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Sample records for hiv-infected persons etiologic

  1. Pneumonia in HIV-infected Persons

    PubMed Central

    Gordin, Fred M.; Roediger, Mollie P.; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Lundgren, Jens D.; Miro, Jose M.; Palfreeman, Adrian; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Wolff, Marcelo J.; Easterbrook, Philippa J.; Clezy, Kate; Slater, Leonard N.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity for HIV-infected persons and contributes to excess mortality in this population. Objectives: To evaluate the frequency and risk factors for occurrence of bacterial pneumonia in the present era of potent antiretroviral therapy. Methods: We evaluated data from a randomized trial of episodic antiretroviral therapy. The study, Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy, enrolled 5,472 participants at 318 sites in 33 countries. Study patients had more than 350 CD4 cells at baseline. Diagnosis of bacterial pneumonia was confirmed by a blinded clinical-events committee. Measurements and Main Results: During a mean follow-up of 16 months, 116 participants (2.2%) developed at least one episode of bacterial pneumonia. Patients randomized to receive episodic antiretroviral therapy were significantly more likely to develop pneumonia than patients randomized to receive continuous antiretroviral therapy (hazard ratio, 1.55; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–2.25; P = 0.02). Cigarette smoking was a major risk factor: Current-smokers had more than an 80% higher risk of pneumonia compared with never-smokers (hazard ratio, 1.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.09–3.04; P = 0.02). Participants who were on continuous HIV treatment and were current smokers were three times more likely to develop bacterial pneumonia than nonsmokers. Current smoking status was significant, but a past history of smoking was not. Conclusions: Bacterial pneumonia is a major source of morbidity, even for persons on potent antiretroviral therapy, including those with high CD4 cells. Efforts to reduce this illness should stress the importance of uninterrupted antiretroviral therapy and attainment and/or maintenance of nonsmoking status. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 00027352). PMID:18617640

  2. HIV infection in the etiology of lung cancer: confounding, causality, and consequences.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Gregory D; Merlo, Christian A

    2011-06-01

    Persons infected with HIV have an elevated risk of lung cancer, but whether the increase simply reflects a higher smoking prevalence continues to be debated. This review summarizes existing data on the association of HIV infection and lung cancer, with particular attention to study design and adjustment for cigarette smoking. Potential mechanisms by which HIV infection may lead to lung cancer are discussed. Finally, irrespective of causality and mechanisms, lung cancer represents an important and growing problem confronting HIV-infected patients and their providers. Substantial efforts are needed to promote smoking cessation and to control lung cancer among HIV-infected populations.

  3. [Incidence and etiology of psychotic disorders in HIV infected patients].

    PubMed

    Niederecker, M; Naber, D; Riedel, R; Perro, C; Goebel, F D

    1995-05-01

    There are numerous case reports on psychoses in AIDS patients and, although more seldom, also in HIV-positive patients in early stages of infection; however, systematic investigations on the frequency, e.g., relevant for the indication of an HIV test in psychiatric patients, are missing. For this study, 1046 HIV-positive patients were examined regarding psychoses. A total of 301 patients (28.8%) were HIV-positive but asymptomatic, and 380 patients (36.2%) had the lymphadenopathy syndrome. One hundred thirty-two patients (12.6%) suffered from an AIDS-related complex and 233 patients (22.3%) from AIDS. Of these 1046 patients, only 9 (0.9%) suffered from psychoses. One patient with a paranoid-hallucinatory syndrome was asymptomatic; one in the lymphadenopathy syndrome was manic. The other 7 patients were all in late stages of the infection. A causal relationship between HIV infection and psychosis and probable in only 3 patients. These data do not indicate a markedly elevated prevalence of psychosis in HIV-positive or AIDS patients.

  4. Cancer clinical trials in persons with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Little, Richard F

    2017-01-01

    The era of modern HIV therapeutics is well underway. The cancer and infectious disease epidemiology of HIV disease has markedly altered as populations are availed to the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ARV). The types of cancers occurring among those with HIV infection has broadened but the case burden in absolute numbers is very low relative to the background population. There are fewer incident cases of the AIDS-defining cancers (aggressive B-cell lymphomas, Kaposi's sarcoma, and cervical cancer). There is an increased risk for certain non-AIDS-defining cancers, but these occur somewhat sporadically relative to clinical trial enrollment. The changing epidemiology of cancer in HIV poses challenges as well as opportunities for participation of persons with HIV in cancer therapy clinical trials. There are excellent examples of cancer trials that inform cancer therapy for patients with HIV infection. Examples include those from HIV-specific trials and from trials mainly focused on the background population that included patients with HIV infection. Interpretation of clinical trials to guide therapy for those with HIV infection and cancer largely depends on data that does not include HIV-infected patients. The ability to extend clinical trial findings to populations not included in clinical trials remains problematic for a variety of populations, including those with HIV or AIDS. Careful prioritization of studies designed to bridge this gap is needed. However, there are published studies that serve as excellent examples bridging these gaps and the portfolio of cancer therapy trials underway will inform HIV and cancer better than at any time in the past.

  5. Screening HIV-infected persons for tuberculosis--Cambodia, January 2004-February 2005.

    PubMed

    2005-11-25

    Worldwide, tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most common causes of death among persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The World Health Organization recommends screening HIV-infected persons for TB disease after HIV diagnosis, before initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), and during routine follow-up care. In 2003, health officials in Banteay Meanchey Province, Cambodia, in conjunction with CDC and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), began a pilot project to increase TB screening among persons with HIV infection. Subsequently, CDC analyzed and evaluated data from the first 14 months of the project. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which determined that, during January 2004--February 2005, among persons with HIV infection at voluntary counseling and confidential testing (VCCT) clinics, 37% were screened for TB disease, and 24% of those screened had TB disease diagnosed. On the basis of these findings, the Provincial Health Department (PHD) took action to increase awareness of the risk for TB among HIV-infected persons. During the 3 months after these measures were implemented, the TB screening rate among persons with HIV infection increased to 61%. Evaluation of projects like the one conducted in Banteay Meanchey Province can help develop an evidence-based approach for removing barriers to screening HIV-infected persons for TB.

  6. Options for treatment of hepatitis C in HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David L

    2006-01-01

    Irrespective of whether a patient has HIV infection, the optimal treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is peginterferon alpha and ribavirin. In both HIV-infected and uninfected persons, sustained virologic response (SVR) rates are higher for genotype 2 and genotype 3 HCV infection and for patients with lower pre-treatment HCV RNA levels. HIV-infection does not alter either the reality that persons who fail to achieve a 2log(10) reduction in HCV RNA level after 12 weeks of therapy rarely achieve a SVR, or the theoretical benefits of maintenance therapy in those without viral responses. The same adverse treatment effects can occur in HIV-infected and uninfected persons, but treatment of HIV-infected persons is complicated by interactions between ribavirin and antiretroviral medications and effects of HCV treatment on the course of HIV. The optimal treatment doses and durations are not known for HIV-infected persons, who are also less likely to achieve a SVR. A final difference is that the benefits of HCV treatment breakthroughs are usually realized in patients without HIV years before those with HIV. Future research must focus both on improving outcomes with currently available medications and rapidly evaluating the safety and efficacy of forthcoming antiviral compounds in HIV/HCV coinfected persons.

  7. Safety of licensed vaccines in HIV-infected persons: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Kagina, Benjamin M; Wiysonge, Charles S; Lesosky, Maia; Madhi, Shabir A; Hussey, Gregory D

    2014-09-11

    Safety of vaccines remains a cornerstone of building public trust on the use of these cost-effective and life-saving public health interventions. In some settings, particularly Sub-Saharan Africa, there is a high prevalence of HIV infection and a high burden of vaccine-preventable diseases. There is evidence suggesting that the immunity induced by some commonly used vaccines is not durable in HIV-infected persons, and therefore, repeated vaccination may be considered to ensure optimal vaccine-induced immunity in this population. However, some vaccines, particularly the live vaccines, may be unsafe in HIV-infected persons. There is lack of evidence on the safety profile of commonly used vaccines among HIV-infected persons. We are therefore conducting a systematic review to assess the safety profile of routine vaccines administered to HIV-infected persons. We will select studies conducted in any setting where licensed and effective vaccines were administered to HIV-infected persons. We will search for eligible studies in PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Scopus, Africa-Wide, PDQ-Evidence and CINAHL as well as reference lists of relevant publications. We will screen search outputs, select studies and extract data in duplicate, resolving discrepancies by discussion and consensus. Globally, immunisation is a major public health strategy to mitigate morbidity and mortality caused by various infectious disease-causing agents. In general, there are efforts to increase vaccination coverage worldwide, and for these efforts to be successful, safety of the vaccines is paramount, even among people living with HIV, who in some situations may require repeated vaccination. Results from this systematic review will be discussed in the context of the safety of routine vaccines among HIV-infected persons. From the safety perspective, we will also discuss whether repeat vaccination strategies may be feasible among HIV-infected persons

  8. Safety of licensed vaccines in HIV-infected persons: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Safety of vaccines remains a cornerstone of building public trust on the use of these cost-effective and life-saving public health interventions. In some settings, particularly Sub-Saharan Africa, there is a high prevalence of HIV infection and a high burden of vaccine-preventable diseases. There is evidence suggesting that the immunity induced by some commonly used vaccines is not durable in HIV-infected persons, and therefore, repeated vaccination may be considered to ensure optimal vaccine-induced immunity in this population. However, some vaccines, particularly the live vaccines, may be unsafe in HIV-infected persons. There is lack of evidence on the safety profile of commonly used vaccines among HIV-infected persons. We are therefore conducting a systematic review to assess the safety profile of routine vaccines administered to HIV-infected persons. Methods/Design We will select studies conducted in any setting where licensed and effective vaccines were administered to HIV-infected persons. We will search for eligible studies in PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Scopus, Africa-Wide, PDQ-Evidence and CINAHL as well as reference lists of relevant publications. We will screen search outputs, select studies and extract data in duplicate, resolving discrepancies by discussion and consensus. Discussion Globally, immunisation is a major public health strategy to mitigate morbidity and mortality caused by various infectious disease-causing agents. In general, there are efforts to increase vaccination coverage worldwide, and for these efforts to be successful, safety of the vaccines is paramount, even among people living with HIV, who in some situations may require repeated vaccination. Results from this systematic review will be discussed in the context of the safety of routine vaccines among HIV-infected persons. From the safety perspective, we will also discuss whether repeat vaccination strategies may be

  9. Multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in HIV-Infected Persons, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Pablo E.; Suarez, Pedro G.; Sanchez, Jorge; Zavala, David; Arevalo, Jorge; Ticona, Eduardo; Nolan, Charles M.; Hooton, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    During 1999 to 2000, we identified HIV-infected persons with new episodes of tuberculosis (TB) at 10 hospitals in Lima-Peru and a random sample of other Lima residents with TB. Multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB was documented in 35 (43%) of 81 HIV-positive patients and 38 (3.9%)of 965 patients who were HIV-negative or of unknown HIV status (p < 0.001). HIV-positive patients with MDR-TB were concentrated at three hospitals that treat the greatest numbers of HIV-infected persons with TB. Of patients with TB, those with HIV infection differed from those without known HIV infection in having more frequent prior exposure to clinical services and more frequent previous TB therapy or prophylaxis. However, MDR-TB in HIV-infected patients was not associated with previous TB therapy or prophylaxis. MDR-TB is an ongoing problem in HIV-infected persons receiving care in public hospitals in Lima and Callao; they represent sentinel cases for a potentially larger epidemic of nosocomial MDR-TB. PMID:14720398

  10. Tuberculosis rates among HIV-infected persons in New York City, 2001-2005.

    PubMed

    Trieu, Lisa; Li, Jiehui; Hanna, David B; Harris, Tiffany G

    2010-06-01

    We calculated population-based tuberculosis (TB) rates among HIV-infected persons in New York City from 2001 through 2005 using data from the city's TB and HIV/AIDS surveillance registries, and we examined those rates using linear trend tests and incidence rate ratios (IRRs). HIV-infected individuals had 16 times the TB rate of a "non-HIV" population (HIV status negative or unknown; IRR = 16.0; 95% confidence interval = 14.9, 17.2). TB rates declined significantly among the US-born HIV-infected population (P (trend) < .001) but not among the foreign-born HIV-infected population (P (trend) = .355). Such disparities must be addressed if further declines are to be achieved.

  11. Sexually transmitted diseases in HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Augenbraun, M H; McCormack, W M

    1994-06-01

    It appears incontestable that there is a link between genital ulcer disease and HIV infection. On the one hand the natural history and response to therapy of syphilis, HSV-2, and chancroid are all modified by the immunosuppressive effects of HIV infection. On the other hand, HIV transmission is probably facilitated by the disruption of the normal epithelial barriers of the genital organs caused by these ulcerative infections. Information is somewhat less convincing that a similar association exists between the nonulcerative STDs (trichomonas, gonorrhea, chlamydial infections) and HIV. Conceptually, the mucosal inflammation associated with these infections might serve as a focus for HIV transmission. The available data, though suggestive, do not strongly support this contention. Theoretically though, even a small risk might potentially result in significant HIV transmission given the prevalence of nonulcerative STDs. These infectious processes do not appear to be markedly altered by HIV induced immunosuppression. The ability of HPV to cause dysplastic changes in cervical and anal tissue did not require the AIDS epidemic to come to light. In HIV infection, disruptions of immunoregulatory processes, which might ordinarily control the progression of potentially malignant cell lines, have created fertile ground for an increasing incidence of premalignant and malignant cytologic changes. The mutual impact these processes have or may have on one another requires that clinicians who care for patients with either HIV infection or with STDs should be thoroughly familiar with both and not consider them somehow exclusive of one another. Efforts toward the prevention and control of STDs should be considered important in the control and prevention of HIV transmission.

  12. The split personality of regulatory T cells in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Mathieu F; Weiss, Laurence

    2013-01-03

    Natural regulatory T cells (Tregs) participate in responses to various chronic infections including HIV. HIV infection is associated with a progressive CD4 lymphopenia and defective HIV-specific CD8 responses known to play a key role in the control of viral replication. Persistent immune activation is a hallmark of HIV infection and is involved in disease progression independent of viral load. The consequences of Treg expansion, observed in HIV infection, could be either beneficial, by suppressing generalized T-cell activation, or detrimental, by weakening HIV-specific responses and thus contributing to viral persistence. The resulting balance between Tregs contrasting outcomes might have critical implications in pathogenesis. Topics covered in this review include HIV-induced alterations of Tregs, Treg cell dynamics in blood and tissues, Treg-suppressive function, and the relationship between Tregs and immune activation. This review also provides a focus on the role of CD39(+) Tregs and other regulatory cell subsets. All these issues will be explored in different situations including acute and chronic infection, antiretroviral treatment-mediated viral control, and spontaneous viral control. Results must be interpreted with regard to both the Treg definition used in context and to the setting of the disease in an attempt to draw clearer conclusions from the apparently conflicting results.

  13. Crofelemer, a novel agent for treatment of non-infectious diarrhea in HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Chordia, Poorvi; MacArthur, Rodger D

    2013-09-01

    Crofelemer is the first US FDA-approved drug for symptomatic relief in HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral therapy (ART) who have non-infectious diarrhea. With the availability of ART, there is increased survival and decrease in gastrointestinal opportunistic infections. However, diarrhea secondary to ART and HIV enteropathy is common in HIV-infected persons. Crofelemer is manufactured from the red latex sap of the Croton lechleri tree in South America. It has a unique mechanism leading to inhibition of chloride ion secretion by blocking chloride channels in the gastrointestinal lumen. This reduces efflux of sodium and water, which in turn reduces the frequency and consistency of diarrhea. Crofelemer is well tolerated due to minimal systemic absorption and has a good safety profile. The availability of crofelemer will likely have a positive impact on the quality of life in HIV-infected persons and also increase compliance to ART.

  14. HIV Infection among Persons who inject Drugs: Ending Old Epidemics and Addressing New Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    DES JARLAIS, DON C.; KERR, THOMAS; CARRIERI, PATRIZIA; FEELEMYER, JONATHAN; ARASTEH, KAMYAR

    2016-01-01

    AIDS among persons who inject drugs, first identified in December 1981, has become a global epidemic. Injecting drug use has been reported in 148 countries and HIV infection has been seen among persons who inject drugs in 61 countries. Many locations have experienced outbreaks of HIV infection among persons who inject drugs, under specific conditions that promote very rapid spread of the virus. In response to these HIV outbreaks, specific interventions for persons who inject drugs include needle/syringe exchange programs, medicated assisted treatment (with methadone or buprenorphine) and antiretroviral therapy. Through a “combined prevention” approach, these interventions significantly reduced new HIV infections among persons who inject drugs in several locations including New York City, Vancouver and France. The efforts effectively ended the local HIV epidemic among persons who inject drugs in those locations. This review examines possible processes through which combined prevention programs may lead to ending HIV epidemics. However, notable outbreaks of HIV among persons who inject drugs have recently occurred in several countries, including in Athens, Greece, Tel-Aviv, Israel, Dublin Ireland, as well as in Scott County, Indiana USA. This review also considers different factors that may have led to these outbreaks. We conclude with addressing the remaining challenges for reducing HIV infection among persons who inject drugs. PMID:26836787

  15. HIV infection among persons who inject drugs: ending old epidemics and addressing new outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, Don C; Kerr, Thomas; Carrieri, Patrizia; Feelemyer, Jonathan; Arasteh, Kamyar

    2016-03-27

    AIDS among persons who inject drugs, first identified in December 1981, has become a global epidemic. Injecting drug use has been reported in 148 countries and HIV infection has been seen among persons who inject drugs in 61 countries. Many locations have experienced outbreaks of HIV infection among persons who inject drugs, under specific conditions that promote very rapid spread of the virus. In response to these HIV outbreaks, specific interventions for persons who inject drugs include needle/syringe exchange programs, medicated-assisted treatment (with methadone or buprenorphine) and antiretroviral therapy. Through a 'combined prevention' approach, these interventions significantly reduced new HIV infections among persons who inject drugs in several locations including New York City, Vancouver and France. The efforts effectively ended the HIV epidemic among persons who inject drugs in those locations. This review examines possible processes through which combined prevention programs may lead to ending HIV epidemics. However, notable outbreaks of HIV among persons who inject drugs have recently occurred in several countries, including in Athens, Greece; Tel-Aviv, Israel; Dublin, Ireland; as well as in Scott County, Indiana, USA. This review also considers different factors that may have led to these outbreaks. We conclude with addressing the remaining challenges for reducing HIV infection among persons who inject drugs.

  16. Fatty Liver Disease is Associated with Underlying Cardiovascular Disease in HIV-Infected Persons

    PubMed Central

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy; Krause, David; Wessman, Dylan; Medina, Sheila; Stepenosky, James; Brandt, Carolyn; Boswell, Gilbert

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is an increasing concern among HIV-infected persons and their providers. We determined if fatty liver disease is a marker for underlying coronary atherosclerosis among HIV-infected persons. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study among HIV-infected adults to evaluate the prevalence of and factors, including fatty liver disease, associated with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. All participants underwent computed tomography for determination of coronary artery calcium (CAC; positive defined as a score >0) and fatty liver disease (defined as a liver-to-spleen ratio <1.0). Factors associated with CAC were determined using multivariate logistic regression models. Results We studied 223 HIV-infected adults with a median age of 43 years (IQR 36–50), 96% were male, and 49% were Caucasian. Median CD4 count was 586 cells/mm3, and 83% were receiving antiretroviral medications. Seventy-five (34%) had a positive CAC score, and 29 (13%) subjects had fatty liver disease. Among those with CAC scores of 0, 1–100, >100, the percentage with concurrent fatty liver disease was 8%, 18%, and 41%, respectively (p=0.001). In the multivariate model, CAC was associated with increasing age (OR 4.3 per 10 years, p<0.01), hypertension (OR 2.6, p<0.01), and fatty liver disease (OR 3.8, p<0.01). Conclusions Coronary atherosclerosis as detected by CAC is prevalent among young HIV-infected persons. The detection of fatty liver disease among HIV-infected adults should prompt consideration for assessment for underlying cardiovascular disease and risk factor reduction. PMID:21251186

  17. Coronary artery disease risk reduction in HIV-infected persons: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Okeke, Nwora Lance; Chin, Tammy; Clement, Meredith; Chow, Shein-Chung; Hicks, Charles B

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), few data are available on primary prevention of CAD in this population. In this retrospective cohort study, HIV-infected patients treated in an academic medical center HIV Specialty Clinic between 1996 and 2010 were matched by age, gender, and ethnicity to a cohort of presumed uninfected persons followed in an academic medical center Internal Medicine primary care clinic. We compared CAD primary prevention care practices between the two clinics, including use of aspirin, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors ("statins"), and anti-hypertensive drugs. CAD risk between the two groups was assessed with 10-year Framingham CAD risk scores. In the comparative analysis, 890 HIV-infected persons were compared to 807 controls. Ten-year Framingham CAD Risk Scores were similar in the two groups (median, 3; interquartile range [IQR], 0-5). After adjusting for relevant risk factors, HIV-infected persons were less likely to be prescribed aspirin (odds ratio [OR] 0.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40-0.71), statins (OR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.53-0.92), and anti-hypertensive drugs (OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.50-0.79) than persons in the control group. In summary, when compared to demographically similar uninfected persons, HIV-infected persons treated in an HIV specialty clinic were less likely to be prescribed medications appropriate for CAD risk reduction. Improving primary preventative CAD care in HIV specialty clinic populations is an important step toward diminishing risk of heart disease in HIV-infected persons.

  18. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Alternative Stress Management Interventions in Persons with HIV Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCain, Nancy L.; Gray, D. Patricia; Elswick, R. K., Jr.; Robins, Jolynne W.; Tuck, Inez; Walter, Jeanne M.; Rausch, Sarah M.; Ketchum, Jessica McKinney

    2008-01-01

    Research in psychoneuroimmunology suggests that immunosuppression associated with perceived stress may contribute to disease progression in persons with HIV infection. While stress management interventions may enhance immune function, few alternative approaches have yet been tested. This randomized clinical trial was conducted to test effects of…

  19. Skin and Soft Tissue Infections among HIV-Infected Persons in the Late HAART Era

    PubMed Central

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.; Grandits, Greg; Weintrob, Amy; Ganesan, Anurahda; Agan, Brian; Landrum, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) occur at higher rates among HIV-infected persons, but current trends and risk factors are largely undefined. We evaluated SSTIs among a prospective cohort of HIV-infected persons during the late HAART era (2006-2010). Of the 1918 HIV-infected persons evaluated, 379 (20%) developed an SSTI during a median of 3.7 years of follow-up; of these,118 (31%) developed at least one recurrent SSTI. The incidence rate of SSTIs was 101 (95% CI 93-109) cases per 1000 PYs, and rates did not significantly change during the study period. Compared to not receiving HAART and having an HIV RNA level ≥1000 copies/ml, patients receiving HAART with an HIV RNA level <1000 copies/ml had a reduced risk of an SSTI (HR 0.64, 95% CI 0.48-0.86, p<0.01). In summary, initial and recurrent SSTIs are common among HIV-infected persons. HIV control is associated with a lower risk of SSTIs. PMID:22844006

  20. Increasing Rates of Obesity Among HIV-Infected Persons During the HIV Epidemic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    America Abstract Background: The prevalence and factors associated with overweight/obesity among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)- infected persons are...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Background: The prevalence and factors associated with overweight/obesity among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV...baseline and last visit) of hypertension , hyperlipidemia, diabetes, or heart disease utilized Fisher’s exact tests. Patients diagnosed with the

  1. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Alternative Stress Management Interventions in Persons with HIV Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCain, Nancy L.; Gray, D. Patricia; Elswick, R. K., Jr.; Robins, Jolynne W.; Tuck, Inez; Walter, Jeanne M.; Rausch, Sarah M.; Ketchum, Jessica McKinney

    2008-01-01

    Research in psychoneuroimmunology suggests that immunosuppression associated with perceived stress may contribute to disease progression in persons with HIV infection. While stress management interventions may enhance immune function, few alternative approaches have yet been tested. This randomized clinical trial was conducted to test effects of…

  2. Obesity Is Not Associated with Impaired Immune Response to Influenza Vaccination in HIV-Infected Persons

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Charitha; McKittrick, Noah; Kim, Deborah; Kappes, Rosemarie A.; Lo Re, Vincent; Tebas, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. HIV-infected individuals demonstrate lower immunogenicity to the influenza vaccine, despite immunologic and virologic control of HIV infection. Obesity has been previously shown to be associated with diminished antibody responses to other vaccines in HIV-uninfected persons. However, no studies have examined if obesity is associated with diminished protective immune response to influenza vaccination among HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods. We performed a retrospective analysis of immunogenicity data from a clinical trial of inactivated, trivalent influenza vaccine. The primary endpoint was the proportion of participants with seroconversion, defined as >4-fold increase in anti-hemagglutinin antibody titers after vaccination. Secondary endpoints were the proportion of participants with seroprotection (defined as antibody titers of ≥1 : 40) and geometric mean hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers. Results. Overall, 48 (27%) participants were obese (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2). Seroconversion rates were comparable between obese and nonobese subjects for all three vaccine strains. Further, postvaccination geometric mean titers did not differ by body mass index category. Conclusion. Obesity was not associated with diminished antibody response to influenza vaccination in a sample of healthy HIV-infected persons. PMID:26576297

  3. Obesity Is Not Associated with Impaired Immune Response to Influenza Vaccination in HIV-Infected Persons.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Charitha; McKittrick, Noah; Kim, Deborah; Kappes, Rosemarie A; Lo Re, Vincent; Tebas, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. HIV-infected individuals demonstrate lower immunogenicity to the influenza vaccine, despite immunologic and virologic control of HIV infection. Obesity has been previously shown to be associated with diminished antibody responses to other vaccines in HIV-uninfected persons. However, no studies have examined if obesity is associated with diminished protective immune response to influenza vaccination among HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods. We performed a retrospective analysis of immunogenicity data from a clinical trial of inactivated, trivalent influenza vaccine. The primary endpoint was the proportion of participants with seroconversion, defined as >4-fold increase in anti-hemagglutinin antibody titers after vaccination. Secondary endpoints were the proportion of participants with seroprotection (defined as antibody titers of ≥1 : 40) and geometric mean hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers. Results. Overall, 48 (27%) participants were obese (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). Seroconversion rates were comparable between obese and nonobese subjects for all three vaccine strains. Further, postvaccination geometric mean titers did not differ by body mass index category. Conclusion. Obesity was not associated with diminished antibody response to influenza vaccination in a sample of healthy HIV-infected persons.

  4. HIV transmission risk behaviors among HIV-infected persons who are successfully linked to care.

    PubMed

    Metsch, Lisa R; Pereyra, Margaret; Messinger, Shari; Del Rio, Carlos; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Anderson-Mahoney, Pamela; Rudy, Ellen; Marks, Gary; Gardner, Lytt

    2008-08-15

    We examined the relationship between receipt of medical care for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and HIV transmission risk behavior among persons who had received a recent diagnosis of HIV infection. We enrolled 316 participants from 4 US cities and prospectively followed up participants for 1 year. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine whether having at least 3 medical care visits in a 6-month period was associated with unprotected vaginal or anal intercourse with an HIV-negative partner or partner with unknown HIV status. A total of 27.5% of the participants (84 of 305) self-reported having unprotected sex with an HIV-negative or unknown status partner at enrollment, decreasing to 12% (31 of 258) and 14.2% (36 of 254) at 6-month and 12-month follow-ups, respectively. At follow-up, people who had received medical care for HIV infection at least 3 times had reduced odds of engaging in risk behavior, compared with those with fewer visits. Other factors associated with reduced risk behavior were being >30 years of age, male sex, not having depressive symptoms, and not using crack cocaine. Being in HIV care is associated with a reduced prevalence of sexual risk behavior among persons living with HIV infection. Persons linked to care can benefit from prevention services available in primary care settings.

  5. A randomized clinical trial of alternative stress management interventions in persons with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    McCain, Nancy L; Gray, D Patricia; Elswick, R K; Robins, Jolynne W; Tuck, Inez; Walter, Jeanne M; Rausch, Sarah M; Ketchum, Jessica McKinney

    2008-06-01

    Research in psychoneuroimmunology suggests that immunosuppression associated with perceived stress may contribute to disease progression in persons with HIV infection. While stress management interventions may enhance immune function, few alternative approaches have yet been tested. This randomized clinical trial was conducted to test effects of three 10-week stress management approaches--cognitive-behavioral relaxation training (RLXN), focused tai chi training (TCHI), and spiritual growth groups (SPRT)--in comparison to a wait-listed control group (CTRL) among 252 individuals with HIV infection. Using repeated measures mixed modeling, the authors found that in comparison to the CTRL group, (a) both the RLXN and TCHI groups used less emotion-focused coping, and (b) all treatment groups had augmented lymphocyte proliferative function. Despite modest effects of the interventions on psychosocial functioning, robust findings of improved immune function have important clinical implications, particularly for persons with immune-mediated illnesses. (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved

  6. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Alternative Stress Management Interventions in Persons With HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    McCain, Nancy L.; Gray, D. Patricia; Elswick, R. K.; Robins, Jolynne W.; Tuck, Inez; Walter, Jeanne M.; Rausch, Sarah M.; Ketchum, Jessica McKinney

    2015-01-01

    Research in psychoneuroimmunology suggests that immunosuppression associated with perceived stress may contribute to disease progression in persons with HIV infection. While stress management interventions may enhance immune function, few alternative approaches have yet been tested. This randomized clinical trial was conducted to test effects of three 10-week stress management approaches—cognitive–behavioral relaxation training (RLXN), focused tai chi training (TCHI), and spiritual growth groups (SPRT)—in comparison to a wait-listed control group (CTRL) among 252 individuals with HIV infection. Using repeated measures mixed modeling, the authors found that in comparison to the CTRL group, (a) both the RLXN and TCHI groups used less emotion-focused coping, and (b) all treatment groups had augmented lymphocyte proliferative function. Despite modest effects of the interventions on psychosocial functioning, robust findings of improved immune function have important clinical implications, particularly for persons with immune-mediated illnesses. PMID:18540736

  7. Premature age-related comorbidities among HIV-infected persons compared with the general population.

    PubMed

    Guaraldi, Giovanni; Orlando, Gabriella; Zona, Stefano; Menozzi, Marianna; Carli, Federica; Garlassi, Elisa; Berti, Alessandra; Rossi, Elisa; Roverato, Alberto; Palella, Frank

    2011-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients may have a greater risk of noninfectious comorbidities (NICMs) compared with the general population. We assessed the prevalence and risk factors for NICMs in a large cohort of HIV-infected adults and compared these findings with data from matched control subjects. We performed a case-control study involving antiretroviral therapy (ART)-experienced HIV-infected patients treated at Modena University, Italy, from 2002 through 2009. These patients were compared with age-, sex-, and race-matched adults (control subjects) from the general population included in the CINECA ARNO database. NICMs included cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, bone fractures, and renal failure. Polypathology (Pp) was defined as the concurrent presence of ≥2 NICMs. Logistic regression models were constructed to evaluate associated predictors of NICMs and Pp. There were 2854 patients and 8562 control subjects. The mean age was 46 years, and 37% were women. Individual NICM and Pp prevalences in each age stratum were higher among patients than among controls (all P <.001). Pp prevalence among patients aged 41-50 years was similar to that among controls aged 51-60 years (P value was not statistically significant); diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, bone fractures, and renal failure were statistically independent after adjustment for sex, age, and hypertension. Logistic regression models showed that independent predictors of Pp in the overall cohort were (all P < .001) age (odds ratio [OR], 1.11), male sex (OR, 1.77), nadir CD4 cell count <200 cells/μL (OR, 4.46), and ART exposure (OR, 1.01). Specific age-related NICMs and Pp were more common among HIV-infected patients than in the general population. The prevalence of Pp in HIV-infected persons anticipated Pp prevalence observed in the general population among persons who were 10 years older, and HIV-specific cofactors (lower nadir CD4 cell count and more prolonged

  8. Unique Cryptosporidium Population in HIV-Infected Persons, Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Gatei, Wangeci; Barrett, Donnett; Lindo, John F.; Eldemire-Shearer, Denise; Cama, Vitaliano

    2008-01-01

    A cryptosporidiosis survey showed the presence of Cryptosporidium hominis, C. parvum, C. canis, and C. felis in 25, 7, 1, and 1 HIV-positive persons from Jamaica, respectively; 1 person had both C. hominis and C. felis. Multilocus sequence typing indicated the presence of a homogeneous but geographically distinct C. hominis population in Jamaica. PMID:18439378

  9. HIV infection Heightens Concurrent Risk of Functional Dependence in Persons With Chronic Methamphetamine Use

    PubMed Central

    Blackstone, K.; Iudicello, J. E.; Morgan, E. E.; Weber, E.; Moore, D. J.; Franklin, D. R.; Ellis, R. J.; Grant, I.; Woods, S. P.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The causes of disability among chronic methamphetamine (MA) users are multifactorial. The current study examined the additive adverse impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, a common comorbidity in MA users, on functional dependence. Methods A large cohort of participants (N=798) stratified by lifetime MA dependence diagnoses (i.e., MA+ or MA−) and HIV serostatus (i.e., HIV+ or HIV−) underwent comprehensive baseline neuromedical, neuropsychiatric, and functional research evaluations, including assessment of neurocognitive symptoms in daily life, instrumental and basic activities of daily living, and employment status. Results Independent, additive effects of MA and HIV were observed across all measures of functional dependence, independent of other demographic, psychiatric, and substance use factors. The prevalence of global functional dependence increased in the expected stepwise fashion across the cohort, with the lowest rates in the MA−/HIV− group (29%) and the highest rates in the MA+/HIV+ sample (69%). The impact of HIV on MA-associated functional dependence was moderated by nadir CD4 count, such that MA use was associated with greater disability among those HIV-infected persons with higher, but not lower nadir CD4. Within the MA+/HIV+ cohort, functional dependence was reliably associated with neurocognitive impairment, lower cognitive reserve, polysubstance use, and major depressive disorder. Conclusions HIV infection confers an increased concurrent risk of MA-associated disability, particularly among HIV-infected persons without histories of immune compromise. Directed referrals, earlier HIV treatment, and compensatory strategies aimed at counteracting the effects of low cognitive reserve, neurocognitive impairment, and psychiatric comorbidities on functional dependence in MA+/HIV+ individuals may be warranted. PMID:23648641

  10. Changes in at-risk behavior for HIV infection among HIV-positive persons in Italy.

    PubMed

    Camoni, Laura; Regine, Vincenza; Colucci, Anna; Conte, Ivano Dal; Chiriotto, Monica; Vullo, Vincenzo; Sebastiani, Marina; Cordier, Laura; Beretta, Rosangela; Fiore, Josè Ramon; Tateo, Mariagrazia; Affronti, Mario; Cassarà, Giuseppina; Suligoi, Barbara

    2009-10-01

    Many HIV-positive persons reportedly continue to engage in at-risk behavior. We compared the sexual and drug-using practices of HIV-positive persons before and after the diagnosis of HIV infection to determine whether their behavior had changed. To this end, in 2006, we conducted a cross-sectional study involving clinical centers in five Italian cities. Each center was asked to enroll 100 persons aged 18 years or older who had a diagnosis of HIV infection that dated back at least 2 years. Data were collected with a specifically designed questionnaire, administered during a structured interview. The McNemar chi2 test was used to compare the data before and after the diagnosis. A total of 497 persons participated (65.5% males; median age of 40 years; age range, 34-45 years). The most common exposure categories were: heterosexual contact (43.4%), homosexual contact (27.2%), and injecting drug use (20.6%). Although the percentage of drug users significantly decreased after diagnosis, 32.4% of injectors continued to use drugs, and approximately half of them exchanged syringes. Regarding sexual behavior, after diagnosis there was a significant decrease in the number of sexual partners and in stable relationships and an increase in condom use, both for persons with stable partners and those with occasional partners, although the percentage varied according to the specific sexual practice. These results indicate that though at-risk behavior seems to decrease after the diagnosis of HIV infection, seropositive persons continue to engage in at-risk practices, indicating the need for interventions specifically geared toward HIV-positive persons.

  11. Depression and Social Functioning among HIV-infected and Uninfected Persons in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Peltzer, Karl; Szrek, Helena; Ramlagan, Shandir; Leite, Rui; Chao, Li-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Depression and other health problems are common co-morbidities among persons living with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). The aim of this study was to investigate depression, health status, and substance use in relation to HIV-infected and uninfected individuals in South Africa. Using a cross-sectional case-control design, we compared depression, physical health, mental health, problem alcohol use, and tobacco use in a sample of HIV infected (N=143) and HIV uninfected (N=199) respondents who had known their HIV status for two months. We found that depression was higher and physical health and mental health were lower in HIV positive than HIV negative individuals. Poor physical health also moderated the effect of HIV infection on depression; HIV positive individuals were significantly more depressed than HIV negative controls, but only when general physical health was also poor. We did not find an association between alcohol or tobacco use and HIV status. These results suggest the importance of incorporating the management of psychological health in the treatment of HIV. PMID:25105215

  12. The health-related quality of life in a Swedish sample of HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, L E; Nordström, G; Berglund, T; Sandström, E

    2000-11-01

    The purposes of the present study are (1) to assess the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and the subjective health status in a sample of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons (2) to relate the results to different population groups and (3) to investigate the relationship of medical and demographic variables with HRQOL. A total of 72 HIV-infected men were included. They answered the Swedish health-related quality of life questionnaire and the health index. Demographic and medical data were obtained from the medical records. The data collection took place before entering a therapeutic HIV vaccine trial. The results showed a more negative impact on the HRQOL and subjective health status in the HIV-positive subjects, compared with male population groups. The dimensions of emotional well-being were most affected. When comparisons were made according to the medical and demographic variables for different subgroups within the HIV sample, differences in the physical-dimension scales were most prominent. Symptomatic HIV infection or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), anti-retroviral treatment, sick leave or disability pension, low income and basic education were associated with worse HRQOL and health status. In conclusion, it is of utmost importance to take into account, aspects of the patients' emotional well-being in nursing, as well as in medical care and interventions. Moreover, individualized caring programs are needed because the disruptions in HRQOL fluctuated within the HIV sample.

  13. Implications of apathy for everyday functioning outcomes in persons living with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Rujvi; Woods, Steven Paul; Marcotte, Thomas D; Ellis, Ronald J; Grant, Igor

    2012-08-01

    Apathy is a relatively common clinical feature of HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders, but little is known about its implications for everyday functioning outcomes. In the present study, we examined the associations between apathy and self-reported instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and neurocognitive complaints in 75 participants with HIV infection and 52 demographically comparable seronegative comparison subjects. All volunteers completed the apathy subscale of the Frontal Systems Behavioral Scale as part of a comprehensive neuromedical, psychiatric, and neurocognitive research evaluation. When compared with the seronegative comparison participants, the HIV+ group reported significantly higher current levels of apathy, but did not differ in self-report of prior (i.e., pre-seroconversion) apathy. Higher current apathy self-ratings were associated with greater severity of IADL declines and more numerous cognitive complaints in the HIV+ sample, even after adjusting for potential psychiatric (e.g., depression), medical (e.g., hepatitis C co-infection), and neurocognitive predictors. Cognitive complaints, but not IADLs, were also uniquely associated with ratings of executive dysfunction and disinhibition. All told, these findings suggest that apathy may make a unique contribution to important everyday functioning outcomes among persons living with HIV infection. The clinical detection of apathy may help identify HIV-infected individuals at particular risk for functional impairments who may require additional support to maintain independence.

  14. An integrative review of guidelines for anal cancer screening in HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jessica S; Holstad, Marcia M; Thomas, Tami; Bruner, Deborah Watkins

    2014-07-01

    HIV-infected individuals are 28 times more likely than the general population to be diagnosed with anal cancer. An integrative review of recommendations and guidelines for anal cancer screening was performed to provide a succinct guide to inform healthcare clinicians. The review excluded studies that were of non-HIV populations, redundant articles or publications, non-English manuscripts, or nonclinical trials. The review found no formal national or international guidelines exist for routine screening of anal cancer for HIV-infected individuals. To date, no randomized control trial provides strong evidence supporting efficaciousness and effectiveness of an anal cancer screening program. The screening recommendations from seven international-, national-, and state-based reports were reviewed and synthesized in this review. These guidelines suggest anal cancer screening, albeit unproven, may be beneficial at decreasing the incidence of anal cancer. This review highlights the paucity of screening-related research and is an area of need to provide clear direction and to define standard of care for anal cancer screening in HIV-infected persons.

  15. Semantic cueing improves category verbal fluency in persons living with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Iudicello, Jennifer E; Kellogg, Emily J; Weber, Erica; Smith, Christine; Grant, Igor; Drane, Daniel L; Woods, Steven Paul

    2012-01-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remain highly prevalent in the era of combination antiretroviral therapies, but there are no validated psychological interventions aimed at improving cognitive outcomes. This study sought to determine the potential benefit of semantic cueing on category fluency deficits, which are prevalent in HIV and affect daily functioning. A group of 86 HIV-infected individuals and 87 demographically-matched seronegative participants were administered a standard (i.e., uncued) and a cued category fluency task. Results revealed significant improvements in cued versus uncued performance in HIV, particularly for persons with lower levels of education. The cueing benefit observed may inform rehabilitation efforts aimed at ameliorating HAND.

  16. Physicians' perception of personal risk of HIV infection and AIDS through occupational exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, K M; Eakin, J M; Skinner, H A; Kelner, M; Shapiro, M

    1990-01-01

    Physicians' response to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is poorly understood and often attributed to fear of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection through occupational exposure. We surveyed 268 physicians from three geographic regions in North American with different specialties and responsibilities for HIV-positive patients. An important difference was found between the published risk and the physicians' perceived risk of infection after a single occupational exposure. Almost half of the respondents stated that they feared contracting AIDS more than other diseases. The physicians who perceived themselves to be at high physical risk were more likely than the others to report that AIDS had changed the way they interact with their patients (r = 0.26, p less than 0.001). No relation was found between the perception of physical risk and the number of HIV-infected patients (r = -0.07, p = 0.15). However, the perception of social risk showed a small inverse correlation (r = -0.15, p less than 0.02), in which the physicians with more HIV-infected patients reported less concern about negative social consequences. The physicians who perceived themselves to be at high personal risk were more likely than the others to report that surgeons have the right to refuse patients who do not wish to undergo HIV antibody testing (r = -0.16, p less than 0.01 for physical risk; r = -0.29, p less than 0.001 for social risk). Multiple regression analyses indicated that physicians' perception of physical risk was not related to age or sex but was modestly related to income source. The perception of social risk was related to sex and income source. Physicians' perception of personal risk is a crucial, yet often unacknowledged, component of the fight against AIDS. Our findings suggest that lack of attention to this issue is seriously compromising initiatives designed to facilitate physician participation in AIDS care. PMID:2207904

  17. The potential risks of probiotics among HIV-infected persons: Bacteraemia due to Lactobacillus acidophilus and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Haghighat, Leila; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F

    2016-11-01

    Lactobacillus sp. are commensal organisms that are increasingly reported to cause invasive infections among immunosuppressed persons. However, few data exist regarding the occurrence and risk factors of these infections among HIV-infected persons. Further, the safety of products that contain lactobacilli (e.g. probiotics) in certain populations, including those with HIV/AIDS, is unclear. We report a case of Lactobacillus acidophilus bacteraemia in a patient with AIDS temporally related to excessive consumption of probiotic-enriched yogurt, and provide a comprehensive review of the literature of Lactobacillus sp. infections among HIV-infected persons. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Morbidity and aging in HIV-infected persons: the Swiss HIV cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hasse, Barbara; Ledergerber, Bruno; Furrer, Hansjakob; Battegay, Manuel; Hirschel, Bernhard; Cavassini, Matthias; Bertisch, Barbara; Bernasconi, Enos; Weber, Rainer

    2011-12-01

    Patterns of morbidity and mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals taking antiretroviral therapy are changing as a result of immune reconstitution and improved survival. We studied the influence of aging on the epidemiology of non-AIDS diseases in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study. The Swiss HIV Cohort Study is a prospective observational cohort established in 1988 with continuous enrollment. We determined the incidence of clinical events (per 1000 person-years) from January 2008 (when a new questionnaire on non-AIDS-related morbidity was introduced) through December 2010. Differences across age groups were analyzed using Cox regression, adjusted for CD4 cell count, viral load, sex, injection drug use, smoking, and years of HIV infection. Overall, 8444 (96%) of 8848 participants contributed data from 40,720 semiannual visits; 2233 individuals (26.4%) were aged 50-64 years, and 450 (5.3%) were aged ≥65 years. The median duration of HIV infection was 15.4 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 9.59-22.0 years); 23.2% had prior clinical AIDS. We observed 994 incident non-AIDS events in the reference period: 201 cases of bacterial pneumonia, 55 myocardial infarctions, 39 strokes, 70 cases of diabetes mellitus, 123 trauma-associated fractures, 37 fractures without adequate trauma, and 115 non-AIDS malignancies. Multivariable hazard ratios for stroke (17.7; CI, 7.06-44.5), myocardial infarction (5.89; 95% CI, 2.17-16.0), diabetes mellitus (3.75; 95% CI, 1.80-7.85), bone fractures without adequate trauma (10.5; 95% CI, 3.58-30.5), osteoporosis (9.13; 95% CI, 4.10-20.3), and non-AIDS-defining malignancies (6.88; 95% CI, 3.89-12.2) were elevated for persons aged ≥65 years. Comorbidity and multimorbidity because of non-AIDS diseases, particularly diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, non-AIDS-defining malignancies, and osteoporosis, become more important in care of HIV-infected persons and increase with older age.

  19. Recommendations for Use of Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccines in HIV-Infected Persons - Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, 2016.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, Jessica R; Rubin, Lorry G; Patton, Monica; Ortega-Sanchez, Ismael R; Martin, Stacey W

    2016-11-04

    At its June 2016 meeting, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended routine use of meningococcal conjugate vaccine (serogroups A, C, W, and Y; including MenACWY-D [Menactra, Sanofi Pasteur] or MenACWY-CRM [Menveo, GlaxoSmithKline]) for persons aged ≥2 months with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. ACIP has previously recommended routine vaccination of persons aged ≥2 months who have certain medical conditions that increase risk for meningococcal disease (1), including persons who have persistent (e.g., genetic) deficiencies in the complement pathway (e.g., C3, properdin, Factor D, Factor H, or C5-C9); persons receiving eculizumab (Soliris, Alexion Pharmaceuticals) for treatment of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome or paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (because the drug binds C5 and inhibits the terminal complement pathway); and persons with functional or anatomic asplenia (including persons with sickle cell disease). Routine vaccination with meningococcal conjugate vaccine is also recommended for all healthy adolescents in the United States (1). This report summarizes the evidence considered by ACIP in recommending vaccination for HIV-infected persons, and provides recommendations and guidance for use of meningococcal conjugate vaccines (serogroups A, C, W, and Y) among HIV-infected persons aged ≥2 months; the majority of meningococcal disease among HIV-infected persons is caused by these four serogroups.

  20. Pain and Mortality Risk in a Cohort of HIV-Infected Persons with Alcohol Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Debbie M.; Quinn, Emily; Bridden, Carly; Merlin, Jessica S.; Saitz, Richard; Samet, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Pain has been associated with increased risk for mortality in some studies. We analyzed data from a cohort study [HIV-longitudinal interrelationships of viruses and ethanol (HIV-LIVE)] of HIV-infected persons with alcohol use disorders enrolled 2001–2003 to explore whether reporting moderate or greater pain interference was associated with mortality. The main independent variable was pain that at least moderately interfered with work based on a single question from the SF-12. Primary analyses dichotomized at “moderately” or above. Cox proportional hazards models assessed the association between pain interference and death adjusting for demographics, substance use, CD4 count, HIV viral load and co-morbidities. Although significant in unadjusted models (HR = 1.58 (95 % CI 1.03–2.41; p value = 0.04)), after adjusting for confounders, ≥moderate pain interference was not associated with an increased risk of death [aHR = 1.30 (95 % CI 0.81–2.11, p value = 0.28)]. Among HIV-infected persons with alcohol use disorders, we did not detect a statistically significant independent association between pain interference and risk of death after adjustment for potential confounders. PMID:26438486

  1. Nutritional status of persons with HIV infection, persons with HIV infection and tuberculosis, and HIV-negative individuals from southern India.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Soumya; Padmapriyadarsini, C; Sukumar, B; Iliayas, Sheikh; Kumar, S Ramesh; Triveni, C; Gomathy, P; Thomas, Beena; Mathew, Minnie; Narayanan, P R

    2008-03-15

    We compared the nutritional status of individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection alone, individuals with HIV infection and tuberculosis (after completion of antituberculosis treatment), and HIV-negative individuals and found that malnutrition, anemia, and hypoalbuminemia were most pronounced among HIV-positive patients with tuberculosis. Weight loss was associated with loss of fat in female patients and with loss of body cell mass in male patients.

  2. Thoughts of suicide among HIV-infected rural persons enrolled in a telephone-delivered mental health intervention.

    PubMed

    Heckman, Timothy G; Miller, Jeffrey; Kochman, Arlene; Kalichman, Seth C; Carlson, Bruce; Silverthorn, Monica

    2002-01-01

    This study characterized rates and predictors of suicidal thoughts among HIV-infected persons living in rural communities of eight U.S. states. Self-administered surveys were completed by 201 HIV-infected persons living in communities of 50,000 or fewer that were located at least 20 miles from a city of 100,000 or more. All participants were clients of rural AIDS service organizations and had recently enrolled into a randomized clinical trial of a telephone-delivered, coping improvement-group intervention designed specifically for HIV-infected rural persons. At baseline, participants reported on thoughts of suicide, psychological symptomatology, life-stressor burden, ways of coping, coping self-efficacy, social support, and barriers to health care and social services. Thirty-eight percent of HIV-infected rural persons had engaged in thoughts of suicide during the past week. A logistic regression analysis revealed that participants who endorsed thoughts of suicide also reported more depressive symptoms (odds ratio [OR] = 2.19; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.32-3.63, p < .002), less coping self-efficacy (OR = 0.70; 95% CI = 0.56-0.88, p < .002), more frequently worried about transmitting their HIV infection to others (OR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.14-2.40, p < .008), and experienced more stress associated with AIDS-related stigma (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.07-2.35, p < .03). As AIDS prevalence rates increase in rural areas, interventions that successfully identify and treat geographically isolated HIV-infected persons who experience more frequent or serious thoughts of suicide are urgently needed.

  3. Utilization of psychotropic drugs prescribed to persons with and without HIV infection: a Danish nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, L D; Obel, D; Kronborg, G; Larsen, C S; Pedersen, C; Gerstoft, J; Obel, N

    2014-09-01

    The objective was to estimate the utilization of psychotropic drugs in HIV-infected individuals compared with that in the background population. Using data obtained from the Danish HIV Cohort Study and the Danish National Prescription Registry, we analysed aggregated data on redeemed prescription of psychotropic drugs during 1995-2009. We primarily focused our analyses on HIV-infected individuals with no history of injecting drug use (IDU) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Drug utilization was expressed as defined daily doses per 1000 person-days (DDD/1000PD). The utilization rate ratio (URR) was calculated as utilization in the HIV-infected cohort compared with that in the comparison cohort. We estimated longitudinal trends in utilization and potential associations with HIV and exposure to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), especially efavirenz. During 1995-2009, 54.5% of the HIV-infected cohort (3615 non-IDU/non-HCV-infected HIV-infected individuals) and 29.2% of the comparison cohort (32 535 individuals) had at least one prescription of a psychotropic drug. HIV infection was associated with a URR of 1.13 for antipsychotics, 1.76 for anxiolytics, 4.42 for hypnotics and sedatives, and 2.28 for antidepressants. Antidepressants were confined primarily to men who have sex with men (MSM). Older age, more recent calendar time, and increased time after HIV diagnosis were associated with increased drug utilization. However, no association with exposure to HAART or efavirenz was found. HIV-infected individuals had a higher utilization of psychotropic drugs than the background population, which was not confined to individuals with a history of IDU or HCV infection. This emphasizes the need to focus on diagnosis of, and appropriate psychopharmacological interventions for, mental disorders in this population. © 2014 British HIV Association.

  4. HIV-infected persons with type 2 diabetes show evidence of endothelial dysfunction and increased inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hove-Skovsgaard, Malene; Gaardbo, Julie Christine; Kolte, Lilian; Winding, Kamilla; Seljeflot, Ingebjørg; Svardal, Asbjørn; Berge, Rolf Kristian; Gerstoft, Jan; Ullum, Henrik; Trøseid, Marius; Nielsen, Susanne Dam

    2017-03-29

    Increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in both HIV infection and type 2 diabetes (T2D) compared to the general population has been described. Little is known about the combined effect of HIV infection and T2D on inflammation and endothelial function, both of which may contribute to elevated risk of CVD. Cross-sectional study including 50 HIV-infected persons on combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART), with HIV RNA <200 copies/mL (n = 25 with T2D (HIV + T2D+), n = 25 without T2D (HIV + T2D-)) and 50 uninfected persons (n = 22 with T2D (HIV-T2D+) and n = 28 without T2D (HIV-T2D-)). Groups were matched on age and sex. High sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) was used to determine inflammation (cut-off 3 mg/L). The marker of endothelial dysfunction asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) was measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), a microbiota-dependent, pro-atherogenic marker was measured using stable isotope dilution LC/MS/MS. The percentage of HIV + T2D+, HIV + T2D-, HIV-T2D+, and HIV-T2D- with hsCRP above cut-off was 50%, 19%, 47%, and 11%, respectively. HIV + T2D+ had elevated ADMA (0.67 μM (0.63-0.72) compared to HIV + T2D- (0.60 μM (0.57-0.64) p = 0.017), HIV-T2D+ (0.57 μM (0.51-63) p = 0.008), and HIV-T2D- (0.55 μM (0.52-0.58) p < 0.001). No differences in TMAO between groups were found. However, a positive correlation between ADMA and TMAO was found in the total population (rs = 0.32, p = 0.001), which was mainly driven by a close correlation in HIV + T2D+ (rs = 0.63, p = 0.001). Elevated inflammation and evidence of endothelial dysfunction was found in HIV-infected persons with T2D. The effect on inflammation was mainly driven by T2D, while both HIV infection and T2D may contribute to endothelial dysfunction. Whether gut microbiota is a contributing factor to this remains to be determined.

  5. Skin and soft tissue infections among HIV-infected persons in the late combination antiretroviral therapy era.

    PubMed

    Crum-Cianflone, N F; Grandits, G; Weintrob, A; Ganesan, A; Agan, B; Landrum, M

    2012-07-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) occur at higher rates among HIV-infected persons, but current trends and risk factors are largely undefined. We evaluated SSTIs among a prospective cohort of HIV-infected persons during the late combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) era (2006-2010). Of the 1918 HIV-infected persons evaluated, 379 (20%) developed an SSTI during a median of 3.7 years of follow-up; of these, 118 (31%) developed at least one recurrent SSTI. The incidence rate of SSTIs was 101 (95% confidence interval [CI] 93-109) cases per 1000 person-years, and rates did not significantly change during the study period. Compared with not receiving cART and having an HIV RNA level >1000 copies/mL, patients receiving cART with an HIV RNA level <1000 copies/mL had a reduced risk of an SSTI (hazard ratio 0.64, 95% CI 0.48-0.86, P < 0.01). In summary, initial and recurrent SSTIs are common among HIV-infected persons, and HIV control is associated with a lower risk of SSTIs.

  6. HIV-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity in immunologically normal HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Bernard, N F; Pederson, K; Chung, F; Ouellet, L; Wainberg, M A; Tsoukas, C M

    1998-11-12

    CD8+ T-cell counts usually increase soon after infection with HIV, whereas CD4+ cell counts decrease. The result of these changes in T-cell subpopulation subsets in most HIV-infected subjects is inversion of the CD4 : CD8 ratio from greater than 1.0 typical of uninfected persons to less than 1.0 after infection. Six HIV-infected individuals were identified in whom the CD4 : CD8 ratio remained normal throughout follow-up (4.0-11.25 years). They all maintained levels of CD4+ cells above 500 x 10(6)/l and had never received antiretroviral therapy. Because HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) have been implicated in control of HIV during the asymptomatic phase of disease, we screened these individuals for the presence of HIV-specific CTL activity. CTL activity was assessed in freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and in phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated interleukin-2 expanded cell lines established from PBMC. Cytotoxicity to HIV-1 env, gag, pol and nef gene products was surveyed in a 4 h 51Cr-release assay using autologous Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transformed B cells infected with vaccinia constructs expressing each of these HIV genes. The immunodominant CTL epitope and MHC class I antigen restriction specificity of HIV-specific CTL was mapped when present. Plasma viral load was assessed by branched DNA assay. Attempts were made to isolate virus from these individuals by the PBMC coculture assay. None of the six immunologically normal HIV-infected (INHI) subjects exhibited direct HIV-specific CTL activity in their freshly isolated PBMC compared with 16 (47%) out of 34 HIV disease progressors (P = 0.03, chi2 test) and one out of 10 seronegative subjects. Three of the six INHI subjects had detectable memory HIV-specific precursor CTL (pCTL) activity in in vitro-activated T-cell lines compared with 25 (73.5%) out of 34 HIV-1 disease progressors and in none out of 10 seronegative individuals. All three INHI subjects had Gag-specific pCTL, and none

  7. Mortality trends of HIV-infected patients after the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy: analysis of a cohort of 3,322 HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Mayor, Angel M; Gómez, María A; Ríos-Oliveras, Eddy; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F

    2005-01-01

    The implementation of highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART) has reduced the mortality attributed to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Variation in the specific causes of death has also changed since the implementation of these therapies. A prospective study was performed in 3322 HIV-infected persons enrolled in Puerto Rico between 1992 and 2003. We measured the mortality rates and the causes of death as listed in the death certificate and analyzed the variation as a function of the antiretroviral therapy (ART) use. Statistical analyses were performed to evaluate differences. The study found that persons treated with HAART had significantly lower mortality risk than ART-naïve persons, regardless of gender and the use of injecting drugs. AIDS-defining conditions as a cause of demise were less frequently reported in patients with HAART. Gastrointestinal dysfunction, sepsis, metabolic abnormalities, and non-Kaposi neoplasms were more frequently reported as causes of death in patients treated with HAART. Hepatic failure as cause of death was also more frequent in these patients. The variation in the mortality trends was similar in both genders and according to the presence or absence of intravenous drug use. Highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART) is associated with significant reduction in mortality and an increment in gastrointestinal dysfunction, sepsis, non-Kaposi neoplasms, and metabolic disorders as listed causes of death. Adverse and toxic profile of ART, along with the potential synergy of concomitant conditions, may accelerate these trends. Continued mortality surveillance of HIV/AIDS is imperative to follow the epidemic changes.

  8. Functional impairment is associated with low bone and muscle mass among persons aging with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Erlandson, Kristine M; Allshouse, Amanda A; Jankowski, Catherine M; MaWhinney, Samantha; Kohrt, Wendy M; Campbell, Thomas B

    2013-06-01

    Disability and frailty are associated with osteoporosis, obesity, and sarcopenia. HIV-infected persons have early functional impairment, but the association between body composition and functional impairment is unknown. HIV-1-infected participants on combination antiretroviral therapy with virologic suppression, aged 45-65 years, had standardized physical function measures. In a nested analysis, 30 low- and 48 high-functioning cases and controls were matched by age, gender, and time since HIV diagnosis. Bone mineral density, fat mass, and lean body mass were assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals were obtained from conditional logistic regression. Mean age was 53 years, mean CD4(+) lymphocytes 598 cells per microliter, and 96% had plasma HIV-1 RNA <50 copies per milliliter. Low- and high-function subjects had similar CD4(+) lymphocyte count and duration and type of antiretroviral therapy. Lower T scores at the hip [OR: 3.8 (1.1 to 12.5)] and lumbar spine [OR: 2.3 (1.1 to 4.5)] and lower lean body mass [OR: 1.1 (1.0 to 1.2)] were associated with significantly greater odds of low function (P ≤ 0.03). Lower insulin-like growth hormone [IGF-1; OR: 5.0 (1.4 to 20.0)] and IGF-1 binding protein-3 [OR: 3.3 (1.7 to 9.9)] increased the odds of low functional status (P ≤ 0.02). Fat mass and lower 25-OH vitamin D did not increase the odds of low functional status (P > 0.05). Functional impairment in HIV-1-infected persons on successful antiretroviral therapy is associated with low muscle mass, low bone mineral density, and low IGF-1 and IGF-1 binding protein-3. These characteristics may be a manifestation of early "somatopause" in middle-aged HIV-infected adults.

  9. Cancer in HIV-infected Persons from the Caribbean, Central and South America

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Valeria I.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Cesar, Carina; Krolewiecki, Alejandro; Wehbe, Firas; Cortés, Claudia P.; Crabtree-Ramírez, Brenda; Padgett, Denis; Shafaee, Maryam; Schechter, Mauro; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Bacon, Melanie; McGowan, Catherine; Cahn, Pedro; Masys, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV infected individuals have heightened cancer risk. With the advent of HAART, the frequency of some AIDS defining cancers (ADC) has decreased while certain non-AIDS defining cancers (NADC) are becoming more frequent. Cancers among HIV-infected individuals in Latin American and the Caribbean have not yet been carefully studied. Methods Cancer cases among the Caribbean, Central and South American network for HIV Research (CCASAnet) cohort were identified reviewing clinical records and preexisting databases. Results There were 406 cancers reported: 331 ADC (224 Kaposi´s sarcomas and 98 non Hodgkin lymphomas). Most frequent NADC (n=75) were Hodgkin lymphoma and skin cancers. Seventy-three percent of NADC and 45% of ADC were diagnosed >1 year after HIV diagnosis. 56% of ADC occurred before HAART start. Median time from HAART start until cancer diagnosis was 2.5 years for NADC and 0.5 years for ADC (p=<0.001). Within 3372 HAART starters, 158 were diagnosed with 165 cancers (82.4% ADC); 85 cases were previous to or concomitant with HAART initiation. Incidence of cancer after HAART initiation in 8080 person-years of follow-up was 7.2 per 1000 person-years (95%CI= 5.5–9.3) for ADC and 2.7 (95%CI= 1.8–4.1) for NADC; incidence was higher in the first two months, particularly for ADC (47.6). A pre-HAART ADC was a predictor of mortality after adjusting for age, sex, and CD4 at HAART initiation. Conclusions ADC were the most frequent cancers in this region and were often diagnosed close to HIV diagnosis and HAART start. Incidence of cancer was highest around HAART initiation. PMID:21239992

  10. Antiretroviral Therapy and Viral Suppression Among Foreign-Born HIV-Infected Persons Receiving Medical Care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Tanya R.; Lin, Xia; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Immigrants to the United States are more likely to be diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection compared with native-born persons. Navigating access to healthcare in the United States can be challenging for foreign-born persons, and HIV treatment outcomes may be suboptimal for these persons. We compared characteristics of and assessed disparities in clinical outcomes of foreign-born persons in care for HIV in the United States. The Medical Monitoring Project is a complex sample, cross-sectional survey designed to be nationally representative of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Using data from 2009, 2010, and 2011, we conducted descriptive analyses and multivariable logistic regression to assess associations between foreign-born status and antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription, and between foreign-born status and viral suppression. In all, 13.4% of HIV-infected persons were self-identified as foreign-born; the most common regions of birth were Central America and Mexico (45.4%) and the Caribbean (16.0%). Nearly 90% of foreign-born persons were diagnosed with HIV after entry into the United States. Compared with US-born persons, foreign-born persons were more likely to be younger, Hispanic, less educated, and uninsured. The prevalence of ART prescription (prevalence ratio 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.98–1.02) was not significantly different between foreign-born and US-born persons. A higher percentage of foreign-born persons achieved viral suppression compared with US-born persons (prevalence ratio 1.05; 95% confidence interval 1.00–1.09). No major disparities in ART prescription and viral suppression were found between foreign-born and US-born HIV-infected persons receiving medical care, despite higher percentages being uninsured. PMID:26986128

  11. Elevated alanine aminotransferase levels in HIV-infected persons without hepatitis B or C virus coinfection.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Saad; Alrbiaan, Abdullah; Alaraj, Ali; Alhuraiji, Ahmad; Alghamdi, Mohammad; Alrajhi, Abdulrahman

    2016-01-01

    Mortality related to human immunodeficiency (HIV) has improved with the use of antiretroviral therapy; however, liver disease-related mortality remains a major concern for the HIV population. Elevation of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) has been noted in HIV-infected persons even without viral hepatitis infection. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence and prevalence of chronic alanine ALT elevation among patients infected with HIV who are negative for hepatitis B or C infection. Retrospective chart review. We reviewed the medical records of all patients infected with HIV who had been treated from November 2002 to December 2010. Patients with an unknown or positive HBV or HCV infection status were excluded. We identified patient demographics, route of transmission, peak viral load, and nadir CD4 count. We followed 440 patients for up to 2265 person-years. A total of 123 patients developed chronically elevated ALT levels, with an incidence of 5.8 cases per 100 person-years. Chronically elevated ALT levels were associated with high HIV viral load, mean body mass index, and diabetes mellitus. We found exposure to lamivudine in 58% of the patients, efavirenz in 41%, and zidovudine in 38%. Abdominal ultrasounds revealed fatty liver in 20 of 39 (51%) of the patients. Among patients without viral hepatitis coinfection, the prevalence and incidence of chronic elevated ALT levels were high and accompanied by high HIV RNA levels and increased BMI. The limitations of this report are its retrospective nature and lack of a control group.

  12. Psychotherapeutic process of cognitive-behavioral intervention in HIV-infected persons: results from a controlled, randomized prospective clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Znoj, Hans-Jörg; Messerli-Burgy, Nadine; Tschopp, Simone; Weber, Rainer; Christen, Lisanne; Christen, Stephan; Grawe, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to examine the possible mechanisms of behavioral change in a cognitive-behavioral intervention supporting medication adherence in HIV-infected persons. A total of 60 persons currently under medical treatment were randomized to psychotherapy or usual care and were compared with a sociodemographically matched group of general psychotherapy clients. Outcome measures included therapy adherence using medication event-monitoring system psychotherapeutic processes and changes of experience and behavior. The general psychotherapy group was initially more distressed than HIV psychotherapy patients and reached higher levels of psychotherapeutic effect. In the HIV psychotherapy patients, a significant effect was found for maintaining adherence to medical treatment (Weber et al., 2004). These findings show that psychotherapy is a beneficial intervention for HIV-infected persons, and therapeutic alliance and activation of resources do not differ from a general psychotherapy treatment. Differential effects were detected for specific process variables, namely problem actuation.

  13. Differences in HIV disease progression by injecting drug use in HIV-infected persons in care.

    PubMed

    Moore, Richard D; Keruly, Jeanne C; Chaisson, Richard E

    2004-01-01

    In the United States and many Western countries, injecting drug use continues to be an important cause of HIV infection. This has important clinical and public health implications if injecting drug users (IDUs) have greater barriers to antiretroviral effectiveness than other risk groups. We assessed if there were differences between HIV-infected IDUs and non-IDU patients in the development of AIDS-defining illnesses (ADIs) from the time the patients started their first combination antiretroviral therapy (CART) regimen. We compared clinical outcomes for IDU patients (n = 827) with those for non-IDU patients (n = 1314) after they started CART. We controlled for financial access, because all patients had access to CART through insurance or a drug assistance program. The incidence (number of ADI cases per 100 person-years) was compared for IDUs and non-IDUs from 1995 through 2002. Incidence ratios were calculated for IDUs compared with non-IDUs. Risk factors for development of ADIs were assessed using negative binomial regression. From 1995-1996 to 2001-2002, there was a decline in ADI incidence among IDUs from 31.9 to 16.2 cases per 100 person-years of follow-up. Over the same time, there was a decline in ADI incidence among non-IDUs from 37.0 to 9.7 cases per 100 person-years. The incidence ratio (incidence among IDUs compared with that among non-IDUs) increased from 0.87 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.65-1.15) to 1.67 (95% CI, 1.25-2.18) from 1995-1996 to 2001-2002. By negative binomial regression, the incidence ratio for ADIs among IDUs versus non-IDUs increased to 1.45 (95% CI, 1.21-1.75), after 1998, adjusting for differences in demographic, clinical, and treatment factors. The relative incidence of ADIs among IDUs with access to treatment increased approximately 50% compared with non-IDUs since 1999. This suggests greater barriers to the effective use of CART for IDUs, resulting in a higher individual and public health burden of clinical HIV disease. It will

  14. Will "Combined Prevention" Eliminate Racial/Ethnic Disparities in HIV Infection among Persons Who Inject Drugs in New York City?

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, Don; Arasteh, Kamyar; McKnight, Courtney; Feelemyer, Jonathan; Hagan, Holly; Cooper, Hannah; Campbell, Aimee; Tross, Susan; Perlman, David

    2015-01-01

    It has not been determined whether implementation of combined prevention programming for persons who inject drugs reduce racial/ethnic disparities in HIV infection. We examine racial/ethnic disparities in New York City among persons who inject drugs after implementation of the New York City Condom Social Marketing Program in 2007. Quantitative interviews and HIV testing were conducted among persons who inject drugs entering Mount Sinai Beth Israel drug treatment (2007-2014). 703 persons who inject drugs who began injecting after implementation of large-scale syringe exchange were included in the analyses. Factors independently associated with being HIV seropositive were identified and a published model was used to estimate HIV infections due to sexual transmission. Overall HIV prevalence was 4%; Whites 1%, African-Americans 17%, and Hispanics 4%. Adjusted odds ratios were 21.0 (95% CI 5.7, 77.5) for African-Americans to Whites and 4.5 (95% CI 1.3, 16.3) for Hispanics to Whites. There was an overall significant trend towards reduced HIV prevalence over time (adjusted odd ratio = 0.7 per year, 95% confidence interval (0.6-0.8). An estimated 75% or more of the HIV infections were due to sexual transmission. Racial/ethnic disparities among persons who inject drugs were not significantly different from previous disparities. Reducing these persistent disparities may require new interventions (treatment as prevention, pre-exposure prophylaxis) for all racial/ethnic groups.

  15. Increased Rates of Respiratory and Diarrheal Illnesses in HIV-Negative Persons Living With HIV-Infected Individuals in a Densely Populated Urban Slum in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Joshua M.; Cosmas, Leonard; Nyachieo, Dhillon; Williamson, John M.; Olack, Beatrice; Okoth, George; Njuguna, Henry; Feikin, Daniel R.; Burke, Heather; Montgomery, Joel M.; Breiman, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolonged pathogen shedding and increased duration of illness associated with infections in immunosuppressed individuals put close human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–negative contacts of HIV-infected persons at increased risk of exposure to infectious pathogens. Methods We calculated incidence and longitudinal prevalence (number of days per year) of influenzalike illness (ILI), diarrhea, and nonspecific febrile illness during 2008 from a population-based surveillance program in the urban slum of Kibera (Kenya) that included 1830 HIV-negative household contacts of HIV-infected individuals and 13 677 individuals living in exclusively HIV-negative households. Results For individuals ≥5 years old, incidence was significantly increased for ILI (risk ratio [RR], 1.47; P < .05) and diarrhea (RR, 1.41; P < .05) in HIV-negative household contacts of HIV-infected individuals compared with exclusively HIV-negative households. The risk of illness among HIV-negative persons was directly proportional to the number of HIV-infected persons living in the home for ILI (RR, 1.39; P < .05) and diarrhea (RR, 1.36; P < .01). We found no increased rates of illness in children <5 years old who lived with HIV-infected individuals. Conclusions Living with HIV-infected individuals is associated with modestly increased rates of respiratory and diarrheal infections in HIV-negative individuals >5 years old. Targeted interventions are needed, including ensuring that HIV-infected persons are receiving appropriate care and treatment. PMID:25722292

  16. Utility of a partner communication scale and a personal meaning scale in newly diagnosed HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Buscher, April; Latini, David M; Hartman, Christine; Kallen, Michael; Sansgiry, Shubhada; Giordano, Thomas P

    2013-01-01

    No studies to our knowledge have examined the Lepore Social Constraint Scale or Fife Constructed Meaning Scale in recently diagnosed HIV-infected persons. Twenty-four participants in a prospective observational cohort completed the social-constraint measure, and 47 completed the constructed-meaning scale at either 3 or 9 months after diagnosis. Participants completed a 4-week visual analogue scale to assess adherence to antiretroviral therapy, and validated depression and self-efficacy scales. Spearman correlation coefficients compared measures. In cross-sectional analyses, participants with higher social-constraint scores had lower constructed meaning and adherence. Higher social constraint correlated negatively with self-efficacy and positively with depression. Higher constructed-meaning scores did not correlate with adherence but correlated positively with self-efficacy and negatively with depression. The quality of HIV-infected individuals' discussions of HIV with their partners and positive constructed meaning were associated with better mental health and could be targets for improving medication adherence. Copyright © 2013 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Neurocognitive impairment is associated with lower health literacy among persons living with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Erin E; Iudicello, Jennifer E; Cattie, Jordan E; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Grant, Igor; Woods, Steven Paul

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to determine the effects of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) on health literacy, which encompasses the ability to access, understand, appraise, and apply health-related information. Participants included 56 HIV seropositive individuals, 24 of whom met Frascati criteria for HAND, and 24 seronegative subjects who were comparable on age, education, ethnicity, and oral word reading. Each participant was administered a brief battery of well-validated measures of health literacy, including the Expanded Numeracy Scale (ENS), Newest Vital Sign (NVS), Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM), and Brief Health Literacy Screen (BHLS). Results revealed significant omnibus differences on the ENS and NVS, which were driven by poorer performance in the HAND group. There were no significant differences on the REALM or the BHLS by HAND status. Among individuals with HAND, lower scores on the NVS were associated with greater severity of neurocognitive dysfunction (e.g., working memory and verbal fluency) and self-reported dependence in activities of daily living. These preliminary findings suggest that HAND hinders both fundamental (i.e., basic knowledge, such as numeracy) and critical (i.e., comprehension and application of healthcare information) health literacy capacities, and therefore may be an important factor in the prevalence of health illiteracy. Health literacy-focused intervention may play an important role in the treatment and health trajectories among persons living with HIV infection.

  18. Neurocognitive Impairment is Associated with Lower Health Literacy Among Persons Living with HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Erin E.; Iudicello, Jennifer E.; Cattie, Jordan E.; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Grant, Igor

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to determine the effects of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) on health literacy, which encompasses the ability to access, understand, appraise, and apply health-related information. Participants included 56 HIV seropositive individuals, 24 of whom met Frascati criteria for HAND, and 24 seronegative subjects who were comparable on age, education, ethnicity, and oral word reading. Each participant was administered a brief battery of well-validated measures of health literacy, including the Expanded Numeracy Scale (ENS), Newest Vital Sign (NVS), Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM), and Brief Health Literacy Screen (BHLS). Results revealed significant omnibus differences on the ENS and NVS, which were driven by poorer performance in the HAND group. There were no significant differences on the REALM or the BHLS by HAND status. Among individuals with HAND, lower scores on the NVS were associated with greater severity of neurocognitive dysfunction (e.g., working memory and verbal fluency) and self-reported dependence in activities of daily living. These preliminary findings suggest that HAND hinders both fundamental (i.e., basic knowledge, such as numeracy) and critical (i.e., comprehension and application of healthcare information) health literacy capacities, and therefore may be an important factor in the prevalence of health illiteracy. Health literacy-focused intervention may play an important role in the treatment and health trajectories among persons living with HIV infection. PMID:25008384

  19. Cryptosporidium species and subtypes in diarrheal children and HIV-infected persons in Ebonyi and Nsukka, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ukwah, Boniface Nwofoke; Ezeonu, Ifeoma Maureen; Ezeonu, Chinonyelum Thecla; Roellig, Dawn; Xiao, Lihua

    2017-02-28

    Cryptosporidiosis is a common disease of children and immune-compromised persons. This study evaluated the diversity and distribution of Cryptosporidium species in diarrheal children and HIV-infected persons on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and those not on HAART. A total of 394 fecal specimens were collected from patients attending clinics in Nsukka and Ebonyi, Nigeria. Detection and identification of Cryptosporidium species were conducted by PCR-RFLP of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene, whereas subtyping was done by sequence analysis of the 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene. Twenty-five (6.3%) specimens yielded four Cryptosporidium species, including C. hominis, C. parvum, C. felis, and C. viatorum. C. hominis was the most dominant species with 48.0% occurrence and three identified subtype families: Ia (six specimens), Ib (three specimens), Ie (two specimens), and one un-subtyped species. C. parvum had 44.0% occurrence and two subtype families: IIc (eight specimens) and IIe (three specimens), while C. felis and C. viatorum each had 4.0% occurrence. There were significant differences in Cryptosporidium species distribution between age groups in children and HIV-infected persons, between suburban and urban areas, and between low and high CD4+ cell counts in HIV-infected patients. There were no significant differences in infection rate and species distribution between HIV-infected patients on HAART and those not on HAART. The results from this study show that there is a high diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. in humans in Ebonyi and Nsukka, Nigeria, and that all the C. parvum subtypes identified are most likely anthroponotic in origin.

  20. Neurocognitive function in HIV-infected persons with asymptomatic cryptococcal antigenemia: a comparison of three prospective cohorts.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Martha P; Nakasujja, Noeline; Morawski, Bozena M; Rajasingham, Radha; Rhein, Joshua; Nalintya, Elizabeth; Williams, Darlisha A; Huppler Hullsiek, Kathy; Kiragga, Agnes; Rolfes, Melissa A; Donahue Carlson, Renee; Bahr, Nathan C; Birkenkamp, Kate E; Manabe, Yukari C; Bohjanen, Paul R; Kaplan, Jonathan E; Kambugu, Andrew; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2017-06-12

    HIV-infected persons with detectable cryptococcal antigen (CrAg) in blood have increased morbidity and mortality compared with HIV-infected persons who are CrAg-negative. This study examined neurocognitive function among persons with asymptomatic cryptococcal antigenemia. Participants from three prospective HIV cohorts underwent neurocognitive testing at the time of antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation. Cohorts included persons with cryptococcal meningitis (N = 90), asymptomatic CrAg + (N = 87), and HIV-infected persons without central nervous system infection (N = 125). Z-scores for each neurocognitive test were calculated relative to an HIV-negative Ugandan population with a composite quantitative neurocognitive performance Z-score (QNPZ-8) created from eight tested domains. Neurocognitive function was measured pre-ART for all three cohorts and additionally after 4 weeks of ART (and 6 weeks of pre-emptive fluconazole) treatment among asymptomatic CrAg + participants. Cryptococcal meningitis and asymptomatic CrAg + participants had lower median CD4 counts (17 and 26 cells/μL, respectively) than the HIV-infected control cohort (233 cells/μL) as well as lower Karnofsky performance status (60 and 70 vs. 90, respectively). The composite QNPZ-8 for asymptomatic CrAg + (-1.80 Z-score) fell between the cryptococcal meningitis cohort (-2.22 Z-score, P = 0.02) and HIV-infected controls (-1.36, P = 0.003). After four weeks of ART and six weeks of fluconazole, the asymptomatic CrAg + cohort neurocognitive performance improved (-1.0 Z-score, P < 0.001). Significant deficits in neurocognitive function were identified in asymptomatic CrAg + persons with advanced HIV/AIDS even without signs or sequelae of meningitis. Neurocognitive function in this group improves over time after initiation of pre-emptive fluconazole treatment and ART, but short term adherence support may be necessary.

  1. Etiology and pharmacologic management of noninfectious diarrhea in HIV-infected individuals in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era.

    PubMed

    MacArthur, Rodger D; DuPont, Herbert L

    2012-09-01

    Diarrhea remains a common problem for patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection despite highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART) and can negatively affect patient quality of life and lead to discontinuation or switching of HAART regimens. In the era of HAART, diarrhea from opportunistic infections is uncommon, and HIV-associated diarrhea often has noninfectious causes, including HAART-related adverse events and HIV enteropathy. Diarrhea associated with HAART is typically caused by protease inhibitors (eg, ritonavir), which may damage the intestinal epithelial barrier (leaky-flux diarrhea) and/or alter chloride ion secretion (secretory diarrhea). HIV enteropathy may result from direct effects of HIV on gastrointestinal tract cells and on the gastrointestinal immune system and gut-associated lymphoid tissue, which may be active sites of HIV infection and ongoing inflammation and mucosal damage. New therapies targeting the pathogenic mechanisms of noninfectious diarrheas are needed.

  2. Disparities in achieving and sustaining viral suppression among a large cohort of HIV-infected persons in care - Washington, DC.

    PubMed

    Castel, Amanda D; Kalmin, Mariah M; Hart, Rachel L D; Young, Heather A; Hays, Harlen; Benator, Debra; Kumar, Princy; Elion, Richard; Parenti, David; Ruiz, Maria Elena; Wood, Angela; D'Angelo, Lawrence; Rakhmanina, Natella; Rana, Sohail; Bryant, Maya; Hebou, Annick; Fernández, Ricardo; Abbott, Stephen; Peterson, James; Wood, Kathy; Subramanian, Thilakavathy; Binkley, Jeffrey; Happ, Lindsey Powers; Kharfen, Michael; Masur, Henry; Greenberg, Alan E

    2016-11-01

    One goal of the HIV care continuum is achieving viral suppression (VS), yet disparities in suppression exist among subpopulations of HIV-infected persons. We sought to identify disparities in both the ability to achieve and sustain VS among an urban cohort of HIV-infected persons in care. Data from HIV-infected persons enrolled at the 13 DC Cohort study clinical sites between January 2011 and June 2014 were analyzed. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were conducted to identify factors associated with achieving VS (viral load < 200 copies/ml) at least once, and Kaplan-Meier (KM) curves and Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify factors associated with sustaining VS and time to virologic failure (VL ≥ 200 copies/ml after achievement of VS). Among the 4311 participants, 95.4% were either virally suppressed at study enrollment or able to achieve VS during the follow-up period. In multivariate analyses, achieving VS was significantly associated with age (aOR: 1.04; 95%CI: 1.03-1.06 per five-year increase) and having a higher CD4 (aOR: 1.05, 95% CI 1.04-1.06 per 100 cells/mm(3)). Patients infected through perinatal transmission were less likely to achieve VS compared to MSM patients (aOR: 0.63, 95% CI 0.51-0.79). Once achieved, most participants (74.4%) sustained VS during follow-up. Blacks and perinatally infected persons were less likely to have sustained VS in KM survival analysis (log rank chi-square p ≤ .001 for both) compared to other races and risk groups. Earlier time to failure was observed among females, Blacks, publically insured, perinatally infected, those with longer standing HIV infection, and those with diagnoses of mental health issues or depression. Among this HIV-infected cohort, most people achieved and maintained VS; however, disparities exist with regard to patient age, race, HIV transmission risk, and co-morbid conditions. Identifying populations with disparate outcomes allows for appropriate targeting

  3. Trends of Mortality and Causes of Death among HIV-infected Persons in Guadeloupe: 1988-2009.

    PubMed

    Elenga, N; Ggeorger-Sow, M T; Messiaen, T; Lamaury, I; Favre, I; Nacher, M; Beaucaire, G

    2015-09-18

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mortality rate, risk factors and causes of death among HIV-infected patients in Guadeloupe from 1988 to 2009. We used Kaplan-Meier analysis to describe the survival trends and the Cox proportional hazard model to identify predictors of deaths in HIV-infected patients. Mortality rate and causes of death were compared among patients whose HIV diagnosis was made in two different study periods. There were 672 deaths recorded. The exact cause of death was clearly identified for 202 patients (35%). There were 165 AIDS defining events and 37 non-AIDS defining events. The most frequent causes of death reported were HIV encephalopathy (n = 54), cerebral toxoplasmosis (n = 39), HIV-wasting syndrome (n = 37), malignancies (n = 13), cytomegalovirus pneumopathy (n = 10). The crude incidence rate for patients on HAART was between 2.2 and 3.1 per 100 person-years, whereas it was 17.2 for those not on HAART. The variables in the Cox model that were significantly associated with death were addiction, depression, low CD4 count and high viral load levels in baseline. These results suggested that increased screening efforts, particularly in marginalised populations could help with early diagnosis and better follow-up in order to reduce mortality among HIV-infected patients.

  4. The Duffy-null state is associated with a survival advantage in leukopenic HIV-infected persons of African ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Hemant; Marconi, Vincent C.; He, Weijing; Landrum, Michael L.; Okulicz, Jason F.; Delmar, Judith; Kazandjian, Dickran; Castiblanco, John; Ahuja, Seema S.; Wright, Edwina J.; Weiss, Robin A.; Clark, Robert A.; Dolan, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    Persons of African ancestry, on average, have lower white blood cell (WBC) counts than those of European descent (ethnic leukopenia), but whether this impacts negatively on HIV-1 disease course remains unknown. Here, in a large natural history cohort of HIV-infected subjects, we show that, although leukopenia (< 4000 WBC/mm3 during infection) was associated with an accelerated HIV disease course, this effect was more prominent in leukopenic subjects of European than African ancestry. The African-specific −46C/C genotype of Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) confers the malaria-resisting, Duffy-null phenotype, and we found that the recently described association of this genotype with ethnic leukopenia extends to HIV-infected African Americans (AAs). The association of Duffy-null status with HIV disease course differed according to WBC but not CD4+ T-cell counts, such that leukopenic but not nonleukopenic HIV+ AAs with DARC −46C/C had a survival advantage compared with all Duffy-positive subjects. This survival advantage became increasingly pronounced in those with progressively lower WBC counts. These data highlight that the interaction between DARC genotype and the cellular milieu defined by WBC counts may influence HIV disease course, and this may provide a partial explanation of why ethnic leukopenia remains benign in HIV-infected AAs, despite immunodeficiency. PMID:19620399

  5. Incidence of syphilis seroconversion among HIV-infected persons in Asia: results from the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin Young; Boettiger, David; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Merati, Tuti Parwati; Huy, Bui Vu; Wong, Wing Wai; Ditangco, Rossana; Lee, Man Po; Oka, Shinichi; Durier, Nicolas; Choi, Jun Yong

    2016-01-01

    Outbreaks of syphilis have been described among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) in Western communities, whereas reports in Asian countries are limited. We aimed to characterize the incidence and temporal trends of syphilis among HIV-infected MSM compared with HIV-infected non-MSM in Asian countries. Patients enrolled in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database cohort and with a negative non-treponemal test since enrolment were analyzed. Incidence of syphilis seroconversion, defined as a positive non-treponemal test after previously testing negative, was evaluated among patients at sites performing non-treponemal tests at least annually. Factors associated with syphilis seroconversion were investigated at sites doing non-treponemal testing in all new patients and subsequently testing routinely or when patients were suspected of having syphilis. We included 1010 patients from five sites that performed non-treponemal tests in all new patients; those included had negative non-treponemal test results during enrolment and subsequent follow-ups. Among them, 657 patients were from three sites conducting regular non-treponemal testing. The incidence of syphilis seroconversion was 5.38/100 person-years (PY). Incidence was higher in MSM than non-MSM (7.64/100 PY vs. 2.44/100 PY, p<0.001). Among MSM, the incidence rate ratio (IRR) for every additional year from 2009 was 1.19 (p=0.051). MSM status (IRR 3.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.88-6.47), past syphilis diagnosis (IRR 5.15, 95% CI 3.69-7.17) and younger age (IRR 0.84 for every additional 10 years, 95% CI 0.706-0.997) were significantly associated with syphilis seroconversion. We observed a higher incidence of syphilis seroconversion among HIV-infected MSM and a trend to increasing annual incidence. Regular screening for syphilis and targeted interventions to limit transmission are needed in this population.

  6. Risk Prediction Tool for Medical Appointment Attendance Among HIV-Infected Persons with Unsuppressed Viremia

    PubMed Central

    Person, Anna; Rebeiro, Peter; Kheshti, Asghar; Raffanti, Stephen; Pettit, April

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Successful treatment of HIV infection requires regular clinical follow-up. A previously published risk-prediction tool (RPT) utilizing data from the electronic health record (EHR) including medication adherence, previous appointment attendance, substance abuse, recent CD4+ count, prior antiretroviral therapy (ART) exposure, prior treatment failure, and recent HIV-1 viral load (VL) has been shown to predict virologic failure at 1 year. If this same tool could be used to predict the more immediate event of appointment attendance, high-risk patients could be identified and interventions could be targeted to improve this outcome. We conducted an observational cohort study at the Vanderbilt Comprehensive Care Clinic from August 2013 through March 2014. Patients with routine medical appointments and most recent HIV-1 VL >200 copies/mL were included. Risk scores for a modified RPT were calculated based on data from the EHR. Odds ratios (OR) for missing the next appointment were estimated using multivariable logistic regression. Among 510 persons included, median age was 39 years, 74% were male, 55% were black, median CD4+ count was 327 cells/mm3 [Interquartile Range (IQR): 142–560], and median HIV-1 VL was 21,818 copies/mL (IQR: 2,030–69,597). Medium [OR 3.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.08–7.50, p-value<0.01] and high (OR 9.55, 95% CI 4.31–21.16, p-value<0.01) vs. low RPT risk scores were independently associated with missing the next appointment. RPT scores, constructed using readily available data, allow for risk-stratification of HIV medical appointment non-attendance and could support targeting limited resources to improve appointment adherence in groups most at-risk of poor HIV outcomes. PMID:25746288

  7. HIV-infected persons with bipolar disorder are less aware of memory deficits as compared to HIV-infected persons without bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Blackstone, Kaitlin; Tobin, Alexis; Posada, Carolina; Gouaux, Ben; Grant, Igor; Moore, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Episodic memory deficits are common in HIV infection and bipolar disorder, but patient insight into such deficits remains unclear. Thirty-four HIV-infected individuals without bipolar disorder l(HIV+/BD−) and 47 HIV+ individuals with comorbid bipolar disorder (HIV+/BD+) were administered the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised and the Brief Visuospatial Memory Test-Revised to examine objective learning/memory functioning. Subjective memory complaints were assessed via the memory subscale of the Patient’s Assessment of Own Functioning Inventory. HIV+/BD+ individuals performed poorer on tests of visual learning and visual/verbal recall compared to HIV+/BD− participants (ps<0.05). Memory complaints only predicted verbal learning (at a trend level, p=0.10) and recall (p=0.03) among the HIV+/BD− individuals. Memory complaints were not associated with memory performance within the HIV+/BD+ group (ps>0.10). Memory complaints were associated with affective symptoms in both groups. These complaints were also predictive of immunosuppression, higher unemployment, and greater dependence on Activities of Daily Living among the HIV+/BD+ individuals (ps<0.05). Awareness of memory abilities was particularly poor among HIV+/BD+ individuals (i.e., objective learning/memory did not correspond to reported complaints), which has important implications for the capacity of these individuals to engage in error-monitoring and compensatory strategies in daily life. Memory complaints are associated with depressed mood regardless of group membership. Among HIV+/BD+ individuals, these complaints may also signify worse HIV disease status and problems with everyday functioning. Clinicians and researchers should be cognizant of what these complaints indicate in order to lead treatment most effectively; use of objective neurocognitive assessments may still be warranted when working with these populations. PMID:22571839

  8. Frailty, Inflammation, and Mortality Among Persons Aging With HIV Infection and Injection Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Varadhan, Ravi; Mehta, Shruti H.; Brown, Todd T.; Li, Huifen; Walston, Jeremy D.; Leng, Sean X.; Kirk, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Serum markers of inflammation increase with age and have been strongly associated with adverse clinical outcomes among both HIV-infected and uninfected adults. Yet, limited data exist on the predictive and clinical utility of aggregate measures of inflammation. This study sought to evaluate the relationship of a recently validated aggregate inflammatory index with frailty and mortality among aging HIV-infected and uninfected injection drug users. Methods. Frailty was assessed among HIV-infected and uninfected participants in the AIDS Linked to the IntraVenous Experience (ALIVE) cohort study using the five Fried phenotypic criteria: weight loss, exhaustion, low physical activity, decreased grip strength, and slow gait. The aggregate inflammatory index was constructed from serum measures of interleukin-6 and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptor-1. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the relationship of frailty with inflammation. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate risk for all-cause mortality. Results. Among 1,326 subjects, the median age was 48 years and 29% were HIV-infected. Adjusting for sociodemographics, comorbidity, and HIV status, frailty was significantly associated with each standard deviation increase in log interleukin-6 (odds ratio 1.33; 95% CI, 1.09–1.61), log tumor necrosis factor-α receptor-1 (odds ratio 1.25; 95% CI, 1.04–1.51) and inflammatory index score (odds ratio 1.39; 95% CI, 1.14–1.68). Adjusting for sociodemographics, comorbidity, HIV status, and frailty, the inflammatory index score was independently associated with increased mortality (HR 1.65; 95% CI, 1.44–1.89). Conclusion. A recently validated, simple, biologically informed inflammatory index is independently associated with frailty and mortality risk among aging HIV-infected and uninfected injection drug users. PMID:26386010

  9. Body mass index, inflammatory biomarkers and neurocognitive impairment in HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Chukwuemeka N; Kelso, Natalie E; Bryant, Vaughn; Burrell, Larry E; Míguez, Maria Jose; Gongvatana, Assawin; Tashima, Karen T; de la Monte, Suzanne; Cook, Robert L; Cohen, Ronald A

    2017-03-01

    To determine the relationships among body mass index (BMI), and HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment and the potential mediating effects of inflammatory cytokines. Among the HIV-infected individuals (N = 90) included in this study, obesity was associated with slower processing speed (β = -.229, standard error (SE) = 2.15, p = .033), compared to participants with a normal BMI, after controlling for psychosocial and HIV clinical factors. Serum concentrations of the interleukin-16 (IL-16) cytokine were significantly associated with slowed processing speed (β = -.235, SE = 1.62, p = .033) but did not mediate the relationship between obesity and processing speed These findings suggest that obesity may contribute to cognitive processing speed deficits in HIV-infected adults. Elevated concentrations of IL-16 are also associated with slowing, though the results suggest that obesity and IL-16 may exert independent effects.

  10. Body Mass Index, Inflammatory Biomarkers and Neurocognitive Impairment in HIV-Infected Persons

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, Chukwuemeka N.; Kelso, Natalie E.; Bryant, Vaughn; Burrell, Larry E.; Míguez, Maria Jose; Gongvatana, Assawin; Tashima, Karen T.; de la Monte, Suzanne; Cook, Robert L.; Cohen, Ronald A.

    2016-01-01

    To determine the relationships among body mass index (BMI), and HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment and the potential mediating effects of inflammatory cytokines. Among the HIV-infected individuals (N=90) included in this study, obesity was associated with slower processing speed (β = −.229, standard error (SE) = 2.15, p = .033), compared to participants with a normal BMI, after controlling for psychosocial and HIV clinical factors. Serum concentrations of the interleukin-16 (IL-16) cytokine were significantly associated with slowed processing speed (β = −.235, standard error (SE) = 1.62, p = .033) but did not mediate the relationship between obesity and processing speed These findings suggest that obesity may contribute to cognitive processing speed deficits in HIV-infected adults. Elevated concentrations of IL-16 are also associated with slowing, though the results suggest that obesity and IL-16 may exert independent effects. PMID:27319430

  11. Apathy is associated with white matter abnormalities in anterior, medial brain regions in persons with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Rujvi; Brown, Gregory G; Bolden, Khalima; Fennema-Notestein, Christine; Archibald, Sarah; Marcotte, Thomas D; Letendre, Scott L; Ellis, Ronald J; Woods, Steven Paul; Grant, Igor; Heaton, Robert K

    2014-01-01

    Apathy is a relatively common psychiatric syndrome in HIV infection, but little is known about its neural correlates. In the present study, we examined the associations between apathy and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) indices in key frontal white matter regions in the thalamocorticostriatal circuit, which has been implicated in the expression of apathy. Nineteen participants with HIV infection and 19 demographically comparable seronegative comparison subjects completed the Apathy subscale of the Frontal Systems Behavioral Scale as a part of a comprehensive neuropsychiatric research evaluation. When compared to the seronegative participants, the HIV+ group had significantly more frontal white matter abnormalities. Within HIV+ persons, and as predicted, higher ratings of apathy were associated with greater white matter alterations in the anterior corona radiata, genu, and orbital medial prefrontal cortex. The associations between white matter alterations and apathy were independent of depression and were stronger among participants with lower current cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) counts. All told, these findings indicate that apathy is independently associated with white matter abnormalities in anterior, medial brain regions in persons infected with HIV, particularly in the setting of lower current immune functioning, which may have implications for antiretroviral therapy.

  12. Apathy is associated with white matter abnormalities in anterior, medial brain regions in persons with HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Rujvi; Brown, Gregory G.; Bolden, Khalima; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Archibald, Sarah; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Letendre, Scott L.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Woods, Steven Paul; Grant, Igor; Heaton, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Apathy is a relatively common psychiatric syndrome in HIV infection, but little is known about its neural correlates. In the present study, we examined the associations between apathy and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) indices in key frontal white matter regions in the thalamocorticostriatal circuit that has been implicated in the expression of apathy. Nineteen participants with HIV infection and 19 demographically comparable seronegative comparison subjects completed the Apathy subscale of the Frontal Systems Behavioral Scale as a part of a comprehensive neuropsychiatric research evaluation. When compared to the seronegative participants, the HIV+ group had significantly more frontal white matter abnormalities. Within HIV+ persons, and as predicted, higher ratings of apathy were associated with greater white matter alterations in the anterior corona radiata, genu, and orbital medial prefrontal cortex. The associations between white matter alterations and apathy were independent of depression and were stronger among participants with lower current CD4 counts. All told, these findings indicate that apathy is independently associated with white matter abnormalities in anterior, medial brain regions in persons infected with HIV, particularly in the setting of lower current immune functioning, which may have implications for antiretroviral therapy. PMID:25275424

  13. Relationship between quality of life, social support and disease-related factors in HIV-infected persons in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Bastardo, Y M; Kimberlin, C L

    2000-10-01

    This study examines the relationships among health-related quality of life (HRQL), social support, sociodemographic factors and disease-related factors in persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) living in Venezuela. A sample of 118 HIV-infected persons living in Caracas, Venezuela, was surveyed using a written questionnaire that included a Spanish translation of the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL) developed for this study, the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36) and a symptom inventory. All three instruments showed good internal consistency reliability. Multiple regression analyses were used to model SF-36 sub-scale scores as a function of symptoms, social support, HIV-status and use of antiretroviral drugs. The models explained between 16 and 39% of the variance in the different HRQL domains. Controlling for other variables in the model, level of symptomatology was significantly associated with all HRQL domains except social functioning and role-emotional scores. Social support was significantly associated with all HRQL domains except physical functioning and bodily pain. The use of antiretroviral drugs was significantly associated with social functioning. The study indicates the importance of social support to the quality of life of HIV-infected individuals in this culture.

  14. Pain is Associated with Risky Drinking over Time among HIV-Infected Persons in St. Petersburg, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Judith I.; Cheng, Debbie M.; Coleman, Sharon M.; Lira, Marlene C.; Blokhina, Elena; Bridden, Carly; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Samet, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain is highly prevalent among persons with HIV. Alcohol may be used to “self-medicate” pain. This study examined the association between pain and risky alcohol use over time in a cohort of HIV-infected Russian drinkers. Methods This secondary analysis utilized longitudinal data from a randomized trial of a behavioral intervention. Subjects included HIV-infected adults who reported past 6-month risky drinking and unprotected sex and were recruited from HIV and addiction treatment sites in St. Petersburg, Russia. The main independent variable was pain that at least moderately interfered with daily living. The primary outcome was past month risky drinking amounts based on NIAAA guidelines. General estimating equations (GEE) logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between pain and risky drinking over time (i.e., baseline, 6- and 12-months), adjusting for potential confounders. Results Baseline characteristics of participants (n=699) were mean age of 30 (SD±5) years, 41% female, and 22% < 9th grade education. Nearly one quarter (24%) had a CD4 cell count <200 cells/μ/l, and only 17% were on antiretroviral therapy. Nearly half (46%) reported at least moderate pain interference in the past month and 81% were drinking risky amounts. In adjusted longitudinal GEE models, pain was significantly associated with greater odds of reporting past month risky drinking (AOR=1.34, 95% CI: 1.05-1.71, p-value=0.02). Conclusions Among a cohort of HIV-infected Russian drinkers, pain that at least moderately interfered with daily living was associated with higher odds of reporting risky drinking amounts over time. PMID:25220898

  15. Sex differences in urinary biomarkers of vascular and endothelial function in HIV-infected persons receiving antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Boger, Michael S.; Bian, Aihua; Shintani, Ayumi; Milne, Ginger L.; Morrow, Jason D.; Erdem, Husamettin; Mitchell, Valerie; Haas, David W.; Hulgan, Todd

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk can be underestimated in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). Novel CVD risk markers in this population are needed. We hypothesized that eicosanoid metabolite production is increased with metabolic complications of ART. Our objective was to determine relationships between urine eicosanoids and traditional CVD risk factors in a cohort of HIV-infected persons receiving ART. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of 107 individuals from a prospective cohort study with urine eicosanoids (isoprostane [15-F2t-IsoP], prostaglandin-E metabolite [PGE-M], thromboxane metabolite [11dTxB2], prostacyclin metabolite [PGI-M]) determined by gas or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results 15-F2t-IsoP was higher (p=0.003), 11dTxB2 tended to be higher (p=0.07), and PGE-M was lower (p=0.003) in females than in males. The overall median Framingham score was 4 (IQR 1 – 7). In multivariable analyses adjusting for age, CD4+ T-cells, smoking status, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory use, aspirin use, and body mass index (BMI), associations included: higher 15-F2t-IsoP with female sex (p=0.004) and current smoking (p=0.04), lower PGE-M with female sex (p=0.005) and higher BMI (p=0.03), higher 11dTxB2 with increasing age (p=0.02) and current smoking (p=0.04), lower 11dTxB2 with higher BMI (p=0.02), and higher PGI-M with current smoking (p=0.04). Conclusions In this pilot study of predominantly virologically suppressed HIV-infected individuals on ART, there were sex-specific differences in urinary eicosanoids, with females having more risk-associated parameters despite low Framingham score. Eicosanoids might be useful CVD biomarkers in ART-treated, HIV-infected patients. Future studies should examine eicosanoids while assessing effects of specific ART regimens and targeted interventions on CVD outcomes. PMID:22293574

  16. Incidence of syphilis seroconversion among HIV-infected persons in Asia: results from the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jin Young; Boettiger, David; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Merati, Tuti Parwati; Huy, Bui Vu; Wong, Wing Wai; Ditangco, Rossana; Lee, Man Po; Oka, Shinichi; Durier, Nicolas; Choi, Jun Yong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Outbreaks of syphilis have been described among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) in Western communities, whereas reports in Asian countries are limited. We aimed to characterize the incidence and temporal trends of syphilis among HIV-infected MSM compared with HIV-infected non-MSM in Asian countries. Methods Patients enrolled in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database cohort and with a negative non-treponemal test since enrolment were analyzed. Incidence of syphilis seroconversion, defined as a positive non-treponemal test after previously testing negative, was evaluated among patients at sites performing non-treponemal tests at least annually. Factors associated with syphilis seroconversion were investigated at sites doing non-treponemal testing in all new patients and subsequently testing routinely or when patients were suspected of having syphilis. Results We included 1010 patients from five sites that performed non-treponemal tests in all new patients; those included had negative non-treponemal test results during enrolment and subsequent follow-ups. Among them, 657 patients were from three sites conducting regular non-treponemal testing. The incidence of syphilis seroconversion was 5.38/100 person-years (PY). Incidence was higher in MSM than non-MSM (7.64/100 PY vs. 2.44/100 PY, p<0.001). Among MSM, the incidence rate ratio (IRR) for every additional year from 2009 was 1.19 (p=0.051). MSM status (IRR 3.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.88–6.47), past syphilis diagnosis (IRR 5.15, 95% CI 3.69–7.17) and younger age (IRR 0.84 for every additional 10 years, 95% CI 0.706–0.997) were significantly associated with syphilis seroconversion. Conclusions We observed a higher incidence of syphilis seroconversion among HIV-infected MSM and a trend to increasing annual incidence. Regular screening for syphilis and targeted interventions to limit transmission are needed in this population. PMID:27774955

  17. Telephone delivered interventions for preventing HIV infection in HIV-negative persons.

    PubMed

    van-Velthoven, Michelle H M M T; Tudor Car, Lorainne; Gentry, Sarah; Car, Josip

    2013-05-31

    This is one of the three Cochrane reviews that examine the role of the telephone in HIV/AIDS services. Although HIV infection can be prevented, still a large number of new infections occur. More effective HIV prevention interventions are needed to reduce the number of people newly infected with HIV. Phone calls can be used to potentially more effectively deliver HIV prevention interventions. They have the potential to save time, reduce costs and facilitate easier access. To assess the effectiveness of voice landline and mobile telephone delivered HIV prevention interventions in HIV-negative persons. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, PubMed Central, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health, the World Health Organization's Global Health Library and Current Controlled Trials from 1980 to June 2011. We searched the following grey literature sources: Dissertation Abstracts International and the Centre for Agricultural Bioscience International Direct Global Health database, the System for Information on Grey Literature Europe, The Healthcare Management Information Consortium, Google Scholar, Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections database, International AIDS Society conference database, AIDS Education Global Information System and reference lists of articles. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomised controlled trials, controlled before and after studies, and interrupted time series studies comparing the effectiveness of delivering HIV prevention by phone calls to usual care in HIV-negative people regardless of their demographic characteristics and in all settings. Two reviewers independently searched databases, screened citations, assessed study quality and extracted data. A third reviewer resolved any disagreement. Primary outcomes were knowledge about the causes and consequences of HIV/AIDS, change in behaviour, healthcare uptake and clinical outcomes

  18. A network intervention that locates and intervenes with recently HIV-infected persons: The Transmission Reduction Intervention Project (TRIP).

    PubMed

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios K; Pavlitina, Eirini; Muth, Stephen Q; Schneider, John; Psichogiou, Mina; Williams, Leslie D; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Sypsa, Vana; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Smyrnov, Pavlo; Korobchuk, Anya; Vasylyeva, Tetyana I; Skaathun, Britt; Malliori, Melpomeni; Kafetzopoulos, Evangelos; Hatzakis, Angelos; Friedman, Samuel R

    2016-12-05

    Early treatment, soon after infection, reduces HIV transmissions and benefits patients. The Transmission Reduction Intervention Project (TRIP) evaluated a network intervention to detect individuals recently infected (in the past 6 months). TRIP was conducted in Greece (2013-2015) and focused on drug injector networks. Based on HIV status, testing history, and the results of an assay to detect recent infections, TRIP classified drug injector "Seeds" into groups: Recent Seeds (RS), and Control Seeds with Long-term HIV infection (LCS). The network members of RS and LCS were traced for two steps. The analysis included 23 RS, 171 network members of the RS, 19 LCS, and 65 network members of the LCS. The per-seed number of recents detected in the network of RS was 5 times the number in the network of LCS (Ratio RS vs. LCS: 5.23; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.54-27.61). The proportion of recents among HIV positives in the network of RS (27%) was approximately 3 times (Ratio RS vs. LCS: 3.30; 95% CI: 1.04-10.43) that in the network of LCS (8%). Strategic network tracing that starts with recently infected persons could support public health efforts to find and treat people early in their HIV infection.

  19. A network intervention that locates and intervenes with recently HIV-infected persons: The Transmission Reduction Intervention Project (TRIP)

    PubMed Central

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios K.; Pavlitina, Eirini; Muth, Stephen Q.; Schneider, John; Psichogiou, Mina; Williams, Leslie D.; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Sypsa, Vana; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Smyrnov, Pavlo; Korobchuk, Anya; Vasylyeva, Tetyana I.; Skaathun, Britt; Malliori, Melpomeni; Kafetzopoulos, Evangelos; Hatzakis, Angelos; Friedman, Samuel R.

    2016-01-01

    Early treatment, soon after infection, reduces HIV transmissions and benefits patients. The Transmission Reduction Intervention Project (TRIP) evaluated a network intervention to detect individuals recently infected (in the past 6 months). TRIP was conducted in Greece (2013–2015) and focused on drug injector networks. Based on HIV status, testing history, and the results of an assay to detect recent infections, TRIP classified drug injector “Seeds” into groups: Recent Seeds (RS), and Control Seeds with Long-term HIV infection (LCS). The network members of RS and LCS were traced for two steps. The analysis included 23 RS, 171 network members of the RS, 19 LCS, and 65 network members of the LCS. The per-seed number of recents detected in the network of RS was 5 times the number in the network of LCS (Ratio RS vs. LCS: 5.23; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.54–27.61). The proportion of recents among HIV positives in the network of RS (27%) was approximately 3 times (Ratio RS vs. LCS: 3.30; 95% CI: 1.04–10.43) that in the network of LCS (8%). Strategic network tracing that starts with recently infected persons could support public health efforts to find and treat people early in their HIV infection. PMID:27917890

  20. Physical and sexual violence and health care utilization in HIV-infected persons with alcohol problems

    PubMed Central

    LIEBSCHUTZ, J. M.; GEIER, J. L.; HORTON, N. J.; CHUANG, C. H.; SAMET, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    We examined interpersonal violence and its association with health care utilization and substance use severity among a cohort of 349 HIV-infected men and women with histories of alcohol problems assessed biannually up to 36 months. Data included demographics, lifetime interpersonal violence histories, age at first violence exposure, recent violence (prior six months), substance use severity and health care utilization (ambulatory visits, Emergency Department (ED) visits, hospitalizations) and adherence to HIV medication. Kaplan-Meier survival curves estimated the proportion of subjects experiencing recent violence. Generalized estimating equation regression models evaluated the relationship between recent violence, utilization and substance use severity over time, controlling for demographics, CD4 counts and depressive symptoms. Subject characteristics included: 79% male; mean age 41 years; 44% black, 33% white and 23% other. Eighty percent of subjects reported lifetime interpersonal violence: 40% physical violence alone, and 40% sexual violence with or without physical violence. First violence occurred prior to age 13 in 46%. Twenty-four (41%) of subjects reported recent violence by 24 and 36 months, respectively. In multivariate analyses, recent violence was associated with more ambulatory visits, ED visits and hospitalizations and worse substance use severity, but not medication adherence. Due to the high incidence and associated increased health care services utilization, violence prevention interventions should be considered for HIV-infected patients with a history of alcohol problems. PMID:16036243

  1. Creating a paper-based personal health record for HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Nokes, Kathleen M; Hughes, Valery; Santos, Ryan; Bang, Heejung

    2012-01-01

    A personal health record (PHR) contains information that a client believes is important to his/her health status; it can be either paper or Internet-based. The purposes of this action research were to determine the length of time an expert HIV nurse clinician needed to create a comprehensive PHR and to determine how hard it was for the patient to understand different components of a PHR. The average respondent (N = 9) was older, female, completed high school, African American, diagnosed with AIDS, and taking HIV medications for 11 years. The HIV nurse expert spent an average of 79 minutes preparing the PHR. Clients had the greatest difficulty understanding laboratory tests, medications, medical history, and immunizations. PHRs are evolving through the consumer-empowerment movement, technology, and a growing awareness of the consequences of medical errors. Nurses need to assist clients to create and use the PHR as an important tool in self-care management. Copyright © 2012 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Stages of HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infection Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Stages of HIV Infection How Does HIV Progress in Your Body? Without treatment, HIV advances ... are the three stages of HIV infection: Acute HIV Infection Stage Within 2-4 weeks after HIV ...

  3. Behavioral and clinical characteristics of persons receiving medical care for HIV infection - Medical Monitoring Project, United States, 2009.

    PubMed

    Blair, Janet M; Fagan, Jennifer L; Frazier, Emma L; Do, Ann; Bradley, Heather; Valverde, Eduardo E; McNaghten, Ad; Beer, Linda; Zhang, Shuyan; Huang, Ping; Mattson, Christine L; Freedman, Mark S; Johnson, Christopher H; Sanders, Catherine C; Spruit-McGoff, Kathryn E; Heffelfinger, James D; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2014-06-20

    As of December 31, 2009, an estimated 864,748 persons were living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the 50 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and six U.S.-dependent areas. Whereas HIV surveillance programs in the United States collect information about persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection, supplemental surveillance systems collect in-depth information about the behavioral and clinical characteristics of persons receiving outpatient medical care for HIV infection. These data are needed to reduce HIV-related morbidity and mortality and HIV transmission. Data were collected during June 2009-May 2010 for patients receiving medical care at least once during January-April 2009. The Medical Monitoring Project (MMP) is an ongoing surveillance system that assesses behaviors and clinical characteristics of HIV-infected persons who have received outpatient medical care. For the 2009 data collection cycle, participants must have been aged ≥18 years and have received medical care during January-April 2009 at sampled facilities that provide HIV medical care within participating MMP project areas. Behavioral and selected clinical data were collected using an in-person interview, and most clinical data were collected using medical record abstraction. A total of 23 project areas in 16 states and Puerto Rico were funded to collect data during the 2009 data collection cycle. The data were weighted for probability of selection and nonresponse to be representative of adults receiving outpatient medical care for HIV infection in the United States and Puerto Rico. Prevalence estimates are presented as weighted percentages. The period of reference is the 12 months before the patient interview unless otherwise noted. The patients in MMP represent 421,186 adults who received outpatient medical care for HIV infection in the United States and Puerto Rico during January-April 2009. Of adults who received medical care for HIV infection, an estimated 71.2% were male

  4. Guidelines for preventing opportunistic infections among HIV-infected persons--2002. Recommendations of the U.S. Public Health Service and the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Jonathan E; Masur, Henry; Holmes, King K

    2002-06-14

    In 1995, the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) developed guidelines for preventing opportunistic infections (OIs) among persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); these guidelines were updated in 1997 and 1999. This fourth edition of the guidelines, made available on the Internet in 2001, is intended for clinicians and other health-care providers who care for HIV-infected persons. The goal of these guidelines is to provide evidence-based guidelines for preventing OIs among HIV-infected adults and adolescents, including pregnant women, and HIV-exposed or infected children. Nineteen OIs, or groups of OIs, are addressed, and recommendations are included for preventing exposure to opportunistic pathogens, preventing first episodes of disease by chemoprophylaxis or vaccination (primary prophylaxis), and preventing disease recurrence (secondary prophylaxis). Major changes since the last edition of the guidelines include 1) updated recommendations for discontinuing primary and secondary OI prophylaxis among persons whose CD4+ T lymphocyte counts have increased in response to antiretroviral therapy; 2) emphasis on screening all HIV-infected persons for infection with hepatitis C virus; 3) new information regarding transmission of human herpesvirus 8 infection; 4) new information regarding drug interactions, chiefly related to rifamycins and antiretroviral drugs; and 5) revised recommendations for immunizing HIV-infected adults and adolescents and HIV-exposed or infected children.

  5. Guidelines for preventing opportunistic infections among HIV-infected persons--2002. Recommendations of the U.S. Public Health Service and the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    PubMed

    Masur, Henry; Kaplan, Jonathan E; Holmes, King K

    2002-09-03

    In 1995, the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) developed guidelines for preventing opportunistic infections (OIs) among persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); these guidelines were updated in 1997 and 1999. This fourth edition of the guidelines, made available on the Internet in 2001, is intended for clinicians and other health-care providers who care for HIV-infected persons. The goal of these guidelines is to provide evidence-based guidelines for preventing OIs among HIV-infected adults and adolescents, including pregnant women, and HIV-exposed or infected children. Nineteen OIs, or groups of OIs, are addressed, and recommendations are included for preventing exposure to opportunistic pathogens, preventing first episodes of disease by chemoprophylaxis or vaccination (primary prophylaxis), and preventing disease recurrence (secondary prophylaxis). Major changes since the last edition of the guidelines include 1) updated recommendations for discontinuing primary and secondary OI prophylaxis among persons whose CD4+ T lymphocyte counts have increased in response to antiretroviral therapy; 2) emphasis on screening all HIV-infected persons for infection with hepatitis C virus; 3) new information regarding transmission of human herpesvirus 8 infection; 4) new information regarding drug interactions, chiefly related to rifamycins and antiretroviral drugs; and 5) revised recommendations for immunizing HIV-infected adults and adolescents and HIV-exposed or infected children.

  6. Treatment options for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in HIV-infected persons: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Loignon, Maude; Toma, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Progressive multifocal encephalopathy (PML) caused by JC virus was frequently encountered in AIDS patients before combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Incidence decreased and the outcome improved with cART. The immune reconstitution with cART is beneficial for HIV-infected patients and is an effective treatment for PML. However, when it is excessive an inflammatory response immune syndrome might occur with deterioration of PML. So far, no specific therapy has proven efficacious in small clinical trials in spite of some optimistic case reports. Combination of drugs targeted at different stages of JC virus life cycle seems to have a better effect. Passive and active immune therapies, immune competence "boosters" appear promising. New future approaches such as gene editing are not far away.

  7. Prevalence and indicators of viral suppression among persons with diagnosed HIV infection retained in care - Georgia, 2010.

    PubMed

    Edison, Laura; Hughes, Denise; Drenzek, Cherie; Kelly, Jane

    2014-01-24

    Advances in treatment have led to dramatic improvements in the health of persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Moreover, treatment can reduce HIV transmission because suppressed levels of circulating virus makes HIV-infected persons less infectious. Until recently, antiretroviral therapy (ART) was recommended only for HIV patients with advanced disease (stages 2 and 3), and was optional for patients with early disease (stage 1). In March 2012, national HIV treatment guidelines were changed to recommend ART at all disease stages. To establish a baseline for care and treatment outcomes among persons with HIV, the Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) examined whether viral suppression among HIV patients in Georgia varied by disease stage at diagnosis before implementation of the new guidelines. Disease stage at diagnosis was assessed as an indicator of viral suppression several months after diagnosis, adjusting for age, sex, and race/ethnicity among patients who were reported to DPH with HIV infections newly diagnosed during 2010 and retained in care. This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated that disease stage at diagnosis was a significant indicator of viral suppression; viral suppression was significantly less frequent among persons with earlier disease stage at diagnosis. Compared with viral suppression among 80.5% of persons with stage 3 HIV disease, only 72.3% with stage 2 disease (prevalence ratio [PR] = 0.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.8-1.0) and 64.5% with stage 1 disease (PR = 0.8; CI = 0.7-0.9) met criteria for viral suppression, likely resulting from lack of initiating treatment or inadequate adherence to treatment regimens, as suggested in previous studies. These data can serve as a baseline to determine the impact of the guideline change in the future, and can be used to emphasize the importance of implementing the guidelines by expanding treatment to persons at all disease stages to reach the goal

  8. Antiretroviral Therapy and Viral Suppression Among Foreign-Born HIV-Infected Persons Receiving Medical Care in the United States: A Complex Sample, Cross-Sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Myers, Tanya R; Lin, Xia; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    Immigrants to the United States are more likely to be diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection compared with native-born persons. Navigating access to healthcare in the United States can be challenging for foreign-born persons, and HIV treatment outcomes may be suboptimal for these persons. We compared characteristics of and assessed disparities in clinical outcomes of foreign-born persons in care for HIV in the United States. The Medical Monitoring Project is a complex sample, cross-sectional survey designed to be nationally representative of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Using data from 2009, 2010, and 2011, we conducted descriptive analyses and multivariable logistic regression to assess associations between foreign-born status and antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription, and between foreign-born status and viral suppression. In all, 13.4% of HIV-infected persons were self-identified as foreign-born; the most common regions of birth were Central America and Mexico (45.4%) and the Caribbean (16.0%). Nearly 90% of foreign-born persons were diagnosed with HIV after entry into the United States. Compared with US-born persons, foreign-born persons were more likely to be younger, Hispanic, less educated, and uninsured. The prevalence of ART prescription (prevalence ratio 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.98-1.02) was not significantly different between foreign-born and US-born persons. A higher percentage of foreign-born persons achieved viral suppression compared with US-born persons (prevalence ratio 1.05; 95% confidence interval 1.00-1.09). No major disparities in ART prescription and viral suppression were found between foreign-born and US-born HIV-infected persons receiving medical care, despite higher percentages being uninsured.

  9. Diagnostic patch testing following tuberculosis-associated cutaneous adverse drug reactions induces systemic reactions in HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Lehloenya, R J; Todd, G; Wallace, J; Ngwanya, M R; Muloiwa, R; Dheda, K

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADRs) to first-line antituberculosis drugs (FLTDs) is higher in HIV-tuberculosis coinfection. However, the utility of patch testing to identify the offending drug in this patient subgroup has been poorly studied. To identify drugs causing adverse drug reactions in patients with HIV-tuberculosis coinfection. Fourteen consecutive patients underwent diagnostic work-up (patch testing followed by a skin prick test and an oral rechallenge) to pinpoint the offending drug after developing FLTD-associated CADR, which included drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (n = 12), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS, n = 1) and toxic epidermal necrolysis/SJS overlap (n = 1). A positive reaction to any of the three diagnostic modalities eliminated that drug from the regimen. Once patients were clinically stable postreaction, sequential and additive rechallenge with FLTDs was initiated. Eleven of the 14 participants with FLTD-associated CADR were HIV infected (median CD4 count 149 cells mm(-3) ). In this subgroup, patch testing resulted in generalized systemic reactions in 10 of 11 patients (91%). These included rash in 10 of 13 reactions (77%), eosinophilia in eight (62%), transaminitis in seven (54%) and fever in five (38%). Isoniazid caused six of 13 (46%) generalized systemic reactions, rifampicin four (31%), ethambutol two (15%) and pyrazinamide one reaction. Using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, five of 13 reactions were mild, six were moderate and two were severe. There were no life-threatening or fatal reactions. In HIV-infected persons with tuberculosis-associated CADR, although patch-testing reactions to FLTD are common and tend to be associated with systemic features, they are not life threatening or fatal. These data inform clinical practice in HIV-endemic settings. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  10. Gender disparities in HIV infection among persons who inject drugs in Central Asia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, Don C; Boltaev, Azizbek; Feelemyer, Jonathan; Bramson, Heidi; Arasteh, Kamyar; Phillips, Benjamin W; Hagan, Holly

    2013-11-01

    Disparities in HIV infection, with females having higher rates of HIV infection than males, have been noted among persons who inject drugs (PWID) in many countries. We examined male/female HIV disparities among PWID in Central Asia and compared these disparities with patterns worldwide. A systematic review and meta-analyses were conducted for studies reporting HIV prevalence by gender among PWID. To be included in the analyses, reports had to contain (1) samples of PWID from Central Asia, (2) HIV data based on laboratory testing, (3) HIV prevalence reported for males and females, and (4) samples that were not recruited on the basis of HIV status. Data were abstracted from 11 studies in 5 countries in Central Asia: China, Kazakhstan, Russia, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan; the total sample size was 12,225. The mean weighted OR for HIV prevalence among females to males was 0.913 (95% CI 0.07, 1.26), with high heterogeneity among studies (I(2)=70.0%) and a possible publication bias among studies with small sample sizes (Eggers test=-1.81, 95% CI -5.18, 0.54). The non-significant higher HIV prevalence among male PWID in Central Asia contrasts with the worldwide findings which show slightly higher HIV prevalence among female PWID. This may reflect the relative recency of the HIV epidemics in Central Asia. The findings also suggest there may be factors that protect female PWID from HIV in some settings. Further examination of transmission dynamics in Central Asia is necessary to better understand the HIV epidemic among PWID. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reproductive health options among HIV-infected persons in the low-income Niger Delta of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Erhabor, Osaro; Akani, Chris I; Eyindah, Cosmos E

    2012-01-01

    infecting their partners and/or baby, such as artificial vaginal insemination, intrauterine insemination, cesarean section, avoidance of breast feeding, and offering prenatal pre-exposure prophylaxis to the fetus. They were unaware of other options, such as sperm washing, in vitro fertilization, and intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Of the 43.1% not anticipating more children, 36.9% were anticipating adoption. Our study has shown that a significant number of HIV-infected persons in the Niger Delta of Nigeria desire to have children irrespective of their positive serostatus. There is the need to support the sexual and reproductive rights of HIV-infected individuals. Additional training needs to be offered to HIV counselors on evidence-based best and affordable practices regarding reproductive health issues among persons living with HIV. Policies that support availability and accessibility to relevant reproductive and sexual health services, including contraception and procreation, need to be developed. Public enlightenment programs on HIV are needed to reduce the stigmatization that HIV-infected persons face from family members and their communities.

  12. Should we look for Strongyloides stercoralis in foreign-born HIV-infected persons?

    PubMed

    Llenas-García, Jara; Fiorante, Silvana; Salto, Efrén; Maseda, Diego; Rodríguez, Violeta; Matarranz, Mariano; Hernando, Asunción; Rubio, Rafael; Pulido, Federico

    2013-08-01

    The objective was to evaluate the implementation of a systematic Strongyloides stercoralis screening programme in HIV infected immigrants attending an HIV Unit in Spain. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to assess the presence of Strongyloides IgG. Patients with a positive serology were treated with ivermectin; serologic follow-up testing was performed. 237 patients were screened (65.4 % men). Origin: 64.1 % came from Latin America, 16.5 % from Sub-Saharan Africa, 9.7 % from the Caribbean, 9.7 % from other areas. Strongyloides stercolaris IgG was positive in 13 cases (5.5 %). In the multivariate analysis, factors associated with a positive Strongyloides serology were illiteracy (OR: 23.31; p = 0.009) and eosinophilia (OR: 15.44; p < 0.0001). Nine of the 13 patients positive for S. stercoralis IgG and treated with ivermectin had a follow up serologic test: 77.8 % achieved a serologic response (55.5 % seroreversion). Screening of HIV-positive immigrants may be desirable, at least in those with higher risk of hyperinfection syndrome. Serologic testing seems a useful tool in both diagnosis and follow-up of these patients.

  13. Vitamin D in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    JE, Lake; JS, Adams

    2013-01-01

    Observational studies have noted very high rates of low 25(OH)D (vitamin D) levels in both the general and HIV-infected populations. In HIV-infected patients, low 25(OH)D levels are likely a combination of both traditional risk factors and HIV- and antiretroviral therapy-specific contributors. Because of this unique risk profile, HIV-infected persons may be at greater risk for low 25(OH)D levels and frank deficiency and/or may respond to standard repletion regimens differently than HIV-uninfected patients. Currently, the optimal repletion and maintenance dosing regimens for HIV-infected patients remain unknown, as do potential benefits of supplementation that may be unique to the HIV-infected population. This paper reviews data published on HIV infection and vitamin D health in adults over the last year. PMID:21647555

  14. Prevalence and incidence of HIV infection, trends, and risk factors among persons aged 15-64 years in Kenya: results from a nationally representative study.

    PubMed

    Kimanga, Davies O; Ogola, Samuel; Umuro, Mamo; Ng'ang'a, Anne; Kimondo, Lucy; Murithi, Patrick; Muttunga, James; Waruiru, Wanjiru; Mohammed, Ibrahim; Sharrif, Shahnaaz; De Cock, Kevin M; Kim, Andrea A

    2014-05-01

    Enhanced HIV surveillance using demographic, behavioral, and biologic data from national surveys can provide information to evaluate and respond to HIV epidemics efficiently. From October 2012 to February 2013, we conducted a 2-stage cluster sampling survey of persons aged 18 months to 64 years in 9 geographic regions in Kenya. Participants answered questionnaires and provided blood for HIV testing. We estimated HIV prevalence, HIV incidence, described trends in HIV prevalence over the past 5 years, and identified factors associated with HIV infection. This analysis was restricted to persons aged 15-64 years. HIV prevalence was 5.6% [95% confidence interval (CI): 4.9 to 6.3] in 2012, a significant decrease from 2007, when HIV prevalence, excluding the North Eastern region, was 7.2% (95% CI: 6.6 to 7.9). HIV incidence was 0.5% (95% CI: 0.2 to 0.9) in 2012. Among women, factors associated with undiagnosed HIV infection included being aged 35-39 years, divorced or separated, from urban residences and Nyanza region, self-perceiving a moderate risk of HIV infection, condom use with the last partner in the previous 12 months, and reporting 4 or more lifetime number of partners. Among men, widowhood, condom use with the last partner in the previous 12 months, and lack of circumcision were associated with undiagnosed HIV infection. HIV prevalence has declined in Kenya since 2007. With improved access to treatment, HIV prevalence has become more challenging to interpret without data on new infections and mortality. Correlates of undiagnosed HIV infection provide important information on where to prioritize prevention interventions to reduce transmission of HIV in the broader population.

  15. Prevalence and Incidence of HIV Infection, Trends, and Risk Factors Among Persons Aged 15–64 Years in Kenya: Results From a Nationally Representative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kimanga, Davies O.; Ogola, Samuel; Umuro, Mamo; Ng’ang’a, Anne; Kimondo, Lucy; Murithi, Patrick; Muttunga, James; Waruiru, Wanjiru; Mohammed, Ibrahim; Sharrif, Shahnaaz; De Cock, Kevin M.; (UK), FRCP; Kim, Andrea A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Enhanced HIV surveillance using demographic, behavioral, and biologic data from national surveys can provide information to evaluate and respond to HIV epidemics efficiently. Methods From October 2012 to February 2013, we conducted a 2-stage cluster sampling survey of persons aged 18 months to 64 years in 9 geographic regions in Kenya. Participants answered questionnaires and provided blood for HIV testing. We estimated HIV prevalence, HIV incidence, described trends in HIV prevalence over the past 5 years, and identified factors associated with HIV infection. This analysis was restricted to persons aged 15–64 years. Results HIV prevalence was 5.6% [95% confidence interval (CI): 4.9 to 6.3] in 2012, a significant decrease from 2007, when HIV prevalence, excluding the North Eastern region, was 7.2% (95% CI: 6.6 to 7.9). HIV incidence was 0.5% (95% CI: 0.2 to 0.9) in 2012. Among women, factors associated with undiagnosed HIV infection included being aged 35–39 years, divorced or separated, from urban residences and Nyanza region, self-perceiving a moderate risk of HIV infection, condom use with the last partner in the previous 12 months, and reporting 4 or more lifetime number of partners. Among men, widowhood, condom use with the last partner in the previous 12 months, and lack of circumcision were associated with undiagnosed HIV infection. Conclusions HIV prevalence has declined in Kenya since 2007. With improved access to treatment, HIV prevalence has become more challenging to interpret without data on new infections and mortality. Correlates of undiagnosed HIV infection provide important information on where to prioritize prevention interventions to reduce transmission of HIV in the broader population. PMID:24445338

  16. Vaccination in HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Vaccines are critical components for protecting HIV-infected adults from an increasing number of preventable diseases. However, missed opportunities for vaccination among HIV-infected persons persist, likely due to concerns regarding the safety and efficacy of vaccines, as well as the changing nature of vaccine guidelines. In addition, the optimal timing of vaccination among HIV-infected adults in regards to HIV stage and receipt of antiretroviral therapy remain important questions. This article provides a review of the current recommendations regarding vaccines among HIV-infected adults and a comprehensive summary of the evidence-based literature of the benefits and risks of vaccines among this vulnerable population. PMID:25029589

  17. Increased risk of histologically-defined cancer subtypes in HIV-infected individuals: clues for possible immunosuppression-related or infectious etiology

    PubMed Central

    Shiels, Meredith S.; Engels, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Malignancies that occur in excess among HIV-infected individuals may be caused by immunosuppression or infections. Because histologically-defined cancer subtypes have not been systematically evaluated, we assessed their risk among people with AIDS. Methods Analyses included 569,268 people with AIDS from the HIV/AIDS Cancer Match Study, a linkage of 15 U.S. population-based HIV/AIDS and cancer registries during 1980–2007. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were estimated to compare cancer risk in people with AIDS to the general population overall, and stratified by age, calendar period (a proxy of changing HIV therapies) and time since AIDS (a proxy of immunosuppression). Results Sixteen individual cancer histologies or histology groupings manifested significantly elevated SIRs. Risks were most elevated for adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (SIR=11.3), neoplasms of histiocytes and accessory lymphoid cells (SIR=10.7), giant cell carcinoma (SIR=7.51) and leukemia not otherwise specified (NOS) (SIR=6.69). SIRs ranged from 1.4 to 4.6 for spindle cell carcinoma, bronchioloalveolar adenocarcinoma, adnexal and skin appendage neoplasms, sarcoma NOS, spindle cell sarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, mesothelioma, germ cell tumors, plasma cell tumors, immunoproliferative diseases, acute lymphocytic leukemia and myeloid leukemias. For several of these cancer subtypes, we observed significant declines in SIRs across calendar periods (consistent with decreasing risk with improved HIV therapies) or increase in SIRs with time since AIDS (i.e., prolonged immunosuppression). Conclusions The elevated risk of certain cancer subtypes in people with AIDS may point to an etiologic role of immunosuppression or infection. Future studies are needed to further investigate these associations and evaluate candidate infectious agents. PMID:22359254

  18. Quality of life among persons living with HIV infection in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ogbuji, Q C; Oke, A E

    2010-06-01

    HIV infection is a major factor in the deteriorating. quality of life particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Currently, the HIV prevalence in Nigeria is 4.4% with wide variation across the states. Though much data exist on the socio-economic aspects of HIV/ AIDS, information on quality of life of People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) is still scanty. Therefore, this study focused on socio-psychological investigation of the quality of life of PLWHAs in Ibadan, Nigeria. The study adopted the survey research design and was conducted in three care support centres in Ibadan. Using systematic random sampling technique, 514 PLWHAs were selected. A triangulation of methods was employed using pre-tested structured questionnaire, fifteen Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) and six in-.depth interviews. The Health Belief Model complemented with the Quality of Life Tree guided the investigation. Quality Of Life was measured using the "HIV Symptom Scale" (HSS) and the "Quality Of Life Scale" (QOLS). Frequency distribution, percentages and chi-square were used to analyze quantitative data while content analysis was employed for qualitative data. The ages of the participants ranged from 15 -60 years with a mean of 34.8 (S.D 8.2). Sex distribution shows female preponderance with male: female ratio of 1:2. The data revealed poor quality of life among PLWHAs. There is no significant relationship between age and quality of life (P > 0.05). Almost equal proportion of participants aged 15 - 34 years (50.3%) and 35 -60 years (49.7%) showed similar quality of life as indicated by emotional status, life satisfaction and level of coping with the infection. Majority (70.0%) considered their poor financial condition a barrier to treatment. Qualitative data showed stigmatization and discrimination against PLWHAs by family and community members regardless of age and gender. This stimulated a deep feeling of sadness, dejection, hopelessness, anxiety and fear thereby affecting negatively their quality of

  19. Risk of HIV transmission during combined ART initiation for HIV-infected persons with severe immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Supervie, V; Assoumou, L; Breban, R; Lert, F; Costagliola, D; Pialoux, G; Landman, R; Girard, P M; Slama, L

    2017-08-14

    Individuals presenting for care with severe immunosuppression typically have high plasma HIV viral load (pVL) and may transmit HIV before and after initiation of combination antiretroviral therapies (cART). Using risk equations and data collected in the IMEA 040 DATA trial on sexual behaviour and pVL level of 84 HIV-infected patients (23 women), we estimated monthly rates of HIV transmission for each virologically unsuppressed participant (pVL >50 copies/mL) who reported sex with HIV-negative or unknown serostatus (HNUS) partners at cART initiation, 24 weeks (W24) and W48 after; rates were considered negligible for other participants. At cART initiation, median pVL was 5.4 log 10  copies/mL. The percentage of virologically unsuppressed patients decreased, from 100% at cART initiation to 27% (95% CI 16%-43%) for heterosexuals and 8% (95% CI 2%-22%) for MSM at W48 ( P  <   0.001). The percentage of patients reporting sex with HNUS partners increased between cART initiation and W48, from 23% (95% CI 10%-42%) to 42% (95% CI 25%-61%) for heterosexuals ( P  =   0.042) and from 41% (95% CI 21%-64%) to 73% (95% CI 52%-88%) for MSM ( P  =   0.004). Median monthly HIV transmission rates were 0.0540 (IQR 0.0339-0.0742) for MSM and 0.0018 (IQR 0.0014-0.0191) for heterosexuals at cART initiation, and were reduced by 95% (95% CI 87%-100%) for heterosexuals and 98% (95% CI 95%-100%) for MSM as early as W24. Risk of onward transmission for severely immunosuppressed individuals is high before and within the first weeks of cART, and persists, at a substantially reduced level, beyond 24 weeks of cART for some individuals. Earlier cART and protecting HIV-negative partners until full viral suppression is achieved could reduce HIV transmission.

  20. [Recommendation for diagnostics and therapy of toxoplasmosis in persons with HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Machala, L; Kodym, P; Rozsypal, H; Stanková, M; Sedlácek, D

    2007-12-01

    Reactivation of latent toxoplasmosis is a serious complication in patients with deep immunodeficiency, but the disease has a good prognosis if early diagnosed and effectively treated. Definitive etiologic proof of the reactivation may be difficult and thus an empiric method (therapeutic trial) is used for confirmation of the diagnosis in clinical practice. The preferred therapy is a combination of pyrimethamine + sulfadiazine.

  1. HIV infections in otolaryngology

    PubMed Central

    Rzewnicki, Ireneusz; Olszewska, Ewa; Rogowska-Szadkowska, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Summary HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection may produce no clinical symptoms for 10 years on average. However, after many years of infection most people develop symptoms that indicate progression of the disease. There are no regular characteristic symptoms or early stage, and no logical sequence of AIDS indicator disorders has been observed. People who are not aware of the infection are referred to physicians of various specializations, including otolaryngologists. It is on their knowledge about HIV infections, among other factors, that early diagnosis of the disease depends. Appropriate and quick introduction of anti-retroviral drugs may let a person with HIV live decades longer. PMID:22367140

  2. Tele-Interpersonal Psychotherapy Acutely Reduces Depressive Symptoms in Depressed HIV-Infected Rural Persons: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Heckman, Timothy G; Heckman, Bernadette D; Anderson, Timothy; Lovejoy, Travis I; Markowitz, John C; Shen, Ye; Sutton, Mark

    2016-04-26

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive rural individuals carry a 1.3-times greater risk of a depressive diagnosis than their urban counterparts. This randomized clinical trial tested whether telephone-administered interpersonal psychotherapy (tele-IPT) acutely relieved depressive symptoms in 132 HIV-infected rural persons from 28 states diagnosed with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV major depressive disorder (MDD), partially remitted MDD, or dysthymic disorder. Patients were randomized to either 9 sessions of one-on-one tele-IPT (n = 70) or standard care (SC; n = 62). A series of intent-to-treat (ITT), therapy completer, and sensitivity analyses assessed changes in depressive symptoms, interpersonal problems, and social support from pre- to postintervention. Across all analyses, tele-IPT patients reported significantly lower depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems than SC controls; 22% of tele-IPT patients were categorized as a priori "responders" who reported 50% or higher reductions in depressive symptoms compared to only 4% of SC controls in ITT analyses. Brief tele-IPT acutely decreased depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems in depressed rural people living with HIV.

  3. Asymptomatic HIV infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000682.htm Asymptomatic HIV infection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Asymptomatic HIV infection is a phase of HIV/AIDS during which ...

  4. Association of CD4+ T-cell Count, HIV-1 RNA Viral Load, and Antiretroviral Therapy With Kaposi Sarcoma Risk Among HIV-infected Persons in the United States and Canada.

    PubMed

    Dubrow, Robert; Qin, Li; Lin, Haiqun; Hernández-Ramírez, Raúl U; Neugebauer, Romain S; Leyden, Wendy; Althoff, Keri N; Achenbach, Chad J; Hessol, Nancy A; Modur, Sharada P; DʼSouza, Gypsyamber; Bosch, Ronald J; Grover, Surbhi; Horberg, Michael A; Kitahata, Mari M; Mayor, Angel M; Novak, Richard M; Rabkin, Charles S; Sterling, Timothy R; Goedert, James J; Justice, Amy C; Engels, Eric A; Moore, Richard D; Silverberg, Michael J

    2017-08-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) remains common among HIV-infected persons. To better understand KS etiology and to help target prevention efforts, we comprehensively examined a variety of CD4 T-cell count and HIV-1 RNA viral load (VL) measures, as well as antiretroviral therapy (ART) use, to determine independent predictors of KS risk. North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design. We followed HIV-infected persons during 1996-2009 from 18 cohorts. We used time-updated Cox regression to model relationships between KS risk and recent, lagged, trajectory, and cumulative CD4 count or VL measures, as well as ART use. We used Akaike's information criterion and global P values to derive a final model. In separate models, the relationship between each measure and KS risk was highly significant (P < 0.0001). Our final mutually adjusted model included recent CD4 count [hazard ratio (HR) for <50 vs. ≥500 cells/μL = 12.4; 95% confidence interval (CI): 6.5 to 23.8], recent VL (HR for ≥100,000 vs. ≤500 copies/mL = 3.8; 95% CI: 2.0 to 7.3), and cumulative (time-weighted mean) VL (HR for ≥100,000 vs. ≤500 copies/mL = 2.5; 95% CI: 1.0 to 5.9). Each P-trend was <0.0001. After adjusting for these measures, we did not detect an independent association between ART use and KS risk. Our results suggested a multifactorial etiology for KS, with early and late phases of development. The cumulative VL effect suggested that controlling HIV replication promptly after HIV diagnosis is important for KS prevention. We observed no evidence for direct anti-KS activity of ART, independent of CD4 count and VL.

  5. A randomized control trial of personalized cognitive counseling to reduce sexual risk among HIV-infected men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Schwarcz, Sandra K; Chen, Yea-Hung; Murphy, Jessie L; Paul, Jay P; Skinta, Matthew D; Scheer, Susan; Vittinghoff, Eric; Dilley, James W

    2013-01-01

    The increased life expectancy and well-being of HIV-infected persons presents the need for effective prevention methods in this population. Personalized cognitive counseling (PCC) has been shown to reduce unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) with a partner of unknown or different serostatus among HIV-uninfected men who have sex with men (MSM). We adapted PCC for use among HIV-infected MSM and tested its efficacy against standard risk-reduction counseling in a randomized clinical trial in San Francisco. Between November 2006 and April 2010, a total of 374 HIV-infected MSM who reported UAI with two or more men of negative or unknown HIV serostatus in the previous 6 months were randomized to two sessions of PCC or standard counseling 6 months apart. The primary outcome was the number of episodes of UAI with a non-primary male partner of different or unknown serostatus in the past 90 days, measured at baseline, 6, and 12 months. Surveys assessed participant satisfaction with the counseling. The mean number of episodes of UAI at baseline did not differ between PCC and control groups (2.97 and 3.14, respectively; p=0.82). The mean number of UAI episodes declined in both groups at 6 months, declined further in the PCC group at 12 months, while increasing to baseline levels among controls; these differences were not statistically significant. Episode mean ratios were 0.76 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.25-2.19, p=0.71) at 6 months and 0.48 (95% CI 0.12-1.84, p=0.34) at 12 months. Participants in both groups reported a high degree of satisfaction with the counseling. The findings from this randomized trial do not support the efficacy of a two-session PCC intervention at reducing UAI among HIV-infected MSM and indicate the continued need to identify and implement effective prevention methods in this population.

  6. A Randomized Trial to Test a Peer Mentor Intervention to Improve Outcomes in Persons Hospitalized With HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Thomas P.; Cully, Jeffrey; Amico, K. Rivet; Davila, Jessica A.; Kallen, Michael A.; Hartman, Christine; Wear, Jackie; Buscher, April; Stanley, Melinda

    2016-01-01

    Background. Few interventions have been shown to improve retention in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care, and none have targeted the hospitalized patient. Peer mentoring has not been rigorously tested. Methods. We conducted a randomized, controlled clinical trial of a peer mentoring intervention. Eligible adults were hospitalized and were either newly diagnosed with HIV infection or out of care. The intervention included 2 in-person sessions with a volunteer peer mentor while hospitalized, followed by 5 phone calls in the 10 weeks after discharge. The control intervention provided didactic sessions on avoiding HIV transmission on the same schedule. The primary outcome was a composite of retention in care (completed HIV primary care visits within 30 days and between 31 and 180 days after discharge) and viral load (VL) improvement (≥1 log10 decline) 6 months after discharge. Results. We enrolled 460 participants in 3 years; 417 were in the modified intent-to-treat analysis. The median age was 42 years; 74% were male; and 67% were non-Hispanic black. Baseline characteristics did not differ between the randomized groups. Twenty-eight percent of the participants in both arms met the primary outcome (P = .94). There were no differences in prespecified secondary outcomes, including retention in care and VL change. Post hoc analyses indicated interactions between the intervention and length of hospitalization and between the intervention and receipt of linkage services before discharge. Conclusions. Peer mentoring did not increase reengagement in outpatient HIV care among hospitalized, out-of-care persons. More intense and system-focused interventions warrant further study. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01103856. PMID:27217266

  7. Associations and Trends in Cause-Specific Rates of Death Among Persons Reported with HIV Infection, 23 U.S. Jurisdictions, Through 2011

    PubMed Central

    Adih, William K.; Selik, Richard M.; Hall, H. Irene; Babu, Aruna Surendera; Song, Ruiguang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Published death rates for persons with HIV have not distinguished deaths due to HIV from deaths due to other causes. Cause-specific death rates would allow better assessment of care needs. Methods: Using data reported to the US national HIV surveillance system, we examined a) associations between selected decedent characteristics and causes of death during 2007-2011, b) trends in rates of death due to underlying causes among persons with AIDS during 1990-2011, and among all persons with diagnosed HIV infection (with or without AIDS) during 2000-2011. Results: During 2007-2011, non-HIV-attributable causes of death with the highest rates per 1,000 person-years were heart disease (2.0), non-AIDS cancers other than lung cancer (1.4), and accidents (0.8). During 1990-2011, among persons with AIDS, the annual rate of death due to HIV-attributable causes decreased by 89% (from 122.0 to 13.2), and the rate due to non-HIV-attributable-causes decreased by 57% (from 20.0 to 8.6), while the percentage of deaths caused by non-HIV-attributable causes increased from 11% to 43%. During 2000-2011, among persons with HIV infection, the rate of death due to HIV-attributable causes decreased by 69% (from 26.4 to 8.3), and the rate due to non-HIV-attributable causes decreased by 28% (from 10.5 to 7.6), while the percentage of deaths caused by non-HIV-attributable causes increased from 25% to 48%. Conclusion: Among HIV-infected persons, as rates of death due to HIV-attributable causes decreased, rates due to non-HIV-attributable causes also decreased, but the percentages of deaths due to non-HIV-attributable causes, such as heart disease and non-AIDS cancers increased. PMID:27708746

  8. HIV Infections: A Personal Perspective on the Implications for Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1992

    1992-01-01

    An unidentified dental student who tested positive for the Human Immunodeficiency Virus offers a personal perspective on the emotions, concerns, and considerations of a seropositive student. He outlines the process by which he made decisions concerning his situation and describes the response of family, fellow students, and dental school…

  9. Chronic kidney disease at presentation is not an independent risk factor for AIDS-defining events or death in HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Alves, Tahira P; Wu, Pingsheng; Ikizler, T Alp; Sterling, Timothy R; Stinnette, Samuel E; Rebeiro, Peter F; Ghosh, Suvro; Hulgan, Todd

    2013-02-01

    Studies have documented an association between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and increased risk of end stage renal disease, death and comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome, in the general population. However, there is little data on the relationship between CKD and ADE (AIDS defining event), and to our knowledge, no studies have analyzed death as a competing risk for ADE among HIV-infected persons. An observational cohort study was performed to determine the incidence and risks for developing an ADE or death among HIV-infected persons with and without CKD from 1998 - 2005. CKD was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 using the CKDEpidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Log rank test and Cox regression which determined time to development of ADE and/or death as combined and separate outcomes, and competing risk models for ADE versus mortality, were performed. Among the 2,127 persons that contributed to the 5,824 person years of follow-up: 22% were female, 34% African American, 38% on HAART, and 3% had CKD at baseline. ADE occurred in 227 (11%) persons and there were 80 (4%) deaths. CKD was not significantly associated with ADE/death (HR 1.3, 95% CIs: 0.5, 3.2), ADE (HR 1.0, 95% CIs: 0.4, 3.1), or death (HR 1.6, 95% CIs: 0.4, 3.1). Competing risk analyses confirmed no statistically significant associations between CKD and these outcomes. CKD was uncommon in HIV-infected persons presenting for care in this racially diverse cohort, and was not independently associated with risk of developing an ADE or dying during follow-up.

  10. Linkage, engagement, and viral suppression rates among HIV-infected persons receiving care at medical case management programs in Washington, DC.

    PubMed

    Willis, Sarah; Castel, Amanda D; Ahmed, Tashrik; Olejemeh, Christie; Frison, Lawrence; Kharfen, Michael

    2013-11-01

    The District of Columbia Department of Health funds facilities to provide HIV medical case management (MCM), inclusive of linkage, engagement in care, and treatment adherence support. The objective of this analysis was to identify the differences in the clinical outcomes among HIV-infected persons receiving care at MCM-funded facilities compared with those in nonfunded facilities. Newly diagnosed and prevalent HIV-infected persons were identified from the District of Columbia Department of Health surveillance system. Clinical outcomes of interest were linkage, retention in care, and viral suppression. Bivariate analyses and random effects logistic regression were used to examine the differences in demographics and clinical outcomes of persons receiving care at MCM-funded and nonfunded facilities. Among 5631 prevalent cases, 56.7% received care at MCM-funded facilities of which 76.2% were retained in care, and 70.6% achieved viral suppression. Those receiving care in MCM-funded facilities were significantly more likely to be retained in care [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 4.13; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.93 to 8.85] and as likely (aOR 1.06; 95% CI: 0.68 to 1.62) to be virally suppressed than persons receiving care in nonfunded facilities. Among 789 newly diagnosed persons, those diagnosed in MCM-funded facilities were not significantly more likely to be linked to care within 3 months (aOR 0.50; 95% CI: 0.21 to 1.18) than those diagnosed in nonfunded facilities. This study provides evidence that MCM may be beneficial to HIV-infected persons in DC by improving retention in care. Further identification of the specific services providing the most benefit to clients is needed, including a better understanding of the complex relationship between retention and viral suppression.

  11. Linkage, Engagement, and Viral Suppression Rates among HIV-Infected Persons Receiving Care at Medical Case Management Programs in Washington, DC

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Sarah; Castel, Amanda D.; Ahmed, Tashrik; Olejemeh, Christie; Frison, Lawrence; Kharfen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background The District of Columbia Department of Health (DCDOH) funds facilities to provide HIV medical case management (MCM), inclusive of linkage, engagement in care, and treatment adherence support. The objective of this analysis was to identify differences in clinical outcomes among HIV-infected persons receiving care at MCM-funded facilities compared to non-funded facilities. Methods Newly diagnosed and prevalent HIV-infected persons were identified from the DCDOH surveillance system. Clinical outcomes of interest were linkage, retention in care, and viral suppression. Bivariate analyses and random effects logistic regression were used to examine differences in demographics and clinical outcomes of persons receiving care at MCM-funded and non-funded facilities. Results Among 5,631 prevalent cases, 56.7% received care at MCM-funded facilities of which 76.2% were retained in care, and 70.6% achieved viral suppression. Those receiving care in MCM-funded facilities were significantly more likely to be retained in care (aOR 4.13; 95%CI: 1.93-8.85) and as likely (aOR 1.06; 95%CI: 0.68-1.62) to be virally suppressed than persons receiving care in non-funded facilities. Among 789 newly diagnosed persons, those diagnosed in MCM-funded facilities were not significantly more likely to be linked to care within 3 months (aOR 0.50; 95%CI: 0.21-1.18) than those diagnosed in non-funded facilities. Discussion This study provides evidence that medical case management may be beneficial to HIV-infected persons in DC, as it improves retention in care. Further identification of the specific services providing the most benefit to clients is needed, as well as a better understanding of the complex relationship between retention and viral suppression. PMID:23982662

  12. Hospitalization Rates and Reasons Among HIV Elite Controllers and Persons With Medically Controlled HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Trevor A.; Gebo, Kelly A.; Blankson, Joel N.; Korthuis, P. Todd; Yehia, Baligh R.; Rutstein, Richard M.; Moore, Richard D.; Sharp, Victoria; Nijhawan, Ank E.; Mathews, W. Christopher; Hanau, Lawrence H.; Corales, Roberto B.; Beil, Robert; Somboonwit, Charurut; Edelstein, Howard; Allen, Sara L.; Berry, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Elite controllers spontaneously suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viremia but also demonstrate chronic inflammation that may increase risk of comorbid conditions. We compared hospitalization rates and causes among elite controllers to those of immunologically intact persons with medically controlled HIV. Methods. For adults in care at 11 sites from 2005 to 2011, person-years with CD4 T-cell counts ≥350 cells/mm2 were categorized as medical control, elite control, low viremia, or high viremia. All-cause and diagnostic category-specific hospitalization rates were compared between groups using negative binomial regression. Results. We identified 149 elite controllers (0.4%) among 34 354 persons in care. Unadjusted hospitalization rates among the medical control, elite control, low-viremia, and high-viremia groups were 10.5, 23.3, 12.6, and 16.9 per 100 person-years, respectively. After adjustment for demographic and clinical factors, elite control was associated with higher rates of all-cause (adjusted incidence rate ratio, 1.77 [95% confidence interval, 1.21–2.60]), cardiovascular (3.19 [1.50–6.79]) and psychiatric (3.98 [1.54–10.28]) hospitalization than was medical control. Non–AIDS-defining infections were the most common reason for admission overall (24.1% of hospitalizations) but were rare among elite controllers (2.7%), in whom cardiovascular hospitalizations were most common (31.1%). Conclusions. Elite controllers are hospitalized more frequently than persons with medically controlled HIV and cardiovascular hospitalizations are an important contributor. PMID:25512624

  13. Human β defensin-3 induces chemokines from monocytes and macrophages: diminished activity in cells from HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Velizar; Funderburg, Nicholas; Weinberg, Aaron; Sieg, Scott

    2013-12-01

    Human β defensin-3 (hBD-3) is an antimicrobial peptide with diverse functionality. We investigated the capacity of hBD-3 and, for comparison, Pam3CSK4 and LL-37 to induce co-stimulatory molecules and chemokine expression in monocytes. These stimuli differentially induced CD80 and CD86 on the surface of monocytes and each stimulant induced a variety of chemokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), Gro-α, macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP1β), while only hBD-3 and Pam3CSK4 significantly induced the angiogenesis factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Human BD-3 induced similar chemokines in monocyte-derived macrophages and additionally induced expression of Regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and presumably secreted (RANTES) in these cells. Comparison of monocytes from HIV(+) and HIV(-) donors indicated that monocytes from HIV(+) donors were more likely to spontaneously express certain chemokines (MIP-1α, MIP-1β and MCP-1) and less able to increase expression of other molecules in response to hBD-3 (MDC, Gro-α and VEGF). Chemokine receptor expression (CCR5, CCR2 and CXCR2) was relatively normal in monocytes from HIV(+) donors compared with cells from HIV(-) donors with the exception of diminished expression of the receptor for MDC, CCR4, which was reduced in the patrolling monocyte subset (CD14(+)  CD16(++) ) of HIV(+) donors. These observations implicate chemokine induction by hBD-3 as a potentially important mechanism for orchestrating cell migration into inflamed tissues. Alterations in chemokine production or their receptors in monocytes of HIV-infected persons could influence cell migration and modify the effects of hBD-3 at sites of inflammation.

  14. Sex, college major, and attribution of responsibility in empathic responding to persons with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Bécares, Laia; Turner, Castellano

    2004-10-01

    This investigation studied the influence of sex, college major, and attributed responsibility on college students' empathic responding towards persons infected with HIV. We hypothesized that (1) women would score higher on empathy than men; (2) nursing and psychology majors would score higher on empathy than business and computer science majors; and (3) participants would score higher on empathy towards a target who contracted HIV through blood transfusion (presented as a Nonresponsible target) rather than through unprotected sex (presented as a Responsible target). Two hundred and fifty-eight undergraduate students (110 male, 148 female) attending a large urban university in the northeast filled out an anonymous demographic questionnaire, the Interpersonal Reactivity Index of Davis (1983), and an Empathy Reaction Scale that was developed by the authors. Results indicated a higher mean Empathy Reaction score from nursing and psychology students as compared to business and computer science students. There was no difference in Empathy Reaction scores between men and women. A higher Empathy Reaction score was found among participants who had read a diary from the target portrayed as Nonresponsible, as opposed to those who read a diary from the target portrayed as Responsible.

  15. Marijuana Use and Viral Suppression in Persons Receiving Medical Care for HIV-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, Chukwuemeka N.; Zhou, Zhi; Burrell, Larry E.; Kelso, Natalie E; Whitehead, Nicole E.; Harman, Jeffery S.; Cook, Christa L.; Cook, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Marijuana use is common among persons living with HIV (PLWH), but its effect on HIV clinical outcomes has not been thoroughly studied. Objectives We determined the association between marijuana use and HIV viral suppression among PLWH. Methods Data came from five repeated cross-sections (2009 – 2013) of the Florida Medical Monitoring Project, a population-based sample of PLWH in Florida. Data were obtained via interview and medical record abstraction. Weighted logistic regression models were used to determine the association between marijuana use (past 12-months) and durable viral suppression (HIV-1 RNA value of ≤ 200 copies/milliliter in all measurements within the past 12-months). Results Of the 1,902 PLWH receiving antiretroviral therapy and completed an interview and had a linked medical record abstraction, 20% reported marijuana use in the past 12 months (13% less than daily and 7% daily use). Of the total sample, 73% achieved durable viral suppression. In multivariable analysis, marijuana use was not significantly associated with durable viral suppression in daily [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR):0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.58, 1.33] or in less than daily [AOR: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.51, 1.37] users as compared to non-users when adjusting for sociodemographic factors, time since HIV diagnosis, depressive symptoms, alcohol, cigarette and other substance use. Conclusion In this sample of PLWH receiving medical care in Florida, there was no statistically significant association between marijuana use and viral suppression. As our findings suggest the possibility of a clinical important effect, there is a need for additional evidence from other samples and settings that include more marijuana users. PMID:27398989

  16. Acute pancreatitis: Manifestation of acute HIV infection in an adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Anas; Altaf, Muhammad; Sferra, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Pancreatitis in the pediatric age group is not as common as in adults. Etiologies are various and differ from those in adults. Although infectious etiology accounts for a significant number of cases of pancreatitis, acute infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) was rarely reported as a possible etiology for acute pancreatitis in adults. Acute pancreatitis has never been reported as a presenting manifestation of acute HIV infection in children. Case Report: We describe a pediatric patient who presented with acute pancreatitis that revealed acute HIV infection. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis as a primary manifestation of HIV infection is very rare. It may represent an uncommon aspect of primary HIV infection. We suggest that acute HIV infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute pancreatitis at all ages. PMID:23569476

  17. The Impact of Taking or Not Taking ARVs on HIV Stigma as Reported by Persons Living with HIV Infection in Five African Countries

    PubMed Central

    Makoae, Lucy N.; Portillo, Carmen J.; Uys, Leana R.; Dlamini, Priscilla S.; Greeff, Minrie; Chirwa, Maureen; Kohi, Thecla W.; Naidoo, Joanne; Mullan, Joseph; Wantland, Dean; Durrheim, Kevin; Holzemer, William L.

    2009-01-01

    Aim This study examined the impact of taking or not taking antiretroviral (ARV) medications on stigma, as reported by people living with HIV infection in five African countries. Design A two group (taking or not taking ARVs) by three (time) repeated measures analysis of variance examined change in reported stigma in a cohort sample of 1,454 persons living with HIV infection in Lesotho, Malawi, South Africa, Swaziland, and Tanzania. Participants self-reported taking ARV medications and completed a standardized stigma scale validated in the African context. Data were collected at three points in time, from January 2006 to March 2007. Participants taking ARV medications self-reported a mean CD4 count of 273 and those not taking ARV self-reported a mean CD4 count of 418. Results Both groups reported significant decreases in total HIV stigma over time; however, people taking ARVs reported significantly higher stigma at Time 3 compared to those not taking ARVs. Discussion This study documents that this sample of 1,454 HIV infected persons in five countries in Africa reported significantly less HIV stigma over time. In addition, those participants taking ARV medications experienced significantly higher HIV stigma over time compared to those not taking ARVs. This finding contradicts some authors’ opinions that when clients enroll in ARV medication treatment it signifies that they are experiencing less stigma. This work provides caution to health care providers to alert clients new to ARV treatment that they may experience more stigma from their families and communities when they learn they are taking ARV medications. PMID:20024711

  18. Health-related beliefs and decisions about accessing HIV medical care among HIV-infected persons who are not receiving care.

    PubMed

    Beer, Linda; Fagan, Jennifer L; Valverde, Eduardo; Bertolli, Jeanne

    2009-09-01

    In the United States, the publically supported national HIV medical care system is designed to provide HIV medical care to those who would otherwise not receive such care. Nevertheless, many HIV-infected persons are not receiving medical care. Limited information is available from HIV-infected persons not currently in care about the reasons they are not receiving care. From November 2006 to February 2007, we conducted five focus groups at community-based organizations and health departments in five U.S. cities to elicit qualitative information about barriers to entering HIV care. The 37 participants were mostly male (n = 29), over the age of 30 (n = 34), and all but one had not received HIV medical care in the previous 6 months. The focus group discussions revealed health belief-related barriers that have often been overlooked by studies of access to care. Three key themes emerged: avoidance and disbelief of HIV serostatus, conceptions of illness and appropriate health care, and negative experiences with, and distrust of, health care. Our findings point to the potentially important influence of these health-related beliefs on individual decisions about whether to access HIV medical care. We also discuss the implications of these beliefs for provider-patient communication, and suggest that providers frame their communications with patients such that they are attentive to the issues identified by our respondents, to better engage patients as partners in the treatment process.

  19. Targeted testing for acute HIV infection in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Miller, William C; Leone, Peter A; McCoy, Sandra; Nguyen, Trang Q; Williams, Delbert E; Pilcher, Christopher D

    2009-04-27

    Persons with acute HIV infection contribute disproportionately to HIV transmission. The identification of these persons is a critical public health challenge. We developed targeted approaches for detecting HIV RNA in persons with negative serological tests. Persons undergoing publicly funded HIV testing in North Carolina between October 2002 and April 2005 were included in this cross-sectional study. We used logistic regression to develop targeted testing approaches. We also assessed simple approaches based on clinic type and geography. Algorithm development used persons with recent HIV infection, determined by a detuned enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Validation used persons with acute HIV infection, identified with an HIV RNA pooling procedure. Among 215 528 eligible persons, 232 persons had recent HIV infection and 44 had acute HIV infection. A combination of five indicators (testing site, sexual preference, sex with a person with HIV infection, county HIV incidence, and race) identified 92% of recent infections when testing 50% of the population. In validation among persons with acute HIV infection, this indicator combination had sensitivities of 98% in years 1 and 2 and 88% in year 3. A simple combination of testing site and county performed nearly as well [development (recent infections): sensitivity = 95%; validation (acute infections): sensitivity = 86% in years 1 and 2; 81% in year 3; cut-off established for testing 50% of population.] Acute HIV infection can be identified accurately using targeted testing. Simple approaches for identifying the types of clinics and geographical areas where infections are concentrated may be logistically feasible and cost-efficient.

  20. Emerging from the database shadows: characterizing undocumented immigrants in a large cohort of HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jonathan; Hanna, David B; Felsen, Uriel R; Cunningham, Chinazo O; Patel, Viraj V

    2017-03-27

    Little is known about how HIV affects undocumented immigrants despite social and structural factors that may place them at risk of poor HIV outcomes. Our understanding of the clinical epidemiology of HIV-infected undocumented immigrants is limited by the challenges of determining undocumented immigration status in large data sets. We developed an algorithm to predict undocumented status using social security number (SSN) and insurance data. We retrospectively applied this algorithm to a cohort of HIV-infected adults receiving care at a large urban healthcare system who attended at least one HIV-related outpatient visit from 1997 to 2013, classifying patients as "screened undocumented" or "documented". We then reviewed the medical records of screened undocumented patients, classifying those whose records contained evidence of undocumented status as "undocumented per medical chart" (charted undocumented). Bivariate measures of association were used to identify demographic and clinical characteristics associated with undocumented immigrant status. Of 7593 patients, 205 (2.7%) were classified as undocumented by the algorithm. Compared to documented patients, undocumented patients were younger at entry to care (mean 38.5 years vs. 40.6 years, p < 0.05), less likely to be female (33.2% vs. 43.1%, p < 0.01), less likely to report injection drug use as their primary HIV risk factor (3.4% vs. 18.0%, p < 0.001), and had lower median CD4 count at entry to care (288 vs. 339 cells/mm(3), p < 0.01). After medical record review, we re-classified 104 patients (50.7%) as charted undocumented. Demographic and clinical characteristics of charted undocumented did not differ substantially from screened undocumented. Our algorithm allowed us to identify and clinically characterize undocumented immigrants within an HIV-infected population, though it overestimated the prevalence of patients who were undocumented.

  1. Genotypic characterisation of human papillomavirus infections among persons living with HIV infection; a case-control study in Kumasi, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Yar, Denis Dekugmen; Salifu, Samson Pandam; Darko, Samuel Nkansah; Annan, Augustina Angelina; Gyimah, Akosua Adumea; Buabeng, Kwame Ohene; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the burden of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among women living with HIV and non-infected women in Ghana. A case-control study was conducted involving 107 women living with HIV aged between 18 and 59 years (cases) and 100 non-HIV-infected apparently healthy women (controls) who were recruited from the Kumasi South Hospital, from July to December, 2014. Cervicovaginal swabs were taken from study participants to characterise 28 high- and low-risk HPV genotypes using a multiplex real-time PCR. The overall mean age for the participants was 40.10 ± 9.76 years. The prevalence of high-risk (hr)-HPV genotypes was significantly higher among the cases than the controls (77.4% vs. 41.6%, P < 0.0001). Overall, HPV 58 and 54 were the most predominant high-risk (18.8%) and low-risk (15.0%) genotypes detected. The two most common hr-HPV genotype isolates were 58 (18.8%) and 35 (15.9%) with 58 being the most prevalent among age group 35-44 years compared with hr-HPV 16, 18, 35 and 45, found predominantly among 18-34 age group. Significant variations exist in HPV genotypes among HIV-infected and uninfected women. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Cost-effectiveness analysis of recruitment strategies in a community-based intervention study of HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Baigis, J; Francis, M E; Hoffman, M

    2003-10-01

    This paper describes and evaluates recruitment methods used to reach adults with HIV infection and to enroll eligible candidates in a randomized trial of aerobic exercise. Potential participants residing in the metropolitan Washington DC area were recruited from January 1994 to December 1996. The yield and associated cost of clinic centre site-visit (CSV) recruitment are compared to similar outcomes for community-based (CB) recruitment strategies, which consisted of presentations to local groups, mail/phone canvasses of caregivers, neighbourhood network promotion, public site postings and print media notices. Of 833 HIV infected adults ascertained during the recruitment phase as prospective study candidates, 66.7% were initially contacted during CSV recruitment. The remainder, 33.3% were CB recruits. The percentage of screened candidates who were subsequently enrolled in the study was 13.5% for CSV recruitment and 21% for CB recruitment. Ascertainment and screening costs combined were $158 per CB recruit compared to $232 per CSV recruit. Using multiple recruitment approaches we successfully achieved our enrollment goal of at least 100 volunteers from diverse populations by the end of the planned recruitment period.

  3. Psychogenic "HIV infection".

    PubMed

    Sno, H N; Storosum, J G; Wortel, C H

    1991-01-01

    The case of a man who falsely represented himself as being HIV positive is reported. In less than one year he was admitted twice with symptoms suggestive of HIV infection. The diagnoses malingering and factitious disorder were consecutively made. Early recognition of Factitious Disorder is essential to prevent patients from harmful diagnostic procedures or surgical treatments. Psychiatric treatment is best focused on management and care rather than cure. Psychogenic "HIV infection" might become more common than acknowledged up to now. Physicians should consider the occurrence of psychogenic "HIV infection," part of the symptomatology may be psychogenically determined, or indeed frankly simulated.

  4. Cancer Prevention in HIV-Infected Populations

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Priscila H.; Montezuma-Rusca, Jairo M.; Yarchoan, Robert; Uldrick, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    People living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are living longer since the advent of effective combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). While cART substantially decreases the risk of developing some cancers, HIV-infected individuals remain at high risk for Kaposi sarcoma, lymphoma and several solid tumors. Currently HIV-infected patients represent an aging group, and malignancies have become a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Tailored cancer-prevention strategies are needed for this population. In this review we describe the etiologic agents and pathogenesis of common malignancies in the setting of HIV, as well as current evidence for cancer prevention strategies and screening programs. PMID:26970136

  5. Travelers' Health: HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share Compartir Chapter 3 - Histoplasmosis Chapter 3 - Influenza HIV Infection Philip J. Peters, John T. Brooks INFECTIOUS ... at 888-448-4911 ( www.nccc.ucsf.edu ). HIV TESTING REQUIREMENTS FOR US TRAVELERS ENTERING FOREIGN COUNTRIES ...

  6. Thinking about HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Simpkins, Evelyn P; Siberry, George K; Hutton, Nancy

    2009-09-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of HIV can occur during pregnancy, labor, delivery, and breastfeeding. Evidence-based interventions (routine screening of pregnant women, initiation of antiretroviral drugs for mother's treatment or prevention of MTCT, and avoiding breastfeeding) have reduced transmission rates in the United States from 25% to 30% to less than 2%. Triple-drug combination antiretroviral therapy effectively controls HIV infection and improves survival and quality of life for HIV-infected children and adolescents. Initial regimens use combinations of two NRTIs together with an NNRTI or a ritonavir-boosted PI. These regimens have been shown to increase CD4 counts and achieve virologic suppression. Prevention of serious and opportunistic infections reduces morbidity and mortality in children and adolescents who have HIV infection. Recommendations for immunizations and chemoprophylaxis vary with the patient's CD4 count. Condoms made from latex, polyurethane, or other synthetic materials have been shown to decrease the transmission of STIs, including HIV infection.

  7. Pediatric HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Espanol, Teresa; Caragol, Isabel; Soler, Pere; Hernandez, Manuel

    2004-12-01

    HIV infection by maternal transmission is increasing in the world due to the increase in infected women who are not receiving appropriate antiretroviral therapy. Prognosis of HIV infection in children is poor because the newborn has an immature immune system. Early diagnosis and therapy are needed to avoid the development of AIDS. New therapies are becoming available but prevention of infection, through maternal therapy during pregnancy, is the most effective measure in avoiding this infection through this transmission route.

  8. Risk factors associated with HIV infection among young persons aged 15-24 years: evidence from an in-depth analysis of the 2005-06 Zimbabwe Demographic and Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Kembo, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on factors that predispose young persons aged 15-24 years in Zimbabwe to infection from HIV. Using the Mosley and Chen framework, multivariate modelling was used to assess the effect of demographic, socio-economic and behavioural factors on the risk of HIV infection among this target group. The study utilised data from the Zimbabwe Demographic and Health Survey (ZDHS) conducted in 2005-06. Only the variables that were significant in the bivariate analysis were included in the multivariate binary logistic regression. Young females aged 15-24 years are associated with a significant two-fold elevated risk of HIV infection relative to their male peers (p < 0.000). Young persons aged 15-24 years who were divorced, widowed or not living together have significantly elevated risk compared with their never-married counterparts, OR = 5.267 (p = 0.000); OR = 4.323 (p = 0.000) and OR = 3.272 (p = 0.000), respectively. Young persons whose age at first sexual intercourse was less than 14 years are significantly associated with 2.696 times more risk of HIV infection relative to their peers whose age at first sexual intercourse was 20-24 years (p = 0.000). Young persons aged 15-24 years with two or more sex partners in the past 12 months preceding the 2005-06 ZDHS survey had a significantly elevated risk of HIV infection of 1.568 times relative to their counterparts with no sex partners in the same period of time. Great challenges still exist for the control of HIV and AIDS among young persons in Zimbabwe. HIV prevention programmes targeted at young persons aged 15-24 years should provide invigorated focus on marital status, age at sexual debut, number of sexual partners, sexually transmitted infections and condom use so as to mitigate these predisposing factors for HIV infection.

  9. Increased Hepatitis E Virus Seroprevalence Correlates with Lower CD4+ Cell Counts in HIV-Infected Persons in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Debes, José D.; Martínez Wassaf, Maribel; Pisano, María Belén; Isa, María Beatriz; Lotto, Martin; Marianelli, Leonardo G.; Frassone, Natalia; Ballari, Estefania; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Hansen, Bettina E.; Ré, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a single-stranded RNA virus that can cause hepatitis in an epidemic fashion. HEV usually causes asymptomatic or limited acute infections in immunocompetent individuals, whereas in immunosuppressed individuals such as transplant recipients, HEV can cause chronic infections. The risks and outcomes of HEV co-infection in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are poorly characterized. We used a third generation immunoassay to measure serum IgG antibodies specific for HEV in 204 HIV-infected individuals from Argentina and a control group of 433 HIV-negative individuals. We found 15 of 204 (7.3%, 95%CI 3.74–10.96%) individuals in the HIV-positive group to have positive HEV IgG levels suggestive of previous infection, compared to 19 of 433 (4.4%, 95% CI 2.5–6.3%) individuals in the HIV-negative control group (p = 0.12). Among HIV-positive individuals, those with HEV seropositivity had lower CD4 counts compared to those that were HEV seronegative (average CD4 count of 234 vs 422 mm3, p = 0.01), indicating that patients with lower CD4 counts were more likely to be HEV IgG positive. Moreover, HEV seropositivity in patients with CD4 counts <200 mm3 was 16%, compared to 4.5% in those with CD4 counts >200 mm3 (p = 0.012). We found a positive PCR result for HEV in one individual. Our study found that increased seroprevalence of HEV IgG correlated with lower CD4 counts in HIV-infected patients in Argentina. PMID:27467394

  10. Increased Hepatitis E Virus Seroprevalence Correlates with Lower CD4+ Cell Counts in HIV-Infected Persons in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Debes, José D; Martínez Wassaf, Maribel; Pisano, María Belén; Isa, María Beatriz; Lotto, Martin; Marianelli, Leonardo G; Frassone, Natalia; Ballari, Estefania; Bohjanen, Paul R; Hansen, Bettina E; Ré, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a single-stranded RNA virus that can cause hepatitis in an epidemic fashion. HEV usually causes asymptomatic or limited acute infections in immunocompetent individuals, whereas in immunosuppressed individuals such as transplant recipients, HEV can cause chronic infections. The risks and outcomes of HEV co-infection in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are poorly characterized. We used a third generation immunoassay to measure serum IgG antibodies specific for HEV in 204 HIV-infected individuals from Argentina and a control group of 433 HIV-negative individuals. We found 15 of 204 (7.3%, 95%CI 3.74-10.96%) individuals in the HIV-positive group to have positive HEV IgG levels suggestive of previous infection, compared to 19 of 433 (4.4%, 95% CI 2.5-6.3%) individuals in the HIV-negative control group (p = 0.12). Among HIV-positive individuals, those with HEV seropositivity had lower CD4 counts compared to those that were HEV seronegative (average CD4 count of 234 vs 422 mm3, p = 0.01), indicating that patients with lower CD4 counts were more likely to be HEV IgG positive. Moreover, HEV seropositivity in patients with CD4 counts <200 mm3 was 16%, compared to 4.5% in those with CD4 counts >200 mm3 (p = 0.012). We found a positive PCR result for HEV in one individual. Our study found that increased seroprevalence of HEV IgG correlated with lower CD4 counts in HIV-infected patients in Argentina.

  11. High Prevalence of Low Bone Mineral Density and Substantial Bone Loss over 4 Years Among HIV-Infected Persons in the Era of Modern Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Escota, Gerome V; Mondy, Kristin; Bush, Tim; Conley, Lois; Brooks, John T; Önen, Nur; Patel, Pragna; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Henry, Keith; Hammer, John; Wood, K C; Lichtenstein, Kenneth A; Overton, Edgar T

    2016-01-01

    HIV-infected persons are living longer on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) but experiencing more comorbidities including low bone mineral density (BMD). Using data from the Study to Understand the Natural History of HIV and AIDS in the Era of Effective Therapy (SUN Study), we determined the prevalence of low BMD (T-score below one standard deviation of the reference mean) and compared it with matched controls from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). We also assessed 4-year longitudinal BMD changes among participants virologically suppressed on cART. Of 653 participants included in this analysis (77% male, 29% black, median age 41 years, median CD4(+) cell count 464 cells/mm(3), 89% with HIV RNA <400 copies/ml), 51% and 10% had baseline osteopenia and osteoporosis, respectively. Low BMD at the femoral neck was significantly more prevalent than for the NHANES controls (47% versus 29%, p<0.001). Lower body mass index, nonwhite race, longer tenofovir exposure, older age, being unemployed or retired, and lower apolipoprotein E were independently associated with baseline osteoporosis. Among 170 participants virologically suppressed on cART and with longitudinal BMD data, 31% experienced substantial bone loss (≥5% BMD decline from baseline) over 4 years. Female sex, current smoking, and longer stavudine use were more common among participants who had substantial bone loss, although these variables failed to reach statistical significance. Low BMD was highly prevalent among HIV-infected persons. One-third of participants experienced substantial bone loss despite cART, suggesting the need for monitoring and potential clinical interventions.

  12. A single dose of benzathine penicillin G is as effective as multiple doses of benzathine penicillin G for the treatment of HIV-infected persons with early syphilis.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Anuradha; Mesner, Octavio; Okulicz, Jason F; O'Bryan, Thomas; Deiss, Robert G; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Whitman, Timothy J; Weintrob, Amy C; Macalino, Grace; Agan, Brian K

    2015-02-15

    Treatment guidelines recommend the use of a single dose of benzathine penicillin G (BPG) for treating early syphilis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons. However, data supporting this recommendation are limited. We examined the efficacy of single-dose BPG in the US Military HIV Natural History Study. Subjects were included if they met serologic criteria for syphilis (ie, a positive nontreponemal test [NTr] confirmed by treponemal testing). Response to treatment was assessed at 13 months and was defined by a ≥4-fold decline in NTr titer. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models were utilized to examine factors associated with treatment response. Three hundred fifty subjects (99% male) contributed 478 cases. Three hundred ninety-three cases were treated exclusively with BPG (141 with 1 dose of BPG). Treatment response was the same among those receiving 1 or >1 dose of BPG (92%). In a multivariate analysis, older age (hazard ratio [HR], 0.82 per 10-year increase; 95% confidence interval [CI], .73-.93) was associated with delayed response to treatment. Higher pretreatment titers (reference NTr titer <1:64; HR, 1.94 [95% CI, 1.58-2.39]) and CD4 counts (HR, 1.07 for every 100-cell increase [95% CI, 1.01-1.12]) were associated with a faster response to treatment. Response was not affected by the number of BPG doses received (reference, 1 dose of BPG; HR, 1.11 [95% CI, .89-1.4]). In this cohort, additional BPG doses did not affect treatment response. Our data support the current recommendations for the use of a single dose of BPG to treat HIV-infected persons with early syphilis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. HIV Care and Viral Suppression During the Last Year of Life: A Comparison of HIV-Infected Persons Who Died of HIV-Attributable Causes With Persons Who Died of Other Causes in 2012 in 13 US Jurisdictions

    PubMed Central

    Hall, H Irene; Selik, Richard M; Guo, Xiuchan

    2017-01-01

    Background Little information is available about care before death among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected persons who die of HIV infection, compared with those who die of other causes. Objective The objective of our study was to compare HIV care and outcome before death among persons with HIV who died of HIV-attributable versus other causes. Methods We used National HIV Surveillance System data on CD4 T-lymphocyte counts and viral loads within 12 months before death in 2012, as well as on underlying cause of death. Deaths were classified as “HIV-attributable” if the reported underlying cause was HIV infection, an AIDS-defining disease, or immunodeficiency and as attributable to “other causes” if the cause was anything else. Persons were classified as “in continuous care” if they had ≥2 CD4 or viral load test results ≥3 months apart in those 12 months and as having “viral suppression” if their last viral load was <200 copies/mL. Results Among persons dying of HIV-attributable or other causes, respectively, 65.28% (2104/3223) and 30.88% (1041/3371) met AIDS criteria within 12 months before death, and 33.76% (1088/3223) and 50.96% (1718/3371) had viral suppression. The percentage of persons who received ≥2 tests ≥3 months apart did not differ by cause of death. Prevalence of viral suppression for persons who ever had AIDS was lower among those who died of HIV but did not differ by cause for those who never had AIDS. Conclusions The lower prevalence of viral suppression among persons who died of HIV than among those who died of other causes implies a need to improve viral suppression strategies to reduce mortality due to HIV infection. PMID:28119277

  14. Efficacy of a Six-Month versus a 36-Month Regimen for Prevention of Tuberculosis in HIV-Infected Persons in India: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Soumya; Menon, Pradeep Aravindan; Gopalan, Narendran; Perumal, Venkatesan; Santhanakrishnan, Ramesh Kumar; Ramachandran, Ranjani; Chinnaiyan, Ponnuraja; Iliayas, Sheik; Chandrasekaran, Padmapriyadarsini; Navaneethapandian, Pooranaganga Devi; Elangovan, Thiruvalluvan; Pho, Mai Tuyet; Wares, Fraser; Paranji RamaIyengar, Narayanan

    2012-01-01

    Background The optimal duration of preventive therapy for tuberculosis (TB) among HIV-infected persons in TB-endemic countries is unknown. Methods An open-label randomized clinical trial was performed and analyzed for equivalence. Seven hundred and twelve HIV-infected, ART-naïve patients without active TB were randomized to receive either ethambutol 800 mg and isoniazid 300 mg daily for six-months (6EH) or isoniazid 300 mg daily for 36-months (36H). Drugs were dispensed fortnightly and adherence checked by home visits. Patients had chest radiograph, sputum smear and culture performed every six months, in addition to investigations if they developed symptoms. The primary endpoint was incident TB while secondary endpoints were all-cause mortality and adverse events. Survival analysis was performed on the modified intent to treat population (m-ITT) and rates compared. Findings Tuberculosis developed in 22 (6.4%) of 344 subjects in the 6EH arm and 13 (3.8%) of 339 subjects in the 36H arm with incidence rates of 2.4/100py (95%CI- 1.4–3.5) and 1.6/100py (95% CI-0.8–3.0) with an adjusted rate ratio (aIRR) of 1.6 (0.8–3.2). Among TST-positive subjects, the aIRR of 6EH was 1.7 (0.6–4.3) compared to 36H, p = 0.8. All-cause mortality and toxicity were similar in the two arms. Among 15 patients with confirmed TB, 4 isolates were resistant to isoniazid and 2 were multidrug-resistant. Interpretation Both regimens were similarly effective in preventing TB, when compared to historical incidence rates. However, there was a trend to lower TB incidence with 36H. There was no increase in isoniazid resistance compared to the expected rate in HIV-infected patients. The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00351702. PMID:23251327

  15. Viral Loads Among HIV-Infected Persons Diagnosed With Primary and Secondary Syphilis in 4 US Cities: New York City, Philadelphia, PA, Washington, DC, and Phoenix, AZ.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Melanie M; Newman, Daniel R; Schillinger, Julia A; Lewis, Felicia M T; Furness, Bruce; Braunstein, Sarah; Mickey, Tom; Skinner, Julia; Eberhart, Michael; Opoku, Jenevieve; Blank, Susan; Peterman, Thomas A

    2015-10-01

    Incident syphilis among HIV-infected persons indicates the ongoing behavioral risk for HIV transmission. Detectable viral loads (VLs) among coinfected cases may amplify this risk. Primary and secondary cases reported during 2009-2010 from 4 US sites were crossmatched with local HIV surveillance registries to identify syphilis case-persons infected with HIV before or shortly after the syphilis diagnosis. We examined HIV VL and CD4 results collected within 6 months before or after syphilis diagnosis for the coinfected cases identified. Independent correlates of detectable VLs (≥200 copies/mL) were determined. We identified 1675 cases of incident primary or secondary syphilis among persons with HIV. Median age was 37 years; 99.5% were men, 41.1% were African American, 24.5% were Hispanics, and 79.9% of the HIV diagnoses were made at least 1 year before syphilis diagnosis. Among those coinfected, there were no VL results reported for 188 (11.2%); of the 1487 (88.8%) with reported VL results, 809 (54.4%) had a detectable VL (median, 25,101 copies/mL; range, 206-3,590,000 copies/mL). Detectable VLs independently correlated with syphilis diagnosed at younger age, at an sexually transmitted disease clinic, and closer in time to HIV diagnosis. More than half of syphilis case-persons identified with HIV had a detectable VL collected within 6 months of the syphilis diagnosis. This suggests virologic and active behavioral risk for transmitting HIV.

  16. Comparison of Rates of Death Having any Death-Certificate Mention of Heart, Kidney, or Liver Disease Among Persons Diagnosed with HIV Infection with those in the General US Population, 2009-2011

    PubMed Central

    Whiteside, Y. Omar; Selik, Richard; An, Qian; Huang, Taoying; Karch, Debra; Hernandez, Angela L; Hall, H. Irene

    2015-01-01

    Objective : Compare age-adjusted rates of death due to liver, kidney, and heart diseases during 2009-2011 among US residents diagnosed with HIV infection with those in the general population. Methods : Numerators were numbers of records of multiple-cause mortality data from the national vital statistics system with an ICD-10 code for the disease of interest (any mention, not necessarily the underlying cause), divided into those 1) with and 2) without an additional code for HIV infection. Denominators were 1) estimates of persons living with diagnosed HIV infection from national HIV surveillance system data and 2) general population estimates from the US Census Bureau. We compared age-adjusted rates overall (unstratified by sex, race/ethnicity, or region of residence) and stratified by demographic group. Results : Overall, compared with the general population, persons diagnosed with HIV infection had higher age-adjusted rates of death reported with hepatitis B (rate ratio [RR]=42.6; 95% CI: 34.7-50.7), hepatitis C (RR=19.4; 95% CI: 18.1-20.8), liver disease excluding hepatitis B or C (RR=2.1; 95% CI: 1.8-2.3), kidney disease (RR=2.4; 95% CI: 2.2-2.6), and cardiomyopathy (RR=1.9; 95% CI: 1.6-2.3), but lower rates of death reported with ischemic heart disease (RR=0.6; 95% CI: 0.6-0.7) and heart failure (RR=0.8; 95% CI: 0.6-0.9). However, the differences in rates of death reported with the heart diseases were insignificant in some demographic groups. Conclusion : Persons with HIV infection have a higher risk of death with liver and kidney diseases reported as causes than the general population. PMID:25767634

  17. Cardiovascular Risk Assessment: A Comparison of the Framingham, PROCAM, and DAD Equations in HIV-Infected Persons

    PubMed Central

    Nery, Max Weyler; Martelli, Celina Maria Turchi; Aparecida Silveira, Erika; de Sousa, Clarissa Alencar; Falco, Marianne de Oliveira; de Castro, Aline de Cássia Oliveira; Esper, Jorge Tannus; Souza, Luis Carlos Silva e; Turchi, Marília Dalva

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to estimate the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and to assess the agreement between the Framingham, Framingham with aggravating factors, PROCAM, and DAD equations in HIV-infected patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted in an outpatient centre in Brazil. 294 patients older than 19 years were enrolled. Estimates of 10-year cardiovascular risk were calculated. The agreement between the CVD risk equations was assessed using Cohen's kappa coefficient. The participants' mean age was 36.8 years (SD = 10.3), 76.9% were men, and 66.3% were on antiretroviral therapy. 47.8% of the participants had abdominal obesity, 23.1% were current smokers, 20.0% had hypertension, and 2.0% had diabetes. At least one lipid abnormality was detected in 72.8%, and a low HDL-C level was the most common. The majority were classified as having low risk for CV events. The percentage of patients at high risk ranged from 0.4 to 5.7. The PROCAM score placed the lowest proportion of the patients into a high-risk group, and the Framingham equation with aggravating factors placed the highest proportion of patients into the high-risk group. Data concerning the comparability of different tools are informative for estimating the risk of CVD, but accuracy of the outcome predictions should also be considered. PMID:24228022

  18. A skills-training group intervention model to assist persons in reducing risk behaviors for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J A; St Lawrence, J S; Betts, R; Brasfield, T L; Hood, H V

    1990-01-01

    Fifteen gay men with a history of recent high-risk sexual activities attended seven group sessions that provided risk education, training in self-management skills pertinent to risk reduction, sexual assertiveness training, and problem solving with respect to health consciousness, social supports, and efficacy of risk-reduction change. Before and after intervention, subjects completed measures of AIDS risk knowledge, sexual practices occurring over 4-month retrospective periods, and self-monitored records of ongoing sexual activities and participated in role plays assessing behavioral assertiveness skill for resisting high-risk coercions. Eight-month follow-up data were also collected. Subjects exhibited substantial and well-maintained change following intervention in behaviors relevant to HIV infection risk, including frequency of unprotected anal intercourse (which decreased to near-zero levels), condom use (which increased to almost 90% of intercourse occasions), and in an index that reflects the multiplicative function of risk behaviors frequency by the number of partners with whom high-risk behaviors occurs. This demonstration provides further evidence that skills-training approaches can assist individuals in implementing behavior changes to reduce risk for AIDS and identifies a model relevant to counseling efforts in AIDS prevention programs, HIV counseling and testing programs, drug abuse and STD clinics, and other applied settings.

  19. Associations between 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Immunologic, Metabolic, Inflammatory Markers in Treatment-Naive HIV-Infected Persons: The ANRS CO9 «COPANA» Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Legeai, Camille; Vigouroux, Corinne; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Bouchaud, Olivier; Boufassa, Faroudy; Bastard, Jean-Philippe; Carlier, Robert; Capeau, Jacqueline; Goujard, Cécile; Meyer, Laurence; Viard, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Low 25(OH)D has been associated with dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and inflammation in both general and HIV-infected (mostly treated) populations. We investigated these associations in antiretroviral-naïve HIV-infected persons. Design We measured plasma 25(OH)D, metabolic, immunologic and inflammatory markers in 355 persons (204 Whites, 151 Blacks) at enrollment in the ANRS COPANA cohort. Methods 25(OH)D levels were categorized <10 ng/mL (severe deficiency) and <20 ng/mL (deficiency). Statistical analyses were adjusted for sampling season, ethnicity and the interaction between season and ethnicity. Results 25(OH)D insufficiency (<30 ng/mL), deficiency (<20 ng/mL) and severe deficiency (<10 ng/mL) were highly prevalent (93%, 67% and 24% of patients, respectively). Blacks had significantly lower 25(OH)D than Whites (median: 13 vs. 17 ng/mL, P<0.001), with markedly less pronounced seasonal variation. Smoking and drinking alcohol were associated with having a 25 OHD level<10 ng/mL. In patients with 25(OH)D<10 ng/mL, the proportion of persons with a CD4 count<100/mm3 was higher than in patients with 25(OH)D≥10 ng/mL (18.8% vs. 10.7%, P = 0.04). Persons with 25 OHD<10 ng/mL had higher levels of hsCRP (1.60 mg/L [IQR: 0.59–5.76] vs. 1.27 mg/L [0.58–3,39], P = 0.03) and resistin (16.81 ng/L [IQR: 13.82–25.74] vs. 11.56 ng/L [IQR: 8.87–20.46], P = 0.02), and, among Blacks only, sTNFR2 (2.92 ng/mL [2.31–4.13] vs. 2.67 ng/mL, [1.90–3.23], P = 0.04). The strength and significance of the association between CD4<100/mm3 and 25 OHD<10 ng/mL were reduced after adjustment on sTNFR1, sTNFR2, and hsCRP levels. In multivariate analysis, a CD4 count <100/mm3, resistin concentration and smoking were independently associated with 25(OH)D<10 ng/mL. Conclusions Severe vitamin D deficiency was associated with low CD4 counts and increased markers of inflammation in ARV-naïve HIV-infected persons. PMID:24058636

  20. [Travel medicine for HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Rossi, M; Furrer, H

    2001-06-01

    Many HIV-infected persons travel from temperate zones to (sub)tropical destinations. HIV-specific immigration issues, medical resources abroad and problems regarding travelling with multiple medications have to be anticipated. When prescribing immunizations and specific chemoprophylaxis, the stage of immunodeficiency as well as drug interactions with antiretrovirals and medicaments against opportunistic infections have to be taken into account. Live vaccines may be contraindicated. Immunocompromised HIV-infected travellers have a higher risk for serious courses of diseases by enteropathogens. Therefore a good information about food hygiene is important and a prescription of an antibiotic to take in case of severe diarrhea may be indicated. A new antiretroviral combination therapy should not be started immediately before travelling to the tropics. The possibility to continue an established HIV treatment during travel has to be evaluated cautiously. With good pre-travel advice the risk of severe health problems is low for most HIV-infected travellers.

  1. Gender differences in HIV manifestations at presentation to care and continuity of care among HIV-infected persons in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ko, Nai-Ying; Lai, Yi-Yin; Liu, Hsiao-Ying; Ko, Wen-Chien; Chang, Chia-Ming; Lee, Nan-Yao; Chen, Po-Lin; Wu, Chi-Juan; Lee, Hsin-Chun

    2011-10-01

    The study aimed to compare the gender difference in clinical manifestations at time of HIV diagnosis and after one year of antiretroviral therapy, and to determine the influence of gender on HIV care continuity. A retrospective study was conducted using chart review of adults diagnosed with HIV infection from 1993-2008 at a university-affiliated AIDS-designated hospital in Taiwan. Men who acknowledged having sex with men were excluded in order to compare the gender differences among patients with similar routes of HIV transmission and social context. Of the 682 patients with HIV, 86.6% were men. There were no significant gender differences in clinical, immunological or virological parameters at baseline. After one year of antiretroviral therapy, the curves of changes in CD4 cell counts in men and women were parallel over time. Continuity of care, referring to at least one appointment in each six-month window during 2005-2008, was significantly associated with age >50 years (OR = 2.54, 95% CI: 1.04-6.16), being enrolled in the case management programme (OR = 4.93, 95% CI: 2.53-9.62), acquisition of HIV via heterosexual contact (OR = 3.63, 95% CI: 1.38-9.55), CD4 lymphocyte count <200 counts/mm(3) at baseline (OR = 3.09, 95% CI: 1.38-6.96), being on highly active antiretroviral therapy (OR = 4.77, 95% CI: 2.37-9.59), and with sero-discordant partners (OR = 2.51, 95% CI: 1.07-5.87). The findings indicate that gender does not appear to be associated with HIV disease manifestations and continuity of care. Further research to develop optimal methods to retain patients in HIV care is needed.

  2. Relationships Among Neurocognitive Status, Medication Adherence Measured by Pharmacy Refill Records, and Virologic Suppression in HIV-infected Persons

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Adriana S.A.; Deutsch, Reena; Celano, Shivaun; Duarte, Nichole A.; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Umlauf, Anya; Atkinson, J. Hampton; McCutchan, J. Allen; Franklin, Donald; Alexander, Terry J.; McArthur, Justin; Marra, Christina; Grant, Igor; Collier, Ann C

    2013-01-01

    Background Optimal antiretroviral therapy (ART) effectiveness depends upon medication adherence, which is a complex behavior with many contributing factors including neurocognitive function. Pharmacy refill records offer a promising and practical tool to assess adherence. Methods A substudy of the CHARTER (CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research) study was conducted at the Johns Hopkins University (JHU) and the University of Washington (UW). Pharmacy refill records were the primary method to measure ART adherence, indexed to a “sentinel” drug with the highest central nervous system penetration effectiveness score. Standardized neuromedical, neuropsychological, psychiatric and substance use assessments were performed at enrollment and at 6 months. Regression models were used to determine factors associated with adherence and the relationships between adherence and change in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid HIV RNA concentrations between visits. Results Among 80 (33 JHU, 47 UW) participants, the mean adherence score was 86.4% with no difference by site. In the final multivariable model, better neurocognitive function was associated with better adherence, especially among participants who were at JHU, male, and HIV-infected for a longer time-period. Worse performance on working memory tests was associated with worse adherence. Better adherence predicted greater decreases in cerebrospinal fluid HIV RNA between visits. Conclusion Poorer global neurocognitive functioning and deficits in working memory were associated with lower adherence defined by a pharmacy refill record measure, suggesting that assessments of cognitive function, and working memory in particular, may identify patients at risk for poor ART adherence who would benefit from adherence support. PMID:23202813

  3. Persons living with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy also consulting traditional healers: a study in three African countries.

    PubMed

    Wanyama, Jane N; Tsui, Sharon; Kwok, Cynthia; Wanyenze, Rhoda K; Denison, Julie A; Koole, Olivier; van Praag, Eric; Castelnuovo, Barbara; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Kwesigabo, Gideon P; Colebunders, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Traditional healers provide healthcare to a substantial proportion of people living with HIV infection (PLHIV) in high HIV burden countries in sub-Saharan Africa. However, the impact on the health of retained patients visiting traditional healers is unknown. In 2011, a study to asses adherence to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) performed in 18 purposefully selected HIV treatment centers in Tanzania, Zambia and Uganda showed that 'consulting a traditional healer/herbalist because of HIV' was an independent risk factor for incomplete ART adherence. To identify characteristics of PLHIV on ART who were also consulting traditional healers, we conducted a secondary analysis of the data from this study. It was found that 260 (5.8%) of the 4451 patients enrolled in the study had consulted a traditional healer during the last three months because of HIV. In multivariable analysis, patients with fewer HIV symptoms, those who had been on ART for >5.3 years and those from Tanzania were more likely to have consulted a traditional healer. However, at the time of the study, there was a famous healer in Manyara district, Loliondo village of Tanzania who claimed his herbal remedy was able to cure all chronic diseases including HIV. HIV treatment programs should be aware that patients with fewer HIV symptoms, those who have been on ART for five or more years, and patients attending ART centers near famous traditional healers are likely to consult traditional healers. Such patients may need more support or counseling about the risks of both stopping ART and poor adherence. Considering the realities of inadequate human resources for health and the burden of disease caused by HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, facilitating a collaboration between allopathic and traditional health practitioners is recommended.

  4. Public Opinion, Public Policy, and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Jane

    1989-01-01

    A four-stage framework for considering the development of public policy in regard to the issue of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infection is offered. The phases are denial, irrationality, acceptance, and the development of a rational response. Federal antidiscrimination policies which include persons with HIV infections as disabled are…

  5. Assessment of the utilization of a state AIDS/STD hotline by persons with and without HIV infection and their information needs.

    PubMed

    Vassilev, Zdravko P; Marcus, Steven M; Jennis, Thelma; Ruck, Bruce; Rego, German

    2005-10-01

    A large number of AIDS/sexually transmitted disease (STD) helplines provide support to people seeking information how to avoid infection with HIV or how to deal with the infection if they have already contracted it. Nevertheless, limited knowledge is available about how such helplines are being utilized by different segments of the population and what the main concerns of the people calling the helplines are. The goal of this study was to evaluate the use of the State AIDS/STD Hotline in New Jersey and describe the information needs of its callers. Callers were categorized as either having HIV or being free of the virus based on their self-reported HIV status. A cross-sectional design was then used combining caller information from the New Jersey AIDS/STD Hotline with data from the state health department on the number of people living with HIV in each county in New Jersey. The utilization rate of the New Jersey AIDS/STD Hotline was significantly higher among persons with HIV infection compared to the utilization rate among persons who were either free of the virus or unaware of their HIV status. The callers infected with HIV differed significantly from the rest of the callers in terms of the type of information they requested. While callers who had the infection were most likely to ask about treatment options, financial assistance, and support groups, the rest of the callers were more likely to inquire about testing site location and prevention information.

  6. When to initiate combined antiretroviral therapy to reduce mortality and AIDS-defining illness in HIV-infected persons in developed countries: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Cain, Lauren E; Logan, Roger; Robins, James M; Sterne, Jonathan A C; Sabin, Caroline; Bansi, Loveleen; Justice, Amy; Goulet, Joseph; van Sighem, Ard; de Wolf, Frank; Bucher, Heiner C; von Wyl, Viktor; Esteve, Anna; Casabona, Jordi; del Amo, Julia; Moreno, Santiago; Seng, Remonie; Meyer, Laurence; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Muga, Roberto; Lodi, Sara; Lanoy, Emilie; Costagliola, Dominique; Hernan, Miguel A

    2011-04-19

    Most clinical guidelines recommend that AIDS-free, HIV-infected persons with CD4 cell counts below 0.350 × 10(9) cells/L initiate combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), but the optimal CD4 cell count at which cART should be initiated remains a matter of debate. To identify the optimal CD4 cell count at which cART should be initiated. Prospective observational data from the HIV-CAUSAL Collaboration and dynamic marginal structural models were used to compare cART initiation strategies for CD4 thresholds between 0.200 and 0.500 × 10(9) cells/L. HIV clinics in Europe and the Veterans Health Administration system in the United States. 20, 971 HIV-infected, therapy-naive persons with baseline CD4 cell counts at or above 0.500 × 10(9) cells/L and no previous AIDS-defining illnesses, of whom 8392 had a CD4 cell count that decreased into the range of 0.200 to 0.499 × 10(9) cells/L and were included in the analysis. Hazard ratios and survival proportions for all-cause mortality and a combined end point of AIDS-defining illness or death. Compared with initiating cART at the CD4 cell count threshold of 0.500 × 10(9) cells/L, the mortality hazard ratio was 1.01 (95% CI, 0.84 to 1.22) for the 0.350 threshold and 1.20 (CI, 0.97 to 1.48) for the 0.200 threshold. The corresponding hazard ratios were 1.38 (CI, 1.23 to 1.56) and 1.90 (CI, 1.67 to 2.15), respectively, for the combined end point of AIDS-defining illness or death. CD4 cell count at cART initiation was not randomized. Residual confounding may exist. Initiation of cART at a threshold CD4 count of 0.500 × 10(9) cells/L increases AIDS-free survival. However, mortality did not vary substantially with the use of CD4 thresholds between 0.300 and 0.500 × 10(9) cells/L.

  7. When to Initiate Combined Antiretroviral Therapy to Reduce Mortality and AIDS-Defining Illness in HIV-Infected Persons in Developed Countries

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most clinical guidelines recommend that AIDS-free, HIV-infected persons with CD4 cell counts below 0.350 × 109 cells/L initiate combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), but the optimal CD4 cell count at which cART should be initiated remains a matter of debate. Objective To identify the optimal CD4 cell count at which cART should be initiated. Design Prospective observational data from the HIV-CAUSAL Collaboration and dynamic marginal structural models were used to compare cART initiation strategies for CD4 thresholds between 0.200 and 0.500 × 109 cells/L. Setting HIV clinics in Europe and the Veterans Health Administration system in the United States. Patients 20 971 HIV-infected, therapy-naive persons with baseline CD4 cell counts at or above 0.500 × 109 cells/L and no previous AIDS-defining illnesses, of whom 8392 had a CD4 cell count that decreased into the range of 0.200 to 0.499 × 109 cells/L and were included in the analysis. Measurements Hazard ratios and survival proportions for all-cause mortality and a combined end point of AIDS-defining illness or death. Results Compared with initiating cART at the CD4 cell count threshold of 0.500 × 109 cells/L, the mortality hazard ratio was 1.01 (95% CI, 0.84 to 1.22) for the 0.350 threshold and 1.20 (CI, 0.97 to 1.48) for the 0.200 threshold. The corresponding hazard ratios were 1.38 (CI, 1.23 to 1.56) and 1.90 (CI, 1.67 to 2.15), respectively, for the combined end point of AIDS-defining illness or death. Limitations CD4 cell count at cART initiation was not randomized. Residual confounding may exist. Conclusion Initiation of cART at a threshold CD4 count of 0.500 × 109 cells/L increases AIDS-free survival. However, mortality did not vary substantially with the use of CD4 thresholds between 0.300 and 0.500 ×109 cells/L. Primary Funding Source National Institutes of Health. PMID:21502648

  8. Drug use and receipt of highly active antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected persons in two U.S. clinic cohorts.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Catherine C; Weinstein, David D; Samenow, Charles P; Stinnette, Samuel E; Barkanic, Gema; Rebeiro, Peter F; Sterling, Timothy R; Moore, Richard D; Hulgan, Todd

    2011-04-25

    Drug use and receipt of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were assessed in HIV-infected persons from the Comprehensive Care Center (CCC; Nashville, TN) and Johns Hopkins University HIV Clinic (JHU; Baltimore, MD) between 1999 and 2005. Participants with and without injection drug use (IDU) history in the CCC and JHU cohorts were evaluated. Additional analysis of persons with history of IDU, non-injection drug use (NIDU), and no drug use from CCC were performed. Activity of IDU and NIDU also was assessed for the CCC cohort. HAART use and time on HAART were analyzed according to drug use category and site of care. 1745 persons were included from CCC: 268 (15%) with IDU history and 796 (46%) with NIDU history. 1977 persons were included from JHU: 731 (35%) with IDU history. Overall, the cohorts differed in IDU risk factor rates, age, race, sex, and time in follow-up. In multivariate analyses, IDU was associated with decreased HAART receipt overall (OR = 0.61, 95% CI: [0.45-0.84] and OR = 0.58, 95% CI: [0.46-0.73], respectively for CCC and JHU) and less time on HAART at JHU (0.70, [0.55-0.88]), but not statistically associated with time on HAART at CCC (0.78, [0.56-1.09]). NIDU was independently associated with decreased HAART receipt (0.62, [0.47-0.81]) and less time on HAART (0.66, [0.52-0.85]) at CCC. These associations were not altered significantly whether patients at CCC were categorized according to historical drug use or drug use during the study period. Persons with IDU history from both clinic populations were less likely to receive HAART and tended to have less cumulative time on HAART. Effects of NIDU were similar to IDU at CCC. NIDU without IDU is an important contributor to HAART utilization.

  9. HIV infection-related tuberculosis: clinical manifestations and treatment.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Timothy R; Pham, Paul A; Chaisson, Richard E

    2010-05-15

    Several aspects of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection-related tuberculosis (TB) and its treatment differ from those of TB in HIV-uninfected persons. The risk of TB and the clinical and radiographic manifestations of disease are primary examples. Antiretroviral therapy has a profound effect on lowering the risk of TB in HIV-infected persons, but it can also be associated with immune reconstitution inflammatory disease and unmasking of previously subclinical disease. There are also differences in treatment of HIV infection-related TB because of overlapping drug toxicities and drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral therapy and anti-TB therapy.

  10. Autoantibodies against peripheral blood cells appear early in HIV infection and their prevalence increases with disease progression.

    PubMed Central

    Klaassen, R J; Mulder, J W; Vlekke, A B; Eeftinck Schattenkerk, J K; Weigel, H M; Lange, J M; von dem Borne, A E

    1990-01-01

    The presence of platelet- and neutrophil-bound immunoglobulin (PBIg and NBIg) in thrombocytopenic or neutropenic HIV-infected individuals has led to the concept that in HIV infection thrombocytopenia and neutropenia are mediated by autoimmunity. However, PBIg and NBIg were also demonstrated in non-cytopenic HIV-infected individuals. We determined the prevalence of autoantibodies against neutrophils and platelets by immunofluorescence in randomly chosen persons in different stages of asymptomatic and symptomatic HIV infection. Platelet and neutrophil autoantibodies already appeared in the asymptomatic stage and their prevalence further increased in the symptomatic stages. No correlation was found between the presence of either platelet or neutrophil antibodies and the occurrence of circulating immune complexes in the blood or the serum immunoglobulin level. There was no significant difference in neutrophil counts in HIV-infected persons with or without neutrophil autoantibodies. In addition, no significant difference in neutrophil count was found between HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected persons. HIV-infected individuals with platelet autoantibodies tended to have a lower platelet count than HIV-infected individuals without these antibodies. However, the platelet count in HIV-infected individuals without platelet antibodies was significantly lower than in the non-HIV infected persons. Thus, autoantibodies against platelets and neutrophils occur early in HIV infection and their prevalence is correlated with disease progression. Their presence is associated with cytopenia only in a limited number of persons. Non-immune mechanisms also mediate thrombocytopenia in HIV infection. PMID:1974174

  11. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitor and HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitor as Adjunct Treatment for Persons with HIV Infection: A Feasibility Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jason V.; Huppler Hullsiek, Kathleen; Prosser, Rachel; Duprez, Daniel; Grimm, Richard; Tracy, Russell P.; Rhame, Frank; Henry, Keith; Neaton, James D.

    2012-01-01

    . Our results also indicate that ACE-I therapy may have anti-inflammatory benefits for ART-treated persons with HIV infection and this should be further evaluated. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00982189 PMID:23082133

  12. Romantic Relationship Satisfaction Moderates the Etiology of Adult Personality

    PubMed Central

    South, Susan C.; Krueger, Robert F.; Elkins, Irene; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The heritability of major normative domains of personality is well-established, with approximately half the proportion of variance attributed to genetic differences. In the current study, we examine the possibility of gene x environment interaction (GxE) for adult personality using the environmental context of intimate romantic relationship functioning. Personality and relationship satisfaction are significantly correlated phenotypically, but to date no research has examined how the genetic and environmental components of variance for personality differ as a function of romantic relationship satisfaction. Given the importance of personality for myriad outcomes from work productivity to psychopathology, it is vital to identify variables present in adulthood that may affect the etiology of personality. In the current study, quantitative models of GxE were used to determine whether the genetic and environmental influences on personality differ as a function of relationship satisfaction. We drew from a sample of now-adult twins followed longitudinally from adolescence through age 29. All participants completed the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ) and an abbreviated version of the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS). Biometric moderation was found for eight of the eleven MPQ scales examined: Well-Being, Social Potency, Negative Emotionality, Alienation, Aggression, Constraint, Traditionalism, and Absorption. The pattern of findings differed, suggesting that the ways in which relationship quality moderates the etiology of personality may depend on the personality trait. PMID:26581694

  13. Romantic Relationship Satisfaction Moderates the Etiology of Adult Personality.

    PubMed

    South, Susan C; Krueger, Robert F; Elkins, Irene J; Iacono, William G; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The heritability of major normative domains of personality is well-established, with approximately half the proportion of variance attributed to genetic differences. In the current study, we examine the possibility of gene × environment interaction (G×E) for adult personality using the environmental context of intimate romantic relationship functioning. Personality and relationship satisfaction are significantly correlated phenotypically, but to date no research has examined how the genetic and environmental components of variance for personality differ as a function of romantic relationship satisfaction. Given the importance of personality for myriad outcomes from work productivity to psychopathology, it is vital to identify variables present in adulthood that may affect the etiology of personality. In the current study, quantitative models of G×E were used to determine whether the genetic and environmental influences on personality differ as a function of relationship satisfaction. We drew from a sample of now-adult twins followed longitudinally from adolescence through age 29. All participants completed the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ) and an abbreviated version of the Dyadic Adjustment Scale. Biometric moderation was found for eight of the eleven MPQ scales examined: well-being, social potency, negative emotionality, alienation, aggression, constraint, traditionalism, and absorption. The pattern of findings differed, suggesting that the ways in which relationship quality moderates the etiology of personality may depend on the personality trait.

  14. Low Non-structured Antiretroviral Therapy Interruptions in HIV-Infected Persons Who Inject Drugs Receiving Multidisciplinary Comprehensive HIV Care at an Outpatient Drug Abuse Treatment Center.

    PubMed

    Vallecillo, Gabriel; Mojal, Sergio; Roquer, Albert; Samos, Pilar; Luque, Sonia; Martinez, Diana; Martires, Paula Karen; Torrens, Marta

    2016-05-01

    Continuous HIV treatment is necessary to ensure successful combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of patient-initiated non-structured treatment interruptions in HIV-infected persons who inject drugs and who received a multidisciplinary comprehensive program, including medical HIV care, drug-dependence treatment and psychosocial support, at a drug outpatient addiction center. Non-structured treatment interruptions were defined as ≥30 consecutive days off cART without medical indication. During a median follow-up of 53.8 months, 37/132 (28 %) patients experienced the first non-structured treatment interruptions. The cumulative probability of cART interruption at 5 years was 31.2 % (95 % CI 22.4-40.0). Current drug use injection ≥1/day (HR 14.77; 95 % CI 5.90-36.96) and cART naive patients (HR 0.35, 95 % CI 0.14-0.93) were predictive factors for non-structured treatment interruptions. HIV care provided at a drug addiction center is a useful strategy to sustain continuous cART, however, drug abstinence is essential for the long-term maintenance of cART.

  15. Microbiome in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Salas, January T.; Chang, Theresa L.

    2014-01-01

    HIV primary infection occurs at mucosa tissues, suggesting an intricate interplay between microbiome and HIV infection. Recent advanced technologies of high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics allow researchers to explore nonculturable microbes including bacteria, virus and fungi and their association with diseases. HIV/SIV infection is associated with microbiome shifts and immune activation that may affect the outcome of disease progression. Similarly, altered microbiome and inflammation are associated with increased risks of HIV acquisition, suggesting the role of microbiome in HIV transmission. In this review, we will focus on microbiome in HIV infection at various mucosal compartments. Understanding the relationship between microbiome and HIV may offer insights into development of better strategies for HIV prevention and treatment. PMID:25439273

  16. A pilot study to evaluate the magnitude of association of the use of electronic personal health records with patient activation and empowerment in HIV-infected veterans.

    PubMed

    Crouch, Pierre-Cédric B; Rose, Carol Dawson; Johnson, Mallory; Janson, Susan L

    2015-01-01

    The HITECH Act signed into law in 2009 requires hospitals to provide patients with electronic access to their health information through an electronic personal health record (ePHR) in order to receive Medicare/Medicaid incentive payments. Little is known about who uses these systems or the impact these systems will have on patient outcomes in HIV care. The health care empowerment model provides rationale for the hypothesis that knowledge from an electronic personal health record can lead to greater patient empowerment resulting in improved outcomes. The objective was to determine the patient characteristics and patient activation, empowerment, satisfaction, knowledge of their CD4, Viral Loads, and antiretroviral medication, and medication adherence outcomes associated with electronic personal health record use in Veterans living with HIV at the San Francisco VA Medical Center. The participants included HIV-Infected Veterans receiving care in a low volume HIV-clinic at the San Francisco VA Medical Center, divided into two groups of users and non-users of electronic personal health records. The research was conducted using in-person surveys either online or on paper and data abstraction from medical records for current anti-retroviral therapy (ART), CD4 count, and plasma HIV-1 viral load. The measures included the Patient Activation Measure, Health Care Empowerment Inventory, ART adherence, provider satisfaction, current CD4 count, current plasma viral load, knowledge of current ART, knowledge of CD4 counts, and knowledge of viral load. In all, 40 participants were recruited. The use of electronic personal health records was associated with significantly higher levels of patient activation and levels of patient satisfaction for getting timely appointments, care, and information. ePHR was also associated with greater proportions of undetectable plasma HIV-1 viral loads, of knowledge of current CD4 count, and of knowledge of current viral load. The two groups differed

  17. (1→3)-β-D-Glucan Levels Correlate With Neurocognitive Functioning in HIV-Infected Persons on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hoenigl, Martin; de Oliveira, Michelli Faria; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Zhang, Yonglong; Morris, Sheldon; McCutchan, Allen J; Finkelman, Malcolm; Marcotte, Thomas D; Ellis, Ronald J; Gianella, Sara

    2016-03-01

    Microbial translocation from the gut is associated with immune dysfunction, persistent inflammation, and likely plays a role in the pathogenesis of neurocognitive dysfunction during HIV infection. (1→3)-β-D-Glucan (BDG) is a component of most fungal cell walls and might be a useful indicator of gut mucosal barrier impairment. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether higher blood BDG levels correlate with impaired neurocognitive functioning in a cohort of HIV-infected adults with suppressed levels of HIV RNA in blood plasma. In this cross-sectional cohort study, we measured levels of BDG in blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) supernatant samples in a cohort of adults with acute/early HIV infection, who initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART) during the earliest phase of infection and achieved suppressed levels of HIV RNA in blood plasma (<50 copies/mL) thereafter. We compared BDG with established biomarkers of microbial translocation, immune activation, and cognitive dysfunction (evaluated by global deficit score). We found that higher blood BDG levels were significantly related to higher global deficit scores, reflecting worse neurocognitive performance (Spearman r = 0.47; P = 0.042) among HIV-infected adults with suppressed viral loads who initiated ART early in infection. Two CSF samples presented elevated BDG levels. Interestingly, these 2 samples originated from the 2 subjects with the highest global deficit scores of the cohort. BDG may be a promising independent biomarker associated with neurocognitive functioning in virologically suppressed HIV-infected individuals.

  18. [Whose borderline is it? Hypothesized etiologies of borderline personality].

    PubMed

    Gil, Tsvi E

    2008-11-01

    Borderline personality is a well known concept in psychiatric literature, however, not fully understood as to its very nature. This article presents a short review of hypothesized etiologies of the borderline personality, starting with so called traditional theories, namely, borderline personality as a consolidated personality organization, in which the patient pathologically deals with his or her inner aggression, or with an enduring developmental failure. More modern hypotheses focus on possible childhood sexual abuse as the origin of the borderline, viewing the adult personality as a chronic, unresolved, post-traumatic disorder. Additionally, a neuro-epigenetic view hypothesized that a unique congenital neurological structure interacts with consequential events in early childhood to create the borderline personality.

  19. Solid organ transplants in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Harbell, Jack; Terrault, Norah A; Stock, Peter

    2013-09-01

    There is a growing need for kidney and liver transplants in persons living with HIV. Fortunately, with the significant advances in antiretroviral therapy and management of opportunistic infections, HIV infection is no longer an absolute contraindication for solid organ transplantation. Data from several large prospective multi-center cohort studies have shown that solid organ transplantation in carefully selected HIV-infected individuals is safe. However, significant challenges have been identified including prevention of acute rejection, management of drug-drug interactions and treatment of recurrent viral hepatitis. This article reviews the selection criteria, outcomes, and special management considerations for HIV-infected patients undergoing liver or kidney transplantation.

  20. Prevention of Sexually Transmitted Diseases in HIV-Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Quilter, Laura; Dhanireddy, Shireesha; Marrazzo, Jeanne

    2017-04-01

    Prevention of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is an important part of the care of the HIV-infected individual. STIs have been associated with increased risk of transmission and acquisition of HIV. Among HIV-infected persons, treatment failures and high recurrence rates of some STIs are more common. Despite the recognized importance of prevention and discussion of sexual health, rates of screening for STIs are suboptimal. Moreover, rates of STIs such as syphilis continue to increase particularly in men who have sex with men (MSM). This review focuses on the most common STIs seen among HIV-infected individuals and recommendations for screening and prevention.

  1. [Problems of early detection of HIV infection, medical and psychological support of HIV-infected soldiers].

    PubMed

    Uliukin, I M; Bolekhan, V N; Iusupov, V V; Bulan'kov, Iu I; Orlova, E S

    2015-01-01

    The article contains the analysis of materials about HIV infection and the status of work on its early detection among soldiers. Currently, the figures have a tendency to stabilization, but there is an increase in the persantage of HIV-infected persons performing military service under the contract, as well as the actualization sexual way of infection. The insufficient effectiveness of the barrier screening during the laboratory examination of recruits may contribute the increase in the incidence of HIV infection. Have been reviewed the questions medical-diagnostic and medical-psychological support of HIV-infected soldiers. Been analyzed the social consequences of delays in seeking medical help of patients in this group, the opportunities and challenges of their dispensary observation. It was noted that early detection of HIV infection and proper medical and psychological support in the dynamics of pathological process helps to reduce the number of new cases and improve their outcomes and to reduce the period of efficiency recovery of military personnel.

  2. Drug Use and Receipt of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy among HIV-Infected Persons in Two U.S. Clinic Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Catherine C.; Weinstein, David D.; Samenow, Charles P.; Stinnette, Samuel E.; Barkanic, Gema; Rebeiro, Peter F.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Moore, Richard D.; Hulgan, Todd

    2011-01-01

    Objective Drug use and receipt of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were assessed in HIV-infected persons from the Comprehensive Care Center (CCC; Nashville, TN) and Johns Hopkins University HIV Clinic (JHU; Baltimore, MD) between 1999 and 2005. Methods Participants with and without injection drug use (IDU) history in the CCC and JHU cohorts were evaluated. Additional analysis of persons with history of IDU, non-injection drug use (NIDU), and no drug use from CCC were performed. Activity of IDU and NIDU also was assessed for the CCC cohort. HAART use and time on HAART were analyzed according to drug use category and site of care. Results 1745 persons were included from CCC: 268 (15%) with IDU history and 796 (46%) with NIDU history. 1977 persons were included from JHU: 731 (35%) with IDU history. Overall, the cohorts differed in IDU risk factor rates, age, race, sex, and time in follow-up. In multivariate analyses, IDU was associated with decreased HAART receipt overall (OR = 0.61, 95% CI: [0.45–0.84] and OR = 0.58, 95% CI: [0.46–0.73], respectively for CCC and JHU) and less time on HAART at JHU (0.70, [0.55–0.88]), but not statistically associated with time on HAART at CCC (0.78, [0.56–1.09]). NIDU was independently associated with decreased HAART receipt (0.62, [0.47–0.81]) and less time on HAART (0.66, [0.52–0.85]) at CCC. These associations were not altered significantly whether patients at CCC were categorized according to historical drug use or drug use during the study period. Conclusions Persons with IDU history from both clinic populations were less likely to receive HAART and tended to have less cumulative time on HAART. Effects of NIDU were similar to IDU at CCC. NIDU without IDU is an important contributor to HAART utilization. PMID:21541016

  3. Cryptococcal meningitis associated with tuberculosis in HIV infected patients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Urvinderpal; Aditi; Aneja, Pooja; Kapoor, B K; Singh, S P; Purewal, Sukhpreet Singh

    2013-07-01

    Opportunistic infections are common complications of advanced immuno-deficiency in individuals with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. Following involvement of the lung, the central nervous system (CNS) is the second most commonly affected organ. We report two cases of concurrent cryptococcal meningitis and tuberculosis (TB) in HIV infected persons. A high suspicion of multiple opportunistic infections should be kept in mind in HIV seropositive individuals.

  4. The Effect of Individual Antiretroviral Drugs on Body Composition in HIV-Infected Persons Initiating Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shlay, Judith C.; Sharma, Shweta; MS, Grace Peng; Gibert, Cynthia L.; Grunfeld, Carl

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To examine the long-term effects of individual antiretroviral drugs on body composition among 416 persons initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods In a substudy of a clinical trial of persons initiating ART, changes in body composition attributable to individual ART were examined. ART assessed were: indinavir, ritonavir, nelfinavir, efavirenz, nevirapine, stavudine (d4T), zidovudine (ZDV), lamivudine (3TC), didanosine (ddI), and abacavir (ABC). Skinfolds and circumferences were measured at baseline and every 4 months. Mid-arm, mid-thigh and waist subcutaneous tissue areas (STAs) and non-subcutaneous tissue areas (NSTAs) were calculated. Rates of change per year of exposure to each individual ART drug were determined using multivariate longitudinal regression. Results D4T and ZDV use were associated with losses in STA and skinfold thickness. 3TC use was associated with gains in all STAs and skinfold thickness, while ABC use was associated with an increase in waist STA. Indinavir was associated with gains in waist STA, while indinavir, efavirenz and nevirapine were associated with increases in upper back skinfolds. D4T use was also associated with increases in all NSTAs; 3TC use was associated with the greatest increase in waist NSTA. Conclusions In this prospective non-randomized evaluation, the NRTIs d4T and ZDV were associated with decreases in STAs, while 3TC use was associated with increased STAs and waist NSTA. PMID:19412117

  5. HIV infection in children.

    PubMed

    Canosa, C A

    1991-01-01

    Various studies have reported rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission from mother to child of 13-40%. Vertical transmission occurs in utero, during delivery, or, in a small number of cases, through breast milk. Whether mothers at various stages of HIV infection experience different rates of transmission remains unknown. Maternal antibodies cross the placenta and are present from birth up to 18 months of age. The offspring of HIV-positive mothers tend to be low birthweight, under 37 weeks' gestation, and at high risk of perinatal mortality. It is likely, however, that this profile is indicative of the low socioeconomic status of most women with HIV rather than a result of infection. Also emerging is a psychosocial profile of the HIV child. These children are isolated, neglected, battered, frequently abandoned, and exhibit various degrees of mental retardation. Also common are delayed psychomotor development, loss of developmental milestones, limited attention span, poor language development, and abnormal reflexes. These features result from the interaction of low socioeconomic status, a lack of psychosocial stimulation, nutritional deficiencies, and central nervous system infections. Since HIV-infected children tend to be the offspring of drug addicts, bisexuals, and prostitutes, they are not awarded the same compassion as children afflicted with other terminal illnesses. Moreover, these children are generally neglected by groups formed to provide support to AIDS patients. Thus, it is up to the general public, the mass media, and the health care system to advocate for the needs of these neglected children.

  6. IP-10 is an additional marker for tuberculosis (TB) detection in HIV-infected persons in a low-TB endemic country.

    PubMed

    Vanini, Valentina; Petruccioli, Elisa; Gioia, Cristiana; Cuzzi, Gilda; Orchi, Nicoletta; Rianda, Alessia; Alba, Lucia; Giancola, Maria Letizia; Conte, Aristide; Schininà, Vincenzo; Rizzi, Elisa Busi; Girardi, Enrico; Goletti, Delia

    2012-07-01

    In Indian HIV-infected patients, IP-10 response to QuantiFERON-TB Gold In tube (QFT-IT) antigens has been associated to tuberculosis (TB). However, specificity for active TB was lower than that reported by QFT-IT, making accuracy for TB detection questionable. To investigate this uncertainty, likely due to India being highly endemic for TB, and to better identify TB correlates, we evaluated the IP-10-based assay in HIV-infected subjects in Italy, a low-TB endemic country. 195 individuals were prospectively enrolled; 118 were HIV-infected (21 with active TB, 97 without active TB, and distinguished as high/low-TB-risk). QFT-IT was performed and IP-10 was evaluated by ELISA. Among the HIV-infected individuals, sensitivity for active TB was 66.7% by IP-10-based test and 52.4% (p = 1) by QFT-IT. IP-10-based assay showed a lower dependence on mitogen-response and CD4 counts than QFT-IT. Among subjects without active TB, a higher proportion of IP-10 responders was shown in high-TB-risk subjects than low-TB-risk subjects (40.0% vs 12.9%), similar to QFT-IT (37.1% vs 4.8%). Low-TB risk subjects showed 87.1% specificity for active TB by IP-10-based test vs 95.2% by QFT-IT. In a low-TB endemic country, besides IFN-γ, IP-10 response to QFT-IT is associated with active TB and TB risk factors in HIV-infected patients with lower dependence on mitogen-response and CD4 counts. Copyright © 2012 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnosis of Acute HIV Infection in Connecticut

    PubMed Central

    DUBROW, ROBERT; SIKKEMA, KATHLEEN J.; MAYER, KENNETH H.; BRUCE, R. DOUGLAS; JULIAN, PAMELA; RODRIGUEZ, IRMA; BECKWITH, CURT; ROOME, AARON; DUNNE, DANA; BOEVING, ALEXANDRA; KIDDER, THOMAS J.; JENKINS, HEIDI; DOBSON, MICHAEL; BECKER, JOSEPH; MERSON, MICHAEL H.

    2011-01-01

    Acute HIV infection (AHI) is the earliest stage of HIV disease, when plasma HIV viremia, but not HIV antibodies, can be detected. Acute HIV infection often presents as a nonspecific viral syndrome. However, its diagnosis, which enables linkage to early medical care and limits further HIV transmission, is seldom made. We describe the experience of Yale's Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS with AHI diagnosis in Connecticut, as a participating center in the National Institute of Mental Health Multisite AHI Study. We sought to identify AHI cases by clinical referrals and by screening for AHI at two substance abuse care facilities and an STD clinic: We identified one case by referral and one through screening of 590 persons. Screening for AHI is feasible and probably cost effective. Primary care providers should include AHI in the differential diagnosis when patients present with a nonspecific viral syndrome. PMID:19637661

  8. Autoimmune diseases and HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Virot, Emilie; Duclos, Antoine; Adelaide, Leopold; Miailhes, Patrick; Hot, Arnaud; Ferry, Tristan; Seve, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To describe the clinical manifestations, treatments, prognosis, and prevalence of autoimmune diseases (ADs) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. All HIV-infected patients managed in the Infectious Diseases Department of the Lyon University Hospitals, France, between January 2003 and December 2013 and presenting an AD were retrospectively included. Thirty-six ADs were found among 5186 HIV-infected patients which represents a prevalence of 0.69% including immune thrombocytopenic purpura (n = 15), inflammatory myositis (IM) (n = 4), sarcoidosis (n = 4), Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) (n = 4), myasthenia gravis (n = 2), Graves’ disease (n = 2), and 1 case of each following conditions: systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune hepatitis, Hashimoto thyroiditis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. One patient presented 2 ADs. Thirty patients were known to be HIV-infected when they developed an AD. The AD preceded HIV infection in 2 patients. GBS and HIV infection were diagnosed simultaneously in 3 cases. At AD diagnosis, CD4 T lymphocytes count were higher than 350/mm3 in 63% of patients, between 200 and 350/mm3 in 19% and less than 200/mm3 in 19%. Twenty patients benefited from immunosuppressant treatments, with a good tolerance. ADs during HIV infection are uncommon in this large French cohort. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura, sarcoidosis, IM, and GBS appear to be more frequent than in the general population. Immunosuppressant treatments seem to be effective and well tolerated. PMID:28121924

  9. Psychopharmacology in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Martin J; Petitto, John M

    2008-06-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders and syndromes may be underdiagnosed and inadequately treated in individuals infected with HIV. Depression in particular is among the most prevalent diagnoses, and data from controlled clinical studies have shown that antidepressant medications are efficacious and safe for treating depression in HIV-infected persons. A significant shortcoming of this literature is that most of the available data are from studies conducted before the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy. In addition, apart from antidepressant medications, controlled studies systematically assessing efficacy and safety issues for other classes of psychotropic drugs (e.g., antipsychotic and anxiolytic medications) in HIV-infected persons are lacking. This review summarizes essential findings pertaining to the use of psychotropic medications to treat depression and other neuropsychiatric disorders in the context of HIV. It includes a discussion of clinically relevant treatment considerations (e.g., side effects, drug-drug interactions) derived from the existing literature as well as judgments that clinicians face in the absence of research data. Despite some shortcomings of the existing literature, overall there is compelling evidence that the appropriate use of psychotropic medications (coupled with behavioral therapy) can improve the quality of life of mentally ill HIV-infected individuals.

  10. [HIV infection and immigration].

    PubMed

    Monge, Susana; Pérez-Molina, José A

    2016-01-01

    Migrants represent around one third of patients newly diagnosed with HIV in Spain and they constitute a population with higher vulnerability to its negative consequences due to the socio-cultural, economical, working, administrative and legal contexts. Migrants are diagnosed later, which worsens their individual prognosis and facilitates the maintenance of the HIV epidemic. In spite of the different barriers they experience to access healthcare in general, and HIV-related services in particular, access to antiretroviral treatment has been similar to that of the autochthonous population. However, benefits of treatment have been not, with women in general and men from Sub-Saharan Africa exhibiting the worse response to treatment. We need to proactively promote earlier diagnosis of HIV infection, the adoption of preventive measures to avoid new infections, and to deliver accessible, adapted and high-quality health-care.

  11. [Cryptococcosis during HIV infection].

    PubMed

    El Fane, M; Badaoui, L; Ouladlahsen, A; Sodqi, M; Marih, L; Chakib, A; Marhoum El Filali, K

    2015-12-01

    Cryptococcosis is a cosmopolitan fungal serious condition due to an encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans. This is the systemic fungal infection the most common in HIV infection. This yeast is present in the environment and its main entrance in the body is the respiratory tract. Its gravity is linked to its tropism for the central nervous system. It generally affects subjects with severe deficit of cellular immunity and in particular, patients living with HIV. The diagnosis of neuromeningeal cryptococcosis is based on the detection of encapsulated yeasts at microscopic examination of cerebrospinal fluid, the detection of capsular polysaccharide antigen in serum or cerebrospinal fluid, but especially on the culture. A staging is always essential. The prognosis is severe. The control of intracranial hypertension is a major element of prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... percentage is less than 15%. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  13. Immunology of pediatric HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Nicole H; Aldrovandi, Grace M

    2013-07-01

    Most infants born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women escape HIV infection. Infants evade infection despite an immature immune system and, in the case of breastfeeding, prolonged repetitive exposure. If infants become infected, the course of their infection and response to treatment differs dramatically depending upon the timing (in utero, intrapartum, or during breastfeeding) and potentially the route of their infection. Perinatally acquired HIV infection occurs during a critical window of immune development. HIV's perturbation of this dynamic process may account for the striking age-dependent differences in HIV disease progression. HIV infection also profoundly disrupts the maternal immune system upon which infants rely for protection and immune instruction. Therefore, it is not surprising that infants who escape HIV infection still suffer adverse effects. In this review, we highlight the unique aspects of pediatric HIV transmission and pathogenesis with a focus on mechanisms by which HIV infection during immune ontogeny may allow discovery of key elements for protection and control from HIV. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Immunology of Pediatric HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Nicole H.; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Most infants born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women escape HIV infection. Infants evade infection despite an immature immune system and, in the case of breastfeeding, prolonged repetitive, exposure. If infants become infected, the course of their infection and response to treatment differs dramatically depending upon the timing (in utero, intrapartum, or during breastfeeding) and potentially the route of their infection. Perinatally acquired HIV infection occurs during a critical window of immune development. HIV’s perturbation of this dynamic process may account for the striking age-dependent differences in HIV disease progression. HIV infection also profoundly disrupts the maternal immune system upon which infants rely for protection and immune instruction. Therefore, it is not surprising that infants who escape HIV infection still suffer adverse effects. In this review, we highlight the unique aspects of pediatric HIV transmission and pathogenesis with a focus on mechanisms by which HIV infection during immune ontogeny may allow discovery of key elements for protection and control from HIV. PMID:23772619

  15. [HIV infection in immigrants].

    PubMed

    López-Vélez, Rogelio; Navarro Beltrá, Miriam; Hernando Jerez, Asunción; del Amo Valero, Julia

    2008-05-01

    Immigration to Spain has greatly increased since 1995. Currently, more than 4 million foreigners are resident in the country. The immigration process increases vulnerability. The most common route of HIV infection in the immigrant population and ethnic minorities is heterosexual transmission. The number of people living with HIV worldwide (39.5 million people in 2006) and the number of those dying from AIDS continues to increase. In 2006, there were an estimated 30,000 people living with HIV/AIDS in Spain. The number of cases of AIDS in immigrants has risen in the last few years. AIDS in immigrants from any country, and especially in those from sub-Saharan Africa, is associated with a greater frequency of tuberculosis disease. Knowledge of opportunistic pathogens with tropical distribution is required for a correct differential diagnosis. Throughout the European Union, the number of AIDS cases has progressively decreased since the introduction of highly effective anti- HIV treatment, but this decrease has been significantly lower in immigrants. The difference may be due to lower access to health systems caused by administrative, legal, cultural and linguistic barriers.

  16. Determinants of use of the fixed dose combination emtricitabine/rilpivirine/tenofovir (Eviplera) in HIV-infected persons receiving care in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Lo Caputo, Sergio; Maggiolo, Franco; Antinori, Andrea; Ammassari, Adriana; Marchetti, Giulia; Mastroianni, Claudio; Gori, Andrea; Di Perri, Giovanni; Angarano, Gioacchino; Carbone, Alessia; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Emtricitabine/rilpivirine/tenofovir (EVP) is a fixed-dose combination of antiretrovirals (ARV) approved by the European Medicines Agency in November 2011 and introduced in Italy in February 2013. It is a once-a-day single tablet and is licensed in Europe for use only in ARV-naïve patients with a viral load (VL) ≤100,000 copies/mL. Objective To identify factors that may be associated with the use of EVP as first-line regimen in HIV-infected individuals starting cART from ARV-naïve in Italy. Methods Clinical sites in ICONA Foundation Study in which ≥1 person had started EVP were selected for this analysis. From these we included all patients who started an EVP-based cART regimen as well as those starting other cART regimens after the date of introduction of EVP at the site (after February 2013 in any case) and with a VL ≤100,000 copies/mL from ARV-naïve. Characteristics at the time of starting cART were compared using chi-square test and unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression analysis. Factors investigated included: gender, mode of HIV transmission, time from HIV diagnosis, CD4 count, nation of birth, AIDS, HCV-status, age, CD8 count, VL, diabetes, smoking, total and HDL cholesterol, eGFR, blood glucose, level of education and employment and site location. Factors showing unadjusted associations with a p-value of 10% or smaller, were retained in the multivariable model. Results We identified 183 patients starting EVP and 173 starting the control regimen from 23 sites. The number of patients starting EVP included at each site ranged from 1 to 12 and the number of those starting the control regimen was similar. The most frequently used drugs in the concurrent group were: TDF (75%), FTC (74%), DRV (39%), ATV/r (26%), LPV/r (9%), EFV (13%) and RAL (14%). In univariable analysis, there were differences in median CD4 count (390 cells/mm3 in EVP versus 348 in controls, p=0.002), time from HIV diagnosis to starting cART (11 versus 3 months, p=0

  17. Balamuthia mandrillaris and Acanthamoeba amebic encephalitis with neurotoxoplasmosis coinfection in a patient with advanced HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Pietrucha-Dilanchian, Paula; Chan, Joseph C; Castellano-Sanchez, Amilcar; Hirzel, Alicia; Laowansiri, Panthipa; Tuda, Claudio; Visvesvara, Govinda S; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Ratzan, Kenneth R

    2012-03-01

    We describe a patient with advanced HIV infection and Balamuthia mandrillaris and Acanthamoeba amebic encephalitis with Toxoplasma gondii coinfection. A multidisciplinary effort and state-of-the-art diagnostic techniques were required for diagnosis. Our patient is the first reported case of an HIV-infected person with dual Balamuthia mandrillaris and Acanthamoeba amebic encephalitis with neurotoxoplasmosis coinfection.

  18. [Chronic genital ulcerations and HIV infection: 29 cases].

    PubMed

    Gbery, I P; Djeha, D; Kacou, D E; Aka, B R; Yoboue, P; Vagamon, B; Sangare, A; Kanga, J M

    1999-01-01

    Genital ulcers are common manifestations of infectious disease. The incidence of genital ulcers featuring a chronic course has increased since the beginning of the AIDS epidemic. The purpose of this 18-month cross-sectional study was to determine the main infectious causes of chronic genital ulcers (CGU) and their correlation with HIV infection. A total of 29 patients with CGU defined as an ulcer showing no sign of healing after more than one month were studied. Mean age ranged from 24 to 54 years. The male-to-female sex ratio was 1:5. The etiology was herpes in 19 cases (65.5 p. 100), chancroid in 6 cases (20.6 p. 100), streptococcal infection in 2 cases (6.8 p. 100), Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in 1 case (3.4 p. 100) and cutaneous amibiasis in 1 case (3.4 p. 100). Twenty-two patients (75.8 p. 100) presented HIV infection including 16 with HIV1 and 6 with HIV1 and HIV2. All patients with herpes were HIV-positive. Eighteen of these patients were in stage C3 of HIV infection. Genital herpes was the main etiology of UGC in patients with HIV infection (p < 0.001). Conversely chancroid was the main etiology in patients without HIV infection (p < 0.05). This finding suggests that herpetic CGU is highly suggestive of AIDS whereas chancroid CGU is not. Although syphilis is widespread in Africa, it was not a cause of CGU in this study. Search for herpes simplex virus or Haemophilus ducreyi in patients with CGU is an important criteria for presumptive diagnosis of AIDS in Africa.

  19. HIV infection and AIDS in China, 1985 through 1994.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, E S; Xie, Q; Zhang, K; Lu, P; Chan, L L

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This paper analyzes data on the distribution of and risk factors for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in China. METHODS. Ten years of data on persons tested for HIV infection and AIDS and the proportion who tested positive were analyzed against the background of China's population count. The Chinese- and English-language literature on HIV and AIDS from 1985 through 1995 was also reviewed. RESULTS. Overall, more males than females had HIV infection. Intravenous drug use was the primary source of transmission, followed by heterosexual contacts. Only a small number of the persons tested were homosexual, but their proportion of HIV seropositivity ranked third to that of drug users; that of general hospital patients ranked fourth. CONCLUSIONS. HIV infection and AIDS in China began as a highly regionalized and largely rural problem in Yunnan Province. However, HIV infection and AIDS have become an emerging urban problem. HIV seropositivity is low among several groups thought to have an elevated risk. PMID:8712271

  20. Science challenging HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Rao, R R; Lakshi, V

    1993-04-01

    The first accepted report of a novel human, slow virus disease belonging to "lentivirus" known as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome can be traced to reports of June 1981. HIV-1 and HIV-2 were later found over the period 1984-86 to be unequivocally associated with AIDS. They are two serologically distinct viruses belonging to the same family with the unique properties of integration and latency in the host cell genome and the presence of reverse transcriptase. Typical of all retroviruses, the HIV genome comprises three genes governing the synthesis of all core proteins, replication protein encoding, and envelope proteins. HIV uses the CD4 antigen on T-helper cells, and about 40% of blood monocytes and tissue macrophages as a cell surface receptor. HIV may, however, also infect cells which contain no CD4. Macrophages serve as the main reservoir of HIV and may carry the virus to different organs. Very recently a rare type of white blood cell called the dendritic cell has been found to allow for direct infection by HIV during sexual intercourse. These cells are prominently present in the anal and vaginal mucosa. The authors discuss facts and figures on the HIV epidemic, the Indian scenario, classification of the clinical spectrum, the enzyme immunoassay HIV testing format, Western blot, immunofluorescence antibody, HIV culture, flow cytometry, radio immuno precipitation assay, and the detection of HIV DNA. Significant advances have been made over the last ten years in understanding the pathogenesis of HIV infection and accurately diagnosing infected individuals, with recombinant technology, polymerase chain reaction, and the construction of synthetic hybrid virus rapidly becoming part of routine diagnostics. More sensitive, specific, and rapid techniques are, however, needed for the early diagnosis and management of AIDS cases. The need for more ideal antibody incorporating both regulatory and structural proteins of the virion, preferably manufactured using

  1. HIV infection and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, A

    1996-09-01

    Many of the clinical features of HIV/AIDS can be ascribed to the profound immune deficiency which develops in infected patients. The destruction of the immune system by the virus results in opportunistic infection, as well as an increased risk of autoimmune disease and malignancy. In addition, disease manifestations related to the virus itself may occur. For example, during the primary illness which occurs within weeks after first exposure to HIV, clinical symptoms occur in at least 50% of cases, typically as a mononucleosis syndrome. HIV-related complications are rarely encountered in patients with preserved immunity (i.e. CD4 T-cell counts greater than 500 cells/mm3). Recurrent mucocutaneous herpes simplex (HSV), herpes zoster (VZV), oral candidiasis and oral hairy leukoplakia occur with increasing frequency as the CD4 count drops below this level. Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) occurs in association with HIV and often presents early in the clinical course. The risk of developing opportunistic infections and malignancies typical of AIDS increases progressively as CD4 counts fall below 200 cells/mm3. The clinical manifestations of infections associated with AIDS tend to fall into well-recognized patterns of presentation, including pneumonia, dysphagia/odynophagia, diarrhoea, neurological symptoms, fever, wasting, anaemia and visual loss. The commonest pathogens include Candida albicans, Pneumocystis carinii, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Toxoplasma gondii, Cryptococcus neoformans, Mycobacterium avium intracellulare and cytomegalovirus. Malignant disease in patients with HIV infection also occurs in a characteristic pattern. Only two tumours are prevalent: Kaposi's sarcoma, a multifocal tumour of vascular endothelium which typically involves skin and mucosal surfaces; and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which is typically high grade in phenotype, often arising within the central nervous system. The principles of therapy include reduction of HIV replication by antiretroviral

  2. Multiplex Urinary Antigen Detection for 13 Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes Improves Diagnosis of Pneumococcal Pneumonia in South African HIV-Infected Adults.

    PubMed

    Albrich, Werner C; Pride, Michael W; Madhi, Shabir A; Callahan, Jan; Adrian, Peter V; French, Roger; van Niekerk, Nadia; Sebastian, Shite; Souza, Victor; Telles, Jean-Noel; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; Jansen, Kathrin U; Klugman, Keith P

    2017-01-01

    A serotype-specific urinary antigen detection (UAD) assay for 13 serotypes included in the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) was recently reported as a useful diagnostic tool for pneumococcal pneumonia. We aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the UAD in HIV-infected South African adults. Urine specimens from a well-defined cohort of HIV-infected South African adults with pneumonia were evaluated retrospectively in the UAD assay. Pneumonia was considered pneumococcal if either sputum Gram stain, sputum culture, blood culture, or the immunochromatographic (ICT) BinaxNow S. pneumoniae test (composite diagnostic) was positive. Among 235 enrolled pneumonia patients, the UAD assay was more frequently positive (104 [44.3%]) than the composite diagnostic (71 [30.2%]; P < 0.001) and increased the pneumococcal etiology from 30.2% by an additional 22.6% to 52.8%. The UAD assay detected more pneumococcal etiologies (45.0%) than the serotype-independent ICT (23.4%, P < 0.001). UAD identified 6/7 patients with PCV13 serotype bacteremia without misclassification of bacteremia episodes due to non-PCV13 serotypes. UAD was positive for 5.1% of asymptomatic HIV-infected persons, with higher rates among those with nasopharyngeal carriage. Concordance between serotypes identified by UAD and by Quellung reaction and PCR serotyping was 70/86 (81.4%). UAD identified the dominant serotype in multiple serotype carriage. This study confirms the utility of the UAD assay for HIV-infected adults comparing favorably with other diagnostic tests. A highly valent UAD may become a new standard for detection of pneumococcal pneumonia in adults. Prior to PCV introduction, at least 53% of pneumonia cases were due to pneumococci in HIV-infected South African adults. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. HIV infection in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nancy; Holodniy, Mark

    2008-01-01

    In the US, an estimated 1 million people are infected with HIV, although one-third of this population are unaware of their diagnosis. While HIV infection is commonly thought to affect younger adults, there are an increasing number of patients over 50 years of age living with the condition. UNAIDS and WHO estimate that of the 40 million people living with HIV/AIDS in the world, approximately 2.8 million are 50 years and older. With the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the mid-1990s, survival following HIV diagnosis has risen dramatically and HIV infection has evolved from an acute disease process to being managed as a chronic medical condition. As treated HIV-infected patients live longer and the number of new HIV diagnoses in older patients rise, clinicians need to be aware of these trends and become familiar with the management of HIV infection in the older patient. This article is intended for the general clinician, including geriatricians, and will review epidemiologic data and HIV treatment as well as provide a discussion on medical management issues affecting the older HIV-infected patient. PMID:18982916

  4. [HIV infection and AIDS in urology].

    PubMed

    Fischer, C; Miller, J; Gahr, M; Ringert, R H

    1994-05-01

    Up to December 1993, a total of 10858 AIDS cases were reported to the central AIDS registry at the Federal Health Office. Human immunodeficiency virus is acquired through needle sharing (i.v. drug users), contaminated blood transfusions, intercourse with infected persons and transplacentally by fetuses. In Germany, about seven people a day are estimated to acquire the HIV infection. Half the patients will develop systemic manifestations of AIDS within 12-13 years. Only a small percentage of these patients suffer from urological manifestations, e.g. urinary tract infection, prostatism or HIV-associated nephropathy. Nevertheless, knowledge of genitourinary pathology caused by HIV makes early diagnosis of AIDS possible.

  5. Bone disease and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Amorosa, Valerianna; Tebas, Pablo

    2006-01-01

    The high prevalence of bone demineralization among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients in the current therapeutic era has been described in multiple studies, sounding the alarm that we may expect an epidemic of fragility fractures in the future. However, despite noting high overall prevalences of osteopenia and osteoporosis, recent longitudinal studies that we review here have generally not observed accelerated bone loss during antiretroviral therapy beyond the initial period after treatment initiation. We discuss the continued progress toward understanding the mechanisms of HIV-associated bone loss, particularly the effects of HIV infection, antiretroviral therapy, and host immune factors on bone turnover. We summarize results of clinical trials published in the past year that studied the safety and efficacy of treatment of bone loss in HIV-infected patients and provide provisional opinions about who should be considered for bone disease screening and treatment.

  6. [Microbiological diagnosis of HIV infection].

    PubMed

    López-Bernaldo de Quirós, Juan Carlos; Delgado, Rafael; García, Federico; Eiros, José M; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl

    2007-12-01

    Currently, there are around 150,000 HIV-infected patients in Spain. This number, together with the fact that this disease is now a chronic condition since the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, has generated an increasing demand on the clinical microbiology laboratories in our hospitals. This increase has occurred not only in the diagnosis and treatment of opportunistic diseases, but also in tests related to the diagnosis and therapeutic management of HIV infection. To meet this demand, the Sociedad de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clinica (Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology) has updated its standard Procedure for the microbiological diagnosis of HIV infection. The main advances related to serological diagnosis, plasma viral load, and detection of resistance to antiretroviral drugs are reviewed in this version of the Procedure.

  7. Preventing HIV Infection in Women

    PubMed Central

    Adimora, Adaora A.; Ramirez, Catalina; Auerbach, Judith D.; Aral, Sevgi O.; Hodder, Sally; Wingood, Gina; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Bukusi, Elizabeth Anne

    2014-01-01

    Although the number of new infections has declined recently, women still constitute almost half of the world's 34 million people with HIV infection, and HIV remains the leading cause of death among women of reproductive age. Prevention research has made considerable progress during the past few years in addressing the biological, behavioral and social factors that influence women's vulnerability to HIV infection. Nevertheless, substantial work still must be done in order to implement scientific advancements and to resolve the many questions that remain. This article highlights some of the recent advances and persistent gaps in HIV prevention research for women and outlines key research and policy priorities. PMID:23764631

  8. Mortality in perinatally HIV-infected young people in England following transition to adult care: an HIV Young Persons Network (HYPNet) audit.

    PubMed

    Fish, R; Judd, A; Jungmann, E; O'Leary, C; Foster, C

    2014-04-01

    Mortality in young people with perinatally acquired HIV infection (PHIV) following transfer to adult care has not been characterized in the UK. We conducted a multicentre audit to establish the number of deaths and associated factors. Fourteen adult clinics caring for infected young people reported deaths to 30 September 2011 on a proforma. Deaths were matched to the Collaborative HIV Paediatric Study, a clinical database of HIV-infected children in the UK/Ireland, to describe clinical characteristics in paediatric care of those who died post-transition. Eleven deaths were reported from 14 clinics which cared for 248 adults with PHIV. For the 11 deaths, the median age at transfer to adult care was 17 years (range 15-21 years), and at death was 21 years (range 17-24 years). Causes of death were suicide (two patients), advanced HIV disease (seven patients) and bronchiectasis (one patient), with one cause missing. At death, the median CD4 count was 27 cells/μL (range 0-630 cells/μL); five patients were on antiretroviral therapy (ART) but only two had a viral load < 50 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL. Nine had poor adherence when in paediatric care, continuing into adult care despite multidisciplinary support. Eight had ART resistance, although all had potentially suppressive regimens available. Nine had mental health diagnoses. Our findings highlight the complex medical and psychosocial issues faced by some adults with PHIV, with nine of the 11 deaths in our study being associated with poor adherence and advanced HIV disease. Novel adherence interventions and mental health support are required for this vulnerable cohort. © 2013 British HIV Association.

  9. Troubled Adolescents and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, John O., Ed.; And Others

    This report on adolescents, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), and Human Immune Virus (HIV) infection had its beginning in the Knowledge Development Workshop "Issues in the Prevention and Treatment of AIDS Among Adolescents with Serious Emotional Disturbance," held June 9-10, 1988 in the District of Columbia. These papers are included:…

  10. Spatiotemporal dynamics of HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strain, Matthew Carl

    Mathematical models of the dynamics of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have contributed to tremendous advances over the past 20 years. This thesis extends this previous work by exploring the importance of spatial heterogeneity in HIV infection both in vitro and in vivo in patients treated with highly-active antiretroviral therapy. Viral infections propagate locally in space, yet HIV infection has been widely regarded as equilibrated over the entire body of an infected patient. This dissertation constructs and explores a cellular automata model of viral spread at the cellular level. Coupling the automata to a blood compartment represented by a differential equation leads to a whole-body model of HIV infection that explicitly includes spatial effects at both the cellular and tissue levels. These models are tested by comparison with experimental data. A central prediction of the spatial model is that, due to competition between Brownian motion and viral lability, HIV infectivity increases with target cell density. This production is verified in a series of in vitro experiments in cell culture. The predicted independence of inhibitory concentrations of antiretoviral agents is verified for nevirapine, but azidothymidine inhibits HIV replication less efficiently in more dense cultures. These in vitro results suggest that systems allowing cell concentrations closer to tissue densities would better reflect virus replication kinetics, although standard measures of relative drug susceptibility may accurately reflect in vivo conditions. The coupled spatial model of in vivo dynamics is compared with novel mathematical analysis of experiments in HIV-infected patients. These analyses indicate that HIV DNA provides a useful marker of the size of long-lived cellular reservoirs of HIV. Levels of HIV DNA in peripheral blood are predictive of the average rate of residual virus production after years of treatment, regardless of whether patients initiate therapy

  11. [Pathological findings in patients with HIV infection and lymphadenopathies].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vega, Federico; Botero, Miguel; Cortés, Jorge Alberto; Tobón, Ángela

    2017-01-24

    Lymphadenopathy is a frequent clinical finding in HIV-infected patients. The differential diagnosis includes infection, malignancy or reactive changes. Currently, there are no data on this topic in the region. To describe the etiology of lymph node pathology in HIV-infected patients from the Hospital La María in Medellín, Colombia. The medical records of HIV-infected patients with lymphadenopathy who underwent excisional lymph node biopsy between June 2009 and October 2011 were retrospectively evaluated. The data were registered according to immune status, antiretroviral therapy and final diagnosis. The evaluation of 120 medical records revealed the following diagnosis distribution: 58% of the cases were attributable to infectious causes, 32.5% were attributable to reactive changes, 6.6% were attributable to neoplastic disease, and 2.5% were normal. The most frequent diagnosis was tuberculosis, which was found in 48.3% of the patients. The lymph node biopsy was useful for identifying additional opportunistic infections in different organs in 14.1% of the patients. A lymph node biopsy in HIV-infected patients is a useful aid in the diagnosis of serious neoplastic and infectious diseases and should be routinely performed in such patients with lymphadenopathy.

  12. Partners in Crime: The Role of CMV in Immune Dysregulation and Clinical Outcome During HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael L; Lederman, Michael M; Gianella, Sara

    2016-02-01

    In the current era of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are living longer and healthier lives. Nevertheless, HIV-infected persons are at greater risk for age-related disorders, which have been linked to residual immune dysfunction and inflammation. HIV-infected individuals are almost universally co-infected with cytomegalovirus (CMV) and both viruses are associated with inflammation-related morbidities. Therefore, a detailed investigation of the relationship between CMV and aging-related morbidities emerging during chronic HIV infection is warranted. Here, we review the literature on how CMV co-infection affects HIV infection and host immunity and we discuss the gaps in our knowledge that need elucidation.

  13. Residual Immune Dysregulation Syndrome in Treated HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Lederman, Michael M.; Funderburg, Nicholas T.; Sekaly, Rafick P.; Klatt, Nichole R.; Hunt, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has revolutionized the course of HIV infection, improving immune function and decreasing dramatically the mortality and morbidity due to the opportunistic complications of the disease. Nonetheless, even with sustained suppression of HIV replication, many HIV-infected persons experience a syndrome characterized by increased T cell activation and evidence of heightened inflammation and coagulation. This residual immune dysregulation syndrome or RIDS is more common in persons who fail to increase circulating CD4+ T cells to normal levels and in several epidemiologic studies it has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. These morbid and fatal events are not the typical opportunistic infections and malignancies seen in the early AIDS era but rather comprise a spectrum of cardiovascular events, liver disease, metabolic disorders, kidney disease, bone disease, and a spectrum of malignant complications distinguishable from the opportunistic malignancies that characterized the earlier days of the AIDS epidemic. While immune activation, inflammation, and coagulopathy are characteristic of untreated HIV infection and improve with drug-induced control of HIV replication, the drivers of RIDS in treated HIV infection are incompletely understood. And while inflammation, immune activation, and coagulopathy are more common in treated persons who fail to restore circulating CD4+ T cells, it is not entirely clear how these two phenomena are linked. PMID:23886064

  14. Human papillomavirus vaccines: where do they fit in HIV-infected individuals?

    PubMed

    Firnhaber, Cynthia; Wilkin, Timothy

    2012-09-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the etiological agent for cervical cancer and a large majority of anal cancers worldwide. In 2006 two preventive vaccines against the HPV were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and have since been approved in over 100 countries. HIV-infected populations are at an increased risk for HPV-related cancers. None of the efficacy trials for these vaccines included HIV-infected populations. However, studies in HIV-infected children and adult men show that the vaccine is safe and highly immunogenic. Studies evaluating the vaccine in HIV-infected women are in progress. Based on these studies, the American Council on Immunization Practices recommends HPV vaccination for all HIV-infected children and young adults up to age 26 years. HPV vaccine policies in resource-limited countries, many of which have a high prevalence of HIV infection, are still being developed. Future studies should examine the role of HPV vaccination for older HIV-infected adults who likely have ongoing HPV infection.

  15. Upregulation of IL-21 Receptor on B Cells and IL-21 Secretion Distinguishes Novel 2009 H1N1 Vaccine Responders from Nonresponders among HIV-Infected Persons on Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pallikkuth, Suresh; Kanthikeel, Sudheesh Pilakka; Silva, Sandra Y.; Fischl, Margaret; Pahwa, Rajendra; Pahwa, Savita

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying failure of novel 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine-induced Ab responses in HIV-infected persons are poorly understood. This study prospectively evaluated 16 HIV-infected patients on combination antiretroviral therapy and eight healthy controls (HC) who received a single 15 μg dose of nonadjuvanted novel 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine during the 2009 H1N1 epidemic. Peripheral blood was collected at baseline (T0) and at 7 d (T1) and 28 d (T2) postvaccination for evaluation of immune responses. Prevaccination hemagglutination inhibition Ab titer was <1:20 in all except one study participant. At T2, all HC and 8 out of 16 patients (50%) developed a vaccine-induced Ab titer of ≥1:40. Vaccine responder (R) and vaccine nonresponder patients were comparable at T0 in age, CD4 counts, virus load, and B cell immunophenotypic characteristics. At T2, HC and R patients developed an expansion of phenotypic and functional memory B cells and ex vivo H1N1-stimulated IgG Ab-secreting cells in an ELISPOT assay. The memory B cell response was preceded by a significant expansion of plasmablasts and spontaneous H1N1-specific Ab-secreting cells at T1. At T2, HC and R patients also exhibited significant increases in serum IL-21 levels and in the frequency and mean fluorescence intensity of IL-21R–expressing B cells, which correlated with serum H1N1 Ab titers. Vaccine nonresponder patients failed to develop the above-described vaccine-induced immunologic responses. The novel association of novel 2009 H1N1 vaccine-induced Ab responses with IL-21/IL-21R upregulation and with development of memory B cells and plasmablasts has implications for future research in vaccine design. PMID:21531891

  16. A review of economic evaluations of darunavir boosted by low-dose ritonavir in treatment-experienced persons living with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Mauskopf, Josephine; Annemans, Lieven; Hill, Andrew M; Smets, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Darunavir boosted by low-dose ritonavir (DRV/r), at a daily dose of 600/100 mg twice a day (bid), has been shown to be superior to alternative highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens for the management of treatment-experienced, HIV-infected adults in the phase IIb POWER trials and the phase III TITAN trial. Economic analyses of different types that have been performed for several countries to investigate the cost effectiveness and budgetary impact of DRV/r 600/100 mg bid for treatment-experienced people living with HIV (PLHIV) based on the clinical data gathered in the POWER and TITAN trials are reviewed for consistency and their value to different decision-makers is assessed. Cost-utility analyses for the USA and several European countries indicate that DRV/r-based HAART is cost effective compared with other standard of care protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimens in PLHIV with evidence of PI resistance. For all of these countries, the estimated cost-utility ratio is well below typical benchmark values and these ratios are robust, as demonstrated by one-way sensitivity and variability analyses and multi-way probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Studies using other metrics including the average 1-year drug cost per patient with a plasma HIV-RNA level less than 50 copies/mL at 48 weeks, the incremental drug cost per additional patient with a plasma HIV-RNA level less than 50 copies/mL at 48 weeks, the total (antiretroviral and non-antiretroviral) costs during the first year of treatment, and the total healthcare budget impact during the first 5 years of treatment provided further evidence of the positive economic outcomes with the use of DRV/r in treatment-experienced PLHIV. Different measures of economic outcomes are useful for different types of decision-makers and different types of decisions. In general, the results of these different types of analyses will be consistent with each other. For darunavir, the economic analyses reviewed in this paper

  17. Health Outcomes for HIV-Infected Persons Released From the New York City Jail System With a Transitional Care-Coordination Plan

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Paul A.; Zaller, Nicolas; Shah, Dipal; Venters, Homer

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to assess 6-month outcomes for HIV-infected people released from New York City jails with a transitional care plan. Methods. Jail detainees in New York City living with HIV who accepted a transitional care plan during incarceration were asked to participate in a multi-site evaluation aimed at improving linkages to community-based care. The evaluation included a 6-month follow-up; HIV surveillance data were used to assess outcomes for those considered lost to follow-up. Results. Participants (n = 434) completed baseline surveys during incarceration in a jail in New York City. Of those seen at 6 months (n = 243), a greater number were taking antiretroviral medications (92.6% vs 55.6%), had improved antiretroviral therapy adherence (93.2% vs 80.7%), and reported significant reductions in emergency department visits (0.20 vs 0.60 visits), unstable housing (4.15% vs 22.4%), and food insecurity (1.67% vs 20.7%) compared with baseline. Conclusions. Transitional care coordination services facilitate continuity of care and improved health outcomes for HIV-positive people released from jail. PMID:25521890

  18. Health outcomes for HIV-infected persons released from the New York City jail system with a transitional care-coordination plan.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Paul A; Jordan, Alison O; Zaller, Nicolas; Shah, Dipal; Venters, Homer

    2015-02-01

    We sought to assess 6-month outcomes for HIV-infected people released from New York City jails with a transitional care plan. Jail detainees in New York City living with HIV who accepted a transitional care plan during incarceration were asked to participate in a multi-site evaluation aimed at improving linkages to community-based care. The evaluation included a 6-month follow-up; HIV surveillance data were used to assess outcomes for those considered lost to follow-up. Participants (n=434) completed baseline surveys during incarceration in a jail in New York City. Of those seen at 6 months (n=243), a greater number were taking antiretroviral medications (92.6% vs 55.6%), had improved antiretroviral therapy adherence (93.2% vs 80.7%), and reported significant reductions in emergency department visits (0.20 vs 0.60 visits), unstable housing (4.15% vs 22.4%), and food insecurity (1.67% vs 20.7%) compared with baseline. Transitional care coordination services facilitate continuity of care and improved health outcomes for HIV-positive people released from jail.

  19. Integrated prevention services for HIV infection, viral hepatitis, sexually transmitted diseases, and tuberculosis for persons who use drugs illicitly: summary guidance from CDC and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

    PubMed

    2012-11-09

    This report summarizes current (as of 2011) guidelines or recommendations published by multiple agencies of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) for prevention and control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, viral hepatitis, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and tuberculosis (TB) for persons who use drugs illicitly. It also summarizes existing evidence of effectiveness for practices to support delivery of integrated prevention services. Implementing integrated services for prevention of HIV infection, viral hepatitis, STDs, and TB is intended to provide persons who use drugs illicitly with increased access to services, to improve timeliness of service delivery, and to increase effectiveness of efforts to prevent infectious diseases that share common risk factors, behaviors, and social determinants. This guidance is intended for use by decision makers (e.g., local and federal agencies and leaders and managers of prevention and treatment services), health-care providers, social service providers, and prevention and treatment support groups. Consolidated guidance can strengthen efforts of health-care providers and public health providers to prevent and treat infectious diseases and substance use and mental disorders, use resources efficiently, and improve health-care services and outcomes in persons who use drugs illicitly. An integrated approach to service delivery for persons who use drugs incorporates recommended science-based public health strategies, including 1) prevention and treatment of substance use and mental disorders; 2) outreach programs; 3) risk assessment for illicit use of drugs; 4) risk assessment for infectious diseases; 5) screening, diagnosis, and counseling for infectious diseases; 6) vaccination; 7) prevention of mother-to-child transmission of infectious diseases; 8) interventions for reduction of risk behaviors; 9) partner services and contact follow-up; 10) referrals and linkage to care; 11) medical

  20. Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroups and Neurocognitive Impairment During HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hulgan, Todd; Samuels, David C.; Bush, William; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott L.; Heaton, Robert K.; Franklin, Donald R.; Straub, Peter; Murdock, Deborah G.; Clifford, David B.; Collier, Ann C.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Marra, Christina M.; McArthur, Justin C.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Morgello, Susan; Simpson, David M.; Grant, Igor; Kallianpur, Asha R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Neurocognitive impairment (NCI) remains an important complication in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Ancestry-related mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups have been associated with outcomes of HIV infection and combination antiretroviral therapy (CART), and with neurodegenerative diseases. We hypothesize that mtDNA haplogroups are associated with NCI in HIV-infected adults and performed a genetic association study in the CNS HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) cohort. Methods. CHARTER is an observational study of ambulatory HIV-infected adults. Haplogroups were assigned using mtDNA sequence, and principal components were derived from ancestry-informative nuclear DNA variants. Outcomes were cross-sectional global deficit score (GDS) as a continuous measure, GDS impairment (GDS ≥ 0.50), and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) using international criteria. Multivariable models were adjusted for comorbidity status (incidental vs contributing), current CART, plasma HIV RNA, reading ability, and CD4 cell nadir. Results. Haplogroups were available from 1027 persons; median age 43 years, median CD4 nadir 178 cells/mm3, 72% on CART, and 46% with HAND. The 102 (9.9%) persons of genetically determined admixed Hispanic ancestry had more impairment by GDS or HAND than persons of European or African ancestry (P < .001 for all). In multivariate models including persons of admixed Hispanic ancestry, those with haplogroup B had lower GDS (β = −0.34; P = .008) and less GDS impairment (odds ratio = 0.16; 95% confidence interval, .04, .63; P = .009) than other haplogroups. There were no significant haplogroup associations among persons of European or African ancestry. Conclusions. In these mostly CART-treated persons, mtDNA haplogroup B was associated with less NCI among persons of genetically determined Hispanic ancestry. mtDNA variation may represent an ancestry-specific factor influencing NCI in HIV-infected

  1. Cold urticaria and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, R Y; Schwartz, R A

    1993-10-01

    Three patients, all seropositive for HIV antibody, complained of swelling and pruritus on the head and limbs when exposed to the cold. All three had received zidovudine for significant CD4 cell depletion, but had no AIDS-defining illnesses. An ice-cube test was positive on each individual. There was no evidence of cold agglutinins, cryoglobulins, syphilis, or other concurrent diseases in any of the patients. This association may represent yet another allergic manifestation in HIV infection.

  2. HIV infection of the penis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deborah; Politch, Joseph A.; Pudney, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The penile foreskin, shaft, glans/corona, meatus and urethral introitus are all potential sites of HIV-1 acquisition in men. Circumcision decreases HIV infection in heterosexual men by 50–60%, indicating that the foreskin plays an important role, but that other sites are also involved. HIV target cells have been described throughout the male genital epithelium, but appear to be more accessible in the inner foreskin and urethral introitus, both of which are mucosal (wet) epithelia and infectable with HIV in vitro. Sexually transmitted co-infections can increase the risk of HIV infection at these and other sites by eroding the protective epithelial layer and by attracting and activating HIV target cells in the mucosal epithelium. The moist subpreputial cavity hosts a unique microbiome that may also play a role in HIV infection. Both innate and adaptive immune defense mechanisms are operative in the lower male genital region. The penile urethral mucosa contains accumulations of IgA+ plasma cells and T lymphocytes, and may provide a responsive target for future mucosal vaccines to prevent HIV sexual transmission. PMID:21214659

  3. Pharmacotherapy of Pediatric HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rakhmanina, Natella; Phelps, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS With the ongoing epidemic of human immune deficiency virus (HIV) infections in the pediatric age group, the delivery of safe and effective antiretroviral therapy to children and adolescents is crucial to save the lives of millions of children worldwide. Antiretroviral drugs have been demonstrated to significantly decrease HIV-associated morbidity and mortality, assure normal growth and development, and improve survival and quality of life in children and adolescents. The immunologic response to HIV infection is closely related to the child’s development and creates age specific parameters for the evaluation of therapeutic response to antiretroviral therapy in pediatric HIV disease. In addition to the changes in immunological response to HIV infection, the development and maturation of organ systems involved in drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination determines significant changes in the pharmacokinetics of antiretroviral drugs throughout the childhood. Multiple factors including age-specific adherence barriers, changes in social and economical surroundings, and psychological and sexual maturation affect the choices and outcomes of the treatment of pediatric HIV disease. In this chapter we will review the evolution of antiretroviral treatment from early infancy through adolescence. PMID:23036246

  4. Low prevalence of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) but high prevalence of pneumocystis dihydropteroate synthase (dhps) gene mutations in HIV-infected persons in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Steve M; Meshnick, Steven R; Worodria, William; Andama, Alfred; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Davis, J Lucian; Yoo, Samuel D; Byanyima, Patrick; Kaswabuli, Sylvia; Goodman, Carol D; Huang, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) is an important opportunistic infection in patients infected with HIV, but its burden is incompletely characterized in those areas of sub-Saharan Africa where HIV is prevalent. We explored the prevalence of both PCP in HIV-infected adults admitted with pneumonia to a tertiary-care hospital in Uganda and of putative P. jirovecii drug resistance by mutations in fungal dihydropteroate synthase (dhps) and dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr). In 129 consecutive patients with sputum smears negative for mycobacteria, 5 (3.9%) were diagnosed with PCP by microscopic examination of Giemsa-stained bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Concordance was 100% between Giemsa stain and PCR (dhps and dhfr). PCP was more prevalent in patients newly-diagnosed with HIV (11.4%) than in patients with known HIV (1.1%; p = 0.007). Mortality at 2 months after discharge was 29% overall: 28% among PCP-negative patients, and 60% (3 of 5) among PCP-positive patients. In these 5 fungal isolates and an additional 8 from consecutive cases of PCP, all strains harbored mutant dhps haplotypes; all 13 isolates harbored the P57S mutation in dhps, and 3 (23%) also harbored the T55A mutation. No non-synonymous dhfr mutations were detected. PCP is an important cause of pneumonia in patients newly-diagnosed with HIV in Uganda, is associated with high mortality, and putative molecular evidence of drug resistance is prevalent. Given the reliability of field diagnosis in our cohort, future studies in sub-Saharan Africa can investigate the clinical impact of these genotypes.

  5. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Based Profiling of Biofluids Reveals Metabolic Dysregulation in HIV-Infected Persons and Those on Anti-Retroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Munshi, Saif Ullah; Rewari, Bharat Bhushan; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar; Jameel, Shahid

    2013-01-01

    Background Although HIV causes immune deficiency by infection and depletion of immunocytes, metabolic alterations with clinical manifestations are also reported in HIV/AIDS patients. Here we aimed to profile metabolite changes in the plasma, urine, and saliva of HIV/AIDS patients, including those on anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Methods Metabolic profiling of biofluids collected from treatment naïve HIV/AIDS patients and those receiving ART was done with solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy followed by statistical analysis and annotation. Results In Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the NMR spectra, Principal Component 1 (PC1) alone accounted for 99.3%, 87.2% and 78.8% variations in plasma, urine, and saliva, respectively. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was applied to generate three-component models, which showed plasma and urine to be better than saliva in discriminating between patients and healthy controls, and between ART-naïve patients and those receiving therapy. Twenty-six metabolites were differentially altered in any or two types of samples. Our results suggest that urinary Neopterin, and plasma Choline and Sarcosine could be used as metabolic biomarkers of HIV/AIDS infection. Pathway analysis revealed significant alternations in 12 metabolic pathways. Conclusions This study catalogs differentially regulated metabolites in biofluids, which helped classify subjects as healthy controls, HIV/AIDS patients, and those on ART. It also underscores the importance of further studying the consequences of HIV infection on host metabolism and its implications for pathogenesis. PMID:23696880

  6. Dental management of HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Aldous, J A

    1990-11-01

    In 1981, a group of male homosexuals was found to have an immunological defect resulting in opportunistic infections. The pattern of symptoms became known as acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Much time and expense have been invested to study the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), prevent its spread, and find a cure for HIV infection. Fear of HIV infection has resulted in implementation of stricter infection control practices. Intervention by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has mandated procedures for infection control and waste disposal. Ethical questions and social problems have surfaced concerning the treatment of HIV-infected patients. Despite reports on infection control, literature concerning management of HIV-infected dental patients is limited. Misinformation has prevented the application of reliable information about the care of HIV-infected individuals. An accurate general knowledge of HIV infection is essential for optimal care of these patients.

  7. HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders: The Relationship of HIV Infection with Physical and Social Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Tedaldi, Ellen M.; Minniti, Nancy L.; Fischer, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) will undoubtedly increase with the improved longevity of HIV-infected persons. HIV infection, itself, as well as multiple physiologic and psychosocial factors can contribute to cognitive impairment and neurologic complications. These comorbidities confound the diagnosis, assessment, and interventions for neurocognitive disorders. In this review, we discuss the role of several key comorbid factors that may contribute significantly to the development and progression of HIV-related neurocognitive impairment, as well as the current status of diagnostic strategies aimed at identifying HIV-infected individuals with impaired cognition and future research priorities and challenges. PMID:25815329

  8. Ocular complications of HIV infection in sub-Sahara Africa.

    PubMed

    Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Tshitswana, Dintle

    2008-08-01

    This article reviews the magnitude and spectrum of ocular complications of HIV infection in sub-Sahara Africa. A literature search was done using PubMed, Google, and UpToDate and by talking to ophthalmologists and HIV experts working in the region. Ocular complications of HIV infection, mostly retinal, are seen in 29% to 71% of patients. Cytomegalovirus retinitis affects 0% to 16.5% of HIV-infected patients and is treated successfully with intravitreal ganciclovir in South Africa and Botswana. Ocular surface squamous neoplasia is seen in 4% to 7.8% of persons with HIV (a 5%-6% increase in Uganda and Tanzania), and recurrence after surgery occurs in 3.2% to 31.2%. In Zimbabwe, 45% of meningitis in adults is cryptococcal, and cryptococcal meningitis is the third leading cause of death in HIV patients in rural Uganda. In Rwanda, 9% of patients with cryptococcal meningitis developed visual loss and sixth nerve palsy. Thus, HIV infection leads to significant ocular morbidity in sub-Sahara Africa.

  9. Adherence to tobacco dependence treatment among HIV-infected smokers

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Kristine K.; Wewers, Mary Ellen; Ferketich, Amy K.; Diaz, Philip; Koletar, Susan L.; Reynolds, Nancy R.

    2017-01-01

    High prevalence of tobacco use and low success in quitting remain significant problems for reducing disease burden among HIV-infected persons. This study’s purpose was to examine participant responsiveness and tobacco dependence treatment adherence and their influences on tobacco abstinence among HIV-infected patients. This non-randomized study included HIV-infected smokers 18 years of age or older, who smoked at least 5 cigarettes per day, and had an interest in quitting smoking in the next 30 days. HIV-infected smokers (n = 247) received a 12-week tobacco dependence treatment intervention that included pharmacotherapy and telephone counseling. Younger age and non-White race were associated with lower adherence to pharmacotherapy. Younger age, non-White race, and increased monthly binge drinking were associated with lower adherence to telephone counseling. High participant responsiveness was associated with adherence to pharmacotherapy, counseling, and abstinence. Development and testing of interventions to improve adherence to evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment is warranted. PMID:25855045

  10. What Can We Learn From Measles? No New HIV Infections.

    PubMed

    Smith, Davey M

    2015-01-01

    Reducing the incidence of HIV infection until there are no new infections depends on driving the number of secondary infections produced by a typical source infection in a completely susceptible population (basic reproduction number; R0) down to less than 1. Components of R0 that must be addressed are the number of sexual contacts the infectious person makes per unit of time (C), the probability of transmission per single sexual contact with the infectious person (P), and the duration that the infected person is infectious to others (D) (R0 = C × P × D). Numerous strategies may contribute to driving transmission of HIV infection down to zero, including early initiation of antiretroviral treatment and pre- or postexposure prophylaxis. This article summarizes a presentation by Davey M. Smith, MD, at the IAS-USA continuing education program held in San Francisco, California, in March 2015.

  11. Ocular manifestations of HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Jabs, D A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of ocular complications and the clinical outcomes of these complications in patients with various stages of HIV infection. METHODS: Retrospective review of all HIV-infected patients seen in an AIDS ophthalmology clinic from November 1983 through December 31, 1992. RESULTS: Eleven-hundred sixty-three patients were seen for ophthalmologic evaluation. Of these, 781 had the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), 226 had symptomatic HIV infection (AIDs-related complex [ARC]), and 156 had asymptomatic HIV infection. Non-infectious HIV retinopathy was the most common ocular complication, affecting 50% of the patients with AIDS, 34% of the patients with ARC, and 3% of the patients with asymptomatic HIV infection. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis was the most common opportunistic ocular infection, affecting 37% of the patients with AIDS. Other opportunistic ocular infections, including ocular toxoplasmosis, varicella zoster virus retinitis, and Pneumocystis choroidopathy were all much less common, each occurring in < or = 1% of the patients with AIDS. Treatment of CMV retinitis with either foscarnet or ganciclovir was successful in initially controlling the retinitis. However, relapse represented a significant problem and required frequent re-inductions. As a consequence of the retinal damage associated with relapse, loss of visual acuity occurred. The median time to a visual acuity of 20/200 or worse for all eyes with CMV retinitis was 13.4 months, and the median time to a visual acuity of 20/200 or worse in the better eye was 21.1 months. At last follow-up, 75% of the patients had a final visual acuity of 20/40 or better in at least one eye. Retinal detachments were a frequent ophthalmologic complication of CMV retinitis with a cumulative probability of a retinal detachment in at least one eye of 57% at 12 months after the diagnosis of CMV retinitis. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus developed in 3% of the overall series and was seen in

  12. Prospective Double-Blind Study of Zidovudine (AZT) in Early Stage HIV infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    FRONT COVER FUNDING NO. 87PP7875 S L. TITLE: Prospective Double-Blind Study of Zidovudine (AZT) in Early Stage HIV Infection PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Prospective Double-Blind Study of Zidovudine (AZT) in Early State HIV Infection 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Shannon M. Harrison 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 113b...COSATI CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUBGROUP HIV , Zidovudine, Early, Infection 06

  13. Short Communication: Kidney Dysfunction Among HIV-Infected Children in Latin America and the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Harris, D. Robert; de Oliveira, Ricardo Hugo; de Abreu, Thalita F.; Kakehasi, Fabiana; Pilotto, Jose Henrique; Ruz, Noris Pavia; Krauss, Margot R.; Hazra, Rohan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Renal toxicity is a concern in HIV-infected children receiving antiretrovirals. However, the prevalence [1.7%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.0–2.6%] and incidence of kidney dysfunction (0.17 cases/100 person-years; 95% CI: 0.04–0.30) were rare in this multicenter cohort study of 1,032 perinatally HIV-infected Latin American and Caribbean children followed from 2002 to 2011. PMID:24866283

  14. Lung Cancer in HIV-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Mena, Álvaro; Meijide, Héctor; Marcos, Pedro J

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of HAART for persons living with HIV since 1996 has resulted in a dramatic decline in AIDS-related mortality. However, other comorbidities are increasing, such as metabolic disturbances or cancers, including solid organ malignancies. Among the latest, lung cancer, especially the adenocarcinoma subtype, is on the rise. HIV infection, even controlling for smoking, is an independent risk factor for developing lung cancer. HIV could promote lung cancers through immunosuppression, chronic inflammation, and a direct oncogenic effect. Smoking, lung infections, and chronic pulmonary diseases are risk factors for lung cancer. All may contribute to the cumulative incidence of lung cancer in persons living with HIV. It is double that in the general population. The role of HAART in lung cancer development in persons living with HIV is not well established. Although data supporting it could be too preliminary, persons living with HIV should be considered within high-risk groups that could benefit from screening strategies with low-dose computed tomography, especially those with airway obstruction and emphysema. Current evidence suggests that quitting smoking strategies in persons living with HIV achieve abstinence rates comparable to those in healthy HIV-negative smokers.

  15. Immune Activation and Cardiovascular Disease in Chronic HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Longenecker, Chris T.; Sullivan, Claire; Baker, Jason V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To describe the potential contribution of immune activation in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated cardiovascular disease (CVD)—a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among HIV positive persons with access to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent findings We review recent literature that suggests abnormalities in both adaptive and innate immunity contributes to CVD risk among persons with HIV infection. In particular, potentially atherogenic T-cell mechanisms include persistent high-level T-cell activation (and associated pro-inflammatory mechanisms), as well as the presence of co-pathogens (e.g., CMV) providing an ongoing stimulus for cytotoxic T-cell responses. More recent data has then emphasized the potential impact of monocyte/macrophage-mediated inflammation and injury within atherosclerotic lesions. The pathology driving innate immune activation many not fully reverse with ART treatment, highlighting the need for interventions that target inflammation as a CVD prevention strategy. Summary Premature CVD among persons with HIV infection is due, in part, to persistent abnormalities in immune activation and systemic inflammation despite viral suppression. Prevention strategies for persons with HIV infection include those that target traditional CVD risk factors as well as newer candidate treatments with potential immunomodulatory benefits. PMID:26599166

  16. Surveillance of recent HIV infections among newly diagnosed HIV cases in Germany between 2008 and 2014.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Alexandra; Hauser, Andrea; Zimmermann, Ruth; Santos-Hövener, Claudia; Bätzing-Feigenbaum, Jörg; Wildner, Stephan; Kücherer, Claudia; Bannert, Norbert; Hamouda, Osamah; Bremer, Viviane; Bartmeyer, Barbara

    2017-07-11

    The HIV surveillance system in Germany is based on mandatory, anonymous notification of newly diagnosed HIV cases by laboratories. Because the time between HIV infection and the diagnosis of HIV varies widely between persons, it is difficult to determine the number of cases of recent HIV infection among newly diagnosed cases of HIV. In Germany, the BED-capture-enzyme immunoassay (BED-CEIA) has been used to distinguish between recent and long-standing HIV infection. The aim of this analysis is to report the proportion of cases of recent HIV infection among newly diagnosed cases in Germany between 2008 and 2014 and to identify factors associated with recent infections. A sample of voluntary laboratories among all HIV diagnostic laboratories was recruited. Residual blood from HIV diagnostic tests was spotted on filter paper as dried serum or dried plasma spots and was sent along with the notification form of the HIV cases. The BED-CEIA test was performed. A case was defined as recent HIV infection with a BED-CEIA test result of less than 0.8 normalized optical density, with the exclusion of CDC stage C. The proportion of recent newly diagnosed HIV infections among different groups (such as transmission groups, gender or age groups) was calculated. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with recent HIV infection and to identify subpopulations with high proportions of recent HIV infections. Approximately 10,257 newly diagnosed cases were tested for recency using the BED-CEIA. In total, 3084 (30.4%) of those were recently infected with HIV. The highest proportion of recent HIV infections was found among men who had sex with men (MSM) (35%) and persons between 18 and 25 years of age (43.0%). Logistic regression revealed that female German intravenous drug users with a recent HIV infection had a higher chance of being detected than German MSM (OR 2.27). Surveillance of recent HIV infection is a useful additional tool to monitor the HIV epidemic in

  17. A Matter of Perspective: Comparison of the Characteristics of Persons with HIV Infection in the United States from the HIV Outpatient Study, Medical Monitoring Project, and National HIV Surveillance System

    PubMed Central

    Buchacz, Kate; Frazier, Emma L.; Hall, H. Irene; Hart, Rachel; Huang, Ping; Franklin, Dana; Hu, Xiaohong; Palella, Frank J.; Chmiel, Joan S.; Novak, Richard M.; Wood, Kathy; Yangco, Bienvenido; Armon, Carl; Brooks, John T.; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Comparative analyses of the characteristics of persons living with HIV infection (PLWH) in the United States (US) captured in surveillance and other observational databases are few. To explore potential joint data use to guide HIV treatment and prevention in the US, we examined three CDC-funded data sources in 2012: the HIV Outpatient Study (HOPS), a multisite longitudinal cohort; the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP), a probability sample of PLWH receiving medical care; and the National HIV Surveillance System (NHSS), a surveillance system of all PLWH. Overall, data from 1,697 HOPS, 4,901 MMP, and 865,102 NHSS PLWH were analyzed. Compared with the MMP population, HOPS participants were more likely to be older, non-Hispanic/Latino white, not using injection drugs, insured, diagnosed with HIV before 2009, prescribed antiretroviral therapy, and to have most recent CD4+ T-lymphocyte cell count ≥500 cells/mm3 and most recent viral load test<2 00 copies/mL. The MMP population was demographically similar to all PLWH in NHSS, except it tended to be slightly older, HIV diagnosed more recently, and to have AIDS. Our comparative results provide an essential first step for combined epidemiologic data analyses to inform HIV care and prevention for PLWH in the US. PMID:26793282

  18. Incidence of benign prostate hypertrophy in Danish men with and without HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Ahlström, Magnus Glindvad; Kronborg, Gitte; Larsen, Carsten S; Pedersen, Court; Pedersen, Gitte; Gerstoft, Jan; Obel, Niels

    2015-11-01

    Information on risk of benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH) in HIV-infected men is sparse. We aimed to estimate the incidence of being diagnosed with BPH among HIV-infected men compared with an age and sex-matched comparison cohort from the background population. To exclude that family-associated risk factors influence risk of BPH diagnoses in families of HIV-infected individuals, we estimated risk of BPH in fathers of HIV-infected men and fathers of the comparison cohort. In a nationwide, population-based, matched cohort study, we calculated incidence rates and used Poisson regression models to calculate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of being diagnosed with BPH, defined as the earliest of date of the second redeemed prescription of a drug used to treat BPH, the first registration of a BPH diagnosis in the Danish National Hospital Registry (DNHR) or the first registration of a surgical procedure for BPH in DNHR. We identified 4633 HIV-infected men, 46 330 comparison cohort individuals, 1585 fathers of HIV-infected men and 20 449 fathers of the comparison cohort. Incidence rate of being diagnosed with BPH was 37.0 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 31.5-43.1] per 10 000 person-years of follow-up among HIV-infected men and was not increased compared with the comparison cohort (IRR 1.04, 95% CI 0.88-1.22). Risk was not increased for fathers of HIV-infected men vs. fathers of the comparison cohort (IRR 0.99, 95% CI 0.87-1.12). Stratified analyses did not change the above results markedly. HIV-infected individuals do not have an increased risk of being diagnosed with BPH.

  19. [Etiological and therapeutic aspects of schizoid and schizotypal personality disorder].

    PubMed

    Sass, H; Jünemann, K

    2001-09-01

    Following the introduction to the history of the concepts of abnormal personality, with regard to the schizoid and schizotypal forms, we present their systematic assessment in the modern classification systems.Both, the schizoid and schizotypal forms, are usually considered as schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. Biological and clinical data indicate relations to other axis-I disorders as well. However there are few systematic and strictly controlled studies on the psychotherapeutic and pharmacological treatment of schizotypal and schizoid personality disorders. Basic theoretic assumptions concerning both treatment concepts - for personality disorders in general, and especially in schizoid and schizotypal personality disorder - are given. Finally the role of neuroleptics and antidepressants for schizophrenia-spectrum disorders is discussed. New possibilities may emerge from the use of the recently developed atypical drugs, but further research in randomised studies is needed. Current prospective studies on early detected schizophrenia-spectrum disorders will broaden our knowledge about prevention and therapy.

  20. HIV infection and cardiovascular disease in women.

    PubMed

    Womack, Julie A; Chang, Chung-Chou H; So-Armah, Kaku A; Alcorn, Charles; Baker, Jason V; Brown, Sheldon T; Budoff, Matthew; Butt, Adeel A; Gibert, Cynthia; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Gottdiener, John; Gottlieb, Stephen; Justice, Amy C; Leaf, David; McGinnis, Kathleen; Rimland, David; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C; Sico, Jason; Skanderson, Melissa; Tindle, Hilary; Tracy, Russell P; Warner, Alberta; Freiberg, Matthew S

    2014-10-16

    HIV infection is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in men. Whether HIV is an independent risk factor for CVD in women has not yet been established. We analyzed data from the Veterans Aging Cohort Study on 2187 women (32% HIV infected [HIV(+)]) who were free of CVD at baseline. Participants were followed from their first clinical encounter on or after April 01, 2003 until a CVD event, death, or the last follow-up date (December 31, 2009). The primary outcome was CVD (acute myocardial infarction [AMI], unstable angina, ischemic stroke, and heart failure). CVD events were defined using clinical data, International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes, and/or death certificate data. We used Cox proportional hazards models to assess the association between HIV and incident CVD, adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, lipids, smoking, blood pressure, diabetes, renal disease, obesity, hepatitis C, and substance use/abuse. Median follow-up time was 6.0 years. Mean age at baseline of HIV(+) and HIV uninfected (HIV(-)) women was 44.0 versus 43.2 years (P<0.05). Median time to CVD event was 3.1 versus 3.7 years (P=0.11). There were 86 incident CVD events (53%, HIV(+)): AMI, 13%; unstable angina, 8%; ischemic stroke, 22%; and heart failure, 57%. Incident CVD/1000 person-years was significantly higher among HIV(+) (13.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]=10.1, 18.1) than HIV(-) women (5.3; 95% CI=3.9, 7.3; P<0.001). HIV(+) women had an increased risk of CVD, compared to HIV(-) (hazard ratio=2.8; 95% CI=1.7, 4.6; P<0.001). HIV is associated with an increased risk of CVD in women. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  1. [Impact of HIV infection and AIDS on dental practice].

    PubMed

    Kielbassa, A M

    1990-11-01

    Describing the results of a study on the impact of HIV on practitional dentistry, the author finds out a considerable uncertainty of knowledge among elder practitioners. While 62% are willing to treat HIV-infected persons, a big part of the participants is looking on AIDS as an occupational risk. Regarding infection control procedures, the results show a limited compliance with the generally accepted recommendations.

  2. [Stroke in HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Lino, Ireneia; Sousa, António; Correia, José

    2007-01-01

    The spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) is changing. New drug treatments have reduced morbidity and mortality of this disease, therefore it is necessary to start treating the HIV infection as a chronical disease. The association of the stroke with the HIV infection was inicially thought to be a result of other opportunistic infeccions and tumors. However, the vascular disease associated with HIV infection has been a subject of research and debate. New evidence shows that the vascular diseases could be a threat for the pacients doing highly active antirretroviral therapy (HAART). In this paper, we review the association between the HIV infection and stroke. Furthermore, we have done an analysis of the risk for the stroke on pacients with HIV infection considering the changes of the infection spectrum by the introduction of HAART.

  3. Morphine Enhances HIV Infection of Neonatal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Merrill, Jeffrey D.; Mooney, Kathy; Song, Li; Wang, Xu; Guo, Chang-Jiang; Savani, Rashmin C.; Metzger, David S.; Douglas, Steven D.; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal transmission of HIV accounts for almost all new HIV infections in children. There is an increased risk of perinatal transmission of HIV with maternal illicit substance abuse. Little is known about neonatal immune system alteration and subsequent susceptibility to HIV infection after morphine exposure. We investigated the effects of morphine on HIV infection of neonatal monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). Morphine significantly enhanced HIV infection of neonatal MDM. Morphine-induced HIV replication in neonatal MDM was completely suppressed by naltrexone, the opioid receptor antagonist. Morphine significantly up-regulated CCR5 receptor expression and inhibited the endogenous production of macrophage inflammatory protein-1β in neonatal MDM. Thus, morphine, most likely through alteration of β-chemokines and CCR5 receptor expression, enhances the susceptibility of neonatal MDM to HIV infection, and may have a cofactor role in perinatal HIV transmission and infection. PMID:12736382

  4. Effects of Smoking on Non-AIDS-Related Morbidity in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shirley, Daniel K.; Kaner, Robert J.; Glesby, Marshall J.

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking has many adverse health consequences. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection smoke at very high rates, and many of the comorbidities associated with smoking in the general population are more prevalent in this population. It is likely that a combination of higher smoking rates along with an altered response to cigarette smoke throughout the body in persons with HIV infection leads to increased rates of the known conditions related to smoking. Several AIDS-defining conditions associated with smoking have been reviewed elsewhere. This review aims to summarize the data on non-AIDS-related health consequences of smoking in the HIV-infected population and explore evidence for the potential compounding effects on chronic systemic inflammation due to HIV infection and smoking. PMID:23572487

  5. [Fever of unknown origin in patients with HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Riera, M; Altés, J; Homar, F; Picco, G; Salas, A; Leyes, M; Cifuentes, C; Artigues, A; Villalonga, C

    1996-12-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the etiology and clinical characteristics of fever of uncertain origin (FUO) among HIV-infected patients. Prospective analysis of 35 episodes of FUO in HIV-infected patients from Balearic Islands that were studied through established guidelines. Most patients were at advanced stages of HIV-1 infection (mean CD4 cell count, 60/mm3). Mean duration of fever until diagnosis was 57 days. Average time of hospitalization until etiological diagnosis of FUO was 26 days (range: 8-127 days). The cause of FUO was identified in 33 cases (94%). Tuberculosis accounted for 18 cases (51%) and visceral leishmaniasis for 8 cases (23%). Other opportunistic infections were the cause of FUO in 8 cases (17%). In one patient, fever was due to Kaposi's sarcoma. Two patients died while febrile, without and identified etiology. Four patients had more than one cause that could contribute to FUO. Imaging techniques that yielded more diagnostic information were abdominal ultrasonography and serial chest X-ray. Leishmania serology and tuberculin skin test showed a high specificity but low sensitivities. Invasive procedures with a highest diagnostic field were fine needle aspirate of lymph nodes, and liver biopsy. FUO is more frequent in advanced stages of HIV disease. In our area, FUO is caused primarily by endemic opportunistic infections specially TB and visceral leishmaniasis, and rarely can be attributable to HIV or neoplastic diseases.

  6. The Development and Implementation of an Outreach Program to Identify Acute and Recent HIV Infections in New York City.

    PubMed

    Silvera, Richard; Stein, Dylan; Hutt, Richard; Hagerty, Robert; Daskalakis, Demetre; Valentine, Fred; Marmor, Michael

    2010-03-05

    Since 2004, the authors have been operating First Call NYU, an outreach program to identify acute and recent HIV infections, also called primary HIV infections, among targeted at-risk communities in the New York City (NYC) metropolitan area. First Call NYU employed mass media advertising campaigns, outreach to healthcare providers in NYC, and Internet-based efforts including search engine optimization (SEO) and Internet-based advertising to achieve these goals. Between October 2004 and October 2008, 571 individuals were screened through this program, leading to 446 unique, in-person screening visits. 47 primary HIV infections, including 14 acute and 33 recent HIV infections, were identified. Internet and traditional recruitment methods can be used to increase self-referrals for screening following possible exposure to HIV. Community education of at-risk groups, with the goal of increased self-diagnosis of possible acute HIV infection, may be a useful addition to traditional efforts to identify such individuals.

  7. Energy expenditure in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kosmiski, Lisa

    2011-12-01

    Energy intake recommendations for adults should be based preferably on direct measurements of total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) in corresponding populations who are maintaining healthy body weight and satisfactory physical activity levels. During adolescence, pregnancy, and lactation, energy requirements should be based on TDEE plus the additional energy required to advance these physiologic states. With illness, energy expenditure and energy intake change, but nutritional intervention is not necessarily beneficial. This article reviews data on energy expenditure in HIV infection with a focus on adults, adolescents aged ≥14 y, and pregnant and lactating women. Resting energy expenditure (REE) in adults with untreated asymptomatic HIV is ~ 10% higher than in healthy control subjects. In asymptomatic adults receiving antiretroviral therapy, REE may be similarly increased. HIV wasting and secondary infections are also associated with increased REE. In contrast, TDEE is typically normal in asymptomatic HIV and decreased in HIV wasting and secondary infection. No direct measurements of REE or TDEE are available in adolescents or in pregnant or lactating women with HIV. On the basis of current data, energy intake may need to increase by ~ 10% in adults with asymptomatic HIV to maintain body weight. In adolescents and in pregnant and lactating women with asymptomatic HIV, energy requirements should approximate recommendations for their uninfected counterparts until further data are available. In the resource-rich world, the energy expenditure changes associated with HIV are unlikely to contribute to significant weight loss. More data are needed on energy expenditure in HIV-infected populations from developing nations, where concurrent malnutrition and coinfections are common.

  8. Preexposure prophylaxis for HIV infection among African women.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Lut; Corneli, Amy; Ahmed, Khatija; Agot, Kawango; Lombaard, Johan; Kapiga, Saidi; Malahleha, Mookho; Owino, Fredrick; Manongi, Rachel; Onyango, Jacob; Temu, Lucky; Monedi, Modie Constance; Mak'Oketch, Paul; Makanda, Mankalimeng; Reblin, Ilse; Makatu, Shumani Elsie; Saylor, Lisa; Kiernan, Haddie; Kirkendale, Stella; Wong, Christina; Grant, Robert; Kashuba, Angela; Nanda, Kavita; Mandala, Justin; Fransen, Katrien; Deese, Jennifer; Crucitti, Tania; Mastro, Timothy D; Taylor, Douglas

    2012-08-02

    Preexposure prophylaxis with antiretroviral drugs has been effective in the prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in some trials but not in others. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we assigned 2120 HIV-negative women in Kenya, South Africa, and Tanzania to receive either a combination of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and emtricitabine (TDF-FTC) or placebo once daily. The primary objective was to assess the effectiveness of TDF-FTC in preventing HIV acquisition and to evaluate safety. HIV infections occurred in 33 women in the TDF-FTC group (incidence rate, 4.7 per 100 person-years) and in 35 in the placebo group (incidence rate, 5.0 per 100 person-years), for an estimated hazard ratio in the TDF-FTC group of 0.94 (95% confidence interval, 0.59 to 1.52; P=0.81). The proportions of women with nausea, vomiting, or elevated alanine aminotransferase levels were significantly higher in the TDF-FTC group (P=0.04, P<0.001, and P=0.03, respectively). Rates of drug discontinuation because of hepatic or renal abnormalities were higher in the TDF-FTC group (4.7%) than in the placebo group (3.0%, P=0.051). Less than 40% of the HIV-uninfected women in the TDF-FTC group had evidence of recent pill use at visits that were matched to the HIV-infection window for women with seroconversion. The study was stopped early, on April 18, 2011, because of lack of efficacy. Prophylaxis with TDF-FTC did not significantly reduce the rate of HIV infection and was associated with increased rates of side effects, as compared with placebo. Despite substantial counseling efforts, drug adherence appeared to be low. (Supported by the U.S. Agency for International Development and others; FEM-PrEP ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00625404.).

  9. Pharmacotherapy of pediatric and adolescent HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Schuval, Susan J

    2009-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection over the past two decades. Improved therapy has prolonged survival and improved clinical outcome for HIV-infected children and adults. Sixteen antiretroviral (ART) medications have been approved for use in pediatric HIV infection. The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has issued “Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in Pediatric HIV Infection”, which provide detailed information on currently recommended antiretroviral therapies (ART). However, consultation with an HIV specialist is recommended as the current therapy of pediatric HIV therapy is complex and rapidly evolving. PMID:19707256

  10. HIV infection in females dependent on drugs.

    PubMed

    Wai, B H; Singh, S; Varma, S L

    1996-03-01

    One hundred and seventy-one drug-dependent females in a drug rehabilitation centre were studied to estimate the prevalence of HIV infection among them. Twenty-four (14%) were positive on the Western Blot test. The presence of HIV infection was significantly correlated with syphilis (p < 0.03) and age (p < 0.001); 83% of those who were HIV positive were intravenous drug users. The need for harm reduction programmes to prevent spread of HIV infection among injecting drug users is stressed.

  11. Invasive Pneumococcal Disease Among HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Adults in a Large Integrated Healthcare System.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Julia L; Baxter, Roger; Leyden, Wendy A; Muthulingam, Dharushana; Yee, Arnold; Horberg, Michael A; Klein, Daniel B; Towner, William J; Chao, Chun R; Quesenberry, Charles P; Silverberg, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    It is unclear whether HIV-infected individuals remain at higher risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) compared with HIV-uninfected individuals. We conducted a cohort study of HIV-infected and demographically matched HIV-uninfected adults within Kaiser Permanente Northern California during the period 1996-2011. We used Poisson models to obtain rate ratios (RRs) for incident IPD associated with HIV infection and other risk factors. Among 13,079 HIV-infected and 137,643 HIV-uninfected adults, the IPD rate per 100,000 person-years was 160 (n = 109 events) for HIV-infected and 8 (n = 75 events) for HIV-uninfected subjects, with an adjusted RR of 13.0 [95% confidence interval (CI): 9.1-18.7]. For HIV-infected individuals, IPD incidence per 100,000 person-years decreased by 71% during study follow-up, from 305 in 1996-1999 to 88 in 2010-2011 (p < 0.001), with an adjusted RR of 6.6 (95% CI: 2.7-16.1) compared with HIV-uninfected subjects in 2010-2011. Risk factors for IPD among HIV-infected individuals included black compared with white race/ethnicity, smoking, cancer, and higher HIV RNA levels. The 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination was not associated with a reduced risk of IPD in HIV-infected or HIV-uninfected individuals. Among HIV-infected IPD cases, the most common serotype was 19A (33%), and 59% of serotypes were covered by the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13). Despite a dramatic decline in IPD incidence for HIV-infected adults since 1996, IPD rates were nearly sevenfold higher compared with HIV-uninfected adults in recent years, even after adjustment for risk factors. Timely antiretroviral therapy initiation, risk reduction strategies, and recent guidelines recommending PCV13 use may further reduce IPD incidence among HIV patients.

  12. Decreased CD95 expression on naive T cells from HIV-infected persons undergoing highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) and the influence of IL-2 low dose administration

    PubMed Central

    Amendola, A; Poccia, F; Martini, F; Gioia, C; Galati, V; Pierdominici, M; Marziali, M; Pandolfi, F; Colizzi, V; Piacentini, M; Girardi, E; D'Offizi, G

    2000-01-01

    The functional recovery of the immune system in HIV-infected persons receiving HAART and the role of adjuvant immune therapy are still matters of intensive investigation. We analysed the effects of HAART combined with cytokines in 22 naive asymptomatic individuals, randomized to receive HAART (n = 6), HAART plus a low dose (1000 000 U/daily) of rIL-2 (n = 8), and HAART plus rIL-2 after previous administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (n = 8). After 3 months of therapy, increased CD4+ T cell counts and diminished viral loads were observed in all patients, independently of cytokine addition. A decreased expression of CD95 (Apo 1/Fas) was evident in all groups when compared with values before therapy. The percentages of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) expressing CD95 after therapy decreased by 15%, 22% and 18% in the three treatment groups, respectively (P < 0·05). Analysis of PBMC subsets demonstrated that CD95 expression was significantly reduced on CD45RA+CD62L+ naive T cells (25·3%, 22·4%, and 18·6%, respectively; P < 0·05) in each group, after therapy. Accordingly, all patients showed a reduced rate of in vitro spontaneous apoptosis (P < 0·05). Another effect induced by HAART was a significant increase in IL-2Rα expression on total PBMC (P < 0·05), independently of cytokine addition. Altogether, our results suggest that very low dose administration of rIL-2 (1000 000 U/daily) may be not enough to induce a significant improvement in the immune system as regards HAART alone. The employment of higher doses of recombinant cytokines and/or different administration protocols in clinical trials might however contribute to ameliorate the immune reconstitution in patients undergoing HAART. PMID:10792383

  13. Psychosocial and cultural correlates of depression among Hispanic men with HIV infection: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    De Santis, J P; Gonzalez-Guarda, R M; Vasquez, E P

    2012-12-01

    Depression is a common mental health condition among persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Depression influences quality of life, social relationships and adherence to medication therapy. Little is known about depression among Hispanic men with HIV infection. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe the relationships of depression to other psychosocial factors (self-esteem, Hispanic stress, substance abuse and violence) and cultural factors (familism and Hispanic stress) among a sample of Hispanic men with HIV infection. Using a cross-sectional, descriptive research design a convenience sample of 46 Hispanic men with HIV infection was recruited and surveyed from the South Florida area of the USA. The majority of the participants (65%; n = 30) were depressed. In addition, the majority of participants reported high familism and self-esteem and low Hispanic stress. A history of substance abuse and childhood and adult violence were common. Significant relationships were noted between depression, and self-esteem, Hispanic stress, substance abuse, and adult physical violence. Healthcare providers need to be aware of the high rates of depression, substance abuse and violence that may occur among Hispanic men with HIV infection. More research is needed to further explore the relationship of these factors, as well as to determine the impact that these variables have on adherence to medication therapy among Hispanic men with HIV infection.

  14. Efficacy of an unsupervised 8-month rifampicin-containing regimen for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J. L.; Okwera, A.; Nsubuga, P.; Nakibali, J. G.; Whalen, C. C.; Hom, D.; Cave, M. D.; Yang, Z. H.; Mugerwa, R. D.; Ellner, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY SETTING National Tuberculosis Treatment Centre, Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda. OBJECTIVE To assess the efficacy of a daily, self-administered 8-month rifampicin-containing regimen for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected adults. DESIGN Treatment outcomes in patients with pulmonary TB treated with a single 8-month regimen and followed in a prospective epidemiological study. RESULTS Two hundred and sixty-five HIV-infected and 26 non-HIV-infected adults with initial episodes of pulmonary tuberculosis were treated with 2 months of daily isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RMP), ethambutol and pyrazinamide followed by 6 months of daily INH + RMP. Median follow-up was 17.8 months. Ninety-five per cent of the HIV-infected and all of the non-HIV-infected patients who had sputum examined were sputum culture negative after 2 months of treatment. Twenty-two HIV-infected and no non-HIV-infected patients died during treatment. Relapse rates were 8.4% (5.9 per 100 person-years of observation [PYO], 95%CI 3.2–8.6) among HIV-infected patients and 4.5% (2.1/100 PYO, 95%CI 0–7.8) for non-HIV-infected patients. Adverse drug reactions occurred in 37% of the HIV-infected patients; most were minor and self-limiting. CONCLUSION An 8-month RMP-containing regimen was well tolerated and effective in the treatment of HIV-infected adults with initial episodes of pulmonary TB. Relapse rates were similar to those reported with 6-month short-course regimens in HIV-infected individuals. Decisions about the duration of anti-tuberculosis treatment for HIV-infected adults must balance programme resources and the likelihood of poor compliance with longer regimens with the potential for a modest decrease in relapses with longer treatment. PMID:11092715

  15. Cognitive Deficits in HIV Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, O. S.; Rani, Mrudula P.; Priya, G.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Children infected with HIV are at risk for significant neurological and neuropsychological problems. This study is aimed at identifying cognitive deficits in HIV-infected children and to compare them with equal number of normal controls. Materials and Methods: Twenty children with HIV infection who are currently on antiretroviral therapy were recruited. They were assessed for their intelligence using Malin's Intelligence Scale for Indian Children and also evaluated for their cognitive abilities with a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. They were matched with equal number of normal controls. Results: HIV-infected children have shown substantial impairments in the domains of attention, language, verbal learning and memory, visuomotor functions, fine motor performance, and executive functions. Conclusion: HIV-infected children have average intelligence, but they performed poorly on several neuropsychological measures. PMID:25035547

  16. Vaccinations for Adults with HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccinations for Adults with HIV Infection The table below shows which vaccinations you should have to protect your health if ... sure you and your healthcare provider keep your vaccinations up to date. Vaccine Do you need it? ...

  17. Novel Use of Surveillance Data to Detect HIV-Infected Persons with Sustained High Viral Load and Durable Virologic Suppression in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Terzian, Arpi S.; Bodach, Sara D.; Wiewel, Ellen W.; Sepkowitz, Kent; Bernard, Marie-Antoinette; Braunstein, Sarah L.; Shepard, Colin W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Monitoring of the uptake and efficacy of ART in a population often relies on cross-sectional data, providing limited information that could be used to design specific targeted intervention programs. Using repeated measures of viral load (VL) surveillance data, we aimed to estimate and characterize the proportion of persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in New York City (NYC) with sustained high VL (SHVL) and durably suppressed VL (DSVL). Methods/Principal Findings Retrospective cohort study of all persons reported to the NYC HIV Surveillance Registry who were alive and ≥12 years old by the end of 2005 and who had ≥2 VL tests in 2006 and 2007. SHVL and DSVL were defined as PLWHA with 2 consecutive VLs ≥100,000 copies/mL and PLWHA with all VLs ≤400 copies/mL, respectively. Logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations were used to model the association between SHVL and covariates. There were 56,836 PLWHA, of whom 7% had SHVL and 38% had DSVL. Compared to those without SHVL, persons with SHVL were more likely to be younger, black and have injection drug use (IDU) risk. PLWHA with SHVL were more likely to die by 2007 and be younger by nearly ten years, on average. Conclusions/Significance Nearly 60% of PLWHA in 2005 had multiple VLs, of whom almost 40% had DSVL, suggesting successful ART uptake. A small proportion had SHVL, representing groups known to have suboptimal engagement in care. This group should be targeted for additional outreach to reduce morbidity and secondary transmission. Measures based on longitudinal analyses of surveillance data in conjunction with cross-sectional measures such as community viral load represent more precise and powerful tools for monitoring ART effectiveness and potential impact on disease transmission than cross-sectional measures alone. PMID:22291892

  18. Epidemiology of Meningitis in an HIV-Infected Ugandan Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rajasingham, Radha; Rhein, Joshua; Klammer, Kate; Musubire, Abdu; Nabeta, Henry; Akampurira, Andrew; Mossel, Eric C.; Williams, Darlisha A.; Boxrud, Dave J.; Crabtree, Mary B.; Miller, Barry R.; Rolfes, Melissa A.; Tengsupakul, Supatida; Andama, Alfred O.; Meya, David B.; Boulware, David R.

    2015-01-01

    There is limited understanding of the epidemiology of meningitis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected populations in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected adults with suspected meningitis in Uganda, to comprehensively evaluate the etiologies of meningitis. Intensive cerebrospiral fluid (CSF) testing was performed to evaluate for bacterial, viral, fungal, and mycobacterial etiologies, including neurosyphilis,16s ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for bacteria, Plex-ID broad viral assay, quantitative-PCR for HSV-1/2, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), and Toxoplasma gondii; reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for Enteroviruses and arboviruses, and Xpert MTB/RIF assay. Cryptococcal meningitis accounted for 60% (188 of 314) of all causes of meningitis. Of 117 samples sent for viral PCR, 36% were EBV positive. Among cryptococcal antigen negative patients, the yield of Xpert MTB/RIF assay was 22% (8 of 36). After exclusion of cryptococcosis and bacterial meningitis, 61% (43 of 71) with an abnormal CSF profile had no definitive diagnosis. Exploration of new TB diagnostics and diagnostic algorithms for evaluation of meningitis in resource-limited settings remains needed, and implementation of cryptococcal diagnostics is critical. PMID:25385864

  19. Epidemiology of meningitis in an HIV-infected Ugandan cohort.

    PubMed

    Rajasingham, Radha; Rhein, Joshua; Klammer, Kate; Musubire, Abdu; Nabeta, Henry; Akampurira, Andrew; Mossel, Eric C; Williams, Darlisha A; Boxrud, Dave J; Crabtree, Mary B; Miller, Barry R; Rolfes, Melissa A; Tengsupakul, Supatida; Andama, Alfred O; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2015-02-01

    There is limited understanding of the epidemiology of meningitis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected populations in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected adults with suspected meningitis in Uganda, to comprehensively evaluate the etiologies of meningitis. Intensive cerebrospiral fluid (CSF) testing was performed to evaluate for bacterial, viral, fungal, and mycobacterial etiologies, including neurosyphilis,16s ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for bacteria, Plex-ID broad viral assay, quantitative-PCR for HSV-1/2, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and Toxoplasma gondii; reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for Enteroviruses and arboviruses, and Xpert MTB/RIF assay. Cryptococcal meningitis accounted for 60% (188 of 314) of all causes of meningitis. Of 117 samples sent for viral PCR, 36% were EBV positive. Among cryptococcal antigen negative patients, the yield of Xpert MTB/RIF assay was 22% (8 of 36). After exclusion of cryptococcosis and bacterial meningitis, 61% (43 of 71) with an abnormal CSF profile had no definitive diagnosis. Exploration of new TB diagnostics and diagnostic algorithms for evaluation of meningitis in resource-limited settings remains needed, and implementation of cryptococcal diagnostics is critical. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  20. State of the art for diagnosis of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Branson, Bernard M

    2007-12-15

    Diagnostic tests for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have undergone considerable evolution since the first enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and Western blot were introduced 2 decades ago. Newer methods detect infection sooner and yield results much faster. Rapid tests represent a major advance for HIV screening in the United States. Six rapid tests for detection of HIV antibody have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) since November 2002. Four of these tests can be done in point-of-care and nonclinical settings because they use whole blood or oral fluid and are simple to perform. An assay for detection of HIV-1 RNA has been approved by the FDA to detect HIV infection before seroconversion has occurred and to confirm results of reactive screening tests; pooled testing of specimens for HIV-1 RNA has increased the cost-effectiveness of this screening tool. These new testing technologies offer unique opportunities to diagnose HIV infection among the estimated 252,000-312,000 persons in the United States who are currently unaware they are infected.

  1. Educational software for simulating risk of HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothberg, Madeleine A.; Sandberg, Sonja; Awerbuch, Tamara E.

    1994-03-01

    The AIDS epidemic is still growing rapidly and the disease is thought to be uniformly fatal. With no vaccine or cure in sight, education during high school years is a critical component in the prevention of AIDS. We propose the use of computer software with which high school students can explore via simulation their own risk of acquiring an HIV infection given certain sexual behaviors. This particular software is intended to help students understand the three factors that determine their risk of HIV infection (number of sexual acts, probability that their partners are infected, and riskiness of the specific sexual activities they choose). Users can explicitly calculate their own chances of becoming infected based on decisions they make. Use of the program is expected to personalize the risk of HIV infection and thus increase users' concern and awareness. Behavioral change may not result from increased knowledge alone. Therefore the effectiveness of this program in changing attitudes toward risky sexual behaviors would be enhanced when the simulation is embedded in an appropriate curriculum. A description of the program and an example of its use are presented.

  2. [Multiple personality disorder. Presentation of 2 cases and a model of the etiology].

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, S; Brenner, L; Spengler, W

    1994-09-01

    Although the syndrome of Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD) has received much interest in the international literature, there have been virtually no professional articles on the topic in German over the last 70 years. This is a report on two cases with nine and 70 persons respectively. Both had undergone severe and prolonged sexual abuse in childhood. Compared with DSM-III-R, the ICD-10 criteria seem to reflect historic reports on alternating personalities rather than recent empirical research on multiple personality. The proposed etiological model postulates that extreme trauma in childhood can result in dissociative vulnerability persisting into adulthood.

  3. Individualized Texting for Adherence Building (iTAB): Improving Antiretroviral Dose Timing Among HIV-Infected Persons with Co-occurring Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Poquette, Amelia; Casaletto, Kaitlin B.; Gouaux, Ben; Montoya, Jessica L.; Posada, Carolina; Rooney, Alexandra S.; Badiee, Jayraan; Deutsch, Reena; Letendre, Scott L.; Depp, Colin A.; Grant, Igor; Atkinson, J. Hampton

    2015-01-01

    HIV+ persons with co-occurring bipolar disorder (HIV+/BD+) have elevated rates of medication nonadherence. We conducted a 30-day randomized controlled trial of a two-way, text messaging system, iTAB (n = 25), compared to an active comparison (CTRL) (n = 25) to improve antiretroviral (ARV) and psychotropic (PSY) adherence and dose timing. Both groups received medication adherence psychoeducation and daily texts assessing mood. The iTAB group additionally received personalized medication reminder texts. Participants responded to over 90 % of the mood and adherence text messages. Mean adherence, as assessed via electronic monitoring caps, was high and comparable between groups for both ARV (iTAB 86.2 % vs. CTRL 84.8 %; p = 0.95, Cliff’s d = 0.01) and PSY (iTAB 78.9 % vs. CTRL 77.3 %; p = 0.43, Cliff’s d = −0.13) medications. However, iTAB participants took ARVs significantly closer to their intended dosing time than CTRL participants (iTAB: 27.8 vs. CTRL: 77.0 min from target time; p = 0.02, Cliff’s d = 0.37). There was no group difference on PSY dose timing. Text messaging interventions may represent a low-burden approach to improving timeliness of medication-taking behaviors among difficult-to-treat populations. The benefits of improved dose timing for long-term medication adherence require additional investigation. PMID:25504449

  4. Individualized texting for adherence building (iTAB): improving antiretroviral dose timing among HIV-infected persons with co-occurring bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Moore, David J; Poquette, Amelia; Casaletto, Kaitlin B; Gouaux, Ben; Montoya, Jessica L; Posada, Carolina; Rooney, Alexandra S; Badiee, Jayraan; Deutsch, Reena; Letendre, Scott L; Depp, Colin A; Grant, Igor; Atkinson, J Hampton

    2015-03-01

    HIV+ persons with co-occurring bipolar disorder (HIV+/BD+) have elevated rates of medication nonadherence. We conducted a 30-day randomized controlled trial of a two-way, text messaging system, iTAB (n = 25), compared to an active comparison (CTRL) (n = 25) to improve antiretroviral (ARV) and psychotropic (PSY) adherence and dose timing. Both groups received medication adherence psychoeducation and daily texts assessing mood. The iTAB group additionally received personalized medication reminder texts. Participants responded to over 90 % of the mood and adherence text messages. Mean adherence, as assessed via electronic monitoring caps, was high and comparable between groups for both ARV (iTAB 86.2 % vs. CTRL 84.8 %; p = 0.95, Cliff's d = 0.01) and PSY (iTAB 78.9 % vs. CTRL 77.3 %; p = 0.43, Cliff's d = -0.13) medications. However, iTAB participants took ARVs significantly closer to their intended dosing time than CTRL participants (iTAB: 27.8 vs. CTRL: 77.0 min from target time; p = 0.02, Cliff's d = 0.37). There was no group difference on PSY dose timing. Text messaging interventions may represent a low-burden approach to improving timeliness of medication-taking behaviors among difficult-to-treat populations. The benefits of improved dose timing for long-term medication adherence require additional investigation.

  5. Understanding of the risk of HIV infection among the elderly in Ga-Rankuwa, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Lekalakala-Mokgele, Eucebious

    2014-01-01

    The literature pertaining to the elderly shows that HIV infection among this population is on the increase, suggesting that the elderly population engages in activities risky for HIV infection. Reports on such behaviour include frequent sexual relations with much younger people and having multiple partners. A study was carried out in Ga-Rankuwa, a black township in Gauteng Province, South Africa to explore and describe the understanding of these elderly people regarding their risks of HIV infection and AIDS. Using a qualitative, exploratory design, three focus-group interviews were conducted with 32 women aged over 50 years. Findings revealed that older persons have knowledge about transmission of HIV infection and AIDS. However, a few had misconceptions as to how HIV infection is transmitted, as they believed that poor nutrition and sharing facilities play a role. Knowledge of mechanisms of protecting themselves against infection, such as use of a condom during coitus and wearing gloves when caring for infected family members, was also evident. The elderly indicated that they would prefer an older person, who they could identify with, to educate them more about HIV infection and AIDS. Although majority of participants had knowledge of how HIV is transmitted, and issues that put them at risk of transmission, a few the older persons had misconceptions about how HIV is transmitted due to lack of knowledge, as they believed that poor nutrition and sharing facilities can transmit infection. The lack of knowledge underscores the importance of addressing sexual risk with older people. It was very clear that more needs to be done in terms of education campaigns to dispel the myths of HIV infection and to empower the elderly.

  6. Social support, distress, and well-being in older men living with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Chesney, Margaret A; Chambers, Donald B; Taylor, Jonelle M; Johnson, Lisa M

    2003-06-01

    Older men with HIV infection/AIDS, having often lived with the condition longer, are more likely to confront the stress of managing more advanced HIV disease than their younger counterparts. Meanwhile, they also are more likely to have less social support and experience more distress than younger persons with HIV infection. The moderating effect of social support on health functioning and distress is unknown for persons with HIV infection, particularly those who are older. Study objectives were to assess whether the association between perceived health functioning and psychological distress and well-being is moderated (or influenced) by social support and age and if the impact of social support on distress and well-being is more pronounced for older than for younger men living with HIV infection/AIDS. In this cross-sectional study of HIV-positive adult men (n = 199) who have sex with men, participants completed self-report assessments of perceived health functioning, social support, and psychological distress and well-being. Measures of health functioning and overall social support were significantly associated with outcome measures of distress and positive affect (all p < .05). However, the main effect for social support was qualified by a significant age-by-social support interaction for both outcomes (beta = -.190, p < .01 for distress; beta = .172, p < .05 for positive affect), indicating that the impact of social support on decreasing distress and increasing well-being was more pronounced in older men. The relationships between perceived health functioning and distress and well-being were not moderated by social support or age. The influence of social support on negative and positive moods in this population of HIV-infected men who have sex with men was significantly greater among older than among younger participants. With an increasing number of older people with HIV infection/AIDS, special efforts to create effective and sustainable social support

  7. Understanding of the risk of HIV infection among the elderly in Ga-Rankuwa, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Lekalakala-Mokgele, Eucebious

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The literature pertaining to the elderly shows that HIV infection among this population is on the increase, suggesting that the elderly population engages in activities risky for HIV infection. Reports on such behaviour include frequent sexual relations with much younger people and having multiple partners. A study was carried out in Ga-Rankuwa, a black township in Gauteng Province, South Africa to explore and describe the understanding of these elderly people regarding their risks of HIV infection and AIDS. Using a qualitative, exploratory design, three focus-group interviews were conducted with 32 women aged over 50 years. Findings revealed that older persons have knowledge about transmission of HIV infection and AIDS. However, a few had misconceptions as to how HIV infection is transmitted, as they believed that poor nutrition and sharing facilities play a role. Knowledge of mechanisms of protecting themselves against infection, such as use of a condom during coitus and wearing gloves when caring for infected family members, was also evident. The elderly indicated that they would prefer an older person, who they could identify with, to educate them more about HIV infection and AIDS. Although majority of participants had knowledge of how HIV is transmitted, and issues that put them at risk of transmission, a few the older persons had misconceptions about how HIV is transmitted due to lack of knowledge, as they believed that poor nutrition and sharing facilities can transmit infection. The lack of knowledge underscores the importance of addressing sexual risk with older people. It was very clear that more needs to be done in terms of education campaigns to dispel the myths of HIV infection and to empower the elderly. PMID:24957136

  8. Cryptococcal Infections in Non-Hiv-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    Infections due to Cryptococcus species occur globally and in a wide variety of hosts, ranging from those who are severely immunosuppressed to those who have phenotypically “normal” immune systems. Approximately 1 million cases of cryptococcosis occur throughout the world, and is it estimated that there are 650,000 associated deaths annually. Most of these cases occur among patients with advanced HIV disease, but a growing number occur among solid organ transplant recipients and others receiving exogenous immunosuppression, patients with innate and acquired immunodeficiency, and otherwise immunologically normal hosts. Much of our recent knowledge is solely derived from clinical experience over the last 2 to 3 decades of cryptococcosis among HIV-infected patients. However, based on recent observations, it is clear that there are substantial differences in the epidemiology, clinical features, approaches to therapy, and outcome when comparing HIV-infected to non–HIV-infected individuals who have cryptococcosis. If one carefully examines cryptococcosis in the three largest subgroups of patients based on host immune status, specifically, those with HIV, solid organ transplant recipients, and those who are non-HIV, non-transplant (NHNT) infected persons, then one can observe very different risks for infection, varied clinical presentations, long-term complications, mortality, and approaches to therapy. This article focuses on cryptococcosis in the non–HIV-infected patient, including a brief review of ongoing events in the Pacific Northwest of the United States and Canada relative to the outbreak of Cryptococcus gattii infections among a largely immunologically normal population, and highlights some of the key insights and questions which have emerged as a result of these important new observations. PMID:23874010

  9. Development of internalized and personal stigma among patients with and without HIV infection and occupational stigma among health care providers in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Assanangkornchai, Sawitri; Lu, Lin; Jia, Manhong; McNeil, Edward B; You, Jing; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV/AIDS-related stigma is a major barrier of access to care for those infected with HIV. The aim of this study was to examine, validate, and adapt measuring scales of internalized, personal, and occupational stigma developed in Africa into a Chinese context. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from January to September 2015 in Kunming, People’s Republic of China. Various scales were constructed on the basis of the previous studies with modifications by experts using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses (EFA + CFA). Validation of the new scales was done using multiple linear regression models and hypothesis testing of the factorial structure invariance. Results The numbers of subjects recruited for the development/validation samples were 696/667 HIV-positive patients, 699/667 non-HIV patients, and 157/155 health care providers. EFA revealed a two-factor solution for internalized and personal stigma scales (guilt/blaming and being refused/refusing service), which were confirmed by CFA with reliability coefficients (r) of 0.869 and 0.853, respectively. The occupational stigma scale was found to have a three-factor structure (blaming, professionalism, and egalitarianism) with a reliability coefficient (r) of 0.839. Higher correlations of factors in the HIV patients (r=0.537) and non-HIV patients (r=0.703) were observed in contrast to low-level correlations (r=0.231, 0.286, and 0.266) among factors from health care providers. Conclusion The new stigma scales are valid and should be used to monitor HIV/AIDS stigma in different groups of Chinese people in health care settings. PMID:27877022

  10. Correlates of retention on extended-release naltrexone among persons living with HIV infection transitioning to the community from the criminal justice system.

    PubMed

    Springer, Sandra A; Brown, Shan-Estelle; Di Paola, Angela; Altice, Frederick L

    2015-12-01

    The acceptability of and retention on extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX), an FDA-approved medication for the treatment of alcohol and opioid use disorders, among persons living with HIV disease (PLH) under criminal justice setting (CJS) supervision has not been evaluated to date. Two double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trials of XR-NTX for inmates with HIV disease transitioning to the community with (1) alcohol use disorders (AUDs) or (2) opioid use disorders, are underway. Reasons for not accepting XR-NTX and an evaluation of differences in demographic features between those who were retained on study drug and those who did not return for their second injection post-release are discussed. 70% of eligible persons consented to participate; almost 90% received their first injection; and almost 60% returned for their first injection after release. Variables found to be associated (p<0.10) with returning for the second injection included: not meeting criteria for hazardous drinking (p=0.035; OR 0.424 (CI 0.191-0.941)); being prescribed antiretroviral therapy (p=0.068; OR 2.170 (CI 0.943-4.992)); expressing experiencing serious depression 30 days prior to incarceration (p=0.068; OR 1.889 (CI 0.955-3.737)); not having a positive cocaine urine screen on the day of release (DOR) (p=0.011; OR 0.258 (CI 0.091-0.729)); and not meeting criteria for an AUD plus any substance use disorder (p=0.068; OR 0.521 (CI 0.259-1.048)). Only positive cocaine urine test on DOR was statistically significant after multivariate regression analyses (p=0.005; OR 0.207 (CI 0.068-0.623)). CJS based XR-NTX programs are highly acceptable among PLH, however retention on XR-NTX after release is negatively impacted by relapse to cocaine use. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. HIV infection in Wisconsin: an overview of epidemiologic trends, 1983-1999.

    PubMed

    Hoxie, N J; Vergeront, J M; Druckenmiller, J K; Reiser, W J; Davis, J P

    2000-08-01

    A review of HIV case surveillance data shows that the number of persons reported with HIV infection in Wisconsin steadily increased during the 1980s, leveled in the early 1990s and since 1993 has tended to decline. Cases reported in 1999 represented a 44% decrease compared to the 1990-1993 average. The number of deaths among persons with HIV infection declined 64% from 1993 to 1999; as a result, the number of persons living with HIV infection nearly doubled during the 1990s. Comparing cases reported 1995-1999 with cases reported in the 1980s, a higher percentage was attributed to injection drug use and high-risk heterosexual contact. A higher percentage of HIV cases also occurred among females and racial and ethnic minorities.

  12. Correlates of Retention on Extended-Release Naltrexone among Persons Living with HIV Infection Transitioning to the Community from the Criminal Justice System

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Sandra A.; Altice, Frederick L.; Brown, Shan-Estelle; Di Paola, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Background The acceptability of and retention on extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX), an FDA-approved medication for the treatment of alcohol and opioid use disorders, among persons living with HIV disease (PLH) under criminal justice setting (CJS) supervision has not been evaluated to date. Methods Two double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trials of XR-NTX for inmates with HIV disease transitioning to the community with (1) alcohol use disorders (AUDs) or (2) opioid use disorders, are underway. Reasons for not accepting XR-NTX and an evaluation of differences in demographic features between those who were retained on study drug and those who did not return for their second injection post-release are discussed. Results 70% of eligible persons consented to participate; almost 90% received their first injection; and almost 60% returned for their second injection after release. Variables found to be associated (p<0.10) with returning for the second injection included: not meeting criteria for hazardous drinking (p=0.035; OR 0.424 (CI 0.191–0.941)); being prescribed antiretroviral therapy (p=0.068; OR 2.170 (CI 0.943–4.992)); expressing experiencing serious depression 30 days prior to incarceration (p=0.068; OR 1.889 (CI 0.955–3.737)); not having a positive cocaine urine screen on the day of release (DOR) (p=0.011; OR 0.258 (CI 0.091–0.729)); and not meeting criteria for an AUD plus any substance use disorder (p=0.068; OR 0.521 (CI 0.259–1.048)). Only positive cocaine urine test on DOR was statistically significant after multivariate regression analyses (p=0.005; OR 0.207 (CI 0.068–0.623)). Conclusion CJS based XR-NTX programs are highly acceptable among PLH, however retention on XR-NTX after release is negatively impacted by relapse to cocaine use. PMID:26560326

  13. Toxoplasmosis in HIV infection: An overview.

    PubMed

    Basavaraju, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite presenting as a zoonotic infection distributed worldwide. In HIV-positive individuals, it causes severe opportunistic infections, which is of major public health concern as it results in physical and psychological disabilities. In healthy immunocompetent individuals, it causes asymptomatic chronic persistent infections, but in immunosuppressed patients, there is reactivation of the parasite if the CD4 counts fall below 200 cells/μl. The seroprevalence rates are variable in different geographic areas. The tissue cyst or oocyst is the infective form which enters by ingestion of contaminated meat and transform into tachyzoites and disseminate into blood stream. In immunocompetent persons due to cell-mediated immunity the parasite is transformed into tissue cyst resulting in life long chronic infection. In HIV-infected people opportunistic infection by T. gondii occurs due to depletion of CD4 cells, decreased production of cytokines and interferon gamma and impaired cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity resulting in reactivation of latent infection. The diagnosis can be done by clinical, serological, radiological, histological or molecular methods, or by the combination of these. There is various treatment regimen including acute treatment, maintenance therapy should be given as the current anti T. gondii therapy cannot eradicate tissue cysts. In HIV patients, CD4 counts <100; cotrimoxazole, alternately dapsone + pyrimethamine can be given for 6 months. Hence, early diagnosis of T. gondii antibodies is important in all HIV-positive individuals to prevent complications of cerebral toxoplasmosis.

  14. Toxoplasmosis in HIV infection: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Basavaraju, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite presenting as a zoonotic infection distributed worldwide. In HIV-positive individuals, it causes severe opportunistic infections, which is of major public health concern as it results in physical and psychological disabilities. In healthy immunocompetent individuals, it causes asymptomatic chronic persistent infections, but in immunosuppressed patients, there is reactivation of the parasite if the CD4 counts fall below 200 cells/μl. The seroprevalence rates are variable in different geographic areas. The tissue cyst or oocyst is the infective form which enters by ingestion of contaminated meat and transform into tachyzoites and disseminate into blood stream. In immunocompetent persons due to cell-mediated immunity the parasite is transformed into tissue cyst resulting in life long chronic infection. In HIV-infected people opportunistic infection by T. gondii occurs due to depletion of CD4 cells, decreased production of cytokines and interferon gamma and impaired cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity resulting in reactivation of latent infection. The diagnosis can be done by clinical, serological, radiological, histological or molecular methods, or by the combination of these. There is various treatment regimen including acute treatment, maintenance therapy should be given as the current anti T. gondii therapy cannot eradicate tissue cysts. In HIV patients, CD4 counts <100; cotrimoxazole, alternately dapsone + pyrimethamine can be given for 6 months. Hence, early diagnosis of T. gondii antibodies is important in all HIV-positive individuals to prevent complications of cerebral toxoplasmosis. PMID:27722101

  15. Hepatitis B virus and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Martín-Carbonero, Luz; Poveda, Eva

    2012-05-01

    Approximately 5 to 10% of human immunodeficiency virus- (HIV-) infected persons worldwide have chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV). The management of these patients merits special attention. They experience a faster progression to cirrhosis and more frequent liver-related death than HBV-monoinfected individuals. For this reason, therapy for both HIV and HBV is a priority in most cases. Some antivirals (i.e., tenofovir, lamivudine, emtricitabine) are active against both viruses and should be part of the antiretroviral treatment choice. However, drugs such as entecavir, telbivudine, or adefovir are active against HBV and may display some residual activity against HIV, occasionally leading to the selection of resistance mutations in the HIV polymerase, as is clearly shown with entecavir. Thus, they should be used only in the context of potent antiretroviral treatment. In this review, the authors will provide updated information on the natural history of HIV/HBV coinfected patients, when and which drugs should be used in treatment, and the concern about selection of drug resistance and vaccine escape mutants. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. HIV Infection is Associated with Increased Risk for Acute Exacerbation of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Allison A.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Astemborski, Jacquie; Mehta, Shruti H.; Wise, Robert A.; Drummond, M. Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Background Poorly controlled HIV infection is associated with increased risk for chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD). Acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) are major contributors to morbidity and mortality. Little is known about the association between HIV infection and AECOPD. Methods We identified 167 individuals with spirometry-confirmed COPD from a longitudinal study of current or former injection drug users at-risk or with HIV infection. AECOPD, defined as self-report of worsening breathing requiring treatment with antibiotics or steroids, was assessed at 6-month study visits. Multivariable logistic regression identified factors associated with AECOPD. Results Of 167 participants, the mean age was 52 years; 89% were black, 30% female and 32% HIV-infected (median CD4 count: 312 cells/mL, 46% with detectable HIV RNA). After adjusting for age, gender, smoking history, comorbidity treatment, and airflow obstruction severity, HIV was independently associated with a 2.47 increased odds of AECOPD (95% CI 1.22, 5.00). Compared to HIV-uninfected persons, HIV-infected persons with undetectable (<50 copies/mL) HIV RNA levels and those with a CD4 count ≥350 cells/mm3 demonstrated increased AECOPD (OR 2.91; 95% CI 1.26, 6.71; OR 4.16; 95% CI 1.87, 9.27, respectively). Higher AECOPD risk was observed with higher CD4 counts irrespective of treatment for comorbid diseases. Conclusions HIV infection is independently associated with increased odds of AECOPD, potentially due to differences in treatment access and to variable disease manifestation by immune status. Providers should be aware that HIV infection may increase risk for AECOPD and that symptoms may be more discernible with intact immune function. PMID:25942460

  17. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in non-HIV-infected patients in the era of novel immunosuppressive therapies.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Sadatomo; Tokuda, Hitoshi

    2012-12-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) is a well-known opportunistic infection, and its management has been established. However, PCP is an emerging threat to immunocompromised patients without HIV infection, such as those receiving novel immunosuppressive therapeutics for malignancy, organ transplantation, or connective tissue diseases. Clinical manifestations of PCP are quite different between patients with and without HIV infections. In patients without HIV infection, PCP rapidly progresses, is difficult to diagnose correctly, and causes severe respiratory failure with a poor prognosis. High-resolution computed tomography findings are different between PCP patients with HIV infection and those without. These differences in clinical and radiologic features are the result of severe or dysregulated inflammatory responses that are evoked by a relatively small number of Pneumocystis organisms in patients without HIV infection. In recent years, the usefulness of PCR and serum β-D-glucan assay for rapid and noninvasive diagnosis of PCP has been revealed. Although corticosteroid adjunctive to anti-Pneumocystis agents has been shown to be beneficial in some populations, the optimal dose and duration remain to be determined. Recent investigations revealed that Pneumocystis colonization is prevalent, and that asymptomatic carriers are at risk for developing PCP and can serve as the reservoir for the spread of Pneumocystis by person-to-person transmission. These findings suggest the need for chemoprophylaxis in immunocompromised patients without HIV infection, although its indication and duration are still controversial. Because a variety of novel immunosuppressive therapeutics have been emerging in medical practice, further innovations in the diagnosis and treatment of PCP are needed.

  18. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in non-HIV-infected patients in the era of novel immunosuppressive therapies.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Sadatomo; Tokuda, Hitoshi

    2014-11-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) is a well-known opportunistic infection, and its management has been established. However, PCP is an emerging threat to immunocompromised patients without HIV infection, such as those receiving novel immunosuppressive therapeutics for malignancy, organ transplantation, or connective tissue diseases. Clinical manifestations of PCP are quite different between patients with and without HIV-infections. In patients without HIV infection, PCP rapidly progresses, is difficult to diagnose correctly, and causes severe respiratory failure with a poor prognosis. High-resolution computed tomography findings are different between PCP patients with HIV infection and those without. These differences in clinical and radiologic features are the result of severe or dysregulated inflammatory responses that are evoked by a relatively small number of Pneumocystis organisms in patients without HIV infection. In recent years, the usefulness of PCR and serum β-D-glucan assay for rapid and noninvasive diagnosis of PCP has been revealed. Although corticosteroid adjunctive to anti-Pneumocystis agents has been shown to be beneficial in some populations, the optimal dose and duration remain to be determined. Recent investigations revealed that Pneumocystis colonization is prevalent, and that asymptomatic carriers are at riskfor developing PCP and can serve as the reservoir for the spread of Pneumocystis by person-to-person transmission. These findings suggest the need for chemoprophylaxis in immunocompromised patients without HIV infection, although its indication and duration are still controversial. Because a variety of novel immunosuppressive therapeutics have been emerging in medical practice, further innovations in the diagnosis and treatment of PCP are needed.

  19. Immunological failure of first-line and switch to second-line antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected persons in Tanzania: analysis of routinely collected national data.

    PubMed

    Vanobberghen, Fiona M; Kilama, Bonita; Wringe, Alison; Ramadhani, Angela; Zaba, Basia; Mmbando, Donan; Todd, Jim

    2015-07-01

    Rates of first-line treatment failure and switches to second-line therapy are key indicators for national HIV programmes. We assessed immunological treatment failure defined by WHO criteria in the Tanzanian national HIV programme. We included adults initiating first-line therapy in 2004-2011 with a pre-treatment CD4 count, and ≥6-months of follow-up. We assessed subhazard ratios (SHR) for immunological treatment failure, and subsequent switch to second-line therapy, using competing risks methods to account for deaths. Of 121 308 adults, 7% experienced immunological treatment failure, and 2% died without observed immunological treatment failure, over a median 1.7 years. The 6-year cumulative probability of immunological treatment failure was 19.0% (95% CI 18.5, 19.7) and of death, 5.1% (4.8, 5.4). Immunological treatment failure predictors included earlier year of treatment initiation (P < 0.001), initiation in lower level facilities (SHR = 2.23 [2.03, 2.45] for dispensaries vs. hospitals), being male (1.27 [1.19, 1.33]) and initiation at low or high CD4 counts (for example, 1.78 [1.65, 1.92] and 5.33 [4.65, 6.10] for <50 and ≥500 vs. 200-349 cells/mm(3) , respectively). Of 7382 participants in the time-to-switch analysis, 6% switched and 5% died before switching. Four years after immunological treatment failure, the cumulative probability of switching was 7.3% (6.6, 8.0) and of death, 6.8% (6.0, 7.6). Those who immunologically failed in dispensaries, health centres and government facilities were least likely to switch. Immunological treatment failure rates and unmet need for second-line therapy are high in Tanzania; virological monitoring, at least for persons with immunological treatment failure, is required to minimise unnecessary switches to second-line therapy. Lower level government health facilities need more support to reduce treatment failure rates and improve second-line therapy uptake to sustain the benefits of increased coverage. © 2015 The

  20. Alcohol Consumption among HIV-Infected Persons in a Large Urban HIV Clinic in Kampala Uganda: A Constellation of Harmful Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Wandera, Bonnie; Tumwesigye, Nazarius Mbona; Nankabirwa, Joaniter Immaculate; Kambugu, Andrew Ddungu; Parkes-Ratanshi, Rosalind; Mafigiri, David Kaawa; Kapiga, Saidi; Sethi, Ajay K

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol use by persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) negatively impacts the public health benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Using a standardized alcohol assessment tool, we estimate the prevalence of alcohol use, identify associated factors, and test the association of alcohol misuse with sexual risk behaviors among PLWHA in Uganda. A cross-section of PLWHA in Kampala were interviewed regarding their sexual behavior and self-reported alcohol consumption in the previous 6 months. Alcohol use was assessed using the alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT). Gender-stratified log binomial regression analyses were used to identify independent factors associated with alcohol misuse and to test whether alcohol misuse was associated with risky sexual behaviors. Of the 725 subjects enrolled, 235 (33%) reported any alcohol use and 135 (18.6%) reported alcohol misuse, while 38 (5.2%) drank hazardous levels of alcohol. Alcohol misuse was more likely among subjects not yet on ART (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] was 1.65 p=0.043 for males and 1.79, p=0.019 for females) and those with self-reported poor adherence (aPR for males=1.56, p=0.052, and for females=1.93, p=0.0189). Belonging to Pentecostal or Muslim religious denominations was protective against alcohol misuse compared to belonging to Anglican and Catholic denominations in both sexes (aPR=0.11 for men, p<0.001, and aPR=0.32 for women, p=0.003). Alcohol misuse was independently associated with reporting risky sexual behaviors (aPR=1.67; 95% CI: 1.07-2.60, p=0.023) among males, but not significant among females (aPR=1.29; 95% CI: 0.95-1.74, p=0.098). Non-disclosure of HIV positive status to sexual partner was significantly associated with risky sex in both males (aPR=1.69; p=0.014) and females (aPR 2.45; p<0.001). Alcohol use among PLWHA was high, and was associated with self-reported medication non-adherence, non-disclosure of HIV positive status to sexual partner(s), and risky sexual behaviors among

  1. Cardiovascular manifestations of HIV infection in children.

    PubMed

    Idris, Nikmah S; Grobbee, Diederick E; Burgner, David; Cheung, Michael M H; Kurniati, Nia; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M

    2015-11-01

    HIV infection in children is now considered as a chronic condition, in which various non-infectious complications may occur, including those affecting the developing cardiovascular system. As children are expected to survive well into adulthood, understanding childhood as well as potential future cardiovascular complications is of major importance. We reviewed published literature on childhood cardiac manifestations and longer term effects of pediatric HIV infection on the cardiovascular system. Evidence gaps that should be prioritized in research are highlighted. Through poorly understood mechanisms, HIV infection may cause various cardiac complications already manifesting in childhood, such as structural and functional myocardial derangements, pulmonary hypertension, pericardial effusion and possibly endocarditis. Evidence indicates that HIV infection in children also has unfavorable effects on the vasculature and cardiovascular biomarkers, such as increased intima-media thickness and decreased flow-mediated dilation, a marker of endothelial function. However, studies are small and predominantly include antiretroviral therapy-treated children, so that it is difficult to differentiate between effects of HIV infection per se and antiretroviral therapy treatment, reported in adults to have cardiovascular side effects. HIV infection in children may greatly impact the cardiovascular system, including effects on the heart, which tend to manifest early in childhood, and on the vasculature. The underlying mechanisms, essential for targeted prevention, are poorly understood. Current evidence largely stems from research in adults. However, as modes of infection, immune maturity, growth and development, and treatment are markedly different in children, specific pediatric research, accounting for the complex interplay of normal growth and development, HIV infection and treatment, is clearly warranted. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014 Reprints and permissions

  2. Changes in weight and weight distribution across the lifespan among HIV-infected and -uninfected men and women

    PubMed Central

    Erlandson, Kristine M.; Zhang, Long; Lake, Jordan E.; Schrack, Jennifer; Althoff, Keri; Sharma, Anjali; Tien, Phyllis C.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Brown, Todd T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Examine body composition changes across the lifespan of HIV-infected compared to uninfected adults. Longitudinal study of antiretroviral therapy (ART)-treated HIV-infected and uninfected participants from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study and Women's Interagency HIV Study. Body mass index (BMI), waist (WC), hip circumference (HC), and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) measured at semiannual visits from 1999 to 2014. The age effect on outcomes over time was investigated using multivariate, piecewise, linear mixed-effect regression models adjusted for demographics, substance use, and comorbidities. Person-visits from 2363 men (1059 HIV-infected/1304 HIV-uninfected) and 2200 women (1455 HIV-infected/745 HIV-uninfected), median ages 45 [IQR 39,51] and 40 [32,46], respectively, were included. BMI gains were slower among HIV-infected participants of 40 years or less (P < 0.001), similar between HIV-infected and uninfected persons 40 to 60 years of age, and plateaued after age 60 in both groups. WC and WHtR increased across the age spectrum (P < 0.001) regardless of HIV serostatus, with significantly greater gains in HIV-infected men more than 60. Black race and Hispanic ethnicity were associated with greater BMI and WC. Lower BMI, WC, hip circumference, and WHtR were associated with hepatitis C infection among women only, and with substance use among all participants, and with lower CD4+ cell count and shorter ART duration among HIV-infected participants. Slower BMI gain among younger HIV-infected adults may be partly explained by substance use and hepatitis C infection, and suggests that lower BMI does not represent improved health. Further analysis of muscle and fat abundance and quality will advance understanding of metabolic risk over the lifespan, a key to reducing morbidity in an aging population. PMID:27861378

  3. Changes in weight and weight distribution across the lifespan among HIV-infected and -uninfected men and women.

    PubMed

    Erlandson, Kristine M; Zhang, Long; Lake, Jordan E; Schrack, Jennifer; Althoff, Keri; Sharma, Anjali; Tien, Phyllis C; Margolick, Joseph B; Jacobson, Lisa P; Brown, Todd T

    2016-11-01

    Examine body composition changes across the lifespan of HIV-infected compared to uninfected adults. Longitudinal study of antiretroviral therapy (ART)-treated HIV-infected and uninfected participants from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study and Women's Interagency HIV Study. Body mass index (BMI), waist (WC), hip circumference (HC), and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) measured at semiannual visits from 1999 to 2014. The age effect on outcomes over time was investigated using multivariate, piecewise, linear mixed-effect regression models adjusted for demographics, substance use, and comorbidities. Person-visits from 2363 men (1059 HIV-infected/1304 HIV-uninfected) and 2200 women (1455 HIV-infected/745 HIV-uninfected), median ages 45 [IQR 39,51] and 40 [32,46], respectively, were included. BMI gains were slower among HIV-infected participants of 40 years or less (P < 0.001), similar between HIV-infected and uninfected persons 40 to 60 years of age, and plateaued after age 60 in both groups. WC and WHtR increased across the age spectrum (P < 0.001) regardless of HIV serostatus, with significantly greater gains in HIV-infected men more than 60. Black race and Hispanic ethnicity were associated with greater BMI and WC. Lower BMI, WC, hip circumference, and WHtR were associated with hepatitis C infection among women only, and with substance use among all participants, and with lower CD4 cell count and shorter ART duration among HIV-infected participants. Slower BMI gain among younger HIV-infected adults may be partly explained by substance use and hepatitis C infection, and suggests that lower BMI does not represent improved health. Further analysis of muscle and fat abundance and quality will advance understanding of metabolic risk over the lifespan, a key to reducing morbidity in an aging population.

  4. Is diabetes prevalence higher among HIV-infected individuals compared with the general population? Evidence from MMP and NHANES 2009–2010

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Romieu, Alfonso C; Garg, Shikha; Rosenberg, Eli S; Thompson-Paul, Angela M; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Background Nationally representative estimates of diabetes mellitus (DM) prevalence among HIV-infected adults in the USA are lacking, and whether HIV-infected adults are at increased risk of DM compared with the general adult population remains controversial. Methods We used nationally representative survey (2009–2010) data from the Medical Monitoring Project (n=8610 HIV-infected adults) and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n=5604 general population adults) and fit logistic regression models to determine and compare weighted prevalences of DM between the two populations, and examine factors associated with DM among HIV-infected adults. Results DM prevalence among HIV-infected adults was 10.3% (95% CI 9.2% to 11.5%). DM prevalence was 3.8% (CI 1.8% to 5.8%) higher in HIV-infected adults compared with general population adults. HIV-infected subgroups, including women (prevalence difference 5.0%, CI 2.3% to 7.7%), individuals aged 20–44 (4.1%, CI 2.7% to 5.5%), and non-obese individuals (3.5%, CI 1.4% to 5.6%), had increased DM prevalence compared with general population adults. Factors associated with DM among HIV-infected adults included age, duration of HIV infection, geometric mean CD4 cell count, and obesity. Conclusions 1 in 10 HIV-infected adults receiving medical care had DM. Although obesity contributes to DM risk among HIV-infected adults, comparisons to the general adult population suggest that DM among HIV-infected persons may develop at earlier ages and in the absence of obesity. PMID:28191320

  5. Immunological failure of first-line and switch to second-line antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected persons in Tanzania: analysis of routinely collected national data

    PubMed Central

    Vanobberghen, Fiona M; Kilama, Bonita; Wringe, Alison; Ramadhani, Angela; Zaba, Basia; Mmbando, Donan; Todd, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Rates of first-line treatment failure and switches to second-line therapy are key indicators for national HIV programmes. We assessed immunological treatment failure defined by WHO criteria in the Tanzanian national HIV programme. Methods We included adults initiating first-line therapy in 2004–2011 with a pre-treatment CD4 count, and ≥6-months of follow-up. We assessed subhazard ratios (SHR) for immunological treatment failure, and subsequent switch to second-line therapy, using competing risks methods to account for deaths. Results Of 121 308 adults, 7% experienced immunological treatment failure, and 2% died without observed immunological treatment failure, over a median 1.7 years. The 6-year cumulative probability of immunological treatment failure was 19.0% (95% CI 18.5, 19.7) and of death, 5.1% (4.8, 5.4). Immunological treatment failure predictors included earlier year of treatment initiation (P < 0.001), initiation in lower level facilities (SHR = 2.23 [2.03, 2.45] for dispensaries vs. hospitals), being male (1.27 [1.19, 1.33]) and initiation at low or high CD4 counts (for example, 1.78 [1.65, 1.92] and 5.33 [4.65, 6.10] for <50 and ≥500 vs. 200–349 cells/mm3, respectively). Of 7382 participants in the time-to-switch analysis, 6% switched and 5% died before switching. Four years after immunological treatment failure, the cumulative probability of switching was 7.3% (6.6, 8.0) and of death, 6.8% (6.0, 7.6). Those who immunologically failed in dispensaries, health centres and government facilities were least likely to switch. Conclusions Immunological treatment failure rates and unmet need for second-line therapy are high in Tanzania; virological monitoring, at least for persons with immunological treatment failure, is required to minimise unnecessary switches to second-line therapy. Lower level government health facilities need more support to reduce treatment failure rates and improve second-line therapy uptake to sustain the

  6. Unusual primary HIV infection with colonic ulcer complicated by hemorrhagic shock: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Timely diagnosis of primary HIV infection is important to prevent further transmission of HIV. Primary HIV infection may take place without symptoms or may be associated with fever, pharyngitis or headache. Sometimes, the clinical presentation includes aseptic meningitis or cutaneous lesions. Intestinal ulceration due to opportunistic pathogens (cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, Toxoplasma gondii) has been described in patients with AIDS. However, although invasion of intestinal lymphoid tissue is a prominent feature of human and simian lentivirus infections, colonic ulceration has not been reported in acute HIV infection. Case description A 42-year-old Caucasian man was treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate for pharyngitis. He did not improve, and a rash developed. History taking revealed a negative HIV antibody test five months previously and unprotected sex with a male partner the month before admission. Repeated tests revealed primary HIV infection with an exceptionally high HIV-1 RNA plasma concentration (3.6 × 107 copies/mL) and a low CD4 count (101 cells/mm3, seven percent of total lymphocytes). While being investigated, the patient had a life-threatening hematochezia. After angiographic occlusion of a branch of the ileocaecal artery and initiation of antiretroviral therapy, the patient became rapidly asymptomatic and could be discharged. Colonoscopy revealed a bleeding colonic ulcer. We were unable to identify an etiology other than HIV for this ulcer. Conclusion This case adds to the known protean manifestation of primary HIV infection. The lack of an alternative etiology, despite extensive investigations, suggests that this ulcer was directly caused by primary HIV infection. This conclusion is supported by the well-described extensive loss of intestinal mucosal CD4+ T cells associated with primary HIV infection, the extremely high HIV viral load observed in our patient, and the rapid improvement of the ulcer after initiation of highly

  7. Social support networks and primary care use by HIV-infected drug users.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Megha; Kelly, Patricia J; Li, Xuan; Berg, Karina M; Litwin, Alain H; Arnsten, Julia H

    2013-01-01

    HIV-infected current and former drug users utilize primary care and preventive health services at suboptimal rates, but little is known about how social support networks are associated with health services use. We investigated the relationship between social support networks and the use of specific types of health services by HIV-infected drug users receiving methadone maintenance. We found that persons with greater social support, in particular more social network members or more network members aware of their HIV status, were more likely to use primary care services. In contrast, social support networks were not related to emergency room or inpatient hospital use. Interventions that build social support might improve coordinated and continuous health services utilization by HIV-infected persons in outpatient drug treatment.

  8. CCR5 and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Blanpain, Cédric; Libert, Frédérick; Vassart, Gilbert; Parmentier, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors play a crucial role in the trafficking of leukocyte populations across the body, and are involved in the development of a large variety of human diseases. CCR5 is the main coreceptor used by macrophage (M)-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2, which are responsible for viral transmission. CCR5 therefore plays an essential role in HIV pathogenesis. A number of inflammatory CC-chemokines, including MIP-1 alpha, MIP-1 beta, RANTES, MCP-2, and HCC-1[9-74] act as CCR5 agonists, while MCP-3 is a natural antagonist of the receptor. CCR5 is mainly expressed in memory T-cells, macrophages, and immature dendritic cells, and is upregulated by proinflammatory cytokines. It is coupled to the Gi class of heterotrimeric G-proteins, and inhibits cAMP production, stimulates Ca2+ release, and activates PI3-kinase and MAP kinases, as well as other tyrosine kinase cascades. A mutant allele of CCR5, CCR5 delta 32 is frequent in populations of European origin, and encodes a nonfunctional truncated protein that is not transported to the cell surface. Homozygotes for the delta 32 allele exhibit a strong, although incomplete, resistance to HIV infection, whereas heterozygotes display delayed progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Many other alleles, affecting the primary structure of CCR5 or its promoter have been described, some of which lead to nonfunctional receptors or otherwise influence AIDS progression. CCR5 is considered as a drug target in the field of HIV, but also in a growing number of inflammatory diseases. Modified chemokines, monoclonal antibodies and small chemical antagonists, as well as a number of gene therapy approaches have been developed in this frame.

  9. [Osteonecrosis in HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Bottaro, Edgardo G; Figueroa, Raúl H; Scapellato, Pablo G; Vidal, Gabriela I; Rodriguez Brieschke, Maria T; Da Representaçao, Silvia; Seoane, Maria B; Laurido, Marcelo F; Caiafa, Diego; Lopardo, Gustavo; Herrera, Fabian; Cassetti, Isabel

    2004-01-01

    Osteonecrosis, also known as avascular necrosis, is chiefly characterized by death of bone caused by vascular compromise. The true incidence of osteonecrosis in HIV-infected patients is not well known and the pathogenesis remains undefined. Hypothetical risk factors peculiar to HIV-infected individuals that might play a role in the pathogenesis of osteonecrosis include the introduction of protease inhibitors and resulting hyperlipidemia, the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies in serum leading to a hypercoagulable state, immune recovery and vasculitis. Hereby we present a series of 13 HIV-infected patients with osteonecrosis. The most common symptom upon presentation was arthralgia. The majority of the patients had received steroids, 9 had developed hyperlipidemia after the introduction of HAART, 8 were smokers and 4 patients were alcoholics. In 2 patients, seric anticardiolipin antibodies were detected. Twelve patients had AIDS and were on HAART (11 were on protease inhibitors). We believe that osteonecrosis should be included as differential diagnosis of every HIV-infected patient who complains of pain of weight bearing joints. Likewise, it seems prudent to rule out HIV infection in subjects with osteonecrosis.

  10. Innate Sensing of HIV-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lepelley, Alice; Louis, Stéphanie; Sourisseau, Marion; Law, Helen K. W.; Pothlichet, Julien; Schilte, Clémentine; Chaperot, Laurence; Plumas, Joël; Randall, Richard E.; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Mammano, Fabrizio; Albert, Matthew L.; Schwartz, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Cell-free HIV-1 virions are poor stimulators of type I interferon (IFN) production. We examined here how HIV-infected cells are recognized by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and by other cells. We show that infected lymphocytes are more potent inducers of IFN than virions. There are target cell-type differences in the recognition of infected lymphocytes. In primary pDCs and pDC-like cells, recognition occurs in large part through TLR7, as demonstrated by the use of inhibitors and by TLR7 silencing. Donor cells expressing replication-defective viruses, carrying mutated reverse transcriptase, integrase or nucleocapsid proteins induced IFN production by target cells as potently as wild-type virus. In contrast, Env-deleted or fusion defective HIV-1 mutants were less efficient, suggesting that in addition to TLR7, cytoplasmic cellular sensors may also mediate sensing of infected cells. Furthermore, in a model of TLR7-negative cells, we demonstrate that the IRF3 pathway, through a process requiring access of incoming viral material to the cytoplasm, allows sensing of HIV-infected lymphocytes. Therefore, detection of HIV-infected lymphocytes occurs through both endosomal and cytoplasmic pathways. Characterization of the mechanisms of innate recognition of HIV-infected cells allows a better understanding of the pathogenic and exacerbated immunologic events associated with HIV infection. PMID:21379343

  11. [HIV infection--a sexually transmitted disease].

    PubMed

    Stapiński, A

    1989-01-01

    In the light of literature reports and own experiences and observations the most important epidemiological aspects of HIV infection acquired through sexual contacts are discussed, including the likelihood of infection during heterosexual or homosexual intercourse, factors increasing the infection risk in homosexuals intercourse and the more or less safe forms of sexual intercourse. The combination of HIV infections with infections with other sexually transmitted diseases is discussed on the basis of own observations which showed that HIV infection was acquired much more frequently by homosexuals treated in outpatient clinics for venereological diseases (19.7%) as compared to other homosexual groups (2.7%), and the risk was even lower in heterosexuals treated in these clinics for sexually transmitted diseases (0.2%). Over half the patients infected with HIV had or had had syphilis. HIV infection was sought for in Warsaw prostitutes, and 0.6% of them were found to be infected, two-thirds of the infected ones were drug addicted prostitutes. The importance of the sexual route of infection in drug addicts and transmission of this infection to the heterosexual population are considered. The principles of prophylaxis, the directions of health education, and the importance of screening for HIV infection prevention are considered. Attention is called to the harmful effects of all types of restriction of the infected people which lead to trials of infection concealment.

  12. Methamphetamine Enhances HIV Infection of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hao; Wang, Xu; Chen, Hui; Song, Li; Ye, Li; Wang, Shi-Hong; Wang, Yan-Jian; Zhou, Lin; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that the use of methamphetamine (meth), a sympathomimetic stimulant, is particularly common among patients infected with HIV. However, there is a lack of direct evidence that meth promotes HIV infection of target cells. This study examined whether meth is able to enhance HIV infection of macrophages, the primary target site for the virus. Meth treatment resulted in a significant and dose-dependent increase of HIV reverse transcriptase activity in human blood monocyte-derived macrophages. Dopamine D1 receptor antagonists (SCH23390 and SKF83566) blocked this meth-mediated increase in the HIV infectivity of macrophages. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of meth action showed that meth up-regulated the expression of the HIV entry co-receptor CCR5 on macrophages. Additionally, meth inhibited the expression of endogenous interferon-α and signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 in macrophages. These findings provide direct in vitro evidence to support the possibility that meth may function as a cofactor in the immunopathogenesis of HIV infection and may lead to the future development of innate immunity-based intervention for meth users with HIV infection. PMID:18458095

  13. Immunodeficiency, AIDS-related pneumonia, and risk of lung cancer among HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Julia L; Leyden, Wendy A; Chao, Chun R; Horberg, Michael A; Klein, Daniel B; Quesenberry, Charles P; Towner, William J; Silverberg, Michael J

    2017-04-24

    The objective is to clarify the role of immunodeficiency and pneumonia in elevated lung cancer risk among HIV-infected individuals. Cohort study of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected adults in a large integrated healthcare system in California during 1996-2011. We used Poisson models to obtain rate ratios for lung cancer associated with HIV infection, overall and stratified by recent CD4 cells/μl (HIV-uninfected as reference group), with χ tests for trends across CD4 strata. Fully adjusted models included demographics, cancer risk factors (smoking, drug/alcohol abuse, overweight/obesity), and prior pneumonia. Among 24 768 HIV-infected and 257 600 HIV-uninfected individuals, the lung cancer rate per 100 000 person-years was 66 (n = 80 events) for HIV-infected and 33 (n = 506 events) for HIV-uninfected individuals [rate ratio 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.7-2.2]. Overall, HIV-infected individuals were at increased risk of lung cancer after adjustment for demographics and cancer risk factors (rate ratio 1.4, 95% CI: 1.1-1.7), but not after additional adjustment for pneumonia (rate ratio 1.2, 95% CI: 0.9-1.6). Lower CD4 cell counts were associated with higher risk of lung cancer in unadjusted and demographics-adjusted models (P < 0.001 for all), but this trend did not remain after adjustment for cancer risk factors and pneumonia. Compared with HIV-uninfected individuals, HIV-infected individuals with CD4 less than 200 cells/μl were not at increased risk of lung cancer in fully adjusted models. The increased lung cancer risk among HIV patients is attributable to differences in demographics, risk factors such as smoking, and history of pneumonia. Immunodeficiency does not appear to have an independent effect on lung cancer risk.

  14. Long-term Durability of Immune Responses After Hepatitis A Vaccination Among HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Kenneth; Lee, Andrew W.; Grosso, Anthony; Landrum, Michael L.; Weintrob, Amy; Ganesan, Anuradha; Maguire, Jason; Klopfer, Stephanie; Brandt, Carolyn; Bradley, William P.; Wallace, Mark R.; Agan, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    Background.  Vaccination provides long-term immunity to hepatitis A virus (HAV) among the general population, but there are no such data regarding vaccine durability among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected adults. Methods.  We retrospectively studied HIV-infected adults who had received 2 doses of HAV vaccine. We analyzed blood specimens taken at 1 year, 3 years, and, when available, 6–10 years postvaccination. HAV immunoglobulin G (IgG) values of ≥10 mIU/mL were considered seropositive. Results.  We evaluated specimens from 130 HIV-infected adults with a median age of 35 years and a median CD4 cell count of 461 cells/mm3 at or before time of vaccination. Of these, 49% had an HIV RNA load <1000 copies/mL. Initial vaccine responses were achieved in 89% of HIV-infected adults (95% confidence interval [CI], 83%–94%), compared with 100% (95% CI, 99%–100%) of historical HIV-uninfected adults. Among initial HIV-infected responders with available specimens, 90% (104 of 116; 95% CI, 83%–95%) remained seropositive at 3 years and 85% (63 of 74; 95% CI, 75%–92%) at 6–10 years. Geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) among HIV-infected adults were 154, 111, and 64 mIU/mL at 1, 3, and 6–10 years, respectively, compared with 1734, 687, and 684 mIU/mL among HIV-uninfected persons. Higher GMCs over time among HIV-infected adults were associated with lower log10 HIV RNA levels (β = −.12, P = .04). Conclusions.  Most adults with well-controlled HIV infections had durable seropositive responses up to 6–10 years after HAV vaccination. Suppressed HIV RNA levels are associated with durable HAV responses. PMID:21606540

  15. Polyomavirus JCV excretion and genotype analysis in HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lednicky, John A.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; White, Zoe S.; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of shedding of polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) genotypes in urine of HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). METHODS: Single samples of urine and blood were collected prospectively from 70 adult HIV-infected patients and 68 uninfected volunteers. Inclusion criteria for HIV-infected patients included an HIV RNA viral load < 1000 copies, CD4 cell count of 200-700 x 106 cells/l, and stable HAART regimen. PCR assays and sequence analysis were carried out using JCV-specific primers against different regions of the virus genome. RESULTS: JCV excretion in urine was more common in HIV-positive patients but not significantly different from that of the HIV-negative group [22/70 (31%) versus 13/68 (19%); P = 0.09]. HIV-positive patients lost the age-related pattern of JCV shedding (P = 0.13) displayed by uninfected subjects (P = 0.01). Among HIV-infected patients significant differences in JCV shedding were related to CD4 cell counts (P = 0.03). Sequence analysis of the JCV regulatory region from both HIV-infected patients and uninfected volunteers revealed all to be JCV archetypal strains. JCV genotypes 1 (36%) and 4 (36%) were the most common among HIV-infected patients, whereas type 2 (77%) was the most frequently detected among HIV-uninfected volunteers. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that JCV shedding is enhanced by modest depressions in immune function during HIV infection. JCV shedding occurred in younger HIV-positive persons than in the healthy controls. As the common types of JCV excreted varied among ethnic groups, JCV genotypes associated with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy may reflect demographics of those infected patient populations.

  16. Fears about HIV transmission in families with an HIV-infected parent: a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Cowgill, Burton O; Bogart, Laura M; Corona, Rosalie; Ryan, Gery; Schuster, Mark A

    2008-11-01

    Children of HIV-infected parents may be affected by their parents' disease even if not infected themselves. Because of advances in HIV treatment that have reduced the risk for vertical HIV transmission from mother to child, more HIV-infected adults are having children. Few studies have examined whether families with an HIV-infected parent experience fears about transmission to children and how they address such fears. In this article, we describe transmission-related fears in families with an HIV-infected parent. We used semistructured qualitative interviews, conducted in person from March 2004 to March 2005, with 33 HIV-infected parents, 27 minor children who were 9 to 17 years of age, 19 adult children, and 15 caregivers (adult family members or friends who helped care for the children and/or parents) to investigate their fears about HIV transmission. The parents are a subset from the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study, a study of people in care for HIV throughout the United States. We analyzed the interview transcripts for themes related to transmission fears. In many of the families, participants identified >or=1 HIV transmission-related fear. Themes included specific fears related to blood contact, bathroom items, kissing/hugging, and food. Families addressed their fears by educating children about modes of HIV transmission and establishing rules or taking precautions to reduce the risk for HIV transmission in the household. HIV-infected parents were also concerned about catching opportunistic infections from a sick child. Many of the fears experienced by HIV-infected parents and their children were based on misconceptions about modes of HIV transmission. Pediatricians and others who treat these children may be able to offer counseling to allay fears that family members have about household transmission of HIV.

  17. Polyomavirus JCV excretion and genotype analysis in HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lednicky, John A.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; White, Zoe S.; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of shedding of polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) genotypes in urine of HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). METHODS: Single samples of urine and blood were collected prospectively from 70 adult HIV-infected patients and 68 uninfected volunteers. Inclusion criteria for HIV-infected patients included an HIV RNA viral load < 1000 copies, CD4 cell count of 200-700 x 106 cells/l, and stable HAART regimen. PCR assays and sequence analysis were carried out using JCV-specific primers against different regions of the virus genome. RESULTS: JCV excretion in urine was more common in HIV-positive patients but not significantly different from that of the HIV-negative group [22/70 (31%) versus 13/68 (19%); P = 0.09]. HIV-positive patients lost the age-related pattern of JCV shedding (P = 0.13) displayed by uninfected subjects (P = 0.01). Among HIV-infected patients significant differences in JCV shedding were related to CD4 cell counts (P = 0.03). Sequence analysis of the JCV regulatory region from both HIV-infected patients and uninfected volunteers revealed all to be JCV archetypal strains. JCV genotypes 1 (36%) and 4 (36%) were the most common among HIV-infected patients, whereas type 2 (77%) was the most frequently detected among HIV-uninfected volunteers. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that JCV shedding is enhanced by modest depressions in immune function during HIV infection. JCV shedding occurred in younger HIV-positive persons than in the healthy controls. As the common types of JCV excreted varied among ethnic groups, JCV genotypes associated with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy may reflect demographics of those infected patient populations.

  18. HIV Infection and Older Americans: The Public Health Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Buchacz, Kate; Gebo, Kelly A.; Mermin, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    HIV disease is often perceived as a condition affecting young adults. However, approximately 11% of new infections occur in adults aged 50 years or older. Among persons living with HIV disease, it is estimated that more than half will be aged 50 years or older in the near future. In this review, we highlight issues related to HIV prevention and treatment for HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected older Americans, and outline unique considerations and emerging challenges for public health and patient management in these 2 populations. PMID:22698038

  19. Innate immunity in resistance to HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Biasin, Mara; Clerici, Mario; Piacentini, Luca

    2010-11-01

    Resistance to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in subjects who do not seroconvert despite multiple exposures to the virus and to the progression to AIDS in HIV‐infected individuals depends on multiple factors involving both the innate and the adaptive immune system. The contribution of natural immunity in preventing HIV infection has so far received little attention, but many recently published articles suggest a key role for Toll‐like receptors, natural killer cells, interleukin‐22, acute‐phase amyloid A protein, and APOBEC3G in conferring resistance to HIV infection. The study of these factors will shed light on HIV pathogenesis and contribute to the development of new therapeutic approaches to this elusive disease.

  20. The nutritional status of asymptomatic HIV-infected Africans: directions for dietary intervention?

    PubMed

    Vorster, Hester H; Kruger, Annamarie; Margetts, Barrie M; Venter, Christina S; Kruger, H Salomé; Veldman, Frederick J; Macintyre, Una E

    2004-12-01

    To compare the relationships between food (nutrient) intakes and biochemical markers of nutritional status of asymptomatic HIV-infected with HIV-uninfected subjects, to gain more information on the appropriate diet for HIV-infected persons at an early stage of infection. Cross-sectional population-based survey. North West Province, South Africa. Two hundred and sixteen asymptomatic HIV-infected and 1550 HIV-uninfected men and women volunteers aged 15 years and older, recruited as 'apparently healthy' subjects from 37 randomly selected sites. Food and nutrient intakes, measured with a validated food-frequency questionnaire, and nutritional status indicated by anthropometric and biochemical variables, measured by a standardised methodology. The prevalence of HIV infection in the study population was 11.9%. The anthropometric indices and nutrient intakes of HIV-infected and uninfected subjects did not differ significantly, indicating that these 216 HIV-infected subjects were at an early stage of infection. Of the biochemical nutritional status variables, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and total cholesterol, haemoglobin, albumin and triglycerides were significantly lower in infected subjects. They also had higher globulin and liver enzyme levels than uninfected subjects. In infected subjects, serum albumin correlated significantly with serum lipids, serum vitamin A, serum vitamin E, serum iron, total iron-binding capacity and haemoglobin. The significant positive correlations of the liver enzymes with serum lipids, albumin, vitamin A and iron, observed in HIV-uninfected subjects, disappeared in the infected subjects. Polyunsaturated fat intake showed significant positive correlations with the increased liver enzymes in infected subjects. A principal components analysis indicated that, in infected subjects, increased liver enzymes correlated with higher consumption of maize meal and lower consumption of meat and vegetables. This survey indicated that asymptomatic

  1. Risk of Anal Cancer in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Individuals in North America

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Bryan; Justice, Amy C.; Engels, Eric; Gill, M. John; Goedert, James J.; Kirk, Gregory D.; D’Souza, Gypsyamber; Bosch, Ronald J.; Brooks, John T.; Napravnik, Sonia; Hessol, Nancy A.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Klein, Marina B.; Moore, Richard D.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Rourke, Sean B.; Saag, Michael S.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Gebo, Kelly A.; Press, Natasha; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Dubrow, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background. Anal cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), although few have evaluated rates separately for men who have sex with men (MSM), other men, and women. There are also conflicting data regarding calendar trends. Methods. In a study involving 13 cohorts from North America with follow-up between 1996 and 2007, we compared anal cancer incidence rates among 34 189 HIV-infected (55% MSM, 19% other men, 26% women) and 114 260 HIV-uninfected individuals (90% men). Results. Among men, the unadjusted anal cancer incidence rates per 100 000 person-years were 131 for HIV-infected MSM, 46 for other HIV-infected men, and 2 for HIV-uninfected men, corresponding to demographically adjusted rate ratios (RRs) of 80.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 42.7–151.1) for HIV-infected MSM and 26.7 (95% CI, 11.5–61.7) for other HIV-infected men compared with HIV-uninfected men. HIV-infected women had an anal cancer rate of 30/100 000 person-years, and no cases were observed for HIV-uninfected women. In a multivariable Poisson regression model, among HIV-infected individuals, the risk was higher for MSM compared with other men (RR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.8–6.0), but no difference was observed comparing women with other men (RR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.5–2.2). In comparison with the period 2000–2003, HIV-infected individuals had an adjusted RR of 0.5 (95% CI, .3–.9) in 1996–1999 and 0.9 (95% CI, .6–1.2) in 2004–2007. Conclusions. Anal cancer rates were substantially higher for HIV-infected MSM, other men, and women compared with HIV-uninfected individuals, suggesting a need for universal prevention efforts. Rates increased after the early antiretroviral therapy era and then plateaued. PMID:22291097

  2. Antiretroviral Drugs Used in the Treatment of HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Antiretroviral drugs used in the treatment of HIV infection Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Email Print Drugs Used in the Treatment of HIV Infection Click on drug brand name for additional ...

  3. Invasive cervical cancer risk among HIV-infected women: A North American multi-cohort collaboration prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Alison G; Strickler, Howard D; Jing, Yuezhou; Gange, Stephen J; Sterling, Timothy R; Silverberg, Michael; Saag, Michael; Rourke, Sean; Rachlis, Anita; Napravnik, Sonia; Moore, Richard D; Klein, Marina; Kitahata, Mari; Kirk, Greg; Hogg, Robert; Hessol, Nancy A; Goedert, James J; Gill, M John; Gebo, Kelly; Eron, Joseph J; Engels, Eric A; Dubrow, Robert; Crane, Heidi M; Brooks, John T; Bosch, Ronald; D’Souza, Gypsyamber

    2013-01-01

    Objective HIV infection and low CD4+ T-cell count are associated with an increased risk of persistent oncogenic HPV infection – the major risk factor for cervical cancer. Few reported prospective cohort studies have characterized the incidence of invasive cervical cancer (ICC) in HIV-infected women. Methods Data were obtained from HIV-infected and -uninfected female participants in the NA-ACCORD with no history of ICC at enrollment. Participants were followed from study entry or January, 1996 through ICC, loss-to follow-up or December, 2010. The relationship of HIV infection and CD4+ T-cell count with risk of ICC was assessed using age-adjusted Poisson regression models and standardized incidence ratios (SIR). All cases were confirmed by cancer registry records and/or pathology reports. Cervical cytology screening history was assessed through medical record abstraction. Results A total of 13,690 HIV-infected and 12,021 HIV-uninfected women contributed 66,249 and 70,815 person-years (pys) of observation, respectively. Incident ICC was diagnosed in 17 HIV-infected and 4 HIV-uninfected women (incidence rate of 26 and 6 per 100,000 pys, respectively). HIV-infected women with baseline CD4+ T-cells of ≥ 350, 200–349 and <200 cells/uL had a 2.3-times, 3.0-times and 7.7-times increase in ICC incidence, respectively, compared with HIV-uninfected women (Ptrend =0.001). Of the 17 HIV-infected cases, medical records for the 5 years prior to diagnosis showed that 6 had no documented screening, 5 had screening with low grade or normal results, and 6 had high-grade results. Conclusions This study found elevated incidence of ICC in HIV-infected compared to -uninfected women, and these rates increased with immunosuppression. PMID:23254153

  4. Cutaneous histoplasmosis disclosing an HIV-infection*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Silvares, Maria Regina Cavariani; de Camargo, Rosangela Maria Pires; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2013-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a systemic mycosis endemic in extensive areas of the Americas. The authors report on an urban adult male patient with uncommon oral-cutaneous lesions proven to be histoplasmosis. Additional investigation revealed unnoticed HIV infection with CD4+ cell count of 7/mm3. The treatment was performed with amphotericin B, a 2065 mg total dose followed by itraconazole 200mg/daily plus antiretroviral therapy with apparent cure. Histoplasmosis is an AIDS-defining opportunistic disease process; therefore, its clinical diagnosis must drive full laboratory investigation looking for unnoted HIV-infection. PMID:23793220

  5. HIV Infection Among People Who Inject Drugs: The Challenge of Racial/Ethnic Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Des Jarlais, Don C.; McCarty, Dennis; Vega, William A.; Bramson, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Racial/ethnic disparities in HIV infection, with minority groups typically having higher rates of infection, are a formidable public health challenge. In the United States, among both men and women who inject drugs, HIV infection rates are elevated among non-Hispanic Blacks and Hispanics. A meta-analysis of international research concluded that among persons who inject drugs, racial and ethnic minorities were twice as likely to acquire an HIV infection, though there was great variation across the individual studies. To examine strategies to reduce racial/ethnic disparities among persons who inject drugs, we reviewed studies on injection drug use and its role in HIV transmission. We identified four sets of evidence-based interventions that may reduce racial ethnic disparities among persons who inject drugs: HIV counseling and testing, risk reduction services, access to anti-retroviral therapy, and drug abuse treatment. Implementation of these services, however, is insufficient in many countries, including the US. Persons who inject drugs appear to be changing drug use norms and rituals to reduce risks. The challenges are to 1) develop a validated model of how racial/ethnic disparities in HIV infection arise, persist, and are reduced or eliminated over time, and 2) implement evidence-based services on a sufficient scale to eliminate HIV transmission among all persons who inject drugs. PMID:23688094

  6. Reproductive decision-making and determinants of contraceptive use in HIV-infected women.

    PubMed

    Williams, H A; Watkins, C E; Risby, J A

    1996-06-01

    Perinatal transmission and reproductive decisions of HIV-infected women can be categorized in statistical and epidemiological terms. These reports and figures, however, do little to fully explain the complexities of human relationships, life experiences, personal and cultural influences, and situational and environmental variables that impact on the HIV-infected woman regarding reproductive decision-making. It is only with genuine attempts to understand the woman's perspective and the dynamic and unique variables that influence reproductive decision-making, as well as maintaining a non-judgmental and culturally sensitive perspective, can we hope to assist women, and society as a whole, in coming to terms with the complexities of HIV and reproductive decision-making. Further study is needed to identify factors that influence reproductive decision-making in HIV-infected women. The determinants of contraceptive use regarding demographic factors, barriers to contraceptive use, and factors that contribute to successful contraceptive use in this population must be understood if efforts to reduce the number of unplanned pregnancies are to be successful. More conclusive data are needed on the safety and efficacy of oral contraceptives in HIV-infected women as well as data that describe the effects of longer acting hormonal contraceptives such as levonorgestrel implants (Norplant; Wyeth-Ayerst, Philadelphia, PA) and injectable medroxyprogesterone acetate (Depo Provera; Upjohn Company, Kalamazoo, MI). More research is needed to determine the effects of patient education and counseling and closer follow-up on effective long-term contraception in HIV-infected women.

  7. Low rates of hepatitis screening and vaccination of HIV-infected MSM in HIV clinics.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Karen W; Butler, Mary; Workowski, Kimberly A; Follansbee, Stephen; Gratzer, Beau; Hare, C Bradley; Johnston, Barbara; Theodore, John L; Tao, Guoyu; Smith, Bryce D; Chorba, Terence; Kent, Charlotte K

    2012-05-01

    HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) are at increased risk of viral hepatitis because of similar behavioral risk factors for acquisition of these infections. Our objective was to estimate adherence to HIV management guidelines that recommend screening HIV-infected persons for hepatitis A, B, and C infection, and vaccinating for hepatitis A and B if susceptible. We evaluated hepatitis prevention services received by a random sample of HIV-infected MSM in 8 HIV clinics in 6 US cities. We abstracted medical records of all visits made by the patients to the clinic during the period from 2004 to 2007, to estimate hepatitis screening and vaccination rates overall and by clinic site. Medical records of 1329 patients who had 14,831 visits from 2004 to 2006 were abstracted. Screening rates for hepatitis A, B, and C were 47%, 52%, and 54%, respectively. Among patients who were screened and found to be susceptible, 29% were vaccinated for hepatitis A and 25% for hepatitis B. The percentage of patients screened and vaccinated varied significantly by clinic. Awareness of hepatitis susceptibility and hepatitis coinfection status in HIV-infected patients is essential for optimal clinical management. Despite recommendations for hepatitis screening and vaccination of HIV-infected MSM, rates were suboptimal at all clinic sites. These low rates highlight the importance of routine review of adherence to recommended clinical services. Such reviews can prompt the development and implementation of simple and sustainable interventions to improve the quality of care.

  8. Epidemiology and clinical features of HIV infection/AIDS in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, June Myung; Cho, Goon Jae; Hong, Sung Kwan; Chang, Kyung Hee; Chung, Joo Sup; Choi, Young Hwa; Song, Young Goo; Huh, Aejung; Yeom, Joon Sup; Lee, Kkot Sil; Choi, Jun Yong

    2003-06-30

    HIV infection/AIDS shows characteristic epidemiological and clinical patterns according to the region, country, and race. The epidemiological and clinical patterns of HIV infection/ AIDS in Korea was investigated by retrospectively analyzing the medical records of 176 HIV-infected persons who visited two major referral hospitals of AIDS in Korea from 1985 to April 2000. The most common transmission route was heterosexual contact (52.3%), followed by homosexual contact (23.9%). Among the opportunistic diseases, candidiasis was the most prevalent (21.6%), followed by Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (15.9%), tuberculosis (12.5%), and CMV infection (9.1%). The most common initial AIDS-defining opportunistic disease was tuberculosis (33.3%). The most common causes of death were tuberculosis (25.7%) and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (25.7%). This study describes the epidemiological and clinical patterns of HIV infection/AIDS in Korea, which not only enables us to accurately understand HIV infection/ AIDS in this country, but eventually to aid in establishing effective preventive measures and treatment guidelines in Korea.

  9. Primary human parvovirus B19 infection in an HIV infected patient on antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Gadwalkar, Srikant R; Deepa, D V; Katageri, Anand; Murthy, P Rama; Dhar, Ravi

    2013-12-01

    Persons with HIV infection frequently present with anaemia from different causes, including use of antiretroviral therapy (typically zidovudine), iron deficiency, vitamin B12 deficiency, opportunistic infections (such as mycobacterial and fungal infections), chronic disease, AIDS-associated malignancies, autoimmune haemolysis, and direct effects of HIV infection itself. Persistent infection with Parvovirus B19 (B19) is an important treatable cause of anaemia in HIV-infected patients. We present a case of anaemia in HIV positive patient who did not respond to change of drug therapy and nutritional supplements. Bone marrow biopsy suggested parvo virus infection. Chronic anaemia due to Parvo virus B19 infection is a treatable cause. Human Parvo virus B19 infection is a diagnosis of exclusion in patients who are started on antiretroviral therapy develop anaemia and later not responding to empirical management. Chronic anaemia requiring recurrent transfusions in HIV positive patient Parvo virus infection should be suspected and evaluated.

  10. The Application of an Etiological Model of Personality Disorders to Problem Gambling.

    PubMed

    Brown, Meredith; Allen, J Sabura; Dowling, Nicki A

    2015-12-01

    Problem gambling is a significant mental health problem that creates a multitude of intrapersonal, interpersonal, and social difficulties. Recent empirical evidence suggests that personality disorders, and in particular borderline personality disorder (BPD), are commonly co-morbid with problem gambling. Despite this finding there has been very little research examining overlapping factors between these two disorders. The aim of this review is to summarise the literature exploring the relationship between problem gambling and personality disorders. The co-morbidity of personality disorders, particularly BPD, is reviewed and the characteristics of problem gamblers with co-morbid personality disorders are explored. An etiological model from the more advanced BPD literature-the biosocial developmental model of BPD-is used to review the similarities between problem gambling and BPD across four domains: early parent-child interactions, emotion regulation, co-morbid psychopathology and negative outcomes. It was concluded that personality disorders, in particular BPD are commonly co-morbid among problem gamblers and the presence of a personality disorder complicates the clinical picture. Furthermore BPD and problem gambling share similarities across the biosocial developmental model of BPD. Therefore clinicians working with problem gamblers should incorporate routine screening for personality disorders and pay careful attention to the therapeutic alliance, client motivations and therapeutic boundaries. Furthermore adjustments to therapy structure, goals and outcomes may be required. Directions for future research include further research into the applicability of the biosocial developmental model of BPD to problem gambling.

  11. [Massive alveolar hemorrhage due to cytomegalovirus (CMV) and HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Cortés, A; Peña, E; Vega, R; Reyes, G; Bautista, E

    2011-03-01

    Alveolar hemorrhage may be a complication of diseases with local and systemic manifestations. Both share the same pathophysiological concept: damage to the alveolar microcirculation. It is a clinical entity that generates a diagnostic challenge for the physician. Early recognition favors aggressive treatment, which can improve the outcome. Despite the technological advances in its diagnosis and treatment, it is still a condition having high morbidity and mortality. We present the case of a 42-year old woman diagnosed of massive alveolar hemorrhage induced by cytomegalovirus (CMV) and HIV infection. Its presentation is atypical because most reported cases have occurred as a pneumonic process, episodes of massive hemorrhage being uncommon. The diagnosis was documented by bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage and etiological diagnosis with molecular techniques using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  12. Residual Injection Risk Behavior, HIV Infection, and the Evaluation of Syringe Exchange Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Des Jarlais, Don C.; Braine, Naomi; Yi, Huso; Turner, Charles

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed relationships between residual risk behavior (risk behavior among persons participating in effective HIV prevention programs) and HIV infection. Structured interviews and HIV tests were obtained from participants in six large U.S. syringe exchange programs. Program characteristics were obtained through interviews with the…

  13. Residual Injection Risk Behavior, HIV Infection, and the Evaluation of Syringe Exchange Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Des Jarlais, Don C.; Braine, Naomi; Yi, Huso; Turner, Charles

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed relationships between residual risk behavior (risk behavior among persons participating in effective HIV prevention programs) and HIV infection. Structured interviews and HIV tests were obtained from participants in six large U.S. syringe exchange programs. Program characteristics were obtained through interviews with the…

  14. End-Stage Renal Disease Among HIV-Infected Adults in North America

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Alison G.; Althoff, Keri N.; Jing, Yuezhou; Estrella, Michelle M.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Wester, C. William; Bosch, Ronald J.; Crane, Heidi; Eron, Joseph; Gill, M. John; Horberg, Michael A.; Justice, Amy C.; Klein, Marina; Mayor, Angel M.; Moore, Richard D.; Palella, Frank J.; Parikh, Chirag R.; Silverberg, Michael J.; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Napravnik, Sonia; Lucas, Gregory M.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Benson, Constance A.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Collier, Ann C.; Boswell, Stephen; Grasso, Chris; Mayer, Ken; Hogg, Robert S.; Harrigan, Richard; Montaner, Julio; Cescon, Angela; Brooks, John T.; Buchacz, Kate; Gebo, Kelly A.; Moore, Richard D.; Moore, Richard D.; Carey, John T.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Horberg, Michael A.; Silverberg, Michael J.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Goedert, James J.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Klein, Marina B.; Rourke, Sean B.; Burchell, Ann; Rachlis, Anita R.; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F.; Mayor, Angel M.; Gill, M. John; Deeks, Steven G.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Saag, Michael S.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Willig, James; Eron, Joseph J.; Napravnik, Sonia; Kitahata, Mari M.; Crane, Heidi M.; Justice, Amy C.; Dubrow, Robert; Fiellin, David; Sterling, Timothy R.; Haas, David; Bebawy, Sally; Turner, Megan; Gange, Stephen J.; Anastos, Kathryn; Moore, Richard D.; Saag, Michael S.; Gange, Stephen J.; Althoff, Keri N.; Kitahata, Mari M.; McKaig, Rosemary G.; Justice, Amy C.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Moore, Richard D.; Freeman, Aimee M.; Lent, Carol; Kitahata, Mari M.; Van Rompaey, Stephen E.; Crane, Heidi M.; Webster, Eric; Morton, Liz; Simon, Brenda; Gange, Stephen J.; Althoff, Keri N.; Abraham, Alison G.; Lau, Bryan; Zhang, Jinbing; Jing, Jerry; Golub, Elizabeth; Modur, Shari; Hanna, David B.; Rebeiro, Peter; Wong, Cherise; Mendes, Adell

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, particularly those of black race, are at high-risk for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but contributing factors are evolving. We hypothesized that improvements in HIV treatment have led to declines in risk of ESRD, particularly among HIV-infected blacks. Methods. Using data from the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration for Research and Design from January 2000 to December 2009, we validated 286 incident ESRD cases using abstracted medical evidence of dialysis (lasting >6 months) or renal transplant. A total of 38 354 HIV-infected adults aged 18–80 years contributed 159 825 person-years (PYs). Age- and sex-standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were estimated by race. Poisson regression was used to identify predictors of ESRD. Results. HIV-infected ESRD cases were more likely to be of black race, have diabetes mellitus or hypertension, inject drugs, and/or have a prior AIDS-defining illness. The overall SIR was 3.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8–3.6) but was significantly higher among black patients (4.5 [95% CI, 3.9–5.2]). ESRD incidence declined from 532 to 303 per 100 000 PYs and 138 to 34 per 100 000 PYs over the time period for blacks and nonblacks, respectively, coincident with notable increases in both the prevalence of viral suppression and the prevalence of ESRD risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and hepatitis C virus coinfection. Conclusions. The risk of ESRD remains high among HIV-infected individuals in care but is declining with improvements in virologic suppression. HIV-infected black persons continue to comprise the majority of cases, as a result of higher viral loads, comorbidities, and genetic susceptibility. PMID:25409471

  15. End-stage renal disease among HIV-infected adults in North America.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Alison G; Althoff, Keri N; Jing, Yuezhou; Estrella, Michelle M; Kitahata, Mari M; Wester, C William; Bosch, Ronald J; Crane, Heidi; Eron, Joseph; Gill, M John; Horberg, Michael A; Justice, Amy C; Klein, Marina; Mayor, Angel M; Moore, Richard D; Palella, Frank J; Parikh, Chirag R; Silverberg, Michael J; Golub, Elizabeth T; Jacobson, Lisa P; Napravnik, Sonia; Lucas, Gregory M

    2015-03-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, particularly those of black race, are at high-risk for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but contributing factors are evolving. We hypothesized that improvements in HIV treatment have led to declines in risk of ESRD, particularly among HIV-infected blacks. Using data from the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration for Research and Design from January 2000 to December 2009, we validated 286 incident ESRD cases using abstracted medical evidence of dialysis (lasting >6 months) or renal transplant. A total of 38 354 HIV-infected adults aged 18-80 years contributed 159 825 person-years (PYs). Age- and sex-standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were estimated by race. Poisson regression was used to identify predictors of ESRD. HIV-infected ESRD cases were more likely to be of black race, have diabetes mellitus or hypertension, inject drugs, and/or have a prior AIDS-defining illness. The overall SIR was 3.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8-3.6) but was significantly higher among black patients (4.5 [95% CI, 3.9-5.2]). ESRD incidence declined from 532 to 303 per 100 000 PYs and 138 to 34 per 100 000 PYs over the time period for blacks and nonblacks, respectively, coincident with notable increases in both the prevalence of viral suppression and the prevalence of ESRD risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and hepatitis C virus coinfection. The risk of ESRD remains high among HIV-infected individuals in care but is declining with improvements in virologic suppression. HIV-infected black persons continue to comprise the majority of cases, as a result of higher viral loads, comorbidities, and genetic susceptibility. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Late presentation of HIV infection: a consensus definition.

    PubMed

    Antinori, A; Coenen, T; Costagiola, D; Dedes, N; Ellefson, M; Gatell, J; Girardi, E; Johnson, M; Kirk, O; Lundgren, J; Mocroft, A; D'Arminio Monforte, A; Phillips, A; Raben, D; Rockstroh, J K; Sabin, C; Sönnerborg, A; De Wolf, F

    2011-01-01

    Across Europe, almost a third of individuals infected with HIV do not enter health care until late in the course of their infection. Surveillance to identify the extent to which late presentation occurs remains inadequate across Europe and is further complicated by the lack of a common clinical definition of late presentation. The objective of this article is to present a consensus definition of late presentation of HIV infection. Over the past year, two initiatives have moved towards a harmonized definition. In spring 2009, they joined efforts to identify a common definition of what is meant by a 'late-presenting' patient. Two definitions were agreed upon, as follows. Late presentation: persons presenting for care with a CD4 count below 350 cells/μL or presenting with an AIDS-defining event, regardless of the CD4 cell count. Presentation with advanced HIV disease: persons presenting for care with a CD4 count below 200 cells/μL or presenting with an AIDS-defining event, regardless of the CD4 cell count. The European Late Presenter Consensus working group believe it would be beneficial if all national health agencies, institutions, and researchers were able to implement this definition (either on its own or alongside their own preferred definition) when reporting surveillance or research data relating to late presentation of HIV infection. © 2010 British HIV Association.

  17. Progress toward curing HIV infections with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Smiley, Stephen T; Singh, Anjali; Read, Sarah W; Sharma, Opendra K; Finzi, Diana; Lane, Clifford; Rice, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-15

    Combination antiretroviral therapy can suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection but cannot completely eradicate the virus. A major obstacle in the quest for a cure is the difficulty in targeting and measuring latently infected cells. To date, a single person seems to have been cured of HIV. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) preceded this cancer patient's long-term sustained HIV remission, but researchers have been unable to replicate this cure, and the mechanisms that led to HIV remission remain to be established. In February 2014, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases sponsored a workshop that provided a venue for in-depth discussion of whether HSCT could be exploited to cure HIV in cancer patients requiring such procedures. Participants also discussed how HSCT might be applied to a broader community of HIV-infected persons in whom the risks of HSCT currently outweigh the likelihood and benefits of HIV cure. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  18. Renal pathology and HIV infection in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Praditpornsilpa, K; Napathorn, S; Yenrudi, S; Wankrairot, P; Tungsaga, K; Sitprija, V

    1999-02-01

    The existence of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) as a distinct disease entity characterized by glomerulosclerosis is well established in North America and Western Europe. Although the large number of HIV-infected cases overwhelm the Asian countries, no cases of HIVAN are documented in the literature. We studied 26 cases of HIV-infected Thai patients with proteinuria greater than 1.5 g/d of protein during 1995 and 1996. None of the patients were treated with antiretroviral drugs at the time of renal biopsy. Intravenous drug addiction and sexual transmission were risk factors in 11 and 15 patients, respectively. Pathological examinations were performed by light microscopic and immunoperoxidase study. Mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis was found in 17 cases, immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy in 2 cases, and diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis and interstitial nephritis secondary to cryptococcal infection in 2 cases each. One case each had membranous glomerulopathy, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, and granulomatous interstitial nephritis secondary to tuberculosis. The renal pathological findings of HIVAN with the unique features described in previous literature were not evident in these patients. Although the data in this study are limited to 26 HIV-infected Thai patients, we believe that HIVAN is uncommon in the Asian HIV-infected population.

  19. Kaleidoscope of autoimmune diseases in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Roszkiewicz, Justyna; Smolewska, Elzbieta

    2016-11-01

    Within the last 30 years, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has changed its status from inevitably fatal to chronic disorder with limited impact on life span. However, this breakthrough was mainly the effect of introduction of the aggressive antiviral treatment, which has led to the clinically significant increase in CD4+ cell count, resulting in fewer cases of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and improved management of opportunistic infections occurring in the course of the disease. The occurrence of a particular autoimmune disease depends on degree of immunosuppression of the HIV-positive patient. In 2002, four stages of autoimmunity were proposed in patients infected by HIV, based on the absolute CD4+ cell count, feature of AIDS as well as on the presence of autoimmune diseases. Spectrum of autoimmune diseases associated with HIV infection seems to be unexpectedly wide, involving several organs, such as lungs (sarcoidosis), thyroid gland (Graves' disease), liver (autoimmune hepatitis), connective tissue (systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, polyarteritis nodosa and other types of vasculitis, antiphospholipid syndrome) or hematopoietic system (autoimmune cytopenias). This paper contains the state of art on possible coincidences between HIV infection and a differential types of autoimmune diseases, including the potential mechanisms of this phenomenon. As the clinical manifestations of autoimmunization often mimic those inscribed in the course of HIV infection, health care providers should be aware of this rare but potentially deadly association and actively seek for its symptoms in their patients.

  20. The Dilemmas of Childhood HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudigier, Anne F.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Increase in number of children infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and consequential developmental disabilities of these children are discussed. Families caring for HIV-infected children express four recurrent themes: psychological stress, grief and mourning, guilt and self-blame, and isolation and fear of discrimination. Flexible…

  1. Heroin dependence and HIV infection in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chawarski, Marek C; Mazlan, Mahmud; Schottenfeld, Richard S

    2006-04-01

    Malaysia is experiencing severe problems with heroin dependence and HIV infection. This, study evaluated drug use and other HIV risk behaviors and their association with HIV and other infectious diseases in heroin-dependent subjects enrolled in a clinical trial of drug abuse treatment in Muar, Malaysia. Baseline assessment of treatment-seeking subjects (n=177) included the Addiction Severity Index; AIDS Risk Inventory; serological tests for HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C; and chest X-ray. All of the subjects were male; 67.8% were Malays, 28.8% Chinese, and 2.3%. Indian. Subjects had a mean (SD) age of 37.2 (9.1) years and 14.4 (8.5) years of using heroin; 76.3% reported lifetime injection drug use (IDU), and 41.5% reported current IDU; 30 of 156 (19.2%) tested HIV positive, 143 of 159 (89.9%) tested hepatitis C positive, and 25 of 159 (15.7%) had radiological evidence of pulmonary tuberbulosis. Malay subjects had a significantly higher prevalence of current IDU, needle sharing (p<0.01), and HIV infection (p<0.05) compared with Chinese subjects. Lifetime IDU, needle sharing, lack of consistent condom use, and Malay ethnicity were significantly associated with HIV infection. The high prevalence of HIV infection among heroin-dependent individuals, in Malaysia supports the important of interventions to reduce the major risk factors for HIV, including IDU, needle sharing, and unprotected sex.

  2. Pediatric HIV Infection and Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, John F.

    This paper presents an overview of the developmental disabilities associated with pediatric Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, and examines efficacious practices for assessment and intervention programming. The focus population is early childhood into school age. The paper describes the complex array of challenges presented by these…

  3. Cognitive function in early HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Aanchal; Hou, Jue; Liu, Lei; Gao, Yi; Kettering, Casey; Ragin, Ann B

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to examine cognitive function in acute/early HIV infection over the subsequent 2 years. Fifty-six HIV+ subjects and 21 seronegative participants of the Chicago Early HIV Infection Study were evaluated using a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment at study enrollment and at 2-year follow-up. Cognitive performance measures were compared in the groups using t tests and mixed-effect models. Patterns of relationship with clinical measures were determined between cognitive function and clinical status markers using Spearman's correlations. At the initial timepoint, the HIV group demonstrated significantly weaker performance on measures of verbal memory, visual memory, psychomotor speed, motor speed, and executive function. A similar pattern was found when cognitive function was examined at follow-up and across both timepoints. The HIV subjects had generally weaker performance on psychomotor speed, executive function, motor speed, visual memory, and verbal memory. The rate of decline in cognitive function across the 2-year follow-up period did not differ between groups. Correlations between clinical status markers and cognitive function at both timepoints showed weaker performance associated with increased disease burden. Neurocognitive difficulty in chronic HIV infection may have very early onset and reflect consequences of initial brain viral invasion and neuroinflammation during the intense, uncontrolled viremia of acute HIV infection. Further characterization of the changes occurring in initial stages of infection and the risk and protective factors for cognitive function could inform new strategies for neuroprotection.

  4. Liver transplantation in HIV-infected recipients.

    PubMed

    Roland, Michelle E; Stock, Peter G

    2006-08-01

    Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients are living longer and dying less often from complications related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), they are experiencing significant morbidity and mortality related to end-stage liver disease. Advances in the management of HIV disease have made it difficult to continue denying transplantation to this population based upon futility arguments alone. Patient and graft survival rates in HIV-infected study subjects appear similar to those in large transplant databases. There are no reports suggesting significant HIV disease progression. There are substantial interactions between immunosuppressants and antiretroviral drugs that require careful monitoring and dose adjustment. The evaluation and management of HIV-infected transplant candidates and recipients require excellent communication among a multidisciplinary team and the primary HIV care provider. It is critical that HIV clinicians and hepatologists are aware that liver transplantation is an option for HIV-infected patients at many transplant centers as delays in referral result in unnecessary mortality during the pretransplantation evaluation process.

  5. Altered Functional Response to Risky Choice in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Colm G.; Bischoff-Grethe, Amanda; Jordan, Stephan J.; Woods, Steven Paul; Ellis, Ronald J.; Paulus, Martin P.; Grant, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Background Risky decision-making is commonly observed in persons at risk for and infected with HIV and is associated with executive dysfunction. Yet it is currently unknown whether HIV alters brain processing of risk-taking decision-making. Methods This study examined the neural substrate of a risky decision-making task in 21 HIV seropositive (HIV+) and 19 seronegative (HIV-) comparison participants. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted while participants performed the risky-gains task, which involves choosing among safe (20 cents) and risky (40/80 cent win or loss) choices. Linear mixed effects analyses examining group and decision type were conducted. Robust regressions were performed to examine the relationship between nadir CD4 count and Kalichman sexual compulsivity and brain activation in the HIV+ group. The overlap between the task effects and robust regressions was explored. Results Although there were no serostatus effects in behavioral performance on the risky-gains task, HIV+ individuals exhibited greater activation for risky choices in the basal ganglia, i.e. the caudate nucleus, but also in the anterior cingulate, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and insula relative to the HIV- group. The HIV+ group also demonstrated reduced functional responses to safe choices in the anterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex relative to the HIV- group. HIV+ individuals with higher nadir CD4 count and greater sexual compulsivity displayed lower differential responses to safe versus risky choices in many of these regions. Conclusions This study demonstrated fronto-striatal loop dysfunction associated with HIV infection during risky decision-making. Combined with similar between-group task behavior, this suggests an adaptive functional response in regions critical to reward and behavioral control in the HIV+ group. HIV-infected individuals with higher CD4 nadirs demonstrated activation patterns more similar to seronegative individuals. This

  6. The metabolic syndrome and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Li Vecchi, Valentina; Maggi, Paolo; Rizzo, Manfredi; Montalto, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS), a cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, has become an important public health problem. Considerable differences in the prevalence of the MetS in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected subjects have been reported, as a consequence of several limitations regarding the diagnostic critera for MetS. New evidence suggests that the use of optimal waist cut-off points specific for the various ethnic populations could represent a step forward in overcoming these limitations. Also the use of specific cut-off points for measuring upper trunk fat as an adjunctive criterion of MetS in HIV patients with lipodystrophy could represent an interesting new research topic. Although metabolic disorders have been associated indirectly with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), directly with HIV infection per se or with host conditions, current circumstances could change the framework of MetS in the HIV setting: For example, the aging HIV population and newer, less metabolically toxic antiretroviral drugs. Lipotoxicity and adipokines have been focused as key issues for explaining MetS in HIV patients. Several studies have investigated the pathophysiology of MetS and cardiovascular complications in HIV infection. Evidence shows that both HIV infection per se and HIV-related chronic immune activation despite antiretroviral therapy are critical factors linking MetS and cardiovascular complications. Current epidemiological and pathogenetic data on MetS in HIV infection, prevention strategies and therapeutic options for all MetS components are reviewed in the light of the recent Adult Treatment Panel IV recommendations and the new antiretroviral drugs.

  7. Etiological features of borderline personality related characteristics in a birth cohort of 12-year-old children

    PubMed Central

    BELSKY, DANIEL W.; CASPI, AVSHALOM; ARSENEAULT, LOUISE; BLEIDORN, WIEBKE; FONAGY, PETER; GOODMAN, MARIANNE; HOUTS, RENATE; MOFFITT, TERRIE E.

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that borderline personality related characteristics can be observed in children, and that these characteristics are associated with increased risk for the development of borderline personality disorder. It is not clear whether borderline personality related characteristics in children share etiological features with adult borderline personality disorder. We investigated the etiology of borderline personality related characteristics in a longitudinal cohort study of 1,116 pairs of same-sex twins followed from birth through age 12 years. Borderline personality related characteristics measured at age 12 years were highly heritable, were more common in children who had exhibited poor cognitive function, impulsivity, and more behavioral and emotional problems at age 5 years, and co-occurred with symptoms of conduct disorder, depression, anxiety, and psychosis. Exposure to harsh treatment in the family environment through age 10 years predicted borderline personality related characteristics at age 12 years. This association showed evidence of environmental mediation and was stronger among children with a family history of psychiatric illness, consistent with diathesis–stress models of borderline etiology. Results indicate that borderline personality related characteristics in children share etiological features with borderline personality disorder in adults and suggest that inherited and environmental risk factors make independent and interactive contributions to borderline etiology. PMID:22293008

  8. Etiological features of borderline personality related characteristics in a birth cohort of 12-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Belsky, Daniel W; Caspi, Avshalom; Arseneault, Louise; Bleidorn, Wiebke; Fonagy, Peter; Goodman, Marianne; Houts, Renate; Moffitt, Terrie E

    2012-02-01

    It has been reported that borderline personality related characteristics can be observed in children, and that these characteristics are associated with increased risk for the development of borderline personality disorder. It is not clear whether borderline personality related characteristics in children share etiological features with adult borderline personality disorder. We investigated the etiology of borderline personality related characteristics in a longitudinal cohort study of 1,116 pairs of same-sex twins followed from birth through age 12 years. Borderline personality related characteristics measured at age 12 years were highly heritable, were more common in children who had exhibited poor cognitive function, impulsivity, and more behavioral and emotional problems at age 5 years, and co-occurred with symptoms of conduct disorder, depression, anxiety, and psychosis. Exposure to harsh treatment in the family environment through age 10 years predicted borderline personality related characteristics at age 12 years. This association showed evidence of environmental mediation and was stronger among children with a family history of psychiatric illness, consistent with diathesis-stress models of borderline etiology. Results indicate that borderline personality related characteristics in children share etiological features with borderline personality disorder in adults and suggest that inherited and environmental risk factors make independent and interactive contributions to borderline etiology.

  9. New Regimens to Prevent Tuberculosis in Adults with HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Martinson, Neil A.; Barnes, Grace L.; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Msandiwa, Reginah; Hausler, Harry; Ram, Malathi; McIntyre, James A.; Gray, Glenda E.; Chaisson, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Treatment of latent tuberculosis in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is efficacious, but few patients around the world receive such treatment. We evaluated three new regimens for latent tuberculosis that may be more potent and durable than standard isoniazid treatment. METHODS We randomly assigned South African adults with HIV infection and a positive tuberculin skin test who were not taking antiretroviral therapy to receive rifapentine (900 mg) plus isoniazid (900 mg) weekly for 12 weeks, rifampin (600 mg) plus isoniazid (900 mg) twice weekly for 12 weeks, isoniazid (300 mg) daily for up to 6 years (continuous isoniazid), or isoniazid (300 mg) daily for 6 months (control group). The primary end point was tuberculosis-free survival. RESULTS The 1148 patients had a median age of 30 years and a median CD4 cell count of 484 per cubic millimeter. Incidence rates of active tuberculosis or death were 3.1 per 100 person-years in the rifapentine–isoniazid group, 2.9 per 100 person-years in the rifampin–isoniazid group, and 2.7 per 100 person-years in the continuous-isoniazid group, as compared with 3.6 per 100 person-years in the control group (P>0.05 for all comparisons). Serious adverse reactions were more common in the continuous-isoniazid group (18.4 per 100 person-years) than in the other treatment groups (8.7 to 15.4 per 100 person-years). Two of 58 isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (3.4%) were found to have multidrug resistance. CONCLUSIONS On the basis of the expected rates of tuberculosis in this population of HIV-infected adults, all secondary prophylactic regimens were effective. Neither a 3-month course of intermittent rifapentine or rifampin with isoniazid nor continuous isoniazid was superior to 6 months of isoniazid. PMID:21732833

  10. Revised surveillance case definitions for HIV infection among adults, adolescents, and children aged <18 months and for HIV infection and AIDS among children aged 18 months to <13 years--United States, 2008.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Eileen; Whitmore, Suzanne; Glynn, Kathleen M; Dominguez, Kenneth; Mitsch, Andrew; McKenna, Matthew T

    2008-12-05

    For adults and adolescents (i.e., persons aged >/=13 years), the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection classification system and the surveillance case definitions for HIV infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have been revised and combined into a single case definition for HIV infection. In addition, the HIV infection case definition for children aged <13 years and the AIDS case definition for children aged 18 months to <13 years have been revised. No changes have been made to the HIV infection classification system, the 24 AIDS-defining conditions for children aged <13 years, or the AIDS case definition for children aged <18 months. These case definitions are intended for public health surveillance only and not as a guide for clinical diagnosis. Public health surveillance data are used primarily for monitoring the HIV epidemic and for planning on a population level, not for making clinical decisions for individual patients. CDC and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists recommend that all states and territories conduct case surveillance of HIV infection and AIDS using the 2008 surveillance case definitions, effective immediately.

  11. Cancer and HIV infection in referral hospitals from four West African countries.

    PubMed

    Jaquet, Antoine; Odutola, Michael; Ekouevi, Didier K; Tanon, Aristophane; Oga, Emmanuel; Akakpo, Jocelyn; Charurat, Manhattan; Zannou, Marcel D; Eholie, Serge P; Sasco, Annie J; Bissagnene, Emmanuel; Adebamowo, Clement; Dabis, Francois

    2015-12-01

    The consequences of the HIV epidemic on cancer epidemiology are sparsely documented in Africa. We aimed to estimate the association between HIV infection and selected types of cancers among patients hospitalized for cancer in four West African countries. A case-referent study was conducted in referral hospitals of Benin, Côte d'Ivoire, Nigeria and Togo. Each participating clinical ward included all adult patients seeking care with a confirmed diagnosis of cancer. All patients were systematically screened for HIV infection. HIV prevalence of AIDS-defining and some non-AIDS defining cancers (Hodgkin lymphoma, leukemia, liver, lung, skin, pharynx, larynx, oral cavity and anogenital cancers) were compared to a referent group of cancers reported in the literature as not associated with HIV. Odds ratios adjusted on age, gender and lifetime number of sexual partners (aOR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. Among the 1644 cancer patients enrolled, 184 (11.2%) were identified as HIV-infected. The HIV prevalence in the referent group (n=792) was 4.4% [CI 3.0-5.8]. HIV infection was associated with Kaposi sarcoma (aOR 34.6 [CI: 17.3-69.0]), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (aOR 3.6 [CI 1.9-6.8]), cervical cancer (aOR 4.3 [CI 2.2-8.3]), anogenital cancer (aOR 17.7 [CI 6.9-45.2]) and squamous cell skin carcinoma (aOR 5.2 [CI 2.0-14.4]). A strong association is now reported between HIV infection and Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers including cervical cancer and anogenital cancer. As these cancers are amenable to prevention strategies, screening of HPV-related cancers among HIV-infected persons is of paramount importance in this African context.

  12. Cancer and HIV infection in referral hospitals from four West African countries

    PubMed Central

    Jaquet, Antoine; Odutola, Michael; Ekouevi, Didier K; Tanon, Aristophane; Oga, Emmanuel; Akakpo, Jocelyn; Charurat, Manhattan; Zannou, Marcel D; Eholie, Serge P; Sasco, Annie J; Bissagnene, Emmanuel; Adebamowo, Clement; Dabis, Francois

    2015-01-01

    The consequences of the HIV epidemic on cancer epidemiology are sparsely documented in Africa. We aimed to estimate the association between HIV infection and selected types of cancers among patients hospitalized for cancer in four West African countries. A case-referent study was conducted in referral hospitals of Benin, Côte d'Ivoire, Nigeria and Togo. Each participating clinical ward included all adult patients seeking care with a confirmed diagnosis of cancer. All patients were systematically screened for HIV infection. HIV prevalence of AIDS-defining and some non-AIDS defining cancers (Hodgkin lymphoma, leukaemia, liver, lung, skin, pharynx, larynx, oral cavity and anogenital cancers) were compared to a referent group of cancers reported in the literature as not associated with HIV. Odds ratios adjusted on age, gender and lifetime number of sexual partners (aOR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. Among the 1,644 cancer patients enrolled, 184 (11.2%) were identified as HIV-infected. The HIV prevalence in the referent group (n=792) was 4.4% [CI 3.0–5.8]. HIV infection was associated with Kaposi sarcoma (aOR 34.6 [CI: 17.3–69.0]), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (aOR 3.6 [CI 1.9–6.8]), cervical cancer (aOR 4.3 [CI 2.2–8.3]), anogenital cancer (aOR 17.7 [CI 6.9–45.2]) and squamous cell skin carcinoma (aOR 5.2 [CI 2.0–14.4]). A strong association is now reported between HIV infection and Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers including cervical cancer and anogenital cancer. As these cancers are amenable to prevention strategies, screening of HPV-related cancers among HIV-infected persons is of paramount importance in this African context. PMID:26375806

  13. Association of HIV Infection and HIV/HCV Coinfection With C-Reactive Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    Reingold, Jason S.; Wanke, Christine; Kotler, Donald P.; Lewis, Cora E.; Tracy, Russell; Heymsfield, Steven; Tien, Phyllis C.; Bacchetti, Peter; Scherzer, Rebecca; Grunfeld, Carl; Shlipak, Michael G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Inflammation is a potential mechanism to explain the accelerated atherosclerosis observed in HIV- and hepatitis C virus (HCV)–infected persons. We evaluated C-reactive protein (CRP) in HIV-infected and HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals in the era of effective antiretroviral (ARV) therapy. Design Cross-sectional study of Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV Infection (FRAM) cohort and controls from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study. Methods CRP levels were measured in 1135 HIV-infected participants from the FRAM cohort and 281 controls from the CARDIA study. The associations of HIV and HIV/HCV infection with CRP levels were estimated by multivariable linear regression. Results Compared with controls, HIV monoinfection was associated with an 88% higher CRP level in men (P < 0.0001) but with no difference in women (5%; P = 0.80) in multivariate analysis. CRP levels were not associated with ARV therapy, HIV RNA level, or CD4 cell count. Compared with controls, HIV/HCV coinfection was associated with a 41% lower CRP level in women (P = 0.012) but with no difference in men (+4%; P = 0.90). Among HIV-infected participants, HCV coinfection was associated with 50% lower CRP levels after multivariable analysis (P < 0.0001) in men and women. Greater visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) were strongly associated with CRP levels. Among HIV- infected participants, CRP levels were 17% (P < 0.001) and 21% (P = 0.002) higher per doubling of VAT and SAT; among controls, CRP levels were 34% (P < 0.001) and 61% (P = 0.009) higher, respectively. Conclusions In the absence of HCV coinfection, HIV infection is associated with higher CRP levels in men. HCV coinfection is associated with lower CRP levels in men and women. PMID:18344877

  14. [The epidemiological characteristics of HIV infection in Turkmenistan].

    PubMed

    Illiev, S Kh; Gaipova, M B; Karmanova, G A

    1999-01-01

    In the presence of the low spread of HIV infection a sharp increase in sexually transmitted diseases is noted. Nevertheless, taking into account a rise in STD, the reality of the potential risk of the spread of HIV is emphasized. Thus, in 1996 morbidity is syphilis was found to grow 7.2 times in comparison with 1992, amounting to 37.5 cases per 100,000 of the population; morbidity in gonorrhea amounted to 32.4 cases per 100,000 of the population with the proportion coming to medical institutions not exceeding 30%. A high proportion of hepatitis B virus carriers was also established (from 15% to 30% of healthy persons), while morbidity in virus hepatitides rose twofold for the period of 1994-1995. During recent years the service for the prophylaxis of AIDS was noted to considerably decrease measures on mass screening. At the same time the article attracts attention to the necessity of increasing the work on the dissemination of information and education on HIV/AIDS drug among addicts, prostitutes and homosexuals. The Draft National Program of the Prophylaxis of HIV infection and STD for 1998-2002 has been worked out. Great importance of methodological and financial assistance rendered since 1994 by international organizations, including WHO, UNFPA, etc., have been emphasized.

  15. Readmissions in HIV-Infected Inpatients: A Large Cohort Analysis.

    PubMed

    Feller, Daniel J; Akiyama, Matthew J; Gordon, Peter; Agins, Bruce D

    2016-04-01

    Hospital readmissions impose considerable physical and psychological hardships on patients and represent a high, but possibly preventable, cost for insurers and hospitals alike. The objective of this study was to identify patient characteristics associated with 30-day readmission among persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH) using a statewide administrative database and to characterize the movement of patients between facilities. Retrospective cohort analysis of HIV-infected individuals in New York State using a comprehensive, all-payer database. All hospitals in New York State. HIV-infected adults admitted to a medical service in 2012. PLWH identified using International Classification of Disease (ICD)-9 diagnosis codes 042 and V08. Of 23,544 index hospitalizations, 21.8% (5121) resulted in readmission. Multivariable predictors of readmission included insurance status, housing instability, psychoses, multiple comorbid chronic conditions, substance use, and past inpatient and emergency department visits. Over 30% of readmissions occurred at a different facility than that of the initial hospitalization. A number of patient characteristics were independently associated with hospital readmission within 30 days. Behavioral health disorders and comorbid conditions may be the strongest predictors of readmission in PLWH. Readmissions, especially those in urban areas, often result in fragmented care which may compromise the quality of care and result in harmful discontinuity of medical treatment.

  16. How can we better identify early HIV infections?

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Nora E.; Pilcher, Christopher D.; Busch, Michael P.; Cohen, Myron S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Detection of early HIV infections (EHIs), including acute HIV infection (AHI), is important for individual health, prevention of HIV transmission, and measurement of HIV incidence. We describe markers of EHI, diagnostic strategies for detecting these markers, and ways to incorporate these strategies into diagnostic and HIV incidence algorithms. Recent findings For individual diagnosis in the United States and Europe, laboratory-based diagnostic algorithms increasingly incorporate fourth-generation HIV antigen tests, allowing for earlier detection. In some sub-Saharan African settings, symptom-based screening is being explored to identify subsets of persons at high risk for AHI. Point-of-care diagnostics designed for AHI detection are in the pipeline and, if validated, represent an opportunity for real-time AHI diagnosis. At the population level, multiassay algorithms are promising new strategies for estimating HIV incidence on the basis of several assays applied to cross-sectional samples. These algorithms can be developed to optimize performance, in addition to cost and logistical considerations. Summary There are important recent advances in detection of EHIs at the individual and population levels. Applying optimal combinations of tests in diagnostic and HIV incidence algorithms is urgently needed to support the multiple goals derived from enhanced detection and discrimination of EHIs. PMID:25389806

  17. Clinical manifestations and outcome in HIV-infected young infants presenting with acute illness in Durban, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Jeena, P M; Reichert, K; Adhikari, M; Popat, M; Carlin, J B; Weber, M W; Hamer, D H

    2011-01-01

    In young infants, early development of symptomatic HIV infection increases the risk of morbidity and mortality. A prospective study was conducted over a 1-year period in a region with a high burden of HIV in order to describe the clinical presentation of HIV infection in infants aged between 0 and 59 days on attendance at hospital and the factors associated with the need for urgent hospital management. Sick young infants presenting to the King Edward VIII Hospital, Durban between February 2003 and January 2004 were enrolled. After systematic evaluation by a primary health worker, an experienced paediatrician determined the primary diagnosis and need for urgent hospital management. Comparisons of these assessments were stratified by HIV status. Children were classified as HIV-uninfected (HIV ELISA-negative), HIV-exposed-but-uninfected (HIV ELISA-positive and HIV RNA PCR-negative), HIV-infected (HIV ELISA-positive and HIV viral load >400 copies/ml). Of 925 infants enrolled, 652 (70·5%) had their HIV status determined: 70 (10·7%) were HIV-infected, 271 (41·6%) HIV-exposed-but-uninfected, and 311 (47·7%) HIV-uninfected. Factors associated with an increased probability of being HIV-infected included if the mother had children from more than one sexual partner, if the infant had had contact with a tuberculosis-infected person or if the HIV-infected mother and/or her exposed infant failed to receive nevirapine prophylaxis. Signs of severe illness were more frequently encountered in HIV-infected than in HIV-exposed-but-uninfected infants, including the prevalence of chest in-drawing (20·3% vs 8·8%, p = 0·004) and severe skin pustules (18·6% vs 8·6%, p = 0·01). Among infants requiring urgent hospital management, observed or reported feeding difficulties and severe skin pustules were more common in HIV-infected than uninfected infants. More HIV-infected infants (12·9%) required hospitalisation than those who were HIV-exposed-but-uninfected (7·7%) or uninfected

  18. Pattern, Clinical Characteristics, and Outcome of Meningitis among HIV-Infected Adults Admitted in a Tertiary Hospital in North Western Tanzania: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Limited information exists on the etiologies, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of meningitis among HIV-infected patients in Africa. We conducted a study to determine the etiology, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of meningitis among HIV-infected adults. Methods. A prospective cross-sectional hospital based study was conducted among HIV-infected patients aged ≥18 years admitted to the medical wards with symptoms and signs of meningitis. Sociodemographic and clinical information were collected using a standardized data collection tool. Lumbar puncture was performed to all patients; cerebrospinal fluid samples were sent for analysis. Results. Among 60 HIV-infected adults clinically diagnosed to have meningitis, 55 had CSF profiles consistent with meningitis. Of these, 14 (25.5%) had a laboratory-confirmed etiology while 41 (74.5%) had no isolate identified. Cryptococcus neoformans was the commonest cause of meningitis occurring in 11 (18.3%) of patients followed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (6.7%). The in-hospital mortality was 20/55 (36.4%). Independent predictors of mortality were low baseline CD4 count and turbid CSF appearance. Conclusion. Cryptococcal meningitis is the most prevalent laboratory-confirmed etiological agent among adult HIV-infected patients with suspected meningitis admitted to medical wards in Western Tanzania. Mortality rate in this population remains unacceptably high. Improving diagnostic capacity and early treatment may help to decrease the mortality rate. PMID:27651801

  19. Widespread Colonization of the Lung by Tropheryma whipplei in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lozupone, Catherine; Cota-Gomez, Adela; Palmer, Brent E.; Linderman, Derek J.; Charlson, Emily S.; Sodergren, Erica; Mitreva, Makedonka; Abubucker, Sahar; Martin, John; Yao, Guohui; Campbell, Thomas B.; Flores, Sonia C.; Ackerman, Gail; Stombaugh, Jesse; Ursell, Luke; Beck, James M.; Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Young, Vincent B.; Lynch, Susan V.; Huang, Laurence; Weinstock, George M.; Knox, Kenneth S.; Twigg, Homer; Morris, Alison; Ghedin, Elodie; Bushman, Frederic D.; Collman, Ronald G.; Knight, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Lung infections caused by opportunistic or virulent pathogens are a principal cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV infection. It is unknown whether HIV infection leads to changes in basal lung microflora, which may contribute to chronic pulmonary complications that increasingly are being recognized in individuals infected with HIV. Objectives: To determine whether the immunodeficiency associated with HIV infection resulted in alteration of the lung microbiota. Methods: We used 16S ribosomal RNA targeted pyrosequencing and shotgun metagenomic sequencing to analyze bacterial gene sequences in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and mouths of 82 HIV-positive and 77 HIV-negative subjects. Measurements and Main Results: Sequences representing Tropheryma whipplei, the etiologic agent of Whipple’s disease, were significantly more frequent in BAL of HIV-positive compared with HIV-negative individuals. T. whipplei dominated the community (>50% of sequence reads) in 11 HIV-positive subjects, but only 1 HIV-negative individual (13.4 versus 1.3%; P = 0.0018). In 30 HIV-positive individuals sampled longitudinally, antiretroviral therapy resulted in a significantly reduced relative abundance of T. whipplei in the lung. Shotgun metagenomic sequencing was performed on eight BAL samples dominated by T. whipplei 16S ribosomal RNA. Whole genome assembly of pooled reads showed that uncultured lung-derived T. whipplei had similar gene content to two isolates obtained from subjects with Whipple’s disease. Conclusions: Asymptomatic subjects with HIV infection have unexpected colonization of the lung by T. whipplei, which is reduced by effective antiretroviral therapy and merits further study for a potential pathogenic role in chronic pulmonary complications of HIV infection. PMID:23392441

  20. Memory Impairment in HIV-Infected Individuals with Early and Late Initiation of Regular Marijuana Use.

    PubMed

    Skalski, Linda M; Towe, Sheri L; Sikkema, Kathleen J; Meade, Christina S

    2017-09-07

    Marijuana use is disproportionately prevalent among HIV-infected individuals. The strongest neurocognitive effect of marijuana use is impairment in the domain of memory. Memory impairment is also high among HIV-infected persons. The present study examined 69 HIV-infected individuals who were stratified by age of regular marijuana initiation to investigate how marijuana use impacts neurocognitive functioning. A comprehensive battery assessed substance use and neurocognitive functioning. Findings indicated early onset marijuana users (regular use prior to age 18), compared to non-marijuana users and late onset marijuana users (regular use at age 18 or later), were over 8 times more likely to have learning impairment and nearly 4 times more likely to have memory impairment. A similar pattern of early onset marijuana users performing worse in learning emerged when examining domain deficit scores. The potential for early onset of regular marijuana use to exacerbate already high levels of memory impairment among HIV-infected persons has important clinical implications, including increased potential for medication non-adherence and difficulty with independent living.

  1. Bloodstream infections in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Taramasso, Lucia; Tatarelli, Paola; Di Biagio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the combined antiretroviral therapy era, HIV-infected patients remain a vulnerable population for the onset of bloodstream infections (BSI). Worldwide, nontyphoid salmonellae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative staphylococci are the most important pathogens. Intravenous catheter associated infection, skin-soft tissue infection and endocarditis are associated with Gram-positive bacteremia. Among the Gram-negative, nontyphoidal Salmonella have been previously correlated to sepsis. Other causes of BSI in HIV-infected patients are mycobacteria and fungi. Mycobacteria constitute a major cause of BSI in limited resource countries. Fungal BSI are not frequent and among them Cryptococcus neoformans is the most common life-threatening infection. The degree of immunosuppression remains the key prognostic factor leading to the development of BSI. PMID:26950194

  2. [Endocrine abnormalities in HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Kedzia, Agnieszka; Krupej-Kedzierska, Joanna; Okopień, Bogusław

    2013-01-01

    HIV infection is associated with a number of adverse consequences, including endocrine disorders. The endocrine changes associated with HIV infection have been studied in depth and, as the results of so far carried out studies suggest, their aetiology is usually multifactoral. Their pathogenesis includes direct infection of endocrine glands by HIV or opportunistic organisms, infiltration by neoplasms and adverse effects of drugs. Endocrine problems that most frequently affect this group of patients include: hypogonadism, adrenal insufficiency, thyroid disorders, impaired growth hormone release, lipodystrophy and bone loss. They may develop in both the early as well as late stages of the infection, ranging from subclinical disturbances to overt endocrine symptoms. The purpose of this paper is to review the aetiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of HIV-associated endocrine disturbances with a special emphasis on the most recent literature.

  3. Sleep disturbance in early HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Darko, D F; Mitler, M M; White, J L

    1995-10-01

    Immune proteins may have a role in HIV-related sleep disturbance. Observations of two notable sleep changes, increase in slow wave sleep and the need for too much sleep, during early stage HIV infection prompted researchers to investigate the neurological changes occurring with sleep structure alterations. When psychiatric, psychological, medical, and pharmacological variables are excluded, researchers begin to examine the effect of HIV infection on the brain itself. While reasons for sleep structure distortion remain unknown, new data suggests that irregular levels of peptides may be involved. Upcoming clinical trials will evaluate medications for efficacy in treating HIV-related sleep disturbance. This could lead to therapies that restore sleep and improve quality of life.

  4. Bloodstream infections in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Taramasso, Lucia; Tatarelli, Paola; Di Biagio, Antonio

    2016-04-02

    In the combined antiretroviral therapy era, HIV-infected patients remain a vulnerable population for the onset of bloodstream infections (BSI). Worldwide, nontyphoid salmonellae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative staphylococci are the most important pathogens. Intravenous catheter associated infection, skin-soft tissue infection and endocarditis are associated with Gram-positive bacteremia. Among the Gram-negative, nontyphoidal Salmonella have been previously correlated to sepsis. Other causes of BSI in HIV-infected patients are mycobacteria and fungi. Mycobacteria constitute a major cause of BSI in limited resource countries. Fungal BSI are not frequent and among them Cryptococcus neoformans is the most common life-threatening infection. The degree of immunosuppression remains the key prognostic factor leading to the development of BSI.

  5. Immigration and HIV infection: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Loue, S; Oppenheim, S

    1994-02-01

    This pilot study was conducted to determine areas in which additional education regarding the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is needed by the undocumented and recently immigrated HIV-infected population, and to obtain preliminary information on the ability of this community to access medical treatment for HIV. Information regarding health status, immigration status, and the use of medical services was obtained from all HIV-infected undocumented and recently immigrated individuals who sought services from a Southern California nonprofit agency between July 1, 1990 and December 31, 1990. A total of 54 such individuals presented for services. Thirteen individuals reported participating in shared needle usage for the administration of medication or vitamins, in addition to other known risk factors for HIV. Only one of these 13 individuals had access to nonemergency medical care. Additional research is necessary to determine the reasons for these needle sharing behaviors. Educational outreach is needed to address these behaviors as a possible risk factor for HIV transmission.

  6. HIV Infection Linked to Injection Use of Oxymorphone in Indiana, 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Peters, Philip J; Pontones, Pamela; Hoover, Karen W; Patel, Monita R; Galang, Romeo R; Shields, Jessica; Blosser, Sara J; Spiller, Michael W; Combs, Brittany; Switzer, William M; Conrad, Caitlin; Gentry, Jessica; Khudyakov, Yury; Waterhouse, Dorothy; Owen, S Michele; Chapman, Erika; Roseberry, Jeremy C; McCants, Veronica; Weidle, Paul J; Broz, Dita; Samandari, Taraz; Mermin, Jonathan; Walthall, Jennifer; Brooks, John T; Duwve, Joan M

    2016-07-21

    In January 2015, a total of 11 new diagnoses of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection were reported in a small community in Indiana. We investigated the extent and cause of the outbreak and implemented control measures. We identified an outbreak-related case as laboratory-confirmed HIV infection newly diagnosed after October 1, 2014, in a person who either resided in Scott County, Indiana, or was named by another case patient as a syringe-sharing or sexual partner. HIV polymerase (pol) sequences from case patients were phylogenetically analyzed, and potential risk factors associated with HIV infection were ascertained. From November 18, 2014, to November 1, 2015, HIV infection was diagnosed in 181 case patients. Most of these patients (87.8%) reported having injected the extended-release formulation of the prescription opioid oxymorphone, and 92.3% were coinfected with hepatitis C virus. Among 159 case patients who had an HIV type 1 pol gene sequence, 157 (98.7%) had sequences that were highly related, as determined by phylogenetic analyses. Contact tracing investigations led to the identification of 536 persons who were named as contacts of case patients; 468 of these contacts (87.3%) were located, assessed for risk, tested for HIV, and, if infected, linked to care. The number of times a contact was named as a syringe-sharing partner by a case patient was significantly associated with the risk of HIV infection (adjusted risk ratio for each time named, 1.9; P<0.001). In response to this outbreak, a public health emergency was declared on March 26, 2015, and a syringe-service program in Indiana was established for the first time. Injection-drug use of extended-release oxymorphone within a network of persons who inject drugs in Indiana led to the introduction and rapid transmission of HIV. (Funded by the state government of Indiana and others.).

  7. Fatal disseminated toxoplasmosis during primary HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Signorini, Liana; Gulletta, Maurizio; Coppini, Davide; Donzelli, Carla; Stellini, Roberto; Manca, Nino; Carosi, Giampiero; Matteelli, Alberto

    2007-03-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a well recognized manifestation of AIDS, but the disseminated disease is a rare condition and it has not been associated to HIV seroconversion to our knowledge. We describe a fatal episode of disseminated T. gondii acute infection with massive organ involvement during primary HIV infection. The serological data demonstrate primary T. gondii infection. The avidity index for HIV antibodies supports recent HIV-1 infection.

  8. Impact of HIV infection on cardiac deformation.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Lígia; Silva, Daniela; Miranda, Carla; Sá, Joana; Duque, Luís; Duarte, Nelson; Brito, Paula; Bernardino, Leonel; Poças, José

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to detect abnormalities in left ventricular myocardial function due to HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection without established cardiovascular disease. An echocardiogram was performed in 50 asymptomatic HIV-infected patients (age 41 ± 6 years, 64% male) and in 20 healthy individuals. Conventional echocardiography and pulsed tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) were performed according to the guidelines. The strain rate of the basal segments was obtained with color tissue Doppler and used to evaluate systolic strain rate (SRS), early diastolic strain rate (SRE) and late diastolic strain rate (SRA). Longitudinal, radial and circumferential strain were assessed by 2D speckle tracking. The mean duration of HIV infection was 10 ± 5 years, CD4 count was 579 ± 286 cells/mm³, 32% had detectable viral load, and 86% were under treatment. Of the HIV-infected patients, one had grade 1 diastolic dysfunction. The groups were not different except for E wave (HIV 0.72 ± 0.17 m/s vs. control 0.84 ± 0.16 m/s, p=0.01), longitudinal strain (-19.5 ± 1.9% vs. -21 ± 2%, p=0.005), SRS (-1.1 ± 0.28 s⁻¹ vs. -1.3 ± 0.28 s⁻¹, p=0.02) and SRE (1.8 ± 0.4 s⁻¹ vs. 2.2 ± 0.4 s⁻¹, p<0.001), but only SRS (p=0.03, 95% CI 0.036; 0.67) and SRE (p=0.001, 95% CI -0.599; -0.168) had independent value. In an HIV-infected population without established cardiovascular disease, myocardial deformation abnormalities can be detected with strain and strain rate, revealing markers of myocardial injury. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. Bacterial infections in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Berger, B J; Hussain, F; Roistacher, K

    1994-06-01

    Although the original opportunistic pathogens described in AIDS were protozoal and fungal organisms, bacterial infections are now recognized with increased prevalence and altered expression in patients with HIV infection. Especially since populations outside of North America and populations of i.v. drug abusers have been studied, bacterial infections have been shown to cause substantially increased morbidity and mortality both early and late in the course of HIV infection. Just as strategies have been developed for primary and secondary prophylaxis of classical HIV-related opportunistic infections, prevention of bacterial complications should be a high priority. Good hygiene and avoidance of unsterile needles in illicit drug use, tattooing, ear-piercing, or other cosmetic or ritual activities should be emphasized in patient education. Patients should be counseled to avoid uncooked or poorly cooked eggs and poultry and to avoid unpasteurized milk products. Pneumococcal vaccine is recommended for all HIV-seropositive patients and should be given as early as possible after recognition of HIV infection for maximal efficacy. Influenza vaccine is also recommended. It may have a role in preventing bacterial pneumonia secondary to influenza. Patient management should include regular dental care and nutritional evaluation. The use of intravenous or central catheters should be limited to essential therapies. When patients present with new febrile illness, a high index of suspicion for invasive bacterial disease is appropriate. The signs of serious bacterial infection in HIV-positive patients are subtle. Diagnostic evaluation should include cultures of blood and other relevant clinical specimens. Empiric antimicrobial therapy based on the clinical presentation may be life saving in patients with invasive bacterial disease complicating HIV infection.

  10. Cardiac manifestations in HIV infected children.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pradeep; Hemal, Alok; Agarwal, Sheetal; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-03-01

    To determine the occurrence of cardiac involvement in HIV infected children and describe its spectrum using non-invasive tests like ECG and 2-Dimensional Echocardiography (2-D ECHO). A cross sectional observational study was carried out on 100 HIV infected children between 1 and 18 y of age. The various cardiac manifestations were determined clinically, by electrocardiogram (ECG) and 2-D echocardiography. Seventy four percent of the patients were males with a mean age of 9.62 ± 3.62 y. Seventy seven percent children were in WHO stage I. Sixty five percent did not have significant immune suppression. Eighty six percent children were on HAART (mean duration- 35.12 ± 29.48 mo). Fifty nine percent of children were symptomatic and only nine patients were clinically suspected to have cardiac involvement. ECG abnormalities were found in 14 % cases. The most common abnormal echocardiographic finding was left ventricular diastolic dysfunction by tissue Doppler (E/E') observed in 64 % cases followed by systolic dysfunction (37 %), abnormal left ventricular mass (29 %), pericardial effusion (2 %) and dilated cardiomyopathy (2 %); 64.2 % cases with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) were in WHO stage III. Involvement of heart in HIV/AIDS is mostly subclinical. HIV myocarditis produces systolic as well as diastolic dysfunction. At present, echocardiography remains the only tool for identifying heart involvement in HIV-infected children. Early diagnosis and intervention may halt the progression of the disease, thereby preventing morbidity and mortality.

  11. New Antiretroviral Therapies for Pediatric HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Jennifer L.; Kraus, Donna M.

    2005-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome affect millions of children worldwide. The development of antiretroviral therapy has significantly improved the morbidity and mortality of pediatric patients infected with HIV. Currently, 4 classes of antiretroviral agents exist: nucleoside / nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors, and entry inhibitors. A total of 21 single-entity antiretroviral agents and 4 co-formulated antiretroviral products hold Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for treatment of HIV-1 infection. However, not all of these agents are indicated for use in patients less than 18 years of age. Since the year 2000, 7 new antiretroviral agents (atazanavir, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, fosamprenavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, tenofovir, and tipranavir) have been approved by the FDA for use in adult patients as part of combination therapy for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Although only 3 of these newer agents (emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, and lopinavir/ritonavir) are currently FDA approved for use in pediatric patients, pediatric clinical studies of the other 4 new agents are currently underway. The purpose of this article is to review these 7 new antiretroviral agents and describe their roles in the treatment of pediatric HIV infection. For each drug, the following information will be addressed: FDA-approved indication and age groups, clinical efficacy, pharmacokinetics, adverse drug reactions, clinically relevant drug interactions, pediatric and adult dosing, dosage forms, administration, and place in the treatment of pediatric HIV infection. PMID:23118639

  12. [Cerebral toxoplasmosis in HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Peregudova, A B; Shakhgil'dian, V I; Goncharov, D B; Ermak, T N; Tishkevich, I M; Shipulina, O Iu; Gorlova, N V; Gruzdev, B M

    2007-01-01

    To detect clinical characteristics of cerebral toxoplasmosis in HIV-infected patients, to clarify diagnostic role of detection of DNA and antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood. Diagnostic procedures were performed in 156 patients with HIV infection at the stage IVB (AIDS) in 2003-2006. All the patients suffered from diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). Toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in 57 (36%) cases. Lumbar puncture, MR imaging of the brain, reaction of indirect immunofluorescence, polymerase chain reaction and enzyme immunoassay were made to identify IgM and IgG to T. gondii. Typical for HIV-infected patients with cerebral toxoplasmosis were focal symptoms of CNS affection, hemipareses, adynamia, mental disorders, intoxication symptoms. MR imaging data are very important. Toxoplastosis is characterized by multiple destructive foci in the hemispheres and cerebellum with great amount of the parasites along the periphery of brain tissue necrosis. Detection of the infective agent DNA and specific IgG antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid confirms the presence of toxoplasmosis but sensitivity of the markers is low. IgG antibodies to T. gondii have diagnostic implications if they occur in high and moderate titers.

  13. Treatment interruptions in HIV-infected subjects.

    PubMed

    Bongiovanni, Marco; Casana, Maddalena; Tincati, Camilla; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella

    2006-09-01

    Despite a high antiviral efficacy, the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in clinical practice is often impaired by the long-term toxicity of antiretroviral treatment, the increased rate of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) drug resistance in treated patients and the cost of therapies, so that possible interruption of HAART has to be considered as part of the current clinical practice. However, this strategy is usually followed by a rapid viral rebound with a substantial loss of CD4 T lymphocytes because the HIV suppression with HAART does not result in reconstitution of the HIV-specific immune response. Structured treatment interruption (STI) has already been investigated in HIV-infected subjects with well-controlled viral replication (initiating treatment during primary or chronic HIV infection) and in those with multiple treatment failures. A clear benefit of STI in patients with chronic infection remains controversial and these benefits are more often observed in patients starting treatment during primary HIV infection.

  14. B-cell responses to HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Moir, Susan; Fauci, Anthony S

    2017-01-01

    The induction of neutralizing antibodies directed against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has received considerable attention in recent years, in part driven by renewed interest and opportunities for antibody-based strategies for prevention such as passive transfer of antibodies and the development of preventive vaccines, as well as immune-based therapeutic interventions. Advances in the ability to screen, isolate, and characterize HIV-specific antibodies have led to the identification of a new generation of potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). The majority of these antibodies have been isolated from B cells of chronically HIV-infected individuals with detectable viremia. In this review, we provide insight into the phenotypic and functional attributes of human B cells, with a focus on HIV-specific memory B cells and plasmablasts/cells that are responsible for sustaining humoral immune responses against HIV. We discuss the abnormalities in B cells that occur in HIV infection both in the peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues, especially in the setting of persisting viremia. Finally, we consider the opportunities and drawbacks of intensively interrogating antibodies isolated from HIV-infected individuals to guide strategies aimed at developing effective antibody-based vaccine and therapeutic interventions for HIV. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Fosamprenavir calcium plus ritonavir for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Torres, Harrys A; Arduino, Roberto C

    2007-06-01

    Fosamprenavir is a protease inhibitor (PI) approved for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Fosamprenavir is a prodrug of amprenavir developed to reduce the pill burden yet maintain the unique resistance pattern and efficacy associated with amprenavir. In a head-to-head, noninferiority trial in antiretroviral treatment-naive HIV-infected patients, the antiviral efficacy and tolerability of ritonavir-boosted fosamprenavir was not inferior to ritonavir-boosted lopinavir, when the PIs were combined with two other nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. There are fewer studies published about fosamprenavir use in antiretroviral treatment-experienced HIV-infected patients. The high genetic barrier to the development of resistance to fosamprenavir and the low level of cross-resistance between ritonavir-boosted fosamprenavir and other PI regimens are notable. As with amprenavir, gastrointestinal disturbance and rash are the most frequent short-term treatment-limiting events with fosamprenavir. Treatment with ritonavir-boosted fosamprenavir can produce a durable response. To date, fosamprenavir is one of the recommended preferred PI components for the treatment of antiretroviral-naive HIV-infected patients.

  16. [HIV infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, J

    1997-05-01

    On June 4, 1981, MMWR published a report about Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in homosexual men in Los Angeles. This was the first published report. A years later, this disease was named acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In the following year, Montangier et al in France discovered the causative agent, which they called lymphadenopathy virus (LAV), now known as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In 1985, solid-phase enzymeimmunoassay for the detection of the antibody to HIV was developed. Since then, other new techniques for the identification of HIV infection have been become available. These include more sensitive methods (for example; polymerase chain reaction techniques). Although these techniques facilitate early and definite diagnosis of infection, these tests may fail to detect the antibody in sera during window period of infection or overdiagnose infection in sera contaminated with genes not related to HIV. Although preventing blood exposure is the primary means of preventing occupationally acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, appropriate post-exposure management is an important element of workplace safety. Information suggesting that zidovudine (ZDV) postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) may reduce the risk for HIV transmission after occupational exposure to HIV infected blood prompted a Public Health Service (PHS) interagency working group, with expert consultation, and recommendations on PEP and management of occupational exposure to HIV in relation to these findings were discussed.

  17. Projection of HIV infection in Calcutta.

    PubMed

    Basu, A; Basu, S; Chakraborty, M S; Dewanji, A; Ghosh, J K; Majumder, P P

    1998-04-01

    Starting with the base year of 1991, the HIV infection projection for 1992-99 for the total, as well as various high-risk sub-populations of Calcutta, the first of its kind is provided. These projections are based on statistical methodology developed in this paper. Our methodology for spread of HIV infection takes into account various social interactions and practices and also uses available data. Rates of these interactions and practices and estimates of demographic parameters used in making projections were obtained primarily from surveys and census data. Since one of these estimated rates, that of HIV transmission rate through heterosexual encounters between an infected and an uninfected had a large range, we have provided two sets of projections based on the largest of these rates (worst-case scenario) and another that is consistent with the available data. The total projection of the number of HIV infected cases in Calcutta for 1999 is between 49,000 and 1,26,000. Separate projections are also provided for high-risk sub-groups. Among these, the sex workers expectedly will continue to manifest the highest numbers of newly infected cases. The temporal rate of increase in prevalence is projected to be alarmingly higher in the general population than even among sex workers, although the actual prevalence will continue to be the lowest in the general population compared to all other sub-groups of the population.

  18. Disseminated Nontuberculous Mycobacteria in HIV-Infected Patients, Oregon, USA, 2007–2012

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Jennifer H.; Henkle, Emily; Schafer, Sean D.; Winthrop, Kevin L.

    2017-01-01

    We determined disseminated nontuberculous mycobacteria incidence in the HIV-infected population of Oregon, USA, during 2007–2012 by using statewide laboratory surveillance. We identified 37 disseminated nontuberculous mycobacteria cases among 7,349 patients with median annual incidence of 110/100,000 HIV person-years and the highest incidence in those with CD4 counts <50 cells/mm3 (5,300/100,000 person-years). PMID:28221103

  19. [Meta-analysis of HIV infection incidence and risk factors among men who have sex with men in China].

    PubMed

    Feng, Yibing; Bu, Kai; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiayan; Jin, Shanshan; Wang, Lu

    2015-07-01

    To understand the incidence of HIV infection among men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. Meta-analysis was performed to systematically and quantitatively review all the original research papers and reports published during 2010-2015 on the incidence of HIV infection among MSM in China. Pooled incidence, pooled hazard ratios, publication bias, heterogeneity and sensitivity analysis for those studies were calculated or analyzed by using Stata 12.0 software. A total of 24 studies were analyzed. Pooled incidence of HIV infection among MSM in China was 5.0/100 person year; Based on HIV case report, severe epidemic areas had higher HIV incidence than other areas (4.9/100 person year vs. 3.4/100 person year). Low education level (HR = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.21-2.15), syphilis prevalence (HR = 3.22, 95% CI: 2.21-4.70), unprotected anal sex (HR = 2.92, 95% CI: 1.51-5.63), minority ethnic group (HR = 4.01, 95% CI: 1.96-8.21), commercial sex (HR = 4.11, 95% CI: 1.47-11.46) and multiple sexual partners (HR = 2.31, 95% CI: 1.60-3.34) were the risk factors for HIV incidence. Pooled incidence of HIV infection among MSM was 5.0% in China. Low education level, syphilis prevalence, unprotected anal sex, minority ethnic group, commercial sex and multiple sexual partners were the risk factors for HIV infection.

  20. [Cutaneous and oral manifestations in HIV-infected children and adults--169 cases].

    PubMed

    Mihalache, Doina; Luca, V; Nicolau, Cristina; Teodorescu, Irina; Prisăcariu, L J; Macovei, Simona

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate cutaneous and oral manifestations in infected HIV patients. We retrospectively analyzed 169 cases admitted in Infectiouse Disease Department of Iaşi in 2001-2002 period. Cutaneous and oral manifestations were: candidiasis (99 cases), herpes virus infectious (36 cases), scabies and straphylococcal/streptococcal skin disease (26 cases), prurigo nodularis, psoriasis and verruca vulgaris (9 cases). Children of 0-13 year old group was 75.73 percent. Classification of HIV infection was related with CD4 count for 166 cases. Twelve cases with oral pharyngitis candidiasis, scabies and streptococcal skin diseases was 2-3 recurrent episodes of manifestations. Etiotrop treatment was associated with HAART therapy. Cutaneous and oral manifestations are occurred frequently in HIV infected patients, with a various etiology, but the severity, persistence and its evolution did not evaluate.

  1. The immunomodulatory nutritional intervention NR100157 reduced CD4+ T-cell decline and immune activation: a 1-year multicenter randomized controlled double-blind trial in HIV-infected persons not receiving antiretroviral therapy (The BITE Study).

    PubMed

    Cahn, P; Ruxrungtham, K; Gazzard, B; Diaz, R S; Gori, A; Kotler, D P; Vriesema, A; Georgiou, N A; Garssen, J; Clerici, M; Lange, J M A

    2013-07-01

    The immunomodulatory nutritional product NR100157 was developed for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. We hypothesized that targeting the compromised gastrointestinal tract of HIV-infected individuals would result in systemic immunological benefits. In a multicenter, randomized, controlled, double-blind trial, 340 HIV-1-positive adults not on antiretroviral therapy, with CD4(+) T-cell counts <800/µL, were given either NR100157 or an isocaloric and isonitrogenous control for 52 weeks. Primary outcome was CD4(+) T-cell count. Secondary outcomes included plasma viral load (pVL), safety, and tolerability. In a pilot study (n = 20), levels of CD4(+)CD25(+) and CD8(+)CD38(+) activation were measured (n = 20). The trial is registered at the Dutch Trial Register (NTR886) and ISRCTN81868024. At 52 weeks, CD4(+) T-cell decline showed a 40-cell/µL difference (P = .03) in the intention-to-treat population in favor of the immunomodulatory NR100157 (control vs active, -68 ± 15 vs -28 ± 16 cells/µL/year). The change in pVL from baseline was similar between groups (P = .81). In the pilot study, the percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+) was lower in the active group (P < .05) and correlated with changes in CD4(+) T-cell count (r = -0.55, P < .05). The percentage of CD8(+)CD38(+) levels was unaffected. The specific immunonutritional product NR100157 significantly reduces CD4(+) decline in HIV-1-infected individuals, and this is associated with decreased levels of CD4(+)CD25(+). (This nutritional intervention is likely to affect local gut integrity and gut-associated lymphoid tissue homeostasis, which in turn translates positively to systemic effects.) Clinical Trials Registration. ISRCTN81868024.

  2. Clinical management of acute HIV infection: best practice remains unknown.

    PubMed

    Bell, Sigall K; Little, Susan J; Rosenberg, Eric S

    2010-10-15

    Best practice for the clinical management of acute human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection remains unknown. Although some data suggest possible immunologic, virologic, or clinical benefit of early treatment, other studies show no difference in these outcomes over time, after early treatment is discontinued. The literature on acute HIV infection is predominantly small nonrandomized studies, which further limits interpretation. As a result, the physician is left to grapple with these uncertainties while making clinical decisions for patients with acute HIV infection. Here we review the literature, focusing on the potential advantages and disadvantages of treating acute HIV infection outlined in treatment guidelines, and summarize the presentations on clinical management of acute HIV infection from the 2009 Acute HIV Infection Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts.

  3. [HIV subtype in newly reported HIV infected cases in Dehong prefecture of Yunnan province, 2015].

    PubMed

    Duan, X; Wang, K R; Wang, J B; Yang, T; Wang, Y K; Yang, J; Ye, R H; Yang, Y C; Yao, S T; Duan, S; He, N

    2017-08-10

    Objective: To explore the distribution of HIV subtype in newly detected people living with HIV from January to November, 2015 in Dehong Dai and Jingpo Autonomous Prefecture, Yunnan province. Methods: DNA extraction, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for gag, env, and pol amplification and amplification product sequencing were conducted by using plasmas of newly detected HIV-infected persons. The subtypes were confirmed by analyzing the sequences of 3 genes. Results: A total of 963 HIV infection cases were reported during this period, the HIV subtype was confirmed in 499 cases. Unique recombinant form (URF) was the most common subtype (27.1%, 135/499), followed by C (26.7%, 133/499), CRF01_AE (19.2%, 96/499) and others. URF included 4 kinds of combination, of which combination of subtype B and C was most common. HIV subtype distribution differed between the Chinese HIV infection cases and the Burmese HIV infection cases, the proportion of B and C combination was higher in the Chinese cases. Transmission route was the only factor influencing HIV subtype distribution. Conclusions: HIV subtype distribution in Dehong was complex. URF was predominant. The HIV subtype distribution differed between Chinese and Burmese under different transmission route.

  4. HIV-Infected Adolescent, Young Adult and Pregnant Smokers: Important Targets for Effective Tobacco Control Programs

    PubMed Central

    Escota, Gerome; Önen, Nur

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco use is inextricably linked to a number of health risks both in the general and HIV-infected populations. There is, however, a dearth of research on effective tobacco control programs among people living with HIV, and especially among adolescents, young adults and pregnant women, groups with heightened or increased vulnerability secondary to tobacco use. Adolescents and young adults constitute a growing population of persons living with HIV infection. Early and continued tobacco use in this population living with a disease characterized by premature onset multimorbidity and chronic inflammation is of concern. Additionally, there is an increased acuity for tobacco control among HIV-infected pregnant women to reduce pregnancy morbidity and improve fetal outcome. This review will provide an important summary of current knowledge of tobacco use among HIV-infected adolescents, young adults and pregnant women. The effects of tobacco use in these specific populations will be presented and the current state of tobacco control within these populations, assessed. PMID:23778059

  5. Factors influencing intent to get pregnant in HIV-infected women living in the southern USA.

    PubMed

    Sowell, R L; Murdaugh, C L; Addy, C L; Moneyham, L; Tavokoli, A

    2002-04-01

    This descriptive study sought to identify factors that influence HIV-infected women's intent to get pregnant. Interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of n = 322 HIV-infected women at risk for pregnancy. Participants were predominantly African-American (84.4%), single (57.9%), and ranged in age from 17 to 48 years. Forty per cent (n = 128) of the women had been pregnant since becoming HIV-positive. Potential factors influencing intent to get pregnant that were examined included demographic characteristics, HIV-related factors and personal beliefs and attitudes. In simple logistic regression models, younger age, increased motivation for child bearing, decreased perceived threat of HIV, decreased HIV symptomatology, higher traditional gender role orientation, and greater avoidance coping were all associated with greater intent to get pregnant. Following a model selection procedure, motivation for child bearing (OR = 16.05, 95% CI 7.95, 30.41) and traditional sex roles (OR = 4.49, 95% CI 1.44, 13.55) were significantly associated with greater intent to get pregnant. Traditional gender role orientation and motivation for childbearing are significant factors in predicting intent to get pregnant among HIV-infected women. These factors, as well as other non HIV-related factors, need to be routinely assessed by health care providers in developing plans of care for HIV-infected women.

  6. Type of partnership and heterosexual spread of HIV infection in rural Uganda: results from simulation modelling.

    PubMed

    Robinson, N J; Mulder, D; Auvert, B; Whitworth, J; Hayes, R

    1999-11-01

    The objective was to estimate the likely percentage of HIV infections that may be attributable to one-off partnerships (such as those between female sex workers and their clients) and longer-term partnerships in rural Uganda. This was addressed by the application of a microsimulation model (SimulAIDS) of the transmission dynamics of HIV infection, drawing on data from a population cohort of 10,000 in rural Uganda. For a scenario reproducing documented characteristics of the study population in 1990, when adult HIV prevalence was 9%, and during subsequent follow up (1990-1994), when adult HIV incidence was 8 per 1000 person-years, the percentage of HIV infections in men (women) attributed to one-off partnerships decreased from 96% (26%) during 1980 to 67% (8%) in 1989 and 22% (5%) in 1994. Reducing HIV transmission between one-off partners early in an HIV epidemic may substantially limit the potential for the spread of HIV infection. At a later phase, prevention must also focus on control of transmission between longer-term HIV-discordant partners.

  7. Are Time- and Event-based Prospective Memory Comparably Affected in HIV Infection?†

    PubMed Central

    Zogg, Jennifer B.; Woods, Steven Paul; Weber, Erica; Doyle, Katie; Grant, Igor; Atkinson, J. Hampton; Ellis, Ronald J.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Hale, Braden R.; Ellis, Ronald J.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Letendre, Scott; Capparelli, Edmund; Schrier, Rachel; Heaton, Robert K.; Cherner, Mariana; Moore, David J.; Jernigan, Terry; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Archibald, Sarah L.; Hesselink, John; Annese, Jacopo; Taylor, Michael J.; Masliah, Eliezer; Everall, Ian; Langford, T. Dianne; Richman, Douglas; Smith, David M.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Everall, Ian; Lipton, Stuart; McCutchan, J. Allen; Atkinson, J. Hampton; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott; Atkinson, J. Hampton; von Jaeger, Rodney; Gamst, Anthony C.; Cushman, Clint; Masys, Daniel R.; Abramson, Ian; Ake, Christopher; Vaida, Florin

    2011-01-01

    According to the multi-process theory of prospective memory (ProM), time-based tasks rely more heavily on strategic processes dependent on prefrontal systems than do event-based tasks. Given the prominent frontostriatal pathophysiology of HIV infection, one would expect HIV-infected individuals to demonstrate greater deficits in time-based versus event-based ProM. However, the two prior studies examining this question have produced variable results. We evaluated this hypothesis in 143 individuals with HIV infection and 43 demographically similar seronegative adults (HIV−) who completed the research version of the Memory for Intentions Screening Test, which yields parallel subscales of time- and event-based ProM. Results showed main effects of HIV serostatus and cue type, but no interaction between serostatus and cue. Planned pair-wise comparisons showed a significant effect of HIV on time-based ProM and a trend-level effect on event-based ProM that was driven primarily by the subset of participants with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Nevertheless, time-based ProM was more strongly correlated with measures of executive functions, attention/working memory, and verbal fluency in HIV-infected persons. Although HIV-associated deficits in time- and event-based ProM appear to be of comparable severity, the cognitive architecture of time-based ProM may be more strongly influenced by strategic monitoring and retrieval processes. PMID:21459901

  8. Treatment Outcomes in Undocumented Hispanic Immigrants with HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Kenneth K.; Dang, Bich N.; Davila, Jessica A.; Hartman, Christine; Giordano, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Little is known about the treatment outcomes of undocumented Hispanic immigrants with HIV infection. We sought to compare the treatment outcomes of undocumented and documented patients 12-months after entering HIV care. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of antiretroviral-naive patients 18 years and older attending their first visit at Thomas Street Health Center in Houston, Texas, between 1/1/2003 and 6/30/2008. The study population of 1,620 HIV-infected adults included 186 undocumented Hispanic, 278 documented Hispanic, 986 Black, and 170 White patients. The main outcome measures were retention in care (quarter years with at least one completed HIV primary care provider visit) and HIV suppression (HIV RNA <400 copies/mL), both measured 12-months after entering HIV care. Results Undocumented Hispanic patients had lower median initial CD4 cell count (132 cells/mm3) than documented Hispanic patients (166 cells/mm3; P = 0.186), Black patients (226 cells/mm3; P<0.001), and White patients (264 cells/mm3; P = 0.001). However, once in care, undocumented Hispanic patients did as well or better than their documented counterparts. One year after entering HIV care, undocumented Hispanics achieved similar rates of retention in care and HIV suppression as documented Hispanic and White patients. Of note, black patients were significantly less likely to have optimal retention in care (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.65, CI = 0.45–0.94) or achieve HIV suppression (aOR 0.32, CI = 0.17–0.61) than undocumented Hispanics. Conclusions Undocumented Hispanic persons with HIV infection enter care with more advanced disease than documented persons, suggesting testing and/or linkage to care efforts for this difficult-to-reach population need intensification. Once diagnosed, however, undocumented Hispanics have outcomes as good as or better than other racial/ethnic groups. Safety net providers for undocumented immigrants are vital for maintaining

  9. Treatment outcomes in undocumented Hispanic immigrants with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Poon, Kenneth K; Dang, Bich N; Davila, Jessica A; Hartman, Christine; Giordano, Thomas P

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the treatment outcomes of undocumented Hispanic immigrants with HIV infection. We sought to compare the treatment outcomes of undocumented and documented patients 12-months after entering HIV care. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of antiretroviral-naive patients 18 years and older attending their first visit at Thomas Street Health Center in Houston, Texas, between 1/1/2003 and 6/30/2008. The study population of 1,620 HIV-infected adults included 186 undocumented Hispanic, 278 documented Hispanic, 986 Black, and 170 White patients. The main outcome measures were retention in care (quarter years with at least one completed HIV primary care provider visit) and HIV suppression (HIV RNA <400 copies/mL), both measured 12-months after entering HIV care. Undocumented Hispanic patients had lower median initial CD4 cell count (132 cells/mm(3)) than documented Hispanic patients (166 cells/mm(3); P = 0.186), Black patients (226 cells/mm(3); P<0.001), and White patients (264 cells/mm(3); P = 0.001). However, once in care, undocumented Hispanic patients did as well or better than their documented counterparts. One year after entering HIV care, undocumented Hispanics achieved similar rates of retention in care and HIV suppression as documented Hispanic and White patients. Of note, black patients were significantly less likely to have optimal retention in care (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.65, CI = 0.45-0.94) or achieve HIV suppression (aOR 0.32, CI = 0.17-0.61) than undocumented Hispanics. Undocumented Hispanic persons with HIV infection enter care with more advanced disease than documented persons, suggesting testing and/or linkage to care efforts for this difficult-to-reach population need intensification. Once diagnosed, however, undocumented Hispanics have outcomes as good as or better than other racial/ethnic groups. Safety net providers for undocumented immigrants are vital for maintaining individual and public health.

  10. A review of renal disease in children with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Ankur Kumar; Tiewsoh, Karalanglin; Pilania, Rakesh Kumar

    2017-09-08

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. HIV-infected individuals are now surviving for a relatively longer period and this is because of easy accessibility to antiretroviral therapy these days. As a result, chronic disease-related complications are now being recognized more often. Kidney disease in HIV-infected children can vary from glomerular to tubular-interstitial involvement. We searched the database to identify various kidney diseases seen in HIV-infected children. We describe the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathology, clinical and laboratory manifestations, management and outcome of commonly seen kidney disease in HIV-infected children. We also provide a brief overview of toxicity of antiretroviral drugs seen in HIV-infected children. Kidney involvement in HIV-infected children may arise because of HIV infection per se, opportunistic infections, immune mediated injury and drug toxicity. HIV-associated nephropathy is perhaps the most common and most severe form of kidney disease. Proteinuria may be a cost-effective screening test in the long-term management of HIV-infected children, however, there are no definite recommendations for the same. Other important renal diseases are HIV immune complex kidney disease, thrombotic microangiopathy, interstitial nephritis and vasculitis.

  11. Low-level Viremia Early in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Iris; Cummings, Vanessa; Fogel, Jessica M.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Clarke, William; Connor, Matthew B.; Griffith, Sam; Buchbinder, Susan; Shoptaw, Steven; del Rio, Carlos; Magnus, Manya; Mannheimer, Sharon; Wheeler, Darrell P.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Koblin, Beryl A.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2014-01-01

    HIV RNA levels are usually high early in HIV infection. In the HPTN 061 study, men were tested for HIV infection every six months; six (21.4%) of 28 men who acquired HIV infection during the study had low or undetectable HIV RNA at the time of HIV diagnosis. Antiretroviral drugs were not detected at the time of HIV diagnosis. False-negative HIV test results were obtained for two men using multiple assays. Antiretroviral drug resistance mutations were detected in HIV from one man. Additional studies are needed to identify factors associated with low HIV RNA levels during early HIV infection. PMID:25140905

  12. Stem-Cell-Based Gene Therapy for HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Anjie; Kitchen, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Despite the enormous success of combined anti-retroviral therapy, HIV infection is still a lifelong disease and continues to spread rapidly worldwide. There is a pressing need to develop a treatment that will cure HIV infection. Recent progress in stem cell manipulation and advancements in humanized mouse models have allowed rapid developments of gene therapy for HIV treatment. In this review, we will discuss two aspects of HIV gene therapy using human hematopoietic stem cells. The first is to generate immune systems resistant to HIV infection while the second strategy involves enhancing anti-HIV immunity to eliminate HIV infected cells. PMID:24368413

  13. Stem-cell-based gene therapy for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Anjie; Kitchen, Scott

    2013-12-24

    Despite the enormous success of combined anti-retroviral therapy, HIV infection is still a lifelong disease and continues to spread rapidly worldwide. There is a pressing need to develop a treatment that will cure HIV infection. Recent progress in stem cell manipulation and advancements in humanized mouse models have allowed rapid developments of gene therapy for HIV treatment. In this review, we will discuss two aspects of HIV gene therapy using human hematopoietic stem cells. The first is to generate immune systems resistant to HIV infection while the second strategy involves enhancing anti-HIV immunity to eliminate HIV infected cells.

  14. Fewer new cases of HIV infection in Helsinki.

    PubMed

    Pönkä, A

    1990-01-01

    The number of new serologically diagnosed HIV infections has decreased in Helsinki since 1986. The clinical search for infections was started in 1983 and the serodiagnostic search in late 1984. The maximum yearly number of new HIV infections was 40 cases in 1986. In 1987 and 1988 the corresponding numbers were 31 and 29, although the number of tests had increased. During the first nine months of 1989 only 16 HIV infections have been diagnosed. The levelling off, and even decrease, in the number of new cases of HIV infection gives cause for optimism about the chances of success of the campaign against AIDS by means of education, information and active screening programmes.

  15. [HIV infection : Reaching a zero risk of transmission].

    PubMed

    Henrard, S; Wyndham-Thomas, C; Van Vooren, J P; Goffard, J C

    2016-01-01

    Despite a global reduction in the prevalence of HIV-infection, the HIV-epidemic is far from over. The prevention of HIV-transmission in all its forms (sexual, mother-to-child etc) must therefore remain a pillar in the fight against AIDS, and both potent and accessible prevention strategies are required. In addition to the classical and wellknown methods such as the condom, ant iretroviral therapy represents a potent prevention tool and the residual risk of transmission of correctly treated HIV-positive persons is virtually nihil. Antiretroviral therapy may and should be used in the prevention of HIV-transmission as Treatment as Prevention (TasP), Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP), and Post- Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP). However, because of their exorbitant costs, the accessibility of these prevention strategies is limited, particularly for the most vulnerable populations.

  16. Hematopoietic Stem and Immune Cells in Chronic HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jielin; Crumpacker, Clyde

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) belongs to multipotent adult somatic stem cells. A single HSC can reconstitute the entire blood system via self-renewal, differentiation into all lineages of blood cells, and replenishment of cells lost due to attrition or disease in a person's lifetime. Although all blood and immune cells derive from HSC, immune cells, specifically immune memory cells, have the properties of HSC on self-renewal and differentiation into lineage effector cells responding to the invading pathogens. Moreover, the interplay between immune memory cell and viral pathogen determines the course of a viral infection. Here, we state our point of view on the role of blood stem and progenitor cell in chronic HIV infection, with a focus on memory CD4 T-cell in the context of HIV/AIDS eradication and cure. PMID:26300920

  17. Reproductive concerns of women at risk for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Williams, A B

    1990-01-01

    This qualitative, exploratory study investigated knowledge about perinatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and perceptions of the childbearing role among women at risk for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) through injection drug use. Content analysis was used to analyze the results of 21 face-to-face, semistructured interviews with women who had a personal history of injection drug use or who were the sexual partners of men who injected drugs. Contextual variables influencing women at risk for HIV infection that were identified included fear of HIV antibody testing, a belief that perinatal HIV transmission is inevitable, support for pregnancy termination in the event of HIV-associated pregnancy, a strong desire for children, pride in mothering behavior, and guilt about the possibility of transmitting HIV to unborn children. AIDS education and counseling for these women will be most effective if these variables are considered.

  18. Health Outcomes of HIV-Infected People with Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Yehia, Baligh R; Stephens-Shield, Alisa J; Momplaisir, Florence; Taylor, Lynne; Gross, Robert; Dubé, Benoit; Glanz, Karen; Brady, Kathleen A

    2015-08-01

    Improving outcomes for people with HIV and mental illness will be critical to meeting the goals of the US National HIV/AIDS Strategy. In a retrospective analysis of the 2008-2010 cycles of the locally representative Philadelphia Medical Monitoring Project, we compared the proportions of HIV-infected adults with and without mental illness: (1) retained in care (≥2 primary HIV visits separated by ≥90 days in a 12-month period); (2) prescribed antiretroviral therapy (ART) at any point in a 12-month period; and (3) virally suppressed (HIV-1 RNA ≤200 copies/mL at the last measure in the 12-month period). Multivariable regression assessed associations between mental illness and the outcomes, adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, insurance, alcohol abuse, injection drug use, CD4 count, and calendar year. Of 730 HIV-infected persons, representative of 9409 persons in care for HIV in Philadelphia, 49.0 % had mental illness. In adjusted analyses, there were no significant differences in retention (91.3 vs. 90.3 %; AOR 1.30, 95 % CI 0.63-2.56) and prescription of ART (83.2 vs. 88.7 %; AOR 0.79, 95 % CI 0.49-1.25) between those with and without mental illness. However, mentally ill patients were less likely to achieve viral suppression than those without mental illness (65.9 vs. 74.4 %; AOR 0.64, 95 % CI 0.46-0.90). These findings argue for the need to optimize ART adherence in this population.

  19. Health Outcomes of HIV-Infected People with Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Yehia, Baligh R.; Stephens-Shield, Alisa J.; Momplaisir, Florence; Taylor, Lynne; Gross, Robert; Dubé, Benoit; Glanz, Karen; Brady, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Improving outcomes for people with HIV and mental illness will be critical to meeting the goals of the US National HIV/AIDS Strategy. In a retrospective analysis of the 2008–2010 cycles of the locally representative Philadelphia Medical Monitoring Project, we compared the proportions of HIV-infected adults with and without mental illness: (1) retained in care (≥2 primary HIV visits separated by ≥90 days in a 12-month period); (2) prescribed antiretroviral therapy (ART) at any point in a 12-month period; and (3) virally suppressed (HIV-1 RNA ≤200 copies/mL at the last measure in the 12-month period). Multivariable regression assessed associations between mental illness and the outcomes, adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, insurance, alcohol abuse, injection drug use, CD4 count, and calendar year. Of 730 HIV-infected persons, representative of 9409 persons in care for HIV in Philadelphia, 49.0 % had mental illness. In adjusted analyses, there were no significant differences in retention (91.3 vs. 90.3 %; AOR 1.30, 95 % CI 0.63–2.56) and prescription of ART (83.2 vs. 88.7 %; AOR 0.79, 95 % CI 0.49–1.25) between those with and without mental illness. However, mentally ill patients were less likely to achieve viral suppression than those without mental illness (65.9 vs. 74.4 %; AOR 0.64, 95 % CI 0.46–0.90). These findings argue for the need to optimize ART adherence in this population. PMID:25931243

  20. Medical and non-medical expenses for treating babies born to HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected mothers.

    PubMed

    Pansatiankul, Boonchian; Bunnag, Thanyanat; Leowsrisook, Pimsiri

    2003-08-01

    Most human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections among children under 5 years are transmitted perinatally. These children require more medical attention and hospitalization than non HIV-infected children. The expenses of HIV-infected children are mostly related to opportunistic infections. To compare the medical and non-medical expenses of treating babies born to HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected mothers at the Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health (QSNICH). Consecutive children of HIV-infected and non HIV-infected mothers born at Rajavithi Hospital, Bangkok, were recruited from 1993 to 1995. All of them were followed at QSNICH for free medical services. The demographic and pregnancy data of mothers and the characteristics of the babies of the two groups were compared as well as the number of the hospital visits and reported medical and non-medical expenses. 58 children of HIV-infected mothers and 119 children of non-HIV-infected mother were recruited during this period. Only 30 (51.7%) children of HIV-infected mothers could complete the 18-month requirement, while 90 (75.6%) of the babies born to non-HIV-infected mothers finished the 18 months follow-up period. The two groups did not differ much in terms of demographic characteristics, except that the infant fathers were younger and serology for syphilis was higher in the HIV-infected mothers. This indicated that the HIV-infected mothers had earlier sexual activity. Babies born to the HIV-infected mothers tended to have a lower birth weight and were small for gestational age (SGA). Nine out of 30 babies (30%) born to the HIV-infected mothers were found to be HIV positive at the 18th month of follow-up. The mean medical, non-medical, and total expenses of the babies of the infected group were 2,525.90 +/- 4,328.75, 1,323.07 +/- 1,452.41, 3,848.97 +/- 5,308.90 baht respectively, or were 2.4, 2.0, and 2.2 times those of the non-infected group. These expenses did not include antiretroviral therapy. The

  1. Modeling the impact of Trichomonas vaginalis infection on HIV transmission in HIV-infected individuals in medical care

    PubMed Central

    Quinlivan, E. Byrd; Patel, Shilpa N.; Grodensky, Catherine A.; Golin, Carol E.; Tien, Hsiao-Chuan; Hobbs, Marcia M.

    2012-01-01

    Background To assess factors associated with having a Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) infection among persons receiving care for HIV and estimate the number of transmitted HIV infections attributable to TV. Methods HIV clinic patients were recruited from two secondary prevention studies, screened by urine nucleic-acid amplification tests for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and interviewed about risk factors (baseline, 6 and 12 months). We conducted mathematical modeling of the results to estimate the number of transmitted HIV infections attributable to TV among a cohort of HIV-infected patients receiving medical care in North Carolina. Results TV was prevalent in 7.4%, and incident in 2% – 3% of subjects at follow-up. Individuals with HIV RNA less than 400 copies/ml (OR 0.32, 95% CI: 0.14 – 0.73) and at least 13 years of education (OR 0.24, 95% CI: 0.08 –0.70) were less likely to have TV. Mathematical modeling predicted that 0.062 HIV transmission events occur per 100 HIV infected women in the absence of TV infection and 0.076 HIV infections per 100 HIV and TV-infected women (estimate range: 0.070 – 0.079), indicating that 23% of the HIV transmission events from HIV-infected women may be attributable to TV infection when 22% of women are co-infected with TV. Conclusions The data suggest the need for improved diagnosis of TV infection and suggest that HIV-infected women in medical care may be appropriate targets for enhanced testing and treatment. PMID:22902662

  2. Early Detection Of Hiv Infection And Of Asymptomatic Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    PubMed

    Coll, Josep; Videla, Sebastián; Leon, Agathe; Ornelas, Arelly; García, Felipe; Fernández, Emma; Blanco, José Luis; Carrillo, Antonio; Bravo, Isabel; Meulbroek, Michael; García-Cuyas, Francesc; González, Victoria; Casabona, Jordi; Leal, Lorna; Clotet, Bonaventura; Brander, Christian

    2017-08-23

    To provide data on incidence of early diagnosis of HIV infections and define prevalence and incidence of asymptomatic STI in MSM. Prospective cohort study of HIV-uninfected MSM at high-risk for HIV-infection. Participants were selected through a risk-assessment questionnaire, and screened for HIV-infection (quarterly) and for other STIs (yearly): syphilis, hepatitis A, B and C (serology); C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae in penis and rectum and Human Papillomavirus in anus and mouth (PCR). Between November 2009 and October 2012, 258 HIV-uninfected MSM at high-risk for HIV-infection were included and followed-up during [median (IQR)] 2 (1.4, 2.5) years. Nineteen acute HIV-infections were diagnosed (incidence: 3.9 per 100 person-years). Prevalence of STIs at baseline was: syphilis 8.4% (95%CI: 5.4-12.7); HCV 2.0% (95%CI: 0.7-4.8); C. trachomatis in penis 3.2% (95%CI:1.5-6.5), in rectum 6.5% (95%CI:3.9-10.5); N. gonorrhoeae in penis 2.0% (95%CI:0.8-5.0), in rectum 6.1% (95%CI:3.6-10.1); HPV in anal canal 75.7% (95%CI:68.8-81.5), in mouth 3.8% (95%CI:1.8-7.7). The implementation of the Check-ear-project in a MSM community centre allowed for the identification of early HIV-infections and asymptomatic STI among MSM. The high incidence of HIV infections and the high prevalence of STIs, strongly supports the recommendation of periodical screenings among sexually active MSM. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Diminished physical function in older HIV-infected adults in the Southeastern U.S. despite successful antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Audrey L; Morey, Miriam C; Wong, Tammy C; McNeil, Donna Lynn; Humphries, Barlett; Frankey, Katherine; Pieper, Carl F; Hicks, Charles B; Huffman, Kim; McKellar, Mehri S

    2017-01-01

    As antiretroviral therapy efficacy improves, HIV is gradually being recognized more as a chronic disease within the aging HIV-infected population. While these individuals are surviving into old age, they may, however, be experiencing "accelerated aging" with greater declines in physical function than that observed among comparably matched individuals free of HIV. This decline is not well understood and it remains unclear if physical decline correlates with the degree of immunosuppression based on CD4 lymphocyte nadir. In a cross-sectional study of accelerated aging in the older HIV-infected population on antiretroviral therapy (ART), physical performance evaluations were completed on a cohort of 107 HIV-infected subjects, age 50 years or older (with no HIV-1 RNA >200 copies/mL in the prior 12 months), and compared to reference ranges for age- and gender-matched HIV-uninfected persons. Physical performance testing consisted of four validated assessments: the 2.4-meter walk, 30-second chair stand, grip strength and 6-minute walk test. When compared to age- and gender-matched HIV-uninfected reference controls, older HIV-infected persons had diminished physical function. No correlation was found between physical function and degree of immunosuppression as determined by pre-ART CD4 nadir. Despite improved survival, HIV-infected adults on suppressive ART have diminished physical function compared to HIV-uninfected persons. The degree of HIV-associated immunosuppression does not correlate with the observed degree of physical function decline in older HIV-infected persons, suggesting the decline is mediated by other mechanisms.

  4. Effect of Cocaine on HIV Infection and Inflammasome Gene Expression Profile in HIV Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Atluri, Venkata Subba Rao; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Garcia, Gabriella; Jayant, Rahul Dev; Sagar, Vidya; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Yndart, Adriana; Nair, Madhavan

    2016-01-01

    We have observed significantly increased HIV infection in HIV infected macrophages in the presence of cocaine that could be due to the downregulation of BST2 restriction factor in these cells. In human inflammasome PCR array, among different involved in inflammasome formation, in HIV infected macrophages in the presence of cocaine, we have observed significant upregulation of NLRP3, AIM2 genes and downstream genes IL-1β and PTGS2. Whereas negative regulatory gene MEFV was upregulated, CD40LG and PYDC1 were significantly downregulated. Among various NOD like receptors, NOD2 was significantly upregulated in both HIV alone and HIV plus cocaine treated cells. In the downstream genes, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), CCL7 and IL-6 were significantly up regulated in HIV plus cocaine treated macrophages. We have also observed significant ROS production (in HIV and/or cocaine treated cells) which is one of the indirect-activators of inflammasomes formation. Further, we have observed early apoptosis in HIV alone and HIV plus cocaine treated macrophages which may be resultant of inflammasome formation and cspase-1 activation. These results indicate that in case of HIV infected macrophages exposed to cocaine, increased ROS production and IL-1β transcription serve as an activators for the formation of NLRP3 and AIM2 mediated inflammasomes that leads to caspase 1 mediated apoptosis. PMID:27321752

  5. Subclinical hypothyroidism in HIV-infected subjects.

    PubMed

    Bongiovanni, Marco; Adorni, Fulvio; Casana, Maddalena; Tordato, Federica; Tincati, Camilla; Cicconi, Paola; Bini, Teresa; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella

    2006-11-01

    The correlation between subclinical hypothyroidism [thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH)>4 mIU/L with normal free triiodothyroxine and free thyroxine levels], HIV infection and HAART is still unclear. To evaluate the predictive factors of subclinical hypothyroidism in an HIV-infected population, we identified three groups of subjects: G1, subjects on stable highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) (for at least 1 year) at baseline and at month 24 (n=97); G2, subjects naive at both baseline and month 24 (n=47); G3, subjects starting HAART at baseline (n=46). The three groups were comparable with respect to age, gender, body weight and prevalence of HCV infection. At baseline, subclinical hypothyroidism was detected in 14 subjects in G1 (14.4%), 5 in G2 (10.6%) and 4 in G3 (8.7%) (P=0.18) and these were excluded from the analysis. At month 24, 15 subjects had developed subclinical hypothyroidism: 4 in G1 (4.8%), 3 in G2 (7.1%) and 8 in G3 (19.0%). In the multivariable analysis, the higher increase in total cholesterol was predictive of subclinical hypothyroidism (RR: 1.53 for each additional 10 mg/dL, 95% CI 1.23-1.90; P<0.01); other variables, which were statistically significant in the univariate analysis, such as G3 group, body weight and higher increase in CD4+ cell count and in triglyceride serum levels were not confirmed to be associated with TSH alterations. The occurrence of subclinical hypothyroidism in HIV-positive patients seems to be related to the increase in total cholesterol serum levels occurring after HAART initiation. Thyroid function should be monitored in all HIV-infected subjects, especially in those starting HAART.

  6. Prevention of diarrhoea in children with HIV infection or exposure to maternal HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Eliza H; Smith, Nathan A; Azman, Hana; McLeod, Deanna; Rutherford, George W

    2010-06-16

    Diarrhoea is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among infants and children worldwide, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is a condition that similarly disproportionately affects low- and middle-income countries; of the nearly 2.1 million children under age 15 years living with HIV/AIDS, the large majority reside in sub-Saharan Africa. Infants and children with HIV infection have more frequent and more severe diarrhoea than children without HIV. Interventions including vitamin A, zinc and cotrimoxazole may contribute substantially to preventing diarrhoea in children with HIV infection or exposure to HIV. We perform a systematic review of randomised controlled trials and nonrandomised studies that examine the effectiveness of vitamin A, zinc and cotrimoxazole on mortality and morbidity from diarrhoea in HIV-infected and -exposed infants and children. Electronic databases including Pubmed, Central and EMBASE were searched without limits to language from 1980 to April 2010. Conference database searches were performed, experts were contacted and bibliographies were handsearched. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and nonrandomised studies (NRSs) that examined the effectiveness of the three interventions were included. Two reviewers independently assessed citations for eligibility and double-extracted included studies. Assessment of bias of individual studies was performed independently by both reviewers. Only two summary estimates were performed due to heterogeneity in study design and interventions. Four RCTs were identified for vitamin A. One RCT was identified for zinc. One RCT and two NRSs were identified for cotrimoxazole. Vitamin A reduced mortality overall in children with HIV infection (four studies). A pooled estimate of three studies for reduction in mortality from vitamin A compared to placebo had a relative risk (DerSimonian and Laird method, random effects) of 0

  7. Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Günthard, Huldrych F.; Saag, Michael S.; Benson, Constance A.; del Rio, Carlos; Eron, Joseph J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Sax, Paul E.; Thompson, Melanie A.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Landovitz, Raphael J.; Smith, Davey M.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    assessments are recommended before treatment, and monitoring during treatment is recommended to assess response, adverse effects, and adherence. Approaches are recommended to improve linkage to and retention in care are provided. Daily tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine is recommended for use as preexposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV infection in persons at high risk. When indicated, postexposure prophylaxis should be started as soon as possible after exposure. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Antiretroviral agents remain the cornerstone of HIV treatment and prevention. All HIV-infected individuals with detectable plasma virus should receive treatment with recommended initial regimens consisting of an InSTI plus 2 NRTIs. Preexposure prophylaxis should be considered as part of an HIV prevention strategy for at-risk individuals. When used effectively, currently available ARVs can sustain HIV suppression and can prevent new HIV infection. With these treatment regimens, survival rates among HIV-infected adults who are retained in care can approach those of uninfected adults. PMID:27404187

  8. [Toxoplasmosis in HIV infection: invasion reactivation criteria].

    PubMed

    Goncharov, D B; Gubareva, E V; Kobets, N V; Domonova, E A; Ievleva, E S

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary representation of toxoplasmosis reactivation criteria in HIV infection is generalized. Significance of the issue is justified: toxoplasmosis is a leading neurological pathology in AIDS with a high lethality percentage due to complexity of clinical confirmation and difficulties of laboratory confirmation of the start of reactivation. Clinical, instrumental, immunologic, molecular genetic invasion reactivation criteria are discussed in the article and analysis of their effectiveness is performed; their most feasible combinations are justified. Further system analysis of the cerebral toxoplasmosis reactivation criteria specified in the article in combination with search of new pathogen dissemination markers will allow to obtain important information that has both fundamental interest and important practical significance.

  9. HIV infection presenting as bone marrow cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Dharwadkar, Arpana; Vimal, Shruti; Buch, Archana C.; Panicker, N. K.

    2014-01-01

    Disseminated cryptococcal infection is an uncommon initial manifestation in immunocompromised patients. We report a rare case of a 40-year-old female presenting with fever and burning epigastrium. Peripheral blood film revealed a leukoerythroblastic picture with thrombocytopenia. Bone marrow aspiration showed granulomas along with cryptococcal yeast forms. The ELISA test for detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigen was positive. Disseminated cryptococcosis can develop as the first manifestation of HIV infection in previously healthy individuals and granulomas in such bone marrow aspiration smears are a valuable clue to an underlying opportunistic infection. PMID:25161991

  10. The stochastic dance of early HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Stephen J.

    2005-12-01

    The stochastic nature of early HIV infection is described in a series of models, each of which captures aspects of the dance of HIV during the early stages of infection. It is to this highly variable target that the immune response must respond. The adaptability of the various components of the immune response is an important aspect of the system's operation, as the nature of the pathogens that the response will be required to respond to and the order in which those responses must be made cannot be known beforehand. As HIV infection has direct influence over cells responsible for the immune response, the dance predicts that the immune response will be also in a variable state of readiness and capability for this task of adaptation. The description of the stochastic dance of HIV here will use the tools of stochastic models, and for the most part, simulation. The justification for this approach is that the early stages and the development of HIV diversity require that the model to be able to describe both individual sample path and patient-to-patient variability. In addition, as early viral dynamics are best described using branching processes, the explosive growth of these models both predicts high variability and rapid response of HIV to changes in system parameters.In this paper, a basic viral growth model based on a time dependent continuous-time branching process is used to describe the growth of HIV infected cells in the macrophage and lymphocyte populations. Immigration from the reservoir population is added to the basic model to describe the incubation time distribution. This distribution is deduced directly from the modeling assumptions and the model of viral growth. A system of two branching processes, one in the infected macrophage population and one in the infected lymphocyte population is used to provide a description of the relationship between the development of HIV diversity as it relates to tropism (host cell preference). The role of the immune

  11. Malignant tumours in patients with HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Tirelli, U.; Franceschi, S.; Carbone, A.

    1994-01-01

    One of the most important though somewhat neglected aspects of research in HIV infection concerns the development, clinicopathological characteristics, and treatment of malignant tumours in infected patients. With the improved survival of patients with AIDS owing to the better prevention and treatment of infectious complications there may well be an increase in AIDS related malignancies. This paper reviews the epidemiology, pathology, and treatment of malignant tumours in patients with HIV. Images p1149-a p1149-b p1149-c FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 p1151-a p1151-b p1151-c PMID:8173459

  12. Neurological Complications in Controlled HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Kate M; Brew, Bruce J

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, there have been great advances in therapies for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that have allowed suppression of the virus and its effects on the body. Despite this progress, neurological complications persist in HIV-infected individuals. In this review we consider the possible ways that HIV might cause neurotoxicity and neuroinflammation. We discuss the spectrum of neurological disorders caused by HIV and its treatment, with a particular focus on both HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders and peripheral neuropathies. Since there has been a shift to HIV being a chronic illness, we also review the increasing prevalence of cerebrovascular disease and neurodegenerative disorders.

  13. Health and health behaviors in HIV-infected jail inmates, 1999 and 2005.

    PubMed

    White, Mary C; Tulsky, Jacqueline P; Estes, Milton; Jamison, Ross; Long, Heather L

    2008-03-01

    Incarcerated HIV-infected persons in San Francisco have benefited from intensive case management in jail and postrelease, which includes but is not focused on interventions to prevent transmission. In this population of predominately injection drug users (IDUs), we had the opportunity to examine interview data from 1999 and 2005 that included health characteristics and risk factors. Those in 2005 were less likely to be satisfied with social support and less likely to be partnered; more likely to have some form of health insurance. On average, health was perceived in both periods to be better the longer the person had been in jail. Injection drug use was reported lower in 2005, but a subset of nearly a quarter in each survey time period reported sharing needles. Persons in 2005 were less likely to report they always used condoms as compared to those in 1999 (odds ratio 0.26, 95% confidence interval 0.12-0.59, p = 0.001). While there were differences in study design and methodology, this comparison demonstrated overall similarities in characteristics of HIV-infected inmates. Findings echo those of others, in other populations of HIV-infected persons. Reasons could include HIV prevention fatigue or decay in effectiveness of prevention messages. Despite an established program for case management and links to services, renewed efforts are needed to maintain effectiveness of prevention strategies to this high-risk population.

  14. Maternal HIV infection is an important health determinant in non-HIV-infected infants.

    PubMed

    Rupérez, María; González, Raquel; Maculuve, Sonia; Quintó, Llorenç; López-Varela, Elisa; Augusto, Orvalho; Vala, Anifa; Nhacolo, Arsénio; Sevene, Esperança; Naniche, Denise; Menéndez, Clara

    2017-07-17

    To assess morbidity and mortality in HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) children to help guiding appropriate clinical care and effective preventive interventions. This is a longitudinal study comparing two cohorts of children; one born to HIV-infected women and the other born to HIV-uninfected women. We have analyzed prospectively obtained information on nutritional status, morbidity and mortality from 966 HEU and 909 HIV-unexposed infants followed up until their first 18 months of life at a referral health facility in southern Mozambique. Determinants for adverse health outcomes in HEU children were also assessed using multivariate logistic regression. Increased incidence of hospital admissions (P = 0.0015), shorter survival in the first 18 months of life (P = 0.0510) and moderate and severe malnutrition (P = 0.0006 and 0.0014, respectively) were observed among HEU children compared with HIV-unexposed children. Incidence of outpatient attendance in HEU children was associated with being men, older age and the mother being on antiretroviral treatment. Among HEU children, those who were never breastfed, or who were weaned or were partially breastfed, had an increased incidence of hospital admissions compared with children who were exclusively breastfed. Maternal HIV infection has important health consequences in non-HIV-infected children. As the prevalence of HIV-infected pregnant women is maintained and the proportion of HIV-infected children declines because of the scale-up of antiretroviral treatment during pregnancy and breastfeeding, more focus should be given to the health needs of HEU children to ensure that the post-2015 sustainable development goals are met.

  15. Routine analysis of induced sputum is not an effective strategy for screening persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus for Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Pneumocystis carinii. Pulmonary Complications of HIV Infection Study Group.

    PubMed

    Kvale, P A; Hansen, N I; Markowitz, N; Rosen, M J; Jordan, M C; Meiselman, L; Glassroth, J; Reichman, L B; Wallace, J M; Stansell, J D

    1994-09-01

    A prospective multicenter cohort study comprising 1,171 individuals who were seropositive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) but did not have AIDS at the time of enrollment and 182 HIV-seronegative controls, was studied by means of routine induced-sputum analysis in an attempt to detect occult tuberculosis or Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. One occult case of tuberculosis was discovered upon the patient's enrollment (at baseline); none were discovered during follow-up. Two additional Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates were recovered (one at baseline, one during follow-up) from subjects with symptoms or abnormalities evident on chest roentgenograms. Three specimens were false-positive (one for M. tuberculosis, two for P. carinii). Five pathogenic nontuberculous mycobacteria isolates were recovered during follow-up. Nonpathogenic, nontuberculous mycobacteria were recovered from 51 (4.6%) of 1,113 baseline specimens and 56 (3.7%) of 1,518 follow-up specimens, primarily at a center where the water supply was contaminated. We conclude that routine induced-sputum analysis is not an effective strategy for screening HIV-infected asymptomatic subjects for tuberculosis or P. carinii pneumonia before the onset of clinically recognizable disease activity.

  16. The HIV-Infected Patient and Family Social Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Thomas M.; And Others

    The goal of this study was to examine the complex interplay among family, neuropsychological, psychosocial, psychiatric, and immunological variables with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected homosexual/bisexual men and their families. The subjects were a broad spectrum of 29 outpatient HIV-infected homosexual/bisexual men between the ages…

  17. Health care delivery for people with HIV infection and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Arkell, S

    Health care delivery for people with HIV infection and AIDS will need to change in the future to accommodate the expected increasing numbers of people affected. Nurses have an important role in preventing the spread of HIV infection and in caring for this group of people.

  18. Primary cutaneous plasmablastic lymphoma revealing clinically unsuspected HIV infection*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Abbade, Luciana P. Fernandes; Guiotoku, Marcelo Massaki; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Plasmablastic lymphoma is a rare subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma more frequently diagnosed in immunosuppressed patients, mainly HIV-infected. Primary cutaneous plasmablastic lymphoma is extremely rare, and in this patient it was the first clinical manifestation of unsuspected HIV-infection. PMID:27579749

  19. The HIV-Infected Patient and Family Social Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Thomas M.; And Others

    The goal of this study was to examine the complex interplay among family, neuropsychological, psychosocial, psychiatric, and immunological variables with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected homosexual/bisexual men and their families. The subjects were a broad spectrum of 29 outpatient HIV-infected homosexual/bisexual men between the ages…

  20. Blood T-cell receptor diversity decreases during the course of HIV infection, but the potential for a diverse repertoire persists

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jennifer J.; Schmidt, Diane; Zhang, Qianjun; Hoh, Rebecca; Busch, Michael; Martin, Jeffrey; Deeks, Steven; McCune, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    HIV infection results in a decrease in circulating CD4+ T-cell and naive T-cell numbers. If such losses were associated with an erosion of T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire diversity in the peripheral T-cell pool, this might exacerbate the state of persistent immunodeficiency. Existing methods for the analysis of the TCR repertoire have demonstrated skewed distributions of TCR genes in HIV-infected subjects but cannot directly measure TCR diversity. Here we used AmpliCot, a quantitative assay based on DNA hybridization kinetics, to measure TCR diversity in a cross-sectional comparison of 19 HIV-infected persons to 18 HIV-uninfected controls. HIV-infected persons had a 10-fold decrease in total TCR repertoire diversity in 1.5 mL of blood compared with uninfected controls, with decreased diversity correlating most closely with a lower CD4+ T-cell percentage. Nonetheless, the TCR repertoire diversity of sort-purified T-cell subpopulations in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected subjects was comparable. These observations suggest that the TCR repertoire diversity changes in whole blood during HIV disease progression are primarily the result of changes in the number and proportion of T-cell subpopulations and that most HIV-infected persons may retain a sufficiently diverse TCR repertoire to permit immune reconstitution with antiretroviral therapy alone, without thymopoiesis. PMID:22371879

  1. Cerebral Toxoplasmosis Mimicking Subacute Meningitis in HIV-Infected Patients; a Cohort Study from Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Ganiem, A. Rizal; Dian, Sofiati; Indriati, Agnes; Chaidir, Lidya; Wisaksana, Rudi; Sturm, Patrick; Melchers, Willem; van der Ven, Andre; Parwati, Ida; van Crevel, Reinout

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-associated subacute meningitis is mostly caused by tuberculosis or cryptococcosis, but often no etiology can be established. In the absence of CT or MRI of the brain, toxoplasmosis is generally not considered as part of the differential diagnosis. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed cerebrospinal fluid real time PCR and serological testing for Toxoplasma gondii in archived samples from a well-characterized cohort of 64 HIV-infected patients presenting with subacute meningitis in a referral hospital in Indonesia. Neuroradiology was only available for 6 patients. At time of presentation, patients mostly had newly diagnosed and advanced HIV infection (median CD4 count 22 cells/mL), with only 17.2% taking ART, and 9.4% PJP-prophylaxis. CSF PCR for T. Gondii was positive in 21 patients (32.8%). Circulating toxoplasma IgG was present in 77.2% of patients tested, including all in whom the PCR of CSF was positive for T. Gondii. Clinically, in the absence of neuroradiology, toxoplasmosis was difficult to distinguish from tuberculosis or cryptococcal meningitis, although CSF abnormalities were less pronounced. Mortality among patients with a positive CSF T. Gondii PCR was 81%, 2.16-fold higher (95% CI 1.04–4.47) compared to those with a negative PCR. Conclusions/Significance Toxoplasmosis should be considered in HIV-infected patients with clinically suspected subacute meningitis in settings where neuroradiology is not available. PMID:23326616

  2. Cerebral toxoplasmosis mimicking subacute meningitis in HIV-infected patients; a cohort study from Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Ganiem, A Rizal; Dian, Sofiati; Indriati, Agnes; Chaidir, Lidya; Wisaksana, Rudi; Sturm, Patrick; Melchers, Willem; van der Ven, Andre; Parwati, Ida; van Crevel, Reinout

    2013-01-01

    HIV-associated subacute meningitis is mostly caused by tuberculosis or cryptococcosis, but often no etiology can be established. In the absence of CT or MRI of the brain, toxoplasmosis is generally not considered as part of the differential diagnosis. We performed cerebrospinal fluid real time PCR and serological testing for Toxoplasma gondii in archived samples from a well-characterized cohort of 64 HIV-infected patients presenting with subacute meningitis in a referral hospital in Indonesia. Neuroradiology was only available for 6 patients. At time of presentation, patients mostly had newly diagnosed and advanced HIV infection (median CD4 count 22 cells/mL), with only 17.2% taking ART, and 9.4% PJP-prophylaxis. CSF PCR for T. Gondii was positive in 21 patients (32.8%). Circulating toxoplasma IgG was present in 77.2% of patients tested, including all in whom the PCR of CSF was positive for T. Gondii. Clinically, in the absence of neuroradiology, toxoplasmosis was difficult to distinguish from tuberculosis or cryptococcal meningitis, although CSF abnormalities were less pronounced. Mortality among patients with a positive CSF T. Gondii PCR was 81%, 2.16-fold higher (95% CI 1.04-4.47) compared to those with a negative PCR. Toxoplasmosis should be considered in HIV-infected patients with clinically suspected subacute meningitis in settings where neuroradiology is not available.

  3. Lack of Evidence for Molecular Mimicry in HIV-Infected Subjects.

    PubMed

    Burbelo, Peter D; Klimavicz, James S; Deeks, Steve G; Kovacs, Joseph A; Ragheb, Jack A

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in HIV patients have reported autoantibodies to several human proteins, including erythropoietin (EPO), interferon-α (IFN-α), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and HLA-DR, as potential mediators of anemia or immunosuppression. The etiology of these autoantibodies has been attributed to molecular mimicry between HIV epitopes and self-proteins. Here, the Luciferase Immunoprecipitation System (LIPS) was used to investigate the presence of such autoantibodies in HIV-infected adults. High levels of antibodies to HIV proteins such as capsid (p24), matrix (p17), envelope (gp41), and reverse transcriptase (RT) were detected using LIPS in both untreated and anti-retroviral-treated HIV-infected individuals but not in uninfected controls. LIPS readily detected anti-EPO autoantibodies in serum samples from subjects with presumptive pure red cell aplasia but not in any of the samples from HIV-infected or uninfected individuals. Similarly, subjects with HIV lacked autoantibodies to IFN-α, IL-2, HLA-DR and the immunoglobulin lambda light chain; all purported targets of molecular mimicry. While molecular mimicry between pathogen proteins and self-proteins is a commonly proposed mechanism for autoantibody production, the findings presented here indicate such a process is not common in HIV disease.

  4. [Prevalence of HIV infection in patients with pellagra and pellagra-like erythemas].

    PubMed

    Pitche, P; Kombate, K; Tchangai-Walla, K

    1999-01-01

    Pellagra is a systemic disorder caused by severe niacin deficiency. While uncommon in Europe and North America, pellagra and pellagra-like erythema are frequently encountered in undernourished adults in poor African countries. The purpose of this three-year prospective study was to determine the prevalence of HIV infection in patients with pellagra. Between 1996 and 1998, all documented cases of pellagra and pellagra-like erythema diagnosed in the Dermatology Department and Internal Medicine Department of the Teaching Hospital in Lome, Togo were included. Patients underwent screening tests for HIV infection. During the study period, pellagra or pellagra-like erythema was diagnosed in a total of 108 patients (59 women and 49 men) with a mean age of 41 +/- 3.5 years (range, 18 to 68 years). Serology tests for HIV were positive in 6 of these patients (5.5 p. 100; mean age 35 years). In four asymptomatic patients with no opportunistic infection, detection of HIV was an incidental discovery. The other two patients had AIDS symptoms. The principal causes of pellagra were malnutrition (n = 30), alcoholism (n = 15), and combined malnutrition and alcoholism (n = 60). The findings of this study suggest that the incidence of HIV infection in patients with pellagra and pellagra-like erythema is low, i.e., not higher than in the general population. This study also confirms previous etiologic and epidemiological data concerning pellagra in poor countries, i.e., the preponderant role of nutritional deficiency.

  5. Interventions to Prevent Sexually Transmitted Infections, Including HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cates, Willard

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) Treatment Guidelines were last updated in 2006. To update the “Clinical Guide to Prevention Services” section of the 2010 CDC STD Treatment Guidelines, we reviewed the recent science with reference to interventions designed to prevent acquisition of STDs, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Major interval developments include (1) licensure and uptake of immunization against genital human papillomavirus, (2) validation of male circumcision as a potent prevention tool against acquisition of HIV and some other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), (3) failure of a promising HIV vaccine candidate to afford protection against HIV acquisition, (4) encouragement about the use of antiretroviral agents as preexposure prophylaxis to reduce risk of HIV and herpes simplex virus acquisition, (5) enhanced emphasis on expedited partner management and rescreening for persons infected with Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, (6) recognition that behavioral interventions will be needed to address a new trend of sexually transmitted hepatitis C among men who have sex with men, and (7) the availability of a modified female condom. A range of preventive interventions is needed to reduce the risks of acquiring STI, including HIV infection, among sexually active people, and a flexible approach targeted to specific populations should integrate combinations of biomedical, behavioral, and structural interventions. These would ideally involve an array of prevention contexts, including (1) communications and practices among sexual partners, (2) transactions between individual clients and their healthcare providers, and (3) comprehensive population-level strategies for prioritizing prevention research, ensuring accurate outcome assessment, and formulating health policy. PMID:22080271

  6. HIV Infection Rates and Risk Behavior among Young Men undergoing community-based Testing in San Diego.

    PubMed

    Hoenigl, Martin; Chaillon, Antoine; Morris, Sheldon R; Little, Susan J

    2016-05-16

    Approximately 80% of new HIV infections in the United States occur in men. Four out of five men diagnosed with HIV infection are men who have sex with men (MSM), with an increasing proportion of young MSM (i.e. ≤24 years of age). We performed a retrospective analysis 11,873 cisgender men participating in a community based HIV screening program in San Diego between 2008 and 2014 to characterize the HIV prevalence and sexual risk behaviors among young men. In young heterosexual men HIV prevalence was lower compared to heterosexual men between 25 and 49 years of age (0.3% vs. 1.4%, p = 0.043). Among young MSM, HIV prevalence was 5.5%, per test positivity rate 3.6%, and HIV incidence 3.4 per 100 person years (95% CI 2.2-5.4). Per test positivity rate (p = 0.008) and incidence (p < 0.001) were significantly higher among young MSM than among MSM above 24-years of age. Young MSM diagnosed with HIV infection reported significantly more serodiscordant condomless anal intercourse, bacterial sexually transmitted infections, and higher rates of methamphetamine and gamma hydroxybutyrate use when compared to young MSM who tested negative. In conclusion, young MSM are particularly vulnerable to HIV infection and may represent ideal candidates for targeted prevention interventions that increase testing uptake and/or decrease the risk of acquiring HIV infection.

  7. The Development and Implementation of an Outreach Program to Identify Acute and Recent HIV Infections in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Silvera, Richard; Stein, Dylan; Hutt, Richard; Hagerty, Robert; Daskalakis, Demetre; Valentine, Fred; Marmor, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Since 2004, the authors have been operating First Call NYU, an outreach program to identify acute and recent HIV infections, also called primary HIV infections, among targeted at-risk communities in the New York City (NYC) metropolitan area. Materials and Methodology: First Call NYU employed mass media advertising campaigns, outreach to healthcare providers in NYC, and Internet-based efforts including search engine optimization (SEO) and Internet-based advertising to achieve these goals. Results: Between October 2004 and October 2008, 571 individuals were screened through this program, leading to 446 unique, in-person screening visits. 47 primary HIV infections, including 14 acute and 33 recent HIV infections, were identified. Discussion: Internet and traditional recruitment methods can be used to increase self-referrals for screening following possible exposure to HIV. Conclusion: Community education of at-risk groups, with the goal of increased self-diagnosis of possible acute HIV infection, may be a useful addition to traditional efforts to identify such individuals. PMID:20386719

  8. Liver and kidney transplantation in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Tan-Tam, Clara C; Frassetto, Lynda A; Stock, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    HIV infection has evolved into a chronic condition as a result of improvements in therapeutic options. Chronic exposure with HIV and associated co-pathogens as well as toxicities from prolonged therapy with antiviral medications has resulted in increased morbidity and mortality rates from end-stage liver and kidney disease in the HIV-infected population. Since the definitive treatment for end-stage organ failure is transplantation, demand has increased among HIV-infected patients. Although the transplant community has been slow to recognize HIV as a chronic condition, many transplant centers have eliminated HIV infection as a contraindication to transplantation as a result of better patient management and demand. This review examines the current clinical strategies and issues surrounding liver and kidney transplantation in HIV-infected patients.

  9. Haemophilia and HIV infection in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lee, S S; Wong, K H; Dickinson, A J

    1996-06-01

    This is a retrospective study of the problems faced and support received by HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infected haemophilia patients in Hong Kong. Between December 1984 and December 1994, 63 patients were detected to be HIV positive, out of a total of 231 haemophiliacs screened. Infection could be traced back to before August 1985, when safer heat-treated clotting factors were not yet available. Psychosocial impacts were obvious in this group of patients because of the double blow of HIV infection and haemophilia. Amongst the more evident problems were obstacles in schooling, employment difficulties, and disturbed relationships with family and friends, to mention a few. Psychosocial support services have been rendered by both the government and non-governmental organizations in Hong Kong. Financial assistance has also been given by the government since April 1993. To date, only eleven (17.5%) patients were known to have progressed to AIDS. Medical treatment, psychosocial support and financial assistance are integral components of an effective AIDS care programme for HIV-infected haemophilia patients.

  10. Guidelines for antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Rachlis, A R; Zarowny, D P

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop guidelines for health care providers and their HIV-positive patients on the clinical use of antiretroviral agents for HIV infection. OPTIONS: Recommendations published in 1996 by an international panel. OUTCOMES: Improvement in clinical outcomes or in surrogate markers of disease activity. EVIDENCE AND VALUES: The Canadian HIV Trials Network held a workshop on Oct. 19-20, 1996, to develop Canadian guidelines that incorporate information from recent basic and clinical research. RECOMMENDATIONS: Recommendations for the use of antiretroviral drugs in HIV infection are provided for initial therapy, continuing therapy, primary infection, vertical transmission, pediatric therapy and postexposure prophylaxis. VALIDATION: The guidelines are based on consensus of the participants attending the workshop: Canadian investigators, clinicians and invited representatives from the community, government and the pharmaceutical industry. They are subject to review and updating as new information on clinical benefits is published. SPONSORS: The workshop was organized by the National Centre of the Canadian HIV Trials Network. Unrestricted educational grants were provided by 8 pharmaceutical companies. Additional support was provided from the National AIDS Strategy of Health Canada. PMID:9627563

  11. Immune impairment thresholds in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Iwami, Shingo; Nakaoka, Shinji; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Miura, Yoshiharu; Miura, Tomoyuki

    2009-04-27

    Longitudinal studies of patients infected with HIV-1 reveal a long and variable length of asymptomatic phase between infection and development of AIDS. Some HIV infected patients are still asymptomatic after 15 or more years of infection but some patients develop AIDS within 2 years. The mechanistic basis of the disease progression has remained obscure but many researchers have been trying to explain it. For example, the possible importance of viral diversity for the disease progression and the development of AIDS has been very well worked out in the early-1990s, especially by some important works of Martin A. Nowak. These studies can give an elegant explanation for a variability of asymptomatic phase. Here, a simple mathematical model was used to propose a new explanation for a variable length of asymptomatic phase. The main idea is that the immune impairment rate increases over the HIV infection. Our model suggested the existence of so-called "Risky threshold" and "Immunodeficiency threshold" on the impairment rate. The former implies that immune system may collapse when the impairment rate of HIV exceeds the threshold value. The latter implies that immune system always collapses when the impairment rate exceeds the value. We found that the length of asymptomatic phase is determined stochastically between these threshold values depending on the virological and immunological states. Furthermore, we investigated a distribution of the length of asymptomatic phase and a survival rate of the immune responses in one HIV patient.

  12. Fuzzy Modeling and Control of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Hassan; Kamyad, Ali Vahidian; Heydari, Ali Akbar

    2012-01-01

    The present study proposes a fuzzy mathematical model of HIV infection consisting of a linear fuzzy differential equations (FDEs) system describing the ambiguous immune cells level and the viral load which are due to the intrinsic fuzziness of the immune system's strength in HIV-infected patients. The immune cells in question are considered CD4+ T-cells and cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs). The dynamic behavior of the immune cells level and the viral load within the three groups of patients with weak, moderate, and strong immune systems are analyzed and compared. Moreover, the approximate explicit solutions of the proposed model are derived using a fitting-based method. In particular, a fuzzy control function indicating the drug dosage is incorporated into the proposed model and a fuzzy optimal control problem (FOCP) minimizing both the viral load and the drug costs is constructed. An optimality condition is achieved as a fuzzy boundary value problem (FBVP). In addition, the optimal fuzzy control function is completely characterized and a numerical solution for the optimality system is computed. PMID:22536298

  13. Microbiome alterations in HIV infection a review.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brett; Landay, Alan; Presti, Rachel M

    2016-05-01

    Recent developments in molecular techniques have allowed researchers to identify previously uncultured organisms, which has propelled a vast expansion of our knowledge regarding our commensal microbiota. Interest in the microbiome specific to HIV grew from earlier findings suggesting that bacterial translocation from the intestines is the cause of persistent immune activation despite effective viral suppression with antiretroviral therapy (ART). Studies of SIV infected primates have demonstrated that Proteobacteria preferentially translocate and that mucosal immunity can be restored with probiotics. Pathogenic SIV infection results in a massive expansion of the virome, whereas non-pathogenic SIV infection does not. Human HIV infected cohorts have been shown to have microbiota distinctive from that of HIV negative controls and efforts to restore the intestinal microbiome via probiotics have often had positive results on host markers. The microbiota of the genital tract may play a significant role in acquisition and transmission of HIV. Modification of commensal microbial communities likely represents an important therapeutic adjunct to treatment of HIV. Here we review the literature regarding human microbiome in HIV infection. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. HIV antibodies for treatment of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Margolis, David M; Koup, Richard A; Ferrari, Guido

    2017-01-01

    The bar is high to improve on current combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), now highly effective, safe, and simple. However, antibodies that bind the HIV envelope are able to uniquely target the virus as it seeks to enter new target cells, or as it is expressed from previously infected cells. Furthermore, the use of antibodies against HIV as a therapeutic may offer advantages. Antibodies can have long half-lives, and are being considered as partners for long-acting antiretrovirals for use in therapy or prevention of HIV infection. Early studies in animal models and in clinical trials suggest that such antibodies can have antiviral activity but, as with small-molecule antiretrovirals, the issues of viral escape and resistance will have to be addressed. Most promising, however, are the unique properties of anti-HIV antibodies: the potential ability to opsonize viral particles, to direct antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against actively infected cells, and ultimately the ability to direct the clearance of HIV-infected cells by effector cells of the immune system. These distinctive activities suggest that HIV antibodies and their derivatives may play an important role in the next frontier of HIV therapeutics, the effort to develop treatments that could lead to an HIV cure. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Proteomic Analysis of HIV-Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Colon, Krystal; Rivera, Linda; Rodriguez-Franco, Eillen; Toro-Nieves, Dianedis

    2010-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (monocytes, macrophages, and microglia) play an important role in innate immunity against pathogens including HIV. These cells are also important viral reservoirs in the central nervous system and secrete inflammatory mediators and toxins that affect the tissue environment and function of surrounding cells. In the era of antiretroviral therapy, there are fewer of these inflammatory mediators. Proteomic approaches including surface enhancement laser desorption ionization, one- and two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis, and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry have been used to uncover the proteins produced by in vitro HIV-infected monocytes, macrophages, and microglia. These approaches have advanced the understanding of novel mechanisms for HIV replication and neuronal damage. They have also been used in tissue macrophages that restrict HIV replication to understand the mechanisms of restriction for future therapies. In this review, we summarize the proteomic studies on HIV-infected mononuclear phagocytes and discuss other recent proteomic approaches that are starting to be applied to this field. As proteomic instruments and methods evolve to become more sensitive and quantitative, future studies are likely to identify more proteins that can be targeted for diagnosis or therapy and to uncover novel disease mechanisms. PMID:21153888

  16. Low-level HIV infection of hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There are only limited data on whether HIV infection occurs within the liver; therefore, we explored early and late stages of the HIV life cycle in two hepatocyte cell lines – Huh7.5 and Huh7.5JFH1 – as well as in primary human hepatocytes. Results Integrated HIV DNA was detected in Huh7.5 and Huh7.5JFH1 cells, as well as in primary hepatocytes, and was inhibited by the integrase inhibitor raltegravir in a dose-dependent manner. HIV p24 protein was also detected in cell culture supernatants at days 1, 3, 5, and 7 post-infection and was inhibited by AZT, although levels were modest compared to those in a lymphocyte cell line. Culture supernatants from HIV-infected hepatocytes were capable of infecting a non-hepatic HIV indicator cell line. Conclusions These results indicating low-level HIV replication in hepatoctyes in vitro complement evidence suggesting that HIV has deleterious effects on the liver in vivo. PMID:22877244

  17. Pulmonary Hypertension Associated With HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cicalini, Stefania; Petrosillo, Nicola; Flores, Sonia C.

    2010-01-01

    The success of antiretroviral therapies in improving the survival of patients infected with HIV and reducing HIV-associated opportunistic infections is undisputed. Nevertheless, long-term outcomes such as noninfectious cardiovascular complications, including cardiomegaly, pericarditis, myocarditis, and pulmonary arterial hypertension, are now serious concerns. The lung is a frequent target organ for disorders associated with HIV infection. HIV-related pulmonary arterial hypertension (HRPAH) affects more individuals who are infected with HIV than individuals who are uninfected. Moreover, the long-standing estimated prevalence of HRPAH in developed countries (calculated at 0.5%) is increasing as more clinician-scientists unify their efforts to screen patients who are pulmonary asymptomatic for pulmonary arterial hypertension. In order to decrease mortality, efforts are directed at early detection, diagnosis, and therapeutic interventions before the disease compromises patients’ quality of life. This article reviews the logistics of screening approaches for HRPAH and discusses the substantial disease burden currently faced by developing countries, where the prevalence of HIV infection is higher and complicated by hyperendemic risk factors, limited access to antiretrovirals, and lack of screening tools. We also present mechanistic insights into HRPAH, including the role of HIV proteins and their potential use as screening tools, and, finally, areas that still need intense research. PMID:20522575

  18. Elevated aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index in perinatally HIV-infected children in the United States.

    PubMed

    Siberry, George K; Patel, Kunjal; Pinto, Jorge A; Puga, Ana; Mirza, Ayesha; Miller, Tracie L; Van Dyke, Russell B

    2014-08-01

    Elevated aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index may signal liver fibrosis. Among 397 US children with perinatal HIV infection, at baseline was >1.5 in 0.8% [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.2-2.2%) and >0.5 in 6.5% (95% CI, 4.3-9.4%); incidence on study was 0.5 (95% CI, 0.2-1.2) and 6.4 (95% CI, 4.8-8.3) per 100 person-years, respectively. Long-term liver outcomes after perinatal HIV infection warrant further study.

  19. Monitoring the levels and trends of HIV infection: the Public Health Service's HIV surveillance program.

    PubMed Central

    Dondero, T J; Pappaioanou, M; Curran, J W

    1988-01-01

    A comprehensive, multifaceted approach to HIV surveillance is needed to provide the information necessary for public health management and policy. Because HIV infection is not readily or uniformly ascertained, survey methods and sentinel surveillance approaches must be used. At least some of the surveys must be blinded, that is, anonymous and unlinked to identifiable persons, to avoid the uninterpretable impact of self-selection bias that could lead to both significant underestimates and occasional overestimates of HIV prevalence. Other surveys must be nonblinded, with careful interviews of volunteer participants to evaluate risk factors for HIV infection. These various surveys must continue over time to evaluate trends in infection. A comprehensive family of complementary HIV surveys and studies and a national household-based HIV seroprevalence survey have been undertaken by the Public Health Service in collaboration with other Federal agencies, State and local health departments, blood collection agencies, and medical research institutions. These projects focus on accessible segments of the general population, childbearing women, persons at high risk for HIV, and persons in special settings such as prisons and colleges. This comprehensive surveillance approach will help monitor the levels and trends of HIV infection in the United States and help prioritize, target, and evaluate HIV prevention activities. PMID:3131809

  20. HIV Infection Legal Issues: An Introduction for Developmental Services. Technical Report on Developmental Disabilities and HIV Infection, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, David C.; Decker, Curtis L.

    As agencies and programs serving individuals with developmental disabilities are called upon to serve a new population of individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, they will be forced to confront complex legal questions. This paper discusses the legal frameworks in which individuals with HIV infection are considered eligible…

  1. Predictors of hypertension in an urban HIV-infected population at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Okpa, Henry Ohem; Bisong, Elvis Mbu; Enang, Ofem Egbe; Monjok, Emmanuel; Essien, Ekere James

    2017-01-01

    Background The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has remarkably improved the prognosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, at the expense of the development of long-term complications such as cardiovascular and renal diseases. Hypertension (HTN) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and its associated mortality. In this study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of HTN and to identify possible predictors among HIV-infected patients attending the HIV Special Treatment Clinic at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar. Materials and methods A cross-sectional study was carried out over a 5-month period from February to July 2016. A total of 112 HIV-infected persons were consecutively recruited and their blood pressures were measured in two consecutive clinic visits. They were compared with the HIV-negative control group (n=309). Data collected were analyzed with SPSS 18, and statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results There was a female preponderance in both the HIV-infected individuals and HIV-negative control group (57.5% vs. 57.4%). The mean ages were 39.3 and 33.9 years in HIV-infected and HIV-negative subjects, respectively. The risk factors that were associated with HTN in both groups were older age (>40 years), increased weight and body mass index (BMI), and presence of obesity. Male sex and duration of exposure to HAART and CD4 count levels >200 cells/mm3 were associated with HTN in HIV-infected patients, whereas the absence of family history of HTN was significantly associated with HTN in both groups. However, in a multivariate logistic regression, the predictors of HTN in both groups are absence of family history of HTN and older age in HIV-infected patients and HIV-negative subjects, respectively. Conclusion Traditional risk factors such as older age, increased BMI, and obesity were linked to HTN in both HIV-infected and HIV-negative subjects, but higher CD4 count level and

  2. Tuberculosis incidence rate and risk factors among HIV-infected adults with access to antiretroviral therapy in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Enju; MAKUBI, Abel; DRAIN, Paul; SPIEGELMAN, Donna; SANDO, David; LI, Nan; CHALAMILLA, Guerino; SUDFELD, Christopher R.; HERTZMARK, Ellen; FAWZI, Wafaie W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence rate and risk factors of tuberculosis (TB) among HIV-infected adults accessing antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Tanzania. Design A prospective observational study among HIV-infected adults attending 47 HIV clinics in Dar es Salaam. Methods We estimated TB incidence rates among HIV-infected patients prior to and after ART initiation. We used Cox proportional hazard regressions to determine the predictors of incident TB among HIV-infected adults enrolled in the HIV care and treatment program. Results We assessed 67,686 patients for a median follow-up period of 24 (interquartile range: 8–49) months; 7,602 patients were diagnosed with active TB. The TB incidence rate was 7.9 (95% Confidence Interval (CI), 7.6–8.2)/100 person-years prior to ART initiation, and 4.4(95%CI, 4.2–4.4)/100 person-years for patients receiving ART. In multivariate analyses, patients on ART in the first 3 months had a 57% higher risk of TB (Hazard Ratio:1.57, 95%CI:1.47–1.68) compared to those not on ART, but the risk significantly decreased with increasing duration of ART. Risk factors for incident TB included being male, having low body mass index or middle upper arm circumference, lower CD4 cell count, and advanced WHO disease stage. There was seasonal variation for incident TB, with higher risk observed following the rainy seasons (May, June, and November). Conclusion In TB endemic regions, HIV-infected patients initiating ART, particularly males and those with poor nutritional status, should be closely monitored for active TB in the months following ART initiation. In addition to increasing the access to ART, interventions should be considered to improve nutritional status among HIV-infected patients. PMID:26091295

  3. Tuberculosis and hepatic steatosis are prevalent liver pathology findings among HIV-infected patients in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Christopher J; Hoffmann, Jennifer D; Kensler, Caroline; van der Watt, Martin; Omar, Tanvier; Chaisson, Richard E; Martinson, Neil A; Variava, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Liver disease epidemiology in sub-Saharan Africa has shifted as a result of HIV and the increased use of antiretroviral therapy leading to a need for updated data on common causes of liver disease. We retrospectively reviewed records from all hospitalized patients who had liver biopsy at a single hospital in South Africa from 2001 to 2009 and compared diagnosis by HIV status. During the period of study 262 patients had liver biopsy, 108 (41%) were HIV-infected, 25 (10%) were HIV-sero-negative, and 129 (49%) had unknown or unrecorded HIV status. Overall 81% of biopsies provided additional diagnostic data. Malignancy was the most common finding reported on 56 (21%) biopsies followed by granuloma or TB, hepatic steatosis, and fibrosis or cirrhosis. HIV-infected patients were more likely to have granulomas and steatosis. Half of patients with granulomas were already on TB treatment, suggesting paradoxical reactions or drug induced liver injury may have been important causes of liver inflammation among these patients. We note that TB, paradoxical reactions during TB treatment, possible drug induced liver injury, and hepatic steatosis are important causes of liver pathology among HIV-infected hospitalized patients with unclear etiology of liver disease after initial assessment. Among HIV sero-negative patients, malignancy was the major cause of liver disease. Our findings re-enforce the importance of TB as a diagnosis among HIV-infected individuals.

  4. Partner notification with HIV-infected drug users: results of formative research.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S J; Tross, S; Doino-Ingersol, J; Weisfuse, I

    1998-08-01

    The authors conducted formative research on the use of partner notification with HIV-infected drug users (i.e. those who use/abuse injectable drugs, crack or cocaine) in order to guide the development of an effective intervention for this population in New York City. Structured focus group and personal interviews were conducted with 25 in- and out-of-treatment drug users, 23 counsellors from a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic and a methadone maintenance treatment programme (MMTP), and nine experts in the field of HIV partner notification and/or substance abuse prevention and treatment. Results revealed factors associated with HIV-positive disclosure, the strengths and barriers of existing partner notification programmes and issues that should be considered in designing an effective intervention with HIV-infected drug users. Further research and planning activities are recommended before piloting and evaluating such a programme.

  5. MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY PROFILE OF HIV INFECTED PATIENTS, WITH AND WITHOUT HEPATITIS C COINFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Mayor, Angel M.; Gomez, Maria A.; Fernandez, Diana M.; Rios-Olivares, Eddy; Thomas, James C.; Hunter, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection is an important and frequent scenario, predominantly in injecting drug users (IDUs). The present study evaluated morbidity and mortality variation in HIV infected patients with and without HCV coinfection. Methods Coinfection prevalence was determined in 356 HIV infected persons. Their clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, risk factors, HIV therapies and mortality rates were evaluated. Results HCV prevalence was 54% in the overall group and 81% in IDUs, with predominance of HCV genotype 1. Mortality rates were similar in patients with and without coinfection; however coinfected patients had significantly higher liver damage as a cause of mortality when compared with those who were not coinfected. Conclusions The high HCV prevalence and the emerging mortality from liver diseases, revealed the significance of this coinfection in HIV epidemic. Primary and secondary prevention are necessary to reduce the expanding impact of HCV infection in HIV patients. PMID:16474077

  6. Attention deficit hyperactivity and oppositional defiance disorder in HIV-infected South African children.

    PubMed

    Zeegers, I; Rabie, H; Swanevelder, S; Edson, C; Cotton, M; van Toorn, R

    2010-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional defiance disorder (ODD) in HIV-infected South African children. Swanson, Nolan and Pelham (SNAP-IV) questionnaires were used to determine ADHD and ODD severity and a draw-a-person (DAP) test was used to screen for developmental disorders. Associations between behavioural subtypes, psychological functioning, demographic and health variables were investigated. The SNAP-IV caregiver questionnaires showed a 26% prevalence of ADHD inattentive type; 38% hyperactive type and 24% combined type. The prevalence of ODD was 12% on parent questionnaires and 9.5% on teacher's questionnaires. Parents/caregiver-only SNAP-IV questionnaires indicate a high prevalence of significant ADHD (all subtypes) and ODD in HIV-infected children. No significant differences were found between the severity of HIV disease and the presence of a behavioural disorder. The SNAP IV questionnaires and DAP test may prove valuable screening tools in HIV children with behavioural problems.

  7. Risk factors for HIV infection in males who have sex with males (MSM) in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Chan, Philip A; Khan, Omar A

    2007-07-12

    Recent surveillance data from Bangladesh indicate rising HIV infection among intravenous drug users (IDU) in the country. We suggest a likely association between HIV risk factors in this group and other groups, such as males who have sex with males (MSM). Data on MSM in Bangladesh was collected and analyzed from numerous primary and secondary sources, including government ministries, non-profit health organizations, and personal communications. The overall prevalence of HIV in Bangladesh is relatively low, but surveillance data indicate that infection has reached significant proportions in certain high-risk groups and may soon spread to other groups, specifically MSM. The epidemiology of HIV infection in other countries suggests that increasing rates of HIV in higher-risk populations can precede an epidemic in the general population. We review the data concerning MSM, IDU and HIV in Bangladesh from a variety of sources and propose ways to prevent HIV transmission.

  8. HIV Infection Affects Streptococcus mutans Levels, but Not Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, G.; Saxena, D.; Chen, Z.; Norman, R.G.; Phelan, J.A.; Laverty, M.; Fisch, G.S.; Corby, P.M.; Abrams, W.; Malamud, D.; Li, Y.

    2012-01-01

    We report a clinical study that examines whether HIV infection affects Streptococcus mutans colonization in the oral cavity. Whole stimulated saliva samples were collected from 46 HIV-seropositive individuals and 69 HIV-seronegative control individuals. The level of S. mutans colonization was determined by conventional culture methods. The genotype of S. mutans was compared between 10 HIV-positive individuals before and after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and 10 non-HIV-infected control individuals. The results were analyzed against viral load, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts, salivary flow rate, and caries status. We observed that S. mutans levels were higher in HIV-infected individuals than in the non-HIV-infected control individuals (p = 0.013). No significant differences in S. mutans genotypes were found between the two groups over the six-month study period, even after HAART. There was a bivariate linear relationship between S. mutans levels and CD8+ counts (r = 0.412; p = 0.007), but not between S. mutans levels and either CD4+ counts or viral load. Furthermore, compared with non-HIV-infected control individuals, HIV-infected individuals experienced lower salivary secretion (p = 0.009) and a positive trend toward more decayed tooth surfaces (p = 0.027). These findings suggest that HIV infection can have a significant effect on the level of S. mutans, but not genotypes. PMID:22821240

  9. Autoimmune diseases and HIV infection: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Virot, Emilie; Duclos, Antoine; Adelaide, Leopold; Miailhes, Patrick; Hot, Arnaud; Ferry, Tristan; Seve, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    To describe the clinical manifestations, treatments, prognosis, and prevalence of autoimmune diseases (ADs) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients.All HIV-infected patients managed in the Infectious Diseases Department of the Lyon University Hospitals, France, between January 2003 and December 2013 and presenting an AD were retrospectively included.Thirty-six ADs were found among 5186 HIV-infected patients which represents a prevalence of 0.69% including immune thrombocytopenic purpura (n = 15), inflammatory myositis (IM) (n = 4), sarcoidosis (n = 4), Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) (n = 4), myasthenia gravis (n = 2), Graves' disease (n = 2), and 1 case of each following conditions: systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune hepatitis, Hashimoto thyroiditis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. One patient presented 2 ADs. Thirty patients were known to be HIV-infected when they developed an AD. The AD preceded HIV infection in 2 patients. GBS and HIV infection were diagnosed simultaneously in 3 cases. At AD diagnosis, CD4 T lymphocytes count were higher than 350/mm in 63% of patients, between 200 and 350/mm in 19% and less than 200/mm in 19%. Twenty patients benefited from immunosuppressant treatments, with a good tolerance.ADs during HIV infection are uncommon in this large French cohort. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura, sarcoidosis, IM, and GBS appear to be more frequent than in the general population. Immunosuppressant treatments seem to be effective and well tolerated.

  10. Dynamics of HIV infection in lymphoid tissue network.

    PubMed

    Nakaoka, Shinji; Iwami, Shingo; Sato, Kei

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a fast replicating ribonucleic acid virus, which can easily mutate in order to escape the effects of drug administration. Hence, understanding the basic mechanisms underlying HIV persistence in the body is essential in the development of new therapies that could eradicate HIV infection. Lymphoid tissues are the primary sites of HIV infection. Despite the recent progress in real-time monitoring technology, HIV infection dynamics in a whole body is unknown. Mathematical modeling and simulations provide speculations on global behavior of HIV infection in the lymphatic system. We propose a new mathematical model that describes the spread of HIV infection throughout the lymphoid tissue network. In order to represent the volume difference between lymphoid tissues, we propose the proportionality of several kinetic parameters to the lymphoid tissues' volume distribution. Under this assumption, we perform extensive numerical computations in order to simulate the spread of HIV infection in the lymphoid tissue network. Numerical computations simulate single drug treatments of an HIV infection. One of the important biological speculations derived from this study is a drug saturation effect generated by lymphoid network connection. This implies that a portion of reservoir lymphoid tissues to which drug is not sufficiently delivered would inhibit HIV eradication despite of extensive drug injection.

  11. A study on malarial infection in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Muthu, Maharajan; Kumaar, G Sampath

    2007-02-01

    To find out whether malaria occurred at an increased frequency in HIV-infected individuals and to evaluate the clinical course and risk factors for malarial infection in HIV, a prospective study was carried out in a tertiary care centre from June, 1999 to December, 2000 among HIV-infected individuals with HIV-uninfected Individuals taken as control. In this study, out of 250 individuals, 152 were HIV-infected and the remaining were HIV-negative. The odd's ratio (OR) for the occurrence of malaria in the HIV-infected population compared with the HIV-uninfected population was 2.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.01, 6.4; p < 0.02). The prevalence of malaria in HIV infection was 20.4%. The same was 8.3% in asymptomatic stage, and 22.6% and 21.3% in the early and late symptomatic stages of HIV disease respectively. Among those who came for follow-up 44.4% of the HIV-infected individuals had recurrence of malarial infection. Contrary to what was thought before, malaria occurred at an increased frequency in HIV cases. The occurrence of malaria increased in the symptomatic stages of HIV disease compared to the asymptomatic stage. Recurrence was high in the HIV-infected population.

  12. The Effect of Latent Toxoplasma gondii Infection on the Immune Response in HIV-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Beran, Ondrej; Kodym, Petr; Maly, Marek; Davidova, Alzbeta; Reinvartova, Gabriela; Jilich, David; Holub, Michal; Rozsypal, Hanus

    2015-01-01

    A relationship between latent toxoplasmosis and the immune system during HIV disease is poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this follow-up study was to characterize immunological parameters in HIV-infected patients with latent toxoplasmosis and noninfected individuals. A total of 101 HIV-infected patients were enrolled in the study. The patients were classified into two groups based on anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies: a group of 55 toxoplasma-positive persons (TP) and a group of 46 toxoplasma-negative persons (TN). Absolute counts of several lymphocyte subsets decreased in the TP group, namely, T cells (p = 0.007), B cells (p = 0.002), NK cells (p = 0.009), CD4 T cells (p = 0.028), and CD8 T cells (p = 0.004). On the other hand, the percentage of CD8 T cells expressing CD38 and HLA-DR significantly increased during the follow-up in the TP group (p = 0.003, p = 0.042, resp.) as well as the intensity of CD38 and HLA-DR expression (MFI) on CD8 T cells (p = 0.001, p = 0.057, resp.). In the TN group, analysis of the kinetics of immunological parameters revealed no significant changes over time. In conclusion, the results suggest that latent T. gondii infection modulates the immune response during HIV infection.

  13. Violence victimization after HIV infection in a US probability sample of adult patients in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Zierler, S; Cunningham, W E; Andersen, R; Shapiro, M F; Nakazono, T; Morton, S; Crystal, S; Stein, M; Turner, B; St Clair, P; Bozzette, S A

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study estimated the proportion of HIV-infected adults who have been assaulted by a partner or someone important to them since their HIV diagnosis and the extent to which they reported HIV-seropositive status as a cause of the violence. METHODS: Study participants were from a nationally representative probability sample of 2864 HIV-infected adults who were receiving medical care and were enrolled in the HIV Costs and Service Utilization Study. All interviews (91% in person, 9% by telephone) were conducted with computer-assisted personal interviewing instruments. Interviews began in January 1996 and ended 15 months later. RESULTS: Overall, 20.5% of the women, 11.5% of the men who reported having sex with men, and 7.5% of the heterosexual men reported physical harm since diagnosis, of whom nearly half reported HIV-seropositive status as a cause of violent episodes. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-related care is an appropriate setting for routine assessment of violence. Programs to cross-train staff in antiviolence agencies and HIV care facilities need to be developed for men and women with HIV infection. PMID:10667181

  14. HIV infection, bone metabolism, and fractures.

    PubMed

    Güerri-Fernández, Robert; Villar-García, Judit; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    With the advent of high active antiretroviral therapy there was a significant improvement on HIV subjects survival. Thus, bone changes related to HIV became an important aspect of these individuals. HIV affects bone remodeling causing bone fragility. In addition, antiretroviral therapy may also negatively affect bone metabolism. Several studies describe an increased incidence of fractures in these patients when compared with controls without the disease. The European Society of AIDS (EACS), and other societies, have included guidance on management of osteoporosis in HIV-infected patients emphasizing the identification of patients with low bone mass. Supplementation of calcium and vitamin D and the use of alendronate in these individuals should be recommended on a case base.

  15. Lack of endemic HIV infection in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Azocar, J; Martinez, C; McLane, M F; Allan, J; Essex, M

    1987-01-01

    A seroepidemiological survey of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was recently conducted in 556 serum samples from donors in rural and urban areas of Venezuela and from aboriginal Amazonian Indians. The samples were tested for the presence of antibodies to HIV by the ELISA technique using several commercially available kits. 19 samples were positive. These samples then were tested by immunofluorescence, Western blot, and radioimmunoprecipitation techniques as confirmatory assays. 4 seropositive control samples from patients from Caracas with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) or AIDS-Related Complex (ARC) were analyzed. None of the samples from rural or aboriginal Indians could be confirmed by these assays. These sera also were evaluated for antibodies to STLV-3 by Western blot analysis. No positive samples were identified. The results fail to support earlier studies suggesting that HIV or a related virus is endemic in the Venezuelan population.

  16. Diagnostic Performance of a Multiplex PCR assay for meningitis in an HIV-infected population in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Rhein, Joshua; Bahr, Nathan C; Hemmert, Andrew C; Cloud, Joann L; Bellamkonda, Satya; Oswald, Cody; Lo, Eric; Nabeta, Henry; Kiggundu, Reuben; Akampurira, Andrew; Musubire, Abdu; Williams, Darlisha; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2015-01-01

    Meningitis remains a worldwide problem, and rapid diagnosis is essential to optimize survival. We evaluated the utility of a multiplex PCR test in differentiating possible etiologies of meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 69 HIV-infected Ugandan adults with meningitis was collected at diagnosis (n=51) and among persons with cryptococcal meningitis during therapeutic lumbar punctures (n=68). Cryopreserved CSF specimens were analyzed with BioFire FilmArray® Meningitis/Encephalitis panel, which targets 17 pathogens. The panel detected Cryptococcus in the CSF of patients diagnosed with a first-episode of cryptococcal meningitis by fungal culture with 100% sensitivity and specificity, and differentiated between fungal relapse and paradoxical immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in recurrent episodes. A negative FilmArray result was predictive of CSF sterility on follow-up lumbar punctures for cryptococcal meningitis. EBV was frequently detected in this immunosuppressed population (n=45). Other pathogens detected included: CMV (n=2), VZV (n=2), HHV-6 (n=1), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (n=1). The FilmArray Meningitis/Encephalitis panel offers a promising platform for rapid meningitis diagnosis. PMID:26711635

  17. Diagnostic performance of a multiplex PCR assay for meningitis in an HIV-infected population in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Rhein, Joshua; Bahr, Nathan C; Hemmert, Andrew C; Cloud, Joann L; Bellamkonda, Satya; Oswald, Cody; Lo, Eric; Nabeta, Henry; Kiggundu, Reuben; Akampurira, Andrew; Musubire, Abdu; Williams, Darlisha A; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2016-03-01

    Meningitis remains a worldwide problem, and rapid diagnosis is essential to optimize survival. We evaluated the utility of a multiplex PCR test in differentiating possible etiologies of meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 69 HIV-infected Ugandan adults with meningitis was collected at diagnosis (n=51) and among persons with cryptococcal meningitis during therapeutic lumbar punctures (n=68). Cryopreserved CSF specimens were analyzed with BioFire FilmArray® Meningitis/Encephalitis panel, which targets 17 pathogens. The panel detected Cryptococcus in the CSF of patients diagnosed with a first episode of cryptococcal meningitis by fungal culture with 100% sensitivity and specificity and differentiated between fungal relapse and paradoxical immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in recurrent episodes. A negative FilmArray result was predictive of CSF sterility on follow-up lumbar punctures for cryptococcal meningitis. EBV was frequently detected in this immunosuppressed population (n=45). Other pathogens detected included: cytomegalovirus (n=2), varicella zoster virus (n=2), human herpes virus 6 (n=1), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (n=1). The FilmArray Meningitis/Encephalitis panel offers a promising platform for rapid meningitis diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. HIV infection and HERV expression: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The human genome contains multiple copies of retrovirus genomes known as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) that have entered the germ-line at some point in evolution. Several of these proviruses have retained (partial) coding capacity, so that a number of viral proteins or even virus particles are expressed under various conditions. Human ERVs (HERVs) belong to the beta-, gamma-, or spuma- retrovirus groups. Endogenous delta- and lenti- viruses are notably absent in humans, although endogenous lentivirus genomes have been found in lower primates. Exogenous retroviruses that currently form a health threat to humans intriguingly belong to those absent groups. The best studied of the two infectious human retroviruses is the lentivirus human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) which has an overwhelming influence on its host by infecting cells of the immune system. One HIV-induced change is the induction of HERV transcription, often leading to induced HERV protein expression. This review will discuss the potential HIV-HERV interactions. Several studies have suggested that HERV proteins are unlikely to complement defective HIV virions, nor is HIV able to package HERV transcripts, probably due to low levels of sequence similarity. It is unclear whether the expression of HERVs has a negative, neutral, or positive influence on HIV-AIDS disease progression. A positive effect was recently reported by the specific expression of HERVs in chronically HIV-infected patients, which results in the presentation of HERV-derived peptides to CD8+ T-cells. These cytotoxic T-cells were not tolerant to HERV peptides, as would be expected for self-antigens, and consequently lysed the HIV-infected, HERV-presenting cells. This novel mechanism could control HIV replication and result in a low plasma viral load. The possibility of developing a vaccination strategy based on these HERV peptides will be discussed. PMID:22248111

  19. Early syphilis affects markers of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kotsafti, Ourania; Paparizos, Vassilios; Kourkounti, Sofia; Chatziioannou, Argiro; Nicolaidou, Electra; Kapsimali, Violetta; Antoniou, Christina

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate if early syphilis infection affects markers of HIV infection; CD4 T cells and viral load (VL). A retrospective study was performed on 160 HIV-positive patients (111 receiving antiretroviral therapy [ART] and 49 without ART). Early syphilis diagnosis was made in HIV patients during their follow-up at the HIV/AIDS Unit at a Greek Dermatology and Venereology Unit. The patients' blood tests were available at the time of diagnosis, as well as before and 12 weeks after early syphilis diagnosis. CD4 T cell counts and VL levels were measured. It was found that syphilis infection had a negative impact on the CD4 T cell counts in both groups, with reduced CD4 T cell counts observed in 84.6% (99/111) and 79.5% (39/49) of patients receiving and not receiving ART, respectively. After treatment for syphilis, CD4 T cell counts returned to pre-treatment levels in most patients, especially those receiving ART. There was a slight and transient VL increase. Patients receiving ART had a 27% increase in VL, compared to 71.4% among patients not receiving ART. Although the VL increase was slight (41-14,000 copies/ml) in the group under treatment, 4-5% (5/111) patients did not return to pre-treatment levels. Moreover, viral mutations associated with treatment resistance were identified in these patients. Early syphilis accelerates and complicates the progression of HIV infection. Early diagnosis and treatment of syphilis may prevent infection-associated complications in most instances. Consequently, prevention of syphilis and other sexually transmitted infections is of great importance for patients infected with HIV. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. A mathematical approach to HIV infection dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, A.; Oharu, S.; Oharu, Y.

    2007-07-01

    In order to obtain a comprehensive form of mathematical models describing nonlinear phenomena such as HIV infection process and AIDS disease progression, it is efficient to introduce a general class of time-dependent evolution equations in such a way that the associated nonlinear operator is decomposed into the sum of a differential operator and a perturbation which is nonlinear in general and also satisfies no global continuity condition. An attempt is then made to combine the implicit approach (usually adapted for convective diffusion operators) and explicit approach (more suited to treat continuous-type operators representing various physiological interactions), resulting in a semi-implicit product formula. Decomposing the operators in this way and considering their individual properties, it is seen that approximation-solvability of the original model is verified under suitable conditions. Once appropriate terms are formulated to describe treatment by antiretroviral therapy, the time-dependence of the reaction terms appears, and such product formula is useful for generating approximate numerical solutions to the governing equations. With this knowledge, a continuous model for HIV disease progression is formulated and physiological interpretations are provided. The abstract theory is then applied to show existence of unique solutions to the continuous model describing the behavior of the HIV virus in the human body and its reaction to treatment by antiretroviral therapy. The product formula suggests appropriate discrete models describing the dynamics of host pathogen interactions with HIV1 and is applied to perform numerical simulations based on the model of the HIV infection process and disease progression. Finally, the results of our numerical simulations are visualized and it is observed that our results agree with medical and physiological aspects.

  1. [New diagnosis of HIV infection in children].

    PubMed

    Guillén, Sara; Prieto, Luis; Jiménez de Ory, Santiago; González-Granado, Ignacio; González-Tomé, María Isabel; Mellado, María José; de José, Maribel; Navarro, María Luisa; Beceiro, José; Roa, Miguel Ángel; Muñoz, María Ángeles; Tomás Ramos, José

    2012-03-01

    The number of children of immigrant origin in the last few years has increased the cohort of HIV-infected children in the Community of Madrid. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the new diagnosed children and describe the different subtypes of HIV-1. The new diagnosed children were analysed from the year 1997, divided into 3 periods: P1 (1997-2000), P2 (2001-2004), P3 (2005-2009). The regions and countries of origin, the clinical, immune and viral characteristics, as well as the response to treatment were analysed. The subtypes of HIV-1 were evaluated by phylogenetic analysis of protease genes and reverse transcriptase. We identified 141 new diagnoses of HIV infection, the percentage of immigrant origin in P1 was (22.5%), P2 (50%) and P3 (68%). The origin had changed from Latin America in P1 to sub-Saharan Africa in P3. There were no differences between Spanish and immigrant children in the age at diagnosis, the CDC clinical stage A/B/C, viral load, percentage of CD4 at diagnosis and actual. Better viral response was more likely in immigrants after the first regimen of HAART (Highly active antiretroviral treatment) independently of the treatment received. A total of 66 subtypes were obtained, 24% were subtypes non-B (56% recombinants forms). All subtypes of Spanish children (43) and Latin American (5) were subtypes B, and all the children from sub-Saharan Africa (14) were subtypes non-B. There were no differences between immigrants and Spanish children infected by HIV, except the different subtypes of HIV-1. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Receipt of HIV/STD Prevention Counseling by HIV-Infected Adults Receiving Medical Care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    MIZUNO, Yuko; ZHU, Julia; CREPAZ, Nicole; BEER, Linda; PURCELL, David W.; JOHNSON, Christopher H.; VALVERDE, Eduardo E.; SKARBINSKI, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Objective Guidelines recommend risk-reduction counseling by HIV providers to all HIV-infected persons. Among HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States, we estimated prevalence of exposure to three types of HIV/sexually transmitted disease (STD) risk-reduction interventions and described the characteristics of persons who received these interventions. Design Data were from the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP), a supplemental HIV surveillance system designed to produce nationally representative estimates of behavioral and clinical characteristics of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Methods Descriptive analyses were conducted to estimate the exposure to each type of HIV/STD risk-reduction intervention. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to assess associations between the selected correlates with each exposure variable. Results About 44% of participants reported a one-on-one conversation with a health care provider about HIV/STD prevention, 30% with a prevention program worker, 16% reported participation in a small group risk-reduction intervention, and 52% reported receiving at least one of the three interventions in the past 12 months. Minority race/ethnicity, low income, and risky sexual behavior consistently predicted greater intervention exposure. However, 39% of persons who reported risky sex did not receive any HIV/STD risk-reduction interventions. Conclusions HIV-infected persons in care with fewer resources or those who engaged in risk behaviors were more likely to receive HIV/STD risk-reduction interventions. However, less than half of HIV-infected persons in care received HIV/STD prevention counseling from their provider, an intervention that has been shown to be effective and is supported by guidelines. PMID:24056066

  3. A Longitudinal Analysis of the Impact of Physical Activity on Neurocognitive Functioning Among HIV-Infected Adults.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Catherine A; Marquine, María J; Fazeli, Pariya L; Umlauf, Anya; Henry, Brook L; Zlatar, Zvinka; Montoya, Jessica L; Ellis, Ronald J; Grant, Igor; Moore, David J

    2016-12-19

    Higher levels of physical activity (PA) have been linked to better neurocognitive functioning in many populations. The current study examines the longitudinal association between PA and neurocognitive functioning among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected persons. Community-dwelling adults (N = 291) self-reported level of PA and completed a comprehensive neuropsychological battery at two to four study visits (Mean follow-up time = 2.6 years). Participants were divided into three PA groups: "No PA" (no PA at any visit), "consistent PA" (PA at ≥50% of visits), and "inconsistent PA" (PA < 50% of visits). A mixed effect model, adjusting for significant covariates showed that all PA groups had statistically significant, yet modest, neurocognitive decline over time; and, the consistent PA group began with, and maintained, significantly better neurocognitive function compared to the other two PA groups. This effect was evident among both HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected persons, despite the fact that HIV-infected persons showed lower baseline neurocognitive function. PA is a modifiable lifestyle behavior that may help to protect against neurocognitive impairment regardless of HIV status, however, given the proportion of HIV-infected individuals who evidence neurocognitive difficulties, a focus on increasing PA seems warranted.

  4. The "moral career" of perinatally HIV-infected children: revisiting Goffman's concept.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Maria Letícia Santos; Bastos, Francisco Inácio; Darmont, Mariana; Dickstein, Paulo; Monteiro, Simone

    2015-01-01

    HIV-infected children usually live in vulnerable situations, experiencing discrimination and stigma commonly felt by other people living with HIV/AIDS. The present study aims to analyse primary socialisation of HIV-infected children and adolescents recruited from a public health service in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) as a social process that shapes a new generation of stigmatised and vulnerable persons. Research was informed by an interactionist perspective, focusing on key aspects of HIV-infected children and adolescents life histories under the conceptual frame of Erving Goffman's theories regarding "moral careers". Goffman defines the making of a moral career as the process through which a person learns that she/he possesses a particular attribute, which may lead her/him to be discredited by members of the surrounding society. We have identified aspects of life histories of HIV-vertically infected children and adolescents for each aspect of "moral career" as described by Goffman, relating them to as family structure, the experience of living HIV within the family, and the position and family role of a given subject. The patterns of "moral career" proposed by Goffman in 1963 were useful in identifying components of HIV-related stigma among children and adolescents. These include gender and social disadvantages, difficulty in coping with a child with a potentially severe disease, orphanhood, abandonment, adoption and disclosure of one's HIV serostatus. Primary socialisation of HIV-infected children and adolescents is a key piece of the complex HIV/AIDS-labelling process that could be targeted by interventions aiming to decrease stigma and marginalisation. Health care workers and stakeholders should be committed to ensuring education and guaranteeing the legal rights of this specific population, including the continuous provision of quality health care, full access to school and support to full disclosure of HIV diagnosis.

  5. Telmisartan to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk in Older HIV-Infected Adults: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV-infected persons are at increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, but traditional CVD therapies are understudied in this population. Telmisartan is an angiotensin receptor blocker and PPAR-γ agonist that improves endothelial function and cardiovascular mortality in HIV-uninfected populations. We assessed the effects of telmisartan on endothelial function in older HIV-infected persons at risk for CVD in a small pilot study. Methods HIV-infected individuals ≥50 years old on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) with ≥1 traditional CVD risk factor received open label telmisartan 80 mg daily for six weeks. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) measured endothelial function. The primary endpoint was six-week change in maximum relative FMD. Results Seventeen participants enrolled; 16 completed all evaluations (88% men, 65% non-White, median age 60 years, CD4+ T lymphocyte count 625 cells/mm3). ART included 71% PI, 29% NNRTI, 29% integrase inhibitor, 65% tenofovir and 29% abacavir. CVD risk factor prevalence included 76% hyperlipidemia, 65% hypertension, 18% smoking and 12% diabetes mellitus. After six weeks, statistically significant blood pressure changes were observed (systolic −16.0 mmHg, diastolic −6.0 mmHg) without significant changes in FMD. In subset analyses, FMD increased more among abacavir-treated, PI-treated and non-smoking participants. Conclusions No significant FMD changes were observed after six weeks of telmisartan therapy; however, abacavir- and PI-treated participants and non-smokers showed greater FMD increases. Additional studies are needed to explore the effects of telmisartan on endothelial function among HIV-infected individuals with traditional CVD and/or ART-specific risk factors. PMID:26360501

  6. Acute encephalitis as initial presentation of primary HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Añón, Rosário Pazos; Àguas, Maria João

    2012-07-03

    Acute encephalitis is a life-threatening condition. A wide variety of infectious agents are implicated and in many patients no cause is found. HIV acute seroconversion illness can rarely present as acute encephalitis. Although most experts agree in starting antiretroviral treatment in severe acute HIV infection, the evidence of the benefits are still lacking. The authors report a case of severe acute encephalitis as a primary presentation of HIV infection in which introduction of highly active antiretroviral treatment resulted in clinical recovery. This case highlights the need to consider HIV infection in the differential diagnosis of treatable viral encephalitis.

  7. Clinical diagnosis of cardiac involvement in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Moldovan, L; Branzan, O; Nechita, O; Ardeleanu, C; Teodorescu, M; Geamai, A

    2012-01-01

    HIV infection is continuously raising, and different treatments did not manage to extend the patient's life. Clinical and morphopathological features of respiratory, gastrointestinal, hematological and nervous system are well characterized in HIV infection, but cardiac involvement is not so well known. Cardiac involvement is extremely rare in HIV disease, but demonstrated by echocardiography and anatomo-pathologic methods, it is more frequently met than the clinical features are supposed to be, and it can be demonstrated by positive serologic tests. The main reason of this research is the necessity to obtain data from HIV infection concerning heart involvement. PMID:23049631

  8. Vitamin A and HIV infection: disease progression, mortality, and transmission.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, C M; Kuhn, L; Stein, Z

    2000-10-01

    Among HIV-infected individuals, many nutritional factors that influence disease progress, mortality, and transmission are not well understood. Of particular interest is the role of vitamin A. The benefits of vitamin A have been recognized since ancient times by Egyptian physicians who successfully treated night blindness with vitamin A. Contemporary scientists have since recognized the importance of vitamin A and have provided evidence that it may help in repairing damaged mucosal surfaces; what remains unclear, however, is its role during HIV infection. In this review, we examine the evidence provided in both observational studies and randomized controlled trials that assessed the effect of vitamin A during HIV infection.

  9. Physical fitness characteristics of active duty US Air Force members with HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    De, Asha; Xu, Xiaohe; White, James; Sunil, Thankam S.; Okulicz, Jason F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with reduced muscle mass and adverse metabolic effects. We evaluated the impact of HIV infection on longitudinal exercise performance in US Air Force (USAF) members with HIV infection. USAF members perform standardized fitness assessments every 6 to 12 months with a composite score comprised of abdominal circumference, push-ups, sit-ups, and 1.5-mile run. Fitness tests between 2004 and 2014 for male USAF members with HIV infection (n = 172) were compared with male HIV-negative controls (∼10 per case; n = 1636) matched by age and rank category at service entry. Fitness tests for cases (n = 1821) were divided into 2 groups, before (pre-HIV) and after (post-HIV) diagnosis, and compared with control fitness assessments (n = 30,443) by paired t tests. Random-effects regression analyses were also performed to compare fitness components. Mean composite scores for cases were higher post-HIV (87.06 ± 9.10) compared with pre-HIV (84.92 ± 8.36; P = 0.004) and did not differ from respective controls. Compared with pre-HIV, mean push-up (51.50 ± 9.67 vs 50.35 ± 11.18; P = 0.018) and sit-up (51.66 ± 7.81 vs 50.57 ± 9.19; P < 0.001) counts improved post-HIV, whereas run times were similar (11:53 ± 1:42 vs 11:51 ± 2:05; P = 0.056). Regression analyses demonstrated that cases had significantly lower predicted abdominal circumference and push-up counts over time compared with controls, regardless of pre-HIV or post-HIV status (P < 0.05 for all). Although functional limitations may occur in the setting of HIV infection, vigorous exercise performance can be both preserved and improved in HIV-infected individuals at a level comparable with HIV-uninfected persons. PMID:27858872

  10. Alcohol use and HIV risk behaviors among HIV-infected hospitalized patients in St. Petersburg, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Krupitsky, Evgeny M.; Horton, Nicholas J.; Williams, Emily C.; Lioznov, Dmitri; Kuznetsova, Maria; Zvartau, Edwin; Samet, Jeffrey H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Russia has high per capita alcohol consumption and an injection-drug-use-driven HIV epidemic. However, the role of alcohol in the spread of HIV infection in Russia is largely unexplored. Thus, we assessed recent alcohol use and associated HIV risk behaviors among HIV-infected persons in St. Petersburg, Russia. Methods: We recruited HIV-infected hospitalized patients from the Botkin Infectious Disease Hospital between June 2001 and March 2002. Interviewers assessed alcohol and drug use with the addiction severity index (ASI) and sex- and drug-risk behaviors with the risk assessment battery (RAB). Lifetime abuse or dependence diagnoses for alcohol and drugs were established by a physician with addiction medicine training. Results: Among 201 subjects, diagnoses of abuse or dependence (AB/DEP) were common: 9% (19/201) had only alcohol AB/DEP; 39% (78/201) had alcohol and drug AB/DEP; 47% (95/201) had only drug AB/DEP; and 4% (9/201) had no diagnosis of alcohol or drug AB/DEP. Sex- and drug-risk behaviors varied significantly by substance use diagnosis. Subjects with any alcohol AB/DEP had higher sex-risk RAB scores than those with drug only AB/DEP (6.1 versus 3.9, p < .0001). Among subjects with any diagnosis of drug AB/DEP, having in addition an alcohol diagnosis was associated with unclean needle use in the last six months (33% (26/78) versus 21% (20/95), p = 0.08). Conclusions: Lifetime alcohol diagnoses of abuse or dependence were present in nearly one-half of hospitalized HIV-infected patients in St. Petersburg, Russia and were associated with significantly higher sex-risk behaviors and borderline significantly higher drug-risk behaviors. As HIV infection spreads rapidly in Russia and Eastern Europe, these data support the need for HIV risk-reduction interventions in alcohol abusing populations and raise the potential of benefit by addressing alcohol use in HIV-infected populations. PMID:16002034

  11. HIV Infection Is Associated with Increased Fatty Infiltration of the Thigh Muscle with Aging Independent of Fat Distribution.

    PubMed

    Natsag, Javzandulam; Erlandson, Kristine M; Sellmeyer, Deborah E; Haberlen, Sabina A; Margolick, Joseph; Jacobson, Lisa P; Palella, Frank J; Koletar, Susan L; Lake, Jordan E; Post, Wendy S; Brown, Todd T

    2017-01-01

    Lower muscle density on computed tomography (CT) provides a measure of fatty infiltration of muscle, an aspect of muscle quality that has been associated with metabolic abnormalities, weakness, decreased mobility, and increased fracture risk in older adults. We assessed the cross-sectional relationship between HIV serostatus, age, thigh muscle attenuation, and thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA). Mean CT-quantified Hounsfield units (HU) of the thigh muscle bundle and CSA were evaluated in 368 HIV-infected and 145 HIV-uninfected men enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) Cardiovascular Substudy using multivariable linear regression. Models all were adjusted for HIV serostatus, age, race, and body mass index (BMI); each model was further adjusted for covariates that differed by HIV serostatus, including insulin resistance, hepatitis C, malignancy, smoking, alcohol use, and self-reported limitation in physical activity. HIV-infected men had greater thigh muscle CSA (p<0.001) but lower muscle density (p<0.001) compared to HIV-uninfected men. Muscle density remained lower in HIV-infected men (p = 0.001) when abdominal visceral adiposity, and thigh subcutaneous adipose tissue area were substituted for BMI in a multivariable model. Muscle density decreased by 0.16 HU per year (p<0.001) of increasing age among the HIV-infected men, but not in the HIV-uninfected men (HIV x age interaction -0.20 HU; p = 0.002). HIV-infected men had lower thigh muscle density compared to HIV-uninfected men, and a more pronounced decline with increasing age, indicative of greater fatty infiltration. These findings suggest that lower muscle quality among HIV-infected persons may be a risk factor for impairments in physical function with aging.

  12. HIV Infection Is Associated with Increased Fatty Infiltration of the Thigh Muscle with Aging Independent of Fat Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Sellmeyer, Deborah E.; Haberlen, Sabina A.; Margolick, Joseph; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Palella, Frank J.; Koletar, Susan L.; Lake, Jordan E.; Post, Wendy S.; Brown, Todd T.

    2017-01-01

    Background Lower muscle density on computed tomography (CT) provides a measure of fatty infiltration of muscle, an aspect of muscle quality that has been associated with metabolic abnormalities, weakness, decreased mobility, and increased fracture risk in older adults. We assessed the cross-sectional relationship between HIV serostatus, age, thigh muscle attenuation, and thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA). Methods Mean CT-quantified Hounsfield units (HU) of the thigh muscle bundle and CSA were evaluated in 368 HIV-infected and 145 HIV-uninfected men enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) Cardiovascular Substudy using multivariable linear regression. Models all were adjusted for HIV serostatus, age, race, and body mass index (BMI); each model was further adjusted for covariates that differed by HIV serostatus, including insulin resistance, hepatitis C, malignancy, smoking, alcohol use, and self-reported limitation in physical activity. Results HIV-infected men had greater thigh muscle CSA (p<0.001) but lower muscle density (p<0.001) compared to HIV-uninfected men. Muscle density remained lower in HIV-infected men (p = 0.001) when abdominal visceral adiposity, and thigh subcutaneous adipose tissue area were substituted for BMI in a multivariable model. Muscle density decreased by 0.16 HU per year (p<0.001) of increasing age among the HIV-infected men, but not in the HIV-uninfected men (HIV x age interaction -0.20 HU; p = 0.002). Conclusion HIV-infected men had lower thigh muscle density compared to HIV-uninfected men, and a more pronounced decline with increasing age, indicative of greater fatty infiltration. These findings suggest that lower muscle quality among HIV-infected persons may be a risk factor for impairments in physical function with aging. PMID:28060856

  13. Acyclovir Prophylaxis Reduces the Incidence of Herpes Zoster Among HIV-Infected Individuals: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Barnabas, Ruanne V; Baeten, Jared M; Lingappa, Jairam R; Thomas, Katherine K; Hughes, James P; Mugo, Nelly R; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Gray, Glenda; Rees, Helen; Mujugira, Andrew; Ronald, Allan; Stevens, Wendy; Kapiga, Saidi; Wald, Anna; Celum, Connie

    2016-02-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons have higher rates of herpes zoster than HIV-uninfected individuals. We assessed whether twice daily treatment with 400 mg of oral acyclovir reduces the incidence of herpes zoster in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial among 3408 persons coinfected with HIV and herpes simplex virus type 2. During 5175 person-years of follow-up, 26 cases of herpes zoster occurred among those assigned acyclovir, compared with 69 cases among those assigned placebo (rates, 1.00 and 2.68/100 person-years, respectively), a relative decrease of 62% (hazard ratio, 0.38; 95% confidence interval, .24-.67; P < .001). Daily acyclovir prophylaxis significantly reduced herpes zoster incidence among HIV-infected persons.

  14. Neutropenia during HIV Infection: Adverse Consequences and Remedies

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xin; Sims, Matthew D; Hanna, Michel M; Xie, Ming; Gulick, Peter G; Zheng, Yong-Hui; Basson, Marc D; Zhang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Neutropenia frequently occurs in patients with Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Causes for neutropenia during HIV infection are multifactoral, including the viral toxicity to hematopoietic tissue, the use of myelotoxic agents for treatment, complication with secondary infections and malignancies, as well as the patient’s association with confounding factors which impair myelopoiesis. An increased prevalence and severity of neutropenia is commonly seen in advanced stages of HIV disease. Decline of neutrophil phagocytic defense in combination with the failure of adaptive immunity renders the host highly susceptible to developing fatal secondary infections. Neutropenia and myelosuppression also restrict the use of many antimicrobial agents for treatment of infections caused by HIV and opportunistic pathogens. In recent years, HIV infection has increasingly become a chronic disease because of progress in antiretroviral therapy (ART). Prevention and treatment of severe neutropenia becomes critical for improving the survival of HIV-infected patients. PMID:24654626

  15. Interferon responses in HIV infection: from protection to disease.

    PubMed

    Sivro, Aida; Su, Ruey-Chyi; Plummer, Francis A; Ball, T Blake

    2014-01-01

    Interferons, induced early during viral infections, represent important regulators of both innate and adaptive immune responses, and provide protective effects against a wide range of pathogens, including HIV. Several in vitro studies and some in vivo data from HIV-exposed seronegative cohorts indicate that interferons and interferon-mediated immune responses are crucial in preventing early HIV replication. Following establishment of HIV infection, the uncontrolled (aberrant) activation of the immune system, in part regulated by interferon levels, contributes to HIV-1-induced immune activation and disease progression. Modulation of interferon responses prior to and during HIV infection shows promise for development of novel therapeutics to prevent HIV transmission, clear HIV infection, and dampen chronic immune activation. In this review we discuss the role that interferons play in protection from HIV infection, acute infection, and their role in HIV pathogenesis and disease progression. Lastly, we review recent advances in modulating interferon responses for purposes of developing novel HIV therapeutic approaches.

  16. Neutropenia during HIV infection: adverse consequences and remedies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xin; Sims, Matthew D; Hanna, Michel M; Xie, Ming; Gulick, Peter G; Zheng, Yong-Hui; Basson, Marc D; Zhang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Neutropenia frequently occurs in patients with Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Causes for neutropenia during HIV infection are multifactoral, including the viral toxicity to hematopoietic tissue, the use of myelotoxic agents for treatment, complication with secondary infections and malignancies, as well as the patient's association with confounding factors which impair myelopoiesis. An increased prevalence and severity of neutropenia is commonly seen in advanced stages of HIV disease. Decline of neutrophil phagocytic defense in combination with the failure of adaptive immunity renders the host highly susceptible to developing fatal secondary infections. Neutropenia and myelosuppression also restrict the use of many antimicrobial agents for treatment of infections caused by HIV and opportunistic pathogens. In recent years, HIV infection has increasingly become a chronic disease because of progress in antiretroviral therapy (ART). Prevention and treatment of severe neutropenia becomes critical for improving the survival of HIV-infected patients.

  17. Abnormal Myocardial Function Is Related to Myocardial Steatosis and Diffuse Myocardial Fibrosis in HIV-Infected Adults.

    PubMed

    Thiara, Diana K; Liu, Chia Ying; Raman, Fabio; Mangat, Sabrina; Purdy, Julia B; Duarte, Horacio A; Schmidt, Nancyanne; Hur, Jamie; Sibley, Christopher T; Bluemke, David A; Hadigan, Colleen

    2015-11-15

    Impaired cardiac function persists in the era of effective human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapy, although the etiology is unclear. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure intramyocardial lipid levels and fibrosis as possible contributors to HIV-associated myocardial dysfunction. A cross-sectional study of 95 HIV-infected and 30 matched-healthy adults, without known cardiovascular disease (CVD) was completed. Intramyocardial lipid levels, myocardial fibrosis, and cardiac function (measured on the basis of strain) were quantified by MRI. Systolic function was significantly decreased in HIV-infected subjects as compared to controls (mean radial strain [±SD], 21.7 ± 8.6% vs 30.5 ± 14.2%; P = .004). Intramyocardial lipid level and fibrosis index were both increased in HIV-infected subjects as compared to controls (P ≤ .04 for both) and correlated with the degree of myocardial dysfunction measured by strain parameters. Intramyocardial lipid levels correlated positively with antiretroviral therapy duration and visceral adiposity. Further, impaired myocardial function was strongly correlated with increased monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 levels (r = 0.396, P = .0002) and lipopolysaccharide binding protein levels (r = 0.25, P = .02). HIV-infected adults have reduced myocardial function as compared to controls in the absence of known CVD. Decreased cardiac function was associated with abnormal myocardial tissue composition characterized by increased lipid levels and diffuse myocardial fibrosis. Metabolic alterations related to antiretroviral therapy and chronic inflammation may be important targets for optimizing long-term cardiovascular health in HIV-infected individuals. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  18. Mortality among blacks or African Americans with HIV infection--United States, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Azfar-e-Alam; Hu, Xiaohong; Hall, H Irene

    2015-02-06

    A primary goal of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy is to reduce HIV-related health disparities, including HIV-related mortality in communities at high risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. As a group, persons who self-identify as blacks or African Americans (referred to as blacks in this report), have been affected by HIV more than any other racial/ethnic population. Forty-seven percent of persons who received an HIV diagnosis in the United States in 2012 and 43% of all persons living with diagnosed HIV infection in 2011 were black. Blacks also experienced a low 3-year survival rate among persons with HIV infection diagnosed during 2003-2008. CDC and its partners have been pursuing a high-impact prevention approach and supporting projects focusing on minorities to improve diagnosis, linkage to care, and retention in care, and to reduce disparities in HIV-related health outcomes. To measure trends in disparities in mortality among blacks, CDC analyzed data from the National HIV Surveillance System. The results of that analysis indicated that among blacks aged ≥13 years the death rate per 1,000 persons living with diagnosed HIV decreased from 28.4 in 2008 to 20.5 in 2012. Despite this improvement, in 2012 the death rate per 1,000 persons living with HIV among blacks was 13% higher than the rate for whites and 47% higher than the rate for Hispanics or Latinos. These data demonstrate the need for implementation of interventions and public health strategies to further reduce disparities in deaths.

  19. Yellow fever vaccine for patients with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Barte, Hilary; Horvath, Tara H; Rutherford, George W

    2014-01-23

    Yellow fever (YF) is an acute viral haemorrhagic disease prevalent in tropical Africa and Latin America. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that there are 200,000 cases of YF and 30,000 deaths worldwide annually. Treatment for YF is supportive, but a live attenuated virus vaccine is effective for preventing infection. WHO recommends immunisation for all individuals > 9 months living in countries or areas at risk. However, the United States Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) advises that YF vaccine is contraindicated in individuals with HIV. Given the large populations of HIV-infected individuals living in tropical areas where YF is endemic, YF vaccine may be an important intervention for preventing YF in immunocompromised populations. To assess the risk and benefits of YF immunisation for people infected with HIV. We used standard Cochrane methods to search electronic databases and conference proceedings with relevant search terms without limits to language. Randomised controlled trials and cohort studies of individuals with HIV infection who received YF vaccine (17DD or 17D-204). Two authors screened abstracts of references identified by electronic or bibliographic searches according to inclusion and exclusion criteria as detailed in the protocol. We identified 199 references and examined 19 in detail for study eligibility. Data were abstracted independently using a standardised abstraction form. Three cohort studies were included in the review. They examined 484 patients with HIV infection who received YF immunisation. Patients with HIV infection developed significantly lower concentrations of neutralising antibodies in the first year post immunisation compared to uninfected patients, though decay patterns were similar for recipients regardless of HIV infection. No study patient with HIV infection suffered serious adverse events as a result of YF vaccination. YF vaccination can produce protective levels of neutralising antibodies in

  20. Relationship between Alcohol Use/Abuse, HIV Infection and Neuropsychological Performance in African American Men

    PubMed Central

    Durvasula, Ramani S.; Myers, Hector f.; Mason, Karen; Hinkin, Charles

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the impact of alcohol use and HIV infection on neuropsychological performance in a sample of 497 community-resident African American men. HIV serostatus and alcohol use (during the past 12 months) exerted an interactive effect on psychomotor speed, reaction time, and motor speed, and in general, HIV infected heavy drinkers evidenced significantly poorer performance than other HIV positive subjects. Main effects for HIV serostatus were noted for reaction time, with seronegative men performing better than seropositives. This study examines a sample of men who continue to show increases in HIV infection, however, sample specific issues such as comorbid substance use, past histories of head injury, and lack of data on alcohol abuse and dependence require caution in definitively attributing the findings solely to alcohol and HIV. However, these findings suggest that relatively recent heavy alcohol use may represent a potential risk factor for more rapid or pronounced cognitive decline in HIV positive individuals, and that these patterns may be even more pronounced in persons with comorbid substance use. PMID:16618627

  1. Age, Stigma, Adherence and Clinical Indicators in HIV-Infected Women

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Katryna; Higgins, Melinda; Zuñiga, Julie Ann; Holstad, Marcia McDonnell

    2016-01-01

    Stigma has become a gendered phenomenon that affects increasing numbers of HIV-infected women worldwide. This study examined the role of age as a possible moderator of the relationship between stigma and antiretroviral therapy adherence, CD4% and viral load among 120 HIV-infected women. A secondary analysis was conducted using data from the Keeping Healthy and Active with Risk Reduction and Medication Adherence (KHARMA) Project, an National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded randomized controlled trial to improve Antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence and reduce risky behaviors in HIV-infected women at five clinical sites in a South-eastern city from 2005 to 2008. Stigma was measured using the Perceived Personal Stigma of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) scale. Among participants <50 years old (n=90), age was significantly associated with viral load (rho=−.24, p=.02) and stigma was negatively associated with CD4% (r =−.26, p=.02). For the 30 participants >50 years old, age was not significantly associated with viral load, stigma or CD4%, and there was no significant association between stigma and CD4% (r=.07, p=.70). These findings indicate the need for furth