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Sample records for hockey injuries national

  1. National survey of spinal injuries in hockey players.

    PubMed Central

    Tator, C. H.; Edmonds, V. E.

    1984-01-01

    There has been an alarming increase in the number of spinal injuries in hockey players. Between 1976 and 1983, 42 were reported to the Committee on Prevention of Spinal Injuries due to Hockey. The median age of the injured players was 17 years. Of the 42 players 28 had spinal cord injuries, and 17 of them had complete paralysis below the vertebral level of the injury. Strikes from behind and collisions with the boards were common mechanisms of injury. Many of the players had suffered a burst fracture of the cervical spine following a blow to the top of the helmet when the neck was slightly flexed. The committee studied a number of possible etiologic factors and made several recommendations regarding prevention. League officials, coaches, players and equipment manufacturers can all play a role in prevention. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6704840

  2. The Epidemiology of Hip/Groin Injuries in National Collegiate Athletic Association Men’s and Women’s Ice Hockey

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Sara L.; Zupon, Alyssa B.; Gardner, Elizabeth C.; Djoko, Aristarque; Dompier, Thomas P.; Kerr, Zachary Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is limited research regarding the epidemiology of hip/groin injuries in ice hockey, the majority of which is restricted to time-loss injuries only. Purpose: To describe the epidemiology of hip/groin injuries in collegiate men’s and women’s ice hockey from 2009-2010 through 2014-2015. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Hip/groin injury data from the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance Program (NCAA-ISP) during the 2009-2010 through 2014-2015 seasons were analyzed. Injury rates, rate ratios (RRs), and injury proportion ratios (IPRs) were reported with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: During the 2009-2010 through 2014-2015 seasons, 421 and 114 hip/groin injuries were reported in men’s and women’s ice hockey, respectively, leading to injury rates of 1.03 and 0.78 per 1000 athlete-exposures (AEs), respectively. The hip/groin injury rate was greater in men than in women (RR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.08-1.63). In addition, 55.6% and 71.1% of hip/groin injuries in men’s and women’s ice hockey, respectively, were non–time loss (NTL) injuries (ie, resulted in participation restriction time <24 hours); 7.6% and 0.9%, respectively, were severe (ie, resulted in participation restriction time >3 weeks). The proportion of hip/groin injuries that were NTL injuries was greater in women than in men (IPR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.11-1.48). Conversely, the proportion of hip/groin injuries that were severe was greater in men than in women (IPR, 8.67; 95% CI, 1.20-62.73). The most common hip/groin injury diagnosis was strain (men, 67.2%; women, 76.3%). Also, 12 (2.9%) and 3 (2.6%) cases of hip impingement were noted in men’s and women’s ice hockey, respectively. Conclusion: Hip/groin injury rates were greater in men’s than in women’s ice hockey. Time loss varied between sexes, with men sustaining more injuries with time loss over 3 weeks. Despite increasing concerns of femoroacetabular impingement in ice hockey

  3. Eye injuries in Canadian amateur hockey.

    PubMed

    Pashby, T J

    1979-01-01

    Two studies, one retrospective (1972 to 1973) and one prospective (1974 to 1975), CONcerning eye injuries incurred by hockey players were conducted by the Canadian Ophthalmological Society with questionnaires to its members. Responses to the questionnaires were analyzed by age, type of injury, cause (i.e., hockey stick, puck, or other means), and results to visual acuity. The results were also designated by organized or unorganized participation. Almost 300 eye injuries were reported in each study. In the first study, 13.7% of the injured players became legally blind as a result of the injury; in the second study, 16% became legally blind. Organized hockey produced more injuries than unorganized hockey. The majority of the injuries were caused by the hockey stick. The injuries were both intraocular and extraocular. The group of 11- to 15-year olds received the highest number of injuries, and the older age group had the higher incidence of blindness. Studies have led to setting more rigid standards, altering rules of the game, and selecting face protectors for hockey players. Older players who care for their equipment prefer the plastic shield face protectors, and the younger players (who complain of fogging and scratching of the plastic) prefer mesh protectors through which neither the stick nor the puck can penetrate. New high sticking (above the shoulder level) rules were included in the 1976 official rule book for Canadian amateur hockey. PMID:474867

  4. Eye injuries in Canadian amateur hockey.

    PubMed

    Pashby, T J

    1979-01-01

    Two studies, one retrospective (1972 to 1973) and one prospective (1974 to 1975), CONcerning eye injuries incurred by hockey players were conducted by the Canadian Ophthalmological Society with questionnaires to its members. Responses to the questionnaires were analyzed by age, type of injury, cause (i.e., hockey stick, puck, or other means), and results to visual acuity. The results were also designated by organized or unorganized participation. Almost 300 eye injuries were reported in each study. In the first study, 13.7% of the injured players became legally blind as a result of the injury; in the second study, 16% became legally blind. Organized hockey produced more injuries than unorganized hockey. The majority of the injuries were caused by the hockey stick. The injuries were both intraocular and extraocular. The group of 11- to 15-year olds received the highest number of injuries, and the older age group had the higher incidence of blindness. Studies have led to setting more rigid standards, altering rules of the game, and selecting face protectors for hockey players. Older players who care for their equipment prefer the plastic shield face protectors, and the younger players (who complain of fogging and scratching of the plastic) prefer mesh protectors through which neither the stick nor the puck can penetrate. New high sticking (above the shoulder level) rules were included in the 1976 official rule book for Canadian amateur hockey.

  5. Injuries in Youth Hockey. On-Ice Emergency Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Bradford M.; Castaldi, Cosmo R.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews the nature and frequency of injuries in youth hockey (which range from musculoskeletal injuries to life-threatening emergencies). Overall injury rates have decreased, but there is an increase in head, neck, and spine injuries. Those injuries that are serious demand prompt, skillful attention. A comprehensive format for on-ice management is…

  6. Biceps femoris tendon injuries sustained while playing hockey

    PubMed Central

    Watura, Christopher; Harries, William

    2011-01-01

    A 42-year-old female nurse presented in March 2008 with a left proximal hamstring tendon injury sustained while playing hockey. At surgery, the proximal biceps femoris tendon and semitendonosus were found to be ruptured and were repaired. The patient made a good recovery but sustained a further hockey injury in January 2010 involving a complete tear and rupture of the biceps femoris tendon distally. This was managed conservatively and the patient was able to return to playing hockey 10 months later. Biceps femoris tendon injuries have been reported in sport but this is the first documented case of the injury occurring while playing hockey and is also the first reported case of a biceps tendon rupture proximally (hamstring tendon) followed by distal biceps femoris rupture at the knee in the same leg. PMID:22715185

  7. Injury data of major international field hockey tournaments

    PubMed Central

    Theilen, Till-Martin; Mueller-Eising, Wiebke; Wefers Bettink, Peter; Rolle, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Background Detailed injury data are not available for international tournaments in field hockey. We investigated the epidemiology of field hockey injuries during major International Hockey Federation (Fédération Internationale de Hockey, FIH) tournaments in 2013. Materials and methods FIH injury reports were used for data collection. All major FIH tournaments for women (n=5) and men (n=11) in 2013 were included. The main focus of this study was to assess the pattern, time, site on the pitch, body site and mechanism of each of the injuries. We calculated the average number of injuries per match and the number of injuries per 1000 player match hours. Results The average number of injuries was 0.7 (95% CI 0.5 to 1.0) per match in women's tournaments and 1.2 (95% CI 0.8 to 1.7) per match in men's tournaments. The number of injuries per 1000 player match hours ranged from 23.4 to 44.2 (average 29.1; 95% CI 18.6 to 39.7) in women and 20.8 to 90.9 (average 48.3; 95% CI 30.9 to 65.8) in men. Most injuries occurred in the circle (n=25, 50%, in women, n=95, 51%, in men). The rate of injuries increased after the first quarter. Injuries to the head and face (n=20, 40%) were most common in women. The head/face (n=51, 27%) and the thigh/knee (n=52, 28%) were equally affected in men. The ball caused the most injuries, followed by the stick, collisions and tripping/falling. There were no deaths or injuries that required hospital treatment in the entire cohort. Summary Field hockey has a low incidence of acute injuries during competition. PMID:26246418

  8. Integration of the functional movement screen into the National Hockey League Combine.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Chip P; Kuropkat, Christiane; Gumieniak, Robert J; Gledhill, Norman; Jamnik, Veronica K

    2015-05-01

    The sport of ice hockey requires coordination of complex skills involving musculoskeletal and physiological abilities while simultaneously exposing players to a high risk for injury. The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) was developed to assess fundamental movement patterns that underlie both sport performance and injury risk. The top 111 elite junior hockey players from around the world took part in the 2013 National Hockey League Entry Draft Combine (NHL Combine). The FMS was integrated into the comprehensive medical and physiological fitness evaluations at the request of strength and conditioning coaches with affiliations to NHL teams. The inclusion of the FMS aimed to help develop strategies that could maximize its utility among elite hockey players and to encourage or inform further research in this field. This study evaluated the outcomes of integrating the FMS into the NHL Combine and identified any links to other medical plus physical and physiological fitness assessment outcomes. These potential associations may provide valuable information to identify elements of future training programs that are individualized to athletes' specific needs. The results of the FMS (total score and number of asymmetries identified) were significantly correlated to various body composition measures, aerobic and anaerobic fitness, leg power, timing of recent workouts, and the presence of lingering injury at the time of the NHL Combine. Although statistically significant correlations were observed, the implications of the FMS assessment outcomes remain difficult to quantify until ongoing assessment of FMS patterns, tracking of injuries, and hockey performance are available. PMID:25719918

  9. Age and competition level on injuries in female ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Keightley, M; Reed, N; Green, S; Taha, T

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the number, types and locations of known injuries occurring across different age categories and levels of competition in female ice hockey within the Ontario Women's Hockey Association from 2004/05 to 2007/08. We further examined under which aforementioned factors and combination of factors an unusually high or low number of injuries was recorded. Secondary analysis of anonymized injury data was conducted. The most common known injury type was strain/sprain, followed by concussion while the most frequent injury location was head/face/mouth. Analysis of deviance indicated that a significantly higher than expected number of sprain/strain, concussion and laceration injuries were recorded compared to all other injury types. In addition, there were a higher number of injuries recorded at the AA level compared to all other levels of competition. Finally, the age categories of Peewee, Midget and Intermediate within the AA level of competition, as well as Senior/Adult within the Houseleague level of competition also recorded a significantly higher number of injuries compared to other combinations of descriptive factors. Further research with female youth is needed to better understand the high number of injuries, including concussions, reported overall. PMID:23516144

  10. The Protective Effect of Kevlar ® Socks Against Hockey Skate Blade Injuries: A Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Nauth, Aaron; Aziz, Mina; Tsuji, Matthew; Whelan, Daniel B.; Theodoropoulos, John S.; Zdero, Rad

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Several recent high profile injuries to elite players in the National Hockey League (NHL) secondary to skate blade lacerations have generated significant interest in these injuries and possible methods to protect against them. These injuries are typically due to direct contact of the skate blade of another player with posterior aspect of the calf resulting in a range of potential injuries to tendons or neurovascular structures. The Achilles tendon is most commonly involved. Kevlar® reinforced socks have recently become available for hockey players to wear and are cited as providing possible protection against such injuries. However, there has been no investigation of the possible protective effects of Kevlar® reinforced socks against skate blade injuries, and it is currently unknown what protective effects, if any, that these socks provide against these injuries. The proposed study sought to address this by conducting a biomechanical investigation of the protective effects of Kevlar® reinforced socks against Achilles tendon injuries in a simulated model of skate blade injury using human cadaver limbs. This novel investigation is the first to address the possible benefits to hockey players of wearing Kevlar® reinforced socks. Methods: Seven matched pairs of human cadaver lower limbs were fitted with a Kevlar ® reinforced sock comprised of 60% Kevlar®/20% Coolmax® polyester/18 % Nylon/12% Spandex (Bauer Elite Performance Skate Sock) on one limb and a standard synthetic sock comprised of 51% polyester/47% nylon/2% spandex (Bauer Premium Performance Skate Sock) on the contralateral limb as a control. Each limb was then mounted on a Materials Testing System (MTS) with the ankle dorsiflexed to 90° and the knee held in full extension using a custom designed jig. Specimens were then impacted with a hockey skate blade directed at the posterior calf, 12 cm above the heel, at an angle of 45° and a speed of 31m/s, to a penetration depth of 4.3 cm, to

  11. Dental and facial injuries in international field hockey.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, J H; Leurs, J M; Flögel, G E

    1987-12-01

    In many respects international sportsmen are trendsetters for the behaviour of recreational sportsmen. For this reason the attitude of international hockey players towards mouth protectors was studied. The possession and use of mouth protectors vary markedly between different countries. The incidence of dental-facial traumas among international field hockey players is high; 54% had sustained injuries necessitating a visit to a physician and/or a dentist. Of these victims 20% sustained serious dental damage at least once (women 16% and men 22%). Only 20% of the international players wear a mouth protector consistently during training and matches. Women use the apparatus almost twice as much as men. The main argument in rejecting a mouth protector is that it is not felt to be necessary.

  12. Brain contusion with aphasia following an ice hockey injury.

    PubMed

    Degen, Ryan M; Fink, Matthew E; Callahan, Lisa; Fibel, Kenton H; Ramsay, Jim; Kelly, Bryan T

    2016-09-01

    Head injuries are relatively common in ice hockey, with the majority represented by concussions, a form of mild traumatic brain injury. More severe head injuries are rare since the implementation of mandatory helmet use in the 1960s. We present a case of a 27 year-old male who sustained a traumatic intraparenchymal hemorrhage with an associated subdural hematoma resulting after being struck by a puck shot at high velocity. The patient presented with expressive aphasia, with no other apparent neurologic deficits. Acutely, he was successfully treated with observation and serial neuroimaging studies ensuring an absence of hematoma expansion. After a stable clinical picture following 24 hours of observation, the patient was discharged and managed with outpatient speech therapy with full resolution of symptoms and return to play 3 months later. We will outline the patient presentation and pertinent points in the management of acute head injuries in athletes. PMID:27074595

  13. The prevalence and severity of injuries in field hockey drag flickers: a retrospective cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Ng, Leo; Sherry, Dorianne; Loh, Wei Bing; Sjurseth, Andreas Myhre; Iyengar, Shrikant; Wild, Catherine; Rosalie, Simon

    2016-09-01

    The drag flick is the preferred method of scoring during a penalty corner in field hockey. Performing the drag flick requires a combination of strength, coordination and timing, which may increase susceptibility to injuries. However, injury prevalence in drag flickers has not previously been investigated. Therefore, this study compared the injury prevalence and severity of lower limb and lower back injuries between drag flickers and non-drag flickers in field hockey. A total of 432 local, national and international adult field hockey players (242 males, 188 females) completed an online questionnaire to retrospectively determine the 3-month prevalence and severity of ankle, knee, hip and lower back injuries. Of this group, 140 self-identified as drag flickers and 292 as non-drag flickers. The results showed that drag flickers had significantly higher prevalence of hip (OR: 1.541; 95% CI: 1.014, 2.343) and lower back injury (OR: 1.564; 95% CI: 1.034, 2.365) compared to non-drag flickers. No significant differences were observed between drag flickers and non-drag flickers in injury prevalence at the ankle and knee. There were no significant between-group differences in injury severity scores. Overall, the prevalence of hip and lower back injuries was significantly higher in drag flickers compared to non-drag flickers.

  14. Aggression, Violence and Injury in Minor League Ice Hockey: Avenues for Prevention of Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cusimano, Michael D.; Ilie, Gabriela; Mullen, Sarah J.; Pauley, Christopher R.; Stulberg, Jennifer R.; Topolovec-Vranic, Jane; Zhang, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    Background In North America, more than 800,000 youth are registered in organized ice hockey leagues. Despite the many benefits of involvement, young players are at significant risk for injury. Body-checking and aggressive play are associated with high frequency of game-related injury including concussion. We conducted a qualitative study to understand why youth ice hockey players engage in aggressive, injury-prone behaviours on the ice. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 61 minor ice hockey participants, including male and female players, parents, coaches, trainers, managers and a game official. Players were aged 13–15 playing on competitive body checking teams or on non-body checking teams. Interviews were manually transcribed, coded and analyzed for themes relating to aggressive play in minor ice hockey. Results Parents, coaches, teammates and the media exert a large influence on player behavior. Aggressive behavior is often reinforced by the player’s social environment and justified by players to demonstrate loyalty to teammates and especially injured teammates by seeking revenge particularly in competitive, body-checking leagues. Among female and male players in non-body checking organizations, aggressive play is not reinforced by the social environment. These findings are discussed within the framework of social identity theory and social learning theory, in order to understand players’ need to seek revenge and how the social environment reinforces aggressive behaviors. Conclusion This study provides a better understanding of the players’ motivations and environmental influences around aggressive and violent play which may be conducive to injury. The findings can be used to help design interventions aimed at reducing aggression and related injuries sustained during ice hockey and sports with similar cultures and rules. PMID:27258426

  15. The Ice Hockey Injury: A Case Study in Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Phil

    2004-01-01

    A high school hockey team is playing the last of three games in one day. The game gets rough, and the star player is slammed against the boards. Injured, he is escorted off the ice. This case follows his health as it deteriorates over the next several hours. Students are presented with the hockey player's symptoms, and they use their knowledge of…

  16. Reducing injury risk from body checking in boys' youth ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Alison; Loud, Keith J; Brenner, Joel S; Demorest, Rebecca A; Halstead, Mark E; Kelly, Amanda K Weiss; Koutures, Chris G; LaBella, Cynthia R; LaBotz, Michele; Martin, Stephanie S; Moffatt, Kody

    2014-06-01

    Ice hockey is an increasingly popular sport that allows intentional collision in the form of body checking for males but not for females. There is a two- to threefold increased risk of all injury, severe injury, and concussion related to body checking at all levels of boys' youth ice hockey. The American Academy of Pediatrics reinforces the importance of stringent enforcement of rules to protect player safety as well as educational interventions to decrease unsafe tactics. To promote ice hockey as a lifelong recreational pursuit for boys, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the expansion of nonchecking programs and the restriction of body checking to elite levels of boys' youth ice hockey, starting no earlier than 15 years of age. PMID:24864185

  17. Effects of multiple concussions on retired national hockey league players.

    PubMed

    Caron, Jeffrey G; Bloom, Gordon A; Johnston, Karen M; Sabiston, Catherine M

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the meanings and lived experiences of multiple concussions in professional hockey players using hermeneutic, idiographic, and inductive approaches within an interpretative phenomenological analysis. The interviewer was an athlete who had suffered multiple concussions, and the interviewees were five former National Hockey League athletes who had retired due to medically diagnosed concussions suffered during their careers. The men discussed the physical and psychological symptoms they experienced as a result of their concussions and how the symptoms affected their professional careers, personal relationships, and quality of life. The former professional athletes related these symptoms to the turmoil that is ever present in their lives. These findings are of interest to athletes, coaches, sport administrators, family members, sport psychology practitioners, and medical professionals, as they highlight the severity of short- and long-term effects of concussions.

  18. Injuries in men's international ice hockey: a 7-year study of the International Ice Hockey Federation Adult World Championship Tournaments and Olympic Winter Games

    PubMed Central

    Tuominen, Markku; Stuart, Michael J; Aubry, Mark; Kannus, Pekka; Parkkari, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Background Information on ice hockey injuries at the international level is very limited. The aim of the study was to analyse the incidence, type, mechanism and severity of ice hockey injuries in men's international ice hockey tournaments. Methods All the injuries in men's International Ice Hockey Federation World Championship tournaments over a 7-year period were analysed using a strict definition of injury, standardised reporting strategies and an injury diagnosis made by a team physician. Results 528 injuries were recorded in games resulting in an injury rate of 14.2 per 1000 player-games (52.1/1000 player-game hours). Additionally, 27 injuries occurred during practice. For WC A-pool Tournaments and Olympic Winter Games (OWG) the injury rate was 16.3/1000 player-games (59.6/1000 player-game hours). Body checking, and stick and puck contact caused 60.7% of the injuries. The most common types of injuries were lacerations, sprains, contusions and fractures. A laceration was the most common facial injury and was typically caused by a stick. The knee was the most frequently injured part of the lower body and the shoulder was the most common site of an upper body injury. Arenas with flexible boards and glass reduced the risk of injury by 29% (IRR 0.71, (95% CI 0.56 to 0.91)). Conclusions The incidence of injury during international ice hockey competition is relatively high. Arena characteristics, such as flexible boards and glass, appeared to reduce the risk of injury. PMID:25293341

  19. Evaluation of the ThinkFirst Canada, Smart Hockey, brain and spinal cord injury prevention video

    PubMed Central

    Cook, D; Cusimano, M; Tator, C; Chipman, M; Macarthur, C

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The ThinkFirst Canada Smart Hockey program is an educational injury prevention video that teaches the mechanisms, consequences, and prevention of brain and spinal cord injury in ice hockey. This study evaluates knowledge transfer and behavioural outcomes in 11–12 year old hockey players who viewed the video. Design: Randomized controlled design. Setting: Greater Toronto Minor Hockey League, Toronto Ontario. Subjects: Minor, competitive 11–12 year old male ice hockey players and hockey team coaches. Interventions: The Smart Hockey video was shown to experimental teams at mid-season. An interview was conducted with coaches to understand reasons to accept or refuse the injury prevention video. Main outcome measures: A test of concussion knowledge was administered before, immediately after, and three months after exposure to the video. The incidence of aggressive penalties was measured before and after viewing the video. Results: The number of causes and mechanisms of concussion named by players increased from 1.13 to 2.47 and from 0.67 to 1.22 respectively. This effect was maintained at three months. There was no significant change in control teams. There was no significant change in total penalties after video exposure; however, specific body checking related penalties were significantly reduced in the experimental group. Conclusion: This study showed some improvements in knowledge and behaviours after a single viewing of a video; however, these findings require confirmation with a larger sample to understand the sociobehavioural aspects of sport that determine the effectiveness and acceptance of injury prevention interventions. PMID:14693901

  20. Effectiveness of interventions to reduce aggression and injuries among ice hockey players: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Cusimano, Michael D.; Nastis, Sofia; Zuccaro, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Background: The increasing incidence of injuries related to playing ice hockey is an important public health issue. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions designed to reduce injuries related to aggressive acts in ice hockey. Methods: We identified relevant articles by searching electronic databases from their inception through July 2012, by using Internet search engines, and by manually searching sports medicine journals, the book series Safety in Ice Hockey and reference lists of included articles. We included studies that evaluated interventions to reduce aggression-related injuries and reported ratings of aggressive behaviour or rates of penalties or injuries. Results: We identified 18 eligible studies. Most involved players in minor hockey leagues. Of 13 studies that evaluated changes in mandatory rules intended to lessen aggression (most commonly the restriction of body-checking), 11 observed a reduction in penalty or injury rates associated with rule changes, and 9 of these showed a statistically significant decrease. The mean number of penalties decreased by 1.2–5.9 per game, and injury rates decreased 3- to 12-fold. All 3 studies of educational interventions showed a reduction in penalty rates, but they were not powered or designed to show a change in injury rates. In 2 studies of cognitive behavioural interventions, reductions in aggressive behaviours were observed. Interpretation: Changes to mandatory rules were associated with reductions in penalties for aggressive acts and in injuries related to aggression among ice hockey players. Effects of educational and cognitive behavioural interventions on injury rates are less clear. Well-designed studies of multifaceted strategies that combine such approaches are required. PMID:23209118

  1. Career/Life Transition Needs of National Hockey League Players and Career-Life Transition Needs of National Hockey League Players: Spouses Perspectives. Final Reports Prepared for the National Hockey League Players' Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blann, Wayne; Zaichkowsky, Leonard

    Two surveys were conducted regarding the career and life transition needs of National Hockey League (NHL) players and their spouses. The Professional Athletes' Career Transition Inventory was distributed to player representatives and members of eight NHL teams. Results revealed that 85 percent of players believed it important that help be provided…

  2. Traumatic upper limb injuries during the Men's Field Hockey Junior World Cup 2009.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Swarup

    2013-01-01

    This study was a prospective epidemiological investigation of upper limb injuries during the Men's Field Hockey Junior World Cup 2009. Three hundred twenty-four players were observed in 58 matches of the tournament. Twenty-eight upper limb-related injuries were documented. The injury incidence was 0.48 per match and 19 per 1,000 match hours. Most injuries were due to contact with the ball, and the left hand was the most commonly injured part. Contusion was the most common type of injury. The odds ratio for hand and wrist injuries in players not wearing gloves was 4.01 (95% CI, 0.52-30.62), and the relative risk of hand and wrist injuries in players wearing gloves was 0.26 (95% CI, 0.03-1.92). Male youth hockey players are at a high risk of upper limb, especially hand and wrist, injuries during major international tournaments and that use of protective gloves can provide significant protection against hand and wrist injuries in the sport. PMID:24067118

  3. Recreational ice hockey injuries in adult non-checking leagues: a United States perspective.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Pasqualino; Mattson, Douglas J

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze injuries among adult recreational ice hockey players. This was an observational prospective cohort study with data collected on injuries sustained during one season in the adult recreational ice hockey leagues of Oneida County, NY. The injury incidence rate was found to be 12.2/1000 player-exposures. The most common anatomic region injured was the head/neck/face (35%). Collisions were most often reported as the mechanism of injury (44%). Fracture was the most common diagnosis. Of players wearing face protection (full cage or shield, or partial visor/half shield), none suffered facial injuries, while all facial injuries reported were to players not wearing facial protection. The concussion rate was 1.1/1000 player-exposures. A lack of protective equipment was associated with 38% of injuries and 24% of injuries involved penalties. A history of prior injuries was found in 89% of injured players with 28% re-injuring the same body part. This study's findings suggested various strategies to address player injuries such as mandatory full facial protection and shoulder pads, strict enforcement of game rules, and game rule modifications (no body checking). Further research is needed on the role of preventive rehabilitation in players with previous injury history. Key PointsThe injury incidence rate was found to be 12.2/1000 player-exposures, similar to previous Canadian literature.The concussion rate was 1.1/1000 player-exposures.38% of injuries involved a lack of protective equipment and 24% of injuries involved penalties.Full facial protection and shoulder pads should be compulsory.Strict enforcement of game rules is necessary.History of prior injuries was found in 89% of injured players. PMID:24431962

  4. Recreational ice hockey injuries in adult non-checking leagues: a United States perspective.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Pasqualino; Mattson, Douglas J

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze injuries among adult recreational ice hockey players. This was an observational prospective cohort study with data collected on injuries sustained during one season in the adult recreational ice hockey leagues of Oneida County, NY. The injury incidence rate was found to be 12.2/1000 player-exposures. The most common anatomic region injured was the head/neck/face (35%). Collisions were most often reported as the mechanism of injury (44%). Fracture was the most common diagnosis. Of players wearing face protection (full cage or shield, or partial visor/half shield), none suffered facial injuries, while all facial injuries reported were to players not wearing facial protection. The concussion rate was 1.1/1000 player-exposures. A lack of protective equipment was associated with 38% of injuries and 24% of injuries involved penalties. A history of prior injuries was found in 89% of injured players with 28% re-injuring the same body part. This study's findings suggested various strategies to address player injuries such as mandatory full facial protection and shoulder pads, strict enforcement of game rules, and game rule modifications (no body checking). Further research is needed on the role of preventive rehabilitation in players with previous injury history. Key PointsThe injury incidence rate was found to be 12.2/1000 player-exposures, similar to previous Canadian literature.The concussion rate was 1.1/1000 player-exposures.38% of injuries involved a lack of protective equipment and 24% of injuries involved penalties.Full facial protection and shoulder pads should be compulsory.Strict enforcement of game rules is necessary.History of prior injuries was found in 89% of injured players.

  5. A prospective study of concussions among National Hockey League players during regular season games: the NHL-NHLPA Concussion Program

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Brian W.; Meeuwisse, Willem H.; Rizos, John; Kang, Jian; Burke, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    Background In 1997, the National Hockey League (NHL) and NHL Players’ Association (NHLPA) launched a concussion program to improve the understanding of this injury. We explored initial postconcussion signs, symptoms, physical examination findings and time loss (i.e., time between the injury and medical clearance by the physician to return to competitive play), experienced by male professional ice-hockey players, and assessed the utility of initial postconcussion clinical manifestations in predicting time loss among hockey players. Methods We conducted a prospective case series of concussions over seven NHL regular seasons (1997–2004) using an inclusive cohort of players. The primary outcome was concussion and the secondary outcome was time loss. NHL team physicians documented post-concussion clinical manifestations and recorded the date when a player was medically cleared to return to play. Results Team physicians reported 559 concussions during regular season games. The estimated incidence was 1.8 concussions per 1000 player-hours. The most common postconcussion symptom was headache (71%). On average, time loss (in days) increased 2.25 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41–3.62) for every subsequent (i.e., recurrent) concussion sustained during the study period. Controlling for age and position, significant predictors of time loss were postconcussion headache (p < 0.001), low energy or fatigue (p = 0.01), amnesia (p = 0.02) and abnormal neurologic examination (p = 0.01). Using a previously suggested time loss cut-point of 10 days, headache (odds ratio [OR] 2.17, 95% CI 1.33–3.54) and low energy or fatigue (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.04–2.85) were significant predictors of time loss of more than 10 days. Interpretation Postconcussion headache, low energy or fatigue, amnesia and abnormal neurologic examination were significant predictors of time loss among professional hockey players. PMID:21502355

  6. Effect of bodychecking on injury rates among minor ice hockey players

    PubMed Central

    Hagel, Brent E.; Marko, Josh; Dryden, Donna; Couperthwaite, Amy B.; Sommerfeldt, Joseph; Rowe, Brian H.

    2006-01-01

    Background In 2002, Hockey Canada changed the age classifications for minor ice hockey. Previously, 10- and 11-year-old children played at the Atom level (no bodychecking), and 12- and 13-year-old children played at the Peewee level (bodychecking allowed). After the policy change, 11-year-old players were placed in the Peewee division with 12-year-old players; the Atom division included 9- and 10-year-old players. The objective of this study was to examine the effect that the policy change had on injuries to 11-year-old players and compare this information with injury trends among 10- and 12-year-old players. Methods The study location was the Capital Health region, which serves the greater Edmonton area in Alberta. Capital Health maintains a database of all emergency department visits in the region. A search of the database identified 10-, 11- and 12-year-old players admitted to 7 emergency departments with hockey-related injuries during the 2 years before and the 2 years after the policy change. We also conducted a chart review for the 11-year-old players, extracting detailed information on the nature and circumstances of their injuries for the same period. Results The rate of injuries sustained by 11-year-old children playing at the Peewee level (with bodychecking) increased significantly compared with the rate among 11-year-0ld players at the Atom level (rate ratio [RR] 1.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4–2.4). The rate of severe injuries was more than 2 times greater among 11-year-old Peewee players than among 11-year-old Atom players (RR 2.4, 95% CI 1.6–3.6). Injury rates among the 10-year-old players (bodychecking never allowed) and the 12-year-old players (bodychecking always allowed) changed little over the study period. Interpretation The introduction of bodychecking to 11-year-old players was associated with a large increase in injury rates. From a public health perspective, the age at which bodychecking is introduced in minor hockey should be

  7. Trends in North American Newspaper Reporting of Brain Injury in Ice Hockey

    PubMed Central

    Cusimano, Michael D.; Sharma, Bhanu; Lawrence, David W.; Ilie, Gabriela; Silverberg, Sarah; Jones, Rochelle

    2013-01-01

    The frequency and potential long-term effects of sport-related traumatic brain injuries (TBI) make it a major public health concern. The culture within contact sports, such as ice hockey, encourages aggression that puts youth at risk of TBI such as concussion. Newspaper reports play an important role in conveying and shaping the culture around health-related behaviors. We qualitatively studied reports about sport-related TBI in four major North American newspapers over the last quarter-century. We used the grounded-theory approach to identify major themes and then did a content analysis to compare the frequency of key themes between 1998–2000 and 2009–2011. The major themes were: perceptions of brain injury, aggression, equipment, rules and regulations, and youth hockey. Across the full study period, newspaper articles from Canada and America portrayed violence and aggression that leads to TBI both as integral to hockey and as an unavoidable risk associated with playing the game. They also condemned violence in ice hockey, criticized the administrative response to TBI, and recognized the significance of TBI. In Canada, aggression was reported more often recently and there was a distinctive shift in portraying protective equipment as a solution to TBI in earlier years to a potential contributing factor to TBI later in the study period. American newspapers gave a greater attention to ‘perception of risks’ and the role of protective equipment, and discussed TBI in a broader context in the recent time period. Newspapers from both countries showed similar recent trends in regards to a need for rule changes to curb youth sport-related TBI. This study provides a rich description of the reporting around TBI in contact sport. Understanding this reporting is important for evaluating whether the dangers of sport-related TBI are being appropriately communicated by the media. PMID:23613957

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Intra-articular Findings After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Ice Hockey Versus Other Sports

    PubMed Central

    Kluczynski, Melissa A.; Kang, Jeansol V.; Marzo, John M.; Bisson, Leslie J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of comorbid knee pathology has been examined for sports-related anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, but it has not been examined in ice hockey players. Purpose: To compare concomitant bone bruising, collateral ligament injuries, and intra-articular injuries in ACL injuries suffered during ice hockey versus other sports. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 20 patients with ACL injuries sustained during ice hockey were identified from a prospective registry, of which 95% were male and 90% had a contact mechanism of injury (MOI). Thirteen cases and 46 controls who sustained ACL injuries from ice hockey and other sports, respectively, were included. Inclusion criteria for cases and controls were male sex, contact MOI, no prior knee surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 6 weeks of injury, and surgery within 3 months of injury. Age, body mass index (BMI), MRI findings (bone bruising, medial and lateral collateral ligament [MCL, LCL] injuries), and arthroscopic findings (meniscus tears, chondral injuries) were compared for cases versus controls using t tests or exact chi-square tests. Results: Age (22.9 ± 8.8 vs 23.4 ± 10.4 years, P = .88) and BMI ≥25 kg/m2 (50% vs 65.9%, P = .66) did not differ between cases and controls. Cases had less lateral bone bruising (lateral femoral condyle: 54.6% vs 93%, P = .01; lateral tibial plateau: 72.7% vs 93%, P = .09) and no medial bone bruising (medial femoral condyle: 0% vs 7%, P = .06; medial tibial plateau: 0% vs 32.6%, P = .05) compared with controls. Cases had less frequent lateral meniscus tears than controls (23.1% vs 58.5%, P = .05). There were no significant differences in MCL (40% vs 31.2%, P = .77), LCL (0% vs 3.9%, P > .999), medial meniscus tears (7.7% vs 37%, P = .08), and chondral injuries (10% vs 9.4%, P > .999) for cases versus controls. Conclusion: Male ice hockey players with ACL injuries had less lateral femoral condyle and

  9. The Control of Externalities in Sports Leagues: An Analysis of Restrictions in the National Hockey League

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Dennis W.; Frankel, Alan S.; Landes, Elisabeth M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides one of the few successful demonstrations of the efficiency of certain types of restrictions in the context of a joint venture. The joint venture we examine is the National Hockey League (NHL) in the 1980s, which was then composed of 21 separately owned teams. (It now has 30 teams.) The restriction we analyze is the NHL rule on…

  10. Factors influencing visor use among players in the National Hockey League (NHL).

    PubMed

    Micieli, Robert; Micieli, Jonathan A

    2014-01-01

    Eye, orbital, and facial injuries are significant risks to National Hockey League (NHL) players, and can be mitigated by the use of a partial visor - currently optional for all non-rookie players. The goal of the current study was to determine the overall use of visors among non-rookie NHL players in the 2013-2014 season and assess factors influencing their uptake. This was an observational, cross-sectional study using active NHL rosters and demographic information obtained from the official NHL website. Visor use was determined based on in-game video or images at two different time points in the 2013-2014 season. The use of visors during the 2013-2014 season was 75.2% among non-rookie players. When rookies were included, the overall use of visors was 77.8%. Compared to Canadian-born players, European players were significantly more likely to choose to wear a visor (odds ratio [OR] 3.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.96-6.17). Players in the younger age-groups, particularly those younger than 24 years (OR 5.67, 95% CI 2.52-5.76) and those between 24 and 28 years (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.23-3.87), were more likely to wear a visor compared to older players. Overall, visor use continues to grow in the NHL independently of new legislation, and is more likely in younger players and those of European origin. PMID:24744613

  11. Ability of Preseason Body Composition and Physical Fitness to Predict the Risk of Injury in Male Collegiate Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Grant, John A.; Bedi, Asheesh; Kurz, Jennifer; Bancroft, Richard; Gagnier, Joel J.; Miller, Bruce S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Injuries in collegiate ice hockey can result in significant time lost from play. The identification of modifiable risk factors relating to a player’s physical fitness allows the development of focused training and injury prevention programs targeted at reducing these risks. Purpose: To determine the ability of preseason fitness outcomes to predict in-season on-ice injury in male collegiate ice hockey players. Study Design: Prognostic cohort study. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: Athlete demographics, percentage body fat, aerobic capacity (300-m shuttle run; 1-, 1.5-, 5-mile run), and strength assessment (sit-ups, push-ups, grip strength, bench press, Olympic cleans, squats) data were collected at the beginning of 8 successive seasons for 1 male collegiate ice hockey team. Hockey-related injury data and player-level practice/game athlete exposure (AE) data were also prospectively collected. Seventy-nine players participated (203 player-years). Injury was defined as any event that resulted in the athlete being unable to participate in 1 or more practices or games following the event. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to determine the ability of the independent variables to predict the occurrence of on-ice injury. Results: There were 132 injuries (mean, 16.5 per year) in 55 athletes. The overall injury rate was 4.4 injuries per 1000 AEs. Forwards suffered 68% of the injuries. Seventy percent of injuries occurred during games with equal distribution between the 3 periods. The mean number of days lost due to injury was 7.8 ± 13.8 (range, 1-127 days). The most common mechanism of injury was contact with another player (54%). The odds of injury in a forward was 1.9 times (95% CI, 1.1-3.4) that of a defenseman and 3 times (95% CI, 1.2-7.7) that of a goalie. The odds of injury if the player’s body mass index (BMI) was ≥25 kg/m2 was 2.1 times (95% CI, 1.1-3.8) that of a player with a BMI <25 kg/m2. The odds ratios for bench press

  12. [Hematologic aspects of the national hockey team athletes].

    PubMed

    Faintuch, J J; Leite, J J; Munhoz, M A; Carazzato, J G

    1997-01-01

    Athletes tend to have lower hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations than sedentary counterparts. Sports anemia is used to describe both pseudodilutional anemia and the true anemia of athletes. Pseudodilutional anemia is a beneficial adaptation to endurance training; the two most common causes of true anemia are iron deficiency and intravascular hemolysis. We used questionnaires, physical examination and laboratory investigation to study 19 highly trained hockey athletes and laboratory investigation to study 32 outpatients without hematological diseases. One athlete had anemia (Hb 10.5 g/ dL; 5.44 million red cells/mL; serum iron-13 micrograms/dL; without parasites in the stools); the athletes had Hb = 14.88 +/- 1.33 g/dL and the outpatients had 15.24 +/- 0.74 g/dL; the maximal oxygen uptake of the athletes was 54.0 +/- 6.03 ml/kg/min (112.15 +/- 14.35% of the predicted values). The maximal oxygen uptake of the anemic athlete was 86% of the predicted value. The three athletes with the best maximal uptake had a mean Hb = 15.8 g/dL. In São Paulo-Brazil anemia is uncommon among males but elite athletes are in a borderline anemic state, that may impair the physical fitness.

  13. Scheduling for the National Hockey League Using a Multi-objective Evolutionary Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Sam; While, Lyndon; Barone, Luigi

    We describe a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm that derives schedules for the National Hockey League according to three objectives: minimising the teams' total travel, promoting equity in rest time between games, and minimising long streaks of home or away games. Experiments show that the system is able to derive schedules that beat the 2008-9 NHL schedule in all objectives simultaneously, and that it returns a set of schedules that offer a range of trade-offs across the objectives.

  14. Bodychecking in youth ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Kristin M; Emery, Carolyn A

    2012-11-01

    Hockey is one of the most popular sports for Canadian children and youth. While the health benefits of physical activity and sport participation are well recognized, there is increasing concern around the frequency and severity of hockey-related injuries, particularly concussion. Studies consistently identify bodychecking as the primary mechanism associated with youth hockey injuries, including concussion. Policy to delay bodychecking until bantam league play (when participants are 13 to 14 years of age) will reduce the risks of injury and concussion in young ice hockey players. Bodychecking should be eliminated from non-elite youth ice hockey. The age at which bodychecking is introduced in competitive hockey leagues must be reconsidered. Both initiatives require policy change in many provinces/territories, and must be re-evaluated prospectively in light of emerging research.

  15. Enforcement of Mouthguard Use and Athlete Compliance in National Collegiate Athletic Association Men's Collegiate Ice Hockey Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawn, Kristen L.; Visser, Mary Frances; Sexton, Patrick J.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated enforcement patterns and athlete compliance with the National Collegiate Athletic Association rule requiring the wearing of mouthguards in men's collegiate ice hockey games during one season. Surveys of athletic trainers indicated that the use of mouthguards in competition was not consistently enforced by athletic trainers, coaches,…

  16. Effects of Short Term Camp Periods on Aerobic and Anaerobic Performance Parameters in Ice Hockey National Team Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eler, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted for determining the effects of trainings, applied to athletes during short term camp period, on their aerobic and anaerobic performance. Measurements were made by the participation of 28 volunteer male ice hockey national team players. During the 15-day camp period, 10-minute running and stretching for warming and then…

  17. Stages and demands in the careers of Canadian National Hockey League players.

    PubMed

    Battochio, Randy C; Stambulova, Natalia; Schinke, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have identified some demands of Canadian National Hockey League (NHL) players, yet there is little direction for players hoping to reach the lucrative league. The objectives of this study were to identify the stages, statuses and demands in Canadian NHL players' careers and propose an empirical career model of Canadian NHL players. In total, 5 rookies, 5 veterans and 13 retirees had their interviews undergo an interpretive thematic analysis. Prospects face the NHL combine, training camp and minor league assignment. While developing into NHL players, rookies deal with NHL call-ups, team competition and formative production while sophomores seemed preoccupied by the opposition. Prime veterans become All-Stars by garnering point production and challenging for the Stanley Cup while seasoned veterans remain relevant through training camps. A discussion about the model's viability is followed by applications for sport psychology researchers and practitioners.

  18. [Anthropometry and muscle force measurement of German male national junior hockey players].

    PubMed

    Gröger, A; Oettl, G M; Tusker, F

    2001-12-01

    In 1996 89 German male national junior hockey players were examined in respect to weight, height, age and body mass of the lower extremities. The average age was 16,8 +/- 1,4 years with an average height of 179,6 +/- 6,3 cm and weight of 73,9 +/- 8,9 kg. The Rohrer-index was 1,27 +/- 0,1. In a biomechanic test set up characteristic values of strength were determined. By position, defence man were as tall as forwards but heavier. Players in the age of 15 to 17 years had a higher mean relative maximum force in leg-extension than players in the age of 18 to 19 years. Forwards had better relative explosive force in leg-extension but a higher force deficit in knee flexion and extension. At the World Championship 1995/96 in Alberta German national junior players, seventh ranked, had the lowest mean Rohrer-index and were the tallest one, but had the mean lowest weight of all teams. PMID:11753780

  19. Applied physiology of ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Cox, M H; Miles, D S; Verde, T J; Rhodes, E C

    1995-03-01

    Today's elite hockey players are physically bigger and have improved levels of physiological fitness when compared with their predecessors. Correspondingly, previous ice hockey studies that have become widely referenced may have little relevance to current players and the way the game is presently played. A great need exists to apply exercise science to the game of ice hockey. Although much has been written about the physiology of ice hockey, there is little information based on well controlled studies. Particularly, there is a paucity of knowledge concerning optimal training schedules, training specificity, recovery profiles and seasonal detraining. Moreover, the reports that do exist have attempted to make comparisons across all levels of skill and talent. Thus, fundamental questions remain as to actual physiological exercise response and specialised training programmes for ice hockey players, particularly at the elite level. There is a demand for new properly designed experiments to find answers pertaining to the appropriate training methods for today's ice hockey players. Future research directions should consider the relationships between performance and such variables as neuromuscular skills, strength, power, peripheral adaptations, travel, hydration, detraining and sport-specific training programmes. Incidence and severity of injury among ice hockey players in relation to fatigue and fitness must also be investigated. Much of the information currently used in ice hockey will remain speculative and anecdotal until these studies are conducted. PMID:7784758

  20. Myelin Water Fraction Is Transiently Reduced after a Single Mild Traumatic Brain Injury--A Prospective Cohort Study in Collegiate Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Wright, Alexander D; Jarrett, Michael; Vavasour, Irene; Shahinfard, Elham; Kolind, Shannon; van Donkelaar, Paul; Taunton, Jack; Li, David; Rauscher, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Impact-related mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) are a major public health concern, and remain as one of the most poorly understood injuries in the field of neuroscience. Currently, the diagnosis and management of such injuries are based largely on patient-reported symptoms. An improved understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of mTBI is urgently needed in order to develop better diagnostic and management protocols. Specifically, dynamic post-injury changes to the myelin sheath in the human brain have not been examined, despite 'compromised white matter integrity' often being described as a consequence of mTBI. In this preliminary cohort study, myelin water imaging was used to prospectively evaluate changes in myelin water fraction, derived from the T2 decay signal, in two varsity hockey teams (45 players) over one season of athletic competition. 11 players sustained a concussion during competition, and were scanned at 72 hours, 2 weeks, and 2 months post-injury. Results demonstrated a reduction in myelin water fraction at 2 weeks post-injury in several brain areas relative to preseason scans, including the splenium of the corpus callosum, right posterior thalamic radiation, left superior corona radiata, left superior longitudinal fasciculus, and left posterior limb of the internal capsule. Myelin water fraction recovered to pre-season values by 2 months post-injury. These results may indicate transient myelin disruption following a single mTBI, with subsequent remyelination of affected neurons. Myelin disruption was not apparent in the athletes who did not experience a concussion, despite exposure to repetitive subconcussive trauma over a season of collegiate hockey. These findings may help to explain many of the metabolic and neurological deficits observed clinically following mTBI. PMID:26913900

  1. Myelin Water Fraction Is Transiently Reduced after a Single Mild Traumatic Brain Injury – A Prospective Cohort Study in Collegiate Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Vavasour, Irene; Shahinfard, Elham; Kolind, Shannon; van Donkelaar, Paul; Taunton, Jack; Li, David; Rauscher, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Impact-related mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) are a major public health concern, and remain as one of the most poorly understood injuries in the field of neuroscience. Currently, the diagnosis and management of such injuries are based largely on patient-reported symptoms. An improved understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of mTBI is urgently needed in order to develop better diagnostic and management protocols. Specifically, dynamic post-injury changes to the myelin sheath in the human brain have not been examined, despite ‘compromised white matter integrity’ often being described as a consequence of mTBI. In this preliminary cohort study, myelin water imaging was used to prospectively evaluate changes in myelin water fraction, derived from the T2 decay signal, in two varsity hockey teams (45 players) over one season of athletic competition. 11 players sustained a concussion during competition, and were scanned at 72 hours, 2 weeks, and 2 months post-injury. Results demonstrated a reduction in myelin water fraction at 2 weeks post-injury in several brain areas relative to preseason scans, including the splenium of the corpus callosum, right posterior thalamic radiation, left superior corona radiata, left superior longitudinal fasciculus, and left posterior limb of the internal capsule. Myelin water fraction recovered to pre-season values by 2 months post-injury. These results may indicate transient myelin disruption following a single mTBI, with subsequent remyelination of affected neurons. Myelin disruption was not apparent in the athletes who did not experience a concussion, despite exposure to repetitive subconcussive trauma over a season of collegiate hockey. These findings may help to explain many of the metabolic and neurological deficits observed clinically following mTBI. PMID:26913900

  2. Myelin Water Fraction Is Transiently Reduced after a Single Mild Traumatic Brain Injury--A Prospective Cohort Study in Collegiate Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Wright, Alexander D; Jarrett, Michael; Vavasour, Irene; Shahinfard, Elham; Kolind, Shannon; van Donkelaar, Paul; Taunton, Jack; Li, David; Rauscher, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Impact-related mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) are a major public health concern, and remain as one of the most poorly understood injuries in the field of neuroscience. Currently, the diagnosis and management of such injuries are based largely on patient-reported symptoms. An improved understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of mTBI is urgently needed in order to develop better diagnostic and management protocols. Specifically, dynamic post-injury changes to the myelin sheath in the human brain have not been examined, despite 'compromised white matter integrity' often being described as a consequence of mTBI. In this preliminary cohort study, myelin water imaging was used to prospectively evaluate changes in myelin water fraction, derived from the T2 decay signal, in two varsity hockey teams (45 players) over one season of athletic competition. 11 players sustained a concussion during competition, and were scanned at 72 hours, 2 weeks, and 2 months post-injury. Results demonstrated a reduction in myelin water fraction at 2 weeks post-injury in several brain areas relative to preseason scans, including the splenium of the corpus callosum, right posterior thalamic radiation, left superior corona radiata, left superior longitudinal fasciculus, and left posterior limb of the internal capsule. Myelin water fraction recovered to pre-season values by 2 months post-injury. These results may indicate transient myelin disruption following a single mTBI, with subsequent remyelination of affected neurons. Myelin disruption was not apparent in the athletes who did not experience a concussion, despite exposure to repetitive subconcussive trauma over a season of collegiate hockey. These findings may help to explain many of the metabolic and neurological deficits observed clinically following mTBI.

  3. Floor Hockey---Is It a Safe Sport for Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Gary R.

    1989-01-01

    Guidelines under which floor hockey should be taught to prevent avoidable injuries are presented. Three court cases involving floor hockey related injuries are reviewed, and issues of responsibility and liability on the part of physical educators and schools are discussed. (IAH)

  4. Head-Impact Mechanisms in Men's and Women's Collegiate Ice Hockey

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Bethany J.; Machan, Jason T.; Beckwith, Jonathan G.; Greenwald, Richard M.; Burmeister, Emily; Crisco, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Concussion injury rates in men's and women's ice hockey are reported to be among the highest of all collegiate sports. Quantification of the frequency of head impacts and the magnitude of head acceleration as a function of the different impact mechanisms (eg, head contact with the ice) that occur in ice hockey could provide a better understanding of this high injury rate. Objective: To quantify and compare the per-game frequency and magnitude of head impacts associated with various impact mechanisms in men's and women's collegiate ice hockey players. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Collegiate ice hockey rink. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-three men and 31 women from 2 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I ice hockey teams. Main Outcome Measure(s): We analyzed magnitude and frequency (per game) of head impacts per player among impact mechanisms and between sexes using generalized mixed linear models and generalized estimating equations to account for repeated measures within players. Intervention(s): Participants wore helmets instrumented with accelerometers to allow us to collect biomechanical measures of head impacts sustained during play. Video footage from 53 games was synchronized with the biomechanical data. Head impacts were classified into 8 categories: contact with another player; the ice, boards or glass, stick, puck, or goal; indirect contact; and contact from celebrating. Results: For men and women, contact with another player was the most frequent impact mechanism, and contact with the ice generated the greatest-magnitude head accelerations. The men had higher per-game frequencies of head impacts from contact with another player and contact with the boards than did the women (P < .001), and these impacts were greater in peak rotational acceleration (P = .027). Conclusions: Identifying the impact mechanisms in collegiate ice hockey that result in frequent and high-magnitude head impacts will provide us with data that may

  5. Editorial Commentary: Helping Those Who Seek the Company of "Lord Stanley": Hockey Players and Hip Injuries Highlight the Current State and Future Challenges in Understanding, Treating, and Preventing Nonarthritic Hip Disease.

    PubMed

    Christoforetti, John

    2016-09-01

    The state of the art in caring for athletic hip injuries requires comprehensive understanding of dynamic sport-specific biomechanical demands, accurate musculoskeletal diagnosis, and a mindset towards matching hip structure with functional demand at all levels of play. The sport of hockey presents a unique opportunity to review these fundamentals of modern management and illuminates the way towards future understanding of the cause of common nonarthritic hip conditions. PMID:27594336

  6. Editorial Commentary: Helping Those Who Seek the Company of "Lord Stanley": Hockey Players and Hip Injuries Highlight the Current State and Future Challenges in Understanding, Treating, and Preventing Nonarthritic Hip Disease.

    PubMed

    Christoforetti, John

    2016-09-01

    The state of the art in caring for athletic hip injuries requires comprehensive understanding of dynamic sport-specific biomechanical demands, accurate musculoskeletal diagnosis, and a mindset towards matching hip structure with functional demand at all levels of play. The sport of hockey presents a unique opportunity to review these fundamentals of modern management and illuminates the way towards future understanding of the cause of common nonarthritic hip conditions.

  7. Hockey STAR: A Methodology for Assessing the Biomechanical Performance of Hockey Helmets.

    PubMed

    Rowson, Bethany; Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M

    2015-10-01

    Optimizing the protective capabilities of helmets is one of several methods of reducing brain injury risk in sports. This paper presents the experimental and analytical development of a hockey helmet evaluation methodology. The Summation of Tests for the Analysis of Risk (STAR) formula combines head impact exposure with brain injury probability over the broad range of 227 head impacts that a hockey player is likely to experience during one season. These impact exposure data are mapped to laboratory testing parameters using a series of 12 impact conditions comprised of three energy levels and four head impact locations, which include centric and non-centric directions of force. Injury risk is determined using a multivariate injury risk function that incorporates both linear and rotational head acceleration measurements. All testing parameters are presented along with exemplar helmet test data. The Hockey STAR methodology provides a scientific framework for manufacturers to optimize hockey helmet design for injury risk reduction, as well as providing consumers with a meaningful metric to assess the relative performance of hockey helmets. PMID:25822907

  8. Physiology applied to field hockey.

    PubMed

    Reilly, T; Borrie, A

    1992-07-01

    Field hockey is a sport with a long history that has undergone quite rapid and radical change within the past decade. The advent of the synthetic playing surface has changed the technical, tactical and physiological requirements of the game at all levels, but in particular at the elite level. In order to cope with the technical evolution within the game, the hockey player has also had to develop physiologically to meet the physical standards required at elite levels. Analysis of the physiological cost and energy expenditure of playing hockey has placed it in the category of 'heavy exercise', with reported VO2 values during a game of 2.26 L/min. Energy expenditure has been estimated to range from 36 to 50 kJ/min. Physiological profiling of female hockey players has shown that somatotype tends towards 3.5/4.0/2.5. Figures for percentage body fat in female players range from 16 to 26%. Anaerobic power output has been shown to compare favourably with other groups of sportswomen and has also been shown to be a discriminating factor between elite and county level female players. Aerobic power amongst female players has been shown to range from 45 to 59 ml/kg/min. The reported somatotypes of male hockey players have shown considerable variation but there seems to be a trend away from ectomorphy towards mesomorphy. Anaerobic power output in male players has been shown to be the same as that of soccer players and better than other sports, e.g. basketball and also higher than reference norms. The range of aerobic power reported in the literature is 48 to 65 ml/kg/min and it would appear that an aerobic power in excess of 60 ml/kg/min is required for elite level play. The physical strain of hockey play has been shown to be considerable, in particular with respect to spinal shrinkage. There is a greater injury risk inherent in playing on synthetic surfaces than on grass.

  9. The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act. The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Susan G.

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act and the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program to specifically address the injuries sustained through vaccination. The compensation program allows special education for children permanently injured by vaccines. Analyzes selected cases. (57 footnotes) (MLF)

  10. Tsunami Hockey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, S.; Becker, N. C.; Wang, D.; Fryer, G. J.

    2013-12-01

    minute simulated time steps takes approximately 50 minutes on the same system. These animations are generated quickly enough to provide decision support for emergency managers whose coastlines may be impacted by the tsunami several hours later. Tsunami reflections can also aid in determining the source region for those tsunamis generated by non-seismic mechanisms without a clear source such as meteotsunamis, tsunamis generated by meteorological phenomena. A derecho that crossed the New Jersey coast and entered the Atlantic Ocean at approximately 1500 UTC June 13, 2013 generated a meteotsunami that struck the northeast coast of the US causing several injuries. A DART sensor off Montauk, NY, recorded tsunami waves approximately 200 minutes apart. We show how the arrival times of the tsunamis recorded by this DART can help to constrain the source region of the meteotsunami. We also examine other reflections produced by the Haida Gwaii 2012, Tohoku 2011, and other tsunamis.

  11. Physiological characteristics of National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I ice hockey players and their relation to game performance.

    PubMed

    Peyer, Karissa L; Pivarnik, James M; Eisenmann, Joey C; Vorkapich, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Previous ice hockey research has focused on physiological profiles and determinants of skating speed, but few studies have examined the association of preseason player evaluations with a measure of season-long performance. Understanding which tests are most predictive of player performance could help coaches organize practice and training more effectively. The purpose of this study was to describe physical characteristics and skill levels of 24 members of an NCAA Division I men's ice hockey team and relate them to game performance over the course of a season as measured by plus/minus (+/-) score. Subjects performed a battery of preseason tests including treadmill maximal aerobic capacity, body fat, leg press, push-ups, bench press, chin-ups, and sprinting ability both on and off ice. Pearson and Spearman correlations were used to examine correlations between preseason measures and +/- score. One coach also subjectively grouped the top and bottom 6 players, and analysis of variance was used to examine any differences in preseason measures and +/- score between these 2 groups. Leg press, chin-ups, bench press, and repeat sprint performance were significantly correlated with +/- score (r = 0.554, 0.462, 0.499, and -0.568, respectively). Teams with limited time and resources may choose to perform these tests to evaluate player potential efficiently. Only +/- score differed between top and bottom players suggesting that +/- accurately reflected the coach's perception of player success in this sample. PMID:21478763

  12. PHYSICAL THERAPY MANAGEMENT OF ICE HOCKEY ATHLETES: FROM THE RINK TO THE CLINIC AND BACK

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Todd E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The increasing number of athletes playing hockey compels rehabilitation professionals working in orthopedic and sports settings to understand the unique functional demands of ice hockey and the patterns of injuries they may promote. Purpose The purpose of this clinical perspective is to: (1) discuss the functional implications of different positions and age levels on injury prevalence within the sport; (2) summarize the seven most common injuries sustained by ice hockey athletes; and (3) present a conceptual model for the clinical management and prevention of these injuries by rehabilitation professionals. Methods A narrative review and synthesis was conducted of currently available literature on prevalence, etiology, rehabilitative intervention, prognosis, and prevention of ice hockey injuries. Results Research evidence is available to support the prevalence of injuries sustained while participating in ice hockey, as well as the most effective clinical treatment protocols to treat them. Most of the existing protocols are based on clinical and sports experience with incorporation of scientific data. Conclusion This clinical commentary reviews the current concepts of ice hockey injury care and prevention, based on scientific information regarding the incidence, mechanism, rehabilitation protocols, prognosis, and prevention of injuries. Science-based, patient-centered reasoning is integral to provide the highest quality of rehabilitative and preventative care for ice hockey athletes by physical therapists. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:27274432

  13. Five Year Overview of Sport Injuries: The NAIRS Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, William E.

    1982-01-01

    Data from a survey of institutional members of the National Athletic Injury/Illness Reporting System (NAIRS) are presented and discussed. Included are tables showing injuries reported in high schools and colleges and universities for male and female athletes in baseball, basketball, football, gymnastics, soccer, wrestling, field hockey, track and…

  14. A Hockey Hero

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolduc, Matt

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the story of Will Poulos, a hockey player who has developmental and physical disabilities (mild mental retardation and left cerebral palsy). Will has overcome tremendous obstacles in his life. He was born at 28 weeks in 1986 at three pounds, one ounce, and 19 inches long. He was very sick; his odds for survival…

  15. The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program.

    PubMed

    Cook, Katherine M; Evans, Geoffrey

    2011-05-01

    The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986 established the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program to compensate people thought to be injured by certain vaccines. The act's goals are to ensure an adequate supply of vaccines, to stabilize vaccine costs, and to establish and maintain an accessible and efficient setting for providing compensation to people found to have been injured by certain childhood vaccines. In addition, the legislation called for the reporting of adverse events after vaccination, the creation of vaccine-information materials that detail vaccine benefits and risks, and Institute of Medicine studies of possible vaccine-related injuries and encouraged research and development of new and safer vaccines. Over its 22-year history, the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program has been a key component in stabilizing the US vaccine market through liability protection to both vaccine companies and health care providers and by providing a forum for people, no matter what age, to seek compensation.

  16. Five minutes' field study on each Indian hockey player in a coaching camp.

    PubMed

    De, A K; Debnath, P K

    1990-08-01

    Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) was measured using portable Wright's peak flow meter on 21 male hockey players of Indian national hockey team probables attending a zonal coaching camp. The mean PEFR was observed to be 580.95 +/- 43.34 1/minute. The PEFR in hockey players were higher than those recorded in inter-university 'kabaddi', basketball players and football goalkeepers. All the group of players had shown higher mean PEFR than those of age matched healthy Indian males.

  17. Evaluation of cricket helmet performance and comparison with baseball and ice hockey helmets

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, A; Janda, D

    2003-01-01

    Background: Protective helmets in sport are important for reducing the risk of head and facial injury. In cricket and other sports with projectiles, national test standards control the minimum helmet performance. However, there are few field data showing if helmets are effective in reducing head injury. Objectives: (a) To examine the performance of cricket helmets in laboratory tests; (b) to examine performance with regard to test standards, game hazards, and helmet construction; (c) to compare and contrast these findings with baseball and ice hockey helmets. Methods: Impact tests were conducted on a selection of helmet models: five cricket, two baseball, and two ice hockey. Ball to helmet impacts at speeds of 19, 27, 36, and 45 m/s were produced using an air cannon and a Hybrid III dummy headform and neck unit. Free fall drop tests with a rigid headform on to a selection of anvils (flat rigid, flat deformable, and hemispherical rigid) were conducted. Resultant headform acceleration was measured and compared between tests. Results: At the lower speed impacts, all helmets produced a good reduction in headform acceleration, and thus injury risk. At the higher speed impacts, the effectiveness was less. For example, the mean maximum headform accelerations for all cricket helmets at each speed were: 67, 160, 316, and 438 g for 19, 27, 36, and 45 m/s ball speeds respectively. Drop tests on to a hemispherical anvil produced the highest accelerations. The variation in performance increased as the magnitude of the impact energy increased, in both types of testing. Conclusions: The test method used for baseball helmets in which the projectile is fired at the helmet may be superior to helmet drop tests. Cricket helmet performance is satisfactory for low speed impacts, but not for impacts at higher, more realistic, speeds. Baseball and ice hockey helmets offer slightly better relative and absolute performance at the 27 m/s ball and puck impacts. PMID:12893718

  18. Concussions in Ice Hockey.

    PubMed

    Parizek, Allison; Ferraro, F Richard

    2016-01-01

    This literature review will summarize, compare, and evaluate the reviewed studies addressing and investigating the relationship between concussion and the sports of hockey. We will accomplish this by identifying prevalence rates, recognizing common mechanisms of causation, describing and discussing prevention and care, and summarizing the results to provide implications for further studies. We conclude by indicating the important mental health issues as well as potentially severe and long-lasting impact concussions can and do have on those that receive them as well as on the friends and families of those who sustain a concussion.

  19. International Toys in Space: Hockey

    NASA Video Gallery

    Cosmonauts Sergi Treschev and Valery Korzun discover ways to adapt the game of hockey while trying to overcome the challenges of playing the game in microgravity. Astronaut Peggy Whitson narrates t...

  20. Field Hockey; Lacrosse, June 1976-June 1978. NAGWS Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Linda K., Ed.; Hess, Eleanor Kay, Ed.

    This guide for field hockey and lacrosse is one in a series of guides for 22 sports published by the National Association for Girls and Women in Sport (NAGWS). Guides contain information on NAGWS-approved playing rules, officials' ratings, articles on teaching, coaching and organization, regulations governing national championships,…

  1. Eye Injuries in Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... these injuries can be prevented. Overall, basketball and baseball cause the most eye injuries, followed by water ... involve body contact. Some high-risk sports are baseball, basketball, hockey, football, lacrosse, tennis and other racquet ...

  2. National Action Plan for the Prevention of Playground Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Donna; Hudson, Susan

    Recognizing the need for a nationally coordinated effort to reduce playground injuries, the National Program for Playground Safety was created in 1995. This package of materials contains a booklet describing the national action plan for the prevention of playground injuries and accompanying supporting materials. The program booklet, designed for…

  3. National Action Plan for the Prevention of Playground Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Donna; Hudson, Susan

    Recognizing the need for a nationally coordinated effort to reduce playground injuries, the National Program for Playground Safety was created in 1995. This booklet describes the national action plan for prevention of playground injuries. Designed for use by parents, teachers, recreation and park personnel, and caregivers involved in providing…

  4. The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act: A Chance for Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Jack; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The article describes the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act which provides for recovery awards for vaccine-related injuries caused by diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, polio, measles, mumps, and rubella vaccines. A Vaccine Injury Table lists types of disabilities covered and time periods for first symptoms. The claims process, legal assistance,…

  5. Asymmetry in body composition in female hockey players.

    PubMed

    Krzykała, M; Leszczyński, P

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if a sport in which one side of the body is dominant, like field hockey, influences regional body composition and bone mineral density (BMD) distribution in particular body segments, and whether the sporting level is a determining factor. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) method (Lunar Prodigy Advance; General Electric, Madison, USA) with the whole body scan was used to measure bone mineral density, fat mass and lean mass in 31 female field hockey players divided according to their sporting level. The morphological asymmetry level was assessed between two body sides and body segments in athletes from the National Team (n=17) and from the Youth Team (n=14) separately and between groups. Bone mineral density in the lower extremity and of the trunk was significantly asymmetric in favor of the left side in the National Team. In the case of the Youth Team, only the trunk BMD indicated clear left-right difference with left side dominance. Both the lean mass and fat mass values were relatively higher on the left side of all body segments and it related to both analyzed groups of athletes. The present study shows that playing field hockey contributes to laterality in body composition and BMD and that the sporting level is a determining factor. In most cases the left side dominated. A greater asymmetry level was observed in more experienced female field hockey players. PMID:26077573

  6. Massachusetts Special Olympics Poly Hockey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrissey, Jim

    Poly Hockey is featured in this manual of instructions for coaches and teachers to use with mentally retarded boys and girls of all ages and ability levels. It is noted that the sport has been supported by the Board of Directors of the Special Olympics and has been used in Massachusetts for over 7 years. Explained is use of the game indoors, and…

  7. Mountaineering and rock-climbing injuries in US national parks.

    PubMed

    Addiss, D G; Baker, S P

    1989-09-01

    Mountaineering and rock climbing have become increasingly popular in recent years and involve an estimated 100,000 participants; accordingly, the number of climbing-related injuries has also increased. We analyzed 127 climbing-related injuries reported to the US National Park Service in 1981 and 1982, 36 (28%) of which were fatal. Falls accounted for 75% of all climbing-related injuries; median length of fall was 91 m for fatal injuries and 9 m for nonfatal injuries. The majority of injuries (69%) occurred while ascending. Falls on snow or ice were longer than falls on rock, and injuries on snow or ice were more likely to be fatal. We discuss considerations and strategies for the prevention of climbing-related injuries. A new conceptual model suggests that the methods of traditional mountaineering safety programs may be of limited efficacy in further reducing the number of climbing-related injuries.

  8. Injuries in Youth and National Combined Events Championships.

    PubMed

    Edouard, P; Samozino, P; Escudier, G; Baldini, A; Morin, J-B

    2012-10-01

    In major track and field competitions, the most risky discipline is the combined event. Therefore, we aimed to record and analyze the incidence and characteristics of sports injuries incurred during the Youth and National Combined Events Championships. During the French Athletics Combined Events Championships in 2010, all newly occurred injuries were prospectively recorded by the local organising committee of physicians and physiotherapists working in the medical centres at the stadium, in order to determine incidence and characteristics of newly occurred injuries. In total, 51 injuries and 9 time-loss injuries were reported among 107 registered athletes, resulting in an incidence of 477 injuries and 84 time-loss injuries per 1,000 registered athletes. Approximately 72% of injuries affected lower limbs and 60% were caused by overuse. Thigh strain (17.6%) was the most common diagnosis. 14 dropouts were recorded, 8 were caused by an injury (57.1%). During the National and Youth Combined Events Championships, over one third of the registered athletes incurred an injury, with an injury incidence higher than in international elite track and field competitions. Interestingly, this higher injury risk concerned the younger population affecting immature musculoskeletal structures. In combined events, preventive interventions should mainly focus on overuse and thigh injuries. PMID:22562740

  9. Cross national study of injury and social determinants in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Pickett, W; Molcho, M; Simpson, K; Janssen, I; Kuntsche, E; Mazur, J; Harel, Y; Boyce, W

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To compare estimates of the prevalence of injury among adolescents in 35 countries, and to examine the consistency of associations cross nationally between socioeconomic status then drunkenness and the occurrence of adolescent injury. Design: Cross sectional surveys were obtained from national samples of students in 35 countries. Eight countries asked supplemental questions about injury. Setting: Surveys administered in classrooms. Subjects: Consenting students (n = 146 440; average ages 11–15 years) in sampled classrooms. 37 878 students (eight countries) provided supplemental injury data. Exposure measures: Socioeconomic status (material wealth, poverty) and social risk taking (drunkenness). Outcome measures: Specific types and locations of medically treated injury. Results: By country, reports of medically treated injuries ranged from 33% (1060/3173) to 64% (1811/2833) of boys and 23% (740/3172) to 51% (1485/2929) of girls, annually. Sports and recreation were the most common activities associated with injury. High material wealth was positively (OR>1.0; p<0.05) and consistently (6/8 countries) associated with medically treated and sports related injuries. Poverty was positively associated with fighting injuries (6/8 countries). Drunkenness (social risk taking) was positively (p<0.01) and consistently (8/8 countries) associated with medically treated, street, and fighting injuries, but not school and sports related injuries. Conclusion: The high prevalence of adolescent injury confirms its importance as a health problem. Social gradients in risk for adolescent injury were illustrated cross nationally for some but not all types of adolescent injury. These gradients were most evident when the etiologies of specific types of adolescent injury were examined. Prevention initiatives should focus upon the etiologies of specific injury types, as well as risk oriented social contexts. PMID:16081749

  10. ThinkFirst National Injury Prevention Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... these injuries are motor vehicle crashes, violence, falls, sports and recreation. What might surprise you is that ... supporting ThinkFirst! Ticket sales and Silent Auction proceeds benefit... Read more 2016 ThinkFirst Conference on Injury Prevention ...

  11. Playing Hockey, Riding Motorcycles, and the Ethics of Protection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Ice hockey and motorcycle riding are increasingly popular activities in the United States that are associated with high risks of head and facial injuries. In both, effective head and facial protective equipment are available. Yet the debates about safety policies regarding the use of head protection in these activities have taken different forms, in terms of the influence of epidemiological data as well as of the ethical concerns raised. I examine these debates over injury prevention in the context of leisure activities, in which the public health duty to prevent avoidable harm must be balanced with the freedom to assume voluntary risks. PMID:23078472

  12. Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Field Hockey Football Injuries Golf Injuries Lacrosse Rugby Running Soccer Softball Tennis Volleyball Find an ACFAS Physician ... Foot and Ankle Although golf does not involve running or jumping, injuries can occur to the foot ...

  13. Sports chiropractic management at the World Ice Hockey Championships

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ice hockey is an international sport. Injuries occur in a full body fashion, to a number of tissues, commonly through body contact. There is a lack of literature documenting the scope of sports chiropractic practice. Thus, it was the aim to document the type, scope and severity of conditions presenting to, and the treatment provided by, the New Zealand team chiropractor acting as a primary health provider for the duration of the 2007 World Ice Hockey Championships. Methods All conditions presenting were recorded. Diagnosis was recorded along with clinical parameters of injury: injury type, severity, mechanism and whether referral or advanced imaging was required. All treatment provided was continuously recorded, including information on the number of treatments required and the reason, duration, type and location of treatment. Results Players presented for diagnosis of injury 50 times. Muscle (34%), joint (24%) and tendon injuries (18%) were most common. Players presented with a new injury 76% of the time. Most injuries had been present for less than one week (84%), with 53% occurring through a contact mechanism. Injuries were common at training and match locations. Only two injuries required the player to stop playing or training, both of which were referred for advanced imaging. During the study, 134 treatment consultations were rendered to 45 player injuries. Eighty per-cent of injuries were managed with four or less treatments. Three quarters of treatment was provided at training locations with treatment duration predominantly being between 11-15 minutes (71%) and 16-20 minutes (27%). Most treatment delivered was passive in nature (71%) although combination active and passive care was provided (27%). Treatment typically involved joint (81%) and soft tissue based therapies (81%) and was delivered in a full body manner. Conclusions This study documented the injury profile of ice hockey at an international level of competition. It documented the

  14. 78 FR 72680 - National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program; List of Petitions Received

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program... received under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (the Program), as required by Section 2112... HRSA's role in the Program, contact the Director, National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program,...

  15. 78 FR 66012 - National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program; List of Petitions Received

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program... received under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (the Program), as required by Section 2112... role in the Program, contact the Director, National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, 5600...

  16. 78 FR 46354 - National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program; List of Petitions Received

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program... received under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (``the Program''), as required by Section... role in the Program, contact the Director, National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, 5600...

  17. 78 FR 38995 - National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, List of Petitions Received

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program... received under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (``the Program''), as required by Section... role in the Program, contact the Director, National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, 5600...

  18. 78 FR 54663 - National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program; List of Petitions Received

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program... received under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (the Program), as required by Section 2112... role in the Program, contact the Director, National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, 5600...

  19. 78 FR 31566 - National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program; List of Petitions Received

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program... received under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (``the Program''), as required by Section... HRSA's role in the Program, contact the Director, National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program,...

  20. Beach Soccer Injuries During the Japanese National Championships

    PubMed Central

    Shimakawa, Tomoyuki; Shimakawa, Yusuke; Kawasoe, Yoko; Yoshimura, Kouji; Chinen, Yuma; Eimon, Kazuya; Chibana, Wataru; Shirota, Shinichi; Kadekawa, Kei; Bahr, Roald; Uezato, Tomomi; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The frequency and severity of injury in beach soccer are unknown. Purpose: To estimate the incidence rates, characteristics, and risk factors for injuries associated with beach soccer. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: The same sports physician examined and recorded injuries incurred during the Japanese National Beach Soccer Championships in 2013 and 2014. Posttournament follow-up was made for all injuries. Match exposure for each player was recorded through video review to examine individual risk factors. Results: A total of 58 injuries were recorded during 54 matches. The overall injury rate was 179.0 (95% CI, 138.4-231.6), and the time-loss injury rate was 28.2 (95% CI, 14.7-54.1) per 1000 player-hours. The foot/toe (34.9%) was the most frequently injured area, followed by the lower leg (22.2%) and thigh (11.1%). There was only 1 ankle injury (1.6%). The most frequent injury type was contusions (60.3%), followed by lacerations/abrasions (14.3%) and sprains/ligament injuries (6.3%). Only 4 injuries resulted in ≥30 days of time-loss (7.4%). After adjusting for age, a previous history of severe injury and longer experience of beach soccer were significantly associated with injury risk. Conclusion: The time-loss injury rate in this study was comparable to the rates reported during the matches of soccer or futsal tournaments. However, a greater incidence of foot/toe injury and lacerations/abrasions as well as a lower incidence of ankle injury distinguished beach soccer from soccer and futsal, possibly related to the specific playing conditions of being barefoot on a sand surface. PMID:26862537

  1. Visual Attentional Orienting in Developing Hockey Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enns, James T.; Richards, James C.

    1997-01-01

    Covert visual orienting was measured in 13 twelve-year-old and 11 fifteen-year-old hockey players and in 13 college students with no hockey training. Found that high-skill 15-year-olds were better able than all other groups to take advantage of the general alerting effect produced by the sudden onset of a cue. (MDM)

  2. Teres major muscle tear in two professional ice hockey players: cases study and literature review.

    PubMed

    Grosclaude, M; Najihi, N; Lädermann, A; Menetrey, J; Ziltener, J-L

    2012-02-01

    Ice hockey is a sport renowned for its numerous injuries; different studies report between 13.8 and 20 lesions per 1000 athlete exposures. Exactly 65.5% of these injuries occur during games, compared to 34.5% during training sessions. And 35.1% of all injuries involve the lower extremity and 29.7% the upper extremity (results drawn from games and training combined). Determining whether muscle injuries are extrinsic (contusions) or intrinsic (tears) is of utmost importance since the former generally require simple follow-up, whereas the latter necessitates further investigations, appropriate treatment and often prolonged absence from sports for the injured athlete. To our knowledge, no publication to date has reported isolated damage of the teres major muscle in Ice Hockey players. Seven cases were reported amongst baseball pitchers. Two cases presented after a waterskiing traction accident and a further case has been described in a tennis player. In the present study, we report two cases of isolated teres major tear in ice hockey players. These two athletes were both professional players competing at the highest level in the Swiss Ice Hockey League.

  3. Ice Hockey Summit II: zero tolerance for head hits and fighting.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aynsley M; Stuart, Michael J; Dodick, David W; Roberts, William O; Alford, Patrick W; Ashare, Alan B; Aubrey, Mark; Benson, Brian W; Burke, Chip J; Dick, Randall; Eickhoff, Chad; Emery, Carolyn A; Flashman, Laura A; Gaz, Daniel V; Giza, Chris C; Greenwald, Richard M; Herring, Stanley A; Hoshizaki, T Blaine; Hudziak, James J; Huston, John; Krause, David; LaVoi, Nicole; Leaf, Matt; Leddy, John J; MacPherson, Alison; McKee, Ann C; Mihalik, Jason P; Moessner, Anne M; Montelpare, William J; Putukian, Margot; Schneider, Kathryn J; Szalkowski, Ron; Tabrum, Mark; Whitehead, James R; Wiese-Bjornstal, Diane M

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to present currently known basic science and on-ice influences of sport-related concussion (SRC) in hockey, building upon the Ice Hockey Summit I action plan (2011) to reduce SRC. The prior summit proceedings included an action plan intended to reduce SRC. As such, the proceedings from Summit I served as a point of departure for the science and discussion held during Summit II (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, October 2013). Summit II focused on (1) Basic Science of Concussions in Ice Hockey: Taking Science Forward, (2) Acute and Chronic Concussion Care: Making a Difference, (3) Preventing Concussions via Behavior, Rules, Education, and Measuring Effectiveness, (4) Updates in Equipment: Their Relationship to Industry Standards, and (5) Policies and Plans at State, National, and Federal Levels To Reduce SRC. Action strategies derived from the presentations and discussion described in these sectors were voted on subsequently for purposes of prioritization. The following proceedings include the knowledge and research shared by invited faculty, many of whom are health care providers and clinical investigators. The Summit II evidence-based action plan emphasizes the rapidly evolving scientific content of hockey SRC. It includes the most highly prioritized strategies voted on for implementation to decrease concussion. The highest-priority action items identified from the Summit include the following: (1) eliminate head hits from all levels of ice hockey, (2) change body checking policies, and (3) eliminate fighting in all amateur and professional hockey. PMID:25757010

  4. 76 FR 8965 - National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program: Revisions to the Vaccine Injury Table

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... published in the Federal Register, September 13, 2010: 75 FR 55503. The public comment period closes March... HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 100 RIN 0907-AA National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program: Revisions to the Vaccine Injury Table AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS....

  5. Conservative management of an elite ice hockey goaltender with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI): a case report

    PubMed Central

    MacIntyre, Kyle; Gomes, Brendan; MacKenzie, Steven; D’Angelo, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To detail the presentation of an elite male ice hockey goaltender with cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and acetabular labral tears. This case will outline the prevalence, clinical presentation, imaging criteria, pathomechanics, and management of FAI, with specific emphasis on the ice hockey goaltender. Clinical Features: A 22-year old retired ice hockey goaltender presented to a chiropractor after being diagnosed by an orthopaedic surgeon with MRI confirmed left longitudinal and chondral flap acetabular labral tears and cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). As the patient was not a candidate for surgical intervention, a multimodal conservative treatment approach including manual therapy, electroacupuncture and rehabilitation exercises were implemented. Summary: FAI is prevalent in ice hockey players, particularly with goaltenders. Both skating and position-dependent hip joint mechanics involved in ice hockey may exacerbate or contribute to acquired and congenital forms of symptomatic FAI. As such, practitioners managing this population must address sport-specific demands in manual therapy, rehabilitation and physical training, to improve functional outcomes and prevent future injury. PMID:26816416

  6. Demographics of acute admissions to a National Spinal Injuries Unit

    PubMed Central

    Boran, S.; Street, J.; Higgins, T.; McCormack, D.; Poynton, A. R.

    2009-01-01

    This prospective demographic study was undertaken to review the epidemiology and demographics of all acute admissions to the National Spinal Injuries Unit in Ireland for the 5 years to 2003. The study was conducted at the National Spinal Injuries Unit, Mater Miscericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. Records of all patients admitted to our unit from 1999 to 2003 were compiled from a prospective computerized spinal database. In this 5-year period, 942 patients were acutely hospitalized at the National Spinal Injuries Unit. There were 686 (73%) males and 256 (27%) females, with an average age of 32 years (range 16–84 years). The leading cause of admission with a spinal injury was road traffic accidents (42%), followed by falls (35%), sport (11%), neoplasia (7.5%) and miscellaneous (4.5%). The cervical spine was most commonly affected (51%), followed by lumbar (28%) and thoracic (21%). On admission 38% of patients were ASIA D or worse, of which one-third were AISA A. Understanding of the demographics of spinal column injuries in unique populations can help us to develop preventative and treatment strategies at both national and international levels. PMID:19283414

  7. Hockey Stats: Data Collection on Ice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Joanne

    2002-01-01

    Part of a series exploring how mathematics is used in the workplace. Software developers and statisticians record data of hockey games and players using statistics accessible to middle school students. (MM)

  8. Hockey night in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichol, Kiri; Daniels, Karen

    2011-03-01

    In order to explore the possibility of developing a statistical mechanics for dissipative ensembles, we have performed an experiment in which we track the translational and rotational velocities of pucks on an air hockey table. The pucks are driven by bumpers at the boundaries and are bidisperse to prevent crystallization. At packing fractions of 60% we find that the system distributes rotational and translation energy according to the equipartition theorem. However, as the packing fraction increases, the ratio of rotational energy to translational energy also increases to a value larger than predicted by equipartition. The translational and angular velocity distributions are approximately exponential and the distributions of the translational velocity are the same for both large and small particles. In contrast, the distribution of the angular velocities is broader for the small particles than for the large.

  9. Pattern and management of sports injuries presented by Lagos state athletes at the 16th National Sports Festival (KADA games 2009) in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is a dearth of information on the epidemiology of sports injuries in Nigeria. The study was aimed at documenting sports injuries sustained by Lagos state athletes during the 16th National Sports Festival (KADA Games 2009). It was also aimed at providing information on treatments offered to injured athletes. Methods The study was carried out at Amadu Bello Stadium Complex, sporting arena of the Murtala Square and the team Lagos mini clinic. Participants were accredited Lagos state athletes who at one point in time during the games required treatment from any of the members of the medical team. Demographic data of athletes, type of injuries, body parts injured and treatment modalities used were documented and analysed using descriptive statistics. Results Within the period of the games, a total of 140 sports injuries were documented from 132 athletes with an approximate male to female ratio of 2:1 and age ranging from 15-38 years. Most of the injuries reported by the athletes were "minor" injuries. Muscle strain was the most common type of injury (31.4%) followed by ligament sprains (22.9%). The lower extremities were the most injured body region accounting for 50% of all injuries. Over 60% of injuries presented by the athletes were from basketball, cricket, hockey, rugby and baseball. Cryotherapy was the most frequently used treatment modality, followed by bandaging and massage with anti-inflammatory gels. Conclusion Establishing injury prevention programmes directed at the lower extremities may help reduce the risk of injuries to the lower extremities. Since cryotherapy was the most used treatment modality, it is suggested that it should be made abundantly available to the medical team preferably in forms of portable cold sprays for easy transportation and application during the games. It is also important that physiotherapists form the core of the medical team since they are trained to apply most of these treatment modalities and they also play a

  10. Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... get ACL injuries usually play contact sports (like football) or sports that feature swift, abrupt movements such ... the things you love — like running or playing football, field hockey, or softball — can be frustrating. Recovering ...

  11. Acute elbow injuries in the National Football League.

    PubMed

    Kenter, K; Behr, C T; Warren, R F; O'Brien, S J; Barnes, R

    2000-01-01

    We performed a retrospective review to evaluate acute medial collateral ligament injuries of the elbow in professional football players from 1991 to 1996 (5 seasons). There were 5 acute medial collateral ligament injuries in 4 players (1 player with bilateral involvement). All injuries occurred with the hand planted on the playing surface while a valgus or hyperextension force was applied to the elbow. There were 2 centers, both involved with long-snapping situations, 1 running back, and 1 quarterback. All elbows had valgus instability on physical examination. Despite this instability, all players were able to function without operative reconstruction of the medial collateral ligament. No evidence of valgus instability was seen at the time of follow-up (average, 3.4 years). Next, we reviewed all acute elbow injuries in the National Football League from the same 5-season period. Ninety-one acute elbow injuries were reviewed. Overall, there were 70 (76.9%) elbow sprains, 16 (17.6%) dislocation/subluxation patterns, 4 (4.4%) fractures, and 1 (1.1%) miscellaneous injury. Review of the acute elbow sprains revealed 39 (55.7%) hyperextension injuries, 14 (20%) medial collateral ligament injuries, 2 (2.9%) lateral collateral ligament sprains, and 15 (21.4%) nonspecific sprains. The epidemiology of the 14 medial collateral ligament injuries was studied in more detail. The 2 most common mechanisms of injury were blocking at the line of scrimmage (50%) and the application of a valgus force with the hand planted on the playing surface (29%). There were 8 linemen, 4 receivers, 1 running back, and 1 quarterback. All injuries were managed with nonoperative treatment. The average time lost was 0.64 games (range, 0 to 4). We report 19 acute medial collateral ligament injuries of the elbow in elite football players, 2 of whom are considered overhead throwing athletes, who were able to function at a competitive level without surgical repair or reconstruction, in contrast to baseball

  12. Field Hockey-Lacrosse Guide. June 1974-June 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramser, Frances, Ed.; Bixler, Agnes, Ed.

    This guide is a collection of essays by various authors on field hockey and lacrosse. There is a separate section for each sport. The topics covered in the field hockey section include half-time coaching, visual aids, umpiring techniques and ratings, goalkeeper training, experimental field hockey rules, and the code of rules for the game of hockey…

  13. Shoulder Range of Motion and Strength in Professional Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Randy M; Strauss, Eric J; Jazrawi, Laith M; Feldman, Andrew J

    2015-03-01

    Ice hockey is a fast paced sport with unique injury potential. There are no studies in the literature that examine the shoulder strength and range of motion in this population. Players on a single professional ice hockey team underwent a comprehensive examination of shoulder motion and strength. Shoulder motion and strength between right and left extremities were compared within athletes. Comparisons were made between right and left handed players, players that shoot right versus left handed, and by position. Within individual athletes, there was no difference in motion or strength between right and left shoulders. There was no difference in motion or strength between the dominant and non-dominant shoulder and players that shoot right versus left handed. Defensemen had a statistically significant increase in external rotation with the arm at the side for the left shoulder (66° versus 55°, p = 0.02) and a trend towards increased external rotation with the arm at the side for the right shoulder (65° versus 56°, p = 0.07). In professional ice hockey players, there is no difference in shoulder motion and strength between the right and left upper extremity. Ice hockey defensemen may have more external rotation with the arm at the side than forward. PMID:26516995

  14. Catastrophic pediatric sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Luckstead, Eugene F; Patel, Dilip R

    2002-06-01

    The high school sports of wrestling, gymnastics, ice hockey, baseball, track, and cheerleading should receive closer attention to prevent injury. Safer equipment and sport-specific conditioning should be provided and injuries strictly monitored. Greater attention must also be paid to swimming and diving techniques, and continued observation is needed for heat stroke and heat intolerance in sports such as football, wrestling, basketball, track and field, and cross-country. An increased awareness of commotio cordis in sports other than baseball should include ice hockey, football, track field events, and lacrosse. American football because of the sheer numbers and associated catastrophic injury potential must continue to be monitored at the highest medical levels!

  15. Epidemiology of children with head injury: a national overview

    PubMed Central

    Trefan, L; Houston, R; Pearson, G; Edwards, R; Hyde, P; Maconochie, I; Parslow, RC; Kemp, A

    2016-01-01

    Background The National Confidential Enquiry describes the epidemiology of children admitted to hospital with head injury. Method Children (<15 years old) who died or were admitted for >4 h with head injury were identified from 216 UK hospitals (1 September 2009 to 28 February 2010). Data were collected using standard proformas and entered on to a database. A descriptive analysis of the causal mechanisms, child demographics, neurological impairment, CT findings, and outcome at 72 h are provided. Results Details of 5700 children, median age 4 years (range 0–14.9 years), were analysed; 1093 (19.2%) were <1 year old, 3500 (61.4%) were boys. There was a significant association of head injury with social deprivation 39.7/100 000 (95% CI 37.0 to 42.6) in the least deprived first quintile vs. 55.1 (95% CI 52.1 to 58.2) in the most deprived fifth quintile (p<0.01). Twenty-four children died (0.4%). Most children were admitted for one night or less; 4522 (79%) had a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15 or were Alert (on AVPU (Alert, Voice, Pain, Unresponsive)). The most common causes of head injury were falls (3537 (62.1%); children <5 years), sports-related incidents (783 (13.7%); median age 12.4 years), or motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) (401 (7.1%); primary-school-aged children). CT scans were performed in 1734 (30.4%) children; 536 (30.9%) were abnormal (skull fracture and/or intracranial injury or abnormality): 269 (7.6%) were falls, 82 (10.5%) sports related and 100 (25%). A total of 357 (6.2%) children were referred to social care because of child protection concerns (median age 9 months (range 0–14.9 years)). Conclusions The data described highlight priorities for targeted age-specific head injury prevention and have the potential to provide a baseline to evaluate the effects of regional trauma networks (2012) and National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) head injury guidelines (2014), which were revised after the study was completed

  16. Knee joint position sense of roller hockey players: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Venâncio, João; Lopes, Diogo; Lourenço, Joaquim; Ribeiro, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to compare knee joint position sense of roller hockey players with an age-matched group of non-athletes. Forty-three male participants voluntarily participated in this cross-sectional study: 21 roller hockey players (mean age: 23.2 ± 4.2 years old, mean weight: 81.8 ± 9.8 kg, mean height: 180.5 ± 4.1 cm) and 22 age-matched non-athletes (mean age: 23.7 ± 3.9 years old, mean weight: 85.0 ± 6.2 kg, mean height: 181.5 ± 5.0 cm). Knee joint position sense of the dominant limb was evaluated using a technique of open-kinetic chain and active knee positioning. Joint position sense was reported using absolute, relative and variable angular errors. The main results indicated that the group of roller hockey players showed significantly lower absolute (2.4 ± 1.2º vs. 6.5 ± 3.2º, p ≤ 0.001) and relative (1.7 ± 2.1º vs. 5.8 ± 4.4º, p ≤ 0.001) angular errors in comparison with the non-athletes group. In conclusion, the results from this present study suggest that proprioceptive acuity, assessed by measuring joint position sense, is increased in roller hockey players. The enhanced proprioception of the roller hockey players could contribute to injury prevention and improved performance during sporting activities. PMID:27111126

  17. Hockey: Special Olympics Sports Skills Instructional Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Special Olympics, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Suggestions for coaching and teaching hockey skills to mentally retarded persons are presented in this guide, one of seven booklets on Special Olympics Sports Skills Instructional Programs. An introductory section presents an overview of the sport, information on the organization of the training session, and a list of goals, objectives, and…

  18. Update on the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Olson, Dana M; Olson, Brianna M; Greene, Jill Amanda; Gubler, K Dean; Winters, Kathryne L; Kelley, Angela R; Britt, L D; Long, William B

    2007-08-01

    The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986, as amended, established the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). The VICP went into effect on October 1, 1988 and is a Federal "no-fault" system designed to compensate individuals, or families of individuals, who have been injured by covered vaccines. From 1988 until July 2006, a total of 2531 non-autism/thimerosal and 5030 autism/thimerosal claims were made to the VICP. The compensation paid for the non-autism/thimerosal claims from 1988 until 2006 was $902,519,103.37 for 2542 awards. There was no compensation for any of the autism/thimerosal claims. On the basis of the deaths and extensive suffering to patients and families from the adverse reactions to vaccines, all physicians must provide detailed information in the Vaccine Information Statement to the patient or the parent or legal guardian of the child about the potential dangers of vaccines as well as the VICP.

  19. Reducing unintentional injuries on the nation's highways: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Schlundt, David; Warren, Rueben; Miller, Stephania

    2004-02-01

    Death and injury on the nation's highways is a public health crisis, especially for youth and members of selected minority groups. The objective of this paper is to review the literature on behavioral and environmental factors that increase risk for traffic morbidity and mortality in populations at high risk. Each of the following is a risky traffic-related behavior: not wearing seat belts, not using child safety seats, not wearing bicycle or motorcycle helmets, driving after drinking, driving while fatigued or distracted, speeding, running red lights, and aggressive driving. Environmental factors that modify risk include urban sprawl, highway design, public policy, racism and economic inequality. High risk groups include youths, males, pickup truck drivers, urban dwellers, the elderly, African Americans, American Indians, and Alaska Natives. A comprehensive approach must be developed for reducing traffic-related risk of death and injury, especially in high risk populations.

  20. National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program: Addition of Intussusception as Injury for Rotavirus Vaccines to the Vaccine Injury Table. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-06-23

    On July 24, 2013, the Secretary of Health and Human Services (the Secretary) published in the Federal Register a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) proposing changes to the regulations governing the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). Specifically, the Secretary proposed revisions to the Vaccine Injury Table (Table). The basis for this change is consistent with the Secretary's findings that intussusceptions can reasonably be determined in some circumstances to be caused by rotavirus vaccines. The Secretary is now making this amendment to the Table and to the Qualifications and Aids to Interpretation (QAI), described below under Background Information, as proposed in the NPRM. These regulations will apply only to petitions for compensation under the VICP filed after this final rule becomes effective.

  1. Predictors of Speed Using Off-Ice Measures of College Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Runner, Aaron R; Lehnhard, Robert A; Butterfield, Stephen A; Tu, Shihfen; OʼNeill, Terrence

    2016-06-01

    Runner, AR, Lehnhard, RA, Butterfield, SA, Tu, S, and O'Neill, T. Predictors of speed using off-ice measures of college hockey players. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1626-1632, 2016-The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between commonly employed dry-land performance tests and skating speed in male collegiate ice hockey players. Forty male National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I hockey players were tested on the following performance variables: vertical jump (VJ), standing broad jump, 40-yard dash, and maximal back squat (SQT). The subjects also performed 3 skating tests: the 90-ft forward acceleration test, the 90-ft backward acceleration test, and the 50-ft flying top speed test (F50). Pearson correlation coefficients were applied to compare the strength of association between each selected off-ice measure and each on-ice measure. Three multiple regression equations were then used to compare the weighted strengths of association between predictor and criterion variables. Only VJ showed significance in relation to skating speed (p = 0.011). These results suggest that meaningful performance testing in ice hockey players should occur mainly on the ice. PMID:25719922

  2. Diagnosis and Rehabilitation of a Middle Cuneiform Fracture in a Hockey Player.

    PubMed

    Hensley, Craig P; Dirschl, Douglas R

    2016-07-01

    Isolated cuneiform fractures are rare and are often missed on plain radiographs, leading to delayed diagnosis and delayed return to sport. The authors of this study present a 32-year-old male ice hockey player who sustained trauma to his dorsal midfoot from a slap shot. Radiographs were negative for fracture. After inability to wean out of the controlled ankle movement boot, magnetic resonance imaging was ordered, demonstrating a middle cuneiform fracture. The patient was seen in physical therapy, where aquatic therapy, strength training, and cardiovascular conditioning were progressed. He was able to wean out of the controlled ankle movement boot at 7 weeks after injury and return to playing ice hockey. Here, we outline rehabilitation and a diagnostic and rehabilitative algorithm for those who sustain trauma to the dorsal midfoot with suspected fracture. PMID:26945214

  3. Biomechanics of head impacts associated with diagnosed concussion in female collegiate ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Bethany J; Beckwith, Jonathan G; Greenwald, Richard M; Raukar, Neha P; Chu, Jeffrey J; McAllister, Thomas W; Flashman, Laura A; Maerlender, Arthur C; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Crisco, Joseph J

    2015-07-16

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that female athletes may be at a greater risk of concussion than their male counterparts. The purpose of this study was to examine the biomechanics of head impacts associated with diagnosed concussions in a cohort of female collegiate ice hockey players. Instrumented helmets were worn by 58 female ice hockey players from 2 NCAA programs over a three year period. Kinematic measures of single impacts associated with diagnosed concussion and head impact exposure on days with and without diagnosed concussion were evaluated. Nine concussions were diagnosed. Head impact exposure was greater in frequency and magnitude on days of diagnosed concussions than on days without diagnosed concussion for individual athletes. Peak linear accelerations of head impacts associated with diagnosed concussion in this study are substantially lower than those previously reported in male athletes, while peak rotational accelerations are comparable. Further research is warranted to determine the extent to which female athletes' biomechanical tolerance to concussion injuries differs from males.

  4. Biomechanics of Head Impacts Associated with Diagnosed Concussion in Female Collegiate Ice Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Bethany J.; Beckwith, Jonathan G.; Greenwald, Richard M.; Raukar, Neha P.; Chu, Jeffrey J.; McAllister, Thomas W.; Flashman, Laura A.; Maerlender, Arthur C.; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Crisco, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that female athletes may be at a greater risk of concussion than their male counterparts. The purpose of this study was to examine the biomechanics of head impacts associated with diagnosed concussions in a cohort of female collegiate ice hockey players. Instrumented helmets were worn by 58 female ice hockey players from 2 NCAA programs over a three year period. Kinematic measures of single impacts associated with diagnosed concussion and head impact exposure on days with and without diagnosed concussion were evaluated. Nine concussions were diagnosed. Head impact exposure was greater in frequency and magnitude on days of diagnosed concussions than on days without diagnosed concussion for individual athletes. Peak linear acceleration of head impacts associated with diagnosed concussion in this study are substantially lower than those previously reported in male athletes, while peak rotational accelerations are comparable. Further research is warranted to determine the extent to which female athletes’ biomechanical tolerance to concussion injuries differs from males. PMID:25913243

  5. Psychosocial Outcomes of Sport Concussions in Youth Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Mrazik, Martin; Brooks, Brian L; Jubinville, Andrea; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Emery, Carolyn A

    2016-06-01

    The objective is to evaluate the psychological outcomes arising from sport concussions. Participants included AA and AAA level Bantam and Midget hockey players (n = 672) between 12 and 17 years of age (mean = 15.0 years; SD = 1.2) enrolled in a large cohort study. All participants completed baseline tests including the Behavior Assessment System for Children, 2nd Edition (BASC2) and a pre-season medical questionnaire (PSQ) completed by parents that included a retrospective report of prior concussions and injuries. Players were assigned to 4 groups: no injury (NONE), concussion (CO) and musculoskeletal (MSK) injuries or both (COMB). Participants in the CO and COMB groups demonstrated significantly higher rates of psychological difficulties compared with other groups [F(63, 1800) = 1.43, p = .016, partial η(2) = 0.05) and on select clinical scales measuring atypicality, locus of control, anxiety, depression, sense of inadequacy, somatization, and attention. In addition, results from the composite clinical scales reached statistical significance for internalizing problems and emotional symptom index. Effect sizes were minimal with the exception of comparisons between the NONE and COMB groups where effect sizes were medium to large. Proportions above clinical cut-off scores set by the BASC2 were higher for the COMB group compared with CO, MSK, or NONE groups. Results suggest smaller percentage of youth may be more prone to psychological sequelae following concussion. PMID:27084731

  6. National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program: revisions to the vaccine injury table. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2011-06-22

    On September 13, 2010, the Secretary of Health and Human Services (the Secretary) published in the Federal Register a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) proposing changes to the regulations governing the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). Specifically, the Secretary proposed revisions to the Vaccine Injury Table (Table) to create distinct listings for hepatitis A, trivalent influenza, meningococcal, and human papillomavirus vaccines. The Secretary is now making this amendment to the Table by final rule; it is technical in nature. The four categories of vaccines described in this final rule are already covered vaccines under the VICP (starting in 2004) and are currently listed in a placeholder category (box XIII) in the Table. This final rule will list these vaccines as separate categories on the Table, with no associated injuries noted at this time, in order to help the public identify clearly that these vaccines are covered by the VICP. The changes implemented here are authorized by section 2114(e) of the Public Health Service Act (the Act). PMID:21696014

  7. Lower Back Injuries in Rowing National Level Compared to International Level Rowers

    PubMed Central

    Verrall, Geoffrey; Darcey, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background: Rowing injuries are common, with lower back injuries having the highest incidence. Objectives: This study was to investigate the major rowing injuries seen at a single high performance rowing sports program over a 5 years training period and establish if any relationship exists between these injuries and the level of competition that the rower is partaking in. Patients and Methods: All rowers at the South Australian Sports Institute (SASI) programs were designated as being either international or national level rowers. Injuries that caused greater than 5 days training loss during any one training year were recorded. The number of lower back injuries and rib stress injuries causing training time loss were analysed to assess whether there was any association between the level of rower and the nature and type of injury causing training time loss. Results: Forty-five national rowers (97 training years) had 15 lower back injuries compared to 12 international rowers 35 training years) with 1 lower back injury. Thus a national level rower was more likely to have a lower back injury compared to an international rower P = 0.05. In contrast an international level was more likely to have a rib stress fracture compared to a national rower P = 0.04. 21% of all injuries in this study were a consequence of cycling injuries. Conclusions: Lower back injuries are a significant cause of training time lost in rowers. These injuries are much more likely to occur in national level rowers when compared to international level rowers. In contrast rib stress injuries are associated with international compared to national level rowers. PMID:25741422

  8. Work-Related Injury Surveillance in Vietnam: A National Reporting System Model

    PubMed Central

    Marucci-Wellman, Helen; Wegman, David H.; Leamon, Tom B.; Tuyet Binh, Ta Thi; Diep, Nguyen Bich; Kriebel, David

    2013-01-01

    Developing nations bear a substantial portion of the global burden of injury. Public health surveillance models in developing countries should recognize injury risks for all levels of society and all causes and should incorporate various groups of workers and industries, including subsistence agriculture. However, many developing nations do not have an injury registration system; current data collection methods result in gross national undercounts of injuries, failing to distinguish injuries that occur during work. In 2006, we established an active surveillance system in Vietnam’s Xuan Tien commune and investigated potential methods for surveillance of work-related injuries. On the basis of our findings, we recommend a national model for work-related injury surveillance in Vietnam that builds on the existing health surveillance system. PMID:24028255

  9. Work-related injury surveillance in Vietnam: a national reporting system model.

    PubMed

    Marucci-Wellman, Helen; Wegman, David H; Leamon, Tom B; Binh, Ta Thi Tuyet; Diep, Nguyen Bich; Kriebel, David

    2013-11-01

    Developing nations bear a substantial portion of the global burden of injury. Public health surveillance models in developing countries should recognize injury risks for all levels of society and all causes and should incorporate various groups of workers and industries, including subsistence agriculture. However, many developing nations do not have an injury registration system; current data collection methods result in gross national undercounts of injuries, failing to distinguish injuries that occur during work. In 2006, we established an active surveillance system in Vietnam's Xuan Tien commune and investigated potential methods for surveillance of work-related injuries. On the basis of our findings, we recommend a national model for work-related injury surveillance in Vietnam that builds on the existing health surveillance system.

  10. Hockey sticks, principal components, and spurious significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Stephen; McKitrick, Ross

    2005-02-01

    The ``hockey stick'' shaped temperature reconstruction of Mann et al. (1998, 1999) has been widely applied. However it has not been previously noted in print that, prior to their principal components (PCs) analysis on tree ring networks, they carried out an unusual data transformation which strongly affects the resulting PCs. Their method, when tested on persistent red noise, nearly always produces a hockey stick shaped first principal component (PC1) and overstates the first eigenvalue. In the controversial 15th century period, the MBH98 method effectively selects only one species (bristlecone pine) into the critical North American PC1, making it implausible to describe it as the ``dominant pattern of variance''. Through Monte Carlo analysis, we show that MBH98 benchmarks for significance of the Reduction of Error (RE) statistic are substantially under-stated and, using a range of cross-validation statistics, we show that the MBH98 15th century reconstruction lacks statistical significance.

  11. Hockey-stick steam generator for LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Hallinan, G.J.; Svedlund, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents the criteria and evaluation leading to the selection of the Hockey Stick Steam Generator Concept and subsequent development of that concept for LMFBR application. The selection process and development of the Modular Steam Generator (MSG) is discussed, including the extensive test programs that culminated in the manufacture and test of a 35 MW(t) Steam Generator. The design of the CRBRP Steam Generator is described, emphasizing the current status and a review of the critical structural areas. CRBRP steam generator development tests are evaluated, with a discussion of test objectives and rating of the usefulness of test results to the CRBRP prototype design. Manufacturing experience and status of the CRBRP prototype and plant units is covered. The scaleup of the Hockey Stick concept to large commercial plant application is presented, with an evaluation of scaleup limitations, transient effects, and system design implications.

  12. Catastrophic spine injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Boden, Barry P; Prior, Chris

    2005-02-01

    Catastrophic spine injuries in sports are rare but tragic events. The sports with the highest risk of catastrophic spinal injuries are football, ice hockey, wrestling, diving, skiing and snowboarding, rugby, cheerleading, and baseball. A common mechanism of injury for all at-risk sports is an axial compression force to the top of the head with the neck slightly flexed. We review common mechanisms of injury and prevention strategies for spine injuries in the at-risk sports.

  13. 76 FR 77537 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the Federal..., National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

  14. Descriptive Epidemiology of Musculoskeletal Injuries and Concussions in the National Football League, 2012-2014

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, David W.; Hutchison, Michael G.; Comper, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background: The risk of all-cause injury and concussion associated with football is significant. The National Football League (NFL) has implemented changes to increase player safety warranting investigation into the incidence and patterns of injury. Purpose: To document the incidence and patterns of all-cause injury and concussions in the NFL. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Injury data were collected prospectively from official NFL injury reports over 2 regular seasons from 2012 to 2014, with identification of injury incidence rates and patterns. Concussion rate ratios were calculated using previously reported NFL rates. Results: A total of 4284 injuries were identified, including 301 concussions. The all-cause injury rate was 395.8 per 1000 athletes at risk (AAR) and concussion incidence was 27.8 per 1000 AAR. Only 2.3% of team games were injury free. Wide receivers, tight ends, and defensive backs had the highest incidence of injury and concussion. Concussion incidence was 1.61-fold higher in 2012 to 2014 compared with 2002 to 2007. The knee was injured most frequently, followed by the ankle, hamstring, shoulder, and head. Conclusion: The incidence of all-cause injury and concussion in the NFL is significant. Concussion injury rates are higher than previous reports, potentially reflecting an improvement in recognition and awareness. Injury prevention efforts should continue to reduce the prevalence of injury associated with football. PMID:26675321

  15. Injury prevention in youth sports.

    PubMed

    Veigel, Jake D; Pleacher, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Sport is the principal cause of injury in children and adolescents. Youth participation in organized athletics is estimated to be 45 million in the United States alone. These injuries influence health and fitness and have socioeconomic impact. Many injuries can be prevented. This article outlines the efficacy of current injury prevention strategies in youth sports through the use of educational programs, rule changes in baseball and hockey, safety equipment, and conditioning programs.

  16. Injury prevention in youth sports.

    PubMed

    Veigel, Jake D; Pleacher, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Sport is the principal cause of injury in children and adolescents. Youth participation in organized athletics is estimated to be 45 million in the United States alone. These injuries influence health and fitness and have socioeconomic impact. Many injuries can be prevented. This article outlines the efficacy of current injury prevention strategies in youth sports through the use of educational programs, rule changes in baseball and hockey, safety equipment, and conditioning programs. PMID:19005358

  17. Notes from the Field: Injuries Associated with Bison Encounters - Yellowstone National Park, 2015.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Cara; Leong, Kirsten; Wallen, Rick; Buttke, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Since 1980, bison have injured more pedestrian visitors to Yellowstone National Park (Yellowstone) than any other animal (1). After the occurrence of 33 bison-related injuries during 1983-1985 (range = 10-13/year), the park implemented successful outreach campaigns (1) to reduce the average number of injuries to 0.8/year (range = 0-2/year) during 2010-2014 (unpublished data, National Park Service, September 2015). During May-July 2015, five injuries associated with bison encounters occurred (Table). Case reports were reviewed to evaluate circumstances surrounding these injuries to inform prevention. PMID:27010506

  18. Notes from the Field: Injuries Associated with Bison Encounters - Yellowstone National Park, 2015.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Cara; Leong, Kirsten; Wallen, Rick; Buttke, Danielle

    2016-03-25

    Since 1980, bison have injured more pedestrian visitors to Yellowstone National Park (Yellowstone) than any other animal (1). After the occurrence of 33 bison-related injuries during 1983-1985 (range = 10-13/year), the park implemented successful outreach campaigns (1) to reduce the average number of injuries to 0.8/year (range = 0-2/year) during 2010-2014 (unpublished data, National Park Service, September 2015). During May-July 2015, five injuries associated with bison encounters occurred (Table). Case reports were reviewed to evaluate circumstances surrounding these injuries to inform prevention.

  19. Prevention of pediatric sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Demorest, Rebecca A; Landry, Gregory L

    2003-12-01

    With over 30 million children participating in sports each year across the United States, a number of significant injuries are to be expected. Although mild injuries such as strains, sprains, and contusions predominate, catastrophic injuries do occur. Young athletes are at an increased risk for growth plate and apophyseal injuries, overuse injuries, and heat illness. Many of these sports injuries can be prevented. Prevention strategies include protective equipment, rule changes, preseason and season prevention interventions, safety measures, better coaching, education, and a societal awareness of injury and prevention. This article discusses current injury prevention for children participating in baseball, football, soccer, and ice hockey.

  20. 2006 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2008-03-06

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  1. 2007 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2008-07-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  2. 2010 Idaho National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-09-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  3. 2010 Sandia National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-10-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  4. 2010 Argonne National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-06-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  5. 2007 Idaho National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety, and Security

    2009-05-04

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  6. 2010 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-08-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  7. Isolated scapula fracture: Ice hockey player without trauma

    PubMed Central

    Memişoğlu, Serdar; Yılmaz, Barış; Aktaş, Erdem; Kömür, Baran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Scapular fractures are generally occur from in high-energy traumas and are associated with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. Presentation of case We present an unusual scapular fracture that occurred with a rare mechanism. A 23-year-old male patient who led an active sports life for 10 years and played ice hockey for the last 5 years. In a competition, he felt a sudden pain in his right scapula after hit the puck. He did not experience any direct trauma to his shoulder and there was no evidence of any pathological fracture. The fracture was isolated in the scapular body and it was classified as type 4, according to Hardegger classification. The was patient immobilized with a Velpau bandage for three weeks and then treated with physiotherapy for shoulder rehabilitation. Discussion The fracture mechanism was likely a disharmonius contracture of the agonist and antagonist muscles of the shoulder joint while hitting the puck. Conclusion Scapular fractures are generally seen along with other injuries, but in this case we wanted to emphasize that care has to been taken to diagnose an isolated scapular fracture while assessing shoulder pain. PMID:26587232

  8. 2003 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-05-23

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Idaho National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  9. On the relationship between upper-body strength, power, and sprint performance in ice sledge hockey.

    PubMed

    Skovereng, Knut; Ettema, Gertjan; Welde, Boye; Sandbakk, Øyvind

    2013-12-01

    Ice sledge hockey is a popular paralympic team sport where players rely entirely on their upper body to propel themselves rapidly across the ice surface. The isolated and repetitive poling movements provide a good model for examining upper-body sprint ability and the related movement and strength characteristics. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between upper-body maximal strength, power, and sprint performance in ice sledge hockey. Thirteen male ice sledge hockey players from the Norwegian national team performed three 30-m maximal sprint tests recorded by fixed light sensors. The best 30-m time for each subject was used for further analyses, and the sprint was analyzed more in detail for the first and last 10-m split times and kinematics (cycle length and rate) using photocells and 2-dimensional video analysis. One repetition maximum (1RM) strength and peak power were assessed in the bench press, bench pull, and pull-down exercises using a barbell and a linear encoder. Both 1RM strength and peak power for all the 3 strength exercises correlated significantly with the total sprint time (-0.75 < r < - 0.86, all p < 0.005), the first (0.60 < r < 0.72, all p < 0.05), and the last (0.74 < r < 0.83, all p < 0.05) 10-m split times in the 30-m sprint test. There were no significant relationships between sprint kinematics and 1RM strength and peak power. Overall, these results demonstrate that there are close relationships between upper-body strength, power, and sprint performance in highly trained athletes and that the ability to produce propulsion and high frequency in combination is important for the sprint abilities in ice sledge hockey.

  10. National survey of the injury prevention activities of children's centres

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Michael C; Mulvaney, Caroline A; Kendrick, Denise; Stewart, Jane; Coupland, Carol; Hayes, Mike; Wynn, Persephone

    2014-01-01

    Children's centres were established across England to provide a range of services including early education, social care and health to pre-school children and their families. We surveyed children's centres to ascertain the activities they were undertaking to prevent unintentional injuries in the under fives. A postal questionnaire was sent to a sample of children's centre managers (n = 694). It included questions on current activities, knowledge and attitudes to injury prevention, health priorities and partnership working. Responses were received from 384 (56%) children's centres. Overall, 58% considered unintentional injury prevention to be one of the three main child health priorities for their centre. Over half the respondents (59%) did not know if there was an injury prevention group in their area, and 21% did not know if there was a home safety equipment scheme. Knowledge of how child injury deaths occur in the home was poor. Only 11% knew the major cause of injury deaths in children under five. Lack of both staff time and funding were seen as important barriers by children's centre staff to undertake injury prevention activities. Nearly all stated that training (97%) and assistance with planning injury prevention (94%) would be helpful to their centres. Children's centres need further support if they are to effectively tackle this important public health area. PMID:23837887

  11. Effect of heat exposure on thermoregulation and hockey-specific response time in field hockey goalkeepers.

    PubMed

    Malan, Marcelle; Dawson, Brian; Goodman, Carmel; Peeling, Peter

    2010-05-01

    This study examined the thermoregulatory responses in field hockey goalkeepers during games (Part A), and assessed the effect of heat stress on hockey-specific response time (Part B). In Part A, core temperature (T(c)), skin temperature (T(sk)), body mass, fluid consumption and heart rate (HR) responses of six goalkeepers during two premier level club games in the Western Australian (winter) hockey season were recorded. Part B assessed the same measures, plus a response time test on four goalkeepers playing a simulated game inside a climate chamber in cool (COOL: 20 degrees C, 40% RH) and hot (HOT: 35 degrees C, 40% RH) conditions. In Part A, the mean (+/-SD) T(c) and T(sk) measured in games was 38.49+/-0.20 degrees C and 34.99+/-0.99 degrees C, with increases from baseline of 1.34+/-0.19 degrees C and 1.08+/-0.30 degrees C, respectively. Most of the increase in T(c) resulted from the pre-game warm-up. In Part B, T(c) and T(sk) only increased significantly (p<0.05) from baseline in the HOT condition (0.62+/-0.18 degrees C and 1.61+/-0.82 degrees C, respectively). Response time was significantly slower (0.87+/-0.14s, p<0.01) after heat exposure, compared to COOL (0.75+/-0.15s), but the number of correct responses was not affected. For optimal performance, careful attention should be given to strategies to limit T(c) increases in field hockey goalkeepers during matches.

  12. Towards an electronic national injury surveillance system in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, F; Hussain, S A; Mandil, A; Alamro, N

    2015-02-01

    Given the need for a uniform, comprehensive, electronic nationwide surveillance system for injuries in Saudi Arabia, a system was designed with the objectives of establishing an epidemiologic profile of injuries in the country; evaluating injury indicators on an ongoing basis; identifying high-risk groups requiring specific interventions; monitoring and evaluating interventions for effectiveness; and producing reports to assist in planning and resource allocation. A special form for this purpose was designed, modified from validated forms used elsewhere for injury surveillance. This initiative of the Ministry of Health is also expected to help validate data collected by other sectors, such as the Ministry of Interior. This paper reviews the milestones of building the system and aims to prompt a debate within the scientific community, especially within the Eastern Mediterranean Region, about the best way to design injury surveillance systems for the Region in order to fine-tune the proposed system before its full-scale implementation. PMID:25876826

  13. The National Head Injury Foundation: Eight Years of Challenge and Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Gerald W.

    1988-01-01

    The National Head Injury Foundation was established to address financial and personal issues involved with brain injury. The Foundation's action agenda emphasizes prevention, public awareness, public policy, public attitudes, social-political action, professional growth, information/referral, guidance on research needs, and a forum for diverse…

  14. The national burden of road traffic injuries in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study quantifies the burden of road traffic injuries (RTIs) in Thailand in 2004, incorporating new Thai data on mortality and the frequency and severity of long-term disability. Methods We quantified the uncertainty around national RTI mortality estimates based on a verbal autopsy study that was conducted to correct for the large proportion of ill-defined deaths in the vital registration system. The number of nonfatal RTI victims was estimated using hospital and survey data. We used the proportion and severity of long-term disabilities from a recent Thai study, instead of the standard Global Burden of Disease assumptions, to calculate the burden due to long-term disability. To evaluate changes over time, we also calculated the burden of RTIs in 2004 using the method and assumptions used in 1999, when standard Global Burden of Disease assumptions were used. Results The total loss of disability-adjusted life years due to RTIs was 673,000 (95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 546,000-881,000). Mortality contributed 88% of this burden. The use of local data led to a significantly higher estimate of the burden of long-term disability due to RTIs (74,000 DALYs [95% UI: 55,400-88,500] vs. 43,000 [UI: 42,700-43,600]) using standard Global Burden of Disease methods. However, this difference constituted only a small proportion of the total burden. Conclusions The burden of RTIs in 2004 remained at the same high level as in 1999. The use of local data on the long-term health consequences of RTIs enabled an estimate of this burden and its uncertainty that is likely to be more valid. PMID:21244666

  15. 75 FR 52356 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel: National Human...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel: National Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Behavioral Surveillance... Disease Registry. Dated: August 18, 2010. Elaine L. Baker, Director, Management Analysis and...

  16. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Environmental Cold Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Cappaert, Thomas A; Stone, Jennifer A; Castellani, John W; Krause, Bentley Andrew; Smith, Daniel; Stephens, Bradford A

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To present recommendations for the prevention, recognition, and treatment of environmental cold injuries. Background: Individuals engaged in sport-related or work-related physical activity in cold, wet, or windy conditions are at risk for environmental cold injuries. An understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology, risk management, recognition, and immediate care of environmental cold injuries is an essential skill for certified athletic trainers and other health care providers working with individuals at risk. Recommendations: These recommendations are intended to provide certified athletic trainers and others participating in athletic health care with the specific knowledge and problem-solving skills needed to address environmental cold injuries. Each recommendation has been graded (A, B, or C) according to the Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy criterion scale. PMID:19030143

  17. 2008 Sandia National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2009-09-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  18. 2009 Argonne National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2010-08-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  19. 2009 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2010-11-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  20. 2007 Sandia National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2009-02-04

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  1. 2008 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2009-12-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  2. 2008 Idaho National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2010-11-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  3. Incidence and Characteristics of Injuries during the 2010 FELDA/FAM National Futsal League in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    A. Hamid, Mohamad Shariff; Jaafar, Zulkarnain; Mohd Ali, Azril Syazwan

    2014-01-01

    Objective In Malaysia, futsal is a popular sport played by individuals across all ages and genders. Despite its popularity, information on futsal related injury in Malaysia is not available. The purpose of this study is to examine the injury incidence and injury patterns among amateur men and women futsal players in Malaysia. Methods Players reported injury to the tournament medical team during the FELDA/FAM National Futsal League 2010 were interviewed and assessed by a Sports Medicine registrar. Player's socio-demographic profiles and information about the injury were documented in the injury report form adapted from medical report form used by FIFA: Medical Assessment and Research Centre (F-Marc). Results A total of 86 injuries were reported from 141 matches, equivalent to an incidence of 91.5 injuries per 1000 player hours (95% CI 72.2 to 110.8), or 61.0 injuries per 1000 player matches (95% CI 48.1 to 73.9). Most were minor injuries resulted from contact with another player. Injuries often involved the lower extremity (44%) followed by the trunk (14%) and the upper limb (13%). Ankle (n = 7; 39%) and knee (n = 6; 33%) sprains were the most prevalent diagnoses of time-loss injuries. A significant association between time-loss and type of injury was found χ2 (1,N = 86) = 3.99, p = 0.04. In addition, time-loss injury was significantly associated with playing surface χ2 (1,N = 86) = 10.11, p = 0.018. Conclusion The injury rate during the FELDA/FAM National Amateur Futsal Men's League in Malaysia was lower compared with previous Futsal World Cups competition. Most injuries resulted from contact with another player were minor and did not lead to time-loss from participation. Time-loss injury was significantly associated with type of injury and playing surface. PMID:24733140

  4. Epidemiology of National Collegiate Athletic Association Women's Gymnastics Injuries, 2009–2010 Through 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Zachary Y.; Hayden, Ross; Barr, Megan; Klossner, David A.; Dompier, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Context Recent injury-surveillance data for collegiate-level women's gymnastics are limited. In addition, researchers have not captured non–time-loss injuries (ie, injuries resulting in restriction of participation <1 day). Objective To describe the epidemiology of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) women's gymnastics injuries during the 2009–2010 through 2013–2014 academic years. Design Descriptive epidemiology study. Setting Aggregate injury and exposure data collected from 11 women's gymnastics programs providing 28 seasons of data. Patients or Other Participants Collegiate student-athletes participating in women's gymnastics during the 2009–2010 through 2013–2014 academic years. Intervention(s) Women's gymnastics data from the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program (ISP) during the 2009–2010 through 2013–2014 academic years were analyzed. Main Outcome Measure(s) Injury rates; injury rate ratios; injury proportions by body site, diagnosis, and apparatus; and injury proportion ratios were reported with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results The ISP captured 418 women's gymnastics injuries, a rate of 9.22/1000 athlete-exposures (AEs; 95% CI = 8.33, 10.10). The competition injury rate (14.49/1000 AEs) was 1.67 times the practice injury rate (8.69/1000 AEs; 95% CI = 1.27, 2.19). When considering time-loss injuries only, the injury rate during this study period (3.62/1000 AEs) was lower than rates reported in earlier NCAA ISP surveillance data. Commonly injured body sites were the ankle (17.9%, n = 75), lower leg/Achilles tendon (13.6%, n = 57), trunk (13.4%, n = 56), and foot (12.4%, n = 52). Common diagnoses were ligament sprain (20.3%, n = 85) and muscle/tendon strain (18.7%, n = 78). Overall, 12.4% (n = 52) of injuries resulted in time loss of more than 3 weeks. Of the 291 injuries reported while a student-athlete used an apparatus (69.6%), most occurred during the floor exercise (41.9%, n = 122) and on the uneven bars (28.2%, n = 82

  5. Descriptive Epidemiology of Collegiate Men's Baseball Injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988–1989 Through 2003–2004

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Randall; Sauers, Eric L; Agel, Julie; Keuter, Greg; Marshall, Stephen W; McCarty, Kenneth; McFarland, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review 16 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) injury surveillance data for men's baseball and identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. Background: Prevention and management of collegiate baseball injuries may be facilitated through injury research aimed at defining the nature of injuries inherent in the sport. Through the NCAA Injury Surveillance System, 16 years of collegiate baseball data were collected for the academic years 1988–1989 through 2003–2004. Main Results: College baseball has a relatively low rate of injury compared with other NCAA sports, but 25% of injuries are severe and result in 10+ days of time loss from participation. The rate of injury was 3 times higher in a game situation than in practice (5.78 versus 1.85 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures [A-Es], rate ratio = 3.1, 95% confidence interval = 3.0, 3.3, P < .01). Practice injury rates were almost twice as high in the preseason as in the regular season (2.97 versus 1.58 per 1000 A-Es, rate ratio = 1.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.8, 2.0, P < .01). A total of 10% of all game injuries occurred from impact with a batted ball, an injury rate of 0.56 injuries per 1000 game A-Es. Sliding was involved in 13% of game injuries. Recommendations: Proper preseason conditioning is important to reduce injuries. Athletic trainers covering practices and games should be prepared to deal with serious, life-threatening injuries from batted balls and other injury mechanisms. Further study of batted-ball injuries is warranted, and the use of breakaway bases to prevent sliding injuries should be supported in college baseball. PMID:17710166

  6. Insurance claims data: a possible solution for a national sports injury surveillance system? An evaluation of data information against ASIDD and consensus statements on sports injury surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Åman, Malin; Forssblad, Magnus; Henriksson-Larsén, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Background Before preventive actions can be suggested for sports injuries at the national level, a solid surveillance system is required in order to study their epidemiology, risk factors and mechanisms. There are guidelines for sports injury data collection and classifications in the literature for that purpose. In Sweden, 90% of all athletes (57/70 sports federations) are insured with the same insurance company and data from their database could be a foundation for studies on acute sports injuries at the national level. Objective To evaluate the usefulness of sports injury insurance claims data in sports injury surveillance at the national level. Method A database with 27 947 injuries was exported to an Excel file. Access to the corresponding text files was also obtained. Data were reviewed on available information, missing information and dropouts. Comparison with ASIDD (Australian Sports Injury Data Dictionary) and existing consensus statements in the literature (football (soccer), rugby union, tennis, cricket and thoroughbred horse racing) was performed in a structured manner. Result Comparison with ASIDD showed that 93% of the suggested data items were present in the database to at least some extent. Compliance with the consensus statements was generally high (13/18). Almost all claims (83%) contained text information concerning the injury. Conclusions Relatively high-quality sports injury data can be obtained from a specific insurance company at the national level in Sweden. The database has the potential to be a solid base for research on acute sports injuries in different sports at the national level. PMID:24928588

  7. Catastrophic pediatric sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Luckstead, Eugene F; Patel, Dilip R

    2002-06-01

    The high school sports of wrestling, gymnastics, ice hockey, baseball, track, and cheerleading should receive closer attention to prevent injury. Safer equipment and sport-specific conditioning should be provided and injuries strictly monitored. Greater attention must also be paid to swimming and diving techniques, and continued observation is needed for heat stroke and heat intolerance in sports such as football, wrestling, basketball, track and field, and cross-country. An increased awareness of commotio cordis in sports other than baseball should include ice hockey, football, track field events, and lacrosse. American football because of the sheer numbers and associated catastrophic injury potential must continue to be monitored at the highest medical levels! PMID:12119866

  8. Game intensity analysis of elite adolescent ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Stanula, Arkadiusz; Roczniok, Robert

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine ice-hockey players' playing intensity based on their heart rates (HRs) recorded during a game and on the outcomes of an incremental maximum oxygen uptake test. Twenty ice-hockey players, members of the Polish junior national team (U18), performed an incremental test to assess their maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max) in the two week's period preceding 5 games they played at the World Championships. Players' HRs at the first and second ventilatory thresholds obtained during the test were utilized to determine intensity zones (low, moderate, and high) that were subsequently used to classify HR values recorded during each of the games. For individual intensity zones, the following HRs expressed as mean values and as percentages of the maximal heart rate (HRmax) were obtained: forwards 148-158 b·min(-1) (79.5-84.8% HRmax), 159-178 b·min(-1) (85.4-95.6% HRmax), 179-186 b·min(-1) (96.1-100.0% HRmax); defensemen 149-153 b·min(-1) (80.0-82.1% HRmax), 154-175 b·min(-1) (82.6-94.0% HRmax), 176-186 b·min(-1) (94.5-100.0% HRmax). The amount of time the forwards and defensemen spent in the three intensity zones expressed as percentages of the total time of the game were: 54.91 vs. 55.62% (low), 26.40 vs. 22.38% (moderate) and 18.68 vs. 22.00% (high). The forwards spent more time in the low intensity zone than the defensemen, however, the difference was not statistically significant. The results of the study indicate that using aerobic and anaerobic metabolism variables to determine intensity zones can significantly improve the reliability of evaluation of the physiological demands of the game, and can be a useful tool for coaches in managing the training process. PMID:25713682

  9. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in National Football League Athletes From 2010 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Christopher C.; Secrist, Eric S.; Bhat, Suneel B.; Woods, Daniel P.; Deluca, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a high incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries among National Football League (NFL) athletes; however, the incidence of reinjury in this population is unknown. Purpose: This retrospective epidemiological study analyzed all publicly disclosed ACL tears occurring in NFL players between 2010 and 2013 to characterize injury trends and determine the incidence of reinjury. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Methods: A comprehensive online search identified any NFL player who had suffered an ACL injury from 2010 to 2013. Position, playing surface, activity, and date were recorded. Each player was researched for any history of previous ACL injury. The NFL games database from USA Today was used to determine the incidence of ACL injuries on artificial turf and grass fields. Databases from Pro Football Focus and Pro Football Reference were used to determine the injury rate for each position. Results: NFL players suffered 219 ACL injuries between 2010 and 2013. Forty players (18.3%) had a history of previous ACL injury, with 27 (12.3%) retears and 16 (7.3%) tears contralateral to a previous ACL injury. Five players (2.28%) suffered their third ACL tear. Receivers (wide receivers and tight ends) and backs (linebackers, fullbacks, and halfbacks) had significantly greater injury risk than the rest of the NFL players, while perimeter linemen (defensive ends and offensive tackles) had significantly lower injury risk than the rest of the players. Interior linemen (offensive guards, centers, and defensive tackles) had significantly greater injury risk compared with perimeter linemen. ACL injury rates per team games played were 0.050 for grass and 0.053 for turf fields (P > .05). Conclusion: In this retrospective epidemiological study of ACL tears in NFL players, retears and ACL tears contralateral to a previously torn ACL constituted a substantial portion (18.3%) of total ACL injuries. The significant majority of ACL injuries in

  10. Testosterone, cortisol and anxiety in elite field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Raúl; Jiménez, Manuel; Alvero-Cruz, José R

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the change in the levels of testosterone and cortisol after victory and defeat in male field hockey players during an important tournament. In the beginning of the game series, the players were ranked very closely to achieve (for the first time) the championship rising to The Honor Division-A, the highest status national category. The first game resulted in a 7-4 victory, the second game resulted in a 6-1 victory, and the third game resulted in a 1-2 defeat. As expected, there were changes in testosterone levels after the competition, dropping in the game which ended in defeat, and rising slightly in the two games which ended in victory; there were also changes in cortisol levels, rising in the game which ended in defeat, and showing no variations in the games which ended in victory; correlational analyses congruently showed that defeat led to rises in cortisol whereas victory led to rises in testosterone; anticipatory somatic anxiety was related to cortisol levels prior to games, and physical exertion during competition was related to the change in testosterone levels (suggesting an inhibitory effect) but not to the change in cortisol levels. Hence, this pattern of hormonal responses to a real-life dominance challenge complied with Mazur's (1985) [16] biosocial model of status and dominance motivation, by showing that testosterone and cortisol are linked to victory and defeat in a theoretically predictable fashion.

  11. Automatic acquisition of motion trajectories: tracking hockey players

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuma, Kenji; Little, James J.; Lowe, David

    2003-12-01

    Computer systems that have the capability of analyzing complex and dynamic scenes play an essential role in video annotation. Scenes can be complex in such a way that there are many cluttered objects with different colors, shapes and sizes, and can be dynamic with multiple interacting moving objects and a constantly changing background. In reality, there are many scenes that are complex, dynamic, and challenging enough for computers to describe. These scenes include games of sports, air traffic, car traffic, street intersections, and cloud transformations. Our research is about the challenge of inventing a descriptive computer system that analyzes scenes of hockey games where multiple moving players interact with each other on a constantly moving background due to camera motions. Ultimately, such a computer system should be able to acquire reliable data by extracting the players" motion as their trajectories, querying them by analyzing the descriptive information of data, and predict the motions of some hockey players based on the result of the query. Among these three major aspects of the system, we primarily focus on visual information of the scenes, that is, how to automatically acquire motion trajectories of hockey players from video. More accurately, we automatically analyze the hockey scenes by estimating parameters (i.e., pan, tilt, and zoom) of the broadcast cameras, tracking hockey players in those scenes, and constructing a visual description of the data by displaying trajectories of those players. Many technical problems in vision such as fast and unpredictable players' motions and rapid camera motions make our challenge worth tackling. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been any automatic video annotation systems for hockey developed in the past. Although there are many obstacles to overcome, our efforts and accomplishments would hopefully establish the infrastructure of the automatic hockey annotation system and become a milestone for

  12. Firework injuries presenting to a national burn's unit.

    PubMed

    Jones, D; Lee, W; Rea, S; Donnell, M O; Eadie, P A

    2004-09-01

    The sale to the general public of fireworks is illegal in Ireland. However, many fireworks are readily available on the black market from illegal traders. The number of firework injuries presenting to our unit during the three week run-up to Hallowe'en October 2001 was recorded. In addition, each patient was contacted to determine how the fireworks were obtained, the average amount of money spent, and the level of adult supervision present at the time of injury. A total of 19 patients presented, 18 from the local catchment area, with a mean age of 16 yrs (range 5-46 yrs). Thirteen patients required admission. Sixteen patients sustained hand injuries including burns, and three sustained burns to other body areas. The amount of money spent varied between adults and children, the average amount among the paediatric group was Euro 2-4, but Euro 45 in the adult group. None were willing to identify the local source of their fireworks, but most fireworks originated in Northern Ireland. This small review highlights an ongoing problem in Ireland; fireworks are illegal, yet they are easily and cheaply available without quality or safety controls. Our public awareness campaign has failed to reach its target audience, and the illegal traders who sell these often inferior products are seldom charged. Children and adults will continue to sustain serious injuries as a result.

  13. Current Pregnancy Among Women with Spinal Cord Injury: Findings from the U.S. National Spinal Cord Injury Database

    PubMed Central

    Iezzoni, Lisa I.; Chen, Yuying; McLain, Aime B. Jackson

    2015-01-01

    Study design Cross-sectional study Objective To examine prevalence of pregnancy and associations with sociodemographic and clinical factors among women with spinal cord injury (SCI) Setting U.S. National Spinal Cord Injury Database, an SCI registry that interviews participants 1, 5, and then every 5 years post-injury. Data include SCI clinical details, functional impairments, participation measures, depressive symptoms, and life satisfaction. Women ages 18-49 are asked about hospitalizations in the last year relating to pregnancy or its complications. Data represent 1,907 women, who completed 3,054 interviews. Methods We used generalized estimating equations to examine bivariable associations between pregnancy and clinical and psychosocial variables and to perform multivariable regressions predicting pregnancy. Results Across all women, 2.0% reported pregnancy during the prior 12 months. This annual prevalence differed significantly by years elapsed since injury; the highest rate occurred 15 years post-injury (3.7%). Bivariable analyses found that younger age at injury was significantly associated with current pregnancy (P < 0.0001). Compared with nonpregnant women, those reporting current pregancy were significantly more likely to be married or partnered, have sport-related SCI, have higher motor scores, and have more positive psychosocial status scores. Multivariable analyses found significant associations between current pregnancy and age, marital status, motor score, and mobility and occupation scale scores. Conclusions Current pregnancy rates among reproductive-aged women with SCI are similar to rates of other U.S. women with chronic mobility impairments. More information is needed about pregnancy experiences and outcomes to inform both women with SCI seeking childbearing and clinicians providing their care. PMID:25987000

  14. Field Hockey-Lacrosse Guide with Official Rules. June 1972 - June 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornburg, Mary Lou, Ed.; Pitts, Jackie, Ed.

    Rules for women's field hockey and lacrosse from June 1972 to June 1974 are discussed. Standards in sports for girls and women are detailed as is the Division for Girls and Women's Sports (DGWS) statement of beliefs. Specific articles on field hockey techniques, skills, services available through the United States Field Hockey Association, rules,…

  15. Do side-effects/injuries from yoga practice result in discontinued use? Results of a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Holton, M Kim; Barry, Adam E

    2014-01-01

    Context: Yoga-related injuries are of increasing concern as the use of yoga continues to rise. Aims: The aim of the following study is to examine whether a national sample of yoga practitioners would report discontinued use of yoga due to injury from the practice, assess what injuries resulted in discontinued use, determine what injuries were most common and identify injuries requiring medical attention. Methods: Secondary data analysis of a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States (n = 23,393). Results: Less than 1% of individuals who had ever practiced yoga (n = 2230) reported an injury from yoga that led to discontinued use. Of those reporting injury, less than one-third (n = 4) reported seeking medical attention. The most common side-effect was back pain. Approximately, half of those reporting back pain sought medical attention. Conclusions: Injury due to yoga is an infrequent barrier to continued practice and severe injury due to yoga is rare. PMID:25035627

  16. Spondylolysis in Elite Junior-Level Ice Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Laurie D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Spondylolysis is a common cause of low back pain and significant loss of play in the young athlete. Its incidence in hockey players has not been reported. This study reviewed the incidence and potential causative factors of low back pain and spondylolysis in an elite junior-level ice hockey program over a 15-year period. Hypothesis: Because of the repetitive movements of the lower spine required by the sport, spondylolysis was expected to be a frequent cause of low back pain in hockey players. Study Design: Retrospective case review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Methods: The medical and athletic trainer records of male ice hockey players, ages 15 to 18 years, who presented with the complaint of low back pain were reviewed. This elite program consisted of 2 rosters. There were approximately 44 players total per year representing these 2 teams. For players diagnosed with spondylolysis, the following factors were reviewed: year in the program, age at presentation, symptoms and duration, studies performed, level of spondylolysis, presence of spondylolisthesis, affected side to shooting side, player position, treatment, and current level of play. Results: Over 9 hockey seasons, 25 players presented to medical staff with low back pain. Of those, 44% were confirmed to have lumbar spondylolysis. The majority of these cases presented in the first year of the program without clear history of trauma but rather vague pain with weight lifting or hockey. Less than half of spondylolysis cases were diagnosed on plain films. There were no cases of spondylolisthesis. Spondylolysis occurred on the shooting side in 73% of players. Sixty-four percent of players with spondylolysis were forwards. The treatment for most included rest from lifting and hockey and physical therapy. Average return to play was 8 weeks. Ninety-six percent of players continued to play at an elite level. Conclusion: Spondylolysis should be strongly considered in the differential of low back pain in ice

  17. 2003 Los Alamos National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-04

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Los Alamos National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  18. 2003 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-02

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Brookhaven National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  19. 2003 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-05-23

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Lawrence Livermore National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  20. 2003 Sandia National Laboratories--Albuquerque Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-05-23

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Sandia National Laboratories-Albuquerque. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  1. A Preliminary Exploration of Concussion and Strength Performance in Youth Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Reed, N; Taha, T; Monette, G; Keightley, M

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the effect of concussion on upper and lower body strength in children and youth athletes. The participant group was made up of 178 unique male and female ice hockey players (ages 8-14 years). Using a 3-year prospective longitudinal research design, baseline and post-concussion data on hand grip strength, jump tests, and leg maximal voluntary contraction were collected. Using a linear mixed-effects model, no significant differences were found when comparing the baseline strength performance of individuals who went on to experience a concussion and those who did not. When accounting for sex, multiple concussions, and ongoing changes in strength associated with age, weaker hand grip scores were found following concussion while participants were still symptomatic. Lower squat jump heights were achieved while participants were symptomatic as well as when they were no longer self-reporting symptoms associated with concussion. This study represents an initial step towards better understanding strength performance following concussion that may limit the on and off ice performance of youth ice hockey players, as well as predispose youth to subsequent injuries. PMID:27191209

  2. A Preliminary Exploration of Concussion and Strength Performance in Youth Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Reed, N; Taha, T; Monette, G; Keightley, M

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the effect of concussion on upper and lower body strength in children and youth athletes. The participant group was made up of 178 unique male and female ice hockey players (ages 8-14 years). Using a 3-year prospective longitudinal research design, baseline and post-concussion data on hand grip strength, jump tests, and leg maximal voluntary contraction were collected. Using a linear mixed-effects model, no significant differences were found when comparing the baseline strength performance of individuals who went on to experience a concussion and those who did not. When accounting for sex, multiple concussions, and ongoing changes in strength associated with age, weaker hand grip scores were found following concussion while participants were still symptomatic. Lower squat jump heights were achieved while participants were symptomatic as well as when they were no longer self-reporting symptoms associated with concussion. This study represents an initial step towards better understanding strength performance following concussion that may limit the on and off ice performance of youth ice hockey players, as well as predispose youth to subsequent injuries.

  3. Locomotor, Heart-Rate, and Metabolic Power Characteristics of Youth Women's Field Hockey: Female Athletes in Motion (FAiM) Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vescovi, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the locomotor, heart-rate, and metabolic power characteristics of high-level youth female field hockey matches. Method: Players from the U21 and U17 Canadian women's national teams were monitored during a 4-match test series using Global Positioning System technology. Position (forward,…

  4. Proposed national strategies for the prevention of leading work-related diseases and injuries. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary strategies developed at the National Symposium on the Prevention of Leading Work Related Diseases and Injuries, held in Atlanta, Georgia on May 1 to 3, 1985 were revised, elaborated, and further developed. Strategies were developed for the prevention of occupational lung diseases, musculoskeletal injuries, occupational cancers, severe occupational traumatic injuries, and occupational cardiovascular diseases. Lung diseases considered included silicosis, asbestosis, lung cancer mesothelioma, coal workers' pneumoconiosis, byssinosis, occupational asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, asphyxiation, irritation, pulmonary edema, brucellosis, psitticosis, anthrax, mycobacterioses, histoplasmosis, aspergillosis, and coccidioidomycosis. Occupational cancers were discussed as they occur in the lung, pleura, peritoneum, bladder, kidneys, blood, nasal cavity, skin, nasal sinuses, and liver.

  5. Hip adductors' strength, flexibility, and injury risk.

    PubMed

    Hrysomallis, Con

    2009-08-01

    The hip adductor muscle group plays an important role in both movement and stability at the hip joint in many athletic pursuits. Injury to this muscle group has been reported in a number of sports, among them, ice hockey, soccer, Australian football, and swimming. The identification of muscle characteristics that predispose a muscle to injury is an important step in developing conditioning programs to reduce injury risk. Muscle strength and range of motion are 2 parameters that may influence injury risk. The aim of this review was to examine the relationship between hip adductors' strength, flexibility, and injury risk. Strength testing has involved isokinetic or hand-held dynamometry. Flexibility has usually been assessed by goniometry during maximal hip abduction. An association has been reported between adductor strength deficits and injury for ice hockey players. Low adductor flexibility has also been identified as a risk factor for injury in soccer players. An intervention program that strengthened the hip adductors had some success in reducing injury risk for ice hockey players. There is some low- to moderate-level evidence from cohort studies to suggest that flexibility and strength are related to injury risk in particular sports and that an intervention program may be effective in reducing injury risk. Higher level evidence from randomized controlled trials is required to firmly establish the link between hip adductor flexibility, strength, and injury. PMID:19620912

  6. History of Injury and Violence as public health problems and emergence of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at CDC.

    PubMed

    Sleet, David A; Baldwin, Grant; Marr, Angela; Spivak, Howard; Patterson, Sara; Morrison, Christine; Holmes, Wendy; Peeples, Amy B; Degutis, Linda C

    2012-09-01

    Injuries and violence are among the oldest health problems facing humans. Only within the past 50 years, however, has the problem been addressed with scientific rigor using public health methods. The field of injury control began as early as 1913, but wasn't approached systematically or epidemiologically until the 1940s and 1950s. It accelerated rapidly between 1960 and 1985. Coupled with active federal and state interest in reducing injuries and violence, this period was marked by important medical, scientific, and public health advances. The National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) was an outgrowth of this progress and in 2012 celebrated its 20th anniversary. NCIPC was created in 1992 after a series of government reports identified injury as one of the most important public health problems facing the nation. Congressional action provided the impetus for the creation of NCIPC as the lead federal agency for non-occupational injury and violence prevention. In subsequent years, NCIPC and its partners fostered many advances and built strong capacity. Because of the tragically high burden and cost of injuries and violence in the United States and around the globe, researchers, practitioners, and decision makers will need to redouble prevention efforts in the next 20 years. This article traces the history of injury and violence prevention as a public health priority-- including the evolution and current structure of the CDC's National Center for Injury Prevention and Control.

  7. Descriptive Epidemiology of Collegiate Women's Basketball Injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988–1989 Through 2003–2004

    PubMed Central

    Agel, Julie; Olson, David E; Dick, Randall; Arendt, Elizabeth A; Marshall, Stephen W; Sikka, Robby S

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review 16 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) injury surveillance data for women's basketball and to identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. Background: The number of colleges participating in women's college basketball has grown over the past 25 years. The Injury Surveillance System (ISS) has enabled the NCAA to collect and report injury trends over an extended period of time. This has allowed certified athletic trainers and coaches to be more informed regarding injuries and to adjust training regimens to reduce the risk of injury. It also has encouraged administrators to make rule changes that attempt to reduce the risk of injury. Main Results: From 1988–1989 through 2003–2004, 12.4% of schools across Divisions I, II, and III that sponsor varsity women's basketball programs participated in annual ISS data collection. Game and practice injury rates exhibited significant decreases over the study period. The rate of injury in a game situation was almost 2 times higher than in a practice (7.68 versus 3.99 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures, rate ratio = 1.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.9, 2.0). Preseason-practice injury rates were more than twice as high as regular-season practice injury rates (6.75 versus 2.84 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures, rate ratio = 2.4, 95% confidence interval = 2.2, 2.4). More than 60% of all game and practice injuries were to the lower extremity, with the most common game injuries being ankle ligament sprains, knee injuries (internal derangements and patellar conditions), and concussions. In practices, ankle ligament sprains, knee injuries (internal derangements and patellar conditions), upper leg muscle-tendon strains, and concussions were the most common injuries. Recommendations: Appropriate preseason conditioning and an emphasis on proper training may reduce the risk of injury and can optimize performance. As both player size and the speed of the women's game continue to

  8. Variations in U.S. pediatric burn injury hospitalizations using the national burn repository data.

    PubMed

    Kramer, C Bradley; Rivara, Frederick P; Klein, Matthew B

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of population-specific variation in pediatric burn injuries is essential to the development of effective prevention strategies. The purpose of this study was to examine the etiology of pediatric burn injury considering age and race categories using the National Burn Repository. The authors reviewed the records of all pediatric patients (age <18 years) in the American Burn Association's National Burn Registry injured between 1995 and 2007. The authors compared patient and injury characteristics across race, age, etiology, and payor status. A total of 46,582 patients were included in this study. The etiology of burn injury varied by both age and race. Populations of color were younger, constituting 53.8% of patients younger than 5 years, whereas 53.9% of the total study population identified as Caucasian. Scald etiology was disproportionately less common in patients identifying as Caucasian (39.9 vs 61.4%, P < .001), and scald was a common etiology in older children identifying as African American, Asian, and Hispanic. Inhalation injuries were also higher in patients identifying as Native American (5.4%), Hispanic (4.2%), and African American (3.7%). Pediatric burn injury etiology varies with age and race. These data should encourage careful consideration of race, age, and other differences in formulating the most effective, population-specific prevention and outreach strategies.

  9. The role of aerobic capacity in high-intensity intermittent efforts in ice-hockey.

    PubMed

    Stanula, A; Roczniok, R; Maszczyk, A; Pietraszewski, P; Zając, A

    2014-08-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine a relationship between aerobic capacity ([Formula: see text]O2max) and fatigue from high-intensity skating in elite male hockey players. The subjects were twenty-four male members of the senior national ice hockey team of Poland who played the position of forward or defence. Each subject completed an on-ice Repeated-Skate Sprint test (RSS) consisting of 6 timed 89-m sprints, with 30 s of rest between subsequent efforts, and an incremental test on a cycle ergometer in the laboratory, the aim of which was to establish their maximal oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]O2max). The analysis of variance showed that each next repetition in the 6x89 m test was significantly longer than the previous one (F5,138=53.33, p<0.001). An analysis of the fatigue index (FI) calculated from the times recorded for subsequent repetitions showed that the value of the FI increased with subsequent repetitions, reaching its maximum between repetitions 5 and 6 (3.10±1.16%). The total FI was 13.77±1.74%. The coefficient of correlation between [Formula: see text]O2max and the total FI for 6 sprints on the distance of 89 m (r =-0.584) was significant (p=0.003). The variance in the index of players' fatigue in the 6x89 m test accounted for 34% of the variance in [Formula: see text]O2max. The 6x89 m test proposed in this study offers a high test-retest correlation coefficient (r=0.78). Even though the test is criticized for being too exhaustive and thereby for producing highly variable results it still seems that it was well selected for repeated sprint ability testing in hockey players. PMID:25177097

  10. Progress in preventing injuries: a content analysis of national policies in Europe.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Nikesh; Mitis, Francesco; Sethi, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a content analysis of national policies to address violence and injury prevention in the World Health Organization (WHO) European Region so as to inform where future improvements can be made. Multiple search methods were used to identify national policies for violence and injury prevention. Application of a framework based on a WHO guide was used for policy analysis. A multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) was additionally conducted. One hundred and twenty-three national policies were identified; of these, 80 were available in English language and analysed further. Most national policies had been developed after 2003. The majority of policies fulfilled most of the WHO criteria for effective policy-making. Policy areas requiring improvement include quantifying objectives, targeting the socio-economic gap in injury burden and increased focus on primary prevention. Results from the MCA confirmed the ones obtained with the descriptive statistics. Encouraging progress is being made in formulating national policy for violence and injury prevention within the WHO European Region. There are specific areas that warrant increasing attention in future policy development.

  11. Management of Sport Injuries with Korean Medicine: A Survey of Korean National Volleyball Team

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Eui-Hyoung; Kwon, Ojin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the current state of Korean medicine (KM) treatment on sports injury by implementing survey with volleyball team medical doctors participating in 2013-2014 season. Six KM doctors completed a questionnaire that includes injury parameters: type, location, situation, and pain scores. We collected 166 injury cases from 94 Korean male and female national volleyball players. Knee (25.9%), low back (13.3%), elbow, and ankle (8.4%) injuries were most common. Joint (41.6%) and muscle (30.7%) were major injured tissues. KM team medical doctors utilized acupuncture (40.4%), chuna manual therapy (16.0%), physical therapy (15.2%), taping (9.0%), and cupping (7.8%) to treat volleyball injuries. Any types of medications were used infrequently. Additional physical and exercise therapy were preferred after receiving acupuncture (both 46.9%). This study presented the preliminary injury profile of Korean elite volleyball players. Injury and treatment parameters could be useful to build advanced KM model in sport medicine.

  12. Management of Sport Injuries with Korean Medicine: A Survey of Korean National Volleyball Team

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Eui-Hyoung; Kwon, Ojin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the current state of Korean medicine (KM) treatment on sports injury by implementing survey with volleyball team medical doctors participating in 2013-2014 season. Six KM doctors completed a questionnaire that includes injury parameters: type, location, situation, and pain scores. We collected 166 injury cases from 94 Korean male and female national volleyball players. Knee (25.9%), low back (13.3%), elbow, and ankle (8.4%) injuries were most common. Joint (41.6%) and muscle (30.7%) were major injured tissues. KM team medical doctors utilized acupuncture (40.4%), chuna manual therapy (16.0%), physical therapy (15.2%), taping (9.0%), and cupping (7.8%) to treat volleyball injuries. Any types of medications were used infrequently. Additional physical and exercise therapy were preferred after receiving acupuncture (both 46.9%). This study presented the preliminary injury profile of Korean elite volleyball players. Injury and treatment parameters could be useful to build advanced KM model in sport medicine. PMID:27651819

  13. Management of Sport Injuries with Korean Medicine: A Survey of Korean National Volleyball Team.

    PubMed

    Yang, Changsop; Lee, Eunyoung; Hwang, Eui-Hyoung; Kwon, Ojin; Lee, Jun-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the current state of Korean medicine (KM) treatment on sports injury by implementing survey with volleyball team medical doctors participating in 2013-2014 season. Six KM doctors completed a questionnaire that includes injury parameters: type, location, situation, and pain scores. We collected 166 injury cases from 94 Korean male and female national volleyball players. Knee (25.9%), low back (13.3%), elbow, and ankle (8.4%) injuries were most common. Joint (41.6%) and muscle (30.7%) were major injured tissues. KM team medical doctors utilized acupuncture (40.4%), chuna manual therapy (16.0%), physical therapy (15.2%), taping (9.0%), and cupping (7.8%) to treat volleyball injuries. Any types of medications were used infrequently. Additional physical and exercise therapy were preferred after receiving acupuncture (both 46.9%). This study presented the preliminary injury profile of Korean elite volleyball players. Injury and treatment parameters could be useful to build advanced KM model in sport medicine. PMID:27651819

  14. Influence of Extrinsic Risk Factors on National Football League Injury Rates

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, David W.; Comper, Paul; Hutchison, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The risk of injury associated with American football is significant, with recent reports indicating that football has one of the highest rates of all-cause injury, including concussion, of all major sports. There are limited studies examining risk factors for injuries in the National Football League (NFL). Purpose: To identify risk factors for NFL concussions and musculoskeletal injuries. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Injury report data were collected prospectively for each week over the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 regular seasons for all 32 teams. Poisson regression models were used to identify the relationship between predetermined variables and the risk of the 5 most frequent injuries (knee, ankle, hamstring, shoulder, and concussion). Results: A total of 480 games or 960 team games (TGs) from the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 regular seasons were included in this study. A trend to an increasing risk of concussion and TG ankle injury with decreasing mean game-day temperature was observed. The risk of TG concussion (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 2.16; 95% CI, 1.35-3.45; P = .001) and TG ankle injury (IRR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.10-1.98; P = .01) was significantly greater for TGs played at a mean game-day temperature of ≤9.7°C (≤49.5°F) compared with a mean game-day temperature of ≥21.0°C (≥69.8°F). The risk of TG shoulder injury was significantly increased for TGs played on grass surfaces (IRR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.02-1.81; P = .038) compared with synthetic surfaces. The risk of TG injury was not associated with time in season, altitude, time zone change prior to game, or distance traveled to a game. Conclusion: This study evaluated extrinsic risk factors for injury in the NFL. A hazardous association was identified for risk of concussion and ankle injury with colder game-day temperature. Further research should be conducted to substantiate this relationship and its potential implication for injury prevention initiatives. PMID

  15. Pattern of fall injuries in Pakistan: the Pakistan National Emergency Department Surveillance (Pak-NEDS) study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background We aimed to analyse the frequency and patterns of fall-related injuries presenting to the emergency departments (EDs) across Pakistan. Methods Pakistan National Emergency Departments surveillance system collected data from November 2010 to March 2011 on a 24/7 basis using a standardized tool in seven major EDs (five public and two private hospitals) in six major cities of Pakistan. For all patients presenting with fall-related injuries, we analysed data by intent with focus on unintentional falls. Simple frequencies were run for basic patient demographics, mechanism of falls, outcomes of fall injuries, mode of arrival to ED, investigations, and procedures with outcomes. Results There were 3335 fall-related injuries. In cases where intent was available, two-thirds (n = 1186, 65.3%) of fall injuries were unintentional. Among unintentional fall patients presenting to EDs, the majority (76.9%) were males and between 15-44 years of age (69%). The majority of the unintentional falls (n = 671, 56.6%) were due to slipping, followed by fall from height (n = 338, 28.5%). About two-thirds (n = 675, 66.6%) of fall injuries involved extremities, followed by head/neck (n = 257, 25.4%) and face (n = 99, 9.8%). Most of the patients were discharged from the hospital (n = 1059, 89.3%). There were 17 (1.3%) deaths among unintentional fall cases. Conclusion Falls are an important cause of injury-related visits to EDs in Pakistan. Most of the fall injury patients were men and in a productive age group. Fall injuries pose a burden on the healthcare system, especially emergency services, and future studies should therefore focus on safety measures at home and in workplaces to reduce this burden. PMID:26691821

  16. 76 FR 28438 - Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC), National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC), National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) The meeting announced below concerns RFA CE10-004,...

  17. 78 FR 29754 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC) In accordance with Section 10(a)(2) of the...

  18. 78 FR 37542 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC) Correction: This notice was published in...

  19. 77 FR 31018 - Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC), National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC), National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) The meeting announced below concerns Research Grants...

  20. 75 FR 1062 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC) In accordance with Section 10(a)(2) of the...

  1. 78 FR 35036 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC) Correction: This notice was published in...

  2. Workforce Implications of Injury among Home Health Workers: Evidence from the National Home Health Aide Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaughey, Deirdre; McGhan, Gwen; Kim, Jungyoon; Brannon, Diane; Leroy, Hannes; Jablonski, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of study: The direct care workforce continues to rank as one of the most frequently injured employee groups in North America. Occupational health and safety studies have shown that workplace injuries translate into negative outcomes for workers and their employers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)…

  3. 75 FR 46952 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): National Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Behavioral Surveillance... Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

  4. 78 FR 69682 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463) of October 6, 1972, that the Board of Scientific...

  5. Self-Injurious Behavior and Fragile X Syndrome: Findings from the National Fragile X Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symons, Frank J.; Byiers, Breanne J.; Raspa, Melissa; Bishop, Ellen; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    We used National Fragile X Survey data in order to examine reported self-injurious behavior (SIB) to (a) generate lifetime and point prevalence estimates, (b) document detailed features of SIB (frequency, types, location, severity) in relation to gender, and (c) compare comorbid conditions between matched pairs (SIB vs. no SIB). Results indicate…

  6. Occupational and recreational noise exposure from indoor arena hockey games.

    PubMed

    Cranston, Cory J; Brazile, William J; Sandfort, Delvin R; Gotshall, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    Occupational and recreational noise exposures were evaluated at two sporting arenas hosting collegiate hockey games (Venue 1) and semi-professional hockey (Venue 2). A total of 54 personal noise dosimetry samples were taken over the course of seven home hockey games: 15 workers and 9 fans at Venue 1, and 19 workers and 11 fans at Venue 2. None of the sampled workers were overexposed to noise based on Occupational Safety and Health Administration criteria. However, 40% and 57% of workers at Venue 1 and 33% and 91% of fans at Venue 2 were overexposed based on ACGIH noise exposure criteria. Noise exposures for fans were significantly different between venues, but worker noise exposures between venues were not significantly different. In addition, extensive area noise monitoring was conducted at each venue to further characterize the stadium noise on a location-by-location basis. Mean equivalent sound pressure levels ranged from 81 to 96 dBA at Venue 1 and from 85 to 97 dBA at Venue 2. Mean noise peak levels ranged from 105 to 124 dBA at Venue 1, and from 110 to 117 dBA at Venue 2. These data reflect the potential for overexposure at indoor hockey events and are useful in characterizing occupational noise exposure of indoor arena support staff and may also provide a foundation for future noise control research in indoor sports arenas. PMID:23145529

  7. A Hockey Night in Canada: An Imagined Conversation between Theorists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogel, Curtis

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, various methodological issues surrounding the sociological study of sport are explored. Through an imagined dialogue between two graduate students at a hockey game, this work brings together three divergent approaches to social enquiry: Positivist Grounded Theory, Constructivist Grounded Theory, and Actor-Network Theory. This paper…

  8. The Financial and Professional Impact of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in National Football League Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Secrist, Eric S.; Bhat, Suneel B.; Dodson, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries can have negative consequences on the careers of National Football League (NFL) players, however no study has ever analyzed the financial impact of these injuries in this population. Purpose: To quantify the impact of ACL injuries on salary and career length in NFL athletes. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Any player in the NFL suffering an ACL injury from 2010 to 2013 was identified using a comprehensive online search. A database of NFL player salaries was used to conduct a matched cohort analysis comparing ACL-injured players with the rest of the NFL. The main outcomes were the percentage of players remaining in the NFL and mean salary at 1, 2, 3, and 4 years after injury. Cohorts were subdivided based on initial salary: group A, <$500,000; group B, ≤$500,000 to $2,000,000; and group C, >$2,000,000. Mean cumulative earnings were calculated by multiplying the percentage of players remaining in the league by their mean salaries and compounding this each season. Results: NFL athletes suffered 219 ACL injuries from 2010 to 2013. The 7504 other player seasons in the NFL during this time were used as controls. Significantly fewer ACL-injured players than controls remained in the NFL at each time point (P < .05). In group A, significantly less ACL-injured players remained in the NFL at 1 to 3 seasons after injury (P < .05), and in group B, significantly less ACL-injured players remained in the NFL at 1 and 2 seasons after injury (P < .05). There was no significant decrease in group C. Players in groups A and B remaining in the NFL also had a lower mean salary than controls (P < .05 in season 1). The mean cumulative earnings over 4 years for ACL-injured players was $2,070,521 less per player than uninjured controls. Conclusion: On average, ACL-injured players earned $2,070,521 less than salary-matched controls over the 4 years after injury. Players initially earning less than $2 million

  9. The Financial and Professional Impact of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in National Football League Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Secrist, Eric S.; Bhat, Suneel B.; Dodson, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries can have negative consequences on the careers of National Football League (NFL) players, however no study has ever analyzed the financial impact of these injuries in this population. Purpose: To quantify the impact of ACL injuries on salary and career length in NFL athletes. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Any player in the NFL suffering an ACL injury from 2010 to 2013 was identified using a comprehensive online search. A database of NFL player salaries was used to conduct a matched cohort analysis comparing ACL-injured players with the rest of the NFL. The main outcomes were the percentage of players remaining in the NFL and mean salary at 1, 2, 3, and 4 years after injury. Cohorts were subdivided based on initial salary: group A, <$500,000; group B, ≤$500,000 to $2,000,000; and group C, >$2,000,000. Mean cumulative earnings were calculated by multiplying the percentage of players remaining in the league by their mean salaries and compounding this each season. Results: NFL athletes suffered 219 ACL injuries from 2010 to 2013. The 7504 other player seasons in the NFL during this time were used as controls. Significantly fewer ACL-injured players than controls remained in the NFL at each time point (P < .05). In group A, significantly less ACL-injured players remained in the NFL at 1 to 3 seasons after injury (P < .05), and in group B, significantly less ACL-injured players remained in the NFL at 1 and 2 seasons after injury (P < .05). There was no significant decrease in group C. Players in groups A and B remaining in the NFL also had a lower mean salary than controls (P < .05 in season 1). The mean cumulative earnings over 4 years for ACL-injured players was $2,070,521 less per player than uninjured controls. Conclusion: On average, ACL-injured players earned $2,070,521 less than salary-matched controls over the 4 years after injury. Players initially earning less than $2 million

  10. Temporal variation in United States firearm injuries 1993-2008: results from a national data base

    PubMed Central

    Loder, Randall T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Background: There are few studies that address temporal variation in firearm associated injuries. It was the purpose of this study to analyze the temporal variation in the types and patterns of injuries associated with firearm use from a national data base. Methods: The database used was the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research Firearm Injury Surveillance Study 1993-2008. Emergency department visits associated with firearm use were analyzed for month and day of the week for various demographic variables. Statistical analyses were performed using SUDAAN 10™ software to give national estimates. Temporal variation by month or day was assessed using histograms, circular distributions, and cosinor analyses. Variation by month and day combined were analyzed using three dimensional contours. Results: There were an estimated 1,841,269 injuries. Circular analyses demonstrated anon-uniform distribution for all parameters for both month and day of injury (p less than 0.001). The overall peak was September 15 with several exceptions. Injuries from BB guns had a peak on May 22, a diagnosis of a foreign body on July 11, and patients aged 10 to 14 years on April 9.The peak day was always Saturday/Sunday when significant variation existed. There were many different patterns for month and day combined. Some were “a rapidly rising high mountain starting at sea level” (hunting), or others a “series of mountain ranges starting from a high plain or steppe” (hospital admissions). Conclusions: This study provides altogether new information regarding temporal variation for injuries associated with firearms in the USA. These results can be used to assist medical resource allocation and prevention campaigns. Education campaigns can be emphasized before the peaks for which prevention is desired (eg. BB gun prevention campaigns should be concentrated in March, prior to the April/May peak). PMID:23669603

  11. Expert-novice differences in brain function of field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Wimshurst, Z L; Sowden, P T; Wright, M

    2016-02-19

    The aims of this study were to use functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the neural bases for perceptual-cognitive superiority in a hockey anticipation task. Thirty participants (15 hockey players, 15 non-hockey players) lay in an MRI scanner while performing a video-based task in which they predicted the direction of an oncoming shot in either a hockey or a badminton scenario. Video clips were temporally occluded either 160 ms before the shot was made or 60 ms after the ball/shuttle left the stick/racquet. Behavioral data showed a significant hockey expertise×video-type interaction in which hockey experts were superior to novices with hockey clips but there were no significant differences with badminton clips. The imaging data on the other hand showed a significant main effect of hockey expertise and of video type (hockey vs. badminton), but the expertise×video-type interaction did not survive either a whole-brain or a small-volume correction for multiple comparisons. Further analysis of the expertise main effect revealed that when watching hockey clips, experts showed greater activation in the rostral inferior parietal lobule, which has been associated with an action observation network, and greater activation than novices in Brodmann areas 17 and 18 and middle frontal gyrus when watching badminton videos. The results provide partial support both for domain-specific and domain-general expertise effects in an action anticipation task. PMID:26674059

  12. “I Went to a Fight the Other Night and a Hockey Game Broke Out”

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmied, Nadav; Espindola, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    Background: The current study explored the relationship between fighting behavior and passage of time, across games and seasons, in an attempt to assess if violent behavior in hockey is impulsive or intentional. Hypothesis: Before engaging in fighting behavior, players assess the utility of their actions and thus will fight less when the game is on the line (third period) and when champions are crowned (postseason). Methods: An archival exploration utilizing open access databases from multiple Internet sources. Results: During the 2010-2011 National Hockey League (NHL) season, players were significantly less likely to be involved in a fight as the game was coming to a close than in its early stages. In addition, data from the past 10 NHL seasons showed that players were significantly more violent in preseason games than during the regular season. They were also least likely to be involved in a fight during the postseason. Conclusion: The converging evidence suggests that players take into account the penalties associated with fighting and are less likely to engage in violence when the stakes are high, such as at the end of a game or a season. This implies, in turn, that major acts of aggression in the league are more likely to be calculated rather than impulsive. The findings suggest that a more punitive system should diminish fighting behavior markedly. PMID:24427418

  13. Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems: Review of Program and National Database From 1970 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Richards, J Scott; SanAgustin, Theresa B

    2016-10-01

    The Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems (SCIMS) centers have provided continuous, comprehensive multidisciplinary care for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) in the United States since their inception in 1970. In addition, the research conducted and the analysis of data collected at these centers facilitate advances in the care and the overall quality of life for people with SCI. Over the past 45 years, the SCIMS program and National Spinal Cord Injury Database (NSCID) have undergone major revisions, which must be recognized in the planning, conduct, and interpretation of SCIMS research to prevent misinterpretation of findings. Therefore, we provide herein a brief review of the SCIMS program and the associated NSCID throughout its history, emphasizing changes and accomplishments within the past 15 years, to facilitate a better understanding and interpretation of the data presented in SCIMS research publications, including the articles published in this special issue of the Archives. PMID:27671806

  14. Victim Injury and Social Distance: A National Test of a General Principle of Conflict.

    PubMed

    Rennison, Callie Marie; Jacques, Scott; Allen, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Our inquiry focuses on why some violent offenses but not others result in injury to the victim. Building on existing theory nested in the paradigm of pure sociology, we propose and test a general principle of conflict: Victim injury varies directly with social distance. This principle predicts that offenders are more likely to harm victims with whom they are less well acquainted and less similar culturally. We test three hypotheses derived from this principle with data from the National Crime Victimization Survey and find little support for the theory. Rather, findings suggest exactly the opposite of that predicted: As social distance between offender and victim increases, the odds of victim injury decreases. Recommendations of additional research are made. PMID:27302957

  15. Characterizing the Epidemiological Transition in Mexico: National and Subnational Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Gretchen; Dias, Rodrigo H; Thomas, Kevin J. A; Rivera, Juan A; Carvalho, Natalie; Barquera, Simón; Hill, Kenneth; Ezzati, Majid

    2008-01-01

    Background Rates of diseases and injuries and the effects of their risk factors can have substantial subnational heterogeneity, especially in middle-income countries like Mexico. Subnational analysis of the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors can improve characterization of the epidemiological transition and identify policy priorities. Methods and Findings We estimated deaths and loss of healthy life years (measured in disability-adjusted life years [DALYs]) in 2004 from a comprehensive list of diseases and injuries, and 16 major risk factors, by sex and age for Mexico and its states. Data sources included the vital statistics, national censuses, health examination surveys, and published epidemiological studies. Mortality statistics were adjusted for underreporting, misreporting of age at death, and for misclassification and incomparability of cause-of-death assignment. Nationally, noncommunicable diseases caused 75% of total deaths and 68% of total DALYs, with another 14% of deaths and 18% of DALYs caused by undernutrition and communicable, maternal, and perinatal diseases. The leading causes of death were ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, cerebrovascular disease, liver cirrhosis, and road traffic injuries. High body mass index, high blood glucose, and alcohol use were the leading risk factors for disease burden, causing 5.1%, 5.0%, and 7.3% of total burden of disease, respectively. Mexico City had the lowest mortality rates (4.2 per 1,000) and the Southern region the highest (5.0 per 1,000); under-five mortality in the Southern region was nearly twice that of Mexico City. In the Southern region undernutrition and communicable, maternal, and perinatal diseases caused 23% of DALYs; in Chiapas, they caused 29% of DALYs. At the same time, the absolute rates of noncommunicable disease and injury burdens were highest in the Southern region (105 DALYs per 1,000 population versus 97 nationally for noncommunicable diseases; 22 versus 19 for injuries

  16. Injury mortality among employees of Los Alamos National Laboratory: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, L.D.; Weber, C.A.; Wilkinson, G.S.

    1986-11-01

    Although injuries compose the fourth leading cause of death among the US population, little is known about this important cause of death. For this reason, we investigated mortality from injuries among a cohort of 23,217 Los Alamos National Laboratory employees. Characteristics of Laboratory employees dying from injuries were described and compared with those dying from noninjury causes. Special emphasis was placed on comparing job-related deaths with non-job-related deaths. A comparison of injury deaths with noninjury deaths showed no differences in sex or race. Significant differences were observed for education, duration of employment, and age at death, with persons dying from injury better educated, more likely to be employed at least one year, and more likely to die at an earlier age. When education was examined further, we found significantly more suicides and air/space accidents among college-educated members of the cohort and more motor vehicle fatalities among persons without a college degree. In this cohort, we identified 45 work-related deaths (all white male), 29 of which occurred during employment with the Los Alamos National Laboratory. A comparison of job-related injury deaths with non-job-related deaths, showed no differences in education. Suicides and motor vehicle accidents were predominant among non-job-related deaths, whereas the categories of other accidents (explosions, electrocutions, machinery accidents, and radiation accidents) and air/space accidents were th leading causes among the deaths on the job. We observed no differences in job classification when job-related deaths were compared with non-job-related deaths. 5 refs., 19 tabs.

  17. Comparability of National Estimates for Traumatic Brain Injury-Related Medical Encounters

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Christopher A.; Greenspan, Arlene I.; Xu, Likang; Kresnow, Marcie-jo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe similarities and differences in the number of civilian traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related hospitalizations and emergency department visits between national databases that capture US hospital data. Participants TBI-related hospitalizations included in the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) and Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample (HCUP-NIS) and emergency department visits in the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) and HCUP Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (HCUP-NEDS) for 2006–2010. Design Cross-sectional design. Main Measures Nationwide counts of TBI-related medical encounters. Results Overall, the frequency of TBI is comparable when comparing NHDS with HCUP-NIS and NHAMCS with HCUP-NEDS. However, annual counts in both NHDS and NHAMCS are consistently unstable when examined in smaller subgroups, such as by age group and injury mechanism. Injury mechanism is consistently missing from many more records in NHDS compared with HCUP-NIS. Conclusion Given the large sample size of HCUP-NIS and HCUP-NEDS, these data can offer a valuable resource for examining TBI-related hospitalization and emergency department visits, especially by subgroup. These data hold promise for future examinations of annual TBI counts, but ongoing comparisons with national probability samples will be necessary to ensure that HCUP continues to track with estimates from these data. PMID:25955702

  18. Injury risks of EMS responders: evidence from the National Fire Fighter Near-Miss Reporting System

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jennifer A; Davis, Andrea L; Barnes, Brittany; Lacovara, Alicia V; Patel, Reema

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We analysed near-miss and injury events reported to the National Fire Fighter Near-Miss Reporting System (NFFNMRS) to investigate the workplace hazards and safety concerns of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) responders in the USA. Methods We reviewed 769 ‘non-fire emergency event’ reports from the NFFNMRS using a mixed methods approach. We identified 185 emergency medical calls and analysed their narrative text fields. We assigned Mechanism of Near-Miss/Injury and Nature of Injury codes and then tabulated frequencies (quantitative). We coded major themes regarding work hazards and safety concerns reported by the EMS responders (qualitative). Results Of the 185 emergency medical calls, the most commonly identified Mechanisms of Near-Miss/Injury to EMS responders was Assaults, followed by Struck-by Motor Vehicle, and Motor Vehicle Collision. The most commonly identified weapon used in an assault was a firearm. We identified 5 major domains of workplace hazards and safety concerns: Assaults by Patients, Risks from Motor Vehicles, Personal Protective Equipment, Relationships between Emergency Responders, and Policies, Procedures and Practices. Conclusions Narrative text from the NFFNMRS is a rich source of data that can be analysed quantitatively and qualitatively to provide insight into near-misses and injuries sustained by EMS responders. Near-miss reporting systems are critical components for occupational hazard surveillance. PMID:26068510

  19. Aerobic Development of Elite Youth Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Jeff R; Cordingley, Dean M; MacDonald, Peter B

    2015-11-01

    Ice hockey is a physiologically complex sport requiring aerobic and anaerobic energy metabolism. College and professional teams often test aerobic fitness; however, there is a paucity of information regarding aerobic fitness of elite youth players. Without this knowledge, training of youth athletes to meet the standards of older age groups and higher levels of hockey may be random, inefficient, and or effective. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the aerobic fitness of elite youth hockey players. A retrospective database review was performed for 200 male AAA hockey players between the ages of 13 and 17 (age, 14.4 ± 1.2 years; height, 174.3 ± 8.5 cm; body mass, 67.2 ± 11.5 kg; body fat, 9.8 ± 3.5%) before the 2012-13 season. All subjects performed a graded exercise test on a cycle ergometer, whereas expired air was collected by either a Parvo Medics TrueOne 2400 or a CareFusion Oxycon Mobile metabolic cart to determine maximal oxygen consumption (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max). Body mass, absolute V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, and the power output achieved during the last completed stage increased in successive age groups from age 13 to 15 years (p ≤ 0.05). Ventilatory threshold (VT) expressed as a percentage of V[Combining Dot Above]O2max and the heart rate (HR) at which VT occurred decreased between the ages of 13 and 14 years (p ≤ 0.05), whereas the V[Combining Dot Above]O2 at which VT occurred increased from the age of 14-15 years. There were no changes in relative V[Combining Dot Above]O2max or HRmax between any successive age groups. The aerobic fitness levels of elite youth ice hockey players increased as players age and mature physically and physiologically. However, aerobic fitness increased to a lesser extent at older ages. This information has the potential to influence off-season training and maximize the aerobic fitness of elite amateur hockey players, so that these players can meet standards set by advanced elite age groups

  20. Aerobic Development of Elite Youth Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Jeff R; Cordingley, Dean M; MacDonald, Peter B

    2015-11-01

    Ice hockey is a physiologically complex sport requiring aerobic and anaerobic energy metabolism. College and professional teams often test aerobic fitness; however, there is a paucity of information regarding aerobic fitness of elite youth players. Without this knowledge, training of youth athletes to meet the standards of older age groups and higher levels of hockey may be random, inefficient, and or effective. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the aerobic fitness of elite youth hockey players. A retrospective database review was performed for 200 male AAA hockey players between the ages of 13 and 17 (age, 14.4 ± 1.2 years; height, 174.3 ± 8.5 cm; body mass, 67.2 ± 11.5 kg; body fat, 9.8 ± 3.5%) before the 2012-13 season. All subjects performed a graded exercise test on a cycle ergometer, whereas expired air was collected by either a Parvo Medics TrueOne 2400 or a CareFusion Oxycon Mobile metabolic cart to determine maximal oxygen consumption (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max). Body mass, absolute V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, and the power output achieved during the last completed stage increased in successive age groups from age 13 to 15 years (p ≤ 0.05). Ventilatory threshold (VT) expressed as a percentage of V[Combining Dot Above]O2max and the heart rate (HR) at which VT occurred decreased between the ages of 13 and 14 years (p ≤ 0.05), whereas the V[Combining Dot Above]O2 at which VT occurred increased from the age of 14-15 years. There were no changes in relative V[Combining Dot Above]O2max or HRmax between any successive age groups. The aerobic fitness levels of elite youth ice hockey players increased as players age and mature physically and physiologically. However, aerobic fitness increased to a lesser extent at older ages. This information has the potential to influence off-season training and maximize the aerobic fitness of elite amateur hockey players, so that these players can meet standards set by advanced elite age groups.

  1. National Estimates of Noncanine Bite and Sting Injuries Treated in US Hospital Emergency Departments, 2001–2010

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Ricky; Mack, Karin; Haileyesus, Tadesse; Proescholdbell, Scott; Annest, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Injuries resulting from contact with animals and insects are a significant public health concern. This study quantifies nonfatal bite and sting injuries by noncanine sources using data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System–All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP). Methods The NEISS-AIP is an ongoing nationally representative surveillance system used to monitor all types and causes of injuries treated in US hospital emergency departments (EDs). Cases were coded by trained hospital coders using information from medical records on animal and insect sources of bite and sting injuries being treated. Data were weighted to produce national annualized estimates, percentages, and rates based on the US population. Results From 2001 to 2010 an estimated 10.1 million people visited EDs for noncanine bite and sting injuries, based on an unweighted case count of 169,010. This translates to a rate of 340.1 per 100,000 people (95% CI, 232.9–447.3). Insects accounted for 67.5% (95% CI, 45.8–89.2) of bite and sting injuries, followed by arachnids 20.8% (95% CI, 13.8–27.9). The estimated number of ED visits for bedbug bite injuries increased more than 7-fold—from 2156 visits in 2007 to 15,945 visits in 2010. Conclusions This study provides an update of national estimates of noncanine bite and sting injuries and describes the diversity of animal exposures based on a national sample of EDs. Treatment of nonfatal bite and sting injuries are costly to society. Direct medical and work time lost translates to an estimated $7.5 billion annually. PMID:24433776

  2. Predictors of Length of Career Following Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement in Professional Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Menge, Travis; Briggs, Karen K.; Philippon, Marc J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Previous studies have shown that professional hockey players return to sport at a high rate following hip arthroscopy. The average length of a National Hockey League (NHL) career has been reported to be 5.5 years, and it is unknown how long players continue to play after hip arthroscopy. The purpose of this study was 1) to determine predictors of length of career in players following hip arthroscopy for treatment of symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), and 2) investigate the rate of those who continue to play professional hockey a minimum of 5 years after hip arthroscopy. Methods: Seventy professional hockey players underwent hip arthroscopy for FAI between 2005 and 2010 by a single surgeon. Data was retrieved from NHL.com regarding the duration of each player’s professional career. In addition, position played, draft position, age at time of surgery, and surgical details were also used in data analysis. Results: Our cohort included thirteen players that were centers, 15 defensemen, 20 goalies, and 22 wings. The average overall draft number was 57 (range 1 to 228), and average age at surgery was 27 years (range 17 to 38). Forty of the 70 athletes (57%) continued to play professionally a minimum of 5 years after hip arthroscopy. As of the most recent 2015 season, the average NHL length of career was 13 years (range 8 to 23 years), with an average of 6.9 years played following hip arthroscopy. Therre was no different in length of career and years played when goalies were compared to other players(p=0.760). Length of career and years played after arthroscopy correlated with age at surgery (r=0.799 and r=-0.408). Players who played 5 or more years after arthroscopy were significantly younger than those who did not (25 vs. 30 years, p=0.001). Sixty-five players (93%) had labral repair and 5 (7%) had labral reconstruction. There were no differences in length of career or years played after arthroscopy based on type of labral treatment (p=0

  3. Preventing head and neck injury.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, A S; McCrory, P

    2005-06-01

    A wide range of head and neck injury risks are present in sport, including catastrophic injury. The literature since 1980 on prevention of head and neck injury in sport was reviewed, focusing on catastrophic and brain injury and identifying the range of injury prevention methods in use. There have been few formal evaluations of injury prevention methods. Approaches that are considered, or have been proven, to be successful in preventing injury include: modification of the baseball; implementation of helmet standards in ice hockey and American football and increased wearing rates; use of full faceguards in ice hockey; changes in rules associated with body contact; implementation of rules to reduce the impact forces in rugby scrums. Helmets and other devices have been shown to reduce the risk of severe head and facial injury, but current designs appear to make little difference to rates of concussion. Research methods involving epidemiological, medical, and human factors are required in combination with biomechanical and technological approaches to reduce further injury risks in sport.

  4. SnapShot: Visualization to Propel Ice Hockey Analytics.

    PubMed

    Pileggi, H; Stolper, C D; Boyle, J M; Stasko, J T

    2012-12-01

    Sports analysts live in a world of dynamic games flattened into tables of numbers, divorced from the rinks, pitches, and courts where they were generated. Currently, these professional analysts use R, Stata, SAS, and other statistical software packages for uncovering insights from game data. Quantitative sports consultants seek a competitive advantage both for their clients and for themselves as analytics becomes increasingly valued by teams, clubs, and squads. In order for the information visualization community to support the members of this blossoming industry, it must recognize where and how visualization can enhance the existing analytical workflow. In this paper, we identify three primary stages of today's sports analyst's routine where visualization can be beneficially integrated: 1) exploring a dataspace; 2) sharing hypotheses with internal colleagues; and 3) communicating findings to stakeholders.Working closely with professional ice hockey analysts, we designed and built SnapShot, a system to integrate visualization into the hockey intelligence gathering process. SnapShot employs a variety of information visualization techniques to display shot data, yet given the importance of a specific hockey statistic, shot length, we introduce a technique, the radial heat map. Through a user study, we received encouraging feedback from several professional analysts, both independent consultants and professional team personnel.

  5. Did Emperor Moctezuma II's head injury and subsequent death hasten the fall of the Aztec nation?

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Gonzalo M

    2015-07-01

    This article analyzes the head injury of Emperor Moctezuma as one of those injuries that affected the course of history. The Emperor's death arguably changed the fate of an entire nation and led to the destruction of the Aztec civilization. Moctezuma died in the evening hours of June 30, 1520, in his palace in the Aztec capital, Tenochtitlan, while a prisoner of the Spanish conquistadors. The Emperor had been speaking to his people in an effort to persuade them to cease hostilities against Hernán Cortés, his Spanish soldiers, and Indian allies. Both Spanish and Indian contemporary sources document that he sustained a severe head injury when one of his own warriors hit him with a rock thrown from a sling. However, after the Conquest of Mexico some of the information collected by Spanish friars from Indian stories, songs, and pictorial representations raised the possibility that Moctezuma died of strangulation or stabbing at the hands of the Spaniards. There is even a suggestion of suicide. This issue remains unresolved and emotionally charged. The historical and clinical analysis of the events surrounding Moctezuma's death indicates that the Emperor most likely died as a consequence of head injury. The author has attempted to present a neutral analysis but agrees with Benjamin Keen that neutrality may be unattainable, no matter how remote the subject of historical inquiry is from the present.

  6. Epidemiology of Football Injuries in the National Collegiate Athletic Association, 2004-2005 to 2008-2009

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Zachary Y.; Simon, Janet E.; Grooms, Dustin R.; Roos, Karen G.; Cohen, Randy P.; Dompier, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research has found that injury rates in football are higher in competition than during practice. However, there is little research on the association between injury rates and type of football practices and how these specific rates compare with those in competitions. Purpose: This study utilized data from the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System (NCAA ISS) to describe men’s collegiate football practice injuries (academic years 2004-2005 to 2008-2009) in 4 event types: competitions, scrimmages, regular practices, and walkthroughs. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Methods: Football data during the 2004-2005 to 2008-2009 academic years were analyzed. Annually, an average of 60 men’s football programs provided data (9.7% of all universities sponsoring football). Injury rates per 1000 athlete-exposures (AEs), injury rate ratios (RRs), 95% CIs, and injury proportions were reported. Results: The NCAA ISS captured 18,075 football injuries. Most injuries were reported in regular practices (55.9%), followed by competitions (38.8%), scrimmages (4.4%), and walkthroughs (0.8%). Most AEs were reported in regular practices (77.6%), followed by walkthroughs (11.5%), competitions (8.6%), and scrimmages (2.3%). The highest injury rate was found in competitions (36.94/1000 AEs), followed by scrimmages (15.7/1000 AEs), regular practices (5.9/1000 AEs), and walkthroughs (0.6/1000 AEs). These rates were all significantly different from one another. Distributions of injury location and diagnoses were similar across all 4 event types, with most injuries occurring at the lower extremity (56.0%) and consisting of sprains and strains (50.6%). However, injury mechanisms varied. The proportion of injuries due to player contact was greatest in scrimmages (66.8%), followed by regular practices (48.5%) and walkthroughs (34.9%); in contrast, the proportion of injuries due to noncontact/overuse was greatest in walkthroughs (41

  7. Epidemiology of Football Injuries in the National Collegiate Athletic Association, 2004-2005 to 2008-2009

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Zachary Y.; Simon, Janet E.; Grooms, Dustin R.; Roos, Karen G.; Cohen, Randy P.; Dompier, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research has found that injury rates in football are higher in competition than during practice. However, there is little research on the association between injury rates and type of football practices and how these specific rates compare with those in competitions. Purpose: This study utilized data from the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System (NCAA ISS) to describe men’s collegiate football practice injuries (academic years 2004-2005 to 2008-2009) in 4 event types: competitions, scrimmages, regular practices, and walkthroughs. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Methods: Football data during the 2004-2005 to 2008-2009 academic years were analyzed. Annually, an average of 60 men’s football programs provided data (9.7% of all universities sponsoring football). Injury rates per 1000 athlete-exposures (AEs), injury rate ratios (RRs), 95% CIs, and injury proportions were reported. Results: The NCAA ISS captured 18,075 football injuries. Most injuries were reported in regular practices (55.9%), followed by competitions (38.8%), scrimmages (4.4%), and walkthroughs (0.8%). Most AEs were reported in regular practices (77.6%), followed by walkthroughs (11.5%), competitions (8.6%), and scrimmages (2.3%). The highest injury rate was found in competitions (36.94/1000 AEs), followed by scrimmages (15.7/1000 AEs), regular practices (5.9/1000 AEs), and walkthroughs (0.6/1000 AEs). These rates were all significantly different from one another. Distributions of injury location and diagnoses were similar across all 4 event types, with most injuries occurring at the lower extremity (56.0%) and consisting of sprains and strains (50.6%). However, injury mechanisms varied. The proportion of injuries due to player contact was greatest in scrimmages (66.8%), followed by regular practices (48.5%) and walkthroughs (34.9%); in contrast, the proportion of injuries due to noncontact/overuse was greatest in walkthroughs (41

  8. National trends in burn and inhalation injury in burn patients: results of analysis of the nationwide inpatient sample database.

    PubMed

    Veeravagu, Anand; Yoon, Byung C; Jiang, Bowen; Carvalho, Carla M; Rincon, Fred; Maltenfort, Mitchell; Jallo, Jack; Ratliff, John K

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was describe national trends in prevalence, demographics, hospital length of stay (LOS), hospital charges, and mortality for burn patients with and without inhalational injury and to compare to the National Burn Repository. Burns and inhalation injury cause considerable mortality and morbidity in the United States. There remains insufficient reporting of the demographics and outcomes surrounding such injuries. The National Inpatient Sample database, the nation's largest all-payer inpatient care data repository, was utilized to select 506,628 admissions for burns from 1988 to 2008 based on ICD-9-CM recording. The data were stratified based on the extent of injury (%TBSA) and presence or absence of inhalational injury. Inhalation injury was observed in only 2.2% of burns with <20% TBSA but 14% of burns with 80 to 99% TBSA. Burn patients with inhalation injury were more likely to expire in-hospital compared to those without (odds ratio, 3.6; 95% confidence interval, 2.7-5.0; P < .001). Other factors associated with higher mortality were African-American race, female sex, and urban practice setting. Patients treated at rural facilities and patients with hyperglycemia had lower mortality rates. Each increase in percent of TBSA of burns increased LOS by 2.5%. Patients with burns covering 50 to 59% of TBSA had the longest hospital stay at a median of 24 days (range, 17-55). The median in-hospital charge for a burn patient with inhalation injury was US$32,070, compared to US$17,600 for those without. Overall, patients who expired from burn injury accrued higher in-hospital charges (median, US$50,690 vs US$17,510). Geographically, California and New Jersey were the states with the highest charges, whereas Vermont and Maryland were states with the lowest charges. The study analysis provides a broad sampling of nationwide demographics, LOS, and in-hospital charges for patients with burns and inhalation injury.

  9. Prevention of sports-related eye injury.

    PubMed

    Stock, J G; Cornell, F M

    1991-08-01

    Sports-related eye injury is an important cause of vision loss. Many eye injuries can be prevented through the supervision of play, the enforcement of game rules and the use of eye protective devices. State-of-the-art eye protective devices incorporate highly impact-resistant optical material, usually polycarbonate lenses, in a sturdy frame. Protective devices are available for use in racquet sports, baseball, basketball, football, ice hockey and other sports. PMID:1858609

  10. Prevention of sports-related eye injury.

    PubMed

    Stock, J G; Cornell, F M

    1991-08-01

    Sports-related eye injury is an important cause of vision loss. Many eye injuries can be prevented through the supervision of play, the enforcement of game rules and the use of eye protective devices. State-of-the-art eye protective devices incorporate highly impact-resistant optical material, usually polycarbonate lenses, in a sturdy frame. Protective devices are available for use in racquet sports, baseball, basketball, football, ice hockey and other sports.

  11. The Relationship of Various Psychosocial Variables on the Positioning of College Ice Hockey Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krotee, March L.; La Point, James D.

    This paper presents the results of research conducted to investigate the relationship of various psychosocial variables on the positioning of college ice hockey players. The California Personality Inventory (CPI) was administered to the NCAA Championship ice hockey team at the University of Minnesota, and a separate subjective psychosocial rating…

  12. Post-Inpatient Brain Injury Rehabilitation Outcomes: Report from the National OutcomeInfo Database.

    PubMed

    Malec, James F; Kean, Jacob

    2016-07-15

    This study examined outcomes for intensive residential and outpatient/community-based post-inpatient brain injury rehabilitation (PBIR) programs compared with supported living programs. The goal of supported living programs was stable functioning (no change). Data were obtained for a large cohort of adults with acquired brain injury (ABI) from the OutcomeInfo national database, a web-based database system developed through National Institutes of Health (NIH) Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) funding for monitoring progress and outcomes in PBIR programs primarily with the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI-4). Rasch-derived MPAI-4 measures for cases from 2008 to 2014 from 9 provider organizations offering programs in 23 facilities throughout the United States were examined. Controlling for age at injury, time in program, and time since injury on admission (chronicity), both intensive residential (n = 205) and outpatient/community-based (n = 2781) programs resulted in significant (approximately 1 standard deviation [SD]) functional improvement on the MPAI-4 Total Score compared with supported living (n = 101) programs (F = 18.184, p < 0.001). Intensive outpatient/community-based programs showed greater improvements on MPAI-4 Ability (F = 14.135, p < 0.001), Adjustment (F = 12.939, p < 0.001), and Participation (F = 16.679, p < 0.001) indices than supported living programs; whereas, intensive residential programs showed improvement primarily in Adjustment and Participation. Age at injury and time in program had small effects on outcome; the effect of chronicity was small to moderate. Examination of more chronic cases (>1 year post-injury) showed significant, but smaller (approximately 0.5 SD) change on the MPAI-4 relative to supported living programs (F = 17.562, p < 0.001). Results indicate that intensive residential and outpatient/community-based PIBR programs result in substantial positive

  13. Risk of childhood injuries after prenatal exposure to maternal bereavement: a Danish National Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Jasveer; Li, Jiong; Lauritsen, Jens; Olsen, Jørn

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the risk of injuries among children exposed to a stressful life exposure (defined as bereavement) before conception or during fetal life. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting Denmark. Participants All singleton births in Denmark between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2006 were identified. These newborns were then linked to mothers, fathers, grandparents and siblings using individually assigned civil personal registration numbers. Primary and secondary outcome measures We identified that data on childhood injuries were obtained from the Danish National Patient Registry, which contains data on all hospital stays and outpatient visits. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated from birth using log-linear Poisson regression models, and person-years were used as the offset variable. Age, residence, calendar period, maternal education, maternal income and parental-cohabitation status are treated as time-dependent variables (records were extracted from the offspring's birth year). Results Exposure to maternal bereavement due to a father's death had the strongest association with childhood injuries, especially when the cause of death was due to a traumatic event (adjusted estimates of IRR (aIRR): 1.25, 95%CI: 0.99 to 1.58). We did not find an association for childhood injuries and maternal bereavement due to grandparent's death, and we only found an association for sibling death when restricting to deaths due to traumatic events (aIRR: 1.20, 95%CI:1.03 to 1.39). Conclusions The aetiology of childhood injuries is complex and may be related to events that take place during prenatal life. This study suggests that exposure to a stressful life event during gestation may be linked to injury susceptibility in childhood. However, changes in postnatal family conditions related to loss or genetic factors may also play a role. Background Developmental plasticity related to early life exposures leading to disease programming in

  14. Descriptive Epidemiology of Collegiate Women's Gymnastics Injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988–1989 Through 2003–2004

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Stephen W; Covassin, Tracey; Dick, Randall; Nassar, Lawrence G; Agel, Julie

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review 16 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) injury surveillance data for women's gymnastics and identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. Background: In the 1988–1989 academic year, 112 schools were sponsoring varsity women's gymnastics teams, with approximately 1550 participants. By 2003–2004, the number of varsity teams had decreased 23% to 86, involving 1380 participants. Significant participation reductions during this time were particularly apparent in Divisions II and III. Main Results: A significant annual average decrease was noted in competition (−4.0%, P < .01) but not in practice (−1.0%, P = .35) injury rates during the sample period. Over the 16 years, the rate of injury in competition was more than 2 times higher than in practice (15.19 versus 6.07 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures; rate ratio = 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.3, 2.8). A total of 53% of all competition and 69% of all practice injuries were to the lower extremity. A participant was almost 6 times more likely to sustain a knee internal derangement injury in competition than in practice (rate ratio = 5.7, 95% CI = 4.5, 7.3) and almost 3 times more likely to sustain an ankle ligament sprain (rate ratio = 2.7, 95% CI = 2.1, 3.4). The majority of competition injuries (approximately 70%) resulted from either landings in floor exercises or dismounts. Recommendations: Gymnasts with a previous history of ankle sprain should either wear an ankle brace or use prophylactic tape on their ankles to decrease the risk of recurrent injury. Preventive efforts may incorporate more neuromuscular training and core stability programs in the off-season and preseason conditioning to enhance proper landing and skill mechanics. Equipment manufacturers are encouraged to reevaluate the design of the landing mats to allow for better absorption of forces. PMID:17710171

  15. NIOSH national survey of long-haul truck drivers: Injury and safety.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang X; Sieber, W Karl; Lincoln, Jennifer E; Birdsey, Jan; Hitchcock, Edward M; Nakata, Akinori; Robinson, Cynthia F; Collins, James W; Sweeney, Marie H

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 1,701,500 people were employed as heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers in the United States in 2012. The majority of them were long-haul truck drivers (LHTDs). There are limited data on occupational injury and safety in LHTDs, which prompted a targeted national survey. The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health conducted a nationally representative survey of 1265 LHTDs at 32 truck stops across the contiguous United States in 2010. Data were collected on truck crashes, near misses, moving violations, work-related injuries, work environment, safety climate, driver training, job satisfaction, and driving behaviors. Results suggested that an estimated 2.6% of LHTDs reported a truck crash in 2010, 35% reported at least one crash while working as an LHTD, 24% reported at least one near miss in the previous 7 days, 17% reported at least one moving violation ticket and 4.7% reported a non-crash injury involving days away from work in the previous 12 months. The majority (68%) of non-crash injuries among company drivers were not reported to employers. An estimate of 73% of LHTDs (16% often and 58% sometimes) perceived their delivery schedules unrealistically tight; 24% often continued driving despite fatigue, bad weather, or heavy traffic because they needed to deliver or pick up a load at a given time; 4.5% often drove 10miles per hours or more over the speed limit; 6.0% never wore a seatbelt; 36% were often frustrated by other drivers on the road; 35% often had to wait for access to a loading dock; 37% reported being noncompliant with hours-of-service rules (10% often and 27% sometimes); 38% of LHTDs perceived their entry-level training inadequate; and 15% did not feel that safety of workers was a high priority with their management. This survey brings to light a number of important safety issues for further research and interventions, e.g., high prevalence of truck crashes, injury underreporting, unrealistically tight delivery schedules

  16. NIOSH national survey of long-haul truck drivers: Injury and safety.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang X; Sieber, W Karl; Lincoln, Jennifer E; Birdsey, Jan; Hitchcock, Edward M; Nakata, Akinori; Robinson, Cynthia F; Collins, James W; Sweeney, Marie H

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 1,701,500 people were employed as heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers in the United States in 2012. The majority of them were long-haul truck drivers (LHTDs). There are limited data on occupational injury and safety in LHTDs, which prompted a targeted national survey. The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health conducted a nationally representative survey of 1265 LHTDs at 32 truck stops across the contiguous United States in 2010. Data were collected on truck crashes, near misses, moving violations, work-related injuries, work environment, safety climate, driver training, job satisfaction, and driving behaviors. Results suggested that an estimated 2.6% of LHTDs reported a truck crash in 2010, 35% reported at least one crash while working as an LHTD, 24% reported at least one near miss in the previous 7 days, 17% reported at least one moving violation ticket and 4.7% reported a non-crash injury involving days away from work in the previous 12 months. The majority (68%) of non-crash injuries among company drivers were not reported to employers. An estimate of 73% of LHTDs (16% often and 58% sometimes) perceived their delivery schedules unrealistically tight; 24% often continued driving despite fatigue, bad weather, or heavy traffic because they needed to deliver or pick up a load at a given time; 4.5% often drove 10miles per hours or more over the speed limit; 6.0% never wore a seatbelt; 36% were often frustrated by other drivers on the road; 35% often had to wait for access to a loading dock; 37% reported being noncompliant with hours-of-service rules (10% often and 27% sometimes); 38% of LHTDs perceived their entry-level training inadequate; and 15% did not feel that safety of workers was a high priority with their management. This survey brings to light a number of important safety issues for further research and interventions, e.g., high prevalence of truck crashes, injury underreporting, unrealistically tight delivery schedules

  17. NIOSH national survey of long-haul truck drivers: Injury and safety

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang X.; Sieber, W. Karl; Lincoln, Jennifer E.; Birdsey, Jan; Hitchcock, Edward M.; Nakata, Akinori; Robinson, Cynthia F.; Collins, James W.; Sweeney, Marie H.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 1,701,500 people were employed as heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers in the United States in 2012. The majority of them were long-haul truck drivers (LHTDs). There are limited data on occupational injury and safety in LHTDs, which prompted a targeted national survey. The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health conducted a nationally representative survey of 1265 LHTDs at 32 truck stops across the contiguous United States in 2010. Data were collected on truck crashes, near misses, moving violations, work-related injuries, work environment, safety climate, driver training, job satisfaction, and driving behaviors. Results suggested that an estimated 2.6% of LHTDs reported a truck crash in 2010, 35% reported at least one crash while working as an LHTD, 24% reported at least one near miss in the previous 7 days, 17% reported at least one moving violation ticket and 4.7% reported a non-crash injury involving days away from work in the previous 12 months. The majority (68%) of non-crash injuries among company drivers were not reported to employers. An estimate of 73% of LHTDs (16% often and 58% sometimes) perceived their delivery schedules unrealistically tight; 24% often continued driving despite fatigue, bad weather, or heavy traffic because they needed to deliver or pick up a load at a given time; 4.5% often drove 10 miles per hours or more over the speed limit; 6.0% never wore a seatbelt; 36% were often frustrated by other drivers on the road; 35% often had to wait for access to a loading dock; 37% reported being noncompliant with hours-of-service rules (10% often and 27% sometimes); 38% of LHTDs perceived their entry-level training inadequate; and 15% did not feel that safety of workers was a high priority with their management. This survey brings to light a number of important safety issues for further research and interventions, e.g., high prevalence of truck crashes, injury underreporting, unrealistically tight delivery schedules

  18. THE COMPETITIVE DEMANDS OF ELITE MALE RINK HOCKEY

    PubMed Central

    Del Valle, M.E.; Egocheaga, J.; Linnamo, V.; Fernández, A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to simulate the activity pattern of rink hockey by designing a specific skate test (ST) to study the energy expenditure and metabolic responses to this intermittent high-intensity exercise and extrapolate the results from the test to competition. Six rink hockey players performed, in three phases, the 20-metre multi-stage shuttle roller skate test, a tournament match and the ST. Heart rate was monitored in all three phases. Blood lactate, oxygen consumption, ventilation and respiratory exchange ratio were also recorded during the ST. Peak HR was 190.7±7.2 beats · min−1. There were no differences in peak HR between the three tests. Mean HR was similar between the ST and the match (86% and 87% of HRmax, respectively). Peak and mean ventilation averaged 111.0±8.8 L · min−1 and 70.3±14.0 L · min−1 (60% of VEmax), respectively. VO2max was 56.3±8.4 mL · kg−1 · min−1, and mean oxygen consumption was 40.9±7.9 mL · kg−1 · min−1 (70% of VO2max). Maximum blood lactate concentration was 7.2±1.3 mmol · L-1. ST yielded an energy expenditure of 899.1±232.9 kJ, and energy power was 59.9±15.5 kJ · min−1. These findings suggest that the ST is suitable for estimating the physiological demands of competitive rink hockey, which places a heavy demand on the aerobic and anaerobic systems, and requires high energy consumption. PMID:24744488

  19. College Sports-Related Injuries - United States, 2009-10 Through 2013-14 Academic Years.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Zachary Y; Marshall, Stephen W; Dompier, Thomas P; Corlette, Jill; Klossner, David A; Gilchrist, Julie

    2015-12-11

    Sports-related injuries can have a substantial impact on the long-term health of student-athletes. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) monitors injuries among college student-athletes at member schools. In academic year 2013-14, a total of 1,113 member schools fielded 19,334 teams with 478,869 participating student-athletes in NCAA championship sports (i.e., sports with NCAA championship competition) (1). External researchers and CDC used information reported to the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program (NCAA-ISP) by a sample of championship sports programs to summarize the estimated national cumulative and annual average numbers of injuries during the 5 academic years from 2009-10 through 2013-14. Analyses were restricted to injuries reported among student-athletes in 25 NCAA championship sports. During this period, 1,053,370 injuries were estimated to have occurred during an estimated 176.7 million athlete-exposures to potential injury (i.e., one athlete's participation in one competition or one practice). Injury incidence varied widely by sport. Among all sports, men's football accounted for the largest average annual estimated number of injuries (47,199) and the highest competition injury rate (39.9 per 1,000 athlete-exposures). Men's wrestling experienced the highest overall injury rate (13.1 per 1,000) and practice injury rate (10.2 per 1,000). Among women's sports, gymnastics had the highest overall injury rate (10.4 per 1,000) and practice injury rate (10.0 per 1,000), although soccer had the highest competition injury rate (17.2 per 1,000). More injuries were estimated to have occurred from practice than from competition for all sports, with the exception of men's ice hockey and baseball. However, injuries incurred during competition were somewhat more severe (e.g., requiring ≥7 days to return to full participation) than those acquired during practice. Multiple strategies are employed by NCAA and others to reduce the number of injuries in

  20. College Sports-Related Injuries - United States, 2009-10 Through 2013-14 Academic Years.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Zachary Y; Marshall, Stephen W; Dompier, Thomas P; Corlette, Jill; Klossner, David A; Gilchrist, Julie

    2015-12-11

    Sports-related injuries can have a substantial impact on the long-term health of student-athletes. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) monitors injuries among college student-athletes at member schools. In academic year 2013-14, a total of 1,113 member schools fielded 19,334 teams with 478,869 participating student-athletes in NCAA championship sports (i.e., sports with NCAA championship competition) (1). External researchers and CDC used information reported to the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program (NCAA-ISP) by a sample of championship sports programs to summarize the estimated national cumulative and annual average numbers of injuries during the 5 academic years from 2009-10 through 2013-14. Analyses were restricted to injuries reported among student-athletes in 25 NCAA championship sports. During this period, 1,053,370 injuries were estimated to have occurred during an estimated 176.7 million athlete-exposures to potential injury (i.e., one athlete's participation in one competition or one practice). Injury incidence varied widely by sport. Among all sports, men's football accounted for the largest average annual estimated number of injuries (47,199) and the highest competition injury rate (39.9 per 1,000 athlete-exposures). Men's wrestling experienced the highest overall injury rate (13.1 per 1,000) and practice injury rate (10.2 per 1,000). Among women's sports, gymnastics had the highest overall injury rate (10.4 per 1,000) and practice injury rate (10.0 per 1,000), although soccer had the highest competition injury rate (17.2 per 1,000). More injuries were estimated to have occurred from practice than from competition for all sports, with the exception of men's ice hockey and baseball. However, injuries incurred during competition were somewhat more severe (e.g., requiring ≥7 days to return to full participation) than those acquired during practice. Multiple strategies are employed by NCAA and others to reduce the number of injuries in

  1. A Prospective Epidemiological Study of Injuries in Japanese National Tournament-Level Badminton Players From Junior High School to University

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Eiji; Yatsunami, Mitsunobu; Kurabayashi, Jun; Teruya, Koji; Sekine, Yasuhiro; Endo, Tatsuaki; Nishida, Ryuichiro; Takano, Nao; Sato, Seiko; Jae Kyung, Han

    2016-01-01

    Background: Injury prevention programs have recently been created for various sports. However, a longitudinal study on badminton injuries, as assessed by a team’s dedicated medical staff, at the gymnasium has not been performed. Objectives: We aimed to perform the first such study to measure the injury incidence, severity and type as the first step in creating a badminton injury prevention program. Patients and Methods: A prospective, longitudinal survey was conducted between April 2012 and March 2013 with 133 national tournament-level badminton players from junior high school to university in Japan with the teams’ physical therapists at the gymnasium. Injury incidence was measured as the injury rate (IR) for every 1,000 hour (1000 hour) and IR for every 1,000 athlete exposures (1000 AE). Severity was classified in 5 levels by the number of days the athlete was absent from practice or matches. Injury types were categorized as trauma or overuse. Results: Practice (IR) (1,000 hour) was significantly higher in female players than in male players; the rates increased with increasing age. IR (1,000 AE) was significantly higher in matches than in practice in both sexes of all ages, except for female junior high school students and injuries were most frequent for high school students in matches. The majority of the injuries were slight (83.8%); overuse injuries occurred approximately 3 times more than trauma. Conclusions: This is the first study in which medical staff assessed injuries in badminton, providing value through benchmark data. Injury prevention programs are particularly necessary for female university students in practice and high school students in matches. PMID:27217933

  2. Closing the Door to Lost Earnings Under the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986.

    PubMed

    Levin, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    After a wave of lawsuits against vaccine manufacturers hindered the profitability and production of life-saving vaccines, Congress enacted The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986. The Act offers an incentive for individuals to get vaccinated in order to mitigate the population's exposure to disease, while encouraging the continued production of these serums by pharmaceutical companies. Although imperfect, the Vaccine Act fosters promise in filtering out frivolous claims and,provides a central route for due process to the individuals who suffer from a vaccine-related injury. By removing a potential state tort issue to the Federal Circuit, Congress created a reasonably justified avenue for the recovery of damages for injuries and adverse reactions to vaccines. However, this is not to say that the Act can't still be improved. Currently, the Act is silent on whether the death of a child from a vaccine-related injury, before a compensation decision is rendered, should bar the family from recovering for the child's lost earnings. Unless the victim demonstrates a stable source of income that they would have earned had their lives not been interrupted by the adverse reaction to the vaccine, the holding that a minor child may not recover for lost earnings is defensible. However, Congress should revise the statute to issue guidance to clarify its ambiguity. Under the current compensation regime, the standard is too arbitrary to decide that a child who dies before reaching the majority age of 18 has no earning potential. Any line Congress or the Supreme Court tries to draw will be arbitrary, but from an economic, policy, and legal perspective clarity and guidance can be offered to maintain greater flexibility through a case-by-case analysis and by applying the modern minimum wage in reference to the child's age. Independent from future earnings awards, Vaccine Act compensation should be amended to increase the cap on these damages to account for inflation since the

  3. Closing the Door to Lost Earnings Under the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986.

    PubMed

    Levin, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    After a wave of lawsuits against vaccine manufacturers hindered the profitability and production of life-saving vaccines, Congress enacted The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986. The Act offers an incentive for individuals to get vaccinated in order to mitigate the population's exposure to disease, while encouraging the continued production of these serums by pharmaceutical companies. Although imperfect, the Vaccine Act fosters promise in filtering out frivolous claims and,provides a central route for due process to the individuals who suffer from a vaccine-related injury. By removing a potential state tort issue to the Federal Circuit, Congress created a reasonably justified avenue for the recovery of damages for injuries and adverse reactions to vaccines. However, this is not to say that the Act can't still be improved. Currently, the Act is silent on whether the death of a child from a vaccine-related injury, before a compensation decision is rendered, should bar the family from recovering for the child's lost earnings. Unless the victim demonstrates a stable source of income that they would have earned had their lives not been interrupted by the adverse reaction to the vaccine, the holding that a minor child may not recover for lost earnings is defensible. However, Congress should revise the statute to issue guidance to clarify its ambiguity. Under the current compensation regime, the standard is too arbitrary to decide that a child who dies before reaching the majority age of 18 has no earning potential. Any line Congress or the Supreme Court tries to draw will be arbitrary, but from an economic, policy, and legal perspective clarity and guidance can be offered to maintain greater flexibility through a case-by-case analysis and by applying the modern minimum wage in reference to the child's age. Independent from future earnings awards, Vaccine Act compensation should be amended to increase the cap on these damages to account for inflation since the

  4. Balancing vaccine science and national policy objectives: lessons from the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program Omnibus Autism Proceedings.

    PubMed

    Keelan, Jennifer; Wilson, Kumanan

    2011-11-01

    The US Court of Federal Claims, which adjudicates cases for the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, has been confronted with more than 5000 cases submitted on behalf of children with autism spectrum disorders, seeking to link the condition to vaccination. Through a test case process, the Omnibus Autism Proceedings have in every instance found no association between autism spectrum disorders and vaccines. However, vaccine advocates have criticized the courts for having an overly permissive evidentiary test for causation and for granting credence to insupportable accusations of vaccine harm. In fact, the courts have functioned as intended and have allowed for a fair hearing of vaccine concerns while maintaining confidence in vaccines and providing protection to vaccine manufacturers. PMID:21940934

  5. Balancing Vaccine Science and National Policy Objectives: Lessons From the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program Omnibus Autism Proceedings

    PubMed Central

    Keelan, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The US Court of Federal Claims, which adjudicates cases for the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, has been confronted with more than 5000 cases submitted on behalf of children with autism spectrum disorders, seeking to link the condition to vaccination. Through a test case process, the Omnibus Autism Proceedings have in every instance found no association between autism spectrum disorders and vaccines. However, vaccine advocates have criticized the courts for having an overly permissive evidentiary test for causation and for granting credence to insupportable accusations of vaccine harm. In fact, the courts have functioned as intended and have allowed for a fair hearing of vaccine concerns while maintaining confidence in vaccines and providing protection to vaccine manufacturers. PMID:21940934

  6. Foliar injury, tree growth and mortality, and lichen studies in Mammoth Cave National Park. Final report, 1985-1986

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, B.; Cloonan, C.L.; Armentano, T.V.

    1987-03-01

    Foliar condition, tree growth, tree mortality, and lichen communities were studied in Mammoth Cave National Park, Kentucky, to document the present forest condition and to provide a basis for detecting future changes. Foliar injury by ozone was common on many plant species in 1985. Species showing the most injury were white ash, green ash, redbud, sycamore, tulip poplar, milkweed, and wild grape. Injury apparently depended on canopy position and vigor. Tree growth was equivocally related to visible symptoms in 1986, probably because of the low ozone levels in that year. Tree mortality rates from 1966-1985 in two natural stands were somewhat lower than mortality rates known for other midwestern woods.

  7. Physical demands and physiological responses during elite field hockey.

    PubMed

    Lythe, J; Kilding, A E

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the physical demands of elite men's field hockey using modern time-motion analysis techniques. 18 elite male players (age: 24.4 ± 4.5 yrs) participated in 5 matches, during which physical outputs of players were quantified using GPS units and heart rate monitors. The mean total distance covered by each individual player was 6798 ± 2009 m. Mean total distance covered per position for 70 min (position (70)) was 8160 ± 428 m. Distance covered per position (70) decreased by 4.8% between the 1 (st )and 2 (nd) halves ( P < 0.05). Fullbacks covered significantly less total distance than all other positions ( P < 0.05). High-intensity running (>19 km.h (-1)) comprised 6.1% (479 ± 108 m) of the total distance covered and involved 34 ± 12 sprints per player, with an average duration of 3.3 s. Average HR was higher in the 1 (st) half (86.7% HR (max)) than the 2 (nd) half, (84.4% HR (max)), though this was not significant ( P = 0.06). The results suggest that modern day elite field hockey is a physically demanding team sport. Quantification of the demands and outputs of players at this level provides a useful framework on which to develop conditioning practices. The difference in physical outputs observed for some positions suggests position-specific conditioning is required at the elite level. PMID:21563026

  8. NON-SURGICAL TREATMENT OF A PROFESSIONAL HOCKEY PLAYER WITH THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF SPORTS HERNIA: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, J. Scott; Parker, Andrew; MacDonald, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design: Case Report Background: Injury or weakness of lower abdominal attachments and the posterior inguinal wall can be symptoms of a “sports hernia” and an underlying source of groin pain. Although several authors note conservative treatment as the initial step in the management of this condition, very little has been written on the specific description of non-surgical measures. Most published articles favoring operative care describe poor results related to conservative management; however they fail to report what treatment techniques comprise non-operative management. Case Presentation: The subject of this case report is a professional ice hockey player who sustained an abdominal injury in a game, which was diagnosed as a sports hernia. Following the injury, structured conservative treatment emphasized core control and stability with progressive peripheral demand challenges. Intrinsic core control emphasis continued throughout the treatment progression and during the functional training prior to return to sport. Outcome: The player completed his recovery with return to full competition seven weeks post injury, and continues to compete in the NHL seven years later. Discussion: Surgical intervention has been shown to be effective in the treatment of the “sports hernia.” However it is the authors' opinion that conservative care emphasizing evaluation of intrinsic core muscular deficits and rehabilitation directed at addressing these deficits is an appropriate option, and should be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:22319682

  9. Maximal anaerobic power in national level Indian players.

    PubMed

    Bhanot, J L; Sidhu, L S

    1981-12-01

    The comparative study of aerobic power in different sports was conducted on 99 National Senior as well as National Junior players specialised in hockey and football, field games; volleyball and basketball, court games. The National Seniors were 27 hockey and 16 volleyball players, whereas, 32 football and 24 basketball players were the National Juniors. The maximal anaerobic power of the players was determined from maximal vertical velocity and body weight by the methods of margaria. The football players have been found to be highest followed by hockey, volleyball and basketball players in vertical velocity. It is observed that field game players are higher than the court game players in vertical velocity and that volleyball players possess higher maximum anaerobic power than football, hockey and basketball players. PMID:7317726

  10. Maximal anaerobic power in national level Indian players.

    PubMed

    Bhanot, J L; Sidhu, L S

    1981-12-01

    The comparative study of aerobic power in different sports was conducted on 99 National Senior as well as National Junior players specialised in hockey and football, field games; volleyball and basketball, court games. The National Seniors were 27 hockey and 16 volleyball players, whereas, 32 football and 24 basketball players were the National Juniors. The maximal anaerobic power of the players was determined from maximal vertical velocity and body weight by the methods of margaria. The football players have been found to be highest followed by hockey, volleyball and basketball players in vertical velocity. It is observed that field game players are higher than the court game players in vertical velocity and that volleyball players possess higher maximum anaerobic power than football, hockey and basketball players.

  11. Assessing Incidence and Risk Factors of Cervical Spine Injury in Blunt Trauma Patients Using the National Trauma Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Young, Andrew J; Wolfe, Luke; Tinkoff, Glenn; Duane, Therese M

    2015-09-01

    Despite the potentially devastating impact of missed cervical spine injuries (CI), there continues to be a large disparity in how institutions attempt to make the diagnosis. To better streamline the approach among institutions, understanding incidence and risk factors across the country is paramount. We evaluated the incidence and risk factors of CI using the National Trauma Databank for 2008 and 2009. We performed a retrospective review of the National Trauma Databank for 2008 and 2009 comparing patients with and without CI. We then performed subset analysis separating injury by patients with and without fracture and ligamentous injury. There were a total of 591,138 patients included with a 6.2 per cent incidence of CI. Regression found that age, Injury Severity Score, alcohol intoxication, and specific mechanisms of motor vehicle crash (MVC), motorcycle crash (MCC), fall, pedestrian stuck, and bicycle were independent risk factors for overall injury (P < 0.0001). Patients with CI had longer intensive care unit (8.5 12.5 vs 5.1 7.7) and hospital lengths of stay (days) (9.6 14.2 vs 5.3 8.1) and higher mortality (1.2 per cent vs 0.3%), compared with those without injury (P < 0.0001). There were 33,276 patient with only fractures for an incidence of 5.6 per cent and 1875 patients with ligamentous injury. Just over 6 per cent of patients suffer some form of CI after blunt trauma with the majority being fractures. Higher Injury Severity Score and MVC were consistent risk factors in both groups. This information will assist in devising an algorithm for clearance that can be used nationally allowing for more consistency among trauma providers. PMID:26350665

  12. Cruise survey of oxidant air pollution injury to Pinus ponderosa and Pinus jeffreyi in Saguaro National Monument, Yosemite National Park, and Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Duriscoe, D.M.

    1990-08-01

    The yellow pine populations in Saguaro National Monument, Yosemite National Park, and Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks were surveyed in 1986 to evaluate and quantify the extent and severity of ozone injury (chlorotic mottle) to foliage of ponderosa and Jeffrey pines. A total of 3780 trees were observed. Severity of ozone injury was quantified, using an approximate square root transformation of the percentage of foliage exhibiting chlorotic mottle in branches pruned from each tree. Foliage of different ages was examined separately. Of all trees examined at Saguaro National Monument, 15% had visible chlorotic mottle; at Yosemite, 28%; and at Sequoia and Kings Canyon, 39%. Severity of injury averaged very slight for all three parks, with least injury at Saguaro and greatest at Sequoia and Kings Canyon.

  13. Injuries in Young People with Developmental Disabilities: Comparative Investigation from the 1988 National Health Interview Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunne, Rosemary G.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Comparison of injury rates among community-based young people (ages birth to 17) found that children with developmental disabilities (n=1,060) had higher injury rates than did controls, but children with chronic illness (n=963) did not. Injury rates increased with age, but no differences in injury rates by gender were found. (Author/JDD)

  14. Spinal injury - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - spinal injury ... The following organizations are good resources for information on spinal injury : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov The National Spinal Cord Injury ...

  15. A cost-outcome approach to pre and post-implementation of national sports injury prevention programmes.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, Simon; Hume, Patria A

    2007-12-01

    In New Zealand (NZ), the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) has developed a pre and post-implementation cost-outcome formulae for sport injury prevention to provide information regarding the success of a prevention programme. The ACC provides for the cost of all personal injuries in NZ and invests in prevention programmes to offset 1.6 million annual claims that cost $NZD 1.9 billion. The ACC invests in nine national community sport injury prevention programmes that represent 40% of sport claims and costs. Pre-implementation is used to determine the decision whether to invest in implementation and to determine the level of such investment for the injury prevention programme. Post-implementation is calculated two ways: unadjusted, assuming ceteris paribus; and adjusted assuming no prevention programme was in place. Post-implementation formulae provide a return on investment (ROI) for each dollar invested in the programme and cost-savings. The cost-outcome formulae approach allows ACC to manage expectations of the prevention programme as well as when it will provide a ROI, allowing it to take a long-term view for investment in sport injury prevention. Originally developed for its sport injury prevention programmes, the cost-outcome formulae have now been applied to the other prevention programmes ACC invests in such as home, road and workplace injury prevention. PMID:17353149

  16. National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System: Review of Methods for 2004–2005 Through 2013–2014 Data Collection

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Zachary Y.; Dompier, Thomas P.; Snook, Erin M.; Marshall, Stephen W.; Klossner, David; Hainline, Brian; Corlette, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Background: Since 1982, the National Collegiate Athletic Association has used the Injury Surveillance System (ISS) to collect injury and athlete-exposure data from a representative sample of collegiate institutions and sports. At the start of the 2004–2005 academic year, a Web-based ISS replaced the paper-based platform previously used for reporting injuries and exposures. Objective: To describe the methods of the Web-based National Collegiate Athletic Association ISS for data collection as implemented from the 2004–2005 to 2013–2014 academic years. Description: The Web-based ISS monitored National Collegiate Athletic Association–sanctioned practices and competitions, the number of participating student–athletes, and time-loss injuries during the preseason, regular season, and postseason in 25 collegiate sports. Starting in the 2009–2010 academic year, non–time-loss injuries were also tracked. Efforts were made to better integrate ISS data collection into the workflow of collegiate athletic trainers. Data for the 2004–2005 to 2013–2014 academic years are available to researchers through a standardized application process available at the Datalys Center Web site. Conclusions: As of February 2014, more than 1 dozen data sets have been provided to researchers. The Datalys Center encourages applications for access to the data. PMID:24870292

  17. Acromioclavicular joint injuries: anatomy, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Willimon, S Clifton; Gaskill, Trevor R; Millett, Peter J

    2011-02-01

    Acromioclavicular (AC) joint injuries are common in athletic populations and account for 40% to 50% of shoulder injuries in many contact sports, including lacrosse, hockey, rugby and football. The AC joint is stabilized by static and dynamic restraints, including the coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments. Knowledge of these supporting structures is important when identifying injury and directing treatment. Management of AC injuries should be guided by severity of injury, duration of injury and symptoms, and individual patient factors. These help determine how best to guide management, and whether patients should be treated surgically or nonsurgically. Treatment options for AC injuries continue to expand, and include arthroscopic-assisted anatomic reconstruction of the CC ligaments. The purpose of this article is to review the anatomy, diagnostic methods, and treatment options for AC joint injuries. In addition, the authors' preferred reconstruction technique and outcomes are presented.

  18. 78 FR 67369 - National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program: Addition to the Vaccine Injury Table to Include All...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... the category for new vaccines on the Table. See 70 FR 19092. Subsequently, the Secretary engaged in...). See 76 FR 36367. Since that time, quadrivalent influenza vaccines (meaning that they contain four...: Addition to the Vaccine Injury Table to Include All Vaccines Against Seasonal Influenza AGENCY:...

  19. Children's social relationships and motivation in sledge hockey.

    PubMed

    Wynnyk, Katrina; Spencer-Cavaliere, Nancy

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore children with disabilities' social relationships and motivation to take part in sledge hockey. Harter's (1978) theory of Competence Motivation was used as the conceptual framework. Ten children (1 girl and 9 boys) between ages 11-16 years, who experienced a range of disabilities, participated. Primary data were collected using semistructured interviews, participant observations, and field and reflective notes. The thematic analysis led to four themes: (a) coach feedback, (b) parental involvement, (c) skill and belonging, and (d) (dis)ability sport. The findings revealed that interactions with significant others contributed extensively to the participant's perceptions of competence and motivation to participate, as did the sport's competitive nature. The findings are discussed in the context of Harter's theory and the children's sport and adapted physical activity inclusion literature.

  20. Lung physiology at play: Hemoptysis due to underwater hockey.

    PubMed

    Aversa, Meghan; Lapinsky, Stephen E

    2014-01-01

    Hemoptysis can be a very concerning symptom, and the workup of a patient with hemoptysis may be expensive and invasive. Over the past decade, there has been increasing recognition of hemoptysis that occurs in highly trained athletes under conditions of extreme physical exertion and is explained by "pulmonary capillary stress failure". This report highlights the physiological mechanisms of pulmonary capillary stress failure in the highly trained athlete, with emphasis on the predisposition to develop this condition in underwater sports. We describe the case of an otherwise healthy 34 year-old competitive underwater hockey player who reported hemoptysis following particularly strenuous games. We postulate that the hemoptysis was a result of the pulmonary capillary stress failure caused by the cumulative hemodynamic effects of a markedly elevated cardiac output, the increased central blood volume caused by the hydrostatic effects of submersion in water, and the negative intrathoracic pressure produced by voluntary diaphragmatic contractions.

  1. Video gaming promotes concussion knowledge acquisition in youth hockey players.

    PubMed

    Goodman, David; Bradley, Nori L; Paras, Bradley; Williamson, Ian J; Bizzochi, James

    2006-06-01

    While the positive uses for video games in an educational setting have also been established, the educational aim is usually made explicit. The goal of this research was to develop a video game wherein the educational aspect was implicitly embedded in the video game, such that the gaming activity remained interesting and relevant. Following a pilot study to confirm the usability of an in-house developed game, two studies were conducted with 11-17 year old hockey players (N(1)=130, N(2)=39). Results demonstrated that participants playing the experimental version of the video game scored significantly higher on a concussion symptoms questionnaire, in a significantly faster time, than participants playing the control version of the game. Most participants indicated that they enjoyed the game and would play it again. These results suggest that educational material can be conveyed successfully and in an appealing manner via video game play.

  2. 75 FR 7284 - National Center for Injury Prevention and Control/Initial Review Group, (NCIPC/IRG)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Injury Prevention and Control/Initial Review Group, (NCIPC/IRG) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), announces...

  3. 75 FR 34458 - National Center for Injury Prevention and Control/Initial Review Group, (NCIPC/IRG)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Injury Prevention and Control/Initial Review Group, (NCIPC/IRG) Correction: This notice was published in the Federal Register on... Control and Prevention (CDC), announces the following meeting of the aforementioned review group: Time...

  4. 75 FR 34459 - National Center for Injury Prevention and Control/Initial Review Group, (NCIPC/IRG)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Injury Prevention and Control/Initial Review Group, (NCIPC/IRG) Correction: This notice was published in the Federal Register on... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), announces the following meeting of the...

  5. 75 FR 34459 - National Center for Injury Prevention and Control/Initial Review Group, (NCIPC/IRG)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Injury Prevention and Control/Initial Review Group, (NCIPC/IRG) Correction: This notice was published in the Federal Register on... Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), announces the following meeting of the aforementioned review...

  6. 76 FR 7217 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (BSC, NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... Center for Injury Prevention and Control (BSC, NCIPC) In accordance with Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... research and control activities related to injury. Matters to be Discussed: The BSC, NCIPC will discuss...

  7. Sports eye injuries a preventable disease.

    PubMed

    Vinger, P F

    1981-02-01

    Each year, sports are responsible for over 100.000 preventable eye injuries. A face-protector standard was developed for hockey. Certified protectors effectively eliminated eye and face injuries to 1,200,000 players averting a projected 70,000 injuries and saving over $10,000,000 in medical expenses annually. The principle of absorbing energy in a protective device before the eye is injured is applied to other sports (racket sports, baseball, basketball). Recommendations are made on eye protection for athletes. Better data collection and standards for sports and children's eyewear are encouraged.

  8. 77 FR 37909 - Meeting: Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-25

    ..., FOA CE12-004: Characterizing the Short and Long Term Consequences of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) among Children in the United States (U01); CE12-005: Field Triage of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in... Injury Research (U01); and CE12-007: Research to Prevent Prescription Drug Overdoses (U01). In...

  9. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module VIII. Soft Tissue Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on soft tissue injuries is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Six units of study are presented: (1) anatomy and physiology of the skin; (2) patient assessment for soft-tissue injuries; (3) pathophysiology and management of soft tissue injuries;…

  10. Risk Factors Associated with Self-Injurious Behavior among a National Sample of Undergraduate College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidality among undergraduates represent important public health issues. This analysis identified risk factors that distinguished 3 groups, those who reported no history of self-harm; self-injury, but no suicide attempts (NSSI only); and self-injury and a suicide attempt (NSSI + SA) in the past year.…

  11. 45 CFR 4.6 - Materials related to petitions under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. 4.6 Section 4.6 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. Notwithstanding the provisions of §§ 4.1, 4.2, and 4.3, service of..., shall be served upon the Director, Division of Vaccine Injury Compensation, Office of Special...

  12. 45 CFR 4.6 - Materials related to petitions under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. 4.6 Section 4.6 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human... Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. Notwithstanding the provisions of §§ 4.1, 4.2, and 4.3, service of..., shall be served upon the Director, Division of Vaccine Injury Compensation, Office of Special...

  13. 45 CFR 4.6 - Materials related to petitions under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. 4.6 Section 4.6 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. Notwithstanding the provisions of §§ 4.1, 4.2, and 4.3, service of..., shall be served upon the Director, Division of Vaccine Injury Compensation, Office of Special...

  14. 45 CFR 4.6 - Materials related to petitions under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. 4.6 Section 4.6 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. Notwithstanding the provisions of §§ 4.1, 4.2, and 4.3, service of..., shall be served upon the Director, Division of Vaccine Injury Compensation, Office of Special...

  15. 45 CFR 4.6 - Materials related to petitions under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. 4.6 Section 4.6 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. Notwithstanding the provisions of §§ 4.1, 4.2, and 4.3, service of..., shall be served upon the Director, Division of Vaccine Injury Compensation, Office of Special...

  16. Eye injuries in athletics and recreation.

    PubMed

    Napier, S M; Baker, R S; Sanford, D G; Easterbrook, M

    1996-01-01

    Sports-related eye injuries represent a significant eye health hazard worldwide. In the USA, it is estimated that eye injuries from sports account for more than 100,000 physician visits per year at the cost of greater than $175 million. The sports responsible for the greatest number of injuries are baseball, ice hockey, and racquet sports. In the USA there are over 189 million participants in these sports with a disproportionate number (one-third) of injuries involving the pediatric population. The most common injuries are abrasions and contusions, followed by more serious injuries, including hyphema. Substantial reduction in the incidence of eye injuries through prevention has been demonstrated in the sport of hockey which can serve as a model for other sports. Specific criteria for protective eyewear must be developed. Polycarbonate plastic lenses and frames which are sturdy and impact resistant provide optimal protection. Lensless goggles, street wear and spectacle correction glasses do not provide adequate eye protection. The ophthalmologist's role in preventing sports-related eye injuries includes addressing particular sports participants needs, identifying one-eyed athletes, and informing patients of the need for protective eyewear.

  17. National Veterans Health Administration inpatient risk stratification models for hospital-acquired acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Robert M; VanHouten, Jacob P; Siew, Edward D; Eden, Svetlana K; Fihn, Stephan D; Nielson, Christopher D; Peterson, Josh F; Baker, Clifton R; Ikizler, T Alp; Speroff, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) is a potentially preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Identifying high-risk patients prior to the onset of kidney injury is a key step towards AKI prevention. Materials and Methods A national retrospective cohort of 1,620,898 patient hospitalizations from 116 Veterans Affairs hospitals was assembled from electronic health record (EHR) data collected from 2003 to 2012. HA-AKI was defined at stage 1+, stage 2+, and dialysis. EHR-based predictors were identified through logistic regression, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (lasso) regression, and random forests, and pair-wise comparisons between each were made. Calibration and discrimination metrics were calculated using 50 bootstrap iterations. In the final models, we report odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals, and importance rankings for predictor variables to evaluate their significance. Results The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the different model outcomes ranged from 0.746 to 0.758 in stage 1+, 0.714 to 0.720 in stage 2+, and 0.823 to 0.825 in dialysis. Logistic regression had the best AUC in stage 1+ and dialysis. Random forests had the best AUC in stage 2+ but the least favorable calibration plots. Multiple risk factors were significant in our models, including some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, blood pressure medications, antibiotics, and intravenous fluids given during the first 48 h of admission. Conclusions This study demonstrated that, although all the models tested had good discrimination, performance characteristics varied between methods, and the random forests models did not calibrate as well as the lasso or logistic regression models. In addition, novel modifiable risk factors were explored and found to be significant. PMID:26104740

  18. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Prevention of Pediatric Overuse Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Valovich McLeod, Tamara C.; Decoster, Laura C.; Loud, Keith J.; Micheli, Lyle J.; Parker, J. Terry; Sandrey, Michelle A.; White, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To provide certified athletic trainers, physicians, and other health care professionals with recommendations on best practices for the prevention of overuse sports injuries in pediatric athletes (aged 6–18 years). Background: Participation in sports by the pediatric population has grown tremendously over the years. Although the health benefits of participation in competitive and recreational athletic events are numerous, one adverse consequence is sport-related injury. Overuse or repetitive trauma injuries represent approximately 50% of all pediatric sport-related injuries. It is speculated that more than half of these injuries may be preventable with simple approaches. Recommendations: Recommendations are provided based on current evidence regarding pediatric injury surveillance, identification of risk factors for injury, preparticipation physical examinations, proper supervision and education (coaching and medical), sport alterations, training and conditioning programs, and delayed specialization. PMID:21391806

  19. Concussion in professional football: summary of the research conducted by the National Football League's Committee on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Pellman, Elliot J; Viano, David C

    2006-01-01

    PIn 1994 the National Football League (NFL) initiated a comprehensive clinical and biomechanical research study of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), a study that is ongoing. Data on mild TBIs sustained between 1996 and 2001 were collected and submitted by NFL team physicians and athletic trainers, and these data were analyzed by the NFL's Committee on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. At the same time, analysis of game videos was performed for on-field mild TBIs to quantify the biomechanics involved and to develop means to improve the understanding of these injuries so that manufacturers could systematically improve and update their head protective equipment. The findings and analysis of the Committee have been presented in a series of articles in Neurosurgery.

  20. Efficacy of a Four-Week Uphill Sprint Training Intervention in Field Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Jakeman, John R; McMullan, Judith; Babraj, John A

    2016-10-01

    Jakeman, JR, McMullan, J, and Babraj, JA. Efficacy of a four-week uphill sprint training intervention in field hockey players. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2761-2766, 2016-Current evidence increasingly suggests that very short, supramaximal bouts of exercise can have significant health and performance benefits. Most research conducted in the area, however, uses laboratory-based protocols, which can lack ecological validity. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a high-intensity sprint training program on hockey-related performance measures. Fourteen semiprofessional hockey players either completed a 4-week high-intensity training (HIT) intervention, consisting of a total of 6 sessions of HIT, which progressively increased in volume (n = 7), or followed their normal training program (Con; n = 7). Straight-line sprint speed, with and without a hockey stick and ball, and slalom sprint speed, with and without a hockey stick and ball, were used as performance indicators. Maximal sprint speed over 22.9 m was also assessed. On completion of the 4-week intervention, straight-line sprint speed improved significantly in the HIT group (∼3%), with no changes in performance for the Con group. Slalom sprint speed, both with and without a hockey ball, was not significantly different after the training program in either group. Maximal sprint speed improved significantly (12.1%) in the HIT group, but there was no significant performance change in the Con group. The findings of this study indicate that a short period of HIT can significantly improve hockey-related performance measures and could be beneficial to athletes and coaches in field settings.

  1. PREVENT: a program of the National Training Initiative on Injury and Violence Prevention.

    PubMed

    Runyan, Carol W; Gunther-Mohr, Carol; Orton, Stephen; Umble, Karl; Martin, Sandra L; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera

    2005-12-01

    Training practitioners to use evidence-based approaches to the primary prevention of violence is challenging as a result of the dearth of well-evaluated intervention programs and the lack of familiarity of some practitioners in drawing critically on existing literature. An element of the National Training Initiative in Injury and Violence Prevention, the PREVENT (Preventing Violence Through Education, Networking, and Technical Assistance) program began in late 2003 to train practitioners to address multiple types of violence by encouraging more widespread use of evidence-based approaches to primary prevention. It is intended to reach practitioners involved in addressing violence against women, sexual violence, child maltreatment, youth violence, and suicide in varied community settings. The program uses a combination of varied types of face-to-face training and distance learning coupled with opportunities for networking and technical assistance. Ultimately the program intends to stimulate and facilitate changes in individual, organizational, and cultural awareness and practices fostering primary prevention of violence. The project employs formative, process, and impact evaluation techniques aimed at improving delivery of the training as well as tracking changes in individual and organizations. PMID:16376727

  2. Head Impact Exposure in Male and Female Collegiate Ice Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Bethany J.; Beckwith, Jonathan G.; Greenwald, Richard M.; Chu, Jeffrey J.; McAllister, Thomas W.; Flashman, Laura A.; Maerlender, Arthur C.; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Crisco, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify head impact exposure (frequency, location and magnitude of head impacts) for individual male and female collegiate ice hockey players and to investigate differences in exposure by sex, player position, session type, and team. Ninety-nine (41 male, 58 female) players were enrolled and 37,411 impacts were recorded over three seasons. Frequency of impacts varied significantly by sex (males: 287 per season, females: 170, p<0.001) and helmet impact location (p<0.001), but not by player position (p=0.088). Head impact frequency also varied by session type; both male and female players sustained more impacts in games than in practices (p<0.001), however the magnitude of impacts did not differ between session types. There was no difference in 95th percentile peak linear acceleration between sexes (males: 41.6g, females: 40.8g), but 95th percentile peak rotational acceleration and HITsp (a composite severity measure) were greater for males than females (4424, 3409 rad/s2, and 25.6, 22.3, respectively). Impacts to the back of the helmet resulted in the greatest 95th percentile peak linear accelerations for males (45.2g) and females (50.4g), while impacts to the side and back of the head were associated with the greatest 95th percentile peak rotational accelerations (males: 4719, 4256 rad/sec2, females: 3567, 3784 rad/sec2 respectively). It has been proposed that reducing an individual’s head impact exposure is a practical approach for reducing the risk of brain injuries. Strategies to decrease an individual athlete’s exposure need to be sport and gender specific, with considerations for team and session type. PMID:24210478

  3. Effect of different between-match recovery times on the activity profiles and injury rates of national rugby league players.

    PubMed

    Murray, Nick B; Gabbett, Tim J; Chamari, Karim

    2014-12-01

    Professional rugby league competition does not coincide with a standardized amount of recovery between matches; matches can be separated by as many as 10 days and as few as 5 days. These variations in recovery time could influence the match activity profiles and injury rates of players. This study investigated the effect of different between-match recovery times on the activity profiles and injury rates of National Rugby League (NRL) players. Forty-three elite male rugby league players participated in this study. Between-match recovery cycles were defined as short (separated by 5 or 6 days), medium (separated by 7 or 8 days), and long (separated by 9 or 10 days) recovery. Movement was recorded using a commercially available microtechnology unit, which provided information on speed, distance, and repeated high-intensity effort activity. Injuries sustained in either training or match play, which resulted in a missed match, were recorded. Significantly greater (p ≤ 0.05) relative total distance was covered after matches involving short recovery than those involving medium (effect size [ES] = 1.13) or long (ES = 1.08) recovery periods. This difference was because of greater low-speed activity. Injury rates for the adjustables positional group were the highest after short between-match recovery cycles, whereas the injury rates of hit-up forwards and outside backs positional groups were the highest after long between-match recovery cycles. These findings suggest that the activity profiles of NRL match play and the injury rates of specific playing positions are influenced by the amount of recovery between matches. The differences in the activity profiles and injury rates between short, medium, and long between-match recovery cycles should be considered when developing recovery strategies for professional rugby league players.

  4. 2007 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2008-05-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  5. 2006 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2008-03-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  6. 2006 Los Alamos National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2008-06-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  7. 2006 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2008-05-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  8. 2006 Sandia National Laboratories--Albuquerque Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2008-05-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  9. 2006 Y-12 National Security Complex Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2008-04-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  10. 2010 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-08-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  11. 2003 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-05-23

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for ORNL. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  12. 2010 Nevada National Security Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-07-28

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  13. 2010 Y-12 National Security Complex Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-08-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  14. 2010 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-07-28

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  15. The management of trauma victims with head injury: a study by the national confidential enquiry into patient outcome and death

    PubMed Central

    Smith, NCE; Findlay, GP; Weyman, D

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In 2006 the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death undertook a large prospective study of trauma care, which revealed several findings pertaining to the management of head injuries in a sample of 493 patients. Methods Case note data were collected for all trauma patients admitted to all hospitals accepting emergencies in England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Channel Islands over a three-month period. Severely injured patients with an injury severity score (ISS) of ≥16 were included in the study. The case notes for these patients were peer reviewed by a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, who rated the overall level of care the patient received. Results Of the 795 patients who met the inclusion criteria for the study, 493 were admitted with a head injury. Room for improvement in the level of care was found in a substantial number of patients (265/493). Good practice was found to be highest in high volume centres. The overall head injury management was found to be satisfactory in 84% of cases (319/381). Conclusions This study has shown that care for trauma patients with head injury is frequently rated as less than good and suggests potential long-term remedies for the problem, including a reconfiguration of trauma services and better provision of neurocritical care facilities. PMID:23484990

  16. 75 FR 19983 - National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Initial Review Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... the following individual research announcements: (1) ] CE 10 001 Preventing Unintentional Childhood... Preventing Violence and Violence- Related Injury (R01) Agenda items are subject to change as...

  17. Physiological, physical and on-ice performance criteria for selection of elite ice hockey teams

    PubMed Central

    Roczniok, R; Stanula, A; Mostowik, A; Kowalczyk, M; Fidos-Czuba, O; Zając, A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine physiological and physical determinants of ice-hockey performance in order to assess their impact on the result during a selection for ice hockey. A total of 42 ice hockey players took part in the selection camp. At the end of the camp 20 best players were selected by team of expert coaches to the ice hockey team and created group G1, while the second group (G2) consisted of not selected players (non-successful group Evaluation of goodness of fit of the model to the data was based on the Hosmer Lemeshow test. Ice hockey players selected to the team were taller 181.95±4.02 cm, had lower% body fat 13.17±3.17%, a shorter time to peak power 2.47±0.35 s, higher relative peak power 21.34±2.41 W·kg−1 and higher relative total work 305.18±28.41 J·kg−1. The results of the aerobic capacity test showed significant differences only in case of two variables. Ice hockey players in the G1 had higher VO2max 4.07±0.31 l·min−1 values than players in the G2 as well as ice hockey players in G1 showed a higher level of relative VO2max 51.75±2.99 ml·min−1·kg−1 than athletes in G2. Ice hockey players selected to the team (G1) performed better in the 30 m Forwards Sprint 4.28±0.31 s; 6x9 Turns 12.19±0.75 s; 6x9 stops 12.79±0.49 s and Endurance test (6x30 m stops) 32.01±0.80 s than players in G2. The logistic regression model showed that the best predictors of success in the recruitment process of top level ice hockey players were time to peak power, relative peak power, VO2max and 30 m sprint forwards on ice. On the basis of the constructed predictive logistic regression model it will be possible to determine the probability of success of the athletes during following the selection processes to the team. PMID:26985133

  18. Incidence Rate of Needlestick and Sharps Injuries in 67 Japanese Hospitals: A National Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Toru; Wada, Koji; Lee, Jong Ja; Mitsuda, Toshihiro; Kidouchi, Kiyoshi; Kurosu, Hitomi; Morisawa, Yuji; Aminaka, Mayumi; Okubo, Takashi; Kimura, Satoshi; Moriya, Kyoji

    2013-01-01

    Background Determining incidence rates of needlestick and sharps injuries (NSIs) using data from multiple hospitals may help hospitals to compare their in-house data with national averages and thereby institute relevant measures to minimize NSIs. We aimed to determine the incidence rate of NSIs using the nationwide EPINet surveillance system. Methodology/Principal Findings Data were analyzed from 5,463 cases collected between April 2009 and March 2011 from 67 Japanese HIV/AIDS referral hospitals that participated in EPINet-Japan. The NSI incidence rate was calculated as the annual number of cases with NSIs per 100 occupied beds, according to the demographic characteristics of the injured person, place, timing, device, and the patients’ infectious status. The NSI incidence rates according to hospital size were analyzed by a non-parametric test of trend. The mean number of cases with NSIs per 100 occupied beds per year was 4.8 (95% confidence interval, 4.1–5.6) for 25 hospitals with 399 or fewer beds, 6.7 (5.9–7.4) for 24 hospitals with 400–799 beds, and 7.6 (6.7–8.5) for 18 hospitals with 800 or more beds (p-trend<0.01). NSIs frequently occurred in health care workers in their 20 s; the NSI incidence rate for this age group was 2.1 (1.6–2.5) for hospitals having 399 or fewer beds, 3.5 (3.0–4.1) for hospitals with 400–799 beds, and 4.5 (3.9–5.0) for hospitals with 800 or more beds (p-trend<0.01). Conclusions/Significance The incidence rate of NSIs tended to be higher for larger hospitals and in workers aged less than 40 years; injury occurrence was more likely to occur in places such as patient rooms and operating rooms. Application of the NSI incidence rates by hospital size, as a benchmark, could allow individual hospitals to compare their NSI incidence rates with those of other institutions, which could facilitate the development of adequate control strategies. PMID:24204856

  19. National Head and Spinal Cord Injury Prevention Program of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Watts, C; Eyster, E F

    1992-03-01

    Organized neurosurgery has developed and promoted a national educational program for adolescents to reduce the number of head and spinal cord injuries sustained by this group of young people. The program has been adopted widely, with over 1,000,000 teenagers exposed to it since its inception in 1986. Preliminary data suggest that the program has had a favorable impact on the knowledge and attitudes of young people regarding head and spinal cord injuries, risk-taking behavior, and incidence of injuries.

  20. Serum SNTF Increases in Concussed Professional Ice Hockey Players and Relates to the Severity of Postconcussion Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Shahim, Pashtun; Tegner, Yelverton; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Smith, Douglas H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Biomarkers for diffuse axonal injury could have utilities for the acute diagnosis and clinical care of concussion, including those related to sports. The calpain-derived αII-spectrin N-terminal fragment (SNTF) accumulates in axons after traumatic injury and increases in human blood after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in relation to white matter abnormalities and persistent cognitive dysfunction. However, SNTF has never been evaluated as a biomarker for sports-related concussion. Here, we conducted longitudinal analysis of serum SNTF in professional ice hockey players, 28 of whom had a concussion, along with 45 players evaluated during the preseason, 17 of whom were also tested after a concussion-free training game. Compared with preseason levels, serum SNTF increased at 1 h after concussion and remained significantly elevated from 12 h to 6 days, before declining to preseason baseline. In contrast, serum SNTF levels were unchanged after training. In 8 players, postconcussion symptoms resolved within a few days, and in these cases serum SNTF levels were at baseline. On the other hand, for the 20 players withheld from play for 6 days or longer, serum SNTF levels rose from 1 h to 6 days postconcussion, and at 12–36 h differed significantly from the less-severe concussions (p=0.004). Serum SNTF exhibited diagnostic accuracy for concussion, especially so with delayed return to play (area under the curve=0.87). Multi-variate analyses of serum SNTF and tau improved the diagnostic accuracy, the relationship with the delay in return to play, and the temporal window beyond tau alone. These results provide evidence that blood SNTF, a biomarker for axonal injury after mTBI, may be useful for diagnosis and prognosis of sports-related concussion, as well as for guiding neurobiologically informed decisions on return to play. PMID:25419578

  1. Serum SNTF Increases in Concussed Professional Ice Hockey Players and Relates to the Severity of Postconcussion Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Siman, Robert; Shahim, Pashtun; Tegner, Yelverton; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Smith, Douglas H

    2015-09-01

    Biomarkers for diffuse axonal injury could have utilities for the acute diagnosis and clinical care of concussion, including those related to sports. The calpain-derived αII-spectrin N-terminal fragment (SNTF) accumulates in axons after traumatic injury and increases in human blood after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in relation to white matter abnormalities and persistent cognitive dysfunction. However, SNTF has never been evaluated as a biomarker for sports-related concussion. Here, we conducted longitudinal analysis of serum SNTF in professional ice hockey players, 28 of whom had a concussion, along with 45 players evaluated during the preseason, 17 of whom were also tested after a concussion-free training game. Compared with preseason levels, serum SNTF increased at 1 h after concussion and remained significantly elevated from 12 h to 6 days, before declining to preseason baseline. In contrast, serum SNTF levels were unchanged after training. In 8 players, postconcussion symptoms resolved within a few days, and in these cases serum SNTF levels were at baseline. On the other hand, for the 20 players withheld from play for 6 days or longer, serum SNTF levels rose from 1 h to 6 days postconcussion, and at 12-36 h differed significantly from the less-severe concussions (p=0.004). Serum SNTF exhibited diagnostic accuracy for concussion, especially so with delayed return to play (area under the curve=0.87). Multi-variate analyses of serum SNTF and tau improved the diagnostic accuracy, the relationship with the delay in return to play, and the temporal window beyond tau alone. These results provide evidence that blood SNTF, a biomarker for axonal injury after mTBI, may be useful for diagnosis and prognosis of sports-related concussion, as well as for guiding neurobiologically informed decisions on return to play. PMID:25419578

  2. Head Injury Secondary to Suspected Child Maltreatment: Results of a Prospective Canadian National Surveillance Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Susan; Ward, Michelle; Moreau, Katherine; Fortin, Gilles; King, Jim; MacKay, Morag; Plint, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine the incidence, clinical features, and demographic profile of head injury secondary to suspected child maltreatment (abuse or neglect) in Canada to help inform the development and evaluation of prevention programs for abusive head injuries. Methods: From March 1, 2005 to February 28, 2008, an average of 2,545…

  3. 77 FR 58847 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (BSC, NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... Center for Injury Prevention and Control (BSC, NCIPC) In accordance with Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... research and control activities related to injury. Matters To Be Discussed: The BSC, NCIPC will discuss the... to the BSC. There will be 15 minutes allotted for public comments at the end of the open...

  4. Preventing Burns and Scalds. Injury Prevention for Young Children from the National Safety Certification System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Sheryl L.; Walker, April L.

    This booklet outlines a comprehensive fire and burn injury prevention program which includes an instructor's manual, a videotape, and a test: the video provides additional information and examples of injury prevention techniques, and the test measures the amount of knowledge acquired. Following an introduction, the prevalence and extent of burn…

  5. Ignition and Growth Modeling of LX-17 Hockey Puck Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    2004-04-19

    Detonating solid plastic bonded explosives (PBX) formulated with the insensitive molecule triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) exhibit measurable reaction zone lengths, curved shock fronts, and regions of failing chemical reaction at abrupt changes in the charge geometry. A recent set of ''hockey puck'' experiments measured the breakout times of diverging detonation waves in ambient temperature LX-17 (92.5 % TATB plus 7.5% Kel-F binder) and the breakout times at the lower surfaces of 15 mm thick LX-17 discs placed below the detonator-booster plane. The LX-17 detonation waves in these discs grow outward from the initial wave leaving regions of unreacted or partially reacted TATB in the corners of these charges. This new experimental data is accurately simulated for the first time using the Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for LX-17, which is normalized to a great deal of detonation reaction zone, failure diameter and diverging detonation data. A pressure cubed dependence for the main growth of reaction rate yields excellent agreement with experiment, while a pressure squared rate diverges too quickly and a pressure quadrupled rate diverges too slowly in the LX-17 below the booster equatorial plane.

  6. The risk of burn injury during long-term oxygen therapy: a 17-year longitudinal national study in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Tanash, Hanan A; Huss, Fredrik; Ekström, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) improves the survival time in hypoxemic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Despite warnings about potential dangers, a considerable number of patients continue to smoke while on LTOT. The incidence of burn injuries related to LTOT is unknown. The aim of this study was to estimate the rate of burn injury requiring health care contact during LTOT. Methods Prospective, population-based, consecutive cohort study of people starting LTOT from any cause between January 1, 1992 and December 31, 2009 in the Swedish National Register of Respiratory Failure (Swedevox). Results In total, 12,497 patients (53% women) were included. The mean (standard deviation) age was 72±9 years. The main reasons for starting LTOT were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (75%) and pulmonary fibrosis (15%). Only 269 (2%) were active smokers when LTOT was initiated. The median follow-up time to event was 1.5 years (interquartile range, 0.55–3.1). In total, 17 patients had a diagnosed burn injury during 27,890 person-years of LTOT. The rate of burn injury was 61 (95% confidence interval, 36–98) per 100,000 person-years. There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of burn injury between ever-smokers and never-smokers, or between men and women. Conclusion The rate of burn injuries in patients on LTOT seems to be low in Sweden. The strict requirements in Sweden for smoking cessation before LTOT initiation may contribute to this finding. PMID:26622175

  7. Motor vehicle injuries in Qatar: time trends in a rapidly developing Middle Eastern nation.

    PubMed

    Mamtani, Ravinder; Al-Thani, Mohammed H; Al-Thani, Al-Anoud Mohammed; Sheikh, Javaid I; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2012-04-01

    Despite their wealth and modern road systems, traffic injury rates in Middle Eastern countries are generally higher than those in Western countries. The authors examined traffic injuries in Qatar during 2000-2010, a period of rapid population growth, focusing on the impact of speed control cameras installed in 2007 on overall injury rates and mortality. During the period 2000-2006, prior to camera installation, the mean (SD) vehicular injury death rate per 100,000 was 19.9±4.1. From 2007 to 2010, the mean (SD) vehicular death rates were significantly lower: 14.7±1.5 (p=0.028). Non-fatal severe injury rates also declined, but mild injury rates increased, perhaps because of increased traffic congestion and improved notification. It is possible that speed cameras decreased speeding enough to affect the death rate, without affecting overall injury rates. These data suggest that in a rapidly growing Middle Eastern country, photo enforcement (speed) cameras can be an important component of traffic control, but other measures will be required for maximum impact.

  8. A physical profile of elite female ice hockey players from the USA.

    PubMed

    Ransdell, Lynda B; Murray, Teena

    2011-09-01

    Despite impressive numbers of hockey participants, there is little research examining elite female ice hockey players. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe the physical characteristics of elite female ice hockey players who were trying out for the 2010 US Women's Ice Hockey team. Twenty-three women participated in the study and were evaluated for body mass (kilograms), height (centimeters), age (years) vertical jump (centimeters), standing long jump (centimeters), 1RM front squat (kilograms), front squat relative to body mass (percent), 1RM bench press (kilograms), bench press relative to body mass (percent), pull-ups, and body composition (percent body fat). The athletes in this sample were 24.7 years of age (SD = 3.1) and 169.7 cm tall (SD = 6.9); on average, they weighed 70.4 kg (SD = 7.1) and reported 15.8% body fat (SD = 1.9). Mean vertical jump height was 50.3 cm (SD = 5.7) and standing long jump was 214.8 cm (SD = 10.9). Mean 1RM for the upper body strength (bench press) was 65.3 kg (SD = 12.2) (95.1 ± 15.5% of body mass), and 1RM for lower body (front squat) was 88.6 kg (SD = 11.2) (127.7 ± 16.3% of body mass). This study is the first to report the physical characteristics of elite female ice hockey players from the USA. Data should assist strength and conditioning coaches in identifying talent, testing for strengths and weaknesses, comparing future teams to these indicators, and designing programs that will enhance the performance capabilities of female ice hockey athletes.

  9. Gender Differences in Head Impacts Sustained by Collegiate Ice Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Brainard, Lindley L.; Beckwith, Jonathan G.; Chu, Jeffrey J.; Crisco, Joseph J.; McAllister, Thomas W.; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Maerlender, Arthur C.; Greenwald, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to quantify the frequency, magnitude, and location of head impacts sustained by male and female collegiate ice hockey players over two seasons of play. Methods Over two seasons, 88 collegiate athletes (51 female, 37 male) on two female and male NCAA varsity ice hockey teams wore instrumented helmets. Each helmet was equipped with 6 single-axis accelerometers and a miniature data acquisition system to capture and record head impacts sustained during play. Data collected from the helmets were post-processed to compute linear and rotational acceleration of the head as well as impact location. The head impact exposure data (frequency, location, and magnitude) were then compared across gender. Results Female hockey players experienced a significantly lower (p < 0.001) number of impacts per athlete exposure than males (female: 1.7 ± 0.7; male: 2.9 ± 1.2). The frequency of impacts by location was the same between gender (p > 0.278) for all locations except the right side of the head, where males received fewer impacts than females (p = 0.031). Female hockey players were 1.1 times more likely than males to sustain an impact less than 50 g while males were 1.3 times more likely to sustain an impact greater than 100 g. Similarly, males were 1.9 times more likely to sustain an impact with peak rotational acceleration greater than 5,000 rad/s2 and 3.5 times more likely to sustain an impact greater than 10,000 rad/s2. Conclusions Although the incidence of concussion has typically been higher for female hockey players than male hockey players, female players sustain fewer impacts and impacts resulting in lower head acceleration than males. Further study is required to better understand the intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors that lead to higher rates of concussion for females that have been previously reported. PMID:21716150

  10. Spinal Cord Injury Community Survey: A National, Comprehensive Study to Portray the Lives of Canadians with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Vanessa K.; Cobb, John; Leblond, Jean; Dumont, Frédéric S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: To better understand service-related needs and the current situation of persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) living in the community, a more comprehensive approach for studying their interrelationships (needs vs community living outcomes) is greatly needed. Objective: To describe the development, design, and findings of a Canadian survey portraying the life situation of people with SCI. Method: The SCI Community Survey covers demographics, health, SCI-specific needs, community participation, employment, quality of life, health care utilization, and overall health rating. A total of 1,549 persons with SCI completed the survey (Web or phone) between May 2011 and August 2012. Results: Some major expressed needs for services to support community living are met to a great extent for a substantial proportion of people with SCI. Complications remain highly prevalent for some health issues, including pain, sexual dysfunction, and musculoskeletal disorders. The extent of community participation based on values and preferences varies tremendously among daily activities and social roles. Some dimensions of quality of life are rated positively (eg, family life) while others are greatly disrupted (eg, sex life and physical health). Most of these findings vary significantly between people with traumatic and nontraumatic lesions. Conclusion: This survey is the first in Canada and among the first worldwide to draw a comprehensive picture of major aspects of the lives of people with SCI including service needs. The results will help to determine the links between various aspects of community living and guide service providers and policy makers in focusing on major issues to enhance quality of life after SCI. PMID:25477739

  11. A Prospective Study of Overuse Knee Injuries Among Female Athletes With Muscle Imbalances and Structural Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Pescatello, Linda S.; Faghri, Pouran; Anderson, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively examine the influence of hamstring-to-quadriceps (H:Q) ratio and structural abnormalities on the prevalence of overuse knee injuries among female collegiate athletes. Design and Setting: We used chi-square 2 × 2 contingency tables and the Fischer exact test to examine associations among H:Q ratios, structural abnormalities, and overuse knee injuries. Subjects: Fifty-three apparently healthy women (age = 19.4 ± 1.3 years, height = 167.6 ± 10.1 cm, mass = 65.0 ± 10.0 kg) from National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I women's field hockey (n = 23), soccer (n = 20), and basketball teams (n = 10) volunteered. Measurements: The H:Q ratio was determined from a preseason isokinetic test on a Biodex system at 60°/s and 300°/s. We measured athletes for genu recurvatum and Q-angles with a 14-in (35.56-cm) goniometer. Iliotibial band flexibility was assessed via the Ober test. Results: Ten overuse knee injuries (iliotibial band friction syndromes = 5, patellar tendinitis = 3, patellofemoral syndrome = 1, pes anserine tendinitis = 1) occurred in 9 athletes. The H:Q ratio below the normal range at 300°/s (P = 0.047) was associated with overuse knee injuries, as was the presence of genu recurvatum (P = 0.004). In addition, athletes possessing lower H:Q ratios at 300°/s and genu recurvatum incurred more overuse knee injuries than athletes without these abnormalities (P = 0.001). Conclusions: The presence of genu recurvatum and an H: Q ratio below normal range was associated with an increased prevalence of overuse knee injuries among female collegiate athletes. Further investigation is needed to clarify which preseason screening procedures may identify collegiate athletes who are susceptible to overuse knee injuries. PMID:15496997

  12. A Prospective Study of Overuse Knee Injuries Among Female Athletes With Muscle Imbalances and Structural Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Devan, Michelle R; Pescatello, Linda S; Faghri, Pouran; Anderson, Jeffrey

    2004-09-01

    OBJECTIVE: To prospectively examine the influence of hamstring-to-quadriceps (H:Q) ratio and structural abnormalities on the prevalence of overuse knee injuries among female collegiate athletes. DESIGN AND SETTING: We used chi-square 2 x 2 contingency tables and the Fischer exact test to examine associations among H:Q ratios, structural abnormalities, and overuse knee injuries. SUBJECTS: Fifty-three apparently healthy women (age = 19.4 +/- 1.3 years, height = 167.6 +/- 10.1 cm, mass = 65.0 +/- 10.0 kg) from National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I women's field hockey (n = 23), soccer (n = 20), and basketball teams (n = 10) volunteered. MEASUREMENTS: The H:Q ratio was determined from a preseason isokinetic test on a Biodex system at 60 degrees /s and 300 degrees /s. We measured athletes for genu recurvatum and Q-angles with a 14-in (35.56-cm) goniometer. Iliotibial band flexibility was assessed via the Ober test. RESULTS: Ten overuse knee injuries (iliotibial band friction syndromes = 5, patellar tendinitis = 3, patellofemoral syndrome = 1, pes anserine tendinitis = 1) occurred in 9 athletes. The H:Q ratio below the normal range at 300 degrees /s (P = 0.047) was associated with overuse knee injuries, as was the presence of genu recurvatum (P = 0.004). In addition, athletes possessing lower H:Q ratios at 300 degrees /s and genu recurvatum incurred more overuse knee injuries than athletes without these abnormalities (P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The presence of genu recurvatum and an H: Q ratio below normal range was associated with an increased prevalence of overuse knee injuries among female collegiate athletes. Further investigation is needed to clarify which preseason screening procedures may identify collegiate athletes who are susceptible to overuse knee injuries. PMID:15496997

  13. A Prospective Study of Overuse Knee Injuries Among Female Athletes With Muscle Imbalances and Structural Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Devan, Michelle R; Pescatello, Linda S; Faghri, Pouran; Anderson, Jeffrey

    2004-09-01

    OBJECTIVE: To prospectively examine the influence of hamstring-to-quadriceps (H:Q) ratio and structural abnormalities on the prevalence of overuse knee injuries among female collegiate athletes. DESIGN AND SETTING: We used chi-square 2 x 2 contingency tables and the Fischer exact test to examine associations among H:Q ratios, structural abnormalities, and overuse knee injuries. SUBJECTS: Fifty-three apparently healthy women (age = 19.4 +/- 1.3 years, height = 167.6 +/- 10.1 cm, mass = 65.0 +/- 10.0 kg) from National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I women's field hockey (n = 23), soccer (n = 20), and basketball teams (n = 10) volunteered. MEASUREMENTS: The H:Q ratio was determined from a preseason isokinetic test on a Biodex system at 60 degrees /s and 300 degrees /s. We measured athletes for genu recurvatum and Q-angles with a 14-in (35.56-cm) goniometer. Iliotibial band flexibility was assessed via the Ober test. RESULTS: Ten overuse knee injuries (iliotibial band friction syndromes = 5, patellar tendinitis = 3, patellofemoral syndrome = 1, pes anserine tendinitis = 1) occurred in 9 athletes. The H:Q ratio below the normal range at 300 degrees /s (P = 0.047) was associated with overuse knee injuries, as was the presence of genu recurvatum (P = 0.004). In addition, athletes possessing lower H:Q ratios at 300 degrees /s and genu recurvatum incurred more overuse knee injuries than athletes without these abnormalities (P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The presence of genu recurvatum and an H: Q ratio below normal range was associated with an increased prevalence of overuse knee injuries among female collegiate athletes. Further investigation is needed to clarify which preseason screening procedures may identify collegiate athletes who are susceptible to overuse knee injuries.

  14. Lesbian erotics at women's hockey: fans, flashing, and the Booby Orrs.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Judy

    2009-01-01

    This article analyzes a public breast flashing event that occurred during the women's ice hockey tournament at the OutGames/Western Cup Lesbigay athletic event in 2007. Employing a postfoundational perspective, I first contextualize the ice hockey subculture of the team called the Booby Orrs, outlining some of our history, norms, and context. I then tell the particular story that leads to our fans flashing their breasts as we finally scored some goals. I end with my analysis of this event: how a public nude display of sexualized women's breasts in a lesbian-coded public space prompted a resistant sporting moment, at least contingently.

  15. Lesbian erotics at women's hockey: fans, flashing, and the Booby Orrs.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Judy

    2009-01-01

    This article analyzes a public breast flashing event that occurred during the women's ice hockey tournament at the OutGames/Western Cup Lesbigay athletic event in 2007. Employing a postfoundational perspective, I first contextualize the ice hockey subculture of the team called the Booby Orrs, outlining some of our history, norms, and context. I then tell the particular story that leads to our fans flashing their breasts as we finally scored some goals. I end with my analysis of this event: how a public nude display of sexualized women's breasts in a lesbian-coded public space prompted a resistant sporting moment, at least contingently. PMID:19598052

  16. Hockey, iPads, and Projectile Motion in a Physics Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hechter, Richard P.

    2013-09-01

    With the increased availability of modern technology and handheld probeware for classrooms, the iPad1 and the Video Physics2 application developed by Vernier are used to capture and analyze the motion of an ice hockey puck within secondary-level physics education. Students collect, analyze, and generate digital modes of representation of physics phenomena using modern technologies to complement theoretical plots. This activity acknowledges hockey players' implicit understanding of the launch angle and initial velocity of a saucer pass as basic projectile motion while engaging students in authentic physics-based problem solving.

  17. 76 FR 67192 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (BSC, NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... Center for Injury Prevention and Control (BSC, NCIPC) In accordance with Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal.... Matters To Be Discussed: The BSC, NCIPC will discuss the recommendations provided by the expert panel...

  18. 2008 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2009-09-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  19. 2003 Y-12 National Security Complex Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-05-23

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Y-12. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  20. 2008 Y-12 National Security Complex Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2009-12-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  1. 2009 Y-12 National Security Complex Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2010-07-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  2. 2008 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2009-12-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  3. 2007 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2009-03-04

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  4. 2007 Y-12 National Security Complex Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2009-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  5. 2007 Los Alamos National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2009-06-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  6. Parental death in childhood and self-inflicted injuries in young adults-a national cohort study from Sweden.

    PubMed

    Rostila, Mikael; Berg, Lisa; Arat, Arzu; Vinnerljung, Bo; Hjern, Anders

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that parental death influences health and mortality in bereaved offspring. To date, few studies have examined whether exposure to parental bereavement in childhood is associated with suicidality later in life. The aim of the present research was to investigate whether parental death during childhood influences self-inflicted injuries/poisoning in young adulthood. A national cohort born during 1973-1982 (N = 871,402) was followed prospectively in the National Patient Discharge Register from age 18 to 31-40 years. Cox regression analyses of proportional hazards, with adjustment for socio-demographic confounders and parental psychosocial covariates, were used to test hypotheses regarding parental loss and hospital admission due to self-inflicted injuries/poisoning. Parental deaths were divided into deaths caused by (1) external causes/substance abuse and (2) natural causes. Persons who had lost a parent to an external cause/substance abuse-related death had the highest risk of being admitted to a hospital for a self-inflicted injury/poisoning; HRs 2.03 (1.67-2.46) for maternal death and 2.03 (1.84-2.25) for paternal death, after adjustment for socio-demographic confounders and risk factors among surviving parents. Risks were also increased for parental death due to natural causes, but at a lower level: 1.19 (1.01-1.39) and 1.28 (1.15-1.43), respectively. Losing a father before school age was associated with a higher risk of hospital admission for a self-inflicted injury/poisoning than was loss at an older age for both genders. Maternal loss before school age was associated with a higher risk only for men, particularly maternal death by natural causes (p < 0.01).

  7. Psychotic-Like Experiences and Nonsuidical Self-Injury in England: Results from a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Ai; Stickley, Andrew; Haro, Josep Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the association between psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) in the general adult population. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the association using nationally-representative data from England. Methods Data from the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey was analyzed. The sample consisted of 7403 adults aged ≥16 years. Five forms of PLEs (mania/hypomania, thought control, paranoia, strange experience, auditory hallucination) were assessed with the Psychosis Screening Questionnaire. The association between PLEs and NSSI was assessed by multivariable logistic regression. Hierarchical models were constructed to evaluate the influence of alcohol and drug dependence, common mental disorders, and borderline personality disorder symptoms on this association. Results The prevalence of NSSI was 4.7% (female 5.2% and male 4.2%), while the figures among those with and without any PLEs were 19.2% and 3.9% respectively. In a regression model adjusted for sociodemographic factors and stressful life events, most types of PLE were significantly associated with NSSI: paranoia (OR 3.57; 95%CI 1.96–6.52), thought control (OR 2.45; 95%CI 1.05–5.74), strange experience (OR 3.13; 95%CI 1.99–4.93), auditory hallucination (OR 4.03; 95%CI 1.56–10.42), and any PLE (OR 2.78; 95%CI 1.88–4.11). The inclusion of borderline personality disorder symptoms in the models had a strong influence on the association between PLEs and NSSI as evidenced by a large attenuation in the ORs for PLEs, with only paranoia continuing to be significantly associated with NSSI. Substance dependence and common mental disorders had little influence on the association between PLEs and NSSI. Conclusions Borderline personality disorder symptoms may be an important factor in the link between PLEs and NSSI. Future studies on PLEs and NSSI should take these symptoms into account. PMID:26700475

  8. Epidemiology of National Collegiate Athletic Association men’s and women’s swimming and diving injuries from 2009/10 to 2013/14

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Zachary Y.; Baugh, Christine M.; Hibberd, Elizabeth E.; Snook, Erin M.; Hayden, Ross; Dompier, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim Recent injury data for collegiate-level swimming and diving is limited. Previous data is limited to single seasons, elite and national team athletes, or emergency department data. This study describes the epidemiology of men’s and women’s swimming and diving injuries reported by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance Program (ISP) during the 2009/10-2013/14 academic years. Methods Injuries and athlete-exposure (AE) data reported within nine men’s and 13 women’s swimming and diving programs were analyzed. Injury rates, injury rate ratios (IRR), and injury proportions by body site, diagnosis, and mechanism were reported with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results The ISP captured 149 and 208 injuries for men’s and women’s swimming and diving, respectively, leading to injury rates of 1.54/1000AEs and 1.71/1000AEs. Among females, divers had a higher injury rate (2.49/1000AEs) than swimmers (1.63/1000AEs; IRR=1.53; 95%CI: 1.07, 2.19). Injury rates for male divers (1.94/1000AEs) and swimmers (1.48/1000AEs) did not differ (IRR=1.33; 95%CI: 0.85, 2.31). Most injuries occurred to the shoulder and resulted in strains. Many injuries were classified as overuse or non-contact. Female swimmers had a higher overuse injury rate (1.04/1000AEs) than male swimmers (0.66/1000AEs; IRR=1.58; 95%CI: 1.14, 2.19). Overuse injury rates for female divers (0.54/1000AEs) and male divers (0.46/1000AEs) did not differ (IRR=1.16; 95%CI: 0.40, 3.34). Conclusions Shoulder, strain, and overuse injuries were common in collegiate men’s and women’s swimming and diving. In addition, divers may have higher injury rates than swimmers, although small reported numbers in this study warrant additional research. PMID:25633831

  9. Sport-related dental injury claims to the New Zealand Accident Rehabilitation & Compensation Insurance Corporation, 1993-1996: analysis of the 10 most common sports, excluding rugby union.

    PubMed

    Love, R M; Carman, N; Carmichael, S; MacFadyen, E

    1998-12-01

    A large number of New Zealanders participate in sport, either formally or informally; sporting injuries are common. In New Zealand, the Accident Rehabilitation & Compensation Insurance Corporation (ACC) is the main organisation that covers sports-related dental claims. Rugby union claims are the most common. The ACC's national data from 1993 to 1996 relating to dental claims for sports injuries (excluding rugby union) were analysed. This study identified 45 other sports in which participants are also at risk for dental injuries. Total claims per sport for each year were determined, and the "top 10" sports for claims per year were identified and compared for any change over the years studied. The top 10 sports for 1993 and 1994 were, in descending order: swimming, rugby league, basketball, cricket, hockey, soccer, netball, squash, softball-baseball, and tennis. Data for 1995 and 1996 revealed a similar trend, except that touch rugby displaced tennis as the tenth-ranked sport. The most common age group for claims was the age group 10-19 years, with a male:female ratio of approximately 2:1. Many sports, in addition to rugby union, place their participants at risk of dental injury. Awareness of prevention of dental injuries should be more widely promoted for all sports.

  10. Ice Hockey Players Using a Weighted Implement when Training on the Ice: A Randomized Control Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Timothy W.; Tvoric, Bojan; Walker, Bruce; Noonan, Dom; Sibla, Janeene

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential for improving hockey players' performance using a weighted implement on the ice. Forty-eight players were tested using a grip strength dynamometer. They also were assessed on their abilities to stick-handle. The participants were randomly placed into a control or research group. The…

  11. Experiential Learning in the Introductory Class: The Role of Minor League Hockey in Teaching Social Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, Krista D.

    2005-01-01

    To convince my students they are surrounded by social psychology, we attended a minor league hockey game. During the next class period I asked students to write a brief paragraph about their experiences. From those paragraphs I chose four reoccurring themes to analyze from a social psychological perspective. My introductory classes and I benefited…

  12. Selected Field Hockey and Lacrosse Articles. Sports Articles Reprint Series. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Harriet, Ed.

    This collection of articles from 1964-1970 "Field Hockey-Lacrosse Guides" by the Division for Girls and Women's Sports is the latest in the American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation's "Sports Articles Reprint Series." A special project of the Publications Committee for Girl's and Women's Sports, it is the third edition of…

  13. Comparison of Dynamic Balance in Collegiate Field Hockey and Football Players Using Star Excursion Balance Test

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Rashi; Moiz, Jamal Ali

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The preliminary study aimed to compare dynamic balance between collegiate athletes competing or training in football and hockey using star excursion balance test. Methods A total thirty university level players, football (n = 15) and field hockey (n = 15) were participated in the study. Dynamic balance was assessed by using star excursion balance test. The testing grid consists of 8 lines each 120 cm in length extending from a common point at 45° increments. The subjects were instructed to maintain a stable single leg stance with the test leg with shoes off and to reach for maximal distance with the other leg in each of the 8 directions. A pencil was used to point and read the distance to which each subject's foot reached. The normalized leg reach distances in each direction were summed for both limbs and the total sum of the mean of summed normalized distances of both limbs were calculated. Results There was no significant difference in all the directions of star excursion balance test scores in both the groups. Additionally, composite reach distances of both groups also found non-significant (P=0.5). However, the posterior (P=0.05) and lateral (P=0.03) normalized reach distances were significantly more in field hockey players. Conclusion Field hockey players and football players did not differ in terms of dynamic balance. PMID:24427482

  14. Checking in: An Analysis of the (Lack of) Body Checking in Women's Ice Hockey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaving, Charlene; Roberts, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Despite the growing popularity of women's ice hockey in North America, players continue to face limitations because of the prohibition of body checking. In this paper, we argue from a liberal feminist philosophical perspective that this prohibition reinforces existing traditional stereotypes of female athletes. Because the women's game does not…

  15. Receiving Video-Based Feedback in Elite Ice-Hockey: A Player's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Lee J.; Potrac, Paul; Groom, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide some rich insights into how an elite ice-hockey player responded to his coaches' pedagogical delivery of video-based feedback sessions. Data for this study were gathered through a series of in-depth, semi-structured interviews and a reflective log relating to those interviews. The interviews were…

  16. A test of motor skill-specific action embodiment in ice-hockey players.

    PubMed

    Ong, Nicole T; Lohse, Keith R; Chua, Romeo; Sinnett, Scott; Hodges, Nicola J

    2014-07-01

    To further our understanding of the role of the motor system in comprehending action-related sentences, we compared action experts (athletes) to visual experts (fans) and novices when responding with an action-specific effector (either hand or foot). These conditions allowed inferences about the degree and specificity of embodiment in language comprehension. Ice hockey players, fans and novices made speeded judgments regarding the congruence between an auditorily presented sentence and a subsequently presented picture. Picture stimuli consisted of either hockey or everyday items. Half of these pictures 'matched' the action implied in the preceding sentence. Further, the action in these images involved either primarily the hand or the foot. For everyday items, action-matched items were responded to faster than action-mismatched items. However, only the players and fans showed the action-match effect for hockey items. There were no consistent effector-stimuli compatibility effects, nor skill-based interactions with compatibility, suggesting that the action-match effect was not based on motor ability per se, but rather a construction of the action based on knowledge or visual experience with the hockey related sentences.

  17. Describing Strategies Used by Elite, Intermediate, and Novice Ice Hockey Referees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, David J.; Ste-Marie, Diane M.

    2014-01-01

    Much is known about sport officials' decisions (e.g., anticipation, visual search, and prior experience). Comprehension of the entire decision process, however, requires an ecologically valid examination. To address this, we implemented a 2-part study using an expertise paradigm with ice hockey referees. Purpose: Study 1 explored the…

  18. Hockey, iPads, and Projectile Motion in a Physics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hechter, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    With the increased availability of modern technology and handheld probeware for classrooms, the iPad and the Video Physics application developed by Vernier are used to capture and analyze the motion of an ice hockey puck within secondary-level physics education. Students collect, analyze, and generate digital modes of representation of physics…

  19. Forecheck, backcheck, health check: the benefits of playing recreational ice hockey for adults in Canada.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Peter; Chowhan, James

    2016-11-01

    More than 1 million Canadian adults play recreational ice hockey. Compared to elite players, very little is known about the physical and health characteristics of people who play the game for fun. Analyzing data from Statistics Canada's 2011/12 Canadian Community Health Survey, the paper found that there is an association between physically active males age 35 or over who play ice hockey regularly (at least once a week) and enhanced health more so than other physically active males. While these players are larger in body size, they have significantly lower rates of diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease and report significantly higher rates of self-assessed health. Given the potential health benefits associated with this high intensity sport, the paper discusses ways in which participation can be promoted among less physically active adults and people who are new to the game or who have historically lower levels of participation including women and recent immigrants. Finally, the paper argues that compared to the very high costs associated with child and youth hockey, participation in adult recreational ice hockey is quite affordable. PMID:26910323

  20. Previous-day hypohydration impairs skill performance in elite female field hockey players.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, H; Sunderland, C

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 2% hypohydration on skill performance in elite female field hockey players following intermittent exercise in the heat. Eight elite female field hockey players performed 50 min of a field hockey-specific intermittent treadmill running protocol (FHITP) in hot environmental conditions (33 °C, 60% relative humidity) in different hydration states: euhydrated (EUH) and hypohydrated by 2% body mass (HYPO). Hydration status was manipulated via a period (121±10 min) of passive hyperthermia (40 °C, 75% relative humidity) and controlled fluid intake 1 day preceding testing. Ad libitum fluid intake was permitted throughout both trials. Field hockey skill tests were performed pre- and post-FHITP. Skill performance time increased (P=0.029) in the HYPO trial compared with the EUH trial, which may be attributed to an increase in penalty time (P=0.024). Decision-making time increased (P=0.008) in the HYPO trial and was significantly impaired compared with EUH (P=0.016) pre-FHITP. Ad libitum drinking appeared to be sufficient to maintain decision-making performance as no interaction effects were evident post-FHITP. Players who commence match-play in a state of hypohydration may be susceptible to decrements in skill and decision-making performance. PMID:20973829

  1. Forecheck, backcheck, health check: the benefits of playing recreational ice hockey for adults in Canada.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Peter; Chowhan, James

    2016-11-01

    More than 1 million Canadian adults play recreational ice hockey. Compared to elite players, very little is known about the physical and health characteristics of people who play the game for fun. Analyzing data from Statistics Canada's 2011/12 Canadian Community Health Survey, the paper found that there is an association between physically active males age 35 or over who play ice hockey regularly (at least once a week) and enhanced health more so than other physically active males. While these players are larger in body size, they have significantly lower rates of diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease and report significantly higher rates of self-assessed health. Given the potential health benefits associated with this high intensity sport, the paper discusses ways in which participation can be promoted among less physically active adults and people who are new to the game or who have historically lower levels of participation including women and recent immigrants. Finally, the paper argues that compared to the very high costs associated with child and youth hockey, participation in adult recreational ice hockey is quite affordable.

  2. Trajectories of Affective States in Adolescent Hockey Players: Turning Point and Motivational Antecedents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudreau, Patrick; Amiot, Catherine E.; Vallerand, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined longitudinal trajectories of positive and negative affective states with a sample of 265 adolescent elite hockey players followed across 3 measurement points during the 1st 11 weeks of a season. Latent class growth modeling, incorporating a time-varying covariate and a series of predictors assessed at the onset of the season,…

  3. Motor vehicle related injuries among American Indian and Alaskan Native youth, 1981–92: analysis of a national hospital discharge database

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, K.; Wallace, L; Furner, S.; Brewer, R.; Bolen, J.; Schieber, R.

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To describe national trends in hospitalizations for motor vehicle related injuries among children and youth (0–24 years) of the United States Indian Health Service (IHS) from 1981–92. Design—Descriptive epidemiologic study of the E coded national hospital discharge database of the IHS. Results—From 1981 to 1992, the age standardized annual incidence of motor vehicle related injury hospitalizations (per 100 000 population) among American Indian and Alaskan Native (AI/AN) youth decreased more than 65% from 269 to 93. Substantial declines in hospitalization rates for all age and sex groups, all IHS areas, and most injury types were seen over this time. Injuries to vehicle occupants accounted for 78% of all motor vehicle related injury hospitalizations. The annual incidence of hospitalization (per 100 000 population) ranged from 291 in the Billings (Wyoming/Montana) and Aberdeen (the Dakotas) areas to 38 in the Portland area (Pacific Northwest). Conclusions—National motor vehicle related injury hospitalization rates of AI/AN children and youth decreased significantly from 1981–92. This may be due to a reduction in the incidence of severe motor vehicle related trauma, changing patterns of medical practice, and changes in the use of services. Additional measures, such as passage and enforcement of tribal laws requiring the use of occupant restraints and stronger laws to prevent alcohol impaired driving, might further reduce the incidence of serious motor vehicle related injuries in this high risk population. PMID:9887418

  4. 78 FR 64505 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC) In accordance with Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... and Control. Matters to be Discussed: The BSC, NCIPC will discuss the recommendations provided by the... strategies needed to guide the Center's focus. The BSC members will also discuss potential topics for...

  5. Sediment quality thresholds: Estimates from hockey stick regression of liver lesion prevalence in English sole (Pleuronectes vetulus)

    SciTech Connect

    Horness, B.H.; Lomax, D.P.; Johnson, L.L.; Myers, M.S.; Pierce, S.M.; Collier, T.K.

    1998-01-01

    Comprehensive, integrative assessments of coastal sediment quality are best effected by using large, diverse data sets that include measures of biological dysfunction observed in association with chronic exposure to sediment contaminants. Under the auspices of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration`s National Status and Trends Program, the National Benthic Surveillance Project accumulated a database of synoptic sediment contaminant concentrations and indices of biological effects that were measured in indigenous animals collected during field surveys conducted from 1984 to 1994. This compilation of data provided the opportunity to develop a new approach for determining sediment quality criteria to add to the current repertoire of environmental assessment tools. Using a two-segment hockey stick regression, statistically significant chemical thresholds of biological effects were estimated for hepatic lesion prevalences in English sole (Pleuronectes vetulus, formerly Parophrys vetulus) in relation to sediment concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These threshold estimates are notably lower than many of those reported for other techniques. Application of this relatively simple dose-response model to subacute, chronic effects that are involved in pepatocarcinogenesis and associated with sediment toxicant content (1) reflects the link between toxicopathic disease progression and conditions observed in benthic fish exposed to contaminants and (2) provides endpoints for assessing sediment quality contaminant concentrations that are not necessarily acutely fatal but may have long-term health implications for populations that are chronically exposed.

  6. Off-Ice Anaerobic Power Does Not Predict On-Ice Repeated Shift Performance in Hockey.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Ben J; Fitzgerald, John S; Dietz, Calvin C; Ziegler, Kevin S; Baker, Sarah E; Snyder, Eric M

    2016-09-01

    Peterson, BJ, Fitzgerald, JS, Dietz, CC, Ziegler, KS, Baker, SE, and Snyder, EM. Off-ice anaerobic power does not predict on-ice repeated shift performance in hockey. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2375-2381, 2016-Anaerobic power is a significant predictor of acceleration and top speed in team sport athletes. Historically, these findings have been applied to ice hockey although recent research has brought their validity for this sport into question. As ice hockey emphasizes the ability to repeatedly produce power, single bout anaerobic power tests should be examined to determine their ability to predict on-ice performance. We tested whether conventional off-ice anaerobic power tests could predict on-ice acceleration, top speed, and repeated shift performance. Forty-five hockey players, aged 18-24 years, completed anthropometric, off-ice, and on-ice tests. Anthropometric and off-ice testing included height, weight, body composition, vertical jump, and Wingate tests. On-ice testing consisted of acceleration, top speed, and repeated shift fatigue tests. Vertical jump (VJ) (r = -0.42; r = -0.58), Wingate relative peak power (WRPP) (r = -0.32; r = -0.43), and relative mean power (WRMP) (r = -0.34; r = -0.48) were significantly correlated (p ≤ 0.05) to on-ice acceleration and top speed, respectively. Conversely, none of the off-ice tests correlated with on-ice repeated shift performance, as measured by first gate, second gate, or total course fatigue; VJ (r = 0.06; r = 0.13; r = 0.09), WRPP (r = 0.06; r = 0.14; r = 0.10), or WRMP (r = -0.10; r = -0.01; r = -0.01). Although conventional off-ice anaerobic power tests predict single bout on-ice acceleration and top speed, they neither predict the repeated shift ability of the player, nor are good markers for performance in ice hockey.

  7. The hockey-stick method to estimate evening dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) in humans.

    PubMed

    Danilenko, Konstantin V; Verevkin, Evgeniy G; Antyufeev, Viktor S; Wirz-Justice, Anna; Cajochen, Christian

    2014-04-01

    The onset of melatonin secretion in the evening is the most reliable and most widely used index of circadian timing in humans. Saliva (or plasma) is usually sampled every 0.5-1 hours under dim-light conditions in the evening 5-6 hours before usual bedtime to assess the dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO). For many years, attempts have been made to find a reliable objective determination of melatonin onset time either by fixed or dynamic threshold approaches. The here-developed hockey-stick algorithm, used as an interactive computer-based approach, fits the evening melatonin profile by a piecewise linear-parabolic function represented as a straight line switching to the branch of a parabola. The switch point is considered to reliably estimate melatonin rise time. We applied the hockey-stick method to 109 half-hourly melatonin profiles to assess the DLMOs and compared these estimates to visual ratings from three experts in the field. The DLMOs of 103 profiles were considered to be clearly quantifiable. The hockey-stick DLMO estimates were on average 4 minutes earlier than the experts' estimates, with a range of -27 to +13 minutes; in 47% of the cases the difference fell within ±5 minutes, in 98% within -20 to +13 minutes. The raters' and hockey-stick estimates showed poor accordance with DLMOs defined by threshold methods. Thus, the hockey-stick algorithm is a reliable objective method to estimate melatonin rise time, which does not depend on a threshold value and is free from errors arising from differences in subjective circadian phase estimates. The method is available as a computerized program that can be easily used in research settings and clinical practice either for salivary or plasma melatonin values.

  8. Caffeinated Energy Drinks Improve High-Speed Running in Elite Field Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Del Coso, Juan; Portillo, Javier; Salinero, Juan José; Lara, Beatriz; Abian-Vicen, Javier; Areces, Francisco

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the efficacy of a caffeine-containing energy drink to improve physical performance of elite field hockey players during a game. On 2 days separated by a week, 13 elite field hockey players (age and body mass = 23.2 ± 3.9 years and 76.1 ± 6.1 kg) ingested 3 mg of caffeine per kg of body mass in the form of an energy drink or the same drink without caffeine (placebo drink). After 60 min for caffeine absorption, participants played a simulated field hockey game (2 × 25 min). Individual running pace and instantaneous speed during the game were assessed using GPS devices. The total number of accelerations and decelerations was determined by accelerometry. Compared with the placebo drink, the caffeinated energy drink did not modify the total distance covered during the game (6,035 ± 451 m and 6,055 ± 499 m, respectively; p = .87), average heart rate (155 ± 13 beats per min and 158 ± 18 beats per min, respectively; p = .46), or the number of accelerations and decelerations (697 ± 285 and 618 ± 221, respectively; p = .15). However, the caffeinated energy drink reduced the distance covered at moderate-intensity running (793 ± 135 and 712 ± 116, respectively; p = .03) and increased the distance covered at high-intensity running (303 ± 67 m and 358 ± 117 m; p = .05) and sprinting (85 ± 41 m and 117 ± 55 m, respectively; p = .02). Elite field hockey players can benefit from ingesting caffeinated energy drinks because they increase the running distance covered at high-intensity running and sprinting. Increased running distance at high speed might represent a meaningful advantage for field hockey performance. PMID:26251550

  9. Caffeinated Energy Drinks Improve High-Speed Running in Elite Field Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Del Coso, Juan; Portillo, Javier; Salinero, Juan José; Lara, Beatriz; Abian-Vicen, Javier; Areces, Francisco

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the efficacy of a caffeine-containing energy drink to improve physical performance of elite field hockey players during a game. On 2 days separated by a week, 13 elite field hockey players (age and body mass = 23.2 ± 3.9 years and 76.1 ± 6.1 kg) ingested 3 mg of caffeine per kg of body mass in the form of an energy drink or the same drink without caffeine (placebo drink). After 60 min for caffeine absorption, participants played a simulated field hockey game (2 × 25 min). Individual running pace and instantaneous speed during the game were assessed using GPS devices. The total number of accelerations and decelerations was determined by accelerometry. Compared with the placebo drink, the caffeinated energy drink did not modify the total distance covered during the game (6,035 ± 451 m and 6,055 ± 499 m, respectively; p = .87), average heart rate (155 ± 13 beats per min and 158 ± 18 beats per min, respectively; p = .46), or the number of accelerations and decelerations (697 ± 285 and 618 ± 221, respectively; p = .15). However, the caffeinated energy drink reduced the distance covered at moderate-intensity running (793 ± 135 and 712 ± 116, respectively; p = .03) and increased the distance covered at high-intensity running (303 ± 67 m and 358 ± 117 m; p = .05) and sprinting (85 ± 41 m and 117 ± 55 m, respectively; p = .02). Elite field hockey players can benefit from ingesting caffeinated energy drinks because they increase the running distance covered at high-intensity running and sprinting. Increased running distance at high speed might represent a meaningful advantage for field hockey performance.

  10. Evaluation of ozone injury on foliage of black cherry (Prunus serotina) and tall milkweed (Asclepias exaltata) in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

    PubMed

    Chappelka, A; Renfro, J; Somers, G; Nash, B

    1997-01-01

    The incidence and severity of visible foliar ozone injury on black cherry (Prunus serotina) seedlings and saplings and tall milkweed (Asclepias exaltata) plants in Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GRSM) were determined by surveys along selected trails conducted during late summer 1992. The incidence (% injured plants) of ozone injury on black cherry was 47% and the percent injured leaves/injured plant and average leaf area injured were 43 and 6%, respectively. Maximum severity (avg. leaf area of the most severely injured leaf) was 12%. Black cherry seedlings and saplings exhibiting ozone injury were taller than non-injured plants. When insect feeding was present, it occurred 96% of the time on plants with ozone injury. Significantly more injury (p=0.007) on black cherry (% injured leaves/injured black cherry) occurred in the NW section of GRSM compared with the other Park sections. Regression analyses showed no relationships in ozone injury with respect to aspect, slope or elevation. Tall milkweed was evaluated twice during August for ozone injury. The incidence (% injured plants) of ozone injury was 74 and 79% for the first and second survey, respectively. The percentage of injured leaves per plant from the first to second survey was 63 to 79%, respectively. Tall milkweeds showing ozone injury were taller than the non-injured plants. The percentage of insect-damaged plants was 50% among plants without ozone injury and 60% among ozone-injured plants. Non-injured tall milkweed had fewer flowers and/or pods than the injured plants. Mean leaf area injured increased over time, and mean maximum leaf area injured increased from 8 to 11% during the same period. Regression analyses showed no differences in ozone injury regarding aspect, slope or elevation. Our findings indicate that ozone injury is widespread throughout the Park on sensitive vegetation. PMID:15093469

  11. A Multidimensional Rasch Analysis of the Functional Independence Measure Based on the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Database.

    PubMed

    Pretz, Christopher R; Kean, Jacob; Heinemann, Allen W; Kozlowski, Allan J; Bode, Rita K; Gebhardt, Eveline

    2016-07-15

    A number of studies have evaluated the psychometric properties of the Functional Independence Measure (FIM™) using Rasch analysis, although none has done so using the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Database, a longitudinal database that captures demographic and outcome information on persons with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury across the United States. In the current study, we examine the psychometric properties of the FIM as represented by persons within this database and demonstrate that the FIM comprises three subscales representing cognitive, self-care, and mobility domains. These subscales were analyzed simultaneously using a multivariate Rasch model in combination with a time dependent concurrent calibration scheme with the goal of creating a raw score-to-logit transformation that can be used to improve the accuracy of parametric statistical analyses. The bowel and bladder function items were removed because of misfit with the motor and cognitive items. Some motor items exhibited step disorder, which was addressed by collapsing Categories 1-3 for Toileting, Stairs, Locomotion, Tub/Shower Transfers; Categories 1 and 2 for Toilet and Bed Transfers; and Categories 2 and 3 for Grooming. The strong correlations (r = 0.82-0.96) among the three subscales suggest they should be modeled together. Coefficient alpha of 0.98 indicates high internal consistency. Keyform maps are provided to enhance clinical interpretation and application of study results.

  12. A Multidimensional Rasch Analysis of the Functional Independence Measure Based on the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Database.

    PubMed

    Pretz, Christopher R; Kean, Jacob; Heinemann, Allen W; Kozlowski, Allan J; Bode, Rita K; Gebhardt, Eveline

    2016-07-15

    A number of studies have evaluated the psychometric properties of the Functional Independence Measure (FIM™) using Rasch analysis, although none has done so using the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Database, a longitudinal database that captures demographic and outcome information on persons with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury across the United States. In the current study, we examine the psychometric properties of the FIM as represented by persons within this database and demonstrate that the FIM comprises three subscales representing cognitive, self-care, and mobility domains. These subscales were analyzed simultaneously using a multivariate Rasch model in combination with a time dependent concurrent calibration scheme with the goal of creating a raw score-to-logit transformation that can be used to improve the accuracy of parametric statistical analyses. The bowel and bladder function items were removed because of misfit with the motor and cognitive items. Some motor items exhibited step disorder, which was addressed by collapsing Categories 1-3 for Toileting, Stairs, Locomotion, Tub/Shower Transfers; Categories 1 and 2 for Toilet and Bed Transfers; and Categories 2 and 3 for Grooming. The strong correlations (r = 0.82-0.96) among the three subscales suggest they should be modeled together. Coefficient alpha of 0.98 indicates high internal consistency. Keyform maps are provided to enhance clinical interpretation and application of study results. PMID:26559881

  13. Peripheral nerve injuries attributable to sport and recreation.

    PubMed

    Toth, Cory

    2009-02-01

    Many different sports and recreational activities are associated with injuries to the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Although some of those injuries are specific to an individual sport, other peripheral nerve injuries occur ubiquitously within many sporting activities. This review of sport-specific PNS injuries should assist in the understanding of morbidity associated with particular sporting activities, professional or amateur. Proper recognition of these syndromes can prevent unnecessary diagnostic testing and delays in proper diagnosis. The sports most commonly associated with peripheral nerve injuries are likely football, hockey, and baseball, but many other sports have unique associations with peripheral nerve injury. This article should be of assistance for the neurologist, neurosurgeon, orthopedic surgeon, physiatrist, sports medicine doctor, and general physician in contact with athletes at risk for neurologic injuries.

  14. Peripheral nerve injuries attributable to sport and recreation.

    PubMed

    Toth, Cory

    2008-02-01

    Many different sports and recreational activities are associated with injuries to the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Although some of those injuries are specific to an individual sport, other peripheral nerve injuries occur ubiquitously within many sporting activities. This review of sport-specific PNS injuries should assist in the understanding of morbidity associated with particular sporting activities, professional or amateur. Proper recognition of these syndromes can prevent unnecessary diagnostic testing and delays in proper diagnosis. The sports most commonly associated with peripheral nerve injuries are likely football, hockey, and baseball, but many other sports have unique associations with peripheral nerve injury. This article should be of assistance for the neurologist, neurosurgeon, orthopedic surgeon, physiatrist, sports medicine doctor, and general physician in contact with athletes at risk for neurologic injuries.

  15. Injuries during leisure physical activity in a Swedish municipality.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, K S; Timpka, T; Bjurulf, P

    1996-12-01

    The objective of this study was to provide an epidemiologic basis for planning community programmes preventing injuries during leisure physical activity, especially participation in sports. A total population survey of unintentional injuries was carried out in an area with a population of over 41,000. All sports injuries (n = 933) occurring within a 12-month period and requiring medical care were noted, giving a ratio of 22.5 per 1000 inhabitants. The majority of the injuries occurred in soccer (38.9%), followed by injuries in basketball/volleyball/handball (10.9%), and bandy/hockey (9.2%). The results correspond to previous studies in southern Scandinavia. In northern communities, the proportion of injuries in winter sports has been shown to be higher. Identification of these similarities and differences between the studies makes it possible to use the findings together in the design of general community-based sports injury prevention programmes suited to northern European conditions.

  16. 78 FR 36192 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Traumatic Injury Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Institute for Occupational... Document Availability AGENCY: The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)....

  17. Pseudo-polar tilted smectic phases exhibited by bent-core hockey stick shaped molecules.

    PubMed

    Malkar, Deepshika; Sadashiva, B K; Roy, Arun

    2016-06-14

    We report experimental and theoretical studies on two new achiral fluid lamellar phases exhibited by bent-core hockey stick shaped molecules. The packing of these bent-core hockey stick shaped molecules in the layers leads to a pseudo-polar order in these tilted smectic phases. An anticlinic SmCA type stacking of the pseudo-polar layers is observed in the higher temperature smectic phase, while in the lower temperature phase the difference in the azimuthal angles of the tilt directions in successive layers is between zero and π with a randomized tilt organization between the successive layers. The randomness arises due to the sign degeneracy of the azimuthal angle difference of the tilt directions in successive layers. Both of these smectic phases show a strong electro-optic response which can be exploited for potential applications.

  18. Quantification of the Demands During an Ice-Hockey Game Based on Intensity Zones Determined From the Incremental Test Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Stanula, Arkadiusz J; Gabryś, Tomasz T; Roczniok, Robert K; Szmatlan-Gabryś, Urszula B; Ozimek, Mariusz J; Mostowik, Aleksandra J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine ice-hockey players' playing intensity based on their heart rates (HRs) recorded during a game and on the outcomes of an incremental maximum oxygen uptake test. Sixteen ice-hockey players, members of the Polish national team junior (U20), performed an incremental test to assess their maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) in the 2 week's period preceding 4 games they played at the World Championships. Players' HRs at the first and second ventilatory thresholds obtained during the test were used to determine intensity zones (low, moderate, and high) that were subsequently used to classify HR values recorded during each of the games. For individual intensity zones, the following HRs expressed as mean values and as percentages of the maximal heart rate (HRmax) were obtained: forwards, 143-151 b · min(-1) (HRmax, 75.2-79.5%), 152-176 b · min(-1) (HRmax, 80.0-92.4%), 177-190 b · min(-1) (HRmax, 92.9-100.0%); defensemen, 127-139 b · min(-1) (HRmax, 69.4-75.8%), 140-163 b · min(-1) (HRmax, 76.4-89.0%), 164-184 b · min(-1) (HRmax, 89.5-100.0%). The amounts of time the forwards and defensemen spent in the 3 intensity zones expressed as percentages of the total time of the game were the following: 58.75% vs. 44.29% (low), 21.95% vs. 25.84% (moderate), and 19.30% vs. 29.87% (high). The forwards spent average more time in the low-intensity zone than did the defensemen, with the difference being statistically significant in periods 1 and 2 (61.44% vs. 44.21% at p ≤ 0.001 and 59.14% vs. 47.23% at p ≤ 0.01, respectively). The results of the study indicate that a method using aerobic and anaerobic metabolism parameters to determine intensity zones can significantly improve the reliability of evaluation of the physiological demands of the game and can be a useful tool for coaches in managing the training process. PMID:26154153

  19. Heart Rate and Energy Expenditure in Division I Field Hockey Players During Competitive Play.

    PubMed

    Sell, Katie M; Ledesma, Allison B

    2016-08-01

    Sell, KM and Ledesma, AB. Heart rate and energy expenditure in Division I field hockey players during competitive play. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2122-2128, 2016-The purpose of this study was to quantify energy expenditure and heart rate data for Division I female field hockey players during competitive play. Ten female Division I collegiate field hockey athletes (19.8 ± 1.6 years; 166.4 ± 6.1 cm; 58.2 ± 5.3 kg) completed the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test to determine maximal heart rate. One week later, all subjects wore a heart rate monitor during a series of 3 matches in an off-season competition. Average heart rate (AvHR), average percentage of maximal heart rate (AvHR%), peak exercise heart rate (PExHR), and percentage of maximal heart rate (PExHR%), time spent in each of the predetermined heart rate zones, and caloric expenditure per minute of exercise (kcalM) were determined for all players. Differences between positions (backs, midfielders, and forwards) were assessed. No significant differences in AvHR, AvHR%, PExHR, PExHR%, and %TM were observed between playing positions. The AvHR% and PExHR% for each position fell into zones 4 (77-93% HRmax) and 5 (>93% HRmax), respectively, and significantly more time was spent in zone 4 compared with zones 1, 2, 3, and 5 across all players (p ≤ 0.05). The kcalM reflected very heavy intensity exercise. The results of this study will contribute toward understanding the sport-specific physiological demands of women's field hockey and has specific implications for the duration and schedule of training regimens.

  20. [Sports injuries of the nervous system].

    PubMed

    Lang, C; Stefan, H

    1999-08-01

    Almost 1% of all Germans suffer sports injuries each year, almost 5% of all peripheral nerve lesions are due to sports. A review is given on various activities detailing the specific risks for traumata of the central and peripheral nervous system. Specifically these are volleyball, handball, basketball, American football, soccer, bowling, hockey, baseball, tennis, golf, javelin, fencing, wrestling, judo, boxing, running, jumping, dancing, mountain climbing, weight lifting, gymnastics, horse-back riding, swimming, rowing, skiing, skating, shooting, (motor) biking, car racing, flying, and sports for the disabled. The knowledge of typical traumata should enable the neurologist to rapidly and reliably recognize related lesions and to contribute to their prevention or improvement.

  1. Bilateral Differences in Muscle Architecture and Increased Rate of Injury in National Basketball Association Players

    PubMed Central

    Mangine, Gerald T.; Hoffman, Jay R.; Gonzalez, Adam M.; Jajtner, Adam R.; Scanlon, Tyler; Rogowski, Joseph P.; Wells, Adam J.; Fragala, Maren S.; Stout, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Context Professional basketball players have demanding schedules that, in combination with certain underlying physical characteristics and side-to-side strength and power imbalances, may make them vulnerable to lower extremity injuries. Objective To examine the relationship among skeletal muscle architecture, lower body power, and games missed because of lower extremity injury (%MISS) in professional basketball players. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Human Performance Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Nine players under contract for Orlando Magic were assessed. We compared athletes who were injured (n = 4, height = 203.2 ± 5.5 cm, mass = 105 ± 7.5 kg, age = 25.0 ± 2.8 years) and those who remained healthy (n = 5, height = 200.2 ± 12.2 cm, mass = 100.1 ± 16.6 kg, age = 22.4 ± 1.9 years) during the season. Main Outcome Measure(s) Bilateral ultrasonographic measurements of muscle thickness, pennation angle, echo intensity, and cross-sectional area of the rectus femoris and vastus lateralis were collected before regular-season play. Subsequently, muscle thickness and pennation angle were used to compute fascicle length. Along with unilateral jumping power, inferences were made upon the magnitude of the relationship between the percentage bilateral difference in these measures and %MISS, as well as between injured and healthy athletes. Results The data indicated likely relationships between %MISS and age (r = 0.772), and between %MISS and bilateral differences in rectus femoris cross-sectional area (7.8% ± 6.4%; r = 0.657) and vastus lateralis cross-sectional area (6.2% ± 4.8%; r = 0.521), as well as a possible relationship with vastus lateralis muscle thickness (7.9% ± 8.9%; r = 0.444). Echo-intensity differences in the vastus lateralis were greater in injured (8.0% ± 2.4%) versus healthy athletes (3.2% ± 2.0%). Although a 2-fold difference in mean jumping power was observed between injured (26.3 ± 14.9 W) and healthy athletes (13.6 ± 8.7 W

  2. Iron Metabolism in Field Hockey Players During an Annual Training Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Podgórski, Tomasz; Kryściak, Jakub; Konarski, Jan; Domaszewska, Katarzyna; Durkalec-Michalski, Krzysztof; Strzelczyk, Ryszard; Pawlak, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Post-physical training changes in iron metabolism in the human body often occur. To fully describe these processes, fifteen male Polish National Team field hockey players (age 27.7 ± 5.2 years, body mass 72.8 ± 7.6 kg and body height 177.1 ± 5.7 cm) were examined in three phases of an annual training cycle: preparatory (T1), competitive (T2) and transition (T3). To assess aerobic fitness, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) was evaluated. Based on the iron concentration, the changes in total iron binding capacity (TIBC), unsaturated iron binding capacity (UIBC) and other selected haematological indicators (haemoglobin, erythrocytes, mean corpuscular haemoglobin - MCH) in iron metabolism were estimated. The average values of maximum oxygen uptake increased from 54.97 ± 3.62 ml·kg−1·min−1 in T1 to 59.93 ± 3.55 ml·kg−1·min−1 in T2 (p<0.05) and then decreased to 56.21 ± 4.56 ml·kg−1·min−1 in T3 (p<0.05). No statistically significant changes in the erythrocyte count were noted. The MCH and haemoglobin concentration decreased between T1 and T2. The maximal exercise test caused a significant (p<0.05) increase in the plasma iron concentration during the competition and transition phases. Progressive but non-significant increases in resting iron concentration, TIBC and UIBC in the analysed annual training cycle were noted. To show global changes in iron metabolism in the human body, it is necessary to determine additional variables, i.e. UIBC, TIBC, haemoglobin, MCH or the erythrocyte count. The direction of changes in iron metabolism depends on both the duration and intensity of the physical activity and the fitness level of the subjects. Dietary intake of iron increases the level of this trace element and prevents anaemia associated with training overloads. PMID:26557195

  3. Injury prevention strategies at the FIFA 2014 World Cup: perceptions and practices of the physicians from the 32 participating national teams

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Alan; Davison, Michael; Andersen, Thor Einar; Beasley, Ian; Bizzini, Mario; Dupont, Gregory; Duffield, Rob; Carling, Chris; Dvorak, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The available scientific research regarding injury prevention practices in international football is sparse. The purpose of this study was to quantify current practice with regard to (1) injury prevention of top-level footballers competing in an international tournament, and (2) determine the main challenges and issues faced by practitioners in these national teams. Methods A survey was administered to physicians of the 32 competing national teams at the FIFA 2014 World Cup. The survey included 4 sections regarding perceptions and practices concerning non-contact injuries: (1) risk factors, (2) screening tests and monitoring tools, (3) preventative strategies and (4) reflection on their experience at the World Cup. Results Following responses from all teams (100%), the present study revealed the most important intrinsic (previous injury, accumulated fatigue, agonist:antagonist muscle imbalance) and extrinsic (reduced recovery time, training load prior to and during World Cup, congested fixtures) risk factors during the FIFA 2014 World Cup. The 5 most commonly used tests for risk factors were: flexibility, fitness, joint mobility, balance and strength; monitoring tools commonly used were: medical screen, minutes/matches played, subjective and objective wellness, heart rate and biochemical markers. The 5 most important preventative exercises were: flexibility, core, combined contractions, balance and eccentric. Conclusions The present study showed that many of the National football (soccer) teams’ injury prevention perceptions and practices follow a coherent approach. There remains, however, a lack of consistent research findings to support some of these perceptions and practices. PMID:25878078

  4. An On-Ice Measurement Approach to Analyse the Biomechanics of Ice Hockey Skating

    PubMed Central

    Buckeridge, Erica; LeVangie, Marc C.; Stetter, Bernd; Nigg, Sandro R.; Nigg, Benno M.

    2015-01-01

    Skating is a fundamental movement in ice hockey; however little research has been conducted within the field of hockey skating biomechanics due to the difficulties of on-ice data collection. In this study a novel on-ice measurement approach was tested for reliability, and subsequently implemented to investigate the forward skating technique, as well as technique differences across skill levels. Nine high caliber (High) and nine low caliber (Low) hockey players performed 30m forward skating trials. A 3D accelerometer was mounted to the right skate for the purpose of stride detection, with the 2nd and 6th strides defined as acceleration and steady-state, respectively. The activity of five lower extremity muscles was recorded using surface electromyography. Biaxial electro-goniometers were used to quantify hip and knee angles, and in-skate plantar force was measured using instrumented insoles. Reliability was assessed with the coefficient of multiple correlation, which demonstrated moderate (r>0.65) to excellent (r>0.95) scores across selected measured variables. Greater plantar-flexor muscle activity and hip extension were evident during acceleration strides, while steady state strides exhibited greater knee extensor activity and hip abduction range of motion (p<0.05). High caliber exhibited greater hip range of motion and forefoot force application (p<0.05). The successful implementation of this on-ice mobile measurement approach offers potential for athlete monitoring, biofeedback and training advice. PMID:25973775

  5. An on-ice measurement approach to analyse the biomechanics of ice hockey skating.

    PubMed

    Buckeridge, Erica; LeVangie, Marc C; Stetter, Bernd; Nigg, Sandro R; Nigg, Benno M

    2015-01-01

    Skating is a fundamental movement in ice hockey; however little research has been conducted within the field of hockey skating biomechanics due to the difficulties of on-ice data collection. In this study a novel on-ice measurement approach was tested for reliability, and subsequently implemented to investigate the forward skating technique, as well as technique differences across skill levels. Nine high caliber (High) and nine low caliber (Low) hockey players performed 30 m forward skating trials. A 3D accelerometer was mounted to the right skate for the purpose of stride detection, with the 2nd and 6th strides defined as acceleration and steady-state, respectively. The activity of five lower extremity muscles was recorded using surface electromyography. Biaxial electro-goniometers were used to quantify hip and knee angles, and in-skate plantar force was measured using instrumented insoles. Reliability was assessed with the coefficient of multiple correlation, which demonstrated moderate (r>0.65) to excellent (r>0.95) scores across selected measured variables. Greater plantar-flexor muscle activity and hip extension were evident during acceleration strides, while steady state strides exhibited greater knee extensor activity and hip abduction range of motion (p<0.05). High caliber exhibited greater hip range of motion and forefoot force application (p<0.05). The successful implementation of this on-ice mobile measurement approach offers potential for athlete monitoring, biofeedback and training advice.

  6. Penalty corner routines in elite women's indoor field hockey: prediction of outcomes based on tactical decisions.

    PubMed

    Vinson, Don; Padley, Simon; Croad, Alison; Jeffreys, Mark; Brady, Abbe; James, David

    2013-01-01

    Indoor hockey is a highly competitive international sport, yet no research to date has investigated the key actions within this sport. As with outdoor field hockey, penalty corners represent one of the most likely situations in which goals can be scored. All 36 matches of the round-robin phase of the 2010-2011 England Hockey League Women's Premier Division 'Super Sixes' competition were analysed with the purpose of establishing which factors can predict the scoring of a goal using binary logistic regression analysis. Seventy-two (22.6%) of the 319 observed penalty corners resulted in a goal. The strongest predictor of scoring a goal was taking the penalty corner from the goalkeeper's right. Based on the odds ratio (OR), the odds of the attacking team scoring were 2.27 (confidence interval (CI) = 1.41-3.65) times higher with penalty corners taken from the goalkeeper's right as opposed to the left. Additionally, if the goalkeeper decided to rush to the edge of the circle, the odds of the attacking team failing to score were 2.19 (CI = 1.18-4.08) times higher compared to when the goalkeeper remained near the goal line. These results suggest that strategic decisions from the players and coaches have an important part to play in the success of penalty corners. Future research should investigate the impact of goalkeepers' movement and further examine the technical and tactical intricacies of penalty corners.

  7. An on-ice measurement approach to analyse the biomechanics of ice hockey skating.

    PubMed

    Buckeridge, Erica; LeVangie, Marc C; Stetter, Bernd; Nigg, Sandro R; Nigg, Benno M

    2015-01-01

    Skating is a fundamental movement in ice hockey; however little research has been conducted within the field of hockey skating biomechanics due to the difficulties of on-ice data collection. In this study a novel on-ice measurement approach was tested for reliability, and subsequently implemented to investigate the forward skating technique, as well as technique differences across skill levels. Nine high caliber (High) and nine low caliber (Low) hockey players performed 30 m forward skating trials. A 3D accelerometer was mounted to the right skate for the purpose of stride detection, with the 2nd and 6th strides defined as acceleration and steady-state, respectively. The activity of five lower extremity muscles was recorded using surface electromyography. Biaxial electro-goniometers were used to quantify hip and knee angles, and in-skate plantar force was measured using instrumented insoles. Reliability was assessed with the coefficient of multiple correlation, which demonstrated moderate (r>0.65) to excellent (r>0.95) scores across selected measured variables. Greater plantar-flexor muscle activity and hip extension were evident during acceleration strides, while steady state strides exhibited greater knee extensor activity and hip abduction range of motion (p<0.05). High caliber exhibited greater hip range of motion and forefoot force application (p<0.05). The successful implementation of this on-ice mobile measurement approach offers potential for athlete monitoring, biofeedback and training advice. PMID:25973775

  8. The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars: Dispatches From The Front Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    A central figure in the controversy over human-caused climate change has been The Hockey Stick, a simple, easy-to-understand graph my colleagues and I constructed to depict changes in Earth's temperature back to 1000 AD. The graph was featured in the high-profile Summary for Policy Makers of the 2001 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and it quickly became an icon in the debate over human-caused (anthropogenic) climate change. I will tell the story behind the Hockey Stick, using it as a vehicle for exploring broader issues regarding the role of skepticism in science, the uneasy relationship between science and politics, and the dangers that arise when special economic interests and those who do their bidding attempt to skew the discourse over policy-relevant areas of science. In short, I attempt to use the Hockey Stick to cut through the fog of disinformation that has been generated by the campaign to deny the reality of climate change. It is my intent, in so doing, to reveal the very real threat to our future that lies behind it.

  9. TRAINING-INDUCED CHANGES IN DRAG-FLICK TECHNIQUE IN FEMALE FIELD HOCKEY PLAYERS

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, M.; Martín-Casado, L.; Navarro, E.

    2012-01-01

    The penalty corner is one of the most important goal plays in field hockey. The drag-flick is used less by women than men in a penalty corner. The aim of this study was to describe training-induced changes in the drag-flick technique in female field hockey players. Four female players participated in the study. The VICON optoelectronic system (Oxford Metrics, Oxford, UK) measured the kinematic parameters of the drag-flick with six cameras sampling at 250 Hz, prior to and after training. Fifteen shots were captured for each subject. A Wilcoxon test assessed the differences between pre-training and post-training parameters. Two players received specific training twice a week for 8 weeks; the other two players did not train. The proposed drills improved the position of the stick at the beginning of the shot (p < 0.05), the total distance of the shot (p < 0.05) and the rotation radius at ball release (p < 0.01). It was noted that all players had lost speed of the previous run. Further studies should include a larger sample, in order to provide more information on field hockey performance. PMID:24868116

  10. The University of the National Football League: How Technology, Injury Surveillance, and Health Care Have Improved the Safety of America's Game.

    PubMed

    Matava, Matthew J; Görtz, Simon

    2016-07-01

    American football has become one of the most popular sports in the United States. Despite the millions of players at all levels of competition who gain the physical, social, and psychological rewards that football provides, many interested stakeholders continue to ask, "Is football safe?" Although there are only approximately 1,700 players on National Football League (NFL) rosters, the injuries they sustain have garnered the most attention-and criticism-from the national media. Increased public awareness of the injury potential football possesses has led to an open debate and a major shift in public sentiment over the past 5 years. Although no sport is perfectly safe, the question is whether it can be made relatively safe and if the long-term consequences are worth the risk. This article reviews the methods by which one sports league-the NFL-has used advances in medical technology and injury surveillance to improve the health and safety of its players.

  11. A resolution congratulating the University of Minnesota Duluth men's ice hockey team on winning their first National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Men's Hockey National Championship.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Klobuchar, Amy [D-MN

    2011-04-14

    05/04/2011 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (text: CR S2695) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form in National Guard Soldiers Screening Positive for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbisi, Paul A.; Polusny, Melissa A.; Erbes, Christopher R.; Thuras, Paul; Reddy, Madhavi K.

    2011-01-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2 RF) was administered to 251 National Guard soldiers who had recently returned from deployment to Iraq. Soldiers were also administered questionnaires to identify posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). On the basis of responses to the…

  13. 76 FR 42116 - National Policy for Distinguishing Serious From Non-Serious Injuries of Marine Mammals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ...) Mail: Chief, Marine Mammal and Sea Turtle Conservation Division, Attn: Policy for distinguishing... need for a nationally consistent and transparent process for effective conservation of marine mammal... conservation management regimes (e.g., MMPA List of Fisheries (LOF), take reduction plans (TRP), ship...

  14. Common Data Elements for Spinal Cord Injury Clinical Research: A National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke Project

    PubMed Central

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Alai, Sherita; Anderson, Kim; Charlifue, Susan; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael; Flanders, Adam E.; Jones, Linda; Kleitman, Naomi; Lans, Aria; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Odenkirchen, Joanne; Steeves, John; Tansey, Keith; Widerström-Noga, Eva; Jakeman, Lyn B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a comprehensive set of common data elements (CDEs), data definitions, case report forms and guidelines for use in spinal cord injury (SCI) clinical research, as part of the CDE project at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) of the USA National Institutes of Health. Setting International Working Groups Methods Nine working groups composed of international experts reviewed existing CDEs and instruments, created new elements when needed, and provided recommendations for SCI clinical research. The project was carried out in collaboration with and cross-referenced to development of the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS) International SCI Data Sets. The recommendations were compiled, subjected to internal review, and posted online for external public comment. The final version was reviewed by all working groups and the NINDS CDE team prior to release. Results The NINDS SCI CDEs and supporting documents are publically available on the NINDS CDE website and the ISCoS website. The CDEs span the continuum of SCI care and the full range of domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Conclusions Widespread use of common data elements can facilitate SCI clinical research and trial design, data sharing, and retrospective analyses. Continued international collaboration will enable consistent data collection and reporting, and will help ensure that the data elements are updated, reviewed and broadcast as additional evidence is obtained. PMID:25665542

  15. THE USE OF ACETIC ACID IONTOPHORESIS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF A SOFT TISSUE INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Ebaugh, David

    2010-01-01

    Background: Contusions are common injuries that occur in athletics. If repeated, complications like myositis ossificans can occur. This case describes the examination and treatment of an athlete with an acute soft tissue injury. Objective: To describe the treatment approach used with a hockey player who sustained a soft tissue injury in his upper extremity. Case Description: A 19 year old male sustained a soft tissue injury to his upper arm while playing hockey. The athlete complained of pain rated a 2-3 out of 10. He had a well circumscribed, firm, 8 by 5 centimeter palpable mass present along the lateral arm, and was able to passively flex his elbow from 56° to 135°, demonstrating a 56° loss of elbow extension. Functionally, he was able to perform most activities of daily living, but he was unable to play hockey. Over 29 days, the athlete was treated one time with pulsed ultrasound and ice and nine times with iontophoresis using a 2% acetic acid solution. Additionally, the athlete performed pain-free active range of motion exercises for the elbow. Outcome: Following treatment, the athlete's pain resolved, the palpable mass disappeared, and his passive range of motion at the elbow was 0° to 135°. Most importantly, the athlete was able to resume playing hockey. Discussion: Acetic acid iontophoresis may be a successful intervention for soft tissue injuries of the upper extremity. In this case, it appeared helpful in decreasing the athlete's impairments and contributed to quicker resumption of all functional activities in less time than previously reported in the literature using traditional treatment interventions. PMID:21655380

  16. Examining the relationship between relative age, competition level, and dropout rates in male youth ice-hockey players.

    PubMed

    Lemez, S; Baker, J; Horton, S; Wattie, N; Weir, P

    2014-12-01

    The relative age effect suggests that athletes born in the first two quartiles of a given selection year experience a selection advantage and therefore a greater opportunity for success. We describe two studies examining the relationship between relative age, competition level, and dropout rates of Ontario Minor Hockey Association male ice-hockey players from ages 10 to 15 years (n = 14 325). In Study 1, dropout was highest among players born in quartiles three and four [χ(2) (3) = 16.32, P < 0.05; w = 0.06], while Study 2 found dropped out players to have less movement between competition levels compared to retained players. This study confirms a relationship between relative age and dropout from ice-hockey and adds further depth to our understanding of this persistent phenomenon. PMID:24118622

  17. Examining the relationship between relative age, competition level, and dropout rates in male youth ice-hockey players.

    PubMed

    Lemez, S; Baker, J; Horton, S; Wattie, N; Weir, P

    2014-12-01

    The relative age effect suggests that athletes born in the first two quartiles of a given selection year experience a selection advantage and therefore a greater opportunity for success. We describe two studies examining the relationship between relative age, competition level, and dropout rates of Ontario Minor Hockey Association male ice-hockey players from ages 10 to 15 years (n = 14 325). In Study 1, dropout was highest among players born in quartiles three and four [χ(2) (3) = 16.32, P < 0.05; w = 0.06], while Study 2 found dropped out players to have less movement between competition levels compared to retained players. This study confirms a relationship between relative age and dropout from ice-hockey and adds further depth to our understanding of this persistent phenomenon.

  18. Experimental models of repetitive brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Weber, John T

    2007-01-01

    Repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs in a significant portion of trauma patients, especially in specific populations, such as child abuse victims or athletes involved in contact sports (e.g. boxing, football, hockey, and soccer). A continually emerging hypothesis is that repeated mild injuries may cause cumulative damage to the brain, resulting in long-term cognitive dysfunction. The growing attention to this hypothesis is reflected in several recent experimental studies of repeated mild TBI in vivo. These reports generally demonstrate cellular and cognitive dysfunction after repetitive injury using rodent TBI models. In some cases, data suggests that the effects of a second mild TBI may be synergistic, rather than additive. In addition, some studies have found increases in cellular markers associated with Alzheimer's disease after repeated mild injuries, which demonstrates a direct experimental link between repetitive TBI and neurodegenerative disease. To complement the findings from humans and in vivo experimentation, my laboratory group has investigated the effects of repeated trauma in cultured brain cells using a model of stretch-induced mechanical injury in vitro. In these studies, hippocampal cells exhibited cumulative damage when mild stretch injuries were repeated at either 1-h or 24-h intervals. Interestingly, the extent of damage to the cells was dependent on the time between repeated injuries. Also, a very low level of stretch, which produced no cell damage on its own, induced cell damage when it was repeated several times at a short interval (every 2 min). Although direct comparisons to the clinical situation are difficult, these types of repetitive, low-level, mechanical stresses may be similar to the insults received by certain athletes, such as boxers, or hockey and soccer players. This type of in vitro model could provide a reliable system in which to study the mechanisms underlying cellular dysfunction following repeated injuries. As

  19. Assessing the risk of foliar injury from ozone on vegetation in parks in the U.S. National Park Service's Vital Signs Network.

    PubMed

    Kohut, Robert

    2007-10-01

    The risk of ozone injury to plants was assessed in support of the National Park Service's Vital Signs Monitoring Network program. The assessment examined bioindicator species, evaluated levels of ozone exposure, and investigated soil moisture conditions during periods of exposure for a 5-year period in each park. The assessment assigned each park a risk rating of high, moderate, or low. For the 244 parks for which assessments were conducted, the risk of foliar injury was high in 65 parks, moderate in 46 parks, and low in 131 parks. Among the well-known parks with a high risk of ozone injury are Gettysburg, Valley Forge, Delaware Water Gap, Cape Cod, Fire Island, Antietam, Harpers Ferry, Manassas, Wolf Trap Farm Park, Mammoth Cave, Shiloh, Sleeping Bear Dunes, Great Smoky Mountains, Joshua Tree, Sequoia and Kings Canyon, and Yosemite.

  20. The impact of a sports vision training program in youth field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Sebastian; Memmert, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a sports vision training program improves the visual performance of youth male field hockey players, ages 12 to 16 years, after an intervention of six weeks compared to a control group with no specific sports vision training. The choice reaction time task at the D2 board (Learning Task I), the functional field of view task (Learning Task II) and the multiple object tracking (MOT) task (Transfer Task) were assessed before and after the intervention and again six weeks after the second test. Analyzes showed significant differences between the two groups for the choice reaction time task at the D2 board and the functional field of view task, with significant improvements for the intervention group and none for the control group. For the transfer task, we could not find statistically significant improvements for either group. The results of this study are discussed in terms of theoretical and practical implications. Key pointsPerceptual training with youth field hockey playersCan a sports vision training program improve the visual performance of youth male field hockey players, ages 12 to 16 years, after an intervention of six weeks compared to a control group with no specific sports vision training?The intervention was performed in the "VisuLab" as DynamicEye(®) SportsVision Training at the German Sport University Cologne.We ran a series of 3 two-factor univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures on both within subject independent variables (group; measuring point) to examine the effects on central perception, peripheral perception and choice reaction time.The present study shows an improvement of certain visual abilities with the help of the sports vision training program.

  1. The Assessment of Airway Maneuvers and Interventions in University Canadian Football, Ice Hockey, and Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, J. Scott; Al-Kashmiri, Ammar; Baylis, Penny-Jane; Troutman, Tracy; Aljufaili, Mahmood; Correa, José A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Managing an airway in an unconscious athlete is a lifesaving skill that may be made more difficult by the recent changes in protective equipment. Different airway maneuvers and techniques may be required to help ventilate an unconscious athlete who is wearing full protective equipment. Objective: To assess the effectiveness of different airway maneuvers with football, ice hockey, and soccer players wearing full protective equipment. Design: Crossover study. Setting: University sports medicine clinic. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 146 university varsity athletes, consisting of 62 football, 45 ice hockey, and 39 soccer players. Intervention(s): Athletes were assessed for different airway and physical characteristics. Three investigators then evaluated the effectiveness of different bag-valve-mask (BVM) ventilation techniques in supine athletes who were wearing protective equipment while inline cervical spine immobilization was maintained. Main Outcome Measure(s): The effectiveness of 1-person BVM ventilation (1-BVM), 2-person BVM ventilation (2-BVM), and inline immobilization and ventilation (IIV) was judged by each investigator for each athlete using a 4-point rating scale. Results: All forms of ventilation were least difficult in soccer players and most difficult in football players. When compared with 1-BVM, both 2-BVM and IIV were deemed more effective by all investigators for all athletes. Interference from the helmet and stabilizer were common reasons for difficult ventilation in football and ice hockey players. Conclusions: Sports medicine professionals should practice and be comfortable with different ventilation techniques for athletes wearing full equipment. The use of a new ventilation technique, termed inline immobilization and ventilation, may be beneficial, especially when the number of responders is limited. PMID:21391796

  2. The effects of undergarment composition worn beneath hockey protective equipment on high-intensity intermittent exercise.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Benjamin; Stachenfeld, Nina

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of undergarment composition worn beneath ice hockey protective equipment on thermal homeostasis and power output, during a cycle ergometer exercise protocol designed to simulate the energy expenditure of a hockey game. We hypothesized that the layers of protective equipment would negate the potential thermoregulatory benefits from synthetic "wicking" undergarments but that subjects may feel more comfortable because of the inherent low moisture retention of these fabrics. Eight men (age, 25.4 ± 1.3 year) performed a repeated sprint test before and after a simulated game under typical hockey conditions (12°C; 82% relative humidity). This test was completed twice while wearing full protective equipment and either synthetic (SYN) or cotton (COT) full-length undergarments. During the simulated game, skin temperatures (34.22 ± 0.20°C vs. 34.46 ± 0.16°C) and core temperatures (37.50 ± 0.13°C vs. 37.59 ± 0.14°C) were similar between SYN and COT, respectively. There were also no significant differences found in sweat loss as a percent of body mass, heart rate, plasma lactate, sprint power, or ratings of perceived exertion between SYN and COT, respectively. The SYN retained less water than COT (140 ± 30 vs. 310 ± 30 g; p < 0.05); however, clothing and protective equipment weight gains as a whole were unaffected by the fabric worn (470 ± 110 vs. 590 ± 80 g) for SYN and COT, respectively. There were minimal differences in thermal sensation and undergarment wetness ratings during the simulated game. Thermoregulation and performance was driven more by properties of the layered protective equipment with minimal effects from undergarment composition.

  3. The Impact of a Sports Vision Training Program in Youth Field Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Sebastian; Memmert, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a sports vision training program improves the visual performance of youth male field hockey players, ages 12 to 16 years, after an intervention of six weeks compared to a control group with no specific sports vision training. The choice reaction time task at the D2 board (Learning Task I), the functional field of view task (Learning Task II) and the multiple object tracking (MOT) task (Transfer Task) were assessed before and after the intervention and again six weeks after the second test. Analyzes showed significant differences between the two groups for the choice reaction time task at the D2 board and the functional field of view task, with significant improvements for the intervention group and none for the control group. For the transfer task, we could not find statistically significant improvements for either group. The results of this study are discussed in terms of theoretical and practical implications. Key pointsPerceptual training with youth field hockey playersCan a sports vision training program improve the visual performance of youth male field hockey players, ages 12 to 16 years, after an intervention of six weeks compared to a control group with no specific sports vision training?The intervention was performed in the “VisuLab” as DynamicEye® SportsVision Training at the German Sport University Cologne.We ran a series of 3 two-factor univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures on both within subject independent variables (group; measuring point) to examine the effects on central perception, peripheral perception and choice reaction time.The present study shows an improvement of certain visual abilities with the help of the sports vision training program. PMID:24150071

  4. Obesity and Other Risk Factors: The National Survey of U.S. Long-Haul Truck Driver Health and Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sieber, W. Karl; Robinson, Cynthia F.; Birdsey, Jan; Chen, Guang X.; Hitchcock, Edward M.; Lincoln, Jennifer E.; Nakata, Akinori; Sweeney, Marie H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Drivers of heavy and tractor-trailer trucks accounted for 56% of all production and nonsupervisory employees in the truck transportation industry in 2011. There are limited data for illness and injury in long-haul truck drivers, which prompted a targeted national survey. Methods Interviewers collected data during 2010 from 1,670 long-haul truck drivers at 32 truck stops across the 48 contiguous United States that were used to compute prevalence estimates for self-reported health conditions and risk factors. Results Obesity (69% vs. 31%, P <0.01) and current smoking (51% vs. 19%, P <0.01) were twice as prevalent in long-haul truck drivers as in the 2010 U.S. adult working population. Sixty-one percent reported having two or more of the risk factors: hypertension, obesity, smoking, high cholesterol, no physical activity, 6 or fewer hours of sleep per 24-hr period. Conclusion Survey findings suggest a need for targeted interventions and continued surveillance for long-haul truck drivers. PMID:24390804

  5. Non-Suicidal Self-Injury--Does social support make a difference? An epidemiological investigation of a Danish national sample.

    PubMed

    Christoffersen, Mogens Nygaard; Møhl, Bo; DePanfilis, Diane; Vammen, Katrine Schjødt

    2015-06-01

    Teenagers and young adults who had experienced child maltreatment, being bullied in school and other serious life events have an increased risk of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI), but some individuals manage to escape serious stressful life events. The research question is: does social support make a difference? A national representative sample of 4,718 persons born in 1984 were selected for an interview about their childhood, maltreatment, serious life events and social support in order to test if social support during childhood is a statistical mediator between childhood disadvantages and NSSI. The survey obtained a 67% response rate (N=2,980). The incidence rate of NSSI among this sample was estimated at 2.7% among young adult respondents. Participants with a history of child maltreatment, being bullied in school or other traumatic life events reported a rate of NSSI 6 times greater than participants without this history (odds ratio: 6.0). The correlation between traumatic life events during adolescence and NSSI is reduced when low social support is accounted for in the statistical model (p<0.01). The results indicate that social support is a partial mediator for NSSI. The reported low self-esteem indicates the importance of treating adolescents who are engaged in NSSI with respect and dignity when they are treated in the health care system. Results further imply that increasing social support may reduce the likelihood of NSSI. PMID:25435107

  6. Non-Suicidal Self-Injury--Does social support make a difference? An epidemiological investigation of a Danish national sample.

    PubMed

    Christoffersen, Mogens Nygaard; Møhl, Bo; DePanfilis, Diane; Vammen, Katrine Schjødt

    2015-06-01

    Teenagers and young adults who had experienced child maltreatment, being bullied in school and other serious life events have an increased risk of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI), but some individuals manage to escape serious stressful life events. The research question is: does social support make a difference? A national representative sample of 4,718 persons born in 1984 were selected for an interview about their childhood, maltreatment, serious life events and social support in order to test if social support during childhood is a statistical mediator between childhood disadvantages and NSSI. The survey obtained a 67% response rate (N=2,980). The incidence rate of NSSI among this sample was estimated at 2.7% among young adult respondents. Participants with a history of child maltreatment, being bullied in school or other traumatic life events reported a rate of NSSI 6 times greater than participants without this history (odds ratio: 6.0). The correlation between traumatic life events during adolescence and NSSI is reduced when low social support is accounted for in the statistical model (p<0.01). The results indicate that social support is a partial mediator for NSSI. The reported low self-esteem indicates the importance of treating adolescents who are engaged in NSSI with respect and dignity when they are treated in the health care system. Results further imply that increasing social support may reduce the likelihood of NSSI.

  7. National Variability in Intracranial Pressure Monitoring and Craniotomy for Children With Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Van Cleve, William; Kernic, Mary A.; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Wang, Jin; Zatzick, Douglas F.; Bell, Michael J.; Wainwright, Mark S.; Groner, Jonathan I.; Mink, Richard B.; Giza, Christopher C.; Boyle, Linda Ng; Mitchell, Pamela H.; Rivara, Frederick P.; Vavilala, Monica S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant cause of mortality and disability in children. Intracranial pressure monitoring (ICPM) and craniotomy/craniectomy (CRANI) may affect outcomes. Sources of variability in the use of these interventions remain incompletely understood. OBJECTIVE To analyze sources of variability in the use of ICPM and CRANI. METHODS Retrospective cross-sectional study of patients with moderate/severe pediatric TBI with the use of data submitted to the American College of Surgeons National Trauma Databank. RESULTS We analyzed data from 7140 children at 156 US hospitals during 7 continuous years. Of the children, 27.4% had ICPM, whereas 11.7% had a CRANI. Infants had lower rates of ICPM and CRANI than older children. A lower rate of ICPM was observed among children hospitalized at combined pediatric/adult trauma centers than among children treated at adult-only trauma centers (relative risk = 0.80; 95% confidence interval 0.66-0.97). For ICPM and CRANI, 18.5% and 11.6%, respectively, of residual model variance was explained by between-hospital variation in care delivery, but almost no correlation was observed between within-hospital tendency toward performing these procedures. CONCLUSION Infants received less ICPM than older children, and children hospitalized at pediatric trauma centers received less ICPM than children at adult-only trauma centers. In addition, significant between-hospital variability existed in the delivery of ICPM and CRANI to children with moderate-severe TBI. PMID:23863766

  8. The National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research burn model system database: a tool for the multicenter study of the outcome of burn injury.

    PubMed

    Klein, Matthew B; Lezotte, Dennis L; Fauerbach, James A; Herndon, David N; Kowalske, Karen J; Carrougher, Gretchen J; deLateur, Barbara J; Holavanahalli, Radha; Esselman, Peter C; San Agustin, Theresa B; Engrav, Loren H

    2007-01-01

    Advances in critical care and surgical management have significantly improved survival after burn injury over the past several decades. However, today, survival alone is an insufficient outcome. In 1994, the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) created a burn model system program to evaluate the long-term sequelae of burn injuries. As part of this multicenter program, a comprehensive demographic and outcome database was developed to facilitate the study of a number of functional and psychosocial outcomes after burns. The purpose of this study is to review the database design and structure as well as the data obtained during the last 10 years. This is a descriptive study of the NIDRR database structure as well as the patient data obtained from the four participating burn centers from 1994 to 2004. Data obtained during hospitalization and at 6, 12, and 24 months after discharge were reviewed and descriptive statistics were calculated for select database fields. The database is divided into several subsections, including demographics, injury complications, patient disposition, and functional and psychological surveys. A total of 4600 patients have been entered into the NIDRR database. To date, 3449 (75%) patients were alive at discharged and consented to follow-up data collection. The NIDRR database provides an expansive repository of patient, injury, and outcome data that can be used to analyze the impact of burn injury on physical and psychosocial function and for the design of interventions to enhance the quality of life of burn survivors. PMID:17211206

  9. Labor and Related Injuries among Schoolchildren in Palestine: Findings from the National Study of Palestinian Schoolchildren (HBSC-WBG2006)

    PubMed Central

    Abdeen, Ziad

    2014-01-01

    Background. Labor related injuries among Palestinian schoolchildren are a significant undocumented public health concern. This study aimed at documenting the prevalence and nature of work related injuries among schoolchildren as well as identifying sociodemographic factors that predict these injuries. Methods. A cross-sectional survey included 15,963 children of whom 6458 (40.8%) completed an optional package related to labor. Students aged 12–18 years self-completed the international WHO collaborative HBSC valid questionnaires between April and May of 2006. Results. Approximately 73.8% of the students who filled the optional package reported working during the last 12 months, of whom 79.1% sustained a work related injury. Work injuries were significantly higher among boys, younger children, and children enrolled in UNRWA schools and living in Gaza Strip (P < 0.05). Children working ≥3 hours/day were more likely to experience injuries, 1.73 (95% CI, 1.53–1.95), than those working ≤3/day. About half of the children worked in retail trade (51.5%), agriculture (20.0%), and cleaning (11.4%). Injury type was related to the type of work performed. Conclusions. The high prevalence of injuries among working Palestinian schoolchildren confirms its severity as a public health problem. To reduce occupational injuries, policymakers and professionals should develop intervention programs that target the public and health providers. PMID:25006490

  10. The state of head injury biomechanics: past, present, and future: part 1.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, W

    2001-01-01

    This article is the first of two parts of a comprehensive survey of the biomechanics of head injury since its inception in 1939 in the United States, the separation being made for temporal and spatial reasons. The second portion of this material will be published at a later time in this journal. The discussion will be almost exclusively limited to nonpenetrating events. The topics presented in the following sections include an introduction that discusses the magnitude of the problem, the basic tools of biomechanics, and significant major reference sources covering this subject. This is succeeded by a brief description of the components of the head, classification of head injuries, early experimental investigations and human tolerance considerations, measurement techniques of kinetic parameters, and head motion and head injury investigations prior to 1966. A Head Injury Conference sponsored by the National Institutes of Neurological Diseases and Stroke in 1966 changed the landscape of investigations in this area. While informal collaboration between neurosurgeons and engineers had existed prior to this time, the conference established a permanent mechanism of synergism between these disciplines, produced the first zero-order realistic model of biomechanical head injury investigation, and established a 4-year program of federally funded research into the mechanical properties of the tissues of the cranium. While a recession precluded a continuation of the national sponsorship of such work, this 4-year period of intensive research resulted in a nationwide individual effort to develop further knowledge in this area. The current presentation, then, covers the mechanical and structural properties of solid and fluid tissues of the head, emphasizing progress during the past 3 decades; fetal cranial properties; analytical and numerical head injury models; experimental cranial loads applied to human volunteers and cadaver heads, dynamic loading of surrogate heads; and

  11. Peripheral nervous system injuries in sport and recreation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Toth, Cory; McNeil, Stephen; Feasby, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Many sports are associated with a variety of peripheral nervous system (PNS) injuries specific to that sport. A systematic review of sport-specific PNS injuries has not been attempted previously, and will assist in the understanding of morbidities and mortality associated with particular sporting activities, either professional or amateur. A systematic review of the literature using PubMed (1965-2003) was performed examining all known sports and a range of possible PNS injuries attributable to that sport. Numerous sporting activities (53) were found to have associated PNS injuries. The sports most commonly reported with injuries were football, hockey, soccer, baseball and winter activities. There are a number of sporting activities with injuries unique to the individual sport. This review should be of assistance for the neurologist, neurosurgeon, orthopaedic surgeon, physiatrist, sports medicine doctor, athletic trainer and general physician in contact with athletes possessing neurological injuries.

  12. The role of nutrition for pressure ulcer management: national pressure ulcer advisory panel, European pressure ulcer advisory panel, and pan pacific pressure injury alliance white paper.

    PubMed

    Posthauer, Mary Ellen; Banks, Merrilyn; Dorner, Becky; Schols, Jos M G A

    2015-04-01

    Nutrition and hydration play an important role in preserving skin and tissue viability and in supporting tissue repair for pressure ulcer (PrU) healing. The majority of research investigating the relationship between nutrition and wounds focuses on PrUs. This white paper reviews the 2014 National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, and Pan Pacific Pressure Injury Alliance Nutrition Guidelines and discusses nutrition strategies for PrU management.

  13. Injury-Proneness of Youth with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A National Clinical Data Analysis in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tai, Yueh-Ming; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Gau, Churn-Shiouh

    2013-01-01

    Limited literature documents injury-proneness of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in western population. However, only a few studies prospectively investigated the prediction of ADHD to injuries without considering other psychiatric and physical conditions and there is lack of such data in Asian population. To prospectively examine the…

  14. Early Risk Behaviors and Adolescent Injury in 25 European and North American Countries: A Cross-National Consistent Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Looze, Margaretha; Pickett, William; Raaijmakers, Quinten; Kuntsche, Emmanuel; Hublet, Anne; Nic Gabhainn, Saoirse; Bjarnason, Thoroddur; Molcho, Michal; Vollebergh, Wilma; ter Bogt, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Injury is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity among adolescents in developed countries. Jessor and Jessor's Problem Behavior Theory suggests an association between risk behaviors (e.g., smoking, drunkenness, cannabis use, and sexual intercourse) and adolescent injury. The present study examined whether early engagement in risk behaviors…

  15. Regional Variation in Acute Kidney Injury Requiring Dialysis in the English National Health Service from 2000 to 2015 – A National Epidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Fluck, Richard J.; Muirhead, Andrew W.; Taal, Maarten W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The absence of effective interventions in presence of increasing national incidence and case-fatality in acute kidney injury requiring dialysis (AKI-D) warrants a study of regional variation to explore any potential for improvement. We therefore studied regional variation in the epidemiology of AKI-D in English National Health Service over a period of 15 years. Method We analysed Hospital Episode Statistics data for all patients with a diagnosis of AKI-D, using ICD-10-CM codes, in English regions between 2000 and 2015 to study temporal changes in regional incidence and case-fatality. Results Of 203,758,879 completed discharges between 1st April 2000 and 31st March 2015, we identified 54,252 patients who had AKI-D in the nine regions of England. The population incidence of AKI-D increased variably in all regions over 15 years; however, the regional variation decreased from 3·3-fold to 1·3-fold (p<0·01). In a multivariable adjusted model, using London as the reference, in the period of 2000–2005, the North East (odd ratio (OR) 1·38; 95%CI 1·01, 1·90), East Midlands (OR 1·38; 95%CI 1·01, 1·90) and West Midlands (OR 1·38; 95%CI 1·01, 1·90) had higher odds for death, while East of England had lower odds for death (OR 0·66; 95% CI 0·49, 0·90). The North East had higher OR in all three five-year periods as compared to the other eight regions. Adjusted case-fatality showed significant variability with temporary improvement in some regions but overall there was no significant improvement in any region over 15 years. Conclusions We observed considerable regional variation in the epidemiology of AKI-D that was not entirely attributable to variations in demographic or other identifiable clinical factors. These observations make a compelling case for further research to elucidate the reasons and identify interventions to reduce the incidence and case-fatality in all regions. PMID:27749903

  16. Eye injuries in Canadian sports and recreational activities.

    PubMed

    Pashby, T J

    1992-08-01

    Over 4000 eye injuries, including 449 blind eyes, have been reported in sports and recreational activities in Canada over the past 20 years. This is not only a great personal loss but also a financial loss, both to the injured person and to the community. Statistics should be tabulated on catastrophic injuries that leave the person with a physical or mental deficit, such as a blind eye, and efforts should be directed toward preventing such injuries. Changing and enforcing game rules and providing proper eye protection has proved very beneficial in Canadian hockey, racket sports and war games. Educational programs supported by the media and government that alert players to the need for eye protection are required. Such measures may lead to the prevention of up to 90% of injuries in sports and recreational activities in Canada.

  17. [The influence of sports injuries on sport participation and work].

    PubMed

    Nel, D; Smit, P J; Stoker, D J

    1979-03-17

    The incidence and complications of sport injuries in athletics, basketball, gymnastics, hockey, netball, cricket, tennis and soccer were analysed from questionnaire responses of 239 sport participants in Pretoria. Lower limb injuries were most common (73%). Torn tendomuscular organs represented 29,3% of the total number of injuries; sprains, strains and dislocations 35,9%; and fractures 20,5%. Medical treatment was sought by 62,8% of the patients. A total of 60,7% of the subjects was advised to suspend further participation in sport, but 30,6% failed to do so and more than half of these again sustained injuries. Those who were booked off from work totalled 18,0%, but a further 4,5% stayed away from work voluntarily.

  18. Motivational climate, goal orientation, perceived sport ability, and enjoyment within Finnish junior ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Jaakkola, T; Ntoumanis, N; Liukkonen, J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relations among situational motivational climate, dispositional approach and avoidance achievement goals, perceived sport ability, and enjoyment in Finnish male junior ice hockey players. The sample comprised 265 junior B-level male players with a mean age of 17.03 years (SD = 0.63). Players filled questionnaires tapping their perceptions of coach motivational climate, achievement goals, perceived sport ability, and enjoyment. For the statistical analysis, players were divided into high and low perceived sport ability groups. Multigroup structural equation modeling (SEM) revealed an indirect path from task-involving motivational climate via task-approach goal to enjoyment. Additionally, SEM demonstrated four other direct associations, which existed in both perceived ability groups: from ego-involving motivational climate to ego-approach and ego-avoidance goals; from ego-approach goal to ego-avoidance goal; and from task-avoidance goal to ego-avoidance goal. Additionally, in the high perceived sport ability group, there was an association from task-involving motivational climate to enjoyment. The results of this study reveal that motivational climate emphasizing effort, personal development and improvement, and achievement goal mastering tasks are significant elements of enjoyment in junior ice hockey. PMID:25648198

  19. High-intensity interval training has positive effects on performance in ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Naimo, M A; de Souza, E O; Wilson, J M; Carpenter, A L; Gilchrist, P; Lowery, R P; Averbuch, B; White, T M; Joy, J

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the well-known benefits that have been shown, few studies have looked at the practical applications of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on athletic performance. This study investigated the effects of a HIIT program compared to traditional continuous endurance exercise training. 24 hockey players were randomly assigned to either a continuous or high-intensity interval group during a 4-week training program. The interval group (IG) was involved in a periodized HIIT program. The continuous group (CG) performed moderate intensity cycling for 45-60 min at an intensity that was 65% of their calculated heart rate reserve. Body composition, muscle thickness, anaerobic power, and on-ice measures were assessed pre- and post-training. Muscle thickness was significantly greater in IG (p=0.01) when compared to CG. The IG had greater values for both ∆ peak power (p<0.003) and ∆ mean power (p<0.02). Additionally, IG demonstrated a faster ∆ sprint (p<0.02) and a trend (p=0.08) for faster ∆ endurance test time to completion for IG. These results indicate that hockey players may utilize short-term HIIT to elicit positive effects in muscle thickness, power and on-ice performance.

  20. Bebop on the Hockey Pitch: Cross-Disciplinary Creativity and Skills Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Clive M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper generalizes task-specific (but dissimilar) skills, from the jazz concert stage and from the hockey field, into the domain of creativity research. What is sought are clues to what skills or creativities are transferable across dissimilar domains. It is argued that certain domain-general skills are transferable across domains, but a domain-general or ‘c’ creative capacity, is not. Rather than transferring some over-arching capacity to be universally creative, this research highlights factors likely to facilitate successful cross-disciplinary creative expression and posits a correlation between the capacities for discriminant pattern-recognition, task-specific expertise, and sensory data-collection, and the transferability of creativity. Of particular significance is the capacity for informed, selective pattern-breaking based on the ‘depth’ or ‘insider’ perspective of the domain expert; such ‘expert variation and selective retention’ provides creative choices and responses that are likely to be perceived by the field as creative: valuable, novel and surprising. The author is a renowned Australian studio bassist, jazz musician, and music educator who also plays field hockey for Australia at Masters level. His recently completed Ph.D. thesis, based on a performance and composition career spanning 46 years, takes the form of an analytical autoethnography drawn from personal field notes, diaries and interviews as well as published record albums. PMID:26903926

  1. Carbon monoxide in indoor ice skating rinks: Evaluation of absorption by adult hockey players

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, B.; Dewailly, E.; Lavoie, R.; Prud'Homme, D.; Allaire, S. )

    1990-05-01

    We evaluated alveolar carbon monoxide (CO) levels of 122 male, adult hockey players active in recreational leagues of the Quebec City region (Canada), before and after 10 weekly 90-minute games in 10 different rinks. We also determined exposure by quantifying the average CO level in the rink during the games. Other variables documented included age, pulmonary function, aerobic capacity, and smoking status. Environmental concentrations varied from 1.6 to 131.5 parts per million (ppm). We examined the absorption/exposure relationship using a simple linear regression model. In low CO exposure levels, physical exercise lowered the alveolar CO concentration. However, we noted that for each 10 ppm of CO in the ambient air, the players had adsorbed enough CO to raise their carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels by 1 percent. This relationship was true both for smokers and non-smokers. We suggest that an average environmental concentration of 20 ppm of CO for the duration of a hockey game (90 minutes) should be reference limit not to be exceeded in indoor skating rinks.

  2. Goal orientations of young male ice hockey players and their parents.

    PubMed

    Bergin, David A; Habusta, Steven F

    2004-12-01

    In this study, the researchers investigated the relationship between parent and player dispositional goal orientations associated with playing youth hockey. The authors used the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (J. L. Duda & J. Whitehead, 1998) to measure task and ego orientation in 123 boys (10-13 years old) and 1 of their parents. Sons rated their own goal orientations for hockey and their perceptions of their parent's goal orientations. Parents rated their goal orientations for their son and their perceptions of their son's goal orientations. Mothers and fathers did not differ in their goal orientations for their son. Travel-team and nontravel-team players did not differ. For ego orientation, the son's self-ratings correlated significantly with the parent's goals for the son, but not for task orientation. Sons reported being significantly more ego-oriented than their parents desired. Sons perceived that their parents had goal orientations similar to their own. The data from this study are congruent with the assertion that parents socialize their children's goal orientations and that ego orientation may be more salient and easily communicated than task orientation. PMID:15636385

  3. Contextual effects on activity profiles of domestic field hockey during competition and training.

    PubMed

    White, Andrew D; MacFarlane, Niall G

    2015-04-01

    Game context is widely accepted to influence performance but most data available is 'categorical' and addresses performance rather than activity. This study assessed direct effects of opposition and team ranking in field hockey to establish influences on activity. One hundred and eight (n=108) female field hockey players (age 16-39 years) participated, giving 186 competition and 48 training analyses. Team average distance (mean ± SD) observed in a mid-ranked team during competition ranged from 5,949 ± 611 to 7,719 ± 257 m demonstrating an opposition rank effect (Pearson's r=.71; adjusted R(2)=.42). However, multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated a stronger relationship in lower ranked teams (Pearson's r=.99; adjusted R(2)=.97 through 3-9). In contrast, no team rank effect was observed during randomly monitored competition where team average distance ranged from 5,177 ± 444 to 7,316 ± 241 m (Pearson's r=.15 and adjusted R(2)=.12). In training, however, a team rank effect was observed in distance-related performance indicators where team average distance during small-sided games ranged from 5,877 ± 188 to 3,551 ± 193 m drill (per 70 min) with Pearson's r=.95 and adjusted R(2)=.87. The presence of contextual effects has significant practical implications for team sports where the training load assumed from competition may be overestimated.

  4. Bebop on the Hockey Pitch: Cross-Disciplinary Creativity and Skills Transfer.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Clive M

    2016-01-01

    This paper generalizes task-specific (but dissimilar) skills, from the jazz concert stage and from the hockey field, into the domain of creativity research. What is sought are clues to what skills or creativities are transferable across dissimilar domains. It is argued that certain domain-general skills are transferable across domains, but a domain-general or 'c' creative capacity, is not. Rather than transferring some over-arching capacity to be universally creative, this research highlights factors likely to facilitate successful cross-disciplinary creative expression and posits a correlation between the capacities for discriminant pattern-recognition, task-specific expertise, and sensory data-collection, and the transferability of creativity. Of particular significance is the capacity for informed, selective pattern-breaking based on the 'depth' or 'insider' perspective of the domain expert; such 'expert variation and selective retention' provides creative choices and responses that are likely to be perceived by the field as creative: valuable, novel and surprising. The author is a renowned Australian studio bassist, jazz musician, and music educator who also plays field hockey for Australia at Masters level. His recently completed Ph.D. thesis, based on a performance and composition career spanning 46 years, takes the form of an analytical autoethnography drawn from personal field notes, diaries and interviews as well as published record albums. PMID:26903926

  5. 1 year test-retest reliability of ImPACT in professional ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Jared; Echemendia, Ruben; Meeuwisse, Willem; Comper, Paul; Sisco, Amber

    2014-01-01

    The Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) battery is widely used to assess neurocognitive outcomes following sports-related concussion. The purpose of this study was to examine the 1 year test-retest reliability of ImPACT in a multilingual sample of professional hockey players. A total of 305 professional hockey players were tested 1 year apart using ImPACT. Reliable change confidence intervals were calculated and test-retest reliability was measured using Pearson and Intraclass correlation coefficients. Results indicated that the 1-year test-retest reliabilities for the Visual Motor and Reaction Time Composites ranged from low to high (.52 to .81). In contrast, 1-year test-retest reliabilities for the Verbal and Visual Memory Composites were low (.22 to .58). The 1-year test-retest results provided mixed support for the use of Visual Motor and Reaction Time Composites in select samples; in contrast, the Verbal and Visual Memory Composites may not be sensitive to clinical change.

  6. Bebop on the Hockey Pitch: Cross-Disciplinary Creativity and Skills Transfer.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Clive M

    2016-01-01

    This paper generalizes task-specific (but dissimilar) skills, from the jazz concert stage and from the hockey field, into the domain of creativity research. What is sought are clues to what skills or creativities are transferable across dissimilar domains. It is argued that certain domain-general skills are transferable across domains, but a domain-general or 'c' creative capacity, is not. Rather than transferring some over-arching capacity to be universally creative, this research highlights factors likely to facilitate successful cross-disciplinary creative expression and posits a correlation between the capacities for discriminant pattern-recognition, task-specific expertise, and sensory data-collection, and the transferability of creativity. Of particular significance is the capacity for informed, selective pattern-breaking based on the 'depth' or 'insider' perspective of the domain expert; such 'expert variation and selective retention' provides creative choices and responses that are likely to be perceived by the field as creative: valuable, novel and surprising. The author is a renowned Australian studio bassist, jazz musician, and music educator who also plays field hockey for Australia at Masters level. His recently completed Ph.D. thesis, based on a performance and composition career spanning 46 years, takes the form of an analytical autoethnography drawn from personal field notes, diaries and interviews as well as published record albums.

  7. Somatotype characteristics of male sprinters, basketball, soccer, and field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Toriola, A L; Salokun, S O; Mathur, D N

    1985-12-01

    In an effort to describe the physique associated with regular involvement in sports activity, the somatotypes of a group of 51 elite male athletes comprising sprinters (n = 10), basketball (n = 12), soccer (n = 15), and field hockey (n = 14) players, and 11 male nonathletes were studied. The subjects' physiques were assessed using the Health-Carter anthropometric somatotype method. Analysis of variance and Newman-Keuls post hoc method were used to test for significant differences among the mean somatotype ratings of the groups. The findings indicated that the nonathletes (3.5) were significantly more endomorphic (P less than 0.05) than the soccer players (2.5) and sprinters (2.4). The sprinters (3.6) and basketball players (3.7) had markedly higher ectomorphic ratings (P less than 0.05) as compared with the hockey players (2.0). The mesomorphic component did not differentiate the groups. The differences observed among the groups which could be attributed to genetic and environmental influences reflect the variability in the morphological characteristics of athletes and nonathletes.

  8. Injuries in Elite Figure Skaters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Robert M.; Striowski, Catherine C.

    1986-01-01

    A questionnaire was used to examine the number, nature, and etiology of injuries to 60 Canadian nationally ranked figure skaters over a one-year period. Twenty-eight of the respondents reported having a significant injury during the year. Forty-three percent of the injuries were overuse injuries. (MT)

  9. Adjustment to Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... of injury are alive and easily get educational information on the Internet. Web happy. sites such as the National Spinal Cord Injury Association (www.spinalcord.org) and SPINAL CORD Injury ♦ “Because of my injury, it is now impossible for me Information Network (www.spinalcord.uab.edu) have to ever ...

  10. Effects of Carbohydrate Intake Before and During An Ice Hockey Game on Blood and Muscle Energy Substrates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simard, Clermont; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Study of the effect of a supplemental carbohydrate intake for seven elite ice hockey players before and during a game demonstrated that the supplement could result in less glycogen usage per distance skated, which had important implications for athletes who may participate in more than one game a day. (Author/CB)

  11. Proprioception of foot and ankle complex in young regular practitioners of ice hockey, ballet dancing and running.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing Xian; Xu, Dong Qing; Hoshizaki, Blaine

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the proprioception of the foot and ankle complex in regular ice hockey practitioners, runners, and ballet dancers. A total of 45 young people with different exercise habits formed four groups: the ice hockey, ballet dancing, running, and sedentary groups. Kinesthesia of the foot and ankle complex was measured in plantarflexion (PF), dorsiflexion (DF), inversion (IV), and eversion (EV) at 0.4 degrees /s using a custom-made device. The results showed the following: (1) significantly better perceived passive motion sense in PF/DF was found as compared with the measurements in IV/EV within each group (P < .01); (2) ice hockey and ballet groups perceived significantly better passive motion sense in IV/EV than the running (P < .05) and the sedentary (P < .01) groups; and (3) no significant difference in the all measurements was found between running and sedentary groups. The benefits of ice hockey and ballet dancing on proprioception may be associated with their movement characteristics.

  12. Development and Validation of a Method for Determining Tridimensional Angular Displacements with Special Applications to Ice Hockey Motions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon, Micheline; And Others

    1983-01-01

    A method for determining the tridimensional angular displacement of skates during the two-legged stop in ice hockey was developed and validated. The angles were measured by geometry, using a cinecamera and specially equipped skates. The method provides a new tool for kinetic analyses of skating movements. (Authors/PP)

  13. Orofacial/cerebral injuries and the use of mouthguards by professional athletes in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Lieger, Olivier; von Arx, Thomas

    2006-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to measure the occurrence of orofacial and cerebral injuries in different sports and to survey the awareness of athletes and officials concerning the use of mouthguards during sport activities. Two hundred and sixty-seven professional athletes and 63 officials participating in soccer, handball, basketball and ice hockey were interviewed. The frequency of orofacial and cerebral trauma during sport practice was recorded and the reason for using and not using mouthguards was assessed. A great difference in orofacial and cerebral injuries was found when comparing the different kinds of sports and comparing athletes with or without mouthguards. 45% of the players had suffered injuries when not wearing mouthguards. Most injuries were found in ice hockey, (59%), whereas only 24% of the soccer players suffered injuries when not wearing mouthguards. Sixty-eight percentage of the players wearing mouthguards had never suffered any orofacial and cerebral injuries. Two hundred and twenty-four athletes (84%) did not use a mouthguard despite general acceptance by 150 athletes (56%). Although the awareness of mouthguards among officials was very high (59%), only 25% of them would support the funding of mouthguards and 5% would enforce regulations. Athletes as well as coaches should be informed about the high risk of oral injuries when performing contact sports. Doctors and dentists need to recommend a more intensive education of students in sports medicine and sports dentistry, and to increase their willingness to become a team dentist.

  14. Prevalence of Injury in Occupation and Industry: Role of Obesity in the National Health Interview Survey 2004 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ja K.; Charles, Luenda E.; Fekedulegn, Desta; Ma, Claudia C.; Andrew, Michael E.; Burchfiel, Cecil M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to estimate prevalence of injury by occupation and industry and obesity’s role. Methods Self-reported injuries were collected annually for US workers during 2004 to 2013. Prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained from fitted logistic regression models. Results Overall weighted injury prevalence during the previous three months was 77 per 10,000 workers. Age-adjusted injury prevalence was greatest for Construction and Extraction workers (169.7/10,000) followed by Production (160.6) among occupations, while workers in the Construction industry sector (147.9) had the highest injury prevalence followed by the Agriculture/Forestry/Fishing/Mining/Utilities sector (122.1). Overweight and obese workers were 26% to 45% more likely to experience injuries than normal-weight workers. Conclusion The prevalence of injury, highest for Construction workers, gradually increased as body mass index levels increased in most occupational and industry groups. PMID:27058472

  15. A four year prospective study of injuries in elite Ontario youth provincial and national soccer players during training and matchplay

    PubMed Central

    Mohib, Milad; Moser, Nicholas; Kim, Richard; Thillai, Maathavan; Gringmuth, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: With over 200 million amateur players worldwide, soccer is one of the most popular and internationally recognized sports today. By understanding how and why soccer injuries occur we hope to reduce prevalent injuries amongst elite soccer athletes. Methods: Via a prospective cohort, we examined both male and female soccer players eligible to train with the Ontario Soccer Association provincial program between the ages of 13 to 17 during the period of October 10, 2008 and April 20, 2012. Data collection occurred during all player exposures to potential injury. Exposures occurred at the Soccer Centre, Ontario Training grounds and various other venues on multiple playing surfaces. Results: A total number of 733 injuries were recorded. Muscle strain, pull or tightness was responsible for 45.6% of all injuries and ranked as the most prevalent injury. Discussion: As anticipated, the highest injury reported was muscular strain, which warrants more suitable preventive programs aimed at strengthening and properly warming up the players’ muscles. PMID:25550661

  16. Road Traffic Related Injury Research and Informatics. New Opportunities for Biomedical and Health Informatics as a Contribution to the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals?

    PubMed

    Al-Shorbaji, N; Haux, R; Krishnamurthy, R; Marschollek, M; Mattfeld, D C; Bartolomeos, K; Reynolds, T A

    2015-01-01

    The United Nations has recently adopted 17 sustainable development goals for 2030, including ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being for all at all ages, and making cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable. Road injuries remain among the ten leading causes of death in the world, and are projected to increase with rapidly increasing motorisation globally. Lack of comprehensive data on road injuries has been identified as one of the barriers for effective implementation of proven road safety interventions. Building, linking and analysing electronic patient records in conjunction with establishing injury event and care registries can substantially contribute to healthy lives and safe transportation. Appropriate use of new technological approaches and health informatics best practices could provide significant added value to WHO's global road safety work and assist Member States in identifying prevention targets, monitoring progress and improving quality of care to reduce injury-related deaths. This paper encourages the initiation of new multidisciplinary research at a global level.

  17. Division I Hockey Players Generate More Power Than Division III Players During on- and Off-Ice Performance Tests.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Ben J; Fitzgerald, John S; Dietz, Calvin C; Ziegler, Kevin S; Ingraham, Stacy J; Baker, Sarah E; Snyder, Eric M

    2015-05-01

    Current research has found anthropometric and physiological characteristics of hockey players that are correlated to performance. These characteristics, however, have never been examined to see whether significant differences exist between on- and off-ice performance markers at different levels of play; Division I, Elite Junior, and Division III. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences that may exist between these characteristics in Division I (24), Elite Junior (10), and Division III hockey (11) players. Forty-five (age: 18-24 years) hockey players completed anthropometric, on-ice, and off-ice tests to ascertain average measures for each division of play. On-ice testing was conducted in full hockey gear and consisted of acceleration, top-speed, and on-ice repeated shift test (RST). Off-ice tests included vertical jump, Wingate, grip strength, and a graded exercise test performed on a skating treadmill to ascertain their (Equation is included in full-text article.). Division I players had significantly lower body fat than their Division III peers (p = 0.004). Division I players also scored significantly better on measures of anaerobic power; vertical jump (p = 0.001), Wingate peak power (p = 0.05), grip strength (p = 0.008), top speed (p = 0.001), and fastest RST course time (p = 0.001) than their Division III counterparts. There was no significant difference between Division I and Elite Junior players for any on- or off-ice performance variable. The results of this study indicate that performance differences between Division I and Division III hockey players seem to be primarily because of the rate of force production.

  18. Active living and injury risk.

    PubMed

    Parkkari, J; Kannus, P; Natri, A; Lapinleimu, I; Palvanen, M; Heiskanen, M; Vuori, I; Järvinen, M

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to get reliable insight into injury risk in various commuting and lifestyle activities, as well as recreational and competitive sports. A cohort of 3 657 persons was randomly selected from the 15- to 74-year-old Finnish population. Ninety-two percent (n = 3 363) of the subjects accepted to participate the one-year follow-up, record all their physical activities that lasted 15 min or more, and register all acute and overuse injuries that occurred during these activities. To collect the information, the study subjects were interviewed by phone by the trained personnel of the Statistics Finland three times in four-month intervals. The individual injury risk per exposure time was relatively low, ranging from 0.19 to 1.5 per 1 000 hours of participation, in commuting and lifestyle activities including walking and cycling to work, gardening, home repair, hunting and fishing, and, in sports such as golf, dancing, swimming, walking, and rowing. The risk was clearly higher in squash, orienteering, and contact and team sports, such as judo, wrestling, karate, rinkball, floorball, basketball, soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, and Finnish baseball ranging from 6.6 to 18.3 per 1 000 hours of participation. However, the highest absolute number of injuries occurred in low-risk activities, such as gardening, walking, home-repair, and cycling, because they are performed so often. In conclusion, individual injury risk per exposure hours is relatively low in commuting and lifestyle activities compared to many recreational and competitive sports. However, at a population level, these low-to-moderate intensity activities are widely practised producing a rather high absolute number of injuries, and thus, preventive efforts are needed in these activities, too.

  19. 75 FR 5089 - National Center for Injury Prevention and Control/Initial Review Group, (NCIPC/IRG)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... applications intended to encourage exploratory/developmental research in unintentional childhood injury. Requests for Applications are related to the following individual research announcement: CE10-001... organizations, including State and local government agencies, to conduct research on unintentional...

  20. Peripheral nerve injuries in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, J H; Nadler, S F; Krivickas, L S

    1997-12-01

    outcome. Proximal nerve injuries have a poorer prognosis for neurological recovery. The most common peripheral nerve injury in the athlete is the burner syndrome. Though primarily a football injury, burners have been reported in wrestling, hockey, basketball and weight-lifting as a result of acute head, neck and/or shoulder trauma. Most burners are self-limiting, but they occasionally produce permanent neurological deficits. The axillary nerve is commonly injured with shoulder dislocations but is also susceptible to injury by direct compression. The sciatic and common peroneal nerves can be injured by trauma. The suprascapular, musculocutaneous, ulnar, median and tibial nerves are susceptible to entrapment. The long thoracic and femoral nerves can be injured by severe traction.

  1. Bomb blast injuries: an exploration of patient characteristics and outcome using Pakistan National Emergency Departments Surveillance (Pak-NEDS) data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Bomb blast injuries result in premature deaths and burdening of healthcare systems. The objective of this study was to explore the characteristics and outcome of patients presenting to the emergency departments in Pakistan with bomb blast injuries. Methods Active surveillance was conducted in seven major emergency departments of Pakistan from November 2010-March 2011. All the sites are tertiary care urban centers. All the patients who presented to the hospital's emergency department (ED) following a bomb blast injury as per self-report or the ambulance personnel were included in the study. Frequency of demographics, injury pattern, and outcomes were calculated. Results A total of 103 patients with bomb blast injuries presented to the selected emergency departments. The median age of patients was 30 years. Around three-fourth of the patients were males (n = 74, 74.7%). Most of the bomb blast patients were seen in Peshawar (n = 41, 39.8%) and Karachi city (n = 31, 30.1%) and the most common mode of arrival was non-ambulance transport (n = 71, 76.3%). Upper limb injuries (n = 12, 40%) were common in the under 18 age group and lower limb injuries (n = 31, 39.2%) in the 18 years and above group. There were a total of 8 (7.7%) deaths reported out of these 103 patients. Conclusion Bomb blast injuries in Pakistan generally affect young males. Non-ambulance transport is the most common way to access emergency departments (ED). Overall ED mortality is high and capturing data during a disaster in an emergency department is challenging. PMID:26692453

  2. Potential Long-Term Consequences of Concussive and Subconcussive Injury.

    PubMed

    Huber, Bertrand R; Alosco, Michael L; Stein, Thor D; McKee, Ann C

    2016-05-01

    Repeated concussive and subconcussive trauma is associated with the later development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a neurodegenerative disease associated with clinical symptoms in multiple domains and a unique pattern of pathologic changes. CTE has been linked to boxing and American football; CTE has also been identified in soccer, ice hockey, baseball, rugby, and military service. To date, most large studies of CTE have come from enriched cohorts associated with brain bank donations for traumatic brain injury, although several recent studies re-examining neurodegenerative disease brain banks suggest that CTE is more common than is currently appreciated.

  3. Potential Long-Term Consequences of Concussive and Subconcussive Injury.

    PubMed

    Huber, Bertrand R; Alosco, Michael L; Stein, Thor D; McKee, Ann C

    2016-05-01

    Repeated concussive and subconcussive trauma is associated with the later development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a neurodegenerative disease associated with clinical symptoms in multiple domains and a unique pattern of pathologic changes. CTE has been linked to boxing and American football; CTE has also been identified in soccer, ice hockey, baseball, rugby, and military service. To date, most large studies of CTE have come from enriched cohorts associated with brain bank donations for traumatic brain injury, although several recent studies re-examining neurodegenerative disease brain banks suggest that CTE is more common than is currently appreciated. PMID:27154859

  4. Occupational Injuries in Germany: Population-Wide National Survey Data Emphasize the Importance of Work-Related Factors.

    PubMed

    Rommel, Alexander; Varnaccia, Gianni; Lahmann, Nils; Kottner, Jan; Kroll, Lars Eric

    2016-01-01

    Unintentional injuries cause much of the global mortality burden, with the workplace being a common accident setting. Even in high-income economies, occupational injury figures remain remarkably high. Because risk factors for occupational injuries are prone to confounding, the present research takes a comprehensive approach. To better understand the occurrence of occupational injuries, sociodemographic factors and work- and health-related factors are tested simultaneously. Thus, the present analysis aims to develop a comprehensive epidemiological model that facilitates the explanation of varying injury rates in the workplace. The representative phone survey German Health Update 2010 provides information on medically treated occupational injuries sustained in the year prior to the interview. Data were collected on sociodemographics, occupation, working conditions, health-related behaviors, and chronic diseases. For the economically active population (18-70 years, n = 14,041), the 12-month prevalence of occupational injuries was calculated with a 95% confidence interval (CI). Blockwise multiple logistic regression was applied to successively include different groups of variables. Overall, 2.8% (95% CI 2.4-3.2) of the gainfully employed population report at least one occupational injury (women: 0.9%; 95% CI 0.7-1.2; men: 4.3%; 95% CI 3.7-5.0). In the fully adjusted model, male gender (OR 3.16) and age 18-29 (OR 1.54), as well as agricultural (OR 5.40), technical (OR 3.41), skilled service (OR 4.24) or manual (OR 5.12), and unskilled service (OR 3.13) or manual (OR 4.97) occupations are associated with higher chances of occupational injuries. The same holds for frequent stressors such as heavy carrying (OR 1.78), working in awkward postures (OR 1.46), environmental stress (OR 1.48), and working under pressure (OR 1.41). Among health-related variables, physical inactivity (OR 1.47) and obesity (OR 1.73) present a significantly higher chance of occupational injuries

  5. Occupational Injuries in Germany: Population-Wide National Survey Data Emphasize the Importance of Work-Related Factors

    PubMed Central

    Rommel, Alexander; Varnaccia, Gianni; Lahmann, Nils; Kottner, Jan; Kroll, Lars Eric

    2016-01-01

    Unintentional injuries cause much of the global mortality burden, with the workplace being a common accident setting. Even in high-income economies, occupational injury figures remain remarkably high. Because risk factors for occupational injuries are prone to confounding, the present research takes a comprehensive approach. To better understand the occurrence of occupational injuries, sociodemographic factors and work- and health-related factors are tested simultaneously. Thus, the present analysis aims to develop a comprehensive epidemiological model that facilitates the explanation of varying injury rates in the workplace. The representative phone survey German Health Update 2010 provides information on medically treated occupational injuries sustained in the year prior to the interview. Data were collected on sociodemographics, occupation, working conditions, health-related behaviors, and chronic diseases. For the economically active population (18–70 years, n = 14,041), the 12-month prevalence of occupational injuries was calculated with a 95% confidence interval (CI). Blockwise multiple logistic regression was applied to successively include different groups of variables. Overall, 2.8% (95% CI 2.4–3.2) of the gainfully employed population report at least one occupational injury (women: 0.9%; 95% CI 0.7–1.2; men: 4.3%; 95% CI 3.7–5.0). In the fully adjusted model, male gender (OR 3.16) and age 18–29 (OR 1.54), as well as agricultural (OR 5.40), technical (OR 3.41), skilled service (OR 4.24) or manual (OR 5.12), and unskilled service (OR 3.13) or manual (OR 4.97) occupations are associated with higher chances of occupational injuries. The same holds for frequent stressors such as heavy carrying (OR 1.78), working in awkward postures (OR 1.46), environmental stress (OR 1.48), and working under pressure (OR 1.41). Among health-related variables, physical inactivity (OR 1.47) and obesity (OR 1.73) present a significantly higher chance of occupational

  6. Occupational Injuries in Germany: Population-Wide National Survey Data Emphasize the Importance of Work-Related Factors.

    PubMed

    Rommel, Alexander; Varnaccia, Gianni; Lahmann, Nils; Kottner, Jan; Kroll, Lars Eric

    2016-01-01

    Unintentional injuries cause much of the global mortality burden, with the workplace being a common accident setting. Even in high-income economies, occupational injury figures remain remarkably high. Because risk factors for occupational injuries are prone to confounding, the present research takes a comprehensive approach. To better understand the occurrence of occupational injuries, sociodemographic factors and work- and health-related factors are tested simultaneously. Thus, the present analysis aims to develop a comprehensive epidemiological model that facilitates the explanation of varying injury rates in the workplace. The representative phone survey German Health Update 2010 provides information on medically treated occupational injuries sustained in the year prior to the interview. Data were collected on sociodemographics, occupation, working conditions, health-related behaviors, and chronic diseases. For the economically active population (18-70 years, n = 14,041), the 12-month prevalence of occupational injuries was calculated with a 95% confidence interval (CI). Blockwise multiple logistic regression was applied to successively include different groups of variables. Overall, 2.8% (95% CI 2.4-3.2) of the gainfully employed population report at least one occupational injury (women: 0.9%; 95% CI 0.7-1.2; men: 4.3%; 95% CI 3.7-5.0). In the fully adjusted model, male gender (OR 3.16) and age 18-29 (OR 1.54), as well as agricultural (OR 5.40), technical (OR 3.41), skilled service (OR 4.24) or manual (OR 5.12), and unskilled service (OR 3.13) or manual (OR 4.97) occupations are associated with higher chances of occupational injuries. The same holds for frequent stressors such as heavy carrying (OR 1.78), working in awkward postures (OR 1.46), environmental stress (OR 1.48), and working under pressure (OR 1.41). Among health-related variables, physical inactivity (OR 1.47) and obesity (OR 1.73) present a significantly higher chance of occupational injuries

  7. The Incidence and Types of Physical Contact Associated with Body Checking Regulation Experience in 13–14 Year Old Ice Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Goulet, Claude; Roy, Thierry-Olivier; Nadeau, Luc; Hamel, Denis; Fortier, Kristine; Emery, Carolyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ice hockey has one of the highest sport participation and injury rates in youth in Canada. Body checking (BC) is the predominant mechanism of injury in leagues in which it is permitted. The objectives of this study were to determine whether the incidence and types of physical contact differ for Bantam players (aged 13–14 years) who were exposed to BC at Pee Wee level (aged 11–12 years) in Calgary, Alberta versus Bantam players who were not exposed to BC at Pee Wee level in Québec City, Québec. All teams were exposed to BC at bantam level; Methods: A cohort study was conducted in Québec City and Calgary. Sixteen games for Calgary and 15 for Québec City were randomly selected and analysed with a validated observation system to quantify five intensities of physical contact and to observe different types of physical contact such as slashing and holding; Results: A total of 5610 incidences of physical contact with the trunk and 3429 other types of physical contact were observed. Very light intensity trunk contact was more frequent in Calgary (adjusted incidence RR (ARR): 1.71; 95% CI: 1.28–2.29). Holding (ARR: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.02–1.07) and slashing (ARR: 1.38; 95% CI: 1.07–1.77) were more frequent in Calgary; Conclusion: Results suggest that players’ physical contacts differ between Bantam leagues in which BC was permitted at Pee Wee level and leagues in which it was not permitted until Bantam level. PMID:27399750

  8. A resolution congratulating the Boston College men's ice hockey team on winning its fifth National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Men's Hockey Championship.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Kerry, John F. [D-MA

    2012-04-25

    04/25/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S2741-2742; text as passed Senate: CR S2742; text of measure as introduced: CR S2736) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. A resolution congratulating the University of Minnesota women's ice hockey team on winning its second straight National Collegiate Athletic Association Women's Ice Hockey Championship.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Klobuchar, Amy [D-MN

    2013-04-25

    04/25/2013 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S3060; text as passed Senate: CR S3049) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. The role of the African-American physician in reducing traffic-related injury and death among African Americans: consensus report of the National Medical Association.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Fernando; Moore, Wayne; Conti, Christopher; Norville Perez, Lucille C.; Gaines, Beverly M.; Hood, Rodney G.; Swain, Ian J. J.; Williams, Rudolph; Burgess, Chaka T.

    2002-01-01

    ISSUE: Traffic-related injuries and fatalities disproportionately affect the African American community. These high rates of traffic-related death and injury among African Americans manifest in multiple areas of traffic safety, including: Failure to use seat belts and child restraints. High incidence of alcohol-impaired driving. Failure to follow child passenger and seat belt safety laws and recommendations. High rates of pedestrian accidents, ofen brought on by impairments of drivers and/or pedestrians. Research indicates that national public information campaigns, with general messages only slightly modified for African American audiences, have not been culturally appropriate or effective in changing traffic safety behavior. In addition, traditional distribution mechanisms for these messages have not effectively reached the target population. Evidence suggests that in the African American community, there is a pervasive lack of knowledge of the devastating impact of traffic-related accidents on the overall health status of the community. This lack of information has resulted in a tragic cycle, in which parents fail to model safe operation of motor vehicles, and generation after generation copy this behavior, increasing the community's vulnerability to serious injuries and untimely deaths. This trend toward improper traffic safety habits among African Americans persists despite federal, state and local laws to enforce and promote sound traffic safety practices. OBJECTIVE: To study the existence of disparities in traffic-related injury and death among African Americans and to determine what kinds of traffic safety messages and campaigns will be effective in encouraging African Americans to respond to safety laws in sufficient numbers to reduce the disproportionately high rate of injury and death. Traffic safety issues were examined to effectively recommend policy, address barriers, best practices, and intervention strategies for the National Medical Association

  11. Bilateral Simultaneous Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: A Case Report and National Survey of Orthopedic Surgeon Management Preference

    PubMed Central

    Saadat, Ehsan; Curry, Emily J.; Li, Xinning; Matzkin, Elizabeth G.

    2014-01-01

    Unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear is a common injury seen by sports medicine orthopedic surgeons. However, a bilateral simultaneous ACL injury is extremely rare and has been reported only three times in the literature. We present a young female skier with simultaneous bilateral ACL tears that were managed with staged ACL reconstruction. We then conducted a nationwide survey (United States) to determine the prevalence of simultaneous bilateral ACL tear and preferred management strategies by sports medicine orthopedic surgeons. Sports medicine fellowship directors were contacted and asked to send an 8-item survey to colleagues (sports medicine fellowship trained surgeons) asking about overall number of ACL reconstructions performed, number of bilateral simultaneous ACL injuries seen and optimal management strategies of such an injury. Out of 43 responses, only 22 (51.2%) surgeons had seen a bilateral simultaneous ACL injury. Of these, 16 (76.2%) preferred staged reconstruction. Graft choice was mixed between autograft and allograft, but a large majority preferred either patellar tendon autograft (58%) or hamstring autograft (41%) were the most common choice. Staged reconstruction is the treatment of choice by surgeons surveyed in our study. PMID:25568728

  12. Bilateral simultaneous anterior cruciate ligament injury: a case report and national survey of orthopedic surgeon management preference.

    PubMed

    Saadat, Ehsan; Curry, Emily J; Li, Xinning; Matzkin, Elizabeth G

    2014-10-27

    Unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear is a common injury seen by sports medicine orthopedic surgeons. However, a bilateral simultaneous ACL injury is extremely rare and has been reported only three times in the literature. We present a young female skier with simultaneous bilateral ACL tears that were managed with staged ACL reconstruction. We then conducted a nationwide survey (United States) to determine the prevalence of simultaneous bilateral ACL tear and preferred management strategies by sports medicine orthopedic surgeons. Sports medicine fellowship directors were contacted and asked to send an 8-item survey to colleagues (sports medicine fellowship trained surgeons) asking about overall number of ACL reconstructions performed, number of bilateral simultaneous ACL injuries seen and optimal management strategies of such an injury. Out of 43 responses, only 22 (51.2%) surgeons had seen a bilateral simultaneous ACL injury. Of these, 16 (76.2%) preferred staged reconstruction. Graft choice was mixed between autograft and allograft, but a large majority preferred either patellar tendon autograft (58%) or hamstring autograft (41%) were the most common choice. Staged reconstruction is the treatment of choice by surgeons surveyed in our study. PMID:25568728

  13. CHRONIC LEG PAIN IN A DIVISION II FIELD HOCKEY PLAYER: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Snowden, Julie; Becker, Jonathan A.; Hazle, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Exertional compartment syndromes in athletes represent a diagnostic and management challenge for clinicians. The clinical presentation of exertional compartment syndrome is similar to other more common musculoskeletal disorders. A lack of special tests or unique diagnostic identifiers for use in decision making by out‐patient clinicians complicates early recognition of this disorder and may delay optimal management. The purpose of this case report is to retrospectively explore the clinical presentation and the decision‐making during the course of care of a field hockey athlete eventually determined to have exertional compartment syndrome. Suggestions to assist in recognition and guidance in patient management are included as well as the procedures required for differential diagnosis. Procedures utilized during conservative care are also described in detail. Level of Evidence: 5 (Single Case Report) PMID:24567863

  14. Cardiovascular Prevention in a High Risk Sport, Ice Hockey: Applications in Wider Sports Physical Therapy Practice

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Although acute myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death are relatively rare occurrences in athletics, cardiovascular accidents do occur. This manuscript presents information on the cardiovascular risks in athletics. In addition, information is provided on screening for cardiovascular risk – including history taking, chart review, physical examination – and the appropriate guidelines on the treatment of athletes found to be at risk. For the purpose of this article, the sport of ice hockey is used to illustrate the subject matter and highlight the behaviors in sport that carry cardiovascular risk. Physical therapists have ethical and legal responsibility to undertake the necessary screening procedures to recognize and respond to any signs of cardiovascular risk in their clients. PMID:21522221

  15. Performance Prediction for a Hockey-Puck Silicon Crystal Monochromator at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zunping; Rosenbaum, Gerd; Navrotski, Gary

    2014-03-01

    One of the Key Performance Parameters of the upgrade of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is the increase of the storage ring current from 100 to 150 mA. In order to anticipate the impact of this increased heat load on the X-ray optics of the beamlines, the APS has implemented a systematic review, by means of finite element analysis and computational fluid dynamics, of the thermal performance of the different types of monochromators installed at the highest-heat-load insertion device beamlines. We present here simulations of the performance of a directly liquid nitrogen-cooled silicon crystal, the hockey-puck design. Calculations of the temperature and slope error at multiple ring currents under multiple operational conditions, including the influence of power, cooling, and diffraction surface thickness are included.

  16. Physical and performance differences among forwards, defensemen, and goalies in elite women's ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Geithner, Christina A; Lee, Amanda M; Bracko, Michael R

    2006-08-01

    Positional differences have been examined in women's basketball, field hockey, netball, and volleyball, but not in elite women's ice hockey. Our purpose was to describe and compare physical, fitness, and skating performance characteristics of forwards (F), defensemen (D), and goalies (G). Subjects were 112 University of Alberta women players (21.4 +/- 2.9 years of age). A full anthropometric battery was conducted on each player. Heath-Carter anthropometric somatotypes were calculated. Percent body fat (%fat) was estimated from both general and population-specific equations. Subjects performed off-ice fitness tests (vertical jump, 40-yd dash, Leger test for predicting .V(O2)max) and on-ice fitness (Modified 3-Repeat Sprint Skate Test-MRSS, blood lactate after sprint test) and skating performance tests (6.10-m acceleration test, Cornering S-Turn Agility Test). Descriptive statistics and multivariate analyses of variance were run using SPSS (Version 10.0) for the MacIntosh, with a significance level set a priori at p < 0.05. Significant positional differences were found for bicristal breadths (D > G, F > G); relaxed arm circumference (D > F, G > F); supraspinale and biceps skinfolds (G > D, G > F); and endomorphy (G > F). Significant differences among positions were also found for the MRSS (G > D > F) and agility tests (G > D, G > F). D tended to have the most robust build overall. F were leaner than D and G, and their smaller relaxed arm circumference measurements most likely reflect less subcutaneous fat on the upper arm. F had greater anaerobic power than D, followed by G, and they tended to have greater aerobic capacity. F and D were more agile than G. Performance demands appear to be position specific. F need to be the most versatile and fit because of a greater amount and variety of work performed both during practices and games; their required degrees of versatility and fitness are followed by those required of D and G.

  17. Do Canadian collegiate hockey players accurately perceive body composition changes after unmonitored training and diet?

    PubMed

    Prokop, Neal W; Duncan, Lindsay R; Andersen, Ross E

    2015-10-01

    Collegiate athletes often use nutritional programs and supplements to elicit body composition changes in muscle or fat. It is unknown if athletes can accurately perceive their fluctuations in body composition, yet their understanding may help them make more accurate interpretations regarding the success of potential nutrition or exercise regimens. The purpose of this study was to investigate if collegiate hockey players could accurately perceive a change in body composition during a 3-month period within their regular season, in which no predetermined nutritional or exercise program was provided. Twenty-four male Canadian collegiate hockey players completed preseason and midseason body composition assessments using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Immediately before the midseason scan, players attempted to accurately match their perceived fluctuation in composition, with predetermined categorical ranges of relative body composition and strength. Two-thirds of players and one-half of players accurately perceived changes in arm-lean and arm-fat tissue, respectively. Approximately two-thirds of players did not accurately perceive gains or losses of lean or fat tissue within their leg and overall body. Although some athletes partially detected changes in the lean and fat tissue of particular regions, the vast majority of players cannot detect the type, or amount of tissue gained and lost across the overall body. Body composition assessments, rather than an athlete's perceptions, should be used to help interpret the success of a sport nutrition or exercise program. Athletes should be aware that physiologic adaptations might take place unnoticed, which could affect the acceptance and adherence of nutrition or exercise interventions. PMID:26394260

  18. Physical and performance differences among forwards, defensemen, and goalies in elite women's ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Geithner, Christina A; Lee, Amanda M; Bracko, Michael R

    2006-08-01

    Positional differences have been examined in women's basketball, field hockey, netball, and volleyball, but not in elite women's ice hockey. Our purpose was to describe and compare physical, fitness, and skating performance characteristics of forwards (F), defensemen (D), and goalies (G). Subjects were 112 University of Alberta women players (21.4 +/- 2.9 years of age). A full anthropometric battery was conducted on each player. Heath-Carter anthropometric somatotypes were calculated. Percent body fat (%fat) was estimated from both general and population-specific equations. Subjects performed off-ice fitness tests (vertical jump, 40-yd dash, Leger test for predicting .V(O2)max) and on-ice fitness (Modified 3-Repeat Sprint Skate Test-MRSS, blood lactate after sprint test) and skating performance tests (6.10-m acceleration test, Cornering S-Turn Agility Test). Descriptive statistics and multivariate analyses of variance were run using SPSS (Version 10.0) for the MacIntosh, with a significance level set a priori at p < 0.05. Significant positional differences were found for bicristal breadths (D > G, F > G); relaxed arm circumference (D > F, G > F); supraspinale and biceps skinfolds (G > D, G > F); and endomorphy (G > F). Significant differences among positions were also found for the MRSS (G > D > F) and agility tests (G > D, G > F). D tended to have the most robust build overall. F were leaner than D and G, and their smaller relaxed arm circumference measurements most likely reflect less subcutaneous fat on the upper arm. F had greater anaerobic power than D, followed by G, and they tended to have greater aerobic capacity. F and D were more agile than G. Performance demands appear to be position specific. F need to be the most versatile and fit because of a greater amount and variety of work performed both during practices and games; their required degrees of versatility and fitness are followed by those required of D and G. PMID:16977704

  19. Repair of flexor carpi radialis tendon laceration at the wrist in a professional ice hockey player.

    PubMed

    Hepper, Clifford T; Boyer, Martin

    2011-06-01

    The flexor carpi radialis is a wrist flexor and radial deviator with half the relative strength of flexor carpi ulnaris. In the majority of patients, the flexor carpi radialis tendon is expendable and is routinely used for various reconstructive procedures about the hand and wrist. Isolated flexor carpi radialis lacerations at the wrist are rare. Flexor carpi radialis tendon ruptures, which have been reported in association with distal radius fractures, longstanding osteoarthritis, and percutaneous treatment of scaphoid fractures, are usually treated non-operatively. We report a case of a traumatic laceration of the flexor carpi radialis tendon at the wrist in a professional ice hockey player. Surgical repair and rehabilitation using established principles for intrasynovial flexor tendon repair allowed return to sport at the professional level in 2 months.Tension-free core suture repair was performed with a modified-Kessler, 4-strand repair using a double-stranded 4-0 Supramid suture. A running epitendinous suture was then placed around the circumference of the tendon with 6-0 Prolene. Immobilization of the wrist in 20° of flexion was maintained for 2 weeks. Full active and passive digital motion was allowed immediately postoperatively and continued throughout the rehabilitation. Therapy was initiated at 2 weeks postoperatively with full passive wrist flexion and passive wrist extension to a dorsal block of 20°. At 4 weeks postoperatively, a dorsal splint was fabricated to keep the wrist in neutral. At this time, active extension to a dorsal block of zero and full passive flexion was allowed. Active wrist flexion without resistance was begun at 6 weeks, and full strengthening was allowed at 8 weeks postoperatively. The patient returned to sport at the professional level shortly thereafter. At latest follow-up, the patient has been able to fully participate in professional ice hockey without pain or functional limitation. PMID:21667915

  20. Sports members' participation in assessment of incidence rate of injuries in five sports from records of hospital-based clinical treatment.

    PubMed

    Kingma, J; ten Duis, H J

    1998-04-01

    This study is about the incidence rate of sports injuries in five different types of sports, gymnastics, soccer, volleyball, hockey, and basketball, for which 5,154 patients were admitted to the Emergency Unit of the Groningen University Hospital during the period 1990 through 1994. Incidence rate had been computed by membership participation. Basketball had the highest incidence rate (231 injured persons per 10,000 participants), followed by hockey (158 injured persons per 10,000 participants). The highest mean Injury Severity Score, 2.39, was found for gymnastics which had the lowest incidence rate (7 injured persons per 10,000 participants). Gymnastics had the highest percentage (12%) clinically treated patients, whereas basketball had the smallest percentage (2%) of clinically treated patients. The most frequent type of injury was distorsion, except for hockey, in which contusion had the highest percentage of occurrence. For all five types of sports, the majority (about 90%) of the injuries were observed at either the lower or at the upper extremities.

  1. Frequency, Causes, and Places of Unintentional Injuries in a Nationally Representative Sample of Iranian Children and Adolescents: The CASPIAN-IV Study

    PubMed Central

    Kelishadi, Roya; Qorbani, Mostafa; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeel; Ardalan, Gelayol; Moafi, Mohammad; Mahmood-Arabi, Minoosadat; Heshmat, Ramin; Jari, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study aims to assess the frequency, causes, and places of injuries in a nationally representative sample of Iranian children and adolescents, as well as the referral, places allocated for injured individuals. Methods: This nationwide study was conducted in 2011-2012 among 13486 elementary, secondary and high-school students who were selected by random cluster stratified multistage sampling from 30 provinces in Iran. The Global School-based Health Survey questionnaire of the World Health Organization was used. Results: The study participants consisted of 50.8% boys, 75.6% urban resident with a mean age of 12.5 years. Overall, 20.25% of participants reported that they were minimally injured once in the last 12 months; this prevalence was higher in boys than in girls (25.74% vs. 14.58%, respectively, P < 0.001), without significant difference in urban (20.11%) and rural (20.69%) areas. Most of them (39.92%) were injured at homes or house yards with higher prevalence in girls than in boys (48.61% vs. 35.17%, respectively, P < 0.001) and in rural than in urban areas (27.30% vs. 20.89%, respectively, P < 0.001). Schools were reported as the second prevalent site of injury occurrence (22.50%). Emergency departments and physician offices were the most prevalent referral places for injured individuals (32.31% and 22.38%, respectively). Most of the school injuries occurred during play or sport activities (45.92%). Conclusions: Prevention of unintentional injuries should be considered as a health priority. Appropriate preventive strategies should be enhanced at homes and schools. PMID:25400879

  2. The relation between perceived parent-created sport climate and competitive male youth hockey players' good and poor sport behaviors.

    PubMed

    LaVoi, Nicole M; Stellino, Megan Babkes

    2008-09-01

    The authors examined achievement goal orientation (J. L. Duda & J. G. Nicholls, 1992), parental influence (M. L. Babkes & M. R. Weiss, 1999), and the parent-initiated motivational climate (S. A. White, 1996, 1998) in combination to broaden understanding of competitive male youth hockey players' (N = 259) perceptions of the parent-created sport climate and its relation to their self-reported good and poor sport behaviors (GPSB). Exploratory factor analysis revealed a multidimensional measure of GPSB. Multiple regression analyses indicated that athletes' GPSB were significantly predicted by different forms of parental influence. Canonical correlations revealed a complex picture of the contributions of goal orientation and the parent-created sport climate on boys' GPSB in youth hockey. Results expand knowledge of the influence that parents have in youth sport and emphasize the importance of understanding how children's interpretations of parental beliefs and behaviors affect their choices to engage in good and poor sport behaviors.

  3. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  4. Back Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... extending from your neck to your pelvis. Back injuries can result from sports injuries, work around the house or in the garden, ... back is the most common site of back injuries and back pain. Common back injuries include Sprains ...

  5. Maintaining hydration with a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution improves performance, thermoregulation, and fatigue during an ice hockey scrimmage.

    PubMed

    Linseman, Mark E; Palmer, Matthew S; Sprenger, Heather M; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2014-11-01

    Research in "stop-and-go" sports has demonstrated that carbohydrate ingestion improves performance and fatigue, and that dehydration of ∼1.5%-2% body mass (BM) loss results in decreased performance, increased fatigue, and increased core temperature. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the physiological, performance, and fatigue-related effects of maintaining hydration with a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES) versus dehydrating by ∼2% BM (no fluid; NF) during a 70-min ice hockey scrimmage. Skilled male hockey players (n = 14; age, 21.3 ± 0.2 years; BM, 80.1 ± 2.5 kg; height, 182.0 ± 1.2 cm) volunteered for the study. Subjects lost 1.94% ± 0.1% BM in NF, and 0.12% ± 0.1% BM in CES. Core temperature (Tc) throughout the scrimmage (10-50 min) and peak Tc (CES: 38.69 ± 0.10 vs. NF: 38.92 ± 0.11 °C; p < 0.05) were significantly reduced in CES compared with NF. Players in CES had increased mean skating speed and time at high effort between 30-50 min of the scrimmage. They also committed fewer puck turnovers and completed a higher percentage of passes in the last 20 min of play compared with NF. Postscrimmage shuttle skating performance was improved in CES versus NF and fatigue was lower following the CES trial. The results indicated that ingesting a CES to maintain BM throughout a 70-min hockey scrimmage resulted in improved hockey performance and thermoregulation, and decreased fatigue as compared with drinking no fluid and dehydrating by ∼2%.

  6. Seasonal Changes in Whole Body and Regional Body Composition Profiles of Elite Collegiate Ice-Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Neal W; Reid, Ryan E R; Andersen, Ross E

    2016-03-01

    The monitoring of a collegiate hockey player's body composition can reflect fitness characteristics and may help players, coaches, or strength and conditioning specialists optimize physiologic gains during an off-season, whereas simultaneously preventing performance decrements in-season. The purpose of the study was to investigate changes in whole-body and regional-body composition of fat and lean tissue. The body composition profiles of 19 elite Canadian collegiate hockey players were assessed using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Players completed end-of-season, preseason, and midseason assessments with questionnaires relating to their off-season and in-season training. Statistically significant changes in body composition profiles were observed between the different time points because players showed various tissue gains and losses depending on the region assessed. Overall, players gained (1.38 kg, p ≤ 0.01) and lost (0.79 kg, p ≤ 0.01) fat tissue during the off-season and in-season, respectively. Players also showed a significant gain of leg lean tissue (0.29 kg, p = 0.02) and loss of arm tissue mass (-0.25 kg, p = 0.02) during the first-half of the competitive season. Several correlations emerged that may provide insight into potential trends that could be more pronounced during longer and more demanding schedules. Collegiate hockey players show changes in body composition during the off-season and in-season. The understanding of body composition profiles, body composition fluctuations, and potential variables that may influence the composition of collegiate hockey players can help coaches and athletic programs tailor their team's training, nutrition, lifestyle, and informative resources to further support their athletes. PMID:26907839

  7. Off-ice fitness of elite female ice hockey players by team success, age, and player position.

    PubMed

    Ransdell, Lynda B; Murray, Teena M; Gao, Yong

    2013-04-01

    This study examined off-ice fitness profiles of 204 elite female ice hockey players from 13 countries who attended a high-performance camp organized by the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) in Bratislava, Slovakia, in July of 2011. Athletes were tested using standardized protocols for vertical jump (centimeters), long jump (centimeters), 4-jump average (centimeters), elasticity ratio (4-vertical jump average/vertical jump), pull-up or inverted row (n), aerobic fitness (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max), body mass (kilograms), and body composition (% fat). These variables were examined relative to team success in major international hockey competition (group 1: Canada and USA, group 2: Sweden and Finland, group 3: All other participating countries), age group (Under 18 and Senior/Open Levels), and player position (forwards, defenders, and goalies). The athletes from countries with the best international records weighed more, yet had less body fat, had greater lower body muscular power and upper body strength, and higher aerobic capacity compared with their less successful counterparts. Compared with the younger athletes, athletes from the senior-level age group weighed more and had higher scores for lower body power, pull-ups, and aerobic capacity. There were no significant differences in anthropometric or fitness data based on player position. This study is the first to report the physical characteristics of a worldwide sample of elite female ice hockey players relative to team performance, age, and player position. Coaches should use these data to identify talent, test for strengths and weaknesses in conditioning programs, and design off-ice programs that will help athletes match the fitness profiles of the most successful teams in the world.

  8. Seasonal Changes in Whole Body and Regional Body Composition Profiles of Elite Collegiate Ice-Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Neal W; Reid, Ryan E R; Andersen, Ross E

    2016-03-01

    The monitoring of a collegiate hockey player's body composition can reflect fitness characteristics and may help players, coaches, or strength and conditioning specialists optimize physiologic gains during an off-season, whereas simultaneously preventing performance decrements in-season. The purpose of the study was to investigate changes in whole-body and regional-body composition of fat and lean tissue. The body composition profiles of 19 elite Canadian collegiate hockey players were assessed using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Players completed end-of-season, preseason, and midseason assessments with questionnaires relating to their off-season and in-season training. Statistically significant changes in body composition profiles were observed between the different time points because players showed various tissue gains and losses depending on the region assessed. Overall, players gained (1.38 kg, p ≤ 0.01) and lost (0.79 kg, p ≤ 0.01) fat tissue during the off-season and in-season, respectively. Players also showed a significant gain of leg lean tissue (0.29 kg, p = 0.02) and loss of arm tissue mass (-0.25 kg, p = 0.02) during the first-half of the competitive season. Several correlations emerged that may provide insight into potential trends that could be more pronounced during longer and more demanding schedules. Collegiate hockey players show changes in body composition during the off-season and in-season. The understanding of body composition profiles, body composition fluctuations, and potential variables that may influence the composition of collegiate hockey players can help coaches and athletic programs tailor their team's training, nutrition, lifestyle, and informative resources to further support their athletes.

  9. ALCOHOL-RELATED INJURY AND DRIVING WHILE INTOXICATED: A RISK FUNCTION ANALYSIS OF TWO ALCOHOL-RELATED EVENTS IN THE 2000 AND 2005 NATIONAL ALCOHOL SURVEYS

    PubMed Central

    Cherpitel, Cheryl J.; Ye, Yu; Greenfield, Thomas K.; Bond, Jason; Kerr, William C.; Midanik, Lorraine T.

    2010-01-01

    Background National population data on risk of alcohol-related injury or driving while intoxicated (DWI) are scarce. Objective The association of alcohol-related injury and perceived DWI (PDWI) with both volume and pattern of consumption are examined in a merged sample of respondents from the 2000 and 2005 National Alcohol Surveys using risk function analysis. Methods Self reported consumption patterns on 8,736 respondents who consumed at least one drink in the last 12 months were assessed as average daily volume and frequency of consuming 5 or more (5+) , 8 or more (8+) and 12 or more (12+) drinks in a day. Risks were defined using CHAID segmentation analysis implemented with SPSS Answer Tree. Results For alcohol-related injury (n=110), those most at risk drank at lower volumes with some high maximum occasions, or at higher volumes, where high maximum occasions had little added effect. Risk was highest for those reporting more than 6 drinks per day (9.7%). For DWI (n=696), those most at risk drank at higher volumes and with a greater number of high maximum occasions. Risk was highest for those reporting more than 6 drinks per day and more than one 8+ occasion during the last year (39%). Conclusions Overall risk appears to increase with increasing volume, but at a given volume level, risk also increases with frequency of high maximum occasions. These data lend relatively weak support for previous findings suggesting that less frequent drinkers who only occasionally consume larger quantities may be at greater risk, and any alcohol consumption appears to carry some risk of these harms. PMID:20465375

  10. Can pre-season fitness measures predict time to injury in varsity athletes?: a retrospective case control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The ability to determine athletic performance in varsity athletes using preseason measures has been established. The ability of pre-season performance measures and athlete’s exposure to predict the incidence of injuries is unclear. Thus our purpose was to determine the ability of pre-season measures of athletic performance to predict time to injury in varsity athletes. Methods Male and female varsity athletes competing in basketball, volleyball and ice hockey participated in this study. The main outcome measures were injury prevalence, time to injury (based on calculated exposure) and pre-season fitness measures as predictors of time to injury. Fitness measures were Apley’s range of motion, push-up, curl-ups, vertical jump, modified Illinois agility, and sit-and-reach. Cox regression models were used to identify which baseline fitness measures were predictors of time to injury. Results Seventy-six percent of the athletes reported 1 or more injuries. Mean times to initial injury were significantly different for females and males (40.6% and 66.1% of the total season (p < 0.05), respectively). A significant univariate correlation was observed between push-up performance and time to injury (Pearson’s r = 0.332, p < 0.01). No preseason fitness measure impacted the hazard of injury. Regardless of sport, female athletes had significantly shorter time to injury than males (Hazard Ratio = 2.2, p < 0.01). Athletes playing volleyball had significantly shorter time to injury (Hazard Ratio = 4.2, p < 0.01) compared to those playing hockey or basketball. Conclusions When accounting for exposure, gender, sport and fitness measures, prediction of time to injury was influenced most heavily by gender and sport. PMID:22824555

  11. In your face: facial metrics predict aggressive behaviour in the laboratory and in varsity and professional hockey players

    PubMed Central

    Carré, Justin M; McCormick, Cheryl M

    2008-01-01

    Facial characteristics are an important basis for judgements about gender, emotion, personality, motivational states and behavioural dispositions. Based on a recent finding of a sexual dimorphism in facial metrics that is independent of body size, we conducted three studies to examine the extent to which individual differences in the facial width-to-height ratio were associated with trait dominance (using a questionnaire) and aggression during a behavioural task and in a naturalistic setting (varsity and professional ice hockey). In study 1, men had a larger facial width-to-height ratio, higher scores of trait dominance, and were more reactively aggressive compared with women. Individual differences in the facial width-to-height ratio predicted reactive aggression in men, but not in women (predicted 15% of variance). In studies 2 (male varsity hockey players) and 3 (male professional hockey players), individual differences in the facial width-to-height ratio were positively related to aggressive behaviour as measured by the number of penalty minutes per game obtained over a season (predicted 29 and 9% of the variance, respectively). Together, these findings suggest that the sexually dimorphic facial width-to-height ratio may be an ‘honest signal’ of propensity for aggressive behaviour. PMID:18713717

  12. Epidemiology of waterskiing injuries.

    PubMed

    Banta, J V

    1979-06-01

    Coast Guard statistics indicate a national boating fatality rate of 9.6 deaths per 100,000 crafts. In 1977 in California, five fatalities and 70 serious injuries were directly attributable to waterskiing. The four cases reported here include three patients with propeller injuries, including one nearly fatal amputation. In each case basic measures for boating safety were overlooked.

  13. Injuries in Swedish skydiving

    PubMed Central

    Westman, Anton; Björnstig, Ulf

    2007-01-01

    Objective To create a basis for prevention of modern skydiving injuries. Design Descriptive epidemiological study. Setting National total material. Patients Data on all reported injury events (n = 257) in Swedish skydiving 1999–2003 (total 539 885 jumps) were retrieved from the Swedish Parachute Association. Non‐fatally injured skydivers were sent a questionnaire asking for event and injury details (response rate 89%), and supplementary hospital records were retrieved for the most serious injuries (n = 85). Human, equipment and environmental factors were assessed for risk. Main Outcome Measurements Frequency and severity of injuries. Results Incidence of non‐fatal injury events was 48 per 100 000 jumps. The lower extremities, spine and shoulders were important regions of injury. The most serious injuries were experienced by licensed skydivers, but students in training had a higher injury rate and more often left the sport because of the injury. Of two student‐training systems, one had an incidence less than half that of the other. Conclusions A basis for prevention was created, showing a potential for reduction of frequency and severity of injuries with training and technical interventions. PMID:17224436

  14. Return to Play After Soleus Muscle Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Pedret, Carles; Rodas, Gil; Balius, Ramon; Capdevila, Lluis; Bossy, Mireia; Vernooij, Robin W.M.; Alomar, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Background Soleus muscle injuries are common in different sports disciplines. The time required for recovery is often difficult to predict, and reinjury is common. The length of recovery time might be influenced by different variables, such as the involved part of the muscle. Hypothesis Injuries in the central aponeurosis have a worse prognosis than injuries of the lateral or medial aponeurosis as well as myofascial injuries. Study Design Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods A total of 61 high-level or professional athletes from several sports disciplines (soccer, tennis, track and field, basketball, triathlon, and field hockey) were reviewed prospectively to determine the recovery time for soleus muscle injuries. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation was performed on 44 soleus muscle injuries. The association between the different characteristics of the 5 typical muscle sites, including the anterior and posterior myofascial and the lateral, central, and medial aponeurosis disruption, as well as the injury recovery time, were determined. Recovery time was correlated with age, sport, extent of edema, volume, cross-sectional area, and retraction extension or gap. Results Of the 44 patients with muscle injuries who were analyzed, there were 32 (72.7%) strains affecting the myotendinous junction (MT) and 12 (23.7%) strains of the myofascial junction. There were 13 injuries involving the myotendinous medial (MTM), 7 affecting the MT central (MTC), 12 the MT lateral (MTL), 8 the myofascial anterior (MFA), and 4 the myofascial posterior (MFP). The median recovery time (±SD) for all injuries was 29.1 ± 18.8 days. There were no statistically significant differences between the myotendinous and myofascial injuries regarding recovery time. The site with the worst prognosis was the MTC aponeurosis, with a mean recovery time of 44.3 ± 23.0 days. The site with the best prognosis was the MTL, with a mean recovery time of 19.2 ± 13.5 days (P < .05). There

  15. Sports injuries in school-aged children. An epidemiologic study.

    PubMed

    Backx, F J; Erich, W B; Kemper, A B; Verbeek, A L

    1989-01-01

    In November 1982, epidemiologic data were collected in a unique, large scale, population-based survey on sports injuries in school-aged children living in Holland. A total of 7,468 pupils, aged 8 to 17, completed questionnaires covering a retrospective period of 6 weeks. Seven hundred ninety-one sports injuries were registered, amounting to an incidence of 10.6 sports injuries per 100 participants. In 31% of the cases, medical consultation was needed. Injuries incurred during the study period caused 36% of the children to miss one or more physical education classes and caused 6% to miss school for at least 1 day. Contusions and sprains were the most common lesions (77%). Three of four injuries involved the lower extremity, in particular the ankle. Sixty-two percent of all the injuries occurred in organized sports, 21% in physical education classes, and 17% in unsupervised sports activities. The highest injury rates were found in basketball and field hockey. In this study population, 15 and 16-year-old boys who had a high sports activity index and played team sports, particularly contact team sports, formed a high risk group.

  16. Test-Retest Reliability of Computerized Neurocognitive Testing in Youth Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Womble, Melissa N; Reynolds, Erin; Schatz, Philip; Shah, Kishan M; Kontos, Anthony P

    2016-06-01

    Computerized neurocognitive tests are frequently used to assess pediatric sport-related concussions; however, only 1 study has focused on the test-retest reliability of the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) in high school athletes and age influences have largely been ignored. Therefore, the purpose was to investigate the test-retest reliability of ImPACT and underlying age influences in a pediatric population. Two hundred (169 men and 31 women) youth ice hockey players completed ImPACT before/after a 6-month season. Reliability was assessed using Pearson correlation coefficients, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and regression-based methods (RBz). ICCs for the sample ranged from .48 to .75 (single)/.65 to .86 (average). In general, the older athletes (15-18: Single/Average ICCs = .35-.75/.52-.86) demonstrated greater reliability across composites than the younger athletes (11-14: Single/Average ICCs = .54-.63/.70-.77). Although there was variation in athletes' performance across two test administrations, RBz revealed that only a small percentage of athletes performed beyond 80%, 90%, and 95% confidence intervals. Statistical metrics demonstrated reliability coefficients for ImPACT composites in a pediatric sample similar to previous studies, and also revealed important age-related influences. PMID:27084734

  17. Comparison of impact characteristics of four different ice hockey arena dasher boards.

    PubMed

    Poutiainen, Piritta; Peltonen, Jussi; Isolehto, Juha; Avela, Janne

    2014-01-01

    During recent years the incidence of ice hockey related concussions has increased. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to determine how dasher board materials and structures affect impact characteristics and thereby concussion risk. The measurements were divided into two parts; 1. physiological characteristics of body checks were determined in real game measurements, and 2. simulation of body checks in the laboratory. Peak forces and stopping distances were determined from the high-speed camera data, and stiffness values were subsequently calculated. Dasher board materials and structures had a clear effect on impact characteristics. Flexible protective shielding material resulted in 17% and 16% lower peak forces, 110% and 136% greater stopping distances and 62% and 56% lower stiffness values in the straight and the corner parts of the dasher board, respectively, compared to the reference dasher board. However, the dasher board with flexible protective shielding material including metal shielding support posts between each shielding panel yielded inconsistent results. The shielding support posts were much stiffer compared to the protective shielding. The single-framed dasher board was found to be 29% and 11% more flexible than its dual-framed counterpart, and heavier protective shielding resulted in 33% and 19% higher element stiffness in the straight and the corner parts of the dasher board, respectively. In light of the results and the epidemiology of concussions, it seems that the most safe dasher board would be single-framed with light and flexible protective shielding material, and would not include shielding support posts.

  18. Test-Retest Reliability of Computerized Neurocognitive Testing in Youth Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Womble, Melissa N; Reynolds, Erin; Schatz, Philip; Shah, Kishan M; Kontos, Anthony P

    2016-06-01

    Computerized neurocognitive tests are frequently used to assess pediatric sport-related concussions; however, only 1 study has focused on the test-retest reliability of the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) in high school athletes and age influences have largely been ignored. Therefore, the purpose was to investigate the test-retest reliability of ImPACT and underlying age influences in a pediatric population. Two hundred (169 men and 31 women) youth ice hockey players completed ImPACT before/after a 6-month season. Reliability was assessed using Pearson correlation coefficients, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and regression-based methods (RBz). ICCs for the sample ranged from .48 to .75 (single)/.65 to .86 (average). In general, the older athletes (15-18: Single/Average ICCs = .35-.75/.52-.86) demonstrated greater reliability across composites than the younger athletes (11-14: Single/Average ICCs = .54-.63/.70-.77). Although there was variation in athletes' performance across two test administrations, RBz revealed that only a small percentage of athletes performed beyond 80%, 90%, and 95% confidence intervals. Statistical metrics demonstrated reliability coefficients for ImPACT composites in a pediatric sample similar to previous studies, and also revealed important age-related influences.

  19. An investigation of the dynamics of aggression: direct observations in ice hockey and basketball.

    PubMed

    Kirker, B; Tenenbaum, G; Mattson, J

    2000-12-01

    There have been significant problems in the study of sports aggression, and they are linked to how aggression has been defined, measured, and analyzed. Following a review of the whole domain, this study aimed to construct a theoretically coherent and ecologically valid framework for research on processes underlying sports aggression and to contribute to the advancement of knowledge in the area. An exploratory method using computer observational analysis as the primary research method, along with complementary questionnaires and personal reflections, considered aggression in two comparison sports: ice hockey and basketball. Data were compiled and classified by involved and independent experts relative to factors and behaviors associated with sports aggression derived from a comprehensive review of the literature. Among the study's findings were that: (a) aggression was instrumental in nature two-thirds of the time; (b) aggressive acts typically occurred in clusters and varied in frequency according to game circumstances; and (c) multiple variables and aggression theories were related to severely aggressive acts. The complex dynamics of sports aggression via similar naturalistic methodologies is discussed.

  20. Experience using liver transplantation for the treatment of severe bile duct injuries over 20 years in Argentina: results from a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ardiles, Victoria; McCormack, Lucas; Quiñonez, Emilio; Goldaracena, Nicolás; Mattera, Juan; Pekolj, Juan; Ciardullo, Miguel; de Santibañes, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Background: Bile duct injury (BDI) is a severe complication that may arise during the surgical treatment of benign disease and a few patients will develop end-stage liver disease (ESLD) requiring a liver transplant (LT). Objective: Analyse the experience using LT as a definitive treatment of BDI in Argentina. Patients and Methods: A national survey regarding the experience of LT for BDI. Results: Sixteen out 18 centres reported a total of 19 patients. The percentage of LT for BDI from the total number of LT per period was: 1990–94 = 3.1%, 1995–99 = 1.6%, 2000–04 = 0.7% and 2005–09 = 0.2% (P < 0.001). The mean age was 45.7 ± 10.3 years (range 26–62) and 10 patients were female. The BDI occurred during cholecystectomy in 16 and 7 had vascular injuries. One patient presented with acute liver failure and the others with chronic ESLD. The median time between BDI and LT was 71 months (range 0.2–157). The mean follow-up was 8.3 years (10 months to 16.4 years). Survival at 1, 3, 5 and 10 years was 73%, 68%, 68% and 45%, respectively. Conclusions: The use of LT for the treatment of BDI declined over the review period. LT plays a role in selected cases in patients with acute liver failure and ESLD. PMID:21762297

  1. A Prospective Pilot Investigation of Brain Volume, White Matter Hyperintensities, and Hemorrhagic Lesions after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, Michael; Tam, Roger; Hernández-Torres, Enedino; Martin, Nancy; Perera, Warren; Zhao, Yinshan; Shahinfard, Elham; Dadachanji, Shiroy; Taunton, Jack; Li, David K. B.; Rauscher, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is among the most common neurological disorders. Hemorrhagic lesions and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) are radiological features associated with moderate and severe TBI. Brain volume reductions have also been observed during the months following injury. In concussion, no signs of injury are observed on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which may be a true feature of concussion or merely due to the limited sensitivity of imaging techniques used so far. Moreover, it is not known whether volume reductions are due to the resolution of trauma-related edema or a true volume loss. Forty-five collegiate-level ice hockey players (20 females) and 15 controls (9 females), 40 players underwent 3-T MRI for hemorrhages [multi-echo susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI)], WMH (three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery), and brain volume at the beginning and the end of the hockey season. Concussed athletes underwent additional imaging and neuropsychological testing at 3 days, 2 weeks, and 2 months after injury. At the end of the hockey season, brain volume was reduced compared to controls by 0.32% (p < 0.034) in the whole cohort and by 0.26% (p < 0.09) in the concussed athletes. Two weeks and 2 months after concussion, brain volume was reduced by −0.08% (p = 0.027) and −0.23% (p = 0.035), respectively. In athletes, the WMH were significantly closer to the interface between gray matter and white matter compared to controls. No significant changes in the number of WMH over the duration of the study were found in athletes. No microhemorrhages were detected as a result of concussion or playing a season of ice hockey. We conclude that mild TBI does not lead to transient increases in brain volume and no new microbleeds or WMH are detectable after concussion. Brain volume reductions appear by 2 weeks after concussion and persist until at least 2 months after concussion. Brain volume is reduced

  2. A Prospective Pilot Investigation of Brain Volume, White Matter Hyperintensities, and Hemorrhagic Lesions after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Michael; Tam, Roger; Hernández-Torres, Enedino; Martin, Nancy; Perera, Warren; Zhao, Yinshan; Shahinfard, Elham; Dadachanji, Shiroy; Taunton, Jack; Li, David K B; Rauscher, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is among the most common neurological disorders. Hemorrhagic lesions and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) are radiological features associated with moderate and severe TBI. Brain volume reductions have also been observed during the months following injury. In concussion, no signs of injury are observed on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which may be a true feature of concussion or merely due to the limited sensitivity of imaging techniques used so far. Moreover, it is not known whether volume reductions are due to the resolution of trauma-related edema or a true volume loss. Forty-five collegiate-level ice hockey players (20 females) and 15 controls (9 females), 40 players underwent 3-T MRI for hemorrhages [multi-echo susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI)], WMH (three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery), and brain volume at the beginning and the end of the hockey season. Concussed athletes underwent additional imaging and neuropsychological testing at 3 days, 2 weeks, and 2 months after injury. At the end of the hockey season, brain volume was reduced compared to controls by 0.32% (p < 0.034) in the whole cohort and by 0.26% (p < 0.09) in the concussed athletes. Two weeks and 2 months after concussion, brain volume was reduced by -0.08% (p = 0.027) and -0.23% (p = 0.035), respectively. In athletes, the WMH were significantly closer to the interface between gray matter and white matter compared to controls. No significant changes in the number of WMH over the duration of the study were found in athletes. No microhemorrhages were detected as a result of concussion or playing a season of ice hockey. We conclude that mild TBI does not lead to transient increases in brain volume and no new microbleeds or WMH are detectable after concussion. Brain volume reductions appear by 2 weeks after concussion and persist until at least 2 months after concussion. Brain volume is reduced between

  3. Sports injuries during one academic year in 6799 Irish school children.

    PubMed

    Watson, A W

    1984-01-01

    Details of the sports injuries occurring in 6799 children between the ages of 10 and 18 were recorded during the course of one academic year (September to June). One hundred sixteen injuries were noted: 29 sprains, 20 fractures, 18 strains, 14 contusions, 10 wounds, 7 dislocations, and 18 other injuries. On average these injuries resulted in 0.47 days of hospitalization, 18 days of incapacity, and 28 days before full recovery. The activities at which the injuries occurred were: football, 24; athletics, 15; rugby and gymnastics, 11 each; hockey, 10; basketball, 9; hurling and soccer, 8 each; indoor soccer, 5; camogie, 4; swimming, 3; tennis, 1; and others, 7. The rugby and indoor soccer injuries tended to be of above average seriousness. Eighty-eight injuries occurred in males and 28 in females. Males over 14 were three and half times as likely to be injured as younger boys. In girls the incidence of injury dropped after the age of 15. In both sexes the likelihood of injury increased with the physical standing of the individual. In outstanding males over the age of 15 the incidence of injury was one in six. The factors which contributed most frequently to injury were recklessness on the part of the injured party and foul or illegal play by another player. Lack of fitness and defects in sports gear, playing area, and equipment were other common causes.

  4. Sleep, Sleep Disorders, and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. What We Know and What We Need to Know: Findings from a National Working Group.

    PubMed

    Wickwire, Emerson M; Williams, Scott G; Roth, Thomas; Capaldi, Vincent F; Jaffe, Michael; Moline, Margaret; Motamedi, Gholam K; Morgan, Gregory W; Mysliwiec, Vincent; Germain, Anne; Pazdan, Renee M; Ferziger, Reuven; Balkin, Thomas J; MacDonald, Margaret E; Macek, Thomas A; Yochelson, Michael R; Scharf, Steven M; Lettieri, Christopher J

    2016-04-01

    Disturbed sleep is one of the most common complaints following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and worsens morbidity and long-term sequelae. Further, sleep and TBI share neurophysiologic underpinnings with direct relevance to recovery from TBI. As such, disturbed sleep and clinical sleep disorders represent modifiable treatment targets to improve outcomes in TBI. This paper presents key findings from a national working group on sleep and TBI, with a specific focus on the testing and development of sleep-related therapeutic interventions for mild TBI (mTBI). First, mTBI and sleep physiology are briefly reviewed. Next, essential empirical and clinical questions and knowledge gaps are addressed. Finally, actionable recommendations are offered to guide active and efficient collaboration between academic, industry, and governmental stakeholders. PMID:27002812

  5. Observations of ozone-induced foliar injury on black cherry (Prunus serotina, var. capuli) within the Desierto de Los Leones National Park, Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Skelly, J M; Savage, J E; de Bauer, M de L; Alvarado, D

    1997-01-01

    A survey for ozone-induced foliar injury of black cherry was conducted in mid-June 1995 within the Desierto de Los Leones National Park located southwest of Mexico City. Evaluations of the upper and lower tree crowns of 18 trees revealed evidence of significant upper surface stipple, leaf reddening and premature senescence on 72% of the trees. A general survey of an additional 169 trees disclosed that 41% exhibited similar symptoms. A gradient of increasing symptoms with increasing elevation was also evident. For the most part, asymptomatic trees were observed to be situated within well-shaded coves at the lower elevations with very few symptomatic trees present in these areas. PMID:15093455

  6. Human injury inflicted by grizzly bears.

    PubMed

    Herrero, S

    1970-11-01

    Grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) attacks resulting in human injury and known to have occurred in the national parks of North America were examined. Fifty-seven attacks in which 61 persons were injured took place in three national parks in the United States and accounted for 79 percent of the known injuries. The remaining 16 injuries occurred in four Canadian national parks. The 77 injured persons gives an injury rate of 1 person per 2 million visitors.

  7. Dental injuries at the 1989 Canada games: an epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Lee-Knight, C T; Harrison, E L; Price, C J

    1992-10-01

    The management and prevention of dental trauma is an integral part of the medical services provided at major athletic events. This paper reviews the organization and delivery of the dental services provided at the 1989 Canada Games. The nature, incidence and management of the dental problems reported in the participant population of 3,411 athletes are also described. During the two-week competition, 15 participants were assessed and treated for various dental conditions, including hard- and soft-tissue injury of the oral cavity, and temporomandibular joint sprain. The sports with the highest incidence of dental injury for the male population were wrestling (one per cent) and basketball (0.8 per cent). For the female population, these sports were basketball (2.5 per cent) and field hockey (1.3 per cent). The dental services provided during the games included emergency assessment and treatment, fabrication of mouthguards, and in-service education to medical team members.

  8. The National Association for Girls and Women in Sport: 110 Years of Promoting Social Justice and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladda, Shawn

    2009-01-01

    From writing the first Guidebooks for hockey, soccer, swimming, track and field, and basketball, to lobbying Congress to strive for equity and equal opportunities for girls, the National Association for Girls and Women in Sport (NAGWS) has been and continues to be the beacon in education to advance fairness and equity in sports. As NAGWS enters…

  9. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries internal head injuries, which may involve the skull, the blood vessels within the skull, or the brain Fortunately, most childhood falls or ... knock the brain into the side of the skull or tear blood vessels. Some internal head injuries ...

  10. Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  11. Blast Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Service Members & Veterans Family & Caregivers Medical Providers Blast Injuries U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Gustavo Olgiati How ... tertiary injury Does a blast cause different brain injuries than blunt trauma? There currently is no evidence ...

  12. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper ... can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  13. Skin conditions in figure skaters, ice-hockey players and speed skaters: part II - cold-induced, infectious and inflammatory dermatoses.

    PubMed

    Tlougan, Brook E; Mancini, Anthony J; Mandell, Jenny A; Cohen, David E; Sanchez, Miguel R

    2011-11-01

    Participation in ice-skating sports, particularly figure skating, ice hockey and speed skating, has increased in recent years. Competitive athletes in these sports experience a range of dermatological injuries related to mechanical factors: exposure to cold temperatures, infectious agents and inflammation. Part I of this two part review discussed the mechanical dermatoses affecting ice-skating athletes that result from friction, pressure, and chronic irritation related to athletic equipment and contact with surfaces. Here, in Part II, we review the cold-induced, infectious and inflammatory skin conditions observed in ice-skating athletes. Cold-induced dermatoses experienced by ice-skating athletes result from specific physiological effects of cold exposure on the skin. These conditions include physiological livedo reticularis, chilblains (pernio), Raynaud phenomenon, cold panniculitis, frostnip and frostbite. Frostbite, that is the literal freezing of tissue, occurs with specific symptoms that progress in a stepwise fashion, starting with frostnip. Treatment involves gradual forms of rewarming and the use of friction massages and pain medications as needed. Calcium channel blockers, including nifedipine, are the mainstay of pharmacological therapy for the major nonfreezing cold-induced dermatoses including chilblains and Raynaud phenomenon. Raynaud phenomenon, a vasculopathy involving recurrent vasospasm of the fingers and toes in response to cold, is especially common in figure skaters. Protective clothing and insulation, avoidance of smoking and vasoconstrictive medications, maintaining a dry environment around the skin, cold avoidance when possible as well as certain physical manoeuvres that promote vasodilation are useful preventative measures. Infectious conditions most often seen in ice-skating athletes include tinea pedis, onychomycosis, pitted keratolysis, warts and folliculitis. Awareness, prompt treatment and the use of preventative measures are

  14. Hamstring injuries.

    PubMed

    Ropiak, Christopher R; Bosco, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    Hamstring injuries are a frequent injury in athletes. Proximal injuries are common, ranging from strain to complete tear. Strains are managed nonoperatively, with rest followed by progressive stretching and strengthening. Reinjury is a concern. High grade complete tears are better managed surgically, with reattachment to the injured tendon or ischial tuberosity. Distal hamstring injury is usually associated with other knee injuries, and isolated injury is rare.

  15. Child Injury Prevention in the Home: A National Survey of Safety Practices and Use of Safety Equipment in Deprived Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvaney, C. A.; Watson, M. C.; Smith, S.; Coupland, C.; Kendrick, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of home safety practices and use of safety equipment by disadvantaged families participating in a national home safety equipment scheme in England. Design: Cross-sectional postal survey sent to a random sample of 1,000 families. Setting: England, United Kingdom. Results: Half the families (51%) returned a…

  16. A Comparison of Somatic Variables of Elite Ice Hockey Players from the Czech ELH and Russian KHL.

    PubMed

    Kutáč, Petr; Sigmund, Martin

    2015-03-29

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the basic morphological variables of contemporary elite ice hockey players, compare the parameters of players in the top Russian ice hockey league (KHL) with those of the top Czech ice hockey league (ELH), and to evaluate the parameters of players according to their position in the game. The research participants included 30 KHL players (mean age: 27.1 ± 5.1 years) and 25 ELH players (mean age: 26.4 ± 5.8 years). We determined body height, body mass, and body composition (body fat, fat-free mass, segmental fat analysis). All measurements were performed at the end of preseason training. The KHL players had the following anthropometric characteristics: body height 182.97 ± 5.61 cm (forward) and 185.72 ± 3.57 cm (defenseman), body mass 89.70 ± 5.28 kg (forward) and 92.52 ± 4.01 kg (defenseman), body fat 10.76 ± 0.63 kg (forward) and 11.10 ± 0.48 kg (defenseman), fat-free mass 78.94 ± 4.65 kg (forward) and 81.42 ± 3.52 kg (defenseman). The values for ELH players were as follows: body height 182.06 ± 5.93 cm (forward) and 185.88 ± 7.13 cm (defenseman), body mass 88.47 ± 7.06 kg (forward) and 89.36 ± 10.91 kg (defenseman), body fat 12.57 ± 2.89 kg (forward) and 11.91 ± 3.10 kg (defenseman), fat-free mass 75.93 ± 6.54 kg (forward) and 77.46 ± 7.89 kg (defenseman). The results indicate that it is beneficial to ice hockey players to have increased body mass and lower body fat, which leads to higher muscle mass, thus enabling a player to perform at the highest level and meet the specific challenges of the game.

  17. A systematic review on ankle injury and ankle sprain in sports.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Hong, Youlian; Chan, Lap-Ki; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2007-01-01

    This article systematically reviews epidemiological studies on sports injury from 1977 to 2005 in which ankle injury was included. A total of 227 studies reporting injury pattern in 70 sports from 38 countries were included. A total of 201,600 patients were included, with 32,509 ankle injuries. Ankle injury information was available from 14,098 patients, with 11 847 ankle sprains. Results show that the ankle was the most common injured body site in 24 of 70 included sports, especially in aeroball, wall climbing, indoor volleyball, mountaineering, netball and field events in track and field. Ankle sprain was the major ankle injury in 33 of 43 sports, especially in Australian football, field hockey, handball, orienteering, scooter and squash. In sports injuries throughout the countries studied, the ankle was the second most common injured body site after the knee, and ankle sprain was the most common type of ankle injury. The incidence of ankle injury and ankle sprain was high in court games and team sports, such as rugby, soccer, volleyball, handball and basketball. This systematic review provides a summary of the epidemiology of ankle injury in sports. PMID:17190537

  18. A systematic review on ankle injury and ankle sprain in sports.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Hong, Youlian; Chan, Lap-Ki; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2007-01-01

    This article systematically reviews epidemiological studies on sports injury from 1977 to 2005 in which ankle injury was included. A total of 227 studies reporting injury pattern in 70 sports from 38 countries were included. A total of 201,600 patients were included, with 32,509 ankle injuries. Ankle injury information was available from 14,098 patients, with 11 847 ankle sprains. Results show that the ankle was the most common injured body site in 24 of 70 included sports, especially in aeroball, wall climbing, indoor volleyball, mountaineering, netball and field events in track and field. Ankle sprain was the major ankle injury in 33 of 43 sports, especially in Australian football, field hockey, handball, orienteering, scooter and squash. In sports injuries throughout the countries studied, the ankle was the second most common injured body site after the knee, and ankle sprain was the most common type of ankle injury. The incidence of ankle injury and ankle sprain was high in court games and team sports, such as rugby, soccer, volleyball, handball and basketball. This systematic review provides a summary of the epidemiology of ankle injury in sports.

  19. Pre-competition hormonal and psychological levels of elite hockey players: relationship to the "home advantage".

    PubMed

    Carré, Justin; Muir, Cameron; Belanger, Joey; Putnam, Susan K

    2006-10-30

    The home advantage is a robust phenomenon that occurs in the world of amateur and professional sport. Athletic teams have been shown to win significantly more games in their home venue as compared to their opponents' venue. Studies have suggested that the home advantage may be related to familiarity with the facility, increased crowd density and even pre-competition hormonal levels. The present study investigated pre-competition physiological and psychological states of elite hockey players in the home and away venues. Physiological measures included salivary cortisol and testosterone, which were assessed using enzyme immunoassays. In addition, pre-competition psychological states were assessed using the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2. Physiological measures indicated that the players had significantly higher pre-game testosterone when playing in their home venue as compared to their opponents' venue (t(13)=2.29, p=0.04); however, this difference was not due to a pre-game rise in testosterone while competing at home. Furthermore, players showed a trend toward higher pre-game cortisol when playing in their home venue (t(13)=1.96, p=0.07). Psychological measures indicated that players were more self-confident when playing in their home venue (t(13)=2.8, p=0.008) and also had higher somatic (t(13)=2.3, p=0.02) and cognitive anxiety (t(13)=1.87, p=0.04) when playing in their opponents' venue. The present study supports the notion that there are differences in pre-competition hormonal and psychological states that may play a key role in the "home advantage".

  20. Muscle Oxygen Changes following Sprint Interval Cycling Training in Elite Field Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ben; Hamilton, David K.; Cooper, Chris E.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of Sprint Interval Cycling (SIT) on muscle oxygenation kinetics and performance during the 30-15 intermittent fitness test (IFT). Twenty-five women hockey players of Olympic standard were randomly selected into an experimental group (EXP) and a control group (CON). The EXP group performed six additional SIT sessions over six weeks in addition to their normal training program. To explore the potential training-induced change, EXP subjects additionally completed 5 x 30s maximal intensity cycle testing before and after training. During these tests near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measured parameters; oxyhaemoglobin + oxymyoglobin (HbO2+ MbO2), tissue deoxyhaemoglobin + deoxymyoglobin (HHb+HMb), total tissue haemoglobin (tHb) and tissue oxygenation (TSI %) were taken. In the EXP group (5.34±0.14 to 5.50±0.14m.s-1) but not the CON group (pre = 5.37±0.27 to 5.39±0.30m.s-1) significant changes were seen in the 30-15IFT performance. EXP group also displayed significant post-training increases during the sprint cycling: ΔTSI (−7.59±0.91 to −12.16±2.70%); ΔHHb+HMb (35.68±6.67 to 69.44±26.48μM.cm); and ΔHbO2+ MbO2 (−74.29±13.82 to −109.36±22.61μM.cm). No significant differences were seen in ΔtHb (−45.81±15.23 to −42.93±16.24). NIRS is able to detect positive peripheral muscle oxygenation changes when used during a SIT protocol which has been shown to be an effective training modality within elite athletes. PMID:25807517

  1. Sport participation, sport injury, risk factors and sport safety practices in Calgary and area junior high schools

    PubMed Central

    Emery, CA; Tyreman, H

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine rates of sport participation, sport injury, risk factors and sport safety practices in young adolescents. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING: Calgary and area junior high schools. PARTICIPANTS: A random sample of 1466 students (aged 12 to 15 years). OUTCOME MEASURES: Sport injury within one year prior to completing the survey. RESULTS: Ninety-three per cent of students participated in sports in the previous year. The injury rate was 60.85 injuries/100 students/year (95% CI 58.29 to 63.35) for students reporting at least one sport injury, 29.4 injuries/100 students/year (95% CI 27.08 to 31.81) for medically treated injuries, and 12.28 injuries/100 students/year (95% CI 10.64 to 14.07) for injuries presenting to a hospital emergency department. The greatest proportion of injuries occurred in basketball (14%), soccer (12%), hockey (8.6%) and snowboarding/skiing (7.1%). CONCLUSIONS: The rates of participation and injury in sports are high in junior high school students. Future research should focus on prevention strategies in sports with high participation and injury rates to have the greatest population health impact. PMID:20808471

  2. Prevention of youth injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Laraque, D.; Barlow, B.; Durkin, M.

    1999-01-01

    There are four categories of causes responsible for the majority of injuries in youth 10-19 years of age: 1) motor vehicle traffic; 2) violence (intra-familial, extra-familial, self, pregnancy-related); 3) recreational; and 4) occupational. This article presents data from the National Center for Health Statistics mortality data and the National Pediatric Trauma Registry morbidity data. Nationwide, the pediatric injury death rate is highest among adolescents 15-19 years of age. Motor vehicle-related deaths account for 41% and firearm-related deaths account for 36% of injury deaths in this age group. For youths aged 10-14 years, motor vehicle-related deaths account for 38% and; firearm-related deaths account for 26% of injury deaths. For both age groups, occupant motor vehicle-related deaths account for the majority of deaths and underscore the need for seat belt use. Using theoretical principles based on the Haddon matrix and a knowledge of adolescent development, proposed interventions to decrease injuries and deaths related to motor vehicles and firearms include graduated licensing, occupant restraint, speed limits, conflict resolution, and gun control. Occupational injuries, particularly injury associated with agricultural production, account for an estimated 100,000 injuries per year. Preventive strategies include OSHA regulations imposing standards for protective devices and further study for guidelines for adolescent work in agriculture. Injuries related to recreation include drowning and sports injuries. Preventive strategies may include proper supervision and risk reduction with respect to use of alcohol/drugs. The data presented support the use of primary prevention to achieve the most effective, safe community interventions targeting adolescents. PMID:10599188

  3. Proposed national strategies for the prevention of leading work-related diseases and injuries. Occupational lung diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The document summarizes what actions need to be taken to prevent occupational lung diseases. The United States Public Health Service has established the following national objectives for the prevention of occupational lung diseases: 'By 1990, among workers newly exposed after 1985, there should be virtually no new cases of four preventable occupational lung diseases--asbestosis, byssinosis, silicosis, and coal workers' pneumoconiosis.' These four chronic lung diseases will be used as examples in the prevention strategy. To the extent that they are typical of most occupational lung diseases, potential prevention methods available for their control are not unique.

  4. Kinematic adaptations in sprint acceleration performances without and with the constraint of holding a field hockey stick.

    PubMed

    Wdowski, Maximilian M; Gittoes, Marianne J R

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the technique adaptations made when performing sprint-based tasks without (free condition) and with (constrained condition) the constraints of carrying a field hockey stick. Three free and three constrained maximal sprint accelerations were performed by 18 experienced university male field hockey players (age = 20 +/- 1 years, body mass = 73.3 +/- 7.1 kg, and stature = 1.78 +/- 0.05 m). An automatic motion analysis system tracked sagittal plane active marker locations (200 Hz). M sprint velocity during the 18-22 m (free: 8.03 +/- 0.43 m/s; constrained: 7.93 +/- 0.36 m/s) interval was significantly (p = 0.03) different between free and constrained conditions. While the M stride length and stride frequency was similar between free and constrained conditions in the 2-13 m capture volume, the free condition elicited a 0.10 m/s faster (p = 0.03) stride velocity. Further significant differences were found between free and constrained kinematic profiles (p < or = 0.05) for the hip angular velocity at touchdown during the 2-12 m interval of the sprints and in the overall sprint technique coordination between free and constrained conditions. Performance and technique adaptations indicated that sprint-training protocols for field sports should integrate specific equipment constraints to ensure explicit replication of the mechanical demands of the skills underpinning superior performance. PMID:23898687

  5. Analysis of international competition and training in men's field hockey by global positioning system and inertial sensor technology.

    PubMed

    White, Andrew D; MacFarlane, Niall G

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the relative demands of elite field hockey training and competition to determine whether familiar exercise prescription strategies provide an appropriate training stimulus. Sixteen elite male field hockey players (age, 25 ± 4 years; body mass, 70.9 ± 6.6 kg; and maximal oxygen consumption, 61.0 ± 2.1 ml·kg·min [mean ± SD]) participated in the study. Seventy-five elite level competition and 37 training analyses from 8 games and 4 training sessions were obtained. Training duration was longer than competition and covered a greater total distance (109 ± 2.5 vs. 74 ± 0.3 minutes and 7318 ± 221 vs. 5868 ± 75 m; p < 0.001 in both). The distance covered sprinting and running at high intensity was not different between training and competition (114 ± 6 vs. 116 ± 9 m when sprinting and 457 ± 6 vs. 448 ± 7 m for high-intensity running). More high-intensity accelerations were performed during training than in competition (37 ± 3 vs. 20 ± 2). Despite having lower predicted aerobic capacity and covering less distance in competition than in some previous studies, these data support the suggestion that it is high-intensity activity that differentiates international level competition and further suggests that international players can replicate the intensity of competition during small-sided games.

  6. Kinematic adaptations in sprint acceleration performances without and with the constraint of holding a field hockey stick.

    PubMed

    Wdowski, Maximilian M; Gittoes, Marianne J R

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the technique adaptations made when performing sprint-based tasks without (free condition) and with (constrained condition) the constraints of carrying a field hockey stick. Three free and three constrained maximal sprint accelerations were performed by 18 experienced university male field hockey players (age = 20 +/- 1 years, body mass = 73.3 +/- 7.1 kg, and stature = 1.78 +/- 0.05 m). An automatic motion analysis system tracked sagittal plane active marker locations (200 Hz). M sprint velocity during the 18-22 m (free: 8.03 +/- 0.43 m/s; constrained: 7.93 +/- 0.36 m/s) interval was significantly (p = 0.03) different between free and constrained conditions. While the M stride length and stride frequency was similar between free and constrained conditions in the 2-13 m capture volume, the free condition elicited a 0.10 m/s faster (p = 0.03) stride velocity. Further significant differences were found between free and constrained kinematic profiles (p < or = 0.05) for the hip angular velocity at touchdown during the 2-12 m interval of the sprints and in the overall sprint technique coordination between free and constrained conditions. Performance and technique adaptations indicated that sprint-training protocols for field sports should integrate specific equipment constraints to ensure explicit replication of the mechanical demands of the skills underpinning superior performance.

  7. The effects of heavy upper-body strength training on ice sledge hockey sprint abilities in world class players.

    PubMed

    Sandbakk, Øyvind; Hansen, Mads; Ettema, Gertjan; Rønnestad, Bent

    2014-12-01

    The current study investigated the effects of 6 weeks of heavy upper-body strength training on maximal strength and sprint abilities in eight world class ice sledge hockey players. Before and after the strength training intervention, all subjects performed a 30-m maximal sprint on ice (where time for each 10 m section was measured) and 1 repetition maximal (1RM) strength test in the bench pull (BP), pull-down (PD), pull over (PO) and front pull (FP) exercises. Three weekly sessions with 3×6-8RM for these strength exercises were added during the intervention period. From pre- to post-test, 1RM in the strength exercises improved by 4-8%, whereas 30-m sprint time, all 10-m section times and the calculated power output in the 10-m acceleration phase all improved by 2-3% (all P<.05). The pre- to post-test changes in 30-m sprint time and the initial 10-m time correlated significantly with the changes in 1RM for BP (r=0.59 and 0.55) and PD (r=0.60 and 0.68) (all P<.05). In conclusion, the results of this study strongly suggest that heavy upper-body strength training improves upper-body strength and ice sledge hockey sprint abilities, and that the magnitude of improvements in strength correlates with the improvements in sprint abilities.

  8. Using Elite Athletes to Promote Drug Abstinence: Evaluation of a Single-Session School-Based Drug Use Prevention Program Delivered by Junior Hockey Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    School-based substance use prevention programs are a common method to approaching drug use in youths. Project SOS is a single-session drug prevention program developed by police officers and delivered by elite junior hockey players to students in grades 6 and 7. The current study evaluates the effects of Project SOS at achieving its objectives of…

  9. Mortality following Traumatic Brain Injury among Individuals Unable to Follow Commands at the Time of Rehabilitation Admission: A National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Study.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Brian D; Hammond, Flora M; Harrison-Felix, Cynthia; Nakase-Richardson, Risa; Howe, Laura L S; Kreider, Scott

    2015-12-01

    Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been associated with increased mortality. This study characterizes long-term mortality, life expectancy, causes of death, and risk factors for death among patients admitted within the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) TBI Model Systems Programs (TBIMS) who lack command following at the time of admission for inpatient TBI rehabilitation. Of the 8084 persons enrolled from 1988 and 2009, 387 from 20 centers met study criteria. Individuals with moderate to severe TBI who received inpatient rehabilitation were 2.2 times more likely to die than individuals in the U.S. general population of similar age, gender, and race, with an average life expectancy (LE) reduction of 6.6 years. The subset of individuals who were unable to follow commands on admission to rehabilitation was 6.9 times more likely to die, with an average LE reduction of 12.2 years. Relative to the U.S. general population matched for age, gender, and race/ethnicity, these non-command following individuals were more than four times more likely to die of circulatory conditions, 44 times more likely to die of pneumonia, and 38 times more likely to die of aspiration pneumonia. The subset of individuals with TBI who are unable to follow commands upon admission to inpatient rehabilitation are at a significantly increased risk of death when compared with the U.S. general population and compared with all individuals with moderate to severe TBI receiving inpatient rehabilitation. Respiratory causes of death predominate, compared with the general population. PMID:25518731

  10. Pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasim; Vernick, Jerome J

    2009-12-01

    Injury to the pancreas, because of its retroperitoneal location, is a rare occurrence, most commonly seen with penetrating injuries (gun shot or stab wounds). Blunt trauma to the pancreas accounts for only 25% of the cases. Pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to accompanying vascular and duodenal injuries. Pancreatic injuries are not always easy to diagnose resulting in life threatening complications. Physical examination as well as serum amylase is not diagnostic following blunt trauma. Computed tomography (CT) scan can delineate the injury or transaction of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography (ERCP) is the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of the main pancreatic duct. Unrecognized ductal injury leads to pancreatic pseudocyst, fistula, abscess, and other complications. Management depends upon the severity of the pancreatic injury as well as associated injuries. Damage control surgery in hemodynamic unstable patients reduces morbidity and mortality.

  11. Snowboard injuries.

    PubMed

    Pino, E C; Colville, M R

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective survey of 267 snowboarders was undertaken to determine the population at risk and types and mechanisms of injuries sustained in this sport. Snowboarders are young (average age, 21 years), male (greater than 90%), view themselves in average or above average physical condition (96%), and have varied sports interests. One hundred ten injuries that resulted in a physician visit were reported. Ligament sprains, fractures, and contusions were the most frequent types of injury. Fifty percent of all injuries occurred in the lower extremities, with ankle injuries being the most common. Snowboard riders using equipment with increased ankle support seem to be more protected from lower extremity injuries. The lower extremity injuries were concentrated in the forward limb of the snowboarder, where the rider's weight is disproportionately distributed. Differences in the mechanism and spectrum of injury between snowboarding and skiing injuries were noted, including: impact rather than torsion as the major mechanism of injury, a significant lack of thumb injuries, comparative increase in ankle injuries, a decrease in knee injuries, and a higher percentage of upper extremity injuries.

  12. Gaze characteristics of elite and near-elite athletes in ice hockey defensive tactics.

    PubMed

    Martell, Stephen G; Vickers, Joan N

    2004-04-01

    Traditional visual search experiments, where the researcher pre-selects video-based scenes for the participant to respond to, shows that elite players make more efficient decisions than non-elites, but disagree on how they temporally regulate their gaze. Using the vision-in-action [J.N. Vickers, J. Exp. Psychol.: Human Percept. Perform. 22 (1996) 342] approach, we tested whether the significant gaze that differentiates elite and non-elite athletes occurred either: early in the task and was of more rapid duration [A.M. Williams et al., Res. Quart. Exer. Sport 65 (1994) 127; A.M. Williams and K. Davids, Res. Quart. Exer. Sport 69 (1998) 111], or late in the task and was of longer duration [W. Helsen, J.M. Pauwels, A cognitive approach to visual search in sport, in: D. Brogan, K. Carr (Eds.), Visual Search, vol. II, Taylor and Francis, London, 1992], or whether a more complex gaze control strategy was used that consisted of both early and rapid fixations followed by a late fixation of long duration prior to the final execution. We tested this using a live defensive zone task in ice hockey. Results indicated that athletes temporally regulated their gaze using two different gaze control strategies. First, fixation/tracking (F/T) gaze early in the trial were significantly shorter than the final F/T and confirmed that the elite group fixated the tactical locations more rapidly than the non-elite on successful plays. And secondly, the final F/T prior to critical movement initiation (i.e. F/T-1) was significantly longer for both groups, averaging 30% of the final part of the phase and occurred as the athletes isolated a single object or location to end the play. The results imply that expertise in defensive tactics is defined by a cascade of F/T, which began with the athletes fixating or tracking specific locations for short durations at the beginning of the play, and concluded with a final gaze of long duration to a relatively stable target at the end. The results are

  13. Basketball injuries.

    PubMed

    Newman, Joel S; Newberg, Arthur H

    2010-11-01

    Basketball injuries are most prevalent in the lower extremity, especially at the ankle and knee. Most basketball injuries are orthopedic in nature and commonly include ligament sprains, musculotendinous strains, and overuse injuries including stress fractures. By virtue of its excellent contrast resolution and depiction of the soft tissues and trabecular bone, magnetic resonance imaging has become the principal modality for evaluating many basketball injuries. In this article, commonly encountered basketball injuries and their imaging appearances are described. The epidemiology of basketball injuries across various age groups and levels of competition and between genders are reviewed.

  14. Adolescent non-suicidal self-injury: A cross-national study of community samples from Italy, the Netherlands and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Giletta, Matteo; Scholte, Ron H.J.; Engels, Rutger C.M.E.; Ciairano, Silvia; Prinstein, Mitchell J.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined rates and correlates of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) across three non-clinical adolescent samples from different countries. Surveys were administered to 1862 adolescents (Mage=15.69, S.D.=0.87) from Italy (n=827), the Netherlands (n=675), and United States (n=360), including measures of NSSI, substance use, internal (i.e., depressive symptoms, loneliness), and interpersonal factors (i.e., peer victimization, peer preference). After controlling for socio-demographic differences, similar prevalence of NSSI was found across the three samples, with approximately 24% of the adolescents reporting at least one NSSI episode within the last year. Multivariate logistic regressions showed that adolescents' victimization and higher levels of depressive symptoms and family-related loneliness were associated concurrently with NSSI comparably in all three samples. However, multi-group analyses indicated that the association between NSSI and substance use varied significantly across samples, indicating that NSSI related more strongly to substance use (i.e., cigarette smoking and frequent marijuana use) in the sample from the United States rather than the samples from the Netherlands and Italy. Findings provide evidence of NSSI and suggest high similarities in rates and correlates across samples from different countries. Future research should further explore NSSI cross-nationally. PMID:22436348

  15. Adolescent non-suicidal self-injury: a cross-national study of community samples from Italy, the Netherlands and the United States.

    PubMed

    Giletta, Matteo; Scholte, Ron H J; Engels, Rutger C M E; Ciairano, Silvia; Prinstein, Mitchell J

    2012-05-15

    This study examined rates and correlates of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) across three non-clinical adolescent samples from different countries. Surveys were administered to 1862 adolescents (M(age)=15.69, S.D.=0.87) from Italy (n=827), the Netherlands (n=675), and United States (n=360), including measures of NSSI, substance use, internal (i.e., depressive symptoms, loneliness), and interpersonal factors (i.e., peer victimization, peer preference). After controlling for socio-demographic differences, similar prevalence of NSSI was found across the three samples, with approximately 24% of the adolescents reporting at least one NSSI episode within the last year. Multivariate logistic regressions showed that adolescents' victimization and higher levels of depressive symptoms and family-related loneliness were associated concurrently with NSSI comparably in all three samples. However, multi-group analyses indicated that the association between NSSI and substance use varied significantly across samples, indicating that NSSI related more strongly to substance use (i.e., cigarette smoking and frequent marijuana use) in the sample from the United States rather than the samples from the Netherlands and Italy. Findings provide evidence of NSSI and suggest high similarities in rates and correlates across samples from different countries. Future research should further explore NSSI cross-nationally.

  16. Skateboard injuries.

    PubMed

    Cass, D T; Ross, F

    1990-08-01

    The recent increase in skateboard injuries is causing concern. Over a 30-month period there were 80 admissions (69 children) to Westmead Hospital because of skateboard injuries. Among children most injuries were minor, involving fractures to the upper limbs (47) or minor head injuries (8). The only serious injuries were a ruptured urethra and a closed head injury. Over the same time period skateboard riding caused five deaths in New South Wales. These all involved head injuries and in four instances collisions with cars. The data strongly support other studies that show skateboard riding is particularly dangerous near traffic and should be proscribed. However, in parkland and around the home the skateboard is an enjoyable toy with an acceptable risk of minor injury. Helmets should be worn and would have prevented all the head injury admissions in this series. Children under 10 have a higher risk of fractures and head injuries due to insufficient motor development to control the boards and the resultant falls. Skateboard injuries are an example of injuries caused by a "fad epidemic". To cope with these types of periodic events up-to-date data collection is needed, followed rapidly by an intervention programme so that serious injuries can be kept to a minimum.

  17. Softball injuries. Aetiology and prevention.

    PubMed

    Janda, D H; Wild, D E; Hensinger, R N

    1992-04-01

    Over 40 million individuals nationally participate in organised softball leagues, playing an estimated 23 million games per year in the United States. It has also been estimated that softball causes more injuries leading to emergency room visits in the United States than any other sport. Between 1983 and 1989, over 2.6 million injuries were documented through selected emergency rooms throughout the United States. In addition, the potential costs of these injuries can be staggering, therefore, prevention is of utmost importance. Prior to implementation of any preventative measures, the aetiology and distribution of injuries must be ascertained. Softball-related injuries can be grouped into 3 categories: (a) sliding-related injuries--the most common injury scenario; (b) collision-related injuries; and (c) falls sustained by the player. Various preventative approaches have been utilised to reduce the incidence of these recreational sports injuries and the associated health care costs. In regard to sliding-related injuries, breakaway bases have been utilised and have been found to reduce sliding-related injuries by approximately 98%. In reference to collision injuries, deformable walls and padded back stops and field maintenance have been found to prevent the majority of injuries secondary to collisions and falls. In addition, better coaching techniques as well as stretching and conditioning programmes have all been found to benefit players in the prevention of their injuries. As physicians, trainers and individuals involved with sporting activities, it is imperative that we turn and focus our attention on prevention. The cornerstone to diminished injuries and subsequent prevention of an injury is a safer environment for the recreational softball player to participate in.

  18. Corneal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... as sand or dust Ultraviolet injuries: Caused by sunlight, sun lamps, snow or water reflections, or arc- ... a corneal injury if you: Are exposed to sunlight or artificial ultraviolet light for long periods of ...

  19. Inhalation Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can inhale that can cause acute internal injuries. Particles in the air from fires and toxic ... and lung diseases worse. Symptoms of acute inhalation injuries may include Coughing and phlegm A scratchy throat ...

  20. Spinal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. Alternative Names Spinal cord injury; SCI Images Skeletal spine Vertebra, cervical (neck) Vertebra, lumbar (low back) Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Vertebral column Central nervous system Spinal cord injury Spinal anatomy Two person roll - ...

  1. Head injury predictors in sports trauma--a state-of-the-art review.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Fábio A O; de Sousa, Ricardo J Alves

    2015-08-01

    Head injuries occur in a great variety of sports. Many of these have been associated with neurological injuries, affecting the central nervous system. Some examples are motorsports, cycling, skiing, horse riding, mountaineering and most contact sports such as football, ice and field hockey, soccer, lacrosse, etc. The outcome of head impacts in these sports can be very severe. The worst-case scenarios of permanent disability or even death are possibilities. Over recent decades, many In recent decades, a great number of head injury criteria and respective thresholds have been proposed. However, the available information is much dispersed and a consensus has still not been achieved regarding the best injury criteria or even their thresholds. This review paper gives a thorough overview of the work carried out by the scientific community in the field of impact biomechanics about head injuries sustained during sports activity. The main goal is to review the head injury criteria, as well as their thresholds. Several are reviewed, from the predictors based on kinematics to the ones based on human tissue thresholds. In this work, we start to briefly introduce the head injuries and their mechanisms commonly seen as a result of head trauma in sports. Then, we present and summarize the head injury criteria and their respective thresholds.

  2. Head injury predictors in sports trauma--a state-of-the-art review.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Fábio A O; de Sousa, Ricardo J Alves

    2015-08-01

    Head injuries occur in a great variety of sports. Many of these have been associated with neurological injuries, affecting the central nervous system. Some examples are motorsports, cycling, skiing, horse riding, mountaineering and most contact sports such as football, ice and field hockey, soccer, lacrosse, etc. The outcome of head impacts in these sports can be very severe. The worst-case scenarios of permanent disability or even death are possibilities. Over recent decades, many In recent decades, a great number of head injury criteria and respective thresholds have been proposed. However, the available information is much dispersed and a consensus has still not been achieved regarding the best injury criteria or even their thresholds. This review paper gives a thorough overview of the work carried out by the scientific community in the field of impact biomechanics about head injuries sustained during sports activity. The main goal is to review the head injury criteria, as well as their thresholds. Several are reviewed, from the predictors based on kinematics to the ones based on human tissue thresholds. In this work, we start to briefly introduce the head injuries and their mechanisms commonly seen as a result of head trauma in sports. Then, we present and summarize the head injury criteria and their respective thresholds. PMID:26238791

  3. Head injury.

    PubMed

    Hureibi, K A; McLatchie, G R

    2010-05-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest injuries in sport. Most are mild but some can have serious outcomes. Sports medicine doctors should be able to recognise the clinical features and evaluate athletes with head injury. It is necessary during field assessment to recognise signs and symptoms that help in assessing the severity of injury and making a decision to return-to-play. Prevention of primary head injury should be the aim. This includes protective equipment like helmets and possible rule changes. PMID:20533694

  4. Fatalities and catastrophic injuries in high school and college sports, 1982-1997 lessons for improving safety.

    PubMed

    Cantu, R C; Mueller, F O

    1999-08-01

    The prohibition of 'spearing' in football and the rules regarding water depth and the racing dive in swimming are examples of how data on deaths and catastrophic injuries can be used to help promote the safety of young athletes. Other preventive measures supported by research include anchoring movable soccer goals to prevent tipping, improved training for high school wrestling coaches, increased awareness of pathogenic weight control in wrestling and gymnastics, rules against pushing or checking from behind in ice hockey, protective helmets for batting-practice pitchers in baseball, and barriers around the discus circle in track and field.

  5. Occupational Injuries, Illnesses and Fatalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... that was created by Act of Congress and publishes data related to safety, injuries, and fatalities that are both work-related and non-work related. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) - a government organization that is part of ...

  6. Relationship of off-ice and on-ice performance measures in high school male hockey players.

    PubMed

    Krause, David A; Smith, Aynsley M; Holmes, Laura C; Klebe, Corrine R; Lee, Jennifer B; Lundquist, Kimberly M; Eischen, Joseph J; Hollman, John H

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of off-ice performance measures with on-ice turning, crossover, and forward skating performance in high school male hockey players. Thirty-eight players aged 15-18 (mean age ± SD: 16.4 ± 1.1 years; height: 177.9 ± 6.8 cm; weight: 72.5 ± 8.9 kg) participated in this study. On-ice tests included a forward sprint, short radius turns, and crossover turns. Off-ice tests included a 40-yd sprint, vertical jumps, horizontal jumps, and a dynamic balance test using a Y balance testing device. Five off-ice variables correlated with all on-ice performance measures. These variables included the 40-yd sprint, lateral bound right to left limb, double limb horizontal hop, balance on right in posterolateral direction, and composite balance performance on the right. Hierachical regression demonstrated that off-ice sprint time was most predictive of on-ice skating performance, accounting for 65.4% of the variability in forward skate time, 45.0% of the variability in left short radius time, 21.8% of the variance in right short radius time, 36.2% of the variance in left crossover time, and 30.8% of the variability in right crossover time. When using off-ice tests to evaluate hockey players, the 40-yd sprint is the best predictor of skating performance. Based on our regression equation, for every 1-second difference in the 40-yd sprint time, there will be approximately a 0.6-second difference in the 34.5-m on-ice sprint. The 40-yd sprint predicts forward skating performance and to a lesser degree; it also predicts crossover and tuning performance.

  7. Adding whole body vibration to preconditioning exercise increases subsequent on-ice sprint performance in ice-hockey players.

    PubMed

    Rønnestad, Bent R; Slettaløkken, Gunnar; Ellefsen, Stian

    2016-04-01

    The phenomenon postactivation potentiation can possibly be used to acutely improve sprint performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of body-loaded half-squats with added whole body vibration (WBV) on subsequent 20 m on-ice sprint performance. Fifteen male ice-hockey players performed 4 test sessions on separate days and in a randomized order. Two of this test sessions were with WBV and 2 were with noWBV and the best sprint time was used to determine effectiveness. Each test session included preconditioning 30 seconds half-squat exercise, 2 of which were supplemented with 50 Hz WBV at a amplitude of 3 mm. One minute after the cessation of the preconditioning exercise, the 20 m sprint test was performed. Intermediate time was sampled after 10 m. Preconditioning exercise performed with 50 Hz WBV resulted in superior 10 m and 20 m sprint performance compared to preconditioning exercise performed without WBV (1.84 6 0.10 seconds vs. 1.89 6 0.10 seconds and 3.14 6 0.13 vs. 3.17 6 0.13 seconds, respectively, p # 0.01). There was no difference between the protocols in perceived well-being of the legs before the warm-up or after the warm up (p = 0.3). However, there was an improved well-being in the legs immediately after the preconditioning exercise with WBV (p , 0.05). In conclusion, preconditioning exercise performed with WBV at 50 Hz seems to enhance on-ice sprint performance in ice-hockey players. This suggests that coaches can incorporate such exercise into the preparation to specific sprint training to improve the quality of the training.

  8. Association Between Vitamin D Status and Maximal-Intensity Exercise Performance in Junior and Collegiate Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, John S; Peterson, Ben J; Warpeha, Joseph M; Johnson, Sam C; Ingraham, Stacy J

    2015-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that athletes are at risk for poor vitamin D status. This study used a cross-sectional design to investigate the strength of association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration and measures of maximal-intensity exercise performance in competitive hockey players. Fifty-three collegiate and junior male ice hockey players training near Minneapolis, MN (44.9° N latitude) participated in the study during the off-season (May 16-June 28). Circulating 25(OH)D concentration, grip strength, vertical jump performance, and power production during the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) were evaluated. Despite no athletes with 25(OH)D concentration indicative of deficiency (<20 ng·mL), positive bivariate correlations were detected between vitamin D status, relative grip strength (p = 0.024), and peak power during the WAnT (p = 0.035). Only for relative grip strength (p = 0.043), did 25(OH)D concentration predict performance after adjusting for level of play, fat-free mass, fat mass, and self-reported total physical activity in sequential linear regression. Vitamin D status was positively associated with starting gradient (p = 0.020) during the squat jump, with higher concentrations associated with increased rate of force development in the initial portion of the jump. Interventional trials should investigate the impact of vitamin D supplementation on maximal-intensity exercise performance outcomes and rate of force development in large samples of vitamin D-deficient athletes while controlling for training exposure. Our data indicate that if vitamin D status is causally related to maximal-intensity exercise performance in athletes, the effect size is likely small.

  9. Bicycling injuries.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Marc R

    2013-01-01

    Bicycling injuries can be classified into bicycle contact, traumatic, and overuse injuries. Despite the popularity of cycling, there are few scientific studies regarding injuries. Epidemiological studies are difficult to compare due to different methodologies and the diverse population of cyclists studied. There are only three studies conducted on top level professionals. Ninety-four percent of professionals in 1 year have experienced at least one overuse injury. Most overuse injuries are mild with limited time off the bike. The most common site of overuse injury is the knee, and the most common site of traumatic injury is the shoulder, with the clavicle having the most common fracture. Many overuse and bicycle contact ailments are relieved with simple bike adjustments.

  10. National Child Traumatic Stress Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Service and Remembrance Preparedness Month National PTSD Awareness Day World Refugee Awareness Month LGBT Pride Month National ... Awareness Month Child Abuse Prevention Month National Alcohol Awareness Month National Day of Silence Brain Injury Awareness Human Trafficking Awareness ...

  11. Sport Injuries for Females: Incidence and Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kindig, Louise E.

    Comparisons between sport-related injuries for male and female athletes are discussed in relation to statistics gathered by the National Athletic Injury/Illness Reporting System (NAIRS) and other sources. Tables display data on: (1) athletic injuries and fatalities in colleges and universities by sport, l975-76; (2) average annual frequency of…

  12. High School Football Injury Surveillance Studies, 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Athletic Trainers' Association, Inc., Greenville, NC.

    This series of newsletters and fact sheets provides information on the incidence of sport-related injuries in scholastic sports. The following topics are addressed: (1) how the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) measures the number and severity of injuries; (2) facts about NATA; (3) injuries to high school football players; (4)…

  13. [Neuroendocrine dysfunctions and their consequences following traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Czirják, Sándor; Rácz, Károly; Góth, Miklós

    2012-06-17

    Posttraumatic hypopituitarism is of major public health importance because it is more prevalent than previously thought. The prevalence of hypopituitarism in children with traumatic brain injury is unknown. Most cases of posttraumatic hypopituitarism remain undiagnosed and untreated in the clinical practice, and it may contribute to the severe morbidity seen in patients with traumatic brain injury. In the acute phase of brain injury, the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency should not be missed. Determination of morning serum cortisol concentration is mandatory, because adrenal insufficiency can be life threatening. Morning serum cortisol lower than 200 nmol/L strongly suggests adrenal insufficiency. A complete hormonal investigation should be performed after one year of the trauma. Isolated growth hormone deficiency is the most common deficiency after traumatic brain injury. Sports-related chronic repetitive head trauma (because of boxing, kickboxing, football and ice hockey) may also result in hypopituitarism. Close co-operation between neurosurgeons, endocrinologists, rehabilitation physicians and representatives of other disciplines is important to provide better care for these patients. PMID:22695628

  14. [Neuroendocrine dysfunctions and their consequences following traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Czirják, Sándor; Rácz, Károly; Góth, Miklós

    2012-06-17

    Posttraumatic hypopituitarism is of major public health importance because it is more prevalent than previously thought. The prevalence of hypopituitarism in children with traumatic brain injury is unknown. Most cases of posttraumatic hypopituitarism remain undiagnosed and untreated in the clinical practice, and it may contribute to the severe morbidity seen in patients with traumatic brain injury. In the acute phase of brain injury, the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency should not be missed. Determination of morning serum cortisol concentration is mandatory, because adrenal insufficiency can be life threatening. Morning serum cortisol lower than 200 nmol/L strongly suggests adrenal insufficiency. A complete hormonal investigation should be performed after one year of the trauma. Isolated growth hormone deficiency is the most common deficiency after traumatic brain injury. Sports-related chronic repetitive head trauma (because of boxing, kickboxing, football and ice hockey) may also result in hypopituitarism. Close co-operation between neurosurgeons, endocrinologists, rehabilitation physicians and representatives of other disciplines is important to provide better care for these patients.

  15. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... How much do you know about taking good care of yourself? Links to more information girlshealth glossary girlshealth.gov home http://www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Illness & disability Types of ... Spinal cord injury Read advice from Dr. Jeffrey Rabin , a pediatric rehabilitation specialist at the Children’s National Medical Center. ...

  16. Gunshot and Explosion Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Peleg, Kobi; Aharonson-Daniel, Limor; Stein, Michael; Michaelson, Moshe; Kluger, Yoram; Simon, Daniel; Noji, Eric K.

    2004-01-01

    Context: An increase of terror-related activities may necessitate treatment of mass casualty incidents, requiring a broadening of existing skills and knowledge of various injury mechanisms. Objective: To characterize and compare injuries from gunshot and explosion caused by terrorist acts. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of patients recorded in the Israeli National Trauma Registry (ITR), all due to terror-related injuries, between October 1, 2000, to June 30, 2002. The ITR records all casualty admissions to hospitals, in-hospital deaths, and transfers at 9 of the 23 trauma centers in Israel. All 6 level I trauma centers and 3 of the largest regional trauma centers in the country are included. The registry includes the majority of severe terror-related injuries. Injury diagnoses, severity scores, hospital resource utilization parameters, length of stay (LOS), survival, and disposition. Results: A total of 1155 terror-related injuries: 54% by explosion, 36% gunshot wounds (GSW), and 10% by other means. This paper focused on the 2 larger patient subsets: 1033 patients injured by terror-related explosion or GSW. Seventy-one percent of the patients were male, 84% in the GSW group and 63% in the explosion group. More than half (53%) of the patients were 15 to 29 years old, 59% in the GSW group and 48% in the explosion group. GSW patients suffered higher proportions of open wounds (63% versus 53%) and fractures (42% versus 31%). Multiple body-regions injured in a single patient occurred in 62% of explosion victims versus 47% in GSW patients. GSW patients had double the proportion of moderate injuries than explosion victims. Explosion victims have a larger proportion of minor injuries on one hand and critical to fatal injuries on the other. LOS was longer than 2 weeks for 20% (22% in explosion, 18% in GSW). Fifty-one percent of the patients underwent a surgical procedure, 58% in the GSW group and 46% in explosion group. Inpatient death rate was 6.3% (65 patients), 7

  17. Independent effects of sleep duration and body mass index on the risk of a work-related injury: evidence from the US National Health Interview Survey (2004-2010).

    PubMed

    Lombardi, David A; Wirtz, Anna; Willetts, Joanna L; Folkard, Simon

    2012-06-01

    Fatigue has been linked to adverse safety outcomes, and poor quality or decreased sleep has been associated with obesity (higher body mass index, BMI). Additionally, higher BMI is related to an increased risk for injury; however, it is unclear whether BMI modifies the effect of short sleep or has an independent effect on work-related injury risk. To answer this question, the authors examined the risk of a work-related injury as a function of total daily sleep time and BMI using the US National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). The NHIS is an in-person household survey using a multistage, stratified, clustered sample design representing the US civilian population. Data were pooled for the 7-yr survey period from 2004 to 2010 for 101 891 "employed" adult subjects (51.7%; 41.1 ± yrs of age [mean ± SEM]) with data on both sleep and BMI. Weighted annualized work-related injury rates were estimated across a priori defined categories of BMI: healthy weight (BMI: <25), overweight (BMI: 25-29.99), and obese (BMI: ≥30) and also categories of usual daily sleep duration: <6, 6-6.99, 7-7.99, 8-8.99, and ≥9 h. To account for the complex sampling design, including stratification, clustering, and unequal weighting, weighted multiple logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of a work-related injury. The initial model examined the interaction among daily sleep duration and BMI, controlling for weekly working hours, age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, type of pay, industry, and occupation. No significant interaction was found between usual daily sleep duration and BMI (p = .72); thus, the interaction term of the final logistic model included these two variables as independent predictors of injury, along with the aforementioned covariates. Statistically significant covariates (p ≤ .05) included age, sex, weekly work hours, occupation, and if the worker was paid hourly. The lowest categories of usual sleep duration (<6 and 6-6.9 h) showed significantly (p

  18. A 7-year study on risks and costs of knee injuries in male and female youth participants in 12 sports.

    PubMed

    de Loës, M; Dahlstedt, L J; Thomée, R

    2000-04-01

    Knee injuries are common and account in various sports for 15-50% of all sports injuries. The cost of knee injuries is therefore a large part of the cost for medical care of sports injuries. Furthermore, the risk of acquiring a knee injury during sports is considered higher for females than for males. The nationwide organization "Youth and Sports" represents the major source of organized sports and recreation for Swiss youth and engages annually around 370000 participants in the age group of 14 to 20 years. The purpose of this study was to combine data on knee injuries from two sources, the first being data on the exposure to risk found in the activity registration in "Youth and Sports" and the second injuries with their associated costs resulting from the activities and filed at the Swiss Military Insurance. This allowed calculation of knee injury incidences, to compare risks between males and females and to estimate the costs of medical treatment. The study comprises 3864 knee injuries from 12 sports during 7 years. Females were significantly more at risk in six sports: alpinism, downhill skiing, gymnastics, volleyball, basketball and team handball. The incidences of knee injuries and of cruciate ligament injuries in particular, together with the costs per hour of participation, all displayed the same sports as the top five for both females and males: ice hockey, team handball, soccer, downhill skiing and basketball. Female alpinism and gymnastics had also high rankings. Knee injuries comprised 10% of all injuries in males and 13% in females, but their proportional contribution to the costs per hour of participation was 27% and 33%, respectively. From this study it can be concluded that females were significantly more at risk for knee injuries than males in six sports and that knee injuries accounted for a high proportion of the costs of medical treatment.

  19. Child injury in a changing world.

    PubMed

    Towner, E; Towner, J

    2009-01-01

    The importance of child injuries has now been recognised as a significant public health problem internationally. The World Health Organisation (WHO) and United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) have recently published the first world report on child injury prevention. As infectious diseases decline, the relative importance of injury has increased, but the pace of change of global processes means that absolute increases in injury may occur over the next 20-30 years. This paper examines child injury in a changing world by outlining the ways in which the forces of globalisation, urbanisation, motorisation and environmental change could have an impact on injury epidemiology and policy. We consider how those in public health and those in the injury field should respond to the changing world of injury. Child injury prevention needs to be incorporated into planning for the rapidly changing urban environments of low-income countries and strategies devised for the large numbers of people displaced by environmental change. PMID:19513912

  20. Child injury in a changing world.

    PubMed

    Towner, E; Towner, J

    2009-01-01

    The importance of child injuries has now been recognised as a significant public health problem internationally. The World Health Organisation (WHO) and United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) have recently published the first world report on child injury prevention. As infectious diseases decline, the relative importance of injury has increased, but the pace of change of global processes means that absolute increases in injury may occur over the next 20-30 years. This paper examines child injury in a changing world by outlining the ways in which the forces of globalisation, urbanisation, motorisation and environmental change could have an impact on injury epidemiology and policy. We consider how those in public health and those in the injury field should respond to the changing world of injury. Child injury prevention needs to be incorporated into planning for the rapidly changing urban environments of low-income countries and strategies devised for the large numbers of people displaced by environmental change.