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Sample records for hockey injuries national

  1. Knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score of Korean national ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeyoung; Hwang, Sujin; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2017-09-01

    [Purpose] To investigate sports injuries in Korean national ice hockey players by surveying parts, times, types, frequency, cure, and prevention types of sports injuries and provide basic data for injury prevention and performance improvement of ice hockey players. Another purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of ice hockey injuries according to age and the relationship between etiological factors and injuries in high school students. [Subjects and Methods] This was a cross-sectional study. Eighteen female ice hockey players in Korean elite athletes were recruited for this study. This study was conducted by a self-administered questionnaire survey using Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) of national ice hockey players. [Results] Participants were injured mainly during training. Injuries were caused by skate, puck-contact, and body check. Five subscales of KOOS were significantly correlated with each other except that the correlation between activities of daily living and quality of life was insignificant. [Conclusion] For injury prevention in national team ice hockey players, full gear is recommended. In addition, therapist in the field needs to conduct injury prevention through consistent observations and counseling in order to prevent injury and improve performance. Ice hockey players also need sufficient rest with systematic and scientific training for injury prevention and performance improvement.

  2. National survey of spinal injuries in hockey players.

    PubMed Central

    Tator, C. H.; Edmonds, V. E.

    1984-01-01

    There has been an alarming increase in the number of spinal injuries in hockey players. Between 1976 and 1983, 42 were reported to the Committee on Prevention of Spinal Injuries due to Hockey. The median age of the injured players was 17 years. Of the 42 players 28 had spinal cord injuries, and 17 of them had complete paralysis below the vertebral level of the injury. Strikes from behind and collisions with the boards were common mechanisms of injury. Many of the players had suffered a burst fracture of the cervical spine following a blow to the top of the helmet when the neck was slightly flexed. The committee studied a number of possible etiologic factors and made several recommendations regarding prevention. League officials, coaches, players and equipment manufacturers can all play a role in prevention. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6704840

  3. Ice Hockey Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sim, Franklin H.; Simonet, William T.

    1988-01-01

    The article describes the mechanisms, management, and prevention of each type of injury to which hockey players are prone. It surveys the injuries sustained by ice hockey players and discusses treatment of specific injuries, including those injuries to the head, eye, shoulder, hand, thigh, scalp, and face. (JL)

  4. [Prospective study on injuries of the German national ice hockey teams in more than 1000 games].

    PubMed

    Gröger, A; Kuropkat, C; Mang, A; Gradinger, R

    2010-06-01

    Due to the fast and physical nature of the game, prevention of injuries is an important issue in ice hockey. The injuries of the German male senior and junior (U16, U17, U18, U19, U20) national ice hockey teams were documented and analyzed in 1006 games between 1986 and 2006. This unique long observation period over 20 years, as well as the standardized protocol of documentation provides reliable data concerning injury pattern in German international ice hockey. Overall 277 injuries were recorded. Comparing the first and the last ten years of observation, the number did not decline over the time, despite various national and international efforts of injury prevention. The majority of the injuries, almost 60%, were caused by body contact with increasing tendency. Remarkably, the injuries with no body or puck/stick contact more than doubled in the last ten years compared to the first ten years of observation. Most injuries happened to the extremities with decreasing tendency to lower body and increasing tendency to upper body injuries. The number of head injuries did not change significantly. More injuries occurred in the second and third period compared to the first period of the game. The data of this study indicate that many injuries might be due to insufficient physical condition with consecutive lack of concentration and coordination. Players do not seem to meet the increasing technical and athletic requirements of international ice-hockey. The increasing speed and physical energy in international ice-hockey make the game unique and fascinating. Therefore, the aim must be to decrease the number and above all the severity of injuries by further development and adjustment of the player's equipment. Also, a better cooperation of players, coaches, sports medicine and referees seems to be necessary for injury prevention in the future.

  5. Acute injuries in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, and karate: analysis of national registry data.

    PubMed Central

    Kujala, U. M.; Taimela, S.; Antti-Poika, I.; Orava, S.; Tuominen, R.; Myllynen, P.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the acute injury profile in each of six sports and compare the injury rates between the sports. DESIGN--Analysis of national sports injury insurance registry data. SETTING--Finland during 1987-91. SUBJECTS--621,691 person years of exposure among participants in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, or karate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Acute sports injuries requiring medical treatment and reported to the insurance company on structured forms by the patients and their doctors. RESULTS--54,186 sports injuries were recorded. Injury rates were low in athletes aged under 15, while 20-24 year olds had the highest rates. Differences in injury rates between the sports were minor in this adult age group. Overall injury rates were higher in sports entailing more frequent and powerful body contact. Each sport had a specific injury profile. Fractures and dental injuries were most common in ice hockey and karate and least frequent in volleyball. Knee injuries were the most common cause of permanent disability. CONCLUSIONS--Based on the defined injury profiles in the different sports it is recommended that sports specific preventive measures should be employed to decrease the number of violent contacts between athletes, including improved game rules supported by careful refereeing. To prevent dental injuries the wearing of mouth guards should be encouraged, especially in ice hockey, karate, and basketball. PMID:8520333

  6. Acute injuries in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, and karate: analysis of national registry data.

    PubMed

    Kujala, U M; Taimela, S; Antti-Poika, I; Orava, S; Tuominen, R; Myllynen, P

    1995-12-02

    To determine the acute injury profile in each of six sports and compare the injury rates between the sports. Analysis of national sports injury insurance registry data. Finland during 1987-91. 621,691 person years of exposure among participants in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, or karate. Acute sports injuries requiring medical treatment and reported to the insurance company on structured forms by the patients and their doctors. 54,186 sports injuries were recorded. Injury rates were low in athletes aged under 15, while 20-24 year olds had the highest rates. Differences in injury rates between the sports were minor in this adult age group. Overall injury rates were higher in sports entailing more frequent and powerful body contact. Each sport had a specific injury profile. Fractures and dental injuries were most common in ice hockey and karate and least frequent in volleyball. Knee injuries were the most common cause of permanent disability. Based on the defined injury profiles in the different sports it is recommended that sports specific preventive measures should be employed to decrease the number of violent contacts between athletes, including improved game rules supported by careful refereeing. To prevent dental injuries the wearing of mouth guards should be encouraged, especially in ice hockey, karate, and basketball.

  7. The risk of injury associated with body checking among Pee Wee ice hockey players: an evaluation of Hockey Canada's national body checking policy change.

    PubMed

    Black, Amanda M; Hagel, Brent E; Palacios-Derflingher, Luz; Schneider, Kathryn J; Emery, Carolyn A

    2017-03-09

    In 2013, Hockey Canada introduced an evidence-informed policy change delaying the earliest age of introduction to body checking in ice hockey until Bantam (ages 13-14) nationwide. To determine if the risk of injury, including concussions, changes for Pee Wee (11-12 years) ice hockey players in the season following a national policy change disallowing body checking. In a historical cohort study, Pee Wee players were recruited from teams in all divisions of play in 2011-2012 prior to the rule change and in 2013-2014 following the change. Baseline information, injury and exposure data for both cohorts were collected using validated injury surveillance. Pee Wee players were recruited from 59 teams in Calgary, Alberta (n=883) in 2011-2012 and from 73 teams in 2013-2014 (n=618). There were 163 game-related injuries (incidence rate (IR)=4.37/1000 game-hours) and 104 concussions (IR=2.79/1000 game-hours) in Alberta prior to the rule change, and 48 injuries (IR=2.16/1000 game-hours) and 25 concussions (IR=1.12/1000 game-hours) after the rule change. Based on multivariable Poisson regression with exposure hours as an offset, the adjusted incidence rate ratio associated with the national policy change disallowing body checking was 0.50 for all game-related injuries (95% CI 0.33 to 0.75) and 0.36 for concussion specifically (95% CI 0.22 to 0.58). Introduction of the 2013 national body checking policy change disallowing body checking in Pee Wee resulted in a 50% relative reduction in injury rate and a 64% reduction in concussion rate in 11-year-old and 12-year-old hockey players in Alberta. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Eye injuries in Canadian hockey.

    PubMed Central

    Pashby, T. J.; Pashby, R. C.; Chisholm, L. D.; Crawford, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    Increasing public concern led the Canadian Ophthalmological Society, in January 1974, to form a committee to study the incidence, types and causes of hockey eye injuries and to devise means of reducing such injuries. Retrospective and current studies were undertaken, and face protectors were tested. In both pilot studies, sticks were the commonest cause and the highest number of eye injuries was in players 11-15 years old. An average of 15% of all injured eyes were rendered legally blind. Cooperation with hockey authorities has resulted in changed rules and their sticter enforcement, and formulation of standards for face protection approved by the Canadian Standards Association. In this interim report the committee recommends that all amateur hockey players wear eye protectors and urges ophthalmologists to participate in efforts to improve the design of protective equipment. Images FIG. 1 PMID:1181024

  9. Descriptive epidemiology of collegiate women's field hockey injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988-1989 through 2002-2003.

    PubMed

    Dick, Randall; Hootman, Jennifer M; Agel, Julie; Vela, Luzita; Marshall, Stephen W; Messina, Renee

    2007-01-01

    To review 15 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) injury surveillance data for women's field hockey and identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. Field hockey is one of the most popular sports worldwide and is growing in participation in the United States, particularly among women. From 1988-1989 to 2002-2003, participation in NCAA women's field hockey increased 12%, with the largest growth among Division III programs. In 2002- 2003, 253 colleges offered women's field hockey and 5385 women participated. Game injury rates showed a significant average annual 2.5% decline over 15 years, most likely fueled by drops in ankle ligament sprain, knee internal derangement, and finger fracture injuries. Despite this, ankle ligament sprains were common (13.7% of game and 15.0% of practice injuries) and a frequent cause of severe injuries (resulting in 10+ days of time-loss activity). Concussion and head laceration injuries increased over this same time, and the risk of sustaining a concussion in a game was 6 times higher than the risk of sustaining one during practice. Overall, injury rates were twice as high in games as in practices (7.87 versus 3.70 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures, rate ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval = 2.0, 2.3). Most head/neck/face (71%) and hand/finger/thumb (68%) injuries occurred when the player was near the goal or within the 25-yd line and were caused by contact with the stick or ball (greater than 77% for both body sites); for 34% of head/neck/ face injuries, a penalty was called on the play. Equipment (requiring helmets and padded gloves) and rule changes (to decrease field congestion near the goal) as well as evidence-based injury prevention interventions (eg, prophylactic ankle taping/bracing, neuromuscular balance exercise programs) may be viable prevention initiatives for reducing injury rates in women's collegiate field hockey players.

  10. Descriptive Epidemiology of Collegiate Women's Field Hockey Injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988–1989 Through 2002–2003

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Randall; Hootman, Jennifer M; Agel, Julie; Vela, Luzita; Marshall, Stephen W; Messina, Renee

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review 15 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) injury surveillance data for women's field hockey and identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. Background: Field hockey is one of the most popular sports worldwide and is growing in participation in the United States, particularly among women. From 1988–1989 to 2002–2003, participation in NCAA women's field hockey increased 12%, with the largest growth among Division III programs. In 2002– 2003, 253 colleges offered women's field hockey and 5385 women participated. Main Results: Game injury rates showed a significant average annual 2.5% decline over 15 years, most likely fueled by drops in ankle ligament sprain, knee internal derangement, and finger fracture injuries. Despite this, ankle ligament sprains were common (13.7% of game and 15.0% of practice injuries) and a frequent cause of severe injuries (resulting in 10+ days of time-loss activity). Concussion and head laceration injuries increased over this same time, and the risk of sustaining a concussion in a game was 6 times higher than the risk of sustaining one during practice. Overall, injury rates were twice as high in games as in practices (7.87 versus 3.70 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures, rate ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval = 2.0, 2.3). Most head/neck/face (71%) and hand/finger/thumb (68%) injuries occurred when the player was near the goal or within the 25-yd line and were caused by contact with the stick or ball (greater than 77% for both body sites); for 34% of head/neck/ face injuries, a penalty was called on the play. Recommendations: Equipment (requiring helmets and padded gloves) and rule changes (to decrease field congestion near the goal) as well as evidence-based injury prevention interventions (eg, prophylactic ankle taping/bracing, neuromuscular balance exercise programs) may be viable prevention initiatives for reducing injury rates in women's collegiate field hockey players

  11. Eye injuries in Canadian amateur hockey.

    PubMed

    Pashby, T J

    1979-01-01

    Two studies, one retrospective (1972 to 1973) and one prospective (1974 to 1975), CONcerning eye injuries incurred by hockey players were conducted by the Canadian Ophthalmological Society with questionnaires to its members. Responses to the questionnaires were analyzed by age, type of injury, cause (i.e., hockey stick, puck, or other means), and results to visual acuity. The results were also designated by organized or unorganized participation. Almost 300 eye injuries were reported in each study. In the first study, 13.7% of the injured players became legally blind as a result of the injury; in the second study, 16% became legally blind. Organized hockey produced more injuries than unorganized hockey. The majority of the injuries were caused by the hockey stick. The injuries were both intraocular and extraocular. The group of 11- to 15-year olds received the highest number of injuries, and the older age group had the higher incidence of blindness. Studies have led to setting more rigid standards, altering rules of the game, and selecting face protectors for hockey players. Older players who care for their equipment prefer the plastic shield face protectors, and the younger players (who complain of fogging and scratching of the plastic) prefer mesh protectors through which neither the stick nor the puck can penetrate. New high sticking (above the shoulder level) rules were included in the 1976 official rule book for Canadian amateur hockey.

  12. Descriptive Epidemiology of Collegiate Men's Ice Hockey Injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988–1989 Through 2003–2004

    PubMed Central

    Agel, Julie; Dompier, Thomas P; Dick, Randall; Marshall, Stephen W

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review 16 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) injury surveillance data for men's ice hockey and to identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. Background: The NCAA began injury surveillance of men's ice hockey during the 1988–1989 academic year. These data represent all 3 NCAA divisions; the last Division II championship, however, was held during the 1998–1999 academic year. Main Results: The rate of injury was more than 8 times higher in games than in practices (16.27 versus 1.96 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures [A-Es], rate ratio = 8.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 7.9, 8.8). A significant average annual increase of 1.3% in game injury rates occurred over the sample period ( P = .05), but practice rates stayed static ( P = .77). Preseason practice injury rates were more than twice as high as regular-season practice rates (5.05 versus 1.94 injuries per 1000 A-Es, rate ratio = 2.6, 95% CI = 2.4, 2.9, P < .01). The majority of game and practice injuries occurred to the lower extremity. Knee internal derangement (13.5%) was the most common lower extremity injury reported for games, whereas pelvis and hip muscle strains (13.1%) were the most common injury reported during practices. Player-to-player contact was the most frequent game mechanism of injury (50.0%). The majority of injuries occurred between the blue line and face-off circles (28.0%), in the corner (23.5%), and in the neutral zone (21.4%). Recommendations: Preventive efforts should focus on strategies that limit player-to-player contact in the neutral zone and at the top of the offensive and defensive zones. In addition, clinicians and researchers should identify risk factors and interventions for muscle strains at the pelvis and hip region. PMID:17710172

  13. Descriptive epidemiology of collegiate men's ice hockey injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988-1989 through 2003-2004.

    PubMed

    Agel, Julie; Dompier, Thomas P; Dick, Randall; Marshall, Stephen W

    2007-01-01

    To review 16 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) injury surveillance data for men's ice hockey and to identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. The NCAA began injury surveillance of men's ice hockey during the 1988-1989 academic year. These data represent all 3 NCAA divisions; the last Division II championship, however, was held during the 1998-1999 academic year. The rate of injury was more than 8 times higher in games than in practices (16.27 versus 1.96 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures [A-Es], rate ratio = 8.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 7.9, 8.8). A significant average annual increase of 1.3% in game injury rates occurred over the sample period (P = .05), but practice rates stayed static (P = .77). Preseason practice injury rates were more than twice as high as regular-season practice rates (5.05 versus 1.94 injuries per 1000 A-Es, rate ratio = 2.6, 95% CI = 2.4, 2.9, P < .01). The majority of game and practice injuries occurred to the lower extremity. Knee internal derangement (13.5%) was the most common lower extremity injury reported for games, whereas pelvis and hip muscle strains (13.1%) were the most common injury reported during practices. Player-to-player contact was the most frequent game mechanism of injury (50.0%). The majority of injuries occurred between the blue line and face-off circles (28.0%), in the corner (23.5%), and in the neutral zone (21.4%). Preventive efforts should focus on strategies that limit player-to-player contact in the neutral zone and at the top of the offensive and defensive zones. In addition, clinicians and researchers should identify risk factors and interventions for muscle strains at the pelvis and hip region.

  14. Head, Face, and Eye Injuries in Collegiate Women's Field Hockey.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Elizabeth C

    2015-08-01

    While there is concern regarding head, face, and eye injuries in field hockey, prompting some to recommend the use of protective equipment such as goggles and helmets, little has been written about their incidence and mechanism of injury in the modern game of field hockey. The elucidation of this information will better inform the development of maximally effective injury prevention schemes to protect the athlete while maintaining the integrity of the game. To determine the incidence and epidemiology of head, face, and eye injuries in United States collegiate women's field hockey players from 2004-2005 to 2008-2009. Descriptive epidemiological study. All head, face, and eye injuries reported to the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System for collegiate women's field hockey athletes from the 2004-2005 through 2008-2009 seasons were analyzed. Data regarding the event type, injury mechanism, body part injured, type of injury, outcome, and time lost were reviewed. The weighted injury incidence per 1000 athlete-exposures (AEs) was calculated using the exposure data set for the same years; 95% CIs were calculated based on a normal approximation to the Poisson distribution. There were 150 reported traumatic injuries during this time period, with a weighted occurrence of 1587.3 injuries. The overall incidence of head, face, and eye injuries in collegiate women's field hockey was 0.94 per 1000 AEs (95% CI, 0.86-1.19). Injuries to the head or face, other than the mouth, nose, and eye, accounted for 75.3% of these injuries. The incidence of eye injuries was 0.07 per 1000 AEs (95% CI, 0.03-0.12); nose injuries occurred at a rate of 0.10 per 1000 AEs (95% CI, 0.05-0.15). The rate of traumatic dental injuries was 0.06 per 1000 AEs (95% CI, 0.04-0.14). Contact with an apparatus caused 72.9% of all injuries; specifically, contact with an elevated ball accounted for 47.9% of all injuries, and contact with an elevated stick caused 21.7% of all injuries

  15. Injury potential in modern ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Sim, F H; Chao, E Y

    1978-01-01

    The majority of the damaging forces to the soft tissue, bone, and articular joint structures of modern hockey players during the energetic activities involved in the game are attributable to impact action during high-speed motion. In addition, non-contact musculoligamentous injuries are common because of the complex forces that are involved. The injury potential of this sport is assessed indirectly from the force and motion involved. The experimental method of measuring the kinematic motion and the impact forces inherent to the sport are presented. Although hockey is a fast and furious game with high injury potential, fortunately the number of serious injuries is not as great as one might expect.

  16. The epidemiology of back/neck/spine injuries in National Collegiate Athletic Association men's and women's ice hockey, 2009/2010 to 2014/2015.

    PubMed

    Zupon, Alyssa B; Kerr, Zachary Y; Dalton, Sara L; Dompier, Thomas P; Gardner, Elizabeth C

    2017-09-04

    This study describes the epidemiology of back/neck/spine injuries in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) men's and women's ice hockey. Data from 66 NCAA men's and 29 women's ice hockey programmes (total of 147 and 67 team-seasons, respectively) were analysed from the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program during the 2009/2010-2014/2015 academic years. In the study period, 226 and 97 back/neck/spine injuries were reported in men and women, respectively, for injury rates of 0.56 and 0.65/1000 athlete exposures. Injury rates were higher in competitions than practices in men (injury rate ratio [IRR] = 4.22; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.24-5.49) and women (IRR = 2.49; 95% CI: 1.67-3.70). Most injuries occurred in the lower back/lumbar spine (men: 52.2%; women: 48.5%). There were notably low rates of fractures and severe spinal injuries for both sexes. This study enhances our understanding of the incidence, mechanisms and factors influencing these injuries and can ultimately lead to more effective injury prevention.

  17. Ice hockey injuries among United States high school athletes from 2008/2009-2012/2013.

    PubMed

    Matic, George T; Sommerfeldt, Mark F; Best, Thomas M; Collins, Christy L; Comstock, R Dawn; Flanigan, David C

    2015-05-01

    The popularity of ice hockey has grown in recent years and injuries are a concern given the physical nature of the sport. We sought to report the rates, mechanisms, and severity of boys' US high school ice hockey injuries. We hypothesized that body checking would be a major source of injury and that concussions would be common. We also expected to find that competition would have a higher rate of injury than practice. Descriptive epidemiology study. Boys' US high school ice hockey injury data from 2008/2009 through 2012/2013 academic years were obtained from the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance System, High School Reporting Information Online database. The primary outcome was rate of injury per 10,000 athlete exposures (AEs). Overall, 724 boys ice hockey injuries occurred during 311,817 AEs for an injury rate of 23.2 per 10,000 AEs. Injury rates were significantly higher during competition compared to practice (rate ratio = 7.8, 95% confidence interval: 6.5-9.4). Concussion was the most frequent injury reported at a rate of 6.4 per 10,000 AEs. Body checking was the mechanism of injury in over 46% of injuries. The head/face/neck region (33.8%) and upper arm/shoulder region (20.6%) were the most commonly injured body sites. Just over 6% of injuries resulted in surgical intervention. Injuries among high school ice hockey athletes are common. Increases in the number of high school ice hockey injuries will likely parallel the increase in high school ice hockey participation in the United States.

  18. Injuries in Youth Hockey. On-Ice Emergency Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Bradford M.; Castaldi, Cosmo R.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews the nature and frequency of injuries in youth hockey (which range from musculoskeletal injuries to life-threatening emergencies). Overall injury rates have decreased, but there is an increase in head, neck, and spine injuries. Those injuries that are serious demand prompt, skillful attention. A comprehensive format for on-ice management is…

  19. Injuries in Youth Hockey. On-Ice Emergency Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Bradford M.; Castaldi, Cosmo R.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews the nature and frequency of injuries in youth hockey (which range from musculoskeletal injuries to life-threatening emergencies). Overall injury rates have decreased, but there is an increase in head, neck, and spine injuries. Those injuries that are serious demand prompt, skillful attention. A comprehensive format for on-ice management is…

  20. Are There Differences in Ice Hockey Injuries Between Sexes?

    PubMed Central

    MacCormick, Lauren; Best, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Men’s ice hockey allows for body checking, and women’s ice hockey prohibits it. Studies have reported injury data on both sexes, but no systematic reviews have compared the injury patterns between male and female ice hockey players. Hypothesis: Men’s and women’s ice hockey would have different types of injuries, and this difference would extend across the different age groups and levels of play. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Three databases, 3 scientific journals, and selected bibliographies were searched to identify articles relevant to this study. Articles were further screened by the use of predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Twenty-two studies met these criteria and were subsequently reviewed. Results: Men sustained higher rates of injuries than women at all age levels, and both sexes sustained at least twice as many injuries in games than practices. Both sexes sustained most of their injuries from player contact. Men and women in college sustained most injuries to the head and face, and women suffered from higher percentages of concussion. At all ages and levels of play, men had higher rates of upper extremity injuries (shoulder), while women were found to sustain more injuries to the lower extremity (thigh, knee). Conclusion: Although findings showed men sustaining higher rates of injuries than women, the predominant mechanism of player contact was the same. The most common locations and types of injuries in female ice hockey players are comparable to other sports played by women, and similar interventions could offer protection against injury. Clinical Relevance: Further studies that report injury data for women playing ice hockey at all levels will assist in understanding what prevention strategies should be implemented. PMID:26535265

  1. Injury data of major international field hockey tournaments

    PubMed Central

    Theilen, Till-Martin; Mueller-Eising, Wiebke; Wefers Bettink, Peter; Rolle, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Background Detailed injury data are not available for international tournaments in field hockey. We investigated the epidemiology of field hockey injuries during major International Hockey Federation (Fédération Internationale de Hockey, FIH) tournaments in 2013. Materials and methods FIH injury reports were used for data collection. All major FIH tournaments for women (n=5) and men (n=11) in 2013 were included. The main focus of this study was to assess the pattern, time, site on the pitch, body site and mechanism of each of the injuries. We calculated the average number of injuries per match and the number of injuries per 1000 player match hours. Results The average number of injuries was 0.7 (95% CI 0.5 to 1.0) per match in women's tournaments and 1.2 (95% CI 0.8 to 1.7) per match in men's tournaments. The number of injuries per 1000 player match hours ranged from 23.4 to 44.2 (average 29.1; 95% CI 18.6 to 39.7) in women and 20.8 to 90.9 (average 48.3; 95% CI 30.9 to 65.8) in men. Most injuries occurred in the circle (n=25, 50%, in women, n=95, 51%, in men). The rate of injuries increased after the first quarter. Injuries to the head and face (n=20, 40%) were most common in women. The head/face (n=51, 27%) and the thigh/knee (n=52, 28%) were equally affected in men. The ball caused the most injuries, followed by the stick, collisions and tripping/falling. There were no deaths or injuries that required hospital treatment in the entire cohort. Summary Field hockey has a low incidence of acute injuries during competition. PMID:26246418

  2. Position Statement. Violence and injury in ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Juhn, Mark S; Brolinson, Per Gunnar; Duffey, Timothy; Stockard, Alan; Vangelos, Zenos A; Emaus, Erik; Maddox, Matthew; Boyajian, Lori; Henehan, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Ice hockey is a sport enjoyed by many men and women at the spectator and participant level. It is played with high intensity and often involves body contact. Although the women's games is far from injury free, it is the men's game that has drawn criticism for excessive violence. Much attention has been drawn to the serious injuries that have occurred in ice hockey, specifically spinal injuries, concussions, and eye injuries. Many such injuries are the result of illegal and violent acts such as checking from behind or a deliberate high stick. Because of this, some medical organizations have called for changes in the sport, such as minimum age requirements for body-checking. As a practical matter such changes are unlikely to be accepted by hockey governing boards. Many of those involved in the sport consider body-checking a fundamental component of the game. Furthermore, a distinction needs to be made between any kind of injury and a serious, catastrophic injury. For example, although a recent study found that body-checking accounted for up to 38% of ice hockey injuries, none were of the catastrophic type. With respect to catastrophic injuries such as spinal cord trauma or a blinded eye, legal body-checking accounts for significantly less than illegal body-checking (e.g., checking from behind) or violent stick work. To reduce serious injury in ice hockey, we offer 10 recommendations, key among them automatic game suspensions for certain rules violations, and recognition of the coach as the most important figure in promoting a clean, safe game.

  3. Integration of the functional movement screen into the National Hockey League Combine.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Chip P; Kuropkat, Christiane; Gumieniak, Robert J; Gledhill, Norman; Jamnik, Veronica K

    2015-05-01

    The sport of ice hockey requires coordination of complex skills involving musculoskeletal and physiological abilities while simultaneously exposing players to a high risk for injury. The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) was developed to assess fundamental movement patterns that underlie both sport performance and injury risk. The top 111 elite junior hockey players from around the world took part in the 2013 National Hockey League Entry Draft Combine (NHL Combine). The FMS was integrated into the comprehensive medical and physiological fitness evaluations at the request of strength and conditioning coaches with affiliations to NHL teams. The inclusion of the FMS aimed to help develop strategies that could maximize its utility among elite hockey players and to encourage or inform further research in this field. This study evaluated the outcomes of integrating the FMS into the NHL Combine and identified any links to other medical plus physical and physiological fitness assessment outcomes. These potential associations may provide valuable information to identify elements of future training programs that are individualized to athletes' specific needs. The results of the FMS (total score and number of asymmetries identified) were significantly correlated to various body composition measures, aerobic and anaerobic fitness, leg power, timing of recent workouts, and the presence of lingering injury at the time of the NHL Combine. Although statistically significant correlations were observed, the implications of the FMS assessment outcomes remain difficult to quantify until ongoing assessment of FMS patterns, tracking of injuries, and hockey performance are available.

  4. The Protective Effect of Kevlar ® Socks Against Hockey Skate Blade Injuries: A Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Nauth, Aaron; Aziz, Mina; Tsuji, Matthew; Whelan, Daniel B.; Theodoropoulos, John S.; Zdero, Rad

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Several recent high profile injuries to elite players in the National Hockey League (NHL) secondary to skate blade lacerations have generated significant interest in these injuries and possible methods to protect against them. These injuries are typically due to direct contact of the skate blade of another player with posterior aspect of the calf resulting in a range of potential injuries to tendons or neurovascular structures. The Achilles tendon is most commonly involved. Kevlar® reinforced socks have recently become available for hockey players to wear and are cited as providing possible protection against such injuries. However, there has been no investigation of the possible protective effects of Kevlar® reinforced socks against skate blade injuries, and it is currently unknown what protective effects, if any, that these socks provide against these injuries. The proposed study sought to address this by conducting a biomechanical investigation of the protective effects of Kevlar® reinforced socks against Achilles tendon injuries in a simulated model of skate blade injury using human cadaver limbs. This novel investigation is the first to address the possible benefits to hockey players of wearing Kevlar® reinforced socks. Methods: Seven matched pairs of human cadaver lower limbs were fitted with a Kevlar ® reinforced sock comprised of 60% Kevlar®/20% Coolmax® polyester/18 % Nylon/12% Spandex (Bauer Elite Performance Skate Sock) on one limb and a standard synthetic sock comprised of 51% polyester/47% nylon/2% spandex (Bauer Premium Performance Skate Sock) on the contralateral limb as a control. Each limb was then mounted on a Materials Testing System (MTS) with the ankle dorsiflexed to 90° and the knee held in full extension using a custom designed jig. Specimens were then impacted with a hockey skate blade directed at the posterior calf, 12 cm above the heel, at an angle of 45° and a speed of 31m/s, to a penetration depth of 4.3 cm, to

  5. Ice Hockey Injuries in a Japanese Elite Team: A 3-Year Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kuzuhara, Kenji; Shimamoto, Hideki; Mase, Yasuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Context: As the Asian Ice Hockey League gradually expands and becomes more competitive, ice hockey-related injuries may increase. However, no reports have been published on ice hockey injuries in Japan, including the method of injury and the daily supervision of the players during the regular season. Objective: To prospectively study the incidence, types, and mechanisms of ice hockey injuries in an elite Japanese ice hockey team. Design: Prospective observational cohort study design. Setting: An elite ice hockey team, Tokyo, Japan. Patients or Other Participants: Ninety-four players during the 2002–2005 seasons. Main Outcome Measure(s): Data were collected for 3 consecutive seasons using an injury reporting form. Results: The overall game injury rate was 74.3 per 1000 player-game hours and 11.7 per 1000 player-game hours for injuries resulting in any time loss. The overall practice injury rates were 11.2 per 1000 player-practice hours and 1.1 per 1000 player-practice hours for injuries resulting in any time loss. Forwards had the highest rate of injury, followed by defensemen and then goalkeepers. Contusions were the most common injury, followed by strains, lacerations, and sprains. Conclusions: Most injuries among Japanese ice hockey players occurred during games. Game or play intensity may influence the injury rate during games. PMID:19295967

  6. Neck injuries presenting to emergency departments in the United States from 1990 to 1999 for ice hockey, soccer, and American football.

    PubMed

    Delaney, J S; Al-Kashmiri, A

    2005-04-01

    To examine the number and rate of neck injuries in the community as a whole for ice hockey, soccer, and American football by analysing data from patients presenting to emergency departments in the United States from 1990 to 1999. Data compiled for the US Consumer Product Safety Commission were used to generate estimates for the total number of neck injuries and the more specific diagnoses of neck fractures, dislocations, contusions, sprains, strains, and lacerations occurring nationally from 1990 to 1999. These data were combined with yearly participation figures to generate rates of injury presenting to emergency departments for each sport. There were an estimated 5038 neck injuries from ice hockey, 19,341 from soccer, and 114 706 from American football. These could be broken down as follows: 4964 contusions, sprains, or strains from ice hockey, 17,927 from soccer, and 104 483 from football; 105 neck fractures or dislocations from ice hockey, 214 from soccer, and 1588 from football; 199 neck lacerations for ice hockey, 0 for soccer, and 621 for football. The rates for total neck injuries and combined neck contusions, sprains, or strains were higher for football than for ice hockey or soccer in all years for which data were available. The rate of neck injury in the United States was higher in football than in ice hockey or soccer in the time period studied.

  7. Brain contusion with aphasia following an ice hockey injury.

    PubMed

    Degen, Ryan M; Fink, Matthew E; Callahan, Lisa; Fibel, Kenton H; Ramsay, Jim; Kelly, Bryan T

    2016-09-01

    Head injuries are relatively common in ice hockey, with the majority represented by concussions, a form of mild traumatic brain injury. More severe head injuries are rare since the implementation of mandatory helmet use in the 1960s. We present a case of a 27 year-old male who sustained a traumatic intraparenchymal hemorrhage with an associated subdural hematoma resulting after being struck by a puck shot at high velocity. The patient presented with expressive aphasia, with no other apparent neurologic deficits. Acutely, he was successfully treated with observation and serial neuroimaging studies ensuring an absence of hematoma expansion. After a stable clinical picture following 24 hours of observation, the patient was discharged and managed with outpatient speech therapy with full resolution of symptoms and return to play 3 months later. We will outline the patient presentation and pertinent points in the management of acute head injuries in athletes.

  8. Is hockey just a game? Contesting meanings of the ice hockey life projects through a career-threatening injury.

    PubMed

    Ronkainen, Noora J; Ryba, Tatiana V

    2017-05-01

    This study is situated within an existential-narrative theoretical framework to examine the impact of career-threatening injury on professional ice hockey players' well-being and career construction. Professional ice hockey culture is construed as a privileged space characterised by hegemonic masculinity, fierce competition as well as high-risk behaviours often resulting in sports injuries. In this paper, we analyse two players' life stories with a particular focus on injury as a boundary situation involving social and temporal breakdown and re-evaluation of meaning of sporting life projects. Emergent narratives surrounding existential themes of loss of meaning and loneliness in the face of injury were analysed in connection with players' search for authenticity and realignment with self-concept. Each player developed resistant narratives to the dominant ethos of professional sport in order to restore well-being and sense of self. The relational aspects of injury are highlighted in practical recommendations.

  9. Head injuries presenting to emergency departments in the United States from 1990 to 1999 for ice hockey, soccer, and football.

    PubMed

    Delaney, J Scott

    2004-03-01

    To examine the number and rates of head injuries occurring in the community as a whole for the team sports of ice hockey, soccer, and football by analyzing data from patients presenting to US emergency departments (EDs) from 1990 to 1999. Retrospective analysis. Data compiled for the US Consumer Product Safety Commission using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System were used to generate estimates for the total number of head injuries, concussions, internal head injuries, and skull fractures occurring on a national level from the years 1990 to 1999. These data were combined with yearly participation figures to generate rates of injuries presenting to the ED for each sport. There were an estimated 17,008 head injuries from ice hockey, 86,697 from soccer, and 204,802 from football that presented to US EDs from 1990 to 1999. The total number of concussions presenting to EDs in the United States over the same period was estimated to be 4820 from ice hockey, 21,715 from soccer, and 68,861 from football. While the rates of head injuries, concussions, and combined concussions/internal head injuries/skull fractures presenting to EDs per 10,000 players were not always statistically similar for all 3 sports in each year data were available, they were usually comparable. While the total numbers of head injuries, concussions, and combined concussions/skull fractures/internal head injuries presenting to EDs in the United States are different for ice hockey, soccer, and football for the years studied, the yearly rates for these injuries are comparable among all 3 sports.

  10. Effects of multiple concussions on retired national hockey league players.

    PubMed

    Caron, Jeffrey G; Bloom, Gordon A; Johnston, Karen M; Sabiston, Catherine M

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the meanings and lived experiences of multiple concussions in professional hockey players using hermeneutic, idiographic, and inductive approaches within an interpretative phenomenological analysis. The interviewer was an athlete who had suffered multiple concussions, and the interviewees were five former National Hockey League athletes who had retired due to medically diagnosed concussions suffered during their careers. The men discussed the physical and psychological symptoms they experienced as a result of their concussions and how the symptoms affected their professional careers, personal relationships, and quality of life. The former professional athletes related these symptoms to the turmoil that is ever present in their lives. These findings are of interest to athletes, coaches, sport administrators, family members, sport psychology practitioners, and medical professionals, as they highlight the severity of short- and long-term effects of concussions.

  11. Evaluation, management and prevention of lower extremity youth ice hockey injuries

    PubMed Central

    Popkin, Charles A; Schulz, Brian M; Park, Caroline N; Bottiglieri, Thomas S; Lynch, T Sean

    2016-01-01

    Ice hockey is a fast-paced sport played by increasing numbers of children and adolescents in North America and around the world. Requiring a unique blend of skill, finesse, power and teamwork, ice hockey can become a lifelong recreational activity. Despite the rising popularity of the sport, there is ongoing concern about the high frequency of musculoskeletal injury associated with participation in ice hockey. Injury rates in ice hockey are among the highest in all competitive sports. Numerous research studies have been implemented to better understand the risks of injury. As a result, rule changes were adopted by the USA Hockey and Hockey Canada to raise the minimum age at which body checking is permitted to 13–14 years (Bantam level) from 11–12 years (Pee Wee). Continuing the education of coaches, parents and players on rules of safe play, and emphasizing the standards for proper equipment use are other strategies being implemented to make the game safer to play. The objective of this article was to review the evaluation, management and prevention of common lower extremity youth hockey injuries. PMID:27920584

  12. Evaluation, management and prevention of lower extremity youth ice hockey injuries.

    PubMed

    Popkin, Charles A; Schulz, Brian M; Park, Caroline N; Bottiglieri, Thomas S; Lynch, T Sean

    2016-01-01

    Ice hockey is a fast-paced sport played by increasing numbers of children and adolescents in North America and around the world. Requiring a unique blend of skill, finesse, power and teamwork, ice hockey can become a lifelong recreational activity. Despite the rising popularity of the sport, there is ongoing concern about the high frequency of musculoskeletal injury associated with participation in ice hockey. Injury rates in ice hockey are among the highest in all competitive sports. Numerous research studies have been implemented to better understand the risks of injury. As a result, rule changes were adopted by the USA Hockey and Hockey Canada to raise the minimum age at which body checking is permitted to 13-14 years (Bantam level) from 11-12 years (Pee Wee). Continuing the education of coaches, parents and players on rules of safe play, and emphasizing the standards for proper equipment use are other strategies being implemented to make the game safer to play. The objective of this article was to review the evaluation, management and prevention of common lower extremity youth hockey injuries.

  13. Aggression, Violence and Injury in Minor League Ice Hockey: Avenues for Prevention of Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cusimano, Michael D.; Ilie, Gabriela; Mullen, Sarah J.; Pauley, Christopher R.; Stulberg, Jennifer R.; Topolovec-Vranic, Jane; Zhang, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    Background In North America, more than 800,000 youth are registered in organized ice hockey leagues. Despite the many benefits of involvement, young players are at significant risk for injury. Body-checking and aggressive play are associated with high frequency of game-related injury including concussion. We conducted a qualitative study to understand why youth ice hockey players engage in aggressive, injury-prone behaviours on the ice. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 61 minor ice hockey participants, including male and female players, parents, coaches, trainers, managers and a game official. Players were aged 13–15 playing on competitive body checking teams or on non-body checking teams. Interviews were manually transcribed, coded and analyzed for themes relating to aggressive play in minor ice hockey. Results Parents, coaches, teammates and the media exert a large influence on player behavior. Aggressive behavior is often reinforced by the player’s social environment and justified by players to demonstrate loyalty to teammates and especially injured teammates by seeking revenge particularly in competitive, body-checking leagues. Among female and male players in non-body checking organizations, aggressive play is not reinforced by the social environment. These findings are discussed within the framework of social identity theory and social learning theory, in order to understand players’ need to seek revenge and how the social environment reinforces aggressive behaviors. Conclusion This study provides a better understanding of the players’ motivations and environmental influences around aggressive and violent play which may be conducive to injury. The findings can be used to help design interventions aimed at reducing aggression and related injuries sustained during ice hockey and sports with similar cultures and rules. PMID:27258426

  14. Concussion in ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Bonfield, Christopher M; Wecht, Daniel A; Lunsford, L Dade

    2014-01-01

    Ice hockey is an aggressive and fast-paced sport which has a high risk of injury, concussions in particular. Although serious head injury has been recognized for nearly 50 years, an increase in mainstream media attention in recent years has led to unprecedented public awareness. As a result, the National Hockey League (NHL) and other professional leagues around the world have initiated concussion protocols in order to better prevent, recognize, and treat concussions. With over 1,000,000 youth hockey participants in Canada and the USA combined, concussion is an issue that reaches beyond the professional level. In this report we review the incidence, evaluation, treatment, return-to-play protocol, and prevention efforts related to concussion in ice hockey.

  15. The Ice Hockey Injury: A Case Study in Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Phil

    2004-01-01

    A high school hockey team is playing the last of three games in one day. The game gets rough, and the star player is slammed against the boards. Injured, he is escorted off the ice. This case follows his health as it deteriorates over the next several hours. Students are presented with the hockey player's symptoms, and they use their knowledge of…

  16. The Ice Hockey Injury: A Case Study in Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Phil

    2004-01-01

    A high school hockey team is playing the last of three games in one day. The game gets rough, and the star player is slammed against the boards. Injured, he is escorted off the ice. This case follows his health as it deteriorates over the next several hours. Students are presented with the hockey player's symptoms, and they use their knowledge of…

  17. Etiologic factors of ice hockey injuries in Korean high school players.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youn Young; Lee, Chang-Hyung; Lee, Sun Myung; Kim, Tae Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Ice hockey is a competitive sport and ice hockey injuries can be influenced by many physical and psychological factors. Young ice hockey players are especially vulnerable to injury due to their relative lack of experience and rapid physical growth during their juvenile years. Up to now there has been no survey of the physical, psychological, and environmental etiological factors based on the Korean high school ice hockey players population. The purpose of our study was to evaluate, through a comprehensive survey, the incidence of ice hockey injuries according to age and the relationship between etiological factors and injuries in high school students. A cross-sectional study. One hundred nineteen ice hockey players in Korean high schools were recruited for this study. The study was conducted by a self-administered questionnaire survey. The researcher explained the purpose of the survey and how to fill it out. Individual questionnaires were distributed to participants. Chi-squared tests were used to evaluate the relationship between the independent and dependent values. There was a significant difference between a player's age and injury incidence (P = .018). The injury level of each position showed a significant tendency (P = .055). Age was highly correlated with the number of total injuries (P = .019). The average demographic characteristics of those surveyed were age (16.7 years), play line (2.2), height (174.8 cm), weight (69.6 kg), and body mass index (23.4). The shoulder was the most frequent injury area and the knee was the most common cause of hospital visits. There was a higher injury incidence in older groups; however, there was no correlation with body mass index, position, and play line. The causative factors were divided into physical factors, psychological factors, and environmental factors. Generally, 3 factors were not closely regarded as etiologic factors of ice hockey injury. However, deficiency of fitness in the physical factor, aggressiveness in

  18. Reducing injury risk from body checking in boys' youth ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Alison; Loud, Keith J; Brenner, Joel S; Demorest, Rebecca A; Halstead, Mark E; Kelly, Amanda K Weiss; Koutures, Chris G; LaBella, Cynthia R; LaBotz, Michele; Martin, Stephanie S; Moffatt, Kody

    2014-06-01

    Ice hockey is an increasingly popular sport that allows intentional collision in the form of body checking for males but not for females. There is a two- to threefold increased risk of all injury, severe injury, and concussion related to body checking at all levels of boys' youth ice hockey. The American Academy of Pediatrics reinforces the importance of stringent enforcement of rules to protect player safety as well as educational interventions to decrease unsafe tactics. To promote ice hockey as a lifelong recreational pursuit for boys, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the expansion of nonchecking programs and the restriction of body checking to elite levels of boys' youth ice hockey, starting no earlier than 15 years of age.

  19. Head and face injuries during the men's field hockey Junior World Cup 2009.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Swarup

    2012-03-01

    Head and face injuries in field hockey are a concern. However, published data on injuries in field hockey are minimal, with apparently no reports on head and face injuries in elite youth hockey players during major international tournaments. To provide a descriptive account of head and face injuries in elite youth male field hockey players during the Men's Junior World Cup 2009. Descriptive epidemiological study. A total of 324 players were observed during 58 matches in the tournament. The injury reporting system was based on that used in team sports during international tournaments. All the head and face injury documentation was done by direct on-location observation by a trained sports medicine physician followed by confirmation from the team doctors or physical therapists. A total of 24 head and face injuries were documented. The overall injury frequency rate was 16 per 1000 match hours and 19 per 1000 player matches. There were 92% of injuries that were of contact type, with the head being the most common site and contusion being the most common type of injury. The incidence of injuries was higher during the second half and during the medal/ranking phase of the tournament. The risk of head and face injuries is high in elite youth players with a potential of both short- and long-term player time loss in international tournaments. Rigorous enforcement of rules prohibiting body contact can significantly reduce the chances of head and face injuries in elite youth field hockey players. In addition, player education on the injury risks and safe practices at the developmental stages is desirable to prevent injuries and prolong sporting careers.

  20. University men's ice hockey: rates and risk of injuries over 6-years.

    PubMed

    Rishiraj, N; Lloyd-Smith, R; Lorenz, T; Niven, B; Michel, M

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the injury rates of a Men's Varsity Ice Hockey team over six-years. Data on ice hockey injury rates and profile continue to increase in the hope of assisting with injury prevention. The University of British Columbia Men's Varsity team has been followed prospectively over a six-year period. All student-athletes completed a preseason medical examinations and physiological assessments. The team physician evaluated each injury and the team therapist completed the injury report forms and the attendance records for each player. A total of 46215 player exposures were recorded. The combined injury rate was 3.70 injuries/1000 player game and practice exposures. A statistically significantly higher risk of injury was observed during games and the greatest risk of injury was observed during the second period. Forwards sustained greater percentage of injuries compared to defensemen and goalies. Sprains and strains accounted for 40% of all injuries, followed by concussions (13%). Non-contact injuries were most common, while the anatomy sustaining the most injuries was the head/neck/face region. A high percentage of the recorded injuries required less than seven days to return to full activity. The risk of injury for university ice hockey players is greater during games and is dependant on playing position. Players are prone to sprains and strains, which may not involve any contact. Concussion and knee joint injury rates continue to cause concern.

  1. Injuries in men's international ice hockey: a 7-year study of the International Ice Hockey Federation Adult World Championship Tournaments and Olympic Winter Games.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, Markku; Stuart, Michael J; Aubry, Mark; Kannus, Pekka; Parkkari, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Information on ice hockey injuries at the international level is very limited. The aim of the study was to analyse the incidence, type, mechanism and severity of ice hockey injuries in men's international ice hockey tournaments. All the injuries in men's International Ice Hockey Federation World Championship tournaments over a 7-year period were analysed using a strict definition of injury, standardised reporting strategies and an injury diagnosis made by a team physician. 528 injuries were recorded in games resulting in an injury rate of 14.2 per 1000 player-games (52.1/1000 player-game hours). Additionally, 27 injuries occurred during practice. For WC A-pool Tournaments and Olympic Winter Games (OWG) the injury rate was 16.3/1000 player-games (59.6/1000 player-game hours). Body checking, and stick and puck contact caused 60.7% of the injuries. The most common types of injuries were lacerations, sprains, contusions and fractures. A laceration was the most common facial injury and was typically caused by a stick. The knee was the most frequently injured part of the lower body and the shoulder was the most common site of an upper body injury. Arenas with flexible boards and glass reduced the risk of injury by 29% (IRR 0.71, (95% CI 0.56 to 0.91)). The incidence of injury during international ice hockey competition is relatively high. Arena characteristics, such as flexible boards and glass, appeared to reduce the risk of injury. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Injuries in men's international ice hockey: a 7-year study of the International Ice Hockey Federation Adult World Championship Tournaments and Olympic Winter Games

    PubMed Central

    Tuominen, Markku; Stuart, Michael J; Aubry, Mark; Kannus, Pekka; Parkkari, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Background Information on ice hockey injuries at the international level is very limited. The aim of the study was to analyse the incidence, type, mechanism and severity of ice hockey injuries in men's international ice hockey tournaments. Methods All the injuries in men's International Ice Hockey Federation World Championship tournaments over a 7-year period were analysed using a strict definition of injury, standardised reporting strategies and an injury diagnosis made by a team physician. Results 528 injuries were recorded in games resulting in an injury rate of 14.2 per 1000 player-games (52.1/1000 player-game hours). Additionally, 27 injuries occurred during practice. For WC A-pool Tournaments and Olympic Winter Games (OWG) the injury rate was 16.3/1000 player-games (59.6/1000 player-game hours). Body checking, and stick and puck contact caused 60.7% of the injuries. The most common types of injuries were lacerations, sprains, contusions and fractures. A laceration was the most common facial injury and was typically caused by a stick. The knee was the most frequently injured part of the lower body and the shoulder was the most common site of an upper body injury. Arenas with flexible boards and glass reduced the risk of injury by 29% (IRR 0.71, (95% CI 0.56 to 0.91)). Conclusions The incidence of injury during international ice hockey competition is relatively high. Arena characteristics, such as flexible boards and glass, appeared to reduce the risk of injury. PMID:25293341

  3. Mechanisms of injury for concussions in university football, ice hockey, and soccer.

    PubMed

    Delaney, J Scott; Al-Kashmiri, Ammar; Correa, José A

    2014-05-01

    To examine the mechanisms of injury for concussions in university football, ice hockey, and soccer. Prospective cohort design. McGill University Sport Medicine Clinic. Male and female athletes participating in varsity football, ice hockey, and soccer. Athletes were followed prospectively over a 10-year period to determine the mechanisms of injury for concussions and whether contact with certain areas of the body or individual variables predisposed to longer recovery from concussions. For soccer, data were collected on whether concussions occurred while attempting to head the ball. There were 226 concussions in 170 athletes over the study period. The side/temporal area of the head or helmet was the most common area to be struck resulting in concussion in all 3 sports. Contact from another player's head or helmet was the most probable mechanism in football and soccer. In hockey, concussion impacts were more likely to occur from contact with another body part or object rather than another head/helmet. Differences in mechanisms of injuries were found between males and females in soccer and ice hockey. Athletes with multiple concussions took longer to return to play with each subsequent concussion. Half of the concussions in soccer were related to attempting to head the soccer ball. The side of the head or helmet was the most common area to be struck resulting in concussion in all 3 sports. In ice hockey and soccer, there are differences in the mechanisms of injury for males and females within the same sport.

  4. Effectiveness of interventions to reduce aggression and injuries among ice hockey players: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Cusimano, Michael D.; Nastis, Sofia; Zuccaro, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Background: The increasing incidence of injuries related to playing ice hockey is an important public health issue. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions designed to reduce injuries related to aggressive acts in ice hockey. Methods: We identified relevant articles by searching electronic databases from their inception through July 2012, by using Internet search engines, and by manually searching sports medicine journals, the book series Safety in Ice Hockey and reference lists of included articles. We included studies that evaluated interventions to reduce aggression-related injuries and reported ratings of aggressive behaviour or rates of penalties or injuries. Results: We identified 18 eligible studies. Most involved players in minor hockey leagues. Of 13 studies that evaluated changes in mandatory rules intended to lessen aggression (most commonly the restriction of body-checking), 11 observed a reduction in penalty or injury rates associated with rule changes, and 9 of these showed a statistically significant decrease. The mean number of penalties decreased by 1.2–5.9 per game, and injury rates decreased 3- to 12-fold. All 3 studies of educational interventions showed a reduction in penalty rates, but they were not powered or designed to show a change in injury rates. In 2 studies of cognitive behavioural interventions, reductions in aggressive behaviours were observed. Interpretation: Changes to mandatory rules were associated with reductions in penalties for aggressive acts and in injuries related to aggression among ice hockey players. Effects of educational and cognitive behavioural interventions on injury rates are less clear. Well-designed studies of multifaceted strategies that combine such approaches are required. PMID:23209118

  5. Head injuries in winter sports: downhill skiing, snowboarding, sledding, snowmobiling, ice skating and ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Chaze, Brian; McDonald, Patrick

    2009-02-01

    Winter sports are often associated with high speed, which carries with it the potential for collision. As such, head injuries are among the more commonly encountered injuries in winter-related sporting activities. This article focuses on popular winter sports such as downhill skiing and snowboarding, sledding, snowmobiling, ice skating, and hockey. In virtually all of these activities, the incidence and severity of head injuries can be reduced by the use of appropriate protective headgear.

  6. Head injuries in winter sports: downhill skiing, snowboarding, sledding, snowmobiling, ice skating and ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Chaze, Brian; McDonald, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    Winter sports are often associated with high speed, which carries with it the potential for collision. As such, head injuries are among the more commonly encountered injuries in winter-related sporting activities. This article focuses on popular winter sports such as downhill skiing and snowboarding, sledding, snowmobiling, ice skating, and hockey. In virtually all of these activities, the incidence and severity of head injuries can be reduced by the use of appropriate protective headgear.

  7. Poor peak dorsiflexor torque associated with incidence of ankle injury in elite field female hockey players.

    PubMed

    Naicker, Marlene; McLean, Michelle; Esterhuizen, Tonya M; Peters-Futre, Edith M

    2007-12-01

    This study set out to determine the incidence of ankle injuries amongst provincial female field hockey players in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), South Africa, during the 2004 field hockey season and relate this to their injury and playing profile, proprioceptive ability and peak isokinetic torque of the ankle plantar and dorsiflexor muscles. Players participating in the senior, U21 and U19/high school provincial A teams (n=47) detailed their hockey playing and training history and injuries sustained during the 2004 season. A subsample of injured and matched, uninjured controls (n=18) underwent anthropometric, proprioceptive and isokinetic testing. Incidence of injury in the 2004 season was 0.98 per player or 6.32 injuries per 1000 player/h(-1), with 25.5% of players (n=12) reporting injuries to the ankle joint. All ankle injuries occurred on artificial turf and 75% occurred during a match. Forwards and links that had been playing for six to seven years presented with the highest incidence of ankle injuries. Injured players were able to maintain balance on a proprioceptive board for 10.31+/-8.2 s versus 23.9+/-15.3 s in matched, uninjured controls (p=0.078). Both mean (27.4+/-5.5 Nm versus 32.7+/-4.7 Nm) and median (27.0, 23.0-31.5 versus 31.8, 30.0-35.1 Nm) peak isokinetic torque of the dorsiflexors of injured legs was significantly lower than in uninjured, contralateral legs of the injured players (p=0.01 and 0.03, respectively). Poor peak dorsiflexion torque in the injured leg was identified as a factor associated with ankle injury in this sample of injured, elite field hockey players.

  8. Trends in reporting of mechanisms and incidence of hip injuries in males playing minor ice hockey in Canada: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Ayeni, Olufemi R; Kowalczuk, Marcin; Farag, Jordan; Farrokhyar, Forough; Chu, Raymond; Bedi, Asheesh; Willits, Kevin; Bhandari, Mohit

    2014-01-01

    There has been a noted increase in the diagnosis and reporting of sporting hip injuries and conditions in the medical literature but reporting at the minor hockey level is unknown. The purpose of this study is to investigate the trend of reporting hip injuries in amateur ice hockey players in Canada with a focus on injury type and mechanism. A retrospective review of the Hockey Canada insurance database was performed and data on ice hockey hip injuries reported between January 2005 and June 2011 were collected. The study population included all male hockey players from Peewee (aged 11-12 years) to Senior (aged 20+ years) participating in amateur level competition sanctioned by Hockey Canada. Reported cases of ice hockey hip injuries were analyzed according to age, mechanism of injury, and injury subtype. Annual injury reporting rates were determined and using a linear regression analysis trended to determine the change in ice hockey hip injury reporting rate over time. One hundred and six cases of ice hockey-related hip injuries were reported in total. The majority of injuries (75.5%) occurred in players aged 15-20 years playing at the Junior level. Most injuries were caused by a noncontact mechanism (40.6%) and strains were the most common subtype (50.0%). From 2005 to 2010, the number of reported hip injuries increased by 5.31 cases per year and the rate of reported hip injury per 1,000 registered players increased by 0.02 cases annually. Reporting of hip injuries in amateur ice hockey players is increasing. A more accurate injury reporting system is critical for future epidemiologic studies to accurately document the rate and mechanism of hip injury in amateur ice hockey players.

  9. A prospective study of concussions among National Hockey League players during regular season games: the NHL-NHLPA Concussion Program.

    PubMed

    Benson, Brian W; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Rizos, John; Kang, Jian; Burke, Charles J

    2011-05-17

    In 1997, the National Hockey League (NHL) and NHL Players' Association (NHLPA) launched a concussion program to improve the understanding of this injury. We explored initial postconcussion signs, symptoms, physical examination findings and time loss (i.e., time between the injury and medical clearance by the physician to return to competitive play), experienced by male professional ice-hockey players, and assessed the utility of initial postconcussion clinical manifestations in predicting time loss among hockey players. We conducted a prospective case series of concussions over seven NHL regular seasons (1997-2004) using an inclusive cohort of players. The primary outcome was concussion and the secondary outcome was time loss. NHL team physicians documented post-concussion clinical manifestations and recorded the date when a player was medically cleared to return to play. Team physicians reported 559 concussions during regular season games. The estimated incidence was 1.8 concussions per 1000 player-hours. The most common postconcussion symptom was headache (71%). On average, time loss (in days) increased 2.25 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41-3.62) for every subsequent (i.e., recurrent) concussion sustained during the study period. Controlling for age and position, significant predictors of time loss were postconcussion headache (p < 0.001), low energy or fatigue (p = 0.01), amnesia (p = 0.02) and abnormal neurologic examination (p = 0.01). Using a previously suggested time loss cut-point of 10 days, headache (odds ratio [OR] 2.17, 95% CI 1.33-3.54) and low energy or fatigue (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.04-2.85) were significant predictors of time loss of more than 10 days. Postconcussion headache, low energy or fatigue, amnesia and abnormal neurologic examination were significant predictors of time loss among professional hockey players.

  10. A prospective study of concussions among National Hockey League players during regular season games: the NHL-NHLPA Concussion Program

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Brian W.; Meeuwisse, Willem H.; Rizos, John; Kang, Jian; Burke, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    Background In 1997, the National Hockey League (NHL) and NHL Players’ Association (NHLPA) launched a concussion program to improve the understanding of this injury. We explored initial postconcussion signs, symptoms, physical examination findings and time loss (i.e., time between the injury and medical clearance by the physician to return to competitive play), experienced by male professional ice-hockey players, and assessed the utility of initial postconcussion clinical manifestations in predicting time loss among hockey players. Methods We conducted a prospective case series of concussions over seven NHL regular seasons (1997–2004) using an inclusive cohort of players. The primary outcome was concussion and the secondary outcome was time loss. NHL team physicians documented post-concussion clinical manifestations and recorded the date when a player was medically cleared to return to play. Results Team physicians reported 559 concussions during regular season games. The estimated incidence was 1.8 concussions per 1000 player-hours. The most common postconcussion symptom was headache (71%). On average, time loss (in days) increased 2.25 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41–3.62) for every subsequent (i.e., recurrent) concussion sustained during the study period. Controlling for age and position, significant predictors of time loss were postconcussion headache (p < 0.001), low energy or fatigue (p = 0.01), amnesia (p = 0.02) and abnormal neurologic examination (p = 0.01). Using a previously suggested time loss cut-point of 10 days, headache (odds ratio [OR] 2.17, 95% CI 1.33–3.54) and low energy or fatigue (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.04–2.85) were significant predictors of time loss of more than 10 days. Interpretation Postconcussion headache, low energy or fatigue, amnesia and abnormal neurologic examination were significant predictors of time loss among professional hockey players. PMID:21502355

  11. A systematic video analysis of National Hockey League (NHL) concussions, part I: who, when, where and what?

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Michael G; Comper, Paul; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Echemendia, Ruben J

    2015-04-01

    Although there is a growing understanding of the consequences of concussions in hockey, very little is known about the precipitating factors associated with this type of injury. To describe player characteristics and situational factors associated with concussions in the National Hockey League (NHL). Case series of medically diagnosed concussions for regular season games over a 3.5-year period during the 2006-2010 seasons using an inclusive cohort of professional hockey players. Digital video records were coded and analysed using the Heads Up Checklist. Of 197 medically diagnosed concussions, 88% involved contact with an opponent. Forwards accounted for more concussions than expected compared with on-ice proportional representation (95% CI 60 to 73; p=0.04). Significantly more concussions occurred in the first period (47%) compared with the second and third periods (p=0.047), with the majority of concussions occurring in the defensive zone (45%). Approximately 47% of the concussions occurred in open ice, 53% occurred in the perimeter. Finally, 37% of the concussions involved injured players' heads contacting the boards or glass. This study describes several specific factors associated with concussions in the NHL, including period of the game, player position, body size, and specific locations on the ice and particular situations based on a player's position. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Recreational ice hockey injuries in adult non-checking leagues: a United States perspective.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Pasqualino; Mattson, Douglas J

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze injuries among adult recreational ice hockey players. This was an observational prospective cohort study with data collected on injuries sustained during one season in the adult recreational ice hockey leagues of Oneida County, NY. The injury incidence rate was found to be 12.2/1000 player-exposures. The most common anatomic region injured was the head/neck/face (35%). Collisions were most often reported as the mechanism of injury (44%). Fracture was the most common diagnosis. Of players wearing face protection (full cage or shield, or partial visor/half shield), none suffered facial injuries, while all facial injuries reported were to players not wearing facial protection. The concussion rate was 1.1/1000 player-exposures. A lack of protective equipment was associated with 38% of injuries and 24% of injuries involved penalties. A history of prior injuries was found in 89% of injured players with 28% re-injuring the same body part. This study's findings suggested various strategies to address player injuries such as mandatory full facial protection and shoulder pads, strict enforcement of game rules, and game rule modifications (no body checking). Further research is needed on the role of preventive rehabilitation in players with previous injury history. Key PointsThe injury incidence rate was found to be 12.2/1000 player-exposures, similar to previous Canadian literature.The concussion rate was 1.1/1000 player-exposures.38% of injuries involved a lack of protective equipment and 24% of injuries involved penalties.Full facial protection and shoulder pads should be compulsory.Strict enforcement of game rules is necessary.History of prior injuries was found in 89% of injured players.

  13. Trends in North American Newspaper Reporting of Brain Injury in Ice Hockey

    PubMed Central

    Cusimano, Michael D.; Sharma, Bhanu; Lawrence, David W.; Ilie, Gabriela; Silverberg, Sarah; Jones, Rochelle

    2013-01-01

    The frequency and potential long-term effects of sport-related traumatic brain injuries (TBI) make it a major public health concern. The culture within contact sports, such as ice hockey, encourages aggression that puts youth at risk of TBI such as concussion. Newspaper reports play an important role in conveying and shaping the culture around health-related behaviors. We qualitatively studied reports about sport-related TBI in four major North American newspapers over the last quarter-century. We used the grounded-theory approach to identify major themes and then did a content analysis to compare the frequency of key themes between 1998–2000 and 2009–2011. The major themes were: perceptions of brain injury, aggression, equipment, rules and regulations, and youth hockey. Across the full study period, newspaper articles from Canada and America portrayed violence and aggression that leads to TBI both as integral to hockey and as an unavoidable risk associated with playing the game. They also condemned violence in ice hockey, criticized the administrative response to TBI, and recognized the significance of TBI. In Canada, aggression was reported more often recently and there was a distinctive shift in portraying protective equipment as a solution to TBI in earlier years to a potential contributing factor to TBI later in the study period. American newspapers gave a greater attention to ‘perception of risks’ and the role of protective equipment, and discussed TBI in a broader context in the recent time period. Newspapers from both countries showed similar recent trends in regards to a need for rule changes to curb youth sport-related TBI. This study provides a rich description of the reporting around TBI in contact sport. Understanding this reporting is important for evaluating whether the dangers of sport-related TBI are being appropriately communicated by the media. PMID:23613957

  14. The Control of Externalities in Sports Leagues: An Analysis of Restrictions in the National Hockey League

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Dennis W.; Frankel, Alan S.; Landes, Elisabeth M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides one of the few successful demonstrations of the efficiency of certain types of restrictions in the context of a joint venture. The joint venture we examine is the National Hockey League (NHL) in the 1980s, which was then composed of 21 separately owned teams. (It now has 30 teams.) The restriction we analyze is the NHL rule on…

  15. The Control of Externalities in Sports Leagues: An Analysis of Restrictions in the National Hockey League

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Dennis W.; Frankel, Alan S.; Landes, Elisabeth M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides one of the few successful demonstrations of the efficiency of certain types of restrictions in the context of a joint venture. The joint venture we examine is the National Hockey League (NHL) in the 1980s, which was then composed of 21 separately owned teams. (It now has 30 teams.) The restriction we analyze is the NHL rule on…

  16. Injuries in women's international ice hockey: an 8-year study of the World Championship tournaments and Olympic Winter Games.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, Markku; Stuart, Michael J; Aubry, Mark; Kannus, Pekka; Tokola, Kari; Parkkari, Jari

    2016-11-01

    We report the incidence, type, mechanism and severity of ice hockey injuries in women's international ice hockey championships. All injuries in the International Ice Hockey Federation World Women's Championship, World Women's under-18 Championship and Olympic Winter Games tournaments were analysed over an 8-year period using a strict injury definition, standardised reporting and team physician diagnosis. 168 injuries were recorded in 637 games over an 8-year period resulting in an injury rate (IR) of 6.4 per 1000 player-games and 22.0/1000 player-game hours. The IRs were 2.7/1000 player-games for the lower body, 1.4 for the upper body, 1.3 for the head and face and 0.9 for the spine and trunk. Contusion was the most common injury followed by a sprain. The most commonly injured site was the knee (48.6% of lower body injuries; IR 1.3/1000 player-games). The Medial collateral ligament sprain occurred in 37.1% and ACL rupture in 11.4% of knee injuries. A concussion (74.3%; IR 1.0/1000 player-games) was the most common head injury. The risk of injury to female ice hockey players at World Championship and Olympic tournaments was about half of that observed in the men's Championships. Full facial protection decreases the risk of lacerations and should be continued in all future female tournaments. More effective prevention strategies for knee, ankle and shoulder injuries are needed in women's ice hockey. Improved concussion education is necessary to promote more consistent diagnosis and return to play protocols. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Update and Overview of Spinal Injuries in Canadian Ice Hockey, 1943 to 2011: The Continuing Need for Injury Prevention and Education.

    PubMed

    Tator, Charles H; Provvidenza, Christine; Cassidy, J David

    2016-05-01

    To identify spinal injuries in Canadian ice hockey from 2006 to 2011 and to discuss data from 1943 to 2011 and impact of injury prevention programs. Data about spinal injuries with and without spinal cord injury in ice hockey have been collected by ThinkFirst's (now Parachute Canada) Canadian Ice Hockey Spinal Injuries Registry since 1981 through questionnaires from practitioners, ice hockey organizations, and media. All Canadian provinces and territories. All registered Canadian ice hockey players. Age, gender, level of play, location, mechanism of injury. Incidence, incidence rate, prevalence, and nature (morbidity) of the injuries. Between 2006 and 2011, 44 cases occurred, 4 (9.1%) of which were severe. The incidence in the recent years continues to be lower than the peak years. From 1943 to 2011, 355 cases have been documented, primarily males (97.7%) and cervical spine injuries (78.9%), resulting from impact with the boards (64.2%). Check or push from behind (36.0%) was still the most common cause of injury, although slightly lower during 2006 to 2011. From 1943 to 2011, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, and British Columbia/Yukon had the highest injury rates. Ontario and Quebec continued to show markedly different injury rates, with Ontario more than twice that of Quebec. Current data for 2006 to 2011 indicate that spinal injuries in ice hockey continue to occur, although still at lower rates than the peak years 1982 to 1995. It is imperative to continue educating players and team officials about spinal injury prevention and to reinforce the rules against checking or pushing from behind to reduce the incidence of these serious injuries.

  18. Enforcement of Mouthguard Use and Athlete Compliance in National Collegiate Athletic Association Men's Collegiate Ice Hockey Competition

    PubMed Central

    Hawn, Kristen L.; Visser, Mary Frances; Sexton, Patrick J.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine enforcement patterns and athlete compliance with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) rule requiring the wearing of mouthguards in men's collegiate ice hockey games during a single competitive season. Design and Setting: We developed a questionnaire and sent it to certified athletic trainers (ATCs) directly responsible for men's varsity collegiate ice hockey at 127 NCAA-affiliated institutions. Then χ2 analyses were conducted to determine whether significant differences existed in the pattern of responses by division of play (Division I, II, or III or independent). Subjects: A total of 104 ATCs responded. We obtained data from 94 questionnaires with complete answers to primary questions addressing program enforcement of the rule and mouthguard use. Measurements: Our questionnaire asked about types of mouthguards used, attitudes of the sports medicine and coaching staffs regarding the role of mouthguards in prevention of injury, enforcement of mouthguard use, and actual numbers of athletes wearing mouthguards in competition. Respondents also provided an estimate of the number of penalties assessed against their team for mouthguard violations during the previous season. Results: Most ATCs (93%) reported that they believed mouthguards play a role in injury prevention. Respondents indicated someone on the coaching or sports medicine staff enforced the rule at 74% of the institutions, with a trend toward greater enforcement at the Division II and III levels. Overall, ATCs reported 63% of athletes consistently wore mouthguards in competition, with significantly higher compliance at the Division II and III levels. A total of 19 penalties were reportedly assessed for violation of the mouthguard rule the previous season. Conclusions: Our data suggest that the use of mouthguards in competition is not consistently enforced by ATCs, coaches, or game officials and that mouthguards are not routinely worn by athletes. These results raise

  19. Enforcement of Mouthguard Use and Athlete Compliance in National Collegiate Athletic Association Men's Collegiate Ice Hockey Competition.

    PubMed

    Hawn, Kristen L; Visser, Mary Frances; Sexton, Patrick J

    2002-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine enforcement patterns and athlete compliance with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) rule requiring the wearing of mouthguards in men's collegiate ice hockey games during a single competitive season. DESIGN AND SETTING: We developed a questionnaire and sent it to certified athletic trainers (ATCs) directly responsible for men's varsity collegiate ice hockey at 127 NCAA-affiliated institutions. Then chi(2) analyses were conducted to determine whether significant differences existed in the pattern of responses by division of play (Division I, II, or III or independent). SUBJECTS: A total of 104 ATCs responded. We obtained data from 94 questionnaires with complete answers to primary questions addressing program enforcement of the rule and mouthguard use. MEASUREMENTS: Our questionnaire asked about types of mouthguards used, attitudes of the sports medicine and coaching staffs regarding the role of mouthguards in prevention of injury, enforcement of mouthguard use, and actual numbers of athletes wearing mouthguards in competition. Respondents also provided an estimate of the number of penalties assessed against their team for mouthguard violations during the previous season. RESULTS: Most ATCs (93%) reported that they believed mouthguards play a role in injury prevention. Respondents indicated someone on the coaching or sports medicine staff enforced the rule at 74% of the institutions, with a trend toward greater enforcement at the Division II and III levels. Overall, ATCs reported 63% of athletes consistently wore mouthguards in competition, with significantly higher compliance at the Division II and III levels. A total of 19 penalties were reportedly assessed for violation of the mouthguard rule the previous season. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that the use of mouthguards in competition is not consistently enforced by ATCs, coaches, or game officials and that mouthguards are not routinely worn by athletes. These results raise

  20. Strength and conditioning practices of National Hockey League strength and conditioning coaches.

    PubMed

    Ebben, William P; Carroll, Ryan M; Simenz, Christopher J

    2004-11-01

    This study describes the results of a survey of the practices of National Hockey League strength and conditioning (NHL S&C) coaches. The response rate was 76.6% (23 of 30). This survey examines (a) background information, (b) physical testing, (c) flexibility development, (d) speed development, (e) plyometrics, (f) strength/power development, (g) unique aspects, and (h) comments. Results indicate, in part, that coaches assess an average of 7.2 parameters of fitness, with tests of strength and power being the most common. All coaches used a variety of flexibility-development strategies. Results reveal that 21 of 23 (91.3%) of NHL S&C coaches follow a periodization model (PM). Of the coaches who follow a PM, 21 of 21 (100%) indicated that their athletes used Olympic-style lifts, and 21 of 21 coaches (100%) trained athletes with plyometric exercises. For those who used plyometrics with their athletes, 17 of 21 (80.1%) reported no plyometric-related injuries in the past year. Coaches who report they did not follow a PM also did not use Olympic-style lifts, plyometrics, or speed development strategies, such as assisted, resisted, or interval training, with their athletes. Finally, coaches reported that the squat and their variations, as well at the Olympic-style lifts and its variations, were most frequently used with their athletes. The survey serves as a review, as well as a source of applied information and new ideas.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Intra-articular Findings After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Ice Hockey Versus Other Sports

    PubMed Central

    Kluczynski, Melissa A.; Kang, Jeansol V.; Marzo, John M.; Bisson, Leslie J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of comorbid knee pathology has been examined for sports-related anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, but it has not been examined in ice hockey players. Purpose: To compare concomitant bone bruising, collateral ligament injuries, and intra-articular injuries in ACL injuries suffered during ice hockey versus other sports. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 20 patients with ACL injuries sustained during ice hockey were identified from a prospective registry, of which 95% were male and 90% had a contact mechanism of injury (MOI). Thirteen cases and 46 controls who sustained ACL injuries from ice hockey and other sports, respectively, were included. Inclusion criteria for cases and controls were male sex, contact MOI, no prior knee surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 6 weeks of injury, and surgery within 3 months of injury. Age, body mass index (BMI), MRI findings (bone bruising, medial and lateral collateral ligament [MCL, LCL] injuries), and arthroscopic findings (meniscus tears, chondral injuries) were compared for cases versus controls using t tests or exact chi-square tests. Results: Age (22.9 ± 8.8 vs 23.4 ± 10.4 years, P = .88) and BMI ≥25 kg/m2 (50% vs 65.9%, P = .66) did not differ between cases and controls. Cases had less lateral bone bruising (lateral femoral condyle: 54.6% vs 93%, P = .01; lateral tibial plateau: 72.7% vs 93%, P = .09) and no medial bone bruising (medial femoral condyle: 0% vs 7%, P = .06; medial tibial plateau: 0% vs 32.6%, P = .05) compared with controls. Cases had less frequent lateral meniscus tears than controls (23.1% vs 58.5%, P = .05). There were no significant differences in MCL (40% vs 31.2%, P = .77), LCL (0% vs 3.9%, P > .999), medial meniscus tears (7.7% vs 37%, P = .08), and chondral injuries (10% vs 9.4%, P > .999) for cases versus controls. Conclusion: Male ice hockey players with ACL injuries had less lateral femoral condyle and

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Intra-articular Findings After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Ice Hockey Versus Other Sports.

    PubMed

    Kluczynski, Melissa A; Kang, Jeansol V; Marzo, John M; Bisson, Leslie J

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of comorbid knee pathology has been examined for sports-related anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, but it has not been examined in ice hockey players. To compare concomitant bone bruising, collateral ligament injuries, and intra-articular injuries in ACL injuries suffered during ice hockey versus other sports. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 20 patients with ACL injuries sustained during ice hockey were identified from a prospective registry, of which 95% were male and 90% had a contact mechanism of injury (MOI). Thirteen cases and 46 controls who sustained ACL injuries from ice hockey and other sports, respectively, were included. Inclusion criteria for cases and controls were male sex, contact MOI, no prior knee surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 6 weeks of injury, and surgery within 3 months of injury. Age, body mass index (BMI), MRI findings (bone bruising, medial and lateral collateral ligament [MCL, LCL] injuries), and arthroscopic findings (meniscus tears, chondral injuries) were compared for cases versus controls using t tests or exact chi-square tests. Age (22.9 ± 8.8 vs 23.4 ± 10.4 years, P = .88) and BMI ≥25 kg/m(2) (50% vs 65.9%, P = .66) did not differ between cases and controls. Cases had less lateral bone bruising (lateral femoral condyle: 54.6% vs 93%, P = .01; lateral tibial plateau: 72.7% vs 93%, P = .09) and no medial bone bruising (medial femoral condyle: 0% vs 7%, P = .06; medial tibial plateau: 0% vs 32.6%, P = .05) compared with controls. Cases had less frequent lateral meniscus tears than controls (23.1% vs 58.5%, P = .05). There were no significant differences in MCL (40% vs 31.2%, P = .77), LCL (0% vs 3.9%, P > .999), medial meniscus tears (7.7% vs 37%, P = .08), and chondral injuries (10% vs 9.4%, P > .999) for cases versus controls. Male ice hockey players with ACL injuries had less lateral femoral condyle and medial tibial plateau bone bruising compared with other sports

  3. Scheduling for the National Hockey League Using a Multi-objective Evolutionary Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Sam; While, Lyndon; Barone, Luigi

    We describe a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm that derives schedules for the National Hockey League according to three objectives: minimising the teams' total travel, promoting equity in rest time between games, and minimising long streaks of home or away games. Experiments show that the system is able to derive schedules that beat the 2008-9 NHL schedule in all objectives simultaneously, and that it returns a set of schedules that offer a range of trade-offs across the objectives.

  4. Ability of Preseason Body Composition and Physical Fitness to Predict the Risk of Injury in Male Collegiate Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Grant, John A.; Bedi, Asheesh; Kurz, Jennifer; Bancroft, Richard; Gagnier, Joel J.; Miller, Bruce S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Injuries in collegiate ice hockey can result in significant time lost from play. The identification of modifiable risk factors relating to a player’s physical fitness allows the development of focused training and injury prevention programs targeted at reducing these risks. Purpose: To determine the ability of preseason fitness outcomes to predict in-season on-ice injury in male collegiate ice hockey players. Study Design: Prognostic cohort study. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: Athlete demographics, percentage body fat, aerobic capacity (300-m shuttle run; 1-, 1.5-, 5-mile run), and strength assessment (sit-ups, push-ups, grip strength, bench press, Olympic cleans, squats) data were collected at the beginning of 8 successive seasons for 1 male collegiate ice hockey team. Hockey-related injury data and player-level practice/game athlete exposure (AE) data were also prospectively collected. Seventy-nine players participated (203 player-years). Injury was defined as any event that resulted in the athlete being unable to participate in 1 or more practices or games following the event. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to determine the ability of the independent variables to predict the occurrence of on-ice injury. Results: There were 132 injuries (mean, 16.5 per year) in 55 athletes. The overall injury rate was 4.4 injuries per 1000 AEs. Forwards suffered 68% of the injuries. Seventy percent of injuries occurred during games with equal distribution between the 3 periods. The mean number of days lost due to injury was 7.8 ± 13.8 (range, 1-127 days). The most common mechanism of injury was contact with another player (54%). The odds of injury in a forward was 1.9 times (95% CI, 1.1-3.4) that of a defenseman and 3 times (95% CI, 1.2-7.7) that of a goalie. The odds of injury if the player’s body mass index (BMI) was ≥25 kg/m2 was 2.1 times (95% CI, 1.1-3.8) that of a player with a BMI <25 kg/m2. The odds ratios for bench press

  5. An observational method to code concussions in the National Hockey League (NHL): the heads-up checklist.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Michael G; Comper, Paul; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Echemendia, Ruben J

    2014-01-01

    Development of effective strategies for preventing concussions is a priority in all sports, including ice hockey. Digital video records of sports events contain a rich source of valuable information, and are therefore a promising resource for analysing situational factors and injury mechanisms related to concussion. To determine whether independent raters reliably agreed on the antecedent events and mechanisms of injury when using a standardised observational tool known as the heads-up checklist (HUC) to code digital video records of concussions in the National Hockey League (NHL). The study occurred in two phases. In phase 1, four raters (2 naïve and 2 expert) independently viewed and completed HUCs for 25 video records of NHL concussions randomly chosen from the pool of concussion events from the 2006-2007 regular season. Following initial analysis, three additional factors were added to the HUC, resulting in a total of 17 factors of interest. Two expert raters then viewed the remaining concussion events from the 2006-2007 season, as well as all digital video records of concussion events up to 31 December 2009 (n=174). For phase 1, the majority of the factors had a κ value of 0.6 or higher (8 of 15 factors for naïve raters; 11 of 15 factors for expert raters). For phase 2, all the factors had a total percent agreement value greater than 0.8 and κ values of >0.65 for the expert raters. HUC is an objective, reliable tool for coding the antecedent events and mechanisms of concussions in the NHL.

  6. Can injury in major junior hockey players be predicted by a pre-season functional movement screen – a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Dossa, Khaled; Cashman, Glenn; Howitt, Scott; West, Bill; Murray, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) is a tool that is commonly used to predict the occurrence of injury. Previous studies have shown that a score of 14 or less (with a maximum possible score of 21) successfully predicted future injury occurrence in athletes. No studies have looked at the use of the FMS to predict injuries in hockey players. Objective: To see if injury in major junior hockey players can be predicted by a preseason FMS. Methods: A convenience sample of 20 hockey players was scored on the FMS prior to the start of the hockey season. Injuries and number of man-games lost for each injury were documented over the course of the season. Results: The mean FMS score was 14.7+/−2.58. Those with an FMS score of ≤14 were not more likely to sustain an injury as determined by the Fisher’s exact test (one-tailed, P = 0.32). Conclusion: This study did not support the notion that lower FMS scores predict injury in major junior hockey players. PMID:25550667

  7. Effects of Short Term Camp Periods on Aerobic and Anaerobic Performance Parameters in Ice Hockey National Team Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eler, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted for determining the effects of trainings, applied to athletes during short term camp period, on their aerobic and anaerobic performance. Measurements were made by the participation of 28 volunteer male ice hockey national team players. During the 15-day camp period, 10-minute running and stretching for warming and then…

  8. Enforcement of Mouthguard Use and Athlete Compliance in National Collegiate Athletic Association Men's Collegiate Ice Hockey Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawn, Kristen L.; Visser, Mary Frances; Sexton, Patrick J.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated enforcement patterns and athlete compliance with the National Collegiate Athletic Association rule requiring the wearing of mouthguards in men's collegiate ice hockey games during one season. Surveys of athletic trainers indicated that the use of mouthguards in competition was not consistently enforced by athletic trainers, coaches,…

  9. Enforcement of Mouthguard Use and Athlete Compliance in National Collegiate Athletic Association Men's Collegiate Ice Hockey Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawn, Kristen L.; Visser, Mary Frances; Sexton, Patrick J.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated enforcement patterns and athlete compliance with the National Collegiate Athletic Association rule requiring the wearing of mouthguards in men's collegiate ice hockey games during one season. Surveys of athletic trainers indicated that the use of mouthguards in competition was not consistently enforced by athletic trainers, coaches,…

  10. Stages and demands in the careers of Canadian National Hockey League players.

    PubMed

    Battochio, Randy C; Stambulova, Natalia; Schinke, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have identified some demands of Canadian National Hockey League (NHL) players, yet there is little direction for players hoping to reach the lucrative league. The objectives of this study were to identify the stages, statuses and demands in Canadian NHL players' careers and propose an empirical career model of Canadian NHL players. In total, 5 rookies, 5 veterans and 13 retirees had their interviews undergo an interpretive thematic analysis. Prospects face the NHL combine, training camp and minor league assignment. While developing into NHL players, rookies deal with NHL call-ups, team competition and formative production while sophomores seemed preoccupied by the opposition. Prime veterans become All-Stars by garnering point production and challenging for the Stanley Cup while seasoned veterans remain relevant through training camps. A discussion about the model's viability is followed by applications for sport psychology researchers and practitioners.

  11. Incidence and body location of reported acute sport injuries in seven sports using a national insurance database.

    PubMed

    Åman, M; Forssblad, M; Larsén, K

    2017-08-07

    Sports with high numbers of athletes and acute injuries are an important target for preventive actions at a national level. Both for the health of the athlete and to reduce costs associated with injury. The aim of this study was to identify injuries where injury prevention should focus, in order to have major impact on decreasing acute injury rates at a national level. All athletes in the seven investigated sport federations (automobile sports, basketball, floorball, football (soccer), handball, ice hockey, and motor sports) were insured by the same insurance company. Using this insurance database, the incidence and proportion of acute injuries, and injuries leading to permanent medical impairment (PMI), at each body location, was calculated. Comparisons were made between sports, sex, and age. In total, there were 84 754 registered injuries during the study period (year 2006-2013). Athletes in team sports, except in male ice hockey, had the highest risk to sustain an injury and PMI in the lower limb. Females had higher risk of injury and PMI in the lower limb compared to males, in all sports except in ice hockey. This study recommends that injury prevention at national level should particularly focus on lower limb injuries. In ice hockey and motor sports, head/neck and upper limb injuries also need attention. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Youth sports & public health: framing risks of mild traumatic brain injury in american football and ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Bachynski, Kathleen E; Goldberg, Daniel S

    2014-01-01

    The framing of the risks of experiencing mild traumatic brain injury in American football and ice hockey has an enormous impact in defining the scope of the problem and the remedies that are prioritized. According to the prevailing risk frame, an acceptable level of safety can be maintained in these contact sports through the application of technology, rule changes, and laws. An alternative frame acknowledging that these sports carry significant risks would produce very different ethical, political, and social debates. © 2014 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  13. Le Hockey [Hockey]. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balchunas, Martha; Ullmann, Rebecca

    A resource kit for the teaching of French at the intermediate level is represented by a teacher's guide and the duplicating master for a tape transcript. The aim of this module is to make the elementary or secondary school student of French familiar with basic hockey terms in French, and to enable the student to understand hockey games broadcast…

  14. Radiographic Hip Anatomy Correlates With Range of Motion and Symptoms in National Hockey League Players.

    PubMed

    Larson, Christopher M; Ross, James R; Kuhn, Andrew W; Fuller, Donnie; Rowley, David M; Giveans, M Russell; Stone, Rebecca M; Bedi, Asheesh

    2017-06-01

    Hip disorders in athletes have been increasingly recognized. To characterize radiographic hip anatomy for National Hockey League (NHL) players and correlate it with hip range of motion and hip symptoms and/or surgery. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Fifty-nine professional hockey players (118 hips) with 1 NHL organization (mean age, 24.2 years; range, 18-36) prospectively underwent history and physician examination by 2 independent orthopaedic surgeons. Current or previous groin and/or hip pain or surgery was noted. Anteroposterior (AP) pelvis and bilateral Dunn lateral radiographs were obtained for all players with assessment of hip morphology by 2 blinded independent orthopaedic surgeons. Good to very good reliability of radiographic assessments was noted (intraclass correlation coefficients = 0.749-0.958). Sixty-four percent of athletes had a positive crossover sign, while 86% and 60% had a positive posterior wall sign and a prominent ischial spine sign, respectively. Twenty-one percent of hips demonstrated dysplastic acetabular features (lateral center edge angle <25°). Eighty-five percent and 89% of hips demonstrated cam-type morphology based on alpha angle (>50° Dunn lateral) and head-neck offset, respectively. Good to very good reliability was noted for ROM assessments (intraclass correlation coefficient >0.69). Mean hip flexion was 107.4º ± 6.7º, and mean hip internal rotation was 26.1º ± 6.6º. Thirty-one percent of hips had a history of hip-related pain and/or surgery. Higher AP, Dunn lateral, and maximal alpha angles correlated with decreased hip internal rotation ( P = .004). Greater AP alpha angle correlated with decreased hip extension/abduction ( P = .025), and greater Dunn lateral and maximal alpha angle correlated with decreased hip flexion/abduction ( P = .001). A positive posterior wall sign correlated with increased straight hip abduction, while other radiographic acetabular parameters were not predictive of range of motion

  15. Greater circadian disadvantage during evening games for the National Basketball Association (NBA), National Hockey League (NHL) and National Football League (NFL) teams travelling westward.

    PubMed

    Roy, Jonathan; Forest, Geneviève

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the effects of a circadian disadvantage (i.e. playing in a different time zone) on the winning percentages in three major sport leagues in North America: the National Basketball Association, the National Hockey League and the National Football League. We reviewed 5 years of regular season games in the National Basketball Association, National Hockey League and National Football League, and noted the winning percentage of the visiting team depending on the direction of travel (west, east, and same time zone) and game time (day and evening games). T-tests and analysis of variance were performed to evaluate the effects of the circadian disadvantage, its direction, the number of time zones travelled, and the game time on winning percentages in each major league. The results showed an association between the winning percentages and the number of time zones traveled for the away evening games, with a clear disadvantage for the teams travelling westward. There was a significant difference in the teams' winning percentages depending on the travelling direction in the National Basketball Association (F2,5908  = 16.12, P < 0.0001) and the National Hockey League (F2,5639  = 4.48, P = 0.011), and a trend was found in the National Football League (F2,1279  = 2.86, P = 0.058). The effect of the circadian disadvantage transcends the type of sport and needs to be addressed for greater equity among the western and eastern teams in professional sports. These results also highlight the importance of circadian rhythms in sport performance and athletic competitions. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  16. Promoting respect for the rules and injury prevention in ice hockey: evaluation of the fair-play program.

    PubMed

    Brunelle, J P; Goulet, C; Arguin, H

    2005-09-01

    To reduce the number of transgressions to the rule, the occurrence of violent acts and to prevent injuries, Hockey Québec adopted the Fair-Play Program (FPP). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the FPP. 52 Bantam (14-15 years) teams participated in this cohort study. In total, 49 games (13 with the FPP, 36 without FPP) were systematically assessed for transgressions to the rule. Body checking was allowed in all games. Transgressions to the rule data were obtained using a real time observation system in a natural setting, while injury data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire. Data were analysed using generalised linear models with generalised estimating equations accounting for potential team effect. The number of penalties per game was significantly lower (p < 0.01) for games played with the FPP. Overall, no difference was noted in the number of transgressions observed during games played with or without the FPP. Players in leagues where the FPP was used held their opponents more frequently (p < 0.0001). On the other hand, players in leagues without the FPP shoved and hit more (p = 0.05). No difference was noted in the injury rate for games played with or without the FPP. This study showed that the FPP is one of the tools available to help those in the hockey world promote fair play values. Moreover, this project clearly showed the importance of program evaluation and the value of direct observation in a natural setting.

  17. A systematic video analysis of National Hockey League (NHL) concussions, part II: how concussions occur in the NHL.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Michael G; Comper, Paul; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Echemendia, Ruben J

    2015-04-01

    Concussions in sports are a growing cause of concern, as these injuries can have debilitating short-term effects and little is known about the potential long-term consequences. This work aims to describe how concussions occur in the National Hockey League. Case series of medically diagnosed concussions for regular season games over a 3.5-year period during the 2006-2010 seasons. Digital video records were coded and analysed using a standardised protocol. 88% (n=174/197) of concussions involved player-to-opponent contact. 16 diagnosed concussions were a result of fighting. Of the 158 concussions that involved player-to-opponent body contact, the most common mechanisms were direct contact to the head initiated by the shoulder 42% of the time (n=66/158), by the elbow 15% (n=24/158) and by gloves in 5% of cases (n=8/158). When the results of anatomical location are combined with initial contact, almost half of these events (n=74/158) were classified as direct contact to the lateral aspect of the head. The predominant mechanism of concussion was consistently characterised by player-to-opponent contact, typically directed to the head by the shoulder, elbow or gloves. Also, several important characteristics were apparent: (1) contact was often to the lateral aspect of the head; (2) the player who suffered a concussion was often not in possession of the puck and (3) no penalty was called on the play. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Teardrop fracture following head-first impact in an ice hockey player: Case report and analysis of injury mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yue, James J; Ivancic, Paul C; Scott, David L

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a young male athlete who sustained a three column displaced teardrop fracture of the C5 vertebra due to a head-first impact in hockey, suffered neurapraxia, yet made full neurological recovery. This full recovery was in sharp contrast to multiple case series which reported permanent quadriplegia in the vast majority of teardrop fracture patients. We investigate the etiology and biomechanical mechanisms of injury. Admission imaging revealed the teardrop fracture which consisted of: a frontal plane fracture which separated an anterior quadrilateral-shaped fragment from the posterior vertebral body; a vertical fracture of the posterior vertebral body in the sagittal plane; and incomplete fractures of the neural arch that initiated superiorly at the anterior aspect of the spinous process and left lamina adjacent to the superior facet. Epidural hematoma in the region of the C5 vertebra was observed in addition to disc and ligamentous disruptions at C4-5 and C5-6. Our patient was ultimately treated surgically with anterior fusion from C4 through C6 and subsequently with bilateral posterior fusion at C5-6. The injuries were caused by high-energy axial compression with the neck in a pre-flexed posture. The first fracture event consisted of the anterior vertebral body fragment being sheared off of the posterior fragment under the compression load due in part to the sagittal plane concavity of the C5 inferior endplate. The etiology of the vertical fracture of the posterior vertebral body fragment in the sagittal plane was consistent with a previously described hypothesis of the mechanistic injury events. First, the C4-5 disc height decreased under load which increased its hoop stress. Next, this increased hoop stress transferred lateral forces to the C5 uncinate processes which caused their outward expansion. Finally, the outward expansion of the uncinate processes caused the left and right sides of the vertebral body to split and spread. Evidence in

  19. Bodychecking Rules and Concussion in Elite Hockey

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Laura; Asbridge, Mark; Cusimano, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Athletes participating in contact sports such as ice hockey are exposed to a high risk of suffering a concussion. We determined whether recent rule changes regulating contact to the head introduced in 2010–11 and 2011–12 have been effective in reducing the incidence of concussion in the National Hockey League (NHL). A league with a longstanding ban on hits contacting the head, the Ontario Hockey League (OHL), was also studied. A retrospective study of NHL and OHL games for the 2009–10 to 2011–12 seasons was performed using official game records and team injury reports in addition to other media sources. Concussion incidence over the 3 seasons analyzed was 5.23 per 100 NHL regular season games and 5.05 per 100 OHL regular season games (IRR 1.04; 95% CI 1.01, 1.50). When injuries described as concussion-like or suspicious of concussion were included, incidences rose to 8.8 and 7.1 per 100 games respectively (IRR 1.23; 95% CI 0.81, 1.32). The number of NHL concussions or suspected concussions was lower in 2009–10 than in 2010–11 (IRR 0.61; 95% CI 0.45, 0.83), but did not increase from 2010–11 to 2011–12 (IRR 1.05; 95% CI 0.80, 1.38). 64.2% of NHL concussions were caused by bodychecking, and only 28.4% of concussions and 36.8% of suspected concussions were caused by illegal incidents. We conclude that rules regulating bodychecking to the head did not reduce the number of players suffering concussions during NHL regular season play and that further changes or stricter enforcement of existing rules may be required to minimize the risk of players suffering these injuries. PMID:23874888

  20. Myelin Water Fraction Is Transiently Reduced after a Single Mild Traumatic Brain Injury – A Prospective Cohort Study in Collegiate Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Vavasour, Irene; Shahinfard, Elham; Kolind, Shannon; van Donkelaar, Paul; Taunton, Jack; Li, David; Rauscher, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Impact-related mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) are a major public health concern, and remain as one of the most poorly understood injuries in the field of neuroscience. Currently, the diagnosis and management of such injuries are based largely on patient-reported symptoms. An improved understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of mTBI is urgently needed in order to develop better diagnostic and management protocols. Specifically, dynamic post-injury changes to the myelin sheath in the human brain have not been examined, despite ‘compromised white matter integrity’ often being described as a consequence of mTBI. In this preliminary cohort study, myelin water imaging was used to prospectively evaluate changes in myelin water fraction, derived from the T2 decay signal, in two varsity hockey teams (45 players) over one season of athletic competition. 11 players sustained a concussion during competition, and were scanned at 72 hours, 2 weeks, and 2 months post-injury. Results demonstrated a reduction in myelin water fraction at 2 weeks post-injury in several brain areas relative to preseason scans, including the splenium of the corpus callosum, right posterior thalamic radiation, left superior corona radiata, left superior longitudinal fasciculus, and left posterior limb of the internal capsule. Myelin water fraction recovered to pre-season values by 2 months post-injury. These results may indicate transient myelin disruption following a single mTBI, with subsequent remyelination of affected neurons. Myelin disruption was not apparent in the athletes who did not experience a concussion, despite exposure to repetitive subconcussive trauma over a season of collegiate hockey. These findings may help to explain many of the metabolic and neurological deficits observed clinically following mTBI. PMID:26913900

  1. Myelin Water Fraction Is Transiently Reduced after a Single Mild Traumatic Brain Injury--A Prospective Cohort Study in Collegiate Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Wright, Alexander D; Jarrett, Michael; Vavasour, Irene; Shahinfard, Elham; Kolind, Shannon; van Donkelaar, Paul; Taunton, Jack; Li, David; Rauscher, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Impact-related mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) are a major public health concern, and remain as one of the most poorly understood injuries in the field of neuroscience. Currently, the diagnosis and management of such injuries are based largely on patient-reported symptoms. An improved understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of mTBI is urgently needed in order to develop better diagnostic and management protocols. Specifically, dynamic post-injury changes to the myelin sheath in the human brain have not been examined, despite 'compromised white matter integrity' often being described as a consequence of mTBI. In this preliminary cohort study, myelin water imaging was used to prospectively evaluate changes in myelin water fraction, derived from the T2 decay signal, in two varsity hockey teams (45 players) over one season of athletic competition. 11 players sustained a concussion during competition, and were scanned at 72 hours, 2 weeks, and 2 months post-injury. Results demonstrated a reduction in myelin water fraction at 2 weeks post-injury in several brain areas relative to preseason scans, including the splenium of the corpus callosum, right posterior thalamic radiation, left superior corona radiata, left superior longitudinal fasciculus, and left posterior limb of the internal capsule. Myelin water fraction recovered to pre-season values by 2 months post-injury. These results may indicate transient myelin disruption following a single mTBI, with subsequent remyelination of affected neurons. Myelin disruption was not apparent in the athletes who did not experience a concussion, despite exposure to repetitive subconcussive trauma over a season of collegiate hockey. These findings may help to explain many of the metabolic and neurological deficits observed clinically following mTBI.

  2. Head-Impact Mechanisms in Men's and Women's Collegiate Ice Hockey

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Bethany J.; Machan, Jason T.; Beckwith, Jonathan G.; Greenwald, Richard M.; Burmeister, Emily; Crisco, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Concussion injury rates in men's and women's ice hockey are reported to be among the highest of all collegiate sports. Quantification of the frequency of head impacts and the magnitude of head acceleration as a function of the different impact mechanisms (eg, head contact with the ice) that occur in ice hockey could provide a better understanding of this high injury rate. Objective: To quantify and compare the per-game frequency and magnitude of head impacts associated with various impact mechanisms in men's and women's collegiate ice hockey players. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Collegiate ice hockey rink. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-three men and 31 women from 2 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I ice hockey teams. Main Outcome Measure(s): We analyzed magnitude and frequency (per game) of head impacts per player among impact mechanisms and between sexes using generalized mixed linear models and generalized estimating equations to account for repeated measures within players. Intervention(s): Participants wore helmets instrumented with accelerometers to allow us to collect biomechanical measures of head impacts sustained during play. Video footage from 53 games was synchronized with the biomechanical data. Head impacts were classified into 8 categories: contact with another player; the ice, boards or glass, stick, puck, or goal; indirect contact; and contact from celebrating. Results: For men and women, contact with another player was the most frequent impact mechanism, and contact with the ice generated the greatest-magnitude head accelerations. The men had higher per-game frequencies of head impacts from contact with another player and contact with the boards than did the women (P < .001), and these impacts were greater in peak rotational acceleration (P = .027). Conclusions: Identifying the impact mechanisms in collegiate ice hockey that result in frequent and high-magnitude head impacts will provide us with data that may

  3. Body Checking in Pee Wee Hockey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Michel-Andre; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The results of 2 studies determining the effects of body checking in Pee Wee hockey indicate variability in player size and strength is reason to avoid this practice. In leagues allowing body checking, 55 percent of all injuries and greater frequency of serious injury were a result of body contact. (SM)

  4. Policy change eliminating body checking in non-elite ice hockey leads to a threefold reduction in injury and concussion risk in 11- and 12-year-old players.

    PubMed

    Black, Amanda M; Macpherson, Alison K; Hagel, Brent E; Romiti, Maria A; Palacios-Derflingher, Luz; Kang, Jian; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Emery, Carolyn A

    2016-01-01

    In ice hockey, body checking is associated with an increased risk of injury. In 2011, provincial policy change disallowed body checking in non-elite Pee Wee (ages 11-12 years) leagues. To compare the risk of injury and concussion between non-elite Pee Wee ice hockey players in leagues where body checking is permitted (2011-12 Alberta, Canada) and leagues where policy change disallowed body checking (2011-12 Ontario, Canada). Non-elite Pee Wee players (lower 70%) from Alberta (n=590) and Ontario (n=281) and elite Pee Wee players (upper 30%) from Alberta (n=294) and Ontario (n=166) were recruited to participate in a cohort study. Baseline information, injury and exposure data was collected using validated injury surveillance. Based on multiple Poisson regression analyses (adjusted for clustering by team, exposure hours, year of play, history of injury/concussion, level of play, position and body checking attitude), the incidence rate ratio (IRR) associated with policy allowing body checking was 2.97 (95% CI 1.33 to 6.61) for all game injury and 2.83 (95% CI 1.09 to 7.31) for concussion. There were no differences between provinces in concussion [IRR=1.50 (95% CI 0.84 to 2.68)] or injury risk [IRR=1.22 (95% CI 0.69 to 2.16)] in elite levels of play where both provinces allowed body checking. The rate of injury and concussion were threefold greater in non-elite Pee Wee ice hockey players in leagues where body checking was permitted. The rate of injury and concussion did not differ between provinces in elite levels, where body checking was allowed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Hockey STAR: A Methodology for Assessing the Biomechanical Performance of Hockey Helmets.

    PubMed

    Rowson, Bethany; Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M

    2015-10-01

    Optimizing the protective capabilities of helmets is one of several methods of reducing brain injury risk in sports. This paper presents the experimental and analytical development of a hockey helmet evaluation methodology. The Summation of Tests for the Analysis of Risk (STAR) formula combines head impact exposure with brain injury probability over the broad range of 227 head impacts that a hockey player is likely to experience during one season. These impact exposure data are mapped to laboratory testing parameters using a series of 12 impact conditions comprised of three energy levels and four head impact locations, which include centric and non-centric directions of force. Injury risk is determined using a multivariate injury risk function that incorporates both linear and rotational head acceleration measurements. All testing parameters are presented along with exemplar helmet test data. The Hockey STAR methodology provides a scientific framework for manufacturers to optimize hockey helmet design for injury risk reduction, as well as providing consumers with a meaningful metric to assess the relative performance of hockey helmets.

  6. A prospective cohort study on symptoms of common mental disorders among current and retired professional ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Gouttebarge, Vincent; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J

    2017-09-01

    Scientific knowledge about symptoms of common mental disorders in professional ice hockey is lacking. Consequently, the primary aims of the study were to (i) determine the prevalence, comorbidity and 6-month incidence of symptoms of common mental disorders (distress, anxiety/depression, sleep disturbance, adverse alcohol use, eating disorders) among current and retired professional ice hockey players and (ii) evaluate their potential relation with potential stressors (severe musculoskeletal injuries, surgeries, recent life events, career dissatisfaction). A prospective cohort study with a 6-month follow-up period was conducted. Using validated questionnaires to assess symptoms of common mental disorders (thus not clinically diagnosed) as well as several stressors, an electronic questionnaire was set up and distributed by the national ice hockey players' unions from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Switzerland. Prevalence ranged from 8% for adverse alcohol use to 24% for anxiety/depression among current professional ice hockey players, and from 12% for distress to 29% for adverse alcohol among retired professional ice hockey players. Six-month incidence reached up to 22% for eating disorders among current players and 25% for sleep disturbance among retired players. Especially a higher number of surgeries, a higher number of recent life events and higher level of career dissatisfaction was related to symptoms of common mental disorders. Our findings indicate that adequate interventions should be developed to improve not only awareness and psychological resilience of both current and retired ice hockey players but also their performance and quality-of-life. An interdisciplinary approach should be applied in the medical care of ice hockey players by including psychologists/psychiatrists who can provide psychotherapeutic or clinical interventions.

  7. Collegiate ACL Injury Rates Across 15 Sports: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System Data Update (2004-2005 Through 2012-2013).

    PubMed

    Agel, Julie; Rockwood, Todd; Klossner, David

    2016-11-01

    To present data on the rate of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in 15 collegiate sports from 2004 to 2005 through 2012 to 2013 updating the 1988-1989 to 2003-2004 data. Prospectively designed descriptive epidemiology study. National Collegiate Athletic Association Schools. National Collegiate Athletic Association School athletes. Injury rate by year and sport. Most ACL injuries to women occurred by a noncontact mechanism (60%) versus a contact mechanism for men (59%). The highest average annual rate of ACL injury for men was found in football (0.17 per 1000 athlete-exposure [A-E]). The highest average annual rate of ACL injury for women was found in lacrosse (0.23 per 1000 A-E). There were statistically significant increases in average annual injury rate for men's (P = 0.04) and women's soccer (P = 0.01) and a statistically significant decrease in women's gymnastics over the 9 years (=0.009). Controlling for exposures, there were statistically significant increases in the average annual number of injuries for men's and women's basketball, ice hockey, field hockey, football, and volleyball and a decrease in the average annual number of injuries for baseball and women's gymnastics. Women continue to sustain ACL injuries at higher rates than men in the comparable sports of soccer, basketball, and lacrosse. Anterior cruciate ligament injury rates continue to rise in men's and women's soccer. Some sports have shown absolute increases in ACL rates, which persist even after exposure rates are taken into account. Despite extensive research and development of prevention programs before and during the time of this study, very few sports showed a reduction in ACL injury rates in this data set.

  8. Physiology of ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, D L

    1988-02-01

    Ice hockey is characterized by high intensity intermittent skating, rapid changes in velocity and duration, and frequent body contact. The typical player performs for 15 to 20 minutes of a 60-minute game. Each shift lasts from 30 to 80 seconds with 4 to 5 minutes of recovery between shifts. The intensity and duration of a particular shift determines the extent of the contribution from aerobic and anaerobic energy systems. The high intensity bursts require the hockey player to develop muscle strength, power, and anaerobic endurance. The length of the game and the need to recover quickly from each shift demands a good aerobic system. Physical characteristics of elite players show that defensemen are taller and heavier than forwards probably due to positional demands. Hockey players are mesomorphic in structure. They are relatively lean since excess mass is detrimental to their skating performance. There is a large interindividual variability in VO2 during skating. Both the aerobic and anaerobic energy systems are important during a hockey game. Peak heart rates during a shift on the ice exceed 90% of HRmax with average on-ice values of about 85% of HRmax. Blood lactate is elevated above resting values confirming the anaerobic nature of the game. Glycogen depletion studies show a preferential utilisation of glycogen from the slow twitch fibres but also significant depletion from the fast twitch fibres. Elite hockey players display a muscle fibre composition similar to untrained individuals. Physiological profiles of elite hockey teams reveal the importance of aerobic endurance, anaerobic power and endurance, muscular strength and skating speed. Training studies have attempted to improve specific components of hockey fitness. Using traditional laboratory tests, a season of hockey play shows gains in anaerobic endurance but no change in aerobic endurance. On-ice tests of hockey fitness have been recommended as an essential part of the hockey player's physiological

  9. Tsunami Hockey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, S.; Becker, N. C.; Wang, D.; Fryer, G. J.

    2013-12-01

    minute simulated time steps takes approximately 50 minutes on the same system. These animations are generated quickly enough to provide decision support for emergency managers whose coastlines may be impacted by the tsunami several hours later. Tsunami reflections can also aid in determining the source region for those tsunamis generated by non-seismic mechanisms without a clear source such as meteotsunamis, tsunamis generated by meteorological phenomena. A derecho that crossed the New Jersey coast and entered the Atlantic Ocean at approximately 1500 UTC June 13, 2013 generated a meteotsunami that struck the northeast coast of the US causing several injuries. A DART sensor off Montauk, NY, recorded tsunami waves approximately 200 minutes apart. We show how the arrival times of the tsunamis recorded by this DART can help to constrain the source region of the meteotsunami. We also examine other reflections produced by the Haida Gwaii 2012, Tohoku 2011, and other tsunamis.

  10. Ball-Contact Injuries in 11 National Collegiate Athletic Association Sports: The Injury Surveillance Program, 2009-2010 Through 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Melissa A; Grooms, Dustin R; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Kerr, Zachary Y

    2017-07-01

      Surveillance data regarding injuries caused by ball contact in collegiate athletes have not been well examined and are mostly limited to discussions of concussions and catastrophic injuries.   To describe the epidemiology of ball-contact injuries in 11 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) sports during the 2009-2010 through 2014-2015 academic years.   Descriptive epidemiology study.   Convenience sample of NCAA programs in 11 sports (men's football, women's field hockey, women's volleyball, men's baseball, women's softball, men's and women's basketball, men's and women's lacrosse, and men's and women's soccer) during the 2009-2010 through 2014-2015 academic years.   Collegiate student-athletes participating in 11 sports.   Ball-contact-injury rates, proportions, rate ratios, and proportion ratios with 95% confidence intervals were based on data from the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program during the 2009-2010 through 2014-2015 academic years.   During the 2009-2010 through 2014-2015 academic years, 1123 ball-contact injuries were reported, for an overall rate of 3.54/10 000 AEs. The sports with the highest rates were women's softball (8.82/10 000 AEs), women's field hockey (7.71/10 000 AEs), and men's baseball (7.20/10 000 AEs). Most ball-contact injuries were to the hand/wrist (32.7%) and head/face (27.0%) and were diagnosed as contusions (30.5%), sprains (23.1%), and concussions (16.1%). Among sex-comparable sports (ie, baseball/softball, basketball, and soccer), women had a larger proportion of ball-contact injuries diagnosed as concussions than men (injury proportion ratio = 2.33; 95% confidence interval = 1.63, 3.33). More than half (51.0%) of ball-contact injuries were non-time loss (ie, participation-restriction time <24 hours), and 6.6% were severe (ie, participation-restriction time ≥21 days). The most common severe ball-contact injuries were concussions (n = 18) and finger fractures (n = 10).   Ball-contact-injury rates

  11. The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act. The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Susan G.

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act and the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program to specifically address the injuries sustained through vaccination. The compensation program allows special education for children permanently injured by vaccines. Analyzes selected cases. (57 footnotes) (MLF)

  12. The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act. The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Susan G.

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act and the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program to specifically address the injuries sustained through vaccination. The compensation program allows special education for children permanently injured by vaccines. Analyzes selected cases. (57 footnotes) (MLF)

  13. Explanatory style among elite ice hockey athletes.

    PubMed

    Davis, H; Zaichkowsky, L

    1998-12-01

    Mentally tough' athletes show resilience and an ability to compete during adverse conditions. The present study investigated mental toughness and assessed causal explanations for positive and negative reactions to imagined events using Seligman's Attributional Style Questionnaire. Pessimistic Explanatory style on this scale is a risk factor for negative affect and behavior following negative events. 38 elite athletes in ice hockey were rated for mental toughness by the National Hockey League's scouts on consensually derived criteria. The comparison of players above and below the median split on mental toughness showed composite explanations for negative events that were more internal, stable and global for players above the median. Contrary to predictions, these results suggest that a Pessimistic Explanatory style may benefit hockey performance.

  14. Perfectionism and achievement goals in young Finnish ice-hockey players aspiring to make the Under-16 national team.

    PubMed

    Stoeber, Joachim; Stoll, Oliver; Salmi, Olli; Tiikkaja, Jukka

    2009-01-01

    Research on perfectionism suggests that is it useful to differentiate between perfectionistic strivings and perfectionistic concerns. Regarding the 2x2 achievement goal framework, the usefulness of this differentiation was recently demonstrated in a study with university student athletes (Stoeber, Stoll, Pescheck, & Otto, 2008, Study 2), in which it was found that perfectionistic strivings were associated with mastery-approach and performance-approach goals and perfectionistic concerns with mastery-avoidance, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance goals. Because the study was largely exploratory and only used non-elite athletes, the aim of the present research was to replicate and extend these findings by investigating a sample of 138 young, elite ice-hockey players, while adding further measures of perfectionism and using structural equation modelling (SEM) to confirm the relationships between perfectionistic strivings, perfectionistic concerns, and the 2x2 achievement goals. The SEM results showed that, in elite athletes also, perfectionistic strivings are associated with mastery-approach and performance-approach goals, whereas perfectionistic concerns are associated with mastery-avoidance, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance goals. Our findings corroborate the importance of differentiating between perfectionistic strivings and perfectionistic concerns when studying perfectionism in sports, because only perfectionistic concerns (and not perfectionistic strivings) are associated with maladaptive patterns of achievement goals.

  15. PHYSICAL THERAPY MANAGEMENT OF ICE HOCKEY ATHLETES: FROM THE RINK TO THE CLINIC AND BACK

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Todd E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The increasing number of athletes playing hockey compels rehabilitation professionals working in orthopedic and sports settings to understand the unique functional demands of ice hockey and the patterns of injuries they may promote. Purpose The purpose of this clinical perspective is to: (1) discuss the functional implications of different positions and age levels on injury prevalence within the sport; (2) summarize the seven most common injuries sustained by ice hockey athletes; and (3) present a conceptual model for the clinical management and prevention of these injuries by rehabilitation professionals. Methods A narrative review and synthesis was conducted of currently available literature on prevalence, etiology, rehabilitative intervention, prognosis, and prevention of ice hockey injuries. Results Research evidence is available to support the prevalence of injuries sustained while participating in ice hockey, as well as the most effective clinical treatment protocols to treat them. Most of the existing protocols are based on clinical and sports experience with incorporation of scientific data. Conclusion This clinical commentary reviews the current concepts of ice hockey injury care and prevention, based on scientific information regarding the incidence, mechanism, rehabilitation protocols, prognosis, and prevention of injuries. Science-based, patient-centered reasoning is integral to provide the highest quality of rehabilitative and preventative care for ice hockey athletes by physical therapists. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:27274432

  16. PHYSICAL THERAPY MANAGEMENT OF ICE HOCKEY ATHLETES: FROM THE RINK TO THE CLINIC AND BACK.

    PubMed

    Wolfinger, Christopher R; Davenport, Todd E

    2016-06-01

    The increasing number of athletes playing hockey compels rehabilitation professionals working in orthopedic and sports settings to understand the unique functional demands of ice hockey and the patterns of injuries they may promote. The purpose of this clinical perspective is to: (1) discuss the functional implications of different positions and age levels on injury prevalence within the sport; (2) summarize the seven most common injuries sustained by ice hockey athletes; and (3) present a conceptual model for the clinical management and prevention of these injuries by rehabilitation professionals. A narrative review and synthesis was conducted of currently available literature on prevalence, etiology, rehabilitative intervention, prognosis, and prevention of ice hockey injuries. Research evidence is available to support the prevalence of injuries sustained while participating in ice hockey, as well as the most effective clinical treatment protocols to treat them. Most of the existing protocols are based on clinical and sports experience with incorporation of scientific data. This clinical commentary reviews the current concepts of ice hockey injury care and prevention, based on scientific information regarding the incidence, mechanism, rehabilitation protocols, prognosis, and prevention of injuries. Science-based, patient-centered reasoning is integral to provide the highest quality of rehabilitative and preventative care for ice hockey athletes by physical therapists. 5.

  17. A Hockey Hero

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolduc, Matt

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the story of Will Poulos, a hockey player who has developmental and physical disabilities (mild mental retardation and left cerebral palsy). Will has overcome tremendous obstacles in his life. He was born at 28 weeks in 1986 at three pounds, one ounce, and 19 inches long. He was very sick; his odds for survival…

  18. A Hockey Hero

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolduc, Matt

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the story of Will Poulos, a hockey player who has developmental and physical disabilities (mild mental retardation and left cerebral palsy). Will has overcome tremendous obstacles in his life. He was born at 28 weeks in 1986 at three pounds, one ounce, and 19 inches long. He was very sick; his odds for survival…

  19. Informing body checking policy in youth ice hockey in Canada: a discussion meeting with researchers and community stakeholders.

    PubMed

    McKay, Carly D; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Emery, Carolyn A

    2014-11-05

    Body checking is a significant risk factor for injury, including concussion, in youth ice hockey. Recent evidence regarding injury rates in youth leagues prompted USA Hockey to institute a national policy change in 2011 that increased the age of body checking introduction from 11-12 years old (Pee Wee) to 13-14 years old (Bantam). Body checking policy was more controversial in Canada, and research evidence alone was insufficient to drive change. The purpose of this paper is to provide an example of one of the knowledge exchange processes that occurred between researchers and community stakeholders, leading up to a national policy change in 2013. There were 28 stakeholder attendees, representing the research community, youth hockey organizations, and child health advocacy groups. A one-day meeting held in Whistler, British Columbia, in April 2013. Researchers and stakeholders presented current perspectives on evidence and policy change, and discussion focused on an a priori set of questions designed to elicit facilitators and barriers to policy change. Three major factors that can drive policy change in the sport safety context were identified: the need for decision-making leadership, the importance of knowledge translation, and the role of sport culture as a barrier to change. There is a critical need for researcher and stakeholder partnership in facilitating ongoing policy discussion and informing evidence-based policy change in sport and recreation injury prevention.

  20. [Incidence and type of injuries in icehockey].

    PubMed

    Mang, W R

    1977-01-27

    This investigation analyzes 79 injuries of players of the German Ice-Hockey-National-Team which happened in 37 international games from 1974 to 1976. 36% of the injuries are caused by the stick, which corresponds to the reports of literature. Serious injuries, especially head injuries can be reduced if the following rules are observed: Good conditioning of the players, equipment according to regulations with helm and mouth protection during training and game, exact control of the game by the referees.

  1. Gender Difference in Aerobic Capacity and the Contribution by Body Composition and Haemoglobin Concentration: A Study in Young Indian National Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Kailashiya, Jyotsna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although gender difference in aerobic capacity is known, the contributing factors have been researched seldom. Aim To investigate the gender gap and the contribution by percentage Body Fat (BF), Body Mass Index (BMI) and haemoglobin concentration Hb. Materials and Methods The study was conducted on 30 (17 males, 13 females) training status matched young hockey players. Healthy players who were playing upto national level competition were included. BW (Body Weight), BF, BMI, LBM (Lean Body Mass), rHR (restring Heart Rate), HRR (Heart Rate Recovery), Hb, a/rVO2max (absolute/relative), a/rPWC (Physical Work Capacity) and RMR (Resting Metabolic Rate) were measured and analysed. Results There was significant gender difference in the measured parameters. Difference in a/rVO2max remained significant even after controlling for BF, BMI and Hb. Multiple regression and correlation analysis revealed gender difference in VO2max/LBM was due to: BMI(31.91%)>BF(27.60%)>Hb(9.91%). BMI also significantly contributed 3.66% of VO2max/LBM variance, independent of that by gender. Difference in RMR was mainly related to LBM, BF and BMI. Conclusion The study provided an understanding for gender gap in aerobic capacity. Differences in BMI & BF were one of the main reasons. PMID:28050360

  2. Concussion among Swedish elite ice hockey players.

    PubMed Central

    Tegner, Y; Lorentzon, R

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of concussion in Swedish ice hockey and to establish a uniform grading and treatment model for concussions of different severity. METHODS: Frequency of concussion was investigated in two studies, one retrospective and one prospective. In the retrospective study, all Swedish elite ice hockey players (n = 265) were asked to answer a questionnaire on the number and treatment of previous concussions. Only concussions diagnosed by a doctor were recorded. The questionnaire was completed by 227 players (86%). In the prospective study, all injuries including concussions occurring during game and practice in the Swedish Elite League (n = 12 teams) were recorded during four years. The causes of injury, referees judgements, diagnosis, treatment, and time absent from ice hockey were registered on special cards. RESULTS: In the retrospective study, 51 out of 227 players (22%) in the Swedish Elite League reported at least one concussion. In the prospective study, 52 concussions were reported. The incidence of a concussion is at least one concussion every year/team or a yearly risk of about 5% for a player to sustain a concussion. Most concussions occurred during league play (81%). Body contact (checking or boarding) was the most common cause of concussions. The players were absent from full training and play on a mean of 6 d. CONCLUSIONS: As this injury is potentially dangerous it must be treated seriously according to a simple treatment model presented. In cases of repeated concussions during the same season, a longer period of time away from play is suggested. In players who have sustained several concussions over the years a thorough medical examination including EEG, CT/MRI, and neuropsychological tests should be performed. If any of these is pathological the player should be advised to give up ice hockey. PMID:8889123

  3. Five Year Overview of Sport Injuries: The NAIRS Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, William E.

    1982-01-01

    Data from a survey of institutional members of the National Athletic Injury/Illness Reporting System (NAIRS) are presented and discussed. Included are tables showing injuries reported in high schools and colleges and universities for male and female athletes in baseball, basketball, football, gymnastics, soccer, wrestling, field hockey, track and…

  4. Five Year Overview of Sport Injuries: The NAIRS Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, William E.

    1982-01-01

    Data from a survey of institutional members of the National Athletic Injury/Illness Reporting System (NAIRS) are presented and discussed. Included are tables showing injuries reported in high schools and colleges and universities for male and female athletes in baseball, basketball, football, gymnastics, soccer, wrestling, field hockey, track and…

  5. The Hockey/Art Alliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadeson, Harriet; Wirtz, Gail

    2005-01-01

    Ice hockey can be a violent sport as evidenced by the fighting among the members of an ice hockey team of 13-year-old boys from mixed racial and socioeconomic backgrounds. Two series of eight art sessions were used to help the boys develop respect for themselves and others, to solve conflicts without combat, and to build more positive…

  6. Injury in the National Basketball Association

    PubMed Central

    Drakos, Mark C.; Domb, Benjamin; Starkey, Chad; Callahan, Lisa; Allen, Answorth A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Injury patterns in elite athletes over long periods continue to evolve. The goal of this study was to review of the injuries and medical conditions afflicting athletes competing in the National Basketball Association (NBA) over a 17-year period. Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Methods: Injuries and player demographic information were reported by each team’s athletic trainer. Criteria for reportable injuries were those that resulted in (1) physician referral, (2) a practice or game being missed, or (3) emergency care. The demographics, frequency of injury, time lost, and game exposures were tabulated, and game-related injury rates and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results: A total of 1094 players appeared in the database 3843 times (3.3 ± 2.6 seasons). Lateral ankle sprains were the most frequent orthopaedic injury (n, 1658; 13.2%), followed by patellofemoral inflammation (n, 1493; 11.9%), lumbar strains (n, 999; 7.9%), and hamstring strains (n, 413; 3.3%). The most games missed were related to patellofemoral inflammation (n, 10 370; 17.5%), lateral ankle sprains (n, 5223; 8.8%), knee sprains (n, 4369; 7.4%), and lumbar strains (n, 3933; 6.6%). No correlations were found between injury rate and player demographics, including age, height, weight, and NBA experience. Conclusion: Professional athletes in the NBA experience a high rate of game-related injuries. Patellofemoral inflammation is the most significant problem in terms of days lost in competition, whereas ankle sprains are the most common injury. True ligamentous injuries of the knee were surprisingly rare. Importantly, player demographics were not correlated with injury rates. Further investigation is necessary regarding the consequences and sport-specific treatment of various injuries in NBA players. Clinical Relevance: Knowledge of these injury patterns can help to guide treatments and provide more accurate guidelines for an athlete to return to play. PMID:23015949

  7. Seasonal Mood Disturbances in Collegiate Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Lionel W.; Shafer, Christine L.; Smokler, Carol; Carrier, David; McKeag, Douglas B.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this paper is to: 1) describe the seasonal affective disorder syndrome using a case illustration, 2) provide a simple and reliable method for identifying seasonal affective disorder, and 3) provide data as to the prevalence of the syndrome in a subset of collegiate hockey players. Design and Setting: Collegiate hockey players were selected, because their practices begin in the fall and play is completed in the spring. The teams selected for participation were from the far Northwest and the upper Midwest regions. Subjects: Sixty-eight Division I hockey players volunteered for the study. The three teams from which the subjects were chosen were located above latitude 42°/45' north. Subjects were from the northern latitudes. Measurements: The Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire was used to screen for seasonality. A sample of the athletes was also examined using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression together with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed) criteria for Seasonal Pattern Specifier. Results: Thirty-three (51%) were asymptomatic, 7 (11%) met the criteria for seasonal affective disorder, and 25 (39%) hockey players scored in the range that could classify them as candidates for subsyndromal seasonal affective disorder. Conclusions: The prevalence of seasonal affective disorder among our sample approximated the national norm for the northern latitudes. However, the prevalence of subsyndromal seasonal affective disorder in our population was 25% compared to 13% reported nationally. Light therapy has been shown to reverse the effects of the disorders; however, further research needs to be conducted to determine its acceptance and effectiveness by the athletic population. PMID:16558403

  8. The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program.

    PubMed

    Cook, Katherine M; Evans, Geoffrey

    2011-05-01

    The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986 established the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program to compensate people thought to be injured by certain vaccines. The act's goals are to ensure an adequate supply of vaccines, to stabilize vaccine costs, and to establish and maintain an accessible and efficient setting for providing compensation to people found to have been injured by certain childhood vaccines. In addition, the legislation called for the reporting of adverse events after vaccination, the creation of vaccine-information materials that detail vaccine benefits and risks, and Institute of Medicine studies of possible vaccine-related injuries and encouraged research and development of new and safer vaccines. Over its 22-year history, the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program has been a key component in stabilizing the US vaccine market through liability protection to both vaccine companies and health care providers and by providing a forum for people, no matter what age, to seek compensation.

  9. Evaluation of cricket helmet performance and comparison with baseball and ice hockey helmets.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, A S; Janda, D

    2003-08-01

    Protective helmets in sport are important for reducing the risk of head and facial injury. In cricket and other sports with projectiles, national test standards control the minimum helmet performance. However, there are few field data showing if helmets are effective in reducing head injury. (a) To examine the performance of cricket helmets in laboratory tests; (b) to examine performance with regard to test standards, game hazards, and helmet construction; (c) to compare and contrast these findings with baseball and ice hockey helmets. Impact tests were conducted on a selection of helmet models: five cricket, two baseball, and two ice hockey. Ball to helmet impacts at speeds of 19, 27, 36, and 45 m/s were produced using an air cannon and a Hybrid III dummy headform and neck unit. Free fall drop tests with a rigid headform on to a selection of anvils (flat rigid, flat deformable, and hemispherical rigid) were conducted. Resultant headform acceleration was measured and compared between tests. At the lower speed impacts, all helmets produced a good reduction in headform acceleration, and thus injury risk. At the higher speed impacts, the effectiveness was less. For example, the mean maximum headform accelerations for all cricket helmets at each speed were: 67, 160, 316, and 438 g for 19, 27, 36, and 45 m/s ball speeds respectively. Drop tests on to a hemispherical anvil produced the highest accelerations. The variation in performance increased as the magnitude of the impact energy increased, in both types of testing. The test method used for baseball helmets in which the projectile is fired at the helmet may be superior to helmet drop tests. Cricket helmet performance is satisfactory for low speed impacts, but not for impacts at higher, more realistic, speeds. Baseball and ice hockey helmets offer slightly better relative and absolute performance at the 27 m/s ball and puck impacts.

  10. Evaluation of cricket helmet performance and comparison with baseball and ice hockey helmets

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, A; Janda, D

    2003-01-01

    Background: Protective helmets in sport are important for reducing the risk of head and facial injury. In cricket and other sports with projectiles, national test standards control the minimum helmet performance. However, there are few field data showing if helmets are effective in reducing head injury. Objectives: (a) To examine the performance of cricket helmets in laboratory tests; (b) to examine performance with regard to test standards, game hazards, and helmet construction; (c) to compare and contrast these findings with baseball and ice hockey helmets. Methods: Impact tests were conducted on a selection of helmet models: five cricket, two baseball, and two ice hockey. Ball to helmet impacts at speeds of 19, 27, 36, and 45 m/s were produced using an air cannon and a Hybrid III dummy headform and neck unit. Free fall drop tests with a rigid headform on to a selection of anvils (flat rigid, flat deformable, and hemispherical rigid) were conducted. Resultant headform acceleration was measured and compared between tests. Results: At the lower speed impacts, all helmets produced a good reduction in headform acceleration, and thus injury risk. At the higher speed impacts, the effectiveness was less. For example, the mean maximum headform accelerations for all cricket helmets at each speed were: 67, 160, 316, and 438 g for 19, 27, 36, and 45 m/s ball speeds respectively. Drop tests on to a hemispherical anvil produced the highest accelerations. The variation in performance increased as the magnitude of the impact energy increased, in both types of testing. Conclusions: The test method used for baseball helmets in which the projectile is fired at the helmet may be superior to helmet drop tests. Cricket helmet performance is satisfactory for low speed impacts, but not for impacts at higher, more realistic, speeds. Baseball and ice hockey helmets offer slightly better relative and absolute performance at the 27 m/s ball and puck impacts. PMID:12893718

  11. Violence in Canadian amateur hockey: the experience of referees in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Ackery, Alun D; Tator, Charles H; Snider, Carolyn

    2012-03-01

    To determine the perceptions and roles of referees about violence and injury in hockey games. Questionnaire. Web-based survey. We contacted referees across Canada from various leagues and all levels of play, with the majority of respondents from Ontario (92%). We gathered demographic information anonymously and posed questions on aggression and experience in hockey games. The majority of referees (n = 632) indicated that violence is a serious concern to both players and referees at all levels of hockey. More than 90% of referees responded that they were the recipients of aggression and anger (92.1%, 95% confidence interval, 90.0-94.2), 55% had been involved in hockey games where aggressive behavior resulted in the referee losing control of the game, and 71% said that this increased aggression leads to injury. Referees' opinions are that the coach is the most responsible for managing on-ice safety (63%). To improve hockey safety, referees suggest education and more rigorous enforcement of discipline for all participants. Referees are important for hockey safety and need to be appropriately supported. Referees believe that increased aggression can lead to injury and that rules need to be enforced more diligently. Referees recommend that increased education about safety is needed to guide parents, coaches, and players to make hockey safer.

  12. Measurement of head impacts in youth ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Reed, N; Taha, T; Keightley, M; Duggan, C; McAuliffe, J; Cubos, J; Baker, J; Faught, B; McPherson, M; Montelpare, W

    2010-11-01

    Despite growing interest in the biomechanical mechanisms of sports-related concussion, ice hockey and the youth sport population has not been studied extensively. The purpose of this pilot study was: 1) to describe the biomechanical measures of head impacts in youth minor ice hockey players; and, 2) to investigate the influence of player and game characteristics on the number and magnitude of head impacts. Data was collected from 13 players from a single competitive Bantam boy's (ages 13-14 years) AAA ice hockey team using telemetric accelerometers implanted within the players' helmets at 27 ice hockey games. The average linear acceleration, rotational acceleration, Gadd Severity Index and Head Injury Criterion of head impacts were recorded. A significantly higher number of head impacts per player per game were found for wingers when compared to centre and defense player positions (df=355, t=3.087, p=0.00218) and for tournament games when compared to regular season and playoff games (df=355, t=2.641, p=0.086). A significant difference in rotational acceleration according to player position (F2,1812=4.9551, p=0.0071) was found. This study is an initial step towards a greater understanding of head impacts in youth ice hockey.

  13. Hubble's Hockey Stick Galaxy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    The star of this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image is a galaxy known as NGC 4656, located in the constellation of Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs). However, it also has a somewhat more interesting and intriguing name: the Hockey Stick Galaxy! The reason for this is a little unclear from this partial view, which shows the bright central region, but the galaxy is actually shaped like an elongated, warped stick, stretching out through space until it curls around at one end to form a striking imitation of a celestial hockey stick. This unusual shape is thought to be due to an interaction between NGC 4656 and a couple of near neighbors, NGC 4631 (otherwise known as The Whale Galaxy) and NGC 4627 (a small elliptical). Galactic interactions can completely reshape a celestial object, shifting and warping its constituent gas, stars, and dust into bizarre and beautiful configurations. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  14. The National Basketball Association eye injury study.

    PubMed

    Zagelbaum, B M; Starkey, C; Hersh, P S; Donnenfeld, E D; Perry, H D; Jeffers, J B

    1995-06-01

    To investigate the epidemiology of eye injuries sustained by professional basketball players in the National Basketball Association (NBA). A prospective study involving all NBA athletes who sustained eye injuries between February 1, 1992, and June 20, 1993, was conducted. Twenty-seven NBA team athletic trainers, physicians, and ophthalmologists were provided data forms to complete for any player examined for an eye injury. Practice and game exposures during the preseason, regular season, playoffs, and championships were included. Of the 1092 injuries sustained by NBA players during the 17-month period, 59 (5.4%) involved the eye and adnexa. Eighteen (30.5%) of the injuries occurred while the player was in the act of rebounding, and 16 (27.1%) while the player was on offense. The most common diagnoses included 30 abrasions or lacerations to the eyelid (50.9%), 17 contusions (edema and/or ecchymosis) to the eyelid or periorbital region (28.8%), and seven corneal abrasions (11.9%). There were three orbital fractures (5.1%). Most injuries were caused by fingers (35.6%) or elbows (28.8%). Nine players (15.3%) missed subsequent games because of their injury. Fifty-seven players (96.6%) were not wearing protective eyewear at the time of injury. The incidence of eye injuries in NBA players during the 17-month period was 1.44 per 1000 game exposures. Frequent physical contact in professional basketball players leaves them at great risk for sustaining eye injuries. To prevent these injuries, protective eyewear is recommended.

  15. International Toys in Space: Hockey

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Cosmonauts Sergi Treschev and Valery Korzun discover ways to adapt the game of hockey while trying to overcome the challenges of playing the game in microgravity. Astronaut Peggy Whitson narrates t...

  16. Comparison of Concussion Rates Between NCAA Division I and Division III Men's and Women's Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Rosene, John M; Raksnis, Bryan; Silva, Brie; Woefel, Tyler; Visich, Paul S; Dompier, Thomas P; Kerr, Zachary Y

    2017-09-01

    Examinations related to divisional differences in the incidence of sports-related concussions (SRC) in collegiate ice hockey are limited. To compare the epidemiologic patterns of concussion in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) ice hockey by sex and division. Descriptive epidemiology study. A convenience sample of men's and women's ice hockey teams in Divisions I and III provided SRC data via the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program during the 2009-2010 to 2014-2015 academic years. Concussion counts, rates, and distributions were examined by factors including injury activity and position. Injury rate ratios (IRRs) and injury proportion ratios (IPRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to compare concussion rates and distributions, respectively. Overall, 415 concussions were reported for men's and women's ice hockey combined. The highest concussion rate was found in Division I men (0.83 per 1000 athlete-exposures [AEs]), followed by Division III women (0.78/1000 AEs), Division I women (0.65/1000 AEs), and Division III men (0.64/1000 AEs). However, the only significant IRR was that the concussion rate was higher in Division I men than Division III men (IRR = 1.29; 95% CI, 1.02-1.65). The proportion of concussions from checking was higher in men than women (28.5% vs 9.4%; IPR = 3.02; 95% CI, 1.63-5.59); however, this proportion was higher in Division I women than Division III women (18.4% vs 1.8%; IPR = 10.47; 95% CI, 1.37-79.75). The proportion of concussions sustained by goalkeepers was higher in women than men (14.2% vs 2.9%; IPR = 4.86; 95% CI, 2.19-10.77), with findings consistent within each division. Concussion rates did not vary by sex but differed by division among men. Checking-related concussions were less common in women than men overall but more common in Division I women than Division III women. Findings highlight the need to better understand the reasons underlying divisional differences within men's and women's ice hockey and the

  17. National survey on sports injuries in the Netherlands: target populations for sports injury prevention programs.

    PubMed

    Schmikli, Sandor L; Backx, Frank J G; Kemler, Helena J; van Mechelen, Willem

    2009-03-01

    To define target populations for sports injury prevention programs. A computer-assisted telephone survey on sports injuries and sports participation during 2000-2005 using a 3-month recall period. Data obtained from a representative sample of Dutch citizens. Fifty-eight thousand four hundred five Dutch citizens aged older than 3 years. Age, gender, and type of sports were used to distinguish subgroups with a substantial contribution to sports injuries. The absolute number of sports injuries, the incidence of sports injuries per 10,000 hours, the severity, and costs of sports injuries. Sports participation was associated with 1.5 million injuries per year and 10 injuries per 10,000 hours; of these, 50% had to be treated medically. Two-thirds of all medically treated sports injuries were associated with 9 sports (representing 18 subpopulations, all younger than 55 years): outdoor soccer (males 4-54 years and females 4-17 years), indoor soccer (males 18-34 years), tennis (males/females 35-54 years), volleyball (females 18-54 years), field hockey (males 18-34 years and females 4-17 years), running/jogging (males/females 35-54 years), gymnastics (males/females 4-17 years), skiing/snowboarding (males 4-17 years and females 18-34 years), and equestrian sports (females 18-34 years). These groups showed more than average injury rates and covered two-thirds of all direct and indirect costs (euro 400 million). The survey identified the most important (sports-, age-, and gender-specific) target populations for injury prevention programs in the Netherlands. Sports participants aged older than 55 years were excluded from these target groups because of their limited contribution to the total sports injury problem.

  18. Pressure mapping to assess seated pressure distributions and the potential risk for skin ulceration in a population of sledge hockey players and control subjects.

    PubMed

    Berthold, Justin; Dicianno, Brad E; Cooper, Rory A

    2013-09-01

    Ice sledge (or sled) hockey is a fast-paced sport that enables individuals with physical disabilities to play ice hockey. As the attraction to the sport continues to rise, the need for developing better equipment and installing preventative measures for injury will become increasingly important. One such injury includes skin pressure ulceration. A total of 26 subjects including active controls and those with spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, limb amputation and traumatic brain injury were studied using a pressure mapping device at the 2012 National Disabled Veterans Winter Sports Clinic to determine the risk for skin pressure ulceration and the impact of cushioning and knee angle positioning on seated pressure distributions. Sledge hockey athletes may be at increased risk for skin pressure ulceration based on seated pressure distribution data. This experiment failed to demonstrate a benefit for specialty cushioning in either group. Interestingly, knee angle positioning, particularly, knee extension significantly lowered the average seated pressures. When considering the risk for skin pressure ulceration, knee angle positioning is of particular clinical importance. More research is warranted, specifically targeting novel cushion and sledge designs and larger groups of individuals with sensory loss and severe spinal deformities. Implications for Rehabilitation Ice sledge (or sled) hockey is a fast-paced and growing adaptive sport played at the Paralympic level. Rehabilitation professionals should consider the potential for skin ulceration in this population of athletes. The effects of cushioning used in the sledge design warrants further investigation. Knee angle positioning; particularly, knee extension significantly lowers seated pressures and may reduce the potential for skin ulceration.

  19. Investigating Strength and Range of Motion of the Hip Complex in Ice Hockey Athletes.

    PubMed

    Wilcox C, R J; Osgood, Chad T; White H, S F; Vince, Rebecca V

    2015-08-01

    Ice hockey athletes frequently injure the hip complex via a noncontact mechanism. The authors investigated patterns of strength and range of motion (ROM) to establish major differences compared with soccer athletes. Soccer athletes were compared with ice hockey athletes due to similarities between the 2 sports with regard to the intermittent nature and high number of lower-limb injuries. To compare the differences in ROM and strength of the hip for both the dominant (Dom) and nondominant (Ndom) limbs in ice hockey and soccer athletes. Case-control study. Bilateral ROM in hip flexion in sitting (FS) and lying (FL), extension, abduction, adduction, and internal rotation (IR) and external rotation (ER) were measured using a goniometer and assessed for strength using a handheld dynamometer on both the Dom and Ndom limbs. 24 male, active, uninjured NCAA Division III ice hockey (16) and soccer (8) athletes. ROM and strength for hip FS, FL, extension, abduction, adduction, IR, and ER. A mixed-model ANOVA was used to investigate interactions and main effects. Ice hockey athletes exhibited greater hip-adduction ROM than soccer athletes in the Dom leg (both P = .002) and when both limbs were combined (P = .010). Ice hockey athletes had less ROM in ER (P = .042) than soccer athletes. Ice hockey athletes displayed less strength in adduction in their Ndom leg than in their Dom leg (P = .02), along with less adduction than soccer players in their Ndom leg (P = .40). Ice hockey athletes displayed less strength in hip adduction (P = .030), FS (P = .023) and FL (P = .030) than soccer athletes. The findings suggest that ice hockey athletes may present an at-risk profile for noncontact hip injuries in comparison with soccer athletes with regard to strength and ROM of the hip.

  20. Dealing with Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... overexertion of back muscles during bending or lifting movements. Back injuries are most common in contact sports like football and ice hockey, or in weightlifting, rowing, golf, figure skating, gymnastics, and dancing. Sex Organ Injuries Injuries to the sex organs ...

  1. Attitudes towards the use of mouth and face guards in Swedish ice hockey: part 2. Results.

    PubMed

    Glendor, Ulf

    2013-12-01

    The yearly cost of sports injuries, which affects Swedish society, is estimated to 3 billion SEK (460 million USD). Injuries in ice hockey represent at least 270 million SEK (42 million USD). Despite the high number of injuries, mouth and face guards are rarely used in Swedish ice hockey. The major aim of this study was to examine the attitudes of mouth and face guards in two ice hockey clubs in Sweden (one elite and one division 3 club). A second purpose was to determine why some players use mouth and face guards, while others do not. A third goal was to present a material that ice hockey clubs could use for further discussions. A phenomenographic analysis of focus groups interviews. The phenomenographic analysis of the data resulted in 12 categories. Within each category, issues, activities and engagement of the participants were described. Further, similarities and differences in the discussions between the elite club and the division 3 club were described. The following categories were found to engage the participants the most: 'Ice hockey is a high-velocity collision sport in which injuries are expected', 'Attitudes towards personal protection guards' and 'Suggested measures'. The participants were aware of the risk of playing ice hockey, but they know little about the consequences of a dental injury. Although ice hockey players wish to protect themselves, they refuse to accept just any mouth or face guard. Through the discussions about reducing dental and jaw injuries by routine use of protection devices, many reform proposals were presented that could be useful in future discussions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Lumbar facet fracture in an adolescent ice hockey player.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, W O; Taylor, M R; Sundaram, M

    1999-11-01

    A 14-year-old boy was checked hard as he was winding up to shoot in an ice hockey game. He experienced low-back pain during the game but when examined later for complaints of pain and fever, he denied trauma. Plain x-rays were normal, but a bone scan showed increased uptake at L-3. MRI evaluation revealed a lumbar mass; a CT scan showed the mass to be a hematoma and edema secondary to a facet fracture. Acute severe back pain in a hockey player should prompt a careful history and a search for musculoskeletal injury. When trauma in the lumbar spine is suspected and plain radiographs are nondiagnostic, CT scans are more precise than MRI for diagnosing injury.

  3. Incidence and severity of reported acute sports injuries in 35 sports using insurance registry data.

    PubMed

    Åman, M; Forssblad, M; Henriksson-Larsén, K

    2016-04-01

    Acute injuries in sport are still a problem where limited knowledge of incidence and severity in different sports at national level exists. In Sweden, 80% of the sports federations have their mandatory injury insurance for all athletes in the same insurance company and injury data are systematically kept in a national database. The aim of the study was to identify high-risk sports with respect to incidence of acute and severe injuries in 35 sports reported to the database. The number and incidences of injuries as well as injuries leading to permanent medical impairment (PMI) were calculated during 2008-2011. Each year approximately 12,000 injuries and 1,162,660 licensed athletes were eligible for analysis. Eighty-five percent of the injuries were reported in football, ice hockey, floorball, and handball. The highest injury incidence as well as PMI was in motorcycle, handball, skating, and ice hockey. Females had higher risk of a PMI compared with males in automobile sport, handball, floorball, and football. High-risk sports with numerous injuries and high incidence of PMI injuries were motorcycle, handball, ice hockey, football, floorball, and automobile sports. Thus, these sports ought to be the target of preventive actions at national level.

  4. Relationship of physical fitness test results and hockey playing potential in elite-level ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Burr, Jaime F; Jamnik, Roni K; Baker, Joseph; Macpherson, Alison; Gledhill, Norman; McGuire, E J

    2008-09-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the fitness variables with the highest capability for predicting hockey playing potential at the elite level as determined by entry draft selection order. We also examined the differences associated with the predictive abilities of the test components among playing positions. The secondary purpose of this study was to update the physiological profile of contemporary hockey players including positional differences. Fitness test results conducted by our laboratory at the National Hockey League Entry Draft combine were compared with draft selection order on a total of 853 players. Regression models revealed peak anaerobic power output to be important for higher draft round selection in all positions; however, the degree of importance of this measurement varied with playing position. The body index, which is a composite score of height, lean mass, and muscular development, was similarly important in all models, with differing influence by position. Removal of the goalies' data increased predictive capacity, suggesting that talent identification using physical fitness testing of this sort may be more appropriate for skating players. Standing long jump was identified as a significant predictor variable for forwards and defense and could be a useful surrogate for assessing overall hockey potential. Significant differences exist between the physiological profiles of current players based on playing position. There are also positional differences in the relative importance of anthropometric and fitness measures of off-ice hockey tests in relation to draft order. Physical fitness measures and anthropometric data are valuable in helping predict hockey playing potential. Emphasis on anthropometry should be used when comparing elite-level forwards, whereas peak anaerobic power and fatigue rate are more useful for differentiating between defense.

  5. Asymmetry in body composition in female hockey players.

    PubMed

    Krzykała, M; Leszczyński, P

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if a sport in which one side of the body is dominant, like field hockey, influences regional body composition and bone mineral density (BMD) distribution in particular body segments, and whether the sporting level is a determining factor. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) method (Lunar Prodigy Advance; General Electric, Madison, USA) with the whole body scan was used to measure bone mineral density, fat mass and lean mass in 31 female field hockey players divided according to their sporting level. The morphological asymmetry level was assessed between two body sides and body segments in athletes from the National Team (n=17) and from the Youth Team (n=14) separately and between groups. Bone mineral density in the lower extremity and of the trunk was significantly asymmetric in favor of the left side in the National Team. In the case of the Youth Team, only the trunk BMD indicated clear left-right difference with left side dominance. Both the lean mass and fat mass values were relatively higher on the left side of all body segments and it related to both analyzed groups of athletes. The present study shows that playing field hockey contributes to laterality in body composition and BMD and that the sporting level is a determining factor. In most cases the left side dominated. A greater asymmetry level was observed in more experienced female field hockey players.

  6. Massachusetts Special Olympics Poly Hockey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrissey, Jim

    Poly Hockey is featured in this manual of instructions for coaches and teachers to use with mentally retarded boys and girls of all ages and ability levels. It is noted that the sport has been supported by the Board of Directors of the Special Olympics and has been used in Massachusetts for over 7 years. Explained is use of the game indoors, and…

  7. 76 FR 8965 - National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program: Revisions to the Vaccine Injury Table

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 100 RIN 0907-AA National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program: Revisions to the Vaccine Injury Table AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS. ACTION... information and views on the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) entitled ``National Vaccine Injury...

  8. National Action Plan for the Prevention of Playground Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Donna; Hudson, Susan

    Recognizing the need for a nationally coordinated effort to reduce playground injuries, the National Program for Playground Safety was created in 1995. This booklet describes the national action plan for prevention of playground injuries. Designed for use by parents, teachers, recreation and park personnel, and caregivers involved in providing…

  9. Spine and axial skeleton injuries in the National Football League.

    PubMed

    Mall, Nathan A; Buchowski, Jacob; Zebala, Lukas; Brophy, Robert H; Wright, Rick W; Matava, Matthew J

    2012-08-01

    The majority of previous literature focusing on spinal injuries in American football players is centered around catastrophic injuries; however, this may underestimate the true number of these injuries in this athletic cohort. The goals of this study were to (1) report the incidence of spinal and axial skeleton injuries, both minor and severe, in the National Football League (NFL) over an 11-year period; (2) determine the incidence of spinal injury by injury type, anatomic location, player position, mechanism of injury, and type of exposure (practice vs game); and (3) determine the average number of practices and days missed because of injury for each injury type. Descriptive epidemiological study. All documented injuries to the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine; pelvis; ribs; and spinal cord were retrospectively analyzed using the NFL's injury surveillance database over a period of 11 seasons from 2000 through 2010. The data were analyzed by the number of injuries per athlete-exposure, the anatomic location and type of injury, player position, mechanism of injury, and number of days missed per injury. A total of 2208 injuries occurred to the spine or axial skeleton over an 11-season interval in the NFL, with a mean loss of 25.7 days per injury. This represented 7% of the total injuries during this time period. Of these 2208 injuries, 987 (44.7%) occurred in the cervical spine. Time missed from play was greatest for thoracic disc herniations (189 days/injury). Other injuries that had a mean time missed greater than 30 days included (in descending order) cervical fracture (120 days/injury), cervical disc degeneration/herniation (85 days/injury), spinal cord injury (77 days/injury), lumbar disc degeneration/herniation (52 days/injury), thoracic fracture (34 days/injury), and thoracic nerve injury (30 days/injury). Offensive linemen were the most likely to suffer a spinal injury, followed by defensive backs, defensive linemen, and linebackers. Blocking and tackling

  10. Sex Differences in Reported Concussion Injury Rates and Time Loss From Participation: An Update of the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance Program From 2004-2005 Through 2008-2009.

    PubMed

    Covassin, Tracey; Moran, Ryan; Elbin, R J

    2016-03-01

    Epidemiologic studies have identified differences in concussion incidence between the sexes. However, few authors to date have updated injury rates (IRs) and time loss between male and female concussed athletes. To examine sex differences in IRs and time loss in concussed National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletes. Descriptive epidemiologic study. National Collegiate Athletic Association athletics. A total of 1702 concusssed NCAA athletes, consisting of 903 females and 779 males participating in soccer, basketball, ice hockey, lacrosse, softball, or baseball over a 5-year period from 2004-2005 through 2008-2009. Using the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program, athletic trainers reported concussions, athlete-exposures (AEs), and time loss across 10 NCAA sports. An IR is the number of injuries in a particular category divided by the number of AEs in that category. During the study period, 1702 concussions were reported during 4 170 427 AEs for an overall total of 5.47 per 10 000 AEs. In sex-comparable sports, females had a 1.4 times higher overall concussion IR than males (IRs = 4.84 and 3.46, respectively), with greater rates in women's baseball/softball, basketball, ice hockey, and soccer than men. Female soccer and basketball players also displayed more time loss after concussion compared with male basketball and soccer players. Female athletes sustained a higher rate of concussion and, in all sports except lacrosse, had greater time loss from concussion than male athletes. Additional research is needed on sex differences in time loss after concussions.

  11. Sex Differences in Reported Concussion Injury Rates and Time Loss From Participation: An Update of the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance Program From 2004–2005 Through 2008–2009

    PubMed Central

    Covassin, Tracey; Moran, Ryan; Elbin, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Context:  Epidemiologic studies have identified differences in concussion incidence between the sexes. However, few authors to date have updated injury rates (IRs) and time loss between male and female concussed athletes. Objective:  To examine sex differences in IRs and time loss in concussed National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletes. Design:  Descriptive epidemiologic study. Setting:  National Collegiate Athletic Association athletics. Patients or Other Participants:  A total of 1702 concusssed NCAA athletes, consisting of 903 females and 779 males participating in soccer, basketball, ice hockey, lacrosse, softball, or baseball over a 5-year period from 2004–2005 through 2008–2009. Main Outcome Measure(s):  Using the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program, athletic trainers reported concussions, athlete-exposures (AEs), and time loss across 10 NCAA sports. An IR is the number of injuries in a particular category divided by the number of AEs in that category. Results:  During the study period, 1702 concussions were reported during 4 170 427 AEs for an overall total of 5.47 per 10 000 AEs. In sex-comparable sports, females had a 1.4 times higher overall concussion IR than males (IRs = 4.84 and 3.46, respectively), with greater rates in women's baseball/softball, basketball, ice hockey, and soccer than men. Female soccer and basketball players also displayed more time loss after concussion compared with male basketball and soccer players. Conclusions:  Female athletes sustained a higher rate of concussion and, in all sports except lacrosse, had greater time loss from concussion than male athletes. Additional research is needed on sex differences in time loss after concussions. PMID:26950073

  12. Shoulder injuries to quarterbacks in the national football league.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Bryan T; Barnes, Ronnie P; Powell, John W; Warren, Russell F

    2004-03-01

    Quarterbacks are at risk for shoulder injury secondary to both the throwing motion as well as from contact injury. To delineate the incidence and etiology of shoulder injuries to quarterbacks in the National Football League (NFL). Using the NFL Injury Surveillance System (NFLISS), all reported injuries to quarterbacks between 1980 and 2001 were identified. A total of 1534 quarterback injuries were identified with a mean of 18.8 and a median of 6.0 days of playing time lost. The majority of these injuries occurred during a game (83.8%). Passing plays were responsible for 77.4% of all quarterback-related injuries. Shoulder injuries were the second most common injury reported (233 or 15.2%), following closely behind head injuries (15.4%). Direct trauma was responsible for 82.3% of the injuries, with acromioclavicular joint sprains being the most common injury overall (40%). Overuse injuries were responsible for 14% of the injuries, the most common being rotator cuff tendinitis (6.1%) followed by biceps tendinitis (3.5%). In this review, the vast majority of shoulder injuries in quarterbacks occurred as a result of direct trauma (82.3%), and less than 15% were overuse injuries resulting from the actual throwing motion.

  13. The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act: A Chance for Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Jack; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The article describes the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act which provides for recovery awards for vaccine-related injuries caused by diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, polio, measles, mumps, and rubella vaccines. A Vaccine Injury Table lists types of disabilities covered and time periods for first symptoms. The claims process, legal assistance,…

  14. The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act: A Chance for Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Jack; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The article describes the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act which provides for recovery awards for vaccine-related injuries caused by diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, polio, measles, mumps, and rubella vaccines. A Vaccine Injury Table lists types of disabilities covered and time periods for first symptoms. The claims process, legal assistance,…

  15. Ice Hockey Summit II: zero tolerance for head hits and fighting.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aynsley M; Stuart, Michael J; Dodick, David W; Roberts, William O; Alford, Patrick W; Ashare, Alan B; Aubrey, Mark; Benson, Brian W; Burke, Chip J; Dick, Randall; Eickhoff, Chad; Emery, Carolyn A; Flashman, Laura A; Gaz, Daniel V; Giza, Chris C; Greenwald, Richard M; Herring, Stanley A; Hoshizaki, T Blaine; Hudziak, James J; Huston, John; Krause, David; LaVoi, Nicole; Leaf, Matt; Leddy, John J; MacPherson, Alison; McKee, Ann C; Mihalik, Jason P; Moessner, Anne M; Montelpare, William J; Putukian, Margot; Schneider, Kathryn J; Szalkowski, Ron; Tabrum, Mark; Whitehead, James R; Wiese-Bjornstal, Diane M

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to present currently known basic science and on-ice influences of sport-related concussion (SRC) in hockey, building upon the Ice Hockey Summit I action plan (2011) to reduce SRC. The prior summit proceedings included an action plan intended to reduce SRC. As such, the proceedings from Summit I served as a point of departure for the science and discussion held during Summit II (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, October 2013). Summit II focused on (1) Basic Science of Concussions in Ice Hockey: Taking Science Forward, (2) Acute and Chronic Concussion Care: Making a Difference, (3) Preventing Concussions via Behavior, Rules, Education, and Measuring Effectiveness, (4) Updates in Equipment: Their Relationship to Industry Standards, and (5) Policies and Plans at State, National, and Federal Levels To Reduce SRC. Action strategies derived from the presentations and discussion described in these sectors were voted on subsequently for purposes of prioritization. The following proceedings include the knowledge and research shared by invited faculty, many of whom are health care providers and clinical investigators. The Summit II evidence-based action plan emphasizes the rapidly evolving scientific content of hockey SRC. It includes the most highly prioritized strategies voted on for implementation to decrease concussion. The highest-priority action items identified from the Summit include the following: (1) eliminate head hits from all levels of ice hockey, (2) change body checking policies, and (3) eliminate fighting in all amateur and professional hockey.

  16. Visual Attentional Orienting in Developing Hockey Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enns, James T.; Richards, James C.

    1997-01-01

    Covert visual orienting was measured in 13 twelve-year-old and 11 fifteen-year-old hockey players and in 13 college students with no hockey training. Found that high-skill 15-year-olds were better able than all other groups to take advantage of the general alerting effect produced by the sudden onset of a cue. (MDM)

  17. Visual Attentional Orienting in Developing Hockey Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enns, James T.; Richards, James C.

    1997-01-01

    Covert visual orienting was measured in 13 twelve-year-old and 11 fifteen-year-old hockey players and in 13 college students with no hockey training. Found that high-skill 15-year-olds were better able than all other groups to take advantage of the general alerting effect produced by the sudden onset of a cue. (MDM)

  18. Injuries in Youth and National Combined Events Championships.

    PubMed

    Edouard, P; Samozino, P; Escudier, G; Baldini, A; Morin, J-B

    2012-10-01

    In major track and field competitions, the most risky discipline is the combined event. Therefore, we aimed to record and analyze the incidence and characteristics of sports injuries incurred during the Youth and National Combined Events Championships. During the French Athletics Combined Events Championships in 2010, all newly occurred injuries were prospectively recorded by the local organising committee of physicians and physiotherapists working in the medical centres at the stadium, in order to determine incidence and characteristics of newly occurred injuries. In total, 51 injuries and 9 time-loss injuries were reported among 107 registered athletes, resulting in an incidence of 477 injuries and 84 time-loss injuries per 1,000 registered athletes. Approximately 72% of injuries affected lower limbs and 60% were caused by overuse. Thigh strain (17.6%) was the most common diagnosis. 14 dropouts were recorded, 8 were caused by an injury (57.1%). During the National and Youth Combined Events Championships, over one third of the registered athletes incurred an injury, with an injury incidence higher than in international elite track and field competitions. Interestingly, this higher injury risk concerned the younger population affecting immature musculoskeletal structures. In combined events, preventive interventions should mainly focus on overuse and thigh injuries. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. 78 FR 38995 - National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, List of Petitions Received

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program... received under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (``the Program''), as required by Section... role in the Program, contact the Director, National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, 5600 Fishers...

  20. 78 FR 46354 - National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program; List of Petitions Received

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program... received under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (``the Program''), as required by Section... role in the Program, contact the Director, National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, 5600 Fishers...

  1. Injuries in the 1987 national amateur volleyball tournament.

    PubMed

    Schafle, M D; Requa, R K; Patton, W L; Garrick, J G

    1990-01-01

    In a prospective study of injuries in the 1987 United States Volleyball Association's national tournament, we found 154 injuries in 1520 participants during 7812 hours of play. The injury rate in this study was 1.97/100 hours of play. Before the tournament, the participants' history was taken, and during the week of participation, records were kept of every player who presented with an injury. Players ranged in age from 17 to 60 and competed in five age/gender groups. Females had an injury rate of 2.3 and males had an injury rate of 1.7. The highest injury rate was seen in the men's open division, ages 17 to 35 (2.7), and the lowest rate was seen in the men's Golden Masters, ages 46 and up (1.5). Seventy-nine percent of the injuries occurred during the tournament and 21% were considered to be chronic injuries with an acute exacerbation. The upper extremities accounted for 20% of the injuries. The ankle (17.6%), low back (14.2%), and knee (11%) were the most common injury sites. Strains (36%) and sprains (28%) were the most frequent types of injury. Only eight (5.2%) injuries resulted in more than 5 days of time loss. Two of these injuries involved the knee and two others required surgery. It is likely that in studies relying upon retrospective methods, fewer of the less severe injuries are found, thereby leading to an overestimation of the percentages of knee and ankle injuries and the proportion of severe injuries. The clinician contemplating providing care for a high-level tournament should expect a preponderance of minor injuries occurring in a variety of anatomical locations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Conservative management of an elite ice hockey goaltender with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI): a case report

    PubMed Central

    MacIntyre, Kyle; Gomes, Brendan; MacKenzie, Steven; D’Angelo, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To detail the presentation of an elite male ice hockey goaltender with cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and acetabular labral tears. This case will outline the prevalence, clinical presentation, imaging criteria, pathomechanics, and management of FAI, with specific emphasis on the ice hockey goaltender. Clinical Features: A 22-year old retired ice hockey goaltender presented to a chiropractor after being diagnosed by an orthopaedic surgeon with MRI confirmed left longitudinal and chondral flap acetabular labral tears and cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). As the patient was not a candidate for surgical intervention, a multimodal conservative treatment approach including manual therapy, electroacupuncture and rehabilitation exercises were implemented. Summary: FAI is prevalent in ice hockey players, particularly with goaltenders. Both skating and position-dependent hip joint mechanics involved in ice hockey may exacerbate or contribute to acquired and congenital forms of symptomatic FAI. As such, practitioners managing this population must address sport-specific demands in manual therapy, rehabilitation and physical training, to improve functional outcomes and prevent future injury. PMID:26816416

  3. Pediatric Genital Injury: An Analysis of the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Jessica T.; Bjurlin, Marc A.; Cheng, Earl Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the characteristics of pediatric genital injuries presenting to United States emergency departments (EDs). Methods A retrospective cohort study utilizing the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) from 1991-2010 to evaluate pediatric genital injuries was performed. Results Pediatric genital injuries represented 0.6% of all pediatric injuries with the incidence of injuries rising through the period studied, 1991-2010. The mean age at injury was 7.1 years old and was distributed 56.6% girls and 43.4% boys. A total of 43.3% had lacerations and 42.2% had contusions/abrasions. The majority of injuries occurred at home (65.9%), and the majority of patients (94.7%) were treated and released from the hospital. The most common consumer products associated with pediatric genital trauma were: bicycles (14.7% of all pediatric genital injuries), bathtubs (5.8%), daywear (5.6%), monkey bars (5.4%), and toilets (4.0%). Conclusion Although pediatric genital injuries represent a small proportion of overall injuries presenting to the ED, genital injuries continue to rise despite public health measures targeted to decrease childhood injury. Our results can be used to guide further prevention strategies for pediatric genital injury. PMID:23953603

  4. Beach Soccer Injuries During the Japanese National Championships

    PubMed Central

    Shimakawa, Tomoyuki; Shimakawa, Yusuke; Kawasoe, Yoko; Yoshimura, Kouji; Chinen, Yuma; Eimon, Kazuya; Chibana, Wataru; Shirota, Shinichi; Kadekawa, Kei; Bahr, Roald; Uezato, Tomomi; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The frequency and severity of injury in beach soccer are unknown. Purpose: To estimate the incidence rates, characteristics, and risk factors for injuries associated with beach soccer. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: The same sports physician examined and recorded injuries incurred during the Japanese National Beach Soccer Championships in 2013 and 2014. Posttournament follow-up was made for all injuries. Match exposure for each player was recorded through video review to examine individual risk factors. Results: A total of 58 injuries were recorded during 54 matches. The overall injury rate was 179.0 (95% CI, 138.4-231.6), and the time-loss injury rate was 28.2 (95% CI, 14.7-54.1) per 1000 player-hours. The foot/toe (34.9%) was the most frequently injured area, followed by the lower leg (22.2%) and thigh (11.1%). There was only 1 ankle injury (1.6%). The most frequent injury type was contusions (60.3%), followed by lacerations/abrasions (14.3%) and sprains/ligament injuries (6.3%). Only 4 injuries resulted in ≥30 days of time-loss (7.4%). After adjusting for age, a previous history of severe injury and longer experience of beach soccer were significantly associated with injury risk. Conclusion: The time-loss injury rate in this study was comparable to the rates reported during the matches of soccer or futsal tournaments. However, a greater incidence of foot/toe injury and lacerations/abrasions as well as a lower incidence of ankle injury distinguished beach soccer from soccer and futsal, possibly related to the specific playing conditions of being barefoot on a sand surface. PMID:26862537

  5. Many roads lead to Rome--developmental paths to Olympic gold in men's field hockey.

    PubMed

    Güllich, Arne

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the developmental sporting activities of the Olympic Champions 2012 in men's field hockey. The volume of organised practice/training and non-organised sporting leisure play in both field hockey and other sports through childhood, adolescence and adulthood was examined and compared between the Olympic Champions and (1) current national class players and (2) international medallists of one decade earlier. Analyses revealed that the Olympic Champions performed moderate volumes of organised field hockey practice/training throughout their career and attained their first international senior medal after accumulating 4393 ± 1389 practice/training hours, but they engaged in extensive other sporting activities during childhood and youth. It took them 18 ± 3 years of involvement to attain an international medal and they had engaged for 22 ± 3 years when winning the Olympic gold medal. The Olympic Champions did not differ from national class players in the amount of hockey-specific practice/training, but in greater amounts of organised involvement in other sports and later specialisation. They differed from the international medallists of one decade earlier in less increase of organised hockey-specific practice/training during adulthood and a longer period of involvement until attaining their first international medal. The sporting activities were characterised by sizeable interindividual variation within each subsample. The findings are reflected against the deliberate practice and Developmental Model of Sports Participation (DMSP) frameworks and are discussed with reference to the concept of long-term sustainability.

  6. Neuropsychological factors related to college ice hockey concussions.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Heather A; Ferraro, F Richard; Himle, Michael; Schultz, Caitlin; Poolman, Mark

    2014-05-01

    We analyzed data from 74 male collegiate hockey players. Each athlete's season began with a baseline administration of the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) neuropsychology test battery. Fourteen athletes sustained a sport-related head injury and were readministered the test to assess the impact of the injury. A significant decrease in performance (compared to baseline) on immediate and delayed word recall and designs followed the first concussion. Following a second sport-related concussion, the 4 affected athletes showed significant decrease in visual motor speed. Performance improved on 2 response speed measures (Ps < .01). More errors occurred during a visual processing/discrimination task and immediate recall of designs declined (Ps < .05). We discuss the results in light of recent work related to the impact of early-life concussions and head injury on late-life consequences, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy, and more immediate issues such as return-to-play decisions for athletes.

  7. Incidence of Sports-Related Concussion Among NCAA Women’s Ice Hockey Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Emily M.; Kroshus, Emily; Hu, Caroline H.; Gedman, Marissa; Collins, Jamie E.; Matzkin, Elizabeth G.

    2017-01-01

    Background: There are limited data on the incidence of concussion and concussion symptom nondisclosure among collegiate women’s ice hockey athletes. Purpose: To determine the incidence of sports-related concussion (SRC) in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) women’s ice hockey athletes. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: An anonymous online survey was completed by 459 NCAA women’s ice hockey athletes. Players reported diagnosed concussions as well as incidents where they experienced an impact or blow to the head followed by symptoms associated with a concussion; reports spanned the duration of the 2014-2015 season and throughout players’ organized hockey career. Results: About half (n = 219, 47.7%) of respondents reported at least 1 diagnosed concussion over the duration of their entire organized ice hockey career. A total of 13.3% (n = 61) of respondents reported a diagnosed concussion during the 2014-2015 season. The incidence rate was 1.18 (95% CI, 0.92-1.51) per 1000 athlete-exposures to a game or practice and 0.58 (95% CI, 0.45-0.74) per 1000 hours of ice time. One-third (34.2%, n = 157) of players reported at least 1 impact where they experienced concussion-like symptoms during the 2014-2015 season; 82.8% of these players reported that they continued to play after at least 1 of these impacts, and 66.8% of players reported at least 1 impact where they never disclosed any symptoms. Conclusion: There is a high incidence of SRC in collegiate women’s ice hockey and a concerning level of symptom nondisclosure. Additional research is needed to understand the causes of concussion and reasons for the lack of symptom disclosure, including factors specific to female athletes and contextual issues specific to women’s collegiate ice hockey. PMID:28812036

  8. Hockey Stats: Data Collection on Ice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Joanne

    2002-01-01

    Part of a series exploring how mathematics is used in the workplace. Software developers and statisticians record data of hockey games and players using statistics accessible to middle school students. (MM)

  9. Hockey Stats: Data Collection on Ice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Joanne

    2002-01-01

    Part of a series exploring how mathematics is used in the workplace. Software developers and statisticians record data of hockey games and players using statistics accessible to middle school students. (MM)

  10. Hockey night in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichol, Kiri; Daniels, Karen

    2011-03-01

    In order to explore the possibility of developing a statistical mechanics for dissipative ensembles, we have performed an experiment in which we track the translational and rotational velocities of pucks on an air hockey table. The pucks are driven by bumpers at the boundaries and are bidisperse to prevent crystallization. At packing fractions of 60% we find that the system distributes rotational and translation energy according to the equipartition theorem. However, as the packing fraction increases, the ratio of rotational energy to translational energy also increases to a value larger than predicted by equipartition. The translational and angular velocity distributions are approximately exponential and the distributions of the translational velocity are the same for both large and small particles. In contrast, the distribution of the angular velocities is broader for the small particles than for the large.

  11. Injury in the national basketball association: a 17-year overview.

    PubMed

    Drakos, Mark C; Domb, Benjamin; Starkey, Chad; Callahan, Lisa; Allen, Answorth A

    2010-07-01

    Injury patterns in elite athletes over long periods continue to evolve. The goal of this study was to review of the injuries and medical conditions afflicting athletes competing in the National Basketball Association (NBA) over a 17-year period. Descriptive epidemiological study. Injuries and player demographic information were reported by each team's athletic trainer. Criteria for reportable injuries were those that resulted in (1) physician referral, (2) a practice or game being missed, or (3) emergency care. The demographics, frequency of injury, time lost, and game exposures were tabulated, and game-related injury rates and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. A total of 1094 players appeared in the database 3843 times (3.3 ± 2.6 seasons). Lateral ankle sprains were the most frequent orthopaedic injury (n, 1658; 13.2%), followed by patellofemoral inflammation (n, 1493; 11.9%), lumbar strains (n, 999; 7.9%), and hamstring strains (n, 413; 3.3%). The most games missed were related to patellofemoral inflammation (n, 10 370; 17.5%), lateral ankle sprains (n, 5223; 8.8%), knee sprains (n, 4369; 7.4%), and lumbar strains (n, 3933; 6.6%). No correlations were found between injury rate and player demographics, including age, height, weight, and NBA experience. Professional athletes in the NBA experience a high rate of game-related injuries. Patellofemoral inflammation is the most significant problem in terms of days lost in competition, whereas ankle sprains are the most common injury. True ligamentous injuries of the knee were surprisingly rare. Importantly, player demographics were not correlated with injury rates. Further investigation is necessary regarding the consequences and sport-specific treatment of various injuries in NBA players. Knowledge of these injury patterns can help to guide treatments and provide more accurate guidelines for an athlete to return to play.

  12. Prevalence of Vitamin D Insufficiency in Professional Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Mehran, Nima; Schulz, Brian M.; Neri, Brian R.; Robertson, William J.; Limpisvasti, Orr

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D is a fat-soluble hormone that plays a role in bone health, muscle function, and athletic performance. Studies have shown that low levels of vitamin D can lead to slower muscle recovery and function, increased rates of stress fractures, and even poorer athletic performance. Insufficient vitamin D levels have been demonstrated in professional basketball and football players, however, there have been no studies to date reviewing vitamin D insufficiency in professional hockey players. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to perform a cross-sectional review to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in professional hockey players. The hypothesis was that there would be a high percentage of players with vitamin D insufficiency. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: The preseason serum 25-hydroxy (OH) vitamin D laboratory test results of 105 professional hockey players were retrospectively reviewed. All players on 3 National Hockey League (NHL) teams were included. Player parameters evaluated included age, height, weight, body mass index, and 25(OH) vitamin D level. Players were divided into 4 groups based on serum vitamin D levels: deficient (<20 ng/mL), insufficient (20-31.9 ng/mL), sufficient (≥32 ng/mL), and ideal (≥40 ng/mL). Descriptive statistics were performed, in addition to 2-group and 3-group comparisons. Results: The average 25(OH) vitamin D level of 105 players was 45.8 ± 13.7 ng/mL (range, 24-108 ng/mL). No players in the study were considered deficient. A total of 14 players (13.3%) were considered insufficient, while 91 players (86.7%) were considered sufficient. However, only 68 players (64.8%) were considered ideal. When comparing groups, athletes with sufficient vitamin D levels were older than athletes with insufficient vitamin D levels (25.9 vs 23.1 years; P = .018). All other player parameters demonstrated no significant difference between groups

  13. Injury surveillance at the 1985 National Boy Scout Jamboree.

    PubMed

    Wetterhall, S F; Waxweiler, R J

    1988-01-01

    Few studies have examined the rate of injuries for those attending summer camps and other recreational facilities. We developed a surveillance system for the 1985 National Boy Scout Jamboree to determine the incidence, nature, and cause of injuries among participants. To characterize the more severe injuries among scouts, we monitored referral visits to an onsite Army hospital. During the 9 day event there was a total of 179 injuries requiring referral visits among the 24,885 scouts, for an overall incidence of 8.5 injuries per 10,000 person-days. Twenty-eight injuries (16%) involved fractures. Ten injuries required hospitalization, for an overall rate of 0.5 per 10,000 person-days. Thirty-six (20%) of the injuries occurred during six organized athletic activities. Of these six, two new Jamboree activities, the bucking bronco and bicycle motocross racing, had the highest event-specific rates, 14.4 and 11.4 injuries per 10,000 participants, respectively. These two events also accounted for one-third of all fractures. In contrast, there were no firearm-related injuries among the 32,616 participants in riflery events. This simple and inexpensive surveillance system provided a mechanism for monitoring activity modifications, as well as useful information for the selection and planning of organized activities at future Jamborees and similar recreational events.

  14. Predictors of Speed Using Off-Ice Measures of College Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Runner, Aaron R; Lehnhard, Robert A; Butterfield, Stephen A; Tu, Shihfen; OʼNeill, Terrence

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between commonly employed dry-land performance tests and skating speed in male collegiate ice hockey players. Forty male National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I hockey players were tested on the following performance variables: vertical jump (VJ), standing broad jump, 40-yard dash, and maximal back squat (SQT). The subjects also performed 3 skating tests: the 90-ft forward acceleration test, the 90-ft backward acceleration test, and the 50-ft flying top speed test (F50). Pearson correlation coefficients were applied to compare the strength of association between each selected off-ice measure and each on-ice measure. Three multiple regression equations were then used to compare the weighted strengths of association between predictor and criterion variables. Only VJ showed significance in relation to skating speed (p = 0.011). These results suggest that meaningful performance testing in ice hockey players should occur mainly on the ice.

  15. Epidemiology of Hip Injuries in the National Basketball Association

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Timothy J.; Starkey, Chad; McElhiney, Danielle; Domb, Benjamin G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Professional athletes are subject to various injuries that are often dictated by the nature of their sport. Professional basketball players previously have been shown to sustain injuries throughout the musculoskeletal system, most commonly to the ankle and knee. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to report the epidemiology of injuries specific to the pelvis, hip, and thigh and their effect on games missed in professional basketball players. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological. Methods: Records were recalled from the National Basketball Association epidemiological database for athletic-related pelvis, hip, or thigh injuries that occurred from the 1988-1989 through the 2011-2012 seasons. The primary information collected included anatomic location where the injury occurred, when in the course of the season injury occurred, specific pathology, date, activity at the time of injury, injury mechanism, number of practices and games missed, and whether surgery was required. The number of practices and games missed were summed to yield the number of days missed per episode. Results: There were 2852 cases (14.6% of all athletic-related injuries) involving 967 individual players. In 1746 (61.2%) cases, injuries occurred during game competition. Across the course of this study, clinical incidence of injury to the pelvis, hip, or thigh was 1.50 per 100 players. The mean (±standard deviation) number of days missed per case was 6.3 ± 10.2. The quadriceps group was the most commonly injured structure (contusions and strains) and had a significantly higher game-related injury rate than other structures (0.96 per 100 athletic exposures, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.87-1.04). Players had the greatest risk (relative risk = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.26-1.52) of sustaining a strain than any other type of injury, with a game-related injury rate of 1.79 (95% CI = 1.67-1.90). The hamstring muscle group was the most frequently strained. Strains were more likely to occur

  16. ThinkFirst National Injury Prevention Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stay Connected TO Stay Informed Stay Connected Follow us on social media The mission of ThinkFirst is to prevent brain, spinal cord and other traumatic injuries through education, research and advocacy. Support ... a Training Center Copyright © ThinkFirst 2015. All ...

  17. Revised National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel Pressure Injury Staging System

    PubMed Central

    Black, Joyce M.; Goldberg, Margaret; McNichol, Laurie; Moore, Lynn; Sieggreen, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of pressure injury etiology and development has grown in recent years through research, clinical expertise, and global interdisciplinary expert collaboration. Therefore, the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) has revised the definition and stages of pressure injury. The revision was undertaken to incorporate the current understanding of the etiology of pressure injuries, as well as to clarify the anatomical features present or absent in each stage of injury. An NPUAP-appointed Task Force reviewed the literature and created drafts of definitions, which were then reviewed by stakeholders and the public, including clinicians, educators, and researchers around the world. Using a consensus-building methodology, these revised definitions were the focus of a multidisciplinary consensus conference held in April 2016. As a result of stakeholder and public input, along with the consensus conference, important changes were made and incorporated into the new staging definitions. The revised staging system uses the term injury instead of ulcer and denotes stages using Arabic numerals rather than Roman numerals. The revised definition of a pressure injury now describes the injuries as usually occurring over a bony prominence or under a medical or other device. The revised definition of a Stage 2 pressure injury seeks to clarify the difference between moisture-associated skin damage and injury caused by pressure and/or shear. The term suspected has been removed from the Deep Tissue Pressure Injury diagnostic label. Each definition now describes the extent of tissue loss present and the anatomical features that may or may not be present in the stage of injury. These important revisions reflect the methodical and collaborative approach used to examine the available evidence and incorporate current interdisciplinary clinical expertise into better defining the important phenomenon of pressure injury etiology and development. PMID:27749790

  18. Hockey Concussion Education Project, Part 2. Microstructural white matter alterations in acutely concussed ice hockey players: a longitudinal free-water MRI study.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Ofer; Koerte, Inga K; Bouix, Sylvain; Fredman, Eli; Sasaki, Takeshi; Mayinger, Michael; Helmer, Karl G; Johnson, Andrew M; Holmes, Jeffrey D; Forwell, Lorie A; Skopelja, Elaine N; Shenton, Martha E; Echlin, Paul S

    2014-04-01

    Concussion is a common injury in ice hockey and a health problem for the general population. Traumatic axonal injury has been associated with concussions (also referred to as mild traumatic brain injuries), yet the pathological course that leads from injury to recovery or to long-term sequelae is still not known. This study investigated the longitudinal course of concussion by comparing diffusion MRI (dMRI) scans of the brains of ice hockey players before and after a concussion. The 2011-2012 Hockey Concussion Education Project followed 45 university-level ice hockey players (both male and female) during a single Canadian Interuniversity Sports season. Of these, 38 players had usable dMRI scans obtained in the preseason. During the season, 11 players suffered a concussion, and 7 of these 11 players had usable dMRI scans that were taken within 72 hours of injury. To analyze the data, the authors performed free-water imaging, which reflects an increase in specificity over other dMRI analysis methods by identifying alterations that occur in the extracellular space compared with those that occur in proximity to cellular tissue in the white matter. They used an individualized approach to identify alterations that are spatially heterogeneous, as is expected in concussions. Paired comparison of the concussed players before and after injury revealed a statistically significant (p < 0.05) common pattern of reduced free-water volume and reduced axial and radial diffusivities following elimination of free-water. These free-water-corrected measures are less affected by partial volumes containing extracellular water and are therefore more specific to processes that occur within the brain tissue. Fractional anisotropy was significantly increased, but this change was no longer significant following the free-water elimination. Concussion during ice hockey games results in microstructural alterations that are detectable using dMRI. The alterations that the authors found suggest

  19. Hockey Concussion Education Project, Part 2. Microstructural white matter alterations in acutely concussed ice hockey players: a longitudinal free-water MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Ofer; Koerte, Inga K.; Bouix, Sylvain; Fredman, Eli; Sasaki, Takeshi; Mayinger, Michael; Helmer, Karl G.; Johnson, Andrew M.; Holmes, Jeffrey D.; Forwell, Lorie A.; Skopelja, Elaine N.; Shenton, Martha E.; Echlin, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Object Concussion is a common injury in ice hockey and a health problem for the general population. Traumatic axonal injury has been associated with concussions (also referred to as mild traumatic brain injuries), yet the pathological course that leads from injury to recovery or to long-term sequelae is still not known. This study investigated the longitudinal course of concussion by comparing diffusion MRI (dMRI) scans of the brains of ice hockey players before and after a concussion. Methods The 2011–2012 Hockey Concussion Education Project followed 45 university-level ice hockey players (both male and female) during a single Canadian Interuniversity Sports season. Of these, 38 players had usable dMRI scans obtained in the preseason. During the season, 11 players suffered a concussion, and 7 of these 11 players had usable dMRI scans that were taken within 72 hours of injury. To analyze the data, the authors performed free-water imaging, which reflects an increase in specificity over other dMRI analysis methods by identifying alterations that occur in the extracellular space compared with those that occur in proximity to cellular tissue in the white matter. They used an individualized approach to identify alterations that are spatially heterogeneous, as is expected in concussions. Results Paired comparison of the concussed players before and after injury revealed a statistically significant (p < 0.05) common pattern of reduced free-water volume and reduced axial and radial diffusivities following elimination of free-water. These free-water–corrected measures are less affected by partial volumes containing extracellular water and are therefore more specific to processes that occur within the brain tissue. Fractional anisotropy was significantly increased, but this change was no longer significant following the free-water elimination. Conclusions Concussion during ice hockey games results in microstructural alterations that are detectable using dMRI. The

  20. Outcomes of Lisfranc Injuries in the National Football League.

    PubMed

    McHale, Kevin J; Rozell, Joshua C; Milby, Andrew H; Carey, James L; Sennett, Brian J

    2016-07-01

    Tarsometatarsal (Lisfranc) joint injuries commonly occur in National Football League (NFL) competition; however, the career effect of these injuries is unknown. To define the time to return to competition for NFL players who sustained Lisfranc injuries and to quantify the effect on athletic performance. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Data on NFL players who sustained a Lisfranc injury between 2000 and 2010 were collected for analysis. Outcomes data included time to return to competition, total games played after season of injury, yearly total yards and touchdowns for offensive players, and yearly total tackles, sacks, and interceptions for defensive players. Offensive power ratings (OPR = [total yards/10] + [total touchdowns × 6]) and defensive power ratings (DPR = total tackles + [total sacks × 2] + [total interceptions × 2]) were calculated for the injury season and for 3 seasons before and after the injury season. Offensive and defensive control groups consisted of all players without an identified Lisfranc injury who competed in the 2005 season. The study group was composed of 28 NFL athletes who sustained Lisfranc injuries during the study period, including 11 offensive and 17 defensive players. While 2 of 28 (7.1%) players never returned to the NFL, 26 (92.9%) athletes returned to competition at a median of 11.1 (interquartile range [IQR], 10.3-12.5) months from time of injury and missed a median of 8.5 (IQR, 6.3-13.0) regular-season games. Analysis of pre- and postinjury athletic performance revealed no statistically significant changes after return to sport after Lisfranc injury. The magnitude of change in median OPR and DPR observed in offensive and defensive Lisfranc-injured study groups, -34.8 (IQR, -64.4 to 1.4) and -13.5 (-30.9 to 4.3), respectively, was greater than that observed in offensive and defensive control groups, -18.8 (-52.9 to 31.5) and -5.0 (-22.0 to 14.0), respectively; however, these differences did not reach statistical

  1. A comparison of the capacity of ice hockey goaltender masks for the protection from puck impacts.

    PubMed

    Nur, Sarah; Kendall, Marshall; Clark, J Michio; Hoshizaki, T Blaine

    2015-01-01

    Goaltenders in ice hockey are the only players that are on the ice for the entire game. Their position exposes them to impacts from collisions with other players, falls to the ice, and puck impacts. In competitive ice hockey leagues, head injuries resulting from puck impacts have been reported with some cases resulting in ending the player's career. Considerable research has been conducted to assess the performance of hockey helmets; however, few have assessed the performance of goaltenders' masks. The purpose of this study was to compare the capacity of four goaltenders' masks for the protection from puck impact as measured by head acceleration and peak force. A Hybrid III headform was fitted with four different goaltender masks and impacted with a hockey puck in three locations at 25 m/s. The masks were found to vary in the level of protection they offered as the mask with the thickest liner resulted in lower forces than the thinnest mask for side impacts; however, the thinnest mask resulted in the lowest force for front impacts. Despite performance differences at specific locations, no one mask proved to be superior as peak acceleration and peak force values did not exceed the thresholds necessary for concussion.

  2. Shoulder Range of Motion and Strength in Professional Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Randy M; Strauss, Eric J; Jazrawi, Laith M; Feldman, Andrew J

    2015-03-01

    Ice hockey is a fast paced sport with unique injury potential. There are no studies in the literature that examine the shoulder strength and range of motion in this population. Players on a single professional ice hockey team underwent a comprehensive examination of shoulder motion and strength. Shoulder motion and strength between right and left extremities were compared within athletes. Comparisons were made between right and left handed players, players that shoot right versus left handed, and by position. Within individual athletes, there was no difference in motion or strength between right and left shoulders. There was no difference in motion or strength between the dominant and non-dominant shoulder and players that shoot right versus left handed. Defensemen had a statistically significant increase in external rotation with the arm at the side for the left shoulder (66° versus 55°, p = 0.02) and a trend towards increased external rotation with the arm at the side for the right shoulder (65° versus 56°, p = 0.07). In professional ice hockey players, there is no difference in shoulder motion and strength between the right and left upper extremity. Ice hockey defensemen may have more external rotation with the arm at the side than forward.

  3. 6th National Occupational Injury Research Symposium: Advancing Occupational Injury Research Through Integration and Partnership.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Dawn N; Schuler, Christine R; Menéndez, Cammie Chaumont

    2017-02-01

    The National Occupational Injury Research Symposium (NOIRS) is the only regularly held forum exclusively dedicated to occupational injury research and prevention. The 2015 conference theme, advancing occupational injury research through integration and partnership, shaped the conference and is reflected in articles selected for this special issue. The 6th NOIRS, held May 19-21, 2015, brought together more than 250 researchers, occupational safety practitioners and students to share and discuss occupational injury research. Articles in this special issue highlight some of the research presented at the conference, reflect multiple scientific disciplines and approaches, cover a breadth of occupational injury causes and worker populations, and provide examples of research advanced by partnerships. The next NOIRS, tentatively scheduled for 2018, will build upon the theme of integration and partnership as well as feedback from conference attendees. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Pattern and management of sports injuries presented by Lagos state athletes at the 16th National Sports Festival (KADA games 2009) in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Owoeye, Oluwatoyosi Ba

    2010-01-22

    There is a dearth of information on the epidemiology of sports injuries in Nigeria. The study was aimed at documenting sports injuries sustained by Lagos state athletes during the 16th National Sports Festival (KADA Games 2009). It was also aimed at providing information on treatments offered to injured athletes. The study was carried out at Amadu Bello Stadium Complex, sporting arena of the Murtala Square and the team Lagos mini clinic. Participants were accredited Lagos state athletes who at one point in time during the games required treatment from any of the members of the medical team. Demographic data of athletes, type of injuries, body parts injured and treatment modalities used were documented and analysed using descriptive statistics. Within the period of the games, a total of 140 sports injuries were documented from 132 athletes with an approximate male to female ratio of 2:1 and age ranging from 15-38 years. Most of the injuries reported by the athletes were "minor" injuries. Muscle strain was the most common type of injury (31.4%) followed by ligament sprains (22.9%). The lower extremities were the most injured body region accounting for 50% of all injuries. Over 60% of injuries presented by the athletes were from basketball, cricket, hockey, rugby and baseball. Cryotherapy was the most frequently used treatment modality, followed by bandaging and massage with anti-inflammatory gels. Establishing injury prevention programmes directed at the lower extremities may help reduce the risk of injuries to the lower extremities. Since cryotherapy was the most used treatment modality, it is suggested that it should be made abundantly available to the medical team preferably in forms of portable cold sprays for easy transportation and application during the games. It is also important that physiotherapists form the core of the medical team since they are trained to apply most of these treatment modalities and they also play a major role in establishing injury

  5. Pattern and management of sports injuries presented by Lagos state athletes at the 16th National Sports Festival (KADA games 2009) in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is a dearth of information on the epidemiology of sports injuries in Nigeria. The study was aimed at documenting sports injuries sustained by Lagos state athletes during the 16th National Sports Festival (KADA Games 2009). It was also aimed at providing information on treatments offered to injured athletes. Methods The study was carried out at Amadu Bello Stadium Complex, sporting arena of the Murtala Square and the team Lagos mini clinic. Participants were accredited Lagos state athletes who at one point in time during the games required treatment from any of the members of the medical team. Demographic data of athletes, type of injuries, body parts injured and treatment modalities used were documented and analysed using descriptive statistics. Results Within the period of the games, a total of 140 sports injuries were documented from 132 athletes with an approximate male to female ratio of 2:1 and age ranging from 15-38 years. Most of the injuries reported by the athletes were "minor" injuries. Muscle strain was the most common type of injury (31.4%) followed by ligament sprains (22.9%). The lower extremities were the most injured body region accounting for 50% of all injuries. Over 60% of injuries presented by the athletes were from basketball, cricket, hockey, rugby and baseball. Cryotherapy was the most frequently used treatment modality, followed by bandaging and massage with anti-inflammatory gels. Conclusion Establishing injury prevention programmes directed at the lower extremities may help reduce the risk of injuries to the lower extremities. Since cryotherapy was the most used treatment modality, it is suggested that it should be made abundantly available to the medical team preferably in forms of portable cold sprays for easy transportation and application during the games. It is also important that physiotherapists form the core of the medical team since they are trained to apply most of these treatment modalities and they also play a

  6. Injuries at a Canadian National Taekwondo Championships: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Mohsen; Pieter, Willy

    2004-01-01

    Background The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the injury rates in male and female adult Canadian Taekwondo athletes relative to total number of injuries, type and body part injured. Methods Subjects (219 males, 99 females) participated in the 1997 Canadian National Taekwondo Championships in Toronto, Canada. Injuries were recorded on an injury form to documents any injury seen and treatment provided by the health care team. These data were later used for this study. The injury form describes the athlete and nature, site, severity and mechanism of the injury. Results The overall rate of injuries was 62.9/1,000 athlete-exposures (A-E). The males (79.9/1,000 A-E) sustained significantly more injuries than the females (25.3/1,000 A-E). The lower extremities were the most commonly injured body region in the men (32.0 /1,000 A-E), followed by the head and neck (18.3/1,000 A-E). Injuries to the spine (neck, upper back, low back and coccyx) were the third most often injured body region in males (13.8/1,000 A-E). All injuries to the women were sustained to the lower extremities. The most common type of injury in women was the contusion (15.2/1,000 A-E). However, men's most common type of injury was the sprain (22.8/1,000 A-E) followed by joint dysfunction (13.7/1,000A-E). Concussions were only reported in males (6.9/1,000 A-E). Compared to international counterparts, the Canadian men and women recorded lower total injury rates. However, the males incurred more cerebral concussions than their American colleagues (4.7/1,000 A-E). Conclusions Similar to what was found in previous studies, the current investigation seems to suggest that areas of particular concern for preventive measures involve the head and neck as well as the lower extremities. This is the first paper to identify spinal joint dysfunction. PMID:15279679

  7. Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... torn MCL tend to play contact sports, like football and soccer. More severe injuries happen when the ... the things you love — like running or playing football, field hockey, or softball — can be frustrating. If ...

  8. Syndesmotic ankle sprain in a recreational hockey player.

    PubMed

    Ward, D W

    1994-01-01

    To present a case of distal tibiofibular sprain, a rare injury among ubiquitous lateral ligament sprains of the ankle. A 45-yr-old recreational hockey player was treated for an ankle sprain demonstrating increased translation on the drawer test and pain with inversion stress, but also pain with external rotation and dorsiflexion. X-rays demonstrated no fractures. The conventional protocol of protect, rest, ice, compress and elevate (PRICE), employed for the more common lateral ankle sprains, was followed by early mobilization and proprioceptive training with a tilt board. Recovery was prolonged, and ossification of the ankle syndesmosis was seen in follow-up radiographs. Because management implications and outcome sequelae of the uncommon syndesmotic sprain are more severe than the commonly seen lateral ankle sprain, simple physical examination procedures useful in identifying syndesmotic sprains in the routine examination of the injured ankle are emphasized. These include dorsiflexion and external rotation stress and the "squeeze test."

  9. Knee joint position sense of roller hockey players: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Venâncio, João; Lopes, Diogo; Lourenço, Joaquim; Ribeiro, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to compare knee joint position sense of roller hockey players with an age-matched group of non-athletes. Forty-three male participants voluntarily participated in this cross-sectional study: 21 roller hockey players (mean age: 23.2 ± 4.2 years old, mean weight: 81.8 ± 9.8 kg, mean height: 180.5 ± 4.1 cm) and 22 age-matched non-athletes (mean age: 23.7 ± 3.9 years old, mean weight: 85.0 ± 6.2 kg, mean height: 181.5 ± 5.0 cm). Knee joint position sense of the dominant limb was evaluated using a technique of open-kinetic chain and active knee positioning. Joint position sense was reported using absolute, relative and variable angular errors. The main results indicated that the group of roller hockey players showed significantly lower absolute (2.4 ± 1.2º vs. 6.5 ± 3.2º, p ≤ 0.001) and relative (1.7 ± 2.1º vs. 5.8 ± 4.4º, p ≤ 0.001) angular errors in comparison with the non-athletes group. In conclusion, the results from this present study suggest that proprioceptive acuity, assessed by measuring joint position sense, is increased in roller hockey players. The enhanced proprioception of the roller hockey players could contribute to injury prevention and improved performance during sporting activities.

  10. Change Agent Research for Windsor Minor Hockey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Dick; Duthie, James

    This study was based on an earlier 1972-73 study (see SP 009 113) which led to organizational restructuring of Windsor minor hockey (WMH). It was felt that further studies comparing attitudes and beliefs with behavior would be beneficial. Of particular interest were: (a) whether or not attitudes and beliefs changed due to adjusted organization and…

  11. Cohesion predicts success in junior ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Salminen, S; Luhtanen, P

    1998-10-01

    This study examined the relationship between cohesion measured by the Group Environment Questionnaire and success measured by winning percentage with over 200 junior ice hockey players. The cohesion explained 29% of the variance of the success. Scores on task cohesion were better predictors of success than social cohesion.

  12. NCAA concussion education in ice hockey: an ineffective mandate.

    PubMed

    Kroshus, Emily; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Baugh, Christine M; Nowinski, Christopher J; Cantu, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    Despite concussion education being increasingly mandated by states and sports leagues, there has been limited evaluation of what education is in fact effective. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) currently mandates that institutions provide concussion education, without specifying content or delivery. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of this general mandate, as enacted for male collegiate ice hockey teams within one conference of competition. In a prospective cohort design, 146 players from 6 male collegiate ice hockey teams in one Division 1 conference completed written surveys before and after receiving their institution-determined concussion education. Knowledge, attitudes, perceived norms and behavioural intention were assessed using validated measures. Education content and delivery was assessed by open-ended responses and consultation with team athletic trainers. All teams received concussion education material; however, content and delivery varied. Rates of material recall differed by delivery format. Considering all teams together, there were no significant improvements in knowledge and only a very small decrease in intention to continue playing while experiencing symptoms of a concussion. Pre-education and post-education, there were significant between-team differences in attitudes towards concussion reporting and behavioural intention. The NCAA's general education mandate was divergently enacted; it did not significantly change the constructs of interest nor did it mitigate the pre-education team differences in these constructs. Existing educational materials should be evaluated, theory and evidence-driven materials developed, and mandates extended to, at a minimum, recommend materials found to be effective in changing concussion-reporting behaviour.

  13. Knee surgery costs in football, floor ball, European team handball and ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Forssblad, Magnus; Weidenhielm, Lars; Werner, Suzanne

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was first, to identify the health costs of knee surgery related to different sports (football, floor ball, European team handball and ice hockey) among players at competitive level in Stockholm 1997. Information was retrieved from three different databases, one containing information on all players in different sports, another one containing information on all surgery performed at S:t Gorans Hospital, Stockholm, and a third one containing information on all surgery performed in Stockholm. The National Registration Number (NRN) was used to identify the patients. The NRN is a unique personal identifier assigned to all Swedish residents, which allows linkage between different registers and databases. In Stockholm in 1997, 6781 surgical procedures related to the knee were performed at a cost of SEK (Swedish Crowns) 39,026,657. On players in all studied sports, 762 knee surgical procedures were performed on 657 patients in Stockholm at a cost of SEK 4,884,076. At S:t Gorans Hospital, 319 knee surgical procedures were performed on 288 patients, and 293 (92%) of these were directly related to sport participation. It was also found that only 74% of anterior cruciate ligament injuries that resulted in a surgical intervention were reported to the insurance company. The average cost for knee surgery in the studied sports was low. Knee surgery costs for European team handball players were the highest compared with other sports studied.

  14. Validity of soccer injury data from the National Collegiate Athletic Association's Injury Surveillance System.

    PubMed

    Kucera, Kristen L; Marshall, Stephen W; Bell, David R; DiStefano, Michael J; Goerger, Candice P; Oyama, Sakiko

    2011-01-01

    Few validation studies of sport injury-surveillance systems are available. To determine the validity of a Web-based system for surveillance of collegiate sport injuries, the Injury Surveillance System (ISS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association's (NCAA). Validation study comparing NCAA ISS data from 2 fall collegiate sports (men's and women's soccer) with other types of clinical records maintained by certified athletic trainers. A purposive sample of 15 NCAA colleges and universities that provided NCAA ISS data on both men's and women's soccer for at least 2 years during 2005-2007, stratified by playing division. A total of 737 men's and women's soccer athletes and 37 athletic trainers at these 15 institutions. The proportion of injuries captured by the NCAA ISS (capture rate) was estimated by comparing NCAA ISS data with the other clinical records on the same athletes maintained by the athletic trainers. We reviewed all athletic injury events resulting from participation in NCAA collegiate sports that resulted in 1 day or more of restricted activity in games or practices and necessitated medical care. A capture-recapture analysis estimated the proportion of injury events captured by the NCAA ISS. Agreement for key data fields was also measured. We analyzed 664 injury events. The NCAA ISS captured 88.3% (95% confidence interval = 85.9%, 90.8%) of all time-lost medical-attention injury events. The proportion of injury events captured by the NCAA ISS was higher in Division I (93.8%) and Division II (89.6%) than in Division III (82.3%) schools. Agreement between the NCAA ISS data and the non-NCAA ISS data was good for the majority of data fields but low for date of full return and days lost from sport participation. The overall capture rate of the NCAA ISS was very good (88%) in men's and women's soccer for this period.

  15. Rock-Climbing Injuries in Yosemite National Park

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, William S.; Hunt, Thomas K.; Allen, Hubert A.

    1988-01-01

    This study was presented in part at the annual meeting of the Wilderness Medical Society at Aspen, Colorado, in August 1986 and at “Mountain Medicine 1987,” Leavenworth, Washington, in November 1987. We questioned 220 injured rock climbers or their partners seen consecutively at the Yosemite (California) Medical Clinic over 3 ½ years regarding details of their accidents. Injury type and location were extracted from medical records and severity quantified. The National Park Service rescued 27% of the climbers. Injured climbers were characteristically male (88%) and experienced (mean 5.9 years) and typically fell while leading climbs (66%). Among 451 injuries, 50% were to the skin or subcutaneous tissues, while 28% involved the lower extremity and were predominantly fractures. In terms of each climber's most severe injury (n = 220), 45% involved the lower extremities (30% from the ankle alone). Head injury or hypothermia caused 12 of 13 fatalities, showing the lowest case-fatality rate reported to date among injured climbers (6%). Rescue personnel successfully managed airways in victims of head injuries, anticipated and treated complications of hypothermia, and stabilized fractures. Victims requiring immediate extensive surgical intervention or blood transfusion usually died before rescue could be effected. PMID:3247732

  16. Rock-climbing injuries in Yosemite National Park.

    PubMed

    Bowie, W S; Hunt, T K; Allen, H A

    1988-08-01

    This study was presented in part at the annual meeting of the Wilderness Medical Society at Aspen, Colorado, in August 1986 and at "Mountain Medicine 1987," Leavenworth, Washington, in November 1987. We questioned 220 injured rock climbers or their partners seen consecutively at the Yosemite (California) Medical Clinic over 3 (1/2) years regarding details of their accidents. Injury type and location were extracted from medical records and severity quantified. The National Park Service rescued 27% of the climbers. Injured climbers were characteristically male (88%) and experienced (mean 5.9 years) and typically fell while leading climbs (66%). Among 451 injuries, 50% were to the skin or subcutaneous tissues, while 28% involved the lower extremity and were predominantly fractures. In terms of each climber's most severe injury (n = 220), 45% involved the lower extremities (30% from the ankle alone). Head injury or hypothermia caused 12 of 13 fatalities, showing the lowest case-fatality rate reported to date among injured climbers (6%). Rescue personnel successfully managed airways in victims of head injuries, anticipated and treated complications of hypothermia, and stabilized fractures. Victims requiring immediate extensive surgical intervention or blood transfusion usually died before rescue could be effected.

  17. Social determinants of violence in hockey: a review.

    PubMed

    Smith, M D

    1979-03-01

    Research on the social determinants of hockey violence is organized in this paper under three main headings: (1) the social organization of the hockey "system", (2) mass media portrayals of the professional game, and (3) the influence of players' reference others. It appears that these determinants all contribute to a social environment in which hockey performers perceive that the rewards of violence often outweigh the costs.

  18. Relationship between core strength and key variables of performance in elite rink hockey players.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, M W; Freiwald, J; Baumgart, C; Born, D P; Reed, J L; Sperlich, B

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a significant relationship exists between the level of core strength-endurance and key variables of endurance, strength, power, speed, and agility performance in male elite rink hockey players. Ten male elite rink hockey players of the German national team were tested for 1) time to exhaustion, maximum oxygen uptake, and running economy, 2) one repetition maximum bench press and half squat, 3) counter movement jump height, 4) 5 m, 10 m, and 20 m speed, and 5) 22 m agility. The rink hockey players were also tested for 6) ventral, lateral-left, lateral-right, and dorsal core strength-endurance using concentric-eccentric muscle tests. The level of total and ventral core strength-endurance was very largely correlated with maximum oxygen uptake (r=0.74 and r=0.71, both P<0.05). Additionally, there was a large correlation between the level of ventral core strength-endurance and time to exhaustion (r=0.66, P<0.05). No further significant relationships were observed (best r=0.60, P>0.05). The findings from this study suggest that the level of core strength-endurance is largely to very largely correlated with key variables of endurance performance, but not significantly with strength, power, speed, or agility indicators in male elite rink hockey players. These findings should be noted by coaches and scientists when testing physical fitness or planning strength and conditioning programs for male elite rink hockey players.

  19. Concussion in the international ice hockey World Championships and Olympic Winter Games between 2006 and 2015.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, Markku; Hänninen, Timo; Parkkari, Jari; Stuart, Michael J; Luoto, Teemu; Kannus, Pekka; Aubry, Mark

    2017-02-01

    Concussions in sports are a growing concern. This study describes the incidence, injury characteristics and time trends of concussions in international ice hockey. All concussions in the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) World Championships (WC) and Olympic Winter Games were analysed over 9 ice hockey seasons between 2006 and 2015 using a standardised injury reporting system and diagnoses made by the team physicians. A total of 3293 games were played (169 tournaments, 1212 teams, 26 130 players) comprising 142 244 athletic game exposures. The average injury rate (IR) for concussion was 1.1 per 1000 ice hockey player-games for all IIHF WC tournaments. The IR was the highest in the men's WC A-pool tournaments and Olympic Games (IR 1.6). However, the annual IR for concussion in the men's tournaments has been lower than that in the World Junior tournaments since 2012. When a concussion occurred with contact to a flexible board, the IR was 0.2 per 1000 player games. In contrast, the IR was 1.1, if the board and glass were traditional (for the latter, RR 6.44 (95% CI 1.50 to 27.61)). In the men's tournaments, the trend of concussions caused by illegal hits decreased over the study period. After the 4th Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport was published (2013), none of the concussed players in the men's WC returned to play on the day of injury. The annual risk of concussion in the men's WC has decreased during the study period. This was most likely due to a reduction in illegal hits. The risk of concussion was significantly lower if games were played on rinks with flexible boards and glass. Rink modifications, improved education and strict rule enforcement should be considered by policymakers in international ice hockey. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Catastrophic pediatric sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Luckstead, Eugene F; Patel, Dilip R

    2002-06-01

    The high school sports of wrestling, gymnastics, ice hockey, baseball, track, and cheerleading should receive closer attention to prevent injury. Safer equipment and sport-specific conditioning should be provided and injuries strictly monitored. Greater attention must also be paid to swimming and diving techniques, and continued observation is needed for heat stroke and heat intolerance in sports such as football, wrestling, basketball, track and field, and cross-country. An increased awareness of commotio cordis in sports other than baseball should include ice hockey, football, track field events, and lacrosse. American football because of the sheer numbers and associated catastrophic injury potential must continue to be monitored at the highest medical levels!

  1. Psychosocial Outcomes of Sport Concussions in Youth Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Mrazik, Martin; Brooks, Brian L; Jubinville, Andrea; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Emery, Carolyn A

    2016-06-01

    The objective is to evaluate the psychological outcomes arising from sport concussions. Participants included AA and AAA level Bantam and Midget hockey players (n = 672) between 12 and 17 years of age (mean = 15.0 years; SD = 1.2) enrolled in a large cohort study. All participants completed baseline tests including the Behavior Assessment System for Children, 2nd Edition (BASC2) and a pre-season medical questionnaire (PSQ) completed by parents that included a retrospective report of prior concussions and injuries. Players were assigned to 4 groups: no injury (NONE), concussion (CO) and musculoskeletal (MSK) injuries or both (COMB). Participants in the CO and COMB groups demonstrated significantly higher rates of psychological difficulties compared with other groups [F(63, 1800) = 1.43, p = .016, partial η(2) = 0.05) and on select clinical scales measuring atypicality, locus of control, anxiety, depression, sense of inadequacy, somatization, and attention. In addition, results from the composite clinical scales reached statistical significance for internalizing problems and emotional symptom index. Effect sizes were minimal with the exception of comparisons between the NONE and COMB groups where effect sizes were medium to large. Proportions above clinical cut-off scores set by the BASC2 were higher for the COMB group compared with CO, MSK, or NONE groups. Results suggest smaller percentage of youth may be more prone to psychological sequelae following concussion.

  2. Hockey-stick steam generator for LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Hallinan, G.J.; Svedlund, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents the criteria and evaluation leading to the selection of the Hockey Stick Steam Generator Concept and subsequent development of that concept for LMFBR application. The selection process and development of the Modular Steam Generator (MSG) is discussed, including the extensive test programs that culminated in the manufacture and test of a 35 MW(t) Steam Generator. The design of the CRBRP Steam Generator is described, emphasizing the current status and a review of the critical structural areas. CRBRP steam generator development tests are evaluated, with a discussion of test objectives and rating of the usefulness of test results to the CRBRP prototype design. Manufacturing experience and status of the CRBRP prototype and plant units is covered. The scaleup of the Hockey Stick concept to large commercial plant application is presented, with an evaluation of scaleup limitations, transient effects, and system design implications.

  3. Home disadvantage in professional ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Loignon, Andrew; Gayton, William F; Brown, Melissa; Steinroeder, William; Johnson, Carrie

    2007-06-01

    Occurrence of the home field disadvantage in professional ice hockey was examined by analyzing data on penalty shots from 1983-2004. This datum was used as it does not involve physical contact for only the player taking the penalty shot is involved in the outcome. As a result, inhibition of anxiety associated with physical contact should not occur, and diffusion of responsibility would not occur since only the shooter is involved. Analysis indicated the player who took the penalty shot did not make significantly fewer shots at home than in away games. The result did not support hypotheses about roles of physical contact and diffusion of responsibility in accounting for past failures to find the home disadvantage in professional ice hockey.

  4. Epidemiology of children with head injury: a national overview

    PubMed Central

    Trefan, L; Houston, R; Pearson, G; Edwards, R; Hyde, P; Maconochie, I; Parslow, RC; Kemp, A

    2016-01-01

    Background The National Confidential Enquiry describes the epidemiology of children admitted to hospital with head injury. Method Children (<15 years old) who died or were admitted for >4 h with head injury were identified from 216 UK hospitals (1 September 2009 to 28 February 2010). Data were collected using standard proformas and entered on to a database. A descriptive analysis of the causal mechanisms, child demographics, neurological impairment, CT findings, and outcome at 72 h are provided. Results Details of 5700 children, median age 4 years (range 0–14.9 years), were analysed; 1093 (19.2%) were <1 year old, 3500 (61.4%) were boys. There was a significant association of head injury with social deprivation 39.7/100 000 (95% CI 37.0 to 42.6) in the least deprived first quintile vs. 55.1 (95% CI 52.1 to 58.2) in the most deprived fifth quintile (p<0.01). Twenty-four children died (0.4%). Most children were admitted for one night or less; 4522 (79%) had a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15 or were Alert (on AVPU (Alert, Voice, Pain, Unresponsive)). The most common causes of head injury were falls (3537 (62.1%); children <5 years), sports-related incidents (783 (13.7%); median age 12.4 years), or motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) (401 (7.1%); primary-school-aged children). CT scans were performed in 1734 (30.4%) children; 536 (30.9%) were abnormal (skull fracture and/or intracranial injury or abnormality): 269 (7.6%) were falls, 82 (10.5%) sports related and 100 (25%). A total of 357 (6.2%) children were referred to social care because of child protection concerns (median age 9 months (range 0–14.9 years)). Conclusions The data described highlight priorities for targeted age-specific head injury prevention and have the potential to provide a baseline to evaluate the effects of regional trauma networks (2012) and National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) head injury guidelines (2014), which were revised after the study was completed

  5. Miniature Videoprobe Hockey Stick Delivery System

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, Lester R.; McMurry, Kyle M.

    1998-06-18

    The present invention is a miniature videoprobe system having a probe termination box, a strong back, and a videoprobe housing. The videoprobe system is able to obtain images from a restricted space at least as small as 0.125 inches while producing a high quality image. The strong back has a hockey stick shape with the probe termination box connecting to the top of the handle-like portion of the hockey stick and the videoprobe housing attaching to the opposite end or nose of the hockey stick shape. The videoprobe housing has a roughly arrowhead shape with two thin steel plates sandwiching the internal components there between. The internal components are connected in series to allow for a minor dimension of the videoprobe housing of 0.110 inches. The internal components include an optics train, a CCD chip, and an electronics package. An electrical signal is transmitted from the electronics package through wiring within an internal channel of the strong back to the probe termination box. The strong back has milled into it multiple internal channels for facilitating the transfer of information, items, or devices between the probe termination box and the videoprobe housing.

  6. Update on the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Olson, Dana M; Olson, Brianna M; Greene, Jill Amanda; Gubler, K Dean; Winters, Kathryne L; Kelley, Angela R; Britt, L D; Long, William B

    2007-08-01

    The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986, as amended, established the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). The VICP went into effect on October 1, 1988 and is a Federal "no-fault" system designed to compensate individuals, or families of individuals, who have been injured by covered vaccines. From 1988 until July 2006, a total of 2531 non-autism/thimerosal and 5030 autism/thimerosal claims were made to the VICP. The compensation paid for the non-autism/thimerosal claims from 1988 until 2006 was $902,519,103.37 for 2542 awards. There was no compensation for any of the autism/thimerosal claims. On the basis of the deaths and extensive suffering to patients and families from the adverse reactions to vaccines, all physicians must provide detailed information in the Vaccine Information Statement to the patient or the parent or legal guardian of the child about the potential dangers of vaccines as well as the VICP.

  7. Validity of Soccer Injury Data from the National Collegiate Athletic Association's Injury Surveillance System

    PubMed Central

    Kucera, Kristen L.; Marshall, Stephen W.; Bell, David R.; DiStefano, Michael J.; Goerger, Candice P.; Oyama, Sakiko

    2011-01-01

    Context: Few validation studies of sport injury-surveillance systems are available. Objective: To determine the validity of a Web-based system for surveillance of collegiate sport injuries, the Injury Surveillance System (ISS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association's (NCAA). Design: Validation study comparing NCAA ISS data from 2 fall collegiate sports (men's and women's soccer) with other types of clinical records maintained by certified athletic trainers. Setting: A purposive sample of 15 NCAA colleges and universities that provided NCAA ISS data on both men's and women's soccer for at least 2 years during 2005–2007, stratified by playing division. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 737 men's and women's soccer athletes and 37 athletic trainers at these 15 institutions. Main Outcome Measure(s): The proportion of injuries captured by the NCAA ISS (capture rate) was estimated by comparing NCAA ISS data with the other clinical records on the same athletes maintained by the athletic trainers. We reviewed all athletic injury events resulting from participation in NCAA collegiate sports that resulted in 1 day or more of restricted activity in games or practices and necessitated medical care. A capture-recapture analysis estimated the proportion of injury events captured by the NCAA ISS. Agreement for key data fields was also measured. Results: We analyzed 664 injury events. The NCAA ISS captured 88.3% (95% confidence interval = 85.9%, 90.8%) of all time-lost medical-attention injury events. The proportion of injury events captured by the NCAA ISS was higher in Division I (93.8%) and Division II (89.6%) than in Division III (82.3%) schools. Agreement between the NCAA ISS data and the non–NCAA ISS data was good for the majority of data fields but low for date of full return and days lost from sport participation. Conclusions: The overall capture rate of the NCAA ISS was very good (88%) in men's and women's soccer for this period. PMID:22488136

  8. Fathers' Career Aspirations for Sons in Competitive Ice Hockey Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlage, Gai Ingham

    A survey was made of 107 fathers of boys aged 11 and 12 competing in the Pee Wee Level Division III of the Connecticut State Ice Hockey Tournament. The questionnaire was designed to examine the career aspirations of the fathers for their sons in ice hockey, and to determine their attitudes toward their son's participation in the sport as it…

  9. Descriptive Epidemiology of Non-Time-Loss Injuries in Collegiate and High School Student-Athletes.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Zachary Y; Lynall, Robert C; Roos, Karen G; Dalton, Sara L; Djoko, Aristarque; Dompier, Thomas P

    2017-05-01

      Research on non-time-loss (NTL) injuries, which result in less than 24 hours of restriction from participation, is limited.   To describe the epidemiology of NTL injuries among collegiate and high school student-athletes.   Descriptive epidemiology study.   Aggregate injury and exposure data collected from a convenience sample of National College Athletic Association varsity teams and 147 high schools in 26 states.   Collegiate and high school student-athletes participating in men's and boys' baseball, basketball, football, lacrosse, soccer, and wrestling and women's and girls' basketball, field hockey, lacrosse, soccer, softball, and volleyball during the 2009-2010 through 2013-2014 and the 2011-2012 through 2013-2014 academic years, respectively, participated. Collegiate student-athletes participating in men's and women's ice hockey were also included.   Injury data from the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance Program and the National Athletic Treatment, Injury and Outcomes Network were analyzed. Injury counts, rates per 1000 athlete-exposures (AEs), and rate ratios were reported with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).   A total of 11 899 and 30 122 NTL injuries were reported in collegiate and high school student-athletes, respectively. The proportion of NTL injuries in high school student-athletes (80.3%) was 1.61 times greater than that of collegiate student-athletes (49.9%; 95% CI = 1.59, 1.63). The NTL injury rate in high school student-athletes (8.75/1000 athlete-exposures [AEs]) was 2.18 times greater than that of collegiate student-athletes (4.02/1000 AEs; 95% CI = 2.13, 2.22). Men's ice hockey (5.27/1000 AEs) and boys' football (11.94/1000 AEs) had the highest NTL injury rates among collegiate and high school athletes, respectively. Commonly injured body parts in collegiate and high school student-athletes were the hip/thigh/upper leg (17.5%) and hand/wrist (18.2%), respectively. At both levels, contusions

  10. 11. Photocopy of Photograph (Courtesy of the Detroit Hockey Club, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of Photograph (Courtesy of the Detroit Hockey Club, Detroit, Michigan). GROUNDBREAKING FOR ADDITION, JUNE 23, 1965. Left Sid Abel, Genral Manager of the Detroit Hockey Club Center - Jerome Cavanaugh, Mayor, City of Detroit Right - Nick Landis, General Manager of the Olympia Stadium - Olympia Arena, 5920 Grand River Avenue, Detroit, MI

  11. National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program: Revisions to the Vaccine Injury Table. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2017-01-19

    On July 29, 2015, the Secretary of Health and Human Services (the Secretary) published in the Federal Register a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) to amend the regulations governing the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP or program) by proposing revisions to the Vaccine Injury Table (Table). The Secretary based the Table revisions primarily on the 2012 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, "Adverse Effects of Vaccines: Evidence and Causality," the work of nine HHS workgroups who reviewed the IOM findings, and consideration of the Advisory Commission on Childhood Vaccines' (ACCV) recommendations. The Secretary amends the Table through the changes in this final rule. These changes will apply only to petitions for compensation under the VICP filed after this final rule becomes effective.

  12. National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program: Addition of Intussusception as Injury for Rotavirus Vaccines to the Vaccine Injury Table. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-06-23

    On July 24, 2013, the Secretary of Health and Human Services (the Secretary) published in the Federal Register a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) proposing changes to the regulations governing the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). Specifically, the Secretary proposed revisions to the Vaccine Injury Table (Table). The basis for this change is consistent with the Secretary's findings that intussusceptions can reasonably be determined in some circumstances to be caused by rotavirus vaccines. The Secretary is now making this amendment to the Table and to the Qualifications and Aids to Interpretation (QAI), described below under Background Information, as proposed in the NPRM. These regulations will apply only to petitions for compensation under the VICP filed after this final rule becomes effective.

  13. Fatness of female field hockey players: Comparison of estimates with different methods.

    PubMed

    Krzykała, M; Konarski, J M; Malina, R M; Rachwalski, K; Leszczyński, P; Ziółkowska-Łajp, E

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to compare relative body fat (% fat) in female field hockey players using several methods with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as the reference. Participants were 31 Polish hockey players 16-30 years of age, 17 national and 14 youth level. Percent body fat was estimated by DXA (reference method), conventional and segmental bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and predicted from skinfolds (SKF). National and youth team members did not differ in estimated body fat. Correlations between BIA and skinfold estimates of % fat and DXA % fat though significant, were moderate. Both % fat SKF and % fat SBIA differed significantly from % fat DXA, while estimated % fat BIA and % fat DXA did not differ. Limits of agreement were narrow for conventional BIA (-1.20 to 1.71% fat), followed by segmental BIA (3.72-6.09% fat) and broadest for SKF (5.97-9.28% fat). Differences between DXA % fat and estimated % fat with SKF and SBIA increased from the leanest to fattest athletes, whereas conventional BIA overestimated % fat relative to DXA in the small sample of individuals with low relative fatness and underestimated % fat in individuals with elevated relative fatness. Estimated % fat from conventional BIA most closely approximated DXA % fat in this sample of female field hockey players suggesting that the method may be suitable for field surveys to monitor body composition during the season.

  14. [Study on child head-injuries through data derived from the National Injury Surveillance System of China, 2014].

    PubMed

    Ji, Cuirong; Duan, Leilei; Er, Yuliang; Ye, Pengpeng; Wang, Yuan; Deng, Xiao; Gao, Xin; Jin, Ye; Wang, Linhong

    2016-04-01

    To understand the epidemiological characteristics of head injuries in children. Data was derived from the Chinese National Injury Surveillance System (NISS) in 2014. Method on descriptive analysis was applied to depict general information, injuries events and clinical characteristics of head injuries among children under 18 years of age. A total number of 47 690 cases with child head injuries in 2014 were collected, including 32 542 males and 15 148 females. 43.47% of them were under 1-4 years of age. In October, 06:00 PM appeared the peak time for the injuries to happen. The three leading causes responsible for child head injuries were falls (69.57%), hit by blunt force (14.23%) or road traffic (11.01%). Main locations responsible for the head injuries to happen were:at home (44.98%), at public places (19.65%) or on roads/streets (15.81%). Recreation activates (77.88%), driving (7.32%), sports (5.72%) were the three major activities causing the injuries to take place. Majority of the cases happened unintentionally (95.35%), with bruise (71.69%) or mild injuries (85.27%) and went back home after treatment (90.25%). In 2014, child head injuries were seen more in males than in females and mostly occured at home. The leading causes for head injuries would include falls, hit by blunt stuff or road traffic .

  15. Carbon Monoxide Exposure in Youth Ice Hockey.

    PubMed

    Macnow, Theodore; Mannix, Rebekah; Meehan, William P

    2016-11-02

    To examine the effect of ice resurfacer type on carboxyhemoglobin levels in youth hockey players. We hypothesized that players in arenas with electric resurfacers would have normal, stable carboxyhemoglobin levels during games, whereas those in arenas with internal combustion engine (IC) resurfacers would have an increase in carboxyhemoglobin levels. Prospective cohort study. Enclosed ice arenas in the northeastern United States. Convenience sample of players aged 8 to 18 years old in 16 games at different arenas. Eight arenas (37 players) used an IC ice resurfacer and 8 arenas (36 players) an electric resurfacer. Carboxyhemoglobin levels (SpCO) were measured using a pulse CO-oximeter before and after the game. Arena air was tested for carbon monoxide (CO) using a metered gas detector. Players completed symptom questionnaires. The change in SpCO from pregame to postgame was compared between players at arenas with electric versus IC resurfacers. Carbon monoxide was present at 6 of 8 arenas using IC resurfacers, levels ranged from 4 to 42 parts per million. Carbon monoxide was not found at arenas with electric resurfacers. Players at arenas with IC resurfacers had higher median pregame SpCO levels compared with those at electric arenas (4.3% vs 1%, P < 0.01). Players in the IC group also had a significant increase in their SpCO level during a hockey game compared with those in the electric group (2.8% vs 1%, P = 0.01). There were no significant differences in symptom scores. Players at arenas operating IC resurfacers had significantly higher SpCO levels. Youth hockey players in arenas with IC resurfacers have an increase in carboxyhemoglobin during games and have elevated baseline carboxyhemoglobin levels compared with players at arenas with electric resurfacers. Electric resurfacers decrease the risk of CO exposure.

  16. Work-related injury surveillance in Vietnam: a national reporting system model.

    PubMed

    Marucci-Wellman, Helen; Wegman, David H; Leamon, Tom B; Binh, Ta Thi Tuyet; Diep, Nguyen Bich; Kriebel, David

    2013-11-01

    Developing nations bear a substantial portion of the global burden of injury. Public health surveillance models in developing countries should recognize injury risks for all levels of society and all causes and should incorporate various groups of workers and industries, including subsistence agriculture. However, many developing nations do not have an injury registration system; current data collection methods result in gross national undercounts of injuries, failing to distinguish injuries that occur during work. In 2006, we established an active surveillance system in Vietnam's Xuan Tien commune and investigated potential methods for surveillance of work-related injuries. On the basis of our findings, we recommend a national model for work-related injury surveillance in Vietnam that builds on the existing health surveillance system.

  17. Work-Related Injury Surveillance in Vietnam: A National Reporting System Model

    PubMed Central

    Marucci-Wellman, Helen; Wegman, David H.; Leamon, Tom B.; Tuyet Binh, Ta Thi; Diep, Nguyen Bich; Kriebel, David

    2013-01-01

    Developing nations bear a substantial portion of the global burden of injury. Public health surveillance models in developing countries should recognize injury risks for all levels of society and all causes and should incorporate various groups of workers and industries, including subsistence agriculture. However, many developing nations do not have an injury registration system; current data collection methods result in gross national undercounts of injuries, failing to distinguish injuries that occur during work. In 2006, we established an active surveillance system in Vietnam’s Xuan Tien commune and investigated potential methods for surveillance of work-related injuries. On the basis of our findings, we recommend a national model for work-related injury surveillance in Vietnam that builds on the existing health surveillance system. PMID:24028255

  18. Quadriceps tendon injuries in national football league players.

    PubMed

    Boublik, Martin; Schlegel, Theodore F; Koonce, Ryan C; Genuario, James W; Kinkartz, Jason D

    2013-08-01

    Distal quadriceps tendon tears are uncommon injuries that typically occur in patients older than 40 years of age, and they have a guarded prognosis. Predisposing factors, prodromal findings, mechanisms of injury, treatment guidelines, and recovery expectations are not well described in high-level athletes. Professional American football players with an isolated tear of the quadriceps tendon treated with timely surgical repair will return to their sport. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Fourteen unilateral distal quadriceps tendon tears were identified in National Football League (NFL) players from 1994 to 2004. Team physicians retrospectively reviewed training room and clinic records, operative notes, and imaging studies for each of these players. Data on each player were analyzed to identify variables predicting return to play. A successful outcome was defined as returning to play in regular-season NFL games. Eccentric contraction of the quadriceps was the most common mechanism of injury, occurring in 10 players. Only 1 player had antecedent ipsilateral extensor mechanism symptoms. Eleven players had a complete rupture of the quadriceps tendon, and 3 had partial tears. There were no associated knee injuries. All ruptures were treated with surgical repair, 1 of which was delayed after failure of nonoperative treatment. Fifty percent of players returned to play in regular-season NFL games. There was a trend toward earlier draft status for those who returned to play compared with those who did not (draft round, 3.1 ± 2.5 vs. 6.0 ± 2.9, respectively; P = .073). For those who returned to play, the average number of games after injury was 40.9 (range, 12-92). Quadriceps tendon tears are rare in professional American football players, and they usually occur from eccentric load on the extensor mechanism. Prodromal symptoms and predisposing factors are usually absent. Even with timely surgical repair, there is a low rate of return to play in regular-season games. There

  19. Injuries to kickers in American football: the National Football League experience.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Robert H; Wright, Rick W; Powell, John W; Matava, Matthew J

    2010-06-01

    Very little information is available regarding the incidence, causative mechanisms, and expected duration of time lost after injuries to kickers (placekickers and punters) in American football. Lower extremity musculotendinous injuries are the most common type of injury in American football kickers. The injuries related to punting differ from injuries related to placekicking. Descriptive epidemiologic study. A retrospective review of all documented injuries to kickers in the National Football League over a 20-year period (1988-2007) was performed using the League's injury surveillance database. The data were analyzed from multiple perspectives, with emphasis on the type of kick or activity at the time of injury and the factors that affect return to play after injury. There were 488 total injuries over the 20-year period: 72% involved the lower extremity, 9% involved the lumbosacral spine, and 7% involved the head. Muscle-tendon injuries (49%) were the most common, followed by ligamentous injuries (17%). There was a significantly higher risk of injury in games (17.7 per 1000) than during practice (1.91 per 1000). Most injuries (93%) did not require surgery, and the mean time to return to play was 15 days if no surgery was necessary. Kickers over 30 years of age took longer to return to play (mean, 21 days) than younger kickers (mean, 12 days) after nonsurgical injuries (P = .03). Mean return to play after injuries that required surgery was 121 days. Lumbosacral soft tissue injury, lateral ankle sprains, and shoulder injuries were more likely to occur in punters than placekickers. Kicking athletes face a low risk of injury in professional American football. Injuries most commonly involve the lower extremities. Training and injury prevention efforts should reflect that punting is associated with different injuries than placekicking, and that older kickers take longer to recuperate than younger kickers after certain injuries.

  20. Sports and Recreation Are a Rising Cause of Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tator, Charles H.; Edmonds, Virginia E.

    1986-01-01

    Sports and recreation rose from the third to the second leading cause of spinal injuries treated in two Toronto hospitals between 1948 and 1983. Separate surveys of diving and hockey injuries are also reported. (Author/MT)

  1. Sports and Recreation Are a Rising Cause of Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tator, Charles H.; Edmonds, Virginia E.

    1986-01-01

    Sports and recreation rose from the third to the second leading cause of spinal injuries treated in two Toronto hospitals between 1948 and 1983. Separate surveys of diving and hockey injuries are also reported. (Author/MT)

  2. National estimates of outdoor recreational injuries treated in emergency departments, United States, 2004-2005.

    PubMed

    Flores, Adrian H; Haileyesus, Tadesse; Greenspan, Arlene I

    2008-01-01

    To provide national estimates of nonfatal outdoor recreational injuries treated in US emergency departments (EDs). Outdoor recreational injuries from January 2004 through December 2005 were identified using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program, a nationally representative sample of ED visits. National estimates of outdoor recreational injuries were calculated, and activities leading to injury, demographic characteristics, principal diagnoses, and primary body parts affected were described. From January 2004 through December 2005, an estimated 212 708 (95% CI = 113 808- 311 608) persons were treated each year in US EDs for outdoor recreational injuries. The annual rate of injuries was 72.1 per 100 000 population (95% CI = 38.6-105.6). Males accounted for 68.2% of the injuries. The lower limb (27%), upper limb (25%), and head and neck region (23.3%) were the most commonly injured body regions. Fractures (27.4%) and sprains or strains (23.9%) were the most common diagnoses. Traumatic brain injuries were diagnosed in 6.5% of injuries, and 5% of injuries resulted in hospitalization or transfer to another hospital. The results of this study provide a starting point for further research into the epidemiology of outdoor and wilderness injury. The results reinforce many common perceptions about the nature of these injuries while highlighting the potential severity and long-term consequences of the injuries. The general recommendations of proper planning, preparation, and problem anticipation for outdoor and wilderness injury prevention should be followed to reduce both the number and severity of injuries.

  3. Visual cues in ice hockey goaltending.

    PubMed

    Salmela, J H; Fiorito, P

    1979-03-01

    The effect of both the availability and the quality of visual cues preceding stick-puck contact was investigated for an ice hockey goaltending task. Thirty-four young (15.8 years) goaltenders observed filmed sequences of a hockey player approaching the net and directing a shot to one of the four corners. The film sequences were edited so that 2, 4 or 8 images were occluded prior to the impact of the stick with the puck, reflecting durations of 1/12, 1/6, 1/3 of a second, respectively. The subjects' performances for both the wrist and the slap shot were measured as well as the level of response confidence in both the horizontal and vertical planes. The results indicated that performance precision was aided by the increased availability of pre-shot visual cues. It was also evident that the wrist shot provided more cues for the goaltender than did the slap shot. Performances were found to be superior in the horizontal as compared to the vertical plane. In all dimensions, the subjects' perceptions of their success closely followed the actual performance patterns. It appeared that information that could facilitate anticipation in this goaltending task was both available and useable during the period that precedes the shot.

  4. Catastrophic spine injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Boden, Barry P; Prior, Chris

    2005-02-01

    Catastrophic spine injuries in sports are rare but tragic events. The sports with the highest risk of catastrophic spinal injuries are football, ice hockey, wrestling, diving, skiing and snowboarding, rugby, cheerleading, and baseball. A common mechanism of injury for all at-risk sports is an axial compression force to the top of the head with the neck slightly flexed. We review common mechanisms of injury and prevention strategies for spine injuries in the at-risk sports.

  5. Isolated scapula fracture: Ice hockey player without trauma

    PubMed Central

    Memişoğlu, Serdar; Yılmaz, Barış; Aktaş, Erdem; Kömür, Baran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Scapular fractures are generally occur from in high-energy traumas and are associated with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. Presentation of case We present an unusual scapular fracture that occurred with a rare mechanism. A 23-year-old male patient who led an active sports life for 10 years and played ice hockey for the last 5 years. In a competition, he felt a sudden pain in his right scapula after hit the puck. He did not experience any direct trauma to his shoulder and there was no evidence of any pathological fracture. The fracture was isolated in the scapular body and it was classified as type 4, according to Hardegger classification. The was patient immobilized with a Velpau bandage for three weeks and then treated with physiotherapy for shoulder rehabilitation. Discussion The fracture mechanism was likely a disharmonius contracture of the agonist and antagonist muscles of the shoulder joint while hitting the puck. Conclusion Scapular fractures are generally seen along with other injuries, but in this case we wanted to emphasize that care has to been taken to diagnose an isolated scapular fracture while assessing shoulder pain. PMID:26587232

  6. 76 FR 77537 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the Federal..., National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC...

  7. Effect of heat exposure on thermoregulation and hockey-specific response time in field hockey goalkeepers.

    PubMed

    Malan, Marcelle; Dawson, Brian; Goodman, Carmel; Peeling, Peter

    2010-05-01

    This study examined the thermoregulatory responses in field hockey goalkeepers during games (Part A), and assessed the effect of heat stress on hockey-specific response time (Part B). In Part A, core temperature (T(c)), skin temperature (T(sk)), body mass, fluid consumption and heart rate (HR) responses of six goalkeepers during two premier level club games in the Western Australian (winter) hockey season were recorded. Part B assessed the same measures, plus a response time test on four goalkeepers playing a simulated game inside a climate chamber in cool (COOL: 20 degrees C, 40% RH) and hot (HOT: 35 degrees C, 40% RH) conditions. In Part A, the mean (+/-SD) T(c) and T(sk) measured in games was 38.49+/-0.20 degrees C and 34.99+/-0.99 degrees C, with increases from baseline of 1.34+/-0.19 degrees C and 1.08+/-0.30 degrees C, respectively. Most of the increase in T(c) resulted from the pre-game warm-up. In Part B, T(c) and T(sk) only increased significantly (p<0.05) from baseline in the HOT condition (0.62+/-0.18 degrees C and 1.61+/-0.82 degrees C, respectively). Response time was significantly slower (0.87+/-0.14s, p<0.01) after heat exposure, compared to COOL (0.75+/-0.15s), but the number of correct responses was not affected. For optimal performance, careful attention should be given to strategies to limit T(c) increases in field hockey goalkeepers during matches.

  8. Injuries in iran futsal national teams: a comparative study of incidence and characteristics.

    PubMed

    Angoorani, Hooman; Haratian, Zohreh; Mazaherinezhad, Ali; Younespour, Shima

    2014-09-01

    Futsal is a growing sport with lots of fans in many countries including Iran, but there are few papers in the literature which report injuries in top level futsal. The aim of this study is to record and analyze the incidence and characteristics of injuries in Iran futsal national teams from March 2011 to September 2012. 55 Iranian national futsal players participated in this prospective cohort study. Before entering the study, all players took part in Pre-Competition Medical Assessment (PCMA) in accordance with FIFA protocol. Team physicians recorded the injuries throughout the match and trainings in a special form which was designed for this purpose. Finally, data analysis was done with the SPSS software. The total exposure time for all players was 24326 hours (21138 hours during training and 3188 hours during matches). During the study period, 32 of the 55 national players (58.2%) incurred 54 injuries (incidence rate = 2.22 injuries per 1000 players-hours). The incidence rate of injury in female players was significantly higher than male players (P = 0.001). The majority of injuries (85.2%) were located on the lower extremities. The ankle was the most frequent injury location (40.7%) and sprain was the most frequent type of injury. Injuries are common among futsal players and female players are more prone to injuries than male players. The ankle is the most frequent site and sprain is the most frequent type of injury among futsal players.

  9. [Analysis on sports and recreation related injuries through data from the Chinese National Injury Surveillance System, 2009-2013].

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiao; Jin, Ye; Ye, Pengpeng; Gao, Xin; Wang, Yuan; Ji, Cuirong; Er, Yuliang; Wang, Linhong; Duan, Leilei

    2015-04-01

    To understand the trend and characteristics of sports and recreation related injuries reported from National Injury Surveillance System (NISS) to provide basis for corresponding prevention strategies and decision-making. Descriptive analysis was applied to display the overall trend, general information, injury event and clinical characteristics of sports and recreation related injuries from 2009 to 2013. The proportion of sports and recreation related injuries among all injuries increased from 2009 to 2013, with an annual increase exceeding 45% (46.21%, 47.32%, 48.14%, 52.00%, 53.65%, respectively). Sports and recreation related injuries mainly involved males, with 15-29 age groups, particularly in summer and autumn. Sports and recreation related injuries mostly occurred at home, with annual rates of proportion as 33.07%, 34.16%, 32.98%, 34.57 and 36.22%, mostly caused by falls (41.19%, 41.64%, 44.70%, 47.41%, 47.96%). Contusion and abrasion were the leading types of injuries (43.49%, 44.56%, 45.14%, 45.02%, 45.62%) with the serious leading types as fracture, concussion/cerebral contusion or laceration, and sharp force injury/bite/open wounds. Head was the part mainly involved (31.30%, 32.48%, 31.89%, 30.88%, 29.44%) in injuries. Most sports and recreation related injuries were minor and most of the patients headed home after treatment. Sports and recreation related injury appeared a growing public health problem in China. Children and the elderly should be the target groups for intervention. Falls prevention in sports and the use of protection gears should be the focus countermeasures for prevention.

  10. Incidence and characteristics of injuries during the 2010 FELDA/FAM National Futsal League in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Mohamad Shariff A; Jaafar, Zulkarnain; Mohd Ali, Azril Syazwan

    2014-01-01

    In Malaysia, futsal is a popular sport played by individuals across all ages and genders. Despite its popularity, information on futsal related injury in Malaysia is not available. The purpose of this study is to examine the injury incidence and injury patterns among amateur men and women futsal players in Malaysia. Players reported injury to the tournament medical team during the FELDA/FAM National Futsal League 2010 were interviewed and assessed by a Sports Medicine registrar. Player's socio-demographic profiles and information about the injury were documented in the injury report form adapted from medical report form used by FIFA: Medical Assessment and Research Centre (F-Marc). A total of 86 injuries were reported from 141 matches, equivalent to an incidence of 91.5 injuries per 1000 player hours (95% CI 72.2 to 110.8), or 61.0 injuries per 1000 player matches (95% CI 48.1 to 73.9). Most were minor injuries resulted from contact with another player. Injuries often involved the lower extremity (44%) followed by the trunk (14%) and the upper limb (13%). Ankle (n = 7; 39%) and knee (n = 6; 33%) sprains were the most prevalent diagnoses of time-loss injuries. A significant association between time-loss and type of injury was found χ2 (1,N = 86) = 3.99, p = 0.04. In addition, time-loss injury was significantly associated with playing surface χ2 (1,N = 86) = 10.11, p = 0.018. The injury rate during the FELDA/FAM National Amateur Futsal Men's League in Malaysia was lower compared with previous Futsal World Cups competition. Most injuries resulted from contact with another player were minor and did not lead to time-loss from participation. Time-loss injury was significantly associated with type of injury and playing surface.

  11. 14. Photocopy of Photograph (Courtesy of the Detroit Hockey Club, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of Photograph (Courtesy of the Detroit Hockey Club, Detroit, Michigan). AERIAL VIEW OF OLYMPIA ARENA, LOOKING NORTH, FEBRUARY 9, 1969. - Olympia Arena, 5920 Grand River Avenue, Detroit, MI

  12. Acromioclavicular joint injuries in National Collegiate Athletic Association football: data from the 2004-2005 through 2008-2009 National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System.

    PubMed

    Dragoo, Jason L; Braun, Hillary J; Bartlinski, Stephen E; Harris, Alex H S

    2012-09-01

    Injuries to the shoulder are common in collegiate football, and injuries to the acromioclavicular (AC) joint have previously accounted for up to 41% of all shoulder injuries. To determine the incidence and epidemiology of injury to the AC joint in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) football athletes. Descriptive epidemiology study. The NCAA Injury Surveillance System (ISS) men's football database was reviewed from the 2004-2009 playing seasons. The exposure data set from the same years was reviewed for the purposes of computing rates of injury per athlete exposure (AE). The injury rate (number of injuries divided by number of AEs) was computed per 10,000 AEs for competition and practice exposures. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals (95% CIs) for the incidence rates were calculated using assumptions of a Poisson distribution. According to the estimates made by the NCAA ISS, a total of 748 injuries to the AC joint occurred in NCAA football players during 2,222,155 AEs, accounting for 4.49% of all injuries sustained during this 5-year surveillance period. The overall rate of injury was 3.34 per 10,000 AEs (95% CI, 3.10-3.59). Players were 11.68 (95% CI, 10.11-13.49) times more likely to sustain an injury in games than practices. Partial sprains (types I or II) accounted for 96.4% of injuries, while complete sprains (≥type III) accounted for the remaining 3.6%. The average amount of time lost per injury was 11.61 days. Complete sprains resulted in a mean time loss of 31.9 days (95% CI, 24.4-39.6) while partial injuries resulted in 11.0 days lost (95% CI, 9.6-12.3). Overall, 2.41% of injuries underwent surgical intervention, with 22.2% of complete sprains and 1.7% of partial injuries resulting in surgery. Complete sprains of the AC joint were 13.5 (95% CI, 4.63-35.26) times more likely to result in surgical intervention than partial sprains. The majority of injuries (71.93%) resulted from contact with another player and 47.09% occurred while

  13. Concomitant hollow viscus injuries in patients with blunt hepatic and splenic injuries: an analysis of a National Trauma Registry database.

    PubMed

    Swaid, Forat; Peleg, Kobi; Alfici, Ricardo; Matter, Ibrahim; Olsha, Oded; Ashkenazi, Itamar; Givon, Adi; Kessel, Boris

    2014-09-01

    Non-operative management has become the standard approach for treating stable patients sustaining blunt hepatic or splenic injuries in the absence of other indications for laparotomy. The liberal use of computed tomography (CT) has reduced the rate of unnecessary immediate laparotomies; however, due to its limited sensitivity in the diagnosis of hollow viscus injuries (HVI), this may be at the expense of a rise in the incidence of missed HVI. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of concomitant HVI in blunt trauma patients diagnosed with hepatic and/or splenic injuries, and to evaluate whether a correlation exists between this incidence and the severity of hepatic or splenic injuries. A retrospective cohort study involving blunt trauma patients with splenic and/or liver injuries, between the years 1998 and 2012 registered in the Israel National Trauma Registry. The association between the presence and severity of splenic and/or liver injuries and the incidence of HVI was examined. Of the 57,130 trauma victims identified as suffering from blunt torso injuries, 2335 (4%) sustained hepatic injuries without splenic injuries (H group), 3127 (5.4%) had splenic injuries without hepatic injuries (S group), and 564 (1%) suffered from both hepatic and splenic injuries (H+S group). Overall, 957 patients sustained 1063 HVI. The incidence of HVI among blunt torso trauma victims who sustained neither splenic nor hepatic injuries was 1.5% which is significantly lower than in the S (3.1%), H (3.1%), and H+S (6.7%) groups. In the S group, there was a clear correlation between the severity of the splenic injury and the incidence of HVI. This correlation was not found in the H group. The presence of blunt splenic and/or hepatic injuries predicts a higher incidence of HVI, especially if combined. While in blunt splenic injury patients there is a clear correlation between the incidence of HVI and the severity of splenic injury, such a correlation does not exist in patients

  14. Hockey Fans in Training: A Pilot Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Petrella, Robert J; Gill, Dawn P; Zou, Guangyong; De Cruz, Ashleigh; Riggin, Brendan; Bartol, Cassandra; Danylchuk, Karen; Hunt, Kate; Wyke, Sally; Gray, Cindy M; Bunn, Christopher; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2017-07-17

    Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT) is a gender-sensitized weight loss and healthy lifestyle program. We investigated: 1) feasibility of recruiting and retaining overweight and obese men into a pilot pragmatic randomized controlled trial; and 2) potential for Hockey FIT to lead to weight loss and improvements in other outcomes at 12 weeks and 12 months. Male fans of 2 ice hockey teams (35-65 years; body-mass index ≥28 kg/m) located in Ontario (Canada) were randomized to intervention (Hockey FIT) or comparator (Wait-list Control). Hockey FIT includes a 12-week active phase (weekly, coach-led group meetings including provision of dietary information, practice of behaviour change techniques, and safe exercise sessions plus incremental pedometer walking) and a 40-week minimally-supported phase (smartphone app for sustaining physical activity; private online social network; standardized emails; booster session/reunion). Measurement at baseline and 12 weeks (both groups), and 12 months (intervention group only), included clinical outcomes (e.g., weight) and self-reported physical activity, diet, self-rated health. Eighty men were recruited in 4 weeks; trial retention was >80% at 12 weeks and >75% at 12 months. At 12 weeks, the intervention group lost 3.6 (95% CI: -5.26, -1.90) kg more than the comparator (p<0.001) and maintained this weight loss to 12 months. The intervention group also demonstrated greater improvements in other clinical measures, physical activity, diet and self-rated health at 12 weeks; most sustained to 12 months. Results suggest feasible recruitment/retention of overweight and obese men in the Hockey FIT program. Results provide evidence for the potential effectiveness of Hockey FIT for weight loss and improved health in at-risk men and thus, evidence to proceed with a definitive trial.

  15. Re-examining the home disadvantage in professional ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Gayton, William F; Perry, Scott M; Loignon, Andrew C; Ricker, Angela

    2011-04-01

    Occurrence of the home disadvantage in professional ice hockey was examined by analyzing shootout data from 2005 through 2008. Results indicated that teams involved in shootouts playing at their home arenas did not lose significantly more games at home than on the road. Results did not support the hypotheses that emphasize the roles of physical contact and diffusion of responsibility in accounting for past failures to find the home disadvantage in professional ice hockey.

  16. Representativeness of the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Database

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, John D.; Cuthbert, Jeffrey P; Whiteneck, Gale G.; Dijkers, Marcel P.; Coronado, Victor; Heinemann, Allen W.; Harrison-Felix, Cynthia; Graham, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Database (TBIMS-NDB) is representative of individuals aged 16 years and older admitted for acute, inpatient rehabilitation in the United States with a primary diagnosis of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design Secondary analysis of existing datasets. Setting Acute inpatient rehabilitation facilities. Participants Patients 16 years of age and older with a primary rehabilitation diagnosis of TBI. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measure demographic characteristics, functional status and hospital length of stay. Results From October 2001 through December 2007 patients included in the TBIMS-NDB were largely representative of all individuals 16 years and older admitted for rehabilitation in the U.S. with a primary diagnosis of TBI. The major difference in distribution was age—the TBIMS-NDB cohort did not include as many patients over age 65 as were admitted for rehabilitation with a primary diagnosis of TBI in the United States. Distributional differences for age-related characteristics were observed; however, groups of patients partitioned at age 65 differed minimally, especially the under 65 subset. Regardless of age, the proportion of patients with a rehabilitation stay of 1-9 days was larger nationwide. Nationwide admissions showed an age distribution similar to patients discharged alive from acute care with moderate, severe or penetrating TBI. The proportion of patients age 70 and older admitted for TBI rehabilitation in the United States increased every year, a trend that was not evident in the general population, TBIMS-NDB or among TBI patients in acute care. Conclusions These results provide substantial empirical evidence that the TBIMS-NDB is representative of patients receiving inpatient rehabilitation for TBI in the U.S. Researchers utilizing the TBIMS-NDB may want to adjust statistically for the lower percentage of patients over age 65 or those with stays less than 10 days

  17. Use of a national reporting system for occupational injuries in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Susan; Krantz, Anne; Klempner, Sophia; Alvarado, Rebeca; Wesseling, Catharina; Fernández, Eduardo; Forst, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Occupational injury surveillance in developing countries may be hindered by the lack of health data infrastructure as well the large numbers of informal-sector workers. The goal of this study was to elucidate the scope of occupational injury in the Monteverde district of Costa Rica using data collected through the national workers social security system. A list of occupational injuries occurring in the district reported to the National Insurance Institute (INS) central office between 1998 and 2002 was taken to the regional INS office, and the original injury reports for the cases were pulled. Specific data on the injuries were collected. There were 184 injuries reported during the five year period. Occupations with the highest number of injuries included production, building and grounds maintenance, and agricultural/forestry/fishing. Descriptive data showed that prevention efforts in this rural region should target food manufacturing, hotels, and construction.

  18. Personal food systems of male college hockey players.

    PubMed

    Smart, L R; Bisogni, C A

    2001-08-01

    This study sought to improve the understanding of processes involved in food choice and dietary change by examining how members of a college men's ice hockey team experienced the multiple factors influencing their food choices. The study employed a theory-guided, grounded-theory approach, participant observation, and open-ended interviews with ten team members. Field notes and transcripts were analysed using the constant comparative method. Going to college and playing hockey involved adjusting to new food and athletic environments, increased personal responsibility for food choices, and new meanings for food and eating. Players viewed hockey, health, and taste as major determinants of their food practices. Hockey meant structured schedules, a social network, and performance expectations. Health meant "feeling good" for hockey, having a lean body composition, and a desirable body image. Low-fat foods were viewed generally as healthy, but as not providing taste satisfaction or reward. Players' food practices cycled through four phases over the year according to the changing meanings and importance of hockey, health, and taste. The findings advance the concept of personal food system to represent the way that a person constructs the options, barriers, trade-offs, rules, and routines in food choice in response to how s/he views his/her relationships with food and the environment.

  19. Incidence of Concussion in Youth Ice Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Elbin, R.J.; Sufrinko, Alicia; Dakan, Scott; Bookwalter, Kylie; Price, Ali; Meehan, William P.; Collins, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ice hockey is a fast-paced collision sport that entails both intentional (ie, body checking) and incidental contact that may involve the head. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of concussions in relation to games/practices and age among competition-level youth ice hockey players (ages 12–18 years). METHODS: Participants included 397 youth ice hockey players from Western Pennsylvania; Boston, Massachusetts; and Birmingham, Alabama, during the 2012–2013 and 2013–2014 youth ice hockey seasons. Incidence rates (IRs) and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of concussion were calculated for games/practices and age groups. RESULTS: A total of 23 369 (12 784 practice/10 585 game) athletic exposures (AEs) involving 37 medically diagnosed concussions occurred. More than 40% of concussions involved illegal contact. The combined IR for games and practices was 1.58 concussions per 1000 AEs. The IRR was 2.86 times (95% confidence interval 0.68–4.42) higher during games (2.49 per 1000 AEs) than practices (1.04 per 1000 AEs). CONCLUSIONS: The overall IR for concussion in youth ice hockey was comparable to those reported in other youth collision sports. The game-to-practice IRR was lower than previously reported in ice hockey and other youth sports, although more concussions per exposure occurred in games compared with practices. Younger players had a higher rate of concussions than older players. PMID:26746405

  20. Incidence of Concussion in Youth Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Anthony P; Elbin, R J; Sufrinko, Alicia; Dakan, Scott; Bookwalter, Kylie; Price, Ali; Meehan, William P; Collins, Michael W

    2016-02-01

    Ice hockey is a fast-paced collision sport that entails both intentional (ie, body checking) and incidental contact that may involve the head. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of concussions in relation to games/practices and age among competition-level youth ice hockey players (ages 12-18 years). Participants included 397 youth ice hockey players from Western Pennsylvania; Boston, Massachusetts; and Birmingham, Alabama, during the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 youth ice hockey seasons. Incidence rates (IRs) and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of concussion were calculated for games/practices and age groups. A total of 23 369 (12 784 practice/10 585 game) athletic exposures (AEs) involving 37 medically diagnosed concussions occurred. More than 40% of concussions involved illegal contact. The combined IR for games and practices was 1.58 concussions per 1000 AEs. The IRR was 2.86 times (95% confidence interval 0.68-4.42) higher during games (2.49 per 1000 AEs) than practices (1.04 per 1000 AEs). The overall IR for concussion in youth ice hockey was comparable to those reported in other youth collision sports. The game-to-practice IRR was lower than previously reported in ice hockey and other youth sports, although more concussions per exposure occurred in games compared with practices. Younger players had a higher rate of concussions than older players. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. Descriptive Epidemiology of Musculoskeletal Injuries and Concussions in the National Football League, 2012-2014

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, David W.; Hutchison, Michael G.; Comper, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background: The risk of all-cause injury and concussion associated with football is significant. The National Football League (NFL) has implemented changes to increase player safety warranting investigation into the incidence and patterns of injury. Purpose: To document the incidence and patterns of all-cause injury and concussions in the NFL. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Injury data were collected prospectively from official NFL injury reports over 2 regular seasons from 2012 to 2014, with identification of injury incidence rates and patterns. Concussion rate ratios were calculated using previously reported NFL rates. Results: A total of 4284 injuries were identified, including 301 concussions. The all-cause injury rate was 395.8 per 1000 athletes at risk (AAR) and concussion incidence was 27.8 per 1000 AAR. Only 2.3% of team games were injury free. Wide receivers, tight ends, and defensive backs had the highest incidence of injury and concussion. Concussion incidence was 1.61-fold higher in 2012 to 2014 compared with 2002 to 2007. The knee was injured most frequently, followed by the ankle, hamstring, shoulder, and head. Conclusion: The incidence of all-cause injury and concussion in the NFL is significant. Concussion injury rates are higher than previous reports, potentially reflecting an improvement in recognition and awareness. Injury prevention efforts should continue to reduce the prevalence of injury associated with football. PMID:26675321

  2. Descriptive Epidemiology of Musculoskeletal Injuries and Concussions in the National Football League, 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David W; Hutchison, Michael G; Comper, Paul

    2015-05-01

    The risk of all-cause injury and concussion associated with football is significant. The National Football League (NFL) has implemented changes to increase player safety warranting investigation into the incidence and patterns of injury. To document the incidence and patterns of all-cause injury and concussions in the NFL. Descriptive epidemiology study. Injury data were collected prospectively from official NFL injury reports over 2 regular seasons from 2012 to 2014, with identification of injury incidence rates and patterns. Concussion rate ratios were calculated using previously reported NFL rates. A total of 4284 injuries were identified, including 301 concussions. The all-cause injury rate was 395.8 per 1000 athletes at risk (AAR) and concussion incidence was 27.8 per 1000 AAR. Only 2.3% of team games were injury free. Wide receivers, tight ends, and defensive backs had the highest incidence of injury and concussion. Concussion incidence was 1.61-fold higher in 2012 to 2014 compared with 2002 to 2007. The knee was injured most frequently, followed by the ankle, hamstring, shoulder, and head. The incidence of all-cause injury and concussion in the NFL is significant. Concussion injury rates are higher than previous reports, potentially reflecting an improvement in recognition and awareness. Injury prevention efforts should continue to reduce the prevalence of injury associated with football.

  3. Acromioclavicular joint injuries in the National Football League: epidemiology and management.

    PubMed

    Lynch, T Sean; Saltzman, Matthew D; Ghodasra, Jason H; Bilimoria, Karl Y; Bowen, Mark K; Nuber, Gordon W

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies investigating acromioclavicular (AC) joint injuries in professional American football players have only been reported on quarterbacks during the 1980s and 1990s. These injuries have not been evaluated across all position players in the National Football League (NFL). The purpose of this study was 4-fold: (1) to determine the incidence of AC joint injuries among all NFL position players; (2) to investigate whether player position, competition setting, type of play, and playing surface put an athlete at an increased risk for this type of injury; (3) to determine the incidence of operative and nonoperative management of these injuries; and (4) to compare the time missed for injuries treated nonoperatively to the time missed for injuries requiring surgical intervention. Descriptive epidemiological study. All documented injuries of the AC joint were retrospectively analyzed using the NFL Injury Surveillance System (NFLISS) over a 12-season period from 2000 through 2011. The data were analyzed by the anatomic location, player position, field conditions, type of play, requirement of surgical management, days missed per injury, and injury incidence. Over 12 NFL seasons, there were a total of 2486 shoulder injuries, with 727 (29.2%) of these injuries involving the AC joint. The overall rate of AC joint injuries in these athletes was 26.1 injuries per 10,000 athlete exposures, with the majority of these injuries occurring during game activity on natural grass surfaces (incidence density ratio, 0.79) and most often during passing plays. These injuries occurred most frequently in defensive backs, wide receivers, and special teams players; however, the incidence of these injuries was greatest in quarterbacks (20.9 injuries per 100 players), followed by special teams players (20.7/100) and wide receivers (16.5/100). Overall, these athletes lost a mean of 9.8 days per injury, with quarterbacks losing the most time to injury (mean, 17.3 days). The majority of

  4. Notes from the Field: Injuries Associated with Bison Encounters - Yellowstone National Park, 2015.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Cara; Leong, Kirsten; Wallen, Rick; Buttke, Danielle

    2016-03-25

    Since 1980, bison have injured more pedestrian visitors to Yellowstone National Park (Yellowstone) than any other animal (1). After the occurrence of 33 bison-related injuries during 1983-1985 (range = 10-13/year), the park implemented successful outreach campaigns (1) to reduce the average number of injuries to 0.8/year (range = 0-2/year) during 2010-2014 (unpublished data, National Park Service, September 2015). During May-July 2015, five injuries associated with bison encounters occurred (Table). Case reports were reviewed to evaluate circumstances surrounding these injuries to inform prevention.

  5. The epidemiology of sports injury during the 37th Thailand National Games 2008 in Phitsanulok.

    PubMed

    Laoruengthana, Artit; Poosamsai, Paisan; Fangsanau, Tharinee; Supanpaiboon, Pattrawan; Tungkasamesamran, Kasame

    2009-12-01

    Prevention of injury among athletes is of paramount importance for sport events. The incidence of injury differs depending on many factors, such as level of competition, type of sport, and standard of surveillance systems. It is our purpose to provide a descriptive epidemiology of a national level competition multi-sports event. During the 2008 Thailand National "Phitsanulok" Games, official medical teams of the various sports completed a report form after each match or competition. The demographic data, type of sport, details of injury or illness, diagnosis, and treatment were collected from the PLKGames 2008 program and analyzed by the Medical Surveillance Committee. There were 14,429 athletes and staff participating in the "Phitsanulok" games. A total of 496 injuries were reported during the competition, of which 300 male and 196 female athletes sustained injuries, resulting in an incidence rate of 4.1 injuries per 100 registered athletes. For all sports, 71, 50 and 38 injuries occurred during Rugby, Handball and Basketball, respectively, which accounted for 32% of all injuries. No injury was reported from many sports, such as table tennis, shooting, dancing, and golf The most common diagnoses were sprains and strains. About half of injuries were caused by contact with another athlete, followed by noncontact (28.6%) and limited-contact incidences (27.6%). According to the number of athletes, the risk of incurring an injury was highest in Pencak Silat, handball, basketball, and rugby football. About half of injuries affected lower extremities, while 135, 53, and 49 injuries involved upper extremity, head & neck, and axial body parts, respectively. The knee and ankle were the most common sites of injury. The data demonstrates a potential risk of injury occurring predominately in full-contact sports and limited-contact sports. The data is potentially useful in developing injury surveillance systems for future sporting events.

  6. Game Intensity Analysis of Elite Adolescent Ice Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Stanula, Arkadiusz; Roczniok, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine ice-hockey players’ playing intensity based on their heart rates (HRs) recorded during a game and on the outcomes of an incremental maximum oxygen uptake test. Twenty ice-hockey players, members of the Polish junior national team (U18), performed an incremental test to assess their maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max) in the two week’s period preceding 5 games they played at the World Championships. Players’ HRs at the first and second ventilatory thresholds obtained during the test were utilized to determine intensity zones (low, moderate, and high) that were subsequently used to classify HR values recorded during each of the games. For individual intensity zones, the following HRs expressed as mean values and as percentages of the maximal heart rate (HRmax) were obtained: forwards 148–158 b·min−1 (79.5–84.8% HRmax), 159–178 b·min−1 (85.4–95.6% HRmax), 179–186 b·min−1 (96.1–100.0% HRmax); defensemen 149–153 b·min−1 (80.0–82.1% HRmax), 154–175 b·min−1 (82.6–94.0% HRmax), 176–186 b·min−1 (94.5–100.0% HRmax). The amount of time the forwards and defensemen spent in the three intensity zones expressed as percentages of the total time of the game were: 54.91 vs. 55.62% (low), 26.40 vs. 22.38% (moderate) and 18.68 vs. 22.00% (high). The forwards spent more time in the low intensity zone than the defensemen, however, the difference was not statistically significant. The results of the study indicate that using aerobic and anaerobic metabolism variables to determine intensity zones can significantly improve the reliability of evaluation of the physiological demands of the game, and can be a useful tool for coaches in managing the training process. PMID:25713682

  7. Testosterone, cortisol and anxiety in elite field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Raúl; Jiménez, Manuel; Alvero-Cruz, José R

    2013-07-02

    The aim of the present study was to assess the change in the levels of testosterone and cortisol after victory and defeat in male field hockey players during an important tournament. In the beginning of the game series, the players were ranked very closely to achieve (for the first time) the championship rising to The Honor Division-A, the highest status national category. The first game resulted in a 7-4 victory, the second game resulted in a 6-1 victory, and the third game resulted in a 1-2 defeat. As expected, there were changes in testosterone levels after the competition, dropping in the game which ended in defeat, and rising slightly in the two games which ended in victory; there were also changes in cortisol levels, rising in the game which ended in defeat, and showing no variations in the games which ended in victory; correlational analyses congruently showed that defeat led to rises in cortisol whereas victory led to rises in testosterone; anticipatory somatic anxiety was related to cortisol levels prior to games, and physical exertion during competition was related to the change in testosterone levels (suggesting an inhibitory effect) but not to the change in cortisol levels. Hence, this pattern of hormonal responses to a real-life dominance challenge complied with Mazur's (1985) [16] biosocial model of status and dominance motivation, by showing that testosterone and cortisol are linked to victory and defeat in a theoretically predictable fashion.

  8. Associated injuries in traumatic sternal fractures: a review of the National Trauma Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Oyetunji, Tolulope A; Jackson, Hope T; Obirieze, Augustine C; Moore, Danier; Branche, Marc J; Greene, Wendy R; Cornwell, Edward E; Siram, Suryanarayana M

    2013-07-01

    Sternal fractures occur infrequently with blunt force trauma. The demographics and epidemiology of associated injuries have not been well characterized from a national trauma database. The National Trauma Data Bank was queried for patients with closed sternal fractures. The demographics were analyzed by age, gender, mechanism and indicators of anatomic and physiologic injuries. Types of commonly associated injuries were also determined. A total of 23,985 records were analyzed. Males accounted for 68.3 per cent and whites 70.9 per cent. Motor vehicle crash was the leading mechanism. More than 56 per cent had severe injuries based on Injury Severity Score (greater than 15) and 17 per cent with Glasgow Coma Score 8 or less. Crude mortality was 7.9 per cent. The majority (57.8%) and approximately one-third (33.7%) of the patients had rib fractures and lung contusions, respectively, 22.0 per cent with closed pneumothorax, 21.6 per cent had a closed thoracic vertebra fracture, 16.9 per cent with lumbar spine fracture, 3.9 per cent with concussion, and blunt cardiac injury in 3.6 per cent. Sternal fractures are usually associated with severe blunt trauma. Lung contusion remains the leading associated injury followed by vertebral spine fractures. Cardiac injuries are less frequent and vascular injuries less so. Mechanism of injury and presence of sternal fractures should alert providers to these potential associated injuries.

  9. 2010 Idaho National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-09-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  10. 2007 Idaho National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2009-05-04

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  11. 2010 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-08-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  12. 2010 Sandia National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-10-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  13. 2010 Argonne National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-06-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  14. 2006 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2008-03-06

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  15. 2007 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2008-07-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  16. Effect of Increasing Maximal Aerobic Exercise on Serum Muscles Enzymes in Professional Field Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Hazar, Muhsin; Otağ, Aynur; Otağ, İlhan; Sezen, Mehmet; Sever, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Exercise results in oxidative enzyme increase and micro-injuries in skeletal muscles. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of maximal aerobic exercise on serum muscle enzymes in professional field hockey players. This study aims to determine the effect of increasing maximal aerobic exercise on creatine kinase (CK), creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) serum levels. Material and Methods: 31 young professional field hockey players (13 female and 18 male players) volunteered for this study. All participants underwent the shuttle run test. Blood samples were taken from each participant before the shuttle run test. Post test blood samples were taken immediately after exercise and one hour after respectively. Pre and post test CK, CK-MB, AST and ALT values were measured by means of auto analyzer using original kits. Results: The acute post test measure of the CK level increased in male (p=0.002) and female (p=0.00) sportsmen. CK-MB values obtained one hour after the exercise was lower than those before the exercise in males (p=0.02). In females (p=0.017) and males (p=0.05) AST activity significantly increased immediately after exercise and decreased to resting activity 1 h recovery. ALT significantly increased immediately after exercise in female (p=0.03) and male (p=0.00) athletes and after 1 h recovery ALT activities decreased below resting values. Conclusion: The timing and severity of exercise used in our study increased CK values, decreased CK-MB values and AST, ALT values increased in female and male field hockey players. PMID:25948428

  17. Injuries to children in the United States related to trampolines, 1990-1995: a national epidemic.

    PubMed

    Smith, G A

    1998-03-01

    To describe the epidemiology of trampoline-related injuries among children in the United States. A retrospective analysis of data for children 18 years old and younger from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System of the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission for 1990 through 1995. There were an estimated 249 400 trampoline-related injuries [95% confidence interval (CI), 166 300-332 500] to children 18 years old and younger treated in hospital emergency departments in the United States during the 6-year study period. The number of injuries increased by 98% from 29 600 in 1990 to 58 400 in 1995, with an average of 41 600 (95% CI, 27 700-55 500) injuries per year, or 59.4 injuries per 100 000 United States children per year (95% CI, 39.6-79.3). The median age of injured children was 10 years, and 50% were males. Ninety-three percent of injuries occurred at home. Injuries to the extremities predominated among children of all ages and accounted for more than 70% of all injuries. This study identified several age-specific injury patterns. There was an inverse relationship between age versus the relative frequency of upper extremity injuries, and fractures and dislocations; and there was a direct relationship between age versus lower extremity injuries and soft tissue injury. There was also an inverse relationship between age versus facial injuries, head and neck injuries, and lacerations. Annually, an estimated 1400 children (95% CI, 800-2000), or 2.0 per 100 000 United States children (95% CI, 1. 1-2.9), required hospital admission or interhospital transfer because of a trampoline-related injury. This represented 3.3% of all children with a trampoline-associated injury. Fractures or dislocations accounted for 83% of injuries among admitted or transferred children, and children with a fracture or dislocation were more likely to be admitted or transferred to another hospital (8.4%) than children with other types of injury (relative risk, 10.80; 95% CI

  18. Prevalence of Cam-Type Morphology in Elite Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Lerebours, Frantz; Robertson, William; Neri, Brian; Schulz, Brian; Youm, Thomas; Limpisvasti, Orr

    2016-04-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) has been increasingly recognized as a cause of hip pain in athletes at all levels of competition, specifically ice hockey players. The purpose of this study was to define the prevalence of cam and pincer radiographic deformity in elite ice hockey players. The hypothesis was that elite hockey players will have a higher prevalence of radiographic hip abnormalities compared with the general population. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Anteroposterior and frog-leg lateral radiographs on 137 elite ice hockey players were prospectively obtained during the 2014-2015 preseason entrance examinations. Study participants included National Hockey League roster players as well as the respective farm team members. Demographic data were collected, including age, position, shooting side, and any history of hip pain or hip surgery. Patients with a history of hip surgery were excluded from the analysis. A single sports medicine fellowship-trained orthopaedic surgeon used standard radiographic measurements to assess for the radiographic presence of cam or pincer deformity. Radiographs with an alpha angle ≥55° on a frog-leg lateral view were defined as cam-positive. Each participant underwent a preseason physical examination with an assessment of hip range of motion and impingement testing. A total of 130 elite ice hockey players were included in the analysis; 180 (69.4%) hips met radiographic criteria for cam-type deformity. The prevalence in right and left hips was 89 (69.5%) and 91 (70.0%), respectively; 70 (60.8%) players demonstrated bilateral involvement. Hips with cam deformity had a mean alpha angle of 67.7° ± 8.3° on the right and 68.9° ± 9.0° on the left. Of the patients with alpha angles ≥55°, 5.6% (5/89) had a positive anterior impingement test of the right hip, while 11% (10/91) had positive anterior impingement test of the left. Players with radiologic cam deformity had a statistically significant deficit in

  19. Automatic acquisition of motion trajectories: tracking hockey players

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuma, Kenji; Little, James J.; Lowe, David

    2003-12-01

    Computer systems that have the capability of analyzing complex and dynamic scenes play an essential role in video annotation. Scenes can be complex in such a way that there are many cluttered objects with different colors, shapes and sizes, and can be dynamic with multiple interacting moving objects and a constantly changing background. In reality, there are many scenes that are complex, dynamic, and challenging enough for computers to describe. These scenes include games of sports, air traffic, car traffic, street intersections, and cloud transformations. Our research is about the challenge of inventing a descriptive computer system that analyzes scenes of hockey games where multiple moving players interact with each other on a constantly moving background due to camera motions. Ultimately, such a computer system should be able to acquire reliable data by extracting the players" motion as their trajectories, querying them by analyzing the descriptive information of data, and predict the motions of some hockey players based on the result of the query. Among these three major aspects of the system, we primarily focus on visual information of the scenes, that is, how to automatically acquire motion trajectories of hockey players from video. More accurately, we automatically analyze the hockey scenes by estimating parameters (i.e., pan, tilt, and zoom) of the broadcast cameras, tracking hockey players in those scenes, and constructing a visual description of the data by displaying trajectories of those players. Many technical problems in vision such as fast and unpredictable players' motions and rapid camera motions make our challenge worth tackling. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been any automatic video annotation systems for hockey developed in the past. Although there are many obstacles to overcome, our efforts and accomplishments would hopefully establish the infrastructure of the automatic hockey annotation system and become a milestone for

  20. 2003 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-05-23

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Idaho National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  1. The Canadian Atlas of Child and Youth Injury: Mobilizing Injury Surveillance Data to Launch a National Knowledge Translation Tool

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Ian; Smith, Jennifer; Al-Hajj, Samar; Fuselli, Pamela; Macpherson, Alison

    2017-01-01

    Child and youth injury prevention research in Canada has lagged behind other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development nations, despite existing surveillance systems and longitudinal data. A critical need to improve access to the available data, as well as need to tailor its display and interpretation, was identified by injury prevention stakeholders involved in research, policy, and practice. The Canadian Atlas of Child and Youth Injury Prevention (“the Atlas”) was developed to address this need. Following a series of iterative consultation meetings and a pilot testing session, the Atlas was scaled up with national data. Two testing sessions were held to evaluate the tools. The Atlas is comprised of three main components: data, indicators, and visualizations. The accessibility of the dashboard is enhanced by customization of data visualizations and data outputs to suit the user’s needs. Overall feedback indicated that the tools were easy to use, and that the interface was intuitive and visually appealing. The Canadian Atlas of Child and Youth Injury Prevention provides readily accessible information to injury prevention practitioners, policy makers and researchers, helping to chart pathways to success in improving the child and youth injury prevention system in Canada. PMID:28867782

  2. Sports injuries during the Summer Olympic Games 2008.

    PubMed

    Junge, Astrid; Engebretsen, Lars; Mountjoy, Margo L; Alonso, Juan Manuel; Renström, Per A F H; Aubry, Mark John; Dvorak, Jiri

    2009-11-01

    Standardized assessment of sports injuries provides important epidemiological information and also directions for injury prevention. To analyze the frequency, characteristics, and causes of injuries incurred during the Summer Olympic Games 2008. Descriptive epidemiology study. The chief physicians and/or chief medical officers of the national teams were asked to report daily all injuries newly incurred during the Olympic Games on a standardized injury report form. In addition, injuries were reported daily by the physicians at the medical stations at the different Olympic venues and at the polyclinic in the Olympic Village. Physicians and/or therapists of 92 national teams covering 88% of the 10,977 registered athletes took part in the study. In total, 1055 injuries were reported, resulting in an incidence of 96.1 injuries per 1000 registered athletes. Half of the injuries (49.6%) were expected to prevent the athlete from participating in competition or training. The most prevalent diagnoses were ankle sprains and thigh strains. The majority (72.5%) of injuries were incurred in competition. One third of the injuries were caused by contact with another athlete, followed by overuse (22%) and noncontact incidences (20%). Injuries were reported from all sports, but their incidence and characteristics varied substantially. In relation to the number of registered athletes, the risk of incurring an injury was highest in soccer, taekwondo, hockey, handball, weightlifting, and boxing (all >or=15% of the athletes) and lowest for sailing, canoeing/kayaking, rowing, synchronized swimming, diving, fencing, and swimming. The data indicate that the injury surveillance system covered almost all of the participating athletes, and the results highlight areas of high risk for sport injury such as the in-competition period, the ankle and thigh, and specific sports. The identification of these factors should stimulate future research and subsequent policy change to prevent injury in

  3. The relationship of positive work environments and workplace injury: evidence from the National Nursing Assistant Survey.

    PubMed

    McCaughey, Deirdre; McGhan, Gwen; Walsh, Erin M; Rathert, Cheryl; Belue, Rhonda

    2014-01-01

    With estimates of a 51% growth in the number of nursing assistants needed by 2016, there is a critical need to examine workplace factors that negatively contribute to the recruitment and retention of nursing assistants. Studies have shown that high demands, physical stress, and chronic workforce shortages contribute to a working environment that fosters one of the highest workforce injury rates in the United States. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between nursing assistant injury rates and key outcomes, such as job satisfaction and turnover intent, while exploring workplace environment factors, such as injury prevention training, supervisor support, and employee engagement, that can decrease the rates of workplace injury. Data from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey were used to examine the negative effects of workplace injury on nursing assistants and the workplace environment factors that are related to the rate of worker injury. Nursing assistants who experience job-related injuries have lower levels of job satisfaction, increased turnover intentions, and are less likely to recommend their facility as a place to work or seek care services. It was also found that nursing assistant injury rates are related to employee ratings of injury prevention training, supervisor support, and employee engagement. NAs with multiple injuries (>2) were 1.3-1.6 times more likely to report being injured at work than NAs who had not been injured when supervisor support, employee engagement, and training ratings were low. Evidence that health care organizations can use to better understand how workplace injuries occur and insight into ways to reduce the current staggering rate of on-the-job injuries occurring in health care workplaces were offered in this study. The findings also offer empirical support for an extension of the National Institute for Occupational Health and Safety/National Occupational Research Agenda Work Organization Framework for

  4. Locomotor, Heart-Rate, and Metabolic Power Characteristics of Youth Women's Field Hockey: Female Athletes in Motion (FAiM) Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vescovi, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the locomotor, heart-rate, and metabolic power characteristics of high-level youth female field hockey matches. Method: Players from the U21 and U17 Canadian women's national teams were monitored during a 4-match test series using Global Positioning System technology. Position (forward,…

  5. Locomotor, Heart-Rate, and Metabolic Power Characteristics of Youth Women's Field Hockey: Female Athletes in Motion (FAiM) Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vescovi, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the locomotor, heart-rate, and metabolic power characteristics of high-level youth female field hockey matches. Method: Players from the U21 and U17 Canadian women's national teams were monitored during a 4-match test series using Global Positioning System technology. Position (forward,…

  6. National survey of the injury prevention activities of children's centres

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Michael C; Mulvaney, Caroline A; Kendrick, Denise; Stewart, Jane; Coupland, Carol; Hayes, Mike; Wynn, Persephone

    2014-01-01

    Children's centres were established across England to provide a range of services including early education, social care and health to pre-school children and their families. We surveyed children's centres to ascertain the activities they were undertaking to prevent unintentional injuries in the under fives. A postal questionnaire was sent to a sample of children's centre managers (n = 694). It included questions on current activities, knowledge and attitudes to injury prevention, health priorities and partnership working. Responses were received from 384 (56%) children's centres. Overall, 58% considered unintentional injury prevention to be one of the three main child health priorities for their centre. Over half the respondents (59%) did not know if there was an injury prevention group in their area, and 21% did not know if there was a home safety equipment scheme. Knowledge of how child injury deaths occur in the home was poor. Only 11% knew the major cause of injury deaths in children under five. Lack of both staff time and funding were seen as important barriers by children's centre staff to undertake injury prevention activities. Nearly all stated that training (97%) and assistance with planning injury prevention (94%) would be helpful to their centres. Children's centres need further support if they are to effectively tackle this important public health area. PMID:23837887

  7. Media Coverage of Boys' and Girls' High School Ice Hockey in Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodcock, Amy Terhaar

    1995-01-01

    Reports a study that compared the newspaper coverage of girls' and boys' high school hockey teams in Minnesota from November 1994 to March 1995. Researchers coded each newspaper article for sex, length, and photo types. Results indicated that boys' high school hockey received much more newspaper coverage than girls' high school hockey. (SM)

  8. Gender, Sport, and the Construction of Community: A Case Study from Women's Ice Hockey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theberge, Nancy

    1995-01-01

    Examines the construction of community on a women's ice hockey team, using data from fieldwork and interviews with one Canadian team. Results indicated that the locker room provided a space where players came together as hockey players and women. A common focus on hockey united the diverse group. (SM)

  9. The National Head Injury Foundation: Eight Years of Challenge and Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Gerald W.

    1988-01-01

    The National Head Injury Foundation was established to address financial and personal issues involved with brain injury. The Foundation's action agenda emphasizes prevention, public awareness, public policy, public attitudes, social-political action, professional growth, information/referral, guidance on research needs, and a forum for diverse…

  10. The National Injury Surveillance System in China: a six-year review.

    PubMed

    Duan, Leilei; Deng, Xiao; Wang, Yuan; Wu, Chunmei; Jiang, Wei; He, Siran; Wang, Linhong; Hyder, Adnan A

    2015-04-01

    This article aims to describe the National Injury Surveillance System (NISS) in China from its establishment in 2006 to the methods used and some key findings from 2006 to 2011. From 2003 to 2005, based upon specific injury case definitions, a pilot study was conducted to explore the feasibility of a National Injury Surveillance System (NISS) in China. The NISS formally started operations in January 2006, and 126 hospitals from 43 sample points (23 rural, 20 urban) were selected to participate. Doctors and nurses in participating hospitals were trained to administer standardised data collection forms. Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention is in charge of analysing data and releasing findings. From 2006 to 2011, the annual recorded injury cases increased from 340,000 to 630,000, the majority being male (65%) and over 80% aged 15-64 years. Falls (32%), road traffic injuries (23%) and blunt injuries (19%) were the most common causes. More than 70% of cases were of minor severity, and over 75% of cases were discharged after treatment in the emergency department. The NISS is the first hospital-based national system in China, therefore considered an important source of injury data. It has the potential to describe injury morbidity in China and to be utilised to develop national technical and policy documents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Epidemiology of National Collegiate Athletic Association men's and women's tennis injuries, 2009/2010-2014/2015.

    PubMed

    Lynall, Robert C; Kerr, Zachary Y; Djoko, Aristarque; Pluim, Babette M; Hainline, Brian; Dompier, Thomas P

    2016-10-01

    This study describes the epidemiology of men's and women's tennis injuries reported by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance Program (ISP) during the 2009/2010-2014/2015 academic years. Injuries and athlete-exposure (AE) data originated from 19 varsity men's programmes (38 team-seasons); women's tennis data originated from 25 varsity programmes (52 team-seasons). Injury rates, injury rate ratios (IRRs) and injury proportions ratios (IPRs) were reported with 95% CIs. The ISP captured 181 and 227 injuries for men's and women's tennis, respectively, for injury rates of 4.89 and 4.88/1000 AE for men and women, respectively. There were 32.2% and 63.9% reductions in men's and women's tennis practice injury rates between 2009/2010-2011/2012 and 2012/2013-2014/2015, but no reductions in competition injury rates. Competition injury rates were higher than practice injury rates in men's (IRR=2.32; 95% CI 1.72 to 3.13) and women's tennis (IRR=1.77; 95% CI 1.35 to 2.33). Most injuries in men's and women's tennis occurred to the lower extremities (47.0% and 52.4%, respectively), compared with the trunk (16.6% and 17.6%, respectively) and upper extremities (23.8 and 23.8, respectively). Injury rates in NCAA men's and women's tennis were similar overall. Practice injury rates in men's and women's tennis have declined, although competition rates have not changed. These findings may help inform injury prevention programmes in the future. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Hip Labral Tears among Asymptomatic Professional Hockey Players Identified on MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Robert A.; Silvis, Matthew; Smetana, Brandon; Mosher, Timothy; Stuck, Dan; Lynch, Scott A.; Black, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: We have previously reported on the prevalence of pathologic hip findings on the MRIs of asymptomatic professional hockey players. The significance of these findings, found in the asymptomatic player, is unknown. The purpose of this study is to report clinical follow-up of this cohort at four years. Methods: 21 professional hockey players with no previous hip/groin pain underwent hip/pelvis MRI. Self-reported symptoms were measured using a modified Oswestry Disability Questionnaires at one and two years following MRI. Games played for each player were followed over a four-year period. Variance of games played greater than five per year compared to baseline (games played year prior to MRI) were explored for specific injury. Results: 16/21 and 14/21 minor league hockey players were available at one- and two-year follow-up, respectively. 19/21 players remained active within four years. Fourteen remained at same level, four advanced to higher level of play, and one was demoted to a lower level at the end of four years. At one-year follow-up, two players (both with labral tear) admitted to groin pain; one, who also had bilateral adductor tendinosis, eventually missed games due to lateral hip pain in the third season after the MRI. At two-year follow-up, one other player (bilateral labral tears) admitted to hip tightness for a week but did not miss any games. Of the15 players that had an asymptomatic labral tear, two players advanced to NHL, ten remained at same level, one demoted, and two retired within four-year follow-up period. Among 9 players with labral tears on original MRI and available for questioning at two years, seven had no hip or groin symptoms and only one of 3 “symptomatic” players missed any games or sought treatment. Only four players had no abnormalities on MRI. None developed symptoms within two years. 3/4 remained at same level while the other advanced to the NHL. Conclusion: Although common on MRI among asymptomatic professional

  13. Percutaneous injuries amongst Greek endodontists: a national questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Zarra, T; Lambrianidis, T

    2013-03-01

    To investigate amongst Greek endodontists the incidence of percutaneous injuries, the circumstances associated with them, the therapeutic measures taken after the injuries and their compliance with infection control measures. One hundred and forty-seven endodontists met the inclusion criteria and were invited to participate in the survey. Personal and professional data, information on percutaneous injuries in the past 5 years and on infection control practices were gathered through interviews based on a questionnaire. Data were analysed using chi-square test, independent samples t-test, one-way anova and Pearson's correlation coefficient. The level of significance was set at P = 0.05. The response rate was 84%. The injury rate was estimated at 1.35 per endodontist per year. Endodontic files were associated with 37% of the injuries and fingers were injured in 75% of the most recent cases. Medical assistance was sought in 36% of the most recent injuries. Endodontists who always or usually practiced 4-handed endodontics (P = 0.007) as well as those not performing surgical endodontics (P = 0.007) reported significantly fewer injuries. In 91% of the participants, a complete hepatitis B virus vaccination was reported. Gloves, masks, rubber dam isolation and puncture-resistant containers for disposal of sharp instruments were always used by 98%, 94%, 100% and 81% of the respondents, respectively. The injury rate was low. The practice of four-handed endodontics was associated with a reduced number of percutaneous injuries; the performance of surgical endodontics increased their incidence. Greek endodontists showed a high level of compliance with infection control measures. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  14. A Preliminary Exploration of Concussion and Strength Performance in Youth Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Reed, N; Taha, T; Monette, G; Keightley, M

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the effect of concussion on upper and lower body strength in children and youth athletes. The participant group was made up of 178 unique male and female ice hockey players (ages 8-14 years). Using a 3-year prospective longitudinal research design, baseline and post-concussion data on hand grip strength, jump tests, and leg maximal voluntary contraction were collected. Using a linear mixed-effects model, no significant differences were found when comparing the baseline strength performance of individuals who went on to experience a concussion and those who did not. When accounting for sex, multiple concussions, and ongoing changes in strength associated with age, weaker hand grip scores were found following concussion while participants were still symptomatic. Lower squat jump heights were achieved while participants were symptomatic as well as when they were no longer self-reporting symptoms associated with concussion. This study represents an initial step towards better understanding strength performance following concussion that may limit the on and off ice performance of youth ice hockey players, as well as predispose youth to subsequent injuries.

  15. Effectiveness of an educational video on concussion knowledge in minor league hockey players: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cusimano, Michael D; Chipman, Mary; Donnelly, Peter; Hutchison, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    With the heightened awareness of concussions in all sports, the development and implementation of effective prevention strategies are necessary. Education has been advocated as an effective injury prevention intervention. To examine the effectiveness of the 'Smart Hockey: More Safety, More Fun' video on knowledge transfer among minor league hockey players. Cluster-randomised controlled trial. A total of 267 participants from two age divisions and competitive levels were assigned to either a video or no-video group. The video was shown (or not shown) to the entire team as a result of random assignment. To evaluate the effectiveness of the educational video, questionnaires specific to concussion knowledge and players' attitudes and behaviours were completed. There was a significant increase in the players' concussion knowledge scores immediately following exposure to the video (F(1,103)=27.00, p<0.001). However, concussion knowledge at 2 months was not significantly different between the video and no-video groups, after controlling for prior knowledge level, age and competitive level (F(1,115)=0.41, p=0.523). Similarly, players' attitudes and behaviour scores at 2 months did not differ between groups (F(1,115)=0.41, p=0.507). We were able to show that a single viewing of an educational video in hockey could immediately improve knowledge about concussion but that this effect was transient and lost at 2-month follow-up. Future prevention endeavours in hockey and other sports should attempt to incorporate strategies and modalities to enhance knowledge retention.

  16. Does fair play reduce concussions? A prospective, comparative analysis of competitive youth hockey tournaments.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aynsley M; Gaz, Daniel V; Larson, Dirk; Jorgensen, Janelle K; Eickhoff, Chad; Krause, David A; Fenske, Brooke M; Aney, Katie; Hansen, Ashley A; Nanos, Stephanie M; Stuart, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    To determine if Boys Bantam and Peewee and Girls U14 sustain fewer concussions, head hits, 'other injuries' and penalties in hockey tournaments governed by intensified fair play (IFP) than non-intensified fair play (NIFP). A prospective comparison of IFP, a behaviour modification programme that promotes sportsmanship, versus control (non-intensified, NIFP) effects on numbers of diagnosed concussions, head hits without diagnosed concussion (HHWDC), 'other injuries', number of penalties and fair play points (FPPs). 1514 players, ages 11-14 years, in 6 IFP (N=950) and 5 NIFP (N=564) tournaments were studied. Two diagnosed concussions, four HHWDC, and six 'other injuries' occurred in IFP tournaments compared to one concussion, eight HHWDC and five 'other injuries' in NIFP. There were significantly fewer HHWDC in IFP than NIFP (p=0.018). However, diagnosed concussions, 'other injuries', penalties and FPPs did not differ significantly between conditions. In IFP, a minority of teams forfeited the majority of FPPs. Most diagnosed concussions, HHWDC, and other injuries occurred to Bantam B players and usually in penalised teams that forfeited their FPPs. In response to significant differences in HHWDC between IFP and NIFP tournaments, the following considerations are encouraged: mandatory implementation of fair play in regular season and tournaments, empowering tournament directors to not accept heavily penalised teams, and introducing 'no body checking' in Bantam.

  17. Acute Gastrocnemius-Soleus Complex Injuries in National Football League Athletes.

    PubMed

    Werner, Brian C; Belkin, Nicole S; Kennelly, Steve; Weiss, Leigh; Barnes, Ronnie P; Potter, Hollis G; Warren, Russell F; Rodeo, Scott A

    2017-01-01

    Lower extremity muscle injuries are common in professional football. Although less common than hamstring or quadriceps injuries in National Football League (NFL) athletes, calf injuries occur with relative frequency and have not previously been studied. To evaluate gastrocnemius-soleus complex muscle injuries over the past 13 years from a single NFL team to determine the incidence of such injuries, their imaging characteristics, and return to play after such injuries and any correlation between imaging findings and prolonged return to play. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A retrospective review of all acute calf muscle injuries on a single NFL team from 2003 to 2015 was performed. Player demographics and return-to-play data were obtained from the medical records. All available magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were reviewed by a musculoskeletal radiologist for specific imaging findings that correlated with return to play. A total of 27 calf injuries in 24 NFL players were reviewed, yielding an incidence of 2.3 acute calf injuries per year on a single NFL team. Of these 27 injuries, 20 (74%) were isolated injuries to the gastrocnemius muscle, 4 (15%) were isolated injuries to the soleus muscle, and the remaining 3 injuries (11%) involved both. Defensive players were more likely to sustain injuries (P = .043). The mean time to return to play for all 27 players was 17.4 ± 14.6 days (range, 3-62 days). MRIs were available in 14 of the 27 injuries. The average size of the fascial defect (P = .032) and the presence of a fluid collection (P = .031) both correlated with return to play of longer than 2 weeks. Although less common than hamstring or quadriceps muscle injuries, calf muscle injuries occur with relative frequency in the NFL, and more so in defensive players. The majority of these injuries occur in the gastrocnemius and result in significant disability, with at least 2 weeks of missed playing time on average. MRI may have an important role in the evaluation of

  18. Acute Gastrocnemius-Soleus Complex Injuries in National Football League Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Brian C.; Belkin, Nicole S.; Kennelly, Steve; Weiss, Leigh; Barnes, Ronnie P.; Potter, Hollis G.; Warren, Russell F.; Rodeo, Scott A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lower extremity muscle injuries are common in professional football. Although less common than hamstring or quadriceps injuries in National Football League (NFL) athletes, calf injuries occur with relative frequency and have not previously been studied. Purpose: To evaluate gastrocnemius-soleus complex muscle injuries over the past 13 years from a single NFL team to determine the incidence of such injuries, their imaging characteristics, and return to play after such injuries and any correlation between imaging findings and prolonged return to play. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A retrospective review of all acute calf muscle injuries on a single NFL team from 2003 to 2015 was performed. Player demographics and return-to-play data were obtained from the medical records. All available magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were reviewed by a musculoskeletal radiologist for specific imaging findings that correlated with return to play. Results: A total of 27 calf injuries in 24 NFL players were reviewed, yielding an incidence of 2.3 acute calf injuries per year on a single NFL team. Of these 27 injuries, 20 (74%) were isolated injuries to the gastrocnemius muscle, 4 (15%) were isolated injuries to the soleus muscle, and the remaining 3 injuries (11%) involved both. Defensive players were more likely to sustain injuries (P = .043). The mean time to return to play for all 27 players was 17.4 ± 14.6 days (range, 3-62 days). MRIs were available in 14 of the 27 injuries. The average size of the fascial defect (P = .032) and the presence of a fluid collection (P = .031) both correlated with return to play of longer than 2 weeks. Conclusion: Although less common than hamstring or quadriceps muscle injuries, calf muscle injuries occur with relative frequency in the NFL, and more so in defensive players. The majority of these injuries occur in the gastrocnemius and result in significant disability, with at least 2 weeks of missed playing

  19. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Environmental Cold Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Cappaert, Thomas A; Stone, Jennifer A; Castellani, John W; Krause, Bentley Andrew; Smith, Daniel; Stephens, Bradford A

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To present recommendations for the prevention, recognition, and treatment of environmental cold injuries. Background: Individuals engaged in sport-related or work-related physical activity in cold, wet, or windy conditions are at risk for environmental cold injuries. An understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology, risk management, recognition, and immediate care of environmental cold injuries is an essential skill for certified athletic trainers and other health care providers working with individuals at risk. Recommendations: These recommendations are intended to provide certified athletic trainers and others participating in athletic health care with the specific knowledge and problem-solving skills needed to address environmental cold injuries. Each recommendation has been graded (A, B, or C) according to the Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy criterion scale. PMID:19030143

  20. 2009 Argonne National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2010-08-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  1. 2007 Sandia National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2009-02-04

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  2. 2008 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2009-12-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  3. 2008 Sandia National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2009-09-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  4. 2009 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2010-11-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  5. 2008 Idaho National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2010-11-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  6. Viewing lava safely: an epidemiology of hiker injury and illness in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

    PubMed

    Heggie, Travis W; Heggie, Tracey M

    2004-01-01

    To report the injuries and illnesses encountered by wilderness hikers in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park attempting to hike to active lava flows and to investigate the roles that demographics, prior hiking experience, hiking behavior, and preparedness play in hiker vulnerability to injury and illness. During an 8-week period, daily on-site exit interviews of lava hikers were conducted by a uniformed park ranger and park volunteer. Information about the hiker's home residence, wilderness hiking experience, preparedness, health status, and health problems encountered during the hike was collected from a total of 804 hikers. A high rate of injury and illness was found among the study population. Scrapes and abrasions (59%), blisters (51%), and muscle strains and sprains (47%) were the most common injuries. Dehydration (77%) and respiratory irritation (46%) were the most common illnesses. Lower extremities were the most common site of injuries, and beginning hikers were the most vulnerable to injury and illness. Many hikers were inexperienced tourists willing to disregard warning signs and enter high-risk areas. Hawaii Volcanoes National Park is one of 22 US national park units with volcanic resources. The injuries and illnesses reported by the study group identify the impact that this type of environment can have on the safety of wilderness users in areas with similar resources. Recreating in remote and severe areas has inherent risks, but the high rate of injuries and illnesses sustained by the hikers of this study can potentially be reduced through the development of more direct risk management methods.

  7. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Preventing and Managing Sport-Related Dental and Oral Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Trenton E.; Piland, Scott G.; Caswell, Shane V.; Ranalli, Dennis; Mills, Stephen; Ferrara, Michael S.; Courson, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To provide athletic trainers, health care professionals, and all those responsible for the care of athletes with clinical recommendations for preventing and managing sport-related dental and oral injuries. Background: Participation in competitive sports continues to grow at both the interscholastic and intercollegiate levels. Therefore, exposure to, and the incidence of athletic-related injury, including orofacial injury, will also likely increase. At the time of this writing, the leading governing agencies for interscholastic (National Federation of State High School Associations) and intercollegiate (National Collegiate Athletic Association) sports require only protective orofacial equipment (eg, mouthguards) for 5 and 4, respectively, of their sanctioned sports. Although orofacial injuries represent a small percentage of all sport-related injuries, the financial burden associated with these injuries (eg, tooth avulsion) can exceed $15 000 over an adult life. Therefore, effective management of sport-related dental injuries is critical to the long-term financial, physical, and emotional health of people who have experienced dental trauma. Recommendations: Based upon the current evidence regarding sport-related orofacial injury, we provide recommendations related to planning considerations, education, and mouthguard efficacy, material, fabrication, and care considerations. Additionally, suggested best practices for managing sport-related dental injury are also given for athletic trainers and other health care professionals. PMID:27875057

  8. Incidence and Characteristics of Injuries during the 2010 FELDA/FAM National Futsal League in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    A. Hamid, Mohamad Shariff; Jaafar, Zulkarnain; Mohd Ali, Azril Syazwan

    2014-01-01

    Objective In Malaysia, futsal is a popular sport played by individuals across all ages and genders. Despite its popularity, information on futsal related injury in Malaysia is not available. The purpose of this study is to examine the injury incidence and injury patterns among amateur men and women futsal players in Malaysia. Methods Players reported injury to the tournament medical team during the FELDA/FAM National Futsal League 2010 were interviewed and assessed by a Sports Medicine registrar. Player's socio-demographic profiles and information about the injury were documented in the injury report form adapted from medical report form used by FIFA: Medical Assessment and Research Centre (F-Marc). Results A total of 86 injuries were reported from 141 matches, equivalent to an incidence of 91.5 injuries per 1000 player hours (95% CI 72.2 to 110.8), or 61.0 injuries per 1000 player matches (95% CI 48.1 to 73.9). Most were minor injuries resulted from contact with another player. Injuries often involved the lower extremity (44%) followed by the trunk (14%) and the upper limb (13%). Ankle (n = 7; 39%) and knee (n = 6; 33%) sprains were the most prevalent diagnoses of time-loss injuries. A significant association between time-loss and type of injury was found χ2 (1,N = 86) = 3.99, p = 0.04. In addition, time-loss injury was significantly associated with playing surface χ2 (1,N = 86) = 10.11, p = 0.018. Conclusion The injury rate during the FELDA/FAM National Amateur Futsal Men's League in Malaysia was lower compared with previous Futsal World Cups competition. Most injuries resulted from contact with another player were minor and did not lead to time-loss from participation. Time-loss injury was significantly associated with type of injury and playing surface. PMID:24733140

  9. Return to Play After Forearm and Hand Injuries in the National Basketball Association

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Kyle W.; Hearns, Krystle A.; Carlson, Michelle Gerwin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hand injuries can result in significant time away from competition for professional basketball players. Time to return to play after hand injuries in elite athletes has not been well described. Purpose: To report the return to play from metacarpal fractures, phalangeal fractures, and thumb ligament tears in National Basketball Association (NBA) players over a 5-year period. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: The NBA transaction report was analyzed from January 2009 to May 2014. Players were identified if they were added to the inactive list (IL), missed games due to their injury, or underwent surgery as a result of hand injury. Number of games missed due to injury, days spent on the IL, and age at injury were calculated by injury type and location. Results: One hundred thirty-seven injuries were identified: 39 injuries to the hand and 98 injuries to the finger. Three major injury patterns were identified and analyzed: metacarpal fractures (n = 26), phalangeal fractures (n = 33), and thumb ligament tears (n = 9). The type of injury sustained affected return to play (P < .05). All thumb ligament tears required surgery and had the longest return to play of 67.5 ± 17.7 days (P < .05). The return to play for surgically treated metacarpal fractures (56.7 ± 26.3 days) was significantly greater than nonsurgically treated metacarpal fractures (26.3 ± 12.1 days; P < .01). Return to play for surgically repaired phalangeal fractures (46.2 ± 10.8 days) trended greater but was not significantly different than phalangeal fractures treated nonsurgically (33.3 ± 28.5 days; P = .21). Conclusion: Hand injuries in professional basketball players can lead to prolonged periods of time away from competition, especially after surgery. This study provides guidelines on expected return to play in the NBA after these common hand injuries. PMID:28251168

  10. Return to Play After Forearm and Hand Injuries in the National Basketball Association.

    PubMed

    Morse, Kyle W; Hearns, Krystle A; Carlson, Michelle Gerwin

    2017-02-01

    Hand injuries can result in significant time away from competition for professional basketball players. Time to return to play after hand injuries in elite athletes has not been well described. To report the return to play from metacarpal fractures, phalangeal fractures, and thumb ligament tears in National Basketball Association (NBA) players over a 5-year period. Descriptive epidemiology study. The NBA transaction report was analyzed from January 2009 to May 2014. Players were identified if they were added to the inactive list (IL), missed games due to their injury, or underwent surgery as a result of hand injury. Number of games missed due to injury, days spent on the IL, and age at injury were calculated by injury type and location. One hundred thirty-seven injuries were identified: 39 injuries to the hand and 98 injuries to the finger. Three major injury patterns were identified and analyzed: metacarpal fractures (n = 26), phalangeal fractures (n = 33), and thumb ligament tears (n = 9). The type of injury sustained affected return to play (P < .05). All thumb ligament tears required surgery and had the longest return to play of 67.5 ± 17.7 days (P < .05). The return to play for surgically treated metacarpal fractures (56.7 ± 26.3 days) was significantly greater than nonsurgically treated metacarpal fractures (26.3 ± 12.1 days; P < .01). Return to play for surgically repaired phalangeal fractures (46.2 ± 10.8 days) trended greater but was not significantly different than phalangeal fractures treated nonsurgically (33.3 ± 28.5 days; P = .21). Hand injuries in professional basketball players can lead to prolonged periods of time away from competition, especially after surgery. This study provides guidelines on expected return to play in the NBA after these common hand injuries.

  11. Total hemoglobin mass, iron status, and endurance capacity in elite field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, Timo; Franke, Julia; Voss, Sven; Bloch, Wilhelm; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Platen, Petra

    2010-03-01

    The aims of this study were as follows: To evaluate total hemoglobin mass (tHbmass) in international field hockey players; to examine the correlation between tHbmass and maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max); and to assess influences of iron status on tHbmass and on VO2max. The players of the German women's (N = 17, aged 24.8 +/- 3.0 [21-31] years) and men's (N = 17, aged 24.2 +/- 2.9 [19-32] years) national field hockey team were investigated. tHbmass was measured by an optimized carbon monoxide rebreathing method. The following parameters were measured in venous blood: Hemoglobin concentration (Hbconc), hematocrit (Hct), number and percentage of reticulocytes, reticulocyte hemoglobin content, serum iron, serum ferritin, serum transferrin, unsaturated iron-binding capacity, and serum soluble transferrin receptor concentration. VO2max was determined in a treadmill test. tHbmass (women: 10.6 +/- 1.1 g/kg; men: 12.5 +/- 0.9 g/kg) correlated to VO2max (women: 46.6 +/- 2.9 mL/min/kg; men: 55.8 +/- 4.0 mL/min/kg) in women (r = 0.56, p < 0.05) and in men (r = 0.57, p < 0.05), whereas Hbconc and Hct did not. The investigated parameters of iron status showed no association to tHbmass or to VO2max. In conclusion, tHbmass can be used as an indicator for endurance capacity in elite field hockey players, whereas Hbconc may not. tHbmass or VO2max were not influenced by the actual iron status of the investigated athletes.

  12. Metabolic power and energy expenditure in an international men's hockey tournament.

    PubMed

    Polglaze, Ted; Dawson, Brian; Buttfield, Alec; Peeling, Peter

    2017-02-20

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the typical metabolic power characteristics of elite men's hockey, and whether changes occur within matches and throughout an international tournament. National team players (n = 16), divided into 3 positional groups (strikers, midfielders, defenders), wore Global Positioning System devices in 6 matches. Energetic (metabolic power, energy expenditure) and displacement (distance, speed, acceleration) variables were determined, and intensity was classified utilising speed, acceleration and metabolic power thresholds. Midfielder's average metabolic power (11.8 ± 1.0 W · kg(-)(1)) was similar to strikers (11.1 ± 1.3 W · kg(-)(1)) and higher than defenders (10.8 ± 1.2 W · kg(-)(1), P = 0.001). Strikers (29.71 ± 3.39 kJ · kg(-)(1)) expended less energy than midfielders (32.18 ± 2.67 kJ · kg(-)(1), P = 0.014) and defenders (33.23 ± 3.96 kJ · kg(-)(1), P < 0.001). Energetic variables did not change between halves or across matches. Across all positions, over 45% of energy expenditure was at high intensity (>20 W · kg(-)(1)). International hockey matches are intense and highly intermittent; however, intensity is maintained throughout matches and over a tournament. In isolation, displacement measures underestimate the amount of high-intensity activity, whereas the integration of instantaneous speed and acceleration provides a more comprehensive assessment of the demands for variable-speed activity typically occurring in hockey matches.

  13. THE ROLE OF AEROBIC CAPACITY IN HIGH-INTENSITY INTERMITTENT EFFORTS IN ICE-HOCKEY

    PubMed Central

    Roczniok, R.; Maszczyk, A.; Pietraszewski, P.; Zając, A.

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine a relationship between aerobic capacity (V.O2max) and fatigue from high-intensity skating in elite male hockey players. The subjects were twenty-four male members of the senior national ice hockey team of Poland who played the position of forward or defence. Each subject completed an on-ice Repeated-Skate Sprint test (RSS) consisting of 6 timed 89-m sprints, with 30 s of rest between subsequent efforts, and an incremental test on a cycle ergometer in the laboratory, the aim of which was to establish their maximal oxygen uptake (V.O2max). The analysis of variance showed that each next repetition in the 6x89 m test was significantly longer than the previous one (F5,138=53.33, p<0.001). An analysis of the fatigue index (FI) calculated from the times recorded for subsequent repetitions showed that the value of the FI increased with subsequent repetitions, reaching its maximum between repetitions 5 and 6 (3.10±1.16%). The total FI was 13.77±1.74%. The coefficient of correlation between V.O2max and the total FI for 6 sprints on the distance of 89 m (r =–0.584) was significant (p=0.003). The variance in the index of players’ fatigue in the 6x89 m test accounted for 34% of the variance in V.O2max. The 6x89 m test proposed in this study offers a high test-retest correlation coefficient (r=0.78). Even though the test is criticized for being too exhaustive and thereby for producing highly variable results it still seems that it was well selected for repeated sprint ability testing in hockey players. PMID:25177097

  14. Increasing task complexity and ice hockey skills of youth athletes.

    PubMed

    Fait, Philippe E; McFadyen, Bradford J; Zabjek, Karl; Reed, Nick; Taha, Tim; Keightley, Michelle

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the effects on cognitive performance of progressively adding tasks specific to ice hockey (skating, stick handling, and obstacle avoidance) during a visual interference task (Stroop Color Word Test-interference condition). In addition, the effects on locomotor performance of progressively adding tasks of stickhandling, visual interference, and obstacle avoidance related to maximal skating speed and minimal obstacle clearance were investigated in eight male athletes ages 10 to 12 years. Results revealed decreased performance on both cognitive and physical measures with increased task complexity, suggesting that adding complexity to an environment influences hockey skill performance.

  15. Epidemiology of National Collegiate Athletic Association Women's Gymnastics Injuries, 2009–2010 Through 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Zachary Y.; Hayden, Ross; Barr, Megan; Klossner, David A.; Dompier, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Context Recent injury-surveillance data for collegiate-level women's gymnastics are limited. In addition, researchers have not captured non–time-loss injuries (ie, injuries resulting in restriction of participation <1 day). Objective To describe the epidemiology of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) women's gymnastics injuries during the 2009–2010 through 2013–2014 academic years. Design Descriptive epidemiology study. Setting Aggregate injury and exposure data collected from 11 women's gymnastics programs providing 28 seasons of data. Patients or Other Participants Collegiate student-athletes participating in women's gymnastics during the 2009–2010 through 2013–2014 academic years. Intervention(s) Women's gymnastics data from the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program (ISP) during the 2009–2010 through 2013–2014 academic years were analyzed. Main Outcome Measure(s) Injury rates; injury rate ratios; injury proportions by body site, diagnosis, and apparatus; and injury proportion ratios were reported with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results The ISP captured 418 women's gymnastics injuries, a rate of 9.22/1000 athlete-exposures (AEs; 95% CI = 8.33, 10.10). The competition injury rate (14.49/1000 AEs) was 1.67 times the practice injury rate (8.69/1000 AEs; 95% CI = 1.27, 2.19). When considering time-loss injuries only, the injury rate during this study period (3.62/1000 AEs) was lower than rates reported in earlier NCAA ISP surveillance data. Commonly injured body sites were the ankle (17.9%, n = 75), lower leg/Achilles tendon (13.6%, n = 57), trunk (13.4%, n = 56), and foot (12.4%, n = 52). Common diagnoses were ligament sprain (20.3%, n = 85) and muscle/tendon strain (18.7%, n = 78). Overall, 12.4% (n = 52) of injuries resulted in time loss of more than 3 weeks. Of the 291 injuries reported while a student-athlete used an apparatus (69.6%), most occurred during the floor exercise (41.9%, n = 122) and on the uneven bars (28.2%, n = 82

  16. 76 FR 28438 - Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC), National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC), National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) The meeting announced below concerns RFA CE10-004, the National Academic Centers of Excellence in Youth Violence Prevention (U01), secondary review. In...

  17. Hockey Concussion Education Project, Part 1: Susceptibility-weighted imaging study in male and female ice hockey players over a single season

    PubMed Central

    Helmer, Karl G.; Pasternak, Ofer; Fredman, Eli; Preciado, Ronny I.; Koerte, Inga K.; Sasaki, Takeshi; Mayinger, Michael; Johnson, Andrew M.; Holmes, Jeffrey D.; Forwell, Lorie; Skopelja, Elaine N.; Shenton, Martha E.; Echlin, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Object Concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), is a commonly occurring sports-related injury, especially in contact sports such as hockey. Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), which are small, hypointense lesions on T2*-weighted images, can result from TBI. The authors use susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) to automatically detect small hypointensities that may be subtle signs of chronic and acute damage due to both subconcussive and concussive injury. The goal was to investigate how the burden of these hypointensities change over time, over a playing season, and postconcussion, compared with subjects who did not suffer a medically observed and diagnosed concussion. Methods Images were obtained in 45 university-level adult male and female ice hockey players before and after a single Canadian Interuniversity Sports season. In addition, 11 subjects (5 men and 6 women) underwent imaging at 72 hours, 2 weeks, and 2 months after concussion. To identify subtle changes in brain tissue and potential CMBs, nonvessel clusters of hypointensities on SWI were automatically identified and a hypointensity burden index was calculated for all subjects at the beginning of the season (BOS) and the end of the season (EOS), in addition to postconcussion time points (where applicable). Results A statistically significant increase in the hypointensity burden, relative to the BOS, was observed for male subjects at the 2-week postconcussion time point. A smaller, nonsignificant rise in the burden for all female subjects was also observed within the same time period. The difference in hypointensity burden was also statistically significant for men with concussions between the 2-week time point and the BOS. There were no significant changes in burden for nonconcussed subjects of either sex between the BOS and EOS time points. However, there was a statistically significant difference in the burden between male and female subjects in the nonconcussed group at both the BOS and EOS time

  18. Hockey Concussion Education Project, Part 1. Susceptibility-weighted imaging study in male and female ice hockey players over a single season.

    PubMed

    Helmer, Karl G; Pasternak, Ofer; Fredman, Eli; Preciado, Ronny I; Koerte, Inga K; Sasaki, Takeshi; Mayinger, Michael; Johnson, Andrew M; Holmes, Jeffrey D; Forwell, Lorie A; Skopelja, Elaine N; Shenton, Martha E; Echlin, Paul S

    2014-04-01

    Concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), is a commonly occurring sports-related injury, especially in contact sports such as hockey. Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), which appear as small, hypointense lesions on T₂*-weighted images, can result from TBI. The authors use susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) to automatically detect small hypointensities that may be subtle signs of chronic and acute damage due to both subconcussive and concussive injury. The goal was to investigate how the burden of these hypointensities changes over time, over a playing season, and postconcussion, in comparison with subjects who did not suffer a medically observed and diagnosed concussion. Images were obtained in 45 university-level adult male and female ice hockey players before and after a single Canadian Interuniversity Sports season. In addition, 11 subjects (5 men and 6 women) underwent imaging at 72 hours, 2 weeks, and 2 months after concussion. To identify subtle changes in brain tissue and potential CMBs, nonvessel clusters of hypointensities on SWI were automatically identified, and a hypointensity burden index was calculated for all subjects at the beginning of the season (BOS), the end of the season (EOS), and at postconcussion time points (where applicable). A statistically significant increase in the hypointensity burden, relative to the BOS, was observed for male subjects with concussions at the 2-week postconcussion time point. A smaller, nonsignificant rise in the burden for female subjects with concussions was also observed within the same time period. There were no significant changes in burden for nonconcussed subjects of either sex between the BOS and EOS time points. However, there was a statistically significant difference in the burden between male and female subjects in the nonconcussed group at both the BOS and EOS time points, with males having a higher burden. This method extends the utility of SWI from the enhancement and detection of larger (> 5

  19. Skateboard-related injuries: not to be taken lightly. A National Trauma Databank Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lustenberger, Thomas; Talving, Peep; Barmparas, Galinos; Schnüriger, Beat; Lam, Lydia; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2010-10-01

    With the increasing popularity of skateboarding, trauma centers are experiencing increased number of skateboard injuries. The incidence and type of injuries and the effect of age on these variables are poorly described in the literature. Data from National Trauma Databank during a 5-year period was used for this study. Injury Severity Score (ISS), injured body area, specific injuries, and outcomes were calculated according to age groups (younger than 10 years, 10-16 years, and older than 16 years). During the study period, there were 2,270 admissions due to skateboard-related injuries (0.1% of all trauma admissions). There were 187 patients (8%) younger than 10 years, 1,314 patients (58%) 10 years to 16 years, and 769 patients (34%) older than 16 years. The overall mortality was 1.1% and ranged from 0% in the age group younger than 10 years to 0.3% in the group 10 years to 16 years and 2.6% in the group older than 16 years (p < 0.001). The incidence of severe trauma (Injury Severity Score ≥ 16) in the three age groups was 5.4%, 13.5%, and 23.7%, respectively (p < 0.001). The incidence of traumatic brain injury in the three age groups was 24.1%, 32.6%, and 45.5%, respectively (p < 0.001). The younger age group (younger than 10 years) was significantly more likely to suffer femur fractures and less likely to suffer tibia fractures than the older age groups. Helmets and use of a skateboard park were significant factors protecting against head injury. Skateboard-related injuries are associated with a high incidence of traumatic brain injury and long bone fractures. Age plays an important role in the anatomic distribution of injuries, injury severity, and outcomes. Our findings demonstrate that helmet utilization and designated skateboard areas significantly reduce the incidence of serious head injuries.

  20. Epidemiology of occupational injuries by nationality in Qatar: Evidence for focused occupational safety programmes.

    PubMed

    Al-Thani, Hassan; El-Menyar, Ayman; Consunji, Rafael; Mekkodathil, Ahammed; Peralta, Ruben; Allen, Katharine A; Hyder, Adnan A

    2015-09-01

    Occupational injuries are the second leading cause of trauma admission in Qatar. Given the wide diversity of the country's migrant worker populations at risk, this study aimed to analyse and describe the epidemiology of these injuries based on the workers nationality residing in Qatar. A retrospective analysis of trauma registry data on occupational-related injuries was conducted. The analysis included all patients [aged ≥18 years] admitted to the Level I Hamad Trauma Center, from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2013. Out of 6555 trauma admissions, 2015 (30.7%) patients had occupational injury. The admitted Case Fatality Rate (CFR) was 4.3 per 100 occupational injury related trauma admissions. Overall non-fatal occupational injury rate was 37.34 per 100,000 workers, whereas fatal injury rate was 1.58 per 100,000 workers. Most of the workers experiencing occupational injuries were from Nepal (28%), India (20%) and Bangladesh (9%). Fatal occupational injuries were predominately among Indians (20%), Nepalese (19%), and Filipinos/Bangladeshis (both 8%). Filipinos had the highest admitted CFR at 8.2 deaths per 100 trauma admissions with the next highest being Indians and Indonesians (4.2 per 100 trauma admissions). During the study period, the incidence of severe occupational injuries decreased despite a simultaneous increase in the worker population within Qatar. Almost one in four occupational injuries was a major trauma (ISS≥16). Nepalese and Indian workers represented 29% and 18% of all major trauma cases. Non-fatal occupational injuries appear to follow a pattern distinct from fatal ones. High-risk worker populations as defined by those with high admitted CFRs, experiencing the most severe or fatal injuries, must be the focus of targeted risk factor analysis and occupational safety interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Game injuries in relation to game schedules in the National Basketball Association.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Masaru; Cross, Chad L; Cushman, Daniel M; Maak, Travis G; Petron, David J; Willick, Stuart E

    2017-03-01

    Injury management is critical in the National Basketball Association (NBA), as players experience a wide variety of injuries. Recently, it has been suggested that game schedules, such as back-to-back games and four games in five days, increase the risk of injuries in the NBA. The aim of this study was to examine the association between game schedules and player injuries in the NBA. Descriptive epidemiology study. The present study analyzed game injuries and game schedules in the 2012-13 through 2014-15 regular seasons. Game injuries by game schedules and players' profiles were examined using an exact binomial test, the Fisher's exact test and the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test. A Poisson regression analysis was performed to predict the number of game injuries sustained by each player from game schedules and injured players' profiles. There were a total of 681 cases of game injuries sustained by 280 different players during the three years (total N=1443 players). Playing back-to-back games or playing four games in five days alone was not associated with an increased rate of game injuries, whereas a significant positive association was found between game injuries and playing away from home (p<0.05). Playing back-to-back games and away games were significant predictors of frequent game injuries (p<0.05). Game schedules could be one factor that impacts the risk of game injuries in the NBA. The findings could be useful for designing optimal game schedules in the NBA as well as helping NBA teams make adjustments to minimize game injuries. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Epidemiology of injuries in the Spanish national futsal male team: a five-season retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Riaza, Luis; Herrero-Gonzalez, Helena; Lopez-Alcorocho, Juan M; Guillen-Garcia, Pedro; Fernandez-Jaen, Tomas F

    2016-01-01

    Futsal started being played in 1930 and the number of futsal players has increased all over the world ever since. Nonetheless, despite the fact that Spain is one of the most relevant national teams worldwide, information on the incidence of injuries and their anthropometric characteristics is sparse in this country. To analyse medical assistance provided to players in their prematch concentration camps with the Spanish national team over five seasons, from 2010-2011 to 2014-2015, and also to collect data regarding anthropometric characteristics. This is a retrospective and detailed study of injuries players suffered over these five seasons. All variables were registered on an Excel spreadsheet and later analysed statistically. 411 injuries were studied in total. The dominant somatotype was mesomorph and the injured pivots were both the most endomorphic and the most mesomorphic. The most injured body structure was the hamstring muscles, occurring due to training and intrinsic mechanisms, where fatigue was the most frequent diagnosis. Only a few complementary examinations were carried out and prematch withdrawal was rare. The skinfold test total sum was lower than that of the Spanish 11-a-side players or than that in the lower category futsal Spanish players. In various research studies analysing exclusively injuries occurring in matches, the most frequent injury is ligament injury by extrinsic mechanism. The body mass index was not a useful parameter when assessing players' appropriate weight. Most injuries occurred in training sessions, mostly by intrinsic mechanism; the highest percentage of traumatic injuries occurred in official matches.

  3. Insurance claims data: a possible solution for a national sports injury surveillance system? An evaluation of data information against ASIDD and consensus statements on sports injury surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Åman, Malin; Forssblad, Magnus; Henriksson-Larsén, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Background Before preventive actions can be suggested for sports injuries at the national level, a solid surveillance system is required in order to study their epidemiology, risk factors and mechanisms. There are guidelines for sports injury data collection and classifications in the literature for that purpose. In Sweden, 90% of all athletes (57/70 sports federations) are insured with the same insurance company and data from their database could be a foundation for studies on acute sports injuries at the national level. Objective To evaluate the usefulness of sports injury insurance claims data in sports injury surveillance at the national level. Method A database with 27 947 injuries was exported to an Excel file. Access to the corresponding text files was also obtained. Data were reviewed on available information, missing information and dropouts. Comparison with ASIDD (Australian Sports Injury Data Dictionary) and existing consensus statements in the literature (football (soccer), rugby union, tennis, cricket and thoroughbred horse racing) was performed in a structured manner. Result Comparison with ASIDD showed that 93% of the suggested data items were present in the database to at least some extent. Compliance with the consensus statements was generally high (13/18). Almost all claims (83%) contained text information concerning the injury. Conclusions Relatively high-quality sports injury data can be obtained from a specific insurance company at the national level in Sweden. The database has the potential to be a solid base for research on acute sports injuries in different sports at the national level. PMID:24928588

  4. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in National Football League Athletes From 2010 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Christopher C.; Secrist, Eric S.; Bhat, Suneel B.; Woods, Daniel P.; Deluca, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a high incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries among National Football League (NFL) athletes; however, the incidence of reinjury in this population is unknown. Purpose: This retrospective epidemiological study analyzed all publicly disclosed ACL tears occurring in NFL players between 2010 and 2013 to characterize injury trends and determine the incidence of reinjury. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Methods: A comprehensive online search identified any NFL player who had suffered an ACL injury from 2010 to 2013. Position, playing surface, activity, and date were recorded. Each player was researched for any history of previous ACL injury. The NFL games database from USA Today was used to determine the incidence of ACL injuries on artificial turf and grass fields. Databases from Pro Football Focus and Pro Football Reference were used to determine the injury rate for each position. Results: NFL players suffered 219 ACL injuries between 2010 and 2013. Forty players (18.3%) had a history of previous ACL injury, with 27 (12.3%) retears and 16 (7.3%) tears contralateral to a previous ACL injury. Five players (2.28%) suffered their third ACL tear. Receivers (wide receivers and tight ends) and backs (linebackers, fullbacks, and halfbacks) had significantly greater injury risk than the rest of the NFL players, while perimeter linemen (defensive ends and offensive tackles) had significantly lower injury risk than the rest of the players. Interior linemen (offensive guards, centers, and defensive tackles) had significantly greater injury risk compared with perimeter linemen. ACL injury rates per team games played were 0.050 for grass and 0.053 for turf fields (P > .05). Conclusion: In this retrospective epidemiological study of ACL tears in NFL players, retears and ACL tears contralateral to a previously torn ACL constituted a substantial portion (18.3%) of total ACL injuries. The significant majority of ACL injuries in

  5. Firework injuries presenting to a national burn's unit.

    PubMed

    Jones, D; Lee, W; Rea, S; Donnell, M O; Eadie, P A

    2004-09-01

    The sale to the general public of fireworks is illegal in Ireland. However, many fireworks are readily available on the black market from illegal traders. The number of firework injuries presenting to our unit during the three week run-up to Hallowe'en October 2001 was recorded. In addition, each patient was contacted to determine how the fireworks were obtained, the average amount of money spent, and the level of adult supervision present at the time of injury. A total of 19 patients presented, 18 from the local catchment area, with a mean age of 16 yrs (range 5-46 yrs). Thirteen patients required admission. Sixteen patients sustained hand injuries including burns, and three sustained burns to other body areas. The amount of money spent varied between adults and children, the average amount among the paediatric group was Euro 2-4, but Euro 45 in the adult group. None were willing to identify the local source of their fireworks, but most fireworks originated in Northern Ireland. This small review highlights an ongoing problem in Ireland; fireworks are illegal, yet they are easily and cheaply available without quality or safety controls. Our public awareness campaign has failed to reach its target audience, and the illegal traders who sell these often inferior products are seldom charged. Children and adults will continue to sustain serious injuries as a result.

  6. Descriptive epidemiology of collegiate men's baseball injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988-1989 through 2003-2004.

    PubMed

    Dick, Randall; Sauers, Eric L; Agel, Julie; Keuter, Greg; Marshall, Stephen W; McCarty, Kenneth; McFarland, Edward

    2007-01-01

    To review 16 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) injury surveillance data for men's baseball and identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. Prevention and management of collegiate baseball injuries may be facilitated through injury research aimed at defining the nature of injuries inherent in the sport. Through the NCAA Injury Surveillance System, 16 years of collegiate baseball data were collected for the academic years 1988-1989 through 2003-2004. College baseball has a relatively low rate of injury compared with other NCAA sports, but 25% of injuries are severe and result in 10+ days of time loss from participation. The rate of injury was 3 times higher in a game situation than in practice (5.78 versus 1.85 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures [A-Es], rate ratio = 3.1, 95% confidence interval = 3.0, 3.3, P < .01). Practice injury rates were almost twice as high in the preseason as in the regular season (2.97 versus 1.58 per 1000 A-Es, rate ratio = 1.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.8, 2.0, P < .01). A total of 10% of all game injuries occurred from impact with a batted ball, an injury rate of 0.56 injuries per 1000 game A-Es. Sliding was involved in 13% of game injuries. Proper preseason conditioning is important to reduce injuries. Athletic trainers covering practices and games should be prepared to deal with serious, life-threatening injuries from batted balls and other injury mechanisms. Further study of batted-ball injuries is warranted, and the use of breakaway bases to prevent sliding injuries should be supported in college baseball.

  7. Descriptive Epidemiology of Collegiate Men's Baseball Injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988–1989 Through 2003–2004

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Randall; Sauers, Eric L; Agel, Julie; Keuter, Greg; Marshall, Stephen W; McCarty, Kenneth; McFarland, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review 16 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) injury surveillance data for men's baseball and identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. Background: Prevention and management of collegiate baseball injuries may be facilitated through injury research aimed at defining the nature of injuries inherent in the sport. Through the NCAA Injury Surveillance System, 16 years of collegiate baseball data were collected for the academic years 1988–1989 through 2003–2004. Main Results: College baseball has a relatively low rate of injury compared with other NCAA sports, but 25% of injuries are severe and result in 10+ days of time loss from participation. The rate of injury was 3 times higher in a game situation than in practice (5.78 versus 1.85 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures [A-Es], rate ratio = 3.1, 95% confidence interval = 3.0, 3.3, P < .01). Practice injury rates were almost twice as high in the preseason as in the regular season (2.97 versus 1.58 per 1000 A-Es, rate ratio = 1.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.8, 2.0, P < .01). A total of 10% of all game injuries occurred from impact with a batted ball, an injury rate of 0.56 injuries per 1000 game A-Es. Sliding was involved in 13% of game injuries. Recommendations: Proper preseason conditioning is important to reduce injuries. Athletic trainers covering practices and games should be prepared to deal with serious, life-threatening injuries from batted balls and other injury mechanisms. Further study of batted-ball injuries is warranted, and the use of breakaway bases to prevent sliding injuries should be supported in college baseball. PMID:17710166

  8. Traumatic vascular injuries of the lower extremity: report of the Iranian National Trauma Project.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Mohammad R; Moini, Majid; Khaji, Ali; Heidari, Pedram; Anvari, Arash

    2010-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the pattern of traumatic lower extremity vascular injuries in Iran. Patients with vascular injury of the lower extremity were selected from the Iranian National Trauma Project. This project was conducted in eight major cities during 2000-2004 and consisted of more than 17000 patients. Sixty-three subjects (54 men) with a total of 92 vascular injuries of the lower extremity were identified. Mean age of the patients was 25.87 +/- 13.37 years. Blunt trauma was more frequent than penetrating (62% vs. 38%). In 36 cases (57%), road traffic crash (RTC) was the cause of injury. In 21% of the patients (n=24), vascular injury resulted from occupational trauma. Workers (n=23, 20%) were the most frequently affected group. Three patients (5%) died due to severity of the associated injuries. Our results revealed that RTC is the most frequent cause of lower extremity vascular injuries in Iran. Our findings also showed that occupational injuries have considerable prevalence. Establishment of preventive strategies to reduce the frequency of these injuries is recommended.

  9. Occupational and recreational noise exposure from indoor arena hockey games.

    PubMed

    Cranston, Cory J; Brazile, William J; Sandfort, Delvin R; Gotshall, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    Occupational and recreational noise exposures were evaluated at two sporting arenas hosting collegiate hockey games (Venue 1) and semi-professional hockey (Venue 2). A total of 54 personal noise dosimetry samples were taken over the course of seven home hockey games: 15 workers and 9 fans at Venue 1, and 19 workers and 11 fans at Venue 2. None of the sampled workers were overexposed to noise based on Occupational Safety and Health Administration criteria. However, 40% and 57% of workers at Venue 1 and 33% and 91% of fans at Venue 2 were overexposed based on ACGIH noise exposure criteria. Noise exposures for fans were significantly different between venues, but worker noise exposures between venues were not significantly different. In addition, extensive area noise monitoring was conducted at each venue to further characterize the stadium noise on a location-by-location basis. Mean equivalent sound pressure levels ranged from 81 to 96 dBA at Venue 1 and from 85 to 97 dBA at Venue 2. Mean noise peak levels ranged from 105 to 124 dBA at Venue 1, and from 110 to 117 dBA at Venue 2. These data reflect the potential for overexposure at indoor hockey events and are useful in characterizing occupational noise exposure of indoor arena support staff and may also provide a foundation for future noise control research in indoor sports arenas.

  10. A Hockey Night in Canada: An Imagined Conversation between Theorists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogel, Curtis

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, various methodological issues surrounding the sociological study of sport are explored. Through an imagined dialogue between two graduate students at a hockey game, this work brings together three divergent approaches to social enquiry: Positivist Grounded Theory, Constructivist Grounded Theory, and Actor-Network Theory. This paper…

  11. Reflecting on the 5th National Occupational Injury Research Symposium and looking forward ☆

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Dawn N.; Collins, James

    2015-01-01

    For 2-1/2 days in October, 2011, more than 200 researchers convened at the 5th National Occupational Injury Research Symposium (NOIRS) to celebrate advances and successes in the field, to learn from each other about recent and ongoing occupational injury research, and to network and establish new professional relationships to advance occupational injury research in the future. This special issue highlights some of the research presented at that meeting. There has been considerable progress in research and worker safety since the first NOIRS in 1997, with demonstrated reductions in worker deaths and injury, an increased depth and breadth of research, and the development and validation of prevention strategies. Despite this progress, occupational injuries continue to exert too high a toll on workers, employers and society, and there are numerous challenges that need to be addressed to continue advancements in worker safety. PMID:23398698

  12. Workforce implications of injury among home health workers: evidence from the National Home Health Aide Survey.

    PubMed

    McCaughey, Deirdre; McGhan, Gwen; Kim, Jungyoon; Brannon, Diane; Leroy, Hannes; Jablonski, Rita

    2012-08-01

     The direct care workforce continues to rank as one of the most frequently injured employee groups in North America. Occupational health and safety studies have shown that workplace injuries translate into negative outcomes for workers and their employers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Organization of Work and Occupational Safety and Health framework is used to examine (a) relationships between injuries and work outcomes as reported by home health aides (HHAs) and (b) the likely efficacy of employee training and supervisor support in reducing worker risk for injury.   Data for this analysis were drawn from the 2007 National Home Health Aide Survey, a nationally representative survey. Ordinary least squares regression and multinomial logistic regression were used to examine relationships between worker injury and (a) worker outcomes and (b) organizational outcomes and to examine ratings of training and supervisory support relative to risk of injury.   Injured aides had lower job satisfaction, higher turnover intent, and poor employment and care quality perceptions. HHA perceptions of poor training and poor supervisory support were significantly related to higher risk for workplace injuries.   The current study suggests that workplace training has an important role in helping reduce direct care worker injuries, thereby decreasing organizational expenses related to injury, such as workers' compensation, sick time, and turnover. The NIOSH Organization of Work and Occupational Safety and Health framework offers a mechanism by which occupational health and safety interventions may be derived to reduce incidents of injury.

  13. Spinal injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Boden, Barry P; Jarvis, Christopher G

    2008-02-01

    Athletic competition has long been a known source of spinal injuries. Approximately 8.7% of all new cases of spinal cord injuries in the United States are related to sports activities. The sports activities that have the highest risk of catastrophic spinal injuries are football, ice hockey, wrestling, diving, skiing, snowboarding, rugby, and cheerleading. Axial compression forces to the top of the head can lead to cervical fracture and quadriplegia in any sport. It is critical for any medical personnel responsible for athletes in team sports to have a plan for stabilization and transfer of an athlete who sustains a cervical spine injury.

  14. Spinal injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Boden, Barry P; Jarvis, Christopher G

    2009-02-01

    Athletic competition has long been a known source of spinal injuries. Approximately 8.7% of all new cases of spinal cord injuries in the United States are related to sports activities. The sports activities that have the highest risk of catastrophic spinal injuries are football, ice hockey, wrestling, diving, skiing, snowboarding, rugby, and cheerleading. Axial compression forces to the top of the head can lead to cervical fracture and quadriplegia in any sport. It is critical for any medical personnel responsible for athletes in team sports to have a plan for stabilization and transfer of an athlete who sustains a cervical spine injury.

  15. 2003 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-05-23

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Lawrence Livermore National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  16. 2003 Sandia National Laboratories--Albuquerque Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-05-23

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Sandia National Laboratories-Albuquerque. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  17. 2003 Los Alamos National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-04

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Los Alamos National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  18. 2003 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-02

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Brookhaven National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  19. “I Went to a Fight the Other Night and a Hockey Game Broke Out”

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmied, Nadav; Espindola, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    Background: The current study explored the relationship between fighting behavior and passage of time, across games and seasons, in an attempt to assess if violent behavior in hockey is impulsive or intentional. Hypothesis: Before engaging in fighting behavior, players assess the utility of their actions and thus will fight less when the game is on the line (third period) and when champions are crowned (postseason). Methods: An archival exploration utilizing open access databases from multiple Internet sources. Results: During the 2010-2011 National Hockey League (NHL) season, players were significantly less likely to be involved in a fight as the game was coming to a close than in its early stages. In addition, data from the past 10 NHL seasons showed that players were significantly more violent in preseason games than during the regular season. They were also least likely to be involved in a fight during the postseason. Conclusion: The converging evidence suggests that players take into account the penalties associated with fighting and are less likely to engage in violence when the stakes are high, such as at the end of a game or a season. This implies, in turn, that major acts of aggression in the league are more likely to be calculated rather than impulsive. The findings suggest that a more punitive system should diminish fighting behavior markedly. PMID:24427418

  20. Proposed national strategies for the prevention of leading work-related diseases and injuries. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary strategies developed at the National Symposium on the Prevention of Leading Work Related Diseases and Injuries, held in Atlanta, Georgia on May 1 to 3, 1985 were revised, elaborated, and further developed. Strategies were developed for the prevention of occupational lung diseases, musculoskeletal injuries, occupational cancers, severe occupational traumatic injuries, and occupational cardiovascular diseases. Lung diseases considered included silicosis, asbestosis, lung cancer mesothelioma, coal workers' pneumoconiosis, byssinosis, occupational asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, asphyxiation, irritation, pulmonary edema, brucellosis, psitticosis, anthrax, mycobacterioses, histoplasmosis, aspergillosis, and coccidioidomycosis. Occupational cancers were discussed as they occur in the lung, pleura, peritoneum, bladder, kidneys, blood, nasal cavity, skin, nasal sinuses, and liver.

  1. Expert-novice differences in brain function of field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Wimshurst, Z L; Sowden, P T; Wright, M

    2016-02-19

    The aims of this study were to use functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the neural bases for perceptual-cognitive superiority in a hockey anticipation task. Thirty participants (15 hockey players, 15 non-hockey players) lay in an MRI scanner while performing a video-based task in which they predicted the direction of an oncoming shot in either a hockey or a badminton scenario. Video clips were temporally occluded either 160 ms before the shot was made or 60 ms after the ball/shuttle left the stick/racquet. Behavioral data showed a significant hockey expertise×video-type interaction in which hockey experts were superior to novices with hockey clips but there were no significant differences with badminton clips. The imaging data on the other hand showed a significant main effect of hockey expertise and of video type (hockey vs. badminton), but the expertise×video-type interaction did not survive either a whole-brain or a small-volume correction for multiple comparisons. Further analysis of the expertise main effect revealed that when watching hockey clips, experts showed greater activation in the rostral inferior parietal lobule, which has been associated with an action observation network, and greater activation than novices in Brodmann areas 17 and 18 and middle frontal gyrus when watching badminton videos. The results provide partial support both for domain-specific and domain-general expertise effects in an action anticipation task. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Hypothenar hammer syndrome from ice hockey stick-handling.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Mohamed A; McDonald, Joey; Tittley, Jacques G

    2013-11-01

    Ulnar artery thrombosis and hypothenar hammer syndrome are rare vascular complications that could potentially occur with repeated blows or trauma to the hand. Although initially reported as an occupational hazard among laborers and craftsmen, it has been observed more recently among recreationalists and athletes. Until now, it has never been reported as a complication in ice hockey players. In this case report, a 26-year-old Canadian professional ice hockey player presented with acute dominant right hand paleness, coolness, and pain with hand use. The patient used a wooden hockey stick with a large knob of tape at the end of the handle, which he regularly gripped in the palm of his right hand to help with face-offs and general stick-handling. Sonographic evaluation demonstrated no arterial flow in the distal right ulnar artery distribution, and ulnar artery occlusion with no aneurysmal degeneration was confirmed by magnetic resonance angiogram. Intraarterial thrombolytic therapy was initiated, and subsequent serial angiograms demonstrated significant improvement in distal ulnar artery flow as well as recanalization of right hand deep palmar arch and digital arteries. The patient's symptoms resolved, and he was maintained on therapeutic anticoagulation for 3 months prior to returning to playing ice hockey professionally, but with a padded glove and no tape knob at the handle tip. This case highlights a unique presentation of hockey stick-handling causing ulnar artery thrombosis that was likely from repeated palmar hypothenar trauma. Appropriate diagnostic imaging, early intraarterial thrombolysis, and postoperative surveillance and follow-up were crucial for the successful outcome in this patient.

  3. A prospective study of physician-observed concussions during junior ice hockey: implications for incidence rates.

    PubMed

    Echlin, Paul Sean; Tator, Charles H; Cusimano, Michael D; Cantu, Robert C; Taunton, Jack E; Upshur, Ross E G; Hall, Craig R; Johnson, Andrew M; Forwell, Lorie A; Skopelja, Elaine N

    2010-11-01

    physician, and as a result this single case was not included in the total of 21 total concussions. This initial concussion of the player was identified during baseline testing 2 days after the injury and was subsequently medically diagnosed and treated. The incidence of game-related concussions (per 100 [corrected] athlete exposures) in these fourth-tier junior [corrected] ice hockey players was 7 [corrected] times higher than [corrected] previously reported in the literature. This difference may be the result of the use of standardized direct physician observation, diagnosis, and subsequent treatment. The results of this study demonstrate the need for follow-up studies involving larger and more diverse sample groups to reflect generalizability of the findings. These follow-up studies should involve other contact sports (for example football and rugby) and also include the full spectrum of gender, age, and skill levels.

  4. Current pregnancy among women with spinal cord injury: findings from the US national spinal cord injury database.

    PubMed

    Iezzoni, L I; Chen, Y; McLain, A B J

    2015-11-01

    Cross-sectional study. To examine the prevalence of pregnancy and associations with sociodemographic and clinical factors among women with spinal cord injury (SCI). US National Spinal Cord Injury Database, an SCI registry that interviews participants 1, 5 and then every 5 years post injury. Data include SCI clinical details, functional impairments, participation measures, depressive symptoms and life satisfaction. Women aged 18-49 are asked about hospitalizations in the last year relating to pregnancy or its complications. Data represent 1907 women, who completed 3054 interviews. We used generalized estimating equations to examine bivariable associations between pregnancy and clinical and psychosocial variables and to perform multivariable regressions predicting pregnancy. Across all women, 2.0% reported pregnancy during the prior 12 months. This annual prevalence differed significantly by the years elapsed since injury; the highest rate occurred 15 years post injury (3.7%). Bivariable analyses found that younger age at injury was significantly associated with current pregnancy (P<0.0001). Compared with nonpregnant women, those reporting current pregnancy were significantly more likely to be married or partnered, have sport-related SCI, have higher motor scores and have more positive psychosocial status scores. Multivariable analyses found significant associations between current pregnancy and age, marital status, motor score and mobility and occupation scale scores. Current pregnancy rates among reproductive-aged women with SCI are similar to rates of other US women with chronic mobility impairments. More information is needed about pregnancy experiences and outcomes to inform both women with SCI seeking childbearing and clinicians providing their care.

  5. Current Pregnancy Among Women with Spinal Cord Injury: Findings from the U.S. National Spinal Cord Injury Database

    PubMed Central

    Iezzoni, Lisa I.; Chen, Yuying; McLain, Aime B. Jackson

    2015-01-01

    Study design Cross-sectional study Objective To examine prevalence of pregnancy and associations with sociodemographic and clinical factors among women with spinal cord injury (SCI) Setting U.S. National Spinal Cord Injury Database, an SCI registry that interviews participants 1, 5, and then every 5 years post-injury. Data include SCI clinical details, functional impairments, participation measures, depressive symptoms, and life satisfaction. Women ages 18-49 are asked about hospitalizations in the last year relating to pregnancy or its complications. Data represent 1,907 women, who completed 3,054 interviews. Methods We used generalized estimating equations to examine bivariable associations between pregnancy and clinical and psychosocial variables and to perform multivariable regressions predicting pregnancy. Results Across all women, 2.0% reported pregnancy during the prior 12 months. This annual prevalence differed significantly by years elapsed since injury; the highest rate occurred 15 years post-injury (3.7%). Bivariable analyses found that younger age at injury was significantly associated with current pregnancy (P < 0.0001). Compared with nonpregnant women, those reporting current pregancy were significantly more likely to be married or partnered, have sport-related SCI, have higher motor scores, and have more positive psychosocial status scores. Multivariable analyses found significant associations between current pregnancy and age, marital status, motor score, and mobility and occupation scale scores. Conclusions Current pregnancy rates among reproductive-aged women with SCI are similar to rates of other U.S. women with chronic mobility impairments. More information is needed about pregnancy experiences and outcomes to inform both women with SCI seeking childbearing and clinicians providing their care. PMID:25987000

  6. Prevalence of brachial plexus injuries in patients with scapular fractures: A National Trauma Data Bank review

    PubMed Central

    Chamata, Edward; Mahabir, Raman; Jupiter, Daniel; Weber, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies investigating the prevalence of brachial plexus injuries associated with scapular fractures are sparse, and are frequently limited by small sample sizes and often restricted to single-centre experience. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of brachial plexus injuries associated with scapular fractures; to determine how the prevalence varies with the region of the scapula injured; and to assess which specific nerves of the brachial plexus were involved. METHODS: The present study was a retrospective review of data from the National Trauma Data Bank over a five-year period (2007 to 2011). RESULTS: Of 68,118 patients with scapular fractures, brachial plexus injury was present in 1173 (1.72%). In patients with multiple scapular fractures, the prevalence of brachial plexus injury was 3.12%, and ranged from 1.52% to 2.22% in patients with single scapular fractures depending on the specific anatomical location of the fracture. Of the 426 injuries with detailed information on nerve injury, 208 (49%) involved the radial nerve, 113 (26.5%) the ulnar nerve, 65 (15%) the median nerve, 36 (8.5%) the axillary nerve and four (1%) the musculocutaneous nerve. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of brachial plexus injuries in patients with scapular fractures was 1.72%. The prevalence was similar across anatomical regions for single scapular fracture and was higher with multiple fractures. The largest percentage of nerve injuries were to the radial nerve. PMID:25535462

  7. Civilian traumatic vascular injuries of the upper extremity:report of the Iranian national trauma project.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Mohammad R; Moini, Majid; Khaji, Ali

    2009-12-01

    The determination of the pattern of traumatic vascular injuries of the upper extremity in Iran was the aim of this study. Data of the Iranian national trauma project were used to identify patients with upper extremity vascular injuries. This project was conducted in 8 major cities from 2000-2004. A total of 113 cases with 130 vascular injuries were found, including 2 axillary, 18 brachial, and 69 radial and ulnar arteries. In 91 cases (81%), penetrating trauma was responsible. Associated nerve and/or upper extremity fractures were seen in 20% and 18% of cases, respectively. End-to-end anastomosis, interposition of saphenous graft, and ligation were used for the management of 44%, 28%, and 17%, respectively, of brachial artery injuries. Ulnar and radial artery injuries had been either ligated (n = 36; 52%) or sutured (n = 33; 48%). Median, ulnar, and radial nerve injuries, except for one, had all been sutured primarily. No patients needed fasciotomy. Amputation and mortality resulting from associated injuries occurred in 3 (2.6%) and 5 (4.4%) patients, respectively. This study revealed that stabbings are the most frequent causes of these injuries in Iran, in spite of the management of patients in level 3 trauma centers; the rate of amputation is acceptable. However, this study does not provide limb functions of the patients.

  8. Prevalence of brachial plexus injuries in patients with scapular fractures: A National Trauma Data Bank review.

    PubMed

    Chamata, Edward; Mahabir, Raman; Jupiter, Daniel; Weber, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Studies investigating the prevalence of brachial plexus injuries associated with scapular fractures are sparse, and are frequently limited by small sample sizes and often restricted to single-centre experience. To determine the prevalence of brachial plexus injuries associated with scapular fractures; to determine how the prevalence varies with the region of the scapula injured; and to assess which specific nerves of the brachial plexus were involved. The present study was a retrospective review of data from the National Trauma Data Bank over a five-year period (2007 to 2011). Of 68,118 patients with scapular fractures, brachial plexus injury was present in 1173 (1.72%). In patients with multiple scapular fractures, the prevalence of brachial plexus injury was 3.12%, and ranged from 1.52% to 2.22% in patients with single scapular fractures depending on the specific anatomical location of the fracture. Of the 426 injuries with detailed information on nerve injury, 208 (49%) involved the radial nerve, 113 (26.5%) the ulnar nerve, 65 (15%) the median nerve, 36 (8.5%) the axillary nerve and four (1%) the musculocutaneous nerve. The prevalence of brachial plexus injuries in patients with scapular fractures was 1.72%. The prevalence was similar across anatomical regions for single scapular fracture and was higher with multiple fractures. The largest percentage of nerve injuries were to the radial nerve.

  9. Burn injury characteristics: findings from Pakistan National Emergency Department Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Burn injury is an important yet under-researched area in Pakistan. The objective of this study was to determine the characteristics and associated outcomes of burn injury patients presenting to major emergency departments in Pakistan. Methods Pakistan National Emergency Department Surveillance (Pak-NEDS) was a pilot active surveillance conducted between November 2010 and March 2011. Information related to patient demographics, mode of arrival, cause of burn injury, and outcomes was analyzed for this paper. Data were entered using Epi Info and analyzed using SPSS v.20. Ethical approval was obtained from all participating sites. Results There were 403 burn injury patients in Pak-NEDS, with a male to female ratio 2:1. About 48.9% of the burn injury patients (n = 199) were between 10 - 29 years of age. There was no statistically significant difference between unintentional and intentional burn injury patients except for body part injured (p-value 0.004) and ED disposition (p-value 0.025). Among 21 patients who died, most were between 40 - 49 years of age (61.9%) and suffered from fire burns (81%). Conclusion Burn injuries are a burden on emergency rooms in Pakistan. We were able to demonstrate the significant burden of burn injuries that is not addressed by specialized burn centers. PMID:26692165

  10. Injury patterns associated with hypotension in pediatric trauma patients: A national trauma database review.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Alison R; Diz, Debra I; Tooze, Janet A; Miller, Chadwick D; Petty, John

    2015-06-01

    Hypotension after trauma is most commonly assumed to be hemorrhagic, or hypovolemic, in origin. However, hypotension may occur in pediatric patients with isolated head injury, challenging accepted tenets of trauma care. We sought to quantify the contribution of head injury to the development of hypotension after pediatric trauma. This is a retrospective cohort analysis using the National Trauma Data Bank registry 2009. Children aged 0 to 15 years were classified by injury pattern sustained during trauma using discharge diagnosis International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes into isolated head, hemorrhagic, spinal cord, or other injury type. The primary outcome was hypotension for age at arrival to the emergency department. Risk of hypotension was estimated and compared by injury pattern using absolute and relative risks (RRs) stratified by age group (0-4 years, 5-11 years, 12-15 years). Rates of hypotension ranged from 1.8% to 2.3% by age, with the highest incidence in the 12- to 15-year group. The RR of hypotension from isolated head injury (RR, 2.5; 95% confidence interval, 2.0-3.2 vs. other) was not significantly different from the RR for hemorrhagic injury (RR, 2.7; 95% confidence interval, 2.1-3.5 vs. other) in the 0- to 4-year-old group. For the older age groups, the RR of hypotension from isolated head injury was significantly lower than from hemorrhagic injury. Hypotension occurs after isolated head injury in children, and the risk of hypotension is as great as hemorrhagic injuries in children aged 0 to 4 years. This finding should now lead us to confirm whether a cause-effect relationship exists and, if so, isolate the responsible mechanism. In turn, this could reveal an opportunity to tailor treatments to address the underlying mechanism for hypotension in these children. Prognostic and epidemiologic study, level III.

  11. Modeling eligibility under national systems of compensation for treatment injury.

    PubMed

    Davis, Peter; Lay-Yee, Roy; Briant, Robin; Scott, Alastair

    2006-04-01

    How can different schemes of compensation for treatment injury be evaluated? This article offers an empirical approach to assessment based on the simulation of alternative models of eligibility using real-world data. It draws on information about adverse events generated from a representative survey of public hospital admissions in New Zealand and classifies these under a range of eligibility criteria for different possible compensation systems. These are then evaluated according to a number of policy design considerations, using variables available from the New Zealand study.

  12. Epidemiology of syndesmosis injuries in intercollegiate football: incidence and risk factors from National Collegiate Athletic Association injury surveillance system data from 2004-2005 to 2008-2009.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Kenneth J; George, Elizabeth; Harris, Alex H S; Dragoo, Jason L

    2013-07-01

    To describe the incidence and risk factors for high ankle sprains (ie, syndesmosis injuries) among National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) football players. Descriptive epidemiologic study. Data were examined from the NCAA's Injury Surveillance System (ISS) for 5 football seasons (from 2004-2005 to 2008-2009). All NCAA men's football programs participating in the ISS. No additional risk factors were introduced as a result of this analysis. For partial and complete syndesmosis injuries, outcome measures included incidence, time lost from participation, and requirement for surgical repair. The overall incidence of high ankle sprains in NCAA football players was 0.24 per 1000 athlete exposures, accounting for 24.6% of all ankle sprains. Athletes were nearly 14 times more likely to sustain the injury during games compared with practice; complete syndesmosis injuries resulted in significantly greater time lost compared with partial injuries (31.3 vs 15.8 days). Less than 3% of syndesmosis injuries required surgical intervention. There was a significantly higher injury incidence on artificial surfaces compared with natural grass. The majority of injuries (75.2%) occurred during contact with another player. Our data suggest a significantly higher incidence of syndesmosis injuries during games, during running plays, and to running backs and interior defensive linemen. The wide range in time lost from participation for complete syndesmosis injuries underscores the need for improved understanding of injury mechanism and classification of injury severity such that prevention, safe return to play protocols, and outcomes can be further improved.

  13. Injury patterns and risk factors for orthopaedic trauma from snowboarding and skiing: a national perspective.

    PubMed

    Basques, Bryce A; Gardner, Elizabeth C; Samuel, Andre M; Webb, Matthew L; Lukasiewicz, Adam M; Bohl, Daniel D; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2016-05-13

    Alpine skiing and snowboarding are both popular winter sports that can be associated with significant orthopaedic injuries. However, there is a lack of nationally representative injury data for the two sports. The National Trauma Data Bank was queried for patients presenting to emergency departments due to injuries sustained from skiing and snowboarding during 2011 and 2012. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and injury patterns were tabulated and compared between skiing and snowboarding. Risk factors for increased injury severity score and lack of helmet use were identified using multivariate logistic regression. Of the 6055 patients identified, 55.2 % were skiers. Sixty-one percent had fractures. Lower extremity fractures were the most common injury and occurred more often in skiers (p < 0.001). Upper extremity fractures were more common in snowboarders, particularly distal radius fractures (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, increased injury severity was independently associated with age 18-29, 60-69, 70+, male sex, a positive blood test for alcohol, a positive blood test for an illegal substance, and wearing a helmet. Lack of helmet use was associated with age 18-29, 30-39, smoking, a positive drug test for an illegal substance, and snowboarding. Young adults, the elderly, and those using substances were shown to be at greater risk of increased injury severity and lack of helmet use. The results of this study can be used clinically to guide the initial assessment of these individuals following injury, as well as for targeting preventive measures and education. Prognostic Level III.

  14. Descriptive Epidemiology of Collegiate Women's Softball Injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988–1989 Through 2003–2004

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Stephen W; Hamstra-Wright, Karrie L; Dick, Randall; Grove, Katie A; Agel, Julie

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review 16 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) injury surveillance data for women's softball and to identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. Background: The NCAA Injury Surveillance System has tracked injuries in all divisions of NCAA softball from the 1988– 1989 to the 2003–2004 seasons. This report describes what was found and why the findings are important for the safety, enhancement, and continued growth of the sport. Main Results: Across all divisions, preseason practice injury rates were more than double the regular-season practice injury rates (3.65 versus 1.68 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures, rate ratio = 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.0, 2.4, P < .01). The rate of injury in a game was 1.6 times that in a practice (4.30 versus 2.67 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures, rate ratio = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.5, 1.7). A total of 51.2% of game injuries resulted from “other-contact” mechanisms, whereas 55% of practice injuries resulted from noncontact mechanisms. In games, ankle ligament sprains and knee internal derangements accounted for 19% of injuries. Twenty-three percent of all game injuries were due to sliding, most of which were ankle sprains. In practices, ankle ligament sprains, quadriceps and hamstring strains, shoulder strains and tendinitis, knee internal derangements, and lower back strains (combined) accounted for 38% of injuries. Recommendations: Ankle ligament sprains, knee internal derangements, sliding injuries, and overuse shoulder and low back injuries were among the most common conditions in NCAA women's softball. Preventive efforts should focus on sliding technique regardless of skill level, potential equipment changes, neuromuscular training programs, position-specific throwing programs, and mechanisms of low back injury. Further research is needed on the development and effects of these preventive efforts, as well as in the area of windmill-pitching biomechanics. PMID:17710178

  15. The National Athletic Treatment, Injury and Outcomes Network (NATION): Methods of the Surveillance Program, 2011–2012 Through 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Dompier, Thomas P.; Marshall, Stephen W.; Kerr, Zachary Y.; Hayden, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Context Previous epidemiologic researchers have examined time-loss (TL) injuries in high school student-athletes, but little is known about the frequency of non–time-loss (NTL) injuries in these athletes. Objective To describe the methods of the National Athletic Treatment, Injury and Outcomes Network (NATION) Surveillance Program and provide descriptive epidemiology of TL and NTL injuries across athletes in 27 high school sports. Design Descriptive epidemiology study. Setting Aggregate injury and exposure data collected from 147 high schools in 26 states. Patients or Other Participants High school student-athletes participating in 13 boys' sports and 14 girls' sports during the 2011–2012 through 2013–2014 academic years. Main Outcome Measure(s) Athletic trainers documented injuries and exposures using commercially available injury-tracking software packages. Standard injury-tracking software was modified by the software vendors to conform to the surveillance needs of this project. The modified software exported a set of common data elements, stripped of personally identifiable information, to a centralized automated verification and validation system before they were included in the centralized research database. Dependent measures were injury and exposure frequencies and injury rates with 95% confidence intervals stratified by sport, sex, and injury type (TL or NTL). Results Over the 3-year period, a total of 2337 team seasons across 27 sports resulted in 47 014 injuries and 5 146 355 athlete-exposures. The NTL injuries accounted for 38 765 (82.45%) and TL injuries for 8249 (17.55%) of the total. Conclusions The NTL injuries accounted for a substantial amount of the total number of injuries sustained by high school student-athletes. This project demonstrates the feasibility of creating large-scale injury surveillance systems using commercially available injury-tracking software. PMID:26067620

  16. Time trends for injuries and illness, and their relation to performance in the National Basketball Association.

    PubMed

    Podlog, Leslie; Buhler, Craig F; Pollack, Harvey; Hopkins, Paul N; Burgess, Paul R

    2015-05-01

    To survey injury/illness in the National Basketball Association over a 25-year period and examine the relationship of injury/illness to team performance. A retrospective correlational design. Trends were examined in reported numbers of players injured/ill during a season and games missed due to injury/illness from seasons ending in 1986 through 2005. This period was compared to years 2006-2010, when NBA teams were allowed to increase the total number of players on the team from 12 to 15. There was a highly significant trend (p<0.0001) of increasing numbers of players injured/ill and games missed from 1986 through 2005. After the team expansion in 2006, these rates fell abruptly by 13% and 39% respectively (both p<0.0001 compared to the previous 5-year period). We also found a significant inverse association between games missed due to injury/illness and percent games won (r=-0.29, p<0.0001). Results demonstrate an increased rate of injury in the National Basketball Association up until the expansion of team size in 2006. Following 2006, team expansion was positively associated with decreased injury/illness rates. The latter finding suggests the importance of maintaining a healthy roster with respect to winning outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Descriptive Epidemiology of Collegiate Women's Soccer Injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988–1989 Through 2002–2003

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Randall; Putukian, Margot; Agel, Julie; Evans, Todd A; Marshall, Stephen W

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review 15 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) injury surveillance data for women's soccer and identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. Background: The number of NCAA schools sponsoring women's soccer has grown tremendously, from 271 in 1988– 1989 to 879 schools in 2002–2003. During that time, the NCAA Injury Surveillance System has collected game and practice injury data for women's soccer across all 3 NCAA divisions. Main Results: The rate of injury was more than 3 times higher in games than in practices (16.44 versus 5.23 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures, rate ratio = 3.2, 95% confidence interval = 3.1, 3.4, P < .01), and preseason practices had an injury rate that was more than 3 times greater than the rate for in-season practices (9.52 versus 2.91 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures, rate ratio = 3.3, 95% confidence interval = 3.1, 3.5, P < .01). Approximately 70% of all game and practice injuries affected the lower extremities. Ankle ligament sprains (18.3%), knee internal derangements (15.9%), concussions (8.6%), and leg contusions (8.3%) accounted for a substantial portion of game injuries. Upper leg muscle-tendon strains (21.3%), ankle ligament sprains (15.3%), knee internal derangements (7.7%), and pelvis and hip muscle strains (7.6%) represented most of the practice injuries. Injuries were categorized as attributable to player contact, “other contact” (eg, contact with the ball, ground, or other object), or no contact. Player-to-player contact accounted for more than half of all game injuries (approximately 54%) but less than 20% of all practice injuries. The majority of practice injuries involved noncontact injury mechanisms. Knee internal derangements, ankle ligament sprains, and concussions were the leading game injuries that resulted in 10 or more days of time lost as a result of injury. Recommendations: Ankle ligament sprains, knee internal derangements, and concussions are common

  18. Descriptive Epidemiology of Collegiate Men's Football Injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988–1989 Through 2003–2004

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Randall; Ferrara, Michael S; Agel, Julie; Courson, Ron; Marshall, Stephen W; Hanley, Michael J; Reifsteck, Fred

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review 16 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) injury surveillance data for men's football and identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. Background: Football is a high-velocity collision sport in which injuries are expected. Football tends to have one of the highest injury rates in sports. Epidemiologic data helps certified athletic trainers and other clinicians identify injury trends and patterns to appropriately design and institute injury prevention protocols and then measure their effects. Main Results: During the 16-year reporting period, about 19% of the Division I, II, and III NCAA institutions sponsoring football participated in the Injury Surveillance System. The results from the 16-year study period show little variation in the injury rates over time: games averaged 36 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures (A-Es); fall practice, approximately 4 injuries per 1000 A-Es; and spring practice, about 10 injuries per 1000 A-Es. The game injury rate was more than 9 times higher than the in-season practice injury rate (35.90 versus 3.80 injuries per 1000 A-Es, rate ratio = 9.1, 95% confidence interval = 9.0, 9.2), and the spring practice injury rate was more than 2 times higher than the fall practice injury rate (9.62 versus 3.80 injuries per 1000 A-Es, rate ratio = 2.5, 95% confidence interval = 2.5, 2.6). The rate ratio for games versus fall practices was greatest for upper leg contusions (18.1 per 1000 A-Es), acromioclavicular joint sprains (14.0 per 1000 A-Es), knee internal derangements (13.4 per 1000 A-Es), ankle ligament sprains (12.0 per 1000 A-Es), and concussions (11.1 per 1000 A-Es). Recommendations: Football is a complex sport that requires a range of skills performed by athletes with a wide variety of body shapes and types. Injury risks are greatest during games. Thus, injury prevention measures should focus on position-specific activities to reduce the injury rate. As equipment technology improves for

  19. Descriptive epidemiology of collegiate men's football injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988-1989 through 2003-2004.

    PubMed

    Dick, Randall; Ferrara, Michael S; Agel, Julie; Courson, Ron; Marshall, Stephen W; Hanley, Michael J; Reifsteck, Fred

    2007-01-01

    To review 16 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) injury surveillance data for men's football and identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. Football is a high-velocity collision sport in which injuries are expected. Football tends to have one of the highest injury rates in sports. Epidemiologic data helps certified athletic trainers and other clinicians identify injury trends and patterns to appropriately design and institute injury prevention protocols and then measure their effects. During the 16-year reporting period, about 19% of the Division I, II, and III NCAA institutions sponsoring football participated in the Injury Surveillance System. The results from the 16-year study period show little variation in the injury rates over time: games averaged 36 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures (A-Es); fall practice, approximately 4 injuries per 1000 A-Es; and spring practice, about 10 injuries per 1000 A-Es. The game injury rate was more than 9 times higher than the in-season practice injury rate (35.90 versus 3.80 injuries per 1000 A-Es, rate ratio = 9.1, 95% confidence interval = 9.0, 9.2), and the spring practice injury rate was more than 2 times higher than the fall practice injury rate (9.62 versus 3.80 injuries per 1000 A-Es, rate ratio = 2.5, 95% confidence interval = 2.5, 2.6). The rate ratio for games versus fall practices was greatest for upper leg contusions (18.1 per 1000 A-Es), acromioclavicular joint sprains (14.0 per 1000 A-Es), knee internal derangements (13.4 per 1000 A-Es), ankle ligament sprains (12.0 per 1000 A-Es), and concussions (11.1 per 1000 A-Es). Football is a complex sport that requires a range of skills performed by athletes with a wide variety of body shapes and types. Injury risks are greatest during games. Thus, injury prevention measures should focus on position-specific activities to reduce the injury rate. As equipment technology improves for the helmet, shoulder pads, and other protective

  20. Aerobic Development of Elite Youth Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Jeff R; Cordingley, Dean M; MacDonald, Peter B

    2015-11-01

    Ice hockey is a physiologically complex sport requiring aerobic and anaerobic energy metabolism. College and professional teams often test aerobic fitness; however, there is a paucity of information regarding aerobic fitness of elite youth players. Without this knowledge, training of youth athletes to meet the standards of older age groups and higher levels of hockey may be random, inefficient, and or effective. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the aerobic fitness of elite youth hockey players. A retrospective database review was performed for 200 male AAA hockey players between the ages of 13 and 17 (age, 14.4 ± 1.2 years; height, 174.3 ± 8.5 cm; body mass, 67.2 ± 11.5 kg; body fat, 9.8 ± 3.5%) before the 2012-13 season. All subjects performed a graded exercise test on a cycle ergometer, whereas expired air was collected by either a Parvo Medics TrueOne 2400 or a CareFusion Oxycon Mobile metabolic cart to determine maximal oxygen consumption (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max). Body mass, absolute V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, and the power output achieved during the last completed stage increased in successive age groups from age 13 to 15 years (p ≤ 0.05). Ventilatory threshold (VT) expressed as a percentage of V[Combining Dot Above]O2max and the heart rate (HR) at which VT occurred decreased between the ages of 13 and 14 years (p ≤ 0.05), whereas the V[Combining Dot Above]O2 at which VT occurred increased from the age of 14-15 years. There were no changes in relative V[Combining Dot Above]O2max or HRmax between any successive age groups. The aerobic fitness levels of elite youth ice hockey players increased as players age and mature physically and physiologically. However, aerobic fitness increased to a lesser extent at older ages. This information has the potential to influence off-season training and maximize the aerobic fitness of elite amateur hockey players, so that these players can meet standards set by advanced elite age groups.

  1. Limitations of child injury data from the CPSC's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System: the case of baby walker related data.

    PubMed

    Weiss, H B

    1996-03-01

    The US Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) is a primary source for children's consumer product injury surveillance data in the US. Differing interpretations of the emergency department based NEISS baby walker data by various parties prompted this detailed examination, reclassification, and analysis of the NEISS data to explain these discrepancies. Case selection was performed by searching the NEISS 1982-91 database for the baby walker product code and various text strings for children less than 24 months old. False negative and false positive cases were identified and reclassified. Adjusted population rates were computed and the types and locations of hospitals contributing to the sample were examined. One per cent false positive and 4% false negative misclassification rates were observed. In 1991, two children's hospitals reported 14% of the baby walker related injuries, though these hospitals made up just 2% of the sample frame. Through random allocation, one state currently contains four acute care hospitals and the only two children's hospitals reporting to the NEISS system. These six hospitals contributed 18% of the walker cases whereas the state represents only 3% of the US infant population. Misclassification in NEISS baby walker reports is minimal, with false negatives outweighing false positives. For trend analysis of product related injuries at the frequency of occurrence observed for baby walkers, NEISS suffers from low sensitivity due to sampling error. For children's injuries, NEISS' estimates have been affected by children's hospitals coming in and out of the sample and currently reflects a random geographic imbalance because one state contributes both of the reporting children's hospitals. To overcome these problems improved multiple product coding, a unique baby walker code, and stratification of children's hospitals in an enlarged NEISS sample is recommended.

  2. Limitations of child injury data from the CPSC's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System: the case of baby walker related data.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, H. B.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The US Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) is a primary source for children's consumer product injury surveillance data in the US. Differing interpretations of the emergency department based NEISS baby walker data by various parties prompted this detailed examination, reclassification, and analysis of the NEISS data to explain these discrepancies. METHODS: Case selection was performed by searching the NEISS 1982-91 database for the baby walker product code and various text strings for children less than 24 months old. False negative and false positive cases were identified and reclassified. Adjusted population rates were computed and the types and locations of hospitals contributing to the sample were examined. RESULTS: One per cent false positive and 4% false negative misclassification rates were observed. In 1991, two children's hospitals reported 14% of the baby walker related injuries, though these hospitals made up just 2% of the sample frame. Through random allocation, one state currently contains four acute care hospitals and the only two children's hospitals reporting to the NEISS system. These six hospitals contributed 18% of the walker cases whereas the state represents only 3% of the US infant population. CONCLUSIONS: Misclassification in NEISS baby walker reports is minimal, with false negatives outweighing false positives. For trend analysis of product related injuries at the frequency of occurrence observed for baby walkers, NEISS suffers from low sensitivity due to sampling error. For children's injuries, NEISS' estimates have been affected by children's hospitals coming in and out of the sample and currently reflects a random geographic imbalance because one state contributes both of the reporting children's hospitals. To overcome these problems improved multiple product coding, a unique baby walker code, and stratification of children's hospitals in an enlarged NEISS sample is

  3. Game performance in ice sledge hockey: an exploratory examination into type of disability and anthropometric parameters.

    PubMed

    Molik, Bartosz; Morgulec-Adamowicz, Natalia; Kosmol, Andrzej; Yilla, Abu B; Filipkowska, Alicja; Lewandowski, Mateusz; Pijanowska, Justyna; Słyk, Katarzyna; Zubala, Tomasz; Flis, Sylwester; Herink, Roman

    2012-01-01

    To compare first disability and anthropometric variables and second disability and game efficiency measures. Prospective cohort study. Winter Paralympic Games in Vancouver (2010). A sample of 54 (age, 30.85 ± 7.99 y) of the 114 elite ice sledge hockey athletes participated in this study. To be included in the analysis, an athlete had to participate for a minimum of 45 minutes in total and in a minimum of 2 games during the tournament. Athletes were categorized according to type of disability into 4 groups: group 1 (double amputee above and below the knee), group 2 (single amputee above and below the knee), group 3 (spinal cord injury), and group 4 (other physical disabilities, including phocomelia, cerebral palsy, sclerosis multiplex, and lower limb paresis, and players with minimal disability). Before the tournament, athletes completed a Personal Questionnaire Form. Data including anthropometric measurements (seated position and range of arms) and length of the sledge were also collected. All 20 scheduled games were videotaped using 3 video cameras. The games were analyzed after the tournament by 5 observers. All observations were recorded using the Game Efficiency Sheet for Ice Sledge Hockey developed by the authors. Fourteen game parameters were included for analysis. The instrument was developed specifically for this project's exploratory analysis. Interobserver and intraobserver reliability were established by statistical analysis (r > 0.93 and r > 0.95, respectively). Significant differences between disability groups were found for training frequency (F3,50 = 4.73, P = 0.006), height (F3,50 = 12.54, P = 0.001), and sledge length (F3,50 = 12.35, P = 0.001). The results of the Tukey honestly significant difference post hoc analyses revealed significant differences between groups 1 and 4 (P = 0.026), 2 and 4 (P = 0.007), and 3 and 4 (P = 0.013) for training frequency. There were also significant differences between groups 1 and 2 (P < 0.001), 1 and 4 (P < 0

  4. Obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI): Canada's national clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Coroneos, Christopher J; Voineskos, Sophocles H; Christakis, Marie K; Thoma, Achilleas; Bain, James R; Brouwers, Melissa C

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to establish an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the primary management of obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI). This clinical practice guideline addresses 4 existing gaps: (1) historic poor use of evidence, (2) timing of referral to multidisciplinary care, (3) Indications and timing of operative nerve repair and (4) distribution of expertise. Setting The guideline is intended for all healthcare providers treating infants and children, and all specialists treating upper extremity injuries. Participants The evidence interpretation and recommendation consensus team (Canadian OBPI Working Group) was composed of clinicians representing each of Canada's 10 multidisciplinary centres. Outcome measures An electronic modified Delphi approach was used for consensus, with agreement criteria defined a priori. Quality indicators for referral to a multidisciplinary centre were established by consensus. An original meta-analysis of primary nerve repair and review of Canadian epidemiology and burden were previously completed. Results 7 recommendations address clinical gaps and guide identification, referral, treatment and outcome assessment: (1) physically examine for OBPI in newborns with arm asymmetry or risk factors; (2) refer newborns with OBPI to a multidisciplinary centre by 1 month; (3) provide pregnancy/birth history and physical examination findings at birth; (4) multidisciplinary centres should include a therapist and peripheral nerve surgeon experienced with OBPI; (5) physical therapy should be advised by a multidisciplinary team; (6) microsurgical nerve repair is indicated in root avulsion and other OBPI meeting centre operative criteria; (7) the common data set includes the Narakas classification, limb length, Active Movement Scale (AMS) and Brachial Plexus Outcome Measure (BPOM) 2 years after birth/surgery. Conclusions The process established a new network of opinion leaders and researchers for further

  5. Management of Sport Injuries with Korean Medicine: A Survey of Korean National Volleyball Team

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Eui-Hyoung; Kwon, Ojin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the current state of Korean medicine (KM) treatment on sports injury by implementing survey with volleyball team medical doctors participating in 2013-2014 season. Six KM doctors completed a questionnaire that includes injury parameters: type, location, situation, and pain scores. We collected 166 injury cases from 94 Korean male and female national volleyball players. Knee (25.9%), low back (13.3%), elbow, and ankle (8.4%) injuries were most common. Joint (41.6%) and muscle (30.7%) were major injured tissues. KM team medical doctors utilized acupuncture (40.4%), chuna manual therapy (16.0%), physical therapy (15.2%), taping (9.0%), and cupping (7.8%) to treat volleyball injuries. Any types of medications were used infrequently. Additional physical and exercise therapy were preferred after receiving acupuncture (both 46.9%). This study presented the preliminary injury profile of Korean elite volleyball players. Injury and treatment parameters could be useful to build advanced KM model in sport medicine. PMID:27651819

  6. Misclassification of Pelvic Ring Injuries in the National Trauma Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Haws, Brittany E; Wuertzer, Scott; Lenchik, Leon; Miller, Anna N

    2015-10-01

    The American College of Surgeons has advocated for all trauma centers to participate in the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB); however, no previous study has evaluated the accuracy of coding included in this data bank. The purpose of this study was to determine whether pelvic ring injuries are coded accurately in the NTDB and, if not, how they were misclassified. A retrospective review of all pelvic ring injuries based on Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) codes was performed at a single level I academic trauma center from July 2010 to June 2013. Thin-section computed tomography (CT) scans in all patients were reviewed and classified using AIS codes: posterior arch intact, incomplete posterior arch, or complete posterior arch. The surgeon was blinded to the AIS code from the registry. These CT-based classifications were then compared with the pelvic ring injury codes designated in the trauma registry for each patient to evaluate agreement. Two hundred thirty-five patients with a mean age of 42 years had pelvic ring injuries in our registry. The agreement between trauma registry codes and CT reclassification was 24% in the intact group, 43% in the incomplete group, and 59% in the complete group. Using only the trauma registry codes, injuries were underclassified in 48% of the incomplete group and 76% of the intact group. Many pelvic ring injuries are miscoded and misclassified in the NTDB. The etiology of this misclassification is unclear, but any research data mined from these databases should be regarded cautiously.

  7. Antihypertensive Medications and Serious Fall Injuries in a Nationally Representative Sample of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tinetti, Mary E.; Han, Ling; Lee, David S. H.; McAvay, Gail J.; Peduzzi, Peter; Gross, Cary P.; Zhou, Bingqing; Lin, Haiqun

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The effect of serious injuries, such as hip fracture and head injury, on mortality and function is comparable to that of cardiovascular events. Concerns have been raised about the risk of fall injuries in older adults taking antihypertensive medications. The low risk of fall injuries reported in clinical trials of healthy older adults may not reflect the risk in older adults with multiple chronic conditions. OBJECTIVE To determine whether antihypertensive medication use was associated with experiencing a serious fall injury in a nationally representative sample of older adults. DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS, AND SETTING Competing risk analysis as performed with propensity score adjustment and matching in the nationally representative Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey cohort during a 3-year follow-up through 2009. Participants included 4961 community-living adults older than 70 years with hypertension. EXPOSURES Antihypertensive medication intensity based on the standardized daily dose for each antihypertensive medication class that participants used. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Serious fall injuries, including hip and other major fractures, traumatic brain injuries, and joint dislocations, ascertained through Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services claims. RESULTS Of the 4961 participants, 14.1% received no antihypertensive medications; 54.6% were in the moderate-intensity and 31.3% in the high-intensity antihypertensive groups. During follow-up, 446 participants (9.0%) experienced serious fall injuries, and 837 (16.9%) died. The adjusted hazard ratios for serious fall injury were 1.40 (95% CI, 1.03–1.90) in the moderate-intensity and 1.28 (95% CI, 0.91–1.80) in the high-intensity antihypertensive groups compared with nonusers. Although the difference in adjusted hazard ratios across the groups did not reach statistical significance, results were similar in the propensity score–matched subcohort. Among 503 participants with a previous fall injury, the

  8. Antihypertensive medications and serious fall injuries in a nationally representative sample of older adults.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Mary E; Han, Ling; Lee, David S H; McAvay, Gail J; Peduzzi, Peter; Gross, Cary P; Zhou, Bingqing; Lin, Haiqun

    2014-04-01

    IMPORTANCE The effect of serious injuries, such as hip fracture and head injury, on mortality and function is comparable to that of cardiovascular events. Concerns have been raised about the risk of fall injuries in older adults taking antihypertensive medications. The low risk of fall injuries reported in clinical trials of healthy older adults may not reflect the risk in older adults with multiple chronic conditions. OBJECTIVE To determine whether antihypertensive medication use was associated with experiencing a serious fall injury in a nationally representative sample of older adults. DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS, AND SETTING Competing risk analysis as performed with propensity score adjustment and matching in the nationally representative Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey cohort during a 3-year follow-up through 2009. Participants included 4961 community-living adults older than 70 years with hypertension. EXPOSURES Antihypertensive medication intensity based on the standardized daily dose for each antihypertensive medication class that participants used. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Serious fall injuries, including hip and other major fractures, traumatic brain injuries, and joint dislocations, ascertained through Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services claims. RESULTS Of the 4961 participants, 14.1% received no antihypertensive medications; 54.6% were in the moderate-intensity and 31.3% in the high-intensity antihypertensive groups. During follow-up, 446 participants (9.0%) experienced serious fall injuries, and 837 (16.9%) died. The adjusted hazard ratios for serious fall injury were 1.40 (95% CI, 1.03-1.90) in the moderate-intensity and 1.28 (95% CI, 0.91-1.80) in the high-intensity antihypertensive groups compared with nonusers. Although the difference in adjusted hazard ratios across the groups did not reach statistical significance, results were similar in the propensity score-matched subcohort. Among 503 participants with a previous fall injury, the adjusted

  9. National vaccine injury compensation program: calculation of average cost of a health insurance policy. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2007-07-05

    Subtitle 2 of Title XXI of the Public Health Service Act, as enacted by the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986, as amended (the Act), governs the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). The VICP, administered by the Secretary of Health and Human Services (the Secretary), provides that a proceeding for compensation for a vaccine-related injury or death shall be initiated by service upon the Secretary, and the filing of a petition with the United States Court of Federal Claims (the Court). In some cases, the injured individual may receive compensation for future lost earnings, less appropriate taxes and the "average cost of a health insurance policy, as determined by the Secretary." The final rule establishes the new method of calculating the average cost of a health insurance policy and determines the amount of the average cost of a health insurance policy to be deducted from the compensation award.

  10. Epidemiology of injuries in the Spanish national futsal male team: a five-season retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Riaza, Luis; Herrero-Gonzalez, Helena; Lopez-Alcorocho, Juan M; Guillen-Garcia, Pedro; Fernandez-Jaen, Tomas F

    2016-01-01

    Background Futsal started being played in 1930 and the number of futsal players has increased all over the world ever since. Nonetheless, despite the fact that Spain is one of the most relevant national teams worldwide, information on the incidence of injuries and their anthropometric characteristics is sparse in this country. Aim To analyse medical assistance provided to players in their prematch concentration camps with the Spanish national team over five seasons, from 2010–2011 to 2014–2015, and also to collect data regarding anthropometric characteristics. Materials and methods This is a retrospective and detailed study of injuries players suffered over these five seasons. All variables were registered on an Excel spreadsheet and later analysed statistically. Results 411 injuries were studied in total. The dominant somatotype was mesomorph and the injured pivots were both the most endomorphic and the most mesomorphic. The most injured body structure was the hamstring muscles, occurring due to training and intrinsic mechanisms, where fatigue was the most frequent diagnosis. Only a few complementary examinations were carried out and prematch withdrawal was rare. Discussion The skinfold test total sum was lower than that of the Spanish 11-a-side players or than that in the lower category futsal Spanish players. In various research studies analysing exclusively injuries occurring in matches, the most frequent injury is ligament injury by extrinsic mechanism. The body mass index was not a useful parameter when assessing players’ appropriate weight. Most injuries occurred in training sessions, mostly by intrinsic mechanism; the highest percentage of traumatic injuries occurred in official matches. PMID:28879032

  11. Relative age and fast tracking of elite major junior ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Sherar, Lauren B; Bruner, Mark W; Munroe-Chandler, Krista J; Baxter-Jones, Adam D G

    2007-06-01

    Investigations in a variety of chronologically grouped team sports have reported that elite young athletes were more likely born in the early months of the selection year, a phenomenon known as the relative age effect. The present study investigated the birth dates and developmental paths of 238 (15 to 20 years old) Major Junior 'A' hockey players from the Ontario Hockey League to determine if a relative age effect still exists in elite junior hockey and if the path to elite sport was accelerated (i.e., fast tracked). The results identified a relative age effect in elite hockey although it is only apparent among individuals who fast track.

  12. History of Injury and Violence as public health problems and emergence of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at CDC.

    PubMed

    Sleet, David A; Baldwin, Grant; Marr, Angela; Spivak, Howard; Patterson, Sara; Morrison, Christine; Holmes, Wendy; Peeples, Amy B; Degutis, Linda C

    2012-09-01

    Injuries and violence are among the oldest health problems facing humans. Only within the past 50 years, however, has the problem been addressed with scientific rigor using public health methods. The field of injury control began as early as 1913, but wasn't approached systematically or epidemiologically until the 1940s and 1950s. It accelerated rapidly between 1960 and 1985. Coupled with active federal and state interest in reducing injuries and violence, this period was marked by important medical, scientific, and public health advances. The National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) was an outgrowth of this progress and in 2012 celebrated its 20th anniversary. NCIPC was created in 1992 after a series of government reports identified injury as one of the most important public health problems facing the nation. Congressional action provided the impetus for the creation of NCIPC as the lead federal agency for non-occupational injury and violence prevention. In subsequent years, NCIPC and its partners fostered many advances and built strong capacity. Because of the tragically high burden and cost of injuries and violence in the United States and around the globe, researchers, practitioners, and decision makers will need to redouble prevention efforts in the next 20 years. This article traces the history of injury and violence prevention as a public health priority-- including the evolution and current structure of the CDC's National Center for Injury Prevention and Control.

  13. Workforce Implications of Injury among Home Health Workers: Evidence from the National Home Health Aide Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaughey, Deirdre; McGhan, Gwen; Kim, Jungyoon; Brannon, Diane; Leroy, Hannes; Jablonski, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of study: The direct care workforce continues to rank as one of the most frequently injured employee groups in North America. Occupational health and safety studies have shown that workplace injuries translate into negative outcomes for workers and their employers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)…

  14. 75 FR 1062 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 5 (Friday, January 8, 2010)] [Notices] [Pages 1062-1063] [FR Doc No: 2010-22] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC) In...

  15. Workforce Implications of Injury among Home Health Workers: Evidence from the National Home Health Aide Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaughey, Deirdre; McGhan, Gwen; Kim, Jungyoon; Brannon, Diane; Leroy, Hannes; Jablonski, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of study: The direct care workforce continues to rank as one of the most frequently injured employee groups in North America. Occupational health and safety studies have shown that workplace injuries translate into negative outcomes for workers and their employers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)…

  16. 78 FR 35036 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC) Correction: This notice was published in the...

  17. 78 FR 37542 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC) Correction: This notice was published in the...

  18. Self-Injurious Behavior and Fragile X Syndrome: Findings from the National Fragile X Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symons, Frank J.; Byiers, Breanne J.; Raspa, Melissa; Bishop, Ellen; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    We used National Fragile X Survey data in order to examine reported self-injurious behavior (SIB) to (a) generate lifetime and point prevalence estimates, (b) document detailed features of SIB (frequency, types, location, severity) in relation to gender, and (c) compare comorbid conditions between matched pairs (SIB vs. no SIB). Results indicate…

  19. 77 FR 58847 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (BSC, NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (BSC, NCIPC) In accordance with Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L.92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the...

  20. 75 FR 19983 - National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Initial Review Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Initial Review Group In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), announces the following meeting...

  1. Self-Injurious Behavior and Fragile X Syndrome: Findings from the National Fragile X Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symons, Frank J.; Byiers, Breanne J.; Raspa, Melissa; Bishop, Ellen; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    We used National Fragile X Survey data in order to examine reported self-injurious behavior (SIB) to (a) generate lifetime and point prevalence estimates, (b) document detailed features of SIB (frequency, types, location, severity) in relation to gender, and (c) compare comorbid conditions between matched pairs (SIB vs. no SIB). Results indicate…

  2. Relationship of personalized jerseys and aggression in women's ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Blome, Jamie; Waldron, Jennifer J; Mack, Mick G

    2005-10-01

    The present study examined the relationship between aggression and players' names on uniforms in collegiate women's ice hockey. Aggression was defined as mean penalty minutes per game. Information, i.e., win/loss record, penalties, and names on uniforms, about the 2002-2003 season women's ice hockey team was obtained via e-mail from 53 of 72 (74% return rate) sports information directors (Division I = 23, Division II = 2, Division III = 28). Analysis indicated that teams with personalized jerseys had significantly more penalty minutes per game than teams without personalized jerseys. However, as the majority of the teams with personalized jerseys were Division I teams and the majority of the teams without personalized jerseys were Division III teams, it is unclear whether results were due to personalized jersey or competition level of play.

  3. Influence of Extrinsic Risk Factors on National Football League Injury Rates

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, David W.; Comper, Paul; Hutchison, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The risk of injury associated with American football is significant, with recent reports indicating that football has one of the highest rates of all-cause injury, including concussion, of all major sports. There are limited studies examining risk factors for injuries in the National Football League (NFL). Purpose: To identify risk factors for NFL concussions and musculoskeletal injuries. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Injury report data were collected prospectively for each week over the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 regular seasons for all 32 teams. Poisson regression models were used to identify the relationship between predetermined variables and the risk of the 5 most frequent injuries (knee, ankle, hamstring, shoulder, and concussion). Results: A total of 480 games or 960 team games (TGs) from the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 regular seasons were included in this study. A trend to an increasing risk of concussion and TG ankle injury with decreasing mean game-day temperature was observed. The risk of TG concussion (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 2.16; 95% CI, 1.35-3.45; P = .001) and TG ankle injury (IRR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.10-1.98; P = .01) was significantly greater for TGs played at a mean game-day temperature of ≤9.7°C (≤49.5°F) compared with a mean game-day temperature of ≥21.0°C (≥69.8°F). The risk of TG shoulder injury was significantly increased for TGs played on grass surfaces (IRR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.02-1.81; P = .038) compared with synthetic surfaces. The risk of TG injury was not associated with time in season, altitude, time zone change prior to game, or distance traveled to a game. Conclusion: This study evaluated extrinsic risk factors for injury in the NFL. A hazardous association was identified for risk of concussion and ankle injury with colder game-day temperature. Further research should be conducted to substantiate this relationship and its potential implication for injury prevention initiatives. PMID

  4. Pattern of fall injuries in Pakistan: the Pakistan National Emergency Department Surveillance (Pak-NEDS) study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background We aimed to analyse the frequency and patterns of fall-related injuries presenting to the emergency departments (EDs) across Pakistan. Methods Pakistan National Emergency Departments surveillance system collected data from November 2010 to March 2011 on a 24/7 basis using a standardized tool in seven major EDs (five public and two private hospitals) in six major cities of Pakistan. For all patients presenting with fall-related injuries, we analysed data by intent with focus on unintentional falls. Simple frequencies were run for basic patient demographics, mechanism of falls, outcomes of fall injuries, mode of arrival to ED, investigations, and procedures with outcomes. Results There were 3335 fall-related injuries. In cases where intent was available, two-thirds (n = 1186, 65.3%) of fall injuries were unintentional. Among unintentional fall patients presenting to EDs, the majority (76.9%) were males and between 15-44 years of age (69%). The majority of the unintentional falls (n = 671, 56.6%) were due to slipping, followed by fall from height (n = 338, 28.5%). About two-thirds (n = 675, 66.6%) of fall injuries involved extremities, followed by head/neck (n = 257, 25.4%) and face (n = 99, 9.8%). Most of the patients were discharged from the hospital (n = 1059, 89.3%). There were 17 (1.3%) deaths among unintentional fall cases. Conclusion Falls are an important cause of injury-related visits to EDs in Pakistan. Most of the fall injury patients were men and in a productive age group. Fall injuries pose a burden on the healthcare system, especially emergency services, and future studies should therefore focus on safety measures at home and in workplaces to reduce this burden. PMID:26691821

  5. Descriptive Epidemiology of Collegiate Women's Basketball Injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988–1989 Through 2003–2004

    PubMed Central

    Agel, Julie; Olson, David E; Dick, Randall; Arendt, Elizabeth A; Marshall, Stephen W; Sikka, Robby S

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review 16 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) injury surveillance data for women's basketball and to identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. Background: The number of colleges participating in women's college basketball has grown over the past 25 years. The Injury Surveillance System (ISS) has enabled the NCAA to collect and report injury trends over an extended period of time. This has allowed certified athletic trainers and coaches to be more informed regarding injuries and to adjust training regimens to reduce the risk of injury. It also has encouraged administrators to make rule changes that attempt to reduce the risk of injury. Main Results: From 1988–1989 through 2003–2004, 12.4% of schools across Divisions I, II, and III that sponsor varsity women's basketball programs participated in annual ISS data collection. Game and practice injury rates exhibited significant decreases over the study period. The rate of injury in a game situation was almost 2 times higher than in a practice (7.68 versus 3.99 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures, rate ratio = 1.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.9, 2.0). Preseason-practice injury rates were more than twice as high as regular-season practice injury rates (6.75 versus 2.84 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures, rate ratio = 2.4, 95% confidence interval = 2.2, 2.4). More than 60% of all game and practice injuries were to the lower extremity, with the most common game injuries being ankle ligament sprains, knee injuries (internal derangements and patellar conditions), and concussions. In practices, ankle ligament sprains, knee injuries (internal derangements and patellar conditions), upper leg muscle-tendon strains, and concussions were the most common injuries. Recommendations: Appropriate preseason conditioning and an emphasis on proper training may reduce the risk of injury and can optimize performance. As both player size and the speed of the women's game continue to

  6. Insurance claims data: a possible solution for a national sports injury surveillance system? An evaluation of data information against ASIDD and consensus statements on sports injury surveillance.

    PubMed

    Aman, Malin; Forssblad, Magnus; Henriksson-Larsén, Karin

    2014-06-12

    Before preventive actions can be suggested for sports injuries at the national level, a solid surveillance system is required in order to study their epidemiology, risk factors and mechanisms. There are guidelines for sports injury data collection and classifications in the literature for that purpose. In Sweden, 90% of all athletes (57/70 sports federations) are insured with the same insurance company and data from their database could be a foundation for studies on acute sports injuries at the national level. To evaluate the usefulness of sports injury insurance claims data in sports injury surveillance at the national level. A database with 27 947 injuries was exported to an Excel file. Access to the corresponding text files was also obtained. Data were reviewed on available information, missing information and dropouts. Comparison with ASIDD (Australian Sports Injury Data Dictionary) and existing consensus statements in the literature (football (soccer), rugby union, tennis, cricket and thoroughbred horse racing) was performed in a structured manner. Comparison with ASIDD showed that 93% of the suggested data items were present in the database to at least some extent. Compliance with the consensus statements was generally high (13/18). Almost all claims (83%) contained text information concerning the injury. Relatively high-quality sports injury data can be obtained from a specific insurance company at the national level in Sweden. The database has the potential to be a solid base for research on acute sports injuries in different sports at the national level. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. SnapShot: Visualization to Propel Ice Hockey Analytics.

    PubMed

    Pileggi, H; Stolper, C D; Boyle, J M; Stasko, J T

    2012-12-01

    Sports analysts live in a world of dynamic games flattened into tables of numbers, divorced from the rinks, pitches, and courts where they were generated. Currently, these professional analysts use R, Stata, SAS, and other statistical software packages for uncovering insights from game data. Quantitative sports consultants seek a competitive advantage both for their clients and for themselves as analytics becomes increasingly valued by teams, clubs, and squads. In order for the information visualization community to support the members of this blossoming industry, it must recognize where and how visualization can enhance the existing analytical workflow. In this paper, we identify three primary stages of today's sports analyst's routine where visualization can be beneficially integrated: 1) exploring a dataspace; 2) sharing hypotheses with internal colleagues; and 3) communicating findings to stakeholders.Working closely with professional ice hockey analysts, we designed and built SnapShot, a system to integrate visualization into the hockey intelligence gathering process. SnapShot employs a variety of information visualization techniques to display shot data, yet given the importance of a specific hockey statistic, shot length, we introduce a technique, the radial heat map. Through a user study, we received encouraging feedback from several professional analysts, both independent consultants and professional team personnel.

  8. [Hemodynamic Status of Prepubertal and Pubertal Hockey Players].

    PubMed

    Shayhelislamova, M V; Sitdikov, F G; Zefirov, T L; Dikopolskaya, N B

    2015-01-01

    The hemodynamic status of 11-15-year-old hockey players depending on their age and puberty stage were studied and compared with hemodynamic parameters of the control group. It was found that regular muscle training has a dominant effect on the functional state of cardiovascular system (CVS) in prepuberty and puberty. It was proved that in hockey players a decrease in the heart rate (H R) and an increase in the stroke volume (SV) result in a significant increase in systolic blood pressure (SBP) at the age of 11-14 years and a progressive increase in total peripheral vascular resistance (PVR), in contrast to significantly lower values in the control group. The urgent adaptation of CVS to graduated physical activities at the age of 11-13 years leads to an enhancement of vascular spasmodic reactions while SV remains constant. It was found that in adolescent hockey players have consistently high SV and SBP; at the same time, maximal values of HR, cardiac output (CO) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were observed at the stages I and II of the puberty period; then, at the stage III, these parameters decrease. I n the control group, hymodinamic status changed in an opposite way. This may be an evidence of the stress effect of physical activities which results in the adaptive reactions of CVS rather than reactions typical of the puberty period.

  9. National estimates of non-fatal firearm related injuries other than gunshot wounds

    PubMed Central

    Hootman, J; Annest, J; Mercy, J; Ryan, G; Hargarten, S

    2000-01-01

    Objective—To characterize non-fatal firearm related injuries other than gunshot wounds (non-GSWs) treated in hospital emergency departments in the United States that occur during routine gun handling and recreational use as well as violence related use of a firearm. Methods—Cases were identified through the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). During the study period, 1 January 1993 through 31 December 1996, NEISS consisted of a nationally representative sample of 91 hospitals in the United States having at least six beds and providing 24 hour emergency services. Results—An estimated 65 374, or an average of 16 300 per year, non-fatal, non-GSWs were treated in American hospital emergency departments during the four year study period. Fifty seven per cent of all the non-fatal, non-GSWs were violence related, most of which involved being struck by a firearm. The majority of unintentional non-fatal, non-GSWs were self inflicted and occurred during routine gun handling or recreational use of a firearm; 43% of these injuries resulted from gun recoils. Conclusions—Non-fatal, non-GSWs make a notable contribution to the public health burden of firearm related injuries. Firearm related injury prevention programs should focus on not only the reduction of gunshot wounds but also the reduction of unintentional and violence related non-GSWs. PMID:11144625

  10. Human bite injuries in the oro-facial region at the Muhimbili National Hospital, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Shubi, Farrid M; Hamza, Omar JM; Kalyanyama, Boniphace M; Simon, Elison NM

    2008-01-01

    Background Human bites in the maxillofacial region compromise function and aesthetics, resulting in social and psychological effects. There is paucity of information regarding human bite injuries in Tanzania. The aim of the study was to assess the occurrence, treatment modalities and prognosis of human bite injuries in the oro-facial region at the Muhimbili National Hospital Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods In a prospective study the details of patients with human bite injuries in the oro-facial region who attended at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the Muhimbili National Hospital between January 2001 and December 2005 were recorded. Data included information on age, sex, site, duration of the injury at the time of reporting to hospital, reasons, details of treatment offered and outcome after treatment. Results A total of 33 patients, 13 males and 20 females aged between 12 and 49 years with human bite injuries in the oro-facial region were treated. Thirty patients presented with clean uninfected wounds while 3 had infected wounds. The most (45.5%) frequently affected site was the lower lip. Treatment offered included thorough surgical cleansing with adequate surgical debridement and primary suturing. Tetanus prophylaxis and a course of broad-spectrum antibiotics were given to all the patients. In 90% of the 30 patients who were treated by suturing, the healing was uneventful with only 10% experiencing wound infection or necrosis. Three patients who presented with wounds that had signs of infection were treated by surgical cleansing with debridement, antibiotics and daily dressing followed by delayed primary suturing. Conclusion Most of the human bite injuries in the oro-facial region were due to social conflicts. Although generally considered to be dirty or contaminated they could be successfully treated by surgical cleansing and primary suture with a favourable outcome. Management of such injuries often need multidisciplinary approach. PMID

  11. Increasing use of endovascular therapy in acute arterial injuries: analysis of the National Trauma Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Reuben, Brian C; Whitten, Matthew G; Sarfati, Mark; Kraiss, Larry W

    2007-12-01

    The application of endovascular technology for the emergency treatment of traumatic vascular injuries is a new frontier. This study examines recent nationwide use of endovascular therapy in acute arterial traumatic injuries. This retrospective study used the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB). Cases with a diagnosis of arterial vascular injury were identified according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, and procedure codes for endovascular therapy were selected. A descriptive analysis and multiple regressions were performed to identify variables predictive of outcomes. From 1994 to 2003, 12,732 arterial injuries were identified. Between 1997 (when the first endovascular repair was recorded in the NTDB) and 2003, 7286 open arterial repairs and 281 endovascular repairs were recorded for an overall utilization rate for endovascular procedures of 3.7%. The yearly number of endovascular procedures registered in the NTDB increased 27-fold, from four in 1997 to 107 in 2003. Use of stents substantially increased from 12 in 2000 to 30 in 2003; endograft use increased from one in 2000 to 37 in 2003. Nearly equal numbers of blunt (n = 134) and penetrating (n = 111) injuries were treated. The injury severity score (median, interquartile range [IRQ]) was significantly lower in patients who underwent an endovascular procedure at 13 (IRQ, 9 to 26) for trauma vs patients requiring an open procedure at 20 (IRQ, 10 to 34; P < .001), a finding corroborated by the lower number of associated injuries in patients undergoing endovascular repair (8.7 +/- 7.2 vs 13.0 +/- 16.1, P < .001). Using multivariable regression to control for differences in injury severity score and associated injuries, mortality was significantly lower for patients undergoing endovascular procedures (odds ratio, 0.18; P = .029) including those with an arterial injury of the torso or head and neck (odds ratio, 0.51, P = .007). Total length of hospital stay also

  12. The Financial and Professional Impact of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in National Football League Athletes.

    PubMed

    Secrist, Eric S; Bhat, Suneel B; Dodson, Christopher C

    2016-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries can have negative consequences on the careers of National Football League (NFL) players, however no study has ever analyzed the financial impact of these injuries in this population. To quantify the impact of ACL injuries on salary and career length in NFL athletes. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Any player in the NFL suffering an ACL injury from 2010 to 2013 was identified using a comprehensive online search. A database of NFL player salaries was used to conduct a matched cohort analysis comparing ACL-injured players with the rest of the NFL. The main outcomes were the percentage of players remaining in the NFL and mean salary at 1, 2, 3, and 4 years after injury. Cohorts were subdivided based on initial salary: group A, <$500,000; group B, ≤$500,000 to $2,000,000; and group C, >$2,000,000. Mean cumulative earnings were calculated by multiplying the percentage of players remaining in the league by their mean salaries and compounding this each season. NFL athletes suffered 219 ACL injuries from 2010 to 2013. The 7504 other player seasons in the NFL during this time were used as controls. Significantly fewer ACL-injured players than controls remained in the NFL at each time point (P < .05). In group A, significantly less ACL-injured players remained in the NFL at 1 to 3 seasons after injury (P < .05), and in group B, significantly less ACL-injured players remained in the NFL at 1 and 2 seasons after injury (P < .05). There was no significant decrease in group C. Players in groups A and B remaining in the NFL also had a lower mean salary than controls (P < .05 in season 1). The mean cumulative earnings over 4 years for ACL-injured players was $2,070,521 less per player than uninjured controls. On average, ACL-injured players earned $2,070,521 less than salary-matched controls over the 4 years after injury. Players initially earning less than $2 million per year have lower mean salaries and are less likely to remain in

  13. The Financial and Professional Impact of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in National Football League Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Secrist, Eric S.; Bhat, Suneel B.; Dodson, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries can have negative consequences on the careers of National Football League (NFL) players, however no study has ever analyzed the financial impact of these injuries in this population. Purpose: To quantify the impact of ACL injuries on salary and career length in NFL athletes. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Any player in the NFL suffering an ACL injury from 2010 to 2013 was identified using a comprehensive online search. A database of NFL player salaries was used to conduct a matched cohort analysis comparing ACL-injured players with the rest of the NFL. The main outcomes were the percentage of players remaining in the NFL and mean salary at 1, 2, 3, and 4 years after injury. Cohorts were subdivided based on initial salary: group A, <$500,000; group B, ≤$500,000 to $2,000,000; and group C, >$2,000,000. Mean cumulative earnings were calculated by multiplying the percentage of players remaining in the league by their mean salaries and compounding this each season. Results: NFL athletes suffered 219 ACL injuries from 2010 to 2013. The 7504 other player seasons in the NFL during this time were used as controls. Significantly fewer ACL-injured players than controls remained in the NFL at each time point (P < .05). In group A, significantly less ACL-injured players remained in the NFL at 1 to 3 seasons after injury (P < .05), and in group B, significantly less ACL-injured players remained in the NFL at 1 and 2 seasons after injury (P < .05). There was no significant decrease in group C. Players in groups A and B remaining in the NFL also had a lower mean salary than controls (P < .05 in season 1). The mean cumulative earnings over 4 years for ACL-injured players was $2,070,521 less per player than uninjured controls. Conclusion: On average, ACL-injured players earned $2,070,521 less than salary-matched controls over the 4 years after injury. Players initially earning less than $2 million

  14. Severe injuries associated with skiing and snowboarding: A national trauma data bank study.

    PubMed

    de Roulet, Amory; Inaba, Kenji; Strumwasser, Aaron; Chouliaras, Konstantinos; Lam, Lydia; Benjamin, Elizabeth; Grabo, Daniel; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2017-04-01

    Injuries after skiing and snowboarding accidents lead to an estimated 7,000 hospital admissions annually and present a significant burden to the health care system. The epidemiology, injury patterns, hospital resource utilization, and outcomes associated with these severe injuries need further characterization. The National Trauma Data Bank was queried for the period 2007 to 2014 for admissions with Injury Severity Score > 15 and International Classification of Diseases Codes-9th Revision codes 885.3 (fall from skis, n = 1,353) and 885.4 (fall from snowboard, n = 1,216). Demographics, emergency department data, diagnosis and procedure codes, and outcomes were abstracted from the database. Severe (Injury Severity Score > 15) ski-associated and snowboard-associated injuries differed with respect to age distribution (median age, 38; interquartile range, 19-59 for skiers and median age, 20; interquartile range, 16-25 for snowboarders; p < 0.001) and sex (78.9% and 86.4% males, respectively, p < 0.001). Traumatic brain injury was common for both sports (56.8% of skiers vs. 46.6% of snowboarders, p < 0.001). Injuries to the spine (28.9%), chest (37.6%), and abdomen (35.0%) were also common. Eighty percent of patients used emergency medical services (50% ambulance, 30% helicopter) with a median emergency medical services transport time of 84 minutes. 50.8% of patients required interhospital transport. 43.2% of injuries required surgical intervention (21.3% orthopedic, 12.5% neurosurgical, 10.5% thoracic, 7.8% abdominal). Median hospital length of stay was 5.0 days. 60.0% of patients required intensive care unit admission with median intensive care unit length of stay 3.0 days. Overall mortality was 4.0% for skiers and 1.9% for snowboarders. Severe injuries after ski and snowboard accidents are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Differences in injury patterns, risk factors for severe injury, and resource utilization require further study. Increased

  15. Demographics, Mechanisms of Injury, and Concurrent Injuries Associated With Calcaneus Fractures: A Study of 14 516 Patients in the American College of Surgeons National Trauma Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Bohl, Daniel D; Ondeck, Nathaniel T; Samuel, Andre M; Diaz-Collado, Pablo J; Nelson, Stephen J; Basques, Bryce A; Leslie, Michael P; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2016-11-28

    Background This study uses the American College of Surgeons National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) to update the field on the demographics, injury mechanisms, and concurrent injuries among a national sample of patients admitted to the hospital department with calcaneus fractures. Methods Patients with calcaneus fractures in the NTDB during 2011-2012 were identified and assessed. Results A total of 14 516 patients with calcaneus fractures were included. The most common comorbidity was hypertension (18%), and more than 90% of fractures occurred via traffic accident (49%) or fall (43%). A total of 11 137 patients had concurrent injuries. Associated lower extremity fractures had the highest incidence and occurred in 61% of patients (of which the most common were other foot and ankle fractures). Concurrent spine fractures occurred in 23% of patients (of which the most common were lumbar spine fractures). Concurrent nonorthopaedic injuries included head injuries in 18% of patients and thoracic organ injuries in 15% of patients. Conclusion This national sample indicates that associated injuries occur in more than three quarters calcaneus fracture patients. The most common associated fractures are in close proximity to the calcaneus. Although the well-defined association of calcaneus fractures with lumbar spine fractures was identified, the data presented highlight additional strong associations of calcaneus fractures with other orthopaedic and nonorthopaedic injuries.

  16. Cardiovascular Response to Recreational Hockey in Middle-Aged Men.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Zack A; Thomas, Scott G; Wald, Robert C; Goodman, Jack M

    2017-06-15

    The present study examined the hemodynamic response to recreational pick-up hockey relative to maximal exercise testing in middle-aged men. A total of 23 men with a mean age of 53 ± 7 years were studied. Graded exercise testing on a cycle ergometer determined maximal oxygen consumption, blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR). Ambulatory BP and Holter electrocardiographic monitoring was performed during one of their weekly hockey games (mean duration = 45 ± 7.2 minutes): for "On-Ice" responses (PLAY; data recorded while standing immediately after a shift; 8.0 ± 1.4 shifts per game) and during seated recovery (BENCH), 15 minutes after the game. On-Ice HRs and BPs were significantly higher than values obtained during maximal cycle exercise, respectively (HR 174 ± 8.9 vs 163 ± 11.0 beats/min) (systolic blood pressure 202 ± 20 vs 173 ± 31 mm Hg; p <0.05). Both systolic and diastolic blood pressures decreased significantly throughout the duration of the game, whereas HR increased from 139 ± 20 to 155 ± 16 beats/min during the game. The myocardial oxygen demand (myocardial time tension index) increased significantly during PLAY concurrent with a decrease in estimated myocardial oxygen supply (diastolic pressure time index), with the endocardial viability ratio during PLAY demonstrating a significant decrease during the third quarter of the game (1.25 ± 0.24) versus the first quarter (1.56 ± 0.30), which remained depressed 15 minutes post-game (p <0.05). In conclusion, recreational pick-up hockey in middle-aged men is an extremely vigorous interval exercise with increasing relative intensity as the game progresses. Hockey elicits peak BPs and HRs that can exceed values observed during maximal exercise testing and is characterized by progressive increases in myocardial oxygen demand and lowered supply during PLAY and BENCH time. Given the progressive and high cardiovascular demands, caution is warranted when estimating the cardiovascular demands of hockey

  17. Consequences of non-fatal electrical injury: findings of community-based national survey in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Mashreky, S R; Rahman, A; Khan, T F; Rahman, F

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to document the consequences of electrical injury in Bangladesh. A community-based cross-sectional survey was conducted from January to December 2003. Nationally representative data were collected from 171,366 rural and urban households, comprising a total of 819,429 population. Face-to-face interview was chosen as a data collection method. The overall rate of electrical injury was 73.7 per 100,000 population-year. The rate of permanent disability due to electrical injury in Bangladesh was 0.366 per 100,000 population-year. Among the total 604 non-fatal electrical injuries in the survey, 282 (46.7%) had suffered from temporary disabilities for different durations. A total of 172 students were injured from electrical injury and among them 139 (80.8%) missed school for different durations due to their illness. Mean duration of absence from school was 9.72 days (SD±10.98), ranging from 1 to 45 days. Among the working people average duration of work loss was 10.56 days (SD±14.98), ranging from 1 to 90 days. About 39% of the total patients with electrical injury were contributors to their family income. For each family the expenditure for each seriously injured patient due to electrical injury was USD 271. Electrical Injury is a major cause of morbidity in Bangladesh. It is responsible for significant loss of school days and work days and creating serious health and economic hardship for the inflicted families. A nationwide prevention program needs to be developed to address this problem.

  18. Injuries and Illnesses in the National Basketball Association: A 10-Year Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Starkey, Chad

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To present an overview of the medical conditions experienced by athletes competing in the National Basketball Association (NBA) from the 1988-1989 through the 1997-1998 seasons. Design and Setting: Athletic trainers completed profiles that provided demographic information for each player. Injury reports indicated when and where the injury occurred, pathology, onset, activity, and the mechanism of injury. The amount of time lost, injured list status, hospitalization, and surgery were also reported. Reportable injuries were those that resulted in (1) physician referral, (2) a practice or game being missed, or (3) emergency care being rendered. Subjects: A total of 1094 players appeared in the database 3843 times (mean, 3.3 ± 2.6 seasons). Mean player demographics were age 26.7 (± 3.7) years, NBA playing experience 4.1 (± 3.7) years, height 200.8 (± 9.9) cm, and weight 100.2 (± 13.5) kg. Players averaged 52 (± 34.7) games and 1263.1 (± 1073.8) minutes played. Measurements: The frequency of injury, time lost, and game exposures were tabulated, and game-related injury rates were then calculated. Results: Ankle sprains were the most frequently occurring orthopaedic injury (942, 9.4%), followed by patellofemoral inflammation (803, 8.1%), lumbar strains (491, 5.0%), and knee sprains (258, 2.3%). The greatest number of days missed were related to patellofemoral inflammation (7569, 11.5%), knee sprains (5712, 8.6%), ankle sprains (5122, 7.7%), and lumbar strains (3365, 5.1%). Conclusions: Professional athletes in the NBA experience a rate of game-related injuries that is twice as high as their collegiate counterparts. Patellofemoral inflammation is a significant problem among NBA players. PMID:16558626

  19. Injuries and illnesses in the national basketball association: a 10-year perspective.

    PubMed

    Starkey, C

    2000-04-01

    To present an overview of the medical conditions experienced by athletes competing in the National Basketball Association (NBA) from the 1988-1989 through the 1997-1998 seasons. Athletic trainers completed profiles that provided demographic information for each player. Injury reports indicated when and where the injury occurred, pathology, onset, activity, and the mechanism of injury. The amount of time lost, injured list status, hospitalization, and surgery were also reported. Reportable injuries were those that resulted in (1) physician referral, (2) a practice or game being missed, or (3) emergency care being rendered. A total of 1094 players appeared in the database 3843 times (mean, 3.3 +/- 2.6 seasons). Mean player demographics were age 26.7 (+/- 3.7) years, NBA playing experience 4.1 (+/- 3.7) years, height 200.8 (+/- 9.9) cm, and weight 100.2 (+/- 13.5) kg. Players averaged 52 (+/- 34.7) games and 1263.1 (+/- 1073.8) minutes played. The frequency of injury, time lost, and game exposures were tabulated, and game-related injury rates were then calculated. Ankle sprains were the most frequently occurring orthopaedic injury (942, 9.4%), followed by patellofemoral inflammation (803, 8.1%), lumbar strains (491, 5.0%), and knee sprains (258, 2.3%). The greatest number of days missed were related to patellofemoral inflammation (7569, 11.5%), knee sprains (5712, 8.6%), ankle sprains (5122, 7.7%), and lumbar strains (3365, 5.1%). Professional athletes in the NBA experience a rate of game-related injuries that is twice as high as their collegiate counterparts. Patellofemoral inflammation is a significant problem among NBA players.

  20. Injuries to the Collateral Ligaments of the Metacarpophalangeal Joint of the Thumb, Including Simultaneous Combined Thumb Ulnar and Radial Collateral Ligament Injuries, in National Football League Athletes.

    PubMed

    Werner, Brian C; Belkin, Nicole S; Kennelly, Steve; Weiss, Leigh; Barnes, Ronnie P; Rodeo, Scott A; Warren, Russell F; Hotchkiss, Robert N

    2017-01-01

    Thumb collateral ligament injuries occur frequently in the National Football League (NFL). In the general population or in recreational athletes, pure metacarpophalangeal (MCP) abduction or adduction mechanisms yield isolated ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) and radial collateral ligament (RCL) tears, respectively, while NFL athletes may sustain combined mechanism injury patterns. To evaluate the incidence of simultaneous combined thumb UCL and RCL tears among all thumb MCP collateral ligament injuries in NFL athletes on a single team. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A retrospective review of all thumb injuries on a single NFL team from 1991 to 2014 was performed. All players with a thumb MCP collateral ligament injury were included. Collateral ligament injuries were confirmed by review of both physical examination findings and magnetic resonance imaging. Player demographics, surgical details, and return-to-play data were obtained from the team electronic medical record and surgeons' records. A total of 36 thumbs in 32 NFL players were included in the study, yielding an incidence of 1.6 thumb MCP collateral ligament injuries per year on a single NFL team. Of these, 9 thumbs (25%) had a simultaneous combined UCL and RCL tear injury pattern confirmed on both physical examination and MRI. The remaining 27 thumbs (75%) were isolated UCL injuries. All combined UCL/RCL injuries required surgery due to dysfunction from instability; 63.0% of isolated UCL injuries required surgical repair ( P = .032) due to continued pain and dysfunction from instability. Repair, when required, was delayed until the end of the season. All players with combined UCL/RCL injuries and isolated UCL injuries returned to play professional football the following season. Simultaneous combined thumb UCL and RCL tear is a previously undescribed injury pattern that occurred in 25% of thumb MCP collateral ligament injuries on a single NFL team over a 23-year period. All players with combined thumb UCL

  1. Influence of Cognitive Interferences and Self-Talk Functions on Performance During Competition in Elite Female Field Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Encinas, Cristina; Fernández-Campos, Francisco J; Rodas, Gil; Barrios, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    Pérez-Encinas, C, Fernández-Campos, FJ, Rodas, G, and Barrios, C. Influence of cognitive interferences and self-talk functions on performance during competition in elite female field hockey players. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3339-3346, 2016-Cognitive interferences in the form of distracting thoughts and self-talk functions may play an important role in athletes' performance. The purpose of this study was to explore the types of interfering thoughts and the concomitant use of self-talk functions occurring in a sample of elite female field hockey players. The variation in these interferences in relation to athletes' performance level in competition was also investigated. Thirty-two female players of the first and the Under-21 National Team completed the Thought Occurrence Questionnaire for Sport and the Self-Talk Questionnaire after an international competition. The trainer rated the players' performance during competition in 3 different categories according to his expectancies based on the athletes' conditioning: Low (n = 6), Normal (n = 15), and High Performance (n = 11). Those players classified as low performing had increased the occurrence of irrelevant thoughts as compared with other groups. These athletes also showed the highest scores on the thoughts of escape subscale. Athletes with high performance during tournaments exhibited the lowest scores on all subscales, especially in thoughts of escape. The S-TQ subscales showed no differences among the 3 performance groups. Under-21 players had higher scores on the occurrence of performance worries and thoughts of escape subscales than first national team players. Interfering thoughts are common in female field hockey players during world-class competitions. The occurrence of irrelevant thoughts and thoughts of escape was related to players exhibiting low performance. The use of self-talk functions was relatively low in these athletes and could explain the enhanced occurrence of interfering thoughts.

  2. Variables Affecting Return to Play After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in the National Football League

    PubMed Central

    Eisenstein, Emmanuel D.; Rawicki, Nathaniel L.; Rensing, Nicholas J.; Kusnezov, Nicholas A.; Lanzi, Joseph T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are common in the National Football League (NFL). Limited literature exists regarding return to play (RTP) and the factors affecting RTP after ACL reconstruction in NFL players. Purpose/Hypothesis: To determine RTP rates after ACL reconstruction in NFL players and to ascertain which variables affect RTP in these players. We hypothesized that RTP in this population will be less than in the general population and similar to the limited studies published previously. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 92 NFL athletes who sustained ACL injuries requiring ACL reconstruction from 2013 to 2015 were retrospectively studied to determine rate of RTP and the variables affecting RTP. Results: Sixty-two percent (57/92) of NFL athletes returned to NFL game play prior to the end of the 2015-2016 postseason. ACL injuries were noted in 10 different player positions, with 81.5% of all injuries as isolated ACL injuries (75/92) and 18.5% with concomitant knee injuries. A significant difference in ability to RTP was found for players who sustained in-season injuries compared with those who sustained off-season/preseason injuries (P = .02). No significant differences in RTP were found for players who played less than 4 years in the NFL compared with those who played longer. The mean draft round of players who returned was 3.96, with the odds ratio favoring RTP at 4.44 (P = .003) for players drafted in the first 3 rounds of the NFL draft compared with those drafted in the fourth round or later. No significant differences were found with regard to playing surface, laterality, concomitant injury, previous ipsilateral or contralateral ACL reconstruction, final outcome of the game, or contact compared with noncontact injuries. Conclusion: The RTP rates we reported after ACL reconstruction in NFL players are similar to prior studies; however, running backs and wide receivers had lower rates of RTP

  3. Socioeconomic differences in injury risks in childhood and adolescence: a nation-wide study of intentional and unintentional injuries in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Engstrom, K; Diderichsen, F; Laflamme, L

    2002-01-01

    Study objective: To measure socioeconomic differences in injuries among different age groups of children and adolescents. Subjects: Children under 20 living in Sweden between 1990 and 1994 (about 2.6 million). Method: A cross sectional study based on record linkage between 15 Swedish national registers. Children were divided into four age groups and allocated to four household socioeconomic status groups. Absolute and relative risks were compiled using children of high/intermediate level salaried employees as the comparison group. Four diagnostic groups were considered: fall, traffic, interpersonal violence, and self inflicted injuries. Results: Injury incidences were relatively low and socioeconomic differences negligible in the 0–4 year olds. Thereafter, significant socioeconomic differences were observed in all diagnostic groups except falls. The highest absolute differences were in traffic injuries, especially among 15–19 year olds, and in self inflicted injuries among 15–19 year old girls. Relative differences were highest in both categories of intentional injuries for the age group 10–14. Social circumstances in the household other than family socioeconomic status affected the social pattern of intentional but not that of unintentional injuries. Conclusions: Socioeconomic differences in injury risks are not necessarily constant over age. Inequalities are particularly high in absolute terms among adolescents 15–19 years old for traffic injuries and in relative terms among 10–14 year olds for intentional injuries. PMID:12120833

  4. "No Fear Comes": Adolescent Girls, Ice Hockey, and the Embodiment of Gender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theberge, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    Examined the relationship between gender, physicality, and embodiment among Canadian adolescent girls who played ice hockey. Interview data indicated that the girls emphasized the importance of being aggressive (fearless in use of the body). Players understood that contrasts between men's hockey (more physical and aggressive) and women's hockey…

  5. "No Fear Comes": Adolescent Girls, Ice Hockey, and the Embodiment of Gender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theberge, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    Examined the relationship between gender, physicality, and embodiment among Canadian adolescent girls who played ice hockey. Interview data indicated that the girls emphasized the importance of being aggressive (fearless in use of the body). Players understood that contrasts between men's hockey (more physical and aggressive) and women's hockey…

  6. Characterizing the Epidemiological Transition in Mexico: National and Subnational Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Gretchen; Dias, Rodrigo H; Thomas, Kevin J. A; Rivera, Juan A; Carvalho, Natalie; Barquera, Simón; Hill, Kenneth; Ezzati, Majid

    2008-01-01

    Background Rates of diseases and injuries and the effects of their risk factors can have substantial subnational heterogeneity, especially in middle-income countries like Mexico. Subnational analysis of the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors can improve characterization of the epidemiological transition and identify policy priorities. Methods and Findings We estimated deaths and loss of healthy life years (measured in disability-adjusted life years [DALYs]) in 2004 from a comprehensive list of diseases and injuries, and 16 major risk factors, by sex and age for Mexico and its states. Data sources included the vital statistics, national censuses, health examination surveys, and published epidemiological studies. Mortality statistics were adjusted for underreporting, misreporting of age at death, and for misclassification and incomparability of cause-of-death assignment. Nationally, noncommunicable diseases caused 75% of total deaths and 68% of total DALYs, with another 14% of deaths and 18% of DALYs caused by undernutrition and communicable, maternal, and perinatal diseases. The leading causes of death were ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, cerebrovascular disease, liver cirrhosis, and road traffic injuries. High body mass index, high blood glucose, and alcohol use were the leading risk factors for disease burden, causing 5.1%, 5.0%, and 7.3% of total burden of disease, respectively. Mexico City had the lowest mortality rates (4.2 per 1,000) and the Southern region the highest (5.0 per 1,000); under-five mortality in the Southern region was nearly twice that of Mexico City. In the Southern region undernutrition and communicable, maternal, and perinatal diseases caused 23% of DALYs; in Chiapas, they caused 29% of DALYs. At the same time, the absolute rates of noncommunicable disease and injury burdens were highest in the Southern region (105 DALYs per 1,000 population versus 97 nationally for noncommunicable diseases; 22 versus 19 for injuries

  7. Association between nationality and occupational injury risk on Danish non-passenger merchant ships.

    PubMed

    Ádám, Balázs

    2013-01-01

    Maritime occupational accidents can be determined by several factors, among which human characteristics play a crucial role. Worker's safety behaviour depends on individual physical and mental characteristics as well as on his/her social and cultural background. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency of workplace injuries in the Danish merchant fleet in the period 2010-2012, and to characterise its nationality dependence. Occupational injuries data reported from ships registered in the Danish International Ship Register to the Danish Maritime Authority were collected. Publicly available employment data were used to calculate the cumulative incidence rates for Danish, non-Danish European Union (EU) and non-EU employees working on non-passenger ships. Crude injury rates and rates adjusted for occupational status were statistically compared. The majority of accidents happened to Danish and non-EU workers on non-passenger ships. The injury rate varied around 70 per 1000 among Danish seafarers, while the rate for non-Danish employees was about 30 per 1000. Crude and adjusted relative risk was found significantly lower for EU (0.33-0.46;0.26-0.39) and for non-EU (0.41-0.53; 0.54-0.65) workers compared to Danish seafarers. The difference decreased, but remained significant in most cases for serious injuries. Occupational injury rates show considerable nationality differences as reported from non-passenger ships registered under the Danish flag. The differences can only be partly explained by varying reporting practices. The findings confirm the results of previous studies and point out the need for effective interventions in the high-risk groups.

  8. Direct catastrophic injury in sports.

    PubMed

    Boden, Barry P

    2005-11-01

    Catastrophic sports injuries are rare but tragic events. Direct (traumatic) catastrophic injury results from participating in the skills of a sport, such as a collision in football. Football is associated with the greatest number of direct catastrophic injuries for all major team sports in the United States. Pole vaulting, gymnastics, ice hockey, and football have the highest incidence of direct catastrophic injuries for sports in which males participate. In most sports, the rate of catastrophic injury is higher at the collegiate than at the high school level. Cheerleading is associated with the highest number of direct catastrophic injuries for all sports in which females participate. Indirect (nontraumatic) injury is caused by systemic failure as a result of exertion while participating in a sport. Cardiovascular conditions, heat illness, exertional hyponatremia, and dehydration can cause indirect catastrophic injury. Understanding the common mechanisms of injury and prevention strategies for direct catastrophic injuries is critical in caring for athletes.

  9. Non-fatal injuries among urban and rural residents: The National Health Interview Survey, 1997–2001

    PubMed Central

    Tiesman, Hope; Zwerling, Craig; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Sprince, Nancy; Cavanaugh, Joseph E

    2007-01-01

    Objective Although death rates from injuries are higher in rural areas compared with large metropolitan areas, little is known about how non-fatal injury rates vary by rurality. Data from the 1997–2001 US National Health Interview Surveys were used to explore associations between rurality and non-fatal injury. Design A nationally representative survey. Methods The annual injury rates per 1000 adults and 95% CIs were computed for medically attended injuries. Counties of residence were coded according to urban influence codes into four categories: large urban, small urban, suburban and rural. A linear-by-linear trend test was used to determine whether injury rates increase monotonically with county rurality. Logistic regression was used to control potential confounders. Results Compared with large urban counties, small urban counties experienced 8% higher injury odds (95% CI 1% to 15%); suburban counties 20% higher injury odds (95% CI 10% to 31%); and rural counties 30% higher injury odds (95% CI 17% to 43%) after adjusting for age, gender, marital status, education and health insurance. Conclusions Rural residents had higher non-fatal injury rates than urban and suburban residents. Exploring this discrepancy can further contribute to new hypotheses regarding rural injury risk and ultimately lead to better suited interventions for rural residents. PMID:17446252

  10. National Trends in Occupational Injuries Before and After 1992 and Predictors of Workers' Compensation Costs

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, Abhinav; Leigh, J. Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective Numbers and costs of occupational injuries and illnesses are significant in terms of morbidity and dollars, yet our understanding of time trends is minimal. We investigated trends and addressed some common hypotheses regarding causes of fluctuations. Methods We pulled data on incidence rates (per 100 full-time employed workers) for injuries and illnesses from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and on costs and benefits from the National Academy of Social Insurance for 1973 through 2007. Rates reflected all injury and illness cases, lost work-time cases, and cases resulting in at least 31 days away from work. We adjusted dollar costs (premiums) and benefits for inflation and measured them per employed worker. We plotted data in time-trend charts and ran linear regressions. Results From 1973 to 1991, there was a weak to nonexistent downward trend for injury and illness rates, and rates were strongly and negatively correlated with the unemployment rate. From 1992 to 2007, there were strong, consistent downward trends, but no longer were there statistically significant correlations with unemployment. Significant predictors (and signs) of workers' compensation premiums for 1973–2007 included medical price inflation (positive), number of lost-time injuries (positive), the Dow Jones Industrial Average (negative), and inflation-adjusted interest rate on U.S. Treasury bonds (negative). Dollars of benefits were positively and significantly predicted by medical inflation and number of lost-time cases. For 1992–2007, the Dow Jones variable was the only robust predictor of premiums; the number of injuries was not a significant positive predictor. Conclusion We had two major conclusions. First, the year 1992 marked a sharp contrast in trends and correlations between unemployment and incidence rates for occupational injuries and illnesses. Second, for the entire time period (1973–2007), insurance carriers' premiums were strongly associated with returns on

  11. National trends in occupational injuries before and after 1992 and predictors of workers' compensation costs.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Abhinav; Leigh, J Paul

    2011-01-01

    Numbers and costs of occupational injuries and illnesses are significant in terms of morbidity and dollars, yet our understanding of time trends is minimal. We investigated trends and addressed some common hypotheses regarding causes of fluctuations. We pulled data on incidence rates (per 100 full-time employed workers) for injuries and illnesses from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and on costs and benefits from the National Academy of Social Insurance for 1973 through 2007. Rates reflected all injury and illness cases, lost work-time cases, and cases resulting in at least 31 days away from work. We adjusted dollar costs (premiums) and benefits for inflation and measured them per employed worker. We plotted data in time-trend charts and ran linear regressions. From 1973 to 1991, there was a weak to nonexistent downward trend for injury and illness rates, and rates were strongly and negatively correlated with the unemployment rate. From 1992 to 2007, there were strong, consistent downward trends, but no longer were there statistically significant correlations with unemployment. Significant predictors (and signs) of workers' compensation premiums for 1973-2007 included medical price inflation (positive), number of lost-time injuries (positive), the Dow Jones Industrial Average (negative), and inflation-adjusted interest rate on U.S. Treasury bonds (negative). Dollars of benefits were positively and significantly predicted by medical inflation and number of lost-time cases. For 1992-2007, the Dow Jones variable was the only robust predictor of premiums; the number of injuries was not a significant positive predictor. We had two major conclusions. First, the year 1992 marked a sharp contrast in trends and correlations between unemployment and incidence rates for occupational injuries and illnesses. Second, for the entire time period (1973-2007), insurance carriers' premiums were strongly associated with returns on investments.

  12. Injury risks of EMS responders: evidence from the National Fire Fighter Near-Miss Reporting System

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jennifer A; Davis, Andrea L; Barnes, Brittany; Lacovara, Alicia V; Patel, Reema

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We analysed near-miss and injury events reported to the National Fire Fighter Near-Miss Reporting System (NFFNMRS) to investigate the workplace hazards and safety concerns of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) responders in the USA. Methods We reviewed 769 ‘non-fire emergency event’ reports from the NFFNMRS using a mixed methods approach. We identified 185 emergency medical calls and analysed their narrative text fields. We assigned Mechanism of Near-Miss/Injury and Nature of Injury codes and then tabulated frequencies (quantitative). We coded major themes regarding work hazards and safety concerns reported by the EMS responders (qualitative). Results Of the 185 emergency medical calls, the most commonly identified Mechanisms of Near-Miss/Injury to EMS responders was Assaults, followed by Struck-by Motor Vehicle, and Motor Vehicle Collision. The most commonly identified weapon used in an assault was a firearm. We identified 5 major domains of workplace hazards and safety concerns: Assaults by Patients, Risks from Motor Vehicles, Personal Protective Equipment, Relationships between Emergency Responders, and Policies, Procedures and Practices. Conclusions Narrative text from the NFFNMRS is a rich source of data that can be analysed quantitatively and qualitatively to provide insight into near-misses and injuries sustained by EMS responders. Near-miss reporting systems are critical components for occupational hazard surveillance. PMID:26068510

  13. Injuries to hired crop workers in the United States: a descriptive analysis of a national probability survey.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuhui; Myers, John R; Layne, Larry A

    2011-10-01

    Little empirical data are available examining the injury experience of hired crop workers in the United States (US). This study analyzed work-related injury data collected on these workers from a national survey. Data were collected through the National Agricultural Workers Survey (NAWS) for the federal fiscal years 1999, 2002, 2003, and 2004. These data provided descriptive injury characteristics and rate estimates from a sample of 13,604 crop farm workers. The injury rate was 4.3 injuries per 100 week-based full-time equivalents (FTE(WB) ). The majority of the injuries occurred to male (84%) and Mexican born (72%) workers. Shuttle migrants had the highest injury rate at 7.2 injuries/100 FTE(WB) . Workers reporting one or more health conditions and workers reporting one or more musculoskeletal complaints had higher injury. The most common injury events were overexertion from lifting (20%), being struck by hand held objects (13%), and falls to a lower level (10%). Injuries due to falls to a lower level accounted for the highest average number of restricted workdays (45 days). The use of hand tools, falls, and lifting overexertion injuries were identified as significant causes of injury among hired crop workers. Increased injury risk was also seen for crop workers with existing health or musculoskeletal complaints. These results are useful for targeting injury prevention efforts and future research needs for this unique worker population. Am. J. Ind. Med. 54:734-747, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. National Estimates of Noncanine Bite and Sting Injuries Treated in US Hospital Emergency Departments, 2001–2010

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Ricky; Mack, Karin; Haileyesus, Tadesse; Proescholdbell, Scott; Annest, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Injuries resulting from contact with animals and insects are a significant public health concern. This study quantifies nonfatal bite and sting injuries by noncanine sources using data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System–All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP). Methods The NEISS-AIP is an ongoing nationally representative surveillance system used to monitor all types and causes of injuries treated in US hospital emergency departments (EDs). Cases were coded by trained hospital coders using information from medical records on animal and insect sources of bite and sting injuries being treated. Data were weighted to produce national annualized estimates, percentages, and rates based on the US population. Results From 2001 to 2010 an estimated 10.1 million people visited EDs for noncanine bite and sting injuries, based on an unweighted case count of 169,010. This translates to a rate of 340.1 per 100,000 people (95% CI, 232.9–447.3). Insects accounted for 67.5% (95% CI, 45.8–89.2) of bite and sting injuries, followed by arachnids 20.8% (95% CI, 13.8–27.9). The estimated number of ED visits for bedbug bite injuries increased more than 7-fold—from 2156 visits in 2007 to 15,945 visits in 2010. Conclusions This study provides an update of national estimates of noncanine bite and sting injuries and describes the diversity of animal exposures based on a national sample of EDs. Treatment of nonfatal bite and sting injuries are costly to society. Direct medical and work time lost translates to an estimated $7.5 billion annually. PMID:24433776

  15. National estimates of noncanine bite and sting injuries treated in US Hospital Emergency Departments, 2001-2010.

    PubMed

    Langley, Ricky; Mack, Karin; Haileyesus, Tadesse; Proescholdbell, Scott; Annest, Joseph L

    2014-03-01

    Injuries resulting from contact with animals and insects are a significant public health concern. This study quantifies nonfatal bite and sting injuries by noncanine sources using data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP). The NEISS-AIP is an ongoing nationally representative surveillance system used to monitor all types and causes of injuries treated in US hospital emergency departments (EDs). Cases were coded by trained hospital coders using information from medical records on animal and insect sources of bite and sting injuries being treated. Data were weighted to produce national annualized estimates, percentages, and rates based on the US population. From 2001 to 2010 an estimated 10.1 million people visited EDs for noncanine bite and sting injuries, based on an unweighted case count of 169,010. This translates to a rate of 340.1 per 100,000 people (95% CI, 232.9-447.3). Insects accounted for 67.5% (95% CI, 45.8-89.2) of bite and sting injuries, followed by arachnids 20.8% (95% CI, 13.8-27.9). The estimated number of ED visits for bedbug bite injuries increased more than 7-fold-from 2156 visits in 2007 to 15,945 visits in 2010. This study provides an update of national estimates of noncanine bite and sting injuries and describes the diversity of animal exposures based on a national sample of EDs. Treatment of nonfatal bite and sting injuries are costly to society. Direct medical and work time lost translates to an estimated $7.5 billion annually. © 2013 Wilderness Medical Society Published by Wilderness Medical Society All rights reserved.

  16. Ambulatory cell phone injuries in the United States: an emerging national concern.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel C; Schreiber, Kristin M; Saltos, Andreas; Lichenstein, Sarah B; Lichenstein, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Over the past 15 years, the use of cell phones has increased 8-fold in the United States. Cell phone use has been shown to increase crash risks for drivers, but no systematic analyses have described injuries related to ambulatory cell phone use. The purpose of this study is to describe and quantitate injuries and deaths among persons using cell phones while walking. We searched the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) for emergency department (ED) reports of injuries related to phone use. The cases that returned were screened initially using words that would eliminate cases unlikely to be related to cell phone use and walking, possibly linked to distraction. The resulting cases were randomized and evaluated for consistency with predetermined case definitions by two authors blinded to the dates of the incidents. Cases that were disagreed upon were evaluated in a second screening by both authors for final case determination. National ED visit rates were estimated based on NEISS sampling methods. Annual variations were analyzed using linear regression with a restricted maximum likelihood approach. Our screening process identified 5,754 possible cases that occurred between 2000 and 2011, and 310 were agreed on as cases of cell-phone-induced distraction. The majority of the patients were female (68%) and 40 years of age or younger (54%). The primary mechanism of injury was a fall (72%), and most patients were treated and released from the ED (85%). No patients died from their injuries while they were in the ED. Linear modeling by year revealed a statistically significant increase in distraction injury rates over the years of study (p<0.001 for trend). The number of ED visits by ambulatory persons injured while being distracted by cell phone use has been increasing. More research is needed to determine the risks associated with walking and talking on a cell phone and to develop strategies for intervention. Cell phone use continues to increase both at

  17. [Sports injuries and illnesses during the 2008 Olympic Games and 2013 China National Games in Shenyang Division].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengzhe; Chen, Zhian; Pan, Shinong; Liao, Wei; Zhan, Yuhua; Zheng, Liqiang; Wang, Yitong; Lu, Chunxue; Fu, Wei; Zhang, Xiaogang; Liang, Hongjun; Guo, Qiyong

    2015-05-05

    To retrospectively analyse the medical imaging examination results of the injuries and illnesses during the 2008 Olympic Games and 2013 China National Games in Shenyang Divison. Collected and analyzed the health information and medical imaging examination results from Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University during the two games. There was 9 cases of sports injuries in the 2008 Olympic Games, mainly for knee, ankle ligament injury and muscle sprain, 36 cases of sports injuries in the 2013 China National Games, mainly for head traumas (9 cases), knee injuries (7 cases), ankle injuries (7 cases), shoulder injures (4 cases). Competitions of high risk of being injured were wrestling (10 cases), track and field (8 cases), American football (6 cases). The most common cause of illness were respiratory system (60 cases) and the digestive system (27 cases) in the total 233 cases illnesses in the China National Games. Different sports have different characteristic, regularity and mechanism of injury. Medical imaging examination has important value in the diagnosis of injury during large games. The respiratory system and digestive system are the most common illnesses and affect the athletes training and competition as important as injuries. So illness is the focus on the medical care assurance of the large games.

  18. Descriptive Epidemiology of Collegiate Men's Basketball Injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988–1989 Through 2003–2004

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Randall; Hertel, Jay; Agel, Julie; Grossman, Jayd; Marshall, Stephen W

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review 16 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) injury surveillance data for men's basketball and identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. Background: Collegiate men's basketball is a contact sport in which numerous anatomical structures are susceptible to both acute and overuse injuries. To date, no comprehensive reporting of injury patterns in NCAA men's basketball has been published. Main Results: The overall rate of injury was 9.9 per 1000 athlete-exposures for games and 4.3 per 1000 athlete-exposures for practices. Approximately 60% of all injuries were to the lower extremity, with ankle ligament sprains being the most common injury overall and knee internal derangements being the most common injury causing athletes to miss more than 10 days of participation. A trend of increasing incidence of injuries to the head and face was noted over the 16-year span of the study, which may be related to an observed increase in physical contact in men's basketball over the past 2 decades. Recommendations: These results provide the most comprehensive description of injury patterns in NCAA men's basketball to date. Many of the most common injuries seen in men's basketball, such as ankle ligament sprains and knee internal derangements, may be at least partially preventable with interventions such as taping and bracing and neuromuscular training. However, randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of such preventive measures among collegiate men's basketball players are clearly lacking. The increase in head and facial injuries may indicate that officials need to assess the increased tolerance for physical contact in men's basketball seen over the past 2 decades. PMID:17710167

  19. THE COMPETITIVE DEMANDS OF ELITE MALE RINK HOCKEY

    PubMed Central

    Del Valle, M.E.; Egocheaga, J.; Linnamo, V.; Fernández, A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to simulate the activity pattern of rink hockey by designing a specific skate test (ST) to study the energy expenditure and metabolic responses to this intermittent high-intensity exercise and extrapolate the results from the test to competition. Six rink hockey players performed, in three phases, the 20-metre multi-stage shuttle roller skate test, a tournament match and the ST. Heart rate was monitored in all three phases. Blood lactate, oxygen consumption, ventilation and respiratory exchange ratio were also recorded during the ST. Peak HR was 190.7±7.2 beats · min−1. There were no differences in peak HR between the three tests. Mean HR was similar between the ST and the match (86% and 87% of HRmax, respectively). Peak and mean ventilation averaged 111.0±8.8 L · min−1 and 70.3±14.0 L · min−1 (60% of VEmax), respectively. VO2max was 56.3±8.4 mL · kg−1 · min−1, and mean oxygen consumption was 40.9±7.9 mL · kg−1 · min−1 (70% of VO2max). Maximum blood lactate concentration was 7.2±1.3 mmol · L-1. ST yielded an energy expenditure of 899.1±232.9 kJ, and energy power was 59.9±15.5 kJ · min−1. These findings suggest that the ST is suitable for estimating the physiological demands of competitive rink hockey, which places a heavy demand on the aerobic and anaerobic systems, and requires high energy consumption. PMID:24744488

  20. A League Table of Child Deaths by Injury in Rich Nations. Innocenti Report Card, Issue No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Peter; Micklewright, John; Wright, Anna

    Noting that injuries are the leading cause of child death in all the world's more developed countries, this report is the second in a series of "Innocenti Report Cards" designed to monitor the performance of industrialized nations in meeting the needs of their children. The report focuses on child death by injury in the member countries…

  1. A League Table of Child Deaths by Injury in Rich Nations. Innocenti Report Card, Issue No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Peter; Micklewright, John; Wright, Anna

    Noting that injuries are the leading cause of child death in all the world's more developed countries, this report is the second in a series of "Innocenti Report Cards" designed to monitor the performance of industrialized nations in meeting the needs of their children. The report focuses on child death by injury in the member countries…

  2. 76 FR 19778 - National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program: Statement of Reasons for Not Conducting Rule-Making...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program... Guillain-Barr Syndrome (GBS) to the Vaccine Injury Table at this time. DATES: Written comments are not being solicited. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Geoffrey Evans, M.D., Director, Division of Vaccine...

  3. The effectiveness of preventive programs in decreasing the risk of soccer injuries in Belgium: national trends over a decade.

    PubMed

    Bollars, Peter; Claes, Steven; Vanlommel, Luc; Van Crombrugge, Kris; Corten, Kristoff; Bellemans, Johan

    2014-03-01

    Although characterized by a relatively high injury rate, soccer is the world's most popular sport. In Belgium, the national Royal Belgian Football Association involves about 420,000 licensed players, whose injury reports are collected in a nationwide registry. Over a period of 10 years, the association has introduced the Fédération Internationale de Football Association preventive programs and has initiated a stringent postponement policy of competition in case of nonoptimal weather conditions. The authors questioned whether these preventive programs effectively decreased the incidence of soccer-related injuries. Descriptive epidemiology study. The authors compared the incidence, location, timing, and severity of all registered soccer injuries in Belgium during 2 complete seasons separated by a decade (1999-2000 vs 2009-2010). A total of 56,364 injuries were reported, with an average of 6.8 injuries per 100 players per season. There was a 21.1% reduction in injury rate in the second season (rate ratio = 0.789; 95% confidence interval, 0.776-0.802), predominantly caused by a significant reduction in injuries during the winter period. In both seasons, an injury peak was noted during the first 3 months of the season. Recreational players had a higher risk for injury than national-level players (7.2 vs 4.4 injuries per 100 players per season; rate ratio = 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.59-1.69). The relative proportion of severe injuries was higher for female players and male youth players in general. The introduction of injury preventive programs has led to a significant reduction of soccer-related injuries, especially during the winter period. However, there is still room for improvement, and preventive programs can become more effective when specific parameters are targeted, such as adequate conditioning of players in the preseason.

  4. Building national estimates of the burden of road traffic injuries in developing countries from all available data sources: Iran.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, K; Naghavi, M; Shahraz, S; Bartels, D; Murray, C J L

    2009-06-01

    To use a range of existing information sources to develop a national snapshot of the burden of road traffic injuries in one developing country-Iran. The distribution of deaths was estimated by using data from the national death registration system, hospital admissions and outpatient visits from a time-limited hospital registry in 12 of 30 provinces, and injuries that received no institutional care using the 2000 demographic and health survey. Results were extrapolated to national annual incidence of health burden differentiated by age, sex, external cause, nature of injuries and institutional care. In 2005, 30,721 Iranians died annually in road traffic crashes and over one million were injured. The death rate (44 per 100,000) is the highest of any country in the world for which reliable estimates are available. Road traffic injuries are the third leading cause of death in Iran. While young adults are at high risk in non-fatal crashes, the elderly have the highest total death rates, largely due to pedestrian crashes. While car occupants lead the death count, motorized two-wheeler riders dominate hospital admissions, outpatient visits and health burden. Reliable estimates of the burden of road traffic injuries are an essential input for rational priority setting. Most low income countries are unlikely to have national injury surveillance systems for several decades. Thus national estimates of the burden of injuries should be built by collating information from all existing information sources by appropriately correcting for source specific shortcomings.

  5. Injuries in male and female semi-professional football (soccer) players in Nigeria: prospective study of a National Tournament.

    PubMed

    Owoeye, Oluwatoyosi Babatunde Alex; Aiyegbusi, Ayoola Ibifubara; Fapojuwo, Oluwaseun Akinleye; Badru, Oluwaseun Abdulganiyu; Babalola, Anike Rasheedat

    2017-03-21

    Research on the epidemiology of football injuries in Africa is very sparse despite its importance for injury prevention planning in a continent with limited sports medicine resources. The vast majority of studies available in literature were conducted in Europe and only a very few studies have prospectively reported the pattern of football injury in Africa. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence and pattern of injuries in a cohort of male and female semi-professional football players in Nigeria. A prospective cohort design was conducted, in which a total of 756 players with an age range of 18-32 years (356 males and 300 females) from 22 different teams (12 male and 10 female teams), were prospectively followed in a National Football Tournament. Physiotherapists recorded team exposure and injuries. Injuries were documented using the consensus protocol for data collection in studies relating to football injury surveillance. An overall incidence of 113.4 injuries/1000 h (95% CI 93.7-136.0) equivalent to 3.7 injuries/match and time-loss incidence of 15.6 injuries/1000 h were recorded for male players and 65.9 injuries/1000 h (95% CI 48.9-86.8) equivalent to 2.2 injuries/match and time-loss incidence of 7.9 injuries/1000 h were recorded for female players. Male players had a significantly higher risk of injuries [IRR = 1.72 (95% CI 1.23-2.45)]. Injuries mostly affected the lower extremity for both genders (n = 81, 70% and n = 31, 62% for males and females respectively). Lower leg contusion (n = 22, 19%) and knee sprain (n = 9, 18%) were the most common specific injury types for male and female players respectively. Most of the injuries were as a result of contact with another player (n = 102, 88%-males; n = 48, 96%-females). Time-loss injuries were mostly estimated as minimal (n = 11, 69%) for male players and severe (n = 4, 66%) for female players. The overall incidence of injuries among Nigerian semi-professional football

  6. Characteristics of persons and jobs with needlestick injuries in a national data set.

    PubMed

    Leigh, J Paul; Wiatrowski, William J; Gillen, Marion; Steenland, N Kyle

    2008-08-01

    Physicians, nurses, and others are at risk of needlesticks, yet little national information is available regarding incidence across demographic and occupational categories. Analysis was conducted on national data on occupational injuries for 1992-2003 from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). Because BLS data were limited to cases with 1 or more days of work loss, and reasons related to reporting of incidents, the data only reflected a subset of all needlesticks. Nevertheless, the data were internally consistent across categories so that relative magnitudes were reliable. Statistical tests for differences in proportions were conducted that compared needlesticks with all other occupational injuries and employment. Cases with 1 or more days of work loss numbered 903 per year, on average, from 1992 through 2003. Women comprised 73.3% (95% CI: 72.5%-74.2%) of persons injured. For those reporting race, white, non-Hispanic comprised 69.3% of the total (95% CI: 68.1%-70.4%); black, non-Hispanic, 14.8% (95% CI: 13.9%-15.6%); and Hispanic, 13.8% (95% CI: 12.9%-14.6%). The age bracket 35 to 44 years had the highest percentage of injuries at 34.0% (95% CI: 33.1%-34.9%). Ages over 54 years reported smaller percentages of needlestick injuries than either all other injuries or employment. Occupations with greatest frequencies included registered nurses, nursing aides and orderlies, janitors and cleaners, licensed practical nurses, and maids and housemen. Occupations with greatest risks included biologic technicians, janitors and cleaners, and maids and housemen. Almost 20% (95% CI: 18.88%-20.49%) of needlesticks occurred outside the services industry. Seven percent (95% CI: 6.56%-7.53%) of needlesticks resulted in 31 or more days of work loss in contrast to 20.46% (95% CI: 20.44%-20.48%) of all other injuries. In this nationally representative sample, the most frequent demographic and occupational categories were women; white, non-Hispanic; ages 35 to 44 years; and registered

  7. Descriptive Epidemiology of Collegiate Men's Soccer Injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988–1989 Through 2002–2003

    PubMed Central

    Agel, Julie; Evans, Todd A; Dick, Randall; Putukian, Margot; Marshall, Stephen W

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review 15 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) injury surveillance data for men's soccer and to identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. Background: The NCAA sanctioned its first men's soccer championship in 1959. Since then, the sport has grown to include more than 18 000 annual participants across 3 NCAA divisions. During the 15 years from 1988–1989 to 2002–2003, the NCAA Injury Surveillance System accumulated game and practice injury data for men's soccer across all 3 NCAA divisions. Main Results: The injury rate was 4 times higher in games compared with practices (18.75 versus 4.34 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures, rate ratio = 4.3, 95% confidence interval = 4.2, 4.5), and preseason practices had a higher injury rate than in-season practices (7.98 versus 2.43 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures, rate ratio = 3.3, 95% confidence interval = 3.1, 3.5). In both games and practices, more than two thirds of men's soccer injuries occurred to the lower extremities, followed by the head and neck in games and the trunk and back in practices. Although player-to-player contact was the primary cause of injury during games, most practice injuries occurred without direct contact to the injured body part. Ankle ligament sprains represented the most common injury during practices and games, whereas knee internal derangements were the most common type of severe injury (defined as 10+ days of time loss). Recommendations: Sprains, contusions, and strains of the lower extremities were the most common injuries in men's collegiate soccer, with player-to-player contact the primary injury mechanism during games. Preventive efforts should focus on the player-to-player contact that often leads to these injuries and greater enforcement of the rules that are in place to limit their frequency and severity. Emphasis also should be placed on addressing the high rate of first-time and recurrent ankle ligament sprains. PMID:17710176

  8. Extremity war injuries: collaborative efforts in research, host nation care, and disaster preparedness.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Andrew N; Ficke, Col James R

    2010-01-01

    The fourth annual Extremity War Injuries (EWI) Symposium addressed ongoing challenges and opportunities in the management of combat-related musculoskeletal injury. The symposium, which also examined host-nation care and disaster preparedness and response, defined opportunities for synergy between several organizations with similar missions and goals. Within the Department of Defense, the Orthopaedic Extremity Trauma Research Program (OETRP) has funded basic research related to a series of protocols first identified and validated at prior EWI symposia. A well-funded clinical research arm of OETRP has been developed to help translate and validate research advances from each of the protocols. The Armed Forces Institute for Regenerative Medicine, a consortium of academic research institutions, employs a tissue-engineering approach to EWI challenges, particularly with regard to tissue loss. Programs within the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases and throughout the National Institutes of Health have also expanded tissue-engineering efforts by emphasizing robust mechanistic basic science programs. Much of the clinical care delivered by US military medical personnel and nongovernmental agencies has been to host-nation populations; coordinating delivery to maximize the number of injured who receive care requires understanding of the breadth and scope of resources available within the war zone. Similarly, providing the most comprehensive care to the greatest number of injured in the context of domestic mass casualty requires discussion and planning by all groups involved.

  9. Did Emperor Moctezuma II's head injury and subsequent death hasten the fall of the Aztec nation?

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Gonzalo M

    2015-07-01

    This article analyzes the head injury of Emperor Moctezuma as one of those injuries that affected the course of history. The Emperor's death arguably changed the fate of an entire nation and led to the destruction of the Aztec civilization. Moctezuma died in the evening hours of June 30, 1520, in his palace in the Aztec capital, Tenochtitlan, while a prisoner of the Spanish conquistadors. The Emperor had been speaking to his people in an effort to persuade them to cease hostilities against Hernán Cortés, his Spanish soldiers, and Indian allies. Both Spanish and Indian contemporary sources document that he sustained a severe head injury when one of his own warriors hit him with a rock thrown from a sling. However, after the Conquest of Mexico some of the information collected by Spanish friars from Indian stories, songs, and pictorial representations raised the possibility that Moctezuma died of strangulation or stabbing at the hands of the Spaniards. There is even a suggestion of suicide. This issue remains unresolved and emotionally charged. The historical and clinical analysis of the events surrounding Moctezuma's death indicates that the Emperor most likely died as a consequence of head injury. The author has attempted to present a neutral analysis but agrees with Benjamin Keen that neutrality may be unattainable, no matter how remote the subject of historical inquiry is from the present.

  10. Morphological, Physiological and Skating Performance Profiles of Male Age-Group Elite Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Allisse, Maxime; Sercia, Pierre; Comtois, Alain-Steve; Leone, Mario

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the evolution of morphological, physiological and skating performance profiles of elite age-group ice hockey players based on repeated measures spread over one season. In addition, the results of fitness tests and training programs performed in off-ice conditions and their relationship with skating performance were analyzed. Eighteen high level age-group ice hockey players (13.1 ± 0.6 years) were assessed off and on-ice at the beginning and at the end of the hockey season. A third evaluation was also conducted at the beginning of the following hockey season. The players were taller, heavier, and showed bone breadths and muscle girths above the reference population of the same age. Muscular variables improved significantly during and between the two hockey seasons (p < 0.05). However, maximal aerobic power improved only during the off-season. All skating performance tests exhibited significant enhancements during the hockey season, but not during the off-season where some degradation was observed. Finally, weak observed variances (generally <20% of the explained variance) between physiological variables measured off-ice and on-ice skating performance tests indicated important gaps, both in the choice of the off-ice assessment tools as well as in training methods conventionally used. The reflection on the best way to assess and train hockey players certainly deserves to be continued.

  11. Traumatic diaphragmatic injury in the American College of Surgeons National Trauma Data Bank: a new examination of a rare diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fair, Kelly A; Gordon, Nicole T; Barbosa, Ronald R; Rowell, Susan E; Watters, Jennifer M; Schreiber, Martin A

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic diaphragmatic injury (TDI) is a rarely diagnosed injury in trauma. Previous studies have been limited in their evaluation of TDI because of small population size and center bias. Although injuries may be suspected based on penetrating mechanism, blunt injuries may be particularly difficult to detect. The American College of Surgeons National Trauma Data Bank is the largest trauma database in the United States. We hypothesized that we could identify specific injury patterns associated with blunt and penetrating TDIs. We examined demographics, diagnoses, mechanism of injury, and outcomes for patients with TDI in 2012 as this is the largest and most recent dataset available. Comparisons were made using chi-square or independent samples t test. There were a total of 833,309 encounters in the National Trauma Data Bank in 2012. Three thousand eight hundred seventy-three patients had a TDI (.46%). Of those, 1,240 (33%) patients had a blunt mechanism and 2,543 (67%) had a penetrating mechanism. Patients with blunt TDI were older (44 ± 19 vs 31 ± 13 years, P < .001), had a higher injury severity score (33 ± 14 vs 24 ± 15, P < .001), and a higher mortality rate (19.8% vs 8.8%, P < .001). Compared with patients with penetrating injuries, those with blunt TDI were more likely to have injuries to the thoracic aorta (2.9% vs .5%, P < .001), lung (48.7% vs 28.1, P < .001), bladder (5.9% vs .7%, P < .001), and spleen (44.8% vs 29.1%, P < .001). Penetrating TDI was associated with liver and hollow viscus injuries. Diaphragmatic injury is an uncommon but significant diagnosis in trauma patients. Blunt injuries may be more likely to be occult; however, a pattern of associated injuries to the aorta, lung, spleen, and bladder should prompt further workup for TDI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dupuytren disease is highly prevalent in male field hockey players aged over 60 years.

    PubMed

    Broekstra, Dieuwke C; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Lanting, Rosanne; Harder, Tom; Smits, Inge; Werker, Paul M N

    2016-09-22

    Dupuytren disease is a fibroproliferative hand condition. The role of exposure to vibration as a risk factor has been studied with contradictory results. Since field hockey is expected to be a strong source of hand-arm vibration, we hypothesised that long-term exposure to field hockey is associated with Dupuytren disease. In this cross-sectional cohort study, the hands of 169 male field hockey players (IQR: 65-71 years) and 156 male controls (IQR: 59-71 years) were examined for signs of Dupuytren disease. Details about their age, lifestyle factors, medical history, employment history and leisure activities were gathered. Prior to the analyses, the groups were balanced in risk factors using propensity score matching. The association between field hockey and Dupuytren disease was determined using a subject-specific generalised linear mixed model with a binomial distribution and logit link function (matched pairs analysis). Dupuytren disease was observed in 51.7% of the field hockey players, and in 13.8% of the controls. After propensity score matching, field hockey playing as dichotomous variable, was associated with Dupuytren disease (OR=9.42, 95% CI 3.01 to 29.53). A linear dose-response effect of field hockey (hours/week x years) within the field hockey players could not be demonstrated (OR=1.03, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.56). We found that field hockey playing has a strong association with the presence of Dupuytren disease. Clinicians in sports medicine should be alert to this less common diagnosis in this sport. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Physiological profiles of the Canadian Olympic Hockey Team (1980).

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Quinney, H A; Steadward, R D; Wenger, H A; Sexsmith, J R

    1982-06-01

    In order to establish baseline data and to prescribe training programmes to off-set weaknesses, selected measures of aerobic fitness (VO2max), muscular power (peak torque and watt output) and performance times on-ice were collected on the Canadian Olympic Hockey Team (1980). VO2max values (54 ml. kg. min) were similar to other non-endurance athletes. Peak torque values relative to body weight in knee extension at 30 degrees and 180 degrees . s-1 (3.62 an 1.85 Nm . kg-1) were the same at low speed but lower at high speed than other selected power athletes. The on-ice performance times showed higher speed of over 180' than professional and junior level players but the speed drop-off over six repeats was greater. There were no differences between positions on these measures. These data offer a baseline from which to compare other hockey players and suggest that the aerobic fitness levels and torque outputs at high speed are not well developed.

  14. Sport-related concussions: knowledge translation among minor hockey coaches.

    PubMed

    Mrazik, Martin; Bawani, Farzad; Krol, Andrea L

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate minor hockey coaches' knowledge base of sport-related concussions. Cross-sectional survey. Subjects independently completed the written survey at preseason organizational meetings. One hundred seventy-eight active coaches spanning 5 age levels (ages 5-15 years). Coaches reported 2.62 ± 3.73 years of coaching experience. Resources where coaches obtained information about concussions, perceptions of variables associated with concussions, knowledge level of issues associated with concussions, and decision-making practices. Newspapers and magazines were the most frequent source of information regarding concussions, yet were rated as not very helpful. Family physicians were less frequently sought but were rated as most helpful. A majority of coaches reported limited knowledge about concussions but rated this knowledge as being important. There was a significant relationship between head coaching experience and concussion knowledge [R = 0.09, F3,156 = 4.41, P = 0.005]. Most coaches demonstrated a good knowledge base of common issues associated with concussions, and a majority of individuals correctly identified return-to-play practices. A majority of minor hockey coaches correctly recognized and understood issues related to sport-related concussions. Results suggested that knowledge translation through various formal and informal sources has had a positive effect. However, a majority of coaches reported having limited knowledge about concussions yet consider it an important topic.

  15. Descriptive epidemiology of collegiate women's lacrosse injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988-1989 through 2003-2004.

    PubMed

    Dick, Randall; Lincoln, Andrew E; Agel, Julie; Carter, Elizabeth A; Marshall, Stephen W; Hinton, Richard Y

    2007-01-01

    To review 16 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association injury surveillance data for women's lacrosse and identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. Women's lacrosse is a fast-paced, primarily noncontact sport. Participation in collegiate women's lacrosse almost doubled between the 1988-1989 and 2003-2004 seasons. Lacrosse equipment consists of sticks made of wood or a synthetic material and a hard rubber ball. Until recently, mouth guards were the only required protective equipment. Collegiate women's lacrosse game injury rates increased over the 16-year study period. More than 60% of all severe game injuries were lower extremity sprains and strains and knee internal derangements, most frequently the result of noncontact incidents. The most common injury scenarios by injury mechanism and player activity were no contact while ball handling (16.4%) and contact from a stick while ball handling (10.5%). Contact from a stick or a ball accounted for 5.6% and 5.2% of injuries sustained during shooting activities, respectively. Approximately 22% of all game and 12% of all practice injuries involved the head and neck. Contact from a stick accounted for the majority (56.0%) of above-the-neck injuries in games; contact from the ball accounted for 20.0% of these injuries. Participants had 5 times the risk of sustaining a concussion in a game as in a practice (0.70 versus 0.15 injuries per 1000 athletic-exposures, rate ratio = 4.7, 95% confidence interval = 3.8, 6.5). To reduce the lower extremity injuries that comprise the greatest injury burden in women's lacrosse, future researchers should evaluate proprioceptive, plyometric, and balance training interventions designed specifically for female players. Other research areas of great interest involve determining whether protective eyewear (mandated in 2004) reduces injuries to the eye, orbit, and nasal area and identifying any unintended consequences of the mandate, such as increased risk of injuries to

  16. Descriptive Epidemiology of Collegiate Women's Lacrosse Injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988–1989 Through 2003–2004

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Randall; Lincoln, Andrew E; Agel, Julie; Carter, Elizabeth A; Marshall, Stephen W; Hinton, Richard Y

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review 16 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association injury surveillance data for women's lacrosse and identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. Background: Women's lacrosse is a fast-paced, primarily noncontact sport. Participation in collegiate women's lacrosse almost doubled between the 1988–1989 and 2003–2004 seasons. Lacrosse equipment consists of sticks made of wood or a synthetic material and a hard rubber ball. Until recently, mouth guards were the only required protective equipment. Main Results: Collegiate women's lacrosse game injury rates increased over the 16-year study period. More than 60% of all severe game injuries were lower extremity sprains and strains and knee internal derangements, most frequently the result of noncontact incidents. The most common injury scenarios by injury mechanism and player activity were no contact while ball handling (16.4%) and contact from a stick while ball handling (10.5%). Contact from a stick or a ball accounted for 5.6% and 5.2% of injuries sustained during shooting activities, respectively. Approximately 22% of all game and 12% of all practice injuries involved the head and neck. Contact from a stick accounted for the majority (56.0%) of above-the-neck injuries in games; contact from the ball accounted for 20.0% of these injuries. Participants had 5 times the risk of sustaining a concussion in a game as in a practice (0.70 versus 0.15 injuries per 1000 athletic-exposures, rate ratio = 4.7, 95% confidence interval = 3.8, 6.5). Recommendations: To reduce the lower extremity injuries that comprise the greatest injury burden in women's lacrosse, future researchers should evaluate proprioceptive, plyometric, and balance training interventions designed specifically for female players. Other research areas of great interest involve determining whether protective eyewear (mandated in 2004) reduces injuries to the eye, orbit, and nasal area and identifying any unintended

  17. Preventing head and neck injury.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, A S; McCrory, P

    2005-06-01

    A wide range of head and neck injury risks are present in sport, including catastrophic injury. The literature since 1980 on prevention of head and neck injury in sport was reviewed, focusing on catastrophic and brain injury and identifying the range of injury prevention methods in use. There have been few formal evaluations of injury prevention methods. Approaches that are considered, or have been proven, to be successful in preventing injury include: modification of the baseball; implementation of helmet standards in ice hockey and American football and increased wearing rates; use of full faceguards in ice hockey; changes in rules associated with body contact; implementation of rules to reduce the impact forces in rugby scrums. Helmets and other devices have been shown to reduce the risk of severe head and facial injury, but current designs appear to make little difference to rates of concussion. Research methods involving epidemiological, medical, and human factors are required in combination with biomechanical and technological approaches to reduce further injury risks in sport.

  18. Epidemiology of Football Injuries in the National Collegiate Athletic Association, 2004-2005 to 2008-2009

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Zachary Y.; Simon, Janet E.; Grooms, Dustin R.; Roos, Karen G.; Cohen, Randy P.; Dompier, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research has found that injury rates in football are higher in competition than during practice. However, there is little research on the association between injury rates and type of football practices and how these specific rates compare with those in competitions. Purpose: This study utilized data from the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System (NCAA ISS) to describe men’s collegiate football practice injuries (academic years 2004-2005 to 2008-2009) in 4 event types: competitions, scrimmages, regular practices, and walkthroughs. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Methods: Football data during the 2004-2005 to 2008-2009 academic years were analyzed. Annually, an average of 60 men’s football programs provided data (9.7% of all universities sponsoring football). Injury rates per 1000 athlete-exposures (AEs), injury rate ratios (RRs), 95% CIs, and injury proportions were reported. Results: The NCAA ISS captured 18,075 football injuries. Most injuries were reported in regular practices (55.9%), followed by competitions (38.8%), scrimmages (4.4%), and walkthroughs (0.8%). Most AEs were reported in regular practices (77.6%), followed by walkthroughs (11.5%), competitions (8.6%), and scrimmages (2.3%). The highest injury rate was found in competitions (36.94/1000 AEs), followed by scrimmages (15.7/1000 AEs), regular practices (5.9/1000 AEs), and walkthroughs (0.6/1000 AEs). These rates were all significantly different from one another. Distributions of injury location and diagnoses were similar across all 4 event types, with most injuries occurring at the lower extremity (56.0%) and consisting of sprains and strains (50.6%). However, injury mechanisms varied. The proportion of injuries due to player contact was greatest in scrimmages (66.8%), followed by regular practices (48.5%) and walkthroughs (34.9%); in contrast, the proportion of injuries due to noncontact/overuse was greatest in walkthroughs (41

  19. Epidemiology of Football Injuries in the National Collegiate Athletic Association, 2004-2005 to 2008-2009.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Zachary Y; Simon, Janet E; Grooms, Dustin R; Roos, Karen G; Cohen, Randy P; Dompier, Thomas P

    2016-09-01

    Research has found that injury rates in football are higher in competition than during practice. However, there is little research on the association between injury rates and type of football practices and how these specific rates compare with those in competitions. This study utilized data from the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System (NCAA ISS) to describe men's collegiate football practice injuries (academic years 2004-2005 to 2008-2009) in 4 event types: competitions, scrimmages, regular practices, and walkthroughs. Descriptive epidemiological study. Football data during the 2004-2005 to 2008-2009 academic years were analyzed. Annually, an average of 60 men's football programs provided data (9.7% of all universities sponsoring football). Injury rates per 1000 athlete-exposures (AEs), injury rate ratios (RRs), 95% CIs, and injury proportions were reported. The NCAA ISS captured 18,075 football injuries. Most injuries were reported in regular practices (55.9%), followed by competitions (38.8%), scrimmages (4.4%), and walkthroughs (0.8%). Most AEs were reported in regular practices (77.6%), followed by walkthroughs (11.5%), competitions (8.6%), and scrimmages (2.3%). The highest injury rate was found in competitions (36.94/1000 AEs), followed by scrimmages (15.7/1000 AEs), regular practices (5.9/1000 AEs), and walkthroughs (0.6/1000 AEs). These rates were all significantly different from one another. Distributions of injury location and diagnoses were similar across all 4 event types, with most injuries occurring at the lower extremity (56.0%) and consisting of sprains and strains (50.6%). However, injury mechanisms varied. The proportion of injuries due to player contact was greatest in scrimmages (66.8%), followed by regular practices (48.5%) and walkthroughs (34.9%); in contrast, the proportion of injuries due to noncontact/overuse was greatest in walkthroughs (41.7%), followed by regular practices (35.6%) and scrimmages (21

  20. The aging road warrior: national trend toward older riders impacts outcome after motorcycle injury.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joshua B; Bankey, Paul E; Gorczyca, John T; Cheng, Julius D; Stassen, Nicole A; Gestring, Mark L

    2010-03-01

    Industry statistics suggest that motorcycle owners in the United States are getting older. Our objective was to analyze the effect of this demographic shift on injuries and outcomes after a motorcycle crash. Injured motorcyclists aged 17 to 89 years in the National Trauma Databank were reviewed from 1996 to 2005. Age trends and injury patterns were assessed over time. Injury Severity Score (ISS), length of stay (LOS), intensive care unit (ICU) use, comorbidities, complications, mortality, injury patterns, helmet use, and alcohol use were compared for subjects 40 and older versus those younger than 40-years-old. There were 61,689 subjects included. Over the study period, the mean age increased from 33.9 to 39.1 years (P < 0.01), and the proportion of subjects 40 years of age or older increased from 27.9 to 48.3 per cent. ISS, LOS, ICU LOS, and mortality were higher in the 40 years of age or older group (P < or = 0.01). The rates of admission to the ICU (32.3 vs. 27.3%), pre-existing comorbidities (20 vs. 9.7%), and complications (7.6 vs. 5.5%) were all higher in the 40 years of age and older group (P < 0.01). The average age of the injured motorcyclist is increasing. Older riders' injuries appear more serious, and their hospital course is more likely to be challenged by comorbidities and complications contributing to poorer outcomes. Motorcycle safety education and training initiatives should be expanded to specifically target older motorcyclists.

  1. National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System Commentaries: Introduction and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Randall; Agel, Julie; Marshall, Stephen W

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe the history and methods of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance System (ISS) as a complement to the sport-specific chapters that follow. Background: The NCAA has maintained the ISS for intercollegiate athletics since 1982. The primary goal of the ISS is to collect injury and exposure data from a representative sample of NCAA institutions in a variety of sports. Relevant data are then shared with the appropriate NCAA sport and policy committees to provide a foundation for evidence-based decision making with regard to health and safety issues. Description: The ISS monitors formal team activities, numbers of participants, and associated time-loss athletic injuries from the first day of formal preseason practice to the final postseason contest for 16 collegiate sports. In this special issue of the Journal of Athletic Training, injury information in 15 collegiate sports from the period covering 1988–1989 to 2003–2004 is evaluated. Conclusions: Athletic trainers and the NCAA have collaborated for 25 years through the NCAA ISS to create the largest ongoing collegiate sports injury database in the world. Data collection through the ISS, followed by annual review via the NCAA sport rules and sports medicine committee structure, is a unique mechanism that has led to significant advances in health and safety policy within and beyond college athletics. The publication of this special issue and the evolution of an expanded Web-based ISS enhance the opportunity to apply the health and safety decision-making process at the level of the individual athletic trainer and institution. PMID:21714302

  2. NIOSH national survey of long-haul truck drivers: Injury and safety

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang X.; Sieber, W. Karl; Lincoln, Jennifer E.; Birdsey, Jan; Hitchcock, Edward M.; Nakata, Akinori; Robinson, Cynthia F.; Collins, James W.; Sweeney, Marie H.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 1,701,500 people were employed as heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers in the United States in 2012. The majority of them were long-haul truck drivers (LHTDs). There are limited data on occupational injury and safety in LHTDs, which prompted a targeted national survey. The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health conducted a nationally representative survey of 1265 LHTDs at 32 truck stops across the contiguous United States in 2010. Data were collected on truck crashes, near misses, moving violations, work-related injuries, work environment, safety climate, driver training, job satisfaction, and driving behaviors. Results suggested that an estimated 2.6% of LHTDs reported a truck crash in 2010, 35% reported at least one crash while working as an LHTD, 24% reported at least one near miss in the previous 7 days, 17% reported at least one moving violation ticket and 4.7% reported a non-crash injury involving days away from work in the previous 12 months. The majority (68%) of non-crash injuries among company drivers were not reported to employers. An estimate of 73% of LHTDs (16% often and 58% sometimes) perceived their delivery schedules unrealistically tight; 24% often continued driving despite fatigue, bad weather, or heavy traffic because they needed to deliver or pick up a load at a given time; 4.5% often drove 10 miles per hours or more over the speed limit; 6.0% never wore a seatbelt; 36% were often frustrated by other drivers on the road; 35% often had to wait for access to a loading dock; 37% reported being noncompliant with hours-of-service rules (10% often and 27% sometimes); 38% of LHTDs perceived their entry-level training inadequate; and 15% did not feel that safety of workers was a high priority with their management. This survey brings to light a number of important safety issues for further research and interventions, e.g., high prevalence of truck crashes, injury underreporting, unrealistically tight delivery schedules

  3. NIOSH national survey of long-haul truck drivers: Injury and safety.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang X; Sieber, W Karl; Lincoln, Jennifer E; Birdsey, Jan; Hitchcock, Edward M; Nakata, Akinori; Robinson, Cynthia F; Collins, James W; Sweeney, Marie H

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 1,701,500 people were employed as heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers in the United States in 2012. The majority of them were long-haul truck drivers (LHTDs). There are limited data on occupational injury and safety in LHTDs, which prompted a targeted national survey. The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health conducted a nationally representative survey of 1265 LHTDs at 32 truck stops across the contiguous United States in 2010. Data were collected on truck crashes, near misses, moving violations, work-related injuries, work environment, safety climate, driver training, job satisfaction, and driving behaviors. Results suggested that an estimated 2.6% of LHTDs reported a truck crash in 2010, 35% reported at least one crash while working as an LHTD, 24% reported at least one near miss in the previous 7 days, 17% reported at least one moving violation ticket and 4.7% reported a non-crash injury involving days away from work in the previous 12 months. The majority (68%) of non-crash injuries among company drivers were not reported to employers. An estimate of 73% of LHTDs (16% often and 58% sometimes) perceived their delivery schedules unrealistically tight; 24% often continued driving despite fatigue, bad weather, or heavy traffic because they needed to deliver or pick up a load at a given time; 4.5% often drove 10miles per hours or more over the speed limit; 6.0% never wore a seatbelt; 36% were often frustrated by other drivers on the road; 35% often had to wait for access to a loading dock; 37% reported being noncompliant with hours-of-service rules (10% often and 27% sometimes); 38% of LHTDs perceived their entry-level training inadequate; and 15% did not feel that safety of workers was a high priority with their management. This survey brings to light a number of important safety issues for further research and interventions, e.g., high prevalence of truck crashes, injury underreporting, unrealistically tight delivery schedules

  4. Not child's play: National estimates of microwave-related burn injuries among young children.

    PubMed

    Lowell, Gina; Quinlan, Kyran

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that children as young as 18 months can open a microwave and remove its contents causing sometimes severe scalds. Although this mechanism may be uniquely preventable by an engineering fix, no national estimate of this type of child burn injury has been reported. We analyzed the Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System data on emergency department-treated microwave-related burn injuries from January 2002 through December 2012 in children aged 12 months to 4 years. Based on the narrative description of how the injury occurred, we defined a case as a burn with a mechanism of either definitely or probably involving a child himself or herself opening a microwave oven and accessing the heated contents. National estimates of cases and their characteristics were calculated. During the 11 years studied, an estimated 10,902 (95% confidence interval, 8,231-13,573) microwave-related burns occurred in children aged 12 months to 4 years. Of these, 7,274 (66.7%) (95% confidence interval, 5,135-9,413) were cases of children burned after accessing the contents of the microwave themselves. A total of 1,124 (15.5%) cases required hospitalization or transfer from the treating emergency department. Narratives for children as young as 12 months described the child himself or herself being able to access microwave contents. The most commonly burned body parts were the upper trunk (3,056 cases) and the face (1,039 cases). The most common scalding substances were water (2,863 cases), noodles (1,011 cases), and soup (931 cases). The majority of microwave-related burns in young children occur as a result of the child himself or herself accessing the microwave and removing the contents. More than 600 young children are treated in US emergency departments annually for such burns. Children as young as 12 months sustained burns caused by this mechanism of injury. These burns could be prevented with a redesign of microwaves to

  5. Does fair play reduce concussions? A prospective, comparative analysis of competitive youth hockey tournaments

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Aynsley M; Gaz, Daniel V; Larson, Dirk; Jorgensen, Janelle K; Eickhoff, Chad; Krause, David A; Fenske, Brooke M; Aney, Katie; Hansen, Ashley A; Nanos, Stephanie M; Stuart, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Background/aim To determine if Boys Bantam and Peewee and Girls U14 sustain fewer concussions, head hits, ‘other injuries’ and penalties in hockey tournaments governed by intensified fair play (IFP) than non-intensified fair play (NIFP). Methods A prospective comparison of IFP, a behaviour modification programme that promotes sportsmanship, versus control (non-intensified, NIFP) effects on numbers of diagnosed concussions, head hits without diagnosed concussion (HHWDC), ‘other injuries’, number of penalties and fair play points (FPPs). 1514 players, ages 11–14 years, in 6 IFP (N=950) and 5 NIFP (N=564) tournaments were studied. Results Two diagnosed concussions, four HHWDC, and six ‘other injuries’ occurred in IFP tournaments compared to one concussion, eight HHWDC and five ‘other injuries’ in NIFP. There were significantly fewer HHWDC in IFP than NIFP (p=0.018). However, diagnosed concussions, ‘other injuries’, penalties and FPPs did not differ significantly between conditions. In IFP, a minority of teams forfeited the majority of FPPs. Most diagnosed concussions, HHWDC, and other injuries occurred to Bantam B players and usually in penalised teams that forfeited their FPPs. Conclusions In response to significant differences in HHWDC between IFP and NIFP tournaments, the following considerations are encouraged: mandatory implementation of fair play in regular season and tournaments, empowering tournament directors to not accept heavily penalised teams, and introducing ‘no body checking’ in Bantam. PMID:27900157

  6. Prevention of sports-related eye injury.

    PubMed

    Stock, J G; Cornell, F M

    1991-08-01

    Sports-related eye injury is an important cause of vision loss. Many eye injuries can be prevented through the supervision of play, the enforcement of game rules and the use of eye protective devices. State-of-the-art eye protective devices incorporate highly impact-resistant optical material, usually polycarbonate lenses, in a sturdy frame. Protective devices are available for use in racquet sports, baseball, basketball, football, ice hockey and other sports.

  7. Epidemiology of National Collegiate Athletic Association Men's and Women's Cross-Country Injuries, 2009–2010 Through 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Zachary Y.; Kroshus, Emily; Grant, Jon; Parsons, John T.; Folger, Dustin; Hayden, Ross; Dompier, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Context  Recent injury-surveillance data for collegiate-level cross-country athletes are limited. Objective  To describe the epidemiology of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) men's and women's cross-country injuries during the 2009–2010 through 2013–2014 academic years. Design  Descriptive epidemiology study. Setting  Aggregate injury and exposure data collected from 25 men's and 22 women's cross-country programs, providing 47 and 43 seasons of data, respectively. Patients or Other Participants  Collegiate student-athletes participating in men's and women's cross-country during the 2009–2010 through 2013–2014 academic years. Main Outcome Measure(s)  Injury rates; injury rate ratios (RRs); injury proportions by body site, diagnosis, and apparatus; and injury proportion ratios were reported with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results  The Injury Surveillance Program captured 216 injuries from men's cross-country and 260 injuries from women's cross-country, leading to injury rates of 4.66/1000 athlete-exposures (AEs) for men (95% CI = 4.04, 5.28) and 5.85/1000 AEs for women (95% CI = 5.14, 6.56). The injury rate in women's cross-country was 1.25 times that of men's cross-country (95% CI = 1.05, 1.50). Most injuries affected the lower extremity (men = 90.3%, women = 81.9%). The hip/groin-injury rate in women (0.65/1000 AEs) was higher than that in men (0.15/1000 AEs; RR = 4.32; 95% CI = 1.89, 9.85). The ankle-injury rate in men (0.60/1000 AEs) was higher than that in women (0.29/1000 AEs; RR = 2.07; 95% CI = 1.07, 3.99). Common diagnoses were strains (men = 19.9%, women = 20.4%) and inflammation (men = 18.1%, women = 23.8%). The majority of injuries were classified as overuse (men = 57.6%, women = 53.3%). Conclusions  Consistent with prior research, injury distributions varied between male and female athletes, and the injury rate among females was higher. Understanding the epidemiology of these cross-country injuries may be

  8. Balancing vaccine science and national policy objectives: lessons from the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program Omnibus Autism Proceedings.

    PubMed

    Keelan, Jennifer; Wilson, Kumanan

    2011-11-01

    The US Court of Federal Claims, which adjudicates cases for the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, has been confronted with more than 5000 cases submitted on behalf of children with autism spectrum disorders, seeking to link the condition to vaccination. Through a test case process, the Omnibus Autism Proceedings have in every instance found no association between autism spectrum disorders and vaccines. However, vaccine advocates have criticized the courts for having an overly permissive evidentiary test for causation and for granting credence to insupportable accusations of vaccine harm. In fact, the courts have functioned as intended and have allowed for a fair hearing of vaccine concerns while maintaining confidence in vaccines and providing protection to vaccine manufacturers.

  9. Balancing Vaccine Science and National Policy Objectives: Lessons From the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program Omnibus Autism Proceedings

    PubMed Central

    Keelan, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The US Court of Federal Claims, which adjudicates cases for the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, has been confronted with more than 5000 cases submitted on behalf of children with autism spectrum disorders, seeking to link the condition to vaccination. Through a test case process, the Omnibus Autism Proceedings have in every instance found no association between autism spectrum disorders and vaccines. However, vaccine advocates have criticized the courts for having an overly permissive evidentiary test for causation and for granting credence to insupportable accusations of vaccine harm. In fact, the courts have functioned as intended and have allowed for a fair hearing of vaccine concerns while maintaining confidence in vaccines and providing protection to vaccine manufacturers. PMID:21940934

  10. 78 FR 28023 - National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program; List of Petitions Received

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ...The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) is publishing this notice of petitions received under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (``the Program''), as required by Section 2112(b)(2) of the Public Health Service (PHS) Act, as amended. While the Secretary of Health and Human Services is named as the respondent in all proceedings brought by the filing of petitions for compensation under the Program, the United States Court of Federal Claims is charged by statute with responsibility for considering and acting upon the petitions.

  11. Delegations of authority and organization; National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986--FDA. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1993-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the regulations for delegations of authority by adding new authorities delegated by the Assistant Secretary for Health to the Commissioner of Food and Drugs (the Commissioner). The new authorities are under certain provisions of the Public Health Service Act (the PHS Act) and of the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986. The authorities added are being further redelegated, from the Commissioner to the Director, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER), and the Associate Director for Policy Coordination and Public Affairs, CBER.

  12. 78 FR 72680 - National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program; List of Petitions Received

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ...The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) is publishing this notice of petitions received under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (the Program), as required by Section 2112(b)(2) of the Public Health Service (PHS) Act, as amended. While the Secretary of Health and Human Services is named as the respondent in all proceedings brought by the filing of petitions for compensation under the Program, the United States Court of Federal Claims is charged by statute with responsibility for considering and acting upon the petitions.

  13. NON-SURGICAL TREATMENT OF A PROFESSIONAL HOCKEY PLAYER WITH THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF SPORTS HERNIA: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, J. Scott; Parker, Andrew; MacDonald, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design: Case Report Background: Injury or weakness of lower abdominal attachments and the posterior inguinal wall can be symptoms of a “sports hernia” and an underlying source of groin pain. Although several authors note conservative treatment as the initial step in the management of this condition, very little has been written on the specific description of non-surgical measures. Most published articles favoring operative care describe poor results related to conservative management; however they fail to report what treatment techniques comprise non-operative management. Case Presentation: The subject of this case report is a professional ice hockey player who sustained an abdominal injury in a game, which was diagnosed as a sports hernia. Following the injury, structured conservative treatment emphasized core control and stability with progressive peripheral demand challenges. Intrinsic core control emphasis continued throughout the treatment progression and during the functional training prior to return to sport. Outcome: The player completed his recovery with return to full competition seven weeks post injury, and continues to compete in the NHL seven years later. Discussion: Surgical intervention has been shown to be effective in the treatment of the “sports hernia.” However it is the authors' opinion that conservative care emphasizing evaluation of intrinsic core muscular deficits and rehabilitation directed at addressing these deficits is an appropriate option, and should be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:22319682

  14. Relationships to skating performance in competitive hockey players.

    PubMed

    Farlinger, Chris M; Kruisselbrink, L Darren; Fowles, Jonathon R

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify off-ice variables that would correlate to on-ice skating sprint performance and cornering ability. Previous literature has not reported any off-ice testing variables that strongly correlate to on-ice cornering ability in ice hockey players. Thirty-six male hockey players aged 15-22 years (mean +/- SD: 16.3 +/- 1.7 years; weight = 70.8 +/- 10.4 kg; height = 175.6 +/- 4.1 cm) with an average of 10.3 +/- 3.0 years hockey playing experience (most at AA and AAA levels) participated in the study. The on-ice tests included a 35-m sprint and the cornering S test. The off-ice tests included the following: 30-m sprint, vertical jump, broad jump, 3 hop jump, Edgren side shuffle, Hexagon agility, side support, push-ups, and 15-second modified Wingate. The on-ice sprint test and cornering S test were strongly correlated (r = 0.70; p < 0.001). While many off-ice tests correlated with on-ice skating, measures of horizontal leg power (off-ice sprint and 3 hop jump) were the best predictors of on-ice skating performance, once weight and playing level were accounted for. These 4 variables accounted for a total of 78% (p < 0.0001) of the variance in on-ice sprint performance. No off-ice test accounted for unique variance in S-cornering performance beyond weight, playing level, and skating sprint performance. These data indicate that coaches should include horizontal power tests of off-ice sprint and 3 hop jump to adequately assess skating ability. To improve on-ice skating performance and cornering ability, coaches should also focus on the development of horizontal power through specific off-ice training, although future research will determine whether off-ice improvements in horizontal power directly transfer to improvements in on-ice skating.

  15. [Profile of childrens' hockey coaches and motives of participation and resignation].

    PubMed

    Spallanzani, C

    1988-06-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to outline a demographic profile of Quebec minor hockey coaches and (b) to identify their motives of involvement and resignation. A questionnaire was completed by 333 current coaches and by 175 former coaches from the Quebec City area. Results showed that these volunteers are very similar on all counts. They are fathers of at least one boy who is a hockey player, and they come from all socio-economic strata. They are former hockey players and are well aware of the activities of the professional teams. They perceive themselves as being competent coaches and are satisfied with their results. They highly value hockey as a means of education and perceive their own role of volunteer as being an unselfish one geared toward youth education. On the other hand, they perceive the other volunteers' involvement as being self-interested and mainly due to the child's primary participation.

  16. The Effect of a Complex Training Program on Skating Abilities in Ice Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Changyoung; Lee, Sookyung; Yoo, Jaehyun

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Little data exist on systemic training programs to improve skating abilities in ice hockey players. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a complex training program on skating abilities in ice hockey players. [Methods] Ten male ice hockey players (training group) that engaged in 12 weeks of complex training and skating training and ten male players (control group) that only participated in 12 weeks of skating training completed on-ice skating tests including a 5 time 18 meters shuttle, t-test, Rink dash 5 times, and line drill before, during, and the training. [Results] Significant group-by-time interactions were found in all skating ability tests. [Conclusion] The complex training program intervention for 12 weeks improved their skating abilities of the ice hockey players. PMID:24764628

  17. No-fault vaccine insurance: lessons from the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, D

    1999-02-01

    During the first eight years of the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (NVICP), 786 contested claims were resolved through published judicial opinions. The likelihood of compensation dependent in part on the closeness of the match between the described injury and a specified list of acknowledged untoward vaccine side effects. In addition, the chances of applicant success were influenced by the applicant's choice of attorney and expert witnesses, by the assignment of the Special Master to decide the case, and increasingly over time, by the applicant's ability to comply with procedural requirements. The majority of contested claims arose from pertussis immunizations. For pertussis claims, the goal of insulating manufacturers from product liability suits has been achieved by granting compensation to applicants whose injuries are not scientifically recognized effects of the vaccine. In spite of (or because of) this jarring contradiction between the legal and medical understanding of causation, vaccine availability and childhood immunization rates improved during the early years of the plan. The apparent success of the program may encourage the substitution of no-fault compensation plans for tort-based consumer protection for other products, both medical and nonmedical.

  18. Descriptive epidemiology of collegiate men's lacrosse injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988-1989 through 2003-2004.

    PubMed

    Dick, Randall; Romani, William A; Agel, Julie; Case, Jim G; Marshall, Stephen W

    2007-01-01

    To review 16 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) injury surveillance data for men's lacrosse and identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. During the sample period, the number of sponsoring institutions and the number of participants in men's college lacrosse grew significantly. Overall, an average of 18% of NCAA institutions participated in the annual NCAA Injury Surveillance System data collection for this sport. Over the sample period, athletes were almost 4 times more likely to sustain injuries in games than in practices (12.58 versus 3.24 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures [A-Es], rate ratio = 3.9, 95% confidence interval = 3.7, 4.1). Approximately half of all game (48.1%) and practice (58.7%) injuries were to the lower extremity, followed by the upper extremity (26.2% in games, 16.9% in practices), and the head and neck (11.7% in games, 6.2% in practices). In games and practices, the most common injuries were ankle ligament sprains (11.3% and 16.4%, respectively). The disparity among preseason, regular-season, and postseason injuries may be due to athlete acclimatization to the rigors of the sport throughout the season. Changes in helmet design may account for the rise in the concussion rate since the 1995-1996 season. We recommend research into the mechanism of head injuries and the implications of design changes to protective helmets, as well as further investigation of the best designs for shoulder and chest protection.

  19. Descriptive Epidemiology of Collegiate Men's Lacrosse Injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988–1989 Through 2003–2004

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Randall; Romani, William A; Agel, Julie; Case, Jim G; Marshall, Stephen W

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review 16 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) injury surveillance data for men's lacrosse and identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. Background: During the sample period, the number of sponsoring institutions and the number of participants in men's college lacrosse grew significantly. Overall, an average of 18% of NCAA institutions participated in the annual NCAA Injury Surveillance System data collection for this sport. Main Results: Over the sample period, athletes were almost 4 times more likely to sustain injuries in games than in practices (12.58 versus 3.24 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures [A-Es], rate ratio = 3.9, 95% confidence interval = 3.7, 4.1). Approximately half of all game (48.1%) and practice (58.7%) injuries were to the lower extremity, followed by the upper extremity (26.2% in games, 16.9% in practices), and the head and neck (11.7% in games, 6.2% in practices). In games and practices, the most common injuries were ankle ligament sprains (11.3% and 16.4%, respectively). The disparity among preseason, regular-season, and postseason injuries may be due to athlete acclimatization to the rigors of the sport throughout the season. Changes in helmet design may account for the rise in the concussion rate since the 1995–1996 season. Recommendations: We recommend research into the mechanism of head injuries and the implications of design changes to protective helmets, as well as further investigation of the best designs for shoulder and chest protection. PMID:17710174

  20. Player and Game Characteristics and Head Impacts in Female Youth Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Reed, Nick; Taha, Tim; Greenwald, Richard; Keightley, Michelle

    2017-08-01

      Despite the growing popularity of ice hockey among female youth and interest in the biomechanics of head impacts in sport, the head impacts sustained by this population have yet to be characterized.   To describe the number of, biomechanical characteristics of, and exposure to head impacts of female youth ice hockey players during competition and to investigate the influences of player and game characteristics on head impacts.   Cohort study.   Twenty-seven female youth ice hockey players (mean age = 12.5 ± 0.52 years) wore instrumented ice hockey helmets during 66 ice hockey games over a 3-year period. Data specific to player, game, and biomechanical head impact characteristics were recorded. A multiple regression analysis identified factors most associated with head impacts of greater frequency and severity.   A total of 436 total head impacts were sustained during 6924 minutes of active ice hockey participation (0.9 ± 0.6 impacts per player per game; range, 0-2.1). A higher body mass index (BMI) significantly predicted a higher number of head impacts sustained per game (P = .008). Linear acceleration of head impacts was greater in older players and those who played the forward position, had a greater BMI, and spent more time on the ice (P = .008), whereas greater rotational acceleration was present in older players who had a greater BMI and played the forward position (P = .008). During tournament games, increased ice time predicted increased severity of head impacts (P = .03).   This study reveals for the first time that head impacts are occurring in female youth ice hockey players, albeit at a lower rate and severity than in male youth ice hockey players, despite the lack of intentional body checking.

  1. Closing the Door to Lost Earnings Under the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986.

    PubMed

    Levin, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    After a wave of lawsuits against vaccine manufacturers hindered the profitability and production of life-saving vaccines, Congress enacted The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986. The Act offers an incentive for individuals to get vaccinated in order to mitigate the population's exposure to disease, while encouraging the continued production of these serums by pharmaceutical companies. Although imperfect, the Vaccine Act fosters promise in filtering out frivolous claims and,provides a central route for due process to the individuals who suffer from a vaccine-related injury. By removing a potential state tort issue to the Federal Circuit, Congress created a reasonably justified avenue for the recovery of damages for injuries and adverse reactions to vaccines. However, this is not to say that the Act can't still be improved. Currently, the Act is silent on whether the death of a child from a vaccine-related injury, before a compensation decision is rendered, should bar the family from recovering for the child's lost earnings. Unless the victim demonstrates a stable source of income that they would have earned had their lives not been interrupted by the adverse reaction to the vaccine, the holding that a minor child may not recover for lost earnings is defensible. However, Congress should revise the statute to issue guidance to clarify its ambiguity. Under the current compensation regime, the standard is too arbitrary to decide that a child who dies before reaching the majority age of 18 has no earning potential. Any line Congress or the Supreme Court tries to draw will be arbitrary, but from an economic, policy, and legal perspective clarity and guidance can be offered to maintain greater flexibility through a case-by-case analysis and by applying the modern minimum wage in reference to the child's age. Independent from future earnings awards, Vaccine Act compensation should be amended to increase the cap on these damages to account for inflation since the

  2. Risk-Prone Pitching Activities and Injuries in Youth Baseball: Findings From a National Sample.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingzhen; Mann, Barton J; Guettler, Joseph H; Dugas, Jeffrey R; Irrgang, James J; Fleisig, Glenn S; Albright, John P

    2014-06-01

    There are relatively few published epidemiological studies that have correlated pitching-related risk factors with increased pitching-related arm problems as well as injuries. High pitching volume and limited recovery will lead to arm fatigue, thus placing young pitchers at a greater risk for elbow and shoulder problems and, subsequently, an increased risk for arm injuries. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A national survey was conducted among 754 youth pitchers (ages 9 to 18 years) who had pitched in organized baseball leagues during the 12 months before the survey. Self-reported risk-prone pitching activities were identified and compared with recommendations by the American Sports Medicine Institute. Relationships between self-reported pitching activities, shoulder and elbow problems, and injuries were assessed using multivariable logistic regression. Of the 754 participating pitchers, 43.4% pitched on consecutive days, 30.7% pitched on multiple teams with overlapping seasons, and 19.0% pitched multiple games a day during the 12 months before the study. Pitchers who engaged in these activities had increased risk of pitching-related arm pain (odds ratio [OR] = 2.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.14-5.60; OR = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.02-3.38; OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 1.03-3.49, respectively). Nearly 70% of the sample reported throwing curveballs, which was associated with 1.66 (95% CI = 1.09-2.53) greater odds of experiencing arm pain while throwing. Pitching-related arm tiredness and arm pain were associated with increased risk of pitching-related injuries. Specifically, those who often pitched with arm tiredness and arm pain had 7.88 (95% CI = 3.88-15.99) and 7.50 (95% CI = 3.47-16.21) greater odds of pitching-related injury, respectively. However, pitching on a travel baseball club, playing baseball exclusively, or playing catcher were not associated with arm problems. The results of this study, along with those of others, reinforce the importance of avoiding

  3. Children's social relationships and motivation in sledge hockey.

    PubMed

    Wynnyk, Katrina; Spencer-Cavaliere, Nancy

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore children with disabilities' social relationships and motivation to take part in sledge hockey. Harter's (1978) theory of Competence Motivation was used as the conceptual framework. Ten children (1 girl and 9 boys) between ages 11-16 years, who experienced a range of disabilities, participated. Primary data were collected using semistructured interviews, participant observations, and field and reflective notes. The thematic analysis led to four themes: (a) coach feedback, (b) parental involvement, (c) skill and belonging, and (d) (dis)ability sport. The findings revealed that interactions with significant others contributed extensively to the participant's perceptions of competence and motivation to participate, as did the sport's competitive nature. The findings are discussed in the context of Harter's theory and the children's sport and adapted physical activity inclusion literature.

  4. Cruise survey of oxidant air pollution injury to Pinus ponderosa and Pinus jeffreyi in Saguaro National Monument, Yosemite National Park, and Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Duriscoe, D.M.

    1990-08-01

    The yellow pine populations in Saguaro National Monument, Yosemite National Park, and Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks were surveyed in 1986 to evaluate and quantify the extent and severity of ozone injury (chlorotic mottle) to foliage of ponderosa and Jeffrey pines. A total of 3780 trees were observed. Severity of ozone injury was quantified, using an approximate square root transformation of the percentage of foliage exhibiting chlorotic mottle in branches pruned from each tree. Foliage of different ages was examined separately. Of all trees examined at Saguaro National Monument, 15% had visible chlorotic mottle; at Yosemite, 28%; and at Sequoia and Kings Canyon, 39%. Severity of injury averaged very slight for all three parks, with least injury at Saguaro and greatest at Sequoia and Kings Canyon.

  5. Descriptive Epidemiology of Collegiate Men's Wrestling Injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988–1989 Through 2003–2004

    PubMed Central

    Agel, Julie; Ransone, Jack; Dick, Randall; Oppliger, Robert; Marshall, Stephen W

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review 16 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) injury surveillance data for men's wrestling and identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. Background: From 1988–1989 through 2003–2004, 17% of NCAA schools sponsoring varsity men's wrestling programs participated in annual Injury Surveillance System (ISS) data collection. Main Results: Patterns of injury were consistent with the person-to-person, combative contact between wrestlers. The musculoskeletal system and head were the most vulnerable areas during competitions; skin infections are a continuing concern in the practice environment. The incidence of injuries in practices exhibited no significant increase over time, a positive trend that may be consistent with the influence of the recent NCAA weight management rules. Recommendations: Expansion of the present ISS to include indirect causes of injury, such as weight loss practices, would strengthen the analysis of data. Efforts by referees to be vigilant for potentially dangerous holds and by athletic trainers to improve wrestler and mat hygiene should be continued. PMID:17710180

  6. Foliar injury, tree growth and mortality, and lichen studies in Mammoth Cave National Park. Final report, 1985-1986

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, B.; Cloonan, C.L.; Armentano, T.V.

    1987-03-01

    Foliar condition, tree growth, tree mortality, and lichen communities were studied in Mammoth Cave National Park, Kentucky, to document the present forest condition and to provide a basis for detecting future changes. Foliar injury by ozone was common on many plant species in 1985. Species showing the most injury were white ash, green ash, redbud, sycamore, tulip poplar, milkweed, and wild grape. Injury apparently depended on canopy position and vigor. Tree growth was equivocally related to visible symptoms in 1986, probably because of the low ozone levels in that year. Tree mortality rates from 1966-1985 in two natural stands were somewhat lower than mortality rates known for other midwestern woods.

  7. College Sports-Related Injuries - United States, 2009-10 Through 2013-14 Academic Years.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Zachary Y; Marshall, Stephen W; Dompier, Thomas P; Corlette, Jill; Klossner, David A; Gilchrist, Julie

    2015-12-11

    Sports-related injuries can have a substantial impact on the long-term health of student-athletes. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) monitors injuries among college student-athletes at member schools. In academic year 2013-14, a total of 1,113 member schools fielded 19,334 teams with 478,869 participating student-athletes in NCAA championship sports (i.e., sports with NCAA championship competition) (1). External researchers and CDC used information reported to the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program (NCAA-ISP) by a sample of championship sports programs to summarize the estimated national cumulative and annual average numbers of injuries during the 5 academic years from 2009-10 through 2013-14. Analyses were restricted to injuries reported among student-athletes in 25 NCAA championship sports. During this period, 1,053,370 injuries were estimated to have occurred during an estimated 176.7 million athlete-exposures to potential injury (i.e., one athlete's participation in one competition or one practice). Injury incidence varied widely by sport. Among all sports, men's football accounted for the largest average annual estimated number of injuries (47,199) and the highest competition injury rate (39.9 per 1,000 athlete-exposures). Men's wrestling experienced the highest overall injury rate (13.1 per 1,000) and practice injury rate (10.2 per 1,000). Among women's sports, gymnastics had the highest overall injury rate (10.4 per 1,000) and practice injury rate (10.0 per 1,000), although soccer had the highest competition injury rate (17.2 per 1,000). More injuries were estimated to have occurred from practice than from competition for all sports, with the exception of men's ice hockey and baseball. However, injuries incurred during competition were somewhat more severe (e.g., requiring ≥7 days to return to full participation) than those acquired during practice. Multiple strategies are employed by NCAA and others to reduce the number of injuries in

  8. The effect of playing surface on the incidence of ACL injuries in National Collegiate Athletic Association American Football.

    PubMed

    Dragoo, Jason L; Braun, Hillary J; Harris, Alex H S

    2013-06-01

    Artificial playing surfaces are widely used for American football practice and competition and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are common. This study analyzed the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance System (ISS) men's football ACL injury database from 2004-2005 through 2008-2009 to determine the effect of playing surface on ACL injury in NCAA football athletes. This database was reviewed from the 2004-2005 through 2008-2009 seasons using the specific injury code, "Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) complete tear." The injury rate was computed for competition and practice exposures. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals were calculated using assumptions of a Poisson distribution. Pair-wise, two-sample tests of equality of proportions with a continuity correction were used to estimate the associations of risk factors. There was an incidence rate of 1.73 ACL injuries per 10,000 athlete-exposures (A-Es) (95% CI 1.47-2.0) on artificial playing surfaces compared with a rate of 1.24 per 10,000 A-Es (1.05-1.45, p<0.001) on natural grass. The rate of ACL injury on artificial surfaces is 1.39 times higher than the injury rate on grass surfaces. Non-contact injuries occurred more frequently on artificial turf surfaces (44.29%) than on natural grass (36.12%). NCAA football players experience a greater number of ACL injuries when playing on artificial surfaces. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The ability of parents to accurately report concussion occurrence in their bantam-aged minor hockey league children

    PubMed Central

    Coghlin, Craig J; Myles, Bryan D; Howitt, Scott D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the ability of hockey parents/guardians to recognize concussion symptoms in their 13–14 year old (Bantam-aged) children. Outcome Measures: The outcome measures were the ability to recognize different signs and symptoms listed on the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT) as well as 8 detractors consisting of signs and symptoms not associated with post concussive syndrome. Additional questions assessing the parents’ knowledge of concussion management and recognition abilities were also posed. Participants: Parents of Bantam-aged minor hockey league athletes volunteered for the study. Methods: The study investigators distributed questionnaires during the warm up period or following their children’s games to the study participants. Following questionnaire completion, participants were provided with an information package outlining the correct signs and symptoms of concussion. Results: The mean number of correct responses to signs and symptoms of concussion was 21.25/25 for the mothers and 20.41/25 for the fathers. The mean number of detractors identified as not associated with concussion was 5.93/8 for the mothers and 4.85/8 for the fathers, indicating that mothers were more capable of recognizing the signs and symptoms than fathers. An analysis of variance including sporting experience in the model did not strengthen the relationship between parent gender and test outcome. Conclusion: This investigation revealed that there is still a disconnect in regards to key components of recognizing a concussion, such as difficulty with sleep, disorientation symptoms, and emotional irritability. Mothers have displayed an ability to better differentiate between true and false signs and symptoms of concussion as compared to fathers. Continued education and awareness of mild traumatic brain injury in athletes should address the misconceptions amongst parents in regards to the true signs and symptoms of a concussion. PMID

  10. An Independent, Prospective, Head to Head Study of the Reliability and Validity of Neurocognitive Test Batteries for the Assessment of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    hockey, field hockey, rugby, wrestling), football will provide the large quantity of both baseline testing participants and concussed athletes. 6...baselines (7.0% overall) • Injury protocol completed on 10 concussed athletes and 10 matched controls in fall sports season (excluding football 2012...Neurobehavioral Assessment (DANA), and Immediate Post- Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT). The study design involves both a Sports

  11. Reducing stress to minimize injury: the nation's first employee assistance program for dairy farmers.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Steven; Dotter, Earl; Handy, Myra; Waterman, Louise

    2014-01-01

    This commentary describes the nation's first Employee Assistance Program (EAP) for dairy farmers. It discusses (1) the significant financial strain and emotional stress experienced by Vermont's dairy farmers reaching dangerous levels; (2) the effect of stress and anxiety on workplace safety; and (3) the highly effective role of an EAP in reducing stress. The commentary depicts the Farm First program model of prevention and early intervention services for dairy farmers that include short-term solution-focused counseling, resources, and referrals to help farmers address the stressors they confront daily. The Farm First program mitigates depression, anxiety, financial and legal problems, family issues, and other stressors on farms that are correlated with accidents, on-the-job injuries, disability, and harm to self or others. EAPs specifically have been shown to reduce on-the-job injuries by reducing employee stress. Ultimately the program has seen good usage commensurate with that at any place of employment. Further, in addition to seeking help for themselves, a number of farmers have used this management consultation service to obtain assistance with farm worker issues. Although the authors have not systematically studied this approach, it shows promise and the authors encourage its duplication and further study in other states.

  12. Outcome assessment of pregnancy-related acute kidney injury in Morocco: A national prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kabbali, Nadia; Tachfouti, Nabil; Arrayhani, Mohammed; Harandou, Mustapha; Tagnaouti, Mounia; Bentata, Yassamine; Laouad, Inass; Ramdani, Benyounes; Bayahia, Rabia; Oualim, Zouhair; Houssaini, Tarik Sqalli

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rare but life-threatening complication of pregnancy. The aim of this paper is to study the characteristics of acute AKI in pregnancy and to emphasize on its management modalities in Moroccan hospitals. This is a national prospective study performed over six months from July 1 to December 31 2010 on AKI developing in pregnant patients, both preand post-partum period. Patients with pre-existing kidney disease were excluded from the study. Outcome was considered unfavorable when complete recovery of renal function was not achieved and/or maternal death occurred. Forty-four patients were included in this study. They were 29.6 ± 6 years old and mostly illiterate (70.6%). Most AKI occurred in the post-partum period, with 66% of the cases occurring in those who did not receive antenatal care. The main etiologies were pre-eclampsia (28 cases), hemorrhagic shock (six cases) and septic events (five cases). We noted three cases of acute fatty liver, one case of obstructive kidney injury and one case of lupus nephritis. Hemodialysis was necessary in 17 (38.6%) cases. The outcome was favorable in 29 patients. The maternal mortality rate was 11.4%. Two poor prognostic factors were identified: Age over 38 years and sepsis. AKI is a severe complication of pregnancy in developing countries. Its prevention necessitates the improvement of the sanitary infrastructure and the establishment of the obligatory antenatal care.

  13. Evaluation of a nationally funded state-based programme to reduce fatal occupational injuries.

    PubMed

    Chaumont Menendez, Cammie; Castillo, Dawn; Rosenman, Kenneth; Harrison, Robert; Hendricks, Scott

    2012-11-01

    The Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) programme was established by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health to help prevent occupational traumatic fatalities by funding states to conduct targeted fatality investigations within cause-specific focus areas and associated prevention efforts. To investigate the impact of the state-based FACE programme on two previous focus areas. A longitudinal time-series analysis spanning 22 years compared state fatality rates for occupational falls and electrocutions before and after FACE programme funding with states not receiving FACE programme funding. Lag periods were utilised to allow time for the programme to have an effect, and rates were adjusted for a variety of covariates. Separate analyses were conducted for each injury outcome. A reduction in fall fatality rates that was of borderline significance (1-year lag adjRR=0.92 (0.84 to 1.00)) and a non-significant reduction in electrocution fatality rates (3-year lag adjRR=0.92 (0.82 to 1.03)) were observed in states with FACE programme funding, Best-fit models presented two separate lag periods. While it is challenging to quantitatively evaluate effectiveness of programmes such as FACE, the data suggest the FACE programme may be effective in preventing occupational injury deaths within its outcome focus areas throughout the state. It is important to look for ways to measure intermediate effects more precisely, as well as ways to maintain effects over time.

  14. Evaluation of a nationally funded state-based programme to reduce fatal occupational injuries

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Cammie Chaumont; Castillo, Dawn; Rosenman, Kenneth; Harrison, Robert; Hendricks, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background The Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) programme was established by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health to help prevent occupational traumatic fatalities by funding states to conduct targeted fatality investigations within cause-specific focus areas and associated prevention efforts. Purpose To investigate the impact of the state-based FACE programme on two previous focus areas. Methods A longitudinal time-series analysis spanning 22 years compared state fatality rates for occupational falls and electrocutions before and after FACE programme funding with states not receiving FACE programme funding. Lag periods were utilised to allow time for the programme to have an effect, and rates were adjusted for a variety of covariates. Separate analyses were conducted for each injury outcome. Results A reduction in fall fatality rates that was of borderline significance (1-year lag adjRR=0.92 (0.84 to 1.00)) and a non-significant reduction in electrocution fatality rates (3-year lag adjRR=0.92 (0.82 to 1.03)) were observed in states with FACE programme funding, Best-fit models presented two separate lag periods. Conclusions While it is challenging to quantitatively evaluate effectiveness of programmes such as FACE, the data suggest the FACE programme may be effective in preventing occupational injury deaths within its outcome focus areas throughout the state. It is important to look for ways to measure intermediate effects more precisely, as well as ways to maintain effects over time. PMID:22864251

  15. [Cervico-facial traumatic injuries at the Donka national hospital of the teaching hospital of Conakry].

    PubMed

    Diallo, O R; Camara, S A T; Diallo, A; Bah, A T; Kane, B T; Camara, A D; Cherif, F

    2012-01-01

    The Cervico-Facial Traumatic Injuries (CFTI) can entrain complications and serious aesthetic and functional sequella. The objectives of this study were to determine the frequency of CFTI, to describe the clinical forms and to evaluate the treatment. It was a prospective study conducted from February to July 2010 in the National Donka hospital of the Teaching Hospital of Conakry. The study concerned 265 patients, who benefited a treatment and reevaluated. The young adults aged between 21-30 years were the most affected (38.49%). 74.34 % were men and 25.66 % were females with a sex ratio of 2.9. Road accident was the etiology of injuries in 70.57% of cases. Clinically, the lesions were dominated by the wounds type II (49.05 %) followed by the wounds type I (48.30 %) and 2,65 % of wounds was type III. The treatment was medical and surgical. Evolution was considered favorable in 82.13 % of cases and disfavorable in 17.85 % of cases.

  16. Proceedings from the Ice Hockey Summit on concussion: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; Stuart, M; Greenwald, R; Benson, B; Dodick, D; Emery, C; Finnoff, J; Mihalik, J; Roberts, W; Sullivan, C A; Meeuwisse, W

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this proceedings is to integrate the concussion in sport literature and sport science research on safety in ice hockey to develop an action plan to reduce the risk, incidence, severity, and consequences of concussion in ice hockey. A rationale paper outlining a collaborative action plan to address concussions in hockey was posted for review two months prior to the Ice Hockey Summit: Action on Concussion. Focused presentations devoted specifically to concussion in ice hockey were presented during the Summit and breakout sessions were used to develop strategies to reduce concussion in the sport. This proceedings and a detailed scientific review (a matrix of solutions) were written to disseminate the evidence-based information and resulting concussion reduction strategies. The manuscripts were reviewed by the authors, advisors and contributors to ensure that the opinions and recommendations reflect the current level of knowledge on concussion in hockey. Six components of a potential solution were articulated in the Rationale paper and became the topics for breakout groups that followed the professional, scientific lectures. Topics that formed the core of the action plan were: metrics and databases; recognizing, managing and return to play; hockey equipment and ice arenas; prevention and education; rules and regulations; and expedient communication of the outcomes. The attendees in breakout sessions identified action items for each section. The most highly ranked action items were brought to a vote in the open assembly, using an Audience Response System (ARS). The strategic planning process was conducted to assess: Where are we at?; Where must we get to?; and What strategies are necessary to make progress on the prioritized action items? Three prioritized action items for each component of the solution and the percentage of the votes received are listed in the body of this proceedings.

  17. Efficacy of a Four-Week Uphill Sprint Training Intervention in Field Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Jakeman, John R; McMullan, Judith; Babraj, John A

    2016-10-01

    Jakeman, JR, McMullan, J, and Babraj, JA. Efficacy of a four-week uphill sprint training intervention in field hockey players. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2761-2766, 2016-Current evidence increasingly suggests that very short, supramaximal bouts of exercise can have significant health and performance benefits. Most research conducted in the area, however, uses laboratory-based protocols, which can lack ecological validity. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a high-intensity sprint training program on hockey-related performance measures. Fourteen semiprofessional hockey players either completed a 4-week high-intensity training (HIT) intervention, consisting of a total of 6 sessions of HIT, which progressively increased in volume (n = 7), or followed their normal training program (Con; n = 7). Straight-line sprint speed, with and without a hockey stick and ball, and slalom sprint speed, with and without a hockey stick and ball, were used as performance indicators. Maximal sprint speed over 22.9 m was also assessed. On completion of the 4-week intervention, straight-line sprint speed improved significantly in the HIT group (∼3%), with no changes in performance for the Con group. Slalom sprint speed, both with and without a hockey ball, was not significantly different after the training program in either group. Maximal sprint speed improved significantly (12.1%) in the HIT group, but there was no significant performance change in the Con group. The findings of this study indicate that a short period of HIT can significantly improve hockey-related performance measures and could be beneficial to athletes and coaches in field settings.

  18. Neurological Diseases, Disorders and Injuries in Canada: Highlights of a National Study.

    PubMed

    Bray, Garth M; Huggett, Deanna L

    2016-01-01

    The National Population Health Study of Neurological Conditions, a partnership between Neurological Health Charities Canada and the Government of Canada, was the largest study of neurological diseases, disorders, and injuries ever conducted in Canada. Undertaken between 2009 and 2013, the expansive program of research addressed the epidemiology, impacts, health services, and risk factors of 18 neurological conditions and estimated the health outcomes and costs of these conditions in Canada through 2031. This review summarizes highlights from the component projects of the study as presented in the synthesis report, Mapping Connections: An Understanding of Neurological Conditions in Canada. The key findings included new prevalence and incidence estimates, documentation of the diverse and often debilitating effects of neurological conditions, and identification of the utilization, economic costs, and current limitations of related health services. The study findings will support health charities, governments, and other stakeholders to reduce the impact of neurological conditions in Canada.

  19. Amount of Minutes Played Does Not Contribute to Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in National Basketball Association Athletes.

    PubMed

    Okoroha, Kelechi R; Marfo, Kojo; Meta, Fabien; Matar, Robert; Shehab, Ramsy; Thompson, Terry; Moutzouros, Vasilios; Makhni, Eric C

    2017-07-01

    There is limited information on the potential risk factors for sustaining an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear in National Basketball Association (NBA) athletes. This study evaluated 83 NBA players who sustained an ACL injury between 1984 and 2015 to determine the influence of minutes played on injury risk. Minutes played in the injury game, during the season, and over their career were assessed, along with the ability to return to play, player efficiency rating, and playing time after return. Athletes in the NBA played significantly fewer minutes before sustaining an ACL injury (17.1 minutes) than their average minutes per game that season (23.5 minutes; P<.01) or over their career (24.0 minutes; P<.01). One-third of all injuries occurred during the first quarter of the season (preseason to November). There was a 95% rate of return (78 players) to NBA competition the season following ACL injury. Players who were drafted as lottery picks (draft pick 1 to 15) or those who were starters played significantly more minutes the season following injury than those who were not (both P<.01). Players who returned to play had decreased player efficiency ratings when compared with matched controls. This study found that minutes played in a single NBA game did not contribute to the risk of sustaining an ACL injury. Although there was a high rate of return to NBA competition the season following injury, those who were elite athletes played more minutes per game than those who were not. Athletes who returned to play sustained a decrease in player efficiency ratings compared with similar athletes without ACL injury. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(4):e658-e662.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System: Review of Methods for 2004–2005 Through 2013–2014 Data Collection

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Zachary Y.; Dompier, Thomas P.; Snook, Erin M.; Marshall, Stephen W.; Klossner, David; Hainline, Brian; Corlette, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Background: Since 1982, the National Collegiate Athletic Association has used the Injury Surveillance System (ISS) to collect injury and athlete-exposure data from a representative sample of collegiate institutions and sports. At the start of the 2004–2005 academic year, a Web-based ISS replaced the paper-based platform previously used for reporting injuries and exposures. Objective: To describe the methods of the Web-based National Collegiate Athletic Association ISS for data collection as implemented from the 2004–2005 to 2013–2014 academic years. Description: The Web-based ISS monitored National Collegiate Athletic Association–sanctioned practices and competitions, the number of participating student–athletes, and time-loss injuries during the preseason, regular season, and postseason in 25 collegiate sports. Starting in the 2009–2010 academic year, non–time-loss injuries were also tracked. Efforts were made to better integrate ISS data collection into the workflow of collegiate athletic trainers. Data for the 2004–2005 to 2013–2014 academic years are available to researchers through a standardized application process available at the Datalys Center Web site. Conclusions: As of February 2014, more than 1 dozen data sets have been provided to researchers. The Datalys Center encourages applications for access to the data. PMID:24870292

  1. Seasonal development of ozone-induced foliar injury on tall milkweed (Asclepias exaltata) in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

    PubMed

    Souza, Lara; Neufeld, Howard S; Chappelka, Arthur H; Burkey, Kent O; Davison, Alan W

    2006-05-01

    The goals of this study were to document the development of ozone-induced foliar injury, on a leaf-by-leaf basis, and to develop ozone exposure relationships for leaf cohorts and individual tall milkweeds (Asclepias exaltata L.) in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Plants were classified as either ozone-sensitive or insensitive based on the amount of foliar injury. Sensitive plants developed injury earlier in the season and to a greater extent than insensitive plants. Older leaf cohorts were more likely to belong to high injury classes by the end of each of the two growing seasons. In addition, leaf loss was more likely for older cohorts (2000) and lower leaf positions (2001) than younger cohorts and upper leaves, respectively. Most leaves abscised without prior ozone-like stippling or chlorosis. Failure to take this into account can result in underestimation of the effects of ozone on these plants.

  2. Race, Racial Discrimination, and the Risk of Work-Related Illness, Injury or Assault: Findings from a National Study

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Candice A.; Rospenda, Kathleen M.; Richman, Judith A.; Minich, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examines whether workplace racial harassment/discrimination mediates the relationship between race/ethnicity and work-related illness, injury or assault across time. Methods: A national random-digit dial phone survey was conducted at two points in time (W1: 2003-2004; W2: 2004-2005) among a sample of Black, Hispanic and non-Hispanic white workers. As part of the survey, respondents indicated their experiences with racial harassment or discrimination, and occupational illness, injury, or assault in the past 12 months. Results: Hispanic respondents were more likely than whites to experience work-related illness, injury or assault, and these associations were mediated by experiences of racial harassment/discrimination. Conclusions: Interventions to reduce workplace harassment and discrimination may help decrease risk for work-related illness, injury, or assault among Hispanic workers. PMID:19339900

  3. Incidence and risk factors for injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament in National Collegiate Athletic Association football: data from the 2004-2005 through 2008-2009 National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System.

    PubMed

    Dragoo, Jason L; Braun, Hillary J; Durham, Jennah L; Chen, Michael R; Harris, Alex H S

    2012-05-01

    Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are common in athletic populations, particularly in athletes participating in football, soccer, and skiing. The purpose of this study was to analyze the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance System (ISS) men's football ACL injury database from the playing seasons of 2004-2005 through 2008-2009 to determine the incidence and epidemiology of complete injury to the ACL in NCAA football athletes. Descriptive epidemiology study. The NCAA ISS men's football database was reviewed from the 2004-2005 through 2008-2009 seasons using the specific injury code, "Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) complete tear." The injury rate was computed for competition and practice exposures. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals (CIs) for the incident rates were calculated using assumptions of a Poisson distribution. Pairwise, 2-sample tests of equality of proportions with a continuity correction were used to estimate the associations of risk factors such as event type, playing surface, season segment, and football subdivision. Descriptive data were also described. The ACL injury rate during games (8.06 per 10,000 athlete-exposures [AEs] 95% CI, 6.80-9.42) was significantly greater than the rate during practice (0.8 per 10,000 AEs 95% CI, 0.68-0.93). Players were 10.09 (95% CI, 8.08-12.59) times more likely to sustain an ACL injury in competition when compared with practices. When practice exposures were analyzed separately, the injury rate was significantly greater during scrimmages (3.99 per 10,000 AEs 95% CI, 2.29-5.94) compared with regular practices (0.83 per 10,000 AEs 95% CI, 0.69-0.97) and walk-throughs (0 per 10,000 AEs 95% CI, 0-0.14). There was an incidence rate of 1.73 ACL injuries per 10,000 AEs (95% CI, 1.47-2.0) on artificial playing surfaces compared with a rate of 1.24 per 10,000 AEs (95% CI, 1.05-1.45) on natural grass. The rate of ACL injury on artificial surfaces is 1.39 (95% CI, 1

  4. Are Workplace Psychosocial Factors Associated With Work-Related Injury in the US Workforce?: National Health Interview Survey, 2010.

    PubMed

    Farnacio, Yvonne; Pratt, Michael E; Marshall, Elizabeth G; Graber, Judith M

    2017-10-01

    Psychosocial hazards in the workplace may adversely impact occupational and general health, including injury risk. Among 16,417 adult workers in the 2010 National Health Interview Survey Occupational Health Supplement, weighted prevalence estimates were calculated for work-related injuries (WRI) and any injuries. The association between injury and psychosocial occupational hazards (job insecurity, work-family imbalance, hostile work environment) was assessed adjusting for sociodemographic and occupational factors. WRI prevalence was 0.65% (n = 99); any injury prevalence was 2.46% (n = 427). In multivariable models job insecurity, work-family imbalance, and hostile work environment were each positively associated with WRI prevalence (odds ratio [OR]: 1.60, 95% CI: 0.97-2.65; OR: 1.69, 95% CI 0.96-2.89; and 2.01, 95% CI 0.94-4.33, respectively). Stressful working conditions may contribute to injuries. There is need for ongoing surveillance of occupational psychosocial risk factors and further study of their relationship with injury.

  5. Historical Patterns and Variation in Treatment of Injuries in NFL (National Football League) Players and NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) Division I Football Players.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Eric C; Kraeutler, Matthew J; Langner, Paula; Cook, Shane; Ellis, Byron; Godfrey, Jenna M

    We conducted a study to identify and contrast patterns in the treatment of common injuries that occur in National Football League (NFL) players and National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I football players. Orthopedic team physicians for all 32 NFL and 119 NCAA Division I football teams were asked to complete a survey regarding demographics and preferred treatment of a variety of injuries encountered in football players. Responses were r