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Sample records for hold engage reorient

  1. Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David W.; Wilson, Edward; How, Jonathan; Sanenz-Otero, Alvar; Chamitoff, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) are bowling-ball sized spherical satellites. They will be used inside the space station to test a set of well-defined instructions for spacecraft performing autonomous rendezvous and docking maneuvers. Three free-flying spheres will fly within the cabin of the station, performing flight formations. Each satellite is self-contained with power, propulsion, computers and navigation equipment. The results are important for satellite servicing, vehicle assembly and formation flying spacecraft configurations. SPHERES is a testbed for formation flying by satellites, the theories and calculations that coordinate the motion of multiple bodies maneuvering in microgravity. To achieve this inside the ISS cabin, bowling-ball-sized spheres perform various maneuvers (or protocols), with one to three spheres operating simultaneously . The Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) experiment will test relative attitude control and station-keeping between satellites, re-targeting and image plane filling maneuvers, collision avoidance and fuel balancing algorithms, and an array of geometry estimators used in various missions. SPHERES consists of three self-contained satellites, which are 18 sided polyhedrons that are 0.2 meter in diameter and weigh 3.5 kilograms. Each satellite contains an internal propulsion system, power, avionics, software, communications, and metrology subsystems. The propulsion system uses CO2, which is expelled through the thrusters. SPHERES satellites are powered by AA batteries. The metrology subsystem provides real-time position and attitude information. To simulate ground station-keeping, a laptop will be used to transmit navigational data and formation flying algorithms. Once these data are uploaded, the satellites will perform autonomously and hold the formation until a new command is given.

  2. SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold,Engage,Reorient,Experimental Satellites)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-06-26

    ISS020-E-014574 (26 June 2009) --- NASA astronaut Michael Barratt, Expedition 20 flight engineer, does a check of the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Beacon / Beacon Tester in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  3. ISS Expedition 18 Synchronized Position Hold,Engage,Reorient,Experimental Satellites (SPHERES)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-26

    ISS018-E-005214 (26 Oct. 2008) --- This close-up view shows three bowling-ball-sized free-flying satellites called Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. SPHERES were designed to test control algorithms for spacecraft by performing autonomous rendezvous and docking maneuvers inside the station. The results are important for multi-body control and in designing constellation and array spacecraft configurations.

  4. Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Vertigo Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-10

    ISS037-E-028591 (10 Nov. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio (left) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata, both Expedition 38 flight engineers, work in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  5. 12 CFR 225.142 - Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S. Government and agency securities and... policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S...

  6. 12 CFR 225.142 - Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S. Government and agency securities and... concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S. Government and...

  7. 12 CFR 225.142 - Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S. Government and agency securities and... policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S...

  8. 12 CFR 225.142 - Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S. Government and agency securities and... concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S. Government and...

  9. Modeling of pulsed propellant reorientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patag, A. E.; Hochstein, J. I.; Chato, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Optimization of the propellant reorientation process can provide increased payload capability and extend the service life of spacecraft. The use of pulsed propellant reorientation to optimize the reorientation process is proposed. The ECLIPSE code was validated for modeling the reorientation process and is used to study pulsed reorientation in small-scale and full-scale propellant tanks. A dimensional analysis of the process is performed and the resulting dimensionless groups are used to present and correlate the computational predictions for reorientation performance.

  10. Holding fat stereotypes is associated with lower body dissatisfaction in normal weight Caucasian women who engage in body surveillance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jean; Jarry, Josée L

    2014-09-01

    This study examined the moderating effect of body surveillance on the relationship between fat stereotype endorsement and body dissatisfaction in normal weight women. Participants (N=225) completed online measures of fat stereotyping, body surveillance, body dissatisfaction, and internalized thin ideals. After accounting for thin ideals, body surveillance moderated the relationship between fat stereotypes and body dissatisfaction. Contrary to hypotheses, higher fat stereotype endorsement predicted lower body dissatisfaction in women with higher body surveillance. Conversely, higher fat stereotype endorsement predicted greater body dissatisfaction in women with lower body surveillance. Thus, endorsing fat stereotypes appears protective against body dissatisfaction in normal weight women who extensively engage in body surveillance. For women who hold fat stereotypes and report high body surveillance, we propose that downward appearance comparison may create a contrast between themselves and the people with overweight whom they denigrate, thus improving body dissatisfaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Diapir-Induced Reorientation of Enceladus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappalardo, Robert T.; Nimno, Francis

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the diapir-induced reorientation of Enceladus is shown. The contents include: 1) Activity on Enceladus; 2) Miranda's Coronae: Origin above Diapirs; 3) Reorientation of Miranda; 4) Planetary Reorientation; 5) Modeling Diapir-Induced Reorientation; 6) Diapir-Induced Reorientation: Results; 7) Tectonic Implications of Reorientation; 8) Additional Tests of Reorientation; 9) Diapir-Induced Reorientation of Enceladus: Conclusions; and 10) Diapir-Induced Reorientation: Future Work

  12. Diapir-Induced Reorientation of Enceladus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappalardo, Robert T.; Nimno, Francis

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the diapir-induced reorientation of Enceladus is shown. The contents include: 1) Activity on Enceladus; 2) Miranda's Coronae: Origin above Diapirs; 3) Reorientation of Miranda; 4) Planetary Reorientation; 5) Modeling Diapir-Induced Reorientation; 6) Diapir-Induced Reorientation: Results; 7) Tectonic Implications of Reorientation; 8) Additional Tests of Reorientation; 9) Diapir-Induced Reorientation of Enceladus: Conclusions; and 10) Diapir-Induced Reorientation: Future Work

  13. Stimulus-Driven Reorienting Impairs Executive Control of Attention: Evidence for a Common Bottleneck in Anterior Insula

    PubMed Central

    Trautwein, Fynn-Mathis; Singer, Tania; Kanske, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    A classical model of human attention holds that independent neural networks realize stimulus-driven reorienting and executive control of attention. Questioning full independence, the two functions do, however, engage overlapping networks with activations in cingulo-opercular regions such as anterior insula (AI) and a reverse pattern of activation (stimulus-driven reorienting), and deactivation (executive control) in temporoparietal junction (TPJ). To test for independent versus shared neural mechanisms underlying stimulus-driven and executive control of attention, we used fMRI and a task that isolates individual from concurrent demands in both functions. Results revealed super-additive increases of left AI activity and behavioral response costs under concurrent demands, suggesting a common bottleneck for stimulus-driven reorienting and executive control of attention. These increases were mirrored by non-additive decreases of activity in the default mode network (DMN), including posterior TPJ, regions where activity increased with off-task processes. The deactivations in posterior TPJ were spatially separated from stimulus-driven reorienting related activation in anterior TPJ, a differentiation that replicated in task-free resting state. Furthermore, functional connectivity indicated inhibitory coupling between posterior TPJ and AI during concurrent attention demands. These results demonstrate a role of AI in stimulus-driven and executive control of attention that involves down-regulation of internally directed processes in DMN. PMID:27550866

  14. Visually induced reorientation illusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, I. P.; Hu, G.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    It is known that rotation of a furnished room around the roll axis of erect subjects produces an illusion of 360 degrees self-rotation in many subjects. Exposure of erect subjects to stationary tilted visual frames or rooms produces only up to 20 degrees of illusory tilt. But, in studies using static tilted rooms, subjects remained erect and the body axis was not aligned with the room. We have revealed a new class of disorientation illusions that occur in many subjects when placed in a 90 degrees or 180 degrees tilted room containing polarised objects (familiar objects with tops and bottoms). For example, supine subjects looking up at a wall of the room feel upright in an upright room and their arms feel weightless when held out from the body. We call this the levitation illusion. We measured the incidence of 90 degrees or 180 degrees reorientation illusions in erect, supine, recumbent, and inverted subjects in a room tilted 90 degrees or 180 degrees. We report that reorientation illusions depend on the displacement of the visual scene rather than of the body. However, illusions are most likely to occur when the visual and body axes are congruent. When the axes are congruent, illusions are least likely to occur when subjects are prone rather than supine, recumbent, or inverted.

  15. Anisotropic water reorientation around ions.

    PubMed

    Tielrooij, K J; van der Post, S T; Hunger, J; Bonn, M; Bakker, H J

    2011-11-03

    We study the reorientation dynamics of water molecules around ions using terahertz dielectric relaxation spectroscopy and polarization-resolved femtosecond infrared pump-probe spectroscopy. The results are discussed in relation to the ion-specific Hofmeister series and the concomitant "structure-making" and "structure-breaking" effects of ions on water. We show that when a dissolved salt consists of a strongly hydrated ion with a weakly hydrated counterion the reorientation of water molecules around the strongly hydrated ion is anisotropic, in the sense that differently charged ions affect reorientation along different molecular axes: cations mainly slow the reorientation dynamics of the water dipole vectors, and anions mainly slow down the reorientation dynamics of the hydroxyl group that points toward the anion. In both cases, motion along only one molecular axis is impeded, so that the hydration shell is best described as semirigid. In this semirigid hydration picture, water molecules in the first hydration shell show anisotropic reorientation, whereas water molecules outside the first hydration shell remain unaffected. The inferred anisotropy in molecular motion explains why terahertz dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, which probes dipolar relaxation, is more sensitive to cation hydration effects while femtosecond infrared pump-probe spectroscopy, which is sensitive to reorientation of hydroxyl groups, is more sensitive to anion hydration effects. We also show that dissolution of CsI-a salt for which both cation and anion are weakly hydrated-has little effect on water reorientation dynamics, with hydration water displaying dynamics that are similar to those in bulk water.

  16. 12 CFR 225.142 - Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... exposure that management believes requires hedging with financial contracts, the bank should be the direct... that bank. (d) Accounting. The joint bank policy statements of March 12, 1980 include accounting guidelines for banks that engage in financial contract activities. Since the Financial Accounting...

  17. Modeling of impulsive propellant reorientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, John I.; Patag, Alfredo E.; Chato, David J.

    1988-01-01

    The impulsive propellant reorientation process is modeled using the (Energy Calculations for Liquid Propellants in a Space Environment (ECLIPSE) code. A brief description of the process and the computational model is presented. Code validation is documented via comparison to experimentally derived data for small scale tanks. Predictions of reorientation performance are presented for two tanks designed for use in flight experiments and for a proposed full scale OTV tank. A new dimensionless parameter is developed to correlate reorientation performance in geometrically similar tanks. Its success is demonstrated.

  18. Reorienting Hypnosis Education.

    PubMed

    Alter, David S; Sugarman, Laurence Irwin

    2017-01-01

    The legacy model of professional clinical hypnosis training presents a restrictive frame increasingly incompatible with our evolving understanding of psychobiology, health, and care. Emerging science recognizes human experience not as disease and diagnosis, but as manifestations of individual, uniquely-endowed, adaptively self-regulating systems. Hypnosis is a particularly well-suited discipline for effecting beneficial change in this paradigm. Training in clinical hypnosis must progress from the current linearly-structured, diagnosis-based, reductionist model toward a more responsive, naturalistic, and client-centered curriculum in order to remain relevant and accessible to clinicians beginning to integrate it into their practices. To that end, this article extends Hope and Sugarman's (2015) thesis of hypnosis as a skill set for systemic perturbation and reorientation to consider what those skills may be, the principles on which they are based, and how they may be taught. Parsing a clinical vignette reveals how incorporation of novelty and uncertainty results in less restrictive and more naturalistic hypnotic encounters that, in response to client-generated cues, elicit psychophysiological plasticity. This disruptive hypnosis education and training framework extends the utility and benefit of applied clinical hypnosis.

  19. Cell reorientation under cyclic stretching

    PubMed Central

    Livne, Ariel; Bouchbinder, Eran; Geiger, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical cues from the extracellular microenvironment play a central role in regulating the structure, function and fate of living cells. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the mechanisms and processes underlying this crucial cellular mechanosensitivity remains a fundamental open problem. Here we provide a novel framework for addressing cellular sensitivity and response to external forces by experimentally and theoretically studying one of its most striking manifestations – cell reorientation to a uniform angle in response to cyclic stretching of the underlying substrate. We first show that existing approaches are incompatible with our extensive measurements of cell reorientation. We then propose a fundamentally new theory that shows that dissipative relaxation of the cell’s passively-stored, two-dimensional, elastic energy to its minimum actively drives the reorientation process. Our theory is in excellent quantitative agreement with the complete temporal reorientation dynamics of individual cells, measured over a wide range of experimental conditions, thus elucidating a basic aspect of mechanosensitivity. PMID:24875391

  20. Computational prediction of propellant reorientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, John I.

    1987-01-01

    Viewgraphs from a presentation on computational prediction of propellant reorientation are given. Information is given on code verification, test conditions, predictions for a one-quarter scale cryogenic tank, pulsed settling, and preliminary results.

  1. Spin reorientation via antiferromagnetic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjbar, M.; Sbiaa, R.; Dumas, R. K.; Åkerman, J.; Piramanayagam, S. N.

    2014-05-07

    Spin reorientation in antiferromagnetically coupled (AFC) Co/Pd multilayers, wherein the thickness of the constituent Co layers was varied, was studied. AFC-Co/Pd multilayers were observed to have perpendicular magnetic anisotropy even for a Co sublayer thickness of 1 nm, much larger than what is usually observed in systems without antiferromagnetic coupling. When similar multilayer structures were prepared without antiferromagnetic coupling, this effect was not observed. The results indicate that the additional anisotropy energy contribution arising from the antiferromagnetic coupling, which is estimated to be around 6 × 10{sup 6} ergs/cm{sup 3}, induces the spin-reorientation.

  2. Reorientation from Altered States: Please, More Carefully.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heikkinen, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    Claims counselors too often appear to forget to reorient clients from altered states of consciousness used in counseling and that failure to reorient can result in unnecessary discomfort for clients. Provides suggestions for when and how to reorient to avoid unwanted, lingering aftereffects. (Author/ABL)

  3. Reorientation from Altered States: Please, More Carefully.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heikkinen, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    Claims counselors too often appear to forget to reorient clients from altered states of consciousness used in counseling and that failure to reorient can result in unnecessary discomfort for clients. Provides suggestions for when and how to reorient to avoid unwanted, lingering aftereffects. (Author/ABL)

  4. [The history of reorientation therapy].

    PubMed

    Kórász, Krisztián

    2013-06-16

    Most scientists today agree that sexual orientation is most likely the result of a complex interaction of environmental, cognitive, and biological factors. In past decades in the United States there has been a big discourse as to the necessity and effectiveness of changing same-sex attraction. Researchers disagree on whether same-sex attraction can be changed. Position statements of the major mental health organizations state that there is not enough scientific evidence to support the reorientation therapy. In addition, there is some evidence to indicate that some individuals experienced harm or believed they had been harmed by these interventions. The aim of this article is to give a historic overview of the reorientation therapies, to review the efficacy of the therapies, motivations for seeking therapy, arguments for and against the therapy, and to overview the actual mainstream organizations' statements.

  5. Spatial Reorientation Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The short-arm centrifuge subjects an astronaut to conflicting sensory input and study the astronaut's perception of motion. It is one of several instruments used in the Spatial Reorientation Following Space Flight investigation to be conducted after astronauts return to Earth. During space flight, the vestibular organs no longer respond in a familiar way. Instead, inputs from the irner ear do not match those coming from the eyes. While on Earth, you can open your eyes to see if you truly are spinning, but astronauts do not have this luxury. Astronauts can see the floor, but have no sense of down; when they bend their heads forward, the otoliths are not stimulated properly. This state, called sensory conflict, must be resolved by the brain to maintain orientation. When they first return to Earth, astronauts are again disoriented because of sensory conflict. They undergo a period of spatial reorientation, as their brains reconcile what their eyes see and what their vestibular system senses. Recovery can take anywhere from hours to days depending on the length of the mission. Principal Investigator: Dr. William Paloski, Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX.

  6. Spatial Reorientation Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The short-arm centrifuge subjects an astronaut to conflicting sensory input and study the astronaut's perception of motion. It is one of several instruments used in the Spatial Reorientation Following Space Flight investigation to be conducted on crewmembers. During space flight, the vestibular organs no longer respond in a familiar way. Instead, inputs from the irner ear do not match those coming from the eyes. While on Earth, you can open your eyes to see if you truly are spinning, but astronauts do not have this luxury. Astronauts can see the floor, but have no sense of down; when they bend their heads forward, the otoliths are not stimulated properly. This state, called sensory conflict, must be resolved by the brain to maintain orientation. When they first return to Earth, astronauts are again disoriented because of sensory conflict. They undergo a period of spatial reorientation, as their brains reconcile what their eyes see and what their vestibular system senses. Recovery can take anywhere from hours to days depending on the length of the mission. Principal Investigator: Dr. William Paloski, Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX.

  7. Spatial Reorientation Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The short-arm centrifuge subjects an astronaut to conflicting sensory input and study the astronaut's perception of motion. It is one of several instruments used in the Spatial Reorientation Following Space Flight investigation to be conducted after astronauts return to Earth. During space flight, the vestibular organs no longer respond in a familiar way. Instead, inputs from the irner ear do not match those coming from the eyes. While on Earth, you can open your eyes to see if you truly are spinning, but astronauts do not have this luxury. Astronauts can see the floor, but have no sense of down; when they bend their heads forward, the otoliths are not stimulated properly. This state, called sensory conflict, must be resolved by the brain to maintain orientation. When they first return to Earth, astronauts are again disoriented because of sensory conflict. They undergo a period of spatial reorientation, as their brains reconcile what their eyes see and what their vestibular system senses. Recovery can take anywhere from hours to days depending on the length of the mission. Principal Investigator: Dr. William Paloski, Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX.

  8. Spatial Reorientation Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The short-arm centrifuge subjects an astronaut to conflicting sensory input and study the astronaut's perception of motion. It is one of several instruments used in the Spatial Reorientation Following Space Flight investigation to be conducted on crewmembers. During space flight, the vestibular organs no longer respond in a familiar way. Instead, inputs from the irner ear do not match those coming from the eyes. While on Earth, you can open your eyes to see if you truly are spinning, but astronauts do not have this luxury. Astronauts can see the floor, but have no sense of down; when they bend their heads forward, the otoliths are not stimulated properly. This state, called sensory conflict, must be resolved by the brain to maintain orientation. When they first return to Earth, astronauts are again disoriented because of sensory conflict. They undergo a period of spatial reorientation, as their brains reconcile what their eyes see and what their vestibular system senses. Recovery can take anywhere from hours to days depending on the length of the mission. Principal Investigator: Dr. William Paloski, Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX.

  9. ORNL Interim Progress Report on Hydride Reorientation CIRFT Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Yan, Yong; Wang, Hong

    2016-10-28

    A systematic study of H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) vibration integrity was performed in Phase I project under simulated transportation environments, using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT) hot cell testing technology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2013–14. The data analysis on the as-irradiated HBR SNF rods demonstrated that the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the fatigue life of bending rods. However, previous studies have shown that the hydrogen content and hydride morphology has an important effect on zirconium alloy mechanical properties. To address the effect of radial hydrides in SNF rods, in Phase II a test procedure was developed to simulate the effects of elevated temperatures, pressures, and stresses during transfer-drying operations. Pressurized and sealed fuel segments were heated to the target temperature for a preset hold time and slow-cooled at a controlled rate. The procedure was applied to both non-irradiated/prehydrided and high-burnup Zircaloy-4 fueled cladding segments using the Nuclear Regulatory Commission-recommended 400°C maximum temperature limit at various cooling rates. Before testing high-burnup cladding, four out-of-cell tests were conducted to optimize the hydride reorientation (R) test condition with pre-hydride Zircaloy-4 cladding, which has the same geometry as the high burnup fuel samples. Test HR-HBR#1 was conducted at the maximum hoop stress of 145 MPa, at a 400°C maximum temperature and a 5°C/h cooling rate. On the other hand, thermal cycling was performed for tests HR-HBR#2, HR-HBR#3, and HR-HBR#4 to generate more radial hydrides. It is clear that thermal cycling increases the ratio of the radial hydride to circumferential hydrides. The internal pressure also has a significant effect on the radial hydride morphology. This report describes a procedure and experimental results of the four out-of-cell hydride reorientation tests of

  10. Pulsed thrust propellant reorientation - Concept and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, John I.; Patag, Alfredo E.; Korakianitis, T. P.; Chato, David J.

    1992-01-01

    The use of pulsed thrust to optimize the propellant reorientation process is proposed. The ECLIPSE code is used to study the performance of pulsed reorientation in small-scale and full-scale propellant tanks. A dimensional analysis of the process is performed and the resulting dimensionless groups are used to present and correlate the computational predictions of reorientation performance. Based on the results obtained from this study, it is concluded that pulsed thrust reorientation seems to be a feasible technique for optimizing the propellant reorientation process across a wide range of spacecraft, for a variety of missions, for the entire duration of a mission, and with a minimum of hardware design and qualification.

  11. Reorientation Histories of the Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, J. T.; Matsuyama, I.

    2016-12-01

    The nature of how a planet spins is controlled by the planet's inertia tensor. In a minimum energy rotation state, planets spin about the maximum principal axis of inertia. Yet, the orientation of this axis is not often constant with time. The redistribution of mass within a planet due to both interior processes (e.g. convection, intrusive volcanism) and surface processes (e.g. extrusive volcanism, impacts) can significantly alter the planet's inertia tensor, resulting in the reorientation of the planet. This form of reorientation is also known as true polar wander. Reorientation can directly alter the topography and gravity field of a planet, generate tectonic stresses, change the insolation geometry (affecting climate and volatile stability), and modify the orientation of the planet's magnetic field. Yet, despite its significance, the reorientation histories of many planets is not well constrained. In this work, we present a new technique for using spacecraft-derived, orbital gravity measurements to directly quantify how individual large geologic features reoriented Mercury, Venus, the Moon, and Mars. When coupled with the geologic record for these respective planets, this enables us to determine the reorientation history for each planet. These mark the first comprehensive, multi-episode reorientation chronologies for these planets. The reorientation histories for the Moon and Mercury are similar; the orientation of both planets is strongly controlled by the presence of large remnant bulges (tidal/rotational for the Moon, and likely thermal for Mercury), but significantly modulated by subsequent, large impacts and volcanic events—resulting in 15° of total reorientation after their formation. Mars experienced larger reorientation due to the formation of the Tharsis rise, punctuated by smaller reorientation events from large impacts. Lastly, Venus's diminutive remnant figure and large volcanic edifices result in the largest possible reorientation events, but the

  12. Two-impulse reorientation of asymmetric spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martz, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation conducted to determine minimum maneuver costs for attitude reorientation of spacecraft of all possible inertial distribution over a wide range of maneuver angles by use of a two impulse coning method of reorientation is reported. Maneuver cost, proportional to the product of fuel consumed (total impulse) and time expended during a maneuver is discussed. Assumptions included external impulsive control torques, rigid body spacecraft rest-to-rest maneuvers, and no disturbance torques. Results are presented in terms of average cost and standard deviation for various maneuver ranges. Costs of individual reorientations are calculated with the computer program included.

  13. Constant reverse thrust activated reorientation of liquid hydrogen with Geyser initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    A key objective of the cryogenic fluid management of the spacecraft propulsion system is to develop the technology necessary for acquisition or positioning of liquid outflow or vapor venting. Numerical simulation of positive liquid acquisition is attempted by introducing reverse gravity acceleration, resulting from the propulsive thrust of auxiliary engines, which exceeds critical value for the initiation of geyser. Based on the computer simulation of flowfields during the course of fluid reorientation, six dimensionless parameters resulted in this study. It shows that these parameters hold near-constant values through the entire ranges of liquid filled levels, from 30-80 percent, during the course of fluid reorientation.

  14. Cryogenic liquid hydrogen reorientation activated by constant reverse gravity acceleration of geyser initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    A key objective for cryogenic fluid management in a spacecraft propulsion system is development of the technology necessary for acquisition or positioning of liquid outflow or vapor venting. Numerical simulation of positive liquid acquisition is attempted by introducing a reverse gravity acceleration from the propulsive thrust of auxiliary engines which exceeds critical value for the initiation of a geyser. Based on the computer simulation of flow fields during the course of fluid reorientation, six dimensionless parameters resulted. These parameters hold near-constant values through the entire range of liquid filled levels, from 30 to 80 percent, during the course of fluid reorientation.

  15. Electron beam stimulated spin reorientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monchesky, T. L.; Unguris, J.; Celotta, R. J.

    2003-05-01

    Using scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis, we observed the electron beam induced switching of the magnetic state of epitaxial single-crystal Fe(110) films grown on atomically flat cleaved GaAs(110). For low film thickness the magnetization lies along the [-110] in-plane direction, while above a thickness of 19 monolayers, the ground state magnetization configuration switches to the [001] in-plane direction. If Fe films are grown to a thickness greater than the critical thickness of the reorientation, the magnetization is caught in a metastable state, oriented along [-110]. We discovered that we can locally switch the metastable state to the stable [001] direction by irradiating the metastable magnetic state with a suitable electron current density. The reversal proceeds by the nucleation and growth of lancet-shaped domains that move in discrete jumps between pinning sites. Our results show that there is a permanent reduction of the strength of defect sites without a permanent change in the overall anisotropy. We demonstrate how an electron beam can be used to locally control domain structure.

  16. Reorientation of icy satellites by impact basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; Matsuyama, I.

    2007-10-01

    Large impact basins are present on many of the icy satellites of the outer solar system. Assuming that their present-day topography is uncompensated, such basins can cause significant poleward reorientations for slow-rotating satellites. This reorientation may have been accompanied by transient large-amplitude wobble. The largest basins on Tethys, Rhea and Titania are predicted to have caused reorientations of roughly 4°, 7° and 12°, respectively, resulting in global tectonic stresses up to ~0.5 MPa. The potential anomalies associated with the basins can be up to one-third of those expected for a hydrostatic, tidally- and rotationally-deformed body, and may complicate interpretation of the satellite interior structure. Pluto and Charon, because of their slow rotation, are also likely to have undergone reorientation of 10-20° if they possess impact basins of comparable sizes to those of the Saturnian satellites.

  17. Planned Axial Reorientation Investigation on Sloshsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper details the design and logic of an experimental investigation to study axial reorientation in low gravity. The Sloshsat free-flyer is described. The planned axial reorientation experiments and test matrixes are presented. Existing analytical tools are discussed. Estimates for settling range from 64 to 1127 seconds. The planned experiments are modelled using computational fluid dynamics. These models show promise in reducing settling estimates and demonstrate the ability of pulsed high thrust settling to emulate lower thrust continuous firing.

  18. Reorienting with terrain slope and landmarks.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Daniele; Newcombe, Nora S; Shipley, Thomas F

    2013-02-01

    Orientation (or reorientation) is the first step in navigation, because establishing a spatial frame of reference is essential for a sense of location and heading direction. Recent research on nonhuman animals has revealed that the vertical component of an environment provides an important source of spatial information, in both terrestrial and aquatic settings. Nonetheless, humans show large individual and sex differences in the ability to use terrain slope for reorientation. To understand why some participants--mainly women--exhibit a difficulty with slope, we tested reorientation in a richer environment than had been used previously, including both a tilted floor and a set of distinct objects that could be used as landmarks. This environment allowed for the use of two different strategies for solving the task, one based on directional cues (slope gradient) and one based on positional cues (landmarks). Overall, rather than using both cues, participants tended to focus on just one. Although men and women did not differ significantly in their encoding of or reliance on the two strategies, men showed greater confidence in solving the reorientation task. These facts suggest that one possible cause of the female difficulty with slope might be a generally lower spatial confidence during reorientation.

  19. ESR Studies of a Reorienting Nickel Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowert, Bruce

    2007-03-01

    Electron spin resonance spectra of the planar bis(maleonitriledithiolato)nickel anion radical (BMNT) in the intermediate motional region have been simulated in several polar solvents using axially symmetric reorientation. The rotational diffusion about the long in-plane axis is three to four times faster than that about the two axes perpendicular to it. The reorientational model needed to produce agreement with experiment is either in or close to the Brownian rotational diffusion limit. The solvents are 4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol (eugenol), dimethyl phthalate, tri-n-butyl phosphate, tris(2-ethyl-hexyl)phosphate, and 2-methoxyethyl ether (diglyme), ethyl alcohol, and a dimethylformamide-chloroform mixed solvent. The reorientational rates from the simulations are in general agreement with those from line width analyses carried out from the fast to the slow motional regions. The temperature dependence of the diffusion rates is discussed in terms of the Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) model and the Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher equation.

  20. Using Perceptrons to Explore the Reorientation Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Michael R. W.; Kelly, Debbie M.; Spetch, Marcia L.; Dupuis, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The reorientation task is a paradigm that has been used extensively to study the types of information used by humans and animals to navigate in their environment. In this task, subjects are reinforced for going to a particular location in an arena that is typically rectangular in shape. The subject then has to find that location again after being…

  1. Affection Training: An Alternative to Sexual Reorientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binder, Carl V.

    1977-01-01

    The author proposes affection training as an alternative to sexual reorientation for homosexuals. This training emphasizes the expansion of behavioral repertories rather than the sexual preference of an individual. Presented at the annual convention of the Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy, San Francisco, 13 December 1975. (Author)

  2. Using Perceptrons to Explore the Reorientation Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Michael R. W.; Kelly, Debbie M.; Spetch, Marcia L.; Dupuis, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The reorientation task is a paradigm that has been used extensively to study the types of information used by humans and animals to navigate in their environment. In this task, subjects are reinforced for going to a particular location in an arena that is typically rectangular in shape. The subject then has to find that location again after being…

  3. Children's Use of Geometry for Reorientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sang Ah; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2008-01-01

    Research on navigation has shown that humans and laboratory animals recover their sense of orientation primarily by detecting geometric properties of large-scale surface layouts (e.g. room shape), but the reasons for the primacy of layout geometry have not been clarified. In four experiments, we tested whether 4-year-old children reorient by the…

  4. "I can't Take Hold of Some Kind of a Life": The Role of Social Connectedness and Confidence in Engaging "Lost" Adolescents with Their Lives.

    PubMed

    Ja, Nicole M; Jose, Paul E

    2017-03-23

    Erik Erikson's theoretical writings on identity have provided a rich foundation upon which decades of research on identity development have been built. However, literature is lacking regarding adolescents who are aware that they lack knowledge about the self (i.e., values, likes, and dislikes) to the extent that they are stuck and directionless, and therefore unable to engage in the process of identity formation, what we refer to as a state of "lostness." Furthermore, while it has been established that supportive relationships facilitate identity development, less is known about whether various domains of social connectedness may diminish "lostness" over time, and if so, what may be the specific processes or conditions within each connectedness domain that supports this aspect of identity development. To address this gap in the literature, this study drew upon self-report data collected from New Zealand adolescents who provided data for two out of three annual time points of measurement (N = 1996; 52% female; 52% European New Zealanders, 30% Māori, and 18% Pacific Islanders and Asian New Zealanders) to examine the longitudinal relationships among three domains of social connectedness (i.e., family, school, and peers), "lostness," and a potential mediator, confidence. The results showed that all three domains of social connectedness predicted diminished "lostness" over time, and confidence mediated these relationships. An examination of the opposite direction of influence showed that "lostness" predicted a decrease in confidence and the three domains of social connectedness, as well. Gender, age, and ethnic group were shown to be moderators of different parts of the model. This study addresses the paucity of research examining "lost" adolescents, while providing insight into the underlying processes through which three key social contexts-family, school, and peers-exert their influence, and are influenced by, identity processes through confidence.

  5. Reorientation and Tectonic Patterns of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Isamu; Nimmo, F.

    2007-10-01

    The global scale tectonic pattern on Enceladus has been interpreted as due to a rotation rate increase, although no mechanism for doing so is known (Porco et al. 2006). We consider an alternative explanation: reorientation of the rotation poles with respect to Enceladus’ surface. Geological observations of equatorial features that resemble the polar "tiger stripes” tectonic features support this scenario (Helfenstein et al. 2006) which is physically plausible, either due to the rise of a hot plume (Nimmo and Pappalardo 2006) or variations in ice shell thickness (Ojakangas and Stevenson 1989). We find solutions for the stresses associated with triaxial distortions due to reorientation and/or despinning of a tidally deformed satellite. Following the analysis of Melosh (1977), we then predict the tectonic pattern due to different geometries for the reorientation of the rotation and tidal axes, and rotation rate variations. The observed N-S trending fractures in the leading hemisphere, which appear to have formed in response to E-W trending extensional stresses, and the circumpolar south polar terrain boundary at 55° S latitude, which seems to have formed in response to N-S trending compressional stresses (Porco et al. 2006), is more easily explained by a large reorientation ( 90°) of the rotation axis, rather than by a rotation rate increase. If Enceladus has a subsurface Ocean, cooling ultimately leads to expansion due to the water-ice volume change (Nimmo 2004). The predicted tectonic pattern due to the combination of large reorientation and a small radius expansion ( 10-3 %) is also in good agreement with the observed tectonic features. The predicted normal faulting province in the trailing hemisphere and circumpolar thrust faulting province around the north pole have not been observed, perhaps because of contrasts between the mechanical nature of the northern and southern polar regions due to degree-one convection or other unknown processes.

  6. Reorientation patterns in central-place foraging: internal clocks and klinokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Daniel; Bartumeus, Frederic; Méndez, Vicenç; Espadaler, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    We study central-place foraging patterns of Aphaenogaster senilis ants at a population level by video framing individual ant trajectories in a circular arena with a nest connected to its centre. The ants naturally leave and enter the nest and forage generating non-trivial movement patterns around the nest. Our data analysis indicated that the trajectories observed can be classified into two strategies: the risk-averse strategy, which involves wandering around the nest without departing far from it and the risk-prone strategy, which involves long exploration paths with periodic returns to the central region, nearby the nest. We found that both risk-prone and risk-averse strategies exhibit qualitatively the same reorientation patterns, with the time between consecutive reorientations covering a wide range of scales, and fitting a stretched exponential function. Nevertheless, differences in the temporal scales and the time variability of such reorientation events differ, together with other aspects of motion, such as average speed and turns. Our results give experimental evidence that the internal mechanisms driving reorientations in ants tend to favour frequently long relocations, as theory predicts for efficient exploration in patchy landscapes, but ants engaged in central-place foraging can modulate such behaviour to control distances from the nest. Previous works on the species support the idea that risk-prone and risk-averse strategies may reflect actual differences between individuals age and experience; these factors (age and experience) should be then relevant in modulating the internal reorientation clocks. To support the validity of our findings, we develop a random-walk model combining stretched exponential reorientation clocks with klinokinesis that fits the time length and the travelled distance distributions of the observed trajectories. PMID:24152814

  7. Reorientation patterns in central-place foraging: internal clocks and klinokinesis.

    PubMed

    Campos, Daniel; Bartumeus, Frederic; Méndez, Vicenç; Espadaler, Xavier

    2014-01-06

    We study central-place foraging patterns of Aphaenogaster senilis ants at a population level by video framing individual ant trajectories in a circular arena with a nest connected to its centre. The ants naturally leave and enter the nest and forage generating non-trivial movement patterns around the nest. Our data analysis indicated that the trajectories observed can be classified into two strategies: the risk-averse strategy, which involves wandering around the nest without departing far from it and the risk-prone strategy, which involves long exploration paths with periodic returns to the central region, nearby the nest. We found that both risk-prone and risk-averse strategies exhibit qualitatively the same reorientation patterns, with the time between consecutive reorientations covering a wide range of scales, and fitting a stretched exponential function. Nevertheless, differences in the temporal scales and the time variability of such reorientation events differ, together with other aspects of motion, such as average speed and turns. Our results give experimental evidence that the internal mechanisms driving reorientations in ants tend to favour frequently long relocations, as theory predicts for efficient exploration in patchy landscapes, but ants engaged in central-place foraging can modulate such behaviour to control distances from the nest. Previous works on the species support the idea that risk-prone and risk-averse strategies may reflect actual differences between individuals age and experience; these factors (age and experience) should be then relevant in modulating the internal reorientation clocks. To support the validity of our findings, we develop a random-walk model combining stretched exponential reorientation clocks with klinokinesis that fits the time length and the travelled distance distributions of the observed trajectories.

  8. Tectonic patterns on a reoriented planet - Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Melosh, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    Both geological and free-air-gravity data suggest that the positive mass anomaly associated with the Tharsis volcanoes may have reoriented Mars' lithosphere by as much as 25 deg. Since Mars is oblate, rotation of the lithosphere over the equatorial bulge by 25 deg produces membrane stresses of several kilobars, large enough to initiate faulting. Plots of the magnitude and direction of stresses in a reoriented planet show that near Tharsis the dominant fault type should be north-south-trending normal faults. This normal fault province is centered at 30 deg N latitude and extends about 45 deg east and west in longitude. Similar faults should occur at the antipodes, north of Hellas Planitia.

  9. Holding fast.

    PubMed

    Gourville, John T

    2005-06-01

    CEO Peter Walsh faces a classic innovator's dilemma. His company, Crescordia, produces high-quality metal plates, pins, and screws that orthopedic surgeons use to repair broken bones. In fact, because the company has for decades refused to compromise on quality, there are orthopedic surgeons who use nothing but Crescordia hardware. And now these customers have begun to clamor for the next generation technology: resorbable hardware. Resorbables offer clear advantages over the traditional hardware. Like dissolving sutures, resorbable plates and screws are made of biodegradable polymers. They hold up long enough to support a healing bone, then gradually and harmlessly disintegrate in the patient's body. Surgeons are especially looking forward to using resorbables on children, so kids won't have to undergo a second operation to remove the old hardware after their bones heal, a common procedure in pediatrics. The new products, however, are not yet reliable; they fail about 8% of the time, sometimes disintegrating before the bone completely heals and sometimes not ever fully disintegrating. That's why Crescordia, mindful of its hard-earned reputation, has delayed launching a line using the new technology. But time is running out. A few competitors have begun to sell resorbables despite their imperfections, and these companies are picking up market share. Should Crescordia join the fray and risk tarnishing its brand? Or should the company sit tight until it can offer a perfect product? Commenting on this fictional case study are Robert A. Lutz, vice chairman of product development at General Motors; Clayton M. Christensen, the Robert and Jane Cizik Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School; Jason Wittes, a senior equity analyst covering medical supplies and devices at Leerink Swann; and Nick Galakatos, a general partner of MPM Capital.

  10. Variable structure control of spacecraft reorientation maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sira-Ramirez, H.; Dwyer, T. A. W., III

    1986-01-01

    A Variable Structure Control (VSC) approach is presented for multi-axial spacecraft reorientation maneuvers. A nonlinear sliding surface is proposed which results in an asymptotically stable, ideal linear sliding motion of Cayley-Rodriques attitude parameters. By imposing a desired equivalent dynamics on the attitude parameters, the approach is devoid of optimal control considerations. The single axis case provides a design scheme for the multiple axes design problem. Illustrative examples are presented.

  11. INF2 promotes the formation of detyrosinated microtubules necessary for centrosome reorientation in T cells

    PubMed Central

    Andrés-Delgado, Laura; Antón, Olga M.; Bartolini, Francesca; Ruiz-Sáenz, Ana; Correas, Isabel; Gundersen, Gregg G.

    2012-01-01

    T cell antigen receptor–proximal signaling components, Rho-family GTPases, and formin proteins DIA1 and FMNL1 have been implicated in centrosome reorientation to the immunological synapse of T lymphocytes. However, the role of these molecules in the reorientation process is not yet defined. Here we find that a subset of microtubules became rapidly stabilized and that their α-tubulin subunit posttranslationally detyrosinated after engagement of the T cell receptor. Formation of stabilized, detyrosinated microtubules required the formin INF2, which was also found to be essential for centrosome reorientation, but it occurred independently of T cell receptor–induced massive tyrosine phosphorylation. The FH2 domain, which was mapped as the INF2 region involved in centrosome repositioning, was able to mediate the formation of stable, detyrosinated microtubules and to restore centrosome translocation in DIA1-, FMNL1-, Rac1-, and Cdc42-deficient cells. Further experiments indicated that microtubule stabilization was required for centrosome polarization. Our work identifies INF2 and stable, detyrosinated microtubules as central players in centrosome reorientation in T cells. PMID:22986496

  12. Fundamental experiments on hydride reorientation in zircaloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, Kimberly B.

    In the current study, an in-situ X-ray diffraction technique using synchrotron radiation was used to follow directly the kinetics of hydride dissolution and precipitation during thermomechanical cycles. This technique was combined with conventional microscopy (optical, SEM and TEM) to gain an overall understanding of the process of hydride reorientation. Thus this part of the study emphasized the time-dependent nature of the process, studying large volume of hydrides in the material. In addition, a micro-diffraction technique was also used to study the spatial distribution of hydrides near stress concentrations. This part of the study emphasized the spatial variation of hydride characteristics such as strain and morphology. Hydrided samples in the shape of tensile dog-bones were used in the time-dependent part of the study. Compact tension specimens were used during the spatial dependence part of the study. The hydride elastic strains from peak shift and size and strain broadening were studied as a function of time for precipitating hydrides. The hydrides precipitate in a very compressed state of stress, as measured by the shift in lattice spacing. As precipitation proceeds the average shift decreases, indicating average stress is reduced, likely due to plastic deformation and morphology changes. When nucleation ends the hydrides follow the zirconium matrix thermal contraction. When stress is applied below the threshold stress for reorientation, hydrides first nucleate in a very compressed state similar to that of unstressed hydrides. After reducing the average strain similarly to unstressed hydrides, the average hydride strain reaches a constant value during cool-down to room temperature. This could be due to a greater ease of deforming the matrix due to the applied far-field strain which would compensate for the strains due to thermal contraction. Finally when hydrides reorient, the average hydride strains become tensile during the first precipitation regime and

  13. Attitude reorientation of spacecraft by means of impulse coning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martz, C. W.

    1977-01-01

    Minimum maneuver costs for attitude reorientation of spacecraft of all possible inertial distribution over a wide range of maneuver angles by use of the impulse coning method of reorientation was studied. Maneuver cost is proportional to the product of fuel consumed and time expended during a maneuver. Assumptions included impulsive external control torques, rigid-body spacecraft, rest-to-rest maneuvers, and no disturbance torques. Also, coning maneuvers were constrained to have equal initial and final cone angles. Maneuver costs are presented for general reorientations as well as for spin-axis reorientations where final attitude about the spin axis is arbitrary.

  14. Toddlers' Use of Metric Information and Landmarks To Reorient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learmonth, Amy E.; Newcombe, Nora S.; Huttenlocher, Janellen

    2001-01-01

    Six experiments examined whether there were circumstances in which toddlers could use landmarks for spatial reorientation. Findings confirmed that geometric information is used for reorientation by toddlers, but give reason to doubt that the use of this information is achieved using a module impenetrable to nongeometric information. (Author/KB)

  15. Spinning in the Scanner: Neural Correlates of Virtual Reorientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Jennifer E.; Joanisse, Marc F.; Newcombe, Nora S.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have used spatial reorientation task paradigms to identify underlying cognitive mechanisms of navigation in children, adults, and a range of animal species. Despite broad interest in this task across disciplines, little is known about the brain bases of reorientation. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine neural…

  16. Reorientations in the bacteriorhodopsin photoscycle are pH dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Harms, G S; Song, Q; Johnson, C K

    1996-01-01

    Chromophore reorientations during the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle in the purple membrane of Halobacterium salinarium have been detected by time-resolved linear dichroism measurements of the optical anisotropy over the pH range from 4 to 10 and at ionic strengths from 10 mM to 1 M. The results show that reorientations in the L and M states of bacteriorhodopsin are pH dependent, reaching their largest amplitude when the membrane is at pH 6-8. Reorientations on the millisecond time scale of unexcited spectator proteins in the native purple membrane also depend on pH, consistent with the suggestion that spectator reorientations are triggered by reorientation of the photoexcited protein. The results imply that a group with a PK(a) of 5 to 6 enables reorientations, and that the deprotonation of a site at pH values above 9 restricts reorientational motion. This suggests that reorientations in M may be correlated with proton release. PMID:9172759

  17. Spinning in the Scanner: Neural Correlates of Virtual Reorientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Jennifer E.; Joanisse, Marc F.; Newcombe, Nora S.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have used spatial reorientation task paradigms to identify underlying cognitive mechanisms of navigation in children, adults, and a range of animal species. Despite broad interest in this task across disciplines, little is known about the brain bases of reorientation. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine neural…

  18. Enabling health systems transformation: what progress has been made in re-orienting health services?

    PubMed

    Wise, Marilyn; Nutbeam, Don

    2007-01-01

    The Ottawa Charter has been remarkably influential in guiding the development of the goals and concepts of health promotion, and in shaping global public health practice in the past 20 years. However, of the five action areas identified in the Ottawa Charter, it appears that there has been little systematic attention to the challenge of re-orienting health services, and less than optimal progress in practice. The purposes of re-orienting health services as proposed in the Ottawa Charter were to achieve a better balance in investment between prevention and treatment, and to include a focus on population health outcomes alongside the focus on individual health outcomes. However, there is little evidence that a re-orientation of health services in these terms has occurred systematically anywhere in the world. This is in spite of the fact that direct evidence of the need to re-orient health services and of the potential benefits of doing so has grown substantially since 1986. Patient education, preventive care (screening, immunisation), and organisational and environmental changes by health organisations have all been found to have positive health and environmental outcomes. However, evidence of effectiveness has not been sufficient, on its own, to sway community preferences and political decisions. The lack of progress points to the need for significant re-thinking of the approaches we have adopted to date. The paper proposes a number of ways forward. These include working effectively in partnership with the communities we want to serve to mobilise support for change, and to reinforce this by working more effectively at influencing broader public opinion through the media. The active engagement of clinical health professionals is also identified as crucial to achieving sustainable change. Finally we recognize that by working in partnership with like-minded advocacy organizations, the IUHPE could put its significant knowledge and experience to work in leading action to

  19. Geometric and featural systems, separable and combined: Evidence from reorientation in people with Williams syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Katrina; Landau, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Spatial reorientation by humans and other animals engages geometric representations of surface layouts as well as featural landmarks; however, the two types of information are thought to be behaviorally and neurally separable. In this paper, we examine the use of these two types of information during reorientation among children and adults with Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic disorder accompanied by abnormalities in brain regions that support use of both geometry and landmarks. Previous studies of reorientation in adolescents and adults with WS have shown deficits in the ability to use geometry for reorientation, but intact ability to use features, suggesting that the two systems can be differentially impaired by genetic disorder. Using a slightly modified layout, we found that many WS participants could use geometry, and most could use features along with geometry. However, the developmental trajectories for the two systems were quite different from one other, and different from those found in typical development. Purely geometric responding was not correlated with age in WS, and search processes appeared similar to those in typically developing (TD) children. In contrast, use of features in combination with geometry was correlated with age in WS, and search processes were distinctly different from TD children. The results support the view that use of geometry and features stem from different underlying mechanisms, that the developmental trajectories and operation of each are altered in WS, and that combination of information from the two systems is atypical. Given brain abnormalities in regions supporting the two kinds of information, our findings suggest that the co-operation of the two systems is functionally altered in this genetic syndrome. PMID:26275835

  20. Global reorientation and its effect on tectonic patterns on Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murchie, S. L.; Head, J. W.

    1986-04-01

    The basins of Ganymede are studied in order to examine the effects of global reorientation on the grooves and furrows of the satellite. An impact basin and the global reorientation of Ganymede were modeled. The damping time, the time for relaxation of tidal bulge, and the time for isostatic adjustment of craters are significant in calculating the duration and amount of global reorientation. The regional global control of groove orientation is examined; the data reveal that the tidal despinning and furrow formation created the reactivated zones of weakness in which the groove sets were formed. It is observed that the grooved terrain emplacement caused a 15 deg shift in the paleopole.

  1. Reorientation of the early lunar pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Futoshi; Tsunakawa, Hideo; Shimizu, Hisayoshi; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Matsushima, Masaki

    2014-06-01

    Palaeomagnetic measurements suggest that an active core dynamo operated on the Moon from 4.2 to 3.56 billion years ago. Since the Apollo era, many magnetic anomalies have been observed on the Moon. The magnetization of the lunar crust in some of these regions could preserve the signature of an early dipolar magnetic field generated by a core dynamo. Thus, the magnetic anomalies may yield information about the position of the palaeomagnetic pole during the time that the dynamo operated. Here we present a comprehensive survey of magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface using magnetometer data obtained by the Lunar Prospector and Kaguya lunar orbiters. We extract magnetization vectors from 24 magnetic anomalies using an iterative inversion method and derive the palaeomagnetic poles. We find that the north poles, as well as the antipodal south poles, cluster in two distinct locations: one near the present rotation axis and the other at mid-latitude. The clustering is consistent with a dipole-dominated magnetic field generated in the lunar core by a dynamo that was reversing, much like that of Earth. Furthermore, the two pole clusters imply that the Moon experienced a polar wander event during its ancient history due to the reorientation of the Moon with respect to its spin axis by 45°-60°.

  2. Optimal Intermittent Reorientation in Insect Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peleg, Orit; Mahadevan, Lakshminarayanan; Applied Math Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    The process of navigation is often accompanied by several cognitive demanding activities, such as motor control, locomotion planning, and multi-sensory acquisition and integration. Organisms with limited cognitive resources must therefore multitask and develop optimal schemes to dynamically allocate resources to the different tasks. An extreme example of task alternations during navigation is the hallmark of ball rolling dung beetles. The beetles need to roll their dung-ball along a straight path away from the dung pile where intense competition occurs. Before initiating a roll, dung beetles climb on top of the ball and rotate about their vertical axis. This action serves as an orientation mechanism that allows them to set an initial bearing, and to regain this bearing if they experience an unintentional disturbance along the way. We developed a model inspired by the beetle's navigational scheme, where an agent performs a random walk intermittent by reorientation events, in which its heading direction is corrected. We show that the resultant paths are a characteristic of correlated diffusion in short time scale, and biased diffusion in the long time scale. We identify optimal alternation schemes and characterize their robustness upon introducing noisy sensory acquisition and rough environmental conditions.

  3. Spin reorientation of a nonsymmetric body with energy dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cenker, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Stable rotating semi-rigid bodies were demonstrated analytically, and verified in flights such as Explorer 1 and ATS-5 satellites. The problem arises from the two potential orientations which the final spin vector can take after large angle reorientation from minor to major axis, i.e., along the positive or negative axis of the maximum inertia. Reorientation of a satellite initially spinning about the minor axis using an energy dissipation device may require that the final spin orientation be controlled. Examples of possible applications are the Apogee Motor Assembly with Paired Satellites (AMAPS) configuration, where proper orientation of the thruster is required; and reorientation of ATS-5, where the spin sensitive nature of the despin device (yo-yo mechanism) requires that the final spin vector point is a specified direction.

  4. Planar reorientation maneuvers of space multibody systems using internal controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyhanoglu, Mahmut; Mcclamroch, N. H.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a reorientation maneuvering strategy for an interconnection of planar rigid bodies in space is developed. It is assumed that there are no exogeneous torques, and torques generated by joint motors are used as means of control so that the total angular momentum of the multibody system is a constant, assumed to be zero in this paper. The maneuver strategy uses the nonintegrability of the expression for the angular momentum. We demonstrate that large-angle maneuvers can be designed to achieve an arbitrary reorientation of the multibody system with respect to an inertial frame. The theoretical background for carrying out the required maneuvers is briefly summarized. Specifications and computer simulations of a specific reorientation maneuver, and the corresponding control strategies, are described.

  5. Reorientation and Allied Dynamics in Water and Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laage, Damien; Stirnemann, Guillaume; Sterpone, Fabio; Rey, Rossend; Hynes, James T.

    2011-05-01

    The reorientation of a water molecule is important for a host of phenomena, ranging over—in an only partial listing—the key dynamic hydrogen-bond network restructuring of water itself, aqueous solution chemical reaction mechanisms and rates, ion transport in aqueous solution and membranes, protein folding, and enzymatic activity. This review focuses on water reorientation and related dynamics in pure water, and for aqueous solutes with hydrophobic, hydrophilic, and amphiphilic character, ranging from tetra-methylurea to halide ions and amino acids. Attention is given to the application of theory, simulation, and experiment in the probing of these dynamics, in usefully describing them, and in assessing the description. Special emphasis is placed on a novel sudden, large-amplitude jump mechanism for water reorientation, which contrasts with the commonly assumed Debye rotational diffusion mechanism, characterized by small-amplitude angular motion. Some open questions and directions for further research are also discussed.

  6. A Modular Geometric Mechanism for Reorientation in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Ah; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2010-01-01

    Although disoriented young children reorient themselves in relation to the shape of the surrounding surface layout, cognitive accounts of this ability vary. The present paper tests three theories of reorientation: a snapshot theory based on visual image-matching computations, an adaptive combination theory proposing that diverse environmental cues to orientation are weighted according to their experienced reliability, and a modular theory centering on encapsulated computations of the shape of the extended surface layout. Seven experiments test these theories by manipulating four properties of objects placed within a cylindrical space: their size, motion, dimensionality, and distance from the space's borders. Their findings support the modular theory and suggest that disoriented search behavior centers on two processes: a reorientation process based on the geometry of the 3D surface layout, and a beacon-guidance process based on the local features of objects and surface markings. PMID:20570252

  7. Reorientional dynamics of water molecules in anionic hydration shells

    PubMed Central

    Laage, Damien; Hynes, James T.

    2007-01-01

    Water molecule rotational dynamics within a chloride anion's first hydration shell are investigated through simulations. In contrast to recent suggestions that the ion's hydration shell is rigid during a water's reorientation, we find a labile hydration sphere, consistent with previous assessments of chloride as a weak structure breaker. The nondiffusive reorientation mechanism found involves a hydrogen-bond partner switch with a large amplitude angular jump and the water's departure from the anion's shell. An analytic extended jump model accounts for the simulation results, as well as available NMR and ultrafast spectroscopic data, and resolves the discrepancy between them. PMID:17581877

  8. Activities of Securities Subsidiaries of Bank Holding Companies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-19

    companies. Since 1987, the Federal Reserve ha.z authorized 21 U.S. bank holding companies and 5 forei;n banks to e~tablish securities subsidiaries known as...the 1987 Federal Reserve authorization of so-called Section 20 subsidiaries of bank holding companies. !Bank Powers: Activities of Securities...engaged in :-host. activities. The Federal Reserve has interpreted the "not prin.:ipally engaged* clause to mean that not more than 10 percent of the

  9. Removable hand hold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Robert D. (Inventor); Hauer, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A hand hold utilizes joining mechanisms which comprises two different mounting brackets that are permanently fastened to a supporting structure. A slide plate is disposed at one end of the hand rail or hand hold which mates with one of the mounting brackets. A securing member is disposed at the opposite end of the hand rail/hand hold which connects with the other mounting bracket by means of a locking device. The slide plate has a central tapered tongue with two matching slots disposed on each side thereof.

  10. A Response to Reorienting Teacher Education towards Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, Jo-Anne; Ryan, Lisa; Tilbury, Daniella

    2014-01-01

    This brief article reflects on progress on reorienting teacher education toward sustainability that has taken place since the publication of the authors' 2007 "Australian Journal of Environmental Education" article, "Planning for Success: Factors Influencing Change in Teacher Education" (EJ833282). It concludes that a key…

  11. Microtubule Stabilization Leads to Growth Reorientation in Arabidopsis Trichomes

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Jaideep; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2000-01-01

    The single-cell trichomes in wild-type Arabidopsis are either unbranched or have two to five branches. Using transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a green fluorescent protein–microtubule-associated protein4 fusion protein, which decorates the microtubular cytoskeleton, we observed that during trichome branching, microtubules reorient with respect to the longitudinal growth axis. Considering branching to be a localized microtubule-dependent growth reorientation event, we investigated the effects of microtubule-interacting drugs on branch induction in trichomes. In unbranched trichomes of the mutant stichel, a change in growth directionality, closely simulating branch initiation, could be elicited by a short treatment with paclitaxel, a microtubule-stabilizing drug, but not with microtubule-disrupting drugs. The growth reorientation appeared to be linked to increased microtubule stabilization and to aster formation in the treated trichomes. Taxol-induced microtubule stabilization also led to the initiation of new branch points in the zwichel mutant of Arabidopsis, which is defective in a kinesin-like microtubule motor protein and possesses trichomes that are less branched. Our observations suggest that trichome cell branching in Arabidopsis might be mediated by transiently stabilized microtubular structures, which may form a component of a multiprotein complex required to reorient freshly polymerizing microtubules into new growth directions. PMID:10760237

  12. The World Is Not Flat: Can People Reorient Using Slope?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardi, Daniele; Newcombe, Nora S.; Shipley, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of spatial representation generally focus on flat environments and visual input. However, the world is not flat, and slopes are part of most natural environments. In a series of 4 experiments, we examined whether humans can use a slope as a source of allocentric, directional information for reorientation. A target was hidden in a corner of…

  13. A Viewpoint-Independent Process for Spatial Reorientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardini, Marko; Thomas, Rhiannon L.; Knowland, Victoria C. P.; Braddick, Oliver J.; Atkinson, Janette

    2009-01-01

    Reorientation tasks, in which disoriented participants attempt to relocate objects using different visual cues, have previously been understood to depend on representing aspects of the global organisation of the space, for example its major axis for judgements based on geometry. Careful analysis of the visual information available for these tasks…

  14. Why water reorientation slows without iceberg formation around hydrophobic solutes.

    PubMed

    Laage, Damien; Stirnemann, Guillaume; Hynes, James T

    2009-02-26

    The dynamics of water molecules next to hydrophobic solutes is investigated, specifically addressing the recent controversy raised by the first time-resolved observations, which concluded that some water molecules are immobilized by hydrophobic groups, in strong contrast to previous NMR conclusions. Through molecular dynamics simulations and an analytic jump reorientation model, we identify the water reorientation mechanism next to a hydrophobic solute and provide evidence that no water molecules are immobilized by hydrophobic solutes. Their moderate rotational slowdown compared to bulk water (e.g., by a factor of less than 2 at low solute concentration) is mainly due to slower hydrogen-bond exchange. The slowdown is quantitatively described by a solute excluded volume effect at the transition state for the key hydrogen-bond exchange in the reorientation mechanism. We show that this picture is consistent with both ultrafast anisotropy and NMR experimental results and that the transition state excluded volume theory yields quantitative predictions of the rotational slowdown for diverse hydrophobic solutes of varying size over a wide concentration range. We also explain why hydrophobic groups slow water reorientation less than do some hydrophilic groups.

  15. A Viewpoint-Independent Process for Spatial Reorientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardini, Marko; Thomas, Rhiannon L.; Knowland, Victoria C. P.; Braddick, Oliver J.; Atkinson, Janette

    2009-01-01

    Reorientation tasks, in which disoriented participants attempt to relocate objects using different visual cues, have previously been understood to depend on representing aspects of the global organisation of the space, for example its major axis for judgements based on geometry. Careful analysis of the visual information available for these tasks…

  16. A Response to Reorienting Teacher Education towards Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, Jo-Anne; Ryan, Lisa; Tilbury, Daniella

    2014-01-01

    This brief article reflects on progress on reorienting teacher education toward sustainability that has taken place since the publication of the authors' 2007 "Australian Journal of Environmental Education" article, "Planning for Success: Factors Influencing Change in Teacher Education" (EJ833282). It concludes that a key…

  17. The World Is Not Flat: Can People Reorient Using Slope?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardi, Daniele; Newcombe, Nora S.; Shipley, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of spatial representation generally focus on flat environments and visual input. However, the world is not flat, and slopes are part of most natural environments. In a series of 4 experiments, we examined whether humans can use a slope as a source of allocentric, directional information for reorientation. A target was hidden in a corner of…

  18. Breath holding spell

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as Riley-Day syndrome or Rett syndrome Iron deficiency anemia A family history of breath holding spells ( ... tests may be done to check for an iron deficiency. Other tests that may be done include: EKG ...

  19. Reorientation and Swimming Stability in Sea Urchin Larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, J.; Chan, K. Y. K.; Anderson, E.; Helfrich, K. R.; Mullineaux, L. S.; Sengupta, A.; Stocker, R.

    2016-02-01

    Many benthic marine invertebrates have two-phase life histories, relying on planktonic larval stages for dispersal and exchange of individuals between adult populations. The dispersal of planktonic larvae is determined by two factors: passive advection by the ambient flow and active motility. By modifying dispersal and ultimately settlement, larval motility influences where and when individuals recruit into benthic communities. Despite its ecological relevance, our understanding of larval motility and behavior in the plankton remains limited, especially regarding the interactions of larval motility and ambient turbulence. As most larvae are smaller than the Kolmogorov scale, they experience ocean turbulence in part as a time-changing viscous torque produced by local fluid shear. This torque causes larval reorientation, impacting swimming direction and potentially dispersal at the macroscale. It is therefore paramount to understand the mechanisms of larval reorientation and the stability of larvae against reorientation. Here we report on the larval reorientation behavior of the sea urchins Arbacia punctulata and Heliocidaris crassispina. Both species have life histories characterized by ontogenetic changes to internal density structure and morphology, which we hypothesized to impact stability. To test this hypothesis, we performed "flip chamber" experiments, in which larvae swim freely in a small chamber that is intermittently inverted, mimicking the overturning experienced by larvae in turbulence. We investigated the role of larval age, body size, species, morphology (number of arms), and motility (live versus dead) on the reorientation dynamics. Our work contributes to a more mechanistic understanding of the role of hydrodynamics in the motility and transport of planktonic larvae.

  20. Environmental Geometry Aligns the Hippocampal Map during Spatial Reorientation.

    PubMed

    Keinath, Alex T; Julian, Joshua B; Epstein, Russell A; Muzzio, Isabel A

    2017-02-06

    When a navigator's internal sense of direction is disrupted, she must rely on external cues to regain her bearings, a process termed spatial reorientation. Extensive research has demonstrated that the geometric shape of the environment exerts powerful control over reorientation behavior, but the neural and cognitive mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well understood. Whereas some theories claim that geometry controls behavior through an allocentric mechanism potentially tied to the hippocampus, others postulate that disoriented navigators reach their goals by using an egocentric view-matching strategy. To resolve this debate, we characterized hippocampal representations during reorientation. We first recorded from CA1 cells as disoriented mice foraged in chambers of various shapes. We found that the alignment of the recovered hippocampal map was determined by the geometry of the chamber, but not by nongeometric cues, even when these cues could be used to disambiguate geometric ambiguities. We then recorded hippocampal activity as disoriented mice performed a classical goal-directed spatial memory task in a rectangular chamber. Again, we found that the recovered hippocampal map aligned solely to the chamber geometry. Critically, we also found a strong correspondence between the hippocampal map alignment and the animal's behavior, making it possible to predict the search location of the animal from neural responses on a trial-by-trial basis. Together, these results demonstrate that spatial reorientation involves the alignment of the hippocampal map to local geometry. We hypothesize that geometry may be an especially salient cue for reorientation because it is an inherently stable aspect of the environment.

  1. Negotiated reorienting: a grounded theory of nurses' end-of-life decision-making in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Ann; Bousso, Regina Szylit; McCarthy, Joan; Kohlen, Helen; Andrews, Tom; Paganini, Maria Cristina; Abu-El-Noor, Nasser Ibrahim; Cox, Anna; Haas, Margit; Arber, Anne; Abu-El-Noor, Mysoon Khalil; Baliza, Michelle Freire; Padilha, Katia Grillo

    2015-04-01

    Intensive care units (ICUs) focus on treatment for those who are critically ill and interventions to prolong life. Ethical issues arise when decisions have to be made regarding the withdrawal and withholding of life-sustaining treatment and the shift to comfort and palliative care. These issues are particularly challenging for nurses when there are varying degrees of uncertainty regarding prognosis. Little is known about nurses' end-of-life (EoL) decision-making practice across cultures. To understand nurses' EoL decision-making practices in ICUs in different cultural contexts. We collected and analysed qualitative data using Grounded Theory. Interviews were conducted with experienced ICU nurses in university or hospital premises in five countries: Brazil, England, Germany, Ireland and Palestine. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 51 nurses (10 in Brazil, 9 in England, 10 in Germany, 10 in Ireland and 12 nurses in Palestine). They were purposefully and theoretically selected to include nurses having a variety of characteristics and experiences concerning end-of-life (EoL) decision-making. The study used grounded theory to inform data collection and analysis. Interviews were facilitated by using key questions. The comparative analysis of the data within and across data generated by the different research teams enabled researchers to develop a deeper understanding of EoL decision-making practices in the ICU. Ethical approval was granted in each of the participating countries and voluntary informed consent obtained from each participant. The core category that emerged was 'negotiated reorienting'. Whilst nurses do not make the 'ultimate' EoL decisions, they engage in two core practices: consensus seeking (involving coaxing, information cuing and voice enabling); and emotional holding (creating time-space and comfort giving). There was consensus regarding the core concept and core practices employed by nurses in the ICUs in the five countries. However

  2. Breath-Holding Spells

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Breath-Holding ... > For Parents > Breath-Holding Spells Print A A A What's ...

  3. Structural evidence for reorientation of Miranda about a paleo-pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappalardo, R.; Greeley, R.

    1993-01-01

    Two structural arguments support the premise that Miranda has reoriented with respect to Uranus over its geologic history. Orientations of major extensional and compressional features are consistent with a major satellite reorientation similar to that previously suggested based on cratering asymmetry. Furthermore, structures within Elsinore Corona provide supporting evidence that this reorientation took place about a paleo-pole located near (-75 deg, 80 deg), suggesting a second minor reorientation of Miranda.

  4. An attitude reorientation algorithm for the Galileo spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, H.-S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents an onboard closed loop attitude reorientation algorithm for a dual-spin spacecraft, Galileo. The basic concept for the design uses the despun stator as a reference and fires a sequence of fixed duration thruster pulses to precess the angular momentum vector to its commanded orientation. The error signals used to despin the stator and to perform the turn are derived from the stator error quaternion which is computed using gyro outputs. Constraints considered in the design include gyro rate saturation, plume impingement effects, system parameter variations, as well as software reliability and flexibility. The performance of the algorithm was predicted by analysis and confirmed by computer simulation results. It was concluded that a reorientation accuracy of better than 1 milliradian with a nutation angle of less than 1 degree during the turn can be achieved.

  5. Wavelength Dependence of the Reorientation Efficiency of Azo Dyes in Polymer Matrixes.

    PubMed

    Grebenkin, Sergey; Meshalkin, Arkadiy B

    2017-09-07

    Irradiation with linearly polarized light of azobenzene-containing polymeric matrixes causes reorientation of azobenzene molecules. In this study, the optical light-induced anisotropy of amorphous poly(alkyl methacrylates) doped with an azo compound was measured at different temperatures and at two irradiation wavelengths. To describe a decrease in the efficiency of anisotropy formation with temperature, a model of molecule reorientation is suggested which includes the probability of molecule reorientation per one isomerization as a basic parameter. The probability of molecule reorientation was found to depend on irradiation wavelength. Comparing the anisotropy time profiles at different irradiation wavelengths, we concluded that, upon each photon absorption, the molecule most likely makes an attempt to reorient even without isomerization, i.e., the reorientation occurs by a mechanism predicted by Persico and co-workers in their theoretical works. Also, we infer that the reorientation is facilitated by the photon energy absorbed by a molecule.

  6. The hippocampus is not a geometric module: processing environment geometry during reorientation

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Jennifer E.; Newcombe, Nora S.

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus has long been known to play a role in allocentric spatial coding, but its specific involvement in reorientation, or the recalibration of a disrupted egocentric spatial representation using allocentric spatial information, has received less attention. Initially, the cognitive literature on reorientation focused on a “geometric module” sensitive to the shape formed by extended surfaces in the environment, and the neuroscience literature followed with proposals that particular MTL regions might be the seat of such a module. However, with behavioral evidence mounting that a modular cognitive architecture is unlikely, recent work has begun to directly address the issue of the neural underpinnings of reorientation. In this review, we describe the reorientation paradigm, initial proposals for the role of the MTL when people reorient, our recent work on the neural bases of reorientation, and finally, how this new information regarding neural mechanism helps to re-interpret and clarify the original behavioral reorientation data. PMID:25140145

  7. Rocket propellant reorientation and fluid management used in space commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Lee, C. C.; Shyu, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    In a spacecraft design, the requirements of settled propellant are different for tank pressurization, engine restart, venting, or propellant transfer. The requirement to settle or to position liquid fuel over the outlet end of the spacecraft propellant tank prior main engine restart possess a microgravity fluid behavior problem. In this paper, the dynamical behavior of liquid propellant, fluid reorientation, and propellant resettling have been carried out.

  8. Reorienting programme budgeting and marginal analysis (PBMA) towards disinvestment.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Duncan

    2010-10-14

    Remarkable progress has been made over the past 40 years in developing rational, evidence-based mechanisms for the allocation of health resources. Much of this progress has centred on mechanisms for commissioning new medical devices and pharmaceuticals. The attention of fund-managers and policy-makers is only now turning towards development of mechanisms for decommissioning, disinvesting or redeploying resources from currently funded interventions. While Programme Budgeting and Marginal Analysis would seem well-suited to this purpose, past applications include both successes and failures in achieving disinvestment and resource release. Drawing on recent successes/failures in achieving disinvestment and resource release via PBMA, this paper identifies four barriers/enablers to disinvestment via PBMA: (i) specification of the budget constraint, (ii) scope of the programme budget, (iii) composition and role of the advisory group, and (iv) incentives for/against contributing to a 'shift list' of options for disinvestment and resource release. A number of modifications to the PBMA process are then proposed with the aim of reorienting PBMA towards disinvestment. The reoriented model is differentiated by four features: (i) hard budget constraint with budgetary pressure; (ii) programme budgets with broad scope but specific investment proposals linked to disinvestment proposals with similar input requirements; (iii) advisory/working groups that include equal representation of sectional interests plus additional members with responsibility for advocating in favour of disinvestment, (iv) 'shift lists' populated and developed prior to 'wish lists' and investment proposals linked to disinvestment proposals within a relatively narrow budget area. While the argument and evidence presented here suggest that the reoriented model will facilitate disinvestment and resource release, this remains an empirical question. Likewise, further research will be required to determine whether or

  9. Reorienting programme budgeting and marginal analysis (PBMA) towards disinvestment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Remarkable progress has been made over the past 40 years in developing rational, evidence-based mechanisms for the allocation of health resources. Much of this progress has centred on mechanisms for commissioning new medical devices and pharmaceuticals. The attention of fund-managers and policy-makers is only now turning towards development of mechanisms for decommissioning, disinvesting or redeploying resources from currently funded interventions. While Programme Budgeting and Marginal Analysis would seem well-suited to this purpose, past applications include both successes and failures in achieving disinvestment and resource release. Discussion Drawing on recent successes/failures in achieving disinvestment and resource release via PBMA, this paper identifies four barriers/enablers to disinvestment via PBMA: (i) specification of the budget constraint, (ii) scope of the programme budget, (iii) composition and role of the advisory group, and (iv) incentives for/against contributing to a 'shift list' of options for disinvestment and resource release. A number of modifications to the PBMA process are then proposed with the aim of reorienting PBMA towards disinvestment. Summary The reoriented model is differentiated by four features: (i) hard budget constraint with budgetary pressure; (ii) programme budgets with broad scope but specific investment proposals linked to disinvestment proposals with similar input requirements; (iii) advisory/working groups that include equal representation of sectional interests plus additional members with responsibility for advocating in favour of disinvestment, (iv) 'shift lists' populated and developed prior to 'wish lists' and investment proposals linked to disinvestment proposals within a relatively narrow budget area. While the argument and evidence presented here suggest that the reoriented model will facilitate disinvestment and resource release, this remains an empirical question. Likewise, further research will be

  10. Efficient Reorientation Maneuvers for Spacecraft with Multiple Articulated Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclamroch, N. Harris

    1993-01-01

    A final report is provided which describes the research program during the period 3 Mar. 1992 to 3 Jun. 1993. A summary of the technical research questions that were studied and of the main results that were obtained is given. The specific outcomes of the research program, including both educational impacts as well as research publications, are listed. The research is concerned with efficient reorientation maneuvers for spacecraft with multiple articulated payloads.

  11. Diapir-induced reorientation of Saturn's moon Enceladus.

    PubMed

    Nimmo, Francis; Pappalardo, Robert T

    2006-06-01

    Enceladus is a small icy satellite of Saturn. Its south polar region consists of young, tectonically deformed terrain and has an anomalously high heat flux. This heat flux is probably due to localized tidal dissipation within either the ice shell or the underlying silicate core. The surface deformation is plausibly due to upwelling of low-density material (diapirism) as a result of this tidal heating. Here we show that the current polar location of the hotspot can be explained by reorientation of the satellite's rotation axis because of the presence of a low-density diapir. If the diapir is in the ice shell, then the shell must be relatively thick and maintain significant rigidity (elastic thickness greater than approximately 0.5 km); if the diapir is in the silicate core, then Enceladus cannot possess a global subsurface ocean, because the core must be coupled to the overlying ice for reorientation to occur. The reorientation generates large (approximately 10 MPa) tectonic stress patterns that are compatible with the observed deformation of the south polar region. We predict that the distribution of impact craters on the surface will not show the usual leading hemisphere-trailing hemisphere asymmetry. A low-density diapir also yields a potentially observable negative gravity anomaly.

  12. A role of right middle frontal gyrus in reorienting of attention: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Japee, Shruti; Holiday, Kelsey; Satyshur, Maureen D.; Mukai, Ikuko; Ungerleider, Leslie G.

    2015-01-01

    The right middle fontal gyrus (MFG) has been proposed to be a site of convergence of the dorsal and ventral attention networks, by serving as a circuit-breaker to interrupt ongoing endogenous attentional processes in the dorsal network and reorient attention to an exogenous stimulus. Here, we probed the contribution of the right MFG to both endogenous and exogenous attention by comparing performance on an orientation discrimination task of a patient with a right MFG resection and a group of healthy controls. On endogenously cued trials, participants were shown a central cue that predicted with 90% accuracy the location of a subsequent peri-threshold Gabor patch stimulus. On exogenously cued trials, a cue appeared briefly at one of two peripheral locations, followed by a variable inter-stimulus interval (ISI; range 0–700 ms) and a Gabor patch in the same or opposite location as the cue. Behavioral data showed that for endogenous, and short ISI exogenous trials, valid cues facilitated responses compared to invalid cues, for both the patient and controls. However, at long ISIs, the patient exhibited difficulty in reverting to top-down attentional control, once the facilitatory effect of the exogenous cue had dissipated. When explicitly cued during long ISIs to attend to both stimulus locations, the patient was able to engage successfully in top-down control. This result indicates that the right MFG may play an important role in reorienting attention from exogenous to endogenous attentional control. Resting state fMRI data revealed that the right superior parietal lobule and right orbitofrontal cortex, showed significantly higher correlations with a left MFG seed region (a region tightly coupled with the right MFG in controls) in the patient relative to controls. We hypothesize that this paradoxical increase in cortical coupling represents a compensatory mechanism in the patient to offset the loss of function of the resected tissue in right prefrontal cortex. PMID

  13. A role of right middle frontal gyrus in reorienting of attention: a case study.

    PubMed

    Japee, Shruti; Holiday, Kelsey; Satyshur, Maureen D; Mukai, Ikuko; Ungerleider, Leslie G

    2015-01-01

    The right middle fontal gyrus (MFG) has been proposed to be a site of convergence of the dorsal and ventral attention networks, by serving as a circuit-breaker to interrupt ongoing endogenous attentional processes in the dorsal network and reorient attention to an exogenous stimulus. Here, we probed the contribution of the right MFG to both endogenous and exogenous attention by comparing performance on an orientation discrimination task of a patient with a right MFG resection and a group of healthy controls. On endogenously cued trials, participants were shown a central cue that predicted with 90% accuracy the location of a subsequent peri-threshold Gabor patch stimulus. On exogenously cued trials, a cue appeared briefly at one of two peripheral locations, followed by a variable inter-stimulus interval (ISI; range 0-700 ms) and a Gabor patch in the same or opposite location as the cue. Behavioral data showed that for endogenous, and short ISI exogenous trials, valid cues facilitated responses compared to invalid cues, for both the patient and controls. However, at long ISIs, the patient exhibited difficulty in reverting to top-down attentional control, once the facilitatory effect of the exogenous cue had dissipated. When explicitly cued during long ISIs to attend to both stimulus locations, the patient was able to engage successfully in top-down control. This result indicates that the right MFG may play an important role in reorienting attention from exogenous to endogenous attentional control. Resting state fMRI data revealed that the right superior parietal lobule and right orbitofrontal cortex, showed significantly higher correlations with a left MFG seed region (a region tightly coupled with the right MFG in controls) in the patient relative to controls. We hypothesize that this paradoxical increase in cortical coupling represents a compensatory mechanism in the patient to offset the loss of function of the resected tissue in right prefrontal cortex.

  14. Domain faceting in an in-plane magnetic reorientation transition

    SciTech Connect

    Vescovo, E.; Mentes, T.O.; Sadowski, J.T.; Ablett, J.M.; Nino, M.A.; Locatelli, A.

    2010-11-04

    The microscopic structure of the 90{sup o} in-plane magnetic reorientation transition in Fe(110) films is examined using photoemission x-ray microscopy. At the nanoscale, sharp magnetic boundaries are detected. They are indicative of a first-order transition and are consistent with Fe magnetic anisotropy constants. At the micron scale, the magnetic boundary breaks up into triangular patterns whose characteristic angular dependence is revealed by experiments on conical microwedges. This effect, fully accounted by micromagnetic simulations, opens the possibility to control the sharpness of the transition at the microscopic scale.

  15. The Catholic Church, the American military, and homosexual reorientation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lutz, David

    2004-01-01

    Homosexual activist groups have targeted the Catholic Church and the American military as institutions especially in need of transformation. Associations of healthcare professionals are also under assault from homosexual activists. It is, nevertheless, appropriate for the Church and the military to defend themselves against this assault, to affirm that homosexuality is incompatible with Christian ethics and military service, and to help homosexuals free themselves from the vice of homosexuality. Arguments that homosexual reorientation therapy is unethical are unsound. Such therapy is consistent with the Christian virtue of charity.

  16. Dopamine modulates involuntary attention shifting and reorienting: an electromagnetic study.

    PubMed

    Kähkönen, Seppo; Ahveninen, Jyrki; Pekkonen, Eero; Kaakkola, Seppo; Huttunen, Juha; Ilmoniemi, Risto J; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P

    2002-12-01

    Dopaminergic function has been closely associated with attentional performance, but its precise role has remained elusive. Electrophysiological and behavioral methods were used to assess the effects of dopamine D2-receptor antagonist haloperidol on involuntary attention shifting using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over design. Eleven subjects were instructed to discriminate equiprobable 200 and 400ms tones in a forced-choice reaction-time (RT) task during simultaneous measurement of whole-head magnetoencephalography and high-resolution electroencephalography. Occasional changes in task-irrelevant tone frequency (10% increase or decrease) caused marked distraction on behavioral performance, as shown by significant RT increases to deviant stimuli and subsequent standard tones. Furthermore, while the standard tones elicited distinct P1-N1-P2-N2-P3 waveforms, deviant tones elicited additional mismatch negativity (MMN), P3a, and reorienting negativity (RON) responses, indexing brain events associated with involuntary attention shifting. While haloperidol did not affect the source loci of the responses of magnetic N1 and MMN, the amplitude of the electric P3a and that of RON were significantly reduced and the latency of magnetic RON were delayed following haloperidol administration. The present results suggest that dopamine modulates involuntary attention shifting to task-irrelevant deviant events. It appears that dopamine may disrupt the subsequent re-orienting efforts to the relevant task after distraction.

  17. Reorientation of Sputnik Planitia implies a subsurface ocean on Pluto.

    PubMed

    Nimmo, F; Hamilton, D P; McKinnon, W B; Schenk, P M; Binzel, R P; Bierson, C J; Beyer, R A; Moore, J M; Stern, S A; Weaver, H A; Olkin, C B; Young, L A; Smith, K E

    2016-12-01

    The deep nitrogen-covered basin on Pluto, informally named Sputnik Planitia, is located very close to the longitude of Pluto's tidal axis and may be an impact feature, by analogy with other large basins in the Solar System. Reorientation of Sputnik Planitia arising from tidal and rotational torques can explain the basin's present-day location, but requires the feature to be a positive gravity anomaly, despite its negative topography. Here we argue that if Sputnik Planitia did indeed form as a result of an impact and if Pluto possesses a subsurface ocean, the required positive gravity anomaly would naturally result because of shell thinning and ocean uplift, followed by later modest nitrogen deposition. Without a subsurface ocean, a positive gravity anomaly requires an implausibly thick nitrogen layer (exceeding 40 kilometres). To prolong the lifetime of such a subsurface ocean to the present day and to maintain ocean uplift, a rigid, conductive water-ice shell is required. Because nitrogen deposition is latitude-dependent, nitrogen loading and reorientation may have exhibited complex feedbacks.

  18. A new twist on old ideas: How sitting reorients crawlers

    PubMed Central

    Soska, Kasey C.; Robinson, Scott R.; Adolph, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, crawling and sitting are considered distinct motor behaviors with different postures and functions. Ten- to 12-month-old infants were observed in the laboratory or in their homes while being coaxed to crawl continuously over long, straight walkways (Study 1; N = 20) and during spontaneous crawling during free play (Study 2; N = 20). In every context, infants stopped crawling to sit 3-6 times per minute. Transitions from crawling to sitting frequently turned infants’ bodies away from the direction of heading; subsequent transitions back to crawling were offset by as much as 180° from the original direction of heading. Apparently, body reorientations result from the biomechanics of transitioning between crawling and sitting. Findings indicate that sustained, linear crawling is likely an epiphenomenon of how gait is studied in standard paradigms. Postural transitions between crawling and sitting are ubiquitous and can represent a functional unit of action. These transitions and the accompanying body reorientations likely have cascading effects for infants’ exploration, visual perception, and spatial cognition. PMID:25041056

  19. A new twist on old ideas: how sitting reorients crawlers.

    PubMed

    Soska, Kasey C; Robinson, Scott R; Adolph, Karen E

    2015-03-01

    Traditionally, crawling and sitting are considered distinct motor behaviors with different postures and functions. Ten- to 12-month-old infants were observed in the laboratory or in their homes while being coaxed to crawl continuously over long, straight walkways (Study 1; N = 20) and during spontaneous crawling during free play (Study 2; N = 20). In every context, infants stopped crawling to sit 3-6 times per minute. Transitions from crawling to sitting frequently turned infants' bodies away from the direction of heading; subsequent transitions back to crawling were offset by as much as 180° from the original direction of heading. Apparently, body reorientations result from the biomechanics of transitioning between crawling and sitting. Findings indicate that sustained, linear crawling is likely an epiphenomenon of how gait is studied in standard paradigms. Postural transitions between crawling and sitting are ubiquitous and can represent a functional unit of action. These transitions and the accompanying body reorientations likely have cascading effects for infants' exploration, visual perception, and spatial cognition.

  20. Liquid propellant reorientation in a low-gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, I. E.

    1978-01-01

    An existing empirical analysis relating to the reorientation of liquids in cylindrical tanks due to propulsive settling in a low gravity environment was extended to include the effects of geyser formation in the Weber number range from 4 to 10. Estimates of the minimum velocity increment required to be imposed on the propellant tank to achieve liquid reorientation were made. The resulting Bond numbers, based on tank radius, were found to be in the range from 3 to 5, depending upon the initial liquid fill level, with higher Bond number required for high initial fill levels. The resulting Weber numbers, based on tank radius and the velocity of the liquid leading edge, were calculated to be in the range from 6.5 to 8.5 for cylindrical tanks having a fineness ratio of 2.0, with Weber numbers of somewhat greater values for longer cylindrical tanks. It, therefore, appeared to be advantageous to allow small geysers to form and then dissipate into the surface of the collected liquid in order to achieve the minimum velocity increment. The Bond numbers which defined the separation between regions in which geyser formation did and did not occur due to propulsive settling in a spherical tank configuration ranged from 2 to 9 depending upon the liquid fill level.

  1. Reorientation of Sputnik Planitia implies a subsurface ocean on Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; Hamilton, D. P.; McKinnon, W. B.; Schenk, P. M.; Binzel, R. P.; Bierson, C. J.; Beyer, R. A.; Moore, J. M.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Young, L. A.; Smith, K. E.; Moore, J. M.; McKinnon, W. B.; Spencer, J. R.; Beyer, R.; Binzel, R. P.; Buie, M.; Buratti, B.; Cheng, A.; Cruikshank, D.; Ore, C. Dalle; Earle, A.; Gladstone, R.; Grundy, W.; Howard, A. D.; Lauer, T.; Linscott, I.; Nimmo, F.; Parker, J.; Porter, S.; Reitsema, H.; Reuter, D.; Roberts, J. H.; Robbins, S.; Schenk, P. M.; Showalter, M.; Singer, K.; Strobel, D.; Summers, M.; Tyler, L.; White, O. L.; Umurhan, O. M.; Banks, M.; Barnouin, O.; Bray, V.; Carcich, B.; Chaikin, A.; Chavez, C.; Conrad, C.; Hamilton, D. P.; Howett, C.; Hofgartner, J.; Kammer, J.; Lisse, C.; Marcotte, A.; Parker, A.; Retherford, K.; Saina, M.; Runyon, K.; Schindhelm, E.; Stansberry, J.; Steffl, A.; Stryk, T.; Throop, H.; Tsang, C.; Verbiscer, A.; Winters, H.; Zangari, A.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Young, L. A.; Smith, K. E.

    2016-12-01

    The deep nitrogen-covered basin on Pluto, informally named Sputnik Planitia, is located very close to the longitude of Pluto’s tidal axis and may be an impact feature, by analogy with other large basins in the Solar System. Reorientation of Sputnik Planitia arising from tidal and rotational torques can explain the basin’s present-day location, but requires the feature to be a positive gravity anomaly, despite its negative topography. Here we argue that if Sputnik Planitia did indeed form as a result of an impact and if Pluto possesses a subsurface ocean, the required positive gravity anomaly would naturally result because of shell thinning and ocean uplift, followed by later modest nitrogen deposition. Without a subsurface ocean, a positive gravity anomaly requires an implausibly thick nitrogen layer (exceeding 40 kilometres). To prolong the lifetime of such a subsurface ocean to the present day and to maintain ocean uplift, a rigid, conductive water-ice shell is required. Because nitrogen deposition is latitude-dependent, nitrogen loading and reorientation may have exhibited complex feedbacks.

  2. Surface instabilities and reorientation induced by vibration in microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier; Ezquerro Navarro, Jose Miguel

    2012-07-01

    The behavior of vibrated fluids and, in particular, the surface or interfacial instabilities that commonly arise in these systems have been the subject of continued experimental and theoretical attention since Faraday's seminal experiments in 1831. Both orientation and frequency are critical in determining the response of the fluid to excitation. Low frequencies are associated with sloshing while higher frequencies may generate Faraday waves or cross-waves, depending on whether the axis of vibration is perpendicular or parallel to the interface. In addition, high frequency vibrations are known to produce large scale reorientation of the fluid (vibroequilibria), an effect that becomes especially pronounced in the absence of gravity. We describe the results of investigations conducted at the ESA affiliated Spanish User Support and Operations Centre (E-USOC) on the effect of vibrations on fluid interfaces, particularly the interaction between Faraday waves, which arise in vertically vibrated systems, cross-waves, which are found in horizontally forced systems, and large scale reorientation (vibroequilibria). Ongoing ground experiments utilizing a dual-axis shaker configuration are described, including the effect on pattern formation of varying the two independent forcing frequencies, amplitudes, and phases. Theoretical results, based on the analysis of reduced models, and on numerical simulations, are then described and compared to experiment. Finally, the interest of a corresponding microgravity experiment is discussed and implications for fluid management strategies considered.

  3. A Tensegrity Model of Cell Reorientation on Cyclically Stretched Substrates.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Li, Bo; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2016-10-04

    Deciphering the mechanisms underlying the high sensitivity of cells to mechanical microenvironments is crucial for understanding many physiological and pathological processes, e.g., stem cell differentiation and cancer cell metastasis. Here, a cytoskeletal tensegrity model is proposed to study the reorientation of polarized cells on a substrate under biaxial cyclic deformation. The model consists of four bars, representing the longitudinal stress fibers and lateral actin network, and eight strings, denoting the microfilaments. It is found that the lateral bars in the tensegrity, which have been neglected in most of the existing models, can play a vital role in regulating the cellular orientation. The steady orientation of cells can be quantitatively determined by the geometric dimensions and elastic properties of the tensegrity elements, as well as the frequency and biaxial ratio of the cyclic stretches. It is shown that this tensegrity model can reproduce all available experimental observations. For example, the dynamics of cell reorientation is captured by an exponential scaling law with a characteristic time that is independent of the loading frequency at high frequencies and scales inversely with the square of the strain amplitude. This study suggests that tensegrity type models may be further developed to understand cellular responses to mechanical microenvironments and provide guidance for engineering delicate cellular mechanosensing systems.

  4. Reorientation and isotropisation of liquid crystals induced by gas diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantillo, Anthony; Shibaev, Petr

    Reorientation and isotropisation of liquid crystals induced by organic solvent vapors was studied experimentally in relation to the use of liquid crystals as gas sensors. Reorientation and isotropisation were studied in the droplets deposited on the flat surface and on the tip of the hollow fibers. The anisotropy of gas diffusion was studied in the films and droplets of different sizes deposited on the surfaces with planar and homeotropic conditions. It was revealed that the diffusion coefficients differ approximately by a factor of two for liquid crystals in planar and homeotropic orientations. It was also shown that interference pattern created by passing light in liquid crystalline droplets deposited on the planar surface and on the tip of the hollow fiber can be used in detection of very small concentration of vapors. The model of diffusion is suggested and molecular dynamics simulations of the diffusion in liquid crystals with different molecular orientation are performed. The molecular dynamics simulations were performed on a time scale of about tens nanoseconds. In general they confirm the experimental results, but provide larger differences (by a factor 2 to 4) for diffusion coefficient in liquid crystals with planar and homeotropic orientation.

  5. 12 CFR 225.141 - Operations subsidiaries of a bank holding company.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... formation of a wholly owned subsidiary of an approved 4(c)(8) company to engage in activities that such a... not believe that such prohibition should apply to the formation by a holding company of a wholly-owned subsidiary to engage in activities that it could engage in directly. Accordingly, as a general matter,...

  6. School Reorientation of Children with Disabilities: A Stressful Life Event Challenging Parental Cognitive and Behavioral Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskam, Isabelle; Zech, Emmanuelle; Nils, Frederic; Nader-Grosbois, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    The authors propose guidelines for counselors who notify parents of children with disabilities that a school reorientation is needed. They propose a model that integrates the predictors, moderators, and mediators of parental adjustment after school reorientation notification. The article includes the risk and resource factors associated with…

  7. Theta Oscillation Reveals the Temporal Involvement of Different Attentional Networks in Contingent Reorienting

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chi-Fu; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Lai, Chiou-Lian; Hung, Daisy L.; Juan, Chi-Hung

    2016-01-01

    In the visual world, rapidly reorienting to relevant objects outside the focus of attention is vital for survival. This ability from the interaction between goal-directed and stimulus-driven attentional control is termed contingent reorienting. Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated activations of the ventral and dorsal attentional networks (DANs) which exhibit right hemisphere dominance, but the temporal dynamics of the attentional networks still remain unclear. The present study used event-related potential (ERP) to index the locus of spatial attention and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) to acquire the time-frequency information during contingent reorienting. The ERP results showed contingent reorienting induced significant N2pc on both hemispheres. In contrast, our time-frequency analysis found further that, unlike the N2pc, theta oscillation during contingent reorienting differed between hemispheres and experimental sessions. The inter-trial coherence (ITC) of the theta oscillation demonstrated that the two sides of the attentional networks became phase-locked to contingent reorienting at different stages. The left attentional networks were associated with contingent reorienting in the first experimental session whereas the bilateral attentional networks play a more important role in this process in the subsequent session. This phase-locked information suggests a dynamic temporal evolution of the involvement of different attentional networks in contingent reorienting and a potential role of the left ventral network in the first session. PMID:27375459

  8. Managerial strategies to reorient hospitals towards health promotion: lessons from organisational theory.

    PubMed

    Röthlin, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Reorienting health services towards health promotion is one of the major health promotion strategies stipulated by the Ottawa Charter). Important contradictions, tensions and barriers to health promotion implementation associated with organisational structures have, thus far, been underexposed in the hospital health promotion discourse. This paper aims at identifying risks and the chances for hospital management to strategically and sustainably reorient their hospitals towards health promotion. The paper combines theories and findings from organisational science and management studies as well as from capacity development in the form of a narrative literature review. The aim is to focus on the conditions hospitals, as organisational systems with a highly professionalised workforce, provide for a strategically managed reorientation towards health promotion. Models and principles helping managers to navigate the difficulties and complexities of health promotion reorientation will be suggested. Hospital managers have to deal with genuine obstacles in the complexity and structural formation of hospital organisations. Against this background, continuous management support, a transformative leadership style, participative strategic management and expert governance can be considered important organisational capacities for the reorientation towards a new concept such as health promotion. This paper discusses managerial strategies, effective structural transformations and important organisational capacities that can contribute to a sustainable reorientation of hospitals towards health promotion. It supports hospital managers in exploring their chances of facilitating and effectively supporting a sustainable health promotion reorientation of their hospitals. The paper provides an innovative approach where the focus is on enhanced possibilities for hospital managers to strategically manage the reorientation towards health promotion.

  9. Reorientation by Geometric and Landmark Information in Environments of Different Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallortigara, Giorgio; Feruglio, Marco; Sovrano, Valeria Anna

    2005-01-01

    It has been found that disoriented children could use geometric information in combination with landmark information to reorient themselves in large but not in small experimental spaces. We tested domestic chicks in the same task and found that they were able to conjoin geometric and nongeometric (landmark) information to reorient themselves in…

  10. Reorientation in the Real World: The Development of Landmark Use and Integration in a Natural Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Alastair D.; Gilchrist, Iain D.; Cater, Kirsten; Ikram, Naimah; Nott, Kylie; Hood, Bruce M.

    2008-01-01

    An influential series of studies have argued that young children are unable to use landmark information to reorient. However, these studies have used artificial experimental environments that may lead to an underestimation of the children's ability. We tested whether young children could reorient using landmarks in an ecologically valid setting.…

  11. Reorientation by Geometric and Landmark Information in Environments of Different Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallortigara, Giorgio; Feruglio, Marco; Sovrano, Valeria Anna

    2005-01-01

    It has been found that disoriented children could use geometric information in combination with landmark information to reorient themselves in large but not in small experimental spaces. We tested domestic chicks in the same task and found that they were able to conjoin geometric and nongeometric (landmark) information to reorient themselves in…

  12. Geometry Three Ways: An fMRI Investigation of Geometric Information Processing during Reorientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Jennifer E.; Twyman, Alexandra D.; Joanisse, Marc F.; Newcombe, Nora S.

    2012-01-01

    The geometry formed by the walls of a room is known to be a potent cue in reorientation, yet little is known about the use of geometric information gleaned from other contexts. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine neural activity in adults while reorienting in 3 different environments: the typical rectangular walled room, a…

  13. Geometry Three Ways: An fMRI Investigation of Geometric Information Processing during Reorientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Jennifer E.; Twyman, Alexandra D.; Joanisse, Marc F.; Newcombe, Nora S.

    2012-01-01

    The geometry formed by the walls of a room is known to be a potent cue in reorientation, yet little is known about the use of geometric information gleaned from other contexts. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine neural activity in adults while reorienting in 3 different environments: the typical rectangular walled room, a…

  14. Reorientation in the Real World: The Development of Landmark Use and Integration in a Natural Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Alastair D.; Gilchrist, Iain D.; Cater, Kirsten; Ikram, Naimah; Nott, Kylie; Hood, Bruce M.

    2008-01-01

    An influential series of studies have argued that young children are unable to use landmark information to reorient. However, these studies have used artificial experimental environments that may lead to an underestimation of the children's ability. We tested whether young children could reorient using landmarks in an ecologically valid setting.…

  15. The modelling of fibre reorientation in soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Karsaj, Igor; Sansour, Carlo; Sorić, Jurica

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, a hyperelastic and thermodynamically consistent model for soft tissue is developed that is able to describe the change of the initial orientation of the collagen fibres. Full numerical implementation is considered as well. The collagen architecture is assumed to reorient driven by a specific thermodynamical force. The anisotropy is described by a strain energy function, which is decomposed into a part related to the matrix and a part related to the fibres. The initial fibre orientation is defined by a structural tensor, while the current orientation is described by a time-dependent structural tensor, which results from the initial one by a rotational transformation. The rotation tensor is obtained via an integration process of a rate tensor, which depends on an adequately defined thermodynamical force. The integration is achieved via an exponential map algorithm, where it is shown that the rotation is necessarily a two-parametric one. Efficiency of the proposed formulation is demonstrated using some numerical examples.

  16. Tidal reorientation and the fracturing of Jupiter's moon Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    The lineaments on Europa are discussed in terms of the orientation of the lineaments relative to the tensile stress trajectories due to tidal distortions and to nonsynchronous rotation. The cracks are noticeable by their darker albedo compared to the presumed water ice surrounding them. The stress trajectories for tidal distortion of a thin elastic shell are superimposed on Mercator projection maps of the lineaments. It is shown that the lineaments are mainly oriented at high angles to the tensile stress trajectories that would be expected for regularly occurring nonsynchronous rotation, i.e., extensional fractures would appear. The reorientation motions which would cause the fractures are estimated. It is suggested that the fractures occur episodically to release stresses built up on the tensile surface of the crust during the continuous nonsynchronous rotation of Europa.

  17. Self-Reorientation Following Colorectal Cancer Treatment - A Grounded Theory Study.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ann-Caroline B; Axelsson, Malin; Berndtsson, Ina; Brink, Eva

    2015-01-01

    After colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment, people reorganize life in ways that are consistent with their understanding of the illness and their expectations for recovery. Incapacities and abilities that have been lost can initiate a need to reorient the self. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have explicitly focused on the concept of self-reorientation after CRC treatment. The aim of the present study was therefore to explore self-reorientation in the early recovery phase after CRC surgery. Grounded theory analysis was undertaken, using the method presented by Charmaz. The present results explained self-reorientation as the individual attempting to achieve congruence in self-perception. A congruent self-perception meant bringing together the perceived self and the self that was mirrored in the near environs. The results showed that societal beliefs and personal explanations are essential elements of self-reorientation, and that it is therefore important to make them visible.

  18. Reorienting MHD colliding flows: a shock physics mechanism for generating filaments normal to magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogerty, Erica; Carroll-Nellenback, Jonathan; Frank, Adam; Heitsch, Fabian; Pon, Andy

    2017-09-01

    We present numerical simulations of reorienting oblique shocks that form in the collision layer between magnetized colliding flows. Reorientation aligns post-shock filaments normal to the background magnetic field. We find that reorientation begins with pressure gradients between the collision region and the ambient medium. This drives a lateral expansion of post-shock gas, which reorients the growing filament from the outside-in (i.e. from the flow/ambient boundary, towards the colliding flows axis). The final structures of our simulations resemble polarization observations of filaments in Taurus and Serpens South, as well as the integral-shaped filament in Orion A. Given the ubiquity of colliding flows in the interstellar medium, shock reorientation may be relevant to the formation of filaments normal to magnetic fields.

  19. Tidal reorientation and the fracturing of Jupiter's moon Europa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    The most striking characteristic of Europa is the network of long linear albedo markings over the surface, suggestive of global-scale tectonic processes. Various explanations for the fractures have been proposed: Freezing and expansion of an early liquid water ocean1, planetary expansion due to dehydration of hydrated silicates2, localization by weak points in the crust generated by impacts3, and a combination of stresses due to planetary volume change and tidal distortions from orbital recession and orbital eccentricity4,5. Calculations by Yoder6 and Greenberg and Weidenschilling7 have shown that Europa may rotate slightly more rapidly than the synchronous rate, with a rotation period (reorientation through 360??) ranging from 20 to >103 yr if a liquid mantle is present, or up to 1010 yr if the satellite is essentially solid7. Helfen-stein and Parmentier8 modelled the stresses due to nonsynchronous rotation, and concluded that this could explain the long fractures in part of the anti-jovian hemisphere. In this note, I present a global map of lineaments with long arc lengths (>20?? or 550 km), and compare the lineament orientations to the tensile stress trajectories due to tidal distortions (changes in the lengths of three principal semiaxes) and to nonsynchronous rotation (longitudinal reorientation of two of the principal semiaxes). An excellent orthogonal fit to the lineaments is achieved by the stresses due to nonsynchronous rotation with the axis radial to Jupiter located 25?? east of its present position. This fit suggests that nonsynchronous rotation occurred at some time in Europa's history. ?? 1986 Nature Publishing Group.

  20. The world is not flat: can people reorient using slope?

    PubMed

    Nardi, Daniele; Newcombe, Nora S; Shipley, Thomas F

    2011-03-01

    Studies of spatial representation generally focus on flat environments and visual input. However, the world is not flat, and slopes are part of most natural environments. In a series of 4 experiments, we examined whether humans can use a slope as a source of allocentric, directional information for reorientation. A target was hidden in a corner of a square, featureless enclosure tilted at a 5° angle. Finding it required using the vestibular, kinesthetic, and visual cues associated with the slope gradient. In Experiment 1, the overall sample performed above chance, showing that slope is sufficient for reorientation in a real environment. However, a sex difference emerged; men outperformed women by 1.4 SDs because they were more likely to use a slope-based strategy. In Experiment 2, attention was drawn to the slope, and participants were prompted to rely on it to solve the task; however, men still outperformed women, indicating a greater ability to use slope. In Experiment 3, we excluded the possibility that women's disadvantage was due to wearing heeled footwear. In Experiment 4, women required more time than men to identify the uphill direction of the slope gradient; this suggests that, in a bottom-up fashion, a perceptual or attentional difficulty underlies women's disadvantage in the ability to use slope and their decreased reliance on this cue. Overall, a bi-coordinate representation was used to find the goal: The target was encoded primarily with respect to the vertical axis and secondarily with respect to the orthogonal axis of the slope.

  1. Holding services to account

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, J

    2008-01-01

    Background Recently, the frequency of audit inspections of health services for people with intellectual disability (ID) in the UK has increased, from occasional inquiries to a systematic audit of all services. From 2008, a process of continuous audit ‘surveillance’ of specialist health services is to be introduced. Similar regimes of inspection are in place for social care services. Aim To explore the conceptual positions which inform audit, through detailed examination of the investigation into the learning disability service at Sutton and Merton. Findings Audit is distinct from evaluation because it neither provides opportunities for service staff to give an account of their work nor represents a search for knowledge. Audit investigates adherence to government policy. In ID, audits measure aspirations derived from normalisation, despite research showing that some of these aspirations have not been achieved by any service. As audit consumes significant public resource, it is questionable whether the dominant finding of the Healthcare Commission's investigation into Sutton and Merton, that the ID service was chronically under-funded, represents value for money. Discussion and conclusions While basic checks on minimum standards will always be necessary, service excellence requires not audit but research-driven evaluation. Audits inhibit rather than open-up debate about improving support to people with ID. They impose an ideology, squander resource, and demoralise carers and staff. Evaluations challenge the implicit management-versus-professional binary enacted by audit, and can inform new care systems which make effective use of all those engaged with people with ID. PMID:18498335

  2. Preparing Teachers to Engage Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Mary M.; Jacobson, Arminta; Hemmer, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Teacher education has the potential to serve as an important forum for overcoming barriers to the engagement of parents in their children?s education. Nevertheless, parent involvement has yet to hold a central role in the teacher education curriculum (Chavkin & Williams, 1987; de Acosta, 1996; Epstein & Dauber, 1991; Hiatt-Michael, 2001) and in…

  3. Cougar Holdings, LLC Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Cougar Holdings, LLC (the Company) is located in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at a property constructed prior to 1978, located in Denver, Colorado.

  4. The effect of stress state on zirconium hydride reorientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinbiz, Mahmut Nedim

    Prior to storage in a dry-cask facility, spent nuclear fuel must undergo a vacuum drying cycle during which the spent fuel rods are heated up to elevated temperatures of ≤ 400°C to remove moisture the canisters within the cask. As temperature increases during heating, some of the hydride particles within the cladding dissolve while the internal gas pressure in fuel rods increases generating multi-axial hoop and axial stresses in the closed-end thin-walled cladding tubes. As cool-down starts, the hydrogen in solid solution precipitates as hydride platelets, and if the multiaxial stresses are sufficiently large, the precipitating hydrides reorient from their initial circumferential orientation to radial orientation. Radial hydrides can severely embrittle the spent nuclear fuel cladding at low temperature in response to hoop stress loading. Because the cladding can experience a range of stress states during the thermo-mechanical treatment induced during vacuum drying, this study has investigated the effect of stress state on the process of hydride reorientation during controlled thermo-mechanical treatments utilizing the combination of in situ X-ray diffraction and novel mechanical testing analyzed by the combination of metallography and finite element analysis. The study used cold worked and stress relieved Zircaloy-4 sheet containing approx. 180 wt. ppm hydrogen as its material basis. The failure behavior of this material containing radial hydrides was also studied over a range of temperatures. Finally, samples from reactor-irradiated cladding tubes were examined by X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. To reveal the stress state effect on hydride reorientation, the critical threshold stress to reorient hydrides was determined by designing novel mechanical test samples which produce a range of stress states from uniaxial to "near-equibiaxial" tension when a load is applied. The threshold stress was determined after thermo-mechanical treatments by

  5. Time course and auxin sensitivity of cortical microtubule reorientation in maize roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blancaflor, E. B.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics of MT [microtubule] reorientation in primary roots of Zea mays cv. Merit, were examined 15, 30, 45, and 60 min after horizontal positioning. Confocal microscopy of longitudinal tissue sections showed no change in MT orientation 15 and 30 min after horizontal placement. However, after 45 and 60 min, MTs of the outer 4-5 cortical cell layers along the lower side were reoriented. In order to test whether MT reorientation during graviresponse is caused by an auxin gradient, we examined the organization of MTs in roots that were incubated for 1 h in solutions containing 10(-9) to 10(-6) M IAA. IAA treatment at 10(-8) M or less showed no major or consistent changes but 10(-7) M IAA resulted in MT reorientation in the cortex. The auxin effect does not appear to be acid-induced since benzoic acid (10(-5) M) did not cause MT reorientation. The region closest to the maturation zone was most sensitive to IAA. The data indicate that early stages of gravity induced curvature occur in the absence of MT reorientation but sustained curvature leads to reoriented MTs in the outer cortex. Growth inhibition along the lower side of graviresponding roots appears to result from asymmetric distribution of auxin following gravistimulation.

  6. Time course and auxin sensitivity of cortical microtubule reorientation in maize roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blancaflor, E. B.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics of MT [microtubule] reorientation in primary roots of Zea mays cv. Merit, were examined 15, 30, 45, and 60 min after horizontal positioning. Confocal microscopy of longitudinal tissue sections showed no change in MT orientation 15 and 30 min after horizontal placement. However, after 45 and 60 min, MTs of the outer 4-5 cortical cell layers along the lower side were reoriented. In order to test whether MT reorientation during graviresponse is caused by an auxin gradient, we examined the organization of MTs in roots that were incubated for 1 h in solutions containing 10(-9) to 10(-6) M IAA. IAA treatment at 10(-8) M or less showed no major or consistent changes but 10(-7) M IAA resulted in MT reorientation in the cortex. The auxin effect does not appear to be acid-induced since benzoic acid (10(-5) M) did not cause MT reorientation. The region closest to the maturation zone was most sensitive to IAA. The data indicate that early stages of gravity induced curvature occur in the absence of MT reorientation but sustained curvature leads to reoriented MTs in the outer cortex. Growth inhibition along the lower side of graviresponding roots appears to result from asymmetric distribution of auxin following gravistimulation.

  7. Modelling and analysis of bacterial tracks suggest an active reorientation mechanism in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Rosser, Gabriel; Baker, Ruth E; Armitage, Judith P; Fletcher, Alexander G

    2014-08-06

    Most free-swimming bacteria move in approximately straight lines, interspersed with random reorientation phases. A key open question concerns varying mechanisms by which reorientation occurs. We combine mathematical modelling with analysis of a large tracking dataset to study the poorly understood reorientation mechanism in the monoflagellate species Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The flagellum on this species rotates counterclockwise to propel the bacterium, periodically ceasing rotation to enable reorientation. When rotation restarts the cell body usually points in a new direction. It has been assumed that the new direction is simply the result of Brownian rotation. We consider three variants of a self-propelled particle model of bacterial motility. The first considers rotational diffusion only, corresponding to a non-chemotactic mutant strain. Two further models incorporate stochastic reorientations, describing 'run-and-tumble' motility. We derive expressions for key summary statistics and simulate each model using a stochastic computational algorithm. We also discuss the effect of cell geometry on rotational diffusion. Working with a previously published tracking dataset, we compare predictions of the models with data on individual stopping events in R. sphaeroides. This provides strong evidence that this species undergoes some form of active reorientation rather than simple reorientation by Brownian rotation. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Large Icy Diapirs and Small Icy Satellites: Reorientation of Mini-Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Nimmo, F.; Moore, J. M.

    2005-12-01

    A class of icy satellites ~400 - 500 km in diameter are large enough that they can experience significant tidal heating (Miranda and Enceladus), while small enough that rising diapirs could significantly perturb the bodies' moments of inertia. If these "mini-moons" are heated sufficiently for differentiation and/or internal convection, the resultant low-density plumes may affect inertia moments enough to trigger satellite reorientation relative to the primary planet. Here we emphasize the case of Miranda and its three large coronae, which are inferred to have formed above large-scale diapiric upwellings [1]. Their locations on the greatest inertia axis (near the south pole) and the intermediate inertia axis (along the leading-trailing axis) suggest that coronae are negative density anomalies that have led to satellite reorientation [2]. The Miranda reorientation hypothesis is further supported by fresh crater distributions [3] and structural evidence [4]. True polar wander of the Earth, promoted by convection and associated continental drift, depends on the perturbation timescale relative to the timescale of viscous relaxation [e.g. 5]. Applying similar arguments to a warm and hydrostatic Miranda, we find that a corona-scale (60° width) icy diapir 100 kg/m3 less dense than its surroundings could induce significant (tens of degrees) reorientation, if the ratio of the diapir lifetime τconv to the ice shell relaxation time τR exceeds 103. For Enceladus, large reorientations can occur even more readily, if τconv / τR exceeds 102. In contrast, a cold mini-moon with a frozen-in hydrostatic figure (Mimas and Proteus) would not easily reorient, as a density anomaly would need to overcome the large difference in principal moments [6]. We find that this latter scenario is consistent with the 130 km crater Herschel not having reoriented Mimas. Mini-moon reorientation allows for some interesting possibilities: a large density anomaly could reorient a warm moon while the

  9. Stress-induced martensite variant reorientation in magnetic shape memory Ni Mn Ga single crystal studied by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, P.; Sittner, P.; Lukas, P.; Hannula, S.-P.; Heczko, O.

    2008-06-01

    Stress-induced martensite variant reorientation in magnetic shape memory Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal was studied in situ by the neutron diffraction technique. Principles of determination of individual tetragonal martensitic variants in shape memory alloys are explained. Using neutron diffraction we show that the macroscopic strain originates solely from the martensite structure reorientation or variant redistribution. Neutron diffraction also reveals that the reorientation of martensite is not fully completed even at a stress value of 25 MPa, which is about 20 times larger than the mean stress needed for reorientation. Only one twinning system is active during the reorientation process.

  10. 78 FR 1265 - Dana Holding Corporation; Power Technologies Group Division; Including On-Site Leased Workers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... Employment and Training Administration Dana Holding Corporation; Power Technologies Group Division; Including... Technologies Group Division, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (subject firm). The worker group includes on-site leased... Company, Power Technologies Group Division, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, who were engaged in employment...

  11. 77 FR 38063 - Formations of, Acquisitions by, and Mergers of Bank Holding Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... Colorado Community Bank, both of Yuma, Colorado. Applicant also has applied to acquire Colorado Front Range Holdings, Inc., Yuma, Colorado, and thereby engage in lending activities pursuant to section 225.28 (b)(1...

  12. Resolving coiled shapes reveals new reorientation behaviors in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Broekmans, Onno D; Rodgers, Jarlath B; Ryu, William S; Stephens, Greg J

    2016-01-01

    We exploit the reduced space of C. elegans postures to develop a novel tracking algorithm which captures both simple shapes and also self-occluding coils, an important, yet unexplored, component of 2D worm behavior. We apply our algorithm to show that visually complex, coiled sequences are a superposition of two simpler patterns: the body wave dynamics and a head-curvature pulse. We demonstrate the precise Ω-turn dynamics of an escape response and uncover a surprising new dichotomy in spontaneous, large-amplitude coils; deep reorientations occur not only through classical Ω-shaped postures but also through larger postural excitations which we label here as δ-turns. We find that omega and delta turns occur independently, suggesting a distinct triggering mechanism, and are the serpentine analog of a random left-right step. Finally, we show that omega and delta turns occur with approximately equal rates and adapt to food-free conditions on a similar timescale, a simple strategy to avoid navigational bias. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17227.001 PMID:27644113

  13. Evolved to fail: Bacteria induce flagellar buckling to reorient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kwangmin; Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    Many marine bacteria swim with a single helical flagellum connected to a rotary motor via a 100 nm long universal joint called the ``hook.'' While these bacteria have seemingly just one degree of freedom, allowing them to swim only back and forth, they in fact exhibit large angular reorientations mediated by off-axis ``flicks'' of their flagellum. High-speed video microscopy revealed the mechanism underpinning this turning behavior: the buckling of the hook during the exceedingly brief (10 ms) forward run that follows a reversal. Direct measurements of the hook's mechanical properties corroborated this result, as the hook's structural stability is governed by the Sperm number, which compares the compressive load from propulsion to the elastic restoring force of the hook. Upon decreasing the Sperm number below a critical value by reducing the swimming speed, the frequency of flicks diminishes sharply, consistent with the criticality of buckling. This elegant, under-actuated turning mechanism appears widespread among marine bacteria and may provide a novel design concept in micro-robotics.

  14. Spin reorientation transition in dysprosium-samarium orthoferrite single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weiyao; Cao, Shixun; Huang, Ruoxiang; Cao, Yiming; Xu, Kai; Kang, Baojuan; Zhang, Jincang; Ren, Wei

    2015-03-01

    We report the control of spin reorientation (SR) transition in perovskite D y1 -xS mxFe O3 , a whole family of single crystals grown by an optical floating zone method from x =0 to 1 with an interval of 0.1. Powder x-ray diffractions and Rietveld refinements indicate that lattice parameters a and c increase linearly with Sm doping concentration, whereas b keeps a constant. Temperature dependence of the magnetizations under zero-field-cooling (ZFC) and field-cooling (FC) processes are studied in detail. We have found a remarkable linear change of SR transition temperature in Sm-rich samples for x >0.2 , which covers an extremely wide temperature range including room temperature. The a -axis magnetization curves under the FC during cooling (FCC) process bifurcate from and then jump back to that of the ZFC and FC warming process in single crystals when x =0.5 -0.9 , suggesting complicated 4 f -3 d electron interactions among D y3 + -S m3 +,D y3 + -F e3 + , and S m3 + -F e3 + sublattices of diverse magnetic configurations. The magnetic properties from the doping effect on SR transition temperature in these single crystals might be useful in the material physics and device design applications.

  15. Shape-assisted body reorientation enhances trafficability through cluttered terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chen; Pullin, Andrew; Haldane, Duncan; Fearing, Ronald; Full, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Many birds and fishes have slender, streamlined bodies that reduce fluid dynamic drag and allow fast and efficient locomotion. Similarly, numerous terrestrial animals run through cluttered terrain where 3-D, multi-component obstacles like grass, bushes, trees, walls, doors, and pillars also resist motion, but it is unknown whether their body shape plays a major role. Here, we challenged discoid cockroaches that possess a rounded, thin, nearly ellipsoidal body to run through tall, narrowly spaced, grass-like beams. The animals primarily rolled their body to the side to maneuver through the obstacle gaps. Reduction of body roundness by artificial shells inhibited this side roll maneuver, resulting in a lower traversal probability and a longer traversal time (P < 0.001, ANOVA). Inspired by this discovery, we added a cockroach-like, rounded exoskeleton shell to a legged robot of a nearly cuboidal body. The rounded shell enabled the robot to use passive side rolling to maneuver through beams. To explain the mechanism, we developed a simple physics model to construct an energy landscape of the body-terrain interaction, which allowed estimation of body forces and torques exerted by the beams. Our model revealed that, by passive interaction with the terrain, a rounded body (ellipsoid) rolled more easily than an angular body (cuboid) to access energy valleys between energy barriers caused by obstacles. Our study is the first to demonstrate that a terradynamically ``streamlined'' shape can reduce terrain resistance and enhance trafficability by assisting body reorientation.

  16. Structure-induced spin reorientation in magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Alexander; Frauen, Axel; Vollmers, Julian; Meyer, Andreas; Oepen, Hans Peter

    2016-09-01

    We report on structuring-induced changes of the magnetic anisotropy of cylindrical nanostructures which are carved out of thin Pt/Co/Pt films. The magnetic properties of films and structures with a diameter of about 34 nm were investigated via magneto-optic Kerr effect. The magnetic anisotropy is determined for both films and nanostructures for varying Co thicknesses (0.5-7 nm). In general, the nanostructures exhibit larger perpendicular anisotropy than the films. On thickness increase of the Co layer two spin reorientation transitions at about 2.2 and 5 nm are found. At 2.2 nm the nanostructures exhibit the transition from perpendicular to in-plane orientation of magnetization while at 5 nm the reversed transition is found. The variation of the magnetic anisotropy of the Co nanostructures is not solely caused by the change of shape anisotropy. The net change, corrected for the shape, reveals a reduction of strain in the thinnest Co layers while the increase of the anisotropy of the nanostructures at higher Co thicknesses is caused by a transformation of the Co lattice from fcc to hcp.

  17. Frequent Spin Reorientation of Galaxies due to Local Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Renyue

    2014-04-01

    We study the evolution of angular momenta of M * = 1010-1012 M ⊙ galaxies utilizing large-scale ultra-high resolution cosmological hydrodynamic simulations and find that the spin of the stellar component changes direction frequently because of interactions with nearby systems, such as major mergers, minor mergers, significant gas inflows, and torques. The rate and nature of change of spin direction cannot be accounted for by large-scale tidal torques, because the rates of the latter fall short by orders of magnitude and because the apparent random swings of the spin direction are inconsistent with the alignment by linear density field. The implications for galaxy formation as well as the intrinsic alignment of galaxies are profound. Assuming the large-scale tidal field is the sole alignment agent, a new picture emerging is that intrinsic alignment of galaxies would be a balance between slow large-scale coherent torquing and fast spin reorientation by local interactions. What is still open is whether other processes, such as feeding galaxies with gas and stars along filaments or sheets, introduce coherence for spin directions of galaxies along the respective structures.

  18. Water reorientation in the hydration shells of hydrophilic and hydrophobic solutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laage, Damien; Stirnemann, Guillaume; Hynes, James T.

    2010-06-01

    We discuss some key aspects of our recent theoretical work on water reorientation dynamics, which is important in a wide range of phenomena, including aqueous phase chemical reactions, protein folding, and drug binding to proteins and DNA. It is shown that, contrary to the standard conception that these dynamics are diffusional, the reorientation of a water molecule occurs by sudden, large amplitude angular jumps. The mechanism involves the exchange of one hydrogen bond for another by the reorienting water, and the process can be fruitfully viewed as a chemical reaction. The results for reorientation times, which can be well described analytically, are discussed in the context of the molecular level interpretation of recent ultrafast infrared spectroscopic results, focusing on the concepts of structure making/breaking and solvent ‘icebergs’.

  19. Intermolecular and intramolecular reorientations in nonchiral smectic liquid-crystalline phases studied by broadband dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schacht, J.; Zugenmaier, P.; Buivydas, M.; Komitov, L.; Stebler, B.; Lagerwall, S. T.; Gouda, F.; Horii, F.

    2000-04-01

    Molecular dynamics has been studied by broadband dielectric relaxation spectroscopy in the Sm-A, Sm-B, and Sm-E phases (Sm denotes smectic) of a homologous series of nonchiral stilbenes. An assignment of modes is presented based on their dependence on temperature and molecular length, and, as far as they obey the Arrhenius law, their activation energy has been determined. In general, reorientations of entire molecules around their short axis are active, whereas reorientations of entire molecules around their long axis are locked out in the Sm-E phase of shorter homologs, yet intramolecular reorientations of polar sites have been established. Strong evidence is presented for an interdependence of reorientations of entire molecules around the short and long axes within the biaxial Sm-E phase of longer homologs.

  20. Ultrafast Reorientation of Dangling OH Groups at the Air-Water Interface Using Femtosecond Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Cho-Shuen; Campen, R. Kramer; Vila Verde, Ana Celia; Bolhuis, Peter; Nienhuys, Han-Kwang; Bonn, Mischa

    2011-09-01

    We report the real-time measurement of the ultrafast reorientational motion of water molecules at the water-air interface, using femtosecond time- and polarization-resolved vibrational sum-frequency spectroscopy. Vibrational excitation of dangling OH bonds along a specific polarization axis induces a transient anisotropy that decays due to the reorientation of vibrationally excited OH groups. The reorientation of interfacial water is shown to occur on subpicosecond time scales, several times faster than in the bulk, which can be attributed to the lower degree of hydrogen bond coordination at the interface. Molecular dynamics simulations of interfacial water dynamics are in quantitative agreement with experimental observations and show that, unlike in bulk, the interfacial reorientation occurs in a largely diffusive manner.

  1. 12 CFR 225.141 - Operations subsidiaries of a bank holding company.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BANK HOLDING COMPANIES AND CHANGE IN BANK CONTROL... formation of a wholly owned subsidiary of an approved 4(c)(8) company to engage in activities that such a... not believe that such prohibition should apply to the formation by a holding company of a...

  2. Fractal reorientation clocks: Linking animal behavior to statistical patterns of search.

    PubMed

    Bartumeus, Frederic; Levin, Simon A

    2008-12-09

    The movement ecology framework depicts animal movement as the result of the combined effects of internal and external constraints on animal navigation and motion capacities. Nevertheless, there are still fundamental problems to understand how these modulations take place and how they might be translated into observed statistical properties of animal trajectories. Of particular interest, here, is the general idea of intermittence in animal movement. Intermittent locomotion assumes that animal movement is, in essence, discrete. The existence of abrupt interruptions in an otherwise continuous flow of movement allows for the possibility of reorientations, that is, to break down previous directional memories of the trajectory. In this study, we explore the potential links between intermittent locomotion, reorientation behavior, and search efficiency. By means of simulations we show that the incorporation of Lévy intermittence in an otherwise nonintermittent search strongly modifies encounter rates. The result is robust to different types of landscapes (i.e., target density and spatial distribution), and spatial dimensions (i.e., 2D, 3D). We propose that Lévy intermittence may come from reorientation mechanisms capable of organizing directional persistence on time (i.e., fractal reorientation clocks), and we rationalize that the explicit distinction between scanning and reorientation mechanisms is essential to make accurate statistical inferences from animal search behavior. Finally, we provide a statistical tool to judge the existence of episodic and strong reorientation behaviors capable of modifying relevant properties of stochastic searches, ultimately controlling the chances of finding unknown located items.

  3. Time-optimal three-axis reorientation of asymmetric rigid spacecraft via homotopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the time-optimal rest-to-rest three-axis reorientation of asymmetric rigid spacecraft. First, time-optimal solutions for the inertially symmetric rigid spacecraft (ISRS) three-axis reorientation are briefly reviewed. By utilizing initial costates and reorientation time of the ISRS time-optimal solution, the homotopic approach is introduced to solve the asymmetric rigid spacecraft time-optimal three-axis reorientation problem. The main merit is that the homotopic approach can start automatically and reliably, which would facilitate the real-time generation of open-loop time-optimal solutions for attitude slewing maneuvers. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate the performance of the proposed method. For principle axis reorientation, numerical results and analytical derivations show that, multiple time-optimal solutions exist and relations between them are given. For generic reorientation problem, though mathematical rigorous proof is not available to date, numerical results also indicated the existing of multiple time-optimal solutions.

  4. Bar-holding prosthetic limb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, Thomas W. (Inventor); Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A prosthetic device for below-the-elbow amputees is disclosed. The device has a removable effector, which is attached to the end of an arm cuff. The effector is comprised of a pair of C-shaped members that are oriented so as to face each other. Working in concert, the C-shaped members are able to hold a bar such as a chainsaw handle. A flat spring is fitted around the C-shaped members to hold them together.

  5. 12 CFR 225.141 - Operations subsidiaries of a bank holding company.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... has stated that it would permit, without any specific regulatory approval, the formation of a wholly... such prohibition should apply to the formation by a holding company of a wholly-owned subsidiary to engage in activities that it could engage in directly. Accordingly, as a general matter, the Board...

  6. 12 CFR 225.141 - Operations subsidiaries of a bank holding company.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... has stated that it would permit, without any specific regulatory approval, the formation of a wholly... such prohibition should apply to the formation by a holding company of a wholly-owned subsidiary to engage in activities that it could engage in directly. Accordingly, as a general matter, the Board...

  7. ISS Update: SPHERES with Telerobotics Project Manager Terry Fong

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean talks with Terry Fong, Telerobotics Project Manager, about how the Synchronized Position, Hold, Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES, are ...

  8. SPHERES Smartphone Workbench

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Smart SPHERES space robot (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites) equipped with an Android smartphone performs a video survey inside of the International Space S...

  9. Android in Space

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Can smartphones control robots in space? The Nexus-S upgrade of Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites -- SPHERES -- makes this a reality. By connecting a smartphone ...

  10. 31 CFR 800.217 - Hold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hold. 800.217 Section 800.217 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF INVESTMENT... FOREIGN PERSONS Definitions § 800.217 Hold. The terms hold(s) and holding mean legal or...

  11. Programmed schedule holds for improving launch vehicle holds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gralow, F. H.; Hayes, J. D.; Streiff, M. A.; Temple, A. G.; Venditti, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Baseline definition and system optimization are used for the analysis of programmed holds developed through prelaunch system analysis. Identification of design specifications for ground support equipment and maintenance concepts, and design specifications are used to describe the functional utilization of the overall flow process.

  12. Bank Powers. Activities of Securities, Subsidiaries of Bank Holding Companies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    securities subsidiaries of bank holding companies. ,JUL, ?• 199 These subsidiaries, authorized by the Federal Reserve Board, are com- monly called Section 20...members of the Federal Reserve System to be affiliatcd with firms that are not principally engaged in securities activi- ti-e generally forbidden to banks...for certain specified securities, mainly government swcurities. member banks of the Federal Reserve System are prohibited under the 1933 Glass

  13. Ultrafast 2D IR anisotropy of water reveals reorientation during hydrogen-bond switching.

    PubMed

    Ramasesha, Krupa; Roberts, Sean T; Nicodemus, Rebecca A; Mandal, Aritra; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2011-08-07

    Rearrangements of the hydrogen bond network of liquid water are believed to involve rapid and concerted hydrogen bond switching events, during which a hydrogen bond donor molecule undergoes large angle molecular reorientation as it exchanges hydrogen bonding partners. To test this picture of hydrogen bond dynamics, we have performed ultrafast 2D IR spectral anisotropy measurements on the OH stretching vibration of HOD in D(2)O to directly track the reorientation of water molecules as they change hydrogen bonding environments. Interpretation of the experimental data is assisted by modeling drawn from molecular dynamics simulations, and we quantify the degree of molecular rotation on changing local hydrogen bonding environment using restricted rotation models. From the inertial 2D anisotropy decay, we find that water molecules initiating from a strained configuration and relaxing to a stable configuration are characterized by a distribution of angles, with an average reorientation half-angle of 10°, implying an average reorientation for a full switch of ≥20°. These results provide evidence that water hydrogen bond network connectivity switches through concerted motions involving large angle molecular reorientation.

  14. The reorientation of cell nucleus promotes the establishment of front-rear polarity in migrating fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Maninová, Miloslava; Klímová, Zuzana; Parsons, J Thomas; Weber, Michael J; Iwanicki, Marcin P; Vomastek, Tomáš

    2013-06-12

    The establishment of cell polarity is an essential step in the process of cell migration. This process requires precise spatiotemporal coordination of signaling pathways that in most cells create the typical asymmetrical profile of a polarized cell with nucleus located at the cell rear and the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) positioned between the nucleus and the leading edge. During cell polarization, nucleus rearward positioning promotes correct microtubule organizing center localization and thus the establishment of front-rear polarity and directional migration. We found that cell polarization and directional migration require also the reorientation of the nucleus. Nuclear reorientation is manifested as temporally restricted nuclear rotation that aligns the nuclear axis with the axis of cell migration. We also found that nuclear reorientation requires physical connection between the nucleus and cytoskeleton mediated by the LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex. Nuclear reorientation is controlled by coordinated activity of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-mediated activation of GTPase Rho and the activation of integrin, FAK (focal adhesion kinase), Src, and p190RhoGAP signaling pathway. Integrin signaling is spatially induced at the leading edge as FAK and p190RhoGAP are predominantly activated or localized at this location. We suggest that integrin activation within lamellipodia defines cell front, and subsequent FAK, Src, and p190RhoGAP signaling represents the polarity signal that induces reorientation of the nucleus and thus promotes the establishment of front-rear polarity.

  15. Study of spin-ordering and spin-reorientation transitions in hexagonal manganites through Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang-Bai; Hien, Nguyen Thi Minh; Han, Kiok; Nam, Ji-Yeon; Huyen, Nguyen Thi; Shin, Seong-Il; Wang, Xueyun; Cheong, S. W.; Lee, D.; Noh, T. W.; Sung, N. H.; Cho, B. K.; Yang, In-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Spin-wave (magnon) scattering, when clearly observed by Raman spectroscopy, can be simple and powerful for studying magnetic phase transitions. In this paper, we present how to observe magnon scattering clearly by Raman spectroscopy, then apply the Raman method to study spin-ordering and spin-reorientation transitions of hexagonal manganite single crystal and thin films and compare directly with the results of magnetization measurements. Our results show that by choosing strong resonance condition and appropriate polarization configuration, magnon scattering can be clearly observed, and the temperature dependence of magnon scattering can be simple and powerful quantity for investigating spin-ordering as well as spin-reorientation transitions. Especially, the Raman method would be very helpful for investigating the weak spin-reorientation transitions by selectively probing the magnons in the Mn3+ sublattices, while leaving out the strong effects of paramagnetic moments of the rare earth ions. PMID:26300075

  16. Reorientation Response of Magnetic Microspheres Attached to Gold Electrodes Under an Applied Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Los Santos Valladares, L.; Dominguez, A. Bustamante; Aguiar, J. Albino; Reeve, R. M.; Mitrelias, T.; Langford, R. M.; Azuma, Y.; Barnes, C. H. W.; Majima, Y.

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we report the mechanical reorientation of thiolated ferromagnetic microspheres bridging a pair of gold electrodes under an external magnetic field. When an external magnetic field (7 kG) is applied during the measurement of the current-voltage characteristics of a carboxyl ferromagnetic microsphere (4 μm diameter) attached to two gold electrodes by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of octane dithiol (C8H18S2), the current signal is distorted. Rather than due to magnetoresistance, this effect is caused by a mechanical reorientation of the ferromagnetic sphere, which alters the number of SAMs between the sphere and the electrodes and therefore affects conduction. To study the physical reorientation of the ferromagnetic particles, we measure their hysteresis loops while suspended in a liquid solution.

  17. Effect of spin reorientation on magnetocaloric and transport properties of NdAl2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, M. V.; da Silva, J. A.; Silva, L. S.

    2017-01-01

    We report the magneto-thermal and resistive properties of rare-earth dialuminide NdAl2, including spin reorientation transition. To this purpose, we used a theoretical model that considers the interactions of exchange and Zeeman, besides the anisotropy due to the electrical crystal field. The theoretical results obtained were compared to experimental data of the NdAl2 in single crystal and bulk forms. Explicitly, we have calculated the anisotropic variation of magnetic entropy with the magnetic field oriented along the three principal crystallographic directions: [100], [110], and [111] of NdAl2 single crystal, where a signature of the spin reorientation is observed in the [110] and [111] directions. Moreover, of magnetoresistivity we consider the applied magnetic field along the crystallographic directions [100] and [110]. In turn, for the polycrystalline form, the good agreement between theory and experiment confirms the presence of spin reorientation, which was predicted theoretically in magnetization curves.

  18. Study of spin-ordering and spin-reorientation transitions in hexagonal manganites through Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang-Bai; Hien, Nguyen Thi Minh; Han, Kiok; Nam, Ji-Yeon; Huyen, Nguyen Thi; Shin, Seong-Il; Wang, Xueyun; Cheong, S W; Lee, D; Noh, T W; Sung, N H; Cho, B K; Yang, In-Sang

    2015-08-24

    Spin-wave (magnon) scattering, when clearly observed by Raman spectroscopy, can be simple and powerful for studying magnetic phase transitions. In this paper, we present how to observe magnon scattering clearly by Raman spectroscopy, then apply the Raman method to study spin-ordering and spin-reorientation transitions of hexagonal manganite single crystal and thin films and compare directly with the results of magnetization measurements. Our results show that by choosing strong resonance condition and appropriate polarization configuration, magnon scattering can be clearly observed, and the temperature dependence of magnon scattering can be simple and powerful quantity for investigating spin-ordering as well as spin-reorientation transitions. Especially, the Raman method would be very helpful for investigating the weak spin-reorientation transitions by selectively probing the magnons in the Mn(3+) sublattices, while leaving out the strong effects of paramagnetic moments of the rare earth ions.

  19. Fluidization, resolidification, and reorientation of the endothelial cell in response to slow tidal stretches.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Canovic, Elizabeth Peruski; Iordan, Andreea L; Rajendran, Kavitha; Manomohan, Greeshma; Pirentis, Athanassios P; Smith, Michael L; Butler, James P; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Stamenovic, Dimitrije

    2012-08-15

    Mechanical stretch plays an important role in regulating shape and orientation of the vascular endothelial cell. This morphological response to stretch is basic to angiogenesis, neovascularization, and vascular homeostasis, but mechanism remains unclear. To elucidate mechanisms, we used cell mapping rheometry to measure traction forces in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells subjected to periodic uniaxial stretches. Onset of periodic stretch of 10% strain amplitude caused a fluidization response typified by attenuation of traction forces almost to zero. As periodic stretch continued, the prompt fluidization response was followed by a slow resolidification response typified by recovery of the traction forces, but now aligned along the axis perpendicular to the imposed stretch. Reorientation of the cell body lagged reorientation of the traction forces, however. Together, these observations demonstrate that cellular reorientation in response to periodic stretch is preceded by traction attenuation by means of cytoskeletal fluidization and subsequent traction recovery transverse to the stretch direction by means of cytoskeletal resolidification.

  20. Reorientation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in negative anisotropy liquid crystals by an electric field

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Amanda; Vergaz, Ricardo; Algorri, José F; Zito, Gianluigi; Cacace, Teresa; Marino, Antigone; Otón, José M

    2016-01-01

    Summary Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are anisotropic nanoparticles that can cause modifications in the electrical and electro-optical properties of liquid crystals. The control of the SWCNT concentration, distribution and reorientation in such self-organized fluids allows for the possibility of tuning the liquid crystal properties. The alignment and reorientation of CNTs are studied in a system where the liquid crystal orientation effect has been isolated. Complementary studies including Raman spectroscopy, microscopic inspection and impedance studies were carried out. The results reveal an ordered reorientation of the CNTs induced by an electric field, which does not alter the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy suggests a nonnegligible anchoring force between the CNTs and the liquid crystal molecules. PMID:27547599

  1. Delirium prevention in critically ill adults through an automated reorientation intervention - A pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Munro, Cindy L; Cairns, Paula; Ji, Ming; Calero, Karel; Anderson, W McDowell; Liang, Zhan

    Explore the effect of an automated reorientation intervention on ICU delirium in a prospective randomized controlled trial. Delirium is common in ICU patients, and negatively affects outcomes. Few prevention strategies have been tested. Thirty ICU patients were randomized to 3 groups. Ten received hourly recorded messages in a family member's voice during waking hours over 3 ICU days, 10 received the same messages in a non-family voice, and 10 (control) did not receive any automated reorientation messages. The primary outcome was delirium free days during the intervention period (evaluated by CAM-ICU). Groups were compared by Fisher's Exact Test. The family voice group had more delirium free days than the non-family voice group, and significantly more delirium free days (p = 0.0437) than the control group. Reorientation through automated, scripted messages reduced incidence of delirium. Using identical scripted messages, family voice was more effective than non-family voice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetization process in holmium: easy axis spin reorientation induced by the magnetostrictive basal plane distortion.

    PubMed

    Benito, L; Ciria, M; de la Fuente, C; Arnaudas, J I; Ward, R C C; Wells, M R

    2005-06-10

    We report on the change of the easy axis direction in holmium, from the a to the b axis, under the application of a magnetic field in the basal plane. This spin reorientation is observed by measuring the magnetic torque in Ho(n)/Lu(15) superlattices (n and 15 are the number of atomic planes in the Ho and Lu blocks). We also observe that, at the field H0 and temperature at which the reorientation occurs, both axes are easy directions. Based on the fact that the field H0 depends on n in the same way as the field-induced magnetoelastic distortion does, we propose that this spin reorientation originates from the strong field-induced magnetoelastic deformation within the basal plane. The modulation of the alpha strains with sixfold symmetry originates a 12-fold term in the magnetic anisotropy energy.

  3. Electron spin relaxation due to reorientation of a permanent zero field splitting tensor.

    PubMed

    Schaefle, Nathaniel; Sharp, Robert

    2004-09-15

    Electron spin relaxation of transition metal ions with spin S> or =1 results primarily from thermal modulation of the zero field splitting (zfs) tensor. This occurs both by distortion of the zfs tensor due to intermolecular collisions and, for complexes with less than cubic symmetry, by reorientational modulation of the permanent zfs tensor. The reorientational mechanism is much less well characterized in previous work than the distortional mechanism although it is an important determinant of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) paramagnetic relaxation enhancement phenomena (i.e., the enhancement of NMR relaxation rates produced by paramagnetic ions in solution or NMR-PRE). The classical density matrix theory of spin relaxation does not provide an appropriate description of the reorientational mechanism at low Zeeman field strengths because the zero-order spin wave functions are stochastic functions of time. Using spin dynamics simulation techniques, the time correlation functions of the spin operators have been computed and used to determine decay times for the reorientational relaxation mechanism for S=1. In the zfs limit of laboratory field strengths (H(Zeem)reorientational correlation time of a molecule-fixed vector. The value of tau(S) (composite function) is independent of the magnitude of the cylindrical zfs parameter (D), but it depends strongly on low symmetry zfs terms (the E/D ratio). Other spin dynamics (SD) simulations examined spin decay in the intermediate regime of field strengths where H(Zeem) approximately H(zfs) (composite function), and in the vicinity of the Zeeman limit. The results demonstrate that the reorientational electron spin relaxation mechanism is often significant when H(zfs) (composite function)> or =H(Zeem), and that its neglect

  4. Engaging Faculty in Community Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Glynis A.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers endorse the integration of community engagement (CE) into higher education as a way to improve the relevance of education, address community needs, and forge university-community partnerships (Zlotkowski, 1996). CE can help create stronger ties between universities and their communities and provide students with experiential learning…

  5. The Changing Nature of Private Engagement in Public Education: For-Profit and Nonprofit Organizations and Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulkley, Katrina E.; Burch, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Recent years have seen a shifting landscape around private engagement in K-12 public education, one that involves a reorientation of education policy and practice around the principles of the marketplace. In this article, we examine the roles of both not-for-profit and for-profit agencies, as distinct from government agencies, in this movement.…

  6. Maximum-likelihood estimation optimizer for constrained, time-optimal satellite reorientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, Robert G.

    2014-10-01

    The Covariance Matrix Adaptation-Evolutionary Strategy (CMA-ES) method provides a high-quality estimate of the control solution for an unconstrained satellite reorientation problem, and rapid, useful guesses needed for high-fidelity methods that can solve time-optimal reorientation problems with multiple path constraints. The CMA-ES algorithm offers two significant advantages over heuristic methods such as Particle Swarm or Bacteria Foraging Optimisation: it builds an approximation to the covariance matrix for the cost function, and uses that to determine a direction of maximum likelihood for the search, reducing the chance of stagnation; and it achieves second-order, quasi-Newton convergence behaviour.

  7. Medium-frequency impulsive-thrust-excited slosh waves during propellant reorientation with a geyser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.; Lee, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    Slosh wave excitation induced by a resettling flowfield activated by 1.0-Hz impulsive thrust during the course of liquid reorientation with the initiation of geyser for liquid-fill levels of 30, 50, 65, 70, and 80 percent has been studied. Characteristics of slosh waves of various frequencies excited by the resettling flowfield are discussed. Slosh wave excitations shift the fluid mass distribution in the container which imposes time-dependent variations in spacecraft moment of inertia. This information is important for spacecraft control during the course of liquid reorientation.

  8. New fractal math tool providing simultaneous reorientation and acceleration of spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yefremov, Alexander P.

    2017-10-01

    Quaternion based math system of spacecraft reorientation is extended by admitting imaginary rotation parameters, thus involving hyperbolic functions. For simplicity only one simple hyperbolic rotation is added as the last one in the series of orthogonal matrices. The scheme is reduced to a single rotation about instant axis, and to transformation of primitive basis on a 2D fractal space of dimension ½. This new tool is proved to simultaneously reorient the spacecraft and to accelerate it the kinematics automatically described as relativistic. With a small speed the problem becomes a classical one.

  9. Orbital magnetic moment instability at the spin reorientation transition of Nd2Fe14B

    PubMed

    Garcia; Chaboy; Bartolome; Goedkoop

    2000-07-10

    Highly accurate soft-XMCD data recorded on a Nd2Fe14B single crystal, through the spin reorientation transition show that the average Fe orbital moment (a) is proportional to the macroscopic Fe anisotropy constant, and (b) diverges 15 K below the reorientation transition temperature. This divergence is indicative of a critical behavior and it is related to a tetragonal distortion. These results give experimental evidence of the mutual dependence between orbital moment, macroscopic magnetic anisotropy, and tetragonal distortion. Furthermore, it is argued that the critical behavior of the orbital moment is at the origin of similar divergences previously observed in Mossbauer and Hall-effect data.

  10. Holding on to Gen Y

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coggins, Celine; Zuckerman, Sarah; McKelvey, Lee Anne

    2010-01-01

    Young teacher applicants to the Teach Plus Policy Fellows Program indicate that contrary to the opinions of those who believe they are in teaching only for the short term, they actually want to find a way to continue teaching. Their description of the profession they seek--one that makes a difference, challenges them, engages them as leaders, and…

  11. 77 FR 285 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ... 75201-2272: 1. Triumph Consolidated Cos., LLC, Dallas, Texas, to engage de novo through the establishment of Triumph CRA Holdings, LLC, Dallas, Texas, as a nonbanking subsidiary in lending activities...

  12. 77 FR 39494 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking and...; to acquire Peoria Holdings, LLC, Vancouver, Washington, and thereby engage in extending credit...

  13. Temperature-pressure-induced solid-solid <100> to <110> reorientation in FCC metallic nanowire: a molecular dynamic study.

    PubMed

    Sutrakar, Vijay Kumar; Roy Mahapatra, D; Pillai, A C R

    2012-01-11

    Atomistic simulation of initial <100> oriented FCC Cu nanowires shows a novel coupled temperature-pressure dependent reorientation from <100> to <110> phase. A temperature-pressure-induced solid-solid <100> to <110> reorientation diagram is generated for Cu nanowire with varying cross-sectional sizes. A critical pressure is reported for Cu nanowires with varying cross-sectional sizes, above which an initial <100> oriented nanowire shows temperature independent reorientation into the <110> phase. The effect of surface stresses on the <100> to <110> reorientation is also studied. The results indicate that above a critical cross-sectional size for a given temperature-pressure, <100> to <110> reorientation is not possible. It is also reported here that for a given applied pressure, an increase in temperature is required for the <100> to <110> reorientation with increasing cross-sectional size of the nanowire. The temperature-pressure-induced solid-solid <100> to <110> reorientation diagram reported in the present paper could further be used as guidelines for controlling the reorientations/shape memory in nano-scale applications of FCC metallic nanowires.

  14. Animals' Use of Landmarks and Metric Information to Reorient: Effects of the Size of the Experimental Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sovrano, Valeria Anna; Bisazza, Angelo; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2005-01-01

    Disoriented children could use geometric information in combination with landmark information to reorient themselves in large but not in small experimental spaces. We tested fish in the same task and found that they were able to conjoin geometric and non-geometric (landmark) information to reorient themselves in both the large and the small space…

  15. A Holding Function for Conflict Probe Appiications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNally, Dave; Walton, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Conflict Alerts for aircraft in holding patterns are often missed or in error due to fact that holding trajectories are not modeled in Conflict Alert or Conflict Probe logic. In addition, a controller in one sector may not know when aircraft are holding in a neighboring sector. These factors can lead to an increased potential for loss of separation while aircraft are flying in holding patterns. A holding function for conflict probe applications has been developed and tested with air traffic data from Fort Worth Center. The holding function automatically determines when an aircraft enters a holding pattern, builds a holding region around the pattern and then probes the region for conflict with other traffic. The operational concept of use assumes that air traffic controllers are very busy during periods when aircraft are in holding and therefore don't have time to manually enter information which defines a holding pattern and activates conflict probing. For this reason, it is important the holding function automatically detect aircraft in holding and compute a holding region for conflict analysis. The controller is then alerted if other aircraft are predicted to fly through the holding region at the holding altitude.

  16. A Holding Function for Conflict Probe Appiications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNally, Dave; Walton, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Conflict Alerts for aircraft in holding patterns are often missed or in error due to fact that holding trajectories are not modeled in Conflict Alert or Conflict Probe logic. In addition, a controller in one sector may not know when aircraft are holding in a neighboring sector. These factors can lead to an increased potential for loss of separation while aircraft are flying in holding patterns. A holding function for conflict probe applications has been developed and tested with air traffic data from Fort Worth Center. The holding function automatically determines when an aircraft enters a holding pattern, builds a holding region around the pattern and then probes the region for conflict with other traffic. The operational concept of use assumes that air traffic controllers are very busy during periods when aircraft are in holding and therefore don't have time to manually enter information which defines a holding pattern and activates conflict probing. For this reason, it is important the holding function automatically detect aircraft in holding and compute a holding region for conflict analysis. The controller is then alerted if other aircraft are predicted to fly through the holding region at the holding altitude.

  17. Stakeholder Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Jessica W.; Petherick, J.T.; Basara, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Background Oklahoma law pre-empts local governments from enacting smoking restrictions inside public places that are stricter than state law, but the sovereign status of Oklahoma’s 38 Tribal nations means they are uniquely positioned to stand apart as leaders in the area of tobacco policy. Purpose To provide recommendations for employing university–Tribal partnerships as an effective strategy for tobacco policy planning in tribal communities. Methods Using a community-based participatory research approach, researchers facilitated a series of meetings with key Tribal stakeholders in order to develop a comprehensive tobacco policy plan. Ongoing engagement activities held between January 2011 and May 2012, including interdepartmental visits, facility site tours, interviews, and attendance at tribal activities, were critical for fostering constructive and trusting relationships between all partners involved in the policy planning process. Results The 17-month collaborative engagement produced a plan designed to regulate the use of commercial tobacco in all Tribally owned properties. The extended period of collaboration between the researchers and Tribal stakeholders facilitated: (1) levels of trust between partners; and (2) a steadfast commitment to the planning process, ensuring completion of the plan amid uncertain political climates and economic concerns about tobacco bans. Conclusions Extended engagement produced an effective foundation for policy planning that promoted collaboration between otherwise dispersed Tribal departments, and facilitated communication of diverse stakeholder interests related to the goal of tobacco policies. The findings of this study provide useful strategies and best practices for those looking to employ Tribal–university partnerships as strategies for tobacco control planning and policy-based research. PMID:25528706

  18. Why Size Counts: Children's Spatial Reorientation in Large and Small Enclosures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learmonth, Amy E.; Newcombe, Nora S.; Sheridan, Natalie; Jones, Meredith

    2008-01-01

    When mobile organisms are spatially disoriented, for instance by rapid repetitive movement, they must re-establish orientation. Past research has shown that the geometry of enclosing spaces is consistently used for reorientation by a wide variety of species, but that non-geometric features are not always used. Based on these findings, some…

  19. Children Reorient Using the Left/Right Sense of Coloured Landmarks at 18-24 Months

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardini, Marko; Atkinson, Janette; Burgess, Neil

    2008-01-01

    In previous studies, children disoriented in small enclosures used room shape, but not wall colors, to find hidden objects. Their reorientation was said to depend solely on a "geometric module" informationally encapsulated with respect to color. We argue that previous studies did not fully evaluate children's use of color owing to a bias in the…

  20. Reorientation in a Rhombic Environment: No Evidence for an Encapsulated Geometric Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hupbach, A.; Nadel, L.

    2005-01-01

    Reorientation behavior of young children has been described as dependent upon a geometric module that is incapable of interacting with landmark information. Whereas previous studies typically used rectangular spaces that provided geometric information about distance, we used a rhombic space that allowed us to explore the way children use geometric…

  1. Terahertz probes of magnetic field induced spin reorientation in YFeO{sub 3} single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Xian; Jiang, Junjie; Ma, Guohong; Jin, Zuanming; Wang, Dongyang; Tian, Zhen; Han, Jiaguang; Cheng, Zhenxiang

    2015-03-02

    Using the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, we demonstrate the spin reorientation of a canted antiferromagnetic YFeO{sub 3} single crystal, by evaluating the temperature and magnetic field dependence of resonant frequency and amplitude for the quasi-ferromagnetic (FM) and quasi-antiferromagnetic modes (AFM), a deeper insight into the dynamics of spin reorientation in rare-earth orthoferrites is established. Due to the absence of 4f-electrons in Y ion, the spin reorientation of Fe sublattices can only be induced by the applied magnetic field, rather than temperature. In agreement with the theoretical predication, the frequency of FM mode decreases with magnetic field. In addition, an obvious step of spin reorientation phase transition occurs with a relatively large applied magnetic field of 4 T. By comparison with the family members of RFeO{sub 3} (R = Y{sup 3+} or rare-earth ions), our results suggest that the chosen of R would tailor the dynamical rotation properties of Fe ions, leading to the designable spin switching in the orthoferrite antiferromagnetic systems.

  2. GOLPH3 drives cell migration by promoting Golgi reorientation and directional trafficking to the leading edge

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Mengke; Peterman, Marshall C.; Davis, Robert L.; Oegema, Karen; Shiau, Andrew K.; Field, Seth J.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of directional cell migration remains an important problem, with relevance to cancer invasion and metastasis. GOLPH3 is a common oncogenic driver of human cancers, and is the first oncogene that functions at the Golgi in trafficking to the plasma membrane. Overexpression of GOLPH3 is reported to drive enhanced cell migration. Here we show that the phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate/GOLPH3/myosin 18A/F-actin pathway that is critical for Golgi–to–plasma membrane trafficking is necessary and limiting for directional cell migration. By linking the Golgi to the actin cytoskeleton, GOLPH3 promotes reorientation of the Golgi toward the leading edge. GOLPH3 also promotes reorientation of lysosomes (but not other organelles) toward the leading edge. However, lysosome function is dispensable for migration and the GOLPH3 dependence of lysosome movement is indirect, via GOLPH3’s effect on the Golgi. By driving reorientation of the Golgi to the leading edge and driving forward trafficking, particularly to the leading edge, overexpression of GOLPH3 drives trafficking to the leading edge of the cell, which is functionally important for directional cell migration. Our identification of a novel pathway for Golgi reorientation controlled by GOLPH3 provides new insight into the mechanism of directional cell migration with important implications for understanding GOLPH3’s role in cancer. PMID:27708138

  3. Leadership and Organization in Education: Time for a Re-Orientation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glatter, Ron

    2006-01-01

    The article raises issues about the current direction of the field of educational leadership and management. It argues that we should consider a re-orientation of the field in order to renew its concern with ideas connected with organization, which include viewing organizations as complex adaptive systems and taking an institutional perspective.…

  4. Use of Geometric Properties of Landmark Arrays for Reorientation Relative to Remote Cities and Local Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mou, Weimin; Nankoo, Jean-François; Zhou, Ruojing; Spetch, Marcia L.

    2014-01-01

    Five experiments investigated how human adults use landmark arrays in the immediate environment to reorient relative to the local environment and relative to remote cities. Participants learned targets' directions with the presence of a proximal 4 poles forming a rectangular shape and an array of more distal poles forming a rectangular shape. Then…

  5. Use of Geometric Properties of Landmark Arrays for Reorientation Relative to Remote Cities and Local Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mou, Weimin; Nankoo, Jean-François; Zhou, Ruojing; Spetch, Marcia L.

    2014-01-01

    Five experiments investigated how human adults use landmark arrays in the immediate environment to reorient relative to the local environment and relative to remote cities. Participants learned targets' directions with the presence of a proximal 4 poles forming a rectangular shape and an array of more distal poles forming a rectangular shape. Then…

  6. Use of Geometry for Spatial Reorientation in Children Applies Only to Symmetric Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lew, Adina R.; Gibbons, Bryony; Murphy, Caroline; Bremner, J. Gavin

    2010-01-01

    Proponents of the geometric module hypothesis argue that following disorientation, many species reorient by use of macro-environment geometry. It is suggested that attention to the surface layout geometry of natural terrain features may have been selected for over evolutionary time due to the enduring and unambiguous location information it…

  7. Reorientation in a Rhombic Environment: No Evidence for an Encapsulated Geometric Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hupbach, A.; Nadel, L.

    2005-01-01

    Reorientation behavior of young children has been described as dependent upon a geometric module that is incapable of interacting with landmark information. Whereas previous studies typically used rectangular spaces that provided geometric information about distance, we used a rhombic space that allowed us to explore the way children use geometric…

  8. Why Size Counts: Children's Spatial Reorientation in Large and Small Enclosures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learmonth, Amy E.; Newcombe, Nora S.; Sheridan, Natalie; Jones, Meredith

    2008-01-01

    When mobile organisms are spatially disoriented, for instance by rapid repetitive movement, they must re-establish orientation. Past research has shown that the geometry of enclosing spaces is consistently used for reorientation by a wide variety of species, but that non-geometric features are not always used. Based on these findings, some…

  9. Education for Sustainability in University Studies: A Model for Reorienting the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junyent, Merce; de Ciurana, Anna M. Geli

    2008-01-01

    A decisive factor for achieving a culture of sustainability is university training for future professionals. The aim of this article is to bring new elements to the process of reorienting university studies towards sustainability. Presented here is the ACES model (Curriculum Greening of Higher Education, acronym in Spanish), which is the result of…

  10. Leadership and Organization in Education: Time for a Re-Orientation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glatter, Ron

    2006-01-01

    The article raises issues about the current direction of the field of educational leadership and management. It argues that we should consider a re-orientation of the field in order to renew its concern with ideas connected with organization, which include viewing organizations as complex adaptive systems and taking an institutional perspective.…

  11. Power-induced evolution and increased dimensionality of nonlinear modes in reorientational soft matter.

    PubMed

    Laudyn, Urszula A; Jung, Paweł S; Zegadło, Krzysztof B; Karpierz, Miroslaw A; Assanto, Gaetano

    2014-11-15

    We demonstrate the evolution of higher order one-dimensional guided modes into two-dimensional solitary waves in a reorientational medium. The observations, carried out at two different wavelengths in chiral nematic liquid crystals, are in good agreement with a simple nonlocal nonlinear model.

  12. RHO binding to FAM65A regulates Golgi reorientation during cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Directional cell migration involves reorientation of the secretory machinery. However, the molecular mechanisms that control this reorientation are not well characterised. Here, we identify a new Rho effector protein, named FAM65A, which binds to active RHOA, RHOB and RHOC. FAM65A links RHO proteins to Golgi-localising cerebral cavernous malformation-3 protein (CCM3; also known as PDCD10) and its interacting proteins mammalian STE20-like protein kinases 3 and 4 (MST3 and MST4; also known as STK24 and STK26, respectively). Binding of active RHO proteins to FAM65A does not affect the kinase activity of MSTs but results in their relocation from the Golgi in a CCM3-dependent manner. This relocation is crucial for reorientation of the Golgi towards the leading edge and subsequent directional cell migration. Our results reveal a previously unidentified pathway downstream of RHO that regulates the polarity of migrating cells through Golgi reorientation in a FAM65A-, CCM3- and MST3- and MST4-dependent manner. PMID:27807006

  13. RHO binding to FAM65A regulates Golgi reorientation during cell migration.

    PubMed

    Mardakheh, Faraz K; Self, Annette; Marshall, Christopher J

    2016-12-15

    Directional cell migration involves reorientation of the secretory machinery. However, the molecular mechanisms that control this reorientation are not well characterised. Here, we identify a new Rho effector protein, named FAM65A, which binds to active RHOA, RHOB and RHOC. FAM65A links RHO proteins to Golgi-localising cerebral cavernous malformation-3 protein (CCM3; also known as PDCD10) and its interacting proteins mammalian STE20-like protein kinases 3 and 4 (MST3 and MST4; also known as STK24 and STK26, respectively). Binding of active RHO proteins to FAM65A does not affect the kinase activity of MSTs but results in their relocation from the Golgi in a CCM3-dependent manner. This relocation is crucial for reorientation of the Golgi towards the leading edge and subsequent directional cell migration. Our results reveal a previously unidentified pathway downstream of RHO that regulates the polarity of migrating cells through Golgi reorientation in a FAM65A-, CCM3- and MST3- and MST4-dependent manner.

  14. Time-dependent solution for reorientation of rotating tidally deformed visco-elastic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haiyang; van der Wal, Wouter; Vermeersen, Bert

    2017-04-01

    Many icy satellites or planets contain features which suggest a (past) reorientation of the body, such as the tiger stripes on Enceladus and the heart-shaped Sputnik Planum on Pluto. Most of these icy bodies are tidally locked and this creates a large tidal bulge which is about three times of its centrifugal (equatorial) bulge. To study the reorientation of such rotating tidally deformed body is complicated and most previous studies apply the so-called fluid limit method. The fluid limit approach ignores the viscous response of the body and assumes that it immediately reaches its fluid limit when simulating the reorientation due to a changing load. As a result, this method can only simulate cases when the change in the load is much slower than the dominant viscous modes of the body. For other kinds of load, for instance, a Heaviside load due to an impact which creates an instant relocation of mass, it does not give us a prediction of how the reorientation is accomplished (e.g. How fast? Along which path?). We establish a new method which can give an accurate time-dependent solution for reorientation of rotating tidally deformed bodies. Our method can be applied both semi-analytically or numerically (with finite element method) to include features such as lateral heterogeneity or non-linear material. We also present an extension of our method to simulate the e ffect of a fossil bulge. With our method, we show that reorientation of a tidally deformed body driven by a positive mass anomaly near the poles has a preference for rotating around the tidal axis instead of towards it, contrary to predictions in previous studies. References Hu, H., W. van der Wal and L.L.A. Vermeersen (2017). A numerical method for reorientation of rotating tidally deformed visco-elastic bodies. Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, doi:10.1002/2016JE005114, 2016JE005114. Matsuyama, I. and Nimmo, F. (2007). Rotational stability of tidally deformed planetary bodies. Journal of Geophysical

  15. Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Domain Reorientation in Lead Zirconate Titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteves, Giovanni

    Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is a leading ferroelectric material used in many electronic applications such as sensors, actuators, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and multi-layered piezoelectric actuators (MA). Many of these applications use PZT in thin film form since it allows for miniaturization. However, the substrate's influence on the film, known as substrate clamping, is known to reduce performance. Typically, a reduction in substrate clamping increases the performance of the film, which can be achieved by partially releasing the film from the underlying substrate. The amount of domain reorientation is known to significantly contribute to the performance of PZT. Though, how mechanical constraint affects domain reorientation is not well-studied. Additionally, the crystallographic texture of the film is another characteristic which can influence the film's domain reorientation response. To elucidate the role of mechanical constraint and crystallographic texture on domain reorientation, X-ray diffraction (XRD) was conducted on PZT films with varying degrees of mechanical constraint and texture. Two release geometries were chosen to undercut the film from the substrate: a hole geometry and a beam geometry. XRD and finite element analysis results of a randomly oriented tetragonal PZT film showed that the overall electromechanical response of the film was greater for the beam-released film than the hole-released film. This is attributed to the beam-released film having a large etch pit, which allows for a greater portion of the PZT film to be near a constraint-free region, i.e. the edges of the etch pit. The susceptibility of different textures to changes in mechanical constraint was elucidated by characterizing the electromechanical response of PZT films with a {100} and {111} texture using XRD. {100} films exhibited the highest enhancement in non-180° domain reorientation when comparing the clamped film and beam-released film. These results are

  16. Use of geometric properties of landmark arrays for reorientation relative to remote cities and local objects.

    PubMed

    Mou, Weimin; Nankoo, Jean-François; Zhou, Ruojing; Spetch, Marcia L

    2014-03-01

    Five experiments investigated how human adults use landmark arrays in the immediate environment to reorient relative to the local environment and relative to remote cities. Participants learned targets' directions with the presence of a proximal 4 poles forming a rectangular shape and an array of more distal poles forming a rectangular shape. Then participants were disoriented and pointed to targets with the presence of the proximal poles or the distal poles. Participants' orientation was estimated by the mean of their pointing error across targets. The targets could be 7 objects in the immediate local environment in which the poles were located or 7 cities around Edmonton (Alberta, Canada) where the experiments occurred. The directions of the 7 cities could be learned from reading a map first and then from pointing to the cities when the poles were presented. The directions of the 7 cities could also be learned from viewing labels of cities moving back and forth in the specific direction in the immediate local environment in which the poles were located. The shape of the array of the distal poles varied in salience by changing the number of poles on each edge of the rectangle (2 vs. 34). The results showed that participants regained their orientation relative to local objects using the distal poles with 2 poles on each edge; participants could not reorient relative to cities using the distal pole array with 2 poles on each edge but could reorient relative to cities using the distal pole array with 34 poles on each edge. These results indicate that use of cues in reorientation depends not only on the cue salience but also on which environment people need to reorient to.

  17. Fluorescence quenching studies of potential-dependent DNA reorientation dynamics at glassy carbon electrode surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Cui, Chenchen; Higgins, Daniel A; Li, Jun

    2012-09-05

    The potential-dependent reorientation dynamics of double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) attached to planar glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surfaces were investigated. The orientation state of surface-bound ds-DNA was followed by monitoring the fluorescence from a 6-carboxyfluorescein (FAM6) fluorophore covalently linked to the distal end of the DNA. Positive potentials (i.e., +0.2 V vs open circuit potential, OCP) caused the ds-DNA to align parallel to the electrode surface, resulting in strong dipole-electrode quenching of FAM6 fluorescence. Switching of the GCE potential to negative values (i.e., -0.2 V vs OCP) caused the ds-DNA to reorient perpendicular to the electrode surface, with a concomitant increase in FAM6 fluorescence. In addition to the very fast (submilliseconds) dynamics of the initial reorientation process, slow (0.1-0.9 s) relaxation of FAM6 fluorescence to intermediate levels was also observed after potential switching. These dynamics have not been previously described in the literature. They are too slow to be explained by double layer charging, and chronoamperometry data showed no evidence of such effects. Both the amplitude and rate of the dynamics were found to depend upon buffer concentration, and ds-DNA length, demonstrating a dependence on the double layer field. The dynamics are concluded to arise from previously undetected complexities in the mechanism of potential-dependent ds-DNA reorientation. The possible origins of these dynamics are discussed. A better understanding of these dynamics will lead to improved models for potential-dependent ds-DNA reorientation at electrode surfaces and will facilitate the development of advanced electrochemical devices for detection of target DNAs.

  18. Out-of-plane orientation alignment and reorientation dynamics of gold nanorods in polymer nanocomposite films.

    PubMed

    Glor, Ethan C; Ferrier, Robert C; Li, Chen; Composto, Russell J; Fakhraai, Zahra

    2017-03-15

    In this work, we develop a novel, in situ characterization method to measure the orientation order parameter and investigate the reorientation and reshaping dynamics of polymer grafted gold nanorods (AuNRs) in polymer nanocomposite (PNC) thin films. The long aspect-ratio of AuNRs results in two well-defined plasmon resonance modes, allowing the optical properties of the PNC to be tuned over a wide spectral range. The alignment of the AuNRs in a particular direction can also be used to further tune these optical properties. We utilize variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry as a unique technique to measure the optical properties of PNC films containing AuNRs at various angles of incidence, and use effective index of refraction analysis of the PNC to relate the birefringence in the film due to changes of the plasmon coupling to the orientation order parameter of AuNRs. Polymer thin films (ca. 70 nm) of either polystyrene (PS) or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) containing PS grafted AuNRs are probed with ellipsometry, and the resulting extinction coefficient spectra compare favorably with more traditional analytical techniques, electron microscopy (EM) and optical absorbance (vis-NIR) spectroscopy. Furthermore, variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry measures optical birefringence, which allows us to determine the in- and out-of plane order of the AuNRs, a property that is not easily accessible using other measurement techniques. Additionally, this technique is applied in situ to demonstrate that AuNRs undergo a rapid (ca. 1-5 hours) reorientation before undergoing a slower (ca. 24 hours) rod to sphere shape transition. The reorientation behavior is different depending on the polymer matrix used. In the athermal case (i.e. PS matrix), the AuNRs reorient isotropically, while in PMMA the AuNRs do not become isotropic, which we hypothesize is due to PMMA preferentially wetting the silica substrate, leaving less vertical space for the AuNRs to reorient.

  19. 12 CFR 225.23 - Expedited action for certain nonbanking proposals by well-run bank holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CONTROL (REGULATION Y) Regulations Nonbanking Activities and Acquisitions by Bank Holding Companies § 225... acquisition of voting securities or assets of a company engaged in nonbanking activities that the Board has... proposals by well-run bank holding companies. 225.23 Section 225.23 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM...

  20. Treatment of Chronic Breath-Holding in an Adult with Severe Mental Retardation: A Clinical Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Derek D.; Martens, Brian K.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a clinical case study surrounding the behavioral assessment and operant treatment of, an adult with severe mental retardation who engaged in chronic breath-holding. In this clinical case, previous neurological and medical testing had ruled out biological bases for the individual's breath-holding. A functional behavioral assessment…

  1. 75 FR 38129 - The Berry Company LLC, a Subsidiary of Local Insight Media Holdings, Inc., Formally Known as...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... Employment and Training Administration The Berry Company LLC, a Subsidiary of Local Insight Media Holdings... Local Insight Media Holdings, Inc., formally known as Local Insight Yellow Pages, including on-site... certification for workers of the subject firm. The workers are engaged in telephone directory advertising...

  2. Digital first order hold circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Fred N. (Inventor); Wensley, Gerald J. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    There is provided a digitally controlled first order hold circuit and waveform synthesizer for digitally controlling the representation of a function over an approximation interval. In accordance with the operation of the invention, the first order hold circuit and waveform generator receives a digital data input signal which contains initial condition data, up/down data, and slope data for the approximation interval. The initial condition data is loaded into an up/down counter which is incremented using counting data at a rate depending on the value of the slope data and in a direction depending on the value of the up-down data. In order to minimize delays arising from data acquistion, two frequency synthesizer circuits are provided such that one frequency synthesizer provides counting data while the other frequency synthesizer receives slope data. During alternating intervals, the other frequency synthesizer circuit provides counting data while the other circuit receives slope data. In addition, long length data input signals covering a plurality of approximation intervals are provided to reduce the demands on a main system central processing unit.

  3. Ultrasonic methods for locating hold-up

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.N.; Olinger, C.T.

    1995-09-01

    Hold-up remains one of the major contributing factors to unaccounted for materials and can be a costly problem in decontamination and decommissioning activities. Ultrasonic techniques are being developed to noninvasively monitor hold-up in process equipment where the inner surface of such equipment may be in contact with the hold-up material. These techniques may be useful in improving hold-up measurements as well as optimizing decontamination techniques.

  4. 76 FR 36625 - Mutual Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Holding Company AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual Holding Company. OMB Number: 1550-0072. Form Numbers: MHC-1 (OTS Form... whether the applicant meets the statutory and regulatory criteria to form a mutual holding company...

  5. 76 FR 20458 - Mutual Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Holding Company AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual Holding Company. OMB Number: 1550-0072. Form Numbers: MHC-1 (OTS Form... whether the applicant meets the statutory and regulatory criteria to form a mutual holding company...

  6. 9 CFR 2.102 - Holding facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Holding facility. 2.102 Section 2.102 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Compliance With Standards and Holding Period § 2.102 Holding facility. (a) If any...

  7. 9 CFR 2.102 - Holding facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Holding facility. 2.102 Section 2.102 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Compliance With Standards and Holding Period § 2.102 Holding facility. (a) If any...

  8. 9 CFR 2.102 - Holding facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Holding facility. 2.102 Section 2.102 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Compliance With Standards and Holding Period § 2.102 Holding facility. (a) If any...

  9. 9 CFR 2.102 - Holding facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Holding facility. 2.102 Section 2.102 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Compliance With Standards and Holding Period § 2.102 Holding facility. (a) If any...

  10. 9 CFR 2.102 - Holding facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Holding facility. 2.102 Section 2.102 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Compliance With Standards and Holding Period § 2.102 Holding facility. (a) If any...

  11. 47 CFR 73.7005 - Holding period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Holding period. 73.7005 Section 73.7005... Applications for Noncommercial Educational Stations on Non-Reserved Channels § 73.7005 Holding period. (a... holding period. From the grant of the construction permit and continuing until the facility has achieved...

  12. Functional Analysis and Intervention for Breath Holding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Lee; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A functional analysis of breath-holding episodes in a 7-year-old girl with severe mental retardation and Cornelia-de-Lange syndrome indicated that breath holding served an operant function, primarily to gain access to attention. Use of extinction, scheduled attention, and a picture card communication system decreased breath holding. (Author/SW)

  13. Functional Analysis and Intervention for Breath Holding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Lee; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A functional analysis of breath-holding episodes in a 7-year-old girl with severe mental retardation and Cornelia-de-Lange syndrome indicated that breath holding served an operant function, primarily to gain access to attention. Use of extinction, scheduled attention, and a picture card communication system decreased breath holding. (Author/SW)

  14. 77 FR 27061 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking Activities The companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12...

  15. 77 FR 1072 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking Activities The companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y,...

  16. 12 CFR Appendix E to Part 360 - Hold File Structure

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... data file type and the date of the extract. The files will be encrypted using an FDIC-supplied.... Character (25). 7. HD_Hold_Amt Hold Amount Decimal (14,2). Dollar amount of the hold 8. HD_Hold_Reason Hold... Order Hold • FD = FDIC hold • OT = Other (do not include daily operational type holds) 9....

  17. Differential Gene Expression in Brassica rapa Roots After Reorientation and Clinorotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edge, Andrea; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    Seedlings align their growth axes parallel to the gravity vector. Any growth adjustment affects genes. We examined these changes in Brassica rapa roots that were reoriented and clinorotated. Gene expression levels related to the actin cytoskeleton (ACT7 and ADK1) and auxin transport (IAA5, PIN1, PIN3, AGR1, ARG1) were assessed in roots grown for 42 hours and then either reoriented to 90° for 15 min, 1, 2 and 3 hours or clinorotated vertically or horizontally for 42 hrs at 2 rpm. After these treatments, roots from 20 seedlings were divided into three sections, the root tip, elongation zone, and maturation zone. The samples from corresponding treatments were combined for RNA extraction, reverse transcription and analysis by quantitative PCR. The results show that gene expression changes in response to duration of reorientation and orientation during clinorotation. All genes, except PIN1 and AGR1 were upregulated in the tip after 2 hours of reorientation. Expression of genes also varied between the root sections except for PIN1, which was uniformly expressed. ADK1 was the only gene that showed consistent down-regulation in all three root regions in vertically and horizontally clinorotated roots (ca 30% of controls). In contrast, ADK1 was upregulated (more than 150 fold) in the tip of roots that were reoriented for 2 hours but little upregulation after one hour (less than 2 fold compared to controls). Our results indicate that gene expression during the gravitropic response changes over time with the tip region being the most dynamic tissue in the root. The large upregulation of ADK1 at 2 h after reorientation may be related to the persistence of the gravitropic response. Because of the variability of the expression profiles, analyses that are based on the entire root miss tissue specific changes in gene expression. Differences in gene expression after vertical and horizontal clinorotation indicates that the graviresponse system is sensitive not just to the magnitude

  18. Paleomagnetic Reorientation of Structural Elements in Drill Cores: an example from Tolhuaca Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Flores, P.; Veloso, E. E.; Cembrano, J. M.; Sánchez, P.; Iriarte, S.; Lohmar, S.

    2013-12-01

    Reorientation of mesoscopic faults, veins and fractures recovered from drilling is critical to construct reliable structural models that can account for their architecture and deformation regime. However, oriented cores are expensive and time consuming to drill. Some techniques achieve reorientation by introducing tools into the borehole. Problems arise when boreholes are unstable or collapse. One alternative technique allowing reorientation is to obtain reliable paleomagnetic vectors to reorient each core piece after drilling. Here, we present stable and reliable remnant magnetic vectors calculated from the Tol-1 core to analyze the geometry of the fracture network and its relationship to regional tectonic. Tol-1 core is a vertical, 1073 m deep geothermal well, drilled at the Tolhuaca Geothermal Field in the Southern Volcanic Zone of the Andes by MRP Geothermal Chile Ltda (formerly GGE Chile SpA) in 2009. The core consists of basaltic/andesitic volcanic rocks with subordinate pyroclastic/volcaniclastic units, with probable Pleistocene age. Fault planes with slickenlines and mineral fiber kinematic indicators are common in the upper 700 m of the core. Calcite, quartz and calcite-quartz veins are recognized along of entire core, whereas epidote-quartz and calcite-epidote veins occur in the last 350 m, minor chlorite, anhydrite and clay-minerals are present. Orientations of structural features in the core were measured with a goniometer using the core's axis and a false north for each piece; hence, orientation data has a false strike but a real dip. To achieve total reorientation of the pieces, we collected 200 standard-size paleomagnetic specimens, ensuring that at least four of them were recovered from continuous pieces. Thermal (up to 700°C) and alternating field demagnetization (up to 90mT on steps of 2mT) methods were used to isolate a stable remnant magnetization (RM) vector, and each technique yielded similar results. RM vectors were recovered between 0 to 25

  19. Measuring molecular reorientation at liquid surfaces with time-resolved sum-frequency spectroscopy: a theoretical framework.

    PubMed

    Nienhuys, Han-Kwang; Bonn, Mischa

    2009-05-28

    A theoretical framework is presented for the design and analysis of ultrafast time- and polarization-resolved surface vibrational spectroscopy, aimed at elucidating surface molecular reorientational motion in real time. Vibrational excitation with linearly polarized light lifts the azimuthal symmetry of the surface transition-dipole distribution, causing marked, time-dependent changes in the surface sum-frequency generation (SFG) intensity. The subsequent recovery of the SFG signal generally reflects both vibrational relaxation and reorientational motion of surface molecules. We present experimental schemes that allow direct quantification of the time scale of surface molecular reorientational diffusive motion.

  20. Hydride reorientation in Zircaloy-4 examined by in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekes, H. E.; Jones, N. G.; Lindley, T. C.; Dye, D.

    2016-09-01

    The phenomenon of stress-reorientation has been investigated using in situ X-ray diffraction during the thermomechanical cycling of hydrided Zircaloy-4 tensile specimens. Results have shown that loading along a sample's transverse direction (TD) leads to a greater degree of hydride reorientation when compared to rolling direction (RD)-aligned samples. The elastic lattice micro-strains associated with radially oriented hydrides have been revealed to be greater than those oriented circumferentially, a consequence of strain accommodation. Evidence of hydride redistribution after cycling, to α-Zr grains oriented in a more favourable orientation when under an applied stress, has also been observed and its behaviour has been found to be highly dependent on the loading axis. Finally, thermomechanical loading across multiple cycles has been shown to reduce the difference in terminal solid solubility of hydrogen during dissolution (TSSD,H) and precipitation (TSSP,H).

  1. Light-induced molecular adsorption and reorientation at polyvinylcinnamate-fluorinated/liquid-crystal interface

    SciTech Connect

    Francescangeli, O.; Lucchetti, L.; Simoni, F.; Stanic, V.; Mazzulla, A.

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out a detailed experimental study, by means of x-ray reflectometry (XRR) and half-leaky guided mode (HLGM) optical characterization, of the light-induced molecular adsorption and reorientation at the polyvinylcinnamate-fluorinated (PVCN-F)/liquid-crystal (LC) interface of a LC cell doped with the azo-dye methyl red (MR). The XRR data allowed characterizing the microscopic structure of the adsorbed dye layer both before irradiation (dark adsorption) and after irradiation (light-induced adsorption). The HLGM optical characterization has made possible the experimental determination of the nematic director profile in the LC cell and evaluation of the effects of light-induced adsorption on the LC anchoring conditions. The experimental findings have confirmed the formation of a dark-adsorbed layer and are in agreement with the absorption model previously proposed to account for the complex phenomenology related to light-induced anchoring and reorientation in dye-doped liquid crystals.

  2. Curved optical solitons subject to transverse acceleration in reorientational soft matter.

    PubMed

    Laudyn, Urszula A; Kwaśny, Michał; Sala, Filip A; Karpierz, Mirosław A; Smyth, Noel F; Assanto, Gaetano

    2017-09-28

    We demonstrate that optical spatial solitons with non-rectilinear trajectories can be made to propagate in a uniaxial dielectric with a transversely modulated orientation of the optic axis. Exploiting the reorientational nonlinearity of nematic liquid crystals and imposing a linear variation of the background alignment of the molecular director, we observe solitons whose trajectories have either a monotonic or a non-monotonic curvature in the observation plane of propagation, depending on either the synergistic or counteracting roles of wavefront distortion and birefringent walk-off, respectively. The observed effect is well modelled in the weakly nonlinear regime using momentum conservation of the self-collimated beams in the presence of the spatial nonlocality of the medium response. Since reorientational solitons can act as passive waveguides for other weak optical signals, these results introduce a wealth of possibilities for all-optical signal routing and light-induced photonic interconnects.

  3. Influence of an electric field on the spin-reorientation transition in Ni/Cu(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard, Lukas; Bonell, Frédéric; Suzuki, Yoshishige; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2014-10-13

    Magnetoelectric coupling offers the possibility to change the magnetic state of a material by an applied electric field. Over the last few years, metallic systems have come up as simple prototypes for this interaction. While the previous studies focused on Fe and Co thin films or their alloys, here we demonstrate magnetoelectric coupling in a Ni thin film which is close to a spin-reorientation transition. Our magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements on 10 ML of Ni/Cu(100) show a considerable influence of the applied electric field on the magnetism. This rounds off the range of magnetic metals that exhibit magnetoelectric coupling, and it reveals the possibility of an electric field control of a spin-reorientation transition.

  4. Magnetization and magnetostriction of Terfenol-D near spin reorientation boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ben L.; Jin, Yongmei M.

    2012-05-01

    Magnetization and magnetostriction behaviors of quasi-binary TbxDy1-xFe2 alloys (Terfenol-D) near spin reorientation boundary (SRB) between <111> and <100> easy axes are studied by computer simulation of magnetic domain rotations under increasing magnetic field and compressive stress along [112] growth direction. The simulation results reveal coexistence of <111> and <100> domains near SRB and show that the switching field first decreases then increases when crossing the SRB from the <100> region into the <111> region of the quasi-binary phase diagram, while the magnetostriction first increases then saturates, thus providing an optimal combination of large magnetostriction and low switching field near the SRB as desired for actuator application. This finding has general implications for other magnetostrictive quasi-binary alloys that also exhibit spin reorientation phenomenon, allowing material design for improved magnetostrictive property near SRB, in analogy to morphotropic phase boundary ferroelectrics.

  5. Effect of dopant nanoparticles on reorientation process in polymer-dispersed liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobov, K. V.; Zharkova, G. M.; Syzrantsev, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the experimental data of the nanoscale powders application for doping polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (PDLC) was represented in this work. A model based on the separation of the liquid crystals reorientation process on the surface mode and the volume mode was proposed and tested. In the research the wide-spread model mixture PDLC were used. But alumina nanoparticles were the distinctive ones obtained by electron beam evaporation. The proposed model allowed to conclude that the nanoparticles localization at the surface of the droplets (as in the Pickering emulsion) lead to the variation of the connection force between the liquid crystals and the polymer. The effect of nanoparticles resulted in an acceleration of the reorientation process near the surface when the control field is turned on and in a deceleration when it is turned off. The effect for the different size particles was confirmed.

  6. A mechanism for reorientation of cortical microtubule arrays driven by microtubule severing.

    PubMed

    Lindeboom, Jelmer J; Nakamura, Masayoshi; Hibbel, Anneke; Shundyak, Kostya; Gutierrez, Ryan; Ketelaar, Tijs; Emons, Anne Mie C; Mulder, Bela M; Kirik, Viktor; Ehrhardt, David W

    2013-12-06

    Environmental and hormonal signals cause reorganization of microtubule arrays in higher plants, but the mechanisms driving these transitions have remained elusive. The organization of these arrays is required to direct morphogenesis. We discovered that microtubule severing by the protein katanin plays a crucial and unexpected role in the reorientation of cortical arrays, as triggered by blue light. Imaging and genetic experiments revealed that phototropin photoreceptors stimulate katanin-mediated severing specifically at microtubule intersections, leading to the generation of new microtubules at these locations. We show how this activity serves as the basis for a mechanism that amplifies microtubules orthogonal to the initial array, thereby driving array reorientation. Our observations show how severing is used constructively to build a new microtubule array.

  7. Medium-frequency impulsive-thrust-activated liquid hydrogen reorientation with Geyser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    Efficient technique are studied for accomplishing propellant resettling through the minimization of propellant usage through impulsive thrust. A comparison between the use of constant-thrust and impulsive-thrust accelerations for the activation of propellant resettlement shows that impulsive thrust is superior to constant thrust for liquid reorientation in a reduced-gravity environment. This study shows that when impulsive thrust with 0.1-1.0-, and 10-Hz frequencies for liquid-fill levels in the range between 30-80 percent is considered, the selection of 1.0-Hz-frequency impulsive thrust over the other frequency ranges of impulsive thrust is the optimum. Characteristics of the slosh waves excited during the course of 1.0-Hz-frequency impulsive-thrust liquid reorientation were also analyzed.

  8. A structured continuum modelling framework for martensitic transformation and reorientation in shape memory materials.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, Davide; Pence, Thomas J

    2016-04-28

    Models for shape memory material behaviour can be posed in the framework of a structured continuum theory. We study such a framework in which a scalar phase fraction field and a tensor field of martensite reorientation describe the material microstructure, in the context of finite strains. Gradients of the microstructural descriptors naturally enter the formulation and offer the possibility to describe and resolve phase transformation localizations. The constitutive theory is thoroughly described by a single free energy function in conjunction with a path-dependent dissipation function. Balance laws in the form of differential equations are obtained and contain both bulk and surface terms, the latter in terms of microstreses. A natural constraint on the tensor field for martensite reorientation gives rise to reactive fields in these balance laws. Conditions ensuring objectivity as well as the relation of this framework to that provided by currently used models for shape memory alloy behaviour are discussed.

  9. Planar reorientation of a free-free beam in space using embedded electromechanical actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolmanovsky, Ilya V.; Mcclamroch, N. Harris

    1993-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the planar reorientation of a free-free beam in zero gravity space can be accomplished by periodically changing the shape of the beam using embedded electromechanical actuators. The dynamics which determine the shape of the free-free beam is assumed to be characterized by the Euler-Bernoulli equation, including material damping, with appropriate boundary conditions. The coupling between the rigid body motion and the flexible motion is explained using the angular momentum expression which includes rotatory inertia and kinematically exact effects. A control scheme is proposed where the embedded actuators excite the flexible motion of the beam so that it rotates in the desired sense with respect to a fixed inertial reference. Relations are derived which relate the average rotation rate to the amplitudes and the frequencies of the periodic actuation signal and the properties of the beam. These reorientation maneuvers can be implemented by using feedback control.

  10. Significance of the dihedral-effect for a combat aircraft in rapid fuselage-reorientation maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bocvarov, Spiro; Cliff, Eugene M.; Lutze, Frederick H.

    1992-01-01

    In the quest for understanding problems of supermaneuverability for combat aircraft, a study is presented about the role the dihedral-effect can have in fuselage-reorientation maneuvers that involve high angles of attack. A mathematical model for attitude maneuvers is developed, which accurately represents the High Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle, including thrust-vectoring generated propulsive moments. The fuselage-reorientation problem is posed as an unconstrained time-optimal control problem. Results for a few families of extremal trajectories are obtained, and the global role of the dihedral effect in the course of the corresponding maneuvers is discussed. In addition, a detailed case-study is presented for an extremal trajectory which utilizes the dihedral effect with considerable benefit.

  11. Control of spin ambiguity during reorientation of an energy dissipating body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. H.; Cenker, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    A quasi-rigid body initially spinning about its minor principal axis and experiencing energy dissipation will enter a tumbling mode and eventually reorient itself such that stable spin about its major principal axis is achieved. However, in this final state the body may be spinning in a positive or negative sense with respect to its major axis and aligned in a positive or negative sense with the inertially fixed angular momentum vector. This ambiguity can be controlled only through an active system. The associated dynamical formulations and simulations of uncontrolled reorientations are presented. Three control schemes are discussed and results offered for specific examples. These schemes include displacement of internal masses, spinning up of internal inertia, and reaction jets, all of which have demonstrated the ability to control spin ambiguity.

  12. Paleomagnetic reorientation of San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) core

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pares, J.M.; Schleicher, A.M.; van der Pluijm, B.A.; Hickman, S.

    2008-01-01

    We present a protocol for using paleomagnetic analysis to determine the absolute orientation of core recovered from the SAFOD borehole. Our approach is based on determining the direction of the primary remanent magnetization of a spot core recovered from the Great Valley Sequence during SAFOD Phase 2 and comparing its direction to the expected reference field direction for the Late Cretaceous in North America. Both thermal and alternating field demagnetization provide equally resolved magnetization, possibly residing in magnetite, that allow reorientation. Because compositionally similar siltstones and fine-grained sandstones were encountered in the San Andreas Fault Zone during Stage 2 rotary drilling, we expect that paleomagnetic reorientation will yield reliable core orientations for continuous core acquired from directly within and adjacent to the San Andreas Fault during SAFOD Phase 3, which will be key to interpretation of spatial properties of these rocks. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Pluto followed its heart: reorientation and faulting of Pluto due to volatile loading in Sputnik Planum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle Keane, James; Matsuyama, Isamu; Kamata, Shunichi; Steckloff, Jordan

    2016-10-01

    The New Horizons flyby of Pluto revealed the dwarf planet to be a strikingly diverse, geologically active world. Perhaps the most intriguing feature on the New Horizons encounter hemisphere is Sputnik Planum—a 1000 km diameter, probable impact basin, filled with several kilometers of actively convecting volatile ices (N2, CH4, CO). One salient characteristic of Sputnik Planum is its curious alignment with the Pluto-Charon tidal axis. The alignment of large geologic features with principal axis of inertia (such as the tidal axis) is the hallmark of global reorientation, i.e. true polar wander. Here we show that the present location of Sputnik Planum is a natural consequence of loading of 1-2 km of volatile ices within the Sputnik Planum basin. Larger volatile ice thicknesses (like those inferred from studies of ice convection within Sputnik Planum) betray an underlying negative gravity anomaly associated with the basin. As Pluto reoriented in response to the loading of volatile ices within Sputnik Planum, stresses accumulated within the lithosphere (as each geographic location experiences a change in tidal/rotational potential). These reorientation stresses, coupled with loading stresses, and stresses from the freezing of a subsurface ocean resulted in the fracturing of Pluto's lithosphere in a characteristic, global pattern of extensional faults. Our predicted pattern of extensional faults due to this reorientation closely replicates the observed distribution of faults on Pluto (more so than global expansion, orbit migration, de-spinning, or loading alone). Sputnik Planum likely formed ~60° northwest of its present location, and was loaded with volatile ices over millions of years due to seasonal volatile transport cycles. This result places Pluto in a truly unique category of planetary bodies where volatiles are not only controlling surface geology and atmospheric processes, but they are also directly controlling the orientation of the entire dwarf planet

  14. Molecular Simulations of Hydrogen Bond Cluster Size and Reorientation Dynamics in Liquid and Glassy Azole Systems.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qinfang; Harvey, Jacob A; Greco, Katharine V; Auerbach, Scott M

    2016-10-06

    We simulated the dynamics of azole groups (pyrazole, imidazole, 1,2,3-triazole, 1,2,4-triazole, and tetrazole) as neat liquids and tethered via linkers to aliphatic backbones to determine how tethering and varying functional groups affect hydrogen bond networks and reorientation dynamics, both factors which are thought to influence proton conduction. We used the DL_Poly_2 molecular dynamics code with the GAFF force field to simulate tethered systems over the temperature range 200-900 K and the corresponding neat liquids under liquid state temperatures at standard pressure. We computed hydrogen bond cluster sizes; orientational order parameters; orientational correlation functions associated with functional groups, linkers, and backbones; time scales; and activation energies associated with orientational randomization. All tethered systems exhibit a liquid to glassy-solid transition upon cooling from 600 to 500 K, as evidenced by orientational order parameters and correlation functions. Tethering the azoles was generally found to produce hydrogen bond cluster sizes similar to those in untethered liquids and hydrogen bond lifetimes longer than those in liquids. The simulated rates of functional group reorientation decreased dramatically upon tethering. The activation energies associated with orientational randomization agree well with NMR data for tethered imidazole systems at lower temperatures and for tethered 1,2,3-triazole systems at both low- and high-temperature ranges. Overall, our simulations corroborate the notion that tethering functional groups dramatically slows the process of reorientation. We found a linear correlation between gas-phase hydrogen bond energies and tethered functional group reorientation barriers for all azoles except for imidazole, which acts as an outlier because of both atomic charges and molecular structure.

  15. GOLPH3 drives cell migration by promoting Golgi reorientation and directional trafficking to the leading edge.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mengke; Peterman, Marshall C; Davis, Robert L; Oegema, Karen; Shiau, Andrew K; Field, Seth J

    2016-12-01

    The mechanism of directional cell migration remains an important problem, with relevance to cancer invasion and metastasis. GOLPH3 is a common oncogenic driver of human cancers, and is the first oncogene that functions at the Golgi in trafficking to the plasma membrane. Overexpression of GOLPH3 is reported to drive enhanced cell migration. Here we show that the phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate/GOLPH3/myosin 18A/F-actin pathway that is critical for Golgi-to-plasma membrane trafficking is necessary and limiting for directional cell migration. By linking the Golgi to the actin cytoskeleton, GOLPH3 promotes reorientation of the Golgi toward the leading edge. GOLPH3 also promotes reorientation of lysosomes (but not other organelles) toward the leading edge. However, lysosome function is dispensable for migration and the GOLPH3 dependence of lysosome movement is indirect, via GOLPH3's effect on the Golgi. By driving reorientation of the Golgi to the leading edge and driving forward trafficking, particularly to the leading edge, overexpression of GOLPH3 drives trafficking to the leading edge of the cell, which is functionally important for directional cell migration. Our identification of a novel pathway for Golgi reorientation controlled by GOLPH3 provides new insight into the mechanism of directional cell migration with important implications for understanding GOLPH3's role in cancer. © 2016 Xing, Peterman, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  16. Efficient reorientation of a deformable body in space: A free-free beam example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolmanovsky, Ilya V.; Mcclamroch, N. Harris

    1993-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the planar reorientation of a free-free beam in zero gravity space can be accomplished by periodically changing the shape of the beam using internal actuators. A control scheme is proposed in which electromechanical actuators excite the flexible motion of the beam so that it rotates in the desired manner with respect to a fixed inertial reference. The results can be viewed as an extension of previous work to a distributed parameter case.

  17. Spatial reorientation decline in aging: the combination of geometry and landmarks.

    PubMed

    Caffò, Alessandro O; Lopez, Antonella; Spano, Giuseppina; Serino, Silvia; Cipresso, Pietro; Stasolla, Fabrizio; Savino, Michelina; Lancioni, Giulio E; Riva, Giuseppe; Bosco, Andrea

    2017-07-20

    The study is focused on the assessment of reorientation skills in a sample of community-dwelling elderly people, manipulating landmarks and geometric (layout) information. A neuropsychological assessment was administered to 286 elderly participants, divided into six groups (healthy controls, HC; four subgroups of participants with mild cognitive impairment, MCI; participants with probable dementia, Prob_D) and tested with the Virtual Reorientation Test (VReoT). VReoT manipulated different spatial cues: geometry and landmarks (proximal and distal). Compared with HC, participants with MCI and Prob_D showed to be impaired in tasks involving geometry, landmarks and a combination of them. Both single and multiple domain impairment in MCI had an impact on reorientation performance. Moreover, VReoT was marginally able to discriminate between amnesic and non-amnesic MCI. The occurrence of getting lost events seemed to be associated to learning of geometric information. The associative strength between landmark and target plays an important role in affecting spatial orientation performance of cognitively impaired participants. Geometry significantly supports landmark information and becomes helpful with the increase of cognitive impairment which is linked to a decrement in landmark encoding. VReoT seems to represent a reliable evaluation supplement for spatial orientation deficits in prodromal stages of dementia.

  18. Local and long-range realizations of a spin-reorientation surface phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, G.; Winch, H.; Belanger, R.; Nguyen, P. H.; Venus, D.

    2017-03-01

    The spin-reorientation transition of an ultrathin film from perpendicular to in-plane magnetization is driven by a competition between dipole and anisotropy energies. In situ measurements of the magnetic susceptibility of Fe/2 monolayers (ML) Ni/W(110) films as a function of Fe coverage, made as the films are deposited at constant temperature, show two clear peaks that are described quantitatively as a long-range and a local realization of the transition. In the long-range realization, the susceptibility probes the striped domain pattern that is formed in response to the balance of energetics on a mesoscopic scale. Here the reorientation transition occurs at a noninteger layer thickness. In the local realization, the susceptibility probes the response of small islands with in-plane anisotropy in the third atomic Fe layer that are grown on the second atomic Fe layer, which has perpendicular anisotropy. It is a response to the local finite-size, metastable energetics due to discrete steps in thickness. An excellent quantitative description of the susceptibility data is obtained when both local and long-range aspects of the spin-reorientation transition are included.

  19. Is height a core geometric cue for navigation? Young children's use of height in reorientation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qingfen; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Di; Shao, Yi

    2015-02-01

    With respect to reorientation, children older than 1.5 to 2 years can use geometric cues (distance and left/right sense). However, because previous studies have focused mainly on the plane geometric properties, little is known about the role of information with respect to vertical dimension in children's reorientation. The current study aimed to examine whether and how 3- and 4-year-old children use height information to search for a hidden toy when disoriented in a small enclosure. In a slant-ceiling rectangular room and a slant-ceiling square room, 4-year-olds were able to use height information to reorient and search for the toy in the correct corner, whereas 3-year-olds were not able to do so. Our results suggest that children can, at least by the age of 4 years, use height information and that height is not used as early as other geometric properties that are in the core geometry system for navigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Postoperative mental impairment in hip fracture patients. A randomized study of reorientation measures in 223 patients.

    PubMed

    Strömberg, L; Ohlén, G; Nordin, C; Lindgren, U; Svensson, O

    1999-06-01

    Mental impairment is a common and serious complication in geriatric surgery. We studied 223 hip fracture patients. They were over 64 years of age (mean 81), with no history of mental deterioration and acutely admitted to hospital from independent living conditions. They were randomized into two groups. One of these was subjected to reorientation measures during the perioperative phase, i.e., presurgery admission to the orthopedic ward, accompanied home visits during the hospital stay and access to reorientation devices--they received a large clock, calendar, radio, TV-set, telephone and were encouraged to wear their own clothing. Otherwise, there were no differences in the treatment given to the two groups. We used monitoring of cognitive function with the Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire (SPMSQ) and a feedback program for evaluation of the treatment results. There was a low incidence of postoperative cognitive deterioration in both groups, compared with historical controls. However, no difference in mental status was noted when we compared the two groups. The conclusion is that attributes were less important than the psychological environment for postoperative mental deterioration. The mean total continuous hospitalization (transfers between departments and hospitals included) in the reorientation group was 22 (95% CI: 17-43) days, the corresponding figures for the controls were 30 (14-29) days.

  1. Reorientation and faulting of Pluto due to volatile loading within Sputnik Planitia.

    PubMed

    Keane, James T; Matsuyama, Isamu; Kamata, Shunichi; Steckloff, Jordan K

    2016-12-01

    Pluto is an astoundingly diverse, geologically dynamic world. The dominant feature is Sputnik Planitia-a tear-drop-shaped topographic depression approximately 1,000 kilometres in diameter possibly representing an ancient impact basin. The interior of Sputnik Planitia is characterized by a smooth, craterless plain three to four kilometres beneath the surrounding rugged uplands, and represents the surface of a massive unit of actively convecting volatile ices (N2, CH4 and CO) several kilometres thick. This large feature is very near the Pluto-Charon tidal axis. Here we report that the location of Sputnik Planitia is the natural consequence of the sequestration of volatile ices within the basin and the resulting reorientation (true polar wander) of Pluto. Loading of volatile ices within a basin the size of Sputnik Planitia can substantially alter Pluto's inertia tensor, resulting in a reorientation of the dwarf planet of around 60 degrees with respect to the rotational and tidal axes. The combination of this reorientation, loading and global expansion due to the freezing of a possible subsurface ocean generates stresses within the planet's lithosphere, resulting in a global network of extensional faults that closely replicate the observed fault networks on Pluto. Sputnik Planitia probably formed northwest of its present location, and was loaded with volatiles over million-year timescales as a result of volatile transport cycles on Pluto. Pluto's past, present and future orientation is controlled by feedbacks between volatile sublimation and condensation, changing insolation conditions and Pluto's interior structure.

  2. Interface reorientation of cryogenic liquids under non-isothermal boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulev, Nikolai; Basting, Steffen; Bänsch, Eberhard; Dreyer, Michael

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the capillary driven oscillations of the liquid-vapor interface in cryogenic systems under non-isothermal boundary conditions. The oscillations took place in a partly filled cylinder during the interface reorientation from its 1 g equilibrium position to the microgravity equilibrium position after a step reduction of gravity. The latter was achieved by dropping the experimental device in the drop tower of Bremen, providing 4.7 s of microgravity. Liquid argon (Tsat=87.3 K at 1013 hPa) and liquid methane (Tsat=111.7 K at 1013 hPa) were used as experimental liquids. Axial wall temperature gradients, corresponding to a linear increase of the wall temperature, were applied above the interface position prior to the experiments with values varying between 0.2 K/mm and 2.9 K/mm. Both liquids showed a qualitatively similar reorientation behavior. The reorientation characteristics were found to depend on the value of the applied gradient and on the material properties of the experimental liquids. Numerical simulation showed a good qualitative agreement with a previous experiment with 1.34 K/mm using liquid argon, demonstrating main characteristic features of the experiment.

  3. Why size counts: children's spatial reorientation in large and small enclosures.

    PubMed

    Learmonth, Amy E; Newcombe, Nora S; Sheridan, Natalie; Jones, Meredith

    2008-05-01

    When mobile organisms are spatially disoriented, for instance by rapid repetitive movement, they must re-establish orientation. Past research has shown that the geometry of enclosing spaces is consistently used for reorientation by a wide variety of species, but that non-geometric features are not always used. Based on these findings, some investigators have postulated a species-universal 'geometric module' that is transcended by the acquisition of spatial language at 6 years. This conclusion has been challenged, however, by findings that children as young as 18 months actually do use features to reorient in larger enclosures than those used in the original experiments. The reason for the room size effect is explored here in five experiments. Collectively, the data on age at which features are first used point to the importance of both restriction of movement in the small space and the fact that features are closer in the small space. In addition, success is seen at younger ages when the target object is adjacent to the feature. These results favor an adaptive combination model of spatial reorientation over a 'module-plus-language' view.

  4. Reorienting the mind: The impact of novel sounds on go/no-go performance.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Alicia; Parmentier, Fabrice B R; Elchlepp, Heike; Verbruggen, Frederick

    2015-10-01

    The present study explores the link between attentional reorienting and response inhibition. Recent behavioral and neuroscience work indicates that both might rely on similar cognitive and neural mechanisms. We tested 2 popular accounts of the overlap: The "circuit breaker" account, which assumes that unexpected events produce global suppression of motor output, and the "stimulus detection" account, which assumes that attention is reoriented to unexpected events. In Experiment 1, we presented standard and (unexpected) novel sounds in a go/no-go task. Consistent with the stimulus detection account, we found longer reaction times on go trials and higher rates of commission errors on no-go trials when these were preceded by a novel sound compared with a standard sound. In Experiment 2, novel and standard sounds acted as no-go signals. In this experiment, the novel sounds produced an improvement on no-go trials. This further highlights the importance of stimulus detection for response inhibition. Combined, the 2 experiments support the idea that attention is oriented to novel or unexpected events, impairing no-go performance if these events are irrelevant but enhancing no-go performance when they are relevant. Our findings also indicate that the popular circuit breaker account of the overlap between response inhibition and attentional reorienting needs some revision.

  5. Enhanced spin - Reorientation temperature and origin of magnetocapacitance in HoFeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotnana, Ganesh; Jammalamadaka, S. Narayana

    2016-11-01

    We report on the increase in the spin reorientation temperature in HoFe0.5Cr0.5O3 compound by isovalent substitution (Cr3+) at the Fe-site and the magnetocapacitance in the HoFeO3 compound. Spin reorientation transition is evident around 50 K and 150 K for the x=0 and x=0.5 compounds respectively. The increase in the spin reorientation transition temperature in case of x=0.5 compound can be attributed to the domination of the Ho3+-Fe3+ interaction over the Fe3+-Fe3+ interaction. Decrease in Néel temperature from 643 K (x=0) to 273 K (x=0.5) can be ascribed to the decrease in the interaction between antiferromagnetically aligned Fe3+ moments as a result of the dilution of the Fe3+ moments with the Cr3+ addition. From the magnetization M vs. magnetic field H variation it is evident that the coercivity, HC decreases for x=0.5 compound, hinting the magnetic softening of the HoFeO3 compound. Observed magnetocapacitance could be due to lossy dielectric mechanism in the present compound. Indeed, present results would be helpful in understanding the physics behind rare-earth orthoferrites.

  6. Simulation of frequency dependence of dielectric susceptibility for description of director reorientation dynamics of nematic LC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakulin, D. A.; Ivanov, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    Simulation of the liquid crystal behavior in an external electric field allows to determine the characteristics of the LC device for specific control signal. The reorientation of director tilt angles is described by the Frank-Oseen elasticity theory, by the Leslie-Ericksen hydrodynamics theory and also by Maxwell system of electromagnetic equations. Due to the fact that it is difficult to obtain analytical solution of dependencies polar and azimuthal angles on time it is necessary to use numerical methods. The numerical solution allows to determine the characteristics of the LC device for specific control signal, but it does not allow to solve the inverse problem. It is determining the necessary parameters of the control signal. To solve this problem, we obtained an approximate analytical solution of the dynamics equations of the director reorientation under the electric field for arbitrary values of the elastic constants and boundary conditions. The results of numerical simulation of the director reorientation under the electric field in hybrid-oriented structure of a dual-frequency nematic liquid crystal were obtained. It is shown that results of analytical solution are in good agreement with the results of computer simulation and experiment in case of small deformations of the LC layer and used approximations.

  7. Nonstationary local reorientation of a nematic liquid crystal in a cell with a silicon p- n junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, Yu. I.; Kolesnikov, D. A.; Kucheev, S. I.

    2014-09-01

    We report the first observation of the phenomenon of nonstationary local reorientation of a nematic liquid crystal (NLC), which is initiated by a reverse biased p- n junction in a cell with silicon substrate. The velocity of reorientation and the distance traveled by a reoriented nematic band (which is tenfold greater than the cell thickness) are determined by the p- n junction bias voltage. The band profile depends on the distribution of the surface conductivity, which has been set in this work either by irradiation with 30-keV Ga ions or by light-induced generation of nonequilibriun carriers in silicon. The local reorientation of NLC and the depletion of the silicon surface are explained by the influence of ion space charge in the liquid crystal.

  8. Phase winding of a nematic liquid crystal by dynamic localized reorientation of an azo-based self-assembled monolayer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yue; Fang, Guanjiu; Glaser, Matthew A; Maclennan, Joseph E; Korblova, Eva; Walba, David M; Clark, Noel A

    2014-08-12

    Azobenzene-based molecules forming a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) tethered to a glass surface are highly photosensitive and readily reorient liquid crystals in contact with them when illuminated with polarized actinic light. We probe the coupling of such monolayers to nematic liquid crystal in a hybrid cell by studying the dynamics of liquid crystal reorientation in response to local orientational changes of the monolayer induced by a focused actinic laser with a rotating polarization. The steady increase in the azimuth of the mean molecular orientation of the SAM around the laser beam locally reorients the nematic, winding up an extended set of nested rings of splay-bend nematic director reorientation until the cumulative elastic torque exceeds that of the surface coupling within the beam, after which the nematic director starts to slip. Quantitative analyses of the ring dynamics allow measurements of the anchoring strength of the azo-SAM and its interaction with the nematic liquid crystal.

  9. Cyclic stretch induces reorientation of cells in a Src family kinase- and p130Cas-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Niediek, Verena; Born, Simone; Hampe, Nico; Kirchgessner, Norbert; Merkel, Rudolf; Hoffmann, Bernd

    2012-02-01

    Recognition of external mechanical signals by cells is an essential process for life. One important mechanical signal experienced by various cell types, e.g. around blood vessels, within the lung epithelia or around the intestine, is cyclic stretch. As a response, many cell types reorient their actin cytoskeleton and main cell axis almost perpendicular to the direction of stretch. Despite the vital necessity of cellular adaptation to cyclic stretch, the underlying mechanosensory signal cascades are far from being understood. Here we show an important function of Src-family kinase activity in cellular reorientation upon cyclic stretch. Deletion of all three family members, namely c-Src, Yes and Fyn (SYF), results in a strongly impaired cell reorientation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts with an only incomplete reorientation upon expression of c-Src. We further demonstrate that this reorientation phenotype of SYF-depleted cells is not caused by affected protein exchange dynamics within focal adhesions or altered cell force generation. Instead, Src-family kinases regulate the reorientation in a mechanotransduction-dependent manner, since knock-down and knock-out of p130Cas, a putative stretch sensor known to be phosphorylated by Src-family kinases, also reduce cellular reorientation upon cyclic stretch. This impaired reorientation is identical in intensity upon mutating stretch-sensitive tyrosines of p130Cas only. These statistically highly significant data pinpoint early events in a Src family kinase- and p130Cas-dependent mechanosensory/mechanotransduction pathway. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. A homogenization approach for nonwoven materials based on fiber undulations and reorientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raina, Arun; Linder, Christian

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a new micromechanical based approach for the modeling of the highly anisotropic and non-linear stiffening response of fibrous materials with random network microstructure at finite strains. The first key aspect of the proposed approach arises from the experimentally justified need to model the elastic microscopic response of the constituent fibers, which are one-dimensional elements, as linear elastic. This linear elastic behavior is modified in the lower strain regime to account for the inherent fiber undulations and the associated fiber unfolding phenomena. Another key aspect is the reorientation of these fibers which is identified as one primary mechanism for the overall macroscopic stiffening. The one-dimensional elements are statistically distributed as unit vectors in a non-uniform manner over an affine referential network space of orientations represented by a unit circle in the two-dimensional case of interest here. A physically motivated reorientation of these unit vectors is achieved by a bijective map which asymptotically aligns them with the maximum loading direction in the referential orientation space. A rate-independent evolution law for this map is sought by a physically motivated assumption to maintain the overall elastic framework of the proposed formulation. A closed form solution to the new evolution law is also presented which allows faster computation of updating orientations without resorting to numerical integration or storing history variables. The unit vectors upon reorientation in the referential orientation space are then mapped to the spatial orientation space by the macrodeformation gradient to compute the macroscopic Kirchhoff stress and the associated spatial elasticity modulus. Reorientation of these unit vectors results in the evolution of the associated probability density function which is also computed in closed form depending on the initial probability density. However, it is shown that for a bijective

  11. 12 CFR 225.17 - Notice procedure for one-bank holding company formations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the remaining shareholders. (2) No shareholder, or group of shareholders acting in concert, will... holding company, unless that shareholder or group of shareholders was authorized, after review under the... reorganization, acquire control of any additional bank or engage in any activities other than those of...

  12. 12 CFR 225.17 - Notice procedure for one-bank holding company formations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the remaining shareholders. (2) No shareholder, or group of shareholders acting in concert, will... holding company, unless that shareholder or group of shareholders was authorized, after review under the... reorganization, acquire control of any additional bank or engage in any activities other than those of...

  13. 76 FR 10595 - Formations of, Acquisitions by, and Mergers of Bank Holding Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... Formations of, Acquisitions by, and Mergers of Bank Holding Companies The companies listed in this notice... company functions, pursuant to section 225.28(b)(5) of Regulation Y; North Star Trust Company, Chicago...; North Star Deferred Exchange Corp., Chicago, Illinois, and thereby engage in real estate...

  14. 18 CFR 284.403 - Code of conduct for persons holding blanket marketing certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Code of conduct for persons holding blanket marketing certificates. 284.403 Section 284.403 Conservation of Power and Water... Seller engages in reporting of transactions to publishers of electricity or natural gas indices,...

  15. 18 CFR 284.403 - Code of conduct for persons holding blanket marketing certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Code of conduct for persons holding blanket marketing certificates. 284.403 Section 284.403 Conservation of Power and Water... Seller engages in reporting of transactions to publishers of electricity or natural gas indices,...

  16. 18 CFR 284.403 - Code of conduct for persons holding blanket marketing certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Code of conduct for persons holding blanket marketing certificates. 284.403 Section 284.403 Conservation of Power and Water... Seller engages in reporting of transactions to publishers of electricity or natural gas indices,...

  17. 18 CFR 284.403 - Code of conduct for persons holding blanket marketing certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Code of conduct for persons holding blanket marketing certificates. 284.403 Section 284.403 Conservation of Power and Water... Seller engages in reporting of transactions to publishers of electricity or natural gas indices,...

  18. 12 CFR 225.113 - Services under section 4(a) of Bank Holding Company Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... “management fees.” Specifically, the company engages in the following activities for the four nonsubsidiary... whether these activities are prohibited by section 4(a)(2) of the Bank Holding Company Act, which permits... company owns or controls 25 percent or more of the voting shares. (d) Clearly, the activities of the...

  19. Knowing, Performing and Holding Queerness: LGBTIQ+ Student Experiences in Australian Tertiary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waling, Andrea; Roffee, James A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores LGBTIQ+ students' experiences of knowing, performing and holding queerness in a tertiary educational environment. Through interviews conducted with LGBTIQ+ students at a large Australian metropolitan university, we examine the students' engagement with other LGBTIQ+ students in the tertiary educational space. Although…

  20. 12 CFR 225.141 - Operations subsidiaries of a bank holding company.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... company. 225.141 Section 225.141 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BANK HOLDING COMPANIES AND CHANGE IN BANK CONTROL (REGULATION Y... may engage directly in the business of managing and controlling banks and permissible nonbank...

  1. Should software hold data hostage?

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H S.; Michaels, George S.

    2004-08-01

    Software tools have become an indispensable part of modern biology, but issues surrounding propriety file formats and closed software architectures threaten to stunt the growth of this rapidly expanding area of research. In an effort to ensure continuous software upgrades to provide a continuous income stream, some software companies have resorted to holding the user?s data hostage by locking them into proprietary file and data formats. Although this might make sense from a business perspective, it violates fundamental principles of data ownership and control. Such tactics should not be tolerated by the scientific community. The future of data-intensive biology depends on ensuring open data standards and freely exchangeable file formats. Compared to the engineering and chemistry fields, computers are a relatively recent addition to the arsenal of biological tools. Thus the pool of potential users of biology-oriented software is comparatively small. Biology itself is a broad field with many sub-disciplines, such as neurobiology, biochemistry, genomics and cell biology. This creates the need for task-oriented software tools that necessarily have a small user base. Simultaneously, the task of developing software has become more complex with the need for multi-platform software and increasing user expectations of sophisticated interfaces and a high degree of usability. Writing successful software in such an environment is very challenging, but progress in biology will increasingly depend on the success of companies and individuals in creating powerful new software tools. The trend to open source software could have an enormous impact on biology by providing the large number of specialized analysis tools that are required. Indeed, in the field of bioinformatics, open source software has become pervasive, largely because of the high degree of computer skill necessary for workers in this field. For these tools to be usable by non-specialists, however, requires the

  2. 12 CFR 347.110 - Affiliate holdings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Affiliate holdings. 347.110 Section 347.110 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.110 Affiliate holdings. References in §§ 347.107, 347.108, and 347.109 to equity...

  3. Error-Compensated Integrate and Hold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matlin, M.

    1984-01-01

    Differencing circuit cancels error caused by switching transistors capacitance. In integrate and hold circuit using JFET switch, gate-to-source capacitance causes error in output voltage. Differential connection cancels out error. Applications in systems where very low voltages sampled or many integrate-and -hold cycles before circuit is reset.

  4. 12 CFR 34.82 - Holding period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY REAL ESTATE LENDING AND APPRAISALS Other Real Estate Owned § 34.82 Holding period. (a) Holding period for OREO. A national bank shall dispose of... estate acquired for future bank expansion. (c) Effect of statutory redemption period. For DPC real...

  5. Holdings as a Measure of Journal Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Danny P.; Boyce, Bert R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a study that compared holdings figures from the OCLC database to productivity measures from the "Journal Citation Reports" section of "Science Citation Index" and publisher circulation figures to determine whether there is a systematic relationship between easily gathered holdings and circulation figures and less…

  6. Holding fixture for metallographic mount polishing

    DOEpatents

    Barth, Clyde H.; Cramer, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    A fixture for holding mounted specimens for polishing, having an arm; a body attached to one end of the arm, the body having at least one flange having an opening to accommodate a mounted specimen; and a means applying pressure against the outer surface of the mounted specimen to hold the specimen in contact with the polishing surface.

  7. Holding fixture for metallographic mount polishing

    DOEpatents

    Barth, C.H.; Cramer, C.E.

    1997-12-30

    A fixture is described for holding mounted specimens for polishing, having an arm; a body attached to one end of the arm, the body having at least one flange having an opening to accommodate a mounted specimen; and a means applying pressure against the outer surface of the mounted specimen to hold the specimen in contact with the polishing surface. 3 figs.

  8. Error-Compensated Integrate and Hold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matlin, M.

    1984-01-01

    Differencing circuit cancels error caused by switching transistors capacitance. In integrate and hold circuit using JFET switch, gate-to-source capacitance causes error in output voltage. Differential connection cancels out error. Applications in systems where very low voltages sampled or many integrate-and -hold cycles before circuit is reset.

  9. Holdings as a Measure of Journal Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Danny P.; Boyce, Bert R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a study that compared holdings figures from the OCLC database to productivity measures from the "Journal Citation Reports" section of "Science Citation Index" and publisher circulation figures to determine whether there is a systematic relationship between easily gathered holdings and circulation figures and less…

  10. School Budget Hold'em Facilitator's Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Resource Strategies, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "School Budget Hold'em" is a game designed to help school districts rethink their budgeting process. It evolved out of Education Resource Strategies' (ERS) experience working with large urban districts around the country. "School Budget Hold'em" offers a completely new approach--one that can turn the budgeting process into a long-term visioning…

  11. A numerical method for reorientation of rotating tidally deformed viscoelastic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H.; van der Wal, W.; Vermeersen, L. L. A.

    2017-01-01

    Existing approaches for simulating the true polar wander (TPW) of a viscoelastic body can be divided into three categories: (i) a linear dynamic approach which uses the linearized Liouville equation (e.g., Wu and Peltier (1984) and Mitrovica et al. (2005)); (ii) a nonlinear dynamic approach which is based on the quasi-fluid approximation (e.g., Sabadini and Peltier (1981), Ricard et al. (1993), and Cambiotti et al. (2011)); and (iii) a long-term limit approach which only considers the fluid limit of a reorientation (e.g., Matsuyama and Nimmo (2007)). Several limitations of these approaches have not been studied: the range for which the linear approach is accurate, the validity of the quasi-fluid approximation, and the dynamic solution for TPW of a tidally deformed rotating body. We establish a numerical procedure which is able to determine the large-angle reorientation of a viscoelastic celestial body that can be both centrifugally and tidally deformed. We show that the linear approach leads to significant errors for loadings near the poles or the equator. Second, we show that slow relaxation modes can have a significant effect on large-angle TPW of Earth or other planets. Finally, we show that reorientation of a tidally deformed body driven by a positive mass anomaly near the poles has a preference for rotating around the tidal axis instead of toward it. At a tidally deformed body which does not have a remnant bulge, positive mass anomalies are more likely to be found near the equator and the plane perpendicular to the tidal axis, while negative mass anomalies tend to be near the great circle that contains the tidal and rotational axes.

  12. A numerical method for reorientation of rotating tidally deformed visco-elastic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H.; van der Wal, W.; Vermeersen, B. L. A.

    2016-12-01

    Currently the true polar wander (TPW) of a visco-elastic body is studied with three types of approches: (i) a linear dynamic approach which applies the linearised Liouville equation (e.g. Wu and Peltier [1984]); (ii) a non-linear dynamic approach which is based on the quasi-fluid approximation (e.g. Ricard et al. [1993]); (iii) a long-term limit approach which only considers the fluid limit of a reorientation (e.g. Matsuyama and Nimmo [2007]). Several limitations of these approaches have not been studied: the range for which the linear approach is accurate, the validity of the quasi-fluid approximation, and the dynamic solution for TPW of a tidally deformed rotating body. In order to deal with these isssues, we establish a numerical procedure which is able to determine the large angle reorientation of a visco-elastic celestial body that can be both centrifugally and tidally deformed. We show that the linear approach leads to significant errors for loadings near the poles or the equator. For instance, when the loading is placed at 10 degree colatitude on a model representing the Earth, the maximum allowed TPW is just 0.2 degree for the error of the linear method to remain below 1%. Secondly, we show that slow relaxation modes can have a significant effect on large angle TPW of Earth or other planets and ignoring these modes can lead to large error for the transient response of TPW. Finally, we show that reorientation of a tidally deformed body driven by a positive mass anomaly near the poles has a preference for rotating around the tidal axis instead of towards it. At a tidally deformed body, positive mass anomalies are more likely to be found near the equator and the plane perpendicular to the tidal axis, while negative mass anomalies tend to be near the great circle with longitudes 0 and 180 degree.

  13. Environment size and the use of feature and geometric cues for reorientation.

    PubMed

    Sturz, Bradley R; Kelly, Debbie M

    2013-02-01

    We tested associative-based accounts of orientation by investigating the influence of environment size on the use of feature and geometric cues for reorientation. Two groups of participants were trained in dynamic three-dimensional virtual rectangular environments that differed in size to find a distinctly colored bin located at one of the four corners. Subsequently, we probed the reliance on feature and geometric cues for reorientation during test trials by presenting six trial types: Small Geometry Only, Large Geometry Only, Small Cue Conflict, Large Cue Conflict, Small Distal, and Large Distal. During Geometry Only test trials, all bins were black; thus, all distinctive featural information was removed leaving only geometric cues. For Cue Conflict test trials, all colored bins were shifted counter-clockwise one corner; thus, the geometric cues from the trained corner and the trained color were in direct conflict. During Distal test trials, the bin in the geometrically incorrect corner farthest from the trained corner was colored the same as during training; the remaining three bins were black. Thus, only this distant feature cue could be used to determine the location of the goal bin. Results suggested that geometric cues were used across changes in environment size, featural cues exerted greater influence when in conflict with geometric cues, and the far featural cue was used to disambiguate the correct from the rotationally equivalent location. In short, both feature and geometric cues were used for reorientation, and environment size influenced the relative use of feature and geometric cues. Collectively, our results provide evidence against associative-based accounts of orientation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Origin of anomalously high exchange field in antiferromagnetically coupled magnetic structures: Spin reorientation versus interface anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, M.; Piramanayagam, S. N.; Wong, S. K.; Sbiaa, R.; Song, W.; Tan, H. K.; Gonzaga, L.; Chong, T. C.

    2011-11-01

    Magnetization reorientation from in-plane to perpendicular direction, observed in Co thin film coupled antiferromagnetically to high perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (Co/Pd) multilayers, is studied systematically for Co thickness ranging from 0 to 2.4 nm. The sample with 0.75 nm thick Co showed an exchange coupling field (Hex) exceeding 15 kOe at room temperature and 17.2 kOe at 5 K. With an increase of Co thickness, Hex decreased as expected and beyond certain thickness, magnetization reorientation was not observed. Indeed, three regions were observed in the thickness dependence of magnetization of the thin layer; one in which the thin layer (in the thickness range up to 0.8 nm) had a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy due to interface effects and antiferromagnetic coupling, another in which the thin layer (0.9-1.2 nm) magnetization had no interface or crystallographic anisotropy but was reoriented in the perpendicular direction due to antiferromagnetic coupling, and the third (above 1.2 nm) in which the magnetization was in-plane. In addition, Hall effect measurements were carried out to observe the anomalous and planar Hall voltages and to quantify the perpendicular and in-plane components of magnetization. The sample with thicker Co layer (2.4 nm) showed an in-plane component of magnetization, whereas the sample with 0.75 nm Co showed no in-plane component. The high value of Hex observed in 0.75 nm Co samples can have important implications in spintronics and bit patterned media.

  15. Basal body reorientation mediated by a Ca2+-modulated contractile protein

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    A rapid, Ca2+-dependent change in the angle between basal bodies (up to 180 degrees) is associated with light-induced reversal of swimming direction (the "photophobic" response) in a number of flagellated green algae. In isolated, detergent-extracted, reactivated flagellar apparatus complexes of Spermatozopsis similis, axonemal beat form conversion to the symmetrical/undulating flagellar pattern and basal body reorientation (from the antiparallel to the parallel configuration) are simultaneously induced at greater than or equal to 10(-7) M Ca2+. Basal body reorientation, however, is independent of flagellar beating since it is induced at greater than or equal to 10(- 7) M Ca2+ when flagellar beating is inhibited (i.e., in the presence of 1 microM orthovanadate in reactivation solutions; in the absence of ATP or dithiothreitol in isolation and reactivation solutions), or when axonemes are mechanically removed from flagellar apparatuses. Although frequent axonemal beat form reversals were induced by varying the Ca2+ concentration, antiparallel basal body configuration could not be restored in isolated flagellar apparatuses. Observations of the photophobic response in vivo indicate that even though the flagella resume the asymmetric, breaststroke beat form 1-2 s after photostimulation, antiparallel basal body configuration is not restored until a few minutes later. Using an antibody generated against the 20- kD Ca2+-modulated contractile protein of striated flagellar roots of Tetraselmis striata (Salisbury, J. L., A. Baron, B. Surek, and M. Melkonian, 1984, J. Cell Biol., 99:962-970), we have found the distal connecting fiber of Spermatozopsis similis to be immunoreactive by indirect immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy. Electrophoretic and immunoblot analysis indicates that the antigen of S. similis flagellar apparatuses consists, like the Tetraselmis protein, of two acidic isoforms of 20 kD. We conclude that the distal basal body connecting fiber is

  16. Spatial reorientation experiments for NMR of solids and partially oriented liquids.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rachel W; Kelly, John E; Collier, Kelsey A

    2015-11-01

    Motional reorientation experiments are extensions of Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) where the rotor axis is changed in order to average out, reintroduce, or scale anisotropic interactions (e.g. dipolar couplings, quadrupolar interactions or chemical shift anisotropies). This review focuses on Variable Angle Spinning (VAS), Switched Angle Spinning (SAS), and Dynamic Angle Spinning (DAS), all of which involve spinning at two or more different angles sequentially, either in successive experiments or during a multidimensional experiment. In all of these experiments, anisotropic terms in the Hamiltonian are scaled by changing the orientation of the spinning sample relative to the static magnetic field. These experiments vary in experimental complexity and instrumentation requirements. In VAS, many one-dimensional spectra are collected as a function of spinning angle. In SAS, dipolar couplings and/or chemical shift anisotropies are reintroduced by switching the sample between two different angles, often 0° or 90° and the magic angle, yielding a two-dimensional isotropic-anisotropic correlation spectrum. Dynamic Angle Spinning (DAS) is a related experiment that is used to simultaneously average out the first- and second-order quadrupolar interactions, which cannot be accomplished by spinning at any unique rotor angle in physical space. Although motional reorientation experiments generally require specialized instrumentation and data analysis schemes, some are accessible with only minor modification of standard MAS probes. In this review, the mechanics of each type of experiment are described, with representative examples. Current and historical probe and coil designs are discussed from the standpoint of how each one accomplishes the particular objectives of the experiment(s) it was designed to perform. Finally, applications to inorganic materials and liquid crystals, which present very different experimental challenges, are discussed. The review concludes with perspectives

  17. Reorientation and faulting of Pluto due to volatile loading within Sputnik Planitia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, James T.; Matsuyama, Isamu; Kamata, Shunichi; Steckloff, Jordan K.

    2016-12-01

    Pluto is an astoundingly diverse, geologically dynamic world. The dominant feature is Sputnik Planitia—a tear-drop-shaped topographic depression approximately 1,000 kilometres in diameter possibly representing an ancient impact basin. The interior of Sputnik Planitia is characterized by a smooth, craterless plain three to four kilometres beneath the surrounding rugged uplands, and represents the surface of a massive unit of actively convecting volatile ices (N2, CH4 and CO) several kilometres thick. This large feature is very near the Pluto-Charon tidal axis. Here we report that the location of Sputnik Planitia is the natural consequence of the sequestration of volatile ices within the basin and the resulting reorientation (true polar wander) of Pluto. Loading of volatile ices within a basin the size of Sputnik Planitia can substantially alter Pluto’s inertia tensor, resulting in a reorientation of the dwarf planet of around 60 degrees with respect to the rotational and tidal axes. The combination of this reorientation, loading and global expansion due to the freezing of a possible subsurface ocean generates stresses within the planet’s lithosphere, resulting in a global network of extensional faults that closely replicate the observed fault networks on Pluto. Sputnik Planitia probably formed northwest of its present location, and was loaded with volatiles over million-year timescales as a result of volatile transport cycles on Pluto. Pluto’s past, present and future orientation is controlled by feedbacks between volatile sublimation and condensation, changing insolation conditions and Pluto’s interior structure.

  18. Tectonic Patterns of Reoriented and Despun Planetary Bodies: Application to Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, I.; Nimmo, F.

    2007-12-01

    We find analytic solutions for the stresses associated with distortions of biaxial or triaxial planetary figures. Distortions of biaxial figures may be driven by variations in rotation rate, rotation axis orientation, or the combination of both. Distortions of triaxial figures may be driven by the same mechanisms and/or variations in tidal axis orientation for tidally deformed satellites. While the magnitude of the resulting stresses depends on the adopted elastic and physical parameters, the expected tectonic pattern is independent of these parameters for these mechanisms. We consider the tectonic pattern on Saturn's moon Enceladus. The global scale tectonic pattern on this satellite has been interpreted as due to a rotation rate increase (Porco et al. 2006), perhaps due to a suitably oriented impact. In this scenario, the flattening increases, forcing the tidal bulge to expand and the polar regions to contract. We show that the observed tectonic pattern is more easily explained by a large reorientation (~90°) of the rotation axis roughly around the tidal axis, than by spin-up. In the spin-up scenario, extension occurs centred on the sub- and anti-Saturnian points and strike-slip faulting centered on the leading and trailing hemispheres. In the reorientation scenario, these patterns are reversed, and are more consistent with the available geological observations (Kargel and Pozio 1996, Porco et al. 2006, Helfenstein et al. 2007). Furthermore, the latitude of the predicted polewards transition to compressional stresses is comparable to that of the observed south polar terrain margin. Reorientation of ~90° may be driven by mass redistribution associated with an internal load (Nimmo & Pappalardo 2006), ice shell thickness variations (Ojakangas and Stevenson 1989), or an equatorial large impact (Melosh 1975). Given Enceladus' orbital evolution constraints, the effect of despinning due to tidal disspation on the predicted tectonic pattern is negligible.

  19. Reaction and reorientation of electronically excited H{sub 2}(B)

    SciTech Connect

    Pibel, C.D.

    1992-09-01

    The room temperature rate (TR) constants for fluorescence quenching fluorescence of H{sub 2}, HD, and D{sub 2} B {sup 1}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +} by {sup 4}He were measured as a function of the initially excited rotational and vibrational level of the hydrogen molecule, and the RT rate constants for molecular angular momentum reorientation of H{sub 2}, HD and D{sub 2} (B {sup 1}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +}. v{prime}=0, J{prime}=1, M{sub J}=0) in collisions with He, Ne, Ar and H{sub 2}(X {sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}) were also measured. Vibrational state dependence of the quenching cross sections fits a vibrationally adiabatic model of the quenching process. From the vibrational state dependence of the quenching cross section, the barrier height for the quenching reaction is found to be 250{plus_minus}40 cm{sup {minus}1}, and the difference in the H-H stretching frequencies between H{sub 2}(B) and the H{sub 2}-He complex at the barrier to reaction is 140{plus_minus}80 cm{sup {minus}1}. The effective cross sections for angular momentum reorientation in collisions of H{sub 2}, HD, D{sub 2} with He and Ne were found to be about 30 {Angstrom}{sup 2} and were nearly the same for each isotope and with He and Ne as collision partners. Cross sections forreorientation of HD and D{sub 2} in collisions with Ar were 10.6{plus_minus}2.0 and 13.9{plus_minus}3.0 {Angstrom}{sup 2}, respectively. Reorientation of D{sub 2}(B) in collisions with room temperature H{sub 2}(X) occurs with a 7.6{plus_minus}3.4 {Angstrom}{sup 2} cross section. Calculated cross sections using semiclassical and quantum close coupled methods give cross sections for reorientation of H{sub 2}(B) and D{sub 2}(B) in collisions with He that agree quantitatively with experiment. Discrepancy between the calculated and experimental cross sections for HD(B)-HE are likely due to rotational relaxation in HD a Turbo PASCAL version of the data-taking program is included.

  20. Reaction and reorientation of electronically excited H[sub 2](B)

    SciTech Connect

    Pibel, C.D.

    1992-09-01

    The room temperature rate (TR) constants for fluorescence quenching fluorescence of H[sub 2], HD, and D[sub 2] B [sup 1][Sigma][sub u][sup +] by [sup 4]He were measured as a function of the initially excited rotational and vibrational level of the hydrogen molecule, and the RT rate constants for molecular angular momentum reorientation of H[sub 2], HD and D[sub 2] (B [sup 1][Sigma][sub u][sup +]. v[prime]=0, J[prime]=1, M[sub J]=0) in collisions with He, Ne, Ar and H[sub 2](X [sup 1][Sigma][sub g][sup +]) were also measured. Vibrational state dependence of the quenching cross sections fits a vibrationally adiabatic model of the quenching process. From the vibrational state dependence of the quenching cross section, the barrier height for the quenching reaction is found to be 250[plus minus]40 cm[sup [minus]1], and the difference in the H-H stretching frequencies between H[sub 2](B) and the H[sub 2]-He complex at the barrier to reaction is 140[plus minus]80 cm[sup [minus]1]. The effective cross sections for angular momentum reorientation in collisions of H[sub 2], HD, D[sub 2] with He and Ne were found to be about 30 [Angstrom][sup 2] and were nearly the same for each isotope and with He and Ne as collision partners. Cross sections forreorientation of HD and D[sub 2] in collisions with Ar were 10.6[plus minus]2.0 and 13.9[plus minus]3.0 [Angstrom][sup 2], respectively. Reorientation of D[sub 2](B) in collisions with room temperature H[sub 2](X) occurs with a 7.6[plus minus]3.4 [Angstrom][sup 2] cross section. Calculated cross sections using semiclassical and quantum close coupled methods give cross sections for reorientation of H[sub 2](B) and D[sub 2](B) in collisions with He that agree quantitatively with experiment. Discrepancy between the calculated and experimental cross sections for HD(B)-HE are likely due to rotational relaxation in HD a Turbo PASCAL version of the data-taking program is included.

  1. Dynamic Isovector Reorientation of Deuteron as a Probe to Nuclear Symmetry Energy.

    PubMed

    Ou, Li; Xiao, Zhigang; Yi, Han; Wang, Ning; Liu, Min; Tian, Junlong

    2015-11-20

    We present the calculations on a novel reorientation effect of deuteron attributed to isovector interaction in the nuclear field of heavy target nuclei. The correlation angle determined by the relative momentum vector of the proton and the neutron originating from the breakup deuteron, which is experimentally detectable, exhibits significant dependence on the isovector nuclear potential but is robust against the variation of the isoscaler sector. In terms of sensitivity and cleanness, the breakup reactions induced by the polarized deuteron beam at about 100 MeV/u provide a more stringent constraint to the symmetry energy at subsaturation densities.

  2. Influence of family, religion, and social conformity on client participation in sexual reorientation therapy.

    PubMed

    Maccio, Elaine M

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the likelihood of participating in sexual reorientation therapy (SRT) based on actual or expected family reactions to the disclosure of one's same-sex sexuality, religious fundamentalism, social conformity, and several demographic variables. A sample of 52 SRT participants and 211 SRT nonparticipants who had ever identified as gay, lesbian, or bisexual completed a survey either online or in hardcopy format. Actual or expected negative family reactions, high religious fundamentalism, and identifying as spiritual significantly increased one's odds of participating in SRT. The findings are essential for preparing practitioners in any clinical practice setting to work with clients struggling with their sexuality.

  3. Switching of bacterial adhesion to a glycosylated surface by reversible reorientation of the carbohydrate ligand.

    PubMed

    Weber, Theresa; Chandrasekaran, Vijayanand; Stamer, Insa; Thygesen, Mikkel B; Terfort, Andreas; Lindhorst, Thisbe K

    2014-12-22

    The surface recognition in many biological systems is guided by the interaction of carbohydrate-specific proteins (lectins) with carbohydrate epitopes (ligands) located within the unordered glycoconjugate layer (glycocalyx) of cells. Thus, for recognition, the respective ligand has to reorient for a successful matching event. Herein, we present for the first time a model system, in which only the orientation of the ligand is altered in a controlled manner without changing the recognition quality of the ligand itself. The key for this orientational control is the embedding into an interfacial system and the use of a photoswitchable mechanical joint, such as azobenzene.

  4. Reorienting health systems to meet the demand for consumer health solutions.

    PubMed

    Buckeridge, David L

    2014-01-01

    There is a clear and pronounced gap between the demand for and access to consumer health solutions. Existing health information systems and broader health system factors such as funding models are reasons for this gap. There are strong arguments from the perspectives of the consumer and population health for closing this gap, but the case from the perspective of the current health system is mixed. Closing the gap will require a concerted effort to reorient health information systems and funding models to support online access by consumers to health information and health services.

  5. Footwall rotation in an oceanic core complex quantified using reoriented Integrated Ocean Drilling Program core samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, A.; Gee, J. S.; Pressling, N.; John, B. E.; MacLeod, C. J.; Grimes, C. B.; Searle, R. C.

    2009-09-01

    Oceanic core complexes expose lower crustal and upper mantle rocks on the seafloor by tectonic unroofing in the footwalls of large-slip detachment faults. The common occurrence of these structures in slow and ultra-slow spread oceanic crust suggests that they accommodate a significant component of plate divergence. However, the subsurface geometry of detachment faults in oceanic core complexes remains unclear. Competing models involve either: (a) displacement on planar, low-angle faults with little tectonic rotation; or (b) progressive shallowing by rotation of initially steeply dipping faults as a result of flexural unloading (the "rolling-hinge" model). We address this debate using palaeomagnetic remanences as markers for tectonic rotation within a unique 1.4 km long footwall section of gabbroic rocks recovered by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) sampling at Atlantis Massif oceanic core complex on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). These rocks contain a complex record of multipolarity magnetizations that are unrelated to alteration and igneous stratigraphy in the sampled section and are inferred to result from progressive cooling of the footwall section over geomagnetic polarity chrons C1r.2r, C1r.1n (Jaramillo) and C1r.1r. For the first time we have independently reoriented drill-core samples of lower crustal gabbros, that were initially azimuthally unconstrained, to a true geographic reference frame by correlating structures in individual core pieces with those identified from oriented imagery of the borehole wall. This allows reorientation of the palaeomagnetic data, placing far more rigorous constraints on the tectonic history than those possible using only palaeomagnetic inclination data. Analysis of the reoriented high temperature reversed component of magnetization indicates a 46° ± 6° anticlockwise rotation of the footwall around a MAR-parallel horizontal axis trending 011° ± 6°. Reoriented lower temperature components of normal and reversed

  6. Domain wall dynamics in a spin-reorientation transition system Au/Co/Au

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Sujoy; Seu, Keoki; Turner, Joshua J.; Park, Sungkyun; Kevan, Steve; Falco, Charles M.

    2009-05-14

    We report measurements of domain wall dynamics in an ultrathin Au/Co/Au system that exhibits a spin reorientation phase transition as a function of temperature.The domain walls exhibit cooperative motion throughout the temperature range of 150 - 300 K. The decay times were found to exhibit a maximum at the transition temperature. The slowdown has been explained as due to formation of a double well in the energy landscape by the different competing interactions. Our results show that the complex, slow dynamics can provide a more fundamental understanding of magnetic phase transitions.

  7. Dynamic Isovector Reorientation of Deuteron as a Probe to Nuclear Symmetry Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Li; Xiao, Zhigang; Yi, Han; Wang, Ning; Liu, Min; Tian, Junlong

    2015-11-01

    We present the calculations on a novel reorientation effect of deuteron attributed to isovector interaction in the nuclear field of heavy target nuclei. The correlation angle determined by the relative momentum vector of the proton and the neutron originating from the breakup deuteron, which is experimentally detectable, exhibits significant dependence on the isovector nuclear potential but is robust against the variation of the isoscaler sector. In terms of sensitivity and cleanness, the breakup reactions induced by the polarized deuteron beam at about 100 MeV /u provide a more stringent constraint to the symmetry energy at subsaturation densities.

  8. Continuous spin reorientation transition in epitaxially grown antiferromagnetic NiO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Arenholz, E.; Meng, Y.; Tan, A.; Park, J.; Jin, E.; Son, H.; Wu, J.; Jenkins, C. A.; Scholl, A.; Hwang, Chanyong; Qiu, Z. Q.

    2011-03-01

    Fe/NiO/MgO/Ag(001) films were grown epitaxially, and the Fe and NiO spin orientations were determined using x-ray magnetic dichroism. We find that the NiO spins are aligned perpendicularly to the in-plane Fe spins. Analyzing both the in-plane and out-of-plane spin components of the NiO layer, we demonstrate unambiguously that the antiferromagnetic NiO spins undergo a continuous spin reorientation transition from the in-plane to out-of-plane directions with increasing of the MgO thickness.

  9. Ferroelectricity and magnetoelectric coupling in h-YbMnO3: Spin reorientation and defect effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Gang; Fang, Yifei; Lu, Xiaowen; Cao, Shixun; Zhang, Jincang

    2016-01-01

    Low-temperature magnetic and electric properties in hexagonal multiferroic compound YbMnO3 were studied. The Mn3+ spin moments order at TN = 85 K and reoriented around 43.5 K, leading to the magnetic phase transition from B2(P63cm) → A2(P63cm). The concomitant ferroelectric polarization is observed and explained microscopically by the destruction of initial symmetric relationship of the polarization between the upper and lower half of the magnetic unit cell. The asymmetry of the polarization vs temperature curves under opposite poling voltage revealed the pinning effect of the defects on the electrical polarization.

  10. Visuospatial reorienting signals in the human temporo-parietal junction are independent of response selection.

    PubMed

    Astafiev, Serguei V; Shulman, Gordon L; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2006-01-01

    This study contrasts visuospatial reorienting and response selection signals in the right temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) with functional magnetic resonance imaging. The overall goal was to investigate whether spatial orienting signals and motor signals interacted or were independent in TPJ. The right TPJ showed a greater response to targets at in-validly rather than validly cued locations, but no significant modulation from the effector used to respond. We suggest that TPJ may work as a modality-independent 'circuit breaker' for the dorsal fronto-parietal attention system, directing attention to salient events and enabling a variety of responses to those events.

  11. Reorientation of the Stripe Phase of 2D Electrons by a Minute Density Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueed, M. A.; Hossain, Md. Shafayat; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Baldwin, K. W.; Shayegan, M.

    2016-08-01

    Interacting two-dimensional electrons confined in a GaAs quantum well exhibit isotropic transport when the Fermi level resides in the first excited (N =1 ) Landau level. Adding an in-plane magnetic field (B||) typically leads to an anisotropic, stripelike (nematic) phase of electrons with the stripes oriented perpendicular to the B|| direction. Our experimental data reveal how a periodic density modulation, induced by a surface strain grating from strips of negative electron-beam resist, competes against the B||-induced orientational order of the stripe phase. Even a minute (<0.25 %) density modulation is sufficient to reorient the stripes along the direction of the surface grating.

  12. 77 FR 48550 - Sears Holdings Management Corporation, A Division of Sears Holdings Corporation, Hoffman Estates...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Sears Holdings Management Corporation, A Division of Sears Holdings... workers at the Hoffman Estates, Illinois facility are similarly situated as the Sears Holdings workers at...

  13. 78 FR 2481 - Watco Holdings, Inc., Watco Railroad Company Holdings, Inc., & Watco Acquisition Sub, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... Acquisition Sub, Inc.--Acquisition of Control Exemption--Ann Arbor Railroad, Inc. Watco Holdings, Inc. (Watco Holdings), Watco Railroad Company Holdings, Inc. (Watco Railroad), and Watco Acquisition Sub, Inc. (Merger Sub), all noncarriers, have filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1180.2(d)(2) for...

  14. 78 FR 66097 - Acies Corporation, Immtech Pharmaceuticals, Inc., MRU Holdings, Inc., MSTI Holdings, Inc., Nestor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Acies Corporation, Immtech Pharmaceuticals, Inc., MRU Holdings, Inc., MSTI Holdings, Inc., Nestor, Inc., New Generation Holdings, Inc., and Nuevo Financial Center, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading October 31, 2013. It appears to...

  15. 12 CFR 575.14 - Subsidiary holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Subsidiary holding companies. 575.14 Section... COMPANIES § 575.14 Subsidiary holding companies. (a) Subsidiary holding companies. A mutual holding company may establish a subsidiary holding company as a direct subsidiary to hold 100% of the stock of...

  16. 12 CFR 239.11 - Subsidiary holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Subsidiary holding companies. 239.11 Section... SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Mutual Holding Companies § 239.11 Subsidiary holding companies. (a) Subsidiary holding companies. A mutual holding company may establish a...

  17. 12 CFR 575.14 - Subsidiary holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Subsidiary holding companies. 575.14 Section 575... COMPANIES § 575.14 Subsidiary holding companies. (a) Subsidiary holding companies. A mutual holding company may establish a subsidiary holding company as a direct subsidiary to hold 100% of the stock of...

  18. 12 CFR 239.11 - Subsidiary holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Subsidiary holding companies. 239.11 Section... SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Mutual Holding Companies § 239.11 Subsidiary holding companies. (a) Subsidiary holding companies. A mutual holding company may establish a...

  19. 12 CFR 575.14 - Subsidiary holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Subsidiary holding companies. 575.14 Section... COMPANIES § 575.14 Subsidiary holding companies. (a) Subsidiary holding companies. A mutual holding company may establish a subsidiary holding company as a direct subsidiary to hold 100% of the stock of...

  20. 12 CFR 239.11 - Subsidiary holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Subsidiary holding companies. 239.11 Section... SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Mutual Holding Companies § 239.11 Subsidiary holding companies. (a) Subsidiary holding companies. A mutual holding company may establish a...

  1. A three-dimensional model of magneto-mechanical behaviors of martensite reorientation in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xue; Moumni, Ziad; He, Yongjun; Zhang, Weihong

    2014-03-01

    The large strain in Ferromagnetic Shape Memory Alloys (FSMA) is due to the martensite reorientation driven by mechanical stresses and/or magnetic fields. Although most experiments studying the martensite reorientation in FSMA are under 1D condition (uniaxial stress plus a perpendicular magnetic field), it has been shown that the 2D/3D configurations can improve the working stress and give much flexibility of the material's applications [He, Y.J., Chen, X., Moumni, Z., 2011. Two-dimensional analysis to improve the output stress in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys. Journal of Applied Physics 110, 063905]. To predict the material's behaviors in 3D loading conditions, a constitutive model is developed in this paper, based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes with internal variables. All the martensite variants are considered in the model and the temperature effect is also taken into account. The model is able to describe all the behaviors of martensite reorientation in FSMA observed in the existing experiments: rotating/non-rotating magnetic-field-induced martensite reorientation, magnetic-field-assisted super-elasticity, super-elasticity under biaxial compressions and temperature-dependence of martensite reorientation. The model is further used to study the nonlinear bending behaviors of FSMA beams and provides some basic guidelines for designing the FSMA-based bending actuators.

  2. Collective behaviors of book holding durations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ren-De; Guo, Qiang; Han, Jing-Ti; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2016-10-01

    Duration can directly reflect the collective reading behaviors of library user book holding. In this paper, by introducing the burstiness and memory coefficients, we empirically investigate the collective book holding behavior of three university libraries. The statistical results show that there are similar properties among the students with different backgrounds, presenting the burstiness < B > = - 0.2 and memory < M > = 0.5 for three datasets, which indicates that memory and random effects coexist in student book holding durations. In addition, we analyze the behavior patterns without duplicate durations by merging a series of books borrowed and returned at the same time. The results show the average burstiness B increases to -0.16 and memory M drops to 0.16 for three datasets, which indicates that both duplicate behavior and student's preference affect the memory effect. Furthermore, we present a model which assumes student's next book holding duration follows the previous one with probability p, and with probability 1 - p, the student would hold the book independently. The experimental results show that the presented model can reproduce the burstiness and memory effect of student book holding durations when p = 0.5 for empirical datasets and p = 0.2 for de-duplicate datasets, which indicate that the student's preferential holding behavior occurs with the probability p. This work helps in deeply understanding the regularity of duration-based human behaviors.

  3. Allowance Holdings and Transfers Data Inventory

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Allowance Holdings and Transfers Data Inventory contains measured data on holdings and transactions of allowances under the NOx Budget Trading Program (NBP), a market-based cap and trade program created to reduce the regional transport of NOx emissions from power plants and other large combustion sources that contribute to ozone nonattainment.The statutory authority leading to the collection of this information comes from Title V of the Clean Air Act. Sustance classes include SO2 and NOx. Data of allowance holdings and transfers are made available in real time.

  4. Reorientation Dynamics of Chromophores in Photosensitive Polymers by Means of Coarse-Grained Modeling.

    PubMed

    Ilnytskyi, Jaroslav M; Saphiannikova, Marina

    2015-10-26

    We study the photoisomerization of azobenzene chromophores embedded into a polymer matrix by using coarse-grained simulations. Two types of beads are considered: t- and c-beads, which are rich in trans and cis isomers, respectively. Simulations combine deterministic (molecular dynamics) and stochastic (random-type switching) parts. The ratio between the characteristic times for photoinduced reorientation and for orientation relaxation is tuned to be of the order found in experiments. The essential features of the phenomenon: 1) the existence of a stationary state, and 2) anisotropic distribution of the orientations of t-beads (orientation hole-burning effect), are reproduced. We study population dynamics of c-beads and the strength of the orientation hole burning, depending on the illumination wavelength and its intensity. The form of the reorientation potential of the mean force acting on the t-beads is analyzed and its use is validated. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Magnetic structure and spin reorientation of quaternary Dy2Fe2Si2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susilo, R. A.; Cadogan, J. M.; Hutchison, W. D.; Stewart, G. A.; Avdeev, M.; Campbell, S. J.

    2017-03-01

    We have investigated the low temperature magnetic properties of Dy2Fe2Si2C by using magnetisation, specific heat, x-ray diffraction, neutron powder diffraction and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements over the temperature range 1.5 K–300 K. Dy2Fe2Si2C exhibits two magnetic transitions at low temperatures: an antiferromagnetic transition at {{T}\\text{N}}∼ 26 K and a spin-reorientation transition at {{T}t}∼ 6 K. The magnetic structure above T t can be described with a propagation vector \\mathbf{k}~=~≤ft(0~0~\\frac{1}{2}\\right) with the ordering of the Dy magnetic moments along the monoclinic b-axis whereas on cooling below T t the Dy moment tips away from the b-axis towards the ac-plane. We find that the spin-reorientation in Dy2Fe2Si2C is mainly driven by the competition between the second-order crystal field term B 20 and the higher-order terms, in particular B 40 and B 64.

  6. Target berthing and base reorientation of free-floating space robotic system after capturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenfu; Li, Cheng; Liang, Bin; Xu, Yangsheng; Liu, Yu; Qiang, Wenyi

    2009-01-01

    Space robots are playing an increasingly important role in on-orbital servicing, including repairing, refueling, or de-orbiting the satellite. The target must be captured and berthed before the servicing task starts. However, the attitude of the base may lean much and needs re-orientating after capturing. In this paper, a method is proposed to berth the target, and re-orientate the base at the same time, using manipulator motion only. Firstly, the system state is formed of the attitude quaternion and joint variables, and the joint paths are parameterized by sinusoidal functions. Then, the trajectory planning is transformed to an optimization problem. The cost function, defined according to the accuracy requirements of system variables, is the function of the parameters to be determined. Finally, we solve the parameters using the particle swarm optimization algorithm. Two typical cases of the spacecraft with a 6-DOF manipulator are dynamically simulated, one is that the variation of base attitude is limited; the other is that both the base attitude and the joint rates are constrained. The simulation results verify the presented method.

  7. Intragranular twinning, detwinning, and twinning-like lattice reorientation in magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei; Gao, Yanfei; Li, Nan; Parish, Chad M.; Liu, Wenjun; Liaw, Peter K.; An, Ke

    2016-09-11

    We present that deformation twinning plays a critical role on improving metals or alloys ductility, especially for hexagonal close-packed materials with low symmetry crystal structure. A rolled Mg alloy was selected as a model system to investigate the extension twinning behaviors and characteristics of parent-twin interactions by nondestructive in situ 3D synchrotron X-ray microbeam diffraction. Besides twinning- detwinning process, the twinning-like lattice reorientation process was captured within an individual grain inside a bulk material during the strain reversal. The distributions of parent, twin, and reorientated grains and sub-micron level strain variation across the twin boundary are revealed. A theoretical calculation of the lattice strain confirms that the internal strain distribution in parent and twinned grains correlates with the experimental setup, grain orientation of parent, twin, and surrounding grains, as well as the strain path changes. In conclusion, the study suggests a novel deformation mechanism within the hexagonal close-packed structure that cannot be determined from surface-based characterization methods.

  8. Intragranular twinning, detwinning, and twinning-like lattice reorientation in magnesium alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Wei; Gao, Yanfei; Oak Ridge National Lab.; ...

    2016-09-11

    We present that deformation twinning plays a critical role on improving metals or alloys ductility, especially for hexagonal close-packed materials with low symmetry crystal structure. A rolled Mg alloy was selected as a model system to investigate the extension twinning behaviors and characteristics of parent-twin interactions by nondestructive in situ 3D synchrotron X-ray microbeam diffraction. Besides twinning- detwinning process, the twinning-like lattice reorientation process was captured within an individual grain inside a bulk material during the strain reversal. The distributions of parent, twin, and reorientated grains and sub-micron level strain variation across the twin boundary are revealed. A theoretical calculationmore » of the lattice strain confirms that the internal strain distribution in parent and twinned grains correlates with the experimental setup, grain orientation of parent, twin, and surrounding grains, as well as the strain path changes. In conclusion, the study suggests a novel deformation mechanism within the hexagonal close-packed structure that cannot be determined from surface-based characterization methods.« less

  9. Fast local trust region technique for diffusion tensor registration using exact reorientation and regularization.

    PubMed

    Li, Junning; Shi, Yonggang; Tran, Giang; Dinov, Ivo; Wang, Danny J J; Toga, Arthur

    2014-05-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging is widely used in brain connectivity research. As more and more studies recruit large numbers of subjects, it is important to design registration methods which are not only theoretically rigorous, but also computationally efficient. However, the requirement of reorienting diffusion tensors complicates and considerably slows down registration procedures, due to the correlated impacts of registration forces at adjacent voxel locations. Based on the diffeomorphic Demons algorithm (Vercauteren , 2009), we propose a fast local trust region algorithm for handling inseparable registration forces for quadratic energy functions. The method guarantees that, at any time and at any voxel location, the velocity is always within its local trust region. This local regularization allows efficient calculation of the transformation update with numeric integration instead of completely solving a large linear system at every iteration. It is able to incorporate exact reorientation and regularization into the velocity optimization, and preserve the linear complexity of the diffeomorphic Demons algorithm. In an experiment with 84 diffusion tensor images involving both pair-wise and group-wise registrations, the proposed algorithm achieves better registration in comparison with other methods solving large linear systems (Yeo , 2009). At the same time, this algorithm reduces the computation time and memory demand tenfold.

  10. Drop Tower Experiments on Non-isothermal Reorientation of Cryogenic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulev, Nikolai; Dreyer, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Capillary driven surface oscillations of liquid argon (Tsat = 87.3 K at 1,013 hPa) have been investigated in a partly filled right circular cylinder under non-isothermal boundary conditions. The oscillations take place during the reorientation from the normal gravity surface position towards a new position upon step reduction of gravity. The situation is similar to the end of thrust in a rocket tank when the cold propellant moves along the warmer tank wall driven by capillary forces. The aim was to investigate the influence of the temperature difference between the slightly subcooled cryogenic liquid and the superheated cylinder wall on the oscillations and their characteristics in a single-component, two-phase system. Axial wall temperature gradients of averaged 0.15 K/mm - 1.93 K/mm above the normal gravity surface position were implemented. A general dependence of the reorientation behavior on the gradient value was observed, concerning the apparent contact line behavior, the frequency and damping of the oscillations of the free surface center point, and the apparent contact angle. The behavior of the ullage pressure was found to follow the behavior of the contact line.

  11. Symmetry-lowering lattice distortion at the spin reorientation in MnBi single crystals

    DOE PAGES

    McGuire, Michael A.; Cao, Huibo; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; ...

    2014-11-18

    Here we report structural and physical properties determined by measurements on large single crystals of the anisotropic ferromagnet MnBi. The findings support the importance of magnetoelastic effects in this material. X-ray diffraction reveals a structural phase transition at the spin reorientation temperature TSR = 90 K. The distortion is driven by magneto-elastic coupling, and upon cooling transforms the structure from hexagonal to orthorhombic. Heat capacity measurements show a thermal anomaly at the crystallographic transition, which is suppressed rapidly by applied magnetic fields. Effects on the transport and anisotropic magnetic properties of the single crystals are also presented. Increasing anisotropy ofmore » the atomic displacement parameters for Bi with increasing temperature above TSR is revealed by neutron diffraction measurements. It is likely that this is directly related to the anisotropic thermal expansion in MnBi, which plays a key role in the spin reorientation and magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Finally, the identification of the true ground state crystal structure reported here may be important for future experimental and theoretical studies of this permanent magnet material, which have to date been performed and interpreted using only the high temperature structure.« less

  12. Magnetic structure and spin reorientation of quaternary Dy2Fe2Si2C.

    PubMed

    Susilo, R A; Cadogan, J M; Hutchison, W D; Stewart, G A; Avdeev, M; Campbell, S J

    2017-03-22

    We have investigated the low temperature magnetic properties of Dy2Fe2Si2C by using magnetisation, specific heat, x-ray diffraction, neutron powder diffraction and (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements over the temperature range 1.5 K-300 K. Dy2Fe2Si2C exhibits two magnetic transitions at low temperatures: an antiferromagnetic transition at [Formula: see text] K and a spin-reorientation transition at [Formula: see text] K. The magnetic structure above T t can be described with a propagation vector [Formula: see text] with the ordering of the Dy magnetic moments along the monoclinic b-axis whereas on cooling below T t the Dy moment tips away from the b-axis towards the ac-plane. We find that the spin-reorientation in Dy2Fe2Si2C is mainly driven by the competition between the second-order crystal field term B 20 and the higher-order terms, in particular B 40 and B 64.

  13. Mechanism of dynamic reorientation of cortical microtubules due to mechanical stress.

    PubMed

    Muratov, Alexander; Baulin, Vladimir A

    2015-12-01

    Directional growth caused by gravitropism and corresponding bending of plant cells has been explored since 19th century, however, many aspects of mechanisms underlying the perception of gravity at the molecular level are still not well known. Perception of gravity in root and shoot gravitropisms is usually attributed to gravisensitive cells, called statocytes, which exploit sedimentation of macroscopic and heavy organelles, amyloplasts, to sense the direction of gravity. Gravity stimulus is then transduced into distal elongation zone, which is several mm far from statocytes, where it causes stretching. It is suggested that gravity stimulus is conveyed by gradients in auxin flux. We propose a theoretical model that may explain how concentration gradients and/or stretching may indirectly affect the global orientation of cortical microtubules, attached to the cell membrane and induce their dynamic reorientation perpendicular to the gradients. In turn, oriented microtubule arrays direct the growth and orientation of cellulose microfibrils, forming part of the cell external skeleton and determine the shape of the cell. Reorientation of microtubules is also observed in reaction to light in phototropism and mechanical bending, thus suggesting universality of the proposed mechanism.

  14. Fast Local Trust Region Technique for Diffusion Tensor Registration using Exact Reorientation and Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junning; Shi, Yonggang; Tran, Giang; Dinov, Ivo; Wang, Danny JJ; Toga, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging is widely used in brain connectivity research. As more and more studies recruit large numbers of subjects, it is important to design registration methods which are not only theoretically rigorous, but also computationally efficient. However, the requirement of reorienting diffusion tensors complicates and considerably slows down registration procedures, due to the correlated impacts of registration forces at adjacent voxel locations. Based on the diffeomorphic Demons algorithm [1], we propose a fast local trust region algorithm for handling inseparable registration forces for quadratic energy functions. The method guarantees that, at any time and at any voxel location, the velocity is always within its local trust region. This local regularization allows efficient calculation of the transformation update with numeric integration instead of completely solving a large linear system at every iteration. It is able to incorporate exact reorientation and regularization into the velocity optimization, and preserve the linear complexity of the diffeomorphic Demons algorithm. In an experiment with 84 diffusion tensor images involving both pair-wise and group-wise registrations, the proposed algorithm achieves better registration in comparison with other methods solving large linear systems [2]. At the same time, this algorithm reduces the computation time and memory demand tenfold. PMID:23880040

  15. Intragranular twinning, detwinning, and twinning-like lattice reorientation in magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei; Gao, Yanfei; Li, Nan; Parish, Chad M.; Liu, Wenjun; Liaw, Peter K.; An, Ke

    2016-09-11

    We present that deformation twinning plays a critical role on improving metals or alloys ductility, especially for hexagonal close-packed materials with low symmetry crystal structure. A rolled Mg alloy was selected as a model system to investigate the extension twinning behaviors and characteristics of parent-twin interactions by nondestructive in situ 3D synchrotron X-ray microbeam diffraction. Besides twinning- detwinning process, the twinning-like lattice reorientation process was captured within an individual grain inside a bulk material during the strain reversal. The distributions of parent, twin, and reorientated grains and sub-micron level strain variation across the twin boundary are revealed. A theoretical calculation of the lattice strain confirms that the internal strain distribution in parent and twinned grains correlates with the experimental setup, grain orientation of parent, twin, and surrounding grains, as well as the strain path changes. In conclusion, the study suggests a novel deformation mechanism within the hexagonal close-packed structure that cannot be determined from surface-based characterization methods.

  16. Converse magnetoelectric effect via strain-driven magnetization reorientations in ultrathin ferromagnetic films on ferroelectric substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertsev, N. A.

    2015-07-01

    A phenomenological theory is developed for the strain-driven magnetization reorientations occurring in ultrathin ferromagnetic films coupled to ferroelectric substrates experiencing electric-field-induced piezoelectric deformations. The theory takes into account the surface/interface magnetic anisotropy playing an important role in the energetics of such films and first describes the thickness-driven spin reorientation transitions emerging in the presence of substrate-induced lattice strains. Then the threshold and critical intensities of the electric field created in a ferroelectric substrate are calculated, at which different magnetic states acquire the same energy or become unstable in a strained ferromagnetic overlayer. To demonstrate stability ranges of various possible magnetization orientations, we introduce magnetoelectric orientational diagrams, where the electric-field intensity and film thickness are employed as two variables. Such diagrams are constructed for ultrathin Ni, Fe, and F e60C o40 films coupled to single crystals of classical and relaxor ferroelectrics. The inspection of these diagrams shows that the use of multiferroic hybrids comprising ultrathin ferromagnetic films significantly enlarges the range of ferroic materials suitable for experimental observations of the strain-mediated converse magnetoelectric effect.

  17. Polarization Sensitive Measurements of Molecular Reorientation in a Glass Capacitor Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Nathan; Lawhead, Carlos; Anderson, Josiah; Shiver, Tegan; Prayaga, Chandra; Ujj, Laszlo

    2014-03-01

    It is well known that molecules having a permanent dipole moment tend to orient in the direction of the electric field at room temperature. The reorientation can be probed with the help of linear spectroscopy methods such as fluorescence anisotropy measurements. We have used nonlinear polarization sensitive Raman scattering spectroscopy to quantify the orientation effect of the dipoles. Vibrational spectra of the molecules has been recorded as a function of the external electric field. The polarization changes observed during the measurement are directly linked to the molecular reorientation rearrangement. Spectra has been recorded with a laser spectrometer comprised of a Nd:YAG laser and an optical parametric oscillator and an imaging spectrometer with a CCD detector. In order to make this measurement we have constructed a glass capacitor cell coated in TiO and applied a significant electric field (0-3 kV/mm) to the sample. Our measurements showed that the orientation effect is most significant for liquid crystals as observed previously with non-polarization sensitive CARS spectroscopy.

  18. Spontaneous reorientations of meta-atoms and electromagnetic spatial solitons in a liquid metacrystal.

    PubMed

    Zharov, Alexander A; Zharov, Alexander A; Zharova, Nina A

    2014-08-01

    We show that transverse electromagnetic waves propagating along an external static electric field in liquid metacrystal (LMC) can provoke spontaneous rearrangement of elongated meta-atoms that changes the direction of the anisotropy axis of the LMC. This kind of instability may reorient the meta-atoms from the equilibrium state parallel to a static field to the state along a high-frequency field and back at the different threshold intensities of electromagnetic waves in such a way that bistability in the system takes place. Reorientation of meta-atoms causes a change in the effective refraction index of LMC that creates, in turn, the conditions for the formation of bright spatial solitons. Such spatial solitons are the self-consistent domains of redirected meta-atoms with trapped photons. We find that the instability thresholds as well as energy flux captured by the spatial soliton can be easily managed by variation of the static electric field applied to the LMC. We study the effects of soliton excitation and collisions via numerical simulations.

  19. Symmetry-lowering lattice distortion at the spin reorientation in MnBi single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, Michael A.; Cao, Huibo; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Sales, Brian C.

    2014-11-18

    Here we report structural and physical properties determined by measurements on large single crystals of the anisotropic ferromagnet MnBi. The findings support the importance of magnetoelastic effects in this material. X-ray diffraction reveals a structural phase transition at the spin reorientation temperature TSR = 90 K. The distortion is driven by magneto-elastic coupling, and upon cooling transforms the structure from hexagonal to orthorhombic. Heat capacity measurements show a thermal anomaly at the crystallographic transition, which is suppressed rapidly by applied magnetic fields. Effects on the transport and anisotropic magnetic properties of the single crystals are also presented. Increasing anisotropy of the atomic displacement parameters for Bi with increasing temperature above TSR is revealed by neutron diffraction measurements. It is likely that this is directly related to the anisotropic thermal expansion in MnBi, which plays a key role in the spin reorientation and magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Finally, the identification of the true ground state crystal structure reported here may be important for future experimental and theoretical studies of this permanent magnet material, which have to date been performed and interpreted using only the high temperature structure.

  20. Doping controlled spin reorientation in dysprosium-samarium orthoferrite single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shixun; Zhao, Weiyao; Kang, Baojuan; Zhang, Jincang; Ren, Wei

    2015-03-01

    As one of the most important phase transitions, spin reorientation (SR) in rare earth transition metal oxides draws much attention of emerging materials technologies. The origin of SR is the competition between different spin configurations which possess different free energy. We report the control of spin reorientation (SR) transition in perovskite rare earth orthoferrite Dy1-xSmxFeO3, a whole family of single crystals grown by optical floating zone method from x =0 to 1. Temperature dependence of the magnetizations under zero-field-cooling (ZFC) and field-cooling (FC) processes are studied. We have found a remarkable linear change of SR transition temperature in Sm-rich samples for x>0.2, which covers an extremely wide temperature range including room temperature. The a-axis magnetization curves under FCC process bifurcate from and then jump down to that of warming process (ZFC and FCW curves) in single crystals when x =0.5-0.9, suggesting complicated 4f-3d electron interactions among Dy3+-Sm3+, Dy3+-Fe3+, and Sm3+-Fe3+ sublattices of diverse magnetic configurations for materials physics and design. The magnetic properties and the doping effect on SR transition temperature in these single crystals might be useful in the spintronics device application. This work is supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB921600), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC, Nos. 51372149, 50932003, 11274222).

  1. Origins of the non-exponential reorientation dynamics of nanoconfined water.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Aoife C; Duboué-Dijon, Elise; Laage, Damien; Thompson, Ward H

    2014-11-14

    The dynamics of water are dramatically modified upon confinement in nanoscale hydrophilic silica pores. In particular, the OH reorientation dynamics of the interfacial water are non-exponential and dramatically slowed relative to the bulk liquid. A detailed analysis of molecular dynamics simulations is carried out to elucidate the microscopic origins of this behavior. The results are analyzed in the context of the extended jump model for water that describes the reorientation as a combination of hydrogen-bond exchanges, or jumps, and rotation of intact hydrogen bonds, with the former representing the dominant contribution. Within this model, the roles of surface and dynamical heterogeneities are considered by spatially resolving the hydrogen-bond jump dynamics into individual sites on the silica pore surface. For each site the dynamics is nearly mono-exponential, indicating that dynamical heterogeneity is at most a minor influence, while the distribution of these individual site jump times is broad. The non-exponential dynamics can also not be attributed to enthalpic contributions to the barriers to hydrogen-bond exchanges. Two entropic effects related to the surface roughness are found to explain the retarded and diverse dynamics: those associated with the approach of a new hydrogen-bond acceptor and with the breaking of the initial hydrogen-bond.

  2. Origins of the non-exponential reorientation dynamics of nanoconfined water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, Aoife C.; Duboué-Dijon, Elise; Laage, Damien; Thompson, Ward H.

    2014-11-01

    The dynamics of water are dramatically modified upon confinement in nanoscale hydrophilic silica pores. In particular, the OH reorientation dynamics of the interfacial water are non-exponential and dramatically slowed relative to the bulk liquid. A detailed analysis of molecular dynamics simulations is carried out to elucidate the microscopic origins of this behavior. The results are analyzed in the context of the extended jump model for water that describes the reorientation as a combination of hydrogen-bond exchanges, or jumps, and rotation of intact hydrogen bonds, with the former representing the dominant contribution. Within this model, the roles of surface and dynamical heterogeneities are considered by spatially resolving the hydrogen-bond jump dynamics into individual sites on the silica pore surface. For each site the dynamics is nearly mono-exponential, indicating that dynamical heterogeneity is at most a minor influence, while the distribution of these individual site jump times is broad. The non-exponential dynamics can also not be attributed to enthalpic contributions to the barriers to hydrogen-bond exchanges. Two entropic effects related to the surface roughness are found to explain the retarded and diverse dynamics: those associated with the approach of a new hydrogen-bond acceptor and with the breaking of the initial hydrogen-bond.

  3. Measurement and Analysis of Full-Scale Hydraulic Fracture Initiation and Reorientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, R. G.; Chen, Z. R.; Zhang, X.; Bunger, A. P.; Mills, K. W.

    2015-11-01

    Hydraulic fracture breakdown and reorientation data collected from two instrumented test borehole sites have been analyzed to assess the effect of the initiation type (axial or transverse) on the treating pressure. Vertical boreholes were drilled and fractures were placed in a conglomerate at depths of 140-180 m in a far-field stress field that favored horizontal fracture growth. Axial initiation resulted in high injection pressure, which was attributed to near-borehole tortuosity generated as the hydraulic fracture reoriented to align with the far-field stresses. Acoustic scanner logging of the boreholes after fracturing demonstrated that, in many cases, axial initiation occurred and when this was the case, treating pressures were high and consistent with near-borehole tortuous fracture paths. A fracture initiation analysis determined that initiation at abrasively cut circumferential slots should occur before axial initiation. Slots were cut to locate the initiation sites and to make transverse fracture initiation more likely. Transverse initiation from the vertical boreholes at pre-cut slots lowered the injection pressures during the fracture treatment by up to 12 MPa for water injected at approximately 500 L per minute.

  4. A study on hydride reorientation of Zircaloy-4 cladding tube under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ju-Seong; Kim, Young-Jun; Kook, Dong-Hak; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    A study of the radial hydride formation in cold worked and stress relieved (CWSR) Zircaloy-4 cladding was performed using a ring tensile method and finite element analysis. Un-irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding ring specimens charged with hydrogen were tested at various temperatures and loading conditions. Measured threshold stresses at loaded temperatures of 400 °C, 335 °C, 300 °C, and 235 °C turned out to be 60 ± 5 MPa, 68 ± 5 MPa, 75 ± 6 MPa, and 90 ± 6 MPa, respectively, demonstrating the tendency of decreasing threshold stress with increasing temperature. These stresses were lower than previously reported ones and close to the lower bound of collected data from the literature. These results reveal that high temperature preheating seems to affect an initiation of the reorientation. This implies that temperature increase caused by the vacuum drying of spent fuel assemblies for transportation can promote the hydride reorientation, leading to mechanical deterioration of the cladding.

  5. Reorientation mechanisms of block copolymer/CdSe quantum dot composites under application of an electric field.

    PubMed

    Kathrein, Christine C; Pester, Christian; Ruppel, Markus; Jung, Maike; Zimmermann, Marc; Böker, Alexander

    2016-10-12

    Time- and temperature-resolved in situ birefringence measurements were applied to analyze the effect of nanoparticles on the electric field-induced alignment of a microphase separated solution of poly(styrene)-block-poly(isoprene) in toluene. Through the incorporation of isoprene-confined CdSe quantum dots the reorientation behavior is altered. Particle loading lowers the order-disorder transition temperature, and increases the defect density, favoring nucleation and growth as an alignment mechanism over rotation of grains. The temperature dependent alteration in the reorientation mechanism is analyzed via a combination of birefringence and synchrotron SAXS. The detailed understanding of the effect of nanoparticles on the reorientation mechanism is an important prerequisite for optimization of electric-field-induced alignment of block copolymer/nanoparticle composites where the block copolymer guides the nanoparticle self-assembly into anisotropic structures.

  6. Peculiarities in the director reorientation and evolution of NMR spectra under the influence of crossed electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Theoretical description is proposed for new modes of reorientation of the director field widehat n and the evolution of the NMR spectrum I(ν) of a nematic liquid crystal (LC) formed by molecules of deuterated 4-n-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl encapsulated in a rectangular LC cell under the action of crossed electric, E, and magnetic, B, fields directed at an angle of α to one another. Numerical calculations in the framework of the nonlinear generalization of the classical Ericksen-Leslie theory show that, under certain relations between the forces and moments acting upon a unit volume of the LC phase upon the reorientation of widehat n, transient periodic structures can arise if the corresponding distortion mode is characterized by the fastest response and thus suppresses all other modes, including uniform ones. It is shown that the rise of these periodic structures leads to a reduction in the time for the reorientation of the director field.

  7. Surface Hold Advisor Using Critical Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, Caleb Hoi Kei (Inventor); Hsiao, Thomas Kun-Lung (Inventor); Mittler, Nathan C. (Inventor); Couluris, George J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The Surface Hold Advisor Using Critical Sections is a system and method for providing hold advisories to surface controllers to prevent gridlock and resolve crossing and merging conflicts among vehicles traversing a vertex-edge graph representing a surface traffic network on an airport surface. The Advisor performs pair-wise comparisons of current position and projected path of each vehicle with other surface vehicles to detect conflicts, determine critical sections, and provide hold advisories to traffic controllers recommending vehicles stop at entry points to protected zones around identified critical sections. A critical section defines a segment of the vertex-edge graph where vehicles are in crossing or merging or opposite direction gridlock contention. The Advisor detects critical sections without reference to scheduled, projected or required times along assigned vehicle paths, and generates hold advisories to prevent conflicts without requiring network path direction-of-movement rules and without requiring rerouting, rescheduling or other network optimization solutions.

  8. Advanced Illness: Holding on and Letting Go

    MedlinePlus

    ... here Home Advanced Illness: Holding On and Letting Go Order this publication Printer-friendly version Introduction Our ... fate, then I accept it with dignity." Letting Go As death nears, many people feel a lessening ...

  9. Holding fixture for variable-contour parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynie, C. C.; Packer, P. N.; Zebus, P. P.

    1979-01-01

    Array of vacuum cups on spindles holds parts for safe machining and other processings. Variable-contour part resting on fixture is held firmly enough for machining, coating, or other mechanical treatment.

  10. 12 CFR 1235.5 - Record hold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... alternative storage method. (d) Access to and retrieval of records during a record hold. The record retention program of each regulated entity or the Office of Finance shall ensure access to and retrieval of...

  11. 12 CFR 1235.5 - Record hold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... alternative storage method. (d) Access to and retrieval of records during a record hold. The record retention program of each regulated entity or the Office of Finance shall ensure access to and retrieval of...

  12. Flu Tightens Its Hold on The Nation

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163039.html Flu Tightens Its Hold on the Nation It's not too late to get vaccinated, CDC says ... pregnant women -- to get their flu shots before it's too late. "Even though activity is elevated, we ...

  13. Prosthetic Tool For Holding Small Ferromagnetic Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Carden, James R.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    Tool attached to prosthetic hand or arm enables user to hold nails, screws, nuts, rivets, and other small ferromagnetic objects on small magnetic tip. Device adjusted to hold nail or screw at proper angle for hammering or for use of screwdriver, respectively. Includes base connector with threaded outer surface and lower male member inserted in standard spring-action, quick-connect/quick-disconnect wrist adapter on prosthetic hand or arm.

  14. Prosthetic Tool For Holding Small Ferromagnetic Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Carden, James R.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    Tool attached to prosthetic hand or arm enables user to hold nails, screws, nuts, rivets, and other small ferromagnetic objects on small magnetic tip. Device adjusted to hold nail or screw at proper angle for hammering or for use of screwdriver, respectively. Includes base connector with threaded outer surface and lower male member inserted in standard spring-action, quick-connect/quick-disconnect wrist adapter on prosthetic hand or arm.

  15. Low speed maneuvering flight of the rose-breasted cockatoo (Eolophus roseicapillus). II. Inertial and aerodynamic reorientation.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, T L; Usherwood, J R; Biewener, A A

    2007-06-01

    The reconfigurable, flapping wings of birds allow for both inertial and aerodynamic modes of reorientation. We found evidence that both these modes play important roles in the low speed turning flight of the rose-breasted cockatoo Eolophus roseicapillus. Using three-dimensional kinematics recorded from six cockatoos making a 90 degrees turn in a flight corridor, we developed predictions of inertial and aerodynamic reorientation from estimates of wing moments of inertia and flapping arcs, and a blade-element aerodynamic model. The blade-element model successfully predicted weight support (predicted was 88+/-17% of observed, N=6) and centripetal force (predicted was 79+/-29% of observed, N=6) for the maneuvering cockatoos and provided a reasonable estimate of mechanical power. The estimated torque from the model was a significant predictor of roll acceleration (r(2)=0.55, P<0.00001), but greatly overestimated roll magnitude when applied with no roll damping. Non-dimensional roll damping coefficients of approximately -1.5, 2-6 times greater than those typical of airplane flight dynamics (approximately -0.45), were required to bring our estimates of reorientation due to aerodynamic torque back into conjunction with the measured changes in orientation. Our estimates of inertial reorientation were statistically significant predictors of the measured reorientation within wingbeats (r(2) from 0.2 to 0.37, P<0.0005). Components of both our inertial reorientation and aerodynamic torque estimates correlated, significantly, with asymmetries in the activation profile of four flight muscles: the pectoralis, supracoracoideus, biceps brachii and extensor metacarpi radialis (r(2) from 0.27 to 0.45, P<0.005). Thus, avian flight maneuvers rely on production of asymmetries throughout the flight apparatus rather than in a specific set of control or turning muscles.

  16. Gravity and tectonic patterns of Mercury: Effect of tidal deformation, spin-orbit resonance, nonzero eccentricity, despinning, and reorientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, I.; Nimmo, F.

    2009-01-01

    We consider the effect of spin-orbit resonance, nonzero eccentricity, despinning, and reorientation on Mercury's gravity and tectonic pattern. Large variations of the gravity and shape coefficients from the synchronous rotation and zero eccentricity values, J 2/C 22 = 10/3 and (b - c)/(a - c) = 1/4, arise because of nonsynchronous rotation and nonzero eccentricity even in the absence of reorientation or despinning. Reorientation or despinning induces additional variations. The large gravity coefficients J 2 = (6 +/- 2) × 10-5 and C 22 = (1 +/- 0.5) × 10-5 estimated from the Mariner 10 flybys cannot be attributed to Caloris alone since the required mass excess in this case would have caused Caloris to migrate to one of Mercury's hot poles. Similarly, a large remnant bulge due to a smaller semimajor axis and spin-orbit resonance can be dismissed since the required semimajor axis is unphysically small (<0.1 AU). Reorientation of a large remnant bulge recording an epoch of faster rotation (without significant semimajor axis variations) can explain the large gravity coefficients. This requires initial rotation rates $\\gtrsim$20 times the present value and a positive gravity anomaly associated with Caloris capable of driving ~10°-45° equatorward reorientation. The required gravity anomaly can be explained by infilling of the basin with material of thicknesses $\\gtrsim$7 km or an annulus of volcanic plains emplaced around the basin with an annulus width ~1200 km and fill thicknesses $\\gtrsim$2 km. The predicted tectonic pattern due to these despinning and reorientation scenarios, including some radial contraction, is in good agreement with the lobate scarp pattern observed by Mariner 10. We also predict that lobate scarps will follow a NE-SW orientation in the eastern hemisphere and a positive gravity anomaly (of a few hundred mGal) associated with Caloris.

  17. Cam operated tool for proximate or remote holding of an object

    DOEpatents

    Schrum, Phillip B.; Gajdzak, George P.

    1997-01-01

    A tool for releasably holding an object includes a receptacle having an outer sleeve and a rotatable inner sleeve. The inner sleeve is coaxially positioned within the outer sleeve and includes a locking member. An insert which is adapted to be operably associated with the receptacle includes a cam. The cam includes a guide and a slot so that when the cam is inserted into the inner sleeve, the guide aligns the locking member with the slot allowing the locking member to engage the slog thereby holding the receptacle and the insert together.

  18. Modification of Eccentric Gaze-Holding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Paloski, W. H.; Somers, J. T.; Leigh, R. J.; Wood, S. J.; Kornilova, L.

    2006-01-01

    Clear vision and accurate localization of objects in the environment are prerequisites for reliable performance of motor tasks. Space flight confronts the crewmember with a stimulus rearrangement that requires adaptation to function effectively with the new requirements of altered spatial orientation and motor coordination. Adaptation and motor learning driven by the effects of cerebellar disorders may share some of the same demands that face our astronauts. One measure of spatial localization shared by the astronauts and those suffering from cerebellar disorders that is easily quantified, and for which a neurobiological substrate has been identified, is the control of the angle of gaze (the "line of sight"). The disturbances of gaze control that have been documented to occur in astronauts and cosmonauts, both in-flight and postflight, can be directly related to changes in the extrinsic gravitational environment and intrinsic proprioceptive mechanisms thus, lending themselves to description by simple non-linear statistical models. Because of the necessity of developing robust normal response populations and normative populations against which abnormal responses can be evaluated, the basic models can be formulated using normal, non-astronaut test subjects and subsequently extended using centrifugation techniques to alter the gravitational and proprioceptive environment of these subjects. Further tests and extensions of the models can be made by studying abnormalities of gaze control in patients with cerebellar disease. A series of investigations were conducted in which a total of 62 subjects were tested to: (1) Define eccentric gaze-holding parameters in a normative population, and (2) explore the effects of linear acceleration on gaze-holding parameters. For these studies gaze-holding was evaluated with the subjects seated upright (the normative values), rolled 45 degrees to both the left and right, or pitched back 30 and 90 degrees. In a separate study the further

  19. Engagement and Institutional Advancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weerts, David; Hudson, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Research suggests that institutional commitment to community engagement can be understood by examining levels of student, faculty, and community involvement in engagement; organizational structure, rewards, and campus publications supporting engagement; and compatibility of an institution's mission with this work (Holland, 1997). Underlying all of…

  20. Engaging Your Beginners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Teachers love to see the spark of engagement when students eagerly engage in learning. But when teachers work with English language learners in the earliest stages of language acquisition, they're often unsure how to foster challenge and engagement with students who know such sparse English. Hill shares six key do's and don'ts for classroom…

  1. Engaging Your Beginners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Teachers love to see the spark of engagement when students eagerly engage in learning. But when teachers work with English language learners in the earliest stages of language acquisition, they're often unsure how to foster challenge and engagement with students who know such sparse English. Hill shares six key do's and don'ts for classroom…

  2. A Dialogue for Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    Student engagement is perhaps the key element for almost any learning context. When engaged, learners are enthusiastic and excited about the subject. Their work is informed by the enjoyment of discovery. Engaged learners work willingly, instead of by coercion, and approach their assignments as something that matters to them personally. The spirit…

  3. Engaging Scholarship with Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Núñez, Guillermina Gina

    2014-01-01

    A pedagogy of engagement links faculty and students to the needs of local communities while promoting academic success through higher retention and graduation rates in higher education. This work describes engaged scholarship and shares guidelines for documenting student engagement and critical reflection across the higher education curriculum.…

  4. Engaging Scholarship with Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Núñez, Guillermina Gina

    2014-01-01

    A pedagogy of engagement links faculty and students to the needs of local communities while promoting academic success through higher retention and graduation rates in higher education. This work describes engaged scholarship and shares guidelines for documenting student engagement and critical reflection across the higher education curriculum.…

  5. A Dialogue for Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    Student engagement is perhaps the key element for almost any learning context. When engaged, learners are enthusiastic and excited about the subject. Their work is informed by the enjoyment of discovery. Engaged learners work willingly, instead of by coercion, and approach their assignments as something that matters to them personally. The spirit…

  6. Engagement and Institutional Advancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weerts, David; Hudson, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Research suggests that institutional commitment to community engagement can be understood by examining levels of student, faculty, and community involvement in engagement; organizational structure, rewards, and campus publications supporting engagement; and compatibility of an institution's mission with this work (Holland, 1997). Underlying all of…

  7. Slip re-orientation in the oblique Abiquiu embayment, northern Rio Grande rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Murphy, M. A.; Andrea, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Traditional models of oblique rifting predict that an oblique fault accommodates both dip-slip and strike-slip kinematics. However, recent analog experiments suggest that slip can be re-oriented to almost pure dip-slip on oblique faults if a preexisting weak zone is present at the onset of oblique extension. In this study, we use fault slip data from the Abiquiu embayment in northern Rio Grande rift to test the new model. The Rio Grande rift is a Cenozoic oblique rift extending from southern Colorado to New Mexico. From north to south, it comprises three major half grabens (San Luis, Española, and Albuquerque). The Abiquiu embayment is a sub-basin of the San Luis basin in northern New Mexico. Rift-border faults are generally older and oblique to the trend of the rift, whereas internal faults are younger and approximately N-S striking, i.e. orthogonal to the regional extension direction. Rift-border faults are deep-seated in the basement rocks while the internal faults only cut shallow stratigraphic sections. It has been suggested by many that inherited structures may influence the Rio Grande rifting. Particularly, Laramide structures (and possibly the Ancestral Rockies as well) that bound the Abiquiu embayment strike N- to NW. Our data show that internal faults in the Abiquiu embayment exhibit almost pure dip-slip (rake of slickenlines = 90º ± 15º), independent of their orientations with respect to the regional extension direction. On the contrary, border faults show two sets of rakes: almost pure dip-slip (rake = 90º ± 15º) where the fault is sub-parallel to the foliation, and moderately-oblique (rake = 30º ± 15º) where the fault is high angle to the foliation. We conclude that slip re-orientation occurs on most internal faults and some oblique border faults under the influence of inherited structures. Regarding those border faults on which slip is not re-oriented, we hypothesize that it may be caused by the Jemez volcanism or small-scale mantle

  8. Involuntary Capture and Voluntary Reorienting of Attention Decline in Middle-Aged and Old Participants.

    PubMed

    Correa-Jaraba, Kenia S; Cid-Fernández, Susana; Lindín, Mónica; Díaz, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine the effects of aging on event-related brain potentials (ERPs) associated with the automatic detection of unattended infrequent deviant and novel auditory stimuli (Mismatch Negativity, MMN) and with the orienting to these stimuli (P3a component), as well as the effects on ERPs associated with reorienting to relevant visual stimuli (Reorienting Negativity, RON). Participants were divided into three age groups: (1) Young: 21-29 years old; (2) Middle-aged: 51-64 years old; and (3) Old: 65-84 years old. They performed an auditory-visual distraction-attention task in which they were asked to attend to visual stimuli (Go, NoGo) and to ignore auditory stimuli (S: standard, D: deviant, N: novel). Reaction times (RTs) to Go visual stimuli were longer in old and middle-aged than in young participants. In addition, in all three age groups, longer RTs were found when Go visual stimuli were preceded by novel relative to deviant and standard auditory stimuli, indicating a distraction effect provoked by novel stimuli. ERP components were identified in the Novel minus Standard (N-S) and Deviant minus Standard (D-S) difference waveforms. In the N-S condition, MMN latency was significantly longer in middle-aged and old participants than in young participants, indicating a slowing of automatic detection of changes. The following results were observed in both difference waveforms: (1) the P3a component comprised two consecutive phases in all three age groups-an early-P3a (e-P3a) that may reflect the orienting response toward the irrelevant stimulation and a late-P3a (l-P3a) that may be a correlate of subsequent evaluation of the infrequent unexpected novel or deviant stimuli; (2) the e-P3a, l-P3a, and RON latencies were significantly longer in the Middle-aged and Old groups than in the Young group, indicating delay in the orienting response to and the subsequent evaluation of unattended auditory stimuli, and in the reorienting of attention to

  9. Involuntary Capture and Voluntary Reorienting of Attention Decline in Middle-Aged and Old Participants

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Jaraba, Kenia S.; Cid-Fernández, Susana; Lindín, Mónica; Díaz, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine the effects of aging on event-related brain potentials (ERPs) associated with the automatic detection of unattended infrequent deviant and novel auditory stimuli (Mismatch Negativity, MMN) and with the orienting to these stimuli (P3a component), as well as the effects on ERPs associated with reorienting to relevant visual stimuli (Reorienting Negativity, RON). Participants were divided into three age groups: (1) Young: 21–29 years old; (2) Middle-aged: 51–64 years old; and (3) Old: 65–84 years old. They performed an auditory-visual distraction-attention task in which they were asked to attend to visual stimuli (Go, NoGo) and to ignore auditory stimuli (S: standard, D: deviant, N: novel). Reaction times (RTs) to Go visual stimuli were longer in old and middle-aged than in young participants. In addition, in all three age groups, longer RTs were found when Go visual stimuli were preceded by novel relative to deviant and standard auditory stimuli, indicating a distraction effect provoked by novel stimuli. ERP components were identified in the Novel minus Standard (N-S) and Deviant minus Standard (D-S) difference waveforms. In the N-S condition, MMN latency was significantly longer in middle-aged and old participants than in young participants, indicating a slowing of automatic detection of changes. The following results were observed in both difference waveforms: (1) the P3a component comprised two consecutive phases in all three age groups—an early-P3a (e-P3a) that may reflect the orienting response toward the irrelevant stimulation and a late-P3a (l-P3a) that may be a correlate of subsequent evaluation of the infrequent unexpected novel or deviant stimuli; (2) the e-P3a, l-P3a, and RON latencies were significantly longer in the Middle-aged and Old groups than in the Young group, indicating delay in the orienting response to and the subsequent evaluation of unattended auditory stimuli, and in the reorienting of

  10. Cross Sections: No. 1 Hold section at Fr 24 Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cross Sections: No. 1 Hold section at Fr 24 Looking Fwd, No 1 Hold Section at Fr 28 Looking Aft, No 2 Hold Section at Fr 48 Looking Aft, No 3 Hold Section at Fr 70 Looking Aft, No 4 Hold Section at Fr 90 Looking Aft - General John Pope, Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  11. A geometrical approach to determine reorientation start and continuation conditions in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys considering the effects of loading history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirani, M.; Kadkhodaei, M.

    2014-12-01

    Ferromagnetic shape memory alloys (FSMAs) and magnetic shape memory alloys (MSMAs) are metallic alloys that can undergo inelastic responses when exposed to magnetic fields. Several constitutive models have been proposed so far to model the behaviors of FSMAs. In this work, the effects of loading history on reorientation start conditions are considered, and it is shown that reorientation start conditions are not fixed values; rather, they change with respect to the amount of loading history. To consider the effects of loading history on reorientation start conditions, an available phase diagram in stress-field space is generalized to reorientation surfaces in stress-field-loading history space. Correspondingly, kinetic laws are derived in a continuum framework to be used with the reorientation surfaces to determine the amount of the martensitic variant 2 volume fraction. Based on the geometry of the reorientation surfaces, conditions that must be satisfied to ensure the continuation of reorientations are obtained. Available experimental findings validate the proposed model and the reorientation surfaces.

  12. Young Children's Use of Features to Reorient Is More than Just Associative: Further Evidence against a Modular View of Spatial Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcombe, Nora S.; Ratliff, Kristin R.; Shallcross, Wendy L.; Twyman, Alexandra D.

    2010-01-01

    Proponents of a geometric module have argued that instances of young children's use of features as well as geometry to reorient can be explained by a two-stage process. In this model, only the first stage is a true reorientation, accomplished by using geometric information alone; features are considered in a second stage using association (Lee,…

  13. Disgust- and not fear-evoking images hold our attention.

    PubMed

    van Hooff, Johanna C; Devue, Christel; Vieweg, Paula E; Theeuwes, Jan

    2013-05-01

    Even though disgust and fear are both negative emotions, they are characterized by different physiology and action tendencies. The aim of this study was to examine whether fear- and disgust-evoking images would produce different attention bias effects, specifically those related to attention (dis)engagement. Participants were asked to identify a target which was briefly presented around a central image cue, which could either be disgusting, frightening, or neutral. The interval between cue onset and target presentation varied within blocks (200, 500, 800, 1100 ms), allowing us to investigate the time course of attention engagement. Accuracy was lower and reaction times were longer when targets quickly (200 ms) followed disgust-evoking images than when they followed neutral- or fear-evoking images. For the other, longer interval conditions no significant image effects were found. These results suggest that emotion-specific attention effects can be found at very early visual processing stages and that only disgust-evoking images, and not fear-evoking ones, keep hold of our attention for longer. We speculate that this increase in early attention allocation is related to the need to perform a more comprehensive risk-assessment of the disgust-evoking images. The outcomes underline not only the importance of examining the time course of emotion induced attention effects but also the need to look beyond the dimensions of valence and arousal.

  14. N-terminal helix reorients in recombinant C-fragment of Clostridium botulinum type B.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Seetharaman; Eswaramoorthy, Subramaniam; Ahmed, S Ashraf; Smith, Leonard A; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2005-04-29

    Botulinum neurotoxins comprise seven distinct serotypes (A-G) produced by Clostridium botulinum. The crystal structure of the binding domain of the botulinum neurotoxin type B (BBHc) has been determined to 2A resolution. The overall structure of BBHc is well ordered and similar to that of the binding domain of the holotoxin. However, significant structural changes occur at what would be the interface of translocation and binding domains of the holotoxin. The loop 911-924 shows a maximum displacement of 14.8A at the farthest point. The N-terminal helix reorients and moves by 19.5A from its original position. BBHc is compared with the binding domain of the holotoxin of botulinum type A and B, and the tetanus C-fragment to characterize the heavy chain-carbohydrate interactions. The probable reasons for different binding affinity of botulinum and tetanus toxins are discussed.

  15. Design and development of a brushless, direct drive solar array reorientation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jessee, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    This report covers the design and development of the laboratory model, and is essentially a compilation of reports covering the system and its various parts. To enhance completeness, the final report of Phase 1 covering circuit development of the controller is also included. A controller was developed for a brushless, direct-drive, single axis solar array reorientation system for earth-pointed, passively-stabilized spacecraft. A control systems was designed and breadboard circuits were built and tested for performance. The controller is designed to take over automatic control of the array on command after the spacecraft is stabilized in orbit. The controller will orient the solar array to the sun vector and automatically track to maintain proper orientation. So long as the orbit is circular, orientation toward the sun is maintained even though the spacecraft goes into the shadow of the earth. Particular attention was given in the design to limit reaction between the array and the spacecraft.

  16. Large Angle Reorientation of a Solar Sail Using Gimballed Mass Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperber, E.; Fu, B.; Eke, F. O.

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a control strategy for the large angle reorientation of a solar sail equipped with a gimballed mass. The algorithm consists of a first stage that manipulates the gimbal angle in order to minimize the attitude error about a single principal axis. Once certain termination conditions are reached, a regulator is employed that selects a single gimbal angle for minimizing both the residual attitude error concomitantly with the body rate. Because the force due to the specular reflection of radiation is always directed along a reflector's surface normal, this form of thrust vector control cannot generate torques about an axis normal to the plane of the sail. Thus, in order to achieve three-axis control authority a 1-2-1 or 2-1-2 sequence of rotations about principal axes is performed. The control algorithm is implemented directly in-line with the nonlinear equations of motion and key performance characteristics are identified.

  17. Electric method for studying reorientation dynamics of the nematic liquid crystal director

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbinin, D. P.; Vakulin, D. A.; Konshina, E. A.

    2016-07-01

    A method has been proposed for studying the reorientation dynamics of the nematic liquid crystal (NLC) director using the results of measurements of the electric response of an LC cell. The simulation of the time dependences of the current in an LC cell with a homogeneous orientation is carried out upon variation of the applied voltage, the initial tilt angle of the director, dielectric anisotropy, and the elasticity coefficient, as well as the dynamic viscosity, density, and ion mobility in the NLC. A comparison of the experimental and computational curves of the electric response for NLC 5CB shows their good agreement. The method makes it possible to monitor the steady-state current, the density, and the ion mobility in NLCs.

  18. Communication: On the origin of the non-Arrhenius behavior in water reorientation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stirnemann, Guillaume; Laage, Damien

    2012-07-21

    We combine molecular dynamics simulations and analytic modeling to determine the origin of the non-Arrhenius temperature dependence of liquid water's reorientation and hydrogen-bond dynamics between 235 K and 350 K. We present a quantitative model connecting hydrogen-bond exchange dynamics to local structural fluctuations, measured by the asphericity of Voronoi cells associated with each water molecule. For a fixed local structure the regular Arrhenius behavior is recovered, and the global anomalous temperature dependence is demonstrated to essentially result from a continuous shift in the unimodal structure distribution upon cooling. The non-Arrhenius behavior can thus be explained without invoking an equilibrium between distinct structures. In addition, the large width of the homogeneous structural distribution is shown to cause a growing dynamical heterogeneity and a non-exponential relaxation at low temperature.

  19. Rotational reorientation dynamics of C60 in various solvents. Picosecond transient grating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubtsov, I. V.; Khudiakov, D. V.; Nadtochenko, V. A.; Lobach, A. S.; Moravskii, A. P.

    1994-11-01

    The picosecond transient grating technique has been used to study the rotational reorientation of C60 in various solvents: in toluene 7 +/- 1.5 ps, o-dichlorobenzene 10.3 +/- 1.5 ps, o-xylene 13 +/- 2 ps and in decalin 3.5 +/- 1.5 ps. The data obtained cannot be described by hydrodynamic Debye theory. Rough-sphere fluid theory predicts the correct values for C60 rotation in toluene, o-dichlorobenzene and in decalin. The deviations for o-xylene are probably connected with the specifics of the local solvent structure or with the stronger interaction of C60 with solvent molecules. The rotation of C60 in decalin is rapid and approaches the rotation in the gas phase determined by inertia.

  20. Observation of second spin reorientation transition within ultrathin region in Fe films on Ag(001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Khim, T.-Y.; Shin, M.; Lee, H. E-mail: jhp@postech.ac.kr; Park, B.-G.; Park, J.-H. E-mail: jhp@postech.ac.kr

    2014-06-21

    We acquired direct measurements for in-plane and perpendicular-to-plane magnetic moments of Fe films using an x-ray magnetic circular dichroism technique with increase of the Fe thickness (up to 40 Å) on the Ag(001) surface. Epitaxial Fe/Ag(001) films were grown in situ with the thickness varying from 2 Å to 40 Å, and the magnetic anisotropy was carefully investigated as a function of the film thickness. We found re-entrance of the in-plane magnetic anisotropy of the Fe film in ultrathin region. The results manifest that the epitaxial Fe/Ag(001) film undergoes two distinct spin reorientation transitions from in-plane to out-of-plane at the film thickness t ≈ 9 Å and back to in-plane at t ≈ 18 Å as t increases.

  1. Temperature-dependent magnetostriction as the key factor for martensite reorientation in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'vov, Victor A.; Kosogor, Anna

    2016-09-01

    The magnetic field application leads to spatially inhomogeneous magnetostriction of twinned ferromagnetic martensite. When the increasing field and magnetostrictive strain reach certain threshold values, the motion of twin boundaries and magnetically induced reorientation (MIR) of twinned martensite start. The MIR leads to giant magnetically induced deformation of twinned martensite. In the present article, the threshold field (TF) and temperature range of observability of MIR were calculated for the Ni-Mn-Ga martensite assuming that the threshold strain (TS) is temperature-independent. The calculations show that if the TS is of the order of 10-4, the TF strongly depends on temperature and MIR can be observed only above the limiting temperature (~220 K). If the TS is of the order of 10-6, the TF weakly depends on temperature and MIR can be observed at extremely low temperatures. The obtained theoretical results are in agreement with available experimental data.

  2. On the spacer and mesogenic unit QNS reorientational motion investigation in liquid crystal polyacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvikl, B.; Peternelj, J.

    1992-01-01

    The incoherent quasi elastic cold neutron scattering data of the side chain dynamics of the backnbone deuterated linear polymer polyacrylate of Benguigui et al. J. Phys. II France 1 (1991) 451), have been successfully interpreted in the isotropic, smectic A and re-entrant nematic phases. The spacer dynamics of the twelve protons are interpreted in terms of the mode1 according to which the protons are subjectec to the transverse oscillations of the standing wave variety with only the fundamental mode of vibrations being excited. The motion of the biphenyl group, constituting the mesogenic unit, can be appropriately described in terms of the uniaxial restricted reorientational model, according to which the benzene rings are subjected, to small step stochastic angular displacements, around their para axis, within a circular segment of an apex angle φ0.

  3. Nonlinear continuous-wave optical propagation in nematic liquid crystals: Interplay between reorientational and thermal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberucci, Alessandro; Laudyn, Urszula A.; Piccardi, Armando; Kwasny, Michał; Klus, Bartlomiej; Karpierz, Mirosław A.; Assanto, Gaetano

    2017-07-01

    We investigate nonlinear optical propagation of continuous-wave (CW) beams in bulk nematic liquid crystals. We thoroughly analyze the competing roles of reorientational and thermal nonlinearity with reference to self-focusing/defocusing and, eventually, the formation of nonlinear diffraction-free wavepackets, the so-called spatial optical solitons. To this extent we refer to dye-doped nematic liquid crystals in planar cells excited by a single CW beam in the highly nonlocal limit. To adjust the relative weight between the two nonlinear responses, we employ two distinct wavelengths, inside and outside the absorption band of the dye, respectively. Different concentrations of the dye are considered in order to enhance the thermal effect. The theoretical analysis is complemented by numerical simulations in the highly nonlocal approximation based on a semi-analytic approach. Theoretical results are finally compared to experimental results in the Nematic Liquid Crystals (NLC) 4-trans-4'-n-hexylcyclohexylisothiocyanatobenzene (6CHBT) doped with Sudan Blue dye.

  4. Exact spacecraft detumbling and reorientation maneuvers with gimbaled thrusters and reaction wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwyer, T. A. W., III; Batten, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    The equations of rotational motion for a spacecraft equipped with external jets and internal reaction wheels are shown to be feedback-equivalent to those of a linear system in attitude parameter space. Reorientation maneuvers are thereby formulated as linear optimal control problems with least mean square acceleration in attitude parameter space, solved in closed form and implementable either with internal or external torque commands, the choice depending on power and throttling requirements. For prior detumbling, an alternative solution with least mean square torque by angular momentum feedback is also given, that is implementable with gimbaled pairs of thrusters at constant throttle. Such a detumbling maneuver may then be followed by an acceleration-commanded rest-to-rest maneuver by means of the reaction wheels.

  5. Strain-induced spin reorientation of bcc-like iron films grown on Cu(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corredor, Edna C.; Arnaudas, José I.; Ciria, Miguel; Lofink, Fabian; Rößler, Stefan; Frömter, Robert; Oepen, Hans Peter

    2014-11-01

    The in-plane orientation of the magnetization vector M in bcc-like Fe(110) films grown on Cu(001) is determined by means of scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis. For thicknesses of 2 nm, slightly above the fcc/bcc phase transition, it is found that M is oriented along the ⟨110⟩ directions of the Cu(001) substrate. Following the Pitsch orientational relationship these correspond to magnetically hard ⟨ 1 1 ¯1 ⟩ and ⟨ 1 1 ¯2 ⟩ axes of bulk iron. This finding is in strong contrast to the behavior reported for thicker films (above 3 nm) of bcc Fe/Cu(001), where the ⟨100⟩ directions of the substrate are preferred. The role of strain in the iron film is discussed, inferring that the presence of a shear strain is mandatory to explain the spin reorientation via the magnetoelastic contribution to the magnetic anisotropy energy.

  6. Biphotonic-induced reorientation inversion in azo-dye-doped liquid crystal films.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Chi; Chu, Chia-Wei; Li, Ming-Shian; Fuh, Andy Ying-Guey

    2011-07-04

    The reorientation inversion of liquid crystal molecules in azo-dye-doped liquid crystal (ADDLC) films irradiated by biphotonic (green and red light) lasers is studied using the self-phase-modulation method. The results show that the induced change of refractive index (∆n) in an ADDLC cell illuminated with a fixed intensity of green light increases with the red-light intensity. Notably, the value of ∆n is initially negative, and becomes positive when the intensity of the red laser is increasing. It is due to the fact that an extra positive torque is exerted on the LCs, which is produced by cis-isomers upon absorbing red light to compensate the negative torque induced by the excitation of the green light.

  7. Magnetic stripe domains of [Pt/Co/Cu]{sub 10} multilayer near spin reorientation transition

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L.; Liang, J. H.; Xiao, X.; Zhou, C.; Huo, Y.; Wu, Y. Z.; Chen, G.

    2016-05-15

    The dependence of magnetic anisotropy, magnetic domain patterns and magnetization reversal processes in [Pt/Co(t{sub Co})/Cu]{sub 10} film stack epitaxied on Cu (111) substrate have been studied as a function of the Co layer thickness t{sub Co}, by magneto-optic polar Kerr magnetometry and microscopy. We find the film undergoes spin reorientation transition from out-of-plane to in-plane as t{sub Co} increases. The SRT thickness is verified by Rotating-field Magneto-Optic Kerr effect method. The film exhibits the stripe domain structures at remanence with the width decreasing while t{sub Co} approaches SRT. As demonstrated by the first order reversal curve measurement, the magnetization reversal process encompasses irreversible domain nucleation, domain annihilation at large field and reversible domain switching near remanence.

  8. Early mammalian development under conditions of reorientation relative to the gravity vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolgemuth, D. J.; Grills, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A clinostat was used to assess the effects of reorientation relative to the gravity vector on mammalian germ cells cultured in vitro. Previous studies using this system revealed an inhibition of meiotic maturation of mouse oocytes. In the present study, the effects of clinostat rotation on in vitro fertilization were examined. The frequency of fertilization of experimental cultures did not vary from that of the clinostat vertical control cultures at either of the rotation rates examined. Importantly, no abnormalities of fertilization, such as parthenogenetic activation, fragmentation, or polyspermy were seen. It is concluded that the initial events of fertilization were unaffected by this treatment, although the developmental potential of these embryos remains to be assessed.

  9. An NMR study of molecular reorientations and diffusion in solid LiBF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynhardt, E. C.; Lourens, J. A. J.

    1984-06-01

    The 19F second moment and the 19F, 11B, and 7Li spin-lattice relaxation times in a powdered sample of LiBF4 have been measured as a function of temperature. The results show that the BF-4 ion reorients isotropically while the Li+ ion remains stationary. The activation energy associated with the BF-4 motion is 8.5 kcal/mol. Above ˜385 K the BF-4 and Li+ diffuse through the lattice resulting in a 19F second moment which is almost zero. The activation energy of this process is 19.2 kcal/mol. A librational motion presumably influences the 19F T1ρ results just before diffusion sets in. The migration of Li+ around the BF-4 ion, which seems to be a strong possibility in the case of an isolated LiBF4 molecule, does not take place in the solid.

  10. Cognitive control and right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex: reflexive reorienting, motor inhibition, and action updating

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Benjamin J.; Wagner, Anthony D.

    2011-01-01

    Delineating the functional organization of the prefrontal cortex is central to advancing models of goal-directed cognition. Considerable evidence indicates that specific forms of cognitive control are associated with distinct subregions of the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), but less is known about functional specialization within the right VLPFC. We report a functional MRI meta-analysis of two prominent theories of right VLPFC function: stopping of motor responses and reflexive orienting to abrupt perceptual onsets. Along with a broader review of right VLPFC function, extant data indicate that stopping and reflexive orienting similarly recruit the inferior frontal junction (IFJ), suggesting that IFJ supports the detection of behaviorally relevant stimuli. By contrast, other right VLPFC subregions are consistently active during motor inhibition, but not reflexive reorienting tasks, with posterior-VLPFC being active during the updating of action plans and mid-VLPFC responding to decision uncertainty. These results highlight the rich functional heterogeneity that exists within right VLPFC. PMID:21486295

  11. Reorientation osteotomy for the atypical clasp thumb in children with arthrogryposis.

    PubMed

    Zlotolow, Dan A; Tiedeken, Nathan C

    2014-12-01

    Congenital thumb contractures are a well described but complex deformity to manage. Thumb contractures are common in patients with arthrogryposis. Many patients with arthrogryposis develop a supination, adduction, and flexion contracture at the thumb carpometacarpal join. Despite some thumb function, their thumb position and contracted first webspace precludes effective pinch or grasp, with the thumb opposing only to the palmar space. An extension, reorientation metacarpal osteotomy that places thumb in an efficient position has the potential to improve function in of these patients. This report provides a new classification system for congenital thumb deformities that can dictate management based upon thumb joint positions. We describe a previously unreported, arthrogrypotic thumb contracture that can be managed with an extension/pronation metacarpal osteotomy with simultaneous widening of the first webspace.

  12. Controlling the canted state in antiferromagnetically coupled magnetic bilayers close to the spin reorientation transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummelen, F. C.; Fernández-Pacheco, A.; Mansell, R.; Petit, D.; Swagten, H. J. M.; Cowburn, R. P.

    2017-03-01

    Canted magnetization is obtained in ultrathin, antiferromagnetically coupled magnetic bilayers with thicknesses around the spin reorientation transition. The canting angle is controlled by both the magnetic layer thickness and interlayer coupling strength, which are tuned independently. Hysteresis loops are obtained, where magnetization components parallel and transverse to the applied field are measured, and analyzed by comparison to micromagnetic simulations. This enables the canting angle to be extracted and the behavior of the individual layers to be distinguished. Two types of canted systems are obtained with either single-layer reversal or complex, coupled two-layer reversal, under moderate external magnetic fields. Controlling the magnetization canting and reversal behavior of ultra-thin layers is relevant for the development of magnetoresistive random-access memory and spin-torque oscillator devices.

  13. An image analysis approach for automatically re-orienteering CT images for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Cucchiara, Rita; Lamma, Evelina; Sansoni, Tommaso

    2004-06-01

    In the last decade, computerized tomography (CT) has become the most frequently used imaging modality to obtain a correct pre-operative implant planning. In this work, we present an image analysis and computer vision approach able to identify, from the reconstructed 3D data set, the optimal cutting plane specific to each implant to be planned, in order to obtain the best view of the implant site and to have correct measures. If the patient requires more implants, different cutting planes are automatically identified, and the axial and cross-sectional images can be re-oriented accordingly to each of them. In the paper, we describe the defined algorithms in order to recognize 3D markers (each one aligned with a missed tooth for which an implant has to be planned) in the 3D reconstructed space, and the results in processing real exams, in terms of effectiveness and precision and reproducibility of the measure.

  14. Structural changes induced spin-reorientation of ultrathin Mn films grown on Ag(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouarab, N.; Haroun, A.; Baadji, N.

    2016-12-01

    The strained body centered tetragonal (bct) Mn ultrathin film from lattice parameter a=2.89 Å to lattice value of 2.73 Å induces anti-ferromagnetic behavior between Mn layers. The magnetic easy axis of Mn film was demonstrated theoretically to switch from the in-plane to out-of-plane by magneto-optical Kerr effect investigation. By including spin-orbit coupling in full potential linearized augmented plane waves and linearized muffin-tin orbitals methods, manganese ultrathin film displays different magnetic behaviors and the spin-reorientation transition is shown to be correlated to these structural changes. The calculated magnetic moment of manganese planes are enhanced and reach a value of ~4.02 μB. The polar magneto-optical Kerr effect is calculated for a photon energy range extended to 15 eV. It shows a pronounced peak in visible light.

  15. Magnetic stripe domains of [Pt/Co/Cu]10 multilayer near spin reorientation transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L.; Liang, J. H.; Xiao, X.; Zhou, C.; Chen, G.; Huo, Y.; Wu, Y. Z.

    2016-05-01

    The dependence of magnetic anisotropy, magnetic domain patterns and magnetization reversal processes in [Pt/Co(tCo)/Cu]10 film stack epitaxied on Cu (111) substrate have been studied as a function of the Co layer thickness tCo, by magneto-optic polar Kerr magnetometry and microscopy. We find the film undergoes spin reorientation transition from out-of-plane to in-plane as tCo increases. The SRT thickness is verified by Rotating-field Magneto-Optic Kerr effect method. The film exhibits the stripe domain structures at remanence with the width decreasing while tCo approaches SRT. As demonstrated by the first order reversal curve measurement, the magnetization reversal process encompasses irreversible domain nucleation, domain annihilation at large field and reversible domain switching near remanence.

  16. [The reorientational rearthrodesis of the upper ankle joint following failed arthrodesis].

    PubMed

    Zwipp, H; Grass, R; Rammelt, S

    2005-12-01

    There are three important principles for the correction of nonunion and/or malunion of the ankle joint: (1) reorientation back to anatomic shape and to the normal biomechanical axis of the ankle and foot; (2) respect for the biology of bone by resecting all sclerotic bone and/or transplantation of autogenous bone graft; and (3) achievement of optimal biomechanical stability by using the four-screw technique, a limited-contact dynamic-compression plate or a blade plate. CT scanning is the most reliable method for detecting nonunion of the ankle joint after arthrodesis. According to Saltzman, in order to understand the pathology of malunions and nonunions and to plan their correction, weight-bearing anteroposterior radiographs with a 20 degrees internal rotation of the feet, precise lateral views, and rear views of both sides are highly recommended.

  17. Power-controlled transition from standard to negative refraction in reorientational soft matter.

    PubMed

    Piccardi, Armando; Alberucci, Alessandro; Kravets, Nina; Buchnev, Oleksandr; Assanto, Gaetano

    2014-11-25

    Refraction at a dielectric interface can take an anomalous character in anisotropic crystals, when light is negatively refracted with incident and refracted beams emerging on the same side of the interface normal. In soft matter subject to reorientation, such as nematic liquid crystals, the nonlinear interaction with light allows tuning of the optical properties. We demonstrate that in such material a beam of light can experience either positive or negative refraction depending on input power, as it can alter the spatial distribution of the optic axis and, in turn, the direction of the energy flow when traveling across an interface. Moreover, the nonlinear optical response yields beam self-focusing and spatial localization into a self-confined solitary wave through the formation of a graded-index waveguide, linking the refractive transition to power-driven readdressing of copolarized guided-wave signals, with a number of output ports not limited by diffraction.

  18. Domain reorientation and rotation of an intracellular assembly regulate conduction in Kir potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Oliver B; Caputo, Alessandro T; Hill, Adam P; Vandenberg, Jamie I; Smith, Brian J; Gulbis, Jacqueline M

    2010-06-11

    Potassium channels embedded in cell membranes employ gates to regulate K+ current. While a specific constriction in the permeation pathway has historically been implicated in gating, recent reports suggest that the signature ion selectivity filter located in the outer membrane leaflet may be equally important. Inwardly rectifying K+ channels also control the directionality of flow, using intracellular polyamines to stem ion efflux by a valve-like action. This study presents crystallographic evidence of interdependent gates in the conduction pathway and reveals the mechanism of polyamine block. Reorientation of the intracellular domains, concomitant with activation, instigates polyamine release from intracellular binding sites to block the permeation pathway. Conformational adjustments of the slide helices, achieved by rotation of the cytoplasmic assembly relative to the pore, are directly correlated to the ion configuration in the selectivity filter. Ion redistribution occurs irrespective of the constriction, suggesting a more expansive role of the selectivity filter in gating than previously appreciated.

  19. In-situ particles reorientation during magnetic hyperthermia application: Shape matters twice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonidis, Konstantinos; Morales, M. Puerto; Marciello, Marzia; Angelakeris, Makis; de La Presa, Patricia; Lazaro-Carrillo, Ana; Tabero, Andrea; Villanueva, Angeles; Chubykalo-Fesenko, Oksana; Serantes, David

    2016-12-01

    Promising advances in nanomedicine such as magnetic hyperthermia rely on a precise control of the nanoparticle performance in the cellular environment. This constitutes a huge research challenge due to difficulties for achieving a remote control within the human body. Here we report on the significant double role of the shape of ellipsoidal magnetic nanoparticles (nanorods) subjected to an external AC magnetic field: first, the heat release is increased due to the additional shape anisotropy; second, the rods dynamically reorientate in the orthogonal direction to the AC field direction. Importantly, the heating performance and the directional orientation occur in synergy and can be easily controlled by changing the AC field treatment duration, thus opening the pathway to combined hyperthermic/mechanical nanoactuators for biomedicine. Preliminary studies demonstrate the high accumulation of nanorods into HeLa cells whereas viability analysis supports their low toxicity and the absence of apoptotic or necrotic cell death after 24 or 48 h of incubation.

  20. In-situ particles reorientation during magnetic hyperthermia application: Shape matters twice.

    PubMed

    Simeonidis, Konstantinos; Morales, M Puerto; Marciello, Marzia; Angelakeris, Makis; de la Presa, Patricia; Lazaro-Carrillo, Ana; Tabero, Andrea; Villanueva, Angeles; Chubykalo-Fesenko, Oksana; Serantes, David

    2016-12-06

    Promising advances in nanomedicine such as magnetic hyperthermia rely on a precise control of the nanoparticle performance in the cellular environment. This constitutes a huge research challenge due to difficulties for achieving a remote control within the human body. Here we report on the significant double role of the shape of ellipsoidal magnetic nanoparticles (nanorods) subjected to an external AC magnetic field: first, the heat release is increased due to the additional shape anisotropy; second, the rods dynamically reorientate in the orthogonal direction to the AC field direction. Importantly, the heating performance and the directional orientation occur in synergy and can be easily controlled by changing the AC field treatment duration, thus opening the pathway to combined hyperthermic/mechanical nanoactuators for biomedicine. Preliminary studies demonstrate the high accumulation of nanorods into HeLa cells whereas viability analysis supports their low toxicity and the absence of apoptotic or necrotic cell death after 24 or 48 h of incubation.

  1. In-situ particles reorientation during magnetic hyperthermia application: Shape matters twice

    PubMed Central

    Simeonidis, Konstantinos; Morales, M. Puerto; Marciello, Marzia; Angelakeris, Makis; de la Presa, Patricia; Lazaro-Carrillo, Ana; Tabero, Andrea; Villanueva, Angeles; Chubykalo-Fesenko, Oksana; Serantes, David

    2016-01-01

    Promising advances in nanomedicine such as magnetic hyperthermia rely on a precise control of the nanoparticle performance in the cellular environment. This constitutes a huge research challenge due to difficulties for achieving a remote control within the human body. Here we report on the significant double role of the shape of ellipsoidal magnetic nanoparticles (nanorods) subjected to an external AC magnetic field: first, the heat release is increased due to the additional shape anisotropy; second, the rods dynamically reorientate in the orthogonal direction to the AC field direction. Importantly, the heating performance and the directional orientation occur in synergy and can be easily controlled by changing the AC field treatment duration, thus opening the pathway to combined hyperthermic/mechanical nanoactuators for biomedicine. Preliminary studies demonstrate the high accumulation of nanorods into HeLa cells whereas viability analysis supports their low toxicity and the absence of apoptotic or necrotic cell death after 24 or 48 h of incubation. PMID:27922119

  2. Spin reorientation and Ce-Mn coupling in antiferromagnetic oxypnictide CeMnAsO

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qiang; Tian, Wei; Peterson, Spencer G.; Dennis, Kevin W.; Vaknin, David

    2015-02-18

    Structure and magnetic properties of high-quality polycrystlline CeMnAsO, a parent compound of the “1111”-type oxypnictides, have been investigated using neutron powder diffraction and magnetization measurements. We find that CeMnAsO undergoes a C-type antiferromagnetic order with Mn2+(S = 5/2) moments pointing along the c axis below a relatively high Néel temperature of TN = 347(1) K. Below TSR = 35 K, two simultaneous transitions occur where the Mn moments reorient from the c axis to the ab plane preserving the C-type magnetic order, and Ce moments undergo long-range AFM ordering with antiparallel moments pointing in the ab plane. Another transition to a noncollinear magnetic structure occurs below 7 K. The ordered moments of Mn and Ce at 2 K are 3.32(4) μB and 0.81(4)μB, respectively. We find that CeMnAsO primarily falls into the category of a local-moment antiferromagnetic insulator in which the nearest-neighbor interaction (J1) is dominant with J2 < J1/2 in the context of J1 – J2 – Jc model. The spin reorientation transition driven by the coupling between Ce and the transition metal seems to be common to Mn, Fe, and Cr ions, but not to Co and Ni ions in the isostructural oxypnictides. As a result, a schematic illustration of magnetic structures in Mn and Ce sublattices in CeMnAsO is presented.

  3. Spin reorientation and Ce-Mn coupling in antiferromagnetic oxypnictide CeMnAsO

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Qiang; Tian, Wei; Peterson, Spencer G.; ...

    2015-02-18

    Structure and magnetic properties of high-quality polycrystlline CeMnAsO, a parent compound of the “1111”-type oxypnictides, have been investigated using neutron powder diffraction and magnetization measurements. We find that CeMnAsO undergoes a C-type antiferromagnetic order with Mn2+(S = 5/2) moments pointing along the c axis below a relatively high Néel temperature of TN = 347(1) K. Below TSR = 35 K, two simultaneous transitions occur where the Mn moments reorient from the c axis to the ab plane preserving the C-type magnetic order, and Ce moments undergo long-range AFM ordering with antiparallel moments pointing in the ab plane. Another transition tomore » a noncollinear magnetic structure occurs below 7 K. The ordered moments of Mn and Ce at 2 K are 3.32(4) μB and 0.81(4)μB, respectively. We find that CeMnAsO primarily falls into the category of a local-moment antiferromagnetic insulator in which the nearest-neighbor interaction (J1) is dominant with J2 < J1/2 in the context of J1 – J2 – Jc model. The spin reorientation transition driven by the coupling between Ce and the transition metal seems to be common to Mn, Fe, and Cr ions, but not to Co and Ni ions in the isostructural oxypnictides. As a result, a schematic illustration of magnetic structures in Mn and Ce sublattices in CeMnAsO is presented.« less

  4. Reorientations of the large-scale flow in turbulent convection in a cube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroozani, N.; Niemela, J. J.; Armenio, V.; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    2017-03-01

    Large-eddy simulations of turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection were conducted for a fluid of Prandtl number Pr=0.7 confined in a cube, for Rayleigh numbers of 106 and 108. The model solves the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations under the Boussinesq approximation, using a dynamic Smagorinsky model with a Lagrangian averaging technique for the subgrid terms. Under fully developed conditions the flow topology is characterized by a large-scale circulation (LSC) developing in a plane containing one of the diagonals of the cell, while two counter-rotating vortices consequently develop in the other diagonal plane, resulting in a strong inflow at the horizontal midplane. This flow structure is not static, with the LSC undergoing nonperiodic reorientations, or switching, between the two diagonal planes; hence, we supplement the observations of the three-dimensional time-averaged flow structures with single point measurements (time series) to shed light on the dynamics of the reorientations. For all observations, this switching results from a lateral rotation of the LSC in which some finite time spent in a transient state where the large-scale circulation is parallel to one set of side walls; there are, importantly, no observations consistent with so-called cessations of the LSC, in which it decays and then reforms in another plane without such a rotation. The average switching rate for the LSC is in excellent agreement with the results of Bai et al. [K. Bai, D. Ji, and E. Brown, Phys. Rev. E 93, 023117 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.93.023117].

  5. Practicalities and challenges in re-orienting the health system in Zambia for treating chronic conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The rapid evolution in disease burdens in low- and middle income countries is forcing policy makers to re-orient their health system towards a system which has the capability to simultaneously address infectious and non-communicable diseases. This paper draws on two different but overlapping studies which examined how actors in the Zambian health system are re-directing their policies, strategies and service structures to include the provision of health care for people with chronic conditions. Methods Study methods in both studies included semi-structured interviews with government health officials at national level, and governmental and non-governmental health practitioners operating from community-, primary health care to hospital facility level. Focus group discussions were conducted with staff, stakeholders and caregivers of programmes providing care and support at community- and household levels. Study settings included urban and rural sites. Results A series of adaptations transformed the HIV programme from an emergency response into the first large chronic care programme in the country. There are clear indications that the Zambian government is intending to expand this reach to patients with non-communicable diseases. Challenges to do this effectively include a lack of proper NCD prevalence data for planning, a concentration of technology and skills to detect and treat NCDs at secondary and tertiary levels in the health system and limited interest by donor agencies to support this transition. Conclusion The reorientation of Zambia’s health system is in full swing and uses the foundation of a decentralised health system and presence of local models for HIV chronic care which actively involve community partners, patients and their families. There are early warning signs which could cause this transition to stall, one of which is the financial capability to resource this process. PMID:25005125

  6. Re-orienting a remote acute care model towards a primary health care approach: key enablers.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Vicki; Reeve, Carole A; Humphreys, John S; Wakerman, John; Carter, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the key enablers of change in re-orienting a remote acute care model to comprehensive primary healthcare delivery. The setting of the study was a 12-bed hospital in Fitzroy Crossing, Western Australia. Individual key informant, in-depth interviews were completed with five of six identified senior leaders involved in the development of the Fitzroy Valley Health Partnership. Interviews were recorded and transcripts were thematically analysed by two investigators for shared views about the enabling factors strengthening primary healthcare delivery in a remote region of Australia. Participants described theestablishment of a culturally relevant primary healthcare service, using a community-driven, 'bottom up' approach characterised by extensive community participation. The formal partnership across the government and community controlled health services was essential, both to enable change to occur and to provide sustainability in the longer term. A hierarchy of major themes emerged. These included community participation, community readiness and desire for self-determination; linkages in the form of a government community controlled health service partnership; leadership; adequate infrastructure; enhanced workforce supply; supportive policy; and primary healthcare funding. The strong united leadership shown by the community and the health service enabled barriers to be overcome and it maximised the opportunities provided by government policy changes. The concurrent alignment around a common vision enabled implementation of change. The key principle learnt from this study is the importance of community and health service relationships and local leadership around a shared vision for the re-orientation of community health services.

  7. Studying Dynamic Myofiber Aggregate Reorientation in Dilated Cardiomyopathy Using In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    von Deuster, Constantin; Sammut, Eva; Asner, Liya; Nordsletten, David; Lamata, Pablo; Stoeck, Christian T.; Razavi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background— The objective of this study is to assess the dynamic alterations of myocardial microstructure and strain between diastole and systole in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy relative to healthy controls using the magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging, myocardial tagging, and biomechanical modeling. Methods and Results— Dual heart-phase diffusion tensor imaging was successfully performed in 9 patients and 9 controls. Tagging data were acquired for the diffusion tensor strain correction and cardiac motion analysis. Mean diffusivity, fractional anisotropy, and myocyte aggregate orientations were compared between both cohorts. Cardiac function was assessed by left ventricular ejection fraction, torsion, and strain. Computational modeling was used to study the impact of cardiac shape on fiber reorientation and how fiber orientations affect strain. In patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, a more longitudinal orientation of diastolic myofiber aggregates was measured compared with controls. Although a significant steepening of helix angles (HAs) during contraction was found in the controls, consistent change in HAs during contraction was absent in patients. Left ventricular ejection fraction, cardiac torsion, and strain were significantly lower in the patients compared with controls. Computational modeling revealed that the dilated heart results in reduced HA changes compared with a normal heart. Reduced torsion was found to be exacerbated by steeper HAs. Conclusions— Diffusion tensor imaging revealed reduced reorientation of myofiber aggregates during cardiac contraction in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy relative to controls. Left ventricular remodeling seems to be an important factor in the changes to myocyte orientation. Steeper HAs are coupled with a worsening in strain and torsion. Overall, the findings provide new insights into the structural alterations in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:27729361

  8. Nuclear Overhauser effect as a probe of molecular structure, dynamics and order of axially reorienting molecules in membranes.

    PubMed

    Davis, James H; Komljenović, Ivana

    2016-02-01

    The location, orientation, order and dynamics of cholesterol in model membranes have been well characterized, therefore cholesterol is an ideal molecule for developing new methods for studying structured molecules undergoing rapid axially symmetric reorientation. The use of (13)C filtering via short contact cross polarization transfer to (1)H allows the recovery of the weak cholesterol (1)H magic angle spinning NMR signals from beneath the strong phospholipid background in bicelles composed of chain perdeuterated dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine/dicaproyl phosphatidylcholine/[3,4-(13)C]-cholesterol. Measurements of the nuclear Overhauser enhancement for (1)H nuclei located in the first ring of cholesterol are interpreted in terms of a simple two motion model consisting of axial reorientation, with a correlation time τ∥, and a slower reorientation of the diffusion axis relative to the bilayer normal, with correlation time τ⊥. This approach can be extended to other molecules which undergo rapid axial reorientation such as small membrane associated peptides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The impact of reorienting cone-beam computed tomographic images in varied head positions on the coordinates of anatomical landmarks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hun; Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Jung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the coordinates of anatomical landmarks on cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images in varied head positions before and after reorientation using image analysis software. Materials and Methods CBCT images were taken in a normal position and four varied head positions using a dry skull marked with 3 points where gutta percha was fixed. In each of the five radiographic images, reference points were set, 20 anatomical landmarks were identified, and each set of coordinates was calculated. Coordinates in the images from the normally positioned head were compared with those in the images obtained from varied head positions using statistical methods. Post-reorientation coordinates calculated using a three-dimensional image analysis program were also compared to the reference coordinates. Results In the original images, statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. However, post-reorientation, no statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. Conclusion The changes in head position impacted the coordinates of the anatomical landmarks in three-dimensional images. However, reorientation using image analysis software allowed accurate superimposition onto the reference positions. PMID:27358821

  10. Symmetry breaking, slow relaxation dynamics, and topological defects at the field-induced helix reorientation in MnSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, A.; Chacon, A.; Wagner, M.; Halder, M.; Georgii, R.; Rosch, A.; Pfleiderer, C.; Garst, M.

    2017-01-01

    We report a study of the reorientation of the helimagnetic order in the archetypal cubic chiral magnet MnSi as a function of magnetic field direction. The reorientation process as inferred from small-angle neutron scattering, the magnetization, and the ac susceptibility is in excellent agreement with an effective mean-field theory taking into account the precise symmetries of the crystallographic space group. Depending on the field and temperature history and the direction of the field with respect to the crystalline axes, the helix reorientation may exhibit a crossover, a first-order, or a second-order transition. The magnetization and ac susceptibility provide evidence that the reorientation of helimagnetic domains is associated with large relaxation times exceeding seconds. At the second-order transitions residual Ising symmetries are spontaneously broken at continuous elastic instabilities of the helimagnetic order. In addition, on the time scales explored in our experiments these transitions are hysteretic as a function of field suggesting, within the same theoretical framework, the formation of an abundance of plastic deformations of the helical spin order. These deformations comprise topologically nontrivial disclinations, reminiscent of the skyrmions discovered recently in the same class of materials.

  11. Leveraging low-dimensional postures to resolve coiled shapes reveals new reorientation behaviors in the nematode C. elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Greg; Broekmans, Onno; Ryu, William

    Low-dimensionality is both a fundamental property of many living systems and an aid in their quantitative analysis. Here, we exploit the low-dimensionality of C. elegans body shape to develop a novel postural tracking algorithm which captures both simple worm shapes and also complex, self-occluding coils. We apply our algorithm to a thermally-evoked escape response with relatively simple coils and to more complex, spontaneous turns which occur during foraging. We divide the escape response into three post-stimulus phases, reversal, turn and post-turn, and find that the full distribution of reorientation angles is shaped by independent and significant contributions from all three phases, a result consistent with the release and presence of the monoamine tyramine during the entire response. In spontaneous coils we find two separable peaks of turning posture amplitudes, indicating distinct reorientation behaviors of large-amplitude ventral-side turns; large ventral bearing reorientations occur through a shape sequence similar to the escape response while large dorsal bearing reorientations are accomplished by overturning across the ventral side. We find that these large-amplitude turning events occur independently but with approximately matched rates that adapt on a similar timescale.

  12. A new biomarker to examine the role of hippocampal function in the development of spatial reorientation in children: a review.

    PubMed

    Vieites, Vanessa; Nazareth, Alina; Reeb-Sutherland, Bethany C; Pruden, Shannon M

    2015-01-01

    Spatial navigation is an adaptive skill that involves determining the route to a particular goal or location, and then traveling that path. A major component of spatial navigation is spatial reorientation, or the ability to reestablish a sense of direction after being disoriented. The hippocampus is known to be critical for navigating, and has more recently been implicated in reorienting in adults, but relatively little is known about the development of the hippocampus in relation to these large-scale spatial abilities in children. It has been established that, compared to school-aged children, preschool children tend to perform poorly on certain spatial reorientation tasks, suggesting that their hippocampi may not be mature enough to process the demands of such a task. Currently, common techniques used to examine underlying brain activity, such as electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), are not suitable for examining hippocampal development in young children. In the present paper, we argue instead for the use of eyeblink conditioning (EBC), a relatively under-utilized, inexpensive, and safe method that is easy to implement in developing populations. In addition, EBC has a well defined neural circuitry, which includes the hippocampus, making it an ideal tool to indirectly measure hippocampal functioning in young children. In this review, we will evaluate the literature on EBC and its relation to hippocampal development, and discuss the possibility of using EBC as an objective measure of associative learning in relation to large-scale spatial skills. We support the use of EBC as a way to indirectly access hippocampal function in typical and atypical populations in order to characterize the neural substrates associated with the development of spatial reorientation abilities in early childhood. As such, EBC is a potential, simple biomarker for success in tasks that require the hippocampus, including spatial reorientation.

  13. A new biomarker to examine the role of hippocampal function in the development of spatial reorientation in children: a review

    PubMed Central

    Vieites, Vanessa; Nazareth, Alina; Reeb-Sutherland, Bethany C.; Pruden, Shannon M.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial navigation is an adaptive skill that involves determining the route to a particular goal or location, and then traveling that path. A major component of spatial navigation is spatial reorientation, or the ability to reestablish a sense of direction after being disoriented. The hippocampus is known to be critical for navigating, and has more recently been implicated in reorienting in adults, but relatively little is known about the development of the hippocampus in relation to these large-scale spatial abilities in children. It has been established that, compared to school-aged children, preschool children tend to perform poorly on certain spatial reorientation tasks, suggesting that their hippocampi may not be mature enough to process the demands of such a task. Currently, common techniques used to examine underlying brain activity, such as electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), are not suitable for examining hippocampal development in young children. In the present paper, we argue instead for the use of eyeblink conditioning (EBC), a relatively under-utilized, inexpensive, and safe method that is easy to implement in developing populations. In addition, EBC has a well defined neural circuitry, which includes the hippocampus, making it an ideal tool to indirectly measure hippocampal functioning in young children. In this review, we will evaluate the literature on EBC and its relation to hippocampal development, and discuss the possibility of using EBC as an objective measure of associative learning in relation to large-scale spatial skills. We support the use of EBC as a way to indirectly access hippocampal function in typical and atypical populations in order to characterize the neural substrates associated with the development of spatial reorientation abilities in early childhood. As such, EBC is a potential, simple biomarker for success in tasks that require the hippocampus, including spatial reorientation. PMID

  14. The effect of friction in the hold down post spherical bearings on hold down post loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, James A.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of friction at the connection of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) aft skirt and the mobile launch platform (MLP) hold down posts was analyzed. A simplified model of the shuttle response during the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) buildup was constructed. The model included the effect of stick-slip friction for the rotation of the skirt about the spherical bearing. Current finite element models assume the joint is completely frictionless in rotation and therefore no moment is transferred between the skirt and the hold down posts. The model was partially verified against test data and preliminary parameter studies were performed. The parameter studies indicated that the coefficient of friction strongly influenced the moment on the hold down posts. The coefficient of friction had little effect on hold down post vertical loads, however. Further calibration of the model is necessary before the effect of friction on the hold down post horizontal loads can be analyzed.

  15. 76 FR 76413 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  16. 78 FR 8534 - Notice of Proposals to Engage in or to Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y ] (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  17. 76 FR 81940 - Notice of Proposals to Engage in or to Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  18. 76 FR 78924 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  19. 77 FR 61607 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  20. 77 FR 23483 - Notice of Proposals To Engage In or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  1. 77 FR 45352 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  2. 78 FR 27239 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  3. 76 FR 71344 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  4. 77 FR 52033 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  5. 77 FR 75633 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y (12 CFR part 225), to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  6. 77 FR 46437 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  7. 77 FR 13127 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  8. 78 FR 62303 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-15

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  9. 78 FR 70946 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  10. 77 FR 50106 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  11. 77 FR 36543 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  12. 77 FR 66464 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-05

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  13. 77 FR 6564 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  14. 76 FR 82298 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  15. 78 FR 9051 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  16. 77 FR 4560 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  17. 78 FR 52915 - Notice of Proposals to Engage In or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  18. 76 FR 69739 - Notice of Proposals To Engage In or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  19. 78 FR 45536 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  20. 77 FR 64994 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  1. 78 FR 9391 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  2. 78 FR 52768 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  3. 78 FR 54648 - Notice of Proposals to Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  4. 77 FR 35387 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  5. 78 FR 35271 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  6. 77 FR 12304 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  7. 76 FR 78658 - Notice of Proposals to Engage in or to Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  8. 77 FR 14015 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... pursuant to section 225.28 (b)(12)(i) of Regulation Y. ] Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control...

  9. 77 FR 8258 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... NE., Atlanta, Georgia 30309: 1. Gateway Financial Holdings of Florida, Inc., Daytona Beach, Florida...., Atlanta, Georgia; through its newly formed wholly owned subsidiary, Certus Investment Advisors, LLC, Atlanta, Georgia, to engage in investment advisory activities, pursuant to section 225.28(b)(6)(i)....

  10. Water holding capacity in poultry breast meat.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The underlying mechanisms that control water-holding capacity (WHC) in pale broiler meat are not well-established. The objectives of the two studies reported here were: 1) to determine the relationship between WHC and protein denaturation in broiler breast meat exhibiting divergent WHC attributes,...

  11. Empowerment Amongst Teachers Holding Leadership Positions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avidov-Ungar, Orit; Friedman, Izhak; Olshtain, Elite

    2014-01-01

    This study used semi-structured in-depth interviews to explore empowerment patterns among teachers who hold leadership positions in school. Our qualitative analysis presents a hierarchical ladder with three types of empowerment amongst these teachers, ranging from limited empowerment through rewarding empowerment to change-enhancing empowerment.…

  12. Package Holds Five Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, Narayan R.; Decker, D. Richard; Olson, Hilding M.

    1996-01-01

    Packages protect and hold monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) chips while providing dc and radio-frequency (RF) electrical connections for chips undergoing development. Required to be compact, lightweight, and rugged. Designed to minimize undesired resonances, reflections, losses, and impedance mismatches.

  13. Holding Students Accountable in Team Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentzer, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    This article describes an efficient peer evaluation process that can be implemented at the middle and high school levels, and that holds students accountable for their individual contributions in a team-based project. Teachers faced with this challenge will welcome the web-based peer-evaluation interface that was capable of soliciting student…

  14. 47 CFR 73.7005 - Holding period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... four years of on-air operations, an applicant proposing to assign or transfer the construction permit... preference is based for a period of four years of on-air operations. (c) The holding period in this section... applications 73.3591-73.3605 Adjacent channel and co-channel stations, Minimum mileage, separation between— FM...

  15. The Bakke Decision: One Holding or Two?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Arval A.

    1979-01-01

    It is suggested that the Bakke case settles so little it is virtually useless as a precedent. Its single holding is that it put Bakke in medical school; without any consistent majority rationale there is no law of the case. Available from Univ. of Oregon, School of Law, Eugene, OR 97403. (MSE)

  16. The Bakke Decision: One Holding or Two?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Arval A.

    1979-01-01

    The "Bakke" case put Allan Bakke in medical school. That is its only holding. Beyond this the results are unclear because there was no consistent majority rationale in the Court. Available from Editorial and Publication Office, School of Law, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403. (Author/IRT)

  17. 31 CFR 800.217 - Hold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hold. 800.217 Section 800.217 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF INVESTMENT SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO MERGERS, ACQUISITIONS, AND TAKEOVERS BY...

  18. The Physics of Breath-Hold Diving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilella, Vicente; Aguilella-Arzo, Marcelo

    1996-01-01

    Analyzes physical features of breath-hold diving. Considers the diver's descent and the initial surface dive and presents examples that show the diver's buoyancy equilibrium varying with depth, the driving force supplied by finning, and the effect of friction between the water and the diver. (Author/JRH)

  19. Holding Students Accountable in Team Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentzer, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    This article describes an efficient peer evaluation process that can be implemented at the middle and high school levels, and that holds students accountable for their individual contributions in a team-based project. Teachers faced with this challenge will welcome the web-based peer-evaluation interface that was capable of soliciting student…

  20. How Much Popcorn Will Our Classroom Hold?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rommel-Esham, Katie

    2007-01-01

    "How much popcorn will our classroom hold?" This intriguing question sparked a terrific integrated science and math exploration that the author conducted with fifth-and sixth-grade students. In the process of finding the classroom's volume, students developed science-process skills (e.g., developing a plan, measurement, collecting and interpreting…

  1. 9 CFR 2.101 - Holding period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... or cat acquired by a dealer 5 or exhibitor shall be held by him or her, under his or her supervision... considered to have acquired a dog or cat which is sold through the auction sale. (1) That any live dog or cat...) Live dogs or cats which have completed a 5-day holding period with another dealer or exhibitor, or a...

  2. 9 CFR 2.101 - Holding period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... or cat acquired by a dealer 5 or exhibitor shall be held by him or her, under his or her supervision... considered to have acquired a dog or cat which is sold through the auction sale. (1) That any live dog or cat...) Live dogs or cats which have completed a 5-day holding period with another dealer or exhibitor, or a...

  3. 9 CFR 2.101 - Holding period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... or cat acquired by a dealer 5 or exhibitor shall be held by him or her, under his or her supervision... considered to have acquired a dog or cat which is sold through the auction sale. (1) That any live dog or cat...) Live dogs or cats which have completed a 5-day holding period with another dealer or exhibitor, or a...

  4. 9 CFR 2.101 - Holding period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... or cat acquired by a dealer 5 or exhibitor shall be held by him or her, under his or her supervision... considered to have acquired a dog or cat which is sold through the auction sale. (1) That any live dog or cat...) Live dogs or cats which have completed a 5-day holding period with another dealer or exhibitor, or a...

  5. 9 CFR 2.101 - Holding period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... or cat acquired by a dealer 5 or exhibitor shall be held by him or her, under his or her supervision... considered to have acquired a dog or cat which is sold through the auction sale. (1) That any live dog or cat...) Live dogs or cats which have completed a 5-day holding period with another dealer or exhibitor, or a...

  6. Holding fixture for a hot stamping press

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, R. P. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A hand held guide for manually positioning a work piece between the anvil rib and tool of a hot die stamping press is described. A groove completed by interchangeable cover plates attached at one end of the guide conforms to a cross sectional dimension common to similar workpieces and, with a force fit, retentively holds each of the workpieces.

  7. 75 FR 41523 - Delphi Corporation, a Subsidiary of Delphi Holdings, LLC, Including On-Site Leased Workers From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... fuel modules, instrument clusters, and air meters. The review shows that on May 15, 2007, a... Automotive Holding Group, Flint, Michigan, engaged in the production of instrument clusters, separated from... workers producing instrument clusters and October 2, 2009 for workers producing fuel modules and...

  8. The Impact of Task Difficulty and Performance Scores on Student Engagement and Progression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Raymond; Patten, James Vincent; Hennessy, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Background: This article considers the impact of differential task difficulty on student engagement and progression within an Irish primary school context. Gaining and maintaining student engagement during learning tasks such as homework is a significant and understandable on-going challenge for teachers. The findings of this study hold the…

  9. Probabilistic Analysis of Ground-Holding Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheel, Minakshi

    1997-01-01

    The Ground-Holding Policy Problem (GHPP) has become a matter of great interest in recent years because of the high cost incurred by aircraft suffering from delays. Ground-holding keeps a flight on the ground at the departure airport if it is known it will be unable to land at the arrival airport. The GBPP is determining how many flights should be held on the ground before take-off and for how long, in order to minimize the cost of delays. When the uncertainty associated with airport landing capacity is considered, the GHPP becomes complicated. A decision support system that incorporates this uncertainty, solves the GHPP quickly, and gives good results would be of great help to air traffic management. The purpose of this thesis is to modify and analyze a probabilistic ground-holding algorithm by applying it to two common cases of capacity reduction. A graphical user interface was developed and sensitivity analysis was done on the algorithm, in order to see how it may be implemented in practice. The sensitivity analysis showed the algorithm was very sensitive to the number of probabilistic capacity scenarios used and to the cost ratio of air delay to ground delay. The algorithm was not particularly sensitive to the number of periods that the time horizon was divided into. In terms of cost savings, a ground-holding policy was the most beneficial when demand greatly exceeded airport capacity. When compared to other air traffic flow strategies, the ground-holding algorithm performed the best and was the most consistent under various situations. The algorithm can solve large problems quickly and efficiently on a personal computer.

  10. What's a Degree Got to Do with It? The Civic Engagement of Associate's and Bachelor's Degree Holders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newell, Mallory Angeli

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the civic engagement of adults holding an associate's degree compared to those holding a bachelor's degree. Most prior research has focused on individuals who hold 4-year degrees; the present study, however, sought to understand differences between holders of 2-year degrees and 4-year degrees. Descriptive statistics…

  11. Photoinduced reordering in thin azo-dye films and light-induced reorientation dynamics of the nematic liquid-crystal easy axis.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Alexei D; Chigrinov, V G; Pasechnik, S V; Dubtsov, A V

    2012-07-01

    We theoretically study the kinetics of photoinduced reordering triggered by linearly polarized (LP) reorienting light in thin azo-dye films that were initially illuminated with LP ultraviolet pumping beam. The process of reordering is treated as a rotational diffusion of molecules in the light intensity-dependent mean-field potential. The two-dimensional diffusion model which is based on the free energy rotational Fokker-Planck equation and describes the regime of in-plane reorientation is generalized to analyze the dynamics of the azo-dye order parameter tensor at varying polarization azimuth of the reorienting light. It is found that, in the photosteady state, the intensity of LP reorienting light determines the scalar order parameter (the largest eigenvalue of the order parameter tensor), whereas the steady state orientation of the corresponding eigenvector (the in-plane principal axis) depends solely on the polarization azimuth. We show that, under certain conditions, reorientation takes place only if the reorienting light intensity exceeds its critical value. Such threshold behavior is predicted to occur in the bistability region provided that the initial principal axis lies in the polarization plane of reorienting light. The model is used to interpret the experimental data on the light-induced azimuthal gliding of the liquid-crystal easy axis on photoaligned azo-dye substrates.

  12. Academic Engagement among African American Males Who Hold Aspirations for Athletic Careers in Professional Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawkins, Marvin P.; Braddock, Jomills Henry, II; Celaya, Adrienne

    2008-01-01

    Despite the large body of evidence on the benefits of sports, there continues to be growing concern regarding the overemphasis on sports, especially related to the social and educational development of blacks and other minority youth. This article introduces a conceptual framework or typology for analyzing the connection between sports…

  13. Academic Engagement among African American Males Who Hold Aspirations for Athletic Careers in Professional Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawkins, Marvin P.; Braddock, Jomills Henry, II; Celaya, Adrienne

    2008-01-01

    Despite the large body of evidence on the benefits of sports, there continues to be growing concern regarding the overemphasis on sports, especially related to the social and educational development of blacks and other minority youth. This article introduces a conceptual framework or typology for analyzing the connection between sports…

  14. Picosecond reorientational dynamics of polar dye probes in binary aqueous mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, G. B.; Doraiswamy, S.

    1992-02-01

    Picosecond time dependent fluorescence method has been used to measure the rotational reorientation times (τr) of three kinds of dye probes—oxazine 720 (a monocation), nile red (neutral but polar), and resorufin (a monoanion)—in a series of binary mixtures of water-amides, water-dipolar aprotics, and water-alcohols at 298 K. Most of the binary mixtures are characterized by the fact that at a particular composition (between 25% to 40% of the organic solvent in water), the viscosity (η) of the solution reaches a maximum value that is higher than the viscosities of the two solvents. As a consequence, the viscosity profile of the solution as a function of the organic solvent exhibits a bivaluedness, the extent of which is more, if the liquids are nearly isoviscous. The dielectric properties of the solution also change across the composition range. All the dyes show a near linear behavior of τr vs η in formamide-water, N-methylformamide-water, and methanol-water mixtures. A dual-valued profile for τr vs η is obtained for the cation oxazine 720 in the three dipolar aprotic mixtures (N, N-dimethylformamide-water, N, N-dimethylacetamide-water, and dimethylsulphoxide-water), with the rotational reorientation times being higher in the organic solvent-rich zone, compared to the corresponding isoviscous point in the water-rich zone. However, the anion resorufin shows a bivalued profile of τr vs η only in dimethylsulphoxide-water mixtures, while the neutral nile red shows a linear behavior in all the dipolar-aprotic water mixtures. A hook-type profile of τr vs η is seen for the anion resorufin in ethanol-, 1-propanol-, and 2-propanol-water mixtures and for the cation oxazine 720 in 1-propanol- and 2-propanol-water mixtures; but nile red shows no departure from linear behavior even in alcohol-water mixtures. The rotational dynamics of the cation oxazine 720 in dipolar aprotic-water mixtures is explained in terms of solvation since the dielectric friction is minimal

  15. Zinc oxide induces the stringent response and major reorientations in the central metabolism of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Luche, Sylvie; Eymard-Vernain, Elise; Diemer, Hélène; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rabilloud, Thierry; Lelong, Cécile

    2016-03-01

    Microorganisms, such as bacteria, are one of the first targets of nanoparticles in the environment. In this study, we tested the effect of two nanoparticles, ZnO and TiO2, with the salt ZnSO4 as the control, on the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis by 2D gel electrophoresis-based proteomics. Despite a significant effect on viability (LD50), TiO2 NPs had no detectable effect on the proteomic pattern, while ZnO NPs and ZnSO4 significantly modified B. subtilis metabolism. These results allowed us to conclude that the effects of ZnO observed in this work were mainly attributable to Zn dissolution in the culture media. Proteomic analysis highlighted twelve modulated proteins related to central metabolism: MetE and MccB (cysteine metabolism), OdhA, AspB, IolD, AnsB, PdhB and YtsJ (Krebs cycle) and XylA, YqjI, Drm and Tal (pentose phosphate pathway). Biochemical assays, such as free sulfhydryl, CoA-SH and malate dehydrogenase assays corroborated the observed central metabolism reorientation and showed that Zn stress induced oxidative stress, probably as a consequence of thiol chelation stress by Zn ions. The other patterns affected by ZnO and ZnSO4 were the stringent response and the general stress response. Nine proteins involved in or controlled by the stringent response showed a modified expression profile in the presence of ZnO NPs or ZnSO4: YwaC, SigH, YtxH, YtzB, TufA, RplJ, RpsB, PdhB and Mbl. An increase in the ppGpp concentration confirmed the involvement of the stringent response during a Zn stress. All these metabolic reorientations in response to Zn stress were probably the result of complex regulatory mechanisms including at least the stringent response via YwaC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Engaging Faculty across the Community Engagement Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorski, Irena; Mehta, Khanjan

    2016-01-01

    There currently exists an incompatibility between the demands of university administrators for increased community engagement and the realities facing faculty who want to integrate it into their academic coursework, research, and professional service. This article provides insight on the complex challenges preventing faculty from becoming involved…

  17. From Engaging Liaison Librarians to Engaging Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Anne R.

    2015-01-01

    Kara J. Malenfant wrote in her 2010 article "Leading Change in the System of Scholarly Communication: A Case Study of Engaging Liaison Librarians for Outreach to Faculty" that it would be interesting to revisit the University of Minnesota (UMN) Libraries in three years and see how they are doing. Malenfant had documented a culture shift…

  18. 12 CFR 225.124 - Foreign bank holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Foreign bank holding companies. 225.124 Section... SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BANK HOLDING COMPANIES AND CHANGE IN BANK CONTROL (REGULATION Y) Regulations Financial Holding Companies Interpretations § 225.124 Foreign bank holding companies. (a) Effective December 1,...

  19. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  20. 26 CFR 1.543-1 - Personal holding company income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Personal holding company income. 1.543-1 Section... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Personal Holding Companies § 1.543-1 Personal holding company income. (a) General rule. The term personal holding company income means the portion of the gross income...

  1. 12 CFR 583.4 - Bank holding company.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bank holding company. 583.4 Section 583.4 Banks... AFFECTING SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.4 Bank holding company. The term bank holding company means any company which has control over any bank or over any company that is or becomes a bank...

  2. 12 CFR 239.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 239.3... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Mutual Holding Companies § 239.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. (a) A mutual savings association may not reorganize to become...

  3. 12 CFR 583.20 - Savings and loan holding company.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Savings and loan holding company. 583.20 Section... REGULATIONS AFFECTING SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.20 Savings and loan holding company. The term savings and loan holding company means any company that directly or indirectly controls a...

  4. 12 CFR 225.124 - Foreign bank holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Foreign bank holding companies. 225.124 Section... SYSTEM BANK HOLDING COMPANIES AND CHANGE IN BANK CONTROL (REGULATION Y) Regulations Financial Holding Companies Interpretations § 225.124 Foreign bank holding companies. (a) Effective December 1, 1971,...

  5. 12 CFR 583.20 - Savings and loan holding company.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Savings and loan holding company. 583.20... REGULATIONS AFFECTING SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.20 Savings and loan holding company. The term savings and loan holding company means any company that directly or indirectly controls a...

  6. 12 CFR 583.20 - Savings and loan holding company.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Savings and loan holding company. 583.20... REGULATIONS AFFECTING SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.20 Savings and loan holding company. The term savings and loan holding company means any company that directly or indirectly controls a...

  7. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  8. 12 CFR 239.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 239.3... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Mutual Holding Companies § 239.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. (a) A mutual savings association may not reorganize to become...

  9. 26 CFR 1.543-1 - Personal holding company income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Personal holding company income. 1.543-1 Section... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Personal Holding Companies § 1.543-1 Personal holding company income. (a) General rule. The term personal holding company income means the portion of the gross income...

  10. 12 CFR 583.4 - Bank holding company.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Bank holding company. 583.4 Section 583.4 Banks... AFFECTING SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.4 Bank holding company. The term bank holding company means any company which has control over any bank or over any company that is or becomes a bank...

  11. 12 CFR 583.4 - Bank holding company.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bank holding company. 583.4 Section 583.4 Banks... AFFECTING SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.4 Bank holding company. The term bank holding company means any company which has control over any bank or over any company that is or becomes a bank...

  12. 12 CFR 583.20 - Savings and loan holding company.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Savings and loan holding company. 583.20... REGULATIONS AFFECTING SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.20 Savings and loan holding company. The term savings and loan holding company means any company that directly or indirectly controls a...

  13. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  14. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  15. 12 CFR 225.124 - Foreign bank holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Foreign bank holding companies. 225.124 Section... SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BANK HOLDING COMPANIES AND CHANGE IN BANK CONTROL (REGULATION Y) Regulations Financial Holding Companies Interpretations § 225.124 Foreign bank holding companies. (a) Effective December 1,...

  16. 12 CFR 225.124 - Foreign bank holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Foreign bank holding companies. 225.124 Section... SYSTEM BANK HOLDING COMPANIES AND CHANGE IN BANK CONTROL (REGULATION Y) Regulations Financial Holding Companies Interpretations § 225.124 Foreign bank holding companies. (a) Effective December 1, 1971,...

  17. 12 CFR 583.4 - Bank holding company.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Bank holding company. 583.4 Section 583.4 Banks... AFFECTING SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.4 Bank holding company. The term bank holding company means any company which has control over any bank or over any company that is or becomes a bank...

  18. 12 CFR 239.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 239.3... RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Mutual Holding Companies § 239.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. (a) A mutual savings association may not reorganize to become...

  19. 12 CFR 225.124 - Foreign bank holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Foreign bank holding companies. 225.124 Section... SYSTEM BANK HOLDING COMPANIES AND CHANGE IN BANK CONTROL (REGULATION Y) Regulations Financial Holding Companies Interpretations § 225.124 Foreign bank holding companies. (a) Effective December 1, 1971,...

  20. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  1. 12 CFR 583.20 - Savings and loan holding company.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Savings and loan holding company. 583.20 Section... REGULATIONS AFFECTING SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.20 Savings and loan holding company. The term savings and loan holding company means any company that directly or indirectly controls a...

  2. 12 CFR 583.4 - Bank holding company.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bank holding company. 583.4 Section 583.4 Banks... AFFECTING SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.4 Bank holding company. The term bank holding company means any company which has control over any bank or over any company that is or becomes a bank...

  3. 26 CFR 53.4943-8 - Business holdings; constructive ownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Business holdings; constructive ownership. 53... Business Holdings § 53.4943-8 Business holdings; constructive ownership. (a) Constructive ownership—(1) In general. For purposes of section 4943, in computing the holdings in a business enterprise of a...

  4. Cross Sections: No 6 Hold Section at Fr 178 Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cross Sections: No 6 Hold Section at Fr 178 Looking Fwd, No 7 Hold Section at No 154 Looking Fwd, No 7 Hold Section at Fr 195 Looking Fwd Showing Trans 194, No 7 Hold Section at Fr 198 Looking Fwd - General John Pope, Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  5. 18. MAIN FLOOR HOLDING TANKS Main floor, looking at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. MAIN FLOOR - HOLDING TANKS Main floor, looking at holding tanks against the west wall, from which sluice gates are seen protruding. Right foreground-wooden holding tanks. Note narrow wooden flumes through which fish were sluiced into holding and brining tanks. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  6. Defining Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axelson, Rick D.; Flick, Arend

    2011-01-01

    Few terms in the lexicon of higher education today are invoked more frequently, and in more varied ways, than "engagement". The phrase "student engagement" has come to refer to how "involved" or "interested" students appear to be in their learning and how "connected" they are to their classes,…

  7. Engagement Means Everyone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Employee engagement is not just HR's responsibility. While HR is responsible for the process of measuring and driving engagement, improving it is actually everyone's responsibility. And that means reducing the barriers to productivity to drive business performance. Training departments can play a pivotal role. Their job is to enhance curriculum or…

  8. Engagement Means Everyone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Employee engagement is not just HR's responsibility. While HR is responsible for the process of measuring and driving engagement, improving it is actually everyone's responsibility. And that means reducing the barriers to productivity to drive business performance. Training departments can play a pivotal role. Their job is to enhance curriculum or…

  9. Civic Engagement Comes Alive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruempel, Beverly J.; Gentzler, Yvonne S.; Hausafus, Cheryl O.; Keino, Leah C.

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses how civic engagement came alive in a Family and Consumer Social Issues class. College students are at a critical age to develop a lifelong interest in civic engagement. Students in a Family and Consumer Social Issues class were required to attend two meetings of a public board or agency of their choice. Their assignment was…

  10. Student Engagement. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Teachers, more than any other person in the school, have the greatest potential to get students engaged in school and in learning. Creating student-directed learning experiences that challenge, stimulate, and engage kids not only raises test scores, it also fosters life-long learners prepared for success in today's globally connected world. This…

  11. Engagement: It's about Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Nancy H.; Anderson, Sharon; Payne, Jack; Foster, David E.

    2004-01-01

    "It's about Them" was introduced by David Hardesty to call attention to the central focus of effective public engagement. The seven-part test of engagement set forth by the Kellogg Commission is examined within the context of the cooperative extension system. The impacts of the changes that will shape American society in the early…

  12. Engaging with Drama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a multi-site global, ethnographic, and mixed methods study on student engagement. Our research has closely examined how engagement and disengagement operate subtly, simultaneously and relationally in the places and spaces where drama is made. Through years of qualitative time in high school classrooms and two different…

  13. Defining Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axelson, Rick D.; Flick, Arend

    2011-01-01

    Few terms in the lexicon of higher education today are invoked more frequently, and in more varied ways, than "engagement". The phrase "student engagement" has come to refer to how "involved" or "interested" students appear to be in their learning and how "connected" they are to their classes,…

  14. Youth Engaged for Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, Margaret; Little, Priscilla

    2005-01-01

    This article examines how out-of-school time programs can promote youth involvement in civic action by focusing on four interrelated programmatic strategies: establishing organizational readiness that fosters engagement; promoting youth-adult partnerships; engaging youth as leaders and decision makers; and involving youth in research and…

  15. Toward Learning from Engagement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsner, Paul A.

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the issue of student engagement in education. Suggests that reasons behind high dropout rates for first-year students may include the college's adherence to the traditional learning paradigm that characterizes the student as a passive learner. Urges institutions to move toward learning through engagement. (NB)

  16. Fitts's law holds for action perception.

    PubMed

    Grosjean, Marc; Shiffrar, Maggie; Knoblich, Günther

    2007-02-01

    Fitts's law is one of the most well-established principles in psychology. It captures the relation between speed and accuracy in performed and imagined movements. The aim of this study was to determine whether this law also holds during the perception of other people's actions. Subjects were shown apparent motion displays of a person moving his arm between two identical targets. Target width, the separation between targets, and movement speed were varied. Subjects reported whether the person could move at the perceived speed without missing the targets. The movement times reported as being just possible were exactly those predicted by Fitts's law (r(2)= .96). A subsequent experiment demonstrated the same lawful relation for the perception of a robot arm (r(2)= .93). To our knowledge, this makes Fitts's law the first motor principle that holds in imagery and the perception of biological and non-biological agents.

  17. Biological specimen holding facilities for Spacelab experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, J. K.; Yakut, M. M.; Murphy, G. L.; Berry, W.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the design, development, integration, and testing of two prototype holding facilities: (1) a unit housing 36 laboratory rats in individual cages, and (2) a unit housing one unrestrained 14-kg rhesus monkey. Both units are environmentally controlled enclosures complete with food, water, and waste-collection equipment. Timer-controlled fluorescent lights in both units permit automatic day-night cycling. Both units are designed to be compatible with Spacelab interfaces and to be operated by NASA payload specialists.

  18. Active hold-down for heat treating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The object of the disclosure is to provide a vacuum hold-down for holding thin sheets to a support surface, which permits the thin sheet to change dimensions as it is held down. The hold-down includes numerous holes in the support surface, through which a vacuum is applied from a vacuum source. The holes are arranged in zones. The vacuum is repeatedly interrupted at only one or a few zones, while it continues to be applied to other zones, to allow the workpiece to creep along that interrupted zone. The vacuum to different zones is interrupted at different times, as by a slowly turning valve number, to allow each zone of the workpiece to creep. A positive pressure may be applied from a pressured air source to a zone when the vacuum is interrupted there, to help lift the corresponding workpiece zone off the surface to aid in creeping. The workpiece may undergo dimensional changes because of heating, cooling, drying, or other procedure.

  19. Propellant reorientation effects on the attitude of the Main Cryotechnic Stage of Ariane V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letourneur, Y.; Sicilian, J.

    1993-06-01

    The objective of this study, performed in the frame of the Ariane V program, is to determine the attitude of the Main Cryotechnic Stage (EPC) of the launcher when it is spun after the staging with the upper stage. The liquids contained in the LOX and LH2 tanks are likely to affect this spin-up. Therefore, an analysis of the propellant reorientation was undertaken using the code FLOW-3D, then a simplified model, which includes a coupled (fluid/dry vehicle) dynamics computation, was used to examine the influence of the parameters of this problem on the EPC attitude: liquid residuals, initial kinematics conditions, characteristics of the spin-up torques. A new version of FLOW-3D which deals with the coupled fluid motion and rigid body dynamics was developed, enabling us to check the results of the parametrization. This paper presents the technological problem, the simplified model, the new version of FLOW-3D, and the results obtained from both codes applied to Ariane V.

  20. Real mental health promotion requires a reorientation of nursing education, practice and research.

    PubMed

    Wand, T

    2011-03-01

    The evidence for the individual, social and economic benefits of mental health promotion is now well established. The indication is that a broader public health approach that addresses social and environmental factors related to mental health and well-being is required. Mainstream mental health services, however, continue to operate in relative isolation, allocating the greatest proportion of funding and resources to the treatment of mental illness and disorder. Relevant to health promotion, this paper explores the bidirectional link between physical and mental health and the social determinants of mental health. The growing interest in the positive aspects of health and well-being which focuses on wellness rather than illness is also discussed. One example of how mental health nurses can adopt principles of positive mental health to education, practice and research is presented. The author proposes that as the largest professional group in health care, nurses must become more actively involved in initiatives that reorientate practices and services away from an illness culture towards the adoption of wider mental health promotion principles.