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Sample records for hockey puck

  1. A comparison of the capacity of ice hockey goaltender masks for the protection from puck impacts.

    PubMed

    Nur, Sarah; Kendall, Marshall; Clark, J Michio; Hoshizaki, T Blaine

    2015-01-01

    Goaltenders in ice hockey are the only players that are on the ice for the entire game. Their position exposes them to impacts from collisions with other players, falls to the ice, and puck impacts. In competitive ice hockey leagues, head injuries resulting from puck impacts have been reported with some cases resulting in ending the player's career. Considerable research has been conducted to assess the performance of hockey helmets; however, few have assessed the performance of goaltenders' masks. The purpose of this study was to compare the capacity of four goaltenders' masks for the protection from puck impact as measured by head acceleration and peak force. A Hybrid III headform was fitted with four different goaltender masks and impacted with a hockey puck in three locations at 25 m/s. The masks were found to vary in the level of protection they offered as the mask with the thickest liner resulted in lower forces than the thinnest mask for side impacts; however, the thinnest mask resulted in the lowest force for front impacts. Despite performance differences at specific locations, no one mask proved to be superior as peak acceleration and peak force values did not exceed the thresholds necessary for concussion.

  2. The Slap Shot in Ice Hockey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod; Lindsey, Crawford

    2018-01-01

    An ice hockey player can strike a puck at speeds up to about 45 m/s (100 mph) using a technique known as the slap shot. There is nothing unusual about the speed, since golf balls, tennis balls, and baseballs can also be projected at that speed or even higher. The unusual part is that the player strikes the ice before striking the puck, causing the stick to slow down and to bend. If a tennis player or a golfer did something like that, by hitting the ground before hitting the ball, it would be classed as a miss-hit and the ball would probably dribble away at low speed. Nevertheless, there appears to be a significant advantage in hitting the ice before hitting the puck, otherwise hockey players would have learned from experience not to do that.

  3. The Slap Shot in Ice Hockey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod; Lindsey, Crawford

    2018-01-01

    An ice hockey player can strike a puck at speeds up to about 45 m/s (100 mph) using a technique known as the slap shot. There is nothing unusual about the speed, since golf balls, tennis balls, and baseballs can also be projected at that speed or even higher. The unusual part is that the player strikes the ice before striking the puck, causing the…

  4. The "Puck" energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements.

    PubMed

    Clark, G; Cohen, I; Westlake, J H; Andrews, G B; Brandt, P; Gold, R E; Gkioulidou, M A; Hacala, R; Haggerty, D; Hill, M E; Ho, G C; Jaskulek, S E; Kollmann, P; Mauk, B H; McNutt, R L; Mitchell, D G; Nelson, K S; Paranicas, C; Paschalidis, N; Schlemm, C E

    2016-08-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  5. The "Puck" Energetic Charged Particle Detector: Design, Heritage, and Advancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G.; Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low-resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low-resource but highly capable, mass-species-discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the "Puck" EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of approximately 10 kiloelectronvolts to several megaelectronvolts. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of kiloelectronvolts to about 1 megaelectronvolt. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 kiloelectronvolt per nucleon,with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high-voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions.

  6. Hockey, iPads, and Projectile Motion in a Physics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hechter, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    With the increased availability of modern technology and handheld probeware for classrooms, the iPad and the Video Physics application developed by Vernier are used to capture and analyze the motion of an ice hockey puck within secondary-level physics education. Students collect, analyze, and generate digital modes of representation of physics…

  7. A longitudinal study of ice hockey in boys aged 8--12.

    PubMed

    MacNab, R B

    1979-03-01

    A group of fifteen boys (experimental or competitive) were studied over a five year period of competitive ice hockey beginning at age 8. The subjects were members of a team which averaged 66 games per year, ranging from 50 at age 8 to 78 at age 12. In addition, they practiced twice a week with heavy stress on skating and individual puck handling skills. A second group of eleven boys (control or less competitive) were studied from age 10 to 12. The latter subjects played an average of 25 games per year and practiced once a week. All subjects were measured each year on skating and puck control skills, fitness-performance tests, grip strength, physical work capacity as well as height and weight. The results demonstrate learning curves for skating and puck control tests which, while typical in nature, show extremely high levels of achievement. Fitness-Performance, grip strength and physical work capacity levels of the competitive group are extremely high in comparison with data from other countries.

  8. Psychologic, situational, and physiologic variables and on-ice performance of youth hockey goalkeepers.

    PubMed

    Smith, A M; Sim, F H; Smith, H C; Stuart, M J; Laskowski, E R

    1998-01-01

    To determine the relationship between psychologic, situational, and physiologic variables and on-ice performance of youth hockey goalkeepers. This study was structured to identify relationships and predictors of goalie performance. Because athletes playing solo positions in team sports have not been analyzed in depth in terms of precompetition anxiety and because goalkeeper performance is critical to game outcome, we undertook a study of 43 goalies at a hockey camp. These goalies completed psychometric inventories to assess trait and state anxiety, confidence, life stress, and social support. Holter monitors measured heart rate while the goalies rotated through on-ice stations. Goalies were videotaped at the puck-shooting machine station, and performance (percent saves) was calculated. Trait (somatic) anxiety and positive mood state (ability to share) had different but significant relationships with on-ice performance. Heart rates ranged from 88 to 208 beats/min at the on-ice stations. Mean heart rate for older goalies (14 to 18 years of age) was 164 beats/min at the puck-shooting machine and 176 beats/min at other stations such as the slap-shot station. Older goalies performed well at a high level of arousal. Better performing goalies were more experienced, had faster heart rates "in the net," and had lower scores on all measures of anxiety.

  9. Common Ice Hockey Injuries and Treatment: A Current Concepts Review.

    PubMed

    Mosenthal, William; Kim, Michael; Holzshu, Robert; Hanypsiak, Bryan; Athiviraham, Aravind

    Injuries are common in ice hockey, a contact sport where players skate at high speeds on a sheet of ice and shoot a vulcanized rubber puck in excess of one hundred miles per hour. This article reviews the diagnoses and treatment of concussions, injuries to the cervical spine, and lower and upper extremities as they pertain to hockey players. Soft tissue injury of the shoulder, acromioclavicular joint separation, glenohumeral joint dislocation, clavicle fractures, metacarpal fractures, and olecranon bursitis are discussed in the upper-extremity section of the article. Lower-extremity injuries reviewed in this article include adductor strain, athletic pubalgia, femoroacetabular impingement, sports hernia, medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligament tears, skate bite, and ankle sprains. This review is intended to aid the sports medicine physician in providing optimal sports-specific care to allow their athlete to return to their preinjury level of performance.

  10. Injuries in men's international ice hockey: a 7-year study of the International Ice Hockey Federation Adult World Championship Tournaments and Olympic Winter Games

    PubMed Central

    Tuominen, Markku; Stuart, Michael J; Aubry, Mark; Kannus, Pekka; Parkkari, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Background Information on ice hockey injuries at the international level is very limited. The aim of the study was to analyse the incidence, type, mechanism and severity of ice hockey injuries in men's international ice hockey tournaments. Methods All the injuries in men's International Ice Hockey Federation World Championship tournaments over a 7-year period were analysed using a strict definition of injury, standardised reporting strategies and an injury diagnosis made by a team physician. Results 528 injuries were recorded in games resulting in an injury rate of 14.2 per 1000 player-games (52.1/1000 player-game hours). Additionally, 27 injuries occurred during practice. For WC A-pool Tournaments and Olympic Winter Games (OWG) the injury rate was 16.3/1000 player-games (59.6/1000 player-game hours). Body checking, and stick and puck contact caused 60.7% of the injuries. The most common types of injuries were lacerations, sprains, contusions and fractures. A laceration was the most common facial injury and was typically caused by a stick. The knee was the most frequently injured part of the lower body and the shoulder was the most common site of an upper body injury. Arenas with flexible boards and glass reduced the risk of injury by 29% (IRR 0.71, (95% CI 0.56 to 0.91)). Conclusions The incidence of injury during international ice hockey competition is relatively high. Arena characteristics, such as flexible boards and glass, appeared to reduce the risk of injury. PMID:25293341

  11. Head-impact mechanisms in men's and women's collegiate ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Bethany J; Machan, Jason T; Beckwith, Jonathan G; Greenwald, Richard M; Burmeister, Emily; Crisco, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    Concussion injury rates in men's and women's ice hockey are reported to be among the highest of all collegiate sports. Quantification of the frequency of head impacts and the magnitude of head acceleration as a function of the different impact mechanisms (eg, head contact with the ice) that occur in ice hockey could provide a better understanding of this high injury rate. To quantify and compare the per-game frequency and magnitude of head impacts associated with various impact mechanisms in men's and women's collegiate ice hockey players. Cohort study. Collegiate ice hockey rink. Twenty-three men and 31 women from 2 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I ice hockey teams. We analyzed magnitude and frequency (per game) of head impacts per player among impact mechanisms and between sexes using generalized mixed linear models and generalized estimating equations to account for repeated measures within players. Participants wore helmets instrumented with accelerometers to allow us to collect biomechanical measures of head impacts sustained during play. Video footage from 53 games was synchronized with the biomechanical data. Head impacts were classified into 8 categories: contact with another player; the ice, boards or glass, stick, puck, or goal; indirect contact; and contact from celebrating. For men and women, contact with another player was the most frequent impact mechanism, and contact with the ice generated the greatest-magnitude head accelerations. The men had higher per-game frequencies of head impacts from contact with another player and contact with the boards than did the women (P < .001), and these impacts were greater in peak rotational acceleration (P = .027). Identifying the impact mechanisms in collegiate ice hockey that result in frequent and high-magnitude head impacts will provide us with data that may improve our understanding of the high rate of concussion in the sport and inform injury-prevention strategies.

  12. Le Hockey [Hockey]. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balchunas, Martha; Ullmann, Rebecca

    A resource kit for the teaching of French at the intermediate level is represented by a teacher's guide and the duplicating master for a tape transcript. The aim of this module is to make the elementary or secondary school student of French familiar with basic hockey terms in French, and to enable the student to understand hockey games broadcast…

  13. Impact of visors on eye and orbital injuries in the National Hockey League.

    PubMed

    Micieli, Jonathan A; Zurakowski, David; Ahmed, Iqbal Ike K

    2014-06-01

    Eye and orbital injuries are a significant risk to professional hockey league players and have resulted in career-ending injuries. The goal of this study was to determine the incidence, value lost, mechanism, and effect of visors on eye and orbital injuries over the last 10 National Hockey League (NHL) seasons: 2002-2003 to 2012-2013. Retrospective case-control study. Participants were 8741 NHL players who had played at least 1 game during the last 10 seasons. Using The Sports Network (TSN), ProSportsTransactions, and the Sporting News Hockey Register, NHL players were searched to identify eye and orbital injuries. The mechanism of injury was obtained from media reports and direct observation from online videos. The number of players wearing visors each year was obtained from The Hockey News annual visor survey. A total of 149 eye or orbital injuries over the last 10 seasons resulted in an overall incidence of 2.48 per 10 000 athlete exposures. A total of 1120 missed games led to a lost financial value of more than $33 million. Visor use among players grew from 32% in 2002-2003 to 73% in 2012-2013, and there was a significantly increased risk for having an eye or orbital injury when a visor was not worn (OR 4.23, 95% CI 2.84-6.30). Most injuries were a result of being hit by a deflected or direct puck (37%) followed by being struck by a high stick (28%). Players who did not wear a visor were found to be involved in more fights, hits, and penalty minutes (p < 0.001). Eye and orbital injuries are mostly accidental in nature and represent a significant risk and cost to the NHL and its players. Eye and orbital injuries are significantly more likely in players who do not wear visors. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Cool Sport Full of Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hache, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Of all sports, ice hockey is possibly the one with the widest array of physics elements in it. The game provides many examples that can bring physics to life in the classroom. Ice hockey (or just "hockey" as many Canadians would say) sees athletes sliding on ice at high speeds and in various ways, shooting and slapping pucks, and…

  15. Enhancing Unity of Effort in Homeland Defense, Homeland Security, and Civil Support Through Interdisciplinary Education

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    to put greatness into these guys, I was trying to pull it out.” The U.S. hockey team learned to work together and demonstrated, in Brooks’ words...skating, passing, defending, and shooting. The goalie works to protect the net from intruding pucks, releasing the puck to his teammates, and defense

  16. Optimization of the Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT) weight loss and healthy lifestyle program for male hockey fans.

    PubMed

    Blunt, Wendy; Gill, Dawn P; Sibbald, Shannon L; Riggin, Brendan; Pulford, Roseanne W; Scott, Ryan; Danylchuk, Karen; Gray, Cindy M; Wyke, Sally; Bunn, Christopher; Petrella, Robert J

    2017-11-28

    The health outcomes of men continue to be poorer than women globally. Challenges in addressing this problem include difficulties engaging men in weight loss programs as they tend to view these programs as contrary to the masculine narrative of independence and self-reliance. Researchers have been turning towards sports fans to engage men in health promotion programs as sports fans are typically male, and tend to have poor health habits. Developed from the highly successful gender-sensitized Football Fans in Training program, Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT) recruited 80 male hockey fans of the London Knights and Sarnia Sting who were overweight or obese into a weekly, 90-minute classroom education and group exercise program held over 12 weeks; a 40-week minimally-supported phase followed. A process evaluation of the Hockey FIT program was completed alongside a pragmatic randomized controlled trial and outcome evaluation in order to fully explore the acceptability of the Hockey FIT program from the perspectives of coaches delivering and participants engaged in the program. Data sources included attendance records, participant focus groups, coach interviews, assessment of fidelity (program observations and post-session coach reflections), and 12-month participant interviews. Coaches enjoyed delivering the program and found it simple to deliver. Men valued being among others of similar body shape and similar weight loss goals, and found the knowledge they gained through the program helped them to make and maintain health behaviour changes. Suggested improvements include having more hockey-related information and activities, greater flexibility with timing of program delivery, and greater promotion of technology support tools. We confirmed Hockey FIT was an acceptable "gender-sensitized" health promotion program for male hockey fans who were overweight or obese. Minor changes were required for optimization, which will be evaluated in a future definitive trial

  17. Evaluation of cricket helmet performance and comparison with baseball and ice hockey helmets.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, A S; Janda, D

    2003-08-01

    Protective helmets in sport are important for reducing the risk of head and facial injury. In cricket and other sports with projectiles, national test standards control the minimum helmet performance. However, there are few field data showing if helmets are effective in reducing head injury. (a) To examine the performance of cricket helmets in laboratory tests; (b) to examine performance with regard to test standards, game hazards, and helmet construction; (c) to compare and contrast these findings with baseball and ice hockey helmets. Impact tests were conducted on a selection of helmet models: five cricket, two baseball, and two ice hockey. Ball to helmet impacts at speeds of 19, 27, 36, and 45 m/s were produced using an air cannon and a Hybrid III dummy headform and neck unit. Free fall drop tests with a rigid headform on to a selection of anvils (flat rigid, flat deformable, and hemispherical rigid) were conducted. Resultant headform acceleration was measured and compared between tests. At the lower speed impacts, all helmets produced a good reduction in headform acceleration, and thus injury risk. At the higher speed impacts, the effectiveness was less. For example, the mean maximum headform accelerations for all cricket helmets at each speed were: 67, 160, 316, and 438 g for 19, 27, 36, and 45 m/s ball speeds respectively. Drop tests on to a hemispherical anvil produced the highest accelerations. The variation in performance increased as the magnitude of the impact energy increased, in both types of testing. The test method used for baseball helmets in which the projectile is fired at the helmet may be superior to helmet drop tests. Cricket helmet performance is satisfactory for low speed impacts, but not for impacts at higher, more realistic, speeds. Baseball and ice hockey helmets offer slightly better relative and absolute performance at the 27 m/s ball and puck impacts.

  18. Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT) pilot study protocol: a gender-sensitized weight loss and healthy lifestyle program for overweight and obese male hockey fans.

    PubMed

    Gill, Dawn P; Blunt, Wendy; De Cruz, Ashleigh; Riggin, Brendan; Hunt, Kate; Zou, Guangyong; Sibbald, Shannon; Danylchuk, Karen; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Gray, Cindy M; Wyke, Sally; Bunn, Christopher; Petrella, Robert J

    2016-10-19

    Effective approaches that engage men in weight loss and lifestyle change are important because of worldwide increases, including in Canada, in obesity and chronic diseases. Football Fans in Training (FFIT), developed in Scotland, successfully tackled these problems by engaging overweight/obese male football fans in sustained weight loss and positive health behaviours, through program deliveries at professional football stadia. Aims: 1) Adapt FFIT to hockey within the Canadian context and integrate with HealtheSteps™ (evidence-based lifestyle program) to develop Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT); 2) Explore potential for Hockey FIT to help overweight/obese men lose weight and improve other outcomes by 12 weeks, and retain these improvements to 12 months; 3) Evaluate feasibility of recruiting and retaining overweight/obese men; 4) Evaluate acceptability of Hockey FIT; and 5) Conduct program optimization via a process evaluation. We conducted a two-arm pilot pragmatic randomized controlled trial (pRCT) whereby 80 overweight/obese male hockey fans (35-65 years; body-mass index ≥28 kg/m 2 ) were recruited through their connection to two junior A hockey teams (London and Sarnia, ON) and randomized to Intervention (Hockey FIT) or Comparator (Wait-List Control). Hockey FIT includes a 12-week Active Phase (classroom instruction and exercise sessions delivered weekly by trained coaches) and a 40-week Maintenance Phase. Data collected at baseline and 12 weeks (both groups), and 12 months (Intervention only), will inform evaluation of the potential of Hockey FIT to help men lose weight and improve other health outcomes. Feasibility and acceptability will be assessed using data from self-reports at screening and baseline, program fidelity (program observations and coach reflections), participant focus group discussions, coach interviews, as well as program questionnaires and interviews with participants. This information will be analyzed to inform program

  19. Ice Hockey Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sim, Franklin H.; Simonet, William T.

    1988-01-01

    The article describes the mechanisms, management, and prevention of each type of injury to which hockey players are prone. It surveys the injuries sustained by ice hockey players and discusses treatment of specific injuries, including those injuries to the head, eye, shoulder, hand, thigh, scalp, and face. (JL)

  20. The 'Patient experience' revolution.

    PubMed

    Hooten, Doug; Zavadsky, Matt

    2014-02-01

    We're arguably at the most pivotal time in our young profession. The ACA has provided EMS an unprecedented opportunity to become a part of the healthcare system, a move that many of us have dreamed about for decades. We need to pay attention to the changing dynamics of the environment in which we operate. The factors that currently impact hospitals, doctors and other healthcare providers will also impact us sooner than we think. Take the time to help shape our future and how we participate in this new healthcare system. It's time to focus on the patient and the patient's experience with our service. Wayne Gretzky said two important things during an interview when he was asked what makes him such a great hockey player. One was, "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take." The other was, "A good hockey player plays where the puck is. A great hockey player plays where the puck is going to be. I skate to where the puck is going to be, not where it has been." Our advice to you is to go ahead, take the shot, get ahead of the other team and focus on improved customer satisfaction sooner rather than later.

  1. The Hockey/Art Alliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadeson, Harriet; Wirtz, Gail

    2005-01-01

    Ice hockey can be a violent sport as evidenced by the fighting among the members of an ice hockey team of 13-year-old boys from mixed racial and socioeconomic backgrounds. Two series of eight art sessions were used to help the boys develop respect for themselves and others, to solve conflicts without combat, and to build more positive…

  2. A Thermally Actuated Flux Pump for Energizing YBCO Pucks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    transmitted through the thermal magnetic material sweeping magnetic field lines into the superconducting puck. We used YBCO as the superconductor with...of the YBCO sweeping vortices into the superconductor . These vortices would gradually accumulate in the superconductor . Successes have been reported...superconducting flux pump,” PHYSICA C, vol. 468, pp. 153-159, 2008. [2] T. A. Coombs, Z. Hong, Y. Yan and C. D. Rawlings, “ Superconductors : The

  3. Influence of viewing professional ice hockey on youth hockey injuries.

    PubMed

    Keays, G; Pless, B

    2013-03-01

    Most televised National Hockey League (NHL) games include violent body checks, illegal hits and fights. We postulated that minor league players imitated these behaviours and that not seeing these games would reduce the rate of injuries among younger hockey players. Using a quasi-experimental design, we compared 7 years of televised NHL matches (2002-2009) with the year of the NHL lock-out (2004/2005). Data from the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program (CHIRPP) were used to identify the injuries and to ascertain whether they were due to intentional contact and illegal acts including fights. We found no significant differences in the proportions of all injuries and those involving intentional contact, violations or illegal acts among male minor league hockey players during the year when professional players were locked out and the years before and after the lock-out. We concluded that not seeing televised NHL violence may not reduce injuries, although a possible effect may have been obscured because there was a striking increase in attendance at equally violent minor league games during the lock-out.

  4. Relationship of physical fitness test results and hockey playing potential in elite-level ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Burr, Jaime F; Jamnik, Roni K; Baker, Joseph; Macpherson, Alison; Gledhill, Norman; McGuire, E J

    2008-09-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the fitness variables with the highest capability for predicting hockey playing potential at the elite level as determined by entry draft selection order. We also examined the differences associated with the predictive abilities of the test components among playing positions. The secondary purpose of this study was to update the physiological profile of contemporary hockey players including positional differences. Fitness test results conducted by our laboratory at the National Hockey League Entry Draft combine were compared with draft selection order on a total of 853 players. Regression models revealed peak anaerobic power output to be important for higher draft round selection in all positions; however, the degree of importance of this measurement varied with playing position. The body index, which is a composite score of height, lean mass, and muscular development, was similarly important in all models, with differing influence by position. Removal of the goalies' data increased predictive capacity, suggesting that talent identification using physical fitness testing of this sort may be more appropriate for skating players. Standing long jump was identified as a significant predictor variable for forwards and defense and could be a useful surrogate for assessing overall hockey potential. Significant differences exist between the physiological profiles of current players based on playing position. There are also positional differences in the relative importance of anthropometric and fitness measures of off-ice hockey tests in relation to draft order. Physical fitness measures and anthropometric data are valuable in helping predict hockey playing potential. Emphasis on anthropometry should be used when comparing elite-level forwards, whereas peak anaerobic power and fatigue rate are more useful for differentiating between defense.

  5. Expert-novice differences in brain function of field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Wimshurst, Z L; Sowden, P T; Wright, M

    2016-02-19

    The aims of this study were to use functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the neural bases for perceptual-cognitive superiority in a hockey anticipation task. Thirty participants (15 hockey players, 15 non-hockey players) lay in an MRI scanner while performing a video-based task in which they predicted the direction of an oncoming shot in either a hockey or a badminton scenario. Video clips were temporally occluded either 160 ms before the shot was made or 60 ms after the ball/shuttle left the stick/racquet. Behavioral data showed a significant hockey expertise×video-type interaction in which hockey experts were superior to novices with hockey clips but there were no significant differences with badminton clips. The imaging data on the other hand showed a significant main effect of hockey expertise and of video type (hockey vs. badminton), but the expertise×video-type interaction did not survive either a whole-brain or a small-volume correction for multiple comparisons. Further analysis of the expertise main effect revealed that when watching hockey clips, experts showed greater activation in the rostral inferior parietal lobule, which has been associated with an action observation network, and greater activation than novices in Brodmann areas 17 and 18 and middle frontal gyrus when watching badminton videos. The results provide partial support both for domain-specific and domain-general expertise effects in an action anticipation task. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Director of Innovation. Volume 3, November 2009

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    evaluated at Crimson Vi- per 2009 included the Portable Acoustic Contraband Detector (PACD) and the Fluxgate Magnetometer , two projects from SPAWAR...concealed within the containers. The Fluxgate Magnetometer is a hockey puck-sized sensor head that can detect vehicles and weapons by measuring

  7. Incidence of Concussion in Youth Ice Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Elbin, R.J.; Sufrinko, Alicia; Dakan, Scott; Bookwalter, Kylie; Price, Ali; Meehan, William P.; Collins, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ice hockey is a fast-paced collision sport that entails both intentional (ie, body checking) and incidental contact that may involve the head. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of concussions in relation to games/practices and age among competition-level youth ice hockey players (ages 12–18 years). METHODS: Participants included 397 youth ice hockey players from Western Pennsylvania; Boston, Massachusetts; and Birmingham, Alabama, during the 2012–2013 and 2013–2014 youth ice hockey seasons. Incidence rates (IRs) and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of concussion were calculated for games/practices and age groups. RESULTS: A total of 23 369 (12 784 practice/10 585 game) athletic exposures (AEs) involving 37 medically diagnosed concussions occurred. More than 40% of concussions involved illegal contact. The combined IR for games and practices was 1.58 concussions per 1000 AEs. The IRR was 2.86 times (95% confidence interval 0.68–4.42) higher during games (2.49 per 1000 AEs) than practices (1.04 per 1000 AEs). CONCLUSIONS: The overall IR for concussion in youth ice hockey was comparable to those reported in other youth collision sports. The game-to-practice IRR was lower than previously reported in ice hockey and other youth sports, although more concussions per exposure occurred in games compared with practices. Younger players had a higher rate of concussions than older players. PMID:26746405

  8. Incidence of Concussion in Youth Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Anthony P; Elbin, R J; Sufrinko, Alicia; Dakan, Scott; Bookwalter, Kylie; Price, Ali; Meehan, William P; Collins, Michael W

    2016-02-01

    Ice hockey is a fast-paced collision sport that entails both intentional (ie, body checking) and incidental contact that may involve the head. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of concussions in relation to games/practices and age among competition-level youth ice hockey players (ages 12-18 years). Participants included 397 youth ice hockey players from Western Pennsylvania; Boston, Massachusetts; and Birmingham, Alabama, during the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 youth ice hockey seasons. Incidence rates (IRs) and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of concussion were calculated for games/practices and age groups. A total of 23 369 (12 784 practice/10 585 game) athletic exposures (AEs) involving 37 medically diagnosed concussions occurred. More than 40% of concussions involved illegal contact. The combined IR for games and practices was 1.58 concussions per 1000 AEs. The IRR was 2.86 times (95% confidence interval 0.68-4.42) higher during games (2.49 per 1000 AEs) than practices (1.04 per 1000 AEs). The overall IR for concussion in youth ice hockey was comparable to those reported in other youth collision sports. The game-to-practice IRR was lower than previously reported in ice hockey and other youth sports, although more concussions per exposure occurred in games compared with practices. Younger players had a higher rate of concussions than older players. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Evaluation, management and prevention of lower extremity youth ice hockey injuries.

    PubMed

    Popkin, Charles A; Schulz, Brian M; Park, Caroline N; Bottiglieri, Thomas S; Lynch, T Sean

    2016-01-01

    Ice hockey is a fast-paced sport played by increasing numbers of children and adolescents in North America and around the world. Requiring a unique blend of skill, finesse, power and teamwork, ice hockey can become a lifelong recreational activity. Despite the rising popularity of the sport, there is ongoing concern about the high frequency of musculoskeletal injury associated with participation in ice hockey. Injury rates in ice hockey are among the highest in all competitive sports. Numerous research studies have been implemented to better understand the risks of injury. As a result, rule changes were adopted by the USA Hockey and Hockey Canada to raise the minimum age at which body checking is permitted to 13-14 years (Bantam level) from 11-12 years (Pee Wee). Continuing the education of coaches, parents and players on rules of safe play, and emphasizing the standards for proper equipment use are other strategies being implemented to make the game safer to play. The objective of this article was to review the evaluation, management and prevention of common lower extremity youth hockey injuries.

  10. First-Generation Jet Propulsion Laboratory "Hockey-Puck" Free-Flying Magnetometers for Distributed In-Situ Multiprobe Measurement of Current Density Filamentation in the Northern Auroral Zone: Enstrophy Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, H.; Blaes, B.; Boehm, M.; Boykins, K.; Gibbs, J.; Goodman, W.; Lieneweg, U.; Lux, J.; Lynch, K.; Narvaez, P.

    2000-01-01

    magnetic signature electronic design and choice of materials in packaging. The miniaturized fluxgate magnetometers had a range of 1-60000 nT with 0.1% full-scale linearity. The frequency range of interest for magnetic measurement was 10 mHz - 50 Hz. Digital data from the magnetometer's three axes were placed in a 4MB Static Random Access Memory (SRAM) in data packages (frames) formatted together with time tags and frame ID. After a specified time was elapsed, the data were Viterbi encoded and transmitted at a rate of 100 kbps (BPSK). Each of the four FFMs transmitted at different frequency. These carrier frequencies were in the range of 2200-2300 MHz. The antenna was a single patch on a high dielectric constant substrate covering one end-plate of the hockey-puck-sized unit. The local clocks aboard the FFMs were reset at the start of the mission and stayed synchronized within 3 msec during the mission. Position of each FFM with respect to the rocket is calculated by the knowledge of its release velocity (measured at exit point of the FFM launcher tract) providing an accuracy of 1 m over the maximum range of 3 km. Spatial and temporal nature of observants can be separated to within 3 m in space or 3 msec time interval.

  11. Evaluation, management and prevention of lower extremity youth ice hockey injuries

    PubMed Central

    Popkin, Charles A; Schulz, Brian M; Park, Caroline N; Bottiglieri, Thomas S; Lynch, T Sean

    2016-01-01

    Ice hockey is a fast-paced sport played by increasing numbers of children and adolescents in North America and around the world. Requiring a unique blend of skill, finesse, power and teamwork, ice hockey can become a lifelong recreational activity. Despite the rising popularity of the sport, there is ongoing concern about the high frequency of musculoskeletal injury associated with participation in ice hockey. Injury rates in ice hockey are among the highest in all competitive sports. Numerous research studies have been implemented to better understand the risks of injury. As a result, rule changes were adopted by the USA Hockey and Hockey Canada to raise the minimum age at which body checking is permitted to 13–14 years (Bantam level) from 11–12 years (Pee Wee). Continuing the education of coaches, parents and players on rules of safe play, and emphasizing the standards for proper equipment use are other strategies being implemented to make the game safer to play. The objective of this article was to review the evaluation, management and prevention of common lower extremity youth hockey injuries. PMID:27920584

  12. Automatic acquisition of motion trajectories: tracking hockey players

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuma, Kenji; Little, James J.; Lowe, David

    2003-12-01

    Computer systems that have the capability of analyzing complex and dynamic scenes play an essential role in video annotation. Scenes can be complex in such a way that there are many cluttered objects with different colors, shapes and sizes, and can be dynamic with multiple interacting moving objects and a constantly changing background. In reality, there are many scenes that are complex, dynamic, and challenging enough for computers to describe. These scenes include games of sports, air traffic, car traffic, street intersections, and cloud transformations. Our research is about the challenge of inventing a descriptive computer system that analyzes scenes of hockey games where multiple moving players interact with each other on a constantly moving background due to camera motions. Ultimately, such a computer system should be able to acquire reliable data by extracting the players" motion as their trajectories, querying them by analyzing the descriptive information of data, and predict the motions of some hockey players based on the result of the query. Among these three major aspects of the system, we primarily focus on visual information of the scenes, that is, how to automatically acquire motion trajectories of hockey players from video. More accurately, we automatically analyze the hockey scenes by estimating parameters (i.e., pan, tilt, and zoom) of the broadcast cameras, tracking hockey players in those scenes, and constructing a visual description of the data by displaying trajectories of those players. Many technical problems in vision such as fast and unpredictable players' motions and rapid camera motions make our challenge worth tackling. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been any automatic video annotation systems for hockey developed in the past. Although there are many obstacles to overcome, our efforts and accomplishments would hopefully establish the infrastructure of the automatic hockey annotation system and become a milestone for

  13. Hockey Fans in Training: A Pilot Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Petrella, Robert J; Gill, Dawn P; Zou, Guangyong; DE Cruz, Ashleigh; Riggin, Brendan; Bartol, Cassandra; Danylchuk, Karen; Hunt, Kate; Wyke, Sally; Gray, Cindy M; Bunn, Christopher; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2017-12-01

    Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT) is a gender-sensitized weight loss and healthy lifestyle program. We investigated 1) feasibility of recruiting and retaining overweight and obese men into a pilot pragmatic randomized controlled trial and 2) potential for Hockey FIT to lead to weight loss and improvements in other outcomes at 12 wk and 12 months. Male fans of two ice hockey teams (35-65 yr; body mass index ≥28 kg·m) located in Ontario (Canada) were randomized to intervention (Hockey FIT) or comparator (wait-list control). Hockey FIT includes a 12-wk active phase (weekly, coach-led group meetings including provision of dietary information, practice of behavior change techniques, and safe exercise sessions plus incremental pedometer walking) and a 40-wk minimally supported phase (smartphone app for sustaining physical activity, private online social network, standardized e-mails, booster session/reunion). Measurement at baseline and 12 wk (both groups) and 12 months (intervention group only) included clinical outcomes (e.g., weight) and self-reported physical activity, diet, and self-rated health. Eighty men were recruited in 4 wk; trial retention was >80% at 12 wk and >75% at 12 months. At 12 wk, the intervention group lost 3.6 kg (95% confidence interval, -5.26 to -1.90 kg) more than the comparator group (P < 0.001) and maintained this weight loss to 12 months. The intervention group also demonstrated greater improvements in other clinical measures, physical activity, diet, and self-rated health at 12 wk; most sustained to 12 months. Results suggest feasible recruitment/retention of overweight and obese men in the Hockey FIT program. Results provide evidence for the potential effectiveness of Hockey FIT for weight loss and improved health in at-risk men and, thus, evidence to proceed with a definitive trial.

  14. Hockey Fans in Training: A Pilot Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    PETRELLA, ROBERT J.; GILL, DAWN P.; ZOU, GUANGYONG; DE CRUZ, ASHLEIGH; RIGGIN, BRENDAN; BARTOL, CASSANDRA; DANYLCHUK, KAREN; HUNT, KATE; WYKE, SALLY; GRAY, CINDY M.; BUNN, CHRISTOPHER; ZWARENSTEIN, MERRICK

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT) is a gender-sensitized weight loss and healthy lifestyle program. We investigated 1) feasibility of recruiting and retaining overweight and obese men into a pilot pragmatic randomized controlled trial and 2) potential for Hockey FIT to lead to weight loss and improvements in other outcomes at 12 wk and 12 months. Methods Male fans of two ice hockey teams (35–65 yr; body mass index ≥28 kg·m−2) located in Ontario (Canada) were randomized to intervention (Hockey FIT) or comparator (wait-list control). Hockey FIT includes a 12-wk active phase (weekly, coach-led group meetings including provision of dietary information, practice of behavior change techniques, and safe exercise sessions plus incremental pedometer walking) and a 40-wk minimally supported phase (smartphone app for sustaining physical activity, private online social network, standardized e-mails, booster session/reunion). Measurement at baseline and 12 wk (both groups) and 12 months (intervention group only) included clinical outcomes (e.g., weight) and self-reported physical activity, diet, and self-rated health. Results Eighty men were recruited in 4 wk; trial retention was >80% at 12 wk and >75% at 12 months. At 12 wk, the intervention group lost 3.6 kg (95% confidence interval, −5.26 to −1.90 kg) more than the comparator group (P < 0.001) and maintained this weight loss to 12 months. The intervention group also demonstrated greater improvements in other clinical measures, physical activity, diet, and self-rated health at 12 wk; most sustained to 12 months. Conclusions Results suggest feasible recruitment/retention of overweight and obese men in the Hockey FIT program. Results provide evidence for the potential effectiveness of Hockey FIT for weight loss and improved health in at-risk men and, thus, evidence to proceed with a definitive trial. PMID:28719494

  15. A Cool Sport Full of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haché, Alain

    2008-10-01

    Of all sports, ice hockey is possibly the one with the widest array of physics elements in it. The game provides many examples that can bring physics to life in the classroom. Ice hockey (or just "hockey" as many Canadians would say) sees athletes sliding on ice at high speeds and in various ways, shooting and slapping pucks, and colliding against each other. The interaction between the skate blade and the ice is a problem of great physical complexity. The question "Why is ice so slippery?" has puzzled generations of scientists and, surprisingly, clear answers have come relatively recently. There is even some optics involved in hockey: how many sports are watched behind tempered glass (or Plexiglas) windows? The optical and mechanical properties of these materials are worth a physics classroom discussion. In this paper, I will review a few topics discussed at length in my book The Physics of Hockey.1,2 Interested readers may also find additional articles on our website.3

  16. Reducing injury risk from body checking in boys' youth ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Alison; Loud, Keith J; Brenner, Joel S; Demorest, Rebecca A; Halstead, Mark E; Kelly, Amanda K Weiss; Koutures, Chris G; LaBella, Cynthia R; LaBotz, Michele; Martin, Stephanie S; Moffatt, Kody

    2014-06-01

    Ice hockey is an increasingly popular sport that allows intentional collision in the form of body checking for males but not for females. There is a two- to threefold increased risk of all injury, severe injury, and concussion related to body checking at all levels of boys' youth ice hockey. The American Academy of Pediatrics reinforces the importance of stringent enforcement of rules to protect player safety as well as educational interventions to decrease unsafe tactics. To promote ice hockey as a lifelong recreational pursuit for boys, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the expansion of nonchecking programs and the restriction of body checking to elite levels of boys' youth ice hockey, starting no earlier than 15 years of age.

  17. The Hip in Ice Hockey: A Current Concepts Review.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Andrew W; Noonan, Benjamin C; Kelly, Bryan T; Larson, Christopher M; Bedi, Asheesh

    2016-09-01

    Ice hockey is a fast, physical sport with unique associated biomechanical demands often placing the hip in forced and repetitive supraphysiological ranges of motion. Ice hockey players commonly endure and are sidelined by nebulous groin injury or hip pain. Underlying causes can be chronic or acute and extra-articular, intra-articular, or "hip-mimicking." This article serves to review common hip-related injuries in ice hockey. For each, we define the particular condition; comment on risk factors and preventive strategies; discuss key historical, physical examination, and imaging findings; and finally, suggest nonoperative and/or operative treatment plans. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hypothenar hammer syndrome from ice hockey stick-handling.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Mohamed A; McDonald, Joey; Tittley, Jacques G

    2013-11-01

    Ulnar artery thrombosis and hypothenar hammer syndrome are rare vascular complications that could potentially occur with repeated blows or trauma to the hand. Although initially reported as an occupational hazard among laborers and craftsmen, it has been observed more recently among recreationalists and athletes. Until now, it has never been reported as a complication in ice hockey players. In this case report, a 26-year-old Canadian professional ice hockey player presented with acute dominant right hand paleness, coolness, and pain with hand use. The patient used a wooden hockey stick with a large knob of tape at the end of the handle, which he regularly gripped in the palm of his right hand to help with face-offs and general stick-handling. Sonographic evaluation demonstrated no arterial flow in the distal right ulnar artery distribution, and ulnar artery occlusion with no aneurysmal degeneration was confirmed by magnetic resonance angiogram. Intraarterial thrombolytic therapy was initiated, and subsequent serial angiograms demonstrated significant improvement in distal ulnar artery flow as well as recanalization of right hand deep palmar arch and digital arteries. The patient's symptoms resolved, and he was maintained on therapeutic anticoagulation for 3 months prior to returning to playing ice hockey professionally, but with a padded glove and no tape knob at the handle tip. This case highlights a unique presentation of hockey stick-handling causing ulnar artery thrombosis that was likely from repeated palmar hypothenar trauma. Appropriate diagnostic imaging, early intraarterial thrombolysis, and postoperative surveillance and follow-up were crucial for the successful outcome in this patient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Predictors of injury in ice hockey players. A multivariate, multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Smith, A M; Stuart, M J; Wiese-Bjornstal, D M; Gunnon, C

    1997-01-01

    Eighty-six male high school ice hockey players participated in this prospective study to determine both the incidence of injury in high school ice hockey and the influence of physical, situational, and psychosocial factors. Physical factors included height, weight, vision, previous injuries, musculoskeletal abnormalities, and injuries present at the time of screening evaluations. Situational factors examined were level of participation, playing time, player position, and games versus practices. Psychosocial factors such as confidence, stress, social support, positive states of mind, and mood states were also examined to determine their influences on injury. Twenty-seven injuries occurred during the 1994 to 1995 season. As hypothesized, the overall incidence of injury in high school hockey games (34.4 per 1000 player-game hours) was less than the incidence of injury in Junior A hockey (96.1 per 1000 player-game hours) and was more than previously reported for Bantam youth hockey (10.9 per 1000 player-game hours). Injuries occurred more often in games than in practices, usually as a result of collisions. Physical factors such as player position and previous injuries did not significantly predict injuries, but players in the high playing time group were more likely to be injured. Psychosocial factors of low vigor and high fatigue as measured by the Incredibly Short Profile of Mood States (ISPOMS) significantly predicted high school ice hockey injuries.

  20. Hockey Games and the Incidence of ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Gebhard, Caroline E; Gebhard, Catherine; Maafi, Foued; Bertrand, Marie-Jeanne; Stähli, Barbara E; Wildi, Karin; Galvan, Zurine; Toma, Aurel; Zhang, Zheng W; Smith, David; Ly, Hung Q

    2018-06-01

    The association between diagnosed acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and hockey games in the Canadian population is unknown. We retrospectively analyzed the association between hockey games of the National Hockey League Montreal Canadiens and daily hospital admissions for acute STEMI at the Montreal Heart Institute, Canada. Between June 2010 and December 2014, a total of 2199 patients (25.9% women; mean age, 62.6 ± 12.4 years) were admitted for acute STEMI. An increase in STEMI admissions was observed the day after a hockey game of the Montreal Canadiens in the overall population (from 1.3 ± 1.2 to 1.5 ± 1.3), however, this difference was not significant (P = 0.1). The number of STEMI admissions increased significantly from 0.9 ± 1.0 to 1.2 ± 1.0 per day in men (P = 0.04), but not in women (P = 0.7). The association between ice hockey matches and STEMI admission rates was strongest after a victory of the Montreal Canadiens. Accordingly, an increased risk for the occurrence of STEMI was observed in the overall population (hazard ratio [HR], 1.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-1.3; P = 0.037) when the Montreal Canadiens won a match. This association was present in men (HR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.03-1.4; P = 0.02) but not in women (P = 0.87), with a most pronounced effect seen in younger men (younger than 55 years; HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1-1.8; P = 0.009). Although a weak association between hockey games and hospital admissions for STEMI was found in our overall population, the event of a hockey game significantly increased the risk for STEMI in younger men. Preventive measures targeting behavioural changes could positively affect this risk. Copyright © 2018 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Gender in ice hockey: women in a male territory.

    PubMed

    Gilenstam, K; Karp, S; Henriksson-Larsén, K

    2008-04-01

    This study investigates how female ice hockey players describe and explain their situation within as well as outside their sport. Information was obtained by semi-structured interviews with female ice hockey players. The results were analyzed in a gender perspective where the main starting point was the concepts of different levels of power relations in society developed by Harding and applied to sports by Kolnes (the symbolic, structural, and individual level). The study shows that the players appeared to share the traditional views of men and women. They also described gender differences in terms of financial and structural conditions as well as differences in ice hockey history. Even though the players described structural inequalities, they were quite content with their situation and the differences in conditions were not considered when they explained the gender differences in ice hockey performance. At the individual level, the players considered themselves different from other women and appeared to share the traditional views of femininity and masculinity. It has been suggested that performance of a sport traditionally associated with the other sex might alter the traditional view of men and women; however, our results lend little support to this suggestion.

  2. On-Ice Return-to-Hockey Progression After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Capin, Jacob J; Behrns, William; Thatcher, Karen; Arundale, Amelia; Smith, Angela Hutchinson; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2017-05-01

    Synopsis The literature pertaining to the rehabilitation of ice hockey players seeking to return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is currently limited. The purpose of this clinical commentary was to present a criterion-based progression for return to ice hockey for athletes after ACLR. First, we review pertinent literature and provide previously published guidelines on general rehabilitation after ACLR. Then, we present a 4-phase, on-ice skating progression with objective criteria to initiate each phase. During the early on-ice phase, the athlete is reintroduced to specific demands, including graded exposure to forward, backward, and crossover skating. In the intermediate on-ice phase, the emphasis shifts to developing power and introducing anticipated changes of direction within a controlled environment. During the late on-ice phase, the focus progresses to developing anaerobic endurance and introducing unanticipated changes of direction, but still without other players or contact. Finally, once objective return-to-sport criteria are met, noncontact team drills, outnumbered and even-numbered drills, practices, scrimmages, and games are progressively reintroduced during the return-to-sport phase. Recommendations for off-ice strength and conditioning exercises complement the on-ice progression. Additionally, we apply the return-to-hockey progression framework to a case report of a female collegiate defensive ice hockey player who returned to sport successfully after ACLR. This criterion-based return-to-hockey progression may guide rehabilitation specialists managing athletes returning to ice hockey after ACLR. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(5):324-333. Epub 29 Mar 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7245.

  3. Home disadvantage in professional ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Loignon, Andrew; Gayton, William F; Brown, Melissa; Steinroeder, William; Johnson, Carrie

    2007-06-01

    Occurrence of the home field disadvantage in professional ice hockey was examined by analyzing data on penalty shots from 1983-2004. This datum was used as it does not involve physical contact for only the player taking the penalty shot is involved in the outcome. As a result, inhibition of anxiety associated with physical contact should not occur, and diffusion of responsibility would not occur since only the shooter is involved. Analysis indicated the player who took the penalty shot did not make significantly fewer shots at home than in away games. The result did not support hypotheses about roles of physical contact and diffusion of responsibility in accounting for past failures to find the home disadvantage in professional ice hockey.

  4. Seasonal Mood Disturbances in Collegiate Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Lionel W.; Shafer, Christine L.; Smokler, Carol; Carrier, David; McKeag, Douglas B.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this paper is to: 1) describe the seasonal affective disorder syndrome using a case illustration, 2) provide a simple and reliable method for identifying seasonal affective disorder, and 3) provide data as to the prevalence of the syndrome in a subset of collegiate hockey players. Design and Setting: Collegiate hockey players were selected, because their practices begin in the fall and play is completed in the spring. The teams selected for participation were from the far Northwest and the upper Midwest regions. Subjects: Sixty-eight Division I hockey players volunteered for the study. The three teams from which the subjects were chosen were located above latitude 42°/45' north. Subjects were from the northern latitudes. Measurements: The Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire was used to screen for seasonality. A sample of the athletes was also examined using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression together with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed) criteria for Seasonal Pattern Specifier. Results: Thirty-three (51%) were asymptomatic, 7 (11%) met the criteria for seasonal affective disorder, and 25 (39%) hockey players scored in the range that could classify them as candidates for subsyndromal seasonal affective disorder. Conclusions: The prevalence of seasonal affective disorder among our sample approximated the national norm for the northern latitudes. However, the prevalence of subsyndromal seasonal affective disorder in our population was 25% compared to 13% reported nationally. Light therapy has been shown to reverse the effects of the disorders; however, further research needs to be conducted to determine its acceptance and effectiveness by the athletic population. PMID:16558403

  5. Player and Game Characteristics and Head Impacts in Female Youth Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Reed, Nick; Taha, Tim; Greenwald, Richard; Keightley, Michelle

    2017-08-01

      Despite the growing popularity of ice hockey among female youth and interest in the biomechanics of head impacts in sport, the head impacts sustained by this population have yet to be characterized.   To describe the number of, biomechanical characteristics of, and exposure to head impacts of female youth ice hockey players during competition and to investigate the influences of player and game characteristics on head impacts.   Cohort study.   Twenty-seven female youth ice hockey players (mean age = 12.5 ± 0.52 years) wore instrumented ice hockey helmets during 66 ice hockey games over a 3-year period. Data specific to player, game, and biomechanical head impact characteristics were recorded. A multiple regression analysis identified factors most associated with head impacts of greater frequency and severity.   A total of 436 total head impacts were sustained during 6924 minutes of active ice hockey participation (0.9 ± 0.6 impacts per player per game; range, 0-2.1). A higher body mass index (BMI) significantly predicted a higher number of head impacts sustained per game (P = .008). Linear acceleration of head impacts was greater in older players and those who played the forward position, had a greater BMI, and spent more time on the ice (P = .008), whereas greater rotational acceleration was present in older players who had a greater BMI and played the forward position (P = .008). During tournament games, increased ice time predicted increased severity of head impacts (P = .03).   This study reveals for the first time that head impacts are occurring in female youth ice hockey players, albeit at a lower rate and severity than in male youth ice hockey players, despite the lack of intentional body checking.

  6. Re-examining the home disadvantage in professional ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Gayton, William F; Perry, Scott M; Loignon, Andrew C; Ricker, Angela

    2011-04-01

    Occurrence of the home disadvantage in professional ice hockey was examined by analyzing shootout data from 2005 through 2008. Results indicated that teams involved in shootouts playing at their home arenas did not lose significantly more games at home than on the road. Results did not support the hypotheses that emphasize the roles of physical contact and diffusion of responsibility in accounting for past failures to find the home disadvantage in professional ice hockey.

  7. Help Kids Stay Safe on the Playground | DoDLive

    Science.gov Websites

    . One day, as I zoomed past another kid on this imaginary rink, I lost my balance, hit the ice face -first and shot like a hockey puck across its slippery surface before slamming into a chain link fence one else knows I have a fake front tooth, but I am reminded every day of that playground injury many

  8. Reliability of Triaxial Accelerometry for Measuring Load in Men's Collegiate Ice Hockey.

    PubMed

    Van Iterson, Erik H; Fitzgerald, John S; Dietz, Calvin C; Snyder, Eric M; Peterson, Ben J

    2017-05-01

    Van Iterson, EH, Fitzgerald, JS, Dietz, CC, Snyder, EM, and Peterson, BJ. Reliability of triaxial accelerometry for measuring load in men's collegiate ice hockey. J Strength Cond Res 31(5): 1305-1312, 2017-Wearable microsensor technology incorporating triaxial accelerometry is used to quantify an index of mechanical stress associated with sport-specific movements termed PlayerLoad. The test-retest reliability of PlayerLoad in the environmental setting of ice hockey is unknown. The primary aim of this study was to quantify the test-retest reliability of PlayerLoad in ice hockey players during performance of tasks simulating game conditions. Division I collegiate male ice hockey players (N = 8) wore Catapult Optimeye S5 monitors during repeat performance of 9 ice hockey tasks simulating game conditions. Ordered ice hockey tasks during repeated bouts included acceleration (forward or backward), 60% top-speed, top-speed (forward or backward), repeated shift circuit, ice coasting, slap shot, and bench sitting. Coefficient of variation (CV), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and minimum difference (MD) were used to assess PlayerLoad reliability. Test-retest CVs and ICCs of PlayerLoad were as follows: 8.6% and 0.54 for forward acceleration, 13.8% and 0.78 for backward acceleration, 2.2% and 0.96 for 60% top-speed, 7.5% and 0.79 for forward top-speed, 2.8% and 0.96 for backward top-speed, 26.6% and 0.95 for repeated shift test, 3.9% and 0.68 for slap shot, 3.7% and 0.98 for coasting, and 4.1% and 0.98 for bench sitting, respectively. Raw differences between bouts were not significant for ice hockey tasks (p > 0.05). For each task, between-bout raw differences were lower vs. MD: 0.06 vs. 0.35 (forward acceleration), 0.07 vs. 0.36 (backward acceleration), 0.00 vs. 0.06 (60% top-speed), 0.03 vs. 0.20 (forward top-speed), 0.02 vs. 0.09 (backward top-speed), 0.18 vs. 0.64 (repeated shift test), 0.02 vs. 0.10 (slap shot), 0.00 vs. 0.10 (coasting), and 0.01 vs. 0

  9. Morphological, Physiological and Skating Performance Profiles of Male Age-Group Elite Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Allisse, Maxime; Sercia, Pierre; Comtois, Alain-Steve; Leone, Mario

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the evolution of morphological, physiological and skating performance profiles of elite age-group ice hockey players based on repeated measures spread over one season. In addition, the results of fitness tests and training programs performed in off-ice conditions and their relationship with skating performance were analyzed. Eighteen high level age-group ice hockey players (13.1 ± 0.6 years) were assessed off and on-ice at the beginning and at the end of the hockey season. A third evaluation was also conducted at the beginning of the following hockey season. The players were taller, heavier, and showed bone breadths and muscle girths above the reference population of the same age. Muscular variables improved significantly during and between the two hockey seasons (p < 0.05). However, maximal aerobic power improved only during the off-season. All skating performance tests exhibited significant enhancements during the hockey season, but not during the off-season where some degradation was observed. Finally, weak observed variances (generally <20% of the explained variance) between physiological variables measured off-ice and on-ice skating performance tests indicated important gaps, both in the choice of the off-ice assessment tools as well as in training methods conventionally used. The reflection on the best way to assess and train hockey players certainly deserves to be continued.

  10. Morphological, Physiological and Skating Performance Profiles of Male Age-Group Elite Ice Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Allisse, Maxime; Sercia, Pierre; Comtois, Alain-Steve; Leone, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to describe the evolution of morphological, physiological and skating performance profiles of elite age-group ice hockey players based on repeated measures spread over one season. In addition, the results of fitness tests and training programs performed in off-ice conditions and their relationship with skating performance were analyzed. Eighteen high level age-group ice hockey players (13.1 ± 0.6 years) were assessed off and on-ice at the beginning and at the end of the hockey season. A third evaluation was also conducted at the beginning of the following hockey season. The players were taller, heavier, and showed bone breadths and muscle girths above the reference population of the same age. Muscular variables improved significantly during and between the two hockey seasons (p < 0.05). However, maximal aerobic power improved only during the off-season. All skating performance tests exhibited significant enhancements during the hockey season, but not during the off-season where some degradation was observed. Finally, weak observed variances (generally <20% of the explained variance) between physiological variables measured off-ice and on-ice skating performance tests indicated important gaps, both in the choice of the off-ice assessment tools as well as in training methods conventionally used. The reflection on the best way to assess and train hockey players certainly deserves to be continued. PMID:28828080

  11. Heat transfer with hockey-stick steam generator. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, E; Gabler, M J

    1977-11-01

    The hockey-stick modular design concept is a good answer to future needs for reliable, economic LMFBR steam generators. The concept was successfully demonstrated in the 30 Mwt MSG test unit; scaled up versions are currently in fabrication for CRBRP usage, and further scaling has been accomplished for PLBR applications. Design and performance characteristics are presented for the three generations of hockey-stick steam generators. The key features of the design are presented based on extensive analytical effort backed up by extensive ancillary test data. The bases for and actual performance evaluations are presented with emphasis on the CRBRP design. The designmore » effort on these units has resulted in the development of analytical techniques that are directly applicable to steam generators for any LMFBR application. In conclusion, the hockey-stick steam generator concept has been proven to perform both thermally and hydraulically as predicted. The heat transfer characteristics are well defined, and proven analytical techniques are available as are personnel experienced in their use.« less

  12. PHYSICAL THERAPY MANAGEMENT OF ICE HOCKEY ATHLETES: FROM THE RINK TO THE CLINIC AND BACK.

    PubMed

    Wolfinger, Christopher R; Davenport, Todd E

    2016-06-01

    The increasing number of athletes playing hockey compels rehabilitation professionals working in orthopedic and sports settings to understand the unique functional demands of ice hockey and the patterns of injuries they may promote. The purpose of this clinical perspective is to: (1) discuss the functional implications of different positions and age levels on injury prevalence within the sport; (2) summarize the seven most common injuries sustained by ice hockey athletes; and (3) present a conceptual model for the clinical management and prevention of these injuries by rehabilitation professionals. A narrative review and synthesis was conducted of currently available literature on prevalence, etiology, rehabilitative intervention, prognosis, and prevention of ice hockey injuries. Research evidence is available to support the prevalence of injuries sustained while participating in ice hockey, as well as the most effective clinical treatment protocols to treat them. Most of the existing protocols are based on clinical and sports experience with incorporation of scientific data. This clinical commentary reviews the current concepts of ice hockey injury care and prevention, based on scientific information regarding the incidence, mechanism, rehabilitation protocols, prognosis, and prevention of injuries. Science-based, patient-centered reasoning is integral to provide the highest quality of rehabilitative and preventative care for ice hockey athletes by physical therapists. 5.

  13. Spinal mobility and trunk muscle strength in elite hockey players.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, S; Twomey, L

    1988-01-01

    Elite hockey players of both sexes from the Australian Institute of Sport were assessed for lumbar spine mobility, trunk flexion and back extensor muscle strength, hamstring flexibility and postural characteristics over a two year period. All the athletes were more mobile in rotation than the 'normal' West Australian population, and demonstrated flexible hamstrings and powerful back extensor muscles; trunk flexion was less strong initially, but improved after intervention in the form of a specific exercise programme, over the measurement period. A questionnaire disclosed that low back pain is a common complaint of hockey players, but rarely required intensive physical and medical treatment. The term 'hockey player's back' has been coined in recognition of the long flat thoracolumbar spine frequently noted in these subjects. Copyright © 1988 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by . All rights reserved.

  14. Dupuytren disease is highly prevalent in male field hockey players aged over 60 years.

    PubMed

    Broekstra, Dieuwke C; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Lanting, Rosanne; Harder, Tom; Smits, Inge; Werker, Paul M N

    2016-09-22

    Dupuytren disease is a fibroproliferative hand condition. The role of exposure to vibration as a risk factor has been studied with contradictory results. Since field hockey is expected to be a strong source of hand-arm vibration, we hypothesised that long-term exposure to field hockey is associated with Dupuytren disease. In this cross-sectional cohort study, the hands of 169 male field hockey players (IQR: 65-71 years) and 156 male controls (IQR: 59-71 years) were examined for signs of Dupuytren disease. Details about their age, lifestyle factors, medical history, employment history and leisure activities were gathered. Prior to the analyses, the groups were balanced in risk factors using propensity score matching. The association between field hockey and Dupuytren disease was determined using a subject-specific generalised linear mixed model with a binomial distribution and logit link function (matched pairs analysis). Dupuytren disease was observed in 51.7% of the field hockey players, and in 13.8% of the controls. After propensity score matching, field hockey playing as dichotomous variable, was associated with Dupuytren disease (OR=9.42, 95% CI 3.01 to 29.53). A linear dose-response effect of field hockey (hours/week x years) within the field hockey players could not be demonstrated (OR=1.03, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.56). We found that field hockey playing has a strong association with the presence of Dupuytren disease. Clinicians in sports medicine should be alert to this less common diagnosis in this sport. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. PHYSICAL THERAPY MANAGEMENT OF ICE HOCKEY ATHLETES: FROM THE RINK TO THE CLINIC AND BACK

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Todd E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The increasing number of athletes playing hockey compels rehabilitation professionals working in orthopedic and sports settings to understand the unique functional demands of ice hockey and the patterns of injuries they may promote. Purpose The purpose of this clinical perspective is to: (1) discuss the functional implications of different positions and age levels on injury prevalence within the sport; (2) summarize the seven most common injuries sustained by ice hockey athletes; and (3) present a conceptual model for the clinical management and prevention of these injuries by rehabilitation professionals. Methods A narrative review and synthesis was conducted of currently available literature on prevalence, etiology, rehabilitative intervention, prognosis, and prevention of ice hockey injuries. Results Research evidence is available to support the prevalence of injuries sustained while participating in ice hockey, as well as the most effective clinical treatment protocols to treat them. Most of the existing protocols are based on clinical and sports experience with incorporation of scientific data. Conclusion This clinical commentary reviews the current concepts of ice hockey injury care and prevention, based on scientific information regarding the incidence, mechanism, rehabilitation protocols, prognosis, and prevention of injuries. Science-based, patient-centered reasoning is integral to provide the highest quality of rehabilitative and preventative care for ice hockey athletes by physical therapists. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:27274432

  16. The usefulness and reliability of fitness testing protocols for ice hockey players: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, Steven C; Miller, Stuart; Turner, Anthony

    2013-06-01

    Ice hockey, like most sports, uses fitness testing to assess athletes. This study reviews the current commonly used fitness testing protocols for ice hockey players, discussing their predictive values and reliability. It also discusses a range of less commonly used measures and limitations in current testing protocols. The article concludes with a proposed testing program suitable for ice hockey players.

  17. Clinical Commentary: On-Ice Return-to-Hockey Progression After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Capin, Jacob J.; Behrns, William; Thatcher, Karen; Arundale, Amelia; Smith, Angela Hutchinson; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Limited literature exists pertaining to rehabilitation of ice hockey players seeking to return-to-sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). The purpose of this clinical commentary is to present a criterion-based, return-to-ice hockey progression for athletes after ACLR. First, we review pertinent literature and provide previously published guidelines on general rehabilitation after ACLR. Then, we present a four-phase, on-ice skating progression with objective criteria to initiate each phase. During the early on-ice phase, the athlete is reintroduced to specific demands, including graded exposure to forward, backward, and crossover skating. In the intermediate on-ice phase, the emphasis shifts to developing power and introducing anticipated changes of direction within a controlled environment. During the late on-ice phase, the focus progresses to developing anaerobic endurance and introducing unanticipated changes of direction, but still without other players or contact. Finally, once objective return-to-sport criteria are met, non-contact team drills, outnumbered and even-numbered drills, practices, scrimmages, and games are progressively reintroduced during the return-to-sport phase. Recommendations for off-ice strength and conditioning exercises complement the on-ice progression. Additionally, we apply the return-to-hockey progression framework to a case report of a female collegiate defensive ice hockey player who returned to sport successfully after ACLR. This criterion-based return-to-hockey progression may guide rehabilitation specialists managing athletes returning to ice hockey after ACLR. PMID:28355976

  18. Are There Differences in Ice Hockey Injuries Between Sexes?: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    MacCormick, Lauren; Best, Thomas M; Flanigan, David C

    2014-01-01

    Men's ice hockey allows for body checking, and women's ice hockey prohibits it. Studies have reported injury data on both sexes, but no systematic reviews have compared the injury patterns between male and female ice hockey players. Men's and women's ice hockey would have different types of injuries, and this difference would extend across the different age groups and levels of play. Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Three databases, 3 scientific journals, and selected bibliographies were searched to identify articles relevant to this study. Articles were further screened by the use of predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Twenty-two studies met these criteria and were subsequently reviewed. Men sustained higher rates of injuries than women at all age levels, and both sexes sustained at least twice as many injuries in games than practices. Both sexes sustained most of their injuries from player contact. Men and women in college sustained most injuries to the head and face, and women suffered from higher percentages of concussion. At all ages and levels of play, men had higher rates of upper extremity injuries (shoulder), while women were found to sustain more injuries to the lower extremity (thigh, knee). Although findings showed men sustaining higher rates of injuries than women, the predominant mechanism of player contact was the same. The most common locations and types of injuries in female ice hockey players are comparable to other sports played by women, and similar interventions could offer protection against injury. Further studies that report injury data for women playing ice hockey at all levels will assist in understanding what prevention strategies should be implemented.

  19. Effect of the look-up line on the gaze and head orientation of elite ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Joan N; Causer, Joe; Stuart, Michael; Little, Elaine; Dukelow, Sean; Lavangie, Marc; Nigg, Sandro; Arsenault, Gina; Morton, Barry; Scott, Matt; Emery, Carolyn

    2017-02-01

    A "look-up line" (LUL) has been proposed for ice hockey, which is an orange 1 m (40') warning line (WL) painted on the ice at the base of the boards. The LUL purports to provide an early warning to players to keep their head up prior to and as they are being checked. We determined if players looked up more on a rink with the LUL compared to a traditional Control rink. Elite offensive (O) and defensive (D) players competed 1 vs. 1, while wearing an eye tracker that recorded their quiet eye (QE) and fixation and tracking (F-T) and an electrogoniometer that measured head angle. External cameras recorded skate duration during four skate phases: P1 preparation, P2 decision-making, P3 cut to boards, P4 contact. The QE was the final fixation prior to contact between O and D as they skated towards and across the WL during P3 and P4. Skate phase durations (%) did not differ by rink or rink by position. More QE and F-T occurred on the WL on the LUL rink than on the Control. The expected increase in head angle on the LUL rink did not occur during P3 or P4. Post-hoc results also showed O and D skated further from the boards on the LUL rink, suggesting the players preferred to control the puck on white ice, rather than the orange colour of the LUL rink. More research is needed to determine if these results apply to the competitive setting.

  20. Hockey-stick steam generator for LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Hallinan, G.J.; Svedlund, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents the criteria and evaluation leading to the selection of the Hockey Stick Steam Generator Concept and subsequent development of that concept for LMFBR application. The selection process and development of the Modular Steam Generator (MSG) is discussed, including the extensive test programs that culminated in the manufacture and test of a 35 MW(t) Steam Generator. The design of the CRBRP Steam Generator is described, emphasizing the current status and a review of the critical structural areas. CRBRP steam generator development tests are evaluated, with a discussion of test objectives and rating of the usefulness of test resultsmore » to the CRBRP prototype design. Manufacturing experience and status of the CRBRP prototype and plant units is covered. The scaleup of the Hockey Stick concept to large commercial plant application is presented, with an evaluation of scaleup limitations, transient effects, and system design implications.« less

  1. Hubble's Hockey Stick Galaxy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    The star of this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image is a galaxy known as NGC 4656, located in the constellation of Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs). However, it also has a somewhat more interesting and intriguing name: the Hockey Stick Galaxy! The reason for this is a little unclear from this partial view, which shows the bright central region, but the galaxy is actually shaped like an elongated, warped stick, stretching out through space until it curls around at one end to form a striking imitation of a celestial hockey stick. This unusual shape is thought to be due to an interaction between NGC 4656 and a couple of near neighbors, NGC 4631 (otherwise known as The Whale Galaxy) and NGC 4627 (a small elliptical). Galactic interactions can completely reshape a celestial object, shifting and warping its constituent gas, stars, and dust into bizarre and beautiful configurations. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  2. Evaluation of anthropometric, physiological, and skill-related tests for talent identification in female field hockey.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Justin W L; Weber, Clare L; Dalton, Carl T

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop an effective testing battery for female field hockey by using anthropometric, physiological, and skill-related tests to distinguish between regional representative (Rep, n = 35) and local club level (Club, n = 39) female field hockey players. Rep players were significantly leaner and recorded faster times for the 10-m and 40-m sprints as well as the Illinois Agility Run (with and without dribbling a hockey ball). Rep players also had greater aerobic and lower body muscular power and were more accurate in the shooting accuracy test, p < 0.05. No significant differences between groups were evident for height, body mass, speed decrement in 6 x 40-m repeated sprints, handgrip strength, or pushing speed. These results indicate that %BF, sprinting speed, agility, dribbling control, aerobic and muscular power, and shooting accuracy can distinguish between female field hockey players of varying standards. Therefore talent identification programs for female field hockey should include assessments of these physical parameters.

  3. Conservative management of an elite ice hockey goaltender with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI): a case report.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, Kyle; Gomes, Brendan; MacKenzie, Steven; D'Angelo, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    To detail the presentation of an elite male ice hockey goaltender with cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and acetabular labral tears. This case will outline the prevalence, clinical presentation, imaging criteria, pathomechanics, and management of FAI, with specific emphasis on the ice hockey goaltender. A 22-year old retired ice hockey goaltender presented to a chiropractor after being diagnosed by an orthopaedic surgeon with MRI confirmed left longitudinal and chondral flap acetabular labral tears and cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). As the patient was not a candidate for surgical intervention, a multimodal conservative treatment approach including manual therapy, electroacupuncture and rehabilitation exercises were implemented. FAI is prevalent in ice hockey players, particularly with goaltenders. Both skating and position-dependent hip joint mechanics involved in ice hockey may exacerbate or contribute to acquired and congenital forms of symptomatic FAI. As such, practitioners managing this population must address sport-specific demands in manual therapy, rehabilitation and physical training, to improve functional outcomes and prevent future injury.

  4. The effect of a complex training program on skating abilities in ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changyoung; Lee, Sookyung; Yoo, Jaehyun

    2014-04-01

    [Purpose] Little data exist on systemic training programs to improve skating abilities in ice hockey players. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a complex training program on skating abilities in ice hockey players. [Methods] Ten male ice hockey players (training group) that engaged in 12 weeks of complex training and skating training and ten male players (control group) that only participated in 12 weeks of skating training completed on-ice skating tests including a 5 time 18 meters shuttle, t-test, Rink dash 5 times, and line drill before, during, and the training. [Results] Significant group-by-time interactions were found in all skating ability tests. [Conclusion] The complex training program intervention for 12 weeks improved their skating abilities of the ice hockey players.

  5. The Effect of a Complex Training Program on Skating Abilities in Ice Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Changyoung; Lee, Sookyung; Yoo, Jaehyun

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Little data exist on systemic training programs to improve skating abilities in ice hockey players. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a complex training program on skating abilities in ice hockey players. [Methods] Ten male ice hockey players (training group) that engaged in 12 weeks of complex training and skating training and ten male players (control group) that only participated in 12 weeks of skating training completed on-ice skating tests including a 5 time 18 meters shuttle, t-test, Rink dash 5 times, and line drill before, during, and the training. [Results] Significant group-by-time interactions were found in all skating ability tests. [Conclusion] The complex training program intervention for 12 weeks improved their skating abilities of the ice hockey players. PMID:24764628

  6. Mechanisms of injury for concussions in university football, ice hockey, and soccer.

    PubMed

    Delaney, J Scott; Al-Kashmiri, Ammar; Correa, José A

    2014-05-01

    To examine the mechanisms of injury for concussions in university football, ice hockey, and soccer. Prospective cohort design. McGill University Sport Medicine Clinic. Male and female athletes participating in varsity football, ice hockey, and soccer. Athletes were followed prospectively over a 10-year period to determine the mechanisms of injury for concussions and whether contact with certain areas of the body or individual variables predisposed to longer recovery from concussions. For soccer, data were collected on whether concussions occurred while attempting to head the ball. There were 226 concussions in 170 athletes over the study period. The side/temporal area of the head or helmet was the most common area to be struck resulting in concussion in all 3 sports. Contact from another player's head or helmet was the most probable mechanism in football and soccer. In hockey, concussion impacts were more likely to occur from contact with another body part or object rather than another head/helmet. Differences in mechanisms of injuries were found between males and females in soccer and ice hockey. Athletes with multiple concussions took longer to return to play with each subsequent concussion. Half of the concussions in soccer were related to attempting to head the soccer ball. The side of the head or helmet was the most common area to be struck resulting in concussion in all 3 sports. In ice hockey and soccer, there are differences in the mechanisms of injury for males and females within the same sport.

  7. Integration of the functional movement screen into the National Hockey League Combine.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Chip P; Kuropkat, Christiane; Gumieniak, Robert J; Gledhill, Norman; Jamnik, Veronica K

    2015-05-01

    The sport of ice hockey requires coordination of complex skills involving musculoskeletal and physiological abilities while simultaneously exposing players to a high risk for injury. The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) was developed to assess fundamental movement patterns that underlie both sport performance and injury risk. The top 111 elite junior hockey players from around the world took part in the 2013 National Hockey League Entry Draft Combine (NHL Combine). The FMS was integrated into the comprehensive medical and physiological fitness evaluations at the request of strength and conditioning coaches with affiliations to NHL teams. The inclusion of the FMS aimed to help develop strategies that could maximize its utility among elite hockey players and to encourage or inform further research in this field. This study evaluated the outcomes of integrating the FMS into the NHL Combine and identified any links to other medical plus physical and physiological fitness assessment outcomes. These potential associations may provide valuable information to identify elements of future training programs that are individualized to athletes' specific needs. The results of the FMS (total score and number of asymmetries identified) were significantly correlated to various body composition measures, aerobic and anaerobic fitness, leg power, timing of recent workouts, and the presence of lingering injury at the time of the NHL Combine. Although statistically significant correlations were observed, the implications of the FMS assessment outcomes remain difficult to quantify until ongoing assessment of FMS patterns, tracking of injuries, and hockey performance are available.

  8. Evaluation of the ThinkFirst Canada, Smart Hockey, brain and spinal cord injury prevention video

    PubMed Central

    Cook, D; Cusimano, M; Tator, C; Chipman, M; Macarthur, C

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The ThinkFirst Canada Smart Hockey program is an educational injury prevention video that teaches the mechanisms, consequences, and prevention of brain and spinal cord injury in ice hockey. This study evaluates knowledge transfer and behavioural outcomes in 11–12 year old hockey players who viewed the video. Design: Randomized controlled design. Setting: Greater Toronto Minor Hockey League, Toronto Ontario. Subjects: Minor, competitive 11–12 year old male ice hockey players and hockey team coaches. Interventions: The Smart Hockey video was shown to experimental teams at mid-season. An interview was conducted with coaches to understand reasons to accept or refuse the injury prevention video. Main outcome measures: A test of concussion knowledge was administered before, immediately after, and three months after exposure to the video. The incidence of aggressive penalties was measured before and after viewing the video. Results: The number of causes and mechanisms of concussion named by players increased from 1.13 to 2.47 and from 0.67 to 1.22 respectively. This effect was maintained at three months. There was no significant change in control teams. There was no significant change in total penalties after video exposure; however, specific body checking related penalties were significantly reduced in the experimental group. Conclusion: This study showed some improvements in knowledge and behaviours after a single viewing of a video; however, these findings require confirmation with a larger sample to understand the sociobehavioural aspects of sport that determine the effectiveness and acceptance of injury prevention interventions. PMID:14693901

  9. SnapShot: Visualization to Propel Ice Hockey Analytics.

    PubMed

    Pileggi, H; Stolper, C D; Boyle, J M; Stasko, J T

    2012-12-01

    Sports analysts live in a world of dynamic games flattened into tables of numbers, divorced from the rinks, pitches, and courts where they were generated. Currently, these professional analysts use R, Stata, SAS, and other statistical software packages for uncovering insights from game data. Quantitative sports consultants seek a competitive advantage both for their clients and for themselves as analytics becomes increasingly valued by teams, clubs, and squads. In order for the information visualization community to support the members of this blossoming industry, it must recognize where and how visualization can enhance the existing analytical workflow. In this paper, we identify three primary stages of today's sports analyst's routine where visualization can be beneficially integrated: 1) exploring a dataspace; 2) sharing hypotheses with internal colleagues; and 3) communicating findings to stakeholders.Working closely with professional ice hockey analysts, we designed and built SnapShot, a system to integrate visualization into the hockey intelligence gathering process. SnapShot employs a variety of information visualization techniques to display shot data, yet given the importance of a specific hockey statistic, shot length, we introduce a technique, the radial heat map. Through a user study, we received encouraging feedback from several professional analysts, both independent consultants and professional team personnel.

  10. Bone properties in child and adolescent male hockey and soccer players.

    PubMed

    Falk, Bareket; Braid, Sarah; Moore, Michael; Yao, Matthew; Sullivan, Phil; Klentrou, Nota

    2010-07-01

    Children and adolescents who train extensively in high-impact, weight-bearing activities have enhanced bone mineral density. The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone strength, as reflected by quantitative ultrasound (QUS, Sunlight Omniscence), of child (10-12 yrs old) and adolescent (14-16 yrs old) male soccer and hockey players in comparison with age-matched controls. The groups included 30 child (CH) and 31 adolescent (AH) hockey players, 26 child (CS) and 30 adolescent (AS) soccer players, as well as 34 child (CC) and 31 adolescent (AC) healthy, non-athletic, age-matched controls. All athletes trained at an elite level year-round, with no difference in training volume between groups. Ultrasound speed of sound (SOS) was measured at the distal-radius and mid-tibia. In both age groups, hockey players were the heaviest and had the highest fat-free mass. No differences were found among groups in total energy intake, calcium or vitamin D intake. Radial and tibial SOS increased with age. Hockey players had higher radial SOS in both age groups (children: CH:3763+/-74, CS:3736+/-77, CC:3721+/-88 m/s; adolescents: AH:3809+/-105, AS:3767+/-85, AC:3760+/-94 m/s). Tibial SOS was higher in soccer players compared with controls. In spite of the higher body mass and fat-free mass in hockey players, their tibial SOS was similar to the non-athletes in both age groups. These findings support previous suggestions of sport-specific effects on bone strength. However, they need to be corroborated with longitudinal or prospective intervention studies. Copyright 2009 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Is hockey just a game? Contesting meanings of the ice hockey life projects through a career-threatening injury.

    PubMed

    Ronkainen, Noora J; Ryba, Tatiana V

    2017-05-01

    This study is situated within an existential-narrative theoretical framework to examine the impact of career-threatening injury on professional ice hockey players' well-being and career construction. Professional ice hockey culture is construed as a privileged space characterised by hegemonic masculinity, fierce competition as well as high-risk behaviours often resulting in sports injuries. In this paper, we analyse two players' life stories with a particular focus on injury as a boundary situation involving social and temporal breakdown and re-evaluation of meaning of sporting life projects. Emergent narratives surrounding existential themes of loss of meaning and loneliness in the face of injury were analysed in connection with players' search for authenticity and realignment with self-concept. Each player developed resistant narratives to the dominant ethos of professional sport in order to restore well-being and sense of self. The relational aspects of injury are highlighted in practical recommendations.

  12. Conservative management of an elite ice hockey goaltender with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI): a case report

    PubMed Central

    MacIntyre, Kyle; Gomes, Brendan; MacKenzie, Steven; D’Angelo, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To detail the presentation of an elite male ice hockey goaltender with cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and acetabular labral tears. This case will outline the prevalence, clinical presentation, imaging criteria, pathomechanics, and management of FAI, with specific emphasis on the ice hockey goaltender. Clinical Features: A 22-year old retired ice hockey goaltender presented to a chiropractor after being diagnosed by an orthopaedic surgeon with MRI confirmed left longitudinal and chondral flap acetabular labral tears and cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). As the patient was not a candidate for surgical intervention, a multimodal conservative treatment approach including manual therapy, electroacupuncture and rehabilitation exercises were implemented. Summary: FAI is prevalent in ice hockey players, particularly with goaltenders. Both skating and position-dependent hip joint mechanics involved in ice hockey may exacerbate or contribute to acquired and congenital forms of symptomatic FAI. As such, practitioners managing this population must address sport-specific demands in manual therapy, rehabilitation and physical training, to improve functional outcomes and prevent future injury. PMID:26816416

  13. Cardiovascular Response to Recreational Hockey in Middle-Aged Men.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Zack A; Thomas, Scott G; Wald, Robert C; Goodman, Jack M

    2017-06-15

    The present study examined the hemodynamic response to recreational pick-up hockey relative to maximal exercise testing in middle-aged men. A total of 23 men with a mean age of 53 ± 7 years were studied. Graded exercise testing on a cycle ergometer determined maximal oxygen consumption, blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR). Ambulatory BP and Holter electrocardiographic monitoring was performed during one of their weekly hockey games (mean duration = 45 ± 7.2 minutes): for "On-Ice" responses (PLAY; data recorded while standing immediately after a shift; 8.0 ± 1.4 shifts per game) and during seated recovery (BENCH), 15 minutes after the game. On-Ice HRs and BPs were significantly higher than values obtained during maximal cycle exercise, respectively (HR 174 ± 8.9 vs 163 ± 11.0 beats/min) (systolic blood pressure 202 ± 20 vs 173 ± 31 mm Hg; p <0.05). Both systolic and diastolic blood pressures decreased significantly throughout the duration of the game, whereas HR increased from 139 ± 20 to 155 ± 16 beats/min during the game. The myocardial oxygen demand (myocardial time tension index) increased significantly during PLAY concurrent with a decrease in estimated myocardial oxygen supply (diastolic pressure time index), with the endocardial viability ratio during PLAY demonstrating a significant decrease during the third quarter of the game (1.25 ± 0.24) versus the first quarter (1.56 ± 0.30), which remained depressed 15 minutes post-game (p <0.05). In conclusion, recreational pick-up hockey in middle-aged men is an extremely vigorous interval exercise with increasing relative intensity as the game progresses. Hockey elicits peak BPs and HRs that can exceed values observed during maximal exercise testing and is characterized by progressive increases in myocardial oxygen demand and lowered supply during PLAY and BENCH time. Given the progressive and high cardiovascular demands, caution is warranted when estimating the cardiovascular demands of hockey

  14. A PILOT SURVEY ON INJURY AND SAFETY CONCERNS IN INTERNATIONAL SLEDGE HOCKEY

    PubMed Central

    Finlayson, Heather; O'Connor, Russ; Anton, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe sledge hockey injury patterns, safety issues and to develop potential injury prevention strategies. Design: Pilot survey study of international sledge hockey professionals, including trainers, physiotherapists, physicians, coaches and/or general managers. Setting: Personal encounter or online correspondence. Respondents: Sledge hockey professionals; a total of 10 respondents from the 5 top-ranked international teams recruited by personal encounter or online correspondence. Main Outcome Measurements: Descriptive Data reports on sledge athlete injury characteristics, quality of rules and enforcement, player equipment, challenges in the medical management during competition, and overall safety. Results: Muscle strains and concussions were identified as common, and injuries were reported to affect the upper body more frequently than the lower body. Overuse and body checking were predominant injury mechanisms. Safety concerns included excessive elbowing, inexperienced refereeing and inadequate equipment standards. Conclusions: This paper is the first publication primarily focused on sledge hockey injury and safety. This information provides unique opportunity for the consideration of implementation and evaluation of safety strategies. Safety interventions could include improved hand protection, cut-resistant materials in high-risk areas, increased vigilance to reduce intentional head-contact, lowered rink boards and modified bathroom floor surfacing. PMID:21904696

  15. Adolescent perspectives of the recreational ice hockey food environment and influences on eating behaviour revealed through photovoice.

    PubMed

    Caswell, M Susan; Hanning, Rhona M

    2018-05-01

    Unhealthy dietary behaviours are prevalent among adolescents. This might relate, in part, to obesogenic environments, including recreation food facilities. The REFRESH Study (Recreation Environment and Food Research: Experiences from Hockey) aimed to explore, from the perspectives of adolescent ice hockey players and parents, broad social and physical environmental influences on adolescent food behaviours associated with hockey participation. Players used photovoice to describe their food experiences in relation to ice hockey. The approach included photos, individual interviews and focus groups. Exemplar photographs were exhibited for stakeholders, including five parents who were interviewed. Interview and focus group transcripts were thematically analysed. Recreational ice hockey environment, Ontario, Canada, 2015-16. Ice hockey players (n 24) aged 11-15 years recruited from five leagues. Dominant influences among players included: their perceived importance of nutrients (e.g. protein) or foods (e.g. chocolate milk) for performance and recovery; marketing and branding (e.g. the pro-hockey aura of Tim Horton's®, Canada's largest quick-service restaurant); social aspects of tournaments and team meals; and moral values around 'right' and 'wrong' food choices. Both players and parents perceived recreational facility food options as unhealthy and identified that travel and time constraints contributed to less healthy choices. Results indicate recreation facilities are only one of a range of environments that influence eating behaviours of adolescent ice hockey players. Players' susceptibility to advertising/brand promotion and the value of healthy food choices for performance are findings that can inform policy and interventions to support healthy environments and behaviours.

  16. The past, present, and future of hockey-stick-shaped liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, E.-Joon

    2014-02-01

    Recently, the liquid crystalline materials with a bent-core mesogen have attracted attentions because their interesting properties such as polarity and biaxiality of the mesophase. There are several types of bent-core mesogenic structures have been reported, for instance, banana-shaped, V-shaped molecules, boomerang-shaped, hockey stick-shaped, and Yshaped molecules. In this study, the liquid crystals and the reactive mesogens with the hockey-stick shaped mesogens will be described concerning with the structure-property relationship.

  17. Physiological correlates of skating performance in women's and men's ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Gilenstam, Kajsa M; Thorsen, Kim; Henriksson-Larsén, Karin B

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of the current investigation was to identify relationships between physiological off-ice tests and on-ice performance in female and male ice hockey players on a comparable competitive level. Eleven women, 24 ± 3.0 years, and 10 male ice hockey players, 23 ± 2.4 years, were tested for background variables: height, body weight (BW), ice hockey history, and lean body mass (LBM) and peak torque (PT) of the thigh muscles, VO2peak and aerobic performance (Onset of Blood Lactate Accumulation [OBLA], respiratory exchange ratio [RER1]) during an incremental bicycle ergometer test. Four different on-ice tests were used to measure ice skating performance. For women, skating time was positively correlated (p < 0.05) to BW and negatively correlated to LBM%, PT/BW, OBLA, RER 1, and VO2peak (ml O2·kg(-1) BW(-1)·min(-1)) in the Speed test. Acceleration test was positively correlated to BW and negatively correlated to OBLA and RER 1. For men, correlation analysis revealed only 1 significant correlation where skating time was positively correlated to VO2peak (L O2·min(-1)) in the Acceleration test. The male group had significantly higher physiological test values in all variables (absolute and relative to BW) but not in relation to LBM. Selected off-ice tests predict skating performance for women but not for men. The group of women was significantly smaller and had a lower physiological performance than the group of men and were slower in the on-ice performance tests. However, gender differences in off-ice variables were reduced or disappeared when values were related to LBM, indicating a similar capacity of producing strength and aerobic power in female and male hockey players. Skating performance in female hockey players may be improved by increasing thigh muscle strength, oxygen uptake, and relative muscle mass.

  18. The Relationship of Various Psychosocial Variables on the Positioning of College Ice Hockey Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krotee, March L.; La Point, James D.

    This paper presents the results of research conducted to investigate the relationship of various psychosocial variables on the positioning of college ice hockey players. The California Personality Inventory (CPI) was administered to the NCAA Championship ice hockey team at the University of Minnesota, and a separate subjective psychosocial rating…

  19. Do physical maturity and birth date predict talent in male youth ice hockey players?

    PubMed

    Sherar, Lauren B; Baxter-Jones, Adam D G; Faulkner, Robert A; Russell, Keith W

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationships among biological maturity, physical size, relative age (i.e. birth date), and selection into a male Canadian provincial age-banded ice hockey team. In 2003, 619 male ice hockey players aged 14-15 years attended Saskatchewan provincial team selection camps, 281 of whom participated in the present study. Data from 93 age-matched controls were obtained from the Saskatchewan Pediatric Bone Mineral Accrual Study (1991-1997). During the initial selection camps, birth dates, heights, sitting heights, and body masses were recorded. Age at peak height velocity, an indicator of biological maturity, was determined in the controls and predicted in the ice hockey players. Data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance, logistic regression, and a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. The ice hockey players selected for the final team were taller, heavier, and more mature (P < 0.05) than both the unselected players and the age-matched controls. Furthermore, age at peak height velocity predicted (P < 0.05) being selected at the first and second selection camps. The birth dates of those players selected for the team were positively skewed, with the majority of those selected being born in the months January to June. In conclusion, team selectors appear to preferentially select early maturing male ice hockey players who have birth dates early in the selection year.

  20. Understanding the resistance to creating safer ice hockey: essential points for injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Todd, Ryan A; Soklaridis, Sophie; Treen, Alice K; Bhalerao, Shree U; Cusimano, Michael D

    2017-11-27

    Despite the known negative health outcomes of concussions in minor level boys' hockey, there has been significant resistance to creating a safer game with less body checking. To better understand cultural barriers that prevent making the sport safer for youth and adolescents, semistructured interviews, with 20 ice hockey stakeholders, were conducted and analysed using thematic analysis. Through this analysis, two primary concepts arose from respondents. The first concept is that body checking, despite the harm it can cause, should be done in a respectful sportsmanlike fashion. The second concept is the contradiction that the game of ice hockey is both dynamic and unchangeable. Using structural functionalist theory, we propose an argument that the unfortunate perpetuation of violence and body checking in youth ice hockey serves to maintain the social order of the game and its culture. Any strategies aimed at modifying and promoting healthy behaviour in the game should take these concepts into account. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. A systematic video analysis of National Hockey League (NHL) concussions, part II: how concussions occur in the NHL.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Michael G; Comper, Paul; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Echemendia, Ruben J

    2015-04-01

    Concussions in sports are a growing cause of concern, as these injuries can have debilitating short-term effects and little is known about the potential long-term consequences. This work aims to describe how concussions occur in the National Hockey League. Case series of medically diagnosed concussions for regular season games over a 3.5-year period during the 2006-2010 seasons. Digital video records were coded and analysed using a standardised protocol. 88% (n=174/197) of concussions involved player-to-opponent contact. 16 diagnosed concussions were a result of fighting. Of the 158 concussions that involved player-to-opponent body contact, the most common mechanisms were direct contact to the head initiated by the shoulder 42% of the time (n=66/158), by the elbow 15% (n=24/158) and by gloves in 5% of cases (n=8/158). When the results of anatomical location are combined with initial contact, almost half of these events (n=74/158) were classified as direct contact to the lateral aspect of the head. The predominant mechanism of concussion was consistently characterised by player-to-opponent contact, typically directed to the head by the shoulder, elbow or gloves. Also, several important characteristics were apparent: (1) contact was often to the lateral aspect of the head; (2) the player who suffered a concussion was often not in possession of the puck and (3) no penalty was called on the play. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Hockey: Special Olympics Sports Skills Instructional Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Special Olympics, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Suggestions for coaching and teaching hockey skills to mentally retarded persons are presented in this guide, one of seven booklets on Special Olympics Sports Skills Instructional Programs. An introductory section presents an overview of the sport, information on the organization of the training session, and a list of goals, objectives, and…

  3. The risk of injury associated with body checking among Pee Wee ice hockey players: an evaluation of Hockey Canada's national body checking policy change.

    PubMed

    Black, Amanda M; Hagel, Brent E; Palacios-Derflingher, Luz; Schneider, Kathryn J; Emery, Carolyn A

    2017-12-01

    In 2013, Hockey Canada introduced an evidence-informed policy change delaying the earliest age of introduction to body checking in ice hockey until Bantam (ages 13-14) nationwide. To determine if the risk of injury, including concussions, changes for Pee Wee (11-12 years) ice hockey players in the season following a national policy change disallowing body checking. In a historical cohort study, Pee Wee players were recruited from teams in all divisions of play in 2011-2012 prior to the rule change and in 2013-2014 following the change. Baseline information, injury and exposure data for both cohorts were collected using validated injury surveillance. Pee Wee players were recruited from 59 teams in Calgary, Alberta (n=883) in 2011-2012 and from 73 teams in 2013-2014 (n=618). There were 163 game-related injuries (incidence rate (IR)=4.37/1000 game-hours) and 104 concussions (IR=2.79/1000 game-hours) in Alberta prior to the rule change, and 48 injuries (IR=2.16/1000 game-hours) and 25 concussions (IR=1.12/1000 game-hours) after the rule change. Based on multivariable Poisson regression with exposure hours as an offset, the adjusted incidence rate ratio associated with the national policy change disallowing body checking was 0.50 for all game-related injuries (95% CI 0.33 to 0.75) and 0.36 for concussion specifically (95% CI 0.22 to 0.58). Introduction of the 2013 national body checking policy change disallowing body checking in Pee Wee resulted in a 50% relative reduction in injury rate and a 64% reduction in concussion rate in 11-year-old and 12-year-old hockey players in Alberta. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Trends in reporting of mechanisms and incidence of hip injuries in males playing minor ice hockey in Canada: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Ayeni, Olufemi R; Kowalczuk, Marcin; Farag, Jordan; Farrokhyar, Forough; Chu, Raymond; Bedi, Asheesh; Willits, Kevin; Bhandari, Mohit

    2014-01-01

    There has been a noted increase in the diagnosis and reporting of sporting hip injuries and conditions in the medical literature but reporting at the minor hockey level is unknown. The purpose of this study is to investigate the trend of reporting hip injuries in amateur ice hockey players in Canada with a focus on injury type and mechanism. A retrospective review of the Hockey Canada insurance database was performed and data on ice hockey hip injuries reported between January 2005 and June 2011 were collected. The study population included all male hockey players from Peewee (aged 11-12 years) to Senior (aged 20+ years) participating in amateur level competition sanctioned by Hockey Canada. Reported cases of ice hockey hip injuries were analyzed according to age, mechanism of injury, and injury subtype. Annual injury reporting rates were determined and using a linear regression analysis trended to determine the change in ice hockey hip injury reporting rate over time. One hundred and six cases of ice hockey-related hip injuries were reported in total. The majority of injuries (75.5%) occurred in players aged 15-20 years playing at the Junior level. Most injuries were caused by a noncontact mechanism (40.6%) and strains were the most common subtype (50.0%). From 2005 to 2010, the number of reported hip injuries increased by 5.31 cases per year and the rate of reported hip injury per 1,000 registered players increased by 0.02 cases annually. Reporting of hip injuries in amateur ice hockey players is increasing. A more accurate injury reporting system is critical for future epidemiologic studies to accurately document the rate and mechanism of hip injury in amateur ice hockey players.

  5. The Relationship Between Maximal Aerobic Power and Recovery in Elite Ice Hockey Players During a Simulated Game.

    PubMed

    Steeves, Darren; Campagna, Phil

    2018-02-14

    This project investigated whether there was a relationship between maximal aerobic power and the recovery or performance in elite ice hockey players during a simulated hockey game. An on-ice protocol was used to simulate a game of ice hockey. Recovery values were determined by the differences in lactate and heart rate measures. Total distance traveled was also recorded as a performance measure. On two other days, subjects returned and completed a maximal aerobic power test on a treadmill and a maximal lactate test on ice. Statistical analysis showed no relationship between maximal aerobic power or maximal lactate values and recovery (heart rate, lactate) or the performance measure of distance traveled. It was concluded there was no relationship between maximal aerobic power and recovery during a simulated game in elite hockey players.

  6. Prevalence of Os Styloideum in National Hockey League Players

    PubMed Central

    Greditzer, Harry G.; Hutchinson, Ian D.; Geannette, Christian S.; Hotchkiss, Robert N.; Kelly, Bryan T.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Os styloideum describes an accessory carpal ossicle between the trapezoid, the capitate, and the second and third metacarpals. Injuries to this tissue have been described as part of the carpal boss syndrome. While the etiology of os styloideum remains uncertain, it may represent a physiologic response to altered loading forces in the wrist, similar to the development of cam-type deformity in the hips of ice hockey players or the Bennett lesion in the shoulders of baseball pitchers. Hypothesis: Professional hockey players will have a higher prevalence of os styloideum compared with the general population. Study Design: Case series. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Methods: A retrospective review of 16 professional hockey players from 4 different National Hockey League (NHL) teams who underwent unilateral imaging of the wrist was performed. Seventeen wrists were reviewed for the presence of os styloideum. Results: Thirteen of 16 players (81%) had an os styloideum, representing an increased prevalence compared with the general population. Previous clinical and cadaveric studies estimated a general prevalence of up to 19% (P < 0.001). For the 10 players who had their leading wrist scanned, 9 had an os styloideum (90%). Ten of 11 (91%) players demonstrated a bone marrow edema pattern within the metacarpal and the os styloideum on magnetic resonance imaging. There was no significant association between the presence of an os styloideum and the player’s position, leading wrist, or years in the league. Conclusion: There appears to be an increased prevalence of os styloideum among NHL players, and team physicians should consider this finding while formulating a differential diagnosis for dorsal wrist pain. Clinical Relevance: This study identified NHL players as having an increased prevalence of os styloideum compared with the general population. By doing so, these findings represent an opportunity to enhance our understanding of the etiology, clinical significance

  7. Bodychecking Rules and Concussion in Elite Hockey

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Laura; Asbridge, Mark; Cusimano, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Athletes participating in contact sports such as ice hockey are exposed to a high risk of suffering a concussion. We determined whether recent rule changes regulating contact to the head introduced in 2010–11 and 2011–12 have been effective in reducing the incidence of concussion in the National Hockey League (NHL). A league with a longstanding ban on hits contacting the head, the Ontario Hockey League (OHL), was also studied. A retrospective study of NHL and OHL games for the 2009–10 to 2011–12 seasons was performed using official game records and team injury reports in addition to other media sources. Concussion incidence over the 3 seasons analyzed was 5.23 per 100 NHL regular season games and 5.05 per 100 OHL regular season games (IRR 1.04; 95% CI 1.01, 1.50). When injuries described as concussion-like or suspicious of concussion were included, incidences rose to 8.8 and 7.1 per 100 games respectively (IRR 1.23; 95% CI 0.81, 1.32). The number of NHL concussions or suspected concussions was lower in 2009–10 than in 2010–11 (IRR 0.61; 95% CI 0.45, 0.83), but did not increase from 2010–11 to 2011–12 (IRR 1.05; 95% CI 0.80, 1.38). 64.2% of NHL concussions were caused by bodychecking, and only 28.4% of concussions and 36.8% of suspected concussions were caused by illegal incidents. We conclude that rules regulating bodychecking to the head did not reduce the number of players suffering concussions during NHL regular season play and that further changes or stricter enforcement of existing rules may be required to minimize the risk of players suffering these injuries. PMID:23874888

  8. Carbon Monoxide Exposure in Youth Ice Hockey.

    PubMed

    Macnow, Theodore; Mannix, Rebekah; Meehan, William P

    2017-11-01

    To examine the effect of ice resurfacer type on carboxyhemoglobin levels in youth hockey players. We hypothesized that players in arenas with electric resurfacers would have normal, stable carboxyhemoglobin levels during games, whereas those in arenas with internal combustion engine (IC) resurfacers would have an increase in carboxyhemoglobin levels. Prospective cohort study. Enclosed ice arenas in the northeastern United States. Convenience sample of players aged 8 to 18 years old in 16 games at different arenas. Eight arenas (37 players) used an IC ice resurfacer and 8 arenas (36 players) an electric resurfacer. Carboxyhemoglobin levels (SpCO) were measured using a pulse CO-oximeter before and after the game. Arena air was tested for carbon monoxide (CO) using a metered gas detector. Players completed symptom questionnaires. The change in SpCO from pregame to postgame was compared between players at arenas with electric versus IC resurfacers. Carbon monoxide was present at 6 of 8 arenas using IC resurfacers, levels ranged from 4 to 42 parts per million. Carbon monoxide was not found at arenas with electric resurfacers. Players at arenas with IC resurfacers had higher median pregame SpCO levels compared with those at electric arenas (4.3% vs 1%, P < 0.01). Players in the IC group also had a significant increase in their SpCO level during a hockey game compared with those in the electric group (2.8% vs 1%, P = 0.01). There were no significant differences in symptom scores. Players at arenas operating IC resurfacers had significantly higher SpCO levels. Youth hockey players in arenas with IC resurfacers have an increase in carboxyhemoglobin during games and have elevated baseline carboxyhemoglobin levels compared with players at arenas with electric resurfacers. Electric resurfacers decrease the risk of CO exposure.

  9. Change Agent Research for Windsor Minor Hockey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Dick; Duthie, James

    This study was based on an earlier 1972-73 study (see SP 009 113) which led to organizational restructuring of Windsor minor hockey (WMH). It was felt that further studies comparing attitudes and beliefs with behavior would be beneficial. Of particular interest were: (a) whether or not attitudes and beliefs changed due to adjusted organization and…

  10. Forecheck, backcheck, health check: the benefits of playing recreational ice hockey for adults in Canada.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Peter; Chowhan, James

    2016-11-01

    More than 1 million Canadian adults play recreational ice hockey. Compared to elite players, very little is known about the physical and health characteristics of people who play the game for fun. Analyzing data from Statistics Canada's 2011/12 Canadian Community Health Survey, the paper found that there is an association between physically active males age 35 or over who play ice hockey regularly (at least once a week) and enhanced health more so than other physically active males. While these players are larger in body size, they have significantly lower rates of diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease and report significantly higher rates of self-assessed health. Given the potential health benefits associated with this high intensity sport, the paper discusses ways in which participation can be promoted among less physically active adults and people who are new to the game or who have historically lower levels of participation including women and recent immigrants. Finally, the paper argues that compared to the very high costs associated with child and youth hockey, participation in adult recreational ice hockey is quite affordable.

  11. Aggression, Violence and Injury in Minor League Ice Hockey: Avenues for Prevention of Injury.

    PubMed

    Cusimano, Michael D; Ilie, Gabriela; Mullen, Sarah J; Pauley, Christopher R; Stulberg, Jennifer R; Topolovec-Vranic, Jane; Zhang, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    In North America, more than 800,000 youth are registered in organized ice hockey leagues. Despite the many benefits of involvement, young players are at significant risk for injury. Body-checking and aggressive play are associated with high frequency of game-related injury including concussion. We conducted a qualitative study to understand why youth ice hockey players engage in aggressive, injury-prone behaviours on the ice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 61 minor ice hockey participants, including male and female players, parents, coaches, trainers, managers and a game official. Players were aged 13-15 playing on competitive body checking teams or on non-body checking teams. Interviews were manually transcribed, coded and analyzed for themes relating to aggressive play in minor ice hockey. Parents, coaches, teammates and the media exert a large influence on player behavior. Aggressive behavior is often reinforced by the player's social environment and justified by players to demonstrate loyalty to teammates and especially injured teammates by seeking revenge particularly in competitive, body-checking leagues. Among female and male players in non-body checking organizations, aggressive play is not reinforced by the social environment. These findings are discussed within the framework of social identity theory and social learning theory, in order to understand players' need to seek revenge and how the social environment reinforces aggressive behaviors. This study provides a better understanding of the players' motivations and environmental influences around aggressive and violent play which may be conducive to injury. The findings can be used to help design interventions aimed at reducing aggression and related injuries sustained during ice hockey and sports with similar cultures and rules.

  12. Aggression, Violence and Injury in Minor League Ice Hockey: Avenues for Prevention of Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cusimano, Michael D.; Ilie, Gabriela; Mullen, Sarah J.; Pauley, Christopher R.; Stulberg, Jennifer R.; Topolovec-Vranic, Jane; Zhang, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    Background In North America, more than 800,000 youth are registered in organized ice hockey leagues. Despite the many benefits of involvement, young players are at significant risk for injury. Body-checking and aggressive play are associated with high frequency of game-related injury including concussion. We conducted a qualitative study to understand why youth ice hockey players engage in aggressive, injury-prone behaviours on the ice. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 61 minor ice hockey participants, including male and female players, parents, coaches, trainers, managers and a game official. Players were aged 13–15 playing on competitive body checking teams or on non-body checking teams. Interviews were manually transcribed, coded and analyzed for themes relating to aggressive play in minor ice hockey. Results Parents, coaches, teammates and the media exert a large influence on player behavior. Aggressive behavior is often reinforced by the player’s social environment and justified by players to demonstrate loyalty to teammates and especially injured teammates by seeking revenge particularly in competitive, body-checking leagues. Among female and male players in non-body checking organizations, aggressive play is not reinforced by the social environment. These findings are discussed within the framework of social identity theory and social learning theory, in order to understand players’ need to seek revenge and how the social environment reinforces aggressive behaviors. Conclusion This study provides a better understanding of the players’ motivations and environmental influences around aggressive and violent play which may be conducive to injury. The findings can be used to help design interventions aimed at reducing aggression and related injuries sustained during ice hockey and sports with similar cultures and rules. PMID:27258426

  13. Skating start propulsion: three-dimensional kinematic analysis of elite male and female ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Shell, Jaymee R; Robbins, Shawn M K; Dixon, Philippe C; Renaud, Philippe J; Turcotte, René A; Wu, Tom; Pearsall, David J

    2017-09-01

    The forward skating start is a fundamental skill for male and female ice hockey players. However, performance differences by athlete's sex cannot be fully explained by physiological variables; hence, other factors such as skating technique warrant examination. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the body movement kinematics of ice hockey skating starts between elite male and female ice hockey participants. Male (n = 9) and female (n = 10) elite ice hockey players performed five forward skating start accelerations. An 18-camera motion capture system placed on the arena ice surface captured full-body kinematics during the first seven skating start steps within 15 meters. Males' maximum skating speeds were greater than females. Skating technique sex differences were noted: in particular, females presented ~10° lower hip abduction throughout skating stance as well as ~10° greater knee extension at initial ice stance contact, conspicuously followed by a brief cessation in knee extension at the moment of ice contact, not evident in male skaters. Further study is warranted to explain why these skating technique differences exist in relation to factors such as differences in training, equipment, performance level, and anthropometrics.

  14. Effectiveness of interventions to reduce aggression and injuries among ice hockey players: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cusimano, Michael D; Nastis, Sofia; Zuccaro, Laura

    2013-01-08

    The increasing incidence of injuries related to playing ice hockey is an important public health issue. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions designed to reduce injuries related to aggressive acts in ice hockey. We identified relevant articles by searching electronic databases from their inception through July 2012, by using Internet search engines, and by manually searching sports medicine journals, the book series Safety in Ice Hockey and reference lists of included articles. We included studies that evaluated interventions to reduce aggression-related injuries and reported ratings of aggressive behaviour or rates of penalties or injuries. We identified 18 eligible studies. Most involved players in minor hockey leagues. Of 13 studies that evaluated changes in mandatory rules intended to lessen aggression (most commonly the restriction of body-checking), 11 observed a reduction in penalty or injury rates associated with rule changes, and 9 of these showed a statistically significant decrease. The mean number of penalties decreased by 1.2-5.9 per game, and injury rates decreased 3- to 12-fold. All 3 studies of educational interventions showed a reduction in penalty rates, but they were not powered or designed to show a change in injury rates. In 2 studies of cognitive behavioural interventions, reductions in aggressive behaviours were observed. Changes to mandatory rules were associated with reductions in penalties for aggressive acts and in injuries related to aggression among ice hockey players. Effects of educational and cognitive behavioural interventions on injury rates are less clear. Well-designed studies of multifaceted strategies that combine such approaches are required.

  15. Proprioception of foot and ankle complex in young regular practitioners of ice hockey, ballet dancing and running.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing Xian; Xu, Dong Qing; Hoshizaki, Blaine

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the proprioception of the foot and ankle complex in regular ice hockey practitioners, runners, and ballet dancers. A total of 45 young people with different exercise habits formed four groups: the ice hockey, ballet dancing, running, and sedentary groups. Kinesthesia of the foot and ankle complex was measured in plantarflexion (PF), dorsiflexion (DF), inversion (IV), and eversion (EV) at 0.4 degrees /s using a custom-made device. The results showed the following: (1) significantly better perceived passive motion sense in PF/DF was found as compared with the measurements in IV/EV within each group (P < .01); (2) ice hockey and ballet groups perceived significantly better passive motion sense in IV/EV than the running (P < .05) and the sedentary (P < .01) groups; and (3) no significant difference in the all measurements was found between running and sedentary groups. The benefits of ice hockey and ballet dancing on proprioception may be associated with their movement characteristics.

  16. Injuries in Youth Hockey. On-Ice Emergency Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Bradford M.; Castaldi, Cosmo R.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews the nature and frequency of injuries in youth hockey (which range from musculoskeletal injuries to life-threatening emergencies). Overall injury rates have decreased, but there is an increase in head, neck, and spine injuries. Those injuries that are serious demand prompt, skillful attention. A comprehensive format for on-ice management is…

  17. Neck injuries presenting to emergency departments in the United States from 1990 to 1999 for ice hockey, soccer, and American football.

    PubMed

    Delaney, J S; Al-Kashmiri, A

    2005-04-01

    To examine the number and rate of neck injuries in the community as a whole for ice hockey, soccer, and American football by analysing data from patients presenting to emergency departments in the United States from 1990 to 1999. Data compiled for the US Consumer Product Safety Commission were used to generate estimates for the total number of neck injuries and the more specific diagnoses of neck fractures, dislocations, contusions, sprains, strains, and lacerations occurring nationally from 1990 to 1999. These data were combined with yearly participation figures to generate rates of injury presenting to emergency departments for each sport. There were an estimated 5038 neck injuries from ice hockey, 19,341 from soccer, and 114 706 from American football. These could be broken down as follows: 4964 contusions, sprains, or strains from ice hockey, 17,927 from soccer, and 104 483 from football; 105 neck fractures or dislocations from ice hockey, 214 from soccer, and 1588 from football; 199 neck lacerations for ice hockey, 0 for soccer, and 621 for football. The rates for total neck injuries and combined neck contusions, sprains, or strains were higher for football than for ice hockey or soccer in all years for which data were available. The rate of neck injury in the United States was higher in football than in ice hockey or soccer in the time period studied.

  18. The hockey-stick method to estimate evening dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) in humans.

    PubMed

    Danilenko, Konstantin V; Verevkin, Evgeniy G; Antyufeev, Viktor S; Wirz-Justice, Anna; Cajochen, Christian

    2014-04-01

    The onset of melatonin secretion in the evening is the most reliable and most widely used index of circadian timing in humans. Saliva (or plasma) is usually sampled every 0.5-1 hours under dim-light conditions in the evening 5-6 hours before usual bedtime to assess the dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO). For many years, attempts have been made to find a reliable objective determination of melatonin onset time either by fixed or dynamic threshold approaches. The here-developed hockey-stick algorithm, used as an interactive computer-based approach, fits the evening melatonin profile by a piecewise linear-parabolic function represented as a straight line switching to the branch of a parabola. The switch point is considered to reliably estimate melatonin rise time. We applied the hockey-stick method to 109 half-hourly melatonin profiles to assess the DLMOs and compared these estimates to visual ratings from three experts in the field. The DLMOs of 103 profiles were considered to be clearly quantifiable. The hockey-stick DLMO estimates were on average 4 minutes earlier than the experts' estimates, with a range of -27 to +13 minutes; in 47% of the cases the difference fell within ±5 minutes, in 98% within -20 to +13 minutes. The raters' and hockey-stick estimates showed poor accordance with DLMOs defined by threshold methods. Thus, the hockey-stick algorithm is a reliable objective method to estimate melatonin rise time, which does not depend on a threshold value and is free from errors arising from differences in subjective circadian phase estimates. The method is available as a computerized program that can be easily used in research settings and clinical practice either for salivary or plasma melatonin values.

  19. Off-Ice Anaerobic Power Does Not Predict On-Ice Repeated Shift Performance in Hockey.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Ben J; Fitzgerald, John S; Dietz, Calvin C; Ziegler, Kevin S; Baker, Sarah E; Snyder, Eric M

    2016-09-01

    Peterson, BJ, Fitzgerald, JS, Dietz, CC, Ziegler, KS, Baker, SE, and Snyder, EM. Off-ice anaerobic power does not predict on-ice repeated shift performance in hockey. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2375-2381, 2016-Anaerobic power is a significant predictor of acceleration and top speed in team sport athletes. Historically, these findings have been applied to ice hockey although recent research has brought their validity for this sport into question. As ice hockey emphasizes the ability to repeatedly produce power, single bout anaerobic power tests should be examined to determine their ability to predict on-ice performance. We tested whether conventional off-ice anaerobic power tests could predict on-ice acceleration, top speed, and repeated shift performance. Forty-five hockey players, aged 18-24 years, completed anthropometric, off-ice, and on-ice tests. Anthropometric and off-ice testing included height, weight, body composition, vertical jump, and Wingate tests. On-ice testing consisted of acceleration, top speed, and repeated shift fatigue tests. Vertical jump (VJ) (r = -0.42; r = -0.58), Wingate relative peak power (WRPP) (r = -0.32; r = -0.43), and relative mean power (WRMP) (r = -0.34; r = -0.48) were significantly correlated (p ≤ 0.05) to on-ice acceleration and top speed, respectively. Conversely, none of the off-ice tests correlated with on-ice repeated shift performance, as measured by first gate, second gate, or total course fatigue; VJ (r = 0.06; r = 0.13; r = 0.09), WRPP (r = 0.06; r = 0.14; r = 0.10), or WRMP (r = -0.10; r = -0.01; r = -0.01). Although conventional off-ice anaerobic power tests predict single bout on-ice acceleration and top speed, they neither predict the repeated shift ability of the player, nor are good markers for performance in ice hockey.

  20. Ultra-Compact Motor Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, William T.; Cromwell, Adam; Hauptman, Traveler; Pratt, Gill Andrews

    2012-01-01

    This invention is an electronically commutated brushless motor contro ller that incorporates Hall-array sensing in a small, 42-gram packag e that provides 4096 absolute counts per motor revolution position s ensing. The unit is the size of a miniature hockey puck, and is a 44 -pin male connector that provides many I/O channels, including CANbus , RS-232 communications, general-purpose analog and digital I/O (GPI O), analog and digital Hall inputs, DC power input (18-90 VDC, 0-l0 A), three-phase motor outputs, and a strain gauge amplifier.

  1. The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars: Dispatches From The Front Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    A central figure in the controversy over human-caused climate change has been The Hockey Stick, a simple, easy-to-understand graph my colleagues and I constructed to depict changes in Earth's temperature back to 1000 AD. The graph was featured in the high-profile Summary for Policy Makers of the 2001 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and it quickly became an icon in the debate over human-caused (anthropogenic) climate change. I will tell the story behind the Hockey Stick, using it as a vehicle for exploring broader issues regarding the role of skepticism in science, the uneasy relationship between science and politics, and the dangers that arise when special economic interests and those who do their bidding attempt to skew the discourse over policy-relevant areas of science. In short, I attempt to use the Hockey Stick to cut through the fog of disinformation that has been generated by the campaign to deny the reality of climate change. It is my intent, in so doing, to reveal the very real threat to our future that lies behind it.

  2. Neck injuries presenting to emergency departments in the United States from 1990 to 1999 for ice hockey, soccer, and American football

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, J; Al-Kashmiri, A

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the number and rate of neck injuries in the community as a whole for ice hockey, soccer, and American football by analysing data from patients presenting to emergency departments in the United States from 1990 to 1999. Methods: Data compiled for the US Consumer Product Safety Commission were used to generate estimates for the total number of neck injuries and the more specific diagnoses of neck fractures, dislocations, contusions, sprains, strains, and lacerations occurring nationally from 1990 to 1999. These data were combined with yearly participation figures to generate rates of injury presenting to emergency departments for each sport. Results: There were an estimated 5038 neck injuries from ice hockey, 19 341 from soccer, and 114 706 from American football. These could be broken down as follows: 4964 contusions, sprains, or strains from ice hockey, 17 927 from soccer, and 104 483 from football; 105 neck fractures or dislocations from ice hockey, 214 from soccer, and 1588 from football; 199 neck lacerations for ice hockey, 0 for soccer, and 621 for football. The rates for total neck injuries and combined neck contusions, sprains, or strains were higher for football than for ice hockey or soccer in all years for which data were available. Conclusion: The rate of neck injury in the United States was higher in football than in ice hockey or soccer in the time period studied. PMID:15793079

  3. Analysis of High-Intensity Skating in Top-Class Ice Hockey Match-Play in Relation to Training Status and Muscle Damage.

    PubMed

    Lignell, Erik; Fransson, Dan; Krustrup, Peter; Mohr, Magni

    2018-05-01

    Lignell, E, Fransson, D, Krustrup, P, and Mohr, M. Analysis of high-intensity skating in top-class ice hockey match-play in relation to training status and muscle damage. J Strength Cond Res 32(5): 1303-1310, 2018-We examined high-intensity activities in a top-class ice-hockey game and the effect of training status. Male ice-hockey players (n = 36) from the National Hockey League participated. Match analysis was performed during a game and physical capacity was assessed by a submaximal Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Ice-hockey test, level 1 (YYIR1-IHSUB). Venous blood samples were collected 24-hour post-game to determine markers of muscle damage. Players performed 119 ± 8 and 31 ± 3 m·min of high intensity and sprint skating, respectively, during a game. Total distance covered was 4,606 ± 219 m (2,260-6,749 m), of which high-intensity distance was 2042 ± 97 m (757-3,026 m). Sprint-skating speed was 5-8% higher (p ≤ 0.05) in periods 1 and 2 vs. period 3 and overtime. Defensemen (D) covered 29% more (p ≤ 0.05) skating in total than forwards (F) and were on the ice 47% longer. However, F performed 54% more (p ≤ 0.05) high-intensity skating per minute than defensemen. Plasma creatine kinase (CK) was 338 ± 45 (78-757) U·L 24-hour post-game. Heart rate loading during YYIR1-IHSUB correlated inversely (p ≤ 0.05) to the frequency of high-intensity skating bouts (r = -0.55) and V[Combining Dot Above]O2max (r = -0.85) and positively to post-game CK (r = 0.49; p ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, ice hockey is a multiple-sprint sport that provokes fatigue in the latter half of a game. Forwards perform more intense skating than defensemen. Moreover, high-intensity game activities during top-class ice hockey are correlated with cardiovascular loading during a submaximal skating test. Taken together, training of elite ice-hockey players should improve the ability for repeated high-intensity skating, and testing should include the YYIR1-IHSUB test as an indicator for ice-hockey

  4. Factors Influencing the Underreporting of Concussion in Sports: A Qualitative Study of Minor Hockey Participants.

    PubMed

    Cusimano, Michael D; Topolovec-Vranic, Jane; Zhang, Stanley; Mullen, Sarah J; Wong, Mattew; Ilie, Gabriela

    2017-07-01

    The present study is to identify factors contributing to underreporting of concussion in adolescent athletes. Qualitative interviews. Participants were interviewed in an office environment. Interviews were conducted with 31 minor hockey players, 10 parents, 6 coaches, 4 trainers, 2 managers, and one game official. Players were 13 to 15 year old. With selective sampling, an inductive approach of analyzing the interviews was undertaken and themes were identified and analyzed. Underreporting is a complex phenomenon. A number of risk factors related to hockey culture, players, reference others, and rules of play were assessed. Reasons not reporting concussion is accepted in minor hockey. Aspects of hockey culture such as an overemphasis on winning games and upheld misperceptions about the risks associated with concussion were identified as relevant to the underreporting of concussions. Various factors relevant to the underreporting of concussions include player's motivation to win, group membership dynamics such as a player's role as the team's "enforcer," coaches' own motivation to win to further their own opportunities in the sport, and parents' personal financial interest or alternative agenda in terms of time commitments and their child's future career prospects. Our findings indicate that underreporting of concussion among those players interviewed appears to be prevalent and associated with misconceptions about injury risk, and a culture that both reinforces and encourages underreporting with tacit or overt complicity of parents and coaches. Our findings support the need to alter the culture of violence and tough play in hockey by education, rule changes, economic measures, and changes in governance of the sport. Interviewing more stakeholders and policy makers would shed light on such potential interventions.

  5. Effectiveness of interventions to reduce aggression and injuries among ice hockey players: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Cusimano, Michael D.; Nastis, Sofia; Zuccaro, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Background: The increasing incidence of injuries related to playing ice hockey is an important public health issue. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions designed to reduce injuries related to aggressive acts in ice hockey. Methods: We identified relevant articles by searching electronic databases from their inception through July 2012, by using Internet search engines, and by manually searching sports medicine journals, the book series Safety in Ice Hockey and reference lists of included articles. We included studies that evaluated interventions to reduce aggression-related injuries and reported ratings of aggressive behaviour or rates of penalties or injuries. Results: We identified 18 eligible studies. Most involved players in minor hockey leagues. Of 13 studies that evaluated changes in mandatory rules intended to lessen aggression (most commonly the restriction of body-checking), 11 observed a reduction in penalty or injury rates associated with rule changes, and 9 of these showed a statistically significant decrease. The mean number of penalties decreased by 1.2–5.9 per game, and injury rates decreased 3- to 12-fold. All 3 studies of educational interventions showed a reduction in penalty rates, but they were not powered or designed to show a change in injury rates. In 2 studies of cognitive behavioural interventions, reductions in aggressive behaviours were observed. Interpretation: Changes to mandatory rules were associated with reductions in penalties for aggressive acts and in injuries related to aggression among ice hockey players. Effects of educational and cognitive behavioural interventions on injury rates are less clear. Well-designed studies of multifaceted strategies that combine such approaches are required. PMID:23209118

  6. Ingesting A Sports Drink Enhances Simulated Ice Hockey Performance While Reducing Perceived Effort.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Matthew Stephen; Heigenhauser, George; Duong, MyLinh; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2017-12-01

    This study determined whether ingesting a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES) vs. progressive dehydration affected skeletal muscle glycogen use and performance in ice hockey players during simulated ice hockey exercise comprised of 3 active "periods". Seven males (21.3±0.3 years, 184.7±1.2 cm, 84.2±3.9 kg, and 49.6±1.8 mL·kg -1 ·min -1 ) performed a hockey-specific protocol on two occasions and either dehydrated progressively (NF), or stayed well-hydrated by ingesting a CES. Muscle biopsies were taken at rest, before the 3 rd period (P3), and after the final sprint in the protocol. Compared to dehydration in the NF trial (-1.8% BM), CES ingestion enhanced voluntary performance (151.0±8.0 vs. 144.1±8.7 kJ) and glycogen use (177.5±31.1 vs. 103.5±16.2 mmol·kg dm -1 ), and reduced perceived exertion (16±1 vs. 18±1) in P3. Mean core temperature was reduced by CES ingestion throughout the protocol (38.0±0.2 vs. 38.1±0.1°C). These results suggest that compared to progressive dehydration, staying hydrated by ingesting a CES helps preserve performance, while reducing thermal and perceptual strains, in P3 of cycle-based simulation of ice hockey exercise. These benefits are observed despite greater glycogen use in P3 with CES ingestion. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. The Protective Effect of Kevlar ® Socks Against Hockey Skate Blade Injuries: A Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Nauth, Aaron; Aziz, Mina; Tsuji, Matthew; Whelan, Daniel B.; Theodoropoulos, John S.; Zdero, Rad

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Several recent high profile injuries to elite players in the National Hockey League (NHL) secondary to skate blade lacerations have generated significant interest in these injuries and possible methods to protect against them. These injuries are typically due to direct contact of the skate blade of another player with posterior aspect of the calf resulting in a range of potential injuries to tendons or neurovascular structures. The Achilles tendon is most commonly involved. Kevlar® reinforced socks have recently become available for hockey players to wear and are cited as providing possible protection against such injuries. However, there has been no investigation of the possible protective effects of Kevlar® reinforced socks against skate blade injuries, and it is currently unknown what protective effects, if any, that these socks provide against these injuries. The proposed study sought to address this by conducting a biomechanical investigation of the protective effects of Kevlar® reinforced socks against Achilles tendon injuries in a simulated model of skate blade injury using human cadaver limbs. This novel investigation is the first to address the possible benefits to hockey players of wearing Kevlar® reinforced socks. Methods: Seven matched pairs of human cadaver lower limbs were fitted with a Kevlar ® reinforced sock comprised of 60% Kevlar®/20% Coolmax® polyester/18 % Nylon/12% Spandex (Bauer Elite Performance Skate Sock) on one limb and a standard synthetic sock comprised of 51% polyester/47% nylon/2% spandex (Bauer Premium Performance Skate Sock) on the contralateral limb as a control. Each limb was then mounted on a Materials Testing System (MTS) with the ankle dorsiflexed to 90° and the knee held in full extension using a custom designed jig. Specimens were then impacted with a hockey skate blade directed at the posterior calf, 12 cm above the heel, at an angle of 45° and a speed of 31m/s, to a penetration depth of 4.3 cm, to

  8. Trends in North American Newspaper Reporting of Brain Injury in Ice Hockey

    PubMed Central

    Cusimano, Michael D.; Sharma, Bhanu; Lawrence, David W.; Ilie, Gabriela; Silverberg, Sarah; Jones, Rochelle

    2013-01-01

    The frequency and potential long-term effects of sport-related traumatic brain injuries (TBI) make it a major public health concern. The culture within contact sports, such as ice hockey, encourages aggression that puts youth at risk of TBI such as concussion. Newspaper reports play an important role in conveying and shaping the culture around health-related behaviors. We qualitatively studied reports about sport-related TBI in four major North American newspapers over the last quarter-century. We used the grounded-theory approach to identify major themes and then did a content analysis to compare the frequency of key themes between 1998–2000 and 2009–2011. The major themes were: perceptions of brain injury, aggression, equipment, rules and regulations, and youth hockey. Across the full study period, newspaper articles from Canada and America portrayed violence and aggression that leads to TBI both as integral to hockey and as an unavoidable risk associated with playing the game. They also condemned violence in ice hockey, criticized the administrative response to TBI, and recognized the significance of TBI. In Canada, aggression was reported more often recently and there was a distinctive shift in portraying protective equipment as a solution to TBI in earlier years to a potential contributing factor to TBI later in the study period. American newspapers gave a greater attention to ‘perception of risks’ and the role of protective equipment, and discussed TBI in a broader context in the recent time period. Newspapers from both countries showed similar recent trends in regards to a need for rule changes to curb youth sport-related TBI. This study provides a rich description of the reporting around TBI in contact sport. Understanding this reporting is important for evaluating whether the dangers of sport-related TBI are being appropriately communicated by the media. PMID:23613957

  9. Trends in North American newspaper reporting of brain injury in ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Cusimano, Michael D; Sharma, Bhanu; Lawrence, David W; Ilie, Gabriela; Silverberg, Sarah; Jones, Rochelle

    2013-01-01

    The frequency and potential long-term effects of sport-related traumatic brain injuries (TBI) make it a major public health concern. The culture within contact sports, such as ice hockey, encourages aggression that puts youth at risk of TBI such as concussion. Newspaper reports play an important role in conveying and shaping the culture around health-related behaviors. We qualitatively studied reports about sport-related TBI in four major North American newspapers over the last quarter-century. We used the grounded-theory approach to identify major themes and then did a content analysis to compare the frequency of key themes between 1998-2000 and 2009-2011. The major themes were: perceptions of brain injury, aggression, equipment, rules and regulations, and youth hockey. Across the full study period, newspaper articles from Canada and America portrayed violence and aggression that leads to TBI both as integral to hockey and as an unavoidable risk associated with playing the game. They also condemned violence in ice hockey, criticized the administrative response to TBI, and recognized the significance of TBI. In Canada, aggression was reported more often recently and there was a distinctive shift in portraying protective equipment as a solution to TBI in earlier years to a potential contributing factor to TBI later in the study period. American newspapers gave a greater attention to 'perception of risks' and the role of protective equipment, and discussed TBI in a broader context in the recent time period. Newspapers from both countries showed similar recent trends in regards to a need for rule changes to curb youth sport-related TBI. This study provides a rich description of the reporting around TBI in contact sport. Understanding this reporting is important for evaluating whether the dangers of sport-related TBI are being appropriately communicated by the media.

  10. Validation of the FAST skating protocol to predict aerobic power in ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Petrella, Nicholas J; Montelpare, William J; Nystrom, Murray; Plyley, Michael; Faught, Brent E

    2007-08-01

    Few studies have reported a sport-specific protocol to measure the aerobic power of ice hockey players using a predictive process. The purpose of our study was to validate an ice hockey aerobic field test on players of varying ages, abilities, and levels. The Faught Aerobic Skating Test (FAST) uses an on-ice continuous skating protocol on a course measuring 160 feet (48.8 m) using a CD to pace the skater with a beep signal to cross the starting line at each end of the course. The FAST incorporates the principle of increasing workload at measured time intervals during a continuous skating exercise. Step-wise multiple regression modelling was used to determine the estimate of aerobic power. Participants completed a maximal aerobic power test using a modified Bruce incremental treadmill protocol, as well as the on-ice FAST. Normative data were collected on 406 ice hockey players (291 males, 115 females) ranging in age from 9 to 25 y. A regression to predict maximum aerobic power was developed using body mass (kg), height (m), age (y), and maximum completed lengths of the FAST as the significant predictors of skating aerobic power (adjusted R2 = 0.387, SEE = 7.25 mL.kg-1.min-1, p < 0.0001). These results support the application of the FAST in estimating aerobic power among male and female competitive ice hockey players between the ages of 9 and 25 years.

  11. Echocardiographic findings in professional hockey players

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Poorya; Roberts, Brad J.; Brooks, John

    2009-01-01

    Tissue Doppler imaging was used to evaluate the physiological and morphological response in athletes whose cardiac system must not only adapt to intense cardiovascular demands but also support sudden, transient changes in cardiac output. A total of 45 professional hockey players with a mean age of 24 years underwent a baseline transthoracic echocardiographic protocol after a typical morning workout; 12 healthy age- and gender-matched controls were evaluated as a means of comparison. The athletes in this study possessed larger left ventricular diastolic and systolic dimensions than the control group (5.5 ± 0.4 vs 4.9 ± 0.4 cm and 3.9 ± 0.4 vs 3.3 ± 0.4 cm, P < 0.0001). The increase in athletes' septal and posterior wall thickness was not substantial, nor was there a significant difference in left ventricular ejection fraction. The athletes demonstrated consistently larger left ventricular end-diastolic volume (196 ± 34 vs 136 ± 23 mL, P < 0.001) and end-systolic volume (87 ± 20 vs 57 ± 12 mL, P < 0.0001). They also had lower annular septal and lateral early diastolic and systolic tissue Doppler velocities compared with the control group. Thus, characteristic myocardial changes previously reported in elite athletes were also represented in professional hockey players. The lower left ventricular tissue Doppler velocities was a relatively unique finding and probably a consequence of lower postexertion preload levels compared with controls who were measured at rest. PMID:19633740

  12. A biomechanical comparison in the lower limb and lumbar spine between a hit and drag flick in field hockey.

    PubMed

    Ng, Leo; Rosalie, Simon M; Sherry, Dorianne; Loh, Wei Bing; Sjurseth, Andreas M; Iyengar, Shrikant; Wild, Catherine Y

    2018-03-01

    Research has revealed that field hockey drag flickers have greater odds of hip and lumbar injuries compared to non-drag flickers (DF). This study aimed to compare the biomechanics of a field hockey hit and a specialised field hockey drag flick. Eighteen male and seven female specialised hockey DF performed a hit and a drag flick in a motion analysis laboratory with an 18-camera three-dimensional motion analysis system and a calibrated multichannel force platform to examine differences in lower limb and lumbar kinematics and kinetics. Results revealed that drag flicks were performed with more of a forward lunge on the left lower limb resulting in significantly greater left ankle dorsiflexion, knee, hip and lumbar flexion (Ps<0.001) compared to a hit. Drag flicks were also performed with significantly greater lateral flexion (P < 0.002) and rotation of the lumbar spine (P < 0.006) compared to a hit. Differences in kinematics lead to greater shear, compression and tensile forces in multiple left lower limb and lumbar joints in the drag flick compared to the hit (P < 0.05). The biomechanical differences in drag flicks compared to a hit may have ramifications with respect to injury in field hockey drag flickers.

  13. The relative age effect reversal among the National Hockey League elite

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Benjamin G.; Jarvis, Jonathan A.; Rossi, Giambattista

    2017-01-01

    Like many sports in adolescence, junior hockey is organized by age groups. Typically, players born after December 31st are placed in the subsequent age cohort and as a result, will have an age advantage over those players born closer to the end of the year. While this relative age effect (RAE) has been well-established in junior hockey and other professional sports, the long-term impact of this phenomenon is not well understood. Using roster data on North American National Hockey League (NHL) players from the 2008–2009 season to the 2015–2016 season, we document a RAE reversal—players born in the last quarter of the year (October-December) score more and command higher salaries than those born in the first quarter of the year. This reversal is even more pronounced among the NHL “elite.” We find that among players in the 90th percentile of scoring, those born in the last quarter of the year score about 9 more points per season than those born in the first quarter. Likewise, elite players in the 90th percentile of salary who are born in the last quarter of the year earn 51% more pay than players born at the start of the year. Surprisingly, compared to players at the lower end of the performance distribution, the RAE reversal is about three to four times greater among elite players. PMID:28806751

  14. A 26 year physiological description of a National Hockey League team.

    PubMed

    Quinney, H A; Dewart, Randy; Game, Alex; Snydmiller, Gary; Warburton, Darren; Bell, Gordon

    2008-08-01

    The primary purpose of this investigation was to examine the physiological profile of a National Hockey League (NHL) team over a period of 26 years. All measurements were made at a similar time of year (pre-season) in 703 male (mean age +/- SD = 24 +/- 4 y) hockey players. The data were analyzed across years, between positions (defensemen, forwards, and goaltenders), and between what were deemed successful and non-successful years using a combination of points acquired during the season and play-off success. Most anthropometric (height, mass, and BMI) and physiological parameters (absolute and relative VO2 peak, relative peak 5 s power output, abdominal endurance, and combined grip strength) showed a gradual increase over the 26 year period. Defensemen were taller and heavier, had higher absolute VO2 peak, and had greater combined grip strength than forwards and goaltenders. Forwards were younger and had higher values for relative VO2 peak. Goaltenders were shorter, had less body mass, a higher sum of skinfolds, lower VO2 peak, and better flexibility. The overall pre-season fitness profile was not related to team success. In conclusion, this study revealed that the fitness profile for a professional NHL ice-hockey team exhibited increases in player size and anaerobic and aerobic fitness parameters over a 26 year period that differed by position. However, this evolution of physiological profile did not necessarily translate into team success in this particular NHL franchise.

  15. A Hockey Night in Canada: An Imagined Conversation between Theorists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogel, Curtis

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, various methodological issues surrounding the sociological study of sport are explored. Through an imagined dialogue between two graduate students at a hockey game, this work brings together three divergent approaches to social enquiry: Positivist Grounded Theory, Constructivist Grounded Theory, and Actor-Network Theory. This paper…

  16. Changes in Collegiate Ice Hockey Player Anthropometrics and Aerobic Fitness Over Three Decades.

    PubMed

    Triplett, Ashley N; Ebbing, Amy C; Green, Matthew R; Connolly, Christopher P; Carrier, David P; Pivarnik, James M

    2018-04-09

    Over the past several decades, an increased emphasis on fitness training has emerged among collegiate ice hockey teams, with the objective to improve on-ice performance. However, it is unknown if this increase in training has translated over time to changes in anthropometric and fitness profiles of collegiate ice hockey players. The purposes of this study were to describe anthropometric (height, weight, BMI, %fat) and aerobic fitness (VO2peak) characteristics of collegiate ice hockey players over 36 years, and to evaluate whether these characteristics differ between player positions. Anthropometric and physiologic data were obtained through preseason fitness testing of players (N=279) from a NCAA Division I men's ice hockey team from the years of 1980 through 2015. Changes over time in the anthropometric and physiologic variables were evaluated via regression analysis using linear and polynomial models and differences between player position were compared via ANOVA (p<0.05). Regression analysis revealed a cubic model best predicted changes in mean height (R2=0.65), weight (R2=0.77), and BMI (R2=0.57), while a quadratic model best fit change in %fat by year (R2=0.30). Little change was observed over time in the anthropometric characteristics. Defensemen were significantly taller than forwards (184.7±12.1 vs. 181.3±5.9cm)(p=0.007) and forwards had a higher relative VO2peak compared to defensemen (58.7±4.7 vs. 57.2±4.4ml/kg/min)(p=0.032). No significant differences were observed in %fat or weight by position. While average player heights and weights fluctuated over time, increased emphasis on fitness training did not affect athletes' relative aerobic fitness. Differences in height and aerobic fitness levels were observed between player position.

  17. Augmented Reality Comes to Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buesing, Mark; Cook, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is a technology used on computing devices where processor-generated graphics are rendered over real objects to enhance the sensory experience in real time. In other words, what you are really seeing is augmented by the computer. Many AR games already exist for systems such as Kinect and Nintendo 3DS and mobile apps, such as Tagwhat and Star Chart (a must for astronomy class). The yellow line marking first downs in a televised football game2 and the enhanced puck that makes televised hockey easier to follow3 both use augmented reality to do the job.

  18. Comparison of Dynamic Balance in Collegiate Field Hockey and Football Players Using Star Excursion Balance Test

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Rashi; Moiz, Jamal Ali

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The preliminary study aimed to compare dynamic balance between collegiate athletes competing or training in football and hockey using star excursion balance test. Methods A total thirty university level players, football (n = 15) and field hockey (n = 15) were participated in the study. Dynamic balance was assessed by using star excursion balance test. The testing grid consists of 8 lines each 120 cm in length extending from a common point at 45° increments. The subjects were instructed to maintain a stable single leg stance with the test leg with shoes off and to reach for maximal distance with the other leg in each of the 8 directions. A pencil was used to point and read the distance to which each subject's foot reached. The normalized leg reach distances in each direction were summed for both limbs and the total sum of the mean of summed normalized distances of both limbs were calculated. Results There was no significant difference in all the directions of star excursion balance test scores in both the groups. Additionally, composite reach distances of both groups also found non-significant (P=0.5). However, the posterior (P=0.05) and lateral (P=0.03) normalized reach distances were significantly more in field hockey players. Conclusion Field hockey players and football players did not differ in terms of dynamic balance. PMID:24427482

  19. Comparison of dynamic balance in collegiate field hockey and football players using star excursion balance test.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Rashi; Moiz, Jamal Ali

    2013-09-01

    The preliminary study aimed to compare dynamic balance between collegiate athletes competing or training in football and hockey using star excursion balance test. A total thirty university level players, football (n = 15) and field hockey (n = 15) were participated in the study. Dynamic balance was assessed by using star excursion balance test. The testing grid consists of 8 lines each 120 cm in length extending from a common point at 45° increments. The subjects were instructed to maintain a stable single leg stance with the test leg with shoes off and to reach for maximal distance with the other leg in each of the 8 directions. A pencil was used to point and read the distance to which each subject's foot reached. The normalized leg reach distances in each direction were summed for both limbs and the total sum of the mean of summed normalized distances of both limbs were calculated. There was no significant difference in all the directions of star excursion balance test scores in both the groups. Additionally, composite reach distances of both groups also found non-significant (P=0.5). However, the posterior (P=0.05) and lateral (P=0.03) normalized reach distances were significantly more in field hockey players. Field hockey players and football players did not differ in terms of dynamic balance.

  20. The “Puck” energetic charged particle detector: Design, heritage, and advancements

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, I.; Westlake, J. H.; Andrews, G. B.; Brandt, P.; Gold, R. E.; Gkioulidou, M. A.; Hacala, R.; Haggerty, D.; Hill, M. E.; Ho, G. C.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Kollmann, P.; Mauk, B. H.; McNutt, R. L.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paranicas, C.; Paschalidis, N.; Schlemm, C. E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Energetic charged particle detectors characterize a portion of the plasma distribution function that plays critical roles in some physical processes, from carrying the currents in planetary ring currents to weathering the surfaces of planetary objects. For several low‐resource missions in the past, the need was recognized for a low‐resource but highly capable, mass‐species‐discriminating energetic particle sensor that could also obtain angular distributions without motors or mechanical articulation. This need led to the development of a compact Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), known as the “Puck” EPD (short for hockey puck), that is capable of determining the flux, angular distribution, and composition of incident ions between an energy range of ~10 keV to several MeV. This sensor makes simultaneous angular measurements of electron fluxes from the tens of keV to about 1 MeV. The same measurements can be extended down to approximately 1 keV/nucleon, with some composition ambiguity. These sensors have a proven flight heritage record that includes missions such as MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging and New Horizons, with multiple sensors on each of Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Magnetospheric Multiscale. In this review paper we discuss the Puck EPD design, its heritage, unexpected results from these past missions and future advancements. We also discuss high‐voltage anomalies that are thought to be associated with the use of curved foils, which is a new foil manufacturing processes utilized on recent Puck EPD designs. Finally, we discuss the important role Puck EPDs can potentially play in upcoming missions. PMID:27867799

  1. Heart Rate and Energy Expenditure in Division I Field Hockey Players During Competitive Play.

    PubMed

    Sell, Katie M; Ledesma, Allison B

    2016-08-01

    Sell, KM and Ledesma, AB. Heart rate and energy expenditure in Division I field hockey players during competitive play. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2122-2128, 2016-The purpose of this study was to quantify energy expenditure and heart rate data for Division I female field hockey players during competitive play. Ten female Division I collegiate field hockey athletes (19.8 ± 1.6 years; 166.4 ± 6.1 cm; 58.2 ± 5.3 kg) completed the Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test to determine maximal heart rate. One week later, all subjects wore a heart rate monitor during a series of 3 matches in an off-season competition. Average heart rate (AvHR), average percentage of maximal heart rate (AvHR%), peak exercise heart rate (PExHR), and percentage of maximal heart rate (PExHR%), time spent in each of the predetermined heart rate zones, and caloric expenditure per minute of exercise (kcalM) were determined for all players. Differences between positions (backs, midfielders, and forwards) were assessed. No significant differences in AvHR, AvHR%, PExHR, PExHR%, and %TM were observed between playing positions. The AvHR% and PExHR% for each position fell into zones 4 (77-93% HRmax) and 5 (>93% HRmax), respectively, and significantly more time was spent in zone 4 compared with zones 1, 2, 3, and 5 across all players (p ≤ 0.05). The kcalM reflected very heavy intensity exercise. The results of this study will contribute toward understanding the sport-specific physiological demands of women's field hockey and has specific implications for the duration and schedule of training regimens.

  2. Effects of badminton and ice hockey on bone mass in young males: a 12-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Tervo, Taru; Nordström, Peter; Nordström, Anna

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of different types of weight bearing physical activity on bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm(2)) and evaluate any residual benefits after the active sports career. Beginning at 17 years of age, BMD was measured 5 times, during 12 years, in 19 badminton players, 48 ice hockey players, and 25 controls. During the active career, badminton players gained significantly more BMD compared to ice hockey players at all sites: in their femoral neck (mean difference (Delta) 0.06 g/cm(2), p=0.04), humerus (Delta 0.06 g/cm(2), p=0.01), lumbar spine (Delta 0.08 g/cm(2), p=0.01), and their legs (Delta 0.05 g/cm(2), p=0.003), after adjusting for age at baseline, changes in weight, height, and active years. BMD gains in badminton players were higher also compared to in controls at all sites (Delta 0.06-0.17 g/cm(2), p<0.01 for all). Eleven badminton players and 37 ice hockey players stopped their active career a mean of 6 years before the final follow-up. Both these groups lost significantly more BMD at the femoral neck and lumbar spine compared to the control group (Delta 0.05-0.12 g/cm(2), p<0.05 for all). At the final follow-up, badminton players had significantly higher BMD of the femoral neck, humerus, lumbar spine, and legs (Delta 0.08-0.20 g/cm(2), p<0.01 for all) than both ice hockey players and controls. In summary, the present study may suggest that badminton is a more osteogenic sport compared to ice hockey. The BMD benefits from previous training were partially sustained with reduced activity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Update and Overview of Spinal Injuries in Canadian Ice Hockey, 1943 to 2011: The Continuing Need for Injury Prevention and Education.

    PubMed

    Tator, Charles H; Provvidenza, Christine; Cassidy, J David

    2016-05-01

    To identify spinal injuries in Canadian ice hockey from 2006 to 2011 and to discuss data from 1943 to 2011 and impact of injury prevention programs. Data about spinal injuries with and without spinal cord injury in ice hockey have been collected by ThinkFirst's (now Parachute Canada) Canadian Ice Hockey Spinal Injuries Registry since 1981 through questionnaires from practitioners, ice hockey organizations, and media. All Canadian provinces and territories. All registered Canadian ice hockey players. Age, gender, level of play, location, mechanism of injury. Incidence, incidence rate, prevalence, and nature (morbidity) of the injuries. Between 2006 and 2011, 44 cases occurred, 4 (9.1%) of which were severe. The incidence in the recent years continues to be lower than the peak years. From 1943 to 2011, 355 cases have been documented, primarily males (97.7%) and cervical spine injuries (78.9%), resulting from impact with the boards (64.2%). Check or push from behind (36.0%) was still the most common cause of injury, although slightly lower during 2006 to 2011. From 1943 to 2011, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, and British Columbia/Yukon had the highest injury rates. Ontario and Quebec continued to show markedly different injury rates, with Ontario more than twice that of Quebec. Current data for 2006 to 2011 indicate that spinal injuries in ice hockey continue to occur, although still at lower rates than the peak years 1982 to 1995. It is imperative to continue educating players and team officials about spinal injury prevention and to reinforce the rules against checking or pushing from behind to reduce the incidence of these serious injuries.

  4. Concussion in the international ice hockey World Championships and Olympic Winter Games between 2006 and 2015.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, Markku; Hänninen, Timo; Parkkari, Jari; Stuart, Michael J; Luoto, Teemu; Kannus, Pekka; Aubry, Mark

    2017-02-01

    Concussions in sports are a growing concern. This study describes the incidence, injury characteristics and time trends of concussions in international ice hockey. All concussions in the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) World Championships (WC) and Olympic Winter Games were analysed over 9 ice hockey seasons between 2006 and 2015 using a standardised injury reporting system and diagnoses made by the team physicians. A total of 3293 games were played (169 tournaments, 1212 teams, 26 130 players) comprising 142 244 athletic game exposures. The average injury rate (IR) for concussion was 1.1 per 1000 ice hockey player-games for all IIHF WC tournaments. The IR was the highest in the men's WC A-pool tournaments and Olympic Games (IR 1.6). However, the annual IR for concussion in the men's tournaments has been lower than that in the World Junior tournaments since 2012. When a concussion occurred with contact to a flexible board, the IR was 0.2 per 1000 player games. In contrast, the IR was 1.1, if the board and glass were traditional (for the latter, RR 6.44 (95% CI 1.50 to 27.61)). In the men's tournaments, the trend of concussions caused by illegal hits decreased over the study period. After the 4th Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport was published (2013), none of the concussed players in the men's WC returned to play on the day of injury. The annual risk of concussion in the men's WC has decreased during the study period. This was most likely due to a reduction in illegal hits. The risk of concussion was significantly lower if games were played on rinks with flexible boards and glass. Rink modifications, improved education and strict rule enforcement should be considered by policymakers in international ice hockey. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. An on-ice measurement approach to analyse the biomechanics of ice hockey skating.

    PubMed

    Buckeridge, Erica; LeVangie, Marc C; Stetter, Bernd; Nigg, Sandro R; Nigg, Benno M

    2015-01-01

    Skating is a fundamental movement in ice hockey; however little research has been conducted within the field of hockey skating biomechanics due to the difficulties of on-ice data collection. In this study a novel on-ice measurement approach was tested for reliability, and subsequently implemented to investigate the forward skating technique, as well as technique differences across skill levels. Nine high caliber (High) and nine low caliber (Low) hockey players performed 30 m forward skating trials. A 3D accelerometer was mounted to the right skate for the purpose of stride detection, with the 2nd and 6th strides defined as acceleration and steady-state, respectively. The activity of five lower extremity muscles was recorded using surface electromyography. Biaxial electro-goniometers were used to quantify hip and knee angles, and in-skate plantar force was measured using instrumented insoles. Reliability was assessed with the coefficient of multiple correlation, which demonstrated moderate (r>0.65) to excellent (r>0.95) scores across selected measured variables. Greater plantar-flexor muscle activity and hip extension were evident during acceleration strides, while steady state strides exhibited greater knee extensor activity and hip abduction range of motion (p<0.05). High caliber exhibited greater hip range of motion and forefoot force application (p<0.05). The successful implementation of this on-ice mobile measurement approach offers potential for athlete monitoring, biofeedback and training advice.

  6. Pilot study to test effectiveness of video game on reaching performance in stroke.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Ana Maria; Dewald, Hendrik A; Dewald, Jules P A

    2011-01-01

    Robotic systems currently used in upper-limb rehabilitation following stroke rely on some form of visual feedback as part of the intervention program. We evaluated the effect of a video game environment (air hockey) on reaching in stroke with various levels of arm support. We used the Arm Coordination Training 3D system to provide variable arm support and to control the hockey stick. We instructed seven subjects to reach to one of three targets covering the workspace of the impaired arm during the reaching task and to reach as far as possible while playing the video game. The results from this study showed that across subjects, support levels, and targets, the reaching distances achieved with the reaching task were greater than those covered with the video game. This held even after further restricting the mapped workspace of the arm to the area most affected by the flexion synergy (effectively forcing subjects to fight the synergy to reach the hockey puck). The results from this study highlight the importance of designing video games that include specific reaching targets in the workspace compromised by the expression of the flexion synergy. Such video games would also adapt the target location online as a subject's success rate increases.

  7. Pilot study to test effectiveness of video game on reaching performance in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Ana Maria; Dewald, Hendrik A.; Dewald, Jules P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Robotic systems currently used in upper-limb rehabilitation following stroke rely on some form of visual feedback as part of the intervention program. We evaluated the effect of a video game environment (air hockey) on reaching in stroke with various levels of arm support. We used the Arm Coordination Training 3D system to provide variable arm support and to control the hockey stick. We instructed seven subjects to reach to one of three targets covering the workspace of the impaired arm during the reaching task and to reach as far as possible while playing the video game. The results from this study showed that across subjects, support levels, and targets, the reaching distances achieved with the reaching task were greater than those covered with the video game. This held even after further restricting the mapped workspace of the arm to the area most affected by the flexion synergy (effectively forcing subjects to fight the synergy to reach the hockey puck). The results from this study highlight the importance of designing video games that include specific reaching targets in the workspace compromised by the expression of the flexion synergy. Such video games would also adapt the target location online as a subject’s success rate increases. PMID:21674392

  8. Developmental contexts and sporting success: birth date and birthplace effects in national hockey league draftees 2000-2005.

    PubMed

    Baker, Joseph; Logan, A Jane

    2007-08-01

    To examine relative age and birth place effects in hockey players drafted to play in the National Hockey League (NHL) between 2000 and 2005 and determine whether these factors influenced when players were chosen in the draft. 1013 North American draftees were evaluated from the official NHL website, which provided birthplace, date of birth and selection order in the draft. Population size was collected from Canadian and American census information. Athletes were divided into four quartiles on the basis of selection date to define age cohorts in hockey. Data between the Canadian and American players were also compared to see if the optimal city sizes differed between the two nations. Relative age and birthplace effects were found, although the optimal city size found was dissimilar to that found in previous studies. Further, there were inconsistencies between the Canadian and American data. Contextual factors such as relative age and size of birthplace have a significant effect on likelihood of being selected in the NHL draft.

  9. Gluteus medius coactivation response in field hockey players with and without low back pain.

    PubMed

    Bussey, Melanie D; Kennedy, James E; Kennedy, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    To examine the effect of prolonged standing on gluteus medius coactivation and to observe whether the changes in gluteus medius coactivation over time were related to the development of low back pain in elite female field hockey players. Prospective cohort design. Participants were 39 elite female field hockey players (14 with a history of low back pain). Before the prolonged stand, maximal hip abduction strength, side bridge hold endurance and hip abduction range of motion were measured bilaterally. Surface electromyography was collected from the gluteus medius for coactivation analysis during a prolonged stand for 70 min. Low back pain was rated every 10 min on a visual analogue scale. Fourteen of 39 participants developed low back pain. The Time effect was significant for gluteus medius coactivation response (p = 0.003) and visual analogue scale score (p < 0.001). There were no significant group × time interactions. Yet athletes who developed pain had higher coactivation for the majority of the stand task. While female field hockey players have high agonist-antagonist coactivation patterns during prolonged standing, stand task is a useful tool to predict low back pain occurrence in players with and without history of pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Posterior approach for arthroscopic treatment of posterolateral impingement syndrome of the ankle in a top-level field hockey player.

    PubMed

    Lohrer, Heinz; Arentz, Sabine

    2004-04-01

    A case history of a 25-year-old field hockey player, a member of the German National Field Hockey Team, is presented. The patient could not remember any specific ankle injury, but since the World Indoor Championship in February 2003, he experienced significant but diffuse pain around the posterior ankle, especially while loading the forefoot in hockey training and competition. For 2 months, the patient was unable to run. Conservative treatment failed, and surgery was performed. Posterior ankle arthroscopy revealed a frayed posterior intermalleolar ligament and meniscoid-like scar tissue at the posterolateral ankle, indicating a posterolateral soft tissue ankle impingement syndrome. A concomitant inflammation of the posterolateral ankle and subtalar synovium was present. After arthroscopic resection and early functional aftertreatment, the patient returned to full high-level sports ability within 2 months.

  11. Sports hernia in National Hockey League players: does surgery affect performance?

    PubMed

    Jakoi, Andre; O'Neill, Craig; Damsgaard, Christopher; Fehring, Keith; Tom, James

    2013-01-01

    Athletic pubalgia is a complex injury that results in loss of play in competitive athletes, especially hockey players. The number of reported sports hernias has been increasing, and the importance of their management is vital. There are no studies reporting whether athletes can return to play at preinjury levels. The focus of this study was to evaluate the productivity of professional hockey players before an established athletic pubalgia diagnosis contrasted with the productivity after sports hernia repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Professional National Hockey League (NHL) players who were reported to have a sports hernia and who underwent surgery from 2001 to 2008 were identified. Statistics were gathered on the players' previous 2 full seasons and compared with the statistics 2 full seasons after surgery. Data concerning games played, goals, average time on ice, time of productivity, and assists were gathered. Players were divided into 3 groups: group A incorporated all players, group B were players with 6 or fewer seasons of play, and group C consisted of players with 7 or more seasons of play. A control group was chosen to compare player deterioration or improvement over a career; each player selected for the study had a corresponding control player with the same tenure in his career and position during the same years. Forty-three hockey players were identified to have had sports hernia repairs from 2001 to 2008; ultimately, 80% would return to play 2 or more full seasons. Group A had statistically significant decreases in games played, goals scored, and assists. Versus the control group, the decreases in games played and assists were supported. Statistical analysis showed significant decreases in games played, goals scored, assists, and average time on ice the following 2 seasons in group C, which was also seen in comparison with the control group. Group B (16 players) showed only statistical significance in games played versus the control group

  12. Describing Strategies Used by Elite, Intermediate, and Novice Ice Hockey Referees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, David J.; Ste-Marie, Diane M.

    2014-01-01

    Much is known about sport officials' decisions (e.g., anticipation, visual search, and prior experience). Comprehension of the entire decision process, however, requires an ecologically valid examination. To address this, we implemented a 2-part study using an expertise paradigm with ice hockey referees. Purpose: Study 1 explored the…

  13. Ground reaction forces produced by two different hockey skating arm swing techniques.

    PubMed

    Hayward-Ellis, Julie; Alexander, Marion J L; Glazebrook, Cheryl M; Leiter, Jeff

    2017-10-01

    The arm swing in hockey skating can have a positive effect on the forces produced by each skate, and the resulting velocity from each push off. The main purpose of this study was to measure the differences in ground reaction forces (GRFs) produced from an anteroposterior versus a mediolateral style hockey skating arm swing. Twenty-four elite-level female hockey players performed each technique while standing on a ground-mounted force platform, and all trials were filmed using two video cameras. Force data was assessed for peak scaled GRFs in the frontal and sagittal planes, and resultant GRF magnitude and direction. Upper limb kinematics were assessed from the video using Dartfish video analysis software, confirming that the subjects successfully performed two distinct arm swing techniques. The mediolateral arm swing used a mean of 18.38° of glenohumeral flexion/extension and 183.68° of glenohumeral abduction/adduction while the anteroposterior technique used 214.17° and 28.97° respectively. The results of this study confirmed that the mediolateral arm swing produced 37% greater frontal plane and 33% less sagittal plane GRFs than the anteroposterior arm swing. The magnitudes of the resultant GRFs were not significantly different between the two techniques; however, the mediolateral technique produced a resultant GRF with a significantly larger angle from the direction of travel (44.44°) as compared to the anteroposterior technique (31.60°). The results of this study suggest that the direction of GRFs produced by the mediolateral arm swing more closely mimic the direction of lower limb propulsion during the skating stride.

  14. A faceoff with hazardous noise: Noise exposure and hearing threshold shifts of indoor hockey officials.

    PubMed

    Adams, Karin L; Brazile, William J

    2017-02-01

    Noise exposure and hearing thresholds of indoor hockey officials of the Western States Hockey League were measured to assess the impact of hockey game noise on hearing sensitivity. Twenty-nine hockey officials who officiated the league in an arena in southeastern Wyoming in October, November, and December 2014 participated in the study. Personal noise dosimetry was conducted to determine if officials were exposed to an equivalent sound pressure level greater than 85 dBA. Hearing thresholds were measured before and after hockey games to determine if a 10 dB or greater temporary threshold shift in hearing occurred. Pure-tone audiometry was conducted in both ears at 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, and 8000 Hz. All noise exposures were greater than 85 dBA, with a mean personal noise exposure level of 93 dBA (SD = 2.2), providing 17.7% (SD = 6.3) of the officials' daily noise dose according to the OSHA criteria. Hearing threshold shifts of 10 dB or greater were observed in 86.2% (25/29) of officials, with 36% (9/25) of those threshold shifts equaling 15 dB or greater. The largest proportion of hearing threshold shifts occurred at 4000 Hz, comprising 35.7% of right ear shifts and 31.8% of left ear shifts. The threshold shifts between the pre- and post-game audiometry were statistically significant in the left ear at 500 (p=.019), 2000 (p=.0009), 3000 (p<.0001) and 4000 Hz (p=.0002), and in the right ear at 2000 (p=.0001), 3000 (p=.0001) and 4000 Hz (p<.0001), based on Wilcoxon-ranked sum analysis. Although not statistically significant at alpha = 0.05, logistic regression indicated that with each increase of one dB of equivalent sound pressure measured from personal noise dosimetry, the odds of a ≥ 10 dB TTS were increased in the left ear at 500 (OR=1.33, 95% CI 0.73-2.45), 3000 (OR=1.02, 95% CI 0.68-1.51), 4000 (OR=1.26, 95% CI 0.93-1.71) and 8000 Hz (OR=1.22, 95% CI 0.76-1.94) and in the right ear at 6000 (OR=1.03, 95% CI 0.14-7.84) and 8000 Hz (OR=1.29, 95

  15. Evaluation of cardiovascular demands of game play and practice in women's ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Spiering, Barry A; Wilson, Meredith H; Judelson, Daniel A; Rundell, Kenneth W

    2003-05-01

    Preparation for the physical demands of competition often involves game simulation during practice. This paradigm is thought to promote physiological adaptations that enhance maximal performance. However, a mismatch between practice intensity and actual competition intensity may not provide adequate training to achieve optimal game-play fitness. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of practice in meeting the cardiovascular demands of a women's ice hockey game. Heart rate (HR) data from 11 U.S. National Women's Ice Hockey team members were collected (5-second intervals) during a game and a typical practice session. Data was normalized to individual HRmax determined during Vo(2)max testing. Working time was defined as a game shift or practice-working interval. Mean working HR was greater during the game than the practice, 90 +/- 2% and 76 +/- 3% of HRmax, respectively (p < 0.05). Mean percent session time (game or practice) >90% HRmax was also longer during the game than the practice, 10.5 +/- 4.1% and 5.6 +/- 3.5% (p < 0.05), respectively. Mean session HR, percent time >80% HRmax, and mean resting HR were not different between game and practice (68 +/- 7% vs. 69 +/- 5%, 23.2 +/- 5.3% vs. 26.1 +/- 9.2%, and 59 +/- 8% vs. 56 +/- 5%, respectively). Elite women hockey players experience significantly greater cardiovascular load during game play than during practice. This mismatch in cardiovascular demand may prevent players from achieving "game shape," thus affecting competition play.

  16. An On-Ice Measurement Approach to Analyse the Biomechanics of Ice Hockey Skating

    PubMed Central

    Buckeridge, Erica; LeVangie, Marc C.; Stetter, Bernd; Nigg, Sandro R.; Nigg, Benno M.

    2015-01-01

    Skating is a fundamental movement in ice hockey; however little research has been conducted within the field of hockey skating biomechanics due to the difficulties of on-ice data collection. In this study a novel on-ice measurement approach was tested for reliability, and subsequently implemented to investigate the forward skating technique, as well as technique differences across skill levels. Nine high caliber (High) and nine low caliber (Low) hockey players performed 30m forward skating trials. A 3D accelerometer was mounted to the right skate for the purpose of stride detection, with the 2nd and 6th strides defined as acceleration and steady-state, respectively. The activity of five lower extremity muscles was recorded using surface electromyography. Biaxial electro-goniometers were used to quantify hip and knee angles, and in-skate plantar force was measured using instrumented insoles. Reliability was assessed with the coefficient of multiple correlation, which demonstrated moderate (r>0.65) to excellent (r>0.95) scores across selected measured variables. Greater plantar-flexor muscle activity and hip extension were evident during acceleration strides, while steady state strides exhibited greater knee extensor activity and hip abduction range of motion (p<0.05). High caliber exhibited greater hip range of motion and forefoot force application (p<0.05). The successful implementation of this on-ice mobile measurement approach offers potential for athlete monitoring, biofeedback and training advice. PMID:25973775

  17. Heart Rate Response in Spectators of the Montreal Canadiens Hockey Team.

    PubMed

    Khairy, Leia T; Barin, Roxana; Demonière, Fabrice; Villemaire, Christine; Billo, Marie-Josée; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Macle, Laurent; Khairy, Paul

    2017-12-01

    To our knowledge, heart rate responses have not previously been assessed in hockey fans. We quantified heart rate increases in spectators of the Montreal Canadiens, compared televised with live games, explored features associated with peak heart rates, and assessed whether increases correlate with a fan passion score. Healthy adults were enrolled, with half attending live games and half viewing televised games. All subjects completed questionnaires and had continuous Holter monitoring. Intensity of the physical stress response was defined according to previously published heart rate index thresholds as mild (< 1.33), moderate (1.33-1.83), or vigorous (> 1.83). In 20 participants, 35% women, age 46 ± 10 years, the heart rate increased by a median of 92% during the hockey game, from 60 (interquartile range, 54-65) beats per minute at rest to 114 (interquartile range, 103-129) beats per minute (P < 0.001). The heart rate increased by 110% vs 75% during live vs televised games (P < 0.001). Heart rate index (2.16 ± 0.27 vs 1.73 ± 0.15; P < 0.001) and percent maximum predicted heart rate attained (75% ± 8% vs 58% ± 7%; P < 0.001) were significantly higher during live vs televised games. Number of premature beats was nonsignificantly higher during live games (5 vs 1; P = 0.181). The fan passion score was not predictive of the heart rate response (P = 0.753). Peak heart rates most commonly occurred during overtime (40%) and scoring opportunities for (25%) and against (15%). It is exciting to watch the Montreal Canadiens! Viewing a live hockey game is associated with a heart rate response equivalent to vigorous physical stress and a televised game to moderate physical stress. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanisms of injury for concussions in university football, ice hockey, and soccer: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Scott Delaney, J; Puni, Vishal; Rouah, Fabrice

    2006-03-01

    To examine the mechanisms of injury for concussions in university football, ice hockey, and soccer. Prospective analysis. McGill University. All athletes participating in varsity football, ice hockey, and soccer. Athletes participating in university varsity football, ice hockey, and soccer were followed prospectively to determine the mechanisms of injury for concussions, whether certain mechanisms of injury causing concussions were more common in any of the three sports, whether different areas of the body seem to be more vulnerable to a concussion after contact, and whether these areas might be predisposed to higher grades of concussion after contact. There were 69 concussions in 60 athletes over a 3-year period. Being hit in the head or helmet was the most common mechanism of injury for all 3 sports. The side/temporal area of the head or helmet was the most probable area to be struck, resulting in concussion for both football and soccer. When examining the body part or object delivering the concussive blow, contact with another player's helmet was the most probable mechanism in football. The mechanisms of injury for concussions in football are similar to previously published research on professional football players. The mechanisms of injury for concussions in soccer are similar to past research on Australian rules football and rugby.

  19. Receiving Video-Based Feedback in Elite Ice-Hockey: A Player's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Lee J.; Potrac, Paul; Groom, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide some rich insights into how an elite ice-hockey player responded to his coaches' pedagogical delivery of video-based feedback sessions. Data for this study were gathered through a series of in-depth, semi-structured interviews and a reflective log relating to those interviews. The interviews were transcribed…

  20. Y-Balance Test Performance Following a Competitive Field Hockey Season: A Pretest-Posttest Study.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Matthew C; Welsch, Lauren A; Hartley, Emily M; Powden, Cameron J; Hoch, Johanna M

    2017-05-22

    The Y-Balance Test (YBT) is a dynamic balance assessment used as a preseason musculoskeletal screen to determine injury risk. While the YBT has demonstrated excellent test-retest reliability, it is unknown if YBT performance changes following participation in a competitive athletic season. Determine if a competitive athletic season affects YBT performance in field hockey players. Pretest-posttest. Laboratory. Twenty NCAA Division I women's field hockey players (age=19.55±1.30 years; height=165.10±5.277cm; mass=62.62±4.64kg) from a single team volunteered. Participants had to be free from injury throughout the entire study and participate in all athletic activities. Participants completed data collection sessions prior to (preseason) and following the athletic season (postseason). Between data collections, participants competed in the fall competitive field hockey season, which was ~3 months in duration. During data collection, participants completed the YBT bilaterally. The independent variable was time (preseason, postseason) and the dependent variables were normalized reach distances (anterior, posteromedial, posterolateral, composite) and between-limb symmetry for each reach direction. Differences between preseason and postseason were examined using paired t-tests (p≤0.05) as well as Bland-Altman limits of agreement. Four players sustained a lower extremity injury during the season and were excluded from analysis. There were no significant differences between preseason and postseason reach distances for any reach directions on either limb (p≥0.31) or in the between-limb symmetries (p≥0.52). The limits of agreement analyses determined there was a low mean bias across measurements (≤1.67%); however, the 95% confidence intervals indicated there was high variability within the posterior reach directions over time (±4.75-±14.83%). No changes in YBT performance were identified following a competitive field hockey season in Division I female athletes

  1. PUCK: An Automated Prompting System for Smart Environments: Towards achieving automated prompting; Challenges involved.

    PubMed

    Das, Barnan; Cook, Diane J; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Seelye, Adriana M

    2012-10-01

    The growth in popularity of smart environments has been quite steep in the last decade and so has the demand for smart health assistance systems. A smart home-based prompting system can enhance these technologies to deliver in-home interventions to users for timely reminders or brief instructions describing the way a task should be done for successful completion. This technology is in high demand given the desire of people who have physical or cognitive limitations to live independently in their homes. In this paper, with the introduction of the "PUCK" prompting system, we take an approach to automate prompting-based interventions without any predefined rule sets or user feedback. Unlike other approaches, we use simple off-the-shelf sensors and learn the timing for prompts based on real data that is collected with volunteer participants in our smart home test bed. The data mining approaches taken to solve this problem come with the challenge of an imbalanced class distribution that occurs naturally in the data. We propose a variant of an existing sampling technique, SMOTE, to deal with the class imbalance problem. To validate the approach, a comparative analysis with Cost Sensitive Learning is performed.

  2. Sports Institute for Research/Change Agent Research (SIR/CAR) Windsor Minor Hockey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Dick; Duthie, James

    This organizational analysis of Windsor minor hockey was conducted as a pilot study into the policy decision making process in a sports organization. The study was divided into three phases. In the first phase the organization was audited and provided with information about various feedback channels. In phase two observations, available…

  3. Pre-game perceived wellness highly associates with match running performances during an international field hockey tournament.

    PubMed

    Ihsan, Mohammed; Tan, Frankie; Sahrom, Sofyan; Choo, Hui Cheng; Chia, Michael; Aziz, Abdul Rashid

    2017-06-01

    This study examined the associations between pre-game wellness and changes in match running performance normalised to either (i) playing time, (ii) post-match RPE or (iii) both playing time and post-match RPE, over the course of a field hockey tournament. Twelve male hockey players were equipped with global positioning system (GPS) units while competing in an international tournament (six matches over 9 days). The following GPS-derived variables, total distance (TD), low-intensity activity (LIA; <15 km/h), high-intensity running (HIR; >15 km/h), high-intensity accelerations (HIACC; >2 m/s 2 ) and decelerations (HIDEC; >-2 m/s 2 ) were acquired and normalised to either (i) playing time, (ii) post-match RPE or (iii) both playing time and post-match RPE. Each morning, players completed ratings on a 0-10 scale for four variables: fatigue, muscle soreness, mood state and sleep quality, with cumulative scores determined as wellness. Associations between match performances and wellness were analysed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Combined time and RPE normalisation demonstrated the largest associations with Δwellness compared with time or RPE alone for most variables; TD (r = -0.95; -1.00 to -0.82, p = .004), HIR (r = -0.95; -1.00 to -0.83, p = .003), LIA (r = -0.94; -1.00 to -0.81, p = .026), HIACC (r = -0.87; -1.00 to -0.66, p = .004) and HIDEC (r = -0.90; -0.99 to -0.74, p = .008). These findings support the use of wellness measures as a pre-match tool to assist with managing internal load over the course of a field hockey tournament. Highlights Fixtures during international field hockey tournaments are typically congested and impose high physiological demands on an athlete. To minimise decrements in running performance over the course of a tournament, measures to identify players who have sustained high internal loads are logically warranted. The present study examined the association between changes in

  4. Measuring static seated pressure distributions and risk for skin pressure ulceration in ice sledge hockey players.

    PubMed

    Darrah, Shaun D; Dicianno, Brad E; Berthold, Justin; McCoy, Andrew; Haas, Matthew; Cooper, Rory A

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether sledge hockey players with physical disability have higher average seated pressures compared to non-disabled controls. Fifteen age-matched controls without physical disability and 15 experimental participants with physical disability were studied using a pressure mapping device to determine risk for skin pressure ulceration and the impact of cushioning and knee angle positioning on seated pressure distributions. Regardless of participant group, cushioning, or knee angle, average seated pressures exceeded clinically acceptable seated pressures. Controls had significantly higher average seated pressures than the disability group when knees were flexed, both with the cushion (p = 0.013) and without (p = 0.015). Knee extension showed significantly lower average pressures in controls, both with the cushion (p < 0.001) and without (p < 0.001). Placement of the cushion resulted in significantly lower average pressure in controls when knees were extended (p = 0.024) but not when flexed (p = 0.248). Placement of the cushion resulted in no difference in pressure (p = 0.443) in the disability group. Pressures recorded indicate high risk for skin ulceration. Cushioning was effective only in the control group with knees extended. That knee extension significantly lowered average seated pressures is important, as many sledge hockey players utilize positioning with larger knee flexion angles. Implications for Rehabilitation Ice sledge hockey is a fast growing adaptive sport. Adaptive sports have been associated with several positive improvements in overall health and quality of life, though may be putting players at risk for skin ulceration. Measured static seated pressure in sledges greatly exceeds current clinically accepted clinical guidelines. With modern improvements in wheelchair pressure relief/cushioning there are potential methods for improvement of elevated seated pressure in ice hockey sledges.

  5. Are Canadian-born Major League Baseball players more likely to bat left-handed? A partial test of the hockey-influence on batting hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Cairney, John; Chirico, Daniele; Li, Yao-Chuen; Bremer, Emily; Graham, Jeffrey D

    2018-01-01

    It has been suggested that Canadian-born Major League Baseball (MLB) players are more likely to bat left-handed, possibly owing to the fact that they learn to play ice hockey before baseball, and that there is no clear hand-preference when shooting with a hockey stick; approximately half of all ice hockey players shoot left. We constructed a database on active (i.e., October, 2016) MLB players from four countries/regions based on place of birth (Canada, United States of America [USA], Dominican Republic and South Asia [i.e., Japan, Taiwan and South Korea]), including information on which hand they use to bat and throw. We also extracted information on all Canadian-born MLB players, dating back to 1917. Our results confirm that the proportion of left-handed batters born in Canada is higher when compared to the other countries selected; also, since 1917, the proportion of Canadian MLB players who bat left has been consistently higher than the league average. We also compared the proportion of left-handed batters in Canada with players born in states in the USA grouped into high, average and low based on hockey participation. The proportion of MLB players born in states with a high level of hockey participation were more likely to bat left, although the differences were significant at trend level only (p < .10). Lastly, we found that while Canadians were more likely to bat left-handed, this did not correspond with a greater left-hand dominance, as determined by throwing hand. In conclusion, the present study confirms that Canadian-born MLB players are more likely to bat left-handed when compared to American, Dominican Republic and South Asian-born MLB players, providing partial support for the hockey influence on batting hypothesis.

  6. Improvement of Ice Hockey Players' On-Ice Sprint With Combined Plyometric and Strength Training.

    PubMed

    Dæhlin, Torstein E; Haugen, Ole C; Haugerud, Simen; Hollan, Ivana; Raastad, Truls; Rønnestad, Bent R

    2017-08-01

    Combined plyometric and strength training has previously been suggested as a strategy to improve skating performance in ice hockey players. However, the effects of combined plyometric and strength training have not previously been compared with the effects of strength training only. To compare the effects of combined plyometric and strength training on ice hockey players' skating sprint performance with those of strength training only. Eighteen participants were randomly assigned to 2 groups that completed 5 strength-training sessions/wk for 8 wk. One group included plyometric exercises at the start of 3 sessions/wk (PLY+ST), and the other group included core exercises in the same sessions (ST). Tests of 10- and 35-m skating sprints, horizontal jumping, 1-repetition-maximum (1 RM) squat, skating multistage aerobic test (SMAT), maximal oxygen consumption, repeated cycle sprints, and body composition were performed before and after the intervention. The participants increased their 1RM squat, lean mass, and body mass (P < .05), with no difference between the groups. Furthermore, they improved their 3×broad jump, repeated cycle sprint, and SMAT performance (P < .05), with no difference between the groups. PLY+ST gained a larger improvement in 10-m on-ice sprint performance than ST (P < .025). Combining plyometric and strength training for 8 wk was superior to strength training alone at improving 10-m on-ice sprint performance in high-level ice hockey players.

  7. Comparison of Concussion Rates Between NCAA Division I and Division III Men's and Women's Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Rosene, John M; Raksnis, Bryan; Silva, Brie; Woefel, Tyler; Visich, Paul S; Dompier, Thomas P; Kerr, Zachary Y

    2017-09-01

    Examinations related to divisional differences in the incidence of sports-related concussions (SRC) in collegiate ice hockey are limited. To compare the epidemiologic patterns of concussion in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) ice hockey by sex and division. Descriptive epidemiology study. A convenience sample of men's and women's ice hockey teams in Divisions I and III provided SRC data via the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program during the 2009-2010 to 2014-2015 academic years. Concussion counts, rates, and distributions were examined by factors including injury activity and position. Injury rate ratios (IRRs) and injury proportion ratios (IPRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to compare concussion rates and distributions, respectively. Overall, 415 concussions were reported for men's and women's ice hockey combined. The highest concussion rate was found in Division I men (0.83 per 1000 athlete-exposures [AEs]), followed by Division III women (0.78/1000 AEs), Division I women (0.65/1000 AEs), and Division III men (0.64/1000 AEs). However, the only significant IRR was that the concussion rate was higher in Division I men than Division III men (IRR = 1.29; 95% CI, 1.02-1.65). The proportion of concussions from checking was higher in men than women (28.5% vs 9.4%; IPR = 3.02; 95% CI, 1.63-5.59); however, this proportion was higher in Division I women than Division III women (18.4% vs 1.8%; IPR = 10.47; 95% CI, 1.37-79.75). The proportion of concussions sustained by goalkeepers was higher in women than men (14.2% vs 2.9%; IPR = 4.86; 95% CI, 2.19-10.77), with findings consistent within each division. Concussion rates did not vary by sex but differed by division among men. Checking-related concussions were less common in women than men overall but more common in Division I women than Division III women. Findings highlight the need to better understand the reasons underlying divisional differences within men's and women's ice hockey and the

  8. Skating mechanics of change-of-direction manoeuvres in ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Antoine; Turcotte, René A; Pearsall, David J

    2014-11-01

    Ice hockey requires rapid transitions between skating trajectories to effectively navigate about the ice surface. Player performance relates in large part to effective change-of-direction manoeuvres, but little is known about how those skills are performed mechanically and the effect of equipment design on them. The purpose of this study was to observe the kinetics involved in those manoeuvres as well as to compare whether kinetic differences may result between two skate models of varying ankle mobility. Eight subjects with competitive ice hockey playing experience performed rapid lateral (90°) left and right change-of-direction manoeuvres. Kinetic data were collected using force strain gauge transducers on the blade holders of the skates. Significantly greater forces were applied by the outside skate (50-70% body weight, %BW) in comparison to the inside skate (12-24%BW, p < 0.05). Skate model and turn direction had no main effect, though significant mixed interactions between leg side (inside/outside) with skate model or turn direction (p < 0.05) were observed, with a trend for left-turn dominance. This study demonstrates the asymmetric dynamic behaviour inherent in skating change-of-direction tasks.

  9. Acute injuries in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, and karate: analysis of national registry data.

    PubMed

    Kujala, U M; Taimela, S; Antti-Poika, I; Orava, S; Tuominen, R; Myllynen, P

    1995-12-02

    To determine the acute injury profile in each of six sports and compare the injury rates between the sports. Analysis of national sports injury insurance registry data. Finland during 1987-91. 621,691 person years of exposure among participants in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, or karate. Acute sports injuries requiring medical treatment and reported to the insurance company on structured forms by the patients and their doctors. 54,186 sports injuries were recorded. Injury rates were low in athletes aged under 15, while 20-24 year olds had the highest rates. Differences in injury rates between the sports were minor in this adult age group. Overall injury rates were higher in sports entailing more frequent and powerful body contact. Each sport had a specific injury profile. Fractures and dental injuries were most common in ice hockey and karate and least frequent in volleyball. Knee injuries were the most common cause of permanent disability. Based on the defined injury profiles in the different sports it is recommended that sports specific preventive measures should be employed to decrease the number of violent contacts between athletes, including improved game rules supported by careful refereeing. To prevent dental injuries the wearing of mouth guards should be encouraged, especially in ice hockey, karate, and basketball.

  10. The effect of laryngoscope handle size on possible endotracheal intubation success in university football, ice hockey, and soccer players.

    PubMed

    Delaney, J Scott; Al-Kashmiri, Ammar; Baylis, Penny-Jane; Aljufaili, Mahmood; Correa, José A

    2012-07-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a standard long-handle laryngoscope and a short-handle laryngoscope on ease of possible intubation in football, ice hockey, and soccer players. Prospective crossover study. University Sport Medicine Clinic. Sixty-two university varsity football (62 males), 45 ice hockey (26 males and 19 females), and 39 soccer players (20 males, 19 females). Athletes were assessed for different airway and physical characteristics. Three different physicians then assessed the use of laryngoscopes of different handle sizes in supine athletes who were wearing protective equipment while in-line cervical spine immobilization was maintained. The ease of passage of a laryngoscope blade into the posterior oropharynx of a supine athlete was assessed using both a standard long-handle and a short-handle laryngoscope. Use of a short-handle laryngoscope was easier for all physicians in all sports as compared with a standard-sized laryngoscope. Passage of a laryngoscope blade into the posterior oropharynx of a supine athlete was easiest in soccer players and most difficult in football and ice hockey players for both sizes of laryngoscope. Interference from chest or shoulder pads was a common cause for difficulty in passing the laryngoscope blade into the posterior oropharynx for football and ice hockey players. In the rare instances that an endotracheal intubation is to be attempted on an unconscious athlete, a short-handle laryngoscope may provide the best chance for successful intubation.

  11. Insulin Delivery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    When Programmable Implantable Medication System (PIMS) is implanted in human body, it delivers precise programmed amounts of insulin over long periods of time. Mini-Med Technologies has been refining the Technologies since initial development at APL. The size of a hockey puck, and encased in titanium shell, PIMS holds about 2 1/2 teaspoons of insulin at a programmed basal rate. If a change in measured blood sugar level dictates a different dose, the patient can vary the amount of insulin delivered by holding a small radio transceiver over the implanted system and dialing in a specific program held in the PIMS computer memory. Insulin refills are accomplished approximately 4 times a year by hypodermic needle.

  12. A Comparison of Somatic Variables of Elite Ice Hockey Players from the Czech ELH and Russian KHL

    PubMed Central

    Kutáč, Petr; Sigmund, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the basic morphological variables of contemporary elite ice hockey players, compare the parameters of players in the top Russian ice hockey league (KHL) with those of the top Czech ice hockey league (ELH), and to evaluate the parameters of players according to their position in the game. The research participants included 30 KHL players (mean age: 27.1 ± 5.1 years) and 25 ELH players (mean age: 26.4 ± 5.8 years). We determined body height, body mass, and body composition (body fat, fat-free mass, segmental fat analysis). All measurements were performed at the end of preseason training. The KHL players had the following anthropometric characteristics: body height 182.97 ± 5.61 cm (forward) and 185.72 ± 3.57 cm (defenseman), body mass 89.70 ± 5.28 kg (forward) and 92.52 ± 4.01 kg (defenseman), body fat 10.76 ± 0.63 kg (forward) and 11.10 ± 0.48 kg (defenseman), fat-free mass 78.94 ± 4.65 kg (forward) and 81.42 ± 3.52 kg (defenseman). The values for ELH players were as follows: body height 182.06 ± 5.93 cm (forward) and 185.88 ± 7.13 cm (defenseman), body mass 88.47 ± 7.06 kg (forward) and 89.36 ± 10.91 kg (defenseman), body fat 12.57 ± 2.89 kg (forward) and 11.91 ± 3.10 kg (defenseman), fat-free mass 75.93 ± 6.54 kg (forward) and 77.46 ± 7.89 kg (defenseman). The results indicate that it is beneficial to ice hockey players to have increased body mass and lower body fat, which leads to higher muscle mass, thus enabling a player to perform at the highest level and meet the specific challenges of the game. PMID:25949747

  13. Less efficient oculomotor performance is associated with increased incidence of head impacts in high school ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Adam W; DiCesare, Christopher; Nalepka, Patrick; Foss, Kim Barber; Thomas, Staci; Myer, Gregory D

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate associations between pre-season oculomotor performance on visual tracking tasks and in-season head impact incidence during high school boys ice hockey. Prospective observational study design. Fifteen healthy high school aged male hockey athletes (M=16.50±1.17years) performed two 30s blocks each of a prosaccade and self-paced saccade task, and two trials each of a slow, medium, and fast smooth pursuit task (90°s -1 ; 180°s -1 ; 360°s -1 ) during the pre-season. Regular season in-game collision data were collected via helmet-mounted accelerometers. Simple linear regressions were used to examine relations between oculomotor performance measures and collision incidence at various impact thresholds. The variability of prosaccade latency was positively related to total collisions for the 20g force cutoff (p=0.046, adjusted R 2 =0.28). The average self-paced saccade velocity (p=0.020, adjusted R 2 =0.37) and variability of smooth pursuit gaze velocity (p=0.012, adjusted R 2 =0.47) were also positively associated with total collisions for the 50g force cutoff. These results provide preliminary evidence that less efficient oculomotor performance on three different oculomotor tasks is associated with increased incidence of head impacts during a competitive ice hockey season. The variability of prosaccade latency, the average self-paced saccade velocity and the variability of gaze velocity during predictable smooth pursuit all related to increased head impacts. Future work is needed to further understand player initiated collisions, but this is an important first step toward understanding strategies to reduce incidence of injury risk in ice hockey, and potentially contact sports more generally. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationship between Physiological Off-Ice Testing, On-Ice Skating, and Game Performance in Division I Women's Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Boland, Michelle; Miele, Emily M; Delude, Katie

    2017-10-07

    The purpose was to identify off-ice testing variables that correlate to skating and game performance in Division I collegiate women ice hockey players. Twenty female, forward and defensive players (19.95 ± 1.35 yr) were assessed for weight, height, percent fat mass (%FAT), bone mineral density, predicted one repetition maximum (RM) absolute and relative (REL%) bench press (BP) and hex bar deadlift (HDL), lower body explosive power, anaerobic power, countermovement vertical jump (CMJ), maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), and on-ice repeated skate sprint (RSS) performance. The on-ice RSS test included 6 timed 85.6 m sprints with participants wearing full hockey equipment; fastest time (FT), average time (AT) and fatigue index (FI) for the first length skate (FLS; 10 m) and total length skate (TLS; 85.6 m) were used for analysis. Game performance was evaluated with game statistics: goals, assists, points, plus-minus, and shots on goal (SOG). Correlation coefficients were used to determine relationships. Percent fat mass was positively correlated (p < 0.05) with FLS-FI and TLS-AT; TLS-FT was negatively correlated with REL%HDL; BP-RM was negatively correlated with FLS-FT and FLS-AT; MIP positively correlated with assists, points, and SOG; FLS-AT negatively correlated with assists. Game performance in women ice hockey players may be enhanced by greater MIP, repeat acceleration ability, and mode-specific training. Faster skating times were associated with lower %FAT. Skating performance in women ice hockey players may be enhanced by improving body composition, anaerobic power, and both lower and upper body strength in off-ice training.

  15. Acute injuries in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, and karate: analysis of national registry data.

    PubMed Central

    Kujala, U. M.; Taimela, S.; Antti-Poika, I.; Orava, S.; Tuominen, R.; Myllynen, P.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the acute injury profile in each of six sports and compare the injury rates between the sports. DESIGN--Analysis of national sports injury insurance registry data. SETTING--Finland during 1987-91. SUBJECTS--621,691 person years of exposure among participants in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, or karate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Acute sports injuries requiring medical treatment and reported to the insurance company on structured forms by the patients and their doctors. RESULTS--54,186 sports injuries were recorded. Injury rates were low in athletes aged under 15, while 20-24 year olds had the highest rates. Differences in injury rates between the sports were minor in this adult age group. Overall injury rates were higher in sports entailing more frequent and powerful body contact. Each sport had a specific injury profile. Fractures and dental injuries were most common in ice hockey and karate and least frequent in volleyball. Knee injuries were the most common cause of permanent disability. CONCLUSIONS--Based on the defined injury profiles in the different sports it is recommended that sports specific preventive measures should be employed to decrease the number of violent contacts between athletes, including improved game rules supported by careful refereeing. To prevent dental injuries the wearing of mouth guards should be encouraged, especially in ice hockey, karate, and basketball. PMID:8520333

  16. The Impact of a Sports Vision Training Program in Youth Field Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Sebastian; Memmert, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a sports vision training program improves the visual performance of youth male field hockey players, ages 12 to 16 years, after an intervention of six weeks compared to a control group with no specific sports vision training. The choice reaction time task at the D2 board (Learning Task I), the functional field of view task (Learning Task II) and the multiple object tracking (MOT) task (Transfer Task) were assessed before and after the intervention and again six weeks after the second test. Analyzes showed significant differences between the two groups for the choice reaction time task at the D2 board and the functional field of view task, with significant improvements for the intervention group and none for the control group. For the transfer task, we could not find statistically significant improvements for either group. The results of this study are discussed in terms of theoretical and practical implications. Key pointsPerceptual training with youth field hockey playersCan a sports vision training program improve the visual performance of youth male field hockey players, ages 12 to 16 years, after an intervention of six weeks compared to a control group with no specific sports vision training?The intervention was performed in the “VisuLab” as DynamicEye® SportsVision Training at the German Sport University Cologne.We ran a series of 3 two-factor univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures on both within subject independent variables (group; measuring point) to examine the effects on central perception, peripheral perception and choice reaction time.The present study shows an improvement of certain visual abilities with the help of the sports vision training program. PMID:24150071

  17. THE ROLE OF AEROBIC CAPACITY IN HIGH-INTENSITY INTERMITTENT EFFORTS IN ICE-HOCKEY

    PubMed Central

    Roczniok, R.; Maszczyk, A.; Pietraszewski, P.; Zając, A.

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine a relationship between aerobic capacity (V.O2max) and fatigue from high-intensity skating in elite male hockey players. The subjects were twenty-four male members of the senior national ice hockey team of Poland who played the position of forward or defence. Each subject completed an on-ice Repeated-Skate Sprint test (RSS) consisting of 6 timed 89-m sprints, with 30 s of rest between subsequent efforts, and an incremental test on a cycle ergometer in the laboratory, the aim of which was to establish their maximal oxygen uptake (V.O2max). The analysis of variance showed that each next repetition in the 6x89 m test was significantly longer than the previous one (F5,138=53.33, p<0.001). An analysis of the fatigue index (FI) calculated from the times recorded for subsequent repetitions showed that the value of the FI increased with subsequent repetitions, reaching its maximum between repetitions 5 and 6 (3.10±1.16%). The total FI was 13.77±1.74%. The coefficient of correlation between V.O2max and the total FI for 6 sprints on the distance of 89 m (r =–0.584) was significant (p=0.003). The variance in the index of players’ fatigue in the 6x89 m test accounted for 34% of the variance in V.O2max. The 6x89 m test proposed in this study offers a high test-retest correlation coefficient (r=0.78). Even though the test is criticized for being too exhaustive and thereby for producing highly variable results it still seems that it was well selected for repeated sprint ability testing in hockey players. PMID:25177097

  18. Trajectories of Affective States in Adolescent Hockey Players: Turning Point and Motivational Antecedents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudreau, Patrick; Amiot, Catherine E.; Vallerand, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined longitudinal trajectories of positive and negative affective states with a sample of 265 adolescent elite hockey players followed across 3 measurement points during the 1st 11 weeks of a season. Latent class growth modeling, incorporating a time-varying covariate and a series of predictors assessed at the onset of the season,…

  19. An Examination of the Relative Age Effect in Developmental Girls' Hockey in Ontario

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kristy L.; Weir, Patricia L.

    2013-01-01

    The relative age effect (RAE) suggests that athletes may be provided with greater opportunities for success depending on the position of their birthdate in a sport's selection year. While the effect has been well established in men's sports, less is known about women's sports. This study examined the RAE in developmental girls' hockey in Ontario.…

  20. Relationship Between Skating Economy and Performance During a Repeated-Shift Test in Elite and Subelite Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Lamoureux, Nicholas R; Tomkinson, Grant R; Peterson, Benjamin J; Fitzgerald, John S

    2018-04-01

    Lamoureux, NR, Tomkinson, GR, Peterson, BJ, and Fitzgerald, JS. Relationship between skating economy and performance during a repeated-shift test in elite and subelite ice hockey players. J Strength Cond Res 32(4): 1109-1113, 2018-The purpose of this study was to determine the importance of skating economy to fatigue during repeated high-intensity efforts of a simulated ice hockey shift. Forty-five collegiate and Junior A male ice hockey players (aged 18-24 years) performed a continuous graded exercise test using a skate treadmill. Breath-by-breath data for oxygen consumption (V[Combining Dot Above]O2) and respiratory exchange ratio were collected and used to derive energy expenditure (EE) averaged over the final 10 seconds of each stage. Economy was determined as the slope of the regression line relating V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and EE against skating speed separately. Participants also completed 8 bouts of maximal ice skating through a course designed to simulate typical shift, with timing gates determining first half, second half, and total fatigue decrement, calculated by a percent decrement score. Partial correlation was used to determine the association between economy measures and decrement during the repeated-shift test. Twenty-six participants met inclusion criteria and were included in data analysis. Skating economy measures (both relative V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and EE) were very likely moderate positive correlates of total fatigue decrement (r [95% confidence interval]: V[Combining Dot Above]O2, 0.46 [0.09, 0.72] and EE, 0.44, [0.06, 0.71]) but not with first or second gate decrement. Our results indicate that skating economy plays an important role in fatigue resistance over repeated on-ice sprints designed to simulate a typical shift. This supports the use of technical skating coaching and training techniques to enhance skating economy as a means of improving ice hockey performance.

  1. Upper respiratory tract infection and mucosal immunity in young ice hockey players during the pre-tournament training period.

    PubMed

    Orysiak, Joanna; Witek, Konrad; Malczewska-Lenczowska, Jadwiga; Zembron-Lacny, Agnieszka; Pokrywka, Andrzej; Sitkowski, Dariusz

    2018-02-27

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of 17 days of training during preparation for the Ice Hockey Under 18 World Championship of the Polish ice hockey national team on the mucosal immune function and monitor upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) incidence before, during and after the competition. Twelve male ice hockey players (age 17.7±0.5 years) were recruited for this study. The first saliva/blood collection took place at the beginning of the training camp (without training at the training camp), the second one was conducted on the 9th day of the training camp immediately after the intensification of training, and the third collection was carried out on the 13th day of training (4 days before leaving for the World Championship) in the tapering phase. To assess the mucosal immune function, concentrations of secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), sIgA1, and sIgA2 were analyzed in saliva. Cortisol concentration and creatine kinase activity were determined in blood, as indicators of stress and muscle damage, respectively. The Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey-21 questionnaire was used to assess URTI symptoms. A significant increase in the sIgA1 and sIgA2 concentrations was observed in the third collection compared with the second time point (114.45±33.00 vs 77.49±27.29 and 88.97±25.33 vs 71.65±32.44 U, respectively). There were no statistically significant correlations between the URTI incidence and saliva variables. In conclusion, the tapering period positively affects the mucosal immune function, especially sIgA1 and sIgA2 concentrations, with no significant change in frequency of URTI in young ice hockey players.

  2. The development and reliability of a repeated anaerobic cycling test in female ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kier; Snydmiller, Gary; Game, Alex; Quinney, Art; Bell, Gordon

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and assess the reliability of a repeated anaerobic power cycling test designed to mimic the repeated sprinting nature of the sport of ice hockey. Nineteen female varsity ice hockey players (mean X +/- SD age, height and body mass = 21 +/- 2 yr, 166.6 +/- 6.3 cm and 62.3 +/- 7.3) completed 3 trials of a repeated anaerobic power test on a Monark cycle ergometer on different days. The test consisted of "all-out" cycling for 5 seconds separated by 10 seconds of low-intensity cycling, repeated 4 times. The relative load factor used for the resistance setting was equal to 0.095 kg per kilogram body mass. There was no significant difference between the peak 5-second power output (PO), mean PO, or the fatigue index (%) among the 3 different trials. The peak 5-second PO was 702.6 +/- 114.8 w and 11.3 +/- 1.1 w x kg, whereas the mean PO across the 4 repeats was 647.1 +/- 96.3 w and 10.4 +/- 1.0 w x kg averaged for the 3 different tests. The fatigue index averaged 17.8 +/- 6.5%. The intraclass correlation coefficient for peak 5-second, mean PO, and fatigue index was 0.82, 0.86, and 0.82, respectively. This study reports the methodology of a repeated anaerobic power cycling test that was reliable for the measurement of PO and calculated fatigue index in varsity women ice hockey players and can be used as a laboratory-based assessment of repeated anaerobic fitness.

  3. Effect of increasing maximal aerobic exercise on serum muscles enzymes in professional field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Hazar, Muhsin; Otag, Aynur; Otag, Ilhan; Sezen, Mehmet; Sever, Ozan

    2014-11-04

    Exercise results in oxidative enzyme increase and micro-injuries in skeletal muscles. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of maximal aerobic exercise on serum muscle enzymes in professional field hockey players. This study aims to determine the effect of increasing maximal aerobic exercise on creatine kinase (CK), creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) serum levels. 31 young professional field hockey players (13 female and 18 male players) volunteered for this study. All participants underwent the shuttle run test. Blood samples were taken from each participant before the shuttle run test. Post test blood samples were taken immediately after exercise and one hour after respectively. Pre and post test CK, CK-MB, AST and ALT values were measured by means of auto analyzer using original kits. The acute post test measure of the CK level increased in male (p=0.002) and female (p=0.00) sportsmen. CK-MB values obtained one hour after the exercise was lower than those before the exercise in males (p=0.02). In females (p=0.017) and males (p=0.05) AST activity significantly increased immediately after exercise and decreased to resting activity 1 h recovery. ALT significantly increased immediately after exercise in female (p=0.03) and male (p=0.00) athletes and after 1 h recovery ALT activities decreased below resting values. The timing and severity of exercise used in our study increased CK values, decreased CK-MB values and AST, ALT values increased in female and male field hockey players.

  4. Three-dimensional kinematics of the knee and ankle joints for three consecutive push-offs during ice hockey skating starts.

    PubMed

    Lafontaine, Dany

    2007-09-01

    Little biomechanical research has been conducted recently on hockey skating despite the sport's worldwide appeal. One reason for this lack of biomechanical knowledge stems from the difficulty of collecting data. The lack of accuracy, the disputable realism of treadmills, and the large field of view required are some of the technical challenges that have to be overcome. The main objective of the current study was to improve our knowledge of the joint kinematics during the skating stroke. A second objective was to improve the data collection system we developed and the third was to establish if a kinematic progression exists in the hockey skating stroke similar to that in speed skating. Relative motions at the knee and ankle joints were computed using a joint coordinate system approach. The differences at the knee joints in push-offs indicated that the skating skill was progressively changing with each push-off. The relative stability of the ankle angles can be attributed to the design of the skate boots, which have recently become very rigid. Further research on ice hockey skating is warranted and should include more skaters and investigate the effect various starting strategies and variations in equipment have on skaters' performance.

  5. Head injuries presenting to emergency departments in the United States from 1990 to 1999 for ice hockey, soccer, and football.

    PubMed

    Delaney, J Scott

    2004-03-01

    To examine the number and rates of head injuries occurring in the community as a whole for the team sports of ice hockey, soccer, and football by analyzing data from patients presenting to US emergency departments (EDs) from 1990 to 1999. Retrospective analysis. Data compiled for the US Consumer Product Safety Commission using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System were used to generate estimates for the total number of head injuries, concussions, internal head injuries, and skull fractures occurring on a national level from the years 1990 to 1999. These data were combined with yearly participation figures to generate rates of injuries presenting to the ED for each sport. There were an estimated 17,008 head injuries from ice hockey, 86,697 from soccer, and 204,802 from football that presented to US EDs from 1990 to 1999. The total number of concussions presenting to EDs in the United States over the same period was estimated to be 4820 from ice hockey, 21,715 from soccer, and 68,861 from football. While the rates of head injuries, concussions, and combined concussions/internal head injuries/skull fractures presenting to EDs per 10,000 players were not always statistically similar for all 3 sports in each year data were available, they were usually comparable. While the total numbers of head injuries, concussions, and combined concussions/skull fractures/internal head injuries presenting to EDs in the United States are different for ice hockey, soccer, and football for the years studied, the yearly rates for these injuries are comparable among all 3 sports.

  6. Checking in: An Analysis of the (Lack of) Body Checking in Women's Ice Hockey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaving, Charlene; Roberts, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Despite the growing popularity of women's ice hockey in North America, players continue to face limitations because of the prohibition of body checking. In this paper, we argue from a liberal feminist philosophical perspective that this prohibition reinforces existing traditional stereotypes of female athletes. Because the women's game does not…

  7. Vitamin D status and its relation to exercise performance and iron status in young ice hockey players

    PubMed Central

    Orysiak, Joanna; Mazur-Rozycka, Joanna; Fitzgerald, John; Starczewski, Michal; Malczewska-Lenczowska, Jadwiga

    2018-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to examine the association between serum vitamin D concentration and isometric strength of various muscle groups, vertical jump performance, and repeated sprint ability in young ice hockey players. The secondary aim was to determine the association between vitamin D deficiency and indices of iron status. Methods Fifty male ice hockey players (17.2±0.9 years) participated in this cross-sectional study. Exercise performance was evaluated using isometric strength measures of upper and lower extremities, vertical jump performance and repeated sprint ability (RSA). Blood samples were collected for the determination of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and multiple indicies of iron status. Results The mean serum 25(OH)D concentration was 30.4 ng·ml-1 and ranged from 12.5 to 91.4 ng·ml-1. Eleven participants (22%) had vitamin D deficiency and 20 athletes (40%) had vitamin D insufficiency. Serum 25(OH)D concentration was not positively correlated with isometric muscle strength, vertical jump performance, or RSA after adjusting for age, training experience, fat mass, fat free mass and height. Serum 25(OH)D concentration was not associated with indices of iron status. Conclusion Vitamin D insufficiency is highly prevalent in ice hockey players, but 25(OH)D concentration but it is not associated with exercise performance or indices of iron status. PMID:29630669

  8. Seagrass vegetation and meiofauna enhance the bacterial abundance in the Baltic Sea sediments (Puck Bay).

    PubMed

    Jankowska, Emilia; Jankowska, Katarzyna; Włodarska-Kowalczuk, Maria

    2015-09-01

    This study presents the first report on bacterial communities in the sediments of eelgrass (Zostera marina) meadows in the shallow southern Baltic Sea (Puck Bay). Total bacterial cell numbers (TBNs) and bacteria biomass (BBM) assessed with the use of epifluorescence microscope and Norland's formula were compared between bare and vegetated sediments at two localities and in two sampling summer months. Significantly higher TBNs and BBM (PERMANOVA tests, P < 0.05) were recorded at bottom covered by the seagrass meadows in both localities and in both sampling months. The relationships between bacteria characteristics and environmental factors (grain size, organic matter, photopigments in sediments), meiofauna and macrofauna densities, as well as macrophyte vegetation characteristics (shoot density, phytobenthos biomass) were tested using PERMANOVA distance-based linear model (DISTLM) procedures and showed that the main factors explaining bacteria characteristics are bottom type (vegetated vs. unvegetated) and meiofauna density. These two factors explained together 48.3% of variability in TBN and 40.5% in BBM, and their impacts did not overlap (as indicated by DISTLM sequential tests) demonstrating the different natures of these relationships. The effects of seagrass were most probably related to the increase of organic matter and providing habitat while higher numbers of meiofauna organisms may have stimulated the bacterial growth by increased grazing.

  9. Carbon monoxide in indoor ice skating rinks: Evaluation of absorption by adult hockey players

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, B.; Dewailly, E.; Lavoie, R.

    1990-05-01

    We evaluated alveolar carbon monoxide (CO) levels of 122 male, adult hockey players active in recreational leagues of the Quebec City region (Canada), before and after 10 weekly 90-minute games in 10 different rinks. We also determined exposure by quantifying the average CO level in the rink during the games. Other variables documented included age, pulmonary function, aerobic capacity, and smoking status. Environmental concentrations varied from 1.6 to 131.5 parts per million (ppm). We examined the absorption/exposure relationship using a simple linear regression model. In low CO exposure levels, physical exercise lowered the alveolar CO concentration. However, we noted thatmore » for each 10 ppm of CO in the ambient air, the players had adsorbed enough CO to raise their carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels by 1 percent. This relationship was true both for smokers and non-smokers. We suggest that an average environmental concentration of 20 ppm of CO for the duration of a hockey game (90 minutes) should be reference limit not to be exceeded in indoor skating rinks.« less

  10. A prospective study of concussions among National Hockey League players during regular season games: the NHL-NHLPA Concussion Program.

    PubMed

    Benson, Brian W; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Rizos, John; Kang, Jian; Burke, Charles J

    2011-05-17

    In 1997, the National Hockey League (NHL) and NHL Players' Association (NHLPA) launched a concussion program to improve the understanding of this injury. We explored initial postconcussion signs, symptoms, physical examination findings and time loss (i.e., time between the injury and medical clearance by the physician to return to competitive play), experienced by male professional ice-hockey players, and assessed the utility of initial postconcussion clinical manifestations in predicting time loss among hockey players. We conducted a prospective case series of concussions over seven NHL regular seasons (1997-2004) using an inclusive cohort of players. The primary outcome was concussion and the secondary outcome was time loss. NHL team physicians documented post-concussion clinical manifestations and recorded the date when a player was medically cleared to return to play. Team physicians reported 559 concussions during regular season games. The estimated incidence was 1.8 concussions per 1000 player-hours. The most common postconcussion symptom was headache (71%). On average, time loss (in days) increased 2.25 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41-3.62) for every subsequent (i.e., recurrent) concussion sustained during the study period. Controlling for age and position, significant predictors of time loss were postconcussion headache (p < 0.001), low energy or fatigue (p = 0.01), amnesia (p = 0.02) and abnormal neurologic examination (p = 0.01). Using a previously suggested time loss cut-point of 10 days, headache (odds ratio [OR] 2.17, 95% CI 1.33-3.54) and low energy or fatigue (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.04-2.85) were significant predictors of time loss of more than 10 days. Postconcussion headache, low energy or fatigue, amnesia and abnormal neurologic examination were significant predictors of time loss among professional hockey players.

  11. A prospective study of concussions among National Hockey League players during regular season games: the NHL-NHLPA Concussion Program

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Brian W.; Meeuwisse, Willem H.; Rizos, John; Kang, Jian; Burke, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    Background In 1997, the National Hockey League (NHL) and NHL Players’ Association (NHLPA) launched a concussion program to improve the understanding of this injury. We explored initial postconcussion signs, symptoms, physical examination findings and time loss (i.e., time between the injury and medical clearance by the physician to return to competitive play), experienced by male professional ice-hockey players, and assessed the utility of initial postconcussion clinical manifestations in predicting time loss among hockey players. Methods We conducted a prospective case series of concussions over seven NHL regular seasons (1997–2004) using an inclusive cohort of players. The primary outcome was concussion and the secondary outcome was time loss. NHL team physicians documented post-concussion clinical manifestations and recorded the date when a player was medically cleared to return to play. Results Team physicians reported 559 concussions during regular season games. The estimated incidence was 1.8 concussions per 1000 player-hours. The most common postconcussion symptom was headache (71%). On average, time loss (in days) increased 2.25 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41–3.62) for every subsequent (i.e., recurrent) concussion sustained during the study period. Controlling for age and position, significant predictors of time loss were postconcussion headache (p < 0.001), low energy or fatigue (p = 0.01), amnesia (p = 0.02) and abnormal neurologic examination (p = 0.01). Using a previously suggested time loss cut-point of 10 days, headache (odds ratio [OR] 2.17, 95% CI 1.33–3.54) and low energy or fatigue (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.04–2.85) were significant predictors of time loss of more than 10 days. Interpretation Postconcussion headache, low energy or fatigue, amnesia and abnormal neurologic examination were significant predictors of time loss among professional hockey players. PMID:21502355

  12. Playing Hockey, Riding Motorcycles, and the Ethics of Protection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Ice hockey and motorcycle riding are increasingly popular activities in the United States that are associated with high risks of head and facial injuries. In both, effective head and facial protective equipment are available. Yet the debates about safety policies regarding the use of head protection in these activities have taken different forms, in terms of the influence of epidemiological data as well as of the ethical concerns raised. I examine these debates over injury prevention in the context of leisure activities, in which the public health duty to prevent avoidable harm must be balanced with the freedom to assume voluntary risks. PMID:23078472

  13. The assessment of airway maneuvers and interventions in university Canadian football, ice hockey, and soccer players.

    PubMed

    Delaney, J Scott; Al-Kashmiri, Ammar; Baylis, Penny-Jane; Troutman, Tracy; Aljufaili, Mahmood; Correa, José A

    2011-01-01

    Managing an airway in an unconscious athlete is a lifesaving skill that may be made more difficult by the recent changes in protective equipment. Different airway maneuvers and techniques may be required to help ventilate an unconscious athlete who is wearing full protective equipment. To assess the effectiveness of different airway maneuvers with football, ice hockey, and soccer players wearing full protective equipment. Crossover study. University sports medicine clinic. A total of 146 university varsity athletes, consisting of 62 football, 45 ice hockey, and 39 soccer players. Athletes were assessed for different airway and physical characteristics. Three investigators then evaluated the effectiveness of different bag-valve-mask (BVM) ventilation techniques in supine athletes who were wearing protective equipment while inline cervical spine immobilization was maintained. The effectiveness of 1-person BVM ventilation (1-BVM), 2-person BVM ventilation (2-BVM), and inline immobilization and ventilation (IIV) was judged by each investigator for each athlete using a 4-point rating scale. All forms of ventilation were least difficult in soccer players and most difficult in football players. When compared with 1-BVM, both 2-BVM and IIV were deemed more effective by all investigators for all athletes. Interference from the helmet and stabilizer were common reasons for difficult ventilation in football and ice hockey players. Sports medicine professionals should practice and be comfortable with different ventilation techniques for athletes wearing full equipment. The use of a new ventilation technique, termed inline immobilization and ventilation, may be beneficial, especially when the number of responders is limited.

  14. A systematic video analysis of National Hockey League (NHL) concussions, part I: who, when, where and what?

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Michael G; Comper, Paul; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Echemendia, Ruben J

    2015-04-01

    Although there is a growing understanding of the consequences of concussions in hockey, very little is known about the precipitating factors associated with this type of injury. To describe player characteristics and situational factors associated with concussions in the National Hockey League (NHL). Case series of medically diagnosed concussions for regular season games over a 3.5-year period during the 2006-2010 seasons using an inclusive cohort of professional hockey players. Digital video records were coded and analysed using the Heads Up Checklist. Of 197 medically diagnosed concussions, 88% involved contact with an opponent. Forwards accounted for more concussions than expected compared with on-ice proportional representation (95% CI 60 to 73; p=0.04). Significantly more concussions occurred in the first period (47%) compared with the second and third periods (p=0.047), with the majority of concussions occurring in the defensive zone (45%). Approximately 47% of the concussions occurred in open ice, 53% occurred in the perimeter. Finally, 37% of the concussions involved injured players' heads contacting the boards or glass. This study describes several specific factors associated with concussions in the NHL, including period of the game, player position, body size, and specific locations on the ice and particular situations based on a player's position. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Scheduling for the National Hockey League Using a Multi-objective Evolutionary Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Sam; While, Lyndon; Barone, Luigi

    We describe a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm that derives schedules for the National Hockey League according to three objectives: minimising the teams' total travel, promoting equity in rest time between games, and minimising long streaks of home or away games. Experiments show that the system is able to derive schedules that beat the 2008-9 NHL schedule in all objectives simultaneously, and that it returns a set of schedules that offer a range of trade-offs across the objectives.

  16. Abnormalities in bivalve larvae from the Puck Bay (Gulf of Gdansk, southern Baltic Sea) as an indicator of environmental pollution.

    PubMed

    Lasota, Rafal; Gierszewska, Katarzyna; Viard, Frédérique; Wolowicz, Maciej; Dobrzyn, Katarzyna; Comtet, Thierry

    2018-01-01

    This study described the occurrence of abnormalities in bivalve larvae from the Puck Bay. Analyses of plankton samples collected in 2012-2013 showed that larval Mytilus trossulus, Mya arenaria, and Cerastoderma glaucum exhibited abnormalities that could indicate adverse environmental impacts. The deformities were mainly in shells, but missing soft tissue fragments and protruding vela were also noted. In addition to larval studies, we analyzed benthic postlarvae of Mytilus trossulus. Interestingly, grooves and notches at different locations of the prodissoconch, dissoconch, and shell margin were observed. Some of these deformations were reminiscent of the indentations found on the shell edge of larvae. Comparing the proportion of abnormal postlarvae to larvae with shell abnormalities suggested that the survival of larvae with shell abnormalities was low. Overall, our results suggested that the ratio of abnormal bivalve larvae could be used as an indicator of the biological effects of hazardous substances in the pelagic environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Practicing Field Hockey Skills Along the Contextual Interference Continuum: A Comparison of Five Practice Schedules

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Jadeera Phaik Geok; Lay, Brendan; Grove, J. Robert; Medic, Nikola; Razman, Rizal

    2012-01-01

    To overcome the weakness of the contextual interference (CI) effect within applied settings, Brady, 2008 recommended that the amount of interference be manipulated. This study investigated the effect of five practice schedules on the learning of three field hockey skills. Fifty-five pre-university students performed a total of 90 trials for each skill under blocked, mixed or random practice orders. Results showed a significant time effect with all five practice conditions leading to improvements in acquisition and learning of the skills. No significant differences were found between the groups. The findings of the present study did not support the CI effect and suggest that either blocked, mixed, or random practice schedules can be used effectively when structuring practice for beginners. Key pointsThe contextual interference effect did not surface when using sport skills.There appears to be no difference between blocked and random practice schedules in the learning of field hockey skills.Low (blocked), moderate (mixed) or high (random) interference practice schedules can be used effectively when conducting a multiple skill practice session for beginners. PMID:24149204

  18. Practicing field hockey skills along the contextual interference continuum: a comparison of five practice schedules.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Jadeera Phaik Geok; Lay, Brendan; Grove, J Robert; Medic, Nikola; Razman, Rizal

    2012-01-01

    To overcome the weakness of the contextual interference (CI) effect within applied settings, Brady, 2008 recommended that the amount of interference be manipulated. This study investigated the effect of five practice schedules on the learning of three field hockey skills. Fifty-five pre-university students performed a total of 90 trials for each skill under blocked, mixed or random practice orders. Results showed a significant time effect with all five practice conditions leading to improvements in acquisition and learning of the skills. No significant differences were found between the groups. The findings of the present study did not support the CI effect and suggest that either blocked, mixed, or random practice schedules can be used effectively when structuring practice for beginners. Key pointsThe contextual interference effect did not surface when using sport skills.There appears to be no difference between blocked and random practice schedules in the learning of field hockey skills.Low (blocked), moderate (mixed) or high (random) interference practice schedules can be used effectively when conducting a multiple skill practice session for beginners.

  19. High-intensity interval training has positive effects on performance in ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Naimo, M A; de Souza, E O; Wilson, J M; Carpenter, A L; Gilchrist, P; Lowery, R P; Averbuch, B; White, T M; Joy, J

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the well-known benefits that have been shown, few studies have looked at the practical applications of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on athletic performance. This study investigated the effects of a HIIT program compared to traditional continuous endurance exercise training. 24 hockey players were randomly assigned to either a continuous or high-intensity interval group during a 4-week training program. The interval group (IG) was involved in a periodized HIIT program. The continuous group (CG) performed moderate intensity cycling for 45-60 min at an intensity that was 65% of their calculated heart rate reserve. Body composition, muscle thickness, anaerobic power, and on-ice measures were assessed pre- and post-training. Muscle thickness was significantly greater in IG (p=0.01) when compared to CG. The IG had greater values for both ∆ peak power (p<0.003) and ∆ mean power (p<0.02). Additionally, IG demonstrated a faster ∆ sprint (p<0.02) and a trend (p=0.08) for faster ∆ endurance test time to completion for IG. These results indicate that hockey players may utilize short-term HIIT to elicit positive effects in muscle thickness, power and on-ice performance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. The Assessment of Airway Maneuvers and Interventions in University Canadian Football, Ice Hockey, and Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, J. Scott; Al-Kashmiri, Ammar; Baylis, Penny-Jane; Troutman, Tracy; Aljufaili, Mahmood; Correa, José A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Managing an airway in an unconscious athlete is a lifesaving skill that may be made more difficult by the recent changes in protective equipment. Different airway maneuvers and techniques may be required to help ventilate an unconscious athlete who is wearing full protective equipment. Objective: To assess the effectiveness of different airway maneuvers with football, ice hockey, and soccer players wearing full protective equipment. Design: Crossover study. Setting: University sports medicine clinic. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 146 university varsity athletes, consisting of 62 football, 45 ice hockey, and 39 soccer players. Intervention(s): Athletes were assessed for different airway and physical characteristics. Three investigators then evaluated the effectiveness of different bag-valve-mask (BVM) ventilation techniques in supine athletes who were wearing protective equipment while inline cervical spine immobilization was maintained. Main Outcome Measure(s): The effectiveness of 1-person BVM ventilation (1-BVM), 2-person BVM ventilation (2-BVM), and inline immobilization and ventilation (IIV) was judged by each investigator for each athlete using a 4-point rating scale. Results: All forms of ventilation were least difficult in soccer players and most difficult in football players. When compared with 1-BVM, both 2-BVM and IIV were deemed more effective by all investigators for all athletes. Interference from the helmet and stabilizer were common reasons for difficult ventilation in football and ice hockey players. Conclusions: Sports medicine professionals should practice and be comfortable with different ventilation techniques for athletes wearing full equipment. The use of a new ventilation technique, termed inline immobilization and ventilation, may be beneficial, especially when the number of responders is limited. PMID:21391796

  1. Safe-Play Knowledge, Aggression, and Head-Impact Biomechanics in Adolescent Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Julianne D; Pierce, Alice F; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Register-Mihalik, Johna K; Pamukoff, Derek N; Mihalik, Jason P

    2016-05-01

    Addressing safe-play knowledge and player aggression could potentially improve ice hockey sport safety. To compare (1) safe-play knowledge and aggression between male and female adolescent ice hockey players and (2) head-impact frequency and severity between players with high and low levels of safe-play knowledge and aggression during practices and games. Cohort study. On field. Forty-one male (n = 29) and female (n = 12) adolescent ice hockey players. Players completed the Safe Play Questionnaire (0 = less knowledge, 7 = most knowledge) and Competitive Aggressiveness and Anger Scale (12 = less aggressive, 60 = most aggressive) at midseason. Aggressive penalty minutes were recorded throughout the season. The Head Impact Telemetry System was used to capture head-impact frequency and severity (linear acceleration [g], rotational acceleration [rad/s(2)], Head Impact Technology severity profile) at practices and games. One-way analyses of variance were used to compare safe play knowledge and aggression between sexes. Players were categorized as having high or low safe-play knowledge and aggression using a median split. A 2 × 2 mixed-model analysis of variance was used to compare head-impact frequency, and random-intercept general linear models were used to compare head-impact severity between groups (high, low) and event types (practice, game). Boys (5.8 of 7 total; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 5.3, 6.3) had a trend toward better safe-play knowledge compared with girls (4.9 of 7 total; 95% CI = 3.9, 5.9; F1,36 = 3.40, P = .073). Less aggressive male players sustained significantly lower head rotational accelerations during practices (1512.8 rad/s (2) , 95% CI = 1397.3, 1637.6 rad/s(2)) versus games (1754.8 rad/s (2) , 95% CI = 1623.9, 1896.2 rad/s(2)) and versus high-aggression players during practices (1773.5 rad/s (2) , 95% CI = 1607.9, 1956.3 rad/s (2) ; F1,26 = 6.04, P = .021). Coaches and sports medicine professionals should ensure that athletes of all levels

  2. Sex differences in white matter alterations following repetitive subconcussive head impacts in collegiate ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Sollmann, Nico; Echlin, Paul S; Schultz, Vivian; Viher, Petra V; Lyall, Amanda E; Tripodis, Yorghos; Kaufmann, David; Hartl, Elisabeth; Kinzel, Philipp; Forwell, Lorie A; Johnson, Andrew M; Skopelja, Elaine N; Lepage, Christian; Bouix, Sylvain; Pasternak, Ofer; Lin, Alexander P; Shenton, Martha E; Koerte, Inga K

    2018-01-01

    Repetitive subconcussive head impacts (RSHI) may lead to structural, functional, and metabolic alterations of the brain. While differences between males and females have already been suggested following a concussion, whether there are sex differences following exposure to RSHI remains unknown. The aim of this study was to identify and to characterize sex differences following exposure to RSHI. Twenty-five collegiate ice hockey players (14 males and 11 females, 20.6 ± 2.0 years), all part of the Hockey Concussion Education Project (HCEP), underwent diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) before and after the Canadian Interuniversity Sports (CIS) ice hockey season 2011-2012 and did not experience a concussion during the season. Whole-brain tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) were used to compare pre- and postseason imaging in both sexes for fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD). Pre- and postseason neurocognitive performance were assessed by the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Test (ImPACT). Significant differences between the sexes were primarily located within the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), the internal capsule (IC), and the corona radiata (CR) of the right hemisphere (RH). In significant voxel clusters (p < 0.05), decreases in FA (absolute difference pre- vs. postseason: 0.0268) and increases in MD (0.0002), AD (0.00008), and RD (0.00005) were observed in females whereas males showed no significant changes. There was no significant correlation between the change in diffusion scalar measures over the course of the season and neurocognitive performance as evidenced from postseason ImPACT scores. The results of this study suggest sex differences in structural alterations following exposure to RSHI. Future studies need to investigate further the underlying mechanisms and association with exposure and clinical outcomes.

  3. Experiential Learning in the Introductory Class: The Role of Minor League Hockey in Teaching Social Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, Krista D.

    2005-01-01

    To convince my students they are surrounded by social psychology, we attended a minor league hockey game. During the next class period I asked students to write a brief paragraph about their experiences. From those paragraphs I chose four reoccurring themes to analyze from a social psychological perspective. My introductory classes and I benefited…

  4. Ice Hockey Players Using a Weighted Implement when Training on the Ice: A Randomized Control Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Timothy W.; Tvoric, Bojan; Walker, Bruce; Noonan, Dom; Sibla, Janeene

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential for improving hockey players' performance using a weighted implement on the ice. Forty-eight players were tested using a grip strength dynamometer. They also were assessed on their abilities to stick-handle. The participants were randomly placed into a control or research group. The…

  5. Vitamin D status is associated with adiposity in male ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, John S; Peterson, Ben J; Wilson, Patrick B; Rhodes, Greg S; Ingraham, Stacy J

    2015-03-01

    The prevalence of insufficient vitamin D status is of concern and may negatively affect health and physical performance. The purpose of this study was twofold, as follows: to assess the prevalence of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) insufficiency among young hockey players and evaluate the association between 25(OH)D concentration and fat mass (FM) after adjusting for covariates. Data were collected for 53 junior and collegiate ice hockey players residing near Minneapolis, MN (44.9° N) during the off-season (May 16 to June 28). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to assess 25(OH)D concentration, and hydrostatic weighing was used to determine FM. Dietary intake and endogenous synthesis of vitamin D were evaluated via a questionnaire. Twenty (37.7%) athletes possessed insufficient 25(OH)D concentrations (<32 ng·mL(-1)). Log-transformed 25(OH)D concentration was inversely associated with FM in the athletes (r = -0.52, n = 51, P = 0.001). After controlling for measured covariates using sequential linear regression, the adjusted R2 change value indicated that 8.1% of the variability in (log of) 25(OH)D concentration was predicted by FM (P = 0.005). The findings of this study demonstrate an inverse association between FM and vitamin D status after adjusting for environmental, dietary, and anthropometric predictors in a sample population of athletes. Athletes with higher levels of adiposity may be at increased risk of poor vitamin D status.

  6. Enforcement of Mouthguard Use and Athlete Compliance in National Collegiate Athletic Association Men's Collegiate Ice Hockey Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawn, Kristen L.; Visser, Mary Frances; Sexton, Patrick J.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated enforcement patterns and athlete compliance with the National Collegiate Athletic Association rule requiring the wearing of mouthguards in men's collegiate ice hockey games during one season. Surveys of athletic trainers indicated that the use of mouthguards in competition was not consistently enforced by athletic trainers, coaches,…

  7. Multidisciplinary approach to non-surgical management of inguinal disruption in a professional hockey player treated with platelet-rich plasma, manual therapy and exercise: a case report

    PubMed Central

    St-Onge, Eric; MacIntyre, Ian G.; Galea, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present the clinical management of inguinal disruption in a professional hockey player and highlight the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and management. Clinical Features: A professional hockey player with recurrent groin pain presented to the clinic after an acute exacerbation of pain while playing hockey. Intervention: The patient received a clinical diagnosis of inguinal disruption. Imaging revealed a tear in the rectus abdominis. Management included two platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections to the injured tissue, and subsequent manual therapy and exercise. The patient returned to his prior level of performance in 3.5 weeks. Discussion: This case demonstrated the importance of a multidisciplinary team and the need for advanced imaging in athletes with groin pain. Summary: Research quality concerning the non-surgical management of inguinal disruption remains low. This case adds evidence that PRP, with the addition of manual therapy and exercise may serve as a relatively quick and effective non-surgical management strategy. PMID:26816415

  8. Multidisciplinary approach to non-surgical management of inguinal disruption in a professional hockey player treated with platelet-rich plasma, manual therapy and exercise: a case report.

    PubMed

    St-Onge, Eric; MacIntyre, Ian G; Galea, Anthony M

    2015-12-01

    To present the clinical management of inguinal disruption in a professional hockey player and highlight the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and management. A professional hockey player with recurrent groin pain presented to the clinic after an acute exacerbation of pain while playing hockey. The patient received a clinical diagnosis of inguinal disruption. Imaging revealed a tear in the rectus abdominis. Management included two platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections to the injured tissue, and subsequent manual therapy and exercise. The patient returned to his prior level of performance in 3.5 weeks. This case demonstrated the importance of a multidisciplinary team and the need for advanced imaging in athletes with groin pain. Research quality concerning the non-surgical management of inguinal disruption remains low. This case adds evidence that PRP, with the addition of manual therapy and exercise may serve as a relatively quick and effective non-surgical management strategy.

  9. Pressure mapping to assess seated pressure distributions and the potential risk for skin ulceration in a population of sledge hockey players and control subjects.

    PubMed

    Berthold, Justin; Dicianno, Brad E; Cooper, Rory A

    2013-09-01

    Ice sledge (or sled) hockey is a fast-paced sport that enables individuals with physical disabilities to play ice hockey. As the attraction to the sport continues to rise, the need for developing better equipment and installing preventative measures for injury will become increasingly important. One such injury includes skin pressure ulceration. A total of 26 subjects including active controls and those with spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, limb amputation and traumatic brain injury were studied using a pressure mapping device at the 2012 National Disabled Veterans Winter Sports Clinic to determine the risk for skin pressure ulceration and the impact of cushioning and knee angle positioning on seated pressure distributions. Sledge hockey athletes may be at increased risk for skin pressure ulceration based on seated pressure distribution data. This experiment failed to demonstrate a benefit for specialty cushioning in either group. Interestingly, knee angle positioning, particularly, knee extension significantly lowered the average seated pressures. When considering the risk for skin pressure ulceration, knee angle positioning is of particular clinical importance. More research is warranted, specifically targeting novel cushion and sledge designs and larger groups of individuals with sensory loss and severe spinal deformities. Implications for Rehabilitation Ice sledge (or sled) hockey is a fast-paced and growing adaptive sport played at the Paralympic level. Rehabilitation professionals should consider the potential for skin ulceration in this population of athletes. The effects of cushioning used in the sledge design warrants further investigation. Knee angle positioning; particularly, knee extension significantly lowers seated pressures and may reduce the potential for skin ulceration.

  10. Effects of Carbohydrate Intake Before and During An Ice Hockey Game on Blood and Muscle Energy Substrates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simard, Clermont; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Study of the effect of a supplemental carbohydrate intake for seven elite ice hockey players before and during a game demonstrated that the supplement could result in less glycogen usage per distance skated, which had important implications for athletes who may participate in more than one game a day. (Author/CB)

  11. The role of visual perception measures used in sports vision programmes in predicting actual game performance in Division I collegiate hockey players.

    PubMed

    Poltavski, Dmitri; Biberdorf, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the growing field of sports vision little is still known about unique attributes of visual processing in ice hockey and what role visual processing plays in the overall athlete's performance. In the present study we evaluated whether visual, perceptual and cognitive/motor variables collected using the Nike SPARQ Sensory Training Station have significant relevance to the real game statistics of 38 Division I collegiate male and female hockey players. The results demonstrated that 69% of variance in the goals made by forwards in 2011-2013 could be predicted by their faster reaction time to a visual stimulus, better visual memory, better visual discrimination and a faster ability to shift focus between near and far objects. Approximately 33% of variance in game points was significantly related to better discrimination among competing visual stimuli. In addition, reaction time to a visual stimulus as well as stereoptic quickness significantly accounted for 24% of variance in the mean duration of the player's penalty time. This is one of the first studies to show that some of the visual skills that state-of-the-art generalised sports vision programmes are purported to target may indeed be important for hockey players' actual performance on the ice.

  12. Multiparametric MRI changes persist beyond recovery in concussed adolescent hockey players.

    PubMed

    Manning, Kathryn Y; Schranz, Amy; Bartha, Robert; Dekaban, Gregory A; Barreira, Christy; Brown, Arthur; Fischer, Lisa; Asem, Kevin; Doherty, Timothy J; Fraser, Douglas D; Holmes, Jeff; Menon, Ravi S

    2017-11-21

    To determine whether multiparametric MRI data can provide insight into the acute and long-lasting neuronal sequelae after a concussion in adolescent athletes. Players were recruited from Bantam hockey leagues in which body checking is first introduced (male, age 11-14 years). Clinical measures, diffusion metrics, resting-state network and region-to-region functional connectivity patterns, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy absolute metabolite concentrations were analyzed from an independent, age-matched control group of hockey players (n = 26) and longitudinally in concussed athletes within 24 to 72 hours (n = 17) and 3 months (n = 14) after a diagnosed concussion. There were diffusion abnormalities within multiple white matter tracts, functional hyperconnectivity, and decreases in choline 3 months after concussion. Tract-specific spatial statistics revealed a large region along the superior longitudinal fasciculus with the largest decreases in diffusivity measures, which significantly correlated with clinical deficits. This region also spatially intersected with probabilistic tracts connecting cortical regions where we found acute functional connectivity changes. Hyperconnectivity patterns at 3 months after concussion were present only in players with relatively less severe clinical outcomes, higher choline concentrations, and diffusivity indicative of relatively less axonal disruption. Changes persisted well after players' clinical scores had returned to normal and they had been cleared to return to play. Ongoing white matter maturation may make adolescent athletes particularly vulnerable to brain injury, and they may require extended recovery periods. The consequences of early brain injury for ongoing brain development and risk of more serious conditions such as second impact syndrome or neural degenerative processes need to be elucidated. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  13. Multiparametric MRI changes persist beyond recovery in concussed adolescent hockey players

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Kathryn Y.; Schranz, Amy; Bartha, Robert; Dekaban, Gregory A.; Barreira, Christy; Brown, Arthur; Fischer, Lisa; Asem, Kevin; Doherty, Timothy J.; Fraser, Douglas D.; Holmes, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether multiparametric MRI data can provide insight into the acute and long-lasting neuronal sequelae after a concussion in adolescent athletes. Methods: Players were recruited from Bantam hockey leagues in which body checking is first introduced (male, age 11–14 years). Clinical measures, diffusion metrics, resting-state network and region-to-region functional connectivity patterns, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy absolute metabolite concentrations were analyzed from an independent, age-matched control group of hockey players (n = 26) and longitudinally in concussed athletes within 24 to 72 hours (n = 17) and 3 months (n = 14) after a diagnosed concussion. Results: There were diffusion abnormalities within multiple white matter tracts, functional hyperconnectivity, and decreases in choline 3 months after concussion. Tract-specific spatial statistics revealed a large region along the superior longitudinal fasciculus with the largest decreases in diffusivity measures, which significantly correlated with clinical deficits. This region also spatially intersected with probabilistic tracts connecting cortical regions where we found acute functional connectivity changes. Hyperconnectivity patterns at 3 months after concussion were present only in players with relatively less severe clinical outcomes, higher choline concentrations, and diffusivity indicative of relatively less axonal disruption. Conclusions: Changes persisted well after players' clinical scores had returned to normal and they had been cleared to return to play. Ongoing white matter maturation may make adolescent athletes particularly vulnerable to brain injury, and they may require extended recovery periods. The consequences of early brain injury for ongoing brain development and risk of more serious conditions such as second impact syndrome or neural degenerative processes need to be elucidated. PMID:29070666

  14. Increasing Social Interactions Using Prompts and Rewards for Adolescents with ASD in an Ice Hockey Practice Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beiers, Kevin; Derby, K. Mark; McLaughlin, T. F.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of using prompts and reinforcement procedures to increase the social interaction of two children with autism (ASD). This study took place during the context of a hockey practice. Two adolescent participants were evaluated using an ABAB single subject reversal design. Baseline data were collected prior to and after the…

  15. The Control of Externalities in Sports Leagues: An Analysis of Restrictions in the National Hockey League

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Dennis W.; Frankel, Alan S.; Landes, Elisabeth M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides one of the few successful demonstrations of the efficiency of certain types of restrictions in the context of a joint venture. The joint venture we examine is the National Hockey League (NHL) in the 1980s, which was then composed of 21 separately owned teams. (It now has 30 teams.) The restriction we analyze is the NHL rule on…

  16. Evaluation of a Hockey Deceased Organ Donation Awareness Campaign: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Kyla L.; McKenzie, Susan; Cherry, Cindy; McArthur, Eric; Li, Alvin H.; McCallum, Megan K.; Kim, S. Joseph; Prakash, Versha; Knoll, Gregory A.; Garg, Amit X.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The Kidney Foundation of Canada developed a pilot campaign to educate persons attending junior hockey league games in London, Ontario, Canada, on deceased organ donation. Objective: To evaluate the impact of a hockey campaign on the number of new organ and tissue donor registrants. Design: Population-based retrospective cohort study. Setting: Residents of London, Ontario. Patients: We included 255 476 individuals eligible to register for organ donation with a London, Ontario postal code. Measurements: We compared the number of new deceased organ donor registrants in London, Ontario, during the campaign period (March 12 to April 16, 2015) with 3 different time periods (December 30, 2014 to February 3, 2015; February 4 to March 11, 2015; April 17 to May 22, 2015). We also compared registration rates in London with 2 Ontario cities (Kitchener-Waterloo and Hamilton) matching in a 1:1 ratio on age, sex, and income quintile. Methods: To compare registrations across time periods, we used binomial regression with an identity link function and generalized estimating equations with an independence correlation structure. We used modified Poisson regression to compare registration rates between cities. Results: During the campaign period, there were slightly more registrations (1218 registered of 252 832 unregistered individuals [0.48%]) compared with an earlier time period (risk difference: 0.09%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.05%-0.12%). However, there was no significant difference compared with 2 time periods immediately before and after the campaign. London had slightly more registrations during the campaign period compared with the matched city of Hamilton (1180 registered of 236 582 unregistered individuals [0.50%] vs 490 registered of 236 582 unregistered individuals [0.21%]; risk ratio: 2.41; 95% CI: 2.17-2.68). The registration rate in London did not significantly differ from Kitchener-Waterloo. Limitations: Unable to conclude whether the minor increase

  17. Development and Validation of a Method for Determining Tridimensional Angular Displacements with Special Applications to Ice Hockey Motions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon, Micheline; And Others

    1983-01-01

    A method for determining the tridimensional angular displacement of skates during the two-legged stop in ice hockey was developed and validated. The angles were measured by geometry, using a cinecamera and specially equipped skates. The method provides a new tool for kinetic analyses of skating movements. (Authors/PP)

  18. Safe-Play Knowledge, Aggression, and Head-Impact Biomechanics in Adolescent Ice Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Julianne D.; Pierce, Alice F.; Guskiewicz, Kevin M.; Register-Mihalik, Johna K.; Pamukoff, Derek N.; Mihalik, Jason P.

    2016-01-01

    Context:  Addressing safe-play knowledge and player aggression could potentially improve ice hockey sport safety. Objectives:  To compare (1) safe-play knowledge and aggression between male and female adolescent ice hockey players and (2) head-impact frequency and severity between players with high and low levels of safe-play knowledge and aggression during practices and games. Design:  Cohort study. Setting:  On field. Patients or Other Participants:  Forty-one male (n = 29) and female (n = 12) adolescent ice hockey players. Intervention(s):  Players completed the Safe Play Questionnaire (0 = less knowledge, 7 = most knowledge) and Competitive Aggressiveness and Anger Scale (12 = less aggressive, 60 = most aggressive) at midseason. Aggressive penalty minutes were recorded throughout the season. The Head Impact Telemetry System was used to capture head-impact frequency and severity (linear acceleration [g], rotational acceleration [rad/s2], Head Impact Technology severity profile) at practices and games. Main Outcome Measure(s):  One-way analyses of variance were used to compare safe play knowledge and aggression between sexes. Players were categorized as having high or low safe-play knowledge and aggression using a median split. A 2 × 2 mixed-model analysis of variance was used to compare head-impact frequency, and random-intercept general linear models were used to compare head-impact severity between groups (high, low) and event types (practice, game). Results:  Boys (5.8 of 7 total; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 5.3, 6.3) had a trend toward better safe-play knowledge compared with girls (4.9 of 7 total; 95% CI = 3.9, 5.9; F1,36 = 3.40, P = .073). Less aggressive male players sustained significantly lower head rotational accelerations during practices (1512.8 rad/s2, 95% CI = 1397.3, 1637.6 rad/s2) versus games (1754.8 rad/s2, 95% CI = 1623.9, 1896.2 rad/s2) and versus high-aggression players during practices (1773.5 rad/s2, 95% CI = 1607

  19. Moral disengagement in the legitimation and realization of aggressive behavior in soccer and ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Traclet, Alan; Moret, Orlan; Ohl, Fabien; Clémence, Alain

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to verify that the level of tolerance for aggression is higher in a collective context than in an individual context (polarization effect), and to test the association between moral disengagement, team and self-attitudes toward aggression, and tolerance and realization of aggressive acts in Swiss male soccer and ice hockey. In individual or collective answering conditions, 104 soccer and 98 ice hockey players viewed videotaped aggressive acts and completed a questionnaire, including measures of the perceived legitimacy of videotaped aggression, of the teammates, coach, and self attitudes toward transgressions (modified TNQ), of the moral disengagement in sport (modified MDSS-S), and of self-reported aggressive behavior. A multilevel analysis confirmed a strong polarization effect on the perception of instrumental aggression, the videotaped aggressive acts appearing more tolerated in the collective than in the individual answering condition. Using a structural equation modeling, we found that the moral disengagement, which mediates the effects of perceived coach and ego attitudes toward transgressions, correlates positively with the tolerance of hostile aggression within teams, and with the level of aggressive acts reported by the participants. Aggr. Behav. Aggr. Behav. 42:123-133, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Bone mineral density and body composition of the United States Olympic women's field hockey team

    PubMed Central

    Sparling, P. B.; Snow, T. K.; Rosskopf, L. B.; O'Donnell, E. M.; Freedson, P. S.; Byrnes, W. C.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate total bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition (% fat) in world class women field hockey players, members of the 1996 United States Olympic team. METHODS: Whole body BMD (g/cm2) and relative body fatness (% fat) were assessed by dual energy x ray absorptiometry using a Lunar DPX-L unit with software version 1.3z. Body composition was also estimated by hydrostatic weighing and the sum of seven skinfolds. Results: Mean (SD) BMD was 1.253 (0.048) g/cm2 which is 113.2 (4.0)% of age and weight adjusted norms. Estimates of body composition from the three methods were similar (statistically non- significant): 16.1 (4.4)% fat from dual energy x ray absorptiometry, 17.6 (3.2)% from hydrostatic weighing, and 16.9 (2.6)% from the sum of seven skinfolds. Mean fat free mass was approximately 50 kg. CONCLUSIONS: The mean whole body BMD value for members of the 1996 United States Olympic women's field hockey team is one of the highest reported for any women's sports team. Moreover, the mean fat free mass per unit height was quite high and % fat was low. In this group of world class sportswomen, low % fat was not associated with low BMD. 




 PMID:9865404

  1. Motivational climate, goal orientation, perceived sport ability, and enjoyment within Finnish junior ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Jaakkola, T; Ntoumanis, N; Liukkonen, J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relations among situational motivational climate, dispositional approach and avoidance achievement goals, perceived sport ability, and enjoyment in Finnish male junior ice hockey players. The sample comprised 265 junior B-level male players with a mean age of 17.03 years (SD = 0.63). Players filled questionnaires tapping their perceptions of coach motivational climate, achievement goals, perceived sport ability, and enjoyment. For the statistical analysis, players were divided into high and low perceived sport ability groups. Multigroup structural equation modeling (SEM) revealed an indirect path from task-involving motivational climate via task-approach goal to enjoyment. Additionally, SEM demonstrated four other direct associations, which existed in both perceived ability groups: from ego-involving motivational climate to ego-approach and ego-avoidance goals; from ego-approach goal to ego-avoidance goal; and from task-avoidance goal to ego-avoidance goal. Additionally, in the high perceived sport ability group, there was an association from task-involving motivational climate to enjoyment. The results of this study reveal that motivational climate emphasizing effort, personal development and improvement, and achievement goal mastering tasks are significant elements of enjoyment in junior ice hockey. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Imaging and detection of mines from acoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witten, Alan J.; DiMarzio, Charles A.; Li, Wen; McKnight, Stephen W.

    1999-08-01

    A laboratory-scale acoustic experiment is described where a buried target, a hockey puck cut in half, is shallowly buried in a sand box. To avoid the need for source and receiver coupling to the host sand, an acoustic wave is generated in the subsurface by a pulsed laser suspended above the air-sand interface. Similarly, an airborne microphone is suspended above this interface and moved in unison with the laser. After some pre-processing of the data, reflections for the target, although weak, could clearly be identified. While the existence and location of the target can be determined by inspection of the data, its unique shape can not. Since target discrimination is important in mine detection, a 3D imaging algorithm was applied to the acquired acoustic data. This algorithm yielded a reconstructed image where the shape of the target was resolved.

  3. The relation between perceived parent-created sport climate and competitive male youth hockey players' good and poor sport behaviors.

    PubMed

    LaVoi, Nicole M; Stellino, Megan Babkes

    2008-09-01

    The authors examined achievement goal orientation (J. L. Duda & J. G. Nicholls, 1992), parental influence (M. L. Babkes & M. R. Weiss, 1999), and the parent-initiated motivational climate (S. A. White, 1996, 1998) in combination to broaden understanding of competitive male youth hockey players' (N = 259) perceptions of the parent-created sport climate and its relation to their self-reported good and poor sport behaviors (GPSB). Exploratory factor analysis revealed a multidimensional measure of GPSB. Multiple regression analyses indicated that athletes' GPSB were significantly predicted by different forms of parental influence. Canonical correlations revealed a complex picture of the contributions of goal orientation and the parent-created sport climate on boys' GPSB in youth hockey. Results expand knowledge of the influence that parents have in youth sport and emphasize the importance of understanding how children's interpretations of parental beliefs and behaviors affect their choices to engage in good and poor sport behaviors.

  4. Effects of Short Term Camp Periods on Aerobic and Anaerobic Performance Parameters in Ice Hockey National Team Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eler, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted for determining the effects of trainings, applied to athletes during short term camp period, on their aerobic and anaerobic performance. Measurements were made by the participation of 28 volunteer male ice hockey national team players. During the 15-day camp period, 10-minute running and stretching for warming and then…

  5. The influence of social variables and moral disengagement on prosocial and antisocial behaviours in field hockey and netball.

    PubMed

    Boardley, Ian D; Kavussanu, Maria

    2009-06-01

    In this study, we examined: (a) the effects of perceived motivational climate and coaching character-building competency on prosocial and antisocial behaviours towards team-mates and opponents in field hockey and netball; (b) whether the effects of perceived character-building competency on sport behaviours are mediated by moral disengagement; and (c) whether these relationships are invariant across sport. Field hockey (n = 200) and netball (n = 179) players completed questionnaires assessing the aforementioned variables. Structural equation modelling indicated that mastery climate had positive effects on prosocial and negative effects on antisocial behaviour towards team-mates, while performance climate had a positive effect on antisocial behaviour towards team-mates. Perceived character-building competency had a positive effect on prosocial behaviour towards opponents and negative effects on the two antisocial behaviours; all of these effects were mediated by moral disengagement. No effect was found for prosocial behaviour towards team-mates. The model was largely invariant across sport. The findings aid our understanding of social influences on prosocial and antisocial behaviours in sport.

  6. Hockey Concussion Education Project, Part 1: Susceptibility-weighted imaging study in male and female ice hockey players over a single season

    PubMed Central

    Helmer, Karl G.; Pasternak, Ofer; Fredman, Eli; Preciado, Ronny I.; Koerte, Inga K.; Sasaki, Takeshi; Mayinger, Michael; Johnson, Andrew M.; Holmes, Jeffrey D.; Forwell, Lorie; Skopelja, Elaine N.; Shenton, Martha E.; Echlin, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Object Concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), is a commonly occurring sports-related injury, especially in contact sports such as hockey. Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), which are small, hypointense lesions on T2*-weighted images, can result from TBI. The authors use susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) to automatically detect small hypointensities that may be subtle signs of chronic and acute damage due to both subconcussive and concussive injury. The goal was to investigate how the burden of these hypointensities change over time, over a playing season, and postconcussion, compared with subjects who did not suffer a medically observed and diagnosed concussion. Methods Images were obtained in 45 university-level adult male and female ice hockey players before and after a single Canadian Interuniversity Sports season. In addition, 11 subjects (5 men and 6 women) underwent imaging at 72 hours, 2 weeks, and 2 months after concussion. To identify subtle changes in brain tissue and potential CMBs, nonvessel clusters of hypointensities on SWI were automatically identified and a hypointensity burden index was calculated for all subjects at the beginning of the season (BOS) and the end of the season (EOS), in addition to postconcussion time points (where applicable). Results A statistically significant increase in the hypointensity burden, relative to the BOS, was observed for male subjects at the 2-week postconcussion time point. A smaller, nonsignificant rise in the burden for all female subjects was also observed within the same time period. The difference in hypointensity burden was also statistically significant for men with concussions between the 2-week time point and the BOS. There were no significant changes in burden for nonconcussed subjects of either sex between the BOS and EOS time points. However, there was a statistically significant difference in the burden between male and female subjects in the nonconcussed group at both the BOS and EOS time

  7. On-Ice Functional Assessment of an Elite Ice Hockey Goaltender After Treatment for Femoroacetabular Impingement.

    PubMed

    Tramer, Joseph S; Deneweth, Jessica M; Whiteside, David; Ross, James R; Bedi, Asheesh; Goulet, Grant C

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a major cause of performance inhibition in elite-level athletes. The condition is characterized by pain, osseous abnormalities such as an increased alpha angle, and decreased range of motion at the affected hip joint. Arthroscopic surgical decompression is useful in reshaping the joint to alleviate symptoms. Functional kinematic outcomes of sport-specific movements after surgery, however, are presently unknown. The ability of an ice hockey goaltender to execute sport-specific movements would improve after arthroscopic surgery. Clinical research. Level 5. An ice hockey goaltender was evaluated after arthroscopic correction of FAI on the symptomatic hip. Passive range of motion and radiographic parameters were assessed from a computed tomography-derived 3-dimensional model. An on-ice motion capture system was also used to determine peak femoral shock and concurrent hip joint postures during the butterfly and braking movements. Maximum alpha angles were 47° in the surgical and 61° in the nonsurgical hip. Internal rotation range of motion was, on average, 23° greater in the surgically corrected hip compared with contralateral. Peak shock was lower in the surgical hip by 1.39 g and 0.86 g during butterfly and braking, respectively. At peak shock, the surgical hip demonstrated increased flexion, adduction, and internal rotation for both tasks (butterfly, 6.1°, 12.3°, and 30.8°; braking, 14.8°, 19.2°, and 41.4°). On-ice motion capture revealed performance differences between hips after arthroscopic surgery in a hockey goaltender. Range of motion and the patient's subjective assessment of hip function were improved in the surgical hip. While presenting as asymptomatic, it was discovered that the contralateral hip displayed measurements consistent with FAI. Therefore, consideration of preemptive treatment in a presently painless hip may be deemed beneficial for young athletes seeking a long career in sport, and future work is

  8. “I Went to a Fight the Other Night and a Hockey Game Broke Out”

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmied, Nadav; Espindola, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    Background: The current study explored the relationship between fighting behavior and passage of time, across games and seasons, in an attempt to assess if violent behavior in hockey is impulsive or intentional. Hypothesis: Before engaging in fighting behavior, players assess the utility of their actions and thus will fight less when the game is on the line (third period) and when champions are crowned (postseason). Methods: An archival exploration utilizing open access databases from multiple Internet sources. Results: During the 2010-2011 National Hockey League (NHL) season, players were significantly less likely to be involved in a fight as the game was coming to a close than in its early stages. In addition, data from the past 10 NHL seasons showed that players were significantly more violent in preseason games than during the regular season. They were also least likely to be involved in a fight during the postseason. Conclusion: The converging evidence suggests that players take into account the penalties associated with fighting and are less likely to engage in violence when the stakes are high, such as at the end of a game or a season. This implies, in turn, that major acts of aggression in the league are more likely to be calculated rather than impulsive. The findings suggest that a more punitive system should diminish fighting behavior markedly. PMID:24427418

  9. Mild Dehydration Does Not Influence Performance Or Skeletal Muscle Metabolism During Simulated Ice Hockey Exercise In Men.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Matthew S; Heigenhauser, George J F; Duong, MyLinh; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2017-04-01

    This study determined whether mild dehydration influenced skeletal muscle glycogen use, core temperature or performance during high-intensity, intermittent cycle-based exercise in ice hockey players vs. staying hydrated with water. Eight males (21.6 ± 0.4 yr, 183.5 ± 1.6 cm, 83.9 ± 3.7 kg, 50.2 ± 1.9 ml·kg -1 ·min -1 ) performed two trials separated by 7 days. The protocol consisted of 3 periods (P) containing 10 × 45-s cycling bouts at ~133% VO 2max , followed by 135 s of passive rest. Subjects drank no fluid and dehydrated during the protocol (NF), or maintained body mass by drinking WATER. Muscle biopsies were taken at rest, immediately before and after P3. Subjects were mildly dehydrated (-1.8% BM) at the end of P3 in the NF trial. There were no differences between the NF and WATER trials for glycogen use (P1+P2; 350.1 ± 31.9 vs. 413.2 ± 33.2, P3; 103.5 ± 16.2 vs. 131.5 ± 18.9 mmol·kg dm -1 ), core temperature (P1; 37.8 ± 0.1 vs. 37.7 ± 0.1, P2; 38.2 ± 0.1 vs. 38.1 ± 0.1, P3; 38.3 ± 0.1 vs. 38.2 ± 0.1 °C) or performance (P1; 156.3 ± 7.8 vs. 154.4 ± 8.2, P2; 150.5 ± 7.8 vs. 152.4 ± 8.3, P3; 144.1 ± 8.7 vs. 148.4 ± 8.7 kJ). This study demonstrated that typical dehydration experienced by ice hockey players (~1.8% BM loss), did not affect glycogen use, core temperature, or voluntary performance vs. staying hydrated by ingesting water during a cycle-based simulation of ice hockey exercise in a laboratory environment.

  10. Maximal anaerobic power in Indian national hockey players.

    PubMed Central

    Bhanot, J. L.; Sidhu, L. S.

    1983-01-01

    Anaerobic power in relation to field position of 90 Indian hockey players has been studied. These players included 10 goalkeepers, 16 backs, 20 half-backs and 44 forwards. The goalkeepers possess maximum and forwards possess minimum anaerobic power while in vertical velocity, the former are the fastest and the latter are the slowest. In body weight the backs are heaviest followed by half-backs, goalkeepers and forwards. Among backs, the lefts are heavier, faster and have more anaerobic power than rights. In half-line players, the centre-half-backs are followed by left-half-backs and right-half-backs both in body weight and anaerobic power, while in vertical velocity, the left-half-backs are the fastest and centre-half-backs are the slowest. Among forwards, the centre-forwards are heaviest with maximum anaerobic power and are followed by inside-forwards and outside-forwards, whereas, in vertical velocity the inside-forwards are fastest followed by centre-forwards and outside-forwards. Images p34-a p34-b PMID:6850203

  11. Relationship between body composition, leg strength, anaerobic power, and on-ice skating performance in division I men's hockey athletes.

    PubMed

    Potteiger, Jeffrey A; Smith, Dean L; Maier, Mark L; Foster, Timothy S

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between laboratory tests and on-ice skating performance in division I men's hockey athletes. Twenty-one men (age 20.7 +/- 1.6 years) were assessed for body composition, isokinetic force production in the quadriceps and hamstring muscles, and anaerobic muscle power via the Wingate 30-second cycle ergometer test. Air displacement plethysmography was used to determine % body fat (%FAT), fat-free mass (FFM), and fat mass. Peak torque and total work during 10 maximal effort repetitions at 120 degrees .s were measured during concentric muscle actions using an isokinetic dynamometer. Muscle power was measured using a Monark cycle ergometer with resistance set at 7.5% of body mass. On-ice skating performance was measured during 6 timed 89-m sprints with subjects wearing full hockey equipment. First length skate (FLS) was 54 m, and total length skate (TLS) was 89 m with fastest and average skating times used in the analysis. Correlation coefficients were used to determine relationships between laboratory testing and on-ice performance. Subjects had a body mass of 88.8 +/- 7.8 kg and %FAT of 11.9 +/- 4.6. First length skate-Average and TLS-Average skating times were moderately correlated to %FAT ([r = 0.53; p = 0.013] and [r = 0.57; p = 0.007]) such that a greater %FAT was related to slower skating speeds. First length skate-Fastest was correlated to Wingate percent fatigue index (r = -0.48; p = 0.027) and FLS-Average was correlated to Wingate peak power per kilogram body mass (r = -0.43; p = 0.05). Laboratory testing of select variables can predict skating performance in ice hockey athletes. This information can be used to develop targeted and effective strength and conditioning programs that will improve on-ice skating speed.

  12. Locomotor, Heart-Rate, and Metabolic Power Characteristics of Youth Women's Field Hockey: Female Athletes in Motion (FAiM) Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vescovi, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the locomotor, heart-rate, and metabolic power characteristics of high-level youth female field hockey matches. Method: Players from the U21 and U17 Canadian women's national teams were monitored during a 4-match test series using Global Positioning System technology. Position (forward,…

  13. Particle-In-Cell Analysis of an Electric Antenna for the BepiColombo/MMO spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Yohei; Usui, Hideyuki; Kojima, Hirotsugu

    The BepiColombo/MMO spacecraft is planned to provide a first electric field measurement in Mercury's magnetosphere by mounting two types of the electric antennas: WPT and MEFISTO. The sophisticated calibration of such measurements should be performed based on precise knowledge of the antenna characteristics in space plasma. However, it is difficult to know prac-tical antenna characteristics considering the plasma kinetics and spacecraft-plasma interactions by means of theoretical approaches. Furthermore, some modern antenna designing techniques such as a "hockey puck" principle is applied to MEFISTO, which introduces much complexity in its overall configuration. Thus a strong demand arises regarding the establishment of a nu-merical method that can solve the complex configuration and plasma dynamics for evaluating the electric properties of the modern instrument. For the self-consistent antenna analysis, we have developed a particle simulation code named EMSES based on the particle-in-cell technique including a treatment antenna conductive sur-faces. In this paper, we mainly focus on electrostatic (ES) features and photoelectron distri-bution in the vicinity of MEFISTO. Our simulation model includes (1) a photoelectron guard electrode, (2) a bias current provided from the spacecraft body to the sensing element, (3) a floating potential treatment for the spacecraft body, and (4) photoelectron emission from sunlit surfaces of the conductive bodies. Of these, the photoelectron guard electrode is a key technol-ogy for producing an optimal condition of plasma environment around MEFISTO. Specifically, we introduced a pre-amplifier housing called puck located between the conductive boom and the sensor wire. The photoelectron guard is then simulated by forcibly fixing the potential difference between the puck surface and the spacecraft body. For the modeling, we use the Capacity Matrix technique in order to assure the conservation condition of total charge owned by the

  14. Ice friction of flared ice hockey skate blades.

    PubMed

    Federolf, Peter A; Mills, Robert; Nigg, Benno

    2008-09-01

    In ice hockey, skating performance depends on the skill and physical conditioning of the players and on the characteristics of their equipment. CT Edge have recently designed a new skate blade that angles outward near the bottom of the blade. The objective of this study was to compare the frictional characteristics of three CT Edge blades (with blade angles of 4 degrees, 60, and 8 degrees, respectively) with the frictional characteristics of a standard skate blade. The friction coefficients of the blades were determined by measuring the deceleration of an aluminium test sled equipped with three test blades. The measurements were conducted with an initial sled speed of 1.8 m s(-1) and with a load of 53 kg on each blade. The friction coefficient of the standard blades was 0.0071 (s = 0.0005). For the CT Edge blades with blade angles of 4 degrees, 6 degrees, and 8 degrees, friction coefficients were lower by about 13%, 21%, and 22%, respectively. Furthermore, the friction coefficients decreased with increasing load. The results of this study show that widely accepted paradigms such as "thinner blades cause less friction" need to be revisited. New blade designs might also be able to reduce friction in speed skating, figure skating, bobsledding, and luge.

  15. Femoroacetabular Impingement in Elite Ice Hockey Goaltenders: Etiological Implications of On-Ice Hip Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, David; Deneweth, Jessica M; Bedi, Asheesh; Zernicke, Ronald F; Goulet, Grant C

    2015-07-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is particularly prevalent in ice hockey. The butterfly goalie technique is thought to involve extreme ranges of hip motion that may predispose goaltenders to FAI. To quantify hip mechanics during 3 common goaltender movements and interpret their relevance to the development of FAI. Descriptive laboratory study. Fourteen collegiate and professional goaltenders performed skating, butterfly save, and recovery movements on the ice. Hip mechanics were compared across the 3 movements. The butterfly did not exhibit the greatest range of hip motion in any of the 3 planes. Internal rotation was the only hip motion that appeared close to terminal in this study. When subjects decelerated during skating—shaving the blade of their skate across the surface of the ice—the magnitude of peak hip internal rotation was 54% greater than in the butterfly and 265% greater than in the recovery. No movement involved levels of concomitant flexion, adduction, and internal rotation that resembled the traditional impingement (FADIR) test. The magnitude of internal rotation was the most extreme planar hip motion (relative to end-range) recorded in this study (namely during decelerating) and appeared to differentiate this cohort from other athletic populations. Consequently, repetitive end-range hip internal rotation may be the primary precursor to symptomatic FAI in hockey goaltenders and provides the most plausible account for the high incidence of FAI in these athletes. Resection techniques should, therefore, focus on enhancing internal rotation in goaltenders, compared with flexion and adduction. While the butterfly posture can require significant levels of hip motion, recovering from a save and, in particular, decelerating during skating are also demanding on goaltenders' hip joints. Therefore, it appears critical to consider and accommodate a variety of sport-specific hip postures to comprehensively diagnose, treat, and rehabilitate FAI. © 2015 The

  16. Examining social identity and intrateam moral behaviours in competitive youth ice hockey using stimulated recall.

    PubMed

    Bruner, Mark W; Boardley, Ian D; Allan, Veronica; Root, Zach; Buckham, Sara; Forrest, Chris; Côté, Jean

    2017-10-01

    Social identity - identity formed through membership in groups - may play an important role in regulating intrateam moral behaviour in youth sport (Bruner, M. W., Boardley, I., & Côté, J. (2014). Social identity and prosocial and antisocial behavior in youth sport. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 15(1), 56-64. doi:10.1016/j.psychsport.2013.09.003). The aim of this study was to qualitatively examine this potential role through stimulated recall interviews with competitive youth-ice-hockey players. Twenty-three players (M age  = 13.27 years, SD = 1.79) who reported engaging in high, median or low frequency of antisocial teammate behaviour (determined through pre-screening with the Prosocial and Antisocial Behaviour in Sport Scale [Kavussanu, M., & Boardley, I. D. (2009). The prosocial and antisocial behavior in sport scale. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 31(1), 97-117. doi:10.1123/jsep.31.1.97]) were recruited from eight youth-ice-hockey teams in Canada. Interviews involved participants recalling their thoughts during prosocial/antisocial interactions with teammates, prompted by previously recorded video sequences of such incidents. Thematic analysis of interview data revealed all athletes - regardless of reported frequency of intrateam antisocial behaviour - felt prosocial interactions with teammates enhanced social identity. In contrast, the perceived influence of antisocial teammate behaviour on social identity differed depending on athletes' reported frequency of intrateam antisocial behaviour; those reporting low and median frequencies described how such behaviour undermines social identity, whereas athletes reporting high frequency did not perceive this effect. The study findings highlight the potential importance of intrateam moral behaviour and social identity for youth-sport team functioning.

  17. Crash-test dummy and pendulum impact tests of ice hockey boards: greater displacement does not reduce impact

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Kai-Uwe; Muser, Markus H; Thueler, Hansjuerg; Bruegger, Othmar

    2018-01-01

    Background One injury mechanism in ice hockey is impact with the boards. We investigated whether more flexible hockey boards would provide less biomechanical loading on impact than did existing (reference) boards. Methods We conducted impact tests with a dynamic pendulum (mass 60 kg) and with crash test dummies (ES-2 dummy, 4.76 m/s impact speed). Outcomes were biomechanical loading experienced by a player in terms of head acceleration, impact force to the shoulder, spine, abdomen and pelvis as well as compression of the thorax. Results The more flexible board designs featured substantial displacement at impact. Some so-called flexible boards were displaced four times more than the reference board. The new boards possessed less stiffness and up to 90 kg less effective mass, reducing the portion of the board mass a player experienced on impact, compared with boards with a conventional design. Flexible boards resulted in a similar or reduced loading for all body regions, apart from the shoulder. The displacement of a board system did not correlate directly with the biomechanical loading. Conclusions Flexible board systems can reduce the loading of a player on impact. However, we found no correlation between the displacement and the biomechanical loading; accordingly, displacement alone was insufficient to characterise the overall loading of a player and thus the risk of injury associated with board impact. Ideally, the performance of boards is assessed on the basis of parameters that show a good correlation to injury risk. PMID:29084724

  18. Arthroscopic Excision of Bipartite Patella With Preservation of Lateral Retinaculum in an Adolescent Ice Hockey Player.

    PubMed

    James, Evan W; LaPrade, Christopher M; Chahla, Jorge; Cinque, Mark E; Kennedy, Nicholas I; LaPrade, Robert F

    Bipartite patella usually is an asymptomatic anatomical variant. However, in some adolescent athletes, it causes anterior knee pain, resulting in decreased participation and performance. We report the case of a high-level adolescent ice hockey player who underwent successful arthroscopic excision with preservation of the lateral retinaculum of a symptomatic bipartite patella after failed nonoperative treatment. The patient returned to play by 6 weeks, and 31-month subjective follow-up scores showed high satisfaction and good clinical outcomes. For patients with a symptomatic bipartite patella, arthroscopic surgery is a good option for reducing pain and returning the athlete to competition.

  19. Greater circadian disadvantage during evening games for the National Basketball Association (NBA), National Hockey League (NHL) and National Football League (NFL) teams travelling westward.

    PubMed

    Roy, Jonathan; Forest, Geneviève

    2018-02-01

    We investigated the effects of a circadian disadvantage (i.e. playing in a different time zone) on the winning percentages in three major sport leagues in North America: the National Basketball Association, the National Hockey League and the National Football League. We reviewed 5 years of regular season games in the National Basketball Association, National Hockey League and National Football League, and noted the winning percentage of the visiting team depending on the direction of travel (west, east, and same time zone) and game time (day and evening games). T-tests and analysis of variance were performed to evaluate the effects of the circadian disadvantage, its direction, the number of time zones travelled, and the game time on winning percentages in each major league. The results showed an association between the winning percentages and the number of time zones traveled for the away evening games, with a clear disadvantage for the teams travelling westward. There was a significant difference in the teams' winning percentages depending on the travelling direction in the National Basketball Association (F 2,5908  = 16.12, P < 0.0001) and the National Hockey League (F 2,5639  = 4.48, P = 0.011), and a trend was found in the National Football League (F 2,1279  = 2.86, P = 0.058). The effect of the circadian disadvantage transcends the type of sport and needs to be addressed for greater equity among the western and eastern teams in professional sports. These results also highlight the importance of circadian rhythms in sport performance and athletic competitions. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  20. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in the National Hockey League: Epidemiology and Performance Impact.

    PubMed

    Longstaffe, Robert; Leiter, Jeff; MacDonald, Peter

    2018-03-27

    To determine the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in the National Hockey League (NHL) and to examine the effects of this injury on return-to-play status and performance. Case series; level of evidence, 4. This was a 2-phase study. Phase I used the NHL electronic injury surveillance system and Athlete Health Management System to collect data on ACL injuries and man games lost over 10 seasons (2006/2007-2015/2016). Data collected in phase I were received in deidentified form. Phase II examined the performance impact of an ACL injury. Players were identified through publically available sources, and performance-related statistics were analyzed. Data collected in phase II were not linked to data collected in phase I. A paired t test was used to determine any difference in the matching variables between controls and cases in the preinjury time period. A General linear model (mixed) was used to determine the performance impact. Phase I: 67 ACL injuries occurred over 10 seasons. The incidence for all players was 0.42/1000 player game hours (forward, 0.61; defenseman, 0.32, goalie, 0.08) and by game exposure was 0.2/1000 player game exposures (forward, 0.33; defenseman, 0.11; goalie, 0.07). Forwards had a greater incidence rate of ACL tears with both game hours and game exposures when compared with defensemen and goalies (P < 0.001, <0.001; P = 0.008, <0.001, respectively). Phase II: 70 ACL tears (60 players) were identified. Compared with controls, players who suffered an ACL tear demonstrated a decrease in goals/season (P < 0.04), goals/game (P < 0.015), points/season (0.007), and points/game (0.001). Number of games and seasons played after an ACL injury did not differ compared with controls (P = 0.068, 0.122, respectively). Anterior cruciate ligament injuries occur infrequently, as it relates to other hockey injuries. Despite a high return to play, the performance after an ACL injury demonstrated a decrease in points and goals per game and per

  1. Saccades and memory: baseline associations of the King-Devick and SCAT2 SAC tests in professional ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Galetta, Matthew S; Galetta, Kristin M; McCrossin, Jim; Wilson, James A; Moster, Stephen; Galetta, Steven L; Balcer, Laura J; Dorshimer, Gary W; Master, Christina L

    2013-05-15

    The Sports Concussion Assessment Tool 2 (SCAT2) and King-Devick (K-D) tests have both been proposed as sideline tools to detect sports-related concussion. We performed an exploratory analysis to determine the relation of SCAT2 components, particularly the Standardized Assessment of Concussion (SAC), to K-D test scores in a professional ice hockey team cohort during pre-season baseline testing. We also examined changes in scores for two athletes who developed concussion and had rinkside testing. A modified SCAT2 (no balance testing) and the K-D test, a brief measure of rapid number naming, were administered to 27 members of a professional ice hockey team during the 2011-2012 pre-season. Athletes with concussion also underwent rinkside testing. Lower (worse) scores for the SCAT2 SAC Immediate Memory Score and the overall SAC score were associated with greater (worse) times required to complete the K-D test at baseline. On average, for every 1-point reduction in SAC Immediate Memory Score, we found a corresponding increase (worsening) of K-D time score of 7.3s (95% CI 4.9, 9.7, p<0.001, R(2)=0.62, linear regression, accounting for age). For the overall SAC score, 1-point reductions were associated with K-D score worsening of 2.2s (95% CI 0.6, 3.8, p=0.01, R(2)=0.25, linear regression). In two players tested rinkside immediately following concussion, K-D test scores worsened from baseline by 4.2 and 6.4s. These athletes had no differences found for SCAT2 SAC components, but reported symptoms of concussion. In this study of professional athletes, scores for the K-D test, a measure for which saccadic (fast) eye movements are required for the task of rapid number naming, were associated with reductions in Immediate Memory at a pre-season baseline. Both working memory and saccadic eye movements share closely related anatomical structures, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). A composite of brief rapid sideline tests, including SAC and K-D (and balance

  2. The incidence of concussion in professional and collegiate ice hockey: are we making progress? A systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ruhe, Alexander; Gänsslen, Axel; Klein, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The fast, random nature and characteristics of ice hockey make injury prevention a challenge as high-velocity impacts with players, sticks and boards occur and may result in a variety of injuries, including concussion. Five online databases (January 1970 and May 2012) were systematically searched followed by a manual search of retrieved papers. Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria. The heterogeneous diagnostic procedures and criteria for concussion prevented a pooling of data. When comparing the injury data of European and North American or Canadian leagues, the latter show a higher percentage of concussions in relation to the overall number of injuries (2-7% compared with 5.3-18.6%). The incidence ranged from 0.2/1000 to 6.5/1000 game-hours, 0.72/1000 to 1.81/1000 athlete-exposures and was estimated at 0.1/1000 practice-hours. The included studies indicate a high incidence of concussion in professional and collegiate ice hockey. Despite all efforts there is no conclusive evidence that rule changes or other measures lead to a decrease in the actual incidence of concussions over the last few decades. This review supports the need for standardisation of the diagnostic criteria and reporting protocols for concussion to allow interstudy comparisons in the future.

  3. Using Elite Athletes to Promote Drug Abstinence: Evaluation of a Single-Session School-Based Drug Use Prevention Program Delivered by Junior Hockey Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    School-based substance use prevention programs are a common method to approaching drug use in youths. Project SOS is a single-session drug prevention program developed by police officers and delivered by elite junior hockey players to students in grades 6 and 7. The current study evaluates the effects of Project SOS at achieving its objectives of…

  4. Sport- and sample-specific features of trace elements in adolescent female field hockey players and fencers.

    PubMed

    Nabatov, Alexey A; Troegubova, Natalya A; Gilmutdinov, Ruslan R; Sereda, Andrey P; Samoilov, Alexander S; Rylova, Natalya V

    2017-09-01

    Active physical exercises and growth are associated with mineral imbalances in young athletes. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of sport-related factors on tissue mineral status in adolescent female athletes. Saliva and hair samples were used for the analysis of immediate and more permanent tissue mineral status, respectively. Samples taken from a control non-athletic female group and two groups of female athletes (field hockey and fencing) were analyzed for seven essential minerals: calcium, chromium, iron, potassium, magnesium, selenium and zinc. Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used for the quantification of elements having very low concentration range in samples (Se, Cr and Zn) whereas inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry was used for quantification of more ubiquitous elements (Mg, К, Са, Fe). The obtained results for athletic groups were compared with control. Female athletes had increased levels of selenium in both saliva and hair as well as chromium in saliva. Field hockey players had the higher level of zinc in hair whereas fencers had the lower levels of salivary calcium. Strong negative correlation between potassium levels in saliva and hair was identified. Iron and magnesium did not differ between the studied groups. In conclusion, novel sport-specific features of chromium tissue levels in female athletes were found. The studied sport disciplines have different impact on the distribution of osteoporosis-related minerals (calcium and zinc). Our finding can help in the development of osteoporosis preventive trainings and in the proper nutrient supplementation to correct mineral imbalances in female athletes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Promoting respect for the rules and injury prevention in ice hockey: evaluation of the fair-play program.

    PubMed

    Brunelle, J P; Goulet, C; Arguin, H

    2005-09-01

    To reduce the number of transgressions to the rule, the occurrence of violent acts and to prevent injuries, Hockey Québec adopted the Fair-Play Program (FPP). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the FPP. 52 Bantam (14-15 years) teams participated in this cohort study. In total, 49 games (13 with the FPP, 36 without FPP) were systematically assessed for transgressions to the rule. Body checking was allowed in all games. Transgressions to the rule data were obtained using a real time observation system in a natural setting, while injury data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire. Data were analysed using generalised linear models with generalised estimating equations accounting for potential team effect. The number of penalties per game was significantly lower (p < 0.01) for games played with the FPP. Overall, no difference was noted in the number of transgressions observed during games played with or without the FPP. Players in leagues where the FPP was used held their opponents more frequently (p < 0.0001). On the other hand, players in leagues without the FPP shoved and hit more (p = 0.05). No difference was noted in the injury rate for games played with or without the FPP. This study showed that the FPP is one of the tools available to help those in the hockey world promote fair play values. Moreover, this project clearly showed the importance of program evaluation and the value of direct observation in a natural setting.

  6. Habituation of 10-year-old hockey players to treadmill skating.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Kelly L; Frost, Gail

    2007-05-01

    This study assessed changes in selected physiological and kinematic variables over 6 weeks of treadmill skating in an effort to understand the process of habituation to this novel training modality. Seven male, Atom-A hockey players who were injury-free and had no previous treadmill skating experience participated in the study. Players performed four 1-min skating bouts at progressively increasing speeds, each week, for 6 weeks. One speed (10.5 km/h) was repeated weekly to allow for assessment of the habituation process. Our criteria for habituation were: a decrease in stride rate, heart rate and rating of perceived exertion, and an increase in stride length, trunk angle and vertical movement of the centre of mass, leading to a plateau, over the course of the 6-week study. Significant decreases were seen in stride rate, heart rate and ratings of perceived exertion, and significant increases were found in stride length. Some of these changes were evident after only one week of training and all were present by week 4. After 6 weeks (24 min) of exposure to treadmill skating, all participants displayed a visibly more efficient skating style.

  7. Vitamin D status and V[combining dot above]O2peak during a skate treadmill graded exercise test in competitive ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, John S; Peterson, Ben J; Warpeha, Joseph M; Wilson, Patrick B; Rhodes, Greg S; Ingraham, Stacy J

    2014-11-01

    Vitamin D status has been associated with cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in cross-sectional investigations in the general population. Data characterizing the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration and CRF in athletes are lacking. Junior and collegiate ice hockey players were recruited from the Minneapolis, MN (44.9° N), area during the off-season period (May 16-June 28). The purpose of this study was to examine the cross-sectional association between 25(OH)D concentration and CRF in a sample population of competitive ice hockey players. Circulating 25(OH)D level was assessed from a capillary blood sample analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak during a skate treadmill graded exercise test (GXT) was used to assess CRF. Data on both 25(OH)D concentration and V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak were available for 52 athletes. Insufficient 25(OH)D concentrations were found in 37.7% of the athletes (<32 ng·ml). Vitamin D status was not significantly associated with any physiological or physical parameter during the skate treadmill GXT.

  8. Multiple Off-Ice Performance Variables Predict On-Ice Skating Performance in Male and Female Division III Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Janot, Jeffrey M; Beltz, Nicholas M; Dalleck, Lance D

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if off-ice performance variables could predict on-ice skating performance in Division III collegiate hockey players. Both men (n = 15) and women (n = 11) hockey players (age = 20.5 ± 1.4 years) participated in the study. The skating tests were agility cornering S-turn, 6.10 m acceleration, 44.80 m speed, modified repeat skate, and 15.20 m full speed. Off-ice variables assessed were years of playing experience, height, weight and percent body fat and off-ice performance variables included vertical jump (VJ), 40-yd dash (36.58m), 1-RM squat, pro-agility, Wingate peak power and peak power percentage drop (% drop), and 1.5 mile (2.4km) run. Results indicated that 40-yd dash (36.58m), VJ, 1.5 mile (2.4km) run, and % drop were significant predictors of skating performance for repeat skate (slowest, fastest, and average time) and 44.80 m speed time, respectively. Four predictive equations were derived from multiple regression analyses: 1) slowest repeat skate time = 2.362 + (1.68 x 40-yd dash time) + (0.005 x 1.5 mile run), 2) fastest repeat skate time = 9.762 - (0.089 x VJ) - (0.998 x 40-yd dash time), 3) average repeat skate time = 7.770 + (1.041 x 40-yd dash time) - (0.63 x VJ) + (0.003 x 1.5 mile time), and 4) 47.85 m speed test = 7.707 - (0.050 x VJ) - (0.01 x % drop). It was concluded that selected off-ice tests could be used to predict on-ice performance regarding speed and recovery ability in Division III male and female hockey players. Key pointsThe 40-yd dash (36.58m) and vertical jump tests are significant predictors of on-ice skating performance specific to speed.In addition to 40-yd dash and vertical jump, the 1.5 mile (2.4km) run for time and percent power drop from the Wingate anaerobic power test were also significant predictors of skating performance that incorporates the aspect of recovery from skating activity.Due to the specificity of selected off-ice variables as predictors of on-ice performance, coaches can

  9. Multiple Off-Ice Performance Variables Predict On-Ice Skating Performance in Male and Female Division III Ice Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Janot, Jeffrey M.; Beltz, Nicholas M.; Dalleck, Lance D.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if off-ice performance variables could predict on-ice skating performance in Division III collegiate hockey players. Both men (n = 15) and women (n = 11) hockey players (age = 20.5 ± 1.4 years) participated in the study. The skating tests were agility cornering S-turn, 6.10 m acceleration, 44.80 m speed, modified repeat skate, and 15.20 m full speed. Off-ice variables assessed were years of playing experience, height, weight and percent body fat and off-ice performance variables included vertical jump (VJ), 40-yd dash (36.58m), 1-RM squat, pro-agility, Wingate peak power and peak power percentage drop (% drop), and 1.5 mile (2.4km) run. Results indicated that 40-yd dash (36.58m), VJ, 1.5 mile (2.4km) run, and % drop were significant predictors of skating performance for repeat skate (slowest, fastest, and average time) and 44.80 m speed time, respectively. Four predictive equations were derived from multiple regression analyses: 1) slowest repeat skate time = 2.362 + (1.68 x 40-yd dash time) + (0.005 x 1.5 mile run), 2) fastest repeat skate time = 9.762 - (0.089 x VJ) - (0.998 x 40-yd dash time), 3) average repeat skate time = 7.770 + (1.041 x 40-yd dash time) - (0.63 x VJ) + (0.003 x 1.5 mile time), and 4) 47.85 m speed test = 7.707 - (0.050 x VJ) - (0.01 x % drop). It was concluded that selected off-ice tests could be used to predict on-ice performance regarding speed and recovery ability in Division III male and female hockey players. Key points The 40-yd dash (36.58m) and vertical jump tests are significant predictors of on-ice skating performance specific to speed. In addition to 40-yd dash and vertical jump, the 1.5 mile (2.4km) run for time and percent power drop from the Wingate anaerobic power test were also significant predictors of skating performance that incorporates the aspect of recovery from skating activity. Due to the specificity of selected off-ice variables as predictors of on-ice performance, coaches

  10. Ice hockey lung – a case of mass nitrogen dioxide poisoning in the Czech Republic

    PubMed Central

    Brat, Kristian; Merta, Zdenek; Plutinsky, Marek; Skrickova, Jana; Ing, Miroslav Stanek

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a toxic gas, a product of combustion in malfunctioning ice-resurfacing machines. NO2 poisoning is rare but potentially lethal. The authors report a case of mass NO2 poisoning involving 15 amateur ice hockey players in the Czech Republic. All players were treated in the Department of Respiratory Diseases at Brno University Hospital in November 2010 – three as inpatients because they developed pneumonitis. All patients were followed-up until November 2011. Complete recovery in all but one patient was achieved by December 2010. None of the 15 patients developed asthma-like disease or chronic cough. Corticosteroids appeared to be useful in treatment. Electric-powered ice-resurfacing machines are preferable in indoor ice skating arenas. PMID:24032121

  11. Crash-test dummy and pendulum impact tests of ice hockey boards: greater displacement does not reduce impact.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Kai-Uwe; Muser, Markus H; Thueler, Hansjuerg; Bruegger, Othmar

    2018-01-01

    One injury mechanism in ice hockey is impact with the boards. We investigated whether more flexible hockey boards would provide less biomechanical loading on impact than did existing (reference) boards. We conducted impact tests with a dynamic pendulum (mass 60 kg) and with crash test dummies (ES-2 dummy, 4.76 m/s impact speed). Outcomes were biomechanical loading experienced by a player in terms of head acceleration, impact force to the shoulder, spine, abdomen and pelvis as well as compression of the thorax. The more flexible board designs featured substantial displacement at impact. Some so-called flexible boards were displaced four times more than the reference board. The new boards possessed less stiffness and up to 90 kg less effective mass, reducing the portion of the board mass a player experienced on impact, compared with boards with a conventional design. Flexible boards resulted in a similar or reduced loading for all body regions, apart from the shoulder. The displacement of a board system did not correlate directly with the biomechanical loading. Flexible board systems can reduce the loading of a player on impact. However, we found no correlation between the displacement and the biomechanical loading; accordingly, displacement alone was insufficient to characterise the overall loading of a player and thus the risk of injury associated with board impact. Ideally, the performance of boards is assessed on the basis of parameters that show a good correlation to injury risk. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. The Effect of the "Zero Tolerance for Head Contact" Rule Change on the Risk of Concussions in Youth Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Krolikowski, Maciej P; Black, Amanda M; Palacios-Derflingher, Luz; Blake, Tracy A; Schneider, Kathryn J; Emery, Carolyn A

    2017-02-01

    Ice hockey is a popular winter sport in Canada. Concussions account for the greatest proportion of all injuries in youth ice hockey. In 2011, a policy change enforcing "zero tolerance for head contact" was implemented in all leagues in Canada. To determine if the risk of game-related concussions and more severe concussions (ie, resulting in >10 days of time loss) and the mechanisms of a concussion differed for Pee Wee class (ages 11-12 years) and Bantam class (ages 13-14 years) players after the 2011 "zero tolerance for head contact" policy change compared with players in similar divisions before the policy change. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. The retrospective cohort included Pee Wee (most elite 70%, 2007-2008; n = 891) and Bantam (most elite 30%, 2008-2009; n = 378) players before the rule change and Pee Wee (2011-2012; n = 588) and Bantam (2011-2012; n = 242) players in the same levels of play after the policy change. Suspected concussions were identified by a team designate and referred to a sport medicine physician for diagnosis. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated based on multiple Poisson regression analysis, controlling for clustering by team and other important covariates and offset by game-exposure hours. Incidence rates based on the mechanisms of a concussion were estimated based on univariate Poisson regression analysis. The risk of game-related concussions increased after the head contact rule in Pee Wee (IRR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.20-2.86) and Bantam (IRR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.17-5.24) players. The risk of more severe concussions increased after the head contact rule in Pee Wee (IRR, 4.12; 95% CI, 2.00-8.50) and Bantam (IRR, 7.91; 95% CI, 3.13-19.94) players. The rates of concussions due to body checking and direct head contact increased after the rule change. The "zero tolerance for head contact" policy change did not reduce the risk of game-related concussions in Pee Wee or Bantam class ice hockey players. Increased concussion awareness and

  13. Cardiovascular Prevention in a High Risk Sport, Ice Hockey: Applications in Wider Sports Physical Therapy Practice

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Although acute myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death are relatively rare occurrences in athletics, cardiovascular accidents do occur. This manuscript presents information on the cardiovascular risks in athletics. In addition, information is provided on screening for cardiovascular risk – including history taking, chart review, physical examination – and the appropriate guidelines on the treatment of athletes found to be at risk. For the purpose of this article, the sport of ice hockey is used to illustrate the subject matter and highlight the behaviors in sport that carry cardiovascular risk. Physical therapists have ethical and legal responsibility to undertake the necessary screening procedures to recognize and respond to any signs of cardiovascular risk in their clients. PMID:21522221

  14. Cardiovascular prevention in a high risk sport, ice hockey: applications in wider sports physical therapy practice.

    PubMed

    Hopkins-Rosseel, Diana H

    2006-11-01

    Although acute myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death are relatively rare occurrences in athletics, cardiovascular accidents do occur. This manuscript presents information on the cardiovascular risks in athletics. In addition, information is provided on screening for cardiovascular risk - including history taking, chart review, physical examination - and the appropriate guidelines on the treatment of athletes found to be at risk. For the purpose of this article, the sport of ice hockey is used to illustrate the subject matter and highlight the behaviors in sport that carry cardiovascular risk. Physical therapists have ethical and legal responsibility to undertake the necessary screening procedures to recognize and respond to any signs of cardiovascular risk in their clients.

  15. Updating the Skating Multistage Aerobic Test and Correction for V[Combining Dot Above]O2max Prediction Using a New Skating Economy Index in Elite Youth Ice Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Allisse, Maxime; Bui, Hung Tien; Léger, Luc; Comtois, Alain-Steve; Leone, Mario

    2018-05-07

    Allisse, M, Bui, HT, Léger, L, Comtois, A-S, and Leone, M. Updating the skating multistage aerobic test and correction for V[Combining Dot Above]O2max prediction using a new skating economy index in elite youth ice hockey players. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2018-A number of field tests, including the skating multistage aerobic test (SMAT), have been developed to predict V[Combining Dot Above]O2max in ice hockey players. The SMAT, like most field tests, assumes that participants who reach a given stage have the same oxygen uptake, which is not usually true. Thus, the objectives of this research are to update the V[Combining Dot Above]O2 values during the SMAT using a portable breath-by-breath metabolic analyzer and to propose a simple index of skating economy to improve the prediction of oxygen uptake. Twenty-six elite hockey players (age 15.8 ± 1.3 years) participated in this study. The oxygen uptake was assessed using a portable metabolic analyzer (K4b) during an on-ice maximal shuttle skate test. To develop an index of skating economy called the skating stride index (SSI), the number of skating strides was compiled for each stage of the test. The SMAT enabled the prediction of the V[Combining Dot Above]O2max (ml·kg·min) from the maximal velocity (m·s) and the SSI (skating strides·kg) using the following regression equation: V[Combining Dot Above]O2max = (14.94 × maximal velocity) + (3.68 × SSI) - 24.98 (r = 0.95, SEE = 1.92). This research allowed for the update of the oxygen uptake values of the SMAT and proposed a simple measure of skating efficiency for a more accurate evaluation of V[Combining Dot Above]O2max in elite youth hockey players. By comparing the highest and lowest observed SSI scores in our sample, it was noted that the V[Combining Dot Above]O2 values can vary by up to 5 ml·kg·min. Our results suggest that skating economy should be included in the prediction of V[Combining Dot Above]O2max to improve prediction accuracy.

  16. Haptic guidance of overt visual attention.

    PubMed

    List, Alexandra; Iordanescu, Lucica; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2014-11-01

    Research has shown that information accessed from one sensory modality can influence perceptual and attentional processes in another modality. Here, we demonstrated a novel crossmodal influence of haptic-shape information on visual attention. Participants visually searched for a target object (e.g., an orange) presented among distractor objects, fixating the target as quickly as possible. While searching for the target, participants held (never viewed and out of sight) an item of a specific shape in their hands. In two experiments, we demonstrated that the time for the eyes to reach a target-a measure of overt visual attention-was reduced when the shape of the held item (e.g., a sphere) was consistent with the shape of the visual target (e.g., an orange), relative to when the held shape was unrelated to the target (e.g., a hockey puck) or when no shape was held. This haptic-to-visual facilitation occurred despite the fact that the held shapes were not predictive of the visual targets' shapes, suggesting that the crossmodal influence occurred automatically, reflecting shape-specific haptic guidance of overt visual attention.

  17. Trajectories of affective states in adolescent hockey players: turning point and motivational antecedents.

    PubMed

    Gaudreau, Patrick; Amiot, Catherine E; Vallerand, Robert J

    2009-03-01

    This study examined longitudinal trajectories of positive and negative affective states with a sample of 265 adolescent elite hockey players followed across 3 measurement points during the 1st 11 weeks of a season. Latent class growth modeling, incorporating a time-varying covariate and a series of predictors assessed at the onset of the season, was used to chart out distinct longitudinal trajectories of affective states. Results provided evidence for 3 trajectories of positive affect and 3 trajectories of negative affect. Two of these trajectories were deflected by team selection, a seasonal turning point occurring after the 1st measurement point. Furthermore, the trajectories of positive and negative affective states were predicted by theoretically driven predictors assessed at the start of the season (i.e., self-determination, need satisfaction, athletic identity, and school identity). These results contribute to a better understanding of the motivational, social, and identity-related processes associated with the distinct affective trajectories of athletes participating in elite sport during adolescence.

  18. Multinational outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infection during an international youth ice hockey competition in Riga, Latvia, preliminary report, March and April 2015.

    PubMed

    Pesola, A K; Parn, T; Huusko, S; Perevosčikovs, J; Ollgren, J; Salmenlinna, S; Lienemann, T; Gossner, C; Danielsson, N; Rimhanen-Finne, R

    2015-05-21

    A multinational outbreak of salmonellosis linked to the Riga Cup 2015 junior ice-hockey competition was detected by the Finnish health authorities in mid-April and immediately notified at the European Union level. This prompted an international outbreak investigation supported by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. As of 8 May 2015, seven countries have reported 214 confirmed and suspected cases, among which 122 from Finland. The search for the source of the outbreak is ongoing.

  19. Three-dimensional kinematics of the lower limbs during forward ice hockey skating.

    PubMed

    Upjohn, Tegan; Turcotte, René; Pearsall, David J; Loh, Jonathan

    2008-05-01

    The objectives of the study were to describe lower limb kinematics in three dimensions during the forward skating stride in hockey players and to contrast skating techniques between low- and high-calibre skaters. Participant motions were recorded with four synchronized digital video cameras while wearing reflective marker triads on the thighs, shanks, and skates. Participants skated on a specialized treadmill with a polyethylene slat bed at a self-selected speed for 1 min. Each participant completed three 1-min skating trials separated by 5 min of rest. Joint and limb segment angles were calculated within the local (anatomical) and global reference planes. Similar gross movement patterns and stride rates were observed; however, high-calibre participants showed a greater range and rate of joint motion in both the sagittal and frontal planes, contributing to greater stride length for high-calibre players. Furthermore, consequent postural differences led to greater lateral excursion during the power stroke in high-calibre skaters. In conclusion, specific kinematic differences in both joint and limb segment angle movement patterns were observed between low- and high-calibre skaters.

  20. Physical fitness and performance of polish ice-hockey players competing at different sports levels

    PubMed Central

    Stanula, Arkadiusz; Gabryś, Tomasz; Szmatlan-Gabryś, Urszula; Gołaś, Artur; Stastny, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The study aimed to determine the values of selected aerobic and anaerobic capacity variables, physical profiles, and to analyze the results of on-ice tests performed by ice-hockey players relegated to a lower league. Performance of 24 ice-hockey players competing in the top league in the 2012/2013 season was analysed to this end. In the 2013/2014 season, 14 of them still played in the top league (the control group), while 10 played in the first league (the experimental group). The study was conducted one week after the end of the playoffs in the seasons under consideration. The results revealed that only in the experimental group the analysed variables changed significantly between the seasons. In the Wingate test, significant changes were only noted in mean relative power (a decrease from 9.91 to 9.14 W/kg; p=0.045) and relative total work (a decrease from 299.17 to 277.22 J/kg; p=0.048). The ramp test indicated significantly lower power output in its final stages (364 compared with 384 W; p=0.034), as well as a significant decrease in relative VO2max (from 52.70 to 48.30 ml/min/kg). Blood lactate concentrations were recorded at the 3rd, 6th, 9th and 12th min of recovery after the ramp test. The rate of post-exercise recovery, ∆LA, recorded after the ramp test turned out to be significantly lower. The times recorded in the on-ice “6x30 m stop” test increased from 32.18 to 33.10 s (p=0.047). The study showed that playing in a lower league where games were less intensive, training sessions shorter and less frequent, had an adverse effect on the performance level of the investigated players. Lower VO2max recorded in the study participants slowed down their rates of post-exercise recovery and led to a significantly worse performance in the 6x30 m stop test, as well as lower relative power and relative total work in the Wingate test. PMID:28149383

  1. Laboratory- and field-based testing as predictors of skating performance in competitive-level female ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Tommy; Vescovi, Jason D; Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine; Gilenstam, Kajsa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether field-based and/or laboratory-based assessments are valid tools for predicting key performance characteristics of skating in competitive-level female hockey players. Cross-sectional study. Twenty-three female ice hockey players aged 15-25 years (body mass: 66.1±6.3 kg; height: 169.5±5.5 cm), with 10.6±3.2 years playing experience volunteered to participate in the study. The field-based assessments included 20 m sprint, squat jump, countermovement jump, 30-second repeated jump test, standing long jump, single-leg standing long jump, 20 m shuttle run test, isometric leg pull, one-repetition maximum bench press, and one-repetition maximum squats. The laboratory-based assessments included body composition (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), maximal aerobic power, and isokinetic strength (Biodex). The on-ice tests included agility cornering s-turn, cone agility skate, transition agility skate, and modified repeat skate sprint. Data were analyzed using stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to establish the relationship between key performance characteristics of skating and the predictor variables. Regression models (adj R (2)) for the on-ice variables ranged from 0.244 to 0.663 for the field-based assessments and from 0.136 to 0.420 for the laboratory-based assessments. Single-leg tests were the strongest predictors for key performance characteristics of skating. Single leg standing long jump alone explained 57.1%, 38.1%, and 29.1% of the variance in skating time during transition agility skate, agility cornering s-turn, and modified repeat skate sprint, respectively. Isokinetic peak torque in the quadriceps at 90° explained 42.0% and 32.2% of the variance in skating time during agility cornering s-turn and modified repeat skate sprint, respectively. Field-based assessments, particularly single-leg tests, are an adequate substitute to more expensive and time

  2. Laboratory- and field-based testing as predictors of skating performance in competitive-level female ice hockey

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, Tommy; Vescovi, Jason D; Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine; Gilenstam, Kajsa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine whether field-based and/or laboratory-based assessments are valid tools for predicting key performance characteristics of skating in competitive-level female hockey players. Design Cross-sectional study. Methods Twenty-three female ice hockey players aged 15–25 years (body mass: 66.1±6.3 kg; height: 169.5±5.5 cm), with 10.6±3.2 years playing experience volunteered to participate in the study. The field-based assessments included 20 m sprint, squat jump, countermovement jump, 30-second repeated jump test, standing long jump, single-leg standing long jump, 20 m shuttle run test, isometric leg pull, one-repetition maximum bench press, and one-repetition maximum squats. The laboratory-based assessments included body composition (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), maximal aerobic power, and isokinetic strength (Biodex). The on-ice tests included agility cornering s-turn, cone agility skate, transition agility skate, and modified repeat skate sprint. Data were analyzed using stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to establish the relationship between key performance characteristics of skating and the predictor variables. Results Regression models (adj R2) for the on-ice variables ranged from 0.244 to 0.663 for the field-based assessments and from 0.136 to 0.420 for the laboratory-based assessments. Single-leg tests were the strongest predictors for key performance characteristics of skating. Single leg standing long jump alone explained 57.1%, 38.1%, and 29.1% of the variance in skating time during transition agility skate, agility cornering s-turn, and modified repeat skate sprint, respectively. Isokinetic peak torque in the quadriceps at 90° explained 42.0% and 32.2% of the variance in skating time during agility cornering s-turn and modified repeat skate sprint, respectively. Conclusion Field-based assessments, particularly single-leg tests, are an adequate

  3. Effect of hockey-stick-shaped molecules on the critical behavior at the nematic to isotropic and smectic-A to nematic phase transitions in octylcyanobiphenyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Anish; Chakraborty, Susanta; Das, Malay Kumar

    2015-03-01

    In the field of soft matter research, the characteristic behavior of both nematic-isotropic (N -I ) and smectic-A nematic (Sm -A N ) phase transitions has gained considerable attention due to their several attractive features. In this work, a high-resolution measurement of optical birefringence (Δ n ) has been performed to probe the critical behavior at the N -I and Sm -A N phase transitions in a binary system comprising the rodlike octylcyanobiphenyl and a laterally methyl substituted hockey-stick-shaped mesogen, 4-(3-n -decyloxy-2-methyl-phenyliminomethyl)phenyl 4-n -dodecyloxycinnamate. For the investigated mixtures, the critical exponent β related to the limiting behavior of the nematic order parameter close to the N -I phase transition has come out to be in good conformity with the tricritical hypothesis. Moreover, the yielded effective critical exponents (α', β', γ') characterizing the critical fluctuation near the Sm -A N phase transition have appeared to be nonuniversal in nature. With increasing hockey-stick-shaped dopant concentration, the Sm -A N phase transition demonstrates a strong tendency to be driven towards a first-order nature. Such a behavior has been accounted for by considering a modification of the effective intermolecular interactions and hence the related coupling between the nematic and smectic order parameters, caused by the introduction of the angular mesogenic molecules.

  4. [The relevance of core muscles in ice hockey players: a feasibility study].

    PubMed

    Rogan, S; Blasimann, A; Nyffenegger, D; Zimmerli, N; Radlinger, L

    2013-12-01

    Good core strength is seen as a condition for high performance in sports. In general, especially maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and strength endurance (SE) measurements of the core muscles are used. In addition, a few studies can be found that examine the core muscles in terms of MVC, rate of force development (RFD) and SE. Primary aims of this feasibility study were to investigate the feasibility regarding recruiting process, compliance and safety of the testing conditions and raise the force capabilities MVC, RFD and SE of the core muscles in amateur ice hockey players. Secondarily, tendencies of correlations between muscle activity and either shot speed and sprint time shall be examined. In this feasibility study the recruitment process has been approved by 29 ice hockey players, their adherence to the study measurements of trunk muscles, and safety of the measurements was evaluated. To determine the MVC, RFD and SE for the ventral, lateral and dorsal core muscles a dynamic force measurement was performed. To determine the correlation between core muscles and shot speed and 40-m sprint, respectively, the rank correlation coefficient (rho) from Spearman was used. The recruited number of eight field players and one goal-keeper was not very high. The compliance with 100 % was excellent. The players reported no adverse symptoms or injuries after the measurements. The results show median values for the ventral core muscles for MVC with 46.5 kg for RFD with 2.23 m/s2 and 96 s for the SE. For lateral core muscle median values of the lateral core muscles for MVC with 71.10 kg, RFD with 2.59 m/s2 and for SE over 66 s were determined. The dorsal core muscles shows values for MVC 69.7 kg, for RFD 3.39 m/s2 and for SE of 75 s. High correlations between MVC of the ventral core muscles (rho = -0.721, p = 0.021), and between the SE of the ventral core muscles (rho = 0.787, p = 0.012), and the shot velocity rate were determined. Another

  5. Cognitive and psychosocial function in retired professional hockey players.

    PubMed

    Esopenko, Carrie; Chow, Tiffany W; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Bacopulos, Agnes; Kumar, Priya; Binns, Malcolm A; Kennedy, James L; Müller, Daniel J; Levine, Brian

    2017-06-01

    The relationship between repeated concussions and neurodegenerative disease has received significant attention, particularly research in postmortem samples. Our objective was to characterise retired professional ice hockey players' cognitive and psychosocial functioning in relation to concussion exposure and apolipoprotein ε4 status. Alumni athletes (N=33, aged 34-71 years) and an age-matched sample of comparison participants (N=18) were administered measures of cognitive function and questionnaires concerning psychosocial and psychiatric functioning. No significant group differences were found on neuropsychological measures of speeded attention, verbal memory or visuospatial functions, nor were significant differences observed on computerised measures of response speed, inhibitory control and visuospatial problem solving. Reliable group differences in cognitive performance were observed on tests of executive and intellectual function; performance on these measures was associated with concussion exposure. Group differences were observed for cognitive, affective and behavioural impairment on psychosocial questionnaires and psychiatric diagnoses. There was no evidence of differential effects associated with age in the alumni athletes. Possession of an apolipoprotein ε4 allele was associated with increased endorsement of psychiatric complaints, but not with objective cognitive performance. We found only subtle objective cognitive impairment in alumni athletes in the context of high subjective complaints and psychiatric impairment. Apolipoprotein ε4 status related to psychiatric, but not cognitive status. These findings provide benchmarks for the degree of cognitive and behavioural impairment in retired professional athletes and a point of comparison for future neuroimaging and longitudinal studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Individual fluid plans versus ad libitum on hydration status in minor professional ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Dawn M; Torres-McGehee, Toni M; Emerson, Charles C; LaSalle, Teri L

    2017-01-01

    Despite exercising in cool environments, ice hockey players exhibit several dehydration risk factors. Individualized fluid plans (IFPs) are designed to mitigate dehydration by matching an individual's sweat loss in order to optimize physiological systems and performance. A randomized control trial was used to examine IFP versus ad libitum fluid ingestion on hydration in 11 male minor professional ice hockey players (mean age = 24.4 ± 2.6 years, height = 183.0 ± 4.6 cm, weight = 92.9 ± 7.8 kg). Following baseline measures over 2 practices, participants were randomly assigned to either control (CON) or intervention (INT) for 10 additional practices. CON participants were provided water and/or carbohydrate electrolyte beverage to drink ad libitum. INT participants were instructed to consume water and an electrolyte-enhanced carbohydrate electrolyte beverage to match sweat and sodium losses. Urine specific gravity, urine color, and percent body mass change characterized hydration status. Total fluid consumed during practice was assessed. INT consumed significantly more fluid than CON (1180.8 ± 579.0 ml vs. 788.6 ± 399.7 ml, p  = 0.002). However, CON participants replaced only 25.4 ± 12.9% of their fluid needs and INT 35.8 ± 17.5%. Mean percent body mass loss was not significantly different between groups and overall indicated minimal dehydration (<1.2% loss). Pre-practice urine specific gravity indicated CON and INT began hypohydrated (mean = 1.024 ± 0.007 and 1.024 ± 0.006, respectively) and experienced dehydration during practice (post = 1.026 ± 0.006 and 1.027 ± 0.005, respectively, p  < 0.001). Urine color increased pre- to post-practice for CON (5 ± 2 to 6 ± 1, p  < 0.001) and INT (5 ± 1 to 6 ± 1, p <  0.001). Participants consistently reported to practice hypohydrated. Ad libitum fluid intake was not significantly different than IFP on hydration status. Based on urine measures, both methods were

  7. The influence of gender-related beliefs and conceptions of ability on women learning the hockey wrist shot.

    PubMed

    Belcher, Don; Lee, Amelia M; Solmon, Melinda A; Harrison, Louis

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of beliefs about gender appropriateness and conceptions of ability on perceived and actual competene and patterns of behavior during practice of the hockey wrist shot. Sixty-eight undergraduate women formed four treatment conditions based on their beliefs about gender appropriateness and conceptions of ability. Four teachers taught across the treatment conditions for a total of 16 learning groups. Data were collected through a three-part questionnaire and from audio-video taping of the entire episode to ascertain the paticipants' competency beliefs, effort, and performance. Gender appropriateness impacted the participants' perceptions of competence and actual performance in the study, while beliefs about conceptions of ability did not produce a significant difference. This study reaffirms that educators must work diligently to combat the stereotypical beliefs many hold with respect to the gender appropriateness of physical activities.

  8. Ice hockey shoulder pad design and the effect on head response during shoulder-to-head impacts.

    PubMed

    Richards, Darrin; Ivarsson, B Johan; Scher, Irving; Hoover, Ryan; Rodowicz, Kathleen; Cripton, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Ice hockey body checks involving direct shoulder-to-head contact frequently result in head injury. In the current study, we examined the effect of shoulder pad style on the likelihood of head injury from a shoulder-to-head check. Shoulder-to-head body checks were simulated by swinging a modified Hybrid-III anthropomorphic test device (ATD) with and without shoulder pads into a stationary Hybrid-III ATD at 21 km/h. Tests were conducted with three different styles of shoulder pads (traditional, integrated and tethered) and without shoulder pads for the purpose of control. Head response kinematics for the stationary ATD were measured. Compared to the case of no shoulder pads, the three different pad styles significantly (p < 0.05) reduced peak resultant linear head accelerations of the stationary ATD by 35-56%. The integrated shoulder pads reduced linear head accelerations by an additional 18-21% beyond the other two styles of shoulder pads. The data presented here suggest that shoulder pads can be designed to help protect the head of the struck player in a shoulder-to-head check.

  9. Long-term reliability of ImPACT in professional ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Echemendia, Ruben J; Bruce, Jared M; Meeuwisse, Willem; Comper, Paul; Aubry, Mark; Hutchison, Michael

    2016-02-01

    This study sought to assess the test-retest reliability of Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) across 2-4 year time intervals and evaluate the utility of a newly proposed two-factor (Speed/Memory) model of ImPACT across multiple language versions. Test-retest data were collected from non-concussed National Hockey League (NHL) players across 2-, 3-, and 4-year time intervals. The two-factor model was examined using different language versions (English, French, Czech, Swedish) of the test using a one-year interval, and across 2-4 year intervals using the English version of the test. The two-factor Speed index improved reliability across multiple language versions of ImPACT. The Memory factor also improved but reliability remained below the traditional cutoff of .70 for use in clinical decision-making. ImPACT reliabilities remained low (below .70) regardless of whether the four-composite or the two-factor model was used across 2-, 3-, and 4-year time intervals. The two-factor approach increased ImPACT's one-year reliability over the traditional four-composite model among NHL players. The increased stability in test scores improves the test's ability to detect cognitive changes following injury, which increases the diagnostic utility of the test and allows for better return to play decision-making by reducing the risk of exposing an athlete to additional trauma while the brain may be at a heightened vulnerability to such trauma. Although the Speed Index increases the clinical utility of the test, the stability of the Memory index remains low. Irrespective of whether the two-factor or traditional four-composite approach is used, these data suggest that new baselines should occur on a yearly basis in order to maximize clinical utility.

  10. Hip abduction-adduction strength and one-leg hop tests: test-retest reliability and relationship to function in elite ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Kea, J; Kramer, J; Forwell, L; Birmingham, T

    2001-08-01

    Single group, test-retest. To determine: (1) hip abduction and adduction torques during concentric and eccentric muscle actions, (2) medial and lateral one-leg hop distances, (3) the test-retest reliability of these measurements, and (4) the relationship between isokinetic measures of hip muscle strength and hop distances in elite ice hockey players. The skating motion used in ice hockey requires strong contractions of the hip and knee musculature. However, baseline scores for hip strength and hop distances, their test-retest reliability, and measures of the extent to which these tests are related for this population are not available. The dominant leg of 27 men (mean age 20 +/- 3 yrs) was tested on 2 occasions. Hip abduction and adduction movements were completed at 60 degrees.s(-1) angular velocity, with the subject lying on the non-test side and the test leg moving vertically in the subject's coronal plane. One-leg hops requiring jumping from and landing on the same leg without losing balance were completed in the medial and lateral directions. Hip adduction torques were significantly greater than abduction torques during both concentric and eccentric muscle actions, while no significant difference was observed between medial and lateral hop distances. Although hop test scores produced excellent ICCs (> 0.75) when determined using scores on 1 occasion, torques needed to be averaged over 2 test occasions to reach this level. Correlations between the strength and hop tests ranged from slight to low (r = -0.26 to 0.27) and were characterized by wide 95% confidence intervals (-0.54 to 0.61). Isokinetic tests of hip abduction and adduction did not provide a strong indication of performance during sideways hop tests. Although isokinetic tests can provide a measure of muscular strength under specific test conditions, they should not be relied upon as a primary indicator of functional abilities or readiness to return to activity.

  11. Educational strategies used in increasing fluid intake and enhancing hydration status in field hockey players preparing for competition in a hot and humid environment: a case study.

    PubMed

    Dabinett, J A; Reid, K; James, N

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a hydration strategy for use by female English field hockey players at the 1998 Commonwealth Games in Malaysia. An additional aim was to initiate the process of acclimation. Fifteen elite players, mean age (+/-SEM) 24.1 +/- 1.19 years, height 1.67 +/- 0.01 m, and body mass 62.8 +/- 1.76 kg, took part in a 5-day training camp immediately prior to departure for the Games. In order to develop the hydration strategy, training took place under similar environmental conditions to those to be experienced in Malaysia (i.e., 32 degrees C, 80% humidity). Acclimation training consisted of 30-50 min of either continuous, low intensity cycling or high intensity intermittent cycling, which more closely replicated the pattern of activity in field hockey. Body mass measures taken each morning, and pre and post training, together with urine color measures, were used to assess hydration status. Pre-loading with up to 1 L of a 3% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution or water immediately prior to acclimation training, as well as regular drinks throughout, ensured that players avoided significant dehydration, with percent body mass changes ranging from -0.34% to +4.24% post training. Furthermore, the protocol used was sufficient to initiate the process of acclimation as demonstrated by a significant reduction in exercising heart rate and core temperature at all time points by days 4 and 5. In conclusion, although labor intensive and time consuming, the camp was successful in developing a hydration strategy that players were able to utilize once at the Games.

  12. Does fair play reduce concussions? A prospective, comparative analysis of competitive youth hockey tournaments.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aynsley M; Gaz, Daniel V; Larson, Dirk; Jorgensen, Janelle K; Eickhoff, Chad; Krause, David A; Fenske, Brooke M; Aney, Katie; Hansen, Ashley A; Nanos, Stephanie M; Stuart, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    To determine if Boys Bantam and Peewee and Girls U14 sustain fewer concussions, head hits, 'other injuries' and penalties in hockey tournaments governed by intensified fair play (IFP) than non-intensified fair play (NIFP). A prospective comparison of IFP, a behaviour modification programme that promotes sportsmanship, versus control (non-intensified, NIFP) effects on numbers of diagnosed concussions, head hits without diagnosed concussion (HHWDC), 'other injuries', number of penalties and fair play points (FPPs). 1514 players, ages 11-14 years, in 6 IFP (N=950) and 5 NIFP (N=564) tournaments were studied. Two diagnosed concussions, four HHWDC, and six 'other injuries' occurred in IFP tournaments compared to one concussion, eight HHWDC and five 'other injuries' in NIFP. There were significantly fewer HHWDC in IFP than NIFP (p=0.018). However, diagnosed concussions, 'other injuries', penalties and FPPs did not differ significantly between conditions. In IFP, a minority of teams forfeited the majority of FPPs. Most diagnosed concussions, HHWDC, and other injuries occurred to Bantam B players and usually in penalised teams that forfeited their FPPs. In response to significant differences in HHWDC between IFP and NIFP tournaments, the following considerations are encouraged: mandatory implementation of fair play in regular season and tournaments, empowering tournament directors to not accept heavily penalised teams, and introducing 'no body checking' in Bantam.

  13. The Winter Olympics in Lillehammer: the last dress rehearsal for Atlanta '96.

    PubMed

    Cantwell, J D

    1994-06-01

    Buoyed by the Norwegian spirit and example, our Atlanta Olympic medical team returned with a sense of admiration and also with the self-confidence that we can provide the same quality of medical care in 1996. It won't be an easy task, though, as the summer games are at least eight times the size of the winter games. It will take great cooperation and self-sacrifice from area physicians and hospitals that are now seemingly enmeshed in vigorous competition for the health care dollar. Perhaps, like Bjornson, I am also an idealist. But I truly feel that we can rise to the occasion and cooperate fully in unselfish ways to accomplish what needs to be done. We will then be able to look back upon the experience with a great sense of self-satisfaction, not for personal accolades, but for a job well done. In 1996, we can show the world the remarkable and too often maligned American health care system and, in so doing, make friends with people from all over the globe. "Let our deeds speak for themselves," implored Bjornson. I toasted that thought with a second glass of Chateau Batailley, then took a long nap and dreamed that I had slapped the hockey puck past the Russian goalie in double overtime to bring a gold medal back to the good old U.S. of A.

  14. Muscle Oxygen Changes following Sprint Interval Cycling Training in Elite Field Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ben; Hamilton, David K.; Cooper, Chris E.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of Sprint Interval Cycling (SIT) on muscle oxygenation kinetics and performance during the 30-15 intermittent fitness test (IFT). Twenty-five women hockey players of Olympic standard were randomly selected into an experimental group (EXP) and a control group (CON). The EXP group performed six additional SIT sessions over six weeks in addition to their normal training program. To explore the potential training-induced change, EXP subjects additionally completed 5 x 30s maximal intensity cycle testing before and after training. During these tests near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measured parameters; oxyhaemoglobin + oxymyoglobin (HbO2+ MbO2), tissue deoxyhaemoglobin + deoxymyoglobin (HHb+HMb), total tissue haemoglobin (tHb) and tissue oxygenation (TSI %) were taken. In the EXP group (5.34±0.14 to 5.50±0.14m.s-1) but not the CON group (pre = 5.37±0.27 to 5.39±0.30m.s-1) significant changes were seen in the 30-15IFT performance. EXP group also displayed significant post-training increases during the sprint cycling: ΔTSI (−7.59±0.91 to −12.16±2.70%); ΔHHb+HMb (35.68±6.67 to 69.44±26.48μM.cm); and ΔHbO2+ MbO2 (−74.29±13.82 to −109.36±22.61μM.cm). No significant differences were seen in ΔtHb (−45.81±15.23 to −42.93±16.24). NIRS is able to detect positive peripheral muscle oxygenation changes when used during a SIT protocol which has been shown to be an effective training modality within elite athletes. PMID:25807517

  15. Towards a compact and precise sample holder for macromolecular crystallography.

    PubMed

    Papp, Gergely; Rossi, Christopher; Janocha, Robert; Sorez, Clement; Lopez-Marrero, Marcos; Astruc, Anthony; McCarthy, Andrew; Belrhali, Hassan; Bowler, Matthew W; Cipriani, Florent

    2017-10-01

    Most of the sample holders currently used in macromolecular crystallography offer limited storage density and poor initial crystal-positioning precision upon mounting on a goniometer. This has now become a limiting factor at high-throughput beamlines, where data collection can be performed in a matter of seconds. Furthermore, this lack of precision limits the potential benefits emerging from automated harvesting systems that could provide crystal-position information which would further enhance alignment at beamlines. This situation provided the motivation for the development of a compact and precise sample holder with corresponding pucks, handling tools and robotic transfer protocols. The development process included four main phases: design, prototype manufacture, testing with a robotic sample changer and validation under real conditions on a beamline. Two sample-holder designs are proposed: NewPin and miniSPINE. They share the same robot gripper and allow the storage of 36 sample holders in uni-puck footprint-style pucks, which represents 252 samples in a dry-shipping dewar commonly used in the field. The pucks are identified with human- and machine-readable codes, as well as with radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags. NewPin offers a crystal-repositioning precision of up to 10 µm but requires a specific goniometer socket. The storage density could reach 64 samples using a special puck designed for fully robotic handling. miniSPINE is less precise but uses a goniometer mount compatible with the current SPINE standard. miniSPINE is proposed for the first implementation of the new standard, since it is easier to integrate at beamlines. An upgraded version of the SPINE sample holder with a corresponding puck named SPINEplus is also proposed in order to offer a homogenous and interoperable system. The project involved several European synchrotrons and industrial companies in the fields of consumables and sample-changer robotics. Manual handling of mini

  16. Pre-competition hormonal and psychological levels of elite hockey players: relationship to the "home advantage".

    PubMed

    Carré, Justin; Muir, Cameron; Belanger, Joey; Putnam, Susan K

    2006-10-30

    The home advantage is a robust phenomenon that occurs in the world of amateur and professional sport. Athletic teams have been shown to win significantly more games in their home venue as compared to their opponents' venue. Studies have suggested that the home advantage may be related to familiarity with the facility, increased crowd density and even pre-competition hormonal levels. The present study investigated pre-competition physiological and psychological states of elite hockey players in the home and away venues. Physiological measures included salivary cortisol and testosterone, which were assessed using enzyme immunoassays. In addition, pre-competition psychological states were assessed using the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2. Physiological measures indicated that the players had significantly higher pre-game testosterone when playing in their home venue as compared to their opponents' venue (t(13)=2.29, p=0.04); however, this difference was not due to a pre-game rise in testosterone while competing at home. Furthermore, players showed a trend toward higher pre-game cortisol when playing in their home venue (t(13)=1.96, p=0.07). Psychological measures indicated that players were more self-confident when playing in their home venue (t(13)=2.8, p=0.008) and also had higher somatic (t(13)=2.3, p=0.02) and cognitive anxiety (t(13)=1.87, p=0.04) when playing in their opponents' venue. The present study supports the notion that there are differences in pre-competition hormonal and psychological states that may play a key role in the "home advantage".

  17. FlexED8: the first member of a fast and flexible sample-changer family for macromolecular crystallography.

    PubMed

    Papp, Gergely; Felisaz, Franck; Sorez, Clement; Lopez-Marrero, Marcos; Janocha, Robert; Manjasetty, Babu; Gobbo, Alexandre; Belrhali, Hassan; Bowler, Matthew W; Cipriani, Florent

    2017-10-01

    Automated sample changers are now standard equipment for modern macromolecular crystallography synchrotron beamlines. Nevertheless, most are only compatible with a single type of sample holder and puck. Recent work aimed at reducing sample-handling efforts and crystal-alignment times at beamlines has resulted in a new generation of compact and precise sample holders for cryocrystallography: miniSPINE and NewPin [see the companion paper by Papp et al. (2017, Acta Cryst., D73, 829-840)]. With full data collection now possible within seconds at most advanced beamlines, and future fourth-generation synchrotron sources promising to extract data in a few tens of milliseconds, the time taken to mount and centre a sample is rate-limiting. In this context, a versatile and fast sample changer, FlexED8, has been developed that is compatible with the highly successful SPINE sample holder and with the miniSPINE and NewPin sample holders. Based on a six-axis industrial robot, FlexED8 is equipped with a tool changer and includes a novel open sample-storage dewar with a built-in ice-filtering system. With seven versatile puck slots, it can hold up to 112 SPINE sample holders in uni-pucks, or 252 miniSPINE or NewPin sample holders, with 36 samples per puck. Additionally, a double gripper, compatible with the SPINE sample holders and uni-pucks, allows a reduction in the sample-exchange time from 40 s, the typical time with a standard single gripper, to less than 5 s. Computer vision-based sample-transfer monitoring, sophisticated error handling and automatic error-recovery procedures ensure high reliability. The FlexED8 sample changer has been successfully tested under real conditions on a beamline.

  18. Square lattice honeycomb tri-carbide fuels for 50 to 250 KN variable thrust NTP design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghaie, Samim; Knight, Travis; Gouw, Reza; Furman, Eric

    2001-02-01

    Ultrahigh temperature solid solution of tri-carbide fuels are used to design an ultracompact nuclear thermal rocket generating 950 seconds of specific impulse with scalable thrust level in range of 50 to 250 kilo Newtons. Solid solutions of tri-carbide nuclear fuels such as uranium-zirconium-niobium carbide. UZrNbC, are processed to contain certain mixing ratio between uranium carbide and two stabilizing carbides. Zirconium or niobium in the tri-carbide could be replaced by tantalum or hafnium to provide higher chemical stability in hot hydrogen environment or to provide different nuclear design characteristics. Recent studies have demonstrated the chemical compatibility of tri-carbide fuels with hydrogen propellant for a few to tens of hours of operation at temperatures ranging from 2800 K to 3300 K, respectively. Fuel elements are fabricated from thin tri-carbide wafers that are grooved and locked into a square-lattice honeycomb (SLHC) shape. The hockey puck shaped SLHC fuel elements are stacked up in a grooved graphite tube to form a SLHC fuel assembly. A total of 18 fuel assemblies are arranged circumferentially to form two concentric rings of fuel assemblies with zirconium hydride filling the space between assemblies. For 50 to 250 kilo Newtons thrust operations, the reactor diameter and length including reflectors are 57 cm and 60 cm, respectively. Results of the nuclear design and thermal fluid analyses of the SLHC nuclear thermal propulsion system are presented. .

  19. Self-assembled microstructures of confined rod-coil diblock copolymers by self-consistent field theory.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Tang, Ping; Yang, Yuliang; Wang, Qiang

    2010-11-25

    We employ the self-consistent field theory (SCFT) incorporating Maier-Saupe orientational interactions between rods to investigate the self-assembly of rod-coil diblock copolymers (RC DBC) in bulk and especially confined into two flat surfaces in 2D space. A unit vector defined on a spherical surface for describing the orientation of rigid blocks in 3D Euclidean space is discretized with an icosahedron triangular mesh to numerically integrate over rod orientation, which is confirmed to have numerical accuracy and stability higher than that of the normal Gaussian quadrature. For the hockey puck-shaped phases in bulk, geometrical confinement, i.e., the film thickness, plays an important role in the self-assembled structures' transitions for the neutral walls. However, for the lamellar phase (monolayer smectic-C) in bulk, the perpendicular lamellae are always stable, less dependent on the film thicknesses because they can relax to the bulk spacing with less-paid coil-stretching in thin films. In particular, a very thin rod layer near the surfaces is formed even in a very thin film. When the walls prefer rods, parallel lamellae are obtained, strongly dependent on the competition between the degree of the surface fields and film geometrical confinement, and the effect of surface field on lamellar structure as a function of film thickness is investigated. Our simulation results provide a guide to understanding the self-assembly of the rod-coil films with desirable application prospects in the fabrication of organic light emitting devices.

  20. A simple video-based timing system for on-ice team testing in ice hockey: a technical report.

    PubMed

    Larson, David P; Noonan, Benjamin C

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and evaluate a newly developed on-ice timing system for team evaluation in the sport of ice hockey. We hypothesized that this new, simple, inexpensive, timing system would prove to be highly accurate and reliable. Six adult subjects (age 30.4 ± 6.2 years) performed on ice tests of acceleration and conditioning. The performance times of the subjects were recorded using a handheld stopwatch, photocell, and high-speed (240 frames per second) video. These results were then compared to allow for accuracy calculations of the stopwatch and video as compared with filtered photocell timing that was used as the "gold standard." Accuracy was evaluated using maximal differences, typical error/coefficient of variation (CV), and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between the timing methods. The reliability of the video method was evaluated using the same variables in a test-retest analysis both within and between evaluators. The video timing method proved to be both highly accurate (ICC: 0.96-0.99 and CV: 0.1-0.6% as compared with the photocell method) and reliable (ICC and CV within and between evaluators: 0.99 and 0.08%, respectively). This video-based timing method provides a very rapid means of collecting a high volume of very accurate and reliable on-ice measures of skating speed and conditioning, and can easily be adapted to other testing surfaces and parameters.

  1. Skin conditions in figure skaters, ice-hockey players and speed skaters: part II - cold-induced, infectious and inflammatory dermatoses.

    PubMed

    Tlougan, Brook E; Mancini, Anthony J; Mandell, Jenny A; Cohen, David E; Sanchez, Miguel R

    2011-11-01

    Participation in ice-skating sports, particularly figure skating, ice hockey and speed skating, has increased in recent years. Competitive athletes in these sports experience a range of dermatological injuries related to mechanical factors: exposure to cold temperatures, infectious agents and inflammation. Part I of this two part review discussed the mechanical dermatoses affecting ice-skating athletes that result from friction, pressure, and chronic irritation related to athletic equipment and contact with surfaces. Here, in Part II, we review the cold-induced, infectious and inflammatory skin conditions observed in ice-skating athletes. Cold-induced dermatoses experienced by ice-skating athletes result from specific physiological effects of cold exposure on the skin. These conditions include physiological livedo reticularis, chilblains (pernio), Raynaud phenomenon, cold panniculitis, frostnip and frostbite. Frostbite, that is the literal freezing of tissue, occurs with specific symptoms that progress in a stepwise fashion, starting with frostnip. Treatment involves gradual forms of rewarming and the use of friction massages and pain medications as needed. Calcium channel blockers, including nifedipine, are the mainstay of pharmacological therapy for the major nonfreezing cold-induced dermatoses including chilblains and Raynaud phenomenon. Raynaud phenomenon, a vasculopathy involving recurrent vasospasm of the fingers and toes in response to cold, is especially common in figure skaters. Protective clothing and insulation, avoidance of smoking and vasoconstrictive medications, maintaining a dry environment around the skin, cold avoidance when possible as well as certain physical manoeuvres that promote vasodilation are useful preventative measures. Infectious conditions most often seen in ice-skating athletes include tinea pedis, onychomycosis, pitted keratolysis, warts and folliculitis. Awareness, prompt treatment and the use of preventative measures are

  2. Four Weeks of Off-Season Training Improves Peak Oxygen Consumption in Female Field Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Funch, Lindsey T.; Lind, Erik; Van Langen, Deborah; Hokanson, James F.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the changes in peak oxygen consumption (V˙O2peak) and running economy (RE) following four-weeks of high intensity training and concurrent strength and conditioning during the off-season in collegiate female field hockey players. Fourteen female student-athletes (age 19.29 ± 0.91 years) were divided into two training groups, matched from baseline V˙O2peak: High Intensity Training (HITrun; n = 8) and High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT; n = 6). Participants completed 12 training sessions. HITrun consisted of 30 min of high-intensity running, while HIIT consisted of a series of whole-body high intensity Tabata-style intervals (75–85% of age predicted maximum heart rate) for a total of four minutes. In addition to the interval training, the off-season training included six resistance training sessions, three team practices, and concluded with a team scrimmage. V˙O2peak was measured pre- and post-training to determine the effectiveness of the training program. A two-way mixed (group × time) ANOVA showed a main effect of time with a statistically significant difference in V˙O2peak from pre- to post-testing, F(1, 12) = 12.657, p = 0.004, partial η2 = 0.041. Average (±SD) V˙O2peak increased from 44.64 ± 3.74 to 47.35 ± 3.16 mL·kg−1·min−1 for HIIT group and increased from 45.39 ± 2.80 to 48.22 ± 2.42 mL·kg−1·min−1 for HITrun group. Given the similar improvement in aerobic power, coaches and training staff may find the time saving element of HIIT-type conditioning programs attractive. PMID:29910449

  3. NON-SURGICAL TREATMENT OF A PROFESSIONAL HOCKEY PLAYER WITH THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF SPORTS HERNIA: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, J. Scott; Parker, Andrew; MacDonald, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design: Case Report Background: Injury or weakness of lower abdominal attachments and the posterior inguinal wall can be symptoms of a “sports hernia” and an underlying source of groin pain. Although several authors note conservative treatment as the initial step in the management of this condition, very little has been written on the specific description of non-surgical measures. Most published articles favoring operative care describe poor results related to conservative management; however they fail to report what treatment techniques comprise non-operative management. Case Presentation: The subject of this case report is a professional ice hockey player who sustained an abdominal injury in a game, which was diagnosed as a sports hernia. Following the injury, structured conservative treatment emphasized core control and stability with progressive peripheral demand challenges. Intrinsic core control emphasis continued throughout the treatment progression and during the functional training prior to return to sport. Outcome: The player completed his recovery with return to full competition seven weeks post injury, and continues to compete in the NHL seven years later. Discussion: Surgical intervention has been shown to be effective in the treatment of the “sports hernia.” However it is the authors' opinion that conservative care emphasizing evaluation of intrinsic core muscular deficits and rehabilitation directed at addressing these deficits is an appropriate option, and should be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:22319682

  4. The Effect of Teaching Games of Understanding as a Coaching Instruction had on Adjust, Cover and Heart Rate among Malaysian and Indian Junior Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Sanmuga

    2017-06-20

    The field hockey coaching process across both Malaysia and India favours a traditional, coach-centred approach of mastering technical skills in terms of game play parameters, fitness, intensity, and load training, whereas a tactical- and player-centred pedagogical approach still takes a backseat. On the other hand, the Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU) model offers tactical-cognitive instruction and is gaining international recognition for its ability to produce intelligent players via a problem-solving approach in game play. Therefore, the purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to investigate the effect of TGfU compared to skill mastery instruction, termed as Skill Drill Technical (SDT), among Malaysian and Indian elite junior hockey players in term of the game play attributes of adjust and cover in 5 vs. 5 small-sided game play and game play intensity via heart rate (HR) at different points of game play. A total of n = 60 players with an average age of 15 ± 1.03 was selected via simple random sampling from both countries involved in this study and assigned equally to groups, with 15 per group for TGfU and for SDT across Malaysia and India. Gathered data were analysed using the ANOVA and ANCOVA techniques. Findings indicated that there were no significant differences for adjust in 5 vs. 5 game play between TGfU and SDT across Malaysia and India after the intervention. For cover, there was significant improvement for Malaysian players using the TGfU model compared to SDT. In contrast, there was no significant difference between these two models among the Indian players after the intervention. There was significant difference between these two models in terms of warm-up HR across the two countries, and HR was higher via TGfU. For HR immediately after the 5 vs. 5 game play intervention and HR after three minutes' recovery, Indian players with TGfU recorded a higher and significant difference compared to SDT. However, findings indicated no significant

  5. Mass carbon monoxide poisoning at an ice-hockey game: initial approach and long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Mortelmans, Luc J M; Populaire, Jacques; Desruelles, Didier; Sabbe, Marc B

    2013-12-01

    A mass carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication during an ice-hockey game is described. Two hundred and thirty-five patients were seen in different hospitals, 88 of them the same night at the nearby emergency department. To evaluate long-term implications and to identify relevant indicators, a follow-up study was organized 1 year after the incident. Apart from the file data from the emergency departments, a 1-year follow-up mailing was sent to all patients. One hundred and ninety-one patients returned their questionnaire (86%). The mean age of the patients was 28 years, with 61% men. The mean carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb) was 9.9%. COHb levels were significantly higher for individuals on the ice (referee, players and maintenance personnel). There was a significant relationship with the initial presence of dizziness, fatigue and the COHb level. Headache, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting were not significantly related to the COHb levels. The relationship between symptoms and CO level, however, should be interpreted with caution as there was a wide range between exposure and blood tests. 5.2% of patients had residual complaints, all including headache, with a significant higher incidence with high COHb levels. Only two patients had an abnormal neurological control (one slightly disturbed electroencephalography and one persistent encephalopathic complaint). Work incapacity was also significantly related to COHb levels. CO mass poisonings remain a risk in indoor sporting events. Although it causes an acute mass casualty incident, it is limited in time and delayed problems are scarce. Symptomatology is a poor tool for triage. The best prevention is the use of nonmineral energy sources such as for example electricity.

  6. Time course and dimensions of postural control changes following neuromuscular training in youth field hockey athletes.

    PubMed

    Zech, Astrid; Klahn, Philipp; Hoeft, Jon; zu Eulenburg, Christine; Steib, Simon

    2014-02-01

    Injury prevention effects of neuromuscular training have been partly attributed to postural control adaptations. Uncertainty exists regarding the magnitude of these adaptations and on how they can be adequately monitored. The objective was to determine the time course of neuromuscular training effects on functional, dynamic and static balance measures. Thirty youth (14.9 ± 3 years) field hockey athletes were randomised to an intervention or control group. The intervention included a 20-min neuromuscular warm-up program performed twice weekly for 10 weeks. Balance assessments were performed at baseline, week three, week six and post-intervention. They included the star excursion balance test (SEBT), balance error scoring system (BESS), jump-landing time to stabilization (TTS) and center of pressure (COP) sway velocity during single-leg standing. No baseline differences were found between groups in demographic data and balance measures. Adherence was at 86%. All balance measures except the medial-lateral TTS improved significantly over time (p < 0.05) in both groups. Significant group by time interactions were found for the BESS score (p < 0.001). The intervention group showed greater improvements (69.3 ± 10.3%) after 10 weeks in comparison to controls (31.8 ± 22.1%). There were no significant group by time interactions in the SEBT, TTS and COP sway velocity. Neuromuscular training was effective in improving postural control in youth team athletes. However, this effect was not reflected in all balance measures suggesting that the neuromuscular training did not influence all dimensions of postural control. Further studies are needed to confirm the potential of specific warm-up programs to improve postural control.

  7. Return to play after an initial or recurrent concussion in a prospective study of physician-observed junior ice hockey concussions: implications for return to play after a concussion.

    PubMed

    Echlin, Paul Sean; Tator, Charles H; Cusimano, Michael D; Cantu, Robert C; Taunton, Jack E; Upshur, Ross E G; Czarnota, Michael; Hall, Craig R; Johnson, Andrew M; Forwell, Lorie A; Driediger, Molly; Skopelja, Elaine N

    2010-11-01

    The authors investigated return-to-play duration for initial and recurrent concussion in the same season in 2 teams of junior (16-21-year-old) ice hockey players during a regular season. The authors conducted a prospective cohort study during 1 junior regular season (2009-2010) of 67 male fourth-tier ice hockey players (mean age 18.2 ± 1.2 years [SD], range 16-21 years) from 2 teams. Prior to the start of the season, every player underwent baseline assessments that were determined using the Sideline Concussion Assessment Tool 2 (SCAT2) and the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Test (ImPACT). The study protocol also required players who entered the study during the season to complete a baseline SCAT2 and ImPACT. If the protocol was not followed, the postinjury test results of a player without true baseline test results were compared with previously established age- and sex-matched group normative levels. Each game was directly observed by a physician and at least 1 neutral nonphysician observer. Players suspected of suffering a concussion were evaluated by the physician during the game. If a concussion was diagnosed, the player underwent clinical evaluation at the physician's office within 24 hours. The return-to-play decision was based on clinical evaluation guided by the Zurich return-to-play protocol (contained in the consensus statement of international expert opinion at the 3rd International Conference on Concussion in Sport held in Zurich, November 2008). This clinical evaluation and return-to-play protocol was augmented by the 2 tests (SCAT2 and ImPACT) also recommended by the Zurich consensus statement, for which baseline values had been obtained. Seventeen players sustained a physician-observed or self-reported, physician-diagnosed concussion during a physician-observed ice hockey game. The mean clinical return-to-play duration (in 15 cases) was 12.8 ± 7.02 days (median 10 days, range 7-29 days); the mean number of physician office visits

  8. Effects of the guard electrode on the photoelectron distribution around an electric field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Y.; Usui, H.; Kojima, H.

    2011-05-01

    We have developed a numerical model of a double-probe electric field sensor equipped with a photoelectron guard electrode for the particle-in-cell simulation. The model includes typical elements of modern double-probe sensors on, e.g., BepiColombo/MMO, Cluster, and THEMIS spacecraft, such as a conducting boom and a preamplifier housing called a puck. The puck is also used for the guard electrode, and its potential is negatively biased by reference to the floating spacecraft potential. We apply the proposed model to an analysis of an equilibrium plasma environment around the sensor by assuming that the sun illuminates the spacecraft from the direction perpendicular to the sensor deployment axis. As a simulation result, it is confirmed that a substantial number of spacecraft-originating photoelectrons are once emitted sunward and then fall onto the puck and sensing element positions. In order to effectively repel such photoelectrons coming from the sun direction, a potential hump for electrons, i.e., a negative potential region, should be created in a plasma region around the sunlit side of the guard electrode surface. The simulation results reveal the significance of the guard electrode potential being not only lower than the spacecraft body but also lower than the background plasma potential of the region surrounding the puck and the sensing element. One solution for realizing such an operational condition is to bias the guard potential negatively by reference to the sensor potential because the sensor is usually operated nearly at the background plasma potential.

  9. Gaze characteristics of elite and near-elite athletes in ice hockey defensive tactics.

    PubMed

    Martell, Stephen G; Vickers, Joan N

    2004-04-01

    Traditional visual search experiments, where the researcher pre-selects video-based scenes for the participant to respond to, shows that elite players make more efficient decisions than non-elites, but disagree on how they temporally regulate their gaze. Using the vision-in-action [J.N. Vickers, J. Exp. Psychol.: Human Percept. Perform. 22 (1996) 342] approach, we tested whether the significant gaze that differentiates elite and non-elite athletes occurred either: early in the task and was of more rapid duration [A.M. Williams et al., Res. Quart. Exer. Sport 65 (1994) 127; A.M. Williams and K. Davids, Res. Quart. Exer. Sport 69 (1998) 111], or late in the task and was of longer duration [W. Helsen, J.M. Pauwels, A cognitive approach to visual search in sport, in: D. Brogan, K. Carr (Eds.), Visual Search, vol. II, Taylor and Francis, London, 1992], or whether a more complex gaze control strategy was used that consisted of both early and rapid fixations followed by a late fixation of long duration prior to the final execution. We tested this using a live defensive zone task in ice hockey. Results indicated that athletes temporally regulated their gaze using two different gaze control strategies. First, fixation/tracking (F/T) gaze early in the trial were significantly shorter than the final F/T and confirmed that the elite group fixated the tactical locations more rapidly than the non-elite on successful plays. And secondly, the final F/T prior to critical movement initiation (i.e. F/T-1) was significantly longer for both groups, averaging 30% of the final part of the phase and occurred as the athletes isolated a single object or location to end the play. The results imply that expertise in defensive tactics is defined by a cascade of F/T, which began with the athletes fixating or tracking specific locations for short durations at the beginning of the play, and concluded with a final gaze of long duration to a relatively stable target at the end. The results are

  10. Gender Difference in Aerobic Capacity and the Contribution by Body Composition and Haemoglobin Concentration: A Study in Young Indian National Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Kailashiya, Jyotsna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although gender difference in aerobic capacity is known, the contributing factors have been researched seldom. Aim To investigate the gender gap and the contribution by percentage Body Fat (BF), Body Mass Index (BMI) and haemoglobin concentration Hb. Materials and Methods The study was conducted on 30 (17 males, 13 females) training status matched young hockey players. Healthy players who were playing upto national level competition were included. BW (Body Weight), BF, BMI, LBM (Lean Body Mass), rHR (restring Heart Rate), HRR (Heart Rate Recovery), Hb, a/rVO2max (absolute/relative), a/rPWC (Physical Work Capacity) and RMR (Resting Metabolic Rate) were measured and analysed. Results There was significant gender difference in the measured parameters. Difference in a/rVO2max remained significant even after controlling for BF, BMI and Hb. Multiple regression and correlation analysis revealed gender difference in VO2max/LBM was due to: BMI(31.91%)>BF(27.60%)>Hb(9.91%). BMI also significantly contributed 3.66% of VO2max/LBM variance, independent of that by gender. Difference in RMR was mainly related to LBM, BF and BMI. Conclusion The study provided an understanding for gender gap in aerobic capacity. Differences in BMI & BF were one of the main reasons. PMID:28050360

  11. An Examination of the Human Factors Attitudes and Knowledge of Surface Warfare Officers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    increase in self-rated mental workload (Hockey, Healey, Crawshaw , Wastell, & Sauer, 2003). The Hockey et al. (2003) study found that as one’s mental...Research, vol 37, 401–411. Hockey, G., Healey, A., Crawshaw , M., Wastell, D., & Sauer, J. (2003). Cognitive demands of collision avoidance in simulated

  12. Designing the Next Generation of Human Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Lunar Space Station Common Module: A new concept for a module for a lunar space station attempts to reduce the module's mass by abandoning the traditional rack structure currently used on the ISS for the mounting of internal hardware and replacing it with a core structure. By using this design, the pressure shell will not have to carry the loads resulting from the internal mass. I worked with another intern to create the initial design for the module, with him focusing on the core and myself focusing on the pressure shell. To start, I was given the shell overall dimensions and material and tasked with sizing the wall thickness and placing stiffeners such that the shell could withstand the required loads. At the same time, I had to keep the mass to a minimum to keep the overall module within the allowable launch mass. Once I had done initial sizing based on pressure loads, I combined the pressure shell with the inner core to perform optimization of the design. Currently, the design involves circumferential stiffeners along the entire length of the pressure shell with longitudinal stiffeners on either end. In addition, extra wall thickness was added around each of the hatches. At this stage, the design shows a comparable mass to a more traditional design, but we are hopeful that, through optimization, we will be able to reduce the mass even further. There is currently a patent pending for the module design, for which I am listed as a co-inventor. ALON Material Testing: I was given samples of aluminum oxynitride (ALON) that had been impacted by a previous intern on which to perform residual strength tests as part of a plan to approve them for space use. Before testing, I measured the pucks and their damages using a ruler and optical micrometer in order to verify that the puck dimensions were within the tolerances set by the test guidelines and that the damages had not grown when the pucks were thinned. The test was a ring-ring test, which used two concentric rings to

  13. Formation and corrosion of a 410 SS/ceramic composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Ebert, W. L.; Indacochea, J. E.

    2016-11-01

    This study addressed the possible use of alloy/ceramic composite waste forms to immobilize metallic and oxide waste streams generated during the electrochemical reprocessing of spent reactor fuel using a single waste form. A representative composite material was made to evaluate the microstructure and corrosion behavior at alloy/ceramic interfaces by reacting 410 stainless steel with Zr, Mo, and a mixture of lanthanide oxides. Essentially all of the available Zr reacted with lanthanide oxides to generate lanthanide zirconates, which combined with the unreacted lanthanide oxides to form a porous ceramic network that filled with alloy to produce a composite puck. Alloy present in excess of the pore volume of the ceramic generated a metal bead on top of the puck. The alloys in the composite and forming the bead were both mixtures of martensite grains and ferrite grains bearing carbide precipitates; FeCrMo intermetallic phases also precipitated at ferrite grain boundaries within the composite puck. Micrometer-thick regions of ferrite surrounding the carbides were sensitized and corroded preferentially in electrochemical tests. The lanthanide oxides dissolved chemically, but the lanthanide zirconates did not dissolve and are suitable host phases. The presence of oxide phases did not affect corrosion of the neighboring alloy phases.

  14. Effect of manual therapy versus proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation in dynamic balance, mobility and flexibility in field hockey players. A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Espí-López, Gemma V; López-Martínez, Susana; Inglés, Marta; Serra-Añó, Pilar; Aguilar-Rodríguez, Marta

    2018-04-22

    To compare the effectiveness of a specific Manual Therapy (MT) protocol applied to field hockey players (FHP), versus a Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) protocol, in the improvement of dynamic balance, active range of movement and lumbar flexibility one-week and four-weeks after the treatment. Randomized controlled trial. Participants were assigned to 2 groups: MT and PNF. 30 min' sessions were performed once a week for three weeks. Three evaluations were performed: basal, one-week and four-weeks post-treatment. University of Valencia (Spain). 22 in MT group and 20 in PNF group. Dynamic Balance, measured with Star Excursion Balance Test; Active Range of Motion (ROM), using a manual goniometer and Lumbar Flexibility, assessed with Fingertip-to-floor test. Both groups significantly improved in lateral and medial dynamic balance one-week post-treatment (p < 0.05); but the improvement in the MT group lasted until the fourth-week after treatment in both reaches (lateral and medial) (p < 0.05). MT group also obtained significant improvements in dorsal flexion of the ankle in the fourth-week post-treatment (p < 0.05) and in lumbar flexibility one-week post-treatment (p < 0.05). MT and PNF improve dynamic balance one-week post-treatment; however, the improvement obtained through MT is maintained four-weeks later. Only MT improves dorsal flexion of the ankle four-weeks post-treatment and lumbar flexibility one-week post-treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sports betting: can gamblers beat randomness?

    PubMed

    Cantinotti, Michael; Ladouceur, Robert; Jacques, Christian

    2004-06-01

    Although skills are not considered relevant in chance-governed activities, only a few studies have assessed the extent to which sport expert skills in wagering are a manifestation of the illusion of control. This study examined (a) whether expert hockey bettors could make better predictions than chance, (b) whether expert hockey bettors could achieve greater monetary gains than chance, and (c) what kind of strategies hockey gamblers rely on when betting. Accordingly, 30 participants were asked to report their state lottery hockey bets on 6 occasions. We suggest that the information used by bettors, along with near-misses, reinforces their perception of expertise. The results of this experiment suggest that the so-called "skills" of the sports bettors are cognitive distortions. (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved

  16. National Aerospace Planning Process Enhancements: Analysis and Innovation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    and backward in time). Asset availability awareness is described based on “Dashboard” and “Magnet’s Grid” visualizations. A “Hockey Card ” metaphor...Magnets Grid” strategy for detailed visualization of air assets (i.e. aircraft). Sections 4.3.4 through 4.3.4.1 propose “Mission Hockey Cards ” to...missions). These three options are presented to the users as three rows of Mission Hockey Cards , with one Card for each new mission and for each

  17. Development of the Direct Fabrication Process for Plutonium Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, J.W.

    2001-07-10

    The current baseline process for fabricating pucks for the Plutonium Immobilization Program includes granulation of the milled feed prior to compaction. A direct fabrication process was demonstrated that eliminates the need for granulation.

  18. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... trauma is likely the cause of CTE. Football players have been the focus of most CTE studies. However, athletes participating in other sports, including soccer, ice hockey, rugby, boxing, wrestling, basketball, field hockey, ...

  19. Hip Labral Tear

    MedlinePlus

    ... participate in such sports as ice hockey, soccer, football, golf and ballet are at higher risk of ... accidents or from playing contact sports such as football or hockey — can cause a hip labral tear. ...

  20. Blunt impact to the chest leading to sudden death from cardiac arrest during sports activities.

    PubMed

    Maron, B J; Poliac, L C; Kaplan, J A; Mueller, F O

    1995-08-10

    Sudden death from cardiac arrest in a young person may occur during sports play after a blunt blow to the chest in the absence of structural cardiovascular disease or traumatic injury (cardiac concussion or commotio cordis). We studied the clinical features of this apparently uncommon but important phenomenon. We identified cases from the registries of relevant agencies and organizations, as well as newsmedia accounts, and developed a clinical profile of 25 children and young adults, 3 to 19 years of age. Each victim collapsed with cardiac arrest immediately after an unexpected blow to the chest, which was usually inflicted by a projectile (such as a baseball or hockey puck). Incidents took place during organized competitive sports in 16 cases and in recreational settings at home, at school, or on the playground in 9. In each instance, the impact to the chest was not judged to be extraordinary for the sport involved and did not appear to have sufficient force to cause death. Twelve victims collapsed virtually instantaneously on impact, whereas 13 remained conscious and physically active for a brief time before cardiac arrest. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was administered within about three minutes to 19 victims, but normal cardiac rhythm could be restored in only 2 (both incurred irreversible brain damage and died shortly thereafter). Seven victims (28 percent) were wearing some form of protective chest padding. We speculate that most sudden deaths related to impact to the chest (not associated with traumatic injury) are due to ventricular dysrhythmia induced by an abrupt, blunt precordial blow, presumably delivered at an electrically vulnerable phase of ventricular excitability. This profile of blunt chest impact leading to cardiac arrest adds to our understanding of the range of causes of sudden death on the athletic field and may help in the development of preventive measures.

  1. Oliver Sacks: Our Correspondence About Twins/Twin Research: Vanishing Twins Syndrome; Discordant Sex in MZ Twins; Pregnancy Outcomes in IVF and ICSI Conceived Twins/Print and Media: Superfetated Twins; Twins Discordant for Smoking; Twins in Fashion; Yale University Twin Hockey Players; Conjoined Twin-Visiting Professor.

    PubMed

    Segal, Nancy L

    2017-08-01

    The late neurologist and author, Oliver Sacks, published an insightful 1986 review of Marjorie Wallace's book, The Silent Twins, in the New York Times. Taking exception to his assertion about Sir Francis Galton, I wrote a letter to the Times' editor. The letter was unpublished, but it brought a wonderful response from Sacks himself that is reproduced and examined. Next, brief reviews of twin research concerning the vanishing twin syndrome (VTS), discordant sex in a monozygotic (MZ) twin pair, and multiple pregnancy outcomes from assisted reproductive technology (ART) are presented. This section is followed by popular coverage of superfetated twins, smoking-discordant co-twins, twins in fashion, Yale University twin hockey players, and a visiting professor who was a conjoined twin.

  2. 'Biracial'-Looking Twins: A New Twin Type?/Twin Research: Twins with Cystic Teratomas; Sleep Quality and Body Mass Index; Previable Membrane Rupture/Print and Online Reports: Twins Born to a Sister Surrogate; NASA Twin Study; African-Cosmopolitan Twin Fashion Inspirations; Triplet Hockey Stars.

    PubMed

    Segal, Nancy L

    2017-06-01

    Dizygotic (DZ) co-twins born to mothers and fathers from different racial or ethnic backgrounds often resemble one parent much more than the other. As such, these pairs comprise a unique subset of twins for investigating how others' responses to their different looks may affect their personalities and self-esteem. This article describes some of these twin pairs and some challenges of raising them, and suggests ways they may be used in research. Next, recent twin research on cystic teratomas, relations between sleep quality and body mass index, and previable membrane rupture is described. The final section concerns twins, twin studies, and related events in the media, namely: twins born to a sister surrogate, the NASA twin investigation, inspiring African-Cosmopolitan twins in fashion, and triplet Hockey Stars.

  3. PUCK: An Automated Prompting System for Smart Environments

    PubMed Central

    Das, Barnan; Cook, Diane J.; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Seelye, Adriana M.

    2014-01-01

    The growth in popularity of smart environments has been quite steep in the last decade and so has the demand for smart health assistance systems. A smart home-based prompting system can enhance these technologies to deliver in-home interventions to users for timely reminders or brief instructions describing the way a task should be done for successful completion. This technology is in high demand given the desire of people who have physical or cognitive limitations to live independently in their homes. In this paper, with the introduction of the “PUCK” prompting system, we take an approach to automate prompting-based interventions without any predefined rule sets or user feedback. Unlike other approaches, we use simple off-the-shelf sensors and learn the timing for prompts based on real data that is collected with volunteer participants in our smart home test bed. The data mining approaches taken to solve this problem come with the challenge of an imbalanced class distribution that occurs naturally in the data. We propose a variant of an existing sampling technique, SMOTE, to deal with the class imbalance problem. To validate the approach, a comparative analysis with Cost Sensitive Learning is performed. PMID:25364323

  4. Campus Computing Looks Ahead: Tracking the Digital Puck.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kenneth C.

    2002-01-01

    Examines data from the 2002 Campus Computing Survey to determine trends in information technology in higher education and future possibilities. Discusses Web portals; electronic commerce capabilities, including use of credit cards; budget challenges, including budget cuts; and mobile technology and wireless networks. (LRW)

  5. Do pattern recognition skills transfer across sports? A preliminary analysis.

    PubMed

    Smeeton, Nicholas J; Ward, Paul; Williams, A Mark

    2004-02-01

    The ability to recognize patterns of play is fundamental to performance in team sports. While typically assumed to be domain-specific, pattern recognition skills may transfer from one sport to another if similarities exist in the perceptual features and their relations and/or the strategies used to encode and retrieve relevant information. A transfer paradigm was employed to compare skilled and less skilled soccer, field hockey and volleyball players' pattern recognition skills. Participants viewed structured and unstructured action sequences from each sport, half of which were randomly represented with clips not previously seen. The task was to identify previously viewed action sequences quickly and accurately. Transfer of pattern recognition skill was dependent on the participant's skill, sport practised, nature of the task and degree of structure. The skilled soccer and hockey players were quicker than the skilled volleyball players at recognizing structured soccer and hockey action sequences. Performance differences were not observed on the structured volleyball trials between the skilled soccer, field hockey and volleyball players. The skilled field hockey and soccer players were able to transfer perceptual information or strategies between their respective sports. The less skilled participants' results were less clear. Implications for domain-specific expertise, transfer and diversity across domains are discussed.

  6. Tsunami Hockey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, S.; Becker, N. C.; Wang, D.; Fryer, G. J.

    2013-12-01

    An important issue that vexes tsunami warning centers (TWCs) is when to cancel a tsunami warning once it is in effect. Emergency managers often face a variety of pressures to allow the public to resume their normal activities, but allowing coastal populations to return too quickly can put them at risk. A TWC must, therefore, exercise caution when cancelling a warning. Kim and Whitmore (2013) show that in many cases a TWC can use the decay of tsunami oscillations in a harbor to forecast when its amplitudes will fall to safe levels. This technique should prove reasonably robust for local tsunamis (those that are potentially dangerous within only 100 km of their source region) and for regional tsunamis (whose danger is limited to within 1000km of the source region) as well. For ocean-crossing destructive tsunamis such as the 11 March 2011 Tohoku tsunami, however, this technique may be inadequate. When a tsunami propagates across the ocean basin, it will encounter topographic obstacles such as seamount chains or coastlines, resulting in coherent reflections that can propagate great distances. When these reflections reach previously-impacted coastlines, they can recharge decaying tsunami oscillations and make them hazardous again. Warning center scientists should forecast sea-level records for 24 hours beyond the initial tsunami arrival in order to observe any potential reflections that may pose a hazard. Animations are a convenient way to visualize reflections and gain a broad geographic overview of their impacts. The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center has developed tools based on tsunami simulations using the RIFT tsunami forecast model. RIFT is a linear, parallelized numerical tsunami propagation model that runs very efficiently on a multi-CPU system (Wang et al, 2012). It can simulate 30-hours of tsunami wave propagation in the Pacific Ocean at 4 arc minute resolution in approximately 6 minutes of real time on a 12-CPU system. Constructing a 30-hour animation using 1 minute simulated time steps takes approximately 50 minutes on the same system. These animations are generated quickly enough to provide decision support for emergency managers whose coastlines may be impacted by the tsunami several hours later. Tsunami reflections can also aid in determining the source region for those tsunamis generated by non-seismic mechanisms without a clear source such as meteotsunamis, tsunamis generated by meteorological phenomena. A derecho that crossed the New Jersey coast and entered the Atlantic Ocean at approximately 1500 UTC June 13, 2013 generated a meteotsunami that struck the northeast coast of the US causing several injuries. A DART sensor off Montauk, NY, recorded tsunami waves approximately 200 minutes apart. We show how the arrival times of the tsunamis recorded by this DART can help to constrain the source region of the meteotsunami. We also examine other reflections produced by the Haida Gwaii 2012, Tohoku 2011, and other tsunamis.

  7. Safety in Team Sports. Sports Safety Series, Monograph No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borozne, Joseph, Ed.; And Others

    This monograph examines methods of promoting safe practices in the conduct of selected team sports with the aim of reducing and eliminating the occurrance of injuries. The team sports discussed are baseball and softball, basketball, field hockey, tackle football, touch and flag football, ice hockey, lacrosse, and soccer. (MJB)

  8. Psychological Implications for Submarine Display Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    maximum vigilance for a shorter period of time (Sauer, Wastell, Hockey, Crawshaw , Ishak, & Downing, 2002). Focused attention involves attending to...McCormick, E. J. (1993). Human Factors in Engineering and Design. New York: McGraw-Hill. Sauer, J., Wastell, D. G., Hockey, R. J., Crawshaw , C. M., Ishak

  9. Shopping for Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, John; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes inexpensive science materials for doing science activities using the steps in the learning cycle: engage, explore, explain, extend, and evaluate. The hands-on activities help students construct knowledge of dissolving and filtering, chemical reactions, conductivity of metals, heat absorption, motion (frictionless puck), sound production…

  10. Nontraditional Games in a Foreign Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Thomas S.

    A study investigated students' reactions to the addition of nontraditional games (played in and traditional to another country) to the physical education curriculum. Seventh grade students in Australia were introduced to game development, skills, and present status of two sports, 'Midget' Hockey, a modified version of Canadian ice hockey, and…

  11. A Framework for the Analysis of Cognitive Tasks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    positions to one another. 16 Crawshaw , Healey, Hockey and Lambert (1993) used HTA as one of the sources of information to analyse the task of a...Studies, 37, 721-750. Crawshaw , C.M., Healey, A., Hockey, G.R.J. & Lambert, J.A.I. (1993). Task analysis and critical incidents. Proceedings (pp. 1-11

  12. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  13. Sports-related eye injuries: the current picture.

    PubMed

    Leivo, Tiina; Haavisto, Anna-Kaisa; Sahraravand, Ahmad

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to represent the epidemiologies, findings, treatments, use of resources, outcomes and protective-eyewear-use recommendations in sports-related eye injuries by sport type. The study population is comprised of all new eye injury patients in 1 year in Helsinki University Eye Hospital. Data were collected from patient questionnaires and hospital records. The follow-up period was 3 months. 149/1151 (12.9%) of eye injuries were sports-related. Thirty two percent were related to floorball (type of hockey played on a mat with a stick and a ball); football, tennis and ice hockey were the next most common eye-injury-causing sports. Relatively, the most dangerous sports were rink bandy, (bandy played on ice hockey rink with a stick and a ball) (0.50 injuries in 12 months/1000 participants, CI 0.10-1.46), floorball (0.47, CI 0.34-0.62) and tennis (0.47, CI 0.26-0.77). Contusion was the primary diagnosis in 77% of cases; 41% of contusion patients had severe, mainly retinal findings. The number of outpatient visits was 459; inpatient days 25 and major surgeries 31. One hundred and eight patients were estimated to need life-long follow-up. Seventeen patients had a permanent functional impairment, 4 in ice hockey, 3 in floorball, 2 each in tennis and badminton. Compared to a previous study, ice hockey eye injuries are increasing and relatively severe, and a third of these injuries occurred despite visor use. Floorball eye injury incidence has significantly declined, mainly due to recently enforced mandatory protective eyewear for younger age groups. Based on these findings, we recommend, in floorball, that protective eyewear should be mandatory in all age groups. Universally in ice hockey, the proper use of a visor should be emphasised. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Defense.gov: Contracts

    Science.gov Websites

    Winter Classic hockey game between the Washington Capitals and Chicago Blackhawks, Jan. 1, 2015. The National Hockey League paid tribute to the U.S. Armed Forces during pre-game and in-game festivities. DoD game between the Washington Capitals and Chicago Blackhawks in Nationals Park, Washington, D.C., Jan. 1

  15. Techniques for Teachers Section

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tait, A., Ed.

    1973-01-01

    Includes a simple technique to demonstrate Millikan's oil drop experiment, an environmental studies experiment to measure dissolved oxygen in water samples, and a technique to demonstrate action-reaction. Science materials described are the Pol-A-Star Tomiscope, Nuffield chemistry film loops, air pucks and pH meters. (JR)

  16. Physics Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles describe the use of a lever to transfer energy between pucks on a frictionless surface, a demonstration of the principle of conservation of linear momentum, the construction of an inexpensive joulemeter, the design and construction of a simple logic demonstration board using integrated circuits, mounting of Geiger-counters to…

  17. Apparatus for Teaching Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Herbert H., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Summarizes the advantages in using the Daedalon Air Table, which supplies compressed air to the pucks instead of the table surface itself. Describes methods for constructing an electronic null detector using a Weston type galvanometer and an integrated circuit operational amplifier. Also describes a redesigned and improved sound-level meter. (CS)

  18. An Independent, Prospective, Head to Head Study of the Reliability and Validity of Neurocognitive Test Batteries for the Assessment of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    hockey, field hockey, rugby, wrestling), football will provide the large quantity of both baseline testing participants and concussed athletes. 6...baselines (7.0% overall) • Injury protocol completed on 10 concussed athletes and 10 matched controls in fall sports season (excluding football 2012...Neurobehavioral Assessment (DANA), and Immediate Post- Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT). The study design involves both a Sports

  19. Score a Facilities Hat Trick: Strategic Goals for Successful Hiring, Training, and Team Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loy, Darcy

    2012-01-01

    Granted, it might be a bit of a stretch to find comparable attributes between an ice hockey team and facilities management organizations. However, if you are open-minded to the possibility and begin to analyze each of these entities, you will find there are some distinct similarities. Ice hockey is a fast-paced and ever-changing game, much like a…

  20. Advanced Team Decision Making: A Developmental Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-03

    role - right wing, center, goalie - but as they set up plays and bring the STRONG puck down the ice, those individuals begin to function TEAM... pulled the team member’s attention away from assigned work - Unwise use of a member’s expertise in designating roles or functions In these cases, advanced

  1. Team Sports: A Place for Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Larry

    1985-01-01

    Physicians' role in team sports goes beyond the traditional ‘Doc’ who attends the game for stitching and primary injury management. Injury and illness prevention, ongoing supervision of rehabilitation, education, fitness evaluation, and training prescription are roles which have often fallen, by default, to paramedicals. The author recounts his experience in medical supervision of major junior hockey in the Western Hockey League. PMID:21274088

  2. Ultra-Compact Motor Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, William T.; Crowell, Adam; Hauptman, Traveler; Pratt, Gill Andrews

    2012-01-01

    This invention is an electronically commutated brushless motor controller that incorporates Hall-array sensing in a small, 42-gram package that provides 4096 absolute counts per motor revolution position sensing. The unit is the size of a miniature hockey puck, and is a 44-pin male connector that provides many I/O channels, including CANbus, RS-232 communications, general-purpose analog and digital I/O (GPIO), analog and digital Hall inputs, DC power input (18-90 VDC, 0-l0 A), three-phase motor outputs, and a strain gauge amplifier. This controller replaces air cooling with conduction cooling via a high-thermal-conductivity epoxy casting. A secondary advantage of the relatively good heat conductivity that comes with ultra-small size is that temperature differences within the controller become smaller, so that it is easier to measure the hottest temperature in the controller with fewer temperature sensors, or even one temperature sensor. Another size-sensitive design feature is in the approach to electrical noise immunity. At a very small size, where conduction paths are much shorter than in conventional designs, the ground becomes essentially isopotential, and so certain (space-consuming) electrical noise control components become unnecessary, which helps make small size possible. One winding-current sensor, applied to all of the windings in fast sequence, is smaller and wastes less power than the two or more sensors conventionally used to sense and control winding currents. An unexpected benefit of using only one current sensor is that it actually improves the precision of current control by using the "same" sensors to read each of the three phases. Folding the encoder directly into the controller electronics eliminates a great deal of redundant electronics, packaging, connectors, and hook-up wiring. The reduction of wires and connectors subtracts substantial bulk and eliminates their role in behaving as EMI (electro-magnetic interference) antennas. A shared

  3. Miniature Free-Flying Magnetometer Utilizing System-On-A-Chip Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eyre, F. B.; Blaes, B. R.

    2001-01-01

    Four Free-Flying Magnetometers (FFMs), developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the Enstrophy mission, were successfully deployed from the payload of a sounding rocket launched from Poker Flats, Alaska on February 11, 1999. The FFMs functioned successfully by synchronously measuring the vector magnetic field at 4 points separate from the payload and at relative distances up to 3 km, and communicated their data, in bursts, to the ground. This is the first time synchronized in-situ multipoint measurements of the Earth's magnetic field utilizing miniature spin-stabilized "sensorcraft" have been performed. The data they provided have enabled, for the first time, the direct measure of field-aligned current density and are enabling new science by determining the fine-scale structure of the currents in the Earth's ionosphere involved in the production of aurora. These proof-of-concept "hockey puck" (80 mm diameter, 38 mm height, 250 gram mass) FFMs were built using off-the-shelf commercial, industrial, and military grade surface-mount electronic components. Radiation-hard electronics was not required for the Enstrophy mission's short sub-orbital flight. The successful design, implementation, and flight demonstration of this 1st generation FFM design has provided a solid base for further development of a 2nd generation FFM design for planetary science applications. A reliable ultra-miniature radiation-hard 2nd-generation FFM utilizing System-On-A-Chip (SOAC) technologies is proposed. This design would be targeted for long-term planetary missions to investigate magnetospheric field configurations in regions having small-scale structure and to separate spatial and temporal variations. A fleet of short-lived (expendable) FFMs would be deployed into a targeted region to gather multiprobe vector magnetic field data. The FFMs would be ejected from a parent spacecraft at a speed of a few m/sec and would cover spatial volumes of order tens of kilometers for times of

  4. Discrepant Results in a 2-D Marble Collision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalajian, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Video analysis of 2-D collisions is an excellent way to investigate conservation of linear momentum. The often-desired experimental design goal is to minimize the momentum loss in order to demonstrate the conservation law. An air table with colliding pucks is an ideal medium for this experiment, but such equipment is beyond the budget of many…

  5. Development of the Molecular Adsorber Coating for Spacecraft and Instrument Interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin

    2011-01-01

    On-orbit Molecular Contamination occurs when materials outgas and deposit onto very sensitive interior surfaces of the spacecraft and instruments. The current solution, Molecular Adsorber Pucks, has disadvantages, which are reviewed. A new innovative solution, Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC), is currently being formulated, optimized, and tested. It is a sprayable alternative composed of Zeolite-based coating with adsorbing properties.

  6. An Analysis of Nondestructive Evaluation Techniques for Polymer Matrix Composite Sandwich Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgriff, Laura M.; Roberts, Gary D.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Zheng, Diahua; Averbeck, Timothy; Roth, Donald J.; Jeanneau, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Structural sandwich materials composed of triaxially braided polymer matrix composite material face sheets sandwiching a foam core are being utilized for applications including aerospace components and recreational equipment. Since full scale components are being made from these sandwich materials, it is necessary to develop proper inspection practices for their manufacture and in-field use. Specifically, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques need to be investigated for analysis of components made from these materials. Hockey blades made from sandwich materials and a flat sandwich sample were examined with multiple NDE techniques including thermographic, radiographic, and shearographic methods to investigate damage induced in the blades and flat panel components. Hockey blades used during actual play and a flat polymer matrix composite sandwich sample with damage inserted into the foam core were investigated with each technique. NDE images from the samples were presented and discussed. Structural elements within each blade were observed with radiographic imaging. Damaged regions and some structural elements of the hockey blades were identified with thermographic imaging. Structural elements, damaged regions, and other material variations were detected in the hockey blades with shearography. Each technique s advantages and disadvantages were considered in making recommendations for inspection of components made from these types of materials.

  7. Effects of Neuromuscular Training on the Rear-foot Angle Kinematics in Elite Women Field Hockey Players with Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunkuk; Choi, Hokyung; Cha, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jong-Chul; Kim, Taegyu

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the ankle position, the changes and persistence of ankle kinematics after neuromuscular training in athletes with chronic ankle instability (CAI). A total of 21 national women’s field hockey players participated (CAI = 12, control = 9). Ankle position at heel strike (HS), midstance (MS), and toe touch (TT) in the frontal plane during walking, running and landing were measured using 3D motion analysis. A 6-week neuromuscular training program was undertaken by the CAI group. Measurements of kinematic data for both groups were measured at baseline and the changes in kinematic data for CAI group were measured at 6 and 24 weeks. The kinematic data at HS during walking and running demonstrated that the magnitude of the eversion in the CAI group (−5.00° and −4.21°) was less than in the control group (−13.45°and −9.62°). The kinematic data at MS also exhibited less ankle eversion in the CAI group (−9.36° and −8.18°) than in the control group (−18.52° and −15.88°). Ankle positions at TT during landing were comparable between groups. Following the 6-week training, the CAI participants demonstrated a less everted ankle at HS during walking and running (−1.77° and −1.76°) compared to the previous positions. They also showed less ankle eversion at MS (−5.14° and −4.19°). Ankle orientation at TT changed significantly to an inverted ankle position (from −0.26° to 4.11°). The ankle kinematics were restored back to the previous positions at 24 weeks except for landing. It appeared that athletes with unstable ankle had a relatively inverted ankle position, and that 6-week neuromuscular training had an immediate effect on changing ankle orientation toward a less everted direction. The changed ankle kinematics seemed to persist during landing but not during walking and running. Key points Athletes with unstable ankles had a relatively inverted ankle position during the initial contact and midstance

  8. Skating crossovers on a motorized flywheel: a preliminary experimental design to test effect on speed and on crossovers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aynsley M; Krause, David A; Stuart, Michael J; Montelpare, William J; Sorenson, Matthew C; Link, Andrew A; Gaz, Daniel V; Twardowski, Casey P; Larson, Dirk R; Stuart, Michael B

    2013-12-01

    Ice hockey requires frequent skater crossovers to execute turns. Our investigation aimed to determine the effectiveness of training crossovers on a motorized, polyethylene high-resistance flywheel. We hypothesized that high school hockey players training on the flywheel would perform as well as their peers training on ice. Participants were 23 male high-school hockey players (age 15-19 years). The study used an experimental prospective design to compare players who trained for 9 sessions on the 22-foot flywheel with players who trained for 9 sessions on a similarly sized on-ice circle. Both groups were compared with control subjects who were randomly selected from the same participant pool as those training on ice. All players were tested before and after their 3-week training regimens, and control subjects were asked to not practice crossovers between testing. Group 1 trained in a hockey training facility housing the flywheel, and group 2 trained in the ice hockey arena where testing occurred. Primary outcome measures tested in both directions were: (a) speed (time in seconds) required to skate crossovers for 3 laps of a marked face-off circle, (b) cadence of skating crossovers on the similarly sized circles, and (c) a repeat interval speed test, which measures anaerobic power. No significant changes were found between groups in on-ice testing before and after training. Among the group 1 players, 7 of 8 believed they benefited from flywheel training. Group 2 players, who trained on ice, did not improve performance significantly over group 1 players. Despite the fact that no significant on-ice changes in performance were observed in objective measures, players who trained on the flywheel subjectively reported that the flywheel is an effective cost-effective alternative to training on ice. This is a relevant finding when placed in context with limited availability of on-ice training.

  9. Incidence and body location of reported acute sport injuries in seven sports using a national insurance database.

    PubMed

    Åman, M; Forssblad, M; Larsén, K

    2018-03-01

    Sports with high numbers of athletes and acute injuries are an important target for preventive actions at a national level. Both for the health of the athlete and to reduce costs associated with injury. The aim of this study was to identify injuries where injury prevention should focus, in order to have major impact on decreasing acute injury rates at a national level. All athletes in the seven investigated sport federations (automobile sports, basketball, floorball, football (soccer), handball, ice hockey, and motor sports) were insured by the same insurance company. Using this insurance database, the incidence and proportion of acute injuries, and injuries leading to permanent medical impairment (PMI), at each body location, was calculated. Comparisons were made between sports, sex, and age. In total, there were 84 754 registered injuries during the study period (year 2006-2013). Athletes in team sports, except in male ice hockey, had the highest risk to sustain an injury and PMI in the lower limb. Females had higher risk of injury and PMI in the lower limb compared to males, in all sports except in ice hockey. This study recommends that injury prevention at national level should particularly focus on lower limb injuries. In ice hockey and motor sports, head/neck and upper limb injuries also need attention. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Who Has the Puck? Strategic Initiative in Modern, Conventional War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    historical examinations including ac- counts such as Harry Gailey’s The War in the Pacific: From Pearl Harbor to Tokyo Bay , James Dunnigan’s Victory at...such as the F4U Corsair and the F6F Hellcat outclassed their Japanese opponents in the air.199 The speed, altitude, range, and payload of the B-29...Blitzkrieg. Novato, CA: Presidio Press, 1997. BIBLIOGRAPHY 115 Gailey, Harry A. The War in the Pacific: From Pearl Harbor to Tokyo Bay . Novato, CA

  11. Enhancing AUV Operational Capabilities: Hovering, Rendezvous, and Docking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-30

    ton on the dock that plunges into the bottom of the puck. A rubber sheath insulates the end of the button from the seawater and the exposed current...AUV Navigation and Self -Motion in Shallow Water, ONR. Autonomous Oceanographic Sampling Network Development, ONR. Enhancing AUV Operational...and Failure Recovery, ONR. Dependable Network Topologies with Network Fragment Healing for Component Level Intelli- gent Distributed Control Systems for

  12. Somatotypes of Nigerian athletes of several sports.

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, D N; Toriola, A L; Igbokwe, N U

    1985-01-01

    Somatotype ratings and percentage body fat of 131 elite Nigerian male athletes, average 24.2 years of age, and belonging to badminton (n = 18), basketball (n = 30), field hockey (n = 24), handball (n = 16), judo (n = 18), and soccer (n = 25) teams were determined. Basketball, handball and soccer players were taller and heavier, and had low percent fat values as compared with the other athletic groups. Judokas and hockey players were endomesomorphs. Other sports groups were predominantly ectomesomorphs. Images p219-a p219-b p219-c PMID:4092144

  13. Exposure to nitrogen dioxide in an indoor ice arena - New Hampshire, 2011.

    PubMed

    2012-03-02

    In January 2011, the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (NHDHHS) investigated acute respiratory symptoms in a group of ice hockey players. The symptoms, which included cough, shortness of breath, hemoptysis, and chest pain or tightness, were consistent with exposure to nitrogen dioxide gas (NO), a byproduct of combustion. Environmental and epidemiologic investigations were begun to determine the source of the exposure and identify potentially exposed persons. This report summarizes the results of those investigations, which implicated a local indoor ice arena that had hosted two hockey practice sessions during a 24-hour period when the arena ventilation system was not functioning. A total of 43 exposed persons were interviewed, of whom 31 (72.1%) reported symptoms consistent with NO exposure. The highest attack rate was among the hockey players (87.9%). After repair of the ventilation system, no additional cases were identified. To prevent similar episodes, ice arena operators should ensure ventilation systems and alarms are operating properly and that levels of NO and carbon monoxide (CO) are monitored continuously for early detection of increased gas levels.

  14. A rehabilitation tool for functional balance using altered gravity and virtual reality.

    PubMed

    Oddsson, Lars I E; Karlsson, Robin; Konrad, Janusz; Ince, Serdar; Williams, Steve R; Zemkova, Erika

    2007-07-10

    There is a need for effective and early functional rehabilitation of patients with gait and balance problems including those with spinal cord injury, neurological diseases and recovering from hip fractures, a common consequence of falls especially in the elderly population. Gait training in these patients using partial body weight support (BWS) on a treadmill, a technique that involves unloading the subject through a harness, improves walking better than training with full weight bearing. One problem with this technique not commonly acknowledged is that the harness provides external support that essentially eliminates associated postural adjustments (APAs) required for independent gait. We have developed a device to address this issue and conducted a training study for proof of concept of efficacy. We present a tool that can enhance the concept of BWS training by allowing natural APAs to occur mediolaterally. While in a supine position in a 90 deg tilted environment built around a modified hospital bed, subjects wear a backpack frame that is freely moving on air-bearings (cf. puck on an air hockey table) and attached through a cable to a pneumatic cylinder that provides a load that can be set to emulate various G-like loads. Veridical visual input is provided through two 3-D automultiscopic displays that allow glasses free 3-D vision representing a virtual surrounding environment that may be acquired from sites chosen by the patient. Two groups of 12 healthy subjects were exposed to either strength training alone or a combination of strength and balance training in such a tilted environment over a period of four weeks. Isokinetic strength measured during upright squat extension improved similarly in both groups. Measures of balance assessed in upright showed statistically significant improvements only when balance was part of the training in the tilted environment. Postural measures indicated less reliance on visual and/or increased use of somatosensory cues after

  15. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox operational test report

    SciTech Connect

    Kersten, J.K.

    1998-02-19

    The Low Level Waste (LLW) Process Gloveboxes are designed to: receive a 55 gallon drum in an 85 gallon overpack in the Entry glovebox (GBIOI); and open and sort the waste from the 55 gallon drum, place the waste back into drum and relid in the Sorting glovebox (GB 102). In addition, waste which requires further examination is transferred to the LLW RWM Glovebox via the Drath and Schraeder Bagiess Transfer Port (DO-07-201) or sent to the Sample Transfer Port (STC); crush the drum in the Supercompactor glovebox (GB 104); place the resulting puck (along with other pucks) into anothermore » 85 gallon overpack in the Exit glovebox (GB 105). The status of the waste items is tracked by the Data Management System (DMS) via the Plant Control System (PCS) barcode interface. As an item is moved from the entry glovebox to the exit glovebox, the Operator will track an items location using a barcode reader and enter any required data on the DMS console. The Operational Test Procedure (OTP) will perform evolution`s (described below) using the Plant Operating Procedures (POP) in order to verify that they are sufficient and accurate for controlled glovebox operation.« less

  16. Exposure to Elevated Carbon Monoxide Levels at an Indoor Ice Arena--Wisconsin, 2014.

    PubMed

    Creswell, Paul D; Meiman, Jon G; Nehls-Lowe, Henry; Vogt, Christy; Wozniak, Ryan J; Werner, Mark A; Anderson, Henry

    2015-11-20

    On December 13, 2014, the emergency management system in Lake Delton, Wisconsin, was notified when a male hockey player aged 20 years lost consciousness after participation in an indoor hockey tournament that included approximately 50 hockey players and 100 other attendees. Elevated levels of carbon monoxide (CO) (range = 45 ppm-165 ppm) were detected by the fire department inside the arena. The emergency management system encouraged all players and attendees to seek medical evaluation for possible CO poisoning. The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (WDHS) conducted an epidemiologic investigation to determine what caused the exposure and to recommend preventive strategies. Investigators abstracted medical records from area emergency departments (EDs) for patients who sought care for CO exposure during December 13-14, 2014, conducted a follow-up survey of ED patients approximately 2 months after the event, and conducted informant interviews. Ninety-two persons sought ED evaluation for possible CO exposure, all of whom were tested for CO poisoning. Seventy-four (80%) patients had blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels consistent with CO poisoning; 32 (43%) CO poisoning cases were among hockey players. On December 15, the CO emissions from the propane-fueled ice resurfacer were demonstrated to be 4.8% of total emissions when actively resurfacing and 2.3% when idling, both above the optimal range of 0.5%-1.0%. Incomplete fuel combustion by the ice resurfacer was the most likely source of elevated CO. CO poisonings in ice arenas can be prevented through regular maintenance of ice resurfacers, installation of CO detectors, and provision of adequate ventilation.

  17. Beyond the game: the legacy of Bill Masterton.

    PubMed

    Bonfield, Christopher M; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2016-07-01

    Bill Masterton is the only man to die of injuries sustained in a National Hockey League (NHL) game. He remains the last fatality in any professional team sport involving a direct in-game injury in North America. While Masterton was originally thought to have suffered a fatal brain injury while being checked on the ice, later analysis of the case revealed evidence of second-impact syndrome and the effects of prior concussions. Masterton's death sparked both an immediate debate in the NHL on whether helmets should be compulsory and the NHL's first vote on mandatory helmet use. Although the subject of mandated helmet use met with resistance in the 10 years after Masterton's death, especially from hockey owners and coaches, the NHL finally legislated helmet use by all players entering the league beginning in the 1979-1980 season. Several awards, including one recognizing the NHL player who best exemplifies the qualities of perseverance, sportsmanship, and dedication to hockey, have been created in memory of Masterton. However, his legacy extends far beyond the awards that bear his name. His death was the seminal event bringing head safety to the forefront of a game that was both unready and unwilling to accept change. An increase in mainstream media attention in recent years has led to unprecedented public awareness of brain injury and concussion in hockey and other sports. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of head injury in sports have occurred recently, the impetus for which started over 45 years ago, when Bill Masterton died.

  18. Puck in the Schoolyard: Crassing the Bard at Hawthorn Secondary College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Terry

    1999-01-01

    Claims doing "A Midsummer Night's Dream" as a school production allows students to bring their own personalities and cultures into the play. Explains how the production can be both inclusive, making room for many extra actions, as well communal, vivifying a school community to make it live more intensely. (NH)

  19. The LivePhoto Physics videos and video analysis site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, David

    2009-09-01

    The LivePhoto site is similar to an archive of short films for video analysis. Some videos have Flash tools for analyzing the video embedded in the movie. Most of the videos address mechanics topics with titles like Rolling Pencil (check this one out for pedagogy and content knowledge—nicely done!), Juggler, Yo-yo, Puck and Bar (this one is an inelastic collision with rotation), but there are a few titles in other areas (E&M, waves, thermo, etc.).

  20. A novel storage system for cryoEM samples.

    PubMed

    Scapin, Giovanna; Prosise, Winifred W; Wismer, Michael K; Strickland, Corey

    2017-07-01

    We present here a new CryoEM grid boxes storage system designed to simplify sample labeling, tracking and retrieval. The system is based on the crystal pucks widely used by the X-ray crystallographic community for storage and shipping of crystals. This system is suitable for any cryoEM laboratory, but especially for large facilities that will need accurate tracking of large numbers of samples coming from different sources. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Ideas from Future Technologies Workshop Held by ARL/TARDEC in Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland on 9-11 June, 1993

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    goalie moving his stick to block a puck. The first estimates of the predicted impact point may be available around 1 s before impact, and positioning...Innovation thrives in a "technology push" environment, not in a "demand pull " siruation. • Micromanagement is lethal to innovation. • Very few...strongest of "demand pull " conditions imaginable-a management method that reduces innovation. This could be counterbalanced with a strong "Tech Base

  2. CAD/CAM complete dentures: a review of two commercial fabrication systems.

    PubMed

    Kattadiyil, Mathew T; Goodacre, Charles J; Baba, Nadim Z

    2013-06-01

    The use of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) has become available for complete dentures through the AvaDent and Dentca systems. AvaDent uses laser scanning and computer technology. Teeth are arranged and bases formed using proprietary software.The bases are milled from prepolymerized pucks of resin. Dentca uses computer software to produce virtual maxillary and mandibular edentulous ridges, arrange the teeth and form bases. The dentures are fabricated using a conventional processing technique.

  3. Skate blade neck lacerations: a survey and case follow-up.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Michael J; Link, Andrew A; Smith, Aynsley M; Krause, David A; Sorenson, Matthew C; Larson, Dirk R

    2009-11-01

    To learn about neck lacerations caused by skate blades in hockey. A retrospective Web-based survey and follow-up of registered USA Hockey players. Three hundred twenty-eight thousand eight hundred twenty-one of 457 038 registered USA Hockey players with a current e-mail address were contacted and invited to participate in the survey. Of 26 589 players (5.8% of all USA registered players) who responded to the survey, 247 were excluded due to incomplete data. Of 26 342 surveys analyzed, 23 199 respondents were men (88%), 3015 women (11.4%), and 128 (0.5%) did not designate gender. An original survey instrument was developed, formatted, and linked to a Mayo Clinic Web site. Neck lacerations from a skate blade, including mechanism, severity, treatment required, and the type of neck protector worn. Of the 26 342 respondents, 11 935 (45.4%) currently wear neck protection and 485 (1.8%) have sustained a neck laceration. When the laceration occurred, 132 of the players (27%) were wearing neck protection. Interviews with 33 injured players established that lacerations were superficial: 20 (61%) required bandaging only, 11 were sutured, and 2 were glued. Based on this survey, the currently available neck laceration protectors do not eliminate the risk of a neck laceration from a skate blade.

  4. Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... read the article, Foot Health Facts for Athletes . Baseball Basketball Field Hockey Football Injuries Golf Injuries Lacrosse Rugby Running Soccer Softball Tennis Volleyball Find an ACFAS Physician Search Search ...

  5. BIG PLAY. Hospitals team up with biggest names in pro sports to score brand awareness.

    PubMed

    Robeznieks, Andis

    2016-07-01

    Partnering with major league baseball, basketball, hockey, football and even lacrosse teams isn't just about building brand recognition. It's also a way to promote health and fitness in the community.

  6. Two baselines are better than one: Improving the reliability of computerized testing in sports neuropsychology.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Jared; Echemendia, Ruben; Tangeman, Lindy; Meeuwisse, Willem; Comper, Paul; Hutchison, Michael; Aubry, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Computerized neuropsychological tests are frequently used to assist in return-to-play decisions following sports concussion. However, due to concerns about test reliability, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends yearly baseline testing. The standard practice that has developed in baseline/postinjury comparisons is to examine the difference between the most recent baseline test and postconcussion performance. Drawing from classical test theory, the present study investigated whether temporal stability could be improved by taking an alternate approach that uses the aggregate of 2 baselines to more accurately estimate baseline cognitive ability. One hundred fifteen English-speaking professional hockey players with 3 consecutive Immediate Postconcussion Assessment and Testing (ImPACT) baseline tests were extracted from a clinical program evaluation database overseen by the National Hockey League and National Hockey League Players' Association. The temporal stability of ImPACT composite scores was significantly increased by aggregating test performance during Sessions 1 and 2 to predict performance during Session 3. Using this approach, the 2-factor Memory (r = .72) and Speed (r = .79) composites of ImPACT showed acceptable long-term reliability. Using the aggregate of 2 baseline scores significantly improves temporal stability and allows for more accurate predictions of cognitive change following concussion. Clinicians are encouraged to estimate baseline abilities by taking into account all of an athlete's previous baseline scores.

  7. Ventricular mass in relation to body size, composition, and skeletal age in adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Valente-Dos-Santos, João; Coelho-e-Silva, Manuel J; Vaz, Vasco; Figueiredo, António J; Castanheira, Joaquim; Leite, Neiva; Sherar, Lauren B; Baxter-Jones, Adam; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Malina, Robert M

    2013-07-01

    To examine the contribution of chronological age (CA), skeletal age (SA), stature, sitting stature, fat-free mass (FFM), and fat mass (FM) to interindividual variability in left ventricular mass (LVM) in male adolescent roller hockey players using allometric models. Cross sectional. Training and competitive sport during adolescence. Seventy-three Portuguese male roller hockey players aged 14.5 to 16.5 years. Stature, sitting stature, body mass, estimated FM and FFM, and SA assessed by the Fels method. Allometric modeling of LVM assessed in accordance with recommendations of the American Society of Echocardiography. Hockey players (CA: 15.4 ± 0.6 years; SA: 16.4 ± 1.5 years) showed an eccentric remodeling of LV structure within the reference range (ie, 0.24-0.42), a dilated LV chamber, but no LVM increase. Exponents for body size descriptors were 2.69 for stature (R(2) = 27%; P < 0.001), 2.49 for sitting stature (R(2) = 37%; P < 0.001), 0.76 for FFM (R(2) = 31%; P < 0.001), and 0.22 for FM (R(2) = 26%; P < 0.001). The combination of size descriptors with CA and SA increased the explained variance in LVM slightly (26%-45%). When stature and FM are used for indexing LVM in a sample of adolescent athletes, biological maturity status should also be considered.

  8. Preventing head injuries in children

    MedlinePlus

    Concussion - preventing in children; Traumatic brain injury - preventing in children; TBI - children; Safety - preventing head injury ... Playing contact sports, such as lacrosse, ice hockey, football Riding a skateboard, scooter, or in-line skates ...

  9. Altitude training considerations for the winter sport athlete.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Robert F; Stickford, Jonathon L; Levine, Benjamin D

    2010-03-01

    Winter sports events routinely take place at low to moderate altitudes, and nearly all Winter Olympic Games have had at least one venue at an altitude >1000 m. The acute and chronic effects of altitude can have a substantial effect on performance outcomes. Acutely, the decline in oxygen delivery to working muscle decreases maximal oxygen uptake, negatively affecting performance in endurance events, such as cross-country skiing and biathlon. The reduction in air resistance at altitude can dramatically affect sports involving high velocities and technical skill components, such as ski jumping, speed skating, figure skating and ice hockey. Dissociation between velocity and sensations usually associated with work intensity (ventilation, metabolic signals in skeletal muscle and heart rate) may impair pacing strategy and make it difficult to determine optimal race pace. For competitions taking place at altitude, a number of strategies may be useful, depending on the altitude of residence of the athlete and ultimate competition altitude, as follows. First, allow extra time and practice (how much is yet undetermined) for athletes to adjust to the changes in projectile motion; hockey, shooting, figure skating and ski jumping may be particularly affected. These considerations apply equally in the reverse direction; that is, for athletes practising at altitude but competing at sea level. Second, allow time for acclimatization for endurance sports: 3-5 days if possible, especially for low altitude (500-2000 m); 1-2 weeks for moderate altitude (2000-3000 m); and at least 2 weeks if possible for high altitude (>3000 m). Third, increase exercise-recovery ratios as much as possible, with 1:3 ratio probably optimal, and consider more frequent substitutions for sports where this is allowed, such as ice hockey. Fourth, consider the use of supplemental O(2) on the sideline (ice hockey) or in between heats (skating and Alpine skiing) to facilitate recovery. For competitions at sea

  10. Children and Sports: Choices for All Ages

    MedlinePlus

    ... to take on complex skill sports, such as football, basketball, hockey and volleyball. Keep in mind, however, ... coach attentive to the prevention and recognition of concussions? Coaching style. Attend practices or talk to the ...

  11. What Can I Do to Help Prevent Traumatic Brain Injury?

    MedlinePlus

    ... terrain vehicle; Playing a contact sport, such as football, ice hockey, or boxing; Using in-line skates ... Brain Injury Awareness Additional Pevention Resources Childhood Injuries Concussion in Children and Teens Injuries from Violence Injuries ...

  12. Concussion - child - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000125.htm Concussion in children - discharge To use the sharing features ... child's provider about: Playing contact sports, such as football, hockey, and soccer Riding a bicycle, motorcycle, or ...

  13. Cauliflower Ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... of headgear are recommended or required (like football, baseball, hockey, boxing, or wrestling). If someone receives a ... Taking Care of Your Skin Stitches Stay Safe: Baseball What's a Bruise? View more About Us Contact ...

  14. Eye Injuries in Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... 90% of them can be avoided. Basketball and baseball cause the most eye injuries, followed by water ... to the sun or harmful objects. Examples include baseball, basketball, hockey, football, soccer, rugby, and lacrosse. Outdoor ...

  15. Hip flexor strain -- aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... flexors. Runners, people who do martial arts, and football, soccer, and hockey players are more likely to ... herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any ...

  16. Going with the Flow of Nosebleeds

    MedlinePlus

    ... wearing protective gear, such as helmets for hockey, football, and baseball and any other sport or activity ... need to see the doctor or visit the emergency department: You feel dizzy, weak, or faint (like ...

  17. Groin pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... who play sports such as hockey, soccer, and football. This condition is sometimes called "sports hernia" although ... herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any ...

  18. Dislocation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dislocations can occur in contact sports, such as football and hockey, and in sports in which falls ... downhill skiing, gymnastics and volleyball. Basketball players and football players also commonly dislocate joints in their fingers ...

  19. Why Exercise Is Cool

    MedlinePlus

    ... these: swimming basketball hockey running or walking skating soccer cross-country skiing riding your bike jumping rope ... My Body? Can Kids With Asthma Play Sports? Nutrition & Fitness Center Sports, Exercise, and Diabetes Getting Muscles ...

  20. Team Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... sleds, which are affixed to two hockey skate blades under the seat. The sleds are about three ... encourages disabled people to participate in long-distance running. ATC provides support, training and technical expertise to ...

  1. Broken Nose

    MedlinePlus

    ... include contact sports, physical fights, falls and motor vehicle accidents that result in facial trauma. A broken ... such as football or hockey Physical altercations Motor vehicle accidents Falls A broken nose can even be ...

  2. Facial Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... high speed or contact sports, such as boxing, football, soccer, ice hockey, bicycling skiing, and snowmobiling. Most ... protective equipment - such as helmets and padding for football, bicycling and rollerblading; face masks, head and mouth ...

  3. Sports and Exercise Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk of injury almost as much as playing football without shoulder pads? Using the wrong — or not ... helmets : They're important for sports such as football , hockey, baseball, softball, biking, skateboarding, inline skating, skiing , ...

  4. Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... like running or playing football, field hockey, or softball — can be frustrating. Recovering from an ACL injury ... Safety Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) Safety Tips: Baseball View more About Us Contact Us Partners Editorial ...

  5. Bruise

    MedlinePlus

    ... and hockey; shin guards and knee pads in soccer and basketball. Alternative Names ... P, Leffler SM. Contusion (bruise). In: Buttaravoli P, Leffler SM, eds. Minor Emergencies . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap ...

  6. Treating and Preventing Sports Hernias

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close ‹ Back to Healthy Living Treating and Preventing Sports Hernias If you play ice hockey, tennis or ... for the most commonly misdiagnosed groin pain—a sports hernia. A sports hernia often results from overuse ...

  7. Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... torn MCL tend to play contact sports, like football and soccer. More severe injuries happen when the ... the things you love — like running or playing football, field hockey, or softball — can be frustrating. If ...

  8. Make time to move

    MedlinePlus

    ... weeknight. Join a team. Softball, basketball, hockey, and soccer are not just for kids. Look for recreational ... us Disclaimers Copyright Privacy Accessibility Quality Guidelines Viewers & Players MedlinePlus Connect for EHRs For Developers U.S. National ...

  9. Ice Skating Instruction at the University of Illinois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Char; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign conducts a instructional ice skating program for its students and the community. Activities include: a figure skating club; a speed skating club; ice hockey program; and ice skating classes. (CJ)

  10. Lionel Charles Renwick (Rennick) Emmett (1913-96): physician and Olympian.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Tamoghna; Datta, Adrija; Chandra, Shivika

    2012-08-01

    Lionel Charles Renwick Emmett, a physician who trained in pre-independent India as a medical student, participated in the 1936 Berlin Summer Olympics as a part of the Indian field hockey team that won the Gold Medal.

  11. Development and Testing of Molecular Adsorber Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin; Hasegawa, Mark; Straka, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The effect of on-orbit molecular contamination has the potential to degrade the performance of spaceflight hardware and diminish the lifetime of the spacecraft. For example, sensitive surfaces, such as optical surfaces, electronics, detectors, and thermal control surfaces, are vulnerable to the damaging effects of contamination from outgassed materials. The current solution to protect these surfaces is through the use of zeolite coated ceramic adsorber pucks. However, these pucks and its additional complex mounting hardware requirements result in several disadvantages, such as size, weight, and cost related concerns, that impact the spacecraft design and the integration and test schedule. As a result, a new innovative molecular adsorber coating was developed as a sprayable alternative to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination. In this study, the formulation for molecular adsorber coatings was optimized using various binders, pigment treatment methods, binder to pigment ratios, thicknesses, and spray application techniques. The formulations that passed coating adhesion and vacuum thermal cycling tests were further tested for its adsorptive capacity. Accelerated molecular capacitance tests were performed in an innovatively designed multi-unit system containing idealized contaminant sources. This novel system significantly increased the productivity of the testing phase for the various formulations that were developed. Work performed during the development and testing phases has demonstrated successful application of molecular adsorber coatings onto metallic substrates, as well as, very promising results for the adhesion performance and the molecular capacitance of the coating. Continued testing will assist in the qualification of molecular adsorber coatings for use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  12. Aggression in Sport: Its Implications for Character Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanDyke, Roger R.

    1980-01-01

    The premise that "sports builds character" is scrutinized through a discussion of several contact sports--boxing, hockey, and football. The fine line between assertiveness and aggression is explored, and the interrelationship between society and sports is investigated. (JN)

  13. Corneal Abrasions

    MedlinePlus

    ... goggles or a facemask) when you're enjoying sports like skiing, snowboarding, hockey, and lacrosse. Safety goggles can protect your eyes when you're using tools or experimenting in science class. If you go outside on a sunny ...

  14. ICESCAPE Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-07-03

    Benny Hopson from the Barrow (Alaska) Arctic Science Consortium drills a core sample from sea ice in the Chukchi Sea on July 4, 2010. The core is sliced up into puck-sized sections and stored onboard the U.S. Coast Guard Healy for analysis in the ship's lab. Impacts of Climate change on the Eco-Systems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment (ICESCAPE) is a multi-year NASA shipborne project. The bulk of the research will take place in the Beaufort and Chukchi Sea’s in summer of 2010 and fall of 2011. Photo Credit: (NASA/Kathryn Hansen)

  15. Coming of Age: Sports Fiction for YAs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ron

    1982-01-01

    This annotated list of 26 citations covering sports fiction includes stories on football, basketball, wrestling, softball, hockey, volleyball, soccer, and baseball for young adults. It is arranged alphabetically by author with grade levels indicated. A brief introduction is provided. (EJS)

  16. Physical Activity and Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes your heart rate to go up Walking, hiking, jogging, running Water aerobics or swimming laps Bicycling, skateboarding, rollerblading, and jumping rope Ballroom dancing and aerobic dancing Tennis, soccer, hockey, and basketball Benefits of Physical Activity Physical activity has many health ...

  17. Sports Involvement and Academic Achievement: A Study of Malaysian University Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuan, Chun Cheng; Yusof, Aminuddin; Shah, Parilah Mohd

    2013-01-01

    Factors that influence the academic achievement of Malaysian university athletes were investigated using 156 field hockey players from several universities. The relationship between team subculture, parental influence, the learning environment, support systems, financial aid, training factors, academic assistance, socialization, and stress level…

  18. Investigation of a Graphical CONOPS Development Environment for Agile Systems Engineering - Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-31

    Westerman, Crawshaw , Hockey, and Sauer, 1998) for practitioners. Thus, CTA extends research by providing a toolbox of methods for understanding teams...drive process and performance. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. pp. 3-8. Shrayne, N. M., Westerman, S. J., Crawshaw , C. M

  19. Anomalous Coronary Artery From the Opposite Sinus (ACAOS): Technical Challenges During Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Razi, Mahmodula; Mahrotra, Anupam; Aggarwal, Puneet; Singh, Anupam; Rekwal, Lokendra; Tripathi, Sunil; Abhishekh, Nishant Kumar; Krishna, Vinay

    2018-04-01

    Anomalies of the coronary arteries are reported in 1-2% of patients among diagnostic angiogram. Ectopic origin of right coronary artery (RCA) from opposite sinus is one of the most common and they are mainly benign, but at times may be malignant. We report a case of a 69-year-old male who underwent early invasive percutaneous coronary intervention for non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) where RCA arising from left sinus at the root of left main artery was culprit and various technical challenges were encountered while intervening in form of cannulation to tracking of hardwares. RCA was cannulated with floating wire technique using hockey stick guide catheter and revascularized by deployment of 3.5 × 38 mm Promus Premier Everolimus eluting stent (Boston Scientific, USA). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ever report of ectopic RCA being revascularized by using hockey stick catheter.

  20. Using Masculine Capital to Understand the Role of a Sport Program in the Lives of Men From a Western Canadian Inner City.

    PubMed

    Holt, Nicholas L; Scherer, Jay; Koch, Jordan

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of a sport program in the lives of homeless men with severe mental illnesses and addictions. Interviews were conducted with eight men who attended a floor hockey program, and data examined using categorical-content narrative methodology. Five themes captured the role of the floor hockey program in the men's lives: (a) relationships with program leader, (b) therapy, (c) community, (d) action, and (e) achievement. These themes were interpreted using theories of masculinity (Connell, 1995; Gough, 2014). Relationships with the program leader and other men, and ways in which they were allowed to play with physicality, provided opportunities to accumulate masculine capital (i.e., ways in which competence in traditionally masculine behaviors provides masculine credit). Practically, the findings suggest that sport program delivery for men such as those in this study can be enhanced by providing opportunities for accruing masculine capital.

  1. Does Relative Age Affect Career Length in North American Professional Sports?

    PubMed

    Steingröver, C; Wattie, N; Baker, J; Schorer, J

    Relative age effects (RAEs) typically favour older members within a cohort; however, research suggests that younger players may experience some long-term advantages, such as longer career length. The purposes of this study were to replicate previous findings on RAEs among National Hockey League (NHL) ice hockey players, National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball players and National Football League (NFL) football players and to investigate the influence of relative age on career length in all three sports. Using official archives, birthdates and number of games played were collected for players drafted into the NBA ( N  = 407), NFL ( N  = 2380) and NHL ( N  = 1028) from 1980 to 1989. We investigated the possibility that younger players might be able to maximize their career length by operationalizing career length as players' number of games played throughout their careers. There was a clear RAE for the NHL, but effects were not significant for the NBA or NFL. Moreover, there was a significant difference in matches played between birth quartiles in the NHL favouring relatively younger players. There were no significant quartiles by career length effects in the NBA or NFL. The significant relationship between relative age and career length provides further support for relative age as an important constraint on expertise development in ice hockey but not basketball or football. Currently, the reason why relatively younger players have longer careers is not known. However, it may be worth exploring the influence of injury risk or the development of better playing skills.

  2. Modifying Intramural Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokosz, Francis M.

    1981-01-01

    Standard sports rules can be altered to improve the game for intramural participants. These changes may improve players' attitudes, simplify rules for officials, and add safety features to a game. Specific rule modifications are given for volleyball, football, softball, floor hockey, basketball, and soccer. (JN)

  3. RIMPAC 08: Naval Oceanographic Office glider operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, Kevin L.; Grembowicz, Ken; Bricker, Bruce; Crossland, Steve; Bryant, Danielle; Torres, Marc; Giddings, Tom

    2009-05-01

    The Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) Glider Operations Center (GOC) supported its first joint-mission exercise during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 08, a multi-national naval exercise conducted during July 2008 near the Hawaiian Islands. NAVOCEANO personnel deployed four Seagliders from USNS SUMNER for Anti-submarine Warfare (ASW) operations and four Slocum gliders for Mine Warfare (MIW) operations. Each Seaglider was equipped with a Sea-Bird Electronics (SBE) 41cp CTD and Wet Labs, Inc. bb2fl ECO-puck optical sensor. The instrumentation suite on the Slocum gliders varied, but each Slocum glider had an SBE 41cp CTD combined with one of the following optical sensors: a Wet Labs, Inc. AUVb scattering sensor, a Wet Labs, Inc. bb3slo ECO-puck backscattering sensor, or a Satlantic, Inc. OCR radiometer. Using Iridium communications, the GOC had command and control of all eight gliders, with Department of Defense (DoD) personnel and DoD contractors serving as glider pilots. Raw glider data were transmitted each time a glider surfaced, and the subsequent data flow included processing, quality-control procedures, and the generation of operational and tactical products. The raw glider data were also sent to the Naval Research Laboratory at Stennis Space Center (NRLSSC) for fusion with satellite data and modeled data (currents, tides, etc.) to create optical forecasting, optical volume, and electro-optical identification (EOID) performance surface products. The glider-based products were delivered to the ASW and MIW Reach Back Cells for incorporation into METOC products and for dissemination to the Fleet. Based on the metrics presented in this paper, the inaugural joint-mission operation was a success.

  4. Mathematics and Sports. Mathematical World. Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadovskii, L. E.; Sadovskii, A. L.

    This volume contains some examples of mathematical applications in sports. Sports discussed include tennis, figure skating, gymnastics, track and field, soccer, skiing, hockey, and swimming. Problems and situations are posed and answers with thorough explanations are provided. Chapters include: (1) Mathematics and Sports; (2) What Is Applied…

  5. 1998 Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenoweth, Karin; Evelyn, Jamilah

    1998-01-01

    Announces the Sports Scholars Awards for 1998. One male and one female college athlete are profiled, and others are named for baseball, softball, basketball, fencing, riflery, bowling, football, wrestling, soccer, lacrosse, field hockey, swimming/diving, gymnastics, crew, tennis, golf, volleyball, track/field, cross country, downhill skiing, and…

  6. Plyometrics: A Legitimate Form of Power Training?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duda, Marty

    1988-01-01

    Plyometric exercises or drills combine speed and strength to produce an explosive-reactive movement or increased power. Some world-class athletes have used plyometric-training in sports such as high-jumping, hurdles, football, baseball, and hockey. The method is still considered experimental. Sample exercises are described. (JL)

  7. Internet-Accessible Scholarly Resources for the Humanities and Social Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACLS Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This newsletter focuses on the presentations of a program session on Internet-accessible scholarly resources, held at the 1996 ACLS Annual Meeting. Articles in the newsletter include: "Building the Scene: Words, Images, Data, and Beyond" (David Green); "Electronic Texts: The Promise and the Reality" (Susan Hockey); "Images…

  8. "Emerging" Sports for Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Debra E.

    1994-01-01

    The National Collegiate Athletic Association has recently introduced nine new sports to intercollegiate athletics: team handball, archery, badminton, bowling, crew, ice hockey, squash, synchronized swimming, and water polo. The initiative is intended to encourage colleges to create more athletic opportunities for women. It sets scholarship limits…

  9. Fit by Five.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Maureen

    1978-01-01

    Describes a preschool program in which all skills, including academic and social skills, are taught through movement. Children are introduced to over 300 physical activities and sports in a year's time including: balance beam, parallel bars, trampoline, swimming, hockey, basketball, golf, archery, track, and volleyball. (JMB)

  10. Plutonism at Different Crustal Levels of an Arc: Insights From the 5 to 40 km (Paleodepth) North Cascades Crustal Section, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. B.; Paterson, S. R.; Matzel, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    The crystalline core of the North Cascades preserves a Cretaceous crustal section that facilitates evaluation of pluton construction, emplacement, geometry, composition, and deformation at widely variable crustal levels (~5 to 40 km paleodepth) in a thick (> 55 km) continental magmatic arc. The oldest and largest pulse of plutonism was focused between 96-89 Ma when fluxes were a minimum of 3.9x10-6km3/yr/km of arc length, but the coincidence with regional crustal thickening and underthrusting of a cool outboard terrane resulted in relatively low mid- to deep-crustal temperatures for an arc. A second, smaller peak of magmatism at 78-71 Ma (minimum of 8.2x10-7km3/yr/km of arc length) occurred during regional transpression. Tonalite dominates at all levels of the section. Intrusions range from large plutons to thin (< 50 m) dispersed sheets encased in metamorphic rocks that record less focused magmatism. The percentage of igneous rocks increases systematically from shallow to middle to deep levels; from approximately 37% to 55% to 65% of the total rock volume. Unfocused magmas comprise much higher percentages (approximately 19%) of the total plutonic rock at deep- and mid-crustal depths, but only 1% at shallower levels, whereas the largest intrusions were emplaced into shallow crust. Plutons have a range of shapes, including: asymmetric wedges to funnels; subhorizontal tabular sheets; steep-sided, blade-shaped bodies with high aspect ratios in map view; and steep-sided, vertically extensive (> 8 km) bodies shaped like thick disks and/or hockey pucks. Sheeted intrusions and gently dipping tabular bodies are more common with depth. Some of these plutons fit the model that most intrusions are subhorizontal and tabular, but many do not, reflecting the complex changes in lithology and rheology in arc crust undergoing regional shortening. The steep sheeted plutons partly represent magma transfer zones that fed the large shallow plutons, which were sites of intermittent

  11. Comparison of the home advantage in nine different professional team sports in Spain.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Miguel A; Pollard, Richard; Luis-Pascual, Juan-Carlos

    2011-08-01

    Home advantage is a well-established phenomenon in many sports. The present study is unique in that it includes different sports analysed in the same country, at the same level of competition, and over the same time period. Nine team sports from Spain were included: baseball, basketball, handball, indoor soccer, roller hockey, rugby, soccer, volleyball, and water polo. Data for five seasons (2005-2006 to 2009-2010) were obtained, totaling 9,472 games. The results confirmed the existence of home advantage in all nine sports. There was a statistically significant difference between the sports; home advantage was highest in rugby (67.0%), and lowest in volleyball (55.7%), water polo (56.2%), and roller hockey (58.3%). The design of the study controlled for some of the likely causes of home advantage, and the results suggested that the high home advantage for rugby was likely a reflection of the continuous, aggressive, and intense nature of the sport.

  12. Battling fire and ice: remote guidance ultrasound to diagnose injury on the International Space Station and the ice rink.

    PubMed

    Kwon, David; Bouffard, J Antonio; van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Sargsyan, Asot E; Hamilton, Douglas R; Melton, Shannon L; Dulchavsky, Scott A

    2007-03-01

    National Aeronautical and Space and Administration (NASA) researchers have optimized training methods that allow minimally trained, non-physician operators to obtain diagnostic ultrasound (US) images for medical diagnosis including musculoskeletal injury. We hypothesize that these techniques could be expanded to non-expert operators including National Hockey League (NHL) and Olympic athletic trainers to diagnose musculoskeletal injuries in athletes. NHL and Olympic athletic trainers received a brief course on musculoskeletal US. Remote guidance musculoskeletal examinations were conducted by athletic trainers, consisting of hockey groin hernia, knee, ankle, elbow, or shoulder evaluations. US images were transmitted to remote experts for interpretation. Groin, knee, ankle, elbow, or shoulder images were obtained on 32 athletes; all real-time US video stream and still capture images were considered adequate for diagnostic interpretation. This experience suggests that US can be expanded for use in locations without a high level of on-site expertise. A non-physician with minimal training can perform complex, diagnostic-quality examinations when directed by a remote-based expert.

  13. Girls Physical Education Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairfax County Schools, VA.

    This handbook was designed to provide the student with basic information for various individual, dual, and team sports. The individual and dual sports which are discussed include archery, badminton, creative dance, fencing, golf, gymnastics, and games such as deck tennis, table tennis, horseshoes, and shuffledboard. Basketball, field hockey,…

  14. A Pirate's Life: A Model and a Metaphor for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses various ways in which context may be interpreted to enhance learning and performance; illustrates domains of learning using a hockey team as an example; and suggests implications for learning, performance, and instructional design. Highlights include an ecological systems model; and examples of individual development, team learning, and…

  15. Some Ways of Helping Underachievers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willings, David; Greenwood, Bill

    1990-01-01

    A program of intervention called therapeutic tutoring to help underachievers is described. Intervention centers around students' loci of control, through a process of identifying areas in which students feel empowered and relating academic experiences to these areas. Academic exercises based on Monopoly, cricket, rugby, soap operas, field hockey,…

  16. 1997 Arthur Ashe Jr. Sport Scholars Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    Winners of the "Black Issues in Higher Education" Arthur Ashe Jr. 1997 athletes of the year, one male and one female, are profiled and Sport Scholars are listed for baseball, softball, basketball, fencing, archery, football, handball, soccer, field hockey, crew, swimming, gymnastics, tennis, squash, golf, volleyball, lacrosse, wrestling, water…

  17. Five Year Overview of Sport Injuries: The NAIRS Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, William E.

    1982-01-01

    Data from a survey of institutional members of the National Athletic Injury/Illness Reporting System (NAIRS) are presented and discussed. Included are tables showing injuries reported in high schools and colleges and universities for male and female athletes in baseball, basketball, football, gymnastics, soccer, wrestling, field hockey, track and…

  18. Are Children's Competitive Team Sports Socializing Agents for Corporate America?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlage, Gai Ingham

    In a study of the similarities between childrens' competitive team sports and the typical corporate or business environment, two research questions were posed: (1) Does the structural organization of childrens' soccer and ice hockey organizations resemble that of American corporations?; and (2) Are the values of childrens' competitive sports…

  19. A Descriptive-Analytic Study of the Practice Field Behavior of a Winning Female Coach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Patt; Rife, Frank

    A winning collegiate field hockey coach was observed across seventeen practice sessions through one complete competitive season. A category system for the event recording of verbal and nonverbal behaviors delivered to the team and to the sixteen individual players produced descriptive-analytic information about relative behavior frequencies for…

  20. Dismal: A Spreadsheet for Sequential Data Analysis and HCI Experimentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-24

    Hambly, Alder, Wyatt- Millington, Shrayane, Crawshaw , et al., 1996). Table 2 provides some example data. An automatically generated header comes first...Shrayane, N. M., Crawshaw , C. M., & Hockey, G. R. J. (1996). Investigating the human-computer interface using the Datalogger. Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, & Computers, 28(4), 603-606.

  1. The Impact of a Concussion-U Educational Program on Knowledge of and Attitudes about Concussion.

    PubMed

    Eagles, Matthew E; Bradbury-Squires, David J; Powell, Maria F; Murphy, Justin R; Campbell, Graeme D; Maroun, Falah B

    2016-09-01

    The diagnosis of a sports-related concussion is often dependent on the athlete self-reporting their symptoms. It has been suggested that improving youth athlete knowledge and attitudes toward concussion may increase self-reporting behaviour. The objective of this study was to determine if a novel Concussion-U educational program improves knowledge of and attitudes about concussion among a cohort of elite male Bantam and Midget AAA hockey players. Fifty-seven male Bantam and Midget AAA-level hockey players (mean age=14.52±1.13 years) were recruited from the local community. Each participant completed a modified version of the Rosenbaum Concussion Knowledge and Attitudes Survey-Student Version immediately before and after a Concussion-U educational presentation. Follow-up sessions were arranged 4 to 6 months after the presentation, and assessed retention of knowledge and attitude changes. Forty-three players completed all three surveys. Concussion knowledge and attitude scores significantly (p<0.01) increased from pre- to post-presentation by 12.79 and 8.41%, respectively. At long-term follow-up, knowledge levels remained significantly (p<0.01) higher than baseline by 8.49%. Mean attitude scores were also increased at follow-up; however, this increase was not statistically significant. A Concussion-U educational program led to an immediate improvement in concussion knowledge and attitudes among elite male Bantam and Midget AAA hockey players. Increased knowledge was maintained at long-term follow-up, but improved attitude was not. Future studies should investigate whether similar educational programs influence symptom reporting and concussion incidence. In addition, they should focus on how to maintain improved concussion attitudes.

  2. Paralympic medical services for the 2010 paralympic winter games.

    PubMed

    Taunton, Jack; Wilkinson, Michael; Celebrini, Rick; Stewart, Robert; Stasyniuk, Treny; Van de Vliet, Peter; Willick, Stuart; Ferrer, Josep Martinez

    2012-01-01

    To present the planning and medical encounters for the 2010 Paralympic Winter Games. Prospective medical encounter study. 2010 Paralympic Winter Games. Athletes, coaches, officials, workforce, volunteers, and media. Sport type: alpine, Nordic, and sledge hockey and curling. Participant type: athlete, workforce, and spectators. Terrain and speed. Medical encounters entered in database at competitive (alpine skiing, biathlon, cross-country skiing, sledge hockey, and curling) and noncompetitive (Whistler and Vancouver Polyclinics, presentation centers, opening and closing ceremonies, media center, Paralympic Family Hotel) venues. Forty-two nations participated with 1350 Paralympic athletes, coaches, and officials. There were 2590 accredited medical encounters (657 athletes, 25.4%; 682 International Federation/National Paralympic Committee officials, 26.3%; 57 IPC, 2.2%; 8 media, 0.3%; 1075 workforce, 41.5%; 111 others, 4.3%) and 127 spectator encounters for a total of 2717 encounters. During the preopening period medical services saw 201 accredited personnel. The busiest venues during the Paralympic Games were the Whistler (1633 encounters) and Vancouver (748 encounters) Polyclinics. Alpine, sledge hockey, and curling were the busiest competitive venues. The majority of medical encounters were musculoskeletal (44.6%, n = 1156). Medical services recorded 1657 therapy treatments, 977 pharmaceutical prescriptions dispensed, 204 dental treatments, 353 imaging examinations (more than 50% from alpine skiing), and 390 laboratory tests. There were 24 ambulance transfers with 7 inpatient hospitalizations for a total of 24 inpatient days and 4 outpatient visits. The mandate to have minimal impact on the health services of Vancouver and the Olympic Corridor while offering excellent medical services to the Games was accomplished. This data will be valuable to future organizing committees.

  3. Ojibway Hockey CD ROM in the Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Shirley I.

    A shortage of instructional materials and activities is a continual problem for Native language courses, as is making the material relevant to students. The Native way of teaching and learning has always been to have fun. In response to these concerns, a group of language experts at Trent University (Ontario) are developing a CD-ROM for high…

  4. Prevalence of joint-related pain in the extremities and spine in five groups of top athletes.

    PubMed

    Jonasson, Pall; Halldin, Klas; Karlsson, Jon; Thoreson, Olof; Hvannberg, Jonas; Swärd, Leif; Baranto, Adad

    2011-09-01

    Joint-related pain conditions from the spine and extremities are common among top athletes. The frequency of back pain has, however, been studied in more detail, and the frequency of low-back pain in top athletes in different high-load sports has been reported to be as high as 85%. Sport-related pain from different joints in the extremities is, however, infrequently reported on in the literature. Seventy-five male athletes, i.e. divers, weight-lifters, wrestlers, orienteers and ice-hockey players and 12 non-athletes (control group) were included in the study. A specific self-assessed pain-oriented questionnaire related to the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine, as well as the various joints, i.e. shoulders, elbows, wrists, hips, knees and ankles, was filled out by the athletes and the non-athletes. The overall frequency of pain reported by the athletes during the last week/last year was as follows; cervical spine 35/55%; thoracic spine 22/33%; lumbar spine 50/68%; shoulder 10/21%; elbow 7/7%; wrist 7/8%; hip 15/23%; knee 22/44%; and ankle 11/25%. The corresponding values for non-athletes were cervical spine 9/36%; thoracic spine 17/33%; lumbar spine 36/50%; shoulder 0/9%; elbow 9/0%; wrist 0/0%; hip 9/16%; knee 10/9%; and ankle 0/0%. A higher percentage of athletes reported pain in almost all joint regions, but there were no statistically significant differences (n.s.), with the exception of the knees (P = 0.05). Over the last year, athletes reporting the highest pain frequency in the lumbar spine were ice-hockey players and, in the cervical spine, wrestlers and ice-hockey players. The highest levels of knee pain were found among wrestlers and ice-hockey players, whereas the highest levels for wrist pain were found among divers, hip pain among weight-lifters, orienteers and divers and ankle pain among orienteers. For the thoracic spine, shoulder and elbow regions, only minor differences were found. There was no statistically significant difference in prevalence of

  5. Regressing Team Performance on Collective Efficacy: Considerations of Temporal Proximity and Concordance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Nicholas D.; Paiement, Craig A.; Feltz, Deborah L.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine to what degree collective efficacy judgments based on summative team performance capabilities exhibited different levels of prediction for three additive intervals of team performance in women's ice hockey. Collective efficacy beliefs of 12 teams were assessed prior to Friday's game and Saturday's game…

  6. Athletes' Evaluations of Their Head Coach's Coaching Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Nicholas D.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Maier, Kimberly S.; Wolfe, Edward W.; Reckase, Mark D.

    2006-01-01

    This study provided initial validity evidence for multidimensional measures of coaching competency derived from the Coaching Competency Scale (CCS). Data were collected from intercollegiate men's (n = 8) and women's (n = 13) soccer and women's ice hockey teams (n = 11). The total number of athletes was 585. Within teams, a multidimensional…

  7. Emergency Management Span of Control: Optimizing Organizational Structures to Better Prepare Vermont for the Next Major or Catastrophic Disaster

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    full glare of media and public scrutiny, they are expected to perform flawlessly like a goalie in hockey or soccer, or a conversion kicker in...among all levels of government, not a plan that is pulled off the shelf only during worst- case disasters. The lifecycle of disasters entails a

  8. Sport in Canada During the Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lappage, Ronald S.

    The author discusses the effect of the Great Depression upon sport in Canada. The difficulties of hockey and football teams are contrasted with the success of professional wrestling, horseracing, and bicycling. The economic plight of professional players who were not allowed to return to the "amateur" rank is discussed. Increased…

  9. Beyond Women's Collegiate Athletics. Opportunities to Play for Pay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehr, Carolyn A.; Washington, Martha A.

    1987-01-01

    Despite the increased emphasis on women's sports and rising participation rates, women are still severely limited in careers as competitors or in sports-related occupations. Opportunities in basketball, volleyball, tennis, cross-country and track, softball, golf, soccer and field hockey, aquatic sports, and a few other sports are examined. (MT)

  10. Lunar Influences on Human Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Gordon W.; Dua, Manjula

    1983-01-01

    Used league records of all Canadian hockey games (N=426) played during a season to test a lunar-aggression hypothesis. Despite the use of multiple measures of lunar phase and interpersonal aggression, support for lunar influence was not forthcoming. Supplemental data revealed that beliefs in lunar influence are fairly common. (JAC)

  11. Staying at the Top: Playing Position and Performance Affect Career Length in Professional Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Joseph; Koz, Dan; Kungl, Ann-Marie; Fraser-Thomas, Jessica; Schorer, Jorg

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to understand the process of skill acquisition and decline, researchers have largely neglected a critical aspect of this development--maximizing time at the highest levels of achievement. This study examined length of career for professional athletes in basketball, football, ice hockey, and baseball and considers whether career length…

  12. Athletes, Doctors, and Lawyers with First Names Beginning with "D" Die Sooner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abel, Ernest L.; Kruger, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    For many people, names have symbolic power that extends to their timing of death. This study examined the relationship between the symbolic significance of the first letters in the names of professional athletes (baseball, football, hockey, and basketball) and their longevity. A similar analysis was performed for doctors (radiologists,…

  13. 75 FR 37651 - United States et al. v. Ticketmaster Entertainment, Inc. et al.; Public Comments and Response on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... Flyers, the Philadelphia 76ers, a venue/sports marketing company, and a food services company whose... and/or hockey team will need its ticketer to handle season ticket sales of sports tickets and provide marketing support for sports ticketing sales. Indeed, this is a significant segment of the market, as sixty...

  14. High performance batch production of LREBa 2Cu 3O y using novel thin film Nd-123 seed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidhar, M.; Suzuki, K.; Fukumoto, Y.; Ishihara, A.; Tomita, M.

    2011-11-01

    A batch production for fabrication of LREBa2Cu3Oy (LRE: Sm, Gd, NEG) "LRE-123" pellets are developed in air and Ar-1% O2 using a novel thin film Nd-123 seeds grown on MgO crystals. The SEM and XRD results conformed that the quality and orientation of the seed crystals are excellent. On the other hand, new seeds can withstand temperatures >1100 °C, as a result, the cold seeding process was applied even to grow Sm-123 material in Air. The trapped field observed in the best 45 mm single-grain puck of Gd-123 was in the range of 1.35 T and 0.35 T at 77.3 K and 87.3 K, respectively. The average trapped field at 77.3 K in the 24 mm diameter NEG-123 samples batch lies between 0.9 and 1 T. The maximum trapped field of 1.2 T was recorded at the sample surface. Further, the maximum trapped field of 0.23 T at 77 K was recorded in a sample with 16 mm diameter of Sm-123 with 3 mol% BaO2 addition. As a result we made more then 130 single grain pucks within a couple of months. Taking advantage of the single grain batch processed material, we constructed self-made chilled levitation disk, which was used on the open day of railway technical research Institute. More then 150 children stood on the levitation disk and revel the experience of levitation. The present results prove that a high-performance good-quality class of LREBa2Cu3Oy material can be made by using a novel thin film Nd-123 seeds.

  15. Outplanting technique, host genotype, and site affect the initial success of outplanted Acropora cervicornis

    PubMed Central

    Gilliam, David S.

    2018-01-01

    Acropora cervicornis is the most widely used coral species for reef restoration in the greater Caribbean. However, outplanting methodologies (e.g., colony density, size, host genotype, and attachment technique) vary greatly, and to date have not been evaluated for optimality across multiple sites. Two experiments were completed during this study, the first evaluated the effects of attachment technique, colony size, and genotype by outplanting 405 A. cervicornis colonies, from ten genotypes, four size classes, and three attachment techniques (epoxy, nail and cable tie, or puck) across three sites. Colony survival, health condition, tissue productivity, and growth were assessed across one year for this experiment. The second experiment assessed the effect of colony density by outplanting colonies in plots of one, four, or 25 corals per 4 m2 across four separate sites. Plot survival and condition were evaluated across two years for this experiment in order to better capture the effect of increasing cover. Colonies attached with a nail and cable tie resulted in the highest survival regardless of colony size. Small corals had the lowest survival, but the greatest productivity. The majority of colony loss was attributed to missing colonies and was highest for pucks and small epoxied colonies. Disease and predation were observed at all sites, but did not affect all genotypes, however due to the overall low prevalence of either condition there were no significant differences found in any comparison. Low density plots had significantly higher survival and significantly lower prevalence of disease, predation, and missing colonies than high density plots. These results indicate that to increase initial outplant success, colonies of many genotypes should be outplanted to multiple sites using a nail and cable tie, in low densities, and with colonies over 15 cm total linear extension. PMID:29507829

  16. Comparative Evaluation of Two Serial Gene Expression Experiments | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Stuart G. Baker, 2014 Introduction This program fits biologically relevant response curves in comparative analysis of the two gene expression experiments involving same genes but under different scenarios and at least 12 responses. The program outputs gene pairs with biologically relevant response curve shapes including flat, linear, sigmoid, hockey stick, impulse and step

  17. The Impact of Athletic Facilities on the Recruitment of Potential Student-Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Ray; Messenger, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the impact that athletic facilities and other college choice factors have on the recruitment of student-athletes to play Division I college hockey compared to the influence of other college choice factors. Although athletic facilities and their seeming importance in the recruitment of top level student-athletes are…

  18. Violence in Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Donald L.

    Increasing violence in sports is deplored, and a warning is issued on an apparent trend toward antisocial behavior. Contact sports such as hockey and football are cited as typically engendering aggression among athletes, but spectator sports (boxing, car racing, basketball, and baseball) are also singled out as eliciting increasing violence on the…

  19. Leadership Development of Team Captains in Collegiate Varsity Athletics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grandzol, Christian; Perlis, Susan; Draina, Lois

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the leadership development of team captains and student-athletes engaged in NCAA Division III intercollegiate athletics at 6 private institutions of higher education. Student-athletes in the sports of men's and women's soccer, women's field hockey, men's and women's cross country, and women's tennis completed the 2nd edition of…

  20. Studies of Television and Youth Sports: Laboratory/Field Research on the Effects of Pro-Social and Anti-Social TV Models on Children/Youth in Sport/Athletics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Dick; And Others

    This study investigates the question of whether or not exposure to televised professional sports affects the social behavior of young people who themselves actively engage in those sports. Lacrosse, hockey, baseball were monitored on television, with students questioned about the impact the behavior of the players (pro-social and anti-social) has…

  1. Pupils' Perceptions of and Experiences in Team Invasion Games: A Case Study of a Scottish Secondary School and Its Three Feeder Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Shirley; Sproule, John; Wang, C. K. John

    2008-01-01

    It has been claimed that young children in schools in Scotland cannot relate to the activities that are taught in the more "traditional" PE curriculum, activities that predominately include team invasion games (TIG) such as basketball, soccer and hockey (Scottish Executive, 2004). However, one of the issues with this claim is that it…

  2. Questionable Supervision by Physical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Thomas H.; Gimbert, Tonya L.

    2013-01-01

    According to Court records, student Pedro Godoy (Godoy) filed a suit against the school district (Central Islip Union Free School District) and teacher Otis R. Scerbo (Scerbo), seeking to recover damages for personal injuries allegedly sustained by Godoy while participating in a game of floor hockey during physical education class. Scerbo (the…

  3. Remotely controlling of mobile robots using gesture captured by the Kinect and recognized by machine learning method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Roy CHaoming; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Lin, Chih-Chuan; Lai, Chien-Hung; Liu, Cheng-Ting

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to use machine learning method and Kinect and its body sensation technology to design a simple, convenient, yet effective robot remote control system. In this study, a Kinect sensor is used to capture the human body skeleton with depth information, and a gesture training and identification method is designed using the back propagation neural network to remotely command a mobile robot for certain actions via the Bluetooth. The experimental results show that the designed mobile robots remote control system can achieve, on an average, more than 96% of accurate identification of 7 types of gestures and can effectively control a real e-puck robot for the designed commands.

  4. Mechanisms of Team-Sport-Related Brain Injuries in Children 5 to 19 Years Old: Opportunities for Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Cusimano, Michael D.; Cho, Newton; Amin, Khizer; Shirazi, Mariam; McFaull, Steven R.; Do, Minh T.; Wong, Matthew C.; Russell, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a gap in knowledge about the mechanisms of sports-related brain injuries. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanisms of brain injuries among children and youth participating in team sports. Methods We conducted a retrospective case series of brain injuries suffered by children participating in team sports. The Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program (CHIRPP) database was searched for brain injury cases among 5–19 year-olds playing ice hockey, soccer, American football (football), basketball, baseball, or rugby between 1990 and 2009. Mechanisms of injury were classified as “struck by player,” “struck by object,” “struck by sport implement,” “struck surface,” and “other.” A descriptive analysis was performed. Results There were 12,799 brain injuries related to six team sports (16.2% of all brain injuries registered in CHIRPP). Males represented 81% of injuries and the mean age was 13.2 years. Ice hockey accounted for the greatest number of brain injuries (44.3%), followed by soccer (19.0%) and football (12.9%). In ice hockey, rugby, and basketball, striking another player was the most common injury mechanism. Football, basketball, and soccer also demonstrated high proportions of injuries due to contact with an object (e.g., post) among younger players. In baseball, a common mechanism in the 5–9 year-old group was being hit with a bat as a result of standing too close to the batter (26.1% males, 28.3% females). Interpretation Many sports-related brain injury mechanisms are preventable. The results suggest that further efforts aimed at universal rule changes, safer playing environments, and the education of coaches, players, and parents should be targeted in maximizing prevention of sport-related brain injury using a multifaceted approach. PMID:23555602

  5. The injury experience at the 2010 winter paralympic games.

    PubMed

    Webborn, Nick; Willick, Stuart; Emery, Carolyn A

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine incidence proportion and the characteristics of athlete injuries sustained during the 2010 Vancouver Paralympic Games. Descriptive epidemiological study. All medical venues at the 2010 Vancouver Paralympic Games, Canada. A total of 505 athletes from 44 National Paralympic Committees participating in the 2010 Vancouver Winter Paralympic Games. Baseline covariates included sport specificity (ie, ice sledge hockey, alpine skiing, Nordic skiing, wheelchair curling), gender, age, and disability classification. All injuries that occurred during the 2010 Vancouver Paralympic Games. "Injury" was defined as any sport-related musculoskeletal complaint that caused the athlete to seek medical attention during the study period, regardless of the athlete's ability to continue with training or competition. The Injury Surveillance System identified a total of 120 injuries among 505 athletes [incidence proportion = 23.8% (95% confidence interval, 20.11-27.7)] participating in the 2010 Winter Paralympic Games. There was a similar injury incidence proportion among male (22.8%) and female (26.6%) athletes [incidence rate ratio = 1.1 (95% confidence interval, 0.7-1.7)]. Medical encounters for musculoskeletal complaints were generated in 34% of all sledge hockey athletes, 22% of alpine ski racers, 19% of Nordic skiers, and 18% of wheelchair curling athletes. The Injury Surveillance System identified sport injuries in 24% of all athletes participating in the 2010 Winter Paralympic Games. The injury risk was significantly higher than during the 2002 (9.4%) and 2006 (8.4%) Winter Paralympic Games. This may reflect improved data collection systems but also highlights the high risk of acute injury in alpine skiing and ice sledge hockey at Paralympic Games. These data will assist future Organizing Committees with the delivery of medical care to athletes with a disability and guide future injury prevention research.

  6. Comparison of Recent Modeled and Observed Trends in Total Column Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, S. B.; Weatherhead, E. C.; Stevermer, A.; Austin, J.; Bruehl, C.; Fleming, E. L.; deGrandpre, J.; Grewe, V.; Isaksen, I.; Pitari, G.; hide

    2006-01-01

    We present a comparison of trends in total column ozone from 10 two-dimensional and 4 three-dimensional models and solar backscatter ultraviolet-2 (SBUV/2) satellite observations from the period 1979-2003. Trends for the past (1979-2000), the recent 7 years (1996-2003), and the future (2000-2050) are compared. We have analyzed the data using both simple linear trends and linear trends derived with a hockey stick method including a turnaround point in 1996. If the last 7 years, 1996-2003, are analyzed in isolation, the SBUV/2 observations show no increase in ozone, and most of the models predict continued depletion, although at a lesser rate. In sharp contrast to this, the recent data show positive trends for the Northern and the Southern Hemispheres if the hockey stick method with a turnaround point in 1996 is employed for the models and observations. The analysis shows that the observed positive trends in both hemispheres in the recent 7-year period are much larger than what is predicted by the models. The trends derived with the hockey stick method are very dependent on the values just before the turnaround point. The analysis of the recent data therefore depends greatly on these years being representative of the overall trend. Most models underestimate the past trends at middle and high latitudes. This is particularly pronounced in the Northern Hemisphere. Quantitatively, there is much disagreement among the models concerning future trends. However, the models agree that future trends are expected to be positive and less than half the magnitude of the past downward trends. Examination of the model projections shows that there is virtually no correlation between the past and future trends from the individual models.

  7. Comparison of recent modeled and observed trends in total column ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, S. B.; Weatherhead, E. C.; Stevermer, A.; Austin, J.; Brühl, C.; Fleming, E. L.; de Grandpré, J.; Grewe, V.; Isaksen, I.; Pitari, G.; Portmann, R. W.; Rognerud, B.; Rosenfield, J. E.; Smyshlyaev, S.; Nagashima, T.; Velders, G. J. M.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Xia, J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a comparison of trends in total column ozone from 10 two-dimensional and 4 three-dimensional models and solar backscatter ultraviolet-2 (SBUV/2) satellite observations from the period 1979-2003. Trends for the past (1979-2000), the recent 7 years (1996-2003), and the future (2000-2050) are compared. We have analyzed the data using both simple linear trends and linear trends derived with a hockey stick method including a turnaround point in 1996. If the last 7 years, 1996-2003, are analyzed in isolation, the SBUV/2 observations show no increase in ozone, and most of the models predict continued depletion, although at a lesser rate. In sharp contrast to this, the recent data show positive trends for the Northern and the Southern Hemispheres if the hockey stick method with a turnaround point in 1996 is employed for the models and observations. The analysis shows that the observed positive trends in both hemispheres in the recent 7-year period are much larger than what is predicted by the models. The trends derived with the hockey stick method are very dependent on the values just before the turnaround point. The analysis of the recent data therefore depends greatly on these years being representative of the overall trend. Most models underestimate the past trends at middle and high latitudes. This is particularly pronounced in the Northern Hemisphere. Quantitatively, there is much disagreement among the models concerning future trends. However, the models agree that future trends are expected to be positive and less than half the magnitude of the past downward trends. Examination of the model projections shows that there is virtually no correlation between the past and future trends from the individual models.

  8. Sports for Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schachter, Ron

    2010-01-01

    When Saul Lerner became director of physical education, athletics, and health for the Bellmore-Merrick (New York) School District 14 years ago, football, soccer, basketball, and floor hockey were staples of most physical education classes on Long Island and around the rest of the country. The mindset of physical educators was to emphasize sports…

  9. Biography Today: Sports Series. Profiles of People of Interest to Young Readers. Volume 3, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Laurie Lanzen, Ed.; Abbey, Cherie D., Ed.

    This third volume is part of a series of biographies that profile individuals of interest to young people over the age of 9 years. The entries in this volume include Joe Dumars, basketball; Jim Harbaugh, football; Dominik Hasek, hockey; Michelle Kwan, figure skating; Rebecca Lobo, basketball; Greg Maddux, baseball; Fatuma Roba, marathon running;…

  10. Social Cognitive Correlates of Young Adult Sport Competitors' Sunscreen Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berndt, Nadine C.; O'Riordan, David L.; Winkler, Elisabeth; McDermott, Liane; Spathonis, Kym; Owen, Neville

    2011-01-01

    Young adults participating in outdoor sports represent a high-risk group for excessive sun exposure. The purpose of this study was to identify modifiable social cognitive correlates of sunscreen use among young adult competitors. Participants aged 18 to 30 years who competed in soccer (n = 65), surf-lifesaving (n = 63), hockey (n = 61), and tennis…

  11. The Lived Experience of a Doctoral Student: The Process of Learning and Becoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callary, Betina; Werthner, Penny; Trudel, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The PhD experience is often a transition from student to future faculty member, which involves considerable learning and development (Glaze, 2002; Hockey, 2004). Using a lifelong learning perspective (Jarvis, 2009), the purpose of this article is to explore, through a reflective self-study, my process of learning throughout the PhD degree. In this…

  12. Enhancing Care and Advocacy for Sexual Assault Survivors on Canadian Campuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinlan, Elizabeth; Clarke, Allyson; Miller, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    Recent media coverage of the rape chant at Saint Mary's University, the misogynist Facebook posts at Dalhousie's dental school, and the suspension of the University of Ottawa's hockey team have brought the topic of campus sexual assault under intense public scrutiny and the media accounts point to a widespread systemic rape culture on Canadian…

  13. The 1983 ARI Survey of Army Recruits: Tabular Description of 1983 (Active) Army Accessions. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    regular season games E - NFL playoffs and Super Bowl F - College football G - Baseball playoffs and World Series H - NBA basketball I - College... basketball J - NHL hockey Survey forms (position): A155 C125 TOTAL surveyed is 5,741 MALE I-IIIA HSDG/POST RESPONSES TO T138 BY TERM OF ENLISTMENT 2 YEAR 3

  14. The 1983 ARI Survey of Army Recruits: Tabular Description of 1983 (Active) Army Accessions. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    games D - Major league baseball-regular season games E - NFL playoffs and Super Bowl F - College football G - Baseball playoffs and World Series H - NBA ... basketball I - College basketball J - NHL hockey Survey forms (position): A155 C125 TOTAL surveyed is 5,741 T138 BY GENDER MALE FEMALE TOTAL 2 n 4810

  15. A Laboratory/Field Study of Television Violence and Aggression in Children's Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Ann E.; Moriarty, Richard J.

    A study on the effect of viewing violence on television on childrens' behavior was conducted within the context of sport activity. Three sports--baseball, hockey, and lacrosse--were chosen. Teams of children from three different age groups were the subjects. Within each of the age levels in each sport, teams were selected and assigned to…

  16. Alpine Skiing in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendez-Gimenez, Antonio; Fernandez-Rio, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Many students settle indoors in the winter. However, this does not mean that winter should be a period of time with no physical activity. Several snow activities could be practiced during those months, such as ice-skating, ice-hockey, snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, alpine skiing, or snowboarding. In order to counteract the tendency for…

  17. Body composition in male elite athletes, comparison of bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry

    PubMed Central

    Svantesson, Ulla; Zander, Martina; Klingberg, Sofia; Slinde, Frode

    2008-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare body composition results from bioelectrical spectroscopy (BIS) with results from dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in a population of male elite athletes. Body composition was assessed using DXA (Lunar Prodigy, GE Lunar Corp., Madison, USA) and BIS (Hydra 4200, Xitron Technologies Inc, San Diego, California, USA) at the same occasion. Agreement between methods was assessed using paired t-tests and agreement-plots. Results Thirty-three male elite athletes (soccer and ice hockey) were included in the study. The results showed that BIS underestimates the proportion of fat mass by 4.6% points in the ice hockey players. In soccer players the BIS resulted in a lower mean fat mass by 1.1% points. Agreement between the methods at the individual level was highly variable. Conclusion Body composition results assessed by BIS in elite athletes should be interpreted with caution, especially in individual subjects. BIS may present values of fat mass that is either higher or lower than fat mass assessed by DXA, independent of true fat content of the individual. PMID:18211680

  18. Discerning measures of conscious brain processes associated with superior early motor performance: Capacity, coactivation, and character.

    PubMed

    van Duijn, Tina; Buszard, Tim; Hoskens, Merel C J; Masters, Rich S W

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between working memory (WM) capacity, corticocortical communication (EEG coherence), and propensity for conscious control of movement during the performance of a complex far-aiming task. We were specifically interested in the role of these variables in predicting motor performance by novices. Forty-eight participants completed (a) an assessment of WM capacity (an adapted Rotation Span task), (b) a questionnaire that assessed the propensity to consciously control movement (the Movement Specific Reinvestment Scale), and (c) a hockey push-pass task. The hockey push-pass task was performed in a single task (movement only) condition and a combined task (movement plus decision) condition. Electroencephalography (EEG) was used to examine brain activity during the single task. WM capacity best predicted single task performance. WM capacity in combination with T8-Fz coherence (between the visuospatial and motor regions of the brain) best predicted combined task performance. We discuss the implied roles of visuospatial information processing capacity, neural coactivation, and propensity for conscious processing during performance of complex motor tasks. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The National Association for Girls and Women in Sport: 110 Years of Promoting Social Justice and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladda, Shawn

    2009-01-01

    From writing the first Guidebooks for hockey, soccer, swimming, track and field, and basketball, to lobbying Congress to strive for equity and equal opportunities for girls, the National Association for Girls and Women in Sport (NAGWS) has been and continues to be the beacon in education to advance fairness and equity in sports. As NAGWS enters…

  20. The Analysis of the Thinking Styles and Creativity of the Sports Students Studying in the Different Fields of University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eraslan, Meric

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzes the creativity and thinking levels of athletes studying at the different college departments; 61 female and 75 male athletes, a total of 136 ice-hockey players have participated in the research. As data collection tools, Thinking Styles Inventory and The Creativity Scale have been used in the study. SPSS 15.0 for Windows…

  1. Korean Affairs Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-02

    volleyball, handball, pingpong, boxing, wrestling, jujitsu, badminton, heavy gymnastics , and artistic gymnastics , can be played. And, all the facilities...various games, including various swimming races, basketball, volleyball, hard gymnastics , artistic gymnastics , pingpong, boxing, jujitsu, and wrestling...pingpong, boxing, 33 artistic gymnastics , jujitsu, wrestling, swimming, ice hockey, figure skating are actively being held year after year amid the great

  2. Leeds-Lyon Symposium on Tribology ’The Tribology Design of Machine Elements’ (15th) 6-9 September 1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    bearing radius 6 ILuR Radial bl 󈧎 :radial clearance A- l a0 a a 1+ b2 U: bearing speed ,. hto p, : ar "ess. 9. Aiscocity b2 b1 Fig. 1 Bearing...priorarrangement for football/ rugby /hockey/cricket, with charges beingade dependent upon playing numbers and duration of time in use. A large sports pavilion

  3. Construct-a-Glove. Science by Design Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulis, Lee

    This book is one of four books in the Science-by-Design Series created by TERC and funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). It offers high school students a challenging, hands-on opportunity to compare the function and design of many types of handwear from a hockey mitt to a surgical glove, and design and test a glove to their own…

  4. Controlling Atomic, Solid-State and Hybrid Systems for Quantum Information Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-04

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAMES AND ADDRESSES 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT NUMBER 77 Massachusetts...for the graphene macro-atom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 4.3 Performance of the graphene based single photon switch. . . . . . . . 68 5.1 All-optical...community of scientists, as well as the occasional pick up basketball, softball , volleyball, hockey and tennis team. Both past and present members have

  5. A Case Study of Wikis and Student-Designed Games in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastie, Peter A.; Casey, Ashley; Tarter, Anne-Marie

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the incorporation of wiki technology within physical education. Boys from two classes at a school in the United Kingdom were divided into small teams and given the task of creating a new game in a same genre as football, hockey, netball or rugby. Each team had a wiki on which were recorded all the plans and developments of…

  6. Synthesis, Analysis, and Processing of Fractal Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    coordinator in hockey, squash, volleyball, and softball, but also for reminding me periodically that 1/f noise can exist outside a computer. More...similar signals as Fourier-based representations are for stationary and periodic signals. Furthermore, because wave- let transformations can be...and periodic signals. Furthermore, just as the discovery of fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithms dramatically increased the viability the Fourier

  7. [Problems with placement and using of automated external defibrillators in Czech Republic].

    PubMed

    Olos, Tomás; Bursa, Filip; Gregor, Roman; Holes, David

    2011-01-01

    The use of automated external defibrillators improves the survival of adults who suffer from cardiopulmonary arrest. Automated external defibrillators detect ventricular fibrillation with almost perfect sensitivity and specificity. Authors describe the use of automated external defibrillator during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a patient with sudden cardiac arrest during ice-hockey match. The article reports also the use of automated external defibrillators in children.

  8. An Australasian hockey stick and associated climate wars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karoly, David; Gergis, Joelle; Neukom, Raphael; Gallant, Ailie

    2017-04-01

    Multiproxy warm season (September-February) temperature reconstructions are presented for the combined land-ocean region of Australasia (0°-50°S, 110°E-180°) covering the last millennium (1000-2001CE). Using between 2 (R2) and 28 (R28) paleoclimate records, four 1000-member ensemble reconstructions of regional temperature are developed using four different statistical methods: principal component regression (PCR), composite plus scale (CPS), Bayesian hierarchical models (LNA), and pairwise comparison (PaiCo). The reconstructions are then compared with a three-member ensemble of GISS-E2-R climate model simulations and independent paleoclimate records. Decadal fluctuations in Australasian temperatures are remarkably similar between the four reconstruction methods. There are, however, differences in the amplitude of temperature variations between the different statistical methods and proxy networks. When the largest R28 network is used, the warmest 30-yr periods occur after 1950 in 77% of ensemble members over all methods. However, reconstructions based on only the longest records (R2 and R3 networks) indicate that single 30- and 10-yr periods of similar or slightly higher temperatures than in the late twentieth century may have occurred during the first half of the millennium. Regardless, the most recent instrumental temperatures (1985-2014) are above the 90th percentile of all 12 reconstruction ensembles (four reconstruction methods based on three proxy networks — R28, R3, and R2). An earlier manuscript describing this study and its results was accepted for publication in the Journal of Climate in May 2012, after two thorough rounds of review. However, as described by Gergis (2016), after the early online release of the paper, a typo in the methods section was identified. While the paper said the study had used "detrended" data - observed temperature data from which the longer-term trends had been removed - the study had in fact used raw data. Both raw and detrended data have been used in similar studies, and both are scientifically justifiable approaches. Instead of taking the easy way out and just correcting the single word in the page proof, we asked the publisher to put our paper on hold and remove the online version while we assessed the influence that the different method had on the results. Gergis (2016) describes the saga of attacks on the study and the authors by bloggers and online experts over the next four years, until the manuscript was finally accepted and published in July 2016 following a further three rounds of peer review and four new reviewers. This is another cautionary tale of the climate wars described by Mike Mann, efforts to discredit studies showing that recent large-scale warming is very likely outside the range of natural climate variability over the last millennium. Gergis, J., R. Neukom, A. J. E. Gallant and D. J. Karoly (2016) Australasian temperature reconstructions spanning the last millennium. J Clim., 29, 5365-5392. Gergis, J., (2016) How a single word sparked a four year sage of climate fact checking and blog backlash. The Conversation, 11 July 2016. https://theconversation.com/how-a-single-word-sparked-a-four-year-saga-of-climate-fact-checking-and-blog-backlash-62174

  9. Born at the Wrong Time: Selection Bias in the NHL Draft

    PubMed Central

    Deaner, Robert O.; Lowen, Aaron; Cobley, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Relative age effects (RAEs) occur when those who are relatively older for their age group are more likely to succeed. RAEs occur reliably in some educational and athletic contexts, yet the causal mechanisms remain unclear. Here we provide the first direct test of one mechanism, selection bias, which can be defined as evaluators granting fewer opportunities to relatively younger individuals than is warranted by their latent ability. Because RAEs are well-established in hockey, we analyzed National Hockey League (NHL) drafts from 1980 to 2006. Compared to those born in the first quarter (i.e., January–March), those born in the third and fourth quarters were drafted more than 40 slots later than their productivity warranted, and they were roughly twice as likely to reach career benchmarks, such as 400 games played or 200 points scored. This selection bias in drafting did not decrease over time, apparently continues to occur, and reduces the playing opportunities of relatively younger players. This bias is remarkable because it is exhibited by professional decision makers evaluating adults in a context where RAEs have been widely publicized. Thus, selection bias based on relative age may be pervasive. PMID:23460902

  10. Solving the energy dilemma at Seven Bridges Ice Arena

    SciTech Connect

    Louria, D.

    1996-08-01

    Seven Bridges Ice Arena with three ice skating rinks is among the largest ice skating facilities in the US. A complete fitness center, pro shop, second level observation gallery, restaurant, aerobics room, dance studio and children`s play room round out the 120,000 ft{sup 2} (11,215 m{sup 2}) world class facility. The Olympic Hockey League ice rink has seating for 800 spectators; and the National Hockey League ice rink has 1,200 spectator seats. The collegiate ice sheet has participant seating only. When building the one-year-old facility, the management initially solicited HVAC design/build system plans based on the usual Package Roof Topmore » (RTU) heat/cool units or split system parameters. Such a plan could have been a disaster because high energy costs have contributed directly to the closing of 20 rinks in the Chicago area. This article describes a HVAC system that would take advantage of every Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECO) possible to ensure the economic well being of this property. This included a plan that uses the refrigeration for both cooling and heating, which eliminated the need for commercial packaged units.« less

  11. Change deafness, dual-task performance, and domain-specific expertise.

    PubMed

    Neuhoff, John G; Bochtler, Katharina S

    2018-05-01

    In a change deafness manipulation using radio broadcasts of sporting events, we show that change deafness to a switch in talker increases when listeners are asked to monitor both lexical and indexical information for change. We held semantic content constant and demonstrated a change deafness rate of 85% when participants listened to the home team broadcast of a hockey game that switched midway to the away team broadcast with a different announcer. In Study 2, participants were asked to monitor either the indexical characteristics ( listen for a change in announcer) or both the indexical and semantic components ( listen for a change in announcer or a goal scored). Monitoring both components led to significantly greater change deafness even though both groups were alerted to the possibility of a change in announcer. In Study 3, we changed both the indexical and the semantic components when the broadcast switched from a hockey game to a basketball game. We found a negative correlation between sports expertise and change deafness. The results are discussed in terms of the nature of perceptual representation and the influence of expertise and evolution on attention allocation.

  12. Epidemiology, pathomechanics, and prevention of athletic injuries to the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Torg, J S

    1985-06-01

    Athletic injuries to the cervical spine associated with quadriplegia most commonly occur as a result of axial loading. Whether it be a football player striking an opponent with the top or crown of his helmet, a poorly executed dive into a shallow body of water where the subject strikes his head on the bottom, or a hockey player pushed into the boards head first, the fragile cervical spine is compressed between the rapidly decelerated head and the continued momentum of the body. Appropriate rule changes recognizing this mechanism have resulted in a reduction of football quadriplegia by two-thirds. Presumably, educational efforts designed to inform the public of the dangers of diving would have a similar effect. The predominance of the axial loading mechanism is not as clearly defined in trampoline and minitrampoline injuries. However, both of these devices are dangerous when used in the best of circumstances, and their use has no place in recreational, educational, or competitive gymnastics. The emergence of severe cervical spine injuries resulting from ice hockey is recognized. Methods, based on sound scientific evidence, to modify the games so as to prevent these injuries are lacking.

  13. Skating Injuries and Their Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lemasters, George S.

    1972-01-01

    There are approximately 682 figure skating clubs in Canada (not including hockey or general recreational figure skating), with anywhere up to 600 or more members. This means that there are probably over 200,000 figure skaters in Canada today. This article deals with the general and specific medical problems that face these skaters, and what a physician should know about treating them. PMID:20468795

  14. Combined Effects of Primary and Tertiary Blast on Rat Brain: Characterization of a Model of Blast-induced Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    known as concussions ) affect ~1.3 million individuals in the US annually mostly during contact sports such as boxing, hockey, and football [1, 2]. In...disorder which has been observed in several athletes with a history of multiple concussions . In particular, phosphorylated Tau (pTau) protein...Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International. References [1] Laker SR. Epidemiology of concussion and mild traumatic brain injury. PM R

  15. Tradespace Assessment: Thermal Strain Modeling Comparison Of Multiple Clothing Configurations Based On Different Environmental Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-01

    risks, by modeling thermal strain. Twenty clothing ensembles were tested for thermal and evaporative resistances according to American Society of...e.g., football, hockey, etc.) or during military, law enforcement, or first responder operations (e.g., body armor, flame resistant clothing, etc...Each clothing configuration was tested to American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards for “dry” thermal resistance (Rct) (ASTM F1291

  16. The 1985 ARI Survey of Army Recruits: Tabular Description of NPS Army Reserve Accessions. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    NBA basketball 1 2 3 4 102. College besketball 1 2 3 4 103. NHL hockey 1 2 3 4 104. Profesional wrestling 1 2 3 4 1OS. Car reces 1 2 3 4 106. Golf...did you participate in while you were in high school? (CIRCLE ALL THAT APPLY) SFootball ....................... I Basketball ..................... 2... Basketball ..................... 2 Swimming ....................... 3 Baseball ....................... Track ............ 5............ Other (Specify

  17. Human Capital - A Critical Look at Developing Better Acquisition Leaders and Decision-Makers Using the Power of Emotional Intelligence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-21

    To successfully implement a new American hockey training and game -playing paradigm, Brooks intensely demonstrated the power of emotional...developed an EI lesson plan that is currently delivered to every student . In the lesson, they offer the following EI definition: “ a confluence of...strategic imperative to “enable the Air Force to adapt our capabilities and thinking to assess a dynamic threat environment, outmaneuver adversaries, and

  18. High variability impairs motor learning regardless of whether it affects task performance.

    PubMed

    Cardis, Marco; Casadio, Maura; Ranganathan, Rajiv

    2018-01-01

    Motor variability plays an important role in motor learning, although the exact mechanisms of how variability affects learning are not well understood. Recent evidence suggests that motor variability may have different effects on learning in redundant tasks, depending on whether it is present in the task space (where it affects task performance) or in the null space (where it has no effect on task performance). We examined the effect of directly introducing null and task space variability using a manipulandum during the learning of a motor task. Participants learned a bimanual shuffleboard task for 2 days, where their goal was to slide a virtual puck as close as possible toward a target. Critically, the distance traveled by the puck was determined by the sum of the left- and right-hand velocities, which meant that there was redundancy in the task. Participants were divided into five groups, based on both the dimension in which the variability was introduced and the amount of variability that was introduced during training. Results showed that although all groups were able to reduce error with practice, learning was affected more by the amount of variability introduced rather than the dimension in which variability was introduced. Specifically, groups with higher movement variability during practice showed larger errors at the end of practice compared with groups that had low variability during learning. These results suggest that although introducing variability can increase exploration of new solutions, this may adversely affect the ability to retain the learned solution. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We examined the role of introducing variability during motor learning in a redundant task. The presence of redundancy allows variability to be introduced in different dimensions: the task space (where it affects task performance) or the null space (where it does not affect task performance). We found that introducing variability affected learning adversely, but the amount of

  19. An investigation of the effects of sports-related concussion in youth using functional magnetic resonance imaging and the head impact telemetry system.

    PubMed

    Keightley, Michelle; Green, Stephanie; Reed, Nick; Agnihotri, Sabrina; Wilkinson, Amy; Lobaugh, Nancy

    2011-01-12

    One of the most commonly reported injuries in children who participate in sports is concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Children and youth involved in organized sports such as competitive hockey are nearly six times more likely to suffer a severe concussion compared to children involved in other leisure physical activities. While the most common cognitive sequelae of mTBI appear similar for children and adults, the recovery profile and breadth of consequences in children remains largely unknown, as does the influence of pre-injury characteristics (e.g. gender) and injury details (e.g. magnitude and direction of impact) on long-term outcomes. Competitive sports, such as hockey, allow the rare opportunity to utilize a pre-post design to obtain pre-injury data before concussion occurs on youth characteristics and functioning and to relate this to outcome following injury. Our primary goals are to refine pediatric concussion diagnosis and management based on research evidence that is specific to children and youth. To do this we use new, multi-modal and integrative approaches that will: 1. Evaluate the immediate effects of head trauma in youth. 2. Monitor the resolution of post-concussion symptoms (PCS) and cognitive performance during recovery. 3. Utilize new methods to verify brain injury and recovery. To achieve our goals, we have implemented the Head Impact Telemetry (HIT) System. (Simbex; Lebanon, NH, USA). This system equips commercially available Easton S9 hockey helmets (Easton-Bell Sports; Van Nuys, CA, USA) with single-axis accelerometers designed to measure real-time head accelerations during contact sport participation. By using telemetric technology, the magnitude of acceleration and location of all head impacts during sport participation can be objectively detected and recorded. We also use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to localize and assess changes in neural activity specifically in the medial temporal and frontal lobes

  20. On the influence of particle morphology on the post-impact ballistic response of ceramic armour materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, Amer; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Wood, David; Jaansalu, Kevin

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies have shown evidence that the ballistic-resistance of fragmented (comminuted) ceramics is independent of the original strength of the material. In particular, experimental investigations into the ballistic behaviour of such fragmented ceramics have indicated that this response is correlated to shattered ceramic morphology. This suggests that careful control of ceramic microstructure - and therefore failure paths - might provide a route to optimise post-impact ballistic performance, thereby enhancing multi-hit capability. In this study, building on previous in-house work, ballistic tests were conducted using pre-formed `fragmented-ceramic' analogues based around three morphologically differing (but chemically identical) alumina feedstock materials compacted into target `pucks. In an evolution of previous work, variation of target thickness provided additional insight into an apparent morphology-based contribution to ballistic response.

  1. An Automated, High-Throughput System for GISAXS and GIWAXS Measurements of Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaible, Eric; Jimenez, Jessica; Church, Matthew; Lim, Eunhee; Stewart, Polite; Hexemer, Alexander

    Grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) are important techniques for characterizing thin films. In order to meet rapidly increasing demand, the SAXSWAXS beamline at the Advanced Light Source (beamline 7.3.3) has implemented a fully automated, high-throughput system to conduct SAXS, GISAXS and GIWAXS measurements. An automated robot arm transfers samples from a holding tray to a measurement stage. Intelligent software aligns each sample in turn, and measures each according to user-defined specifications. Users mail in trays of samples on individually barcoded pucks, and can download and view their data remotely. Data will be pipelined to the NERSC supercomputing facility, and will be available to users via a web portal that facilitates highly parallelized analysis.

  2. Liborg: a lidar-based robot for efficient 3D mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaminck, Michiel; Luong, Hiep; Philips, Wilfried

    2017-09-01

    In this work we present Liborg, a spatial mapping and localization system that is able to acquire 3D models on the y using data originated from lidar sensors. The novelty of this work is in the highly efficient way we deal with the tremendous amount of data to guarantee fast execution times while preserving sufficiently high accuracy. The proposed solution is based on a multi-resolution technique based on octrees. The paper discusses and evaluates the main benefits of our approach including its efficiency regarding building and updating the map and its compactness regarding compressing the map. In addition, the paper presents a working prototype consisting of a robot equipped with a Velodyne Lidar Puck (VLP-16) and controlled by a Raspberry Pi serving as an independent acquisition platform.

  3. Event detection and localization for small mobile robots using reservoir computing.

    PubMed

    Antonelo, E A; Schrauwen, B; Stroobandt, D

    2008-08-01

    Reservoir Computing (RC) techniques use a fixed (usually randomly created) recurrent neural network, or more generally any dynamic system, which operates at the edge of stability, where only a linear static readout output layer is trained by standard linear regression methods. In this work, RC is used for detecting complex events in autonomous robot navigation. This can be extended to robot localization tasks which are solely based on a few low-range, high-noise sensory data. The robot thus builds an implicit map of the environment (after learning) that is used for efficient localization by simply processing the input stream of distance sensors. These techniques are demonstrated in both a simple simulation environment and in the physically realistic Webots simulation of the commercially available e-puck robot, using several complex and even dynamic environments.

  4. A resolution congratulating the Alaska Aces hockey team on winning the 2014 Kelly Cup as champions of the East Coast Hockey League.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Begich, Mark [D-AK

    2014-06-12

    Senate - 06/12/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. Maniac Talk - Dr. James Garvin

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-28

    James Garvin Maniac Lecture, 28 May 2014 Dr. James Garvin, Chief Scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, presented a Maniac Talk entitled "From Brownian Motion to Mars, by way of hockey on the rocks." Jim shared how his passion for rocks and landscapes drove him to promote new remote sensing approaches for measuring their topologies and led to founding of the Mars Science Laboratory and its Curiosity Rover.

  6. Operator State Estimation for Adaptive Aiding in Uninhabited Combat Air Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    1992). Van Boxtel, A., W. Waterink, and I.J.T. Veldhuizen . “Tonic Facial EMG Activity As An Index of Mental Effort: Effects of Work Rate, Time-On...the ‘normal’ functioning of brain activity (Beaumont, Burov, Carter, Cheuvront, Sawka, Wilson, Van Orden, Hockey, Balkin and Gundel, 2004). For...by the sympathetic nervous system. Electromyographic activity has been shown to predict arousal accurately ( Veldhuizen , Gaillard, and de Vries, 2003

  7. Effectiveness of the Physical Education Curriculum at the United States Military Academy in Preparing Its Women Graduates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    activities as calisthenics , swimming, bayonet drills, fencing, and gymnastics. Unfortunately, this program was in place for only one year. The onset of...fall); basketball, boxing, street hockey, swimming, and wallyball (volleyball played on a racquetball court) (winter); cross country, flickerball...improve the running ability of new cadets; female new cadets used the lighter M16 rifle during rifle calisthenics in CBT II; and fewer hills were run during

  8. The 1984 ARI Survey of Army Recruits: Tabular Description of NPS (active) Army Accessions. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    YOU WATCH ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PROGRAMS OR PROGRAMMING TYPES ON TV? - NBA BASKETBALL 1 - REGULARLY TURN ON THE TV TO WATCH IT 2 - SOMETIMES WATCH IT...league baseball — regular season games 105. Major league baseball playoffs 106. World Series 107. NBA basketball 108. College basketball 109...LAG BASEBALL PLAYOFFS WORLD SERIES MBA BASKETBALL COLLEGE BASKETBALL NHL HOCKEY PROFESSIONAL WRESTLING CAR RACES 154 156 158- 160 162- 164

  9. The 1984 ARI Survey of Army Recruits: Supplementary User’s Manual for October 1984/February 1985 Administration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    league baseball playoffs 106. World Series 116. Which of the following mathematics 107. NBA basketball and technical courses, if any, did you take and pass...baseball playoffs 94. World Series (Mark all that apply) 95. NBA bdsketball A. Elementary Algebra B. Plane Geometry e 96. College basketball C...in high school? 108. College basketball (Mark all that apply) 109. NHL hockey A. Elementary Algebra 110. Professional wrestling S. Plane Geometry C

  10. Hip adductor muscle function in forward skating.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ryan; Turcotte, Rene; Pearsall, David

    2009-09-01

    Adductor strain injuries are prevalent in ice hockey. It has long been speculated that adductor muscular strains may be caused by repeated eccentric contractions which decelerate the leg during a stride. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of skating speed with muscle activity and lower limb kinematics, with a particular focus on the role of the hip adductors. Seven collegiate ice hockey players consented to participate. Surface electromyography (EMG) and kinematics of the lower extremities were measured at three skating velocities 3.33 m/s (slow), 5.00 m/s (medium) and 6.66 m/s (fast). The adductor magnus muscle exhibited disproportionately larger increases in peak muscle activation and significantly prolonged activation with increased speed. Stride rate and stride length also increased significantly with skating velocity, in contrast, hip, knee and ankle total ranges of motion did not. To accommodate for the increased stride rate with higher skating speeds, the rate of hip abduction increased significantly in concert with activations of adductor magnus indicating a substantial eccentric contraction. In conclusion, these findings highlight the functional importance of the adductor muscle group and hip abduction-adduction in skating performance as well as indirectly support the notion that groin strain injury potential increases with skating speed.

  11. Comparison of Home Advantage in College and Professional Team Sports in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Richard; Gómez, Miguel A

    2015-09-01

    Home advantage in seven American college team sports (baseball, basketball, football, hockey, lacrosse, soccer and women's basketball) was compared with professional leagues in the United States for the same sports and for the same time period. A total of 81,063 college games and 22,477 professional games were analyzed for the four seasons 2006-07 to 2009-10. There was a significant home advantage, as measured by home winning percentage, in all sports, both college and professional. The overall home advantage in college sports was significantly greater than in professional sports (p<0.015). The mean difference was 3.73 home winning percentage points, being greatest for baseball, basketball, and hockey (all p<0.001). Plausible explanations for these results include differences in college and professional competition in terms of familiarity with local conditions, referee bias, territoriality and psychological factors. However, the influence of travel fatigue was inconclusive. Only for soccer was the home advantage greater for professionals. This was the only sport where crowd size appeared to be having an effect. In addition the rules of college soccer allow more substitution and hence greater coach intervention than in professional soccer, a factor that could also be reducing home advantage.

  12. The effect of leg preference on postural stability in healthy athletes.

    PubMed

    Huurnink, Arnold; Fransz, Duncan P; Kingma, Idsart; Hupperets, Maarten D W; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2014-01-03

    In research regarding postural stability, leg preference is often tested and controlled for. However, leg preference may vary between tasks. As athletes are a group of interest for postural stability testing, we evaluated the effect of five leg preference tasks categorization (step up, hop, ball kick, balance, pick up) on single-leg postural stability of 16 field hockey athletes. The 'center of pressure speed' was calculated as the primary outcome variable of single-leg postural stability. Secondary variables were 'mean length of the GRF vector in the horizontal plane', 'mean length of the ankle angular velocity vector', and 'mean length of the hip angular velocity vector', as well as the separate outcomes per degree of freedom. Results showed that leg preference was inconsistent between leg preference tasks. Moreover, the primary and secondary variables yielded no significant difference between the preferred and non-preferred legs, regardless of the applied leg preference task categorization (p>0.05). The present findings do not support the usability of leg preference tasks in controlling for bias of postural stability. In conclusion, none of the applied leg preference tasks revealed a significant effect on postural stability in healthy field hockey athletes. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Competitive Sport Involvement and Substance Use among Adolescents: A Nationwide Study

    PubMed Central

    Veliz, Philip Todd; Boyd, Carol J.; McCabe, Sean Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Background The empirical research examining the impact of sports participation on alcohol and other drug use has produced mixed results. Part of this problem may be the result of how different types of sports participation create different experiences that shape certain types of behaviors that either facilitate or deter substance use. Objectives We examined the association between different types of competitive sports participation and substance use among a nationally representative sample of adolescents. Methods Two recent cross-sections from the Monitoring the Future were merged to capture a large subsection of adolescents who participate in either high-contact sports (football, wrestling, hockey and lacrosse), semi-contact sports (baseball, basketball, field hockey and soccer), and non-contact sports (cross-country, gymnastics, swimming, tennis, track, and volleyball). Results Multivariate analyses revealed that adolescents who participated in high-contact sports had higher odds of using substances during the past 30 days and initiating substance use at early ages. Further, adolescents who participated in non-contact sports had lower odds to indicate smoking cigarettes and marijuana during the past 30 days. Conclusions Parents, educators, and policy makers need to consider that some sporting contexts may be a catalyst to engage in risky behaviors like substance use. PMID:25290659

  14. Kinematics of the field hockey penalty corner push-in.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Rebecca; Ness, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The aims of the study were to determine those variables that significantly affect push-in execution and thereby formulate coaching recommendations specific to the push-in. Two 50 Hz video cameras recorded transverse and longitudinal views of push-in trials performed by eight experienced and nine inexperienced male push-in performers. Video footage was digitized for data analysis of ball speed, stance width, drag distance, drag time, drag speed, centre of massy displacement and segment and stick displacements and velocities. Experienced push-in performers demonstrated a significantly greater (p < 0.05) stance width, a significantly greater distance between the ball and the front foot at the start of the push-in and a significantly faster ball speed than inexperienced performers. In addition, the experienced performers showed a significant positive correlation between ball speed and playing experience and tended to adopt a combination of simultaneous and sequential segment rotation to achieve accuracy and fast ball speed. The study yielded the following coaching recommendations for enhanced push-in performance: maximize drag distance by maximizing front foot-ball distance at the start of the push-in; use a combination of simultaneous and sequential segment rotations to optimise both accuracy and ball speed and maximize drag speed.

  15. Cue Integration in Dynamic Decision Marking (Integration des indices dans la Prise de Decision Dynamique)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    e.g., pulling the goalie in hockey). Outcomes are thought of as changes from a reference point- the reference point is itself changed by how the...challenges and training related issues can be pulled from the literature. These are discussed below. General Themes Cue integration involves the use...from our understanding of the term "pattern recognition", a number of general themes, challenges and training related issues can be pulled from the

  16. [Comparative study of the performance of leather and plastic skate boots].

    PubMed

    Roy, B; Grenier, R

    1982-03-01

    The authors have tried to demonstrate the influence of leather skate boots and plastic boots on the performance of Atome hockey players. Speed tests and joint flexibility tests by means of rotentgenograms showed that besides the speed tests where the leather boot appeared to perform a little better than the plastic boot, no significant difference could be found between both types of boots. It seems to be more a matter of individual choice and adaptation.

  17. Command and Control in Virtual Environments: Using Contingency Theory to Understand Organization in Virtual Worlds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    organization in the WoW virtual world. Unlike the real world guilds of olden days (e.g., stone masons, leather workers, apothecaries) and unions of current...oriented sports teams (e.g., football, hockey, rugby ). This is the case in particular with player-vs- player combat. Fourth, organizational learning is...Microsystems  Telecom Italia  Telus Mobility  Text 100  Toyota  Trades Union Congress  Union Network International  New Unionism

  18. Finite element analysis of hypervelocity impact behaviour of CFRP-Al/HC sandwich panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadnis, Vaibhav A.; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical response of CFRP-Al/HC (carbon fibre-reinforced/epoxy composite face sheets with Al honeycomb core) sandwich panels to hyper-velocity impact (up to 1 km/s) is studied using a finite-element model developed in ABAQUS/Explicit. The intraply damage of CFRP face sheets is analysed by mean of a user-defined material model (VUMAT) employing a combination of Hashin and Puck criteria, delamination modelled using cohesive-zone elements. The damaged Al/HC core is assessed on the basis of a Johnson Cook dynamic failure model while its hydrodynamic response is captured using the Mie-Gruneisen equation of state. The results obtained with the developed finite-element model showed a reasonable correlation to experimental damage patterns. The surface peeling of both face sheets was evident, with a significant delamination around the impact location accompanied by crushing HC core.

  19. A resolution congratulating the Boston College men's ice hockey team on winning its fifth National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Men's Hockey Championship.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Kerry, John F. [D-MA

    2012-04-25

    Senate - 04/25/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. Activity Demands During Multi-Directional Team Sports: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jeffrey B; Wright, Alexis A; Dischiavi, Steven L; Townsend, M Allison; Marmon, Adam R

    2017-12-01

    Late-stage rehabilitation programs often incorporate 'sport-specific' demands, but may not optimally simulate the in-game volume or intensity of such activities as sprinting, cutting, jumping, and lateral movement. The aim of this review was to characterize, quantify, and compare straight-line running and multi-directional demands during sport competition. A systematic review of PubMed, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases was conducted. Studies that reported time-motion analysis data on straight-line running, accelerations/decelerations, activity changes, jumping, cutting, or lateral movement over the course of an entire competition in a multi-directional sport (soccer, basketball, lacrosse, handball, field hockey, futsal, volleyball) were included. Data was organized based on sport, age level, and sex and descriptive statistics of the frequency, intensity, time, and volume of the characteristics of running and multi-directional demands were extracted from each study. Eighty-one studies were included in the review (n = 47 soccer, n = 11 basketball, n = 9 handball, n = 7 field hockey, n = 3 futsal, n = 4 volleyball). Variability of sport demand data was found across sports, sexes, and age levels. Specifically, soccer and field hockey demanded the most volume of running, while basketball required the highest ratio of high-intensity running to sprinting. Athletes change activity between 500 and 3000 times over the course of a competition, or once every 2-4 s. Studies of soccer reported the most frequent cutting (up to 800 per game), while studies of basketball reported the highest frequency of lateral movement (up to 450 per game). Basketball (42-56 per game), handball (up to 90 per game), and volleyball (up to 35 per game) were found to require the most jumping. These data may provide an incomplete view of an athlete's straight-line running load, considering that only competition and not practice data was

  1. Ball-Contact Injuries in 11 National Collegiate Athletic Association Sports: The Injury Surveillance Program, 2009-2010 Through 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Melissa A; Grooms, Dustin R; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Kerr, Zachary Y

    2017-07-01

      Surveillance data regarding injuries caused by ball contact in collegiate athletes have not been well examined and are mostly limited to discussions of concussions and catastrophic injuries.   To describe the epidemiology of ball-contact injuries in 11 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) sports during the 2009-2010 through 2014-2015 academic years.   Descriptive epidemiology study.   Convenience sample of NCAA programs in 11 sports (men's football, women's field hockey, women's volleyball, men's baseball, women's softball, men's and women's basketball, men's and women's lacrosse, and men's and women's soccer) during the 2009-2010 through 2014-2015 academic years.   Collegiate student-athletes participating in 11 sports.   Ball-contact-injury rates, proportions, rate ratios, and proportion ratios with 95% confidence intervals were based on data from the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program during the 2009-2010 through 2014-2015 academic years.   During the 2009-2010 through 2014-2015 academic years, 1123 ball-contact injuries were reported, for an overall rate of 3.54/10 000 AEs. The sports with the highest rates were women's softball (8.82/10 000 AEs), women's field hockey (7.71/10 000 AEs), and men's baseball (7.20/10 000 AEs). Most ball-contact injuries were to the hand/wrist (32.7%) and head/face (27.0%) and were diagnosed as contusions (30.5%), sprains (23.1%), and concussions (16.1%). Among sex-comparable sports (ie, baseball/softball, basketball, and soccer), women had a larger proportion of ball-contact injuries diagnosed as concussions than men (injury proportion ratio = 2.33; 95% confidence interval = 1.63, 3.33). More than half (51.0%) of ball-contact injuries were non-time loss (ie, participation-restriction time <24 hours), and 6.6% were severe (ie, participation-restriction time ≥21 days). The most common severe ball-contact injuries were concussions (n = 18) and finger fractures (n = 10).   Ball-contact-injury rates

  2. A Qualitative Case Study on the Implementation of a Priority Seating Program at an NCAA Division I School

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    green earth.. .It’s Badger hockey fans who research the name of the mother of an opposing team’s goalie so as to better inform their heckling.. .It’s the...Center and is information pulled directly from the aforementioned document ’The Kohl Center: Basketball Ticket Plan." 84 The athletic department began...our development staff which was initially housed over at the UW Foundation.. .we really hammered out the details and logistics of pulling a

  3. Frequency Domain Evaluation of Helmet Padding Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-24

    F717 [8] have been used to evaluate helmets including motorcycle, football , and hockey helmets to ensure a basic level of protection. These standards...injury, including concussion and traumatic brain injury. These topics are outside the scope of this research and will not be addressed in this paper. The...Document. [6] Moss, W. C., and King, M. J., 2011. Impact response of us army and national football league helmet pad systems. Tech. rep., DTIC Document. [7

  4. Sonographic assessment of volar digital nerve injury in the context of penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    Umans, Hilary; Kessler, James; de la Lama, Mauricio; Magge, Keshav; Liebling, Ralph; Negron, Judith

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this article was to report our experience using ultrasound to assess digital nerve integrity after penetrating hand trauma with sensory deficit. Ultrasound was performed in the long axis on 22 digital nerves in 11 patients using a 12-14-MHz linear array hockey stick transducer. Of 22 volar digital nerves evaluated by sonography, six were transected. All imaging findings were confirmed surgically. High-frequency ultrasound permits accurate imaging of intact and transected volar digital nerves.

  5. The 1984 ARI Survey of Army Recruits: Tabular Description of NPS Army Reserve Accessions. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    12 PROB. 0.1867 I 186 T261 — NATCH TV PROG’NBA BASKETBALL NARK ONE LETTER FOR EACH OF THE FOLLOWING PROGRAMS OR PROGRAMMING TYPES ON TV: NBA ...Major league baseball — regular seaaon games 105. Major league baaaball playoffs 106. World Series 107. NBA baaketball 106. College basketball 109...BASEBALL PLAYOFFS HATCH TV PROG:WORLD SERIES HATCH TV PROG:NBA BASKETBALL HATCH TV PROG:COLLEGE BASKETBALL HATCH TV PROG:NHL HOCKEY HATCH TV

  6. The 1984 ARI Survey of Army Recruits: Tabular Description of NPS (active) Army Accessions. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    WATCH TV PROG MJR LEAG BASEBALL PLAYOFFS 232-233 WATCH TV PROG WORLD SERIES 23<«-235 WATCH TV PROG NBA BASKETBALL 236-237 WATCH TV PROG COLLEGE...PROG:NBA BASKETBALL DO YOU ’^ATCH ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PROGRAMS OR PROGRAMMING TYPES ON TV? - NBA BASKETBALL , 1 - REGULARLY TURN ON THE TV TO WATCH...107. NBA basketball 108. College basketball 109. NHL hockey 110. Professional wrestling 111. Car r.ices 112. Golf tournaments 113. Tennis

  7. Specialized Regional National Guard Brigades - The Army’s Federal Disaster Response Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-24

    into the Pentagon and of Anthrax spores being sent to congressional buildings in the DC area, most would just think you were being a bit extreme...Chapter 9&10. 20 “A foreign terrorist organization smuggles anthrax bacillus into the United States and places it in the heating, ventilating, and air...conditioning ( HVAC ) ducting at an indoor sports arena, exposing some 17,000 in attendance at a hockey game. The game concludes without incident and the

  8. Effect of shallow angles on compressive strength of biaxial and triaxial laminates.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hongli; Yang, Hyun-Ik

    2016-01-01

    Biaxial (BX) and triaxial (TX) composite laminates with ±45° angled plies have been widely used in wind turbine blades. As the scale of blades increases, BX and TX laminates with shallow-angled plies (i.e. off-axis ply angle <45°) might be utilized for reducing mass and/or improving performance. The compressive properties of shallow-angled BX and TX laminates are critical considering their locations in a wind turbine blade, and therefore in this study, the uniaxial static compression tests were conducted using BX and TX laminates with angled-plies of ±45°, ±35°, and ±25°, for the purpose of evaluation. On the other hand, Mori-Tanaka mean field homogenization method was employed to predict elastic constants of plies in BX and TX laminates involved in tests; linear regression analyses of experimentally measured ply strengths collected from various sources were then performed to estimate strengths of plies in BX and TX laminates; finally, Tsai-Wu, Hashin, and Puck failure criteria were chosen to predict compressive strengths of BX and TX laminates. Comparison between theoretical predictions and test results were carried out to illustrate the effectiveness of each criterion. The compressive strength of BX laminate decreases as ply angle increases, and the trend was successfully predicted by all three failure criteria. For TX laminates, ±35° angled plies rather than ±45° angled plies led to the lowest laminate compressive strength. Hashin and Puck criteria gave good predictions at certain ply angles for TX laminates, but Tsai-Wu criterion was able to capture the unexpected strength variation of TX laminates with ply angle. It was concluded that the transverse tensile stress in 0° plies of TX laminates, which attains its maximum when the off-axis ply angle is 35°, is the dominant factor in failure determination if using Tsai-Wu criterion. This explains the unexpected strength variation of TX laminates with ply angle, and also indicates that proper

  9. The evaluation of speed skating helmet performance through peak linear and rotational accelerations.

    PubMed

    Karton, Clara; Rousseau, Philippe; Vassilyadi, Michael; Hoshizaki, Thomas Blaine

    2014-01-01

    Like many sports involving high speeds and body contact, head injuries are a concern for short track speed skating athletes and coaches. While the mandatory use of helmets has managed to nearly eliminate catastrophic head injuries such as skull fractures and cerebral haemorrhages, they may not be as effective at reducing the risk of a concussion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance characteristics of speed skating helmets with respect to managing peak linear and peak rotational acceleration, and to compare their performance against other types of helmets commonly worn within the speed skating sport. Commercially available speed skating, bicycle and ice hockey helmets were evaluated using a three-impact condition test protocol at an impact velocity of 4 m/s. Two speed skating helmet models yielded mean peak linear accelerations at a low-estimated probability range for sustaining a concussion for all three impact conditions. Conversely, the resulting mean peak rotational acceleration values were all found close to the high end of a probability range for sustaining a concussion. A similar tendency was observed for the bicycle and ice hockey helmets under the same impact conditions. Speed skating helmets may not be as effective at managing rotational acceleration and therefore may not successfully protect the user against risks associated with concussion injuries.

  10. Academic characteristics of orthopedic team physicians affiliated with high school, collegiate, and professional teams.

    PubMed

    Makhni, Eric C; Buza, John A; Byram, Ian; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2015-11-01

    We conducted a study to determine the academic involvement and research productivity of orthopedic team physicians at high school, college, and professional levels of sport. Through Internet and telephone queries, we identified 1054 team physicians from 362 institutions, including 120 randomly selected high schools and colleges and 122 professional teams (baseball, basketball, football, hockey). For all physicians included in the study, we performed a comprehensive search of the Internet and of a citation database to determine academic affiliations, number of publications, and h-index values. Of the 1054 physicians, 678 (64%) were orthopedic surgeons. Percentage of orthopedic team physicians affiliated with an academic medical center was highest in professional sports (64%; 173/270) followed by collegiate sports (36%; 98/275) and high school sports (20%; 27/133). Median number of publications per orthopedic team physician was significantly higher in professional sports (30.6) than in collegiate sports (10.7) or high school sports (6). Median number of publications by orthopedic physicians also varied by sport, with the highest number in Major League Baseball (37.9; range, 0-225) followed by the National Basketball Association (32.0; range, 0-227) and the National Football League (30.4; range, 0-460), with the lowest number within the National Hockey League (20.7; range, 0-144). Academic affiliation and research productivity of orthopedic team physicians vary by competition level and professional sporting league.

  11. A population-based study of sport and recreation-related head injuries treated in a Canadian health region.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andrew W; Jones, C Allyson; Rowe, Brian H; Voaklander, Donald C

    2012-07-01

    To report the rates of SR-related HIs presenting to EDs in a Canadian population-based sample. Descriptive epidemiology study. Using administrative data, sport and recreation-related emergency department presentations for persons 0-35 years of age, from April 1997 through March 2008, were obtained from the Edmonton Zone (formerly the Capital Health Region), Alberta Health Services through the Ambulatory Care Classification System. Of the 3,230,890 visits to the emergency departments of the five hospitals in Edmonton, 63,219 sport and recreation-related injury records and 4935 sport and recreation-head injury records were identified. Head injuries were most frequently treated for the activities of hockey (20.7%), cycling (12.0%), and skiing/snowboarding/sledding. Males accounted for 71.9% (n=3546) and patients less than 18 years of age sustained 3446 (69.8%) sport and recreation-head injuries. Sport and recreation-related head injuries most frequently treated in emergency departments involve common activities such as hockey, cycling, skiing/snowboarding/sledding, and soccer. Males and those less than 18 years of age sustain the majority of sport and recreation-related head injuries treated in emergency departments. These findings underscore the importance of sport-specific policies and safety promotion for the prevention of head injuries, in sports and recreational activities. Copyright © 2011 Sports Medicine Australia. All rights reserved.

  12. A resolution congratulating the University of Minnesota women's ice hockey team on winning its second straight National Collegiate Athletic Association Women's Ice Hockey Championship.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Klobuchar, Amy [D-MN

    2013-04-25

    Senate - 04/25/2013 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Hypervelocity Impact Behaviour of CFRP-A1/HC Sandwich Panel: Finite-Element Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadnis, Vaibhav A.; Roy, Anish; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2014-06-01

    The mechanical response of CFRP-Al/HC (carbon fibre- reinforced/epoxy composite face sheets with Al honeycomb core) sandwich panels to hyper-velocity impact ( 1 km/s) is studied using a finite-element model developed in ABAQUS/Explicit. The intraply damage of CFRP face sheets is analysed by the means of a user-defined material model (VUMAT) employing a combination of Hashin and Puck criteria and delamination is modelled using cohesive-zone elements. The damage of Al/HC core is assessed on the basis of a Johnson-Cook dynamic failure model while its hydrodynamic response is captured using the Mie- Gruneisen equation of state. The results obtained with the developed finite-element model showed a reasonable correlation to experimental damage patterns. The surface peeling of both face sheets was evident, with a significant delamination around the impact location accompanied by crushing of HC core.

  14. [Athletic pubalgia and hip impingement].

    PubMed

    Berthaudin, A; Schindler, M; Ziltener, J-L; Menetrey, J

    2014-07-16

    Athletic pubalgia is a painful and complex syndrom encountered by athletes involved in pivoting and cutting sports such as hockey and soccer. To date, there is no real consensus on the criteria for a reliable diagnostic, the different investigations, and the appropriate therapy. Current literature underlines intrinsic and extrinsic factors contributing to athletic pubalgia. This review article reports upon two novelties related to the issue: the importance and efficience of prevention program and the association of femoro-acetabular impingement with the pubalgia.

  15. KSC-04PD-1317

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Jay Feaster, general manager of the National Hockey League 2004 Champions Tampa Bay Lightning, displays the Stanley Cup. At right is KSC Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow. The cup was also briefly available for viewing by employees in the KSC Training Auditorium. Feaster brought the cup to KSC while on a tour. The Stanley Cup weighs 35 pounds and is more than 100 years old. The Lightning will be added to the cup in September.

  16. The 1984 ARI Survey of Army Recruits. Codebook for Summer 84 Active Army Survey Respondents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    ARMY SURVEY RESPONDENTS T261 - DO YOU HATCH ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PROGRAMS OR PROGRAMMING TYPES ON TV? - NBA BASKETBALL . RAN DATA ICARD i1 COLS ILENGTHII... BASKETBALL 280 T262 WATCH TV PROG:COLLEGE BASKETBALL 281 T263 WATCH TV PROG:NHL HOCKEY 282 T264 WATCH TV PROG:PROFESSIONAL WRESTLING 283 T265 WATCH TV...SURVEY RESPONDENTS T262 - DO YOU HATCH ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PROGRAMS OR PROGRAMMING TYPES ON TV? - COLLEGE BASKETBALL . RAW DATA ICARD #1 COLS ILENGTHII

  17. The 1985 ARI Survey of Army Recruits: Tabular Description of NPS (active) Army Accessions. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    T261 -- WATCH TV PROG:NBA BASKETBALL DO YOU WATCH ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PROGRAMS OR PROGRAMMING TYPES ON REGULAR TV STATIONS? .- NBA BASKETBALL . 1...327𔃻 261 WATCH TV PROG:NBA BASKETBALL 328-329 T262 WATCH TV PROG:COLLEGE BASKETBALL 330-331 T263 WATCH TV PROG:NHL HOCKEY 332-333 T264 WlATCH TV...T262 -- WATCH TV PROG:COLLEGE BASKETBALL DO YOU WATCH ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PROGRAMS OR PROGRAMMING TYPES ON REGULAR TV STATIONS? - COLLEGE BASKETBALL . 1

  18. Video Gaming Promotes Concussion Knowledge Acquisition in Youth Hockey Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, David; Bradley, Nori L.; Paras, Bradley, Williamson, Ian J.; Bizzochi, James

    2006-01-01

    While the positive uses for video games in an educational setting have also been established, the educational aim is usually made explicit. The goal of this research was to develop a video game wherein the educational aspect was implicitly embedded in the video game, such that the gameing activity remained interesting and relevant. Following a…

  19. 11.72-sq cm Active-Area Wafer Interconnected PiN Diode Pulsed at 64 kA Dissipates 382 J and Exhibits an Action of 1.7 MA(sup 2)-s

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-30

    calculated action exceeded 1.7 MA2 -s. Preliminary efforts on high voltage diode interconnection have produced quarter wafer interconnected PiN...was packaged in a “hockey-puck” configuration and pulsed to 64 kA, dissipating 382 J with a calculated action exceeding 1.7 MA2 -s. II. FULL...epitaxial layers are utilized. 11.72-cm2 Active-area Wafer Interconnected PiN Diode pulsed at 64 kA dissipates 382 J and exhibits an action of 1.7 MA2 -s

  20. KSC-04PD-1318

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Jay Feaster, general manager of the National Hockey League 2004 Champions Tampa Bay Lightning, sits next to the Stanley Cup in front of the open hatch into Discovery. The cup was also briefly available for viewing by employees in the KSC Training Auditorium. Feaster brought the cup to KSC while on a tour. The Stanley Cup weighs 35 pounds and is more than 100 years old. The Lightning will be added to the cup in September.

  1. KSC-04PD-1314

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Jay Feaster, general manager of the National Hockey League 2004 Champions Tampa Bay Lightning, stands next to the Stanley Cup, which he brought to KSC while on a tour. The cup stands next to the orbiter Discovery in the Orbiter Processing Facility. The cup was also briefly available for viewing by employees in the KSC Training Auditorium. The Stanley Cup weighs 35 pounds and is more than 100 years old. The Lightning will be added to the cup in September.

  2. Simulation of Low Velocity Impact Induced Inter- and Intra-Laminar Damage of Composite Beams Based on XFEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei; Guan, Zhidong; Li, Zengshan

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, the Inter-Fiber Fracture (IFF) criterion of Puck failure theory based on the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) was implemented in ABAQUS code to predict the intra-laminar crack initiation of unidirectional (UD) composite laminate. The transverse crack path in the matrix can be simulated accurately by the presented method. After the crack initiation, the propagation of the crack is simulated by Cohesive Zoom Model (CZM), in which the displacement discontinuities and stress concentration caused by matrix crack is introduced into the finite element (FE) model. Combined with the usage of the enriched element interface, which can be used to simulate the inter-laminar delamination crack, the Low Velocity Impact (LVI) induced damage of UD composite laminate beam with a typical stacking of composite laminates [05/903]S is studied. A complete crack initiation and propagation process was simulated and the numerical results obtained by the XFEM are consistent with the experimental results.

  3. Linear sine wave profiling to machine instability targets

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Derek William; Martinez, John Israel

    2016-08-01

    Specialized machining processes and programming have been developed to deliver thin tin and copper Richtmyer-Meshkov instability targets that have different amplitude perturbations across the face of one 4-in.-diameter target. Typical targets have anywhere from two to five different regions of sine waves that have different amplitudes varying from 4 to 200 μm across the face of the target. The puck is composed of multiple rings that are zero press fit together and diamond turned to create a flat platform with a tolerance of 2 μm for the shock experiment. A custom software program was written in Labview to write themore » point-to-point program for the diamond-turning profiler through the X-Y-Z movements to cut the pure planar straight sine wave geometry. As a result, the software is optimized to push the profile of the whole part into the face while eliminating any unneeded passes that do not cut any material.« less

  4. Epidemiology of concussions among United States high school athletes in 20 sports.

    PubMed

    Marar, Mallika; McIlvain, Natalie M; Fields, Sarah K; Comstock, R Dawn

    2012-04-01

    In the United States (US), an estimated 300,000 sports-related concussions occur annually. Among individuals 15 to 24 years of age, sports are second only to motor vehicle crashes as the leading cause of concussions. To investigate the epidemiology of concussions in high school athletes by comparing rates and patterns of concussion among 20 sports. Descriptive epidemiology study. Using an Internet-based data collection tool, RIO, certified athletic trainers from a large, nationally disperse sample of US high schools reported athlete exposure and injury data for 20 sports during the 2008-2010 academic years. During the study period, 1936 concussions were reported during 7,780,064 athlete-exposures (AEs) for an overall injury rate of 2.5 per 10,000 AEs. The injury rate was higher in competition (6.4) than practice (1.1) (rate ratio [RR], 5.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.2-6.3). The majority of concussions resulted from participation in football (47.1%, n = 912), followed by girls' soccer (8.2%, n = 159), boys' wrestling (5.8%, n = 112), and girls' basketball (5.5%, n = 107). Football had the highest concussion rate (6.4), followed by boys' ice hockey (5.4) and boys' lacrosse (4.0). Concussions represented a greater proportion of total injuries among boys' ice hockey (22.2%) than all other sports studied (13.0%) (injury proportion ratio [IPR], 1.7; 95% CI, 1.4-2.1; P < .01). In gender-comparable sports, girls had a higher concussion rate (1.7) than boys (1.0) (RR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.4-2.0). The most common mechanisms of injury were player-player contact (70.3%) and player-playing surface contact (17.2%). In more than 40% of athletes in sports other than girls' swimming and girls' track, concussion symptoms resolved in 3 days or less. Athletes most commonly returned to play in 1 to 3 weeks (55.3%), with 22.8% returning in less than 1 week and 2.0% returning in less than 1 day. Although interest in sports-related concussions is usually focused on full-contact sports

  5. Seismic refraction and GPR measurements of depth to bedrock: A case study from Randolph College, Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, A.; Pokharel, R.; Toteva, T.

    2007-12-01

    Randolph College is located in Lynchburg, VA, in the eastern edge of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Lynchburg city lies in the James River Synclinorium and consists of metasedimentary and metaigneous rocks. As part of College's plan to expand, a new soccer field will be build. For that purpose, part of a hill has to be excavated. Information was needed on the depth to the bedrock at the site. We conducted a seismic refraction experiment as part of an eight week summer research program for undergraduate students. We used 24 vertical geophones, spaced at 1.5 m interval. Our recording device was a 12 channel Geometrics geode (ES 3000). The source was an 8 pound sledge hummer. Source positions were chosen to be at 5, 10, 15 and 20 m on both sides of the array. We collected data along a tree line (in two segments) and across a hockey field. The data collected from the hockey field had very low signal to noise ratio and clear refraction arrivals. The other two acquisition lines were much noisier and difficult to interpret. Our results are consistent with data from seven bore holes in close proximity to the field site. We interpreted depth to bedrock to be between 4 and 12 m. The bedrock velocities are consistent with weathered gneiss. To improve the interpretation of the tree line records, we conducted a GPR survey. The preliminary radar images are showing highly heterogeneous subsurface with multiple point reflectors.

  6. Groin injuries in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Timothy F; Silvers, Holly J; Gerhardt, Michael B; Nicholas, Stephen J

    2010-05-01

    An in-season groin injury may be debilitating for the athlete. Proper diagnosis and identification of the pathology are paramount in providing appropriate intervention. Furthermore, an adductor strain that is treated improperly can become chronic and career threatening. Any one of the 6 muscles of the adductor muscle group can be involved. The degree of injury can range from a minor strain (grade 1), where minimal playing time is lost, to a severe strain (grade 3), in which there is complete loss of muscle function. Persistent groin pain and muscle imbalance may lead to athletic pubalgia. Relevant studies were identified through a literature search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane database from 1990 to 2009, as well as a manual review of reference lists of identified sources. Ice hockey and soccer players seem particularly susceptible to adductor muscle strains. In professional ice hockey and soccer players throughout the world, approximately 10% to 11% of all injuries are groin strains. These injuries have been linked to hip muscle weakness, a previous injury to that area, preseason practice sessions, and level of experience. This injury may be prevented if these risk factors are addressed before each season. Despite the identification of risk factors and strengthening intervention for athletes, adductor strains continue to occur throughout sport. If groin pain persists, the possibility of athletic pubalgia needs to be explored, because of weakening or tears in the abdominal wall muscles. A diagnosis is confirmed by exclusion of other pathology.

  7. Comparing Global Positioning System (GPS) and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Measures of Team Sport Movements.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Benjamin M; Polglaze, Ted; Dawson, Brian; King, Trish; Peeling, Peter

    2018-02-21

    To compare data from conventional GPS and new GNSS-enabled tracking devices, and to examine the inter-unit reliability of GNSS devices. Inter-device differences between 10 Hz GPS and GNSS devices were examined during laps (n=40) of a simulated game circuit (SGC) and during elite hockey matches (n=21); GNSS inter-unit reliability was also examined during the SGC laps. Differences in distance values and measures in three velocity categories (low <3 m.s -1 ; moderate 3-5 m.s -1 ; high >5 m.s -1 ) and acceleration/deceleration counts (>1.46 m.s -2 and < -1.46 m.s -2 ) were examined using one-way ANOVA. Inter-unit GNSS reliability was examined using the coefficient of variation (CV) and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Inter-device differences (P <0.05) were found for measures of peak deceleration, low-speed distance, % total distance at low speed, and deceleration count during the SGC, and for all measures except total distance and low-speed distance during hockey matches. Inter-unit (GNSS) differences (P <0.05) were not found. The CV was below 5% for total distance, average and peak speeds and distance and % total distance of low-speed running. The GNSS devices had a lower HDoP score than GPS devices in all conditions. These findings suggest that GNSS devices may be more sensitive than GPS in quantifying the physical demands of team sport movements, but further study into the accuracy of GNSS devices is required.

  8. Paths to Expertise in Portuguese National Team Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Nuno; Baker, Joseph; Sampaio, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the quantity and type of sporting activities undertaken by expert team sport athletes in the earlier stages of the long- term athlete development. Experts in roller-hockey (n = 19), volleyball (n = 14), soccer (n = 42) and basketball (n = 37) provided detailed information about the sporting activities they undertook throughout their careers. Results showed considerable variation between and within sports; however, generally, athletes began participating in sports between 6 and 10 years of age. The pattern of participation in specific and non-specific (team, individual and combat) sports for each stage of involvement demonstrated an increase in the number of activities participated in until early adolescence. Our results suggest that involvement in multiple sports during early stages of development is an alternative to early specialization and add further evidence of the complexity of skill acquisition in sport. Key points Although most athletes began sport participation between 6 and 10 years of age, there was significant variation across groups suggesting considerable flexibility in the pathways to expertise. The path to expertise in volleyball was clearly distinct from the paths of basketball, soccer and roller-hockey. There is a considerable involvement in sports other than the athlete’s primary sport, suggesting early specialization is not required for these sports. The pattern of participation in specific and non-specific sports for each stage of involvement demonstrated an increase in the number of activities participated in until early adolescence. PMID:24149598

  9. Sports-related and gender differences on neuropsychological measures of frontal lobe functioning.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Jeanne P; Atkinson, Thomas M; Dunham, Katherine T

    2004-01-01

    To determine similarities and differences in the performance of female and male athletes on neuropsychological measures of frontal lobe functioning. A cross-sectional study of male and female college-aged athletes involved in one of the following sports: hockey, basketball, softball, lacrosse, soccer, swimming, and track. Division III college. A total of 262 athletes (male, n=157; female, n=105) participated in the study. Controlled Oral Word Association (letters F, A, S), Cognitive Assessment System (Planned Codes, Planned Connections, Number Detection), and WAIS-R-NI Vocabulary were administered to all athletes. MANCOVA was performed with gender and sport as fixed factors. Female athletes displayed faster and more accurate performance on perceptual-motor tasks (P<0.01) and on one condition of a verbal fluency task (P<0.01) compared with male athletes. Male hockey athletes showed superior perceptual-motor speed and accuracy (P<0.01) compared with male athletes in the track/swimming group. Evaluators were naive to athletes' gender and sport. Gender- and sport-specific performances on perceptual-motor and verbal fluency tasks were found. Adding cognitive components to base functions eliminates gender- and sports-related distinctions, suggesting that existing differences are related to basic, fundamental skills, which are inherent and practiced within the respective sport. Understanding the differences and similarities across sports and gender on various neurocognitive measures is relevant for determining group differences in studies examining the consequences of mild traumatic brain injury among athletes.

  10. Determinants of 25(OH)D sufficiency in obese minority children: selecting outcome measures and analytic approaches.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ping; Schechter, Clyde; Cai, Ziyong; Markowitz, Morri

    2011-06-01

    To highlight complexities in defining vitamin D sufficiency in children. Serum 25-(OH) vitamin D [25(OH)D] levels from 140 healthy obese children age 6 to 21 years living in the inner city were compared with multiple health outcome measures, including bone biomarkers and cardiovascular risk factors. Several statistical analytic approaches were used, including Pearson correlation, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), and "hockey stick" regression modeling. Potential threshold levels for vitamin D sufficiency varied by outcome variable and analytic approach. Only systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly correlated with 25(OH)D (r = -0.261; P = .038). ANCOVA revealed that SBP and triglyceride levels were statistically significant in the test groups [25(OH)D <10, <15 and <20 ng/mL] compared with the reference group [25(OH)D >25 ng/mL]. ANCOVA also showed that only children with severe vitamin D deficiency [25(OH)D <10 ng/mL] had significantly higher parathyroid hormone levels (Δ = 15; P = .0334). Hockey stick model regression analyses found evidence of a threshold level in SBP, with a 25(OH)D breakpoint of 27 ng/mL, along with a 25(OH)D breakpoint of 18 ng/mL for triglycerides, but no relationship between 25(OH)D and parathyroid hormone. Defining vitamin D sufficiency should take into account different vitamin D-related health outcome measures and analytic methodologies. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Basic Skills Resource Center: Teaching Reading Comprehension to Adults in Basic Skills Courses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    paper trash out to be burned 4. A hockey coach telling his players to keep shooting at the goalie . What skill, or skills, did you use to answer the...With this exercise the learner is introduced to the idea of INFERENCE. The learner’s mind must INFER the rest of the idea in order to pull the four...to pull the ideas of the paragraph together. (Lesson 3 will teach learners how to construct an "umbrella" idea to act as a topic sentence for readings

  12. Sierra Hotel: Flying Air Force Fighters in the Decade After Vietnam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    intake in the front, and two rear missiles on the aft belly stations. Each missile had an ejector foot that kicked the missile away from the aircraft...bar, often dragging a thrower or two along with him. The more dangerous the game, the better, and Sockey, a hybrid of soccer and hockey, was the most...When the LGB kits were added to the 2,000-pound ver- sion, they added a tremendous punch, but the biggest punch of all came from “ Fat Albert,” a 3,000

  13. KSC-04PD-1316

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Mike Bolt holds the Stanley Cup, won this year by the National Hockey Leagues Tampa Bay Lightning. Bolt is the Stanley Cup keeper. The cup was also briefly available for viewing by employees in the KSC Training Auditorium. Jay Feaster, general manager of the Tampa Bay Lightning, brought the cup to KSC while on a tour. The Stanley Cup weighs 35 pounds and is more than 100 years old. The Lightning will be added to the cup in September.

  14. KSC-04PD-1315

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Jack Legere, NASA Quality Assurance specialist for the Shuttle Program, displays the Stanley Cup to employees in the Orbiter Processing Facility. Behind him is Discovery. Jay Feaster, general manager of the National Hockey League 2004 Champions Tampa Bay Lightning, brought the cup to KSC while on a tour. The cup was also briefly available for viewing by employees in the KSC Training Auditorium. The Stanley Cup weighs 35 pounds and is more than 100 years old. The Lightning will be added to the cup in September.

  15. Swanson prepares to retract the P6 Truss STBD SAW during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-06-13

    S117-E-07233 (13 June 2007) --- Astronauts Steven Swanson and Patrick Forrester (out of frame), both STS-117 mission specialists, participate in the mission's second planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction resumes on the International Space Station. Among other tasks, Forrester and Swanson removed all of the launch locks holding the 10-foot-wide solar alpha rotary joint in place and began the solar array retraction. Tethered to his Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuit, a hockey-stick-shaped tool wrapped in insulating tape, is visible in front of Swanson.

  16. Swanson prepares to retract the P6 Truss STBD SAW during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-06-13

    S117-E-07234 (13 June 2007) --- Astronauts Steven Swanson and Patrick Forrester (out of frame), both STS-117 mission specialists, participate in the mission's second planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction resumes on the International Space Station. Among other tasks, Forrester and Swanson removed all of the launch locks holding the 10-foot-wide solar alpha rotary joint in place and began the solar array retraction. Tethered to his Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuit, a hockey-stick-shaped tool wrapped in insulating tape, is visible in front of Swanson.

  17. The 1984 ARI Survey of Army Recruits: Codebook for Summer 84 USAR and ARNG Survey Respondents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    THE FOLLOWING PROGRAMS OR PROGRAMMING TYPES ON TV: NBA BASKETBALL . RAW DATA ICARD #I COLS ILENGTHI I _ _ _ I _ _ I _ _ _ I05 0-2-043 20I __ I I SAS...LEAG BASEBALL REG SEAS 249 T259 WATCH TV PROG:MJR LEAG BASEBALL PLAYOFFS 250 T260 WATCH TV PROG:WORLD SERIES 251 V T261 WATCH TV PROG:NBA BASKETBALL 252...T262 WATCH TV PROG:COLLEGE BASKETBALL 253 T263 WATCH TV PROG:NHL HOCKEY 254 T264 WATCH TV PROG:PROFESSIONAL WRESTLING 255 T265 WATCH TV PROG:CAR RACES

  18. Groin Injuries in Sports Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Timothy F.; Silvers, Holly J.; Gerhardt, Michael B.; Nicholas, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: An in-season groin injury may be debilitating for the athlete. Proper diagnosis and identification of the pathology are paramount in providing appropriate intervention. Furthermore, an adductor strain that is treated improperly can become chronic and career threatening. Any one of the 6 muscles of the adductor muscle group can be involved. The degree of injury can range from a minor strain (grade 1), where minimal playing time is lost, to a severe strain (grade 3), in which there is complete loss of muscle function. Persistent groin pain and muscle imbalance may lead to athletic pubalgia. Evidence Acquisition: Relevant studies were identified through a literature search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane database from 1990 to 2009, as well as a manual review of reference lists of identified sources. Results: Ice hockey and soccer players seem particularly susceptible to adductor muscle strains. In professional ice hockey and soccer players throughout the world, approximately 10% to 11% of all injuries are groin strains. These injuries have been linked to hip muscle weakness, a previous injury to that area, preseason practice sessions, and level of experience. This injury may be prevented if these risk factors are addressed before each season. Conclusion: Despite the identification of risk factors and strengthening intervention for athletes, adductor strains continue to occur throughout sport. If groin pain persists, the possibility of athletic pubalgia needs to be explored, because of weakening or tears in the abdominal wall muscles. A diagnosis is confirmed by exclusion of other pathology. PMID:23015943

  19. Exercise capacity is associated with endothelin-1 release during emotional excitement in coronary artery disease patients.

    PubMed

    Tulppo, Mikko P; Piira, Olli-Pekka; Hautala, Arto J; Kiviniemi, Antti M; Miettinen, Johanna A; Huikuri, Heikki V

    2014-08-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstrictor, IL-6, and catecholamines are increased and heart rate variability [SD of normal to normal R-R intervals (SDNN)] decreased during emotional excitement, but individual responses vary. We tested the hypothesis that exercise capacity is associated with physiological responses caused by real-life emotional excitement. We measured the plasma levels of ET-1, IL-6, catecholamines, heart rate, and SDNN in enthusiastic male ice hockey spectators (n = 51; age, 59 ± 9 years) with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) at baseline and during the Finnish National Ice Hockey League's final play-off matches. Maximal exercise capacity (METs) by bicycle exercise test and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were measured on a separate day. ET-1 response from baseline to emotional excitement correlated with maximal METs (r = -0.30; P = 0.040). In a linear stepwise regression analysis age, body mass index (BMI), METs, LVEF, basal ET-1, and subjective experience of excitement were entered the model as independent variables to explain ET-1 response. This model explained 27% of ET-1 response (P = 0.003). Maximal METs were most strongly correlated with ET-1 response (β = -0.45; partial correlation r = -0.43; P = 0.002), followed by BMI (β = -0.31; partial correlation r = -0.31; P = 0.033) and LVEF (β = -0.30; partial correlation r = -0.33; P = 0.023). Exercise capacity may protect against further cardiovascular events in CAD patients, because it is associated with reduced ET-1 release during emotional excitement. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Measuring cognitive change with ImPACT: the aggregate baseline approach.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Jared M; Echemendia, Ruben J; Meeuwisse, Willem; Hutchison, Michael G; Aubry, Mark; Comper, Paul

    2017-11-01

    The Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Test (ImPACT) is commonly used to assess baseline and post-injury cognition among athletes in North America. Despite this, several studies have questioned the reliability of ImPACT when given at intervals employed in clinical practice. Poor test-retest reliability reduces test sensitivity to cognitive decline, increasing the likelihood that concussed athletes will be returned to play prematurely. We recently showed that the reliability of ImPACT can be increased when using a new composite structure and the aggregate of two baselines to predict subsequent performance. The purpose of the present study was to confirm our previous findings and determine whether the addition of a third baseline would further increase the test-retest reliability of ImPACT. Data from 97 English speaking professional hockey players who had received at least 4 ImPACT baseline evaluations were extracted from a National Hockey League Concussion Program database. Linear regression was used to determine whether each of the first three testing sessions accounted for unique variance in the fourth testing session. Results confirmed that the aggregate baseline approach improves the psychometric properties of ImPACT, with most indices demonstrating adequate or better test-retest reliability for clinical use. The aggregate baseline approach provides a modest clinical benefit when recent baselines are available - and a more substantial benefit when compared to approaches that obtain baseline measures only once during the course of a multi-year playing career. Pending confirmation in diverse samples, neuropsychologists are encouraged to use the aggregate baseline approach to best quantify cognitive change following sports concussion.