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Sample records for holmium silicates

  1. High-pressure synthesis and single-crystal structure refinement of gadolinium holmium silicate hydroxyapatite Gd{sub 4.33}Ho{sub 4.33}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chao; Liu Xiaoyang . E-mail: liuxy@jlu.edu.cn; Fleet, M.E.; Feng, Shouhua; Xu Ruren

    2006-07-15

    Single crystals of gadolinium holmium silicate hydroxyapatite Gd{sub 4.33}Ho{sub 4.33}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2} have been synthesized at 2.0GPa and 1450 deg. C using a piston-cylinder-type high-pressure apparatus. The crystal symmetry by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis is hexagonal, space group P6{sub 3}/m (No. 176), with a=9.3142(5)A, c=6.7010(4)A, Z=1. Gadolinium and Ho are disordered over the two large cation positions, A(1) and A(2), and charge balance in this silicate apatite is maintained by cation vacancies in A(1). Two other apatite-structure crystals investigated have P3-bar and Imma symmetry, and represent either partially ordered Gd-Ho distributions or crystal strain induced during quenching.

  2. Gain-switched holmium-doped fibre laser.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ka S; Ottaway, David; Munch, Jesper; Lancaster, David G; Bennetts, Shayne; Jackson, Stuart D

    2009-11-01

    We demonstrate the first gain-switched, singly doped, single-mode holmium-doped silicate glass fibre laser that operates at 2.106 microm. Using a gain-switched 1.909-microm thulium-doped fibre laser as the pump source, output pulses of energy 3.2 microJ and pulse duration of 150 ns were generated at 80 kHz and slope efficiency of 44%. Pulse stacking within the holmium-doped fibre laser resulted in significantly shorter 70 ns pulses.

  3. Metals fact sheet: Holmium/thulium

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    This article discusses the geology, exploitation, market, and applications of holmium and thulium. Holmium and thulium are important part in the development of specific laser technologies, x-ray film and high-temperature superconductors.

  4. Holmium laser applications of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Lori B; Tyson, Mark D

    2009-11-01

    The high-powered holmium laser is an excellent tool for the surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. This article discusses the background of holmium use in the prostate and describes the surgical techniques of holmium laser ablation of the prostate and holmium laser enucleation of the prostate. Operative challenges are reviewed with suggestions as to how to avoid these problems or deal with them when they arise. Surgical outcomes and a thorough literature review are both presented.

  5. Magnetic structure of holmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechan, M. J.; Stassis, C.

    1984-03-01

    The magnetic structure of high purity single crystals of holmium has been studied by neutron diffraction techniques. Although the general characteristics of the magnetic structure have been found to agree with earlier measurements, some discrepancies have been resolved and new features have been observed. The magnetic form factor has been measured and compared with relativistic atomic calculations. The low temperature structure (T<20 K) is that of a conical ferromagnet with wave vector (1/6)(2π/c) along the c axis. The basal plane moment is 9.7 μB and the c-axis ferromagnetic component is 1.6 μB at T=6 K. Bunching of the basal plane moments around the easy hexagonal direction has been observed below T=50 K. Evidence for asphericity in the magnetization density is presented and discussed. The wave vector of the basal plane modulation decreases monotonically with temperature in general accordance with the Elliott-Wedgewood theory. Several inflection points were observed, however, which correspond to commensurability with the chemical lattice. The measured temperature dependence of the c- and a-axis lattice constants shows significant magnetostriction. The possibility of a c-axis modulated moment is discussed.

  6. Complications employing the holmium:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Beaghler, M; Poon, M; Ruckle, H; Stewart, S; Weil, D

    1998-12-01

    We report the operative and early postoperative complications and limitations in 133 patients treated with the holmium laser. Complications included urinary tract infection (N = 3), postoperative bradycardia (1), inverted T-waves (1), intractable flank pain (1), urinary retention (1), inability to access a lower-pole calix with a 365-microm fiber (9), stone migration (5), and termination of procedure because of poor visibility (2). No ureteral perforations or strictures occurred, and no complications were directly attributable to the laser. The holmium laser was capable of fragmenting all urinary calculi in this study. In our initial experience, the holmium laser is safe and effective in the treatment of urinary pathology. Use of laser fibers larger than 200 microm occasionally limits deflection of the endoscope into a lower-pole or dependent calix.

  7. Urological applications of the holmium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaghler, Marc A.; Poon, Michael W.; Ruckle, Herbert C.; Stewart, Steven C.; Weil, Dane

    1998-07-01

    While the role of endoscopy was initially diagnostic, the advent of improved endoscopes and working instruments have increased its therapeutic applications. One of the most recent advances is the holmium laser. It has a broad range of urological applications due to its ability to fragment all urinary calculi and its soft tissue effects. This laser is based on laser energy delivered in a pulsatile fashion at 2100 nm. The purpose of this study is to report our experience with the holmium laser. A retrospective study of patients undergoing endourological procedures with the holmium laser was performed. One hundred and forty patients underwent 157 procedures. The holmium laser was used for the treatment of urinary calculi in 122 patients. Stone location included 61 renal, 64 ureteral, and 17 bladder stones. Renal stone burden was 17 mm (range 3-50), ureteral stone size averaged 10 mm (range 3 - 35), and mean bladder stone size was 31 mm (range 10 - 60). Other uses included treatment of transitional cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis, ureter, and bladder, incision of ureteral strictures, ureterocele, and prostate, and ablation of renal hemangiomas. Intraoperative and post operative complications were noted. Follow-up for calculi consisted of a plain film of the abdomen at one week and an ultrasound or intravenous pyelogram at six to eight weeks post procedure. No ureteral perforations or strictures occurred. The Holmium laser was capable of fragmenting all urinary calculi in this study. No complications were directly attributable to the Holmium laser. In our initial experience, the Holmium laser is safe and effective in the treatment of urinary pathology. It is the most effective lithotrite available and is able to incise and coagulate soft tissue as well. This combination allows the urologist to treat a variety of urinary pathology using a single modality. Its main limitation is the ability to access lower pole lesions in the upper urinary tract due to the fiber

  8. Holmium laser lithotripsy of bladder calculi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaghler, Marc A.; Poon, Michael W.

    1998-07-01

    Although the overall incidence of bladder calculi has been decreasing, it is still a significant disease affecting adults and children. Prior treatment options have included open cystolitholapaxy, blind lithotripsy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, and visual lithotripsy with ultrasonic or electrohydraulic probes. The holmium laser has been found to be extremely effective in the treatment of upper tract calculi. This technology has also been applied to the treatment of bladder calculi. We report our experience with the holmium laser in the treatment of bladder calculi. Twenty- five patients over a year and a half had their bladder calculi treated with the Holmium laser. This study was retrospective in nature. Patient demographics, stone burden, and intraoperative and post-operative complications were noted. The mean stone burden was 31 mm with a range of 10 to 60 mm. Preoperative diagnosis was made with either an ultrasound, plain film of the abdomen or intravenous pyelogram. Cystoscopy was then performed to confirm the presence and determine the size of the stone. The patients were then taken to the operating room and given a regional or general anesthetic. A rigid cystoscope was placed into the bladder and the bladder stone was then vaporized using the holmium laser. Remaining fragments were washed out. Adjunctive procedures were performed on 10 patients. These included transurethral resection of the prostate, transurethral incision of the prostate, optic internal urethrotomy, and incision of ureteroceles. No major complications occurred and all patients were rendered stone free. We conclude that the Holmium laser is an effective and safe modality for the treatment of bladder calculi. It was able to vaporize all bladder calculi and provides a single modality of treating other associated genitourinary pathology.

  9. Holmium laser for multifunctional use in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Graham M.; Shroff, Sunil; Thomas, Robert; Kellett, Michael

    1994-05-01

    The holmium laser pulsed at 350 microsecond cuts tissue and fragments calculi. It has been assessed for minimally invasive urological intervention. It is useful for partly excising and partly coagulating tumors, incising strictures and the obstructed PUJ. It partly drill and partly fragments urinary calculi however hard. Other lasers are more effective at any one particular application, but this laser is a useful compromise as a multifunctional device.

  10. Semiconductor disk laser-pumped subpicosecond holmium fibre laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chamorovskiy, A Yu; Marakulin, A V; Leinonen, T; Kurkov, Andrei S; Okhotnikov, Oleg G

    2012-01-31

    The first passively mode-locked holmium fibre laser has been demonstrated, with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) as a mode locker. Semiconductor disk lasers have been used for the first time to pump holmium fibre lasers. We obtained 830-fs pulses at a repetition rate of 34 MHz with an average output power of 6.6 mW.

  11. Spherulitic crystallization of holmium tartrates in silica gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Want, Basharat

    2011-09-01

    Spherulites of holmium tartrate trihydrate and holmium nitro-tartrate monohydrate have been grown in silica gel medium by making holmium nitrate to react with tartaric acid at high supersaturations. The mechanism of spherulitic growth of holmium tartrates is discussed. The spherulitic crystallization is shown to be due to heterogeneous nucleation. In the early stages of growth an amorphous spherical mass gets nucleated inside the gel. Crystal fibers diverge radially from the surface of the spherical mass giving rise to a spherical polycrystalline holmium tartrate. Thermal stability of the two types of spherulites grown in the silica gel shows that the holmium tartrate trihydrate is more stable than holmium nitro-tartrate monohydrate. The surface morphology and internal structure of the spherulites of holmium tartrates have been studied by using scanning electron microscopy. The results on growth kinetics are given by studying the variation of radius of spherulites as a function of time. A non-linear time-size relations under several conditions of growth have been observed, which suggests a non-uniform solute concentration at the crystal surface.

  12. Laser cooling, trapping, and Rydberg spectroscopy of neutral holmium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostetter, James Allen

    This thesis focuses on progress towards using ensembles of neutral holmium for use in quantum computing operations. We are particularly interested in using a switchable interaction between neutral atoms, the Rydberg blockade, to implement a universal set of quantum gates in a collective encoding scheme that presents many benefits over quantum computing schemes which rely on physically distinct qubits. We show that holmium is uniquely suited for operations in a collective encoding basis because it has 128 ground hyperfine states, the largest number of any stable, neutral atom. Holmium is a rare earth atom that is very poorly described for our purposes as it has never been cooled and trapped, its spectrum is largely unknown, and it presents several unique experimental challenges related to its complicated atomic structure and short wavelength transitions. We demonstrate important progress towards overcoming these challenges. We produce the first laser cooling and trapping of holmium into a MOT. Because we use a broad cooling transition, our cooling technique does not require the use of a Zeeman slower. Using MOT depletion spectroscopy, we provide precise measurements of holmium's Rydberg states and its ionization potential. Our work continues towards cooling holmium into a dipole trap by calculating holmium's AC polarizability and demonstrating the results of early attempts at an optical dipole trap. We provide details of future upgrades to the experimental apparatus and discuss interesting potential for using holmium in quantum computing using single atoms in a magnetically trapped lattice. This thesis shows several promising indicators for continued work in this field.

  13. Holmium fibre laser with record quantum efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Sholokhov, E M; Tsvetkov, V B; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A; Medvedkov, O I; Kosolapov, A F

    2011-06-30

    We report holmium-doped fibre lasers with a Ho{sup 3+} concentration of 1.6 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} and lasing wavelengths of 2.02, 2.05, 2.07 and 2.1 {mu}m at a pump wavelength of 1.15 {mu}m. The slope efficiency of the lasers has been measured. The maximum efficiency, 0.455, has been obtained at a lasing wavelength of 2.05 {mu}m. The laser efficiency is influenced by both the optical loss in the wing of a vibrational absorption band of silica and active-ion clustering. (lasers)

  14. Perspectives of holmium laser resection of the prostate: cutting effects with the holmium:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichenauer, Rolf H.; Droege, Gerit; Brinkmann, Ralf; Neuss, Malte; Gafumbegete, Evariste; Jocham, Dieter

    1998-07-01

    Laser prostatectomy shows an improvement in peak urinary flow rates, in post-void residual urine volumes and also a symptomatic improvement when compared to the transurethral resection of the prostate (TUR-P). Time to achieve symptomatic improvement is delayed with many established laser procedures compared to standard resection. However, this disadvantage can be solved with a new resection technique using a pulsed holmium laser. Nevertheless, this advanced technique shows a few problems in a first clinical trial. Besides this clinical study, in vitro experiments were carried out in order to determine the optimal irradiation parameters with respect to resection rate, incision/ablation quality and handling. Prostate tissue of radical prostatectomies and chicken breast as model were irradiated with a pulsed holmium-laser in vitro with different laser parameters using a bare fiber in contact to tissue. The incision quality (depths and coagulation/vaporization effects) was analyzed with regard to pulse energy (speed of incision, angle of incision) and fiber diameter. Fast flash photography was performed to analyze thermo-mechanical side-effects. Fast flash photography reveals cavitation bubble up to 7 mm length in water and dissections in tissue. The ablation rate increases proportional to the laser pulse energy. The Holmium Laser Resection of the Prostate (HOLRP) in humans with available instrumentation right now shows equieffective results compared to the transurethral resection, no need for transfusion, no transurethral resection syndrome, short time for catheterization. Further technical approvement may significantly improve holmium laser prostate resection. We present a new application system for the laser resection.

  15. Clinical research of holmium laser therapy in extramammary Paget's disease.

    PubMed

    Ziyao, Li; Deyong, Yang; Xiangyu, Che; Huafeng, Zong; Hafeez, Adnan; Jianbo, Wang; Xishuang, Song

    2014-11-01

    This study aims to investigate the safety and efficiency of the holmium laser therapy in extramammary Paget's disease. The clinical data of 61 patients was collected since 2002 to 2012, confirmed as non-subcutaneous invasive extramammary Paget's disease by biopsy and underwent surgery. All patients were divided into two groups. Group A included 30 patients who underwent the holmium laser therapy. Group B included 31 patients who underwent the traditional surgical therapy. The clinical data of all patients included preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative management and follow-up records. Compared with the traditional operation group, the holmium laser group had a shorter operation time and was easier to perform. There were no significant differences between the two groups in cases of intraoperative and postoperative complications, the recurrence-free survival, and the disease-specific survival. But the holmium laser group had a longer recovery time than the traditional operation group in large and deep nidus. Multiple-factor analysis of prognostic parameters of 61 patients confirmed that any of these two methods chosen was not a prognostic parameter for recurrence-free survival. The holmium laser therapy might prove to be a preferable alternative to the traditional operative therapy of extramammary Paget's disease. However, the holmium laser therapy did not demonstrate to have an obvious advantage over traditional operative therapy in the recurrence-free survival and the disease-specific survival.

  16. Wavelength agile holmium-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, N.; Daniel, J. M. O.; Ward, J.; Clarkson, W. A.; Hemming, A.; Haub, J.

    2016-03-01

    For the first time, an electronically-controlled, wavelength-agile tuneable holmium-doped fibre laser is presented. A narrow-band acousto-optic tuneable filter was characterized and used as the wavelength selective element to avoid any inertial effects associated with opto-mechanical tuning mechanisms. We demonstrate operation over a 90 nm wavelength range spanning 2040 - 2130 nm. The laser produced >150 mW over this entire range with a signal-to-noise ratio of >45 dB and line-width of ~0.16 nm. Switching times of ~35 μs and sweep rates of up to 9 nm/ms were also demonstrated.

  17. Midline Prostatic Cyst Marsupialization Using Holmium Laser

    PubMed Central

    Kilinc, Mehmet; Goger, Yunus Emre; Piskin, Mesut; Balasar, Mehmet; Kandemir, Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    Many of the prostatic cysts are asymptomatic and only 5% are symptomatic (Hamper et al., 1990; Higashi et al., 1990). These symptoms include pelvic pain, hematospermia, infertility, voiding dysfunction, prostatitis-like syndrome, and painful ejaculation. Treatment of prostatic cysts includes TRUSG guided drainage, endoscopic transurethral resection, and in some cases even open surgery. In the literature, endoscopic interventions use marsupialization of the midline prostatic cyst with transurethral resection (TUR) or transurethral incision with endoscopic urethrotomy (Dik et al., 1996; Terris, 1995). Holmium: YAG laser was employed for the marsupialization of the cyst wall in midline prostatic cyst treatment for the first time in the present study. Symptoms, treatment, and follow-up are presented in this paper. PMID:26101688

  18. Use of the holmium:YAG laser in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, Stefano

    1997-12-01

    The Holmium-YAG is a versatile laser with multiple soft- tissue applications including tissue incision and vaporization, and pulsed-laser applications such as lithotripsy. At 2140 nanometers, the wavelength is highly absorbed by tissue water. Further, like CO2 laser, the Holmium produces immediate tissue vaporization while minimizing deep thermal damage to surrounding tissues. It is an excellent instrument for endopyelotomy, internal urethrotomy, bladder neck incisions and it can be used to resect the prostate. The Holmium creates an acute TUR defect which gives immediate results like the TURP. More than 50 patients were treated from Jan. 1996 to Jan. 1997 for obstructive symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia, bladder neck stricture, urethral stenosis, and superficial bladder tumors.

  19. Gain and energy storage in holmium YLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storm, Mark E.; Deyst, John P.

    1991-01-01

    It is demonstrated that Q-switched holmium lasers are capable of high-gain and high-energy operation at 300 K. Small-signal gain coefficients of 0.50 and 0.12/cm have been measured in YLF and YAG, respectively. Small-signal gains of 0.50/cm are comparable to those achievable in Nd:YAG and are not typical of low-gain materials. This large gain in the Ho:YLF material is made possible by operating the amplifier in the ground state depletion mode. The amplifier performance data and associated analysis presented demonstrate that efficient energy storage is possible with very high excited state ion densities of the Ho 5I7 upper laser level. This is an important result since upconversion can limit the 5I7 population. Although upconversion was still present in this experiment, it was possible to achieve efficient energy storage, demonstrating that the problem is manageable even at high excitation densities in YLF.

  20. High gain holmium-doped fibre amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Simakov, Nikita; Li, Zhihong; Jung, Yongmin; Daniel, Jae M O; Barua, Pranabesh; Shardlow, Peter C; Liang, Sijing; Sahu, Jayanta K; Hemming, Alexander; Clarkson, W Andrew; Alam, Shaif-Ul; Richardson, David J

    2016-06-27

    We investigate the operation of holmium-doped fibre amplifiers (HDFAs) in the 2.1 µm spectral region. For the first time we demonstrate a diode-pumped HDFA. This amplifier provides a peak gain of 25 dB at 2040 nm with a 15 dB gain window spanning the wavelength range 2030 - 2100 nm with an external noise figure (NF) of 4-6 dB. We also compare the operation of HDFAs when pumped at 1950 nm and 2008 nm. The 1950 nm pumped HDFA provides 41 dB peak gain at 2060 nm with 15 dB of gain spanning the wavelength range 2050 - 2120 nm and an external NF of 7-10 dB. By pumping at the longer wavelength of 2008 nm the gain bandwidth of the amplifier is shifted to longer wavelengths and using this architecture a HDFA was demonstrated with a peak gain of 39 dB at 2090 nm and 15 dB of gain spanning the wavelength range 2050 - 2150 nm. The external NF over this wavelength range was 8-14 dB. PMID:27410557

  1. Holmium:YAG laser stapedotomy: preliminary evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubig, Ingrid M.; Reder, Paul A.; Facer, G. W.; Rylander, Henry G.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1993-07-01

    This study investigated the use of a pulsed Holmium:YAG ((lambda) equals 2.09 micrometers ) laser- fiber microsurgical system for laser stapedotomy. This system ablates human stapes bones effectively with minimal thermal damage. The study was designed to determine the effectiveness of the Ho:YAG laser (Schwartz Electro Optics, Inc., Orlando, FL) for stapedotomy and to evaluate temperature changes within the cochlea during the ablation process. Human cadaveric temporal bones were obtained and the stapes portion of the ossicular chain was removed. A 200 micrometers diameter low OH quartz fiber was used to irradiate these stapes bones in an air environment. The laser was pulsed at 2 Hz, 250 microsecond(s) ec pulse width and an irradiance range of 100 - 240 J/cm2 was used to ablate holes in the stapes footplate. The resultant stapedotomies created had smooth 300 micrometers diameter holes with a minimum of circumferential charring. Animal studies in-vivo were carried out in chinchillas to determine the caloric spread within the cochlea. A 0.075 mm Type T thermocouple was placed in the round window. Average temperature change during irradiation of the stapes footplate recorded in the round window was 3.6 degree(s)C. The data suggest that stapedotomy using the Ho:YAG laser can result in a controlled ablation of the stapes footplate with minimal thermal damage to the surrounding stapes. Optical coupling using fiberoptic silica fibers is an ideal method for delivering laser energy to the stapes during stapedotomy.

  2. Holmium:YAG laser coronary angioplasty in acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaz, On; Luxenberg, Michael; Schumacher, Audrey

    1994-07-01

    Patients who sustain complicated acute myocardial infarction in whom thrombolytic agents either fail or are contraindicated often need mechanical revascularization other than PTCA. In 24 patients with acute infarction complicated by continuous chest pain and ischemia who either received lytics or with contraindication to lytics, a holmium:YAG laser (Eclipse Surgical Technologies, Palo Alto, CA) was utilized for thrombolysis and plaque ablation. Clinical success was achieved in 23/24 patients, with 23 patients (94%) surviving the acute infarction. Holmium:YAG laser is very effective and safe in thrombolysis and revascularization in this complicated clinical setting.

  3. Resonant magnetic scattering in holmium at an undulator source

    SciTech Connect

    Gruebel, G.; Als-Nielsen, J.; Vettier, C.; Gibbs, D.; Bohr, J.; Pengra, D.

    1994-06-01

    The resonance properties of the magnetic cross section of antiferromagnetic holmium were studied at the L absorption edges. A polarization analysis of the magnetic cross section was performed at the L{sub III} and L{sub II} edges using {pi} polarized incident x-rays.

  4. Synthesis, characterization, and neutron activation of holmium metallofullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Cagle, D.W.; Thrash, T.P.; Wilson, L.J.; Alford, M.; Chibante, L.P.F.; Ehrhardt, G.J.

    1996-08-28

    Isolation of the first macroscopic quantities of endohedral holmium metallofullerenes (principally Ho@C{sub 82}, Ho{sub 2}@C{sub 82}, and Ho{sub 3}@C{sub 82} by LD-TOF mass spectrometry) has been accomplished by carbon-arc and preparative HPLC methodologies. The detailed procedure for production and isolation of the metallofullerenes includes a new technique whereby holmium-impregnated electrodes are prepared simply by soaking porous graphite rods in an ethanolic solution of Ho(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}.xH{sub 2}O. Monoisotopic {sup 165}Ho offers a unique combination of advantages for neutron-activation studies of metallofullerenes, and purified samples containing {sup 165}Ho@C{sub 82}, {sup 165}Ho{sub 2}@C{sub 82}, and {sup 165}Ho{sub 3}@C{sub 82} have been activated by high-flux neutron irradiation ({Phi} = 4 x 10{sup 13}n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) to generate {sup 166}Ho metallofullerenes, which undergo {beta}{sup -} decay to produce stable {sup 166}Er. Chemical workup of the irradiated samples, followed by re-irradiation, has been used to demonstrate that observed decomposition of holmium metallofullerenes is due mainly to `fast` neutron damage rather than to holmium atom nuclear recoil (E{sub max} = 200 eV). This implies that metallofullerene damage can be minimized by using neutron fluxes with the highest possible thermal component. 60 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Discovery of dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, and ytterbium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, C.; Thoennessen, M.

    2013-09-15

    Currently, thirty-one dysprosium, thirty-two holmium, thirty-two erbium, thirty-three thulium, and thirty-one ytterbium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  6. Spectral performance of monolithic holmium and thulium lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storm, Mark E.

    1991-01-01

    Fabry-Perot resonators have been used to demonstrate single-mode lasing of holmium and neodymium YAG. The previous demonstration in the holmium laser required TE cooling the crystal to -15 C in order to achieve threshold. The present study extends that result, demonstrating +25 C operation in a 1-mm thick plano/plano resonator. The experimental configuration of lasing both the holmium and thulium lasers used a 500-mW diode laser which was collimated, circularized, and focused into a beam radius of 60 microns. The single-frequency lasing spectrum of the holmium laser is shown. By adjusting the mirror reflectivity, the ability to control the laser's wavelength is demonstrated. This laser operated with 11 mW of optical power, a 57-percent slope efficiency, and 120-mW threshold vs absorbed diode power laser for the 60-micron beam radius. The thulium laser operated very efficiently at room temperature, but on seven longitudinal modes. The Tm:TAG laser exhibits typical characteristics of spatial hole burning not seen in the Ho:Tm:YAG for flat/flat resonators.

  7. Holmium:YAG laser in the treatment of ureteral strictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Rajiv K.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Chun, Samuel S.; Denstedt, John D.; Sales, Jack L.

    1996-05-01

    Endourologic intervention has become widely considered the initial procedure of choice for short segment ureteral strictures. Techniques employed in conjunction with endourologic access to manage the strictured area have included balloon dilation, cold knife and electrosurgical incision. More recently laser incision with the potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser has been employed. The holmium:YAG laser with a wavelength of 2100 nm has recently become available for urologic use. This wavelength is able to precisely vaporize and incise tissue. In this presentation we describe our results with holmium:YAG laser incision of ureteral strictures. Seventeen patients were treated including 12 patients with distal ureteral strictures, 4 patients with ureteroileal anastomotic strictures and 1 patient with a stricture in the ureter of a transplanted kidney. The holmium:YAG laser was employed using a 400 (mu) end-firing quartz fiber placed in contact with the tissue. Clinical and radiologic follow-up of at least 3 months post-surgery (range 3 - 21 months) is available in 14 patients. At last follow-up in these patients, 10/14 (71%) of strictures have remained open. While the ultimate success of endourological techniques of stricture management are determined by the inherent nature of the stricture rather than the technique employed, the holmium:YAG laser for endoureterotomy demonstrates short term efficacy and safety comparable to that reported for other minimally- invasive techniques of stricture management.

  8. Evaluation of retropulsion caused by holmium:YAG laser with various power settings and fibers.

    PubMed

    White, M D; Moran, M E; Calvano, C J; Borhan-Manesh, A; Mehlhaff, B A

    1998-04-01

    The ideal intracorporeal lithotriper would comminute all types of calculi into small readily excreted particles. It would be small and flexible with an energy source safe for the uroepithelium. It should not break, should be inexpensive, and should not retropulse the stone up the urinary tract. This investigation was designed to quantify the last quality for the holmium:YAG laser. The mechanism of action of the pulsed Ho:YAG laser (wavelength 2100 nm) is the generation of a gas plasma at the stone-fluid interface causing a shockwave. The holmium laser was employed for lithotripsy of model stones composed of silicate with a ferrous coating. Stones were selected with a mass of 2 mg +/- 0.1 mg. We sequentially investigated three variables: energy (0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 J), frequency (10, 16, and 20 Hz), and fiber diameter (200, 365, 550, and 1000 microm). Ten stone trials were performed with each of the 36 possible combinations of energy, pulse frequency, and fiber diameter. Our model ureter consisted of a clear rigid polymer tube filled with 0.9% saline. The system was closed and permitted intertrial flushing of generated air bubbles. The laser fiber was maintained at constant extension from the ureteroscope, with stones positioned at the fiber tip before each trial. Laser energy was applied for 2 seconds, with maximum and net retropulsion recorded in millimeters. Each measurement series was recorded in a database for paired Student t-tests. Net retropulsion was then compared by statistically holding each of the three variables constant (fiber size constant with power and frequency varying; frequency constant with power and fiber size varying; and power constant with fiber size and frequency varying). Most retropulsion occurred with the 365-microm and 550-microm fibers. Most comminution was also noted with these fiber sizes. There was no statistical correlation between observed retropulsion and efficiency of comminution. This self-contained model for laser lithotripsy

  9. Evaluation of retropulsion caused by holmium:YAG laser with various power settings and fibers.

    PubMed

    White, M D; Moran, M E; Calvano, C J; Borhan-Manesh, A; Mehlhaff, B A

    1998-04-01

    The ideal intracorporeal lithotriper would comminute all types of calculi into small readily excreted particles. It would be small and flexible with an energy source safe for the uroepithelium. It should not break, should be inexpensive, and should not retropulse the stone up the urinary tract. This investigation was designed to quantify the last quality for the holmium:YAG laser. The mechanism of action of the pulsed Ho:YAG laser (wavelength 2100 nm) is the generation of a gas plasma at the stone-fluid interface causing a shockwave. The holmium laser was employed for lithotripsy of model stones composed of silicate with a ferrous coating. Stones were selected with a mass of 2 mg +/- 0.1 mg. We sequentially investigated three variables: energy (0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 J), frequency (10, 16, and 20 Hz), and fiber diameter (200, 365, 550, and 1000 microm). Ten stone trials were performed with each of the 36 possible combinations of energy, pulse frequency, and fiber diameter. Our model ureter consisted of a clear rigid polymer tube filled with 0.9% saline. The system was closed and permitted intertrial flushing of generated air bubbles. The laser fiber was maintained at constant extension from the ureteroscope, with stones positioned at the fiber tip before each trial. Laser energy was applied for 2 seconds, with maximum and net retropulsion recorded in millimeters. Each measurement series was recorded in a database for paired Student t-tests. Net retropulsion was then compared by statistically holding each of the three variables constant (fiber size constant with power and frequency varying; frequency constant with power and fiber size varying; and power constant with fiber size and frequency varying). Most retropulsion occurred with the 365-microm and 550-microm fibers. Most comminution was also noted with these fiber sizes. There was no statistical correlation between observed retropulsion and efficiency of comminution. This self-contained model for laser lithotripsy

  10. Resonance ionization of holmium for ion implantation in microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, F.; Chrysalidis, K.; Dorrer, H.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Haas, R.; Kieck, T.; Mokry, C.; Naubereit, P.; Schmidt, S.; Wendt, K.

    2016-06-01

    The determination of the electron neutrino mass by calorimetric measurement of the 163 Ho electron capture spectrum requires ultra-pure samples. Several collaborations, like ECHo or HOLMES, intend to employ microcalorimeters into which 163 Ho is implanted as an ion beam. This makes a selective and additionally very efficient ion source for holmium mandatory. For this purpose, laser resonance ionization of stable holmium 165 Ho was studied, using a three step excitation scheme driven by pulsed Ti:sapphire lasers. Five measurements with sample sizes of 1014 and 1015 atoms were performed for the efficiency investigation. In average, an excellent ionization efficiency of 32(5) % could be shown, demonstrating the suitability for ion beam implantation.

  11. Holmium laser with an acousto-optic paratellurite filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhin, A. V.; Velikanov, S. D.; Glukhodedov, V. D.; Zakharov, N. G.; Frolov, Yu N.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental results on a solid-state holmium laser (Ho : YAG) with an intracavity acousto-optic paratellurite filter are presented. The laser power in cw and repetitively pulsed regimes is determined experimentally. It is shown that the use of an acoustooptic filter in the Ho : YAG laser cavity makes it possible to solve several important problems such as obtaining repetitively pulsed lasing, wavelength tuning and linearly polarised emission.

  12. Radioisotope synoviorthesis with Holmium-166-chitosan complex in haemophilic arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y J; Kim, K I; Chun, Y S; Rhyu, K H; Kwon, B K; Kim, D Y; Yoo, M C

    2010-07-01

    Radiosynoviorthesis is a safe and easy method for synovectomy in haemophilic arthropathy. Various agents have been used in radiosynoviorthesis, especially newly developed agent Holmium-166-chitosan complex has good clinical outcome. This study analysed clinical results and radiologic evaluation of radioisotope synoviorthesis using Holmium-166-chitosan complex in haemophilic arthropathy. From March 2001 to December 2003, 58 radiosynoviorthesis were performed in 53 haemophiliacs. The average age at procedure was 13.8 years. The Arnold and Hilgartner stage of the patients was from I to IV. Holmium-166-chitosan complex was injected in 31 ankle joints, 19 elbow joints and 8 knee joints. Average follow-up was 33 months since primary procedure. The range of motion of each joint, frequency of intra-articular bleeding and factor dose used were analysed for clinical assessment. There was no significant improvement of range of motion in affected joints. After procedure, the average frequency of bleeding of the elbow joint has decreased from 3.76 to 0.47 times per month, the knee joint from 5.87 to 1.12 times per month, and the ankle joint from 3.62 to 0.73 times per month respectively (P < 0.05). After treatment, the average coagulation factor dose injected was significantly decreased to 779.3 units per month from 2814.8 units per month before treatment (P < 0.001). Radioisotope synoviorthesis with Holmium-166-chitosan complex in haemophilic arthropathy is a very safe and simple procedure with the expectation of a satisfactory outcome without serious complication. It has excellent bleeding control effect on target joint and the need for substitution of coagulation factor concentrate can be reduced.

  13. Hard and fragile holmium-based bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Q.; Zhao, D.Q.; Pan, M.X.; Wang, R.J.; Wang, W.H.

    2006-05-01

    A family of holmium-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with high glass-forming ability is obtained. The Ho-based BMGs exhibit much larger elastic moduli and high thermal stability in contrast to other known rare-earth (RE)-based BMGs. In particular, the BMGs show a large value of fragility. It is expected that the hard RE-based glasses with high glass-forming ability and fragile behaviors make them the appropriate candidate for glass transition study.

  14. Evolution of the use of the holmium laser for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilling, Peter J.; Cass, Carol B.; Cresswell, Michael D.; Kennett, Katie M.; Mackey, Michael; Fraundorfer, Mark R.; Kabalin, John N.

    1997-05-01

    The holmium laser is becoming an important tool in the urologists' armamentarium. In this manuscript the evolution of laser resection of the prostate using the holmium wavelength is described. This technique represents a significant advance in the surgical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia and allows even very large prostates to be safely and efficiently managed transurethrally.

  15. Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żmojda, Jacek; Dorosz, Dominik; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Miluski, Piotr; Dorosz, Jan

    The emission properties of Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber has been investigated. Luminescence at 2.1 μm corresponding to 5I7--> 5I8 transition in holmium was obtained by energy transfer between Yb3+ and Ho3+ ions. According to the Dexter-Miyakawa model, the parameters of energy migration CDD of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) <--> 2F5/2 (Yb3+) transition and direct energy transfer CDA of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) --> 5I6 (Ho3+) transition was calculated. The optimization of the activator content and the concentration ratio were conducted with the purpose of maximizing the efficiency of energy transfer. It made possible to select best-suited glass which was used to manufacture double-clad optical fiber. Strong and narrow bands of spontaneous emission which formed as a result of energy transfer between ytterbium and holmium ions were observed in the fiber under exciting with radiation at 978 nm wavelength.

  16. Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żmojda, Jacek; Dorosz, Dominik; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Miluski, Piotr; Dorosz, Jan

    2012-05-01

    The emission properties of Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber has been investigated. Luminescence at 2.1 μm corresponding to 5I7--> 5I8 transition in holmium was obtained by energy transfer between Yb3+ and Ho3+ ions. According to the Dexter-Miyakawa model, the parameters of energy migration CDD of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) <--> 2F5/2 (Yb3+) transition and direct energy transfer CDA of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) --> 5I6 (Ho3+) transition was calculated. The optimization of the activator content and the concentration ratio were conducted with the purpose of maximizing the efficiency of energy transfer. It made possible to select best-suited glass which was used to manufacture double-clad optical fiber. Strong and narrow bands of spontaneous emission which formed as a result of energy transfer between ytterbium and holmium ions were observed in the fiber under exciting with radiation at 978 nm wavelength.

  17. Buckshot colic: utilizing holmium:yag laser for ureteroscopic removal of a bullet fragment within the proximal ureter.

    PubMed

    Ziegelmann, Matthew; Carrasco, Alonso; Knoedler, John; Krambeck, Amy E

    2016-06-01

    Buckshot colic is a rare phenomenon, presenting as firearm-induced urinary tract obstruction. We present a case of gunshot-induced ureteral obstruction in a 49-year-old male, treated endoscopically with the holmium:YAG (holmium) laser. CT revealed a 1 cm bullet fragment within the left proximal ureter. A percutaneous nephrolithotomy was performed utilizing the holmium laser to fragment the metal into basket-retrievable pieces. At 4 month follow up the patient is without evidence of stricture. To our knowledge, this is the first reported utilization of the holmium laser to treat "buckshot colic". Endoscopy with holmium laser appears a feasible and safe treatment option. PMID:27347630

  18. Intracorporeal lithotripsy with the holmium:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denstedt, John D.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Chun, Samuel S.; Sales, Jack L.

    1995-05-01

    A variety of devices are currently available for intracorporeal stone fragmentation. Recently a new wavelength of laser, the Holmium:YAG, has demonstrated a variety of potential urologic applications including ablation of soft tissue lesions as well as stone fragmentation. This laser has a wavelength of 2100 nm and operates in a pulsed mode. Energy is delivered through a 400 um quartz end-firing fiber. In this presentation we review our clinical experience with the Holmium:YAG laser for the treatment of renal and ureteral calculi. Over a 23 month period, 63 patients underwent 67 procedures. Seven procedures consisted of percutaneous nephrolithotripsy for large or staghorn renal calculi. Sixty procedures were performed for ureteral stones. Procedures for proximal ureteral stones (6) employed a retrograde approach using flexible ureteroscopes (8.5 or 9.8). Stones in the mid ureter (12) and distal ureter (42) were approached transurethrally using a 6.9 rigid ureteroscope. Complete stone fragmentation without the need for additional procedures was achieved in 82% of cases. Treatment failures included 1 stone migration into the renal pelvis during laser activation, 6 patients who had incomplete fragmentation and 3 patients in which laser malfunction precluded complete fragmentation. Stone analysis available in 23 patients revealed calcium oxalate monohydrate (15), calcium oxalate dihydrate (2), cystine (2), uric acid (3) and calcium phosphate (1). A single complication of ureteral perforation occurred when the laser was fired without direct visual guidance. Radiographic follow-up at an average of 16 weeks is available in 22 patients and has identified 2 patients with ureteral strictures that are not believed to be related to laser lithotripsy. In summary, we have found the Holmium:YAG laser to be a reliable and versatile device for intracorporeal lithotripsy. Its safety and efficacy make it a suitable alternative for performing intracorporeal lithotripsy of urinary

  19. Evolution and success of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Krambeck, Amy E.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this article is to review the development of instruments, current technique, and expected outcomes for holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP). Materials and Methods: A review of published, peer-reviewed articles focusing on HoLEP was performed using the MEDLINE database. Results: Historically, the gold-standard management for symptomatic obstructing benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has been transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). With the development of new laser technology minimally invasive surgical procedures have been introduced in an attempt to decrease the morbidity experienced with standard TURP. Laser treatment of BPH has evolved from coagulation to complete adenoma enucleation. The holmium laser was initially utilized for prostate ablation and soon evolved into holmium laser tissue resection, but was limited by difficulties with extracting the prostate tissue from the bladder. With the development of a compatible tissue morcellator whole prostate lobes could be enucleated similar to an open prostate enucleation and the HoLEP procedure was developed. Currently HoLEP is the only procedure to demonstrate superior outcomes to TURP on urodynamic studies and long-term studies demonstrate its durability up to 7 years post procedure. Changes in enucleation technique have also increased the efficiency of the HoLEP procedure, such that any sized prostate can be treated. Conclusions: HoLEP is a safe and effective surgical treatment for symptomatic BPH, dependent on a high powered laser and morcellation system. The procedure continues to gain acceptance due to excellent short and long-term results, its wide application, and further simplification of technique. PMID:21116363

  20. Magnetoelastic nature of the dodecagonal anisotropy in holmium metal.

    PubMed

    Benito, L; Ciria, M; Fraile, A; Fort, D; Abell, J S; Arnaudas, J I

    2007-06-29

    We have investigated the magnetoelastic nature of the dodecagonal anisotropy in the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) in the basal plane of the hcp crystalline structure in holmium single crystal. We have proved that the origin of the second harmonic of the hexagonal symmetry in MAE clearly lies on a sixth-order magnetoelastic coupling term. The appearance of a 12-fold anisotropy in MAE in a single crystal having hexagonal symmetry provides a new insight on how the magnetic anisotropy can be modified in a magnetic material with giant spin-lattice coupling.

  1. The magnetic properties of potassium holmium double tungstate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowiec, M. T.; Dyakonov, V. P.; Khatsko, E. N.; Zayarnyuk, T.; Zubov, E. E.; Szewczyk, A.; Gutowska, M. U.; Rykova, A. I.; Pietosa, J.; Majchrowski, A.; Michalski, E.; Hoffmann, J.-U.; Prokes, K.; Woźniak, K.; Dobrzycki, Ł.; Barański, M.; Domukhovski, V.; Shtyrkhunova, V.; Żmija, J.; Szymczak, H.

    2011-08-01

    The magnetic investigations of potassium holmium double tungstate KHo(WO4)2 have been performed. The results of measurements of magnetic susceptibility and magnetization as a function of temperature (T from 0.3 K up to 100 K) and magnetic field (up to 1.5 T) are presented. A strong anisotropy of magnetic properties was found. The magnetic measurements data were used to calculate the interaction energy. It was shown that the interactions between nearest neighbors Ho3+ ions have antiferromagnetic character.

  2. Drug metabolism: Comparison of biodistribution profile of holmium in three different compositions in healthy Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira-Coutinho, Cristal; Vidal, Lluis Pascual; Pinto, Suyene Rocha; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2016-06-01

    Radioisotope holmium is a candidate to be used in cancer treatment and diagnosis. There are different holmium salts and they present distinct solubility and consequently different biodistribution profiles. In this work, we aimed to evaluate the biodistribution profiles of two holmium salts (chloride and sulfate) and holmium nanoparticles (oxide) through an in vivo biodistribution assay using animal model. Samples were labeled with technetium-99m and administered in Wistar rats by retro-orbital route. Holmium chloride is highly soluble in water and it was quickly filtered by the kidneys while holmium sulfate that presents lower solubility in water was mainly found in the liver and the spleen. However, both the salts showed a similar biodistribution profile. On the other hand, holmium oxide showed a very different biodistribution profile since it seemed to interact with all organs. Due to its particle size range (approximately 100nm) it was not intensively filtered by the kidneys being found in high quantities in many organs, for this reason its use as a nanoradiopharmaceutical could be promising in the oncology field. PMID:26986812

  3. The studies on the aromaticity of fullerenes and their holmium endohedral compounds.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bisheng; Peng, Rufang; Li, Hongbo; Wang, Bing; Jin, Bo; Chu, Shijin; Long, Xinping

    2011-02-01

    Density functional theory BLYP/DNP was employed to optimize a series of fullerenes and their holmium endohedral compounds, including C(20), Ho@C(20), Ho(3+)@C(20), C(60), Ho@C(60), Ho(3+)@C(60),C(70), Ho@C(70), Ho(3+)@C(70) C(78), Ho@C(78), Ho(3+)@C(78), C(82),Ho@C(82) and Ho(3+)@C(82). DFT semi core pseudospot approximation was taken into consideration in the calculations of the element holmium because of its particular electronic structure. Fullerenes and their holmium endohedral compounds' aromaticity were studied in terms of structural criteria, energetic criteria, and reactivity criteria. The results indicate that the aromaticity of fullerenes was reduced when a holmium atom was introduced into the carbon cage, and the endohedral fullerenes' reactive activity enhance; but the aromaticity of the carbon cage increased when a Ho(3+) cation was encapsulated into a fullerene. Calculations of aromaticity and stability indicate that two paths can lead to the similar aim of preparing holmium endohedral fullerenes; that is, they can form from either a holmium atom or a holmium cation (Ho(3+)) reacting with fullerenes, respectively, and the latter is more favorable.

  4. Drug metabolism: Comparison of biodistribution profile of holmium in three different compositions in healthy Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira-Coutinho, Cristal; Vidal, Lluis Pascual; Pinto, Suyene Rocha; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2016-06-01

    Radioisotope holmium is a candidate to be used in cancer treatment and diagnosis. There are different holmium salts and they present distinct solubility and consequently different biodistribution profiles. In this work, we aimed to evaluate the biodistribution profiles of two holmium salts (chloride and sulfate) and holmium nanoparticles (oxide) through an in vivo biodistribution assay using animal model. Samples were labeled with technetium-99m and administered in Wistar rats by retro-orbital route. Holmium chloride is highly soluble in water and it was quickly filtered by the kidneys while holmium sulfate that presents lower solubility in water was mainly found in the liver and the spleen. However, both the salts showed a similar biodistribution profile. On the other hand, holmium oxide showed a very different biodistribution profile since it seemed to interact with all organs. Due to its particle size range (approximately 100nm) it was not intensively filtered by the kidneys being found in high quantities in many organs, for this reason its use as a nanoradiopharmaceutical could be promising in the oncology field.

  5. Effect of active-ion concentration on holmium fibre laser efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Sholokhov, E M; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A

    2010-08-03

    We have measured the fraction of holmium ions that relax nonradiatively to the ground level as a result of interaction at a metastable level in optical fibres with a silica-based core doped with holmium ions to 2 x 10{sup 19} - 2 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. The percentage of such ions has been shown to depend on the absolute active-ion concentration. The fibres have been used to make a number of 2.05-{mu}m lasers, and their slope efficiency has been measured. The laser efficiency decreases with increasing holmium concentration in the fibres (lasers)

  6. Characterization of holmium loaded alginate microspheres for multimodality imaging and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Zielhuis, S W; Seppenwoolde, J H; Bakker, C J G; Jahnz, U; Zonnenberg, B A; van het Schip, A D; Hennink, W E; Nijsen, J F W

    2007-09-15

    In this paper the preparation and characterization of holmium-loaded alginate microspheres is described. The rapid development of medical imaging techniques offers new opportunities for the visualisation of (drug-loaded) microparticles. Therefore, suitable imaging agents have to be incorporated into these particles. For this reason, the element holmium was used in this study in order to utilize its unique imaging characteristics. The paramagnetic behaviour of this element allows visualisation with MRI and holmium can also be neutron-activated resulting in the emission of gamma-radiation, allowing visualisation with gamma cameras, and beta-radiation, suitable for therapeutic applications. Almost monodisperse alginate microspheres were obtained by JetCutter technology where alginate droplets of a uniform size were hardened in an aqueous holmium chloride solution. Ho(3+) binds via electrostatic interactions to the carboxylate groups of the alginate polymer and as a result alginate microspheres loaded with holmium were obtained. The microspheres had a mean size of 159 microm and a holmium loading of 1.3 +/- 0.1% (w/w) (corresponding with a holmium content based on dry alginate of 18.3 +/- 0.3% (w/w)). The binding capacity of the alginate polymer for Ho(3+) (expressed in molar amounts) is equal to that for Ca(2+), which is commonly used for the hardening of alginate. This indicates that Ho(3+) has the same binding affinity as Ca(2+). In line herewith, dynamic mechanical analyses demonstrated that alginate gels hardened with Ca(2+) or Ho(3+) had similar viscoelastic properties. The MRI relaxation properties of the microspheres were determined by a MRI phantom experiment, demonstrating a strong R(2)* effect of the particles. Alginate microspheres could also be labelled with radioactive holmium by adding holmium-166 to alginate microspheres, previously hardened with calcium (labelling efficiency 96%). The labelled microspheres had a high radiochemical stability (94% after

  7. Holmium Nitrate Complexation with Tri-n-butyl Phosphate in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Robert V. Fox; R. Duane Ball; Peter de B. Harrington; Harry W. Rollins; Chien M. Wai

    2005-12-01

    Holmium nitrate pentahydrate was reacted with tri-n-butyl phosphate in supercritical carbon dioxide at 308 K. The products of the complexation reaction were measured under supercritical fluid conditions using UV-vis spectroscopy. The solubility of the metal complexes in the supercritical fluid phase was measured. The mole-ratio titration method was used to determine the stoichiometry of the soluble complexes. Conditional extraction coefficients were calculated from spectral data using least-squares regression and hard-equilibria models. Data indicate that the holmium nitrate-tributyl phosphate system forms 1:2 and 1:4 holmium-tributyl phosphate complexes.

  8. Effect of the active-ion concentration on the lasing dynamics of holmium fibre lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Sholokhov, E M; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A

    2010-12-09

    The lasing dynamics of fibre lasers with a core based on quartz glass doped with holmium ions to concentrations in the range of 10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} is investigated. It is shown that fibre lasers with a high concentration of active holmium ions generate pulses, but a decrease in the holmium concentration changes the lasing from pulsed to cw regime. At the same time, a decrease in the active-ion concentration and the corresponding increase in the fibre length in the cavity reduce the lasing efficiency. (lasers)

  9. Silicate volcanism on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1986-03-01

    This paper is mainly concerned with the nature of volcanic eruptions on Io, taking into account questions regarding the presence of silicates or sulfur as principal component. Attention is given to the generation of silicate magma, the viscous dissipation in the melt zone, thermal anomalies at eruption sites, and Ionian volcanism. According to the information available about Io, it appears that its volcanism and hence its surface materials are dominantly silicic. Several percent of volatile materials such as sulfur, but also including sodium- and potassium-rich materials, may also be present. The volatile materials at the surface are continually vaporized and melted as a result of the high rates of silicate volcanism.

  10. Dielectric and conducting behaviour of polycrystalline holmium octa-molybdate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Want, Basharat; Zahoor Ahmad, Bhat; Bhat, Bilal Hamid

    2014-09-01

    Polycrystalline holmium octa-molybdate spherulites have been obtained by using gel diffusion technique and characterized by different physio-chemical techniques. The surfaces of these spherulites are composed of nano-rod with an average diameter of about 80 nm. At room temperature the initial crystal structure is triclinic, space group P1. Thermal studies suggested a phase transition occurring in holmium octa-molybdate crystals at about 793 K. The electrical properties of the system have been studied as a function of frequency and temperature in the ranges of 20 Hz-3 MHz and 290-570 K, respectively. A giant dielectric constant and two loss peaks have been observed in the permittivity formalism. The conducting behaviour of the material is also discussed. The conductivity was found to be 1572 μ Ω-1 m-1 at room temperature and 3 MHz frequency. The conductivity of the polycrystalline material was attributed to the fact that it arises due to the migration of defects on the oxygen sub-lattice. Impedance studies were also performed in the frequency domain to infer the bulk and grain boundary contributions to the overall electric response of the material. The electrical responses have been attributed to the grain, grain-boundary, and interfacial effects.

  11. Holmium:YAG laser angioplasty: treatment of acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaz, On

    1993-06-01

    We report our clinical experience with a group of 14 patients who presented with acute myocardial infarction. A holmium:YAG laser was applied to the infarct-related artery. This laser emits 250 - 600 mJ per pulse, with a pulse length of 250 microseconds and repetition rate of 5 Hz. Potential benefits of acute thrombolysis by lasers include the absence of systemic lytic state; a shortened thrombus clearing time relative to using thrombolytics; safe removal of the intracoronary thrombus and facilitation of adjunct balloon angioplasty. Potential clinical difficulties include targeting the obstructive clot and plaque, creation of debris and distal emboli and laser-tissue damage. It is conceivable that holmium:YAG laser can be a successful thrombolytic device as its wave length (2.1 microns) coincides with strong water absorption peaks. Since it is common to find an atherosclerotic plaque located under or distal to the thrombotic occlusion, this laser can also be applied for plaque ablation, and the patient presenting with acute myocardial infarction can clearly benefit from the combined function of this laser system.

  12. Holmium laser use in the treatment of selected dry eye syndrome complications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecik, Dariusz; Kecik, Tadeusz; Kasprzak, Jan; Kecik, Mariusz

    1996-03-01

    The authors present initial results of treatment selected complications of dry eye syndrome with holmium laser. The lacrimal puncta obliteration and coagulation of the corneal ulcer surface were done.

  13. Holmium-doped fibre amplifier operating at 2.1 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Kamynin, V A; Antipov, S O; Kurkov, A S; Baranikov, A V

    2014-02-28

    A small-signal holmium-doped fibre amplifier is demonstrated. The seed source is a cw holmium-doped fibre laser whose output power is modulated by an electro-optical modulator. The maximum gain reached (wavelength, 2.1 μm; power, 0.25 mW; pulse duration, 100 ns; pulse repetition rate, 1 μs) is 28.5 dB. (lasers)

  14. Energy upconversion in holmium doped lead-germano-tellurite glass

    SciTech Connect

    Kamma, Indumathi; Reddy, B. Rami

    2010-06-15

    Holmium doped lead-germano-tellurite glass was prepared by the melt quenching technique. The Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters were estimated as {Omega}{sub 2}=7.6x10{sup -20}, {Omega}{sub 4}=12.9x10{sup -20}, and {Omega}{sub 6}=2.5x10{sup -20} cm{sup 2}. Radiative transition probabilities and lifetimes were also determined for some of the levels. Room temperature upconversion emissions have been observed from Ho{sup 3+} at 497 nm under 532 nm laser excitation, and at 557 and 668 nm under 762 nm laser excitation. The upconversion emission mechanisms were found to be due to a step wise excitation process. Upconversion emission intensity enhanced in a heat treated glass.

  15. The specific heat of potassium holmium double tungstate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowiec, M. T.; Dyakonov, V. P.; Szewczyk, A.; Gutowska, M. U.; Zayarnyuk, T.; Zubov, E. E.; Majchrowski, A.; Michalski, E.; Hoffmann, J.-U.; Prokes, K.; Woźniak, K.; Dobrzycki, Ł.; Khatsko, E. N.; Rykova, A. I.; Domukhovski, V.; Barański, M.; Shtyrkhunova, V.; Żmija, J.; Szymczak, H.

    2011-11-01

    The results of measurements of thermal properties (specific heat) of potassium holmium double tungstate KHo(WO4)2 as a function of temperature (from 0.5 to 300 K) and magnetic field (up to 2 T) are presented. The total specific heat without the phonon and Schottky contributions is found to have the anomaly with maximum at T SPT ∼ 5 K. This anomaly is likely related with the structural phase transition (SPT) caused by the cooperative Jahn-Teller effect. The increase of specific heat at very low temperatures and its shift towards high temperatures with increasing magnetic field are observed. The origin of this behaviour can be connected with possible magnetic phase transition induced by magnetic field.

  16. Combination of erbium and holmium laser radiation for tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratisto, Hans S.; Frenz, Martin; Koenz, Flurin; Altermatt, Hans J.; Weber, Heinz P.

    1996-05-01

    Erbium lasers emitting at 2.94 micrometers and holmium lasers emitting at 2.1 micrometers are interesting tools for cutting, drilling, smoothing and welding of water containing tissues. The high absorption coefficient of water at these wavelengths leads to their good ablation efficiency with controlled thermally altered zones around the ablation sites. Combination of pulses with both wavelengths transmitted through one fiber were used to perform incisions in soft tissue and impacts in bone disks. Histological results and scanning electron microscope evaluations reveal the strong influence of the absorption coefficient on tissue effects, especially on the ablation efficiency and the zone of thermally damaged tissue. It is demonstrated that the combination of high ablation rates and deep coagulation zones can be achieved. The results indicate that this laser system can be considered as a first step towards a multi-functional medical instrument.

  17. Holmium:YAG laser: effects on dentin demineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Raleigh A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1995-05-01

    The Holmium:YAG laser at 2.12 microns wavelength was used to compare the changes in resistance to demineralization of the dentinal root surfaces of human extracted teeth in vitro. Three protocols were used: Group #1, and application of nonfilled resin/NaF (4%) solution followed by exposure with the Holmium:YAG laser beam; Group #2, an application of an aqueous solution of NaF (4%) only; and Group #3, irradiation with the laser beam only. The teeth were exposed on the root surfaces with untreated control and experimental sites on opposite sides of the teeth. A 3 mm spot size covered an area of 3 X 5 mm with 0.450 (+/- .05) joules at a fluence of 2.66 - 3.3 J/cm2. All teeth were decalcified in a 10% Formic acid solution for a timed period. Samples were prepared for staining by sectioning the teeth at the dentoenamel junction and 3 mm apically to produce a cross-section of each tooth root surface. Each sample was placed in toluidine blue dye to observe the depth of dye penetration into the dentin of treated and control sites. Toluidine blue dye showed a consistent greater depth of dye penetration into the dentinal areas of the untreated control sites versus the resin/NaF-lased group. The topical fluoride only group did not appear different than the untreated control sites of the teeth. The lased only group showed areas of dye penetration similar to the untreated control sides with other areas of little or no dye penetration. The finding that HO:YAG laser energy/chemical agent produced increased resistance to demineralization of dentinal surfaces in vitro suggested potential clinical applications of this combined modality.

  18. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate: patient selection and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Marien, Tracy; Kadihasanoglu, Mustafa; Miller, Nicole L

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple endoscopic surgical options exist to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), including holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP). HoLEP alleviates obstructive prostatic tissue via enucleation, both bluntly with a resectoscope and by cutting tissue with the holmium laser, and removal of adenoma via morcellation. This article reviews patient selection for HoLEP in order to optimize outcomes, costs, and patient satisfaction. Methods A literature review of all studies on HoLEP was conducted. Studies that focused on outcomes in regard to patient and procedural factors were closely reviewed and discussed. Results Various studies found that men with large or small prostates, on antithrombotic therapy, in urinary retention, with bladder hypocontractility, with prostate cancer, undergoing retreatment for BPH, or in need of concomitant surgery for bladder stones and other pathologies do well with HoLEP, as demonstrated by excellent functional and symptomatic outcomes as well as low complication rates. There is a 74–78% rate of retrograde ejaculation following HoLEP. Techniques to preserve ejaculatory function following enucleative techniques have not been able to demonstrate a significant improvement. Conclusion Patient selection for HoLEP can include most men with bothersome BPH who have evidence of bladder outlet obstruction and are healthy enough to undergo surgery. The ability to safely perform concomitant surgery with HoLEP benefits the patient by sparing them an additional anesthetic and also decreases costs. Patients should be made aware of the risk of retrograde ejaculation following HoLEP and counseled on treatment alternatives if maintaining ejaculatory function is desired. PMID:27800470

  19. Preparation, characterization and photocatalytic activities of holmium-doped titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jian-Wen; Zheng, Jing-Tang; Wu, Peng

    2009-01-15

    Holmium-doped TiO2 nanoparticles with high photocatalytic activities were prepared by sol-gel method and characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, and surface area measurement by nitrogen adsorption in this study. Experimental results indicated holmium doping could increase the surface area of TiO2 nanoparticles, and inhibit the growth of crystalline size and the anatase-to-rutile phase transformation. The results of photodegrading methyl orange showed holmium doping improved the photocatalytic activity of TiO2, and the reasons could be attributed to the synergetic effects of large surface areas, small crystallite size, lattice distortion and more charge imbalance of holmium-doped TiO2. In our experiment, the optimal doped amount was 0.3mol.% for the maximum photocatalytic degradation ratio when holmium-doped TiO2 was calcined at 500 degrees C, and the optimal calcined temperature was 600 degrees C when the doped amount was 0.5mol.%.

  20. Evaluation of six holmium:YAG optical fibers for ureteroscopy: What's new in 2009?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Bodo E.; Teichman, Joel M. H.

    2010-02-01

    The holmium:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser is the gold standard laser for intracorporeal lithotripsy.1 Optical fibers are utilized to transmit laser energy to the surface of a stone for fragmentation via a predominant photothermal mechanism.2 Previous work has demonstrated that performance characteristics of holmium:YAG optical fibers used for laser lithotripsy varies. Performance may difference not only between fibers made by different manufacturers but also between individual fibers produced by the same manufacturer.3,4 Fiber failure with bending, such as during lower pole ureterorenoscopy, can lead to catastrophic endoscope damage resulting in costly repair. Manufacturers continue to develop new holmium:YAG optical fibers. In this study we evaluate a series of newly commercially available fibers using a previously designed testing protocol. This study was designed to determine the performance and threshold for failure of six newly available holmium:YAG laser fibers from Cook Medical and Fibertech Gmbh. We hypothesize that fiber performance will continue to vary amongst different holmium:YAG optical fibers.

  1. Safety and efficacy of holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy in patients with bleeding diatheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watterson, James D.; Girvan, Andrew R.; Cook, Anthony J.; Beiko, Darren T.; Nott, Linda; Auge, Brian K.; Preminger, Glenn M.; Denstedt, John D.

    2003-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of ureteroscopy and holmium:YAG (yttrium-aluminum-garnet) laser lithotripsy in the treatment of upper urinary tract calculi in patients with known and uncorrected bleeding diatheses. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review from 2 tertiary stone centers was performed to identify patients with known bleeding diatheses who were treated with holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy for upper urinary tract calculi. Twenty-five patients with 29 upper urinary tract calculi were treated with ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy. Bleeding diatheses identified were coumadin administration for various conditions (17), liver dysfunction (3), thrombocytopenia (4), and von Willebrand's disease (1). Mean international normalized ratio (INR), platelet count and bleeding time were 2.3, 50 x 109/L, and > 16 minutes, for patients receiving coumadin or with liver dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, or von Willebrand's disease, respectively. Results: Overall, the stone-free rate was 96% (27/28) and 29 of 30 procedures were completed successfully without significant complication. One patient who was treated concomitantly with electrohydraulic lithotripsy (EHL) had a significant retroperitoneal hemorrhage that required blood transfusion. Conclusions: Treatment of upper tract urinary calculi in patients with uncorrected bleeding diatheses can be safely performed using contemporary small caliber ureteroscopes and holmium laser as the sole modality of lithotripsy. Ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy without preoperative correction of hemostatic parameters limits the risk of thromboembolic complications and costs associated with an extended hospital stay. Avoidance of the use of EHL is crucial in reducing bleeding complications in this cohort of patients.

  2. [A Case of Holmium: YAG Laser Resection of Superficial Bladder Tumor (HoLRBT)].

    PubMed

    Sugita, Yoshiko; Shitara, Toshiya; Hirayama, Takahiro; Fujita, Tetsuo; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kubo, Seiichi; Iwamura, Masatsugu

    2015-10-01

    We present a case of holmium : YAG laser resection of superficial bladder tumor (HoLRBT). A 73-year-old male was referred to our hospital with elevated prostatic specific antigen. Due to difficulty of urination, holmium : YAG laser enucleation of the prostate was performed under the diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia. During the surgery, superficial bladder tumor was incidentally identified, and HoLRBT was performed. After the operation, histopathological examination revealed urothelial carcinoma, G2 > G1, pTa. The patient has been subsequently followed up for 9 months, and there areno evidence of recurrence. Changing the holmium : YAG laser energy setting can potentially be effective and safe to approach a superficial bladder tumor.

  3. Holmium:YAG laser in dentistry: photoconditioning of dentinal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Raleigh A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1994-09-01

    This in vitro study was undertaken to determine energy levels necessary to produce tubule closure and surface smoothing on dentinal surfaces of human teeth and their resultant temperature increases within the pulpal canals with the Holmium:YAG laser. An optimal working spot size and even absorption pattern were produced by defocusing the laser beam and evaluated by images produced on light exposed and developed photographic paper. The surface effects on dentin were examined by scanning electron microscopy. A thermocouple was positioned in the canals of fresh dissected dog jaws and attached to a recorder which produced a graph of the temperature changes. The in vitro research model for intrapulpal temperatures changes was verified by comparing premortem and postmortem temperature readings. The same protocol was used to evaluate temperature changes in fresh human extracted teeth. In vivo histological studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of HO:YAG laser energy on pulpal tissues. The results of these studies indicate the HO:YAG laser at a wavelength of 2.12 microns can be safely and effectively used for photoconditioning of the dentinal surfaces of teeth in clinical conditions.

  4. Magnetic field-dependent spin structures of nanocrystalline holmium

    PubMed Central

    Szary, Philipp; Kaiser, Daniel; Bick, Jens-Peter; Lott, Dieter; Heinemann, André; Dewhurst, Charles; Birringer, Rainer; Michels, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The results are reported of magnetic field-dependent neutron diffraction experiments on polycrystalline inert-gas condensed holmium with a nanometre crystallite size (D = 33 nm). At T = 50 K, no evidence is found for the existence of helifan(3/2) or helifan(2) structures for the nanocrystalline sample, in contrast with results reported in the literature for the single crystal. Instead, when the applied field H is increased, the helix pattern transforms progressively, most likely into a fan structure. It is the component of H which acts on the basal-plane spins of a given nanocrystallite that drives the disappearance of the helix; for nanocrystalline Ho, this field is about 1.3 T, and it is related to a characteristic kink in the virgin magnetization curve. For a coarse-grained Ho sample, concomitant with the destruction of the helix phase, the emergence of an unusual angular anisotropy (streak pattern) and the appearance of novel spin structures are observed. PMID:27047307

  5. An architecture for quantum computation with magnetically trapped Holmium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffman, Mark; Hostetter, James; Booth, Donald; Collett, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    Outstanding challenges for scalable neutral atom quantum computation include correction of atom loss due to collisions with untrapped background gas, reduction of crosstalk during state preparation and measurement due to scattering of near resonant light, and the need to improve quantum gate fidelity. We present a scalable architecture based on loading single Holmium atoms into an array of Ioffe-Pritchard traps. The traps are formed by grids of superconducting wires giving a trap array with 40 μm period, suitable for entanglement via long range Rydberg gates. The states | F = 5 , M = 5 > and | F = 7 , M = 7 > provide a magic trapping condition at a low field of 3.5 G for long coherence time qubit encoding. The F = 11 level will be used for state preparation and measurement. The availability of different states for encoding, gate operations, and measurement, spectroscopically isolates the different operations and will prevent crosstalk to neighboring qubits. Operation in a cryogenic environment with ultra low pressure will increase atom lifetime and Rydberg gate fidelity by reduction of blackbody induced Rydberg decay. We will present a complete description of the architecture including estimates of achievable performance metrics. Work supported by NSF award PHY-1404357.

  6. Proximal fiber tip damage during Holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser ablation of kidney stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    The Thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being studied as an alternative to Holmium:YAG laser for lithotripsy. TFL beam originates within an 18-μm-core thulium doped silica fiber, and its near single mode, Gaussian beam profile enables transmission of higher laser power through smaller fibers than possible during Holmium laser lithotripsy. This study examines whether TFL beam profile also reduces proximal fiber tip damage compared to Holmium laser multimodal beam. TFL beam at wavelength of 1908 nm was coupled into 105-μm-core silica fibers, with 35-mJ energy, 500-μs pulse duration, and pulse rates of 50-500 Hz. For each pulse rate, 500,000 pulses were delivered. Magnified images of proximal fiber surfaces were taken before and after each trial. For comparison, 20 single-use, 270-μm-core fibers were collected after clinical Holmium laser lithotripsy procedures using standard settings (600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz). Total laser energy, number of laser pulses, and laser irradiation time were recorded, and fibers were rated for damage. For TFL studies, output power was stable, and no proximal fiber damage was observed after delivery of 500,000 pulses at settings up to 35 mJ, 500 Hz, and 17.5 W average power. In contrast, confocal microscopy images of fiber tips after Holmium lithotripsy showed proximal fiber tip degradation in all 20 fibers. The proximal fiber tip of a 105-μm-core fiber transmitted 17.5 W of TFL power without degradation, compared to degradation of 270-μm-core fibers after transmission of 3.6 W of Holmium laser power. The smaller and more uniform TFL beam profile may improve fiber lifetime, and potentially reduce costs for the surgical disposables as well.

  7. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  8. Use of the holmium:YAG laser in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Douglas E.; Cromeens, Douglas M.; Price, Roger E.

    1992-06-01

    The Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser operating at a wavelength of 2.1 micrometers with a maximum power of 15 watts (W) and 10 different pulse-energy settings was systematically evaluated on kidney, bladder, prostate, ureteral, and vasal tissue, and was used to perform various urologic surgical procedures (partial nephrectomy, transurethral laser incision of the prostate, and laser-assisted vasovasostomy) in the dog. By using the SurgiTomeTM 3- inch straight delivery system with an energy-pulse setting of 0.5 joules (J) at 20 Hz (10 W), partial nephrectomies required slightly longer operating times (15 minutes) than when similar procedures were performed using the Neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) laser and a free GI fiber at 59 to 83 W (4 - 7 minutes); however, the total energy required was considerably less. Hemostasis was excellent and no sutures were required to control bleeding. Transurethral incisions of the prostate using TV monitoring were made at the 4 and 8 o'clock positions extending from the colliculus seminalis through the vesical neck with an energy/pulse setting of 1.0 J at 15 Hz (15 W). Attempts at laser-assisted vasovasostomies were unsuccessful due to excessive thermal affect. The LaparoTomeTM Delivery System proved helpful in performing laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy in the pig. Our investigations showed that the Ho:YAG laser possesses both excellent cutting and adequate hemostatic abilities even in a fluid medium. Although these results are preliminary, we believe that the Ho:YAG laser is well suited for urologic surgery and may well become the 'urologist's laser of the future.'

  9. Laser-assisted hair transplantation: histologic comparison between holmium:YAG and CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Eugene A.; Rabinov, C. Rose; Wong, Brian J.; Krugman, Mark E.

    1999-06-01

    The histological effects of flash-scanned CO2 (λ=10.6μm) and pulsed Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG, λ=2.12μm) lasers were evaluated in human scalp following the creation of hair transplant recipient channels. Ho:YAG laser irradiation created larger zones of thermal injury adjacent to the laser channels than irradiation with the CO2 laser device. When the two lasers created recipient sites of nearly equal depth, the Holmium:YAG laser caused a larger region of lateral thermal damage (589.30μm) than the CO2 laser (118.07μm). In addition, Holmium:YAG irradiated specimens exhibited fractures or discontinuities beyond the region of clear thermal injury. This shearing effect is consistent with the photoacoustic mechanism of ablation associated with pulsed mid-IR laser irradiation. In contrast, channels created with the CO2 exhibited minimal epithelial disruption and significantly less lateral thermal damage. While the Holmium:YAG laser is a useful tool for ablation soft tissue with minimal char in select applications (sinus surgery, arthroscopic surgery), this study suggests that the use of the CO2 laser for the creation of transplantation recipient channels result in significantly less lateral thermal injury for the laser parameters employed.

  10. Effects Of Holmium-YSGG Laser Irradiation On Arterial Tissue: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aretz, H. Thomas; Butterly, John R.; Jewell, Edward R.; Setzer, Suzanne E.; Shapshay, Stanley M.

    1989-06-01

    The effects of pulsed holmium-YSGG laser energy (2.1 μm) on arterial tissue were studied in vitro and in vivo. Delivered through silica optical fibers, the laser ablated calcified and noncalcified tissue in air and saline in a noncontact mode. Early in vivo healing studies in normal canine carotid arteries showed minimal chronic sequelae at 3 weeks.

  11. Holmium laser for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: old wine in a new bottle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelius, Thomas; de Riese, Werner T. W.

    2003-06-01

    Urinary tract symptoms related to benign prostatic hyperplasia affect 70% of men older than 70 years. Complications are common problems and a significant cause of morbidity in this population, placing a considerable burden on health services. In the early 1990s laser treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia became widely used after the introduction of the side-firing neodym: YAG laser. However, because of technical limitations and inferior results compared to classical transurethral resection of the prostate many Urologists became desinterested in this device. With the introduction of the holmium: YAG laser a new laser generation became available for use in Urology. Beside several other applications the holmium: YAG laser can be used for incision, ablation, resection, and more recently enucleation of the prostate. In this paper we reviewed the current literature regarding the holmium: YAG laser resection and enucleation of the prostate compared to transurethral resection of the prostate and open prostatectomy. The holmium: YAG laser technique is an effective and durable surgical alternative to standard transurethral resection of the prostate. Interestingly, enucleation of the prostate with this device seems to be a safe and effective procedure for large prostatic adenomas, it may become an attractive alternative to open prostatectomy.

  12. Preparation and complex characterization of silica holmium sol-gel monoliths.

    PubMed

    Cacaina, D; Areva, S; Laaksonen, H; Simon, S; Ylänen, H

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous, sol-gel derived SiO(2) are known to biocompatible and bioresorbable materials. Biodegradable and inert materials containing radioactive isotopes have potential application as delivery vehicles of the beta radiation to the cancer tumors inside the body. Incorporation of holmium in the sol-gel derived SiO(2) could lead to the formation of a biodegradable material which could be used as carrier biomaterial for the radiation of radioactive holmium to the various cancer sites. The homogeneity of the prepared sol-gel silica holmium monoliths was investigated by Back Scattered Electron Imaging of Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis, X-ray Induced Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. The biodegradation of the monoliths was investigated in Simulated Body Fluid and TRIS (Trizma pre-set Crystals) solution. The results show that by suitable tailoring of the sol-gel processing parameters holmium can be homogeneously incorporated in the silica matrix with a controlled biodegradation rate.

  13. Chiral holmium complex-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction of silyloxyvinylindoles: stereoselective synthesis of hydrocarbazoles.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shinji; Morikawa, Takahiro; Nishida, Atsushi

    2013-10-18

    The catalytic and asymmetric cycloaddition between 3-[1-(silyloxy)vinyl]indoles and electron-deficient olefins gave substituted hydrocarbazoles in up to 99% yield and 94% ee. This reaction was catalyzed by a novel chiral holmium(III) complex. Alkylation of the cycloadduct gave a tricyclic compound with four continuous chiral centers, one of which was a quaternary carbon.

  14. Fiber-optic manipulation of urinary stone phantoms using holmium:YAG and thulium fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Case, Jason R.; Trammell, Susan R.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2013-02-01

    Fiber-optic attraction of urinary stones during laser lithotripsy may be exploited to manipulate stone fragments inside the urinary tract without mechanical grasping tools, saving the urologist time and space in the ureteroscope working channel. We compare thulium fiber laser (TFL) high pulse rate/low pulse energy operation to conventional holmium:YAG low pulse rate/high pulse energy operation for fiber-optic suctioning of plaster-of-paris (PoP) stone phantoms. A TFL (wavelength of 1908 nm, pulse energy of 35 mJ, pulse duration of 500 μs, and pulse rate of 10 to 350 Hz) and a holmium laser (wavelength of 2120 nm, pulse energy of 35 to 360 mJ, pulse duration of 300 μs, and pulse rate of 20 Hz) were tested using 270-μm-core optical fibers. A peak drag speed of ˜2.5 mm/s was measured for both TFL (35 mJ and 150 to 250 Hz) and holmium laser (210 mJ and 20 Hz). Particle image velocimetry and thermal imaging were used to track water flow for all parameters. Fiber-optic suctioning of urinary stone phantoms is feasible. TFL operation at high pulse rates/low pulse energies is preferable to holmium operation at low pulse rates/high pulse energies for rapid and smooth stone pulling. With further development, this novel technique may be useful for manipulating stone fragments in the urinary tract.

  15. Silicates in Alien Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescopes shows that asteroid dust around a dead 'white dwarf' star contains silicates a common mineral on Earth. The data were taken primarily by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that breaks light apart into its basic constituents. The yellow dots show averaged data from the spectrograph, while the orange triangles show older data from Spitzer's infrared array camera. The white dwarf is called GD 40.

  16. Thermochemistry of Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Gustavo; Jacobson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of vapor and condensed phases of silicates are crucial in many fields of science. These quantities address fundamental questions on the formation, stability, transformation, and physical properties of silicate minerals and silicate coating compositions. Here the thermodynamic activities of silica and other species in solid solution have been measured by the analysis of the corresponding high temperature vapors using Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry (KEMS). In first set of experiments KEMS has been used to examine the volatility sequence of species (Fe, SiO, Mg, O2 and O) present in the vapor phase during heating of fosterite-rich olivine (Fo93Fa7) up to 2400 C and to measure the Fe, SiO and Mg activities in its solid solution. The data of fosterite-rich olivine are essential for thermochemical equilibrium models to predict the atmospheric and surface composition of hot, rocky exoplanets (Lava Planets). In the second set of experiments the measured thermodynamic activities of the silica in Y2O3-SiO2 and Yb2O3-SiO2 systems are used to assess their reactivity and degradation recession as environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) in combustion environments (e.g. non-moveable parts of gas turbine engine).

  17. Holmium:YAG laser coronary angioplasty: quantitative angiography and clinical results in a large experience of a single medical center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaz, On; Luxenberg, Michael; Schumacher, Audrey

    1994-07-01

    Clinical experience with the mid IR holmium:YAG laser in a single medical center (St. Paul Ramsey Medical Center, University of Minnesota Medical School, St. Paul, MN) includes 112 patients who underwent holmium laser coronary angioplasty. Utilizing a unique lasing technique; `pulse and retreat,' we applied this laser to thrombotic and nonthrombotic lesions in patients presenting with unstable angina, stable angina, and acute myocardial infarction. A very high clinical success and very low complication rates were achieved. Holmium:YAG laser is effective and safe therapy for patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease. Unlike excimer lasers, the clinical success, efficacy and safety of holmium laser angioplasty is not compromised when thrombus is present.

  18. Quantitative Monte Carlo-based holmium-166 SPECT reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Elschot, Mattijs; Smits, Maarten L. J.; Nijsen, Johannes F. W.; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de; Viergever, Max A.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Quantitative imaging of the radionuclide distribution is of increasing interest for microsphere radioembolization (RE) of liver malignancies, to aid treatment planning and dosimetry. For this purpose, holmium-166 ({sup 166}Ho) microspheres have been developed, which can be visualized with a gamma camera. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a new reconstruction method for quantitative {sup 166}Ho SPECT, including Monte Carlo-based modeling of photon contributions from the full energy spectrum.Methods: A fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulator was developed for simulation of {sup 166}Ho projection images and incorporated in a statistical reconstruction algorithm (SPECT-fMC). Photon scatter and attenuation for all photons sampled from the full {sup 166}Ho energy spectrum were modeled during reconstruction by Monte Carlo simulations. The energy- and distance-dependent collimator-detector response was modeled using precalculated convolution kernels. Phantom experiments were performed to quantitatively evaluate image contrast, image noise, count errors, and activity recovery coefficients (ARCs) of SPECT-fMC in comparison with those of an energy window-based method for correction of down-scattered high-energy photons (SPECT-DSW) and a previously presented hybrid method that combines MC simulation of photopeak scatter with energy window-based estimation of down-scattered high-energy contributions (SPECT-ppMC+DSW). Additionally, the impact of SPECT-fMC on whole-body recovered activities (A{sup est}) and estimated radiation absorbed doses was evaluated using clinical SPECT data of six {sup 166}Ho RE patients.Results: At the same noise level, SPECT-fMC images showed substantially higher contrast than SPECT-DSW and SPECT-ppMC+DSW in spheres ≥17 mm in diameter. The count error was reduced from 29% (SPECT-DSW) and 25% (SPECT-ppMC+DSW) to 12% (SPECT-fMC). ARCs in five spherical volumes of 1.96–106.21 ml were improved from 32%–63% (SPECT-DSW) and 50%–80

  19. Influence of water environment on holmium laser ablation performance for hard tissues.

    PubMed

    Lü, Tao; Xiao, Qing; Li, Zhengjia

    2012-05-01

    This study clarifies the ablation differences in air and in water for hard biological tissues, which are irradiated by fiber-guided long-pulsed holmium lasers. High-speed photography is used to record the dynamic characteristics of ablation plumes and vaporization bubbles induced by pulsed holmium lasers. The ablation morphologies and depth of hard tissues are quantitatively measured by optical coherence microscopy. Explosive vaporization effects in water play a positive role in the contact ablation process and are directly responsible for significant ablation enhancement. Furthermore, water layer depth can also contribute to ablation performance. Under the same laser parameters for fiber-tissue contact ablation in air and water, ablation performances are comparable for a single-laser pulse, but for more laser pulses the ablation performances in water are better than those in air. Comprehensive knowledge of ablation differences under various environments is important, especially in medical procedures that are performed in a liquid environment.

  20. Thermal properties of holmium-implanted gold films for a neutrino mass experiment with cryogenic microcalorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Prasai, K.; Yanardag, S. Basak; Galeazzi, M.; Uprety, Y.; Alves, E.; Rocha, J.; Bagliani, D.; Biasotti, M.; Gatti, F.; Gomes, M. Ribeiro

    2013-08-15

    In a microcalorimetric neutrino mass experiment using the radioactive decay of {sup 163}Ho, the radioactive material must be fully embedded in the microcalorimeter absorber. One option that is being investigated is to implant the radioactive isotope into a gold absorber, as gold is successfully used in other applications. However, knowing the thermal properties at the working temperature of microcalorimeters is critical for choosing the absorber material and for optimizing the detector performance. In particular, it is paramount to understand if implanting the radioactive material in gold changes its heat capacity. We used a bolometric technique to measure the heat capacity of gold films, implanted with various concentrations of holmium and erbium (a byproduct of the {sup 163}Ho fabrication), in the temperature range 70 mK–300 mK. Our results show that the specific heat capacity of the gold films is not affected by the implant, making this a viable option for a future microcalorimeter holmium experiment.

  1. Holmium:YAG laser-assisted otolaryngologic surgery: Lahey Clinic experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapshay, Stanley M.; Rebeiz, Elie E.; Pankratov, Michail M.

    1993-07-01

    The Holmium:YAG laser was used to assist in 36 rhinologic procedures including surgery for chronic sinus disease, chronic dacryocystitis, recurrent choanal stenosis, and a sphenoid sinus mucocele. There were no laser related complications. The laser permitted controlled ablation of bone and soft tissue in all cases with satisfactory results. The Ho:YAG laser can be used in otolaryngology to assist in cases where surgical access is difficult or when controlled, precise bone and soft tissue ablation is necessary.

  2. Laser Prostatectomy: Holmium Laser Enucleation and Photoselective Laser Vaporization of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Bostanci, Yakup; Kazzazi, Amir; Djavan, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Historically, transurethral resection of the prostate has been the gold standard for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Laser technology has been used to treat BPH for > 15 years. Over the past decade, it has gained wide acceptance by experienced urologists. This review provides an evidence-based update on laser surgery for BPH with a focus on photoselective laser vaporization and holmium laser enucleation of the prostate surgeries and assesses the safety, efficacy, and durability of these techniques. PMID:23671400

  3. Mathematical modelling of dispersion-managed thulium/holmium fibre lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Yarutkina, I A; Shtyrina, O V

    2013-11-30

    The mathematical model of a dispersion-managed thulium/holmium fibre laser is described; the results of numerical calculations and their comparison with the experimental data are presented. Qualitative agreement of the results of the mathematical modelling with those of the experiment is obtained. Using the methods of mathematical modelling, the variation in the characteristics of the optical pulses due to the change in the average cavity dispersion is analysed. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  4. Long-term toxicity of holmium-loaded poly(L-lactic acid) microspheres in rats.

    PubMed

    Zielhuis, Sander W; Nijsen, J Frank W; Seppenwoolde, Jan-Henry; Bakker, Chris J G; Krijger, Gerard C; Dullens, Hub F J; Zonnenberg, Bernard A; van Rijk, Peter P; Hennink, Wim E; van het Schip, Alfred D

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to get insight into the toxic effects of holmium-166-loaded poly(L-lactic acid) microspheres (Ho-PLLA-MS) which have very interesting features for treatment of liver malignancies. Acute, mid- and long-term effects were studied in healthy Wistar rats by evaluating clinical, biochemical and tissue response. Rats were divided into four treatment groups: sham, decayed neutron-irradiated Ho-PLLA-MS, non-irradiated Ho-PLLA-MS and PLLA-MS. After implantation of the microspheres into the liver of the rats, the animals were monitored (body weight, temperature and liver enzymes) for a period of 14-18 months. Some of the rats that received previously neutron-irradiated Ho-PLLA-MS were periodically scanned with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to see if holmium was released from the microspheres. After sacrifice, the liver tissue was histologically evaluated. Bone tissue was subjected to neutron-activation analysis in order to examine whether accumulation of released holmium in the bone had occurred. No measurable clinical and biochemical toxic effects were observed in any of the treatment groups. Furthermore, histological analyses of liver tissue samples only showed signs of a slight chronic inflammation and no significant differences in the tissue reaction between rats of the different treatment groups could be observed. The non-irradiated PLLA-MS and Ho-PLLA-MS stayed intact during the study. In contrast, 14 months after administration, the neutron-irradiated Ho-PLLA-MS was not completely spherical anymore, indicating that degradation had started. However, the holmium loading had not been released as was illustrated with MRI and affirmed by neutron-activation analysis of bone tissue. In conclusion, neutron-irradiated Ho-PLLA-MS does not provoke any toxic reaction and can be applied safely in vivo.

  5. Efficient holmium:yttrium lithium fluoride laser longitudinally pumped by a semiconductor laser array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1987-01-01

    Optical pumping of a holmium:yttrium lithium floride (Ho:YLF) crystal with a 790-nm continuous-wave diode-laser array has generated 56 mW of 2.1-micron laser radiation with an optical-to-optical conversion slope efficiency of 33 percent while the crystal temperature is held at 77 K. The lasing threshold occurs at 7 mW of input power, and laser operation continues up to a crystal temperature of 124 K.

  6. Preparation of neutron-activatable holmium nanoparticles for the treatment of ovarian cancer metastases.

    PubMed

    Di Pasqua, Anthony J; Huckle, James E; Kim, Jin-Ki; Chung, Younjee; Wang, Andrew Z; Jay, Michael; Lu, Xiuling

    2012-04-10

    Nanoparticles containing stable holmium ((165) Ho) are prepared by nanotemplate engineering and subsequently irradiated in a neutron flux to yield (166) Ho, a beta-emitting radiotherapeutic isotope. After intraperitoneal injection to mice bearing SKOV-3 ovarian tumors, significant tumor accumulation of the (166) Ho-nanoparticles is observed by SPECT imaging indicating the potential of these neutron activatable nanoparticles for internal radiation therapy of ovarian cancer metastases.

  7. Effects of the holmium laser on the human cornea: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Linda J.; Tassignon, Marie J.; Trau, Rene; Pels, Liesbeth; Vrensen, Gijs F.

    1996-12-01

    Treatment of peripheral post-mortem human corneas with the Holmium laser in a ring pattern resulted in opaque spots. One pair of treated eyes was immediately processed for light and electron microscopy and three other treated eyes were preserved for 4 days in medium in order to compare direct and short-term effects of the Holmium laser. Cross as well as frontal light microscopical sections of all eyes revealed interconnecting bands between the spots. At the ultrastructural level the anterior corneal tissue within these spots was characterized by coagulation of cells and collagen and shoed either a dramatic distorting effect on the epithelium in the eyes processed immediately or a single layer of flattened multi-nucleolated epithelial cells having more than one nucleolus per nucleus in the eyes stored in medium. Furthermore, the spots showed disturbed Bowman's layer, destroyed keratocytes and collagen fibrils which were either coagulated or organized chaotically. The interconnecting bands contained alternating normal and coagulated collagen fibers. The rest of the cornea outside the spots had a normal appearance. In corneas stored in medium, both keratocytes and epithelial cells over the entire cornea exhibited accumulations of cytoplasmic fibrils and glycogen particles. These phenomena were not observed in non-preserved corneas, suggesting that the differences are due to preservation and not due to the laser treatment. It is concluded that morphological changes occur mainly in the treated peripheral cornea whereas the central untreated cornea remains unaffected,indicating that the Holmium laser is a reliable instrument to treat hypermetropic patients.

  8. Soft-tissue applications of the holmium:YAG laser in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denstedt, John D.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Chun, Samuel S.; Sales, Jack L.

    1995-05-01

    The ideal surgical laser for the treatment of soft tissue pathology should possess both ablative and hemostatic abilities. As well, for use in urologic conditions the laser must also be suitable for endoscopic use. The Holmium:YAG laser possesses these qualities and in preliminary clinical use has demonstrated a variety of potential urologic applications. In this study we review our initial experience with the Holmium:YAG laser over a 18 month period. A total of 51 patients underwent 53 procedures for a variety of soft tissue conditions including: bladder tumor ablation (25), incision of ureteral stricture (15), incision of urethral stricture (6), treatment of ureteropelvic junction obstruction (3), incision of bladder neck contracture (2), and ablation of a ureteral tumor (2). Satisfactory hemostasis was achieved in all cases. Procedures were considered successful (no further intervention being required to treat the condition) in 81% of the cases. Two patients with dense bladder neck contractures required electroincision under the same anesthetic for completion of the procedure. A single complication, that of urinary extravasation following incision of a urethral stricture resolved with conservative management. In summary, the Holmium:YAG laser has demonstrated safety and proficiency in the treatment of a variety of urologic soft tissue conditions.

  9. Selective determination of the holmium in rare earth mixtures by second derivative spectrophotometry with 2-isobutylformyl-1,3-dione-indan and octylphenol poly-(ethyleneglycol)ether

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Naixing; Si Zhikun; Jiang Wei

    1996-09-01

    In this paper the absorption spectra of 4f electron transitions of the system of holmium with 2-isobutylformyl-1,3-dione-indan and TX-100 have been studied by normal and derivative spectrophotometry. The molar absorptivities are 98 (at 450 nm) and 21 (at 460 nm) 1 {center_dot} mol{sup -1} {center_dot} cm{sup -1}, respectively. The use of the second derivative spectra, eliminates the interference by other lanthanides and improves the sensitivity for holmium determination. The derivative molar absorptivity is 558 1 {center_dot} mol{sup -1} {center_dot} cm{sup -1}. The calibration graph was linear up to 25{mu}g/ml of holmium. The relative standard deviation evaluated from ten independent determinations of 8.0 {mu}g/ml holmium is 1.0%. The detection limit, obtained from the sensitivity of the calibration graph and for 3 S{sub b} (S{sub b} = standard deviation of a blank without holmium, n = 11), was found to be 0.31 {mu}g/ml of holmium. The quantification limit, obtained for 10 S{sub b}, was 1.0 {mu}g/ml of holmium. A method has been developed for determining holmium in a mixture of lanthanides by means of the second derivative spectra and the analytical results obtained are satisfactory.

  10. Ureteroscopy and holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy: an emerging definitive management strategy for symptomatic ureteral calculi in pregnancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watterson, James D.; Girvan, Andrew R.; Beiko, Darren T.; Nott, Linda; Wollin, Timothy A.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Denstedt, John D.

    2003-06-01

    Objectives: Symptomatic urolithiasis in pregnancy that does not respond to conservative measures has traditionally been managed with ureteral stent insertion or percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN). Holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) laser lithotripsy using state-of-the-art ureteroscopes represents an emerging strategy for definitive stone management in pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to review the results of holmium laser lithotripsy in a cohort of patients who presented with symptomatic urolithiasis in pregnancy. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted at 2 tertiary stone centers from January 1996 to August 2001 to identify pregnant patients who were treated with ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy for symptomatic urolithiasis or encrusted stents. Eight patients with a total of 10 symptomatic ureteral calculi and 2 encrusted ureteral stents were treated. Mean gestational age at presentation was 22 weeks. Mean stone size was 8.1 mm. Stones were located in the proximal ureter/ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) (3), mid ureter (1), and distal ureter (6). Results: Complete stone fragmentation and/or removal of encrusted ureteral stents were achieved in all patients using the holmium:YAG laser. The overall procedural success rate was 91%. The overall stone-free rate was 89%. No obstetrical or urological complications were encountered. Conclusions: Ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy can be performed safely in all stages of pregnancy providing definitive management of symptomatic ureteral calculi. The procedure can be done with minimal or no fluoroscopy and avoids the undesirable features of stents or nephrostomy tubes.

  11. Analysis of a Sheet Silicate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, J. M.; Evans, S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a student project in analytical chemistry using sheet silicates. Provides specific information regarding the use of phlogopite in an experiment to analyze samples for silicon, aluminum, magnesium, iron, potassium, and fluoride. (CS)

  12. Ion implantation in silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, G.W.

    1993-12-01

    This review examines the effects of ion implantation on the physical properties of silicate glasses, the compositional modifications that can be brought about, and the use of metal implants to form colloidal nanosize particles for increasing the nonlinear refractive index.

  13. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used in food in accordance with...

  14. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  15. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  16. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  17. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates.

    PubMed

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P; Andreev, Andrey S; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F; Flatt, Robert J; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of (29)Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  18. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates.

    PubMed

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P; Andreev, Andrey S; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F; Flatt, Robert J; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-24

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of (29)Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured.

  19. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    PubMed Central

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  20. Effects of the holmium:YAG and erbium:YAG lasers on endotracheal tubes.

    PubMed

    Kautzky, M; Fitzgerald, R; Dechtyar, I; Schenk, P

    1993-01-01

    Endotracheal tube (ET) fire is the most frequent complication arising with laser surgery in the upper aerodigestive tract. No data are available about the safety of commonly used ETs when used with recently developed high-energy pulsed lasers, working with only a minimal thermal component but mainly photoablative. A comparative in vitro study was performed with three types of endotracheal tubes to assess their resistance to wall and cuff damage by the laser beams of two pulsed infrared solid-state lasers. ET perforation was attempted with the erbium:YAG (lambda = 2,930 nm) and holmium:YAG (lambda = 2,120 nm) lasers. For all experiments, a repetition rate of 5 Hz was used. The 2.5-microseconds holmium:YAG pulses were coupled into a nylon fibre of 400 microns diameter. The 2.0-microseconds erbium:YAG laser pulses were applied to ETs through a lens system providing a spot size diameter of 200 microns. Polyvinyl chloride and silicon ET segments were exposed to laser pulse energies from 97 to 500 mJ in the presence of different anaesthetic gas mixtures. The time from the onset of exposure to tube perforation was recorded. Thermal gradients following laser application were measured. Laser exposure was continued for up to 90 s, unless tube ignition occurred. At all energy levels tested, the photo-ablative mechanism of laser-tube interaction, with few thermal components, led to laser-induced tube ignition if an FiO2 > 21% for the holmium:YAG and 34% for the erbium:YAG laser was established. With increasing pulse energies, ET segments ignited sooner. MLT tubes performed best in the present safety test. PMID:8446385

  1. Nonstented versus routine stented ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy: a prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yi; Zhuo, Jian; Sun, Xiao-Wen; Wen, Wei; Liu, Hai-Tao; Xia, Shu-Jie

    2008-10-01

    We conducted a prospective, randomized study to evaluate whether postoperative ureteral stenting is necessary after ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy. A total of 115 consecutive patients with distal or middle ureteral calculi amenable to ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy were prospectively randomized into stented group (n = 58) and nonstented group (n = 57). The stent was routinely placed in the treated ureter for 2 weeks. The outcomes were measured with postoperative patient symptoms, stone-free rates, early and late postoperative complications, and cost-effectiveness. The postoperative symptoms were measured with Ureteral Stent Symptom Questionnaire (USSQ). All patients completed a 12-week follow-up. There was no significant difference between two groups with respect to the patient age, stone size, stone location and mean operative time. According to the USSQ, the symptoms of the stented group were significantly worse compared to the nonstented group (P = 0.0001). In the stented group, two patients had high fever for 1 week after the operation, stent migration was found in two patients, and the stents had to be removed earlier in five patients because of severe pain or hematuria. The cost of the stented group was significantly higher than the nonstented group. The stone-free rate was 100% in both groups. No hydronephrosis or ureteral stricture was detected by intravenous pyelogram in the 12th week postoperative follow-up. In conclusion, we believe that routine stenting after ureteroscopic intracorporeal lithotripsy with the holmium laser is not necessary as long as the procedure is uncomplicated for distal or middle ureteral calculis less than 2 cm.

  2. Percutaneous Endoscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy for Management of Complicated Biliary Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Kelly; Chamsuddin, Abbas; Spivey, James; Martin, Louis; Nieh, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Advances in endoscopic techniques have transformed the management of urolithiasis. We sought to evaluate the role of such urological interventions for the treatment of complex biliary calculi. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients (n=9) undergoing percutaneous holmium laser lithotripsy for complicated biliary calculi over a 4-year period (12/2003 to 12/2007). All previously failed standard techniques include ERCP with sphincterotomy (n=6), PTHC (n=7), or both of these. Access to the biliary system was obtained via an existing percutaneous transhepatic catheter or T-tube tracts. Endoscopic holmium laser lithotripsy was performed via a flexible cystoscope or ureteroscope. Stone clearance was confirmed intra- and postoperatively. A percutaneous transhepatic drain was left indwelling for follow-up imaging. Results: Mean patient age was 65.6 years (range, 38 to 92). Total stone burden ranged from 1.7 cm to 5 cm. All 9 patients had stones located in the CBD, with 2 patients also having additional stones within the hepatic ducts. All 9 patients (100%) were visually stone-free after one endoscopic procedure. No major perioperative complications occurred. Mean length of stay was 2.4 days. At a mean radiological follow-up of 5.4 months (range, 0.5 to 21), no stone recurrence was noted. Conclusions: Percutaneous endoscopic holmium laser lithotripsy is a minimally invasive alternative to open salvage surgery for complex biliary calculi refractory to standard approaches. This treatment is both safe and efficacious. Success depends on a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:19660213

  3. Effects of the holmium:YAG and erbium:YAG lasers on endotracheal tubes.

    PubMed

    Kautzky, M; Fitzgerald, R; Dechtyar, I; Schenk, P

    1993-01-01

    Endotracheal tube (ET) fire is the most frequent complication arising with laser surgery in the upper aerodigestive tract. No data are available about the safety of commonly used ETs when used with recently developed high-energy pulsed lasers, working with only a minimal thermal component but mainly photoablative. A comparative in vitro study was performed with three types of endotracheal tubes to assess their resistance to wall and cuff damage by the laser beams of two pulsed infrared solid-state lasers. ET perforation was attempted with the erbium:YAG (lambda = 2,930 nm) and holmium:YAG (lambda = 2,120 nm) lasers. For all experiments, a repetition rate of 5 Hz was used. The 2.5-microseconds holmium:YAG pulses were coupled into a nylon fibre of 400 microns diameter. The 2.0-microseconds erbium:YAG laser pulses were applied to ETs through a lens system providing a spot size diameter of 200 microns. Polyvinyl chloride and silicon ET segments were exposed to laser pulse energies from 97 to 500 mJ in the presence of different anaesthetic gas mixtures. The time from the onset of exposure to tube perforation was recorded. Thermal gradients following laser application were measured. Laser exposure was continued for up to 90 s, unless tube ignition occurred. At all energy levels tested, the photo-ablative mechanism of laser-tube interaction, with few thermal components, led to laser-induced tube ignition if an FiO2 > 21% for the holmium:YAG and 34% for the erbium:YAG laser was established. With increasing pulse energies, ET segments ignited sooner. MLT tubes performed best in the present safety test.

  4. Transurethral holmium-YAG laser lithotripsy for large symptomatic prostatic calculi: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Neeraj Kumar; Goel, Apul; Sankhwar, Satyanarayan

    2013-08-01

    Symptomatic prostatic calculi are a rare clinical entity with wide range of management options, however, there is no agreement about the preferred method for treating these symptomatic calculi. In this study we describe our experience of transurethral management of symptomatic prostatic calculi using holmium-YAG laser lithotripsy. Patients with large, symptomatic prostatic stones managed by transurethral lithotripsy using holmium-YAG laser over 3-year duration were included in this retrospective study. Patients were evaluated for any underlying pathological condition and calculus load was determined by preoperative X-ray KUB film/CT scan. Urethrocystoscopy was performed using 30° cystoscope in lithotomy position under spinal anesthesia, followed by transurethral lithotripsy of prostatic calculi using a 550 μm laser fiber. Stone fragments were disintegrated using 100 W laser generators (VersaPulse PowerSuite 100 W, LUMENIS Surgical, CA). Larger stone fragments were retreived using Ellik's evacuator while smaller fragments got flushed under continuous irrigation. Five patients (median age 42 years) with large symptomatic prostatic calculi were operated using the described technique. Three patients had idiopathic stones while rest two had bulbar urethral stricture and neurogenic bladder, respectively. Median operative time was 62 min. All the patients were stone free at the end of procedure. Median duration of catheterization was 2 days. Significant improvement was observed in symptoms score and peak urinary flow and none of the patient had any complication. Transurethral management using holmium-YAG laser lithotripsy is a safe and highly effective, minimally invasive technique for managing symptomatic prostatic calculi of all sizes with no associated morbidity.

  5. Optimization of dosimetry and safety using the holmium laser for urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Swol, Christiaan F. P.; Verdaasdonck, Rudolf M.; Zeijlemaker, Bram Y. W.; Grimbergen, Matthijs C. M.; Boon, Tom A.

    1998-07-01

    The holmium laser has become accepted as a versatile instrument for urological applications, such as prostate resection, urethrotomy, tumor coagulation and lithotripsy. Presently, more powerful lasers have become available generating pulses up to 4 J at 80 W. The necessity of these high power systems in urology is ambiguous. In this study, the dosimetry as to efficacy and especially safety was investigated for various applications. The holmium laser ((lambda) equals 2.1 micrometer) emits its energy in 350 microsecond pulses which instantly turn water into vapor. Using high-speed photography explosive vapor bubbles with diameters over 10 mm were captured. The mechanical force of these bubbles, effectively fragments stones but may dilate and rupture a small lumen like the ureter. After implosion of the bubble, the energy of vaporization turns into heat. Depending on pulse energy and pulse repetition rate, tissue can be thermally affected up to 5 mm. For soft tissue applications, e.g., urethrotomy, prostatectomy or tumor coagulation, pulse energies of 0.5 - 1.5 J were applied at a high repetition rate (20 - 40 Hz) to provide sufficient coagulative and hemostatic effects. At higher pulse energies, the fiber tip was vibrating vigorously and the tissue was ripped to pieces decreasing hemostasis and visibility. For hard tissue applications, bursts of 0.5 J pulses at 5 Hz, proved to be sufficient to fragment all types of stones (including cystine) in the ureter and the bladder without mechanical or thermal damage to surrounding tissue. At higher settings, targeting the stone was less controlled and effective due to 'jumping' of the fiber tip with resulting mechanical and thermal trauma to the surrounding tissue. The holmium laser can be used effectively to coagulate and cut soft tissue and fragment stones at relatively low energy and power settings, thus minimizing the risk of complications.

  6. Comparative pathology of silicate pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Brambilla, C.; Abraham, J.; Brambilla, E.; Benirschke, K.; Bloor, C.

    1979-01-01

    A simple pneumoconiosis with lamellar birefringent crystals was observed in animals dying in the San Diego Zoo. We studied 100 autopsies from 11 mammalian and eight avian species. In mammals, mild pulmonary lesions comprised crystal-laden macrophages in alveoli and lymphatics. Interstitial fibrosis was present in 20% of cases. There were no nodules. In birds, dust retention produced large granulomas around tertiary bronchi without fibrosis. Mineralogic analysis using scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed most of the crystals to be silicates. Ninety percent were complex silicates, with aluminum-potassium silicates comprising 70% of the analyzed particles. Electron and x-ray diffraction showed the silicates to be muscovite mica and its hydrothermal degradation product, ie, illite clay. This mica was also present on filtration membranes of atmospheric air samples obtained from the San Diego Zoo. The amount of dust retention was related to the animal's age, anatomic or ecologic variances, and length of stay in the San Diego Zoo. Its semidesert atmosphere is rich in silicates, which are inhaled and deposited in the lungs. Similar mica-induced lesions are found in humans living in this region or the Southwest of the USA. This simple pneumoconiosis is likely to be widespread in human populations living in desert or semidesert climates. Images Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:223447

  7. Stardust silicates from primitive meteorites.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2004-04-29

    Primitive chondritic meteorites contain material (presolar grains), at the level of a few parts per million, that predates the formation of our Solar System. Astronomical observations and the chemical composition of the Sun both suggest that silicates must have been the dominant solids in the protoplanetary disk from which the planets of the Solar System formed, but no presolar silicates have been identified in chondrites. Here we report the in situ discovery of presolar silicate grains 0.1-1 microm in size in the matrices of two primitive carbonaceous chondrites. These grains are highly enriched in 17O (delta17O(SMOW) > 100-400 per thousand ), but have solar silicon isotopic compositions within analytical uncertainties, suggesting an origin in an oxygen-rich red giant or an asymptotic giant branch star. The estimated abundance of these presolar silicates (3-30 parts per million) is higher than reported for other types of presolar grains in meteorites, consistent with their ubiquity in the early Solar System, but is about two orders of magnitude lower than their abundance in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles. This result is best explained by the destruction of silicates during high-temperature processing in the solar nebula.

  8. Stardust silicates from primitive meteorites.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2004-04-29

    Primitive chondritic meteorites contain material (presolar grains), at the level of a few parts per million, that predates the formation of our Solar System. Astronomical observations and the chemical composition of the Sun both suggest that silicates must have been the dominant solids in the protoplanetary disk from which the planets of the Solar System formed, but no presolar silicates have been identified in chondrites. Here we report the in situ discovery of presolar silicate grains 0.1-1 microm in size in the matrices of two primitive carbonaceous chondrites. These grains are highly enriched in 17O (delta17O(SMOW) > 100-400 per thousand ), but have solar silicon isotopic compositions within analytical uncertainties, suggesting an origin in an oxygen-rich red giant or an asymptotic giant branch star. The estimated abundance of these presolar silicates (3-30 parts per million) is higher than reported for other types of presolar grains in meteorites, consistent with their ubiquity in the early Solar System, but is about two orders of magnitude lower than their abundance in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles. This result is best explained by the destruction of silicates during high-temperature processing in the solar nebula. PMID:15118720

  9. Holmium-lipiodol-alginate microspheres for fluoroscopy-guided embolotherapy and multimodality imaging.

    PubMed

    Oerlemans, Chris; Seevinck, Peter R; Smits, Maarten L; Hennink, Wim E; Bakker, Chris J G; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Nijsen, J Frank W

    2015-03-30

    Embolotherapy is a minimally invasive transcatheter technique aiming at reduction or complete obstruction of the blood flow by infusion of micro-sized particles in order to induce tumor regression. A major drawback of the current commercially available and clinically used microspheres is that they cannot be detected in vivo with medical imaging techniques, impeding intra- and post-procedural feedback. It can be expected that real-time monitoring of microsphere infusion and post-procedural imaging will result in better predictability and higher efficacy of the treatment. In this study, a novel microsphere formulation has been developed that can be visualized with fluoroscopy, X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The microspheres were prepared with the JetCutter technique and consist of alginate (matrix-forming polymer), holmium (cross-linking and MRI contrast agent), lipiodol (radiopaque contrast agent) and Pluronic F-68 (surfactant). The mean size (±SEM) of the hydrated holmium-lipiodol-alginate microspheres (Ho-lip-ams) was 570±12 μm with a holmium content of 0.38±0.01% (w/w). Stability studies showed that the microspheres remained intact during incubation for two weeks in fetal calf serum (FCS) at 37 °C. The inclusion of lipiodol in the microspheres rendered excellent visualization capabilities for fluoroscopy and CT, whereas the holmium ions, which keep the alginate network together, also allow MR imaging. In this study it was shown that single sphere detection was possible by fluoroscopy, CT and MRI. The Ho-lip-ams were visualized in real-time, during infusion in a porcine kidney using fluoroscopy, and post-procedural, the deposition of the microspheres was examined with fluoroscopy, (cone beam rotational) CT and MRI. The different imaging modalities showed similar deposition patterns of the microspheres within the organ. The combination of intra-procedural visualization, multimodality imaging for patient follow-up and the

  10. Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate and Iatrogenic Arteriovenous Fistula Treated by Superselective Arterial Embolization.

    PubMed

    Asimakopoulos, Anastasios D; Dutto, Lorenzo; Preziosi, Paolo; Spera, Enrico; Micali, Francesco; De Carolis, Andrea; Iorio, Beniamino

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic pelvic pseudoaneurysm with concomitant arteriovenous fistula has been described as a rare and challenging complication, which may occur during transurethral resection of the prostate. We provide the first report of this complication after holmium laser enucleation of the prostate for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The attempt to control the bleeding by conversion to open surgery and placement of haemostatic stitches into the prostatic fossa failed. Angiography with superselective arterial embolization proved to be a modern, quick, safe, and efficient treatment of this uncommon complication. PMID:27022498

  11. Evaluation of holmium laser versus cold knife in optical internal urethrotomy for the management of short segment urethral stricture

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sudhir Kumar; Kaza, Ram Chandra Murthy; Singh, Bipin Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Sachse cold knife is conventionally used for optical internal urethrotomy intended to manage urethral strictures and Ho: YAG laser is an alternative to it. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of urethral stricture treatment outcomes, efficacy, and complications using cold knife and Ho: YAG (Holmium laser) for optical internal urethrotomy Materials and Methods: In this prospective study included, 90 male patients age >18 years, with diagnosis of urethral stricture admitted for internal optical urethrotomy during April 2010 to March 2012. The patients were randomized into two groups containing 45 patients each using computer generated random number. In group A (Holmium group), internal urethrotomy was done with Holmium laser and in group B (Cold knife group) Sachse cold knife was used. Patients were followed up for 6 months after surgery in Out Patient Department on 15, 30 and 180 post-operative days. At each follow up visit physical examination, and uroflowmetry was performed along with noting complaints, if any. Results: The peak flow rates (PFR) were compared between the two groups on each follow up. At 180 days (6 month interval) the difference between mean of PFR for Holmium and Cold knife group was statistically highly significant (P < 0.001). Complications were seen in 12.22% of cases. Conclusion: Both modalities are effective in providing immediate relief to patients with single and short segment (<2 cm long) urethral strictures but more sustained response was attained with Cold knife urethrotomy. PMID:25371611

  12. Holmium:YAG laser: effects of various treatments on root surface topography and acid resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Raleigh A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1996-04-01

    The effects of Holmium:YAG laser energy with and without a topical fluoride mixture (resin to NaF) was compared with two types of topical fluorides on surface topography and resistance to acid destruction of root surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the effects of the selected treatments on surface topography before acid exposure. Toluidine blue dye was used to test the permeability of root surfaces after acid exposures. SEM examinations of the dentinal root surfaces showed consistently smooth surfaces with tubule closures when using topical resin to fluoride and HO:YAG laser treatment; in contrast, HO:YAG laser energy treatment alone exhibited increased roughness of root surfaces. Topical fluoride applications alone presented surfaces similar to untreated control sites. Toluidine blue dye penetration into root surfaces of the fluoride/laser-treated root surfaces showed significantly less dye penetration after acid exposures than controls and other treatment protocols. The results of this study indicate that the resin-fluoride application and holmium:YAG irradiation effectively produced increased smoothness and increased resistance to destruction of root surfaces in human extracted teeth under these in vitro conditions.

  13. Histologic comparison of needle, holmium:YAG, and erbium:YAG endoscopic goniotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Karen M.; Shen, Jin-Hui; Rivera, Brian K.; Hernandez, Eleut; Shetlar, Debra J.

    1995-05-01

    An endoscope allows visualization of the anterior chamber angle in porcine eyes despite the presence of cloudy corneas. The pectinate ligaments in the anterior chamber angle are a surgical model for primary infantile glaucoma. This study investigated the histologic results, one month after treating the anterior chamber angle with a goniotomy needle, the holmium:YAG laser, or the erbium:YAG laser coupled to a small endoscope. The anterior chambers were deepened with a viscoelastic material in one-month-old anesthetized pigs. An Olympus 0.8 mm diameter flexible endoscope was externally coupled to a 23 gauge needle or a 300 micron diameter fiber. The angle was treated for 120 degrees by one of the three methods, and the probe was removed. During the acute study, all three methods cut the pectinate ligaments. The histologic findings one month after healing demonstrated minimal surrounding tissue damage following goniotomy with a needle and the most surrounding tissue damage following treatment with the holmium:YAG laser.

  14. Treatment of Parapelvic Cyst by Internal Drainage Technology Using Ureteroscope and Holmium Laser

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Q; Huang, S; Li, Q; Xu, L; Wei, X; Huang, S; Li, S; Liu, Z

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The aim of parapelvic cyst treatment is to have complete drainage of cyst fluid and prevent its further compression of the kidney and collective system. This study explores the efficacy and safety of surgical approaches with holmium laser ureteroscopic internal drainage in the treatment of parapelvic cyst. Methods: The compression effect of parapelvic cyst on the renal collective system was observed by rigid ureteroscope using retrograde ureteroscopic technology. With direct vision, the cyst wall on the obvious parapelvic compression site was cut. The diameter of the cyst wall cut was about 1 cm. The internal drainage was obtained by double-J tubes. When the cyst was in the inferior pole of kidney or where the rigid ureteroscope could not reach, a flexible ureteroscope was used. Results: In 28 cases of operation, 27 cases were successful. The cyst treatment time was eight to 40 minutes (average 26 minutes). During the operation, no massive haemorrhage, damage of nearby organ and ureter, or other complications happened. Time of follow-up was 10–72 months (average 39 months). The results of follow-up showed that in 22 cases, the cyst disappeared; the diameter of the cyst in four cases was reduced by more than half, and one case recurred. Conclusion: The treatment of parapelvic cyst by internal drainage operation using holmium laser and ureteroscopy was effective. The operation was safe with few complications. PMID:26426175

  15. Posterior Urethral Polyp: First Holmium-YAG Laser Ablation on a 3-Month-Old Infant

    PubMed Central

    Keskin, Ercument; Yapanoglu, Turgut; Adanur, Senol; Ziypak, Tevfik; Altay, Mehmet Sefa; Aksoy, Yılmaz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Urethral polyps are rare benign pathologies seen in the male posterior urethra, more frequently originating from verumontanum. In this article, we aimed to discuss diagnosis and treatment of a urethral polyp causing hematuria and urinary infection in a 3-month-old male infant. This is the first case in the literature in which a urethral polyp is treated with Holmium yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) laser. Case Presentation: The patient was a 3-month-old male infant, and complains were hematuria and crying during micturition. Ultrasonography and voiding cystourethrogram were used for diagnosis. Urethral polyp was observed on urethrocystoscopy. Ablation was performed with a newborn cystoscope. Conclusion: Urethral polyp can cause hematuria and urinary obstruction and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pathologies such as posterior urethral valve and cecoureterocele that could cause infravesical obstruction. Holmium-YAG laser is a good choice of treatment with easy application possibilities using a newborn cystoscope, especially for newborns and infants who have thin urethra. PMID:27579428

  16. Silicates in Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirocky, M. M.; Levenson, N. A.; Elitzur, M.; Spoon, H. W. W.; Armus, L.

    2008-05-01

    We analyze the mid-infrared (MIR) spectra of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrograph. Dust emission dominates the MIR spectra of ULIRGs, and the reprocessed radiation that emerges is independent of the underlying heating spectrum. Instead, the resulting emission depends sensitively on the geometric distribution of the dust, which we diagnose with comparisons of numerical simulations of radiative transfer. Quantifying the silicate emission and absorption features that appear near 10 and 18 μm requires a reliable determination of the continuum, and we demonstrate that including a measurement of the continuum at intermediate wavelength (between the features) produces accurate results at all optical depths. With high-quality spectra, we successfully use the silicate features to constrain the dust chemistry. The observations of the ULIRGs and local sight lines require dust that has a relatively high 18 μm/10 μm absorption ratio of the silicate features (around 0.5). Specifically, the cold dust of Ossenkopf et al. is consistent with the observations, while other dust models are not. We use the silicate feature strengths to identify two families of ULIRGs, in which the dust distributions are fundamentally different. Optical spectral classifications are related to these families. In ULIRGs that harbor an active galactic nucleus, the spectrally broad lines are detected only when the nuclear surroundings are clumpy. In contrast, the sources of lower ionization optical spectra are deeply embedded in smooth distributions of optically thick dust.

  17. Amended Silicated for Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect

    James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

    2006-12-31

    Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where fly

  18. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  19. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  20. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  1. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  2. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  3. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  4. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  5. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  6. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  7. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  8. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  9. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  10. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  11. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  12. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  13. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  14. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  15. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  16. Modifying Silicates for Better Dispersion in Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi

    2005-01-01

    An improved chemical modification has been developed to enhance the dispersion of layered silicate particles in the formulation of a polymer/silicate nanocomposite material. The modification involves, among other things, the co-exchange of an alkyl ammonium ion and a monoprotonated diamine with interlayer cations of the silicate. The net overall effects of the improved chemical modification are to improve processability of the nanocomposite and maximize the benefits of dispersing the silicate particles into the polymer. Some background discussion is necessary to give meaning to a description of this development. Polymer/silicate nanocomposites are also denoted polymer/clay composites because the silicate particles in them are typically derived from clay particles. Particles of clay comprise layers of silicate platelets separated by gaps called "galleries." The platelet thickness is 1 nm. The length varies from 30 nm to 1 m, depending on the silicate. In order to fully realize the benefits of polymer/silicate nanocomposites, it is necessary to ensure that the platelets become dispersed in the polymer matrices. Proper dispersion can impart physical and chemical properties that make nanocomposites attractive for a variety of applications. In order to achieve nanometer-level dispersion of a layered silicate into a polymer matrix, it is typically necessary to modify the interlayer silicate surfaces by attaching organic functional groups. This modification can be achieved easily by ion exchange between the interlayer metal cations found naturally in the silicate and protonated organic cations - typically protonated amines. Long-chain alkyl ammonium ions are commonly chosen as the ion-exchange materials because they effectively lower the surface energies of the silicates and ease the incorporation of organic monomers or polymers into the silicate galleries. This completes the background discussion. In the present improved modification of the interlayer silicate surfaces

  17. Silicate condensation in Mira variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gail, Hans-Peter; Scholz, Michael; Pucci, Annemarie

    2016-06-01

    Context. The formation of dust in winds of cool and highly evolved stars and the rate of injection of dust into the interstellar medium is not yet completely understood, despite the importance of the process for the evolution of stars and galaxies. This holds in particular for oxygen-rich stars, where it is still not known which process is responsible for the formation of the necessary seed particles of their silicate dust. Aims: We study whether the condensation of silicate dust in Mira envelopes could be caused by cluster formation by the abundant SiO molecules. Methods: We solve the dust nucleation and growth equations in the co-moving frame of a fixed mass element for a simplified model of the pulsational motions of matter in the outer layers of a Mira variable, which is guided by a numerical model for Mira pulsations. It is assumed that seed particles form through the clustering of SiO. The calculation of the nucleation rate is based on published experimental data. The quantity of dust formed is calculated via a moment method and the calculation of radiation pressure on dusty gas is based on a dirty silicate model. Results: Dust nucleation occurs in the model at the upper culmination of the trajectory of a gas parcel where it stays for a considerable time at low temperatures. Subsequent dust growth occurs during the descending part of the motion and continues after the next shock reversed motion. It is found that sufficient dust forms that radiation pressure exceeds the gravitational pull of the stars such that the mass element is finally driven out of the star. Conclusions: Nucleation of dust particles by clustering of the abundant SiO molecules could be the mechanism that triggers silicate dust formation in Miras.

  18. Microscopic analysis of laser-induced proximal fiber tip damage during holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-04-01

    The thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being studied as an alternative to the standard holmium:YAG laser for lithotripsy. The TFL beam originates within an 18-μm-core thulium-doped silica fiber, and its near single mode, Gaussian beam profile enables transmission of higher laser power through smaller (e.g., 50- to 150-μm core) fibers than possible during holmium laser lithotripsy. This study examines whether the more uniform TFL beam profile also reduces proximal fiber tip damage compared with the holmium laser multimodal beam. Light and confocal microscopy images were taken of the proximal surface of each fiber to inspect for possible laser-induced damage. A TFL beam at a wavelength of 1908 nm was coupled into 105-μm-core silica fibers, with 35-mJ energy, and 500-μs pulse duration, and 100,000 pulses were delivered at each pulse rate setting of 50, 100, 200, 300, and 400 Hz. For comparison, single use, 270-μm-core fibers were collected after clinical holmium laser lithotripsy procedures performed with standard settings (600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz). Total laser energy, number of laser pulses, and laser irradiation time were recorded, and fibers were rated for damage. For TFL studies, output pulse energy and average power were stable, and no proximal fiber damage was observed at settings up to 35 mJ, 400 Hz, and 14 W average power (n=5). In contrast, confocal microscopy images of fiber tips after holmium lithotripsy showed proximal fiber tip degradation, indicated by small ablation craters on the scale of several micrometers in all fibers (n=20). In summary, the proximal fiber tip of a 105-μm-core fiber transmitted up to 14 W of TFL power without degradation, compared to degradation of 270-μm-core fibers after transmission of 3.6 W of holmium laser power. The smaller and more uniform TFL beam profile may improve fiber lifetime, and potentially translate into lower costs for the surgical disposables as well.

  19. Use of the holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser for treatment of superficial bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D E

    1994-01-01

    This is the first North American report describing the use of the holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser to treat patients with superficial bladder carcinoma. Fifteen patients, with a total of 52 recurrent superficial bladder tumors, underwent endoscopic laser photoablation of their lesions. No intraoperative or delayed complications occurred. At follow-up cystoscopy performed 3 months after lasing, four patients (27%) were without disease; eight patients (53%) had out-of-field recurrences; and three patients (20%) were classified as having in-field recurrences. We conclude that using the Ho:YAG for endoscopic treatment of patients with superficial bladder tumors is both feasible and clinically useful and that the lack of perceived pain or discomfort during lasing, as well as the lack of need for an in-dwelling urethral catheter, makes it advantageous for selected patients over conventional electroresection techniques.

  20. Operation of the nose using Nd-YAG and holmium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukwa, Andrzej; Tulibacki, Marek P.; Zajac, Andrzej; Dudziec, Katarzyna

    2000-06-01

    During more than 5 years Nd:YAG and Holmium laser has been used in our ENT Department for the treatment of varies pathological changes. Most of our cases were previously treated many times because of recurrences of the nasal polyps. As a rule the treatment was given in one to three sessions. Each patient was very closely monitored. The time period between the session was 2-4 weeks. The consequent application of laser was dependent on healing process. All adults' patients were treated in local anesthesia using 1,5 percent of Cocaine and 10 percent Xylocaine applied in a spray; no other anesthetics were needed, although in some patients 10 mg Valium was administered before first session of laser application. We do not observe a severe bleeding needed sponge or a nose package. Among advantages we have to concentrate on two: the recurrences of nasal polyps are definitely much rare and patient may appear at work at the same day.

  1. Application of 2-um wavelength holmium lasers for treatment of skin diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, Ivan A.; Klimov, Igor V.; Tsvetkov, Vladimir B.; Nerobeev, Alexander I.; Sadovnikova, Lija B.; Eliseenko, Vladimir I.

    1994-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental analysis of the efficiency of application of 2 micrometers pulsed holmium laser for cosmetic and plastic surgery and dermatology is carried out. Preliminary experiments were carried out on rats. Solid state 2 micrometers pulsed laser was allowed to operate in free running mode with pulse energy up to 1.5 J and pulse repetition rate up to 5 Hz. To deliver emission to the object a flexible quartz fiber without further focusing of 2.5 m in length and 400 micrometers of the core diameter was used. The effect of the different power density emission on the skin was studied. The second stage was the study of the influence of 2 micrometers emission on human skin. The results of the removal of hemangioma, papilloma, telangiectasia, nevus, nevus acantholytic, xanthelasma palpebral, verruca, chloasma, pigmental spots, tattoos, etc. are presented. Precision, simplicity, efficiency, and the high cosmetic effect of these operations is noted.

  2. Magnetization process in holmium: easy axis spin reorientation induced by the magnetostrictive basal plane distortion.

    PubMed

    Benito, L; Ciria, M; de la Fuente, C; Arnaudas, J I; Ward, R C C; Wells, M R

    2005-06-10

    We report on the change of the easy axis direction in holmium, from the a to the b axis, under the application of a magnetic field in the basal plane. This spin reorientation is observed by measuring the magnetic torque in Ho(n)/Lu(15) superlattices (n and 15 are the number of atomic planes in the Ho and Lu blocks). We also observe that, at the field H0 and temperature at which the reorientation occurs, both axes are easy directions. Based on the fact that the field H0 depends on n in the same way as the field-induced magnetoelastic distortion does, we propose that this spin reorientation originates from the strong field-induced magnetoelastic deformation within the basal plane. The modulation of the alpha strains with sixfold symmetry originates a 12-fold term in the magnetic anisotropy energy.

  3. Holmium-doped fluorotellurite microstructured fibers for 2.1 μm lasing.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chuanfei; He, Chunfeng; Jia, Zhixu; Wang, Shunbin; Qin, Guanshi; Ohishi, Yasutake; Qin, Weiping

    2015-10-15

    Holmium (Ho3+)-doped fluorotellurite microstructured fibers based on TeO2-BaF2-Y2O3 glasses are fabricated by using a rod-in-tube method. By using a 1.992 μm fiber laser as the pump source, lasing at 2.077 μm is obtained from a 27 cm long Ho3+-doped fluorotellurite microstructured fiber. The maximum unsaturated power is about 161 mW and the corresponding slope efficiency is up to 67.4%. The influence of fiber length on lasing at 2.1 μm is also investigated. Our results show that Ho3+-doped fluorotellurite microstructured fibers are promising gain media for 2.1 μm laser applications.

  4. High power operation of cladding pumped holmium-doped silica fibre lasers.

    PubMed

    Hemming, Alexander; Bennetts, Shayne; Simakov, Nikita; Davidson, Alan; Haub, John; Carter, Adrian

    2013-02-25

    We report the highest power operation of a resonantly cladding-pumped, holmium-doped silica fibre laser. The cladding pumped all-glass fibre utilises a fluorine doped glass layer to provide low loss cladding guidance of the 1.95 µm pump radiation. The operation of both single mode and large-mode area fibre lasers was demonstrated, with up to 140 W of output power achieved. A slope efficiency of 59% versus launched pump power was demonstrated. The free running emission was measured to be 2.12-2.15 µm demonstrating the potential of this architecture to address the long wavelength operation of silica based fibre lasers with high efficiency.

  5. Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate in a 400 cc Prostate: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Matthew K.H.; Pham, Trung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The modality of choice in the surgical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia for large prostates has traditionally been open prostatectomy. Advances in minimally invasive techniques have begun to challenge this notion with advantages such as lower bleeding and transfusion rates and shorter hospital stay. In this case report, we illustrate the use of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) in a gland measuring more than 400 cc. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man with persistent voiding urinary symptoms despite two previous transurethral resections of his prostate. With greater experience in HoLEP and declining experience in open prostatectomy, there may be a shift toward HoLEP as the preferred treatment choice for large prostate glands. PMID:27579406

  6. Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate in a 400 cc Prostate: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gopee, Esha L; Hong, Matthew K H; Pham, Trung

    2016-01-01

    The modality of choice in the surgical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia for large prostates has traditionally been open prostatectomy. Advances in minimally invasive techniques have begun to challenge this notion with advantages such as lower bleeding and transfusion rates and shorter hospital stay. In this case report, we illustrate the use of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) in a gland measuring more than 400 cc. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man with persistent voiding urinary symptoms despite two previous transurethral resections of his prostate. With greater experience in HoLEP and declining experience in open prostatectomy, there may be a shift toward HoLEP as the preferred treatment choice for large prostate glands. PMID:27579406

  7. Acute and chronic response of meniscal fibrocartilage to holmium:YAG laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, Patrick J.; Popovic, Neven A.; Islinger, Richard B.; Kuklo, Timothy R.; Dick, Edward J.

    1997-05-01

    The acute and chronic (10 week) histological effects of the holmium:YAG laser during partial meniscectomy in an in vivo rabbit model were investigated. Twenty-four adult male New Zealand rabbits underwent bilateral parapatellar medial knee arthrotomies. In the right knee, a partial medial meniscectomy was done through the avascular zone using a standard surgical blade. In the left knee, an anatomically similar partial medial meniscectomy was performed using a Ho:YAG laser (Coherent, USA). This study indicates that the laser creates two zones of damage in the meniscal fibrocartilage and that the zone of thermal change may act as a barrier to healing. The zone of thermal change which is eventually debrided was thought at the time of surgery to be viable. In the laser cut menisci, the synovium appears to have greater inflammation early and to be equivalent with the scalpel cut after three weeks. At all time periods there appeared more cellular damage in the laser specimens.

  8. Percutaneous Transhepatic Endoscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy for Intrahepatic and Choledochal Biliary Stones

    SciTech Connect

    Rimon, Uri; Kleinmann, Nir; Bensaid, Paul; Golan, Gil; Garniek, Alexander; Khaitovich, Boris; Winkler, Harry

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To report our approach for treating complicated biliary calculi by percutaneous transhepatic endoscopic biliary holmium laser lithotripsy (PTBL). Patients and Methods: Twenty-two symptomatic patients (11 men and 11 women, age range 51 to 88 years) with intrahepatic or common bile duct calculi underwent PTBL. Nine patients had undergone previous gastrectomy and small-bowel anastomosis, thus precluding endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. In the other 13 patients, stone removal attempts by ERCP failed due to failed access or very large calculi. We used a 7.5F flexible ureteroscope and a 200-{mu}m holmium laser fiber by way of a percutaneous transhepatic tract, with graded fluoroscopy, to fragment the calculi with direct vision. Balloon dilatation was added when a stricture was seen. The procedure was performed with the patient under general anaesthesia. A biliary drainage tube was left at the end of the procedure. Results: All stones were completely fragmented and flushed into the small bowel under direct vision except for one patient in whom the procedure was aborted. In 18 patients, 1 session sufficed, and in 3 patients, 2 sessions were needed. In 7 patients, balloon dilatation was performed for benign stricture after Whipple operation (n = 3), for choledochalenteric anastomosis (n = 3), and for recurrent cholangitis (n = 1). Adjunctive 'balloon push' (n = 4) and 'rendezvous' (n = 1) procedures were needed to completely clean the biliary tree. None of these patients needed surgery. Conclusion: Complicated or large biliary calculi can be treated successfully using PTBL. We suggest that this approach should become the first choice of treatment before laparoscopic or open surgery is considered.

  9. Efficacy of retrograde ureteropyeloscopic holmium laser lithotripsy for intrarenal calculi >2 cm.

    PubMed

    Bader, M J; Gratzke, C; Walther, S; Weidlich, P; Staehler, M; Seitz, M; Sroka, R; Reich, O; Stief, C G; Schlenker, B

    2010-10-01

    The objectives of this study are to assess the efficacy and safety of retrograde ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy for intrarenal calculi greater than 2 cm in diameter. A total of 24 patients with a stone burden >2 cm were treated with retrograde ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy. Primary study endpoints were number of treatments until the patient was stone free and perioperative complications with a follow-up of at least 3 months after intervention. In 24 patients (11 women and 13 men, 20-78 years of age), a total of 40 intrarenal calculi were treated with retrograde endoscopic procedures. At the time of the initial procedure, calculi had an average total linear diameter of 29.75 ± 1.57 mm and an average stone volume of 739.52 ± 82.12 mm(3). The mean number of procedures per patient was 1.7 ± 0.8 (range 1-3 procedures). The overall stone-free rate was 92%. After 1, 2 and 3 procedures 54, 79 and 92% of patients were stone free, respectively. There were no major complications. Minor postoperative complications included pyelonephritis in three cases (7.5%), of whom all responded immediately to parenteral antibiotics. In one patient the development of steinstrasse in the distal ureter required ureteroscopic fragment disruption and basketing. Ureteroscopy with holmium laser lithotripsy represents an efficient treatment option and allows the treatment of large intrarenal calculi of all compositions and throughout the whole collecting system even for patients with a stone burden of more than 2 cm size. PMID:20204341

  10. Correlation of thermal and mechanical effects of the holmium laser for various clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimbergen, Matthijs C. M.; Verdaasdonck, Rudolf M.; van Swol, Christiaan F. P.

    1998-05-01

    The Holmium laser has become established in orthopedic surgery and urology due to its unique combination of mechanical and thermal properties induced by explosive vapor bubbles. In a specialized setup, real-time high-speed and thermal images of dynamic vapor bubbles and thermal relaxation at a water tissue interface were obtained simultaneously. The thermal effects in the tissue model were correlated to the characteristics of the bubbles dependent on pulse energy (0.2 - 4 J), pulse repetition frequency (5 - 40 Hz), distance and angle of fiber delivery system (diameter 365 micrometer) to the tissue surface. Up to a fiber-to-tissue distance of 50% of the radius of the bubble, only a superficial tissue layer was heated. During bubble implosion, the tissue surface was attracted to the fiber, ripping of irregularities, and was effectively cooled by turbulence. In case of hard tissues, the bubble detached from the fiber imploding towards the hard surface. At closer distances (less than 50% of bubble radius), the tissue itself was vaporized resulting in mechanical damage and thermal relaxation into the tissue, especially above repetition rates of 5 Hz. There is a strong correlation between the path length of the free beam within the bubble and the degree of mechanical and thermal damage in the tissue directly irradiated by this beam. During clinical applications the surgeon should be aware of the size of the vapor bubble in relation to the distance and angle with the tissue for safe optimal use of the mechanical and thermal properties of the Holmium laser.

  11. Intracavitary Radiation Therapy for Recurrent Cystic Brain Tumors with Holmium-166-Chico : A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Eun Jin; Rhee, Chang Hun; Youn, Sang Min; Choi, Chang-Woon; Cheon, Gi Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Objective Intracavitary injection of beta-emitting radiation source for control of cystic tumors has been tried with a benefit of localized internal radiation. The authors treated cystic brain tumor patients with Holmium-166-chitosan complex (Ho-166-chico), composed of a beta-emitting radionuclide Holmium-166 and biodegradable chit polymer, and evaluated the safety and effective measurement for response. Methods Twenty-two patients with recurrent cystic brain tumor and/or located in a deep or eloquent area were enrolled in this pilot study. The cyst volume and wall thickness were determined on CT or MRI to assess radiological response. The activity of Ho-166-chico injected via Ommaya reservoir was prescribed to be 10-25 Gy to the cyst wall in a depth of 4 mm. Results There was neither complications related to systemic absorption nor leakage of Ho-166-chico in all 22 patients. But, two cases of oculomotor paresis were observed in patients with recurrent craniopharyngioma. Radiological response was seen in 14 of 20 available follow-up images (70%). Seven patients of 'evident' radiological response experienced more than 25% decrease of both cyst volume and wall thickness. Another 7 patients with 'suggestive' response showed decrease of cyst volume without definitive change of the wall thickness or vice versa. All patients with benign tumors or low grade gliomas experienced symptomatic improvement. Conclusion Ho-166-chico intracavitary radiation therapy for cystic tumor is a safe method of palliation without serious complications. The determination of both minimal effective dosage and time interval of repeated injection through phase 1 trial could improve the results in the future. PMID:24278644

  12. Holmium-loaded PLLA nanoparticles for intratumoral radiotherapy via the TMT technique: preparation, characterization, and stability evaluation after neutron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hamoudeh, Misara; Fessi, Hatem; Salim, Hani; Barbos, Dumitru

    2008-08-01

    This article describes the preparation of biocompatible radioactive holmium-loaded particles with appropriate nanoscale size for radionuclide intratumoral administration by the targeted multitherapy (TMT) technique. For this objective, holmium acetylacetonate has been encapsulated in poly-L-lactide (PLLA)-based nanoparticles (NP) by oil-in-water emulsion-solvent evaporation method. NP sizes ranged between 100 and 1,100 m being suitable for the TMT administration method. Elemental holmium loading was found to be around 18% wt/wt and the holmium acetylacetonate trihydrate (HoAcAc) encapsulation efficacy was about 90%. Different experiments demonstrated an amorphous state of HoAcAc after incorporation in NPs. The NPs were irradiated in a nuclear reactor with a neutron flux of 1.1 x 10(13) n/cm(2)/s for 1 h, which yielded a specific activity of about 27.4 GBq/g of NPs being sufficient for our desired application. Microscopic analysis of irradiated NPs showed some alteration after neutron irradiation as some NPs looked partially coagglomerated and a few pores appeared at their surface because of the locally released heat in the irradiation vials. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results indicated a clear decrease in PLLA melting point and melting enthalpy reflecting a decrease in polymer crystallinity. This was accompanied by a clear decrease in polymer molecular weights, which can be ascribed to a radiation-induced chain scission mechanism. However, interestingly, other experiments confirmed the chemical identity retention of both HoAcAc and PLLA in irradiated NPs despite this detected decrease in the polymer crystallinity and molecular weight. Although neutron irradiation has induced some NPs damage, these NPs kept out their overall chemical composition, and their size distribution remained suitable for the TMT administration technique. Coupled with the TMT technique, these NPs may represent a novel potential radiopharmaceutical agent for

  13. Holmium laser vs. conventional (cold knife) direct visual internal urethrotomy for short-segment bulbar urethral stricture: Outcome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jhanwar, Ankur; Kumar, Manoj; Sankhwar, Satya Narayan; Prakash, Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Our goal was to analyze the outcome between holmium laser and cold knife direct visual internal urethrotomy (DVIU) for short-segment bulbar urethral stricture. Methods: We conducted a prospective study comprised of 112 male patients seen from June 2013 to December 2014. Inclusion criterion was short-segment bulbar urethral stricture (≤1.5cm). Exclusion criteria were prior intervention/urethroplasty, pan-anterior urethral strictures, posterior stenosis, urinary tract infection, and those who lost to followup. Patients were divided into two groups; Group A (n=58) included cold knife DVIU and group B (n=54) included holmium laser endourethrotomy patients. Patient followup included uroflowmetry at postoperative Day 3, as well as at three months and six months. Results: Baseline demographics were comparable in both groups. A total of 107 patients met the inclusion criteria and five patients were excluded due to inadequate followup. Mean stricture length was 1.31 ± 0.252 cm (p=0.53) and 1.34 ± 0.251 cm in Groups A and B, respectively. Mean operating time in Group A was 16.3 ± 1.78 min and in Group B was 20.96 ± 2.23 min (p=0.0001). Five patients in Group A had bleeding after the procedure that was managed conservatively by applying perineal compression. Three patients in Group B had fluid extravasation postoperatively. Qmax (ml/s) was found to be statistically insignificant between the two groups at all followups. Conclusions: Both holmium laser and cold knife urethrotomy are safe and equally effective in treating short-segment bulbar urethral strictures in terms of outcome and complication rate. However, holmium laser requires more expertise and is a costly alternative. PMID:27790296

  14. Q-switching of a thulium-doped fibre laser using a holmium-doped fibre saturable absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Sadovnikova, Ya E; Kamynin, V A; Kurkov, A S; Medvedkov, O I; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A

    2014-01-31

    We have proposed and demonstrated a new passively Q-switched thulium-doped fibre laser configuration. A distinctive feature of this configuration is the use of a heavily holmium-doped fibre for Q-switching. Lasing was obtained at 1.96 μm, with a pulse energy of 3 μJ and pulse duration of 600 ns. The highest pulse repetition rate was 80 kHz. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  15. Cumulate Fragments in Silicic Ignimbrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, O.; Ellis, B. S.; Wolff, J.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, studies are concluding that silicic ignimbrites are the result of the amalgamation of multiple discrete magma batches. Yet the existence of discrete batches presents a conundrum for magma generation and storage; if silicic magma batches are not generated nearly in situ in the upper crust, they must traverse, and reside within, a thermally hostile environment with large temperature gradients, resulting in low survivability in their shallow magmatic hearths. The Snake River Plain (Idaho, USA) is a type example of this 'multi-batch' assembly with ignimbrites containing multiple populations of pyroxene crystals, glass shards, and crystal aggregates. The ubiquitous crystal aggregates hint at a mechanism to facilitate the existence of multiple, relatively small batches of rhyolite in the upper crust. These aggregates contain the same plagioclase, pyroxene, and oxide mineral compositions as single phenocrysts of the same minerals in their host rocks, but they have significantly less silicic bulk compositions and lack quartz and sanidine, which occur as single phenocrysts in the deposits. This implies significant crystallization followed by melt extraction from mushy reservoir margins. The extracted melt then continues to evolve (crystallizing sanidine and quartz) while the melt-depleted margins provide an increasingly rigid and refractory network segregating the crystal-poor batches of magma. The hot, refractory, margins insulate the crystal-poor lenses, allowing (1) extended residence in the upper crust, and (2) preservation of chemical heterogeneities among batches. In contrast, systems that produce cumulates richer in low-temperature phases (quartz, K-feldspars, and/or biotite) favour remelting upon recharge, leading to less segregation of eruptible melt pockets and the formation of gradationally zoned ignimbrites. The occurrence of similar crystal aggregates from a variety of magmatic lineages suggests the generality of this process.

  16. Characterization of holmium fibers with various concentrations for fiber laser applications around 2.1 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrecht, Jan; Peterka, Pavel; Honzatko, Pavel; Baravets, Yauhen; Jelinek, Michal; Kubecek, Vaclav; Pawliszewska, Maria; Sotor, Jaroslaw; Sobon, Grzegorz; Abramski, Krzysztof M.; Kasik, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present experimental results of characterization of the developed holmium-doped silica-based optical fibers with holmium ions concentrations in the range from 1000 to 10000 ppm. The fibers were fabricated by the modified chemical vapor deposition and solution doping method. They were characterized in terms of their spectral attenuation, refractive index profile, and especially performance in fiber laser. Simultaneously, two different fiber laser setups were tested. In the first one, holmium-doped fiber in Fabry-Perot configuration was pumping by in house developed thulium-doped fiber laser in ring arrangement. In the second one, bulk-optic pump-coupling configuration, consisted of a commercially available thulium fiber laser emitting at 1940 nm and system of lenses and mirrors was used. We have focused on comparison of laser output powers, slope efficiencies, and laser thresholds for individual holmiumdoped fiber in these different laser arrangements. Finally, the application of the developed fiber in subpicosecond fiber laser with graphene-based saturable absorber for mode-locking operation was investigated.

  17. Models for silicate melt viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, D.; Russell, K.; Moretti, R.; Mangiacapra, A.; Potuzak, M.; Romano, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2004-12-01

    The prediction of viscosity in silicate liquids, over the range of temperatures and compositions encountered in nature, remains one of the most challenging and elusive goals in Earth Sciences. Recent work has demonstrated that there are now sufficient experimental measurements of melt viscosity to create new viscosity models to replace previous Arrhenian models [1],[2] and extend the compositional range of more recent non-Arrhenian models [3]. Most recently, [4] have developed an empirical strategy for accurately predicting viscosities over a very wide range of anhydrous silicate melt compositions (e.g., rhyolite to basanite). Future models that improve upon this work, will probably extend the composition range of the model to consider, at least, H2O and other volatile components and may utilize a compositional basis that reflects melt structure. In preparation for the next generation model, we explore the attributes of the three most common equations that could be used to model the non-Arrhenian viscosity of multicomponent silicate melts. The equations for the non-Arrhenian temperature dependence of viscosity (η ) include: a) Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT): log η = A + B/(T - C) b) Adam and Gibbs (AG): log η = A + B/[T log (T/C)], and c) Avramov (Av): log η = A + [B/T]α We use an experimental database of approximately 900 high-quality viscosity measurements on silicate melts to test the ability of each equation to capture the experimental data. These equations have different merits [5]. VFT is purely empirical in nature. The AG model has a quasi-theoretical basis that links macroscopic transport properties directly to thermodynamic properties via the configurational entropy. Lastly, the model proposed by Avramov adopts a form designed to relate the fit parameter (α ) to the fragility of the melt. [1] Shaw, H.R., 1972. Am J Science, 272, 438-475. [2] Bottinga Y. and Weill, D., 1972. Am J Science, 272, 438-475. [3] Hess, K.U. and Dingwell, D.B, 1996, Am Min, 81

  18. Basaltic injections into floored silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, R. A.

    Recent studies have provided compelling evidence that many large accumulations of silicic volcanic rocks erupted from long-lasting, floored chambers of silicic magma that were repeatedly injected by basaltic magma. These basaltic infusions are commonly thought to play an important role in the evolution of the silicic systems: they have been proposed as a cause for explosive silicic eruptions [Sparks and Sigurdsson, 1977], compositional variation in ash-flow sheets [Smith, 1979], mafic magmatic inclusions in silicic volcanic rocks [Bacon, 1986], and mixing of mafic and silicic magmas [Anderson, 1976; Eichelberger, 1978]. If, as seems likely, floored silicic magma chambers have frequently been invaded by basalt, then plutonic bodies should provide records of these events. Although plutonic evidence for mixing and commingling of mafic and silicic magmas has been recognized for many years, it has been established only recently that some intrusive complex originated through multiple basaltic injections into floored chambers of silicic magma [e.g., Wiebe, 1974; Michael, 1991; Chapman and Rhodes, 1992].

  19. Tailoring polymer properties with layered silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang

    Polymer layered silicate nanocomposites have found widespread applications in areas such as plastics, oil and gas production, biomedical, automotive and information storage, but their successful commercialization critically depends on consistent control over issues such as complete dispersion of layered silicate into the host polymer and optimal interaction between the layered silicates and the polymers. Polypropylene is a commercially important polymer but usually forms intercalated structures with organically modified layered silicate upon mixing, even it is pre-treated with compatibilizing agent such as maleic anhydride. In this work, layered silicate is well dispersed in ammonium modified polypropylene but does not provide sufficient reinforcement to the host polymer due to poor interactions. On the other hand, interactions between maleic anhydride modified polypropylene and layered silicate are fine tuned by using a small amount of maleic anhydride and mechanical strength of the resultant nanocomposites are significantly enhanced. In particular, the melt rheological properties of layered silicate nanocomposites with maleic anhydride functionalized polypropylene are contrasted to those based on ammonium-terminated polypropylene. While the maleic anhydride treated polypropylene based nanocomposites exhibit solid-like linear dynamic behavior, consistent with the formation of a long-lived percolated nanoparticle network, the single-end ammonium functionalized polypropylene based nanocomposites demonstrated liquid-like behavior at comparable montmorillonite concentrations. The differences in the linear viscoelasticity are attributed to the presence of bridging interaction in maleic anhydride functionalized nanocomposites, which facilitates formation of a long-lived silicate network mediated by physisorbed polymer chains. Further, the transient shear stress of the maleic anhydride functionalized nanocomposites in start-up of steady shear is a function of the shear

  20. Silicate Glass Corrosion Mechanism revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Thorsten; Lenting, Christoph; Dohmen, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the mechanism(s) of aqueous corrosion of nuclear waste borosilicate glasses is essential to predict their long-term aqueous durability in a geologic repository. Several observations have been made with compositionally different silicate glasses that cannot be explained by any of the established glass corrosion models. These models are based on diffusion-controlled ion exchange and subsequent structural reorganisation of a leached, hydrated residual glass, leaving behind a so-called gel layer. In fact, the common observation of lamellar to more complex pattern formation observed in experiment and nature, the porous structure of the corrosion layer, an atomically sharp boundary between the corrosion zone and the underlying pristine glass, as well as results of novel isotope tracer and in situ, real time experiments rather support an interface-coupled glass dissolution-silica reprecipitation model. In this model, the congruent dissolution of the glass is coupled in space and time to the precipitation and growth of amorphous silica at an inwardly moving reaction front. We suggest that these coupled processes have to be considered to realistically model the long-term performance of silicate glasses in aqueous environments.

  1. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2437 Magnesium silicate. (a) Product....

  2. Silicate minerals and the interferon system

    SciTech Connect

    Hahon, N.; Booth, J.A.

    1987-08-01

    Natural-occurring minerals representative of six silicate classes were examined for their influence on interferon induction by influenza virus in Rhesus monkey kidney (LLC-MK/sub 2/) cell monolayers. Minerals within the classes nesosilicate, sorosilicate, cyclosilicate, and inosilicate exhibited either little or marked (50% or greater) inhibition of interferon induction. Within the inosilicate class, however, minerals of the pyroxenoid group (wollastonite, pectolite, and rhodonite) all significantly showed a two- to threefold increase in interferon production. Silicate materials in the phyllosilicate and tectosilicate classes all showed inhibitory activity for the induction process. When silicate minerals were coated with the polymer poly(4-vinylpyridine-N-oxide), the inhibitory activity of silicates on viral interferon induction was counteracted. Of nine randomly selected silicate minerals, which inhibited viral interferon induction, none adversely affected the ability of exogenous interferon to confer antiviral cellular resistance. Increased levels of influenza virus multiplication concomitant with decreased levels of interferon occurred in cell monolayers pretreated with silicates. The findings of this study demonstrate the diverse effects of minerals representative of different silicate classes on the interferon system and indicate that certain silicates in comprising the viral interferon induction process may increase susceptibility to viral infection.

  3. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2227 Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium...

  4. Mesoporous Silicate Materials in Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Melde, Brian J.; Johnson, Brandy J.; Charles, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Mesoporous silicas, especially those exhibiting ordered pore systems and uniform pore diameters, have shown great potential for sensing applications in recent years. Morphological control grants them versatility in the method of deployment whether as bulk powders, monoliths, thin films, or embedded in coatings. High surface areas and pore sizes greater than 2 nm make them effective as adsorbent coatings for humidity sensors. The pore networks also provide the potential for immobilization of enzymes within the materials. Functionalization of materials by silane grafting or through co-condensation of silicate precursors can be used to provide mesoporous materials with a variety of fluorescent probes as well as surface properties that aid in selective detection of specific analytes. This review will illustrate how mesoporous silicas have been applied to sensing changes in relative humidity, changes in pH, metal cations, toxic industrial compounds, volatile organic compounds, small molecules and ions, nitroenergetic compounds, and biologically relevant molecules.

  5. Structure-directing and template roles of aromatic molecules in the self-assembly formation process of 3D holmium-succinate MOFs.

    PubMed

    Bernini, María C; Snejko, Natalia; Gutierrez-Puebla, Enrique; Brusau, Elena V; Narda, Griselda E; Monge, M Ángeles

    2011-07-01

    Two new holmium-succinate frameworks have been synthesized by hydrolysis in situ of the succinylsalicylic acid under different hydrothermal conditions. Compound 1, [Ho(2)(C(4)H(4)O(4))(3)(H(2)O)(2)]·0.33(C(7)H(6)O(3)), P ̅i space group, has a novel structure composed by 1D-SBUs consisting of [HoO(9)] chains of polyhedra linked by the succinate ligands giving a 3D framework. Compound 2, [Ho(2)(C(4)H(4)O(4))(3)(H(2)O)(2)], also belonging to the P ̅i space group, has a denser structure. The role of the in-situ-generated salicylic acid on formation of both structures is studied by means of a synthesis design methodology. A topological study of the new holmium succinate compounds in comparison with the previously reported 3D holmium-succinate framework is performed here.

  6. Changes in corneal collagen induced by holmium:YAG laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timberlake, George T.; Reinke, Martin H.; Miller, Alvin

    1996-05-01

    Holmium:YAG laser thermokeratoplasty corrects hyperopia (farsightedness) by producing small areas of corneal collagen shrinkage that cause the central cornea to bulge outward, increasing optical power. Collagen shrinkage is probably caused by laser-heated corneal water, but details of the shrinkage mechanism are not known. We investigated the shrinkage mechanism by measuring changes in corneal ultrastructure, surface shrinkage, water content, and strength following Ho:YAG laser exposures. Morphological changes in collagen were documented by measurements from electron micrographs. Corneal adhesive strength was determined by measuring tearing force in a plane parallel to the corneal surface. Laser-induced water loss was measured by weighing corneal samples before and after exposure. Corneal surface shrinkage was assessed by photographing the movement of particles on the cornea. Lasered collagen fibrils increased in diameter, lost their orderly arrangement, and appeared `frayed.' The corneal surface contracted toward lasered areas with a maximal shift of approximately 190 micrometers , more than could be explained by a model based on collagen fibril changes. Water loss plays a minor role in corneal shrinkage since corneal samples lost about only about 1.4% of their weight after massive laser exposure. Despite marked changes in collagen structure, corneal adhesive force was unchanged.

  7. Effectiveness and Safety of Ureteroscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy for Upper Urinary Tract Calculi in Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Takashi; Otsuki, Hideo; Uehara, Shinya; Shimizu, Toshihiro; Murao, Wataru; Fujio, Koji; Fujio, Kei; Wada, Koichiro; Araki, Motoo; Nasu, Yasutomo

    2016-06-01

    Upper urinary tract calculi are common; however, there is no recommended treatment selection for elderly patients. Ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy (URS lithotripsy) is minimally invasive, and it provides a high stone-free rate (SFR) treatment for upper urinary tract calculi. Here, we retrospectively evaluated the surgical outcomes of URS lithotripsy after dividing the 189 cases into 3 groups by patient age: the '<65 group' (<65 years old, n=108), the '65-74 group' (65-74 years old, n=42), and the ' 75 group' ( 75 years old, n=39). The patients' characteristics, stone status, and perioperative outcomes were assessed. The 65-74 group and the 75 group had a significantly higher prevalence of hypertension compared to the<65 group. Compared to the<65 group, the 65-74 group had a significantly higher prevalence of hyperlipidemia, and the 75 group had significantly higher the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores. Despite these preoperative risk factors, SFR and postoperative pyelonephritis in the 65-74 group and the 75 group were similar to those of the<65 group. In conclusion, URS lithotripsy is the preferred treatment for upper urinary tract calculi, even for elderly patients who have multiple preoperative risk factors. PMID:27339204

  8. Laboratory investigation of the efficacy of holmium:YAG laser irradiation in removing intracanal debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuebler-Moritz, Michael; Gutknecht, Norbert; Sailer, Hermann F.; Hering, Peter; Prettl, Wilhelm

    1997-05-01

    Current endodontic therapy involves debridement and disinfection of the root canal by means of mechanical instrumentation and chemical irrigation. However, several studies have shown that these techniques fail to achieve complete cleansing. Recently, lasers have been suggested for use within root canals. This study was conducted to determine the efficacy of Holmium:YAG laser irradiation in removing intracanal debris and smear layer. Root canal surfaces of freshly-extracted human teeth were exposed to pulsed Ho:YAG laser radiation. Subsequently, laser induced structural changes were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Temperature measurements during irradiation were performed by means of thermocouples. The result of this survey give a preliminary indication of the ability of the Ho:YAG laser to improve current endodontic treatment survey give a preliminary indication of the ability of the Ho:YAG laser to improve current endodontic treatment modalities. However, limitations exist with regard to circumscribed and well-quantified irradiation of root canal surfaces, due to the lack of perpendicular delivery of the laser beam. Additional studies will be required to develop suitable optical transmission systems, in order to achieve complete cleansing and to avoid damage to the periradicular tissues, respectively.

  9. Kidney stone ablation times and peak saline temperatures during Holmium:YAG and Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy, in vitro, in a ureteral model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-02-01

    Using a validated in vitro ureter model for laser lithotripsy, the performance of an experimental Thulium fiber laser (TFL) was studied and compared to clinical gold standard Holmium:YAG laser. The Holmium laser (λ = 2120 nm) was operated with standard parameters of 600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz, and 270-μm-core optical fiber. TFL (λ = 1908 nm) was operated with 35 mJ, 500 μs, 150-500 Hz, and 100-μm-core fiber. Urinary stones (60% calcium oxalate monohydrate / 40% calcium phosphate), of uniform mass and diameter (4-5 mm) were laser ablated with fibers through a flexible video-ureteroscope under saline irrigation with flow rates of 22.7 ml/min and 13.7 ml/min for the TFL and Holmium laser, respectively. The temperature 3 mm from tube's center and 1 mm above mesh sieve was measured by a thermocouple and recorded during experiments. Total laser and operation times were recorded once all stone fragments passed through a 1.5-mm sieve. Holmium laser time measured 167 +/- 41 s (n = 12). TFL times measured 111 +/- 49 s, 39 +/- 11 s, and 23 +/- 4 s, for pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz (n = 12 each). Mean peak saline irrigation temperatures reached 24 +/- 1 °C for Holmium, and 33 +/- 3 °C, 33 +/- 7 °C, and 39 +/- 6 °C, for TFL at pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz. To avoid thermal buildup and provide a sufficient safety margin, TFL lithotripsy should be performed with pulse rates below 500 Hz and/or increased saline irrigation rates. The TFL rapidly fragmented kidney stones due in part to its high pulse rate, high power density, high average power, and reduced stone retropulsion, and may provide a clinical alternative to the conventional Holmium laser for lithotripsy.

  10. Visible absorption spectra of the 4f electron transitions of neodymium, praseodymium, holmium and erbium complexes with fleroxacin and their analytical application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Naixing; Jiang, Wei; Xu, Xiuqin; Si, Zhikun; Bai, Haitao; Tian, Cong

    2002-05-01

    The absorption spectra of the 4f electron transitions of neodymium, praseodymium, holmium and erbium complexes with fleroxacin in the presence of cetylpyridinium chloride were studied by normal and derivative spectrophotometry. Their molar absorptivity at the maximum absorption bands are about 5.3 (at 571 nm) times greater for neodymium, 2.8 (at 483 nm) times greater for praseodymium, 12.6 (at 448.5 nm) times greater for holmium and 9.7 (at 519 nm) times greater for erbium than those in the absence of complexing agents. The second-derivative spectrum is used both to eliminate the interference from other rare earths and to improve the sensitivity. Beer's law is obeyed from 3.0 - 70 microg ml(-1) for neodymium and holmium, from 6.0 - 70 microg ml(-1) for erbium, and from 12.0 - 70 microg ml(-1) for praseodymium. The relative standard deviations are 1.9% and 1.5% for 7.5 microg ml(-1) of neodymium and holmium, and 2.1% and 1.6% for 15.0 microg ml(-1) of praseodymium and erbium, respectively. Their detection limits (signal-to-noise ratio = 2) are 3.2 microg ml(-1), 1.3 microg ml(-1), (1.1) microg ml(-1) and 2.5 microg ml(-1) for praseodymium, neodymium, holmium and erbium, respectively. A new system for the simultaneous determinations of the praseodymium, neodymium, holmium and erbium in rare earth mixtures with good accuracy and selectivity is proposed.

  11. Silicate Composition of the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogerty, S.; Forrest, W.; Watson, D. M.; Sargent, B. A.; Koch, I.

    2016-10-01

    The composition of silicate dust in the diffuse interstellar medium and in protoplanetary disks around young stars informs our understanding of the processing and evolution of the dust grains leading up to planet formation. An analysis of the well-known 9.7 μm feature indicates that small amorphous silicate grains represent a significant fraction of interstellar dust and are also major components of protoplanetary disks. However, this feature is typically modeled assuming amorphous silicate dust of olivine and pyroxene stoichiometries. Here, we analyze interstellar dust with models of silicate dust that include non-stoichiometric amorphous silicate grains. Modeling the optical depth along lines of sight toward the extinguished objects Cyg OB2 No. 12 and ζ Ophiuchi, we find evidence for interstellar amorphous silicate dust with stoichiometry intermediate between olivine and pyroxene, which we simply refer to as “polivene.” Finally, we compare these results to models of silicate emission from the Trapezium and protoplanetary disks in Taurus.

  12. Alkali Silicate Vehicle Forms Durable, Fireproof Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, John B.; Seindenberg, Benjamin

    1964-01-01

    The problem: To develop a paint for use on satellites or space vehicles that exhibits high resistance to cracking, peeling, or flaking when subjected to a wide range of temperatures. Organic coatings will partially meet the required specifications but have the inherent disadvantage of combustibility. Alkali-silicate binders, used in some industrial coatings and adhesives, show evidence of forming a fireproof paint, but the problem of high surface-tension, a characteristic of alkali silicates, has not been resolved. The solution: Use of a suitable non-ionic wetting agent combined with a paint incorporating alkali silicate as the binder.

  13. Silicate mineralogy of martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papike, J. J.; Karner, J. M.; Shearer, C. K.; Burger, P. V.

    2009-12-01

    Basalts and basaltic cumulates from Mars (delivered to Earth as meteorites) carry a record of the history of that planet - from accretion to initial differentiation and subsequent volcanism, up to recent times. We provide new microprobe data for plagioclase, olivine, and pyroxene from 19 of the martian meteorites that are representative of the six types of martian rocks. We also provide a comprehensive WDS map dataset for each sample studied, collected at a common magnification for easy comparison of composition and texture. The silicate data shows that plagioclase from each of the rock types shares similar trends in Ca-Na-K, and that K 2O/Na 2O wt% of plagioclase multiplied by the Al content of the bulk rock can be used to determine whether a rock is "enriched" or "depleted" in nature. Olivine data show that meteorite Y 980459 is a primitive melt from the martian mantle as its olivine crystals are in equilibrium with its bulk rock composition; all other olivine-bearing Shergottites have been affected by fractional crystallization. Pyroxene quadrilateral compositions can be used to isolate the type of melt from which the grains crystallized, and minor element concentrations in pyroxene can lend insight into parent melt compositions. In a comparative planetary mineralogy context, plagioclase from Mars is richer in Na than terrestrial and lunar plagioclase. The two most important factors contributing to this are the low activity of Al in martian melts and the resulting delayed nucleation of plagioclase in the crystallizing rock. Olivine from martian rocks shows distinct trends in Ni-Co and Cr systematics compared with olivine from Earth and Moon. The trends are due to several factors including oxygen fugacity, melt compositions and melt structures, properties which show variability among the planets. Finally, Fe-Mn ratios in both olivine and pyroxene can be used as a fingerprint of planetary parentage, where minerals show distinct planetary trends that may have been

  14. Bipolar, Monopolar, Photovaporization of the Prostate, or Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate: How to Choose What's Best?

    PubMed

    Cornu, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-08-01

    Endoscopic management of benign prostatic obstruction is based on resection, vaporization, or enucleation. Enucleation provides the best efficacy and long-term outcome. Lasers have advantages in patients at high risk of bleeding. Holmium enucleation is the best evaluated technique, but has a steep learning curve. Greenlight photovaporization is a safe alternative to transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) in prostates of less than 100 mL, especially in patients at high risk of bleeding. Bipolar devices can be used for resection, vaporization, and enucleation and provides efficacy results similar to TURP in the short term with better safety. PMID:27476130

  15. Hybrid method of transurethral resection of ejaculatory ducts using holmium:yttriumaluminium garnet laser on complete ejaculatory duct obstruction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Yong; Diaz, Richilda Red; Choi, Young Deuk; Cho, Kang Su

    2013-07-01

    A 32-year old single man presented with azoospermia and low semen volume which was noted one and half a year ago. Transrectal ultrasonography and seminal vesiculography were performed to evaluate ejaculatory duct obstruction, and transurethral resection of the ejaculatory duct was performed using a hybrid technique of holmium:yttriumaluminium garnet laser with monopolar transurethral resection to overcome the narrow prostatic urethra. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the successful outcome of a hybrid technique applied for transurethral resection of the ejaculatory duct.

  16. Redox Processes in Silicate Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicconi, M. R.; de Ligny, D.

    2015-12-01

    Studies into the redox state of magmas provide important constrains on the formation and evolution of planetary bodies Indeed, oxygen fugacity is a key parameter in controlling the physical and chemical properties of melts and therefore it determine the possible interactions between reservoirs within the mantle and between the mantle and surface. It follows that redox mechanisms play a key role in determining the dynamics of the (inner and outer) terrestrial planets. The redox conditions that have accompanied basalt evolution on planetary bodies are known to be different, albeit with some similarities. The strongly reducing environments of the moon and meteorites have led to significant reduced mineralogical assemblages, whereas analogous terrestrial materials predominantly contain the corresponding oxidized compounds. Important geochemical elements such as Fe, Cr, V, Ce and Eu, exist in magmatic systems with different valences and coordination geometries, and the key subjects which need to be understood are: factors influencing redox mechanisms, and the effect on mineral assemblage, element partitioning, mass transfers processes and rheology of the melts. Examples on the study of Ce, Eu and Fe in silicate glasses/melts and on the parameters influencing their oxidation states will be provided.

  17. Highly silicic compositions on the Moon.

    PubMed

    Glotch, Timothy D; Lucey, Paul G; Bandfield, Joshua L; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Thomas, Ian R; Elphic, Richard C; Bowles, Neil; Wyatt, Michael B; Allen, Carlton C; Donaldson Hanna, Kerri; Paige, David A

    2010-09-17

    Using data from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment, we show that four regions of the Moon previously described as "red spots" exhibit mid-infrared spectra best explained by quartz, silica-rich glass, or alkali feldspar. These lithologies are consistent with evolved rocks similar to lunar granites in the Apollo samples. The spectral character of these spots is distinct from surrounding mare and highlands material and from regions composed of pure plagioclase feldspar. The variety of landforms associated with the silicic spectral character suggests that both extrusive and intrusive silicic magmatism occurred on the Moon. Basaltic underplating is the preferred mechanism for silicic magma generation, leading to the formation of extrusive landforms. This mechanism or silicate liquid immiscibility could lead to the formation of intrusive bodies.

  18. Magnesium silicates adsorbents of organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesielczyk, Filip; Krysztafkiewicz, Andrzej; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2007-08-01

    Studies were presented on production of highly dispersed magnesium silicate at a pilote scale. The process of silicate adsorbent production involved precipitation reaction using water glass (sodium metasilicate) solution and appropriate magnesium salt, preceded by an appropriate optimization stage. Samples of best physicochemical parameters were in addition modified (in order to introduce to silica surface of several functional groups) using the dry technique and various amounts of 3-isocyanatepropyltrimethoxysilane, 3-thiocyanatepropyltrimethoxysilane, N-phenyl-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane. The so prepared samples were subjected to a comprehensive physicochemical analysis. At the terminal stage of studies attempts were made to adsorb phenol from its aqueous solutions on the surface of unmodified and modified magnesium silicates. Particle size distributions were determined using the ZetaSizer Nano ZS apparatus. In order to define adsorptive properties of studied magnesium silicates isotherms of nitrogen adsorption/desorption on their surfaces were established. Efficiency of phenol adsorption was tested employing analysis of post-adsorption solution.

  19. Highly silicic compositions on the Moon.

    PubMed

    Glotch, Timothy D; Lucey, Paul G; Bandfield, Joshua L; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Thomas, Ian R; Elphic, Richard C; Bowles, Neil; Wyatt, Michael B; Allen, Carlton C; Donaldson Hanna, Kerri; Paige, David A

    2010-09-17

    Using data from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment, we show that four regions of the Moon previously described as "red spots" exhibit mid-infrared spectra best explained by quartz, silica-rich glass, or alkali feldspar. These lithologies are consistent with evolved rocks similar to lunar granites in the Apollo samples. The spectral character of these spots is distinct from surrounding mare and highlands material and from regions composed of pure plagioclase feldspar. The variety of landforms associated with the silicic spectral character suggests that both extrusive and intrusive silicic magmatism occurred on the Moon. Basaltic underplating is the preferred mechanism for silicic magma generation, leading to the formation of extrusive landforms. This mechanism or silicate liquid immiscibility could lead to the formation of intrusive bodies. PMID:20847267

  20. Influence of Silicate Melt Composition on Metal/Silicate Partitioning of W, Ge, Ga and Ni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singletary, S. J.; Domanik, K.; Drake, M. J.

    2005-01-01

    The depletion of the siderophile elements in the Earth's upper mantle relative to the chondritic meteorites is a geochemical imprint of core segregation. Therefore, metal/silicate partition coefficients (Dm/s) for siderophile elements are essential to investigations of core formation when used in conjunction with the pattern of elemental abundances in the Earth's mantle. The partitioning of siderophile elements is controlled by temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and by the compositions of the metal and silicate phases. Several recent studies have shown the importance of silicate melt composition on the partitioning of siderophile elements between silicate and metallic liquids. It has been demonstrated that many elements display increased solubility in less polymerized (mafic) melts. However, the importance of silicate melt composition was believed to be minor compared to the influence of oxygen fugacity until studies showed that melt composition is an important factor at high pressures and temperatures. It was found that melt composition is also important for partitioning of high valency siderophile elements. Atmospheric experiments were conducted, varying only silicate melt composition, to assess the importance of silicate melt composition for the partitioning of W, Co and Ga and found that the valence of the dissolving species plays an important role in determining the effect of composition on solubility. In this study, we extend the data set to higher pressures and investigate the role of silicate melt composition on the partitioning of the siderophile elements W, Ge, Ga and Ni between metallic and silicate liquid.

  1. Results of a retrospective single institution analysis of targeted skeletal radiotherapy with (166)Holmium-DOTMP as conditioning regimen for autologous stem cell transplant for patients with multiple myeloma. Impact on transplant outcomes.

    PubMed

    Christoforidou, Anna V; Saliba, Rima M; Williams, Patricia; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Roden, Linda; Aleman, Ana; Weber, Donna; Mendoza, Floralyn; Podoloff, Donald; Wendt, Richard; Breitz, Hazel; Alexanian, Raymond; Champlin, Richard; Giralt, Sergio

    2007-05-01

    (166)Holmium-DOTMP is a beta-emitting radiophosphonate that localizes specifically to the bone surfaces and can deliver high-dose radiation to the bone marrow. Phase I/II trials showed feasibility and tolerability when combined with high-dose melphalan with or without total-body irradiation (TBI) in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). The purpose of this study was to define the potential impact of (166)Holmium-DOTMP on outcomes in patients with MM undergoing ASCT. Retrospective review of transplant outcomes among patients with MM who received an ASCT between January 1998 to December 2001 with either melphalan 200 mg/m(2) or a (166)Holmium-DOTMP containing regimen as part of their initial therapy. Univariate analysis was performed for response, overall survival (OS), and event free survival (EFS). One hundred four patients were identified, of which 41 received a (166)Holmium-DOTMP containing regimen and 63 received melphalan alone. The (166)Holmium-DOTMP patients were divided into 2 groups according to the dose received (<2400 mCi versus > or = 2400 mCi). The (166)Holmium-DOTMP group had a trend towards a higher complete remission (CR) rate compared to patients receiving melphalan alone (51% versus 32%). The median EFS for the low-dose (166)Holmium-DOTMP, the high-dose (166)Holmium-DOTMP, and melphalan alone was 30, 23, and 19 months, respectively; the OS rate at 5 years for the 3 groups was 61%, 40%, and 43%, respectively. (166)Holmium-DOTMP, in combination with high-dose melphalan, can result in higher CR rates when given in optimal doses (<2400 mCi) when compared to melphalan alone, and should be further tested in phase III trials in patients with MM undergoing ASCT.

  2. Fracture of Silicate Glasses: Ductile or Brittle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guin, Jean-Pierre; Wiederhorn, Sheldon M.

    2004-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy is used to investigate the possibility of cavity formation during crack growth in silicate glasses. Matching areas on both fracture surfaces were mapped and then compared. For silica glass, and soda-lime-silicate glass, the fracture surfaces matched to a resolution of better than 0.3 nm normal to the surface and 5 nm parallel to the surface. We could find no evidence for cavity formation in our study and suggest that completely brittle fracture occurs in glass.

  3. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Silicate Vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Costa, Gustavo C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Silicates are a common class of materials that are often exposed to high temperatures. The behavior of these materials needs to be understood for applications as high temperature coatings in material science as well as the constituents of lava for geological considerations. The vaporization behavior of these materials is an important aspect of their high temperature behavior and it also provides fundamental thermodynamic data. The application of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) to silicates is discussed. There are several special considerations for silicates. The first is selection of an appropriate cell material, which is either nearly inert or has well-understood interactions with the silicate. The second consideration is proper measurement of the low vapor pressures. This can be circumvented by using a reducing agent to boost the vapor pressure without changing the solid composition or by working at very high temperatures. The third consideration deals with kinetic barriers to vaporization. The measurement of these barriers, as encompassed in a vaporization coefficient, is discussed. Current measured data of rare earth silicates for high temperature coating applications are discussed. In addition, data on magnesium-iron-silicates (olivine) are presented and discussed.

  4. Analysis of lapine cartilage matrix after radiosynovectomy with holmium-166 ferric hydroxide macroaggregate

    PubMed Central

    Makela, O; Lammi, M; Uusitalo, H; Hyttinen, M; Vuorio, E; Helminen, H; Tulamo, R

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the short and long term effects of radiosynovectomy on articular cartilage in growing and mature rabbits. Methods: The articular cartilage of the distal femurs of rabbits was examined four days, two months, and one year after radiosynovectomy with holmium-166 ferric hydroxide macroaggregate ([166Ho]FHMA). Arthritic changes were evaluated from histological sections by conventional and polarised light microscopy, and glycosaminoglycan measurements using safranin O staining, digital densitometry, and uronic acid determination. Proteoglycan synthesis was studied by metabolic [35]sulphate labelling followed by autoradiography, and electrophoretic analysis of extracted proteoglycans. Northern analyses were performed to determine the mRNA levels of type II collagen, aggrecan, and Sox9 in cartilage samples. Results: Radiosynovectomy had no major effect on the histological appearance of articular cartilage in mature rabbits, whereas more fibrillation was seen in [166Ho]FHMA radiosynovectomised knee joints of growing rabbits two months after treatment, but not after one year. Radiosynovectomy did not cause changes in the glycosaminoglycan content of cartilage or in the synthesis or chemical structure of proteoglycans. No radiosynovectomy related changes were seen in the mRNA levels of type II collagen, whereas a transient down regulation of aggrecan and Sox9 mRNA levels was seen in young rabbits two months after [166Ho]FHMA radiosynovectomy. Conclusions: [166Ho]FHMA radiosynovectomy caused no obvious chondrocyte damage or osteoarthritic changes in mature rabbits, but in growing rabbits some transient radiation induced effects were seen—for example, mild cartilage fibrillation and down regulation of cartilage-specific genes. PMID:12480668

  5. Effects of Intraluminal Irradiation with Holmium-166 for TIPS Stenosis: Experimental Study in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Seon; Kim, Deog Yoon; Park, Yong Koo; Park, Sang Joon; Kim, Soo Joong

    2007-01-01

    Objective We wanted to evaluate the effectiveness of intraluminal irradiation with Holmium-166 (166Ho) for reducing the pseudointimal hyperplasia (PIH) in the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) tract in a swine model. Materials and Methods TIPS was performed in 12 domestic pigs, after the creation of portal hypertension by intraportal injection of a mixture of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) and lipiodol. Five pigs first underwent intraluminal irradiation (30 Gy) in the parenchymal tract with using a 166Ho solution-filled balloon catheter, and this was followed by the placement of a nitinol stent in the TIPS tract. For the seven control pigs, the balloon was filled with saline and contrast media mixture. Two weeks later, follow-up portography and histological analysis were performed. Results TIPS was successfully performed in all twelve pigs with achieving artificially induced portal hypertension. Portography performed two weeks after TIPS showed the patent tracts in the TIPS tracts that were irradiated with 166Ho (5/5, 100%), whereas either completely (5/6, 83.3%) or partially (1/6, 16.7%) occluded TIPS were seen in the seven pigs of the nonirradiated control group, except in one pig that experienced periprocedural death due to bleeding. Histological analysis showed a statistically significant difference for the maximal PIH (irradiated: 32.8%, nonirradiated: 76.0%, p < 0.001) between the two groups. Conclusion Intraluminal irradiation with 30 Gy of 166Ho for TIPS significantly improved the TIPS patency in a swine model of portal hypertension during a 2-week period of follow-up. PMID:17420630

  6. Enhanced magnetization with unusual low temperature magnetic ordering behaviour and spin reorientation in holmium-modified multiferroic BiFeO3 perovskite ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Hemant; Yadav, K. L.

    2015-05-01

    Holmium-doped Bi1-xHoxFeO3 (x = 0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.075 and 0.10) perovskite ceramics were synthesized by a rapid liquid phase quenching process. The structural analysis performed using x-ray diffraction suggested phase formation with distorted rhombohedral structure in all the synthesized ceramic samples. Rietveld analysis of x-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectroscopy also confirmed the distorted perovskite structure with R3c symmetry. Optical studies showed characteristic bending vibrations of O - Fe - O, Fe - O stretching and visible range PL emissions in modified BiFeO3 ceramics. Ferromagnetic characteristics were shown by all the holmium-doped samples at room temperature and 5 K. Very high saturation magnetization (at 7 T), four to six times higher at 5 K than at 300 K, is observed for holmium-doped ceramic samples. A complex temperature dependence of magnetization behaviour is observed for holmium-doped samples, which is indicative of a spin reorientation in doped ceramics.

  7. Gamma spectrometry and chemical characterization of ceramic seeds with samarium-153 and holmium-166 for brachytherapy proposal.

    PubMed

    Valente, Eduardo S; Campos, Tarcísio P R

    2010-12-01

    Ceramic seeds were synthesized by the sol-gel technique with Si:Sm:Ca and Si:Ho:Ca. One set of seeds was irradiated in the TRIGA type nuclear reactor IPR-R1 and submitted to instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), K(0) method, to determine mass percentage concentration of natural samarium and holmium in the seed as well as to determine all existing radionuclides and their activities. Attention was paid to discrimination of Si-31, Ca-40, Ca-45, Ca-47, Ca-49, Sm-145, Sm-155, Sm-153 and Ho-166. A second sample was submitted to atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) also to determine samarium and holmium concentrations in weight. A third sample was submitted to X-ray fluorescence spectrometry to qualitatively determine chemical composition. The measured activity was due to Sm-153 and Ho-166 with a well-characterized gamma spectrum. The X-ray fluorescence spectrum demonstrated that there is no discrepancy in seed composition. The maximum ranges in the water of beta particles from Sm-153 and Ho-166 decay were evaluated, as well as the dose rate and total dose delivered within the volume delimited by the range of the beta particles. The results are relevant for investigation of the viability of producing Sm-153 and Ho-166 radioactive seeds for use in brachytherapy.

  8. Large Dumbbell Shaped Vesicovaginal Calculus Managed with Holmium Laser Cystolithotripsy Followed by Staged Repair of Vesicovaginal Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Ajit; Pawar, Prakash; Kasat, Gaurav Vinod; Kapadnis, Lomesh

    2016-01-01

    Complicated Vesicovaginal Fistulae (VVF) is prevalent in developing countries following obstetric injury. We report a rare case of a large dumbbell shaped vesicovaginal calculus measuring 7x 4.6cm in a patient with recurrent, complicated VVF managed successfully in two stages 6 weeks apart. Holmium laser (30 Watt) cystolithotripsy was used to break the vesical portion of the stone at the waist of the dumbbell, followed by delivery of vaginal part of the stone. Trans-abdominal VVF repair (O’Connor method) with omental interposition flap with right side ureteric reimplant was done after six weeks. Our case was unique because of occurrence of a larger sized fistula after a gynaecological surgery. She had developed larger stone (weight more than190gm- vaginal component) into the fistula tract. Also she had undergone multiple failed VVF repair attempts before. Use of holmium laser energy to break the stone was unique which minimized the morbidity of the first procedure leading to early recovery followed by staged repair of fistula after six weeks. PMID:27790520

  9. Determination of some trace elements in food and soil samples by atomic absorption spectrometry after coprecipitation with holmium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Saracoglu, Sibel; Soylak, Mustafa; Cabuk, Dilek; Topalak, Zeynep; Karagozlu, Yasemin

    2012-01-01

    The determination of trace elements in food and soil samples by atomic absorption spectrometry was investigated. A coprecipitation procedure with holmium hydroxide was used for separation-preconcentration of trace elements. Trace amounts of copper(II), manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(ll), chromium(lll), iron(Ill), cadmium(ll), and lead(ll) ions were coprecipitated with holmium hydroxide in 2.0 M NaOH medium. The optimum conditions for the coprecipitation process were investigated for several commonly tested experimental parameters, such as amount of coprecipitant, effect of standing time, centrifugation rate and time, and sample volume. The precision, based on replicate analysis, was lower than 10% for the analytes. In order to verify the accuracy of the method, the certified reference materials BCR 141 R calcareous loam soil and CRM 025-050 soil were analyzed. The procedure was successfully applied for separation and preconcentration of the investigated ions in various food and soil samples. An amount of the solid samples was decomposed with 15 mL concentrated hydrochloric acid-concentrated nitric acid (3 + 1). The preconcentration procedure was then applied to the final solutions. The concentration of trace elements in samples was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry.

  10. Use of the holmium:YAG laser for percutaneous photothermal ablation of cervical invertebral disks in dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochat, Mark; Henry, George A.; Campbell, Gregory A.; Stair, Ernest L.; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Dickey, Tom

    1999-06-01

    Holmium:YAG laser ablation of thoracolumbar disks in dogs has been shown to be an effective alternative to standard surgical fenestration techniques. Our hypothesis was the Holmium:YAG laser could be equally effective and safe when used to ablate cervical intervertebral disks. Six normal chondrodystrophoid breed dogs were used. A sterile, cleaved, 320 micrometers , low-OH quartz optical fiber was inserted into each needle and the laser activated for 40 s at 2 W mean power and a 15 Hz pulse repetition rate for a total of 80 J. Dogs were observed in pain, neurological deficits, or other complications for 24 weeks. At 24 weeks, dogs were euthanatized and cervical disks collected and placed in 10 percent neutral buffered formalin. Disks were decalcified, sectioned at 5 micrometers , and stained with H and E. No problems were encountered during the procedure except occasional difficulties passing the needle by the shoulder to enter the C6-7 disk space. No complications, including neurologic deficits or pain were observe during the 24 weeks. Histologic examination revealed varying degrees of necrosis and defects created in the nucleus pulposus by laser irradiation. In some instances there was evidence of mild adjacent annular and bony thermal injury. On the basis of these result, the Ho:YAG laser appears to be a safe and efficacious method for ablation of canine cervical disks.

  11. Phosphorus Equilibria Among Mafic Silicate Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlin, Jana; Xirouchakis, Dimitris

    2002-01-01

    Phosphorus incorporation in major rock-forming silicate minerals has the following implications: (1) Reactions between phosphorus-hosting major silicates and accessory phosphates, which are also major trace element carriers, may control the stability of the latter and thus may affect the amount of phosphorus and other trace elements released to the coexisting melt or fluid phase. (2) Less of a phosphate mineral is needed to account for the bulk phosphorus of planetaty mantles. (3) During partial melting of mantle mineral assemblages or equilibrium fractional crystallization of basaltic magmas, and in the absence or prior to saturation with a phosphate mineral, silicate melts may become enriched in phosphorus, especially in the geochemically important low melt fraction regime, Although the small differences in the ionic radii of IVp5+, IVSi4+, and IV Al3+ makes phosphoms incorporation into crystalline silicates perhaps unsurprising, isostructural silicate and phosphate crystalline solids do not readily form solutions, e.g., (Fe, Mg)2SiO4 vs. LiMgPO4, SiO)2 VS. AlPO4. Nonetheless, there are reports of, poorly characterized silico-phosphate phases in angrites , 2-4 wt% P2O5 in olivine and pyroxene grains in pallasites and reduced terestrial basalts which are little understood but potentially useful, and up to 17 wt% P2O5 in olivine from ancient slags. However, such enrichments are rare and only underscore the likelihood of phosphoms incorporation in silicate minerals. The mechanisms that allow phosphorus to enter major rock-forming silicate minerals (e.g., Oliv, Px, Gt) remain little understood and the relevant data base is limited. Nonetheless, old and new high-pressure (5-10 GPa) experimental data suggest that P2O5 wt% decreases from silica-poor to silica-rich compositions or from orthosilicate to chain silicate structures (garnet > olivine > orthopyroxene) which implies that phosphorus incorporation in silicates is perhaps more structure-than site-specific. The

  12. Molybdenum Valence in Basaltic Silicate Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S.; Pando, K.

    2010-01-01

    The moderately siderophile element molybdenum has been used as an indicator in planetary differentiation processes, and is particularly relevant to core formation [for example, 1-6]. However, models that apply experimental data to an equilibrium differentiation scenario infer the oxidation state of molybdenum from solubility data or from multivariable coefficients from metal-silicate partitioning data [1,3,7]. Partitioning behavior of molybdenum, a multivalent element with a transition near the J02 of interest for core formation (IW-2) will be sensitive to changes in JO2 of the system and silicate melt structure. In a silicate melt, Mo can occur in either 4+ or 6+ valence state, and Mo6+ can be either octahedrally or tetrahedrally coordinated. Here we present first XANES measurements of Mo valence in basaltic run products at a range of P, T, and JO2 and further quantify the valence transition of Mo.

  13. Histological changes and wound healing response following noncontact holmium: YAG laser thermal keratoplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, D D

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate acute histological changes and the induced wound healing response in corneal tissue following noncontact holmium:YAG laser thermal keratoplasty (LTK). METHODS: LTK using 10 pulses and a range of radiant energies was performed on 3 human corneas one day prior ro their removal at penetrating keratoplasty. Rabbit corneas were treated with 10-pulse and 5-pulse LTK and followed for up to 3 months. Tissues were studies with light and transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: The amount of acute tissue injury increased with increasing pulse radiant energy. In human corneas, changes in the irradiated zones included epithelial cell injury and death loss of fine filamentous structure in Bowman's layer, disruption of stromal lamallae, and keratocyte injury and death. In the rabbit corneas, similar acute changes were noted. By 3 weeks, epithelial hyperplasia and stromal contraction were present. Wound healing in the rabbit corneas included repair of the epithelial attachment complex, keratocyte activation, synthesis of type I collagen, partial restoration of stromal keratan sulfate and type VI collagen, and retrocorneal membrane formation. Compared to 10-pulse treatments, 5-pulse treatments produced less acute tissue injury and had more rapid restoration of normal stromal architecture. CONCLUSION: Noncontact LTK produces acute epithelial and stromal tissue changes and in rabbit corneas stimulates a brisk wound healing response. These changes could contribute to postoperative regression of induced refractive correction. Further work is required to determine if reductions in the magnitude of acute tissue injury and induced wound healing response will enhance the efficacy and stability of LTK. Images FIGURE 1A FIGURE 1B FIGURE 2A FIGURE 2B FIGURE 3A FIGURE 3B FIGURE 4A FIGURE 4B FIGURE 4C FIGURE 4D FIGURE 5A FIGURE 5B FIGURE 5C FIGURE 5D FIGURE 6A FIGURE 6B FIGURE 6C FIGURE 6D FIGURE 7A FIGURE 7B FIGURE 8A FIGURE 8B FIGURE 8C FIGURE

  14. Single-frequency, single-polarization holmium-doped ZBLAN fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.; Zong, J.; Miller, A.; Wiersma, K.; Norwood, R. A.; Prasad, N. S.; Chavez-Pirson, A.; Peyghambarian, N.

    2013-02-01

    We present the performance of a single frequency, single-polarization holmium (Ho3+)-doped ZBLAN (ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3- AlF3-NaF) fiber laser at 1200 nm. This distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber laser was developed by splicing a 22 mm long highly Ho3+-doped ZBLAN fiber to a pair of silica fiber Bragg gratings (FBG). The successful fusion splicing of silica fiber to ZBLAN fiber, with their very different melting temperatures, was accomplished by using NP Photonics proprietary splicing technique. The 3 mol% Ho3+-doped ZBLAN fiber had a core diameter of 6.5 μm and a cladding diameter of 125 μm. The threshold of this laser was seen to be about 260 mW, and when the pump power was 520 mW, the output power was about 10 mW. The efficiency of the 1200 nm single-frequency fiber laser, i.e. the ratio of the output power to the launched pump power, was about 3.8%. The linewidth of the 1200 nm single-frequency fiber laser was estimated to be about 100 kHz by comparing the measured frequency noise of the 1200 nm single-frequency fiber laser with that of 1 μm NP Photonics single-frequency fiber lasers whose linewidths have been measured to be in the 1- 10 kHz range. The relative intensity noise of this DBR all-fiber laser was measured to be < 110 dB/Hz at the relaxation oscillation peak and the polarization extinction ratio was measured to be > 19 dB. Due to its low phonon energy and long radiative lifetimes, rare-earth-doped ZBLAN allows various transitions that are typically terminated in silica glass, resulting in ultraviolet, visible, and infrared rare-earth doped ZBLAN lasers. Therefore, our results highlight the exciting prospect that the accessible wavelength range of single-frequency DBR fiber lasers can be expanded significantly by using rare-earth-doped ZBLAN fibers.

  15. Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate is Safe for Patients Above 80 Years: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of age on the efficacy and safety of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) for the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods: A total of 579 patients underwent HoLEP procedure performed by a single surgeon (SJO) between December 2009 and May 2013. The perioperative and functional outcomes of patients in the age groups of 50–59 (group A, n=44), 60–69 (group B, n=253), 70–79 (group C, n=244), and ≥80 years (group D, n=38) were compared. The Clavien-Dindo system was used to evaluate clinical outcomes. The International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), postvoid residual (PVR) urine volume, and urinary continence were used to assess functional outcomes. Results: In this study, the patients ≥80 years had significantly higher presence of hypertension (P=0.007), total prostate volumes (P=0.024), transitional zone volume (P=0.002), American Society of Anesthesiologists scores (P=0.006), urinary retention (P=0.032), and anticoagulation use (P=0.008) at preoperative period. Moreover, the mean values of operation time, enucleation time, morcellation time, and enucleation weight were higher in group D compared with other group patients (P=0.002, P=0.010, P<0.01, and P=0.009, respectively). Patients aged ≥80 years had a longer hospital stay time (2.9±1.8 days) than other groups (group A, 2.3±0.7 days; group B, 2.3±0.7 days vs. group C, 2.4±0.7 days; P=0.001). All groups were similar in regard to the incidence of complications (Clavien-Dindo grade) post operatively (P>0.05). All the patients in the present study showed improvement in functional outcomes after HoLEP. By the sixth month, there were no significant differences in IPSS, quality of life, Qmax, and PVR among the groups (P>0.05). Conclusions: Compared with younger patients, the patients aged ≥80 years had a similar overall morbidity and 6-month functional outcomes of HoLEP. HoLEP is a safe and

  16. Core formation in silicate bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kleine, T.

    2008-12-01

    Differentiation of a body into a metallic core and silicate mantle occurs most efficiently if temperatures are high enough to allow at least the metal to melt [1], and is enhanced if matrix deformation occurs [2]. Elevated temperatures may occur due to either decay of short-lived radio-isotopes, or gravitational energy release during accretion [3]. For bodies smaller than the Moon, core formation happens primarily due to radioactive decay. The Hf-W isotopic system may be used to date core formation; cores in some iron meteorites and the eucrite parent body (probably Vesta) formed within 1 My and 1-4~My of solar system formation, respectively [4]. These formation times are early enough to ensure widespread melting and differentiation by 26Al decay. Incorporation of Fe60 into the core, together with rapid early mantle solidification and cooling, may have driven early dynamo activity on some bodies [5]. Iron meteorites are typically depleted in sulphur relative to chondrites, for unknown reasons [6]. This depletion contrasts with the apparently higher sulphur contents of cores in larger planetary bodies, such as Mars [7], and also has a significant effect on the timing of core solidification. For bodies of Moon-size and larger, gravitational energy released during accretion is probably the primary cause of core formation [3]. The final stages of accretion involve large, stochastic collisions [8] between objects which are already differentiated. During each collision, the metallic cores of the colliding objects merge on timescales of a few hours [9]. Each collision will reset the Hf-W isotopic signature of both mantle and core, depending on the degree to which the impactor core re-equilibrates with the mantle of the target [10]. The re-equilibration efficiency depends mainly on the degree to which the impactor emulsifies [11], which is very uncertain. Results from N-body simulations [8,12] suggest that significant degrees of re- equilibration are required [4,10]. Re

  17. Statistics of silicate units in binary glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaddam, Anuraag; Montagne, Lionel; Ferreira, José M. F.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we derive a new model to determine the distribution of silicate units in binary glasses (or liquids). The model is based on statistical mechanics and assumes grand canonical ensemble of silicate units which exchange energy and network modifiers from the reservoir. This model complements experimental techniques, which measure short range order in glasses such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The model has potential in calculating the amounts of liquid-liquid phase segregation and crystal nucleation, and it can be easily extended to more complicated compositions. The structural relaxation of the glass as probed by NMR spectroscopy is also reported, where the model could find its usefulness.

  18. Microfabrics in Siliceous Hotsprings: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidry, S. A.; Chafetz, H. S.; Westall, F.

    2001-01-01

    Microfabrics shed light on the mechanisms governing siliceous sinter precipitation, the profound effects of microorganisms, as well as a conventional facies model for siliceous hotsprings. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Holmium YLF amplifier performance and the prospects for multi-Joule energies using diode-laser pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storm, Mark E.

    1993-01-01

    Laser studies were performed to examine the amplifier characteristics of holmium-doped yttrium lithium fluoride (YLF) at 300 K. An inversion ratio of 0.37 was reached resulting in a measured small-signal gain coefficient of 0.50/cm. In a flashlamp pumping experiment, an output energy of 240 mJ was achieved for 38.5 mJ of input energy resulting in a large gain of 6.2. An amplifier model was developed for diode laser pumping and adapted to consider this flashlamp-pumped case. There is good agreement between the theory and experiment. Multipass amplifier calculations using the model suggest that the Ho: Tm: YLF laser crystal can support a 12 percent electrical to optical efficiency at 300 K even in the presence of upconversion.

  20. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on the incommensurate magnetic phase transition in holmium at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Sarah; Uhoya, Walter; Tsoi, Georgiy; Wenger, Lowell E; Vohra, Yogesh; Chesnut, Gary Neal; Weir, S. T.; Tulk, Christopher A; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2012-01-01

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been made on the heavy rare earth metal holmium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate its transition from a paramagnetic (PM) to a helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordered phase as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in the resistance slope as the temperature is lowered through the antiferromagnetic Neel temperature. The temperature of this antiferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 122 K at ambient pressure at a rate of -4.9 K GPa(-1) up to a pressure of 9 GPa, whereupon the PM-to-AFM transition vanishes for higher pressures. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at 89 and 110 K confirm the incommensurate nature of the phase transition associated with the antiferromagnetic ordering of the magnetic moments in a helical arrangement and that the ordering occurs at similar pressures as determined from the resistance results for these temperatures.

  1. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on the incommensurate magnetic phase transition in holmium at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sarah A; Uhoya, Walter O; Tsoi, Georgiy M; Wenger, Lowell E; Vohra, Yogesh K; Chesnut, Gary N; Weir, Samuel T; Tulk, Christopher A; dos Santos, Antonio M

    2012-05-30

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been made on the heavy rare earth metal holmium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate its transition from a paramagnetic (PM) to a helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordered phase as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in the resistance slope as the temperature is lowered through the antiferromagnetic Néel temperature. The temperature of this antiferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 122 K at ambient pressure at a rate of -4.9 K GPa(-1) up to a pressure of 9 GPa, whereupon the PM-to-AFM transition vanishes for higher pressures. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at 89 and 110 K confirm the incommensurate nature of the phase transition associated with the antiferromagnetic ordering of the magnetic moments in a helical arrangement and that the ordering occurs at similar pressures as determined from the resistance results for these temperatures.

  2. Holmium-doped 2.1 μm waveguide chip laser with an output power > 1 W.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, D G; Stevens, V J; Michaud-Belleau, V; Gross, S; Fuerbach, A; Monro, T M

    2015-12-14

    We demonstrate the increasing applicability of compact ultra-fast laser inscribed glass guided-wave lasers and report the highest-power glass waveguide laser with over 1.1 W of output power in monolithic operation in the short-infrared near 2070 nm achieved (51% incident slope efficiency). The holmium doped ZBLAN chip laser is in-band pumped by a 1945 nm thulium fiber laser. When operated in an extended-cavity configuration, over 1 W of output power is realized in a linearly polarized beam. Broad and continuous tunability of the extended-cavity laser is demonstrated from 2004 nm to 2099 nm. Considering its excellent beam quality of M² = 1.08, this laser shows potential as a flexible master oscillator for single frequency and mode-locking applications. PMID:26699055

  3. Thulium/holmium-doped fiber laser passively mode locked by black phosphorus nanoplatelets-based saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Zheng, Xin; Yin, Ke; Cheng, Xiang'ai; Jiang, Tian

    2015-12-01

    By coupling black phosphorus (BP) nanoplatelets (NPs) with a fiber-taper evanescent light field, a saturable absorber (SA) based on the BP NPs has been successfully fabricated and used in a thulium/holmium-doped fiber laser as the mode locker. The SA had a modulation depth of ∼9.8% measured at 1.93 μm. A stable mode-locking operation at 1898 nm was achieved with a pulse width of 1.58 ps and a fundamental mode-lock repetition rate of 19.2 MHz. By increasing the pump intensity, phenomena of multi-pulsing operations, including harmonic mode-locked states and soliton bunches, were obtained in the experiment, showing that the BP NPs possess an ultrafast optical response time. This work suggests that the BP NPs-based SA is potentially useful for ultrashort, pulsed laser operations in the eye-safe region of 2 μm. PMID:26836690

  4. Studies on the sorption of praseodymium (III), holmium (III) and cobalt (II) from nitrate medium using TVEX-PHOR resin.

    PubMed

    El-Dessouky, S I; El-Sofany, E A; Daoud, J A

    2007-05-01

    The use of TVEX-PHOR resin for the sorption of praseodymium (III), holmium (III) and cobalt (II) from nitrate medium was carried out using batch and column techniques. Various parameters affecting the uptake of these metal ions such as v/m ratio, pH and the metal ion concentration were separately studied. Effect of temperature on the equilibrium distribution values has been studied to evaluate the changes in standard thermodynamic quantities. Experimental results of the investigated metal ions were found to fit to Freundlich isotherm model over the entire studied concentration range. Selectivity sequence of the resin for these metals is Ho>Pr>Co. The recovery of the investigated metals from the loaded resin is preformed with 0.1M sulphuric acid.

  5. [Endoscopic lithotripsy of a urinary bladder calculus with the aid of a holmium-YAG-laser in a gelding].

    PubMed

    Simhofer, H; Riedelberger, K

    2002-09-01

    A 6 year old Haflinger gelding was presented to the reporting clinics with a history of chronic dysuria. A large cystic calculus (12 x 9 x 9 cm) was diagnosed cystoscopically. Lithotripsy was carried out endoscopically in the standing, sedated patient with a Holmium:YAG surgical laser (2100 nm, 0.5-3.5 J/pulse, 3-60 pulses/sec.). The endoscope was inserted into the bladder via perineal urethrostomy. Fragmentation of the urolith was carried out with a laser fiber (core diameter 600 microns) in contact mode. Healing proceeded uneventfully. On follow up examination 8 weeks post surgery, no signs of recurrence, cystitis or strictures of the urethra were present. PMID:12395576

  6. Holmium YLF amplifier performance and the prospects for multi-Joule energies using diode-laser pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, M.E. )

    1993-02-01

    Laser studies were performed that examined the amplifier characteristics of holmium-doped yttrium lithium fluoride (YLF) at 300 K. An inversion ratio n[sup 5]I[sub 7]/n[sub H0] of 0.37 was reached resulting in a measured small-signal gain coefficient of 0.50 cm[sub [minus]1]. In a flashlamp pumping experiment, an output energy of 240 mJ was achieved for 38.5 Mj of input energy resulting in a large gain of 6.2. An amplifier model was developed for diode laser pumping and adapted to consider this flashlamp-pumped case. There is good agreement between the theory and experiment. Multipass amplifier calculations using the model suggest that the Ho:Tm:YLF laser crystal can support a 12% electrical to optical efficiency at 300 K even in the presence of upconversion.

  7. Effects of a high-power high-energy holmium:YAG laser on human meniscal ablation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadatmanesh, Vahid; Vangsness, C. Thomas; Ghaderi, Bahram; Gong, Naomi F.

    1994-09-01

    Using a pulsed Holmium:YAG laser at a wavelength of 2.1 microns, the ablation rates and thermal effects were measured on human meniscal cartilage. The penetration rate of a fiber under saline was measured as well as the mass loss in an air environment. Fluences were varied between 167 - 927 J/cm2/pulse for the penetration rate experiment and between 38 - 490 J/cm2/pulse for the mass loss experiment. Ablation threshold was found to be 10.6 J/cm2 in air. A double pulsing scheme used to reduce acoustic effects showed equivalent tissue ablation effects. The increases in ablation rates were directly proportional to the increases in pulse fluence for both methods. Histologic examination showed the lateral thermal change to be a maximum of 600 microns in air at 24 pulses per second.

  8. Penetration and mass loss rates with different energy levels in the human meniscus for the holmium:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vangsness, C. Thomas; Ghaderi, Bahram; Brustein, Marshall; Sadettmanesh, Vahid; Hawver, Joan

    1993-07-01

    Using a pulsed Holmium:YAG laser, wavelength 2.1 micrometers , the ablation rate and thermal effect were measured on human meniscal cartilage. Holding the pulsewidth and repetition rate constant, fluences per pulse were varied between 167 - 927 J/cm2/pulse for the penetration rate and between 1.7 - 100 J/cm2/pulse for the mass loss rate. The fastest ablation rate was found at 927 J/cm2/pulse for the penetration rate and at 100 J/cm2/pulse for the mass loss rate. The thresholds were 53 J/cm2/pulse and 1.36 J/cm2/pulse, respectively. The increases in ablation rate were directly proportional to increases in fluences for both methods. Histological examination showed the average lateral thermal change to be 400 - 500 micrometers and 400 - 460 micrometers , respectively, with no relation to level of fluence.

  9. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on the incommensurate magnetic phase transition in holmium at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Sarah A.; Uhoya, Walter O.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Wenger, Lowell E.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Chesnut, Gary N.; Weir, Samuel T.; Tulk, Christopher A.; dos Santos, Antonio M.

    2012-05-01

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been made on the heavy rare earth metal holmium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate its transition from a paramagnetic (PM) to a helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordered phase as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in the resistance slope as the temperature is lowered through the antiferromagnetic Néel temperature. The temperature of this antiferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 122 K at ambient pressure at a rate of -4.9 K GPa-1 up to a pressure of 9 GPa, whereupon the PM-to-AFM transition vanishes for higher pressures. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at 89 and 110 K confirm the incommensurate nature of the phase transition associated with the antiferromagnetic ordering of the magnetic moments in a helical arrangement and that the ordering occurs at similar pressures as determined from the resistance results for these temperatures.

  10. Dynamic Fatigue of a Titanium Silicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Cagle, Holly A.; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A dynamic fatigue study was performed on a Titanium Silicate Glass in order to assess its susceptibility to delayed failure. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions for optical elements made from this material. The material has reasonably good resistance (N=23 to stress corrosion in ambient conditions).

  11. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking... agent in food in an amount not in excess of that reasonably required to produce its intended effect. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food...

  12. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  13. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  14. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  15. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  16. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  17. Chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung Y.; Lohan, Dirk; Elizabeth, Anne

    2003-01-01

    A chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic formed by chemically reacting a monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and a sparsely soluble oxide, with a sparsely soluble silicate in an aqueous solution. The monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and sparsely soluble oxide are both in powder form and combined in a stochiometric molar ratio range of (0.5-1.5):1 to form a binder powder. Similarly, the sparsely soluble silicate is also in powder form and mixed with the binder powder to form a mixture. Water is added to the mixture to form a slurry. The water comprises 50% by weight of the powder mixture in said slurry. The slurry is allowed to harden. The resulting chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic exhibits high flexural strength, high compression strength, low porosity and permeability to water, has a definable and bio-compatible chemical composition, and is readily and easily colored to almost any desired shade or hue.

  18. Thermoset polymer-layered silicic acid nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen

    Nanocomposites are formed when phase mixing occurs on a nanometer length scale. Due to the improved phase morphology and interfacial properties, nanocomposites exhibit mechanical properties superior to conventional composites. Toyota researchers first demonstrated that organoclay could be exfoliated in a nylon-6 matrix to greatly improve the thermal and mechanical properties of the polymer, which has resulted in a practical application in the automobile industry. A great deal of research has been conducted on organic-inorganic hybrid composites in which smectite clays are used as reinforcement agents. However, little work has been devoted to derivatives of other layered inorganic solids. In the present work, the first examples of organic polymer-layered silicic acid nanocomposites have been prepared by formation of a cured epoxy polymer network in the presence of organo cation exchange forms of magadiite. The exfoliation of silicate nanolayers in the epoxy matrix was achieved by in-situ intragallery polymerization during the thermosetting process. In general, the tensile properties, solvent resistance, barrier properties and chemical stability of the polymer matrix are greatly improved by the embedded silicate nanolayers when the matrix is flexible (sub-ambient Tg). The improvement of properties are dependent on the silicate loading, the degree of nanolayer separation and interfacial properties. Interestingly, the exfoliation also affects the polymer elasticity in a favorable way. The mechanism leading to nanocomposite formation is proposed. One exfoliated epoxy-magadiite nanocomposite/composition possessed unique transparent optical properties. The exfoliation chemistry was successfully extended to the other members of the layered silicic acid family. A new approach also was developed to prepare thermoset epoxy polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites in which curing agents can be directly intercalated into the intragallery without the need for alkylammonium ions

  19. Radiotherapeutic bandage based on electrospun polyacrylonitrile containing holmium-166 iron garnet nanoparticles for the treatment of skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Munaweera, Imalka; Levesque-Bishop, Daniel; Shi, Yi; Di Pasqua, Anthony J; Balkus, Kenneth J

    2014-12-24

    Radiation therapy is used as a primary treatment for inoperable tumors and in patients that cannot or will not undergo surgery. Radioactive holmium-166 ((166)Ho) is a viable candidate for use against skin cancer. Nonradioactive holmium-165 ((165)Ho) iron garnet nanoparticles have been incorporated into a bandage, which, after neutron-activation to (166)Ho, can be applied to a tumor lesion. The (165)Ho iron garnet nanoparticles ((165)HoIG) were synthesized and introduced into polyacrylonitrile (PAN) polymer solutions. The polymer solutions were then electrospun to produce flexible nonwoven bandages, which are stable to neutron-activation. The fiber mats were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The bandages are stable after neutron-activation at a thermal neutron-flux of approximately 3.5 × 10(12) neutrons/cm(2)·s for at least 4 h and 100 °C. Different amounts of radioactivity can be produced by changing the amount of the (165)HoIG nanoparticles inside the bandage and the duration of neutron-activation, which is important for different stages of skin cancer. Furthermore, the radioactive bandage can be easily manipulated to irradiate only the tumor site by cutting the bandage into specific shapes and sizes that cover the tumor prior to neutron-activation. Thus, exposure of healthy cells to high energy β-particles can be avoided. Moreover, there is no leakage of radioactive material after neutron activation, which is critical for safe handling by healthcare professionals treating skin cancer patients.

  20. Radiotherapeutic bandage based on electrospun polyacrylonitrile containing holmium-166 iron garnet nanoparticles for the treatment of skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Munaweera, Imalka; Levesque-Bishop, Daniel; Shi, Yi; Di Pasqua, Anthony J; Balkus, Kenneth J

    2014-12-24

    Radiation therapy is used as a primary treatment for inoperable tumors and in patients that cannot or will not undergo surgery. Radioactive holmium-166 ((166)Ho) is a viable candidate for use against skin cancer. Nonradioactive holmium-165 ((165)Ho) iron garnet nanoparticles have been incorporated into a bandage, which, after neutron-activation to (166)Ho, can be applied to a tumor lesion. The (165)Ho iron garnet nanoparticles ((165)HoIG) were synthesized and introduced into polyacrylonitrile (PAN) polymer solutions. The polymer solutions were then electrospun to produce flexible nonwoven bandages, which are stable to neutron-activation. The fiber mats were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The bandages are stable after neutron-activation at a thermal neutron-flux of approximately 3.5 × 10(12) neutrons/cm(2)·s for at least 4 h and 100 °C. Different amounts of radioactivity can be produced by changing the amount of the (165)HoIG nanoparticles inside the bandage and the duration of neutron-activation, which is important for different stages of skin cancer. Furthermore, the radioactive bandage can be easily manipulated to irradiate only the tumor site by cutting the bandage into specific shapes and sizes that cover the tumor prior to neutron-activation. Thus, exposure of healthy cells to high energy β-particles can be avoided. Moreover, there is no leakage of radioactive material after neutron activation, which is critical for safe handling by healthcare professionals treating skin cancer patients. PMID:25396281

  1. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  4. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  5. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  6. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  7. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  8. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  9. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  10. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  11. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  12. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  13. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  14. 40 CFR 721.10495 - Metal silicate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Metal silicate (generic). 721.10495... Substances § 721.10495 Metal silicate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as metal silicate (PMN P-05-634) is subject...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10495 - Metal silicate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Metal silicate (generic). 721.10495... Substances § 721.10495 Metal silicate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as metal silicate (PMN P-05-634) is subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  17. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  18. Amorphous Silicates in Primitive Meteoritic Materials: Acfer 094 and IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Walker, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    The abundance of presolar grains is one measure of the primitive nature of meteoritic materials. Presolar silicates are abundant in meteorites whose matrices are dominated by amorphous silicates such as the unique carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094. Presolar silicates are even more abundant in chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs). Amorphous silicates in the form of GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) grains are a major component of CP IDPs. We are studying amorphous silicates in Acfer 094 matrix in order to determine whether they are related to the GEMS grains in CPIDPs

  19. Characterizing Amorphous Silicates in Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Wang, A.; Krawczynski, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silicates are common in extraterrestrial materials. They are seen in the matrix of carbonaceous chondrites as well as in planetary materials. Tagish Lake is one of the most primitive carbonaceous meteorites in which TEM and XRD analyses found evidence for poorly crystalline phyllosilicate-like species; Raman spectra revealed amorphous silicates with variable degree of polymerization and low crystallinity. On Mars, CheMin discovered amorphous phases in all analyzed samples, and poorly crystalline smectite in mudstone samples. These discoveries pose questions on the crystallinity of phyllosilicates found by remote sensing on Mars, which is directly relevant to aqueous alteration during geologic history of Mars. Our goal is to use spectroscopy to better characterize amorphous silicates. We use three approaches: (1) using silicate glasses synthesized with controlled chemistry to study the effects of silicate polymerization and (2) using phyllosilicates synthesized with controlled hydrothermal treatment to study the effect of crystallinity on vibrational spectroscopy, finally (3) to use the developed correlations in above two steps to study amorphous phases in meteorites, and those found in future missions to Mars. In the 1st step, silicate glasses were synthesized from pure oxides in a range of NBO/T ratios (from 0 to 4). Depending on the targeted NBO/T and composition of mixed oxides, temperatures for each experiment fell in a range from 1260 to 1520 °C, run for ~ 4 hrs. The melt was quenched in liquid N2 or water. Homogeneity of glass was checked under optical microscopy. Raman spectra were taken over 100 spots on small chips free of bubbles and crystals. We have observed that accompanying an increase of NBO/T, there is a strengthening and a position shift of the Raman peak near 1000 cm-1 (Si-Onon-bridging stretching mode), and the weakening of broad Raman peaks near 500 cm-1 (ring breathing mode) and 700cm-1 (Si-Obridging-Si mode). We are building the

  20. Tracking bubble evolution inside a silicic dike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Valero, Antonio M.; Okumura, Satoshi; Arzilli, Fabio; Borrajo, Javier; Recio, Clemente; Ban, Masao; Gonzalo, Juan C.; Benítez, José M.; Douglas, Madison; Sasaki, Osamu; Franco, Piedad; Gómez-Barreiro, Juan; Carnicero, Asunción

    2016-10-01

    Pressure estimates from rapidly erupted crustal xenoliths constrain the depth of intrusion of the silicic lavas hosting them. This represents an opportunity for tracking magmatic bubble's evolution and quantifying the variation in bubble volume during rapid magma ascent through a volcanic dike just prior to eruption. The petrology, stable-isotope geochemistry and X-ray micro-tomography of dacites containing crustal xenoliths, erupted from a Neogene volcano in SE Spain, showed an increase in porosity from ~ 1.7 to 6.4% from ~ 19 to 13 km depth, at nearly constant groundmass and crystal volumes. This result provides additional constraints for experimental and numerical simulations of subvolcanic magma-crust degassing processes in silicic systems, and may allow the characterization of volcanic eruptive styles based on volatile content.

  1. Cooling rate calculations for silicate glasses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnie, D. P., III; Dyar, M. D.

    1986-03-01

    Series solution calculations of cooling rates are applied to a variety of samples with different thermal properties, including an analog of an Apollo 15 green glass and a hypothetical silicate melt. Cooling rates for the well-studied green glass and a generalized silicate melt are tabulated for different sample sizes, equilibration temperatures and quench media. Results suggest that cooling rates are heavily dependent on sample size and quench medium and are less dependent on values of physical properties. Thus cooling histories for glasses from planetary surfaces can be estimated on the basis of size distributions alone. In addition, the variation of cooling rate with sample size and quench medium can be used to control quench rate.

  2. Recycle of silicate waste into mesoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Minwoo; Yu, Jong-Sung

    2011-04-15

    Template synthesis of porous carbon materials usually requires selective removal of template silica from the carbon/silica composites. It not only involves waste of valuable chemicals, but also poses significant environmental concerns including high waste treatment cost. Recycling of silicates released from such nanocasting methods is successfully performed for the first time to regenerate valuable mesoporous MCM and SBA type silica materials, which will not only help in saving valuable chemicals, but also in decreasing chemical waste, contributing in improvement of our environmental standards. This approach can thus improve cost effectiveness for the mass production of nanostructured carbon and others utilizing silica directed nanocasting method by recycling otherwise silicate waste into highly desirable valuable mesoporous silica.

  3. Structure and properties of ITQ-8: a hydrous layer silicate with microporous silicate layers.

    PubMed

    Marler, Bernd; Müller, Melanie; Gies, Hermann

    2016-06-21

    ITQ-8 is a new hydrous layer silicate (HLS) with a chemical composition of [C4H8(C7H13N)2]8 [Si64O128(OH)16]·48H2O per unit cell. The synthesis of ITQ-8 was first described in 2002 by Díaz-Cabañas et al., the structure of this material, however, remained unsolved at that time. Physico-chemical characterization using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, SEM, TG-DTA, and FTIR spectroscopy confirmed that ITQ-8 is a layer silicate. The XRD powder pattern was indexed in the monoclinic system with lattice parameters of a0 = 35.5168(5) Å, b0 = 13.3989(2) Å, c0 = 16.0351(2) Å, β = 106.74(2)°. The crystal structure was solved by simulated annealing. Rietveld refinement of the structure in space group C2/c converged to residual values of RBragg = 0.023, RF = 0.022 and chi(2) = 2.3 confirming the structure model. The structure of ITQ-8 contains silicate layers with a topology that resembles a (11-1) section of the framework of zeolite levyne. So far, this layer topology is unique among layer silicates. The layer can be regarded as made up of 4-, 6-, double-six and 8-rings which are interconnected to form cup-like "half-cages". Unlike other HLSs, which possess impermeable silicate layers, ITQ-8 contains 8-rings pores with a free diameter of 3.5 Å × 3.4 Å and can be regarded as a "small-pore layer silicate". In the crystal structure, the organic cations, 1,4-diquiniclidiniumbutane, used as structure directing agents during synthesis are intercalated between the silicate layers. Clusters (bands) of water molecules which are hydrogen bonded to each other and to the terminal Si-OH/Si-O(-) groups are located between the organic cations and interconnect the silicate layers. ITQ-8 is a very interesting material as precursor for the synthesis of microporous framework silicates by topotactic condensation or interlayer expansion reactions leading to 3D micro-pore systems which may be useful in applications as e.g. catalysts, catalyst supports and adsorbents of for separation. PMID

  4. Lead-silicate glass optical microbubble resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Pengfei; Ward, Jonathan; Yang, Yong; Chormaic, Síle Nic; Feng, Xian; Brambilla, Gilberto; Farrell, Gerald

    2015-02-09

    Microbubble whispering gallery resonators have the potential to become key components in a variety of active and passive photonic circuit devices by offering a range of significant functionalities. Here, we report on the fabrication, optical characterization, and theoretical analysis of lead-silicate glass and optical microbubble resonators. Evanescent field coupling to the microbubbles was achieved using a 1 μm diameter, silica microfiber at a wavelength of circa 775 nm. High Q-factor modes were efficiently excited in both single-stem and two-stem, lead-silicate glass, and microbubble resonators, with bubble diameters of 38 μm (single-stem) and 48 μm (two-stem). Whispering gallery mode resonances with Q-factors as high as 2.3 × 10{sup 5} (single-stem) and 7 × 10{sup 6} (two-stem) were observed. By exploiting the high-nonlinearity of the lead-silicate glass, this work will act as a catalyst for studying a range of nonlinear optical effects in microbubbles, such as Raman scattering and four-wave mixing, at low optical powers.

  5. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Domka, Ludwik; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Kozak, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay - hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1‧-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d001) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH2 and CH3 groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  6. Investigation on broadband near-infrared emission in Yb3+/Ho3+ co-doped antimony-silicate glass and optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorosz, D.; Zmojda, J.; Kochanowicz, M.

    2013-10-01

    In the paper antimony-silicate glass and double-clad optical fiber co-doped with ytterbium and holmium ions were investigated. Absorption spectra in infrared (FT-IR) showed characteristic bands: 445, 605, 1037, 1168 cm-1 coming from the vibration of chemical bonds of SbO3 and SiO4, respectively. The combination of relatively low phonon energy with a capability for greater separation (avoiding clustering) of optically active centers in the fabricated glasses should allow an effective expansion of spontaneous emission band. The highest intensity of emission at the wavelength of λe = 1950 nm resulting from energy transfer between Yb3+ → Ho3+ ions was observed in the glass co-doped with 1 mol% Yb2O3:0.5 mol% Ho2O3. As a result of the optical pumping at the wavelength of 976 nm in the produced optical fiber, strong and narrow band of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) around 2.1 μm, corresponds to the 5I7 → 5I8 transition, were obtained.

  7. Diseases associated with exposure to silica and nonfibrous silicate minerals. Silicosis and Silicate Disease Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Silicosis, a disease of historical importance, continues to occur cryptically today. Its pathogenesis is under ongoing study as new concepts of pathobiology evolve. In this article, the gross and microscopic features of the disease in the lungs and the lesions in lymph nodes and other viscera are described. These tissue changes are then discussed in the context of clinical disease and other possible or established complications of silica exposure (ie, scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis, glomerulonephritis, and bronchogenic carcinoma). Silicates are members of a large family of common minerals, some of which have commercial importance. Silicates are less fibrogenic than silica when inhaled into the lungs, but cause characteristic lesions after heavy prolonged exposure. The features of these disease conditions are described herein. Various aspects of the mineralogy and tissue diagnosis of silicosis and lung disease due to silicates are reviewed. An overview of contemporary regulatory considerations is provided.204 references.

  8. Adsorption of β-carotene on modified magnesium silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shanshan; Guo, Ning; Fu, Yongfeng

    2016-02-01

    Modified flocculation magnesium silicate is prepared by a hydrothermal process at 120°C for 18 h after adding Al2(SO4)3 into the magnesium silicate gel. Compared with standard magnesium silicate with 328.116 m2 g-1 surface area, this modified magnesium silicate has a bigger BET surface area of 536.803 m2 g-1 and a lower interlayer water content. Modified magnesium silicate exhibits high β-carotene adsorption with a maximum adsorption capacity of 364.96 mg g-1. It is shown that when suspended in organic solvent, this material can be used effectively for carotenoid separation. Furthermore, our results suggest that modified magnesium silicate may be a promising candidate as an absorbent in the decoloring of oil.

  9. Experiments of water formation on warm silicates

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2014-06-10

    When dust grains have a higher temperature than they would have in dense clouds, and when H, H{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} have a negligible residence time on grains, the formation of water should still be possible via the hydrogenation of OH and Eley-Rideal-type reactions. We determined that the OH desorption energy from an amorphous silicate surface is at least 143 meV (1656 K). This is 400 K higher than the value previously used in chemical models of the interstellar medium and is possibly as high as 410 meV (4760 K). This extends the temperature range for the efficient formation of water on grains from about 30 K to at least 50 K, and possibly over 100 K. We do not find evidence that water molecules leave the surface upon formation. Instead, through a thermal programmed desorption experiment, we find that water formed on the surface of an amorphous silicate desorbs at around 160 K. We also measured the cross-sections for the reaction of H and D with an O{sub 3} layer on an amorphous silicate surface at 50 K. The values of the cross-sections, σ{sub H} = 1.6 ± 0.27 Å{sup 2} and σ{sub D} = 0.94 ± 0.09 Å{sup 2}, respectively, are smaller than the size of an O{sub 3} molecule, suggesting the reaction mechanism is more likely Eley-Rideal than hot-atom. Information obtained through these experiments should help theorists evaluate the relative contribution of water formation on warm grains versus in the gas phase.

  10. Noble gas diffusion in silicate liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amalberti, J.; Burnard, P.; Laporte, D.

    2013-12-01

    Fractionated noble gas relative abundances (Ne/Ar, Kr/Ar and Xe/Ar) and isotopic compositions (40Ar/36Ar, 38Ar/36Ar, 20Ne/22Ne, 21Ne/22Ne) are found in volcanic materials, notably in pumices (1-3). This has generally been interpreted as fractionation resulting from diffusion. However, there is some disagreement as to whether this fractionation occurs during high temperature magmatic processes (3) or due to diffusion of air into solidified pyroclastic deposits (2). We show that differences in relative noble gas diffusivities (e.g. D4He vs D40Ar, where D is the diffusivity) and isotopic diffusivities (e.g. D40Ar vs D36Ar) reduce at high temperatures (Fig). These results predict minimal fractionation of noble gases during magmatic processes. However, it is important to note that these diffusivities were measured in silicate glasses; the relative noble diffusivities in silicate liquids are poorly known. We have developed a new experimental protocol which will to determine the diffusivities of the noble gases and their isotopes in the liquid state. A graphite crucible c. 0.3 mm diameter and c. 20mm deep is filled with powdered glass of the desired composition, heated to 1773 K for 15 minutes and quenched to form a glass cylinder within the crucible. The crucible is then placed in a low pressure (1 bar) controlled atmosphere vertical furnace and heated at high temperatures (1673-1773K) for 2 hours in a pure N2 atmosphere. At this point noble gases (He and Ar) are introduced into the furnace and allowed to diffuse into the cylinder of liquid for durations of between 30 and 90. After quenching, the glass cylinder, preserving its' diffusion profile, is sawed into c. 1mm thick discs which are measured by conventional noble gas mass spectrometry for noble gas abundances (He, Ar) and isotopes (40,38,36Ar). The results will be presented at the conference. References 1 Kaneoka, I. Earth Planet Sci Letts 48, 284-292 (1980). 2 Pinti, D. L., Wada, N. & Matsuda, J. J. Volcan

  11. Determination of chlorine in silicate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, L.C.

    1959-01-01

    In a rapid accurate method for the determination of chlorine in silicate rocks, the rock powder is sintered with a sodium carbonate flux containing zinc oxide and magnesium carbonate. The sinter cake is leached with water, the resulting solution is filtered, and the filtrate is acidified with nitric acid. Chlorine is determined by titrating this solution with mercuric nitrate solution using sodium nitroprusside as the indicator. The titration is made in the dark with a beam of light shining through the solution. The end point of the titration is found by visually comparing the intensity of this beam of light with that of a similar beam of light in a reference solution.

  12. Microbial dissolution of silicate materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzman, D.

    1996-03-26

    The objective of this research was to better understand the role of selected thermophilic bacteria in the colonization and dissolution of silicate minerals, with potential applications to the HDR Project. The demonstration of enhanced dissolution from microbial effects is critically dependent on providing a mineral bait within a media deficient in the critical nutrient found in the mineral (e.g., Fe). Reproducible experimental conditions in batch experiments require agitation to expose mineral powders, as well as nearly similar initial conditions for both inoculated cultures and controls. It is difficult, but not impossible to ensure reproducible conditions with microbes favoring filamentous growth habits.

  13. Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate

    DOEpatents

    Shen, Ming-Shing; Chen, James M.; Yang, Ralph T.

    1982-01-01

    This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850.degree.-1000.degree. C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

  14. Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate

    DOEpatents

    Shen, M.S.; Chen, J.M.; Yang, R.T.

    1980-02-28

    This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica, and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane, and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850 to 1000/sup 0/C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

  15. Activity composition relationships in silicate melts

    SciTech Connect

    Glazner, A.F.

    1990-01-01

    Equipment progress include furnace construction and electron microprobe installation. The following studies are underway: phase equilibria along basalt-rhyolite mixing line (olivine crystallization from natural silicic andensites, distribution of Fe and Mg between olivine and liquid, dist. of Ca and Na between plagioclase and liquid), enthalpy-composition relations in magmas (bulk heat capacity of alkali basalt), density model for magma ascent and contamination, thermobarometry in igneous systems (olivine/plagioclase phenocryst growth in Quat. basalt), high-pressure phase equilibria of alkali basalt, basalt-quartz mixing experiments, phase equilibria of East African basalts, and granitic minerals in mafic magma. (DLC)

  16. Lithium metaborate flux in silicate analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingamells, C.O.

    1970-01-01

    Lithium metaborate is an effective flux for silicates and other rock-forming minerals. The glass resulting from fusion is mechanically strong, reasonably nonhygroscopic, and is readily soluble in dilute acids. These characteristics lead to its use in X-ray spectrography and in methods which require whole-rock solutions, such as atomic absorption and emission spectrometry. Difficulties have been encountered in the use of such techniques : a high-quality reagent has been difficult to obtain ; fusion conditions must be rather closely controlled; graphite crucibles used in the fusions need special treatment. Methods for overcoming these difficulties are outlined. Selected procedures for various instrumental methods of analysis are described. ?? 1970.

  17. Iron-rich silicates in the Earth's D'' layer.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wendy L; Meng, Yue; Shen, Guoyin; Prakapenka, Vitali B; Campbell, Andrew J; Heinz, Dion L; Shu, Jinfu; Caracas, Razvan; Cohen, Ronald E; Fei, Yingwei; Hemley, Russell J; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2005-07-12

    High-pressure experiments and theoretical calculations demonstrate that an iron-rich ferromagnesian silicate phase can be synthesized at the pressure-temperature conditions near the core-mantle boundary. The iron-rich phase is up to 20% denser than any known silicate at the core-mantle boundary. The high mean atomic number of the silicate greatly reduces the seismic velocity and provides an explanation to the low-velocity and ultra-low-velocity zones. Formation of this previously undescribed phase from reaction between the silicate mantle and the iron core may be responsible for the unusual geophysical and geochemical signatures observed at the base of the lower mantle.

  18. The Impact of Increased Bladder Blood Flow on Storage Symptoms after Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate.

    PubMed

    Saito, Keisuke; Hisasue, Shin-ichi; Ide, Hisamitsu; Aoki, Hiroaki; Muto, Satoru; Yamaguchi, Raizo; Tsujimura, Akira; Horie, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate how holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) improves urinary storage symptoms, we assessed blood flow in the urinary bladder mucosa of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) before and after laser surgery. Seventy-four consecutive patients with BPH (median age 69 years, range; 53-88) underwent HoLEP at our institution and are included in this study. We prospectively assessed the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), IPSS-QOL Score, the Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS), uroflowmetry, and blood flow in the urinary bladder, before and after surgery. Blood flow in the bladder mucosa was measured using the OMEGA FLOW (OMEGAWAVE, Tokyo, Japan) laser Doppler flowmeter. The median volume of the enucleated adenomas was 45.0 g (range: 25.0 to 83.2). The median IPSS improved significantly from 20 (range: 6-35) to 3 (0-22) (p < 0.001; Wilcoxon signed-rank test), as did the storage symptoms score, which decreased from 13 (2-20) to 3 (1-8) (p < 0.001). Median bladder blood flow increased at the trigone from 9.57 ± 0.83 ml/sec to 17.60 ± 1.08 ml/sec. Multiple regression analysis for the improved storage symptom score eliminated all explanatory variables except increased bladder perfusion. The data suggest that HoLEP improves blood flow in the bladder mucosa, which independently leads to the improvement of storage symptoms. PMID:26090819

  19. Predictive risk factors of postoperative urinary incontinence following holmium laser enucleation of the prostate during the initial learning period

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shuichiro; Yano, Masataka; Nakayama, Takayuki; Kitahara, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the predictive factors for postoperative urinary incontinence (UI) following holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) during the initial learning period. Patients and Methods: We evaluated 127 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia who underwent HoLEP between January 2011 and December 2013. We recorded clinical variables, including blood loss, serum prostate-specific antigen levels, and the presence or absence of UI. Blood loss was estimated as a decline in postoperative hemoglobin levels. The predictive factors for postoperative UI were determined using a multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results: Postoperative UI occurred in 31 patients (24.4%), but it cured in 29 patients (93.5%) after a mean duration of 12 weeks. Enucleation time >100 min (p=0.043) and blood loss >2.5g/dL (p=0.032) were identified as significant and independent risk factors for postoperative UI. Conclusions: Longer enucleation time and increased blood loss were independent predictors of postoperative UI in patients who underwent HoLEP during the initial learning period. Surgeons in training should take care to perform speedy enucleation maneuver with hemostasis. PMID:27564285

  20. Neutron activation of holmium poly(L-lactic acid) microspheres for hepatic arterial radio-embolization: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Vente, M A D; Nijsen, J F W; de Roos, R; van Steenbergen, M J; Kaaijk, C N J; Koster-Ammerlaan, M J J; de Leege, P F A; Hennink, W E; van Het Schip, A D; Krijger, G C

    2009-08-01

    Poly(L-lactic acid) microspheres loaded with holmium-166 acetylacetonate (166Ho-PLLA-MS) are a novel microdevice for intra-arterial radio-embolization in patients with unresectable liver malignancies. The neutron activation in a nuclear reactor, in particular the gamma heating, damages the 166Ho-PLLA-MS. The degree of damage is dependent on the irradiation characteristics and irradiation time in a particular reactor facility. The aim of this study was to standardize and objectively validate the activation procedure in a particular reactor. The methods included light- and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), particle size analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, viscometry, thermal neutron flux measurements and energy deposition calculations. Seven hours-neutron irradiation results in sufficient specific activity of the 166Ho-PLLA-MS while structural integrity is preserved. Neutron flux measurements and energy deposition calculations are required in the screening of other nuclear reactors. For the evaluation of microsphere quality, light microscopy, SEM and particle size analysis are appropriate techniques.

  1. The Impact of Increased Bladder Blood Flow on Storage Symptoms after Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate.

    PubMed

    Saito, Keisuke; Hisasue, Shin-ichi; Ide, Hisamitsu; Aoki, Hiroaki; Muto, Satoru; Yamaguchi, Raizo; Tsujimura, Akira; Horie, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate how holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) improves urinary storage symptoms, we assessed blood flow in the urinary bladder mucosa of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) before and after laser surgery. Seventy-four consecutive patients with BPH (median age 69 years, range; 53-88) underwent HoLEP at our institution and are included in this study. We prospectively assessed the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), IPSS-QOL Score, the Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS), uroflowmetry, and blood flow in the urinary bladder, before and after surgery. Blood flow in the bladder mucosa was measured using the OMEGA FLOW (OMEGAWAVE, Tokyo, Japan) laser Doppler flowmeter. The median volume of the enucleated adenomas was 45.0 g (range: 25.0 to 83.2). The median IPSS improved significantly from 20 (range: 6-35) to 3 (0-22) (p < 0.001; Wilcoxon signed-rank test), as did the storage symptoms score, which decreased from 13 (2-20) to 3 (1-8) (p < 0.001). Median bladder blood flow increased at the trigone from 9.57 ± 0.83 ml/sec to 17.60 ± 1.08 ml/sec. Multiple regression analysis for the improved storage symptom score eliminated all explanatory variables except increased bladder perfusion. The data suggest that HoLEP improves blood flow in the bladder mucosa, which independently leads to the improvement of storage symptoms.

  2. Holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy for the management of urolithiasis in small ruminants and pot-bellied pigs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halland, Spring K.; House, John K.; George, Lisle

    2001-05-01

    Obstructive urolithiasis is a common problem in small ruminants and pot-bellied pigs. The most common site of urinary tract obstruction in these species is the urethra. Surgical procedures developed to relieve obstructions, in our experience have been effective in approximately 75% of cases. Urethral stricture is a common complication if the mucosa of the urethra is disrupted. The objective of this project was to evaluate endoscopy guided laser lithotripsy as a therapeutic modality to relieve urethral obstructions in small ruminants and pot-bellied pigs. The study population consisted of patients presented to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at the University of California Davis with obstructive urolithiasis. Lithotripsy was performed using a Holmium:YAG laser via a 200-micron low water quartz fiber passed through a flexible mini-endoscope. Two types of urinary calculi were managed with this technique, calcium carbonate and calcium hydroxyphosphate. Laser lithotripsy was effective at relieving obstructions caused by both types of calculi when conventional methods had failed. Laser lithotripsy performed via urethral endoscopy is a safe and effective therapeutic modality for management of obstructive urolithiasis in small ruminants and pot-bellied pigs and reduces the risk of post procedural urethral stricture.

  3. The Impact of Increased Bladder Blood Flow on Storage Symptoms after Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Hisamitsu; Aoki, Hiroaki; Muto, Satoru; Yamaguchi, Raizo; Tsujimura, Akira; Horie, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate how holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) improves urinary storage symptoms, we assessed blood flow in the urinary bladder mucosa of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) before and after laser surgery. Seventy-four consecutive patients with BPH (median age 69 years, range; 53–88) underwent HoLEP at our institution and are included in this study. We prospectively assessed the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), IPSS-QOL Score, the Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS), uroflowmetry, and blood flow in the urinary bladder, before and after surgery. Blood flow in the bladder mucosa was measured using the OMEGA FLOW (OMEGAWAVE, Tokyo, Japan) laser Doppler flowmeter. The median volume of the enucleated adenomas was 45.0 g (range: 25.0 to 83.2). The median IPSS improved significantly from 20 (range: 6–35) to 3 (0–22) (p<0.001; Wilcoxon signed-rank test), as did the storage symptoms score, which decreased from 13 (2–20) to 3 (1–8) (p<0.001). Median bladder blood flow increased at the trigone from 9.57±0.83 ml/sec to 17.60±1.08 ml/sec. Multiple regression analysis for the improved storage symptom score eliminated all explanatory variables except increased bladder perfusion. The data suggest that HoLEP improves blood flow in the bladder mucosa, which independently leads to the improvement of storage symptoms. PMID:26090819

  4. New framework hydrous silicate K{sub 3}Sc[Si{sub 3}O{sub 9}] {center_dot} H{sub 2}O related to the high-temperature anhydrous silicate K{sub 3}Ho[Si{sub 3}O{sub 9}] and symmetry analysis of a phase transition with prediction of structures

    SciTech Connect

    Belokoneva, E. L. Zorina, A. P.; Dimitrova, O. V.

    2013-07-15

    Crystals of a new framework silicate K{sub 3}Sc[Si{sub 3}O{sub 9}] {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, space group Pm2{sub 1}n (nonstandard setting of space group Pmn2{sub 1} = C{sub 2v}{sup 7}), are obtained under hydrothermal conditions. The structure is determined without preliminary knowledge of the chemical formula. The absolute configuration is determined. The structure is close to that of the high-temperature K{sub 3}Ho[Si{sub 3}O{sub 9}] phase, which was obtained upon the heating of K{sub 3}HoSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}(OH){sub 2}. This structural similarity is due to the specific conditions of synthesis and an analogous formula, where holmium is replaced by scandium. A symmetry analysis shows that the high local symmetry of a block (rod) is responsible for the first-order phase transition of both the order-disorder (OD) and displacement type. The number of structures in which the simplest and high-symmetry layers are multiplied by different symmetry elements are predicted.

  5. Thermochemistry of dense hydrous magnesium silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Kunal; Burnley, Pamela; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1994-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations under mantle conditions have identified a suite of dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) phases that could be conduits to transport water to at least the 660 km discontinuity via mature, relatively cold, subducting slabs. Water released from successive dehydration of these phases during subduction could be responsible for deep focus earthquakes, mantle metasomatism and a host of other physico-chemical processes central to our understanding of the earth's deep interior. In order to construct a thermodynamic data base that can delineate and predict the stability ranges for DHMS phases, reliable thermochemical and thermophysical data are required. One of the major obstacles in calorimetric studies of phases synthesized under high pressure conditions has been limitation due to the small (less than 5 mg) sample mass. Our refinement of calorimeter techniques now allow precise determination of enthalpies of solution of less than 5 mg samples of hydrous magnesium silicates. For example, high temperature solution calorimetry of natural talc (Mg(0.99) Fe(0.01)Si4O10(OH)2), periclase (MgO) and quartz (SiO2) yield enthalpies of drop solution at 1044 K to be 592.2 (2.2), 52.01 (0.12) and 45.76 (0.4) kJ/mol respectively. The corresponding enthalpy of formation from oxides at 298 K for talc is minus 5908.2 kJ/mol agreeing within 0.1 percent to literature values.

  6. SPM nanolithography of hydroxy-silicates.

    PubMed

    Valdrè, G; Moro, D; Hounsome, C M; Antognozzi, M

    2012-09-28

    Bio-nanopatterning of surfaces is becoming a crucial technique with applications ranging from molecular and cell biology to medicine. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is one of the most useful tools for nanopatterning of flat surfaces. However, these patterns are usually built on homogeneous surfaces and require chemical functionalization to ensure specific affinity. Layered magnesium-aluminum hydroxide-silicates have already shown unique self-assembly properties on DNA molecules, due to their peculiar crystal chemistry based on alternating positive and negative crystal layers. However, patterns on these surfaces tend to be randomly organized. Here we show etching and oxidation at the nanometer scale of magnesium-aluminum hydroxide-silicates using the same SPM probe for the creation of organized nanopatterns. In particular, it is possible to produce three-dimensional structures in a reproducible way, with a depth resolution of 0.4 nm, lateral resolution of tens of nm, and a speed of about 10 μm s(-1). We report, as an example, the construction of an atomically flat charged pattern, designed to guide DNA deposition along predetermined directions without the need of any chemical functionalization of the surface. PMID:22948182

  7. Stability of foams in silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proussevitch, Alexander A.; Sahagian, Dork L.; Kutolin, Vladislav A.

    1993-12-01

    Bubble coalescence and the spontaneous disruption of high-porosity foams in silicate melts are the result of physical expulsion of interpore melt (syneresis) leading to bubble coalescence, and diffusive gas exchange between bubbles. Melt expulsion can be achieved either along films between pairs of bubbles, or along Plateau borders which represent the contacts between 3 or more bubbles. Theoretical evaluation of these mechanisms is confirmed by experimental results, enabling us to quantify the relevant parameters and determine stable bubble size and critical film thickness in a foam as a function of melt viscosity, surface tension, and time. Foam stability is controlled primarily by melt viscosity and time. Melt transport leading to coalescence of bubbles proceeds along inter-bubble films for smaller bubbles, and along Plateau borders for larger bubbles. Thus the average bubble size accelerates with time. In silicate melts, the diffusive gas expulsion out of a region of foam is effective only for water (and even then, only at small length scales), as the diffusion of CO 2 is negligible. The results of our analyses are applicable to studies of vesicularity of lavas, melt degassing, and eruption mechanisms.

  8. Thermochemistry of dense hydrous magnesium silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Kunal; Burnley, Pamela; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    Recent experimental investigations under mantle conditions have identified a suite of dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) phases that could be conduits to transport water to at least the 660 km discontinuity via mature, relatively cold, subducting slabs. Water released from successive dehydration of these phases during subduction could be responsible for deep focus earthquakes, mantle metasomatism and a host of other physico-chemical processes central to our understanding of the earth's deep interior. In order to construct a thermodynamic data base that can delineate and predict the stability ranges for DHMS phases, reliable thermochemical and thermophysical data are required. One of the major obstacles in calorimetric studies of phases synthesized under high pressure conditions has been limitation due to the small (less than 5 mg) sample mass. Our refinement of calorimeter techniques now allow precise determination of enthalpies of solution of less than 5 mg samples of hydrous magnesium silicates. For example, high temperature solution calorimetry of natural talc (Mg(0.99) Fe(0.01)Si4O10(OH)2), periclase (MgO) and quartz (SiO2) yield enthalpies of drop solution at 1044 K to be 592.2 (2.2), 52.01 (0.12) and 45.76 (0.4) kJ/mol respectively. The corresponding enthalpy of formation from oxides at 298 K for talc is minus 5908.2 kJ/mol agreeing within 0.1 percent to literature values.

  9. Research drilling in young silicic volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Eichelberger, J.C.

    1989-06-30

    Magmatic activity, and particularly silicic magmatic activity, is the fundamental process by which continental crust forms and evolves. The transport of magma from deep crustal reservoirs to the surface is a neglected but important aspect of magmatic phenomena. It encompasses problems of eruptive behavior, hydrothermal circulation, and ore deposition, and must be understood in order to properly interpret deeper processes. Drilling provides a means for determining the relationship of shallow intrusive processes to eruption processes at young volcanoes where eruptions are best understood. Drilling also provides a means for directly observing the processes of heat and mass transfer by which recently emplaced intrusions approach equilibrium with their new environment. Drilling in the Inyo Chain, a 600-year-old chain of volcanic vents in California, has shown the close relationship of silicic eruption to shallow dike emplacement, the control of eruptive style by shallow porous-flow degassing, the origin of obsidian by welding, the development of igneous zonation by viscosity segregation, and the character and size of conduits in relation to well-understood magmatic and phreatic eruptions. 36 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Lithium alumino-silicate ion source development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Prabir Kumar; Seidl, Peter A.; Kwan, Joe W.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Waldron, William L.; Wu, James K.; Mazaheri, Kavous

    2009-11-01

    We report experimental progress on Li+ source development in preparation for warm dense matter heating experiments. To uniformly heat targets to electron-volt temperatures for the study of warm dense matter, we are pursuing the use of a low (E < 5 MeV) kinetic energy singly ionized lithium beam and a thin target. Two kinds of lithium (Li+) alumino-silicate ion sources, β-spodumene and β-eucryptite, each of area 0.31 cm2, have been fabricated for ion emission measurements. These surface ionization sources are heated to 1200 to 1300 C where they preferentially emit singly ionized alkali ions. Tight process controls were necessary in preparing and sintering the alumino-silicate to the porous tungsten substrate to produce an emitter that gives uniform ion emission, sufficient current density and low beam emittance. Current density limit of the two kinds have been measured, and ion species identification of possible contaminants has been verified with a Wien (E x B) filter.

  11. Carbon Mineralization Using Phosphate and Silicate Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokturk, H.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction from combustion of fossil fuels has become an urgent concern for the society due to marked increase in weather related natural disasters and other negative consequences of global warming. CO2 is a highly stable molecule which does not readily interact with other neutral molecules. However it is more responsive to ions due to charge versus quadrupole interaction [1-2]. Ions can be created by dissolving a salt in water and then aerosolizing the solution. This approach gives CO2 molecules a chance to interact with the hydrated salt ions over the large surface area of the aerosol. Ion containing aerosols exist in nature, an example being sea spray particles generated by breaking waves. Such particles contain singly and doubly charged salt ions including Na+, Cl-, Mg++ and SO4--. Depending on the proximity of CO2 to the ion, interaction energy can be significantly higher than the thermal energy of the aerosol. For example, an interaction energy of 0.6 eV is obtained with the sulfate (SO4--) ion when CO2 is the nearest neighbor [2]. In this research interaction between CO2 and ions which carry higher charges are investigated. The molecules selected for the study are triply charged phosphate (PO4---) ions and quadruply charged silicate (SiO4----) ions. Examples of salts which contain such molecules are potassium phosphate (K3PO4) and sodium orthosilicate (Na4SiO4). The research has been carried out with first principle quantum mechanical calculations using the Density Functional Theory method with B3LYP functional and Pople type basis sets augmented with polarization and diffuse functions. Atomic models consist of the selected ions surrounded by water and CO2 molecules. Similar to the results obtained with singly and doubly charged ions [1-2], phosphate and silicate ions attract CO2 molecules. Energy of interaction between the ion and CO2 is 1.6 eV for the phosphate ion and 3.3 eV for the silicate ion. Hence one can expect that the selected

  12. Impact of holmium fibre laser radiation (λ = 2.1 μm) on the spinal cord dura mater and adipose tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatova, S. A.; Kamynin, V. A.; Ryabova, A. V.; Loshchenov, V. B.; Zelenkov, P. V.; Zolotovskii, I. O.; Tsvetkov, V. B.; Kurkov, A. S.

    2015-08-01

    The impact of holmium fibre laser radiation on the samples of biologic tissues (dura mater of spinal cord and adipose tissue with interlayers of muscle) is studied. The experimental results are evaluated by the size of carbonisation and coagulation necrosis zones. The experiment shows that in the case of irradiation of the spinal cord dura mater samples the size of carbonisation and coagulation necrosis zones is insignificant. In the adipose tissue the carbonisation zone is also insignificant, but the region of cellular structure disturbance is large. In the muscle tissue the situation is opposite. The cw laser operation provides clinically acceptable degree of destruction in tissue samples with a minimal carbonisation zone.

  13. Wideband thulium-holmium-doped fiber source with combined forward and backward amplified spontaneous emission at 1600-2300  nm spectral band.

    PubMed

    Honzatko, Pavel; Baravets, Yauhen; Kasik, Ivan; Podrazky, Ondrej

    2014-06-15

    We have experimentally demonstrated two extremely wideband amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) sources. High bandwidth is achieved by combining the backward and forward ASEs generated in thulium-holmium-doped fiber using appropriate wideband couplers. The ASE source optimized for flat spectral power density covers a spectral range from 1527 to 2171 nm at a -10  dB level. The ASE source optimized for spectroscopy features an enhancement with respect to single-mode fiber (SMF) coupled halogen lamps within the spectral range from 1540 nm to more than 2340 nm covering the 800 nm bandwidth.

  14. Natural Weathering Rates of Silicate Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. F.

    2003-12-01

    Silicates constitute more than 90% of the rocks exposed at Earth's land surface (Garrels and Mackenzie, 1971). Most primary minerals comprising these rocks are thermodynamically unstable at surface pressure/temperature conditions and are therefore susceptible to chemical weathering. Such weathering has long been of interest in the natural sciences. Hartt (1853) correctly attributed chemical weathering to "the efficacy of water containing carbonic acid in promoting the decomposition of igneous rocks." Antecedent to the recent interest in the role of vegetation on chemical weathering, Belt (1874) observed that the most intense weathering of rocks in tropical Nicaragua was confined to forested regions. He attributed this effect to "the percolation through rocks of rain water charged with a little acid from decomposing vegetation." Chamberlin (1899) proposed that the enhanced rates of chemical weathering associated with major mountain building episodes in Earth's history resulted in a drawdown of atmospheric CO2 that led to periods of global cooling. Many of the major characteristics of chemical weathering had been described when Merrill (1906) published the groundbreaking volume Rocks, Rock Weathering, and Soils.The major advances since that time, particularly during the last several decades, have centered on understanding the fundamental chemical, hydrologic, and biologic processes that control weathering and in establishing quantitative weathering rates. This research has been driven by the importance of chemical weathering to a number environmentally and economically important issues. Undoubtedly, the most significant aspect of chemical weathering is the breakdown of rocks to form soils, a process that makes life possible on the surface of the Earth. The availability of many soil macronutrients such as magnesium, calcium, potassium, and PO4 is directly related to the rate at which primary minerals weather. Often such nutrient balances are upset by anthropogenic

  15. SILICATES FOR CORROSION CONTROL IN BUILDING POTABLE WATER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Silicates have been used to control the corrosion of drinking water distribution system materials. Previous work has shown that they are particularly useful in reducing the release of zinc from galvanized materials in hot water systems. Negatively charged silicate species were re...

  16. On the Filling Process Forming Silicic Segregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, K.; Marsh, B. D.

    2001-05-01

    Interdigitating silicic lenses are particularly well developed and well exposed in the Ferrar Dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Silicic segregations are texturally splotchy, have sharp upper contacts, and diffuse lower contacts that grade into normal dolerite. What is unusual about these 1- 2 m lenses is that the background sill shows very little compositional variation and yet the silicic segregations show wide compositional variation. In particular, silica content varies between 47 and 68%, and thus produces for the sill overall a bimodal composition. We have analyzed over 100 segregation samples in order to investigate the nature of the filling process. Previous work (Zavala & Marsh, 1999) has shown that segregations have compositions that correspond to interstitial liquid present at crystallinities between 59 and 63 % and temperatures between 1135° and 1115° . Additionally, it was noted that the large segregation lenses are not homogeneous and exhibit cyclic variations in silica content. This observation lead to the current study, in which new samples from the Peneplain Sill (235 to 241) show remarkable correlations between segregation texture, stratigraphic position and silica enrichment. Incompatibles like Zr indicate relatively low 35 to 40% concentrations of melt at the point of segregation extraction, which supports the notion that segregations formed by withdrawal of interstitial melt into tears as the solidification front (SF) became gravitationally unstable. The details of the filling process can also be gauged using chemical profiles normalized to segregation thickness. One group shows distinct multiple smaller cycles of silica enrichment versus depth, which suggests successive stages of opening. The other group shows a strong enrichment in silica followed by a steady decay to the base. The general form of this latter pattern measures the gradient in melt composition immediately below the segregation at the time of infilling. From

  17. The pulse of large silicic magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Silva, S. L.; Schmitt, A. K.

    2008-12-01

    Large silicic volcanic fields (LSVFs) are considered windows into the tops of upper crustal batholiths that are the foundations of the continental crust. The space-time-volume records of volcanism in LSVFs are therefore assumed to mirror the accumulation record of the associated upper crustal batholith. However, key questions about the link between the volcanic and plutonic realms remain to be addressed if this view is to be substantiated. Among these are: 1) What does the surface pattern of volcanism really tell us about the development of the plutonic system below? Do these eruptions represent evacuation from a distinct batch of magma that formed just prior to eruption or do they represent the periodic tapping of a long lived regional magma body? 2) What does the cyclicity of the large caldera systems and the regional concordance of eruptions tell us about the development of the magmatic systems beneath? Does the repose period represent the time scale of development of the next magma batch or does the erupted magma develop in a timescale much shorter than the repose period? 3) What does the self-organization of single batholithic scale magmatic systems, for instance the development of a zoned system, tell us about the dynamics and time scales over which these systems differentiate and evolve? We are addressing some of these questions in the Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex of the Central Andes. Here, time scales of assembly and organization of batholith-scale silicic magma systems investigated using 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb in zircon connote: 1) Supereruptions in the APVC evacuated distinct magma batches that accumulated within a few hundred thousand years prior to eruption 2) The repose period of cyclic supervolcanic systems is considerably longer than the time scale to develop the next eruptible magma batch 3) Batholith scale-silicic magma chambers can develop significant zonations in time scales of a few hundred thousand years. Additionally, our data suggest quasi

  18. Silicate Inclusions in the Kodaikanal IIE Iron Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurat, G.; Varela, M. E.; Zinner, E.

    2005-01-01

    Silicate inclusions in iron meteorites display an astonishing chemical and mineralogical variety, ranging from chondritic to highly fractionated, silica- and alkali-rich assemblages. In spite of this, their origin is commonly considered to be a simple one: mixing of silicates, fractionated or unfractionated, with metal. The latter had to be liquid in order to accommodate the former in a pore-free way which all models accomplish by assuming shock melting. II-E iron meteorites are particularly interesting because they contain an exotic zoo of silicate inclusions, including some chemically strongly fractionated ones. They also pose a formidable conundrum: young silicates are enclosed by very old metal. This and many other incompatibilities between models and reality forced the formulation of an alternative genetic model for irons. Here we present preliminary findings in our study of Kodaikanal silicate inclusions.

  19. Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates in the Far-infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen A,; Benford, Dominic J.; Dwek, Eli; Henry, Ross M.; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Silverberg, Robert f.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2008-01-01

    Correct interpretation of a vast array of astronomical data relies heavily on understanding the properties of silicate dust as a function of wavelength, temperature, and crystallinity. We introduce the QPASI-T (Optical Properties of Astronomical Silicates with Infrared Techniques) project to address the need for high fidelity optical characterization data on the various forms of astronomical dust. We use two spectrometers to provide extinction data for silicate samples across a wide wavelength range (from the near infrared to the millimeter). New experiments are in development that will provide complementary information on the emissivity of our samples, allowing us to complete the optical characterization of these dust materials. In this paper, we present initial results from several materials including amorphous iron silicate, magnesium silicate and silica smokes, over a wide range of temperatures, and discuss the design and operation of our new experiments.

  20. Cesium titanium silicate and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, M.L.

    1997-01-07

    The invention is the new material, a ternary compound of cesium, silica, and titania, together with a method of making the ternary compound, cesium titanium silicate pollucite. More specifically, the invention is Cs{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}Si{sub 4}O{sub 13} pollucite which is a new crystalline phase representing a novel class of Ti-containing zeolites. Compositions contain relatively high Cs{sub 2}O and TiO{sub 2} loadings and are durable glass and ceramic materials. The amount of TiO{sub 2} and Cs{sub 2} that can be incorporated into these glasses and crystalline ceramics far exceeds the limits set for the borosilicate high level waste glass. 10 figs.

  1. Cesium titanium silicate and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Balmer, Mari L.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is the new material, a ternary compound of cesium, silica, and titania, together with a method of making the ternary compound, cesium titanium silicate pollucite. More specifically, the invention is Cs.sub.2 Ti.sub.2 Si.sub.4 O.sub.13 pollucite which is a new crystalline phase representing a novel class of Ti-containing zeolites. Compositions contain relatively high Cs.sub.2 O and TiO.sub.2 loadings and are durable glass and ceramic materials. The amount of TiO.sub.2 and Cs.sub.2 that can be incorporated into these glasses and crystalline ceramics far exceeds the limits set for the borosilicate high level waste glass.

  2. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  3. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in ablation simulations of the meteoroid or glassy Thermal Protection Systems for spacecraft. Time-dependent axi-symmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. For model validation, the surface recession of fused amorphous quartz rod is computed, and the recession predictions reasonably agree with available data. The present parametric studies for two groups of meteoroid earth entry conditions indicate that the mass loss through moving molten layer is negligibly small for heat-flux conditions at around 1 MW/cm(exp. 2).

  4. Comparison of Photoselective Vaporization versus Holmium Laser Enucleation for Treatment of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia in a Small Prostate Volume

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kang Sup; Choi, Jin Bong; Bae, Woong Jin; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyun Woo; Cho, Su Yeon; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) using GreenLight and Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is an important surgical technique for management of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). We aimed to compare the effectiveness and safety of PVP using a 120 W GreenLight laser with HoLEP in a small prostate volume. Methods Patients who underwent PVP or HoLEP surgery for BPH at our institutions were reviewed from May 2009 to December 2014 in this retrospective study. Among them, patients with prostate volumes < 40 mL based on preoperative trans-rectal ultrasonography were included in this study. Peri-operative and post-operative parameters—such as International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), post-void residual urine volume (PVR), and complications—were compared between the groups. Results PVP was performed in 176 patients and HoLEP in162 patients. Preoperative demographic data were similar in both groups, with the exception of PVR. Operative time and catheter duration did not show significant difference. Significant improvements compared to preoperative values were verified at the postoperative evaluation in both groups in terms of IPSS, QoL, Qmax, and PVR. Comparison of the postoperative parameters between the PVP and HoLEP groups demonstrated no significant difference, with the exception of IPSS voiding subscore at 1 month postoperatively (5.9 vs. 3.8, P< 0.001). There was no significant difference in postoperative complications between the two groups. Conclusion Our data suggest that PVP and HoLEP are efficient and safe surgical treatment options for patients with small prostate volume. PMID:27227564

  5. Semiempirical quantum chemistry model for the lanthanides: RM1 (Recife Model 1) parameters for dysprosium, holmium and erbium.

    PubMed

    Filho, Manoel A M; Dutra, José Diogo L; Rocha, Gerd B; Simas, Alfredo M; Freire, Ricardo O

    2014-01-01

    Complexes of dysprosium, holmium, and erbium find many applications as single-molecule magnets, as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, as anti-cancer agents, in optical telecommunications, etc. Therefore, the development of tools that can be proven helpful to complex design is presently an active area of research. In this article, we advance a major improvement to the semiempirical description of lanthanide complexes: the Recife Model 1, RM1, model for the lanthanides, parameterized for the trications of Dy, Ho, and Er. By representing such lanthanide in the RM1 calculation as a three-electron atom with a set of 5 d, 6 s, and 6 p semiempirical orbitals, the accuracy of the previous sparkle models, mainly concentrated on lanthanide-oxygen and lanthanide-nitrogen distances, is extended to other types of bonds in the trication complexes' coordination polyhedra, such as lanthanide-carbon, lanthanide-chlorine, etc. This is even more important as, for example, lanthanide-carbon atom distances in the coordination polyhedra of the complexes comprise about 30% of all distances for all complexes of Dy, Ho, and Er considered. Our results indicate that the average unsigned mean error for the lanthanide-carbon distances dropped from an average of 0.30 Å, for the sparkle models, to 0.04 Å for the RM1 model for the lanthanides; for a total of 509 such distances for the set of all Dy, Ho, and Er complexes considered. A similar behavior took place for the other distances as well, such as lanthanide-chlorine, lanthanide-bromine, lanthanide, phosphorus and lanthanide-sulfur. Thus, the RM1 model for the lanthanides, being advanced in this article, broadens the range of application of semiempirical models to lanthanide complexes by including comprehensively many other types of bonds not adequately described by the previous models.

  6. Semiempirical Quantum Chemistry Model for the Lanthanides: RM1 (Recife Model 1) Parameters for Dysprosium, Holmium and Erbium

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Manoel A. M.; Dutra, José Diogo L.; Rocha, Gerd B.; Simas, Alfredo M.; Freire, Ricardo O.

    2014-01-01

    Complexes of dysprosium, holmium, and erbium find many applications as single-molecule magnets, as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, as anti-cancer agents, in optical telecommunications, etc. Therefore, the development of tools that can be proven helpful to complex design is presently an active area of research. In this article, we advance a major improvement to the semiempirical description of lanthanide complexes: the Recife Model 1, RM1, model for the lanthanides, parameterized for the trications of Dy, Ho, and Er. By representing such lanthanide in the RM1 calculation as a three-electron atom with a set of 5 d, 6 s, and 6 p semiempirical orbitals, the accuracy of the previous sparkle models, mainly concentrated on lanthanide-oxygen and lanthanide-nitrogen distances, is extended to other types of bonds in the trication complexes’ coordination polyhedra, such as lanthanide-carbon, lanthanide-chlorine, etc. This is even more important as, for example, lanthanide-carbon atom distances in the coordination polyhedra of the complexes comprise about 30% of all distances for all complexes of Dy, Ho, and Er considered. Our results indicate that the average unsigned mean error for the lanthanide-carbon distances dropped from an average of 0.30 Å, for the sparkle models, to 0.04 Å for the RM1 model for the lanthanides; for a total of 509 such distances for the set of all Dy, Ho, and Er complexes considered. A similar behavior took place for the other distances as well, such as lanthanide-chlorine, lanthanide-bromine, lanthanide, phosphorus and lanthanide-sulfur. Thus, the RM1 model for the lanthanides, being advanced in this article, broadens the range of application of semiempirical models to lanthanide complexes by including comprehensively many other types of bonds not adequately described by the previous models. PMID:24497945

  7. Comparison of holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser lithotripsy: ablation thresholds, ablation rates, and retropulsion effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-07-01

    The holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser lithotriptor is capable of operating at high pulse energies, but efficient operation is limited to low pulse rates (~10 Hz) during lithotripsy. On the contrary, the thulium fiber laser (TFL) is limited to low pulse energies, but can operate efficiently at high pulse rates (up to 1000 Hz). This study compares stone ablation threshold, ablation rate, and retropulsion for the two different Ho:YAG and TFL operation modes. The TFL (λ = 1908 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 5 to 35 mJ, 500-μs pulse duration, and pulse rates of 10 to 400 Hz. The Ho:YAG laser (λ = 2120 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 30 to 550 mJ, 350-μs pulse duration, and a pulse rate of 10 Hz. Laser energy was delivered through 200- and 270-μm-core optical fibers in contact mode with human calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones for ablation studies and plaster-of-Paris stone phantoms for retropulsion studies. The COM stone ablation threshold for Ho:YAG and TFL measured 82.6 and 20.8 J/cm2, respectively. Stone retropulsion with the Ho:YAG laser linearly increased with pulse energy. Retropulsion with TFL was minimal at pulse rates less than 150 Hz, then rapidly increased at higher pulse rates. For minimal stone retropulsion, Ho:YAG operation at pulse energies less than 175 mJ at 10 Hz and TFL operation at 35 mJ at 100 Hz is recommended, with both lasers producing comparable ablation rates. Further development of a TFL operating with both high pulse energies of 100 to 200 mJ and high pulse rates of 100 to 150 Hz may also provide an alternative to the Ho:YAG laser for higher ablation rates, when retropulsion is not a primary concern.

  8. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate: surgical, functional, and quality-of-life outcomes upon extended follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Ilter; Ozveri, Hakan; Akin, Yigit; Ipekci, Tumay; Alican, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To evaluate the long-term surgical, functional, and quality-of-life (QoL) outcomes after Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) in patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed recorded data on patients who underwent HoLEP between June 2002 and February 2005. Ninety-six patients were enrolled. Demographic, perioperative, and postoperative data were recorded. On follow-up, International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSSs), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, QoL scores, peak uroflowmetric data (Qmax values), and post-voiding residual urine volumes (PVR volumes), were recorded. Complications were scored using the Clavien system. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Results: The mean follow-up time was 41.8±34.6 months and the mean patient age 73.2±8.7 years. The mean prostate volume was 74.6±34.3mL. Significant improvements in Qmax values, QoL, and IPSSs and decreases in PSA levels and PVR volumes were noted during follow-up (all p values=0.001). The most common complication was a requirement for re-catheterisation because of urinary retention. Two patients had concomitant bladder tumours that did not invade the muscles. Eight patients (8.3%) required re-operations; three had residual adenoma, three urethral strictures, and two residual prostate tissue in the bladder. Stress incontinence occurred in one patient (1%). All complications were of Clavien Grade 3a. We noted no Clavien 3b, 4, or 5 complications during follow-up. Conclusions: HoLEP improved IPSSs, Qmax values, PVR volumes, and QoL and was associated with a low complication rate, during extended follow-up. Thus, HoLEP can be a viable option to transurethral resection of the prostate. PMID:27256184

  9. DISORDERED SILICATES IN SPACE: A STUDY OF LABORATORY SPECTRA OF 'AMORPHOUS' SILICATES

    SciTech Connect

    Speck, Angela K.; Whittington, Alan G.; Hofmeister, Anne M.

    2011-10-20

    We present a laboratory study of silicate glasses of astrophysically relevant compositions including olivines, pyroxenes, and melilites. With emphasis on the classic Si-O stretching feature near 10 {mu}m, we compare infrared spectra of our new samples with laboratory spectra on ostensibly similar compositions, and also with synthetic silicate spectral data commonly used in dust modeling. Several different factors affect spectral features including sample chemistry (e.g., polymerization, Mg/Fe ratio, oxidation state, and Al-content) whereas different sample preparation techniques lead to variations in porosity, density, and water content. The convolution of chemical and physical effects makes it difficult to attribute changes in spectral parameters to any given variable. It is important that detailed chemical and structural characterization be provided along with laboratory spectra. In addition to composition and density, we measured the glass transition temperatures for the samples which place upper limits on the formation and/or processing temperatures of these solids in space. Popular synthetically generated optical functions do not have spectral features that match any of our glass samples. However, the {approx}10 {mu}m feature generated by the synthetic data rarely exactly matches the shape and peak position of astronomically observed silicate features. Our comparison with the synthetic spectra allows astronomers to determine likely candidates among our glass samples for matching astronomical observations.

  10. INTERSTELLAR SILICATE DUST IN THE z = 0.89 ABSORBER TOWARD PKS 1830-211: CRYSTALLINE SILICATES AT HIGH REDSHIFT?

    SciTech Connect

    Aller, Monique C.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Som, Debopam; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Vladilo, Giovanni

    2012-03-20

    We present evidence of a >10{sigma} detection of the 10 {mu}m silicate dust absorption feature in the spectrum of the gravitationally lensed quasar PKS 1830-211, produced by a foreground absorption system at redshift 0.886. We have examined more than 100 optical depth templates, derived from both observations of Galactic and extragalactic sources and laboratory measurements, in order to constrain the chemical structure of the silicate dust. We find that the best fit to the observed absorption profile is produced by laboratory crystalline olivine, with a corresponding peak optical depth of {tau}{sub 10} = 0.27 {+-} 0.05. The fit is slightly improved upon by including small contributions from additional materials, such as silica, enstatite, or serpentine, which suggests that the dust composition may consist of a blend of crystalline silicates. Combining templates for amorphous and crystalline silicates, we find that the fraction of crystalline silicates needs to be at least 95%. Given the rarity of extragalactic sources with such a high degree of silicate crystallinity, we also explore the possibility that the observed spectral features are produced by amorphous silicates in combination with other molecular or atomic transitions, or by foreground source contamination. While we cannot rule out these latter possibilities, they lead to much poorer profile fits than for the crystalline olivine templates. If the presence of crystalline interstellar silicates in this distant galaxy is real, it would be highly unusual, given that the Milky Way interstellar matter contains essentially only amorphous silicates. It is possible that the z = 0.886 absorber toward PKS 1830-211, well known for its high molecular content, has a unique star-forming environment that enables crystalline silicates to form and prevail.

  11. Lattice thermal conductivity of dense silicate glass at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y. Y.; Hsieh, W. P.

    2015-12-01

    The layered structure of the Earth's interior is generally believed to develop through the magma ocean differentiation in the early Earth. Previous seismic studies revealed the existence of ultra low velocity zones above the core mantle boundary (CMB) which was inferred to be associated with the remnant of a deep magma ocean. The heat flux through the core mantle boundary therefore would strongly depend on the thermal conductivity, both lattice (klat) and radiative (krad) of dense silicate melts and major constituent minerals of the lower mantle. Recent experimental results on the radiative thermal conductivity of dense silicate glasses and lower-mantle minerals suggest that krad of dense silicate glasses could be remarkably lower than krad of the surrounding solid mantle phases. In this case, the dense silicate melts will act as a trap for heat from the Earth's outer core. However, this conclusion remains uncertain because of the lack of direct measurements on lattice thermal conductivities of silicate glasses/melts under lower mantle pressures up to date. Here we report experimental results on lattice thermal conductivities of dense silicate glass with basaltic composition under pressures relevant to the Earth's lower mantle in a diamond-anvil cell using time-domain thermoreflectance method. The study will assist the comprehension of thermal transport properties of silicate melts in the Earth's deep interior and is crucial for understanding the dynamic and thermal evolution of the Earth's internal structure.

  12. Deep ocean biogeochemistry of silicic acid and nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmiento, J. L.; Simeon, J.; Gnanadesikan, A.; Gruber, N.; Key, R. M.; Schlitzer, R.

    2007-03-01

    Observations of silicic acid and nitrate along the lower branch of the global conveyor belt circulation show that silicic acid accumulation by diatom opal dissolution occurs at 6.4 times the rate of nitrate addition by organic matter remineralization. The export of opal and organic matter from the surface ocean occurs at a Si:N mole ratio that is much smaller than this almost everywhere (cf. Sarmiento et al., 2004). The preferential increase of silicic acid over nitrate as the deep circulation progresses from the North Atlantic to the North Pacific is generally interpreted as requiring deep dissolution of opal together with shallow remineralization of organic matter (Broecker, 1991). However, Sarmiento et al. (2004) showed that the primary reason for the low silicic acid concentration of the upper ocean is that the waters feeding the main thermocline from the surface Southern Ocean are depleted in silicic acid relative to nitrate. By implication, the same Southern Ocean processes that deplete the silicic acid in the surface Southern Ocean must also be responsible for the enhanced silicic acid concentration of the deep ocean. We use observations and results from an updated version of the adjoint model of Schlitzer (2000) to confirm that this indeed the case.

  13. On the Stabilization of Ribose by Silicate Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Mayagoitia, Álvaro; Horton, Scott R.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Šponer, Jiří; Šponer, Judit E.; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel

    2011-03-01

    The RNA-world theory hypothesizes that early Earth life was based on the RNA molecule. However, the notion that ribose, the sugar in RNA, is unstable still casts a serious doubt over this theory. Recently, it has been found that the silicate-mediated formose reaction facilitates the stabilization of ribose. Using accurate quantum chemical calculations, we determined the relative stability of the silicate complexes of arabinose, lyxose, ribose, and xylose with the intent to determine which would form predominantly from a formose-like reaction. Five stereoisomers were investigated for each complex. The stereoisomers of 2:1 ribose-silicate are the more stable ones, to the extent that the least stable of these is even more stable than the most stable stereoisomer of the other 2:1 sugar-silicate complexes. Thus, thermodynamically, a formose-like reaction in the presence of silicate minerals should preferentially form the silicate complex of ribose over the silicate complex of arabinose, lyxose, and xylose.

  14. Microstructures of Rare Silicate Stardust from Nova and Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Messenger, S

    2011-01-01

    Most silicate stardust analyzed in the laboratory and observed around stellar environments derives from O-rich red giant and AGB stars [1,2]. Supernova (SN) silicates and oxides are comparatively rare, and fewer than 10 grains from no-va or binary star systems have been identified to date. Very little is known about dust formation in these stellar environments. Mineralogical studies of only three O-rich SN [3-5] and no nova grains have been performed. Here we report the microstructure and chemical makeup of two SN silicates and one nova grain.

  15. The Mineralogy of Circumstellar Silicates Preserved in Cometary Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.

    2010-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) contain a record of the building blocks of the solar system including presolar grains, molecular cloud material, and materials formed in the early solar nebula. Cometary IDPs have remained relatively unaltered since their accretion because of the lack of parent body thermal and aqueous alteration. We are using coordinated transmission electron microscope (TEM) and ion microprobe studies to establish the origins of the various components within cometary IDPs. Of particular interest is the nature and abundance of presolar silicates in these particles because astronomical observations suggest that crystalline and amorphous silicates are the dominant grain types produced in young main sequence stars and evolved O-rich stars. Five circumstellar grains have been identified including three amorphous silicate grains and two polycrystalline aggregates. All of these grains are between 0.2 and 0.5 micrometers in size. The isotopic compositions of all five presolar silicate grains fall within the range of presolar oxides and silicates, having large (17)O-enrichments and normal (18)O/(16)O ratios (Group 1 grains from AGB and RG stars). The amorphous silicates are chemically heterogeneous and contain nanophase FeNi metal and FeS grains in a Mg-silicate matrix. Two of the amorphous silicate grains are aggregates with subgrains showing variable Mg/Si ratios in chemical maps. The polycrystalline grains show annealed textures (equilibrium grains boundaries, uniform Mg/Fe ratios), and consist of 50-100 nm enstatite and pyrrhotite grains with lesser forsterite. One of the polycrystalline aggregates contains a subgrain of diopside. The polycrystalline aggregates form by subsolidus annealing of amorphous precursors. The bulk compositions of the five grains span a wide range in Mg/Si ratios from 0.4 to 1.2 (avg. 0.86). The average Fe/Si (0.40) and S/Si (0.21) ratios show a much narrower range of values and are approximately 50% of their solar

  16. Thermally responsive aqueous silicate mixtures and use thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.H.; Vinson, E.F.

    1987-02-03

    A method is described of plugging or sealing a zone in a subterranean formation comprising: (a) contacting the zone with an aqueous silicate composition consisting essentially of (i) an aqueous solution containing an alkali metal silicate; and, (ii) a thermally responsive gelation activator selected from the group consisting of lactose, dextrose, fructose, galactose, mannose, mantose, xylose and mixtures thereof; and (b) activating the gelation activator in response to a thermal change in the composition within the formation whereby the silicate composition is caused to form a gel in the zone.

  17. Chemistry of the subalkalic silicic obsidians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacDonald, Ray; Smith, Robert L.; Thomas, John E.

    1992-01-01

    Nonhydrated obsidians are quenched magmatic liquids that record in their chemical compositions details of the tectonic environment of formation and of the differentiation mechanisms that affected their subsequent evolution. This study attempts to analyze, in terms of geologic processes, the compositional variations in the subalkalic silicic obsidians (Si02≥70 percent by weight, molecular (Na2O+K20)>Al2O3). New major- and trace-element determinations of 241 samples and a compilation of 130 published major-element analyses are reported and interpreted. Obsidians from five different tectonic settings are recognized: (1) primitive island arcs, (2) mature island arcs, (3) continental margins, (4) continental interiors, and (5) oceanic extensional zones. Tectonomagmatic discrimination between these groups is successfully made on Nb-Ta, Nb-FeOt and Th-Hf-Ta plots, and compositional ranges and averages for each group are presented. The chemical differences between groups are related to the type of crust in which magmas were generated. With increasingly sialic (continental type) crust, the obsidians show overall enrichment in F, Be, Li, Mo, Nb, Rb, Sn, Ta, U, W, Zn, and the rare-earth elements, and depletion in Mg, Ca, Ba, Co, Sc, Sr, and Zr. They become more potassic, have higher Fe/Mg and F/Cl ratios, and lower Zr/Hf, Nb/Ta, and Th/U ratios. Higher values of total rare-earth elements are accompanied by light rare-earth-element enrichment and pronounced negative Eu anomalies. An attempt is made to link obsidian chemistry to genetic mechanlism. Two broad groups of rocks are distinguished: one generated where crystal-liquid processes dominated (CLPD types), which are the products of crustal anatexis, possibly under conditions of low halogen fugacity, ± crystal fractionation ± magma mixing; and a second group represented by rocks formed in the upper parts of large magma chambers by interplays of crystal fractionation, volatile transfer, magma mixing, and possibly various

  18. Metal/Silicate Partitioning of W, Ge, Ga and Ni: Dependence on Silicate Melt Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singletary, S.; Drake, M. J.

    2004-12-01

    Metal/silicate partition coefficients (Dm/s) for siderophile elements are essential to investigations of core formation when used in conjunction with the pattern of elemental abundances in the Earth's mantle (Drake and Righter, 2002; Jones and Drake, 1986; Righter et al. 1997). The partitioning of siderophile elements is controlled by temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and by the compositions of the metal and silicate phases. In this work, we investigate the role of silicate melt composition on the partitioning of the siderophile elements W, Ge, Ga and Ni between metallic and silicate liquid. Experiments were performed in the Experimental Geochemistry Laboratory at the University of Arizona utilizing a non-end loaded piston cylinder apparatus with a barium carbonate pressure medium. Starting materials were created by combining the mafic and silicic compositions of Jaeger and Drake (2000) with Fe powder (~25 wt% of the total mixture) to achieve metal saturation. Small amounts of W, Ge, Ga2O3 and NiO powder (less than 2 wt% each) were also added to the starting compositions. The experiments were contained in a graphite capsule and performed with temperature and pressure fixed at 1400ºC and 1.5 GPa. Experimental run products were analyzed with the University of Arizona Cameca SX50 electron microprobe with four wavelength dispersive spectrometers and a PAP ZAF correction program. All experiments in our set are saturated with metal and silicate liquid, indicating that oxygen fugacity is below IW. Several of the runs also contain a gallium-rich spinel as an additional saturating phase. Quench phases are also present in the silicate liquid in all runs. The experimentally produced liquids have nbo/t values (calculated using the method of Mills, 1993) that range from 1.10 to 2.97. These values are higher than those calculated for the liquids in the Jaeger and Drake (2000) study. The higher nbo/t values are due to uptake of Fe by the melt. The initial silicate

  19. Interstellar silicate analogs for grain-surface reaction experiments: Gas-phase condensation and characterization of the silicate dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Sabri, T.; Jäger, C.; Gavilan, L.; Lemaire, J. L.; Vidali, G.; Henning, T.

    2014-01-10

    Amorphous, astrophysically relevant silicates were prepared by laser ablation of siliceous targets and subsequent quenching of the evaporated atoms and clusters in a helium/oxygen gas atmosphere. The described gas-phase condensation method can be used to synthesize homogeneous and astrophysically relevant silicates with different compositions ranging from nonstoichiometric magnesium iron silicates to pyroxene- and olivine-type stoichiometry. Analytical tools have been used to characterize the morphology, composition, and spectral properties of the condensates. The nanometer-sized silicate condensates represent a new family of cosmic dust analogs that can generally be used for laboratory studies of cosmic processes related to condensation, processing, and destruction of cosmic dust in different astrophysical environments. The well-characterized silicates comprising amorphous Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, as well as the corresponding crystalline silicates forsterite and fayalite, produced by thermal annealing of the amorphous condensates, have been used as real grain surfaces for H{sub 2} formation experiments. A specifically developed ultra-high vacuum apparatus has been used for the investigation of molecule formation experiments. The results of these molecular formation experiments on differently structured Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} described in this paper will be the topic of the next paper of this series.

  20. Interstellar Silicate Dust: Modeling and Grain Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Indrajit

    We examine some aspects of the alignment of silicate dust grains with respect to the interstellar magnetic field. First, we consider possible observational constraints on the magnetic properties of the grains. Second, we investigate the role of collisions with gas atoms and the production of H2 molecules on the grain surface in the alignment process when the grain is drifting in the gaseous medium. Paramagnetism associated with Fe content in the dust is thought to play a critical role in alignment. Min et al (2007) claimed that the Fe content of the silicate dust can be constrained by the shape of the 10 μm extinction feature. They found low Fe abundances, potentially posing problems for grain alignment theories. We revisit this analysis modeling the grains with irregularly shaped Gaussian Random Sphere (GRS). We give a comprehensive review of all the relevant constraints researchers apply and discuss their effects on the inferred mineralogy. Also, we extend this analysis to examine whether constraints can be placed on the presence of Fe-rich inclusions which could yield "super-paramagnetism". This possibility has long been speculated, but so far observational constraints are lacking. Every time a gas atom collides with a grain, the grain's angular momentum is slightly modified. Likewise when an H2 molecule forms on the surface and is ejected. Here also we model the grain with GRS shape and considered various scenarios about how the colliding gas particles depart the grain. We develop theoretical and computational tools to estimate the torques associated with these aforementioned events for a range of grain drift speeds---from low subsonic to high supersonic speeds. Code results were verified with spherical grain for which analytical results were available. Finally, the above torque results were used to study the grain rotational dynamics. Solving dynamical equations we examine how these torques influence the grain alignment process. Our analysis suggests that

  1. Copper isotopic composition of the silicate Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sheng-Ao; Huang, Jian; Liu, Jingao; Wörner, Gerhard; Yang, Wei; Tang, Yan-Jie; Chen, Yi; Tang, Limei; Zheng, Jianping; Li, Shuguang

    2015-10-01

    Copper isotopes have been successfully applied to many fields in geochemistry, and in particular, as a strongly chalcophile element, the isotope systematics of Cu can be potentially applied as a proxy for crust-mantle and core-mantle differentiation processes. However, to date, the Cu isotopic composition of distinct silicate reservoirs in the Earth, as well as the behaviour of Cu isotopes during igneous processes and slab dehydration are not well constrained. To address these issues, here we report high-precision (±0.05‰; 2SD) Cu isotope data for 132 terrestrial samples including 28 cratonic peridotites, 19 orogenic peridotites, 70 basalts (MORBs, OIBs, arc basalts and continental basalts) and 15 subduction-related andesites/dacites sourced worldwide. The peridotites are classified into metasomatized and non-metasomatized groups, based upon their rare earth element (REE) patterns and the presence or lack of minerals diagnostic of metasomatism (e.g., phlogopite). The metasomatized peridotites span a wide range of δ65Cu values from -0.64 to +1.82‰, in sharp contrast to the non-metasomatized peridotites that exhibit a narrow range of δ65Cu from -0.15 to +0.18‰ with an average of + 0.03 ± 0.24 ‰ (2SD). Comparison between these two groups of peridotites demonstrates that metasomatism significantly fractionates Cu isotopes with sulfide breakdown and precipitation potentially shifting Cu isotopes towards light and heavy values, respectively. MORBs and OIBs have homogeneous Cu isotopic compositions (+ 0.09 ± 0.13 ‰; 2SD), which are indistinguishable from those of the non-metasomatized peridotites within uncertainty. This suggests that Cu isotope fractionation during mantle partial melting is limited, even if sulfides are a residual phase. Compared with MORBs and OIBs, arc and continental basalts are more heterogeneous in Cu isotopic composition. In particular, basalts that were collected from a traverse across the Kamchatka arc over a distance of 200 to 400

  2. Metal-Silicate Segregation in Asteroidal Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrin, Jason S.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2006-01-01

    A fundamental process of planetary differentiation is the segregation of metal-sulfide and silicate phases, leading eventually to the formation of a metallic core. Asteroidal meteorites provide a glimpse of this process frozen in time from the early solar system. While chondrites represent starting materials, iron meteorites provide an end product where metal has been completely concentrated in a region of the parent asteroid. A complimentary end product is seen in metal-poor achondrites that have undergone significant igneous processing, such as angrites, HED's and the majority of aubrites. Metal-rich achondrites such as acapulcoite/lodranites, winonaites, ureilites, and metal-rich aubrites may represent intermediate stages in the metal segregation process. Among these, acapulcoite-lodranites and ureilites are examples of primary metal-bearing mantle restites, and therefore provide an opportunity to observe the metal segregation process that was captured in progress. In this study we use bulk trace element compositions of acapulcoites-lodranites and ureilites for this purpose.

  3. Selective silicate-directed motility in diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Bondoc, Karen Grace V.; Heuschele, Jan; Gillard, Jeroen; Vyverman, Wim; Pohnert, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are highly abundant unicellular algae that often dominate pelagic as well as benthic primary production in the oceans and inland waters. Being strictly dependent on silica to build their biomineralized cell walls, marine diatoms precipitate 240 × 1012 mol Si per year, which makes them the major sink in the global Si cycle. Dissolved silicic acid (dSi) availability frequently limits diatom productivity and influences species composition of communities. We show that benthic diatoms selectively perceive and behaviourally react to gradients of dSi. Cell speed increases under dSi-limited conditions in a chemokinetic response and, if gradients of this resource are present, increased directionality of cell movement promotes chemotaxis. The ability to exploit local and short-lived dSi hotspots using a specific search behaviour likely contributes to micro-scale patch dynamics in biofilm communities. On a global scale this behaviour might affect sediment–water dSi fluxes and biogeochemical cycling. PMID:26842428

  4. Nanostructure of Er3+ doped silicates.

    PubMed

    Yao, Nan; Hou, Kirk; Haines, Christopher D; Etessami, Nathan; Ranganathan, Varadh; Halpern, Susan B; Kear, Bernard H; Klein, Lisa C; Sigel, George H

    2005-06-01

    We demonstrate nanostructural evolution resulting in highly increased photoluminescence in silicates doped with Er3+ ions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging, nano-energy dispersed X-ray (NEDX) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence analysis confirm the local composition and structure changes of the Er3+ ions upon thermal annealing. We studied two types of amorphous nanopowder: the first is of the composition SiO2/18Al2O3/2Er2O3 (SAE), synthesized by combustion flame-chemical vapor condensation, and the second is with a composition of SiO2/8Y2O3/2Er2O3 (SYE), synthesized by sol-gel synthesis (composition in mol%). Electron diffraction and HRTEM imaging clearly show the formation of nanocrystallites with an average diameter of approximately 8 nm in SAE samples annealed at 1000 degrees C and SYE samples annealed at 1200 degrees C. The volume fraction of the nanocrystalline phase increased with each heat treatment, eventually leading to complete devitrification at 1400 degrees C. Further XRD and NEDX analysis indicates that the nanocrystalline phase has the pyrochlore structure with the formula Er(x)Al(2-x)Si2O7 or Er(x)Y(2-x)Si2O7 and a surrounding silica matrix.

  5. Lithologic mapping of silicate rocks using TIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    Common rock-forming minerals have thermal infrared spectral features that are measured in the laboratory to infer composition. An airborne Daedalus scanner (TIMS) that collects six channels of thermal infrared radiance data (8 to 12 microns), may be used to measure these same features for rock identification. Previously, false-color composite pictures made from channels 1, 3, and 5 and emittance spectra for small areas on these images were used to make lithologic maps. Central wavelength, standard deviation, and amplitude of normal curves regressed on the emittance spectra are related to compositional information for crystalline igneous silicate rocks. As expected, the central wavelength varies systematically with silica content and with modal quartz content. Standard deviation is less sensitive to compositional changes, but large values may result from mixed admixture of vegetation. Compression of the six TIMS channels to three image channels made from the regressed parameters may be effective in improving geologic mapping from TIMS data, and these synthetic images may form a basis for the remote assessment of rock composition.

  6. Study of thermal effects of silicate-containing hydroxyapatites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Zaits, A. V.; Berdinskaya, N. V.; Mylnikova, T. S.

    2016-02-01

    The possibility of modifications of hydroxyapatite silicate ions, from the extracellular fluid prototype solution under near-physiological conditions has been studied. Formation of silicon-structured hydroxyapatite with different extent of substitution of phosphate groups in the silicate group has been established through chemical and X-ray diffraction analyses, FTIR spectroscopy and optical microscopy. The results obtained are in agreement and suggest the possibility of substitution of phosphate groups for silicate groups in the hydroxyapatite structure when introducing different sources of silica, tetraethoxysilane and sodium silicate, in the reaction mixture. Growth in the amount of silicon in Si-HA results in the increase in the thermal stability of the samples. The greatest mass loss occurs at temperatures in the range of 25-400 0C that is caused by the removal of the crystallization and adsorption water and volatile impurities. It is shown that the modified apatites are of imperfect structure and crystallize in a nanocrystalline state.

  7. Characterization of iron-phosphate-silicate chemical garden structures.

    PubMed

    Barge, Laura M; Doloboff, Ivria J; White, Lauren M; Stucky, Galen D; Russell, Michael J; Kanik, Isik

    2012-02-28

    Chemical gardens form when ferrous chloride hydrate seed crystals are added or concentrated solutions are injected into solutions of sodium silicate and potassium phosphate. Various precipitation morphologies are observed depending on silicate and phosphate concentrations, including hollow plumes, bulbs, and tubes. The growth of precipitates is controlled by the internal osmotic pressure, fluid buoyancy, and membrane strength. Additionally, rapid bubble-led growth is observed when silicate concentrations are high. ESEM/EDX analysis confirms compositional gradients within the membranes, and voltage measurements across the membranes during growth show a final potential of around 150-200 mV, indicating that electrochemical gradients are maintained across the membranes as growth proceeds. The characterization of chemical gardens formed with iron, silicate, and phosphate, three important components of an early earth prebiotic hydrothermal system, can help us understand the properties of analogous structures that likely formed at submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents in the Hadean-structures offering themselves as the hatchery of life.

  8. History of Nebular Processing Traced by Silicate Stardust in IDPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Nguyen, A.

    2010-03-01

    We have identified two presolar silicate grains as polycrystalline assemblages, or equilibrated aggregates. These grains occur in a stardust-rich interplanetary dust particle (IDP). We propose these grains were annealed in the solar nebula.

  9. History of Nebular Processing Traced by Silicate Stardust in IDPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2010-01-01

    Chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) may be the best preserved remnants of primordial solar system materials, in part because they were not affected by parent body hydrothermal alteration. Their primitive characteristics include fine grained, unequilibrated, anhydrous mineralogy, enrichment in volatile elements, and abundant molecular cloud material and silicate stardust. However, while the majority of CP-IDP materials likely derived from the Solar System, their formation processes and provenance are poorly constrained. Stardust abundances provide a relative measure of the extent of processing that the Solar System starting materials has undergone in primitive materials. For example, among primitive meteorites silicate stardust abundances vary by over two orders of magnitude (less than 10-200 ppm). This range of abundances is ascribed to varying extents of aqueous processing in the meteorite parent bodies. The higher average silicate stardust abundances among CP-IDPs (greater than 375 ppm) are thus attributable to the lack of aqueous processing of these materials. Yet, silicate stardust abundances in IDPs also vary considerably. While the silicate stardust abundance in IDPs having anomalous N isotopic compositions was reported to be 375 ppm, the abundance in IDPs lacking N anomalies is less than 10 ppm. Furthermore, these values are significantly eclipsed among some IDPs with abundances ranging from 2,000 ppm to 10,000 ppm. Given that CP-IDPs have not been significantly affected by parent body processes, the difference in silicate stardust abundances among these IDPs must reflect varying extents of nebular processing. Here we present recent results of a systematic coordinated mineralogical/isotopic study of large cluster IDPs aimed at (1) characterizing the mineralogy of presolar silicates and (2) delineating the mineralogical and petrographic characteristics of IDPs with differing silicate stardust abundances. One of the goals of this study is

  10. Holmium laser enucleation versus simple prostatectomy for treating large prostates: Results of a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Patrick; Alzweri, Laith; Rai, Bhavan Prasad; Somani, Bhaskar K.; Bates, Chris; Aboumarzouk, Omar M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare and evaluate the safety and efficacy of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) and simple prostatectomy for large prostate burdens, as discussion and debate continue about the optimal surgical intervention for this common pathology. Materials and methods A systematic search was conducted for studies comparing HoLEP with simple prostatectomy [open (OP), robot-assisted, laparoscopic] using a sensitive strategy and in accordance with Cochrane collaboration guidelines. Primary parameters of interest were objective measurements including maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax) and post-void residual urine volume (PVR), and subjective outcomes including International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and quality of life (QoL). Secondary outcomes of interest included volume of tissue retrieved, catheterisation time, hospital stay, blood loss and serum sodium decrease. Data on baseline characteristics and complications were also collected. Where possible, comparable data were combined and meta-analysis was conducted. Results In all, 310 articles were identified and after screening abstracts (114) and full manuscripts (14), three randomised studies (263 patients) were included, which met our pre-defined inclusion criteria. All these compared HoLEP with OP. The mean transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) volume was 113.9 mL in the HoLEP group and 119.4 mL in the OP group. There was no statistically significant difference in Qmax, PVR, IPSS and QoL at 12 and 24 months between the two interventions. OP was associated with a significantly shorter operative time (P = 0.01) and greater tissue retrieved (P < 0.001). However, with HoLEP there was significantly less blood loss (P < 0.001), patients had a shorter hospital stay (P = 0.03), and were catheterised for significantly fewer hours (P = 0.01). There were no significant differences in the total number of complications recorded amongst HoLEP and OP (P = 0.80). Conclusion The results of the meta

  11. Long-term sexual outcomes after holmium laser enucleation of the prostate: which patients could benefit the most?

    PubMed

    Capogrosso, P; Ventimiglia, E; Ferrari, M; Serino, A; Boeri, L; Capitanio, U; Briganti, A; Damiano, R; Montorsi, F; Salonia, A

    2016-09-01

    Assess rate and predictors of erectile function (EF) outcomes at long-term follow-up (FU) after holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP). Cross-sectional analyses were performed on 135 patients with a mean FU of 12 years post HoLEP. Patients completed both a baseline and a FU International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF)-EF domain and the International Prostatic Symptoms Score (IPSS). Postoperative EF outcomes, including rate and predictors of EF improvement considering minimal clinically important differences (MCIDs) criteria, were assessed. Logistic regression models tested the association between predictors and EF. At a mean (median) FU of 152.1 (163) months, patients showed a significant decrease in the IIEF-EF score P<0.01) and significant IPSS improvement (P<0.01). Overall, 50 (37%) patients worsened by at least one IIEF-EF category. Conversel, 23 (17%) patients reported an improvement in postoperative IIEF-EF score; 75 (55.6%) and 10 (7.4%) patients maintained and eventually improved their IIEF-EF category, respectively. Patients reporting a decrease in the postoperative IIEF-EF score were significantly older (P=0.03) and showed a significantly longer mean FU (P<0.01) than those reporting postoperative improvements of IIEF-EF. Nine (6.7%) patients showed significant EF improvement according to MCIDs criteria. Both higher IPSS scores (odds ratio (OR): 1.12; P=0.02) and lower IIEF-EF (OR: 0.88; P<0.01) at baseline, emerged as independent predictors of postoperative EF improvement. HoLEP was associated with a decrease in EF and a persistent amelioration of BPH-related urinary symptoms at long-term FU. Almost one third of patients worsened by at least one IIEF-EF category. However, a clinically meaningful EF improvement was observed in roughly 7% of the individuals. Patients with more severe preoperative urinary symptoms and ED benefited more from HoLEP in terms of EF. PMID:27465782

  12. LOW-TEMPERATURE CRYSTALLIZATION OF AMORPHOUS SILICATE IN ASTROPHYSICAL ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    We construct a theoretical model for low-temperature crystallization of amorphous silicate grains induced by exothermic chemical reactions. As a first step, the model is applied to the annealing experiments, in which the samples are (1) amorphous silicate grains and (2) amorphous silicate grains covered with an amorphous carbon layer. We derive the activation energies of crystallization for amorphous silicate and amorphous carbon from the analysis of the experiments. Furthermore, we apply the model to the experiment of low-temperature crystallization of an amorphous silicate core covered with an amorphous carbon layer containing reactive molecules. We clarify the conditions of low-temperature crystallization due to exothermic chemical reactions. Next, we formulate the crystallization conditions so as to be applicable to astrophysical environments. We show that the present crystallization mechanism is characterized by two quantities: the stored energy density Q in a grain and the duration of the chemical reactions {tau}. The crystallization conditions are given by Q>Q{sub min} and {tau} < {tau}{sub cool} regardless of details of the reactions and grain structure, where {tau}{sub cool} is the cooling timescale of the grains heated by exothermic reactions, and Q{sub min} is minimum stored energy density determined by the activation energy of crystallization. Our results suggest that silicate crystallization occurs in wider astrophysical conditions than hitherto considered.

  13. High Pressure/Temperature Metal Silicate Partitioning of Tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shofner, G. A.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Campbell, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of chemical elements during metal/silicate segregation and their resulting distribution in Earth's mantle and core provide insight into core formation processes. Experimental determination of partition coefficients allows calculations of element distributions that can be compared to accepted values of element abundances in the silicate (mantle) and metallic (core) portions of the Earth. Tungsten (W) is a moderately siderophile element and thus preferentially partitions into metal versus silicate under many planetary conditions. The partitioning behavior has been shown to vary with temperature, silicate composition, oxygen fugacity, and pressure. Most of the previous work on W partitioning has been conducted at 1-bar conditions or at relatively low pressures, i.e. <10 GPa, and in two cases at or near 20 GPa. According to those data, the stronger influences on the distribution coefficient of W are temperature, composition, and oxygen fugacity with a relatively slight influence in pressure. Predictions based on extrapolation of existing data and parameterizations suggest an increased pressured dependence on metal/ silicate partitioning of W at higher pressures 5. However, the dependence on pressure is not as well constrained as T, fO2, and silicate composition. This poses a problem because proposed equilibration pressures for core formation range from 27 to 50 GPa, falling well outside the experimental range, therefore requiring exptrapolation of a parametereized model. Higher pressure data are needed to improve our understanding of W partitioning at these more extreme conditions.

  14. Modular flexible ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy for the treatment of renal and proximal ureteral calculi: A single-surgeon experience of 382 cases

    PubMed Central

    YAN, ZEJUN; XIE, GUOHAI; YUAN, HESHENG; CHENG, YUE

    2015-01-01

    To determine the safety and efficacy of modular flexible ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy for the treatment of renal and proximal ureteral calculi, a retrospective chart review of a single surgeon's 3-year modular flexible ureteroscopy experience was performed. All of the patients were treated with modular flexible ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy by a single surgeon. Stone-free status was defined as no fragments or a single fragment ≤4 mm in diameter at the 3-month follow-up. The procedure number, operative time, stone-free rates, repeat usage of the multilumen catheter, and perioperative complications were documented. The present study included 215 male patients and 167 female patients, with an average age of 48.5±13.7 years (range, 17–84 years). The mean stone size was 11.5±4.1 mm (range, 4–28 mm), and the mean total stone burden was 17.5±5.7 mm (range 15–46 mm). A total of 305 patients (79.8%) had a stone burden ≤20 mm, and 77 patients (20.2%) had a stone burden >20 mm. The mean number of primary procedures was 1.3±0.2 (range, 1–3). The stone-free rate following the first and the second procedure was 73.4 and 86.9%, respectively. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 3.1±1.2 days (range, 2–6 days). The highest clearance rates were observed for proximal ureteral stones (100%) and renal pelvic stones (88.7%), whereas the lowest clearance rates were observed for lower calyx stones (76.7%) and multiple calyx stones (77.8%). The higher the initial stone burden, the lower the postoperative stone-free rate (≤20 vs. >20 mm; 89.8 vs. 75.3%). The overall complication rate was 8.1%. The results of the present study suggest that modular flexible ureteroscopy with holmium laser lithotripsy may be considered the primary method for the treatment of renal and proximal ureteral calculi in select patients, due to its acceptable efficacy, low morbidity, and relatively low maintenance costs. PMID:26622508

  15. Erupted silicic cumulates in large ignimbrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, O.; Deering, C. D.; Huber, C.; Dufek, J.

    2011-12-01

    If chemical diversity in igneous rocks is dominated by crystal-liquid separation in open-system magma reservoirs, a significant number of crystal accumulation zones must be preserved in the crust and upper mantle. Such cumulates are conspicuous in mafic lithologies (MOR, layered mafic intrusions, lower crustal arc sections), but have rarely been described and/or are controversial in the silicic upper crust. Although it is possible to recognize signs of crystal accumulations in plutonic exposures, the fact that these batholiths are typically: 1) at least several millions of years old, 2) multi-stage, 3) deformed and 4) biased towards the youngest intrusive episodes, some ambiguity remains in how to interpret geochemical and textural observations. We have chosen to explore large zoned ignimbrites, which represent an instantaneous evacuation of an upper crustal magma reservoir, to isolate potential crystal accumulation zones. Late-erupted, crystal-rich scoria with unusual chemistries (e.g., high Ba, Zr, Eu/Eu*) have been found in multiple examples of these zoned ignimbrites around the world, including the 900+ km3 Ammonia Tanks and Carpenter Ridge Tuffs, both erupted during the Tertiary magmatic flare-up in the Western USA. As already suggested for the 7700 BP Crater Lake ignimbrite, such crystal-rich scoria have mineralogical and geochemical characteristics that are most convincingly explained by accumulation of low temperature minerals as highly-evolved melt escapes upward and pools at the top of large crystalline mushes. To account for the eruption of such crystal-rich zones (technically uneruptible with >50vol% crystals), some melting of low-temperature mineral phases is required; evidence for resorption textures in sanidine and quartz is commonplace in these scoria. The presence of mafic enclaves and/or mingling textures in such scoria indicate that recharge from below ultimately drove melting of part of the mineral assemblage within the cumulate rootzone, while

  16. Activation cross sections of proton and deuteron induced nuclear reactions on holmium and erbium, related to the production of (161)Er and (160)Er medical isotopes.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Baba, M

    2016-09-01

    Experimental excitation functions for long-lived products in proton induced reactions were measured with the activation method in the 37-65MeV energy range on natural holmium. Stacked foil irradiation technique and high resolution gamma spectrometry were used in order to measure cross-section data for the production of (161)Er, (160)Er and (1)(59,157)Dy. For comparison of the production routes of medically related (161)Er and (160)Er radioisotopes new experimental cross section data were deduced for the (162)Er(p,x)(161,160)Er and (162)Er(d,x)(161,160)Er reactions by re-evaluating gamma-ray spectra from earlier measurements. No earlier data were found in the literature for these reactions. The experimental data are compared with results of TALYS theoretical code reported in TENDL-2015. PMID:27451109

  17. Enhanced cathodoluminescence from an amorphous AlN:holmium phosphor by co-doped Gd{sup +3} for optical devices applications

    SciTech Connect

    Maqbool, Muhammad; Kordesch, Martin E.; Kayani, A.

    2009-05-15

    Sputter-deposited thin films of amorphous AlN:Ho (1 at. %) emits in the green (549 nm) region of the visible spectrum under electron excitation. The addition of Gd (1 at. %) in the film enhances the green emission linearly after thermal activation at 900 deg. C for 40 min in a nitrogen atmosphere. The luminescence enhancement saturates when the gadolinium concentration reaches four times the holmium concentration. The optical bandgap of amorphous AlN is about 210 nm, so that the film is transparent in the ultraviolet, allowing us to observe the ultraviolet emission at 313 nm from Gd. No significant quenching of the Gd emission is observed. Energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectra confirm the increasing concentration of Gd. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows no peaks other than those arising from the Si (111) substrate, confirming that the films are amorphous. The enhanced luminescence can be used to make high-efficiency optical devices.

  18. Sub-100  fs passively mode-locked holmium-doped fiber oscillator operating at 2.06  μm.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Ruehl, Axel; Grosse-Wortmann, Uwe; Hartl, Ingmar

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate a simple and compact Holmium-doped fiber femtosecond oscillator, in-band pumped by a commercial Tm-doped fiber laser. The oscillator operates in the dispersion managed soliton regime at net zero intracavity dispersion and delivers >1  nJ pulse energy at 35 MHz repetition rate. The pulse duration directly at the oscillator output is 160 fs FWHM, close to the Fourier-limit of 145 fs FWHM. Using an additional nonlinear compressor stage, sub-100 fs FWHM pulse durations could be achieved. The nonlinear fiber compressor is implemented by a solid core highly nonlinear fiber for spectral broadening and a single mode fiber for pulse compression.

  19. Activation cross sections of proton and deuteron induced nuclear reactions on holmium and erbium, related to the production of (161)Er and (160)Er medical isotopes.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Baba, M

    2016-09-01

    Experimental excitation functions for long-lived products in proton induced reactions were measured with the activation method in the 37-65MeV energy range on natural holmium. Stacked foil irradiation technique and high resolution gamma spectrometry were used in order to measure cross-section data for the production of (161)Er, (160)Er and (1)(59,157)Dy. For comparison of the production routes of medically related (161)Er and (160)Er radioisotopes new experimental cross section data were deduced for the (162)Er(p,x)(161,160)Er and (162)Er(d,x)(161,160)Er reactions by re-evaluating gamma-ray spectra from earlier measurements. No earlier data were found in the literature for these reactions. The experimental data are compared with results of TALYS theoretical code reported in TENDL-2015.

  20. Comment on "The shape and composition of interstellar silicate grains"

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J P; Ishii, H

    2007-09-27

    In the paper entitled 'The shape and composition of interstellar silicate grains' (A & A, 462, 667-676 (2007)), Min et al. explore non-spherical grain shape and composition in modeling the interstellar 10 and 20 {micro}m extinction features. This progression towards more realistic models is vitally important to enabling valid comparisons between dust observations and laboratory measurements. Min et al. proceed to compare their model results with GEMS (glass with embedded metals and sulfides) from IDPs (interplanetary dust particles) and to discuss the nature and origin of GEMS. Specifically, they evaluate the hypothesis of Bradley (1994) that GEMS are interstellar (IS) amorphous silicates. From a comparison of the mineralogy, chemical compositions, and infrared (IR) spectral properties of GEMS with their modeling results, Min et al. conclude: 'GEMS are, in general, not unprocessed leftovers from the diffuse ISM'. This conclusion is based, however, on erroneous and incomplete GEMS data. It is important to clarify first that Bradley (1994) never proposed that GEMS are unprocessed leftovers from the diffuse ISM, nor did he suggest that individual subnanogram mass GEMS are a representative sampling of the enormous mass of silicates in the diffuse ISM. Bradley (1994) simply showed that GEMS properties are consistent with those of IS amorphous silicates. It is widely accepted that circumstellar outflows are important sources of IS silicates, and whether GEMS are processed or not, the circumstellar heritage of some has been rigorously confirmed through measurements of non-solar oxygen (O) isotope abundances (Messenger et al., 2003; Floss et al., 2006). Keller et al. (2000) assert that even GEMS without detectable O isotope anomalies are probably also extrasolar IS silicates because they are embedded in carbonaceous material with non-solar D/H isotopic composition. (Much of the silicate dust in the ISM may be isotopically homogenized (Zhukovska et al., 2007)). Recent

  1. Silicic Arc Magmas And Silicic Slab Melts: The Melt-Rock Reaction Link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, S. M.; Gomez-Tuena, A.; Bolge, L. L.; Espinasa-Perena, R.; Bindeman, I. N.; Stuart, F. M.; Zellmer, G. F.

    2013-12-01

    While a genetic link between silicic arc magmas and silicic melts from the subducted slab has long been proposed, this hypothesis is commonly refuted because most arc magmas lack a 'garnet-signature' which such slab melts must have. A comprehensive geochemical study of high-Mg# arc magmas from the Quaternary central Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB), however, shows that this conflict can be reconciled if melt-rock reaction processes in the mantle wedge were essential to arc magma formation. In the central MVB, monogenetic and composite volcanoes erupt high-Mg# basalts to andesites with highly variable trace element patterns. These magmas contain high-Ni olivines (olivine Ni higher than permissible for olivines in partial peridotite melts) with high 3He/4He = 7-8 Ra that provide strong evidence for silicic slab components that infiltrate the subarc mantle to produce olivine-free segregations of 'reaction pyroxenite' in the sources of individual volcanoes. Melting of silica-excess and silica-deficient reaction pyroxenites can then produce high-Mg# basaltic and dacitic primary melts that mix during ascent through mantle and crust to form high-Mg# andesites. Mass balance requires that reaction pyroxenites contain at least >15-18 wt%, and likely more, of slab component. However, because the HREE of the slab component are efficiently retained in the eclogitic slab, elements Ho to Lu in partial melts from reaction pyroxenites remain controlled by the mantle and maintain MORB-normalized Ho/Lun ˜1.15 close to unity. In contrast, the MREE to LREE and fluid mobile LILE of the arc magmas are either controlled, or strongly influenced, by slab-contributions. The origin from hybrid sources also shows in the major elements that are blends of mantle-derived elements (Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ti) and elements augmented by slab contributions (Si, Na, K, P, and possibly Al). Moreover, strong correlations between bulk rock SiO2, 87Sr/86Sr and δ18O (olivines) can be interpreted as mixtures of subarc

  2. AB178. Holmium laser resection of the distal ureter and bladder cuff during radical nephroureterectomy for patients with pelvis or ureteral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yongchao

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the feasibility of transurethral resection for the distal ureter and bladder cuff in radical nephroureterectomy for the treatment of upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UUT-UC). Methods A total of 76 patients with renal pelvic carcinoma or upper tract urothelial carcinoma during July 2003 to December 2011 were retrospective analyzed. All patients were divided into two groups according to doctor’s suggestion and their wishes. Thirty-six patients of them received excision of the distal ureter and bladder cuff by transurethral Holmium laser (cystoscopy group) combined with open nephroureterectomy, and 40 patients of them underwent open surgery (open surgery group).The operation time, postoperative activity time, and postoperative hospital stay in the two groups were compared. Results All operations were completed successfully in both groups. Compared with Open Surgery Group, the operation time [(177.2±36.9) vs. (229.6±28.1) min, t=−7.004, P=0.000], postoperative activity time [(2.7±0.7) vs. (4.1±1.0) d, t=−6.802, P=0.000] and hospital stay [(6.9±1.0) vs. (8.6±1.5) d, t=−5.448, P=0.000] of cystoscopy group were shorter. No recurrence or metastasis was observed from a follow-up of 6–120 months (median=32 months) in the two groups. Conclusions Transurethral surgery is superior to traditional open surgery in trauma degree and postoperative recovery time. Transurethral Holmium laser resection of the distal ureter and bladder cuff is a minimally invasive and safety technique in the nephroureterectomy for the treatment of UTUC.

  3. Activities and volatilities of trace components in silicate melts: a novel use of metal-silicate partitioning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Bernard J.; Wade, Jon

    2013-09-01

    Ian Carmichael spent 45 years thinking about and working on the activities of components in silicate melts and their use to estimate physicochemical conditions at eruption and in the source regions of igneous rocks. These interests, principally in major components such as SiO2, led us to think about possible ways of determining the complementary activity coefficients of trace components in silicate melts. While investigating the conditions of accretion and differentiation of the Earth, a number of authors have determined the partitioning of trace elements such as Co, Ni, Mo and W between liquid Fe metal and liquid silicate. These data have the potential to provide activity information for a large number of trace components in silicate melts. In order to turn the partitioning measurements into activities, however, we need to know the activity coefficient of FeO, γFeO in the silicate. We obtained γFeO as a function of melt composition by fitting a simple model to 83 experimental data for which the authors had measured the FeO content of the silicate melt in equilibrium with metal (Fe-bearing alloy) at known fO2. The compositional dependence of γFeO is weak, but, when calculated in the system Diopside-Anorthite-Forsterite, it decreases towards the Forsterite apex. A similar approach for Ni, for which twice as many data are available, leads to similar composition dependence of activity coefficient and confirms the suggestion that γNiO/γFeO is almost constant over a wide range of silicate melt composition. The activity coefficients for FeO were used in conjunction with measured Mo and W partitioning between Fe-rich metal and silicate melt to estimate activity coefficients for trace MoO2 and WO3 dissolved in silicate melt. When combined with data on Mo- and W-saturated silicate melts a strong dependence of activity coefficient is observed. Calculated in the system Diopside-Anorthite-Forsterite, both MoO2 and WO3 exhibit similar behaviour to FeO and NiO in that

  4. Gas-phase molecular structure and energetics of anionic silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, José R. B.; Cordeiro, M. Natália D. S.; Jorge, Miguel

    2008-09-01

    The gas-phase stabilities of linear, branched and cyclic silicates made of up to five silicon atoms were studied with density functional theory (DFT). The starting geometries for the DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p) level of theory were obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulations. We have observed that geometric parameters and charges are mainly affected by the degree of deprotonation. Charges on Si atoms are also influenced by their degree of substitution. The enthalpy of deprotonation of the neutral species was found to decrease with the size of the molecule, while the average deprotonation enthalpy of highly charged compounds increased with molecular size. Furthermore, the formation of rings in highly charged silicates is enthalpically preferred to chain growth. These observations result from two competing effects: the easier distribution of negative charge in silicates with low charge density and the strong intramolecular repulsions present in silicates with high charge density. As a consequence, highly charged silicates in the gas phase tend to be as small and as highly condensed as possible, which is in line with experimental observations from solution NMR.

  5. Properties of cometary crystalline silicate before and after perihelion passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootsubo, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline silicate is sometimes observed in comets as an 11.3-micron resonant emission feature, and may be used for probing the early solar nebula. Because the formation of the crystalline silicate requires high temperature, they are thought to be born from amorphous silicate at the inner region, and then transported toward the outer regions where comets were born. This transportation can produce the difference in the crystalline fraction in the cometary silicate dust between two dynamical types of comets, Oort-cloud comets (OCs) and Ecliptic comets (ECs), due to the different heliocentric distances of their birth places. The study of peak wavelengths in crystalline features is important to investigate the conditions of the crystalline silicate formation as well. Thus far, we don't have enough OC samples, while we have observed several ECs. Fortunately, we can observe three comets in this semester. In particular, C/2012 S1 (ISON) is a bright sungrazing comet, and we might expect possible splitting and exposing of pristine materials inside the nucleus after its perihelion passage. Observations at pre- and post-perihelion provide us precious information on the dust evolution of the comet. The comet C/2012 S1 (ISON), along with two other comets, is an unparalleled target for this study.

  6. Behavior of Np(VII, VI, V) in Silicate Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Shilov, V P.; Fedoseev, A M.; Yusov, A B.; Delegard, Calvin H.

    2004-11-30

    Spectrophotometric methods were used to investigate the properties of neptunium(VII), (VI), and (V) in silicate solution. The transition of cationic neptunium(VII) to anionic species in non-complexing environments proceeds in the range of ?? 5.5 to 7.5. In the presence of carbonate, this transition occurs at ?? 10.0 to 11.5 and in silicate solutions at ?? 10.5-12.0. These findings show that cationic neptunium(VII) forms complexes with both carbonate and silicate and that the silicate complex is stronger than that of the carbonate. The competition of complex formation reactions for neptunium(VI) with carbonate and silicate and on the known complex stability constant of NpO2(CO3)34- allowed the NpO2SiO3 complex stability constant, log ? = 16.5, to be estimated. Determination of the formation constant of Np(V) complexes with SiO32- was not possible using similar methods.

  7. FORMATION OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN AND OZONE ON AMORPHOUS SILICATES

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Dapeng; He Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco; Brucato, John Robert; Tozzetti, Lorenzo; De Sio, Antonio

    2012-09-01

    Oxygen in the interstellar medium is seen in the gas phase, in ices (incorporated in H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2}), and in grains such as (Mg{sub x} Fe{sub 1-x} )SiO{sub 3} or (Mg{sub x} Fe{sub 1-x} ){sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, 0 < x < 1. In this investigation, we study the diffusion of oxygen atoms and the formation of oxygen molecules and ozone on the surface of an amorphous silicate film. We find that ozone is formed at low temperature (<30 K), and molecular oxygen forms when the diffusion of oxygen atoms becomes significant, at around 60 K. This experiment, besides being the first determination of the diffusion energy barrier (1785 {+-} 35 K) for oxygen atoms on a silicate surface, suggests bare silicates as a possible storage place for oxygen atoms in low-A{sub v} environments.

  8. Electric field-induced softening of alkali silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, C.; Heffner, W.; Jain, H.; Tessarollo, R.; Raj, R.

    2015-11-02

    Motivated by the advantages of two-electrode flash sintering over normal sintering, we have investigated the effect of an external electric field on the viscosity of glass. The results show remarkable electric field-induced softening (EFIS), as application of DC field significantly lowers the softening temperature of glass. To establish the origin of EFIS, the effect is compared for single vs. mixed-alkali silicate glasses with fixed mole percentage of the alkali ions such that the mobility of alkali ions is greatly reduced while the basic network structure does not change much. The sodium silicate and lithium-sodium mixed alkali silicate glasses were tested mechanically in situ under compression in external electric field ranging from 0 to 250 V/cm in specially designed equipment. A comparison of data for different compositions indicates a complex mechanical response, which is observed as field-induced viscous flow due to a combination of Joule heating, electrolysis and dielectric breakdown.

  9. A search for OH masers in silicate carbon star candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, Dieter; Green, James; Horiuchi, Shinji; Etoka, Sandra

    2014-04-01

    We wish to observe 22 silicate carbon stars and candidates with the Tidbinbilla radio telescope with the aim to detect possible new OH maser emission. Among the silicate carbon stars, which often show water maser emission, only V778 Cyg and IRAS 18006-3213 are known to show OH maser emission, while the present sample has never been searched for OH masers. New OH masers could be used for future interferometric observations to determine the geometry of the emission region, which is of special interest since silicate carbon stars are believed to be binaries surrounded by an oxygen-rich disk. The complement of the present sample accessible on the Northern Sky was observed with the Nancay radio telescope in the OH maser lines yielding 6 new detections. The observations proposed here will complement observations with the Effelsberg and Tidbinbilla radio telescopes in the 22 GHz water maser line.

  10. Energetic Processing of Interstellar Silicate Grains by Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bringa, E M; Kucheyev, S O; Loeffler, M J; Baragiola, R A; Tielens, A G Q M; Dai, Z R; Graham, G; Bajt, S; Bradley, J; Dukes, C A; Felter, T E; Torres, D F; van Breugel, W

    2007-03-28

    While a significant fraction of silicate dust in stellar winds has a crystalline structure, in the interstellar medium nearly all of it is amorphous. One possible explanation for this observation is the amorphization of crystalline silicates by relatively 'low' energy, heavy ion cosmic rays. Here we present the results of multiple laboratory experiments showing that single-crystal synthetic forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) amorphizes when irradiated by 10 MeV Xe{sup ++} ions at large enough fluences. Using modeling, we extrapolate these results to show that 0.1-5.0 GeV heavy ion cosmic rays can rapidly ({approx}70 Million yrs) amorphize crystalline silicate grains ejected by stars into the interstellar medium.

  11. Redox equilibria of multivalent ions in silicate glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Morris, R. V.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental studies were made on the compositional dependence of the redox equilibrium of Eu in synthetic silicate liquids, together with an empirical model describing the observed compositional dependence. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was used to measure the concentration ratio of Eu(2+) to Eu(3+) in various glasses formed by rapidly quenching silicate liquids. The compositional field studied comprised mixtures of SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, CaO, MgO, and Na2O. The proposed model describes the Eu(2+)/Eu(3+) ratio over the entire compositional field in terms of parameters easily related to each glass composition. The general applicability and utility of the model is further demonstrated by its application to the Fe(2+)-Fe(3+), Ce(3+)-Ce(4+), and Cr(3+)-Cr(6+) redox reactions in binary alkali oxide silicate glasses of Li, Na, and K.

  12. Chromate/silicate aluminum surface treatment for heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, B.B.; Ramo, S.J. Jr.

    1993-08-10

    A process is described for surface treating an aluminum heat exchanger by successively immersing the heat exchanger within a series of chemical solutions to provided the heat exchanger with a corrosive-resistent hydrophilic coating; the process comprising the steps of: providing a cleaning mixture including 40 to 60 weight percent of nitric acid and 1 to 5 weight percent of sodium fluoride, adding water to the cleaning mixture to form an aqueous cleaning solution having a total concentration of cleaning mixture between 2.0 to 5.0 weight percent; providing a chromate mixture including 10 weight percent of chromium trioxide, 25 weight percent of nitric acid and between 10 to 11 weight percent of hydrofluoric acid, providing a chromate activator comprising less than 25 weight percent of molybdic acid and disodium salt, adding water and the chromate activator to the chromate mixture to form an aqueous chromate solution; providing a silicate mixture comprising 90 to 100 weight percent of silicate of soda and 0 to 10 weight percent of potassium hydroxide, adding water to the silicate mixture to form an aqueous silicate solution; immersing the heat exchanger within an aqueous cleaning solution, and removing the heat exchanger from the cleaning solution; immersing the cleansed heat exchanger in the aqueous chromate solution, and removing the heat exchanger from the chromate solution; immersing the chromed heat exchanger in the aqueous silicate solution, and subsequently removing the heat exchanger from the silicate solution; and characterized by maintaining the total concentration of chromate mixture within the aqueous chromate solution at 0.9 to 1.5 weight percent ([plus minus] 0.1%) and the total concentration of chromate activator within the aqueous chromate solution at 1.1 weight percent ([plus minus] 0.1 %) thereby providing the necessary chemical concentration for producing a corrosion-resistent hydrophilic coating which is substantially free from musty odor emission.

  13. MG Isotopic Measurement of FIB-Isolated Presolar Silicate Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Nguyen, A.; Ito, M.; Rahman, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of presolar oxide and silicate grains are ascribed to origins in low-mass red giant and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars based on their O isotopic ratios. However, a minor population of these grains (< 10%) has O isotopic ratios incompatible with these sources. Two principle alternative sources are higher-than-solar metallicity (Z) stars or, more likely, supernovae (SN) [1-3]. These rare (Group 4) grains [3] are characterized by enrichments in O-18, and typically also enrichments in O-17. An even rarer subset of grains with extremely large enrichments in O-17 and smaller depletions in O-18 were suggested to come from binary star systems [2]. To establish the origins of these isotopically unusual grains, it is necessary to examine isotopic systems in addition to O. Presolar silicates offer several elements diagnostic of their stellar sources and nuclear processes, including O, Si, Mg, Fe and Ca. However, the database for minor element isotopic compositions in silicates is seriously lacking. To date only two silicate grains have been analyzed for Mg [4] or Fe [5]. One major complicating factor is their small size (average 230 nm), which greatly limits the number of measurements that can be performed on any one grain and makes it more difficult to obtain statistically relevant data. This problem is compounded because the grains are identified among isotopically solar silicates, which contribute a diluting signal in isotopic measurements [1]. Thus, relatively small isotopic anomalies are missed due to this dilution effect. By applying focused ion beam (FIB) milling, we obtain undiluted Mg isotopic ratios of isolated rare presolar silicate grains to investigate their sources.

  14. Formation of Magnesium Silicates is Limited around Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, J. A., III

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory experiments suggest that magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) grains could be produced in the hydrogen dominant gas outflow from evolved stars in addition to amorphous oxide minerals. Astronomical observations have shown the existence of abundant silicate grains around evolved stars and we have long realized that most of the silicate grains are amorphous, based on the observed infrared features. Only high mass loss stars show the feature attributed to magnesium-rich crystalline silicate about 10-20 % respect to total silicates, so far. The lower degree of crystallinity observed in silicates formed in outflows of lower mass-loss-rate stars might be caused by the formation of magnesium silicide in this relatively hydrogen-rich environment. As a result of predominant distribution of magnesium into the silicide, the composition of interstellar amorphous silicates could be magnesium poor compared with silicon. Indeed, the chemical composition of isotopically anomalous GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) is magnesium poor with respect to a forsteritic composition (Floss et al. 2006; Keller & Messenger 2007). Infrared observations suggest that there is little or no crystalline forsterite in interstellar environments while there is an abundance of crystalline forsterite in our Solar System. If the forsterite is a result of the oxidation of interstellar magnesium silicide, then it is clear both why crystalline forsterite is stoichiometric olivine and why the chemical composition of isotopically anomalous GEMS is magnesium poor with respect to a forsteritic composition. In addition, it may also explain why the chemical composition of olivine is iron poor. Unfortunately, magnesium silicide has never been detected via astronomical observation or in the analysis of primitive meteorites. I would suggest that future analysis of meteorites and theoretical calculations could confirm the possibility of the formation of magnesium silicide grains around evolved stars.

  15. Nitrogen distribution between aqueous fluids and silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Huang, Ruifang; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Keppler, Hans

    2015-02-01

    The partitioning of nitrogen between hydrous fluids and haplogranitic, basaltic, or albitic melts was studied at 1-15 kbar, 800-1200 °C, and oxygen fugacities (fO2) ranging from the Fe-FeO buffer to 3log units above the Ni-NiO buffer. The nitrogen contents in quenched glasses were analyzed either by electron microprobe or by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), whereas the nitrogen contents in fluids were determined by mass balance. The results show that the nitrogen content in silicate melt increases with increasing nitrogen content in the coexisting fluid at given temperature, pressure, and fO2. Raman spectra of the silicate glasses suggest that nitrogen species change from molecular N2 in oxidized silicate melt to molecular ammonia (NH3) or the ammonium ion (NH4+) in reduced silicate melt, and the normalized Raman band intensities of the nitrogen species linearly correlate with the measured nitrogen content in silicate melt. Elevated nitrogen contents in silicate melts are observed at reduced conditions and are attributed to the dissolution of NH3/NH4+. Measured fluid/melt partition coefficients for nitrogen (DNfluid/ melt) range from 60 for reduced haplogranitic melts to about 10 000 for oxidized basaltic melts, with fO2 and to a lesser extent melt composition being the most important parameters controlling the partitioning of nitrogen. Pressure appears to have only a minor effect on DNfluid/ melt in the range of conditions studied. Our data imply that degassing of nitrogen from both mid-ocean ridge basalts and arc magmas is very efficient, and predicted nitrogen abundances in volcanic gases match well with observations. Our data also confirm that nitrogen degassing at present magma production rates is insufficient to accumulate the atmosphere. Most of the nitrogen in the atmosphere must have degassed very early in Earth's history and degassing was probably enhanced by the oxidation of the mantle.

  16. The Lassell Massif - a Silicic Lunar Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, J.; Robinson, M. S.; Stopar, J. D.; Glotch, T. D.; Hawke, B. R.; Lawrence, S. J.; Jolliff, B. L.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Paige, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Lunar volcanic processes were dominated by mare-producing basaltic extrusions. However, limited occurrences of non-mare, geochemically evolved (Si-enriched) volcanic deposits have long been suspected on the basis of spectral anomalies (red spots), landform morphologies, and the occurrence of minor granitic components in Apollo sample suites [e.g., 1-5]. The LRO Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment (Diviner) measured thermal emission signatures considered diagnostic of highly silicic rocks in several red spot areas [6,7], within the Marius domes [8], and from the Compton-Belkovich feature on the lunar farside [9]. The present study focuses on the Lassell massif red spot (14.73°S, 350.97°E) located in northeastern Mare Nubium near the center of Alphonsus A crater. Here we use Diviner coverage co-projected with Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) images [10] and digital elevation models to characterize the Lassell massif geomorphology and composition. Localized Diviner signatures indicating relatively high silica contents correlate with spatially distinct morphologic features across the Lassell massif. These features include sub-kilometer scale deposits with clear superposing relationships between units of different silica concentrations. The zone with the strongest signal corresponds to the southern half of the massif and the Lassell G and K depressions (formerly thought to be impact craters [11]). These steep-walled pits lack any obvious raised rims or ejecta blankets that would identify them as impact craters; they are likely explosive volcanic vents or collapse calderas. This silica-rich area is contained within the historic red spot area [4], but does not appear to fully overlap with it, implying compositionally distinct deposits originating from the same source region. Low-reflectance deposits, exposed by impact craters and mass wasting across the massif, suggest either basaltic pyroclastics or minor late-stage extrusion of basaltic lavas through vents

  17. Mesoporous silicates: Materials science and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggers, Robert Anthony

    This thesis dissertation presents the collective research into the advancement of mesoporous silicate particles as biointerface devices, the development of new materials and the application of these particles as solid supports for heterogeneous catalysis. Mesoporous silica has been utilized in the aforementioned applications due to several reasons; the first being the ability to achieve high surface areas (500 - 1000 m2 g-1) with controlled pore sizes and particle morphology. Another reason for their popularity is their robustness in applications of heterogeneous catalysis and the ability to functionalize the surface with a wide variety of organic functional groups. In the field of biointerface devices, mesoporous silica nanoparticles represent a class of materials that exhibit high biocompatibility. In addition, the ability to functionalize the surfaces (outer surface and pore interiors) allows the particles to be targeted to specific cell types as well as the ability to release many different therapeutic molecules under specific stimuli. A unique particle coating consisting of a chemically cleavable lipid bilayer that allows for the encapsulation of a fluorescent molecule and increases the biocompatibility of the particle has been developed. The lipid bilayer coated mesoporous silica nanoparticle (LB-MSN) was characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen `sorption isotherms. The finished LB-MSN was then incubated with mammalian cells in order to prove their biocompatibility. Confocal micrographs demonstrate the endocytosis of the particles into the cells. In addition the micrographs also show that the LB-MSNs are separate from the endosomal compartments, however due to the lipophilic nature of the dye used to label the endosome there is some debate regarding this conclusion. The lipid bilayer coating was then applied to a large pore MSN (l-MSN) which had been previously shown to cause lysis of red blood cells (RBCs) at low

  18. Discovery of ancient silicate stardust in a meteorite.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ann N; Zinner, Ernst

    2004-03-01

    We have discovered nine presolar silicate grains from the carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094. Their anomalous oxygen isotopic compositions indicate formation in the atmospheres of evolved stars. Two grains are identified as pyroxene, two as olivine, one as a glass with embedded metal and sulfides (GEMS), and one as an Al-rich silicate. One grain is enriched in 26Mg, which is attributed to the radioactive decay of 26Al and provides information about mixing processes in the parent star. This discovery opens new means for studying stellar processes and conditions in various solar system environments.

  19. Development of interfaces in oxide and silicate matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.H.; Cain, M.G.; Doleman, P.

    1995-12-01

    Silicate and oxide matrix CMCs are being developed for application in advanced gas turbines. High-performance Silicate/Nicalon CMCs have been characterised mainly as materials for interface, process and mechanical modelling due to their limited thermal and oxidative stability. Saphikon (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) monofilaments have been used in the development of interphase chemistry and processing via vapour and liquid-precursor methods. Prototype Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-matrix CMCs have been fabricated and exploration of alternative fibre/interphase chemistries conducted via reactivity studies up to 1600{degrees}C.

  20. Thermal Expansion and Thermal Conductivity of Rare Earth Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Lee, Kang N.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2006-01-01

    Rare earth silicates are considered promising candidate materials for environmental barrier coatings applications at elevated temperature for ceramic matrix composites. High temperature thermophysical properties are of great importance for coating system design and development. In this study, the thermal expansion and thermal conductivity of hot-pressed rare earth silicate materials were characterized at temperatures up to 1400 C. The effects of specimen porosity, composition and microstructure on the properties were also investigated. The materials processing and testing issues affecting the measurements will also be discussed.

  1. Electrical conductivity measurements on silicate melts using the loop technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waff, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    A new method is described for measurement of the electrical conductivity of silicate melts under controlled oxygen partial pressure at temperatures to 1550 C. The melt samples are suspended as droplets on platinum-rhodium loops, minimizing iron loss from the melt due to alloying with platinum, and providing maximum surface exposure of the melt to the oxygen-buffering gas atmosphere. The latter provides extremely rapid equilibration of the melt with the imposed oxygen partial pressure. The loop technique involves a minimum of setup time and cost, provides reproducible results to within + or - 5% and is well suited to electrical conductivity studies on silicate melts containing redox cations.

  2. Solvothermal syntheses and characterizations of three new holmium selenidostannates(iv): a rare example of adamantane-like [Sn4Se10](4-) selenidostannate(iv) with lanthanide complexes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hong-Ping; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Xiao-Li; Zou, Hua-Hong; Zhao, Rong-Qing; Xiao, Hong

    2014-08-28

    Three new holmium selenidostannates(iv), [Ho(dap)4]2[Sn2Se6]Cl2 (, dap = diaminopropane), {[Ho(dien)2]2(μ2-OH)2}[Sn2Se6] (, dien = diethylenetriamine), and [Ho2(tepa)2(μ2-OH)2Cl2]2[Sn4Se10]·4H2O (, tepa = tetraethylenepentamine), have been solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. consists of two mononuclear [Ho(dap)4](3+) complex cations, one [Sn2Se6](4-) anion built up from two [SnSe4] tetrahedra sharing a common edge, and two Cl(-) ions. consists of one binuclear holmium(iii) complex {[Ho(dien)2]2(μ2-OH)2}(4+) cation and one dimeric [Sn2Se6](4-) anion. is composed of rare binuclear holmium(iii) complex [Ho2(tepa)2(μ2-OH)2Cl2](2+) cations, adamantane-like [Sn4Se10](4-) and free water molecules. Although a few chalcogenidostannates(iv) with lanthanide(iii) complex cations acting as counterions have been reported, their anions are strongly dominated by the dimeric [Sn2Se6](4-) moieties. represents a rare example of an adamantane-like [Sn4Se10](4-) selenidostannate with lanthanide complexes as counterions. The optical properties of have been investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy.

  3. Core Formation Timescale, Silicate-Metal Equilibration, and W Diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Q.; Jacobsen, B.; Tinker, D.; Lesher, C.

    2004-12-01

    The extent to which material accreted to the proto-Earth and segregated to form the core was chemically and isotopically equilibrated with the silicate mantle is an outstanding problem in planetary science. This is particularly important when attempting to assign a meaningful age for planetary accretion and core formation based on Hf-W isotope systematics. The Earth and other terrestrial planets likely formed by accretion of previously differentiated planetesimals. For the planetesimals themselves the most important energy source for metal-silicate differentiation is the combined radioactive heating due to decay of 26Al (half-life 0.7 Ma) and 60Fe (half-life 1.5 Ma). It is expected that the fractionation of Hf and W during planetesimal core formation will lead to a divergence in the W isotopic compositions of the core and silicate portions of these bodies. This expectation is supported by the enormously radiogenic 182W signatures reported for basaltic eucrites. The observation that the W isotopic compositions of the silicate portions of Earth, Moon and Mars are similar and markedly less radiogenic than eucrites suggests that during planet accretion the pre-differentiated metallic core material containing low 182W must have equilibrated extensively with the more radiogenic (high 182W) silicate material to subdue the ingrowth of 182W in the silicate mantle of the planets. The standard theory of planet formation predicts that after runaway and oligarchic growth, the late stage of planet formation is characterized by impact and merging of Mars-sized objects. This is a tremendously energetic process estimated to raise the temperature of the proto-Earth to about 7000K (a temperature equivalent to a mass spectrometer's plasma source, which indiscriminately ionizes all incoming elements). After the giant impacts, the proto-Earth had a luminosity and surface temperature close to a low mass star for a brief period of time. Stevenson (1990) argued that emulsification caused

  4. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION OF ORGANIC/INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS - SILICATE TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Silicate Technology Corporation's (STC's) technology for treating hazardous waste utilizes silicate compounds to stabilize organic and inorganic constituents in contaminated soils and sludges. STC has developed two groups of reagents: SOILSORB HM for treating wastes with inorgan...

  5. SILICATE TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION'S SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC AND INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SOILS - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Applications Analysis Report evaluates the solidification/stabilization treatment process of Silicate Technology Corporation (STC) for the on-site treatment of hazardous waste. The STC immobilization technology utilizes a proprietary product (FMS Silicate) to chemically stab...

  6. Mesoporous silicates: Materials science and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggers, Robert Anthony

    This thesis dissertation presents the collective research into the advancement of mesoporous silicate particles as biointerface devices, the development of new materials and the application of these particles as solid supports for heterogeneous catalysis. Mesoporous silica has been utilized in the aforementioned applications due to several reasons; the first being the ability to achieve high surface areas (500 - 1000 m2 g-1) with controlled pore sizes and particle morphology. Another reason for their popularity is their robustness in applications of heterogeneous catalysis and the ability to functionalize the surface with a wide variety of organic functional groups. In the field of biointerface devices, mesoporous silica nanoparticles represent a class of materials that exhibit high biocompatibility. In addition, the ability to functionalize the surfaces (outer surface and pore interiors) allows the particles to be targeted to specific cell types as well as the ability to release many different therapeutic molecules under specific stimuli. A unique particle coating consisting of a chemically cleavable lipid bilayer that allows for the encapsulation of a fluorescent molecule and increases the biocompatibility of the particle has been developed. The lipid bilayer coated mesoporous silica nanoparticle (LB-MSN) was characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen `sorption isotherms. The finished LB-MSN was then incubated with mammalian cells in order to prove their biocompatibility. Confocal micrographs demonstrate the endocytosis of the particles into the cells. In addition the micrographs also show that the LB-MSNs are separate from the endosomal compartments, however due to the lipophilic nature of the dye used to label the endosome there is some debate regarding this conclusion. The lipid bilayer coating was then applied to a large pore MSN (l-MSN) which had been previously shown to cause lysis of red blood cells (RBCs) at low

  7. On the Dissolution Behavior of Sulfur in Ternary Silicate Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Youn-Bae; Park, Joo Hyun

    2011-12-01

    Sulfur dissolution behavior, in terms of sulfide capacity ( C S), in ternary silicate slags (molten oxide slags composed of MO - NO - SiO2, where M and N are Ca, Mn, Fe, and Mg), is discussed based on available experimental data. Composition dependence of the sulfur dissolution, at least in the dilute region of sulfur, may be explained by taking into account the cation-anion first-nearest-neighbor (FNN) interaction (stability of sulfide) and the cation-cation second-nearest-neighbor (SNN) interaction over O anion (oxygen proportions in silicate slags). When the Gibbs energy of a reciprocal reaction MO + NS = MS + NO is positive, the sulfide capacity of slags with virtually no SiO2 or low SiO2 concentration decreases as the concentration of MO increases. However, in some slags, as SiO2 concentration increases, replacing NO by MO at a constant SiO2 concentration may increase sulfide capacity when the basicity of NO is less than that of MO. This phenomenon is observed as rotation of iso- C S lines in ternary silicate slags, and it is explained by simultaneous consideration of the stability of sulfide and oxygen proportions in the silicate slags. It is suggested that a solution model for the prediction of sulfide capacity should be based on the actual dissolution mechanism of sulfur rather than on the simple empirical correlation.

  8. In vitro macrophage cytotoxicity of five calcium silicates.

    PubMed Central

    Skaug, V; Davies, R; Gylseth, B

    1984-01-01

    Five calcium silicate minerals (two naturally occurring and three synthetic compounds) with defined morphology and chemical composition were compared for their cytotoxic and lysosomal enzyme releasing effects on unstimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. One synthetic material, a fibrous tobermorite, was cytotoxic towards the cells, and two naturally occurring wollastonites induced selective release of beta-glucuronidase from the cells. Images PMID:6318798

  9. Thermodynamic consistencies and anomalies among end-member silicate garnets.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Leslie

    2014-09-01

    Materials with the garnet crystal structure include silicate minerals of importance both in geology, on account of their use in geothermobarometry, and industrially as abrasives. As a consequence of the former, there is considerable published thermodynamic information concerning them. We here examine this thermodynamic information for end-member silicate garnets (some of which are synthetic since not all occur in nature) for consistencies and anomalies, using thermodynamic relations between thermodynamic properties that we have established over recent years. The principal properties of interest are formula volume, heat capacity, entropy, formation enthalpy (from which the Gibbs energy may be obtained), and isothermal compressibility. A significant observation is that the ambient-temperature heat capacities of the silicate garnets are rather similar, whereas their ambient-temperature entropies are roughly proportional to their formula volumes. Evaluation of their Debye temperatures implies that their vibrational contributions to heat capacity are fully excited at ambient temperatures. The relatively small isothermal compressibilities of these garnets is related to the rigidity of their constituent silicate tetrahedra. We here establish additive single-ion values for each of the thermodynamic properties, which may be applied in estimating corresponding values for related materials.

  10. Energetics of silicate melts from thermal diffusion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.

    1992-07-01

    Efforts are reported in the following areas: laboratory equipment (multianvils for high P/T work, pressure media, SERC/DL sychrotron), liquid-state thermal diffusion (silicate liquids, O isotopic fractionation, volatiles, tektites, polymetallic sulfide liquids, carbonate liquids, aqueous sulfate solutions), and liquid-state isothermal diffusion (self-diffusion, basalt-rhyolite interdiffusion, selective contamination, chemical diffusion).

  11. Experiments on metal-silicate plumes and core formation.

    PubMed

    Olson, Peter; Weeraratne, Dayanthie

    2008-11-28

    Short-lived isotope systematics, mantle siderophile abundances and the power requirements of the geodynamo favour an early and high-temperature core-formation process, in which metals concentrate and partially equilibrate with silicates in a deep magma ocean before descending to the core. We report results of laboratory experiments on liquid metal dynamics in a two-layer stratified viscous fluid, using sucrose solutions to represent the magma ocean and the crystalline, more primitive mantle and liquid gallium to represent the core-forming metals. Single gallium drop experiments and experiments on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities with gallium layers and gallium mixtures produce metal diapirs that entrain the less viscous upper layer fluid and produce trailing plume conduits in the high-viscosity lower layer. Calculations indicate that viscous dissipation in metal-silicate plumes in the early Earth would result in a large initial core superheat. Our experiments suggest that metal-silicate mantle plumes facilitate high-pressure metal-silicate interaction and may later evolve into buoyant thermal plumes, connecting core formation to ancient hotspot activity on the Earth and possibly on other terrestrial planets. PMID:18826918

  12. Potassium silicate-zinc oxide solution for metal finishes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, J. B.

    1970-01-01

    Examples of zinc dust formulations, which are not subject to cracking or crazing, are fire retardant, and have high adhesive qualities, are listed. The potassium silicate in these formulations has mol ratios of dissolved silica potassium oxide in the range 4.8 to 1 - 5.3 to 1.

  13. Electron stimulated hydroxylation of a metal supported silicate film.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Emmez, Emre; Pan, Qiushi; Yang, Bing; Pomp, Sascha; Kaden, William E; Sterrer, Martin; Shaikhutdinov, Shamil; Freund, Hans-Joachim; Goikoetxea, Itziar; Wlodarczyk, Radoslaw; Sauer, Joachim

    2016-02-01

    Water adsorption on a double-layer silicate film was studied by using infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, thermal desorption spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. Under vacuum conditions, small amounts of silanols (Si-OH) could only be formed upon deposition of an ice-like (amorphous solid water, ASW) film and subsequent heating to room temperature. Silanol coverage is considerably enhanced by low-energy electron irradiation of an ASW pre-covered silicate film. The degree of hydroxylation can be tuned by the irradiation parameters (beam energy, exposure) and the ASW film thickness. The results are consistent with a generally accepted picture that hydroxylation occurs through hydrolysis of siloxane (Si-O-Si) bonds in the silica network. Calculations using density functional theory show that this may happen on Si-O-Si bonds, which are either parallel (i.e., in the topmost silicate layer) or vertical to the film surface (i.e., connecting two silicate layers). In the latter case, the mechanism may additionally involve the reaction with a metal support underneath. The observed vibrational spectra are dominated by terminal silanol groups (ν(OD) band at 2763 cm(-1)) formed by hydrolysis of vertical Si-O-Si linkages. Film dehydroxylation fully occurs only upon heating to very high temperatures (∼ 1200 K) and is accompanied by substantial film restructuring, and even film dewetting upon cycling hydroxylation/dehydroxylation treatment.

  14. Fulgurites: A Look at Transient High Temperature Processes in Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserman, A. A.; Melosh, H. J.; Lauretta, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    Fulgurites result from transient high temperature processes, and some have extremely reduced phases. We performed both modeling and a microprobe analysis of natural fulgurites. The modeling suggests vapor phase C causes reduction of silicate liquid. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Low-temperature crystallization of silicate dust in circumstellar disks.

    PubMed

    Molster, F J; Yamamura, I; Waters, L B; Tielens, A G; de Graauw, T; de Jong, T; de Koter, A; Malfait, K; van den Ancker, M E; van Winckel, H; Voors, R H; Waelkens, C

    1999-10-01

    Silicate dust in the interstellar medium is observed to be amorphous, yet silicate dust in comets and interplanetary dust particles is sometimes partially crystalline. The dust in disks that are thought to be forming planets around some young stars also appears to be partially crystalline. These observations suggest that as the dust goes from the precursor clouds to a planetary system, it must undergo some processing, but the nature and extent of this processing remain unknown. Here we report observations of highly crystalline silicate dust in the disks surrounding binary red-giant stars. The dust was created in amorphous form in the outer atmospheres of the red giants, and therefore must be processed in the disks to become crystalline. The temperatures in these disks are too low for the grains to anneal; therefore, some low-temperature process must be responsible. As the physical properties of the disks around young stars and red giants are similar, our results suggest that low-temperature crystallization of silicate grains also can occur in protoplanetary systems.

  16. Fate of silicate minerals in a peat bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Philip C.; Siegel, Donald I.; Hill, Barbara M.; Glaser, Paul H.

    1991-04-01

    An investigation of silicate weathering in a Minnesota mire indicates that quartz and aluminosilicates rapidly dissolve in anoxic, organic-rich, neutral- pH environments. Vertical profiles of pH, dissolved silicon, and major cations were obtained at a raised bog and a spring fen and compared. Profiles of readily extractable silicon, diatom abundance, ash mineralogy, and silicate surface texture were determined from peat cores collected at each site. In the bog, normally a recharge mound, dissolved silicon increases with depth as pH increases, exceeding the background silicon concentration by a factor of two. Silicate grain surfaces, including quartz, are chemically etched at this location, despite being in contact with pore water at neutral pH with dissolved silicon well above the equilibrium solubility of quartz. The increasing silica concentrations at circum-neutral pH are consistent with a system where silicate solubility is influenced by silica-organic-acid complexes. Silica-organic-acid complexes therefore may be the cause of the almost complete absence of diatoms in decomposed peat and contribute to the formation of silica-depleted underclays commonly found beneath coal.

  17. SINTERING AND SULFATION OF CALCIUM SILICATE-ALUMINATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of sintering on the reactivity of solids at high temperature was studied. The nature of the interaction was studied with calcium silicate-aluminate reacting with SO2 between 665 and 800 C. The kinetics of the sintering and sulfation processes were measured independentl...

  18. Comparative FeNi and Silicate Chronology in Portales Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    2000-01-01

    Re-Os and U-Pb data on Portales Valley suggest an early formation for the metal and silicates. These two chronometers and Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd require a young disturbance. This is inconsistent with the 39 Ar-40 Ar age and in need of clarification.

  19. Thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of silicate materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, I.; Wechsler, A. E.

    1968-01-01

    Report on the thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of nonmetallic materials evaluates the mechanisms of heat transfer in evacuated silicate powders and establishes the complex dielectric constant of these materials. Experimental measurements and results are related to postulated lunar surface materials.

  20. Oxygen from the lunar soil by molten silicate electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, Russell O.; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    Accepting that oxygen, rather than gigantic gems or gold, is likely to make the Moon's Klondike, the extraction of oxygen from the lunar soil by molten silicate electrolysis has chosen to be investigated. Process theory and proposed lunar factory are addressed.

  1. Determination of boron in silicates after ion exchange separation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, H.

    1955-01-01

    Existing methods for the determination of boron in silicates are not entirely satisfactory. Separation as the methyl ester is lengthy and frequently erratic. An accurate and rapid method applicable to glass, mineral, ore, and water samples uses ion exchange to remove interfering cations, and boron is determined titrimetrically in the presence of mannitol, using a pH meter to indicate the end point.

  2. Structural effects of phosphorus inclusion in bioactive silicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Tilocca, Antonio; Cormack, Alastair N

    2007-12-27

    Molecular dynamics simulations of four bioactive silicate glasses containing between 0 (P0) and 12 (P12) mol % P2O5 have been carried out in order to elucidate the structural role of phosphorus in these materials. In particular, we have focused on structural features which can have a direct role in the bioactive mechanism of dissolution and bone bonding. The higher affinity of modifier Na and Ca cations for coordinating phosphate rather than silicate, together with the formation of P-O-Si linkages, lead to increasing repolymerization of the silicate network with increasing P2O5 content, which in principle would represent a negative effect of P inclusion on the glass bioactivity. However, this effect is counterbalanced by the concomitant increase in the amount of free orthophosphate groups, whose fast release is deemed to enhance the bioactivity. The strong affinity of the orthophosphates for calcium ions leads to a clear tendency toward separation of silicate-rich and phosphate-rich phases for the P12 composition. Although this could reduce the bioactivity in the case of P12, in general, the favorable balance between the effects mentioned above should result in a positive effect of partial Si --> P substitution on the glass bioactivity.

  3. Experiments on metal-silicate plumes and core formation.

    PubMed

    Olson, Peter; Weeraratne, Dayanthie

    2008-11-28

    Short-lived isotope systematics, mantle siderophile abundances and the power requirements of the geodynamo favour an early and high-temperature core-formation process, in which metals concentrate and partially equilibrate with silicates in a deep magma ocean before descending to the core. We report results of laboratory experiments on liquid metal dynamics in a two-layer stratified viscous fluid, using sucrose solutions to represent the magma ocean and the crystalline, more primitive mantle and liquid gallium to represent the core-forming metals. Single gallium drop experiments and experiments on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities with gallium layers and gallium mixtures produce metal diapirs that entrain the less viscous upper layer fluid and produce trailing plume conduits in the high-viscosity lower layer. Calculations indicate that viscous dissipation in metal-silicate plumes in the early Earth would result in a large initial core superheat. Our experiments suggest that metal-silicate mantle plumes facilitate high-pressure metal-silicate interaction and may later evolve into buoyant thermal plumes, connecting core formation to ancient hotspot activity on the Earth and possibly on other terrestrial planets.

  4. ZnO doped sodium silicate preionize N2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Montaser; F, Sabry; S, A. Ibrahim

    1989-11-01

    An experimental study of the effect of ZnO doped sodium silicate thin film, used as a semiconductive preionizer on the output energy is presented. The output energy of the nitrogen laser increased by two folds. The performance of the preionizer can be controlled to match the discharge requirements.

  5. Estimation of high temperature metal-silicate partition coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John H.; Capobianco, Christopher J.; Drake, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    It has been known for some time that abundances of siderophile elements in the upper mantle of the Earth are far in excess of those expected from equilibrium between metal and silicate at low pressures and temperatures. Murthy (1991) has re-examined this excess of siderophile element problem by estimating liquid metal/liquid silicate partition coefficients reduces from their measured values at a lower temperature, implying that siderophile elements become much less siderophilic at high temperatures. Murthy then draws the important conclusion that metal/silicate equilibrium at high temperatures can account for the abundances of siderophile elements in the Earth's mantle. Of course, his conclusion is critically dependent on the small values of the partition coefficients he calculates. Because the numerical values of most experimentally-determined partition coefficients increase with increasing temperature at both constant oxygen fugacity and at constant redox buffer, we think it is important to try an alternative extrapolation for comparison. We have computed high temperature metal/silicate partition coefficients under a different set of assumptions and show that such long temperature extrapolations yield values which are critically dependent upon the presumed chemical behavior of the siderophile elements in the system.

  6. Effect of antioxidants and silicates on peroxides in povidone.

    PubMed

    Narang, Ajit S; Rao, Venkatramana M; Desai, Divyakant S

    2012-01-01

    Reactive peroxides in povidone often lead to degradation of oxidation-labile drugs. To reduce peroxide concentration in povidone, the roles of storage conditions, antioxidants, and silicates were investigated. Povidone alone and its physical mixtures with ascorbic acid, propyl gallate, sodium sulfite, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), or butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) were stored at 25 °C and 40 °C, at 11%, 32%, and 50% relative humidity. In addition, povidone solution in methanol was equilibrated with silicates (silica gel and molecular sieves), followed by solvent evaporation to recover povidone powder. Peroxide concentrations in povidone were measured. The concentration of peroxides in povidone increased under very-low-humidity storage conditions. Among the antioxidants, ascorbic acid, propyl gallate, and sodium sulfite reduced the peroxide concentration in povidone, whereas BHA and BHT did not. Water solubility appeared to determine the effectiveness of antioxidants. Also, some silicates significantly reduced peroxide concentration in povidone without affecting its functionality as a tablet binder. Porosity of silicates was critical to their ability to reduce the peroxide concentration in povidone. A combination of these approaches can reduce the initial peroxide concentration in povidone and minimize peroxide growth under routine storage conditions.

  7. A preliminary investigation of chlorine XANES in silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, K. A.; Mavrogenes, J. A.; O'Neill, H. S.; Keller, N. S.; Jang, L.-Y.

    2008-10-01

    Chlorine speciation in silicate melts affects volatile exsolution, rheology, and thermodynamic properties of the melt but is poorly known. X-Ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectra have been used to investigate Cl speciation in 26 silicate glasses and to test the hypothesis that Cl in silicate melts is hosted by species that combine Cl and network-modifying cations such as Ca and Mg. Results indicate that Cl in CMAS (CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2) plus Na2O, K2O, or MnO silicate glasses exists as a combination of Ca-Clx and Mg-Clx species or, possibly, as mixed Ca-Mgy-Clx species. The geometry and stoichiometry of the proposed species is unknown, but there are similarities between spectra from Ca-bearing melts and the spectra of hydrated CaCl2.2H2O, suggesting that the Ca-Clx species could have a salt-like atomic arrangement and ionic bonding. Further investigations using XANES, alternative spectroscopic techniques, and forward modeling approaches are required to distinguish between these possibilities.

  8. PREFACE: 5th Baltic Conference on Silicate Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezinskis, G.; Bragina, L.; Colombo, P.; Frischat, G. H.; Grabis, J.; Greil, P.; Deja, J.; Kaminskas, R.; Kliava, J.; Medvids, A.; Nowak, I.; Siauciunas, R.; Valancius, Z.; Zalite, I.

    2011-12-01

    Logo This Volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering presents a selection of the contributions to the 5th Baltic Conference on Silicate Materials (BaltSilica2011) held at Riga Technical University, Riga, Latvia from 23-25 May 2011. The conference was organized by Riga Technical University (Latvia) and Kaunas University of Technology (Lithuania). The series of Baltic conferences on silicate materials was started since 2004: the first conference was held in Riga, Latvia, 2004; the second conference was held in Kaunas, Lithuania 2005; the third was held again in Riga, Latvia, 2007, and the fourth was held in Kaunas, Lithuania 2009. BaltSilica 2011 was attended by around 50 participants from Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Germany, Poland, Italy, France, Ukraine and Russia. In comparison with previous silicate materials conferences, the broadening of participating countries is an indication of the interest of scientists, engineers and students to exchange research ideas, latest results, and to find new research topics for cooperation in the fields of silicate, high temperature materials, and inorganic nanomaterials. The scientific programme included 8 invited plenary lectures 23 oral presentations and 25 posters [1]. Scientific themes covered in the conference and in this special issue: Natural and Artificial Stone Materials; Traditional and New Ceramic and Glass-Like Materials; Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials. This volume consists of 23 selected proceeding papers. The Editor of this special issue is grateful to all the contributors to BaltSilica 2011. I am also very grateful to the scientific committee, the local organizing committee, the session chairs, the referees who refereed the submitted articles to this issue, and to students from the Department of Silicate, High Temperature and Inorganic Nanomaterials Technology of the Riga Technical University who ensured the smooth running of the conference. Particular thanks goes to eight plenary

  9. Laboratory Analysis of Silicate Stardust Grains of Diverse Stellar Origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Ann N.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Silicate dust is ubiquitous in a multitude of environments across the cosmos, including evolved oxygen-rich stars, interstellar space, protoplanetary disks, comets, and asteroids. The identification of bona fide silicate stardust grains in meteorites, interplanetary dust particles, micrometeorites, and dust returned from comet Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft has revolutionized the study of stars, interstellar space, and the history of dust in the Galaxy. These stardust grains have exotic isotopic compositions that are records of nucleosynthetic processes that occurred in the depths of their now extinct parent stars. Moreover, the chemical compositions and mineralogies of silicate stardust are consequences of the physical and chemical nature of the stellar condensation environment, as well as secondary alteration processes that can occur in interstellar space, the solar nebula, and on the asteroid or comet parent body in which they were incorporated. In this talk I will discuss our use of advanced nano-scale instrumentation in the laboratory to conduct coordinated isotopic, chemical, and mineralogical analyses of silicate stardust grains from AGB stars, supernovae, and novae. By analyzing the isotopic compositions of multiple elements in individual grains, we have been able to constrain their stellar sources, explore stellar nucleosynthetic and mixing processes, and Galactic chemical evolution. Through our mineralogical studies, we have found these presolar silicate grains to have wide-ranging chemical and mineral characteristics. This diversity is the result of primary condensation characteristics and in some cases secondary features imparted by alteration in space and in our Solar System. The laboratory analysis of actual samples of stars directly complements astronomical observations and astrophysical models and offers an unprecedented level of detail into the lifecycles of dust in the Galaxy.

  10. X-ray spectral diagnostics of synthetic lanthanide silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsova, A. N.; Guda, A. A.; Soldatov, A. V.; Goettlicher, J.; Taroev, V. K.; Kashaev, A. A.; Suvorova, L. F.; Tauson, V. L.

    2015-12-01

    Potassium and rare-earth (Eu, Sm, Yb, Ce) silicate and aluminosilicate crystals are hydrothermally synthesized under isothermal conditions at 500°C and a pressure of 100 MPa. The chemical and structural formulas of the synthesized compounds HK6Eu[Si10O25], K7Sm3[Si12O32], K2Sm[AlSi4O12] · 0.375H2O, K4Yb2[Si8O21], and K4Ce2[Al2Si8O24] are determined. In addition, a synthesis product with Eu, in which the dominant phase is assumed to be K3Eu3+[Si6O15] · 2H2O, is studied. The oxidation state of lanthanides in the silicates under study is determined based on X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy. The Eu L 3-, Sm L 3-, Yb L 3-, and Ce L 3-edge X-ray absorption spectra of the studied silicates and reference samples are recorded using a Rigaku R-XAS laboratory spectrometer. As reference samples, Eu2+S, Eu3+F3, Eu 2 3+ O3, Sm 2 3+ O3, Yb 2 3+ O3, Yb3+F3, Yb3+Cl3, Ce 2 3+ O3, and Ce4+O2 are used. Comparison of the absorption edge energies of lanthanide silicates and reference samples shows that Eu, Sm, Yb, and Ce in all the samples studied are in the oxidation state 3+. The synthesized silicates will supplement our knowledge of possible rare-earth minerals existing in hydrothermal systems, which is important for analyzing the distribution spectra of rare elements, which are widely used for diagnostics of geochemical processes and determination of sources of ore materials.

  11. Synthesis and structure of nanocrystalline mixed Ce–Yb silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Małecka, Małgorzata A. Kępiński, Leszek

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • New method of synthesis of nanocrystalline mixed lanthanide silicates is proposed. • Formation of A-type (Ce{sub 1−y}Yb{sub y}){sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} in well dispersed Ce{sub 1−x}Yb{sub x}O{sub 2−(x/2)}–SiO{sub 2} system. • Formation of Yb{sub y}Ce{sub 9.33−y}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} in agglomerated Ce{sub 1−x}Yb{sub x}O{sub 2−(x/2)}–SiO{sub 2} system. - Abstract: This work presents results of studies on synthesis and structure of mixed, nanocrystalline Ce–Yb silicates. Using TEM, XRD and FTIR we showed that heat treatment of nanocrystalline Ce{sub 1−x}Yb{sub x}O{sub 2−(x/2)} (x = 0.3, 0.5) mixed oxide supported on amorphous silica in reducing atmosphere, results in formation of Ce–Yb mixed silicates. Dispersion of the oxide on the silica surface and thus a local lanthanide/Si atomic ratio determines the stoichiometry of the silicate. Oxide crystallites uniformly dispersed on the silica surface transformed into A-(Ce{sub 1−y}Yb{sub y}){sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} disilicate, while the agglomerated nanoparticles converted into Yb{sub y}Ce{sub 9.33−y}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} oxyapatite silicate as an intermediate phase.

  12. Metal/Silicate Partitioning at High Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shofner, G.; Campbell, A.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Rahman, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of siderophile elements during metal-silicate segregation, and their resulting distributions provide insight into core formation processes. Determination of partition coefficients allows the calculation of element distributions that can be compared to established values of element abundances in the silicate (mantle) and metallic (core) portions of the Earth. Moderately siderophile elements, including W, are particularly useful in constraining core formation conditions because they are sensitive to variations in T, P, oxygen fugacity (fO2), and silicate composition. To constrain the effect of pressure on W metal/silicate partitioning, we performed experiments at high pressures and temperatures using a multi anvil press (MAP) at NASA Johnson Space Center and laser-heated diamond anvil cells (LHDAC) at the University of Maryland. Starting materials consisted of natural peridotite mixed with Fe and W metals. Pressure conditions in the MAP experiments ranged from 10 to 16 GPa at 2400 K. Pressures in the LHDAC experiments ranged from 26 to 58 GPa, and peak temperatures ranged up to 5000 K. LHDAC experimental run products were sectioned by focused ion beam (FIB) at NASA JSC. Run products were analyzed by electron microprobe using wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. Liquid metal/liquid silicate partition coefficients for W were calculated from element abundances determined by microprobe analyses, and corrected to a common fO2 condition of IW-2 assuming +4 valence for W. Within analytical uncertainties, W partitioning shows a flat trend with increasing pressure from 10 to 16 GPa. At higher pressures, W becomes more siderophile, with an increase in partition coefficient of approximately 0.5 log units.

  13. Using silicates to lower lead levels in drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    York is a small resort town on the coast of Maine, near the New Hampshire border. The town's population of 5,000 usually doubles during the summer tourist season. Like many small water systems in New England, its soft, moderately alkaline water corrodes its unlined, cast-iron pipe distribution system, picking up significant quantities of iron along the way. Customers served by these lines have complained about the red water. York Water District officials hoped that a new 4-mgd treatment facility brought into service in spring 1990 would alleviate the red water problems, but they were also considering ways to address the requirements of the Lead and Copper Rule from the EPA promulgated in 1991. With the assistance of their consulting engineering firm, York Water District officials evaluated treatment strategies and decided against using polyphosphates to control lead and copper because of their ability to complex with the metals, possibly causing an increase in concentration. The officials eventually chose sodium silicates to lower the iron, lead, and copper levels in the system. Several utilities in Maine had reported using sodium silicate as a common strategy for red water problems. In addition, sodium silicate was favored because it reacts with metal for form a barrier to corrosion. York Water District, with assistance from its consultant, designed an 18-month program to add sodium silicates to its system, track metal concentrations, and monitor red water complaints. The district prepared a report for the EPA, covering data collected over the first 12 months of the program -- essentially calendar year 1991. According to Michael R. Schock, research chemist with the EPA's Drinking Water Research Division in Cincinnati, the agency is anxious to obtain as much quantitative information as possible on using sodium silicate for pH and/or corrosion control. This article describes the monitoring system, water treatment and study results.

  14. 40 CFR 180.1268 - Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Potassium silicate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1268 Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Potassium silicate is exempt from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all food commodities so long...

  15. 40 CFR 180.1268 - Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Potassium silicate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1268 Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Potassium silicate is exempt from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all food commodities so long...

  16. 40 CFR 180.1268 - Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Potassium silicate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1268 Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Potassium silicate is exempt from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all food commodities so long...

  17. 40 CFR 180.1268 - Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Potassium silicate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1268 Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Potassium silicate is exempt from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all food commodities so long...

  18. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products with... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with...

  19. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products with... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products with... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products with... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9514 - Ethyl silicate, reaction products with modified alkoxysilane salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ethyl silicate, reaction products with... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9514 Ethyl silicate, reaction products with.... (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Ethyl silicate, reaction products with...

  3. 40 CFR 180.1268 - Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Potassium silicate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1268 Potassium silicate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Potassium silicate is exempt from the requirement of a tolerance in or on all food commodities so long...

  4. Impressive Performance: New Disposable Digital Ureteroscope Allows for Extreme Lower Pole Access and Use of 365 μm Holmium Laser Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Emily Fell

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Since the development of the first flexible ureteroscope, in 1964, technological advances in image quality, flexibility, and deflection have led to the development of the first single-use digital flexible ureteroscope, LithoVue™ (Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA). With respect to reusable fiber-optic and now digital ureteroscopes, there is an initial capital cost of several thousand dollars (USD) as well as, controversy regarding durability, the cost of repairs and the burdensome reprocessing steps of ureteroscopy. The single-use LithoVue eliminates the need for costly repairs, the occurrence of unpredictable performance, and procedural delays. Renal stones located in the lower pole of the kidney can be extremely challenging as extreme deflections of greater than 160° are difficult to maintain and are often further compromised when using stone treatment tools, such as laser fibers and baskets. This case describes an initial use of the LithoVue digital disposable ureteroscope in the effective treatment of lower pole calculi using a 365 μm holmium laser fiber. Case Report: A 35-year-old female, with a medical history significant for chronic bacteriuria, and recurrent symptomatic culture proven urinary tract infections, underwent localization studies. Retrograde ureteropyelography demonstrated two calcifications adjoining, measuring a total of 1.4 cm, overlying the left renal shadow. Urine aspirated yielded clinically significant, >100,000, Escherichia coli and Streptococcus anginosus bacteriuria, which was felt to be originating from the left lower calix. This case used the newly FDA-approved LithoVue flexible disposable ureteroscope. The two stones were seen using the ureteroscope passed through an ureteral access sheath in the lower pole calix. A 365 μm holmium laser fiber was inserted into the ureteroscope and advanced toward the stones. There was no loss of deflection as the ureteroscope performed reproducibly. The laser was used

  5. Towards optimizing prostate tissue retrieval following holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP): Assessment of two morcellators and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Elshal, Ahmed M.; Mekkawy, Ramy; Laymon, Mahmoud; El-Assmy, Ahmed; El-Nahas, Ahmed R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We assess different approaches to retrieve the enucleated adenoma after transurethral enucleation of the prostate, particularly using the holmium laser. Methods: A retrospective review through our prospectively maintained database was performed looking for safety and efficacy of two morcellators. The enucleation phase of the holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) was classically performed followed by retrieval of the intravesical adenoma using either the Piranha (Wolf Inc., Knittlingen, Germany) or VersaCut (Lumenis) morcellator. A PubMed-MEDLINE search was conducted for all transurethral enucleation procedures and relevant data regarding methods of prostate tissue retrieval were extracted. Results: Strictly limiting the study to 3 reusable blades with each morcellator, we performed 67 and 55 consecutive procedures with Piranha and VersaCut, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two morcellators regarding perioperative complications, apart from 5 bladder mucosal injuries with the VersaCut (9%). Furthermore, there were similar retrieved tissue weight, mechanical problems-rate, catheter-time and hospital-stay in both morcellators. However, the Piranha morcellator needed significantly less morcellation-time, needed to use cold loop to remove non-morcellated pieces and to score the adenoma by laser for better bite of the adenoma, and had a higher median morcellation-rate 6.2 (rate: 2.8–12) g/min. Despite little reporting on morcellation, we had data on the tissue retrieval rate (2.6 to 6.5 g/min with Piranha and 1.9 to 11 g/min with VersaCut. Furthermore, bladder mucosal injury was reported in 1.4% and 0.7 to 5.7% with Piranha and VersaCut, respectively; bladder perforation with VersaCut was experienced in about 0.1 to 1.5% of patients. Our study is limited by its non-randomization. Conclusion: The Piranha morcellator was the most efficient and safe way to retrieve tissue after a transurethral enucleation of a prostate

  6. Biological and therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and some ortho-silicic acid-releasing compounds: New perspectives for therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is the most abundant element present in the Earth's crust besides oxygen. However, the exact biological roles of silicon remain unknown. Moreover, the ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4), as a major form of bioavailable silicon for both humans and animals, has not been given adequate attention so far. Silicon has already been associated with bone mineralization, collagen synthesis, skin, hair and nails health atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, immune system enhancement, and with some other disorders or pharmacological effects. Beside the ortho-silicic acid and its stabilized formulations such as choline chloride-stabilized ortho-silicic acid and sodium or potassium silicates (e.g. M2SiO3; M= Na,K), the most important sources that release ortho-silicic acid as a bioavailable form of silicon are: colloidal silicic acid (hydrated silica gel), silica gel (amorphous silicon dioxide), and zeolites. Although all these compounds are characterized by substantial water insolubility, they release small, but significant, equilibrium concentration of ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4) in contact with water and physiological fluids. Even though certain pharmacological effects of these compounds might be attributed to specific structural characteristics that result in profound adsorption and absorption properties, they all exhibit similar pharmacological profiles readily comparable to ortho-silicic acid effects. The most unusual ortho-silicic acid-releasing agents are certain types of zeolites, a class of aluminosilicates with well described ion(cation)-exchange properties. Numerous biological activities of some types of zeolites documented so far might probably be attributable to the ortho-silicic acid-releasing property. In this review, we therefore discuss biological and potential therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and ortho-silicic acid -releasing silicon compounds as its major natural sources. PMID:23298332

  7. Biological and therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and some ortho-silicic acid-releasing compounds: New perspectives for therapy.

    PubMed

    Jurkić, Lela Munjas; Cepanec, Ivica; Pavelić, Sandra Kraljević; Pavelić, Krešimir

    2013-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is the most abundant element present in the Earth's crust besides oxygen. However, the exact biological roles of silicon remain unknown. Moreover, the ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4), as a major form of bioavailable silicon for both humans and animals, has not been given adequate attention so far. Silicon has already been associated with bone mineralization, collagen synthesis, skin, hair and nails health atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, immune system enhancement, and with some other disorders or pharmacological effects. Beside the ortho-silicic acid and its stabilized formulations such as choline chloride-stabilized ortho-silicic acid and sodium or potassium silicates (e.g. M2SiO3; M= Na,K), the most important sources that release ortho-silicic acid as a bioavailable form of silicon are: colloidal silicic acid (hydrated silica gel), silica gel (amorphous silicon dioxide), and zeolites. Although all these compounds are characterized by substantial water insolubility, they release small, but significant, equilibrium concentration of ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4) in contact with water and physiological fluids. Even though certain pharmacological effects of these compounds might be attributed to specific structural characteristics that result in profound adsorption and absorption properties, they all exhibit similar pharmacological profiles readily comparable to ortho-silicic acid effects. The most unusual ortho-silicic acid-releasing agents are certain types of zeolites, a class of aluminosilicates with well described ion(cation)-exchange properties. Numerous biological activities of some types of zeolites documented so far might probably be attributable to the ortho-silicic acid-releasing property. In this review, we therefore discuss biological and potential therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and ortho-silicic acid -releasing silicon compounds as its major natural sources.

  8. Effect of silicate modulus and metakaolin incorporation on the carbonation of alkali silicate-activated slags

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, Susan A.; Mejia de Gutierrez, Ruby; Provis, John L.; Rose, Volker

    2010-06-15

    Accelerated carbonation is induced in pastes and mortars produced from alkali silicate-activated granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS)-metakaolin (MK) blends, by exposure to CO{sub 2}-rich gas atmospheres. Uncarbonated specimens show compressive strengths of up to 63 MPa after 28 days of curing when GBFS is used as the sole binder, and this decreases by 40-50% upon complete carbonation. The final strength of carbonated samples is largely independent of the extent of metakaolin incorporation up to 20%. Increasing the metakaolin content of the binder leads to a reduction in mechanical strength, more rapid carbonation, and an increase in capillary sorptivity. A higher susceptibility to carbonation is identified when activation is carried out with a lower solution modulus (SiO{sub 2}/Na{sub 2}O ratio) in metakaolin-free samples, but this trend is reversed when metakaolin is added due to the formation of secondary aluminosilicate phases. High-energy synchrotron X-ray diffractometry of uncarbonated paste samples shows that the main reaction products in alkali-activated GBFS/MK blends are C-S-H gels, and aluminosilicates with a zeolitic (gismondine) structure. The main crystalline carbonation products are calcite in all samples and trona only in samples containing no metakaolin, with carbonation taking place in the C-S-H gels of all samples, and involving the free Na{sup +} present in the pore solution of the metakaolin-free samples. Samples containing metakaolin do not appear to have the same availability of Na{sup +} for carbonation, indicating that this is more effectively bound in the presence of a secondary aluminosilicate gel phase. It is clear that claims of exceptional carbonation resistance in alkali-activated binders are not universally true, but by developing a fuller mechanistic understanding of this process, it will certainly be possible to improve performance in this area.

  9. Experimental determination of the solubility of iridium in silicate melts: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borisov, Alexander; Dingwell, Donald B.; Oneill, Hugh ST.C.; Palme, Herbert

    1992-01-01

    Little is known of the geochemical behavior of iridium. Normally this element is taken to be chalcophile and/or siderophile so that during planetary differentiation processes, e.g., core formation, iridium is extracted from silicate phases into metallic phases. Experimental determination of the metal/silicate partition coefficient of iridium is difficult simply because it is so large. Also there are no data on the solubility behavior of iridium in silicate melts. With information on the solubility of iridium in silicate melts it is possible, in combination with experimental data for Fe-Ir alloys, to calculate the partition coefficient between a metallic phase and a silicate melt.

  10. A hidden reservoir of Fe/FeS in interstellar silicates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, M.; Jones, A.; Ysard, N.

    2014-05-01

    Context. The depletion of iron and sulphur into dust in the interstellar medium and the exact nature of interstellar amorphous silicate grains is still an open question. Aims: We study the incorporation of iron and sulphur into amorphous silicates of olivine- and pyroxene-types and their effects on the dust spectroscopy and thermal emission. Methods: We used the Maxwell-Garnett effective-medium theory to construct the optical constants for a mixture of silicates, metallic iron, and iron sulphide. We also studied the effects of iron and iron sulphide in aggregate grains. Results: Iron sulphide inclusions within amorphous silicates that contain iron metal inclusions show no strong differences in the optical properties of the grains. A mix of amorphous olivine- and pyroxene-type silicate broadens the silicate features. An amorphous carbon mantle with a thickness of 10 nm on the silicate grains leads to an increase in absorption on the short-wavelength side of the 10 μm silicate band. Conclusions: The assumption of amorphous olivine-type and pyroxene-type silicates and a 10 nm thick amorphous carbon mantle better matches the interstellar silicate band profiles. Including iron nano-particles leads to an increase in the mid-IR extinction, while up to 5 ppm of sulphur can be incorporated as Fe/FeS nano inclusions into silicate grains without leaving a significant trace of its presence.

  11. IN SITU INFRARED MEASUREMENTS OF FREE-FLYING SILICATE DURING CONDENSATION IN THE LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizuka, Shinnosuke; Kimura, Yuki; Sakon, Itsuki

    2015-04-20

    We developed a new experimental system for infrared (IR) measurements on free-flying nucleating nanoparticles in situ and applied it to studies on silicate particles. We monitored the condensation of magnesium-bearing silicate nanoparticles from thermally evaporated magnesium and silicon monoxide vapor under an atmosphere of oxygen and argon. The IR spectrum of newly condensed particles showed a spectral feature for non-crystalline magnesium-bearing silicate that is remarkably consistent with the IR spectrum of astronomically observed non-crystalline silicate around oxygen-rich evolved stars. The silicate crystallized at <500 K and eventually developed a high crystallinity. Because of the size effects of nanoparticles, the silicate would be expected to be like a liquid at least during the initial stages of nucleation and growth. Our experimental results therefore suggest decreasing the possible formation temperature of crystalline silicates in dust formation environments with relatively higher pressure.

  12. In Situ Infrared Measurements of Free-flying Silicate during Condensation in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, Shinnosuke; Kimura, Yuki; Sakon, Itsuki

    2015-04-01

    We developed a new experimental system for infrared (IR) measurements on free-flying nucleating nanoparticles in situ and applied it to studies on silicate particles. We monitored the condensation of magnesium-bearing silicate nanoparticles from thermally evaporated magnesium and silicon monoxide vapor under an atmosphere of oxygen and argon. The IR spectrum of newly condensed particles showed a spectral feature for non-crystalline magnesium-bearing silicate that is remarkably consistent with the IR spectrum of astronomically observed non-crystalline silicate around oxygen-rich evolved stars. The silicate crystallized at <500 K and eventually developed a high crystallinity. Because of the size effects of nanoparticles, the silicate would be expected to be like a liquid at least during the initial stages of nucleation and growth. Our experimental results therefore suggest decreasing the possible formation temperature of crystalline silicates in dust formation environments with relatively higher pressure.

  13. Holmium(III)-selective fluorimetric optode based on N,N-bis(salicylidene)-naphthylene-1,8-diamine as a neutral fluorogenic ionophore.

    PubMed

    Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Morteza; Karimi, Anahita; Haji-Hashemi, Hedieh; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Norouzi, Parviz

    2014-01-01

    For the first time a highly sensitive and selective fluorimetric optode for determination of trace amounts of Ho(3+) ions was prepared. The sensing system was prepared by incorporating of N,N-bis(salicylidene)-naphthylene-1,8-diamine (L) as a neutral Ho(3+)-selective fluoroionophore, in a plasticized PVC membrane containing sodium tetraphenyl borate as a lipophilic anionic additive. The response of the sensor is based on the strong fluorescence quenching of L by Ho(3+) ions. At pH 5.4, the proposed sensor displays a calibration curve over a wide concentration range of 1.0×10(-10)-1.0×10(-3)M, with a relatively fast response time of less than 1 min. In addition to high stability, high reproducibility and a relatively long working lifetime, the sensor shows a good selectivity towards Ho(3+) ion with respect to common coexisting cations. The fluorescence optode was applied to determination of holmium ion contents of water samples.

  14. Calc-silicate mineralization in active geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, D.K.; Schiffman, P.; Elders, W.A.; Williams, A.E.; McDowell, S.D.

    1983-01-01

    The detailed study of calc-silicate mineral zones and coexisting phase relations in the Cerro Prieto geothermal system were used as examples for thermodynamic evaluation of phase relations among minerals of variable composition and to calculate the chemical characteristics of hydrothermal solutions compatible with the observed calc-silicate assemblages. In general there is a close correlation between calculated and observed fluid compositions. Calculated fugacities of O{sub 2} at about 320{degrees}C in the Cerro Prieto geothermal system are about five orders of magnitude less than that at the nearby Salton Sea geothermal system. This observation is consistent with the occurrence of Fe{sup 3+} rich epidotes in the latter system and the presence of prehnite at Cerro Prieto.

  15. Electroosmotic Pumps with Frits Synthesized from Potassium Silicate

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Nathaniel D.

    2015-01-01

    Electroosmotic pumps employing silica frits synthesized from potassium silicate as a stationary phase show strong electroosmotic flow velocity and resistance to pressure-driven flow. We characterize these pumps and measure an electroosmotic mobility of 2.5×10-8 m2/V s and hydrodynamic resistance per unit length of 70 ×1017 Pa s/m4 with a standard deviation of less than 2% even when varying the amount of water used in the potassium silicate mixture. Furthermore, we demonstrate the simple integration of these pumps into a proof-of-concept PDMS lab-on-a-chip device fabricated from a 3D-printed template. PMID:26629907

  16. Metal silicate mixtures - Spectral properties and applications to asteroid taxonomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloutis, Edward A.; Smith, Dorian G. W.; Lambert, Richard St. J.; Gaffey, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    The reflectance spectra of combinations of olivine, orthopyroxene, and iron meteorite metal are experimentally studied, and the obtained variations in spectral properties are used to constrain the physical and chemical properties of the assemblages. The presence of metal most noticeably affects band area ratios, peak-to-peak and peak-to-minimum reflectance ratios, and band widths. Band width and band areas are useful for determining metal abundance in olivine and metal and orthopyroxene and metal assemblages, respectively. Mafic silicate grain size variations are best determined using band depth criteria. Band centers are most useful for determining mafic silicate composition. An application of these parameters to the S-class asteroid Flora is presented.

  17. Deformation and Fracture Mechanisms of Polymer-Silicate Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harcup, Jason; Yee, Albert

    1998-03-01

    The deformation and fracture behavior of a series of nanocomposites comprising polyamide, silicate and in some cases rubber has been studied. Mechanical properties including Young modulus and fracture toughness were measured and it was found that compared to conventional composites, the nanocomposites exhibited far greater improvement in properties over the neat matrix for a given silicate fraction. It was also found that the addition of the rubber phase produced an increase in toughness. The arrested crack tip process zone was obtained using the Double Notch Four Point Bend test geometry and the process zone morphology was studied using TEM and TOM. Fracture surfaces were probed with XEDS and SEM. The use of these techniques enabled the mechanisms which occur during fracture to be studied and related to the mechanical properties and toughening of these materials.

  18. Carbon and silicate dust formation in V1280 Sco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakon, I.; Sako, S.; Oanaka, T.; Nozawa, T.; Kimura, Y.; Fujiyoshi, T.; Shimonishi, T.; Usui, F.; Takahashi, H.; Ohsawa, R.; Arai, A.; Uemura, M.; Nagayama, T.; Koo, B.-C.; Kozasa, T.

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the temporal evolution of the infrared emission from the dusty nova V1280 Sco over 2000 days from the outburst. We have revealed that the infrared spectral energy distributions at 1272, 1616 and 1947 days are explained by the emissions produced by amorphous carbon dust of mass (6.6-8.7) × 10-8 Mʘ with a representative grain size of 0.01 µm and astronomical silicate dust of mass (3.4-4.3) × 10-7 Mʘ with a representative grain size of 0.3-0.5 µm. Both of carbon and silicate dust travel farther away from the white dwarf without an apparent mass evolution throughout those later epochs.

  19. Electroosmotic Pumps with Frits Synthesized from Potassium Silicate.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Sara; Erlandsson, Per G; Robinson, Nathaniel D

    2015-01-01

    Electroosmotic pumps employing silica frits synthesized from potassium silicate as a stationary phase show strong electroosmotic flow velocity and resistance to pressure-driven flow. We characterize these pumps and measure an electroosmotic mobility of 2.5 × 10(-8) m(2)/V s and hydrodynamic resistance per unit length of 70 × 10(17) Pa s/m(4) with a standard deviation of less than 2% even when varying the amount of water used in the potassium silicate mixture. Furthermore, we demonstrate the simple integration of these pumps into a proof-of-concept PDMS lab-on-a-chip device fabricated from a 3D-printed template. PMID:26629907

  20. Origin and consequences of silicate glass passivation by surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gin, Stéphane; Jollivet, Patrick; Fournier, Maxime; Angeli, Frédéric; Frugier, Pierre; Charpentier, Thibault

    2015-02-01

    Silicate glasses are durable materials, but are they sufficiently durable to confine highly radioactive wastes for hundreds of thousands years? Addressing this question requires a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underpinning aqueous corrosion of these materials. Here we show that in silica-saturated solution, a model glass of nuclear interest corrodes but at a rate that dramatically drops as a passivating layer forms. Water ingress into the glass, leading to the congruent release of mobile elements (B, Na and Ca), is followed by in situ repolymerization of the silicate network. This material is at equilibrium with pore and bulk solutions, and acts as a molecular sieve with a cutoff below 1 nm. The low corrosion rate resulting from the formation of this stable passivating layer enables the objective of durability to be met, while progress in the fundamental understanding of corrosion unlocks the potential for optimizing the design of nuclear glass-geological disposal.

  1. Loss of halogens from crystallized and glassy silicic volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, D.C.; Smith, V.C.; Peck, L.C.

    1967-01-01

    One hundred and sixty-four F and Cl analyses of silicic welded tuffs and lavas and glass separates are presented. Comparison of the F and Cl contents of crystallized rocks with those of nonhydrated glass and hydrated glassy rocks from the same rock units shows that most of the halogens originally present were lost on crystallization. An average of about half of the F and four-fifths of the Cl originally present was lost. Analyses of hydrated natural glasses and of glassy rocks indicate that in some cases significant amounts of halogens may be removed from or added to hydrated glass through prolonged contact with ground water. The data show that the original halogen contents of the groundmass of a silicic volcanic rock can be reliably determined only from nonhydrated glass. ?? 1967.

  2. Osmium Solubility in Silicate Melts: New Efforts and New Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borisov, A.; Walker, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    In a recent paper, Borisov and Palme reported the first experimental results on the partitioning of Os between metal (Ni-rich OsNi alloys) and silicate melt of anorthite-diopside eutectic composition at 1400 C and 1 atm total pressure and and at function of O2 from 10(exp -8) to 10(exp -12) atm. Experiments were done by equilibrating OsNi metal loops with silicate melt. Metal and glass were analyzed separately by INAA. D(sup 0s) ranged from 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 7), which is inconsistent with core/ mantle equilibrium for HSEs and favors the late veneer hypothesis. Unfortunately, there was practically no function of O2 dependence of Os partitioning, and the scatter of experimental results was quite serious, so the formation of Os nuggets was suspected. This new set of experiments was specifically designed to avoid of at least minimize the nugget problem

  3. Thermochemistry of Rare Earth Silicates for Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Gustavo; Jacobson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth silicates are promising candidates as environmental protective coatings (EBCs) for silica-forming ceramics and composites in combustion environments since they are predicted to have lower reactivity with the water vapor combustion products. The reactivity of rare earth silicates is assessed by the thermodynamic activity of the silica component which is best measured by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS). Here, we discuss a novel method based on a reducing agent to increase the partial pressure of SiO(g) which is then used to calculate thermodynamic activity of silica in Y2O3-SiO2 and Yb2O3-SiO2 systems. After the KEMS measurements, samples were probed by X-ray diffraction and their phase content was calculated from Rietveld refinement.

  4. Origin and consequences of silicate glass passivation by surface layers.

    PubMed

    Gin, Stéphane; Jollivet, Patrick; Fournier, Maxime; Angeli, Frédéric; Frugier, Pierre; Charpentier, Thibault

    2015-02-19

    Silicate glasses are durable materials, but are they sufficiently durable to confine highly radioactive wastes for hundreds of thousands years? Addressing this question requires a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underpinning aqueous corrosion of these materials. Here we show that in silica-saturated solution, a model glass of nuclear interest corrodes but at a rate that dramatically drops as a passivating layer forms. Water ingress into the glass, leading to the congruent release of mobile elements (B, Na and Ca), is followed by in situ repolymerization of the silicate network. This material is at equilibrium with pore and bulk solutions, and acts as a molecular sieve with a cutoff below 1 nm. The low corrosion rate resulting from the formation of this stable passivating layer enables the objective of durability to be met, while progress in the fundamental understanding of corrosion unlocks the potential for optimizing the design of nuclear glass-geological disposal.

  5. Origin and consequences of silicate glass passivation by surface layers.

    PubMed

    Gin, Stéphane; Jollivet, Patrick; Fournier, Maxime; Angeli, Frédéric; Frugier, Pierre; Charpentier, Thibault

    2015-01-01

    Silicate glasses are durable materials, but are they sufficiently durable to confine highly radioactive wastes for hundreds of thousands years? Addressing this question requires a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underpinning aqueous corrosion of these materials. Here we show that in silica-saturated solution, a model glass of nuclear interest corrodes but at a rate that dramatically drops as a passivating layer forms. Water ingress into the glass, leading to the congruent release of mobile elements (B, Na and Ca), is followed by in situ repolymerization of the silicate network. This material is at equilibrium with pore and bulk solutions, and acts as a molecular sieve with a cutoff below 1 nm. The low corrosion rate resulting from the formation of this stable passivating layer enables the objective of durability to be met, while progress in the fundamental understanding of corrosion unlocks the potential for optimizing the design of nuclear glass-geological disposal. PMID:25695377

  6. Inorganic phosphors in lead-silicate glass for white LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonorov, N. V.; Kolobkova, E. V.; Aseev, V. A.; Bibik, A. Yu.; Nekrasova, Ya. A.; Tuzova, Yu. V.; Novogran, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    Luminescent composites of the "phosphor-in-glass" type, based on a highly reflective lead-silicate matrix and fine-grained powders of YAG:Ce3+ and SiAlON:Eu2+ crystals, are developed and synthesized. Phosphor and glass powders are sintered at a temperature of 550°C to obtain phosphor samples for white LEDs. The composites are analyzed by X-ray diffraction and luminescence spectroscopy. The dependence of the light quantum yield on the SiAlON:Eu2+ content in the samples is investigated. A breadboard of a white LED is designed using a phosphor-in-glass composite based on lead-silicate glass with a low glasstransition temperature. The total emission spectra of a blue LED and glass-based composites are measured. The possibility of generating warm white light by choosing an appropriate composition is demonstrated.

  7. LOW VELOCITY SHPERE IMPACT OF SODA LIME SILICATE GLASS

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, Timothy G; Fox, Ethan E; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Vuono, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity ( 30 m/s or 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations.

  8. The solubility of gold in silicate melts: First results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borisov, A.; Palme, H.; Spettel, B.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of oxygen fugacity and temperature on the solubility of Au in silicate melts were determined. Pd-Au alloys were equilibrated with silicate of anorthite-diopside eutectic composition at different T-fO2 conditions. The behavior of Au was found to be similar to that of Pd reported recently. Au solubilities for alloys with 30 to 40 at. percent Au decrease at 1400 C from 12 ppm in air to 160 ppb at a log fO2 = -8.7. The slope of the log(Me-solubility) vs. log(fO2) curve is close to 1/4 for Au and the simultaneously determined Pd suggesting a formal valence of Au and Pd of 1+. Near the IW buffer Pd and Au solubilities become even less dependent on fO2 perhaps reflecting the presence of some metallic Au and Pd.

  9. Origin and consequences of silicate glass passivation by surface layers

    PubMed Central

    Gin, Stéphane; Jollivet, Patrick; Fournier, Maxime; Angeli, Frédéric; Frugier, Pierre; Charpentier, Thibault

    2015-01-01

    Silicate glasses are durable materials, but are they sufficiently durable to confine highly radioactive wastes for hundreds of thousands years? Addressing this question requires a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underpinning aqueous corrosion of these materials. Here we show that in silica-saturated solution, a model glass of nuclear interest corrodes but at a rate that dramatically drops as a passivating layer forms. Water ingress into the glass, leading to the congruent release of mobile elements (B, Na and Ca), is followed by in situ repolymerization of the silicate network. This material is at equilibrium with pore and bulk solutions, and acts as a molecular sieve with a cutoff below 1 nm. The low corrosion rate resulting from the formation of this stable passivating layer enables the objective of durability to be met, while progress in the fundamental understanding of corrosion unlocks the potential for optimizing the design of nuclear glass-geological disposal. PMID:25695377

  10. Xe and Kr analyses of silicate inclusions from iron meteorites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Huneke, J. C.; Burnett, D. S.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1971-01-01

    Measurements have been conducted of the amounts and isotopic composition of Xe and Kr in silicate inclusions of several iron meteorites. It is shown that the Xe and Kr contents are comparable to chondritic values. The isotopic compositions show trapped gas of both chondritic and atmospheric composition. Large spallation effects occur in some of the meteorites; the spallation spectra in some instances differ from those reported for stone meteorites. In several meteorites, very large neutron capture effects on Br and I occur. All samples have pronounced Xe129 excesses which apparently indicate differences in the formation times from chondrites of less than about 100 million years; however, the presence of trapped Xe132 in silicates which were enclosed in molten Fe-Ni and cooled slowly proves that they were not entirely outgassed, so that some of the Xe129 excess may also be trapped.

  11. Analysis of the Barrier Properties of Polyimide-Silicate Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi; Johnston, J. Chris; Inghram, Linda; McCorkle, Linda; Silverman, Edward

    2003-01-01

    Montmorillonite clay was organically modified and dispersed into a thermoplastic (BPADA-BAPP) and a thermosetting (PMR-15) polyimide matrix. The barrier properties of the neat resins and the nanocomposites were evaluated. Reductions in gas permeability and water absorption were observed in thermoplastic polyimide nanocomposites. The thermosetting polyimide showed a reduction in weight loss during isothermal aging at 288 C. Carbon fabric (T650-35, 8 HS, 8 ply) composites were prepared using both the BPADE-BAPP and PMR-15 based nanocomposites. Dispersion of the layered silicate in the BPADA-BAPP matrix reduced helium permeability by up to 70 percent. The PMR-15/ silicate nanocomposite matrix had an increase in thermal oxidative stability of up to 25 percent.

  12. Sulfur Solubility In Silicate Melts: A Thermochemical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, R.; Ottonello, G.

    A termochemical model for calculating sulfur solubility of simple and complex silicate melts has been developed in the framework of the Toop-Samis polymeric approach combined with a Flood - Grjotheim theoretical treatment of silicate slags [1,2]. The model allows one to compute sulfide and sulfate content of silicate melts whenever fugacity of gaseous sulphur is provided. "Electrically equivalent ion fractions" are needed to weigh the contribution of the various disproportion reactions of the type: MOmelt + 1/2S2 ,gas MSmelt+1/2O2 ,gas (1) MOmelt + 1/2S2 ,gas + 3/2O2 ,gas MSO4 ,melt (2) Eqs. 1 and 2 account for the oxide-sulfide and the oxide-sulfate disproportiona- tion in silicate melt. Electrically equivalent ion fractions are computed, in a fused salt Temkin notation, over the appropriate matrixes (anionic and cationic). The extension of such matrixes is calculated in the framework of a polymeric model previously developed [1,2,3] and based on a parameterization of acid-base properties of melts. No adjustable parameters are used and model activities follow the raoultian behavior implicit in the ion matrix solution of the Temkin notation. The model is based on a huge amount of data available in literature and displays a high heuristic capability with virtually no compositional limits, as long as the structural role assigned to each oxide holds. REFERENCES: [1] Ottonello G., Moretti R., Marini L. and Vetuschi Zuccolini M. (2001), Chem. Geol., 174, 157-179. [2] Moretti R. (2002) PhD Thesis, University of Pisa. [3] Ottonello G. (2001) J. Non-Cryst. Solids, 282, 72-85.

  13. DIRECT LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF SILICATE STARDUST FROM RED GIANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Vollmer, Christian; Hoppe, Peter; Brenker, Frank E.

    2009-07-20

    We performed combined focused ion beam/transmission electron microscopy studies to investigate the chemistry and structure of eight presolar silicate grains that were previously detected by NanoSIMS oxygen isotope mapping of the carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094. The analyzed presolar silicates belong to the O isotope Groups I/II ({sup 17}O-enriched and {sup 18}O-depleted) and therefore come from 1-2.5 M{sub sun} asymptotic giant branch stars of close-to-solar or slightly lower-than-solar metallicity. Three grains are amorphous, Mg-rich, and show a variable, but more pyroxene-like composition. Most probably, these grains have formed under circumstellar low-temperature conditions below the crystallization temperature. Three grains are Fe-bearing glasses similar to the 'glass with embedded metal and sulfides' (GEMS) grains found in interplanetary dust particles. However, two of the meteorite GEMS grains from this study lack comparatively large ({approx}>20 nm) Fe-rich inclusions and have sulfur contents <1 at.%, which is different than observed for the majority of GEMS grains. These grains likely condensed under strong non-equilibrium conditions from an Si-enriched gas. One olivine is characterized by a crystalline core and an amorphous, more Fe-rich rim, which is probably the result of interstellar medium sputtering combined with Mg removal. The detection of another olivine with a relatively high Fe content (Mg no. 0.9) shows that circumstellar crystalline silicates are more Fe-rich than astrophysical models usually suggest. The overall predominance of olivine among the crystalline silicate stardust population compared to pyroxene indicates preferential formation or survival of this type of mineral. As pyroxene is indeed detected in circumstellar outflows, it remains to be seen how this result is compatible with astrophysical observations and experimental data.

  14. Optical properties of silicates in the far ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamy, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    Near-normal incidence reflectance measurements in the interval 1026-1640 A were performed on four silicates already studied in the visible and infrared. A Kramers-Kronig analysis of these data is used to calculate the complex index of refraction m = n - ik. New transmission measurements improve the determination of k in the interval 2500-4500 A, except for andesite, which is more opaque than had been previously observed.

  15. Lead silicate microstructured optical fibres for electro-optical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen Qi; Manning, Sean; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Monro, Tanya M

    2013-12-16

    We report progress towards the realization of optical modulators based on electro-optic effects in soft glass fibres. A hybrid fabrication procedure was developed for producing microstructured lead silicate glass fibres with internal electrodes. Electro-optical characterization confirms experimentally that the enhanced nonlinear properties and superior isolation between the optical field and the electrodes make these fibres an ideal candidate platform for efficient electro-optical devices.

  16. Scenario of Growing Crops on Silicates in Lunar Gargens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrovska, N.; Kovalchuk, M.; Negutska, V.; Lar, O.; Korniichuk, O.; Alpatov, A.; Rogutskiy, I.; Kordyum, V.; Foing, B.

    Self-perpetuating gardens will be a practical necessity for humans, living in permanently manned lunar bases. A lunar garden has to supplement less appetizing packaged food brought from the Earth, and the ornamental plants have to serve as valuable means for emotional relaxation of crews in a hostile lunar environment. The plants are less prone to the inevitable pests and diseases when they are in optimum condition, however, in lunar greenhouses there is a threat for plants to be hosts for pests and predators. Although the lunar rocks are microorganism free, there will be a problem with the acquired infection (pathogens brought from the Earth) in the substrate used for the plant growing. On the Moon pests can be removed by total fumigation, including seed fumigation. However, such a treatment is not required when probiotics (biocontrol bacteria) for seed inoculation are used. A consortium of bacteria, controlling plant diseases, provides the production of an acceptable harvest under growth limiting factors and a threatening infection. To model lunar conditions we have used terrestrial alumino-silicate mineral anorthosite (Malyn, Ukraine) which served us as a lunar mineral analog for a substrate composition. With the idea to provide a plant with some essential growth elements siliceous bacterium Paenibacillus sp. has been isolated from alumino-silicate mineral, and a mineral leaching has been simulated in laboratory condition. The combination of mineral anorthosite and siliceous bacteria, on one hand, and a consortium of beneficial bacteria for biocontrol of plant diseases, on the other hand, are currently used in model experiments to examine the wheat and potato growth and production in cultivating chambers under controlled conditions.

  17. Rapid determination of nanogram amounts of tellurium in silicate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.; Campbell, E.Y.

    1976-01-01

    A hydride-generation flameless atomic-absorption technique is used to determine as little as 5 ng g-1 tellurium in 0.25 g of silicate rock. After acid decomposition of the sample, tellurium hydride is generated with sodium borohydride and the vapor passed directly to a resistance-heated quartz cell mounted in an atomic-absorption spectrophotometer. Analyses of 11 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks are presented. ?? 1976.

  18. Method 366.0 Determination of Dissolved Silicate in Estuarine and Coastal Watersby Gas Segmented Continuous Flow Colorimetric Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    This method provides a procedure for the determination of dissolved silicate concentration in estuarine and coastal waters. The dissolved silicate is mainly in the form of silicic acid, H SiO , in estuarine and 4 4 coastal waters. All soluble silicate, including colloidal silici...

  19. Lanthanides in silicate glasses: A vibrational spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Adam J. G.; Hess, Paul C.

    1990-09-01

    Parallel- and perpendicular-polarized Raman and KBr pellet transmission IR spectra of quenched 10K2O-50SiO2-nR2O3 (R = La, Gd, Yb; n = 0, 1, 5, 10 mol) glasses are presented. Increasing lanthanide oxide concentration produces partially-polarized high-frequency bands at 1030, 940, and 860 cm-1, assigned to the symmetric stretching modes of SiO4 tetrahedra containing 1, 2, and 4 nonbridging oxygen, respectively, in which the nonbridging oxygen coordinate primarily with lanthanides. Lanthanides therefore form silicate anions that are depolymerized relative to the bulk liquid and which have no counterparts in R2O3-SiO2 binary systems. The spectra indicate that there is little sharing of nonbridging oxygen by K and lanthanides. The spectra of glasses containing different lanthanides at the same concentration are qualitatively and quantitatively very similar. Lanthanides have energetically unfavorable interactions with the network structure of polymerized liquids compared to cations of lower valence. If lanthanides coordinate nonbridging oxygen without the aid of K, then lanthanide saturation concentrations will show modest increases with increasing (Na,K)/Al in peralkaline liquids, except in liquids in which P2O5 concentration is comparable to the total lanthanide concentration. Since differences in lanthanide ionic radii have small effects upon the spectra, lanthanide solution mechanisms in silicate glasses (and by inference silicate liquids) are probably very similar.

  20. Laboratory studies of actinide metal-silicate fractionation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.; Burnett, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Actinide and Sm partition coefficients between silicate melt and several metallic phases have been measured. Under reducing conditions Si, Th, U and Pu can be reduced to metals from silicate melts and alloyed with a platinum-gold alloy. U and Pu enter a molten Pt-Si alloy with roughly equal affinity but U strongly partitions into the solid Pt. Th behaves qualitatively the same as Pu but is much less readily reduced than U, and Sm appears to remain unreduced. Experiments with Fe metal have shown that the partition coefficients of the actinides between Fe and silicate liquid are extremely low, suggesting a very low actinide concentration in planetary cores. Experiments show that platinum metals can efficiently fractionate actinides and fractionate actinides from lanthanides and this process may be relevant to the condensation behavior of these elements from the solar nebula. Pt-metal grains in Allende Ca-Al-rich inclusions appear to be U-poor, although the sub-class of Zr-bearing Pt metals may have high U contents.

  1. Translational dynamics of water in a nanoporous layered silicate

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Sankar; Chowdhuri, Zema; Peral, Inmaculada; Neumann, Dan A.; Dickinson, L. Charles; Tompsett, Geoffrey; Jeong, Hae-Kwon; Tsapatsis, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Neutron time-of-flight and backscattering spectroscopy have been used to study the translational diffusion of water molecules in the unusual layered material AMH-3, which consists of (zeolitelike) three-dimensionally nanoporous silicate layers spaced by (claylike) interlayer regions. The synthesis of AMH-3 and its characterization by {sup 29}Si NMR, Raman, and infrared spectroscopy, are described. An analysis of quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) spectra using the random jump diffusion model reveals two translational diffusive motions clearly separated in time scales: a fast process (D{approx}10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s at 300 K), and a much slower process (D{approx}10{sup -11} m{sup 2}/s at 300 K). Considering the structural model of AMH-3 and the transport properties extracted from the QENS data, it is suggested that the slower motion corresponds to diffusion by water molecules in the interlayer spaces whereas the fast process involves diffusion in the silicate layer. This first investigation of transport phenomena in nanoporous layered silicates like AMH-3 indicates that they have the potential to offer mass transport properties different from zeolite materials and layered clays.

  2. (Energetics of silicate melts from thermal diffusion studies)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The first year of this three year renewal award has been used to continue data collection and analysis of thermal (Soret) diffusion in silicate liquid and explore the related process of thermal migration in subliquidus magmas and isothermal interdiffusion. Data collection efforts have been materially aided by advances in thermal insulation in the pressure media outside our pressurized cylindrical heaters. BaCO{sub 3} is very effective in protecting the pressure vessel core from thermal deterioration with the result that the heater inside and outside diameters can be substantially increased. This permits several charges to be run simultaneously in an axisymmetric cluster around a double or triple junction thermocouple which can measure axial thermal gradients in situ. Research during the past year has concentrated in four major areas: Modelling thermal diffusion in multi-component silicate liquids, Soret fractionation of major and minor chemical components, characterization of thermal diffusion in naturally-occurring magmas with an emphasis on volatile bearing rhyolitic melts, and the effects of thermal gradients on silicate magma in the melting interval.

  3. Translational dynamics of water in a nanoporous layered silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Sankar; Chowdhuri, Zema; Peral, Inmaculada; Neumann, Dan A.; Dickinson, L. Charles; Tompsett, Geoffrey; Jeong, Hae-Kwon; Tsapatsis, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Neutron time-of-flight and backscattering spectroscopy have been used to study the translational diffusion of water molecules in the unusual layered material AMH-3, which consists of (zeolitelike) three-dimensionally nanoporous silicate layers spaced by (claylike) interlayer regions. The synthesis of AMH-3 and its characterization by Si29 NMR, Raman, and infrared spectroscopy, are described. An analysis of quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) spectra using the random jump diffusion model reveals two translational diffusive motions clearly separated in time scales: a fast process ( Dtilde 10-9m2/s at 300 K), and a much slower process ( Dtilde 10-11m2/s at 300 K). Considering the structural model of AMH-3 and the transport properties extracted from the QENS data, it is suggested that the slower motion corresponds to diffusion by water molecules in the interlayer spaces whereas the fast process involves diffusion in the silicate layer. This first investigation of transport phenomena in nanoporous layered silicates like AMH-3 indicates that they have the potential to offer mass transport properties different from zeolite materials and layered clays.

  4. CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION BY MECHANOCHEMICAL CARBONATION OF MINERAL SILICATES

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. Nelson

    2004-04-01

    The University of Utah and the University of Idaho investigated the carbonation of silicate minerals by mechanochemical processing. This method uses intense grinding, and has the potential of being much less expensive than other methods of mineral sequestration. Tests were conducted in three types of grinding devices. In these tests, natural and synthetic silicate compounds were ground for varying times in the presence of gaseous CO{sub 2}. A significant change takes place in the lizardite variety of serpentine after 15 to 20 minutes of intense grinding in the presence of gaseous CO{sub 2}. The X-ray diffraction spectrum of lizardite thus treated was much different than that of the untreated mineral. This spectrum could not be identified as that of any natural or synthetic material. Laboratory analyses showed that small amounts of carbon are fixed by grinding lizardite, forsterite, and wollastonite (all naturally-occurring minerals), and synthetic magnesium silicate, in the presence of gaseous CO{sub 2}. It was thus concluded that further investigation was warranted, and a follow-up proposal was submitted to the Department of Energy under solicitation number.

  5. Contrasting siliceous replacement mineralization, east-central Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M.D.; Ilchik, R.P. . Dept. of Geosciences); Seedorff, C.E. )

    1993-04-01

    Fine-grained siliceous replacement of carbonate-bearing rocks (jasperoid) occurs in most mineral districts in east-central Nevada. In most of these occurrences, jasperoid contains Au and(or) Ag and little or no base metals, although concentrations and ratios vary significantly. Broadly, two end-members are distinguished: (1) silicification as an intermediate- to late-stage part of complex alteration associated with igneous centers, and (2) jasperoids lacking other associated alteration and having few or no associated igneous rocks. Within this region, siliceous replacements are found with all metallic ([+-] magmatic) suites. No single factor in these occurrences relates the distribution, metal contents, fluid geochemistry, igneous rocks and associated alteration. Summarizing these characteristics: geochemical and fluid inclusion evidence shows that fluids in igneous-related jasperoids can be high-salinity magmatic (Ely), low-salinity magmatic (McCullough Butte), or metoric (Ward). Fluids in igneous-poor systems are low-salinity, exchanged meteoric waters from which a minor magmatic component can not be excluded. At this level of detail, the best predictor of Ag:Au are the district-scale alteration characteristics. Siliceous replacement takes place in many kinds systems and probably requires no more than a cooling, mildly acidic hydrothermal fluid. Metal suites, other fluid characteristics, and geological environment all need to be considered in evaluating the significance of any jasperoid.

  6. Kinetics of nitrate reduction by detrital Fe(II)-silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postma, Dieke

    1990-03-01

    The ability of Fe(II)-bearing minerals to reduce nitrate was investigated experimentally in order to asses their potential for nitrate removal in aquifers. Experiments were carried out with a fluidized bed reactor, using arfvedsonite as an example for amphiboles and augite for pyroxenes. Results show that both Fe(II)-bearing silicates are able to reduce nitrate at low rates in the pH range 2 to 7. For arfvedsonite a maximum reduction rate was found around pH 4, while at higher values a pH independent rate of 4 · 10 -17 N mol/cm 2· sec (25°C) is found. Nitrate reduction rates for augite are on the same order of magnitude. The mechanism appears to be complex; apparently, it is not a direct reaction between nitrate and the dissolving mineral surface, but rather nitrate seems to react with secondary products of silicate dissolution. The most plausible explanation is that freshly precipitated FeOOH catalyzes nitrate reduction by Fe 2+, as has been reported from other studies. A rough estimate for sandy aquifers indicates that Fe(II)-bearing silicates should be able to reduce nitrate at a rate on the order of magnitude of 4 · 10 -5 NO 3 mol/1 · a, and they can be of importance in aquifers with long groundwater residence times or low nitrate loads.

  7. An impact origin for hydrated silicates on Mars: A synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornabene, Livio L.; Osinski, Gordon R.; McEwen, Alfred S.; Wray, James J.; Craig, Michael A.; Sapers, Haley M.; Christensen, Philip R.

    2013-05-01

    Recent Mars-orbiting spectrometers continue to detect surface materials containing hydrated silicates, particularly clays and amorphous phases (e.g., silica glasses), concentrated within the heavily cratered Noachian highlands crust. This paper provides a review, summary, and synthesis of observations from terrestrial impact structures with current Martian data. It is suggested that numerous and frequent impacts into the volatile-rich silicate crust of Mars, through direct and indirect impact-generated mechanisms, represent a plausible hypothesis that can explain the widespread distribution of hydrated silicates in the surface and subsurface of the heavily cratered Noachian highlands crust largely independent of climate. In addition to impact-generated hydrothermal activity, devitrification, autometamorphism, and the voluminous production of impact "damaged" materials that are susceptible to alteration must be considered. When taken together, a drastically different early climate on Mars, in which water is stable at the surface for extended periods of time, cannot be ruled out; however, it is noted here that these additional impact mechanisms can operate and thereby extend the range of possible alteration settings to include climate conditions that may have been predominately colder and drier. Such a climate would not be dissimilar to the conditions of today, with the important exceptions of a higher geothermal gradient, and punctuated thermal disturbance to the cryosphere and hydrosphere from igneous activity and an exponentially higher impact flux.

  8. Grasslands, silicate weathering and diatoms: Cause and effect

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, A.K. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Diatoms are silica-limited, photosynthetic, single-celled eukaryotes that today occupy a wide variety of habitats both in freshwater and marine environments. Ultimately the silica they use is derived from the weathering of silicates on land. Although marine diatoms first appear in the Jurassic, the fossil record shows a remarkable correlation between the Mid-Miocene appearance of widespread grasslands and the drastic increase in diatom-rich deposits in freshwater, as well as in marine environments throughout the world. Grasses actively weather silicates, accumulating soluble silica into their leaves. Decomposing grasses release this soluble silica into the soil from whence it is transported into lakes and oceans and made available to diatoms. Grasses also probably increased chemical weathering, and hence the release of soluble silica, in previously weakly vegetated semi-arid areas. Increased weathering of silicates also led to cooler climates as evidenced by the Mid-Miocene [delta][sup 18]O record. The author suggests that the Tertiary expansion of grasslands is responsible for the explosive increase in diversity and abundance of diatoms in the oceans and freshwaters of the Mid-Miocene.

  9. Development of Li+ alumino-silicate ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.; Greenway, W.; Lidia, S.; Anders, A.; Kwan, J.

    2009-04-21

    To uniformly heat targets to electron-volt temperatures for the study of warm dense matter, one strategy is to deposit most of the ion energy at the peak of energy loss (dE/dx) with a low (E< 5 MeV) kinetic energy beam and a thin target[1]. Lower mass ions have a peak dE/dx at a lower kinetic energy. To this end, a small lithium (Li+) alumino-silicate source has been fabricated, and its emission limit has been measured. These surface ionization sources are heated to 1000-1150 C where they preferentially emit singly ionized alkali ions. Alumino-silicates sources of K+ and Cs+ have been used extensively in beam experiments, but there are additional challenges for the preparation of high-quality Li+ sources: There are tighter tolerances in preparing and sintering the alumino-silicate to the substrate to produce an emitter that gives uniform ion emission, sufficient current density and low beam emittance. We report on recent measurements ofhigh ( up to 35 mA/cm2) current density from a Li+ source. Ion species identification of possible contaminants is being verified with a Wien (E x B) filter, and via time-of-flight.

  10. Compositional dependence of in vitro response to commercial silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedlicka, Amy B.

    Materials are often incorporated into the human body, interacting with surrounding fluids, cells and tissues. The reactions that occur between a material and this surrounding biological system are not fundamentally understood. Basic knowledge of material biocompatibility and the controlling processes is lacking. This thesis examines material biocompatibility of a series of silicate-based glasses on a primary level determining cell response to material composition and durability. The silicate glass system studied included two BioglassRTM compositions with known biologically favorable response, two fiberglass compositions, with demonstrated 'not-unfavorable' in vitro response, a ternary soda-lime-silicate glass, a binary alkali silicate glass, and pure silica. Chemical durability was analyzed in three different fluids through solution analysis and material characterization. In vitro response to the substrates was observed. Cell behavior was then directly correlated to the material behavior in cell culture medium under the same conditions as the in vitro test, yet in the absence of cells. The effect of several physical and chemical surface treatments on substrates with predetermined biocompatible behavior was subsequently determined. The chemically durable glasses with no added B2O3 elicited similar cell response as the control polystyrene substrate. The addition of B2O3 resulted in polygonal cell shape and restricted cell proliferation. The non-durable glasses presented a dynamic surface to the cells, which did not adversely affect in vitro response. Extreme dissolution of the binary alkali silicate glass in conjunction with increased pH resulted in unfavorable cell response. Reaction of the Bioglass RTM compositions, producing a biologically favorable calcium-phosphate surface film, caused enhanced cell attachment and spreading. Surface energy increase due to sterilization procedures did not alter cellular response. Surface treatment procedures influencing substrate

  11. ON THE 10 mum SILICATE FEATURE IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Nikutta, Robert; Elitzur, Moshe; Lacy, Mark E-mail: moshe@pa.uky.ed

    2009-12-20

    The 10 mum silicate feature observed with Spitzer in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) reveals some puzzling behavior. It (1) has been detected in emission in type 2 sources, (2) shows broad, flat-topped emission peaks shifted toward long wavelengths in several type 1 sources, and (3) is not seen in deep absorption in any source observed so far. We solve all three puzzles with our clumpy dust radiative transfer formalism. Addressing (1), we present the spectral energy distribution (SED) of SST1721+6012, the first type 2 quasar observed to show a clear 10 mum silicate feature in emission. Such emission arises in models of the AGN torus easily when its clumpy nature is taken into account. We constructed a large database of clumpy torus models and performed extensive fitting of the observed SED. We find that the cloud radial distribution varies as r {sup -1.5} and the torus contains 2-4 clouds along radial equatorial rays, each with optical depth at visual approx60-80. The source bolometric luminosity is approx3 x 10{sup 12} L{sub sun}. Our modeling suggests that approx<35% of objects with tori sharing these characteristics and geometry would have their central engines obscured. This relatively low obscuration probability can explain the clear appearance of the 10 mum emission feature in SST1721+6012 together with its rarity among other QSO2. Investigating (2), we also fitted the SED of PG1211+143, one of the first type 1 QSOs with a 10 mum silicate feature detected in emission. Together with other similar sources, this QSO appears to display an unusually broadened feature whose peak is shifted toward longer wavelengths. Although this led to suggestions of non-standard dust chemistry in these sources, our analysis fits such SEDs with standard galactic dust; the apparent peak shifts arise from simple radiative transfer effects. Regarding (3), we find additionally that the distribution of silicate feature strengths among clumpy torus models closely resembles the observed

  12. Mg-perovskite/silicate melt and magnesiowuestite/silicate melt partition coefficients for KLB-1 at 250 Kbars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Michael J.; Rubie, David C.; Mcfarlane, Elisabeth A.

    1992-01-01

    The partitioning of elements amongst lower mantle phases and silicate melts is of interest in unraveling the early thermal history of the Earth. Because of the technical difficulty in carrying out such measurements, only one direct set of measurements was reported previously, and these results as well as interpretations based on them have generated controversy. Here we report what are to our knowledge only the second set of directly measured trace element partition coefficients for a natural system (KLB-1).

  13. Efficacy of holmium laser urethrotomy and intralesional injection of Santosh PGI tetra-inject (Triamcinolone, Mitomycin C, Hyaluronidase and N-acetyl cysteine) on the outcome of urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Lalit; Sharma, Aditya Prakash; Garg, Nitin; Singh, Shrawan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To study the efficacy of holmium laser urethrotomy with intralesional injection of Santosh PGI tetra-inject (Triamcinolone, Mitomycin C, Hyaluronidase and N-acetyl cysteine) in the treatment of urethral strictures. Material and methods A total of 50 patients with symptomatic urethral stricture were evaluated by clinical history, physical examination, uroflowmetry and retrograde urethrogram preoperatively. All patients were treated with holmium laser urethrotomy, followed by injection of tetra-inject at the urethrotomy site. Tetra-inject was prepared by diluting acombination of 40 mg Triamcinolone, 2 mg Mitomycin, 3000 UHyaluronidase and 600 mg N-acetyl cysteine in 5–10 ml of saline, according to the stricture length. An indwelling 18 Fr silicone catheter was left in place for 7–10 days.All patients were followed-up for 6-18 months postoperatively by history, uroflowmetry, and if required, retrograde urethrogram and micturating urethrogram every 3 months. Results 41 (82%) patients had asuccessful outcome,whereas 9 (18%) had recurrences during a follow-up ranging from 6–18 months. In <1 cm length strictures, the success rate was 100%, while in 1–3 cm and >3 cm lengthsthe success rates were 81.2% and 66.7% respectively. This modality, thus, has an encouraging success rate, especially in those with short segment urethral strictures (<3 cm). Conclusions Holmium laser urethrotomy with intralesional injection ofSantosh PGI tetra-inject (Triamcinolone, Mitomycin C, Hyaluronidase, N-acetyl cysteine) is a safe and effective minimally-invasive therapeutic modality for short segment urethral strictures. PMID:26855803

  14. Silicate sulfidation and chemical differences between enstatite chondrites and Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, S. W.; Petaev, M. I.; Buseck, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    Isotopic similarity between the Earth-Moon system and enstatite chondrites (ECs) led to the idea that ECs were Earth's building blocks [1-3]. However, compared to Earth's mantle, ECs have low Fe0/Fe ratios, are enriched in volatile elements, and depleted in refractory lithophile elements and Mg [4]. Therefore, deriving Earth composition from ECs requires a loss of volatiles during or prior to accretion and sequestering a large fraction of Si in the deep Earth. Alternatively, the isotopic similarity between the Earth and ECs is explained by their formation from a common precursor that experienced different evolutionary paths resulting in the chemical difference [4]. The vestiges of such a precursor are still present in the unequilibrated ECs as FeO-rich silicates with O isotopic compositions identical to bulk ECs and Earth [5]. Conversion of such a precursor into the characteristic EC mineral assemblage requires high-temperature processing in an H-poor environment with high fS2 and fO2 close to that of the classic solar nebula [6], consistent with redox conditions inferred from Ti4+/Ti3+ ratios in EC pyroxene [7]. Under such conditions reaction of FeO-rich silicates with S-rich gas results in their replacement by the assemblage of FeO-poor silicates; Fe, Mg, Ca sulfides; free silica; and Si-bearing Fe,Ni metal alloy. The progressive sulfidation of ferromagnesian silicates in chondrules results in loss of Mg and addition of Fe, Mn, S, Na, K and, perhaps, other volatiles [6]. At the advanced stages of silicate sulfidation recorded in the metal-sulfide nodules [8], a portion of Si is reduced and dissolved in the Fe,Ni metal. This process is known to fractionate Si isotopes [9,10] and would explain the differences between the ECs and Earth's mantle [11]. The sulfidation of silicates also produces porous S-rich silica, a peculiar phase observed so far only in the ECs. It consists of a sinewy SiO2-rich framework enclosing numerous vesicles filled with beam

  15. Analyses of Cometary Silicate Crystals: DDA Spectral Modeling of Forsterite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Comets are the Solar System's deep freezers of gases, ices, and particulates that were present in the outer protoplanetary disk. Where comet nuclei accreted was so cold that CO ice (approximately 50K) and other supervolatile ices like ethane (C2H2) were preserved. However, comets also accreted high temperature minerals: silicate crystals that either condensed (greater than or equal to 1400 K) or that were annealed from amorphous (glassy) silicates (greater than 850-1000 K). By their rarity in the interstellar medium, cometary crystalline silicates are thought to be grains that formed in the inner disk and were then radially transported out to the cold and ice-rich regimes near Neptune. The questions that comets can potentially address are: How fast, how far, and over what duration were crystals that formed in the inner disk transported out to the comet-forming region(s)? In comets, the mass fractions of silicates that are crystalline, f_cryst, translate to benchmarks for protoplanetary disk radial transport models. The infamous comet Hale-Bopp has crystalline fractions of over 55%. The values for cometary crystalline mass fractions, however, are derived assuming that the mineralogy assessed for the submicron to micron-sized portion of the size distribution represents the compositional makeup of all larger grains in the coma. Models for fitting cometary SEDs make this assumption because models can only fit the observed features with submicron to micron-sized discrete crystals. On the other hand, larger (0.1-100 micrometer radii) porous grains composed of amorphous silicates and amorphous carbon can be easily computed with mixed medium theory wherein vacuum mixed into a spherical particle mimics a porous aggregate. If crystalline silicates are mixed in, the models completely fail to match the observations. Moreover, models for a size distribution of discrete crystalline forsterite grains commonly employs the CDE computational method for ellipsoidal platelets (c:a:b=8

  16. Pyrolytic Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes from Sucrose on a Mesoporous Silicate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Fattah, Tarek; Siochi, Mia; Crooks, Roy

    2005-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes were synthesized from sucrose by a pyrolytic technique using mesoporous MCM-41 silicate templates without transition metal catalysts. The Nanotubes were examined in the carbon/silicate composite and after dissolution of the silicate. High resolution transmission electron microscopy study of the multiwall nanotubes showed them to be 15 nm in diameter, 200 nm in length and close-ended. There was variation in crystallinity with some nanotubes showing disordered wall structures.

  17. A comparative study to analyze the efficacy and safety of flexible ureteroscopy combined with holmium laser lithotripsy for residual calculi after percutaneous nephrolithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Wen, Jiaming; Li, Zhongyi; Zhang, Zhewei; Gong, Xiuqing; Chen, Jimin; Du, Chuanjun

    2015-01-01

    A certain proportion of patients with initial Percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PCNL) management require ancillary procedures to increase the stone-free rate. In this study, we aim to analyze the efficacy and safety of flexible ureteroscopy combined with holmium laser lithotripsy (F-UL) for treatment of residual calculi after PCNL by comparison with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL). Total of 96 patients with residual renal calculi (4 mm to 20 mm) after PCNL was enrolled from May 2010 to March 2013. They were randomly divided into two groups: US Group: patients were treated with F-UL; SWL Group: patients were treated with SWL. Follow-up was made one month and three months after treatment. The mean residual stone size after PCNL was 12.4 ± 4.3 mm in US group compared with 11.9 ± 4.5 in SWL group. The stone-free rate was 84.7% one month after surgical procedure in US group, this rate increased to 91.3% in the third months, while the stone-free rate in SWL group is 64.6% one month after treatment and 72.9% in the third month. For residual stone in lower calyx, the stone-free rate three month after treatment was 90.4% in US group compared to 65.2% in SWL group (P < 0.05). The overall complication rate was low in both groups, no severe complication was found. Both F-UL and SWL are safe and effective methods for residual calculi after PCNL, without severe complications. F-UL provided significantly higher stone-free rate compared with SWL, especially for low-pole calculi.

  18. Holmium:YAG (λ=2120nm) vs. Thulium fiber laser (λ=1908nm) ablation of kidney stones: thresholds, rates, and retropulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-03-01

    The Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser lithotriptor is capable of operating at high pulse energies, but its efficient operation is limited to relatively low pulse rates (~10 Hz) during lithotripsy. On the contrary, the Thulium Fiber Laser (TFL) is limited to low pulse energies, but can operate at very high pulse rates (up to 1000 Hz). This study compares stone ablation threshold, ablation rate, and retropulsion effects for different Ho:YAG and TFL operation modes. The TFL (λ=1908 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 5-35 mJ, 500-μs pulse duration, and pulse rates of 10-400 Hz. The Ho:YAG laser (λ=2120 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 30-550 mJ, 350-μs pulse duration, and pulse rate of 10 Hz. Laser energy was delivered through small-core (200-270-μm) optical fibers in contact mode with human calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones for ablation studies and plaster-of-Paris stone phantoms for retropulsion studies. The COM stone ablation threshold for Ho:YAG and TFL measured 82.6 J/cm2and 20.8 J/cm2, respectively. Stone retropulsion with Ho:YAG laser increased linearly with pulse energy. Retropulsion with TFL was minimal at pulse rates < 150 Hz, then rapidly increased at higher pulse rates. For minimal stone retropulsion, Ho:YAG operation at pulse energies < 175 mJ at 10 Hz, and TFL operation at 35 mJ at 100 Hz is recommended, with both lasers producing comparable ablation rates. Further development of a TFL operating with both high pulse energies (e.g. 100-200 mJ) and high pulse rates (100-150 Hz) may also provide higher ablation rates, when retropulsion is not the primary concern.

  19. Low-power holmium:YAG laser urethrotomy for urethral stricture disease: comparison of outcomes with the cold-knife technique.

    PubMed

    Atak, Mustafa; Tokgöz, Hüsnü; Akduman, Bülent; Erol, Bülent; Dönmez, Ibrahim; Hancı, Volkan; Türksoy, Ozlem; Mungan, Necmettin Aydın

    2011-11-01

    In this prospective randomized clinical trial, we aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of endourethrotomy with holmium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (HO:YAG) laser and compare the outcomes with the conventional cold-knife urethrotomy. Fifty-one male patients with single, iatrogenic, annular strictures of the urethra were randomly divided into two groups; 21 patients who underwent direct-vision endoscopic urethrotomy with Ho:YAG laser (15 W; 1,200-1,400 mJ; 8-12 Hz) at 12 o'clock position (laser group) and 30 patients who underwent direct-vision endoscopic urethrotomy with cold-knife incision at 12 o'clock position (cold-knife group). The results obtained were analyzed and compared at 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, and 12 months postoperatively by clinical evaluation, uroflowmetry, and retrograde urethrographies. Variables were compared among groups using Fisher's exact and Mann Whitney U tests. There were no differences between two groups in terms of patient age, preoperative Qmax value, stricture location, and length. Operative time was shorter in laser group (16.4 ± 8.04 minutes) when compared with cold-knife group (23.8 ± 5.47 minutes) (p<0.001). Recurrence-free rate at 3 months was similar between two groups (p=0.122). However, recurrence-free rates at 6 months, 9 months, and 12 months were significantly higher in laser group when compared with cold-knife group (p values were 0.045, 0.027, and 0.04, respectively). No intra- or postoperative complications were encountered. Use of Ho:YAG laser in the management of urethral stricture disease is a safe and effective method. In addition, it provides shorter operative time and lower recurrence rate when compared with the conventional technique.

  20. AB070. Comparison of photoselective vaporization versus holmium laser enucleation for treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia in a small prostate volume

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Woong Jin; Bashraheel, Fahad; Choi, Sae Woong; Kim, Su Jin; Yoon, Byung Il; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) using GreenLight and Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is an important surgical technique for management of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). We aimed to compare the effectiveness and safety of PVP using a 120 W GreenLight laser with HoLEP in a small prostate volume. Methods Patients who underwent PVP or HoLEP surgery for BPH at our institutions were reviewed from May 2009 to December 2014 in this retrospective study. Among them, patients with prostate volumes <40 mL based on preoperative trans-rectal ultrasonography were included in this study. Peri-operative and post-operative parameters—such as International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), post-void residual urine volume (PVR), and complications—were compared between the groups. Results PVP was performed in 176 patients and HoLEP in162 patients. Preoperative demographic data were similar in both groups, with the exception of PVR. Operative time and catheter duration did not show significant difference. Significant improvements compared to preoperative values were verified at the postoperative evaluation in both groups in terms of IPSS, QoL, Qmax, and PVR. Comparison of the postoperative parameters between the PVP and HoLEP groups demonstrated no significant difference, with the exception of IPSS voiding subscore at one month postoperatively (5.9 vs. 3.8, P<0.001). There was no significant difference in postoperative complications between the two groups. Conclusions Our data suggest that PVP and HoLEP are efficient and safe surgical treatment options for patients with small prostate volume.

  1. Geoengineering potential of artificially enhanced silicate weathering of olivine.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Peter; Hartmann, Jens; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A

    2010-11-23

    Geoengineering is a proposed action to manipulate Earth's climate in order to counteract global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. We investigate the potential of a specific geoengineering technique, carbon sequestration by artificially enhanced silicate weathering via the dissolution of olivine. This approach would not only operate against rising temperatures but would also oppose ocean acidification, because it influences the global climate via the carbon cycle. If important details of the marine chemistry are taken into consideration, a new mass ratio of CO(2) sequestration per olivine dissolution of about 1 is achieved, 20% smaller than previously assumed. We calculate that this approach has the potential to sequestrate up to 1 Pg of C per year directly, if olivine is distributed as fine powder over land areas of the humid tropics, but this rate is limited by the saturation concentration of silicic acid. In our calculations for the Amazon and Congo river catchments, a maximum annual dissolution of 1.8 and 0.4 Pg of olivine seems possible, corresponding to the sequestration of 0.5 and 0.1 Pg of C per year, but these upper limit sequestration rates come at the environmental cost of pH values in the rivers rising to 8.2. Open water dissolution of fine-grained olivine and an enhancement of the biological pump by the rising riverine input of silicic acid might increase our estimate of the carbon sequestration, but additional research is needed here. We finally calculate with a carbon cycle model the consequences of sequestration rates of 1-5 Pg of C per year for the 21st century by this technique.

  2. Low-(18)O Silicic Magmas: Why Are They So Rare?

    SciTech Connect

    Balsley, S.D.; Gregory, R.T.

    1998-10-15

    LOW-180 silicic magmas are reported from only a small number of localities (e.g., Yellowstone and Iceland), yet petrologic evidence points to upper crustal assimilation coupled with fractional crystallization (AFC) during magma genesis for nearly all silicic magmas. The rarity of 10W-l `O magmas in intracontinental caldera settings is remarkable given the evidence of intense 10W-l*O meteoric hydrothermal alteration in the subvolcanic remnants of larger caldera systems. In the Platoro caldera complex, regional ignimbrites (150-1000 km3) have plagioclase 6180 values of 6.8 + 0.1%., whereas the Middle Tuff, a small-volume (est. 50-100 km3) post-caldera collapse pyroclastic sequence, has plagioclase 8]80 values between 5.5 and 6.8%o. On average, the plagioclase phenocrysts from the Middle Tuff are depleted by only 0.3%0 relative to those in the regional tuffs. At Yellowstone, small-volume post-caldera collapse intracaldera rhyolites are up to 5.5%o depleted relative to the regional ignimbrites. Two important differences between the Middle Tuff and the Yellowstone 10W-180 rhyolites elucidate the problem. Middle Tuff magmas reached water saturation and erupted explosively, whereas most of the 10W-l 80 Yellowstone rhyolites erupted effusively as domes or flows, and are nearly devoid of hydrous phenocrysts. Comparing the two eruptive types indicates that assimilation of 10W-180 material, combined with fractional crystallization, drives silicic melts to water oversaturation. Water saturated magmas either erupt explosively or quench as subsurface porphyrins bejiire the magmatic 180 can be dramatically lowered. Partial melting of low- 180 subvolcanic rocks by near-anhydrous magmas at Yellowstone produced small- volume, 10W-180 magmas directly, thereby circumventing the water saturation barrier encountered through normal AFC processes.

  3. Proton tunneling in low dimensional cesium silicate LDS-1

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Hiroshi Iwamoto, Kei; Mochizuki, Dai; Osada, Shimon; Asakura, Yusuke; Kuroda, Kazuyuki

    2015-07-14

    In low dimensional cesium silicate LDS-1 (monoclinic phase of CsHSi{sub 2}O{sub 5}), anomalous infrared absorption bands observed at 93, 155, 1210, and 1220 cm{sup −1} are assigned to the vibrational mode of protons, which contribute to the strong hydrogen bonding between terminal oxygen atoms of silicate chain (O–O distance = 2.45 Å). The integrated absorbance (oscillator strength) for those modes is drastically enhanced at low temperatures. The analysis of integrated absorbance employing two different anharmonic double-minimum potentials makes clear that proton tunneling through the potential barrier yields an energy splitting of the ground state. The absorption bands at 93 and 155 cm{sup −1}, which correspond to the different vibrational modes of protons, are attributed to the optical transition between the splitting levels (excitation from the ground state (n = 0) to the first excited state (n = 1)). Moreover, the absorption bands at 1210 and 1220 cm{sup −1} are identified as the optical transition from the ground state (n = 0) to the third excited state (n = 3). Weak Coulomb interactions in between the adjacent protons generate two types of vibrational modes: symmetric mode (93 and 1210 cm{sup −1}) and asymmetric mode (155 and 1220 cm{sup −1}). The broad absorption at 100–600 cm{sup −1} reveals an emergence of collective mode due to the vibration of silicate chain coupled not only with the local oscillation of Cs{sup +} but also with the proton oscillation relevant to the second excited state (n = 2)

  4. SILICATES ON IAPETUS FROM CASSINI’S COMPOSITE INFRARED SPECTROMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Cindy L.; Wray, James J.; Clark, Roger N.; Spencer, John R.; Jennings, Donald E.; Hand, Kevin P.; Carlson, Robert W.; Poston, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    We present the first spectral features obtained from Cassini’s Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) for any icy moon. The spectral region covered by CIRS focal planes (FP) 3 and 4 is rich in emissivity features, but previous studies at these wavelengths have been limited by low signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) for individual spectra. Our approach is to average CIRS FP3 spectra to increase the S/N and use emissivity spectra to constrain the composition of the dark material on Iapetus. We find an emissivity feature at ∼855 cm{sup −1} and a possible doublet at 660 and 690 cm{sup −1} that do not correspond to any known instrument artifacts. We attribute the 855 cm{sup −1} feature to fine-grained silicates, similar to those found in dust on Mars and in meteorites, which are nearly featureless at shorter wavelengths. Silicates on the dark terrains of Saturn’s icy moons have been suspected for decades, but there have been no definitive detections until now. Serpentines reported in the literature at ambient temperature and pressure have features near 855 and 660 cm{sup −1}. However, peaks can shift depending on temperature and pressure, so measurements at Iapetus-like conditions are necessary for more positive feature identifications. As a first investigation, we measured muscovite at 125 K in a vacuum and found that this spectrum does match the emissivity feature near 855 cm{sup −1} and the location of the doublet. Further measurements are needed to robustly identify a specific silicate, which would provide clues regarding the origin and implications of the dark material.

  5. Conduction mechanism in bismuth silicate glasses containing titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dult, Meenakshi; Kundu, R. S.; Murugavel, S.; Punia, R.; Kishore, N.

    2014-11-01

    Bismuth silicate glasses mixed with different concentrations of titanium dioxide having compositions xTiO2-(60-x)Bi2O3-40SiO2 with x=0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 were prepared by the normal melt quench technique. The frequency dependence of the ac electrical conductivity of different compositions of titanium bismuth silicate glasses has been studied in the frequency range 10-1 Hz to 10 MHz and in the temperature range 623-703 K. The temperature and frequency dependent conductivity is found to obey Jonscher's universal power law for all the compositions of titanium bismuth silicate glass system. The dc conductivity (σdc), so called crossover frequency (ωH), and frequency exponent (s) have been estimated from the fitting of experimental data of ac conductivity with Jonscher's universal power law. Enthalpy to dissociate the cation from its original site next to a charge compensating center (Hf) and enthalpy of migration (Hm) have also been estimated. The conductivity data have been analyzed in terms of different theoretical models to determine the possible conduction mechanism. Analysis of the conductivity data and the frequency exponent shows that the correlated barrier hopping of electrons between Ti3+ and Ti4+ ions in the glasses is the most favorable mechanism for ac conduction. The temperature dependent dc conductivity has been analyzed in the framework of theoretical variable range hopping model (VRH) proposed by Mott which describe the hopping conduction in disordered semiconducting systems. The various polaron hopping parameters have also been deduced. Mott's VRH model is found to be in good agreement with experimental data and the values of inverse localization length of s-like wave function (α) obtained by this model with modifications suggested by Punia et al. are close to the ones reported for a number of oxide glasses.

  6. Geoengineering potential of artificially enhanced silicate weathering of olivine.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Peter; Hartmann, Jens; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A

    2010-11-23

    Geoengineering is a proposed action to manipulate Earth's climate in order to counteract global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. We investigate the potential of a specific geoengineering technique, carbon sequestration by artificially enhanced silicate weathering via the dissolution of olivine. This approach would not only operate against rising temperatures but would also oppose ocean acidification, because it influences the global climate via the carbon cycle. If important details of the marine chemistry are taken into consideration, a new mass ratio of CO(2) sequestration per olivine dissolution of about 1 is achieved, 20% smaller than previously assumed. We calculate that this approach has the potential to sequestrate up to 1 Pg of C per year directly, if olivine is distributed as fine powder over land areas of the humid tropics, but this rate is limited by the saturation concentration of silicic acid. In our calculations for the Amazon and Congo river catchments, a maximum annual dissolution of 1.8 and 0.4 Pg of olivine seems possible, corresponding to the sequestration of 0.5 and 0.1 Pg of C per year, but these upper limit sequestration rates come at the environmental cost of pH values in the rivers rising to 8.2. Open water dissolution of fine-grained olivine and an enhancement of the biological pump by the rising riverine input of silicic acid might increase our estimate of the carbon sequestration, but additional research is needed here. We finally calculate with a carbon cycle model the consequences of sequestration rates of 1-5 Pg of C per year for the 21st century by this technique. PMID:21059941

  7. Geoengineering potential of artificially enhanced silicate weathering of olivine

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Peter; Hartmann, Jens; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A.

    2010-01-01

    Geoengineering is a proposed action to manipulate Earth’s climate in order to counteract global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. We investigate the potential of a specific geoengineering technique, carbon sequestration by artificially enhanced silicate weathering via the dissolution of olivine. This approach would not only operate against rising temperatures but would also oppose ocean acidification, because it influences the global climate via the carbon cycle. If important details of the marine chemistry are taken into consideration, a new mass ratio of CO2 sequestration per olivine dissolution of about 1 is achieved, 20% smaller than previously assumed. We calculate that this approach has the potential to sequestrate up to 1 Pg of C per year directly, if olivine is distributed as fine powder over land areas of the humid tropics, but this rate is limited by the saturation concentration of silicic acid. In our calculations for the Amazon and Congo river catchments, a maximum annual dissolution of 1.8 and 0.4 Pg of olivine seems possible, corresponding to the sequestration of 0.5 and 0.1 Pg of C per year, but these upper limit sequestration rates come at the environmental cost of pH values in the rivers rising to 8.2. Open water dissolution of fine-grained olivine and an enhancement of the biological pump by the rising riverine input of silicic acid might increase our estimate of the carbon sequestration, but additional research is needed here. We finally calculate with a carbon cycle model the consequences of sequestration rates of 1–5 Pg of C per year for the 21st century by this technique. PMID:21059941

  8. Silicates on Iapetus from Cassini’s Composite Infrared Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Cindy L.; Wray, James J.; Clark, Roger N.; Spencer, John R.; Jennings, Donald E.; Hand, Kevin P.; Poston, Michael J.; Carlson, Robert W.

    2015-10-01

    We present the first spectral features obtained from Cassini’s Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) for any icy moon. The spectral region covered by CIRS focal planes (FP) 3 and 4 is rich in emissivity features, but previous studies at these wavelengths have been limited by low signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) for individual spectra. Our approach is to average CIRS FP3 spectra to increase the S/N and use emissivity spectra to constrain the composition of the dark material on Iapetus. We find an emissivity feature at ∼855 cm‑1 and a possible doublet at 660 and 690 cm‑1 that do not correspond to any known instrument artifacts. We attribute the 855 cm‑1 feature to fine-grained silicates, similar to those found in dust on Mars and in meteorites, which are nearly featureless at shorter wavelengths. Silicates on the dark terrains of Saturn’s icy moons have been suspected for decades, but there have been no definitive detections until now. Serpentines reported in the literature at ambient temperature and pressure have features near 855 and 660 cm‑1. However, peaks can shift depending on temperature and pressure, so measurements at Iapetus-like conditions are necessary for more positive feature identifications. As a first investigation, we measured muscovite at 125 K in a vacuum and found that this spectrum does match the emissivity feature near 855 cm‑1 and the location of the doublet. Further measurements are needed to robustly identify a specific silicate, which would provide clues regarding the origin and implications of the dark material.

  9. Sealing of cracks in cement using microencapsulated sodium silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannaros, P.; Kanellopoulos, A.; Al-Tabbaa, A.

    2016-08-01

    Cement-based materials possess an inherent autogenous self-healing capability allowing them to seal, and potentially heal, microcracks. This can be improved through the addition of microencapsulated healing agents for autonomic self-healing. The fundamental principle of this self-healing mechanism is that when cracks propagate in the cementitious matrix, they rupture the dispersed capsules and their content (cargo material) is released into the crack volume. Various healing agents have been explored in the literature for their efficacy to recover mechanical and durability properties in cementitious materials. In these materials, the healing agents are most commonly encapsulated in macrocontainers (e.g. glass tubes or capsules) and placed into the material. In this work, microencapsulated sodium silicate in both liquid and solid form was added to cement specimens. Sodium silicate reacts with the calcium hydroxide in hydrated cement paste to form calcium-silicate-hydrate gel that fills cracks. The effect of microcapsule addition on rheological and mechanical properties of cement is reported. It is observed that the microcapsule addition inhibits compressive strength development in cement and this is observed through a plateau in strength between 28 and 56 days. The improvement in crack-sealing for microcapsule-containing specimens is quantified through sorptivity measurements over a 28 day healing period. After just seven days, the addition of 4% microcapsules resulted in a reduction in sorptivity of up to 45% when compared to specimens without any microcapsule addition. A qualitative description of the reaction between the cargo material and the cementitious matrix is also provided using x-ray diffraction analysis.

  10. Ion beam analysis of the hydration of tricalcium silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, J. S.; Livingston, R. A.; Rolfs, C.; Becker, H.-W.; Kubsky, S.

    2003-05-01

    Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent of Portland cement, and the kinetics of its hydration is a major topic in concrete technology. Nuclear resonance reaction analysis using 15N has been applied to measure the evolution of the hydrogen profile. During the first few hours, the induction period, the hydrogen diffusion is controlled by a 10-20 nm thick surface layer. To observe this layer, the beam energy resolution must be on the order of 10 keV or less. This has been achieved at the dynamitron tandem accelerator at the Ruhr Universität Bochum.

  11. Discovery of the Largest Historic Silicic Submarine Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Rebecca J.; Wysoczanski, Richard; Wunderman, Richard; Jutzeler, Martin

    2014-05-01

    It was likely twice the size of the renowned Mount St. Helens eruption of 1980 and perhaps more than 10 times bigger than the more recent 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption in Iceland. However, unlike those two events, which dominated world news headlines, in 2012 the daylong submarine silicic eruption at Havre volcano in the Kermadec Arc, New Zealand (Figure 1a; ~800 kilometers north of Auckland, New Zealand), passed without fanfare. In fact, for a while no one even knew it had occurred.

  12. Sulfide and sulfate saturation in hydrous silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, M. R.; Rutherford, M. J.

    1985-02-01

    A series of hydrothermal experiments was performed over a wide range of pressures, temperatures, oxygen fugacities, and melt FeO content, in order to examine the effects of physical changes on sulfur solubility in fractionated hydrous silicate melts. On the basis of the experimental results, it is concluded that upper crustal oxidation-reduction reactions and crystal fractionation processes may exert considerable influence on the amount of sulfur contained in magmas erupted at the surface. The application of the experimental results to investigations of volatile transport and volcanic degassing processes on the earth, Venus, and Mars is discussed

  13. Sulfide and sulfate saturation in hydrous silicate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, M. R.; Rutherford, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    A series of hydrothermal experiments was performed over a wide range of pressures, temperatures, oxygen fugacities, and melt FeO content, in order to examine the effects of physical changes on sulfur solubility in fractionated hydrous silicate melts. On the basis of the experimental results, it is concluded that upper crustal oxidation-reduction reactions and crystal fractionation processes may exert considerable influence on the amount of sulfur contained in magmas erupted at the surface. The application of the experimental results to investigations of volatile transport and volcanic degassing processes on the earth, Venus, and Mars is discussed

  14. Alkali-metal silicate binders and methods of manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, J. B. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A paint binder is described which uses a potassium or sodium silicate dispersion having a silicon dioxide to alkali-metal oxide mol ratio of from 4.8:1 to 6.0:1. The binder exhibits stability during both manufacture and storage. The process of making the binder is predictable and repeatable and the binder may be made with inexpensive components. The high mol ratio is achieved with the inclusion of a silicon dioxide hydrogel. The binder, which also employs a silicone, is in the final form of a hydrogel sol.

  15. Micro-PIXE analysis of silicate reference standards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czamanske, G.K.; Sisson, T.W.; Campbell, J.L.; Teesdale, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    The accuracy and precision of the University of Guelph proton microprobe have been evaluated through trace-element analysis of well-characterized silicate glasses and minerals, including BHVO-1 glass, Kakanui augite and hornblende, and ten other natural samples of volcanic glass, amphibole, pyroxene, and garnet. Using the 2.39 wt% Mo in a NIST steel as the standard, excellent precision and agreement between reported and analyzed abundances were obtained for Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, and Nb. -from Authors

  16. Infrared spectroscopy and hydrogen isotope geochemistry of hydrous silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, S.; Stolper, E.

    1992-01-01

    The focus of this project is the combined appication of infrared spectroscopy and stable isotope geochemistry to the study of hydrogen-bearing species dissolved in silicate melts and glasses. We are conducting laboratory experiments aimed at determining the fractionation of D and H between melt species (OH and H{sub 2}O) and hydrous vapor and the diffusivities of these species in glasses and melts. Knowledge of these parameters is critical to understanding the behavior of hydrogen isotopes during igneous processes and hydrothermal processes. These results also could be valuable in application of glass technology to development of nuclear waste disposal strategies.

  17. Computational Thermomechanical Modelling of Early-Age Silicate Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vala, J.; Št'astník, S.; Kozák, V.

    2009-09-01

    Strains and stresses in early-age silicate composites, widely used in civil engineering, especially in fresh concrete mixtures, in addition to those caused by exterior mechanical loads, are results of complicated non-deterministic physical and chemical processes. Their numerical prediction at the macro-scale level requires the non-trivial physical analysis based on the thermodynamic principles, making use of micro-structural information from both theoretical and experimental research. The paper introduces a computational model, based on a nonlinear system of macroscopic equations of evolution, supplied with certain effective material characteristics, coming from the micro-scale analysis, and sketches the algorithm for its numerical analysis.

  18. Activity composition relationships in silicate melts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Glazner, A.F.

    1990-12-31

    Equipment progress include furnace construction and electron microprobe installation. The following studies are underway: phase equilibria along basalt-rhyolite mixing line (olivine crystallization from natural silicic andensites, distribution of Fe and Mg between olivine and liquid, dist. of Ca and Na between plagioclase and liquid), enthalpy-composition relations in magmas (bulk heat capacity of alkali basalt), density model for magma ascent and contamination, thermobarometry in igneous systems (olivine/plagioclase phenocryst growth in Quat. basalt), high-pressure phase equilibria of alkali basalt, basalt-quartz mixing experiments, phase equilibria of East African basalts, and granitic minerals in mafic magma. (DLC)

  19. High-temperature silicate volcanism on Jupiter's moon Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, A.S.; Keszthelyi, L.; Spencer, J.R.; Schubert, G.; Matson, D.L.; Lopes-Gautier, R.; Klaasen, K.P.; Johnson, T.V.; Head, J.W.; Geissler, P.; Fagents, S.; Davies, A.G.; Carr, M.H.; Breneman, H.H.; Belton, M.J.S.

    1998-01-01

    Infrared wavelength observations of Io by the Galileo spacecraft show that at last 12 different vents are erupting lavas that are probably hotter than the highest temperature basaltic eruptions on Earth today. In at least one case, the eruption near Pillan Patea, two independent instruments on Galileo show that the lava temperature must have exceeded 1700 kelvin and may have reached 2000 kelvin. The most likely explanation is that these lavas are ultramafic (magnesium-rich) silicates, and this idea is supported by the tentative identification of magnesium-rich orthopyroxene in lava flows associated with thse high-temperature hot spots.

  20. Sublithospheric Triggers for Episodic Silicic Magmatism in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, T.; Vogt, K.; Schubert, M.

    2014-12-01

    The melt source and ascent mechanisms for crustal-scale silicic magmatism in subduction zones remain a matter of debate. Recent petrological-thermo-mechanical numerical experiments suggest that important physical controls of this process can be of sublithospheric origin. Firstly, deep sources of silicic magma can be related to episodic development of positively buoyant diapiric structures in the mantle wedge originated from deeply subducted rock mélanges (Gerya and Yuen, 2003; Castro and Gerya, 2008). Partial melting of these rapidly ascending lithologically mixed structures can produce silicic magmas with a relatively constant major element composition and variable time-dependent isotopic ratios inherited from the mélange (Vogt et al., 2013). Secondly, episodic injections of subduction-related mantle-derived mafic magmas into a partially molten hot zone of the arc lower crust can drive ascents of pre-existing felsic crustal magmas toward upper crustal levels. The injection of mafic magma induces overpressure in the lower crustal magma reservoir, which increases crustal stresses and triggers development of brittle/plastic fracture zones serving as conduits for the rapid episodic ascent of felsic magmas (Shubert et al., 2013). Our numerical results thus imply that subduction-related sublithospheric magma intrusions into the lower arc crust may both be the prime source for the generation of silicic magmas and the major physical driving mechanism for their episodic ascent toward upper crustal levels. References:Castro, A., and Gerya, T.V., 2008. Magmatic implications of mantle wedge plumes: experimental study. Lithos 103, 138-148. Gerya, T.V., and Yuen, D.A., 2003. Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities from hydration and melting propel "cold plumes" at subduction zones. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 212, 47-62.Schubert, M., Driesner, T., Gerya, T.V., Ulmer, P., 2013. Mafic injection as a trigger for felsic magmatism: A numerical study. Geochemistry, Geophysics

  1. Experimental study of the electrolysis of silicate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, R.; Larimer, K. T.

    1991-01-01

    To produce oxygen from lunar resources, it may be feasible to melt and electrolyze local silicate ores. This possibility was explored experimentally with synthesized melts of appropriate compositions. Platinum electrodes were employed at a melt temperature of 1425 C. When silicon components of the melt were reduced, the platinum cathode degraded rapidly, which prompted the substitution of a graphite cathode substrate. Discrete particles containing iron or titanium were found in the solidified electrolyte after three hours of electrolysis. Electrolyte conductivities did not decrease substantially, but the escape of gas bubbles, in some cases, appeared to be hindered by high viscosity of the melt.

  2. Infrared Spectroscopy and Stable Isotope Geochemistry of Hydrous Silicate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Stolper, Edward

    2007-03-05

    The focus of this DOE-funded project has been the study of volatile components in magmas and the atmosphere. Over the twenty-one year period of this project, we have used experimental petrology and stable isotope geochemistry to study the behavior and properties of volatile components dissolved in silicate minerals and melts and glasses. More recently, we have also studied the concentration and isotopic composition of CO2 in the atmosphere, especially in relation to air quality issues in the Los Angeles basin.

  3. U.S. Geological Survey silicate rock standards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flanagan, F.J.

    1967-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has processed six silicate rocks to provide new reference samples to supplement G-1 and W-1. Complete conventional, rapid rock, and spectrochemical analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey are reported for a granite (replacement for G-1), a granodiorite, an andesite, a peridotite, a dunite, and a basalt. Analyses of variance for nickel, chromium, copper, and zirconium in each rock sample showed that for these elements, the rocks can be considered homogeneous. Spectrochemical estimates are given for the nickel, chromium, copper, and zirconium contents of the samples. The petrography of five of the six rocks is described and CIPW norms are presented. ?? 1967.

  4. Authigenic Mineralization of Silicates at the Organic-water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvoy, B.; Wallace, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    It is relatively common for some fraction of organic material to be preserved in the sedimentary rock record as disseminated molecular fragments. The survival of wholly coherent tissues from primarily soft-bodied organisms is far more unusual. However, the literature is now well- populated with spectacular examples of soft-tissue preservation ranging from a 2,600 year old human brain to the tissues of the Ediacaran biota that have survived ~600 million years. Some of the most exceptional examples of soft tissue preservation are from the Proterozoic-Cambrian transition, however, nearly all modes of fossil preservation during this time are debated. Clay mineral templates have been implicated as playing a role in several types of soft tissue preservation, including Burgess Shale and Beecher's Trilobite-type preservation, and more recently, Bitter Springs-type silicification. Yet, there is still much debate over whether these clay mineral coatings form during early stage burial and diagenesis, or later stage metamorphism. This research addresses this question by using in situ fluid cell Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to investigate the nucleation and growth of silicate minerals on model biological surfaces. Herein we present preliminary results on the deposition of hydrous magnesium silicates on self-assembled monolayers (-OH, -COOH, -CH3, and -H2PO3 terminated surfaces) at ambient conditions.

  5. Siliceous Shrubs in Yellowstone's Hot Springs: Implications for Exobiological Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidry, S. A.; Chafetz, H. S.

    2003-01-01

    Potential relict hot springs have been identified on Mars and, using the Earth as an analog, Martian hot springs are postulated to be an optimal locality for recognizing preserved evidence of extraterrestrial life. Distinctive organic and inorganic biomarkers are necessary to recognize preserved evidence of life in terrestrial and extraterrestrial hot spring accumulations. Hot springs in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, U.S.A., contain a wealth of information about primitive microbial life and associated biosignatures that may be useful for future exobiological investigations. Numerous siliceous hot springs in Yellowstone contain abundant, centimeter-scale, spinose precipitates of opaline silica (opal-A). Although areally extensive in siliceous hot spring discharge channel facies, these spinose forms have largely escaped attention. These precipitates referred to as shrubs, consist of porous aggregates of spinose opaline silica that superficially resemble miniature woody plants, i.e., the term shrubs. Shrubs in carbonate precipitating systems have received considerable attention, and represent naturally occurring biotically induced precipitates. As such, shrubs have great potential as hot spring environmental indicators and, more importantly, proxies for pre-existing microbial life.

  6. Cobalt silicate hierarchical hollow spheres for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Guo, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yufei; Sun, Chencheng; Yan, Qingyu; Dong, Xiaochen

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the synthesis of cobalt silicate novel hierarchical hollow spheres via a facile hydrothermal method is presented. With a unique hollow structure, the Co2SiO4 provides a large surface area, which can shorten the lithium ions diffusion length and effectively accommodate the volumetic variation during the lithiation/de-lithiation process. Serving as an anode material in lithium-ion battery application, the Co2SiO4 electrode demonstrates a high reversible specific capacity (first-cycle charge capacity of 948.6 mAh g-1 at 100 mA g-1), a cycling durability (specific capacity of 791.4 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles at 100 mA g-1), and a good rate capability (specific capacity of 349.4 mAh g-1 at 10 A g-1). The results indicate that the cobalt silicate hierarchical hollow sphere holds the potential applications in energy storage electrodes.

  7. Gels composed of sodium-aluminium silicate, lake magadi, kenya.

    PubMed

    Eugster, H P; Jones, B F

    1968-07-12

    Sodium-aluminum silicate gels are found in surficial deposits as thick as 5 centimeters in the Magadi area of Kenya. Chemical data indicate they are formed by the interaction of hot alkaline springwaters (67 degrees to 82 degrees C; pH, about 9) with alkali trachyte flows and their detritus, rather than by direct precipitation. In the process, Na(2)O is added from and silica is released to the saline waters of the springs. Algal mats protect the gels from erosion and act as thermal insulators. The gels are probably yearly accumulates that are washed into the lakes during floods. Crystallization of these gels in the laboratory yields analcite; this fact suggests that some analcite beds in lacustrine deposits may have formed from gels. Textural evidence indicates that cherts of rocks of the Pleistocene chert series in the Magadi area may have formed from soft sodium silicate gels. Similar gels may have acted as substrates for the accumulation and preservation of prebiological organic matter during the Precambrian.

  8. Cobalt silicate hierarchical hollow spheres for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Guo, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yufei; Sun, Chencheng; Yan, Qingyu; Dong, Xiaochen

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the synthesis of cobalt silicate novel hierarchical hollow spheres via a facile hydrothermal method is presented. With a unique hollow structure, the Co2SiO4 provides a large surface area, which can shorten the lithium ions diffusion length and effectively accommodate the volumetic variation during the lithiation/de-lithiation process. Serving as an anode material in lithium-ion battery application, the Co2SiO4 electrode demonstrates a high reversible specific capacity (first-cycle charge capacity of 948.6 mAh g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1)), a cycling durability (specific capacity of 791.4 mAh g(-1) after 100 cycles at 100 mA g(-1)), and a good rate capability (specific capacity of 349.4 mAh g(-1) at 10 A g(-1)). The results indicate that the cobalt silicate hierarchical hollow sphere holds the potential applications in energy storage electrodes. PMID:27479691

  9. On the Filling Process Forming Silicic Segregations: Porous Flow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, K.; Marsh, B. D.

    2002-05-01

    Silicic segregations are only observed in the upper parts of large diabase sill, lava lakes and gabbroic intrusions. The segregations often have sharp upper contacts and diffuse lower contacts that grade into the host rock texture. We have analyzed over 100 segregation samples from the Ferrar Dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys Antarctica, to investigate the nature of the infilling process. These segregations have compositions that correspond to interstitial liquid present at crystallinities between 59 and 63% and temperatures between 1135o C and 1115 oC. Stratigraphic position, size, textures, and chemical composition relations indicate that silicic segregation represent a form of bimodal differentiation produced by the physical tearing of the upper Solidification Front (SF) due to gravitational instability, (SFI). Previous work (Zavala & Marsh, 2001) showed that large segregations, which are chemically and texturally non-homogeneous and have non-monotonic Si02 profiles form by multiple infilling episodes. In contrast, smaller segregations have homogeneous textures and chemical profiles, formed by perhaps longer single episode of infilling. Because the rate of melt flow forming these segregations is controlled by the resistance to flow through the crystalline matrix we performed a series of porous media flow experiments to investigate the details of the melt transport dynamics of the infilling process.

  10. Metal/silicate fractionation in the solar system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    Fractionation between the metal and silicate components of objects in the inner solar system has long been recognized as a necessity in order to explain the observed density variations of the terrestrial planets and the H-group, L-group dichotomy of the ordinary chondrites. This paper discusses the densities of the terrestrial planets in light of current physical and chemical models of processes in the solar nebula. It is shown that the observed density trends in the inner solar system need not be the result of special fractionation processes, and that the densities of the planets may be direct results of simultaneous application of both physical and chemical restraints on the structure of the nebula, most notably the variation of temperature with heliocentric distance. The density of Mercury is easily attributed to accretion at temperatures so high that MgSiO3 is only partially retained but Fe metal is condensed. The densities of the other terrestrial planet are shown to be due to different degrees of retention of S, O and H as FeS, FeO and hydrous silicates produced in chemical equilibrium between condensates and solar-composition gases.

  11. Polymer-Layered Silicate Nanocomposites for Cryotank Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Meador, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Previous composite cryotank designs have relied on the use of conventional composite materials to reduce microcracking and permeability. However, revolutionary advances in nanotechnology derived materials may enable the production of ultra-lightweight cryotanks with significantly enhanced durability and damage tolerance, as well as reduced propellant permeability. Layered silicate nanocomposites are especially attractive in cryogenic storage tanks based on results that have been reported for epoxy nanocomposite systems. These materials often exhibit an order of magnitude reduction in gas permeability when compared to the base resin. In addition, polymer-silicate nanocomposites have been shown to yield improved dimensional stability, strength, and toughness. The enhancement in material performance of these systems occurs without property trade-offs which are often observed in conventionally filled polymer composites. Research efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center have led to the development of epoxy-clay nanocomposites with 70% lower hydrogen permeability than the base epoxy resin. Filament wound carbon fiber reinforced tanks made with this nanocomposite had a five-fold lower helium leak rate than the corresponding tanks made without clay. The pronounced reduction observed with the tank may be due to flow induced alignment of the clay layers during processing. Additionally, the nanocomposites showed CTE reductions of up to 30%, as well as a 100% increase in toughness.

  12. The structure of alkali silicate gel by total scattering methods

    SciTech Connect

    Benmore, C.J.; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2010-06-15

    The structure of the alkali silicate gel (ASR) collected from the galleries of Furnas Dam in Brazil was determined by a pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of high energy X-ray diffraction data. Since this method is relatively new to concrete structure analysis a detailed introduction on the PDF method is given for glassy SiO{sub 2}. The bulk amorphous structure of the dam material is confirmed as no Bragg peaks are observed in the scattered intensity. The real space results show that the local structure of the amorphous material is similar to kanemite (KHSi{sub 2}O{sub 5}:3H{sub 2}O) however the long range layer structure of the crystal is broken up in the amorphous state, so that ordering only persists of the length scale of a few polyhedra. The silicate layer structure is a much more disordered than predicted by molecular dynamics models. The X-ray results are consistent with the molecular dynamics model of Kirkpatrick et al. (2005) [1] which predicts that most of the water resides in pores within the amorphous network rather than in layers. The total scattering data provide a rigorous basis against which other models may also be tested.

  13. The structure of alkali silicate gel by total scattering methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Benmore, C. J.; Monteiro, P. J. M.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of California at Berkeley

    2010-01-01

    The structure of the alkali silicate gel (ASR) collected from the galleries of Furnas Dam in Brazil was determined by a pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of high energy X-ray diffraction data. Since this method is relatively new to concrete structure analysis a detailed introduction on the PDF method is given for glassy SiO{sub 2}. The bulk amorphous structure of the dam material is confirmed as no Bragg peaks are observed in the scattered intensity. The real space results show that the local structure of the amorphous material is similar to kanemite (KHSi{sub 2}O{sub 5}:3H{sub 2}O) however the long range layer structure of the crystal is broken up in the amorphous state, so that ordering only persists of the length scale of a few polyhedra. The silicate layer structure is a much more disordered than predicted by molecular dynamics models. The X-ray results are consistent with the molecular dynamics model of Kirkpatrick et al. (2005) [1] which predicts that most of the water resides in pores within the amorphous network rather than in layers. The total scattering data provide a rigorous basis against which other models may also be tested.

  14. Gels composed of sodium-aluminium silicate, lake magadi, kenya.

    PubMed

    Eugster, H P; Jones, B F

    1968-07-12

    Sodium-aluminum silicate gels are found in surficial deposits as thick as 5 centimeters in the Magadi area of Kenya. Chemical data indicate they are formed by the interaction of hot alkaline springwaters (67 degrees to 82 degrees C; pH, about 9) with alkali trachyte flows and their detritus, rather than by direct precipitation. In the process, Na(2)O is added from and silica is released to the saline waters of the springs. Algal mats protect the gels from erosion and act as thermal insulators. The gels are probably yearly accumulates that are washed into the lakes during floods. Crystallization of these gels in the laboratory yields analcite; this fact suggests that some analcite beds in lacustrine deposits may have formed from gels. Textural evidence indicates that cherts of rocks of the Pleistocene chert series in the Magadi area may have formed from soft sodium silicate gels. Similar gels may have acted as substrates for the accumulation and preservation of prebiological organic matter during the Precambrian. PMID:17770594

  15. Ion-specific effects influencing the dissolution of tricalcium silicate

    SciTech Connect

    Nicoleau, L.; Schreiner, E.; Nonat, A.

    2014-05-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that the dissolution kinetics of tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S) is driven by the deviation from its solubility equilibrium. In this article, special attention is paid to ions relevant in cement chemistry likely to interact with C{sub 3}S. In order to determine whether specific effects occur at the interface C{sub 3}S–water, particular efforts have been made to model ion activities using Pitzer's model. It has been found that monovalent cations and monovalent anions interact very little with the surface of C{sub 3}S. On the other side, divalent anions like sulfate slow down the dissolution more strongly by modifying the surface charging of C{sub 3}S. Third, aluminate ions covalently bind to surface silicate monomers and inhibit the dissolution in mildly alkaline conditions. The formation and the breaking of these bonds depend on pH and on [Ca{sup 2+}]. Thermodynamic calculations performed using DFT combined with the COSMO-RS solvation method support the experimental findings.

  16. Gels composed of sodium-aluminum silicate, Lake Magadi, Kenya

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eugster, H.P.; Jones, B.F.

    1968-01-01

    Sodium-aluminum silicate gels are found in surftcial deposits as thick as 5 centimeters in the Magadi area of Kenya. Chemical data indicate they are formed by the interaction of hot alkaline springwaters (67?? to 82??C; pH, about 9) with alkali trachyte flows and their detritus, rather than by direct precipitation. In the process, Na2O is added from and silica is released to the saline waters of the springs. Algal mats protect the gels from erosion and act as thermal insulators. The gels are probably yearly accumulates that are washed into the lakes during floods. Crystallization of these gels in the laboratory yields analcite; this fact suggests that some analcite beds in lacustrine deposits may have formed from gels. Textural evidence indicates that cherts of rocks of the Pleistocene chert series in the Magadi area may have formed from soft sodium silicate gels. Similar gels may have acted as substrates for the accumulation and preservation of prebiological organic matter during the Precambrian.

  17. Iron-magnesium silicate bioweathering on Earth (and Mars?).

    PubMed

    Fisk, M R; Popa, R; Mason, O U; Storrie-Lombardi, M C; Vicenzi, E P

    2006-02-01

    We examined the common, iron-magnesium silicate minerals olivine and pyroxene in basalt and in mantle rocks to determine if they exhibit textures similar to bioweathering textures found in glass. Our results show that weathering in olivine may occur as long, narrow tunnels (1-3 microm in diameter and up to 100 microm long) and as larger irregular galleries, both of which have distinctive characteristics consistent with biological activity. These weathering textures are associated with clay mineral by-products and nucleic acids. We also examined olivine and pyroxene in martian meteorites, some of which experienced preterrestrial aqueous alteration. Some olivines and pyroxenes in the martian meteorite Nakhla were found to contain tunnels that are similar in size and shape to tunnels in terrestrial iron-magnesium silicates that contain nucleic acids. Though the tunnels found in Nakhla are similar to the biosignatures found in terrestrial minerals, their presence cannot be used to prove that the martian alteration features had a biogenic origin. The abundance and wide distribution of olivine and pyroxene on Earth and in the Solar System make bioweathering features in these minerals potentially important new biosignatures that may play a significant role in evaluating whether life ever existed on Mars.

  18. Atomic oxygen diffusion on and desorption from amorphous silicate surfaces.

    PubMed

    He, Jiao; Jing, Dapeng; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2014-02-28

    Surface reactions involving atomic oxygen have attracted much attention in astrophysics and astrochemistry, but two of the most fundamental surface processes, desorption and diffusion, are not well understood. We studied diffusion and desorption of atomic oxygen on or from amorphous silicate surfaces under simulated interstellar conditions using a radio-frequency dissociated oxygen beam. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments were performed to study the formation of ozone from reaction of atomic and molecular oxygen deposited on the surface of a silicate. It is found that atomic oxygen begins to diffuse significantly between 40 K and 50 K. A rate equation model was used to study the surface kinetics involved in ozone formation experiments. The value of atomic oxygen desorption energy has been determined to be 152 ± 20 meV (1764 ± 232 K). The newly found atomic oxygen desorption energy, which is much higher than the well-accepted value, might explain the discrepancy in abundance of molecular oxygen in space between observations and chemical models.

  19. The electrical conductivity of silicate liquids at extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scipioni, R.; Stixrude, L. P.

    2015-12-01

    Could the Earth have had a silicate dynamo early in its history? One requirement is that the electrical conductivity of silicate liquids be sufficiently high. However, very little is known about this property at the extreme conditions of pressure and temperature that prevailed in the magma ocean. We have computed from first principles molecular dynamics simulations the dc conductivity of liquid Silica SiO2 at pressure and temperature conditions spanning those of the magma ocean and super-Earth interiors. We find semi-metallic values of the conductivity at conditions typical of the putative basal magma ocean in the Early Earth. The variation of the conductivity with pressure and temperature displays interesting behavior that we rationalize on the basis of the closing the pseudo-gap at the Fermi level. For temperatures lower than T < 20,000 K electrical conductivity exhibits a maximum at intermediate compressions. We further explain this behavior in terms of stuctural changes that occur in silica liquid at high pressure; we find that the structure approaches that of the iso-electronic rare earth element Ne. We compare with Hugoniot data, including the equation of state, heat capacity, and reflectivity. The behavior of the heat capacity is different to that inferred from multiple Hugoniot experiments. These differences and the effect of including exact exchange on the calculations are discussed. Our results have important consequences for magnetic field generation in the early Earth and super-Earths.

  20. Alumino-silicate ion sources for accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, A.I.

    1985-04-01

    As part of the program of Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, ion sources have been developed using thermionic emitters of singly charged alkali metal ions. These emitters are flat surfaces of alumino-silicate, loaded with the appropriate ion. They have become convenient and reliable sources producing pulsed beams of very low emittance. Thermionic emission of ions from alumino-silicates has been known for a very long time. Here the author focuses on the practical application as accelerator ion sources. The author discusses the fabrication and heating of large area emitters, uniformity of emission and the maximum ion current density which can be extracted under space charge limited conditions, with zero electric field on the emitter surface. Results are presented for Na, K and Cs ions showing maximum space charge limited current densities of 25, 40 and 120 mAcm/sup -2/ respectively. In the case of cesium the author has produced a 5 mA beam at a kinetic energy of 200 keV with normalized emittance 1.2 x 10/sup -7/ ..pi.. m rad.

  1. Cobalt silicate hierarchical hollow spheres for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Guo, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yufei; Sun, Chencheng; Yan, Qingyu; Dong, Xiaochen

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the synthesis of cobalt silicate novel hierarchical hollow spheres via a facile hydrothermal method is presented. With a unique hollow structure, the Co2SiO4 provides a large surface area, which can shorten the lithium ions diffusion length and effectively accommodate the volumetic variation during the lithiation/de-lithiation process. Serving as an anode material in lithium-ion battery application, the Co2SiO4 electrode demonstrates a high reversible specific capacity (first-cycle charge capacity of 948.6 mAh g‑1 at 100 mA g‑1), a cycling durability (specific capacity of 791.4 mAh g‑1 after 100 cycles at 100 mA g‑1), and a good rate capability (specific capacity of 349.4 mAh g‑1 at 10 A g‑1). The results indicate that the cobalt silicate hierarchical hollow sphere holds the potential applications in energy storage electrodes.

  2. Enhanced bioactivity of glass ionomer cement by incorporating calcium silicates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Song; Cai, Yixiao; Engqvist, Håkan; Xia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are known as a non-bioactive dental cement. During setting the GIC have an acidic pH, driven by the acrylic acid component. It is a challenge to make GIC alkaline without disturbing its mechanical properties. One strategy was to add slowly reacting systems with an alkaline pH. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possibility of forming a bioactive dental material based on the combination of glass ionomer cement and calcium silicates. Two types of GIC were used as control. Wollastonite (CS also denoted β-CaSiO3) or Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) was incorporated into the 2 types of GIC. The material formulations' setting time, compressive strength, pH and bioactivity were compared between modified GIC and GIC control. Apatite crystals were found on the surfaces of the modified cements but not on the control GIC. The compressive strength of the cement remained with the addition of 20% calcium silicate or 20% MTA after one day immersion. In addition, the compressive strength of GIC modified with 20% MTA had been increased during the 14 d immersion (p < 0 .05).

  3. Humidity sensing by nanocomposites of silver in silicate glass ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, B. N.; Kundu, T. K.; Banerjee, S.; Chakravorty, D.

    2003-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles of diameters in the range 3.4 to 13.2 nm were grown within a silicate glass ceramics containing barium titanate phase. The glass ceramics were filled with silver particles by subjecting the former to a Na+-Ag+ ion exchange process followed by a reduction treatment in hydrogen. Silver particles were formed at the interfaces of the silicate glass and the barium titanate phases, respectively. The silver particle sizes could be varied by controlling the fractal structure of the crystalline phase by prior heat treatment. Electrical resistivity measurements were carried out on cold-pressed specimens of nanocomposite powders prepared as just stated. A five order of magnitude resistivity change was recorded in the case of nanocomposite specimen with a silver particle diameter of 10.1 nm in the relative humidity range of 25% to 85%. The resistivity of the nanocomposites was found to be controlled by a variable range hopping conduction. It is believed that the silver nanoparticles provide sites where physisorption of water molecules takes place which increases the number of localized states near the Fermi level.

  4. Carbon substitution for oxygen in silicates in planetary interiors

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Widgeon, Scarlett J.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Mera, Gabriela; Tavakoli, Amir; Ionescu, Emanuel; Riedel, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous silicon oxycarbide polymer-derived ceramics (PDCs), synthesized from organometallic precursors, contain carbon- and silica-rich nanodomains, the latter with extensive substitution of carbon for oxygen, linking Si-centered SiOxC4-x tetrahedra. Calorimetric studies demonstrated these PDCs to be thermodynamically more stable than a mixture of SiO2, C, and silicon carbide. Here, we show by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy that substitution of C for O is also attained in PDCs with depolymerized silica-rich domains containing lithium, associated with SiOxC4-x tetrahedra with nonbridging oxygen. We suggest that significant (several percent) substitution of C for O could occur in more complex geological silicate melts/glasses in contact with graphite at moderate pressure and high temperature and may be thermodynamically far more accessible than C for Si substitution. Carbon incorporation will change the local structure and may affect physical properties, such as viscosity. Analogous carbon substitution at grain boundaries, at defect sites, or as equilibrium states in nominally acarbonaceous crystalline silicates, even if present at levels at 10–100 ppm, might form an extensive and hitherto hidden reservoir of carbon in the lower crust and mantle. PMID:24043830

  5. Santaclaraite, a new calcium-manganese silicate hydrate from California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erd, Richard C.; Ohashi, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Santaclaraite, ideally CaMn4(Si5O14(OH))(OH).H2O, occurs as pink and tan veins and masses in Franciscan chert in the Diablo Range, Santa Clara and Stanislaus counties, California. It is associated with four unidentified Mn silicates, Mn-howieite, quartz, braunite, calcite, rhodochrosite, kutnahorite, baryte, harmotome, chalcopyrite and native copper. Santaclaraite is triclinic, space group B1, a 15.633(1), b 7.603(1) , c 12.003(1) A, alpha 109.71(1)o, beta 88.61(1)o, gamma 99.95(1) o, V 1322.0(3) A3; Z = 4. The strongest lines of the X-ray pattern are 7.04(100), 3.003(84), 3.152(80), 7.69(63), 3.847(57) A. Crystals are lamellar to prismatic (flattened on (100)), with good cleavage on (100) and (010); H. 61/2 Dcalc. 3.398 g/cm3, Dmeas. 3.31 (+ or -0.01); optically biaxial negative, alpha 1.681, beta 1.696, gamma 1.708 (all + or - 0.002), 2Valpha 83 (+ or -1)o. Although chemically a hydrated rhodonite, santaclaraite dehydrates to Mn-bustamite at approx 550oC (in air) . Santaclaraite is a five-tetrahedral-repeat single-chain silicate and has structural affinities with rhodonite, nambulite, marsturite, babingtonite and inesite.-J.A.Z.

  6. Lightning and Mass Independent Oxygen Isotopic Fractionation in Nebular Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Lightning has long been postulated as the agent of Chondru|e formation in the solar nebula, but it may have an additional role to play as well. Lightning bolts of almost any scale will both vaporize dust and liberate oxygen atoms that will then interact with both nebular gases as well as the refractory silicate vapor as it re-condenses. Such processes should result in the addition of the heavy oxygen isotopes to the growing silicate grains while the light oxygen-16 becomes part of the gas phase water. This process will proceed to some extent throughout the history of any turbulent nebula and will result in the gradual increase of O-16 in the gas phase and in a much larger relative increase in the O-17 and O-18 content of the nebular dust. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated the production of such "heavy oxygen enriched", non-mass-dependently-fractionated dust grains in a high voltage discharge in a hydrogen rich gas containing small quantities of silane, pentacarbonyl iron and oxygen.

  7. Enhanced bioactivity of glass ionomer cement by incorporating calcium silicates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Song; Cai, Yixiao; Engqvist, Håkan; Xia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are known as a non-bioactive dental cement. During setting the GIC have an acidic pH, driven by the acrylic acid component. It is a challenge to make GIC alkaline without disturbing its mechanical properties. One strategy was to add slowly reacting systems with an alkaline pH. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possibility of forming a bioactive dental material based on the combination of glass ionomer cement and calcium silicates. Two types of GIC were used as control. Wollastonite (CS also denoted β-CaSiO3) or Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) was incorporated into the 2 types of GIC. The material formulations’ setting time, compressive strength, pH and bioactivity were compared between modified GIC and GIC control. Apatite crystals were found on the surfaces of the modified cements but not on the control GIC. The compressive strength of the cement remained with the addition of 20% calcium silicate or 20% MTA after one day immersion. In addition, the compressive strength of GIC modified with 20% MTA had been increased during the 14 d immersion (p < 0 .05). PMID:26787304

  8. Iron-magnesium silicate bioweathering on Earth (and Mars?).

    PubMed

    Fisk, M R; Popa, R; Mason, O U; Storrie-Lombardi, M C; Vicenzi, E P

    2006-02-01

    We examined the common, iron-magnesium silicate minerals olivine and pyroxene in basalt and in mantle rocks to determine if they exhibit textures similar to bioweathering textures found in glass. Our results show that weathering in olivine may occur as long, narrow tunnels (1-3 microm in diameter and up to 100 microm long) and as larger irregular galleries, both of which have distinctive characteristics consistent with biological activity. These weathering textures are associated with clay mineral by-products and nucleic acids. We also examined olivine and pyroxene in martian meteorites, some of which experienced preterrestrial aqueous alteration. Some olivines and pyroxenes in the martian meteorite Nakhla were found to contain tunnels that are similar in size and shape to tunnels in terrestrial iron-magnesium silicates that contain nucleic acids. Though the tunnels found in Nakhla are similar to the biosignatures found in terrestrial minerals, their presence cannot be used to prove that the martian alteration features had a biogenic origin. The abundance and wide distribution of olivine and pyroxene on Earth and in the Solar System make bioweathering features in these minerals potentially important new biosignatures that may play a significant role in evaluating whether life ever existed on Mars. PMID:16551226

  9. Influence of silicate on the transport of bacteria in quartz sand and iron mineral-coated sand.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhe; Yang, Haiyan; Wu, Dan; Ni, Jinren; Kim, Hyunjung; Tong, Meiping

    2014-11-01

    The influence of silicate on the transport and deposition of bacteria (Escherichia coli) in packed porous media were examined at a constant 20 mM ionic strength with different silicate concentrations (from 0 to 1 mM) at pH 7. Transport experiments were performed in two types of representative porous media, both bare quartz sand and iron mineral-coated quartz sand. In bare quartz sand, the breakthrough plateaus in the presence of silicate in suspensions were lower and the corresponding retained profiles were higher than those without silicate ions, indicating that the presence of silicate in suspensions decreased cell transport in bare quartz sand. Moreover, the decrease of bacteria transport in quartz sand induced by silicate was more pronounced with increasing silicate concentrations from 0 to 1 mM. However, when EPS was removed from cell surfaces, the presence of silicate in cell suspensions (with different concentrations) did not affect the transport behavior of bacteria in quartz sand. The interaction of silicate with EPS on cell surfaces negatively decreased the zeta potentials of bacteria, resulting in the decreased cell transport in bare quartz sand when silicate was copresent in bacteria suspensions. In contrast, the presence of silicate in suspensions increased cell transport in iron mineral-coated sand. Silicate ions competed with bacteria for the adsorption sites on mineral-coated sand, contributing to the increased cell transport in mineral-coated sand with silicate present in cell suspensions.

  10. Examination of silicate limitation of primary production in Jiaozhou Bay, China. I. Silicate being a limiting factor of phytoplankton primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong-Fang; Zhang, Jing; Lu, Ji-Bin; Gao, Zhen-Hui; Chen, Yu

    2002-09-01

    Jiaozhou Bay data collected from May 1991 to February 1994, in 12 seasonal investigations, and provided the authors by the Ecological Station of Jiaozhou Bay, were analyzed to determine the spatiotemporal variations in temperature, light, nutrients (NO{3/-}-N, NO{2/-}-N, NH{4/+}-N, SiO{3/2-}-Si, PO{4/3-}-P), phytoplankton, and primary production in Jiaozhou Bay. The results indicated that only silicate correlated well in time and space with, and had important effects on, the characteristics, dynamic cycles and trends of, primary production in Jiaozhou Bay. The authors developed a corresponding dynamic model of primary production and silicate and water temperature. Eq. (1) of the model shows that the primary production variation is controlled by the nutrient Si and affected by water temperature; that the main factor controlling the primary production is Si; that water temperature affects the composition of the structure of phytoplankton assemblage; that the different populations of the phytoplankton assemblage occupy different ecological niches for C, the apparent ratio of conversion of silicate in seawater into phytoplankton biomas and D, the coefficient of water temperature's effect on phytoplankton biomass. The authors researched the silicon source of Jiaozhou Bay, the biogeochemical sediment process of the silicon, the phytoplankton predominant species and the phytoplankton structure. The authors considered silicate a limiting factor of primary production in Jiaozhou Bay, whose decreasing concentration of silicate from terrestrial source is supposedly due to dilution by current and uptake by phytoplankton; quantified the silicate assimilated by phytoplankton, the intrinsic ratio of conversion of silicon into phytoplankton biomass, the proportion of silicate uptaken by phytoplankton and diluted by current; and found that the primary production of the phytoplankton is determined by the quantity of the silicate assimilated by them. The phenomenon of apparently high

  11. Preparation, Characterization and Release Properties of Nanostructured Polystyrene Microparticles Containing Different Silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Scarfato, Paola; Iannelli, Pio; Russo, Pietro; Acierno, Domenico

    2010-06-02

    Nanostructured polystyrene microparticles containing different silicates as nanosized filler were successfully prepared using an emulsification/solvent evaporation method. X-ray diffraction showed that all hybrid systems were in an intercalated morphology. The microparticles display regular geometry, improved thermal resistance and release behavior dependent upon the silicate type in the hybrid, as demonstrated by preliminary investigations performed using benzophenone as model penetrant.

  12. 40 CFR 721.10292 - Silicate (2-), hexafluoro-, cesium (1:2).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Silicate (2-), hexafluoro-, cesium (1... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10292 Silicate (2-), hexafluoro-, cesium (1:2). (a) Chemical substance...-) hexafluoro-cesium (1:2) (PMN P-11-546; CAS No. 16923-87-8) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10292 - Silicate (2-), hexafluoro-, cesium (1:2).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Silicate (2-), hexafluoro-, cesium (1... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10292 Silicate (2-), hexafluoro-, cesium (1:2). (a) Chemical substance...-) hexafluoro-cesium (1:2) (PMN P-11-546; CAS No. 16923-87-8) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10292 - Silicate (2-), hexafluoro-, cesium (1:2).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Silicate (2-), hexafluoro-, cesium (1... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10292 Silicate (2-), hexafluoro-, cesium (1:2). (a) Chemical substance...-) hexafluoro-cesium (1:2) (PMN P-11-546; CAS No. 16923-87-8) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  15. Crystal Structure and Chemical Composition of a Presolar Silicate from the Queen Elizabeth Range 99177 Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Messenger, S.

    2013-01-01

    Mineral characterization of presolar silicate grains, the most abundant stardust phase, has provided valuable information about the formation conditions in circumstellar environments and in super-nova (SN) outflows. Spectroscopic observations of dust around evolved stars suggest a majority of amor-phous, Mg-rich olivine grains, but crystalline silicates, most of which are pyroxene, have also been observed [1]. The chemical compositions of hundreds of presolar silicates have been determined by Auger spectroscopy and reveal high Fe contents and nonstoichiometric compositions intermediate to olivine and pyroxene [2-6]. The unexpectedly high Fe contents can partly be attributed to secondary alteration on the meteorite parent bodies, as some grains have Fe isotopic anomalies from their parent stellar source [7]. Only about 35 presolar silicates have been studied for their mineral structures and chemical compositions by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These grains display a wide range of compositions and structures, including crystalline forsterite, crystalline pyroxene, nanocrystalline grains, and a majority of amorphous nonstoichiometric grains. Most of these grains were identified in the primitive Acfer 094 meteorite. Presolar silicates from this meteorite show a wide range of Fe-contents, suggestive of secondary processing on the meteorite parent body. The CR chondrite QUE 99177 has not suffered as much alteration [8] and displays the highest presolar silicate abundance to date among carbonaceous chondrites [3, 6]. However, no mineralogical studies of presolar silicates from this meteorite have been performed. Here we examine the mineralogy of a presolar silicate from QUE 99177.

  16. Mg/Fe FRACTIONATION IN CIRCUMSTELLAR SILICATE DUST INVOLVED IN CRYSTALLIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, K.; Takakura, T.; Chihara, H.; Koike, C.; Tsuchiyama, A.

    2009-05-10

    Infrared astronomical observations of oxygen-rich young and evolved stars show that only magnesium-rich crystalline silicates exist in circumstellar regions, and iron, one of the most important dust-forming elements, is extremely depleted. The compositional characteristic of circumstellar crystalline silicates is fundamentally different from that of primitive extraterrestrial materials in our solar system, such as chondritic meteorites and interplanetary dust particles. Amorphous silicates are ubiquitous and abundant in space, and are a promising carrier of iron. However, since the first detection of crystalline silicates, there has been an unsolved inconsistency due to differing compositions of coexisting crystalline and amorphous phases, considering that amorphous silicates have been expected to be precursors of these crystals. Here we show the first experimental evidence that Fe-depleted olivine can be formed by crystallization via thermal heating of FeO-bearing amorphous silicates under subsolidus conditions. Mg/Fe fractionation involved in crystallization makes possible to coexist Mg-rich crystalline silicates with Fe-bearing amorphous silicates around stars.

  17. Nanoparticles Containing High Loads of Paclitaxel-Silicate Prodrugs: Formulation, Drug Release, and Anticancer Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Michel, Andrew R; Lee, Han Seung; Kalscheuer, Stephen; Wohl, Adam; Hoye, Thomas R; McCormick, Alon V; Panyam, Jayanth; Macosko, Christopher W

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated particle size, interior structure, drug release kinetics, and anticancer efficacy of PEG-b-PLGA-based nanoparticles loaded with a series of paclitaxel (PTX)-silicate prodrugs [PTX-Si(OR)3]. Silicate derivatization enabled us to adjust the hydrophobicity and hydrolytic lability of the prodrugs by the choice of the alkyl group (R) in the silicate derivatives. The greater hydrophobicity of these prodrugs allows for the preparation of nanoparticles that are stable in aqueous dispersion even when loaded with up to ca. 75 wt % of the prodrug. The hydrolytic lability of silicates allows for facile conversion of prodrugs back to the parent drug, PTX. A suite of eight PTX-silicate prodrugs was investigated; nanoparticles were made by flash nanoprecipitation (FNP) using a confined impingement jet mixer with a dilution step (CIJ-D). The resulting nanoparticles were 80-150 nm in size with a loading level of 47-74 wt % (wt %) of a PTX-silicate, which corresponds to 36-59 effective wt % of free PTX. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy images show that particles are typically spherical with a core-shell structure. Prodrug/drug release profiles were measured. Release tended to be slower for prodrugs having greater hydrophobicity and slower hydrolysis rate. Nanoparticles loaded with PTX-silicate prodrugs that hydrolyze most rapidly showed in vitro cytotoxicity similar to that of the parent PTX. Nanoparticles loaded with more labile silicates also tended to show greater in vivo efficacy. PMID:26505116

  18. Facile synthesis of magnetic hierarchical copper silicate hollow nanotubes for efficient adsorption and removal of hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Wang, Baoyu; Zhang, Yanwei; Li, Weizhen; Gan, Wenjun; Xu, Jingli

    2016-01-21

    This study reports the fabrication of magnetic copper silicate hierarchical hollow nanotubes, which are featured by a tailored complex wall structure and high surface area. Moreover, they exhibit excellent performance as an easily recycled adsorbent for protein separation. Particularly, this strategy can be extended as a general method to prepare other magnetic metal silicate hollow nanotubes. PMID:26678096

  19. Nanoparticles Containing High Loads of Paclitaxel-Silicate Prodrugs: Formulation, Drug Release, and Anticancer Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Michel, Andrew R; Lee, Han Seung; Kalscheuer, Stephen; Wohl, Adam; Hoye, Thomas R; McCormick, Alon V; Panyam, Jayanth; Macosko, Christopher W

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated particle size, interior structure, drug release kinetics, and anticancer efficacy of PEG-b-PLGA-based nanoparticles loaded with a series of paclitaxel (PTX)-silicate prodrugs [PTX-Si(OR)3]. Silicate derivatization enabled us to adjust the hydrophobicity and hydrolytic lability of the prodrugs by the choice of the alkyl group (R) in the silicate derivatives. The greater hydrophobicity of these prodrugs allows for the preparation of nanoparticles that are stable in aqueous dispersion even when loaded with up to ca. 75 wt % of the prodrug. The hydrolytic lability of silicates allows for facile conversion of prodrugs back to the parent drug, PTX. A suite of eight PTX-silicate prodrugs was investigated; nanoparticles were made by flash nanoprecipitation (FNP) using a confined impingement jet mixer with a dilution step (CIJ-D). The resulting nanoparticles were 80-150 nm in size with a loading level of 47-74 wt % (wt %) of a PTX-silicate, which corresponds to 36-59 effective wt % of free PTX. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy images show that particles are typically spherical with a core-shell structure. Prodrug/drug release profiles were measured. Release tended to be slower for prodrugs having greater hydrophobicity and slower hydrolysis rate. Nanoparticles loaded with PTX-silicate prodrugs that hydrolyze most rapidly showed in vitro cytotoxicity similar to that of the parent PTX. Nanoparticles loaded with more labile silicates also tended to show greater in vivo efficacy.

  20. Accretion and core formation: constraints from metal-silicate partitioning.

    PubMed

    Wood, Bernard J

    2008-11-28

    Experimental metal-silicate partitioning data for Ni, Co, V, Cr, Nb, Mn, Si and W were used to investigate the geochemical consequences of a range of models for accretion and core formation on Earth. The starting assumptions were chondritic ratios of refractory elements in the Earth and the segregation of metal at the bottom of a magma ocean, which deepened as the planet grew and which had, at its base, a temperature close to the liquidus of the silicate. The models examined were as follows. (i) Continuous segregation from a mantle which is chemically homogeneous and which has a fixed oxidation state, corresponding to 6.26 per cent oxidized Fe. Although Ni, Co and W partitioning is consistent with chondritic ratios, the current V content of the silicate Earth cannot be reconciled with core segregation under these conditions of fixed oxidation state. (ii) Continuous segregation from a mantle which is chemically homogeneous but in which the Earth became more oxidized as it grew. In this case, the Ni, Co, W, V, Cr and Nb contents of core and mantle are easily matched to those calculated from the chondritic ratios of refractory elements. The magma ocean is calculated to maintain a thickness approximately 35 per cent of the depth to the core-mantle boundary in the accreting Earth, yielding a maximum pressure of 44GPa. This model yields a Si content of the core of 5.7 per cent, in good agreement with cosmochemical estimates and with recent isotopic data. (iii) Continuous segregation from a mantle which is not homogeneous and in which the core equilibrates with a restricted volume of mantle at the base of the magma ocean. This is found to increase depth of the magma ocean by approximately 50 per cent. All of the other elements (except Mn) have partitioning consistent with chondritic abundances in the Earth, provided the Earth became, as before, progressively oxidized during accretion. (iv) Continuous segregation of metal from a crystal-melt mush. In this case, pressures