to NXT-encoded glycan motifs correlated with neutralization breadth. Further analysis comparing amino acid sequence changes, insertions/deletions, and glycan motif alterations between the T/F Env and autologous early Env variants revealed that extensive diversification focused in the V2, V4, and V5 regions of gp120, accompanied by contemporaneous viral escape, significantly favored the development of breadth. These results suggest that more efficient glycosylation of subtype A and C T/F Envs through fewer NXS-encoded glycan sites is more likely to elicit antibodies that can transition from autologous to heterologous neutralizing activity following exposure to gp120 diversification. This initiates an Env-antibody co-evolution cycle that increases neutralization breadth, and is further augmented over time by additional viral and host factors. These findings suggest that understanding how variation in the efficiency of site-specific glycosylation influences

  16. Diversification in the HIV-1 Envelope Hyper-variable Domains V2, V4, and V5 and Higher Probability of Transmitted/Founder Envelope Glycosylation Favor the Development of Heterologous Neutralization Breadth.

    PubMed

    Smith, S Abigail; Burton, Samantha L; Kilembe, William; Lakhi, Shabir; Karita, Etienne; Price, Matt; Allen, Susan; Hunter, Eric; Derdeyn, Cynthia A

    2016-11-01

    A recent study of plasma neutralization breadth in HIV-1 infected individuals at nine International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) sites reported that viral load, HLA-A*03 genotype, and subtype C infection were strongly associated with the development of neutralization breadth. Here, we refine the findings of that study by analyzing the impact of the transmitted/founder (T/F) envelope (Env), early Env diversification, and autologous neutralization on the development of plasma neutralization breadth in 21 participants identified during recent infection at two of those sites: Kigali, Rwanda (n = 9) and Lusaka, Zambia (n = 12). Single-genome analysis of full-length T/F Env sequences revealed that all 21 individuals were infected with a highly homogeneous population of viral variants, which were categorized as subtype C (n = 12), A1 (n = 7), or recombinant AC (n = 2). An extensive amino acid sequence-based analysis of variable loop lengths and glycosylation patterns in the T/F Envs revealed that a lower ratio of NXS to NXT-encoded glycan motifs correlated with neutralization breadth. Further analysis comparing amino acid sequence changes, insertions/deletions, and glycan motif alterations between the T/F Env and autologous early Env variants revealed that extensive diversification focused in the V2, V4, and V5 regions of gp120, accompanied by contemporaneous viral escape, significantly favored the development of breadth. These results suggest that more efficient glycosylation of subtype A and C T/F Envs through fewer NXS-encoded glycan sites is more likely to elicit antibodies that can transition from autologous to heterologous neutralizing activity following exposure to gp120 diversification. This initiates an Env-antibody co-evolution cycle that increases neutralization breadth, and is further augmented over time by additional viral and host factors. These findings suggest that understanding how variation in the efficiency of site-specific glycosylation influences

  17. Phospholipase D1 Couples CD4+ T Cell Activation to c-Myc-Dependent Deoxyribonucleotide Pool Expansion and HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Harry E.; Simmons, Glenn E.; Mathews, Thomas P.; Khatua, Atanu K.; Popik, Waldemar; Lindsley, Craig W.; D’Aquila, Richard T.; Brown, H. Alex

    2015-01-01

    Quiescent CD4+ T cells restrict human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection at early steps of virus replication. Low levels of both deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) and the biosynthetic enzymes required for their de novo synthesis provide one barrier to infection. CD4+ T cell activation induces metabolic reprogramming that reverses this block and facilitates HIV-1 replication. Here, we show that phospholipase D1 (PLD1) links T cell activation signals to increased HIV-1 permissivity by triggering a c-Myc-dependent transcriptional program that coordinates glucose uptake and nucleotide biosynthesis. Decreasing PLD1 activity pharmacologically or by RNA interference diminished c-Myc-dependent expression during T cell activation at the RNA and protein levels. PLD1 inhibition of HIV-1 infection was partially rescued by adding exogenous deoxyribonucleosides that bypass the need for de novo dNTP synthesis. Moreover, the data indicate that low dNTP levels that impact HIV-1 restriction involve decreased synthesis, and not only increased catabolism of these nucleotides. These findings uncover a unique mechanism of action for PLD1 inhibitors and support their further development as part of a therapeutic combination for HIV-1 and other viral infections dependent on host nucleotide biosynthesis. PMID:26020637

  18. Acyclovir and Transmission of HIV-1 from Persons Infected with HIV-1 and HSV-2

    PubMed Central

    Celum, Connie; Wald, Anna; Lingappa, Jairam R.; Magaret, Amalia S.; Wang, Richard S.; Mugo, Nelly; Mujugira, Andrew; Baeten, Jared M.; Mullins, James I.; Hughes, James P.; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; Cohen, Craig R.; Katabira, Elly; Ronald, Allan; Kiarie, James; Farquhar, Carey; Stewart, Grace John; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Myron; Were, Edwin; Fife, Kenneth H.; de Bruyn, Guy; Gray, Glenda E.; McIntyre, James A.; Manongi, Rachel; Kapiga, Saidi; Coetzee, David; Allen, Susan; Inambao, Mubiana; Kayitenkore, Kayitesi; Karita, Etienne; Kanweka, William; Delany, Sinead; Rees, Helen; Vwalika, Bellington; Stevens, Wendy; Campbell, Mary S.; Thomas, Katherine K.; Coombs, Robert W.; Morrow, Rhoda; Whittington, William L.H.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Barnes, Linda; Ridzon, Renee; Corey, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Most persons who are infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are also infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), which is frequently reactivated and is associated with increased plasma and genital levels of HIV-1. Therapy to suppress HSV-2 reduces the frequency of reactivation of HSV-2 as well as HIV-1 levels, suggesting that suppression of HSV-2 may reduce the risk of transmission of HIV-1. METHODS We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of suppressive therapy for HSV-2 (acyclovir at a dose of 400 mg orally twice daily) in couples in which only one of the partners was seropositive for HIV-1 (CD4 count, ≥250 cells per cubic millimeter) and that partner was also infected with HSV-2 and was not taking antiretroviral therapy at the time of enrollment. The primary end point was transmission of HIV-1 to the partner who was not initially infected with HIV-1; linkage of transmissions was assessed by means of genetic sequencing of viruses. RESULTS A total of 3408 couples were enrolled at 14 sites in Africa. Of the partners who were infected with HIV-1, 68% were women, and the baseline median CD4 count was 462 cells per cubic millimeter. Of 132 HIV-1 seroconversions that occurred after randomization (an incidence of 2.7 per 100 person-years), 84 were linked within couples by viral sequencing: 41 in the acyclovir group and 43 in the placebo group (hazard ratio with acyclovir, 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60 to 1.41; P = 0.69). Suppression with acyclovir reduced the mean plasma concentration of HIV-1 by 0.25 log10 copies per milliliter (95% CI, 0.22 to 0.29; P<0.001) and the occurrence of HSV-2–positive genital ulcers by 73% (risk ratio, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.36; P<0.001). A total of 92% of the partners infected with HIV-1 and 84% of the partners not infected with HIV-1 remained in the study for 24 months. The level of adherence to the dispensed study drug was 96%. No serious adverse events related to acyclovir

  19. Acyclovir and transmission of HIV-1 from persons infected with HIV-1 and HSV-2.

    PubMed

    Celum, C; Wald, A; Lingappa, J R; Magaret, A S; Wang, R S; Mugo, N; Mujugira, A; Baeten, J M; Mullins, J I; Hughes, J P; Bukusi, E A; Cohen, C R; Katabira, E; Ronald, A; Kiarie, J; Farquhar, C; Stewart, G J; Makhema, J; Essex, M; Were, E; Fife, K H; de Bruyn, G; Gray, G E; McIntyre, J A; Manongi, R; Kapiga, S; Coetzee, D; Allen, S; Inambao, M; Kayitenkore, K; Karita, E; Kanweka, W; Delany, S; Rees, H; Vwalika, B; Stevens, W; Campbell, M S; Thomas, K K; Coombs, R W; Morrow, R; Whittington, W L H; McElrath, M J; Barnes, L; Ridzon, R; Corey, L

    2010-02-04

    Most persons who are infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are also infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), which is frequently reactivated and is associated with increased plasma and genital levels of HIV-1. Therapy to suppress HSV-2 reduces the frequency of reactivation of HSV-2 as well as HIV-1 levels, suggesting that suppression of HSV-2 may reduce the risk of transmission of HIV-1. We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of suppressive therapy for HSV-2 (acyclovir at a dose of 400 mg orally twice daily) in couples in which only one of the partners was seropositive for HIV-1 (CD4 count, > or = 250 cells per cubic millimeter) and that partner was also infected with HSV-2 and was not taking antiretroviral therapy at the time of enrollment. The primary end point was transmission of HIV-1 to the partner who was not initially infected with HIV-1; linkage of transmissions was assessed by means of genetic sequencing of viruses. A total of 3408 couples were enrolled at 14 sites in Africa. Of the partners who were infected with HIV-1, 68% were women, and the baseline median CD4 count was 462 cells per cubic millimeter. Of 132 HIV-1 seroconversions that occurred after randomization (an incidence of 2.7 per 100 person-years), 84 were linked within couples by viral sequencing: 41 in the acyclovir group and 43 in the placebo group (hazard ratio with acyclovir, 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60 to 1.41; P=0.69). Suppression with acyclovir reduced the mean plasma concentration of HIV-1 by 0.25 log(10) copies per milliliter (95% CI, 0.22 to 0.29; P<0.001) and the occurrence of HSV-2-positive genital ulcers by 73% (risk ratio, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.36; P<0.001). A total of 92% of the partners infected with HIV-1 and 84% of the partners not infected with HIV-1 remained in the study for 24 months. The level of adherence to the dispensed study drug was 96%. No serious adverse events related to acyclovir were observed. Daily

  20. Spectrum bias and loss of statistical power in discordant couple studies of sexually transmitted infections.

    PubMed

    Tuite, Ashleigh R; Fisman, David N

    2011-01-01

    Discordant couple studies are frequently used to evaluate preventive interventions for sexually transmitted infections (STI). This study design may be vulnerable to spectrum bias when transmission risk is heterogeneous. We used Markov models to assess the effect of heterogeneous transmission risk on the ability to detect effective interventions using a discordant couple study design. We also evaluated the implications that such bias may have for statistical power. Models incorporated potential health states in a population of initially infection-discordant couples, according to infection status with a hypothetical STI and participation in a hypothetical clinical research study. We evaluated the effect of length of discordant relationship at time of study enrollment, the shape of distribution describing transmission risk among couples, and the effect of sex-specific differential transmission probabilities, on model outcomes. The results demonstrate that discordant couple studies are prone to spectrum bias, the degree of which is affected by the shape of the underlying transmission probability density function. Such bias could lead to unexpected study findings, including gender-specific vaccine effects, and loss of statistical power, making this an important and underrecognized consideration in the design and interpretation of discordant couple studies.

  1. Sensitive HIV-1 detection in a homogeneous solution based on an electrochemical molecular beacon coupled with a nafion-graphene composite film modified screen-printed carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Li, Zhengliang; Situ, Bo; Dai, Zong; Liu, Qinlan; Wang, Qian; Gu, Dayong; Zheng, Lei

    2014-02-15

    A novel electrochemical sensing assay for sensitive determination of HIV-1 in a homogeneous solution has been developed using an electrochemical molecular beacon combined with a nafion-graphene composite film modified screen-printed carbon electrode (nafion-graphene/SPCE). The electrochemical molecular beacon (CAs-MB), comprising a special recognition sequence for the conserved region of the HIV-1 gag gene and a pair of carminic acid molecules as a marker, can indicate the presence of the HIV-1 target by its on/off electrochemical signal behavior. It is suitable for direct, electrochemical determination of HIV-1, thereby simplifying the detection procedure and improving the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. To further improve the sensitivity, the nafion-graphene/SPCE was used to monitor changes in the CAs-MB, which has notable advantages, such as being ultrasensitive, inexpensive, and disposable. Under optimized conditions, the peak currents showed a linear relationship with the logarithm of target oligonucleotide concentrations ranging from 40 nM to 2.56 μM, with a detection limit of 5 nM (S/N=3). This sensing assay also displays a good stability, with a recovery of 88-106.8% and RSD<7% (n=5) in real serum samples. This work may lead to the development of an effective method for early point-of-care diagnosis of HIV-1 infection. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Design optimization of transmitting antennas for weakly coupled magnetic induction communication systems

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This work focuses on the design of transmitting coils in weakly coupled magnetic induction communication systems. We propose several optimization methods that reduce the active, reactive and apparent power consumption of the coil. These problems are formulated as minimization problems, in which the power consumed by the transmitting coil is minimized, under the constraint of providing a required magnetic field at the receiver location. We develop efficient numeric and analytic methods to solve the resulting problems, which are of high dimension, and in certain cases non-convex. For the objective of minimal reactive power an analytic solution for the optimal current distribution in flat disc transmitting coils is provided. This problem is extended to general three-dimensional coils, for which we develop an expression for the optimal current distribution. Considering the objective of minimal apparent power, a method is developed to reduce the computational complexity of the problem by transforming it to an equivalent problem of lower dimension, allowing a quick and accurate numeric solution. These results are verified experimentally by testing a number of coil geometries. The results obtained allow reduced power consumption and increased performances in magnetic induction communication systems. Specifically, for wideband systems, an optimal design of the transmitter coil reduces the peak instantaneous power provided by the transmitter circuitry, and thus reduces its size, complexity and cost. PMID:28192463

  3. HIV-1 vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H

    2014-01-01

    The development of a safe and effective preventive HIV-1 vaccine remains a public health priority. Despite scientific difficulties and disappointing results, HIV-1 vaccine clinical development has, for the first time, established proof-of-concept efficacy against HIV-1 acquisition and identified vaccine-associated immune correlates of risk. The correlate of risk analysis showed that IgG antibodies against the gp120 V2 loop correlated with decreased risk of HIV infection, while Env-specific IgA directly correlated with increased risk. The development of vaccine strategies such as improved envelope proteins formulated with potent adjuvants and DNA and vectors expressing mosaics, or conserved sequences, capable of eliciting greater breadth and depth of potentially relevant immune responses including neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ cell-mediated immune responses, mucosal immune responses, and immunological memory, is now proceeding quickly. Additional human efficacy trials combined with other prevention modalities along with sustained funding and international collaboration remain key to bring an HIV-1 vaccine to licensure. PMID:24637946

  4. Viral linkage in HIV-1 seroconverters and their partners in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Mary S; Mullins, James I; Hughes, James P; Celum, Connie; Wong, Kim G; Raugi, Dana N; Sorensen, Stefanie; Stoddard, Julia N; Zhao, Hong; Deng, Wenjie; Kahle, Erin; Panteleeff, Dana; Baeten, Jared M; McCutchan, Francine E; Albert, Jan; Leitner, Thomas; Wald, Anna; Corey, Lawrence; Lingappa, Jairam R

    2011-03-02

    Characterization of viruses in HIV-1 transmission pairs will help identify biological determinants of infectiousness and evaluate candidate interventions to reduce transmission. Although HIV-1 sequencing is frequently used to substantiate linkage between newly HIV-1 infected individuals and their sexual partners in epidemiologic and forensic studies, viral sequencing is seldom applied in HIV-1 prevention trials. The Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00194519) was a prospective randomized placebo-controlled trial that enrolled serodiscordant heterosexual couples to determine the efficacy of genital herpes suppression in reducing HIV-1 transmission; as part of the study analysis, HIV-1 sequences were examined for genetic linkage between seroconverters and their enrolled partners. We obtained partial consensus HIV-1 env and gag sequences from blood plasma for 151 transmission pairs and performed deep sequencing of env in some cases. We analyzed sequences with phylogenetic techniques and developed a Bayesian algorithm to evaluate the probability of linkage. For linkage, we required monophyletic clustering between enrolled partners' sequences and a Bayesian posterior probability of ≥ 50%. Adjudicators classified each seroconversion, finding 108 (71.5%) linked, 40 (26.5%) unlinked, and 3 (2.0%) indeterminate transmissions, with linkage determined by consensus env sequencing in 91 (84%). Male seroconverters had a higher frequency of unlinked transmissions than female seroconverters. The likelihood of transmission from the enrolled partner was related to time on study, with increasing numbers of unlinked transmissions occurring after longer observation periods. Finally, baseline viral load was found to be significantly higher among linked transmitters. In this first use of HIV-1 sequencing to establish endpoints in a large clinical trial, more than one-fourth of transmissions were unlinked to the enrolled partner, illustrating the

  5. HIV-1 variants in South and South-East Asia.

    PubMed

    Tsuchie, H; Saraswathy, T S; Sinniah, M; Vijayamalar, B; Maniar, J K; Monzon, O T; Santana, R T; Paladin, F J; Wasi, C; Thongcharoen, P

    1995-01-01

    HIV spread in South and South-East Asia is most alarming, and genetic variability of HIV-1 is an important consideration in vaccine development. In this study, we examined the third variable (V3) region of env gene of HIV-1 variants prevalent in Thailand, Malaysia, India, and the Philippines. By phylogenetic tree analyses, an HIV-1 variant from an injecting drug user (IDU) in Thailand belonged to subtype B, and HIV-1 variants from 2 IDUs in Malaysia were classified into 2 subtypes, B and E. One HIV-1 variant from a male homosexual in the Philippines belonged to subtype B. Out of 8 HIV-1 variants from sexually transmitted disease patients in India, 7 belonged to subtype C, and one to subtype A. Although the total number of individuals examined in this study was limited, 4 HIV-1 subtypes were found in South and South-East Asia and large international movements of HIV-1-infected individuals in this region could induce global dissemination of these HIV-1 variants.

  6. HIV-1 LTR subtype and perinatal transmission.

    PubMed

    Blackard, J T; Renjifo, B; Fawzi, W; Hertzmark, E; Msamanga, G; Mwakagile, D; Hunter, D; Spiegelman, D; Sharghi, N; Kagoma, C; Essex, M

    2001-09-01

    Multiple subtypes of HIV-1 have been identified; however, there is little data on the relative transmissibility of viruses belonging to different subtypes. A matched case-control study addressed whether viruses with different long terminal repeat (LTR) subtypes were transmitted equally from mother to infant. The LTR subtype was determined for 45 matched cases and controls who participated in a clinical trial in Tanzania. HIV-1 subtypes A, C, and D and intersubtype recombinant sequences were identified. Exact matched logistic regression analysis showed that viruses containing subtype A or intersubtype recombinant LTRs were 3.2 and 4.8 times more likely to be transmitted from mother to infant than viruses with subtype D LTRs. Viruses containing subtype C LTRs were 6.1 times more likely to be transmitted than those with subtype D LTRs. These differences in transmission were independent of maternal CD4 at enrollment. Thus, it appears that HIV-1 subtype may be associated with differing rates of perinatal transmission in Tanzania. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  7. HIV-1 target cells in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sarah B; Arrildt, Kathryn T; Sturdevant, Christa B; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2015-06-01

    HIV-1 replication in the central nervous system (CNS) is typically limited by the availability of target cells. HIV-1 variants that are transmitted and dominate the early stages of infection almost exclusively use the CCR5 coreceptor and are well adapted to entering, and thus infecting, cells expressing high CD4 densities similar to those found on CD4+ T cells. While the "immune privileged" CNS is largely devoid of CD4+ T cells, macrophage and microglia are abundant throughout the CNS. These cells likely express CD4 densities that are too low to facilitate efficient entry or allow sustained replication by most HIV-1 isolates. Examination of CNS viral populations reveals that late in disease the CNS of some individuals contains HIV-1 lineages that have evolved the ability to enter cells expressing low levels of CD4 and are well-adapted to entering macrophages. These macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) viruses are able to maintain sustained replication in the CNS for many generations, and their presence is associated with severe neurocognitive impairment. Whether conditions such as pleocytosis are necessary for macrophage-tropic viruses to emerge in the CNS is unknown, and extensive examinations of macrophage-tropic variants have not revealed a genetic signature of this phenotype. It is clear, however, that macrophage tropism is rare among HIV-1 isolates and is not transmitted, but is important due to its pathogenic effects on hosts. Prior to the evolution of macrophage-tropic variants, the viruses that are predominately infecting T cells (R5 T cell-tropic) may infect macrophages at a low level and inefficiently, but this could contribute to the reservoir.

  8. HIV-1 target cells in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Sarah B.; Arrildt, Kathryn T.; Sturdevant, Christa B.; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 replication in the central nervous system (CNS) is typically limited by the availability of target cells. HIV-1 variants that are transmitted and dominate the early stages of infection almost exclusively use the CCR5 coreceptor and are well adapted to entering, and thus infecting, cells expressing high CD4 densities similar to those found on CD4+ T cells. While the “immune privileged” CNS is largely devoid of CD4+ T cells, macrophage and microglia are abundant throughout the CNS. These cells likely express CD4 densities that are too low to facilitate efficient entry or allow sustained replication by most HIV-1 isolates. Examination of CNS viral populations reveals that late in disease the CNS of some individuals contains HIV-1 lineages that have evolved the ability to enter cells expressing low levels of CD4 and are well-adapted to entering macrophages. These macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) viruses are able to maintain sustained replication in the CNS for many generations, and their presence is associated with severe neurocognitive impairment. Whether conditions such as pleocytosis are necessary for macrophage-tropic viruses to emerge in the CNS is unknown, and extensive examinations of macrophage-tropic variants have not revealed a genetic signature of this phenotype. It is clear, however, that macrophage tropism is rare among HIV-1 isolates and is not transmitted, but is important due to its pathogenic effects on hosts. Prior to the evolution of macrophage-tropic variants, the viruses that are predominately infecting T cells (R5 T cell-tropic) may infect macrophages at a low level and inefficiently, but this could contribute to the reservoir. PMID:25236812

  9. HIV-1 Reverse Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei-Shau; Hughes, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Reverse transcription and integration are the defining features of the Retroviridae; the common name “retrovirus” derives from the fact that these viruses use a virally encoded enzyme, reverse transcriptase (RT), to convert their RNA genomes into DNA. Reverse transcription is an essential step in retroviral replication. This article presents an overview of reverse transcription, briefly describes the structure and function of RT, provides an introduction to some of the cellular and viral factors that can affect reverse transcription, and discusses fidelity and recombination, two processes in which reverse transcription plays an important role. In keeping with the theme of the collection, the emphasis is on HIV-1 and HIV-1 RT. PMID:23028129

  10. Epidemiological trends of HIV-1 infection in blood donors from Catalonia, Spain (2005-2014).

    PubMed

    Bes, Marta; Piron, Maria; Casamitjana, Natàlia; Gregori, Josep; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Ribera, Esteban; Quer, Josep; Puig, Lluís; Sauleda, Sílvia

    2017-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) subtype B is predominant in Spain. However, the recent arrival of immigrant populations has increased the prevalence of non-B subtypes and circulating recombinant forms. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of HIV-1 subtypes and transmitted drug-resistance mutations in blood donors from the Catalonian region (northeastern Spain). HIV-1-positive blood donors identified in Catalonia from 2005 to 2014 were included. Demographic variables and risk factors for HIV-1 acquisition were recorded. HIV-1 subtyping was carried out by HIV-1 DNA polymerase region sequencing, and phylogenetic analyses were performed using the neighbor-joining method. During the study period, 2.8 million blood donations were screened, and 214 HIV-1-positive donors were identified, yielding an overall prevalence of 7.7 per 100,000 donations (89% men; mean age, 34 ± 10 years). Most HIV-1-positive donors were native to Spain (81%), and 61% were regular blood donors. When risk factors were known, 62% reportedly were men who had sex with men. HIV-1 subtyping was possible in 176 HIV-1-positive individuals: 143 (81%) had HIV-1 subtype B, and 33 (19%) had non-B subtypes. Most HIV-1 non-B subtypes were circulating recombinant forms (n = 20; 61%). Factors associated with HIV-1 subtype B were male sex (p = 0.007) and men who had sex with men (p < 0.001). The overall prevalence of transmitted drug-resistance mutations was 14%. Non-B subtypes, circulating recombinant forms, and transmitted drug-resistance mutation sequences circulate among HIV-1-positive blood donors in Catalonia. Continuous local epidemiological surveillance is required to implement optimal prevention strategies for controlling transfusion-transmitted HIV and to improve health policies regarding HIV infection. © 2017 AABB.

  11. HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Freed, E O

    2001-11-01

    In general terms, the replication cycle of lentiviruses, including HIV-1, closely resembles that of other retroviruses. There are, however, a number of unique aspects of HIV replication; for example, the HIVs and SIVs target receptors and coreceptors distinct from those used by other retroviruses. Lentiviruses encode a number of regulatory and accessory proteins not encoded by the genomes of the prototypical "simple" retroviruses. Of particular interest from the gene therapy perspective, lentiviruses possess the ability to productively infect some types of non-dividing cells. This chapter, while reiterating certain points discussed in Chapter 1, will attempt to focus on issues unique to HIV-1 replication. The HIV-1 genome encodes the major structural and non-structural proteins common to all replication-competent retroviruses (Fig. 1, and Chapter 1). From the 5'- to 3'-ends of the genome are found the gag (for group-specific antigen), pol (for polymerase), and env (for envelope glycoprotein) genes. The gag gene encodes a polyprotein precursor whose name, Pr55Gag, is based on its molecular weight. Pr55Gag is cleaved by the viral protease (PR) to the mature Gag proteins matrix (also known as MA or p17), capsid (CA or p24), nucleocapsid (NC or p7), and p6. Two spacer peptides, p2 and p1, are also generated upon Pr55Gag processing. The pol-encoded enzymes are initially synthesized as part of a large polyprotein precursor, Pr160GagPol, whose synthesis results from a rare frameshifting event during Pr55Gag translation. The individual pol-encoded enzymes, PR, reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN), are cleaved from Pr160GagPol by the viral PR. The envelope (Env) glycoproteins are also synthesized as a polyprotein precursor (Fig. 1). Unlike the Gag and Pol precursors, which are cleaved by the viral PR, the Env precursor, known as gp160, is processed by a cellular protease during Env trafficking to the cell surface, gp160 processing results in the generation of the

  12. Viral piracy: HIV-1 targets dendritic cells for transmission.

    PubMed

    Lekkerkerker, Annemarie N; van Kooyk, Yvette; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2006-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen presenting cells, are critical for host immunity by inducing specific immune responses against a broad variety of pathogens. Remarkably the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) subverts DC function leading to spread of the virus. At an early phase of HIV-1 transmission, DCs capture HIV-1 at mucosal surfaces and transmit the virus to T cells in secondary lymphoid tissues. Capture of the virus on DCs takes place via C-type lectins of which the dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM-3) grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) is the best studied. DC-SIGN-captured HIV-1 particles accumulate in CD81(+) multivesicular bodies (MVBs) in DCs and are subsequently transmitted to CD4+ T cells resulting in infection of T cells. The viral cell-to-cell transmission takes place at the DC-T cell interface termed the infectious synapse. Recent studies demonstrate that direct infection of DCs contributes to the transmission to T cells at a later phase. Moreover, the infected DCs may function as cellular reservoirs for HIV-1. This review discusses the different processes that govern viral piracy of DCs by HIV-1, emphasizing the intracellular routing of the virus from capture on the cell surface to egress in the infectious synapse.

  13. Multipair Two-Way Relay Network With Harvest-Then-Transmit Users: Resolving Pairwise Uplink-Downlink Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Xia, Minghua; Wu, Yik-Chung

    2016-12-01

    While two-way relaying is a promising way to enhance the spectral efficiency of wireless networks, the imbalance of relay-user distances may lead to excessive wireless power at the nearby-users. To exploit the excessive power, the recently proposed harvest-then-transmit technique can be applied. However, it is well-known that harvest-then-transmit introduces uplink-downlink coupling for a user. Together with the co-dependent relationship between paired users and interference among multiple user pairs, wirelessly powered two-way relay network suffers from the unique pairwise uplink-downlink coupling, and the joint uplink-downlink network design is nontrivial. To this end, for the one pair users case, we show that a global optimal solution can be obtained. For the general case of multi-pair users, based on the rank-constrained difference of convex program, a convergence guaranteed iterative algorithm with an efficient initialization is proposed. Furthermore, a lower bound to the performance of the optimal solution is derived by introducing virtual receivers at relay. Numerical results on total transmit power show that the proposed algorithm achieves a transmit power value close to the lower bound.

  14. Association of HIV-1 Envelope-Specific Breast Milk IgA Responses with Reduced Risk of Postnatal Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Pollara, Justin; McGuire, Erin; Fouda, Genevieve G.; Rountree, Wes; Eudailey, Josh; Overman, R. Glenn; Seaton, Kelly E.; Deal, Aaron; Edwards, R. Whitney; Tegha, Gerald; Kamwendo, Deborah; Kumwenda, Jacob; Nelson, Julie A. E.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Brinkley, Christie; Denny, Thomas N.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Ellington, Sascha; King, Caroline C.; Jamieson, Denise J.; van der Horst, Charles; Kourtis, Athena P.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Ferrari, Guido

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infants born to HIV-1-infected mothers in resource-limited areas where replacement feeding is unsafe and impractical are repeatedly exposed to HIV-1 throughout breastfeeding. Despite this, the majority of infants do not contract HIV-1 postnatally, even in the absence of maternal antiretroviral therapy. This suggests that immune factors in breast milk of HIV-1-infected mothers help to limit vertical transmission. We compared the HIV-1 envelope-specific breast milk and plasma antibody responses of clade C HIV-1-infected postnatally transmitting and nontransmitting mothers in the control arm of the Malawi-based Breastfeeding Antiretrovirals and Nutrition Study using multivariable logistic regression modeling. We found no association between milk or plasma neutralization activity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, or HIV-1 envelope-specific IgG responses and postnatal transmission risk. While the envelope-specific breast milk and plasma IgA responses also did not reach significance in predicting postnatal transmission risk in the primary model after correction for multiple comparisons, subsequent exploratory analysis using two distinct assay methodologies demonstrated that the magnitudes of breast milk total and secretory IgA responses against a consensus HIV-1 envelope gp140 (B.con env03) were associated with reduced postnatal transmission risk. These results suggest a protective role for mucosal HIV-1 envelope-specific IgA responses in the context of postnatal virus transmission. This finding supports further investigations into the mechanisms by which mucosal IgA reduces risk of HIV-1 transmission via breast milk and into immune interventions aimed at enhancing this response. IMPORTANCE Infants born to HIV-1-infected mothers are repeatedly exposed to the virus in breast milk. Remarkably, the transmission rate is low, suggesting that immune factors in the breast milk of HIV-1-infected mothers help to limit transmission. We compared the antibody

  15. One love: explicit monogamy agreements among heterosexual young adult couples at increased risk of sexually transmitted infections.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jocelyn T; Harvey, S Marie; Agnew, Christopher R

    2012-01-01

    HIV prevention strategies among couples include condom use, mutual monogamy, and HIV testing. Research suggests that condom use is more likely with new or casual partners, and tends to decline as relationships become steady over time. Little is known, however, about explicit mutual monogamy agreements and HIV testing within heterosexual couples. This study used data from 434 young heterosexual couples at increased risk of HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) to assess (a) couple concordance on perceptions of a monogamy agreement, sustained monogamy, and HIV testing; and (b) the associations of relationship and demographic factors with monogamy agreement, sustained monogamy, and HIV testing. Results indicated only slight to fair agreement within couples on measures of monogamy agreement and sustained monogamy. Overall, 227 couples (52%) concurred that they had an explicit agreement to be monogamous; of those, 162 (71%) had sustained the agreement. Couples with greater health protective communication and commitment were more likely to have a monogamy agreement. Couples of Latino and Hispanic ethnicity and those with children were less likely to have a monogamy agreement. Only commitment was related to sustained monogamy. Having children, greater health protective communication, and perceived vulnerability to HIV and STIs were associated with HIV testing within the couple.

  16. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Meziane, Oussama; Kula, Anna; Nisole, Sébastien; Porrot, Françoise; Anderson, Ian; Mammano, Fabrizio; Fassati, Ariberto; Marcello, Alessandro; Benkirane, Monsef; Schwartz, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C) increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity.

  17. Hyperthermia Stimulates HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Meziane, Oussama; Kula, Anna; Nisole, Sébastien; Porrot, Françoise; Anderson, Ian; Mammano, Fabrizio; Fassati, Ariberto; Marcello, Alessandro; Benkirane, Monsef; Schwartz, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42–45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38–40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C) increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity. PMID:22807676

  18. Preexposure prophylaxis is efficacious for HIV-1 prevention among women using depot medroxyprogesterone acetate for contraception.

    PubMed

    Heffron, Renee; Mugo, Nelly; Were, Edwin; Kiarie, James; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Mujugira, Andrew; Frenkel, Lisa M; Donnell, Deborah; Ronald, Allan; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared M

    2014-11-28

    To evaluate preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) efficacy for HIV-1 prevention among women using depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) for contraception and men whose HIV-1-infected partners use DMPA. Secondary analysis of data from a randomized placebo-controlled trial of daily oral tenofovir and emtricitabine/tenofovir PrEP among heterosexual Kenyan and Ugandan HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. PrEP efficacy for HIV-1 prevention was compared among HIV-1-uninfected women using DMPA versus no hormonal contraception and among HIV-1 uninfected men whose HIV-1-infected female partners used DMPA versus no hormonal contraception. Of 4747 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples, 901 HIV-1-uninfected women used DMPA at some point during follow-up, 1422 HIV-1-uninfected women used no hormonal contraception, 1568 HIV-1-uninfected men had female partners who used DMPA, and 2626 men had female partners who used no hormonal contraception. PrEP efficacy estimates for HIV-1 prevention, compared with placebo, were similar among women using DMPA and those using no hormonal contraception (64.7 and 75.5%, adjusted interaction P = 0.65). Similarly, for men whose female partners used DMPA, PrEP efficacy did not differ from men whose partners used no hormonal contraception (90.0 versus 81.7%, adjusted interaction P = 0.52). PrEP is efficacious for HIV-1 prevention among women using DMPA and men whose partners use DMPA, suggesting PrEP could mitigate the potential increased HIV-1 acquisition and transmission risks that have been associated with DMPA use. Women at risk for HIV-1 choosing DMPA could maintain this contraceptive method and add PrEP to achieve prevention of unintended pregnancy and HIV-1.

  19. The transcriptome of HIV-1 infected intestinal CD4+ T cells exposed to enteric bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Alyson C; Guo, Kejun; Dillon, Stephanie M; Phang, Tzu; Lee, Eric J; Harper, Michael S; Helm, Karen; Kappes, John C; Ochsenbauer, Christina; McCarter, Martin D; Wilson, Cara C; Santiago, Mario L

    2017-02-01

    Global transcriptome studies can help pinpoint key cellular pathways exploited by viruses to replicate and cause pathogenesis. Previous data showed that laboratory-adapted HIV-1 triggers significant gene expression changes in CD4+ T cell lines and mitogen-activated CD4+ T cells from peripheral blood. However, HIV-1 primarily targets mucosal compartments during acute infection in vivo. Moreover, early HIV-1 infection causes extensive depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal tract that herald persistent inflammation due to the translocation of enteric microbes to the systemic circulation. Here, we profiled the transcriptome of primary intestinal CD4+ T cells infected ex vivo with transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1. Infections were performed in the presence or absence of Prevotella stercorea, a gut microbe enriched in the mucosa of HIV-1-infected individuals that enhanced both TF HIV-1 replication and CD4+ T cell death ex vivo. In the absence of bacteria, HIV-1 triggered a cellular shutdown response involving the downregulation of HIV-1 reactome genes, while perturbing genes linked to OX40, PPAR and FOXO3 signaling. However, in the presence of bacteria, HIV-1 did not perturb these gene sets or pathways. Instead, HIV-1 enhanced granzyme expression and Th17 cell function, inhibited G1/S cell cycle checkpoint genes and triggered downstream cell death pathways in microbe-exposed gut CD4+ T cells. To gain insights on these differential effects, we profiled the gene expression landscape of HIV-1-uninfected gut CD4+ T cells exposed to bacteria. Microbial exposure upregulated genes involved in cellular proliferation, MAPK activation, Th17 cell differentiation and type I interferon signaling. Our findings reveal that microbial exposure influenced how HIV-1 altered the gut CD4+ T cell transcriptome, with potential consequences for HIV-1 susceptibility, cell survival and inflammation. The HIV-1- and microbe-altered pathways unraveled here may serve as a molecular blueprint

  20. The transcriptome of HIV-1 infected intestinal CD4+ T cells exposed to enteric bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Stephanie M.; Phang, Tzu; Lee, Eric J.; Helm, Karen; Kappes, John C.; McCarter, Martin D.

    2017-01-01

    Global transcriptome studies can help pinpoint key cellular pathways exploited by viruses to replicate and cause pathogenesis. Previous data showed that laboratory-adapted HIV-1 triggers significant gene expression changes in CD4+ T cell lines and mitogen-activated CD4+ T cells from peripheral blood. However, HIV-1 primarily targets mucosal compartments during acute infection in vivo. Moreover, early HIV-1 infection causes extensive depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal tract that herald persistent inflammation due to the translocation of enteric microbes to the systemic circulation. Here, we profiled the transcriptome of primary intestinal CD4+ T cells infected ex vivo with transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1. Infections were performed in the presence or absence of Prevotella stercorea, a gut microbe enriched in the mucosa of HIV-1-infected individuals that enhanced both TF HIV-1 replication and CD4+ T cell death ex vivo. In the absence of bacteria, HIV-1 triggered a cellular shutdown response involving the downregulation of HIV-1 reactome genes, while perturbing genes linked to OX40, PPAR and FOXO3 signaling. However, in the presence of bacteria, HIV-1 did not perturb these gene sets or pathways. Instead, HIV-1 enhanced granzyme expression and Th17 cell function, inhibited G1/S cell cycle checkpoint genes and triggered downstream cell death pathways in microbe-exposed gut CD4+ T cells. To gain insights on these differential effects, we profiled the gene expression landscape of HIV-1-uninfected gut CD4+ T cells exposed to bacteria. Microbial exposure upregulated genes involved in cellular proliferation, MAPK activation, Th17 cell differentiation and type I interferon signaling. Our findings reveal that microbial exposure influenced how HIV-1 altered the gut CD4+ T cell transcriptome, with potential consequences for HIV-1 susceptibility, cell survival and inflammation. The HIV-1- and microbe-altered pathways unraveled here may serve as a molecular blueprint

  1. Tracing HIV-1 transmission: envelope traits of HIV-1 transmitter and recipient pairs.

    PubMed

    Oberle, Corinna S; Joos, Beda; Rusert, Peter; Campbell, Nottania K; Beauparlant, David; Kuster, Herbert; Weber, Jacqueline; Schenkel, Corinne D; Scherrer, Alexandra U; Magnus, Carsten; Kouyos, Roger; Rieder, Philip; Niederöst, Barbara; Braun, Dominique L; Pavlovic, Jovan; Böni, Jürg; Yerly, Sabine; Klimkait, Thomas; Aubert, Vincent; Trkola, Alexandra; Metzner, Karin J; Günthard, Huldrych F

    2016-09-05

    Mucosal HIV-1 transmission predominantly results in a single transmitted/founder (T/F) virus establishing infection in the new host despite the generally high genetic diversity of the transmitter virus population. To what extent HIV-1 transmission is a stochastic process or driven by selective forces that allow T/F viruses best to overcome bottlenecks in transmission has not been conclusively resolved. Building on prior investigations that suggest HIV-1 envelope (Env) features to contribute in the selection process during transmission, we compared phenotypic virus characteristics of nine HIV-1 subtype B transmission pairs, six men who have sex with men and three male-to-female transmission pairs. All recipients were identified early in acute infection and harbored based on extensive sequencing analysis a single T/F virus allowing a controlled analysis of virus properties in matched transmission pairs. Recipient and transmitter viruses from the closest time point to transmission showed no signs of selection for specific Env modifications such as variable loop length and glycosylation. Recipient viruses were resistant to circulating plasma antibodies of the transmitter and also showed no altered sensitivity to a large panel of entry inhibitors and neutralizing antibodies. The recipient virus did not consistently differ from the transmitter virus in terms of entry kinetics, cell-cell transmission and replicative capacity in primary cells. Our paired analysis revealed a higher sensitivity of several recipient virus isolates to interferon-α (IFNα) which suggests that resistance to IFNα cannot be a general driving force in T/F establishment. With the exception of increased IFNα sensitivity, none of the phenotypic virus properties we investigated clearly distinguished T/F viruses from their matched transmitter viruses supporting the notion that at least in subtype B infection HIV-1 transmission is to a considerable extent stochastic.

  2. T21/DP107, A synthetic leucine zipper-like domain of the HIV-1 envelope gp41, attracts and activates human phagocytes by using G-protein-coupled formyl peptide receptors.

    PubMed

    Su, S B; Gao, J l; Gong, W h; Dunlop, N M; Murphy, P M; Oppenheim, J J; Wang, J M

    1999-05-15

    A leucine zipper-like domain, T21/DP107, located in the amino terminus of the ectodomain of gp41, is crucial to the formation of fusogenic configuration of the HIV-1 envelope protein gp41. We report that the synthetic T21/DP107 segment is a potent stimulant of migration and calcium mobilization in human monocytes and neutrophils. The activity of T21/DP107 on phagocytes was pertussis toxin-sensitive, suggesting this peptide uses Gi-coupled seven-transmembrane receptor(s). Since the bacterial chemotactic peptide fMLP partially desensitized the calcium-mobilizing activity of T21/DP107 in phagocytes, we postulated that T21/DP107 might preferentially use a lower affinity fMLP receptor. By using cells transfected to express cloned prototype chemotactic N-formyl peptide receptor (FPR) or its variant, FPR-like 1 (FPRL1), we demonstrate that T21/DP107 activates both receptors but has a much higher efficacy for FPRL1. In addition, T21/DP107 at nM concentrations induced migration of FPRL1-transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells. In contrast, fMLP did not induce significant chemotaxis of the same cells at a concentration as high as 50 microM. Although a lipid metabolite, lipoxin A4, was a high-affinity ligand for FPRL1, it was not reported to induce Ca2+ mobilization or chemotaxis in FPRL1-transfected cells. Therefore, T21/DP107 is a first chemotactic peptide agonist identified thus far for FPRL1. Our results suggest that this peptide domain of the HIV-1 gp41 may have the potential to activate host innate immune response by interacting with FPR and FPRL1 on phagocytes.

  3. HIV-1 subtypes in Yugoslavia.

    PubMed

    Stanojevic, Maja; Papa, Anna; Papadimitriou, Evagelia; Zerjav, Sonja; Jevtovic, Djordje; Salemovic, Dubravka; Jovanovic, Tanja; Antoniadis, Antonis

    2002-05-01

    To gain insight concerning the genetic diversity of HIV-1 viruses associated with the HIV-1 epidemic in Yugoslavia, 45 specimens from HIV-1-infected individuals were classified into subtypes by sequence-based phylogenetic analysis of the polymerase (pol) region of the viral genome. Forty-one of 45 specimens (91.2%) were identified as pol subtype B, 2 of 45 as subtype C (4.4%), 1 of 45 as CRF01_AE (2.2%), and 1 as CRF02_AG recombinant (2.2%). Nucleotide divergence among subtype B sequences was 4.8%. Results of this study show that among HIV-1-infected patients in Yugoslavia subtype B predominates (91.5%), whereas non-B subtypes are present at a low percentage, mostly related to travel abroad.

  4. RF Coupling into the Fuel Tank of a Large Transport Aircraft from Intentionally Transmitting Peds in the Passenger Cabin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Scearce, Stephen A.; Ely, Jay J.; Richardson, Robert E.; Hatfield, Michael O.

    2000-01-01

    An investigation was performed to study the potential for radio frequency (RF) power radiated from Portable Electronic Devices (PEDs) to create an arcing/sparking event within the fuel tank of a large transport aircraft. This paper describes the experimental methods used for measuring RF coupling to the fuel tank and Fuel Quantity Indication System (FQIS) wiring from PED sources located in the passenger cabin. To allow comparison of voltage/current data obtained in a laboratory chamber FQIS installation to an actual aircraft FQIS installation, aircraft fuel tank RF reverberation characteristics were also measured. Results from the measurements, along with a survey of threats from typical intentional transmitting PEDs are presented. The resulting worst-case power coupled onto fuel tank FQIS wiring is derived. The same approach can be applied to measure RF coupling into various other aircraft systems.

  5. Bottlenecks in HIV-1 transmission: insights from the study of founder viruses.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sarah B; Swanstrom, Ronald; Kashuba, Angela D M; Cohen, Myron S

    2015-07-01

    HIV-1 infection typically results from the transmission of a single viral variant, the transmitted/founder (T/F) virus. Studies of these HIV-1 variants provide critical information about the transmission bottlenecks and the selective pressures acting on the virus in the transmission fluid and in the recipient tissues. These studies reveal that T/F virus phenotypes are shaped by stochastic and selective forces that restrict transmission and may be targets for prevention strategies. In this Review, we highlight how studies of T/F viruses contribute to a better understanding of the biology of HIV-1 transmission and discuss how these findings affect HIV-1 prevention strategies.

  6. Defining the roles for Vpr in HIV-1-associated neuropathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    James, Tony; Nonnemacher, Michael R.; Wigdahl, Brian; Krebs, Fred C.

    2016-01-01

    It is increasingly evident that the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral protein R (Vpr) has a unique role in neuropathogenesis. Its ability to induce G2/M arrest coupled with its capacity to increase viral gene transcription gives it a unique role in sustaining viral replication and aiding in the establishment and maintenance of a systemic infection. The requirement of Vpr for HIV-1 infection and replication in cells of monocytic origin (a key lineage of cells involved in HIV-1 neuroinvasion) suggests an important role in establishing and sustaining infection in the central nervous system (CNS). Contributions of Vpr to neuropathogenesis can be expanded further through (i) naturally occurring HIV-1 sequence variation that results in functionally divergent Vpr variants; (ii) the dual activities of Vpr as a intracellular protein delivered and expressed during HIV-1 infection and as an extracellular protein that can act on neighboring, uninfected cells; (iii) cell type-dependent consequences of Vpr expression and exposure, including cell cycle arrest, metabolic dysregulation, and cytotoxicity; and (iv) the effects of Vpr on exosome-based intercellular communication in the CNS. Revealing the effects of this pleiotropic viral protein is an essential part of a greater understanding of HIV-1-associated pathogenesis and potential approaches to treating and preventing disease caused by HIV-1 infection. PMID:27056720

  7. Defining the roles for Vpr in HIV-1-associated neuropathogenesis.

    PubMed

    James, Tony; Nonnemacher, Michael R; Wigdahl, Brian; Krebs, Fred C

    2016-08-01

    It is increasingly evident that the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral protein R (Vpr) has a unique role in neuropathogenesis. Its ability to induce G2/M arrest coupled with its capacity to increase viral gene transcription gives it a unique role in sustaining viral replication and aiding in the establishment and maintenance of a systemic infection. The requirement of Vpr for HIV-1 infection and replication in cells of monocytic origin (a key lineage of cells involved in HIV-1 neuroinvasion) suggests an important role in establishing and sustaining infection in the central nervous system (CNS). Contributions of Vpr to neuropathogenesis can be expanded further through (i) naturally occurring HIV-1 sequence variation that results in functionally divergent Vpr variants; (ii) the dual activities of Vpr as a intracellular protein delivered and expressed during HIV-1 infection and as an extracellular protein that can act on neighboring, uninfected cells; (iii) cell type-dependent consequences of Vpr expression and exposure, including cell cycle arrest, metabolic dysregulation, and cytotoxicity; and (iv) the effects of Vpr on exosome-based intercellular communication in the CNS. Revealing that the effects of this pleiotropic viral protein is an essential part of a greater understanding of HIV-1-associated pathogenesis and potential approaches to treating and preventing disease caused by HIV-1 infection.

  8. [Sensitivity of the COBAS AmpliScreen™ HIV-1 test v1.5 for HIV-1 detection].

    PubMed

    Gomez, Lucía P; Balangero, Marcos C; Castro, Gonzalo; Kademian, Silvia; Mangeaud, Arnaldo; Barbas, María G; Cudolá, Analía; de León, Juan F; Carrizo, Horacio; Gallego, Sandra V

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of nucleic acid amplification techniques (NAT) in blood banks was intended to reduce the residual risk of transfusion-transmitted infections. Co-circulation of a great diversity of HIV-1 variants in Argentina portrays the need to assess the sensitivity of serological and molecular assays available for their detection. In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity of the COBAS AmpliScreen™ HIV-1 Test, version 1.5 (Roche) for the detection of HIV-1 RNA in plasma samples of infected individuals from Argentina. The results of this study reveal that this technique has high sensitivity for the detection of HIV-1 RNA under assay conditions: using mini-pool testing, pools ≥ 50 RNA copies per ml achieved ≥ 92 % sensitivity, whereas in the standard procedure, samples ≥ 207 RNA copies/ml achieved 100 % sensitivity. Moreover, the COBAS AmpliScreen™ HIV-1 Test, version 1.5 (Roche) is suitable for detecting prevailing HIV-1 variants. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. Vaccines and microbicides preventing HIV-1, HSV-2, and HPV mucosal transmission.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Damjan S; Piguet, Vincent

    2010-02-01

    HIV-1, herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), and human papillomavirus (HPV), among other sexually transmitted infections, represent a major burden for global health. Initial insights into the mucosal transmission of these viral pathogens have raised optimism with regard to the rapid generation of protective vaccines. Nevertheless, setbacks for HIV-1 and HSV-2 vaccines have seriously challenged the initial enthusiasm. Recently, two new vaccines that efficiently prevented HPV infection have renewed the hope that vaccinal prevention of viral mucosal sexually transmitted infections is possible. HIV-1 and HSV-2 differ from HPV, and each virus needs to be tackled with a distinct approach. However, vaccines are not the only possible answer. Topically applied agents (microbicides) are an attractive alternative in the prevention of HIV-1 and HSV-2 mucosal transmission. Progress in understanding the mechanisms of genital transmission of HIV-1 and HSV-2 is required for successful vaccine or microbicide candidates to emerge from current approaches.

  10. Ambiguity, Ambivalence, and Apprehensions of Taking HIV-1 Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis among Male Couples in San Francisco: A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Parya; Gamarel, Kristi E.; Neilands, Torsten B.; Comfort, Megan; Sheon, Nicolas; Darbes, Lynae A.; Johnson, Mallory O.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We conducted a mixed-methods study to examine serodiscordant and seroconcordant (HIV-positive/HIV-positive) male couples' PrEP awareness, concerns regarding health care providers offering PrEP to the community, and correlates of PrEP uptake by the HIV-negative member of the couple. Design Qualitative sub-study included one-on-one interviews to gain a deeper understanding of participants' awareness of and experiences with PrEP and concerns regarding health care providers offering PrEP to men who have sex with men (MSM). Quantitative analyses consisted of a cross-sectional study in which participants were asked about the likelihood of PrEP uptake by the HIV-negative member of the couple and level of agreement with health care providers offering PrEP to anyone requesting it. Methods We used multivariable regression to examine associations between PrEP questions and covariates of interest and employed an inductive approach to identify key qualitative themes. Results Among 328 men (164 couples), 62% had heard about PrEP, but approximately one-quarter were mistaking it with post-exposure prophylaxis. The majority of participants had low endorsement of PrEP uptake and 40% were uncertain if health care providers should offer PrEP to anyone requesting it. Qualitative interviews with 32 men suggest that this uncertainty likely stems from concerns regarding increased risk compensation. Likelihood of future PrEP uptake by the HIV-negative member of the couple was positively associated with unprotected insertive anal intercourse but negatively correlated with unprotected receptive anal intercourse. Conclusions Findings suggest that those at greatest risk may not be receptive of PrEP. Those who engage in moderate risk express more interest in PrEP; however, many voice concerns of increased risk behavior in tandem with PrEP use. Results indicate a need for further education of MSM communities and the need to determine appropriate populations in which PrEP can have the

  11. Syphilis Infection Differentially Regulates the Phenotype and Function of γδ T Cells in HIV-1-Infected Patients Depends on the HIV-1 Disease Stage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Lu, Xiaofan; Hu, Zhiliang; Luo, Zhenwu; Jiang, Wei; Wu, Hao; Gao, Yanqing; Yan, Junling; Zhang, Qiuyue; Song, Aixin; Huang, Xiaojie; Mou, Danlei; Su, Bin; Zhang, Tong

    2017-01-01

    A rapidly escalating outbreak of syphilis infection has been affected men who have sex with men, particularly those with HIV-1 infection. γδ T cells are unconventional immune cells with two main subsets, Vδ1 T cells and Vδ2 T cells, which possess a combination of innate and adaptive immune features allowing them against HIV-1. However, whether syphilis infection affects the phenotype and function of γδ T cells in HIV-1-infected patients remains unclear, especially in acute HIV-1 infection (AHI). In this study, we enrolled 57 HIV-1-infected patients (24 with HIV-1 infection only and 33 coinfected with syphilis) from an acute HIV-1-infected cohort in Beijing (PRIMO). A comprehensive analysis of γδ T-cell phenotype and function was performed by flow cytometry. We found syphilis coinfection could reverse the imbalance of Vδ1/Vδ2 ratio in AHI. Syphilis infection results in decreased γδ T-cell activation in AHI, but increased γδ T-cell activation in chronic HIV-1 infection (CHI). Moreover, patients with CHI had larger numbers of IL-17-producing γδ T cells than those with AHI, regardless of syphilis status. Thus, syphilis affected the γδ T-cell immune response differently in patients depending on the stages of HIV-1 disease. In addition, the percentage of IL-17-producing γδ T cells was positively correlated with the percentage of neutrophils. These results suggest that the γδ T-cell/IL-17/neutrophil axis is involved in HIV-1 pathogenesis and disease progression. Taken together, our observations provide new insight into the roles of γδ T cells in immunopathogenesis of syphilis and HIV-1 coinfection, particularly during AHI, and our findings may be helpful for the prevention of syphilis and other sexually transmitted infections and highlight the great significance on the remedy of patients coinfected with HIV-1. PMID:28871259

  12. Changes in HIV-1 incidence in heroin users in Guangxi Province, China.

    PubMed

    Lai, S; Liu, W; Chen, J; Yang, J; Li, Z J; Li, R J; Liang, F X; Liang, S L; Zhu, Q Y; Yu, X F

    2001-04-01

    Guangxi Province, China recently experienced an outbreak of HIV-1 infection among heroin users. We studied HIV-1 incidence rates and associated risk factors for HIV-1 infection among heroin users residing in Pingxiang City. A total of 318 heroin users were followed from February 1998 through January 1999 (median follow-up: 8.1 months). Of these, 130 were prospectively followed from January through September 1999 (median follow-up: 8.3 months). HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV) incidence rates for each period were calculated. A generalized estimating equation approach was implemented to identify independent risk factors associated with HIV-1 infection across both periods. Among 318 study participants, 97.2% were men. The median age was 22 years. Approximately 60% reported sharing needles. HIV-1 prevalence at baseline was 15.4%. During the first follow-up period, HIV-1 incidence was 2.38 per 100 person years (py), and HCV incidence was 26.8 per 100 py. During the second follow-up period, HIV-1 incidence was 6.86 per 100 py, and HCV incidence was 28.9 per 100 py. After controlling for age and other factors, HCV seropositivity, history of sexually transmitted diseases, and sharing needles were independently associated with HIV-1 infection. These data suggest that HIV-1 incidence was rising over time in Pingxiang City, Guangxi Province. The high incidence of HCV heightens the importance of enhanced prevention programs to reduce injection and needle sharing among heroin users.

  13. Micelle-induced curvature in a water-insoluble HIV-1 Env peptide revealed by NMR dipolar coupling measurement in stretched polyacrylamide gel.

    PubMed

    Chou, James J; Kaufman, Joshua D; Stahl, Stephen J; Wingfield, Paul T; Bax, Ad

    2002-03-20

    The structure of a water-insoluble fragment encompassing residues 282-304 of the HIV envelope protein gp41 is studied when solubilized by dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC) and by small bicelles, consisting of a 4:1 molar ratio of DHPC and dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC). Weak alignment with the magnetic field was accomplished in a stretched polyacrylamide gel, permitting measurement of one-bond (1)H-(15)N, (13)Ca-(13)C', and (13)C'-(15)N dipolar couplings, which formed the basis for determining the peptide structure. In both detergent systems, the peptide adopts an alpha-helical conformation from residue 4 through 18. In the presence of the DHPC micelles the helix is strongly curved towards the hydrophobic surface, whereas in the presence of bicelles a much weaker curvature in the opposite direction is observed.

  14. Patterns of HIV and sexually transmitted infection testing among men who have sex with men couples in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jason W; Petroll, Andrew E

    2012-11-01

    Most men who have sex with men (MSM) within the United States acquire human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) while in a same-sex relationship. Few studies have examined HIV and sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing rates among MSM couples. Interestingly, the patterns that MSM test for HIV while in their relationships remain largely unknown. The current study helps fill this gap in knowledge by assessing HIV testing patterns and HIV and STI testing rates from a large convenience sample of Internet-using MSM couples. The current study used a cross-sectional study design to collect dyadic data from 361 MSM couples who lived throughout the United States. A novel recruitment strategy that included placing paid targeted advertisements on Facebook enrolled both men in the couple to independently complete the confidential electronic survey. Nearly half of the HIV-negative men indicated either not having been tested for HIV since their relationship started or only testing if they believed they were at risk. Few men reported testing every 3 to 4 months. HIV/STI testing rates varied among the sample of couples. Few men reported having been diagnosed with a recent STI. Testing patterns and rates were mostly similar, irrespective of whether unprotected anal intercourse was practiced within and/or outside the relationship. HIV testing and prevention services must target men who are at risk for acquiring HIV within MSM couples. To help accomplish this goal, additional research is needed to examine the specific barriers and facilitators to HIV and STI testing among MSM in couples.

  15. Authentic HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R; Pommier, Yves; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is indispensable for HIV-1 replication and has become a validated target for developing anti-AIDS agents. In two decades of development of IN inhibition-based anti-HIV therapeutics, a significant number of compounds were identified as IN inhibitors, but only some of them showed antiviral activity. This article reviews a number of patented HIV-1 IN inhibitors, especially those that possess high selectivity for the strand transfer reaction. These compounds generally have a polar coplanar moiety, which is assumed to chelate two magnesium ions in the binding site. Resistance to those compounds, when given to patients, can develop as a result of IN mutations. We refer to those compounds as authentic IN inhibitors. Continued drug development has so far delivered one authentic IN inhibitor to the market (raltegravir in 2007). Current and future attention will be focused on the development of novel authentic IN inhibitors with the goal of overcoming viral resistance. PMID:21426159

  16. Developing strategies for HIV-1 eradication

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Christine M.; Blankson, Joel N.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) suppresses HIV-1 replication, transforming the outlook for infected patients. However, reservoirs of replication-competent forms of the virus persist during HAART, and when treatment is stopped, high rates of HIV-1 replication return. Recent insights into HIV-1 latency, as well as a report that HIV-1 infection was eradicated in one individual, have renewed interest in finding a cure for HIV-1 infection. Strategies for HIV-1 eradication include gene therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, stimulating host immunity to control HIV-1 replication, and targeting latent HIV-1 in resting memory CD4+ T cells. Future efforts should aim to provide better understanding of how to reconstitute the CD4+ T cell compartment with genetically engineered cells, exert immune control over HIV-1 replication, and identify and eliminate all viral reservoirs. PMID:22867874

  17. Prevalence of HIV-1 in east African lorry drivers.

    PubMed

    Carswell, J W; Lloyd, G; Howells, J

    1989-11-01

    Sixty-eight lorry drivers and their assistants were examined for evidence of infection with HIV-1 because of their association and regular contact with prostitutes. Out of a total of 68 drivers, 24 (35.2%) were serologically found to be HIV-1 positive. Epidemiological evidence demonstrated a wide travel history involving seven different countries served by the port of Mombasa. History of other sexually transmitted disorders were significantly higher in HIV-seropositive individuals. The data presented here further support the hypothesis that a major route of heterosexual transmission of HIV in Africa is dissemination through a group such as lorry drivers and their assistants, whose behaviour puts them at risk of acquiring sexually transmitted diseases.

  18. Ultrasonic input-output for transmitting and receiving longitudinal transducers coupled to same face of isotropic elastic plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Karagulle, H.; Lee, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    The quantitative understanding of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation parameters such as the stress wave factor were studied. Ultrasonic input/output characteristics for an isotropic elastic plate with transmitting and receiving longitudinal transducers coupled to the same face were analyzed. The asymptotic normal stress is calculated for an isotropic elastic half space subjected to a uniform harmonic normal stress applied to a circular region at the surface. The radiated stress waves are traced within the plate by considering wave reflections at the top and bottom faces. The output voltage amplitude of the receiving transducer is estimated by considering only longitudinal waves. Agreement is found between the output voltage wave packet amplitudes and times of arrival due to multiple reflections of the longitudinal waves.

  19. Pandemic HIV-1 Vpu overcomes intrinsic herd immunity mediated by tetherin

    PubMed Central

    Iwami, Shingo; Sato, Kei; Morita, Satoru; Inaba, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Takeuchi, Junko S.; Kimura, Yuichi; Misawa, Naoko; Ren, Fengrong; Iwasa, Yoh; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Among the four groups of HIV-1 (M, N, O, and P), HIV-1M alone is pandemic and has rapidly expanded across the world. However, why HIV-1M has caused a devastating pandemic while the other groups remain contained is unclear. Interestingly, only HIV-1M Vpu, a viral protein, can robustly counteract human tetherin, which tethers budding virions. Therefore, we hypothesize that this property of HIV-1M Vpu facilitates human-to-human viral transmission. Adopting a multilayered experimental-mathematical approach, we demonstrate that HIV-1M Vpu confers a 2.38-fold increase in the prevalence of HIV-1 transmission. When Vpu activity is lost, protected human populations emerge (i.e., intrinsic herd immunity develops) through the anti-viral effect of tetherin. We also reveal that all Vpus of transmitted/founder HIV-1M viruses maintain anti-tetherin activity. These findings indicate that tetherin plays the role of a host restriction factor, providing ‘intrinsic herd immunity’, whereas Vpu has evolved in HIV-1M as a tetherin antagonist. PMID:26184634

  20. Pandemic HIV-1 Vpu overcomes intrinsic herd immunity mediated by tetherin.

    PubMed

    Iwami, Shingo; Sato, Kei; Morita, Satoru; Inaba, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Takeuchi, Junko S; Kimura, Yuichi; Misawa, Naoko; Ren, Fengrong; Iwasa, Yoh; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2015-07-17

    Among the four groups of HIV-1 (M, N, O, and P), HIV-1M alone is pandemic and has rapidly expanded across the world. However, why HIV-1M has caused a devastating pandemic while the other groups remain contained is unclear. Interestingly, only HIV-1M Vpu, a viral protein, can robustly counteract human tetherin, which tethers budding virions. Therefore, we hypothesize that this property of HIV-1M Vpu facilitates human-to-human viral transmission. Adopting a multilayered experimental-mathematical approach, we demonstrate that HIV-1M Vpu confers a 2.38-fold increase in the prevalence of HIV-1 transmission. When Vpu activity is lost, protected human populations emerge (i.e., intrinsic herd immunity develops) through the anti-viral effect of tetherin. We also reveal that all Vpus of transmitted/founder HIV-1M viruses maintain anti-tetherin activity. These findings indicate that tetherin plays the role of a host restriction factor, providing 'intrinsic herd immunity', whereas Vpu has evolved in HIV-1M as a tetherin antagonist.

  1. Maternal HIV-1 envelope-specific antibody responses and reduced risk of perinatal transmission.

    PubMed

    Permar, Sallie R; Fong, Youyi; Vandergrift, Nathan; Fouda, Genevieve G; Gilbert, Peter; Parks, Robert; Jaeger, Frederick H; Pollara, Justin; Martelli, Amanda; Liebl, Brooke E; Lloyd, Krissey; Yates, Nicole L; Overman, R Glenn; Shen, Xiaoying; Whitaker, Kaylan; Chen, Haiyan; Pritchett, Jamie; Solomon, Erika; Friberg, Emma; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Von Holle, Tarra; Martinez, David R; Cai, Fangping; Kumar, Amit; Xia, Shi-Mao; Lu, Xiaozhi; Louzao, Raul; Wilkes, Samantha; Datta, Saheli; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Alam, S Munir; Montefiori, David C; Denny, Thomas N; Moody, M Anthony; Tomaras, Georgia D; Gao, Feng; Haynes, Barton F

    2015-07-01

    Despite the wide availability of antiretroviral drugs, more than 250,000 infants are vertically infected with HIV-1 annually, emphasizing the need for additional interventions to eliminate pediatric HIV-1 infections. Here, we aimed to define humoral immune correlates of risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1, including responses associated with protection in the RV144 vaccine trial. Eighty-three untreated, HIV-1-transmitting mothers and 165 propensity score-matched nontransmitting mothers were selected from the Women and Infants Transmission Study (WITS) of US nonbreastfeeding, HIV-1-infected mothers. In a multivariable logistic regression model, the magnitude of the maternal IgG responses specific for the third variable loop (V3) of the HIV-1 envelope was predictive of a reduced risk of MTCT. Neutralizing Ab responses against easy-to-neutralize (tier 1) HIV-1 strains also predicted a reduced risk of peripartum transmission in secondary analyses. Moreover, recombinant maternal V3-specific IgG mAbs mediated neutralization of autologous HIV-1 isolates. Thus, common V3-specific Ab responses in maternal plasma predicted a reduced risk of MTCT and mediated autologous virus neutralization, suggesting that boosting these maternal Ab responses may further reduce HIV-1 MTCT.

  2. Some findings of FADD knockdown in inhibition of HIV-1 replication in Jurkat cells and PBMCs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Tan, Jiying; Zhao, Jiangqin; Ragupathy, Viswannath; Haleyurgirisetty, Mohan; Hewlett, Indira

    2014-08-01

    Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD) is a key adaptor molecule transmitting the death signal mediated by death receptors, and it is also required for T cell proliferation. A recent study indicated that FADD is able to affect HIV-1 production, but the mechanism is not known. Using the susceptible Jurkat cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we studied the effects of FADD on HIV-1 production. TaqMan RT-PCR was used to quantify HIV-1 viral RNA copies, and Western blot analysis was used to detect protein expression. FADD knockdown decreased HIV-1 replication and inactivated caspase-3 activity in the cells and blocked CD4 translocation to the lipid rafts of the plasma membrane. Reduced expression of FADD suppressed TCR signaling through downregulation of TCR, CD3, and Zap-70 in response to HIV-1 infection and blocked the trafficking of TCR, CD3, CD28, and Zap-70 to lipid rafts, leading to reduced activation of NF-κB and NFAT, which are required for HIV-1 replication. FADD knockdown diminished caspase-8 migration to lipid rafts and its expression in response to HIV-1 infection. These results indicate that FADD, as a host pro-apoptotic protein, plays important roles in regulating HIV-1 replication and production in several ways, and apoptotic pathway inhibition is able to decrease HIV-1 replication and production.

  3. Maternal HIV-1 envelope–specific antibody responses and reduced risk of perinatal transmission

    PubMed Central

    Permar, Sallie R.; Fong, Youyi; Vandergrift, Nathan; Fouda, Genevieve G.; Gilbert, Peter; Parks, Robert; Jaeger, Frederick H.; Pollara, Justin; Martelli, Amanda; Liebl, Brooke E.; Lloyd, Krissey; Yates, Nicole L.; Overman, R. Glenn; Shen, Xiaoying; Whitaker, Kaylan; Chen, Haiyan; Pritchett, Jamie; Solomon, Erika; Friberg, Emma; Marshall, Dawn J.; Whitesides, John F.; Gurley, Thaddeus C.; Von Holle, Tarra; Martinez, David R.; Cai, Fangping; Kumar, Amit; Xia, Shi-Mao; Lu, Xiaozhi; Louzao, Raul; Wilkes, Samantha; Datta, Saheli; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Alam, S. Munir; Montefiori, David C.; Denny, Thomas N.; Moody, M. Anthony; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Gao, Feng; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the wide availability of antiretroviral drugs, more than 250,000 infants are vertically infected with HIV-1 annually, emphasizing the need for additional interventions to eliminate pediatric HIV-1 infections. Here, we aimed to define humoral immune correlates of risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1, including responses associated with protection in the RV144 vaccine trial. Eighty-three untreated, HIV-1transmitting mothers and 165 propensity score–matched nontransmitting mothers were selected from the Women and Infants Transmission Study (WITS) of US nonbreastfeeding, HIV-1–infected mothers. In a multivariable logistic regression model, the magnitude of the maternal IgG responses specific for the third variable loop (V3) of the HIV-1 envelope was predictive of a reduced risk of MTCT. Neutralizing Ab responses against easy-to-neutralize (tier 1) HIV-1 strains also predicted a reduced risk of peripartum transmission in secondary analyses. Moreover, recombinant maternal V3–specific IgG mAbs mediated neutralization of autologous HIV-1 isolates. Thus, common V3-specific Ab responses in maternal plasma predicted a reduced risk of MTCT and mediated autologous virus neutralization, suggesting that boosting these maternal Ab responses may further reduce HIV-1 MTCT. PMID:26053661

  4. Risk Factors for HSV-2 Infection among Sexual Partners of HSV-2/HIV-1 Co-Infected Persons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is the most frequent cause of genital ulcer disease worldwide and has been associated with increased risk for HIV-1 acquisition and transmission. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of risk factors for HSV-2 infection among HIV-1 uninfected partners, whose partners were co-infected with HIV-1 and HSV-2. Methods Between November 2004 and April 2007, 3408 HIV-discordant couples, in which the HIV-1 infected partners were HSV-2 seropositive with CD4 250 cells/mm3 or greater, were enrolled in an HSV-2 suppression trial to prevent HIV-1 transmission at 14 sites in 7 African countries. Clinical & behavioral data, HSV-2 and HIV-1 testing were conducted at enrolment. Univariate and multivariate Poisson regression analyses were performed separately, by gender of the HIV-1 infected partner. Results Among 3354 HIV-1 uninfected participants, 32% were female and overall 71% were HSV-2 seropositive. Among couples with female HIV-1 infected partners, HIV-1 plasma RNA [aPR 1.03; 95% CI: 0.99 to 1.06; p = 0.11] and CD4 count [aPR 1.00; 95% CI: 0.98 to 1.01; p = 0.48] in the HSV-2/HIV-1 dually infected female and circumcision in the HIV-1 uninfected male partner [aPR 0.94; 95% CI: 0.88 to 1.00; p = 0.06] were not associated with reduced risk of HSV-2 seropositivity, after adjusting for other factors. Conclusions In this cross-sectional analysis of African HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual couples with prevalent HSV-2 infection in the HIV-1 infected partner, HIV-1 plasma RNA and CD4 count in the dually-infected partner and male circumcision in the HIV-1 uninfected partner were not associated with HSV-2 concordance. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00194519 PMID:21406077

  5. Selective transmission of R5 HIV-1 variants: where is the gatekeeper?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    To enter target cells HIV-1 uses CD4 and a coreceptor. In vivo the coreceptor function is provided either by CCR5 (for R5) or CXCR4 (for X4 HIV-1). Although both R5 and X4 HIV-1 variants are present in body fluids (semen, blood, cervicovaginal and rectal secretions), R5 HIV-1 appears to transmit infection and dominates early stages of HIV disease. Moreover, recent sequence analysis of virus in acute infection shows that, in the majority of cases of transmission, infection is initiated by a single virus. Therefore, the existence of a “gatekeeper” that selects R5 over X4 HIV-1 and that operates among R5 HIV-1 variants has been suggested. In the present review we consider various routes of HIV-transmission and discuss potential gatekeeping mechanisms associated with each of these routes. Although many mechanisms have been identified none of them explains the almost perfect selection of R5 over X4 in HIV-1 transmission. We suggest that instead of one strong gatekeeper there are multiple functional gatekeepers and that their superimposition is sufficient to protect against X4 HIV-1 infection and potentially select among R5 HIV-1 variants. In conclusion, we propose that the principle of multiple barriers is more general and not restricted to protection against X4 HIV-1 but rather can be applied to other phenomena when one factor has a selective advantage over the other(s). In the case of gatekeepers for HIV-1 transmission, the task is to identify them and to decipher their molecular mechanisms. Knowledge of the gatekeepers‘ localization and function may enable us to enhance existing barriers against R5 transmission and to erect the new ones against all HIV-1 variants. PMID:21284905

  6. Genotypic and functional properties of early infant HIV-1 envelopes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding the properties of HIV-1 variants that are transmitted from women to their infants is crucial to improving strategies to prevent transmission. In this study, 162 full-length envelope (env) clones were generated from plasma RNA obtained from 5 HIV-1 Clade B infected mother-infant pairs. Following extensive genotypic and phylogenetic analyses, 35 representative clones were selected for functional studies. Results Infant quasispecies were highly homogeneous and generally represented minor maternal variants, consistent with transmission across a selective bottleneck. Infant clones did not differ from the maternal in env length, or glycosylation. All infant variants utilized the CCR5 co-receptor, but were not macrophage tropic. Relatively high levels (IC50 ≥ 100 μg/ml) of autologous maternal plasma IgG were required to neutralize maternal and infant viruses; however, all infant viruses were neutralized by pooled sera from HIV-1 infected individuals, implying that they were not inherently neutralization-resistant. All infant viruses were sensitive to the HIV-1 entry inhibitors Enfuvirtide and soluble CD4; none were resistant to Maraviroc. Sensitivity to human monoclonal antibodies 4E10, 2F5, b12 and 2G12 varied. Conclusions This study provides extensive characterization of the genotypic and functional properties of HIV-1 env shortly after transmission. We present the first detailed comparisons of the macrophage tropism of infant and maternal env variants and their sensitivity to Maraviroc, the only CCR5 antagonist approved for therapeutic use. These findings may have implications for improving approaches to prevent mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission. PMID:21843318

  7. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  8. Evaluation of Cervical Mucosa in Transmission Bottleneck during Acute HIV-1 Infection Using a Cervical Tissue-Based Organ Culture

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chengli; Ding, Ming; Ratner, Deena; Montelaro, Ronald C.; Chen, Yue; Gupta, Phalguni

    2012-01-01

    Background Although there are different strains of HIV-1 in a chronically infected individual, only one or limited virus strains are successfully transmitted to a new individual. The reason for this “transmission bottleneck” is as yet unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings A human cervical explant model was used to measure HIV-1 transmission efficiency of viral strains from chronic infections, and transmitter/founder variants. We also evaluated the genetic characteristics of HIV-1 variants in the inoculums compared to those transmitted across the cervical mucosa. Eight different HIV-1 isolates were used in this study, six chronic isolates and two transmitter/founder viruses. The transmission efficiency of the chronic and transmitter/founder virus isolates and the viral diversity of chronic isolates before and after viral transmission were assessed. The results indicate that transmitter/founder viruses did not display higher transmission efficiency than chronic HIV-1 isolates. Furthermore, no evidence for a difference in diversity was found between the inoculums and transmitted virus strains. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the sequences of variants in the inoculums and those present in transmitted virus intermingled irrespective of co-receptor usage. In addition, the inoculum and transmitted variants had a similar pairwise distance distribution. Conclusion There was no selection of a single or limited number of viral variants during HIV-1 transmission across the cervical mucosa in the organ culture model, indicating that the cervical mucosa alone may not produce the transmission bottleneck of HIV-1 infection observed in vivo. PMID:22412886

  9. HIV-1 neutralization: mechanisms and relevance to vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Zwick, Michael B; Burton, Dennis R

    2007-11-01

    Antibody (Ab) mediated neutralization is a crucial means of host resistance to many pathogens and will most likely be required in the development of a vaccine to protect against HIV-1. Here we examine mechanistic aspects of HIV-1 neutralization with attention to recent studies on the stoichiometric, kinetic and thermodynamic parameters involved. Neutralization of HIV-1, as with any microbe, minimally requires an initial molecular encounter with Ab. Ab occupancy of functional heterotrimers of the envelope glycoproteins, gp120 and gp41 (Env), indeed appears to be the dominant mechanism of neutralization for HIV-1. However, the Ab-binding site, the parameters mentioned above, as well as the stages and duration of vulnerability to Ab recognition, prior to and leading up to viral entry, each have a distinct impact on the mechanism of neutralization for any given Ab specificity. With HIV-1, the problems of mutational variation and neutralization resistance, coupled with the lability and conformational heterogeneity in Env, have stimulated the search for rational approaches to Env immunogen design that are unprecedented in vaccinology.

  10. HIV-1 in Haitian women 1982-1988. The Cite Soleil/JHU AIDS Project Team.

    PubMed

    Boulos, R; Halsey, N A; Holt, E; Ruff, A; Brutus, J R; Quinn, T C; Adrien, M; Boulos, C

    1990-01-01

    Pregnant Haitian women (n = 4,474) residing in a periurban slum were interviewed to identify risk factors for sexually transmitted diseases and sera were tested to identify antibodies to HIV-1 and syphilis. The seroprevalence rates for antibodies to HIV-1 increased from 8.9% in 1986 to 9.9% in 1987 and 10.3% in 1988. Sera obtained in 1982 from 533 mothers of young infants in the same community revealed that 7.8% were HIV-1 seropositive. Of women pregnant for the first time in 1986-1988, 6.6% were HIV-1 seropositive and 6.0% had a positive VDRL. The highest seropositivity rates (greater than 15%) were noted in women 20 to 29 years of age with a history of two or more sexual partners in the year prior to pregnancy. Factors independently associated with HIV-1 seropositivity in pregnant women by logistic regression analysis included being unmarried, age 20-29 years, having had more than one sex partner in the year prior to pregnancy, a positive serologic test for syphilis, and smoking. A dose-response effect was noted in the association between HIV-1 seropositivity and smoking. The association between smoking and HIV-1 infections could be confounded by unrecognized behavioral factors or due to a biologic effect of smoking. The continuing high HIV-1 seropositivity rates in pregnant women indicate that current preventive measures are insufficient and increased control efforts are urgently needed.

  11. Vpu-Mediated Counteraction of Tetherin Is a Major Determinant of HIV-1 Interferon Resistance.

    PubMed

    Kmiec, Dorota; Iyer, Shilpa S; Stürzel, Christina M; Sauter, Daniel; Hahn, Beatrice H; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2016-08-16

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) groups M, N, O, and P are the result of independent zoonotic transmissions of simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) infecting great apes in Africa. Among these, only Vpu proteins of pandemic HIV-1 group M strains evolved potent activity against the restriction factor tetherin, which inhibits virus release from infected cells. Thus, effective Vpu-mediated tetherin antagonism may have been a prerequisite for the global spread of HIV-1. To determine whether this particular function enhances primary HIV-1 replication and interferon resistance, we introduced mutations into the vpu genes of HIV-1 group M and N strains to specifically disrupt their ability to antagonize tetherin, but not other Vpu functions, such as degradation of CD4, down-modulation of CD1d and NTB-A, and suppression of NF-κB activity. Lack of particular human-specific adaptations reduced the ability of HIV-1 group M Vpu proteins to enhance virus production and release from primary CD4(+) T cells at high levels of type I interferon (IFN) from about 5-fold to 2-fold. Interestingly, transmitted founder HIV-1 strains exhibited higher virion release capacity than chronic control HIV-1 strains irrespective of Vpu function, and group M viruses produced higher levels of cell-free virions than an N group HIV-1 strain. Thus, efficient virus release from infected cells seems to play an important role in the spread of HIV-1 in the human population and requires a fully functional Vpu protein that counteracts human tetherin. Understanding which human-specific adaptations allowed HIV-1 to cause the AIDS pandemic is of great importance. One feature that distinguishes pandemic HIV-1 group M strains from nonpandemic or rare group O, N, and P viruses is the acquisition of mutations in the accessory Vpu protein that confer potent activity against human tetherin. Adaptation was required because human tetherin has a deletion that renders it resistant to the Nef protein used by

  12. Newly Exerted T Cell Pressures on Mutated Epitopes following Transmission Help Maintain Consensus HIV-1 Sequences.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Emily M; Liegler, Teri; Keh, Chris E; Karlsson, Annika C; Holditch, Sara J; Pilcher, Christopher D; Loeb, Lisa; Nixon, Douglas F; Hecht, Frederick M

    2014-01-01

    CD8+ T cells are important for HIV-1 virus control, but are also a major contributing factor that drives HIV-1 virus sequence evolution. Although HIV-1 cytotoxic T cell (CTL) escape mutations are a common aspect during HIV-1 infection, less is known about the importance of T cell pressure in reversing HIV-1 virus back to a consensus sequences. In this study we aimed to assess the frequency with which reversion of transmitted mutations in T cell epitopes were associated with T cell responses to the mutation. This study included 14 HIV-1 transmission pairs consisting of a 'source' (virus-donor) and a 'recipient' (newly infected individual). Non-consensus B sequence amino acids (mutations) in T cell epitopes in HIV-1 gag regions p17, p24, p2 and p7 were identified in each pair and transmission of mutations to the recipient was verified with population viral sequencing. Longitudinal analyses of the recipient's viral sequence were used to identify whether reversion of mutations back to the consensus B sequence occurred. Autologous 12-mer peptides overlapping by 11 were synthesized, representing the sequence region surrounding each reversion and longitudinal analysis of T cell responses to source-derived mutated and reverted epitopes were assessed. We demonstrated that mutations in the source were frequently transmitted to the new host and on an average 17 percent of mutated epitopes reverted to consensus sequence in the recipient. T cell responses to these mutated epitopes were detected in 7 of the 14 recipients in whom reversion occurred. Overall, these findings indicate that transmitted non-consensus B epitopes are frequently immunogenic in HLA-mismatched recipients and new T cell pressures to T cell escape mutations following transmission play a significant role in maintaining consensus HIV-1 sequences.

  13. C-type lectin Mermaid inhibits dendritic cell mediated HIV-1 transmission to CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Nabatov, Alexey A; de Jong, Marein A W P; de Witte, Lot; Bulgheresi, Silvia; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2008-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are important in HIV-1 transmission; DCs capture invading HIV-1 through the interaction of the gp120 oligosaccharides with the C-type lectin DC-SIGN and migrate to the lymphoid tissues where HIV-1 is transmitted to T cells. Thus, the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 is an attractive target to prevent interactions with DCs and subsequent viral transmission. Here, we have investigated whether the structural homologue of DC-SIGN, the nematode C-type lectin Mermaid can be used to prevent HIV-1 transmission by DCs. Our data demonstrate that Mermaid interacts with high mannose structures present on HIV-1 gp120 and thereby inhibits HIV-1 binding to DC-SIGN on DCs. Moreover, Mermaid inhibits DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 transmission from DC to T cells. We have identified Mermaid as a non-cytotoxic agent that shares the glycan specificity with DC-SIGN and inhibits DC-SIGN-gp120 interaction. The results are important for the anti-HIV-1 microbicide development directed at preventing DC-HIV-1 interactions.

  14. Characterizing HIV-1 Splicing by Using Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Emery, Ann; Zhou, Shuntai; Pollom, Elizabeth; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2017-03-15

    Full-length human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA serves as the genome or as an mRNA, or this RNA undergoes splicing using four donors and 10 acceptors to create over 50 physiologically relevant transcripts in two size classes (1.8 kb and 4 kb). We developed an assay using Primer ID-tagged deep sequencing to quantify HIV-1 splicing. Using the lab strain NL4-3, we found that A5 (env/nef) is the most commonly used acceptor (about 50%) and A3 (tat) the least used (about 3%). Two small exons are made when a splice to acceptor A1 or A2 is followed by activation of donor D2 or D3, and the high-level use of D2 and D3 dramatically reduces the amount of vif and vpr transcripts. We observed distinct patterns of temperature sensitivity of splicing to acceptors A1 and A2. In addition, disruption of a conserved structure proximal to A1 caused a 10-fold reduction in all transcripts that utilized A1. Analysis of a panel of subtype B transmitted/founder viruses showed that splicing patterns are conserved, but with surprising variability of usage. A subtype C isolate was similar, while a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) isolate showed significant differences. We also observed transsplicing from a downstream donor on one transcript to an upstream acceptor on a different transcript, which we detected in 0.3% of 1.8-kb RNA reads. There were several examples of splicing suppression when the env intron was retained in the 4-kb size class. These results demonstrate the utility of this assay and identify new examples of HIV-1 splicing regulation. IMPORTANCE During HIV-1 replication, over 50 conserved spliced RNA variants are generated. The splicing assay described here uses new developments in deep-sequencing technology combined with Primer ID-tagged cDNA primers to efficiently quantify HIV-1 splicing at a depth that allows even low-frequency splice variants to be monitored. We have used this assay to examine several features of HIV-1 splicing and to identify new examples of

  15. Vpu-Mediated Counteraction of Tetherin Is a Major Determinant of HIV-1 Interferon Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kmiec, Dorota; Iyer, Shilpa S.; Stürzel, Christina M.; Sauter, Daniel; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) groups M, N, O, and P are the result of independent zoonotic transmissions of simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) infecting great apes in Africa. Among these, only Vpu proteins of pandemic HIV-1 group M strains evolved potent activity against the restriction factor tetherin, which inhibits virus release from infected cells. Thus, effective Vpu-mediated tetherin antagonism may have been a prerequisite for the global spread of HIV-1. To determine whether this particular function enhances primary HIV-1 replication and interferon resistance, we introduced mutations into the vpu genes of HIV-1 group M and N strains to specifically disrupt their ability to antagonize tetherin, but not other Vpu functions, such as degradation of CD4, down-modulation of CD1d and NTB-A, and suppression of NF-κB activity. Lack of particular human-specific adaptations reduced the ability of HIV-1 group M Vpu proteins to enhance virus production and release from primary CD4+ T cells at high levels of type I interferon (IFN) from about 5-fold to 2-fold. Interestingly, transmitted founder HIV-1 strains exhibited higher virion release capacity than chronic control HIV-1 strains irrespective of Vpu function, and group M viruses produced higher levels of cell-free virions than an N group HIV-1 strain. Thus, efficient virus release from infected cells seems to play an important role in the spread of HIV-1 in the human population and requires a fully functional Vpu protein that counteracts human tetherin. PMID:27531907

  16. Macrophages and HIV-1: An Unhealthy Constellation.

    PubMed

    Sattentau, Quentin J; Stevenson, Mario

    2016-03-09

    Lentiviruses have a long-documented association with macrophages. Abundant evidence exists for in vitro and, in a tissue-specific manner, in vivo infection of macrophages by the primate lentiviruses HIV-1 and SIV. However, macrophage contribution to aspects of HIV-1 and SIV pathogenesis, and their role in viral persistence in individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy, remains unclear. Here we discuss recent evidence implicating macrophages in HIV-1-mediated disease and highlight directions for further investigation.

  17. Antiretroviral Therapy for the Prevention of HIV-1 Transmission.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Myron S; Chen, Ying Q; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Hakim, James G; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Pilotto, Jose H S; Godbole, Sheela V; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Santos, Breno R; Mayer, Kenneth H; Hoffman, Irving F; Eshleman, Susan H; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Cottle, Leslie; Zhang, Xinyi C; Makhema, Joseph; Mills, Lisa A; Panchia, Ravindre; Faesen, Sharlaa; Eron, Joseph; Gallant, Joel; Havlir, Diane; Swindells, Susan; Elharrar, Vanessa; Burns, David; Taha, Taha E; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Celentano, David D; Essex, Max; Hudelson, Sarah E; Redd, Andrew D; Fleming, Thomas R

    2016-09-01

    An interim analysis of data from the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 052 trial showed that antiretroviral therapy (ART) prevented more than 96% of genetically linked infections caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in serodiscordant couples. ART was then offered to all patients with HIV-1 infection (index participants). The study included more than 5 years of follow-up to assess the durability of such therapy for the prevention of HIV-1 transmission. We randomly assigned 1763 index participants to receive either early or delayed ART. In the early-ART group, 886 participants started therapy at enrollment (CD4+ count, 350 to 550 cells per cubic millimeter). In the delayed-ART group, 877 participants started therapy after two consecutive CD4+ counts fell below 250 cells per cubic millimeter or if an illness indicative of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (i.e., an AIDS-defining illness) developed. The primary study end point was the diagnosis of genetically linked HIV-1 infection in the previously HIV-1-negative partner in an intention-to-treat analysis. Index participants were followed for 10,031 person-years; partners were followed for 8509 person-years. Among partners, 78 HIV-1 infections were observed during the trial (annual incidence, 0.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7 to 1.1). Viral-linkage status was determined for 72 (92%) of the partner infections. Of these infections, 46 were linked (3 in the early-ART group and 43 in the delayed-ART group; incidence, 0.5%; 95% CI, 0.4 to 0.7) and 26 were unlinked (14 in the early-ART group and 12 in the delayed-ART group; incidence, 0.3%; 95% CI, 0.2 to 0.4). Early ART was associated with a 93% lower risk of linked partner infection than was delayed ART (hazard ratio, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.22). No linked infections were observed when HIV-1 infection was stably suppressed by ART in the index participant. The early initiation of ART led to a sustained decrease in genetically linked HIV-1

  18. Antiretroviral Therapy for the Prevention of HIV-1 Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Myron S.; Chen, Ying Q.; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Hakim, James G.; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Pilotto, Jose H.S.; Godbole, Sheela V.; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Santos, Breno R.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Hoffman, Irving F.; Eshleman, Susan H.; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Cottle, Leslie; Zhang, Xinyi C.; Makhema, Joseph; Mills, Lisa A.; Panchia, Ravindre; Faesen, Sharlaa; Eron, Joseph; Gallant, Joel; Havlir, Diane; Swindells, Susan; Elharrar, Vanessa; Burns, David; Taha, Taha E.; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Celentano, David D.; Essex, Max; Hudelson, Sarah E.; Redd, Andrew D.; Fleming, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND An interim analysis of data from the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 052 trial showed that antiretroviral therapy (ART) prevented more than 96% of genetically linked infections caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in serodiscordant couples. ART was then offered to all patients with HIV-1 infection (index participants). The study included more than 5 years of follow-up to assess the durability of such therapy for the prevention of HIV-1 transmission. METHODS We randomly assigned 1763 index participants to receive either early or delayed ART. In the early-ART group, 886 participants started therapy at enrollment (CD4+ count, 350 to 550 cells per cubic millimeter). In the delayed-ART group, 877 participants started therapy after two consecutive CD4+ counts fell below 250 cells per cubic millimeter or if an illness indicative of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (i.e., an AIDS-defining illness) developed. The primary study end point was the diagnosis of genetically linked HIV-1 infection in the previously HIV-1– negative partner in an intention-to-treat analysis. RESULTS Index participants were followed for 10,031 person-years; partners were followed for 8509 person-years. Among partners, 78 HIV-1 infections were observed during the trial (annual incidence, 0.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7 to 1.1). Viral-linkage status was determined for 72 (92%) of the partner infections. Of these infections, 46 were linked (3 in the early-ART group and 43 in the delayed-ART group; incidence, 0.5%; 95% CI, 0.4 to 0.7) and 26 were unlinked (14 in the early-ART group and 12 in the delayed-ART group; incidence, 0.3%; 95% CI, 0.2 to 0.4). Early ART was associated with a 93% lower risk of linked partner infection than was delayed ART (hazard ratio, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.22). No linked infections were observed when HIV-1 infection was stably suppressed by ART in the index participant. CONCLUSIONS The early initiation of ART led to a sustained

  19. Cytopathic Mechanisms of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Costin, Joshua M

    2007-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been intensely investigated since its discovery in 1983 as the cause of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). With relatively few proteins made by the virus, it is able to accomplish many tasks, with each protein serving multiple functions. The Envelope glycoprotein, composed of the two noncovalently linked subunits, SU (surface glycoprotein) and TM (transmembrane glycoprotein) is largely responsible for host cell recognition and entry respectively. While the roles of the N-terminal residues of TM is well established as a fusion pore and anchor for Env into cell membranes, the role of the C-terminus of the protein is not well understood and is fiercely debated. This review gathers information on TM in an attempt to shed some light on the functional regions of this protein. PMID:17945027

  20. Cytopathic mechanisms of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Costin, Joshua M

    2007-10-18

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been intensely investigated since its discovery in 1983 as the cause of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). With relatively few proteins made by the virus, it is able to accomplish many tasks, with each protein serving multiple functions. The Envelope glycoprotein, composed of the two noncovalently linked subunits, SU (surface glycoprotein) and TM (transmembrane glycoprotein) is largely responsible for host cell recognition and entry respectively. While the roles of the N-terminal residues of TM is well established as a fusion pore and anchor for Env into cell membranes, the role of the C-terminus of the protein is not well understood and is fiercely debated. This review gathers information on TM in an attempt to shed some light on the functional regions of this protein.

  1. Macrophage infection via selective capture of HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Amy E; Russell, Rebecca A; Duncan, Christopher J A; Moore, Michael D; Willberg, Christian B; Pablos, Jose L; Finzi, Andrés; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C; Groot, Fedde; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2014-12-10

    Macrophages contribute to HIV-1 pathogenesis by forming a viral reservoir and mediating neurological disorders. Cell-free HIV-1 infection of macrophages is inefficient, in part due to low plasma membrane expression of viral entry receptors. We find that macrophages selectively capture and engulf HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells leading to efficient macrophage infection. Infected T cells, both healthy and dead or dying, were taken up through viral envelope glycoprotein-receptor-independent interactions, implying a mechanism distinct from conventional virological synapse formation. Macrophages infected by this cell-to-cell route were highly permissive for both CCR5-using macrophage-tropic and otherwise weakly macrophage-tropic transmitted/founder viruses but restrictive for nonmacrophage-tropic CXCR4-using virus. These results have implications for establishment of the macrophage reservoir and HIV-1 dissemination in vivo.

  2. HIV-1 protease-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is one of the presumptive causes of CD4+ T cell depletion during HIV infection and progression to AIDS. However, the precise role of HIV-1 in this process remains unexplained. HIV-1 protease (PR) has been suggested as a possible factor, but a direct link between HIV-1 PR enzymatic activity and apoptosis has not been established. Results Here, we show that expression of active HIV-1 PR induces death in HeLa and HEK-293 cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. This conclusion is based on in vivo observations of the direct localization of HIV-1 PR in mitochondria, a key player in triggering apoptosis. Moreover, we observed an HIV-1 PR concentration-dependent decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and the role of HIV-1 PR in activation of caspase 9, PARP cleavage and DNA fragmentation. In addition, in vitro data demonstrated that HIV-1 PR mediates cleavage of mitochondrial proteins Tom22, VDAC and ANT, leading to release of AIF and Hsp60 proteins. By using yeast two-hybrid screening, we also identified a new HIV-1 PR interaction partner, breast carcinoma-associated protein 3 (BCA3). We found that BCA3 accelerates p53 transcriptional activity on the bax promoter, thus elevating the cellular level of pro-apoptotic Bax protein. Conclusion In summary, our results describe the involvement of HIV-1 PR in apoptosis, which is caused either by a direct effect of HIV-1 PR on mitochondrial membrane integrity or by its interaction with cellular protein BCA3. PMID:24886575

  3. Pharmacotherapy of HIV-1 Infection: Focus on CCR5 Antagonist Maraviroc

    PubMed Central

    Latinovic, Olga; Kuruppu, Janaki; Davis, Charles; Le, Nhut; Heredia, Alonso

    2009-01-01

    Sustained inhibition of HIV-1, the goal of antiretroviral therapy, is often impeded by the emergence of viral drug resistance. For patients infected with HIV-1 resistant to conventional drugs from the viral reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitor classes, the recently approved entry and integration inhibitors effectively suppress HIV-1 and offer additional therapeutic options. Entry inhibitors are particularly attractive because, unlike conventional antiretrovirals, they target HIV-1 extracellularly, thereby sparing cells from both viral- and drug-induced toxicities. The fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide and the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc are the first entry inhibitors licensed for patients with drug-resistant HIV-1, with maraviroc restricted to those infected with CCR5-tropic HIV-1 (R5 HIV-1) only. Vicriviroc (another CCR5 antagonist) is in Phase III clinical trials, whereas the CCR5 antibodies PRO 140 and HGS 004 are in early stages of clinical development. Potent antiviral synergy between maraviroc and CCR5 antibodies, coupled with distinct patterns of resistance, suggest their combinations might be particularly effective in patients. In addition, given that oral administration of maraviroc achieves high drug levels in cervicovaginal fluid, combinations of maraviroc and other CCR5 inhibitors could be effective in preventing HIV-1 transmission. Moreover, since CCR5 antagonists prevent rejection of transplanted organs, maraviroc could both suppress HIV-1 and prolong organ survival for the growing number of HIV-1 patients with kidney or liver failure necessitating organ transplantation. Thus, maraviroc offers an important treatment option for patients with drug-resistant R5 HIV-1, who presently account for >50% of drug-resistance cases. PMID:19920876

  4. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of salicylidene acylhydrazide compounds

    PubMed Central

    Forthal, Donald N.; Phan, Tran B.; Slepenkin, Anatoly V.; Landucci, Gary; Chu, Hencelyn; Elofsson, Mikael; Peterson, Ellena

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Salicylidene acylhydrazide compounds have been shown to inhibit bacterial pathogens, including Chlamydia and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. If such compounds could also target HIV-1, their potential use as topical microbicides to prevent sexually transmitted infections would be considerable. We determined the in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity, cytotoxicity and mechanism of action of several salicylidene acylhydrazides. Methods Inhibitory activity was assessed using TZMbl cells and primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as targets for HIV-1 infection. Anti-viral activity was measured against cell-free and cell-associated virus and in vaginal fluid and semen simulants. Since the anti-bacterial activity of salicylidene acylhydrazides is reversible by Fe2+, we determined whether Fe2+ and other cations could reverse the anti-HIV-1 activity of the compounds. We also employed real-time PCR to determine the stage affected in the HIV-1 replication cycle. Results We identified four compounds with 50% HIV-1 inhibitory concentrations of 1 to 7 μM. In vitro toxicity varied but was generally limited. Activity was similar against three R5 clade B primary isolates and whether targets for virus replication were TZMbl cells or PBMCs. Compounds inhibited cell-free and cell-associated virus and were active in vaginal fluid and semen simulants. Fe2+, but not other cations, reversed the anti-HIV-1 effect. Finally, inhibitory effect of the compounds occurred at a post-integration step. Conclusions We identified salicylidene acylhydrazides with in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity in the μM range. The activity of these compounds against other sexually transmitted pathogens makes them potential candidates to formulate for use as a broad-spectrum topical genital microbicide. PMID:22819150

  5. Drug-Eluting Fibers for HIV-1 Inhibition and Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Cameron; Krogstad, Emily; Chaowanachan, Thanyanan; Woodrow, Kim A.

    2012-01-01

    Multipurpose prevention technologies (MPTs) that simultaneously prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and unintended pregnancy are a global health priority. Combining chemical and physical barriers offers the greatest potential to design effective MPTs, but integrating both functional modalities into a single device has been challenging. Here we show that drug-eluting fiber meshes designed for topical drug delivery can function as a combination chemical and physical barrier MPT. Using FDA-approved polymers, we fabricated nanofiber meshes with tunable fiber size and controlled degradation kinetics that facilitate simultaneous release of multiple agents against HIV-1, HSV-2, and sperm. We observed that drug-loaded meshes inhibited HIV-1 infection in vitro and physically obstructed sperm penetration. Furthermore, we report on a previously unknown activity of glycerol monolaurate (GML) to potently inhibit sperm motility and viability. The application of drug-eluting nanofibers for HIV-1 prevention and sperm inhibition may serve as an innovative platform technology for drug delivery to the lower female reproductive tract. PMID:23209601

  6. Drug-eluting fibers for HIV-1 inhibition and contraception.

    PubMed

    Ball, Cameron; Krogstad, Emily; Chaowanachan, Thanyanan; Woodrow, Kim A

    2012-01-01

    Multipurpose prevention technologies (MPTs) that simultaneously prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and unintended pregnancy are a global health priority. Combining chemical and physical barriers offers the greatest potential to design effective MPTs, but integrating both functional modalities into a single device has been challenging. Here we show that drug-eluting fiber meshes designed for topical drug delivery can function as a combination chemical and physical barrier MPT. Using FDA-approved polymers, we fabricated nanofiber meshes with tunable fiber size and controlled degradation kinetics that facilitate simultaneous release of multiple agents against HIV-1, HSV-2, and sperm. We observed that drug-loaded meshes inhibited HIV-1 infection in vitro and physically obstructed sperm penetration. Furthermore, we report on a previously unknown activity of glycerol monolaurate (GML) to potently inhibit sperm motility and viability. The application of drug-eluting nanofibers for HIV-1 prevention and sperm inhibition may serve as an innovative platform technology for drug delivery to the lower female reproductive tract.

  7. Relationships between humoral factors in HIV-1-infected mothers and the occurrence of HIV infection in their infants.

    PubMed Central

    Mabondzo, A; Rouvier, P; Raoul, H; Le Naour, R; Courpotin, C; Hervé, F; Parnet-Mathieu, F; Lasfargues, G; Dormont, D

    1995-01-01

    Based on what is known about the biology of HIV-1 vertical transmission, the HIV burden of the mother, maternal immune factors and the integrity of the placental barrier are likely to play major roles. We therefore sought to determine whether the presence of antibodies in sera from 47 HIV-1-infected mothers, including 30 non-transmitting and 17 transmitting mothers, affected the risk of HIV-1 transmission to infants. Our findings showed no significant correlation between the capacity of antibodies to mediate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and their capacity to induce protection of the child from HIV-1 infection (P = 0.14). Furthermore, no correlation was found between the capacity of maternal antibodies to neutralize in vitro lymphocyte or macrophage heterologous viral infection and the occurrence of in vivo HIV-1 infection in the infant. Sera recovered from five of 12 transmitting mothers and from five of 11 non-transmitting mothers were compared in their capacity to neutralize the viruses drawn from the same individuals. Four out of five maternal isolates from transmitting mothers and all maternal isolates from non-transmitting mothers were sensitive to enhancement of infection mediated by the maternal serum. PMID:8536360

  8. HIV-1-induced AIDS in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hatziioannou, Theodora; Del Prete, Gregory Q; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; McNatt, Matthew W; Bitzegeio, Julia; Raymond, Alice; Rodriguez, Anthony; Schmidt, Fabian; Mac Trubey, C; Smedley, Jeremy; Piatak, Michael; KewalRamani, Vineet N; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2014-06-20

    Primate lentiviruses exhibit narrow host tropism, reducing the occurrence of zoonoses but also impairing the development of optimal animal models of AIDS. To delineate the factors limiting cross-species HIV-1 transmission, we passaged a modified HIV-1 in pigtailed macaques that were transiently depleted of CD8(+) cells during acute infection. During adaptation over four passages in macaques, HIV-1 acquired the ability to antagonize the macaque restriction factor tetherin, replicated at progressively higher levels, and ultimately caused marked CD4(+) T cell depletion and AIDS-defining conditions. Transient treatment with an antibody to CD8 during acute HIV-1 infection caused rapid progression to AIDS, whereas untreated animals exhibited an elite controller phenotype. Thus, an adapted HIV-1 can cause AIDS in macaques, and stark differences in outcome can be determined by immunological perturbations during early infection.

  9. Vaginal washing and increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition among African women: a 10-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    McClelland, R Scott; Lavreys, Ludo; Hassan, Wisal M; Mandaliya, Kishorchandra; Ndinya-Achola, Jeckoniah O; Baeten, Jared M

    2006-01-09

    No prospective study has examined the risk of HIV-1 acquisition associated with vaginal washing, although intravaginal practices have been identified as potentially important contributors to HIV-1 susceptibility. To evaluate the contribution of vaginal washing to incident HIV-1 infection. Prospective cohort study. Data were derived from a 10-year study of risk factors for HIV-1 acquisition among 1270 Kenyan female sex workers. Intravaginal practices were ascertained at study enrollment. At monthly follow-up visits, women completed a standardized interview and specimens were collected for diagnosis of HIV-1 and genital tract infections. : Compared with women who did not perform vaginal washing, there was an increased risk for acquiring HIV-1 among women who used water [adjusted hazard ratio (HR), 2.64; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.00-6.97] or soap (adjusted HR 3.84; 95% CI, 1.51-9.77) to clean inside the vagina, after adjustment for demographic factors, sexual behavior, and sexually transmitted infections. Furthermore, women who performed vaginal washing with soap or other substances were at higher risk for HIV-1 compared with those who used water alone (adjusted HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.02-2.13). In populations where vaginal washing is common, this practice may be an important factor promoting the spread of HIV-1. Intervention strategies aimed at modifying intravaginal practices should be evaluated as a possible female-controlled HIV-1 prevention strategy.

  10. High-Throughput Humanized Mouse Models for Evaluation of HIV-1 Therapeutics and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Tynisha; Seay, Kieran; Zheng, Jian Hua; Zhang, Cong; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C; Goldstein, Harris

    2016-01-01

    Mice cannot be used as a model to evaluate HIV-1 therapeutics because they do not become infected by HIV-1 due to structural differences between several human and mouse proteins required for HIV-1 replication. This has limited their use for in vivo assessment of anti-HIV-1 therapeutics and the mechanism by which cofactors, such as illicit drug use accelerate HIV-1 replication and disease course in substance abusers. Here, we describe the development and application of two in vivo humanized mouse models that are highly sensitive and useful models for the in vivo evaluation of candidate anti-HIV therapeutics. The first model, hu-spl-PBMC-NSG mice, uses NOD-SCID IL2rγ(-/-) (NSG) mice intrasplenically injected with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) which develop productive splenic HIV-1 infection after intrasplenic inoculation with a replication-competent HIV-1 expressing Renilla reniformis luciferase (HIV-LucR) and enables investigators to use bioluminescence to visualize and quantitate the temporal effects of therapeutics on HIV-1 infection. The second model, hCD4/R5/cT1 mice, consists of transgenic mice carrying human CD4, CCR5 and cyclin T1 genes, which enables murine CD4-expressing cells to support HIV-1 entry, Tat-mediated LTR transcription and consequently develop productive infection. The hCD4/R5/cT1 mice develop disseminated infection of tissues including the spleen, small intestine, lymph nodes and lungs after intravenous injection with HIV-1-LucR. Because these mice can be infected with HIV-LucR expressing transmitted/founder and clade A/E and C Envs, these mouse models can also be used to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of broadly neutralizing antibodies and antibodies induced by candidate HIV-1 vaccines. Furthermore, because hCD4/R5/cT1 mice can be infected by vaginal inoculation with replication-competent HIV-1 expressing NanoLuc (HIV-nLucR)-, this mouse model can be used to evaluate the mechanisms by which substance abuse and other factors

  11. GADD45 proteins inhibit HIV-1 replication through specific suppression of HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhibin; Liu, Ruikang; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Suzhen; Hu, Xiaomei; Tan, Juan; Liang, Chen; Qiao, Wentao

    2016-06-01

    GADD45 proteins are a group of stress-induced proteins and participate in various cellular pathways including cell cycle regulation, cell survival and death, DNA repair and demethylation. It was recently shown that HIV-1 infection induces the expression of GADD45 proteins. However, the effect of GADD45 on HIV-1 replication has not been studied. Here, we report that overexpression of GADD45 proteins reduces HIV-1 production through suppressing transcription from the HIV-1 LTR promoter. This inhibitory effect is specific to HIV-1, since GADD45 proteins neither inhibit the LTR promoters from other retroviruses nor reduce the production of these viruses. Knockdown of endogenous GADD45 modestly activates HIV-1 in the J-Lat A72 latency cell line, which suggests GADD45 proteins might play a role in maintaining HIV-1 latency.

  12. The Presence and Anti-HIV-1 Function of Tenascin C in Breast Milk and Genital Fluids.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Robin G; Stamper, Lisa; Jaeger, Frederick; McGuire, Erin; Fouda, Genevieve; Amos, Joshua; Barbas, Kimberly; Ohashi, Tomoo; Alam, S Munir; Erickson, Harold; Permar, Sallie R

    2016-01-01

    Tenascin-C (TNC) is a newly identified innate HIV-1-neutralizing protein present in breast milk, yet its presence and potential HIV-inhibitory function in other mucosal fluids is unknown. In this study, we identified TNC as a component of semen and cervical fluid of HIV-1-infected and uninfected individuals, although it is present at a significantly lower concentration and frequency compared to that of colostrum and mature breast milk, potentially due to genital fluid protease degradation. However, TNC was able to neutralize HIV-1 after exposure to low pH, suggesting that TNC could be active at low pH in the vaginal compartment. As mucosal fluids are complex and contain a number of proteins known to interact with the HIV-1 envelope, we further studied the relationship between the concentration of TNC and neutralizing activity in breast milk. The amount of TNC correlated only weakly with the overall innate HIV-1-neutralizing activity of breast milk of uninfected women and negatively correlated with neutralizing activity in milk of HIV-1 infected women, indicating that the amount of TNC in mucosal fluids is not adequate to impede HIV-1 transmission. Moreover, the presence of polyclonal IgG from milk of HIV-1 infected women, but not other HIV-1 envelope-binding milk proteins or monoclonal antibodies, blocked the neutralizing activity of TNC. Finally, as exogenous administration of TNC would be necessary for it to mediate measurable HIV-1 neutralizing activity in mucosal compartments, we established that recombinantly produced TNC has neutralizing activity against transmitted/founder HIV-1 strains that mimic that of purified TNC. Thus, we conclude that endogenous TNC concentration in mucosal fluids is likely inadequate to block HIV-1 transmission to uninfected individuals.

  13. Uneven Genetic Robustness of HIV-1 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Rihn, Suzannah J.; Hughes, Joseph; Wilson, Sam J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genetic robustness (tolerance of mutation) may be a naturally selected property in some viruses, because it should enhance adaptability. Robustness should be especially beneficial to viruses like HIV-1 that exhibit high mutation rates and exist in immunologically hostile environments. Surprisingly, however, the HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) exhibits extreme fragility. To determine whether fragility is a general property of HIV-1 proteins, we created a large library of random, single-amino-acid mutants in HIV-1 integrase (IN), covering >40% of amino acid positions. Despite similar degrees of sequence variation in naturally occurring IN and CA sequences, we found that HIV-1 IN was significantly more robust than CA, with random nonsilent IN mutations only half as likely to cause lethal defects. Interestingly, IN and CA were similar in that a subset of mutations with high in vitro fitness were rare in natural populations. IN mutations of this type were more likely to occur in the buried interior of the modeled HIV-1 intasome, suggesting that even very subtle fitness effects suppress variation in natural HIV-1 populations. Lethal mutations, in particular those that perturbed particle production, proteolytic processing, and particle-associated IN levels, were strikingly localized at specific IN subunit interfaces. This observation strongly suggests that binding interactions between particular IN subunits regulate proteolysis during HIV-1 virion morphogenesis. Overall, use of the IN mutant library in conjunction with structural models demonstrates the overall robustness of IN and highlights particular regions of vulnerability that may be targeted in therapeutic interventions. IMPORTANCE The HIV-1 integrase (IN) protein is responsible for the integration of the viral genome into the host cell chromosome. To measure the capacity of IN to maintain function in the face of mutation, and to probe structure/function relationships, we created a library of random single

  14. HIV-1 drug resistance and resistance testing.

    PubMed

    Clutter, Dana S; Jordan, Michael R; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Shafer, Robert W

    2016-12-01

    The global scale-up of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy (ART) has led to dramatic reductions in HIV-1 mortality and incidence. However, HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) poses a potential threat to the long-term success of ART and is emerging as a threat to the elimination of AIDS as a public health problem by 2030. In this review we describe the genetic mechanisms, epidemiology, and management of HIVDR at both individual and population levels across diverse economic and geographic settings. To describe the genetic mechanisms of HIVDR, we review the genetic barriers to resistance for the most commonly used ARVs and describe the extent of cross-resistance between them. To describe the epidemiology of HIVDR, we summarize the prevalence and patterns of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and acquired drug resistance (ADR) in both high-income and low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We also review to two categories of HIVDR with important public health relevance: (i) pre-treatment drug resistance (PDR), a World Health Organization-recommended HIVDR surveillance metric and (ii) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)-related drug resistance, a type of ADR that can impact clinical outcomes if present at the time of treatment initiation. To summarize the implications of HIVDR for patient management, we review the role of genotypic resistance testing and treatment practices in both high-income and LMIC settings. In high-income countries where drug resistance testing is part of routine care, such an understanding can help clinicians prevent virological failure and accumulation of further HIVDR on an individual level by selecting the most efficacious regimens for their patients. Although there is reduced access to diagnostic testing and to many ARVs in LMIC, understanding the scientific basis and clinical implications of HIVDR is useful in all regions in order to shape appropriate surveillance, inform treatment algorithms, and manage difficult cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  15. Blocking HIV-1 transmission in the female reproductive tract: from microbicide development to exploring local antiviral responses

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Sahar G; Mangan, Niamh E; Hertzog, Paul J; Mak, Johnson

    2015-01-01

    The majority of new HIV-1 infections are transmitted sexually by penetrating the mucosal barrier to infect target cells. The development of microbicides to restrain heterosexual HIV-1 transmission in the past two decades has proven to be a challenging endeavor. Therefore, better understanding of the tissue environment in the female reproductive tract may assist in the development of the next generation of microbicides to prevent HIV-1 transmission. In this review, we highlight the important factors involved in the heterosexual transmission of HIV-1, provide an update on microbicides' clinical trials, and discuss how different delivery platforms and local immunity may empower the development of next generation of microbicide to block HIV-1 transmission in the female reproductive tract. PMID:26682051

  16. Adenoviral gene delivery for HIV-1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Vanniasinkam, T; Ertl, H C J

    2005-04-01

    The AIDS epidemic continues to spread throughout nations of Africa and Asia and is by now threatening to undermine the already frail infrastructure of developing countries in Sub-Saharan Africa that are hit the hardest. The only option to stem this epidemic is through inexpensive and efficacious vaccines that prevent or at least blunt HIV-1 infections. Despite decades of pre-clinical and clinical research such vaccines remain elusive. Most anti-viral vaccines act by inducing protective levels of virus-neutralizing antibodies. The envelope protein of HIV-1, the sole target of neutralizing antibodies, is constantly changing due to mutations, B cell epitopes are masked by heavy glycosylation and the protein's structural unfolding upon binding to its CD4 receptor and chemokine co-receptors. Efforts to induce broadly cross-reactive virus-neutralizing antibodies able to induce sterilizing or near sterilizing immunity to HIV-1 have thus failed. Studies have indicated that cell-mediated immune responses and in particular CD8+ T cell responses to internal viral proteins may control HIV-1 infections without necessarily preventing them. Adenoviral vectors expressing antigens of HIV-1 are eminently suited to stimulate potent CD8+ T cell responses against transgene products, such as antigens of HIV-1. They performed well in pre-clinical studies in rodents and nonhuman primates and are currently in human clinical trials. This review summarizes the published literature on adenoviral vectors as vaccine carriers for HIV-1 and discusses advantages and disadvantages of this vaccine modality.

  17. Lessons from HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials.

    PubMed

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Michael, Nelson L

    2016-11-01

    Only four HIV-1 vaccine concepts have been tested in six efficacy trials with no product licensed to date. Several scientific and programmatic lessons can be learned from these studies generating new hypotheses and guiding future steps. RV144 [ALVAC-HIV (canarypox vector) and AIDSVAX B/E (bivalent gp120 HIV-1 subtype B and CRF01_AE)] remains the only efficacy trial that demonstrated a modest vaccine efficacy, which led to the identification of immune correlates of risk. Progress on subtype-specific, ALVAC (canarypox vector) and gp120 vaccine prime-boost approaches has been slow, but we are finally close to the launch of an efficacy study in Africa in 2016. The quest of a globally effective HIV-1 vaccine has led to the development of new approaches. Efficacy studies of combinations of Adenovirus type 26 (Ad26)/Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA)/gp140 vaccines with mosaic designs will enter efficacy studies mid-2017 and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-vectored vaccines begin Phase I studies at the same time. Future HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials face practical challenges as effective nonvaccine prevention programs are projected to decrease HIV-1 incidence. An HIV-1 vaccine is urgently needed. Increased industry involvement, mobilization of resources, expansion of a robust pipeline of new concepts, and robust preclinical challenge studies will be essential to accelerate efficacy testing of next generation HIV-1 vaccine candidates.

  18. Unexplained diarrhoea in HIV-1 infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal symptoms, in particular diarrhoea, are common in non-treated HIV-1 infected individuals. Although various enteric pathogens have been implicated, the aetiology of diarrhoea remains unexplained in a large proportion of HIV-1 infected patients. Our aim is to identify the cause of diarrhoea for patients that remain negative in routine diagnostics. Methods In this study stool samples of 196 HIV-1 infected persons, including 29 persons with diarrhoea, were examined for enteropathogens and HIV-1. A search for unknown and unexpected viruses was performed using virus discovery cDNA-AFLP combined with Roche-454 sequencing (VIDISCA-454). Results HIV-1 RNA was detected in stool of 19 patients with diarrhoea (66%) compared to 75 patients (45%) without diarrhoea. In 19 of the 29 diarrhoea cases a known enteropathogen could be identified (66%). Next to these known causative agents, a range of recently identified viruses was identified via VIDISCA-454: cosavirus, Aichi virus, human gyrovirus, and non-A non-B hepatitis virus. Moreover, a novel virus was detected which was named immunodeficiency-associated stool virus (IASvirus). However, PCR based screening for these viruses showed that none of these novel viruses was associated with diarrhoea. Notably, among the 34% enteropathogen-negative cases, HIV-1 RNA shedding in stool was more frequently observed (80%) compared to enteropathogen-positive cases (47%), indicating that HIV-1 itself is the most likely candidate to be involved in diarrhoea. Conclusion Unexplained diarrhoea in HIV-1 infected patients is probably not caused by recently described or previously unknown pathogens, but it is more likely that HIV-1 itself plays a role in intestinal mucosal abnormalities which leads to diarrhoea. PMID:24410947

  19. Antiretroviral (HIV-1) activity of azulene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Peet, Julia; Selyutina, Anastasia; Bredihhin, Aleksei

    2016-04-15

    The antiretroviral activity of azulene derivatives was detected for the first time. A series of eighteen diversely substituted azulenes was synthesized and tested in vitro using HIV-1 based virus-like particles (VLPs) and infectious HIV-1 virus in U2OS and TZM-bl cell lines. Among the compounds tested, the 2-hydroxyazulenes demonstrated the most significant activity by inhibiting HIV-1 replication with IC50 of 2-10 and 8-20 μM for the VLPs and the infectious virus, respectively. These results indicate that azulene derivatives may be potentially useful candidates for the development of antiretroviral agents.

  20. [Mechanisms of resistance to sexual transmission of HIV-1].

    PubMed

    Eberhard, A; Ponceau, B; Biron, F; Verrier, B

    2005-11-01

    Sexual transmission is the most common pathway for HIV-1; nevertheless some individuals remain seronegative despite repeated high risk sexual exposure. These were grouped in cohorts of "highly exposed but persistently seronegative" individuals, mostly prostitutes and flailing couples. Three lines of defence were observed in these cohorts. The first one is the mucosal barrier, the determining factors of which are the type of epithelium (monolayer or multilayer), epithelial integrity, and the pre-existing microflora. The second one is linked to innate immunity directly related to the genetic and/or immune predispositions of the individual: mutations affecting the CCR5 chemokine receptor, secretion of protective soluble factors, and particular HLA alleles. The third one is acquired immunity via the mechanisms of humoral and/or specific cellular immunity. These studies suggest anti HIV-1 vaccinal strategies aiming at a local immunization combining the different types of responses observed in these individuals.

  1. Risk factors for HIV-1 seroconversion among young men in northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Celentano, D D; Nelson, K E; Suprasert, S; Eiumtrakul, S; Tulvatana, S; Kuntolbutra, S; Akarasewi, P; Matanasarawoot, A; Wright, N H; Sirisopana, N

    1996-01-10

    To identify behavioral and sociodemographic risk factors for incident human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection among healthy young men in northern Thailand. Men inducted into military service in northern Thailand in May and November 1991 were followed at 6-month intervals until discharge 2 years later. Trained nonmilitary interviewers identified risk factors for HIV-1 infection through interviews with the men. Thirteen military bases in northern Thailand. A total of 1932 seronegative men, aged 19 to 23 years (average age, 21 years) at enrollment, conscripted into the Royal Thai Army and Air Force from six upper-northern Thai provinces. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 seroincidence as determined through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and verified by Western blot, and univariate and multivariate analyses of risk factors related to HIV-1 incidence. A total of 85 men seroconverted to HIV-1 over the period of observation, giving an incidence rate of 2.43 per 100 person-years. Factors strongly associated with HIV-1 seroconversion were frequency of visits to female commercial sex workers (CSWs), sex with men, and incident sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). High frequency of condom use showed a significant (P < .001) protective effect for HIV-1 incidence among men with a history of recent sex with female CSWs in univariate analysis, but a multivariate model demonstrated no difference in HIV-1 seroconversion rates by consistency of condom use. Multivariate analysis incorporating condom use showed that having sex with men (adjusted relative risk [RR], 2.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08 to 6.25), having sex with CSWs (adjusted RR ranged from 2.54 [95% CI, 1.81 to 3.58] to 2.74 [95% CI, 1.56 to 4.81]), and incident STDs (adjusted RR, 2.38 [95%, CI, 1.31 to 4.32]) to be predictors of incident HIV-1 infection. Substance use was not associated with HIV-1 seroconversion rates in multivariate analysis. The HIV-1 incidence in this cohort of young men appears to be

  2. Population-Level Immune-Mediated Adaptation in HIV-1 Polymerase during the North American Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Kinloch, Natalie N.; MacMillan, Daniel R.; Le, Anh Q.; Cotton, Laura A.; Bangsberg, David R.; Buchbinder, Susan; Carrington, Mary; Fuchs, Jonathan; Harrigan, P. Richard; Koblin, Beryl; Kushel, Margot; Markowitz, Martin; Mayer, Kenneth; Milloy, M. J.; Schechter, Martin T.; Wagner, Theresa; Walker, Bruce D.; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Poon, Art F. Y.

    2015-01-01

    accumulate in circulation over time, potentially undermining host antiviral immunity to the transmitted viral strain. We studied >600 experimentally collected HIV-1 polymerase sequences linked to host HLA information dating back to 1979, along with phylogenetically reconstructed HIV-1 sequences dating back to the virus' introduction into North America. Overall, our results support the gradual spread of many—though not all—HIV-1 polymerase immune escape mutations in circulation over time. This is consistent with recent observations from other global regions, though the extent of polymorphism accumulation in North America appears to be lower than in populations with high seroprevalence, older epidemics, and/or limited HLA diversity. Importantly, the risk of acquiring an HIV-1 polymerase sequence at transmission that is substantially preadapted to one's HLA profile remains relatively low in North America, even in the present era. PMID:26559841

  3. Vaginal Lactobacillus Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in Human Tissues Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ñahui Palomino, Rogers A.; Zicari, Sonia; Vanpouille, Christophe; Vitali, Beatrice; Margolis, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacillus species, which dominate vaginal microbiota of healthy reproductive-age women, lower the risks of sexually transmitted infections, including the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition. The exact mechanisms of this protection remain to be understood. Here, we investigated these mechanisms in the context of human cervico-vaginal and lymphoid tissues ex vivo. We found that all six Lactobacillus strains tested in these systems significantly suppressed HIV type-1 (HIV-1) infection. We identified at least three factors that mediated this suppression: (i) Acidification of the medium. The pH of the undiluted medium conditioned by lactobacilli was between 3.8 and 4.6. Acidification of the culture medium with hydrochloric acid (HCl) to this pH in control experiments was sufficient to abrogate HIV-1 replication. However, the pH of the Lactobacillus-conditioned medium (CM) diluted fivefold, which reached ∼6.9, was also suppressive for HIV-1 infection, while in control experiments HIV-1 infection was not abrogated when the pH of the medium was brought to 6.9 through the use of HCl. This suggested the existence of other factors responsible for HIV-1 inhibition by lactobacilli. (ii) Lactic acid. There was a correlation between the concentration of lactic acid in the Lactobacillus-CM and its ability to suppress HIV-1 infection in human tissues ex vivo. Addition of lactic acid isomers D and L to tissue culture medium at the concentration that corresponded to their amount released by lactobacilli resulted in HIV-1 inhibition. Isomer L was produced in higher quantities than isomer D and was mostly responsible for HIV-1 inhibition. These results indicate that lactic acid, in particular its L-isomer, inhibits HIV-1 independently of lowering of the pH. (iii) Virucidal effect. Incubation of HIV-1 in Lactobacillus-CM significantly suppressed viral infectivity for human tissues ex vivo. Finally, lactobacilli adsorb HIV-1, serving as a sink decreasing the

  4. Lack of Detection of XMRV in Seminal Plasma from HIV-1 Infected Men in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Cornelissen, Marion; Zorgdrager, Fokla; Blom, Petra; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Repping, Sjoerd; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth; Bakker, Margreet; Berkhout, Ben; van der Kuyl, Antoinette C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a recently discovered human gammaretrovirus with yet unknown prevalence and transmission route(s). Its presence in prostate stromal fibroblasts and prostatic secretions suggests that XMRV might be sexually transmitted. We chose to study a compartment closely connected to the prostate, a location where XMRV was detected in independent studies. Seminal plasma samples from HIV-1 infected men were examined as they have an increased probability of acquiring sexually transmitted pathogens. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied the prevalence of XMRV in 93 seminal plasma samples of 54 HIV-1 infected men living in The Netherlands with a nested PCR amplification specifically targeting the XMRV gag gene. As a control for the presence and integrity of retrovirus particles, HIV-1 was amplified from the same samples with a PCR amplification targeting the env gene of the virus, or HIV-1 was quantified with a real-time PCR amplifying part of the pol gene. Conclusions/Significance Although HIV-1 was amplified from 25% of the seminal plasma samples, no XMRV was detected, suggesting that either the prevalence of XMRV is very low in The Netherlands, or that XMRV is not naturally present in the seminal plasma. PMID:20706581

  5. Co-evolution of a broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibody and founder virus.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hua-Xin; Lynch, Rebecca; Zhou, Tongqing; Gao, Feng; Alam, S Munir; Boyd, Scott D; Fire, Andrew Z; Roskin, Krishna M; Schramm, Chaim A; Zhang, Zhenhai; Zhu, Jiang; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mullikin, James C; Gnanakaran, S; Hraber, Peter; Wiehe, Kevin; Kelsoe, Garnett; Yang, Guang; Xia, Shi-Mao; Montefiori, David C; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E; Scearce, Richard M; Soderberg, Kelly A; Cohen, Myron; Kamanga, Gift; Louder, Mark K; Tran, Lillian M; Chen, Yue; Cai, Fangping; Chen, Sheri; Moquin, Stephanie; Du, Xiulian; Joyce, M Gordon; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Zhang, Baoshan; Zheng, Anqi; Shaw, George M; Hahn, Beatrice H; Kepler, Thomas B; Korber, Bette T M; Kwong, Peter D; Mascola, John R; Haynes, Barton F

    2013-04-25

    Current human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) vaccines elicit strain-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies arise in approximately 20% of HIV-1-infected individuals, and details of their generation could provide a blueprint for effective vaccination. Here we report the isolation, evolution and structure of a broadly neutralizing antibody from an African donor followed from the time of infection. The mature antibody, CH103, neutralized approximately 55% of HIV-1 isolates, and its co-crystal structure with the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 revealed a new loop-based mechanism of CD4-binding-site recognition. Virus and antibody gene sequencing revealed concomitant virus evolution and antibody maturation. Notably, the unmutated common ancestor of the CH103 lineage avidly bound the transmitted/founder HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, and evolution of antibody neutralization breadth was preceded by extensive viral diversification in and near the CH103 epitope. These data determine the viral and antibody evolution leading to induction of a lineage of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies, and provide insights into strategies to elicit similar antibodies by vaccination.

  6. Herpes Simplex Virus: The Interplay Between HSV, Host, and HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Desai, Dipen Vijay; Kulkarni, Smita Shrikant

    2015-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus proteins interact with host (human) proteins and create an environment conducive for its replication. Genital ulceration due to herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infections is an important clinical manifestation reported to increase the risk of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) acquisition and replication in HIV-1/HSV-2 coinfection. Dampening the innate and adaptive immune responses of the skin-resident dendritic cells, HSV-2 not only helps itself, but creates a "yellow brick road" for one of the most dreaded viruses HIV, which is transmitted mainly through the sexual route. Although, data from clinical trials show that HSV-2 suppression reduces HIV-1 viral load, there are hardly any reports presenting conclusive evidence on the impact of HSV-2 coinfection on HIV-1 disease progression. Be that as it may, understanding the interplay between these three characters (HSV, host, and HIV-1) is imperative. This review endeavors to collate studies on the influence of HSV-derived proteins on the host response and HIV-1 replication. Studying such complex interactions may help in designing and developing common strategies for the two viruses to keep these "partners in crime" at bay.

  7. Two subtypes of HIV-1 among injection-drug users in southern China.

    PubMed

    Yu, X F; Chen, J; Shao, Y; Beyrer, C; Lai, S

    1998-04-25

    The rate of HIV-1 infection has increased steadily in China by about 80% annually and by the end of September 1997, 8277 HIV-1 cases had been reported, of whom more than 75% were IV drug users (IVDUs). UNAIDS, however, has estimated that up to 200,000 people could actually be infected with HIV-1 in China. Guangxi Province borders Yunnan province in the west and Vietnam to the south, and is a major transit area for heroin trafficking from the opium-growing region of Laos and Myanmar. Phylogenetic analyses of HIV-1 env sequences (C2-V3) obtained from 14 IVDUs found that 9 subjects from Pingxiang City were infected with subtype E and 5 from Baise City with subtype C. The 9 subtype E and 5 subtype C HIV-1 sequences were clustered together within each group, with significant bootstrap values of 100% and 95%, respectively. The subtype E sequences were more closely related to HIV-1 subtype E from Thailand than to those from Africa, and the subtype C sequences were clustered more closely to those from India than to those from Africa. Study results suggest 2 epidemiologically unrelated epidemics and 2 different sources; subtype C probably transmitted from Yunnan to Baise City through drug trafficking and IVDU interaction, and subtype E coming into China from Vietnam.

  8. HIV-1 Transmission during Early Antiretroviral Therapy: Evaluation of Two HIV-1 Transmission Events in the HPTN 052 Prevention Study

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Allen G.; Hudelson, Sarah E.; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Wang, Lei; Eshleman, Susan H.; Cohen, Myron S.; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    In the HPTN 052 study, transmission between HIV-discordant couples was reduced by 96% when the HIV-infected partner received suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined two transmission events where the newly infected partner was diagnosed after the HIV-infected partner (index) initiated therapy. We evaluated the sequence complexity of the viral populations and antibody reactivity in the newly infected partner to estimate the dates of transmission to the newly infected partners. In both cases, transmission most likely occurred significantly before HIV-1 diagnosis of the newly infected partner, and either just before the initiation of therapy or before viral replication was adequately suppressed by therapy of the index. This study further strengthens the conclusion about the efficacy of blocking transmission by treating the infected partner of discordant couples. However, this study does not rule out the potential for HIV-1 transmission to occur shortly after initiation of ART, and this should be recognized when antiretroviral therapy is used for HIV-1 prevention. PMID:24086252

  9. Development of prophylactic vaccines against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Schiffner, Torben; Sattentau, Quentin J; Dorrell, Lucy

    2013-07-17

    The focus of most current HIV-1 vaccine development is on antibody-based approaches. This is because certain antibody responses correlated with protection from HIV-1 acquisition in the RV144 phase III trial, and because a series of potent and broad spectrum neutralizing antibodies have been isolated from infected individuals. Taken together, these two findings suggest ways forward to develop a neutralizing antibody-based vaccine. However, understanding of the correlates of protection from disease in HIV-1 and other infections strongly suggests that we should not ignore CTL-based research. Here we review recent progress in the field and highlight the challenges implicit in HIV-1 vaccine design and some potential solutions.

  10. HIV-1 Eradication: Early Trials (and Tribulations).

    PubMed

    Spivak, Adam M; Planelles, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has rendered HIV-1 infection a manageable illness for those with access to treatment. However, ART does not lead to viral eradication owing to the persistence of replication-competent, unexpressed proviruses in long-lived cellular reservoirs. The potential for long-term drug toxicities and the lack of access to ART for most people living with HIV-1 infection have fueled scientific interest in understanding the nature of this latent reservoir. Exploration of HIV-1 persistence at the cellular and molecular level in resting memory CD4(+) T cells, the predominant viral reservoir in patients on ART, has uncovered potential strategies to reverse latency. We review recent advances in pharmacologically based 'shock and kill' HIV-1 eradication strategies, including comparative analysis of early clinical trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Substance abuse, HIV-1 and hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Nirzari; Nonnemacher, Michael R.; Pirrone, Vanessa; Block, Timothy; Mehta, Anand; Wigdahl, Brian

    2013-01-01

    During the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) disease, the virus has been shown to effectively escape the immune response with the subsequent establishment of latent viral reservoirs in specific cell populations within the peripheral blood (PB) and associated lymphoid tissues, bone marrow (BM), brain, and potentially other end organs. HIV-1, along with hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV and HCV), are known to share similar routes of transmission, including intravenous drug use, blood transfusions, sexual intercourse, and perinatal exposure. Substance abuse, including the use of opioids and cocaine, is a significant risk factor for exposure to HIV-1 and the development of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, as well as HBV and HCV exposure, infection, and disease. Thus, coinfection with HIV-1 and HBV or HCV is common and may be impacted by chronic substance abuse during the course of disease. HIV-1 impacts the natural course of HBV and HCV infection by accelerating the progression of HBV/HCV-associated liver disease toward end-stage cirrhosis and quantitative depletion of the CD4+ T-cell compartment. HBV or HCV coinfection with HIV-1 is also associated with increased mortality when compared to either infection alone. This review focuses on the impact of substance abuse and coinfection with HBV and HCV in the PB, BM, and brain on the HIV-1 pathogenic process as it relates to viral pathogenesis, disease progression, and the associated immune response during the course of this complex interplay. The impact of HIV-1 and substance abuse on hepatitis virus-induced disease is also a focal point. PMID:22973853

  12. Substance abuse, HIV-1 and hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Nirzari; Nonnemacher, Michael R; Pirrone, Vanessa; Block, Timothy; Mehta, Anand; Wigdahl, Brian

    2012-10-01

    During the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) disease, the virus has been shown to effectively escape the immune response with the subsequent establishment of latent viral reservoirs in specific cell populations within the peripheral blood (PB) and associated lymphoid tissues, bone marrow (BM), brain, and potentially other end organs. HIV-1, along with hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV and HCV), are known to share similar routes of transmission, including intravenous drug use, blood transfusions, sexual intercourse, and perinatal exposure. Substance abuse, including the use of opioids and cocaine, is a significant risk factor for exposure to HIV-1 and the development of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, as well as HBV and HCV exposure, infection, and disease. Thus, coinfection with HIV-1 and HBV or HCV is common and may be impacted by chronic substance abuse during the course of disease. HIV- 1 impacts the natural course of HBV and HCV infection by accelerating the progression of HBV/HCV-associated liver disease toward end-stage cirrhosis and quantitative depletion of the CD4+ T-cell compartment. HBV or HCV coinfection with HIV-1 is also associated with increased mortality when compared to either infection alone. This review focuses on the impact of substance abuse and coinfection with HBV and HCV in the PB, BM, and brain on the HIV-1 pathogenic process as it relates to viral pathogenesis, disease progression, and the associated immune response during the course of this complex interplay. The impact of HIV-1 and substance abuse on hepatitis virus-induced disease is also a focal point.

  13. HIV-1 Proteins, Tat and gp120, Target the Developing Dopamine System

    PubMed Central

    Fitting, Sylvia; Booze, Rosemarie M.; Mactutus, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, 3.2 million children (< 15 years of age) were estimated to be living with HIV and AIDS worldwide, with the 240,000 newly infected children in the past year, i.e., another child infected approximately every two minutes [1]. The primary mode of HIV infection is through mother-to-child transmission (MTCT), occurring either in utero, intrapartum, or during breastfeeding. The effects of HIV-1 on the central nervous system (CNS) are putatively accepted to be mediated, in part, via viral proteins, such as Tat and gp120. The current review focuses on the targets of HIV-1 proteins during the development of the dopamine (DA) system, which appears to be specifically susceptible in HIV-1-infected children. Collectively, the data suggest that the DA system is a clinically relevant target in chronic HIV-1 infection, is one of the major targets in pediatric HIV-1 CNS infection, and may be specifically susceptible during development. The present review discusses the development of the DA system, follows the possible targets of the HIV-1 proteins during the development of the DA system, and suggests potential therapeutic approaches. By coupling our growing understanding of the development of the CNS with the pronounced age-related differences in disease progression, new light may be shed on the neurological and neurocognitive deficits that follow HIV-1 infection. PMID:25613135

  14. HIV-1 genetic diversity and antiretroviral drug resistance among individuals from Roraima state, northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Corado, André de Lima Guerra; Bello, Gonzalo; Leão, Renato Augusto Carvalho; Granja, Fabiana; Naveca, Felipe Gomes

    2017-01-01

    The HIV-1 epidemic in Brazil has spread towards the Northern country region, but little is known about HIV-1 subtypes and prevalence of HIV strains with resistance mutations to antiretrovirals in some of the Northern states. HIV-1 protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences were obtained from 73 treatment-naive and -experienced subjects followed between 2013 and 2014 at a public health reference unit from Roraima, the northernmost Brazilian state. The most prevalent HIV-1 clade observed in the study population was the subtype B (91%), followed by subtype C (9%). Among 12 HIV-1 strains from treatment-naïve patients, only one had a transmitted drug resistance mutation for NNRTI. Among 59 treatment-experienced patients, 12 (20%) harbored HIV-1 strains with acquired drug resistance mutations (ADRM) that reduce the susceptibility to two classes of antiretroviral drugs (NRTI and NNRTI or NRTI and PI), and five (8%) harbored HIV-1 strains with ADRM that reduced susceptibility to only one class of antiretroviral drugs (NNRTI or PI). No patients harboring HIV strains with reduced susceptibility to all three classes of antiretroviral drugs were detected. A substantial fraction of treatment-experienced patients with (63%) and without (70%) ADRM had undetectable plasma viral loads (<40 copies/ml) at the time of sampling. Among treatment-experienced with plasma viral loads above 2,000 copies/ml, 44% displayed no ADRM. This data showed that the HIV-1 epidemic in Roraima displayed a much lower level of genetic diversity and a lower prevalence of ADRM than that described in other Brazilian states.

  15. HIV-1 genetic diversity and antiretroviral drug resistance among individuals from Roraima state, northern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Renato Augusto Carvalho; Granja, Fabiana; Naveca, Felipe Gomes

    2017-01-01

    The HIV-1 epidemic in Brazil has spread towards the Northern country region, but little is known about HIV-1 subtypes and prevalence of HIV strains with resistance mutations to antiretrovirals in some of the Northern states. HIV-1 protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences were obtained from 73 treatment-naive and -experienced subjects followed between 2013 and 2014 at a public health reference unit from Roraima, the northernmost Brazilian state. The most prevalent HIV-1 clade observed in the study population was the subtype B (91%), followed by subtype C (9%). Among 12 HIV-1 strains from treatment-naïve patients, only one had a transmitted drug resistance mutation for NNRTI. Among 59 treatment-experienced patients, 12 (20%) harbored HIV-1 strains with acquired drug resistance mutations (ADRM) that reduce the susceptibility to two classes of antiretroviral drugs (NRTI and NNRTI or NRTI and PI), and five (8%) harbored HIV-1 strains with ADRM that reduced susceptibility to only one class of antiretroviral drugs (NNRTI or PI). No patients harboring HIV strains with reduced susceptibility to all three classes of antiretroviral drugs were detected. A substantial fraction of treatment-experienced patients with (63%) and without (70%) ADRM had undetectable plasma viral loads (<40 copies/ml) at the time of sampling. Among treatment-experienced with plasma viral loads above 2,000 copies/ml, 44% displayed no ADRM. This data showed that the HIV-1 epidemic in Roraima displayed a much lower level of genetic diversity and a lower prevalence of ADRM than that described in other Brazilian states. PMID:28301548

  16. Sex differences in HIV-1-mediated immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Susanne; Altfeld, Marcus

    2016-03-01

    The article reviews our current knowledge regarding the role of sex and sex hormones in regulating innate immune responses to viral infections, which may account for the described sex differences in immunity to HIV-1. Prominent sex differences exist in various infectious and autoimmune diseases. Biological mechanisms underlying these differences include the modulation of immunological pathways by sex hormones and gene dosage effects of immunomodulatory genes encoded by the X chromosome. During HIV-1 infections, women have been shown to present with lower viral load levels in primary infection, although their progression to AIDS is faster in comparison with men when accounting for viral load levels in chronic infection. HIV-1-infected women furthermore tend to have higher levels of immune activation and interferon-stimulated gene expression in comparison with men for the same viral load, which has been associated to innate sensing of HIV-1 by Toll-like receptor 7 and the consequent interferon-α production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Improvement in understanding the mechanisms associated with sex differences in HIV-1-mediated immunopathology will be critical to take sex differences into consideration when designing experimental and clinical studies in HIV-1-infected populations.

  17. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Marisa N.; Okeoma, Chioma M.

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission. PMID:26205405

  18. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Madison, Marisa N; Okeoma, Chioma M

    2015-07-20

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission.

  19. Functional Properties of the HIV-1 Subtype C Envelope Glycoprotein Associated with Mother-to-Child Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Rola, Marzena; West, John T.; Tully, Damien C.; Kubis, Piotr; He, Jun; Kankasa, Chipepo; Wood, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the properties of viruses capable of establishing infection during perinatal transmission of HIV-1 is critical for designing effective means of limiting transmission. We previously demonstrated that the newly transmitted viruses (in infant) were more fit in growth, as imparted by their envelope glycoproteins, than those in their corresponding mothers. Here, we further characterized the viral envelope glycoproteins from six mother-infant transmission pairs and determined whether any specific envelope functions correlate with HIV-1 subtype C perinatal transmission. We found that most newly transmitted viruses were less susceptible to neutralization by their maternal plasma compared to contemporaneous maternal viruses. However, the newly transmitted variants were sensitive to neutralization by pooled heterologous plasma but in general were resistant to IgG1 b12. Neither Env processing nor incorporation efficiency was predictive of viral transmissibility. These findings provide further insight into the characteristics of perinatally transmissible HIV-1 and may have implications for intervention approaches. PMID:20096914

  20. Targeting dendritic cells for improved HIV-1 vaccines.

    PubMed

    Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Loré, Karin

    2013-01-01

    As dendritic cells (DCs) have the unique capacity to activate antigen-naive T cells they likely play a critical role in eliciting immune responses to vaccines. DCs are therefore being explored as attractive targets for vaccines, but understanding the interaction of DCs and clinically relevant vaccine antigens and adjuvants is a prerequisite. The HIV-1/AIDS epidemic continues to be a significant health problem, and despite intense research efforts over the past 30 years a protective vaccine has not yet been developed. A common challenge in vaccine design is to find a vaccine formulation that best shapes the immune response to protect against and/or control the given pathogen. Here, we discuss the importance of understanding the diversity, anatomical location and function of different human DC subsets in order to identify the optimal target cells for an HIV-1 vaccine. We review human DC interactions with some of the HIV-1 vaccine antigen delivery vehicles and adjuvants currently utilized in preclinical and clinical studies. Specifically, the effects of distinctly different vaccine adjuvants in terms of activation of DCs and improving DC function and vaccine efficacy are discussed. The susceptibility and responses of DCs to recombinant adenovirus vectors are reviewed, as well as the strategy of directly targeting DCs by using DC marker-specific monoclonal antibodies coupled to an antigen.

  1. First evidence of transmission of an HIV-1 M/O intergroup recombinant virus.

    PubMed

    Ngoupo, Paul Alain; Sadeuh-Mba, Serge Alain; De Oliveira, Fabienne; Ngono, Valérie; Ngono, Laure; Tchendjou, Patrice; Penlap, Véronique; Mourez, Thomas; Njouom, Richard; Kfutwah, Anfumbom; Plantier, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-02

    Despite the genetic divergence between HIV-1 groups M and O, HIV-1  M/O intergroup recombinants were reported. Actually, there is no data on the transmissibility of such recombinant forms. During a surveillance of HIV genetic diversity in Cameroon, we investigated the possible direct transmission of an HIV-1  M/O recombinant virus in an HIV-infected couple. Consecutive samples obtained from the couple were analysed for detection of dual HIV-1 groups M and O infections, and HIV-1  M/O recombinant forms. Analyses were performed using a serological and molecular algorithm based on HIV serotyping and group-specific PCRs targeting the polymerase and envelope genes. Pattern characterization of the strains found in both patients was based on complete genome sequencing. Phylogenetic and similarity profile analyses were performed to investigate the genetic relationship between viruses from both spouses and the previously described recombinant forms. The sero-molecular algorithm data showed a group O serotype confirmed by molecular analysis in the envelope regions, whereas molecular tests identified HIV-1 group M in the polymerase. Phylogenetic analyses and similarity profiles of the full-length genome sequences showed that both spouses were infected with a unique recombinant virus having two recombination breakpoints in the vpr gene and LTR region. No phylogenetic link was found with the previous M/O recombinants. We provide, for the first time, molecular evidence of direct transmission of an HIV-1  M/O recombinant, highlighting the potential spread of these divergent viruses. The importance of HIV-1 recombination on genetic evolution and public health when implying divergent strains as group O has to be carefully considered.

  2. Structured Observations Reveal Slow HIV-1 CTL Escape

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Hannah E.; Hurst, Jacob; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Flanagan, Peter; Vass, Laura; Fidler, Sarah; Weber, Jonathan; Babiker, Abdel; Phillips, Rodney E.; McLean, Angela R.; Frater, John

    2015-01-01

    The existence of viral variants that escape from the selection pressures imposed by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) in HIV-1 infection is well documented, but it is unclear when they arise, with reported measures of the time to escape in individuals ranging from days to years. A study of participants enrolled in the SPARTAC (Short Pulse Anti-Retroviral Therapy at HIV Seroconversion) clinical trial allowed direct observation of the evolution of CTL escape variants in 125 adults with primary HIV-1 infection observed for up to three years. Patient HLA-type, longitudinal CD8+ T-cell responses measured by IFN-γ ELISpot and longitudinal HIV-1 gag, pol, and nef sequence data were used to study the timing and prevalence of CTL escape in the participants whilst untreated. Results showed that sequence variation within CTL epitopes at the first time point (within six months of the estimated date of seroconversion) was consistent with most mutations being transmitted in the infecting viral strain rather than with escape arising within the first few weeks of infection. Escape arose throughout the first three years of infection, but slowly and steadily. Approximately one third of patients did not drive any new escape in an HLA-restricted epitope in just under two years. Patients driving several escape mutations during these two years were rare and the median and modal numbers of new escape events in each patient were one and zero respectively. Survival analysis of time to escape found that possession of a protective HLA type significantly reduced time to first escape in a patient (p = 0.01), and epitopes escaped faster in the face of a measurable CD8+ ELISpot response (p = 0.001). However, even in an HLA matched host who mounted a measurable, specific, CD8+ response the average time before the targeted epitope evolved an escape mutation was longer than two years. PMID:25642847

  3. N6-methyladenosine of HIV-1 RNA regulates viral infection and HIV-1 Gag protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Tirumuru, Nagaraja; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Lu, Wuxun; Lu, Zhike; He, Chuan; Wu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The internal N6-methyladenosine (m6A) methylation of eukaryotic nuclear RNA controls post-transcriptional gene expression, which is regulated by methyltransferases (writers), demethylases (erasers), and m6A-binding proteins (readers) in cells. The YTH domain family proteins (YTHDF1–3) bind to m6A-modified cellular RNAs and affect RNA metabolism and processing. Here, we show that YTHDF1–3 proteins recognize m6A-modified HIV-1 RNA and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell lines and primary CD4+ T-cells. We further mapped the YTHDF1–3 binding sites in HIV-1 RNA from infected cells. We found that the overexpression of YTHDF proteins in cells inhibited HIV-1 infection mainly by decreasing HIV-1 reverse transcription, while knockdown of YTHDF1–3 in cells had the opposite effects. Moreover, silencing the m6A writers decreased HIV-1 Gag protein expression in virus-producing cells, while silencing the m6A erasers increased Gag expression. Our findings suggest an important role of m6A modification of HIV-1 RNA in viral infection and HIV-1 protein synthesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15528.001 PMID:27371828

  4. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This "shock" approach is then followed by "kill" of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells.

  5. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This “shock” approach is then followed by “kill” of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  6. HIV-1 Entry Inhbitors: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review This review provides an overview of HIV-1 entry inhibitors, with a focus on chemokine receptor antagonists. Recent findings Entry of HIV-1 into target cells is an ordered multi-step process involving attachment, co-receptor binding and fusion. Inhibitors of each step have been identified and shown to have antiviral activity in clinical trials. Phase 1-2 trials of monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule attachment inhibitors have demonstrated activity in HIV-1-infected subjects, but none has progressed to later phase clinical trials. The post-attachment inhibitor ibalizumab has shown activity in phase 1 and 2 trials; further studies are anticipated. The CCR5 antagonists maraviroc (now been approved for clinical use) and vicriviroc (in phase 3 trials) have shown significant benefit in controlled trials in treatment-experienced subjects; additional CCR5 antagonists are in various stages of clinical development. Targeting CXCR4 has proven to be more challenging. Although proof of concept has been demonstrated in phase 1-2 trials of two compounds, neither proved suitable for chronic administration. Little progress has been reported in developing longer acting or orally bioavailable fusion inhibitors. Summary ACCR5 antagonist and a fusion inhibitor are approved for use as HIV-1 entry inhibitors. Development of drugs targeting other steps in HIV-1 entry is ongoing. PMID:19339945

  7. Macrophage polarization and HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Cassol, Edana; Cassetta, Luca; Alfano, Massimo; Poli, Guido

    2010-04-01

    Polarization of MP into classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2a, M2b, and M2c) macrophages is critical in mediating an effective immune response against invading pathogens. However, several pathogens use these activation pathways to facilitate dissemination and pathogenesis. Viruses generally induce an M1-like phenotype during the acute phase of infection. In addition to promoting the development of Th1 responses and IFN production, M1 macrophages often produce cytokines that drive viral replication and tissue damage. As shown for HIV-1, polarization can also alter macrophage susceptibility to infection. In vitro polarization into M1 cells prevents HIV-1 infection, and M2a polarization inhibits viral replication at a post-integration level. M2a cells also express high levels of C-type lectins that can facilitate macrophage-mediated transmission of HIV-1 to CD4(+) T cells. Macrophages are particularly abundant in mucosal membranes and unlike DCs, do not usually migrate to distal tissues. As a result, macrophages are likely to contribute to HIV-1 pathogenesis in mucosal rather than lymphatic tissues. In vivo polarization of MP is likely to span a spectrum of activation phenotypes that may change the permissivity to and alter the outcome of HIV-1 and other viral infections.

  8. Modulation of HIV-1 immunity by adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Moody, M. Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize the role of adjuvants in eliciting desirable antibody responses against HIV-1 with particular emphasis on both historical context and recent developments. Recent findings Increased understanding of the role of pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors in recruiting and directing the immune system has increased the variety of adjuvant formulations being tested in animal models and humans. Across all vaccine platforms, adjuvant formulations have been shown to enhance desirable immune responses such as higher antibody titers and increased functional activity. Although no vaccine formulation has yet succeeded in eliciting broad neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1, the ability of adjuvants to direct the immune response to immunogens suggests they will be critically important in any successful HIV-1 vaccine. Summary The parallel development of adjuvants along with better HIV-1 immunogens will be needed for a successful AIDS vaccine. Additional comparative testing will be required to determine the optimal adjuvant and immunogen regimen that can elicit antibody responses capable of blocking HIV-1 transmission. PMID:24670321

  9. HIV-1 associated dementia: symptoms and causes

    PubMed Central

    Ghafouri, Mohammad; Amini, Shohreh; Khalili, Kamel; Sawaya, Bassel E

    2006-01-01

    Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), neuronal cell death remains a problem that is frequently found in the brains of HIV-1-infected patients. HAART has successfully prevented many of the former end-stage complications of AIDS, however, with increased survival times, the prevalence of minor HIV-1 associated cognitive impairment appears to be rising among AIDS patients. Further, HIV-1 associated dementia (HAD) is still prevalent in treated patients as well as attenuated forms of HAD and CNS opportunistic disorders. HIV-associated cognitive impairment correlates with the increased presence in the CNS of activated, though not necessarily HIV-1-infected, microglia and CNS macrophages. This suggests that indirect mechanisms of neuronal injury and loss/death occur in HIV/AIDS as a basis for dementia since neurons are not themselves productively infected by HIV-1. In this review, we discussed the symptoms and causes leading to HAD. Outcome from this review will provide new information regarding mechanisms of neuronal loss in AIDS patients. PMID:16712719

  10. Discordance in monogamy beliefs, sexual concurrency, and condom use among young adult substance-involved couples: implications for risk of sexually transmitted infections.

    PubMed

    Riehman, Kara S; Wechsberg, Wendee M; Francis, Shelley A; Moore, Melvin; Morgan-Lopez, Antonio

    2006-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the association between individual and partnership characteristics with condom use, sexual concurrency, and discordance in monogamy perceptions among out-of-treatment, young adult, drug-involved couples to gain a better understanding of how discordance in monogamy beliefs may influence HIV/sexually transmitted infection risk. Data were collected from 94 predominantly black heavy alcohol and/or drug users (AOD) and their steady partners recruited through street outreach in Durham, North Carolina, and a methadone clinic in Raleigh, North Carolina. One third was wrong about partners' monogamy intentions. Greater lifetime number of substances, longer relationship duration, and at least weekly relationship conflict were associated with inconsistent condom use, and discordant monogamy beliefs were associated with consistent condom use. Many individuals misperceive their partners' monogamy intentions, although this misperception may be reflective of greater HIV/sexually transmitted infection protection. Interventions for couples should focus on strategies appropriate for committed long-term relationships, including increasing awareness of partner risk behavior, negotiating safety, and conflict resolution skills.

  11. The relationship between maternal-infant antibody levels and vertical transmission of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Moodley, D; Coovadia, H M; Bobat, R A; Madurai, S; Sullivan, J L

    1997-04-01

    This study assesses the predictive value of the ratio of HIV-1 antibodies in the newborn at birth to that in the mother for perinatally transmitted infection confirmed subsequently by age 18 months. The ratio of HIV-1 (EIA) antibody levels in the baby at birth to that in the seropositive mother after the first trimester (sequenstration index SI) was available in 114 of a perinatal cohort of 137 infants. We related this ratio to the HIV infection status of the children by 18 months, HIV-1 DNA PCR and HIV-specific IgA antibody detection at birth, between 3 and 6 months, and morbidity and mortality. Thirty-five of the 137 (26 per cent) children were diagnosed as infected by 18 months. The mean (SD) HIV SI was 1.57 (0.88) in 29 infected and 0.83 (0.42) in 85 uninfected infants (P < 0.0001). Sensitivity and specificity of a threshold SI of 1.27 (mean +/- 2 SD of uninfected group) for the prediction of perinatal HIV-1 infection were 41 and 98 per cent, respectively. The reason for the higher SI in the infected babies is the combination of lower antibody titres in the transmitting mothers with raised levels in the infected babies. A similar analysis of antibody ratios showed no statistical differences for measles and tetanus (P > 0.1) between HIV infected and uninfected groups. There was a tendency to increased morbidity (Pearson's correlation coefficient r = 0.31) and more severe disease in those with higher HIV-1 SI. Three of 17 (18 per cent) peripheral blood samples from infected children at birth were PCR positive; all had SI's above the threshold. Overall sensitivity and specificity of PCR were 85 per cent each. Eleven of the 29 infected children were HIV-1 specific IgA positive at birth; six (64 per cent) of these had an SI > 1.27. This simple SI of HIV-1 EIA antibodies at birth is comparable to elaborate techniques in its power to predict perinatally acquired infection. It may be a cheap, reliable and rapid screening test for vertically transmitted HIV-1 infection.

  12. HIV-1 Populations in Semen Arise through Multiple Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dibben, Oliver; Jabara, Cassandra B.; Arney, Leslie; Kincer, Laura; Tang, Yuyang; Hobbs, Marcia; Hoffman, Irving; Kazembe, Peter; Jones, Corbin D.; Borrow, Persephone; Fiscus, Susan; Cohen, Myron S.; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 is present in anatomical compartments and bodily fluids. Most transmissions occur through sexual acts, making virus in semen the proximal source in male donors. We find three distinct relationships in comparing viral RNA populations between blood and semen in men with chronic HIV-1 infection, and we propose that the viral populations in semen arise by multiple mechanisms including: direct import of virus, oligoclonal amplification within the seminal tract, or compartmentalization. In addition, we find significant enrichment of six out of nineteen cytokines and chemokines in semen of both HIV-infected and uninfected men, and another seven further enriched in infected individuals. The enrichment of cytokines involved in innate immunity in the seminal tract, complemented with chemokines in infected men, creates an environment conducive to T cell activation and viral replication. These studies define different relationships between virus in blood and semen that can significantly alter the composition of the viral population at the source that is most proximal to the transmitted virus. PMID:20808902

  13. HIV-1 Populations in Semen Arise through Multiple Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jeffrey A; Ping, Li-Hua; Dibben, Oliver; Jabara, Cassandra B; Arney, Leslie; Kincer, Laura; Tang, Yuyang; Hobbs, Marcia; Hoffman, Irving; Kazembe, Peter; Jones, Corbin D; Borrow, Persephone; Fiscus, Susan; Cohen, Myron S; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2010-08-19

    HIV-1 is present in anatomical compartments and bodily fluids. Most transmissions occur through sexual acts, making virus in semen the proximal source in male donors. We find three distinct relationships in comparing viral RNA populations between blood and semen in men with chronic HIV-1 infection, and we propose that the viral populations in semen arise by multiple mechanisms including: direct import of virus, oligoclonal amplification within the seminal tract, or compartmentalization. In addition, we find significant enrichment of six out of nineteen cytokines and chemokines in semen of both HIV-infected and uninfected men, and another seven further enriched in infected individuals. The enrichment of cytokines involved in innate immunity in the seminal tract, complemented with chemokines in infected men, creates an environment conducive to T cell activation and viral replication. These studies define different relationships between virus in blood and semen that can significantly alter the composition of the viral population at the source that is most proximal to the transmitted virus.

  14. The electrical coupling confers to a network of interneurons the ability of transmitting excitatory inputs with high temporal precision.

    PubMed

    Di Garbo, Angelo

    2008-08-15

    The transmission of excitatory inputs by inhibitory networks of different sizes is investigated by means of numerical simulations. The interneurons are coupled by electrical and/or inhibitory synapses and each of them receives an excitatory pulse at a random time. The pulse times are extracted from a Gaussian distribution and each cell model is subject to an independent noisy current. The results described in this paper suggest that the presence of the electrical coupling promotes the transmission of the excitatory synaptic inputs on a time scale of a few milliseconds.

  15. Comparative Evaluation of HIV-1 Neutralization in External Secretions and Sera of HIV-1-Infected Women.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qing; Moldoveanu, Zina; Huang, Wen-Qiang; Alexander, Rashada C; Goepfert, Paul A; Mestecky, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    Although human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific antibodies are detectable in external secretions by ELISA and western blot (WB), the presence of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies is difficult to evaluate due to the low levels of immunoglobulins (Ig) and the presence of humoral factors of innate immunity. The objective of this study was to determine virus neutralization activity and the relative contribution of HIV-1-specific antibodies of various isotypes to virus neutralization in serum/plasma samples, cervicovaginal lavages (CVL), and rectal lavages (RL). Serum/plasma, CVL, and RL samples were examined by ELISA, WB and HIV-1 neutralization assays. Selected samples were Ig depleted and analyzed for virus neutralization. IgG specific for three HIV-1 ENV antigens was detected in all serum/plasma samples, while IgA to at least one ENV glycoprotein was found at the low levels in 95% samples. Serum/plasma samples had the ability to neutralize at least one of three clade B and two clade C viruses. The neutralizing titers were reduced significantly or became undetectable after IgG removal. In corresponding CVL and RL, HIV-1 ENV-specific IgG antibodies were readily detected compared to IgA. Furthermore, IgG in CVL had greater ability than IgA to reduce virus infectivity. The difference in HIV-1 neutralization before and after Ig depletion was not observed in RL, implying that innate humoral factors were involved in anti-HIV-1 activity. Results demonstrate that HIV-1-specific neutralizing antibodies are almost exclusively of the IgG isotype in serum/plasma and CVL samples. HIV-1-specific binding antibodies detected in RL are not responsible for neutralization activity, suggesting that the antibody-mediated virus neutralization in external secretions should be verified by means of a selective depletion of Ig.

  16. HIV-1 Reservoirs During Suppressive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Kirston; Winckelmann, Anni; Palmer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) 20 years ago has dramatically reduced morbidity and mortality associated with HIV-1. Initially there was hope that ART would be curative, but it quickly became clear that even though ART was able to restore CD4+ T cell counts and suppress viral loads below levels of detection, discontinuation of treatment resulted in a rapid rebound of infection. This is due to persistence of a small reservoir of latently infected cells with a long half-life, which necessitates life-long ART. Over the past few years, significant progress has been made in defining and characterizing the latent reservoir of HIV-1, and here we review how understanding the latent reservoir during suppressive therapy will lead to significant advances in curative approaches for HIV-1. PMID:26875617

  17. Unusual Fusion Proteins of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Simon; Sauter, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Despite its small genome size, the Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1) is one of the most successful pathogens and has infected more than 70 million people worldwide within the last decades. In total, HIV-1 expresses 16 canonical proteins from only nine genes within its 10 kb genome. Expression of the structural genes gag, pol, and env, the regulatory genes rev and tat and the accessory genes vpu, nef, vpr, and vif enables assembly of the viral particle, regulates viral gene transcription, and equips the virus to evade or counteract host immune responses. In addition to the canonically expressed proteins, a growing number of publications describe the existence of non-canonical fusion proteins in HIV-1 infected cells. Most of them are encoded by the tat-env-rev locus. While the majority of these fusion proteins (e.g., TNV/p28tev, p186Drev, Tat1-Rev2, Tat^8c, p17tev, or Ref) are the result of alternative splicing events, Tat-T/Vpt is produced upon programmed ribosomal frameshifting, and a Rev1-Vpu fusion protein is expressed due to a nucleotide polymorphism that is unique to certain HIV-1 clade A and C strains. A better understanding of the expression and activity of these non-canonical viral proteins will help to dissect their potential role in viral replication and reveal how HIV-1 optimized the coding potential of its genes. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of previously described HIV-1 fusion proteins and to summarize our current knowledge of their expression patterns and putative functions. PMID:28119676

  18. The ESCRT pathway and HIV-1 budding.

    PubMed

    Usami, Yoshiko; Popov, Sergei; Popova, Elena; Inoue, Michio; Weissenhorn, Winfried; G Göttlinger, Heinrich

    2009-02-01

    HIV-1 Gag engages components of the ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) pathway via so-called L (late-assembly) domains to promote virus budding. Specifically, the PTAP (Pro-Thr-Ala-Pro)-type primary L domain of HIV-1 recruits ESCRT-I by binding to Tsg101 (tumour susceptibility gene 101), and an auxiliary LYPX(n)L (Leu-Tyr-Pro-Xaa(n)-Leu)-type L domain recruits the ESCRT-III-binding partner Alix [ALG-2 (apoptosis-linked gene 2)-interacting protein X]. The structurally related CHMPs (charged multivesicular body proteins), which form ESCRT-III, are kept in an inactive state through intramolecular interactions, and become potent inhibitors of HIV-1 budding upon removal of an autoinhibitory region. In the absence of the primary L domain, HIV-1 budding is strongly impaired, but can be efficiently rescued through the overexpression of Alix. This effect of Alix depends on its ability to interact with CHMP4, suggesting that it is the recruitment of CHMPs that ultimately drives virus release. Surprisingly, HIV-1 budding defects can also be efficiently corrected by overexpressing Nedd (neural-precursor-cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated) 4-2s, a member of a family of ubiquitin ligases previously implicated in the function of PPXY (Pro-Pro-Xaa-Tyr)-type L domains, which are absent from HIV-1. At least under certain circumstances, Nedd4-2s stimulates the activity of PTAP-type L domains, raising the possibility that the ubiquitin ligase regulates the activity of ESCRT-I.

  19. Assessing the HIV-1 Epidemic in Brazilian Drug Users: A Molecular Epidemiology Approach

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Monick Lindenmeyer; Marques, Bianca Cristina Leires; Bertoni, Neilane; Teixeira, Sylvia Lopes Maia; Morgado, Mariza Gonçalves; Bastos, Francisco Inácio

    2015-01-01

    Person who inject illicit substances have an important role in HIV-1 blood and sexual transmission and together with person who uses heavy non-injecting drugs may have less than optimal adherence to anti-retroviral treatment and eventually could transmit resistant HIV variants. Unfortunately, molecular biology data on such key population remain fragmentary in most low and middle-income countries. The aim of the present study was to assess HIV infection rates, evaluate HIV-1 genetic diversity, drug resistance, and to identify HIV transmission clusters in heavy drug users (DUs). For this purpose, DUs were recruited in the context of a Respondent-Driven Sampling (RDS) study in different Brazilian cities during 2009. Overall, 2,812 individuals were tested for HIV, and 168 (6%) of them were positive, of which 19 (11.3%) were classified as recent seroconverters, corresponding to an estimated incidence rate of 1.58%/year (95% CI 0.92–2.43%). Neighbor joining phylogenetic trees from env and pol regions and bootscan analyses were employed to subtype the virus from132 HIV-1-infected individuals. HIV-1 subtype B was prevalent in most of the cities under analysis, followed by BF recombinants (9%-35%). HIV-1 subtype C was the most prevalent in Curitiba (46%) and Itajaí (86%) and was also detected in Brasília (9%) and Campo Grande (20%). Pure HIV-1F infections were detected in Rio de Janeiro (9%), Recife (6%), Salvador (6%) and Brasília (9%). Clusters of HIV transmission were assessed by Maximum likelihood analyses and were cross-compared with the RDS network structure. Drug resistance mutations were verified in 12.2% of DUs. Our findings reinforce the importance of the permanent HIV-1 surveillance in distinct Brazilian cities due to viral resistance and increasing subtype heterogeneity all over Brazil, with relevant implications in terms of treatment monitoring, prophylaxis and vaccine development. PMID:26536040

  20. HIV-1 Protease: Structure, Dynamics and Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, John M.; Ishima, R.; Torchia, D.A.; Weber, Irene T.

    2008-06-03

    The HIV-1 protease is synthesized as part of a large Gag-Pol precursor protein. It is responsible for its own release from the precursor and the processing of the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins into the mature structural and functional proteins required for virus maturation. Because of its indispensable role, the mature HIV-1 protease dimer has proven to be a successful target for the development of antiviral agents. In the last 5 years, a major emphasis in protease research has been to improve inhibitor design and treatment regimens.

  1. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Quinn, Caitlin M.; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates.

  2. Molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 in Madrid.

    PubMed

    Rojas, J M; Dopazo, J; Nájera, I; Sánchez-Palomino, S; Olivares, I; Martin, M J; Bernal, A; García Saiz, A; Nájera, R; López-Galíndez, C

    1994-03-01

    Thirteen HIV-1 isolates from patients of different risk groups in Madrid (Spain) have been analyzed at the genetic level. Two distinct lineages of subtype B have been detected among the HIV-1 circulating in this area: one was related to SF-2/RF strains, whereas the other consists of a more heterogeneous group related to reference strain III-B. Variants of each lineage appeared to circulate preferentially within a risk group: III-B among intravenous drug users, and RF/SF-2 among male homosexuals.

  3. Incident HIV-1 infection in a cohort of young women in Butare, Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Bulterys, M; Chao, A; Habimana, P; Dushimimana, A; Nawrocki, P; Saah, A

    1994-11-01

    To determine the incidence of HIV-1 infection and associated risk factors among young, seronegative, and sexually active women in a mixed rural and urban population in southern Rwanda. A prospective cohort study. Between October 1991 and April 1993, we completed a 2-year follow-up survey among HIV-1-seronegative women aged < or = 30 years at the time of their initial HIV-1 screening during pregnancy. All women aged < or = 25 years and a randomly selected sample of 26-30-year olds were invited to participate from five prenatal clinics in the Butare region. The interview focused on potential risk factors for HIV-1 acquisition during the 2-year interval between blood collection. Out of 1524 women selected, 1150 (75%) participated in the follow-up survey. The 2-year incidence of HIV-1 infection was 2.7% [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.8-3.9]. Teenage women were at the highest risk (incidence, 10.5%; 95% CI, 5.2-19.4), with incidence leveling off with increasing age (P < 0.001). Women who began sexual activity recently were also at higher risk; the lowest risk category consisted of women aged 26-30 years with 5 or more years of sexual experience. The more urban the geographic residence of the woman, the more likely she was to have acquired HIV-1 infection (P < 0.001). In the urban and peri-urban zones, the poorest women were at significantly higher risk of incident HIV-1 infection than women reporting higher household income. In a multivariate analysis, young maternal age, marital status (being single, divorced or widowed), multiple sexual partners, and a history of sexually transmitted diseases remained strongly associated with incident HIV-1 infection. Geographic residence, hormonal contraception, and receipt of injections were no longer significantly associated with incident HIV-1 infection when these other factors were accounted for simultaneously. Among young Rwandan women, the early years of sexual activity are particularly dangerous for acquisition of HIV-1

  4. HIV-1 Genetic Diversity and Drug Resistance Mutations Among Treatment-Naive Adult Patients in Suriname.

    PubMed

    Abdoel Wahid, Firoz; Sno, Rachel; Darcissac, Edith; Lavergne, Anne; Adhin, Malti R; Lacoste, Vincent

    2016-12-01

    The molecular epidemiologic profile of HIV-1 in Suriname was determined through protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences obtained from HIV-1 strains collected from 100 drug-naive HIV-1-infected persons. Subtype determination revealed that most viruses were of subtype B (94.9%) in both PR and RT genomic regions, followed by B/D recombinants (5.1%). Analysis of drug resistance mutations showed only one transmitted dug resistance mutation (TDRM) (V75M) in a single strain. The genetic data obtained can serve as a baseline for Suriname to monitor emerging mutations. This study reveals that the HIV-1 epidemic in Suriname is still characterized by a low TDRM rate (1%) and a low level of subtype diversity. However, both genes display a high genetic polymorphism. This high polymorphism may ultimately lead to drug resistance. Continuous monitoring of the baseline resistance is therefore a prerequisite to safeguard effective long-term treatment for people living with HIV-1 in Suriname.

  5. Coupling membranes as energy-transmitting cables. I. Filamentous mitochondria in fibroblasts and mitochondrial clusters in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Amchenkova, A A; Bakeeva, L E; Chentsov, Y S; Skulachev, V P; Zorov, D B

    1988-08-01

    An hypothesis considering mitochondria as intracellular power-transmitting protonic cables was tested in human fibroblasts where mitochondria are thin and long and in rat cardiomyocytes where they show cluster organization. Mitochondria in the cell were specifically stained with fluorescent-penetrating cation ethylrhodamine, which electrophoretically accumulates in the mitochondrial matrix. A 40-micron-long mitochondrial filament of fibroblast was illuminated by a very narrow (less than or equal to 0.5 micron) laser beam to induce local damage of the mitochondrial membranes. Such a treatment was found to induce quenching of the ethylrhodamine fluorescence in the entire filament. According to the electron microscope examination, the laser-treated filament retained its continuity after the laser illumination. Other mitochondrial filaments (some of which were localized at a distance less than 10 micron from the laser-treated one) remained fluorescent. In a cell where mitochondrial filaments seemed to be united in a network, laser illumination of one filament resulted in fluorescence quenching in the whole network, whereas fluorescence of small mitochondria not connected with the network was unaffected. The illumination of cardiomyocyte was found to result in the fluorescence quenching not only in a laser-illuminated mitochondrion but also in a large cluster of organelles composed of many mitochondria. Electron microscopy showed that all the mitochondria in the cluster change from the orthodox to the condensed state. It was also found that mitochondria in the cluster are connected to one another with specific junctions. If a mitochondrion did not form junctions with a quenched cluster, its fluorescence was not decreased even when this mitochondrion was localized close to an illuminated one. The size of the mitochondrial cluster may be as long as 50 micron. The cluster is formed by branched chains of contacting mitochondria, which may be defined as Streptio

  6. Subclinical mastitis, cell-associated HIV-1 shedding in breast milk, and breast-feeding transmission of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Kantarci, Serpil; Koulinska, Irene N; Aboud, Said; Fawzi, Wafaie W; Villamor, Eduardo

    2007-12-15

    Mastitis has been identified as a risk factor for mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1 through breast-feeding. It is unclear whether this association is mediated by increased cell-free virus (CFV) versus cell-associated virus (CAV) HIV shedding in breast milk. We examined the risk of MTCT associated with subclinical mastitis and the relation between mastitis and CFV or CAV shedding in breast milk. Fifty-nine women who transmitted HIV through breast-feeding (cases) were individually matched to 59 nontransmitting controls nested in a cohort from Tanzania. For each case, we selected a milk specimen obtained before the infant's first positive test to quantify sodium (Na) and potassium (K) and measure CFV and CAV concentrations. Controls were matched on the child's age at the time of sample collection. Women with a breast milk Na/K ratio suggestive of mastitis (>1.0) had an 11-fold greater odds of transmission (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2 to 98.1), compared to women with a Na/K HIV-1 shedding in breast milk could mediate the association between mastitis and MTCT.

  7. The function and affinity maturation of HIV-1 gp120-specific monoclonal antibodies derived from colostral B cells.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, T L; Sacha, C R; Pollara, J; Himes, J; Jaeger, F H; Dennison, S M; McGuire, E; Kunz, E; Eudailey, J A; Trama, A M; LaBranche, C; Fouda, G G; Wiehe, K; Montefiori, D C; Haynes, B F; Liao, H-X; Ferrari, G; Alam, S M; Moody, M A; Permar, S R

    2016-03-01

    Despite the risk of transmitting HIV-1, mothers in resource-poor areas are encouraged to breastfeed their infants because of beneficial immunologic and nutritional factors in milk. Interestingly, in the absence of antiretroviral prophylaxis, the overwhelming majority of HIV-1-exposed, breastfeeding infants are naturally protected from infection. To understand the role of HIV-1 envelope (Env)-specific antibodies in breast milk in natural protection against infant virus transmission, we produced 19 HIV-1 Env-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) isolated from colostrum B cells of HIV-1-infected mothers and investigated their specificity, evolution, and anti-HIV-1 functions. Despite the previously reported genetic compartmentalization and gp120-specific bias of colostrum HIV Env-specific B cells, the colostrum Env-specific mAbs described here demonstrated a broad range of gp120 epitope specificities and functions, including inhibition of epithelial cell binding and dendritic cell-mediated virus transfer, neutralization, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. We also identified divergent patterns of colostrum Env-specific B-cell lineage evolution with respect to crossreactivity to gastrointestinal commensal bacteria, indicating that commensal bacterial antigens play a role in shaping the local breast milk immunoglobulin G (IgG) repertoire. Maternal vaccine strategies to specifically target this breast milk B-cell population may be necessary to achieve safe breastfeeding for all HIV-1-exposed infants.

  8. The function and affinity maturation of HIV-1 gp120-specific monoclonal antibodies derived from colostral B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Thomas L; Sacha, CR; Pollara, Justin; Himes, Jon; Jaeger, Frederick H; Dennison, S Moses; McGuire, Erin; Kunz, Erika; Eudailey, Joshua A; Trama, Ashley M; LaBranche, Celia; Fouda, Genevieve G; Wiehe, Kevin; Montefiori, David C; Haynes, Barton F; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Permar, Sallie R

    2015-01-01

    Despite the risk of transmitting HIV-1, mothers in resource-poor areas are encouraged to breastfeed their infants due to beneficial immunologic and nutritional factors in milk. Interestingly, in the absence of antiretroviral prophylaxis, the overwhelming majority of HIV-1-exposed, breastfeeding infants are naturally protected from infection. To understand the role of HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-specific antibodies in breast milk in natural protection against infant virus transmission, we produced 19 HIV-1 Env-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) isolated from colostrum B cells of HIV-1-infected mothers and investigated their specificity, evolution and anti-HIV-1 functions. Despite the previously reported genetic compartmentalization and gp120-specific bias of colostrum HIV Env-specific B cells, the colostrum Env-specific mAbs described here demonstrated a broad range of gp120 epitope specificities and functions, including inhibition of epithelial cell binding and dendritic cell mediated virus transfer, neutralization, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Interestingly, we also identified divergent patterns of colostrum Env-specific B cell lineage evolution with respect to cross-reactivity to gastrointestinal commensal bacteria, indicating that commensal bacterial antigens play a role in shaping the local breast milk IgG repertoire. Maternal vaccine strategies to specifically target this breast milk B cell population may be necessary to achieve safe breastfeeding for all HIV-1-exposed infants. PMID:26242599

  9. Phylodynamics of HIV-1 unique recombinant forms in China-Myanmar border: implication for HIV-1 transmission to Myanmar from Dehong, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Jia, Yanhui; Xu, Qinggang; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Zhang, Chiyu

    2012-12-01

    China-Myanmar border plays a crucial role in HIV-1 transmission in Asia. Here, we performed Bayesian phylodynamics analyses on p17 gene using BEAST to investigate HIV-1 transmission in this region. Maximum clade credibility trees of subtype C and CRF01_AE show that majority of unique recombinant forms (URFs) and pure subtype strains from Dehong and Myanmar cluster together, forming large clades with ancestral geographical states of Dehong. Bayes factor tests support the statistically significant geographic diffusion link between Dehong and Myanmar. The estimated time to the most recent common ancestor of Myanmar URFs_BC (1999.2) was later than that of Dehong URFs_BC (1998.0), but earlier than that of Myanmar URFs_01BC (2004.3). Since 1998, HIV-1 recombination between subtypes B, C and CRF01_AE has been continuously occurring in China-Myanmar border region. These results suggest that HIV-1 subtypes B, C and CRF01_AE were most likely transmitted from Dehong to Myanmar, and predict that URFs_01BC should be also prevalent in Dehong, Yunnan.

  10. HIV-1 Capsid: The Multifaceted Key Player in HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Edward M.; Hope, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    In a mature, infectious HIV-1 virion, the viral genome is housed within a conical capsid core comprised of the viral capsid (CA) protein. The CA protein, and the structure into which it assembles, facilitate virtually every step of infection through a series of interactions with multiple host cell factors. This review describes our understanding of the interactions between the viral capsid core and several cellular factors that enable efficient HIV-1 genome replication, timely core disassembly, nuclear import and the integration of the viral genome into the genome of the target cell. We then discuss how elucidating these interactions can reveal new targets for therapeutic interactions against HIV-1. PMID:26179359

  11. Phosphorylation of HIV-1 Tat by CDK2 in HIV-1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ammosova, Tatyana; Berro, Reem; Jerebtsova, Marina; Jackson, Angela; Charles, Sharroya; Klase, Zachary; Southerland, William; Gordeuk, Victor R; Kashanchi, Fatah; Nekhai, Sergei

    2006-01-01

    Background Transcription of HIV-1 genes is activated by HIV-1 Tat protein, which induces phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) C-terminal domain (CTD) by CDK9/cyclin T1. Earlier we showed that CDK2/cyclin E phosphorylates HIV-1 Tat in vitro. We also showed that CDK2 induces HIV-1 transcription in vitro and that inhibition of CDK2 expression by RNA interference inhibits HIV-1 transcription and viral replication in cultured cells. In the present study, we analyzed whether Tat is phosphorylated in cultured cells by CDK2 and whether Tat phosphorylation has a regulatory effect on HIV-1 transcription. Results We analyzed HIV-1 Tat phosphorylation by CDK2 in vitro and identified Ser16 and Ser46 residues of Tat as potential phosphorylation sites. Tat was phosphorylated in HeLa cells infected with Tat-expressing adenovirus and metabolically labeled with 32P. CDK2-specific siRNA reduced the amount and the activity of cellular CDK2 and significantly decreased phosphorylation of Tat. Tat co-migrated with CDK2 on glycerol gradient and co-immunoprecipitated with CDK2 from the cellular extracts. Tat was phosphorylated on serine residues in vivo, and mutations of Ser16 and Ser46 residues of Tat reduced Tat phosphorylation in vivo. Mutation of Ser16 and Ser46 residues of Tat reduced HIV-1 transcription in transiently transfected cells. The mutations of Tat also inhibited HIV-1 viral replication and Tat phosphorylation in the context of the integrated HIV-1 provirus. Analysis of physiological importance of the S16QP(K/R)19 and S46YGR49 sequences of Tat showed that Ser16 and Ser46 and R49 residues are highly conserved whereas mutation of the (K/R)19 residue correlated with non-progression of HIV-1 disease. Conclusion Our results indicate for the first time that Tat is phosphorylated in vivo; Tat phosphorylation is likely to be mediated by CDK2; and phosphorylation of Tat is important for HIV-1 transcription. PMID:17083724

  12. Enteric viruses in HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative children with diarrheal diseases in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Monica Simões; Fumian, Tulio Machado; Maranhão, Adriana Gonçalves; de Assis, Rosane Maria; Xavier, Maria da Penha Trindade Pinheiro; Rocha, Myrna Santos; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Volotão, Eduardo de Mello

    2017-01-01

    Diarrheal diseases (DD) have distinct etiological profiles in immune-deficient and immune-competent patients. This study compares detection rates, genotype distribution and viral loads of different enteric viral agents in HIV-1 seropositive (n = 200) and HIV-1 seronegative (n = 125) children hospitalized with DD in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Except for group A rotavirus (RVA), which were detected through enzyme immunoassay, the other enteric viruses (norovirus [NoV], astrovirus [HAstV], adenovirus [HAdV] and bocavirus [HBoV]) were detected through PCR or RT-PCR. A quantitative PCR was performed for RVA, NoV, HAstV, HAdV and HBoV. Infections with NoV (19% vs. 9.6%; p<0.001), HBoV (14% vs. 7.2%; p = 0.042) and HAdV (30.5% vs. 14.4%; p<0.001) were significantly more frequent among HIV-1 seropositive children. RVA was significantly less frequent among HIV-1 seropositive patients (6.5% vs. 20%; p<0.001). Similarly, frequency of infection with HAstV was lower among HIV-1 seropositive children (5.5% vs. 12.8%; p = 0.018). Among HIV-1 seropositive children 33 (16.5%) had co-infections, including three enteric viruses, such as NoV, HBoV and HAdV (n = 2) and NoV, HAstV and HAdV (n = 2). The frequency of infection with more than one virus was 17 (13.6%) in the HIV-1 negative group, triple infection (NoV + HAstV + HBoV) being observed in only one patient. The median viral load of HAstV in feces was significantly higher among HIV-1 positive children compared to HIV-1 negative children. Concerning children infected with RVA, NoV, HBoV and HAdV, no statistically significant differences were observed in the medians of viral loads in feces, comparing HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative children. Similar detection rates were observed for RVA, HAstV and HAdV, whilst NoV and HBoV were significantly more prevalent among children with CD4+ T lymphocyte count below 200 cells/mm3. Enteric viruses should be considered an important cause of DD in HIV-1 seropositive children, along with

  13. HIV-1 transcription and latency: an update

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy, despite being potent and life-prolonging, is not curative and does not eradicate HIV-1 infection since interruption of treatment inevitably results in a rapid rebound of viremia. Reactivation of latently infected cells harboring transcriptionally silent but replication-competent proviruses is a potential source of persistent residual viremia in cART-treated patients. Although multiple reservoirs may exist, the persistence of resting CD4+ T cells carrying a latent infection represents a major barrier to eradication. In this review, we will discuss the latest reports on the molecular mechanisms that may regulate HIV-1 latency at the transcriptional level, including transcriptional interference, the role of cellular factors, chromatin organization and epigenetic modifications, the viral Tat trans-activator and its cellular cofactors. Since latency mechanisms may also operate at the post-transcriptional level, we will consider inhibition of nuclear RNA export and inhibition of translation by microRNAs as potential barriers to HIV-1 gene expression. Finally, we will review the therapeutic approaches and clinical studies aimed at achieving either a sterilizing cure or a functional cure of HIV-1 infection, with a special emphasis on the most recent pharmacological strategies to reactivate the latent viruses and decrease the pool of viral reservoirs. PMID:23803414

  14. HIV-1 vaccines: challenges and new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H

    2014-01-01

    The development of a safe and effective preventive HIV-1 vaccine remains a public health priority. Despite scientific difficulties and disappointing results, HIV-1 vaccine clinical development has, for the first time, established proof-of-concept efficacy against HIV-1 acquisition and identified vaccine-associated immune correlates of risk. The correlate of risk analysis showed that IgG antibodies against the gp120 V2 loop correlated with decreased risk of HIV infection, while Env-specific IgA directly correlated with increased risk. The development of vaccine strategies such as improved envelope proteins formulated with potent adjuvants and DNA and vectors expressing mosaics, or conserved sequences, capable of eliciting greater breadth and depth of potentially relevant immune responses including neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ cell-mediated immune responses, mucosal immune responses, and immunological memory, is now proceeding quickly. Additional human efficacy trials combined with other prevention modalities along with sustained funding and international collaboration remain key to bring an HIV-1 vaccine to licensure.

  15. Vaccine-Induced HIV-1 Envelope gp120 Constant Region 1-Specific Antibodies Expose a CD4-Inducible Epitope and Block the Interaction of HIV-1 gp140 with Galactosylceramide

    PubMed Central

    Dennison, S. Moses; Anasti, Kara M.; Jaeger, Frederick H.; Stewart, Shelley M.; Pollara, Justin; Liu, Pinghuang; Kunz, Erika L.; Zhang, Ruijun; Vandergrift, Nathan; Permar, Sallie; Ferrari, Guido; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Bonsignori, Mattia; Michael, Nelson L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Liao, Hua-Xin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mucosal epithelial cell surface galactosylceramide (Galcer) has been postulated to be a receptor for HIV-1 envelope (Env) interactions with mucosal epithelial cells. Disruption of the HIV-1 Env interaction with such alternate receptors could be one strategy to prevent HIV-1 entry through the mucosal barrier. To study antibody modulation of HIV-1 Env-Galcer interactions, we used Galcer-containing liposomes to assess whether natural- and vaccine-induced monoclonal antibodies can block HIV-1 Env binding to Galcer. HIV-1 Env gp140 proteins bound to Galcer liposomes with Kds (dissociation constants) in the nanomolar range. Several HIV-1 ALVAC/AIDSVAX vaccinee-derived monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the gp120 first constant (C1) region blocked Galcer binding of a transmitted/founder HIV-1 Env gp140. Among the C1-specific MAbs that showed Galcer blocking, the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity-mediating CH38 IgG and its natural IgA isotype were the most potent blocking antibodies. C1-specific IgG monoclonal antibodies that blocked Env binding to Galcer induced upregulation of the gp120 CD4-inducible (CD4i) epitope bound by MAb 17B, demonstrating that a conformational change in gp120 may be required for Galcer blocking. However, the MAb 17B itself did not block Env-Galcer binding, suggesting that the C1 antibody-induced gp120 conformational changes resulted in alteration in a Galcer binding site distant from the CD4i 17B MAb binding site. IMPORTANCE Galactosyl ceramide, a glycosphingolipid, has been postulated to be a receptor for the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) interaction with mucosal epithelial cells. Here, we have mimicked this interaction by using an artificial membrane containing synthetic Galcer and recombinant HIV-1 Env proteins to identify antibodies that would block the HIV-1 Env-Galcer interaction. Our study revealed that a class of vaccine-induced human antibodies potently blocks HIV-1 Env-Galcer binding by perturbing the HIV-1

  16. [Analysis on HIV-1 genetics and threshold of drug resistance in Dehong prefecture of Yunnan province in 2013].

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanling; Wang, Jibao; Xing, Hui; Chen, Min; Yao, Shitang; Chen, Huichao; Yang, Jin; Li, Yanling; Duan, Song; Jia, Manhong

    2015-06-01

    To study the HIV-1 genotypes and transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in Dehong prefecture of Yunnan province in 2013. Referring to the guidelines for HIV drug resistance threshold survey (HIVDR-TS), 54 plasma samples of recently reported HIV-infected individuals, aged between 16 and 25 years, were collected in Dehong prefecture from January to August 2013. Genotyping of partial pol gene was performed by using reverse transcriptional PCR. HIV-1 genotype. Prevalent levels of HIV-1 drug resistance transmission were analyzed. Forty-eight plasma samples were successfully sequenced and analyzed. Among them, 45.8% were Chinese and the rest 54.2% were all Burmese. Based on pol sequences, identified HIV genotypes included subtype C (41.7%), URF (31.3%), CRF01_AE (12.5%), CRF07_BC (10.4%), CRF08_BC (2.1%) and subtype B (2.1%), C subtype appeared dominated in Chinese while URF was dominated in Burmese. One drug resistant mutation to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) was detected in one sequence from Burmese. Based on the statistical method of HIVDR-TS, the prevalence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance was adjusted as < 5%. Diverse HIV-1 genotypes were found in this study, and the current HIV-1 drug resistant strains transmission was catalogued as at low prevalence level, in Dehong. To prevent the increase of the prevalence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance, standard treatment and scientific management for people living with HIV/AIDS should be strictly followed. Meanwhile, relevant surveillance, including drug resistance surveillance should also be performed among cross-border migrant population.

  17. Population-based study of food insecurity and HIV transmission risk behaviors and symptoms of sexually transmitted infections among linked couples in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Alexander C.; Weiser, Sheri D.

    2014-01-01

    Food insecurity has recently emerged as an important risk factor for HIV acquisition among women worldwide. No previous studies have used linked data that would permit investigation of the extent to which food insecurity may have differential associations with HIV transmission risk behaviors or symptoms of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among men and women in the same households. We used nationally representative data on linked couples from the Nepal 2011 Demographic and Health Survey. The primary explanatory variable of interest was food insecurity, measured with the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale. In multivariable logistic regression models, women in food insecure householdswere less likely to report recent condom use and more likely to report symptoms consistent with STIs. These patterns were absent among men. Interventions targeting food insecurity may have beneficial implications for both HIV prevention and gender equity in Nepal. PMID:24833522

  18. Quantitative moment study and coupling of 4 f rare earth and 3 d metal by transmitted electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Warot-Fonrose, B.; Arras, R.; Dumesnil, K.; Serin, V.

    2016-10-01

    We report a simultaneous investigation of 3 d and 4 f magnetic moments by exploring the Fe -L2 ,3 and Dy -M4 ,5 electron energy-loss edges of a DyF e2/YF e2 superlattice using the energy-loss magnetic chiral dichroism (EMCD) technique. Specific EMCD sum rules for M4 ,5 edges were established and carefully applied to the dichroic signal at Dy -M4 ,5 edges, giving an orbital to the effective spin moment ratio of 5.1 ±1.8 . With dynamic diffraction effects considered, the opposite signs of Fe -L3 and Dy -M5 dichroic peaks unambiguously indicate the antiparallel alignment of net Fe 3 d and Dy 4 f moments. The EMCD technique is shown to be an effective tool to locally characterize the 4 f moment of rare earth elements and study 3 d -4 f moment coupling.

  19. Enhanced clearance of HIV-1-infected cells by broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ching-Lan; Murakowski, Dariusz K; Bournazos, Stylianos; Schoofs, Till; Sarkar, Debolina; Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Horwitz, Joshua A; Nogueira, Lilian; Golijanin, Jovana; Gazumyan, Anna; Ravetch, Jeffrey V; Caskey, Marina; Chakraborty, Arup K; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-05-20

    Antiretroviral drugs and antibodies limit HIV-1 infection by interfering with the viral life cycle. In addition, antibodies also have the potential to guide host immune effector cells to kill HIV-1-infected cells. Examination of the kinetics of HIV-1 suppression in infected individuals by passively administered 3BNC117, a broadly neutralizing antibody, suggested that the effects of the antibody are not limited to free viral clearance and blocking new infection but also include acceleration of infected cell clearance. Consistent with these observations, we find that broadly neutralizing antibodies can target CD4(+) T cells infected with patient viruses and can decrease their in vivo half-lives by a mechanism that requires Fcγ receptor engagement in a humanized mouse model. The results indicate that passive immunotherapy can accelerate elimination of HIV-1-infected cells.

  20. HIV, HSV-2 and syphilis among married couples in India: patterns of discordance and concordance.

    PubMed

    Arora, Paul; Nagelkerke, Nico; Sgaier, Sema K; Kumar, Rajesh; Dhingra, Neeraj; Jha, Prabhat

    2011-10-01

    Differences in sexual networks probably explain the disparity in the scale of HIV epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa and India. HIV and sexually transmitted infection (STI) discordant couple studies provide insights into important aspects of these sexual networks. The authors quantify the role of male sexual behaviour in HIV transmission in married couples in India. The authors analysed patterns of HIV and STI discordance in married couples from two community surveys in India: the National Family Health Study-3 for HIV-1 and the Centre for Global Health Research health check-up for HSV-2 and syphilis. A statistical model was used to estimate the fraction of infections introduced by each of the two partners. Only 0.8%, 16.0% and 3.5% of couples were infected (either partner or both) with HIV-1, HSV-2 and syphilis, respectively. A large proportion of infected couples were discordant (73.0%, 56.3% and 84.2% for HIV-1, HSV-2 and syphilis, respectively). This model estimated that, among couples with any STI, the male partner introduced the infection the majority of the time (HIV-1: 85.4%, HSV-2: 64.1%, syphilis: 75.0%). Male sexual activity outside of marriage appears to be a driving force for the Indian HIV/STI epidemic. Male client and female sex worker contacts should remain a primary target of the National AIDS Control Program in India.

  1. Interferon-α Subtypes in an Ex Vivo Model of Acute HIV-1 Infection: Expression, Potency and Effector Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Harper, Michael S; Guo, Kejun; Gibbert, Kathrin; Lee, Eric J; Dillon, Stephanie M; Barrett, Bradley S; McCarter, Martin D; Hasenkrug, Kim J; Dittmer, Ulf; Wilson, Cara C; Santiago, Mario L

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 is transmitted primarily across mucosal surfaces and rapidly spreads within the intestinal mucosa during acute infection. The type I interferons (IFNs) likely serve as a first line of defense, but the relative expression and antiviral properties of the 12 IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection of mucosal tissues remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the expression of all IFNα subtypes in HIV-1-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells by next-generation sequencing. We then determined the relative antiviral potency of each IFNα subtype ex vivo using the human intestinal Lamina Propria Aggregate Culture model. IFNα subtype transcripts from the centromeric half of the IFNA gene complex were highly expressed in pDCs following HIV-1 exposure. There was an inverse relationship between IFNA subtype expression and potency. IFNα8, IFNα6 and IFNα14 were the most potent in restricting HIV-1 infection. IFNα2, the clinically-approved subtype, and IFNα1 were both highly expressed but exhibited relatively weak antiviral activity. The relative potencies correlated with binding affinity to the type I IFN receptor and the induction levels of HIV-1 restriction factors Mx2 and Tetherin/BST-2 but not APOBEC3G, F and D. However, despite the lack of APOBEC3 transcriptional induction, the higher relative potency of IFNα8 and IFNα14 correlated with stronger inhibition of virion infectivity, which is linked to deaminase-independent APOBEC3 restriction activity. By contrast, both potent (IFNα8) and weak (IFNα1) subtypes significantly induced HIV-1 GG-to-AG hypermutation. The results unravel non-redundant functions of the IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection, with strong implications for HIV-1 mucosal immunity, viral evolution and IFNα-based functional cure strategies.

  2. Interferon-α Subtypes in an Ex Vivo Model of Acute HIV-1 Infection: Expression, Potency and Effector Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Michael S.; Guo, Kejun; Gibbert, Kathrin; Lee, Eric J.; Dillon, Stephanie M.; Barrett, Bradley S.; McCarter, Martin D.; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Dittmer, Ulf; Wilson, Cara C.; Santiago, Mario L.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 is transmitted primarily across mucosal surfaces and rapidly spreads within the intestinal mucosa during acute infection. The type I interferons (IFNs) likely serve as a first line of defense, but the relative expression and antiviral properties of the 12 IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection of mucosal tissues remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the expression of all IFNα subtypes in HIV-1-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells by next-generation sequencing. We then determined the relative antiviral potency of each IFNα subtype ex vivo using the human intestinal Lamina Propria Aggregate Culture model. IFNα subtype transcripts from the centromeric half of the IFNA gene complex were highly expressed in pDCs following HIV-1 exposure. There was an inverse relationship between IFNA subtype expression and potency. IFNα8, IFNα6 and IFNα14 were the most potent in restricting HIV-1 infection. IFNα2, the clinically-approved subtype, and IFNα1 were both highly expressed but exhibited relatively weak antiviral activity. The relative potencies correlated with binding affinity to the type I IFN receptor and the induction levels of HIV-1 restriction factors Mx2 and Tetherin/BST-2 but not APOBEC3G, F and D. However, despite the lack of APOBEC3 transcriptional induction, the higher relative potency of IFNα8 and IFNα14 correlated with stronger inhibition of virion infectivity, which is linked to deaminase-independent APOBEC3 restriction activity. By contrast, both potent (IFNα8) and weak (IFNα1) subtypes significantly induced HIV-1 GG-to-AG hypermutation. The results unravel non-redundant functions of the IFNα subtypes against HIV-1 infection, with strong implications for HIV-1 mucosal immunity, viral evolution and IFNα-based functional cure strategies. PMID:26529416

  3. Picomolar dichotomous activity of gnidimacrin against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Ho, Phong; Yu, Jie; Zhu, Lei; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Chen, Chin-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has offered a promising approach for controlling HIV-1 replication in infected individuals. However, with HARRT, HIV-1 is suppressed rather than eradicated due to persistence of HIV-1 in latent viral reservoirs. Thus, purging the virus from latent reservoirs is an important strategy toward eradicating HIV-1 infection. In this study, we discovered that the daphnane diterpene gnidimacrin, which was previously reported to have potent anti-cancer cell activity, activated HIV-1 replication and killed persistently-infected cells at picomolar concentrations. In addition to its potential to purge HIV-1 from latently infected cells, gnidimacrin potently inhibited a panel of HIV-1 R5 virus infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) at an average concentration lower than 10 pM. In contrast, gnidimacrin only partially inhibited HIV-1 ×4 virus infection of PBMCs. The strong anti-HIV-1 R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was correlated with its effect on down-regulation of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5. The anti-R5 virus activity of gnidimacrin was completely abrogated by a selective protein kinase C beta inhibitor enzastaurin, which suggests that protein kinase C beta plays a key role in the potent anti-HIV-1 activity of gnidimacrin in PBMCs. In summary, these results suggest that gnidimacrin could activate latent HIV-1, specifically kill HIV-1 persistently infected cells, and inhibit R5 viruses at picomolar concentrations.

  4. High Multiplicity Infection by HIV-1 in Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuyi; Decker, Julie M.; Chen, Yalu; Sun, Chuanxi; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Salazar, Maria G.; Learn, Gerald H.; Morgan, Charity J.; Schumacher, Joseph E.; Hraber, Peter; Giorgi, Elena E.; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Korber, Bette T.; Perelson, Alan S.; Eron, Joseph J.; Cohen, Myron S.; Hicks, Charles B.; Haynes, Barton F.; Markowitz, Martin; Keele, Brandon F.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.

    2010-01-01

    Elucidating virus-host interactions responsible for HIV-1 transmission is important for advancing HIV-1 prevention strategies. To this end, single genome amplification (SGA) and sequencing of HIV-1 within the context of a model of random virus evolution has made possible for the first time an unambiguous identification of transmitted/founder viruses and a precise estimation of their numbers. Here, we applied this approach to HIV-1 env analyses in a cohort of acutely infected men who have sex with men (MSM) and found that a high proportion (10 of 28; 36%) had been productively infected by more than one virus. In subjects with multivariant transmission, the minimum number of transmitted viruses ranged from 2 to 10 with viral recombination leading to rapid and extensive genetic shuffling among virus lineages. A combined analysis of these results, together with recently published findings based on identical SGA methods in largely heterosexual (HSX) cohorts, revealed a significantly higher frequency of multivariant transmission in MSM than in HSX [19 of 50 subjects (38%) versus 34 of 175 subjects (19%); Fisher's exact p = 0.008]. To further evaluate the SGA strategy for identifying transmitted/founder viruses, we analyzed 239 overlapping 5′ and 3′ half genome or env-only sequences from plasma viral RNA (vRNA) and blood mononuclear cell DNA in an MSM subject who had a particularly well-documented virus exposure history 3–6 days before symptom onset and 14–17 days before peak plasma viremia (47,600,000 vRNA molecules/ml). All 239 sequences coalesced to a single transmitted/founder virus genome in a time frame consistent with the clinical history, and a molecular clone of this genome encoded replication competent virus in accord with model predictions. Higher multiplicity of HIV-1 infection in MSM compared with HSX is consistent with the demonstrably higher epidemiological risk of virus acquisition in MSM and could indicate a greater challenge for HIV-1

  5. HIV-1 protease and HIV-1 integrase inhibitory substances from Eclipta prostrata.

    PubMed

    Tewtrakul, Supinya; Subhadhirasakul, Sanan; Cheenpracha, Sarot; Karalai, Chatchanok

    2007-11-01

    The bioassay-guided fractionation for anti-HIV-1 integrase activity led to the isolation of six compounds from the whole plant extract of Eclipta prostrata extract. They were identified as 5-hydroxymethyl-(2,2':5',2'')-terthienyl tiglate (1), 5-hydroxymethyl-(2,2':5',2'')-terthienyl agelate (2), 5-hydroxymethyl-(2,2':5',2'')-terthienyl acetate (3), ecliptal (4), orobol (5) and wedelolactone (6). Of these, compound 6 showed the highest activity against HIV-1 integrase (IN) with an IC50 value of 4.0+/-0.2 microm, followed by compound 5 (IC50=8.1+/-0.5 microm), whereas the four terthiophene compounds (1-4) were inactive (IC50>100 microm). Regarding HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitory activity, compound 1 exhibited appreciable activity against HIV-1 PR with an IC50 of 58.3+/-0.8 microm, followed by compound 4 (IC50=83.3+/-1.6 microm) and compound 3 (IC50=93.7+/-0.8 microm), while compounds 2, 5 and 6 were inactive against HIV-1 PR (IC50>100 microm). This is the first report of anti-HIV-1 IN activities for wedelolactone (6), a coumarin derivative, and orobol (5), an isoflavone derivative. This study supports the use of E. prostrata in AIDS patients, which is in accord with its traditional use by Thai traditional doctors for curing blood related diseases. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Dynamic Motions of the HIV-1 Frameshift Site RNA

    PubMed Central

    Mouzakis, Kathryn D.; Dethoff, Elizabeth A.; Tonelli, Marco; Al-Hashimi, Hashim; Butcher, Samuel E.

    2015-01-01

    The HIV-1 frameshift site (FS) plays a critical role in viral replication. During translation, the HIV-1 FS transitions from a 3-helix to a 2-helix junction RNA secondary structure. The 2-helix junction structure contains a GGA bulge, and purine-rich bulges are common motifs in RNA secondary structure. Here, we investigate the dynamics of the HIV-1 FS 2-helix junction RNA. Interhelical motions were studied under different ionic conditions using NMR order tensor analysis of residual dipolar couplings. In 150 mM potassium, the RNA adopts a 43°(±4°) interhelical bend angle (β) and displays large amplitude, anisotropic interhelical motions characterized by a 0.52(±0.04) internal generalized degree of order (GDOint) and distinct order tensor asymmetries for its two helices (η = 0.26(±0.04) and 0.5(±0.1)). These motions are effectively quenched by addition of 2 mM magnesium (GDOint = 0.87(±0.06)), which promotes a near-coaxial conformation (β = 15°(±6°)) of the two helices. Base stacking in the bulge was investigated using the fluorescent purine analog 2-aminopurine. These results indicate that magnesium stabilizes extrahelical conformations of the bulge nucleotides, thereby promoting coaxial stacking of helices. These results are highly similar to previous studies of the HIV transactivation response RNA, despite a complete lack of sequence similarity between the two RNAs. Thus, the conformational space of these RNAs is largely determined by the topology of their interhelical junctions. PMID:25650931

  7. Transplanting Supersites of HIV-1 Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongping; Gorman, Jason; Ofek, Gilad; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Druz, Aliaksandr; Lees, Christopher R.; Lu, Gabriel; Soto, Cinque; Stuckey, Jonathan; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Connors, Mark; Kwon, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    One strategy for isolating or eliciting antibodies against a specific target region on the envelope glycoprotein trimer (Env) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) involves the creation of site transplants, which present the target region on a heterologous protein scaffold with preserved antibody-binding properties. If the target region is a supersite of HIV-1 vulnerability, recognized by a collection of broadly neutralizing antibodies, this strategy affords the creation of “supersite transplants”, capable of binding (and potentially eliciting) antibodies similar to the template collection of effective antibodies. Here we transplant three supersites of HIV-1 vulnerability, each targeted by effective neutralizing antibodies from multiple donors. To implement our strategy, we chose a single representative antibody against each of the target supersites: antibody 10E8, which recognizes the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) on the HIV-1 gp41 glycoprotein; antibody PG9, which recognizes variable regions one and two (V1V2) on the HIV-1 gp120 glycoprotein; and antibody PGT128 which recognizes a glycopeptide supersite in variable region 3 (glycan V3) on gp120. We used a structural alignment algorithm to identify suitable acceptor proteins, and then designed, expressed, and tested antigenically over 100-supersite transplants in a 96-well microtiter-plate format. The majority of the supersite transplants failed to maintain the antigenic properties of their respective template supersite. However, seven of the glycan V3-supersite transplants exhibited nanomolar affinity to effective neutralizing antibodies from at least three donors and recapitulated the mannose9-N-linked glycan requirement of the template supersite. The binding of these transplants could be further enhanced by placement into self-assembling nanoparticles. Essential elements of the glycan V3 supersite, embodied by as few as 3 N-linked glycans and ∼25 Env residues, can be segregated

  8. The HIV-1 Entry Process: A Stoichiometric View.

    PubMed

    Brandenberg, Oliver F; Magnus, Carsten; Regoes, Roland R; Trkola, Alexandra

    2015-12-01

    HIV-1 infection starts with fusion of the viral and the host cell membranes, a process mediated by the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer. The number of trimers required to complete membrane fusion, referred to as HIV-1 entry stoichiometry, remains under debate. A precise definition of HIV-1 entry stoichiometry is important as it reflects the efficacy of the viral entry process and steers the infectivity of HIV-1 virion populations. Initial estimates suggested a unanimous entry stoichiometry across HIV-1 strains while recent findings showed that HIV-1 strains can differ in entry stoichiometry. Here, we review current analyses of HIV-1 entry stoichiometry and point out future research directions to further define the interplay between entry stoichiometry, virus entry fitness, transmission, and susceptibility to antibody neutralization.

  9. HIV-1 Variants and Drug Resistance in Pregnant Women from Bata (Equatorial Guinea): 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Patricia; Fernández McPhee, Carolina; Prieto, Luis; Martín, Leticia; Obiang, Jacinta; Avedillo, Pedro; Vargas, Antonio; Rojo, Pablo; Benito, Agustín; Ramos, José Tomás; Holguín, África

    2016-01-01

    This is the first study describing drug resistance mutations (DRM) and HIV-1 variants among infected pregnant women in Equatorial Guinea (GQ), a country with high (6.2%) and increasing HIV prevalence. Dried blood spots (DBS) were collected from November 2012 to December 2013 from 69 HIV-1 infected women participating in a prevention of mother-to-child transmission program in the Hospital Regional of Bata and Primary Health Care Centre María Rafols, Bata, GQ. The transmitted (TDR) or acquired (ADR) antiretroviral drug resistance mutations at partial pol sequence among naive or antiretroviral therapy (ART)-exposed women were defined following WHO or IAS USA 2015 lists, respectively. HIV-1 variants were identified by phylogenetic analyses. A total of 38 of 69 HIV-1 specimens were successfully amplified and sequenced. Thirty (79%) belonged to ART-experienced women: 15 exposed to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) monotherapy, and 15 to combined ART (cART) as first regimen including two NRTI and one non-NRTI (NNRTI) or one protease inhibitor (PI). The TDR rate was only found for PI (3.4%). The ADR rate was 37.5% for NNRTI, 8.7% for NRTI and absent for PI or NRTI+NNRTI. HIV-1 group M non-B variants caused most (97.4%) infections, mainly (78.9%) recombinants: CRF02_AG (55.2%), CRF22_A101 (10.5%), subtype C (10.5%), unique recombinants (5.3%), and A3, D, F2, G, CRF06_cpx and CRF11_cpx (2.6% each). The high rate of ADR to retrotranscriptase inhibitors (mainly to NNRTIs) observed among pretreated pregnant women reinforces the importance of systematic DRM monitoring in GQ to reduce HIV-1 resistance transmission and to optimize first and second-line ART regimens when DRM are present.

  10. Early Low-Titer Neutralizing Antibodies Impede HIV-1 Replication and Select for Virus Escape

    PubMed Central

    Bar, Katharine J.; Tsao, Chun-yen; Iyer, Shilpa S.; Decker, Julie M.; Yang, Yongping; Bonsignori, Mattia; Chen, Xi; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Montefiori, David C.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Hraber, Peter; Fischer, William; Li, Hui; Wang, Shuyi; Sterrett, Sarah; Keele, Brandon F.; Ganusov, Vitaly V.; Perelson, Alan S.; Korber, Bette T.; Georgiev, Ivelin; McLellan, Jason S.; Pavlicek, Jeffrey W.; Gao, Feng; Haynes, Barton F.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Kwong, Peter D.; Shaw, George M.

    2012-01-01

    Single genome sequencing of early HIV-1 genomes provides a sensitive, dynamic assessment of virus evolution and insight into the earliest anti-viral immune responses in vivo. By using this approach, together with deep sequencing, site-directed mutagenesis, antibody adsorptions and virus-entry assays, we found evidence in three subjects of neutralizing antibody (Nab) responses as early as 2 weeks post-seroconversion, with Nab titers as low as 1∶20 to 1∶50 (IC50) selecting for virus escape. In each of the subjects, Nabs targeted different regions of the HIV-1 envelope (Env) in a strain-specific, conformationally sensitive manner. In subject CH40, virus escape was first mediated by mutations in the V1 region of the Env, followed by V3. HIV-1 specific monoclonal antibodies from this subject mapped to an immunodominant region at the base of V3 and exhibited neutralizing patterns indistinguishable from polyclonal antibody responses, indicating V1–V3 interactions within the Env trimer. In subject CH77, escape mutations mapped to the V2 region of Env, several of which selected for alterations of glycosylation. And in subject CH58, escape mutations mapped to the Env outer domain. In all three subjects, initial Nab recognition was followed by sequential rounds of virus escape and Nab elicitation, with Nab escape variants exhibiting variable costs to replication fitness. Although delayed in comparison with autologous CD8 T-cell responses, our findings show that Nabs appear earlier in HIV-1 infection than previously recognized, target diverse sites on HIV-1 Env, and impede virus replication at surprisingly low titers. The unexpected in vivo sensitivity of early transmitted/founder virus to Nabs raises the possibility that similarly low concentrations of vaccine-induced Nabs could impair virus acquisition in natural HIV-1 transmission, where the risk of infection is low and the number of viruses responsible for transmission and productive clinical infection is typically

  11. HIV-1 Variants and Drug Resistance in Pregnant Women from Bata (Equatorial Guinea): 2012-2013

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Patricia; Fernández McPhee, Carolina; Prieto, Luis; Martín, Leticia; Obiang, Jacinta; Avedillo, Pedro; Vargas, Antonio; Rojo, Pablo; Benito, Agustín; Ramos, José Tomás; Holguín, África

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This is the first study describing drug resistance mutations (DRM) and HIV-1 variants among infected pregnant women in Equatorial Guinea (GQ), a country with high (6.2%) and increasing HIV prevalence. Methods Dried blood spots (DBS) were collected from November 2012 to December 2013 from 69 HIV-1 infected women participating in a prevention of mother-to-child transmission program in the Hospital Regional of Bata and Primary Health Care Centre María Rafols, Bata, GQ. The transmitted (TDR) or acquired (ADR) antiretroviral drug resistance mutations at partial pol sequence among naive or antiretroviral therapy (ART)-exposed women were defined following WHO or IAS USA 2015 lists, respectively. HIV-1 variants were identified by phylogenetic analyses. Results A total of 38 of 69 HIV-1 specimens were successfully amplified and sequenced. Thirty (79%) belonged to ART-experienced women: 15 exposed to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) monotherapy, and 15 to combined ART (cART) as first regimen including two NRTI and one non-NRTI (NNRTI) or one protease inhibitor (PI). The TDR rate was only found for PI (3.4%). The ADR rate was 37.5% for NNRTI, 8.7% for NRTI and absent for PI or NRTI+NNRTI. HIV-1 group M non-B variants caused most (97.4%) infections, mainly (78.9%) recombinants: CRF02_AG (55.2%), CRF22_A101 (10.5%), subtype C (10.5%), unique recombinants (5.3%), and A3, D, F2, G, CRF06_cpx and CRF11_cpx (2.6% each). Conclusions The high rate of ADR to retrotranscriptase inhibitors (mainly to NNRTIs) observed among pretreated pregnant women reinforces the importance of systematic DRM monitoring in GQ to reduce HIV-1 resistance transmission and to optimize first and second-line ART regimens when DRM are present. PMID:27798676

  12. Molecular clock of HIV-1 envelope genes under early immune selection.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Yong; Love, Tanzy M T; Perelson, Alan S; Mack, Wendy J; Lee, Ha Youn

    2016-06-01

    The molecular clock hypothesis that genes or proteins evolve at a constant rate is a key tool to reveal phylogenetic relationships among species. Using the molecular clock, we can trace an infection back to transmission using HIV-1 sequences from a single time point. Whether or not a strict molecular clock applies to HIV-1's early evolution in the presence of immune selection has not yet been fully examined. We identified molecular clock signatures from 1587 previously published HIV-1 full envelope gene sequences obtained since acute infection in 15 subjects. Each subject's sequence diversity linearly increased during the first 150 days post infection, with rates ranging from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] with a mean of [Formula: see text] per base per day. The rate of diversification for 12 out of the 15 subjects was comparable to the neutral evolution rate. While temporal diversification was consistent with evolution patterns in the absence of selection, mutations from the founder virus were highly clustered on statistically identified selection sites, which diversified more than 65 times faster than non-selection sites. By mathematically quantifying deviations from the molecular clock under various selection scenarios, we demonstrate that the deviation from a constant clock becomes negligible as multiple escape lineages emerge. The most recent common ancestor of a virus pair from distinct escape lineages is most likely the transmitted founder virus, indicating that HIV-1 molecular dating is feasible even after the founder viruses are no longer detectable. The ability of HIV-1 to escape from immune surveillance in many different directions is the driving force of molecular clock persistence. This finding advances our understanding of the robustness of HIV-1's molecular clock under immune selection, implying the potential for molecular dating.

  13. Development of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors targeting gp41.

    PubMed

    Lu, K; Asyifah, M R; Shao, F; Zhang, D

    2014-06-01

    The HIV-1 envelope protein glycoprotein 41 (gp41) is crucial in the HIV-1 infection process, therefore gp41 has emerged as an attractive target for drug design against AIDS. During the past few decades, tremendous efforts have been made on developing inhibitors that can prevent the HIV-1 entry process via suppressing functional gp41. In this review, the development of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors targeting gp41 including peptide inhibitors, small molecule inhibitors, vaccines and neutralized antibodies will be discussed.

  14. Therapeutics for HIV-1 reactivation from latency.

    PubMed

    Sgarbanti, Marco; Battistini, Angela

    2013-08-01

    Intensive combined antiretroviral therapy successfully suppresses HIV-1 replication and AIDS disease progression making infection manageable, but it is unable to eradicate the virus that persists in long-lived, drug-insensitive and immune system-insensitive reservoirs thus asking for life-long treatments with problems of compliance, resistance, toxicity and cost. These limitations and recent insights into latency mechanisms have fueled a renewed effort in finding a cure for HIV-1 infection. Proposed eradication strategies involve reactivation of the latent reservoir upon induction of viral transcription followed by the elimination of reactivated virus-producing cells by viral cytopathic effect or host immune response. Several molecules identified by mechanism-directed approaches or in large-scale screenings have been proposed as latency reversing agents. Some of them have already entered clinical testing in humans but with mixed or unsatisfactory results.

  15. The role of NK cells in HIV-1 protection: autologous, allogeneic or both?

    PubMed

    Hens, Jef; Jennes, Wim; Kestens, Luc

    2016-01-01

    transmission. Therefore, theoretically, HIV-1 would be eliminated before it has the chance to infect the autologous cells in the recipient. While this "alloreactive" NK cell mechanism is especially relevant to HIV transmission in monogamous couples, it would be interesting to investigate how it could influence resistance to HIV in other settings. The objective of this review is to summarize the knowledge about these autologous and alloreactive NK cell responses with regard to HIV-1 outcome.

  16. [Molecular characterization of complex recombinant HIV-1 CRF06_cpx subtype detected in Turkey].

    PubMed

    Sayan, Murat; Kaptan, Figen; Ormen, Bahar; Türker, Nesrin

    2014-01-01

    A major proportion of the global HIV infections is caused by group M of HIV-1 genotype and to date approximately nine subtypes (A, B, C, D, F, G, H, J, K) and 50 circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) have been recognized. Recombinants between different HIV-1 group M subtypes are designated as CRF. The extension 'cpx', for complex, is given if the CRF consists of contributions from three or more different subtypes but the composition of the subtype is not given. The objective of this study was to present, for the first time an HIV-1 positive married couple infected with CRF06_cpx subtype in Izmir, Turkey. A 39-year-old male patient who admitted to hospital with the complaints of oral candidiasis and zona, was found to be anti-HIV positive. CD4+ T lymphocyte count was 21 cells/mm3 and plasma HIV-1 RNA level was 56.380 copies/ml. He reported unprotected heterosexual contact with multiple partners including African women during his stay in Saudi Arabia between 1996 and 2002. After his diagnosis, his 37-year-old wife was screened for HIV infection and she was also found anti-HIV positive, with CD4+ T cell count of 122 cells/mm3. However, her results of basal plasma HIV-1 RNA could not be obtained because of an internal control error. HIV-1 strains were analysed for subtyping, recombination and drug resistance mutations with pol gene region sequencing. HIV-1 sequences were subtyped as CRF06_cpx after phylogenetic analysis using neighbor-joining method. According to the recombination analysis, HIV-1 pol gene regions consisted of group M subtype G, A, D, and B in the male patient and G K, A, F, and D in the female patient. While L10I + L33F mutation associated with protease inhibitor (PI) resistance was detected in both of the patients, K219N mutation associated with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) resistance was detected only in the male patient. In conclusion, HIV-1 molecular epidemiology studies are important tools for tracking transmission patterns and

  17. Extensive Genetic Diversity of HIV-1 in Incident and Prevalent Infections among Malaysian Blood Donors: Multiple Introductions of HIV-1 Genotypes from Highly Prevalent Countries.

    PubMed

    Chow, Wei Zhen; Bon, Abdul Hamid; Keating, Sheila; Anderios, Fread; Halim, Hazwan Abdul; Takebe, Yutaka; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Busch, Michael P; Tee, Kok Keng

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion-transmissible infections including HIV-1 continue to pose major risks for unsafe blood transfusions due to both window phase infections and divergent viruses that may not be detected by donor screening assays. Given the recent emergence of several HIV-1 circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) in high-risk populations in the Southeast Asia region, we investigated the genetic diversity of HIV-1 among the blood donors in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. A total of 211 HIV-positive plasma samples detected among 730,188 donations to the National Blood Centre between 2013 and 2014 were provided (90.5% male, median age: 27.0 years old). Recent or long-term infection status at the time of donation was determined using a limiting antigen avidity enzyme immunoassay (LAg-Avidity EIA). HIV-1 gag-pol genes were amplified and sequenced from residual plasma for 149 cases followed by genotype determination using phylogenetic and recombination analyses. Transmitted antiretroviral resistance mutations were not observed among the blood donors, among which 22.7% were classified as recent or incident infections. Major circulating HIV-1 genotypes determined by neighbour-joining phylogenetic inference included CRF01_AE at 40.9% (61/149), CRF33_01B at 21.5% (32/149), and subtype B at 10.1% (15/149). Newly-described CRFs including CRF54_01B circulated at 4.0%, CRF74_01B at 2.0%, and CRF53_01B and CRF48_01B at 0.7% each. Interestingly, unique HIV-1 genotypes including African subtype G (8.7%), CRF45_cpx (1.3%), CRF02_AG (0.7%) and CRF07_BC (0.7%) from China were detected for the first time in the country. A cluster of subtype G sequences formed a distinct founder sub-lineage within the African strains. In addition, 8.7% (13/149) of HIV-infected donors had unique recombinant forms (URFs) including CRF01_AE/B' (4.7%), B'/C (2.7%) and B'/G (1.3%) recombinants. Detailed analysis identified similar recombinant structures with shared parental strains among the B'/C and B'/G URFs, some of which

  18. Nanochemistry-based immunotherapy for HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Lori, F; Calarota, S A; Lisziewicz, J

    2007-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART), i.e. the combination of three or more drugs against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has greatly improved the clinical outcome of HIV-1-infected individuals. However, HAART is unable to reconstitute HIV-specific immunity and eradicate the virus. Several observations in primate models and in humans support the notion that cell-mediated immunity can control viral replication and slow disease progression. Thus, besides drugs, an immunotherapy that induces long-lasting HIV-specific T-cell responses could play a role in the treatment of HIV/AIDS. To induce such immune responses, DermaVir Patch has been developed. DermaVir consists of an HIV-1 antigen-encoding plasmid DNA that is chemically formulated in a nanoparticle. DermaVir is administered under a patch after a skin preparation that supports the delivery of the nanoparticle to Langerhans cells (LC). Epidermal LC trap and transport the nanomedicine to draining lymph nodes. While in transit, LC mature into dendritic cells (DC), which can efficiently present the DNA-encoded antigens to naïve T-cells for the induction of cellular immunity. Pre-clinical studies and Phase I clinical testing of DermaVir in HIV-1-infected individuals have demonstrated the safety and tolerability of DermaVir Patch. To further modulate cellular immunity, molecular adjuvants might be added into the nanoparticle. DermaVir Patch represents a new nanomedicine platform for immunotherapy of HIV/AIDS. In this review, the antiviral activity of DermaVir-induced cellular immunity is discussed. Furthermore, the action of some cytokines currently being tested as adjuvants are highlighted and the adjuvant effect of cytokine plasmid DNA included in the DermaVir nanoparticle is reviewed.

  19. HIV-1 Transmission Networks Across South Korea.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Mi Young; Wertheim, Joel O; Kim, Woo Joo; Kim, Shin-Woo; Lee, Jin Soo; Ann, Hea Won; Jeon, Yongduk; Ahn, Jin Young; Song, Je Eun; Oh, Dong Hyun; Kim, Yong Chan; Kim, Eun Jin; Jung, In Young; Kim, Moo Hyun; Jeong, Wooyoung; Jeong, Su Jin; Ku, Nam Su; Kim, June Myung; Smith, Davey M; Choi, Jun Yong

    2017-03-27

    Molecular epidemiology can help clarify the properties and dynamics of HIV-1 transmission networks in both global and regional scales. We studied 143 HIV-1-infected individuals recruited from four medical centers of three cities in South Korea between April 2013 and May 2014. HIV-1 env V3 sequence data were generated (337-793 bp) and analyzed using a pairwise distance-based clustering approach to infer putative transmission networks. Participants whose viruses were ≤2.0% divergent according to Tamura-Nei 93 genetic distance were defined as clustering. We collected demographic, risk, and clinical data and analyzed these data in relation to clustering. Among 143 participants, we identified nine putative transmission clusters of different sizes (range 2-4 participants). The reported risk factor of participants were concordant in only one network involving two participants, that is, both individuals reported homosexual sex as their risk factor. The participants in the other eight networks did not report concordant risk factors, although they were phylogenetically linked. About half of the participants refused to report their risk factor. Overall, molecular epidemiology provides more information to understand local transmission networks and the risks associated with these networks.

  20. Population genomics of intrapatient HIV-1 evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zanini, Fabio; Brodin, Johanna; Thebo, Lina; Lanz, Christa; Bratt, Göran; Albert, Jan; Neher, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Many microbial populations rapidly adapt to changing environments with multiple variants competing for survival. To quantify such complex evolutionary dynamics in vivo, time resolved and genome wide data including rare variants are essential. We performed whole-genome deep sequencing of HIV-1 populations in 9 untreated patients, with 6-12 longitudinal samples per patient spanning 5-8 years of infection. The data can be accessed and explored via an interactive web application. We show that patterns of minor diversity are reproducible between patients and mirror global HIV-1 diversity, suggesting a universal landscape of fitness costs that control diversity. Reversions towards the ancestral HIV-1 sequence are observed throughout infection and account for almost one third of all sequence changes. Reversion rates depend strongly on conservation. Frequent recombination limits linkage disequilibrium to about 100bp in most of the genome, but strong hitch-hiking due to short range linkage limits diversity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11282.001 PMID:26652000

  1. Maturation of the viral core enhances the fusion of HIV-1 particles with primary human T cells and monocyte-derived macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Jiyang; Aiken, Christopher . E-mail: chris.aiken@vanderbilt.edu

    2006-03-15

    HIV-1 infection requires fusion of viral and cellular membranes in a reaction catalyzed by the viral envelope proteins gp120 and gp41. We recently reported that efficient HIV-1 particle fusion with target cells is linked to maturation of the viral core by an activity of the gp41 cytoplasmic domain. Here, we show that maturation enhances the fusion of a variety of recombinant viruses bearing primary and laboratory-adapted Env proteins with primary human CD4{sup +} T cells. Overall, HIV-1 fusion was more dependent on maturation for viruses bearing X4-tropic envelope proteins than for R5-tropic viruses. Fusion of HIV-1 with monocyte-derived macrophages was also dependent on particle maturation. We conclude that the ability to couple fusion to particle maturation is a common feature of HIV-1 Env proteins and may play an important role during HIV-1 replication in vivo.

  2. Optically transmitted and inductively coupled electric reference to access in vivo concentrations for quantitative proton-decoupled ¹³C magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Pavan, Matteo; Heinzer-Schweizer, Susanne; Boesiger, Peter; Henning, Anke

    2012-01-01

    This report describes our efforts on quantification of tissue metabolite concentrations in mM by nuclear Overhauser enhanced and proton decoupled (13) C magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the Electric Reference To access In vivo Concentrations (ERETIC) method. Previous work showed that a calibrated synthetic magnetic resonance spectroscopy-like signal transmitted through an optical fiber and inductively coupled into a transmit/receive coil represents a reliable reference standard for in vivo (1) H magnetic resonance spectroscopy quantification on a clinical platform. In this work, we introduce a related implementation that enables simultaneous proton decoupling and ERETIC-based metabolite quantification and hence extends the applicability of the ERETIC method to nuclear Overhauser enhanced and proton decoupled in vivo (13) C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In addition, ERETIC signal stability under the influence of simultaneous proton decoupling is investigated. The proposed quantification method was cross-validated against internal and external reference standards on human skeletal muscle. The ERETIC signal intensity stability was 100.65 ± 4.18% over 3 months including measurements with and without proton decoupling. Glycogen and unsaturated fatty acid concentrations measured with the ERETIC method were in excellent agreement with internal creatine and external phantom reference methods, showing a difference of 1.85 ± 1.21% for glycogen and 1.84 ± 1.00% for unsaturated fatty acid between ERETIC and creatine-based quantification, whereas the deviations between external reference and creatine-based quantification are 6.95 ± 9.52% and 3.19 ± 2.60%, respectively.

  3. HIV-1 Vpr accelerates viral replication during acute infection by exploitation of proliferating CD4+ T cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kei; Misawa, Naoko; Iwami, Shingo; Satou, Yorifumi; Matsuoka, Masao; Ishizaka, Yukihito; Ito, Mamoru; Aihara, Kazuyuki; An, Dong Sung; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The precise role of viral protein R (Vpr), an HIV-1-encoded protein, during HIV-1 infection and its contribution to the development of AIDS remain unclear. Previous reports have shown that Vpr has the ability to cause G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HIV-1-infected cells in vitro. In addition, vpr is highly conserved in transmitted/founder HIV-1s and in all primate lentiviruses, which are evolutionarily related to HIV-1. Although these findings suggest an important role of Vpr in HIV-1 pathogenesis, its direct evidence in vivo has not been shown. Here, by using a human hematopoietic stem cell-transplanted humanized mouse model, we demonstrated that Vpr causes G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis predominantly in proliferating CCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells, which mainly consist of regulatory CD4(+) T cells (Tregs), resulting in Treg depletion and enhanced virus production during acute infection. The Vpr-dependent enhancement of virus replication and Treg depletion is observed in CCR5-tropic but not CXCR4-tropic HIV-1-infected mice, suggesting that these effects are dependent on the coreceptor usage by HIV-1. Immune activation was observed in CCR5-tropic wild-type but not in vpr-deficient HIV-1-infected humanized mice. When humanized mice were treated with denileukin diftitox (DD), to deplete Tregs, DD-treated humanized mice showed massive activation/proliferation of memory T cells compared to the untreated group. This activation/proliferation enhanced CCR5 expression in memory CD4(+) T cells and rendered them more susceptible to CCR5-tropic wild-type HIV-1 infection than to vpr-deficient virus. Taken together, these results suggest that Vpr takes advantage of proliferating CCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells for enhancing viremia of CCR5-tropic HIV-1. Because Tregs exist in a higher cycling state than other T cell subsets, Tregs appear to be more vulnerable to exploitation by Vpr during acute HIV-1 infection.

  4. Nup153 and Nup98 bind the HIV-1 core and contribute to the early steps of HIV-1 replication

    SciTech Connect

    Di Nunzio, Francesca; Fricke, Thomas; Miccio, Annarita; Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos; Perez, Patricio; Souque, Philippe; Rizzi, Ermanno; Severgnini, Marco; Mavilio, Fulvio; Charneau, Pierre; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2013-05-25

    The early steps of HIV-1 replication involve the entry of HIV-1 into the nucleus, which is characterized by viral interactions with nuclear pore components. HIV-1 developed an evolutionary strategy to usurp the nuclear pore machinery and chromatin in order to integrate and efficiently express viral genes. In the current work, we studied the role of nucleoporins 153 and 98 (Nup153 and Nup98) in infection of human Jurkat lymphocytes by HIV-1. We showed that Nup153-depleted cells exhibited a defect in nuclear import, while depletion of Nup 98 caused a slight defect in HIV integration. To explore the biochemical viral determinants for the requirement of Nup153 and Nup98 during HIV-1 infection, we tested the ability of these nucleoporins to interact with HIV-1 cores. Our findings showed that both nucleoporins bind HIV-1 cores suggesting that this interaction is important for HIV-1 nuclear import and/or integration. Distribution analysis of integration sites in Nup153-depleted cells revealed a reduced tendency of HIV-1 to integrate in intragenic sites, which in part could account for the large infectivity defect observed in Nup153-depleted cells. Our work strongly supports a role for Nup153 in HIV-1 nuclear import and integration. - Highlights: ► We studied the role of Nup98 and Nup153 in HIV-1 infection. ► Nup98 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 integration. ► Nup153 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 nuclear import. ► Depletion of Nup153 decreased the integration of HIV-1 in transcriptionally active sites.

  5. Nevirapine-Resistant HIV-1 DNA in Breast Milk After Single-Dose Nevirapine With or Without Zidovudine for Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Gantt, Soren; Payant, Rachel; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Micek, Mark A.; Blanco, Ana Judith; Beck, Ingrid A.; Matunha, Laurinda; Montoya, Pablo; Matediana, Eduardo; Gloyd, Stephen; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Among 30 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)–infected women who received single-dose nevirapine (NVP), 17 (57%) had NVP-resistant HIV-1 detected in breast milk. NVP resistance in breast milk persisted for at least 8 months postpartum and was apparently transmitted to at least 1 infant. NVP resistance was detected less often in women who also received zidovudine. PMID:23687579

  6. Slit2N Inhibits Transmission of HIV-1 from Dendritic Cells to T-cells by Modulating Novel Cytoskeletal Elements

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Ashutosh; Prasad, Anil; Kuzontkoski, Paula M.; Yu, Jinlong; Groopman, Jerome E.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells are among the first cells to encounter sexually acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), in the mucosa, and they can transmit HIV-1 to CD4+ T-cells via an infectious synapse. Recent studies reveal that actin-rich membrane extensions establish direct contact between cells at this synapse and facilitate virus transmission. Genesis of these contacts involves signaling through c-Src and Cdc42, which modulate actin polymerization and filopodia formation via the Arp2/3 complex and Diaphanous 2 (Diaph2). We found that Slit2N, a ligand for the Roundabout (Robo) receptors, blocked HIV-1-induced signaling through Arp2/3 and Diaph2, decreased filopodial extensions on dendritic cells, and inhibited cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1 in a Robo1-dependent manner. Employing proteomic analysis, we identified Flightless-1 as a novel, Robo1-interacting protein. Treatment with shRNAs reduced levels of Flightless-1 and demonstrated its role in efficient cell-to-cell transfer of HIV-1. These results suggest a novel strategy to limit viral infection in the host by targeting the Slit/Robo pathway with modulation of cytoskeletal elements previously unrecognized in HIV-1 transmission. PMID:26582347

  7. Rapid selection of escape mutants by the first CD8 T cell responses in acute HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, Bette Tina Marie

    2008-01-01

    The recent failure of a vaccine that primes T cell responses to control primary HIV-1 infection has raised doubts about the role of CD8+ T cells in early HIV-1 infection. We studied four patients who were identified shortly after HIV-1 infection and before seroconversion. In each patient there was very rapid selection of multiple HIV-1 escape mutants in the transmitted virus by CD8 T cells, including examples of complete fixation of non-synonymous substitutions within 2 weeks. Sequencing by single genome amplification suggested that the high rate of virus replication in acute infection gave a selective advantage to virus molecules that contained simultaneous and gained sequential T cell escape mutations. These observations show that whilst early HIV-1 specific CD8 T cells can act against virus, rapid escape means that these T cell responses are unlikely to benefit the patient and may in part explain why current HIV-1 T cell vaccines may not be protective.

  8. Identifying the Important HIV-1 Recombination Breakpoints

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jun; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Arts, Eric J.; Negroni, Matteo; Robertson, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant HIV-1 genomes contribute significantly to the diversity of variants within the HIV/AIDS pandemic. It is assumed that some of these mosaic genomes may have novel properties that have led to their prevalence, particularly in the case of the circulating recombinant forms (CRFs). In regions of the HIV-1 genome where recombination has a tendency to convey a selective advantage to the virus, we predict that the distribution of breakpoints—the identifiable boundaries that delimit the mosaic structure—will deviate from the underlying null distribution. To test this hypothesis, we generate a probabilistic model of HIV-1 copy-choice recombination and compare the predicted breakpoint distribution to the distribution from the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Across much of the HIV-1 genome, we find that the observed frequencies of inter-subtype recombination are predicted accurately by our model. This observation strongly indicates that in these regions a probabilistic model, dependent on local sequence identity, is sufficient to explain breakpoint locations. In regions where there is a significant over- (either side of the env gene) or under- (short regions within gag, pol, and most of env) representation of breakpoints, we infer natural selection to be influencing the recombination pattern. The paucity of recombination breakpoints within most of the envelope gene indicates that recombinants generated in this region are less likely to be successful. The breakpoints at a higher frequency than predicted by our model are approximately at either side of env, indicating increased selection for these recombinants as a consequence of this region, or at least part of it, having a tendency to be recombined as an entire unit. Our findings thus provide the first clear indication of the existence of a specific portion of the genome that deviates from a probabilistic null model for recombination. This suggests that, despite the wide diversity of recombinant forms seen in the viral

  9. Suppression of HIV-1 Infectivity by Human Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Tanaka, Atsushi; Islam, Salequl; Ahsan, Gias Uddin; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infection to the central nervous system (CNS) is very common in AIDS patients. The predominant cell types infected in the brain are monocytes and macrophages, which are surrounded by several HIV-1-resistant cell types, such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and microvascular cells. The effect of these HIV-1-resistant cells on HIV-1 infection is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the stability of HIV-1 cultured with several human glioblastoma cell lines, for example, NP-2, U87MG, T98G, and A172, to determine whether these HIV-1-resistant brain cells could enhance or suppress HIV-1 infection and thus modulate HIV-1 infection in the CNS. The HIV-1 titer was determined using the MAGIC-5A indicator cell line as well as naturally occurring CD4(+) T cells. We found that the stability of HIV-1 incubated with NP-2 or U87MG cells at 37°C was significantly shorter (half-life, 2.5-4 h) compared to that of HIV-1 incubated with T98G or A172 cells or in culture medium without cells (half-life, 8-18 h). The spent culture media (SCM) of NP-2 and U87MG cells had the ability to suppress both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection by inhibiting HIV-1 attachment to target cells. This inhibitory effect was eliminated by the treatment of the SCM with chondroitinase ABC but not heparinase, suggesting that the inhibitory factor(s) secreted by NP-2 and U87MG cells was chiefly mediated by chondroitin sulfate (CS) or CS-like moiety. Thus, this study reveals that some but not all glioma cells secrete inhibitory molecules to HIV-1 infection that may contribute in lowering HIV-1 infection in the CNS in vivo.

  10. Suppression of HIV-1 Infectivity by Human Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Tanaka, Atsushi; Islam, Salequl; Ahsan, Gias Uddin; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract HIV-1 infection to the central nervous system (CNS) is very common in AIDS patients. The predominant cell types infected in the brain are monocytes and macrophages, which are surrounded by several HIV-1–resistant cell types, such as astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and microvascular cells. The effect of these HIV-1–resistant cells on HIV-1 infection is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the stability of HIV-1 cultured with several human glioblastoma cell lines, for example, NP-2, U87MG, T98G, and A172, to determine whether these HIV-1–resistant brain cells could enhance or suppress HIV-1 infection and thus modulate HIV-1 infection in the CNS. The HIV-1 titer was determined using the MAGIC-5A indicator cell line as well as naturally occurring CD4+ T cells. We found that the stability of HIV-1 incubated with NP-2 or U87MG cells at 37°C was significantly shorter (half-life, 2.5–4 h) compared to that of HIV-1 incubated with T98G or A172 cells or in culture medium without cells (half-life, 8–18 h). The spent culture media (SCM) of NP-2 and U87MG cells had the ability to suppress both R5- and X4-HIV-1 infection by inhibiting HIV-1 attachment to target cells. This inhibitory effect was eliminated by the treatment of the SCM with chondroitinase ABC but not heparinase, suggesting that the inhibitory factor(s) secreted by NP-2 and U87MG cells was chiefly mediated by chondroitin sulfate (CS) or CS-like moiety. Thus, this study reveals that some but not all glioma cells secrete inhibitory molecules to HIV-1 infection that may contribute in lowering HIV-1 infection in the CNS in vivo. PMID:26650729

  11. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development

    DOE PAGES

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; ...

    2014-11-14

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth ofmore » IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research.« less

  12. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-14

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth of IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research.

  13. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Kathryn E; Neubauer, George H; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T; Barouch, Dan H

    2015-01-01

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth of IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Quantification of the Epitope Diversity of HIV-1-Specific Binding Antibodies by Peptide Microarrays for Global HIV-1 Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-01-01

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6,564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth of IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research. PMID:25445329

  15. Phenotypic Correlates of HIV-1 Macrophage Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Arrildt, Kathryn T.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Joseph, Sarah B.; Dukhovlinova, Elena N.; Graham, William D.; Ping, Li-Hua; Schnell, Gretja; Sturdevant, Christa B.; Kincer, Laura P.; Mallewa, Macpherson; Heyderman, Robert S.; Van Rie, Annelies; Cohen, Myron S.; Spudich, Serena; Price, Richard W.; Montefiori, David C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 is typically CCR5 using (R5) and T cell tropic (T-tropic), targeting memory CD4+ T cells throughout acute and chronic infections. However, viruses can expand into alternative cells types. Macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) HIV-1 variants have evolved to infect macrophages, which have only low levels of surface CD4. Most M-tropic variants have been isolated from the central nervous system during late-stage chronic infection. We used the HIV-1 env genes of well-defined, subject-matched M-tropic and T-tropic viruses to characterize the phenotypic features of the M-tropic Env protein. We found that, compared to T-tropic viruses, M-tropic viruses infect monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) on average 28-fold more efficiently, use low-density CD4 more efficiently, have increased sensitivity to soluble CD4 (sCD4), and show trends toward sensitivity to some CD4 binding site antibodies but no difference in sensitivity to antibodies targeting the CD4-bound conformation. M-tropic viruses also displayed a trend toward resistance to neutralization by monoclonal antibodies targeting the V1/V2 region of Env, suggesting subtle changes in Env protein conformation. The paired M- and T-tropic viruses did not differ in autologous serum neutralization, temperature sensitivity, entry kinetics, intrinsic infectivity, or Env protein incorporation. We also examined viruses with modestly increased CD4 usage. These variants have significant sensitivity to sCD4 and may represent evolutionary intermediates. CD4 usage is strongly correlated with infectivity of MDMs over a wide range of CD4 entry phenotypes. These data suggest that emergence of M-tropic HIV-1 includes multiple steps in which a phenotype of increased sensitivity to sCD4 and enhanced CD4 usage accompany subtle changes in Env conformation. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 typically replicates in CD4+ T cells. However, HIV-1 can evolve to infect macrophages, especially within the brain. Understanding how CCR5-using macrophage-tropic viruses

  16. HIV-1 Phylogenetic analysis shows HIV-1 transits through the meninges to brain and peripheral tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lamers, Susanna L.; Gray, Rebecca R.; Salemi, Marco; Huysentruyt, Leanne C.; McGrath, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Brain infection by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been investigated in many reports with a variety of conclusions concerning the time of entry and degree of viral compartmentalization. To address these diverse findings, we sequenced HIV-1 gp120 clones from a wide range of brain, peripheral and meningeal tissues from five patients who died from several HIV-1 associated disease pathologies. High-resolution phylogenetic analysis confirmed previous studies that showed a significant degree of compartmentalization in brain and peripheral tissue subpopulations. Some intermixing between the HIV-1 subpopulations was evident, especially in patients that died from pathologies other than HIV-associated dementia. Interestingly, the major tissue harboring virus from both the brain and peripheral tissues was the meninges. These results show that 1) HIV-1 is clearly capable of migrating out of the brain, 2) the meninges are the most likely primary transport tissues, and 3) infected brain macrophages comprise an important HIV reservoir during highly active antiretroviral therapy. PMID:21055482

  17. HIV-1-Specific CD8 T Cells Exhibit Limited Cross-Reactivity during Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Du, Victor Y; Bansal, Anju; Carlson, Jonathan; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F; Salazar, Maria G; Ladell, Kristin; Gras, Stephanie; Josephs, Tracy M; Heath, Sonya L; Price, David A; Rossjohn, Jamie; Hunter, Eric; Goepfert, Paul A

    2016-04-15

    Prior work has demonstrated that HIV-1-specific CD8 T cells can cross-recognize variant epitopes. However, most of these studies were performed in the context of chronic infection, where the presence of viral quasispecies makes it difficult to ascertain the true nature of the original antigenic stimulus. To overcome this limitation, we evaluated the extent of CD8 T cell cross-reactivity in patients with acute HIV-1 clade B infection. In each case, we determined the transmitted founder virus sequence to identify the autologous epitopes restricted by individual HLA class I molecules. Our data show that cross-reactive CD8 T cells are infrequent during the acute phase of HIV-1 infection. Moreover, in the uncommon instances where cross-reactive responses were detected, the variant epitopes were poorly recognized in cytotoxicity assays. Molecular analysis revealed that similar antigenic structures could be cross-recognized by identical CD8 T cell clonotypes mobilized in vivo, yet even subtle differences in a single TCR-accessible peptide residue were sufficient to disrupt variant-specific reactivity. These findings demonstrate that CD8 T cells are highly specific for autologous epitopes during acute HIV-1 infection. Polyvalent vaccines may therefore be required to provide optimal immune cover against this genetically labile pathogen.

  18. Transmission of cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 through breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    Koulinska, Irene N; Villamor, Eduardo; Chaplin, Beth; Msamanga, Gernard; Fawzi, Wafaie; Renjifo, Boris; Essex, Max

    2006-01-01

    Transmission through breast-feeding is an important cause of infant HIV-1 infections in developing countries; however, its mechanism remains largely unknown. We have explored the association between cell-free virus (CFV) and cell-associated virus (CAV) levels in breast milk (BM), as reflected by viral RNA and proviral DNA, respectively, and the risk of infant HIV-1 infection after 6 weeks postpartum. Sixty-one HIV-positive mothers who transmitted HIV-1 by BM were matched to 61 HIV-positive nontransmitting mothers based on their infant's age at sample collection. CFV and CAV were quantified in a single milk specimen per mother preceding the infant's first HIV-positive result. After adjusting for maternal CD4 cell counts and disease stage, each 10-fold increase in CFV or CAV load was associated with an almost 3-fold increase in BM transmission. Whereas CAV load was predictive of transmission before and after 9 months postpartum, CFV was a significant predictor of transmission occurring only after 9 months. Phylogenetic analyses of the C2 to C5 env region showed that 85% of infants (11 of 13 infants) harboring viruses that clustered with CFV in their mother's milk were infected after 9 months postpartum. A reduction in milk CAV and CFV loads might significantly decrease HIV-1 transmission by breast-feeding.

  19. Viral Evolution and Cytotoxic T Cell Restricted Selection in Acute Infant HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Knight, Miguel A.; Slyker, Jennifer; Payne, Barbara Lohman; Pond, Sergei L. Kosakovsky; de Silva, Thushan I.; Chohan, Bhavna; Khasimwa, Brian; Mbori-Ngacha, Dorothy; John-Stewart, Grace; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.; Esbjörnsson, Joakim

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy-naive HIV-1 infected infants experience poor viral containment and rapid disease progression compared to adults. Viral factors (e.g. transmitted cytotoxic T- lymphocyte (CTL) escape mutations) or infant factors (e.g. reduced CTL functional capacity) may explain this observation. We assessed CTL functionality by analysing selection in CTL-targeted HIV-1 epitopes following perinatal infection. HIV-1 gag, pol and nef sequences were generated from a historical repository of longitudinal specimens from 19 vertically infected infants. Evolutionary rate and selection were estimated for each gene and in CTL-restricted and non-restricted epitopes. Evolutionary rate was higher in nef and gag vs. pol, and lower in infants with non-severe immunosuppression vs. severe immunosuppression across gag and nef. Selection pressure was stronger in infants with non-severe immunosuppression vs. severe immunosuppression across gag. The analysis also showed that infants with non-severe immunosuppression had stronger selection in CTL-restricted vs. non-restricted epitopes in gag and nef. Evidence of stronger CTL selection was absent in infants with severe immunosuppression. These data indicate that infant CTLs can exert selection pressure on gag and nef epitopes in early infection and that stronger selection across CTL epitopes is associated with favourable clinical outcomes. These results have implications for the development of paediatric HIV-1 vaccines. PMID:27403940

  20. Lack of resistance to integrase inhibitors among antiretroviral-naive subjects with primary HIV-1 infection, 2007–2013

    PubMed Central

    Stekler, Joanne D; McKernan, Jennifer; Milne, Ross; Tapia, Kenneth A; Mykhalchenko, Kateryna; Holte, Sarah; Maenza, Janine; Stevens, Claire E; Buskin, Susan E; Mullins, James I; Frenkel, Lisa M; Collier, Ann C

    2014-01-01

    Background U.S. guidelines recommend genotyping for persons newly diagnosed with HIV infection to identify transmitted drug resistance mutations associated with decreased susceptibility to NRTIs, NNRTIs, and PIs. To date, testing for integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) mutations has not been routinely recommended. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of transmitted INSTI mutations among persons with primary HIV-1 infection in Seattle, WA. Methods Persons with primary HIV-1 infection have enrolled in an observational cohort at the University of Washington Primary Infection Clinic since 1992. We performed a retrospective analysis of plasma specimens collected prospectively from the 82 antiretroviral-naive subjects who were enrolled from 2007–13, after FDA-approval of the first INSTI. Resistance testing was performed by consensus sequencing. Results Specimens for analysis had been obtained a median of 24 (lQR 18–41, range 8–108) days after the estimated date of HIV-1 infection. All subjects were infected with HIV-1 subtype B except for one subject infected with subtype C. Consensus sequencing identified no subjects with major INSTI mutations (T66I, E92Q, G140S, Y143C/H/R, S147G, Q148H/K/R, N155H). Using exact binomial confidence intervals, the upper bound of the 95% CI was 4.4%. Conclusions Although our sample size was small, this study does not support the need at this time to evaluate integrase mutations as part of routine consensus sequencing among persons newly diagnosed with HIV-1 infection. However, it is likely that the prevalence of transmitted INSTI mutations may increase with the recent commercial introduction of additional INSTIs and presumably greater INST1 use among persons living with HIV-1. PMID:24831260

  1. Viral Decay Dynamics and Mathematical Modeling of Treatment Response: Evidence of Lower in vivo Fitness of HIV-1 Subtype C

    PubMed Central

    Shet, Anita; Nagaraja, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the high prevalence of HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1C) worldwide, information on HIV-1C viral dynamics and response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is limited. We sought to measure viral load decay dynamics during treatment and estimate the within-host basic reproductive ratio, R0, and the critical efficacy, εc, for successful treatment of HIV-1C infection. Methods: Individuals initiated on first-line ART in India and monitored for 6 months of treatment were considered. Viral load, CD4+ count, and adherence data were collected at baseline, 4, 12, 16 and 24 weeks after ART initiation. Drug resistance genotyping was performed at baseline. R0 and εc were estimated using a mathematical model. Results: Among 257 patients with complete data, mean baseline viral load was 5.7 log10 copies per milliliter and median CD4+ count was 165 cells per cubic millimeter. Primary drug resistance was present in 3.1% at baseline. At 6 months, 87.5% had undetectable viral load, indicating excellent response to ART despite high baseline viremia. After excluding those with transmitted resistance, suboptimal adherence and viral rebound, data from 112 patients were analyzed using a mathematical model. We estimated the median R0 to be 5.3. The corresponding εc was ∼0.8. Conclusions: These estimates of R0 and εc are smaller than current estimates for HIV-1B, suggesting that HIV-1C exhibits lower in vivo fitness compared with HIV-1B, which allows successful treatment despite high baseline viral loads. The lower fitness, and potentially lower virulence, together with high viral loads may underlie the heightened transmission potential of HIV-1C and its growing global spread. PMID:27273158

  2. A global approach to HIV-1 vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Kathryn E; Barouch, Dan H

    2013-01-01

    Summary A global human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) vaccine will have to elicit immune responses capable of providing protection against a tremendous diversity of HIV-1 variants. In this review, we first describe the current state of the HIV-1 vaccine field, outlining the immune responses that are desired in a global HIV-1 vaccine. In particular, we emphasize the likely importance of Env-specific neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies for protection against HIV-1 acquisition and the likely importance of effector Gag-specific T lymphocytes for virologic control. We then highlight four strategies for developing a global HIV-1 vaccine. The first approach is to design specific vaccines for each geographic region that include antigens tailor-made to match local circulating HIV-1 strains. The second approach is to design a vaccine that will elicit Env-specific antibodies capable of broadly neutralizing all HIV-1 subtypes. The third approach is to design a vaccine that will elicit cellular immune responses that are focused on highly conserved HIV-1 sequences. The fourth approach is to design a vaccine to elicit highly diverse HIV-1-specific responses. Finally, we emphasize the importance of conducting clinical efficacy trials as the only way to determine which strategies will provide optimal protection against HIV-1 in humans. PMID:23772627

  3. Short Communication: Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV-1-Infected Brazilian Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Morgado, Mariza Gonçalvez; Côrtes, Fernanda Heloise; Guimarães, Monick Lindermeyer; Mendonça-Lima, Leila; Pilotto, Jose Henrique; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdiléa Gonçalves; Bongertz, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Tests for the detection of the humoral immune response to HIV-1 have to be standardized and established, demanding regional efforts. For this purpose the neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay for HIV-1 in TZM-bl cells was introduced in Brazil. Twenty plasma samples from HIV-1-infected individuals were assayed: 10 progressors and 10 long-term nonprogressors. These were tested against eight env-pseudotyped viruses (psVs) in the TZM-bl NAb assay and against HIV-1 strain HTLV/IIIB (HIV-1 IIIB) in primary lymphocytes. Forty-four percent of the samples showed neutralizing titers for psVs and 55% for HIV-1 IIIB. Plasma from progressors showed a broader neutralization and a higher potency. The introduction of these reference reagents encourages the participation of Brazil in future comparative assessments of anti-HIV-1 antibodies. PMID:23145941

  4. HIV-1 VACCINES. HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies induced by native-like envelope trimers.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Rogier W; van Gils, Marit J; Derking, Ronald; Sok, Devin; Ketas, Thomas J; Burger, Judith A; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Cupo, Albert; Simonich, Cassandra; Goo, Leslie; Arendt, Heather; Kim, Helen J; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Pugach, Pavel; Williams, Melissa; Debnath, Gargi; Moldt, Brian; van Breemen, Mariëlle J; Isik, Gözde; Medina-Ramírez, Max; Back, Jaap Willem; Koff, Wayne C; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Rakasz, Eva G; Seaman, Michael S; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly K; Klasse, Per Johan; LaBranche, Celia; Schief, William R; Wilson, Ian A; Overbaugh, Julie; Burton, Dennis R; Ward, Andrew B; Montefiori, David C; Dean, Hansi; Moore, John P

    2015-07-10

    A challenge for HIV-1 immunogen design is the difficulty of inducing neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against neutralization-resistant (tier 2) viruses that dominate human transmissions. We show that a soluble recombinant HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer that adopts a native conformation, BG505 SOSIP.664, induced NAbs potently against the sequence-matched tier 2 virus in rabbits and similar but weaker responses in macaques. The trimer also consistently induced cross-reactive NAbs against more sensitive (tier 1) viruses. Tier 2 NAbs recognized conformational epitopes that differed between animals and in some cases overlapped with those recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), whereas tier 1 responses targeted linear V3 epitopes. A second trimer, B41 SOSIP.664, also induced a strong autologous tier 2 NAb response in rabbits. Thus, native-like trimers represent a promising starting point for the development of HIV-1 vaccines aimed at inducing bNAbs.

  5. Population-Level Immune-Mediated Adaptation in HIV-1 Polymerase during the North American Epidemic.

    PubMed

    Kinloch, Natalie N; MacMillan, Daniel R; Le, Anh Q; Cotton, Laura A; Bangsberg, David R; Buchbinder, Susan; Carrington, Mary; Fuchs, Jonathan; Harrigan, P Richard; Koblin, Beryl; Kushel, Margot; Markowitz, Martin; Mayer, Kenneth; Milloy, M J; Schechter, Martin T; Wagner, Theresa; Walker, Bruce D; Carlson, Jonathan M; Poon, Art F Y; Brumme, Zabrina L

    2015-11-11

    circulation over time, potentially undermining host antiviral immunity to the transmitted viral strain. We studied >600 experimentally collected HIV-1 polymerase sequences linked to host HLA information dating back to 1979, along with phylogenetically reconstructed HIV-1 sequences dating back to the virus' introduction into North America. Overall, our results support the gradual spread of many-though not all-HIV-1 polymerase immune escape mutations in circulation over time. This is consistent with recent observations from other global regions, though the extent of polymorphism accumulation in North America appears to be lower than in populations with high seroprevalence, older epidemics, and/or limited HLA diversity. Importantly, the risk of acquiring an HIV-1 polymerase sequence at transmission that is substantially preadapted to one's HLA profile remains relatively low in North America, even in the present era. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Human Cytosolic Extracts Stabilize the HIV-1 Core

    PubMed Central

    Fricke, Thomas; Brandariz-Nuñez, Alberto; Wang, Xiaozhao; Smith, Amos B.

    2013-01-01

    The stability of the HIV-1 core in the cytoplasm is crucial for productive HIV-1 infection. Mutations that stabilize or destabilize the core showed defects on HIV-1 reverse transcription and infection. We developed a novel and simple assay to measure the stability of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. The assay allowed us to demonstrate that cytosolic extracts strongly stabilize the HIV-1 core. Interestingly, stabilization of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes is not due solely to macromolecular crowding, suggesting the presence of specific cellular factors that stabilize the HIV-1 core. By using our novel assay, we measured the abilities of different drugs, such as PF74, CAP-1, IXN-053, cyclosporine, Bi2 (also known as BI-2), and the peptide CAI, to modulate the stability of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. Interestingly, we found that PF74 and Bi2 strongly stabilized HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. On the other hand, the peptide CAI destabilized HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. We also found that purified cyclophilin A destabilizes in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes in the presence of cellular extracts in a cyclosporine-sensitive manner. In agreement with previous observations using the fate-of-the-capsid assay, we also demonstrated the ability of recombinant CPSF6 to stabilize HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. Overall, our findings suggested that cellular extracts specifically stabilize the HIV-1 core. We believe that our assay can be a powerful tool to assess HIV-1 core stability in vitro. PMID:23885082

  7. Productive replication and evolution of HIV-1 in ferret cells.

    PubMed

    Fadel, Hind J; Saenz, Dyana T; Guevara, Rebekah; von Messling, Veronika; Peretz, Mary; Poeschla, Eric M

    2012-02-01

    A rodent or other small animal model for HIV-1 has not been forthcoming, with the principal obstacles being species-specific restriction mechanisms and deficits in HIV-1 dependency factors. Some Carnivorans may harbor comparatively fewer impediments. For example, in contrast to mice, the domestic cat genome encodes essential nonreceptor HIV-1 dependency factors. All Feliformia species and at least one Caniformia species also lack a major lentiviral restriction mechanism (TRIM5α/TRIMCyp proteins). Here we investigated cells from two species in another carnivore family, the Mustelidae, for permissiveness to the HIV-1 life cycle. Mustela putorius furo (domesticated ferret) primary cells and cell lines did not restrict HIV-1, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), or N-tropic murine leukemia virus (MLV) postentry and supported late HIV-1 life cycle steps comparably to human cells. The ferret TRIM5α gene exon 8, which encodes the B30.2 domain, was found to be pseudogenized. Strikingly, ferret (but not mink) cells engineered to express human HIV-1 entry receptors supported productive spreading replication, amplification, and serial passage of wild-type HIV-1. Nevertheless, produced virions had relatively reduced infectivity and the virus accrued G→A hypermutations, consistent with APOBEC3 protein pressure. Ferret cell-passaged HIV-1 also evolved amino acid changes in the capsid cyclophilin A binding loop. We conclude that the genome of this carnivore can provide essential nonreceptor HIV-1 dependency factors and that ferret APOBEC3 proteins with activity against HIV-1 are likely. Even so, unlike in cat cells, HIV-1 can replicate in ferret cells without vif substitution. The virus evolves in this novel nonprimate cell adaptive landscape. We suggest that further characterization of HIV-1 adaptation in ferret cells and delineation of Mustelidae restriction factor repertoires are warranted, with a view to the potential for an HIV-1

  8. Productive Replication and Evolution of HIV-1 in Ferret Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fadel, Hind J.; Saenz, Dyana T.; Guevara, Rebekah; von Messling, Veronika; Peretz, Mary

    2012-01-01

    A rodent or other small animal model for HIV-1 has not been forthcoming, with the principal obstacles being species-specific restriction mechanisms and deficits in HIV-1 dependency factors. Some Carnivorans may harbor comparatively fewer impediments. For example, in contrast to mice, the domestic cat genome encodes essential nonreceptor HIV-1 dependency factors. All Feliformia species and at least one Caniformia species also lack a major lentiviral restriction mechanism (TRIM5α/TRIMCyp proteins). Here we investigated cells from two species in another carnivore family, the Mustelidae, for permissiveness to the HIV-1 life cycle. Mustela putorius furo (domesticated ferret) primary cells and cell lines did not restrict HIV-1, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), or N-tropic murine leukemia virus (MLV) postentry and supported late HIV-1 life cycle steps comparably to human cells. The ferret TRIM5α gene exon 8, which encodes the B30.2 domain, was found to be pseudogenized. Strikingly, ferret (but not mink) cells engineered to express human HIV-1 entry receptors supported productive spreading replication, amplification, and serial passage of wild-type HIV-1. Nevertheless, produced virions had relatively reduced infectivity and the virus accrued G→A hypermutations, consistent with APOBEC3 protein pressure. Ferret cell-passaged HIV-1 also evolved amino acid changes in the capsid cyclophilin A binding loop. We conclude that the genome of this carnivore can provide essential nonreceptor HIV-1 dependency factors and that ferret APOBEC3 proteins with activity against HIV-1 are likely. Even so, unlike in cat cells, HIV-1 can replicate in ferret cells without vif substitution. The virus evolves in this novel nonprimate cell adaptive landscape. We suggest that further characterization of HIV-1 adaptation in ferret cells and delineation of Mustelidae restriction factor repertoires are warranted, with a view to the potential for an HIV-1

  9. An autoreactive antibody from an SLE/HIV-1 individual broadly neutralizes HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Wiehe, Kevin; Grimm, Sebastian K.; Lynch, Rebecca; Yang, Guang; Kozink, Daniel M.; Perrin, Florence; Cooper, Abby J.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Chen, Xi; Liu, Mengfei; McKee, Krisha; Parks, Robert J.; Eudailey, Joshua; Wang, Minyue; Clowse, Megan; Criscione-Schreiber, Lisa G.; Moody, M. Anthony; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Boyd, Scott D.; Gao, Feng; Kelsoe, Garnett; Verkoczy, Laurent; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Kepler, Thomas B.; Montefiori, David C.; Mascola, John R.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2014-01-01

    Broadly HIV-1–neutralizing antibodies (BnAbs) display one or more unusual traits, including a long heavy chain complementarity-determining region 3 (HCDR3), polyreactivity, and high levels of somatic mutations. These shared characteristics suggest that BnAb development might be limited by immune tolerance controls. It has been postulated that HIV-1–infected individuals with autoimmune disease and defective immune tolerance mechanisms may produce BnAbs more readily than those without autoimmune diseases. In this study, we identified an HIV-1–infected individual with SLE who exhibited controlled viral load (<5,000 copies/ml) in the absence of controlling HLA phenotypes and developed plasma HIV-1 neutralization breadth. We collected memory B cells from this individual and isolated a BnAb, CH98, that targets the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120). CH98 bound to human antigens including dsDNA, which is specifically associated with SLE. Anti-dsDNA reactivity was also present in the patient’s plasma. CH98 had a mutation frequency of 25% and 15% nt somatic mutations in the heavy and light chain variable domains, respectively, a long HCDR3, and a deletion in the light chain CDR1. The occurrence of anti-dsDNA reactivity by a HIV-1 CD4bs BnAb in an individual with SLE raises the possibility that some BnAbs and SLE-associated autoantibodies arise from similar pools of B cells. PMID:24614107

  10. HIV-1 vaccine antibody induction against a variable region of HIV-1: a possible link to protective immunity?

    PubMed

    Bauer, Gerhard

    2013-05-01

    Evaluation of: Liao H, Bonsignori M, Alam M et al. Vaccine induction of antibodies against a structurally heterogeneous site of immune pressure within HIV-1 envelope protein variable regions 1 and 2. Immunity 38, 176-186 (2013). In 2009, results from the Phase III HIV-1 vaccine clinical trial RV144 applying a prime/boost regimen with a canarypox vaccine vector ALVAC-HIV plus the AIDSVAX B/E subunit envelope vaccine conducted in Thailand were reported. The priming canarypox vector carried the HIV-1 vaccine genes gp120 linked to the transmembrane-anchoring portion of subtype B gp41, HIV-1 Gag and protease; the boosting vaccine was composed of clades B and E of HIV-1 gp120. A 31.2% vaccine efficacy could be seen in this trial, an encouraging result in HIV-1 vaccine research that had been previously plagued with little clinical efficacy. In this paper, results from tests of four monoclonal antibodies isolated from RV144 vaccinees are reported. The antibodies recognize a certain HIV-1 envelope residue (169), neutralize laboratory-adapted HIV-1 strains and mediate killing of CD4(+) cells infected with HIV-1 laboratory isolates. Crystal structure analysis suggests that the recognized HIV-1 envelope epitope can exist in different conformations. It is thought that the immune pressure elicited by the monoclonal antibodies targets a HIV-1 envelope region with variable sequence structure.

  11. Time trends in drug resistant HIV-1 infections in the United Kingdom up to 2009: multicentre observational study.

    PubMed

    Dolling, David; Sabin, Caroline; Delpech, Valerie; Smit, Erasmus; Pozniak, Anton; Asboe, David; Brown, Andrew Leigh; Churchill, Duncan; Williams, Ian; Geretti, Anna Maria; Phillips, Andrew; Mackie, Nicola; Murphy, Gary; Castro, Hannah; Pillay, Deenan; Cane, Patricia; Dunn, David; Dolling, David

    2012-08-21

    To evaluate whether the prevalence of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance has continued to decline in infections probably acquired within the United Kingdom. Multicentre observational study. All UK public laboratories conducting tests for genotypic HIV resistance as a part of routine care. 14,584 patients infected with HIV-1 subtype B virus, who were first tested for resistance before receiving antiretroviral therapy between January 2002 and December 2009. Prevalence of transmitted drug resistance, defined as one or more resistance mutations from the surveillance list recommended by the World Health Organization. 1654 (11.3%, 95% confidence interval 10.8% to 11.9%) patients had one or more mutations associated with transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance; prevalence was found to decline from 15.5% in 2002 to 9.6% in 2007, followed by a slight increase to 10.9% in 2009 (P=0.21). This later rise was mainly a result of increases in resistance to nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (from 5.4% in 2007 to 6.6% in 2009, P=0.24) and protease inhibitors (1.5% to 2.1%, P=0.12). Thymidine analogue mutations, including T215 revertants, remained the most frequent mutations associated with nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors, despite a considerable fall in stavudine and zidovudine use between 2002 and 2009 (from 29.4% of drug regimens in 2002 to 0.8% in 2009, from 47.9% to 8.8%, respectively). The previously observed decline in the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance in HIV-1 infections probably acquired in the UK seems to have stabilised. The continued high prevalence of thymidine analogue mutations suggests that the source of this resistance may be increasingly from patients who have not undergone antiretroviral therapy and who harbour resistant viruses. Testing of all newly diagnosed HIV-1 positive people should be continued.

  12. An Integrated Overview of HIV-1 Latency

    PubMed Central

    Ruelas, Debbie S.; Greene, Warner C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant advances in our understanding of HIV, a cure has not been realized for the more than 34 million infected with this virus. HIV is incurable because infected individuals harbor cells where the HIV provirus is integrated into the host’s DNA but is not actively replicating and thus is not inhibited by antiviral drugs. Similarly, these latent viruses are not detected by the immune system. In this review, we discuss HIV-1 latency and the mechanisms that allow this pathogenic retrovirus to hide and persist by exploiting the cellular vehicles of immunological memory. PMID:24243012

  13. HIV-1 Accessory Proteins: Vpu and Vif

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Amy; Strebel, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 Vif and Vpu are accessory factors involved in late stages of viral replication. Vif regulates viral infectivity by preventing virion incorporation of APOBEC3G and other members of the family of cytidine deaminases, while Vpu causes degradation of CD4 and promotes virus release by functionally inactivating the host factor BST-2. This chapter described techniques used for the characterization of Vif and Vpu and their functional interaction with host factors. Many of the techniques are, however, applicable to the functional analysis of other viral proteins. PMID:24158820

  14. The V3 Loop of HIV-1 Env Determines Viral Susceptibility to IFITM3 Impairment of Viral Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimeng; Pan, Qinghua; Ding, Shilei; Wang, Zhen; Yu, Jingyou; Finzi, Andrés; Liu, Shan-Lu; Liang, Chen

    2017-04-01

    Interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) inhibit a broad spectrum of viruses, including HIV-1. IFITM proteins deter HIV-1 entry when expressed in target cells and also impair HIV-1 infectivity when expressed in virus producer cells. However, little is known about how viruses resist IFITM inhibition. In this study, we have investigated the susceptibilities of different primary isolates of HIV-1 to the inhibition of viral infectivity by IFITMs. Our results demonstrate that the infectivity of different HIV-1 primary isolates, including transmitted founder viruses, is diminished by IFITM3 to various levels, with strain AD8-1 exhibiting strong resistance. Further mutagenesis studies revealed that HIV-1 Env, and the V3 loop sequence in particular, determines the extent of inhibition of viral infectivity by IFITM3. IFITM3-sensitive Env proteins are also more susceptible to neutralization by soluble CD4 or the 17b antibody than are IFITM3-resistant Env proteins. Together, data from our study suggest that the propensity of HIV-1 Env to sample CD4-bound-like conformations modulates viral sensitivity to IFITM3 inhibition.IMPORTANCE Results of our study have revealed the key features of the HIV-1 envelope protein that are associated with viral resistance to the IFITM3 protein. IFITM proteins are important effectors in interferon-mediated antiviral defense. A variety of viruses are inhibited by IFITMs at the virus entry step. Although it is known that envelope proteins of several different viruses resist IFITM inhibition, the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood. Taking advantage of the fact that envelope proteins of different HIV-1 strains exhibit different degrees of resistance to IFITM3 and that these HIV-1 envelope proteins share the same domain structure and similar sequences, we performed mutagenesis studies and determined the key role of the V3 loop in this viral resistance phenotype. We were also able to associate viral resistance to IFITM3

  15. Lower levels of HIV RNA in semen in HIV-2 compared with HIV-1 infection: implications for differences in transmission

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.; Hawes, Stephen E.; Agne, Habibatou D.; Stern, Joshua E.; Critchlow, Cathy W.; Kiviat, Nancy B.; Sow, Papa Salif

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives HIV-2 infection, in comparison with HIV-1, is characterized by lower plasma viral loads, slower CD4 cell count decline, decreased AIDS-related mortality, and lower rates of mother-to-child and sexual transmission. To gain further insight into why HIV-1 is more readily transmitted as compared with HIV-2, we analyzed semen and plasma HIV RNA levels in HIV-1 and HIV-2-positive men from Senegal. Design and methods Twenty-two HIV-1 and 10 HIV-2-infected subjects from the University of Dakar donated semen and blood samples for this analysis. HIV-1 and HIV-2 viral loads in semen and plasma were quantified using type-specific polymerase chain reaction assays. Results The mean age of the subjects was 37 and 40 years; mean CD4 cell count was 222 and 276 cells/µl and the mean plasma viral load was 4.7 and 3.0 log10 copies/ml for HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively (P = 0.002). HIV RNA was detected in semen in 21 of 22 (95%) of HIV-1 and seven of 10 (70%) of HIV-2-infected subjects; P = 0.07). However, the levels of HIV RNA present in semen were markedly different between those with HIV-1 and HIV-2, with a mean of 4.4 log10 copies/ml among those with HIV-1 and a mean of 2.6 log10 copies/ml among those with HIV-2 (P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, plasma viral load and HIV type, but not CD4 cell count, were independently predictive of semen viral load (P = 0.03, 0.05, 0.48, respectively) Conclusions These data suggest that differences in semen viral load between HIV-1 and HIV-2 may be in part responsible for the markedly different transmission rates of these two viruses. In addition, risk of male genital tract shedding strongly correlates with plasma viral loads. Interventions that decrease viral load may help decrease transmission of both HIV-1 and HIV-2. PMID:16549974

  16. Deciphering Multiplicity of HIV-1C Infection: Transmission of Closely Related Multiple Viral Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Novitsky, Vlad; Moyo, Sikhulile; Wang, Rui; Gaseitsiwe, Simani; Essex, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background A single viral variant is transmitted in the majority of HIV infections. However, about 20% of heterosexually transmitted HIV infections are caused by multiple viral variants. Detection of transmitted HIV variants is not trivial, as it involves analysis of multiple viral sequences representing intra-host HIV-1 quasispecies. Methodology We distinguish two types of multiple virus transmission in HIV infection: (1) HIV transmission from the same source, and (2) transmission from different sources. Viral sequences representing intra-host quasispecies in a longitudinally sampled cohort of 42 individuals with primary HIV-1C infection in Botswana were generated by single-genome amplification and sequencing and spanned the V1C5 region of HIV-1C env gp120. The Maximum Likelihood phylogeny and distribution of pairwise raw distances were assessed at each sampling time point (n = 217; 42 patients; median 5 (IQR: 4–6) time points per patient, range 2–12 time points per patient). Results Transmission of multiple viral variants from the same source (likely from the partner with established HIV infection) was found in 9 out of 42 individuals (21%; 95 CI 10–37%). HIV super-infection was identified in 2 patients (5%; 95% CI 1–17%) with an estimated rate of 3.9 per 100 person-years. Transmission of multiple viruses combined with HIV super-infection at a later time point was observed in one individual. Conclusions Multiple HIV lineages transmitted from the same source produce a monophyletic clade in the inferred phylogenetic tree. Such a clade has transiently distinct sub-clusters in the early stage of HIV infection, and follows a predictable evolutionary pathway. Over time, the gap between initially distinct viral lineages fills in and initially distinct sub-clusters converge. Identification of cases with transmission of multiple viral lineages from the same source needs to be taken into account in cross-sectional estimation of HIV recency in epidemiological and

  17. Methamphetamine inhibits HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells by modulating anti-HIV-1 miRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Mantri, Chinmay K; Mantri, Jyoti V; Pandhare, Jui; Dash, Chandravanu

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine is the second most frequently used illicit drug in the United States. Methamphetamine abuse is associated with increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition, higher viral loads, and enhanced HIV-1 pathogenesis. Although a direct link between methamphetamine abuse and HIV-1 pathogenesis remains to be established in patients, methamphetamine has been shown to increase HIV-1 replication in macrophages, dendritic cells, and cells of HIV transgenic mice. Intriguingly, the effects of methamphetamine on HIV-1 replication in human CD4(+) T cells that serve as the primary targets of infection in vivo are not clearly understood. Therefore, we examined HIV-1 replication in primary CD4(+) T cells in the presence of methamphetamine in a dose-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that methamphetamine had a minimal effect on HIV-1 replication at concentrations of 1 to 50 μmol/L. However, at concentrations >100 μmol/L, it inhibited HIV-1 replication in a dose-dependent manner. We also discovered that methamphetamine up-regulated the cellular anti-HIV-1 microRNAs (miR-125b, miR-150, and miR-28-5p) in CD4(+) T cells. Knockdown experiments illustrated that up-regulation of the anti-HIV miRNAs inhibited HIV-1 replication. These results are contrary to the paradigm that methamphetamine accentuates HIV-1 pathogenesis by increasing HIV-1 replication. Therefore, our findings underline the complex interaction between drug use and HIV-1 and necessitate comprehensive understanding of the effects of methamphetamine on HIV-1 pathogenesis.

  18. Methamphetamine Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in CD4+ T Cells by Modulating Anti–HIV-1 miRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Mantri, Chinmay K.; Mantri, Jyoti V.; Pandhare, Jui; Dash, Chandravanu

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine is the second most frequently used illicit drug in the United States. Methamphetamine abuse is associated with increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition, higher viral loads, and enhanced HIV-1 pathogenesis. Although a direct link between methamphetamine abuse and HIV-1 pathogenesis remains to be established in patients, methamphetamine has been shown to increase HIV-1 replication in macrophages, dendritic cells, and cells of HIV transgenic mice. Intriguingly, the effects of methamphetamine on HIV-1 replication in human CD4+ T cells that serve as the primary targets of infection in vivo are not clearly understood. Therefore, we examined HIV-1 replication in primary CD4+ T cells in the presence of methamphetamine in a dose-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that methamphetamine had a minimal effect on HIV-1 replication at concentrations of 1 to 50 μmol/L. However, at concentrations >100 μmol/L, it inhibited HIV-1 replication in a dose-dependent manner. We also discovered that methamphetamine up-regulated the cellular anti–HIV-1 microRNAs (miR-125b, miR-150, and miR-28-5p) in CD4+ T cells. Knockdown experiments illustrated that up-regulation of the anti-HIV miRNAs inhibited HIV-1 replication. These results are contrary to the paradigm that methamphetamine accentuates HIV-1 pathogenesis by increasing HIV-1 replication. Therefore, our findings underline the complex interaction between drug use and HIV-1 and necessitate comprehensive understanding of the effects of methamphetamine on HIV-1 pathogenesis. PMID:24434277

  19. Imaging HIV-1 Genomic DNA from Entry through Productive Infection.

    PubMed

    Stultz, Ryan D; Cenker, Jennifer J; McDonald, David

    2017-05-01

    In order to track the fate of HIV-1 particles from early entry events through productive infection, we developed a method to visualize HIV-1 DNA reverse transcription complexes by the incorporation and fluorescent labeling of the thymidine analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into nascent viral DNA during cellular entry. Monocyte-derived macrophages were chosen as natural targets of HIV-1, as they do not divide and therefore do not incorporate EdU into chromosomal DNA, which would obscure the detection of intranuclear HIV-1 genomes. Using this approach, we observed distinct EdU puncta in the cytoplasm of infected cells within 12 h postinfection and subsequent accumulation of puncta in the nucleus, which remained stable through 5 days. The depletion of the restriction factor SAMHD1 resulted in a markedly increased number of EdU puncta, allowing efficient quantification of HIV-1 reverse transcription events. Analysis of HIV-1 isolates bearing defined mutations in the capsid protein revealed differences in their cytoplasmic and nuclear accumulation, and data from quantitative PCR analysis closely recapitulated the EdU results. RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization identified actively transcribing, EdU-labeled HIV-1 genomes in productively infected cells, and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that CDK9, phosphorylated at serine 175, was recruited to RNA-positive HIV-1 DNA, providing a means to directly observe transcriptionally active HIV-1 genomes in productively infected cells. Overall, this system allows stable labeling and monitoring of HIV genomic DNA within infected cells during cytoplasmic transit, nuclear import, and mRNA synthesis.IMPORTANCE The fates of HIV-1 reverse transcription products within infected cells are not well understood. Although previous imaging approaches identified HIV-1 intermediates during early stages of infection, few have connected these events with the later stages that ultimately lead to proviral transcription and the

  20. HIV-1 imposes rigidity on blood and semen cytokine networks.

    PubMed

    Lisco, Andrea; Introini, Andrea; Munawwar, Arshi; Vanpouille, Christophe; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Blank, Paul; Singh, Sarman; Margolis, Leonid

    2012-12-01

    Although it is established that the levels of individual cytokines are altered by HIV-1 infection, the changes in cytokine interrelations that organize them into networks have been poorly studied. Here, we evaluated these networks in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals in fluid compartments that are critical for HIV-1 pathogenesis and transmission, namely blood and semen. In samples collected from therapy-naïve HIV-1-infected and HIV-1-uninfected individuals, we measured HIV-1-load, CD4 cell count, and levels of 21 cytokines using a multiplex bead assay. Cytokine networks in blood and semen were different for HIV-1-infected and HIV-1-uninfected individuals. In both compartments of HIV-1-infected individuals, the cytokine networks were more interlocked than in controls: HIV-1 infection resulted in the establishment of new correlations and in the strengthening of pre-existing correlations between different cytokines. In blood and semen of HIV-infected patients, there were, respectively, 68 and 72 statistically significant correlations between cytokines, while in uninfected individuals, there were 18 and 21 such correlations. HIV-1 infection reorganizes the cytokine networks, establishing new strong correlations between various cytokines and thus imposes a high rigidity on the cytokine network. This rigidity may reflect the impairment of the ability of the immune system to respond to microbial challenges. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Candida albicans Delays HIV-1 Replication in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Rodrigues, Christian; Remes Lenicov, Federico; Jancic, Carolina; Sabatté, Juan; Cabrini, Mercedes; Ceballos, Ana; Merlotti, Antonela; Gonzalez, Heidi; Ostrowski, Matías; Geffner, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are one of the most important HIV-1 target cells. Unlike CD4+ T cells, macrophages are resistant to the cytophatic effect of HIV-1. They are able to produce and harbor the virus for long periods acting as a viral reservoir. Candida albicans (CA) is a commensal fungus that colonizes the portals of HIV-1 entry, such as the vagina and the rectum, and becomes an aggressive pathogen in AIDS patients. In this study, we analyzed the ability of CA to modulate the course of HIV-1 infection in human monocyte-derived macrophages. We found that CA abrogated HIV-1 replication in macrophages when it was evaluated 7 days after virus inoculation. A similar inhibitory effect was observed in monocyte-derived dendritic cells. The analysis of the mechanisms responsible for the inhibition of HIV-1 production in macrophages revealed that CA efficiently sequesters HIV-1 particles avoiding its infectivity. Moreover, by acting on macrophages themselves, CA diminishes their permissibility to HIV-1 infection by reducing the expression of CD4, enhancing the production of the CCR5-interacting chemokines CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL4/MIP-1β, and CCL5/RANTES, and stimulating the production of interferon-α and the restriction factors APOBEC3G, APOBEC3F, and tetherin. Interestingly, abrogation of HIV-1 replication was overcome when the infection of macrophages was evaluated 2-3 weeks after virus inoculation. However, this reactivation of HIV-1 infection could be silenced by CA when added periodically to HIV-1-challenged macrophages. The induction of a silent HIV-1 infection in macrophages at the periphery, where cells are continuously confronted with CA, might help HIV-1 to evade the immune response and to promote resistance to antiretroviral therapy. PMID:24009706

  2. High Degree of HIV-1 Group M (HIV-1M) Genetic Diversity within Circulating Recombinant Forms: Insight into the Early Events of HIV-1M Evolution

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The existence of various highly divergent HIV-1 lineages and of recombination-derived sequence tracts of indeterminate origin within established circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) strongly suggests that HIV-1 group M (HIV-1M) diversity is not fully represented under the current classification system. Here we used a fully exploratory screen for recombination on a set of 480 near-full-length genomes representing the full known diversity of HIV-1M. We decomposed recombinant sequences into their constituent parts and then used maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analyses of this mostly recombination-free data set to identify rare divergent sequence lineages that fall outside the major named HIV-1M taxonomic groupings. We found that many of the sequence fragments occurring within CRFs (including CRF04_cpx, CRF06_cpx, CRF11_cpx, CRF18_cpx, CRF25_cpx, CRF27_cpx, and CRF49_cpx) are in fact likely derived from divergent unclassified parental lineages that may predate the current subtypes, even though they are presently identified as derived from currently defined HIV-1M subtypes. Our evidence suggests that some of these CRFs are descended predominantly from what were or are major previously unidentified HIV-1M lineages that were likely epidemiologically relevant during the early stages of the HIV-1M epidemic. The restriction of these divergent lineages to the Congo basin suggests that they were less infectious and/or simply not present at the time and place of the initial migratory wave that triggered the global epidemic. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 group M (HIV-1M) likely spread to the rest of the world from the Congo basin in the mid-1900s (N. R. Faria et al., Science 346:56–61, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1256739) and is today the principal cause of the AIDS pandemic. Here, we show that large sequence fragments from several HIV-1M circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) are derived from divergent parental lineages that cannot reasonably be classified within the

  3. High Degree of HIV-1 Group M (HIV-1M) Genetic Diversity within Circulating Recombinant Forms: Insight into the Early Events of HIV-1M Evolution.

    PubMed

    Tongo, Marcel; Dorfman, Jeffrey R; Martin, Darren P

    2015-12-09

    The existence of various highly divergent HIV-1 lineages and of recombination-derived sequence tracts of indeterminate origin within established circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) strongly suggests that HIV-1 group M (HIV-1M) diversity is not fully represented under the current classification system. Here we used a fully exploratory screen for recombination on a set of 480 near-full-length genomes representing the full known diversity of HIV-1M. We decomposed recombinant sequences into their constituent parts and then used maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analyses of this mostly recombination-free data set to identify rare divergent sequence lineages that fall outside the major named HIV-1M taxonomic groupings. We found that many of the sequence fragments occurring within CRFs (including CRF04_cpx, CRF06_cpx, CRF11_cpx, CRF18_cpx, CRF25_cpx, CRF27_cpx, and CRF49_cpx) are in fact likely derived from divergent unclassified parental lineages that may predate the current subtypes, even though they are presently identified as derived from currently defined HIV-1M subtypes. Our evidence suggests that some of these CRFs are descended predominantly from what were or are major previously unidentified HIV-1M lineages that were likely epidemiologically relevant during the early stages of the HIV-1M epidemic. The restriction of these divergent lineages to the Congo basin suggests that they were less infectious and/or simply not present at the time and place of the initial migratory wave that triggered the global epidemic.IMPORTANCE HIV-1 group M (HIV-1M) likely spread to the rest of the world from the Congo basin in the mid-1900s (N. R. Faria et al., Science 346:56-61, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1256739) and is today the principal cause of the AIDS pandemic. Here, we show that large sequence fragments from several HIV-1M circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) are derived from divergent parental lineages that cannot reasonably be classified within the nine

  4. Short-Term Dynamic and Local Epidemiological Trends in the South American HIV-1B Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira, Dennis Maletich; de Medeiros, Rubia Marília; Gräf, Tiago; Almeida, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2016-01-01

    The human displacement and sexual behavior are the main factors driving the HIV-1 pandemic to the current profile. The intrinsic structure of the HIV transmission among different individuals has valuable importance for the understanding of the epidemic and for the public health response. The aim of this study was to characterize the HIV-1 subtype B (HIV-1B) epidemic in South America through the identification of transmission links and infer trends about geographical patterns and median time of transmission between individuals. Sequences of the protease and reverse transcriptase coding regions from 4,810 individuals were selected from GenBank. Maximum likelihood phylogenies were inferred and submitted to ClusterPicker to identify transmission links. Bayesian analyses were applied only for clusters including ≥5 dated samples in order to estimate the median maximum inter-transmission interval. This study analyzed sequences sampled from 12 South American countries, from individuals of different exposure categories, under different antiretroviral profiles, and from a wide period of time (1989–2013). Continentally, Brazil, Argentina and Venezuela were revealed important sites for the spread of HIV-1B among countries inside South America. Of note, from all the clusters identified about 70% of the HIV-1B infections are primarily occurring among individuals living in the same geographic region. In addition, these transmissions seem to occur early after the infection of an individual, taking in average 2.39 years (95% CI 1.48–3.30) to succeed. Homosexual/Bisexual individuals transmit the virus as quickly as almost half time of that estimated for the general population sampled here. Public health services can be broadly benefitted from this kind of information whether to focus on specific programs of response to the epidemic whether as guiding of prevention campaigns to specific risk groups. PMID:27258369

  5. Short-Term Dynamic and Local Epidemiological Trends in the South American HIV-1B Epidemic.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Dennis Maletich; de Medeiros, Rubia Marília; Gräf, Tiago; Almeida, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2016-01-01

    The human displacement and sexual behavior are the main factors driving the HIV-1 pandemic to the current profile. The intrinsic structure of the HIV transmission among different individuals has valuable importance for the understanding of the epidemic and for the public health response. The aim of this study was to characterize the HIV-1 subtype B (HIV-1B) epidemic in South America through the identification of transmission links and infer trends about geographical patterns and median time of transmission between individuals. Sequences of the protease and reverse transcriptase coding regions from 4,810 individuals were selected from GenBank. Maximum likelihood phylogenies were inferred and submitted to ClusterPicker to identify transmission links. Bayesian analyses were applied only for clusters including ≥5 dated samples in order to estimate the median maximum inter-transmission interval. This study analyzed sequences sampled from 12 South American countries, from individuals of different exposure categories, under different antiretroviral profiles, and from a wide period of time (1989-2013). Continentally, Brazil, Argentina and Venezuela were revealed important sites for the spread of HIV-1B among countries inside South America. Of note, from all the clusters identified about 70% of the HIV-1B infections are primarily occurring among individuals living in the same geographic region. In addition, these transmissions seem to occur early after the infection of an individual, taking in average 2.39 years (95% CI 1.48-3.30) to succeed. Homosexual/Bisexual individuals transmit the virus as quickly as almost half time of that estimated for the general population sampled here. Public health services can be broadly benefitted from this kind of information whether to focus on specific programs of response to the epidemic whether as guiding of prevention campaigns to specific risk groups.

  6. Cyclophilin B enhances HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    DeBoer, Jason; Madson, Christian J.; Belshan, Michael

    2016-02-15

    Cyclophilin B (CypB) is a member of the immunophilin family and intracellular chaperone. It predominantly localizes to the ER, but also contains a nuclear localization signal and is secreted from cells. CypB has been shown to interact with the Gag protein of human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1). Several proteomic and genetic studies identified it as a potential factor involved in HIV replication. Herein, we show that over-expression of CypB enhances HIV infection by increasing nuclear import of viral DNA. This enhancement was unaffected by cyclosporine treatment and requires the N-terminus of the protein. The N-terminus contains an ER leader sequence, putative nuclear localization signal, and is required for secretion. Deletion of the N-terminus resulted in mislocalization from the ER and suppression of HIV infection. Passive transfer experiments showed that secreted CypB did not impact HIV infection. Combined, these experiments show that intracellular CypB modulates a pathway of HIV nuclear import. - Highlights: • CypB has been identified in several proteomic studies of HIV-1 infection. • CypB expression is upregulated in activated and infected T-cells. • Over-expression of CypB enhances HIV nuclear import and infection. • The N-terminus of CypB is necessary for these effects.

  7. Nucleoprotein complex intermediates in HIV-1 integration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Craigie, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Integration of retroviral DNA into the host genome is an essential step in the viral replication cycle. The viral DNA, made by reverse transcription in the cytoplasm, forms part of a large nucleoprotein complex called the preintegration complex (PIC). The viral integrase protein is the enzyme within the PIC that is responsible for integrating the viral DNA into the host genome. Integrase is tightly associated with the viral DNA within the PIC as demonstrated by functional assays. Integrase protein catalyzes the key DNA cutting and joining steps of integration in vitro with DNA substrates that mimic the ends of the viral DNA. Under most in vitro assay conditions the stringency of the reaction is relaxed; most products result from “half-site” integration in which only one viral DNA end is integrated into one strand of target DNA rather than concerted integration of pairs of DNA as occurs with PICs and in vivo. Under these relaxed conditions catalysis appears to occur without formation of the highly stable nucleoprotein complexes that is characteristic of the association of integrase with viral DNA in the PIC. Here we describe methods for the assembly of nucleoprotein complex intermediates in HIV-1 DNA integration from purified HIV-1 integrase and substrates that mimic the viral DNA ends. PMID:19232539

  8. Fucoidans as potential inhibitors of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Prokofjeva, Maria M; Imbs, Tatyana I; Shevchenko, Natalya M; Spirin, Pavel V; Horn, Stefan; Fehse, Boris; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N; Prassolov, Vladimir S

    2013-08-19

    The antiviral activity of different structure fucoidans (α-l-fucans and galactofucans) was studied using two model viral systems based on a lentiviral vectors and a replication competent Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV). It was found that investigated fucoidans have no cytotoxic effects on Jurkat and SC-1cell at the concentration range of 0.001-100 µg/mL. Fucoidans with different efficiency suppressed transduction of Jurkat cell line by pseudo-HIV-1 particles carrying the envelope protein of HIV-1 and infection of SC-1 cells by Mo-MuLV. According to our data, all natural fucoidans can be considered as potential anti-HIV agents regardless of their carbohydrate backbone and degree of sulfating, since their activity is shown at low concentrations (0.001-0.05 µg/mL). High molecular weight fucoidans isolated from Saccharina cichorioides (1.3-α-l-fucan), and S. japonica (galactofucan) were the most effective inhibitors.

  9. Novel Approaches to Inhibiting HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Catherine S.; Freed, Eric O.

    2009-01-01

    Considerable success has been achieved in the treatment of HIV-1 infection, and more than two-dozen antiretroviral drugs are available targeting several distinct steps in the viral replication cycle. However, resistance to these compounds emerges readily, even in the context of combination therapy. Drug toxicity, adverse drug-drug interactions, and accompanying poor patient adherence can also lead to treatment failure. These considerations make continued development of novel antiretroviral therapeutics necessary. In this article, we highlight a number of steps in the HIV-1 replication cycle that represent promising targets for drug discovery. These include lipid raft microdomains, the RNase H activity of the viral enzyme reverse transcriptase, uncoating of the viral core, host cell machinery involved in the integration of the viral DNA into host cell chromatin, virus assembly, maturation, and budding, and the functions of several viral accessory proteins. We discuss the relevant molecular and cell biology, and describe progress to date in developing inhibitors against these novel targets. PMID:19782103

  10. Rational Development of Radiopharmaceuticals for HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Chuen-Yen; Maldarelli, Frank; Eckelman, William C; Neumann, Ronald D

    2014-01-01

    The global battle against HIV-1 would benefit from a sensitive and specific radiopharmaceutical to localize HIV-infected cells. Ideally, this probe would be able to identify latently infected host cells containing replication competent HIV sequences. Clinical and research applications would include assessment of reservoirs, informing clinical management by facilitating assessment of burden of infection in different compartments, monitoring disease progression and monitoring response to therapy. A “rational” development approach could facilitate efficient identification of an appropriate targeted radiopharmaceutical. Rational development starts with understanding characteristics of the disease that can be effectively targeted and then engineering radiopharmaceuticals to hone in on an appropriate target, which in the case of HIV-1 (HIV) might be an HIV-specific product on or in the host cell, a differentially expressed gene product, an integrated DNA sequence specific enzymatic activity, part of the inflammatory response, or a combination of these. This is different from the current approach that starts with a radiopharmaceutical for a target associated with a disease, mostly from autopsy studies, without a strong rationale for the potential to impact patient care. At present, no targeted therapies are available for HIV latency, although a number of approaches are under study. Here we discuss requirements for a radiopharmaceutical useful in strategies targeting persistently infected cells. The radiopharmaceutical for HIV should be developed based on HIV biology, studied in an animal model and then in humans, and ultimately used in clinical and research settings. PMID:24607432

  11. Evaluation of Hologic Aptima HIV-1 Quant Dx Assay on the Panther System on HIV Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Manak, Mark M; Hack, Holly R; Nair, Sangeetha V; Worlock, Andrew; Malia, Jennifer A; Peel, Sheila A; Jagodzinski, Linda L

    2016-10-01

    Quantitation of the HIV-1 viral load in plasma is the current standard of care for clinical monitoring of HIV-infected individuals undergoing antiretroviral therapy. This study evaluated the analytical and clinical performances of the Aptima HIV-1 Quant Dx assay (Hologic, San Diego, CA) for monitoring viral load by using 277 well-characterized subtype samples, including 171 cultured virus isolates and 106 plasma samples from 35 countries, representing all major HIV subtypes, recombinants, and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) currently in circulation worldwide. Linearity of the Aptima assay was tested on each of 6 major HIV-1 subtypes (A, B, C, D, CRF01_AE, and CRF02_AG) and demonstrated an R(2) value of ≥0.996. The performance of the Aptima assay was also compared to those of the Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 v.2 (CAP/CTM) and Abbott m2000 RealTime HIV-1 (RealTime) assays on all subtype samples. The Aptima assay values averaged 0.21 log higher than the CAP/CTM values and 0.30 log higher than the RealTime values, and the values were >0.4 log higher than CAP/CTM values for subtypes F and G and than RealTime values for subtypes C, F, and G and CRF02_AG. Two samples demonstrated results with >1-log differences from RealTime results. When the data were adjusted by the average difference, 94.9% and 87.0% of Aptima results fell within 0.5 log of the CAP/CTM and RealTime results, respectively. The linearity and accuracy of the Aptima assay in correctly quantitating all major HIV-1 subtypes, coupled with the completely automated format and high throughput of the Panther system, make this system well suited for reliable measurement of viral load in the clinical laboratory. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Evaluation of Hologic Aptima HIV-1 Quant Dx Assay on the Panther System on HIV Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Hack, Holly R.; Nair, Sangeetha V.; Worlock, Andrew; Malia, Jennifer A.; Peel, Sheila A.; Jagodzinski, Linda L.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitation of the HIV-1 viral load in plasma is the current standard of care for clinical monitoring of HIV-infected individuals undergoing antiretroviral therapy. This study evaluated the analytical and clinical performances of the Aptima HIV-1 Quant Dx assay (Hologic, San Diego, CA) for monitoring viral load by using 277 well-characterized subtype samples, including 171 cultured virus isolates and 106 plasma samples from 35 countries, representing all major HIV subtypes, recombinants, and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) currently in circulation worldwide. Linearity of the Aptima assay was tested on each of 6 major HIV-1 subtypes (A, B, C, D, CRF01_AE, and CRF02_AG) and demonstrated an R2 value of ≥0.996. The performance of the Aptima assay was also compared to those of the Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 v.2 (CAP/CTM) and Abbott m2000 RealTime HIV-1 (RealTime) assays on all subtype samples. The Aptima assay values averaged 0.21 log higher than the CAP/CTM values and 0.30 log higher than the RealTime values, and the values were >0.4 log higher than CAP/CTM values for subtypes F and G and than RealTime values for subtypes C, F, and G and CRF02_AG. Two samples demonstrated results with >1-log differences from RealTime results. When the data were adjusted by the average difference, 94.9% and 87.0% of Aptima results fell within 0.5 log of the CAP/CTM and RealTime results, respectively. The linearity and accuracy of the Aptima assay in correctly quantitating all major HIV-1 subtypes, coupled with the completely automated format and high throughput of the Panther system, make this system well suited for reliable measurement of viral load in the clinical laboratory. PMID:27510829

  13. T cell virological synapses and HIV-1 pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Benjamin K

    2012-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is the cause of a modern global pandemic associated with progressive acquired immune deficiency. The infection is characterized by the loss of the primary target of viral infection, the CD4+ T cell. The measurement of plasma viremia in patients can predict the rate of CD4+ cell decline; however, it is not clear whether this cell-free plasma virus represents the engine that drives viral spread. Active viral replication is mainly observed within lymphoid tissues that are hotbeds of cell-cell interactions that initiate and organize immune responses. It is well established that cell-cell interactions enhance viral spread in vitro. Dendritic cell-T cell interactions, which lie at the heart of adaptive immune responses, enhance viral infection in vitro. Interactions between infected and uninfected CD4+ T cells are a dominant route of viral spread in vitro and are likely to play a central role in viral dissemination in vivo. Future studies will test existing paradigms of HIV-1 dissemination to determine whether virus-transmitting contacts between infected and uninfected T cells called virological synapses are the dominant mode of viral spread in vivo. Here, we review the status of our understanding of this mode of infection with a focus on T cell-T cell interactions and examine how it may explain resistance to neutralizing antibodies and or the generation of genetic diversity of HIV.

  14. Herpes simplex virus 2 serostatus and viral loads of HIV-1 in blood and semen as risk factors for HIV transmission among men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Butler, David M; Smith, Davey M; Cachay, Edward R; Hightower, George K; Nugent, Charles Thomas; Richman, Douglas D; Little, Susan J

    2008-08-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 blood plasma viral load is correlated with the sexual transmission of HIV, although transmission from men involves virus from semen instead of blood. We quantified HIV-1 RNA in the blood and semen of men who did or did not transmit HIV to their sex partners. We compared the relationships of HIV-1 transmission risk with blood plasma viral load, seminal plasma viral load, herpes simplex virus 2 serostatus and other factors. A case-control study. Participants were men evaluated for primary HIV infection and their recent male sex partners. They were interviewed, and clinical specimens were collected. Epidemiologic and phylogenetic linkages were determined by history and molecular techniques. Couples were grouped on the basis of transmission after exposure. Fisher's exact test and Wilcoxon tests were used for comparisons between groups. Multivariable logistic regressions were fit to identify independent predictors of transmission. HIV-transmitting partners (n = 15) had a higher median seminal plasma viral load (P < 0.015) and median blood plasma viral load (P < 0.001) than nontransmitting partners (n = 32). Herpes simplex virus 2 serostatus was associated with transmission only when the HIV-infected source partner was herpes simplex virus 2 seropositive and the HIV-exposed partner was not (odds ratio 16, P < 0.03). Adjusting for other factors, HIV transmission was significantly associated with blood plasma viral load (odds ratio 13.4, P < 0.02) but not seminal plasma viral load (odds ratio 0.69, P = not significant). Blood and seminal plasma viral load were both associated with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmission, but blood plasma viral load was the stronger predictor in this cohort. Herpes simplex virus 2 coinfection was associated with the risk of transmission but not acquisition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

  15. Fetal exposure to HIV-1 alters chemokine receptor expression by CD4+T cells and increases susceptibility to HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Bunders, Madeleine J; van Hamme, John L; Jansen, Machiel H; Boer, Kees; Kootstra, Neeltje A; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2014-10-24

    Absolute numbers of lymphocytes are decreased in uninfected infants born to HIV-1-infected women (HIV-1-exposed). Although the exact mechanism is unknown, fetal exposure to maternal HIV-1-infection could prime the immune system and affect T cell trafficking. We compared the expression of chemokine receptors on cord blood CD4(+) T cells from HIV-1-exposed children and healthy controls. At baseline CD4(+) T cells had a largely naïve phenotype. However, stimulation with cytokines resulted in an upregulation of inflammatory response-related chemokine receptors on CD4(+) T cells, with HIV-1-exposed infants having a significantly higher frequency of CD4(+) T cells expressing, in particularly Th2 associated chemokine receptors (CCR3 p < 0.01, CCR8 p = 0.03). Numbers of naive CCR7(+) CD4(+) T cells were reduced (p = 0.01) in HIV-1-exposed infants. We further assessed whether the inflammatory phenotype was associated with susceptibility to HIV-1 and detected higher levels of p24 upon in in vitro infection of stimulated CD4(+) T cells of HIV-1-exposed infants. In summary, fetal exposure to HIV-1 primes the immune system in the infant leading to an enhanced immune activation and altered T cell homing, with potential ramifications regarding T cell responses and the acquisition of HIV-1 as an infant.

  16. Curdlan sulfate and HIV-1. I. In vitro inhibitory effects of curdlan sulfate on HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Aoki, T; Kaneko, Y; Stefanski, M S; Nguyen, T; Ting, R C

    1991-04-01

    Action mechanisms of a newly synthesized polysaccharide, curdlan sulfate (CRDS), on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection were investigated in vitro using syncytium formation microassay and p24 antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. These assays measured the titer of infectious virions and the amounts of HIV-1 core antigen p24 in soluble, intraviral, and intracellular forms. CRDS treatments were performed for 1 h at 37 degrees C. H9 cells pretreated with 0.1 to 100.0 micrograms/ml of CRDS appreciably inhibited HIV-1 infection. CRDS-treated HIV-1 virions were less able to infect H9 cells than untreated virions. The simultaneous treatment of H9 cells and HIV-1 virions with CRDS induced a significant inhibition of HIV-1 infection, resulting in the temporary disappearance of virions at the highest dose of CRDS. In contrast, CRDS treatment of newly HIV-1-infected H9 cells caused a significant decrease in the titer of infectious HIV-1 and the p24 amounts of all three forms, but no absolute elimination. Taken together, these results indicate that CRDS may block the binding of the HIV-1 envelope to the H9 cell surface, with emphasis on the high affinity of CRDS to the HIV-1 envelope.

  17. Innate immune sensing of HIV-1 by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Luban, Jeremy

    2012-10-18

    HIV-1-specific antibodies and CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells are detected in most HIV-1-infected people, yet HIV-1 infection is not eradicated. Contributing to the failure to mount a sterilizing immune response may be the inability of antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) to sense HIV-1 during acute infection, and thus the inability to effectively prime naive, HIV-1-specific T cells. Recent findings related to DC-expressed innate immune factors including SAMHD1, TREX1, and TRIM5 provide a molecular basis for understanding why DCs fail to adequately sense invasion by this deadly pathogen and suggest experimental approaches to improve T cell priming to HIV-1 in prophylactic vaccination protocols. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Broadly neutralizing antibodies: An approach to control HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Yaseen, Mahmoud Mohammad; Yaseen, Mohammad Mahmoud; Alqudah, Mohammad Ali

    2017-01-02

    Although available antiretroviral therapy (ART) has changed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection to a non-fatal chronic disease, the economic burden of lifelong therapy, severe adverse ART effects, daily ART adherence, and emergence of ART-resistant HIV-1 mutants require prospecting for alternative therapeutic modalities. Indeed, a growing body of evidence suggests that broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibodies (BNAbs) may offer one such feasible alternative. To evaluate their therapeutic potential in established HIV-1 infection, we sought to address recent advances in pre-clinical and clinical investigations in this area of HIV-1 research. In addition, we addressed the obstacles that may impede the success of such immunotherapeutic approach, suggested strategic solutions, and briefly compared this approach with the currently used ART to open new insights for potential future passive immunotherapy for HIV-1 infection.

  19. Differential binding of the HIV-1 envelope to phosphatidylserine receptors.

    PubMed

    Gu, Linlin; Sims, Brian; Krendelchtchikov, Alexandre; Tabengwa, Edlue; Matthews, Qiana L

    2017-10-01

    Prior work has shown that the HIV-1 envelope of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) interacts directly with T-cell immunoglobulin mucin (TIM) family proteins. Herein, we demonstrate that HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins from varying HIV-1 clades bind differentially to TIM proteins and functionally similar proteins acting as phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) receptors. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology, we show that lysate containing HIV-1 envelope and recombinant HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins bind TIM-4 and advanced glycosylation end product-specific receptor (AGER). The complex binding of HIV-1 UG21 gp140 to TIM-4 or AGER suggests a biphasic interaction with these proteins. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Refined solution structure and backbone dynamics of HIV-1 Nef.

    PubMed Central

    Grzesiek, S.; Bax, A.; Hu, J. S.; Kaufman, J.; Palmer, I.; Stahl, S. J.; Tjandra, N.; Wingfield, P. T.

    1997-01-01

    The tendency of HIV-1 Nef to form aggregates in solution, particularly at pH values below 8, together with its large fraction of highly mobile residues seriously complicated determination of its three-dimensional structure, both for heteronuclear solution NMR (Grzesiek et al., 1996a, Nat Struct Biol 3:340-345) and for X-ray crystallography (Lee et al., 1996, Cell 85:931-942). Methods used to determine the Nef structure by NMR at pH 8 and 0.6 mM concentration are presented, together with a detailed description of Nef's secondary and tertiary structure. The described techniques have general applicability for the NMR structure determination of proteins that are aggregating and/or have limited stability at low pH values. Extensive chemical shift assignments are reported for backbone and side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonances of the HIV-1 Nef deletion mutants NEF delta 2-39, NEF delta 2-39, delta 159-173, and of NEF delta 2-39, delta 159-173 in complex with the SH3 domain of the Hck tyrosine protein kinase. Besides a type II polyproline helix, Nef's structure consists of three alpha-helices, a 3(10) helix, and a five-stranded anti-parallel beta-sheet. The analysis of 15N relaxation parameters of the backbone amide sites reveals that all the secondary structure elements are non-mobile on the picosecond to nanosecond and on the millisecond time scale. A large number of slowly exchanging amide protons provides evidence for the stability of the Nef core even on the time scale of hours. Significant internal motions on the ps to ns time scale are detected for residues 60 to 71 and for residues 149 to 180, which form solvent-exposed loops. The residues of the HIV-1 protease cleavage site (W57/L58) do not exhibit large amplitude motions on the sub-nanosecond time scale, and their side chains insert themselves into a hydrophobic crevice formed between the C-terminus of helix 1 and the N-terminus of helix 2. A refined structure has been determined based on additional constraints

  1. Antibodies Elicited by Multiple Envelope Glycoprotein Immunogens in Primates Neutralize Primary Human Immunodeficiency Viruses (HIV-1) Sensitized by CD4-Mimetic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Madani, Navid; Princiotto, Amy M.; Easterhoff, David; Bradley, Todd; Luo, Kan; Williams, Wilton B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M. Anthony; Phad, Ganesh E.; Vázquez Bernat, Néstor; Melillo, Bruno; Santra, Sampa; Smith, Amos B.; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.; Haynes, Barton

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins (Env) mediate virus entry through a series of complex conformational changes triggered by binding to the receptors CD4 and CCR5/CXCR4. Broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved Env epitopes are thought to be an important component of a protective immune response. However, to date, HIV-1 Env immunogens that elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies have not been identified, creating hurdles for vaccine development. Small-molecule CD4-mimetic compounds engage the CD4-binding pocket on the gp120 exterior Env and induce Env conformations that are highly sensitive to neutralization by antibodies, including antibodies directed against the conserved Env region that interacts with CCR5/CXCR4. Here, we show that CD4-mimetic compounds sensitize primary HIV-1 to neutralization by antibodies that can be elicited in monkeys and humans within 6 months by several Env vaccine candidates, including gp120 monomers. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the gp120 V2 and V3 variable regions were isolated from the immunized monkeys and humans; these monoclonal antibodies neutralized a primary HIV-1 only when the virus was sensitized by a CD4-mimetic compound. Thus, in addition to their direct antiviral effect, CD4-mimetic compounds dramatically enhance the HIV-1-neutralizing activity of antibodies that can be elicited with currently available immunogens. Used as components of microbicides, the CD4-mimetic compounds might increase the protective efficacy of HIV-1 vaccines. IMPORTANCE Preventing HIV-1 transmission is a high priority for global health. Eliciting antibodies that can neutralize transmitted strains of HIV-1 is difficult, creating problems for the development of an effective vaccine. We found that small-molecule CD4-mimetic compounds sensitize HIV-1 to antibodies that can be elicited in vaccinated humans and monkeys. These results suggest an approach to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission in

  2. HIV-1 diversity and drug resistance mutations among people seeking HIV diagnosis in voluntary counseling and testing sites in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Velasco-de-Castro, Carlos A; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdiléa G; Bastos, Francisco I; Pilotto, José H; Fernandes, Nilo; Morgado, Mariza G

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable viral diversity remains a big challenge to the development of HIV vaccines and optimal therapy worldwide. In the latest years, as a consequence of the large expansion of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) availability worldwide, an increase in transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRM) has been observed, varying according the region. This study assessed HIV-1 diversity and TDRM profile over time among newly HIV-1 diagnosed individuals from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Blood samples were collected from individuals seeking HIV diagnosis in four voluntary counseling and testing (VCTs) sites located in the Rio de Janeiro Metropolitan Area, in 2005-2007. Recent (RS) and long-term (LTS) HIV-1 seroconverters were distinguished using BED-CEIA. Pol viral sequences were obtained for 102 LTS identified in 2005 and 144 RS from 2005-2007. HIV-1 subtype and pol recombinant genomes were determined using Rega HIV-1 Subtyping Tool and by phylogenetic inferences and bootscanning analyses. Surveillance of HIV-1 TDRM to protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitors were performed according to the Calibrated Population Resistance (CPR) Tool 6.0. Overall, subtype B remains the most prevalent in Rio de Janeiro in both LTS and RS HIV-1 infected individuals. An increased proportion of recombinant samples was detected over time, especially in RS heterosexual men, due to the emergence of CRF02_AG and URF samples bearing a subtype K fragment. The prevalence of HIV-1 samples carrying TDRM was high and similar between LTS and RS (15.7% vs 14.6%) or age (<25yo 17.9% vs >25yo 16.6%) along the study period. The high resistance levels detected in both populations are of concern, especially considering the dynamics of HIV-1 diversity over time. Our results suggest that the incorporation of resistance testing prior to HAART initiation should be highly considered, as well as permanent surveillance, aiming to carefully monitoring HIV-1 diversity, with focus on CRF/URF emergence

  3. Control of HIV-1 replication in vitro by vaccine-induced human CD8+ T cells through conserved subdominant Pol epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tina; Borthwick, Nicola J.; Gilmour, Jill; Hayes, Peter; Dorrell, Lucy; Hanke, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Objective The specificity of CD8+ T cells is critical for early control of founder/transmitted and reactivated HIV-1. To tackle HIV-1 variability and escape, we designed vaccine immunogen HIVconsv assembled from 14 highly conserved regions of mainly Gag and Pol proteins. When administered to HIV-1-negative human volunteers in trial HIV-CORE 002, HIVconsv vaccines elicited CD8+ effector T cells which inhibited replication of up to 8 HIV-1 isolates in autologous CD4+ cells. This inhibition correlated with interferon-γ production in response to Gag and Pol peptide pools, but direct evidence of the inhibitory specificity was missing. Here, we aimed to define through recognition of which epitopes these effectors inhibit HIV-1 replication. Design CD8+ T-cells from the 3 broadest HIV-1 inhibitors out of 23 vaccine recipients were expanded in culture by Gag or Pol peptide restimulation and tested in viral inhibition assay (VIA) using HIV-1 clade B and A isolates. Methods Frozen PBMCs were expanded first using peptide pools from Gag or Pol conserved regions and tested on HIV-1-infected cells in VIA or by individual peptides for their effector functions. Single peptide specificities responsible for inhibition of HIV-1 replication were then confirmed by single-peptide expanded effectors tested on HIV-1-infected cells. Results We formally demonstrated that the vaccine-elicited inhibitory human CD8+ T cells recognized conserved epitopes of both Pol and Gag proteins. We defined 7 minimum epitopes, of which 3 were novel, presumably naturally subdominant. The effectors were oligofunctional producing several cytokines and chemokines and killing peptide-pulsed target cells. Conclusions These results implicate the use of functionally conserved regions of Pol in addition to the widely used Gag for T-cell vaccine design. Proportion of volunteers developing these effectors and their frequency in circulating PBMC are separate issues, which can be addressed, if needed, by more efficient

  4. HSV-2- and HIV-1- permissive cell lines co-infected by HSV-2 and HIV-1 co-replicate HSV-2 and HIV-1 without production of HSV-2/HIV-1 pseudotype particles

    PubMed Central

    LeGoff, Jérôme; Bouhlal, Hicham; Lecerf, Maxime; Klein, Christophe; Hocini, Hakim; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Muggeridge, Martin; Bélec, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is a major cofactor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) sexual acquisition and transmission. In the present study, we investigated whether HIV-1 and HSV-2 may interact at the cellular level by forming HIV-1 hybrid virions pseudotyped with HSV-2 envelope glycoproteins, as was previously reported for HSV type 1. Methods We evaluated in vitro the production of HSV-2/HIV-1 pseudotypes in mononuclear CEM cells and epithelial HT29 and P4P cells. We analyzed the incorporation into the HIV-1 membrane of HSV-2 gB and gD, two major HSV-2 glycoproteins required for HSV-2 fusion with the cell membrane, in co-infected cells and in HIV-1-infected P4P cells transfected by plasmids coding for gB or gD. Results We show that HSV-2 and HIV-1 co-replicated in dually infected cells, and gB and gD were co-localized with gp160. However, HIV-1 particles, produced in HIV-1-infected cells expressing gB or gD after transfection or HSV-2 superinfection, did not incorporate either gB or gD in the viral membrane, and did not have the capacity to infect cells normally non-permissive for HIV-1, such as epithelial cells. Conclusion Our results do not support the hypothesis of HSV-2/HIV-1 pseudotype formation and involvement in the synergistic genital interactions between HIV-1 and HSV-2. PMID:17207276

  5. Human Erythrocytes Selectively Bind and Enrich Infectious HIV-1 Virions

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Zoltan; Brown, Bruce K.; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Peachman, Kristina K.; Matyas, Gary R.; Polonis, Victoria R.; Rao, Mangala; Alving, Carl R.

    2009-01-01

    Although CD4(+) cells represent the major target for HIV infection in blood, claims of complement-independent binding of HIV-1 to erythrocytes and the possible role of Duffy blood group antigen, have generated controversy. To examine the question of binding to erythrocytes, HIV-1 was incubated in vitro with erythrocytes from 30 healthy leukapheresis donors, and binding was determined by p24 analysis and adsorption of HIV-1 with reduction of infectivity for CD4(+) target cells. All of the cells, regardless of blood group type, bound HIV-1 p24. A typical preparation of erythrocytes bound <2.4% of the added p24, but erythrocytes selectively removed essentially all of the viral infectivity as determined by decreased infection of CD4(+) target cells; however, cell-associated HIV-1 was approximately 100-fold more efficient, via trans infection, than unadsorbed virus for infection of CD4(+) cells. All of the bound HIV-1 p24 was released by treatment of the cells with EDTA, and binding was optimized by adding Ca2+ and Mg2+ during the washing of erythrocytes containing bound HIV-1. Although the small number of contaminating leukocytes in the erythrocyte preparation also bound HIV-1 p24, there was no significant binding to CD4, and it thus appears that the binding occurred on leukocytes at non-CD4 sites. Furthermore, binding occurred to erythrocyte ghosts from which contaminating leukocytes had been previously removed. The results demonstrate that erythrocytes incubated in vitro with HIV-1 differentially adsorb all of the infectious HIV-1 virions (as opposed to non-infectious or degraded virions) in the absence of complement and independent of blood group, and binding is dependent on divalent cations. By analogy with HIV-1 bound to DC-SIGN on dendritic cells, erythrocyte-bound HIV-1 might comprise an important surface reservoir for trans infection of permissive cells. PMID:20011536

  6. Genetic Signatures of HIV-1 Envelope-mediated Bystander Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Anjali; Lee, Raphael T. C.; Mohl, Jonathan; Sedano, Melina; Khong, Wei Xin; Ng, Oon Tek; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Garg, Himanshu

    2014-01-01

    The envelope (Env) glycoprotein of HIV is an important determinant of viral pathogenesis. Several lines of evidence support the role of HIV-1 Env in inducing bystander apoptosis that may be a contributing factor in CD4+ T cell loss. However, most of the studies testing this phenomenon have been conducted with laboratory-adapted HIV-1 isolates. This raises the question of whether primary Envs derived from HIV-infected patients are capable of inducing bystander apoptosis and whether specific Env signatures are associated with this phenomenon. We developed a high throughput assay to determine the bystander apoptosis inducing activity of a panel of primary Envs. We tested 38 different Envs for bystander apoptosis, virion infectivity, neutralizing antibody sensitivity, and putative N-linked glycosylation sites along with a comprehensive sequence analysis to determine if specific sequence signatures within the viral Env are associated with bystander apoptosis. Our studies show that primary Envs vary considerably in their bystander apoptosis-inducing potential, a phenomenon that correlates inversely with putative N-linked glycosylation sites and positively with virion infectivity. By use of a novel phylogenetic analysis that avoids subtype bias coupled with structural considerations, we found specific residues like Arg-476 and Asn-425 that were associated with differences in bystander apoptosis induction. A specific role of these residues was also confirmed experimentally. These data demonstrate for the first time the potential of primary R5 Envs to mediate bystander apoptosis in CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, we identify specific genetic signatures within the Env that may be associated with the bystander apoptosis-inducing phenotype. PMID:24265318

  7. HIV-1 Matrix Protein p17 and its Receptors.

    PubMed

    Caccuri, Francesca; Marsico, Stefania; Fiorentini, Simona; Caruso, Arnaldo; Giagulli, Cinzia

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1 matrix protein p17 (p17) plays a crucial role in the virus life cycle. It is released in the extracellular space from HIV-1-infected cells and accumulates in the tissues of patients, even in those successfully treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy. Extracellular p17 deregulates the biological functions of many different cells that are directly or indirectly implicated in AIDS pathogenesis. All p17 actions depend on interaction between its functional epitope (AT20), located at the protein N-terminal region, and different receptors expressed on target cells. This finding corroborates the importance of impeding p17/p17 receptors interaction as a contribution to block AIDS. In this article we review the interaction of p17 with heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) and with the chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 1 (CXCR1) and 2 (CXCR2). We provide details on how p17 interacts with its receptors and how these interactions are central to the p17 biological activities. Moreover, we highlight the existence of a p17 variant, named S75X, which displays opposite effects on B-cell proliferation as compared to p17. A two-site model for p17 interaction with G-coupled receptors provides a possible explanation on how mutations naturally occurring within the primary amino acid structure can lead S75X to activate the Akt signaling pathway and to promote B-cell growth and transformation. Identification of p17 interaction with HSPGs, CXCR1 and CXCR2 as a fundamental event in supporting its activity could help to find new treatment approaches aimed at blocking all p17/p17 receptors interactions and, consequently, p17 detrimental activities.

  8. Genome editing strategies: potential tools for eradicating HIV-1/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Kamel; Gordon, Jennifer; Cosentino, Laura; Hu, Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    Current therapy for controlling HIV-1 infection and preventing AIDS progression has profoundly decreased viral replication in cells susceptible to HIV-1 infection, but it does not eliminate the low level of viral replication in latently infected cells which contain integrated copies of HIV-1 proviral DNA. There is an urgent need for the development of HIV-1 genome eradication strategies that will lead to a permanent or “sterile” cure of HIV-1/AIDS. In the past few years, novel nuclease-initiated genome editing tools have been developing rapidly, including ZFNs, TALENs, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. These surgical knives, which can excise any genome, provide a great opportunity to eradicate the HIV-1 genome by targeting highly conserved regions of the HIV-1 long terminal repeats or essential viral genes. Given the time consuming and costly engineering of target-specific ZFNs and TALENs, the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 technology has emerged as a simpler and more versatile technology to allow permanent removal of integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA in eukaryotic cells, and hopefully animal models or human patients. The major unmet challenges of this approach at present include inefficient nuclease gene delivery, potential off-target cleavage, and cell-specific genome targeting. Nanoparticle or lentivirus-mediated delivery of next generation Cas9 technologies including nickase or RNA-guided FokI nuclease (RFN) will further improve the potential for genome editing to become a promising approach for curing HIV-1/AIDS. PMID:25716921

  9. Broad activation of latent HIV-1 in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Kirston; Hiener, Bonnie; Winckelmann, Anni; Rasmussen, Thomas Aagaard; Shao, Wei; Byth, Karen; Lanfear, Robert; Solomon, Ajantha; McMahon, James; Harrington, Sean; Buzon, Maria; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Denton, Paul W.; Olesen, Rikke; Østergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Lewin, Sharon R.; Søgaard, Ole Schmeltz; Palmer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The ‘shock and kill' approach to cure human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) includes transcriptional induction of latent HIV-1 proviruses using latency-reversing agents (LRAs) with targeted immunotherapy to purge infected cells. The administration of LRAs (panobinostat or vorinostat) to HIV-1-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy induces a significant increase in cell-associated unspliced (CA-US) HIV-1 RNA from CD4+ T cells. However, it is important to discern whether the increases in CA-US HIV-1 RNA are due to limited or broad activation of HIV-1 proviruses. Here we use single-genome sequencing to find that the RNA transcripts observed following LRA administration are genetically diverse, indicating activation of transcription from an extensive range of proviruses. Defective sequences are more frequently found in CA HIV-1 RNA than in HIV-1 DNA, which has implications for developing an accurate measure of HIV-1 reservoir size. Our findings provide insights into the effects of panobinostat and vorinostat as LRAs for latent HIV-1. PMID:27605062

  10. [Genetic subtyping of HIV-1 strains by heteroduplex mobility assay].

    PubMed

    Yu, H; Su, L; Shao, J J

    1997-08-01

    DNA fragments of HIV-1 env gene were amplified by nested PCR from uncultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from 24 HIV-1 infected individuals. The PCR products were separated by melting and annealing with denatured PCR product prepared from reference plasimd of representative subtypes. Heteroduplex were then formed between the single-stranded DNA from the two sources and were analysed on polyacrylamide gels. The results from heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) were compared with HIV-1 subtype results determined by DNA sequencing. With advantages of high speed, low cost and high specificity, HMA is a reliable screening method for HIV-1 subtyping.

  11. TIM-family proteins inhibit HIV-1 release

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minghua; Ablan, Sherimay D.; Miao, Chunhui; Zheng, Yi-Min; Fuller, Matthew S.; Rennert, Paul D.; Maury, Wendy; Johnson, Marc C.; Freed, Eric O.; Liu, Shan-Lu

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that T-cell immunoglobulin (Ig) and mucin domain (TIM) proteins play critical roles in viral infections. Herein, we report that the TIM-family proteins strongly inhibit HIV-1 release, resulting in diminished viral production and replication. Expression of TIM-1 causes HIV-1 Gag and mature viral particles to accumulate on the plasma membrane. Mutation of the phosphatidylserine (PS) binding sites of TIM-1 abolishes its ability to block HIV-1 release. TIM-1, but to a much lesser extent PS-binding deficient mutants, induces PS flipping onto the cell surface; TIM-1 is also found to be incorporated into HIV-1 virions. Importantly, TIM-1 inhibits HIV-1 replication in CD4-positive Jurkat cells, despite its capability of up-regulating CD4 and promoting HIV-1 entry. In addition to TIM-1, TIM-3 and TIM-4 also block the release of HIV-1, as well as that of murine leukemia virus (MLV) and Ebola virus (EBOV); knockdown of TIM-3 in differentiated monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) enhances HIV-1 production. The inhibitory effects of TIM-family proteins on virus release are extended to other PS receptors, such as Axl and RAGE. Overall, our study uncovers a novel ability of TIM-family proteins to block the release of HIV-1 and other viruses by interaction with virion- and cell-associated PS. Our work provides new insights into a virus-cell interaction that is mediated by TIMs and PS receptors. PMID:25136083

  12. HIV-1 imposes rigidity on blood and semen cytokine networks

    PubMed Central

    LISCO, Andrea; INTROINI, Andrea; MUNAWWAR, Arshi; VANPOUILLE, Christope; GRIVEL, Jean-Charles; BLANK, Paul; SINGH, Sarman

    2012-01-01

    Problem Although it is established that the levels of individual cytokines are altered by HIV-1 infection, the changes in cytokine interrelations that organize them into networks have been poorly studied. Here, we evaluated these networks in HIV-infected and -uninfected individuals in fluid compartments that are critical for HIV-1 pathogenesis and transmission, namely blood and semen. Method of Study In samples collected from therapy-naïve HIV-1-infected and HIV-1-uninfected individuals, we measured HIV-1-load, CD4-cell-count, and levels of 21 cytokines using a multiplex bead-assay. Results Cytokine networks in blood and semen were different for HIV-1-infected and -uninfected individuals. In both compartments of HIV-1-infected individuals, the cytokine networks were more interlocked than in controls: HIV -1 infection results in the establishment of new correlations and the strengthening of pre-existing correlations between different cytokines. In blood and semen of HIV-infected patients there were, respectively, 68 and 72 statistically significant correlations between cytokines, while in uninfected individuals there were 18 and 21 such correlations. Conclusions HIV-1 infection reorganizes the cytokine networks, establishing new strong correlations between various cytokines and thus imposing a high rigidity on the cytokine network. This rigidity may reflect the impairment of the ability of the immune system to respond to microbial challenges. PMID:23006048

  13. Relaxation of adaptive evolution during the HIV-1 infection owing to reduction of CD4+ T cell counts.

    PubMed

    Leal, Élcio; Casseb, Jorge; Hendry, Michael; Busch, Michael P; Diaz, Ricardo Sobhie

    2012-01-01

    The first stages of HIV-1 infection are essential to establish the diversity of virus population within host. It has been suggested that adaptation to host cells and antibody evasion are the leading forces driving HIV evolution at the initial stages of AIDS infection. In order to gain more insights on adaptive HIV-1 evolution, the genetic diversity was evaluated during the infection time in individuals contaminated by the same viral source in an epidemic cluster. Multiple sequences of V3 loop region of the HIV-1 were serially sampled from four individuals: comprising a single blood donor, two blood recipients, and another sexually infected by one of the blood recipients. The diversity of the viral population within each host was analyzed independently in distinct time points during HIV-1 infection. Phylogenetic analysis identified multiple HIV-1 variants transmitted through blood transfusion but the establishing of new infections was initiated by a limited number of viruses. Positive selection (d(N)/d(S)>1) was detected in the viruses within each host in all time points. In the intra-host viruses of the blood donor and of one blood recipient, X4 variants appeared respectively in 1993 and 1989. In both patients X4 variants never reached high frequencies during infection time. The recipient, who X4 variants appeared, developed AIDS but kept narrow and constant immune response against HIV-1 during the infection time. Slowing rates of adaptive evolution and increasing diversity in HIV-1 are consequences of the CD4+ T cells depletion. The dynamic of R5 to X4 shift is not associated with the initial amplitude of humoral immune response or intensity of positive selection.

  14. Immunization with HIV-1 gp41 subunit virosomes induces mucosal antibodies protecting nonhuman primates against vaginal SHIV challenges.

    PubMed

    Bomsel, Morgane; Tudor, Daniela; Drillet, Anne-Sophie; Alfsen, Annette; Ganor, Yonatan; Roger, Marie-Gaëlle; Mouz, Nicolas; Amacker, Mario; Chalifour, Anick; Diomede, Lorenzo; Devillier, Gilles; Cong, Zhe; Wei, Qiang; Gao, Hong; Qin, Chuan; Yang, Gui-Bo; Zurbriggen, Rinaldo; Lopalco, Lucia; Fleury, Sylvain

    2011-02-25

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 is mainly transmitted mucosally during sexual intercourse. We therefore evaluated the protective efficacy of a vaccine active at mucosal sites. Macaca mulatta monkeys were immunized via both the intramuscular and intranasal routes with an HIV-1 vaccine made of gp41-subunit antigens grafted on virosomes, a safe delivery carrier approved in humans with self-adjuvant properties. Six months after 13 vaginal challenges with simian-HIV (SHIV)-SF162P3, four out of five vaccinated animals remained virus-negative, and the fifth was only transiently infected. None of the five animals seroconverted to p27gag-SIV. In contrast, all 6 placebo-vaccinated animals became infected and seroconverted. All protected animals showed gp41-specific vaginal IgAs with HIV-1 transcytosis-blocking properties and vaginal IgGs with neutralizing and/or antibody-dependent cellular-cytotoxicity activities. In contrast, plasma IgGs totally lacked virus-neutralizing activity. The protection observed challenges the paradigm whereby circulating antiviral antibodies are required for protection against HIV-1 infection and may serve in designing a human vaccine against HIV-1-AIDS.

  15. The Neonatal Fc Receptor (FcRn) Enhances Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Transcytosis across Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sandeep; Gach, Johannes S.; Becerra, Juan C.; Phan, Tran B.; Pudney, Jeffrey; Moldoveanu, Zina; Joseph, Sarah B.; Landucci, Gary; Supnet, Medalyn Jude; Ping, Li-Hua; Corti, Davide; Moldt, Brian; Hel, Zdenek; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Ruprecht, Ruth M.; Burton, Dennis R.; Mestecky, Jiri; Anderson, Deborah J.; Forthal, Donald N.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) crosses mucosal surfaces to establish infection are unknown. Acidic genital secretions of HIV-1-infected women contain HIV-1 likely coated by antibody. We found that the combination of acidic pH and Env-specific IgG, including that from cervicovaginal and seminal fluids of HIV-1-infected individuals, augmented transcytosis across epithelial cells as much as 20-fold compared with Env-specific IgG at neutral pH or non-specific IgG at either pH. Enhanced transcytosis was observed with clinical HIV-1 isolates, including transmitted/founder strains, and was eliminated in Fc neonatal receptor (FcRn)-knockdown epithelial cells. Non-neutralizing antibodies allowed similar or less transcytosis than neutralizing antibodies. However, the ratio of total:infectious virus was higher for neutralizing antibodies, indicating that they allowed transcytosis while blocking infectivity of transcytosed virus. Immunocytochemistry revealed abundant FcRn expression in columnar epithelia lining the human endocervix and penile urethra. Acidity and Env-specific IgG enhance transcytosis of virus across epithelial cells via FcRn and could facilitate translocation of virus to susceptible target cells following sexual exposure. PMID:24278022

  16. High genetic diversity of HIV-1 was found in men who have sex with men in Shijiazhuang, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Lu, Xinli; Li, Hanping; Chen, Lili; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yongjian; Bao, Zuoyi; Li, Tianyi; Tian, Chong; Liu, Hongxin; Zhuang, Daomin; Liu, Siyang; Li, Jingyun

    2011-08-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) have become one of the populations with severely HIV prevalence in China. However, very few genetic studies have been done on HIV-1 spreading in this population. In this study, the genetic characterization of HIV-1 strains prevalent in the MSM in Shijiazhuang, China, was analyzed basing on the HIV-1 full-length gag, pol, and partial env gene. 21 drug-naïve HIV-1 sero-positive patients were enrolled into the study. Full length gag, pol, partial env genes and some near full length genomes were amplified with nest RT-PCR followed by sequencing. Multiple subtypes, including CRF01_AE (52.9%), subtype B (35.3%) and CRF07_BC (11.8%), were found in the population. Phylogenetic analysis showed close relationship between our strains with those from Beijing MSM but not those from paid blood donors of local area. Drug resistance surveillance evaluation showed no transmitted drug resistance (TDR). However, some drug-resistance related polymorphism sites (V181I and V106I) were popularly found in B subtype strains. The findings will contribute to understanding the distribution and evolution of HIV-1 in MSM and also help the behavior change intervention.

  17. Transcriptional Bursting from the HIV-1 Promoter is a Significant Source of Stochastic Noise in HIV-1 Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A; Razooky, B; Cox, Chris D.; Simpson, Michael L; Weinberger, Leor S.

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of noise in gene expression has proven a powerful approach for analyzing gene regulatory architecture. To probe the regulatory mechanisms controlling expression of HIV-1, we analyze noise in gene-expression from HIV-1 s long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter at different HIV-1 integration sites across the human genome. Flow cytometry analysis of GFP expression from the HIV-1 LTR shows high variability (noise) at each integration site. Notably, the measured noise levels are inconsistent with constitutive gene expression models. Instead, quantification of expression noise indicates that HIV-1 gene expression occurs through randomly timed bursts of activity from the LTR and that each burst generates an average of 2 10 mRNA transcripts before the promoter returns to an inactive state. These data indicate that transcriptional bursting can generate high variability in HIV-1 early gene products, which may critically influence the viral fate-decision between active replication and proviral latency.

  18. Antiretroviral Therapy Fails to Restore Levels of HIV-1 Restriction miRNAs in PBMCs of HIV-1-infected MSM

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Man-Qing; Zhao, Min; Kong, Wen-Hua; Peng, Jin-Song; Wang, Fang; Qiu, Hong-Yan; Zhu, Ze-Rong; Tang, Li; Sang, Ming; Wu, Jian-Guo; Ho, Wen-Zhe; Zhou, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A number of cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified to have the ability to inhibit HIV-1 replication. In this study, we examined the impact of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on the expression of HIV-1 restriction miRNAs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-1–infected men who have sex with men (MSM). Compared with male healthy donors, HIV-infected MSM had significantly lower levels of 9 HIV-1 restriction miRNAs. The treatment of HIV-1–infected MSM with cART, however, failed to restore the levels of these miRNAs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These observations suggest that the suppression of the cellular restriction miRNAs by HIV-1 may attribute to the virus latency during cART. PMID:26579828

  19. Antiretroviral Therapy Fails to Restore Levels of HIV-1 Restriction miRNAs in PBMCs of HIV-1-infected MSM.

    PubMed

    Liu, Man-Qing; Zhao, Min; Kong, Wen-Hua; Peng, Jin-Song; Wang, Fang; Qiu, Hong-Yan; Zhu, Ze-Rong; Tang, Li; Sang, Ming; Wu, Jian-Guo; Ho, Wen-Zhe; Zhou, Wang

    2015-11-01

    A number of cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified to have the ability to inhibit HIV-1 replication. In this study, we examined the impact of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on the expression of HIV-1 restriction miRNAs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-1-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). Compared with male healthy donors, HIV-infected MSM had significantly lower levels of 9 HIV-1 restriction miRNAs. The treatment of HIV-1-infected MSM with cART, however, failed to restore the levels of these miRNAs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These observations suggest that the suppression of the cellular restriction miRNAs by HIV-1 may attribute to the virus latency during cART.

  20. Novel pseudosymmetric inhibitors of HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, A.; Roesel, J.; Gruetter, M.; Tintelnot-Blomley, M.; Alteri, E.; Bold, G.; Lang, M.

    1993-12-31

    Taking into account the unique C-2 symmetric nature of the HIV-1 protease homodimer, the authors have designed and synthesized novel inhibitors featuring an almost symmetric structure. Compounds containing the easily accessible Phe[CH(OH)CH{sub 2}N(NH)]Cha dipeptide isostere as a nonhydrolyzable replacement of the scissile amide bond of the natural substrate are potent inhibitors in vitro with IC{sub 50} values of 9 to 50 nM. The antiviral activity depends mainly on the nature of the anylated valine residues linked to the dipeptide mimic. In this series, CGP 53820 combines both high potency and excellent specificity. Its predicted symmetric binding pattern is illustrated by the X-ray structure analysis performed with the corresponding enzyme-inhibitor complex.

  1. HIV-1 protease inhibitors in development.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Stefano; La Seta Catamancio, Simona

    2002-03-01

    Several pharmaceutical companies have developed an increasing number of second generation protease inhibitors (PI) during the last few years. Many of these compounds have been in preclinical trials and some are now in clinical use. All drugs in this category have been designed to be well absorbed and overcome the crucial problem of cross-resistance within this class of compounds. Taking into account the rapid occurrence of PI cross-resistance, clinicians who are treating patients with the HIV-1 infection will need new active PIs in the near future. The clinical and antiviral efficacy of the new molecules versus the older PIs will be investigated through comparative trials that are likely to be completed over the next 12 months. These third-generation PIs currently in development will be the subject of our review.

  2. Allosteric inhibition of HIV-1 integrase activity

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, Alan; Kessl, Jacques J.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase is an important therapeutic target in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs), which target the enzyme active site, have witnessed clinical success over the past 5 years, but the generation of drug resistance poses challenges to INSTI-based therapies moving forward. Integrase is a dynamic protein, and its ordered multimerization is critical to enzyme activity. The integrase tetramer, bound to viral DNA, interacts with host LEDGF/p75 protein to tether integration to active genes. Allosteric integrase inhibitors (ALLINIs) that compete with LEDGF/p75 for binding to integrase disrupt integrase assembly with viral DNA and allosterically inhibit enzyme function. ALLINIs display steep dose response curves and synergize with INSTIs ex vivo, highlighting this novel inhibitor class for clinical development. PMID:23647983

  3. HIV-1 Strategies of Immune Evasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglione, F.; Bernaschi, M.

    We simulate the progression of the HIV-1 infection in untreated host organisms. The phenotype features of the virus are represented by the replication rate, the probability of activating the transcription, the mutation rate and the capacity to stimulate an immune response (the so-called immunogenicity). It is very difficult to study in-vivo or in-vitro how these characteristics of the virus influence the evolution of the disease. Therefore we resorted to simulations based on a computer model validated in previous studies. We observe, by means of computer experiments, that the virus continuously evolves under the selective pressure of an immune response whose effectiveness downgrades along with the disease progression. The results of the simulations show that immunogenicity is the most important factor in determining the rate of disease progression but, by itself, it is not sufficient to drive the disease to a conclusion in all cases.

  4. Differential Ability of Primary HIV-1 Nef Isolates To Downregulate HIV-1 Entry Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Mako; Ogata, Yoko; Mahiti, Macdonald; Maeda, Yosuke; Kuang, Xiaomei T.; Miura, Toshiyuki; Jessen, Heiko; Walker, Bruce D.; Brockman, Mark A.; Brumme, Zabrina L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 Nef downregulates the viral entry receptor CD4 as well as the coreceptors CCR5 and CXCR4 from the surface of HIV-infected cells, and this leads to promotion of viral replication through superinfection resistance and other mechanisms. Nef sequence motifs that modulate these functions have been identified via in vitro mutagenesis with laboratory HIV-1 strains. However, it remains unclear whether the same motifs contribute to Nef activity in patient-derived sequences and whether these motifs may differ in Nef sequences isolated at different infection stages and/or from patients with different disease phenotypes. Here, nef clones from 45 elite controllers (EC), 46 chronic progressors (CP), and 43 acute progressors (AP) were examined for their CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4 downregulation functions. Nef clones from EC exhibited statistically significantly impaired CD4 and CCR5 downregulation ability and modestly impaired CXCR4 downregulation activity compared to those from CP and AP. Nef's ability to downregulate CD4 and CCR5 correlated positively in all cohorts, suggesting that they are functionally linked in vivo. Moreover, impairments in Nef's receptor downregulation functions increased the susceptibility of Nef-expressi