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Sample records for hollow cathode lamp

  1. Hollow cathode lamp based Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter.

    PubMed

    Pan, Duo; Xue, Xiaobo; Shang, Haosen; Luo, Bin; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF), which has acquired wide applications, is mainly limited to some gaseous elements and low melting-point metals before, for the restriction of the attainable atomic density. In conventional FADOF systems a high atomic density is usually achieved by thermal equilibrium at the saturated vapor pressure, hence for elements with high melting-points a high temperature is required. To avoid this restriction, we propose a scheme of FADOF based on the hollow cathode lamp (HCL), instead of atomic vapor cells. Experimental results in strontium atoms verified this scheme, where a transmission peak corresponding to the (88)Sr (5s(2))(1)S0 - (5s5p)(1)P1 transition (461 nm) is obtained, with a maximum transmittance of 62.5% and a bandwith of 1.19 GHz. The dependence of transmission on magnetic field and HCL discharge current is also studied. Since the state-of-art commercial HCLs cover about 70 elements, this scheme can greatly expand the applications of FADOFs, and the abundant atomic transitions they provide bring the HCL based FADOFs potential applications for frequency stabilization. PMID:27418112

  2. Hollow cathode lamp based Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Duo; Xue, Xiaobo; Shang, Haosen; Luo, Bin; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF), which has acquired wide applications, is mainly limited to some gaseous elements and low melting-point metals before, for the restriction of the attainable atomic density. In conventional FADOF systems a high atomic density is usually achieved by thermal equilibrium at the saturated vapor pressure, hence for elements with high melting-points a high temperature is required. To avoid this restriction, we propose a scheme of FADOF based on the hollow cathode lamp (HCL), instead of atomic vapor cells. Experimental results in strontium atoms verified this scheme, where a transmission peak corresponding to the 88Sr (5s2)1S0 − (5s5p)1P1 transition (461 nm) is obtained, with a maximum transmittance of 62.5% and a bandwith of 1.19 GHz. The dependence of transmission on magnetic field and HCL discharge current is also studied. Since the state-of-art commercial HCLs cover about 70 elements, this scheme can greatly expand the applications of FADOFs, and the abundant atomic transitions they provide bring the HCL based FADOFs potential applications for frequency stabilization. PMID:27418112

  3. Hollow cathode lamp based Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter.

    PubMed

    Pan, Duo; Xue, Xiaobo; Shang, Haosen; Luo, Bin; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF), which has acquired wide applications, is mainly limited to some gaseous elements and low melting-point metals before, for the restriction of the attainable atomic density. In conventional FADOF systems a high atomic density is usually achieved by thermal equilibrium at the saturated vapor pressure, hence for elements with high melting-points a high temperature is required. To avoid this restriction, we propose a scheme of FADOF based on the hollow cathode lamp (HCL), instead of atomic vapor cells. Experimental results in strontium atoms verified this scheme, where a transmission peak corresponding to the (88)Sr (5s(2))(1)S0 - (5s5p)(1)P1 transition (461 nm) is obtained, with a maximum transmittance of 62.5% and a bandwith of 1.19 GHz. The dependence of transmission on magnetic field and HCL discharge current is also studied. Since the state-of-art commercial HCLs cover about 70 elements, this scheme can greatly expand the applications of FADOFs, and the abundant atomic transitions they provide bring the HCL based FADOFs potential applications for frequency stabilization.

  4. Hollow cathode lamp based Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Duo; Xue, Xiaobo; Shang, Haosen; Luo, Bin; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2016-07-01

    The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF), which has acquired wide applications, is mainly limited to some gaseous elements and low melting-point metals before, for the restriction of the attainable atomic density. In conventional FADOF systems a high atomic density is usually achieved by thermal equilibrium at the saturated vapor pressure, hence for elements with high melting-points a high temperature is required. To avoid this restriction, we propose a scheme of FADOF based on the hollow cathode lamp (HCL), instead of atomic vapor cells. Experimental results in strontium atoms verified this scheme, where a transmission peak corresponding to the 88Sr (5s2)1S0 ‑ (5s5p)1P1 transition (461 nm) is obtained, with a maximum transmittance of 62.5% and a bandwith of 1.19 GHz. The dependence of transmission on magnetic field and HCL discharge current is also studied. Since the state-of-art commercial HCLs cover about 70 elements, this scheme can greatly expand the applications of FADOFs, and the abundant atomic transitions they provide bring the HCL based FADOFs potential applications for frequency stabilization.

  5. Hollow cathode lamp based Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Duo; Xue, Xiaobo; Shang, Haosen; Luo, Bin; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2016-07-01

    The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF), which has acquired wide applications, is mainly limited to some gaseous elements and low melting-point metals before, for the restriction of the attainable atomic density. In conventional FADOF systems a high atomic density is usually achieved by thermal equilibrium at the saturated vapor pressure, hence for elements with high melting-points a high temperature is required. To avoid this restriction, we propose a scheme of FADOF based on the hollow cathode lamp (HCL), instead of atomic vapor cells. Experimental results in strontium atoms verified this scheme, where a transmission peak corresponding to the 88Sr (5s2)1S0 - (5s5p)1P1 transition (461 nm) is obtained, with a maximum transmittance of 62.5% and a bandwith of 1.19 GHz. The dependence of transmission on magnetic field and HCL discharge current is also studied. Since the state-of-art commercial HCLs cover about 70 elements, this scheme can greatly expand the applications of FADOFs, and the abundant atomic transitions they provide bring the HCL based FADOFs potential applications for frequency stabilization.

  6. Note: Hollow cathode lamp with integral, high optical efficiency isolation valve: A modular vacuum ultraviolet source

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan Roberts, F.; Anderson, Scott L.

    2013-12-15

    The design and operating conditions of a hollow cathode discharge lamp for the generation of vacuum ultraviolet radiation, suitable for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) application, are described in detail. The design is easily constructed, and modular, allowing it to be adapted to different experimental requirements. A thin isolation valve is built into one of the differential pumping stages, isolating the discharge section from the UHV section, both for vacuum safety and to allow lamp maintenance without venting the UHV chamber. The lamp has been used both for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of surfaces and as a “soft” photoionization source for gas-phase mass spectrometry.

  7. Atlas of the Spectrum of a Platinum/Neon Hollow-Cathode Lamp in the Region 1130-4330 Å

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 112 Atlas of the Spectrum of a Platinum/Neon Hollow-Cathode Lamp in the Region 1130-4330 Å (Web, free access)   Atlas of the Spectrum of a Platinum/Neon Hollow-Cathode Lamp in the Region 1130-4330 Å contains wavelengths and intensities for about 5600 lines in the region 4330 Å. An atlas plot of the spectrum is given, with the spectral lines marked and their intensities, wavelengths, and classifications listed.

  8. Anomalous optogalvanic line shapes of argon metastable transitions in a hollow cathode lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruyten, W. M.

    1993-01-01

    Anomalous optogalvanic line shapes were observed in a commercial hollow cathode lamp containing argon buffer gas. Deviations from Gaussian line shapes were particularly strong for transitions originating from the 3P2 metastable level of argon. The anomalous line shapes can be described reasonably well by the assumption that two regions in the discharge are excited simultaneously, each giving rise to a purely Gaussian line shape, but with different polarities, amplitudes, and linewidths.

  9. Laser optogalvanic wavelength calibration with a commercial hollow cathode iron - neon discharge lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Xinming; Nur, Abdullahi H.; Misra, Prabhakar

    1994-01-01

    351 optogalvanic transitions have been observed in the 337 - 598 nm wavelength region using an iron - neon hollow cathode discharge lamp and a pulsed tunable dye laser. 223 of these have been identified as transitions associated with neon energy levels. These optogalvanic transitions have allowed, in conjunction with interference fringes recorded concomitantly with an etalon, the calibration of the dye laser wavelength with 0.3/cm accuracy.

  10. First results on Ge resonant laser photoionization in hollow cathode lamp.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, Daniele; Barzakh, Anatoly; Fedorov, Dmitry; Andrighetto, Alberto; Mariotti, Emilio; Nicolosi, Piergiorgio; Tomaselli, Alessandra

    2016-02-01

    In the framework of the research and development activities of the SPES project regarding the optimization of the radioactive beam production, a dedicated experimental study has been recently started in order to investigate the possibility of in-source ionization of germanium using a set of tunable dye lasers. Germanium is one of the beams to be accelerated by the SPES ISOL facility, which is under construction at Legnaro INFN Laboratories. The three-step, two color ionization schemes have been tested using a Ge hollow cathode lamp. The slow and the fast optogalvanic signals were detected and averaged by an oscilloscope as a proof of the laser ionization inside the lamp. As a result, several wavelength scans across the resonances of ionization schemes were collected with the fast optogalvanic signal. Some comparisons of ionization efficiency for different ionization schemes were made. Furthermore, saturation curves of the first excitation transitions have been obtained. This investigation method and the setup built in the laser laboratory of the SPES project can be applied for the photo-ionization scheme studies also for the other possible radioactive elements. PMID:26932071

  11. The Spectrum of Th-Ar Hollow Cathode Lamps in the 691nm to 5804nm region Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 161 The Spectrum of Th-Ar Hollow Cathode Lamps in the 691nm to 5804nm region Database (Web, free access)   This atlas presents observations of the infra-red (IR) spectrum of a low current Th-Ar hollow cathode lamp with the 2-m Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at NIST. These observations establish more than 2400 lines that are suitable for use as wavelength standards in the range 691 nm to 5804 nm. The observations were made in collaboration with the European Southern Observatory (ESO), in order to provide calibration reference data for new high-resolution Echelle spectrographs, such as the Cryogenic High-Resolution IR Echelle Spectrograph ([CRIRES]), ESO's new IR spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope in Chile.

  12. Wavelengths and intensities of a platinum/neon hollow cathode lamp in the region 1100-4000 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reader, Joseph; Acquista, Nicolo; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Sansonetti, Jean E.

    1990-01-01

    The spectrum of a platinum hollow cathode lamp containing neon carrier gas was recorded photographically and photoelectrically with a 10.7 m normal-incidence vacuum spectrograph. Wavelengths and intensities were determined for about 3000 lines in the region 1100-4000 A. The uncertainty of the measured wavelengths is estimated to be + or - 0.0020 A. Ritz-type wavelengths are given for about 550 classified lines of Pt II with uncertainites varying from + or - 0.0004 A to + or - 0.0025 A. The uncertainty of the relative intensities is estimated to be about 20 percent.

  13. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  14. Performance of the FOS and GHRS Pt/(Cr)-Ne Hollow-cathode Lamps after their Return from Space and Comparison with Archival Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerber, Florian; Lindler, Don; Bristow, Paul; Lembke, Dominik; Nave, Gillian; Reader, Joseph; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Heap, Sara R.; Rosa, Michael R.; Wood, H. John

    2006-01-01

    The Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF) and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are collaborating to study hollow cathode calibration lamps as used onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). As part of the STIS Calibration Enhancement (STIS-CE) Project we are trying to improve our understanding of the performance of hollow cathode lamps and the physical processes involved in their long term operation. The original flight lamps from the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) and the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) are the only lamps that have ever been returned to Earth after extended operation in space. We have taken spectra of all four lamps using NIST s 10.7-m normal-incidence spectrograph and Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) optimized for use in the ultraviolet (UV). These spectra, together with spectra archived from six years of on-orbit operations and pre-launch spectra, provide a unique data set - covering a period of about 20 years - for studying aging effects in these lamps. Our findings represent important lessons for the choice and design of calibration sources and their operation in future UV and optical spectrographs in space.

  15. Hollow cathode apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A hollow cathode apparatus is described, which can be rapidly and reliably started. An ignitor positioned upstream from the hollow cathode, generates a puff of plasma that flows with the primary gas to be ionized through the cathode. The plasma puff creates a high voltage breakdown between the downstream end of the cathode and a keeper electrode, to heat the cathode to an electron-emitting temperature.

  16. Use of multiwavelength emission from hollow cathode lamp for measurement of state resolved atom density of metal vapor produced by electron beam evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, A.; Dikshit, B.; Bhatia, M. S.; Mago, V. K.

    2008-09-15

    State resolved atom population of metal vapor having low-lying metastable states departs from equilibrium value. It needs to be experimentally investigated. This paper reports the use of hollow cathode lamp based atomic absorption spectroscopy technique to measure online the state resolved atom density (ground and metastable) of metal vapor in an atomic beam produced by a high power electron gun. In particular, the advantage of availability of multiwavelength emission in hollow cathode lamp is used to determine the atom density in different states. Here, several transitions pertaining to a given state have also been invoked to obtain the mean value of atom density thereby providing an opportunity for in situ averaging. It is observed that at higher source temperatures the atoms from metastable state relax to the ground state. This is ascribed to competing processes of atom-atom and electron-atom collisions. The formation of collision induced virtual source is inferred from measurement of atom density distribution profile along the width of the atomic beam. The total line-of-sight average atom density measured by absorption technique using hollow cathode lamp is compared to that measured by atomic vapor deposition method. The presence of collisions is further supported by determination of beaming exponent by numerically fitting the data.

  17. Micro hollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbach, K.H.; Peterkin, F.E.; Verhappen, R.

    1995-12-31

    Hollow cathode discharges are glow discharges with the cathode fall and negative glow confined in a cavity in the cathode. For the discharge to develop, the cathode hole dimensions must be on the order of the mean free path. By reducing the cathode hole dimensions it is therefore possible to increase the pressure. Stable hollow cathode discharges in air have been observed at almost one atmosphere when the cathode diameter was reduced to 20 micrometers. In order to study the electrical parameters of a micro hollow cathode discharge, a set of experiments has been performed in argon at pressures in the torr range and a cathode hole diameter of 0.7 mm in molybdenum. The current-voltage characteristics and the appearance of the discharge plasma showed two distinct regions. At lower voltage or pressure the current varies linearly with voltage and the hollow cathode plasma is concentrated around the axis of the cathode hole (low glow mode). At higher values of voltage or pressure the current increases nonlinearly, up to a point where a transition into a low voltage hollow cathode arc was observed, and the plasma column expands and fills almost the entire cathode hole (high glow mode). Spectral measurements showed that the transition from the low glow mode into the high glow mode is related to an increased density of electrode vapor in the hollow cathode discharge. Up to the breakdown into a hollow cathode arc, the current voltage characteristic of the discharge has a positive slope. In this range, hollow cathode discharges can be operated in parallel without a ballast resistor.

  18. Microhollow Cathode Discharge Excimer Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, K. H.

    1999-11-01

    character. Reducing the diameter of the cathode hole in a hollow cathode discharge geometry to values on the order of 100 μm has allowed us to extend the pressure range of stable, direct current hollow cathode gas discharges up to atmospheric pressure. The large concentration of high-energy electrons generated in the cathode fall, in combination with the high neutral gas density favors three-body processes such as excimer formation. Excimer emission in xenon discharges peaking at 172 nm, was observed with efficiencies between 6% and 9% at pressures of several hundred Torr. Typical forward voltages are 200 V at dc currents up to 8 mA. Pulsed operation allowed us to extend the current range to 80 mA with corresponding linear increase in optical power. Spatially resolved measurements showed that the source of the excimer radiation at atmospheric pressure and currents of less than 8 mA is confined to the cathode opening. The radiative emittance at 8 mA and atmospheric pressure is approximately 20 W/cm^2. With reduced pressure and increased current, respectively, the excimer source extends into the area outside the cathode hole. Besides in xenon, excimer emission in argon at a peak wavelength of 128 nm has been recorded. In addition to operating the discharge in rare gases, we have also explored its use as rare gas-halide excimer source. In a gas mixture containing 1% ArF we were able to generate stable dc discharges in flowing gas at pressures ranging from 100 Torr to atmospheric pressure. The spectra of the high-pressure ArF discharges are dominated by excimer radiation peaking at 193 nm. The excimer emission of a single ArF discharge at 700 Torr was measured as 150 mW at an efficiency of 3%. Parallel operation of these discharges by means of a resistive anode, which has recently been demonstrated for argon discharges, offers the possibility to use microhollow cathode discharge arrays as dc-excimer lamps, with estimated power densities exceeding 10 W/cm^2. abstract

  19. Microhollow Cathode Discharge Excimer Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, Karl H.

    1999-10-01

    Reducing the diameter of the cathode hole in hollow cathode discharge geometry to values on the order of 100 μm has allowed us to extend the pressure range of stable, direct current hollow cathode discharges up to atmospheric pressure. The large concentration of high-energy electrons in the nonthermal discharge, in combination with the high neutral gas density favors three-body processes such as rare gas excimer formation. Excimer emission in argon and xenon discharges peaking at 130 nm and 172 nm, respectively, was observed with an efficiency for xenon excimer emission between 6% and 9% in a pressure range from 250 Torr and 450 Torr. Typical forward voltages are 200 V at dc currents of up to 8 mA. Pulsed operation allowed us to extend the current range in xenon discharges to 80 mA. At pressures in the hundreds of Torr range the source of the excimer radiation extends over an area of several times the cathode opening. With increasing pressure the source is reduced in size and eventually, at pressures exceeding atmospheric becomes confined to the cathode opening. For a specific pressure the radiative power increases linearly with current at constant radiant emittance. For atmospheric pressure discharges in xenon the radiative emittance is approximately 20 W/cm^2. In addition to operating the discharge in rare gases, we have also explored its use as rare gas-halide excimer source. In a gas mixture containing 1 % ArF we were able to generate stable dc discharges in flowing gas at pressures ranging from 100 Torr to atmospheric pressure. The spectra of the high-pressure ArF discharges are dominated by excimer radiation peaking at 193 nm. The excimer emission of an ArF discharge at 700 Torr was measured as 150 mW. With a discharge voltage of 500 V, and a current of 10 mA the efficiency is 3 %. Parallel operation of the micro-discharges by means of a resistive anode offers the possibility to use microhollow cathode discharge arrays as dc-excimer lamps, with estimated

  20. Absolute number density calibration of the absorption by ground-state lead atoms of the 283. 3-nm resonance line from a high-intensity lead hollow cathode lamp and the calculated effect of argon pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, J.W.; McClean, R.E. ); Oldenborg, R.C. )

    1991-03-21

    The absolute number density calibration for the absorption by ground-state lead atoms of the 283.3-nm resonance line from a high-intensity lead hollow cathode lamp (Photron superlamp) is determined and found to be the same as that of a standard hollow cathode lamp. Comparisons of the calibrations to theoretical calculations are found to be quite satisfactory. The effects of argon pressures in the absorption cell on the calibration are examined theoretically by using a simple Lorentzian broadening and shifting model. These calculations show the expected reduction in sensitivity and increasing linearity of Beer-Lambert plots with increasing argon pressure.

  1. Atlas of the spectrum of a platinum/neon hollow-cathode reference lamp in the region 1130-4330 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sansonetti, Jean E.; Reader, Joseph; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Acquista, Nicolo

    1992-01-01

    The spectrum of a platinum hollow-cathode lamp containing neon carrier gas was recorded photographically and photoelectrically with a 10.7 m normal-incidence vacuum spectrograph. Wavelengths and intensities were determined for about 5600 lines in the region 1130-4330 A. An atlas of the spectrum is given, with the spectral lines marked and their intensities, wavelengths, and classifications listed. Lines of impurity species are also identified. The uncertainty of the photographically measured wavelengths is estimated to be +/- 0.0020 A. The uncertainty of lines measured in the photoelectric scans is 0.01 A for wavelengths shorter than 2030 A and 0.02 A for longer wavelengths. Ritz-type wavelengths are given for many of the classified lines of Pt II with uncertainties varying from +/- 0.0004 to +/- 0.0025 A. The uncertainty of the relative intensities is estimated to be about 20 percent.

  2. Hot hollow cathode gun assembly

    DOEpatents

    Zeren, J.D.

    1983-11-22

    A hot hollow cathode deposition gun assembly includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, the hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

  3. Absorption by ground-state lead atoms of the 283. 3-nm resonant line from a lead hollow cathode lamp. An absolute number density calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, J.W. ); Oldenborg, R.C.; Baughcum, S.L. )

    1989-10-19

    An accurate absolute number density calibration curve for absorption by gaseous lead atoms of the 283.3-nm resonant line from a typical lead hollow cathode lamp is reported. This calibration shows the usual curvature in the Beer-Lambert plot for atomic absorption at moderate to high absorbances that is commonly attributed to self-absorption leading to line reversal in the source and/or preferential absorption at the line center when the absorber temperature is not much greater than the source Doppler temperature. A theoretical calculation utilizing a Doppler-limited Fourier transform spectrum of the 283.3-nm emission from the lamp and a tabulated value of the absorption cross section and accounting for the isotopic and nuclear hyperfine components in both the emission and absorption due to naturally occurring lead quantitatively reproduces the experimental calibration curve without any parameter adjustments. It is found that the curvature in the Beer-Lambert plot has more to do with the fact that the absorbing and emitting atoms are a mixture of isotopes giving several isotopic and nuclear hyperfine transitions at slightly different frequencies than it does with preferential absorption at line centers.

  4. [High current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp excited ionic fluorescence spectrometry of alkaline earth elements in inductively coupled plasma with a Fassel-torch].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Yu; Gong, Zhen-Bin; Huang, Ben-Li

    2006-02-01

    High current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp (HCMP-HCL) excited ionic fluorescence spectrometry (IFS) of alkaline earth elements in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with a Fassel-torch has been investigated. In wide condition ranges only IFS was observed, whilst atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) was not detectable. More intense ionic fluorescence signal was observed at lower observation heights and at lower incident RF powers. Without introduction of any reduction organic gases into the ICP, the limit of detection (LOD, 3sigma) of Ba was improved by 50-fold over that of a conventional pulsed (CP) HCL with the Baird sleeve-extended torch. For Ca and Sr, the LODs by HCMP-HCL-ICP-IFS and CP-HCL-ICP-AFS show no significant difference. Relative standard deviations were 0.6%-1.4% (0.1-0.2 microg x mL(-1), n = 10) for 5 ionic fluorescence lines. Preliminary studies showed that the intensity of ionic fluorescence could be depressed in the presence of K, Al and P.

  5. Microhollow cathode discharge excimer lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbach, Karl H.; El-Habachi, Ahmed; Moselhy, Mohamed M.; Shi, Wenhui; Stark, Robert H.

    2000-05-01

    Microhollow cathode discharges are high-pressure, nonequilibrium gas discharges between a hollow cathode and a planar or hollow anode with electrode dimensions in the 100 {mu}m range. The large concentration of high-energy electrons, in combination with the high-gas density favors excimer formation. Excimer emission was observed in xenon and argon, at wavelengths of 128 and 172 nm, respectively, and in argon fluoride and xenon chloride, at 193 and 308 nm. The radiant emittance of the excimer radiation was found to increase monotonically with pressure. However, due to the decrease in source size with pressure, the efficiency (ratio of excimer radiant power to input electrical power), has for xenon and argon fluoride a maximum at {approx}400 Torr. The maximum efficiency is between 6% and 9% for xenon, and {approx}2% for argon fluoride. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  6. Microhollow cathode discharge excimer lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, Karl H.; El-Habachi, Ahmed; Moselhy, Mohamed M.; Shi, Wenhui; Stark, Robert H.

    2000-05-01

    Microhollow cathode discharges are high-pressure, nonequilibrium gas discharges between a hollow cathode and a planar or hollow anode with electrode dimensions in the 100 μm range. The large concentration of high-energy electrons, in combination with the high-gas density favors excimer formation. Excimer emission was observed in xenon and argon, at wavelengths of 128 and 172 nm, respectively, and in argon fluoride and xenon chloride, at 193 and 308 nm. The radiant emittance of the excimer radiation was found to increase monotonically with pressure. However, due to the decrease in source size with pressure, the efficiency (ratio of excimer radiant power to input electrical power), has for xenon and argon fluoride a maximum at ˜400 Torr. The maximum efficiency is between 6% and 9% for xenon, and ˜2% for argon fluoride.

  7. Hydrogen hollow cathode ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J., Jr.; Sovey, J. S.; Roman, R. F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A source of hydrogen ions is disclosed and includes a chamber having at one end a cathode which provides electrons and through which hydrogen gas flows into the chamber. Screen and accelerator grids are provided at the other end of the chamber. A baffle plate is disposed between the cathode and the grids and a cylindrical baffle is disposed coaxially with the cathode at the one end of the chamber. The cylindrical baffle is of greater diameter than the baffle plate to provide discharge impedance and also to protect the cathode from ion flux. An anode electrode draws the electrons away from the cathode. The hollow cathode includes a tubular insert of tungsten impregnated with a low work function material to provide ample electrons. A heater is provided around the hollow cathode to initiate electron emission from the low work function material.

  8. High Pressure Hollow Cathode Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, Karl H.; Tessnow, Thomas; Elhabachi, Ahmed

    1996-10-01

    The sustaining voltage of hollow cathode discharges is dependent on the product of pressure and cathode hole diameter. By reducing the dimension of the cathode hole to 0.2 mm we were able to operate micro-hollow cathode discharges at pressures up to 750 Torr in argon in a direct current mode. The current-voltage characteristics of the 0.2 mm cathode hole discharges was found to have a positive slope at currents below 0.25 mA. Up to this current level hollow cathode discharges can be operated in parallel without ballast. The negative slope observed above the threshold current seems to be due to the onset of thermionic electron emission caused by Joule heating of the cathode. This assumption is supported by the experimental observation that multi-hole operation without ballast even at currents far above the dc-threshold current was possible when the discharge was operated in a pulsed mode. The possibility of generating large arrays of ballast-free, pulsed micro-hollow cathode discharges suggests their use as flat panel light sources or electron sources.

  9. Multiple Hollow Cathode Wear Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    1994-01-01

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor has been baselined for use on the Space Station to reduce station charging. The plasma contactor provides a low impedance connection to space plasma via a plasma produced by an arc discharge. The hollow cathode of the plasma contactor is a refractory metal tube, through which xenon gas flows, which has a disk-shaped plate with a centered orifice at the downstream end of the tube. Within the cathode, arc attachment occurs primarily on a Type S low work function insert that is next to the orifice plate. This low work function insert is used to reduce cathode operating temperatures and energy requirements and, therefore, achieve increased efficiency and longevity. The operating characteristics and lifetime capabilities of this hollow cathode, however, are greatly reduced by oxygen bearing contaminants in the xenon gas. Furthermore, an optimized activation process, where the cathode is heated prior to ignition by an external heater to drive contaminants such as oxygen and moisture from the insert absorbed during exposure to ambient air, is necessary both for cathode longevity and a simplified power processor. In order to achieve the two year (approximately 17,500 hours) continuous operating lifetime requirement for the plasma contactor, a test program was initiated at NASA Lewis Research Center to demonstrate the extended lifetime capabilities of the hollow cathode. To date, xenon hollow cathodes have demonstrated extended lifetimes with one test having operated in excess of 8000 hours in an ongoing test utilizing contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey. The objectives of this study were to verify the transportability of the contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey and to evaluate cathode contamination control procedures, activation processes, and cathode-to-cathode dispersions in operating characteristics with time. These were accomplished by conducting a 2000 hour wear test of four hollow

  10. Hollow cathodes for arcjet thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebben, Craig R.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1987-01-01

    In an attempt to prevent exterior spot emission, hollow cathode bodies and orifice plates were constructed from boron nitride which is an electrical insulator, but the orifice plates melted and/or eroded at high interelectrode pressures. The most suitable hollow cathodes tested included a refractory metal orifice plate in a boron nitride body, with the insert insulated electrically from the orifice plate. In addition, the hollow cathode interior was evacuated to assure a low pressure at the insert surface, thus promoting diffuse electron emission. At high interelectrode pressures, the electrons tended to flow through the orifice plate rather than through the orifice, which could result in overheating of the orifice plate. Using a carefully aligned centerline anode, electron flow through the orifice could be sustained at interelectrode pressures up to 500 torr - but the current flow path still occasionally jumped from the orifice to the orifice plate. Based on these tests, it appears that a hollow cathode would operate most effectively at pressures in the arcjet regime with a refractory, chemically stable, and electrically insulating cathode body and orifice plate.

  11. Micro-hollow cathode dischargers

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbach, K.H.; Verhappen, R.; Peterkin, F.E.

    1995-12-31

    In order to develop a hollow cathode discharge (HCD) with its increased current over planar electrode glow discharges, the cathode fall, which is on the order of the mean free path for ionization, must be comparable in length to the hole diameter. This indicates that the discharge parameters vary with pressure, p, times hole diameter, D. The pD product for stable operation of a hollow cathosde discharge was quoted to be on the order of one to ten Torr cm for noble gases, less for molecular gases. White (1959) observed the hollow cathode effect in a neon discharge at a pressure of 100 Torr when the hole dimensions were less than 1 mm. The cathode hole in his experiments changed from a cylindrical into a spherical cavity due to sputtering. The anode consisted in White`s experiment of a pin on the axis of the discharge geometry. We have studied micro-hollow (submillimeter) cathode discharges between two electrodes with aligned cylindrical holes by determining the current-voltage characteristics and the visual appearance of the discharge in argon over a wide range of pressure and voltage. The cross-section of the discharge geometry. The cathode is made of molybdenum or barium oxide inserted into a tungsten matrix (dispenser-cathode), the anode of molybdenum, and the dielectric spacer is mica. The discharge was operated under dc conditions, with half-wave rectified ac voltage applied, and pulsed with a 400 {mu}s rectangular voltage pulse. The lower limit in pressure was determined by the maximum voltage which could be applied to the discharge geometry without breakdown along insulators. The upper limit, in this study, is determined by the transition from cathode electrode emission due to ion-impact to thermal emission of electrons, which causes a dramatic increase in current and a drop in forward voltage to values on the order of 20 V.

  12. Hollow Cathode With Multiple Radial Orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Improved hollow cathode serving as source of electrons has multiple radial orifices instead of single axial orifice. Distributes ion current more smoothly, over larger area. Prototype of high-current cathodes for ion engines in spacecraft. On Earth, cathodes used in large-diameter ion sources for industrial processing of materials. Radial orientation of orifices in new design causes current to be dispersed radially in vicinity of cathode. Advantageous where desireable to produce plasma more nearly uniform over wider region around cathode.

  13. Temperature Distributions in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, Jay; Marrese, Colleen; Thornber, Ben; Dang, Lisa; Johnson, Lee

    2004-01-01

    Life-limiting processes in hollow cathodes are determined largely by the temperature of the emitter. To support development of cathode life models we have developed a noncontact temperature measurement technique which employs a stepper motor-driven fiber optic probe. The probe is driven inside the hollow cathode and collects light radiated by the hot interior surface of the emitter. Ratio pyrometry is used determine the axial temperature profile. Thermocouples on the orifice plate provide measurements ofthe external temperature during cathode operation and are used to calibrate the pyrometer system in situ with a small oven enclosing the externally heated cathode. Initial measurements of the temperature distribution in a hollow cathode with the same geometry as a cathode that failed after operating at 12 A emission current for 27800 hours are discussed.

  14. Observation of the hollow cathode effect from a dielectric cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hyeon Seok; Oh, Jin Young; Kim, Youn Sang; Jong Lee, Se; Song, Kie Moon; Baik, Hong Koo

    2010-12-01

    The hollow cathode effect (HCE) is investigated in the dielectric hollow cathode structure in a Ne-Xe mixture at 4%. The influence of the dielectric is shown experimentally by the relationship between voltage and current peaks. The linearity of reduced current density confirms the existence of the HCE and shows that cathode fall has the same value at every pD condition. Varying the pD, the variation in the discharge mode can be measured with IR intensity emitted from the plasma and photographs of discharge in the visible part of the spectra. Voltages and current in the range of 3 kV at 10 µA were used. We suggest an electrode configuration reinforced in cathode sputtering for the display panel and light source using the dielectric hollow cathode discharge (DHCD), and introducing a mechanism of the DHCD mode.

  15. Pulsed hollow cathode discharge with nanosecond risetime

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, G.; Husoy, P.O.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1984-12-01

    This paper reports the operation of a cylindrical hollow cathode discharge with current risetimes of a few nanoseconds at current densities at the entrance of the cathode in the range of 50-560A x cm/sup -2/ and at voltages of 280-850 V. Time-dependent measurements of the impedance of the discharge are presented. They allow for the evaluation of discharge quantities such as risetime, delay time, discharge voltage, and current, depending on the operation parameters as applied voltage, pressure, and preionization. The power density in the active region of the hollow cathode exceeded 200 kW x cm/sup -3/.

  16. Parallel operation of miniature hollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbach, K.H.; Peterkin, F.E.; Verhappen, R.

    1994-12-31

    The pressure where hollow cathode discharges operate scales inversely with the cathode hole diameter. By reducing the size of the cathode hole to less than one millimeter, the authors were able to obtain stable operation of the hollow cathode glow discharge in air, up to ten`s of torr. The current-voltage characteristic was found to have a positive slope below approximately 5 torr. This allows the authors to operate hollow cathode discharges in parallel at these pressures without using ballast resistors for the individual discharges. In an experiment with four 0.75 mm diameter cathode holes drilled in a 0.75 mm copper plate, the authors obtained stable operation of the discharges at a threshold voltage of 380 V and a total current of 0.16 mA. The intensity of the glow from each hole tended to equalize after several hours of operation. The system was run for approximately 40 hours without evident change in performance. The stability with respect to parallel operation offers the possibility to use miniature hollow cathode discharge arrays as flat panel electron and ion sources.

  17. Co-Flow Hollow Cathode Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    Hall thrusters utilize identical hollow cathode technology as ion thrusters, yet must operate at much higher mass flow rates in order to efficiently couple to the bulk plasma discharge. Higher flow rates are necessary in order to provide enough neutral collisions to transport electrons across magnetic fields so that they can reach the discharge. This higher flow rate, however, has potential life-limiting implications for the operation of the cathode. A solution to the problem involves splitting the mass flow into the hollow cathode into two streams, the internal and external flows. The internal flow is fixed and set such that the neutral pressure in the cathode allows for a high utilization of the emitter surface area. The external flow is variable depending on the flow rate through the anode of the Hall thruster, but also has a minimum in order to suppress high-energy ion generation. In the co-flow hollow cathode, the cathode assembly is mounted on thruster centerline, inside the inner magnetic core of the thruster. An annular gas plenum is placed at the base of the cathode and propellant is fed throughout to produce an azimuthally symmetric flow of gas that evenly expands around the cathode keeper. This configuration maximizes propellant utilization and is not subject to erosion processes. External gas feeds have been considered in the past for ion thruster applications, but usually in the context of eliminating high energy ion production. This approach is adapted specifically for the Hall thruster and exploits the geometry of a Hall thruster to feed and focus the external flow without introducing significant new complexity to the thruster design.

  18. The temporal development of hollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo, M.T. ); Schoenbach, K.H.; Gerdin, G.A. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Lee, J.H. )

    1990-06-01

    This paper reports the temporal development of hollow cathode discharges studied by means of electrical and optical diagnostic techniques. The results indicate that the discharge develops in two stages. The initial breakdown occurs along the longest straight path of the system; i.e., from the anode to the bottom of the cathode hole. This predischarge is confined to a narrow filament along the axis and carries a current of up to hundreds of mA. The resulting distortion of the electric field in the cathode hole is assumed to cause a radial breakdown from the filamentary plasma on the axis to the edge of the cathode hole. After this second breakdown, an increase in current by more than three orders of magnitude is observed. Measurements with axial magnetic fields support the two-stage model.

  19. Hollow-Cathode Source Generates Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deininger, W. D.; Aston, G.; Pless, L. C.

    1989-01-01

    Device generates argon, krypton, or xenon plasma via thermionic emission and electrical discharge within hollow cathode and ejects plasma into surrounding vacuum. Goes from cold start up to full operation in less than 5 s after initial application of power. Exposed to moist air between operations without significant degradation of starting and running characteristics. Plasma generated by electrical discharge in cathode barrel sustained and aided by thermionic emission from emitter tube. Emitter tube does not depend on rare-earth oxides, making it vulnerable to contamination by exposure to atmosphere. Device modified for use as source of plasma in laboratory experiments or industrial processes.

  20. Combined plasma and thermal hollow cathode insert model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ionnis G.; Goebel, Dan m.; Hornbeck, Sarah E.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the first results from a Hollow Cathode Thermal (HCThermal) model that uses the spatially distributed plasma fluxes calculated by the InsertRegion of an Orificed Cathode (IROrCa2D) code as the heat source to predict the hollow cathode and insert temperatures.

  1. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out

  2. Low temperature aluminum reduction cell using hollow cathode

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.; Frizzle, Patrick B.

    2002-08-20

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte. A plurality of non-consumable anodes are disposed substantially vertically in the electrolyte along with a plurality of monolithic hollow cathodes. Each cathode has a top and bottom and the cathodes are disposed vertically in the electrolyte and the anodes and the cathodes are arranged in alternating relationship. Each of the cathodes is comprised of a first side facing a first opposing anode and a second side facing a second opposing anode. The first and second sides are joined by ends to form a reservoir in the hollow cathode for collecting aluminum therein deposited at the cathode.

  3. A pulsed DC gas flow hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paduraru, Cristian

    A new gas flow hollow cathode discharge source (GFHC) has been developed, characterized, and applied to thin film deposition by sputtering and low-temperature PECVD. Non-reactive and reactive sputtering processes were investigated using copper and aluminum targets, respectively. For the first time, pulsed DC power was applied to a GFHC in order to avoid arcing caused by electrode surface contamination, and to stabilize the discharge in general. The electrical characteristics of the source, the parameters of the remote plasma and its optical emission, were studied and compared to those of a DC powered GFHC. We determined the electrical characteristics of the plasma, including the temporal behavior of the current and voltage under various conditions of pressure and inert gas flow through the cathode. The transition from a glow discharge mode to the hollow cathode mode was studied in an effort to determine the operating range of the GFHC. A capacitive current was discovered at the beginning of the on-time. The properties of the remote plasma were investigated using averaged and time-resolved Langmuir probe and optical emission measurements. The distribution of the remote plasma density resembles the gas flow velocity distribution through the cathode. Plasma processes during off time (decaying plasma) and on-time (plasma reestablishment) were studied and compared to those in pulsed DC magnetron and high power inductively coupled glow discharges. The dependence of the deposition rate, resistivity and thickness distribution of copper films dependence on pulse parameters, power, inert gas flow through the cathode and pressure have been studied. The thin film thickness distribution is governed by the distribution of the gas flow velocity, which can be calculated using laminar flow gas dynamics. In a pulsed DC GFHC system, the inert gas flow through the cathode prevents the penetration of the reactive gas from the chamber into the cathode. A special reactive gas delivery

  4. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  5. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Capece, Angela M.; Katz, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al2O3 source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values.

  6. Self-contained hot-hollow cathode gun source assembly

    DOEpatents

    Zeren, Joseph D.

    1986-01-01

    A self-contained hot-hollow cathode gun source assembly for use in a vacuum chamber includes a crucible block having a hot-hollow cathode gun mounted underneath and providing a hole for the magnetic deflection of the ion/electron beam into a crucible on top the block.

  7. Self-contained hot-hollow cathode gun source assembly

    DOEpatents

    Zeren, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    A self-contained hot-hollow cathode gun source assembly for use in a vacuum chamber includes a crucible block having a hot-hollow cathode gun mounted underneath and providing a hole for the magnetic deflection of the ion/electron beam into a crucible on top the block.

  8. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  9. Hollow cathode plasma coupling study, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    The electron collection and emission characteristics of a simple hollow cathode contactor, an extended anode hollow cathode contactor supplied by JSC, and a ring cusp magnetic field contactor are presented and the effects of discharge power and argon or xenon expellant flowrate on these characteristics are examined. All of the contactors are shown to exhibit good electron emission performance over a wide range of discharge power and expellant type and flowrate. Good electron performance is shown to be more difficult to achieve. Results suggest that the extended anode and ring cusp contactors should perform satisfactorily to electron emission currents beyond 1000 mA and electron collection currents beyond 500 mA. All contactors performed better on xenon than argon. A general theory of plasma contactor operation in both the electron collection and electron emission modes, which describes the current-limiting effects of space-charge phenomena is given. This current-limiting and collecting phenomenon is shown to be a function of driving potential differences and emitting and collecting surface radius ratio for the case of a spherical geometry. Discharge power did not appear to influence the electron collection current substantially in the experiments so it is suggested in light of the model that the contactors are generally not limited by their ion production capabilities under conditions at which they were tested.

  10. Model of a Hollow Cathode Insert Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.

    2004-01-01

    A 2-D axisymmetric fluid model of the plasma in the insert region of a hollow cathode is presented. The level of sophistication included in the model is motivated in part by the need to determine quantitatively plasma fluxes to the emitter surface. The ultimate goal is to assess whether plasma effects can degrade the life of impregnated inserts beyond those documented throughout the 30-50 year history of vacuum cathode technologies. Results from simulations of a 1.2-cm diameter cathode operating at a discharge current of 25 A, and a gas flow rate of 5 sccm, suggest that approximately 10 A of electron current, and 3.5 A of ion current return to the emitter surface. The total emitted electron current computed by the model is about 35 A. Comparisons with plasma measurements suggest that anomalous heating of the plasma due to two-stream instabilities is possible near the orifice region. Solution to the heavy species energy equation, with classical transport and no viscous effects, predicts heavy species temperatures as high as 2640 K.

  11. Long lifetime hollow cathodes for 30-cm mercury ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Kerslake, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation of hollow cathodes for 30-cm Hg bombardment thrusters was carried out. Both main and neutralizer cathode configurations were tested with both rolled foil inserts coated with low work function material and impregnated porous tungsten inserts. Temperature measurements of an impregnated insert at various positions in the cathode were made. These, along with the cathode thermal profile are presented. A theory for rolled foil and impregnated insert operation and lifetime in hollow cathodes is developed. Several endurance tests, as long as 18000 hours at emission currents of up to 12 amps were attained with no degradation in performance.

  12. Energetic ion production and electrode erosion in hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina; Katz, Ira; Mikellides, Ioannis

    2005-01-01

    Ions with energies significantly in excess of the discharge voltage have been reported in high current hollow cathode discharges. Models of DC potential hills downstream of the cathode and ion acoustic instabilities in a double layer postulated in the cathode orifice have been proposed to explain these energetic ions, but have not been substantiated in experiments.

  13. Diagnostics of a see-through hollow cathode discharge by emission, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Nicholas

    Atomic line filters have been suggested to be attractive in areas of Doppler velocimetry, resonance fluorescence detection, and resonance ionization detection. They are based on the resonant absorption of photons by an atomic vapor, and allow all other radiation to pass. This allows the detection of very low levels of light superimposed on a large optical background. Several elements have been studied for use as atomic line filters, such as the alkali metals, alkaline earths, and thallium. As previously recognized, thallium is especially attractive since the 535.046 nm metastable transition overlaps with the second harmonic output of an Nd:La2Be2O 5 (BEL) laser (1070 nm). This makes thallium ideal for certain applications as an atomic line filter. Recently a see-through hollow cathode lamp, or galvatron (Hamamatsu), was made commercially available. The galvatron geometry is unique compared to traditional hollow cathode lamps since the cathode and cell are oriented in a T-shape, with the cathode bored completely through to allow the propagation of a light source through the cathode. This allows multi-step excitation of the atomic vapor, not easily accomplished with a traditional hollow cathode lamp. The advantages that a galvatron offers over conventional atomic reservoirs make it an attractive candidate for the application as an atomic line filter; however, little spectroscopic data have been found in the literature. For this reason, Doppler temperatures, number densities, quantum efficiencies, and lifetimes have been determined in order to characterize this atomic reservoir as a potential atomic line filter. These parameters are determined by use of various spectroscopic techniques which include emission, absorption, time-resolved fluorescence, and time-resolved laser-induced saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. From these measurements, it has been demonstrated that a galvatron is an attractive atomic reservoir for applications as an atomic line filter. The

  14. Scanning optical pyrometer for measuring temperatures in hollow cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Polk, J. E.; Marrese-Reading, C. M.; Thornber, B.; Dang, L.; Johnson, L. K.; Katz, I.

    2007-09-15

    Life-limiting processes in hollow cathodes are determined largely by the temperature of the electron emitter. To support cathode life assessment, a noncontact temperature measurement technique which employs a stepper motor-driven fiber optic probe was developed. The probe is driven inside the hollow cathode and collects light radiated by the hot interior surface of the emitter. Ratio pyrometry is used to determine the axial temperature profile. Thermocouples on the orifice plate provide measurements of the external temperature during cathode operation and are used to calibrate the pyrometer system in situ with a small oven enclosing the externally heated cathode. The diagnostic method and initial measurements of the temperature distribution in a hollow cathode are discussed.

  15. Scanning optical pyrometer for measuring temperatures in hollow cathodes.

    PubMed

    Polk, J E; Marrese-Reading, C M; Thornber, B; Dang, L; Johnson, L K; Katz, I

    2007-09-01

    Life-limiting processes in hollow cathodes are determined largely by the temperature of the electron emitter. To support cathode life assessment, a noncontact temperature measurement technique which employs a stepper motor-driven fiber optic probe was developed. The probe is driven inside the hollow cathode and collects light radiated by the hot interior surface of the emitter. Ratio pyrometry is used to determine the axial temperature profile. Thermocouples on the orifice plate provide measurements of the external temperature during cathode operation and are used to calibrate the pyrometer system in situ with a small oven enclosing the externally heated cathode. The diagnostic method and initial measurements of the temperature distribution in a hollow cathode are discussed. PMID:17902941

  16. Studies on an experimental quartz tube hollow cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegfried, D. E.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study is described in which a quartz tube, hollow cathode was operated in a test fixture allowing the simultaneous measurement of internal cathode pressure, insert temperature profiles, and the emission currents from various cathode components as a function of discharge current and propellant (mercury) mass flow rate for a number of different cathode orifice diameters. Results show that the insert temperature profile is essentially independent of orifice diameter but depends strongly on internal cathode pressure and emission current. The product of internal cathode pressure and insert diameter is shown to be important in determining the emission location and the minimum keeper voltage.

  17. Scenario for Hollow Cathode End-Of-Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    2000-01-01

    Recent successful hollow cathode life tests have demonstrated that lifetimes can meet the requirements of several space applications. However, there are no methods for assessing cathode lifetime short of demonstrating the requirement. Previous attempts to estimate or predict cathode lifetime were based on relatively simple chemical depletion models derived from the dispenser cathode community. To address this lack of predicative capability, a scenario for hollow cathode lifetime under steady-state operating conditions is proposed. This scenario has been derived primarily from the operating behavior and post-test condition of a hollow cathode that was operated for 28,000 hours. In this scenario, the insert chemistry evolves through three relatively distinct phases over the course of the cathode lifetime. These phases are believed to correspond to demonstrable changes in cathode operation. The implications for cathode lifetime limits resulting from this scenario are examined, including methods to assess cathode lifetime without operating to End-of- Life and methods to extend the cathode lifetime.

  18. Extended-testing of xenon ion thruster hollow cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1992-01-01

    A hollow cathode wear-test of 508 hours was successfully completed at an emission current of 23.0 A and a xenon flow rate of 10 Pa-L/s. This test was the continuation of a hollow cathode contamination investigation. Discharge voltage was stable at 16.7 V. The cathode temperature averaged 1050 C with a 7 percent drop during the wear-test. Discharge ignition voltage was found to be approximately 20 V and was repeatable over four starts. Post-test analyses of the hollow cathode found a much improved internal cathode condition with respect to earlier wear-test cathodes. Negligible tungsten movement occurred and no formation of mono-barium tungsten was observed. These results correlated with an order-of-magnitude reduction in propellant feed-system leakage rate. Ba2CaWO6 and extensive calcium crystal formation occurred on the upstream end of the insert. Ba-Ca compound depositions were found on the Mo insert collar, on the Re electrical leads, and in the gap between the insert and cathode wall. This wear-test cathode was found to be in the best internal condition and had the most stable operating performance of any hollow cathode tested during this contamination investigation.

  19. Characterization of Hollow Cathode Performance and Thermal Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Goebel, Dan M.; Watkins, Ron; Jameson, Kristina; Yoneshige, Lance; Przybylowski, JoHanna; Cho, Lauren

    2006-01-01

    Hollow cathodes are one of the main life-limiting components in ion engines and Hall thrusters. Although state-of-the-art hollow cathodes have demonstrated up to 30,352 hours of operation in ground tests with careful handling, future missions are likely to require longer life, more margin and greater resistance to reactive contaminant gases. Three alternate hollow cathode technologies that exploit different emitter materials or geometries to address some of the limitations of state-of-the-art cathodes are being investigated. Performance measurements of impregnated tungsten-iridium dispenser cathodes at discharge currents of 4 to 15 A demonstrated that they have the same operating range and ion production efficiency as conventional tungsten dispenser cathodes. Temperature measurements indicated that tungsten-iridium cathodes also operate at the same emitter temperatures. They did not exhibit the expected reduction in work function at the current densities tested. Hollow cathodes with lanthanum hexaboride emitters operated over a wide current range, but suffered from lower ion production efficiency at currents below about 12.4 A because of higher insert heating requirements. Differences in operating voltages and ion production rates are explained with a simple model of the effect of cathode parameters on discharge behavior.

  20. Preliminary test results of a hollow cathode MPD thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, Maris A.; Myers, Roger M.

    1991-01-01

    Performance of four hollow cathode configurations with low work function inserts was evaluated in a steady-state 100 kW class applied magnetic field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster. Two of the configurations exhibited stable discharge current attachment to the low work function inserts of the hollow cathodes. A maximum discharge current of 2250 A was attained. While the applied-field increased the performance of the thruster, at high applied fields the discharge current attachment moved from the insert to the cathode body. The first successful hollow cathode performed well in comparison with a conventional rod cathode MPD thruster, attaining a thrust efficiency with argon of close to 20 percent at a specific impulse of about 2000 s. The second successful configuration had significantly lower performance.

  1. Development of light source using micro hollow cathode plasma for monitoring absolute densities of metal atoms in magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Takayuki; Tachibana, Yoshihiro; Ito, Masafumi; Takashima, Seigo; Higashijima, Yasuhiro; Kano, Hiroyuki; den, Shoji; Hori, Masaru

    2007-10-01

    The quantitative analysis of metal atoms is important for understanding the chemistry and controlling the conditions in sputtering process. The light source, which emits multi-atomic lines simultaneously, is required for diagnostics of behaviors of many kind of metallic atom at the same time. In this study, a multi-micro hollow cathode lamp for simultaneous monitoring of multi-metal atoms in sputtering process was developed. The emissions of Cu, Zn, Fe, and Mo for analysis were simultaneously obtained from 4 hollows. The Cu and Mo densities in the magnetron sputtering were measured using absorption spectroscopy employing the multi-micro hollow cathode lamp. Those densities were measured to be from 10^9 to 10^10 cm-3 in the RF power range from 0 to 100 W at a pressure of 5 Pa. The simultaneous measurement of the atomic densities in the sputtering plasma has been performed.

  2. Plasma generation near an Ion thruster disharge chamber hollow cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Anderson, John R.; Goebel, Dan M.; Wirz, Richard; Sengupta, Anita

    2003-01-01

    In gridded electrostatic thrusters, ions are produced by electron bombardment in the discharge chamber. In most of these thrusters, a single, centrally located hollow cathode supplies the ionizing electrons. An applied magnetic field in the discharge chamber restricts the electrons leaving the hollow cathode to a very narrow channel. In this channel, the high electron current density ionizes both propellant gas flowing from the hollow cathode, and other neutrals from the main propellant flow from the plenum. The processes that occur just past the hollow cathode exit are very important. In recent engine tests, several cases of discharge cathode orifice place and keeper erosion have been reported. In this paper we present results from a new 1-D, variable area model of the plasma processes in the magnetized channel just downstream of the hollow cathode keeper. The model predicts plasma densities, and temperatures consistent with those reported in the literature for the NSTAR engine, and preliminary results from the model show a potential maximum just downstream of the cathode.

  3. High Current Hollow Cathode Plasma Plume Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Kamhawi, Hani; Williams, George J., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma plume measurements are reported for a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) oper-ated at discharge currents of 50, 70, and 100 A at xenon ow rates between 19 - 46 sccm.The HCA was centrally mounted in the annulus of the NASA-300MS Hall Thruster andwas operated in the spot and plume modes with additional data taken with an appliedmagnetic eld. Langmuir probes, retarding potential analyzers, and optical emission spec-troscopy were employed to measure plasma properties near the orice of the HCA and toassess the charge state of the near-eld plasma. Electron temperatures (2-6 eV) and plasmapotentials are consistent with probe-measured values in previous investigations. Operationwith an applied-eld yields higher discharge voltages, increased Xe III production, andincreased signals from the 833.5 nm C I line. While operating in plume mode and with anapplied eld, ion energy distribution measurements yield ions with energies signicantlyexceeding the applied discharge voltage. These ndings are correlated with high-frequencyoscillations associated with each mode.

  4. High Current Hollow Cathode Plasma Plume Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Kamhawi, Hani; Williams, George J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma plume measurements are reported for a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) operated at discharge currents of 50, 70, and 100 A at xenon flow rates between 19 - 46 standard cubic centimeter per minute. The HCA was centrally mounted in the NASA-300MS Hall Thruster and was operated in the "spot" and "plume" modes with additional data taken with an applied magnetic field. Langmuir probes, retarding potential analyzers, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to measure plasma properties near the orifice of the HCA and to assess the charge state of the near-field plasma. Electron temperatures (2-6 electron volt) and plasma potentials are consistent with probe-measured values in previous investigations. Operation with an applied-field yields higher discharge voltages, increased Xe III production, and increased signals from the 833.5 nm C I line. While operating in plume mode and with an applied field, ion energy distribution measurements yield ions with energies significantly exceeding the applied discharge voltage. These findings are correlated with high-frequency oscillations associated with each mode.

  5. Cavity-hollow cathode-sputtering source for titanium films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrittwieser, R.; Ionita, C.; Murawski, A.; Maszl, C.; Asandulesa, M.; Nastuta, A.; Rusu, G.; Douat, C.; Olenici, S. B.; Vojvodic, I.; Dobromir, M.; Luca, D.; Jaksch, S.; Scheier, P.

    2010-08-01

    A cavity-hollow cathode was investigated as low-cost sputtering source for titanium. An argon discharge is produced inside a hollow cathode consisting of two specifically formed disks of titanium. An additional cavity further enhances the pendulum effect of the electrons. Measurements with small Langmuir probes yielded evidence for the formation of a space charge double layer above the cathode. The sputtered atoms form negatively charged clusters. After further acceleration by the double layer the clusters impinge on the substrates. Titanium thin films were produced on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. The films were investigated by a scanning tunnel microscope and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  6. Characterization of a High Current, Long Life Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanNoord, Jonathan L.; Kamhawi, Hani; McEwen, Heather K.

    2006-01-01

    The advent of higher power spacecraft makes it desirable to use higher power electric propulsion thrusters such as ion thrusters or Hall thrusters. Higher power thrusters require cathodes that are capable of producing higher currents. One application of these higher power spacecraft is deep-space missions that require tens of thousands of hours of operation. This paper presents the approach used to design a high current, long life hollow cathode assembly for that application, along with test results from the corresponding hollow cathode. The design approach used for the candidate hollow cathode was to reduce the temperature gradient in the insert, yielding a lower peak temperature and allowing current to be produced more uniformly along the insert. The lower temperatures result in a hollow cathode with increased life. The hollow cathode designed was successfully operated at currents from 10 to 60 A with flow rates of 5 to 19 sccm with a maximum orifice temperature measured of 1100 C. Data including discharge voltage, keeper voltage, discharge current, flow rates, and orifice plate temperatures are presented.

  7. 12Cao-7Al2o3 Electride Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, Lauren P. (Inventor); Williams, John D. (Inventor); Martinez, Rafael A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The use of the electride form of 12CaO-7Al.sub.2O.sub.3, or C12A7, as a low work function electron emitter in a hollow cathode discharge apparatus is described. No heater is required to initiate operation of the present cathode, as is necessary for traditional hollow cathode devices. Because C12A7 has a fully oxidized lattice structure, exposure to oxygen does not degrade the electride. The electride was surrounded by a graphite liner since it was found that the C12A7 electride converts to it's eutectic (CA+C3A) form when heated (through natural hollow cathode operation) in a metal tube.

  8. Microanalysis of extended-test xenon hollow cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhey, Timothy R.; Patterson, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    Four hollow cathode electron sources were analyzed via boroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x ray analysis, and x ray diffraction analysis. These techniques were used to develop a preliminary understanding of the chemistry of the devices that arise from contamination due to inadequate feed-system integrity and improper insert activation. Two hollow cathodes were operated in an ion thruster simulator at an emission current of 23.0 A for approximately 500 hrs. The two tests differed in propellant-feed systems, discharge power supplies, and activation procedures. Tungsten deposition and barium tungstate formation on the internal cathode surfaces occurred during the first test, which were believed to result from oxygen contamination of the propellant feed-system. Consequently, the test facility was upgraded to reduce contamination, and the test was repeated. The second hollow cathode was found to have experienced significantly less tungsten deposition. A second pair of cathodes examined were the discharge and the neutralizer hollow cathodes used in a life-test of a 30-cm ring-cusp ion thruster at a 5.5 kW power level. The cathodes' test history was documented and the post-test microanalyses are described. The most significant change resulting from the life-test was substantial tungsten deposition on the internal cathode surfaces, as well as removal of material from the insert surface. In addition, barium tungstate and molybdate were found on insert surfaces. As a result of the cathode examinations, procedures and approaches were proposed for improved discharge ignition and cathode longevity.

  9. Micro-hollow cathode discharge arrays: high pressure, nonthermal plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbach, Karl H.

    1999-10-26

    Microhollow cathode discharges are gas discharges between a hollow cathode and a planar or hollow anode with electrode dimensions in the 100 mm range. The characteristics of the microhollow cathode discharges allow their utilization in flat panel excimer (UV and VUV) lamps, as micro for gaseous emission treatment, and as broad area electron and ion sources. The electrical and optical properties of these nonthermal, high-pressure discharges have been studied, with particular emphasis on their use as compact, direct current excimer lamps, and, to a lesser degree, as gas reactors for treatment of polluted gases. The large concentration of high-energy electrons, in combination with the high neutral gas density in microhollow cathode discharges favors three-body processes such as excimer formation. Excimer emission in rare gases, xenon and argon, at wavelengths of 130 nm and 172 nm, respectively, was observed with intensity increasing monotonically with pressure. The efficiency of excimer emitters, however, defined as ratio of the radiant power in the VUV (172 nm) to the electrical power supplied to the discharge, peaks at approximately 400 Torr. For xenon the maximum efficiency is between 6% and 9%. We demonstrated the existence of stable micro discharges in rare gas halogen mixtures, argon fluoride (193 nm) and xenon chloride (308 nm). Efficiencies of approximately 3% were measured for argon fluoride excimer emission. Parallel operation of these discharges, which has also been demonstrated indicates that power densities on the order of 5 W/cm{sup 2} can be obtained for cd operation, >500 W/cm{sup 2} for pulsed operation. The high electron energies in microhollow cathode discharges favor the generation of radicals in any gas, which is flowed through the cathode opening. In experiments where toluene, a volatile organic compound, was added to atmospheric air, the concentration of the toluene was reduced by almost two orders of magnitude after passing through the

  10. Characteristics of DC and pulsed hollow cathode glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Atta Khedr, M.; Hefny, A.A.; Hamdy, H.; Shahen, F.; Gamal, Y.

    1998-12-31

    The investigation of the characteristics of hollow cathode glow discharge and plasma produced are important in different applications, applied physics, technology, and environment, hollow cathode UV light sources, hollow cathode gas lasers, and air treatment. In this work the authors have studied the characteristics of two types of hollow cathode glow discharge and plasmas produced. One kind is plasma has a large area in low gas pressure (0.1 to 10 Torr) using three electrodes, the second is confined in a small area inside the two hollow electrodes under high gas pressure (20--400 Torr). The gases used were He, Ar and dry air. The results show that the current and voltage are dependent on the gas pressure. The lifetime of plasma is considered at value 300 {micro}s. The electron temperature and light intensity have an optimum value at threshold conditions of gas pressure. Increasing the gas pressure cause the plasma is exited due to the change of the gas conductivity, the plasma is confined in a small area at higher pressure and started to be off. The increasing of the gas molecules that is decreasing the mean free path of electrons and the thermal absorption increase.

  11. Processes For Cleaning a Cathode Tube and Assemblies In A Hollow Cathode Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor); Verhey, Timothy R. R. (Inventor); Soulas, George C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is a process for cleaning a cathode tube and other subassemblies in a hollow cathode assembly. In the disclosed process, hand covering elastomer gloves are used for handling all cathode assembly parts. The cathode tube and other subassemblies are cleaned with a lint-free cloth damped with acetone, then wiped with alcohol, immersed in ethyl alcohol or acetone, and ultrasonic agitation is applied, heating to 60 C. for ethyl alcohol or 56 C. for acetone. The cathode tube and other subassemblies are dried by blowing with nitrogen gas.

  12. The hollow cathode effect in a radio-frequency driven microhollow cathode discharge in nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lianzhu; Zhao, Guoming; Wang, Jing; Han, Qing

    2016-02-01

    A two-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte-Carlo code has been developed to study the physical mechanism of the hollow cathode effect (HCE) in an rf microhollow cathode discharge (rf-MHCD). Under the simulated conditions, the HCE in the rf-MHCD is the result of sheath-superposition, and both α ionization and γ ionization play a role. However, α ionization mode is predominant. Electrons undergo a pendular motion during the negative portion of the rf cycle. When the rf hollow electrode has a positive voltage, the majority of the electrons move toward the rf electrode, and the mean electron energy near the rf electrode is higher than that in a dc hollow cathode discharge, resulting in a large number of energetic electrons bombarding the hollow cathode wall, an important characteristic of the rf-MHCD. When the hollow cathode aperture is sufficiently small, many electrons strike the hollow electrode and are removed from the discharge space, so that the plasma density decreases. The average energy of the ions in the quasi-neutral plasma region near the axis is greater than the thermal energy in a molecular gas. Therefore, high density, high energy, and high chemical activity are characteristic advantages of rf-MHCD plasma sources.

  13. Thrust measurements of a hollow-cathode discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, A.; Banks, B. A.

    1972-01-01

    Thrust measurements of a hollow cathode mercury discharge were made with a synthetic mica target on a torsion pendulum. Thrust measurements were made for various target angles, tip temperatures, flow rates, keeper discharge powers, and accelerator electrode voltages. The experimental thrust data are compared with theoretical values for the case where no discharge power was employed.

  14. Potential Fluctuations and Energetic Ion Production in Hollow Cathode Discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.; Katz, Ira; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2007-01-01

    Ions with energies significantly in excess of the applied discharge voltage have been reported for many years in hollow cathode discharges. Models of dc potential hills downstream of the cathode and instabilities in postulated double layers in the cathode orifice have been proposed to explain this, but have not been substantiated. Measurements of the dc and rf plasma density and potential profiles near the exit of hollow cathodes by miniature fast-scanning probes suggests that turbulent ion acoustic fluctuations and ionization instabilities in the cathode plume significantly increase the energy of the ions that flow from this region. Increases in the discharge current and/or decreases in the cathode gas flow enhance the amplitude of the fluctuations and increase the number and energy of the energetic ions, which increases the erosion rate of the cathode electrodes. The transition from the quiescent 'spot mode' to the noisy 'plume mode' characteristic of these discharges is found to be a gradual transition of increasing fluctuation amplitudes.

  15. A 5,000 hour xenon hollow cathode life test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Garner, Charles E.

    1991-01-01

    A cathode life test voluntary terminated after 5024 hours of operation at 25 A is reported. The cathode including a 6.35-mm diameter by 57.12-mm long molybdenum tube with a nominal wall thickness of 0.38 mm is described along with a test facility and start-up procedure. It is shown that over the time of the experiment, the cathode-orifice diameter eroded from 1.80 mm to 2.08 mm, which corresponds to a ratio of the emission current to the orifice diameter at the end of the test of 12.0 A/mm. Tungsten deposits on the interior surface of the insert are detected in post-test analyses, and complete depletion of the original impregnate is suggested by X-ray diffraction analyses. A cathode-jet phenomenon in which energetic ions are produced during hollow-cathode operation at emission currents above 20 A is confirmed.

  16. A micromachined hollow cathode discharge device for the flexible display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jeang Su; Kim, Geun Young; Yang, Sang Sik; Oh, Soo-ghee

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the fabrication and experiment of a flexible micro hollow cathode discharge device. The device is composed of three layers which are a thin anode layer, a insulation layer and a hollow cathode layer. The micro hollow cathode discharge occurs between two electrodes that have an array of holes with the diameter of 70 μm. The device has an array of 7 × 11 holes. The hollow cathode discharge usually has a characteristic of the high current density. The device is fabricated by micromaching technology. The micro hollow cathode is made by means of nickel electroplating in the photoresist mold. The material of the thin insulator is polyimide. Polyimide is spin-coated on a nickel layer and the anode is fabricated by thermal evaporation of aluminum. The thickness of the flexible discharge device is 50 μm and total size of the device is 20 mm × 10 mm. The test set up consists of a direct current high voltage source, a ballast resistor, a gas chamber and a CCD camera. The discharge test was performed in argon gas chamber at room temperature for various pressures. We measured the current while the discharge occurs for various voltages applied. Compared with macro discharge devices, this device operates at much higher pressure, even at 1 atm. The discharge appears at the applied voltage of 0.23 kV in 260 mm Hg. We observed the stable discharge. The device breaks down when the current is over 3 mA. The obtained current-voltage relationship is linear.

  17. Computational study of RF micro-hollow cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkane, A.; Rebiai, S.; Bouanaka, F.; Bahouh, H.

    2015-06-01

    Radiofrequency discharges can generate non-equilibrium and stable micro-plasmas without a streamer in micro-hollow cathode reactors. In this work, we present the results of a fluid model describing the mechanisms occurring in a micro-reactor in argon plasma, generated by an excitation of 13.56 MHz at high pressures (100 Torr) with and without a secondary emission of electrons. The results of the simulation improve the understanding of the effect of micro-hollow cathodes and of the influence of excited atoms in ionization and sustainment of argon discharge at low voltage (150 V). Simulation results showed that the maximum of penning ionization and stepwise ionization rates are respectively about 25% and 11% of the maximum of direct ionization rate. The metastable atom density reaches a maximum value of 1020/m3 inside the hole and have also two humps near to oppsite cathodes. Accordingly the excitation rate is significant in all the space.

  18. Emission of excimer radiation from direct current, high-pressure hollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    El-Habachi, A.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1998-01-01

    A novel, nonequilibrium, high-pressure, direct current discharge, the microhollow cathode discharge, has been found to be an intense source of xenon and argon excimer radiation peaking at wavelengths of 170 and 130 nm, respectively. In argon discharges with a 100 {mu}m diam hollow cathode, the intensity of the excimer radiation increased by a factor of 5 over the pressure range from 100 to 800 mbar. In xenon discharges, the intensity at 170 nm increased by two orders of magnitude when the pressure was raised from 250 mbar to 1 bar. Sustaining voltages were 200 V for argon and 400 V for xenon discharges, at current levels on the order of mA. The resistive current{endash}voltage characteristics of the microdischarges indicate the possibility to form arrays for direct current, flat panel excimer lamps. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Generation of intense excimer radiation from high-pressure hollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    El-Habachi, A.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1998-08-01

    By reducing the diameter of the cathode opening in a hollow cathode discharge geometry to values on the order of 100 {mu}m, we were able to operate these discharges in noble gases in a direct current mode up to atmospheric pressure. High-pressure discharges in xenon were found to be strong sources of excimer radiation. Highest intensities at a wavelength of 172 nm were obtained at a pressure of 400 Torr. At this pressure, the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiant power of a single discharge operating at a forward voltage of 220 V and currents exceeding 2 mA reaches values between 6{percent} and 9{percent} of the input electrical power. The possibility to form arrays of these discharges allows the generation of flat panel VUV lamps with radiant emittances exceeding 50 W/cm{sup 2}. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Continuing life test of a xenon hollow cathode for a space plasma contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1994-01-01

    Implementation of a hollow cathode plasma contactor for charge control on the Space Station has required validation of long-life hollow cathodes. A test series of hollow cathodes and hollow cathode plasma contactors was initiated as part of the plasma contactor development program. An on-going wear-test of a hollow cathode has demonstrated cathode operation in excess of 10,000 hours with small changes in operating parameters. The discharge has experienced 10 shutdowns during the test, all of which were due to test facility failures or expellant replenishment. In all cases, the cathode was re-ignited at approximately 42 volts and resumed typical operation. This test represents the longest demonstrated stable operation of a high current (greater than 1 A) xenon hollow cathode reported to date.

  1. Extended test of a xenon hollow cathode for a space plasma contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1994-01-01

    Implementation of a hollow cathode plasma contactor for charge control on the Space Station has required validation of long-life hollow cathodes. A test series of hollow cathodes and hollow cathode plasma contactors was initiated as part of the plasma contactor development program. An on-going wear-test of a hollow cathode has demonstrated cathode operation in excess of 4700 hours with small changes in operating parameters. The discharge experienced 4 shutdowns during the test, all of which were due to test facility failures or expellant replenishment. In all cases, the cathode was reignited at approximately 42 volts and resumed typical operation. This test represents the longest demonstrated stable operation of a high current (greater than 1A) xenon hollow cathode reported to date.

  2. Hollow cathode-based plasma contactor experiments for electrodynamic tether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    The role plasma contactors play in effective electrodynamic tether operation is discussed. Hollow cathodes and hollow cathode-based plasma sources have been identified as leading candidates for the electrodynamic tether plasma contactor. Present experimental efforts to evaluate the suitability of these devices as plasma contactors are reviewed. This research includes the definition of preliminary plasma contactor designs, and the characterization of their operation as electron collectors from a simulated space plasma. The discovery of an 'ignited mode' regime of high contactor efficiency and low impedance is discussed, as well as is the application of recent models of the plasma coupling process to contactor operation. Results indicate that ampere-level electron currents can be exchanged between hollow cathode-based plasma contactors and a dilute plasma in this regime. A discussion of design considerations for plasma contactors is given which includes expressions defining the total mass flow rate and power requirements of plasma contactors operating in both the cathodic and anodic regimes, and correlation of this to the tether current. Finally, future ground and spaceflight experiments are proposed to resolve critical issues of plasma contactor operation.

  3. Influence of the cathode composition on the performance of high pressure short arc xenon lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minayeva, Olga B.; Doughty, Douglas A.

    2006-10-01

    Thoriated tungsten has been widely used as a cathode material in arc lamps. The addition of thorium reduces the work function of tungsten and allows the cathode to operate at a lower temperature. However, most of the studies on thoriated cathodes were done either for welding arcs or for metal halide lamps, where reactions with the ambient gas could contribute to the cathode erosion. In the case of completely inert, high-purity xenon gas and highly collisional arc plasma, the differences in performance of thoriated and non-thoriated cathodes are mainly material-based. In this talk we will discuss how 2% ThO2 addition to tungsten cathodes changes the lifetime, ignition performance, and stability of xenon lamps.

  4. Energetic ion production in high current hollow cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, John; Kovach, Yao; Arthur, Neil; Viges, Eric; Davis, Chris

    2015-09-01

    High power Hall and gridded ion thrusters are being considered as a propulsion option supporting human operations (cargo or tug) to Mars. These engines utilize hollow cathodes for plasma production and beam neutralization. It has now been well documented that these cathodes produce energetic ions when operated at high current densities. Such ions are observed with peak energies approaching 100 eV. Because these ions can drive erosion of the cathode assembly, they represent a credible failure mode. An understanding of energetic ion production and approaches to mitigation is therefore desired. Presented here are data documenting the presence of energetic ions for both a barium oxide and a lanthanum hexaboride cathode as measured using a retarding potential analyzer. Also presented are energetic ion mitigation approaches, which are designed to eliminate the ion energy transfer mechanism. NASA SBIR Contract NNX15CP62P.

  5. Study of the Discharge Mode in Micro-Hollow Cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Feng; He, Shoujie; Zhao, Xiaofei; Guo, Bingang; Ouyang, Jiting

    2012-12-01

    In this study, micro-hollow cathode discharge (MHCD) is investigated by a fluid model with drift-diffusion approximation. The MHC device is a cathode/dielectric/anode sandwich structure with one hole of a diameter D=200 μm. The gas is a Ne/Xe mixture at a pressure p=50~500 Torr. The evolutions of the discharge show that there are two different discharge modes. At larger pD the discharge plasma and high density excited species expand along the cathode surface and, a ringed discharge mode is formed. At smaller pD, the discharge plasma and the excited species expand along the axis of the cathode aperture to form a columnar discharge.

  6. Instability of plasma plume of micro-hollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, D.; Bliokh, Y. P.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2015-11-15

    The micro-hollow cathode gas discharge driven by thermionic emission is studied using the two-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions simulation. The electron current is extracted from the plasma plume penetrating into the keeper–anode space through a small keeper orifice from the cathode-keeper space. The results of simulations and a simplified analytical model showed that the plasma density and extracted current can exhibit deep modulation in the range of frequencies of tens of MHz. This modulation appears when the space-charge limited current between the plume boundary and the anode exceeds the plasma thermal electron current through the orifice.

  7. Instability of plasma plume of micro-hollow cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, D.; Bliokh, Y. P.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2015-11-01

    The micro-hollow cathode gas discharge driven by thermionic emission is studied using the two-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions simulation. The electron current is extracted from the plasma plume penetrating into the keeper-anode space through a small keeper orifice from the cathode-keeper space. The results of simulations and a simplified analytical model showed that the plasma density and extracted current can exhibit deep modulation in the range of frequencies of tens of MHz. This modulation appears when the space-charge limited current between the plume boundary and the anode exceeds the plasma thermal electron current through the orifice.

  8. High Pressure Micro-Slot Hollow Cathode Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinbing; Zhou, Lina; Yao, Xilin

    2005-12-01

    A direct current glow discharge source structure operating at high pressure based on the micro-slot hollow cathode is presented in this article. A 100 μm width slot cathode was fabricated of copper, and a stable DC glow discharge with an area of 0.5 mm2 was produced in noble gases (He, Ne) and air over a wide pressure range (kPa-10 kPa). The current-voltage characteristics and the near UV radiation emission of the discharge were studied.

  9. Linear ion source with magnetron hollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, D.L.; Pu, S.H.; Wang, L.S.; Qiu, X.M.; Chu, Paul K.

    2005-11-15

    A linear ion source with magnetron hollow cathode discharge is described in this paper. The linear ion source is based on an anode layer thruster with closed-drift electrons that move in a closed path in the ExB fields. An open slit configuration is designed at the end of the ion source for the extraction of the linear ion beam produced by the magnetron hollow cathode discharge. The special configurations enable uninterrupted and expanded operation with oxygen as well as other reactive gases because of the absence of an electron source in the ion source. The ion current density and uniformity were experimentally evaluated. Using the ion source, surface modification was conducted on polyethylene terephthalate polymer films to improve the adhesion strength with ZnS coatings.

  10. Negative ion source with hollow cathode discharge plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Prelec, Krsto

    1983-01-01

    A negative ion source of the type where negative ions are formed by bombarding a low-work-function surface with positive ions and neutral particles from a plasma, wherein a highly ionized plasma is injected into an anode space containing the low-work-function surface. The plasma is formed by hollow cathode discharge and injected into the anode space along the magnetic field lines. Preferably, the negative ion source is of the magnetron type.

  11. Analysis of geological samples by hollow cathode plume

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, R.K.; Harrison, W.W.

    1987-10-01

    The hollow cathode plume (HCP) was applied to the elemental analysis of geological materials by atomic emission. Graphite, silver, and copper were studied as matrix materials to produce conducting electrodes from geological/matrix mixtures. Data taken from a range of sample-to-matrix ratios showed that a 10% sample composition was optimum. Reproducibility of HCP data was approximately 5%. Simulated analyses of NBS geological samples were undertaken by the developed procedures.

  12. Negative ion source with hollow cathode discharge plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.; Prelec, K.

    1980-12-12

    A negative ion source of the type where negative ions are formed by bombarding a low-work-function surface with positive ions and neutral particles from a plasma, wherein a highly ionized plasma is injected into an anode space containing the low-work-function surface is described. The plasma is formed by hollow cathode discharge and injected into the anode space along the magnetic field lines. Preferably, the negative ion source is of the magnetron type.

  13. Hollow nanoparticle cathode materials for sodium electrochemical cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Shevchenko, Elena; Rajh, Tijana; Johnson, Christopher S.; Koo, Bonil

    2016-07-12

    A cathode comprises, in its discharged state, a layer of hollow .gamma.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3 nanoparticles disposed between two layers of carbon nanotubes, and preferably including a metallic current collector in contact with one of the layers of carbon nanotubes. Individual particles of the hollow .gamma.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3 nanoparticles comprise a crystalline shell of .gamma.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3 including cation vacancies within the crystal structure of the shell (i.e., iron vacancies of anywhere between 3% to 90%, and preferably 44 to 77% of available octahedral iron sites). Sodium ions are intercalated within at least some of the cation vacancies within the crystalline shell of the hollow .gamma.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3 nanoparticles.

  14. 28,000 Hour Xenon Hollow Cathode LifeTest Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1997-01-01

    The International Space Station Plasma Contactor System requires a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) with a lifetime of at least 18,000 hours. Critical components of the HCA include the hollow cathode and electron emitter. A series of hollow cathode wear tests was performed which included a life test operated at the maximum current of the HCA. This test sought to verify the hollow cathode design and contamination control protocols. The life test accumulated 27,800 hours of operation before failing to ignite. The hollow cathode exhibited relatively small changes in operating parameters over the course of the test. This life test is the longest duration test of a high current xenon hollow cathode reported to date.

  15. The hollow cathode in the quasi-steady MPD discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Jaskowsky, W. F.; Jahn, R. G.; Clark, K. E.; Krishnan, M.

    1973-01-01

    A large hollow cathode has been operated in a quasi-steady MPD discharge over a range of current from 7 to 30 kA and argon mass flow from 0.04 to 6.0 g/sec. The 1.3-cm-i.d. cathode cavity attains steady emission characteristics in some tens of microseconds without the assistance of auxiliary heating, low work function inserts, or external keeper electrodes. Measured current and potential distributions within the cavity reveal that the current attaches in a zone 1 to 2 cm long with a surface current density greater than 1000 A/sq cm and a local axial electric field less than 10 V/cm. Electron densities within the cavity, estimated from spectroscopic records, are above 10 to the 17th power per cu cm, at least one order of magnitude greater than has been reported for either ion engine hollow cathodes or conventional solid cathodes in similar arc discharges.

  16. [Experimental investigation on micro-hollow cathode sustained discharge].

    PubMed

    Xia, Guang-Qing; Sadeghi, Nader

    2011-01-01

    Based on micro-hollow cathode discharge (MHCD) as a plasma cathode, a second anode was added to the device for obtaining large volume and uniform plasma at high pressure. The discharge producing condition of MCSD was investigated in the experiments. And the rotational structures of the N2 first positive bands were analyzed with traces of nitrogen added in argon for the measurements of the gas temperature in the MCSD plume. The experimental results show that when the current of the plasma cathode exceeds the threshold, the large volume stable plasma is generated. The gas temperature in the plume is increased a little with increasing the current (0.5-4 mA) and is about 500 K at the pressure of 50 Torr.

  17. Investigation of Energetic Ions in a 100-A Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorns, Benjamin A.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2014-01-01

    The role of ion acoustic turbulence in the formation of high-energy ion tails in the plume of a 100-A LaB6 hollow cathode is experimentally and theoretically examined. At fixed flow rate and varying discharge current, single-point measurements of fluctuation intensity in the cathode plume are taken and compared to ion energy measurements. It is shown that for high discharge current the formation of energetic ions is correlated with the amplitude of the ion acoustic turbulence. Two-dimensional maps of background plasma parameters and wave turbulence are made at the highest discharge current investigated, 140 A. A simple, one-dimensional quasilinear model for the interaction of the ion energy distribution with the ion acoustic turbulence is employed, and it is shown that the energy in the measured wave turbulence is sufficiently large to explain the formation of ion tails in the cathode plume. Mitigation techniques for minimizing the amplitude of the turbulence are discussed.

  18. A 13000-hour test of a mercury hollow cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, V. K.

    1973-01-01

    A mercury-fed hollow cathode was tested for 12,979 hours in a bell jar at SERT 2 neutralizer operating conditions. The net electron current drawn to a collector was 0.25 ampere at average collector voltages between 21.8 and 36.7 volts. The mercury flow rate was varied from 5.6 to 30.8 equivalent milliamperes to give stable operation at the desired electrode voltages and currents. Variations with time in the neutralizer discharge characteristics were observed and hypothesized to be related to changes in the cathode orifice dimensions and the availability of electron emissive material. A facility failure caused abnormal test conditions for the last 876 hours and led to the cathode heater failure which concluded the test.

  19. Pulsed hollow-cathode ion lasers: pumping and lasing parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Zinchenko, S P; Ivanov, I G

    2012-06-30

    Optimal discharge conditions have been experimentally found for ion lasers excited in the hollow-cathode discharge plasma by microsecond current pulses by pumping working atoms in secondkind collisions with ions and metastable buffer-gas atoms. Measurements of the output power of krypton ion and zinc-, cadmium-, mercury-, thallium-, copper-, and gallium-vapour lasers in tubes with cathodes of different diameters showed that the pulse power reaches several tens of watts, and the average power obtained with cathodes 2 cm in diameter and a length of 40 cm or more approaches 1 W. Lasing in most media is observed simultaneously at several lines (the multi-wavelength regime). Lasing on a three-component (He - Kr - Hg) mixture is realised in the multi-wavelength regime at blue, red, and IR lines.

  20. Electron energy distribution function and electron characteristics of conventional and micro hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; Zhechev, D.

    2002-05-01

    The conventional hollow cathode discharge, micro hollow cathode discharge, and the transition between them have been analyzed. The time independent and spatially averaged electron energy distribution function, electron density, mean electron energy, excitation, and ionization rates have been calculated and compared. The direct comparison showed substantial differences between the conventional and micro hollow cathode discharges, particularly in absorbed power per unit volume, degree of ionization, and excitation and ionization rates.

  1. The effect of cathode geometry on barium transport in hollow cathode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Polk, James E. Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2014-05-14

    The effect of barium transport on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in numerical modeling of a cathode with two different orifice sizes. Despite large differences in cathode emitter temperature, emitted electron current density, internal xenon neutral and plasma densities, and size of the plasma-surface interaction region, the barium transport in the two geometries is qualitatively very similar. Barium is produced in the insert and flows to the surface through the porous structure. A buildup of neutral Ba pressure in the plasma over the emitter surface can suppress the reactions supplying the Ba, restricting the net production rate. Neutral Ba flows into the dense Xe plasma and has a high probability of being ionized at the periphery of this zone. The steady state neutral Ba density distribution is determined by a balance between pressure gradient forces and the drag force associated with collisions between neutral Ba and neutral Xe atoms. A small fraction of the neutral Ba is lost upstream. The majority of the neutral Ba is ionized in the high temperature Xe plasma and is pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field. The steady state Ba{sup +} ion density distribution results from a balance between electrostatic and pressure forces, neutral Xe drag and Xe{sup +} ion drag with the dominant forces dependent on location in the discharge. These results indicate that hollow cathodes are very effective at recycling Ba within the discharge and therefore maintain a high coverage of Ba on the emitter surface, which reduces the work function and sustains high electron emission current densities at moderate temperatures. Barium recycling is more effective in the cathode with the smaller orifice because the Ba is ionized in the dense Xe plasma concentrated just upstream of the orifice and pushed back into the hollow cathode. Despite a lower emitter temperature, the large orifice cathode has a higher Ba loss rate through the orifice

  2. Electrical characteristics of micro-hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaroni, C.; Chabert, P.

    2013-11-01

    A cathode sheath model of micro-hollow cathode discharges is proposed to calculate the voltage-current characteristics and discuss the physics of the discharge resistance. Three different approaches are compared: (i) a self-consistent model where the electric field is determined self-consistently with the electron flux, (ii) a matrix sheath model where the electric field profile in the sheath is imposed, (iii) a constant electric field model where the electric field in the sheath is assumed to be equal to a constant fraction of the electric field at the cathode. The sheath size is found to decrease with the pressure, the voltage and the secondary emission coefficient. There is a strong effect of the secondary emission coefficient and the pressure on the voltage-current characteristics. The discharge resistance is found to be several hundreds of kΩ and decreases with the discharge current, the pressure and the secondary emission coefficient. A comparison between the matrix sheath model and experiments suggests that both the secondary emission coefficient and the surface area on which the current is collected at the cathode increase with the discharge current. This increase is related to a transition between a discharge confined in the hole at low current and a plasma abruptly expanded on the cathode backside at higher current.

  3. Electron and ion kinetics in a micro hollow cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G. J.; Iza, F.; Lee, J. K.

    2006-10-01

    Electron and ion kinetics in a micro hollow cathode discharge are investigated by means of two-dimensional axisymmetric particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision simulations. Argon discharges at 10 and 300 Torr are studied for various driving currents. Electron and ion energy probability functions (IEPF) are shown at various times and locations to study the spatio-temporal behaviour of the discharge. The electron energy probability function (EEPF) evolves from the Druyvesteyn type in the early stages of the discharge into a two (or three) temperature distribution when steady state is reached. In steady state, secondary electrons accelerated across the cathode fall populate the high energy tail of the EEPF while the low energy region is populated by trapped electrons. The IEPF evolves from a Maxwellian in the negative glow (bulk) to a two temperature distribution on the cathode surface. The overpopulation of low energy ions near the cathode surface is attributed to a larger collision cross section for low energy ions and ionization within the cathode fall.

  4. Radiative and collisional processes in a high pressure micro-hollow cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurunczi, Peter Frank

    Conventional low-pressure hollow cathode glow discharge lamps are well known as intense sources with high emission efficiencies. Reducing the electrode geometries to sub millimeter scales allows us to operate at higher pressures of approximately 500 to 1000 mbar. This high-pressure region is conducive to the formation of rare gas excimers, with applications as a vacuum ultraviolet light source. Here we present the results of vacuum-ultraviolet emission spectroscopy of Neon and Helium excimers. Specifically discussed are the mechanisms of rare gas excimer production, quenching of the neon excimer by H2 resulting in a novel monochromatic hydrogen Lyman-alpha line source, time resolved analysis of the quenching rate constant, and gas kinetic temperatures inferred from vibrational band emission spectra from N2 have been measured. The measured excimer emissions, rate constants, and gas kinetic temperatures have all been shown to be affected by non-radiative collisional processes.

  5. Geometrical Aspects of a Hollow-cathode Magnetron (HCM)

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Samuel, A.; Wang, Zhehui

    1998-11-01

    A hollow-cathode magnetron (HCM), built by surrounding a planar sputtering-magnetron cathode with a hollow-cathode structure (HCS), is operable at substantially lower pressures than its planar-magnetron counterpart. We have studied the dependence of magnetron operational parameters on the inner diameter D and length L of a cylindrical HCS. Only when L is greater than L sub zero, a critical length, is the HCM operable in the new low-pressure regime. The critical length varies with HCS inner diameter D. Explanations of the lower operational pressure regime, critical length, and plasma shape are proposed and compared with a one-dimension diffusion model for energetic or primary electron transport. At pressures above 1 mTorr, an electron-impact ionization model with Bohm diffusion at a temperature equivalent to one-half the primary electron energy and with an ambipolar constraint can explain the ion-electron pair creation required to sustain the discharge. The critical length L sub zero is determined by the magnetization length of the primary electrons.

  6. Determination of the cathode and anode voltage drops in high power low-pressure amalgam lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilyak, L. M.; Vasiliev, A. I. Kostyuchenko, S. V.; Sokolov, D. V.; Startsev, A. Yu.; Kudryavtsev, N. N.

    2011-12-15

    For the first time, cathode and anode drops of powerful low-pressure amalgam lamps were measured. The lamp discharge current is 3.2 A, discharge current frequency is 43 kHz, linear electric power is 2.4 W/cm. The method of determination of a cathode drop is based on the change of a lamp operating voltage at variation of the electrode filament current at constant discharge current. The total (cathode plus anode) drop of voltage was measured by other, independent ways. The maximum cathode fall is 10.8 V; the anode fall corresponding to the maximal cathode fall is 2.4 V. It is shown that in powerful low pressure amalgam lamps the anode fall makes a considerable contribution (in certain cases, the basic one) to heating of electrodes. Therefore, the anode fall cannot be neglected, at design an electrode and ballast of amalgam lamps with operating discharge current frequency of tens of kHz.

  7. Neutralizer Hollow Cathode Simulations and Validation with Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Goebel, Dan M.; Snyder, John S.; Katz, Ira; Herman, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    The fidelity of electric propulsion physics-based models depends largely on the validity of their predictions over a range of operating conditions and geometries. In general, increased complexity of the physics requires more extensive comparisons with laboratory data to identify the region(s) that lie outside the validity of the model assumptions and to quantify the uncertainties within its range of application. This paper presents numerical simulations of neutralizer hollow cathodes at various operating conditions and orifice sizes. The simulations were performed using a two-dimensional axisymmetric model that solves numerically a relatively extensive system of conservation laws for the partially-ionized gas in these devices. The results for the plasma are compared directly with Langmuir probe measurements. The computed keeper voltages are also compared with the observed values. Wherever model inputs and/or specific physics of the cathode discharge are uncertain, additional sensitivity calculations have been performed to quantify the uncertainties.

  8. Radiation Efficiency of AC-excited Micro Hollow Cathode Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biborosch, L. D.; Petzenhauser, I.; Popescu, S.; Luca, D.; Frank, K.

    2006-01-01

    This contribution reports on micro hollow cathode discharges (MHCD) generated in a device supplied by rectified but non-filtered low-frequency currents to preserve the cathode function of one micro electrode. The vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation efficiency of such an MHCD was investigated in high-pressure argon in the frequency range from 40 kHz to 140 kHz. Both the currents and voltages of the MHCD device are nonlinear and the power input shows a flat maximum at about 50 kHz. The VUV relative efficiency also displays a more pronounced maximum at this frequency but remains still comparable with those of the dc supplied MHCD. Unfortunately, this VUV efficiency rather refers to the resonant lines of oxygen impurity at about 130.5 nm and not to the argon excimer radiation.

  9. Hollow cathode plasma source for active spacecraft charge control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deininger, William D.; Aston, Graeme; Pless, Lewis C.

    1987-06-01

    A prototype plasma source spacecraft discharge device has been developed to control overall and differential spacecraft surface charging. The plasma source is based on a unique hollow cathode discharge, where the plasma generation process is contained completely within the cathode. This device can be operated on argon, krypton, or xenon and has a rapid cold start time of less than 4 s. The discharge system design includes a spacecraft-discharge/net-charge sensing circuit which provides the ability to measure the polarity, magnitude, pulse shape, and time duration of a discharging event. Ion currents of up to 325 microA and electron currents ranging from 0.02 to 6.0 A have been extracted from the device. In addition, the spacecraft discharge device successfully discharged capacitively biased plates, from as high as + or - 2500 V, to ground potential, and discharged and clamped actively biased plates at +5 V with respect to ground potential during ground simulation testing.

  10. Characteristics of Ozone Generation using a Micro Hollow Cathode Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Yasunobu; Yasuoka, Koichi; Ishii, Shozo

    A new type of ozone generator using a micro hollow cathode discharge has been developed and evaluated on its operating characteristics. The electrode system consists of two thin metal cathodes and a ceramic spacer with a center hole of a few 100 µm diameter. By feeding high- pressure oxygen gas through the center hole, the residence time of the oxygen gas within the discharge space decreases to the order of micro second. The ozone generation efficiency increases up to 45 g/kWh at the ozone concentration of 7.6 g/Nm3 without any cooling systems. In this ozone generating system, the ozone decomposition mechanisms such as electron impacts and the heat rise of oxygen gas are effectively removed by decreasing the gas-residence time.

  11. Radiation Efficiency of AC-excited Micro Hollow Cathode Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Biborosch, L. D.; Popescu, S.; Luca, D.; Petzenhauser, I.; Frank, K.

    2006-01-15

    This contribution reports on micro hollow cathode discharges (MHCD) generated in a device supplied by rectified but non-filtered low-frequency currents to preserve the cathode function of one micro electrode. The vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation efficiency of such an MHCD was investigated in high-pressure argon in the frequency range from 40 kHz to 140 kHz. Both the currents and voltages of the MHCD device are nonlinear and the power input shows a flat maximum at about 50 kHz. The VUV relative efficiency also displays a more pronounced maximum at this frequency but remains still comparable with those of the dc supplied MHCD. Unfortunately, this VUV efficiency rather refers to the resonant lines of oxygen impurity at about 130.5 nm and not to the argon excimer radiation.

  12. Three dimensional simulation of the operation of a hollow cathode electron emitter on the Shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.; Parks, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested using hollow cathodes as plasma contactors for electrodynamic tethers, particularly to prevent the shuttle orbiter from charging to large negative potentials. Previous studies have shown that fluid models with anomalous scattering can describe the electron transport in hollow cathode generated plasmas. An improved theory of the hollow cathode plasmas is developed and computational results using the theory are compared with laboratory experiment. Numerical predictions for a hollow cathode plasma source of the type considered for use on the shuttle are presented as are three-dimensional NASCAP/LEO calculations of the emitted ion trajectories and the resulting potentials in the vicinity of the orbiter. The computer calculations show that the hollow cathode plasma source makes vastly superior contact with the ionospheric plasma compared with either an electron gun or passive ion collection by the orbiter.

  13. Hollow cathodes as electron emitting plasma contactors Theory and computer modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.; Parks, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested using hollow cathodes as plasma contactors for electrodynamic tethers, particularly to prevent the Shuttle Orbiter from charging to large negative potentials. Previous studies have shown that fluid models with anomalous scattering can describe the electron transport in hollow cathode generated plasmas. An improved theory of the hollow cathode plasmas is developed and computational results using the theory are compared with laboratory experiments. Numerical predictions for a hollow cathode plasma source of the type considered for use on the Shuttle are presented, as are three-dimensional NASCAP/LEO calculations of the emitted ion trajectories and the resulting potentials in the vicinity of the Orbiter. The computer calculations show that the hollow cathode plasma source makes vastly superior contact with the ionospheric plasma compared with either an electron gun or passive ion collection by the Orbiter.

  14. Self-pulsing of hollow cathode discharge in various gases

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Y.; He, F. Jiang, X. X.; Ouyang, J. T.; Xie, K.

    2014-07-15

    In this paper, we investigate the self-pulsing phenomenon of cavity discharge in a cylindrical hollow cathode in various gases including argon, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, and air. The current-voltage characteristics of the cavity discharge, the waveforms of the self-pulsing current and voltage as well as the repetition frequency were measured. The results show that the pulsing frequency ranges from a few to tens kilohertz and depends on the averaged current and the pressure in all gases. The pulsing frequency will increase with the averaged current and decrease with the pressure. The rising time of the current pulse is nearly constant in a given gas or mixture. The self-pulsing does not depend on the external ballast but is affected significantly by the external capacitor in parallel with the discharge cell. The low-current self-pulsing in hollow cathode discharge is the mode transition between Townsend and glow discharges. It can be described by the charging-discharging process of an equivalent circuit consisting of capacitors and resistors.

  15. 75 FR 36119 - In the Matter of Certain Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lamp (“CCFL”) Inverter Circuits and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-24

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lamp (``CCFL'') Inverter Circuits and Products... United States after importation of certain cold cathode fluorescent lamp inverter circuits and products..., California. 74 FR 2099. The complaint alleges violations of section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19...

  16. Evidence of Non-Classical Transport in Discharge Hollow Cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan; Jameson, Kristina

    2006-10-01

    Measurements, simplified analyses and 2-D numerical simulations with a fluid plasma model show that classical resistivity can not fully account for the elevated electron temperatures and steep plasma potential gradients measured in a discharge hollow cathode used as an electron source in electric propulsion. The numerical simulations show that classical resistivity yields much colder electron temperatures compared to the measured values in the orifice and near-plume regions of the cathode. Classical transport and Ohm's law also predict exceedingly high electron-ion relative drift speeds compared to the electron thermal speed, which would normally excite streaming instabilities in this plasma. Measurements with a high frequency emissive probe also capture 50-100 kHz plasma potential fluctuations in the near-plume region. It is found that the addition of anomalous resistivity based on existing growth rate formulae for such instabilities improves significantly the comparison between fluid theory and experiment. But the extent of possible deviations from the Maxwellian EEDF, possibly as a result of the micro instabilities, has not yet been quantified in this cathode.

  17. Neutralizer Hollow Cathode Simulations and Comparisons with Ground Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Snyder, John S.; Goebel, Dan M.; Katz, Ira; Herman, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    The fidelity of electric propulsion physics-based models depends largely on the validity of their predictions over a range of operating conditions and geometries. In general, increased complexity of the physics requires more extensive comparisons with laboratory data to identify the region(s) that lie outside the validity of the model assumptions and to quantify the uncertainties within its range of application. This paper presents numerical simulations of neutralizer hollow cathodes at various operating conditions and orifice sizes. The simulations were performed using a two-dimensional axisymmetric model that solves numerically a relatively extensive system of conservation laws for the partially ionized gas in these devices. A summary of the comparisons between simulation results and Langmuir probe measurements is provided. The model has also been employed to provide insight into recent ground test observations of the neutralizer cathode in NEXT. It is found that a likely cause of the observed keeper voltage drop is cathode orifice erosion. However, due to the small magnitude of this change, is approx. 0.5 V (less than 5% of the beginning-of-life value) over 10 khrs, and in light of the large uncertainties of the cathode material sputtering yield at low ion energies, other causes cannot be excluded. Preliminary simulations to understand transition to plume mode suggest that in the range of 3-5 sccm the existing 2-D model reproduces fairly well the rise of the keeper voltage in the NEXT neutralizer as observed in the laboratory. At lower flow rates the simulation produces oscillations in the keeper current and voltage that require prohibitively small time-steps to resolve with the existing algorithms.

  18. Recovery of yttrium from cathode ray tubes and lamps' fluorescent powders: experimental results and economic simulation.

    PubMed

    Innocenzi, V; De Michelis, I; Ferella, F; Vegliò, F

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, yttrium recovery from fluorescent powder of lamps and cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is described. The process for treating these materials includes the following: (a) acid leaching, (b) purification of the leach liquors using sodium hydroxide and sodium sulfide, (c) precipitation of yttrium using oxalic acid, and (d) calcinations of oxalates for production of yttrium oxides. Experimental results have shown that process conditions necessary to purify the solutions and recover yttrium strongly depend on composition of the leach liquor, in other words, whether the powder comes from treatment of CRTs or lamp. In the optimal experimental conditions, the recoveries of yttrium oxide are about 95%, 55%, and 65% for CRT, lamps, and CRT/lamp mixture (called MIX) powders, respectively. The lower yields obtained during treatments of MIX and lamp powders are probably due to the co-precipitation of yttrium together with other metals contained in the lamps powder only. Yttrium loss can be reduced to minimum changing the experimental conditions with respect to the case of the CRT process. In any case, the purity of final products from CRT, lamps, and MIX is greater than 95%. Moreover, the possibility to treat simultaneously both CRT and lamp powders is very important and interesting from an industrial point of view since it could be possible to run a single plant treating fluorescent powder coming from two different electronic wastes.

  19. Atlas of uranium emission intensities in a hollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, B.A.; Keller, R.A.; Engleman, R. Jr.

    1980-07-01

    The uranium emission spectrum from a hollow cathode discharge is displayed from 11,000 to 26,000 cm/sup -1/. This atlas lists 4928 spectral lines of uranium; 3949 are classified to the neutral spectrum and 431 are classified to the singly ionized spectrum. Listed wavenumbers are accurate to +-0.003 cm/sup -1/ and the listed relative intensities to +-8%. The richness of the spectrum makes this atlas useful for wavenumber calibration of lasers, spectrographs, and monochromators to an accuracy of 1 part in 10/sup 7/. This atlas is also useful as a guide to the uranium spectrum, and relative oscillator strengths (gf values) can be calculated from the intensities to a precision of +-20%.

  20. Study of Discharging Characteristics of Hollow Cathode Surge Protective Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xueling; Chen, Jingliang; Xu, Xiaowei; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Yong

    2010-02-01

    A hollow cathode surge protective gap (HCSPG) was designed, and the discharge characteristics was investigated in an air and nitrogen gas environment. For both the gap spacing D and the hole diameter varphi of HCSPG of 3 mm, the voltage protective value Up of HCSPG is about 3.5 kV and its converting time tc exceeds 100 ns at an air pressure from 10 Pa to 100 Pa. The maximum converting time tc from glow to arc discharging reaches 1600 ns at an air pressure of 100 Pa, while the minimum converting time tc is 120 ns at 10 Pa. For a triggered HCSPG, Up is reduced to about 1.6 kV while the converting time is 120 ns with a semiconductor trigger device and 50 ns with a dielectric porcelain trigger device under an air pressure of 100 Pa.

  1. The hollow-cathode helium-fluorine laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, J. K.; Verdeyen, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    It is possible to obtain uniform stable long-pulse excitation (in excess of 100 microsec) in gas mixtures involving highly electronegative constituents (SF6, CCl4, NF3, and I2). Such a system was used to investigate the atomic fluorine laser. In the hollow cathode, lasing on fluorine transitions in the doublet system lasted for up to 80 microsec with no signs of the self-termination as reported previously in positive-column devices. The excitation process of the laser appears to depend heavily upon the fluorine donor utilized. For instance, a single-step process is involved when NF3 is used whereas a two-step process is evident for SF6. The details are discussed.

  2. Spectroscopic application of an iterative kinetic cathode sheath model to high voltage hollow cathode glow discharge in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spasojević, Dj.; Mijin, S.; Šišović, N. M.; Konjević, N.

    2016-02-01

    We present a simple one-dimensional iterative kinetic model of the cathode sheath region of high voltage, low-pressure hydrogen hollow cathode discharge. The model's convenience as a supplemental diagnostic tool is demonstrated by determining the most relevant discharge parameters through an analysis of the spectral shape of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line recorded along the axis of a cylindrically symmetrical high voltage low-pressure hollow cathode glow discharge in hydrogen. Thus, an effectively one-dimensional approach is tested and shown to give satisfactory spectral lines fits with reasonable values for discharge parameters, most notably the gas temperature.

  3. Compact High Current Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode for Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R. (Inventor); Goebel, Dan M. (Inventor); Watkins, Ronnie M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus and method for achieving an efficient central cathode in a Hall effect thruster is disclosed. A hollow insert disposed inside the end of a hollow conductive cathode comprises a rare-earth element and energized to emit electrons from an inner surface. The cathode employs an end opening having an area at least as large as the internal cross sectional area of the rare earth insert to enhance throughput from the cathode end. In addition, the cathode employs a high aspect ratio geometry based on the cathode length to width which mitigates heat transfer from the end. A gas flow through the cathode and insert may be impinged by the emitted electrons to yield a plasma. One or more optional auxiliary gas feeds may also be employed between the cathode and keeper wall and external to the keeper near the outlet.

  4. Radial Profiles of Electron Density and Current Components at Cathode Surface in LaB6 Hollow Cathode Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Setsuo; Asano, Toshiaki; Morimiya, Osami

    1987-06-01

    Experimental studies on a hydrogen-fed LaB6 hollow cathode arc have been pursued. The plasma parameter in the cathode has been measured by a Langmuir probe. The radial variation in the electron density inside the cathode was calculated using the continuity and momentum equations, showing good agreement with the experimental results. The electron density at the cathode surface was estimated to be 15%-20% of that at the cathode axis. It was also found from the current balance that the arc current components at the cathode surface consist of a thermionic current which takes into account the Schottky effect, the ion current and the secondary electron current induced by ion bombardment. The ion current and the cathode surface is larger than the electron current emitted from the cathode.

  5. Two-dimensional model of orificed micro-hollow cathode discharge for space application

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, D.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Vekselman, V.; Haber, I.

    2013-08-15

    In this paper, we describe results of self-consistent two-dimensional (x-z) particle-in-cell simulations, with a Monte Carlo collision model, of an orificed micro-hollow cathode operating in a planar diode geometry. The model includes thermionic electron emission with Schottky effect, secondary electron emission due to cathode bombardment by the plasma ions, several different collision processes, and a non-uniform xenon background gas density in the cathode-anode gap. Simulated results showing behavior of the plasma density, potential distribution, and energy flux towards the hollow cathode and orifice walls, are discussed. In addition, results of simulations showing the effect of different Xe gas pressures, orifice size, and cathode voltage, on operation of the micro-hollow cathode are presented.

  6. Two-dimensional model of orificed micro-hollow cathode discharge for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, D.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Vekselman, V.; Haber, I.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we describe results of self-consistent two-dimensional (x-z) particle-in-cell simulations, with a Monte Carlo collision model, of an orificed micro-hollow cathode operating in a planar diode geometry. The model includes thermionic electron emission with Schottky effect, secondary electron emission due to cathode bombardment by the plasma ions, several different collision processes, and a non-uniform xenon background gas density in the cathode-anode gap. Simulated results showing behavior of the plasma density, potential distribution, and energy flux towards the hollow cathode and orifice walls, are discussed. In addition, results of simulations showing the effect of different Xe gas pressures, orifice size, and cathode voltage, on operation of the micro-hollow cathode are presented.

  7. Life Model of Hollow Cathodes Using a Barium Calcium Aluminate Impregnated Tungsten Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovaleski, S. D.; Burke, Tom (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Hollow cathodes with barium calcium aluminate impregnated tungsten emitters for thermionic emission are widely used in electric propulsion. These high current, low power cathodes are employed in ion thrusters, Hall thrusters, and on the International Space Station in plasma contactors. The requirements on hollow cathode life are growing more stringent with the increasing use of electric propulsion technology. The life limiting mechanism that determines the entitlement lifetime of a barium impregnated thermionic emission cathode is the evolution and transport of barium away from the emitter surface. A model is being developed to study the process of barium transport and loss from the emitter insert in hollow cathodes. The model accounts for the production of barium through analysis of the relevant impregnate chemistry. Transport of barium through the approximately static gas is also being treated. Finally, the effect of temperature gradients within the cathode are considered.

  8. Lowering the ignition voltage by the dual microhollow cathode configuration for multichannel flat panel lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae Il; Park, Ki Wan; Lee, Sung Won; Baik, Hong Koo

    2006-03-20

    We have developed a dual microhollow cathode configuration, employing one power supply circuit with a resistor that is suitable for lamp starting without additional power supplier. We also investigated their electrical characteristics and photo images, varying the applied voltage. The electrical and optical measurements showed that the discharge passed through four distinct stages: no discharges, the first microhollow cathode discharges, the both of the first and second microhollow cathode discharges, and finally the main discharge. As a result, the V{sub s} and E{sub s}/p of a dual microhollow configuration were lower by a factor of about 2 than those of a diode at 40 Torr. We have also observed that the parallel operation can be possible with a single resistor in nine channels flat panel lamp.

  9. Modeling of self organization in Xe micro hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashi, Haruaki

    2009-10-01

    Recently, self organization discharges in Xe micro hollow cathode discharges(MHCDs) have been obtained. The discharge is sustainable in DC, not like dielectric barrier discharge(DBD). Stollenwerk et al[1] reported the self organized pattern in DBD is related to the accumulated charge on the dielectric. In DBD, self organized patterns are significantly affected by dielectric, however, it is not known yet in MHCD. To clarify the mechanism, the simulation has been started. Cylindrical symmetric two dimensional fluid model is taken. The fluid model is adapted from the ref.[2]. The electrodes configuration is similar to ref.[3]. Negative voltage is applied to cathode. In this condition, the self organization pattern is not shown, but the discharge becomes glow like discharge as written in ref.[3]. The peak of electron density is obtained slightly above the hole, but the excimer and ions density peaks are obtained in the hole.[4pt] [1] L.Stollenwerk et al. Phys.Rev.Lett.,96,255001(2006)[0pt] [2] H.Akashi et al, IEEE Trans.Plasma Sci.,33,2,308(2005)[0pt] [3] W.Zhu et al, J.Phys.D: Appl.Phys.,40,3896(2007)

  10. Study Of Erosion Rates And Surface Effects of Different Hollow Cathode Materials During Vacuum Microarc Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Atta Khedr, M.; Abdel Moneim, H.M.

    2005-03-17

    Studies of the properties of the emitted plasma from graphite, titanium, titanium Carbide, Stainless Steel, Cupper and Molybdenum Hollow Cathode materials during vacuum microarc were carried out. Using high voltage of 30 KV, short arc duration (0.5 - 4 {mu}s) and arc currents (100 - 450 A), each cathode material was subjected to 1000-3000 arc discharges under high vacuum (10-8 mbar) conditions. The angular distributions for the evaporants in each case were measured and show an exponential isotropic distribution in agreement with the theoretical predictions. The total erosion rates of evaporants and molten droplets were estimated and showed clearly their, dependence on the cathode material and on the hollow cathode geometry. The damages on the cathode surfaces and the inside of the hollow cathodes were investigated by the scanning electron microscope. Crater formation were formed spreading inside the hole of the hollow cathodes as well as on the rim surfaces and were found to differ according to both geometry and material of the hollow cathodes. The crater evacuation velocity and plasma pressure were determined. The damage on the anode tip showed erosion on the pen anode tip to the extent of drilling hole. The mechanism responsible for such phenomena is discussed.

  11. Destructive Evaluation of a Xenon Hollow Cathode after a 28,000 Hour Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1998-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) plasma contactor system requires a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) with a lifetime of at least 18,000 hours. In order to demonstrate the lifetime capability of the HCA, a series of hollow cathode wear tests was performed which included a life test operated at the maximum current of the HCA. This test sought to verify hollow cathode lifetime capability and contamination control protocols. This hollow cathode accumulated 27,800 hours of operation before it failed during a restart attempt. The cathode was subsequently destructively analyzed in order to determine the failure mechanism. Microscopic examination of the cathode interior determined that relatively small changes in the cathode physical geometry had occurred and barium tungstates, which are known to limit the emission process, had formed over a majority of the electron emitter surface. Because the final state of the insert was consistent with expected impregnate chemistry, the hollow cathode was believed to have reached the end of its usable life under the test conditions.

  12. Numerical simulation of the sustaining discharge in radio frequency hollow cathode discharge in argon

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xin-Xian; He, Feng Ouyang, Ji-Ting; Chen, Qiang Ge, Teng

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, a two-dimensional fluid model was developed to study the radio frequency (RF) hollow cathode discharge (HCD) in argon at 1 Torr. The evolutions of the particle density distribution and the ionization rate distribution in RF HCD at 13.56 MHz indicate that the discharge mainly occurs inside the hollow cathode. The spatio-temporal distributions of the ionization rate and the power deposition within the hollow cathode imply that sheath oscillation heating is the primary mechanism to sustain the RF HCD, whereas secondary electron emission plays a negligible role. However, as driving frequency decreases, secondary electron heating becomes a dominant mechanism to sustain the discharge in RF hollow cathode.

  13. Mercury vapor hollow cathode component studies. [emissive materials for ion thruster requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuccaro, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study of starting and operating characteristics of conventional hollow cathodes and of hollow cathodes without alkaline earth emissive materials demonstrated that the emissive mix is essential to obtain the desired cathode operation. Loss of the emissive mix by evaporation and chemical reaction was measured. New insert designs consisting of emissive mix supported on nickel and of barium impregnated porous tungsten were studied. Cathodes with a modified orifice geometry operated in a low voltage, 'spot' mode over a broad range of discharge current. Thermal degradation tests on cathode heaters showed the flame sprayed SERT II type to be the most durable at high temperatures. Thermal shock was observed to be a significant factor in limiting cathode heater life. A cathode having a barium impregnated porous tungsten tip and a heater which is potted in sintered alumina was found to have favorable operating characteristics.

  14. Life Cycle Tests on a Hollow Cathode Based Plasma Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Schneider, Todd A.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) mission is designed to provide an on-orbit demonstration of the electrodynamic propulsion capabilities of tethers in space. The ProSEDS experiment will be a secondary payload on a Delta II unmanned expendable booster with a mission duration of 12 days. A 5-km conductive tether is attached to the Delta II second stage and collects current from the low Earth orbit (LEO) plasma, and a Hollow Cathode Plasma Contactor (HCPC) emits the collected electrons from the Delta II, completing the electrical circuit to the ambient plasma. The HCPC for the ProSEDS mission have made it necessary to turn off the HCPC once a minute throughout the entire mission. Because of the unusual operating requirements by the ProSEDS mission, an engineering development unit of the HCPC was built to demonstrate the HCPC design would start reliably for the life of the ProSEDS mission. During the life test the engineering unit cycled for over 10,000 on/off cycles without missing a single start, and during that same test the HCPC unit demonstrated the capability to emit 0 to 5 A electron emission current. The performance of the HCPC unit during this life test will be discussed.

  15. Ozone Synthesis in DC Driven Micro Hollow Cathode Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamatake, Atsushi; Yasuoka, Koichi; Ishii, Shozo

    2003-10-01

    The ozone generation in a high pressure micro-discharge driven by DC voltage source was studied. High pressure gas of oxygen, air or a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen passed through an electrode-hole of a few hundred micrometers within several micro-seconds. The maximum ozone concentration of 13.7g/Nm^3 was obtained at the efficiency of 204g/kWh in pure oxygen. The measured distribution of the ozone molecules showed that the oxygen molecules were dissociated within the micro-plasma and ozone molecules were generated in the downstream of the discharge space. The ozone concentration drastically decreased with increasing the specific energy or the ratio of nitrogen to oxygen. Only 25ppm of ozone was detected with air. That is because the electron temperature within the micro-plasma was high enough to synthesize NOx that dissociated ozone molecules catalytically. In conclusion, the spatial and temporal control of the ozone synthesis can be possible by using the micro-hollow cathode discharges.

  16. Ignition and extinction phenomena in helium micro hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulsreshath, M. K.; Sadeghi, N.; Schwaederle, L.; Dufour, T.; Overzet, L. J.; Lefaucheux, P.; Dussart, R.

    2013-12-01

    Micro hollow cathode discharges (MHCD) were produced using 250 μm thick dielectric layer of alumina sandwiched between two nickel electrodes of 8 μm thickness. A through cavity at the center of the chip was formed by laser drilling technique. MHCD with a diameter of few hundreds of micrometers allowed us to generate direct current discharges in helium at up to atmospheric pressure. A slowly varying ramped voltage generator was used to study the ignition and the extinction periods of the microdischarges. The analysis was performed by using electrical characterisation of the V-I behaviour and the measurement of He*(3S1) metastable atoms density by tunable diode laser spectroscopy. At the ignition of the microdischarges, 2 μs long current peak as high as 24 mA was observed, sometimes followed by low amplitude damped oscillations. At helium pressure above 400 Torr, an oscillatory behaviour of the discharge current was observed just before the extinction of the microdischarges. The same type of instability in the extinction period at high pressure also appeared on the density of He*(3S1) metastable atoms, but delayed by a few μs relative to the current oscillations. Metastable atoms thus cannot be at the origin of the generation of the observed instabilities.

  17. Ignition and extinction phenomena in helium micro hollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsreshath, M. K.; Schwaederle, L.; Dufour, T.; Lefaucheux, P.; Dussart, R.; Overzet, L. J.

    2013-12-28

    Micro hollow cathode discharges (MHCD) were produced using 250 μm thick dielectric layer of alumina sandwiched between two nickel electrodes of 8 μm thickness. A through cavity at the center of the chip was formed by laser drilling technique. MHCD with a diameter of few hundreds of micrometers allowed us to generate direct current discharges in helium at up to atmospheric pressure. A slowly varying ramped voltage generator was used to study the ignition and the extinction periods of the microdischarges. The analysis was performed by using electrical characterisation of the V-I behaviour and the measurement of He*({sup 3}S{sub 1}) metastable atoms density by tunable diode laser spectroscopy. At the ignition of the microdischarges, 2 μs long current peak as high as 24 mA was observed, sometimes followed by low amplitude damped oscillations. At helium pressure above 400 Torr, an oscillatory behaviour of the discharge current was observed just before the extinction of the microdischarges. The same type of instability in the extinction period at high pressure also appeared on the density of He*({sup 3}S{sub 1}) metastable atoms, but delayed by a few μs relative to the current oscillations. Metastable atoms thus cannot be at the origin of the generation of the observed instabilities.

  18. Studies on pulsed optogalvanic effect in Eu/Ne hollow cathode discharge.

    PubMed

    Saini, V K; Kumar, P; Dixit, S K; Nakhe, S V

    2014-07-01

    The optogalvanic (OG) effect has been observed in a Eu/Ne hollow cathode discharge lamp using pulsed laser irradiation. An OG spectrum is recorded in dye laser wavelength region 574–602 nm using a boxcar-averager. In total 41 atomic lines are observed. Of these, 38 lines are assigned to neon transitions. Two lines observed corresponding to wavelengths 576.519 and 601.815 nm are assigned to europium transitions; (4f 7 6s 2 , S 8 7/2 →4f 7 6s6p , zP 6 7/2 ) and (4f 7 6s 2 , S 8 7/2 →4f 7 6s6p , zP 8 9/2 ), respectively, and the remaining line at 582.475 nm could not be assigned. The effect of the discharge current on europium as well as neon OG signals is also studied. At moderate discharge current values, an extra positive peak is observed in neon OG signal for the transition (1s 5 →2p 2 ) at 588.189 nm, which is explained by Penning-ionization process using the quasi-resonant energy transfer interactions between excited neon and europium atoms lying in 2p 2 and D 10 9/2 states, respectively. PMID:25089996

  19. Model of the Plasma Potential Distribution in the Plume of a Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present results from a new model of the plasma potentials in the plume just downstream of the hollow cathode keeper. We examine the electron drift velocity as the hollow cathode plasma and neutral gas expand downstream of the keeper. If the drift velocity exceeds the thermal velocity a double layer potential structure develops that is the source of hot electrons. Ions are accelerated upstream through the double layer. The locations of the double layers are calculated using a simple model. It is shown that as the cathode gas flow increases, the location of the double layer moves farther downstream.

  20. Monitoring of Metallic-atom-density in Plasma Processes by Light Source for Absorption Spectroscopy using Micro Hollow Cathode Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi

    It is important to monitor the density of species in plasma or sputtering processes for controlling the process precisely because both composition and property of films are affected by the density of species such as radicals and ions. Absorption spectroscopy is a powerful method to monitor the density of species in the plasma. We have developed a multi-micro hollow cathode lamp (multi-MHCL) for monitoring densities of multi-metallic-atoms in the plasma or sputtering processes. The multi-MHCL is a compact light source in compared with the conventional light sources, and can emit multi-atomic lines simultaneously. The multi-MHCL was applied to an absorption spectroscopy for measuring densities of Zn and In atoms in a radio frequency magnetron sputtering process using IZO (Indium Zinc Oxide) target. The densities of Zn and In atoms were successfully measured in the range of 109 to 1010cm-3.

  1. Status of Hollow Cathode Heater Development for the Space Station Plasma Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    1994-01-01

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor has been selected for use on the Space Station. During the operation of the plasma contactor, the hollow cathode heater will endure approximately 12000 thermal cycles. Since a hollow cathode heater failure would result in a plasma contactor failure, a hollow cathode heater development program was established to produce a reliable heater. The development program includes the heater design, process documents for both heater fabrication and assembly, and heater testing. The heater design was a modification of a sheathed ion thruster cathode heater. Heater tests included testing of the heater unit alone and plasma contactor and ion thruster testing. To date, eight heaters have been or are being processed through heater unit testing, two through plasma contactor testing and three through ion thruster testing, all using direct current power supplies. Comparisons of data from heater unit performance tests before cyclic testing, plasma contactor tests, and ion thruster tests at the ignition input current level show the average deviation of input power and tube temperature near the cathode tip to be +/-0.9 W and +/- 21 C, respectively. Heater unit testing included cyclic testing to evaluate reliability under thermal cycling. The first heater, although damaged during assembly, completed 5985 ignition cycles before failing. Four additional heaters successfully completed 6300, 6300, 700, and 700 cycles. Heater unit testing is currently ongoing for three heaters which have to date accumulated greater than 7250, greater than 5500, and greater than 5500 cycles, respectively.

  2. Characterization of hollow cathode, ring cusp discharge chambers. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study into the effects of changes in such physical design parameters as hollow cathode position, anode position and ring cusp magnetic field configuration and strength on discharge chamber performance, is described. The results are presented in terms of comparative plasma ion energy cost, extracted ion fraction and ion beam profile data. Such comparisons are used to demonstrate specific means by which changes in these design parameters induce changes in performance, i.e., through changes in the loss rates of primary electrons to the anode, of ions to discharge chamber walls or of ions to cathode and anode surfaces. Results show: (1) the rate of primary electron loss to the anode decreases as the anode is moved downstream of the ring cusp toward the screen grid, (2) the loss rate of ions to hollow cathode surfaces are excessive if the cathode is located upstream of a point of peak magnetic flux density on the discharge chamber centerline, and (3) the fraction of the ions produced that are lost to discharge chamber walls and ring magnet surfaces is reduced by positioning the magnet rings so the plasma density is uniform over the grid surface and so there are no steep magnetic flux density gradients near the walls through which ions can be lost by Bohm diffusion. The uniformity of the plasma density at the grids can also be improved by moving the point of primary electron injection into the discharge chamber off of the chamber centerline. Other results show the discharge chamber losses decrease when a filament cathode is substituted for a hollow cathode to the extent of the hollow cathode operating power. When plasma ion energy cost is determined in such a way that the cost of operating the hollow cathode is subtracted out, the performance using either electron source is similar.

  3. On a focal point instability in (B3Πg - C3Πu)N2 optogalvanic circuit with hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencheva, V.

    2016-03-01

    The (B3Πg, v = 0 - C3 Πu, v = 0) N2 dynamic optogalvanic signals have been registered illuminating an Al hollow cathode lamp with a pulsed N2 laser generating at the wavelength of 337.1nm. The dynamic optogalvanic signal (DOGS) at certain discharge current of 8 mA is a harmonic oscillator due to a focal point instability produced by our optogalvanic circuit. This damped harmonic oscillator can be described as a solution of linear second order homogeneous differential equation. The oscillation frequency is estimated from the registered DOGS using Fourier synthesis. The analytical description of the damped harmonic DOGS is obtained.

  4. Stability of vacuum-ultraviolet radiometric transfer standards: Electron cyclotron resonance versus hollow cathode source

    SciTech Connect

    Gottwald, Alexander; Richter, Mathias; Ulm, Gerhard; Schuehle, Udo

    2005-02-01

    Established transfer standards such as Penning and hollow cathode discharge sources suffer from limited spectral range and, in particular, a limited lifetime and stability due to electrode erosion. The development of a vacuum-ultraviolet radiation source based on an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR)-created plasma might overcome these limitations. To test such a source with regard to its usefulness as radiometric transfer standard, the emission intensity of a Ne plasma was monitored over an operation period of 180 days, with regard to stability and reproducibility in the 50-75 nm wavelength range. For comparison and calibration, a hollow cathode was used as transfer standard traceable to the electron storage ring BESSY II as primary standard. It was found that the ECR source exceeded the lifetime of the hollow cathode source by far, offering a more balanced spectral emission line variety with similar stability.

  5. Field Emission Lamps Prepared with Dip-Coated and Nickel Electroless Plated Carbon Nanotube Cathodes.

    PubMed

    Pu, N W; Youh, M J; Chung, K J; Liu, Y M; Ger, M D

    2015-07-01

    Fabrication and efficiency enhancement of tubal field emission lamps (FELs) using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) as the cathode field emitters were studied. The cathode filaments were prepared by eletrolessly plating a nickel (Ni) film on the cathode made of a 304 stainless steel wire dip-coated with MWNTs. The 304 wire was dip-coated with MWNTs and nano-sized Pd catalyst in a solution, and then eletrolessly plated with Ni to form an MWNT-embedded composite film. The MWNTs embedded in Ni not only had better adhesion but also exhibited a higher FE threshold voltage, which is beneficial to our FEL system and can increase the luminous efficiency of the anode phosphor. Our results show that the FE cathode prepared by dipping three times in a solution containing 400 ppm Pd nano-catalysts and 0.2 wt.% MWNTs and then eletrolessly plating a Ni film at a deposition temperature of 60 °C, pH value of 5, and deposition time of 7 min has the best FE uniformity and efficiency. Its emission current can stay as low as 2.5 mA at a high applied voltage of 7 kV, which conforms to the high-voltage-and-low-current requirement of the P22 phosphor and can therefore maximize the luminous efficiency of our FEL. We found that the MWNT cathodes prepared by this approach are suitable for making high-efficiency FELs. PMID:26373085

  6. Life test of a xenon hollow cathode for a space plasma contractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1994-01-01

    A plasma contacting device using a hollow cathode for plasma production has been baselined for use on the Space Station. This application will require reliable, continuous operation of the cathode at electron emission currents of between 0.75 and 10 A for two years (17,500 hours). In order to validate life-time capability, a hollow cathode, operated in a diode configuration, has been tested for more than 8600 hours of stable discharge operation as of March 30, 1994. This cathode is operated at a steady-state emission current of 12.0 and a fixed xenon flow rate of 4.5 sccm. Discharge voltage and cathode temperature have remained relatively stable at approximately 12.9 V and 1260 C during the test. The test has experienced 7 shutdowns to date. In all instances, the cathode was reignited at about 42 V and resumed stable operation. This test represents the longest demonstration of stable operation of high current (greater than 1A) xenon hollow cathodes reported to date.

  7. Characteristics of a LaB6 hollow cathode in the glow-arc transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonegawa, Akira; Takayama, Kazuo

    1990-10-01

    A new type of a simple LaB6 hollow cathode tube allows us to have very stable discharge even in the regime of the glow-arc transition, which is commonly unstable for widely used cathode materials (Ta,W). Because of the relatively large size of our device (25 mm diameter) and the low-temperature operation (~1400 K), we were able to investigate various plasma parameters of the internal plasma in detail by using a standard Langmuir probe and an ion sampling technique with a tiny orifice (1 mm diameter) to study the ion behavior near the cathode wall. Our measurements of the electron-energy distribution function F(ɛ), the space potential φ, the mean electron energy ɛ¯, the electron density ne, and the sampling ion current density Ji were carried out under various discharge conditions in order to understand the basic characteristics of hollow cathode discharge. We have found that these plasma parameters show anomalous properties in the glow-arc transition: (1) The different discharge regime of hollow cathode discharge, namely the abnormal glow, the arc, and the glow-arc transition, are clearly distinguished, and the discharge voltage Vd and Ji are a unique function of the discharge current in our hollow cathode tube. (2) A distinct high-energy component appears in the range ~1-7 eV, with two types of high-energy tails. (3) The local growth of ɛ¯, the local ionization, and appearance of the space potential hill are observed near the anode and central region of the tube. These anomalous disturbances correspond to nonuniform self-heating: the nonuniform thermionic electron-emission effect along the LaB6 hollow cathode tube in the glow-arc transition.

  8. Hollow Cathode and Keeper-region Plasma Measurements Using Ultra-fast Miniature Scanning Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.; Watkins, Ron M.; Katz, Ira

    2004-01-01

    In order to support the development of comprehensive performance and life models for future deep space missions that will utilize ion thrusters, we have undertaken a study of the plasma structure in hollow cathodes using an new pneumatic scanning probe diagnostic. This device is designed to insert a miniature probe directly into the hollow cathode orifice from either the upstream insert region in the interior of the hollow cathode, or from the downstream keeper-plasma region at the exit of the hollow cathode, to provide complete axial profiles of the discharge plasma parameters. Previous attempts to diagnose this region with probes was Limited by the melting of small probes in the intense discharge near the orifice, or caused significant perturbation of the plasma by probes large enough to survive. Our new probe is extremely compact, and when configured as a single Langmuir probe, the ceramic tube insulator is only 0.5mm in diameter and the current collecting conductor has a total area of 0.002 cm2. A series of current-voltage characteristics are obtained by applying a rapid sawtooth voltage waveform to the probe as it is scanned by the pneumatic actuator into and out of the plasma region, The bellow-sealed pneumatic drive scans the probe 4 cm in the cathode insert region and 10 cm in the anode/keeper plasmas region at average speeds of about 1 mm/msec, and the residence time at the end of the insertion stroke in the densest part of the plasma near the orifice is measured to be only 10 msec. Since the voltage sweep time is fast compared to the motion of the probe, axial profiles of the plasma density, temperature and potential with reasonable spatial resolution are obtained. Measurements of the internal cathode pressures and the axial plasma-parameter profiles for a hollow cathode operating at discharge currents of up to 35 A in xenon will be presented.

  9. Influence of the floating potential on micro-hollow cathode operation

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, D.; Bliokh, Y. P.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2015-06-15

    The influence of a keeper electrode with a floating potential on the operation of a micro-hollow cathode is studied using the two-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions model. The floating potential is determined self-consistently, taking into account the electron and ion charges collected by the keeper and the potential induced by the plasma non-compensated space charge. It is shown that the parameters of the micro-hollow cathode operation vary significantly, according to whether the keeper potential is floating or has a specified constant value.

  10. Influence of the floating potential on micro-hollow cathode operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, D.; Bliokh, Y. P.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2015-06-01

    The influence of a keeper electrode with a floating potential on the operation of a micro-hollow cathode is studied using the two-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions model. The floating potential is determined self-consistently, taking into account the electron and ion charges collected by the keeper and the potential induced by the plasma non-compensated space charge. It is shown that the parameters of the micro-hollow cathode operation vary significantly, according to whether the keeper potential is floating or has a specified constant value.

  11. Characteristics of a toroidal planar hollow cathode and its use for the preparation of Bi nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, A.; Luna, A. T.; Muhl, S.

    2013-12-01

    Using ideas from the sputter deposition by gas flow hollow cathode (GFHC) we have designed a new version in the form of a toroidal planar hollow cathode. Here the flow of gas is used to entrain the sputtered atoms and nanoparticles formed by agglomeration in the gas phase, through the cathode central exit aperture towards the substrate. We have studied the characteristics of the deposit as a function of the applied pulsed dc electrical power, the argon gas pressure and flow. By varying the different operating parameters, such as pressure (6.7-267 Pa), power (40-120 W) and gas flow (20-140 sccm), it was possible to control the size of the nanoparticles (10-150 nm) and the deposition rate (0.4-4.0 nm min-1). We demonstrate that the nanoparticles are of crystalline bismuth, even though the cathode is made of graphite with small added pieces of bismuth.

  12. Plasma Emission Characteristics from a High Current Hollow Cathode in an Ion Thruster Discharge Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    The presence of energetic ions produced by a hollow cathodes operating at high emission currents (greater than 5A) has been documented in the literature. In order to further elucidate these findings, an investigation of a high current cathode operating in an ion thruster discharge chamber has been undertaken. Using Langmuir probes, a low energy charged particle analyzer and emission spectroscopy, the behavior of the near-cathode plasma and the emitted ion energy distribution was characterized. The presence of energetic ions was confirmed. It was observed that these ions had energies in excess of the discharge voltage and thus cannot be simply explained by ions falling out of plasma through a potential difference of this order. Additionally, evidence provided by Langmuir probes suggests the existence of a double layer essentially separating the hollow cathode plasma column from the main discharge. The radial potential difference associated with this double layer was measured to be of order the ionization potential.

  13. Proof and analysis of the pendulum motion of beam electrons in a hollow cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockhausen, G.; Kock, M.

    2001-06-01

    The pendulum motion of electrons in a hollow cathode discharge accelerated in the cathode fall is demonstrated with the use of a femtosecond laser pulse and the so-called fast optogalvanic effect. The signals are described quantitatively using a Monte Carlo model for various pressure and current levels. As a result the discharge can be described by the model from start-up to high-current operation.

  14. Optimization of hollow cathode discharge electrode for damage free remote plasma removal process for semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Tae S.; Han, Qing; Yang, Dongqing; Park, Soonam; Lubomirsky, Dima; Venkataraman, Shankar

    2016-05-01

    Cone-shaped hollow cathode electrode configuration for a damage free remote plasma removal process has been optimized for given pressures based on Paschen characteristic curves, voltage-current characteristics and time-resolved discharge observations as well as oxide film removal performances. Remote plasmas have been generated in two types of cone-shaped electrodes with mixtures of He, NF3, and NH3 for pressure range of 1-30 Torr. Paschen characteristic curves and voltage-current (V-I) characteristics define an operating pressure for low breakdown voltage and the hollow cathode effect to minimize the particles. Sinusoidal voltage waveform and asymmetry electrode configuration alternate the glow discharge and hollow cathode discharge modes in a cycle. The current and infrared emission intensity from the glow discharge increases together for both cone-shaped electrodes with increasing pressure, whereas the hollow cathode discharge plasma emits strong infrared only when pD condition is satisfied. For the wide cone electrode configuration, high voltage operation at higher pressure results in particle contamination on the processed wafer by high energy ion bombardment. Operating at optimum pressure for a given electrode configuration shows faster oxide etch rate with better uniformity over a whole 300 mm wafer.

  15. A High-Pressure Hollow Cathode Ionization Source for In-Situ Detection of Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, L. W.; Kanik, I.

    2001-01-01

    We have designed, constructed and characterized a new high-pressure (1-5 Torr) hollow cathode discharge source (HCDS) that can be utilized as an ionizer in a wide variety of mass analyzers. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Instability of a Low-Pressure Hollow-Cathode Discharge in a Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, E.M.; Anders, A.; Brown, I.G.; Soloshenko, I.A.; Shchedrin, A.I.

    2005-11-15

    Mechanisms responsible for current oscillations at the ion branch of the probe characteristic are investigated experimentally and theoretically. A comparison between experiment and theory shows that the oscillations in a hollow-cathode discharge in a longitudinal magnetic field are most likely related to the onset of helical instabili0008.

  17. Kinetics of metastable He atom at middle pressure in micro hollow cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Mari; Ohta, Takayuki; Kanae, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Masafumi; Hori, Masaru

    2011-10-01

    Hollow cathode discharges has been studied as light sources. Conventional hollow cathode discharges has been operated in low pressure, while micro hollow cathode discharge in near atmospheric pressure. In this study, the behavior of metastable He atoms (23S1-23P0 ; 1082.909 nm) in micro hollow cathode discharge in the middle range of the pressure from 5 to 30 kPa were fundamentally studied. The translational temperature and density of metastable He atoms were measured by diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The spectral line profile was analyzed and the pressure-broadening effect was investigated. The absorption profile of metastable He atoms was obtained by scanning the wavelength of the diode laser. The absorption profile of metastable He atoms shits from a Gaussian to Voigt profile at around pressure of 10 kPa. The metastable He atoms temperatures were estimated to be 900 to 1150 K, and the densities were measured to be 1.3 x 1013 cm-3 to 7.6 x 1012 cm-3 in the range of 5 to 30 kPa. The translational temperatures and densities of metastable He atoms were decreased with increasing pressure below 10 kPa, on the other hand, increased with increasing pressure in the range from 10 to 30 kPa.

  18. RF hollow cathode discharge with mini-slot at high gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zengqi; Hoshimiya, Katsumi; Collins, George

    2002-10-01

    The hollow cathode discharge (HCD) has been widely used for spectra light sources, low-vacuum electron beam sources and gas lasers due to its ability provide a low voltage plasma discharge. Traditional HCD operates with a DC power supply to drive the discharge. The HCD, however, has a tendency to arc, which limits its maximum operating power without arc control provisions in the power supply. K. Schoenbachs group reported the most detailed progress to achieve pulsed micro hollow cathode discharge at Hundreds Torr of noble gases for VUV source. CSU has explored a rectangular shape HCD, which also demonstrates its stable operation at RF discharge mode. The rf HCD devices consist of a water-cold cathode with a proximity anode, controllable spacer, and rf matching elements. As with other HCD the cathode cooling mechanism is important to assure long device life time due to the high-density plasma achieved and associated heat build-up, especially at the narrow (100 micron) slot several centimeter length. Tailored dielectric coatings, with controlled thickness, on top of the metallic cathode surface play an important role in creating the characteristics of the discharge plasma. Alternatively, the cold cathode can be made from metal-ceramic composite for the additional capability of high secondary electron emission. Cathode slot size of 0.1 0.5 mm has been tested at slot length of 3 cm, and it operates at the gas pressure up to atmospheric pressure.

  19. Hollow cathode and thruster discharge chamber plasma measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Kristina K.; Goebel, Dan M.; Watkins, Ron M.

    2005-01-01

    Due to the successful performance of the NSTAR ion thruster in Deep Space 1 mission, coupled with the recently completed 30,352 hour extended life test (ELT) of the NSTAR flight spare thruster, ion thrusters have become a viable option for future NASA missions. In this paper, detailed measurements of the plasma parameters internal and external to the cathode will presented for the NSTAR cathode up to 13.1A of discharge current and for the NEXIS cathode up to 30A of discharge current.

  20. Development and Testing of High Current Hollow Cathodes for High Power Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Van Noord, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist In-Space Propulsion project is sponsoring the testing and development of high power Hall thrusters for implementation in NASA missions. As part of the project, NASA Glenn Research Center is developing and testing new high current hollow cathode assemblies that can meet and exceed the required discharge current and life-time requirements of high power Hall thrusters. This paper presents test results of three high current hollow cathode configurations. Test results indicated that two novel emitter configurations were able to attain lower peak emitter temperatures compared to state-of-the-art emitter configurations. One hollow cathode configuration attained a cathode orifice plate tip temperature of 1132 degC at a discharge current of 100 A. More specifically, test and analysis results indicated that a novel emitter configuration had minimal temperature gradient along its length. Future work will include cathode wear tests, and internal emitter temperature and plasma properties measurements along with detailed physics based modeling.

  1. Requirements for long-life operation of inert gas hollow cathodes: Preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhey, Timothy R.; Macrae, Gregory S.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was initiated to establish conditioning procedures for reliable hollow cathode operation via the characterization of critical parameters in a representative cathode test facility. From vacuum pumpdown rates, it was found that approximately 1.5 hours were required to achieve pressure levels within 5 percent of the lowest attainable pressure for this facility, depending on the purge conditions. The facility atmosphere was determined by a residual gas analyzer to be composed of primarily air and water vapor. The effects of vacuum pumping and inert gas purging were evaluated. A maximum effective leakage rate of 2.0 x 10(exp -3)sccm was observed and its probable causes were examined. An extended test of a 0.64 cm diameter Mo-Re hollow cathode was successfully completed. This test ran for 504 hours at an emission current of 23.0 amperes and a xenon flow rate of 6.1 sccm. Discharge voltage rose continuously from 15 to 21 volts over the course of the test. The temperature of the cathode body during the test was relatively stable at 1160 C. Post-test examination revealed ion-bombardment texturing of the orifice plate to be the only detectable sign of wear on the hollow cathode.

  2. Modeling of LaB6 hollow cathode performance and lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrini, Daniela; Albertoni, Riccardo; Paganucci, Fabrizio; Andrenucci, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Thermionic hollow cathodes are currently used as sources of electrons in a variety of space applications, in particular as cathodes/neutralizers of electric thrusters (Hall effect and ion thrusters). Numerical tools are needed to guide the design of new devices before their manufacturing and testing, since multiple geometrical parameters influence the cathode performance. A reduced-order, numerical model was developed to assess the performance of orificed hollow cathodes, with a focus on the operational lifetime. The importance of the lifetime prediction is tied to its impact on the operational lifetime of the thruster to which the cathode is coupled. The cathode architecture consists of a refractory metal tube with an internal electron emitter made of lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6). The choice of LaB6 accounts for the reduced evaporation rate, the low sensitivity to poisoning and the absence of an activation procedure with respect to oxide cathodes. A LaB6 emitter is thus a valuable option for long-lasting cathodes, despite its relatively high work-function and reactivity with many refractory metals at high temperatures. The suggested reduced-order model self-consistently predicts the key parameters of the cathode operation, shedding light on the power deposition processes as well as on the main erosion mechanisms. Preliminary results showed good agreement with both the experimental data collected by Alta and data available from the literature for different operating conditions and power levels. Next developments will include further comparisons between theoretical and experimental data, considering cathodes of various size and operating conditions.

  3. Hollow cathode theory and experiment. I. Plasma characterization using fast miniature scanning probes

    SciTech Connect

    Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.; Watkins, Ron M.; Katz, Ira; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2005-12-01

    A detailed study of the spatial variation of plasma density, temperature, and potential in hollow cathodes using miniature fast scanning probes has been undertaken in order to better understand the cathode operation and to provide benchmark data for the modeling of the cathode performance and life described in a companion paper. Profiles are obtained throughout the discharge and in the very high-density orifice region by pneumatically driven Langmuir probes, which are inserted directly into the hollow cathode orifice from either the upstream insert region inside the hollow cathode or from the downstream anode-plasma region. A fast transverse-scanning probe is also used to provide radial profiles of the cathode plume as a function of position from the cathode exit. The probes are extremely small to avoid perturbing the plasma; the ceramic tube insulator is 0.05 cm in diameter with a probe tip area of 0.002 cm{sup 2}. A series of current-voltage characteristics are obtained by applying a rapid sawtooth voltage wave form to the probe as it is scanned through the plasma at speeds of up to 2 m/s to produce the profiles with a spatial resolution of about 0.05 cm. At discharge currents of 10-25 A from the 1.5-cm-diameter hollow cathode, the plasma density inside the cathode is found to exceed 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}, with the peak density occurring upstream of the orifice. The plasma potentials on axis inside the cathode are found to be in the 10-20 V range with electron temperatures of 2-5 eV, depending on the discharge current and gas flow rate. A potential discontinuity or double layer of less than 10 V is observed in the orifice region, and under certain conditions appears in the bright 'plasma ball' in front of the cathode. This structure tends to change location and magnitude with discharge current, gas flow, and orifice size. A potential maximum proposed in the literature to exist in or near the cathode orifice is not observed. Instead, the plasma potential increases

  4. Multiple Hollow Cathode Wear Testing for the Space Station Plasma Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    1994-01-01

    A wear test of four hollow cathodes was conducted to resolve issues associated with the Space Station plasma contactor. The objectives of this test were to evaluate unit-to-unit dispersions, verify the transportability of contamination control protocols developed by the project, and to evaluate cathode contamination control and activation procedures to enable simplification of the gas feed system and heater power processor. These objectives were achieved by wear testing four cathodes concurrently to 2000 hours. Test results showed maximum unit-to-unit deviations for discharge voltages and cathode tip temperatures to be +/-3 percent and +/-2 percent, respectively, of the nominal values. Cathodes utilizing contamination control procedures known to increase cathode lifetime showed no trends in their monitored parameters that would indicate a possible failure, demonstrating that contamination control procedures had been successfully transferred. Comparisons of cathodes utilizing and not utilizing a purifier or simplified activation procedure showed similar behavior during wear testing and pre- and post-test performance characterizations. This behavior indicates that use of simplified cathode systems and procedures is consistent with long cathode lifetimes.

  5. Operational Status of the International Space Station Plasma Contactor Hollow Cathode Assemblies from July 2011 to May 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Yim, John T.; Patterson, Michael J.; Dalton, Penni J.

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station has onboard two Aerojet Rocketdyne developed plasma contactor units that perform the function of charge control. The plasma contactor units contain NASA Glenn Research Center developed hollow cathode assemblies. NASA Glenn Research Center monitors the onorbit operation of the flight hollow cathode assemblies. As of May 31, 2013, HCA.001-F has been ignited and operated 123 times and has accumulated 8072 hours of operation, whereas, HCA.003-F has been ignited and operated 112 times and has accumulated 9664 hours of operation. Monitored hollow cathode ignition times and anode voltage magnitudes indicate that they continue to operate nominally.

  6. Operational Status of the International Space Station Plasma Contactor Hollow Cathode Assemblies July 2001 to May 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Yim, John T.; Patterson, Michael J.; Dalton, Penni J.

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station has onboard two Aerojet Rocketdyne developed plasma contactor units that perform the function of charge control. The plasma contactor units contain NASA Glenn Research Center developed hollow cathode assemblies. NASA Glenn Research Center monitors the on-orbit operation of the flight hollow cathode assemblies. As of May 31, 2013, HCA.001-F has been ignited and operated 123 times and has accumulated 8072 hours of operation, whereas, HCA.003-F has been ignited and operated 112 times and has accumulated 9664 hours of operation. Monitored hollow cathode ignition times and anode voltage magnitudes indicate that they continue to operate nominally.

  7. Wear Mechanisms in Electron Sources for Ion Propulsion, 1: Neutralizer Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2008-01-01

    Upon the completion of two long-duration life tests of a 30-cm ion engine, the orifice channel of the neutralizer hollow cathode was eroded away to as much as twice its original diameter. Whereas the neutralizer cathode orifice opened significantly, no noticeable erosion of the discharge cathode orifice was observed. Noquantitative explanation of these erosion trends has been established since the completion of the two life tests. A two-dimensional model of the partially ionized gas inside these devices has been developed and applied to the neutralizer hollow cathode. The numerical simulations show that the main mechanism responsible for the channel erosion is sputtering by Xe+. These ions are accelerated by the sheath along the channel and bombard the surface with kinetic energy/charge of about 17 V at the beginning of cathode life. The density of the ions inside the neutralizer orifice is computed to be as high as 2.1 x 10(sup 22) m(sup -3). Because of the 3.5-times larger diameter of the discharge cathode orifice, the ion density inside the orifice is more than 40 times lower and the sheath drop 7 V lower compared with the values in the neutralizer. At these conditions, Xe+ can cause no significant sputtering of the surface.

  8. Comparison of On-orbit and Ground Based Hollow Cathode Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael (Technical Monitor); Carpenter, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The Plasma Contactor Units (PCUs) were developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and Boeing for charge control on board the International Space Station (ISS). Since the first ignition of a PCU on 10/16/2000 over 3,900 hours of operation have been demonstrated on a single unit. In order to guarantee that the PCUs hollow cathode assemblies (HCAs), which emit the electrons used for charge control, would satisfy the life requirement of 18,000 hours, a ground based hollow cathode life test program was initiated at GRC. The life test program aimed at 27,000 hours of operation on a single unit to demonstrate the industry standard 1.5 times operational life requirement. As of this printing, over 18,000 hours of operation have been accumulated on a single hollow cathode. By comparing the data received from the on-orbit HCAs to the data obtained for the life test cathodes, a comparison may be drawn to determine if the on-orbit HCAs are operating normally, with a final goal of predicting lifetime. Based on the data taken thus far, it can be concluded that the on-orbit HCAs are operating within their design specifications.

  9. Process for testing a xenon gas feed system of a hollow cathode assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor); Verhey, Timothy R. R. (Inventor); Soulas, George C. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The design and manufacturing processes for Hollow Cathode Assemblies (HCA's) that operate over a broad range of emission currents up to 30 Amperes, at low potentials, with lifetimes in excess of 17,500 hours. The processes include contamination control procedures which cover hollow cathode component cleaning procedures, gas feed system designs and specifications, and hollow cathode activation and operating procedures to thereby produce cathode assemblies that have demonstrated stable and repeatable operating conditions, for both the discharge current and voltage. The HCA of this invention provides lifetimes of greater than 10,000 hours, and expected lifetimes of greater than 17,500 hours, whereas the present state-of-the-art is less than 500 hours at emission currents in excess of 1 Ampere. Stable operation is provided over a large range of operating emission currents, up to a 6:1 ratio, and this HCA can emit electron currents of up to 30 Amperes in magnitude to an external anode that simulates the current drawn to a space plasma, at voltages of less than 20 Volts.

  10. Design and Manufacturing Processes of Long-Life Hollow Cathode Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor); Verhey, Timothy R. (Inventor); Soulas, George C. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The design and manufacturing processes for Hollow Cathode Assemblies (HCA's) that operate over a broad range of emission currents up to 30 Amperes, at low potentials, with lifetimes in excess of 17,500 hours. The processes include contamination control procedures which cover hollow cathode component cleaning procedures, gas feed system designs and specifications, and hollow cathode activation and operating procedures to thereby produce cathode assemblies that have demonstrated stable and repeatable operating conditions, for both the discharge current and voltage. The HCA of this invention provides lifetimes of greater than 10,000 hours, and expected lifetimes of greater than 17,500 hours, whereas the present state-of-the-art is less than 500 hours at emission currents in excess of 1 Ampere. Stable operation is provided over a large range of operating emission currents, up to a 6:1 ratio, and this HCA can emit electron currents of up to 30 Amperes in magnitude to an external anode that simulates the current drawn to a space plasma at voltages of less than 20 Volts.

  11. Operating modes of a hydrogen ion source based on a hollow-cathode pulsed Penning discharge.

    PubMed

    Oks, E M; Shandrikov, M V; Vizir, A V

    2016-02-01

    An ion source based on a hollow-cathode Penning discharge was switched to a high-current pulsed mode (tens of amperes and tens of microseconds) to produce an intense hydrogen ion beam. With molecular hydrogen (H2), the ion beam contained three species: H(+), H2(+), and H3(+). For all experimental conditions, the fraction of H2 (+) ions in the beam was about 10 ÷ 15% of the total ion beam current and varied little with ion source parameters. At the same time, the ratio of H(+) and H3(+) depended strongly on the discharge current, particularly on its distribution in the gap between the hollow and planar cathodes. Increasing the discharge current increased the H(+) fraction in ion beam. The maximum fraction of H(+) reached 80% of the total ion beam current. Forced redistribution of the discharge current in the cathode gap for increasing the hollow cathode current could greatly increase the H3(+) fraction in the beam. At optimum parameters, the fraction of H3(+) ions reached 60% of the total ion beam current.

  12. Process for Ignition of Gaseous Electrical Discharge Between Electrodes of a Hollow Cathode Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor); Verhey, Timothy R. R. (Inventor); Soulas, George C. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The design and manufacturing processes for Hollow Cathode Assemblies (HCA's) that operate over a broad range of emission currents up to 30 Amperes, at low potentials, with lifetimes in excess of 17,500 hours. The processes include contamination control procedures which cover hollow cathode component cleaning procedures, gas feed system designs and specifications, and hollow cathode activation and operating procedures to thereby produce cathode assemblies that have demonstrated stable and repeatable operating conditions, for both the discharge current and voltage. The HCA of this invention provides lifetimes of greater than 10,000 hours, and expected lifetimes of greater than 17,500 hours, whereas the present state-of-the-art is less than 500 hours at emission currents in excess of 1 Ampere. Stable operation is provided over a large range of operating emission currents, up to a 6:1 ratio, and this HCA can emit electron currents of up to 30 Amperes in magnitude to an external anode that simulates the current drawn to a space plasma, at voltages of less than 20 Volts.

  13. Operating modes of a hydrogen ion source based on a hollow-cathode pulsed Penning discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, E. M.; Shandrikov, M. V.; Vizir, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    An ion source based on a hollow-cathode Penning discharge was switched to a high-current pulsed mode (tens of amperes and tens of microseconds) to produce an intense hydrogen ion beam. With molecular hydrogen (H2), the ion beam contained three species: H+, H2+, and H3+. For all experimental conditions, the fraction of H2+ ions in the beam was about 10 ÷ 15% of the total ion beam current and varied little with ion source parameters. At the same time, the ratio of H+ and H3+ depended strongly on the discharge current, particularly on its distribution in the gap between the hollow and planar cathodes. Increasing the discharge current increased the H+ fraction in ion beam. The maximum fraction of H+ reached 80% of the total ion beam current. Forced redistribution of the discharge current in the cathode gap for increasing the hollow cathode current could greatly increase the H3+ fraction in the beam. At optimum parameters, the fraction of H3+ ions reached 60% of the total ion beam current.

  14. Hollow cathode operation at high discharge currents. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedly, Verlin Joe

    1990-01-01

    It was shown that ion thruster hollow cathode operation at high discharge current levels can induce reduced thruster lifetimes by causing cathode insert overheating and/or erosion of surfaces located downstream of the cathode. The erosion problem has been particularly baffling because the mechanism by which it occurs has not been understood. The experimental investigation described reveals the energies of the ions produced close to the cathode orifice can be several times the anode-to-cathode potential difference generally considered available to accelerate them. These energies (of order 50 eV) are sufficient to cause the observed erosion rates. The effects of discharge current (to 60 A), magnetic field configuration and the cathode flowrate, orifice diameter and insert design on the energies and current densities of these jet ions are examined. A model describing the mechanism by which the high energy ions could be produced when the anode-cathode potential difference is insufficient is proposed. The effects of discharge current on cathode temperature and internal pressure are also examined experimentally and described phenomenologically.

  15. A global model of micro-hollow cathode discharges in the stationary regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaroni, C.; Chabert, P.

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents a global model of micro-hollow cathode discharges working in argon gas. Inspired by experiments and two-dimensional numerical simulations, the discharge is decomposed into two main regions, labelled the cathodic region and the positive column region. The first is composed of a cathode sheath (surrounding the cathode) and a plasma in the centre, while the positive column region is essentially filled with plasma. A cathode sheath model is developed to calculate the sheath size and the power dissipated by ions and electrons in the sheath. Charged-particle transport equations are solved in one-dimensional cylindrical coordinates, in the quasi-neutral plasma region, in order to determine the radial density profiles and the electron temperature in the microhole. A global power balance is then performed in the two distinct regions in order to determine the absolute electron density. We found that the electron density is one order of magnitude higher in the cathodic region than in the positive column, showing that the power dissipation is mainly located in the cathode sheath. The calculated electron density in the cathodic region is in reasonable agreement with experiments.

  16. Mercury recovery from cold cathode fluorescent lamps using thermal desorption technology.

    PubMed

    Chang, T C; Chen, C M; Lee, Y F; You, S J

    2010-05-01

    Cold cathode fluorescent lamps (CCFLs) are globally used components of high technology products. A large amount of mercury in waste CCFLs is being recovered by thermal desorption technology in Taiwan. However, the complexity of the samples affects the thermal desorption efficiency and increases costs. This study identifies the mercury release behaviour of amalgam, phosphor and mercury-containing components as well as waste CCFLs by bench scale thermal desorption test. The results show that the mercury was released from amalgam and mercury/fluorescent powder from a real treatment plant at temperatures between 550 degrees C to 850 degrees C, which is much higher than from cinnabar at 300 degrees C to 380 degrees C and that of pure mercury, high pressure mercury lamps, and fluorescent tubes containing mercury/fluorescent-powder at 50 degrees C to 250 degrees C. In addition, the experiment also showed the mercury release peak of the mercury/fluorescent powders from a real treatment plant occurs at much higher temperatures than that of commercial phosphor at 50 degrees C to 200 degrees C. Thus, complete separation of the cracked CCFLs is necessary to effectively recover phosphor and mercury at low financial and energy cost.

  17. Auxiliary glow discharge in the trigger unit of a hollow-cathode thyratron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Yu. D.; Landl, N. V.; Geyman, V. G.; Frants, O. B.; Shemyakin, I. A.; Nekhoroshev, V. O.

    2016-08-01

    Results from studies of a low-current glow discharge with a hollow cathode are presented. A specific feature of the discharge conditions was that a highly emissive tablet containing cesium carbonate was placed in the cathode cavity. In the absence of a tablet, the discharge ignition voltage was typically ≥3.5 kV, while the burning voltage was in the range of 500-600 V. The use of the tablet made it possible to decrease the ignition voltage to 280 V and maintain the discharge burning voltage at a level of about 130 V. A model of the current sustainment in a hollow-cathode discharge is proposed. Instead of the conventional secondary emission yield, the model uses a generalized emission yield that takes into account not only ion bombardment of the cathode, but also the emission current from an external source. The model is used to interpret the observed current-voltage characteristics. The results of calculations agree well with the experimental data. It is shown that, in some discharge modes, the external emission current from the cathode can reach 25% of the total discharge current.

  18. A Particle and Energy Balance Model of the Orificed Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domonkos, Matthew T.

    2002-01-01

    A particle and energy balance model of orificed hollow cathodes was developed to assist in cathode design. The model presented here is an ensemble of original work by the author and previous work by others. The processes in the orifice region are considered to be one of the primary drivers in determining cathode performance, since the current density was greatest in this volume (up to 1.6 x 10(exp 8) A/m2). The orifice model contains comparatively few free parameters, and its results are used to bound the free parameters for the insert model. Next, the insert region model is presented. The sensitivity of the results to the free parameters is assessed, and variation of the free parameters in the orifice dominates the calculated power consumption and plasma properties. The model predictions are compared to data from a low-current orificed hollow cathode. The predicted power consumption exceeds the experimental results. Estimates of the plasma properties in the insert region overlap Langmuir probe data, and the predicted orifice plasma suggests the presence of one or more double layers. Finally, the model is used to examine the operation of higher current cathodes.

  19. Influence of Xe2+ ions on the micro-hollow cathode discharge driven by thermionic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, D.; Bliokh, Y. P.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2014-04-01

    The influence of Xe2+ dimer ions and excited Xe* atoms on the hollow cathode discharge driven by electron thermionic emission is studied using two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions modeling. A comparison with the results of two-component (electrons and Xe+ ions) plasma modeling showed that the presence of the Xe2+ dimer ions and excited Xe* atoms in the plasma affects the plasma parameters (density, potential, and ion fluxes toward the cathode). The influence of Xe2+ ions and Xe* atoms on the plasma sheath parameters, such as thickness and the ion velocity at the sheath edge, is analyzed.

  20. Hollow cathode restartable 15 cm diameter ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of substituting high perveance dished grids for low perveance flat ones on performance variables and plasma properties within a 15 cm modified SERT II thruster are discussed. Results suggest good performance may be achieved as an ion thruster is throttled if the screen grid transparency is decreased with propellant flow rate. Thruster startup tests, which employ a pulsed high voltage tickler electrode between the keeper and the cathode to initiate the discharge, are described. High startup reliability at cathode tip temperatures of about 500 C without excessive component wear over 2000 startup cycles is demonstrated. Testing of a single cusp magnetic field concept of discharge plasma containment is discussed. A theory which explains the observed behavior of the device is presented and proposed thruster modifications and future testing plans are discussed.

  1. Spatio-temporal characteristics of self-pulse in hollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, Ha; He, Shoujie

    2015-02-15

    The characteristics of self-pulse in hollow cathode discharge at low pressure have been investigated. The voltage-current (V-I) curves, the influence of ballast resistor on the self-pulses, and the evolution of current and voltage are measured. Both the axial and radial spatio-temporal discharge images of self-pulse are recorded. The results show that there exists the hysteresis effect in the present hollow cathode discharge. The high value of ballast resistors is favourable for the observation of self-pulses. The process of the self-pulse can be divided into three stages from the temporal discharge images, i.e., the pre-discharge, the transition from mainly axial electric field to mainly radial electric field, and the decaying process. The self-pulse is suggested to originate from the mode transition of the discharge in essence.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of a sputtering hollow-cathode discharge for laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatodorov, S.; Mihailova, D.; van Dijk, J.; van der Mullen, J.; Grozeva, M.

    2014-06-01

    We report on a kinetic model that computes the electron behaviour in a hollow cathode discharge. It is a part of the PLASIMO toolkit and is based on a Monte-Carlo technique. The model is tested by varying the input parameters and by comparing the output with the output obtained by the freeware Boltzmann equation solver BOLSIG+. The results show that the Monte-Carlo model gives reliable information about the behavior of the electrons in the discharge. The Monte-Carlo module is applied to the case of a hollow cathode discharge for laser applications. Analysis of the output data and its adequateness is done. Future developments of the model are discussed.

  3. Excitation mechanism in a hollow cathode He-Kr ion laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hazama, J.; Arai, T.; Goto, M.; Iijima, T.

    1995-12-31

    Pulsed laser operation in the afterglow of a positive column He-Kr discharge on the 469.4 nm (6s{sup 4}P{sub 5/2} {yields} 5p{sup 4}P{sub 5/2}) transition of Kr(II) was observed for the first time by Dana and Laure`s. It appears that the upper level of Kr(II) laser line is populated by the second kind collisions between He 2{sup 3}S metastable atoms and ground state Kr ions. CW oscillations on Kr(II) transitions have been obtained in a hollow cathode discharge. In this work, we have estimated the excitation mechanism for the upper state of 469.4 nm laser line from the measurements of the decay of endlight intensity in the hollow cathode He-Kr discharge.

  4. Hollow-Cathode Based Electrical Discharge in Atmospheric Pressure Water Vapor at Wide Range of Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Il Gyo; Lee, Woong Moo

    2006-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure water vapor, in the temperature range from 150 to 700 °C, was used as the carrier gas for DC powered electrical discharge in hollow cathode configuration. The electrode assembly was constructed in usual hollow-cathode configuration by sandwiching a dielectric spacer, 200 μm thick, with two thin metal sheets and boring a micro hole of 300 μm diameter. The current-voltage profile of the discharge showed a positive differential resistivity characterizing an abnormal glow discharge. The power consumption for the water discharge at 700 °C was less than 50% the consumption at 150 °C. The reduction of the power for sustaining the discharge with increase of the gas temperature was partly explained by relating the ionic mobility and the distribution of ionic mean free path to the temperature.

  5. Characterisation of a rf micro hollow cathode discharge and its interactions with nearest neighbours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Sam; Boswell, Rod; Charles, Christine; Holland, John; Cox, Wes

    2012-10-01

    A novel microplasma hollow cathode plasma source of 4 mm diameter and driven by 13.56 MHz is investigated using 3D sweeps of Langmuir probes in the downstream plasma expansion region. Initial results suggest that the plasma expansion is a simple diffusion from the exit orifice of the 30 mm long cylindrical source region. By making comprehensive measurements of the plasma plumes produced by two micro hollow cathode sources separated by differing distances, the mutual interaction between these components of the system have been determined with the aim of determining whether a much larger array of sources could be envisioned. The effectiveness of the plasma in dissociating reactive species was tested using SF6 and measuring etch patterns on unbiased silicon wafers. The results have been modeled and show that it is indeed possible to produce a uniform spread of active species over large areas.

  6. Broadband microwave characteristics of a novel coaxial gridded hollow cathode argon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ruilin; Yuan, Chengxun; Li, Hui; Jia, Jieshu; Zhou, Zhong-Xiang; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoou; Wu, Jian

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between microwave and large area plasma is crucially important for space communication. Gas pressure, input power, and plasma volume are critical to both the microwave electromagnetic wave phase shift and electron density. This paper presents a novel type of large coaxial gridded hollow cathode plasma having a 50 cm diameter and a 40 cm thickness. Microwave characteristics are studied using a microwave measurement system that includes two broadband antennae in the range from 2 GHz to 18 GHz. The phase shift under varying gas pressure and input power is shown. In addition, the electron density ne, which varies from 1.2 × 1016 m-3 to 8.7 × 1016 m-3 under different discharge conditions, is diagnosed by the microwave system. The measured results accord well with those acquired by Langmuir Probe measurement and show that the microwave properties in the large volume hollow cathode discharge significantly depend on the input power and gas pressure.

  7. Absolute continuum intensity diagnostics of a novel large coaxial gridded hollow cathode argon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ruilin; Yuan, Chengxun; Li, Hui; Jia, Jieshu; Zhou, Zhong-Xiang; Wu, Jian; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoou

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports a novel coaxial gridded hollow discharge during operation at low pressure (20 Pa-80 Pa) in an argon atmosphere. A homogeneous hollow discharge was observed under different conditions, and the excitation mechanism and the discharge parameters for the hollow cathode plasma were examined at length. An optical emission spectrometry (OES) method, with a special focus on absolute continuum intensity method, was employed to measure the plasma parameters. The Langmuir probe measurement (LPM) was used to verify the OES results. Both provided electron density values (ne) in the order of 1016 m-3 for different plasma settings. Taken together, the results show that the OES method is an effective approach to diagnosing the similar plasma, especially when the LPM is hardly operated.

  8. Effects of Neutral Density on Energetic Ions Produced Near High-Current Hollow Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kameyama, Ikuya

    1997-01-01

    Energy distributions of ion current from high-current, xenon hollow cathodes, which are essential information to understand erosion phenomena observed in high-power ion thrusters, were obtained using an electrostatic energy analyzer (ESA). The effects of ambient pressure and external flow rate introduced immediately downstream of hollow cathode on ion currents with energies greater than that associated with the cathode-to-anode potential difference were investigated. The results were analyzed to determine the changes in the magnitudes of ion currents to the ESA at various energies. Either increasing the ambient pressure or adding external flow induces an increase in the distribution of ion currents with moderate energies (epsilon less than 25 to 35 eV) and a decrease in the distribution for high energies (epsilon greater than 25 to 35 eV). The magnitude of the current distribution increase in the moderate energy range is greater for a cathode equipped with a toroidal keeper than for one without a keeper, but the distribution in the high energy range does not seem to be affected by a keeper. An MHD model, which has been proposed to describe energetic-ion production mechanism in hollow cathode at high discharge currents, was developed to describe these effects. The results show, however, that this model involves no mechanism by which a significant increase of ion current could occur at any energy. It was found, on the other hand, that the potential-hill model of energetic ion production, which assumes existence of a local maximum of plasma potential, could explain combined increases in the currents of ions with moderate energies and decreases in high energy ions due to increased neutral atom density using a charge-exchange mechanism. The existing, simplified version of the potential-hill model, however, shows poor quantitative agreement with measured ion-current-energy-distribution changes induced by neutral density changes.

  9. Plasma-Surface Interactions in Hollow Cathode Discharges for Electric Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capece, Angela Maria

    Electric thrusters generate high exhaust velocities and can achieve specific impulses in excess of 1000 s. The low thrust generation and high specific impulse make electric propulsion ideal for interplanetary missions, spacecraft station keeping, and orbit raising maneuvers. Consequently, these devices have been used on a variety of space missions including Deep Space 1, Dawn, and hundreds of commercial spacecraft in Earth orbit. In order to provide the required total impulses, thruster burn time can often exceed 10,000 hours, making thruster lifetime essential. One of the main life-limiting components on ion engines is the hollow cathode, which serves as the electron source for ionization of the xenon propellant gas. Reactive contaminants such as oxygen can modify the cathode surface morphology and degrade the electron emission properties. Hollow cathodes that operate with reactive impurities in the propellant will experience higher operating temperatures, which increase evaporation of the emission materials and reduce cathode life. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms initiating cathode failure will improve thruster operation, increase lifetime, and ultimately reduce cost. A significant amount of work has been done previously to understand the effects of oxygen poisoning on vacuum cathodes; however, the xenon plasma adds complexity, and its role during cathode poisoning is not completely understood. The work presented here represents the first attempt at understanding how oxygen impurities in the xenon discharge plasma alter the emitter surface and affect operation of a 4:1:1 BaO-CaO-Al2O3 hollow cathode. A combination of experimentation and modeling was used to investigate how oxygen impurities in the discharge plasma alter the emitter surface and reduce the electron emission capability. The experimental effort involved operating a 4:1:1 hollow cathode at various conditions with oxygen impurities in the xenon flow. Since direct measurements of the emitter

  10. Ring cusp/hollow cathode discharge chamber performance studies. [ion propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, J. A.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to determine the effects of hollow cathode position, anode position, and ring cusp magnetic field configuration and strength on discharge chamber performance. The results are presented in terms of comparative plasma ion energy cost, extracted ion fraction, and beam profile data. Such comparisons are used to demonstrate whether changes in performance are caused by changes in the loss rate of primary electrons to the anode or the loss rate of ions to discharge chamber walls or cathode and anode surfaces. Results show: (1) the rate of primary electron loss to the anode decreases as the anode is moved downstream of the ring cusp toward the screen grid; (2) the loss rate of ions to hollow cathode surfaces are excessive if the cathode is located upstream of a point of peak magnetic flux density at the discharge chamber centerline; and (3) the fraction of the ions produced that are lost to discharge chamber walls and ring magnet surfaces is reduced by positioning of the magnet rings so the plasma density is uniform over the grid surface, and adjusting their strength to a level where it is sufficient to prevent excessive ion losses by Bohm diffusion.

  11. A Review of Testing of Hollow Cathodes for the International Space Station Plasma Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovaleski, S. D.; Patterson, M. J.; Soulas, G. C.; Sarver-Verhey, T. R.

    2001-01-01

    Since October 2000, two plasma contactors have been providing charge control on the International Space Station (ISS). At the heart of each of the two plasma contactors is a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) that produces the contacting xenon plasma. The HCA is the result of 9 years of design and testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This paper summarizes HCA testing that has been performed to date. As of this time, one cathode has demonstrated approximately 28,000 hr of lifetime during constant, high current use. Another cathode, HCA.014. has demonstrated 42,000 ignitions before cathode heater failure. In addition to these cathodes, four cathodes. HCA.006, HCA.003, HCA.010, and HCA.013 have undergone cyclic testing to simulate the variable current demand expected on the ISS. HCA.006 accumulated 8,000 hr of life test operation prior to being voluntarily stopped for analysis before the flight units were fabricated. HCA.010 has accumulated 15,876 hr of life testing, and 4,424 ignitions during ignition testing. HCA.003 and HCA.0 13 have accumulated 12,415 and 18,823 hr of life testing respectively.

  12. Measurement of electric fields in a helium micro-hollow cathode discharge by forbidden transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namba, Shinichi; Maki, Daisuke; Takiyama, Ken

    2013-09-01

    Micro-hollow cathode discharges operated at high pressure has been attracting a great deal of interest for various application, such as, excimer light sources, medical/biological fields and microchemical reactor. In the plasmas, the electric (E) field in the sheath region plays an important role to generate and sustain the plasmas. In order to determine the E field in the He microplasma, the emissions of allowed (He I 2P-4D: 492.19 nm) and forbidden (2P-4F: 492.06 nm) lines were observed. The cathode and anode were both made of brass, and ceramic disks were used to electrically insulate the electrodes. The cathode disk had inner hole diameter of 1.0 mm (length: 2.0 mm). The gas with a flow rate was 1.0 L/min. The discharge was operated at voltages of 250 V, currents of 8 mA and gas pressures up to 100 kPa. The plasmas in the cathode opening were observed using a visible spectrometer. The forbidden line associated with the level mixing of upper levels was observed in the cathode surface, indicating that the high E field was formed. As the intensity ratio of forbidden to the allowed lines is a function of the E field which is calculated by perturtabation theory, we derived the field strength of 18 kV/cm at 1.0 mm cathode surface.

  13. Studies on laser-assisted Penning ionization by the optogalvanic effect in Ne/Eu hollow cathode discharge.

    PubMed

    Saini, V K; Kumar, P; Dixit, S K; Nakhe, S V

    2015-02-01

    Laser-assisted Penning ionization (LAPI) is detected in a Ne/Eu hollow cathode (HC) discharge lamp using the pulsed optogalvanic (OG) method. In the Ne/Eu discharge, doubly ionized europium excited energy levels Eu[4f(7)(P(7/2,5/2)6)] lie within the thermal limit (∼kT) from the laser-excited neon's energy level [2p(5)(P3/202)3p or 2p(8) (in Paschen notation)] lying at 149,848  cm(-1). Therefore, Penning ionization (PI) of europium atoms likely to occur into its highly excited ionic states is investigated. To probe the PI of europium, the temporal profiles of its counterpart neon OG signal are studied as a function of discharge current for the transitions (1s(4)→2p(8)) and (1s(2)→2p(2)), corresponding to 650.65 and 659.89 nm wavelengths, respectively. It is observed that PI of europium alters the overall discharge characteristics significantly and, hence, modifies the temporal profile of the OG signals accordingly. The quasi-resonant ionizing energy transfer collisions between laser-excited Ne 2p(8) atoms and electronically excited europium P(9/2)10 atoms are used to explain the LAPI mechanism. Such LAPI studies carried out in HC discharge could be useful for the discharge of a metal-vapor laser with appropriate Penning mixtures.

  14. Studies on laser-assisted Penning ionization by the optogalvanic effect in Ne/Eu hollow cathode discharge.

    PubMed

    Saini, V K; Kumar, P; Dixit, S K; Nakhe, S V

    2015-02-01

    Laser-assisted Penning ionization (LAPI) is detected in a Ne/Eu hollow cathode (HC) discharge lamp using the pulsed optogalvanic (OG) method. In the Ne/Eu discharge, doubly ionized europium excited energy levels Eu[4f(7)(P(7/2,5/2)6)] lie within the thermal limit (∼kT) from the laser-excited neon's energy level [2p(5)(P3/202)3p or 2p(8) (in Paschen notation)] lying at 149,848  cm(-1). Therefore, Penning ionization (PI) of europium atoms likely to occur into its highly excited ionic states is investigated. To probe the PI of europium, the temporal profiles of its counterpart neon OG signal are studied as a function of discharge current for the transitions (1s(4)→2p(8)) and (1s(2)→2p(2)), corresponding to 650.65 and 659.89 nm wavelengths, respectively. It is observed that PI of europium alters the overall discharge characteristics significantly and, hence, modifies the temporal profile of the OG signals accordingly. The quasi-resonant ionizing energy transfer collisions between laser-excited Ne 2p(8) atoms and electronically excited europium P(9/2)10 atoms are used to explain the LAPI mechanism. Such LAPI studies carried out in HC discharge could be useful for the discharge of a metal-vapor laser with appropriate Penning mixtures. PMID:25967764

  15. Excimer radiation from pulsed micro hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzenhauser, Isfried; Ernst, Uwe; Frank, Klaus

    2001-10-01

    Since several years d.c. microhollow cathode discharges (MHCDs) are under investigation as efficient sources of VUV excimer radiation [1]. Up to now overall efficiency and the radiation power of the MHCDs are too low to compete e.g. with silent discharges. Substantial improvement in these parameters would make by its simple geometry MCHDs attractive for a wide range of applications. Experiments and simulations show that the efficiency of MCHDs is substantially reduced by high gas temperatures beyond 1500 K. Measurements in pure nitrogen showed that the gas temperature can be reduced about 40The actual experiments are with Xe and Ar bands in the VUV and the results of radiation output under d.c. and pulsed operation for different pulse duration and repetition rates are presented. [1] A. El-Habachi, K.H. Schoenbach, Appl. Phys. Lett. 73(7), pp. 885-887 (1998) [2] U. Ernst, "Emissionsspektroskopische Charakterisierung von Hochdruck-Mikrohohlkathodenentladungen", Ph. D thesis, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 2001 This work was supported by DFG under the contact FR 1273-1

  16. Local Electric Field Strength in a Hollow Cathode Determined by Stark Splitting of the 2S Level of Hydrogen Isotopes by Optogalvanic Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, C.; Rosa, M. I. de la; Gruetzmacher, K.; Fuentes, L. M.; Gonzalo, A. B.

    2008-10-22

    In this work we present Doppler-free two-photon optogalvanic spectroscopy as a tool to measure the electric field strength in the cathode fall region of a hollow cathode discharge via the Stark splitting of the 2S level of atomic deuterium. The strong electric field strength present in the hollow cathode is determined for various discharge conditions which allows studying the corresponding variations of the cathode fall, and its changes with discharge operation time.

  17. Emission characteristics on light source array using micro hollow cathode plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Takayuki; Takota, Naoki; Tachibana, Yoshihiro; Ito, Masafumi; Higashijima, Yasuhiro; Kano, Hiroyuki; den, Shoji; Hori, Masaru

    2008-10-01

    We have developed a light source array for an absorption spectroscopy using micro hollow cathode plasma. The light source is capable of emitting multi-lines of metallic atoms for measuring absolute densities of metallic atoms simultaneously in sputtering, MBE, CVD processes, and so on. In this study, the emission characteristics of the light source were investigated. Emission intensities of metallic atoms and the rotational temperatures of the N2 second positive system were measured as functions of cathode length or cathode diameter. The emission intensity of Cu atom increased with a decrease in the cathode length from 20mm to 3mm. The applied voltage was 400 V, the pressure was 0.01 MPa, and the current was 40 mA. The current density which was applied to the Cu pipe cathode becomes larger in the shorter pipe length, so that the emission intensity became larger. The N2 rotational temperature was used for evaluating the neutral gas temperature and was evaluated to be from 510 to 750 K.

  18. Wear Mechanisms in Electron Sources for Ion Propulsion, 2: Discharge Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.; Polk, James E.

    2008-01-01

    The wear of the keeper electrode in discharge hollow cathodes is a major impediment to the implementation of ion propulsion onboard long-duration space science missions. The development of a predictive theoretical model for hollow cathode keeper life has long been sought, but its realization has been hindered by the complexities associated with the physics of the partially ionized gas and the associated erosion mechanisms in these devices. Thus, although several wear mechanisms have been hypothesized, a quantitative explanation of life test erosion profiles has remained incomplete. A two-dimensional model of the partially ionized gas in a discharge cathode has been developed and applied to understand the mechanisms that drove the erosion of the keeper in two long-duration life tests of a 30-cm ion thruster. An extensive set of comparisons between predictions by the numerical simulations and measurements of the plasma properties and of the erosion patterns is presented. It is found that the near-plume plasma oscillations, predicted by theory and observed by experiment, effectively enhance the resistivity of the plasma as well as the energy of ions striking the keeper.

  19. Temporal Fluctuations in a 100-A LaB6 Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorns, Benjamin A.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2013-01-01

    The temporal fluctuations in the near plume of a 100-Amperes LaB6 (Lanthanum hexaboride) hollow cathode are experimentally investigated. At high currents, turbulent oscillations may contribute to two of the anomalous processes of hollow cathode operation - anomalous resistivity and the production of energetic ions. A detailed study of the properties of the oscillations in a high current cathode is necessary to determine the impact of the fluctuation spectrum on these two effects. In this investigation, a probe array is employed to measure the amplitude and dispersion of axial modes in the plume while a retarding potential analyzer yields estimates of the radial ion energy distribution. The onset of the ion acoustic turbulence (IAT) is observed at high current values, and the character of the turbulent spectrum is shown to agree with weak turbulent theory: the amplitude of the spectrum decreases with flow rate but increases with discharge current. Estimates of the anomalous collision frequency based on experimental observations indicate that the IAT collision frequency can exceed the classical collision frequency at sufficiently high discharge current densities. Additionally, the onset of the IAT is shown to be correlated with the appearance of a high energy ion tail and that the energy in this tail is comparable to the energy in the experimentally-observed IAT.

  20. Evidence of nonclassical plasma transport in hollow cathodes for electric propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.

    2007-03-15

    Measurements, simplified analyses, and two-dimensional numerical simulations with a fluid plasma model show that classical resistivity cannot account for the elevated electron temperatures and steep plasma potential gradients measured in a 25-27.5 A electric propulsion hollow cathode. The cathode consisted of a 1.5 cm hollow tube with an {approx}0.28 cm diameter orifice and was operated with 5.5 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) of xenon flow using two different anode geometries: a segmented cone and a circular flat plate. The numerical simulations show that classical resistivity yields as much as four times colder electron temperatures compared to the measured values in the orifice and near-plume regions of the cathode. Classical transport and Ohm's law also predict exceedingly high electron-ion relative drift speeds compared to the electron thermal speed (>4). It is found that the addition of anomalous resistivity based on existing growth rate formulas for electron-ion streaming instabilities improves qualitatively the comparison between the numerical results and the time-averaged measurements. Simplified analyses that have been based largely on the axial measurements support the conclusion that additional resistivity is required in Ohm's law to explain the measurements. The combined results from the two-dimensional simulations and the analyses bound the range of enhanced resistivity to be 3-100 times the classical value.

  1. A phenomenological model for orificed hollow cathodes. Ph.D. Thesis, 1 Dec. 1981 - 1 Dec. 1982; [electrostatic thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegfried, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    A quartz hollow tube cathode was used to determine the operating conditions within a mercury orificed hollow cathode. Insert temperature profiles, cathode current distributions, plasma properties profile, and internal pressure-mass flow rate results are summarized and used in a phenomenological model which qualitatively describes electron emission and plasma production processes taking place within the cathode. By defining an idealized ion production region within which most of the plasma processes are concentrated, this model is expressed analytically as a simple set of equations which relate cathode dimensions and specifiable operating conditions, such as mass flow rate and discharge current, to such important parameters as emission surface temperature and internal plasma properties. Key aspects of the model are examined.

  2. Design and Manufacturing Processes of Long-Life Hollow Cathode Assembles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor); Verhey, Timothy R. (Inventor); Soulas, George C. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A process for testing an impregnated insert of a Hollow Cathode Assembly (HCA) subsequent to every exposure of the HCA to air, and prior to ignition, using a heater and an oil-free assembly having a base pressure of less than 5.0 x 10(exp -6) torr. The process comprises the steps of: installing the HCA in a vacuum; energizing the heater to a particular current level; de-energizing the heater after one-half hour; again energizing the heater to a particular current level; and de-energizing the heater for at least one-half hour.

  3. Diagnostics of a steady-state low-pressure hollow cathode arc in argon

    SciTech Connect

    Bessenrodt-Weberpals, M.; Brockhaus, A.; Jauernik, P.; Kempkens, H.; Nieswand, C.; Uhlenbusch, J.

    1986-08-01

    In a steady-state low-pressure hollow cathode arc (HCA) stabilized by a longitudinal magnetic field, the spatial distribution of the argon plasma parameters are investigated. Densities, temperatures, velocities, and fluctuations of electrons, ions, and neutrals are measured by various local methods such as Thomson and Rayleigh scattering and laser-induced fluorescence(LIF). The experimental results are supported by a theoretical treatment of the plasma using a two-fluid model which gives a good description of the dynamics of HCA's.

  4. Modelling of the relaxation of supra-thermal electrons in a hollow cathode arc

    SciTech Connect

    Lunk, A.; Maier, J.; Rohrbach, G.

    1995-12-31

    The plasma of a hollow cathode arc (HCA) consists of four components: neutrals, ions, isotropically distributed electrons and beam-like electrons. The ratio electron collision frequency/plasma can be controlled by variation of the discharge current and the gas pressure in a wide range. Excitation of Langmuir waves and electron-neutral collisions will be discussed as relaxation mechanisms for the beam-like electrons. Excitation of Langmuir waves is considered in the frame of linear and quasilinear theory. The relaxation by electron-neutral collisions is described by solving the Boltzmann equation.

  5. Compact far ultraviolet emission source with rich spectral emission 1150-3100 A. [Pt hollow cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, G. H.; Fastie, W. G.; Yamasaki, G.; Fowler, W.

    1977-01-01

    The article describes a compact hollow Pt cathode emission source for the far UV, developed for use as a high-resolution wavelength standard in laboratory work or on spacecraft (specifically, the NASA International UV Explorer - IUE). The source is small, rugged, lightweight, spectrally rich, bright in the 1150-3200 A region, features long service life, low operating voltage, and lower power drain, and stably emits a large number of very sharp lines with a spectrum lending itself to projection onto the focal plane of a spectrograph. The source has successfully passed exacting environmental tests, and serves as a transfer standard for absolute sensitivity calibration of spectrometric instruments.

  6. Hot ion plasma production in HIP-1 using water-cooled hollow cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.; Lauver, M. R.; Patch, R. W.; Layman, R. W.; Snyder, A.

    1975-01-01

    A steady-state ExB plasma was formed by applying a strong radially inward dc electric field near the mirror throats. Most of the results were for hydrogen, but deuterium and helium plasmas were also studied. Three water-cooled hollow cathodes were operated in the hot-ion plasma mode with the following results: (1) thermally emitting cathodes were not required to achieve the hot-ion mode; (2) steady-state operation (several minutes) was attained; (3) input powers greater than 40 kW were achieved; (4) cathode outside diameters were increased from 1.2 cm (uncooled) to 4.4 cm (water-cooled); (5) steady-state hydrogen plasma with ion temperatures from 185 to 770 eV and electron temperatures from 5 to 21 eV were produced. Scaling relations were empirically obtained for discharge current, ion temperature, electron temperature, and relative ion density as a function of hydrogen gas feed rate, magnetic field, and cathode voltage. Neutrons were produced from deuterium plasma, but it was not established whether thay came from the plasma volume or from the electrode surfaces.

  7. Hot ion plasma production in HIP-1 using water-cooled hollow cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.; Lauver, M. R.; Patch, R. W.; Layman, R. W.; Snyder, A.

    1975-01-01

    The paper reports on hot-ion plasma experiments conducted in a magnetic mirror facility. A steady-state E x B plasma was formed by applying a strong radially inward dc electric field near the mirror throats. Most of the results were for hydrogen, but deuterium and helium plasmas were also studied. Three water-cooled hollow cathodes were operated in the hot-ion plasma mode with the following results: (1) thermally emitting cathodes were not required to achieve the hot-ion mode; (2) steady-state operation (several minutes) was attained; (3) input powers greater than 40 kW were achieved; (4) cathode outside diameters were increased from 1.2 cm (uncooled) to 4.4 cm (water-cooled); (5) steady-state hydrogen plasmas with ion temperatures from 185 to 770 eV and electron temperatures from 5 to 21 eV were produced. Scaling relations were empirically obtained for discharge current, ion temperature, electron temperature, and relative ion density as a function of hydrogen gas feed rate, magnetic field, and cathode voltage.

  8. Criteria of radio-frequency ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge using H{sub 2} and Ar gases for plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsu, Yasunori; Kawasaki, Yujiro

    2013-01-21

    In order to achieve high-density capacitively coupled plasma, a radio-frequency (RF) ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge has been developed as a candidate for processing plasma sources. The plasma density in the hollow cathode discharge reaches a high magnitude of 10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. The RF ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge depends on the pressure and mass of the working gas. Criteria required for producing a RF ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge have been investigated for various gas pressures using H{sub 2} and Ar gases for high-density plasma production. The results reveal that the criteria for the occurrence of the hollow cathode effect are that the trench width should be approximately equal to the sum of the electron-neutral mean free paths and twice the sheath thickness of the RF powered electrode.

  9. DUHOCAMIS: a dual hollow cathode ion source for metal ion beams.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W J; Müller, M W O; Janik, J; Liu, K X; Ren, X T

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we describe a novel ion source named DUHOCAMIS for multiply charged metal ion beams. This ion source is derived from the hot cathode Penning ion gauge ion source (JINR, Dubna, 1957). A notable characteristic is the modified Penning geometry in the form of a hollow sputter electrode, coaxially positioned in a compact bottle-magnetic field along the central magnetic line of force. The interaction of the discharge geometry with the inhomogeneous but symmetrical magnetic field enables this device to be operated as hollow cathode discharge and Penning discharge as well. The main features of the ion source are the very high metal ion efficiency (up to 25%), good operational reproducibility, flexible and efficient operations for low charged as well as highly charged ions, compact setup, and easy maintenance. For light ions, e.g., up to titanium, well-collimated beams in the range of several tens of milliamperes of pulsed ion current (1 ms, 10/s) have been reliably performed in long time runs.

  10. An experimental investigation of hollow cathode-based plasma contactors. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, John D.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results are presented which describe operation of the plasma environment associated with a hollow cathod-based plasma contactor collecting electrons from or emitting them to an ambient, low density Maxwellian plasma. A one-dimensional, phenomenological model of the near-field electron collection process, which was formulated from experimental observations, is presented. It considers three regions, namely, a plasma cloud adjacent to the contactor, an ambient plasma from which electrons are collected, and a double layer region that develops between the contactor plasma cloud and the ambient plasma regions. Results of the electron emission experiments are also presented. An important observation is made using a retarding potential analyzer (RPA) which shows that high energy ions generally stream from a contactor along with the electrons being emitted. A mechanism for this phenomenon is presented and it involves a high rate of ionization induced between electrons and atoms flowing together from the hollow cathode orifice. This can result in the development of a region of high positive potential. Langmuir and RPA probe data suggest that both electrons and ions expand spherically from this hill region. In addition to experimental observations, a one-dimensional model which describes the electron emission process and predicts the phenomena just mentioned is presented and shown to agree qualitatively with these observations.

  11. Surface Charging Controlling of the Chinese Space Station with Hollow Cathode Plasma Contactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Kai; Wang, Xianrong; Qin, Xiaogang; Yang, Shengsheng; Yang, Wei; Zhao, Chengxuan; Chen, Yifeng; Shi, Liang; Tang, Daotan; Xie, Kan

    2016-07-01

    A highly charged manned spacecraft threatens the life of an astronaut and extravehicular activity, which can be effectively reduced by controlling the spacecraft surface charging. In this article, the controlling of surface charging on Chinese Space Station (CSS) is investigated, and a method to reduce the negative potential to the CSS is the emission electron with a hollow cathode plasma contactor. The analysis is obtained that the high voltage (HV) solar array of the CSS collecting electron current can reach 4.5 A, which can be eliminated by emitting an adequate electron current on the CSS. The theoretical analysis and experimental results are addressed, when the minimum xenon flow rate of the hollow cathode is 4.0 sccm, the emission electron current can neutralize the collected electron current, which ensures that the potential of the CSS can be controlled in a range of less than 21 V, satisfied with safety voltage. The results can provide a significant reference value to define a flow rate to the potential controlling programme for CSS.

  12. Broadband microwave characteristics of a novel coaxial gridded hollow cathode argon plasma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ruilin; Yuan, Chengxun; Li, Hui; Jia, Jieshu; Zhou, Zhong-Xiang; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoou; Wu, Jian

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between microwave and large area plasma is crucially important for space communication. Gas pressure, input power, and plasma volume are critical to both the microwave electromagnetic wave phase shift and electron density. This paper presents a novel type of large coaxial gridded hollow cathode plasma having a 50 cm diameter and a 40 cm thickness. Microwave characteristics are studied using a microwave measurement system that includes two broadband antennae in the range from 2 GHz to 18 GHz. The phase shift under varying gas pressure and input power is shown. In addition, the electron density ne, which varies from 1.2 × 10(16) m(-3) to 8.7 × 10(16) m(-3) under different discharge conditions, is diagnosed by the microwave system. The measured results accord well with those acquired by Langmuir Probe measurement and show that the microwave properties in the large volume hollow cathode discharge significantly depend on the input power and gas pressure. PMID:27587122

  13. DUHOCAMIS: a dual hollow cathode ion source for metal ion beams.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W J; Müller, M W O; Janik, J; Liu, K X; Ren, X T

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we describe a novel ion source named DUHOCAMIS for multiply charged metal ion beams. This ion source is derived from the hot cathode Penning ion gauge ion source (JINR, Dubna, 1957). A notable characteristic is the modified Penning geometry in the form of a hollow sputter electrode, coaxially positioned in a compact bottle-magnetic field along the central magnetic line of force. The interaction of the discharge geometry with the inhomogeneous but symmetrical magnetic field enables this device to be operated as hollow cathode discharge and Penning discharge as well. The main features of the ion source are the very high metal ion efficiency (up to 25%), good operational reproducibility, flexible and efficient operations for low charged as well as highly charged ions, compact setup, and easy maintenance. For light ions, e.g., up to titanium, well-collimated beams in the range of several tens of milliamperes of pulsed ion current (1 ms, 10/s) have been reliably performed in long time runs. PMID:18315181

  14. Hollow cathode sustained plasma microjets: Characterization and application to diamond deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, R. Mohan; Giapis, Konstantinos P.

    2002-09-01

    Extending the principle of operation of hollow cathode microdischarges to a tube geometry has allowed the formation of stable, high-pressure plasma microjets in a variety of gases including Ar, He, and H2. Direct current discharges are ignited between stainless steel capillary tubes (d=178 mum) which are operated as the cathode and a metal grid or plate that serves as the anode. Argon plasma microjets can be sustained in ambient air with plasma voltages as low as 260 V for cathode-anode gaps of 0.5 mm. At larger operating voltage, this gap can be extended up to several millimeters. Using a heated molybdenum substrate as the anode, plasma microjets in CH4/H2 mixtures have been used to deposit diamond crystals and polycrystalline films. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of these films shows mainly sp3 carbon content with slight shifting of the diamond peak due to internal stresses. Optical emission spectroscopy of the discharges used in the diamond growth experiments confirms the presence of atomic hydrogen and CH radicals.

  15. Anomalous Broadening of Balmer H{sub {alpha}} Line in Aluminum and Copper Hollow Cathode Glow Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Sisovic, N. M.; Majstorovic, G. Lj.; Konjevic, N.

    2008-10-22

    The presented results are concerned with the shape of Balmer alpha line emitted from a low pressure DC glow discharge with aluminum (Al) and copper (Cu) hollow cathode (HC) in pure H{sub 2} and Ar-H{sub 2} gas mixture. The analysis indicates that the line profile represents a convolution of Gaussian profiles resulting from different collision excitation processes.

  16. Process for Testing Compaction of a Swaged Heater for an Anode Sub-Assembly of a Hollow Cathode Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor); Verhey, Timothy R. R. (Inventor); Soulas, George C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A process for testing compaction of a swaged heater for an anode sub-assembly of a Hollow Cathode Assembly (HCA), in which a test sample is cleaned, its mass measured before and after immersion in kerosene for 24 hours, and a compaction percentage calculated. A swaged heater is rejected if the compaction percentage exceeds 84%, plus or minus 4%.

  17. Hollow electron beam with a pulse length 10/sup -4/ s from a multitip explosive-emission cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilevskii, M.A.; Nikonov, A.G.; Roife, I.M.; Savel'ev, Y.M.; Engel'ko, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    In this letter we report experiments in which a hollow electron beam with a pulse length 0/sup -4/ s is produced. The cathode has a conical working surface of 1.5 x 10/sup -3/ cm/sup 2/ on which there are 500 fine tips made of carbon fibers. (AIP)

  18. A high pressure hollow cathode ionization source for in-situ detection of organic molecules on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, Luther W.; Kanik, Isik

    2001-01-01

    We have designed, constructed and characterized a new high-pressure (1-5 Torr) hollow cathode discharge source (HCDSj that can be utilized as an ionizer in a wide variety of mass analyzers. It is able to function under ambient Martian atmospheric conditions without modification.

  19. Line profile and translational temperature of Pb and metastable He atoms at middle pressures in micro hollow cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Mari; Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi; Hori, Masaru

    2012-10-01

    Hollow cathode discharges have been studied as light sources. Conventional hollow cathode discharges have been operated at low pressure, while micro hollow cathode discharges at near atmospheric pressure. At the middle pressures below 40 kPa, the emission of metallic atoms is observed due to sputtering. Moreover, the line profile of atom shits from a Gaussian to Voigt profile as increasing pressure. In this study, the behaviors of Pb and metastable He atoms in the micro hollow cathode discharge at pressures of the order of kPa have been investigated by diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The pressure broadening effect for absorption line-profile was overlapped to Doppler profile and was estimated to be 0.26 MHz/Pa for metastable He atoms in the range from 5 to 10 kPa. The translational temperature decreased from 830 to 410 K with increasing the pressure. For Pb atoms, the temperature decreased from 820 to 610 K with increasing He pressure from 4.9 to 7.4 kPa. The pressure broadening effect for Pb atom has been estimated to be 0.22 MHz/Pa.

  20. On the Operational Status of the ISS Plasma Contactor Hollow Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Thomas P. (Technical Monitor); Carpenter, Christian B.

    2004-01-01

    The Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) was developed by the Rocketdyne division of The Boeing Company to control charging of the International Space Station (ISS). Each PCU contains a Hollow Cathode Assembly (HCA), which emits the charge control electrons. The HCAs were designed and fabricated at NASA s Glenn Research Center (GRC). GRC's HCA development program included manufacture of engineering, qualification, and flight model HCAs as well as qualification and wear tests. GRC tracks the on-orbit data for the flight HCAs in order to ascertain their overall health. As of April 5, 2004, 43 ignitions and over 6000 hours have been accumulated on a single unit. The flight HCAs continue to operate flawlessly. This paper will discuss the operation of the HCAs during ground tests and on-orbit operation from initial startup to April 30, 2004.

  1. Comparison of On-Orbit and Ground Based Hollow Cathode Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Tom (Technical Monitor); Carpenter, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) was developed by the Rocketdyne division of Boeing to control charging of the International Space Station (ISS). Each PCU contains a Hollow Cathode Assembly (HCA), which emits the charge control electrons. The HCAs were designed and fabricated at NASA's Glenn Research Center (GRC). GRC's HCA development program included manufacture of engineering, qualification, and flight model HCAs as well as wear tests and qualification tests. GRC is currently tracking the on-orbit data for the flight HCAs. This data will be discussed with comparison to operating parameters verified by ground based HCA tests. The flight HCAs continue to operate flawlessly. The first unit has accumulated more than 3650 hours of on-orbit operation and the second unit has accumulated over 5550 hours.

  2. Plasma Treatment of Polyethylene Powder Particles in Hollow Cathode Glow Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolter, Matthias; Quitzau, Meike; Bornholdt, Sven; Kersten, Holger

    2008-09-01

    Polyethylen (PE) is widely used in the production of foils, insulators, packaging materials, plastic bottles etc. Untreated PE is hydrophobic due to its unpolar surface. Therefore, it is hard to print or glue PE and the surface has to be modified before converting. In the present experiments a hollow cathode glow discharge is used as plasma source which is mounted in a spiral conveyor in order to ensure a combines transport of PE powder particles. With this set-up a homogeneous surface treatment of the powder is possible while passing the glow discharge. The plasma treatment causes a remarkable enhancement of the hydrophilicity of the PE powder which can be verified by contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  3. Plasma Treatment of Polyethylene Powder Particles in Hollow Cathode Glow Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Wolter, Matthias; Quitzau, Meike; Bornholdt, Sven; Kersten, Holger

    2008-09-07

    Polyethylen (PE) is widely used in the production of foils, insulators, packaging materials, plastic bottles etc. Untreated PE is hydrophobic due to its unpolar surface. Therefore, it is hard to print or glue PE and the surface has to be modified before converting.In the present experiments a hollow cathode glow discharge is used as plasma source which is mounted in a spiral conveyor in order to ensure a combines transport of PE powder particles. With this set-up a homogeneous surface treatment of the powder is possible while passing the glow discharge. The plasma treatment causes a remarkable enhancement of the hydrophilicity of the PE powder which can be verified by contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  4. Towards a reduced chemistry module of a He-Ar-Cu hollow cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailova, D.; van Dijk, J.; Grozeva, M.; Degrez, G.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.

    2011-05-01

    This study is aimed at finding a reduced chemistry module for a hollow cathode discharge (HCD) excited in a He-Ar-Cu mixture. This enables us to construct lean and reliable models that can be used as a part of the design tool of HCDs. To this end estimative calculations and numerical simulations are performed under optimal conditions for lasing. An analysis of the species behaviour and reactions is made and as a result the model is simplified by means of reducing the number of species and reactions. The consequences of these reductions are justified by comparing the results of the simplified models with those of a more complete one. This study delivers a model that is chemically lean and thus, much less time consuming. It can be used in optimization studies to find the optimum in the plasma control parameter set of HCDs. The technique developed in this study for HCDs can be applied to glow discharges in general.

  5. Cathode sheath and hydrogen Balmer lines modelling in a micro-hollow gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spasojević, Dj

    2012-11-01

    We present a model of the cathode sheath (CS) processes responsible for the broadening of the hydrogen Balmer beta line recorded from a micro-hollow gas discharge (MHGD) and used for simultaneous diagnostics of plasma and CS parameters. The MHGD was generated in a microhole (diameter 100 μm at narrow side and 130 μm at wider side) of a gold-alumina-gold sandwich in the pressure ranges: (100-900) mbar in argon with traces of hydrogen, and (100-400) mbar in pure hydrogen. The electron number density is determined from the plasma broadened line width of the central part of Balmer beta profile, while the average value of electric field strength in the CS and the CS thickness are determined from the extended line wings induced by the dc Stark effect.

  6. Comprehensive parameter study of a micro-hollow cathode discharge containing xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, F.; Davliatchine, E.; Kindel, E.

    2002-09-01

    The micro-hollow cathode (MHC) discharge is investigated with respect to the application as an excimer radiation source, emitting in the VUV-region around 151 nm. For reasons of efficiency and to minimize the mean electrical power input the discharge was driven in pulsed mode. In order to analyse the VUV-generation in a MHC, especially the temporal behaviour of the absolute metastable state density of xenon (1s5) in correlation with the VUV-emission was investigated. In the pulsed discharge a remarkable amount of the radiation is emitted during the temporal afterglow. In this case the excitation conditions support the dominance of ionization processes. The dissociative recombination causes a clearly visible reservoir effect. In the MHC, this effect was evidenced by the measured time dependence of densities and VUV-emission. The 1s5-density was measured to be on the order of 1×1018-1.1×1019 m-3.

  7. Broadband microwave propagation in a novel large coaxial gridded hollow cathode helium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ruilin; Yuan, Chengxun; Liu, Sha; Yue, Feng; Jia, Jieshu; Zhou, Zhongxiang; Wu, Jian; Li, Hui

    2016-06-01

    The broadband microwave propagating characteristics of a novel, large volume, coaxial gridded hollow cathode helium plasma is reported in this paper. The basic plasma parameters were determined using an Impedans Ltd. Langmuir probe under a variety of conditions. The transmission attenuation was recorded by using Scattering Parameters (S-parameters) of a vector network analyzer with the frequency range from 2 GHz to 18 GHz and a propagation model was established using the Z transform finite-difference time-domain method for simulating the transmission of microwave. The effects of both the gas pressure and the input power on the electromagnetic wave propagation are analyzed. The results showed that the computational and experimental results of transmission attenuation were in good agreements. Moreover, the electron density ne and the effective collision rate ν c were found to play important roles in the propagation of microwave.

  8. Low-frequency flute instabilities of a hollow cathode arc discharge - Theory and experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilic, D. B.; Rognlien, T. D.; Self, S. A.; Crawford, F. W.

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of two low-frequency electrostatic flute instabilities of a low-pressure hollow cathode arc discharge are reported. Mode I has azimuthal mode number m = 1, and occurs when the radial electric field is negative (directed inward), while mode II has m = - 1 and occurs when the field is positive. The radial electric field is controlled by varying the potential of a secondary anode cylinder located close to the outer discharge radius. A linear perturbation analysis, based on the two-fluid equations, is given for a low-beta, collisionless, cylindrical plasma column, immersed in a uniform axial magnetic field, having a Gaussian density profile and an arbitrary radial electric field profile. Reasonable correlation between theory and experiment is demonstrated for both modes.

  9. Spectroscopic study of hydrogen rotational, vibrational and translational temperatures in a hollow cathode glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majstorovic, G. Lj.

    2008-07-01

    Hydrogen hollow cathode glow discharges (HCGD) have been extensively used for study of fundamental discharge processes as well as for wide variety of applications. For instance, recently, this type of discharge was utilized for producing hydrogen by reforming natural gas (da Silva et al. 2006). The translational or gas kinetic temperature in gas discharges is a parameter of utmost importance in the field of plasma chemistry while vibrationally excited neutral hydrogen molecules play significant role in the chemistry of weakly ionized hydrogen plasmas. This is why the modeling of cold, reactive hydrogen plasma includes rotational and vibrational energy of the hydrogen molecule. This is the reason why we study HC discharge parameters like rotational, translational and vibrational temperature. Several diagnostic techniques are developed to determine gas kinetic temperature T_g like coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering (CARS), laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Here we selected OES. This diagnostic technique provides information about atom, molecule and ion density in excited and ground state, as well as rotational, vibrational, and gas temperature including the excitation temperature of certain group of excited levels. The technique is applied for measurements of the rotational T_rot, vibrational T_vib and determines translational temperatures in a hollow cathode glow discharge in hydrogen. The rotational temperature of excited electron energy levels is determined from the Boltzmann plot of intensities of rotational moleculelar hydrogen lines belonging to Fulcher-alpha diagonal bands. Following procedure described elsewhere (Astashkevich et al. 2006) the temperature of ground state rovibronic levels is evaluated. The constrains of rotational temperature are discussed in detail. The vibrational temperature is also determined, but from the relative intensities of the H_2 Fulcher-alpha diagonal bands. The dependence of these

  10. PIC/MCC Simulation of Radio Frequency Hollow Cathode Discharge in Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qing; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Lianzhu

    2016-01-01

    A two-dimensional PIC/MCC model is developed to simulate the nitrogen radio frequency hollow cathode discharge (rf-HCD). It is found that both the sheath oscillation heating and the secondary electron heating together play a role to maintain the rf-HCD under the simulated conditions. The mean energy of ions (N2+, N+) in the negative glow region is greater than the thermal kinetic energy of the molecular gas (N2), which is an important characteristic of rf-HCD. During the negative portion of the hollow electrode voltage cycle, electrons mainly follow pendulum movement and produce a large number of ionization collisions in the plasma region. During the positive voltage of the rf cycle, the axial electric field becomes stronger and its direction is pointing to the anode (substrate), therefore the ions move toward the anode (substrate) via the axial electric field acceleration. Compared with dc-HCD, rf-HCD is more suitable for serving as a plasma jet nozzle at low pressure. supported by Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (No. A2012205072)

  11. Numerical Simulations of the Partially-Ionized Gas in a 100-A LaB6 Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Goebel, Dan M.; Jorns, Benjamin A.; Polk, James E.; Guerrero, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations of a hollow cathode with a LaB6 emitter operating at 100 A have been performed for the first time using the 2-D Orificed Cathode (OrCa2D) code. Results for a variety of plasma properties are presented and compared with laboratory measurements. The large size of the device permits peak electron number densities in the cathode interior that are lower than those established in the NSTAR hollow cathode, which operates with a 7.3x lower discharge current and 3.2x lower mass flow rate. Also, despite the higher discharge current in the LaB6 cathode, the maximum electron current density is lower, by 4.2x, than that in the NSTAR cathode due to the larger orifice size. Simulations and direct measurements show that at 12 sccm of xenon flow the peak emitter temperature is in the range of 1594-1630 C. It is also found that the conditions for the excitement of current-driven streaming instabilities and ion-acoustic turbulence (IAT) are satisfied in this cathode, similarly to what was found in the past in its smaller counterparts like the NSTAR cathode. Based on numerical simulations, it has long been argued that these instabilities may be responsible for the anomalously large ion energies that have been measured in these discharges as well as for the enhancement of the plasma resistivity. Confirmation of the presence of IAT in this cathode is presented for the first time in a companion paper.

  12. A thin-walled metallic hollow cathode as an atomizer for Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeyev, A. A.; Sholupov, S. E.

    1998-03-01

    A new kind of glow discharge atomizer, a thin-walled metallic hollow cathode (TMHC) combined with Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry using high frequency modulated light polarization (ZAAS-HFM), is studied. A theoretically suggested, and experimentally confirmed, model of the atom confinement in the TMHC yields the appearance of the diffusion traps for atoms at both ends of the cathode, which increases the residence time of the analyte atoms in the analysis volume. The high atomization efficiency in the glow discharge atomizer (caused by the ionic-thermal mechanism of sputtering) and the high selectivity of ZAAS-HFM are demonstrated in the analysis of complex matrix samples such as whole blood and urine. The analytical system TMHC + ZAAS-HFM is characterized by low detection limits, which are comparable to those of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Owing to its rather low average power consumption (30-50 W) the TMHC can be used in a portable and mobile spectrometer, and is therefore suitable for the in situ analysis of various sample materials.

  13. Hollow K0.27MnO2 Nanospheres as Cathode for High-Performance Aqueous Sodium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Qiao, Yun; Lou, Xiangdong; Zhang, Xinhe; Zhang, Wuxing; Huang, Yunhui

    2016-06-15

    Hollow K0.27MnO2 nanospheres as cathode material were designed for aqueous sodium ion batteries (SIBs) using polystyrene (PS) as a template. The samples were systematically studied by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. As cathode materials for aqueous SIBs, the hollow structure can effectively improve the sodium storage property. A coin cell with hollow K0.27MnO2 as cathode and NaTi2(PO4)3 as anode exhibits a specific capacity of 84.9 mA h g(-1) at 150 mA g(-1), and the capacity of 56.6 mA h g(-1) is still maintained at an extremely high current density of 600 mA g(-1). For full cell measurement at the current density of 200 mA g(-1), 83% capacity retention also can be attained after 100 cycles. The as-designed hollow K0.27MnO2 nanospheres demonstrate long cyclability and high rate capability, which grant the potential for application in advanced aqueous SIBs.

  14. Tungsten and Barium Transport in the Internal Plasma of Hollow Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the flow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushedback to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. Thisbarium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream endgreater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length,so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollowcathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  15. Evanescent wave fields at the plasma frequency in a microwave-generated hollow-cathode plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, J.

    2006-08-01

    The different discharge regimes of the double-plate hollow-cathode are analysed with respect to the high plasmon levels, which are measured by the spectroscopic plasma-satellite method. The high-current glow discharge at start up creates a preplasma, which lets charging half-cycles start in an alternating order from both cathodes. They follow a cylindric boundary surrounding the central plasma cylinder, which exceeds the cut-off density, and thus constitute a self sustaining microwave oscillator. The ions from anodic space are radially attracted by the scattered Hertzian electrons and approach the central plasma, where they get neutralized upon penetrating the boundary, which is steadily displacing. Below the spiking threshold these ions of a high final radial velocity are responsible for the rapidly growing plasma core, whose expansion velocity has a strong cooling effect on the radial electron kinetic energy. Then a Lorentzian line shape indicating critical damping over a single oscillation is found for the near and the far satellites to the forbidden component of the helium I 447 nm line, corresponding to a field of up to 4 kV cm-1. The rotating wave approximation allows us to derive the exponential damping of the field envelope. The other solution of the rotating wave approximation is associated with the reflection of microwaves at the plasma boundary. Above the spiking threshold the production of wave fields around the plasma frequency in the central region is continued by the 4 ns current spikes. But the boundary conditions of high-current electron-neutral scattering require a spatially evanescent Green's function, therefore within both regions 2 mm adjacent to the cathode surfaces no plasma-satellites are then found.

  16. High pressure hollow electrode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbach, K.H.; El-Habachi, A.; Shi, W.; Ciocca, M.

    1997-12-31

    Reduction of the cathode hole diameter into the submillimeter range has allowed the authors to extend the pressure range for hollow electrode discharge operation to values on the order of 50 Torr. In recent experiments with cathode holes of 0.2 mm diameter they obtained stable glow discharge operation up to approximately 900 Torr in argon. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of these discharges (with currents ranging from the ten`s of {micro}A to ten mA) show three distinct discharge modes: at low current, a discharge with positive differential resistivity, followed by a range with strong increase in current and reduction in voltage, and, at high current, again a resistive discharge mode. For low pressure (< 100 Torr) these modes correspond to the predischarge, hollow cathode discharge (sustained by pendulum electrons), and abnormal glow discharge, respectively. At higher pressure the discharge in the short gap system (anode-cathode distance: 0.25 mm) changes from a hollow cathode discharge to, what seems to be a pulseless partial glow discharge. In hollow cathode discharges operated in the torr range the electron energy distribution is known to be strongly non-maxwellian with a large concentration of electrons at energies greater than 30 eV. This holds also for hollow cathode discharge at high pressure and for partial discharges as indicated by the presence of strong excimer lines in the VUV spectrum of Ar-discharges at 128 nm and Xe-discharges at 172 nm. The resistive characteristic of high pressure hollow electrode discharges over a large range of current allows them to generate arrays of these discharges for use as flat panel, direct current, excimer lamps.

  17. Ozone Generation by a DC Driven Micro-Hollow Cathode Discharge in Nitrogen-Mixed Oxygen Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamatake, Atsushi; Yasuoka, Koichi; Ishii, Shozo

    2004-09-01

    The ozone generation characteristic of a DC driven micro-hollow cathode discharge was studied in nitrogen-mixed oxygen gas flow. An ozone concentration of 13.7 g/Nm3 was obtained at an efficiency of 97 g/kWh in pure oxygen. However, ozone concentrations of 8.2 g/Nm3 and 25 ppm ozone were obtained in gas mixtures of 4% and 80% N2-mixed oxygen gases, respectively. There was a threshold specific energy above which ozone concentration markedly decreased. High-energy electrons dissociate the nitrogen molecules and generate NO and NO2 which accelerate the ozone decomposition in high-power-density plasmas such as a micro-hollow cathode discharge.

  18. Process for thermal imaging scanning of a swaged heater for an anode subassembly of a hollow cathode assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor); Verhey, Timothy R. R. (Inventor); Soulas, George C. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A process for thermal imaging scanning of a swaged heater of an anode subassembly of a hollow cathode assembly, comprising scanning a swaged heater with a thermal imaging radiometer to measure a temperature distribution of the heater; raising the current in a power supply to increase the temperature of the swaged heater; and measuring the swaged heater temperature using the radiometer, whereupon the temperature distribution along the length of the heater shall be less than plus or minus 5 degrees C.

  19. Autonomous portable pulsed-periodical generator of high-power radiofrequency-pulses based on gas discharge with hollow cathode.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Sergey V; Dubinov, Alexander E; L'vov, Igor L; Popolev, Vyacheslav L; Sadovoy, Sergey A; Sadchikov, Eugeny A; Selemir, Victor D; Valiulina, Valeria K; Vyalykh, Dmitry V; Zhdanov, Victor S

    2016-05-01

    Portable autonomous generator of high-power RF-pulses based on the gas discharge with hollow cathode has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Input and output characteristics are the following: discharge current amplitude is 800 A, duration of generated RF-pulses is 350 ns, carrier frequency is ∼90 MHz, power in RF-pulse is 0.5 MW, pulse repetition rate is 0.5 kHz, and device efficiency is ∼25%.

  20. Autonomous portable pulsed-periodical generator of high-power radiofrequency-pulses based on gas discharge with hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulychev, Sergey V.; Dubinov, Alexander E.; L'vov, Igor L.; Popolev, Vyacheslav L.; Sadovoy, Sergey A.; Sadchikov, Eugeny A.; Selemir, Victor D.; Valiulina, Valeria K.; Vyalykh, Dmitry V.; Zhdanov, Victor S.

    2016-05-01

    Portable autonomous generator of high-power RF-pulses based on the gas discharge with hollow cathode has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Input and output characteristics are the following: discharge current amplitude is 800 A, duration of generated RF-pulses is 350 ns, carrier frequency is ˜90 MHz, power in RF-pulse is 0.5 MW, pulse repetition rate is 0.5 kHz, and device efficiency is ˜25%.

  1. Life Testing of the Hollow Cathode Plasma Contactor for the ProSEDS Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Schneider, Todd A.; Finckenor, Miria M.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) mission is designed to provide an on-orbit demonstration of the electrodynamic propulsion capabilities of tethers in space. The ProSEDS experiment will be a secondary payload on a Delta 11 unmanned expendable booster. A 5-km conductive tether is attached to the Delta 11 second stage and collects current from the low Earth orbit (LEO) plasma. A hollow cathode plasma contactor emits the collected electrons from the Delta II, completing the electrical circuit with the ambient plasma. The current flowing through the tether generates thrust based on the Lorentz Force Law. The thrust will be generated opposite to the velocity vector, slowing down the spacecraft and causing it to de-orbit in approximately 14 days compared to the normal 6 months. A 10-km non-conductive tether is between the conductive tether and an endmass containing several scientific instruments. The ProSEDS mission lifetime was set at I day because most of the primary objectives can be met in that time. The extended ProSEDS mission will be for as many days as possible, until the Delta 11 second stage burns up or the tether is severed by a micrometeoroid or space debris particle. The Hollow Cathode Plasma Contactor (HCPC) unit has been designed for a 12-day mission. Because of the science requirements to measure the background ambient plasma, the HCPC must operate on a duty cycle. Later in the ProSEDS mission, the HCPC is operated in a manner to allow charging of the secondary battery. Due to the unusual operating requirements by the ProSEDS mission, a development unit of the HCPC was built for thorough testing. This developmental unit was tested for a simulated ProSEDS mission, with measurements of the ability to start and stop during the duty cycle. These tests also provided valuable data for the ProSEDS software requirements. Qualification tests of the HCPC flight hardware are also discussed.

  2. Role of electrostatic and magnetic electron confinement in a hollow-cathode glow discharge in a nonuniform magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Metel, A. S. Grigoriev, S. N.; Volosova, M. A.; Bolbukov, V. P.; Melnik, Yu. A.

    2015-02-15

    Glow discharge with electron confinement in an electrostatic trap has been studied. The trap is formed by a cylindrical hollow cathode, as well as by a flat target on its bottom and a grid covering its output aperture, both being negatively biased relative to the cathode. At a gas pressure of 0.2–0.4 Pa, the fraction of ions sputtering the target (δ = 0.13) in the entire number of ions emitted by the uniform discharge plasma corresponds to the ratio of the target surface area to the total surface area of the cathode, grid, and target. When a nonuniform magnetic field with force lines passing through the target center (where the magnetic induction reaches 35 mT), as well as through the grid, hollow cathode, and target periphery (where the field lines are arc-shaped), is applied to the trap, its influence on the discharge depends on the magnetic induction B{sub 0} at the target edge. At B{sub 0} = 1 mT, the electrons emitted from the target periphery and drifting azimuthally in the arc-shaped field insignificantly contribute to gas ionization. Nevertheless, since fast electrons that are emitted from the cathode and oscillate inside it are forced by the magnetic field to come more frequently to the target, thereby intensifying gas ionization near the latter, the fraction δ doubles and the plasma density near the target becomes more than twice as high as that near the grid. At B{sub 0} = 6 mT, the contribution of electrons emitted from the target surface to gas ionization near the target grows up and δ increases two more times. At cathode-target voltages in the range of 0–3 kV, the current in the target circuit vanishes as the voltage between the anode and the cathode decreases to zero.

  3. Simultaneous monitoring of multimetallic atom densities in plasma processes employing a multimicrohollow cathode lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi; Tachibana, Yoshihiro; Taneda, Satoshi; Takashima, Seigo; Hori, Masaru; Kano, Hiroyuki; Den, Shoji

    2007-06-18

    The authors have developed a simultaneous measurement technique of multimetallic atom densities in process plasmas using absorption spectroscopy employing a multimicrohollow cathode plasma as a light source. The optical emissions of four metallic atoms of Cu, Zn, Fe, and Mo were simultaneously produced from the multimicrohollow cathode plasma of millimeter size. The absolute densities of Cu and Mo in the magnetron sputtering plasma were simultaneously measured using this technique. The simultaneous monitoring of multimetallic atoms is very useful for controlling the plasma processes precisely.

  4. Influence of metastable atoms in the simulation of hollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    He, Shoujie; Liu, Shumin; Jing, Ha; Ouyang, Jiting

    2013-12-15

    The characteristics of hollow cathode discharge are investigated by using two-dimensional fluid model combined with a transport model for metastable atoms (F-M model) in argon. It shows that the stepwise ionization is one of main important mechanism for electrons production. The distribution of electric potential, density of electrons, ions, and metastable atoms are calculated with a pressure of 10 Torr and a voltage of 250 V. The peak density of electron and ion is 1.2×10{sup 13} cm{sup −3}, and the peak density of metastable atoms is 3.5×10{sup 13} cm{sup −3}. The results obtained in F-M model are compared with that in fluid model (without metastable atoms involved). Metastable atoms are found to play an important role in the discharge. In addition, with the increase of pressure and voltage, the percentage of stepwise ionization in the total ionization increase, and the difference of discharge characteristics simulated by these two kinds of models rises.

  5. Flux and energy analysis of species in hollow cathode magnetron ionized physical vapor deposition of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L.; Ko, E.; Dulkin, A.; Park, K. J.; Fields, S.; Leeser, K.; Meng, L.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2010-12-01

    To meet the stringent requirements of interconnect metallization for sub-32 nm technologies, an unprecedented level of flux and energy control of film forming species has become necessary to further advance ionized physical vapor deposition technology. Such technology development mandates improvements in methods to quantify the metal ion fraction, the gas/metal ion ratio, and the associated ion energies in the total ion flux to the substrate. In this work, a novel method combining planar Langmuir probes, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), and gridded energy analyzer (GEA) custom instrumentation is developed to estimate the plasma density and temperature as well as to measure the metal ion fraction and ion energy. The measurements were conducted in a Novellus Systems, Inc. Hollow Cathode Magnetron (HCMTM) physical vapor deposition source used for deposition of Cu seed layer for 65-130 nm technology nodes. The gridded energy analyzer was employed to measure ion flux and ion energy, which was compared to the collocated planar Langmuir probe data. The total ion-to-metal neutral ratio was determined by the QCM combined with GEA. The data collection technique and the corresponding analysis are discussed. The effect of concurrent resputtering during the deposition process on film thickness profile is also discussed.

  6. Optogalvanic single-color multiphoton ionization spectroscopy of uranium in a hollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, S.; Babin, F.; Gagne, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    Single color multiphoton ionization spectra of atoms can be obtained using the fast pulsed ({approximately} 10{sup {minus}9} s) optogalvanic signal generated by photoionization in the dark space of a hollow cathode discharge. Such spectra have been measured for uranium in the spectral range of rhodamine 6G with a high laser bandwidth excitation (0.3 cm{sup {minus}1}). In the process of ascribing an ionization scheme to each line through the known levels of uranium, many possibilities appear. In order to help the authors select the correct scheme, they perturbed the atomic level population distribution by optical pumping of the 16900.37 cm{sup {minus}1} level ({sup 7}M{sub 7}). The spectrum obtained this way show many new strong lines. They try to explain these lines by a three photon resonant or quasi-resonant scheme, using known levels of uranium, or by a two photon scheme from the 16900.37 cm{sup {minus}1} level. In both perturbed and unperturbed spectra, many ionization schemes are still possible for each line. For this reason the authors have performed higher resolution scans of selected lines (in particular 5915.4{angstrom}) in order to confirm the existence of more than one scheme for many lines.

  7. An investigation of conducted and radiated emissions from a hollow-cathode plasma contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchholtz, Brett W.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation conducted on the electrical interference induced by the operation of a hollow-cathode plasma contractor in a ground-based facility is described. The types of electrical interference, or noise, which are important to Space Station Freedom designers are classified as either conducted or radiated emissions. The procedures required to perform conducted and radiated emission measurements on a plasma contactor are examined. The experimental data obtained are typically examined in the frequency domain (i.e. amplitudes of the noise fluctuations versus frequency). Results presented indicate the conducted emissions, which are the current fluctuations from the contactor into the space station wiring, are affected by operating parameters such as expellant flow rate and discharge current. The radiated emissions, which are the electromagnetic waves induced and emitted by the contactor, appear to be influenced by the contactor emission current. Other experimental results suggest possible sources which are responsible for the observed noise. For example, the influence of the plasma environment downstream from the contactor on noise emission levels is described. In addition, a brief discussion is given on the correlation between conducted and radiated emissions and the mechanisms through which both are influenced by the plasma downstream of the contactor.

  8. Emission spectroscopy of anharmonic vibrational series for micro-hollow cathode discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano F., A.; Juárez, A. M.

    2013-09-01

    The field of micro plasmas is currently very active, due to the useful properties and potential applications of micro-hollow cathode discharges.Our group is currently developing these discharge characterization techniques and, as a first obvious starting point, we are performing emission spectroscopy in normal discharges. The focus of this particular contribution is to present a study of vibrational eigenvalues of Morse potential for diatomic molecules. We performed the experimental measurements of these eigenvalues using a high resolution optical monochromator and a parallel plate nitrogen discharge in the glow regime. In particular we determined using this simple arrangement the ro-vibration transitions in N2, between the electronic states C3Πu -B1Πg . Moreover, we evaluated theoretically the anharmonic eigenvalues of these transitions using Wigner function for a Morse potential. Based on experimental measurements and making use of the calculated Franck-Condon factors it is possible to extract energy potential parameters of these energy states directly from measured transitions. In particular we have calculated the internuclear separation between the excited states associated with the vibrational transitions observed. This work was funded by the grant DGAPA-PAPIIT IT100613.

  9. A global model of the self-pulsing regime of micro-hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaroni, C.; Chabert, P.

    2012-03-01

    A global (volume-averaged) model of the self-pulsing regime of micro-hollow cathode discharges working in argon gas is proposed. The power balance is done using an equivalent circuit model of the discharge that allows the current and voltage dynamics to be calculated. The fraction of the total power dissipated in the discharge that contributes to electron heating is deduced from a sheath model previously described. The particle balance is first done in a very simplified reaction scheme involving only electrons, argon atomic ions, and argon molecular ions. In a second step, the excited states (the metastable state Ar*(3P2) and the resonant state Ar*(3P1)) are included in the particle balance equations. The models are compared to experiments and several conclusions are drawn. The model without excited states underestimates the electron density and does not capture well the trends in pressure. The model with the excited states is in better agreement which shows that multi-step ionization plays a significant role. The time-evolution of the electron density follows closely that of the discharge current but the excited states density presents two peaks: (i) the first at the early stage of the current peak due to direct excitation with high electron temperature, (ii) the second at the end of the current (and electron density) peak due to large production of excited states by electron-ion recombination at very low electron temperature.

  10. A global model of the self-pulsing regime of micro-hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaroni, Claudia; Chabert, Pascal

    2011-10-01

    A global model of the self-pulsing regime of Micro-Hollow Cathode Discharges (MHCD's) working in argon gas is proposed. The power balance is done using an equivalent circuit model of the discharge that allows the current and voltage dynamics to be calculated. The fraction of the total power dissipated in the discharge that contributes to electron heating is deduced from a sheath model. The particle balance is first done in a very simplified reaction scheme involving only electrons, argon atomic ions and argon molecular ions. In a second step, the excited states are included in the particle balance equations. The models are compared to experiments and several conclusions are drawn. The model without excited states underestimates the electron density and does not capture well the trends in pressure. The model with the excited states is in better agreement which shows that multi-step ionization plays a significant role. The time-evolution of the electron density follows closely that of the discharge current but the excited states density presents two peaks: (i) the first at the early stage of the current peak due to direct excitation with high electron temperature, (ii) the second at the end of the current (and electron density) peak due to large production of excited states by electron-ion recombination at very low electron temperature.

  11. Electrical and emission spectroscopic investigation of a self-pulsing micro hollow cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Beilei; Mohr, Sebastian; Luggenhoelscher, Dirk; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2009-10-01

    Micro hollow cathode discharges (MHCD) consist of two electrodes separated by a thin dielectric (here: 100 μm). The discharge develops in a hole penetrating all three foils (200 μm diameter). When powered by a DC voltage of several 100 V, the discharge shows self-pulsing operation. Voltage and current measurements, optical emission measurements by an ICCD camera equipped with a microscope lens as well as the determination of electron density from the Stark broadening of the Hβ-line are performed in argon at pressure from several 1000 Pa to atmospheric pressure. The voltage-current characteristic during self-pulsing indicates a transition from abnormal mode to spark mode as in a DC glow discharge. The pulse frequency can range from kHz up to about 1 MHz and depends on the capacitance of the discharge setup. The pulse width can be as short as several 10 ns and the current peaks can be as high as 1 A. With the appearance of the self-pulsing the electron density increases from the order of 10^15 cm-3 during the non self-pulsing operation to the order of 10^16 cm-3. A comparison of the plasma conductivity obtained from the performed measurements with the electrical measurements shows excellent quantitative agreement.

  12. Discharge Hollow Cathode and Extraction Grid Analysis for the MiXI Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard; Sullivan, Regina; Przybylowski, JoHanna; Silva, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Miniature ion thrusters are well-suited future space missions such as Terrestrial Planet Finder - Interferometer (TPF-I), where high efficiency thrusters using non-contaminating noble gas propellant are desirable. Transient dynamic and orbital analyses have shown that the low-noise, continuous thrust of the Miniature Xenon Ion (MiXI) thruster is desirable for TPF-I formation rotation maneuvers when compared with other thruster options [1], [2]. The 3cm diameter MiXI thruster, Figure 1, was originally designed using experimental methods and is capable of high Isp (> 3,000 sec), propellant efficiency > 80%, and thrust from <0.1 mN to >1.5 mN [3]. The MiXI thruster must demonstrate high levels of thrust resolution and a low minimum impulse bit to ensure it meets the precision formation flying needs of missions such as TPF-I. A novel concept for controlling the ion extraction voltages yields the necessary thrust characteristics for the MiXI thruster. Experiments verify these techniques and two dimensional computational models show that such techniques should have minimal effect on the lifetime of the thruster. During this effort, the MiXI thruster incorporates, for the first time, flight like hollow cathodes for both the discharge chamber and beam neutralization.

  13. Flux and energy analysis of species in hollow cathode magnetron ionized physical vapor deposition of copper

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L.; Ko, E.; Dulkin, A.; Park, K. J.; Fields, S.; Leeser, K.; Meng, L.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2010-12-15

    To meet the stringent requirements of interconnect metallization for sub-32 nm technologies, an unprecedented level of flux and energy control of film forming species has become necessary to further advance ionized physical vapor deposition technology. Such technology development mandates improvements in methods to quantify the metal ion fraction, the gas/metal ion ratio, and the associated ion energies in the total ion flux to the substrate. In this work, a novel method combining planar Langmuir probes, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), and gridded energy analyzer (GEA) custom instrumentation is developed to estimate the plasma density and temperature as well as to measure the metal ion fraction and ion energy. The measurements were conducted in a Novellus Systems, Inc. Hollow Cathode Magnetron (HCM{sup TM}) physical vapor deposition source used for deposition of Cu seed layer for 65-130 nm technology nodes. The gridded energy analyzer was employed to measure ion flux and ion energy, which was compared to the collocated planar Langmuir probe data. The total ion-to-metal neutral ratio was determined by the QCM combined with GEA. The data collection technique and the corresponding analysis are discussed. The effect of concurrent resputtering during the deposition process on film thickness profile is also discussed.

  14. Magnetic control of breakdown: Toward energy-efficient hollow-cathode magnetron discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, O.; Romanov, M.; Kumar, S.; Zong, X. X.; Ostrikov, K.

    2011-03-15

    Characteristics of electrical breakdown of a planar magnetron enhanced with an electromagnet and a hollow-cathode structure, are studied experimentally and numerically. At lower pressures the breakdown voltage shows a dependence on the applied magnetic field, and the voltage necessary to achieve the self-sustained discharge regime can be significantly reduced. At higher pressures, the dependence is less sensitive to the magnetic field magnitude and shows a tendency of increased breakdown voltage at the stronger magnetic fields. A model of the magnetron discharge breakdown is developed with the background gas pressure and the magnetic field used as parameters. The model describes the motion of electrons, which gain energy by passing the electric field across the magnetic field and undergo collisions with neutrals, thus generating new bulk electrons. The electrons are in turn accelerated in the electric field and effectively ionize a sufficient amount of neutrals to enable the discharge self-sustainment regime. The model is based on the assumption about the combined classical and near-wall mechanisms of electron conductivity across the magnetic field, and is consistent with the experimental results. The obtained results represent a significant advance toward energy-efficient multipurpose magnetron discharges.

  15. Characteristics of a vacuum spark triggered by the transient hollow cathode discharge electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.S.; Ong, C.X.; Moo, S.P.; Choi, P.

    1995-06-01

    The discharge characteristics of a vacuum spark triggered by the transient hollow cathode discharge (THCD) electron beam is investigated over a wide variety of discharge conditions. Two systems of the vacuum spark device have been considered--the first system powered by eight 2,700-pF doorknob capacitors charged to a voltage of 40 kV (input energy of 17.6 J); while the second system employs a single 1.85-{micro}F Maxwell capacitor discharged at a voltage of 20 kV (input energy of 370 J). The operating pressure of these systems has been varied over the range of 10{sup {minus}2} to 10{sup {minus}5} mbar in order to examine the effect of the operating pressure on the plasma formation of the vacuum spark discharge. The effectiveness of plasma heating has been found to be significantly enhanced in the two vacuum spark systems studied here. In particular, the plasma of the 17.6 J system has been observed to be heated to a condition hot enough to emit in the X-ray region when the operating pressure is reduced from 10{sup {minus}2} to 10{sup {minus}5} mbar. Similarly, in the case of the 370 J system, hot spot formation is also observed to occur only at a low operating pressure of 10{sup {minus}4} mbar.

  16. A global model of the self-pulsing regime of micro-hollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzaroni, C.; Chabert, P.

    2012-03-01

    A global (volume-averaged) model of the self-pulsing regime of micro-hollow cathode discharges working in argon gas is proposed. The power balance is done using an equivalent circuit model of the discharge that allows the current and voltage dynamics to be calculated. The fraction of the total power dissipated in the discharge that contributes to electron heating is deduced from a sheath model previously described. The particle balance is first done in a very simplified reaction scheme involving only electrons, argon atomic ions, and argon molecular ions. In a second step, the excited states (the metastable state Ar*({sup 3}P{sub 2}) and the resonant state Ar*({sup 3}P{sub 1})) are included in the particle balance equations. The models are compared to experiments and several conclusions are drawn. The model without excited states underestimates the electron density and does not capture well the trends in pressure. The model with the excited states is in better agreement which shows that multi-step ionization plays a significant role. The time-evolution of the electron density follows closely that of the discharge current but the excited states density presents two peaks: (i) the first at the early stage of the current peak due to direct excitation with high electron temperature, (ii) the second at the end of the current (and electron density) peak due to large production of excited states by electron-ion recombination at very low electron temperature.

  17. Characterization of Downstream Ion Energy Distributions From a High Current Hollow Cathode in a Ring Cusp Discharge Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    The presence of energetic ions produced by a hollow cathodes operating at high emission currents (greater than 10 Angstroms) has been documented in the literature. As part of an ongoing effort to uncover the underlying physics of the formation of these ions, ion efflux from a high current hollow cathode operating in an ion thruster discharge chamber was investigated. Using a spherical sector electrostatic energy analyzer located downstream of the discharge cathode, the ion energy distribution over a 0 to 60 eV energy range was measured. The sensitivity of the ion energy distribution function to zenith angle was also assessed at 3 different positions: 0, 15, and 25 degrees. The measurements suggest that the majority of the ion current at the measuring point falls into the analyzer with an energy approximately equal to the discharge voltage. The ion distribution, however, was found to be quite broad. The high energy tail of the distribution function tended to grow with increasing discharge current. Sensitivity of the profiles to flow rate at fixed discharge current was also investigated. A simple model is presented that provides a potential mechanism for the production of ions with energies above the discharge voltage.

  18. Electronic Transition Spectra of Thiophenoxy and Phenoxy Radicals in Hollow Cathode Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Mitsunori; Wako, Hiromichi; Niwayama, Kei; Tsukiyama, Koichi

    2014-06-01

    Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) still remain the longest standing unsolved problem in spectroscopy and astrochemistry, although several hundreds of DIBs have been already detected. It is expected that identifications of DIBs can give us crucial information for extraterrestrial organic molecule. One of the best approaches to identify carrier molecules of DIBs is a measurement of DIB candidate molecule produced in the laboratory to compare their absorption spectra with astronomically observed DIB spectra. Radical in a gas phase is a potential DIB candidate molecule. The electronic transitions of polyaromatic hydrocarbon radicals result in optical absorption. However, because radicals are unstable, their electronic transitions are difficult to observe using a laboratory spectrometer system. To solve this difficulty, we have developed a glow-discharge cell using a hollow cathode in which radicals can be effectively produced as a high-density plasma. The radicals produced were measured by using the cavity ringdown (CRD) spectrometer and the discharge emission spectrometer. The CRD spectrometer, which consists of a tunable pulse laser system, an optical cavity and a discharge device, is an apparatus to observe an high-resolution optical absorption spectrum. The electronic transition of the thiophenoxy radical C6H5OS was observed in the discharge emission of thiophenol C6H5OH. The electronic transition frequency of the thiophenoxy radical was measured. A optical discharge emission was examined by using a HORIBA Jobin Yvon iHR320 monochromator. We detected the phenoxy radical C6H5O in the discharge of phenol C6H5OH. The band observed at 6107 Å in the discharge was assigned to the electronic transition of the phenoxy radical on the basis of the sample gas dependences and the reported low resolution spectrum. The electronic transition frequency of the phenoxy radical was measured. Comparison studies of the thiophenoxy and phenoxy radicals were made with known DIB spectra

  19. Spectroscopic investigation of high-pressure micro-hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chao; Wang, Youqing

    2006-02-01

    Micro-hollow cathode discharge (MHCD), as a high-pressure glow discharge, has many applications in industry. Theclosed-MHCD is investigated experimentally in argon in the paper. The relations between breakdown voltages of glow discharge and gas pressure in argon are measured. Minimum breakdown voltages obtained, are about 520V at 200Torr argon. The differential resistivity of the voltage-current characteristics for all of the pressure studied is positive. Strong optical emission from the closed-MHCD is also observed. Measurement of electron temperature is carried out by optical emission spectroscopy. The electron temperature was about 1eV at the pressure from 200Torr to 760Torr and at the discharge current from 0.5mA to 10mA. An increase in pressure of the working gas leads to a slight decrease in electron temperature. The electron number density and gas temperature of closed-MHCD was investigated by diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy. The gas temperature and the electron number density were evaluated from the analysis of the absorption line profiles, taking into account significant Stark broadening mechanisms. The gas temperature was found to increase with pressure from 1100K to 2100K. The electron number density was calculated from Stark broadening and shift, and it ranges from 7×10 14 to 1.5×10 15cm -3. Thus, the closed-MHCD is similar to MHCD, which has the non-equilibrium character with the advantage of high-pressure. And it can also be used for non-thermal plasma processing e.g. surface treatment, plasma chemistry and generation of UV and VUV radiation.

  20. Simple template fabrication of porous MnCo2O4 hollow nanocages as high-performance cathode catalysts for rechargeable Li-O2 batteries.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y L; Lv, F C; Yu, S C; Xu, J; Yang, X; Lu, Z G

    2016-04-01

    Porous MnCo2O4 hollow nanocages have been fabricated via a simple template method using carbon spheres as a template. The hydrophilic surface of carbon spheres can adsorb Mn(2+) and Co(2+) ions simultaneously to form Mn,Co-adsorbed carbon spheres. The calcination of Mn,Co-adsorbed carbon spheres can result in porous hollow nanocages of MnCo2O4. The MnCo2O4 hollow nanocages are built by nanoscale MnCo2O4 crystals. Because of the unique porous hollow nanostructures, the resulting MnCo2O4/KB cathode shows an efficient electrocatalytic performance in LiTFSI/TEGDME electrolyte-based Li-O2 batteries. The MnCo2O4 hollow nanocages as the cathode catalysts can deliver better performance during the discharge/charge processes and good cycle stability compared with that of the pure KB carbon. The preliminary results manifest that porous MnCo2O4 hollow nanocages are promising high-performance cathode catalysts for Li-O2 batteries. This template technique is a simple, general, low-cost and controllable method and can be extended to prepare other transition metal oxide hollow nanostructures.

  1. Simple template fabrication of porous MnCo2O4 hollow nanocages as high-performance cathode catalysts for rechargeable Li-O2 batteries.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y L; Lv, F C; Yu, S C; Xu, J; Yang, X; Lu, Z G

    2016-04-01

    Porous MnCo2O4 hollow nanocages have been fabricated via a simple template method using carbon spheres as a template. The hydrophilic surface of carbon spheres can adsorb Mn(2+) and Co(2+) ions simultaneously to form Mn,Co-adsorbed carbon spheres. The calcination of Mn,Co-adsorbed carbon spheres can result in porous hollow nanocages of MnCo2O4. The MnCo2O4 hollow nanocages are built by nanoscale MnCo2O4 crystals. Because of the unique porous hollow nanostructures, the resulting MnCo2O4/KB cathode shows an efficient electrocatalytic performance in LiTFSI/TEGDME electrolyte-based Li-O2 batteries. The MnCo2O4 hollow nanocages as the cathode catalysts can deliver better performance during the discharge/charge processes and good cycle stability compared with that of the pure KB carbon. The preliminary results manifest that porous MnCo2O4 hollow nanocages are promising high-performance cathode catalysts for Li-O2 batteries. This template technique is a simple, general, low-cost and controllable method and can be extended to prepare other transition metal oxide hollow nanostructures. PMID:26894375

  2. Simple template fabrication of porous MnCo2O4 hollow nanocages as high-performance cathode catalysts for rechargeable Li-O2 batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Y. L.; Lv, F. C.; Yu, S. C.; Xu, J.; Yang, X.; Lu, Z. G.

    2016-04-01

    Porous MnCo2O4 hollow nanocages have been fabricated via a simple template method using carbon spheres as a template. The hydrophilic surface of carbon spheres can adsorb Mn2+ and Co2+ ions simultaneously to form Mn,Co-adsorbed carbon spheres. The calcination of Mn,Co-adsorbed carbon spheres can result in porous hollow nanocages of MnCo2O4. The MnCo2O4 hollow nanocages are built by nanoscale MnCo2O4 crystals. Because of the unique porous hollow nanostructures, the resulting MnCo2O4/KB cathode shows an efficient electrocatalytic performance in LiTFSI/TEGDME electrolyte-based Li-O2 batteries. The MnCo2O4 hollow nanocages as the cathode catalysts can deliver better performance during the discharge/charge processes and good cycle stability compared with that of the pure KB carbon. The preliminary results manifest that porous MnCo2O4 hollow nanocages are promising high-performance cathode catalysts for Li-O2 batteries. This template technique is a simple, general, low-cost and controllable method and can be extended to prepare other transition metal oxide hollow nanostructures.

  3. Hollow cathodes with BaO impregnated, porous tungsten inserts and tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.; Weigand, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The technology of impregnated materials is described and some inherently advantageous characteristics of impregnated cathodes are discussed. Thermionic emission measurements are presented for oxide coated and impregnated cathodes. Five cathode configurations with barium oxide impregnated porous tungsten inserts and/or tips have been fabricated and tested. Reliability, durability, and stability of operation are characterized. One of the cathodes has accumulated over 9000 operational hours, another has been cycled on and off more than 800 times.

  4. Influence of Xe{sub 2}{sup +} ions on the micro-hollow cathode discharge driven by thermionic emission

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, D.; Bliokh, Y. P.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2014-04-15

    The influence of Xe{sub 2}{sup +} dimer ions and excited Xe* atoms on the hollow cathode discharge driven by electron thermionic emission is studied using two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions modeling. A comparison with the results of two-component (electrons and Xe{sup +} ions) plasma modeling showed that the presence of the Xe{sub 2}{sup +} dimer ions and excited Xe* atoms in the plasma affects the plasma parameters (density, potential, and ion fluxes toward the cathode). The influence of Xe{sub 2}{sup +} ions and Xe* atoms on the plasma sheath parameters, such as thickness and the ion velocity at the sheath edge, is analyzed.

  5. Observations of a mode transition in a hydrogen hollow cathode discharge using phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Sam Charles, Christine; Dedrick, James; Boswell, Rod; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah

    2014-07-07

    Two distinct operational modes are observed in a radio frequency (rf) low pressure hydrogen hollow cathode discharge. The mode transition is characterised by a change in total light emission and differing expansion structures. An intensified CCD camera is used to make phase resolved images of Balmer α emission from the discharge. The low emission mode is consistent with a typical γ discharge, and appears to be driven by secondary electrons ejected from the cathode surface. The bright mode displays characteristics common to an inductive discharge, including increased optical emission, power factor, and temperature of the H{sub 2} gas. The bright mode precipitates the formation of a stationary shock in the expansion, observed as a dark region adjacent to the source-chamber interface.

  6. The deposition of titanium dioxide nanoparticles by means of a hollow cathode plasma jet in dc regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perekrestov, R.; Kudrna, P.; Tichý, M.

    2015-06-01

    TiO2 nanoparticles are being investigated in this work. Nanoparticles were obtained in Ar plasma on monocrystaline Si(111) substrate by means of a gas-phase deposition using a low pressure hollow cathode plasma jet. The material of the cathode is pure titanium. Oxygen was introduced separately from argon through an inlet in the chamber. The nanoparticle growth mechanism is qualitatively discussed. The morphology of the surfaces of thin films was investigated by an atomic force microscope. The chemical composition of the thin films was investigated by means of an energy-dispersive x-ray analysis and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A cylindrical Langmuir probe and a fiber optic thermometer was used for measurements of plasma parameters and neutral gas temperature respectively. The relationship between plasma parameters and the films’ morphology is particularly explained.

  7. Study of the transition between MicroHollow Cathode Discharge and MicroCathode Sustained Discharge in a 3-electrode system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitchford, L. C.; Makasheva, K.; Callegari, Th.; Boeuf, J. P.; Santos Sousa, J.; Puech, V.

    2007-10-01

    MicroHollow Cathode Discharges (MHCDs) are known to be good sources for production of DC non-thermal plasmas at high gas pressure. Using them as a cathode in a system with third positivly biased electrode, placed at distance of about 1 cm from the MHCD, allows the ignition of a stable, larger volume plasma in the MicroCathode Sustained Discharge (MCSD). The aim of our study is to investigate the electrical properties of the discharge when it is sustained in different gases (He, Ne, Ar or O2). The voltage-current (V-I) characteristics of the MCSD were measured for gas pressures in the range p = 50 -- 200 Torr, varying gas flow Q = 50 --500 sccm and gas composition. The MHCD is a sandwich type, consisting of 100 μm thick molybdenum electrodes glued on each side of 500 μm thick Al2O3 plate, with a 800 μm diameter hole. The transition between the MHCD and MCSD, defined as the point where the third electrode collects all the electron current, is rather abrupt and depends on the operating conditions. Results from model calculations will also be presented to help clarify the phenomena occuring during the transition.

  8. Correlation of Hollow Cathode Assembly and Plasma Contactor Data from Ground Testing and In-Space Operation on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalkeski, Scott D.; Patterson, Michael J.; Soulas, George C.

    2001-01-01

    Charge control on the International Space Station (ISS) is currently being provided by two plasma contactor units (PCUs). The plasma contactor includes a hollow cathode assembly (HCA), power processing unit and Xe gas feed system. The hollow cathode assemblies in use in the ISS plasma contactors were designed and fabricated at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Prequalification testing of development HCAs as well as acceptance testing of the flight HCAs is presented. Integration of the HCAs into the Boeing North America built PCU and acceptance testing of the PCU are summarized in this paper. Finally, data from the two on-orbit PCUs is presented.

  9. Doppler spectroscopy of hydrogen Balmer lines in a hollow cathode glow discharge in ammonia and argon-ammonia mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Sisovic, N. M.; Konjevic, N.

    2008-11-15

    The results of Doppler spectroscopy of hydrogen Balmer lines from a stainless steel (SS) and copper (Cu) hollow cathode (HC) glow discharge in ammonia and argon-ammonia mixture are reported. The experimental profiles in ammonia discharge are fitted well by superposing three Gaussian profiles. The half widths, in energy units, of narrow and medium Gaussians are in the ranges 0.3-0.4 eV and 3-4 eV, respectively, for both hollow cathodes what is expected on the basis of earlier electron beam{yields}NH{sub 3} experiments. The half widths of the largest Gaussian in ammonia are 46 and 55 eV for SS and Cu HC, respectively. In argon-ammonia discharge, three Gaussians are also required to fit experimental profiles. While half widths of narrow and medium Gaussians are similar to those in ammonia, the half widths of the largest Gaussians are 35 and 42 eV for SS and Cu HC, respectively. The half widths of the largest Gaussians in ammonia and in argon-ammonia mixture indicate the presence of excessive Doppler broadening.

  10. Selenium/interconnected porous hollow carbon bubbles composites as the cathodes of Li-Se batteries with high performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Fan, Long; Zhu, Yongchun; Xu, Yanhua; Liang, Jianwen; Wei, Denghu; Qian, Yitai

    2014-11-01

    A kind of Se/C nanocomposite is fabricated by dispersing selenium in interconnected porous hollow carbon bubbles (PHCBs) via a melt-diffusion method. Such PHCBs are composed of porous hollow carbon spheres with a size of ∼70 nm and shells of ∼12 nm thickness interconnected to each other. Instrumental analysis shows that the porous shell of the PHCBs could effectively disperse and sequester most of the selenium, while the inner cavity remains hollow. When evaluated as cathode materials in a carbonate-based electrolyte for Li-Se batteries, the Se/PHCBs composites exhibit significantly excellent cycling performance and a high rate capability. Especially, the Se/PHCBs composite with an optimal content of ∼50 wt% selenium (Se50/PHCBs) displays a reversible discharge capacity of 606.3 mA h g(-1) after 120 cycles at 0.1 C charge-discharge rate. As the current density increased from 0.1 to 1 C (678 mA g(-1)), the reversible capacity of the Se50/PHCBs composite can still reach 64% of the theoretical capacity (431.9 mA h g(-1)). These outstanding electrochemical features should be attributed to effective sequestration of Se in the PHCBs, as well as to the ability to accommodate volume variation and enhance the electronic transport by making Se have close contact with the carbon framework.

  11. Interpretation of Digital Chest Radiographs: Comparison of Light Emitting Diode versus Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lamp Backlit Monitors

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyun-ju; Lee, Geewon; Yie, Miyeon; Shin, Kyung Eun; Moon, Jung Won; Lee, Kyung Soo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the diagnostic performance of light emitting diode (LED) backlight monitors and cold cathode fluorescent lamp (CCFL) monitors for the interpretation of digital chest radiographs. Materials and Methods We selected 130 chest radiographs from health screening patients. The soft copy image data were randomly sorted and displayed on a 3.5 M LED (2560 × 1440 pixels) monitor and a 3 M CCFL (2048 × 1536 pixels) monitor. Eight radiologists rated their confidence in detecting nodules and abnormal interstitial lung markings (ILD). Low dose chest CT images were used as a reference standard. The performance of the monitor systems was assessed by analyzing 2080 observations and comparing them by multi-reader, multi-case receiver operating characteristic analysis. The observers reported visual fatigue and a sense of heat. Radiant heat and brightness of the monitors were measured. Results Measured brightness was 291 cd/m2 for the LED and 354 cd/m2 for the CCFL monitor. Area under curves for nodule detection were 0.721 ± 0.072 and 0.764 ± 0.098 for LED and CCFL (p = 0.173), whereas those for ILD were 0.871 ± 0.073 and 0.844 ± 0.068 (p = 0.145), respectively. There were no significant differences in interpretation time (p = 0.446) or fatigue score (p = 0.102) between the two monitors. Sense of heat was lower for the LED monitor (p = 0.024). The temperature elevation was 6.7℃ for LED and 12.4℃ for the CCFL monitor. Conclusion Although the LED monitor had lower maximum brightness compared with the CCFL monitor, soft copy reading of the digital chest radiographs on LED and CCFL showed no difference in terms of diagnostic performance. In addition, LED emitted less heat. PMID:24265575

  12. High-performance hollow sulfur nanostructured battery cathode through a scalable, room temperature, one-step, bottom-up approach

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiyang; Zheng, Guangyuan; Yang, Yuan; Seh, Zhi Wei; Liu, Nian; Cui, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Sulfur is an exciting cathode material with high specific capacity of 1,673 mAh/g, more than five times the theoretical limits of its transition metal oxides counterpart. However, successful applications of sulfur cathode have been impeded by rapid capacity fading caused by multiple mechanisms, including large volume expansion during lithiation, dissolution of intermediate polysulfides, and low ionic/electronic conductivity. Tackling the sulfur cathode problems requires a multifaceted approach, which can simultaneously address the challenges mentioned above. Herein, we present a scalable, room temperature, one-step, bottom-up approach to fabricate monodisperse polymer (polyvinylpyrrolidone)-encapsulated hollow sulfur nanospheres for sulfur cathode, allowing unprecedented control over electrode design from nanoscale to macroscale. We demonstrate high specific discharge capacities at different current rates (1,179, 1,018, and 990 mAh/g at C/10, C/5, and C/2, respectively) and excellent capacity retention of 77.6% (at C/5) and 73.4% (at C/2) after 300 and 500 cycles, respectively. Over a long-term cycling of 1,000 cycles at C/2, a capacity decay as low as 0.046% per cycle and an average coulombic efficiency of 98.5% was achieved. In addition, a simple modification on the sulfur nanosphere surface with a layer of conducting polymer, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), allows the sulfur cathode to achieve excellent high-rate capability, showing a high reversible capacity of 849 and 610 mAh/g at 2C and 4C, respectively. PMID:23589875

  13. Assessments of Hollow Cathode Wear in the Xenon Ion Propulsion System (XIPs(c)) by Numerical Analyses and Wear Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.

    2008-01-01

    The standard approach presently followed by NASA to qualify electric propulsion for the required mission throughput has been based largely on life tests, which can be costly and time consuming. Revised electric propulsion lifequalification approaches are being formulated that combine analytical and/or computational methods with (shorter-duration) wear tests. As a model case, a wear test is being performed at JPL to assess the lifetime of the discharge hollow cathode in the Xenon Ion Propulsion System (XIPS(c)), a 25-cm ion engine developed by L-3 Communications Electron Technologies, Inc. for commercial applications. Wear and plasma data accumulated throughout this life-assessment program are being used to validate the existing 2-D hollow cathode code OrCa2D. We find that the OrCa2D steady-state solution predicts very well the time-averaged plasma data and the keeper voltage after 5500 hrs of operation in high-power mode. When the wave motion that occurs naturally in these devices is accounted for, based on an estimate of the maximum wave amplitude, the molybdenum-keeper erosion profile observed in the XIPS(c) discharge cathode is also reproduced within a factor of two of the observation. When the same model is applied to predict the erosion of a tantalum keeper we find that erosion is reduced by more than two orders of magnitude compared to the molybdenum keeper due the significantly lower sputtering yield of tantalum. A tantalum keeper would therefore allow keeper lifetimes that greatly exceed the present requirements for deep-space robotic missions considered by NASA. Moreover, such large reduction of the erosion renders the largest uncertainties in the models, which are associated with the wave amplitude estimates and the electron transport model, negligible.

  14. Biochemistry-directed hollow porous microspheres: bottom-up self-assembled polyanion-based cathodes for sodium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bo; Li, Qiufeng; Liu, Baodong; Zhang, Sen; Deng, Chao

    2016-04-21

    Biochemistry-directed synthesis of functional nanomaterials has attracted great interest in energy storage, catalysis and other applications. The unique ability of biological systems to guide molecule self-assembling facilitates the construction of distinctive architectures with desirable physicochemical characteristics. Herein, we report a biochemistry-directed "bottom-up" approach to construct hollow porous microspheres of polyanion materials for sodium ion batteries. Two kinds of polyanions, i.e. Na3V2(PO4)3 and Na3.12Fe2.44(P2O7)2, are employed as cases in this study. The microalgae cell realizes the formation of a spherical "bottom" bio-precursor. Its tiny core is subjected to destruction and its tough shell tends to carbonize upon calcination, resulting in the hollow porous microspheres for the "top" product. The nanoscale crystals of the polyanion materials are tightly enwrapped by the highly-conductive framework in the hollow microsphere, resulting in the hierarchical nano-microstructure. The whole formation process is disclosed as a "bottom-up" mechanism. Moreover, the biochemistry-directed self-assembly process is confirmed to play a crucial role in the construction of the final architecture. Taking advantage of the well-defined hollow-microsphere architecture, the abundant interior voids and the highly-conductive framework, polyanion materials show favourable sodium-intercalation kinetics. Both materials are capable of high-rate long-term cycling. After five hundred cycles at 20 C and 10 C, Na3V2(PO4)3 and Na(3.12)Fe2.44(P2O7)2 retain 96.2% and 93.1% of the initial capacity, respectively. Therefore, the biochemistry-directed technique provides a low-cost, highly-efficient and widely applicable strategy to produce high-performance polyanion-based cathodes for sodium ion batteries. PMID:27029436

  15. Biochemistry-directed hollow porous microspheres: bottom-up self-assembled polyanion-based cathodes for sodium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bo; Li, Qiufeng; Liu, Baodong; Zhang, Sen; Deng, Chao

    2016-04-21

    Biochemistry-directed synthesis of functional nanomaterials has attracted great interest in energy storage, catalysis and other applications. The unique ability of biological systems to guide molecule self-assembling facilitates the construction of distinctive architectures with desirable physicochemical characteristics. Herein, we report a biochemistry-directed "bottom-up" approach to construct hollow porous microspheres of polyanion materials for sodium ion batteries. Two kinds of polyanions, i.e. Na3V2(PO4)3 and Na3.12Fe2.44(P2O7)2, are employed as cases in this study. The microalgae cell realizes the formation of a spherical "bottom" bio-precursor. Its tiny core is subjected to destruction and its tough shell tends to carbonize upon calcination, resulting in the hollow porous microspheres for the "top" product. The nanoscale crystals of the polyanion materials are tightly enwrapped by the highly-conductive framework in the hollow microsphere, resulting in the hierarchical nano-microstructure. The whole formation process is disclosed as a "bottom-up" mechanism. Moreover, the biochemistry-directed self-assembly process is confirmed to play a crucial role in the construction of the final architecture. Taking advantage of the well-defined hollow-microsphere architecture, the abundant interior voids and the highly-conductive framework, polyanion materials show favourable sodium-intercalation kinetics. Both materials are capable of high-rate long-term cycling. After five hundred cycles at 20 C and 10 C, Na3V2(PO4)3 and Na(3.12)Fe2.44(P2O7)2 retain 96.2% and 93.1% of the initial capacity, respectively. Therefore, the biochemistry-directed technique provides a low-cost, highly-efficient and widely applicable strategy to produce high-performance polyanion-based cathodes for sodium ion batteries.

  16. A hollow cathode ion source for production of primary ions for the BNL electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, James Beebe, Edward; Carlson, Charles; McCafferty, Daniel; Pikin, Alexander; Ritter, John

    2014-02-15

    A hollow cathode ion source, based on one developed at Saclay, has been modified significantly and used for several years to produce all primary 1+ ions injected into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven. Currents of tens to hundreds of microamperes have been produced for 1+ ions of He, C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, Ti, Fe, Cu, Kr, Xe, Ta, Au, and U. The source is very simple, relying on a glow discharge using a noble gas, between anode and a solid cathode containing the desired species. Ions of both the working gas and ionized sputtered cathode material are extracted, and then the desired species is selected using an ExB filter before being transported into the EBIS trap for charge breeding. The source operates pulsed with long life and excellent stability for most species. Reliable ignition of the discharge at low gas pressure is facilitated by the use of capacitive coupling from a simple toy plasma globe. The source design, and operating experience for the various species, is presented.

  17. Hollow-spherical Co/N-C nanoparticle as an efficient electrocatalyst used in air cathode microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tingting; Li, Kexun; Pu, Liangtao; Liu, Ziqi; Ge, Baochao; Pan, Yajun; Liu, Ying

    2016-12-15

    The hollow-spherical Co/N-C nanoparticle, which is synthesized via a simple hydrothermal reaction followed by heat treatment, is firstly used as electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC). The maximum power density of MFC with 10% Co/N-C air-cathode is as high as 2514±59mWm(-2), which is almost 174% higher than the control. The exchange current density (i0) of cathode equipped with 10% Co/N-C is 238% higher than that of untreated AC. While the total resistance of treated samples decreases from 13.017 to 10.255Ω. The intensity ratio of Raman D to G band (ID/IG) decreases from 0.93 (N-C) to 0.73 (Co/N-C), indicating the catalyst forms graphite structure. Both XRD and XPS testify that Co is bonded to N within graphitic sheets and serves as the active sites in ORR. The four-electron pathway of the Co/N-C also plays a crucial role in electrochemical catalytic activity. As a result, it can be expected that the as-synthesized Co/N-C, with extraordinary electro-catalytic performance towards ORR, will be a promising alternative to the state-of-the-art non-precious metal ORR electro-catalysts for electrochemical energy applications.

  18. Observation of radio frequency ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge plasma with MgO and Al electrodes for plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsu, Yasunori Matsumoto, Naoki

    2014-05-15

    Various high-density plasma sources have been proposed for plasma processing. Especially, the hollow cathode discharge is one of the powerful ones. In this work, radio-frequency (RF) driven ring-shaped hollow cathode discharges with high secondary-electron emission have been investigated, using an aluminum (Al) cathode, coated or not with magnesium oxide (MgO). The thickness of MgO thin film is approximately 200 nm. The RF discharge voltage for the coated cathode is almost the same as that for the uncoated one, in a wide range of Ar gas pressure, from 5.3 to 53.2 Pa. The results reveal that the plasma density has a peak at an Ar gas pressure of 10.6 Pa for both cathodes. The plasma density for the coated cathode is about 1.5–3 times higher than that for the uncoated one, at various gas pressures. To the contrary, the electron temperature for the coated cathode is lower than temperature obtained with the uncoated cathode, at various gas pressures. Radial profiles of electron saturation current, which is proportional to plasma flux, are also examined for a wide range of gas pressure. Radial profiles of electron temperature at various axial positions are almost uniform for both cathodes so that the diffusion process due to density gradient is dominant for plasma transport. The secondary electrons emitted from the coated cathode contribute to the improvement of the plasma flux radial profile obtained using the uncoated cathode.

  19. Scalable synthesis of Na3V2(PO4)(3)/C porous hollow spheres as a cathode for Na-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, JF; Luo, C; Gao, T; Fan, XL; Wang, CS

    2015-01-01

    Na3V2(PO4)(3) (NVP) has been considered as a very promising cathode material for sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) due to its typical NASICON structure, which provides an open and three dimensional (3D) framework for Na+ migration. However, the low electronic conductivity of NVP limits its rate capability and cycling ability. In this study, carbon coated hollow structured NVP/C composites are synthesized via a template-free and scalable ultrasonic spray pyrolysis process, where the carbon coated NVP particles are uniformly decorated on the inner and outer surfaces of the porous hollow carbon spheres. When evaluated as a cathode material for SIBs, the unique NVP/C porous hollow sphere cathode delivers an initial discharge capacity of 99.2 mA h g(-1) and retains 89.3 mA h g(-1) after 300 charge/discharge cycles with a very low degradation rate of 0.035% per cycle. For comparison, the NVP/C composite, prepared by the traditional sol-gel method, delivers a lower initial discharge capacity of 97.4 mA h g(-1) and decreases significantly to 71.5 mA h g(-1) after 300 cycles. The superior electrochemical performance of NVP/C porous hollow spheres is attributed to their unique porous, hollow and spherical structures, as well as the carbon-coating layer, which provides a high contact area between electrode/electrolyte, high electronic conductivity, and high mechanical strength.

  20. Local Neutral Density and Plasma Parameter Measurements in a Hollow Cathode Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Kristina K.; Goebel, Dan M.; MiKellides, Joannis; Watkins, Ron M.

    2006-01-01

    In order to understand the cathode and keeper wear observed during the Extended Life Test (ELT) of the DS1 flight spare NSTAR thruster and provide benchmarking data for a 2D cathode/cathode-plume model, a basic understanding of the plasma and neutral gas parameters in the cathode orifice and keeper region of the cathode plume must be obtained. The JPL cathode facility is instrumented with an array of Langmuir probe diagnostics along with an optical diagnostic to measure line intensity of xenon neutrals. In order to make direct comparisons with the present model, a flat plate anode arrangement was installed for these tests. Neutral density is deduced from the scanning probe data of the plasma parameters and the measured xenon line intensity in the optical regime. The Langmuir probes are scanned both axially, out to 7.0 cm downstream of the keeper, and radially to obtain 2D profile of the plasma parameters. The optical fiber is housed in a collimating stainless steel tube, and is scanned to view across the cathode plume along cuts in front of the keeper with a resolution of 1.5 mm. The radial intensities are unfolded using the Abel inversion technique that produces radial profiles of local neutral density. In this paper, detailed measurements of the plasma parameters and the local neutral densities will be presented in the cathode/keeper plume region for a 1.5 cm diameter NEXIS cathode at 25A of discharge current at several different strengths of applied magnetic field.

  1. Hollow-cathode electrode for high-power, high-pressure discharge devices

    DOEpatents

    Chang, J.J.; Alger, T.W.

    1995-08-22

    Several different cold cathode configurations are disclosed for a gas discharge device each having a plurality of grooves of selected spacing, depth and width to improve the emission of electrons in a gas discharge device. Each of the cold cathode configurations can be machined from a single piece of a selected material. Several of the configurations can be assembled with individual elements which is easily seen from the various figures. 8 figs.

  2. Hollow - cathode electrode for high-power, high-pressure discharge devices

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J.; Alger, Terry W.

    1995-01-01

    Several different cold cathode configurations for a gas discharge device each having a plurality of grooves of selected spacing, depth and width to improve the emission of electrons in a gas discharge device. Each of the cold cathode configurations can be machined from a single piece of a selected material. Several of the configurations can be assembled with individual elements which is easily seen from the various figures.

  3. Oxygen transport in the internal xenon plasma of a dispenser hollow cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Capece, Angela M. Shepherd, Joseph E.; Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2014-04-21

    Reactive gases such as oxygen and water vapor modify the surface morphology of BaO dispenser cathodes and degrade the electron emission properties. For vacuum cathodes operating at fixed temperature, the emission current drops rapidly when oxygen adsorbs on top of the low work function surface. Previous experiments have shown that plasma cathodes are more resistant to oxygen poisoning and can operate with O{sub 2} partial pressures one to two orders of magnitude higher than vacuum cathodes before the onset of poisoning occurs. Plasma cathodes used for electric thrusters are typically operated with xenon; however, gas phase barium, oxygen, and tungsten species may be found in small concentrations. The densities of these minor species are small compared with the plasma density, and thus, their presence in the discharge does not significantly alter the xenon plasma parameters. It is important, however, to consider the transport of these minor species as they may deposit on the emitter surface and affect the electron emission properties. In this work, we present the results of a material transport model used to predict oxygen fluxes to the cathode surface by solving the species conservation equations in a cathode with a 2.25 mm diameter orifice operated at a discharge current of 15 A, a Xe flow rate of 3.7 sccm, and 100 ppm of O{sub 2}. The dominant ionization process for O{sub 2} is resonant charge exchange with xenon ions. Ba is effectively recycled in the plasma; however, BaO and O{sub 2} are not. The model shows that the oxygen flux to the surface is not diffusion-limited; therefore, the high resistance to oxygen poisoning observed in plasma cathodes likely results from surface processes not considered here.

  4. Oxygen transport in the internal xenon plasma of a dispenser hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capece, Angela M.; Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Shepherd, Joseph E.

    2014-04-01

    Reactive gases such as oxygen and water vapor modify the surface morphology of BaO dispenser cathodes and degrade the electron emission properties. For vacuum cathodes operating at fixed temperature, the emission current drops rapidly when oxygen adsorbs on top of the low work function surface. Previous experiments have shown that plasma cathodes are more resistant to oxygen poisoning and can operate with O2 partial pressures one to two orders of magnitude higher than vacuum cathodes before the onset of poisoning occurs. Plasma cathodes used for electric thrusters are typically operated with xenon; however, gas phase barium, oxygen, and tungsten species may be found in small concentrations. The densities of these minor species are small compared with the plasma density, and thus, their presence in the discharge does not significantly alter the xenon plasma parameters. It is important, however, to consider the transport of these minor species as they may deposit on the emitter surface and affect the electron emission properties. In this work, we present the results of a material transport model used to predict oxygen fluxes to the cathode surface by solving the species conservation equations in a cathode with a 2.25 mm diameter orifice operated at a discharge current of 15 A, a Xe flow rate of 3.7 sccm, and 100 ppm of O2. The dominant ionization process for O2 is resonant charge exchange with xenon ions. Ba is effectively recycled in the plasma; however, BaO and O2 are not. The model shows that the oxygen flux to the surface is not diffusion-limited; therefore, the high resistance to oxygen poisoning observed in plasma cathodes likely results from surface processes not considered here.

  5. The influence of pressure and gas flow on size and morphology of titanium oxide nanoparticles synthesized by hollow cathode sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunnarsson, Rickard; Pilch, Iris; Boyd, Robert D.; Brenning, Nils; Helmersson, Ulf

    2016-07-01

    Titanium oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized via sputtering of a hollow cathode in an argon atmosphere. The influence of pressure and gas flow has been studied. Changing the pressure affects the nanoparticle size, increasing approximately proportional to the pressure squared. The influence of gas flow is dependent on the pressure. In the low pressure regime (107 ≤ p ≤ 143 Pa), the nanoparticle size decreases with increasing gas flow; however, at high pressure (p = 215 Pa), the trend is reversed. For low pressures and high gas flows, it was necessary to add oxygen for the particles to nucleate. There is also a morphological transition of the nanoparticle shape that is dependent on the pressure. Shapes such as faceted, cubic, and cauliflower can be obtained.

  6. An investigation of micro-hollow cathode glow discharge generated optical emission spectroscopy for hydrocarbon detection and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Randy L; Gaddam, Chethan K; Kulis, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The analytical utility of a micro-hollow cathode glow discharge plasma for detection of varied hydrocarbons was tested using acetone, ethanol, heptane, nitrobenzene, and toluene. Differences in fragmentation pathways, reflecting parent compound molecular structure, led to differences in optical emission patterns that can then potentially serve as signatures for the species of interest. Spectral simulations were performed emphasizing the CH (A(2)Δ-X(2)Π), CH (C(2)Σ-X(2)Π), and OH (A(2)Σ(+)-X(2)Π) electronic systems. The analytical utility of selected emission lines is demonstrated by a linear relationship between optical emission spectroscopy and parent compound concentration over a wide range, with detection limits extending down to parts per billion (ppb) levels.

  7. A contribution to spectroscopic diagnostics and cathode sheath modeling of micro-hollow gas discharge in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvejić, M.; Spasojević, Dj.; Šišović, N. M.; Konjević, N.

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, the hydrogen Balmer beta line shape from a micro-hollow gas discharge (MHGD) in argon with traces of hydrogen is used for simultaneous diagnostics of plasma and cathode sheath (CS) parameters. For this purpose, a simple model of relevant processes responsible for the line broadening is introduced and applied to the Balmer beta profile recorded from a MHGD generated in the microhole (diameter 100 μm at narrow side and 130 μm at wider side) of a gold-alumina-gold sandwich in the pressure range (100-900 mbar). The electron number density Ne in the range (0.4-4.5) × 1020 m-3 is determined from the width of the central part of the Balmer beta line profile, while, from the extended wings of the Balmer beta profile, induced by dc Stark effect, the next three parameters are determined: the average value Ea of electric field strength in the CS in the range (16-95 kV/cm), the electric field strength E0 at the cathode surface in the range (32-190 kV/cm), and the CS thickness zg in the range (18-70 μm). All four MHGD parameters, Ne, Ea, E0, and zg, compare reasonably well with results of the modeling experiment by M. J. Kushner [J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 38, 1633 (2005)]. The results for Ne are compared with other emission experiments.

  8. Development of a Compact Ion Source with a Hot Hollow Cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, N.; Demura, Y.; Imakita, S.; Kasuya, T.; Vasquez, M. R.; Wada, M.

    2011-01-01

    A compact ion source with 14 mm diameter, 30 mm long discharge region was developed. A total size of the ion source including the beam extraction system was 60 mm in diameter and 160 mm in length. A high temperature coaxial cathode consisting of thin-wall tantalum and tungsten tubes produced a discharge plasma. A source gas was supplied through the inner W tube of the coaxial cathode. A stable plasma of H2 was maintained with the discharge current of 2.0 A at 68 A cathode heating current. The optimum H2 gas pressure for ion beam extraction was 2×10-2 Pa. Hydrogen ion beam current was 120 μA (1 mA/cm2) at 2.0 A discharge current and 3.0 kV extraction voltage.

  9. Pulse ignition characterization of mercury ion thruster hollow cathode using an improved pulse ignitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.; Gruber, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation of the high voltage pulse ignition characteristics of the 8 cm mercury ion thruster neutralizer cathode identified a low rate of voltage rise and long pulse duration as desirable factors for reliable cathode starting. Cathode starting breakdown voltages were measured over a range of mercury flow rates and tip heater powers for pulses with five different rates of voltage rise. Breakdown voltage requirements for the fastest rising pulse (2.5 to 3.0 kV/micro sec) were substantially higher (2 kV or more) than for the slowest rising pulse (0.3 to 0.5 kV/micro sec) for the same starting conditions. Also described is an improved, low impedance pulse ignitor circuit which reduces power losses and eliminates problems with control and packaging associated with earlier designs.

  10. Biochemistry-directed hollow porous microspheres: bottom-up self-assembled polyanion-based cathodes for sodium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bo; Li, Qiufeng; Liu, Baodong; Zhang, Sen; Deng, Chao

    2016-04-01

    Biochemistry-directed synthesis of functional nanomaterials has attracted great interest in energy storage, catalysis and other applications. The unique ability of biological systems to guide molecule self-assembling facilitates the construction of distinctive architectures with desirable physicochemical characteristics. Herein, we report a biochemistry-directed ``bottom-up'' approach to construct hollow porous microspheres of polyanion materials for sodium ion batteries. Two kinds of polyanions, i.e. Na3V2(PO4)3 and Na3.12Fe2.44(P2O7)2, are employed as cases in this study. The microalgae cell realizes the formation of a spherical ``bottom'' bio-precursor. Its tiny core is subjected to destruction and its tough shell tends to carbonize upon calcination, resulting in the hollow porous microspheres for the ``top'' product. The nanoscale crystals of the polyanion materials are tightly enwrapped by the highly-conductive framework in the hollow microsphere, resulting in the hierarchical nano-microstructure. The whole formation process is disclosed as a ``bottom-up'' mechanism. Moreover, the biochemistry-directed self-assembly process is confirmed to play a crucial role in the construction of the final architecture. Taking advantage of the well-defined hollow-microsphere architecture, the abundant interior voids and the highly-conductive framework, polyanion materials show favourable sodium-intercalation kinetics. Both materials are capable of high-rate long-term cycling. After five hundred cycles at 20 C and 10 C, Na3V2(PO4)3 and Na3.12Fe2.44(P2O7)2 retain 96.2% and 93.1% of the initial capacity, respectively. Therefore, the biochemistry-directed technique provides a low-cost, highly-efficient and widely applicable strategy to produce high-performance polyanion-based cathodes for sodium ion batteries.Biochemistry-directed synthesis of functional nanomaterials has attracted great interest in energy storage, catalysis and other applications. The unique ability of

  11. A hollow cathode neutralizer for a 30-cm diameter bombardment thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtel, R. T.

    1973-01-01

    Recent improvements in overall thrustor performance have imposed new constraints on neutralizer performance. The use of compensated grid extraction system requires a re-evaluation of neutralizer position. In addition a suitable control logic for the neutralizer has proven difficult. A series of tests were conducted to determine what effect neutralizer cathode geometry has on performance. The parameters investigated included orifice diameter and length, and cathode diameter. Similar tests investigated open and enclosed keeper geometries. Neutralizer position tests with compensated grids suggest positions approximately 10 cm from the accelerator and radially out of the beam envelope should result in satisfactory performance and long life. Finally operation at keeper currents of 1.5 amp has resulted in lower total neutralizer power, the elimination of tip heater power, and suitable closed loop control of the neutralizer vaporizer.

  12. Production of High Energy Ions Near an Ion Thruster Discharge Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Mikellides, I. G.; Goebel, D. M.; Jameson, K. K.; Wirz, R.; Polk, James E.

    2006-01-01

    Several researchers have measured ions leaving ion thruster discharge chambers with energies far greater than measured discharge chamber potentials. Presented in this paper is a new mechanism for the generation of high energy ions and a comparison with measured ion spectra. The source of high energy ions has been a puzzle because they not only have energies in excess of measured steady state potentials, but as reported by Goebel et. al. [1], their flux is independent of the amplitude of time dependent plasma fluctuations. The mechanism relies on the charge exchange neutralization of xenon ions accelerated radially into the potential trough in front of the discharge cathode. Previous researchers [2] have identified the importance of charge exchange in this region as a mechanism for protecting discharge cathode surfaces from ion bombardment. This paper is the first to identify how charge exchange in this region can lead to ion energy enhancement.

  13. Search for a ''3.5-eV isomer'' in {sup 229}Th in a hollow-cathode electric discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Inamura, T. T.; Haba, H.

    2009-03-15

    A hollow-cathode electric discharge, a well-established source in optical spectroscopy, was used to populate the ''3.5-eV isomer'' in {sup 229}Th with use of nuclear excitation by electron transition (NEET). The radiochemically purest {sup 229}Th sample was loaded into the hollow cathode in which the electric discharge excited the {sup 229}Th to atomic states some of which could be expected to lie close to the excitation energy of the sought isomer. Although there remain some uncertainties, our experiments indicate that the isomer was populated by NEET and its {alpha} decay observed after switching off the electric discharge with a corresponding isomer half-life 1 min < or approx. T{sub 1/2}{sup m} < or approx. 3 min. From the present NEET condition, the isomer appears to lie between 3 eV and 7 eV. The probability of the isomer population by NEET is discussed.

  14. Sulfur/graphitic hollow carbon sphere nano-composite as a cathode material for high-power lithium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eon Sung; Kim, Min-Seop; Cho, Won Il; Oh, Si Hyoung

    2013-08-03

    The intrinsic low conductivity of sulfur which leads to a low performance at a high current rate is one of the most limiting factors for the commercialization of lithium-sulfur battery. Here, we present an easy and convenient method to synthesize a mono-dispersed hollow carbon sphere with a thin graphitic wall which can be utilized as a support with a good electrical conductivity for the preparation of sulfur/carbon nano-composite cathode. The hollow carbon sphere was prepared from the pyrolysis of the homogenous mixture of the mono-dispersed spherical silica and Fe-phthalocyanine powder in elevated temperature. The composite cathode was manufactured by infiltrating sulfur melt into the inner side of the graphitic wall. The electrochemical cycling shows a capacity of 425 mAh g-1 at 3 C current rate which is more than five times larger than that for the sulfur/carbon black nano-composite prepared by simple ball milling.

  15. A contribution to spectroscopic diagnostics and cathode sheath modeling of micro-hollow gas discharge in argon

    SciTech Connect

    Cvejic, M.; Spasojevic, Dj.; Sisovic, N. M.; Konjevic, N.

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, the hydrogen Balmer beta line shape from a micro-hollow gas discharge (MHGD) in argon with traces of hydrogen is used for simultaneous diagnostics of plasma and cathode sheath (CS) parameters. For this purpose, a simple model of relevant processes responsible for the line broadening is introduced and applied to the Balmer beta profile recorded from a MHGD generated in the microhole (diameter 100 {mu}m at narrow side and 130 {mu}m at wider side) of a gold-alumina-gold sandwich in the pressure range (100-900 mbar). The electron number density N{sub e} in the range (0.4-4.5) x 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} is determined from the width of the central part of the Balmer beta line profile, while, from the extended wings of the Balmer beta profile, induced by dc Stark effect, the next three parameters are determined: the average value E{sub a} of electric field strength in the CS in the range (16-95 kV/cm), the electric field strength E{sub 0} at the cathode surface in the range (32-190 kV/cm), and the CS thickness z{sub g} in the range (18-70 {mu}m). All four MHGD parameters, N{sub e}, E{sub a}, E{sub 0}, and z{sub g}, compare reasonably well with results of the modeling experiment by M. J. Kushner [J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 38, 1633 (2005)]. The results for N{sub e} are compared with other emission experiments.

  16. Ignition of parallel Micro Hollow Cathode Discharges in He without ballasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Thierry; Mandra, Monali; Goeckner, Matthew; Lefaucheux, Philippe; Ranson, Pierre; Lee, Jeong-Bong; Dussart, Rémi; Overzet, Lawrence

    2008-10-01

    Microplasmas are of interest for many different applications including medical, micro TAS, plasma treatment The purpose of our study is to switch on and control several microdischarges mounted in parallel on a single chip, without ballasting them individually. Microcavities used in our experiments are Ni:Al2O3:Ni sandwich structures. Holes are 80-180 μm diameter. DC microplasmas are created in He gas without flow with a pressure from 200 to 1000 Torr. A maximum power of 7 watts can be injected into one microdischarge. The area of the plasma spread on the cathode side is determined using an ICCD camera. A current density as high as around 10 mA/mm^2 could be evaluated. Abnormal glow regime can be obtained by limiting the cathode surface. By this way, it is possible to switch on all the microplasmas without using individual ballasts. We will also present results of microplasmas ignited in gas flow crossing the cavities and show the flow affects the microplasmas and their V-I curve.

  17. Low temperature thin film transistors with hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition based GaN channels

    SciTech Connect

    Bolat, S. E-mail: aokyay@ee.bilkent.edu.tr; Tekcan, B.; Ozgit-Akgun, C.; Biyikli, N.; Okyay, A. K. E-mail: aokyay@ee.bilkent.edu.tr

    2014-06-16

    We report GaN thin film transistors (TFT) with a thermal budget below 250 °C. GaN thin films are grown at 200 °C by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (HCPA-ALD). HCPA-ALD-based GaN thin films are found to have a polycrystalline wurtzite structure with an average crystallite size of 9.3 nm. TFTs with bottom gate configuration are fabricated with HCPA-ALD grown GaN channel layers. Fabricated TFTs exhibit n-type field effect characteristics. N-channel GaN TFTs demonstrated on-to-off ratios (I{sub ON}/I{sub OFF}) of 10{sup 3} and sub-threshold swing of 3.3 V/decade. The entire TFT device fabrication process temperature is below 250 °C, which is the lowest process temperature reported for GaN based transistors, so far.

  18. Interfacial reaction dependent performance of hollow carbon nanosphere - sulfur composite as a cathode for Li-S battery

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jianming; Yan, Pengfei; Gu, Meng; Wagner, Michael J.; Hays, Kevin A.; Chen, Junzheng; Li, Xiaohong S.; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Ji -Guang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2015-05-26

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is a promising energy storage system due to its high energy density, cost effectiveness and environmental friendliness of sulfur. However, there are still a number of challenges, such as low Coulombic efficiency and poor long-term cycling stability, impeding the commercialization of Li-S battery. The electrochemical performance of Li-S battery is closely related with the interfacial reactions occurring between hosting substrate and active sulfur species which are poorly conducting at fully oxidized and reduced states. Here, we correlate the relationship between the performance and interfacial reactions in the Li-S battery system, using a hollow carbon nanosphere (HCNS) with highly graphitic character as hosting substrate for sulfur. With an appropriate amount of sulfur loading, HCNS/S composite exhibits excellent electrochemical performance because of the fast interfacial reactions between HCNS and the polysulfides. However, further increase of sulfur loading leads to increased formation of highly resistive insoluble reaction products (Li2S2/Li2S) which limits the reversibility of the interfacial reactions and results in poor electrochemical performance. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate the importance of the interfacial reaction reversibility in the whole electrode system on achieving high capacity and long cycle life of sulfur cathode for Li-S batteries.

  19. Electronic and optical device applications of hollow cathode plasma assisted atomic layer deposition based GaN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bolat, Sami Tekcan, Burak; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Biyikli, Necmi; Okyay, Ali Kemal

    2015-01-15

    Electronic and optoelectronic devices, namely, thin film transistors (TFTs) and metal–semiconductor–metal (MSM) photodetectors, based on GaN films grown by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (PA-ALD) are demonstrated. Resistivity of GaN thin films and metal-GaN contact resistance are investigated as a function of annealing temperature. Effect of the plasma gas and postmetallization annealing on the performances of the TFTs as well as the effect of the annealing on the performance of MSM photodetectors are studied. Dark current to voltage and responsivity behavior of MSM devices are investigated as well. TFTs with the N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} PA-ALD based GaN channels are observed to have improved stability and transfer characteristics with respect to NH{sub 3} PA-ALD based transistors. Dark current of the MSM photodetectors is suppressed strongly after high-temperature annealing in N{sub 2}:H{sub 2} ambient.

  20. Interfacial reaction dependent performance of hollow carbon nanosphere - sulfur composite as a cathode for Li-S battery

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Jianming; Yan, Pengfei; Gu, Meng; Wagner, Michael J.; Hays, Kevin A.; Chen, Junzheng; Li, Xiaohong S.; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Ji -Guang; Liu, Jun; et al

    2015-05-26

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is a promising energy storage system due to its high energy density, cost effectiveness and environmental friendliness of sulfur. However, there are still a number of challenges, such as low Coulombic efficiency and poor long-term cycling stability, impeding the commercialization of Li-S battery. The electrochemical performance of Li-S battery is closely related with the interfacial reactions occurring between hosting substrate and active sulfur species which are poorly conducting at fully oxidized and reduced states. Here, we correlate the relationship between the performance and interfacial reactions in the Li-S battery system, using a hollow carbon nanosphere (HCNS) withmore » highly graphitic character as hosting substrate for sulfur. With an appropriate amount of sulfur loading, HCNS/S composite exhibits excellent electrochemical performance because of the fast interfacial reactions between HCNS and the polysulfides. However, further increase of sulfur loading leads to increased formation of highly resistive insoluble reaction products (Li2S2/Li2S) which limits the reversibility of the interfacial reactions and results in poor electrochemical performance. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate the importance of the interfacial reaction reversibility in the whole electrode system on achieving high capacity and long cycle life of sulfur cathode for Li-S batteries.« less

  1. Modification of polyethylene powder with an organic precursor in a spiral conveyor by hollow cathode glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quitzau, M.; Wolter, M.; Zaporojtchenko, V.; Kersten, H.; Faupel, F.

    2010-06-01

    Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) films were deposited on polyethylene (PE, (C2H4)n) powder by hollow cathode glow discharge. The reactive species in different HMDSO/Ar plasmas were studied by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Increasing the HMDSO fraction in the gas mixture additional compounds like CHx, OH, SiC and SiO can be identified. After deposition the formed silicon and carbon containing groups (C-O, C=O, SiC and SiO) on the PE powder surface have been analyzed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Changes in wettability depending on the HMDSO fraction were investigated by contact angle measurements (CAM). The free surface energy of the PE powder decreases with increasing HMDSO fraction in the process gas and encapsulation of the powder particles occurs. An aging effect of the plasma treated PE surface was observed depending on the process gas composition. The higher the HMDSO fraction the less is the aging effect of the plasma treated PE surface.

  2. TiO2 nanoparticle detection by means of laser beam scattering in a hollow cathode plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perekrestov, R.; Kudrna, P.; Tichý, M.; Khalakhan, I.; Myshkin, V. F.

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of TiO2 nanoparticles in a plasma plume of a hollow cathode plasma jet is being studied in this work. The method is based on the detection of light from a laser beam scattered on nanoparticles by three detectors: a photodiode, an optical spectrometer and a digital photo camera. The Rayleigh–Mie theory was used as a basis for the description of the results. Two lasers with wavelengths of 446 and 661 nm were used as light sources. 2D maps of the scattered light intensity were assembled from photo camera pictures at different discharge parameters. Dependencies of the signal intensity on the O2 flow rate and wavelength are discussed. Direct measurements of particle size on the substrate were carried out by means of a scanning electron microscope in order to verify the agreement of results with the theory. Aside from nanoparticles we detected TiO2 columnar structures in the deposited samples. Crystalline structure of the samples was investigated using x-ray diffraction analysis.

  3. Time-resolved pinhole camera imaging and extreme ultraviolet spectrometry on a hollow cathode discharge in xenon.

    PubMed

    Kieft, E R; van der Mullen, J J A M; Kroesen, G M W; Banine, V

    2003-11-01

    A pinhole camera, an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer, a fast gatable multichannel plate EUV detector, and a digital camera have been installed on the ASML EUV laboratory setup to perform time-resolved pinhole imaging and EUV spectroscopy on a copy of the Philips EUV hollow cathode discharge plasma source. The main properties of the setup have been characterized. Time-resolved measurements within the plasma pulse in the EUV have been performed on this source. Specific features of the plasma, such as a ring shape in the initiation phase and a propagating sphere during the pinch phase, have either been discovered or confirmed experimentally. Relative populations of various ionization stages in the pinch plasma have been estimated on the basis of line intensities and calculated transition probabilities. The changes in relative line intensities of a single ionization stage can be explained by a combination of temperature and excitation/deexcitation balance effects. Experiments with argon dilution on a newer version of the source show considerable effect on the shape of the xenon EUV spectrum.

  4. Discharge resistance and power dissipation in the self-pulsing regime of micro-hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaroni, C.; Chabert, P.

    2011-10-01

    Micro-hollow cathode discharges (MHCDs), driven by a dc voltage source, may operate in a self-pulsing regime during which the voltage and the current across the discharge are pulsed with a frequency of several tens of kilohertz. A model for the self-pulsing regime of MHCDs is proposed based on an equivalent electrical circuit of the whole device. The discharge itself is modeled by a non-linear resistance in series with an inductance, and it is placed in parallel with the capacitance of the electrode-dielectric-electrode sandwich hosting the discharge micro-hole. The capacitance of the coaxial cable used to feed the device is also included. It is shown that a detailed comparison between theory and experiments allows the discharge non-linear resistance to be accurately determined. When the discharge current is maximum, this resistance is about 2500 Ω at 50 Torr and decreases to about 750 Ω at 150 Torr. The absorbed power is calculated throughout the self-pulsing cycle and may be above 100 W at the current peak, while the time-averaged power remains a fraction of a Watt.

  5. In-situ monitoring of actinides and rare earth elements by electrothermal hollow cathode discharge spectrometry. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.C.; Edelson, M.C.

    1992-12-01

    This report describes an Electrothermal Hollow Cathode Discharge Spectrometry (ET-HCDS) source being constructed for the analytical determination of actinides and rare earth elements. This work was initiated with the support of the Office of Safeguards and Security; the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration began funding work in this area in mid-FY1992 and the work is continuing into FY1993 with funds from both sources. Special features of this instrument should permit it to be used for the determination of individual isotopic species, which is important for safeguard`s materials control and accountancy. ET-HCDS can be achieved using compact instrumentation suitable for use in field laboratories. The technique is capable of determining a suite of environmentally-important species, such as the actinides and the heavy metals, in a variety of physical forms (e.g., in solution, as found on air particulates, or in soils). ET-HCDS should be capable of very sensitive analyses and should require very small samples (e.g., microgram). Since ET-HCDS is possible in an air atmosphere (at reduced pressures), it may be useful for the real-time determination of hazardous materials, both radioactive and non radioactive, contained in dusts released during waste retrieval operations; ET-HCDS should also be useful for the rapid and sensitive analysis of metals in soils.

  6. The effects of a realistic hollow cathode plasma contactor model on the simulation of bare electrodynamic tether systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blash, Derek M.

    The region known as Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) has become populated with artificial satellites and space debris since humanities initial venture into the region. This has turned LEO into a hazardous region. Since LEO is very valuable to many different countries, there has been a push to prevent further buildup and talk of even deorbiting spent satellites and debris already in LEO. One of the more attractive concepts available for deorbiting debris and spent satellites is a Bare Electrodynamic Tether (BET). A BET is a propellantless propulsion technique in which two objects are joined together by a thin conducting material. When these tethered objects are placed in LEO, the tether sweeps across the magnetic field lines of the Earth and induces an electromotive force (emf) along the tether. Current from the space plasma is collected on the bare tether under the action of the induced emf, and this current interacts with the Earth's magnetic field to create a drag force that can be used to deorbit spent satellites and space debris. A Plasma Contactor (PC) is used to close the electrical circuit between the BET and the ionospheric plasma. The PC requires a voltage and, depending on the device, a gas flow to emit electrons through a plasma bridge to the ionospheric plasma. The PC also can require a plasma discharge electrode and a heater to condition the PC for operation. These parameters as well as the PC performance are required to build an accurate simulation of a PC and, therefore, a BET deorbiting system. This thesis focuses on the development, validation, and implementation of a simulation tool to model the effects of a realistic hollow cathode PC system model on a BET deorbit system.

  7. Pulsed electromagnetic gas accelleration. [incorporation of hollow cathode in plasma discharge and suitability determination of MPD discharge as plasmadynamic laser source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    Direct measurement with thermocouples of the power deposited in the anode of a multi-megawatt magnetoplasmadynamic discharge has shown the fractional anode power to decrease from 50% at 200 kW to 10% at 20 MW. Using local measurements of current density, electric potential, and electron temperature, the traditional model for heat conduction to the anode is found to be inadequate. Other experiments in which the voltage-current characteristics and exhaust velocities of MPD arcs using Plexiglas and boron nitride chamber insulators and various mass injection configurations show that ablation can affect nominal accelerator operation in several distinct ways. The incorporation of a hollow cathode in a 7 kA plasma discharge has shown that a stable current attachment can be realized in the cavity without the aid of cathode heaters, keeper electrodes, or emissive coatings.

  8. Ionic liquid-assisted solvothermal synthesis of hollow Mn2O3 anode and LiMn2O4 cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xin; Wang, Jun; Jia, Haiping; Kloepsch, Richard; Liu, Haidong; Beltrop, Kolja; Li, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Mn-based Mn2O3 anode and LiMn2O4 cathode materials are prepared by a solvothermal method combined with post annealing process. Environmentally friendly ionic liquid 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate as both structure-directing agent and fluorine source is used to prepare hollow polyhedron MnF2 precursor. Both target materials Mn2O3 anode and LiMn2O4 cathode have the morphology of the MnF2 precursor. The Mn2O3 anode using carboxymethyl cellulose as binder could deliver slight better electrochemical performance than the one using poly (vinyldifluoride) as binder. The former has an initial charge capacity of 800 mAh g-1 at a current density of 101.8 mA g-1, and exhibits no obvious capacity decay for 150 cycles at 101.8 mA g-1. The LiMn2O4 cathode material prepared with molten salt assistant could display much better electrochemical performance than the one prepared without molten salt assistance. In particular, it has an initial discharge capacity of 117.5 mAh g-1 at a current density of 0.5C and good rate capability. In the field of lithium ion batteries, both the Mn2O3 anode and LiMn2O4 cathode materials could exhibit enhanced electrochemical performance due to the well formed morphology based on the ionic liquid-assisted solvothermal method.

  9. In vitro growth and single-leaf photosynthetic response of Cymbidium plantlets to super-elevated CO2 under cold cathode fluorescent lamps.

    PubMed

    Norikane, Atsushi; Takamura, Takejiro; Morokuma, Masahiro; Tanaka, Michio

    2010-03-01

    To examine the effectiveness of super-elevated (10,000 micromol mol(-1)) CO(2) enrichment under cold cathode fluorescent lamps (CCFL) for the clonal propagation of Cymbidium, plantlets were cultured on modified Vacin and Went (VW) medium under 0, 3,000 and 10,000 micromol mol(-1) CO(2) enrichment and two levels of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD, 45 and 75 micromol m(-2) s(-1)). Under high PPFD, 10,000 micromol mol(-1) CO(2) increased root dry weight and promoted shoot growth. In addition, a decrease in photosynthetic capacity and chlorosis at leaf tips were observed. Rubisco activity and stomatal conductance of these plantlets were lower than those of plantlets at 3,000 micromol mol(-1) CO(2) under high PPFD, which had a higher photosynthetic capacity. On the other hand, plantlets on Kyoto medium grown in 10,000 micromol mol(-1) CO(2) under high PPFD had a higher photosynthetic rate than those on modified VW medium; no chlorosis was observed. Furthermore, growth of plantlets, in particular the roots, was remarkably enhanced. This result indicates that a negative response to super-elevated CO(2) under high PPFD could be improved by altering medium components. Super-elevated CO(2) enrichment of in vitro-cultured Cymbidium could positively affect the efficiency and quality of commercial production of clonal orchid plantlets.

  10. Sulfur/graphitic hollow carbon sphere nano-composite as a cathode material for high-power lithium-sulfur battery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The intrinsic low conductivity of sulfur which leads to a low performance at a high current rate is one of the most limiting factors for the commercialization of lithium-sulfur battery. Here, we present an easy and convenient method to synthesize a mono-dispersed hollow carbon sphere with a thin graphitic wall which can be utilized as a support with a good electrical conductivity for the preparation of sulfur/carbon nano-composite cathode. The hollow carbon sphere was prepared from the pyrolysis of the homogenous mixture of the mono-dispersed spherical silica and Fe-phthalocyanine powder in elevated temperature. The composite cathode was manufactured by infiltrating sulfur melt into the inner side of the graphitic wall. The electrochemical cycling shows a capacity of 425 mAh g−1 at 3 C current rate which is more than five times larger than that for the sulfur/carbon black nano-composite prepared by simple ball milling. PMID:23914902

  11. Solvothermal synthesis of monodisperse LiFePO4 micro hollow spheres as high performance cathode material for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shiliu; Hu, Mingjun; Xi, Liujiang; Ma, Ruguang; Dong, Yucheng; Chung, C Y

    2013-09-25

    A microspherical, hollow LiFePO4 (LFP) cathode material with polycrystal structure was simply synthesized by a solvothermal method using spherical Li3PO4 as the self-sacrificed template and FeCl2·4H2O as the Fe(2+) source. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show that the LFP micro hollow spheres have a quite uniform size of ~1 μm consisting of aggregated nanoparticles. The influences of solvent and Fe(2+) source on the phase and morphology of the final product were chiefly investigated, and a direct ion exchange reaction between spherical Li3PO4 templates and Fe(2+) ions was firstly proposed on the basis of the X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) transformation of the products. The LFP nanoparticles in the micro hollow spheres could finely coat a uniform carbon layer ~3.5 nm by a glucose solution impregnating-drying-sintering process. The electrochemical measurements show that the carbon coated LFP materials could exhibit high charge-discharge capacities of 158, 144, 125, 101, and even 72 mAh g(-1) at 0.1, 1, 5, 20, and 50 C, respectively. It could also maintain 80% of the initial discharge capacity after cycling for 2000 times at 20 C.

  12. Fabrication of Various V2O5 Hollow Microspheres as Excellent Cathode for Lithium Storage and the Application in Full Cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaochuan; Zhai, Yanjun; Zhu, Lin; He, Yanyan; Li, Aihua; Guo, Chunli; Xu, Liqiang

    2016-07-13

    Vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) has attracted interesting attention as cathode material for LIBs because of its stable crystal structure and high theoretical specific capacity. However, the low rate performance and poor long-term cycling stability of V2O5 limit its applications. In order to improve its battery performance, various V2O5 hollow microspheres including a yolk-shell structure, double-shell structure, triple-shell structure, and hierarchical hollow superstructures have been selectively prepared. The obtained hierarchical V2O5 hollow microspheres (HVHS) exhibit a high capacity of 123 mAh g(-1) at 20 C (1 C = 147 mA g(-1)) in the range of 2.5-4.0 V, and 73.5 mAh g(-1) can be reached after 3000 cycles. HVHS also display good cycling performance in the range of 2.0-4.0 V. Moreover, the V2O5//Li4Ti5O12 full cell was successfully assembled, which exhibits an excellent performance of 139.5 mAh g(-1) between 1.0 and 2.5 V at a current density of 147 mA g(-1), and a high capacity of 106 mAh g(-1) remained after 100 cycles, indicating the good cycling performance and promising application of the full cell. PMID:27322775

  13. The plasma properties and electron emission characteristics of near-zero differential resistance of hollow cathode-based plasma contactors with a discharge chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Kan; Farnell, Casey C.; Williams, John D.

    2014-08-15

    The formation of electron emission-bias voltage (I-V) characteristics of near-zero differential resistance in the cathodic plasma contactor for bare electrodynamic tether applications, based on a hollow cathode embedded in a ring-cusp ionization stage, is studied. The existence of such an I-V regime is important to achieve low impedance performance without being affected by the space plasma properties for a cathodic plasma contactor. Experimental data on the plasma structure and properties downstream from the ionization stage are presented as functions of the xenon flow rate and the electron emission current. The electrons were emitted from the cathode to the cylindrical vacuum chamber wall (r = 0.9 m) under ≈10{sup −5 }Torr of vacuum pressure. The ring-cusp configuration selected for the plasma contactor created a 125-Gauss axial field near the cathode orifice, along with a large-volume 50-Gauss magnitude pocket in the stage. A baseline ion energy cost of ≈300 eV/ion was measured in the ionization stage when no electrons were emitted to the vacuum chamber wall. In addition, the anode fall growth limited the maximum propellant unitization to below ≈75% in the discharge loss curves for this ion stage. Detailed measurements on the plasma properties were carried out for the no-electron emission and 3 A emission conditions. The experimental data are compared with 1-D models, and the effectiveness of the model is discussed. The four key issues that played important roles in the process of building the near-zero different resistance I-V regime are: a significant amount of ionization by the emission electrons, a decrease in the number of reflected electrons in the plume, the electron-temperature increment, and low initial ion energy at the source outlet.

  14. Destructive physical analysis of hollow cathodes from the Deep Space 1 Flight spare ion engine 30,000 hr life test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, Anita

    2005-01-01

    Destructive physical analysis of the discharge and neutralizer hollow cathode assemblies from the Deep Space 1 Flight Spare 30,000 Hr life test was performed to characterize physical and chemical evidence of operationally induced effects after 30,372 hours of operation with beam extraction. Post-test inspection of the discharge-cathode assembly was subdivided into detailed analyses at the subcomponent level. Detailed materials analysis and optical inspection of the insert, orifice plate, cathode tube, heater, keeper assembly, insulator, and low-voltage propellant isolator were performed. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEW analyses were used to determine the extent and composition of regions of net deposition and erosion of both the discharge and neutralizer inserts. A comparative approach with an un-operated 4:1:1 insert was used to determine the extent of impregnate material depletion as a function of depth from the ID surface and axial position from the orifice plate. Analysis results are compared and contrasted with those obtained from similar analyses on components from shorter term tests, and provide insight regarding the prospect for successful longer-term operation consistent with SOA ion engine program life objectives at NASA.

  15. Baffle aperture design study of hollow cathode equipped ion thrusters. M.S. Thesis Technical Report, 1 Dec. 1979 - 1 Oct. 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, J. R., Jr.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    A simple theoretical model which can be used as an aid in the design of the baffle aperture region of a hollow cathode equipped ion thruster was developed. An analysis of the ion and electron currents in both the main and cathode discharge chambers is presented. From this analysis a model of current flow through the aperture, which is required as an input to the design model, was developed. This model was verified experimentally. The dominant force driving electrons through the aperture was the force due to the electrical potential gradient. The diffusion process was modeled according to the Bolm diffusion theory. A number of simplifications were made to limit the amount of detailed plasma information required as input to the model to facilitate the use of the model in thruster design. This simplified model gave remarkably consistant results with experimental results obtained with a given thruster geometry over substantial changes in operating conditions. The model was uncertain to about a factor of two for different thruster cathode region geometries. The design usefulness was limited by this factor of two uncertainty and by the accuracy to which the plasma parameters required as inputs to the model were specified.

  16. Hollow Plasma in a Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Oks, Efim M.; Roy, Prabir K.

    2010-11-30

    A ring cathode for a pulsed, high-current, multi-spot cathodic arc discharge was placed inside a pulsed magnetic solenoid. Photography is used to evaluate the plasma distribution. The plasma appears hollow for cathode positions close the center of the solenoid, and it is guided closer to the axis when the cathode is away from the center.

  17. Characterization of TiO x film prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using a multi-jet hollow cathode plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Masatoshi; Korzec, Dariusz; Aoki, Toru; Engemann, Jurgen; Hatanaka, Yoshinori

    2001-05-01

    The high rate deposition of TiO x film at low temperature was achieved by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) as a source material. The multi-jet hollow cathode plasma source was used to generate the high-density plasma, which was showered toward the substrate. The emission spectra suggest that oxygen radicals play an important role for dissociation of the source material and for yielding the precursors. The high deposition rate up to 50 nm/min was achieved by this process. The as-deposited films are completely amorphous. They consist of structures with complex bondings including both tetrahedral and octahedral components. Though they have such complex bondings, the hydrophilicity of the PECVD film is excellent comparing to that of the annealed crystalline anatase structure. It seems that the PECVD using the multi-jet plasma source is promising for fabrication of hydrophilic TiO x films in low-temperature process.

  18. High rate deposition of photocatalytic TiO{sub 2} films with high activity by hollow cathode gas-flow sputtering method

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Iwabuchi, Yoshinori; Yoshikawa, Masato; Sato, Yasushi; Shigesato, Yuzo

    2008-07-15

    Photocatalytic TiO{sub 2} films were deposited by a hollow cathode gas-flow sputtering method using two Ti metal targets mounted parallel to each other. The Ar and O{sub 2} flow rates were 3000 and 0-50 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP), respectively, and total gas pressure during the deposition was maintained at 45 Pa. The highest deposition rate for the photocatalytic TiO{sub 2} films was 162 nm/min at 30 SCCM of O{sub 2} flow. The as-deposited films and postannealed films, annealed in air at 300 deg. C for 1 h, were used to carry out photocatalytic decomposition of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO). In particular, the postannealed films showed extremely high photocatalytic activity compared to the photocatalytic activity of films deposited by conventional reactive sputtering.

  19. Time-resolved diagnostics and kinetic modelling of the ignition transient of a H2 + 10% N2 square wave modulated hollow cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, E.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I.

    2012-08-01

    Time-resolved emission spectroscopy and quadrupole mass spectrometry are used for the experimental diagnostics of a low pressure (8 Pa) modulated dc hollow cathode discharge of H2 + 10% N2. The time-dependent experimental results are reasonably accounted for by a zero-order kinetic model developed in our group and checked previously with steady-state measurements (Carrasco et al 2011 Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13 19561), which is now validated under more stringent conditions. In addition to the discharge precursors, which are partly recycled in wall reactions, NH3 is produced in small but appreciable amounts. The slower evolution of NH3, as compared with H2 and N2, is traced back to the multistep surface reaction mechanism responsible for its production. An analysis of the time variation of optical emission measurements shows that excited NH(c 1Π) radicals are essentially formed in the electron-impact dissociation of NH3.

  20. Graphene-Coated Hollow Fiber Membrane as the Cathode in Anaerobic Electrochemical Membrane Bioreactors--Effect of Configuration and Applied Voltage on Performance and Membrane Fouling.

    PubMed

    Werner, Craig M; Katuri, Krishna P; Hari, Ananda Rao; Chen, Wei; Lai, Zhiping; Logan, Bruce E; Amy, Gary L; Saikaly, Pascal E

    2016-04-19

    Electrically conductive, graphene-coated, hollow-fiber porous membranes were used as cathodes in anaerobic electrochemical membrane bioreactors (AnEMBRs) operated at different applied voltages (0.7 and 0.9 V) using a new rectangular reactor configuration compared to a previous tubular design (0.7 V). The onset of biofouling was delayed and minimized in rectangular reactors operated at 0.9 V compared to those at 0.7 V due to higher rates of hydrogen production. Maximum transmembrane pressures for the rectangular reactor were only 0.10 bar (0.7 V) or 0.05 bar (0.9 V) after 56 days of operation compared to 0.46 bar (0.7 V) for the tubular reactor after 52 days. The thickness of the membrane biofouling layer was approximately 0.4 μm for rectangular reactors and 4 μm for the tubular reactor. Higher permeate quality (TSS = 0.05 mg/L) was achieved in the rectangular AnEMBR than that in the tubular AnEMBR (TSS = 17 mg/L), likely due to higher current densities that minimized the accumulation of cells in suspension. These results show that the new rectangular reactor design, which had increased rates of hydrogen production, successfully delayed the onset of cathode biofouling and improved reactor performance.

  1. Surfactant-free synthesis of Cu2O hollow spheres and their wavelength-dependent visible photocatalytic activities using LED lamps as cold light sources

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A facile synthesis route of cuprous oxide (Cu2O) hollow spheres under different temperatures without the aid of a surfactant was introduced. Morphology and structure varied as functions of reaction temperature and duration. A bubble template-mediated formation mechanism was proposed, which explained the reason of morphology changing with reaction temperature. The obtained Cu2O hollow spheres were active photocatalyst for the degradation of methyl orange under visible light. A self-designed equipment of light emitting diode (LED) cold light sources with the wavelength of 450, 550, and 700 nm, respectively, was used for the first time in the photocatalysis experiment with no extra heat introduced. The most suitable wavelength for Cu2O to photocatalytic degradation is 550 nm, because the light energy (2.25 eV) is closest to the band gap of Cu2O (2.17 eV). These surfactant-free synthesized Cu2O hollow spheres would be highly attractive for practical applications in water pollutant removal and environmental remediation. PMID:25489279

  2. The excitation structure in a micro-hollow cathode discharge in the normal regime at medium argon pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaroni, C.; Chabert, P.; Rousseau, A.; Sadeghi, N.

    2010-03-01

    A microplasma is generated in the micro-hole (400 µm diameter) of a molybdenum-alumina-molybdenum sandwich (MHCD type) at medium pressure (30-200 Torr) in pure argon. Imaging and emission spectroscopy have been used to study the light emission mechanisms in the micro-discharge. We find that the emission intensities of both argon atom and argon ion lines present sharp peaks located near the cathode, and that the position of these peaks moves towards the cathode with increasing gas pressure. An ionizing-sheath model has been developed to calculate the evolution of the sheath thickness as a function of the gas pressure. This model includes the ratio between the ion flux coming from the bulk of the plasma and the ion flux created in the sheath and also accounts for the gas heating in the micro-hole. The variation of the calculated ionizing-sheath thickness as a function of pressure agrees well with the variation of the measured peak positions. The case of a sheath free of ionization has also been considered. However, the comparison between experiments and the various theories shows that a significant fraction of the ionization occurs in the sheath.

  3. Electrical conduction and dielectric relaxation properties of AlN thin films grown by hollow-cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altuntas, Halit; Bayrak, Turkan; Kizir, Seda; Haider, Ali; Biyikli, Necmi

    2016-07-01

    In this study, aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films were deposited at 200 °C, on p-type silicon substrates utilizing a capacitively coupled hollow-cathode plasma source integrated atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor. The structural properties of AlN were characterized by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, by which we confirmed the hexagonal wurtzite single-phase crystalline structure. The films exhibited an optical band edge around ˜5.7 eV. The refractive index and extinction coefficient of the AlN films were measured via a spectroscopic ellipsometer. In addition, to investigate the electrical conduction mechanisms and dielectric properties, Al/AlN/p-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor structures were fabricated, and current density-voltage and frequency dependent (7 kHz-5 MHz) dielectric constant measurements (within the strong accumulation region) were performed. A peak of dielectric loss was observed at a frequency of 3 MHz and the Cole-Davidson empirical formula was used to determine the relaxation time. It was concluded that the native point defects such as nitrogen vacancies and DX centers formed with the involvement of Si atoms into the AlN layers might have influenced the electrical conduction and dielectric relaxation properties of the plasma-assisted ALD grown AlN films.

  4. Nitrogen incorporation in saturated aliphatic C6-C8 hydrocarbons and ethanol in low-pressure nitrogen plasma generated by a hollow cathode discharge ion source.

    PubMed

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek T; Chen, Lee Chuin; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Wada, Hiroshi; Nonami, Hiroshi; Yamabe, Shinichi

    2016-06-01

    Ion/molecule reactions of saturated hydrocarbons (n-hexane, cyclohexane, n-heptane, n-octane and isooctane) in 28-Torr N2 plasma generated by a hollow cathode discharge ion source were investigated using an Orbitrap mass spectrometer. It was found that the ions with [M+14](+) were observed as the major ions (M: sample molecule). The exact mass analysis revealed that the ions are nitrogenated molecules, [M+N](+) formed by the reactions of N3 (+) with M. The reaction, N3 (+) + M → [M+N](+) + N2 , were examined by the density functional theory calculations. It was found that N3 (+) abstracts the H atom from hydrocarbon molecules leading to the formation of protonated imines in the forms of R'R″CNH2 (+) (i.e. C-H bond nitrogenation). This result is in accord with the fact that elimination of NH3 is the major channel for MS/MS of [M+N](+) . That is, nitrogen is incorporated in the C-H bonds of saturated hydrocarbons. No nitrogenation was observed for benzene and acetone, which was ascribed to the formation of stable charge-transfer complexes benzene⋅⋅⋅⋅N3 (+) and acetone⋅⋅⋅⋅N3 (+) revealed by density functional theory calculations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27270868

  5. Electrical conduction and dielectric relaxation properties of AlN thin films grown by hollow-cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altuntas, Halit; Bayrak, Turkan; Kizir, Seda; Haider, Ali; Biyikli, Necmi

    2016-07-01

    In this study, aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films were deposited at 200 °C, on p-type silicon substrates utilizing a capacitively coupled hollow-cathode plasma source integrated atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor. The structural properties of AlN were characterized by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, by which we confirmed the hexagonal wurtzite single-phase crystalline structure. The films exhibited an optical band edge around ∼5.7 eV. The refractive index and extinction coefficient of the AlN films were measured via a spectroscopic ellipsometer. In addition, to investigate the electrical conduction mechanisms and dielectric properties, Al/AlN/p-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor structures were fabricated, and current density–voltage and frequency dependent (7 kHz–5 MHz) dielectric constant measurements (within the strong accumulation region) were performed. A peak of dielectric loss was observed at a frequency of 3 MHz and the Cole–Davidson empirical formula was used to determine the relaxation time. It was concluded that the native point defects such as nitrogen vacancies and DX centers formed with the involvement of Si atoms into the AlN layers might have influenced the electrical conduction and dielectric relaxation properties of the plasma-assisted ALD grown AlN films.

  6. Structure of a micro hollow cathode discharge in the normal regime at medium pressure range in pure argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaroni, Claudia; Chabert, Pascal; Rousseau, Antoine; Sadeghi, Nader

    2009-10-01

    A microplasma is generated in the 400 μm diameter micro hole of a molybdenum-alumina-molybdenum sandwich (MHCD type) at medium pressure (30-300Torr) in pure argon. Experiments are performed during the normal regime, when the plasma is not only confined in the hole but also expands on the cathode backside. Imaging and emission spectroscopy allows the discharge structure to be studied and is used to infer the electronic density in the micro-hole via the Stark broadening of the Hβ line. We find strong maxima of the plasma emission in the vicinity of the sheath edge. To explain some of the experimental observations, we use a one dimensional transport model to obtain the radial evolution of the charged-particles densities and fluxes. The result of this model is used as an input parameter of a sheath-model which allows the sheath thickness to be calculated as a function of pressure. The sheath size variation with pressure is well correlated with the maxima of plasma emission.

  7. Microhollow cathode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, K. H.; Moselhy, M.; Shi, W.; Bentley, R.

    2003-07-01

    By reducing the dimensions of hollow cathodes into the hundred micrometer range, stable, direct current, high (atmospheric) pressure glow discharges in rare gases, rare gas-halide mixtures and in air could be generated. The electron energy distribution in these microdischarges is non-Maxwellian, with a pronounced high-energy tail. The high electron energy together with the high gas density, which favors three-body collisions, is the reason for an efficient excimer generation in these microplasmas. Excimer efficiencies from 1% to 9% have been measured for argon, xenon, argon fluoride, and xenon chloride direct current excimer emitters, with a radiant excimer emittance of up to 2 W/cm2 for xenon. Adding small amounts of oxygen to argon has allowed us to generate vacuum ultraviolet line radiation at 130.5 nm with an efficiency approaching 1%. Pulsing xenon discharges with nanosecond electrical pulses has led to an increase in intensity to 15 W/cm2 and to a simultaneous increase in efficiency to more than 20%. Operating the discharges in an abnormal glow mode has allowed us to generate microdischarge arrays without individual ballast. Applications of these plasma arrays are excimer lamps and plasma reactors.

  8. Hollow Li1.2Mn0.5Co0.25Ni0.05O2 microcube prepared by binary template as a cathode material for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, S. J.; Lou, Z. R.; Xia, T. F.; Wang, X. L.; Gu, C. D.; Tu, J. P.

    2014-07-01

    Novel Li1.2Mn0.5Co0.25Ni0.05O2 microcube is prepared through a simple binary template method. After calcined at 800 °C, lithium and nickel are permeated into the cathode material and a well-crystallized Li-rich layered oxide is obtained. Furthermore, hollow circle cube architecture is formed due to the decomposing of the carbonate. As a cathode material for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), the oxide with such architecture can deliver high initial discharge capacity of 272.9 mAh g-1 at a current density of 20 mA g-1. High reversible discharge capacities of 208 mAh g-1 and 110 mAh g-1 are obtained at a current density of 200 mA g-1 and 2000 mA g-1, respectively. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) are performed to further study the hollow Li1.2Mn0.5Co0.25Ni0.05O2 microcube. It is remarkable that such architecture makes the Li-rich layered oxide Li1.2Mn0.5Co0.25Ni0.05O2 a promising cathode material for LIBs.

  9. Hollow electrode plasma excitation source

    DOEpatents

    Ballou, Nathan E.

    1992-01-01

    A plasma source incorporates a furnace as a hollow anode, while a coaxial cathode is disposed therewithin. The source is located in a housing provided with an ionizable gas such that a glow discharge is produced between anode and cathode. Radiation or ionic emission from the glow discharge characterizes a sample placed within the furnace and heated to elevated temperatures.

  10. Hollow electrode plasma excitation source

    DOEpatents

    Ballou, N.E.

    1992-04-14

    A plasma source incorporates a furnace as a hollow anode, while a coaxial cathode is disposed therewithin. The source is located in a housing provided with an ionizable gas such that a glow discharge is produced between anode and cathode. Radiation or ionic emission from the glow discharge characterizes a sample placed within the furnace and heated to elevated temperatures. 5 figs.

  11. Flickering lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, Michael; Möllmann, Klaus-Peter

    2015-05-01

    Many processes in electromagnetism vary with time. Some of them are well known, in particular those related to line frequencies of 50 Hz or 60 Hz such as fluctuating light output of discharge and incandescent lamps. The flickers of discharge and incandescent lamps have quite different physical principles involved, which are investigated experimentally using high-speed cameras and theoretically using simplified models. The topic is related to other phenomena such as the transient behaviour of phosphor layers covering the screen of oscilloscopes and the time-varying Lorentz force acting on the filament of light bulbs. All studies are well suited for teaching selected aspects of electromagnetism and light at undergraduate level at university.

  12. Optical characteristics of nanocrystalline Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N thin films deposited by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Goldenberg, Eda; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Biyikli, Necmi; Kemal Okyay, Ali

    2014-05-15

    Gallium nitride (GaN), aluminum nitride (AlN), and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N films have been deposited by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition at 200 °C on c-plane sapphire and Si substrates. The dependence of film structure, absorption edge, and refractive index on postdeposition annealing were examined by x-ray diffraction, spectrophotometry, and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements, respectively. Well-adhered, uniform, and polycrystalline wurtzite (hexagonal) GaN, AlN, and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N films were prepared at low deposition temperature. As revealed by the x-ray diffraction analyses, crystallite sizes of the films were between 11.7 and 25.2 nm. The crystallite size of as-deposited GaN film increased from 11.7 to 12.1 and 14.4 nm when the annealing duration increased from 30 min to 2 h (800 °C). For all films, the average optical transmission was ∼85% in the visible (VIS) and near infrared spectrum. The refractive indices of AlN and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N were lower compared to GaN thin films. The refractive index of as-deposited films decreased from 2.33 to 2.02 (λ = 550 nm) with the increased Al content x (0 ≤ x ≤ 1), while the extinction coefficients (k) were approximately zero in the VIS spectrum (>400 nm). Postdeposition annealing at 900 °C for 2 h considerably lowered the refractive index value of GaN films (2.33–1.92), indicating a significant phase change. The optical bandgap of as-deposited GaN film was found to be 3.95 eV, and it decreased to 3.90 eV for films annealed at 800 °C for 30 min and 2 h. On the other hand, this value increased to 4.1 eV for GaN films annealed at 900 °C for 2 h. This might be caused by Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} formation and following phase change. The optical bandgap value of as-deposited Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N films decreased from 5.75 to 5.25 eV when the x values decreased from 1 to 0.68. Furthermore, postdeposition annealing did not

  13. Lava Lamp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leif, Todd R.

    2008-01-01

    This past semester I brought a Lava Lite[R] Lamp into my classroom. Why bring such a thing into class? Many of today's students are part of the "retro" movement. They buy clothes from the '60s, they wear their hair like people did in the '60s, and they look for the ideals and themes related to living in the 1960s. Physics education reform is also…

  14. Excimer emission from high pressure microhollow cathode discharges in xenon

    SciTech Connect

    El-Habachi, A.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1998-12-31

    By reducing the diameter of the cathode opening in hollow cathode discharge geometry to values on the order of 100 micrometers the authors were able to operate the discharged in argon and xenon in a direct current mode at atmospheric pressure. The micro-discharges have been shown to emit excimer radiation peaking at wavelengths of 130 nm and 170 nm, respectively. They have in this study particularly concentrated on the xenon VUV radiation. The emission from a 100 micrometers microhollow cathode discharge in xenon at pressures between 40 and 760 Torr was measured over the spectral range from 130 nm to 400 nm. At 40 Torr, the 147 nm Xenon resonance line dominates the emission spectra. There are some indications of the first continuum which extends from the resonance line towards longer wavelength. The second excimer continuum peaking at 170 nm appears at higher pressures. At pressures greater than 300 Torr, it dominates the emission spectra up to the longest recorded wavelength of 400 nm. In order to determine the absolute values of the excimer radiation the emission was compared to that of calibrated UV sources: a Hg lamp and a Deuterium lamp. The results gave them a value of the efficiency defined as the ratio of the optical power of the excimer emitter to the input electrical power, of 5.3% and 6.3%, respectively. A single discharge, which was in this experiment run with a current of 3 mA at a forward voltage of 200 to 250 V, emits therefore {approximately}40 mW of VUV radiation concentrated in the spectral range from 150 to 190 nm. The possibility to operate the discharges in parallel opens the possibility to fabricate scalable flat panel excimer lamps.

  15. Aperture lamp

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.

    2003-01-01

    A discharge lamp includes means for containing a light emitting fill, the fill being capable of absorbing light at one wavelength and re-emitting the light at a different wavelength, the light emitted from the fill having a first spectral power distribution in the absence of reflection of light back into the fill; means for exciting the fill to cause the fill to emit light; and means for reflecting some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit, the exiting light having a second spectral power distribution with proportionately more light in the visible region as compared to the first spectral power distribution, wherein the light re-emitted by the fill is shifted in wavelength with respect to the absorbed light and the magnitude of the shift is in relation to an effective optical path length. Another discharge lamp includes an envelope; a fill which emits light when excited disposed in the envelope; a source of excitation power coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light; and a reflective ceramic structure disposed around the envelope and defining an light emitting opening, wherein the structure comprises a sintered body built up directly on the envelope and made from a combination of alumina and silica.

  16. Lava Lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Todd R.

    2008-04-01

    This past semester I brought a Lava Lite® Lamp into my classroom. Why bring such a thing into class? Many of today's students are part of the "retro" movement. They buy clothes from the '60s, they wear their hair like people did in the '60s, and they look for the ideals and themes related to living in the 1960s. Physics education reform is also examining ideas from the "retro" world of science. This was the post-Sputnik era, a time when science was done by actually doing it and not necessarily by lecturing about it. Cliff Swartz, former TPT editor, once mentioned during a presentation at a Texas AAPT meeting, "The world of physics teaching is cyclic, like a swinging pendulum. We as physics teachers jump from `new ideas' back to our old ones, each generation testing what works best for them."

  17. LED lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Galvez, Miguel; Grossman, Kenneth; Betts, David

    2013-11-12

    There is herein described a lamp for providing white light comprising a plurality of light sources positioned on a substrate. Each of said light sources comprises a blue light emitting diode (LED) and a dome that substantially covers said LED. A first portion of said blue light from said LEDs is transmitted through said domes and a second portion of said blue light is converted into a red light by a first phosphor contained in said domes. A cover is disposed over all of said light sources that transmits at least a portion of said red and blue light emitted by said light sources. The cover contains a second phosphor that emits a yellow light in response to said blue light. The red, blue and yellow light combining to form the white light and the white light having a color rendering index (CRI) of at least about 80.

  18. Hierarchical LiMn2O4 Hollow Cubes with Exposed {111} Planes as High-Power Cathodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu; Cao, Chuanbao; Zhang, Junting; Wang, Lin; Ma, Xilan; Xu, Xingyan

    2016-08-01

    Hierarchical LiMn2O4 hollow cubes with exposed {111} planes have been synthesized using cube-shaped MnCO3 precursors, which are fabricated through a facile co-precipitation reaction. Without surface modification, the as-prepared LiMn2O4 exhibits excellent cyclability and superior rate capability. Surprisingly, even over 70% of primal discharge capacity can be maintained for up to 1000 cycles at 50 C, and with only about 72 s of discharge time the as-prepared materials can deliver initial discharge capacity of 96.5 mA h g(-1). What is more, the materials have 98.4% and 90.7% capacity retentions for up to 100 cycles at 5 C under the temperatures of 25 and 60 °C, respectively. The superior electrochemical performance can be attributed to the unique hierarchical and interior hollow structure, exposed {111} planes, and high-quality crystallinity.

  19. Hierarchical LiMn2O4 Hollow Cubes with Exposed {111} Planes as High-Power Cathodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu; Cao, Chuanbao; Zhang, Junting; Wang, Lin; Ma, Xilan; Xu, Xingyan

    2016-08-01

    Hierarchical LiMn2O4 hollow cubes with exposed {111} planes have been synthesized using cube-shaped MnCO3 precursors, which are fabricated through a facile co-precipitation reaction. Without surface modification, the as-prepared LiMn2O4 exhibits excellent cyclability and superior rate capability. Surprisingly, even over 70% of primal discharge capacity can be maintained for up to 1000 cycles at 50 C, and with only about 72 s of discharge time the as-prepared materials can deliver initial discharge capacity of 96.5 mA h g(-1). What is more, the materials have 98.4% and 90.7% capacity retentions for up to 100 cycles at 5 C under the temperatures of 25 and 60 °C, respectively. The superior electrochemical performance can be attributed to the unique hierarchical and interior hollow structure, exposed {111} planes, and high-quality crystallinity. PMID:27400369

  20. Remote control for anode-cathode adjustment

    DOEpatents

    Roose, Lars D.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for remotely adjusting the anode-cathode gap in a pulse power machine has an electric motor located within a hollow cathode inside the vacuum chamber of the pulse power machine. Input information for controlling the motor for adjusting the anode-cathode gap is fed into the apparatus using optical waveguides. The motor, controlled by the input information, drives a worm gear that moves a cathode tip. When the motor drives in one rotational direction, the cathode is moved toward the anode and the size of the anode-cathode gap is diminished. When the motor drives in the other direction, the cathode is moved away from the anode and the size of the anode-cathode gap is increased. The motor is powered by batteries housed in the hollow cathode. The batteries may be rechargeable, and they may be recharged by a photovoltaic cell in combination with an optical waveguide that receives recharging energy from outside the hollow cathode. Alternatively, the anode-cathode gap can be remotely adjusted by a manually-turned handle connected to mechanical linkage which is connected to a jack assembly. The jack assembly converts rotational motion of the handle and mechanical linkage to linear motion of the cathode moving toward or away from the anode.

  1. Cauliflower-like SnO2 hollow microspheres as anode and carbon fiber as cathode for high performance quantum dot and dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathy, Veerappan; Kong, Eui-Hyun; Park, Yoon-Cheol; Jang, Hyun Myung; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2014-02-01

    Cauliflower-like tin oxide (SnO2) hollow microspheres (HMS) sensitized with multilayer quantum dots (QDs) as photoanode and alternative stable, low-cost counter electrode are employed for the first time in QD-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs). Cauliflower-like SnO2 hollow spheres mainly consist of 50 nm-sized agglomerated nanoparticles; they possess a high internal surface area and light scattering in between the microspheres and shell layers. This makes them promising photoanode material for both QDSCs and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method and chemical bath deposition (CBD) are used for QD-sensitizing the SnO2 microspheres. Additionally, carbon-nanofiber (CNF) with a unique structure is used as an alternative counter electrode (CE) and compared with the standard platinum (Pt) CE. Their electrocatalytic properties are measured using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and Tafel-polarization. Under 1 sun illumination, solar cells made with hollow SnO2 photoanode sandwiched with the stable CNF CE showed a power conversion efficiency of 2.5% in QDSCs and 3.0% for DSCs, which is quite promising with the standard Pt CE (QDSCs: 2.1%, and DSCs: 3.6%).Cauliflower-like tin oxide (SnO2) hollow microspheres (HMS) sensitized with multilayer quantum dots (QDs) as photoanode and alternative stable, low-cost counter electrode are employed for the first time in QD-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs). Cauliflower-like SnO2 hollow spheres mainly consist of 50 nm-sized agglomerated nanoparticles; they possess a high internal surface area and light scattering in between the microspheres and shell layers. This makes them promising photoanode material for both QDSCs and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method and chemical bath deposition (CBD) are used for QD-sensitizing the SnO2 microspheres. Additionally, carbon-nanofiber (CNF) with a

  2. Orienting Arc Lamps for Longest Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature distribution strongly affects performance. Tests on floodlights for Space Shuttle payload bay show useful life of metal halide dc arc lamp prolonged by mounting "anode down" and wiring for maximum heat conduction away from electrodes. Anode-down configuration, anode and cathode temperatures stabilize at 333 degrees and 313 degrees C, respectively, after 1 hour of operation. Temperatures both below limit for quartz-to-metal seals, and lamps able to withstand a 2,000-hour life test with satisfactory light output at end.

  3. Precision performance lamp technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Dean A.; Kiesa, James E.; Dean, Raymond A.

    1997-09-01

    A principal function of a lamp is to produce light output with designated spectra, intensity, and/or geometric radiation patterns. The function of a precision performance lamp is to go beyond these parameters and into the precision repeatability of performance. All lamps are not equal. There are a variety of incandescent lamps, from the vacuum incandescent indictor lamp to the precision lamp of a blood analyzer. In the past the definition of a precision lamp was described in terms of wattage, light center length (LCL), filament position, and/or spot alignment. This paper presents a new view of precision lamps through the discussion of a new segment of lamp design, which we term precision performance lamps. The definition of precision performance lamps will include (must include) the factors of a precision lamp. But what makes a precision lamp a precision performance lamp is the manner in which the design factors of amperage, mscp (mean spherical candlepower), efficacy (lumens/watt), life, not considered individually but rather considered collectively. There is a statistical bias in a precision performance lamp for each of these factors; taken individually and as a whole. When properly considered the results can be dramatic to the system design engineer, system production manage and the system end-user. It can be shown that for the lamp user, the use of precision performance lamps can translate to: (1) ease of system design, (2) simplification of electronics, (3) superior signal to noise ratios, (4) higher manufacturing yields, (5) lower system costs, (6) better product performance. The factors mentioned above are described along with their interdependent relationships. It is statistically shown how the benefits listed above are achievable. Examples are provided to illustrate how proper attention to precision performance lamp characteristics actually aid in system product design and manufacturing to build and market more, market acceptable product products in the

  4. Wood's lamp illumination (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A Wood's lamp emits ultraviolet light and can be a diagnostic aid in determining if someone has a fungal ... is an infection on the area where the Wood's lamp is illuminating, the area will fluoresce. Normally ...

  5. Wood's Lamp Examination

    MedlinePlus

    ... dermatologists to assist in the diagnosis of various pigment and infectious disorders. The examination is performed in ... lamp. If a fungal or bacterial infection or pigment disorder is present, Wood's lamp examination can strengthen ...

  6. Halogen lamp experiment, HALEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, G.; Stapelmann, J.

    1986-01-01

    The main purpose of the Halogen Lamp Experiment (HALEX) was to investigate the operation of a halogen lamp during an extended period in a microgravity environment and to prove its behavior in space. The Mirror Heating Facilities for Crystal Growth and Material Science Experiments in space relies on one or two halogen lamps as a furnace to melt the specimens. The HALEX aim is to verify: full power operation of a halogen lamp for a period of about 60 hours; achievement of about 10% of its terrestrial life span; and operation of the halogen lamp under conditions similar to furnace operation.

  7. Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Scholand, Michael

    2012-04-01

    Fluorescent lamps are the most widely used artificial light source today, responsible for approximately 70% of the lumens delivered to our living spaces globally. The technology was originally commercialized in the 1930's, and manufacturers have been steadily improving the efficacy of these lamps over the years through modifications to the phosphors, cathodes, fill-gas, operating frequency, tube diameter and other design attributes. The most efficient commercially available fluorescent lamp is the 25 Watt T5 lamp. This lamp operates at 114-116 lumens per watt while also providing good color rendering and more than 20,000 hours of operating life. Industry experts interviewed indicated that while this lamp is the most efficient in the market today, there is still a further 10 to 14% of potential improvements that may be introduced to the market over the next 2 to 5 years. These improvements include further developments in phosphors, fill-gas, cathode coatings and ultraviolet (UV) reflective glass coatings. The commercialization of these technology improvements will combine to bring about efficacy improvements that will push the technology up to a maximum 125 to 130 lumens per watt. One critical issue raised by researchers that may present a barrier to the realization of these improvements is the fact that technology investment in fluorescent lamps is being reduced in order to prioritize research into light emitting diodes (LEDs) and ceramic metal halide high intensity discharge (HID) lamps. Thus, it is uncertain whether these potential efficacy improvements will be developed, patented and commercialized. The emphasis for premium efficacy will continue to focus on T5 lamps, which are expected to continue to be marketed along with the T8 lamp. Industry experts highlighted the fact that an advantage of the T5 lamp is the fact that it is 40% smaller and yet provides an equivalent lumen output to that of a T8 or T12 lamp. Due to its smaller form factor, the T5 lamp

  8. 49 CFR 393.25 - Requirements for lamps other than head lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REGULATIONS PARTS AND ACCESSORIES NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Electrical... lamps; school bus warning lamps; amber warning lamps or flashing warning lamps on tow trucks...

  9. Endurance testing of downstream cathodes on a low-power MPD thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, J. A.; Rose, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A low-power MPD thruster with downstream cathode was tested for endurance with a series of hollow cathode designs. Failure modes and failure mechanisms were identified. A new hollow cathode (with rod inserts) has emerged which shows promise for long life. The downstream positioning of the cathode was also changed from an on-axis location to an off-axis location. Data are presented for a 1332-hour life test of this new hollow cathode located at the new off-axis location. Xenon propellant was used.

  10. High temperature battery cell comprising stress free hollow fiber bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, J. N.; Revak, T. T.; Rossini, F. J.

    1985-04-16

    Thermal stressing of hollow fibers constituting the electrolyte-separator in a high temperature battery cell, and of certain other elements thereof, is avoided by suspending the assembly comprising the anolyte tank, the tube-sheet, the hollow fibers and a cathodic current collector-distributor within the casing and employing a limp connection between the collector-distributor and the cathode terminal of the cell.

  11. High temperature battery cell comprising stress-free hollow fiber bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, J.N.; Revak, T.T.; Rossini, F.J.

    1982-06-01

    Thermal stressing of hollow fibers constituting the electrolyteseparator in a high temperature battery cell, and of certain other elements thereof, is avoided by suspending the assembly comprising the anolyte tank, the tubesheet, the hollow fibers and a cathodic current collector-distributing means, within the casing and employing a limp connection between the latter means and the cathode terminal of the cell.

  12. Discharge lamp technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dakin, James

    1994-01-01

    This talk is an overview of discharge lamp technology commonly employed in general lighting, with emphasis on issues pertinent to lighting for plant growth. Since the audience is primarily from the plant growth community, and this begins the light source part of the program, we will start with a brief description of the discharge lamps. Challenges of economics and of thermal management make lamp efficiency a prime concern in controlled environment agriculture, so we will emphasize science considerations relating to discharge lamp efficiency. We will then look at the spectra and ratings of some representative lighting products, and conclude with a discussion of technological advances.

  13. Hollow Retroreflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A hollow retroreflector is a mirror-like instrument that reflects light and other radiations back to the source. After developing a hollow retroreflector for NASA's Apollo-Soyuz mission, PLX, Inc. continued to expand the technology and develop a variety of retroreflector systems. The Lateral Transfer Hollow Retroreflector maintains precise separation, at any wavelength, of incoming and existing beams regardless of their orientation. It can be used as an instrument or as a component of an optical system. In the laboratory, it offers a new efficient means of beam positioning. In other applications, it connects laser resonators, aligns telescope mirrors and is useful in general boresighting and alignment.

  14. Hollow Electrode Discharge Triodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, K. H.; Peterkin, F. E.; Tessnow, T.

    1996-10-01

    The current through a direct current micro-hollow electrode (electrode hole diameter: 0.7 mm) discharge in argon was shown to be controllable by means of a third, external electrode placed close to the cathode opening. By increasing the potential of the positively biased control electrode from zero to 30 V the discharge current could be linearly reduced from 5 μA to 0.75 μA, at a discharge voltage of 300 V. The current-voltage characteristic of the micro-hollow electrode discharge was found to have a positive slope, allowing parallel discharge operation without ballast. By drilling holes through a metal-plated, dielectric film, an array of hollow electrode discharges could be generated. It was shown that each discharge responds individually to variations in the potential of the corresponding external control electrode. The simplicity of the electrode configuration and the possibility of linear, electrical control of the individual discharge currents offers the possibility to use these triode arrays in addressable flat panel displays (patent pending).

  15. Jacketed lamp bulb envelope

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Bass, Gary K.; Dolan, James T.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang; Levin, Izrail; Roy, Robert J.; Shanks, Bruce; Smith, Malcolm; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a partially closed end, the partially closed end defining an aperture, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material at least partially covering a portion of the bulb not abutting the aperture. The reflective ceramic material may substantially fill an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. The ceramic cup may include a structural feature for aiding in alignment of the jacketed lamp bulb envelope in a lamp. The ceramic cup may include an external flange about a periphery thereof. One example of a jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a closed end, a ceramic washer covering the open end of the ceramic cup, the washer defining an aperture therethrough, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material filling an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. A method of packing a jacketed lamp bulb envelope of the type comprising a ceramic cup with a lamp bulb disposed therein includes the steps of filling the ceramic cup with a flowable slurry of reflective material, and applying centrifugal force to the cup to pack the reflective material therein.

  16. Turning on LAMP

    ScienceCinema

    Bostedt, Christoph

    2016-07-12

    Christoph Bostedt, a senior staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser, provides a sneak peek of a powerful new instrument, called LAMP, that is now available for experiments that probe the atomic and molecular realm. LAMP replaces and updates the first instrument at LCLS, dubbed CAMP, which will be installed at an X-ray laser in Germany.

  17. Turning on LAMP

    SciTech Connect

    Bostedt, Christoph

    2014-06-30

    Christoph Bostedt, a senior staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser, provides a sneak peek of a powerful new instrument, called LAMP, that is now available for experiments that probe the atomic and molecular realm. LAMP replaces and updates the first instrument at LCLS, dubbed CAMP, which will be installed at an X-ray laser in Germany.

  18. Breakdown characteristics of xenon HID Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia; Sato, Ayumu; Brates, Nanu; Noro, Koji; Kushner, Mark

    2009-10-01

    The breakdown characteristics of mercury free xenon high intensity discharge (HID) lamps exhibit a large statistical time lag often having a large scatter in breakdown voltages. In this paper, we report on results from a computational investigation of the processes which determine the ignition voltages for positive and negative pulses in commercial HID lamps having fill pressures of up to 20 atm. Steep voltage rise results in higher avalanche electron densities and earlier breakdown times. Circuit characteristics also play a role. Large ballast resistors may limit current to the degree that breakdown is quenched. The breakdown voltage critically depends on cathode charge injection by electric field emission (or other mechanisms) which in large part controls the statistical time lag for breakdown. For symmetric lamps, ionization waves (IWs) simultaneously develop from the bottom and top electrodes. Breakdown typically occurs when the top and bottom IWs converge. Condensed salt layers having small conductivities on the inner walls of HID lamps and on the electrodes can influence the ignition behavior. With these layers, IWs tend to propagate along the inner wall and exhibit a different structure depending on the polarity.

  19. Parallel operation of microhollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, W.; Stark, R.H.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1999-02-01

    Parallel operation of dc microhollow cathode discharges in argon at pressures up to several hundred torr was obtained without individual ballast at low currents, where the slope of the current-voltage characteristic is positive. By using semi-insulating silicon as anode material, the authors were able to extend the range of stable operation over the entire current range, including that with negative differential resistance. This opens the possibility to utilize microhollow cathode discharge arrays in flat panel lamps.

  20. Rapid flash lamp

    DOEpatents

    Gavenonis, Thomas L.; Hewitt, William H.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for providing low peak time and pulse width actinic energy from a lamp by varying the input energy of a capacitive ignition circuit having relatively high voltage to the lamp. The lamp comprises a pair of electrodes disposed within a light transparent envelope in which a combustible and an oxidizing gas reaction combination is located. The combustible is preferably shredded zirconium which is in contact with and provides an electrical discharge path between the electrodes. The gas is preferably pressurized oxygen.

  1. Robust Low-Cost Cathode for Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Under funding from the NASA Commercial Technology Office, a cathode assembly was designed, developed, fabricated, and tested for use in plasma sources for ground-based materials processing applications. The cathode development activity relied on the large prior NASA investment and successful development of high-current, high-efficiency, long-life hollow cathodes for use on the International Space Station Plasma Contactor System. The hollow cathode was designed and fabricated based on known engineering criteria and manufacturing processes for compatibility with the requirements of the plasma source. The transfer of NASA GRC-developed hollow cathode technology for use as an electron emitter in the commercial plasma source is anticipated to yield a significant increase in process control, while eliminating the present issues of electron emitter lifetime and contamination.

  2. Physics of Incandescent Lamp Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul; King, John

    2008-01-01

    Incandescent lamps with tungsten filaments have been in use for about a century while being gradually replaced by fluorescent lamps; in another generation both will quite probably be largely replaced by light-emitting diodes. Incandescent lamps (simply called "lamps" in what follows) burn out after a lifetime that depends mostly on the temperature…

  3. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    DOEpatents

    Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

    1983-12-29

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  4. Frog Hollow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCardell, Bonnie

    1979-01-01

    The Vermont State Craft Center, Frog Hollow, in Middlebury, Vermont, provides studio space and instruction to students from two elementary schools, a day-care center, the county school for the mentally retarded, and an area kindergarten. Described are the programs offered to each of these groups of students. (Author/KC)

  5. 49 CFR 393.24 - Requirements for head lamps, auxiliary driving lamps and front fog lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... specifications in FMVSS No. 108 (49 CFR 571.108), SAE J581, and SAE J583, respectively. ... lamps and front fog lamps. 393.24 Section 393.24 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Devices, and Electrical Wiring § 393.24 Requirements for head lamps, auxiliary driving lamps and front...

  6. 49 CFR 393.24 - Requirements for head lamps, auxiliary driving lamps and front fog lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... specifications in FMVSS No. 108 (49 CFR 571.108), SAE J581, and SAE J583, respectively. ... lamps and front fog lamps. 393.24 Section 393.24 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Devices, and Electrical Wiring § 393.24 Requirements for head lamps, auxiliary driving lamps and front...

  7. 49 CFR 393.24 - Requirements for head lamps, auxiliary driving lamps and front fog lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... specifications in FMVSS No. 108 (49 CFR 571.108), SAE J581, and SAE J583, respectively. ... lamps and front fog lamps. 393.24 Section 393.24 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Devices, and Electrical Wiring § 393.24 Requirements for head lamps, auxiliary driving lamps and front...

  8. 49 CFR 393.24 - Requirements for head lamps, auxiliary driving lamps and front fog lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... specifications in FMVSS No. 108 (49 CFR 571.108), SAE J581, and SAE J583, respectively. ... lamps and front fog lamps. 393.24 Section 393.24 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Devices, and Electrical Wiring § 393.24 Requirements for head lamps, auxiliary driving lamps and front...

  9. 49 CFR 393.24 - Requirements for head lamps, auxiliary driving lamps and front fog lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... specifications in FMVSS No. 108 (49 CFR 571.108), SAE J581, and SAE J583, respectively. ... lamps and front fog lamps. 393.24 Section 393.24 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Devices, and Electrical Wiring § 393.24 Requirements for head lamps, auxiliary driving lamps and front...

  10. Long-Life/Low-Power Ion-Gun Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    New cathode has form of hollow tube through which gas enters region of high electron density, produced by electric discharge with auxiliary electrode referred to as "keeper." Ion-gun cathode emits electrons that bombard gas in chamber. Ions accelerated out of source are used to dope semiconductor material.

  11. Restructuring hollow Au–Ag nanostructures for improved SERS activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiji, S. G.; Gopchandran, K. G.

    2016-10-01

    Hollow Au–Ag nanostructures with improved SERS performance were prepared by using a modified galvanic replacement reaction. The plasmon characteristics of the hollow structures are found to be highly sensitive to the volume of cathode, whether or not a co-reductant was used in the synthesis. It is found that the presence of a co-reductant viz., ascorbic acid (AA) during the reaction make the hollow structures capable to maintain its physical structure even after addition of excess cathode and also it transformes sacrificial templates into highly efficient hollow Au–Ag SERS substrates. In the galvanic replacement reaction conducted in presence of AA, where on one side the removal of Ag atoms make cavities to occur and on the other side a coating on the surface with Au and Ag atoms due to co-reduction take place simultaneously. Morphological observations indicated that it is possible to control the competition between these two mechanisms and to make Au–Ag hollow structures in tune with applications by optimizing the volume of cathode or AA. The SERS activity of these substrates were tested with crystal violet molecule as probe, using two different laser lines, 514 and 784.8 nm. In this report, the enhancement observed for hollow structures fabricated under optimum conditions are in the order of 106. SERS measurements have shown that for a specific volume of cathode, substrates fabricated in presence of AA are superior to the other type and also the increase in enhancement factor is ∼10 fold.

  12. Secondary electron emission characteristics of oxide electrodes in flat electron emission lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chang-Lin; Zeng, Hui-Kai; Li, Chia-Hung; Li, Jung-Yu; Chen, Shih-Pu; Lin, Yi-Ping; Hsieh, Tai-Chiung; Juang, Jenh-Yih

    2016-01-01

    The present study concerns with the secondary electron emission coefficient, γ, of the cathode materials used in the newly developed flat electron emission lamp (FEEL) devices, which essentially integrates the concept of using cathode for fluorescent lamp and anode for cathode ray tube (CRT) to obtain uniform planar lighting. Three different cathode materials, namely fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO), aluminum oxide coated FTO (Al2O3/FTO) and magnesium oxide coated FTO (MgO/FTO) were prepared to investigate how the variations of γ and working gases influence the performance of FEEL devices, especially in lowering the breakdown voltage and pressure of the working gases. The results indicate that the MgO/FTO bilayer cathode exhibited a relatively larger effective secondary electron emission coefficient, resulting in significant reduction of breakdown voltage to about 3kV and allowing the device to be operated at the lower pressure to generate the higher lighting efficiency.

  13. Numerical study on rectangular microhollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    He Shoujie; Ouyang Jiting; He Feng; Li Shang

    2011-03-15

    Rectangular microhollow cathode discharge in argon is investigated by using two-dimensional time-dependent self-consistent fluid model. The electric potential, electric field, particle density, and mean electron energy are calculated. The results show that hollow cathode effect can be onset in the present configuration, with strong electric field and high mean electron energy in the cathode fall while high density and quasineutral plasma in the negative glow. The potential well and electric filed reversal are formed in the negative glow region. It is suggested that the presence of large electron diffusion flux necessitates the field reversal and potential well.

  14. Fluorescent discharge lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, E.; Otsuka, H.; Nomi, K.; Honmo, I.

    1982-01-01

    A rapidly illuminating fluorescent lamp 1,200 mm long and 32.5 mm in diameter with an interior conducting strip which is compatible with conventional fixtures and ballasts is described. The fluorescent lamp is composed of a linear glass tube, electrodes sealed at both ends, mercury and raregas sealed in the glass tube, a fluorescent substance clad on the inner walls of the glass tube, and a clad conducting strip extending the entire length of the glass tube in the axial direction on the inner surface of the tube.

  15. Glow discharges in high pressure microhollow cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeuf, J.-P.; Pitchford, L. C.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2004-09-01

    We have developed a model of high-pressure, microhollow cathode discharges (MHCDs) which has been used to predict the electrical characteristics and other properties of these discharges for comparison with experiment. The configuration studied here is an anode/dielectric/cathode sandwich in which a cylindrical hole with a diameter of some 100's of microns is pierced in the dielectric and in the cathode. Results from the model calculations in xenon at 100 torr and higher pressures show that the positive V-I (voltage-current) characteristic observed experimentally at low current corresponds to an abnormal glow discharge inside the cathode hole. At higher current, the V-I characteristic is that of a normal to slightly abnormal glow discharge between the anode and the outer face of the cathode. The change in slope of the V-I characteristic is consistent with experiment (provided metastables are taken into account). This shape was previously attribed to the onset of the classical hollow cathode effect, but we find no hollow cathode effect for pressures above about 30 torr and for 200 micron hole diameters.

  16. False "highlighting" with Wood's lamp.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Jonathan I; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-01-01

    Wood's lamp evaluation is used to diagnose pigmentary disorders. For example, vitiligo typically demonstrates lesional enhancement under Wood's lamp evaluation. Numerous false positive enhancing lesions can be noted in the skin. We describe a 5-year-old Hispanic boy who had painted his face with highlighter, producing enhancing lesions under Wood's lamp. Physicians who use Wood's lamp should be aware that the appearance of markers and highlighter can mimic that of true clinical illnesses.

  17. Axial segregation in high intensity discharge lamps measured by laser absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Flikweert, A.J.; Nimalasuriya, T.; Groothuis, C.H.J.M.; Kroesen, G.M.W.; Stoffels, W.W.

    2005-10-01

    High intensity discharge lamps have a high efficiency. These lamps contain rare-earth additives (in our case dysprosium iodide) which radiate very efficiently. A problem is color separation in the lamp because of axial segregation of the rare-earth additives, caused by diffusion and convection. Here two-dimensional atomic dysprosium density profiles are measured by means of laser absorption spectroscopy; the order of magnitude of the density is 10{sup 22} m{sup -3}. The radially resolved atomic density measurements show a hollow density profile. In the outer parts of the lamp molecules dominate, while the center is depleted of dysprosium atoms due to ionization. From the axial profiles the segregation parameter is determined. It is shown that the lamp operates on the right-hand side of the Fischer curve [J. Appl. Phys. 47, 2954 (1976)], i.e., a larger convection leads to less segregation.

  18. The fundus slit lamp.

    PubMed

    Gellrich, Marcus-Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Fundus biomicroscopy with the slit lamp as it is practiced widely nowadays was not established until the 1980-es with the introduction of the Volk lenses +90 and +60D. Thereafter little progress has been made in retinal imaging with the slit lamp. It is the aim of this paper to fully exploit the potential of a video slit lamp for fundus documentation by using easily accessible additions. Suitable still images are easily retrieved from videorecordings of slit lamp examinations. The effects of changements in the slit lamp itself (slit beam and apertures) and its examination equipment (converging lenses from +40 to +90D) on quality and spectrum of fundus images are demonstrated. Imaging software is applied for reconstruction of larger fundus areas in a mosaic pattern (Hugin®) and to perform the flicker test in order to visualize changes in the same fundus area at different points of time (Power Point®). The three lenses +90/+60/+40D are a good choice for imaging the whole spectrum of retinal diseases. Displacement of the oblique slit light can be used to assess changes in the surface profile of the inner retina which occurs e.g. in macular holes or pigment epithelial detachment. The mosaic function in its easiest form (one strip macula adapted to one strip with the optic disc) provides an overview of the posterior pole comparable to a fundus camera's image. A reconstruction of larger fundus areas is feasible for imaging in vitreoretinal surgery or occlusive vessel disease. The flicker test is a fine tool for monitoring progressive glaucoma by changes in the optic disc, and it is also a valuable diagnostic tool in macular disease. Nearly all retinal diseases can be imaged with the slit lamp - irrespective whether they affect the posterior pole, mainly the optic nerve or the macula, the whole retina or only its periphery. Even a basic fundus controlled perimetry is possible. Therefore fundus videography with the slit lamp is a worthwhile approach especially for the

  19. Cathode Effects in Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Granstedt, E.M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-09-12

    Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode-neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

  20. Dimming of metal halide lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    We ran some tests on the effect of dimming of metal halide (MH) lamps upon the stability and the spectral quality of the light output. Lamps used were a new Philips lamp HPI-T 250W, a similar Philips lamp with a few thousand burning hours and a new Osram lamp HQI-T 250W/D. The ballast was a BBC type DJ 250/2KS, the starter a BAS TORGI type MZN 250 SE and the dimmer an Elstrom Control System type ERHQ-T 250. Power was derived from a Philips stabilizer, type PE 1602. Lamp output was monitored with a PAR meter. Spectra were taken at 100% and at 50% output as measured with the PAR meter. Lamps were allowed to stabilize at any setting for 30 minutes before measurements were made. Lamp manufacturers advise against dimming for fear of poor stability and intolerable changes of the spectrum. However, none of the lamps showed a decrease in stability, no flicker or wandering of the discharge, and the changes of the spectrum were not negligible, but certainly not dramatic. Lamps of either manufacture retain their white color, relative peak heights of spectral lines did shift, but no gaps in the spectrum occurred. Spectra taken at 50% with 30 minutes intervals coincided. Differences between the new and the older Philips lamp were noticeable, but not really significant.

  1. Cathodic arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2003-10-29

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

  2. Analysis of cathode geometry to minimize cathode erosion in direct current microplasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Causa, Federica; Ghezzi, Francesco; Caniello, Roberto; Grosso, Giovanni; Dellasega, David

    2012-12-15

    Microplasma jets are now widely used for deposition, etching, and materials processing. The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of cathode geometry on deposition quality, for microplasma jet deposition systems in low vacuum. The interest here is understanding the influence of hydrogen on sputtering and/or evaporation of the electrodes. Samples obtained with two cathode geometries with tapered and rectangular cross-sections have been investigated experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Samples obtained with a tapered-geometry cathode present heavy contamination, demonstrating cathode erosion, while samples obtained with a rectangular-cross-section cathode are free from contamination. These experimental characteristics were explained by modelling results showing a larger radial component of the electric field at the cathode inner wall of the tapered cathode. As a result, ion acceleration is larger, explaining the observed cathode erosion in this case. Results from the present investigation also show that the ratio of radial to axial field components is larger for the rectangular geometry case, thus, qualitatively explaining the presence of micro-hollow cathode discharge over a wide range of currents observed in this case. In the light of the above findings, the rectangular cathode geometry is considered to be more effective to achieve cleaner deposition.

  3. Analysis of cathode geometry to minimize cathode erosion in direct current microplasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Causa, Federica; Ghezzi, Francesco; Dellasega, David; Caniello, Roberto; Grosso, Giovanni

    2012-12-01

    Microplasma jets are now widely used for deposition, etching, and materials processing. The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of cathode geometry on deposition quality, for microplasma jet deposition systems in low vacuum. The interest here is understanding the influence of hydrogen on sputtering and/or evaporation of the electrodes. Samples obtained with two cathode geometries with tapered and rectangular cross-sections have been investigated experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Samples obtained with a tapered-geometry cathode present heavy contamination, demonstrating cathode erosion, while samples obtained with a rectangular-cross-section cathode are free from contamination. These experimental characteristics were explained by modelling results showing a larger radial component of the electric field at the cathode inner wall of the tapered cathode. As a result, ion acceleration is larger, explaining the observed cathode erosion in this case. Results from the present investigation also show that the ratio of radial to axial field components is larger for the rectangular geometry case, thus, qualitatively explaining the presence of micro-hollow cathode discharge over a wide range of currents observed in this case. In the light of the above findings, the rectangular cathode geometry is considered to be more effective to achieve cleaner deposition.

  4. Guidelines for application of fluorescent lamps in high-performance avionic backlight systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syroid, Daniel D.

    1997-07-01

    Fluorescent lamps have proven to be well suited for use in high performance avionic backlight systems as demonstrated by numerous production applications for both commercial and military cockpit displays. Cockpit display applications include: Boeing 777, new 737s, F-15, F-16, F-18, F-22, C- 130, Navy P3, NASA Space Shuttle and many others. Fluorescent lamp based backlights provide high luminance, high lumen efficiency, precision chromaticity and long life for avionic active matrix liquid crystal display applications. Lamps have been produced in many sizes and shapes. Lamp diameters range from 2.6 mm to over 20 mm and lengths for the larger diameter lamps range to over one meter. Highly convoluted serpentine lamp configurations are common as are both hot and cold cathode electrode designs. This paper will review fluorescent lamp operating principles, discuss typical requirements for avionic grade lamps, compare avionic and laptop backlight designs and provide guidelines for the proper application of lamps and performance choices that must be made to attain optimum system performance considering high luminance output, system efficiency, dimming range and cost.

  5. Cathode degradation and erosion in high pressure arc discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, T. L.; Nakanishi, S.

    1983-01-01

    The various processes which control cathode erosion and degradation were identified and evaluated. A direct current arc discharge was established between electrodes in a pressure-controlled gas flow environment. The cathode holder was designed for easy testing of various cathode materials. The anode was a water cooled copper collector electrode. The arc was powered by a dc power supply with current and voltage regulated cross-over control. Nitrogen and argon were used as propellants and the materials used were two percent thoriated tungsten, barium oxide impregnated porous tungsten, pure tungsten and lanthanum hexaboride. The configurations used were cylindrical solid rods, wire bundles supported by hollow molybdenum tubes, cylindrical hollow tubes, and hollow cathodes of the type used in ion thrusters. The results of the mass loss tests in nitrogen indicated that pure tungsten eroded at a rate more than 10 times faster than the rates of the impregnated tungsten materials. It was found that oxygen impurities of less than 0.5 percent in the nitrogen increased the mass loss rate by a factor of 4 over high purity nitrogen. At power levels less than 1 kW, cathode size and current level did not significantly affect the mass loss rate. The hollow cathode was found to be operable in argon and in nitrogen only at pressures below 400 and 200 torr, respectively.

  6. Cathode degradation and erosion in high pressure arc discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, T. L.; Nakanishi, S.

    1984-01-01

    The various processes which control cathode erosion and degradation were identified and evaluated. A direct current arc discharge was established between electrodes in a pressure-controlled gas flow environment. The cathode holder was designed for easy testing of various cathode materials. The anode was a water cooled copper collector electrode. The arc was powered by a dc power supply with current and voltage regulated cross-over control. Nitrogen and argon were used as propellants and the materials used were two percent thoriated tungsten, barium oxide impregnated porous tungsten, pure tungsten and lanthanum hexaboride. The configurations used were cylindrical solid rods, wire bundles supported by hollow molybdenum tubes, cylindrical hollow tubes, and hollow cathodes of the type used in ion thrusters. The results of the mass loss tests in nitrogen indicated that pure tungsten eroded at a rate more than 10 times faster than the rates of the impregnated tungsten materials. It was found that oxygen impurities of less than 0.5 percent in the nitrogen increased the mass loss rate by a factor of 4 over high purity nitrogen. At power levels less than 1 kW, cathode size and current level did not significantly affect the mass loss rate. The hollow cathode was found to be operable in argon and in nitrogen only at pressures below 400 and 200 torr, respectively.

  7. Physics of Incandescent Lamp Burnout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluck, Paul; King, John

    2008-01-01

    Incandescent lamps with tungsten filaments have been in use for about a century while being gradually replaced by fluorescent lamps; in another generation both will quite probably be largely replaced by light-emitting diodes. Incandescent lamps (simply called lamps in what follows) burn out after a lifetime that depends mostly on the temperature of the filament and hence the applied voltage. A full-term project (about 100 hours) on lamp burnout was carried out by two students in 1965 and has been briefly described. Many aspects of the physics of lamps have been dealt with in articles that have appeared in this journal, in the American Journal of Physics, and in Physics Education.2,3

  8. Effect of Cathode Length on Electrical Characteristics of a Microhollow Cathode Discharge in Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Tsutomu; Namba, Shinichi; Takiyama, Ken; Nojima, Hideo

    2012-06-01

    The electrical characteristics of a microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) have been measured over a wide range of helium gas pressures from 10 to 900 Torr, by using cathodes of 0.5 mm diameter and 0.5-3.0 mm length. A relatively high voltage of the Paschen minimum at high pressure for the shortest cathode and a conventional hollow cathode mode for longer ones were observed. These are explained by a change of the plasma loss owing to the difference in cathode length. The radial extent of the negative glow inside the cathode hole increased with discharge current, and eventually spread along the outer surface. The threshold current for the extension of the plasma outside the cathode hole increased in proportion to the cathode length and to the square of the gas pressure. Thus, the longer cathode provides a favorable condition for the generation of reactive MHCD plasma at high-pressure and high-current operation. On the basis of these results and spectroscopic observation, the sustaining mechanism of an MHCD is briefly discussed.

  9. Compact fluorescent lamps, LED lamps and harmonic distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, A. M. R.; Debatin, R. M.; Cotia, F. C. G.; Silva, M. V. M.; Ribeiro, R. S.; Zampilis, R. R. N.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the harmonic distortion in the current waveform of Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFL) and Lamps Lighting Emitting Diode (LED). For this, we analysed the power factor, voltage waveform, current waveform, total harmonic distortion (THD) and active power consumed.

  10. Monolithic cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, P. R.; Swanson, L. W.

    1985-11-01

    The purpose of this program was to evaluate LaB6 (210) and (310) oriented single crystal material for flat cathode applications and to deliver mounted LaB6 cathodes with (310) orientation for operation in RADC/Varian life test vehicles. To that end, the program was divided into four separate tasks, as shown in the report. This project was extended for 3 months past the initial program period so that unavoidable delays could be overcome and the project completed. The final report covers the entire period of the program, which terminated 29 March 1985.

  11. High brightness microwave lamp

    DOEpatents

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Dolan, James T.; MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Simpson, James E.

    2003-09-09

    An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes a source of microwave energy, a microwave cavity, a structure configured to transmit the microwave energy from the source to the microwave cavity, a bulb disposed within the microwave cavity, the bulb including a discharge forming fill which emits light when excited by the microwave energy, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity, wherein the reflector defines a reflective cavity which encompasses the bulb within its volume and has an inside surface area which is sufficiently less than an inside surface area of the microwave cavity. A portion of the reflector may define a light emitting aperture which extends from a position closely spaced to the bulb to a light transmissive end of the microwave cavity. Preferably, at least a portion of the reflector is spaced from a wall of the microwave cavity. The lamp may be substantially sealed from environmental contamination. The cavity may include a dielectric material is a sufficient amount to require a reduction in the size of the cavity to support the desired resonant mode.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Thruster Cathode Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crofton, Mark

    2004-11-01

    Advanced ion propulsion technologies are being developed under the Nuclear Electric Xenon Ion System (NEXIS) program for use in outer planet exploration. A revolutionary approach to thruster cathode design is dictated by the very high lifetime and propellant throughput requirements for nuclear electric applications. In conventional dispenser hollow cathodes used in thrusters, processes leading to depletion, inadequate transport, or insufficient production of barium are among those limiting the lifetime. A reservoir hollow cathode is being developed to address each of these failure mechanisms, exploiting four design variables - matrix material, source material, geometry, and thermal design - to essentially eliminate established failure modes. The very long anticipated lifetime necessitates new life validation methods to augment or replace the conventional lifetest approach. One important tool for quickly evaluating design changes is the ability to measure barium density inside a hollow cathode and/or in the plume. The dependence of barium density on temperature and other factors is an extremely important indicator of cathode health, particularly if the ratio Ba:BaO is also obtained. Comparison of barium production for reservoir and conventional cathodes will enable an assessment of the efficacy of reservoir designs and the goal of reducing barium consumption at a given emission current level. This study describes benchmark measurements made on a conventional cathode previously operated in a 20-kW NEXIS laboratory engine. Data on cathode operation and life-limiting processes were obtained through direct, real-time monitoring of atoms and molecules. A high-resolution, tunable laser system was employed to detect absorption of the low-density barium atoms inside the cathode. The plume was monitored also, using a quadrupole mass spectrometer to monitor multiple species and measure ion charge ratios. Data obtained with retarding potential analyzers or other means are

  13. Modeling cathode boundary layer discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Serrano, E.; Boeuf, J. P.; Pitchford, L. C.

    2009-10-01

    A Cathode Boundary Layer Discharge or CBL (Schoenbach, et al Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 13, 177,2004) is an electrode/dielectric/electrode sandwich with a central hole pierced through the dielectric and one of the electrodes (the anode). Thus, the cathode surface area available to the discharge is limited by the annular dielectric, and the discharge operates in an abnormal glow mode with a positive V-I characteristic at higher current. Using a two-dimensional fluid model, we have studied the electrical properties of CBLs in argon at 100 and 400 torr pressure. The spatial profiles of charged particle and metastable densities, potential, and gas temperature, as well as calculated V-I characteristics will be shown for a range of conditions for a 800 micron hole diameter. One interesting result (anticipated in the work of Belostotskiy, et al, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol 17, 045018, 2008) is that there is a sharp increase in the slope of the V-I characteristic when gas heating is taken into account. This current limiting effect is not observed when the discharge is able to expand on the outer surface of the cathode as in the case of the MicroHollow Cathode Discharge (MHCD) configuration, for example.

  14. Inductive tuners for microwave driven discharge lamps

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, James E.

    1999-01-01

    An RF powered electrodeless lamp utilizing an inductive tuner in the waveguide which couples the RF power to the lamp cavity, for reducing reflected RF power and causing the lamp to operate efficiently.

  15. Inductive tuners for microwave driven discharge lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.E.

    1999-11-02

    An RF powered electrodeless lamp utilizing an inductive tuner in the waveguide which couples the RF power to the lamp cavity, for reducing reflected RF power and causing the lamp to operate efficiently.

  16. Characterization of a radio frequency hollow electrode discharge at low gas pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Ahadi, Amir Mohammad; Rehders, Stefan; Strunskus, Thomas; Faupel, Franz; Trottenberg, Thomas; Kersten, Holger

    2015-08-15

    A radio frequency (RF) hollow discharge configuration is presented, which makes use of a combination of RF plasma generation and the hollow cathode effect. The system was especially designed for the treatment of nanoparticles, plasma polymerization, and nanocomposite fabrication. The process gas streams through the plasma in the inner of the cylindrical electrode system. In the here presented measurements, pure argon and argon with oxygen admixtures are exemplarily used. The discharge is characterized by probe measurements in the effluent, electrical measurements of the discharge parameters, and visual observations of the plasma glow. It is found that the RF fluctuations of the plasma potential are weak. The plasma potential resembles the one of a DC hollow cathode discharge, the RF hollow electrode acts as a cathode due to the self-bias, and a high voltage sheath forms in its inner cylinder.

  17. Characterization of a radio frequency hollow electrode discharge at low gas pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahadi, Amir Mohammad; Trottenberg, Thomas; Rehders, Stefan; Strunskus, Thomas; Kersten, Holger; Faupel, Franz

    2015-08-01

    A radio frequency (RF) hollow discharge configuration is presented, which makes use of a combination of RF plasma generation and the hollow cathode effect. The system was especially designed for the treatment of nanoparticles, plasma polymerization, and nanocomposite fabrication. The process gas streams through the plasma in the inner of the cylindrical electrode system. In the here presented measurements, pure argon and argon with oxygen admixtures are exemplarily used. The discharge is characterized by probe measurements in the effluent, electrical measurements of the discharge parameters, and visual observations of the plasma glow. It is found that the RF fluctuations of the plasma potential are weak. The plasma potential resembles the one of a DC hollow cathode discharge, the RF hollow electrode acts as a cathode due to the self-bias, and a high voltage sheath forms in its inner cylinder.

  18. The fate and management of high mercury-containing lamps from high technology industry.

    PubMed

    Chang, T C; You, S J; Yu, B S; Kong, H W

    2007-03-22

    This study investigated the fate and management of high mercury-contained lamps, such as cold cathode fluorescent lamps (CCFLs), ultraviolet lamps (UV lamps), and super high pressure mercury lamps (SHPs), from high technology industries in Taiwan, using material flow analysis (MFA) method. Several organizations, such as Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration, Taiwan External Trade Development Council, the light sources manufactories, mercury-containing lamps importer, high technology industrial user, and waste mercury-containing lamps treatment facilities were interviewed in this study. According to this survey, the total mercury contained in CCFLs, UV lamps, and SHPs produced in Taiwan or imported from other countries was 886kg in year 2004. Among the various lamps containing mercury, 57kg mercury was exported as primary CCFLs, 7kg mercury was wasted as defective CCFLs, and 820kg mercury was used in the high technology industries, including 463kg mercury contained in exported industrial products using CCFLs as components. On the contrary, only 59kg of mercury was exported, including 57kg in CCFLs and 2kg in UV lamps. It reveals that 364kg mercury was consumed in Taiwan during year 2004. In addition, 140kg of the 364kg mercury contained in lamps used by high technology industry was well treated through industrial waste treatment system. Among the waste mercury from high technology industry, 80kg (57%), 53kg (38%), and 7kg (5%) of mercury were through domestic treatment, offshore treatment, and emission in air, respectively. Unfortunately, 224kg waste mercury was not suitable treated, including 199kg mercury contained in CCFL, which is a component of monitor for personal computer and liquid crystal display television, and 25kg non-treated mercury. Thus, how to recover the mercury from the waste monitors is an important challenge of zero wastage policy in Taiwan.

  19. International Space Station Cathode Life Testing Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Soulas, George C.

    1998-01-01

    To demonstrate adequate lifetime and performance capabilities of a hollow cathode for use on the International Space Station (ISS) plasma contactor system, life tests of multiple hollow cathode assemblies (HCAs) were initiated at operating conditions simulating on-orbit operation. Three HCAs are presently being tested. These HCAs are operated with a continuous 6 sccm xenon flow rate and 3 A anode current. Emission current requirements are simulated with a square waveform consisting of 50 minutes at a 2.5 A emission current and 40 minutes with no emission current. As of July 1998, these HCAs have accumulated between 1 1,700 and 14,200 hours. While there have been changes in operatin, behavior the three HCAs continue to operate stably within ISS specifications and are expected to demonstrate the required lifetime.

  20. High pressure microhollow cathode discharges in air

    SciTech Connect

    Khedr, M.A.; Stark, R.H.; Watson, B.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1998-12-31

    Research on high pressure, large volume glow discharges in air is motivated by applications such as reflectors and absorbers for electromagnetic radiation, plasma processing, and the remediation of gaseous pollution. In order to prevent glow-to-arc transitions, which in high-pressure glow discharges start in the cathode region, it is proposed to use a plasma cathode consisting of an array of microhollow cathode discharges. To explore the conditions for stable operation of single 100 {micro}m microhollow cathode discharges in flowing air, the current-voltage characteristics, and the visual appearance of a 100 {micro}m microhollow cathode discharge were studied. The results show that the threshold current for the transition from a glow into a filamentary discharge varies inversely with pressure. At pressures of 400 Torr the current in the 100 {micro}m hollow cathode discharge must not exceed 0.5 mA in order for the discharge to be stable. The type of instability, which causes the transition from dc to fluctuating currents, is not known at this time, but the observed dependence of the threshold current from the gas pressure points to a thermal instability. Assuming that the White-Allis scaling law still holds for air discharges at pressures close to atmospheric, it is expected that reducing the cathode hole diameter to 50 {micro}m will allow us to operate microhollow cathode discharges at atmospheric air with currents of up to 0.25 mA. Experimental studies on the effect of the cathode dimensions and cathode material are underway and results will be discussed at the conference.

  1. Evaluation of GOES encoder lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W.; Helmold, N.

    1983-01-01

    Aging characteristics and life expectancies of flight quality, tungsten filament, encoder lamps are similar to those of 'commercial' grade gas filled lamps of similar construction, filament material and filament temperature. The aging and final failure by filament burnout are caused by single crystal growth over large portions of the filament with the concomitant development of facets and notches resulting in reduction of cross section and mechanical weakening of the filament. The life expectancy of presently produced lamps is about one year at their nominal operating voltage of five volts dc. At 4.5 volts, it is about two years. These life times are considerably shorter, and the degradation rates of lamp current and light flux are considerably higher, than were observed in the laboratory and in orbit on lamps of the same type manufactured more than a decade ago. It is speculated that the filaments of these earlier lamps contained a crystallization retarding dopant, possibly thorium oxide. To obtain the desired life expectancy of or = to four years in present lamps, operating voltages of or = to four volts dc would be required.

  2. Transparent ceramic lamp envelope materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, G. C.

    2005-09-01

    Transparent ceramic materials with optical qualities comparable to single crystals of similar compositions have been developed in recent years, as a result of the improved understanding of powder-processing-fabrication- sintering-property inter-relationships. These high-temperature materials with a range of thermal and mechanical properties are candidate envelopes for focused-beam, short-arc lamps containing various fills operating at temperatures higher than quartz. This paper reviews the composition, structure and properties of transparent ceramic lamp envelope materials including sapphire, small-grained polycrystalline alumina, aluminium oxynitride, yttrium aluminate garnet, magnesium aluminate spinel and yttria-lanthana. A satisfactory thermal shock resistance is required for the ceramic tube to withstand the rapid heating and cooling cycles encountered in lamps. Thermophysical properties, along with the geometry, size and thickness of a transparent ceramic tube, are important parameters in the assessment of its resistance to fracture arising from thermal stresses in lamps during service. The corrosive nature of lamp-fill liquid and vapour at high temperatures requires that all lamp components be carefully chosen to meet the target life. The wide range of new transparent ceramics represents flexibility in pushing the limit of envelope materials for improved beamer lamps.

  3. Custom blending of lamp phosphors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemm, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Spectral output of fluorescent lamps can be precisely adjusted by using computer-assisted analysis for custom blending lamp phosphors. With technique, spectrum of main bank of lamps is measured and stored in computer memory along with emission characteristics of commonly available phosphors. Computer then calculates ratio of green and blue intensities for each phosphor according to manufacturer's specifications and plots them as coordinates on graph. Same ratios are calculated for measured spectrum. Once proper mix is determined, it is applied as coating to fluorescent tubing.

  4. Rapid measurement of spatial light distribution of a short-arc xenon flash lamp.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Youquan; Guo, Dexia; Liu, Xiao; Wang, Lingli; Jiang, Nan; Wang, Xianquan

    2016-08-20

    Small short-arc xenon flash lamps, yielding high energy and ultraviolet radiation without cooling structures, provide ideal analytic-instrument light. Improving instrument designs requires accurately determining spatial optical-flux distribution. Thus, this paper presents rapid scanning of a xenon lamp's central light intensity using a high-sensitivity photodiode to capture short light pulses. Results show two-dimensional optical illumination patterns. In the horizontal mode, the anode and cathode lie in the target plane. In the vertical mode, the two electrodes are centered in a circle. Thus, because the xenon lamp's spatial light flux varies by orientation and main driving voltage, we recommend sampling light horizontally in front of the lamp across small angles. PMID:27556976

  5. Multi-lamp laser pumping cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Kuppenheimer, J.D. Jr.

    1987-07-21

    An optically pumped laser comprises: A. a cylindrical laser rod having a longitudinal central rod axis; B. cylindrical lamps for optically pumping the laser rod. The lamps have longitudinal central lamp axes parallel to the rod axis. The lamps being so located with respect to each other and to the laser rod as to define in cross section a base line associated with each lamp and extending between the rod axis and the lamp axis of the associated lamp. The base lines being equal in length and equiangularly spaced; and C. a reflector wall consisting essentially of first and second wall sections associated with each lamp, the cross sections of the first and second wall sections associated with a given lamp essentially following first and second curves extending from a lamp cusp associated with the given lamp to second and first rod cusps, respectively, associated with the given lamp. The first and second curves consist of the loci of points to which the sums of the distances, exterior to the laser rod and the given lamp, from first and second rod starting points, respectively, associated with the given lamp and from first and second lamp starting points, respectively, on the given lamp equal a fixed quantity.

  6. LAMP Observes the LCROSS Plume

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows LAMP’s view of the LCROSS plume. The first half of the animation shows the LAMP viewport scanning across the horizon, passing through the plume, and moving on. The second half of...

  7. 49 CFR 393.25 - Requirements for lamps other than head lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirements for lamps other than head lamps. 393.25 Section 393.25 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL... Wiring § 393.25 Requirements for lamps other than head lamps. (a) Mounting. All lamps shall be...

  8. 49 CFR 393.25 - Requirements for lamps other than head lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirements for lamps other than head lamps. 393.25 Section 393.25 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL... Wiring § 393.25 Requirements for lamps other than head lamps. (a) Mounting. All lamps shall be...

  9. 10 CFR 429.27 - General service fluorescent lamps, general service incandescent lamps, and incandescent reflector...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false General service fluorescent lamps, general service... EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.27 General service fluorescent lamps, general service incandescent lamps, and... § 429.11 are applicable to general service fluorescent lamps, general service incandescent lamps...

  10. 10 CFR 429.27 - General service fluorescent lamps, general service incandescent lamps, and incandescent reflector...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General service fluorescent lamps, general service... EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.27 General service fluorescent lamps, general service incandescent lamps, and... § 429.11 are applicable to general service fluorescent lamps, general service incandescent lamps...

  11. 10 CFR 429.27 - General service fluorescent lamps, general service incandescent lamps, and incandescent reflector...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General service fluorescent lamps, general service... EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.27 General service fluorescent lamps, general service incandescent lamps, and... § 429.11 are applicable to general service fluorescent lamps, general service incandescent lamps...

  12. A study on the influence of operating circuit on the position of emission point of fluorescent lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uetsuki, Tadao; Genba, Yuki; Kanda, Takashi

    2009-10-01

    High efficiency fluorescent lamp systems driven by high frequency are very popular for general lighting. Therefore it is very beneficial to be able to predict the lamp's life before the lamp dying, because people can buy a new lamp just before the lamp dying and need not have stocks. In order to judge the lifetime of a lamp it is very useful to know where the emission point is on the electrode filament. With regard to a method for grasping the emission point, it has been reported that the distance from the emission point to the end of the filament can be calculated by measuring the voltage across the filament and the currents flowing in both ends of the filament. The lamp's life can be predicted by grasping the movement of the emission point with operating time. Therefore it is very important to confirm whether the movement of the emission point changes or not when the operating circuit is changed. The authors investigated the difference in the way the emission points moved for two lamp systems which are very popular. One system had an electronic ballast having an auxiliary power source for the heating cathode. Another system had an electronic ballast with no power source, but with a capacitor connected to the lamp in parallel. In this presentation these measurement results will be reported.

  13. Development of plasma cathode electron guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, Efim M.; Schanin, Peter M.

    1999-05-01

    The status of experimental research and ongoing development of plasma cathode electron guns in recent years is reviewed, including some novel upgrades and applications to various technological fields. The attractiveness of this kind of e-gun is due to its capability of creating high current, broad or focused beams, both in pulsed and steady-state modes of operation. An important characteristic of the plasma cathode electron gun is the absence of a thermionic cathode, a feature which leads to long lifetime and reliable operation even in the presence of aggressive background gas media and at fore-vacuum gas pressure ranges such as achieved by mechanical pumps. Depending on the required beam parameters, different kinds of plasma discharge systems can be used in plasma cathode electron guns, such as vacuum arcs, constricted gaseous arcs, hollow cathode glows, and two kinds of discharges in crossed E×B fields: Penning and magnetron. At the present time, plasma cathode electron guns provide beams with transverse dimension from fractional millimeter up to about one meter, beam current from microamperes to kiloamperes, beam current density up to about 100 A/cm2, pulse duration from nanoseconds to dc, and electron energy from several keV to hundreds of keV. Applications include electron beam melting and welding, surface treatment, plasma chemistry, radiation technologies, laser pumping, microwave generation, and more.

  14. Electrorefining cell with parallel electrode/concentric cylinder cathode

    DOEpatents

    Gay, E.C.; Miller, W.E.; Laidler, J.J.

    1997-07-22

    A cathode-anode arrangement for use in an electrolytic cell is adapted for electrochemically refining spent nuclear fuel from a nuclear reactor and recovering purified uranium for further treatment and possible recycling as a fresh blanket or core fuel in a nuclear reactor. The arrangement includes a plurality of inner anodic dissolution baskets that are each attached to a respective support rod, are submerged in a molten lithium halide salt, and are rotationally displaced. An inner hollow cylindrical-shaped cathode is concentrically disposed about the inner anodic dissolution baskets. Concentrically disposed about the inner cathode in a spaced manner are a plurality of outer anodic dissolution baskets, while an outer hollow cylindrical-shaped is disposed about the outer anodic dissolution baskets. Uranium is transported from the anode baskets and deposited in a uniform cylindrical shape on the inner and outer cathode cylinders by rotating the anode baskets within the molten lithium halide salt. Scrapers located on each anode basket abrade and remove the spent fuel deposits on the surfaces of the inner and outer cathode cylinders, with the spent fuel falling to the bottom of the cell for removal. Cell resistance is reduced and uranium deposition rate enhanced by increasing the electrode area and reducing the anode-cathode spacing. Collection efficiency is enhanced by trapping and recovery of uranium dendrites scrapped off of the cylindrical cathodes which may be greater in number than two. 12 figs.

  15. Electrorefining cell with parallel electrode/concentric cylinder cathode

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Eddie C.; Miller, William E.; Laidler, James J.

    1997-01-01

    A cathode-anode arrangement for use in an electrolytic cell is adapted for electrochemically refining spent nuclear fuel from a nuclear reactor and recovering purified uranium for further treatment and possible recycling as a fresh blanket or core fuel in a nuclear reactor. The arrangement includes a plurality of inner anodic dissolution baskets that are each attached to a respective support rod, are submerged in a molten lithium halide salt, and are rotationally displaced. An inner hollow cylindrical-shaped cathode is concentrically disposed about the inner anodic dissolution baskets. Concentrically disposed about the inner cathode in a spaced manner are a plurality of outer anodic dissolution baskets, while an outer hollow cylindrical-shaped is disposed about the outer anodic dissolution baskets. Uranium is transported from the anode baskets and deposited in a uniform cylindrical shape on the inner and outer cathode cylinders by rotating the anode baskets within the molten lithium halide salt. Scrapers located on each anode basket abrade and remove the spent fuel deposits on the surfaces of the inner and outer cathode cylinders, with the spent fuel falling to the bottom of the cell for removal. Cell resistance is reduced and uranium deposition rate enhanced by increasing the electrode area and reducing the anode-cathode spacing. Collection efficiency is enhanced by trapping and recovery of uranium dendrites scrapped off of the cylindrical cathodes which may be greater in number than two.

  16. Hollow lensing duct

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J.; Honea, Eric C.; Bibeau, Camille; Mitchell, Scott; Lang, John; Maderas, Dennis; Speth, Joel; Payne, Stephen A.

    2000-01-01

    A hollow lensing duct to condense (intensify) light using a combination of focusing using a spherical or cylindrical lens followed by reflective waveguiding. The hollow duct tapers down from a wide input side to a narrow output side, with the input side consisting of a lens that may be coated with an antireflective coating for more efficient transmission into the duct. The inside surfaces of the hollow lens duct are appropriately coated to be reflective, preventing light from escaping by reflection as it travels along the duct (reflective waveguiding). The hollow duct has various applications for intensifying light, such as in the coupling of diode array pump light to solid state lasing materials.

  17. High pressure neon arc lamp

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2003-07-15

    A high pressure neon arc lamp and method of using the same for photodynamic therapies is provided. The high pressure neon arc lamp includes a housing that encloses a quantity of neon gas pressurized to about 500 Torr to about 22,000 Torr. At each end of the housing the lamp is connected by electrodes and wires to a pulse generator. The pulse generator generates an initial pulse voltage to breakdown the impedance of the neon gas. Then the pulse generator delivers a current through the neon gas to create an electrical arc that emits light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. A method for activating a photosensitizer is provided. Initially, a photosensitizer is administered to a patient and allowed time to be absorbed into target cells. Then the high pressure neon arc lamp is used to illuminate the target cells with red light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. The red light activates the photosensitizers to start a chain reaction that may involve oxygen free radicals to destroy the target cells. In this manner, a high pressure neon arc lamp that is inexpensive and efficiently generates red light useful in photodynamic therapy is provided.

  18. Parallel operation of microhollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, W.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1998-12-31

    The dc current-voltage characteristics of microhollow cathode discharges has, in certain ranges of the discharge current, a positive slope. In these current ranges it should be possible to operate multiple discharges in parallel without individual ballast, and be used as flat panel excimer lamps or large area plasma cathodes. In order to verify this hypothesis they have studied the parallel operation of two microhollow cathode discharges of 100 {micro}m hole diameter in argon at pressures from 100 Torr to 800 Torr. Stable dc operation of the two discharges, without individual ballast, was obtained if the voltage-current characteristics of the individual discharges had a positive slope greater than 10 V/mA over a voltage range of more than 5% of the sustaining voltage. Small variations in the discharge geometry generated during fabrication of cathode holes or caused by thermal effects during discharge operation are detrimental to parallel operation. Varying the distance between the discharges from twice the hole diameter to approximately five times did not affect the parallel operation. The total current was always slightly larger than the sum of the currents measured for the individual discharges, indicating coupling between the two discharges. In order to obtain parallel operation even for microhollow cathode geometries with large variations, they have studied the effect of distributed resistive ballast on the operation of such discharges.

  19. Microwave-Assisted Solvothermal Synthesis of VO2 Hollow Spheres and Their Conversion into V2O5 Hollow Spheres with Improved Lithium Storage Capability.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing; Zhong, Li; Li, Ming; Luo, Yuanyuan; Li, Guanghai

    2016-01-22

    Monodispersed hierarchically structured V2O5 hollow spheres were successfully obtained from orthorhombic VO2 hollow spheres, which are in turn synthesized by a simple template-free microwave-assisted solvothermal method. The structural evolution of VO2 hollow spheres has been studied and explained by a chemically induced self-transformation process. The reaction time and water content in the reaction solution have a great influence on the morphology and phase structure of the resulting products in the solvothermal reaction. The diameter of the VO2 hollow spheres can be regulated simply by changing vanadium ion content in the reaction solution. The VO2 hollow spheres can be transformed into V2O5 hollow spheres with nearly no morphological change by annealing in air. The nanorods composed of V2O5 hollow spheres have an average length of about 70 nm and width of about 19 nm. When used as a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries, the V2O5 hollow spheres display a diameter-dependent electrochemical performance, and the 440 nm hollow spheres show the highest specific discharge capacity of 377.5 mAhg(-1) at a current density of 50 mAg(-1) , and are better than the corresponding solid spheres and nanorod assemblies.

  20. LAMP: Peering Into the Lunar Dark

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Lyman-Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) is an instrument on NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission to map and study the moon. LAMP is a spectrograph that images the ultraviolet region of the...

  1. Production of hollow aerogel microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Henning, Sten A.

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for making hollow aerogel microspheres of 800-1200 .mu. diameter and 100-300 .mu. wall thickness by forming hollow alcogel microspheres during the sol/gel process in a catalytic atmosphere and capturing them on a foam surface containing catalyst. Supercritical drying of the formed hollow alcogel microspheres yields hollow aerogel microspheres which are suitable for ICF targets.

  2. Production of hollow aerogel microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, R.S.; Henning, S.A.

    1990-12-31

    A method is described for making hollow aerogel microspheres of 800--1200{mu} diameter and 100--300{mu} wall thickness by forming hollow alcogel microspheres during the sol/gel process in a catalytic atmosphere and capturing them on a foam surface containing catalyst. Supercritical drying of the formed hollow alcogel microspheres yields hollow aerogel microspheres which are suitable for ICF targets.

  3. Thermal analysis of a linear infrared lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Nakos, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental analysis of an infrared lamp is presented based on radiant heat transfer theory. The analysis is performed on a specific type of linear lamp which has a coiled tungsten filament surrounded by a fused quartz envelope. The purpose of the study was to model the lamp thermally, not electrically, to arrive at a better understanding of the operation of the lamp.

  4. Nanotube cathodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  5. Fuel cell components and systems having carbon-containing electrically-conductive hollow fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Langry, Kevin C; Farmer, Joseph C

    2015-04-28

    A method, according to one embodiment, includes acquiring a structure having an ionically-conductive, electrically-resistive electrolyte/separator layer covering an inner or outer surface of a carbon-containing electrically-conductive hollow fiber and a catalyst along one side thereof, adding an anode that extends along at least part of a length of the structure, and adding a cathode that extends along at least part of the length of the structure, the cathode being on an opposite side of the hollow fiber as the anode.

  6. 49 CFR 393.25 - Requirements for lamps other than head lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: J586—Stop Lamps for Use on Motor Vehicles Less Than 2032 mm in Overall Width, March 2000; J2261 Stop... these documents.) (f) Stop lamp operation. The stop lamps on each vehicle shall be activated upon application of the service brakes. The stop lamps are not required to be activated when the emergency...

  7. 30 CFR 57.17010 - Electric lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electric lamps. 57.17010 Section 57.17010 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE....17010 Electric lamps. Individual electric lamps shall be carried for illumination by all...

  8. 30 CFR 57.17010 - Electric lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electric lamps. 57.17010 Section 57.17010 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE....17010 Electric lamps. Individual electric lamps shall be carried for illumination by all...

  9. 30 CFR 57.17010 - Electric lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electric lamps. 57.17010 Section 57.17010 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE....17010 Electric lamps. Individual electric lamps shall be carried for illumination by all...

  10. 30 CFR 57.17010 - Electric lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electric lamps. 57.17010 Section 57.17010 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE....17010 Electric lamps. Individual electric lamps shall be carried for illumination by all...

  11. 30 CFR 57.17010 - Electric lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electric lamps. 57.17010 Section 57.17010 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE....17010 Electric lamps. Individual electric lamps shall be carried for illumination by all...

  12. Hollow-Fiber Clinostat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H.; Miller, Teresa Y.; Snyder, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    Hollow-fiber clinostat, is bioreactor used to study growth and other behavior of cells in simulated microgravity. Cells under study contained in porous hollow fiber immersed in culture medium inside vessel. Bores in hollow fiber allow exchange of gases, nutrients, and metabolic waste products between living cells and external culture media. Hollow fiber lies on axis of vessel, rotated by motor equipped with torque and speed controls. Desired temperature maintained by operating clinostat in standard tissue-culture incubator. Axis of rotation made horizontal or vertical. Designed for use with conventional methods of sterilization and sanitation to prevent contamination of specimen. Also designed for asepsis in assembly, injection of specimen, and exchange of medium.

  13. Nanosized aluminum nitride hollow spheres formed through a self-templating solid-gas interface reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Jie Song Xubo; Zhang Yaohua; Li Yan; Li Xingguo; Pu Yikang

    2007-01-15

    Nanosized aluminum nitride hollow spheres were synthesized by simply heating aluminum nanoparticles in ammonia at 1000 deg. C. The as-synthesized sphere shells are polycrystalline with cavity diameters ranging from 15 to 100 nm and shell thickness from 5 to 15 nm. The formation mechanism can be explained by the nanoscale Kirkendall effect, which results from the difference in diffusion rates between aluminum and nitrogen. The Al nanoparticles served as both reactant and templates for the hollow sphere formation. The effects of precursor particle size and temperature were also investigated in terms of product morphology. Room temperature cathode luminescence spectrum of the nanosized hollow spheres showed a broad emission band centered at 415 nm, which is originated from oxygen related luminescence centers. The hollow structure survived a 4-h heat treatment at 1200 deg. C, exhibiting excellent thermal stability. - Graphical abstract: Nanosized aluminum nitride hollow spheres were synthesized by nitridation of aluminum nanoparticles at 1000 deg. C using ammonia.

  14. Verification of high efficient broad beam cold cathode ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Reheem, A. M.; Ahmed, M. M.; Abdelhamid, M. M.; Ashour, A. H.

    2016-08-01

    An improved form of cold cathode ion source has been designed and constructed. It consists of stainless steel hollow cylinder anode and stainless steel cathode disc, which are separated by a Teflon flange. The electrical discharge and output characteristics have been measured at different pressures using argon, nitrogen, and oxygen gases. The ion exit aperture shape and optimum distance between ion collector plate and cathode disc are studied. The stable discharge current and maximum output ion beam current have been obtained using grid exit aperture. It was found that the optimum distance between ion collector plate and ion exit aperture is equal to 6.25 cm. The cold cathode ion source is used to deposit aluminum coating layer on AZ31 magnesium alloy using argon ion beam current which equals 600 μA. Scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction techniques used for characterizing samples before and after aluminum deposition.

  15. Verification of high efficient broad beam cold cathode ion source.

    PubMed

    Abdel Reheem, A M; Ahmed, M M; Abdelhamid, M M; Ashour, A H

    2016-08-01

    An improved form of cold cathode ion source has been designed and constructed. It consists of stainless steel hollow cylinder anode and stainless steel cathode disc, which are separated by a Teflon flange. The electrical discharge and output characteristics have been measured at different pressures using argon, nitrogen, and oxygen gases. The ion exit aperture shape and optimum distance between ion collector plate and cathode disc are studied. The stable discharge current and maximum output ion beam current have been obtained using grid exit aperture. It was found that the optimum distance between ion collector plate and ion exit aperture is equal to 6.25 cm. The cold cathode ion source is used to deposit aluminum coating layer on AZ31 magnesium alloy using argon ion beam current which equals 600 μA. Scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction techniques used for characterizing samples before and after aluminum deposition. PMID:27587108

  16. Evaluating fluorescent lamp options under EPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Palko, E.

    1994-02-01

    The National Energy Policy Act (EPACT) sweeps the full spectrum of energy use in all forms, prescribing minimum efficiency standards for energy-consuming products. Notable among the products covered under EPACT are general-purpose fluorescent lamps commonly used to illuminate manufacturing, storage, laboratory, and office areas of industrial plants. Some specialty fluorescent lamp categories are exempt from the provisions of EPACT. Included in this specialty group are plant-growth, reflectorized or aperture, colored, reprographic, cold-temperature, and impact-resistant lamps. EPACT decrees moratorium dates on the manufacture of many types of lamps in common use in plants today. Lamps proscribed by EPACT, and their effective manufacturing cutoff dates, are given in the accompanying section, Fluorescent Lamps Outlawed Under EPACT. Noncomplying lamps, however, are permitted to remain in service, and can continue to be sold until stock is depleted. This paper explains the provisions of the Act.

  17. Recent Advances in Thermionic Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Miram, George; Collins, George; Falce, Louis R.

    2010-11-04

    The latest advances in thermionic cathodes, including scandate and controlled porosity reservoir cathodes, are reviewed. These new cathodes provide improved performance over conventional cathodes for many applications. Advantages and disadvantages are presented.

  18. Pulsed mode cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M. (Inventor); Rawlin, Vinvent K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A cathode in an MPD thruster has an internal heater and utilizes low work function material. The cathode is preheated to operating temperature, and then the thruster is fired by discharging a capacitor bank in a pulse forming network.

  19. Sintered wire cathode

    DOEpatents

    Falce, Louis R.; Ives, R. Lawrence

    2009-06-09

    A porous cathode structure is fabricated from a plurality of wires which are placed in proximity to each other in elevated temperature and pressure for a sintering time. The sintering process produces the porous cathode structure which may be divided into a plurality of individual porous cathodes, one of which may be placed into a dispenser cathode support which includes a cavity for containing a work function reduction material such as BaO, CaO, and Al.sub.2O.sub.3. The work function reduction material migrates through the pores of the porous cathode from a work replenishment surface adjacent to the cavity of the dispenser cathode support to an emitting cathode surface, thereby providing a dispenser cathode which has a uniform work function and therefore a uniform electron emission.

  20. Cathodic protection -- Rectifier 47

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, W.M.

    1995-06-14

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the cathodic protection system functions as required by project criteria. The cathodic protection system is for the tank farms at the Hanford Reservation. The tank farms store radioactive waste.

  1. Cathodic protection -- Rectifier 46

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, W.M.

    1995-06-14

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the cathodic protection system functions as required by project criteria. The cathodic protection system is for the tank farms on the Hanford Reservation. The tank farms store radioactive waste.

  2. Pressed boride cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolski, W.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental studies of emission cathodes made from lanthanum, yttrium, and gadolinium hexaborides are presented. Maximum thermal emission was obtained from lanthanum hexaboride electrodes. The hexaboride cathodes operated stably under conditions of large current density power draw, at high voltages and poor vacuum. A microtron electron gun with a lanthanum hexaboride cathode is described.

  3. The Smokey Hollow Community The Smokey Hollow Community, Informal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    The Smokey Hollow Community - The Smokey Hollow Community, Informal boundaries by street name: North to South: East Jefferson Street to East Van Buren Street. West to East: South Gadsden Street to Marvin Street., Tallahassee, Leon County, FL

  4. Smokey Hollow Ethnographic Landscape Circa 1955 The Smokey Hollow ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Smokey Hollow Ethnographic Landscape Circa 1955 - The Smokey Hollow Community, Informal boundaries by street name: North to South: East Jefferson Street to East Van Buren Street. West to East: South Gadsden Street to Marvin Street., Tallahassee, Leon County, FL

  5. Mode transition of microhollow cathode sustained discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shoujie; jing, Ha; Zhang, Zhao; Ouyang, Jiting; Li, Qing

    2016-09-01

    The spatio-temporal characteristics of microhollow cathode sustained discharge are investigated using a fully self-consistent fluid model. The evolutions of discharge current, electric potential, electron density, the axial and radial electric fields, and ionization rates are simulated at 100 Torr. The interaction between the microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) and the microhollow cathode sustained discharge (MCSD) is also investigated. Results show that the mode transition is related to the distance d between the first anode and the second anode. When the distance is large (e.g. d  =  2 mm), a complete discharge process comprises five stages. These stages are Townsend mode, the transition from mainly axial electric field to mainly radial electric field, the formation of the hollow cathode effect, the formation of microcathode sustained discharge, and stable discharge. The influence of MHCD on MCSD is prior to the influence of MCSD on MHCD. By contrast, when d is very small (e.g. d  =  0.3 mm), the influence of MHCD on MCSD is posterior to the influence of MCSD on MHCD.

  6. Microhollow cathode discharge excimer light sources

    SciTech Connect

    El-Habachi, A.; Moselhy, M.; El-Dakroury, A.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1999-07-01

    Microhollow Cathode discharges are non-equilibrium, high pressure, direct current discharges. By reducing the diameter of the cathode opening in a hollow cathode discharge geometry to values in the sub millimeter range the authors were able to operate discharges in argon and xenon in a direct current mode up to atmospheric pressure. They have shown that these discharges are intense source of xenon and argon excimer radiation peaking at wavelengths of 172 nm and 130 nm, respectively. Spatially resolved measurements of the excimer source in xenon have been performed. The source was found to be cylindrical along the axis of the electrodes. Its radius increases with current and decreases with pressure. Stacking the discharges, operating them in series, holds the promise for the generation of a laser medium with sufficient length to provide the required threshold gain for a dc excimer laser. Experimental studies of the gain of the plasma column in microhollow cathode discharges are underway. Excimer efficiencies, defined as the ratio of optical to electrical power, of 6% to 9% have been achieved. Further increase of the efficiency seems to be possible; according to the modeling results, efficiencies of 30% to 40% may be obtainable. The effect of various parameters such as electrode geometry, gas flow and pulsed versus cw operation on the excimer efficiency is being studied with the goal to optimize the discharge.

  7. Temperature measurement on and inside lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Wallin, B.

    1994-12-31

    The use of thermography within the lamp manufacturing industry can improve the quality of many types of lamps ranging from normal incandescent lamps to highly specialized lamps for sports arenas, airports or small lamps for cars. There is a strong demand for more light for the same energy input. Specialized lamps for all possible purposes are developed. But it also forces the lamp manufacturers to utilize the available materials to their extremes. The exact control of the temperatures inside or on the lamp shell has therefore become increasingly necessary as temperatures in lamps can be rather extreme. In plasma lamps for example, the plasma can have a temperature of 6,000 C, the bulk around 700 C and the electrodes inside the bulb can have temperatures in excess of 2,000 C. Thermographic methods have shown their applicability for a large number of measurement cases. Some of these methods and measurement cases are described. As these applications put very special demands on the measurement equipment, these demands are explained in more detail.

  8. Microhollow Cathode Discharge Excimer Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moselhy, M.; El-Habachi, A.; Shi, W.; Stark, R. H.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2000-10-01

    Microhollow cathode discharges (MHCDs) are direct current, high-pressure, non-equilibrium gas discharges. When operated in Ar, Xe, ArF and XeCl, these discharges were found to be intense sources of excimer radiation at 130, 172, 193, 308 nm, respectively. Internal conversion efficiencies (from input electrical power to output optical power) of 1% (Ar), 8% (Xe), 2% (ArF) and 3% (XeCl) were achieved [1,2,3]. The spatial distribution of the xenon excimer source was studied by means of an ICCD-MAX intensified CCD camera. The measurements showed that the source expands with current and becomes reduced in size with pressure. The maximum radiant emittance (radiant power per source area) was measured as 2 W/cm^2 at atmospheric pressure and a discharge current of 3 mA. The peak irradiance (radiant power per target area) for a single discharge was calculated to be 3 mW/cm^2 at a distance of 1 cm from the source. Operating multiple discharges in parallel allows us to generate flat panel excimer lamps with an irradiance approaching the value of the radiant emittance (2 W/cm^2). In order to increase the irradiance further MHCDs could be operated in series. First experiments with two discharges in series have shown that the radiant emittance increases linearly with the number of discharges [3]. Besides using systems of MHCDs as lamps, efforts to utilize “stacked discharges” as excimer laser medium are underway. This work is supported by NSF and DARPA. 1. Ahmed El-Habachi and Karl H. Schoenbach, Appl. Phys. Lett. 73, 885 (1998). 2. Wenhui Shi, Ahmed El-Habachi, and Karl H. Schoenbach, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 25 (1999). 3. Ahmed El-Habachi et. al., “Series Operation of Direct Current Xenon Chloride Excimer Sources”, to appear in J. Appl. Phys.

  9. Hollow cathode and keeper-region plasma measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Kristina K.; Goebel, Dan M.; Watkins, Ron M.

    2005-01-01

    The successful performance of the NSTAR ion thruster in Deep Space 1 mission, coupled with the recently completed 30,032 hour life test of the flight spare thruster, has accelerated with the implementation of electric propulsion in NASA missions.

  10. Effect of thermionic cathode heating current self-magnetic field on gaseous plasma generator characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Lopatin, I. V. Akhmadeev, Yu. H.; Koval, N. N.

    2015-10-15

    The performance capabilities of the PINK, a plasma generator with a thermionic cathode mounted in the cavity of a hollow cathode, depending for its operation on a non-self-sustained low-pressure gas discharge have been investigated. It has been shown that when a single-filament tungsten cathode 2 mm in diameter is used and the peak filament current is equal to or higher than 100 A, the self-magnetic field of the filament current significantly affects the discharge current and voltage waveforms. This effect is due to changes in the time and space distributions of the emission current density from the hot cathode. When the electron mean free path is close to the characteristic dimensions of the thermionic cathode, the synthesized plasma density distribution is nonuniform and the cathode is etched nonuniformly. The cathode lifetime in this case is 8–12 h. Using a cathode consisting of several parallel-connected tungsten filaments ∼0.8 mm in diameter moderates the effect of the self-magnetic field of the filament current and nearly doubles the cathode lifetime. The use of this type of cathode together with a discharge igniting electrode reduces the minimum operating pressure in the plasma generator to about one third of that required for the generator operation with a single-filament cathode (to 0.04 Pa)

  11. Effect of thermionic cathode heating current self-magnetic field on gaseous plasma generator characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lopatin, I V; Akhmadeev, Yu H; Koval, N N

    2015-10-01

    The performance capabilities of the PINK, a plasma generator with a thermionic cathode mounted in the cavity of a hollow cathode, depending for its operation on a non-self-sustained low-pressure gas discharge have been investigated. It has been shown that when a single-filament tungsten cathode 2 mm in diameter is used and the peak filament current is equal to or higher than 100 A, the self-magnetic field of the filament current significantly affects the discharge current and voltage waveforms. This effect is due to changes in the time and space distributions of the emission current density from the hot cathode. When the electron mean free path is close to the characteristic dimensions of the thermionic cathode, the synthesized plasma density distribution is nonuniform and the cathode is etched nonuniformly. The cathode lifetime in this case is 8-12 h. Using a cathode consisting of several parallel-connected tungsten filaments ∼0.8 mm in diameter moderates the effect of the self-magnetic field of the filament current and nearly doubles the cathode lifetime. The use of this type of cathode together with a discharge igniting electrode reduces the minimum operating pressure in the plasma generator to about one third of that required for the generator operation with a single-filament cathode (to 0.04 Pa).

  12. Effect of thermionic cathode heating current self-magnetic field on gaseous plasma generator characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopatin, I. V.; Akhmadeev, Yu. H.; Koval, N. N.

    2015-10-01

    The performance capabilities of the PINK, a plasma generator with a thermionic cathode mounted in the cavity of a hollow cathode, depending for its operation on a non-self-sustained low-pressure gas discharge have been investigated. It has been shown that when a single-filament tungsten cathode 2 mm in diameter is used and the peak filament current is equal to or higher than 100 A, the self-magnetic field of the filament current significantly affects the discharge current and voltage waveforms. This effect is due to changes in the time and space distributions of the emission current density from the hot cathode. When the electron mean free path is close to the characteristic dimensions of the thermionic cathode, the synthesized plasma density distribution is nonuniform and the cathode is etched nonuniformly. The cathode lifetime in this case is 8-12 h. Using a cathode consisting of several parallel-connected tungsten filaments ˜0.8 mm in diameter moderates the effect of the self-magnetic field of the filament current and nearly doubles the cathode lifetime. The use of this type of cathode together with a discharge igniting electrode reduces the minimum operating pressure in the plasma generator to about one third of that required for the generator operation with a single-filament cathode (to 0.04 Pa).

  13. Recovery of yttrium from cathode ray tubes and lamps’ fluorescent powders: experimental results and economic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Innocenzi, V. De Michelis, I.; Ferella, F.; Vegliò, F.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Fluorescent powder of lamps. • Fluorescent powder of cathode ray rubes. • Recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powders. • Economic simulation for the processes to recover yttrium from WEEE. - Abstract: In this paper, yttrium recovery from fluorescent powder of lamps and cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is described. The process for treating these materials includes the following: (a) acid leaching, (b) purification of the leach liquors using sodium hydroxide and sodium sulfide, (c) precipitation of yttrium using oxalic acid, and (d) calcinations of oxalates for production of yttrium oxides. Experimental results have shown that process conditions necessary to purify the solutions and recover yttrium strongly depend on composition of the leach liquor, in other words, whether the powder comes from treatment of CRTs or lamp. In the optimal experimental conditions, the recoveries of yttrium oxide are about 95%, 55%, and 65% for CRT, lamps, and CRT/lamp mixture (called MIX) powders, respectively. The lower yields obtained during treatments of MIX and lamp powders are probably due to the co-precipitation of yttrium together with other metals contained in the lamps powder only. Yttrium loss can be reduced to minimum changing the experimental conditions with respect to the case of the CRT process. In any case, the purity of final products from CRT, lamps, and MIX is greater than 95%. Moreover, the possibility to treat simultaneously both CRT and lamp powders is very important and interesting from an industrial point of view since it could be possible to run a single plant treating fluorescent powder coming from two different electronic wastes.

  14. Slit lamp photography: The basics.

    PubMed

    Painter, Rosalyn

    2015-06-01

    This introductory paper is designed to explain the basics of slit lamp photography with the use of illustrations and sample images. The two primary methods of illumination are described with reference to positioning and magnification, as well as the use of background illumination. Filters and dye usage are described along with a brief explanation of associated imaging techniques. Further explanation of techniques will be looked at in subsequent articles, this paper aims to give an over view rather than an in-depth discussion of techniques.

  15. Lamp bulb with integral reflector

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Izrail; Shanks, Bruce; Sumner, Thomas L.

    2001-01-01

    An improved electrodeless discharge lamp bulb includes an integral ceramic reflector as a portion of the bulb envelope. The bulb envelope further includes two pieces, a reflector portion or segment is cast quartz ceramic and a light transmissive portion is a clear fused silica. In one embodiment, the cast quartz ceramic segment includes heat sink fins or stubs providing an increased outside surface area to dissipate internal heat. In another embodiment, the quartz ceramic segment includes an outside surface fused to eliminate gas permeation by polishing.

  16. 10 CFR 429.40 - Candelabra base incandescent lamps and intermediate base incandescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Candelabra base incandescent lamps and intermediate base....40 Candelabra base incandescent lamps and intermediate base incandescent lamps. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to candelabra...

  17. 10 CFR 429.40 - Candelabra base incandescent lamps and intermediate base incandescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Candelabra base incandescent lamps and intermediate base....40 Candelabra base incandescent lamps and intermediate base incandescent lamps. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to candelabra...

  18. 10 CFR 429.40 - Candelabra base incandescent lamps and intermediate base incandescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Candelabra base incandescent lamps and intermediate base....40 Candelabra base incandescent lamps and intermediate base incandescent lamps. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to candelabra...

  19. 'Hank's Hollow' Sparkles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color composite panoramic camera image highlights mysterious and sparkly dust-like material that is created when the soil in this region is disturbed. NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this image on sol 165 (June 20, 2004) in 'Hank's Hollow,' using filters L2, L5 and L7.

  20. Discharge lamp with reflective jacket

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Kipling, Kent

    2001-01-01

    A discharge lamp includes an envelope, a fill which emits light when excited disposed in the envelope, a source of excitation power coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light, and a reflector disposed around the envelope and defining an opening, the reflector being configured to reflect some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit through the opening. The reflector may be made from a material having a similar thermal index of expansion as compared to the envelope and which is closely spaced to the envelope. The envelope material may be quartz and the reflector material may be either silica or alumina. The reflector may be formed as a jacket having a rigid structure which does not adhere to the envelope. The lamp may further include an optical clement spaced from the envelope and configured to reflect an unwanted component of light which exited the envelope back into the envelope through the opening in the reflector. Light which can be beneficially recaptured includes selected wavelength regions, a selected polarization, and selected angular components.

  1. Study of electron current extraction from a radio frequency plasma cathode designed as a neutralizer for ion source applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahanbakhsh, Sina; Satir, Mert; Celik, Murat

    2016-02-01

    Plasma cathodes are insert free devices that are developed to be employed as electron sources in electric propulsion and ion source applications as practical alternatives to more commonly used hollow cathodes. Inductively coupled plasma cathodes, or Radio Frequency (RF) plasma cathodes, are introduced in recent years. Because of its compact geometry, and simple and efficient plasma generation, RF plasma source is considered to be suitable for plasma cathode applications. In this study, numerous RF plasma cathodes have been designed and manufactured. Experimental measurements have been conducted to study the effects of geometric and operational parameters. Experimental results of this study show that the plasma generation and electron extraction characteristics of the RF plasma cathode device strongly depend on the geometric parameters such as chamber diameter, chamber length, orifice diameter, orifice length, as well as the operational parameters such as RF power and gas mass flow rate.

  2. Development of hollow anode penning ion source for laboratory application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, B. K.; Shyam, A.; Das, R.; Rao, A. D. P.

    2012-03-01

    The research work presented here focuses for the development of miniature penning type ion source. One hollow anode penning type ion source was developed in our laboratory. The size of the ion source is 38 mm diameter and 55 mm length. The ion source consists of two cathodes, a hollow anode and one piece of rare earth permanent magnet. The plasma was created in the plasma region between cathodes and the hollow anode. The J × B force in the region helps for efficient ionization of the gas even in the high vacuum region˜1×10 -5 Torr. The ions were extracted in the axial direction with help of the potential difference between the electrodes and the geometry of the extraction angle. The effect of the extraction electrode geometry for efficient extraction of the ions from the plasma region was examined. This ion source is a self extracted ion source. The self extracted phenomena reduce the cost and the size of the ion source. The extracted ion current was measured by a graphite probe. An ion current of more than 200 μA was observed at the probe placed 70 mm apart from the extraction electrode. In this paper, the structure of the ion source, effect of operating pressure, potential difference and the magnetic field on the extracted ion current is reported.

  3. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Signature Identification Software

    2009-03-17

    This is an extendable open-source Loop-mediated isothermal AMPlification (LAMP) signature design program called LAVA (LAMP Assay Versatile Analysis). LAVA was created in response to limitations of existing LAMP signature programs.

  4. 49 CFR 393.23 - Power supply for lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Electrical Wiring § 393.23 Power supply for lamps. All required lamps must be powered by the electrical system of the motor vehicle with...

  5. 21 CFR 878.4580 - Surgical lamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Surgical lamp. 878.4580 Section 878.4580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4580 Surgical lamp. (a) Identification....

  6. 21 CFR 878.4580 - Surgical lamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Surgical lamp. 878.4580 Section 878.4580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4580 Surgical lamp. (a) Identification....

  7. 21 CFR 878.4580 - Surgical lamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgical lamp. 878.4580 Section 878.4580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4580 Surgical lamp. (a) Identification....

  8. 21 CFR 878.4580 - Surgical lamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Surgical lamp. 878.4580 Section 878.4580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4580 Surgical lamp. (a) Identification....

  9. 21 CFR 878.4580 - Surgical lamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Surgical lamp. 878.4580 Section 878.4580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4580 Surgical lamp. (a) Identification....

  10. Today`s fluorescent lamp choice

    SciTech Connect

    Foszcz, J.L.

    1997-10-01

    The choice of fluorescent lamps to replace the old standbys presents an opportunity to improve the quality of lighting, make a significant reduction in electrical bills, and contribute to improvement of the environment. The paper discusses the new electronic ballasts available today, the Green Light program to encourage US corporations to install energy efficient lighting in their facilities, and disposal of fluorescent lamps.

  11. Primer of School Lighting Lamps and Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allphin, Willard

    The basic principles of the most commonly used lamp types and the circuitry which makes them operate are discussed. The two objectives of this book are to serve as a--(1) guide to economical lighting, and (2) a permanent reference source for troubleshooting. Areas dealt with include--(1) lighting fundamentals, (2) incandescent lamps, (3)…

  12. 21 CFR 890.5500 - Infrared lamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Infrared lamp. 890.5500 Section 890.5500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5500 Infrared lamp....

  13. 21 CFR 890.5500 - Infrared lamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Infrared lamp. 890.5500 Section 890.5500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5500 Infrared lamp....

  14. 21 CFR 890.5500 - Infrared lamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Infrared lamp. 890.5500 Section 890.5500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5500 Infrared lamp....

  15. 21 CFR 890.5500 - Infrared lamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Infrared lamp. 890.5500 Section 890.5500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5500 Infrared lamp....

  16. 21 CFR 890.5500 - Infrared lamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Infrared lamp. 890.5500 Section 890.5500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5500 Infrared lamp....

  17. Axial Magnetic Field Effects on Xenon Short-Arc Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Chen, Tang; Li, Wanwan; Zha, Jun; Xia, Weidong

    2014-12-01

    The effect of an axial magnetic field (AMF) on an old xenon short-arc lamp is experimentally investigated in this work. As the AMF increases up to 18 mT, the visible radiation power and electric power ascend more than 80% and 70% respectively, and the radiation efficiency is improved by 23% for the best increment at 12 mT AMF. The measurement of radiation intensity shows that the increment of radiation intensity comes mostly from the plasma area close to the cathode tip, and partially from the other area of the arc column. Successive images of the arc indicate that the arc column not only rotates about its axis, but revolves around the axis of electrodes with the AMF. The arc column structure is constricted, distorted and elongated as the AMF increases. It is suggested that the improvements of the radiation intensity and radiation efficiency are attributed to the constriction of the arc column, which is mainly induced by the enhanced cathode jet.

  18. High efficiency fluorescent excimer lamps: An alternative to mercury based UVC lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Masoud, N. M.; Murnick, D. E.

    2013-12-15

    A high efficiency xenon excimer lamp radiating at 172 nm, with an internal phosphor coating shifting to UVC has been demonstrated, showing the feasibility of a cost effective alternative to UVC mercury lamps. Fluorescent lamps so designed can be fabricated in various geometries with high efficiency. Unlike other xenon excimer lamps based on dielectric barrier discharges this new system is highly compatible with existing and proposed phosphors as it operates in an inert gas environment at modest temperature and is subject only to 172 nm primary radiation. Using a lamp coated with a UVC phosphor we have demonstrated the feasibility of germicidal and curing lamps with 40% energy conversion efficiency and high power density. These lamps are rapidly switchable, have long projected lifetimes and are compatible with dimmers.

  19. High efficiency fluorescent excimer lamps: an alternative to mercury based UVC lamps.

    PubMed

    Masoud, N M; Murnick, D E

    2013-12-01

    A high efficiency xenon excimer lamp radiating at 172 nm, with an internal phosphor coating shifting to UVC has been demonstrated, showing the feasibility of a cost effective alternative to UVC mercury lamps. Fluorescent lamps so designed can be fabricated in various geometries with high efficiency. Unlike other xenon excimer lamps based on dielectric barrier discharges this new system is highly compatible with existing and proposed phosphors as it operates in an inert gas environment at modest temperature and is subject only to 172 nm primary radiation. Using a lamp coated with a UVC phosphor we have demonstrated the feasibility of germicidal and curing lamps with 40% energy conversion efficiency and high power density. These lamps are rapidly switchable, have long projected lifetimes and are compatible with dimmers.

  20. Optimized design of LED plant lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-sheng; Cai, Ruhai; Zhao, Yunyun; Zhao, Fuli; Yang, Bowen

    2014-12-01

    In order to fabricate the optimized LED plant lamp we demonstrated an optical spectral exploration. According to the mechanism of higher plant photosynthesis process and the spectral analysis we demonstrate an optical design of the LED plant lamp. Furthermore we built two kins of prototypes of the LED plant lamps which are suitable for the photosynthesis of higher green vegetables. Based on the simulation of the lamp box of the different alignment of the plants we carried out the growing experiment of green vegetable and obtain the optimized light illumination as well as the spectral profile. The results show that only blue and red light are efficient for the green leave vegetables. Our work is undoubtedly helpful for the LED plant lamping design and manufacture.

  1. Portable lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Siminovitch, Michael J.; Page, Erik R.

    2001-01-01

    A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) arranged vertically with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum insures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

  2. Optimization of white polychromatic semiconductor lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žukauskas, A.; Vaicekauskas, R.; Ivanauskas, F.; Gaska, R.; Shur, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    A stochastic method of optimization of a white-light source that relies on additive color mixing of the emissions from colored light-emitting diodes (LEDs) was developed. The method allows for finding the optimal wavelengths of LEDs in order to obtain the best possible trade off between luminous efficacy and the general color rendering index (CRI) of the white source for an arbitrary number of primary LEDs. Optimal solid-state lamps composed of two, three, four, and five different LEDs were analyzed. We show that a dichromatic LED lamp can only provide high efficacy with a general CRI close to zero, whereas trichromatic and quadrichromatic lamps are able to cover the entire range of reasonable general CRI values. The optimization of quintichromatic LED lamps and lamps with a higher number of primary color LEDs yields a negligible benefit in improving CRI but provides for quasicontinuous spectra that might be required for special lighting needs.

  3. Note: Arc discharge plasma source with plane segmented LaB6 cathode.

    PubMed

    Akhmetov, T D; Davydenko, V I; Ivanov, A A; Kreter, A; Mishagin, V V; Savkin, V Ya; Shulzhenko, G I; Unterberg, B

    2016-05-01

    A plane cathode composed of close-packed hexagonal LaB6 (lanthanum hexaboride) segments is described. The 6 cm diameter circular cathode is heated by radiation from a graphite foil flat spiral. The cathode along with a hollow copper anode is used for the arc discharge plasma production in a newly developed linear plasma device. A separately powered coil located around the anode is used to change the magnetic field strength and geometry in the anode region. Different discharge regimes were realized using this coil. PMID:27250481

  4. Dispenser printed electroluminescent lamps on textiles for smart fabric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, Marc; Torah, Russel; Tudor, John

    2016-04-01

    Flexible electroluminescent (EL) lamps are fabricated onto woven textiles using a novel dispenser printing process. Dispenser printing utilizes pressurized air to deposit ink onto a substrate through a syringe and nozzle. This work demonstrates the first use of this technology to fabricate EL lamps. The luminance of the dispenser printed EL lamps is compared to screen-printed EL lamps, both printed on textile, and also commercial EL lamps on polyurethane film. The dispenser printed lamps are shown to have a 1.5 times higher luminance than the best performing commercially available lamp, and have a comparable performance to the screen-printed lamps.

  5. Predicted properties of microhollow cathode discharges in xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeuf, J. P.; Pitchford, L. C.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2005-02-01

    A fluid model has been developed and used to help clarify the physical mechanisms occurring in microhollow cathode discharges (MHCD). Calculated current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and gas temperatures in xenon at 100 Torr are presented. Consistent with previous experimental results in similar conditions, we find a voltage maximum in the I-V characteristic. We show that this structure reflects a transition between a low-current, abnormal discharge localized inside the cylindrical hollow cathode to a higher-current, normal glow discharge sustained by electron emission from the outer surface of the cathode. This transition, due to the geometry of the device, is a factor contributing to the well-known stability of MHCDs.

  6. Treating high-mercury-containing lamps using full-scale thermal desorption technology.

    PubMed

    Chang, T C; You, S J; Yu, B S; Chen, C M; Chiu, Y C

    2009-03-15

    The mercury content in high-mercury-containing lamps are always between 400 mg/kg and 200,000 mg/kg. This concentration is much higher than the 260 mg/kg lower boundary recommended for the thermal desorption process suggested by the US Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. According to a Taiwan EPA survey, about 4,833,000 cold cathode fluorescent lamps (CCFLs), 486,000 ultraviolet lamps and 25,000 super high pressure mercury lamps (SHPs) have been disposed of in the industrial waste treatment system, producing 80, 92 and 9 kg-mercury/year through domestic treatment, offshore treatment and air emissions, respectively. To deal with this problem we set up a full-scale thermal desorption process to treat and recover the mercury from SHPs, fluorescent tube tailpipes, fluorescent tubes containing mercury-fluorescent powder, and CCFLs containing mercury-fluorescent powder and monitor the use of different pre-heating temperatures and desorption times. The experimental results reveal that the average thermal desorption efficiency of SHPs and fluorescent tube tailpipe were both 99.95%, while the average thermal desorption efficiencies of fluorescent tubes containing mercury-fluorescent powder were between 97% and 99%. In addition, a thermal desorption efficiency of only 69.37-93.39% was obtained after treating the CCFLs containing mercury-fluorescent powder. These differences in thermal desorption efficiency might be due to the complexity of the mercury compounds contained in the lamps. In general, the thermal desorption efficiency of lamps containing mercury-complex compounds increased with higher temperatures.

  7. Tungsten wire for incandescent lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, J.L.; Briant, C.L. )

    1990-09-01

    Tungsten wire for incandescent lamp filaments must operate at high temperatures and for long times. To meet these requirements, the grain morphology of the wire must be controlled to reduce the propensity for grain boundary sliding. The morphology is a function of the distribution of very small pockets of potassium in the wire and the mechanical processing from ingot to wire. The behavior of the filament is directly related to the grain morphology. This paper describes the mechanism by which the potassium is incorporated into and distributed in the ingot. The elongation and spheroidization of the bubbles during hot rolling and swaging is also examined and related to the grain morphology of wire. Some indications of the relationship between grain morphology and filament behavior are also given.

  8. Zinc/air cell cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvoy, J. J.

    1986-04-01

    This invention relates to a cathode for an air depolarized cell in which the hydrophobic catalytic cathode contains or in integrally drophobi catalytic cathode contains or is integrally coated with, on the surface adjacent the cell separator, an absorbent material such as the gelling material used in the anode. The absorbent material, integrated with the cathode surface, adheres the separator to the cathode thereby preventing delamination and provides an electrolyte reservoir for the hydrophobic cathode.

  9. Hollow Microporous Organic Capsules

    PubMed Central

    Li, Buyi; Yang, Xinjia; Xia, Lingling; Majeed, Muhammad Irfan; Tan, Bien

    2013-01-01

    Fabrication of hollow microporous organic capsules (HMOCs) could be very useful because of their hollow and porous morphology, which combines the advantages of both microporous organic polymers and non-porous nanocapsules. They can be used as storage materials or reaction chambers while supplying the necessary path for the design of controlled uptake/release systems. Herein, the synthesis of HMOCs with high surface area through facile emulsion polymerization and hypercrosslinking reactions, is described. Due to their tailored porous structure, these capsules possessed high drug loading efficiency, zero-order drug release kinetics and are also demonstrated to be used as nanoscale reactors for the prepareation of nanoparticles (NPs) without any external stabilizer. Moreover, owing to their intrinsic biocompatibility and fluorescence, these capsules exhibit promising prospect for biomedical applications. PMID:23820511

  10. HOLLOW CARBON ARC DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-10-11

    A device is described for producing an energetic, direct current, hollow, carbon-arc discharge in an evacuated container and within a strong magnetic field. Such discharges are particularly useful not only in dissociation and ionization of high energy molecular ion beams, but also in acting as a shield or barrier against the instreaming of lowenergy neutral particles into a plasma formed within the hollow discharge when it is used as a dissociating mechanism for forming the plasma. There is maintained a predetermined ratio of gas particles to carbon particles released from the arc electrodes during operation of the discharge. The carbon particles absorb some of the gas particles and are pumped along and by the discharge out of the device, with the result that smaller diffusion pumps are required than would otherwise be necessary to dispose of the excess gas.

  11. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, T.P.

    1991-11-26

    A process is disclosed for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry. 3 figures.

  12. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, Thomas P.

    1991-01-01

    A process for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry.

  13. Thermionic Cathode Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getty, W. D.; Herniter, M. E.

    1986-01-01

    A planar cathode, Pierce type electron gun with a design perveance of .0000032 (amps/volts to the 3/2 power) has been operated with a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathode. The cathode (useful diameter 1.9 cm) is heated by bombardment by electrons from a small tungsten filament. The bombardment heating system is stabilized by a feedback control circuit. The power required to heat the cathode is 315 W bombardment power and 200 W filament power. Heating power has been reduced by careful heat shielding and reduction of heat conduction losses. Significant additional reductions should be possible. The sintered LaB6 cathode disk is 2.5 cm in diameter, 3.2 mm thick, and has a density of 94%. No problems have been encountered with cracking of the disk. Cathode emission is insensitive to repeated exposure to air after allowing the cathode to fully cool. The measured perveance and anode transmission of the gun are 3.2x10(-6) and 94%, respectively. Current densities up to 6.5 A/sq cm have been reached with 5 micrometer pulses. Measurements were made at cathode temperatures of 1300 to 1600 C.

  14. Intensified phototherapy using daylight fluorescent lamps.

    PubMed

    De Carvalho, M; De Carvalho, D; Trzmielina, S; Lopes, J M; Hansen, T W

    1999-07-01

    Jaundice is a common reason for therapeutic intervention in newborn infants and phototherapy is effective treatment if enough light energy is delivered to a skin surface area of sufficient size. Narrow spectrum blue light is superior to white light, but in developing countries fluorescent blue lamps often have to be imported and are much more expensive than white lamps. We developed a phototherapy unit in which seven daylight fluorescent tubes are placed immediately under the floor of a transparent plexiglass crib. The efficacy of this unit, delivering approximately 19 microW/cm2/nm, was compared with that of two conventional phototherapy units using overhead lamps placed 35 cm above the infants. One unit used daylight fluorescent tubes and delivered approximately 4 microW/cm2/nm, the other unit used special blue fluorescent tubes and delivered approximately 22 microW/cm2/nm. Fifty-one infants were included in the analyses, all of them breastfed on demand. Serum bilirubin levels were determined spectrophotometrically at 0, 12 and 24 h. The decrement in serum bilirubin concentrations was significantly greater in infants undergoing phototherapy with the new device or with special blue lamps compared to conventional overhead daylight lamps (p < 0.001 both at 12 and at 24 h). We conclude that highly efficient phototherapy may be delivered with daylight fluorescent lamps placed in very close proximity to the patient. Thus, lack of access to expensive imported special blue lamps does not preclude delivery of effective phototherapy in developing countries.

  15. Fuel cell components and systems having carbon-containing electrically-conductive hollow fibers

    DOEpatents

    Langry, Kevin C.; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2014-07-08

    According to one embodiment, a system includes a structure having an ionically-conductive, electrically-resistive electrolyte/separator layer covering an inner or outer surface of a carbon-containing electrically-conductive hollow fiber and a catalyst coupled to the hollow fiber, an anode extending along at least part of a length of the structure, and a cathode extending along at least part of the length of the structure, the cathode being on an opposite side of the hollow fiber as the anode. In another embodiment, a method includes acquiring a structure having an ionically-conductive, electrically-resistive electrolyte/separator layer covering an inner or outer surface of a carbon-containing electrically-conductive hollow fiber and a catalyst along one side thereof, adding an anode that extends along at least part of a length of the structure, and adding a cathode that extends along at least part of the length of the structure on an opposite side as the anode.

  16. Compact fluorescent lamp applications in luxury hotels

    SciTech Connect

    Gilleskie, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    Over the past several years, consumers, lighting designers, and energy conservationists have paid increasing attention to the special characteristics of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs). CFLs can typically be used to replace incandescent lamps of three to four times their own wattage, and their color rendering indices (CRIs)-80 to 85-make them virtually indistinguishable from incandescents. The typical 10,0000-hour life of a CFL often makes savings in labor its most desirable feature when compared to a shorter-lived incandescent lamp.

  17. Lamp system for uniform semiconductor wafer heating

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, Luis E.; Hackel, Lloyd

    2001-01-01

    A lamp system with a very soft high-intensity output is provided over a large area by water cooling a long-arc lamp inside a diffuse reflector of polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) and titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) white pigment. The water is kept clean and pure by a one micron particulate filter and an activated charcoal/ultraviolet irradiation system that circulates and de-ionizes and biologically sterilizes the coolant water at all times, even when the long-arc lamp is off.

  18. Nickel titanates hollow shells: nanosphere, nanorod, and their photocatalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiuye; Xing, Yangyang; Zong, Lanlan; Li, Rui; Yang, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    Two kinds of hollow shell structured nickel titanates (nanosphere, nanorod) were prepared by the microwave-assisted hydrothermal method using carbon material as the template. Their phase structure, morphology, and optical properties were well characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). Comparing with the template-free NiTiO3 (NiTiO3-TF), the two kinds of hollow shell structured NiTiO3 have larger Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface areas. Both NiTiO3 nanosphere (NiTiO3-NS) and nanorod (NiTiO3-NR) showed remarkably photocatalytic H2 evolution from the methanol aqueous solution under full-arc lamp and visible light. Additional, their photocatalytic activities were also determined by photo-degradation of methyl blue (MB), and the degradation yield reached nearly 100% within 100 min on NiTiO3-NR under visible light. Whatever in photocatalytic H2 evolution or MB degradation, their photocatalytic activities all followed the order: NiTiO3-NR > NiTiO3-NS > NiTiO3-TF. The higher photocatalytic activities of the hollow shelled NiTiO3 should be due to their larger BET surface areas and more utilization of the incident light. PMID:23646762

  19. A multiple gap plasma cathode electron gun and its electron beam analysis in self and trigger breakdown modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Niraj; Pal, Dharmendra Kumar; Jadon, Arvind Singh; Pal, Udit Narayan; Rahaman, Hasibur; Prakash, Ram

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper, a pseudospark discharge based multiple gap plasma cathode electron gun is reported which has been operated separately in self and trigger breakdown modes using two different gases, namely, argon and hydrogen. The beam current and beam energy have been analyzed using a concentric ring diagnostic arrangement. Two distinct electron beams are clearly seen with hollow cathode and conductive phases. The hollow cathode phase has been observed for ˜50 ns where the obtained electron beam is having low beam current density and high energy. While in conductive phase it is high current density and low energy electron beam. It is inferred that in the hollow cathode phase the beam energy is more for the self breakdown case whereas the current density is more for the trigger breakdown case. The tailor made operation of the hollow cathode phase electron beam can play an important role in microwave generation. Up to 30% variation in the electron beam energy has been achieved keeping the same gas and by varying the breakdown mode operations. Also, up to 32% variation in the beam current density has been achieved for the trigger breakdown mode at optimized trigger position by varying the gas type.

  20. A multiple gap plasma cathode electron gun and its electron beam analysis in self and trigger breakdown modes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Niraj; Pal, Dharmendra Kumar; Jadon, Arvind Singh; Pal, Udit Narayan; Rahaman, Hasibur; Prakash, Ram

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper, a pseudospark discharge based multiple gap plasma cathode electron gun is reported which has been operated separately in self and trigger breakdown modes using two different gases, namely, argon and hydrogen. The beam current and beam energy have been analyzed using a concentric ring diagnostic arrangement. Two distinct electron beams are clearly seen with hollow cathode and conductive phases. The hollow cathode phase has been observed for ∼50 ns where the obtained electron beam is having low beam current density and high energy. While in conductive phase it is high current density and low energy electron beam. It is inferred that in the hollow cathode phase the beam energy is more for the self breakdown case whereas the current density is more for the trigger breakdown case. The tailor made operation of the hollow cathode phase electron beam can play an important role in microwave generation. Up to 30% variation in the electron beam energy has been achieved keeping the same gas and by varying the breakdown mode operations. Also, up to 32% variation in the beam current density has been achieved for the trigger breakdown mode at optimized trigger position by varying the gas type.