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Sample records for home-based health platform

  1. Smart Home-Based Health Platform for Behavioral Monitoring and Alteration of Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Helal, Abdelsalam; Cook, Diane J.; Schmalz, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Background Researchers and medical practitioners have long sought the ability to continuously and automatically monitor patients beyond the confines of a doctor's office. We describe a smart home monitoring and analysis platform that facilitates the automatic gathering of rich databases of behavioral information in a manner that is transparent to the patient. Collected information will be automatically or manually analyzed and reported to the caregivers and may be interpreted for behavioral modification in the patient. Method Our health platform consists of five technology layers. The architecture is designed to be flexible, extensible, and transparent, to support plug-and-play operation of new devices and components, and to provide remote monitoring and programming opportunities. Results The smart home-based health platform technologies have been tested in two physical smart environments. Data that are collected in these implemented physical layers are processed and analyzed by our activity recognition and chewing classification algorithms. All of these components have yielded accurate analyses for subjects in the smart environment test beds. Conclusions This work represents an important first step in the field of smart environment-based health monitoring and assistance. The architecture can be used to monitor the activity, diet, and exercise compliance of diabetes patients and evaluate the effects of alternative medicine and behavior regimens. We believe these technologies are essential for providing accessible, low-cost health assistance in an individual's own home and for providing the best possible quality of life for individuals with diabetes. PMID:20046657

  2. Privacy and information security risks in a technology platform for home-based chronic disease rehabilitation and education

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Privacy and information security are important for all healthcare services, including home-based services. We have designed and implemented a prototype technology platform for providing home-based healthcare services. It supports a personal electronic health diary and enables secure and reliable communication and interaction with peers and healthcare personnel. The platform runs on a small computer with a dedicated remote control. It is connected to the patient’s TV and to a broadband Internet. The platform has been tested with home-based rehabilitation and education programs for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and diabetes. As part of our work, a risk assessment of privacy and security aspects has been performed, to reveal actual risks and to ensure adequate information security in this technical platform. Methods Risk assessment was performed in an iterative manner during the development process. Thus, security solutions have been incorporated into the design from an early stage instead of being included as an add-on to a nearly completed system. We have adapted existing risk management methods to our own environment, thus creating our own method. Our method conforms to ISO’s standard for information security risk management. Results A total of approximately 50 threats and possible unwanted incidents were identified and analysed. Among the threats to the four information security aspects: confidentiality, integrity, availability, and quality; confidentiality threats were identified as most serious, with one threat given an unacceptable level of High risk. This is because health-related personal information is regarded as sensitive. Availability threats were analysed as low risk, as the aim of the home programmes is to provide education and rehabilitation services; not for use in acute situations or for continuous health monitoring. Conclusions Most of the identified threats are applicable for healthcare services intended for patients or

  3. ERMHAN: A Context-Aware Service Platform to Support Continuous Care Networks for Home-Based Assistance.

    PubMed

    Paganelli, Federica; Spinicci, Emilio; Giuli, Dino

    2008-01-01

    Continuous care models for chronic diseases pose several technology-oriented challenges for home-based continuous care, where assistance services rely on a close collaboration among different stakeholders such as health operators, patient relatives, and social community members. Here we describe Emilia Romagna Mobile Health Assistance Network (ERMHAN) a multichannel context-aware service platform designed to support care networks in cooperating and sharing information with the goal of improving patient quality of life. In order to meet extensibility and flexibility requirements, this platform has been developed through ontology-based context-aware computing and a service oriented approach. We also provide some preliminary results of performance analysis and user survey activity.

  4. Pilot Study of a Home-based Asthma Health Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolinar, Rose-Marie; Kumar, Vijay; Rowe, Brian H.; Coutu-Wakulczyk, Ginette

    2000-01-01

    Examines the influence of a home-based asthma health education program on parental coping and quality of life. Families (N=40) with children under 11 received either health education sessions or a booklet representing the traditional approach to care. Results suggest the use of a one-time, home-based intervention to assist families caring for…

  5. GOLIAH: A Gaming Platform for Home-Based Intervention in Autism - Principles and Design.

    PubMed

    Bono, Valentina; Narzisi, Antonio; Jouen, Anne-Lise; Tilmont, Elodie; Hommel, Stephane; Jamal, Wasifa; Xavier, Jean; Billeci, Lucia; Maharatna, Koushik; Wald, Mike; Chetouani, Mohamed; Cohen, David; Muratori, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    -child relationship. This pilot study shows the feasibility of using the developed gaming platform for home-based intensive intervention. However, the overall capability of the platform in delivering intervention needs to be assessed in a bigger open trial.

  6. GOLIAH: A Gaming Platform for Home-Based Intervention in Autism – Principles and Design

    PubMed Central

    Bono, Valentina; Narzisi, Antonio; Jouen, Anne-Lise; Tilmont, Elodie; Hommel, Stephane; Jamal, Wasifa; Xavier, Jean; Billeci, Lucia; Maharatna, Koushik; Wald, Mike; Chetouani, Mohamed; Cohen, David; Muratori, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    parents–child relationship. This pilot study shows the feasibility of using the developed gaming platform for home-based intensive intervention. However, the overall capability of the platform in delivering intervention needs to be assessed in a bigger open trial. PMID:27199777

  7. Risk management and clinical governance for complex home-based health care.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mary; Noyes, Jane

    2007-07-01

    Healthcare professionals have an obligation to enable children with complex needs to lead 'ordinary lives' at home but the views of professionals and family members often diverge in relation to the management of risks. Nurses are increasingly taking on the clinical responsibility for children with complex needs within a multidisciplinary, multi-agency team, yet have little training or experience in adapting risk management and clinical governance frameworks to home-based settings. Risk management frameworks for home-based care for children with complex health and social care needs are introduced in this article. Best practice guidance and resources for adapting risk management frameworks are presented to meet this identified gap in knowledge and experience. Children, young people and their parents have increasing expectations relating to the type and quality of home-based support they receive. Developing and applying clinical governance and risk management frameworks are part of improving outcomes for children with complex needs and their families.

  8. Investment in home-based maternal, newborn and child health records improves immunization coverage in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Osaki, K; Hattori, T; Kosen, Soewarta; Singgih, Budihardja

    2009-08-01

    Indonesia Demographic and Health Surveys show that the ownership of home-based immunization records among children aged 12-23 months increased from 30.8% in 1997 and 30.7% in 2002-3 to 37% in 2007. In 2002-3, 70.9% of children who owned records had received all vaccines by the time of the survey, whereas 42.9% of children who did not own records had been fully immunized. An Indonesian ministerial decree of 2004 stated that the Maternal and Child Health Handbook (MCH handbook) was to be the only home-based record of maternal, newborn and child health. The increased immunization coverage seen would be a reflection of MCH handbook implementation, through raising awareness of immunization among community and health personnel and children's parents or guardians and allowing more accurate measurement of immunization coverage.

  9. Internet Protocol Television for Personalized Home-Based Health Information: Design-Based Research on a Diabetes Education System

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Ken; Kwong, Mabel; Alzougool, Basil; Hines, Carolyn; Tidhar, Gil; Frukhtman, Feodor

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of Internet protocol television (IPTV) as a channel for consumer health information is a relatively under-explored area of medical Internet research. IPTV may afford new opportunities for health care service providers to provide health information and for consumers, patients, and caretakers to access health information. The technologies of Web 2.0 add a new and even less explored dimension to IPTV’s potential. Objective Our research explored an application of Web 2.0 integrated with IPTV for personalized home-based health information in diabetes education, particularly for people with diabetes who are not strong computer and Internet users, and thus may miss out on Web-based resources. We wanted to establish whether this system could enable diabetes educators to deliver personalized health information directly to people with diabetes in their homes; and whether this system could encourage people with diabetes who make little use of Web-based health information to build their health literacy via the interface of a home television screen and remote control. Methods This project was undertaken as design-based research in two stages. Stage 1 comprised a feasibility study into the technical work required to integrate an existing Web 2.0 platform with an existing IPTV system, populated with content and implemented for user trials in a laboratory setting. Stage 2 comprised an evaluation of the system by consumers and providers of diabetes information. Results The project succeeded in developing a Web 2.0 IPTV system for people with diabetes and low literacies and their diabetes educators. The performance of the system in the laboratory setting gave them the confidence to engage seriously in thinking about the actual and potential features and benefits of a more widely-implemented system. In their feedback they pointed out a range of critical usability and usefulness issues related to Web 2.0 affordances and learning fundamentals. They also described

  10. "Willing but unwilling": attitudinal barriers to adoption of home-based health information technology among older adults.

    PubMed

    Young, Rachel; Willis, Erin; Cameron, Glen; Geana, Mugur

    2014-06-01

    While much research focuses on adoption of electronic health-care records and other information technology among health-care providers, less research explores patient attitudes. This qualitative study examines barriers to adoption of home-based health information technology, particularly personal electronic health records, among older adults. We conducted in-depth interviews (30-90 min duration) with 35 American adults, aged 46-72 years, to determine their perceptions of and attitudes toward home-based health information technology. Analysis of interview data revealed that most barriers to adoption fell under four themes: technological discomfort, privacy or security concerns, lack of relative advantage, and perceived distance from the user representation. Based on our findings, systems to promote home-based health information technology should incorporate familiar computer applications, alleviate privacy and security concerns, and align with older adults' active and engaged self-image.

  11. Home-based chronic care. An expanded integrative model for home health professionals.

    PubMed

    Suter, Paula; Hennessey, Beth; Harrison, Gregory; Fagan, Martha; Norman, Barbara; Suter, W Newton

    2008-04-01

    The Chronic Care Model (CCM) developed by is an influential and accepted guide for the care of patients with chronic disease. Wagner acknowledges a current healthcare focus on acute care needs that often circumvents chronic care coordination. He identifies the need for a "division of labor" to assist the primary care physician with this neglected function. This article posits that the role of chronic care coordination assistance and disease management fits within the purview of home healthcare and should be central to home health chronic care delivery. An expanded Home-Based Chronic Care Model (HBCCM) is described that builds on Wagner's model and integrates salient theories from fields beyond medicine. The expanded model maximizes the potential for disease self-management success and is intended to provide a foundation for home health's integral role in chronic disease management.

  12. Development of a powered mobile module for the ArmAssist home-based telerehabilitation platform.

    PubMed

    Jung, Je Hyung; Valencia, David B; Rodríguez-de-Pablo, Cristina; Keller, Thierry; Perry, Joel C

    2013-06-01

    The ArmAssist, developed by Tecnalia, is a system for at-home telerehabilitation of post-stroke arm impairments. It consists of a wireless mobile base module, a global position and orientation detection mat, a PC with display monitor, and a tele-rehabilitation software platform. This paper presents the recent development results on the mobile module augmenting its functionality by adding actuation components. Three DC servo motors were employed to drive the mobile module and a position control algorithm based on the kinematic model and velocity mode control was implemented such that the module tracks a path defined in the training software. Pilot tests of the powered mobile module were performed in experiments with different load conditions and two unimpaired subjects. Both test results show that the module is able to follow the predefined path within an acceptable error range for reach movement training. Further study and testing of the system in realistic conditions following stroke will be a future topic of research.

  13. Community health workers and home-based care programs for HIV clients.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Becky A.; Khanna, Sunil K.

    2004-01-01

    In Nyanza Province, Kenya, estimated HIV prevalence is 22%. Given that more than 80% of the population resides in rural areas, the majority of individuals in Nyanza Province do not have access to medical facilities on a regular basis. In response to the growing demands the HIV epidemic has placed on the people and communities in this region, hundreds of lay individuals have been trained as community health workers to provide home-based care to sick or dying HIV/AIDS clients in rural areas. This paper discusses the role and impact of these community health workers in Nyanza Province, Kenya. It outlines the collaborative relationship between community health workers and the Ministry of Health, examining community health workers' use of extant biomedical structures at the district level to provide services that government-run health facilities lack the monetary resources or personnel to provide. Finally, it explores the role played by community health workers in providing HIV/AIDS education to individuals in an attempt to prevent further infections. PMID:15101670

  14. The Impact of Perceived Stress, Social Support, and Home-Based Physical Activity on Mental Health among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwag, Kyung Hwa; Martin, Peter; Russell, Daniel; Franke, Warren; Kohut, Marian

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how perceived stress, social support, and home-based physical activity affected older adults' fatigue, loneliness, and depression. We also explored whether social support and physical activity mediated the relationships between stress and mental health problems. The data of 163 older participants were analyzed in this…

  15. The web-rhetoric of companies offering home-based personal health monitoring.

    PubMed

    Nordgren, Anders

    2012-06-01

    In this paper I investigate the web-rhetoric of companies offering home-based personal health monitoring to patients and elderly people. Two main rhetorical methods are found, namely a reference to practical benefits and a use of prestige words like "quality of life" and "independence". I interpret the practical benefits in terms of instrumental values and the prestige words in terms of final values. I also reconstruct the arguments on the websites in terms of six different types of argument. Finally, I articulate a general critique of the arguments, namely that the websites neglect the context of use of personal health monitoring technologies. Whether or not a technology is good depends on the use of the technology by a particular individual in a particular context. The technology is not good-or bad-in itself. I support this critique with a number of more specific arguments such as the risk for reduced personal contact. For some elderly people social contact with care providers is more valuable than the independent living made possible by remote monitoring, for others independence is more important.

  16. Automated Cognitive Health Assessment From Smart Home-Based Behavior Data.

    PubMed

    Dawadi, Prafulla Nath; Cook, Diane Joyce; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2016-07-01

    Smart home technologies offer potential benefits for assisting clinicians by automating health monitoring and well-being assessment. In this paper, we examine the actual benefits of smart home-based analysis by monitoring daily behavior in the home and predicting clinical scores of the residents. To accomplish this goal, we propose a clinical assessment using activity behavior (CAAB) approach to model a smart home resident's daily behavior and predict the corresponding clinical scores. CAAB uses statistical features that describe characteristics of a resident's daily activity performance to train machine learning algorithms that predict the clinical scores. We evaluate the performance of CAAB utilizing smart home sensor data collected from 18 smart homes over two years. We obtain a statistically significant correlation ( r=0.72) between CAAB-predicted and clinician-provided cognitive scores and a statistically significant correlation ( r=0.45) between CAAB-predicted and clinician-provided mobility scores. These prediction results suggest that it is feasible to predict clinical scores using smart home sensor data and learning-based data analysis.

  17. An easy to use and affordable home-based personal eHealth system for chronic disease management based on free open source software.

    PubMed

    Burkow, Tatjana M; Vognild, Lars K; Krogstad, Trine; Borch, Njål; Ostengen, Geir; Bratvold, Astrid; Risberg, Marijke Jongsma

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an easy to use home-based eHealth system for chronic disease management. We present the design and implementation of a prototype for home based education, exercises, treatment and following-up, with the TV and a remote control as user interface. We also briefly describe field trials of the system for patients with COPD and diabetes, and their experience with the technology.

  18. Home-based neuromuscular electrical stimulation improves exercise tolerance and health-related quality of life in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Coquart, Jérémy B; Grosbois, Jean-Marie; Olivier, Cecile; Bart, Frederic; Castres, Ingrid; Wallaert, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Background This retrospective, observational study of a routine clinical practice reports the feasibility and efficiency of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation (PR), including transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) or usual endurance physical exercise (UEPE), on exercise tolerance, anxiety/depression, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with COPD. Methods Seventy-one patients with COPD participated in home-based PR with NMES (Group NMES [GNMES]), while 117 patients participated in home-based PR with the UEPEs (Group UEPE [GUEPE]). NMES was applied for 30 minutes twice a day, every day. The endurance exercises in GUEPE began with a minimum 10-minute session at least 5 days a week, with the goal being 30–45 minutes per session. Three upper and lower limb muscle strengthening exercises lasting 10–15 minutes were also proposed to both the groups for daily practice. Moreover, PR in both the groups included a weekly 90-minute session based on an educational needs assessment. The sessions comprised endurance physical exercise for GUEPE, NMES for GNMES, resumption of physical daily living activities, therapeutic patient education, and psychosocial support to facilitate health behavior changes. Before and after PR, functional mobility and physical exercise capacity, anxiety, depression, and HRQoL were evaluated at home. Results The study revealed that NMES significantly improved functional mobility (−18.8% in GNMES and −20.6% in GUEPE), exercise capacity (+20.8% in GNMES and +21.8% in GUEPE), depression (−15.8% in GNMES and −30.1% in GUEPE), and overall HRQoL (−7.0% in GNMES and −18.5% in GUEPE) in the patients with COPD, regardless of the group (GNMES or GUEPE) or severity of airflow obstruction. Moreover, no significant difference was observed between the groups with respect to these data (P>0.05). Conclusion Home-based PR including self-monitored NMES seems feasible and effective for severely disabled COPD patients

  19. Occupational Safety, Health, and Well-being Among Home-based Workers in the Informal Economy of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Nankongnab, Noppanun; Silpasuwan, Pimpan; Markkanen, Pia; Kongtip, Pornpimol; Woskie, Susan

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this article is to provide a summary of the issues related to occupational safety and health and well-being among workers in the informal economy of Thailand, with a special emphasis on home-based workers. The reviewed literature includes documents and information sources developed by the International Labour Organization, the National Statistical Office of Thailand, peer-reviewed scientific publications, and master's theses conducted in Thailand. This work is part of a needs and opportunities analysis carried out by the Center for Work, Environment, Nutrition and Development--a partnership between Mahidol University and University of Massachusetts Lowell to identify the gaps in knowledge and research to support government policy development in the area of occupational and environmental health for workers in the informal economy.

  20. Design and methodology of a randomized clinical trial of home-based telemental health treatment for U.S. military personnel and veterans with depression.

    PubMed

    Luxton, David D; Pruitt, Larry D; O'Brien, Karen; Stanfill, Katherine; Jenkins-Guarnieri, Michael A; Johnson, Kristine; Wagner, Amy; Thomas, Elissa; Gahm, Gregory A

    2014-05-01

    Home-based telemental health (TMH) treatments have the potential to address current and future health needs of military service members, veterans, and their families, especially for those who live in rural or underserved areas. The use of home-based TMH treatments to address the behavioral health care needs of U.S. military healthcare beneficiaries is not presently considered standard of care in the Military Health System. The feasibility, safety, and clinical efficacy of home-based TMH treatments must be established before broad dissemination of home-based treatment programs can be implemented. This paper describes the design, methodology, and protocol of a clinical trial that compares in-office to home-based Behavioral Activation for Depression (BATD) treatment delivered via web-based video technology for service members and veterans with depression. This grant funded three-year randomized clinical trial is being conducted at the National Center for Telehealth and Technology at Joint-base Lewis-McChord and at the Portland VA Medical Center. Best practice recommendations regarding the implementation of in-home telehealth in the military setting as well as the cultural and contextual factors of providing in-home care to active duty and veteran military populations are also discussed.

  1. Assessing Health Status Differences Between Veterans Affairs Home-Based Primary Care and State Medicaid Waiver Program Clients

    PubMed Central

    Wharton, Tracy C.; Nnodim, Joseph; Hogikyan, Robert; Mody, Lona; James, Mary; Montagnini, Marcos; Fries, Brant E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Comprehensive health care for older adults is complex, involving multiple comorbidities and functional impairments of varying degrees and numbers. In response to this complexity and associated barriers to care, home-based care models have become prevalent. The home-based primary care (HBPC) model, based at a Michigan Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and the Michigan Waiver Program (MWP) that includes home-based care are 2 of these. Although both models are formatted to address barriers to effective and efficient health care, there are differences in disease prevalence and functional performance between groups. The objective of this study was to explore the differences between the 2 groups, to shed some light on potential trends that could suggest areas for resource allocation by service providers. Design Using a retrospective analysis of data collected using the interRAI-home care, we examined a cross-sectional representation of clients enrolled in HBPC and MWP in 2008. Participants The HBPC sample had 89 participants. The MWP database contained 9324 participants from across the State of Michigan and were weighted to be comparable to the HBPC population in sex and age, and to simulate the HBPC sample size. Results Veterans were more independent in basic activities of daily living performance, but there was no difference in the rate of reported falls between the 2 groups. Veterans had more pain and a higher prevalence of coronary artery disease (z = 7.0; P <.001), Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (z = 3.9; P < .001), and cancer (z = 8.5; P < .001). There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups in terms of the prevalence of geriatric syndromes. Scores on subscales of the interRAI-home care indicated a lower risk of serious health decline and adverse outcomes for MWP compared with HBPC clients (1.4 ± 1.1 vs 0.9 ± 0.1; z = 2.5; P = .012). Veterans receiving home-based care through the Veterans Affairs Medical

  2. The impact of perceived stress, social support, and home-based physical activity on mental health among older adults.

    PubMed

    Kwag, Kyung Hwa; Martin, Peter; Russell, Daniel; Franke, Warren; Kohut, Marian

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how perceived stress, social support, and home-based physical activity affected older adults' fatigue, loneliness, and depression. We also explored whether social support and physical activity mediated the relationships between stress and mental health problems. The data of 163 older participants were analyzed in this study. Structural equation modeling using LISREL 8.71 was performed to assess the effects of stress, support, and physical activity on mental health. The findings indicate that perceived stress predicted higher levels of depression, social support predicted lower levels of loneliness and fatigue, and physical activity predicted lower levels of fatigue among older adults. Social support and physical activity mediated the relationships between stress and mental health, except depression. In conclusion, the relative impacts of perceived stress, social support, and physical activity on types of mental health (e.g., fatigue, loneliness, and depression) were different. Furthermore, stress had direct and indirect effects on each construct of mental health (e.g., fatigue, loneliness, and depression).

  3. Framing the evidence for health smart homes and home-based consumer health technologies as a public health intervention for independent aging: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Blaine; Meyer, Ellen; Lazar, Amanda; Chaudhuri, Shomir; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Demiris, George

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There is a critical need for public health interventions to support the independence of older adults as the world’s population ages. Health smart homes (HSH) and home-based consumer health (HCH) technologies may play a role in these interventions. Methods We conducted a systematic review of HSH and HCH literature from indexed repositories for health care and technology disciplines (e.g., MEDLINE, CINAHL, and IEEE Xplore) and classified included studies according to an evidence-based public health (EBPH) typology. Results One thousand, six hundred and thirty nine candidate articles were identified. Thirty-one studies from the years 1998–2011 were included. Twenty-one included studies were classified as emerging, 10 as promising and 3 as effective (first tier). Conclusion The majority of included studies were published in the period beginning in the year 2005. All 3 effective (first tier) studies and 9 of 10 of promising studies were published during this period. Almost all studies included an activity sensing component and most of these used passive infrared motion sensors. The three effective (first tier) studies all used a multicomponent technology approach that included activity sensing, reminders and other technologies tailored to individual preferences. Future research should explore the use of technology for self-management of health by older adults, social support and self-reported health measures incorporated into personal health records, electronic medical records, and community health registries. PMID:23639263

  4. [Evaluation of the effectiveness of home-based physical activity promotion by community health workers].

    PubMed

    Costa, Evelyn Fabiana; Andrade, Douglas Roque; Garcia, Leandro Martin Totaro; Ribeiro, Evelyn Helena Corgosinho; Santos, Taynã Ishi dos; Florindo, Alex Antonio

    2015-10-01

    This study analyzed the effectiveness of physical activity promotion by community health workers (CHW) during home visits. This was a non-randomized controlled trial that lasted six months, with one group of CHW that received training to promote physical activity during home visits among users of the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS) and a control group. Physical activity and stages of behavior change were evaluated in 176 adults (n = 90 in the intervention group and n = 86 in the control group) assisted by the CHW. Associations, prevalence ratios, and generalized estimate equations were conducted to verify differences between groups. No evidence of differences in physical activity and stages of behavior change were observed between the two groups. CHW from the intervention group conducted more home visits promoting physical activity among elders, those with low schooling, unemployed, and those with chronic diseases. It is important to reassess the work and priorities of CHW to expand physical activity promotion under the SUS.

  5. Effects of home-based exercise intervention on health-related quality of life for patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui; Zhang, Hua; Ji, Haiyan; Wang, Chunmei

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this paper was to objectively evaluate the effectiveness of home-based exercise interventions for improving health-related quality of life in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Databases including PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, Ovid-Medline, and The Cochrane Library were electronically searched published from inception through October 2014 involving home-based exercise intervention in AS patients. Studies that measured the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), depression and pain as outcomes were included. Studies involving patients with multiple diseases or received combinations of other interventions were excluded. Two independent investigators screened the identified articles, extracted the data, and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. Qualitative descriptions were conducted, and quantitative analysis was performed with RevMan software (version 5.2). A total of six studies comprising 1098 participants were included in the study. Meta-analyses showed that home-based exercise interventions significantly reduced the BASFI scores (MD = -0.39, 95 % CI -0.57, -0.20, p = 0.001), BASDAI scores (MD = -0.50, 95 % CI -0.99, -0.02, p = 0.04), depression scores (MD = -2.31, 95 % CI -3.33, -1.30, p = 0.001), and for pain scores because of different evaluation methods among these studies; therefore, a subgroup analysis should be conducted for comparison. The results show that home-based exercise interventions can effectively improve the health-related quality of life in patients with AS. The benefit and clinical performance of home-based exercise care requires further investigation by a series of multicenter, large-sample size randomized controlled trails.

  6. Pollution Prevention through Peer Education: A Community Health Worker and Small and Home-Based Business Initiative on the Arizona-Sonora Border.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Denise Moreno; Ramírez-Andreotta, Mónica D; Vea, Lourdes; Estrella-Sánchez, Rocío; Wolf, Ann Marie A; Kilungo, Aminata; Spitz, Anna H; Betterton, Eric A

    2015-09-09

    Government-led pollution prevention programs tend to focus on large businesses due to their potential to pollute larger quantities, therefore leaving a gap in programs targeting small and home-based businesses. In light of this gap, we set out to determine if a voluntary, peer education approach led by female, Hispanic community health workers (promotoras) can influence small and home-based businesses to implement pollution prevention strategies on-site. This paper describes a partnership between promotoras from a non-profit organization and researchers from a university working together to reach these businesses in a predominately Hispanic area of Tucson, Arizona. From 2008 to 2011, the promotora-led pollution prevention program reached a total of 640 small and home-based businesses. Program activities include technical trainings for promotoras and businesses, generation of culturally and language appropriate educational materials, and face-to-face peer education via multiple on-site visits. To determine the overall effectiveness of the program, surveys were used to measure best practices implemented on-site, perceptions towards pollution prevention, and overall satisfaction with the industry-specific trainings. This paper demonstrates that promotoras can promote the implementation of pollution prevention best practices by Hispanic small and home-based businesses considered "hard-to-reach" by government-led programs.

  7. Pollution Prevention through Peer Education: A Community Health Worker and Small and Home-Based Business Initiative on the Arizona-Sonora Border

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Ramírez, Denise; Ramírez-Andreotta, Mónica D.; Vea, Lourdes; Estrella-Sánchez, Rocío; Wolf, Ann Marie A.; Kilungo, Aminata; Spitz, Anna H.; Betterton, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Government-led pollution prevention programs tend to focus on large businesses due to their potential to pollute larger quantities, therefore leaving a gap in programs targeting small and home-based businesses. In light of this gap, we set out to determine if a voluntary, peer education approach led by female, Hispanic community health workers (promotoras) can influence small and home-based businesses to implement pollution prevention strategies on-site. This paper describes a partnership between promotoras from a non-profit organization and researchers from a university working together to reach these businesses in a predominately Hispanic area of Tucson, Arizona. From 2008 to 2011, the promotora-led pollution prevention program reached a total of 640 small and home-based businesses. Program activities include technical trainings for promotoras and businesses, generation of culturally and language appropriate educational materials, and face-to-face peer education via multiple on-site visits. To determine the overall effectiveness of the program, surveys were used to measure best practices implemented on-site, perceptions towards pollution prevention, and overall satisfaction with the industry-specific trainings. This paper demonstrates that promotoras can promote the implementation of pollution prevention best practices by Hispanic small and home-based businesses considered “hard-to-reach” by government-led programs. PMID:26371028

  8. Oral health related quality of life in pregnant and post partum women in two social network domains; predominantly home-based and work-based networks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Individuals connected to supportive social networks have better general and oral health quality of life. The objective of this study was to assess whether there were differences in oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL) between women connected to either predominantly home-based and work-based social networks. Methods A follow-up prevalence study was conducted on 1403 pregnant and post-partum women (mean age of 25.2 ± 6.3 years) living in two cities in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Women were participants in an established cohort followed from pregnancy (baseline) to post-partum period (follow-up). All participants were allocated to two groups; 1. work-based social network group - employed women with paid work, and, 2. home-based social network group - women with no paid work, housewives or unemployed women. Measures of social support and social network were used as well as questions on sociodemographic characteristics and OHRQoL and health related behaviors. Multinomial logistic regression was performed to obtain OR of relationships between occupational contexts, affectionate support and positive social interaction on the one hand, and oral health quality of life, using the Oral Health Impacts Profile (OHIP) measure, adjusted for age, ethnicity, family income, schooling, marital status and social class. Results There was a modifying effect of positive social interaction on the odds of occupational context on OHRQoL. The odds of having a poorer OHIP score, ≥4, was significantly higher for women with home-based social networks and moderate levels of positive social interactions [OR 1.64 (95% CI: 1.08-2.48)], and for women with home-based social networks and low levels of positive social interactions [OR 2.15 (95% CI: 1.40-3.30)] compared with women with work-based social networks and high levels of positive social interactions. Black ethnicity was associated with OHIP scores ≥4 [OR 1.73 (95% CI: 1.23-2.42)]. Conclusions Pregnant and post

  9. Evaluation of a Home-Based Environmental and Educational Intervention to Improve Health in Vulnerable Households: Southeastern Pennsylvania Lead and Healthy Homes Program

    PubMed Central

    Mankikar, Deepa; Campbell, Carla; Greenberg, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    This evaluation examined whether participation in a home-based environmental educational intervention would reduce exposure to health and safety hazards and asthma-related medical visits. The home intervention program focused on vulnerable, low-income households, where children had asthma, were at risk for lead poisoning, or faced multiple unsafe housing conditions. Home visitors conducted two home visits, two months apart, consisting of an environmental home assessment, Healthy Homes education, and distribution of Healthy Homes supplies. Measured outcomes included changes in participant knowledge and awareness of environmental home-based hazards, rate of children’s asthma-related medical use, and the presence of asthma triggers and safety hazards. Analysis of 2013–2014 baseline and post-intervention program data for a cohort of 150 families revealed a significantly lower three-month rate (p < 0.05) of children’s asthma-related doctor visits and hospital admissions at program completion. In addition, there were significantly reduced reports of the presence of home-based hazards, including basement or roof leaks (p = 0.011), plumbing leaks (p = 0.019), and use of an oven to heat the home (p < 0.001). Participants’ pre- and post- test scores showed significant improvement (p < 0.05) in knowledge and awareness of home hazards. Comprehensive home interventions may effectively reduce environmental home hazards and improve the health of asthmatic children in the short term. PMID:27618087

  10. Home-based neonatal care by community health workers for preventing mortality in neonates in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gogia, S; Sachdev, H P S

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this review is to assess the effect of home-based neonatal care provided by community health workers (CHWs) for preventing neonatal, infant and perinatal mortality in resource-limited settings with poor access to health facility-based care. The authors conducted a systematic review, including meta-analysis and meta-regression of controlled trials. The data sources included electronic databases, with a hand search of reviews, abstracts and proceedings of conferences to search for randomized, or cluster randomized, controlled trials evaluating the effect of home-based neonatal care provided by CHWs for preventing neonatal, infant and perinatal mortality. Among the included trials, all from South Asian countries, information on neonatal, infant and perinatal mortality was available in five, one and three trials, respectively. The intervention package comprised three components, namely, home visits during pregnancy (four trials), home-based preventive and/or curative neonatal care (all trials) and community mobilization efforts (four trials). Intervention was associated with a reduced risk of mortality during the neonatal (random effects model relative risk (RR) 0.75; 95% confidence intervals (CIs) 0.61 to 0.92, P=0.005; I2=82.2%, P<0.001 for heterogeneity; high-quality evidence) and perinatal periods (random effects model RR 0.78; 95% CI 0.64 to 0.94, P=0.009; I2=79.6%, P=0.007 for heterogeneity; high-quality evidence). In one trial, a significant decline in infant mortality (RR 0.85; 95% CI 0.77 to 0.94) was documented. Subgroup and meta-regression analyses suggested a greater effect with a higher baseline neonatal mortality rate. The authors concluded that home-based neonatal care is associated with a reduction in neonatal and perinatal mortality in South Asian settings with high neonatal-mortality rates and poor access to health facility-based care. Adoption of a policy of home-based neonatal care provided by CHWs is justified in such settings

  11. Specifying the content of home-based health behaviour change interventions for older people with frailty or at risk of frailty: an exploratory systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Jovicic, Ana; Belk, Celia; Kharicha, Kalpa; Iliffe, Steve; Manthorpe, Jill; Goodman, Claire; Drennan, Vari M

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To identify trials of home-based health behaviour change interventions for frail older people, describe intervention content and explore its potential contribution to intervention effects. Design 15 bibliographic databases, and reference lists and citations of key papers, were searched for randomised controlled trials of home-based behavioural interventions reporting behavioural or health outcomes. Setting Participants' homes. Participants Community-dwelling adults aged ≥65 years with frailty or at risk of frailty. Primary and secondary outcome measures Trials were coded for effects on thematically clustered behavioural, health and well-being outcomes. Intervention content was described using 96 behaviour change techniques, and 9 functions (eg, education, environmental restructuring). Results 19 eligible trials reported 22 interventions. Physical functioning was most commonly assessed (19 interventions). Behavioural outcomes were assessed for only 4 interventions. Effectiveness on most outcomes was limited, with at most 50% of interventions showing potential positive effects on behaviour, and 42% on physical functioning. 3 techniques (instruction on how to perform behaviour, adding objects to environment, restructuring physical environment) and 2 functions (education and enablement) were more commonly found in interventions showing potential than those showing no potential to improve physical function. Intervention content was not linked to effectiveness on other outcomes. Conclusions Interventions appeared to have greatest impact on physical function where they included behavioural instructions, environmental modification and practical social support. Yet, mechanisms of effects are unclear, because impact on behavioural outcomes has rarely been considered. Moreover, the robustness of our findings is also unclear, because interventions have been poorly reported. Greater engagement with behavioural science is needed when developing and evaluating home-based

  12. Virtual health platform for medical tourism purposes.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Debora; Ferriol, Pedro; Tous, Xisco; Cabrer, Miguel; Prats, Mercedes

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces an overview of the Virtual Health Platform (VHP), an alternative approach to create a functional PHR system in a medical tourism environment. The proposed platform has been designed in order to be integrated with EHR infrastructures and in this way it expects to be useful and more advantageous to the patient or tourist. Use cases of the VHP and its potential benefits summarize the analysis.

  13. Home-Based Art Therapy for Older Adults with Mental Health Needs: Views of Clients and Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElroy, Siobhan; Warren, Alison; Jones, Fay

    2006-01-01

    The value of art therapy for older people with mental health problems is well documented although there is a paucity of research for people who are home bound. This study, based in England, involved five clients, all older people with mental health problems, receiving art therapy sessions at home. The clients and caregivers were then interviewed…

  14. Determinants of health: a progressive political platform.

    PubMed

    Terris, M

    1994-01-01

    This paper is based on the statement in the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion that "The fundamental conditions and resources for health are peace, shelter, education, food, income, a stable eco-system, sustainable resources, social justice and equity. Improvement in health requires a secure foundation in these basic prerequisites." It attempts to formulate a progressive political platform for a number of these prerequisites, offering a series of recommendations regarding education, employment, income, and housing, and urging that the proposed programs be funded by progressive taxation and major reductions in the military budget.

  15. EXAMINING LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF AN INFANT MENTAL HEALTH HOME-BASED EARLY HEAD START PROGRAM ON FAMILY STRENGTHS AND RESILIENCE.

    PubMed

    Mckelvey, Lorraine; Schiffman, Rachel F; Brophy-Herb, Holly E; Bocknek, Erika London; Fitzgerald, Hiram E; Reischl, Thomas M; Hawver, Shelley; Cunningham Deluca, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Infant Mental Health based interventions aim to promote the healthy development of infants and toddlers through promoting healthy family functioning to foster supportive relationships between the young child and his or her important caregivers. This study examined impacts of an Infant Mental Health home-based Early Head Start (IMH-HB EHS) program on family functioning. The sample includes 152 low-income families in the Midwestern United States, expectant or parenting a child younger than 1 year of age, who were randomly assigned to receive IMH-HB EHS services (n = 75) or to a comparison condition (n = 77). Mothers who received IMH-HB EHS services reported healthier psychological and family functioning, outcomes that are consistent with the IMH focus, when their children were between the ages of 3 and 7 years of age. Specifically, mothers in the IMH-HB EHS group reported healthier family functioning and relationships, better coping skills needed to advocate for their families, and less stress in the parenting role versus those in the comparison condition. The study also examined support seeking coping, some of which changed differently over time based on program group assignment. Overall, findings suggest that the gains families achieve from participating in IMH-HB EHS services are maintained after services cease.

  16. Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and Suicidal Behaviour in Children and Adolescents Accessing Residential or Intensive Home-Based Mental Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Preyde, Michèle; Watkins, Hanna; Csuzdi, Nicklaus; Carter, Jeff; Lazure, Kelly; White, Sara; Penney, Randy; Ashbourne, Graham; Cameron, Gary; Frensch, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: There is a dearth of Canadian research with clinical samples of youth who self-harm, and no studies could be located on self-harm in children and youth accessing residential or intensive home-based treatment. The purposes of this report were to explore the proportion and characteristics of children and youth identified as self-harming at admission by clinicians compared to youth not identified as self-harming, compare self-harming children to adolescents, and to compare caregiver ratings of self-harm at intake to clinician ratings at admission. Method: This report was developed from a larger longitudinal, observational study involving 210 children and youth accessing residential and home-based treatment and their caregivers in partnership with five mental health treatment centres in southwestern Ontario. Agency data were gleaned from files, and caregivers reported on symptom severity at 12 to 18 months and 36 to 40 months post-discharge. Results: Fifty-seven (34%) children and youth were identified as self-harming at admission. The mean age was 11.57 (SD 2.75). There were statistically significant differences on symptom severity at intake between those identified as self-harming and those not so identified; most of these differences were no longer present at follow up. Children were reported to have higher severity of conduct disorder symptoms than adolescents at intake, and there was some consistency between caregiver-rated and clinician-rated self-harm. Children were reported to engage in a wide range of self-harming behaviours. Conclusion: These findings suggest that youth who were identified as self-harming at admission have elevated scores of symptom severity, self-harm can occur in young children and while many improve, there remains a concern for several children and youth who did not improve by the end of service. Children engage in some of the same types of self-harm behaviours as adolescents, and they also engage in behaviours unique to

  17. Sensing platforms for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shijie; Naik, Gautam; Chen, Zhongbi; Zhu, Yinian; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2013-04-01

    The emerging concept of structural health management relies on extensive onboard diagnostic sensors that can provide near real-time information about the state of a structure so that informed prognostic assessment can be made of the continuing reliability of the structure. In this paper, we will discuss two types of sensing platforms that can provide valuable information about the state of a structure: 1D fiber-optic sensors and 2D thin-film sensors. Both fiber-optic and thin film sensors are easily integrated with structures, and can offer local and/or distributed sensing capabilities. Parameters that can be sensed include: static and dynamic strain, acoustic emission, vibration, corrosion products, moisture ingression etc. We will first describe some recent developments in dynamic strain sensing using optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. Applications to detection of acoustic emission and impact will be described. In the area of chemical sensing, we will describe a nanofilm-coated photonic crystal fiber (PCF) long-period grating (LPG) sensing platform. PCF-LPG sensors can be designed to provide greater interaction between the analyte of interest and the light propagating in the fiber, thereby increasing the sensitivity of detection. Applications to humidity sensing will be described. Finally, 2D thin-film sensors on polymer substrates will be discussed. One type of sensor we have been fabricating is based on reduced graphene oxide for large-area chemical sensing applications. It is expected that these 1D and 2D sensing platforms will form part of a suite of sensors that can provide diagnostic structural health information.

  18. Parents as Teachers Health Literacy Demonstration project: integrating an empowerment model of health literacy promotion into home-based parent education.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Lauren N; Smith, Sandra A; Thomson, Nicole R

    2015-03-01

    The Parents as Teachers (PAT) Health Literacy Demonstration project assessed the impact of integrating data-driven reflective practices into the PAT home visitation model to promote maternal health literacy. PAT is a federally approved Maternal, Infant, Early Childhood Home Visiting program with the goal of promoting school readiness and healthy child development. This 2-year demonstration project used an open-cohort longitudinal design to promote parents' interactive and reflective skills, enhance health education, and provide direct assistance to personalize and act on information by integrating an empowerment paradigm into PAT's parent education model. Eight parent educators used the Life Skills Progression instrument to tailor the intervention to each of 103 parent-child dyads. Repeated-measures analysis of variance, paired t tests, and logistic regression combined with qualitative data demonstrated that mothers achieved overall significant improvements in health literacy, and that home visitors are important catalysts for these improvements. These findings support the use of an empowerment model of health education, skill building, and direct information support to enable parents to better manage personal and child health and health care.

  19. Remotely Delivered Exercise-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation: Design and Content Development of a Novel mHealth Platform

    PubMed Central

    Gant, Nicholas; Meads, Andrew; Warren, Ian; Maddison, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Background Participation in traditional center-based cardiac rehabilitation exercise programs (exCR) is limited by accessibility barriers. Mobile health (mHealth) technologies can overcome these barriers while preserving critical attributes of center-based exCR monitoring and coaching, but these opportunities have not yet been capitalized on. Objective We aimed to design and develop an evidence- and theory-based mHealth platform for remote delivery of exCR to any geographical location. Methods An iterative process was used to design and develop an evidence- and theory-based mHealth platform (REMOTE-CR) that provides real-time remote exercise monitoring and coaching, behavior change education, and social support. Results The REMOTE-CR platform comprises a commercially available smartphone and wearable sensor, custom smartphone and Web-based applications (apps), and a custom middleware. The platform allows exCR specialists to monitor patients’ exercise and provide individualized coaching in real-time, from almost any location, and provide behavior change education and social support. Intervention content incorporates Social Cognitive Theory, Self-determination Theory, and a taxonomy of behavior change techniques. Exercise components are based on guidelines for clinical exercise prescription. Conclusions The REMOTE-CR platform extends the capabilities of previous telehealth exCR platforms and narrows the gap between existing center- and home-based exCR services. REMOTE-CR can complement center-based exCR by providing an alternative option for patients whose needs are not being met. Remotely monitored exCR may be more cost-effective than establishing additional center-based programs. The effectiveness and acceptability of REMOTE-CR are now being evaluated in a noninferiority randomized controlled trial. PMID:27342791

  20. Employing the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework to capture user feedback in the design and testing stage of development of home-based arm rehabilitation technology.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Manoj; Gallagher, Justin; Holt, Ray; Weightman, Andrew; O'Connor, Rory; Levesley, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a framework to ensure that key aspects of user feedback are identified in the design and testing stages of development of a home-based upper limb rehabilitation system. Seventeen stroke survivors with residual upper limb weakness, and seven healthcare professionals with expertise in stroke rehabilitation, were enrolled in the user-centered design process. Through semi-structured interviews, they provided feedback on the hardware, software and impact of a home-based rehabilitation device to facilitate self-managed arm exercise. Members of the multidisciplinary clinical and engineering research team, based on previous experience and existing literature in user-centred design, developed the topic list for the interviews. Meaningful concepts were extracted from participants' interviews based on existing ICF linking rules and matched to categories within the ICF Comprehensive Core Set for stroke. Most of the interview concepts (except personal factors) matched the existing ICF Comprehensive Core Set categories. Personal factors that emerged from interviews e.g. gender, age, interest, compliance, motivation, choice and convenience that might determine device usability are yet to be categorised within the ICF framework and hence could not be matched to a specific Core Set category.

  1. Improving chronic disease management with mobile health platform.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do-Youn; Bae, Sungchul; Song, Joon Hyun; Yi, Byoung-Kee; Kim, Il Kon

    2013-01-01

    In modern society, aging and chronic disease is becoming common phenomenon due to the increasing numbers of elderly patients. To best treat this growing segment of the population, medical care should be based on constant vital sign monitoring. In this study, we propose a mobile vital sign measurement and data collection system for chronic disease management.. And we implemented a middle ware using Multi-Agent platform in SOS (Self-Organizing System) platform that transmits patient clinical data for services. We also implemented a HL7 messaging interface for interoperability of clinical data exchange. We propose health services on a self-organized software platform.

  2. N-Acetylcysteine Combined with Home Based Physical Activity: Effect on Health Related Quality of Life in Stable COPD Patients- A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Atram, Jitesh S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Quality of life is adversely affected in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), due to irreversible, progressive nature of the disease and limitations of current treatment options available. One of the important aim of treatment of COPD is to improve Quality of Life (QoL). Cigarette smoke contains numerous free radicals and other oxidants. Oxidative stress has been implicated in pathogenesis, progression of disease and exacerbation in COPD. Pulmonary tuberculosis, outdoor and indoor air pollution and many others are aetiologies of COPD in non-smokers. N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) is a precursor of endogenous anti-oxidant, Glutathione (GSH) and both agents act as free radical scavengers. Exercise limitation results in poor physical performance and eventually poor QoL in COPD. Aim To observe the combined effect of 600mg of NAC once daily and physical activity (home based) in addition to standard treatment for ten weeks, compared with placebo as control group with standard treatment. Materials and Methods This randomised controlled trial was conducted at a tertiary care centre in Mumbai for two years from December 2011 to December 2013. Hundred patients diagnosed as stable COPD (as per Global Initiative against Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) 2010 guidelines) were enrolled in the study. There were 50 patients in study group and control group each. The QoL was assessed using Saint George Respiratory Questionnaire-C (SGRQ-C) initially and at the end of ten weeks. The study group was treated with NAC 600mg once a day combined with daily physical activity in addition to standard treatment. Control group patients were treated with placebo and standard treatment. Results At the end of 10 weeks, it was observed that, mean change in SGRQ-C was significant in “study group” as compared to “control group”. Mean change in score among study group was 4.72 and the same in control was 1.32, p-value=0.007. There was significant improvement in SGRQ-C score at the

  3. Implementation of Home based management of malaria in children reduces the work load for peripheral health facilities in a rural district of Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Tiono, Alfred B; Kaboré, Youssouf; Traoré, Abdoulaye; Convelbo, Nathalie; Pagnoni, Franco; Sirima, Sodiomon B

    2008-01-01

    Background Home Management of Malaria (HMM) is one of the key strategies to reduce the burden of malaria for vulnerable population in endemic countries. It is based on the evidence that well-trained communities health workers can provide prompt and adequate care to patients close to their homes. The strategy has been shown to reduce malaria mortality and severe morbidity and has been adopted by the World Health Organization as a cornerstone of malaria control in Africa. However, the potential fall-out of this community-based strategy on the work burden at the peripheral health facilities level has never been investigated. Methods A two-arm interventional study was conducted in a rural health district of Burkina Faso. The HMM strategy has been implemented in seven community clinics catchment's area (intervention arm). For the other seven community clinics in the control arm, no HMM intervention was implemented. In each of the study arms, presumptive treatment was provided for episodes of fevers/malaria (defined operationally as malaria). The study drug was artemether-lumefantrine, which was sold at a subsidized price by community health workers/Key opinion leaders at the community level and by the pharmacists at the health facility level. The outcome measured was the proportion of malaria cases among all health facility attendance (all causes diseases) in both arms throughout the high transmission season. Results A total of 7,621 children were enrolled in the intervention arm and 7,605 in the control arm. During the study period, the proportions of malaria cases among all health facility attendance (all causes diseases) were 21.0%, (445/2,111, 95% CI [19.3%–22.7%]) and 70.7% (2,595/3,671, 95% CI 68.5%–71.5%), respectively in the intervention and control arms (p << 0.0001). The relative risk ratio for a fever/malaria episode to be treated at the HF level was 30% (0.30 < RR < 0.32). The number of malaria episodes treated in the intervention arm was much higher

  4. Head Start Home-Based Resource Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trans-Management Systems, Inc.

    A revision of the 1989 publication, this directory was compiled in order to help parents and professionals involved with Head Start home-based programming in meeting the needs of young children and families. The directory lists a broad range of guides and resources on topics related to Head Start home-based programs. Each listing provides the…

  5. Java-based Open Platform for distributed health telematics applications.

    PubMed

    Hoepner, Petra; Eckert, Klaus-Peter

    2003-01-01

    Within the European HARP project, a Java-based Open Platform has been specified and implemented to support trustworthy distributed applications for health. Emphasis was put on security services for enabling both communication and application security. The Open Platform is Web-based and comprises the Client environment, Web/Application server, as well as Database and Archive servers. Servlets composed and executed according to the user's authorisation create signed XML messages. From those messages, user-role-related applets are generated. The technical details of the realisation are presented. Possible future enhancements for user-centric, adaptable services based on next-generation mobile service environments are outlined.

  6. Public Health Platforms: An Emerging Informatics Approach to Health Professional Learning and Development

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Health informatics has a major role to play in optimising the management and use of data, information and knowledge in health systems. As health systems undergo digital transformation, it is important to consider informatics approaches not only to curriculum content but also to the design of learning environments and learning activities for health professional learning and development. An example of such an informatics approach is the use of large-scale, integrated public health platforms on the Internet as part of health professional learning and development. This article describes selected examples of such platforms, with a focus on how they may influence the direction of health professional learning and development. Significance for public health The landscape of healthcare systems, public health systems, health research systems and professional education systems is fragmented, with many gaps and silos. More sophistication in the management of health data, information, and knowledge, based on public health informatics expertise, is needed to tackle key issues of prevention, promotion and policy-making. Platform technologies represent an emerging large-scale, highly integrated informatics approach to public health, combining the technologies of Internet, the web, the cloud, social technologies, remote sensing and/or mobile apps into an online infrastructure that can allow more synergies in work within and across these systems. Health professional curricula need updating so that the health workforce has a deep and critical understanding of the way that platform technologies are becoming the foundation of the health sector. PMID:27190977

  7. Public Health Platforms: An Emerging Informatics Approach to Health Professional Learning and Development.

    PubMed

    Gray, Kathleen

    2016-04-26

    Health informatics has a major role to play in optimising the management and use of data, information and knowledge in health systems. As health systems undergo digital transformation, it is important to consider informatics approaches not only to curriculum content but also to the design of learning environments and learning activities for health professional learning and development. An example of such an informatics approach is the use of large-scale, integrated public health platforms on the Internet as part of health professional learning and development. This article describes selected examples of such platforms, with a focus on how they may influence the direction of health professional learning and development. Significance for public healthThe landscape of healthcare systems, public health systems, health research systems and professional education systems is fragmented, with many gaps and silos. More sophistication in the management of health data, information, and knowledge, based on public health informatics expertise, is needed to tackle key issues of prevention, promotion and policy-making. Platform technologies represent an emerging large-scale, highly integrated informatics approach to public health, combining the technologies of Internet, the web, the cloud, social technologies, remote sensing and/or mobile apps into an online infrastructure that can allow more synergies in work within and across these systems. Health professional curricula need updating so that the health workforce has a deep and critical understanding of the way that platform technologies are becoming the foundation of the health sector.

  8. Experiences in home-based growth monitoring.

    PubMed

    Suelan, F; Briones, H

    1992-01-01

    A growth monitoring project (GMP) of child weighing was implemented by the Philippines' Department of Health (DOH) through the Integrated Provincial Health Office to monitor either children's nutritional progress or their faltering of growth. Weaknesses, however, were found in the GMP. For example, only 31% of preschoolers included in the Nutrition Center of the Philippines (NCP) survey had growth charts. An 1990 UNICEF-DOH survey also found that the growth chart was used primarily by mothers and service providers to record infant immunization. Mothers brought their children to well-baby clinics in barangay health centers only when their children were sick. Conducted only once per year, weighing was not perceived as a tool in detecting and preventing sickness, and ensuring normal growth. Asked to help improve the GMP, the NCP consulted intended beneficiaries and cooperators to develop a plan to pilot an intensive monitoring project in four towns of Negros Occidental, starting in January 1991 and ending in December 1992. The resultant Home-Based Growth Monitoring (HBGM) project would place emphasis upon enabling rural mothers to become self-sustaining agents for child growth monitoring. A key feature was the establishment of a weighing post in a strategic place for every 2-3 family clusters. The HBGM project was piloted in 1991 in Calatrava, Toboso, Cauayan, and Sipalay. This paper describes project implementation, problems and solutions, and results.

  9. Evaluation of a university-community partnership to provide home-based, mental health services for children from families living in poverty.

    PubMed

    Fox, Robert A; Mattek, Ryan J; Gresl, Brittany L

    2013-10-01

    A university-community partnership is described that resulted in the development of community-based mental health services for young children from families living in poverty. The purpose of this pilot project was to implement an evidence-based treatment program in the homes of an at-risk population of children with significant emotional and behavior problems that were further complicated by developmental delays. Outcomes for 237 children who participated in the clinic's treatment program over a 2 year period are presented. Comparisons are included between treatment completers and non-completers and the issues of subject attrition, potential subject selection bias, and the generalizability of the results are addressed. The need for more professionals who are trained to address mental health issues in very young children who live in very challenging conditions are discussed.

  10. PRISM: A DATA-DRIVEN PLATFORM FOR MONITORING MENTAL HEALTH.

    PubMed

    Kamdar, Maulik R; Wu, Michelle J

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders are the leading cause of disability worldwide and there is no gold standard currently available for the measurement of mental health. This issue is exacerbated by the fact that the information physicians use to diagnose these disorders is episodic and often subjective. Current methods to monitor mental health involve the use of subjective DSM-5 guidelines, and advances in EEG and video monitoring technologies have not been widely adopted due to invasiveness and inconvenience. Wearable technologies have surfaced as a ubiquitous and unobtrusive method for providing continuous, quantitative data about a patient. Here, we introduce PRISM-Passive, Real-time Information for Sensing Mental Health. This platform integrates motion, light and heart rate data from a smart watch application with user interactions and text entries from a web application. We have demonstrated a proof of concept by collecting preliminary data through a pilot study of 13 subjects. We have engineered appropriate features and applied both unsupervised and supervised learning to develop models that are predictive of user-reported ratings of their emotional state, demonstrating that the data has the potential to be useful for evaluating mental health. This platform could allow patients and clinicians to leverage continuous streams of passive data for early and accurate diagnosis as well as constant monitoring of patients suffering from mental disorders.

  11. Fiber optic sensors for structural health monitoring of air platforms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Honglei; Xiao, Gaozhi; Mrad, Nezih; Yao, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM) based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided.

  12. Fiber Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Air Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Honglei; Xiao, Gaozhi; Mrad, Nezih; Yao, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM) based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided. PMID:22163816

  13. System perspectives for mobile platform design in m-Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roveda, Janet M.; Fink, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    Advances in integrated circuit technologies have led to the integration of medical sensor front ends with data processing circuits, i.e., mobile platform design for wearable sensors. We discuss design methodologies for wearable sensor nodes and their applications in m-Health. From the user perspective, flexibility, comfort, appearance, fashion, ease-of-use, and visibility are key form factors. From the technology development point of view, high accuracy, low power consumption, and high signal to noise ratio are desirable features. From the embedded software design standpoint, real time data analysis algorithms, application and database interfaces are the critical components to create successful wearable sensor-based products.

  14. Health-e-Child: a grid platform for european paediatrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaburskas, K.; Estrella, F.; Shade, J.; Manset, D.; Revillard, J.; Rios, A.; Anjum, A.; Branson, A.; Bloodsworth, P.; Hauer, T.; McClatchey, R.; Rogulin, D.

    2008-07-01

    The Health-e-Child (HeC) project [1], [2] is an EC Framework Programme 6 Integrated Project that aims to develop a grid-based integrated healthcare platform for paediatrics. Using this platform biomedical informaticians will integrate heterogeneous data and perform epidemiological studies across Europe. The resulting Grid enabled biomedical information platform will be supported by robust search, optimization and matching techniques for information collected in hospitals across Europe. In particular, paediatricians will be provided with decision support, knowledge discovery and disease modelling applications that will access data in hospitals in the UK, Italy and France, integrated via the Grid. For economy of scale, reusability, extensibility, and maintainability, HeC is being developed on top of an EGEE/gLite [3] based infrastructure that provides all the common data and computation management services required by the applications. This paper discusses some of the major challenges in bio-medical data integration and indicates how these will be resolved in the HeC system. HeC is presented as an example of how computer science (and, in particular Grid infrastructures) originating from high energy physics can be adapted for use by biomedical informaticians to deliver tangible real-world benefits.

  15. An international randomized study of a home-based self-management program for severe COPD: the COMET

    PubMed Central

    Bourbeau, Jean; Casan, Pere; Tognella, Silvia; Haidl, Peter; Texereau, Joëlle B; Kessler, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Most hospitalizations and costs related to COPD are due to exacerbations and insufficient disease management. The COPD patient Management European Trial (COMET) is investigating a home-based multicomponent COPD self-management program designed to reduce exacerbations and hospital admissions. Design Multicenter parallel randomized controlled, open-label superiority trial. Setting Thirty-three hospitals in four European countries. Participants A total of 345 patients with Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease III/IV COPD. Intervention The program includes extensive patient coaching by health care professionals to improve self-management (eg, develop skills to better manage their disease), an e-health platform for reporting frequent health status updates, rapid intervention when necessary, and oxygen therapy monitoring. Comparator is the usual management as per the center’s routine practice. Main outcome measures Yearly number of hospital days for acute care, exacerbation number, quality of life, deaths, and costs. PMID:27418817

  16. Home based management in multiple sclerosis: results of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Pozzilli, C; Brunetti, M; Amicosante, A; Gasperini, C; Ristori, G; Palmisano, L; Battaglia, M

    2002-01-01

    Background: Home based medical care is a popular alternative to standard hospital care but there is uncertainty about its cost-effectiveness. Objectives: To compare the effectiveness and the costs of multidisciplinary home based care in multiple sclerosis with hospital care in a prospective randomised controlled trial with a one year follow up. Methods: 201 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis were studied. They were randomised in a ratio 2:1 to an intervention group (133) or a control group (68). They were assessed at baseline and one year after randomisation with validated measures of physical and psychological impairment and quality of life (SF-36 health survey). The costs to the National Health Service over the one year follow up were calculated by a cost minimisation analysis. Results: There were no differences in functional status between the home based care group and the hospital group. There was a significant difference between the two groups favouring home based management in four SF-36 health dimensions—general health, bodily pain, role-emotional, and social functioning (all p ≤ 0.001). The cost of home based care was slightly less (822 euros/patient/year) than hospital care, mainly as a result of a reduction in hospital admissions. Conclusions: Comprehensive planning of home based intervention implemented by an interdisciplinary team and designed specifically for people with multiple sclerosis may provide a cost-effective approach to management and improve the quality of life. PMID:12185154

  17. Promoting Oral Health Using Social Media Platforms: Seeking Arabic Online Oral Health Related Information (OHRI).

    PubMed

    Almaiman, Sarah; Bahkali, Salwa; Alabdulatif, Norah; Bahkaly, Ahlam; Al-Surimi, Khaled; Househ, Mowafa

    2016-01-01

    Access to oral health care services around the world is limited by a lack of universal coverage. The internet and social media can be an important source for patients to access supplementary oral health related information (OHRI). Online OHRI presents an opportunity to enhance dental public health education about innumerable oral health issues and promote dental self-care. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of social media users among the Saudi population and identify the preferred social media platform for seeking Arabic OHRI and its impact on seekers' knowledge, attitude, and behavior. A total of 2652 Twitter followers were surveyed, using a web-based self-administered questionnaire to collect data on demographic characteristics and online OHRI seeking behavior More than two thirds, 67.7% (n= 1796), of the participants reported they were seeking Arabic online OHRI, while 41.1% of the participants reported they had no preference for using a specific social media platform. These results emphasize the need and importance of supporting the content of social media with trusted and high quality online OHRI resources to promote a high level of public awareness about oral health and dental health services. Further studies in this regard are highly recommended on a larger scale of nationalities to explore the role of social media platform preference in promoting health promotion and dental public health awareness.

  18. Open innovation in health care: analysis of an open health platform.

    PubMed

    Bullinger, Angelika C; Rass, Matthias; Adamczyk, Sabrina; Moeslein, Kathrin M; Sohn, Stefan

    2012-05-01

    Today, integration of the public in research and development in health care is seen as essential for the advancement of innovation. This is a paradigmatic shift away from the traditional assumption that solely health care professionals are able to devise, develop, and disseminate novel concepts and solutions in health care. The present study builds on research in the field of open innovation to investigate the adoption of an open health platform by patients, care givers, physicians, family members, and the interested public. Results suggest that open innovation practices in health care lead to interesting innovation outcomes and are well accepted by participants. During the first three months, 803 participants of the open health platform submitted challenges and solutions and intensively communicated by exchanging 1454 personal messages and 366 comments. Analysis of communication content shows that empathic support and exchange of information are important elements of communication on the platform. The study presents first evidence for the suitability of open innovation practices to integrate the general public in health care research in order to foster both innovation outcomes and empathic support.

  19. OpenHealth Platform for Interactive Contextualization of Population Health Open Data

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Jonas S; Hajagos, Janos; Crnosija, Ivan; Kurc, Tahsin; Saltz, Mary; Saltz, Joel

    2015-01-01

    The financial incentives for data science applications leading to improved health outcomes, such as DSRIP (bit.ly/dsrip), are well-aligned with the broad adoption of Open Data by State and Federal agencies. This creates entirely novel opportunities for analytical applications that make exclusive use of the pervasive Web Computing platform. The framework described here explores this new avenue to contextualize Health data in a manner that relies exclusively on the native JavaScript interpreter and data processing resources of the ubiquitous Web Browser. The OpenHealth platform is made publicly available, and is publicly hosted with version control and open source, at https://github.com/mathbiol/openHealth. The different data/analytics workflow architectures explored are accompanied with live applications ranging from DSRIP, such as Hospital Inpatient Prevention Quality Indicators at http://bit.ly/pqiSuffolk, to The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) as illustrated by http://bit.ly/tcgascopeGBM. PMID:26958160

  20. Home-based versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Rod S; Dalal, Hayes; Jolly, Kate; Moxham, Tiffany; Zawada, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background The burden of cardiovascular disease world-wide is one of great concern to patients and health care agencies alike. Traditionally centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes are offered to individuals after cardiac events to aid recovery and prevent further cardiac illness. Home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes have been introduced in an attempt to widen access and participation. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes compared with supervised centre-based cardiac rehabilitation on mortality and morbidity, health-related quality of life and modifiable cardiac risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease. Search methods We updated the search of a previous review by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (2007, Issue 4), MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL from 2001 to January 2008. We checked reference lists and sought advice from experts. No language restrictions were applied. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (e.g. hospital, gymnasium, sports centre) with home-based programmes, in adults with myocardial infarction, angina, heart failure or who had undergone revascularisation. Data collection and analysis Studies were selected independently by two reviewers, and data extracted by a single reviewer and checked by a second one. Authors were contacted where possible to obtain missing information. Main results Twelve studies (1,938 participants) met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies recruited a lower risk patient following an acute myocardial infarction (MI) and revascularisation. There was no difference in outcomes of home- versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation in mortality risk ratio (RR) was 1.31 (95% confidence interval (C) 0.65 to 2.66), cardiac events, exercise capacity standardised mean difference (SMD) −0.11 (95% CI −0.35 to 0.13), as well

  1. Platform-dependent optimization considerations for mHealth applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaghyan, Sahak; Akopian, David; Sarukhanyan, Hakob

    2015-03-01

    Modern mobile devices contain integrated sensors that enable multitude of applications in such fields as mobile health (mHealth), entertainment, sports, etc. Human physical activity monitoring is one of such the emerging applications. There exists a range of challenges that relate to activity monitoring tasks, and, particularly, exploiting optimal solutions and architectures for respective mobile software application development. This work addresses mobile computations related to integrated inertial sensors for activity monitoring, such as accelerometers, gyroscopes, integrated global positioning system (GPS) and WLAN-based positioning, that can be used for activity monitoring. Some of the aspects will be discussed in this paper. Each of the sensing data sources has its own characteristics such as specific data formats, data rates, signal acquisition durations etc., and these specifications affect energy consumption. Energy consumption significantly varies as sensor data acquisition is followed by data analysis including various transformations and signal processing algorithms. This paper will address several aspects of more optimal activity monitoring implementations exploiting state-of-the-art capabilities of modern platforms.

  2. Economic Evidence for US Asthma Self-Management Education and Home-Based Interventions.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Joy; Wilhelm, Natalie; Lewis, Lillianne; Herman, Elizabeth

    The health and economic burden of asthma in the United States is substantial. Asthma self-management education (AS-ME) and home-based interventions for asthma can improve asthma control and prevent asthma exacerbations, and interest in health care-public health collaboration regarding asthma is increasing. However, outpatient AS-ME and home-based asthma intervention programs are not widely available; economic sustainability is a common concern. Thus, we conducted a narrative review of existing literature regarding economic outcomes of outpatient AS-ME and home-based intervention programs for asthma in the United States. We identified 9 outpatient AS-ME programs and 17 home-based intervention programs with return on investment (ROI) data. Most programs were associated with a positive ROI; a few programs observed positive ROIs only among selected populations (eg, higher health care utilization). Interpretation of existing data is limited by heterogeneous ROI calculations. Nevertheless, the literature suggests promise for sustainable opportunities to expand access to outpatient AS-ME and home-based asthma intervention programs in the United States. More definitive knowledge about how to maximize program benefit and sustainability could be gained through more controlled studies of specific populations and increased uniformity in economic assessments.

  3. Information needs in home based healthcare in South Africa.

    PubMed

    de la Harpe, Retha; Barnes, Jay; Korpela, Mikko

    2010-01-01

    Home based health care (HBHC) is advocated by the WHO "to ensure better accessibility to effective and efficient health care in community and home-settings to improve health and well-being, and contribute to morbidity and mortality reduction". In South Africa the government and many other role players see an increasingly important role for HBHC. Many researchers believe that the evolution of HBHC will follow the socio-technical network evolution. There can be no doubt that the focus is on using information and communication technologies (ICT) to implement HBHC solutions. The objective of this paper is to provide a rich picture of the current situation and needs for improvement in HBHC in South Africa today through descriptive research in one specific case. The longer-term purpose is to identify pain-points that require socio-technical solutions, including but not exclusively ICT-supported solutions.

  4. Query Health: standards-based, cross-platform population health surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Klann, Jeffrey G; Buck, Michael D; Brown, Jeffrey; Hadley, Marc; Elmore, Richard; Weber, Griffin M; Murphy, Shawn N

    2014-01-01

    Objective Understanding population-level health trends is essential to effectively monitor and improve public health. The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) Query Health initiative is a collaboration to develop a national architecture for distributed, population-level health queries across diverse clinical systems with disparate data models. Here we review Query Health activities, including a standards-based methodology, an open-source reference implementation, and three pilot projects. Materials and methods Query Health defined a standards-based approach for distributed population health queries, using an ontology based on the Quality Data Model and Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture, Health Quality Measures Format (HQMF) as the query language, the Query Envelope as the secure transport layer, and the Quality Reporting Document Architecture as the result language. Results We implemented this approach using Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) and hQuery for data analytics and PopMedNet for access control, secure query distribution, and response. We deployed the reference implementation at three pilot sites: two public health departments (New York City and Massachusetts) and one pilot designed to support Food and Drug Administration post-market safety surveillance activities. The pilots were successful, although improved cross-platform data normalization is needed. Discussions This initiative resulted in a standards-based methodology for population health queries, a reference implementation, and revision of the HQMF standard. It also informed future directions regarding interoperability and data access for ONC's Data Access Framework initiative. Conclusions Query Health was a test of the learning health system that supplied a functional methodology and reference implementation for distributed population health queries that has been validated at three sites. PMID:24699371

  5. An e-Health Platform for the Elderly Population: The Butler System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etchemendy, E.; Banos, R. M.; Botella, C.; Castilla, D.; Alcaniz, M.; Rasal, P.; Farfallini, L.

    2011-01-01

    The Butler system is an e-health platform designed to improve the elderly population's quality of life. The Butler system has three applications diagnostic, therapeutic and playful. The objective of this work is to present the influence of the use of the platform on elderly users' mood states and the degree of acceptance. These measures were…

  6. Between ideals and reality in home-based rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Steihaug, Sissel; Lippestad, Jan-W.; Werner, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Setting and objective The growing elderly population and the rising number of people with chronic diseases indicate an increasing need for rehabilitation. Norwegian municipalities are required by law to offer rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to investigate how rehabilitation work is perceived and carried out by first-line service providers compared with the guidelines issued by Norway’s health authorities. Design and subjects In this action research project, qualitative data were collected through 24 individual interviews and seven group interviews with employees – service providers and managers – in the home-based service of two boroughs in Oslo, Norway. The data were analysed using a systematic text-condensation method. Results The results show that rehabilitation receives little attention in the boroughs and that patients are seldom rehabilitated at home. There is disagreement among professional staff as to what rehabilitation is and should be. The purchaser–provider organization, high speed of service delivery, and scarcity of resources are reported to hamper rehabilitation work. Conclusion and implications A discrepancy exists between the high level of ambitious goals of Norwegian health authorities and the possibilities that practitioners have to achieve them. This situation results in healthcare staff being squeezed by the increasing expectations and demands of the population and the promises and statutory rights coming from politicians and administrators. For the employees in the municipalities to place rehabilitation on the agenda, it is a requirement that authorities understand the clinical aspect of rehabilitation and provide the municipalities with adequate framework conditions for successful rehabilitation work. Key pointsHome-based rehabilitation is documented to be effective, and access to rehabilitation has been established in Norwegian law.The purchaser–provider organization, high rate of speed, and a scarcity of resources in

  7. Social media as a platform for science and health engagement: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Social media has become a major platform for debates on science and health. This commentary argues that while social media can present challenges to communicating important health matters, it can also provide health experts a unique opportunity to engage with and build trust among members of the public.

  8. Evaluation of bluetooth low power for physiological monitoring in a home based cardiac rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Martin, Timothy; Ding, Hang; D'Souza, Matthew; Karunanithi, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in Australia, and places large burdens on the healthcare system. To assist patients with CVDs in recovering from cardiac events and mediating cardiac risk factors, a home based cardiac rehabilitation program, known as the Care Assessment Platform (CAP), was developed. In the CAP program, patients are required to manually enter health information into their mobile phones on a daily basis. The manual operation is often subject to human errors and is inconvenient for some elderly patients. To improve this, an automated wireless solution has been desired. The objectives of this paper are to investigate the feasibility of implementing the newly released Bluetooth 4.0 (BT4.0) for the CAP program, and practically evaluate BT4.0 communications between a developed mobile application and some emulated healthcare devices. The study demonstrated that BT4.0 addresses usability, interoperability and security for healthcare applications, reduces the power consumption in wireless communication, and improves the flexibility of interface for software development. This evaluation study provides an essential mobile BT4.0 framework to incorporate a large range of healthcare devices for clinical assessment and intervention in the CAP program, and hence it is useful for similar development and research work of other mobile healthcare solutions.

  9. Lessons learned from the usability assessment of home-based telemedicine systems.

    PubMed

    Agnisarman, Sruthy Orozhiyathumana; Chalil Madathil, Kapil; Smith, Kevin; Ashok, Aparna; Welch, Brandon; McElligott, James T

    2017-01-01

    At-home telemedicine visits are quickly becoming an acceptable alternative for in-person patient visits. However, little work has been done to understand the usability of these home-based telemedicine solutions. It is critical for user acceptance and real-world applicability to evaluate available telemedicine solutions within the context-specific needs of the users of this technology. To address this need, this study evaluated the usability of four home-based telemedicine software platforms: Doxy.me, Vidyo, VSee, and Polycom. Using a within-subjects experimental design, twenty participants were asked to complete a telemedicine session involving several tasks using the four platforms. Upon completion of these tasks for each platform, participants completed the IBM computer system usability questionnaire (CSUQ) and the NASA Task Load Index test. Upon completing the tasks on all four platforms, the participants completed a final post-test subjective questionnaire ranking the platforms based on their preference. Of the twenty participants, 19 completed the study. Statistically significant differences among the telemedicine software platforms were found for task completion time, total workload, mental demand, effort, frustration, preference ranking and computer system usability scores. Usability problems with installation and account creation led to high mental demand and task completion time, suggesting the participants preferred a system without such requirements. Majority of the usability issues were identified at the telemedicine initiation phase. The findings from this study can be used by software developers to develop user-friendly telemedicine systems.

  10. [Home-based telerehabilitation after stroke].

    PubMed

    Keidel, M; Vauth, F; Richter, J; Hoffmann, B; Soda, H; Griewing, B; Scibor, M

    2017-02-01

    The use of modern information and telecommunication technologies enables telerehabilitation of neurological deficits in the domestic environment. The current state of studies on rehabilitative teletherapy for improvement of motor function and mobility deficits due to stroke is reviewed. Two neurolinguistic proof of concept studies investigating the efficacy of online interactive telespeech therapy are reported, which compared virtual screen to screen interactive telerehabilitation of aphasia after stroke and dysarthrophonia in Parkinson's disease to conventional face to face rehabilitation. The results of the studies indicate that the neurological rehabilitation of motor and communicative deficits in the domestic environment of patients by means of teletherapy is just as efficient as conventional rehabilitation. Under home-based telerehabilitation patient transfer becomes unnecessary. Rehabilitative Teletherapy is a posthospital component of a cross-sector supply chain for patients with handicaps or impairments due to stroke and other neurological diseases.

  11. User Interaction Design for a Home-Based Telecare System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raptis, Spyros; Tsiakoulis, Pirros; Chalamandaris, Aimilios; Karabetsos, Sotiris

    This paper presents the design of the user-interaction component of a home-based telecare system for congestive heart failure patients. It provides a short overview of the overall system and offers details on the different interaction types supported by the system. Interacting with the user occurs either as part of a scheduled procedure or as a consequence of identifying or predicting a potentially hazardous deterioration of the patients' health state. The overall logic of the interaction is structured around event-scenario associations, where a scenario consists of concrete actions to be performed, some of which may involve the patient. A key objective in this type of interaction that it is very simple, intuitive and short, involving common everyday objects and familiar media such as speech.

  12. THE VALUE OF HOME-BASED COLLECTION OF BIOSPECIMENS IN REPRODUCTIVE EPIDEMIOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Value of Home-Based Collection of Biospecimens in Reproductive Epidemiology
    John C. Rockett1, Germaine M. Buck2, Courtney D. Johnson2 and Sally D. Perreault1
    1Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Rese...

  13. Perceptions of Personal Well-Being among Youth Accessing Residential or Intensive Home-Based Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preyde, Michele; Watkins, Hanna; Ashbourne, Graham; Lazure, Kelly; Carter, Jeff; Penney, Randy; White, Sara; Frensch, Karen; Cameron, Gary

    2013-01-01

    The outcomes of youth accessing residential treatment or intensive home-based treatment are varied. Understanding youth's perceptions of their well-being may inform service. The purpose of this report was to explore perceptions of youth's mental health, life satisfaction, and outlook for the future. Youth reported ongoing struggles with mental…

  14. Mobile health platform for pressure ulcer monitoring with electronic health record integration.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Joel J P C; Pedro, Luís M C C; Vardasca, Tomé; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Martins, Henrique M G

    2013-12-01

    Pressure ulcers frequently occur in patients with limited mobility, for example, people with advanced age and patients wearing casts or prostheses. Mobile information communication technologies can help implement ulcer care protocols and the monitoring of patients with high risk, thus preventing or improving these conditions. This article presents a mobile pressure ulcer monitoring platform (mULCER), which helps control a patient's ulcer status during all stages of treatment. Beside its stand-alone version, it can be integrated with electronic health record systems as mULCER synchronizes ulcer data with any electronic health record system using HL7 standards. It serves as a tool to integrate nursing care among hospital departments and institutions. mULCER was experimented with in different mobile devices such as LG Optimus One P500, Samsung Galaxy Tab, HTC Magic, Samsung Galaxy S, and Samsung Galaxy i5700, taking into account the user's experience of different screen sizes and processing characteristics.

  15. Home-Based Hospice Care Reduces End-of-Life Expenditure in Taiwan: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Fu; Chang, Chun-Ming; Huang, Chih-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Inpatient hospice care can reduce futile treatment and medical costs. However, the cost trimming effect of home-based hospice care in hospital has yet not been explored. This study evaluates the impact of home-based hospice care on end-of-life expenditure in hospitals with different spending intensity. This is a population-based retrospective study in Taiwan. Cancer decedents were identified in the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) from 2009 to 2011. They are categorized by hospital spending intensity. A hierarchical linear regression model with a random-intercept model was used to analyze the relationship between end-of-life expenditure (dependent variable) with and without home-based hospice, and both patient-level and hospital-level characteristics. A total of 78,613 cancer decedents were identified in the NHIRD from 2009 to 2011. Of these decedents, 17,638, 43,286, and 17,689 were categorized by hospital spending intensity as high, moderate, and low, respectively. Decedents with home-based hospice care were associated with US$2452 less in expenditure per patient compared with those without home-based hospice care. The majority of savings occurred in the last 3 months of life. These savings with home-based hospice care were consistent in hospitals with different levels of spending intensity. Home-based hospice reduced one-fifth expenditure at the end of life of cancer decedents treated in hospitals with different spending intensity.

  16. The Health Systems Funding Platform: Is this where we thought we were going?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In March 2009, the Task Force for Innovative International Financing for Health Systems recommended "a health systems funding platform for the Global Fund, GAVI Alliance, the World Bank and others to coordinate, mobilize, streamline and channel the flow of existing and new international resources to support national health strategies." Momentum to establish the Health Systems Funding Platform was swift, with the World Bank convening a Technical Workshop on Health Systems Strengthening (HSS), and serial meetings organized to progress the agenda. Despite its potential significance, there has been little comment in peer-reviewed literature, though some disquiet in the international development community around the scope of the Platform and the capacity of the partners, which appears disproportionate to the available information. Methods This case study uses documentary analysis, participant observation and 24 in-depth interviews to examine the processes of development and key issues raised by the Platform. Results The findings show a fluid and volatile process, with debate over whether ongoing engagement in HSS by Global Fund and GAVI represents a dilution of organizational focus, risking ongoing support, or a paradigm shift that facilitates the achievement of targeted objectives, builds systems capacity, and will attract additional resources. Uncertainty in the development of the Platform reflects the flexibility of the recently formed global health initiatives, and the instability of donor commitments, particularly in the current financial climate. But implicit in the conflict is tension between key global stakeholders over defining and ownership of the health systems agenda. Conclusions The tensions appear to have been resolved through a focus on national planning, applying International Health Partnership principles, though the global financial crisis and key personnel changes may yet alter outcomes. Despite its dynamic evolution, the Platform may offer

  17. Home-Based Resistance Training: Predictors of Participation and Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jette, Alan M.; Rooks, Dan; Lachman, Margie; Lin, Ting H.; Levenson, Claudia; Heislein, Diane; Giorgetti, Marie M.; Harris, B. A.

    1998-01-01

    Identifies factors associated with exercise participation and adherence in a sample of sedentary, functionally limited, community-dwelling adults ages 60 to 94 who participated in a home-based resistance training program (N=102). Results show that psychological factors were most important to adherence to the home-based program. (Author/MKA)

  18. Social network of PESCA (Open Source Platform for eHealth).

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Carlos L; Romero-Cuevas, Miguel; Lopez, Diego M; Lorca, Julio; Alcazar, Francisco J; Ruiz, Sergio; Mercado, Carmen; Garcia-Fortea, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) are revolutionizing how healthcare systems deliver top-quality care to citizens. In this way, Open Source Software (OSS) has demonstrated to be an important strategy to spread ICTs use. Several human and technological barriers in adopting OSS for healthcare have been identified. Human barriers include user acceptance, limited support, technical skillfulness, awareness, resistance to change, etc., while Technological barriers embrace need for open standards, heterogeneous OSS developed without normalization and metrics, lack of initiatives to evaluate existing health OSS and need for quality control and functional validation. The goals of PESCA project are to create a platform of interoperable modules to evaluate, classify and validate good practices in health OSS. Furthermore, a normalization platform will provide interoperable solutions in the fields of healthcare services, health surveillance, health literature, and health education, knowledge and research. Within the platform, the first goal to achieve is the setup of the collaborative work infrastructure. The platform is being organized as a Social Network which works to evaluate five scopes of every existing open source tools for eHealth: Open Source Software, Quality, Pedagogical, Security and privacy and Internationalization/I18N. In the meantime, the knowledge collected from the networking will configure a Good Practice Repository on eHealth promoting the effective use of ICT on behalf of the citizen's health.

  19. A Mobile Cloud-Based Parkinson’s Disease Assessment System for Home-Based Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Petitti, Diana B

    2015-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the most prevalent movement disorder of the central nervous system, and affects more than 6.3 million people in the world. The characteristic motor features include tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and impaired postural stability. Current therapy based on augmentation or replacement of dopamine is designed to improve patients’ motor performance but often leads to levodopa-induced adverse effects, such as dyskinesia and motor fluctuation. Clinicians must regularly monitor patients in order to identify these effects and other declines in motor function as soon as possible. Current clinical assessment for Parkinson’s is subjective and mostly conducted by brief observations made during patient visits. Changes in patients’ motor function between visits are hard to track and clinicians are not able to make the most informed decisions about the course of therapy without frequent visits. Frequent clinic visits increase the physical and economic burden on patients and their families. Objective In this project, we sought to design, develop, and evaluate a prototype mobile cloud-based mHealth app, “PD Dr”, which collects quantitative and objective information about PD and would enable home-based assessment and monitoring of major PD symptoms. Methods We designed and developed a mobile app on the Android platform to collect PD-related motion data using the smartphone 3D accelerometer and to send the data to a cloud service for storage, data processing, and PD symptoms severity estimation. To evaluate this system, data from the system were collected from 40 patients with PD and compared with experts’ rating on standardized rating scales. Results The evaluation showed that PD Dr could effectively capture important motion features that differentiate PD severity and identify critical symptoms. For hand resting tremor detection, the sensitivity was .77 and accuracy was .82. For gait difficulty detection, the sensitivity was .89

  20. Model, Framework, and Platform of Health Persuasive Social Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Ayubi, Soleh Udin

    2013-01-01

    Persuasive technology (PT) has the potential to support individuals to perform self-management and social support as a part of health behavior change. This has led a few researchers in the intersection of the areas of health behavior change and software engineering to apply behavior change and persuasion theories to software development practices,…

  1. A Platform to Build Mobile Health Apps: The Personal Health Intervention Toolkit (PHIT).

    PubMed

    Eckhoff, Randall Peter; Kizakevich, Paul Nicholas; Bakalov, Vesselina; Zhang, Yuying; Bryant, Stephanie Patrice; Hobbs, Maria Ann

    2015-06-01

    Personal Health Intervention Toolkit (PHIT) is an advanced cross-platform software framework targeted at personal self-help research on mobile devices. Following the subjective and objective measurement, assessment, and plan methodology for health assessment and intervention recommendations, the PHIT platform lets researchers quickly build mobile health research Android and iOS apps. They can (1) create complex data-collection instruments using a simple extensible markup language (XML) schema; (2) use Bluetooth wireless sensors; (3) create targeted self-help interventions based on collected data via XML-coded logic; (4) facilitate cross-study reuse from the library of existing instruments and interventions such as stress, anxiety, sleep quality, and substance abuse; and (5) monitor longitudinal intervention studies via daily upload to a Web-based dashboard portal. For physiological data, Bluetooth sensors collect real-time data with on-device processing. For example, using the BinarHeartSensor, the PHIT platform processes the heart rate data into heart rate variability measures, and plots these data as time-series waveforms. Subjective data instruments are user data-entry screens, comprising a series of forms with validation and processing logic. The PHIT instrument library consists of over 70 reusable instruments for various domains including cognitive, environmental, psychiatric, psychosocial, and substance abuse. Many are standardized instruments, such as the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test, Patient Health Questionnaire-8, and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist. Autonomous instruments such as battery and global positioning system location support continuous background data collection. All data are acquired using a schedule appropriate to the app's deployment. The PHIT intelligent virtual advisor (iVA) is an expert system logic layer, which analyzes the data in real time on the device. This data analysis results in a tailored app of interventions

  2. A Platform to Build Mobile Health Apps: The Personal Health Intervention Toolkit (PHIT)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Personal Health Intervention Toolkit (PHIT) is an advanced cross-platform software framework targeted at personal self-help research on mobile devices. Following the subjective and objective measurement, assessment, and plan methodology for health assessment and intervention recommendations, the PHIT platform lets researchers quickly build mobile health research Android and iOS apps. They can (1) create complex data-collection instruments using a simple extensible markup language (XML) schema; (2) use Bluetooth wireless sensors; (3) create targeted self-help interventions based on collected data via XML-coded logic; (4) facilitate cross-study reuse from the library of existing instruments and interventions such as stress, anxiety, sleep quality, and substance abuse; and (5) monitor longitudinal intervention studies via daily upload to a Web-based dashboard portal. For physiological data, Bluetooth sensors collect real-time data with on-device processing. For example, using the BinarHeartSensor, the PHIT platform processes the heart rate data into heart rate variability measures, and plots these data as time-series waveforms. Subjective data instruments are user data-entry screens, comprising a series of forms with validation and processing logic. The PHIT instrument library consists of over 70 reusable instruments for various domains including cognitive, environmental, psychiatric, psychosocial, and substance abuse. Many are standardized instruments, such as the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test, Patient Health Questionnaire-8, and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist. Autonomous instruments such as battery and global positioning system location support continuous background data collection. All data are acquired using a schedule appropriate to the app’s deployment. The PHIT intelligent virtual advisor (iVA) is an expert system logic layer, which analyzes the data in real time on the device. This data analysis results in a tailored app of interventions

  3. Older Adult Perceptions of Participation in Group- and Home-Based Falls Prevention Exercise.

    PubMed

    Robins, Lauren M; Hill, K D; Day, Lesley; Clemson, Lindy; Finch, Caroline; Haines, Terry

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes why older adults begin, continue, and discontinue group- and home-based falls prevention exercise and benefits and barriers to participation. Telephone surveys were used to collect data for 394 respondents. Most respondents reported not participating in group- (66%) or home-based (78%) falls prevention exercise recently. Reasons for starting group-based falls prevention exercise include health benefits (23-39%), health professional recommendation (13-19%), and social interaction (4-16%). They discontinued because the program finished (44%) or due to poor health (20%). Commonly reported benefits were social interaction (41-67%) and health (15-31%). Disliking groups was the main barrier (2-14%). Home-based falls prevention exercise was started for rehabilitation (46-63%) or upon health professional recommendation (22-48%) and stopped due to recovery (30%). Improvement in health (18-46%) was the main benefit. These findings could assist health professionals in prescribing group-based falls prevention exercise by considering characteristics of older adults who perceive social interaction to be beneficial.

  4. Platform links clinical data with electronic health records

    Cancer.gov

    To make data gathered from patients in clinical trials available for use in standard care, NCI has created a new computer tool to support interoperability between clinical research and electronic health record systems. This new software represents an inno

  5. 77 FR 33740 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for “Health Data Platform Simple Sign-On Challenge”

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-07

    ... Challenge'' AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION... Technology. SUMMARY: As part of the HHS Open Government Plan, the HealthData.gov Platform (HDP) is a flagship... productivity of developers. The ``Health Data Platform Simple Sign-On Challenge'' will improve...

  6. A platform for real-time online health analytics during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGregor, Carolyn

    Monitoring the health and wellbeing of astronauts during spaceflight is an important aspect of any manned mission. To date the monitoring has been based on a sequential set of discontinuous samplings of physiological data to support initial studies on aspects such as weightlessness, and its impact on the cardiovascular system and to perform proactive monitoring for health status. The research performed and the real-time monitoring has been hampered by the lack of a platform to enable a more continuous approach to real-time monitoring. While any spaceflight is monitored heavily by Mission Control, an important requirement within the context of any spaceflight setting and in particular where there are extended periods with a lack of communication with Mission Control, is the ability for the mission to operate in an autonomous manner. This paper presents a platform to enable real-time astronaut monitoring for prognostics and health management within space medicine using online health analytics. The platform is based on extending previous online health analytics research known as the Artemis and Artemis Cloud platforms which have demonstrated their relevance for multi-patient, multi-diagnosis and multi-stream temporal analysis in real-time for clinical management and research within Neonatal Intensive Care. Artemis and Artemis Cloud source data from a range of medical devices capable of transmission of the signal via wired or wireless connectivity and hence are well suited to process real-time data acquired from astronauts. A key benefit of this platform is its ability to monitor their health and wellbeing onboard the mission as well as enabling the astronaut's physiological data, and other clinical data, to be sent to the platform components at Mission Control at each stage when that communication is available. As a result, researchers at Mission Control would be able to simulate, deploy and tailor predictive analytics and diagnostics during the same spaceflight for

  7. Building a knowledge translation platform in Malawi to support evidence-informed health policy.

    PubMed

    Berman, Joshua; Mitambo, Collins; Matanje-Mwagomba, Beatrice; Khan, Shiraz; Kachimanga, Chiyembekezo; Wroe, Emily; Mwape, Lonia; van Oosterhout, Joep J; Chindebvu, Getrude; van Schoor, Vanessa; Puchalski Ritchie, Lisa M; Panisset, Ulysses; Kathyola, Damson

    2015-12-08

    With the support of the World Health Organization's Evidence-Informed Policy Network, knowledge translation platforms have been developed throughout Africa, the Americas, Eastern Europe, and Asia to further evidence-informed national health policy. In this commentary, we discuss the approaches, activities and early lessons learned from the development of a Knowledge Translation Platform in Malawi (KTPMalawi). Through ongoing leadership, as well as financial and administrative support, the Malawi Ministry of Health has strongly signalled its intention to utilize a knowledge translation platform methodology to support evidence-informed national health policy. A unique partnership between Dignitas International, a medical and research non-governmental organization, and the Malawi Ministry of Health, has established KTPMalawi to engage national-level policymakers, researchers and implementers in a coordinated approach to the generation and utilization of health-sector research. Utilizing a methodology developed and tested by knowledge translation platforms across Africa, a stakeholder mapping exercise and initial capacity building workshops were undertaken and a multidisciplinary Steering Committee was formed. This Steering Committee prioritized the development of two initial Communities of Practice to (1) improve data utilization in the pharmaceutical supply chain and (2) improve the screening and treatment of hypertension within HIV-infected populations. Each Community of Practice's mandate is to gather and synthesize the best available global and local evidence and produce evidence briefs for policy that have been used as the primary input into structured deliberative dialogues. While a lack of sustained initial funding slowed its early development, KTPMalawi has greatly benefited from extensive technical support and mentorship by an existing network of global knowledge translation platforms. With the continued support of the Malawi Ministry of Health and the

  8. On Curating Multimodal Sensory Data for Health and Wellness Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Muhammad Bilal; Banos, Oresti; Khan, Wajahat Ali; Muhammad Bilal, Hafiz Syed; Gong, Jinhyuk; Bui, Dinh-Mao; Cho, Soung Ho; Hussain, Shujaat; Ali, Taqdir; Akhtar, Usman; Chung, Tae Choong; Lee, Sungyoung

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the focus of healthcare and wellness technologies has shown a significant shift towards personal vital signs devices. The technology has evolved from smartphone-based wellness applications to fitness bands and smartwatches. The novelty of these devices is the accumulation of activity data as their users go about their daily life routine. However, these implementations are device specific and lack the ability to incorporate multimodal data sources. Data accumulated in their usage does not offer rich contextual information that is adequate for providing a holistic view of a user’s lifelog. As a result, making decisions and generating recommendations based on this data are single dimensional. In this paper, we present our Data Curation Framework (DCF) which is device independent and accumulates a user’s sensory data from multimodal data sources in real time. DCF curates the context of this accumulated data over the user’s lifelog. DCF provides rule-based anomaly detection over this context-rich lifelog in real time. To provide computation and persistence over the large volume of sensory data, DCF utilizes the distributed and ubiquitous environment of the cloud platform. DCF has been evaluated for its performance, correctness, ability to detect complex anomalies, and management support for a large volume of sensory data. PMID:27355955

  9. Health care and social media platforms in hospitals.

    PubMed

    McCarroll, Michele L; Armbruster, Shannon D; Chung, Jae Eun; Kim, Junghyun; McKenzie, Alissa; von Gruenigen, Vivian E

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to illustrate user characteristics of a hospital's social media structure using analytics and user surveys. A 1-year retrospective analysis was conducted along with an Internet survey of users of the hospital's Facebook, Twitter, and blog. Of the survey respondents (n = 163), 95.7% are female and 4.3% are male; most are ages 50-59 years (31.5%) and 40-49 years (27.8%); and 93.2% are Caucasian. However, the hospital system database revealed 55% female and 37% minority population, respectively. Of the survey respondents, 61.4% reported having a bachelor's degree or higher, whereas only 11.7% reported having a high school degree/equivalent or lower. However, within the hospital patient databases, 93% of patients have a high school degree/equivalent or lower and only 3% have a bachelor's degree or higher in our women's services population. Social media were used to seek personal health information 68.7% (n = 112), to learn about hospital programming 27.6% (n = 45), and to seek family health information 25.2% (n = 41). Respondents younger than 49 years of age were more likely to seek personal health information using social media compared to those 50 years of age and older (p = .02). Respondents with a bachelor's degree or higher education were statistically less likely to search for physician information compared to those less educated individuals (p = .04). We conclude that social media may play an important role in personal health information, especially for young female respondents; however, the survey provides strong evidence that further research is needed to ensure that social network sites provided by hospitals are reaching the full spectrum of health system patients.

  10. PARAMO: A Parallel Predictive Modeling Platform for Healthcare Analytic Research using Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kenney; Ghoting, Amol; Steinhubl, Steven R.; Stewart, Walter F.; Malin, Bradley; Sun, Jimeng

    2014-01-01

    Objective Healthcare analytics research increasingly involves the construction of predictive models for disease targets across varying patient cohorts using electronic health records (EHRs). To facilitate this process, it is critical to support a pipeline of tasks: 1) cohort construction, 2) feature construction, 3) cross-validation, 4) feature selection, and 5) classification. To develop an appropriate model, it is necessary to compare and refine models derived from a diversity of cohorts, patient-specific features, and statistical frameworks. The goal of this work is to develop and evaluate a predictive modeling platform that can be used to simplify and expedite this process for health data. Methods To support this goal, we developed a PARAllel predictive MOdeling (PARAMO) platform which 1) constructs a dependency graph of tasks from specifications of predictive modeling pipelines, 2) schedules the tasks in a topological ordering of the graph, and 3) executes those tasks in parallel. We implemented this platform using Map-Reduce to enable independent tasks to run in parallel in a cluster computing environment. Different task scheduling preferences are also supported. Results We assess the performance of PARAMO on various workloads using three datasets derived from the EHR systems in place at Geisinger Health System and Vanderbilt University Medical Center and an anonymous longitudinal claims database. We demonstrate significant gains in computational efficiency against a standard approach. In particular, PARAMO can build 800 different models on a 300,000 patient data set in 3 hours in parallel compared to 9 days if running sequentially. Conclusion This work demonstrates that an efficient parallel predictive modeling platform can be developed for EHR data. This platform can facilitate large-scale modeling endeavors and speed-up the research workflow and reuse of health information. This platform is only a first step and provides the foundation for our ultimate

  11. The use of regional platforms for managing electronic health records for the production of regional public health indicators in France

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In France, recent developments in healthcare system organization have aimed at strengthening decision-making and action in public health at the regional level. Firstly, the 2004 Public Health Act, by setting 100 national and regional public health targets, introduced an evaluative approach to public health programs at the national and regional levels. Meanwhile, the implementation of regional platforms for managing electronic health records (EHRs) has also been under assessment to coordinate the deployment of this important instrument of care within each geographic area. In this context, the development and implementation of a regional approach to epidemiological data extracted from EHRs are an opportunity that must be seized as soon as possible. Our article addresses certain design and organizational aspects so that the technical requirements for such use are integrated into regional platforms in France. The article will base itself on organization of the Rhône-Alpes regional health platform. Discussion Different tools being deployed in France allow us to consider the potential of these regional platforms for epidemiology and public health (implementation of a national health identification number and a national information system interoperability framework). The deployment of the Rhône-Alpes regional health platform began in the 2000s in France. By August 2011, 2.6 million patients were identified in this platform. A new development step is emerging because regional decision-makers need to measure healthcare efficiency. To pool heterogeneous information contained in various independent databases, the format, norm and content of the metadata have been defined. Two types of databases will be created according to the nature of the data processed, one for extracting structured data, and the second for extracting non-structured and de-identified free-text documents. Summary Regional platforms for managing EHRs could constitute an important data source for

  12. A Home-Based Palliative Care Consult Service for Veterans.

    PubMed

    Golden, Adam G; Antoni, Charles; Gammonley, Denise

    2016-11-01

    We describe the development and implementation of a home-based palliative care consult service for Veterans with advanced illness. A retrospective chart review was performed on 73 Veterans who received a home-based palliative care consult. Nearly one-third were 80 years of age or older, and nearly one-third had a palliative diagnosis of cancer. The most common interventions of the consult team included discussion of advance directives, completion of a "do not resuscitate" form, reduction/stoppage of at least 1 medication, explanation of diagnosis, referral to home-based primary care program, referral to hospice, and assessment/support for caregiver stress. The home-based consult service was therefore able to address clinical and psychosocial issues that can demonstrate a direct benefit to Veterans, families, and referring clinicians.

  13. Rationing home-based nursing care: professional ethical implications.

    PubMed

    Tønnessen, Siri; Nortvedt, Per; Førde, Reidun

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate nurses' decisions about priorities in home-based nursing care. Qualitative research interviews were conducted with 17 nurses in home-based care. The interviews were analyzed and interpreted according to a hermeneutic methodology. Nurses describe clinical priorities in home-based care as rationing care to mind the gap between an extensive workload and staff shortages. By organizing home-based care according to tight time schedules, the nurses' are able to provide care for as many patients as possible. Furthermore, legal norms set boundaries for clinical priority decisions, resulting in marginalized care. Hence, rationing care jeopardizes important values in the nurse-patient relationship, in particular the value of individualized and inclusive nursing care. The findings are highly relevant for clinical practice, since they have major implications for provision of nursing care. They revive debates about the protection of values and standards of care, and nurses' role and responsibility when resources are limited.

  14. Home Based Early Intervention: Dimensions of Current Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Robert

    1986-01-01

    Questions whether home-based early intervention is an invasion of the family that inadvertently undermines its self-confidence or is a life-saving service to families whose children are at risk of abuse and neglect. (HOD)

  15. Prospective study on cost-effectiveness of home-based motor assessment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Cubo, E; Mariscal, N; Solano, B; Becerra, V; Armesto, D; Calvo, S; Arribas, J; Seco, J; Martinez, A; Zorrilla, L; Heldman, D

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Treatment adjustments in Parkinson's disease (PD) are in part dependent on motor assessments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of home-based motor monitoring plus standard in-office visits versus in-office visits alone in patients with advanced PD. Methods The procedures consisted of a prospective, one-year follow-up, randomized, case-control study. A total of 40 patients with advanced PD were randomized into two groups: 20 patients underwent home-based motor monitoring by using wireless motion sensor technology, while the other 20 patients had in-office visits. Motor and non-motor symptom severities, quality of life, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and comorbidities were assessed every four months. Direct costs were assessed using a standardized questionnaire. Cost-effectiveness was assessed using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Results Both groups of PD patients were largely comparable in their clinical and demographic variables at baseline; however, there were more participants using levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel in the home-based motor monitoring group. There was a trend for lower Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale functional status (UPDRS II) scores in the patients monitored at home compared to the standard clinical follow-up ( p = 0.06). However, UPDRS parts I, III, IV and quality-adjusted life-years scores were similar between both groups. Home-based motor monitoring was cost-effective in terms of improvement of functional status, motor severity, and motor complications (UPDRS II, III; IV subscales), with an ICER/UPDRS ranging from €126.72 to €701.31, respectively. Discussion Home-based motor monitoring is a tool which collects cost-effective clinical information and helps augment health care for patients with advanced PD.

  16. A tool for home-based rehabilitation allowing for clinical evaluation in a visual markerless scenario.

    PubMed

    Capecci, M; Ceravolo, M G; D'Orazio, F; Ferracuti, F; Iarlori, S; Lazzaro, G; Longhi, S; Romeo, L; Verdini, F

    2015-08-01

    This work deals with the design of an interactive monitoring tool for home-based physical rehabilitation. The software platform includes a video processing stage and the exercise performance evaluation. Image features are extracted by a Kinect v2 sensor and elaborated to return the exercises score. Furthermore the tool provides to physiotherapists a quantitative exercise evaluation of subject's performances. The proposed tool for home rehabilitation has been tested on 5 subjects and 5 different exercises and results are presented. In particular both exercises and relative evaluation indexes were selected by specialists in neurorehabilitation.

  17. Using a digital marketing platform for the promotion of an internet based health encyclopedia in saudi arabia.

    PubMed

    Al Ateeq, Asma; Al Moamary, Eman; Daghestani, Tahani; Al Muallem, Yahya; Al Dogether, Majed; Alsughayr, Abdulrahman; Altuwaijri, Majid; Househ, Mowafa

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the experiences of using a digital marketing platform to promote the use of an internet based health encyclopedia in Saudi Arabia. Key informant interviews, meeting documentation, and Google Analytics were the data collection sources used in the study. Findings show that using a digital marketing platform led to a significant increase in the number of visitors to the health encyclopedia. The results demonstrate that digital marketing platforms are effective tools to be used for promoting internet based health education interventions. Future work will examine long-term educational impacts and costs in using digital marketing platforms to promote online healthcare sites in Saudi Arabia.

  18. HOME-BASED BLOOD PRESSURE INTERVENTIONS FOR AFRICAN AMERICANS

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Penny H.; McDonald, Margaret V.; Mongoven, Jennifer M.; Peng, Timothy R.; Gerber, Linda M.; Pezzin, Liliana E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Efforts to increase blood pressure (BP) control rates in African Americans, a traditionally underserved, high risk population must address both provider practice and patient adherence issues. The Home-Based BP Intervention for African Americans study is a three-arm randomized controlled trial designed to test two strategies to improve HTN management and outcomes in a decentralized service setting serving a vulnerable and complex home care population. The primary study outcomes are systolic BP, diastolic BP, and BP control; secondary outcomes are nurse adherence to HTN management recommendations, and patient adherence to medication, healthy diet and other self-management strategies. Methods and Results Nurses (N=312) in a nonprofit Medicare-certified home health agency are randomized along with their eligible hypertensive patients (N=845). The two interventions being tested are: (i) a “basic” intervention delivering key evidence-based reminders to home care nurses and patients while the patient is receiving traditional post-acute home health care; and (ii) an “augmented” intervention that includes that same as the basic intervention, plus transition to an ongoing HTN Home Support Program that extends support for 12 months. Outcomes are measured at 3 and 12 months post baseline interview. The interventions will be assessed relative to usual care and to each other. Conclusions Systems change to improve BP management and outcomes in home health will not easily occur without new intervention models and rigorous evaluation of their impact. Results from this trial will provide important information on potential strategies to improve BP control in a low income, chronically ill patient population. PMID:20031844

  19. The Architecture of an Automatic eHealth Platform With Mobile Client for Cerebrovascular Disease Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingce; Bie, Rongfang; Wu, Zhongke; Zhou, Mingquan; Cao, Rongfei; Xie, Lizhi; Zhang, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, cerebrovascular disease has been the leading cause of death and adult disability in the world. This study describes an efficient approach to detect cerebrovascular disease. Objective In order to improve cerebrovascular treatment, prevention, and care, an automatic cerebrovascular disease detection eHealth platform is designed and studied. Methods We designed an automatic eHealth platform for cerebrovascular disease detection with a four-level architecture: object control layer, data transmission layer, service supporting layer, and application service layer. The platform has eight main functions: cerebrovascular database management, preprocessing of cerebral image data, image viewing and adjustment model, image cropping compression and measurement, cerebrovascular segmentation, 3-dimensional cerebrovascular reconstruction, cerebrovascular rendering, cerebrovascular virtual endoscope, and automatic detection. Several key technologies were employed for the implementation of the platform. The anisotropic diffusion model was used to reduce the noise. Statistics segmentation with Gaussian-Markov random field model (G-MRF) and Stochastic Estimation Maximization (SEM) parameter estimation method were used to realize the cerebrovascular segmentation. Ball B-Spline curve was proposed to model the cerebral blood vessels. Compute unified device architecture (CUDA) based on ray-casting volume rendering presented by curvature enhancement and boundary enhancement were used to realize the volume rendering model. We implemented the platform with a network client and mobile phone client to fit different users. Results The implemented platform is running on a common personal computer. Experiments on 32 patients’ brain computed tomography data or brain magnetic resonance imaging data stored in the system verified the feasibility and validity of each model we proposed. The platform is partly used in the cranial nerve surgery of the First Hospital

  20. Home-based telemental healthcare safety planning: what you need to know.

    PubMed

    Luxton, David D; O'Brien, Karen; McCann, Russell A; Mishkind, Matthew C

    2012-10-01

    Telemental health (TMH) care provided directly to the home is an emerging area of care delivery. TMH care involves awareness of safety issues and adequate safety planning, although detailed practical recommendations for home-based TMH safety planning are absent in the literature. With this article we aim to increase awareness of safety issues associated with home-based synchronous TMH treatment and to discuss recommendations for consistent safety planning that can inform the development of standard operating procedures, emergency protocols, and overall good TMH practice. Specific areas discussed include consideration of state and local requirements, appropriateness of TMH care, technology and infrastructure, and emergency management and monitoring procedures. The topic of safety, as it relates to TMH policy, as well as the need for additional TMH research are also discussed.

  1. Evaluating the benefits of home-based management of atrial fibrillation: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Azfar B; Felzer, Jamie R; Munir, Abdullah Bin; Morin, Daniel P; Lavie, Carl J

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia worldwide, leading to an extensive public health and economic burden. The increasing incidence and prevalence of AF is due to the advancing age of the population, structural heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, and thyroid disease. The majority of costs associated with AF have been attributed to the cost of hospitalization. In order to minimize costs and decrease hospitalizations, counseling on modifiable risk factors contributing to AF has been strongly emphasized. With the release of novel oral anticoagulants bypassing the need for anticoagulant bridging or laboratory monitoring, post-discharge nurse-led home intervention, and novel methods of heart rate monitoring, home-based AF management has reached a new level of ease and sophistication. In this review, we aimed to review modifiable risk factors for AF and various methods of home-based management of AF, along with their benefits. PMID:27799843

  2. Creating an Ethnodrama to Catalyze Dialogue in Home-Based Dementia Care.

    PubMed

    Speechley, Mark; DeForge, Ryan T; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Marlatt, Nicole M; Gutmanis, Iris

    2015-11-01

    This article describes the development of a theater script derived from a critical ethnographic study that followed people living with dementia--and their family and professional caregivers--over an 18-month period. Analysis of the ethnographic data yielded four themes that characterized home-based dementia care relationships: managing care resources, making care decisions, evaluating care practices, and reifying care norms. The research team expanded to include a colleague with playwright experience, who used these themes to write a script. A theater director was included to cast and direct the play, and finally, a videography company filmed the actors on a realistic set. To contribute to the qualitative health research and the research-based theater knowledge translation literatures, this article describes and explains the creative decisions taken as part of our effort to disseminate research focused on home-based dementia care in a way that catalyzes and fosters critical (actionable) dialogue.

  3. Developing a Common Health Information Exchange Platform to Implement a Nationwide Health Information Network in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minho; Heo, Eunyoung; Lim, Heesook; Lee, Jun Young; Weon, Sangho; Chae, Hoseok; Hwang, Hee

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to develop a common health information exchange (HIE) platform that can provide integrated services for implementing the HIE infrastructure in addition to guidelines for participating in an HIE network in South Korea. Methods By exploiting the Health Level 7 (HL7) Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) and Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) Cross-enterprise Document Sharing-b (XDS.b) profile, we defined the architectural model, exchanging data items and their standardization, messaging standards, and privacy and security guidelines, for a secure, nationwide, interoperable HIE. We then developed a service-oriented common HIE platform to minimize the effort and difficulty of fulfilling the standard requirements for participating in the HIE network. The common platform supports open application program interfaces (APIs) for implementing a document registry, a document repository, a document consumer, and a master patient index. It could also be used for testing environments for the implementation of standard requirements. Results As the initial phase of implementing a nationwide HIE network in South Korea, we built a regional network for workers' compensation (WC) hospitals and their collaborating clinics to share referral and care record summaries to ensure the continuity of care for industrially injured workers, using the common HIE platform and verifying the feasibility of our technologies. Conclusions We expect to expand the HIE network on a national scale with rapid support for implementing HL7 and IHE standards in South Korea. PMID:25705554

  4. Wearable mental-health monitoring platform with independent component analysis and nonlinear chaotic analysis.

    PubMed

    Roh, Taehwan; Bong, Kyeongryeol; Hong, Sunjoo; Cho, Hyunwoo; Yoo, Hoi-Jun

    2012-01-01

    The wearable mental-health monitoring platform is proposed for mobile mental healthcare system. The platform is headband type of 50 g and consumes 1.1 mW. For the mental health monitoring two specific functions (independent component analysis (ICA) and nonlinear chaotic analysis (NCA)) are implemented into CMOS integrated circuits. ICA extracts heart rate variability (HRV) from EEG, and then NCA extracts the largest lyapunov exponent (LLE) as physiological marker to identify mental stress and states. The extracted HRV is only 1.84% different from the HRV obtained by simple ECG measurement system. With the help of EEG signals, the proposed headband mental monitoring system shows 90% confidence level in stress test, which is better than the test results of only HRV.

  5. Evaluation of Game Engines for Cross-Platform Development of Mobile Serious Games for Health.

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, Carina; Haag, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that serious games for health can improve patient compliance and help to increase the quality of medical education. Due to a growing availability of mobile devices, especially the development of cross-platform mobile apps is helpful for improving healthcare. As the development can be highly time-consuming and expensive, an alternative development process is needed. Game engines are expected to simplify this process. Therefore, this article examines the question whether using game engines for cross-platform serious games for health can simplify the development compared to the development of a plain HTML5 app. At first, a systematic review of the literature was conducted in different databases (MEDLINE, ACM and IEEE). Afterwards three different game engines were chosen, evaluated in different categories and compared to the development of a HTML5 app. This was realized by implementing a prototypical application in the different engines and conducting a utility analysis. The evaluation shows that the Marmalade engine is the best choice for development in this scenario. Furthermore, it is obvious that the game engines have great benefits against plain HTML5 development as they provide components for graphics, physics, sounds, etc. The authors recommend to use the Marmalade Engine for a cross-platform mobile Serious Game for Health.

  6. Effects of Pharmacist-Led Patient Education on Diabetes-Related Knowledge and Medication Adherence: A Home-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Ee Pin; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Saleem, Fahad; Aljadhey, Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Patient education is key to the management of acute and chronic conditions. However, the majority of such educational interventions have been reported from health-care settings. In contrast, this study aims to evaluate whether a home-based intervention can result in better understanding about type 2 diabetes mellitus and can increase…

  7. Reach Out to Enhance Wellness Home-Based Diet-Exercise Intervention Promotes Reproducible and Sustainable Long-Term Improvements in Health Behaviors, Body Weight, and Physical Functioning in Older, Overweight/Obese Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Morey, Miriam C.; Sloane, Richard; Snyder, Denise C.; Miller, Paige E.; Hartman, Terryl J.; Cohen, Harvey J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Diet and exercise interventions have been tested in cancer survivors as a means to reduce late effects and comorbidity, but few have assessed adherence and health outcomes long term. Methods Between July 2005 and May 2007, the Reach Out to Enhance Wellness (RENEW) trial accrued 641 locoregionally staged, long-term (≥ 5 years from diagnosis) colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer survivors in the United States (21 states), Canada, and the United Kingdom. All participants were sedentary (< 150 minutes of physical activity [PA] a week), overweight or obese (body mass index, 25 to 40 kg/m2), and over age 65 years. The trial tested a diet-exercise intervention delivered via mailed print materials and telephone counseling. RENEW used a wait-list control, cross-over design (ie, participants received the year-long intervention immediately or after a 1-year delay), which allowed the opportunity to assess program efficacy (previously reported primary outcome), durability, and reproducibility (reported herein). Measures included diet quality (DQ), PA, BMI, and physical function (PF). Results No significant relapse was observed in the immediate-intervention arm for DQ, PA, and BMI; however, rates of functional decline increased when the intervention ceased. From year 1 to year 2, significant improvements were observed in the delayed-intervention arm; mean change scores in behaviors and BMI and PF slopes were as follows: DQ score, 5.2 (95% CI, 3.4 to 7.0); PA, 45.8 min/wk (95% CI, 26.9 to 64.6 min/wk); BMI, −0.56 (95% CI, −0.75 to −0.36); and Short Form-36 PF, −1.02 versus −5.52 (P < .001 for all measures). Overall, both arms experienced significant improvements in DQ, PA, and BMI from baseline to 2-year follow-up (P < .001). Conclusion Older cancer survivors respond favorably to lifestyle interventions and make durable changes in DQ and PA that contribute to sustained weight loss. These changes positively reorient functional decline trajectories during

  8. The SMART Platform: early experience enabling substitutable applications for electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Joshua C; Murphy, Shawn N; Bernstam, Elmer Victor; Ramoni, Rachel L; Kreda, David A; McCoy, J Michael; Adida, Ben; Kohane, Isaac S

    2012-01-01

    Objective The Substitutable Medical Applications, Reusable Technologies (SMART) Platforms project seeks to develop a health information technology platform with substitutable applications (apps) constructed around core services. The authors believe this is a promising approach to driving down healthcare costs, supporting standards evolution, accommodating differences in care workflow, fostering competition in the market, and accelerating innovation. Materials and methods The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, through the Strategic Health IT Advanced Research Projects (SHARP) Program, funds the project. The SMART team has focused on enabling the property of substitutability through an app programming interface leveraging web standards, presenting predictable data payloads, and abstracting away many details of enterprise health information technology systems. Containers—health information technology systems, such as electronic health records (EHR), personally controlled health records, and health information exchanges that use the SMART app programming interface or a portion of it—marshal data sources and present data simply, reliably, and consistently to apps. Results The SMART team has completed the first phase of the project (a) defining an app programming interface, (b) developing containers, and (c) producing a set of charter apps that showcase the system capabilities. A focal point of this phase was the SMART Apps Challenge, publicized by the White House, using http://www.challenge.gov website, and generating 15 app submissions with diverse functionality. Conclusion Key strategic decisions must be made about the most effective market for further disseminating SMART: existing market-leading EHR vendors, new entrants into the EHR market, or other stakeholders such as health information exchanges. PMID:22427539

  9. Cutting through the politics: presidential candidates' healthcare platforms and impact on health benefits.

    PubMed

    Howell, Peyton

    2008-10-01

    Healthcare reform is one of the top issues for the presidential elections this year, and both candidates have proposed a wide range of health policy changes that could be the most important changes to the delivery of care in the country since the creation of Medicare and Medicaid in the 1960s. This article provides a summary analysis of the healthcare platforms of the presidential candidates. Specifically, the major components of their published health plan proposals are broken out and compared using the language and descriptions from the candidates. The article also highlights several healthcare reform proposals from health advocacy organizations, as well as insights from medical directors and pharmacy directors across more than 50 major managed care health plans. By framing the issues, the article provides a basis for consideration of more detail as healthcare reform recommendations are developed by Congress in 2009.

  10. Use of an Internet “Viral” Marketing Software Platform in Health Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Poitras, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Background Health-related websites have become a common tool for public health authorities to inform the general public of their health promotion information and programs. However, building traffic in the cluttered health Internet universe is becoming increasingly complex, costly, and challenging for governmental health promotion websites. In 2006, the Canadian Health Network (CHN), a cooperative program made up of the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) and some 20 health non-governmental organizations (NGOs), was looking for an affordable marketing tool for the promotion of its website and contents to specific populations. Objective To test new and innovative marketing tools for a health promotion website in Canada. Methods Within the context and constraints of a governmental health promotion website, an adaptation of a commercial Internet viral marketing software platform was developed and implemented under the name “The Crazy Race”. This process was done interactively between seven NGOs and the CHN staff. The communication objectives were (a) to provide a meaningful visit that could communicate important public health messages, and (b) to increase subscriptions to its e-newsletter. A nine-step standardized Web-user experience (Internet path) was thus defined and experimented with under a pre-determined operating budget of less then Can$50,000, mainly paid for by participating organizations on a pay-per-performance basis. Results An initial group of 215 people were sent an invitation to participate in the campaign. Over its 15-day duration, the campaign generated by itself and without any media support a total of 110,200 Web user participants who registered and sent a total of 439,275 invitations (2% of the Canadian Web-user population of 21.8 million in 2006). The epidemic self-dissemination of the campaign occurred in both French and English populations and spread across all age groups. Two-thirds of the participants were women. Conclusions The use of an

  11. Encounters in Home-Based Nursing Care - Registered Nurses’ Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Wälivaara, Britt-Marie; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Axelsson, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The encounter between registered nurses and persons in need of healthcare has been described as fundamental in nursing care. This encounter can take place face-to-face in physical meetings and through meetings via distance-spanning technology. A strong view expressed in the literature is that the face-to-face encounter is important and cannot entirely be replaced by remote encounters. The encounter has been studied in various healthcare contexts but there is a lack of studies with specific focus on the encounter in home-based nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore the encounter in home-based nursing care based on registered nurses’ experiences. Individual interviews were performed with 24 nurses working in home-based nursing care. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using thematic content analysis and six themes were identified: Follows special rules, Needs some doing, Provides unique information and understanding, Facilitates by being known, Brings energy and relieves anxiety, and Can reach a spirit of community. The encounter includes dimensions of being private, being personal and being professional. A good encounter contains dimensions of being personal and being professional and that there is a good balance between these. This is an encounter between two human beings, where the nurse faces the person with herself and the profession steadily and securely in the back. Being personal and professional at the same time could encourage nurses to focus on doing and being during the encounter in home-based nursing care. PMID:23847697

  12. Washington State's Laws Regulating Home-Based Instruction. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergeson, Terry; Kelly, Thomas J.; Riggers, Marcia L.; Dyer, Melinda

    This publication was put together by the Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction in response to questions about laws concerning home-based instruction passed in 1985. Part 1 contains responses to questions relating to Chapter 28A.225 RCW and Chapter 28A.200 RCW; topics covered include regulations governing compulsory school…

  13. Home-Based Crisis Therapy: A Comparative Outcome Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Charity; And Others

    Substitute care for a child at risk has been been associated with psychological distress in the child and his family and a drain on public finances. To investigate the cost effectiveness and ultimate influence on family intactness of home-based family crisis intervention, 77 low income, inner city families with an adolescent child at risk of…

  14. Status of the Home-Based Effort Within Head Start.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children First, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This status report is an attempt to provide a comprehensive picture of Head Start home-based programs which aimed at helping parents provide children with the same kinds of activities and support in their own homes that children would receive in any quality child development center. Data was collected through: (1) Children (1st) First, Inc.'s…

  15. Home Based Early Intervention: The Story of Susan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Davon

    1980-01-01

    Case of a severely handicapped preschooler illustrates advantages of home-based infant stimulation program. Initial goals were: work toward physical separation of mother and child, shape and reinforce child's behavior to extinguish crying, shape and reinforce mother's behavior to enrich home environment, and stimulate and reinforce a developmental…

  16. Home Based Care: Direction for the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryce, Marvin E.

    Home based family centered (HBFC) service programs have been developed as alternatives to out-of-home placement. These programs have reported relatively high service success rates at costs signficantly lower than foster home and institutional care while, at the same time, avoiding the social and psychological risks of out-of-home placement.…

  17. The health systems funding platform and World Bank legacy: the gap between rhetoric and reality

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Global health partnerships created to encourage funding efficiencies need to be approached with some caution, with claims for innovation and responsiveness to development needs based on untested assumptions around the potential of some partners to adapt their application, funding and evaluation procedures within these new structures. We examine this in the case of the Health Systems Funding Platform, which despite being set up some three years earlier, has stalled at the point of implementation of its key elements of collaboration. While much of the attention has been centred on the suspension of the Global Fund’s Round 11, and what this might mean for health systems strengthening and the Platform more broadly, we argue that inadequate scrutiny has been made of the World Bank’s contribution to this partnership, which might have been reasonably anticipated based on an historical analysis of development perspectives. Given the tensions being created by the apparent vulnerability of the health systems strengthening agenda, and the increasing rhetoric around the need for greater harmonization in development assistance, an examination of the positioning of the World Bank in this context is vital. PMID:23497327

  18. The health systems funding platform and World Bank legacy: the gap between rhetoric and reality.

    PubMed

    Brown, Scott S; Sen, Kasturi; Decoster, Kristof

    2013-03-06

    Global health partnerships created to encourage funding efficiencies need to be approached with some caution, with claims for innovation and responsiveness to development needs based on untested assumptions around the potential of some partners to adapt their application, funding and evaluation procedures within these new structures. We examine this in the case of the Health Systems Funding Platform, which despite being set up some three years earlier, has stalled at the point of implementation of its key elements of collaboration. While much of the attention has been centred on the suspension of the Global Fund's Round 11, and what this might mean for health systems strengthening and the Platform more broadly, we argue that inadequate scrutiny has been made of the World Bank's contribution to this partnership, which might have been reasonably anticipated based on an historical analysis of development perspectives. Given the tensions being created by the apparent vulnerability of the health systems strengthening agenda, and the increasing rhetoric around the need for greater harmonization in development assistance, an examination of the positioning of the World Bank in this context is vital.

  19. Photoacoustic imaging: a potential new platform for assessment of bone health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ting; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Xu, Guan; Du, Sidan; Yuan, Jie; Deng, Cheri X.; Wang, Xueding

    2015-02-01

    The ultimate goal of this work is to develop a novel photoacoustic (QPA) platform for highly-sensitive and quantitative assessment of bone health. First, the feasibility to perform 3D photoacoustic imaging (PAI) of bone was investigated. Then another two techniques, including thermal photoacoustic measurement (TPAM) and photoacoustic spectral analysis (PASA), both being able to achieve quantitative results were investigated for bone characterization. TPAM, by evaluating the dependence of photoacoustic signal amplitude on the sample temperature, is sensitive to the chemical constituents in tissue and holds promise for assessment of bone mineral density (BMD). PASA characterizes micron size physical features in tissue, and has shown feasibility for objective assessment of bone microarchitecture (BMA). This integrated QPA platform can assess both bone mass and microstructure simultaneously without involving invasive biopsy or ionizing radiation. Since QPA is non-ionizing, non-invasive, and has sufficient penetration in both soft tissue and bone, it has unique advantages for clinical translation.

  20. Design of a Community-Engaged Health Informatics Platform with an Architecture of Participation.

    PubMed

    Millery, Mari; Ramos, Wilson; Lien, Chueh; Aguirre, Alejandra N; Kukafka, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Community-engaged health informatics (CEHI) applies information technology and participatory approaches to improve the health of communities. Our objective was to translate the concept of CEHI into a usable and replicable informatics platform that will facilitate community-engaged practice and research. The setting is a diverse urban neighborhood in New York City. The methods included community asset mapping, stakeholder interviews, logic modeling, analysis of affordances in open-source tools, elicitation of use cases and requirements, and a survey of early adopters. Based on synthesis of data collected, GetHealthyHeigths.org (GHH) was developed using open-source LAMP stack and Drupal content management software. Drupal's organic groups module was used for novel participatory functionality, along with detailed user roles and permissions. Future work includes evaluation of GHH and its impact on agency and service networks. We plan to expand GHH with additional functionality to further support CEHI by combining informatics solutions with community engagement to improve health.

  1. Linking Human Health and Livestock Health: A “One-Health” Platform for Integrated Analysis of Human Health, Livestock Health, and Economic Welfare in Livestock Dependent Communities

    PubMed Central

    Thumbi, S. M.; Njenga, M. Kariuki; Marsh, Thomas L.; Noh, Susan; Otiang, Elkanah; Munyua, Peninah; Ochieng, Linus; Ogola, Eric; Yoder, Jonathan; Audi, Allan; Montgomery, Joel M.; Bigogo, Godfrey; Breiman, Robert F.; Palmer, Guy H.; McElwain, Terry F.

    2015-01-01

    Background For most rural households in sub-Saharan Africa, healthy livestock play a key role in averting the burden associated with zoonotic diseases, and in meeting household nutritional and socio-economic needs. However, there is limited understanding of the complex nutritional, socio-economic, and zoonotic pathways that link livestock health to human health and welfare. Here we describe a platform for integrated human health, animal health and economic welfare analysis designed to address this challenge. We provide baseline epidemiological data on disease syndromes in humans and the animals they keep, and provide examples of relationships between human health, animal health and household socio-economic status. Method We designed a study to obtain syndromic disease data in animals along with economic and behavioral information for 1500 rural households in Western Kenya already participating in a human syndromic disease surveillance study. Data collection started in February 2013, and each household is visited bi-weekly and data on four human syndromes (fever, jaundice, diarrhea and respiratory illness) and nine animal syndromes (death, respiratory, reproductive, musculoskeletal, nervous, urogenital, digestive, udder disorders, and skin disorders in cattle, sheep, goats and chickens) are collected. Additionally, data from a comprehensive socio-economic survey is collected every 3 months in each of the study households. Findings Data from the first year of study showed 93% of the households owned at least one form of livestock (55%, 19%, 41% and 88% own cattle, sheep, goats and chickens respectively). Digestive disorders, mainly diarrhea episodes, were the most common syndromes observed in cattle, goats and sheep, accounting for 56% of all livestock syndromes, followed by respiratory illnesses (18%). In humans, respiratory illnesses accounted for 54% of all illnesses reported, followed by acute febrile illnesses (40%) and diarrhea illnesses (5%). While controlling

  2. Home-based exercise and support programme for people with dementia and their caregivers: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dementia affects the mood of people with dementia but also of their caregivers. In the coming years, the number of people with dementia will increase worldwide and most of them will continue to live in the community as long as possible. Home-based psychosocial interventions reducing the depressive symptoms of both people with dementia and their caregivers in their own home are highly needed. Methods/Design This manuscript describes the design of a Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) of the effects of a home-based exercise and support programme for people with dementia and their caregivers. The aim is to randomly assign 156 dyads (caregiver and dementia diagnosed person) to an intervention group or a comparison group. The experimental group receives a home programme in which exercise and support for the people with dementia and their caregivers are combined and integrated. The comparison group receives a minimal intervention. Primary outcomes are physical health (people with dementia) and mood (people with dementia and caregivers). In addition, to get more insight in the working components of the intervention and the impact of the intervention on the relationship of the dyads a qualitative sub-study is carried out. Discussion This study aims to contribute to an evidence-based treatment to reduce depressive symptoms among people with dementia and their caregivers independently living in the community. Trial Registration The study has been registered at the Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR), which is connected to the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform of the WHO. Trial number: NTR1802. PMID:22117691

  3. Health scorecard of spacecraft platforms: Track record of on-orbit anomalies and failures and preliminary comparative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Marcie A.; Saleh, Joseph H.; Haga, Rachel A.

    2011-01-01

    Choosing the "right" satellite platform for a given market and mission requirements is a major investment decision for a satellite operator. With a variety of platforms available on the market from different manufacturers, and multiple offerings from the same manufacturer, the down-selection process can be quite involved. In addition, because data for on-obit failures and anomalies per platform is unavailable, incomplete, or fragmented, it is difficult to compare options and make an informed choice with respect to the critical attribute of field reliability of different platforms. In this work, we first survey a large number of geosynchronous satellite platforms by the major satellite manufacturers, and we provide a brief overview of their technical characteristics, timeline of introduction, and number of units launched. We then analyze an extensive database of satellite failures and anomalies, and develop for each platform a "health scorecard" that includes all the minor and major anomalies, and complete failures—that is failure events of different severities—observed on-orbit for each platform. We identify the subsystems that drive these failure events and how much each subsystem contributes to these events for each platform. In addition, we provide the percentage of units in each platform which have experienced failure events, and, after calculating the total number of years logged on-orbit by each platform, we compute its corresponding average failure and anomaly rate. We conclude this work with a preliminary comparative analysis of the health scorecards of different platforms. The concept of a "health scorecard" here introduced provides a useful snapshot of the failure and anomaly track record of a spacecraft platform on orbit. As such, it constitutes a useful and transparent benchmark that can be used by satellite operators to inform their acquisition choices ("inform" not "base" as other considerations are factored in when comparing different spacecraft

  4. Evaluating Patient Usability of an Image-Based Mobile Health Platform for Postoperative Wound Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Wiseman, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical patients are increasingly using mobile health (mHealth) platforms to monitor recovery and communicate with their providers in the postdischarge period. Despite widespread enthusiasm for mHealth, few studies evaluate the usability or user experience of these platforms. Objective Our objectives were to (1) develop a novel image-based smartphone app for postdischarge surgical wound monitoring, and (2) rigorously user test it with a representative population of vascular and general surgery patients. Methods A total of 9 vascular and general surgery inpatients undertook usability testing of an internally developed smartphone app that allows patients to take digital images of their wound and answer a survey about their recovery. We followed the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 9241-11 guidelines, focusing on effectiveness, efficiency, and user satisfaction. An accompanying training module was developed by applying tenets of adult learning. Sessions were audio-recorded, and the smartphone screen was mirrored onto a study computer. Digital image quality was evaluated by a physician panel to determine usefulness for clinical decision making. Results The mean length of time spent was 4.7 (2.1-12.8) minutes on the training session and 5.0 (1.4-16.6) minutes on app completion. 55.5% (5/9) of patients were able to complete the app independently with the most difficulty experienced in taking digital images of surgical wounds. Novice patients who were older, obese, or had groin wounds had the most difficulty. 81.8% of images were sufficient for diagnostic purposes. User satisfaction was high, with an average usability score of 83.3 out of 100. Conclusion Surgical patients can learn to use a smartphone app for postoperative wound monitoring with high user satisfaction. We identified design features and training approaches that can facilitate ease of use. This protocol illustrates an important, often overlooked, aspect of mHealth development

  5. Home based versus centre based cardiac rehabilitation: Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zawada, Anna; Jolly, Kate; Moxham, Tiffany; Taylor, Rod S

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect of home based and supervised centre based cardiac rehabilitation on mortality and morbidity, health related quality of life, and modifiable cardiac risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease. Design Systematic review. Data sources Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO, without language restriction, searched from 2001 to January 2008. Review methods Reference lists checked and advice sought from authors. Included randomised controlled trials that compared centre based cardiac rehabilitation with home based programmes in adults with acute myocardial infarction, angina, or heart failure or who had undergone coronary revascularisation. Two reviewers independently assessed the eligibility of the identified trials and extracted data independently. Authors were contacted when possible to obtain missing information. Results 12 studies (1938 participants) were included. Most studies recruited patients with a low risk of further events after myocardial infarction or revascularisation. No difference was seen between home based and centre based cardiac rehabilitation in terms of mortality (relative risk 1.31, 95% confidence interval 0.65 to 2.66), cardiac events, exercise capacity (standardised mean difference −0.11, −0.35 to 0.13), modifiable risk factors (weighted mean difference systolic blood pressure (0.58 mm Hg, −3.29 mm Hg to 4.44 mm Hg), total cholesterol (−0.13 mmol/l, −0.31 mmol/l to 0.05 mmol/l), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (−0.15 mmol/l, −0.31 mmol/l to 0.01 mmol/l), or relative risk for proportion of smokers at follow-up (0.98, 0.73 to 1.31)), or health related quality of life, with the exception of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (−0.06, −0.11 to −0.02) mmol/l). In the home based participants, there was evidence of superior adherence. No consistent difference was seen in the healthcare costs of the two forms

  6. Mobile and home-based vendors' contributions to the retail food environment in rural South Texas Mexican-origin settlements.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Zulema; Dean, Wesley R; Sharkey, Joseph R

    2012-10-01

    A growing concern with high rates of obesity and overweight among immigrant minority populations in the US has focused attention on the availability and accessibility to healthy foods in such communities. Small-scale vending in rural, impoverished and underserved areas, however, is generally overlooked; yet, this type of informal activity and source for food is particularly important in such environs, or "food desserts," where traditional forms of work and mainstream food outlets are limited or even absent. This exploratory study investigates two types of small-scale food vending that take place in rural colonias, or Mexican-origin settlements along the South Texas border with Mexico: mobile and home-based. Using a convenience sample of 23 vendors who live and work in Texas colonias, this study identifies the characteristics associated with mobile and home-based food vendors and their businesses and its contributions to the rural food environment. Findings reveal that mobile and home-based vending provides a variety of food and beverage options to colonia residents, and suggests that home-based vendors contribute a greater assortment of food options, including some healthier food items, than mobile food vendors, which offer and sell a limited range of products. Findings may contribute to the development of innovative policy solutions and interventions aimed at increasing healthy food options or reducing health disparities in immigrant communities.

  7. Effects of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation with a metronome-guided walking pace in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-soon; Kim, Changhwan; Jin, Young-Soo; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do; Yang, Yun Jun; Park, Yong Bum

    2013-05-01

    Despite documented efficacy and recommendations, pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been underutilized. Home-based PR was proposed as an alternative, but there were limited data. The adequate exercise intensity was also a crucial issue. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of home-based PR with a metronome-guided walking pace on functional exercise capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in COPD. The subjects participated in a 12-week home-based PR program. Exercise intensity was initially determined by cardiopulmonary exercise test, and was readjusted (the interval of metronome beeps was reset) according to submaximal endurance test. Six-minute walk test, pulmonary function test, cardiopulmonary exercise test, and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) were done before and after the 12-week program, and at 6 months after completion of rehabilitation. Thirty-three patients participated in the program. Six-minute walking distance was significantly increased (48.8 m; P = 0.017) and the SGRQ score was also improved (-15; P < 0.001) over the six-month follow-up period after rehabilitation. There were no significant differences in pulmonary function and peak exercise parameters. We developed an effective home-based PR program with a metronome-guided walking pace for COPD patients. This rehabilitation program may improve functional exercise capacity and HRQOL.

  8. Developing Initiatives for Home-Based Child Care: Current Research and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Toni; Paulsell, Diane

    2011-01-01

    Home-based child care accounts for a significant share of the child care supply in the United States, especially for infants and toddlers. A synthesis of the home-based care research literature and information about recent home-based care quality initiatives points to a critical need for more systematic efforts to develop and test quality…

  9. eFurniture for home-based frailty detection using artificial neural networks and wireless sensors.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Chuan; Lin, Chung-Chih; Lin, Pei-Hsin; Chen, Chun-Chang; Lee, Ren-Guey; Huang, Jing-Siang; Tsai, Tsai-Hsuan

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to integrate wireless sensor technologies and artificial neural networks to develop a system to manage personal frailty information automatically. The system consists of five parts: (1) an eScale to measure the subject's reaction time; (2) an eChair to detect slowness in movement, weakness and weight loss; (3) an ePad to measure the subject's balancing ability; (4) an eReach to measure body extension; and (5) a Home-based Information Gateway, which collects all the data and predicts the subject's frailty. Using a furniture-based measuring device to provide home-based measurement means that health checks are not confined to health institutions. We designed two experiments to obtain optimum frailty prediction model and test overall system performance: (1) We developed a three-step process to adjust different parameters to obtain an optimized neural identification network whose parameters include initialization, L.R. dec and L.R. inc. The post-process identification rate increased from 77.85% to 83.22%. (2) We used 149 cases to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of our frailty prediction algorithm. The sensitivity and specificity of this system are 79.71% and 86.25% respectively. These results show that our system is a high specificity prediction tool that can be used to assess frailty.

  10. Recent enhancements to and applications of the SmartBrick structural health monitoring platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunasekaran, A.; Cross, S.; Patel, N.; Sedigh, S.

    2012-04-01

    The SmartBrick network is an autonomous and wireless solution for structural health monitoring of civil infrastructures. The base station is currently in its third generation and has been laboratory- and field-tested in the United States and Italy. The second generation of the sensor nodes has been laboratory-tested as of publication. In this paper, we present recent enhancements made to hardware and software of the SmartBrick platform. Salient improvements described include the development of a new base station with fully-integrated long-range GSM (cellular) and short-range ZigBee communication. The major software improvement described in this paper is migration to the ZigBee PRO stack, which was carried out in the interest of interoperability. To broaden the application of the platform to critical environments that require survivability and fault tolerance, we have striven to achieve compliance with military standards in the areas of hardware, software, and communication. We describe these efforts and present a survey of the military standards investigated. Also described is instrumentation of a three-span experimental bridge in Washington County, Missouri; with the SmartBrick platform. The sensors, whose output is conditioned and multiplexed; include strain gauges, thermocouples, push potentiometers, and three-axis inclinometers. Data collected is stored on site and reported over the cellular network. Real-time alerts are generated if any monitored parameter falls outside its acceptable range. Redundant sensing and communication provide reliability and facilitate corroboration of the data collected. A web interface is used to issue remote configuration commands and to facilitate access to and visualization of the data collected.

  11. The Analytic Information Warehouse (AIW): a Platform for Analytics using Electronic Health Record Data

    PubMed Central

    Post, Andrew R.; Kurc, Tahsin; Cholleti, Sharath; Gao, Jingjing; Lin, Xia; Bornstein, William; Cantrell, Dedra; Levine, David; Hohmann, Sam; Saltz, Joel H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To create an analytics platform for specifying and detecting clinical phenotypes and other derived variables in electronic health record (EHR) data for quality improvement investigations. Materials and Methods We have developed an architecture for an Analytic Information Warehouse (AIW). It supports transforming data represented in different physical schemas into a common data model, specifying derived variables in terms of the common model to enable their reuse, computing derived variables while enforcing invariants and ensuring correctness and consistency of data transformations, long-term curation of derived data, and export of derived data into standard analysis tools. It includes software that implements these features and a computing environment that enables secure high-performance access to and processing of large datasets extracted from EHRs. Results We have implemented and deployed the architecture in production locally. The software is available as open source. We have used it as part of hospital operations in a project to reduce rates of hospital readmission within 30 days. The project examined the association of over 100 derived variables representing disease and co-morbidity phenotypes with readmissions in five years of data from our institution’s clinical data warehouse and the UHC Clinical Database (CDB). The CDB contains administrative data from over 200 hospitals that are in academic medical centers or affiliated with such centers. Discussion and Conclusion A widely available platform for managing and detecting phenotypes in EHR data could accelerate the use of such data in quality improvement and comparative effectiveness studies. PMID:23402960

  12. Wireless structural health monitoring of cable-stayed bridge using Imote2-platformed smart sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Duc-Duy; Nguyen, Khac-Duy; Lee, Po-Young; Hong, Dong-Soo; Lee, So-Young; Kim, Jeong-Tae; Shin, Sung-Woo; Yun, Chung-Bang; Shinozuka, Masanobu

    2012-04-01

    In this study, wireless structural health monitoring (SHM) system of cable-stayed bridge is developed using Imote2- platformed smart sensors. In order to achieve the objective, the following approaches are proposed. Firstly, vibrationand impedance-based SHM methods suitable for the pylon-cable-deck system in cable-stayed bridge are briefly described. Secondly, the multi-scale vibration-impedance sensor node on Imote2-platform is presented on the design of hardware components and embedded software for vibration- and impedance-based SHM. In this approach, a solarpowered energy harvesting is implemented for autonomous operation of the smart sensor node. Finally, the feasibility and practicality of the multi-scale sensor system is experimentally evaluated on a real cable-stayed bridge, Hwamyung Bridge in Korea. Successful level of wireless communication and solar-power supply for smart sensor nodes are verified. Also, vibration and impedance responses measured from the target bridge which experiences various weather conditions are examined for the robust long-term monitoring capability of the smart sensor system.

  13. Developing a service platform definition to promote evidence-based planning and funding of the mental health service system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Yi; Meurk, Carla S; Harris, Meredith G; Diminic, Sandra; Scheurer, Roman W; Whiteford, Harvey A

    2014-11-26

    Ensuring that a mental health system provides 'value for money' requires policy makers to allocate resources to the most cost-effective interventions. Organizing cost-effective interventions into a service delivery framework will require a concept that can guide the mapping of evidence regarding disorder-level interventions to aggregations of services that are meaningful for policy makers. The 'service platform' is an emerging concept that could be used to this end, however no explicit definition currently exists in the literature. The aim of this study was to develop a service platform definition that is consistent with how policy makers conceptualize the major elements of the mental health service system and to test the validity and utility of this definition through consultation with mental health policy makers. We derived a provisional definition informed by existing literature and consultation with experienced mental health researchers. Using a modified Delphi method, we obtained feedback from nine Australian policy makers. Respondents provided written answers to a questionnaire eliciting their views on the acceptability, comprehensibility and usefulness of a service platform definition which was subject to qualitative analysis. Overall, respondents understood the definition and found it both acceptable and useful, subject to certain conditions. They also provided suggestions for its improvement. Our findings suggest that the service platform concept could be a useful way of aggregating mental health services as a means for presenting priority setting evidence to policy makers in mental health. However, further development and testing of the concept is required.

  14. Utilisation of home-based physician, nurse and personal support worker services within a palliative care programme in Ontario, Canada: trends over 2005-2015.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhuolu; Laporte, Audrey; Guerriere, Denise N; Coyte, Peter C

    2016-12-26

    With health system restructuring in Canada and a general preference by care recipients and their families to receive palliative care at home, attention to home-based palliative care continues to increase. A multidisciplinary team of health professionals is the most common delivery model for home-based palliative care in Canada. However, little is known about the changing temporal trends in the propensity and intensity of home-based palliative care. The purpose of this study was to assess the propensity to use home-based palliative care services, and once used, the intensity of that use for three main service categories: physician visits, nurse visits and care by personal support workers (PSWs) over the last decade. Three prospective cohort data sets were used to track changes in service use over the period 2005 to 2015. Service use for each category was assessed using a two-part model, and a Heckit regression was performed to assess the presence of selectivity bias. Service propensity was modelled using multivariate logistic regression analysis and service intensity was modelled using log-transformed ordinary least squares regression analysis. Both the propensity and intensity to use home-based physician visits and PSWs increased over the last decade, while service propensity and the intensity of nurse visits decreased. Meanwhile, there was a general tendency for service propensity and intensity to increase as the end of life approached. These findings demonstrate temporal changes towards increased use of home-based palliative care, and a shift to substitute care away from nursing to less expensive forms of care, specifically PSWs. These findings may provide a general idea of the types of services that are used more intensely and require more resources from multidisciplinary teams, as increased use of home-based palliative care has placed dramatic pressures on the budgets of local home and community care organisations.

  15. Exploring pharmacy and home-based sexually transmissible infection testing

    PubMed Central

    Habel, Melissa A.; Scheinmann, Roberta; Verdesoto, Elizabeth; Gaydos, Charlotte; Bertisch, Maggie; Chiasson, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Background This study assessed the feasibility and acceptability of pharmacy and home-based sexually transmissible infection (STI) screening as alternate testing venues among emergency contraception (EC) users. Methods The study included two phases in February 2011–July 2012. In Phase I, customers purchasing EC from eight pharmacies in Manhattan received vouchers for free STI testing at onsite medical clinics. In Phase II, three Facebook ads targeted EC users to connect them with free home-based STI test kits ordered online. Participants completed a self-administered survey. Results Only 38 participants enrolled in Phase I: 90% female, ≤29 years (74%), 45% White non-Hispanic and 75% college graduates; 71% were not tested for STIs in the past year and 68% reported a new partner in the past 3 months. None tested positive for STIs. In Phase II, ads led to >45 000 click-throughs, 382 completed the survey and 290 requested kits; 28% were returned. Phase II participants were younger and less educated than Phase I participants; six tested positive for STIs. Challenges included recruitment, pharmacy staff participation, advertising with discretion and cost. Conclusions This study found low uptake of pharmacy and home-based testing among EC users; however, STI testing in these settings is feasible and the acceptability findings indicate an appeal among younger women for testing in non-traditional settings. Collaborating with and training pharmacy and medical staff are key elements of service provision. Future research should explore how different permutations of expanding screening in non-traditional settings could improve testing uptake and detect additional STI cases. PMID:26409484

  16. A fully-integrated aptamer-based affinity assay platform for monitoring astronaut health in space.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xianbin; Durland, Ross H.; Hecht, Ariel H.; Singh, Anup K.; Sommer, Gregory Jon; Hatch, Anson V.

    2010-07-01

    Here we demonstrate the suitability of robust nucleic acid affinity reagents in an integrated point-of-care diagnostic platform for monitoring proteomic biomarkers indicative of astronaut health in spaceflight applications. A model thioaptamer targeting nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) is evaluated in an on-chip electrophoretic gel-shift assay for human serum. Key steps of (i) mixing sample with the aptamer, (ii) buffer exchange, and (iii) preconcentration of sample were successfully integrated upstream of fluorescence-based detection. Challenges due to (i) nonspecific interactions with serum, and (ii) preconcentration at a nanoporous membrane are discussed and successfully resolved to yield a robust, rapid, and fully-integrated diagnostic system.

  17. Living Profiles: design of a health media platform for teens with special healthcare needs.

    PubMed

    Chira, Peter; Nugent, Lisa; Miller, Kimberly; Park, Tina; Donahue, Sean; Soni, Amit; Nugent, Diane; Sandborg, Christy

    2010-10-01

    Living Profiles is a health media platform in development that aggregates multiple data flows to help teens with special healthcare needs (SHCN), particularly with regard to self-management and independence. A teen-oriented personal health record (PHR) incorporates typical teen behaviors and attitudes about health and wellness, encompasses how teens perceive and convey quality of life, and aligns with data related to their chronic medical condition. We have conceived a secure personalized user interface called the Quality of Life Timeline, which will assist with the transition from pediatric care to an adult provider through modules that include a mood meter, reminder device, and teleport medicine. With this personalized PHR, teens with SHCN can better understand their condition and its effects on daily activities and life goals and vice versa; additionally, use of this PHR allows for better information sharing and communication between providers and patients. The use of a teen-oriented tool such as Living Profiles can impact teens' overall quality of life and disease self-management, important attributes for a successful transition program.

  18. Overcoming Barriers in Kidney Health-Forging a Platform for Innovation.

    PubMed

    Linde, Peter G; Archdeacon, Patrick; Breyer, Matthew D; Ibrahim, Tod; Inrig, Jula K; Kewalramani, Reshma; Lee, Celeste Castillo; Neuland, Carolyn Y; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Sloand, James A; Meyer, Rachel; Smith, Kimberly A; Snook, Jennifer; West, Melissa; Falk, Ronald J

    2016-07-01

    Innovation in kidney diseases is not commensurate with the effect of these diseases on human health and mortality or innovation in other key therapeutic areas. A primary cause of the dearth in innovation is that kidney diseases disproportionately affect a demographic that is largely disenfranchised, lacking sufficient advocacy, public attention, and funding. A secondary and likely consequent cause is that the existing infrastructure supporting nephrology research pales in comparison with those for other internal medicine specialties, especially cardiology and oncology. Citing such inequities, however, is not enough. Changing the status quo will require a coordinated effort to identify and redress the existing deficits. Specifically, these deficits relate to the need to further develop and improve the following: understanding of the disease mechanisms and pathophysiology, patient engagement and activism, clinical trial infrastructure, and investigational clinical trial designs as well as coordinated efforts among critical stakeholders. This paper identifies potential solutions to these barriers, some of which are already underway through the Kidney Health Initiative. The Kidney Health Initiative is unique and will serve as a current and future platform from which to overcome these barriers to innovation in nephrology.

  19. Design of a Community-Engaged Health Informatics Platform with an Architecture of Participation

    PubMed Central

    Millery, Mari; Ramos, Wilson; Lien, Chueh; Aguirre, Alejandra N.; Kukafka, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Community-engaged health informatics (CEHI) applies information technology and participatory approaches to improve the health of communities. Our objective was to translate the concept of CEHI into a usable and replicable informatics platform that will facilitate community-engaged practice and research. The setting is a diverse urban neighborhood in New York City. The methods included community asset mapping, stakeholder interviews, logic modeling, analysis of affordances in open-source tools, elicitation of use cases and requirements, and a survey of early adopters. Based on synthesis of data collected, GetHealthyHeigths.org (GHH) was developed using open-source LAMP stack and Drupal content management software. Drupal’s organic groups module was used for novel participatory functionality, along with detailed user roles and permissions. Future work includes evaluation of GHH and its impact on agency and service networks. We plan to expand GHH with additional functionality to further support CEHI by combining informatics solutions with community engagement to improve health. PMID:26958227

  20. Optimizing the Presentation of Mental Health Information in Social Media: The Effects of Health Testimonials and Platform on Source Perceptions, Message Processing, and Health Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Quintero Johnson, Jessie M; Yilmaz, Gamze; Najarian, Kristy

    2016-08-30

    Using social media for the purpose of disseminating mental health information is a critical area of scientific inquiry for health communication professionals. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the presence of a first-person testimonial in educational mental health information placed in Facebook and Twitter messages influenced college students' (N = 257) source perceptions, information processing, cognitive elaboration, health information recall, beliefs, and behavioral intentions. Results show that exposure to social media messages that featured mental health information embedded with a testimonial predicted less source homophily and more critical thoughts about the social media source, less systematic message processing, and less cognitive elaboration. Health information recall was significantly impacted by both the social media platform and message content such that participants in the testimonial condition on Facebook were more likely to recall the health facts in those messages whereas participants who viewed the testimonial in Twitter were less likely to recall the facts in those tweets. Compared to those who read Facebook messages, participants who read Twitter messages reported higher levels of systematic message processing. These findings suggest that the integration of health testimonials into social media messages might inadvertently provoke psychological resistance to mental health information, thereby reducing the persuasive impact of those messages.

  1. Foreclosure and Health in Southern Europe: Results from the Platform for People Affected by Mortgages.

    PubMed

    Vásquez-Vera, Hugo; Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica; Palència, Laia; Borrell, Carme

    2016-04-01

    Housing instability has been shown to be related to poorer health outcomes in various studies, mainly in the USA and UK. Affected individuals are more prone to psychiatric (e.g., major depression, anxiety) and physical disorders (e.g., hypertension). This situation has deteriorated with the onset of the economic crisis. One of the most affected countries is Spain, which has high rates of foreclosure and eviction that continue to rise. In response, a civil movement, The Platform for People Affected by Mortgages (PAH), works to provide solutions to its members affected by foreclosure and advocates for the right to decent housing. The aims of this study ware to describe and compare the health status of PAH members from Catalonia to a sample of the general population and to analyze the association between health status and mortgage status, foreclosure stage, and other socioeconomic variables, among members of the PAH. We conducted a cross-sectional study using a self-administered online questionnaire (2014) administered to 905 PAH members in Catalonia (>18 years; 559 women and 346 men). Results were compared with health indicators from The Health Survey of Catalonia 2013 (n = 4830). The dependent variables were poor mental health (GHQ 12 ≥ 3), and poor self-reported health (fair or poor). All analyses were stratified by sex. We computed age-standardized prevalence and prevalence ratios of poor mental and self-reported health in both samples. We also analyzed health outcomes among PAH members according to mortgage status (mortgage holders or guarantors), stage of foreclosure, and other socioeconomic variables by computing prevalence ratios from robust Poisson regression models. The prevalence of poor mental health among PAH members was 90.6 % in women and 84.4 % in men, and 15.5 and 10.2 % in the general population, respectively. The prevalence of poor self-reported health was 55.6 % in women and 39.4 % in men from the PAH, and 19.2 and 16.1 % in the general

  2. Evaluation of the home-based maternal record: a WHO collaborative study.

    PubMed Central

    Shah, P. M.; Selwyn, B. J.; Shah, K.; Kumar, V.

    1993-01-01

    Thirteen centres in eight countries (Egypt, India, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Sri Lanka, Democratic Yemen and Zambia) participated in the WHO collaborative study to evaluate the home-based maternal record (HBMR). The evaluation showed that use of the HBMR had a favourable impact on utilization of health care services and continuity of the health care of women during their reproductive period. When adapted to local risk conditions, their cut-off points and the available resources, the HBMR succeeded in promoting self-care by mothers and their families and in enhancing the timely identification of at-risk cases that needed referral and special care. The introduction of the HBMR increased the diagnosis and referral of at-risk pregnant women and newborn infants, improved family planning and health education, led to an increase in tetanus toxoid immunization, and provided a means of collecting health information in the community. The HBMR was liked by mothers, community health workers and other health care personnel because, by using it, the mothers became more involved in looking after their own health and that of their babies. Apart from local adaptation of the HBMR, the training and involvement of health personnel (including those at the second and tertiary levels) from the start of the HBMR scheme influenced its success in promoting maternal and child health care. It also improved the collection of community-based data and the linking of referral networks. PMID:8261557

  3. Systematic review of family and home-based interventions targeting paediatric overweight and obesity.

    PubMed

    Knowlden, A P; Sharma, M

    2012-06-01

    The family and home environment is a highly influential psychosocial antecedent of paediatric obesity. The purpose of this investigation was to systematically analyze family and home-based randomized control trials aimed at treating overweight and obesity in children ages 2-7 years. In gathering materials for this review, a search of Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, MEDLINE, Education Resources Information Center, Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection and CENTRAL databases was conducted for the time frame of January 2001 to August 2011. The data extraction spanned three phases resulting in a total of nine interventions that met the specified inclusion criteria. Among the identified studies, eight produced significant outcomes. The majority of the programmes incorporated educational sessions targeting parents as the primary modality for intervention delivery. Less than one-quarter of the interventions included home visitations; however, all of the interventions included home-based activities to reinforce behaviour modification. Only three of the interventions applied social and behavioural theory, and only two interventions employed process evaluation. Additional research is needed to gauge the efficacy of the home and family milieu for treating paediatric obesity.

  4. Cost-Effectiveness of a Home Based Intervention for Secondary Prevention of Readmission with Chronic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Joshua; Carrington, Melinda; Chan, Yih-Kai; Pollicino, Christine; Dubrowin, Natalie; Stewart, Simon; Scuffham, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to consider the cost-effectiveness of a nurse-led, home-based intervention (HBI) in cardiac patients with private health insurance compared to usual post-discharge care. A within trial analysis of the Young @ Heart multicentre, randomized controlled trial along with a micro-simulation decision analytical model was conducted to estimate the incremental costs and quality adjusted life years associated with the home based intervention compared to usual care. For the micro-simulation model, future costs, from the perspective of the funder, and effects are estimated over a twenty-year time horizon. An Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratio, along with Incremental Net Monetary Benefit, is evaluated using a willingness to pay threshold of $50,000 per quality adjusted life year. Sub-group analyses are conducted for men and women across three age groups separately. Costs and benefits that arise in the future are discounted at five percent per annum. Overall, home based intervention for secondary prevention in patients with chronic heart disease identified in the Australian private health care sector is not cost-effective. The estimated within trial incremental net monetary benefit is -$3,116 [95%CI: -11,145, $4,914]; indicating that the costs outweigh the benefits. However, for males and in particular males aged 75 years and above, home based intervention indicated a potential to reduce health care costs when compared to usual care (within trial: -$10,416 [95%CI: -$26,745, $5,913]; modelled analysis: -$1,980 [95%CI: -$22,843, $14,863]). This work provides a crucial impetus for future research to understand for whom disease management programs are likely to benefit most. PMID:26657844

  5. Processes of user participation among formal and family caregivers in home-based care for persons with dementia.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Lill Sverresdatter; Normann, Hans Ketil; Hamran, Torunn

    2017-02-01

    Scandinavian health policy supports prolonged home-based care for people with dementia. User participation is expected to reduce family burden. The aim of this study was to explore how formal and family caregivers experience collaboration while providing home-based dementia care, with a focus on user participation. Seventeen qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted among formal and family caregivers in rural municipalities. The theme identified during this process was 'negotiating participation in decisions'. This theme was analysed using positioning theory. Concepts such as user participation are ambiguous, and caregivers negotiate positions during decision-making processes. Such negotiations are caused by the problematic relationships among patients' legal consent, undefined spokespersons and pragmatic care practices. These constant negotiations enable or obstruct collaboration in several situations. User participation as a concept might contribute to conflicts during collaborations. Dialogues about user participation that focus on consent and spokespersons could reduce the burden created by negotiations in practice.

  6. The role of home-based information and communications technology interventions in chronic disease management: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Rekha; Warren, Jim

    2009-06-01

    This article presents a systematic literature review done to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of home-based information and communications technology enabled interventions for chronic disease management, with emphasis on their impact on health outcomes and costs. Relevant articles were retrieved from PubMed and evaluated using quality worksheets with pre-identified inclusion and exclusion criteria. Of the 256 articles retrieved, 27 were found to concord with the study criteria. Evaluation of the identified articles was conducted irrespective of study design, type of home-based intervention or chronic disease involved. The review demonstrates that HBIs applied to chronic disease management improve functional and cognitive patient outcomes and reduce healthcare spending. However, further research is needed to assess benefit in terms of evidence-based outcome indicators (that can provide a basis for meta-analysis), to confirm sustainable cost benefits, and to systematically collect data on physician satisfaction with patient management.

  7. Service Desk Calls in a Home-based Clinical Informatics Study: Supporting End Users in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, RS; Burke, LJ; Casper, GR; Sturgeon, BA; Rosmait, C; Palzkill, D; Hamann, D; Murphy, J; Brennan, PF

    2012-01-01

    Home-based clinical informatics technologies are being developed to facilitate health care provision and management. Given the novelty of these technologies, end users such as patients and their formal and informal caregivers may require support during use. This paper presents a case study within the United States of the service desk calls generated over a 31-month period by patients enrolled in a large randomized field experiment, HeartCare II. This case study provides future deployers of home-based clinical information technologies with an understanding of the types of support that may be required during use. Our analysis reveals that calls to the service desk originated as a result of user problems, hardware problems, software problems, and internal communication problems among individuals involved in the delivery and use of the technology. Implications of these needs for support during use are also discussed. PMID:24199135

  8. Pre-Sleep and Sleeping Platform Construction Behavior in Captive Orangutans (Pongo spp.): Implications for Ape Health and Welfare.

    PubMed

    Samson, David R; Shumaker, Rob

    2015-01-01

    The nightly construction of a 'nest' or sleeping platform is a behavior that has been observed in every wild great ape population studied, yet in captivity, few analyses have been performed on sleep related behavior. Here, we report on such behavior in three female and two male captive orangutans (Pongo spp.), in a natural light setting, at the Indianapolis Zoo. Behavioral samples were generated, using infrared cameras for a total of 47 nights (136.25 h), in summer (n = 25) and winter (n = 22) periods. To characterize sleep behaviors, we used all-occurrence sampling to generate platform construction episodes (n = 217). Orangutans used a total of 2.4 (SD = 1.2) techniques and 7.5 (SD = 6.3) actions to construct a sleeping platform; they spent 10.1 min (SD - 9.9 min) making the platform and showed a 77% preference for ground (vs. elevated) sleep sites. Comparisons between summer and winter platform construction showed winter start times (17:12 h) to be significantly earlier and longer in duration than summer start times (17:56 h). Orangutans should be provisioned with seasonally appropriate, high quality materials suitable for construction of sleeping platforms to increase sleep quality and improve animal health and welfare.

  9. Research on a Community-based Platform for Promoting Health and Physical Fitness in the Elderly Community

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsai-Hsuan; Wong, Alice May-Kuen; Hsu, Chien-Lung; Tseng, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to assess the acceptability of a fitness testing platform (iFit) for installation in an assisted living community with the aim of promoting fitness and slowing the onset of frailty. The iFit platform develops a means of testing Bureau of Health Promotion mandated health assessment items for the elderly (including flexibility tests, grip strength tests, balance tests, and reaction time tests) and integrates wireless remote sensors in a game-like environment to capture and store subject response data, thus providing individuals in elderly care contexts with a greater awareness of their own physical condition. In this study, we specifically evaluated the users’ intention of using the iFit using a technology acceptance model (TAM). A total of 101 elderly subjects (27 males and 74 females) were recruited. A survey was conducted to measure technology acceptance, to verify that the platform could be used as intended to promote fitness among the elderly. Results indicate that perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use and usage attitude positively impact behavioral intention to use the platform. The iFit platform can offer user-friendly solutions for a community-based fitness care and monitoring of elderly subjects. In summary, iFit was determined by three key drivers and discussed as follows: risk factors among the frail elderly, mechanism for slowing the advance frailty, and technology acceptance and support for promoting physical fitness. PMID:23460859

  10. Research on a community-based platform for promoting health and physical fitness in the elderly community.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsai-Hsuan; Wong, Alice May-Kuen; Hsu, Chien-Lung; Tseng, Kevin C

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to assess the acceptability of a fitness testing platform (iFit) for installation in an assisted living community with the aim of promoting fitness and slowing the onset of frailty. The iFit platform develops a means of testing Bureau of Health Promotion mandated health assessment items for the elderly (including flexibility tests, grip strength tests, balance tests, and reaction time tests) and integrates wireless remote sensors in a game-like environment to capture and store subject response data, thus providing individuals in elderly care contexts with a greater awareness of their own physical condition. In this study, we specifically evaluated the users' intention of using the iFit using a technology acceptance model (TAM). A total of 101 elderly subjects (27 males and 74 females) were recruited. A survey was conducted to measure technology acceptance, to verify that the platform could be used as intended to promote fitness among the elderly. Results indicate that perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use and usage attitude positively impact behavioral intention to use the platform. The iFit platform can offer user-friendly solutions for a community-based fitness care and monitoring of elderly subjects. In summary, iFit was determined by three key drivers and discussed as follows: risk factors among the frail elderly, mechanism for slowing the advance frailty, and technology acceptance and support for promoting physical fitness.

  11. Challenges and Strategies in Providing Home Based Primary Care for Refugees in the US.

    PubMed

    Febles, C; Nies, M A; Fanning, K; Tavernier, S S

    2016-08-18

    The recent crisis in the Middle East has prompted the exodus of millions of refugees from the region who are at present seeking shelter across Europe and in the United States. Among the most immediate needs of refugees upon arrival in a host country is health care, and it is one of the most sustained interactions they experience. Home visits are a common form of primary care for refugees. The authors review the literature to identify themes related to challenges and strategies for providing home based primary care to refugees. The literature review was performed by searching cross-disciplinary databases utilizing Onesearch, but focusing primarily on results produced through CINAHL, EBSCOHOST, and Pub Med databases. To maximize the number of studies included, there was no time frame placed upon publication dates of articles within the search. A total of 55 articles were included in this paper.

  12. Analyzing the Interprofessional Working of a Home-Based Primary Care Team.

    PubMed

    Smith-Carrier, Tracy; Neysmith, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    Increasingly, interprofessional teams are responsible for providing integrated health care services. Effective teams, however, are not the result of chance but require careful planning and ongoing attention to team processes. Based on a case study involving interviews, participant observation, and a survey, we identified key attributes for effective interprofessional working (IPW) within a home-based primary care (HBPC) setting. Recognizing the importance of a theoretical model that reflects the multidimensional nature of team effectiveness research, we employed the integrated team effectiveness model to analyze our findings. The results indicated that a shared vision, common goals, respect, and trust among team members – as well as processes for ongoing communication, effective leadership, and mechanisms for conflict resolution – are vital in the development of a high-functioning IPW team. The ambiguity and uncertainty surrounding the context of service provision (clients' homes), as well the negotiation of external relationships in the HBPC field, require further investigation.

  13. Secure access to patient's health records using SpeechXRays a mutli-channel biometrics platform for user authentication.

    PubMed

    Spanakis, Emmanouil G; Spanakis, Marios; Karantanas, Apostolos; Marias, Kostas

    2016-08-01

    The most commonly used method for user authentication in ICT services or systems is the application of identification tools such as passwords or personal identification numbers (PINs). The rapid development in ICT technology regarding smart devices (laptops, tablets and smartphones) has allowed also the advance of hardware components that capture several biometric traits such as fingerprints and voice. These components are aiming among others to overcome weaknesses and flaws of password usage under the prism of improved user authentication with higher level of security, privacy and usability. To this respect, the potential application of biometrics for secure user authentication regarding access in systems with sensitive data (i.e. patient's data from electronic health records) shows great potentials. SpeechXRays aims to provide a user recognition platform based on biometrics of voice acoustics analysis and audio-visual identity verification. Among others, the platform aims to be applied as an authentication tool for medical personnel in order to gain specific access to patient's electronic health records. In this work a short description of SpeechXrays implementation tool regarding eHealth is provided and analyzed. This study explores security and privacy issues, and offers a comprehensive overview of biometrics technology applications in addressing the e-Health security challenges. We present and describe the necessary requirement for an eHealth platform concerning biometric security.

  14. Home-Based Life Saving Skills in Ethiopia: an update on the second phase of field testing.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Lynn; Buffington, Sandra Tebben; Tedessa, Lelisse; McNatt, Kathryn

    2006-01-01

    Home-Based Life Saving Skills (HBLSS) was integrated over 3 years into a district-level child survival project coordinated through the Ministry of Health and Save the Children Foundation/US in Liben Woreda, Guji Zone, Oromia Region, southern Ethiopia. During late 2004, the second phase of the program was reviewed for performance, home-based management, learning transfer, and program coverage. The immediate posttraining performance score for HBLSS guides for "First Actions" was 87% (a 78% increase over the pretraining baseline) and 79% at 1 year (a 9% decrease from the immediate posttraining score). The home-based management score of women attended by HBLSS guides for "First Actions" was 89%, compared to 32% for women assisted by other unskilled attendants. HBLSS guides teach women and families in the community as they were taught, by using pictorial Take Action Cards, role-play and demonstration, and a variety of venues. Estimates of HBLSS coverage suggest that HBLSS guides attended 24% to 26% of births, and 54% of women giving birth were exposed to HBLSS training. The HBLSS field tests demonstrate a promising program that increases access to basic care for poor, underserved, rural populations who carry the greatest burden of maternal and neonatal mortality.

  15. Usability, learnability and performance evaluation of Intelligent Research and Intervention Software: A delivery platform for eHealth interventions.

    PubMed

    Wozney, Lori; McGrath, Patrick J; Newton, Amanda; Huguet, Anna; Franklin, Marcia; Perri, Kaitlin; Leuschen, K; Toombs, Elaine; Lingley-Pottie, Patricia

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation of an eHealth platform, Intelligent Research and Intervention Software was undertaken via cross-sectional survey of staff users and application performance monitoring. The platform is used to deliver psychosocial interventions across a range of clinical contexts, project scopes, and delivery modalities (e.g. hybrid telehealth, fully online self-managed, randomized control trials, and clinical service delivery). Intelligent Research and Intervention Software supports persuasive technology elements (e.g. tailoring, reminders, and personalization) as well as staff management tools. Results from the System Usability Scale involving 30 Staff and Administrative users across multiple projects were positive with overall mean score of 70 ("Acceptable"). The mean score for "Usability" sub-scale was 82 and for "Learnability" sub-scale 61. There were no significant differences in perceptions of usability across user groups or levels of experience. Application performance management analytics (e.g. Application Performance Index scores) across two test sites indicate the software platform is robust and reliable when compared to industry standards. Intelligent Research and Intervention Software is successfully operating as a flexible platform for creating, delivering, and evaluating eHealth interventions.

  16. Home-based versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation: abridged Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, S A; Taylor, R S; Jolly, K; Zawada, A; Dean, S G; Cowie, A; Norton, R J; Dalal, H M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To update the Cochrane review comparing the effects of home-based and supervised centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) on mortality and morbidity, quality of life, and modifiable cardiac risk factors in patients with heart disease. Methods Systematic review and meta-analysis. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL were searched up to October 2014, without language restriction. Randomised trials comparing home-based and centre-based CR programmes in adults with myocardial infarction, angina, heart failure or who had undergone coronary revascularisation were included. Results 17 studies with 2172 patients were included. No difference was seen between home-based and centre-based CR in terms of: mortality (relative risk (RR) 0.79, 95% CI 0.43 to 1.47); cardiac events; exercise capacity (mean difference (MD) −0.10, −0.29 to 0.08); total cholesterol (MD 0.07 mmol/L, −0.24 to 0.11); low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (MD −0.06 mmol/L, −0.27 to 0.15); triglycerides (MD −0.16 mmol/L, −0.38 to 0.07); systolic blood pressure (MD 0.2 mm Hg, −3.4 to 3.8); smoking (RR 0.98, 0.79 to 1.21); health-related quality of life and healthcare costs. Lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (MD −0.07 mmol/L, −0.11 to −0.03, p=0.001) and lower diastolic blood pressure (MD −1.9 mm Hg, −0.8 to −3.0, p=0.009) were observed in centre-based participants. Home-based CR was associated with slightly higher adherence (RR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.07). Conclusions Home-based and centre-based CR provide similar benefits in terms of clinical and health-related quality of life outcomes at equivalent cost for those with heart failure and following myocardial infarction and revascularisation. PMID:27738516

  17. Creating a Knowledge Translation Platform: nine lessons from the Zambia Forum for Health Research.

    PubMed

    Kasonde, Joseph M; Campbell, Sandy

    2012-10-03

    The concept of the Knowledge Translation Platform (KTP) provides cohesion and leadership for national-level knowledge translation efforts. In this review, we discuss nine key lessons documenting the experience of the Zambia Forum for Health Research, primarily to inform and exchange experience with the growing community of African KTPs. Lessons from ZAMFOHR's organizational development include the necessity of selecting a multi-stakeholder and -sectoral Board of Directors; performing comprehensive situation analyses to understand not only the prevailing research-and-policy dynamics but a precise operational niche; and selecting a leader that bridges the worlds of research and policy. Programmatic lessons include focusing on building the capacity of both policy-makers and researchers; building a database of local evidence and national-level actors involved in research and policy; and catalyzing work in particular issue areas by identifying leaders from the research community, creating policy-maker demand for research evidence, and fostering the next generation by mentoring both up-and-coming researchers and policy-makers. Ultimately, ZAMFOHR's experience shows that an African KTP must pay significant attention to its organizational details. A KTP must also invest in the skill base of the wider community and, more importantly, of its own staff. Given the very real deficit of research-support skills in most low-income countries - in synthesis, in communications, in brokering, in training - a KTP must spend significant time and resources in building these types of in-house expertise. And lastly, the role of networking cannot be underestimated. As a fully-networked KTP, ZAMFOHR has benefited from the innovations of other KTPs, from funding opportunities and partnerships, and from invaluable technical support from both African and northern colleagues.

  18. Predictors of caregiver burden across the home-based palliative care trajectory in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Guerriere, Denise; Husain, Amna; Zagorski, Brandon; Marshall, Denise; Seow, Hsien; Brazil, Kevin; Kennedy, Julia; Burns, Sheri; Brooks, Heather; Coyte, Peter C

    2016-07-01

    Family caregivers of patients enrolled in home-based palliative care programmes provide unpaid care and assistance with daily activities to terminally ill family members. Caregivers often experience caregiver burden, which is an important predictor of anxiety and depression that can extend into bereavement. We conducted a longitudinal, prospective cohort study to comprehensively assess modifiable and non-modifiable patient and caregiver factors that account for caregiver burden over the palliative care trajectory. Caregivers (n = 327) of patients with malignant neoplasm were recruited from two dedicated home-based palliative care programmes in Southern Ontario, Canada from 1 July 2010 to 31 August 2012. Data were obtained from bi-weekly telephone interviews with caregivers from study admission until death, and from palliative care programme and home-care agency databases. Information collected comprised patient and caregiver demographics, utilisation of privately and publicly financed resources, patient clinical status and caregiver burden. The average age of the caregivers was 59.0 years (SD: 13.2), and almost 70% were female. Caregiver burden increased over time in a non-linear fashion from study admission to patient death. Increased monthly unpaid care-giving time costs, monthly public personal support worker costs, emergency department visits and low patient functional status were associated with higher caregiver burden. Greater use of hospice care was associated with lower burden. Female caregivers tended to report more burden compared to men as death approached, and burden was higher when patients were male. Low patient functional status was the strongest predictor of burden. Understanding the influence of modifiable and non-modifiable factors on the experience of burden over the palliative trajectory is essential for the development and targeting of programmes and policies to support family caregivers and reduce burden. Supporting caregivers can have

  19. Analysis of an innovative survey platform: comparison of the public's responses to human health and salmon genomics surveys.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rana; Bailey, Jennifer; Danielson, Peter

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents the results of the first two surveys conducted using the innovative NERD (Norms Evolving in Response to Dilemmas) platform. The structure, results, and analysis of the first two NERD surveys on genomics and human health and salmon genomics are compared. This comparison demonstrates that NERD is a cost-effective and efficient public consultation and experimental tool that has provided insight on public acceptance of new technologies such as genomics.

  20. Family Members Providing Home-Based Palliative Care to Older Adults: The Enactment of Multiple Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemmer, Sarah J.; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Forbes, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Canadians are experiencing increased life expectancy and chronic illness requiring end-of-life care. There is limited research on the multiple roles for family members providing home-based palliative care. Based on a larger ethnographic study of client-family-provider relationships in home-based palliative care, this qualitative secondary analysis…

  1. Entrepreneurial Checklist Tool for Beginning Farm and Home-Based Businesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafie, A. R.; Nartea, Theresa

    2012-01-01

    Extension educators entertain frequent questions on beginning a farm or starting a home-based business. Retired, unemployed, and displaced workers consider starting a small farm or home-based business. Determining educational needs or individual business aptitude is time consuming. Lengthy and comprehensive skill-based checklists exist for…

  2. A Controlled Trial of Hospital versus Home-Based Exercise in Cardiac Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Heather M.; Smith, Kelly M.; Kodis, Jennifer; McKelvie, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effect of 6-month hospital-based exercise training versus 6-month monitored home-based training in cardiac rehabilitation patients following surgery, investigating which conferred the greatest physical, quality of life, and social support benefits. Home-based training resulted in improvements in exercise performance as great as those…

  3. Latino Parent Home-Based Practices that Bolster Student Academic Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mena, Jasmine A.

    2011-01-01

    Home-based parental involvement practices (i.e., educational encouragement, monitoring, and support) and their impact on students' academic persistence were investigated with a sample of 137, ninth-grade Latino students in a northeast high school. Structural Equation Modeling results indicate that the relationship between home-based parental…

  4. Kinect system in home-based cardiovascular rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Ágata; Gabriel, Joaquim; Melo, Cristina; Machado, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases lead to a high consumption of financial resources. An important part of the recovery process is the cardiovascular rehabilitation. This study aimed to present a new cardiovascular rehabilitation system to 11 outpatients with coronary artery disease from a Hospital in Porto, Portugal, later collecting their opinions. This system is based on a virtual reality game system, using the Kinect sensor while performing an exercise protocol which is integrated in a home-based cardiovascular rehabilitation programme, with a duration of 6 months and at the maintenance phase. The participants responded to a questionnaire asking for their opinion about the system. The results demonstrated that 91% of the participants (n = 10) enjoyed the artwork, while 100% (n = 11) agreed on the importance and usefulness of the automatic counting of the number of repetitions, moreover 64% (n = 7) reported motivation to continue performing the programme after the end of the study, and 100% (n = 11) recognized Kinect as an instrument with potential to be an asset in cardiovascular rehabilitation. Criticisms included limitations in motion capture and gesture recognition, 91% (n = 10), and the lack of home space, 27% (n = 3). According to the participants' opinions, the Kinect has the potential to be used in cardiovascular rehabilitation; however, several technical details require improvement, particularly regarding the motion capture and gesture recognition.

  5. Infection control in home-based care for people living with HIV/AIDS/TB in South Africa: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Akintola, Olagoke; Hangulu, Lydia

    2014-01-01

    The majority of HIV and AIDS patients in sub-Saharan African countries receive health care services at home. Yet research on infection control in home-based care settings is virtually non-existent. This study explored infection control practices in home-based care in a South African province with a high HIV/TB prevalence. We conducted interviews with 10 managers of home-based care organizations and 10 focus group discussions with 80 volunteer caregivers working in high HIV/TB prevalent communities in South Africa. Findings show that volunteers had insufficient training on infection control. Materials necessary for the maintenance of hygiene and protective equipment were in short supply and the protective equipment supplied was of poor quality. Home-based care patients lived in crowded and poor conditions, and family members were negatively disposed to the use of protective devices. Together, these factors put volunteers and family caregivers at risk of infection with HIV and TB. Health policy should address the training of volunteer caregivers and the regular supply of good quality materials to ensure effective infection control. It is also important to educate families on infection control. Finally, there is a need to integrate HIV and TB control at the community level.

  6. A randomized controlled trial of telephone-mentoring with home-based walking preceding rehabilitation in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Cameron-Tucker, Helen Laura; Wood-Baker, Richard; Joseph, Lyn; Walters, Julia A; Schüz, Natalie; Walters, E Haydn

    2016-01-01

    Purpose With the limited reach of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) and low levels of daily physical activity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a need exists to increase daily exercise. This study evaluated telephone health-mentoring targeting home-based walking (tele-rehab) compared to usual waiting time (usual care) followed by group PR. Patients and methods People with COPD were randomized to tele-rehab (intervention) or usual care (controls). Tele-rehab delivered by trained nurse health-mentors supported participants’ home-based walking over 8–12 weeks. PR, delivered to both groups simultaneously, included 8 weeks of once-weekly education and self-management skills, with separate supervised exercise. Data were collected at three time-points: baseline (TP1), before (TP2), and after (TP3) PR. The primary outcome was change in physical capacity measured by 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) with two tests performed at each time-point. Secondary outcomes included changes in self-reported home-based walking, health-related quality of life, and health behaviors. Results Of 65 recruits, 25 withdrew before completing PR. Forty attended a median of 6 (4) education sessions. Seventeen attended supervised exercise (5±2 sessions). Between TP1 and TP2, there was a statistically significant increase in the median 6MWD of 12 (39.1) m in controls, but no change in the tele-rehab group. There were no significant changes in 6MWD between other time-points or groups, or significant change in any secondary outcomes. Participants attending supervised exercise showed a nonsignificant improvement in 6MWD, 12.3 (71) m, while others showed no change, 0 (33) m. The mean 6MWD was significantly greater, but not clinically meaningful, for the second test compared to the first at all time-points. Conclusion Telephone-mentoring for home-based walking demonstrated no benefit to exercise capacity. Two 6-minute walking tests at each time-point may not be necessary. Supervised exercise

  7. Geographic health information systems: a platform to support the 'triple aim'.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Marie Lynn; Ferranti, Jeffrey; Strauss, Benjamin; Neelon, Brian; Califf, Robert M

    2013-09-01

    Despite the rapid growth of electronic health data, most data systems do not connect individual patient records to data sets from outside the health care delivery system. These isolated data systems cannot support efforts to recognize or address how the physical and environmental context of each patient influences health choices and health outcomes. In this article we describe how a geographic health information system in Durham, North Carolina, links health system and social and environmental data via shared geography to provide a multidimensional understanding of individual and community health status and vulnerabilities. Geographic health information systems can be useful in supporting the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Triple Aim Initiative to improve the experience of care, improve the health of populations, and reduce per capita costs of health care. A geographic health information system can also provide a comprehensive information base for community health assessment and intervention for accountable care that includes the entire population of a geographic area.

  8. Parent and Child Perceptions of a Self-Regulated, Home-Based Exercise Program for Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Happ, Mary Beth; Hoffman, Leslie A.; Higgins, Linda W.; DiVirgilio, Dana; Orenstein, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite recognized benefits, many children with cystic fibrosis (CF) do not consistently participate in physical activities. There is little empirical literature regarding the feelings and attitudes of children with CF toward exercise programs, parental roles in exercise, or factors influencing exercise experiences during research participation. Objectives To describe the exercise experiences of children with CF and their parents during participation in a six-month program of self-regulated, home-based exercise. Methods This qualitative descriptive study nested within a randomized controlled trial of a self-regulated, home-based exercise program used serial semi-structured interviews conducted individually at two and six months with 11 purposively selected children with CF and their parent(s). Results Six boys and five girls, ages 10–16, and parents (nine mothers, four fathers) participated in a total of 44 interviews. Five major thematic categories describing child and parent perceptions and experience of the bicycle exercise program were identified in the transcripts: (a) motivators; (b) barriers; (c) effort/work; (d) exercise routine; (e) sustaining exercise. Research participation, parent-family participation, health benefits, and the child’s personality traits were primary motivators. Competing activities, priorities and responsibilities were the major barriers to implementing the exercise program as prescribed. Motivation waned and the novelty wore off for several (approximately half) parent-child dyads, who planned to decrease or stop the exercise program after the study ended. Discussion We identified motivators and barriers to a self-regulated, home-based exercise program for children with CF that can be addressed in planning future exercise interventions to maximize the health benefits for children with CF and the feasibility and acceptability to the children and their families. PMID:23995464

  9. Comparison of group-based exercise versus home-based exercise in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: effects on Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Indices, quality of life and depression.

    PubMed

    Karapolat, Hale; Akkoc, Yeşim; Sari, Ismail; Eyigor, Sibel; Akar, Servet; Kirazli, Yeşim; Akkoc, Nurullah

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this non-randomised controlled trial was to evaluate the impact of group-based exercise programme and a home-based exercise programme on Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Indices, depression and quality of life in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Approximately 41 patients in a rehabilitation unit were divided into two groups, either group- or home-based exercise programme. Exercise sessions were performed three times a week for a period of 6 weeks. The patients were compared before and after the rehabilitation programme, with respect to Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Assessment Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and The Nottingham Health Profile (NHP). A statistically significant improvement was observed on BASDAI, BASMI and energy, pain, reaction of emotional and sleep subscores of NHP in both exercise groups after the exercise programme (p < 0.05). No statistically significant changes were detected in BASFI, BDI and social and mobility subscores of NHP in both exercise groups (p > 0.05). No statistically significant differences were found between the two exercise programmes (p > 0.05). Group and home-based exercise programmes are efficient in improving symptoms and mobility and had an important effect on quality of life in patients with AS. Home-based exercise programme, as it is cheaper, more easily performed and efficient, may be preferable for the management programme in AS.

  10. The Incidence and Wage Consequences of Home-Based Work in the United States, 1980-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oettinger, Gerald S.

    2011-01-01

    This study documents the rapid growth in home-based wage and salary employment and the sharp decline in the home-based wage penalty in the United States between 1980 and 2000. These twin patterns, observed for both men and women in most occupation groups, suggest that employer costs of providing home-based work arrangements have decreased.…

  11. "We Smoke the Same Pipe": Religion and Community Home-Based Care for PLWH in Rural Swaziland.

    PubMed

    Root, Robin; Van Wyngaard, Arnau; Whiteside, Alan

    2017-04-01

    We draw on a study of a church-run community home-based care organization in Swaziland to explore how individuals living with HIV perceived caregivers' impact on well-being. Our primary concern was to examine how religion, as a heuristic practice of Christian-based caregiving, was felt to be consequential in a direly underserved region. Part of a larger medical anthropological project, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 79 community home-based care clients, of whom half (53%) said they would have died, some from suicide, without its services. We utilized a critical phenomenological approach to interpret semantic and latent themes, and explicated these themes within a 'healthworld' framework. Participants were resolute that caregivers be Christian, less for ideological positioning than for perceived ontological sameness and ascribed traits: "telling the truth" about treatment, confidentiality, and an ethos of unconditional love that restored clients' desire to live and adhere to treatment. Findings are intended to help theorize phenomenological meanings of care, morality, health, and sickness, and to interrogate authoritative biomedically based rationalities that underwrite most HIV-related global health policy.

  12. Effects of home-based exercise on postural control and sensory organization in individuals with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Nocera, Joe; Horvat, Michael; Ray, Christopher T

    2009-12-01

    Loss of function and postural instability occur in Parkinson disease (PD). Dynamic exercise interventions are successful in improving motor control and physical function. However, most programs are based in a health facility or physical therapy setting and involve travel. With the limitations associated with PD (e.g. health care and medication cost as well as travel limitations) these therapies may be inaccessible and exclude some individuals from maintaining or increasing their function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based exercise intervention on postural control in individuals with PD. Multivariate analysis of covariance was performed on individuals with PD (N = 10) and healthy aged-matched controls (N = 10). Participants were assessed utilizing computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) before and after a 10-week exercise intervention. Participants were instructed on proper technique prior to the intervention, were given an illustrated home program, and were monitored weekly concerning their progress. Pre-intervention assessment demonstrated that individuals with PD had statically lower scores on a Sensory Organization Test (p < .05). Following the intervention, results indicated no statistical difference between individuals with PD and aged match controls (p > .05). This initial study indicates that a home exercise intervention is an effective method of improving postural control in individuals with PD. Results from this investigation support further study to determine the extent to which both preventative and restorative home-based programs can improve postural control.

  13. A Food in Health Security (FIHS) platform in the Asia-Pacific Region: the way forward.

    PubMed

    Wahlqvist, Mark L; Keatinge, John Donough H; Butler, Colin D; Friel, Sharon; McKay, John; Easdown, Warwick; Kuo, Ken N; Huang, Ching-jang; Pan, Wen-Harn; Yang, Ray-Yu; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Chiu, Ya-Wen; Jaron, Dov; Krawinkel, Michael; Barlow, Snow; Walsh, Greg; Chiang, Tung-liang; Huang, Po-Chao; Li, Duo

    2009-01-01

    The advent of multiple global crises, especially those of climate change, economics, energy, water, food and health evident in 2008, is of considerable moment to those who are suffering their consequences and for those with responsibility and interest in the systems affected. A coalition of parties in the Asia Pacific Region who work in the food and health systems met in August, 2009 in Taiwan and instigated a Food in Health Security (FIHS) Network which might join with other like-minded networks in and beyond the region. Sustainable health has many dimensions, among which food and nutrition is often neglected; there is a wide spectrum of nutritionally-related disorders. Malnutrition remains the global concern for agricultural research and development scientists and linkage with the health sector is key to progress. The disconnect between agricultural and health sectors negatively impacts consumer nutrition and health. Ethical and equity affect food and health systems. Food and health security is attainable only when the underlying social inequities are addressed; it is an ethical issue as reflected in the UN Universal declaration of Human Rights which includes the right to food for health and well-being. Food and health security are part of the larger security agenda and merit corresponding attention. Policy recommendations with immediacy are greater investment in combined food and health research; an Asia Pacific security agenda which emphasizes planetary, human, health and food security as relevant to traditional defence security; and community and household security measures which include maternal literacy, communication technology and entrepreneurial opportunity.

  14. Illness experiences of persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: self-perceived efficacy of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Juliana Maria de Sousa; Martín-Nogueras, Ana; Nations, Marilyn

    2014-06-01

    This qualitative study explores the illness experiences, the efficacy of pulmonary rehabilitation as perceived by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and their rationale for improvements in health. 23 patients participated in a daily, three-month home-based pulmonary rehabilitation. A pre-post self-perceived assessment of efficacy was conducted. Semi-structured interviews, illness narratives and participant-observation provided a "dense description" of patients' lived-experience before and after the program. Interviews and narratives were tape-recorded, transcribed and coded. Qualitative data was subjected to "thematic content analysis" and "contextualized semantic interpretation". Patients compare functional status before and after falling ill, experience loss, stigma and depression, describe health improvements and judge the pulmonary rehabilitation's efficacy. Giving voice to chronically-ill patients, as individuals, is needed. To reduce clinical conflicts, health professionals should encourage illness narratives and value their patients' lived-experience.

  15. A Web-Based Platform to Support an Evidence-Based Mental Health Intervention: Lessons From the CBITS Web Site

    PubMed Central

    Vona, Pamela; Wilmoth, Pete; Jaycox, Lisa H.; McMillen, Janey S.; Kataoka, Sheryl H.; Wong, Marleen; DeRosier, Melissa E.; Langley, Audra K.; Kaufman, Joshua; Tang, Lingqi; Stein, Bradley D.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore the role of Web-based platforms in behavioral health, the study examined usage of a Web site for supporting training and implementation of an evidence-based intervention. Methods Using data from an online registration survey and Google Analytics, the investigators examined user characteristics and Web site utilization. Results Site engagement was substantial across user groups. Visit duration differed by registrants’ characteristics. Less experienced clinicians spent more time on the Web site. The training section accounted for most page views across user groups. Individuals previously trained in the Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools intervention viewed more implementation assistance and online community pages than did other user groups. Conclusions Web-based platforms have the potential to support training and implementation of evidence-based interventions for clinicians of varying levels of experience and may facilitate more rapid dissemination. Web-based platforms may be promising for trauma-related interventions, because training and implementation support should be readily available after a traumatic event. PMID:25124275

  16. Service and business model for technology enabled and home-based cardiac rehabilitation programs.

    PubMed

    Sarela, Antti; Whittaker, Frank; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation programs are comprehensive life-style programs aimed at preventing recurrence of a cardiac event. However, the current programs have globally significantly low levels of uptake. Home-based model can be a viable alternative to hospital-based programs. We developed and analysed a service and business model for home based cardiac rehabilitation based on personal mentoring using mobile phones and web services. We analysed the different organizational and economical aspects of setting up and running the home based program and propose a potential business model for a sustainable and viable service. The model can be extended to management of other chronic conditions to enable transition from hospital and care centre based treatments to sustainable home-based care.

  17. Compact handheld low-cost biosensor platform for remote health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastanin, J.; Lenaerts, C.; Gailly, P.; Jans, H.; Huang, C.; Lagae, L.; Kokkinos, D.; Fleury-Frenette, K.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present an original concept of plasmonic-related instrumentation platform dedicated to diagnostic biosensing tests out of the laboratory. The developed instrumental platform includes both disposable one-use microfluidic affinity biochip and compact optical readout device for biochip monitoring involving mobile Internet devices for data processing and communication. The biochip includes both microfluidic and optical coupling structures formed into a single plastic slab. The microfluidic path of the biochip operates in passive capillary pumping mode. In the proof-of-concept prototype, we address specifically the sensing format involving Surface Plasmon Resonance phenomenon. The biochip is plugged in the readout device without the use of an index matching fluid. An essential advantage of the developed biochip is that its implementation involves conventional hot embossing and thin film deposition process, perfectly suited for mass production of low-cost microfluidic biochip for biochemical applications.

  18. Impact of an mHealth Platform for Pregnancy on Nutrition and Lifestyle of the Reproductive Population: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Van Dijk, Matthijs R; Huijgen, Nicole A; Willemsen, Sten P; Laven, Joop SE; Steegers, Eric AP

    2016-01-01

    Background Poor nutrition and lifestyle behaviors exert detrimental effects on reproduction and health during the life course. Therefore, lifestyle interventions during the periconceptional period can improve fertility, pregnancy outcome, and health of subsequent generations. Objective This survey investigates the compliance, usability, and initial effectiveness of the Web-based mHealth platform, Smarter Pregnancy. Methods A free subscription to the mHealth platform, Smarter Pregnancy, was provided to couples contemplating pregnancy (n=1275) or already pregnant (n=603). After baseline identification of inadequate nutrition and lifestyle behaviors, a personal online coaching program of 6 months was generated. Using multiple imputation and the generalized estimating equation model with independent correlations, we estimated the changes from inadequate to adequate nutrition and lifestyle behaviors over time. Subgroup analyses were performed for (1) overweight and obese women (body mass index [BMI] ≥25 kg/m2), (2) pregnant women at the start of the program, and (3) couples. Results A 64.86% (1218/1878) compliance rate was observed and 54.7% (range 39.2-73.4%) of participants rated the program usability as positive or very positive. Adequate nutrition and lifestyle behaviors at baseline were 21.57% (405/1878) for vegetable intake, 52.61% (988/1878) for fruit intake, 85.44% (1303/1525) for folic acid use, 86.79% (1630/1878) for no tobacco use, and 64.43% (1210/1878) for no alcohol consumption. After 6 months of coaching, these lifestyle behaviors improved by 26.3% (95% CI 23.0-29.9) for vegetable intake, 38.4% (95% CI 34.5-42.5) for fruit intake, 56.3% (95% CI 48.8-63.6) for folic acid use, 35.1% (95% CI 29.1-41.6) for no tobacco use, and 41.9% (95% CI 35.2-48.9) for no alcohol consumption. The program showed the strongest effectiveness for participating couples. Conclusions This novel Web-based mHealth platform shows high compliance and usability, and users

  19. MetaSurv: Web-Platform Generator for the Monitoring of Health Indicators and Interactive Geographical Information System.

    PubMed

    Toubiana, Laurent; Moreau, Stéphane; Bonnard, Gaétan

    2005-01-01

    The control of the transmissible epidemics of diseases requires fast and effective tools for data acquisition, analysis, and information feedback to the actors of health like to general public. We present a tool for the fast creation of platforms of monitoring on Internet allowing the collection and the analysis in real time of the epidemic data of any origin with the dynamic and interactive cartographic representation. A Web-based Geographic Information System (Web-GIS) has been designed for communicable diseases monitoring. The Web-GIS was coupled to a data warehouse and embedded in an n-tier architecture designed as the Multi-Source Information System. It allows to access views of communicable diseases. Thus it is a useful tool for supporting health care decision-making for communicable diseases.This tool is based on the 20 years experiment of the Network Sentinels, with the daily participation of the general practitioners.

  20. A feasibility study of home-based contingency management with adolescent smokers of rural Appalachia.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Brady; Harris, Millie; Slone, Stacey A; Shelton, Brent J; Dallery, Jesse; Stoops, William; Lewis, Russell

    2015-12-01

    Cigarette smoking among adolescents remains a significant public health concern. This problem is compounded in regions such as rural Appalachia where rates of smoking are consistently higher than national averages and access to treatments is limited. The current research evaluated a home-based contingency management program completed over the Internet with adolescent smokers recruited from rural Appalachia. Participants (N = 62) submitted 3 video recordings per day showing their breath carbon monoxide (CO) levels using a handheld CO monitor. Participants were assigned to either an active treatment condition (AT; n = 31) in which reductions in breath CO were reinforced or a control treatment condition (CT; n = 31) in which providing timely video recordings were reinforced with no requirement to reduce breath CO. Results revealed that participants in the AT condition reduced their breath CO levels significantly more so during treatment than participants in the CT condition. Within-group comparisons revealed that participants in both conditions significantly reduced their breath CO, self-reported smoking, and nicotine dependence ratings during treatment. However, only participants in the AT condition significantly reduced urinary cotinine levels during treatment, and only participants in this condition maintained all reductions until 6-week post treatment. Participants in the CT condition only maintained self-reported smoking reductions until posttreatment assessments. These results support the feasibility and initial efficacy of this incentive-based approach to smoking cessation with adolescent smokers living in rural locations.

  1. Engaging military parents in a home-based reintegration program: a consideration of strategies.

    PubMed

    Ross, Abigail M; DeVoe, Ellen R

    2014-02-01

    For more than a decade, the long wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have placed tremendous and cumulative strain on U.S. military personnel and their families. The high operational tempo, length, and number of deployments-and greater in-theater exposure to threat-have resulted in well-documented psychological health concerns among service members and veterans. In addition, there is increasing and compelling evidence describing the significant deleterious impact of the deployment cycle on family members, including children, in military-connected families. However, rates of engagement and service utilization in prevention and intervention services continue to lag far below apparent need among service members and their families, because of both practical and psychological barriers. The authors describe the dynamic and ultimately successful process of engaging military families with young children in a home-based reintegration program designed to support parenting and strengthen parent-child relationships as service member parents move back into family life. In addition to the integration of existing evidence-based engagement strategies, the authors applied a strengths-based approach to working with military families and worked from a community-based participatory foundation to enhance family engagement and program completion. Implications for engagement of military personnel and their loved ones are discussed.

  2. Comparison of Veteran experiences of low-cost, home-based diet and exercise interventions.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Bree; Krein, Sarah L; Bentley, Douglas R; Hughes, Maria E; Giardino, Nicholas D; Richardson, Caroline R

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a significant health problem among Veterans who receive care from the Department of Veterans Affairs, as it is for so many other Americans. Veterans from Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) experience a myriad of chronic conditions, which can make it difficult to maintain a physically active lifestyle. This pilot study tested the feasibility and user satisfaction with three low-cost, home-based diet and exercise programs, as well as point-of-decision prompts among these Veterans. The three programs target mechanisms that have been shown to improve healthy behavior change, including (1) online mediated social support, (2) objective monitoring of physical activity, and (3) structured high-intensity workouts. This was a randomized crossover trial; each participant used two of the three programs, and all used the point-of-decision prompts. Our qualitative results identified five overall themes related to social support, objective monitoring, structured activity, awareness and understanding, and the point-of-decision prompts. In general, participants were satisfied with and lost weight with each of the interventions. This study demonstrated that these low-cost interventions could be successful with the OIF/OEF Veteran population. A larger and longer study is planned to further investigate the effectiveness of these interventions.

  3. Integration proposal through standard-based design of an end-to-end platform for p-Health environments.

    PubMed

    Martíínez, I; Trigo, J D; Martínez-Espronceda, M; Escayola, J; Muñoz, P; Serrano, L; García, J

    2009-01-01

    Interoperability among medical devices and compute engines in the personal environment of the patient, and with healthcare information systems in the remote monitoring and management process is a key need that requires developments supported on standard-based design. Even though there have been some international initiatives to combine different standards, the vision of an entire end-to-end standard-based system is the next challenge. This paper presents the implementation guidelines of a ubiquitous platform for Personal Health (p-Health). It is standard-based using the two main medical norms in this context: ISO/IEEE11073 in the patient environment for medical device interoperability, and EN13606 to allow the interoperable communication of the Electronic Healthcare Record of the patient. Furthermore, the proposal of a new protocol for End-to-End Standard Harmonization (E2ESHP) is presented in order to make possible the end-to-end standard integration. The platform has been designed to comply with the last ISO/IEEE11073 and EN13606 available versions, and tested in a laboratory environment as a proof-of-concept to illustrate its feasibility as an end-to-end standard-based solution.

  4. Feasibility and effect of home-based therapy programmes for children with cerebral palsy: a protocol for a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Beckers, L W M E; Schnackers, M L A P; Janssen-Potten, Y J; Kleijnen, J; Steenbergen, B

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Given the promising advantages of upper extremity home-based programmes in children with cerebral palsy (CP), a systematic review of the available literature on this topic is warranted. The purpose of the systematic review described in this protocol is to investigate currently available home-based occupational therapy and physiotherapy programmes regarding both their feasibility and effect. Methods and analysis This protocol describes a systematic review, developed in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocols (PRISMA-P) 2015. Studies will be included in which primary data are collected, participants are children aged <18 years with any type of CP and the intervention of interest is a home-based occupational therapy or physiotherapy intervention. Comparators of interest are: no therapy, care as usual, centre-based occupational therapy or physiotherapy, an alternative home-based programme and a medical intervention. Studies will be included that report either on feasibility (ie, acceptability, demand, implementation, practicality, adaptation, expansion or integration) or on efficacy/effectiveness (ie, child-related upper extremity outcomes within all International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health levels or parent-related/caregiver-related outcomes on the psychological and social domain). Relevant studies will be identified by searching the databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, PEDro, OTSeeker and CPCI-S as well as the trial registers ICTRP and CENTRAL, the reference lists of included records and by circulating a bibliography of the included records to authors of included studies. There will be no restrictions on language or year of publication. The search strategy consists of terms related to the population and intervention. Data will be extracted in duplicate using a digital data extraction form. Ethics and dissemination The proposed study does not involve collection of

  5. Ubiquitous and ambient-assisted living eHealth platforms for Down's syndrome and palliative care in the Republic of Panama: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Saldaña Barrios, Juan Jose; Mendoza, Luis; Pitti, Edgardo; Vargas, Miguel

    2016-10-21

    In this work, the authors present two eHealth platforms that are examples of how health systems are migrating from client-server architecture to the web-based and ubiquitous paradigm. These two platforms were modeled, designed, developed and implemented with positive results. First, using ambient-assisted living and ubiquitous computing, the authors enhance how palliative care is being provided to the elderly patients and patients with terminal illness, making the work of doctors, nurses and other health actors easier. Second, applying machine learning methods and a data-centered, ubiquitous, patient's results' repository, the authors intent to improve the Down's syndrome risk estimation process with more accurate predictions based on local woman patients' parameters. These two eHealth platforms can improve the quality of life, not only physically but also psychologically, of the patients and their families in the country of Panama.

  6. Mobile voice health monitoring using a wearable accelerometer sensor and a smartphone platform

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Daryush D.; Zañartu, Matías; Feng, Shengran W.; Cheyne, Harold A.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Many common voice disorders are chronic or recurring conditions that are likely to result from faulty and/or abusive patterns of vocal behavior, referred to generically as vocal hyperfunction. An ongoing goal in clinical voice assessment is the development and use of noninvasively derived measures to quantify and track the daily status of vocal hyperfunction so that the diagnosis and treatment of such behaviorally based voice disorders can be improved. This paper reports on the development of a new, versatile, and cost-effective clinical tool for mobile voice monitoring that acquires the high-bandwidth signal from an accelerometer sensor placed on the neck skin above the collarbone. Using a smartphone as the data acquisition platform, the prototype device provides a user-friendly interface for voice use monitoring, daily sensor calibration, and periodic alert capabilities. Pilot data are reported from three vocally normal speakers and three subjects with voice disorders to demonstrate the potential of the device to yield standard measures of fundamental frequency and sound pressure level and model-based glottal airflow properties. The smartphone-based platform enables future clinical studies for the identification of the best set of measures for differentiating between normal and hyperfunctional patterns of voice use. PMID:22875236

  7. Mobile voice health monitoring using a wearable accelerometer sensor and a smartphone platform.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Daryush D; Zañartu, Matías; Feng, Shengran W; Cheyne, Harold A; Hillman, Robert E

    2012-11-01

    Many common voice disorders are chronic or recurring conditions that are likely to result from faulty and/or abusive patterns of vocal behavior, referred to generically as vocal hyperfunction. An ongoing goal in clinical voice assessment is the development and use of noninvasively derived measures to quantify and track the daily status of vocal hyperfunction so that the diagnosis and treatment of such behaviorally based voice disorders can be improved. This paper reports on the development of a new, versatile, and cost-effective clinical tool for mobile voice monitoring that acquires the high-bandwidth signal from an accelerometer sensor placed on the neck skin above the collarbone. Using a smartphone as the data acquisition platform, the prototype device provides a user-friendly interface for voice use monitoring, daily sensor calibration, and periodic alert capabilities. Pilot data are reported from three vocally normal speakers and three subjects with voice disorders to demonstrate the potential of the device to yield standard measures of fundamental frequency and sound pressure level and model-based glottal airflow properties. The smartphone-based platform enables future clinical studies for the identification of the best set of measures for differentiating between normal and hyperfunctional patterns of voice use.

  8. The effect of a home-based exercise intervention on postnatal depression and fatigue: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Fatemeh; Malakooti, Jamileh; Babapoor, Jalil; Mohammad-Alizadeh-Charandabi, Sakineh

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to determine the effectiveness of home-based low-intensity stretching and breathing exercises on the reduction of 1 and 2 month post-partum depression (primary outcome) and fatigue (secondary outcome) scores. In this randomized controlled trial, 127 women at 26-32 weeks' gestation with Edinburgh score less than 15, who attended 14 selected health centres in Tabriz, Iran, were randomly allocated into one of the following three groups: no intervention group, group receiving training for exercise during pregnancy, and group receiving training for exercise during pregnancy and post-partum period until 2 months after delivery. Depression and fatigue scores were measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and Fatigue Identification Form, respectively, at baseline, 1 month and 2 months after delivery. The data were analysed with SPSS-ver. 13.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL, USA) using chi-square, Fisher's exact and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Mean rank of the difference scores of depression and fatigue were not significantly different among the groups, both at 1 and 2 months post-partum (P > 0.05). Therefore, this study did not provide evidence to show that training women to do the home-based exercises during pregnancy or during pregnancy and post-partum period have a preventive effect on post-partum depression and fatigue. However, more studies are needed for making precise judgment.

  9. Improving quality of home-based postnatal care by microteaching of multipurpose workers in rural and urban slum areas of Chandigarh, India: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Madhu; Tripathy, Jaya Prasad; Jamir, Limalemla; Sarwa, Ashutosh; Sinha, Smita; Bhag, Chering

    2017-01-01

    Background Microteaching is an efficient teaching tool to improve skills. Until now, its use is very limited in the health sector. A pilot study was carried out to improve the quality of home-based postnatal care by microteaching of health workers (HWs) and ascertain its feasibility for supportive supervision. Methods All (n=12) the HWs catering to a population of ~0.1 million were video recorded while performing home-based postnatal check up in Chandigarh from August 2013 to December 2014. After each round, HWs were shown their videos and trained in the facility and at home. Video recordings, assessments followed by training, continued until HWs acquired the intended skills. A pretested structured checklist based on the national home-based postnatal care guidelines was used for recording and assessing of postnatal skills. A score “0” given for no task, “1” for incorrectly done or partially done task, and “2” for correct task. The average score of each round was calculated and compared. Results The overall skill assessment score improved from 0.64 to 1.76, newborn examination skill from 0.52 to 1.63, maternal examination from 0.54 to 1.62, and counseling from 1.01 to 1.85 after three rounds of video recording. The proportion of HWs carrying a thermometer increased from 21% to 100%. Second and third rounds of video recording and microteaching were successfully carried out by the program supervisors. Conclusion This was the first study to report on the effective use of microteaching in improving home-based postnatal care skills of the health care workers and its feasibility for supportive supervision. PMID:28031730

  10. Effectiveness and Limitations of Unsupervised Home-Based Balance Rehabilitation with Nintendo Wii in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pau, Massimiliano; Coghe, Giancarlo; Corona, Federica; Leban, Bruno; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Cocco, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Balance training represents a critical part of the rehabilitation process of individuals living with multiple sclerosis (MS) since impaired postural control is a distinctive symptom of the disease. In recent years, the use of the Nintendo Wii system has become widespread among rehabilitation specialists for this purpose, but few studies have verified the effectiveness of such an approach using quantitative measures of balance. In this study, we analyzed the postural sway features of a cohort of twenty-seven individuals with MS before and after 5 weeks of unsupervised home-based balance training with the Wii system. Center of pressure (COP) time-series were recorded using a pressure platform and processed to calculate sway area, COP path length, displacements, and velocities in mediolateral (ML) and anteroposterior (AP) directions. Although the results show a significant reduction in sway area, COP displacements, and velocity, such improvements are essentially restricted to the ML direction, as the Wii platform appears to properly stimulate the postural control system in the frontal plane but not in the sagittal one. Available Wii games, although somewhat beneficial, appear not fully suitable for rehabilitation in MS owing to scarce flexibility and adaptability to MS needs and thus specific software should be developed. PMID:26583146

  11. Revisiting practice-based research networks as a platform for mental health services research.

    PubMed

    Curtis McMillen, J; Lenze, Shannon L; Hawley, Kristin M; Osborne, Victoria A

    2009-09-01

    Practice-based research networks (PBRNs)-collaborations of practice settings that work together to generate research knowledge-are underused in mental health services research. This article proposes an agenda for mental health services research that uses a variety of PBRN structures and that focuses on what really happens in practice, the effectiveness of practice innovations in real world care, the challenges of implementing evidence supported interventions, modification of clinician behavior, and assessment of the effect of mental health policy changes on practice. The challenges of conducting research within PBRNs are substantial, including difficulties in maintaining positive member relations, securing ongoing funding, sustaining productivity, overcoming IRB entanglements and achieving both scientific excellence in recruitment and measurement validity and utility for practitioner members. However, the awareness of these challenges allows researchers and practitioners to build networks that creatively overcome them and that infuse mental health services research with heavy doses of the realities of everyday clinical practice.

  12. Innovative models of home-based palliative care.

    PubMed

    Labson, Margherita C; Sacco, Michele M; Weissman, David E; Gornet, Betsy; Stuart, Brad

    2013-01-01

    The focus of palliative care is to alleviate pain and suffering for patients, potentially while they concurrently pursue life-prolonging or curative therapy. The potential breadth of palliative care is recognized by the Medicare program, but the Medicare hospice benefit is narrowly defined and limited to care that is focused on comfort and not on cure. Any organization or setting that has been accredited or certified to provide health care may provide palliative care. Home health agencies are highly attuned to patients' need for palliative care, and often provide palliative care for patients who are ineligible for hospice or have chosen not to enroll in it. Two home health-based programs have reported improved patient satisfaction, better utilization of services, and significant cost savings with palliative care. Moving the focus of care from the hospital to the home and community can be achieved with integrated care and can be facilitated by changes in government policy.

  13. Data Safe Havens and Trust: Toward a Common Understanding of Trusted Research Platforms for Governing Secure and Ethical Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Jacqueline; Dobbs, Christine; Sethi, Nayha; Cunningham, James; Ainsworth, John; Heaven, Martin; Peacock, Trevor; Peacock, Anthony; Jones, Kerina; Laurie, Graeme; Kalra, Dipak

    2016-01-01

    In parallel with the advances in big data-driven clinical research, the data safe haven concept has evolved over the last decade. It has led to the development of a framework to support the secure handling of health care information used for clinical research that balances compliance with legal and regulatory controls and ethical requirements while engaging with the public as a partner in its governance. We describe the evolution of 4 separately developed clinical research platforms into services throughout the United Kingdom-wide Farr Institute and their common deployment features in practice. The Farr Institute is a case study from which we propose a common definition of data safe havens as trusted platforms for clinical academic research. We use this common definition to discuss the challenges and dilemmas faced by the clinical academic research community, to help promote a consistent understanding of them and how they might best be handled in practice. We conclude by questioning whether the common definition represents a safe and trustworthy model for conducting clinical research that can stand the test of time and ongoing technical advances while paying heed to evolving public and professional concerns. PMID:27329087

  14. Research and Deployment a Hospital Open Software Platform for e-Health on the Grid System at VAST/IAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tuyet, Dao; Tuan, Ngo Anh; van Lang, Tran

    Grid computing has been an increasing topic in recent years. It attracts the attention of many scientists from many fields. As a result, many Grid systems have been built for serving people's demands. At present, many tools for developing the Grid systems such as Globus, gLite, Unicore still developed incessantly. Especially, gLite - the Grid Middleware - was developed by the Europe Community scientific in recent years. Constant growth of Grid technology opened the way for new opportunities in term of information and data exchange in a secure and collaborative context. These new opportunities can be exploited to offer physicians new telemedicine services in order to improve their collaborative capacities. Our platform gives physicians an easy method to use telemedicine environment to manage and share patient's information (such as electronic medical record, images formatted DICOM) between remote locations. This paper presents the Grid Infrastructure based on gLite; some main components of gLite; the challenge scenario in which new applications can be developed to improve collaborative work between scientists; the process of deploying Hospital Open software Platform for E-health (HOPE) on the Grid.

  15. Data Safe Havens and Trust: Toward a Common Understanding of Trusted Research Platforms for Governing Secure and Ethical Health Research.

    PubMed

    Lea, Nathan Christopher; Nicholls, Jacqueline; Dobbs, Christine; Sethi, Nayha; Cunningham, James; Ainsworth, John; Heaven, Martin; Peacock, Trevor; Peacock, Anthony; Jones, Kerina; Laurie, Graeme; Kalra, Dipak

    2016-06-21

    In parallel with the advances in big data-driven clinical research, the data safe haven concept has evolved over the last decade. It has led to the development of a framework to support the secure handling of health care information used for clinical research that balances compliance with legal and regulatory controls and ethical requirements while engaging with the public as a partner in its governance. We describe the evolution of 4 separately developed clinical research platforms into services throughout the United Kingdom-wide Farr Institute and their common deployment features in practice. The Farr Institute is a case study from which we propose a common definition of data safe havens as trusted platforms for clinical academic research. We use this common definition to discuss the challenges and dilemmas faced by the clinical academic research community, to help promote a consistent understanding of them and how they might best be handled in practice. We conclude by questioning whether the common definition represents a safe and trustworthy model for conducting clinical research that can stand the test of time and ongoing technical advances while paying heed to evolving public and professional concerns.

  16. Effectiveness of a home-based exercise program on anthropometric and metabolic changes among school cooks.

    PubMed

    Mediano, Mauro Felippe Felix; de Souza, Rita Adriana Gomes; Souza, Amanda Moura; Sichieri, Rosely

    2015-12-01

    The scope of this study was to evaluate the anthropometric and metabolic changes after low intensity home-based exercise. In the school year of 2007, 95 school cooks in the city of Niteroi (State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: home-based exercise (n = 47) or control group (n = 48). The home-based exercise program was performed three times a week, during 40 minutes at moderate intensity. Anthropometric variables were collected at the baseline and after 4 and 8 months, whereas biochemical and individual food intake were measured at the baseline and after 8 months. Energy expenditure was evaluated only at the baseline. The home-based exercise group exhibited a greater weight loss (-0.9 vs. -0.2; p = 0.05) in comparison with controls during the follow-up and the same pattern was found for BMI (-0.1 vs. +0.1; p = 0.07), although without statistical significance. Exercise showed no effects on waist circumference, lipid profile and glucose. In conclusion, greater weight loss was observed in the group that performed low intensity home-based exercise and this strategy can assist in body weight control even without alterations in terms of lipids and glucose.

  17. Tile-Ippokratis: The Experience of an Ehealth Platform for the Provision of Health Care Services in the Island of Chios and Cyprus

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Homer

    2010-01-01

    Tile-Ippokratis proposed an integrated platform for the provision of low-cost ehealth services to citizens in southeast Mediterranean area (Island of Chios and Cyprus). The aim of the paper is to present the architecture, the design, and the evaluation results of this platform. The platform based on already evaluated state-of-the-art mobile ehealth systems and using wireless and terrestrial telecommunication networks is able to provide the following health care services: (i) telecollaboration and teleconsultation services between health care personnel and between health care personnel and patients and (ii) ehealth services for “at risk” citizens such as elderly and patients with chronic diseases (Island of Chios) and postsurgery patients (Cyprus). The ehealth systems supported capabilities for vital signal measurements (ECG 1 lead, SPO2, HR, BP, weight, and temperature), an Electronic Patient Record (EPR) infrastructure, and video conference, along with communication gateways for data transmission over ADSL, GPRS, and WLAN networks. PMID:20871664

  18. Efficacy of home-based lymphoedema management in reducing acute attacks in subjects with lymphatic filariasis in Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Jullien, Patrick; Somé, Jeanne d'Arc; Brantus, Pierre; Bougma, Roland W; Bamba, Issouf; Kyelem, Dominique

    2011-09-01

    One of the two main goals of the Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (LF) is to provide care for those suffering from the devastating clinical manifestations of this filarial infection. Among the 120 million infected people worldwide, up to 16 million have lymphoedema. The WHO strategy for managing lymphoedema is based on rigorous skin hygiene, exercise, antibiotics and antifungals when indicated. The aim is to reduce acute attacks of adenolymphangitis and cellulitis responsible for lymphoedema progression and disability. The objective of our study was to assess the effectiveness of home-based lymphoedema management implemented by the national health system of Burkina Faso. Any patient was eligible to participate in the study if suffering from LF-related lymphoedema of a lower limb at any stage, and receiving care as part of the health education and washing project between April 2005 and December 2007. The primary readout was the occurrence of an acute attack in the month preceding the consultation reported by the patient or observed by the care-giver. In all, 1089 patients were enrolled in the study. Before lymphoedema management intervention, 78.1% (95%CI: 75.5-80.5) of the patients had an acute attack in the month preceding the consultation; after four and half months of lymphoedema management, this was reduced to 39.1% (95%CI: 36.2-42.1). A reduction of acute attacks related to the number of consultations or related to the patients' age and gender was not observed. Our results suggest that the home-based lymphoedema management programme in the primary health care system of Burkina Faso is effective in reducing morbidity due to LF in the short-term (4.5 months). The lymphoedema management requires no additional human resources, but whether its effect can be sustained remains to be seen.

  19. MO-E-18C-05: Global Health Catalyst: A Novel Platform for Enhancing Access to Medical Physics Education and Research Excellence (AMPERE)

    SciTech Connect

    Ngwa, W; Moreau, M; Asana, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a platform for catalyzing collaborative global Cancer Care Education and Research (CaRE), with a prime focus on enhancing Access to Medical Physics Education and Research Excellence (AMPERE) Methods: An analysis of over 50 global health collaborations between partners in the U.S. and low and middle income countries (LMIC) in Africa was carried out to assess the models of collaborations in Education and Research and relative success. A survey was carried out with questions including: the nature of the collaboration, how it was initiated, impact of culture and other factors, and recommendations for catalyzing/enhancing such collaborations. An online platform called Global Health Catalyst was developed for enhancing AMPERE. Results: The analysis yielded three main models for global health collaborations with survey providing key recommendations on how to enhance such collaborations. Based on this, the platform was developed, and customized to allow Medical Physicists and other Radiation oncology (RadOnc) professionals interested in participating in Global health to readily do so e.g. teach an online course module, participate in training Medical Physicists or other RadOnc health professionals in LMIC, co-mentor students, residents or postdocs, etc. The growing list of features on the platform also include: a feature to enable people to easily find each other, form teams, operate more effectively as partners from different disciplines, institutions, nations and cultural backgrounds, share tools and technologies, obtain seed funding to develop curricula and/or embark upon new areas of investigation, and participate in humanitarian outreach: remote treatment planning assistance, and participation in virtual Chart Rounds, etc. Conclusion: The developed Global Health Catalyst platform could enable any Medical Physicist or RadoOnc professional interested in global health to readily participate in the Education/training of next generation Rad

  20. District decision-making for health in low-income settings: a feasibility study of a data-informed platform for health in India, Nigeria and Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Avan, Bilal Iqbal; Berhanu, Della; Umar, Nasir; Wickremasinghe, Deepthi; Schellenberg, Joanna

    2016-09-01

    Low-resource settings often have limited use of local data for health system planning and decision-making. To promote local data use for decision-making and priority setting, we propose an adapted framework: a data-informed platform for health (DIPH) aimed at guiding coordination, bringing together key data from the public and private sectors on inputs and processes. In working to transform this framework from a concept to a health systems initiative, we undertook a series of implementation research activities including background assessment, testing and scaling up of the intervention. This first paper of four reports the feasibility of the approach in a district health systems context in five districts of India, Nigeria and Ethiopia. We selected five districts using predefined criteria and in collaboration with governments. After scoping visits, an in-depth field visit included interviews with key health stakeholders, focus group discussions with service-delivery staff and record review. For analysis, we used five dimensions of feasibility research based on the TELOS framework: technology and systems, economic, legal and political, operational and scheduling feasibility. We found no standardized process for data-based district level decision-making, and substantial obstacles in all three countries. Compared with study areas in Ethiopia and Nigeria, the health system in Uttar Pradesh is relatively amenable to the DIPH, having relative strengths in infrastructure, technological and technical expertise, and financial resources, as well as a district-level stakeholder forum. However, a key challenge is the absence of an effective legal framework for engagement with India's extensive private health sector. While priority-setting may depend on factors beyond better use of local data, we conclude that a formative phase of intervention development and pilot-testing is warranted as a next step.

  1. District decision-making for health in low-income settings: a feasibility study of a data-informed platform for health in India, Nigeria and Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Avan, Bilal Iqbal; Berhanu, Della; Umar, Nasir; Wickremasinghe, Deepthi; Schellenberg, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Low-resource settings often have limited use of local data for health system planning and decision-making. To promote local data use for decision-making and priority setting, we propose an adapted framework: a data-informed platform for health (DIPH) aimed at guiding coordination, bringing together key data from the public and private sectors on inputs and processes. In working to transform this framework from a concept to a health systems initiative, we undertook a series of implementation research activities including background assessment, testing and scaling up of the intervention. This first paper of four reports the feasibility of the approach in a district health systems context in five districts of India, Nigeria and Ethiopia. We selected five districts using predefined criteria and in collaboration with governments. After scoping visits, an in-depth field visit included interviews with key health stakeholders, focus group discussions with service-delivery staff and record review. For analysis, we used five dimensions of feasibility research based on the TELOS framework: technology and systems, economic, legal and political, operational and scheduling feasibility. We found no standardized process for data-based district level decision-making, and substantial obstacles in all three countries. Compared with study areas in Ethiopia and Nigeria, the health system in Uttar Pradesh is relatively amenable to the DIPH, having relative strengths in infrastructure, technological and technical expertise, and financial resources, as well as a district-level stakeholder forum. However, a key challenge is the absence of an effective legal framework for engagement with India’s extensive private health sector. While priority-setting may depend on factors beyond better use of local data, we conclude that a formative phase of intervention development and pilot-testing is warranted as a next step. PMID:27591204

  2. Adolescents' Views about an Internet Platform for Adolescents with Mental Health Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havas, Jano; de Nooijer, Jascha; Crutzen, Rik; Feron, Frans

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the needs and views of adolescents regarding the development of online support for mental health problems. Design/methodology/approach: Semi-structured qualitative focus group interviews were conducted with ten groups of Dutch adolescents (n=106), aged 12-19 years, from four urban secondary schools…

  3. Adherence to and effectiveness of an individually tailored home-based exercise program for frail older adults, driven by mobility monitoring: design of a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background With the number of older adults in society rising, frailty becomes an increasingly prevalent health condition. Regular physical activity can prevent functional decline and reduce frailty symptoms. In particular, home-based exercise programs can be beneficial in reducing frailty of older adults and fall risk, and in improving associated physiological parameters. However, adherence to home-based exercise programs is generally low among older adults. Current developments in technology can assist in enlarging adherence to home-based exercise programs. This paper presents the rationale and design of a study evaluating the adherence to and effectiveness of an individually tailored, home-based physical activity program for frail older adults driven by mobility monitoring through a necklace-worn physical activity sensor and remote feedback using a tablet PC. Methods/design Fifty transitionally frail community-dwelling older adults will join a 6-month home-based physical activity program in which exercises are provided in the form of exercise videos on a tablet PC and daily activity is monitored by means of a necklace-worn motion sensor. Participants exercise 5 times a week. Exercises are built up in levels and are individually tailored in consultation with a coach through weekly telephone contact. Discussion The physical activity program driven by mobility monitoring through a necklace-worn sensor and remote feedback using a tablet PC is an innovative method for physical activity stimulation in frail older adults. We hypothesize that, if participants are sufficiently adherent, the program will result in higher daily physical activity and higher strength and balance assessed by physical tests compared to baseline. If adherence to and effectiveness of the program is considered sufficient, the next step would be to evaluate the effectiveness with a randomised controlled trial. The knowledge gained in this study can be used to develop and fine-tune the application

  4. RAPID HOME-BASED HIV TESTING TO REDUCE COSTS IN A LARGE TUBERCULOSIS COHORT STUDY.

    PubMed

    Galea, Jerome T; Contreras, Carmen; Lecca, Leonid; Shin, Sonya; Lobatón, Raúl; Zhang, Zibiao; Calderón, Roger; Murray, Megan; Becerra, Mercedes C

    2013-06-21

    To reduce costs in a large tuberculosis household contact cohort study in Lima, Peru, we replaced laboratory-based HIV testing with home-based rapid testing. We developed a protocol and training course to prepare staff for the new strategy; these included role playing for home-based deployment of the Determine® HIV 1/2 Ag/Ac Combo HIV test. Though the rapid HIV test produced more false-positives, the overall cost per participant tested, refusal rate and time to confirmatory HIV testing were lower with the home-based rapid testing strategy compared to the original approach. Rapid testing could be used in similar research or routine care settings.

  5. Exercise therapy for claudication: Should home-based exercise therapy be prescribed in clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Lindo, Fae A

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral artery disease is a cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The literature suggests evidence that an exercise program can be beneficial in the treatment of patients with claudication. Supervised exercise therapy is well documented in the literature, and national guidelines recommend it as an initial conservative management. When a supervised exercise program is unavailable or not covered by insurance, an alternative to supervised exercise is vital. The purpose of this review is to examine the evidence regarding the efficacy of a home-based exercise program. Four studies were included in this review, and although the evidence supporting a home-based exercise program is limited in the literature, the findings indicate that a home-based exercise program increases claudication onset time, resulting in greater mobility and improvement in the patient's quality of life.

  6. A multistakeholder platform to promote health and prevent noncommunicable diseases in the region of the Americas: the Pan American Health Organization partners forum for action.

    PubMed

    Hospedales, C James; Jané-Llopis, Eva

    2011-08-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and obesity are the most serious health problem facing the countries of the Americas in terms of avoidable deaths as well as costs to governments, families, and business. The main causes are ageing of the population, and widespread risks such as tobacco use, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, and harmful use of alcohol, linked to major changes in the way we live and work, to public policies, cultural norms, and private sector forces. Underlying determinants are globalization, urbanization, poverty, education, gender, ethnicity, and access to health services. Yet, approximately 80% of cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and 40% of cancer, are preventable through a range of cost-effective population and individual measures for those at high risk of living with NCDs. However, the multisectoral nature of NCDs requires a cross-sector response to succeed. Several governments have commenced intersectoral efforts, and civil society and private sector also have many initiatives, but the responses are fragmented and skewed. The Partners Forum is being launched by the Pan American Health Organization in collaboration with the World Economic Forum and a set of partners including member states, partners in civil society, and partners in the private sector, as a multisector platform to catalyze, recognize, and scale up collaborative action to promote health and prevent and control NCDs at regional, subregional, and country level. The principles of partnership and lessons learned from other partnership experiences are being used in its design.

  7. Seasonal influenza vaccination among homebound elderly receiving home-based primary care in New York City.

    PubMed

    Banach, David B; Ornstein, Katherine; Factor, Stephanie H; Soriano, Theresa A

    2012-02-01

    Seasonal influenza vaccination is recommended for all persons aged ≥50 years to reduce influenza related morbidity and mortality, but vaccination coverage among community-dwelling elderly remains low. Homebound elderly receiving home-based primary care (HBPC) have fewer barriers to vaccination than other community-dwelling elderly. The Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors (MSVD) program provides HBPC to homebound elderly in New York City. This study assessed seasonal influenza vaccination coverage within an urban HBPC program and identified factors associated with vaccine refusal. A cross-sectional analysis of data from the 2008-2009 influenza season was completed and influenza vaccination coverage was assessed. The association between social, demographic and health-related characteristics and vaccine refusal was evaluated using bivariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression. Of 689 people aged >65 eligible for influenza vaccination, 578 (84%) accepted and 111 (16%) refused vaccination. In multivariable analysis, vaccine refusal was positively associated with female gender (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02, 3.35), black race (AOR = 2.04, 95% CI 1.28, 3.25), and living alone (AOR = 1.71, 95% CI 1.10, 2.67), and negatively associated with dementia (AOR = 0.59, 95% CI 0.37, 0.91). Seasonal influenza vaccine coverage in the MSVD program was high compared to nursing home and community-dwelling elderly. Offering patients vaccination at home without additional expense will likely improve vaccine coverage among urban homebound elderly. Understanding why vaccine refusal rates are higher among females, black patients, and those living alone should guide interventions to increase vaccine acceptance among this population.

  8. Home-based HIV counseling and testing: Client experiences and perceptions in Eastern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Though prevention and treatment depend on individuals knowing their HIV status, the uptake of testing remains low in Sub-Saharan Africa. One initiative to encourage HIV testing involves delivering services at home. However, doubts have been cast about the ability of Home-Based HIV Counseling and Testing (HBHCT) to adhere to ethical practices including consent, confidentiality, and access to HIV care post-test. This study explored client experiences in relation these ethical issues. Methods We conducted 395 individual interviews in Kumi district, Uganda, where teams providing HBHCT had visited 6–12 months prior to the interviews. Semi-structured questionnaires elicited information on clients’ experiences, from initial community mobilization up to receipt of results and access to HIV services post-test. Results We found that 95% of our respondents had ever tested (average for Uganda was 38%). Among those who were approached by HBHCT providers, 98% were informed of their right to decline HIV testing. Most respondents were counseled individually, but 69% of the married/cohabiting were counseled as couples. The majority of respondents (94%) were satisfied with the information given to them and the interaction with the HBHCT providers. Most respondents considered their own homes as more private than health facilities. Twelve respondents reported that they tested positive, 11 were referred for follow-up care, seven actually went for care, and only 5 knew their CD4 counts. All HIV infected individuals who were married or cohabiting had disclosed their status to their partners. Conclusion These findings show a very high uptake of HIV testing and satisfaction with HBHCT, a large proportion of married respondents tested as couples, and high disclosure rates. HBHCT can play a major role in expanding access to testing and overcoming disclosure challenges. However, access to HIV services post-test may require attention. PMID:23146071

  9. Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Fernanda Dultra; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; da Silva, Graziela Alves; Gomes, Évelim LF Dantas; do Nascimento, Eloisa Sanches Pereira; Alves, Vera Lucia Santos; Stirbulov, Roberto; Costa, Dirceu

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is a multidisciplinary program of care for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with the goal of improving the functional capacity and quality of life, as well as maintaining the clinical stability of COPD sufferers. However, not all patients are available for such a program despite discomfort with their condition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a home-based PR (HBPR) program on functional ability, quality of life, and respiratory muscle strength and endurance. Patients and methods Patients with COPD according to the Global Initiative of Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease were randomized (double-blind) into two groups. One group performed a protocol at home with aerobic and muscle strength exercises and was called the intervention group; the other group received only instructions to perform breathing and stretching exercises, characterizing it as the control group (CG). We assessed the following variables at baseline and 2 months: exercise tolerance (incremental shuttle walk test and upper limb test), respiratory muscle (strength and endurance test), and health-related quality of life (Airways Questionnaire 20). Results There were no significant changes after the intervention in either of the two groups in exercise tolerance and quality of life. However, the intervention group had improved respiratory endurance compared with the CG, while the CG presented a decrease in the load sustained by the respiratory muscles after the HBPR. Conclusion A program of HBPR with biweekly supervision (although not enough to provide significant improvements in physical capacity or quality of life) played an important role in maintaining the stability of the clinical features of patients with COPD; the patients had no worsening of symptoms during the intervention period according to the daily log. PMID:24235824

  10. Translating Behavioral Interventions Onto mHealth Platforms: Developing Text Message Interventions for Smoking and Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The development of mHealth applications is often driven by the investigators and developers with relatively little input from the targeted population. User input is commonly limited to “like/dislike” post- intervention consumer satisfaction ratings or device or application specific user analytics such as usability. However, to produce successful mHealth applications with lasting effects on health behaviors it is crucial to obtain user input from the start of each project and throughout development. The aim of this tutorial is to illustrate how qualitative methods in an iterative process of development have been used in two separate behavior change interventions (targeting smoking and alcohol) delivered through mobile technologies (ie, text messaging). A series of focus groups were conducted to assist in translating a face-to-face smoking cessation intervention onto a text message (short message service, SMS) delivered format. Both focus groups and an advisory panel were used to shape the delivery and content of a text message delivered intervention for alcohol risk reduction. An in vivo method of constructing message content was used to develop text message content that was consistent with the notion of texting as “fingered speech”. Formative research conducted with the target population using a participatory framework led to important changes in our approach to intervention structure, content development, and delivery. Using qualitative methods and an iterative approach that blends consumer-driven and investigator-driven aims can produce paradigm-shifting, novel intervention applications that maximize the likelihood of use by the target audience and their potential impact on health behaviors. PMID:25714907

  11. Translating Behavioral Interventions Onto mHealth Platforms: Developing Text Message Interventions for Smoking and Alcohol.

    PubMed

    Bock, Beth C; Rosen, Rochelle K; Barnett, Nancy P; Thind, Herpreet; Walaska, Kristen; Foster, Robert; Deutsch, Christopher; Traficante, Regina

    2015-02-24

    The development of mHealth applications is often driven by the investigators and developers with relatively little input from the targeted population. User input is commonly limited to "like/dislike" post- intervention consumer satisfaction ratings or device or application specific user analytics such as usability. However, to produce successful mHealth applications with lasting effects on health behaviors it is crucial to obtain user input from the start of each project and throughout development. The aim of this tutorial is to illustrate how qualitative methods in an iterative process of development have been used in two separate behavior change interventions (targeting smoking and alcohol) delivered through mobile technologies (ie, text messaging). A series of focus groups were conducted to assist in translating a face-to-face smoking cessation intervention onto a text message (short message service, SMS) delivered format. Both focus groups and an advisory panel were used to shape the delivery and content of a text message delivered intervention for alcohol risk reduction. An in vivo method of constructing message content was used to develop text message content that was consistent with the notion of texting as "fingered speech". Formative research conducted with the target population using a participatory framework led to important changes in our approach to intervention structure, content development, and delivery. Using qualitative methods and an iterative approach that blends consumer-driven and investigator-driven aims can produce paradigm-shifting, novel intervention applications that maximize the likelihood of use by the target audience and their potential impact on health behaviors.

  12. Enhancing provider knowledge and patient screening for palliative care needs in chronic multimorbid patients receiving home-based primary care.

    PubMed

    Wharton, Tracy; Manu, Erika; Vitale, Caroline A

    2015-02-01

    This article describes a pilot model to increase palliative care (PC) knowledge and collaboration among providers and to systematically identify chronic multimorbid home care patients who would benefit from focused discussion of potential PC needs. Thirty health care providers from a home-based primary care team attended interdisciplinary trainings. The Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) tool was used to trigger discussions of potential palliative needs at team rounds for patients who scored below a cutoff point on the tool. Palliative Performance Scale implementation added little burden on nurses and triggered a discussion in 51 flagged patients. The tool successfully identified 75% of patients who died or were discharged. Screening was systematic and consistent and resulted in targeted discussions about PC needs without generating additional burden on our PC consult service. This model shows promise for enhancing collaborative patient care and access to PC.

  13. Creating a Powerful Platform to Explore Health in a Correctional Population: A Record Linkage Study

    PubMed Central

    McIsaac, Kathryn E.; Farrell MacDonald, Shanna; Chong, Nelson; Moser, Andrea; Moineddin, Rahim; Colantonio, Angela; Nathens, Avery; Matheson, Flora I.

    2016-01-01

    We used record linkage to create a data repository of health information of persons who were federally incarcerated in Ontario and Canada. We obtained records from 56,867 adults who were federally incarcerated between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2011 from the Correctional Service of Canada; 15,248 records belonged to individuals residing in Ontario, Canada. We linked these records to the Registered Persons Database (RPDB) which contained records from 18,116,996 individuals eligible for health care in Ontario. Out of 56,867 OMS records, 22,844 (40.2%) were linked to the RPDB. Looking only at those incarcerated in Ontario, 98%, (14 953 of 15248) records were linked to RPDB. Most records of persons in Ontario-based facilities were linked deterministically. Linkage rates were lower for women, minority groups, and substance users. In conclusion, record linkage enabled the creation of a valuable data repository: there are no electronic medical records for correctional populations in Canada, making it more difficult to profile their health. PMID:27532612

  14. The role of home-based records in the establishment of a continuum of care for mothers, newborns, and children in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Keiko; Hattori, Tomoko; Kosen, Soewarta

    2013-01-01

    Background The provision of appropriate care along the continuum of maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) service delivery is a challenge in developing countries. To improve this, in the 1990s, Indonesia introduced the maternal and child health (MCH) handbook, as an integrated form of parallel home-based records. Objective This study aimed to identify the roles of home-based records both before and after childbirth, especially in provinces where the MCH handbook (MCHHB) was extensively promoted, by examining their association with MNCH service uptake. Design This was a cross-sectional study using nationally representative data sets, the Indonesia Demographic and Health Surveys (IDHSs) from 1997, 2002–2003, and 2007. The IDHS identifies respondents’ ownership of home-based records before and after childbirth. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine associations between record ownership and service utilisation in national data and data from two provinces, West Sumatra and North Sulawesi, where ownership of pre- and post-natal records served as a proxy for MCHHB ownership. Results Pre- and post-natal record ownership increased from 1997 to 2007. Provincial data from 2007 showed that handbook ownership was associated with having delivery assisted by trained personnel [adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 2.12, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05–4.25], receiving maternal care (aOR: 3.92, 95% CI: 2.35–6.52), completing 12 doses of child immunisation for seven diseases (aOR: 4.86, 95% CI: 2.37–9.95), and having immunisation before and after childbirth (aOR: 5.40, 95% CI: 2.28–12.76), whereas national data showed that service utilisation was associated with ownership of both records compared with owning a single record or none. Conclusion Our results suggest that pre- and post-natal home-based record use may be effective for ensuring service utilisation. In addition, since the handbook is an efficient home-based record for use throughout children's life

  15. Zika virus pandemic-analysis of Facebook as a social media health information platform.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Megha; Yadav, Kapil; Yadav, Nitika; Ferdinand, Keith C

    2017-03-01

    The arrival of Zika virus in the United States has generated a lot of activity on social media focusing on the algorithmic increase in the spread of the disease and its concerning complications. Accurate and credible dissemination of correct information about the arbovirus could help in decreasing the pandemic spread and associated apprehension in the population. Our study examined the effective use of the social media site Facebook (Facebook Inc, Menlo Park, CA) as an information source for the Zika virus pandemic. We found that the misleading posts were far more popular than the posts dispersing accurate, relevant public health information about the disease.

  16. Protocol for a home-based integrated physical therapy program to reduce falls and improve mobility in people with Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The high incidence of falls associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD) increases the risk of injuries and immobility and compromises quality of life. Although falls education and strengthening programs have shown some benefit in healthy older people, the ability of physical therapy interventions in home settings to reduce falls and improve mobility in people with Parkinson’s has not been convincingly demonstrated. Methods/design 180 community living people with PD will be randomly allocated to receive either a home-based integrated rehabilitation program (progressive resistance strength training, movement strategy training and falls education) or a home-based life skills program (control intervention). Both programs comprise one hour of treatment and one hour of structured homework per week over six weeks of home therapy. Blinded assessments occurring before therapy commences, the week after completion of therapy and 12 months following intervention will establish both the immediate and long-term benefits of home-based rehabilitation. The number of falls, number of repeat falls, falls rate and time to first fall will be the primary measures used to quantify outcome. The economic costs associated with injurious falls, and the costs of running the integrated rehabilitation program from a health system perspective will be established. The effects of intervention on motor and global disability and on quality of life will also be examined. Discussion This study will provide new evidence on the outcomes and cost effectiveness of home-based movement rehabilitation programs for people living with PD. Trial registration The trial is registered on the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12608000390381). PMID:22799601

  17. WHO/UNICEF recommended therapeutic food versus home based therapeutic food in the management of severe acute malnutrition: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Mahima; Kushwaha, K P

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is a major public health problem especially in the developing countries. The objective of the study was to compare WHO/UNICEF recommended therapeutic food with home based therapeutic food in the management of severe acute malnutrition. It was a randomized controlled trial at tertiary care level hospital with nutritional rehabilitation centre. Children (6 month to 5 years) having severe acute malnutrition were included in the study. Group A (n=74 children) was given WHO recommended therapeutic food and group B (n=75 children) was given home based therapeutic food. The mean rate of weight gain, gain in height and increase in mid-upper arm circumference were significantly higher (p<0.05) in the group received home based therapeutic food. Mean duration to achieve target weight was 21.44±3.33 days in group A and 16.28±2.11 days in group B (phome based therapeutic food was found to be more effective. This could be explained by better acceptability in terms of better palatability, more affordability, increased frequency of feeding, and having less difficulty in making. PMID:28096555

  18. A platform for leveraging next generation sequencing for routine microbiology and public health use.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Laura I; Wyres, Kelly L; Reumann, Matthias; Queiroz, Carlos; Bojovschi, Alexe; Conway, Tom; Garg, Saurabh; Edwards, David J; Hogg, Geoff; Holt, Kathryn E

    2015-01-01

    Even with the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies which have revolutionised the field of bacterial genomics in recent years, a major barrier still exists to the implementation of NGS for routine microbiological use (in public health and clinical microbiology laboratories). Such routine use would make a big difference to investigations of pathogen transmission and prevention/control of (sometimes lethal) infections. The inherent complexity and high frequency of data analyses on very large sets of bacterial DNA sequence data, the ability to ensure data provenance and automatically track and log all analyses for audit purposes, the need for quick and accurate results, together with an essential user-friendly interface for regular non-technical laboratory staff, are all critical requirements for routine use in a public health setting. There are currently no systems to answer positively to all these requirements, in an integrated manner. In this paper, we describe a system for sequence analysis and interpretation that is highly automated and tackles the issues raised earlier, and that is designed for use in diagnostic laboratories by healthcare workers with no specialist bioinformatics knowledge.

  19. From battlefield to home: a mobile platform for assessing brain health

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, Helaine E.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive testing batteries have been used for decades to diagnose deficits associated with conditions such as head injury, age-related cognitive decline, and stroke, and they have also been used extensively for educational evaluation and planning. Cognitive testing is generally office-based, administered by professionals, uses paper and pencil testing modalities, reports results as summary scores, and is a “one shot deal” whose primary objective is to identify the presence and severity of cognitive deficit. This paper explores innovative departures from historical cognitive testing strategies and paradigms. The report explores (I) a shift from disease diagnosis in the office setting to mobile tracking of cognitive health and wellness in any setting; (II) the strength of computer-based cognitive measures and their role in facilitating development of new computational methods; and (III) using cognitive testing to inform on individual-level outcomes over time rather than dichotomous metrics at a single point in time. PMID:28293603

  20. A Pilot Study on the Impact of a Home-Based Parenting Intervention: Parents Plus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Ellie; Holland, Sally; Jerzembek, Gabi

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a pilot study undertaken in order to explore the impact of a home-based parenting intervention (Parents Plus), on parents and families. Parents Plus is part of a Welsh Early Years strategy called Flying Start and aims to promote positive parent-child interactions. This article explores the medium-term to long-term impact of…

  1. Developing Student Knowledge and Skills for Home-Based Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Susan F.; Tracy, Elizabeth M.

    2008-01-01

    Providing social work services for clients in their homes is often a distinguishing feature of social work practice. The home environment affects the intervention process at each stage of contact with a family. Home-based practice requires specific skills to deal with clients' presenting concerns as well as safety, boundary, confidentiality, and…

  2. Dutch Home-Based Pre-Reading Intervention with Children at Familial Risk of Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Otterloo, Sandra G.; van der Leij, Aryan

    2009-01-01

    Children (5 and 6 years old, n = 30) at familial risk of dyslexia received a home-based intervention that focused on phoneme awareness and letter knowledge in the year prior to formal reading instruction. The children were compared to a no-training at-risk control group (n = 27), which was selected a year earlier. After training, we found a small…

  3. An Evaluation of Migrant Head Start Programs. Appendices. Preliminary Report on Home Base Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes (J.A.) Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Utilizing specially designed interview schedules to evaluate the kinds of services children and families receive from various Migrant Head Start programs throughout the country, this preliminary report on home base findings consists of questions asked of the staff at every Migrant Head Start site across the country and questions asked of parents…

  4. Parent Perspective on the Home-Based Interim Alternative Educational Setting: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Gregory L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the perspectives of parents of expelled disabled students placed in home-based interim alternative educational settings (IAES). The study consisted of three parent participants whose disabled children, by virtue of their violations of the school district's discipline policy, were…

  5. Predictors of Home-Based Child Care Providers' Participation in Professional Development Workshops and Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusby, Julie C.; Jones, Laura B.; Crowley, Ryann; Smolkowski, Keith; Arthun, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Background: Little is known about factors that influence home-based child care providers' participation in professional development. Factors that predict participation in activities that are designed to promote the utilization and maintenance of skills taught are of particular interest. Objective: Our aim was to examine factors in the home-based…

  6. Impact of Home-Based Family Therapy on Maternal and Child Outcomes in Disadvantaged Adolescent Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherniss, Cary; Herzog, Elaine

    1996-01-01

    Evaluates the effects of home-based family therapy on 116 high- risk teenage mothers and their children. Subjects received case management, supportive counseling and some received family therapy. Twelve-month follow-up indicated family therapy subjects improved parenting and became less welfare dependent. No significant difference was found at 24…

  7. Home-Based Comprehensive Assessment of Rural Elderly Persons: The CARE Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cravens, David D.; Mehr, David R.; Campbell, James D.; Armer, Jane; Kruse, Robin L.; Rubenstein, Laurence Z.

    2005-01-01

    Context: Home-based comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) has been effective in urban areas but has had little study in rural areas. CGA involves medical history taking, a physical exam, and evaluation of functional status, mental status, cognitive status, gait and balance, medications, vision, extent of social supports, and home safety. We…

  8. Brief Report: Relative Effectiveness of Different Home-Based Behavioral Approaches to Early Teaching Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Phil; Osborne, Lisa A.; Corness, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of home-based early behavioral interventions for children (2:6-4:0 years old) with autistic spectrum disorders was studied over 9-10 months. Measures of autistic severity, intellectual, educational, and adaptive behavioral functioning were taken. There was no evidence of recovery from autism. High-intensity behavioral approaches…

  9. Latino Parents Utilizing Home-Based Activities to Support Algebra-Readiness Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molinar, Soledad Marie

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation involved a series of training sessions where parents from a Title I middle school participated in the learning and practice of Algebra Readiness skills. The project was based on a series of six weekly trainings for parents to learn home-based activities to increase their child's Algebra Readiness. I administered an initial…

  10. Home-based therapy for severe acute malnutrition with ready-to-use food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Severe acute malnutrition is a devastating condition afflicting children under 5 years in many developing countries, but concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa. This paper examines the development of home-based lipid-nutrient therapeutic foods for the treatment of acute malnutrition in sub-Saharan Afric...

  11. School- And Home-Based Drug Prevention: Environmental, Parent, and Child Risk Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Ellen J.; Hall, Lynne A.; Rayens, Mary Kay; Myers, April V.; Bonnel, Galadriel

    2007-01-01

    The study purpose was to test the effect of a school- and home-based alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD) prevention program on reducing environmental, parent, and child risk factors for ATOD use. The design was a three-group pretest-posttest with interviews at baseline and 1 and 6 months post-intervention. The sample was 126 parents and their…

  12. Quality Improvement in Home-Based Child Care Settings: Research Resources to Inform Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Sharmila; Stephens, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    This "Topic of Interest" provides a comprehensive list of research in the Research Connections collection that was published in 2005 or later addressing issues related to quality improvement specifically in home-based child care. The resources are grouped under the following headings: Overviews, Summaries, and Reviews of Quality…

  13. Recurrent Vascular Headache: Home-Based Behavioral Treatment versus Abortive Pharmacological Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Kenneth A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of a home-based behavioral intervention (relaxation and thermal biofeedback training) with an abortive pharmacological intervention (with compliance training) for treating recurrent migraine and migraine/tension headaches. Both interventions yielded reductions in headache activity, psychosomatic symptoms, and daily life…

  14. Suggested Structure for Meetings of Home-Based ESL Classes for Native Speakers of Spanish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spener, David

    This guide for volunteer teachers of English as a Second Language to Spanish speakers in a home-based program outlines a suggested format for class time and activities. The guide describes how teachers can organize their class periods to promote learner-centeredness and participation in the English learning process. The structure, designed to help…

  15. A Home-Based Ecobehavioral Parent-Training and Generalization Package with a Neglectful Mother.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dachman, Ronald S.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A home-based ecobehavioral parent-training package with a low-income single-parent referred for child neglect, and her seven-year-old son was effective in increasing the mother's frequency of descriptive praise and in producing demonstrable changes in the untreated corollary behaviors. Maintenance probes conducted two and six months following the…

  16. Home-based rehabilitation for COPD using minimal resources: a randomised, controlled equivalence trial

    PubMed Central

    Mahal, Ajay; Hill, Catherine J; Lee, Annemarie L; Burge, Angela T; Cox, Narelle S; Moore, Rosemary; Nicolson, Caroline; O'Halloran, Paul; Lahham, Aroub; Gillies, Rebecca; McDonald, Christine F

    2017-01-01

    Background Pulmonary rehabilitation is a cornerstone of care for COPD but uptake of traditional centre-based programmes is poor. We assessed whether home-based pulmonary rehabilitation, delivered using minimal resources, had equivalent outcomes to centre-based pulmonary rehabilitation. Methods A randomised controlled equivalence trial with 12 months follow-up. Participants with stable COPD were randomly assigned to receive 8 weeks of pulmonary rehabilitation by either the standard outpatient centre-based model, or a new home-based model including one home visit and seven once-weekly telephone calls from a physiotherapist. The primary outcome was change in 6 min walk distance (6MWD). Results We enrolled 166 participants to receive centre-based rehabilitation (n=86) or home-based rehabilitation (n=80). Intention-to-treat analysis confirmed non-inferiority of home-based rehabilitation for 6MWD at end-rehabilitation and the confidence interval (CI) did not rule out superiority (mean difference favouring home group 18.6 m, 95% CI −3.3 to 40.7). At 12 months the CI did not exclude inferiority (−5.1 m, −29.2 to 18.9). Between-group differences for dyspnoea-related quality of life did not rule out superiority of home-based rehabilitation at programme completion (1.6 points, −0.3 to 3.5) and groups were equivalent at 12 months (0.05 points, −2.0 to 2.1). The per-protocol analysis showed the same pattern of findings. Neither group maintained postrehabilitation gains at 12 months. Conclusions This home-based pulmonary rehabilitation model, delivered with minimal resources, produced short-term clinical outcomes that were equivalent to centre-based pulmonary rehabilitation. Neither model was effective in maintaining gains at 12 months. Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation could be considered for people with COPD who cannot access centre-based pulmonary rehabilitation. Trial registration number NCT01423227, clinicaltrials.gov. PMID:27672116

  17. Increasing Access to Cost Effective Home-Based Rehabilitation for Rural Veteran Stroke Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Housley, SN; Garlow, AR; Ducote, K; Howard, A; Thomas, T; Wu, D; Richards, K; Butler, AJ

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An estimated 750,000 Americans experience a stroke annually. Most stroke survivors require rehabilitation. Limited access to rehabilitation facilities has a pronounced burden on functional outcomes and quality of life. Robotic devices deliver reproducible therapy without the need for real-time human oversight. This study examined the efficacy of using home-based, telerobotic-assisted devices (Hand and Foot Mentor: HM and FM) to improve functional ability and reduce depression symptoms, while improving access and cost savings associated with rehabilitation. Methods Twenty stroke survivors performed three months of home-based rehabilitation using a robotic device, while a therapist remotely monitored progress. Baseline and end of treatment function and depression symptoms were assessed. Satisfaction with the device and access to therapy were determined using qualitative surveys. Cost analysis was performed to compare home-based, robotic-assisted therapy to clinic-based physical therapy. Results Compared to baseline, significant improvement in upper extremity function (30.06%, p= 0.046), clinically significant benefits in gait speed (29.03%), moderate improvement in depressive symptoms (28.44%) and modest improvement in distance walked (30.2%) were observed. Participants indicated satisfaction with the device. Home-based robot therapy expanded access to post-stroke rehabilitation for 35% of the people no longer receiving formal services and increased daily access for the remaining 65%, with a cost savings of $2,352 (64.97%) compared to clinic-based therapy. Conclusion Stroke survivors made significant clinically meaningful improvements in the use of their impaired extremities using a robotic device in the home. Home-based, robotic therapy reduced costs, while expanding access to a rehabilitation modality for people who would not otherwise have received care. PMID:28018979

  18. Behaviour change techniques in home-based cardiac rehabilitation: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Heron, Neil; Kee, Frank; Donnelly, Michael; Cardwell, Christopher; Tully, Mark A; Cupples, Margaret E

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes offering secondary prevention for cardiovascular disease (CVD) advise healthy lifestyle behaviours, with the behaviour change techniques (BCTs) of goals and planning, feedback and monitoring, and social support recommended. More information is needed about BCT use in home-based CR to support these programmes in practice. Aim To identify and describe the use of BCTs in home-based CR programmes. Design and setting Randomised controlled trials of home-based CR between 2005 and 2015 were identified by searching MEDLINE®, Embase, PsycINFO, Web of Science, and Cochrane Database. Method Reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts for eligibility. Relevant data, including BCTs, were extracted from included studies. A meta-analysis studied risk factor change in home-based and comparator programmes. Results From 2448 studies identified, 11 of good methodological quality (10 on post-myocardial infarction, one on heart failure, 1907 patients) were included. These reported the use of 20 different BCTs. Social support (unspecified) was used in all studies and goal setting (behaviour) in 10. Of the 11 studies, 10 reported effectiveness in reducing CVD risk factors, but one study showed no improvement compared to usual care. This study differed from effective programmes in that it didn’t include BCTs that had instructions on how to perform the behaviour and monitoring, or a credible source. Conclusion Social support and goal setting were frequently used BCTs in home-based CR programmes, with the BCTs related to monitoring, instruction on how to perform the behaviour, and credible source being included in effective programmes. Further robust trials are needed to determine the relative value of different BCTs within CR programmes. PMID:27481858

  19. Home-Based Telemanagement in Advanced COPD: Who Uses it Most? Real-Life Study in Lombardy.

    PubMed

    Vitacca, Michele; Fumagalli, Lia Paola; Borghi, Gabriella; Colombo, Fausto; Castelli, Alberto; Scalvini, Simonetta; Masella, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Current evidence indicates that the benefits of tele-health may not be uniform across all patients. Therefore, to understand what specific variables influence use of home-based telemanagement in COPD, we conducted this retrospective study.  A 6-month home-based telemanagement program (HTP) was offered to 1,074 COPD patients over a 4-year period. Multivarible linear regression analysis was used to identify predictors of HTP use/week (phone calls and specialist consultations) among all variables: clinical (body mass index, co-morbidities, HTP prescription not following an exacerbation, long-term oxygen therapy use, COPD severity, hospital readmissions, exacerbations and death), socio-demographic (sex, age, place of abode), smoking history, arterial blood gases (ABG), and specialist/general practitioner (GP) urgent need. Logistic regression was conducted to predict relapses/hospitalizations risk as well as the disease impact (COPD Assessment Test, CAT) at the end of the program.  Presence of relapses (p < 0.001), ABGs (p < 0.001) and GP request (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with higher HTP-use. Smoking history (OR 1.542 [IC 95% 1.069-2.217], p = 0.020), specialist (OR 2.895 [2.144-3.910], p < 0.001) and GP consultations (OR 6.575 [4.521-9.561], p < 0.001) were the only independent risk factors for relapse. No predictor of hospitalization was found. High final CAT score was inversely related to oxygen therapy use (p = 0.001) and HTP prescription (p < 0.001), and positively related to presence of co-morbidities (p = 0.001) and baseline CAT (p < 0.001).  This HTP in Lombardy shows that relapsers, people requiring several ABGs and urgent GP visits are the patient subgroup most likely to consume telemanagement services (scheduled and unscheduled). We propose a patient 'identikit' to improve prioritization for HTP prescriptions.

  20. Attitudes towards acceptance of an innovative home-based and remote sensing rehabilitation protocol among cardiovascular patients in Shantou, China

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jia-Ying; Li, Ji-Lin; Li, Zhong-Han; Xu, Duan-Min; Chen, Chang; Xie, Bin; Chen, Helen; Au, William W

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) protocols have diversified to include home-based cardiac tele-rehabilitation (HBCTR) as an alternative to hospital-based or center-based CR. To adopt the use of home-based cardiac tele-rehabilitation, it is necessary to assess cardiac patients' attitudes towards acceptance of such e-health technology, especially in China where knowledge of such technology is deficient. Methods Interviews were conducted in the First Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, China. After percutaneous coronary interventional (PCI) surgery, patients completed the survey. Results Among the 150 patients, only 13% had ever heard of HBCTR. After an introduction of our HBCTR program, 60% of patients were willing to participate in the program. From our multivariate analysis of questionnaire data, age (OR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.86–0.98; P = 0.007), average family monthly income (OR: 0.13, 95% CI: 0.05–0.34; P < 0.001), education level (OR: 0.24, 95% CI: 0.10–0.59; P = 0.002) and physical exercise time (OR: 0.19, 95% CI: 0.06–0.56; P = 0.003) were independent predictors for acceptance of HBCTR. From the reasons for participation, patients selected: enhanced safety and independence (28.3%), ability to self-monitor physical conditions daily (25.4%), and having automatic and emergency alert (23.1%). Reasons for refusal were: too cumbersome operation (34.3%) and unnecessary protocol (19.4%). Conclusions Most patients lacked knowledge about HBCTR but volunteered to participate after they have learned about the program. Several personal and life-style factors influenced their acceptance of the program. These indicate that both improvement of technology and better understanding of the program will enhance active participation. PMID:27403142

  1. Associations of Caregiver Stress with Working Conditions, Caregiving Practices, and Child Behaviour in Home-Based Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusby, Julie C.; Jones, Laura Backen; Crowley, Ryann; Smolkowski, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Home-based child caregivers face unique stressors related to the nature of their work. One hundred and fifty-five home-based child care providers in Oregon, USA, participated in this cross-sectional correlational study. We investigated associations between indicators of caregiver stress and child care working conditions, the quality of caregiver…

  2. Parental Perceptions of Child Care Quality in Centre-Based and Home-Based Settings: Associations with External Quality Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrer, Joanne S.; Lemay, Lise; Bigras, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined how parental perceptions of child care quality were related to external quality ratings and considered how parental perceptions of quality varied according to child care context (home-based or centre-based settings). Parents of 179 4-year-old children who attended child care centres (n = 141) and home-based settings…

  3. Transgenic rice seed synthesizing diverse flavonoids at high levels: a new platform for flavonoid production with associated health benefits.

    PubMed

    Ogo, Yuko; Ozawa, Kenjiro; Ishimaru, Tsutomu; Murayama, Tsugiya; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    Flavonoids possess diverse health-promoting benefits but are nearly absent from rice, because most of the genes encoding enzymes for flavonoid biosynthesis are not expressed in rice seeds. In the present study, a transgenic rice plant producing several classes of flavonoids in seeds was developed by introducing multiple genes encoding enzymes involved in flavonoid synthesis, from phenylalanine to the target flavonoids, into rice. Rice accumulating naringenin was developed by introducing phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and chalcone synthase (CHS) genes. Rice producing other classes of flavonoids, kaempferol, genistein, and apigenin, was developed by introducing, together with PAL and CHS, genes encoding flavonol synthase/flavanone-3-hydroxylase, isoflavone synthase, and flavone synthases, respectively. The endosperm-specific GluB-1 promoter or embryo- and aleurone-specific 18-kDa oleosin promoters were used to express these biosynthetic genes in seed. The target flavonoids of naringenin, kaempferol, genistein, and apigenin were highly accumulated in each transgenic rice, respectively. Furthermore, tricin was accumulated by introducing hydroxylase and methyltransferase, demonstrating that modification to flavonoid backbones can be also well manipulated in rice seeds. The flavonoids accumulated as both aglycones and several types of glycosides, and flavonoids in the endosperm were deposited into PB-II-type protein bodies. Therefore, these rice seeds provide an ideal platform for the production of particular flavonoids due to efficient glycosylation, the presence of appropriate organelles for flavonoid accumulation, and the small effect of endogenous enzymes on the production of flavonoids by exogenous enzymes.

  4. Development of an Electronic Claim System Based on an Integrated Electronic Health Record Platform to Guarantee Interoperability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hwa Sun; Cho, Hune

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We design and develop an electronic claim system based on an integrated electronic health record (EHR) platform. This system is designed to be used for ambulatory care by office-based physicians in the United States. This is achieved by integrating various medical standard technologies for interoperability between heterogeneous information systems. Methods The developed system serves as a simple clinical data repository, it automatically fills out the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)-1500 form based on information regarding the patients and physicians' clinical activities. It supports electronic insurance claims by creating reimbursement charges. It also contains an HL7 interface engine to exchange clinical messages between heterogeneous devices. Results The system partially prevents physician malpractice by suggesting proper treatments according to patient diagnoses and supports physicians by easily preparing documents for reimbursement and submitting claim documents to insurance organizations electronically, without additional effort by the user. To show the usability of the developed system, we performed an experiment that compares the time spent filling out the CMS-1500 form directly and time required create electronic claim data using the developed system. From the experimental results, we conclude that the system could save considerable time for physicians in making claim documents. Conclusions The developed system might be particularly useful for those who need a reimbursement-specialized EHR system, even though the proposed system does not completely satisfy all criteria requested by the CMS and Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC). This is because the criteria are not sufficient but necessary condition for the implementation of EHR systems. The system will be upgraded continuously to implement the criteria and to offer more stable and transparent transmission of electronic claim data. PMID

  5. Long-term evaluation of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Grosbois, Jean Marie; Gicquello, Alice; Langlois, Carole; Le Rouzic, Olivier; Bart, Frédéric; Wallaert, Benoit; Chenivesse, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Personalized, global pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) management of patients with COPD is effective, regardless of the place in which this rehabilitation is provided. The objective of this retrospective observational study was to study the long-term outcome of exercise capacity and quality of life during management of patients with COPD treated by home-based PR. Methods Home-based PR was administered to 211 patients with COPD (mean age, 62.3±11.1 years; mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second, 41.5%±17.7%). Home-based PR was chosen because of the distance of the patient’s home from the PR center and the patient’s preference. Each patient was individually managed by a team member once a week for 8 weeks with unsupervised continuation of physical exercises on the other days of the week according to an individual action plan. Exercise conditioning, therapeutic patient education, and self-management were included in the PR program. The home assessment comprised evaluation of the patient’s exercise capacity by a 6-minute stepper test, Timed Up and Go test, ten times sit-to-stand test, Hospital Anxiety and Depression score, and quality of life (Visual Simplified Respiratory Questionnaire, VQ11, Maugeri Respiratory Failure 28). Results No incidents or accidents were observed during the course of home-based PR. The 6-minute stepper test was significantly improved after completion of the program, at 6 months and 12 months, whereas the Timed Up and Go and ten times sit-to-stand test were improved after PR and at 6 months but not at 12 months. Hospital Anxiety and Depression and quality of life scores improved after PR, and this improvement persisted at 6 months and 12 months. Conclusion Home-based PR for unselected patients with COPD is effective in the short term, and this effectiveness is maintained in the medium term (6 months) and long term (12 months). Home-based PR is an alternative to outpatient management provided all activities, such as exercise

  6. PREDIRCAM eHealth Platform for Individualized Telemedical Assistance for Lifestyle Modification in the treatment of Obesity, Diabetes, and Cardiometabolic Risk Prevention: A Pilot Study (PREDIRCAM 1)

    PubMed Central

    González, Cintia; Herrero, Pau; Cubero, José M.; Iniesta, José M.; Hernando, M. Elena; García-Sáez, Gema; Alvaro J., Serrano; Martinez-Sarriegui, Iñaki; Perez-Gandia, Carmen; Gómez, Enrique J.; Rubinat, Esther; Alcantara, Valeria; Brugués, Eulalia; Chico, Ana; Mato, Eugenia; Bell, Olga; Corcoy, Rosa; de Leiva, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Background Healthy diet and regular physical activity are powerful tools in reducing diabetes and cardiometabolic risk. Various international scientific and health organizations have advocated the use of new technologies to solve these problems. The PREDIRCAM project explores the contribution that a technological system could offer for the continuous monitoring of lifestyle habits and individualized treatment of obesity as well as cardiometabolic risk prevention. Methods PREDIRCAM is a technological platform for patients and professionals designed to improve the effectiveness of lifestyle behavior modifications through the intensive use of the latest information and communication technologies. The platform consists of a web-based application providing communication interface with monitoring devices of physiological variables, application for monitoring dietary intake, ad hoc electronic medical records, different communication channels, and an intelligent notification system. A 2-week feasibility study was conducted in 15 volunteers to assess the viability of the platform. Results The website received 244 visits (average time/session: 17 min 45 s). A total of 435 dietary intakes were recorded (average time for each intake registration, 4 min 42 s ± 2 min 30 s), 59 exercises were recorded in 20 heart rate monitor downloads, 43 topics were discussed through a forum, and 11 of the 15 volunteers expressed a favorable opinion toward the platform. Food intake recording was reported as the most laborious task. Ten of the volunteers considered long-term use of the platform to be feasible. Conclusions The PREDIRCAM platform is technically ready for clinical evaluation. Training is required to use the platform and, in particular, for registration of dietary food intake. PMID:23911170

  7. Muscle Strength Enhancement Following Home-Based Virtual Cycling Training in Ambulatory Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chia-Ling; Hong, Wei-Hsien; Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy; Liaw, Mei-Yun; Chung, Chia-Ying; Chen, Chung-Yao

    2012-01-01

    This study is the first well-designed randomized controlled trial to assess the effects of a novel home-based virtual cycling training (hVCT) program for improving muscle strength in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Twenty-eight ambulatory children with spastic CP aged 6-12 years were randomly assigned to an hVCT group (n = 13) or a…

  8. Using Child-Parent Psychotherapy in a Home-Based Program Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Jennifer; Smith, Mae

    2015-01-01

    This article tells the story of a single mother, Maria, who has a history of trauma, and her 2-year-old daughter, Lina, as they learn, play, and heal together through the use of Child-Parent Psychotherapy, an evidenced-based, trauma-informed therapeutic intervention in a home-based program model. Through the power of play, Maria and Lina are able…

  9. Efficacy of an early home-based cardiac rehabilitation program for patients after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lin; Cai, Zekun; Xiong, Meihua; Li, Yekuo; Li, Guoying; Deng, Yu; Hau, William Kongto; Li, Shuo; Huang, Wenhua; Qiu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The effect of an early short-term home-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program on ventricular function in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients is not yet clear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of our CR program on the improvement of myocardial function using three-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (3D-STE) in AMI patients. Methods: Fifty-two AMI patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups after discharge: the rehabilitation group, which participated in an early, home-based CR program, and the control group, which received only usual care. All subjects in both groups underwent 3D-STE examinations of the left ventricle within 48 hours of percutaneous coronary intervention and again 4 weeks after discharge. Global longitudinal strain (GLS), global radial strain (GRS), global area strain (GAS), global circumferential strain (GCS), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and segmental strains were computed. The CR program was initially conducted with supervised inpatient training, followed by an unsupervised home-based training program during a 4-week follow-up. Results: We obtained segmental strains from 832 segments, of which 319 were defined as interventional segments, 179 as ischemic segments, and the remaining segments as normal segments. At the 4-week follow-up, when controlling for baseline values, the rehabilitation group showed significant improvements in GLS, GRS, GCS, GAS, LVEF, and in all of the segmental strains of the 3 subgroups compared with the control group (P <0.05). Conclusion: Our study suggests that an early, home-based CR program can greatly improve the ventricular function of AMI patients in a short period of time. PMID:28033254

  10. Knowledge regarding HIV/AIDS among home-based caregivers in Namibia

    PubMed Central

    Niikondo, Hileni; Hoque, Muhammad; Ntuli-Ngcobo, Busi

    2011-01-01

    Lack of practical knowledge among home-based caregivers on human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), anti-retroviral therapy (ART) and poor individual adherence to treatment are among the root causes of ineffective ART service delivery in Namibia. The purpose of our study was to investigate the knowledge among home-based caregivers in Namibia regarding HIV/AIDS. The study was a descriptive, cross-sectional one in which 89 participants completed a self-administered questionnaire to assess their knowledge of HIV/AIDS. Almost all (93%) of the respondents gave a correct definition of HIV. Over a tenth (11.3%) did not know that HIV decreases the body's ability to fight disease and 33.7% could not define AIDS. Almost all (98%) the home-based caregivers knew that HIV can be diagnosed only through a blood test and 91% mentioned that consistent and correct use of condoms during sexual intercourse protects one from HIV infection. Fewer than half (44%) of the respondents could indicate on-and-off fever as a symptom of AIDS and 16% mentioned that increased body weight is a sign of AIDS, which is incorrect. Although the knowledge of the caregivers on HIV/AIDS was above average in some aspects, there was still lack of knowledge on isolated issues such as AIDS definitions and signs and how HIV works. Training organisations in home-based care settings should emphasise the knowledge of AIDS definition and signs as well as of post-test counselling, consequence of poor adherence and facilities that issue anti-retroviral treatment.

  11. The process associated with motivation of a home-based Wii Fit exercise program among sedentary African American women with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Hon K.; Breland, Hazel L.; Vogtle, Laura K.; Holthaus, Katy; Kamen, Diane L.; Sword, David

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the process associated with the motivation for playing Wii Fit among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Individual in-depth semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 14 sedentary African American women with SLE to explore their experiences and reflect on their motivation for playing Wii Fit after completing a 10-week home-based Wii Fit exercise program. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using the constant comparative method to identify categories related to participants’ motivation. Three authors independently sorted, organized and coded transcript text into categories, then combined the categories into themes and subthemes. Results In addition to the two themes (Ethical principal of keeping a commitment, and Don’t want to let anyone down) generic to home-based exercise trials, we identified five themes (Enjoyment, Health Benefits, Sense of Accomplishment, Convenience, and Personalized) that revealed why the participants were motivated to play the Wii Fit. Enjoyment had three subthemes: Interactive, Challenging, and Competitive with an embedded social element. However, several participants commented they were not able to do many activities, master certain games, or figure out how to play some; as a result, they were bored with the limited selection of activities that they could do. Conclusions The motivational elements of the Wii Fit may contribute to improved exercise motivation and adherence in select sedentary African American women with SLE. Results provide a better understanding on the important elements to incorporate in the development of sustainable home-based exercise programs with interactive health video games for this population. PMID:23260612

  12. Self-reported impact of caregiving on voluntary home-based caregivers in Mutale Municipality, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Netshandama, Vhonani O.; Mudau, Makondelela J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The establishment of home-based care (HBC) programmes in developing countries has resulted in a shift of burden from hospitals to communities where palliative care is provided by voluntary home-based caregivers. Aim The study investigated the impact of caregiving on voluntary home-based caregivers. Setting The study was conducted at HBC organisations located in Mutale Municipality of Limpopo Province, South Africa. Methods A quantitative cross-sectional descriptive survey design was applied to investigate the impact of caregiving on voluntary home-based caregivers. The sample was comprised of (N = 190) home-based caregivers. Home-based caregivers provide care to people in need of care in their homes, such as orphans, the elderly and those suffering from chronic illnesses such as tuberculosis, HIV and/or AIDS, cancer and stroke. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect data which were analysed descriptively using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software, Version 20. Results The results showed that 101 (53.2%) participants were worried about their financial security because they were not registered as workers, whilst 74 (39.0%) participants were always worried about getting infection from their clients because they often do not have protective equipment. Conclusion Voluntary home-based caregivers have an important role in the provision of palliative care to people in their own homes, and therefore, the negative caregiving impact on the lives of caregivers may compromise the provision of quality palliative care. PMID:27380854

  13. GetHealthyHarlem.org: Developing a Web Platform for Health Promotion and Wellness Driven by and for the Harlem Community

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sharib A.; Ancker, Jessica S.; Li, Jianhua; Kaufman, David; Hutchinson, Carly; Cohall, Alwyn; Kukafka, Rita

    2009-01-01

    GetHealthyHarlem.org is a community website developed on an open-source platform to facilitate collaborative development of health content through participatory action research (PAR) principles. The website was developed to enable the Harlem community to create a shared health and wellness knowledgebase, to enable discourse about local and culturally relevant health information, and to foster social connections between community members and health promotion organizations. The site is gaining active use with more than 9,500 unique site visits in the six months since going live in November, 2008. In ongoing research studies, we are using the website to explore how the PAR model can be applied to the development of a community health website. PMID:20351872

  14. [Sociability networks: approaches based on home-based therapeutic care services].

    PubMed

    Argiles, Carmen Terezinha Leal; Kantorski, Luciane Prado; Willrich, Janaína Quinzen; Antonacci, Milena Hohmann; Coimbra, Valéria Cristina Christello

    2013-07-01

    Home-based therapeutic services emerge in the context of psychiatric reform in Brazil, as a step forward in the policy of de-institutionalization, as well as being essential services to overcome custody practices, typical of the asylum model. These services provide spaces for care, welcome and decent housing for people whose family and social ties have been affected by internment in psychiatric hospitals. The article seeks to evaluate the sociability network of users of home-based therapeutic services in Alegrete in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, based on a case report. This study is part of the research on 'Networks that Rehabilitate'--evaluating innovative experiments in the composition of psychosocial care networks. Data from semi-structured interviews with the six workers of the service were used. It was observed that the service provides unique and innovative experience to find solutions that bring people with long periods of psychiatric hospitalization back together with their family, the community and city life, thereby eliminating the segregation to which they were subjected. Coaching residents and workers in the creation of home-based therapeutic care services reveals the potential to reintegrate mentally handicapped patients into society.

  15. Peer tutoring with or without home-based reinforcement, for reading remediation.

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, J; Bucher, B

    1980-01-01

    An operant-based corrective reading program was established to study effectiveness of peer tutoring in the school, for reading deficient children. Sixty-nine second to fourth grade students were matched on measures of initial reading ability and level of reading retardation, and randomly assigned to three groups: Peer Tutoring Only, Peer Tutoring with Home Based Reinforcement, and Control. SRA materials were used in training for the experimental groups, supplemented with additional reading materials. The program continued for 15 weeks, in seven public schools. Changes in oral reading accuracy and comprehansion were assessed. Both reading and comprehension were significantly increased by peer tutoring, relative to the control group. The addition of home-based reinforcement doubled this increase. The measured gain in oral reading, based upon standardized testing, was 0.19 years for the controls and 1.27 years for peer tutoring with home-based reinforcement. Internal measures of gain showed similar results, and comprehension gains were also comparable. A high rate of compliance with the tutoring program was maintained by the tutors. High ratings of satisfaction were obtained for the program, from all groups of participants. The feasibility of the program for application in the school system is discussed. PMID:7364691

  16. Enhancing the capacity to facilitate physical activity in home-based child care settings.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Patti-Jean; Temple, Viviene A

    2013-01-01

    Healthy Opportunities for Preschoolers (HOP) is a physical activity and movement skill intervention that was developed to address the unique needs of home-based child care providers. The authors used a train-the-trainer approach to enhance local uptake and implementation of HOP and examined the impact on the trainers' (workshop leaders') perceived knowledge, confidence, and intention to implement community workshops and subsequently on the knowledge, confidence, and intentions of workshop participants. This study also assessed feasibility: reach, satisfaction, and facilitators and barriers to workshop implementation. Overall, 92% and 89.5% of the leaders were very or extremely satisfied with the workshop content and delivery, respectively. Training significantly increased their self-reported knowledge (p < .001) and confidence (p < .001). Subsequently, 73% of workshop participants (48 workshops, n = 321) took part in the evaluation; intention to use what they learned after the workshop was high (86%) and perceived knowledge, confidence, and attitude all increased significantly (p < .001). The HOP train-the-trainer approach was feasible and enhanced knowledge, confidence, and readiness to change among home-based child care providers. This approach should be considered as a component of an overall strategy to enhance the promotion of physical activity and movement skills in home-based child care settings.

  17. The effectiveness of home-based exercise programs for low back pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Anar, Sevgi Özdinç

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of home-based exercise programs for low back pain (LBP) patients. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were 49 volunteer chronic LBP patients. Home-based exercises that had been specifically modified for the individual patients were prescribed for a period of four weeks, and the volunteers were asked to return for a control evaluation at the end of this period. Exercise adherence and correct performance, pain intensity, disability, endurance, and flexibility were compared between pre- and post intervention, and correlations between exercise adherence and correct performance with, pain intensity score, endurance, disability, and flexibility were investigated. [Results] Twenty-eight patients (57.14%) did not return for the control evaluation. The mean age of the patients who participated in this control test was 43.24 ± 10.89 years. The adherence rate of the home exercise program was 54.10 ± 26.01%, and the correctly performed execises score was 2.7 ± 1.9. All of the parameters had improved at the final evaluation; however, there was no correlation among the parameters. [Conclusion] Clinicians should be aware of the patient’s adherence level when recommending home-based exercises, and should also realize that exercises might be performed inaccurately in an unsupervised environment. PMID:27821923

  18. A qualitative study of community home-based care and antiretroviral adherence in Swaziland

    PubMed Central

    Root, Robin; Whiteside, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has rendered HIV and AIDS a chronic condition for individuals in many parts of the world. Adherence, however, is integral to achieving chronicity. Studies have shown both relatively high ART adherence rates in sub-Saharan Africa and the importance of community home-based care (CHBC) to facilitating this process. In light of diminished HIV and AIDS funding globally and increased reliance on CHBC throughout Africa, a better understanding of how CHBC may strengthen ART adherence is essential to improving patients’ quality of life, tending to the needs of care supporters and achieving healthier populations. Methods This article reports findings from a qualitative study of a CHBC organiztion serving an estimated 2500 clients in rural Swaziland. Semi-structured questionnaires with 79 HIV-positive clients [people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA)] yielded data on diverse aspects of being HIV positive, including insights on whether and how PLWHA perceived care supporters to facilitate ART adherence in a high stigma and structurally impoverished setting. Results Ninety-two percent of participants said their health had improved since care supporters came into their lives. A major finding was that an estimated 53% of participants said they would have died, a few from suicide had the care supporter never intervened. More than one in four participants (27.9%) sought HIV testing after a care supporter began visiting them. Nearly a third (31%) commenced ART after and largely as a consequence of care supporter intervention. Approximately one in four (23%) reported that their care supporter had helped them to disclose their HIV-positive status to family members. Twenty-seven percent said they had felt discouraged or had been discouraged from taking ART by members of their family or community. Discussion General inductive analysis of participant reports suggested two social mechanisms of CHBC impact on ART adherence: (i) cultivating client

  19. HeLiVa platform: integrated heart-liver-vascular systems for drug testing in human health and disease.

    PubMed

    Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Chen, Christopher; Hirschi, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Our project team is developing an integrated microphysiological platform with functionally connected vascular, liver and cardiac microtissues derived from a single line of human pluripotent stem cells. The platform enables functional representation of human physiology in conjunction with real-time biological readouts (via imaging and homologous reporters for all three cell phenotypes) and compatibility with high-throughput/high-content analysis. In this paper, we summarize progress made over the first year of the grant.

  20. Efficacy of home-based exercise programmes for people with chronic heart failure: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Rita; Marwick, Thomas

    2009-10-01

    Home-based programmes may offer an alternative to conventional programmes or as a means of maintaining physical fitness after graduating from centre-based programmes. We sought to examine the effectiveness of home-based exercise programmes on exercise capacity in patients with heart failure compared with usual medical care. Electronic databases were searched to identify randomized controlled trials. Protocols included an initial period of centre-based exercise followed by exercise at home, home-based exercise only and concurrent centre and home-based exercise. Outcome measures included peak oxygen consumption, exercise duration and the six-minute walk test. Nineteen relevant studies were identified for review. The mean improvement in peak oxygen consumption was 2.86 ml/kg per min [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.43-4.29]. Exercise duration increased by 1.94 min (95% CI: 0.89-2.98) and distance on the six-minute walk test was increased by 30.41 m (95% CI: 6.13-54.68). Other reported benefits of home-based programmes include increased quality of life and lowered hospital admission rates. In conclusion, home-based exercise programmes have been shown to benefit people with heart failure in the short term. Further research is required to investigate the long-term effects of home exercise and to determine the optimal strategies for improving exercise adherence in patients with heart failure.

  1. Effect of home-based Kegel exercises on quality of life in women with stress and mixed urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Cavkaytar, S; Kokanali, M K; Topcu, H O; Aksakal, O S; Doğanay, M

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of home-based Kegel exercises in women with stress and mixed urinary incontinence. A total of 90 women with urodynamically proven urinary stress (SUI) and mixed (MUI) incontinence awaiting anti-incontinence surgery were recruited in the urogynaecology clinic of Ankara Zekai Tahir Burak Women's Health Research and Education Hospital. Of these, 18 women were excluded due to low compliance and the remaining 72 were divided into two groups according to urodynamic diagnosis (SUI group, n = 38; MUI group, n = 34). Age, BMI, menopausal status and medical history of the women were recorded. The women took Kegel exercise, consisting of 10 sets of contractions/day; each set included 10 repetitions, for at least 8 weeks. To evaluate the pelvic floor muscle strength, the modified Oxford grading system was used before and after Kegel exercising. The Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7); Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6) and the Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I) questions were compared before and after 8 weeks of Kegel exercising. The age, BMI, gravidity, menopausal status, macrosomic fetus history, hypertension and asthma were similar between the groups. There were statistically significant lower scores in both IIQ-7 and UDI-6 before and after Kegel exercises within each group (p < 0.001). The mean change of the IIQ-7 and UDI-6 score was statistically significantly higher in the SUI group than in the MUI group (p = 0.023 and p = 0.003, respectively). Results of the Oxford scale were also statistically significantly higher after Kegel exercises within each group (p = < 0.001). In total, 68.4% of the women in the SUI group and 41.2% of the women in the MUI group reported improvements which were statistically significant (p = 0.02). We conclude that home-based Kegel exercises, with no supervision, have been found effective in women with SUI and MUI. The improvement was more prominent in women with SUI.

  2. Home-based voluntary HIV counselling and testing found highly acceptable and to reduce inequalities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Low uptake of voluntary HIV counselling and testing (VCT) in sub-Saharan Africa is raising acceptability concerns which might be associated with ways by which it is offered. We investigated the acceptability of home-based delivery of counselling and HIV testing in urban and rural populations in Zambia where VCT has been offered mostly from local clinics. Methods A population-based HIV survey was conducted in selected communities in 2003 (n = 5035). All participants stating willingness to be HIV tested were offered VCT at home and all counselling was conducted in the participants' homes. In the urban area post-test counselling and giving of results were done the following day whereas in rural areas this could take 1-3 weeks. Results Of those who indicated willingness to be HIV tested, 76.1% (95%CI 74.9-77.2) were counselled and received the test result. Overall, there was an increase in the proportion ever HIV tested from 18% before provision of home-based VCT to 38% after. The highest increase was in rural areas; among young rural men aged 15-24 years up from 14% to 42% vs. for urban men from 17% to 37%. Test rates by educational attainment changed from being positively associated to be evenly distributed after home-based VCT. Conclusions A high uptake was achieved by delivering HIV counselling and testing at home. The highest uptakes were seen in rural areas, in young people and groups with low educational attainment, resulting in substantial reductions in existing inequalities in accessing VCT services. PMID:20553631

  3. Effects of home-based respiratory muscle training in children and adolescents with chronic lung disease* **

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Iván; Zenteno, Daniel; Manterola, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Respiratory muscle weakness is a functional repercussion of chronic lung disease (CLD). The objective of this study was to assess the effects of home-based respiratory muscle training (RMT) in children and adolescents with CLD or neuromuscular disease (NMD). METHODS: This was a quasi-experimental study involving children and adolescents with CLD or NMD. Before and after 6 months of home-based RMT, we measured respiratory muscle strength (MIP and MEP), PEF, and peak cough flow (PCF). We made statistical comparisons between the pre-RMT and post-RMT values, as well as evaluating the correlation between the duration and effect of RMT. RESULTS: The study included 29 patients, with a mean age of 12 years (range, 5-17 years), of whom 18 (62.1%) were male. The CLD group comprised 11 patients (37.9%), and the NMD group comprised 18 (62.1%). The mean duration of the RMT was 60 weeks (range, 46-90 weeks) in the CLD group and 39 weeks (range, 24-89 weeks) in the NMD group. In comparison with the pre-RMT values, the post-RMT values for MIP and MEP were significantly higher in both groups, whereas those for PEF and PCF were significantly higher only in the NMD group. We found no correlation between the duration and the effect of RMT. CONCLUSIONS: Home-based RMT appears to be an effective strategy for increasing respiratory muscle strength in children and adolescents with CLD or NMD, although it increased the ability to cough effectively only in those with NMD. PMID:25610503

  4. Home-based administration of Sayana® Press: review and assessment of needs in low-resource settings.

    PubMed

    Keith, Bonnie; Wood, Siri; Tifft, Sara; Hutchings, Jane

    2014-05-01

    A new presentation of the subcutaneous (SC) injectable contraceptive depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) increases the possibilities for home and self-administration of this popular contraceptive method. Sayana® Press is DMPA-SC in the prefilled Uniject™ injection system and consists of one dose that provides 3 months of contraceptive protection. Studies indicate that lay caregiver and self-injection of various medications, including other injectable presentations of DMPA-SC, are acceptable and effective. Introduction of Sayana® Press in developing countries could extend injectable contraceptive delivery safely and effectively beyond the clinic and, eventually, into the home, allowing lay caregiver or self-administration. Research needs for low-resource settings include assessing the acceptability and feasibility of self-injection with Sayana® Press. Feasibility studies necessary for implementing a sustainable home-based delivery program include assessment of training, health systems, policies, infrastructure needs and programmatic considerations to optimize women's ability to manage their self-injection schedule.

  5. Lifestyle-oriented non-pharmacological treatments for fibromyalgia: a clinical overview and applications with home-based technologies

    PubMed Central

    Friedberg, Fred; Williams, David A; Collinge, William

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a persistent and disabling widespread pain condition often accompanied by chronic fatigue, cognitive problems, sleep disturbance, depression, anxiety, and headache. To date, the most thoroughly studied non-pharmacological approaches to managing FM are those with a focus on changing patient activities and beliefs that affect the illness. These interventions are intended to facilitate enduring improvement in pain and functional status. Lifestyle-oriented treatments include patient education, aerobic or other physical exercise, and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). These interventions in FM can be delivered in medical or behavioral health care settings by trained professionals, through patient-oriented treatment manuals, or via remote-access technologies. Non-pharmacological treatments, in particular exercise and CBT, have yielded effect sizes and cost–benefit ratios comparable to medications. This paper describes lifestyle-oriented non-pharmacological treatments for FM and highlights selected literature reviews of these interventions. In addition, behavioral and practical issues are addressed that may affect these non-pharmacological treatments, including patient expectations, participant burden, and treatment availability. Recommendations are made to facilitate these interventions and potentially improve outcomes. In particular, the increasing availability of convenient home-based mobile technologies to deliver these non-pharmacological treatments is described. PMID:23166446

  6. Home based neuromuscular electrical stimulation as a new rehabilitative strategy for severely disabled patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Neder, J; Sword, D; Ward, S; Mackay, E; Cochrane, L; Clark, C

    2002-01-01

    Background: Passive training of specific locomotor muscle groups by means of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) might be better tolerated than whole body exercise in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It was hypothesised that this novel strategy would be particularly effective in improving functional impairment and the consequent disability which characterises patients with end stage COPD. Methods: Fifteen patients with advanced COPD (nine men) were randomly assigned to either a home based 6 week quadriceps femoris NMES training programme (group 1, n=9, FEV1=38.0 (9.6)% of predicted) or a 6 week control period before receiving NMES (group 2, n=6, FEV1=39.5 (13.3)% of predicted). Knee extensor strength and endurance, whole body exercise capacity, and health related quality of life (Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire, CRDQ) were assessed. Results: All patients were able to complete the NMES training programme successfully, even in the presence of exacerbations (n=4). Training was associated with significant improvements in muscle function, maximal and endurance exercise tolerance, and the dyspnoea domain of the CRDQ (p<0.05). Improvements in muscle performance and exercise capacity after NMES correlated well with a reduction in perception of leg effort corrected for exercise intensity (p<0.01). Conclusions: For severely disabled COPD patients with incapacitating dyspnoea, short term electrical stimulation of selected lower limb muscles involved in ambulation can improve muscle strength and endurance, whole body exercise tolerance, and breathlessness during activities of daily living. PMID:11923552

  7. Enabling cross-platform clinical decision support through Web-based decision support in commercial electronic health record systems: proposal and evaluation of initial prototype implementations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingyuan; Velasco, Ferdinand T; Musser, R Clayton; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2013-01-01

    Enabling clinical decision support (CDS) across multiple electronic health record (EHR) systems has been a desired but largely unattained aim of clinical informatics, especially in commercial EHR systems. A potential opportunity for enabling such scalable CDS is to leverage vendor-supported, Web-based CDS development platforms along with vendor-supported application programming interfaces (APIs). Here, we propose a potential staged approach for enabling such scalable CDS, starting with the use of custom EHR APIs and moving towards standardized EHR APIs to facilitate interoperability. We analyzed three commercial EHR systems for their capabilities to support the proposed approach, and we implemented prototypes in all three systems. Based on these analyses and prototype implementations, we conclude that the approach proposed is feasible, already supported by several major commercial EHR vendors, and potentially capable of enabling cross-platform CDS at scale.

  8. The Home-Based Occupational Therapy Intervention in the Alzheimer's Disease Multiple Intervention Trial (ADMIT).

    PubMed

    Schmid, Arlene A; Spangler-Morris, Carrie; Beauchamp, Rachel C; Wellington, Miranda C; Hayden, Whitney M; Porterfield, Hannah S; Ferguson, Denisha; Callahan, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    There is no way to prevent functional declines related to Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The use of occupational therapy (OT) has been shown to be successful in managing some aspects of AD. We added home-based OT to evidence-based best practice for AD with the aim of delaying functional decline in people with AD. OT was delivered in the home to a caregiver dyad including the person with AD and her/his caregiver. This paper describes the OT intervention for the AD Multiple Intervention Trial, a parallel randomized controlled trial. We include baseline data on the 180 caregiver dyads.

  9. Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation improves clinical features and systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Eloisa Sanches Pereira; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Dias, Fernanda Dultra; Gomes, Evelim Leal Freitas Dantas; Greiffo, Flavia Regina; Ligeiro de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Stirbulov, Roberto; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a respiratory disease characterized by chronic airflow limitation that leads beyond the pulmonary changes to important systemic effects. COPD is characterized by pulmonary and systemic inflammation. However, increases in the levels of inflammatory cytokines in plasma are found even when the disease is stable. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves physical exercise capacity and quality of life and decreases dyspnea. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a home-based pulmonary rehabilitation (HBPR) program improves exercise tolerance in COPD patients, as well as health-related quality of life and systemic inflammation. This prospective study was conducted at the Laboratory of Functional Respiratory Evaluation, Nove de Julho University, São Paulo, Brazil. After anamnesis, patients were subjected to evaluations of health-related quality of life and dyspnea, spirometry, respiratory muscle strength, upper limbs incremental test, incremental shuttle walk test, and blood test for quantification of systemic inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-6 and IL-8). At the end of the evaluations, patients received a booklet containing the physical exercises to be performed at home, three times per week for 8 consecutive weeks. Around 25 patients were enrolled, and 14 completed the pre- and post-HBPR ratings. There was a significant increase in the walked distance and the maximal inspiratory pressure, improvements on two components from the health-related quality-of-life questionnaire, and a decrease in plasma IL-8 levels after the intervention. The HBPR is an important and viable alternative to pulmonary rehabilitation for the treatment of patients with COPD; it improves exercise tolerance, inspiratory muscle strength, quality of life, and systemic inflammation in COPD patients.

  10. Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation improves clinical features and systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Eloisa Sanches Pereira; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Dias, Fernanda Dultra; Gomes, Evelim Leal Freitas Dantas; Greiffo, Flavia Regina; Ligeiro de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Stirbulov, Roberto; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a respiratory disease characterized by chronic airflow limitation that leads beyond the pulmonary changes to important systemic effects. COPD is characterized by pulmonary and systemic inflammation. However, increases in the levels of inflammatory cytokines in plasma are found even when the disease is stable. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves physical exercise capacity and quality of life and decreases dyspnea. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a home-based pulmonary rehabilitation (HBPR) program improves exercise tolerance in COPD patients, as well as health-related quality of life and systemic inflammation. This prospective study was conducted at the Laboratory of Functional Respiratory Evaluation, Nove de Julho University, São Paulo, Brazil. After anamnesis, patients were subjected to evaluations of health-related quality of life and dyspnea, spirometry, respiratory muscle strength, upper limbs incremental test, incremental shuttle walk test, and blood test for quantification of systemic inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-6 and IL-8). At the end of the evaluations, patients received a booklet containing the physical exercises to be performed at home, three times per week for 8 consecutive weeks. Around 25 patients were enrolled, and 14 completed the pre- and post-HBPR ratings. There was a significant increase in the walked distance and the maximal inspiratory pressure, improvements on two components from the health-related quality-of-life questionnaire, and a decrease in plasma IL-8 levels after the intervention. The HBPR is an important and viable alternative to pulmonary rehabilitation for the treatment of patients with COPD; it improves exercise tolerance, inspiratory muscle strength, quality of life, and systemic inflammation in COPD patients. PMID:25848241

  11. Caregiver Perceptions of Children who have Complex Communication Needs Following a Home-based Intervention Using Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Rural Kenya: An Intervention Note

    PubMed Central

    Gona, Joseph K.; Newton, Charles R.; Hartley, Sally

    2014-01-01

    A high level of unmet communication need exists amongst children with developmental disabilities in sub-Saharan Africa. This study investigated preliminary evidence of the impact associated with a home-based, caregiver-implemented intervention employing AAC methods, with nine children in rural Kenya who have complex communication needs. The intervention used mainly locally-sourced low-tech materials, and was designed to make use of the child's strengths and the caregiver's natural expertise. A pretest-posttest design was used in the study. Data were gathered using an adapted version of the Communication Profile, which was based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) framework. The non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test was applied to data from the first two sections of the Communication Profile-Adapted. Qualitative analysis was conducted on the final section. The data provided evidence of statistically significant positive changes in caregiver perceptions of communication at the levels of Body Structure and Function, and Activities for Communication. Also, analysis of the Participation for Communication section revealed some expansion to the children's social activities. The potential impact of the home-based intervention would benefit from investigation on a larger scale. Limitations of the study are discussed. PMID:25379627

  12. Caregiver perceptions of children who have complex communication needs following a home-based intervention using augmentative and alternative communication in rural Kenya: an intervention note.

    PubMed

    Bunning, Karen; Gona, Joseph K; Newton, Charles R; Hartley, Sally

    2014-12-01

    A high level of unmet communication need exists amongst children with developmental disabilities in sub-Saharan Africa. This study investigated preliminary evidence of the impact associated with a home-based, caregiver-implemented intervention employing AAC methods, with nine children in rural Kenya who have complex communication needs. The intervention used mainly locally-sourced low-tech materials, and was designed to make use of the child's strengths and the caregiver's natural expertise. A pretest-posttest design was used in the study. Data were gathered using an adapted version of the Communication Profile, which was based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) framework. The non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test was applied to data from the first two sections of the Communication Profile-Adapted. Qualitative analysis was conducted on the final section. The data provided evidence of statistically significant positive changes in caregiver perceptions of communication at the levels of Body Structure and Function, and Activities for Communication. Also, analysis of the Participation for Communication section revealed some expansion to the children's social activities. The potential impact of the home-based intervention would benefit from investigation on a larger scale. Limitations of the study are discussed.

  13. Factors associated with HIV-testing and acceptance of an offer of home-based testing by men in rural Zambia.

    PubMed

    Hensen, B; Lewis, J J; Schaap, A; Tembo, M; Mutale, W; Weiss, H A; Hargreaves, J; Ayles, H

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study is to describe HIV-testing among men in rural Lusaka Province, Zambia, using a population-based survey for a cluster-randomized trial. Households (N = 120) were randomly selected from each of the 42 clusters, defined as a health facility catchment area. Individuals aged 15-60 years were invited to complete questionnaires regarding demographics and HIV-testing history. Men testing in the last year were defined as recent-testers. After questionnaire completion adults were offered home-based rapid HIV-testing. Of the 2,828 men, 53 % reported ever-testing and 25 % recently-testing. Factors independently associated with ever- and recent-testing included age 20+ years, secondary/higher education, being married or widowed, a history of TB-treatment and higher socioeconomic position. 53 % of never-testers and 57 % of men who did not report a recent-test accepted home-based HIV-testing. Current HIV-testing approaches are inadequate in this high prevalence setting. Alternative strategies, including self-testing, mobile- or workplace-testing, may be required to complement facility-based services.

  14. Clinic- and Home-Based Contingency Management Plus Parent Training for Adolescent Cannabis Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Stanger, Catherine; Ryan, Stacy R.; Scherer, Emily A.; Norton, Gray E.; Budney, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To conduct a randomized test comparing two multicomponent, contingency management interventions, one with and one without a full parent training curriculum, and an individual treatment for adolescent cannabis use disorders. Method 153 adolescents who met DSM-IV criteria for cannabis abuse or dependence were randomized to motivational enhancement therapy/cognitive-behavioral therapy (MET/CBT), MET/CBT+abstinence-based contingency management (CM), or MET/CBT+CM+Parent Training (PT). Results Overall, during treatment, abstinence was greater for youth receiving clinic- and home-based CM without PT compared to those who received individual MET/CBT. There was no additional benefit of the full parent training curriculum on marijuana use, youth externalizing problems, or parenting. Conclusion These results suggest that clinic- plus home-based CM for cannabis use disorders can increase rates of abstinence during treatment over and above an evidence-based treatment (individual MET/CBT), but the addition of a comprehensive parenting training curriculum did not further enhance efficacy. PMID:26004659

  15. Predictors of client engagement and attrition in home-based child maltreatment prevention services.

    PubMed

    Damashek, Amy; Doughty, Debby; Ware, Lisa; Silovsky, Jane

    2011-02-01

    High rates of program attrition in home-based family support and child maltreatment prevention services are common. Researchexamining factors related to family engagement (i.e., enrollment and completion rates) may help program developers increase theimpact of child abuse prevention services by reducing attrition. The present study examined the relative influence of provider,program, and individual factors from the Integrated Theory of Parent Involvement (ITPI) as well as maternal and family demo-graphic and risk variables in predicting service enrollment and completion in a home-based child maltreatment prevention service(SafeCareþ) and a standard community care program (Services as Usual [SAU]). Participants were 398 female caregivers ofchildren ages 5 and below. Support was found for the primary role of program and provider factors in client enrollment andcompletion of services. Specifically, participants in SafeCareþ were 4 times more likely to enroll in services and 8.5 times morelikely to complete services than those in SAU. Family risk variables including intimate partner psychological aggression, substanceabuse, and depression were also significant predictors. Recommended next steps include integration of risk-related factors in theITPI framework and disentangling specific provider and program factors related to service engagement.

  16. A computerized recognition system for the home-based physiotherapy exercises using an RGBD camera.

    PubMed

    Ar, Ilktan; Akgul, Yusuf Sinan

    2014-11-01

    Computerized recognition of the home based physiotherapy exercises has many benefits and it has attracted considerable interest among the computer vision community. However, most methods in the literature view this task as a special case of motion recognition. In contrast, we propose to employ the three main components of a physiotherapy exercise (the motion patterns, the stance knowledge, and the exercise object) as different recognition tasks and embed them separately into the recognition system. The low level information about each component is gathered using machine learning methods. Then, we use a generative Bayesian network to recognize the exercise types by combining the information from these sources at an abstract level, which takes the advantage of domain knowledge for a more robust system. Finally, a novel postprocessing step is employed to estimate the exercise repetitions counts. The performance evaluation of the system is conducted with a new dataset which contains RGB (red, green, and blue) and depth videos of home-based exercise sessions for commonly applied shoulder and knee exercises. The proposed system works without any body-part segmentation, bodypart tracking, joint detection, and temporal segmentation methods. In the end, favorable exercise recognition rates and encouraging results on the estimation of repetition counts are obtained.

  17. Home-based reinforcement and the modification of pre-delinquents' classroom behavior1

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Jon S.; Wolf, Montrose M.; Phillips, Elery L.

    1970-01-01

    In Exp. I, five pre-delinquents from Achievement Place attended a special summer school math class where study behavior and rule violations were measured daily for each boy. The boys were required to take a “report card” for the teacher to mark. The teacher simply marked yes or no whether a boy had “studied the whole period” and “obeyed the class rules.” All yeses earned privileges in the home that day but a no lost all the privileges. Using a reversal design, it was shown that privileges dispensed remotely could significantly improve classroom performance. In Exp. II and III, home-based reinforcement was also shown to be effective in improving the study behavior of two youths in public school classrooms. In addition, data from Exp. III suggest that the daily feedback and reinforcement may be faded without much loss in study behavior. Home-based reinforcement was demonstrated to be a very effective and practical classroom behavior modification technique. PMID:16795262

  18. Mobile Phone Based System Opportunities to Home-based Managing of Chemotherapy Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Davoodi, Somayeh; Mohammadzadeh, Zeinab; Safdari, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Applying mobile base systems in cancer care especially in chemotherapy management have remarkable growing in recent decades. Because chemotherapy side effects have significant influences on patient’s lives, therefore it is necessary to take ways to control them. This research has studied some experiences of using mobile phone based systems to home-based monitor of chemotherapy side effects in cancer. Methods: In this literature review study, search was conducted with keywords like cancer, chemotherapy, mobile phone, information technology, side effects and self managing, in Science Direct, Google Scholar and Pub Med databases since 2005. Results: Today, because of the growing trend of the cancer, we need methods and innovations such as information technology to manage and control it. Mobile phone based systems are the solutions that help to provide quick access to monitor chemotherapy side effects for cancer patients at home. Investigated studies demonstrate that using of mobile phones in chemotherapy management have positive results and led to patients and clinicians satisfactions. Conclusion: This study shows that the mobile phone system for home-based monitoring chemotherapy side effects works well. In result, knowledge of cancer self-management and the rate of patient’s effective participation in care process improved. PMID:27482134

  19. Reliability of home-based, motor function measure in hereditary neuromuscular diseases.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Cortes, Xiomara; Ortiz-Corredor, Fernando; Mendoza-Pulido, Camilo

    2017-02-01

    Objective To evaluate the reliability of the motor function measure (MFM) scale in the assessment of disease severity and progression when administered at home and clinic and assess its correlation with the Paediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI). Methods In this prospective study, two assessors rated children with hereditary neuromuscular diseases (HNMDs) using the MFM at the clinic and then 2 weeks later at the patients' home. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated for the reliability of the MFM and its domains. The reliability of each item was assessed and the correlation between MFM and three domains of PODCI was evaluated. Results A total of 48 children (5-17 years of age) were assessed in both locations and the MFM scale demonstrated excellent inter-rater reliability (ICC, 0.98). Weighted kappa ranged from excellent to poor. Correlation of the home-based MFM with the PODCI domain 'basic mobility and transfers' was excellent, with the 'upper extremity' domain was moderate, but there was no correlation with the 'happiness' domain. Conclusion The MFM is a reliable tool for assessing patients with HNMD when used in a home-based setting.

  20. Home-Based versus Hospital-Based Rehabilitation Program after Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    López-Liria, Remedios; Padilla-Góngora, David; Catalan-Matamoros, Daniel; Rocamora-Pérez, Patricia; Pérez-de la Cruz, Sagrario; Fernández-Sánchez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To compare home-based rehabilitation with the standard hospital rehabilitation in terms of improving knee joint mobility and recovery of muscle strength and function in patients after a total knee replacement. Materials and Methods. A non-randomised controlled trial was conducted. Seventy-eight patients with a prosthetic knee were included in the study and allocated to either a home-based or hospital-based rehabilitation programme. Treatment included various exercises to restore strength and joint mobility and to improve patients' functional capacity. The primary outcome of the trial was the treatment effectiveness measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Results. The groups did not significantly differ in the leg side (right/left) or clinical characteristics (P > 0.05). After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements (P < 0.001) from the baseline values in the level of pain (visual analogue scale), the range of flexion-extension motion and muscle strength, disability (Barthel and WOMAC indices), balance, and walking. Conclusions. This study reveals that the rehabilitation treatments offered either at home or in hospital settings are equally effective. PMID:25961017

  1. Daily home-based spirometry during withdrawal of inhaled corticosteroid in severe to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto; Tetzlaff, Kay; Watz, Henrik; Wouters, Emiel FM; Disse, Bernd; Finnigan, Helen; Magnussen, Helgo; Calverley, Peter MA

    2016-01-01

    The WISDOM study (NCT00975195) reported a change in lung function following withdrawal of fluticasone propionate in patients with severe to very severe COPD treated with tiotropium and salmeterol. However, little is known about the validity of home-based spirometry measurements of lung function in COPD. Therefore, as part of this study, following suitable training, patients recorded daily home-based spirometry measurements in addition to undergoing periodic in-clinic spirometric testing throughout the study duration. We subsequently determined the validity of home-based spirometry for detecting changes in lung function by comparing in-clinic and home-based forced expiratory volume in 1 second in patients who underwent stepwise fluticasone propionate withdrawal over 12 weeks versus patients remaining on fluticasone propionate for 52 weeks. Bland–Altman analysis of these data confirmed good agreement between in-clinic and home-based measurements, both across all visits and at the individual visits at study weeks 6, 12, 18, and 52. There was a measurable difference between the forced expiratory volume in 1 second values recorded at home and in the clinic (mean difference of −0.05 L), which may be due to suboptimal patient effort in performing unsupervised recordings. However, this difference remained consistent over time. Overall, these data demonstrate that home-based and in-clinic spirometric measurements were equally valid and reliable for assessing lung function in patients with COPD, and suggest that home-based spirometry may be a useful tool to facilitate analysis of changes in lung function on a day-to-day basis. PMID:27578972

  2. Home e-health system integration in the Smart Home through a common media server.

    PubMed

    Pau, I; Seoane, F; Lindecrantz, K; Valero, M A; Carracedo, J

    2009-01-01

    Home e-health systems and services are revealed as one of the most important challenges to promote Quality of Life related to Health in the Information Society. Leading companies have worked on e-health systems although the majority of them are addressed to hospital or primary care settings. The solution detailed in this paper offers a personal health system to be integrated with Smart Home services platform to support home based e-care. Thus, the home e-health system and architecture detailed in this research work is ready to supply a seamless personal care solution both from the biomedical data analysis, service provision, security guarantee and information management s point of view. The solution is ready to be integrated within the Accessible Digital Home, a living lab managed by Universidad Politécnica de Madrid for R&D activities.

  3. Atmospheric metallic and arsenic pollution at an offshore drilling platform in the Bo Sea: A health risk assessment for the workers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Han, Suqin; Bi, Xiaohui; Zhao, Zhijing; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Wenjie; Zhang, Min; Chen, Jing; Wu, Jianhui; Zhang, Yufen; Feng, Yinchang

    2016-03-05

    To investigate the ambient metal pollution at the offshore drilling platform in the Bo Sea, which few studies have focused on, PM2.5 samples were collected and ten heavy metals, as well as As, were analyzed. High concentration levels of metals were observed, and the heavy metal pollution was quite serious compared to air quality standards and other marine areas. Back trajectories and wind dependent and PCA analyses showed that the marine sources included ship traffic emissions and corrosive stainless steels from the equipment at the platform as well as industrial emissions from stainless steel production and coal combustion sources, which were transported from the surrounding mainland. Both contributed greatly to the ambient metallic particles at the offshore platform. The Hazard Index values of the metals, which were much less than 1, the Carcinogenic Risk data, which were lower than the EPA's acceptable range, and the fact that the metal concentrations did not the exceed the permissible exposure limits of OSHA, indicated that the health risks from the ambient metallic particles for the oil-drilling workers were not significant.

  4. Modeling the Cost-Effectiveness of Home-Based HIV Testing and Education (HOPE) for Pregnant Women and Their Male Partners in Nyanza Province, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Farquhar, Carey; Ying, Roger; Krakowiak, Daisy; Kinuthia, John; Osoti, Alfred; Asila, Victor; Gone, Molly; Mark, Jennifer; Barnabas, Ruanne V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Women in sub-Saharan Africa face a 2-fold higher risk of HIV acquisition during pregnancy and postpartum and the majority do not know the HIV status of their male partner. Home-based couple HIV testing for pregnant women can reduce HIV transmission to women and infants while increasing antiretroviral therapy (ART) coverage in men. However, the cost-effectiveness of this program has not been evaluated. Methods: We modeled the health and economic impact of implementing a home-based partner education and HIV testing (HOPE) intervention for pregnant women and their male partners in a region of Western Kenya (formally Nyanza Province). We used data from the HOPE randomized clinical trial conducted in Kisumu, Kenya, to parameterize a mathematical model of HIV transmission. We conducted an in-country microcosting of the HOPE intervention (payer perspective) to estimate program costs as well as a lower cost scenario of task-shifting to community health workers. Results: The incremental cost of adding the HOPE intervention to standard antenatal care was $31–37 and $14–16 USD per couple tested with program and task-shifting costs, respectively. At 60% coverage of male partners, HOPE was projected to avert 6987 HIV infections and 2603 deaths in Nyanza province over 10 years with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $886 and $615 per disability-adjusted life year averted for the program and task-shifting scenario, respectively. ICERs were robust to changes in intervention coverage, effectiveness, and ART initiation and dropout rates. Conclusions: The HOPE intervention can moderately decrease HIV-associated morbidity and mortality by increasing ART coverage in male partners of pregnant women. ICERs fall below Kenya's per capita gross domestic product ($1358) and are therefore considered cost-effective. Task-shifting to community health workers can increase intervention affordability and feasibility. PMID:27355506

  5. Lysimeter Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klammler, Gernot; Murer, Erwin; Plieschnegger, Markus

    2014-05-01

    The existing European Lysimeter Platform (www.lysimeter.at/HP_EuLP) provides an overview of lysimeter types used in Europe and show details on equipment, research results and future perspectives of lysimeter facilities. However, this platform is not user-editable and has not been updated since 2008. Thus, the Lysimeter Research Group (www.lysimeter.at) intends to serve a new database based website called Lysimeter Platform, where existing information of the former European Lysimeter Platform will be transferred to the new Lysimeter Platform and, furthermore, registered users are able to create and edit sites where lysimeters, soil water samplers and soil hydrologic measuring profiles are operated. The Lysimeter Research Group is a scientific association and, therefore, the membership is free of charge. The new Lysimeter Platform contains general information of lysimeter sites worldwide (e.g., what is measured at which site) in a standardized form to get a quick but informative overview of the sites and can be linked to more detailed, already existing information provided by the site operators. Due to the standardized information in the database the Lysimeter Platform serves also as search-engine for soil water measurements and helps to find sites of interest and corresponding contact information worldwide. The Session "Estimation of soil-atmosphere and vadose zone water fluxes by use of precision lysimeter measurements" at the EGU General Assembly 2014 would be an excellent chance to present the idea and the concept of this new Lysimeter Platform to international site operators and scientists.

  6. Rapid home-based human immunodeficiency virus testing to reduce costs in a large tuberculosis cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, C.; Lecca, L.; Shin, S.; Lobatón, R.; Zhang, Z.; Calderón, R.; Murray, M.; Becerra, M. C.

    2013-01-01

    To reduce costs in a large tuberculosis household contact cohort study in Lima, Peru, we replaced laboratory-based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing with home-based rapid HIV testing. We developed a protocol and training course to prepare staff for the new strategy; these included role-playing for home-based deployment of the Determine® HIV 1/2 Ag/Ac Combo HIV test. Although the rapid HIV test produced more false-positives, the overall cost per participant tested, refusal rate and time to confirmatory HIV testing were lower with the home-based rapid testing strategy compared to the original approach. Rapid testing could be used in similar research or routine care settings. PMID:25580381

  7. Home based telemedicine intervention for patients with uncontrolled hypertension: - a real life - non-randomized study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Control of blood pressure is frequently inadequate in spite of availability of several classes of well tolerated and effective antihypertensive drugs. Several factors, including the use of suboptimal doses of drugs, inadequate or ineffective treatments and poor drug compliance may be the reason for this phenomenon. The aim of the current non- randomized study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a Home-Based Telemedicine service in patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Methods 74 patients were enrolled in a Home Based Telemedicine group and 94 patients in the Usual Care group. At baseline and at the end of the study, patients in both groups were seen in a cardiology office. Patients in Home Based Telemedicine group additionally were followed by a physician-nurse, through scheduled and unscheduled telephone appointments. These patients also received a blood pressure measuring device that could transmit the readings to a central data monitor via secure data connection. Results During the study period (80 ± 25 days), a total of 17401 blood pressure measurements were taken in the Home Based Telemedicine group corresponding to 236 ± 136 readings per patient and a mean daily measurement of 3 ± 1.7. The scheduled telephone contacts (initiated by the nurse) equaled to 5.2 ± 4.3/patient (370 in total) and the unscheduled telephone contacts (initiated by the patients) were 0.4 ± 0.9/patient (30 in total). The mean systolic blood pressure values decreased from 153 ± 19 mmHg to 130 ± 15 mmHg (p < 0.0001) at the end of the study and diastolic blood pressure values decreased from 89 ± 10 mmHg to 76 ± 11 mmHg (p < 0.0001). In the Usual Care group, the mean systolic blood pressure values decreased from 156 ± 16 mmHg to 149 ± 17 mmHg (p < 0.05) at the end of the study and diastolic blood pressure values decreased from 90 ± 8 mmHg to 86 ± 9 mmHg (p < 0.05). The changes in drug

  8. Home-based caregivers' knowledge regarding anti-retroviral therapy in Namibia.

    PubMed

    Niikondo, H N; Hoque, M E; Ntuli-Ngcobo, B

    2011-03-01

    Lack of practical knowledge among home-based caregivers (HBCs) on HIV/AIDS, anti-retroviral treatment (ART) and poor individual adherence to treatment are among the root causes of ineffective ART service delivery in Namibia. The purpose of the study was to investigate the knowledge of HBCs in Namibia regarding ART. The study was a descriptive, cross-sectional study in which 89 participants completed self-administered questionnaires to assess their knowledge regarding ART. Knowledge of HBCs on ART was above average in some aspects, there was still lack of knowledge on necessity of post-test counseling. Training organizations should put emphasis on the necessity of post-test counseling, consequence of poor adherence and type of facilities that issue ART.

  9. The use of computer vision techniques to augment home based sensorised environments.

    PubMed

    Uhríková, Zdenka; Nugent, Chris D; Hlavác, Václav

    2008-01-01

    Technology within the home environment is becoming widely accepted as a means to facilitate independent living. Nevertheless, practical issues of detecting different tasks between multiple persons within the same environment along with managing instances of uncertainty associated with recorded sensor data are two key challenges yet to be fully solved. This work presents details of how computer vision techniques can be used as both alternative and complementary means in the assessment of behaviour in home based sensorised environments. Within our work we assessed the ability of vision processing techniques in conjunction with sensor based data to deal with instances of multiple occupancy. Our Results indicate that the inclusion of the video data improved the overall process of task identification by detecting and recognizing multiple people in the environment using color based tracking algorithm.

  10. Evaluation of A Novel Information-Sharing Instrument for Home-Based Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Koichiro; Shimada, Masanari; Kadoya, Shinichi; Endo, Naoki; Ishiguro, Kaname; Takashima, Rumi; Amemiya, Yoko; Fujikawa, Yasunaga; Ikezaki, Tomoaki; Takeuchi, Miyako; Kitazawa, Hidenori; Iida, Hiroyuki; Koseki, Shiro; Morita, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Koji; Kashii, Tatsuhiko; Murakami, Nozomu

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To examine the feasibility and usefulness of a novel region-based pathway: the Regional Referral Clinical Pathway for Home-Based Palliative Care. Method: This was a feasibility study to evaluate the frequency of variances and the perceived usefulness of pathway using in-depth interviews. All patients with cancer referred to the palliative care team between 2011 and 2013 and received home care services were enrolled. Result: A total of 44 patients were analyzed, and pathway was completed in all the patients. The target outcome was achieved in 61.4% while some variances occurred in 54.5%. Nine categories were identified as the usefulness of the pathway, such as reviewing and sharing information and promoting communication, education, motivation, and relationships. Conclusion: This novel pathway is feasible and seems to be useful. PMID:24814723

  11. Parents' experiences of home-based applied behavior analysis programs for young children with autism.

    PubMed

    Grindle, Corinna F; Kovshoff, Hanna; Hastings, Richard P; Remington, Bob

    2009-01-01

    Although much research has documented the benefits to children with autism of early intensive behavioral intervention (EIBI), little has focused on the impact of EIBI on families. Using a semi-structured format, we interviewed 53 parents whose children had received 2 years of EIBI to obtain detailed first person accounts of the perceived benefits and pitfalls of running a home program, and the impact of EIBI on family life and support systems. In general, parents were positive about EIBI, its benefits for them, their child, and the broader family. Interviews also, however, revealed some of the more challenging aspects of managing home-based EIBI. The implications of these findings for more supportive interventions for families on home programs are discussed.

  12. Teaching math skills to at-risk students using home-based peer tutoring.

    PubMed

    Mayfield, Kristin H; Vollmer, Timothy R

    2007-01-01

    Home-based peer tutoring was used to teach math skills to 4 girls with deficits in mathematics and histories of abuse or neglect. Girls living in the same home formed tutoring dyads, and each participant served as both the peer tutor and the tutee during the course of the study. At the initiation of the tutoring intervention, an expert tutor provided multiple 3-min tutoring sessions to the designated peer tutor on three or four mathematics skills. The peer tutor concurrently provided 3-min tutoring sessions on the same skills to the tutee using a multiple baseline design. Results showed that participants improved their performance on all target skills. Additional interventions were implemented for some skills to improve accuracy further. Maintenance tests were also administered after 3 to 5 months of no practice on the skills. Results showed that tutors and tutees maintained their accuracy on 7 of the 12 skills assessed.

  13. Treatment Engagement: Building Therapeutic Alliance in Home-Based Treatment with Adolescents and their Families

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Sanna J.; Bender, Kimberly; Lantry, Janet; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2010-01-01

    Client engagement is an essential yet challenging ingredient in effective therapy. Engaged clients are more likely to bond with therapists and counselors, endorse treatment goals, participate to a greater degree, remain in treatment longer, and report higher levels of satisfaction. This study explored the process of engaging high-risk youth and their parents in a unique home-based family therapy intervention. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 19 families who completed family therapy sessions that included a core component aimed at increasing treatment engagement. Parents’ and youths’ perceptions of engagement suggest the importance of developing therapeutic alliance with therapists, who facilitated building a shared alliance among family members. Implications for improving client engagement are discussed within the context of alliance building with the therapist and among family members. PMID:20556209

  14. Home-based Diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in an Urban Population

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Natasha; Rolle, Andrew J.; Lee, Todd A.; Prasad, Bharati

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Home-based diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with portable monitoring (PM) is increasingly utilized, but remains understudied in underserved and minority populations. We tested the feasibility of home PM in an urban population at risk for OSA compared to in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG) and examined patient preference with respect to home PM versus PSG. Methods: Randomized crossover study of home PM (WatchPAT200) and in-laboratory simultaneous PSG and PM in 75 urban African Americans with high pre-test probability of OSA, identified with the Berlin questionnaire. Results: Fifty-seven of 75 participants were women, average age 45 ± 11 years (mean ± SD), 35% with ≤ high school education, and 76% with annual household income < $50,000. Technical failure rates were 5.3% for home vs. 3.1% for in-laboratory PM. There was good agreement between apnea hypopnea index on PSG; AHIPSG and AHI on home PM (mean ± 2 SD of the differences = 0.64 ± 46.5 and intraclass correlation coefficient; ICC = 0.73). The areas under the curve for the receiver-operator characteristic curves for home PM were 0.90 for AHIPSG ≥ 5, 0.95 for AHIPSG ≥ 10, and 0.92 for AHIPSG ≥ 15. 62/75 (82%) participants preferred home over in-laboratory testing. Conclusions: Home PM for diagnosis of OSA in a high risk urban population is feasible, accurate, and preferred by patients. As home PM may improve access to care, the cost-effectiveness of this diagnostic strategy for OSA should be examined in underserved urban and rural populations. Clinical Trials Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT01997723 Citation: Garg N, Rolle AJ, Lee TA, Prasad B. Home-based diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea in an urban population. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(8):879-885. PMID:25126034

  15. Bayesian Spatial NBDA for Diffusion Data with Home-Base Coordinates.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, Glenna F; Laland, Kevin N; Hoppitt, William; Nightingale, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Network-based diffusion analysis (NBDA) is a statistical method that allows the researcher to identify and quantify a social influence on the spread of behaviour through a population. Hitherto, NBDA analyses have not directly modelled spatial population structure. Here we present a spatial extension of NBDA, applicable to diffusion data where the spatial locations of individuals in the population, or of their home bases or nest sites, are available. The method is based on the estimation of inter-individual associations (for association matrix construction) from the mean inter-point distances as represented on a spatial point pattern of individuals, nests or home bases. We illustrate the method using a simulated dataset, and show how environmental covariates (such as that obtained from a satellite image, or from direct observations in the study area) can also be included in the analysis. The analysis is conducted in a Bayesian framework, which has the advantage that prior knowledge of the rate at which the individuals acquire a given task can be incorporated into the analysis. This method is especially valuable for studies for which detailed spatially structured data, but no other association data, is available. Technological advances are making the collection of such data in the wild more feasible: for example, bio-logging facilitates the collection of a wide range of variables from animal populations in the wild. We provide an R package, spatialnbda, which is hosted on the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN). This package facilitates the construction of association matrices with the spatial x and y coordinates as the input arguments, and spatial NBDA analyses.

  16. Home-based functional walking program for advanced cancer patients receiving palliative care: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although meta-analyses have demonstrated that physical activity can positively impact quality of life outcomes in early stage cancer patients, it is not yet known whether these benefits can be extended to patients with advanced cancer. In a previous pilot survey of patients with advanced cancer with a median survival of 104 days, participants felt willing and able to participate in a physical activity intervention, and reported a strong preference for walking and home-based programming. Here, we report on the initial development and feasibility of a home-based functional walking program in patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative care. Methods Nine adult patients were recruited from outpatient palliative care clinics and palliative home care. A pilot intervention trial was conducted over a 6-week period. The McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire (MQOL), Late Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI), Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), Seniors Fitness Test, four-test balance scale, and grip strength, were performed pre- and post-intervention. Participants wore activPAL™ accelerometers to monitor ambulatory activity levels. Results Of the nine recruited participants, three participants dropped out prior to baseline testing due to hospital admission and feeling overwhelmed, and three participants dropped out during the intervention due to severe symptoms. Only three participants completed the intervention program, pre- and post-intervention assessments: two reported improvements in total MQOL scores, yet all three shared an overall trend towards worsening symptom and total fatigue scores post-intervention. Two participants passed away within 90 days of completing the intervention. Conclusions This case series demonstrates the challenges of a physical activity intervention in patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative care. Further feasibility research is required in this patient population. Trial registration This study is

  17. Home based therapy for severe malnutrition with ready-to-use food

    PubMed Central

    Manary, M; Ndkeha, M; Ashorn, P; Maleta, K; Briend, A

    2004-01-01

    Background: The standard treatment of severe malnutrition in Malawi often utilises prolonged inpatient care, and after discharge results in high rates of relapse. Aims: To test the hypothesis that the recovery rate, defined as catch-up growth such that weight-for-height z score >0 (WHZ, based on initial height) for ready-to-use food (RTUF) is greater than two other home based dietary regimens in the treatment of malnutrition. Methods: HIV negative children >1 year old discharged from the nutrition unit in Blantyre, Malawi were systematically allocated to one of three dietary regimens: RTUF, RTUF supplement, or blended maize/soy flour. RTUF and maize/soy flour provided 730 kJ/kg/day, while the RTUF supplement provided a fixed amount of energy, 2100 kJ/day. Children were followed fortnightly. Children completed the study when they reached WHZ >0, relapsed, or died. Outcomes were compared using a time-event model. Results: A total of 282 children were enrolled. Children receiving RTUF were more likely to reach WHZ >0 than those receiving RTUF supplement or maize/soy flour (95% v 78%, RR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1 to 1.3). The average weight gain was 5.2 g/kg/day in the RTUF group compared to 3.1 g/kg/day for the maize/soy and RTUF supplement groups. Six months later, 96% of all children that reached WHZ >0 were not wasted. Conclusions: Home based therapy of malnutrition with RTUF was successful; further operational work is needed to implement this promising therapy. PMID:15155403

  18. First-time parents' experiences of home-based postnatal care in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Aarts, Clara; Darj, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Aim To gain a deeper understanding of first-time parents' experiences of early discharge from hospital after delivery and home-based postnatal care. Material and methods The study was comprised of focus group interviews, interviews with couples and with fathers. Twenty-one parents participated. Inclusion criteria: healthy women who have given birth to their first child after a normal pregnancy and delivery, the women's partners, healthy and full term babies, Swedish-speaking, discharge from the delivery ward within 24 hours, resident in the Uppsala community, the parents cohabited at the time of the delivery. The material was analysed by qualitative content analysis. Results Three themes emerged: The family's strategy, which describes the family's expectations of postnatal care and their experiences of the real situation. Some are flexible concerning going home early, and others have decided in advance. Self-reliance and strength, which explores the parents' feelings of security and uncertainty, freedom and independence, and shared responsibility. Breast-feeding is described as the ‘main thing’, an interactive learning process. Professional support in the home summarizes the parents' experience of the midwife's support at home. While conflicting feelings may be revealed during the first days, the midwife confirms their new roles as parents. The midwife is seen as a support and adviser to the parents. Conclusion This study shows that parents welcome home-based postnatal care with professional support from midwives. We conclude that this care suits healthy families. We think it will be more important in the future to discriminate between healthy families and those in need of hospital care, than to focus on the moment when they leave the hospital, early or late. PMID:20074000

  19. Home-based rehabilitation interventions for adults living with HIV: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Cobbing, Saul; Hanass-Hancock, Jill; Myezwa, Hellen

    2016-01-01

    Home-based rehabilitation (HBR) has been shown to improve the lives of people living with a wide range of chronic diseases in resource-rich settings. This may also be a particularly effective strategy in resource-poor settings, where access to institution-based rehabilitation is limited. This review aimed to summarise and discuss the evidence related to the effectiveness of home-based rehabilitation (HBR) interventions designed specifically for adults living with HIV. A scoping review methodology was employed, involving systematic search techniques and appraisal of appropriate evidence. English-language journal articles that assessed the quality of life or functional ability outcomes of HBR interventions for adults living with HIV were considered for this review. Out of an initial 1 135 publications retrieved from the search of databases, six articles met this review's inclusion criteria. While this review highlights the scarcity of empirical evidence related to HBR interventions for adults living with HIV, the findings of these six articles are that HBR is a safe management option that may confer a number of physical and psychological benefits for this population. Future research on HBR interventions should include a wider range of assessment measures, including cost-benefit analyses and specific tools designed to assess the functional ability and participation in activities of daily living of participants involved in these programmes. In particular, more research on HBR is required in resource-poor environments, such as sub-Saharan Africa where HIV is endemic, to assess whether this is a feasible strategy that is both effective and practical in the areas that may need it most.

  20. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of a Clinic and Home-Based Behavioral Intervention to Decrease Obesity in Preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Lori J.; Spear, Stephanie; Boles, Richard; Kuhl, Elizabeth; Ratcliff, Megan; Scharf, Cindy; Bolling, Christopher; Rausch, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of a 6-month clinic and home-based behavioral intervention (Learning about Activity and Understanding Nutrition for Child Health; LAUNCH) to reduce obesity in preschool children ≥95th BMI percentile compared to enhanced standard of care (Pediatrician Counseling; PC). LAUNCH was a family-based behavioral intervention that taught parents to use child behavior management strategies to increase healthy eating and activity for their children and themselves. PC presented the same diet and activity recommendations, but was delivered in a one-time PC session. Eighteen children aged 2–5 years (mean 4.71 ± 1.01) with an average BMI percentile of 98 (±1.60) and an overweight parent were randomized to LAUNCH or PC. Assessments were conducted at baseline, 6 months (end of LAUNCH treatment) and 12 months (6 months following LAUNCH treatment). LAUNCH showed a significantly greater decrease on the primary outcomes of child at month 6 (post-treatment) BMI z (−0.59 ± 0.17), BMI percentile (−2.4 ± 1.0), and weight gain (−2.7 kg ± 1.2) than PC and this difference was maintained at follow-up (month 12). LAUNCH parents also had a significantly greater weight loss (−5.5 kg ± 0.9) at month 6 and 12 (−8.0 kg ± 3.5) than PC parents. Based on the data from this small sample, an intensive intervention that includes child behavior management strategies to improve healthy eating and activity appears more promising in reducing preschool obesity than a low intensity intervention that is typical of treatment that could be delivered in primary care. PMID:20395948

  1. Results from a survey of national immunization programmes on home-based vaccination record practices in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Young, Stacy L.; Gacic-Dobo, Marta; Brown, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Data on home-based records (HBRs) practices within national immunization programmes are non-existent, making it difficult to determine whether current efforts of immunization programmes related to basic recording of immunization services are appropriately focused. Methods During January 2014, WHO and the United Nations Children's Fund sent a one-page questionnaire to 195 countries to obtain information on HBRs including type of record used, number of records printed, whether records were provided free-of-charge or required by schools, whether there was a stock-out and the duration of any stock-outs that occurred, as well as the total expenditure for printing HBRs during 2013. Results A total of 140 countries returned a completed HBR questionnaire. Two countries were excluded from analysis because they did not use a HBR during 2013. HBR types varied across countries (vaccination only cards, 32/138 [23.1%]; vaccination plus growth monitoring records, 31/138 [22.4%]; child health books, 48/138 [34.7%]; combination of these, 27/138 [19.5%] countries). HBRs were provided free-of-charge in 124/138 (89.8%) respondent countries. HBRs were required for school entry in 62/138 (44.9%) countries. Nearly a quarter of countries reported HBR stock-outs during 2013. Computed printing cost per record was

  2. The contribution of home-based technology to older people's quality of life in extra care housing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background British government policy for older people focuses on a vision of active ageing and independent living. In the face of diminishing personal capacities, the use of appropriate home-based technology (HBT) devices could potentially meet a wide range of needs and consequently improve many aspects of older people's quality of life such as physical health, psychosocial well-being, social relationships, and their physical or living environment. This study aimed to examine the use of HBT devices and the correlation between use of such devices and quality of life among older people living in extra-care housing (ECH). Methods A structured questionnaire was administered for this study. Using purposive sampling 160 older people living in extra-care housing schemes were selected from 23 schemes in England. A face-to-face interview was conducted in each participant's living unit. In order to measure quality of life, the SEIQoL-Adapted and CASP-19 were used. Results Although most basic appliances and emergency call systems were used in the living units, communally provided facilities such as personal computers, washing machines, and assisted bathing equipment in the schemes were not well utilised. Multiple regression analysis adjusted for confounders including age, sex, marital status, living arrangement and mobility use indicated a coefficient of 1.17 with 95% CI (0.05, 2.29) and p = 0.04 [SEIQoL-Adapted] and 2.83 with 95% CI (1.17, 4.50) and p = 0.001 [CASP-19]. Conclusions The findings of the present study will be value to those who are developing new form of specialised housing for older people with functional limitations and, in particular, guiding investments in technological aids. The results of the present study also indicate that the home is an essential site for developing residential technologies. PMID:22040111

  3. Quality of life in Chinese home-based advanced cancer patients: does awareness of cancer diagnosis matter?

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoping; Huang, Hua; Luo, Qiong; Zhou, Jiying; Tan, Ge; Yong, Na

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the quality of life (QOL) of Chinese home-based advanced-stage cancer patients and to evaluate the association between the disclosure of cancer diagnosis and QOL. An interview-based survey was conducted from December 2009 to June 2010 in the home-based hospice of the First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, China. The principal finding of this study demonstrated that patients who did not have knowledge of their diagnosis exhibited better physical and emotional QOL compared with those who had knowledge of their diagnosis.

  4. Assessment of home-based behavior modification programs for autistic children: reliability and validity of the behavioral summarized evaluation.

    PubMed

    Oneal, Brent J; Reeb, Roger N; Korte, John R; Butter, Eliot J

    2006-01-01

    Since the publication of Lovaas' (1987) impressive findings, there has been a proliferation of home-based behavior modification programs for autistic children. Parents and other paraprofessionals often play key roles in the implementation and monitoring of these programs. The Behavioral Summarized Evaluation (BSE) was developed for professionals and paraprofessionals to use in assessing the severity of autistic symptoms over the course of treatment. This paper examined the psychometric properties of the BSE (inter-item consistency, factorial composition, convergent validity, and sensitivity to parents' perceptions of symptom change over time) when used by parents of autistic youngsters undergoing home-based intervention. Recommendations for future research are presented.

  5. Exercise rehabilitation for peripheral artery disease: An exercise physiology perspective with special emphasis on the emerging trend of home-based exercise.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andrew W

    2015-11-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a significant medical concern that is highly prevalent, costly, and deadly. Additionally, patients with PAD have significant impairments in functional independence and health-related quality of life due to leg symptoms and ambulatory dysfunction. Exercise therapy is a primary treatment for patients with PAD, as ambulatory outcome measures improve following a program of exercise rehabilitation. This review describes the outcomes that improve with exercise, the potential mechanisms for improved leg symptoms, key exercise program considerations for training patients with PAD with walking-based exercise, other exercise modalities that have been utilised, the use of on-site supervised exercise programs, and a major focus on historical and contemporary trials on conducting home-based, minimally supervised exercise program to treat PAD. The review concludes with recommendations for future exercise trials, with particular emphasis on reported greater details of the exercise prescription to more accurately quantify the total exercise dose of the program.

  6. Building capacity to develop an African teaching platform on health workforce development: a collaborative initiative of universities from four sub Saharan countries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Health systems in many low-income countries remain fragile, and the record of human resource planning and management in Ministries of Health very uneven. Public health training institutions face the dual challenge of building human resources capacity in ministries and health services while alleviating and improving their own capacity constraints. This paper reports on an initiative aimed at addressing this dual challenge through the development and implementation of a joint Masters in Public Health (MPH) programme with a focus on health workforce development by four academic institutions from East and Southern Africa and the building of a joint teaching platform. Methods Data were obtained through interviews and group discussions with stakeholders, direct and participant observations, and reviews of publications and project documents. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Case description The institutions developed and collaboratively implemented a ‘Masters Degree programme with a focus on health workforce development’. It was geared towards strengthening the leadership capacity of Health ministries to develop expertise in health human resources (HRH) planning and management, and simultaneously build capacity of faculty in curriculum development and innovative educational practices to teach health workforce development. The initiative was configured to facilitate sharing of experience and resources. Discussion The implementation of this initiative has been complex, straddling multiple and changing contexts, actors and agendas. Some of these are common to postgraduate programmes with working learners, while others are unique to this particular partnership, such as weak institutional capacity to champion and embed new programmes and approaches to teaching. Conclusions The partnership, despite significant inherent challenges, has potential for providing real opportunities for building the field and community of practice, and strengthening the

  7. [Lens platform].

    PubMed

    Łukaszewska-Smyk, Agnieszka; Kałuzny, Józef

    2010-01-01

    The lens platform defines lens structure and lens material. Evolution of lens comprises change in their shape, angulation of haptens and transition of three-piece lens into one-piece lens. The lens fall into two categories: rigid (PMMA) and soft (siliconic, acrylic, colameric). The main lens maaterials are polymers (hydrophilic and hydrophobic). The lens platform has an effect on biocompatibility, bioadhesion, stability of lens in capsule, degree of PCO evolution and sensitiveness to laser damages.

  8. Home-Based Psychiatric Outpatient Care Through Videoconferencing for Depression: A Randomized Controlled Follow-Up Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rössler, Wulf

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a tremendous opportunity for innovative mental health care solutions such as psychiatric care through videoconferencing to increase the number of people who have access to quality care. However, studies are needed to generate empirical evidence on the use of psychiatric outpatient care via videoconferencing, particularly in low- and middle-income countries and clinically unsupervised settings. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of home-based treatment for mild depression through psychiatric consultations via videoconferencing. Methods A randomized controlled trial with a 6- and 12-month follow-up including adults with mild depression treated in an ambulatory setting was conducted. In total, 107 participants were randomly allocated to the videoconferencing intervention group (n=53) or the face-to-face group (F2F; n=54). The groups did not differ with respect to demographic characteristics at baseline. The F2F group completed monthly follow-up consultations in person. The videoconferencing group received monthly follow-up consultations with a psychiatrist through videoconferencing at home. At baseline and after 6 and 12 months, in-person assessments were conducted with all participants. Clinical outcomes (severity of depression, mental health status, medication course, and relapses), satisfaction with treatment, therapeutic relationship, treatment adherence (appointment compliance and dropouts), and medication adherence were assessed. Results The severity of depression decreased significantly over the 12-month follow-up in both the groups. There was a significant difference between groups regarding treatment outcomes throughout the follow-up period, with better results in the videoconferencing group. There were 4 relapses in the F2F group and only 1 in the videoconferencing group. No significant differences between groups regarding mental health status, satisfaction with treatment, therapeutic

  9. Impact of a home-based social welfare program on care for palliative patients in the Basque Country (SAIATU Program)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background SAIATU is a program of specially trained in-home social assistance and companionship which, since February 2011, has provided support to end-of-life patients, enabling the delivery of better clinical care by healthcare professionals in Osakidetza (Basque Health Service), in Guipúzcoa (Autonomous Community of the Basque Country). In January 2012, a retrospective observational study was carried out, with the aim of describing the characteristics of the service and determining if the new social service and the associated socio-health co-ordination had produced any effect on the use of healthcare resources by end-of-life patients. The results of a comparison of a cohort of cases and controls demonstrated evidence that the program could reduce the use of hospital resources and promote the continuation of living at home, increasing the home-based activity of primary care professionals. The objective of this study is to analyse whether a program of social intervention in palliative care (SAIATU) results in a reduction in the consumption of healthcare resources and cost by end-of-life patients and promotes a shift towards a more community-based model of care. Method/design Comparative prospective cohort study, with randomised selection of patients, which will systematically measure patient characteristics and their consumption of resources in the last 30 days of life, with and without the intervention of a social support team trained to provide in-home end-of-life care. For a sample of approximately 150 patients, data regarding the consumption of public healthcare resources, SAIATU activity, home hospitalisation teams, and palliative care will be recorded. Such data will also include information dealing with the socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients and attending carers, as well as particular characteristics of patient outcomes (Karnofsky Index), and of the outcomes of palliative care received (Palliative Outcome Scale). Ethical

  10. Mandates for Collaboration: Health Care and Child Welfare Policy and Practice Reforms Create the Platform for Improved Health for Children in Foster Care.

    PubMed

    Zlotnik, Sarah; Wilson, Leigh; Scribano, Philip; Wood, Joanne N; Noonan, Kathleen

    2015-10-01

    Improving the health of children in foster care requires close collaboration between pediatrics and the child welfare system. Propelled by recent health care and child welfare policy reforms, there is a strong foundation for more accountable, collaborative models of care. Over the last 2 decades health care reforms have driven greater accountability in outcomes, access to care, and integrated services for children in foster care. Concurrently, changes in child welfare legislation have expanded the responsibility of child welfare agencies in ensuring child health. Bolstered by federal legislation, numerous jurisdictions are developing innovative cross-system workforce and payment strategies to improve health care delivery and health care outcomes for children in foster care, including: (1) hiring child welfare medical directors, (2) embedding nurses in child welfare agencies, (3) establishing specialized health care clinics, and (4) developing tailored child welfare managed care organizations. As pediatricians engage in cross-system efforts, they should keep in mind the following common elements to enhance their impact: embed staff with health expertise within child welfare settings, identify long-term sustainable funding mechanisms, and implement models for effective information sharing. Now is an opportune time for pediatricians to help strengthen health care provision for children involved with child welfare.

  11. IAServ: An Intelligent Home Care Web Services Platform in a Cloud for Aging-in-Place

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chuan-Jun; Chiang, Chang-Yu

    2013-01-01

    As the elderly population has been rapidly expanding and the core tax-paying population has been shrinking, the need for adequate elderly health and housing services continues to grow while the resources to provide such services are becoming increasingly scarce. Thus, increasing the efficiency of the delivery of healthcare services through the use of modern technology is a pressing issue. The seamless integration of such enabling technologies as ontology, intelligent agents, web services, and cloud computing is transforming healthcare from hospital-based treatments to home-based self-care and preventive care. A ubiquitous healthcare platform based on this technological integration, which synergizes service providers with patients’ needs to be developed to provide personalized healthcare services at the right time, in the right place, and the right manner. This paper presents the development and overall architecture of IAServ (the Intelligent Aging-in-place Home care Web Services Platform) to provide personalized healthcare service ubiquitously in a cloud computing setting to support the most desirable and cost-efficient method of care for the aged-aging in place. The IAServ is expected to offer intelligent, pervasive, accurate and contextually-aware personal care services. Architecturally the implemented IAServ leverages web services and cloud computing to provide economic, scalable, and robust healthcare services over the Internet. PMID:24225647

  12. IAServ: an intelligent home care web services platform in a cloud for aging-in-place.

    PubMed

    Su, Chuan-Jun; Chiang, Chang-Yu

    2013-11-12

    As the elderly population has been rapidly expanding and the core tax-paying population has been shrinking, the need for adequate elderly health and housing services continues to grow while the resources to provide such services are becoming increasingly scarce. Thus, increasing the efficiency of the delivery of healthcare services through the use of modern technology is a pressing issue. The seamless integration of such enabling technologies as ontology, intelligent agents, web services, and cloud computing is transforming healthcare from hospital-based treatments to home-based self-care and preventive care. A ubiquitous healthcare platform based on this technological integration, which synergizes service providers with patients' needs to be developed to provide personalized healthcare services at the right time, in the right place, and the right manner. This paper presents the development and overall architecture of IAServ (the Intelligent Aging-in-place Home care Web Services Platform) to provide personalized healthcare service ubiquitously in a cloud computing setting to support the most desirable and cost-efficient method of care for the aged-aging in place. The IAServ is expected to offer intelligent, pervasive, accurate and contextually-aware personal care services. Architecturally the implemented IAServ leverages web services and cloud computing to provide economic, scalable, and robust healthcare services over the Internet.

  13. SKI*HI Home-Based Programming for Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: Recent Research Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Carol J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Data relating to 2,768 children served by the SKI*HI model of early, home-based programming for children with hearing impairments revealed that SKI*HI children, on average, were identified by 18 months of age, had higher rates of language development during intervention than prior to intervention, and had greater language gains than expected based…

  14. Evaluation of the routine use of amoxicillin as part of the home-based treatment of severe acute malnutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine whether the inclusion of amoxicillin correlates with better recovery rates in the home-based treatment of severe acute malnutrition with ready-to-use therapeutic food. This retrospective cohort study compared data from the treatment of two groups of children in Malawi aged 6-59 months w...

  15. A Case for Increasing Empirical Attention to Head Start's Home-Based Program: An Exploration of Routine Collaborative Goal Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manz, Patricia H.; Lehtinen, Jaana; Bracaliello, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Collaborative goal setting among home visitors and family members is a mandate for Head Start's home-based program. Yet, a dearth of research is available for advancing evidence-based practices for setting and monitoring home visiting goals or for understanding how family characteristics or program features are associated with them. With the…

  16. Science and Pre-School Children with Special Educational Needs: Aspects of Home-Based Teaching Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennington, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses upon the role of the peripatetic pre-school teacher for children who have special educational needs. It explores the key issues involved in home-based teaching; the importance of developing meaningful partnerships with parents; early intervention; and the significance of play in promoting learning for young children. The…

  17. Home-Based Child Development Interventions for Preschool Children from Socially Disadvantaged Families. Campbell Systematic Reviews. 2012:1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Sarah; Maguire, Lisa K.; Macdonald, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine the effects of home-based programmes aimed specifically at improving developmental outcomes for preschool children from socially disadvantaged families. The authors searched the following databases between 7 October and 12 October 2010: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2010,…

  18. A Correlational Study of Telework Frequency, Information Communication Technology, and Job Satisfaction of Home-Based Teleworkers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster-Trotman, Shana P.

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, 33.7 million Americans teleworked from home. The Telework Enhancement Act (S. 707) and the Telework Improvements Act (H.R. 1722) of 2009 were designed to increase the number of teleworkers. The research problem addressed was the lack of understanding of factors that influence home-based teleworkers' job satisfaction. Job dissatisfaction…

  19. Visually Impaired Older Adults and Home-Based Leisure Activities: The Effects of Person-Environment Congruence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens-Ratchford, Regina; Krause, Airi

    2004-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the effect of person-environment congruence on participation in homebased leisure activities by two legally blind older adults who lived independently in the community. The results indicated that visual impairment increased the time spent in home-based leisure activities and that the participants used various…

  20. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Child FIRST: A Comprehensive Home-Based Intervention Translating Research into Early Childhood Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowell, Darcy I.; Carter, Alice S.; Godoy, Leandra; Paulicin, Belinda; Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J.

    2011-01-01

    This randomized, controlled trial was designed to document the effectiveness of Child FIRST (Child and Family Interagency, Resource, Support, and Training), a home-based, psychotherapeutic, parent-child intervention embedded in a system of care. Multirisk urban mothers and children, ages 6-36 months (N = 157) participated. At the 12-month…

  1. Parent Training: An Investigation of a Home-Based Teaching Program for a Mentally Retarded Infant by a Parent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimizu, Naoji

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports on a parent training program based on behavior analysis and home-based teaching by the parent of a 2-year-old Japanese boy tentatively diagnosed as autistic. Parent training was divided into three modules: understanding the fundamental principles of teaching by using the knowledge of behavioral principles as applied to children;…

  2. Home-Based Preventive Parenting Intervention for at-Risk Infants and Their Families: An Open Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bagner, Daniel M.; Rodríguez, Gabriela M.; Blake, Clair A.; Rosa-Olivares, Jose

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility, acceptability, and initial outcome of a home-based adaptation of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for at-risk infants with externalizing behavior problems. Seven 12- to 15-month-old infants and their families were recruited at a large pediatric primary care clinic to participate in a home-based parenting intervention to prevent subsequent externalizing behavior problems. Home-based assessments were conducted at baseline, postintervention, and a 4- to 6-month follow-up. Six of the 7 (86%) families completed the intervention, and all completers reported high satisfaction with the intervention. All of the mothers demonstrated significant improvements and statistically reliable changes in their interactions with their infant, and most reported clinically significant and statistically reliable changes in infant behavior problems. The current study provides preliminary support for the use of this brief, home-based parenting intervention in addressing behavior problems as early as possible to improve access to an intervention for at-risk infants and their families. Successes and challenges with the development and implementation of this intervention are discussed along with directions for future research and clinical practice. PMID:25414568

  3. The Universal Periodic Review: A Platform for Dialogue, Accountability, and Change on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Kate; Mora, Luis; Barragues, Alfonso; Mikkelsen, Ida Krogh

    2015-12-10

    This paper argues that the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) of the United Nations Human Rights Council can be a critical avenue for promoting a human rights-based approach to sexual and reproductive health and well-being due to its reliance on the principles of participation and accountability. Drawing on evidence from the UPR process since its inception in 2008, the paper analyzes the impact of the UPR in advancing sexual and reproductive health and rights. The evidence collected speaks to the political opportunity represented by the UPR at the country level to enhance government accountability and national dialogue on sexual and reproductive health and rights among key stakeholders. However, the UPR should not be seen in isolation from other human rights mechanisms. Countries' implementation of UPR recommendations should be done conjointly with the guidance provided by other human rights mechanisms, including the expert views of United Nations treaty monitoring bodies and Special Procedures, and alongside strong national human rights protection systems.

  4. Improving nutrition surveillance and public health research in Central and Eastern Europe/Balkan Countries using the Balkan Food Platform and dietary tools.

    PubMed

    Gurinović, Mirjana; Milešević, Jelena; Novaković, Romana; Kadvan, Agnes; Djekić-Ivanković, Marija; Šatalić, Zvonimir; Korošec, Mojca; Spiroski, Igor; Ranić, Marija; Dupouy, Eleonora; Oshaug, Arne; Finglas, Paul; Glibetić, Maria

    2016-02-15

    The objective of this paper is to share experience and provide updated information on Capacity Development in the Central and Eastern Europe/Balkan Countries (CEE/BC) region relevant to public health nutrition, particularly in creation of food composition databases (FCDBs), applying dietary intake assessment and monitoring tools, and harmonizing methodology for nutrition surveillance. Balkan Food Platform was established by a Memorandum of Understanding among EuroFIR AISBL, Institute for Medical Research, Belgrade, Capacity Development Network in Nutrition in CEE - CAPNUTRA and institutions from nine countries in the region. Inventory on FCDB status identified lack of harmonized and standardized research tools. To strengthen harmonization in CEE/BC in line with European research trends, the Network members collaborated in development of a Regional FCDB, using web-based food composition data base management software following EuroFIR standards. Comprehensive nutrition assessment and planning tool - DIET ASSESS & PLAN could enable synchronization of nutrition surveillance across countries.

  5. [se-atlas - the health service information platform for people with rare diseases : Supporting research on medical care institutions and support groups].

    PubMed

    Haase, Johanna; Wagner, Thomas O F; Storf, Holger

    2017-03-08

    se-atlas - the health service information platform for rare diseases - is part of the German National Action Plan for People with Rare Diseases and is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Health. The objective of se-atlas as a web-based platform is to illustrate those medical care institutions that are linked to rare diseases, in a transparent and user-friendly way. The website provides an overview of medical care institutions and support groups focusing on rare diseases in Germany. The primary target groups of se-atlas are affected patients, their relatives and physicians but can also include non-medical professionals and the general public. In order to make it easier to look up medical care institutions or support groups and optimize the search results displayed, various strategies are being developed and evaluated. Hence, the allocation of diseases to appropriate medical care institutions and support groups is currently a main focus. Since its launch in 2015, se-atlas has grown continuously and now incorporates five times more entries than were included 20 months prior. Among this data are the current rare diseases centres in Germany, which play a major role in providing patient-centred healthcare by acting as primary contact points for people with rare diseases. Further expansion and maintenance of the data base raises several organisational and software-related challenges. For one, the data should be completed by adding more high-quality information, while not neglecting the existing entries and maintaining their high level of quality in the long term.

  6. The Role of Clinical and Geographic Factors in the Use of Hospital versus Home-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Brual, Janette; Gravely, Shannon; Suskin, Neville; Stewart, Donna E.; Grace, Sherry L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is most often provided in a hospital setting. Home-based models of care have been developed to overcome geographic, among other, barriers in patients at lower-risk. This study assessed whether clinical and geographic factors were related to use of either a hospital- or home-based program. Methods Secondary analysis was undertaken within a study of 1268 cardiac outpatients recruited from 97 cardiologist practices where clinical data were extracted. Participants completed a survey including the Duke Activity Status Index. They reported CR utilization in a second survey mailed 9 months later, including CR site and program model. Geographic information systems was used to determine distances and drive times to the CR site attended from patients’ homes. Results Overall, 469 (37.0%) participants attended CR at one of 41 programs. Of the 373 (79.5%) participants with complete geographic data, 43 (11.5%) reported attending home-based CR. The sole clinical difference was in activity status, where patients attending hospital-based program had lower activity status (p<.01). There were no differences in model attended based on geographic parameters including urban vs. rural dwelling or drive times (p>.05). Conclusions Only one-tenth of outpatients participated in a home-based program, and this allocation was unrelated geographic considerations. While patients should continue to be appropriately-triaged based on clinical risk to ensure safety, more targeted allocation of patients to home-based services may be warranted. This may optimize degree of participation, and potentially patient outcomes. PMID:22561240

  7. The magnitude, share and determinants of unpaid care costs for home-based palliative care service provision in Toronto, Canada.

    PubMed

    Chai, Huamin; Guerriere, Denise N; Zagorski, Brandon; Coyte, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    With increasing emphasis on the provision of home-based palliative care in Canada, economic evaluation is warranted, given its tremendous demands on family caregivers. Despite this, very little is known about the economic outcomes associated with home-based unpaid care-giving at the end of life. The aims of this study were to (i) assess the magnitude and share of unpaid care costs in total healthcare costs for home-based palliative care patients, from a societal perspective and (ii) examine the sociodemographic and clinical factors that account for variations in this share. One hundred and sixty-nine caregivers of patients with a malignant neoplasm were interviewed from time of referral to a home-based palliative care programme provided by the Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care at Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Canada, until death. Information regarding palliative care resource utilisation and costs, time devoted to care-giving and sociodemographic and clinical characteristics was collected between July 2005 and September 2007. Over the last 12 months of life, the average monthly cost was $14 924 (2011 CDN$) per patient. Unpaid care-giving costs were the largest component - $11 334, accounting for 77% of total palliative care expenses, followed by public costs ($3211; 21%) and out-of-pocket expenditures ($379; 2%). In all cost categories, monthly costs increased exponentially with proximity to death. Seemingly unrelated regression estimation suggested that the share of unpaid care costs of total costs was driven by patients' and caregivers' sociodemographic characteristics. Results suggest that overwhelming the proportion of palliative care costs is unpaid care-giving. This share of costs requires urgent attention to identify interventions aimed at alleviating the heavy financial burden and to ultimately ensure the viability of home-based palliative care in future.

  8. Health Care Transformation Through Collaboration on Open-Source Informatics Projects: Integrating a Medical Applications Platform, Research Data Repository, and Patient Summarization

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Allison B; Wright, Adam; Wattanasin, Nich; Sittig, Dean F; Murphy, Shawn N

    2013-01-01

    Background The Strategic Health IT Advanced Research Projects (SHARP) program seeks to conquer well-understood challenges in medical informatics through breakthrough research. Two SHARP centers have found alignment in their methodological needs: (1) members of the National Center for Cognitive Informatics and Decision-making (NCCD) have developed knowledge bases to support problem-oriented summarizations of patient data, and (2) Substitutable Medical Apps, Reusable Technologies (SMART), which is a platform for reusable medical apps that can run on participating platforms connected to various electronic health records (EHR). Combining the work of these two centers will ensure wide dissemination of new methods for synthesized views of patient data. Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) is an NIH-funded clinical research data repository platform in use at over 100 sites worldwide. By also working with a co-occurring initiative to SMART-enabling i2b2, we can confidently write one app that can be used extremely broadly. Objective Our goal was to facilitate development of intuitive, problem-oriented views of the patient record using NCCD knowledge bases that would run in any EHR. To do this, we developed a collaboration between the two SHARPs and an NIH center, i2b2. Methods First, we implemented collaborative tools to connect researchers at three institutions. Next, we developed a patient summarization app using the SMART platform and a previously validated NCCD problem-medication linkage knowledge base derived from the National Drug File-Reference Terminology (NDF-RT). Finally, to SMART-enable i2b2, we implemented two new Web service “cells” that expose the SMART application programming interface (API), and we made changes to the Web interface of i2b2 to host a “carousel” of SMART apps. Results We deployed our SMART-based, NDF-RT-derived patient summarization app in this SMART-i2b2 container. It displays a problem-oriented view of

  9. End-of-life Characteristics of the Elderly: An Assessment of Home-based Palliative Services in Two Panchayats of Kerala

    PubMed Central

    Jayalakshmi, R; Chatterjee, Suhita Chopra; Chatterjee, Debolina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Home-based palliative services form the cornerstone of Kerala's palliative program. However, two issues need research: (a) whether family-homes can be considered as the locus of ageing and dying for marginal populations who experience deprivation and poverty and (b) whether the present delivery structure meets the needs of elderly population. These issues are examined in the context of two rural areas. The study explores end-of-life characteristics of the elderly – their sociodemographic status and living patterns, morbidity profile, and functional status. It also looks into the accessibility and utilization of palliative services and respondents’ satisfaction with different components of the services. Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional survey design is used. Data were collected based on the interviews of sixty service users sampled randomly from a roster of palliative care services. Semi-structured interviews were substantiated by personal field observations. Results: The study has found people living under extreme financial distress with inadequate shelter and poor social security provisions. The health profile is characterized by high level of functional dependence. Many dependent widowed women were living alone without appropriate care and shelter. The palliative program as perceived by the respondents is characterized by few doctor visitations and poor frequency. Conclusion: The study concludes that home-based palliation in its present form does not promote good end-of-life care. It lacks an integrated approach with good service-mix. It raises serious questions on family-home as the locus of ageing and dying for marginal populations, and suggests need for restructuring of the palliative program. PMID:27803573

  10. A Home-Based Exercise Program Driven by Tablet Application and Mobility Monitoring for Frail Older Adults: Feasibility and Practical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Zijlstra, Wiebren; Zhang, Wei; Spoorenberg, Sophie L.W.; Báez, Marcos; Far, Iman Khaghani; Baldus, Heribert; Stevens, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Stimulation of a physically active lifestyle among older adults is essential to health and well-being. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and user opinion of a home-based exercise program supported by a sensor and tablet application for frail older adults. Methods Community-dwelling older adults (aged ≥70 y) living in The Netherlands were recruited in 2014. Participants exercised 3 months with and 3 months without supervision from a remote coach. Feasibility was operationalized as adherence to exercise (percentage of 5 exercise bouts per week completed) and to wearing the sensor (with 70% defined as sufficient adherence) and the number of problems reported. User opinion was measured with a questionnaire addressing ease of use of the technology and opinion on the program. Results Twenty-one of 40 enrolled participants completed the trial. Adherence overall was 60.9% (average of 3 bouts per week). Adherence among completers (69.2%) was significantly higher than adherence among dropouts (49.9%). Adherence was sufficient among completers during the 3 months of supervision (75.8%). Adherence to wearing the sensor was 66.7% and was significantly higher among completers than among dropouts (75.7% vs 54.2%). The rate of incidents was significantly lower among completers than among dropouts (0.4 vs 1.2 incidents per participant per week). Connectivity-related incidents were prominent. On a scale of 1 to 5, completers gave ratings of 4.3 (after 3 months) and 4.2 (after 6 months). Conclusion A home-based exercise program using novel technology seems feasible when participants are given a stable internet connection. This program shows promise for stimulating physical activity among older frail adults, especially if it offers regular coaching. PMID:28152361

  11. Motivation and sustainability of care facilitators engaged in a community home-based HIV/AIDS program in Masvingo Province, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Eri; Kodama, Tomoko; Kundishora, Emma

    2010-07-01

    Community home-based HIV/AIDS programs with care facilitators (CFs) are key interventions for dealing with both the shortage of health professionals (e.g., physicians, nurses, midwives, etc.) and the current HIV/AIDS epidemic in many parts of Africa. Zimbabwe, one of the sub-Saharan countries is not an exception. The Zimbabwe Red Cross Society started a community home-based HIV/AIDS program with CFs in 1992. This paper describes the results of a cross-sectional study conducted to examine the factors influencing the motivational outcome and self-assessed performance of CFs from one province involved in this program. Self-administered questionnaires provided to CFs were analyzed by chi-square test and multiple liner regression. The response rate was 71.7% (15 male, 104 female). Results showed that 46.8% of CFs in rural area had worked more than five years whilst only 18.5% of CFs in urban area did (p<0.05). The motivational outcome and self-assessed performance of CFs were significantly associated with perception toward family and community environment (beta=0.462, SE=0.092, p<0.001 and beta=0.496, SE=0.173, p<0.001, respectively) and perception toward organizational characteristics, specially managerial support, like attention from a manager, clear instruction, and goals, had an impact to CFs motivational outcome. These findings suggest that organization need to create the policy consistent with community need and provide clear goal and instruction to improve to motivation and performance of CFs.

  12. A large-scale operational study of home-based therapy with ready-to-use therapeutic food in childhood malnutriton in Malawi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Home-based therapy with ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) for the treatment of malnutrition has better outcomes in the research setting than standard therapy. This study examined outcomes of malnourished children aged 6-60 months enrolled in operational home-based therapy with RUTF. Children enro...

  13. Effects of Home-Based Constraint-Induced Therapy versus Dose-Matched Control Intervention on Functional Outcomes and Caregiver Well-Being in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Keh-chung; Wang, Tien-ni; Wu, Ching-yi; Chen, Chia-ling; Chang, Kai-chieh; Lin, Yu-chan; Chen, Yi-ju

    2011-01-01

    This study compared home-based constraint-induced therapy (CIT) with a dose-matched home-based control intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP). The differences in unilateral and bilateral motor performance, daily functions, and quality of parental well-being (i.e., the stress level of their parents) were evaluated. The study included 21…

  14. Linking Home-Based Child Care and State-Funded Preschool: The Community Connections Preschool Program (Illinois Action for Children). Evaluation Phase 1-Implementation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forry, Nicole; Anderson, Rachel; Zaslow, Martha; Chrisler, Alison; Banghart, Patti; Kreader, J. Lee

    2011-01-01

    The Community Connections preschool program (herein referred to as Community Connections) was developed to help prepare children in home-based child care for success in school and in life. It has three goals: (1) to make state prekindergarten classroom experiences available to children in home-based care, (2) to extend classroom learning…

  15. Fractionating dead reckoning: role of the compass, odometer, logbook, and home base establishment in spatial orientation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Megan M.; Winter, Shawn S.

    2008-01-01

    Rats use multiple sources of information to maintain spatial orientation. Although previous work has focused on rats' use of environmental cues, a growing number of studies have demonstrated that rats also use self-movement cues to organize navigation. This review examines the extent that kinematic analysis of naturally occurring behavior has provided insight into processes that mediate dead-reckoning-based navigation. This work supports a role for separate systems in processing self-movement cues that converge on the hippocampus. The compass system is involved in deriving directional information from self-movement cues; whereas, the odometer system is involved in deriving distance information from self-movement cues. The hippocampus functions similar to a logbook in that outward path unique information from the compass and odometer is used to derive the direction and distance of a path to the point at which movement was initiated. Finally, home base establishment may function to reset this system after each excursion and anchor environmental cues to self-movement cues. The combination of natural behaviors and kinematic analysis has proven to be a robust paradigm to investigate the neural basis of spatial orientation. PMID:18553065

  16. Induction of oral tolerance to peanut: a successful home-based protocol.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, P; Ojeda, I; Pineda, F; Alfaya, T; Ojeda, J A

    2010-01-01

    In Spain, peanut allergy is increasingly prevalent. Successful protocols for the induction of oral tolerance (LOT) with several foods have been reported. We aimed to induce clinical tolerance to peanut in a child with severe peanut allergy (age 4 years, facial urticaria and lip angioedema upon licking a peanut; peanut skin prick test, 13 x 10 mm; specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E > 100 kUA/L). At age 6, the threshold oral challenge dose was 62.5 mg. Several peanut solutions were prepared and sequentially administered at the patient's home. Over 138 days, the dose was increased from 0.625 to 5500 mg. There were 43 mild-to-moderate reactions (28% of the doses administered). Pre-LOT and post-LOT peanut IgE and IgG4 values were 265 vs 487 kUA/L, and 6.11 vs 14.8 mg/L. This is the first report of successful LOT to peanut in Spain. This home-based regimen is safe under permanent and close medical supervision by an allergist.

  17. Quality of Life Improves with Individualized Home-based Exercises in Critical Care Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Shelly, Aayushi G.; Prabhu, Nivedita S.; Jirange, Priyanka; Kamath, Asha; Vaishali, K.

    2017-01-01

    The Aim of the Study: This study aims to determine the effect of individualized home-based exercise on the quality of life post-Intensive Care Unit (ICU) discharge. Subjects: Adult patients invasively mechanically ventilated for more than 48 h in medical ICU. Methodology: Thirty-five patients were enrolled prospectively in this study. They were interviewed to complete short form 36 (SF-36) version 2 questionnaire and were randomly allocated to control and experimental group by block randomization. The experimental group received individualized exercise information sheet and control group was asked to continue routine exercises done during their hospital stay. The experimental group also received a log book and weekly telephonic reminders. Patients were interviewed to complete the SF-36 through the telephone 4 weeks after hospital discharge. Results: Physical and mental components of the quality of life as measured by the SF-36 at the end of 4 weeks after hospital discharge showed a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) in the experimental group. Conclusion: A well-structured individualized exercise program improves the quality of life of critically ill patients after discharge. PMID:28250604

  18. A novel BCI-controlled pneumatic glove system for home-based neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Aodhán L; Leamy, Darren J; Ward, Tomás E

    2014-01-01

    Commercially available devices for Brain-Computer Interface (BCI)-controlled robotic stroke rehabilitation are prohibitively expensive for many researchers who are interested in the topic and physicians who would utilize such a device. Additionally, they are cumbersome and require a technician to operate, increasing the inaccessibility of such devices for home-based robotic stroke rehabilitation therapy. Presented here is the design, implementation and test of an inexpensive, portable and adaptable BCI-controlled hand therapy device. The system utilizes a soft, flexible, pneumatic glove which can be used to deflect the subject's wrist and fingers. Operation is provided by a custom-designed pneumatic circuit. Air flow is controlled by an embedded system, which receives serial port instruction from a PC running real-time BCI software. System tests demonstrate that glove control can be successfully driven by a real-time BCI. A system such as the one described here may be used to explore closed loop neurofeedback rehabilitation in stroke relatively inexpensively and potentially in home environments.

  19. Monitoring and Modeling Crop Health and Water Use via in-situ, Airborne and Space-based Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    The accurate retrieval of plant water use, health and function together with soil state and condition, represent key objectives in the management and monitoring of large-scale agricultural production. In regions of water shortage or stress, understanding the sustainable use of available water supplies is critical. Unfortunately, this need is all too often limited by a lack of reliable observations. Techniques that balance the demand for reliable ground-based data with the rapid retrieval of spatially distributed crop characteristics represent a needed line of research. Data from in-situ monitoring coupled with advances in satellite retrievals of key land surface variables, provide the information necessary to characterize many crop health and water use features, including evaporation, leaf-chlorophyll and other common vegetation indices. With developments in UAV and quadcopter solutions, the opportunity to bridge the spatio-temporal gap between satellite and ground based sensing now exists, along with the capacity for customized retrievals of crop information. While there remain challenges in the routine application of autonomous airborne systems, the state of current technology and sensor developments provide the capacity to explore the operational potential. While this presentation will focus on the multi-scale estimation of crop-water use and crop-health characteristics from satellite-based sensors, the retrieval of high resolution spatially distributed information from near-surface airborne and ground-based systems will also be examined.

  20. Platforms for antibiotic discovery.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kim

    2013-05-01

    The spread of resistant bacteria, leading to untreatable infections, is a major public health threat but the pace of antibiotic discovery to combat these pathogens has slowed down. Most antibiotics were originally isolated by screening soil-derived actinomycetes during the golden era of antibiotic discovery in the 1940s to 1960s. However, diminishing returns from this discovery platform led to its collapse, and efforts to create a new platform based on target-focused screening of large libraries of synthetic compounds failed, in part owing to the lack of penetration of such compounds through the bacterial envelope. This article considers strategies to re-establish viable platforms for antibiotic discovery. These include investigating untapped natural product sources such as uncultured bacteria, establishing rules of compound penetration to enable the development of synthetic antibiotics, developing species-specific antibiotics and identifying prodrugs that have the potential to eradicate dormant persisters, which are often responsible for hard-to-treat infections.

  1. ATHENA: a personalized platform to promote an active lifestyle and wellbeing based on physical, mental and social health primitives.

    PubMed

    Fahim, Muhammad; Idris, Muhammad; Ali, Rahman; Nugent, Christopher; Kang, Byeong; Huh, Eui-Nam; Lee, Sungyoung

    2014-05-23

    Technology provides ample opportunities for the acquisition and processing of physical, mental and social health primitives. However, several challenges remain for researchers as how to define the relationship between reported physical activities, mood and social interaction to define an active lifestyle. We are conducting a project, ATHENA(activity-awareness for human-engaged wellness applications) to design and integrate the relationship between these basic health primitives to approximate the human lifestyle and real-time recommendations for wellbeing services. Our goal is to develop a system to promote an active lifestyle for individuals and to recommend to them valuable interventions by making comparisons to their past habits. The proposed system processes sensory data through our developed machine learning algorithms inside smart devices and utilizes cloud infrastructure to reduce the cost. We exploit big data infrastructure for massive sensory data storage and fast retrieval for recommendations. Our contributions include the development of a prototype system to promote an active lifestyle and a visual design capable of engaging users in the goal of increasing self-motivation. We believe that our study will impact the design of future ubiquitous wellness applications.

  2. ATHENA: A Personalized Platform to Promote an Active Lifestyle and Wellbeing Based on Physical, Mental and Social Health Primitives

    PubMed Central

    Fahim, Muhammad; Idris, Muhammad; Ali, Rahman; Nugent, Christopher; Kang, Byeong; Huh, Eui-Nam; Lee, Sungyoung

    2014-01-01

    Technology provides ample opportunities for the acquisition and processing of physical, mental and social health primitives. However, several challenges remain for researchers as how to define the relationship between reported physical activities, mood and social interaction to define an active lifestyle. We are conducting a project, ATHENA(activity-awareness for human-engaged wellness applications) to design and integrate the relationship between these basic health primitives to approximate the human lifestyle and real-time recommendations for wellbeing services. Our goal is to develop a system to promote an active lifestyle for individuals and to recommend to them valuable interventions by making comparisons to their past habits. The proposed system processes sensory data through our developed machine learning algorithms inside smart devices and utilizes cloud infrastructure to reduce the cost. We exploit big data infrastructure for massive sensory data storage and fast retrieval for recommendations. Our contributions include the development of a prototype system to promote an active lifestyle and a visual design capable of engaging users in the goal of increasing self-motivation. We believe that our study will impact the design of future ubiquitous wellness applications. PMID:24859031

  3. The role of 'hidden' community volunteers in community-based health service delivery platforms: examples from sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Leon, Natalie; Sanders, David; Van Damme, Wim; Besada, Donela; Daviaud, Emmanuelle; Oliphant, Nicholas P; Berzal, Rocio; Mason, John; Doherty, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    Community-based research on child survival in sub-Saharan Africa has focussed on the increased provision of curative health services by a formalised cadre of lay community health workers (CHWs), but we have identified a particular configuration, that deserves closer scrutiny. We identified a two-tiered CHW system, with the first tier being the lessor known or 'hidden' community/village level volunteers and the second tier being formal, paid CHWs, in Ethiopia, Mali, and Niger. Whilst the disease-focussed tasks of the formal CHW tier may be more amenable to classic epidemiological surveillance, we postulate that understanding the relationship between formalised CHWs and volunteer cadres, in terms of scope, location of practice and ratio to population, would be important for a comprehensive evaluation of child survival in these countries. We report on the findings from our joint qualitative and quantitative investigations, highlighting the need to recognise the 'hidden' contribution of volunteers. We need to better characterize the volunteers' interaction with community-based and primary care services and to better understand ways to improve the volunteer systems with the right type of investments. This is particularly important for considering the models for scale-up of CHWs in sub-Saharan Africa.

  4. BUILDING A PLATFORM FOR TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH IN CHRONIC NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES TO ADDRESS POPULATION HEALTH IN PERU

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, J. Jaime; Bernabé-Ortiz, Antonio; Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Málaga, Germán; Cardenas, María K.; Carrillo-Larco, Rodrigo M.; Pesantes, M. Amalia; Araya, Ricardo; Boggio, Oscar; Checkley, William; García, Patricia J.; León-Velarde, Fabiola; Lescano, Andrés G.; Montori, Victor; Pan, William; Rivera-Chira, Maria; Sacksteder, Katherine; Smeeth, Liam; García, Héctor H.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The CRONICAS Centre of Excellence in Chronic Diseases, based at Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, was created in 2009 with support from the United States National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). The vision of CRONICAS is to build a globally recognised Centre of Excellence conducting quality and innovative research and generating high-impact evidence for health. The Centre’s identity is embedded in its core values: generosity, innovation, integrity, and quality. This review has been structured to describe the development of the CRONICAS Centre, with a focus on highlighting the ongoing translational research projects and capacity building strategies. The CRONICAS Centre of Excellence is not a risk-averse organisation: it benefits from past experiences, including past mistakes, and improves upon them, and thus challenges traditional research approaches. This ethos and environment is key to fostering innovation in research. PMID:25754562

  5. Efficacy of home-based kinesthesia, balance & agility exercise training among persons with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Matthew W; Tamulevicius, Nauris; Semple, Stuart J; Krkeljas, Zarko

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a home-based kinesthesia, balance and agility (KBA) exercise program to improve symptoms among persons age ≥ 50 years with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Forty-four persons were randomly assigned to 8-weeks, 3 times per week KBA, resistance training (RT), KBA + RT, or Control. KBA utilized walking agility exercises and single-leg static and dynamic balancing. RT used elastic resistance bands for open chain lower extremity exercises. KBA + RT performed selected exercises from each technique. Control applied inert lotion daily. Outcomes included the OA specific WOMAC Index of Pain, Stiffness, and Physical Function (PF), community activity level, exercise self-efficacy, self-report knee stability, and 15m get up & go walk (GUG). Thirty-three participants [70.7 (SD 8.5) years] completed the trial. Analysis of variance comparing baseline, mid-point, and follow-up measures revealed significant (p < 0.05) improvements in WOMAC scores among KBA, RT, KBA + RT, and Control, with no differences between groups. However, Control WOMAC improvements peaked at mid-point, whereas improvement in the exercise conditions continued at 8-weeks. There were no significant changes in community activity level. Only Control improved exercise self-efficacy. Knee stability was improved in RT and Control. GUG improved in RT and KBA+RT. These results indicate that KBA, RT, or a combination of the two administered as home exercise programs are effective in improving symptoms and quality of life among persons with knee OA. Control results indicate a strong placebo effect in the short term. A combination of KBA and RT should be considered as part of the rehabilitation program, but KBA or RT alone may be appropriate for some patients. Studies with more statistical power are needed to confirm or refute these results. Patient presentation, preferences, costs, and convenience should be considered when choosing an exercise rehabilitation approach

  6. Muscle strength enhancement following home-based virtual cycling training in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Ling; Hong, Wei-Hsien; Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy; Liaw, Mei-Yun; Chung, Chia-Ying; Chen, Chung-Yao

    2012-01-01

    This study is the first well-designed randomized controlled trial to assess the effects of a novel home-based virtual cycling training (hVCT) program for improving muscle strength in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Twenty-eight ambulatory children with spastic CP aged 6-12 years were randomly assigned to an hVCT group (n=13) or a control group (n=15). Outcome measures, including gross motor function of the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOTMP) and muscle strength (isokinetic torque of knee extensor and flexor muscle), were administered before and immediately after the 12-week intervention. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) at post-treatment showed that, compared to the control group, the hVCT group had significantly higher isokinetic torque in the knee extensor and flexor muscles at 60°/s and 120°/s angular velocities (p<0.05). At post-treatment, the hVCT group also showed greater isokinetic strength improvement in the knee flexor than in the knee extensor at 60°/s (knee flexor: 41%; knee extensor: 19%) and at 120°/s (knee flexor: 36%; knee extensor: 30%). However, the BOTMP scores at post-treatment did not differ between the two groups. Although the proposed 12-week hVCT protocol does not improve gross motor function, it enhances knee muscle strength in children with CP. The protocol obtains larger gains in the knee flexor than in the knee extensor at different angular velocities. The study findings will help clinicians to provide more effective and efficient strategies for muscle strength training in children with CP.

  7. The Effect of Home-based Daily Journal Writing in Korean Adolescents with Smartphone Addiction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyuk; Seo, Min Jae; Choi, Tae Young

    2016-05-01

    Despite the benefits of smartphones, many adverse effects have emerged. However, to date, there was no particular approach to treat or prevent smartphone addiction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of a home-based daily journal of smartphone use (HDJ-S) in Korean adolescents. Three hundred thirty five middle school students participated in this study. The severity of smartphone addiction was measured using the Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale. The ability to control smartphone use was evaluated with the Motive Scale for Smartphone Regulation. We used the Parents' Concerns for Children's Smartphone Activities Scale to measure parental monitoring and supervision of adolescents' smartphone activities. The Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale classified subjects into high risk and non-high risk for smartphone addiction, according to total scores. Forty six participants (14%) were high risk for smartphone addiction. The high risk group performed the HDJ-S for two weeks, and the same scales were subsequently assessed. After performing the HDJ-S, the total scores of the Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale decreased significantly in the high risk group (P < 0.001). There was a significant increase in the total scores of the Parents' Concerns for Children's Smartphone Activities Scale in the high risk group between baseline and following two weeks of treatment (P < 0.05). The HDJ-S was effective for adolescents with smartphone addiction and increased the parents' concerns for their children's smartphone activities. We suggested that HDJ-S would be considered as a treatment and prevention for smartphone addiction.

  8. The Effect of Home-based Daily Journal Writing in Korean Adolescents with Smartphone Addiction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the benefits of smartphones, many adverse effects have emerged. However, to date, there was no particular approach to treat or prevent smartphone addiction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of a home-based daily journal of smartphone use (HDJ-S) in Korean adolescents. Three hundred thirty five middle school students participated in this study. The severity of smartphone addiction was measured using the Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale. The ability to control smartphone use was evaluated with the Motive Scale for Smartphone Regulation. We used the Parents’ Concerns for Children’s Smartphone Activities Scale to measure parental monitoring and supervision of adolescents’ smartphone activities. The Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale classified subjects into high risk and non-high risk for smartphone addiction, according to total scores. Forty six participants (14%) were high risk for smartphone addiction. The high risk group performed the HDJ-S for two weeks, and the same scales were subsequently assessed. After performing the HDJ-S, the total scores of the Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale decreased significantly in the high risk group (P < 0.001). There was a significant increase in the total scores of the Parents’ Concerns for Children’s Smartphone Activities Scale in the high risk group between baseline and following two weeks of treatment (P < 0.05). The HDJ-S was effective for adolescents with smartphone addiction and increased the parents’ concerns for their children’s smartphone activities. We suggested that HDJ-S would be considered as a treatment and prevention for smartphone addiction. PMID:27134499

  9. Characterisation methods for the hyperspectral sensor HySpex at DLR's calibration home base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Andreas; Gege, Peter; Köhler, Claas; Lenhard, Karim; Schwarzmaier, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    The German Aerospace Center's (DLR) Remote Sensing Technology Institute (IMF) operates a laboratory for the characterisation of imaging spectrometers. Originally designed as Calibration Home Base (CHB) for the imaging spectrometer APEX, the laboratory can be used to characterise nearly every airborne hyperspectral system. Characterisation methods will be demonstrated exemplarily with HySpex, an airborne imaging spectrometer system from Norsk Elektro Optikks A/S (NEO). Consisting of two separate devices (VNIR-1600 and SWIR-320me) the setup covers the spectral range from 400 nm to 2500 nm. Both airborne sensors have been characterised at NEO. This includes measurement of spectral and spatial resolution and misregistration, polarisation sensitivity, signal to noise ratios and the radiometric response. The same parameters have been examined at the CHB and were used to validate the NEO measurements. Additionally, the line spread functions (LSF) in across and along track direction and the spectral response functions (SRF) for certain detector pixels were measured. The high degree of lab automation allows the determination of the SRFs and LSFs for a large amount of sampling points. Despite this, the measurement of these functions for every detector element would be too time-consuming as typical detectors have 105 elements. But with enough sampling points it is possible to interpolate the attributes of the remaining pixels. The knowledge of these properties for every detector element allows the quantification of spectral and spatial misregistration (smile and keystone) and a better calibration of airborne data. Further laboratory measurements are used to validate the models for the spectral and spatial properties of the imaging spectrometers. Compared to the future German spaceborne hyperspectral Imager EnMAP, the HySpex sensors have the same or higher spectral and spatial resolution. Therefore, airborne data will be used to prepare for and validate the spaceborne system

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of a Community-Integrated Home Based Depression Intervention in Older African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Pizzi, Laura T.; Jutkowitz, Eric; Frick, Kevin D.; Suh, Dong-Churl; Prioli, Katherine M.; Gitlin, Laura N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To test the cost-effectiveness of a home-based depression program, Beat the Blues (BTB). Design We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis as part of a previously reported randomized controlled trial that tested BTB versus a wait-list control group. Setting Community-dwelling older African American adults. Participants African Americans who were ≥55 years of age, English speaking, cognitively intact (MMSE ≥24), and had depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 score ≥5) (N=129). Intervention Participants randomly assigned to BTB received up to 10 home visits over a period of 4 months by licensed social workers who provided care management, referral/linkage, stress reduction, depression education, and behavioral activation to help participants achieve self-identified goals. Measurements Incremental cost effectiveness ratios (ICERs) of BTB versus wait-list controls during the 4-month study period. The primary ICER was defined as cost/quality-adjusted life year using the EQ-5D and secondarily using the HUI-3. Additional ICERs were calculated using clinical measures (cost per depression improvement, cost per depression remission). Costs included BTB intervention, depression-related healthcare visits and medications, caregiver time, and social services. Results BTB cost per participant per month was $146. Base case ICERs were $64,896 per QALY (EQ-5D) and $36,875 per QALY (HUI-3). Incremental cost per depression improvement was $2,906 and per remission was $3,507. Univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses yielded cost/QALY range of $20,500-$76,500. Conclusion Based on the range of cost effectiveness values resulting from this study, BTB is a cost-effective treatment for managing depressive symptoms in older African Americans that compares favorably with the cost effectiveness of previously tested approaches. PMID:25516025

  11. Assessment of Haptic Interaction for Home-Based Physical Tele-Therapy using Wearable Devices and Depth Sensors.

    PubMed

    Barmpoutis, Angelos; Alzate, Jose; Beekhuizen, Samantha; Delgado, Horacio; Donaldson, Preston; Hall, Andrew; Lago, Charlie; Vidal, Kevin; Fox, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a prototype system is presented for home-based physical tele-therapy using a wearable device for haptic feedback. The haptic feedback is generated as a sequence of vibratory cues from 8 vibrator motors equally spaced along an elastic wearable band. The motors guide the patients' movement as they perform a prescribed exercise routine in a way that replaces the physical therapists' haptic guidance in an unsupervised or remotely supervised home-based therapy session. A pilot study of 25 human subjects was performed that focused on: a) testing the capability of the system to guide the users in arbitrary motion paths in the space and b) comparing the motion of the users during typical physical therapy exercises with and without haptic-based guidance. The results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed system.

  12. Effects on balance, falls, and bone mineral density of a home-based exercise program without home visits in community-dwelling elderly women: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kamide, Naoto; Shiba, Yoshitaka; Shibata, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of home-based exercise without home visits on physical function, falls, and bone mineral density in community-dwelling elderly women. Sixty community-dwelling, elderly (> or =65 years of age) women were recruited from a Japanese community. Subjects were randomly assigned to a home-based exercise group or a control group. The subjects assigned to the home-based exercise group performed home-based exercise without home visits 3 times per week for 6 months in their homes. Assessments of physical function and bone mineral density were carried out before and after intervention in both groups. Muscle strength, gait velocity, the timed up and go test (TUGT), single leg stance time, the bend reach performance test, and reaction time were measured to assess physical function. The patients' history of falls was also assessed before and after the 12-month follow-up. To determine bone mineral density, the speed of sound (SOS) at the right calcaneus was measured using a quantitative ultrasound device. There were no significant differences between the two groups in baseline characteristics. 82.6% of subjects completed the prescribed exercise program in the home-based exercise group. Compared to the control group, TUGT improved significantly (p<0.05) in the home-based exercise group. Home-based exercise without home visits can be adopted for community-dwelling elderly women, particularly since no specific place or instructor is needed.

  13. Self-Administered, Home-Based SMART (Sensorimotor Active Rehabilitation Training) Arm Training: A Single-Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Kathryn S; Neibling, Bridee A; Barker, Ruth N

    2015-01-01

    This single-case, mixed-method study explored the feasibility of self-administered, home-based SMART (sensorimotor active rehabilitation training) Arm training for a 57-yr-old man with severe upper-limb disability after a right frontoparietal hemorrhagic stroke 9 mo earlier. Over 4 wk of self-administered, home-based SMART Arm training, the participant completed 2,100 repetitions unassisted. His wife provided support for equipment set-up and training progressions. Clinically meaningful improvements in arm impairment (strength), activity (arm and hand tasks), and participation (use of arm in everyday tasks) occurred after training (at 4 wk) and at follow-up (at 16 wk). Areas for refinement of SMART Arm training derived from thematic analysis of the participant's and researchers' journals focused on enabling independence, ensuring home and user friendliness, maintaining the motivation to persevere, progressing toward everyday tasks, and integrating practice into daily routine. These findings suggest that further investigation of self-administered, home-based SMART Arm training is warranted for people with stroke who have severe upper-limb disability.

  14. Home-based music therapy - a systematic overview of settings and conditions for an innovative service in healthcare

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Almost every Western healthcare system is changing to make their services more centered around out-patient care. In particular, long-term or geriatric patients who have been discharged from the hospital often require home-based care and therapy. Therefore, several programs have been developed to continue the therapeutic process and manage the special needs of patients after discharge from hospital. Music therapy has also moved into this field of healthcare service by providing home-based music therapy (HBMT) programs. This article reviews and summarizes the settings and conditions of HBMT for the first time. Methods The following databases were used to find articles on home-based music therapy: AMED, CAIRSS, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, and PSYNDEX. The search terms were "home-based music therapy" and "mobile music therapy". Included articles were analyzed with respect to participants as well as conditions and settings of HBMT. Furthermore, the date of publication, main outcomes, and the design and quality of the studies were investigated. Results A total of 20 international publications, 11 clinical studies and nine reports from practice, mainly from the United States (n = 8), were finally included in the qualitative synthesis. Six studies had a randomized controlled design and included a total of 507 patients. The vast majority of clients of HBMT are elderly patients living at home and people who need hospice and palliative care. Although settings were heterogeneous, music listening programs played a predominant role with the aim to reduce symptoms like depression and pain, or to improve quality of life and the relationship between patients and caregivers as primary endpoints. Conclusions We were able to show that HBMT is an innovative service for future healthcare delivery. It fits with the changing healthcare system and its conditions but also meets the therapeutic needs of the increasing number of elderly and severely impaired people. Apart from

  15. A new strategy toward Internet of Things: structural health monitoring using a combined fiber optic and acoustic emission wireless sensor platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, A. D.; Page, C.; Wilson, C. L.

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates a new low-power structural health monitoring (SHM) strategy where fiber Bragg grating (FBG) rosettes can be used to continuously monitor for changes in a host structure's principal strain direction, suggesting damage and thus enabling the immediate triggering of a higher power acoustic emissions (AE) sensor to provide for better characterization of the damage. Unlike traditional "always on" AE platforms, this strategy has the potential for low power, while the wireless communication between different sensor types supports the Internet of Things (IoT) approach. A combination of fiber-optic sensor rosettes for strain monitoring and a fiber-optic sensor for acoustic emissions monitoring was attached to a sample and used to monitor crack initiation. The results suggest that passive principal strain direction monitoring could be used as a damage initiation trigger for other active sensing elements such as acoustic emissions. In future work, additional AE sensors can be added to provide for damage location; and a strategy where these sensors can be powered on periodically to further establish reliability while preserving an energy efficient scheme can be incorporated.

  16. HOME-BASED COLLECTION OF BIOLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS AND SPECIMENS FROM MEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental epidemiology studies of relations between exposures and male reproductive health face the same challenges as studies of female reproductive health in geographically dispersed individuals or groups (as discussed in the previous talk). Semen quality can be used as an...

  17. The Impact of a Home-Based Palliative Care Program in an Accountable Care Organization

    PubMed Central

    Mudra, Mitchell; Romano, Carole; Lukoski, Ed; Chang, Andy; Mittelberger, James; Scherr, Terry; Cooper, David

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: People with advanced illness usually want their healthcare where they live—at home—not in the hospital. Innovative models of palliative care that better meet the needs of seriously ill people at lower cost should be explored. Objectives: We evaluated the impact of a home-based palliative care (HBPC) program implemented within an Accountable Care Organization (ACO) on cost and resource utilization. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis to quantify cost savings associated with a HBPC program in a Medicare Shared Savings Program ACO where total cost of care is available. We studied 651 decedents; 82 enrolled in a HBPC program compared to 569 receiving usual care in three New York counties who died between October 1, 2014, and March 31, 2016. We also compared hospital admissions, ER visits, and hospice utilization rates in the final months of life. Results: The cost per patient during the final three months of life was $12,000 lower with HBPC than with usual care ($20,420 vs. $32,420; p = 0.0002); largely driven by a 35% reduction in Medicare Part A ($16,892 vs. $26,171; p = 0.0037). HBPC also resulted in a 37% reduction in Medicare Part B in the final three months of life compared to usual care ($3,114 vs. $4,913; p = 0.0008). Hospital admissions were reduced by 34% in the final month of life for patients enrolled in HBPC. The number of admissions per 1000 beneficiaries per year was 3073 with HBPC and 4640 with usual care (p = 0.0221). HBPC resulted in a 35% increased hospice enrollment rate (p = 0.0005) and a 240% increased median hospice length of stay compared to usual care (34 days vs. 10 days; p < 0.0001). Conclusion: HBPC within an ACO was associated with significant cost savings, fewer hospitalizations, and increased hospice use in the final months of life. PMID:27574868

  18. Clinical Relevance of the First Domomedicine Platform Securing Multidrug Chronotherapy Delivery in Metastatic Cancer Patients at Home: The inCASA European Project

    PubMed Central

    Innominato, Pasquale F; Komarzynski, Sandra; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali; Arbaud, Alexandre; Ulusakarya, Ayhan; Bouchahda, Mohamed; Haydar, Mazen; Bossevot-Desmaris, Rachel; Plessis, Virginie; Mocquery, Magali; Bouchoucha, Davina; Afshar, Mehran; Beau, Jacques; Karaboué, Abdoulaye; Morère, Jean-François; Fursse, Joanna; Rovira Simon, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Background Telehealth solutions can improve the safety of ambulatory chemotherapy, contributing to the maintenance of patients at their home, hence improving their well-being, all the while reducing health care costs. There is, however, need for a practicable multilevel monitoring solution, encompassing relevant outputs involved in the pathophysiology of chemotherapy-induced toxicity. Domomedicine embraces the delivery of complex care and medical procedures at the patient’s home based on modern technologies, and thus it offers an integrated approach for increasing the safety of cancer patients on chemotherapy. Objective The objective was to evaluate patient compliance and clinical relevance of a novel integrated multiparametric telemonitoring domomedicine platform in cancer patients receiving multidrug chemotherapy at home. Methods Self-measured body weight, self-rated symptoms using the 19-item MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI), and circadian rest-activity rhythm recording with a wrist accelerometer (actigraph) were transmitted daily by patients to a server via the Internet, using a dedicated platform installed at home. Daily body weight changes, individual MDASI scores, and relative percentage of activity in-bed versus out-of-bed (IHealth Organization Performance Status=0: 29% (9/31); age range: 35-91 years) participated for a median of 58 days (38-313). They received a total of 102

  19. "Not easy at all but I am trying": barriers and facilitators to physical activity in a South African cohort of people living with HIV participating in a home-based pedometer walking programme.

    PubMed

    Roos, Ronel; Myezwa, Hellen; van Aswegen, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The promotion of physical activity is encouraged in people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA) as a means of promoting wellness and health. Adherence to programmes that promote exercise is often reduced, and home-based programmes are suggested to improve adherence. This study investigated the personal and environmental factors that cause barriers and facilitators of physical activity in a home-based pedometer walking programme as a means of highlighting adherence challenges. An observational study nested in a randomised controlled trial was conducted in a cohort of South African PLWHA on antiretroviral therapy over a six-month period. Descriptive analysis and qualitative content analysis of 42 participants who underwent physical activity modification assisted with data review. The mean age of the sample was 38.7 (±8.9) years, consisted mostly of women (n = 35; 83.3%) who were employed (n = 19; 45.2%) but earning very little (less than R500 per month) and often single or widowed (n = 23; 54.8%). Barriers to physical activity identified included physical complaints, e.g., low-energy levels; psychological complaints, e.g., stress levels; family responsibility, e.g., being primary caregivers; the physical environment, e.g., adverse weather conditions; social environment, e.g., domestic abuse and crime; and workplace, e.g., being in a sedentary job. Facilitators of physical activity included support and encouragement from friends and family, religious practices during worship and community environment, e.g., having access to parks and sport fields. The study is of benefit as it highlights personal and environmental factors that need to be considered when developing or implementing a home-based walking programme in PLWHA.

  20. Acceptability of self-conducted home-based HIV testing among men who have sex with men in Brazil: data from an on-line survey.

    PubMed

    Lippman, Sheri A; Périssé, André R S; Veloso, Valdiléa G; Sullivan, Patrick S; Buchbinder, Susan; Sineath, R Craig; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2014-04-01

    The Brazilian HIV/AIDS epidemic is concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM), however HIV testing rates among MSM are not commensurate with their risk. Strategies to expand early diagnosis may include use of self-conducted home-based testing kits, which are now available for purchase in the US. In April 2011 we conducted a survey with Brazilian MSM using Facebook to assess HIV testing preferences and acceptability of home-based testing. Among 356 previously tested, HIV-negative MSM, 47% reported a preference for home-based testing, 27% preferred clinic-based testing, and 26% had no preference. Less frequent testers and those who had considered testing but failed to test were more likely to prefer home-based testing. Close to 90% reported that they would use self-test kits; 62% and 54% said they would use home-based testing to make choices about unprotected sex with regular and new partners, respectively. Concerns included difficulty to understand the tests (32%) and receiving results alone (23%). Overall, home-based testing may appeal to MSM and result in increased testing frequency. Research on feasibility and utilization of self-tests in practice is needed.

  1. Effect of home-based counselling on newborn care practices in southern Tanzania one year after implementation: a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In Sub-Saharan Africa over one million newborns die annually. We developed a sustainable and scalable home-based counselling intervention for delivery by community volunteers in rural southern Tanzania to improve newborn care practices and survival. Here we report the effect on newborn care practices one year after full implementation. Methods All 132 wards in the 6-district study area were randomised to intervention or comparison groups. Starting in 2010, in intervention areas trained volunteers made home visits during pregnancy and after childbirth to promote recommended newborn care practices including hygiene, breastfeeding and identification and extra care for low birth weight babies. In 2011, in a representative sample of 5,240 households, we asked women who had given birth in the previous year both about counselling visits and their childbirth and newborn care practices. Results Four of 14 newborn care practices were more commonly reported in intervention than comparison areas: delaying the baby’s first bath by at least six hours (81% versus 68%, OR 2.0 (95% CI 1.2-3.4)), exclusive breastfeeding in the three days after birth (83% versus 71%, OR 1.9 (95% CI 1.3-2.9)), putting nothing on the cord (87% versus 70%, OR 2.8 (95% CI 1.7-4.6)), and, for home births, tying the cord with a clean thread (69% versus 39%, OR 3.4 (95% CI 1.5-7.5)). For other behaviours there was little evidence of differences in reported practices between intervention and comparison areas including childbirth in a health facility or with a skilled attendant, thermal care practices, breastfeeding within an hour of birth and, for home births, the birth attendant having clean hands, cutting the cord with a clean blade and birth preparedness activities. Conclusions A home-based counselling strategy using volunteers and designed for scale-up can improve newborn care behaviours in rural communities of southern Tanzania. Further research is needed to evaluate if, and at what cost

  2. Effects of Home-Based Diet and Exercise on Functional Outcomes Among Older, Overweight Long-Term Cancer Survivors: The RENEW: Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Morey, Miriam C.; Snyder, Denise C.; Sloane, Richard; Jay Cohen, Harvey; Peterson, Bercedis; Hartman, Terryl J; Miller, Paige; Mitchell, Diane C.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Context Five-year survival rates for early-stage colorectal, breast and prostate cancer currently exceed 90% and are increasing. Cancer survivors are at greater risk for second malignancies, other co-morbidities, and accelerated functional decline. Lifestyle interventions may provide benefit, but it is unknown whether long-term cancer survivors can modify their lifestyle behaviors sufficiently to improve functional status. Objective To determine whether a telephone counseling and mailed material-based diet-exercise intervention is effective in reorienting functional decline in older, overweight cancer survivors. Design Randomized controlled trial in which survivors were randomly assigned to intervention (Intervention, n=319) or delayed-intervention control arms (Control, n=322). Setting Home-based from Canada, United Kingdom and 21 United States Participants 641 overweight (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 25), long-term (≥ 5 years) survivors (ages 65–91) of colorectal, breast and prostate cancer recruited July 2005-May 2007. Intervention 12-month home-based tailored program of telephone counseling and mailed materials promoting exercise, improved diet quality, and modest weight loss. Control group wait-listed for 12 months. Main Outcome Measures Change in self-reported physical function (SF-36 physical function subscale: 0–100, high score indicates better function) from baseline to 12 months was the primary endpoint. Secondary outcomes included changes in basic and advanced lower extremity function (0–100), physical activity, BMI, and overall health quality-of-life. Results From an average baseline score of 75.7 to 12-month follow-up, SF-36 function scores declined less rapidly in Intervention [−2.15(95% CI-0.36,−3.93)] versus Control [−4.84(−3.04,−6.63)] arms (p=0.03). Likewise, changes in basic lower extremity function were +0.34(−0.84,1.52) versus −1.89(−0.70,−3.09) from an average baseline score of 78.2, p=0.005. Physical activity, dietary

  3. Sleep efficiency during sleep studies: results of a prospective study comparing home-based and in-hospital polysomnography.

    PubMed

    Bruyneel, Marie; Sanida, Christina; Art, Geneviève; Libert, Walter; Cuvelier, Laurent; Paesmans, Marianne; Sergysels, Roger; Ninane, Vincent

    2011-03-01

    To date, the clinical use of unattended home-based polysomnography (PSG) is not recommended. To assess whether sleep efficiency is better at home, we have performed a prospective, crossover, single-blind study comparing unattended home- versus attended in-hospital PSG in a population referred for high clinical suspicion of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSA). Within 2 weeks, all the patients underwent both PSG performed by the same sleep technician, which were analysed by another blinded technician. Payments for each procedure were also calculated. Sixty-six patients (mean age: 49±13 years; mean body mass index: 30±7; mean Epworth Sleepiness Scale: 10±5) were included. The quality of recordings was poor in 1.5% of the attended PSG versus 4.7% for unattended PSG (P=0.36). Sleep efficiency at home was better (82% versus 75%, P<0.001), and sleep duration longer (412 min versus 365 min, P<0.001). Sleep latency was also shorter at home (28 min versus 45 min, P=0.004), and patients spent more time in rapid eye movement sleep (19% versus 16%, P=0.006). Apnoea-hypopnoea index (23 versus 26, P=0.08) was similar at home and in the sleep lab. Sixty-seven per cent of patients preferred home-based PSG. PSG payment was also lower at home (268 Euros versus 1057 Euros). We conclude that home-based PSG is associated with a better sleep efficiency. It also appears as feasible and reliable in patients with high preclinical suspicion for OSA. It is also more comfortable for the patients whose sleep efficiency is better and allows cost saving related to the absence of hospitalization.

  4. A home-based comprehensive care model in patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A study pre-protocol.

    PubMed

    Young, Lufei; Healey, Kathleen; Charlton, Mary; Schmid, Kendra; Zabad, Rana; Wester, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Background Disability is prevalent in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), leading to difficulty in care access, significant caregiver burden, immense challenges in self-care and great societal burden.  Without highly coordinated, competent and accessible care, individuals living with progressive MS experience psychological distress, poor quality of life, suffer from life-threatening complications, and have frequent but avoidable healthcare utilizations. Unfortunately, current healthcare delivery models present severe limitations in providing easily accessible, patient-centered, coordinated comprehensive care to those with progressive MS. We propose a home-based comprehensive care model (MAHA) to address the unmet needs, challenges, and avoidable complications in individuals with progressive MS with disabling disease. Objective The article aims to describe the study design and methods used to implement and evaluate the proposed intervention.   Method The study will use a randomized controlled design to evaluate the feasibility of providing a 24-month, home-based, patient-centered comprehensive care program to improve quality of life, reduce complications and healthcare utilizations overtime (quarterly) for 24 months. A transdisciplinary team led by a MS-Comprehensivist will carry out this project. Fifty MS patients will be randomly assigned to the intervention and usual care program using block randomization procedures. We hypothesize that patients in the intervention group will have fewer complications, higher quality of life, greater satisfaction with care, and reduced healthcare utilization. The proposed project is also expected to be financially sustainable in fee-for-service models but best suited for and gain financial success in valued-based care systems.   Discussion This is the first study to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of a home-based comprehensive care management program in MS patients living with progressive disability. If

  5. Home-based family intervention for low-income children with asthma: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Celano, Marianne P; Holsey, Chanda Nicole; Kobrynski, Lisa J

    2012-04-01

    Low-income African American children have disproportionately higher asthma morbidity and mortality. Education alone may not address barriers to asthma management due to psychosocial stress. This study evaluated the efficacy of a home-based family intervention integrating asthma education and strategies to address stress using a community-based participatory research model. Children age 8 to 13 with poorly controlled asthma and their caregivers were recruited from an urban hospital and an asthma camp. Caregivers with elevated scores on a stress measure were enrolled. Forty-three families were randomized to the 4- to 6-session Home Based Family Intervention (HBFI) or the single session of Enhanced Treatment as Usual (ETAU). All families received an asthma action plan and dust mite covers; children performed spirometry and demonstrated MDI/spacer technique at each home visit. The HBFI addressed family-selected goals targeting asthma management and stressors. Asthma management, morbidity, family functioning, and caregiver stress were assessed at baseline, postintervention, and 6 months after the intervention. ED visits and hospitalizations were ascertained by medical record review for a year after intervention completion. Only one child (5%) in HBFI had an asthma-related hospitalization compared to 7 patients (35%) in ETAU in the year following intervention. Participants in both groups demonstrated improved asthma management and family functioning, and reduced ED visits, symptom days, missed school days, and caregiver stress, but there were no differential treatment effects. The results suggest that a home-based intervention addressing medical and psychosocial needs may prevent hospitalizations for children with poorly controlled asthma and caregivers under stress.

  6. A low cost virtual reality system for home based rehabilitation of the arm following stroke: a randomised controlled feasibility trial

    PubMed Central

    Standen, PJ; Threapleton, K; Richardson, A; Connell, L; Brown, DJ; Battersby, S; Platts, F; Burton, A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the feasibility of conducting a randomised controlled trial of a home-based virtual reality system for rehabilitation of the arm following stroke. Design: Two group feasibility randomised controlled trial of intervention versus usual care. Setting: Patients’ homes. Participants: Patients aged 18 or over, with residual arm dysfunction following stroke and no longer receiving any other intensive rehabilitation. Interventions: Eight weeks’ use of a low cost home-based virtual reality system employing infra-red capture to translate the position of the hand into game play or usual care. Main measures: The primary objective was to collect information on the feasibility of a trial, including recruitment, collection of outcome measures and staff support required. Patients were assessed at three time points using the Wolf Motor Function Test, Nine-Hole Peg Test, Motor Activity Log and Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living. Results: Over 15 months only 47 people were referred to the team. Twenty seven were randomised and 18 (67%) of those completed final outcome measures. Sample size calculation based on data from the Wolf Motor Function Test indicated a requirement for 38 per group. There was a significantly greater change from baseline in the intervention group on midpoint Wolf Grip strength and two subscales of the final Motor Activity Log. Training in the use of the equipment took a median of 230 minutes per patient. Conclusions: To achieve the required sample size, a definitive home-based trial would require additional strategies to boost recruitment rates and adequate resources for patient support. PMID:27029939

  7. Home-based telecommuting and quality of life: further evidence on an employee-oriented human resource practice.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Severin; Glaser, Jürgen

    2009-04-01

    Building on previous research, further evidence for the potential of home-based telecommuting as an employee-oriented human resource practice is provided from a study in the German public administration. Survey data from 1,008 public employees were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Mean age of the sample was 43.6 yr. (SD = 8.8 yr.), and 27.5% (277) of the participants were women. Analysis supported the roles of higher Autonomy and lower Work-Family Conflict as psychological mediators between Telecommunication Intensity and both Job Satisfaction and Quality of Life. Implications for the design of flexible working arrangements are discussed.

  8. Home-Based or Clinic-Based Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Screening

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-23

    Atypical Squamous Cell of Undetermined Significance; Cervical Carcinoma; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 2/3; Health Status Unknown; Human Papillomavirus Infection; Low Grade Cervical Squamous Intraepithelial Neoplasia; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer

  9. Home-based vs. laboratory-based practical activities in the learning of human physiology: the perception of students.

    PubMed

    Neves, Ben-Hur S; Altermann, Caroline; Gonçalves, Rithiele; Lara, Marcus Vinícius; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B

    2017-03-01

    Different tools have been used to facilitate the teaching and learning process in different areas of knowledge. Practical activities represent a form of teaching in which students not only listen to theoretical concepts but are also able to link theory and practice, and their importance in the biological sciences is notable. Sometimes, however, there is neither the time nor the resources to promote laboratory practices in physiology classes. In this sense, home-based practical activities may be an interesting alternative. Here, different approaches of practical activities were used and students' perceptions of the contributions of home-based practical activities (HBPA) and laboratory-based practical activities (LBPA) for physiology learning were collected. After each approach, the students evaluated the activities through an anonymous questionnaire. A total of 49 students completed the questionnaires, and the results demonstrate that both HBPA and LBPA were considered important contributors to physiology learning but that this contribution was more significant in the case of LBPA (χ(2) = 4.356, P = 0.037).

  10. Personalized Home-based Interval Exercise Training May Improve Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Cancer Patients Preparing to Undergo Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, William A; Phillips, Brett; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Wilson, Doug; Deal, Allison M; Bailey, Charlotte; Meeneghan, Mathew; Reeve, Bryce B; Basch, Ethan M; Bennett, Antonia V; Shea, Thomas C; Battaglini, Claudio L

    2016-01-01

    Impaired cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with inferior survival in patients preparing to undergo hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Exercise training based on short, higher-intensity intervals has the potential to efficiently improve cardiorespiratory fitness. We studied home-based interval exercise training (IET) in 40 patients prior to autologous (N=20) or allogeneic (N=20) HCT. Each session consisted of 5, three-minute intervals of walking, jogging, or cycling at 65-95% maximal heart rate (MHR) with 3 minutes of low intensity exercise (<65% MHR) between intervals. Participants were asked to perform sessions at least 3 times weekly. The duration of the intervention was at least 6 weeks, depending on each patient’s scheduled transplantation date. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed from a peak oxygen consumption test (VO2peak) and a 6 minute walk (6MWD) before and after the intervention period. For the autologous HCT cohort, improvements in VO2peak (p=0.12) and 6MWD (p=0.19) were not statistically significant. For the allogeneic cohort, the median VO2peak improvement was 3.7ml/kg*min (p=0.005) and the median 6MWD improvement was 34 meters (p=0.006). Home-based, interval exercise training can be performed prior to HCT and has the potential to improve cardiorespiratory fitness. PMID:26999467

  11. Adherence to a home-based exercise program and incidence of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Shinji, S; Shigeru, M; Ryusei, U; Mitsuru, M; Shigehiro, K

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between adherence to a home-based exercise program and the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with type 2 diabetes. We investigated 102 patients with type 2 diabetes aged 35 to 75 years, and followed them prospectively for 17.2 months. Before enrollment, all patients received a traditional exercise prescription. The exercise program consisted of a daily walking exercise at home for 20 - 30 minutes. Self-reported adherence to the exercise program and the incidence of CVD were confirmed by information obtained from telephone interviews. There were 38 dropouts among the patients in the exercise program. Dropouts were significantly younger than completers. The rate of obesity was significantly higher among the dropouts than among the completers. No differences were observed between the two groups for gender, history of CVD and other clinical characteristics. During the follow-up, we documented 8 new cases of CVD. The incidence of CVD during the follow-up was 1.56 percent among the program completers and 18.4 percent among the dropouts. Adherence to the home-based exercise was inversely related to the incidence of CVD (p < 0.01). These associations persisted after adjustment for age and other covariates. In conclusion, adherence to an exercise program is associated with a reduced incidence of CVD among patients with type 2 diabetes.

  12. Office versus Home-Based Family Therapy for Runaway, Alcohol Abusing Adolescents: Examination of Factors Associated with Treatment Attendance

    PubMed Central

    Slesnick, Natasha; Prestopnik, Jillian L.

    2008-01-01

    There is a dearth of research examining treatment engagement and attendance among runaway youth and their families. Such research is needed in order to inform treatment providers on factors associated with engagement and maintenance of these difficult to engage families into counseling. This study examined differential treatment attendance for alcohol abusing runaway youth residing at a local shelter. A traditional office-based family systems approach, Functional Family Therapy (FFT), was compared to a non-traditional, home-based, multi-systemic family therapy approach, Ecologically Based Family Therapy (EBFT). As expected, treatment engagement and attendance was significantly higher for those assigned to EBFT (N = 37) compared to FFT (N = 40). Predictors of treatment attendance (income, family chaos, externalization problems and level of youth substance use) were examined within each treatment modality. Findings suggest that home-based (compared to office-based) treatment modalities may significantly increase treatment attendance and engagement of runaway youth and their families. Non-traditional forms of treatment may need to be considered in order to best meet the needs of highly chaotic and disorganized family systems. PMID:18607515

  13. Befriending breastfeeding: a home-based antenatal pilot for south Asian families.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Naomi

    2012-06-01

    In the last decade recognition of the impact of social inequalities on health has resulted in a refocus of the public health agenda, with health visitors having a pivotal role. While this involvement is in the form of family-centred public health, it is also intended to involve work with the wider community and primarily focuses on beginning to address the injustice of inequality before a child is born, acknowledging that early intervention is key to breaking the cycle of deprivation. Such inequalities disproportionately affect those from black and minority ethnic (BME) groups who are more likely to report long-term ill health than their white counterparts. Access to healthcare services is restricted not only by family choices but also by difficulties of location and language. Numerous initiatives to address these issues have been implemented in the last 10 years, from Sure Start centres to maternity service reform, but the level of engagement from women from BME groups is not equal to their counterparts. In one locality in Oxford there is a high concentration of families from Pakistan and Bangladesh who, despite concerted efforts, have remained hard to reach. This project attempted to redesign the current antenatal breastfeeding information service, and aimed to produce evidence to guide practice to better connect with this group. The review considers evidence provided by the literature base and uses a home visiting approach to investigate the topic. Results are correlated and compared, and recommendations for the future are presented.

  14. Effectiveness of Home-Based Cupping Massage Compared to Progressive Muscle Relaxation in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain—A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lauche, Romy; Materdey, Svitlana; Cramer, Holger; Haller, Heidemarie; Stange, Rainer; Dobos, Gustav; Rampp, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Chronic neck pain is a major public health problem with very few evidence-based complementary treatment options. This study aimed to test the efficacy of 12 weeks of a partner-delivered home-based cupping massage, compared to the same period of progressive muscle relaxation in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain. Patients were randomly assigned to self-directed cupping massage or progressive muscle relaxation. They were trained and asked to undertake the assigned treatment twice weekly for 12 weeks. Primary outcome measure was the current neck pain intensity (0–100 mm visual analog scale; VAS) after 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measures included pain on motion, affective pain perception, functional disability, psychological distress, wellbeing, health-related quality of life, pressure pain thresholds and adverse events. Sixty one patients (54.1±12.7 years; 73.8%female) were randomized to cupping massage (n = 30) or progressive muscle relaxation (n = 31). After treatment, both groups showed significantly less pain compared to baseline however without significant group differences. Significant effects in favor of cupping massage were only found for wellbeing and pressure pain thresholds. In conclusion, cupping massage is no more effective than progressive muscle relaxation in reducing chronic non-specific neck pain. Both therapies can be easily used at home and can reduce pain to a minimal clinically relevant extent. Cupping massage may however be better than PMR in improving well-being and decreasing pressure pain sensitivity but more studies with larger samples and longer follow-up periods are needed to confirm these results. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01500330 PMID:23762355

  15. Learning by Living: Life-Altering Medical Education through Nursing Home-Based Experiential Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gugliucci, Marilyn R.; Weiner, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    The University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine Learning by Living Project (referred to as Learning by Living) was piloted in 2006 as an experiential medical education learning model. Since its inception, medical and other health professions students have been "admitted" into nursing homes to live the life of an older adult nursing…

  16. Implications of Changes in Households and Living Arrangements for Future Home-based Care Needs and Costs of Disabled Elders in China1

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yi; Chen, Huashuai; Wang, Zhenglian; Land, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Understand future home-based care needs/costs for disabled elders in China. Method Further develop/apply ProFamy extended cohort-component method. Results (1) Chinese disabled elders and percentage of national GDP devoted to home-based care costs for disabled elders will increase much quicker than growth of total elderly population; (2) Home-based care needs/costs for disabled oldest-old aged 80+ will increase much faster than that for disabled young-old aged 65–79 after 2030; (3) Disabled unmarried elders living alone and their home-based care costs increase substantially faster than disabled unmarried elders living with children; (4) Sensitivity analyses shown that possible changes in mortality and elderly disability status are the major factors affecting home-based care needs and costs; (5) Caregivers resources under two-child policy will be substantially better than under current fertility policy unchanged. Discussion Policy recommendations concerning reductions of prevalence of disability, gender equality, two-child policy, encouraging elder’s residential proximity to their adult children, etc. PMID:25213460

  17. Home-Based Intervention Program to Reduce Food Insecurity in Elderly Populations Using a TV App: Study Protocol of the Randomized Controlled Trial Saúde.Come Senior

    PubMed Central

    Gregório, Maria João; Gein, Pierre; Eusébio, Mónica; Santos, Maria José; de Sousa, Rute Dinis; Coelho, Pedro S; Mendes, Jorge M; Graça, Pedro; Oliveira, Pedro; Branco, Jaime C; Canhão, Helena

    2017-01-01

    recruit a total of 1,128 subjects considering that 50% of the target individuals are food insecure (based on INFOFAMÍLIA Survey) (567) and about 50% of those will adhere to the study (282). Results The randomized controlled trial with the 12-week home-based intervention with a comprehensive program on healthy eating and physical activity delivery is planned to start recruiting participants at the end of 2017. Conclusions This study will assess the efficacy of this innovative tool (Saúde.Come Senior) for disseminating relevant health information, modifying behaviors, and decreasing food insecurity in an easy, low-cost, and massive way. PMID:28288956

  18. The seven Cs of the high acceptability of home-based VCT: results from a mixed methods approach in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Marte; Sandøy, Ingvild F; Michelo, Charles; Fylkesnes, Knut; Mwangala, Sheila; Blystad, Astrid

    2013-11-01

    HIV testing and counselling is a critical gateway to prevention and treatment. Yet, coverage remains insufficient, few couples are tested together and gender differences in access exist. We used an embedded mixed methods approach to investigate possible explanations for the high acceptance of home-based voluntary HIV counselling and testing (HB-VCT) in a pair-matched cluster-randomized trial in Zambia. A baseline survey included 1694 individuals in 36 clusters. Adults in 18 intervention clusters were offered HB-VCT by lay counsellors. Standard testing services were available in both trial arms. After the completion of the intervention, a follow-up survey was conducted in all trial clusters. In addition, 21 in-depth interviews and one focus group discussion were conducted with home-based VCT clients in the intervention arm. Informants favoured the convenience, confidentiality and credibility of HB-VCT. Counsellors were perceived as trustworthy owing to their closeness and conduct, and the consent process was experienced as convincing. Couple testing was selected by 70% of cohabiting couples and was experienced as beneficial by both genders. Levels of first-time testing (68% vs. 29%, p < 0.0001) and re-testing (94% vs. 74%, p < 0.0001) were higher in the intervention than in the control arm. Acceptance of HIV testing and counselling is dependent on stigma, trust and gender. The confidentiality of home-based VCT was essential for overcoming stigma-related barriers, and the selection of local counsellors was important to ensure trust in the services. The high level of couple counselling within HB-VCT may contribute to closing the gender gap in HIV testing, and has benefits for both genders and potentially for prevention of HIV transmission. The study demonstrates the feasibility of achieving high test coverage with an opt-in consent approach. The embedded qualitative component confirmed the high satisfaction with HB-VCT reported in the quantitative survey and was

  19. Evaluating the effectiveness of a home-based exercise programme delivered through a tablet computer for preventing falls in older community-dwelling people over 2 years: study protocol for the Standing Tall randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Delbaere, K; Valenzuela, T; Woodbury, A; Davies, T; Yeong, J; Steffens, D; Miles, L; Pickett, L; Zijlstra, G A R; Clemson, L; Close, J C T; Howard, K; Lord, S R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In order to prevent falls, older people should exercise for at least 2 h per week for 6 months, with a strong focus on balance exercises. This article describes the design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based exercise programme delivered through a tablet computer to prevent falls in older people. Methods and analysis Participants aged 70 years or older, living in the community in Sydney will be recruited and randomly allocated to an intervention or control group. The intervention consists of a tailored, home-based balance training delivered through a tablet computer. Intervention participants will be asked to complete 2 h of exercises per week for 2 years. Both groups will receive an education programme focused on health-related information relevant to older adults, delivered through the tablet computer via weekly fact sheets. Primary outcome measures include number of fallers and falls rate recorded in weekly fall diaries at 12 months. A sample size of 500 will be necessary to see an effect on falls rate. Secondary outcome measures include concern about falling, depressive symptoms, health-related quality of life and physical activity levels (in all 500 participants); and physiological fall risk, balance, functional mobility, gait, stepping and cognitive performance (in a subsample of 200 participants). Adherence, acceptability, usability and enjoyment will be recorded in intervention group participants over 2 years. Data will be analysed using the intention-to-treat principle. Secondary analyses are planned in people with greater adherence. Economic analyses will be assessed from a health and community care provider perspective. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was obtained from UNSW Ethics Committee in December 2014 (ref number HC#14/266). Outcomes will be disseminated through publication in peer-reviewed journals and presentations at international conferences. Trial registration number

  20. The team approach to home-based primary care: restructuring care to meet individual, program, and system needs.

    PubMed

    Reckrey, Jennifer M; Soriano, Theresa A; Hernandez, Cameron R; DeCherrie, Linda V; Chavez, Silvia; Zhang, Meng; Ornstein, Katherine

    2015-02-01

    Team-based models of care are an important way to meet the complex medical and psychosocial needs of the homebound. As part of a quality improvement project to address individual, program, and system needs, a portion of a large, physician-led academic home-based primary care practice was restructured into a team-based model. With support from an office-based nurse practitioner, a dedicated social worker, and a dedicated administrative assistant, physicians were able to care for a larger number of patients. Hospitalizations, readmissions, and patient satisfaction remained the same while physician panel size increased and physician satisfaction improved. The Team Approach is an innovative way to improve interdisciplinary, team-based care through practice restructuring and serves as an example of how other practices can approach the complex task of caring for the homebound.

  1. The Team Approach to Home-Based Primary Care: Restructuring Care to Meet Patient, Program, and System Needs

    PubMed Central

    Reckrey, Jennifer M.; Soriano, Theresa A.; Hernandez, Cameron R.; DeCherrie, Linda V.; Chavez, Silvia; Zhang, Meng; Ornstein, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Team-based models of care are an important way to meet the complex medical and psychosocial needs of the homebound. As part of a quality improvement project to address patient, program, and system needs, we restructured a portion of our large, physician-led academic home-based primary care practice into a team-based model. With support from an office-based nurse practitioner, a dedicated social worker, and a dedicated administrative assistant, physicians were able to care for a larger number of patients. Hospitalizations, readmissions, and patient satisfaction remained the same while physician panel size increased and physician satisfaction improved. Our Team Approach is an innovative way to improve interdisciplinary, team-based care though practice restructuring and serves as an example of how other practices can approach the complex task of caring for the homebound. PMID:25645568

  2. Safety and efficacy of a 6-month home-based exercise program in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bankolé, Landry-Cyrille; Millet, Guillaume Y.; Temesi, John; Bachasson, Damien; Ravelojaona, Marion; Wuyam, Bernard; Verges, Samuel; Ponsot, Elodie; Antoine, Jean-Christophe; Kadi, Fawzi; Féasson, Léonard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Previous randomized controlled trials investigating exercise training programs in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) patients are scarce and of short duration only. This study assessed the safety and efficacy of a 6-month home-based exercise training program on fitness, muscle, and motor function in FSHD patients. Methods: Sixteen FSHD patients were randomly assigned to training (TG) and control (CG) groups (both n = 8) in a home-based exercise intervention. Training consisted of cycling 3 times weekly for 35 minutes (combination of strength, high-intensity interval, and low-intensity aerobic) at home for 24 weeks. Patients in CG also performed an identical training program (CTG) after 24 weeks. The primary outcome was change in peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) measured every 6 weeks. The principal secondary outcomes were maximal quadriceps strength (MVC) and local quadriceps endurance every 12 weeks. Other outcome measures included maximal aerobic power (MAP) and experienced fatigue every 6 weeks, 6-minute walking distance every 12 weeks, and muscle characteristics from vastus lateralis biopsies taken pre- and postintervention. Results: The compliance rate was 91% in TG. Significant improvements with training were observed in the VO2 peak (+19%, P = 0.002) and MAP by week 6 and further to week 24. Muscle endurance, MVC, and 6-minute walking distance increased and experienced fatigue decreased. Muscle fiber cross-sectional area and citrate synthase activity increased by 34% (P = 0.008) and 46% (P = 0.003), respectively. Dystrophic pathophysiologic patterns were not exacerbated. Similar improvements were experienced by TG and CTG. Conclusions: A combined strength and interval cycling exercise-training program compatible with patients’ daily professional and social activities leads to significant functional benefits without compromising muscle tissue. PMID:27495097

  3. An evaluation of the routine use of amoxicillin as part of the home-based treatment of severe acute malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Trehan, Indi; Amthor, Rachel E.; Maleta, Kenneth; Manary, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine if the inclusion of amoxicillin correlates with better recovery rates in the home-based treatment of severe acute malnutrition with ready-to-use therapeutic food. Methods This retrospective cohort study compared data from the treatment of two groups of children in Malawi aged 6–59 months with uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition. The standard protocol group received a 7 day course of amoxicillin at the onset of treatment. The alternate protocol group received no antibiotics. All children were treated with the same ready-to-use therapeutic food. The primary outcome was nutritional recovery, defined as achieving a weight-for-height Z-score > −2 without edema. Results 498 children were treated according to the standard protocol with amoxicillin and 1955 were treated under the alternate protocol without antibiotics. The group of children treated with amoxicillin was slightly older and more stunted at baseline. The recovery rate for children who received amoxicillin was worse at 4 weeks (40% vs. 71%) but similar after up to 12 weeks of therapy (84% vs. 86%), compared to the children treated without antibiotics. Regression modeling indicated that this difference at 4 weeks was most strongly associated with the receipt of amoxicillin. Conclusions This review of two therapeutic feeding programs suggests that children with severe acute malnutrition who were treated without amoxicillin did not have an inferior rate of recovery. Given the limitations of this retrospective analysis, a prospective trial is warranted to determine the effect of antibiotics on recovery from uncomplicated malnutrition with home-based therapy. PMID:20545919

  4. Sex-specific predictors of improved walking with step-monitored, home-based exercise in peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andrew W; Parker, Donald E; Montgomery, Polly S

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether baseline clinical characteristics and the duration and intensity of ambulation during our step-monitored home-based exercise program were predictive of changes in ambulatory outcomes at completion of the program in symptomatic patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Twenty-two men (ankle-brachial index (ABI) = 0.71 ± 0.19) and 24 women (ABI = 0.66 ± 0.23) completed the home exercise program, consisting of intermittent walking to mild-to-moderate claudication pain for 3 months. Ambulatory outcome measures were peak walking time (PWT) and claudication onset time (COT) during a treadmill test, and the distance recorded during a 6-minute walk distance test (6MWD). Men experienced significant increases (p<0.01) in COT, PWT, and 6MWD following the home exercise program, and women had significant increases in 6MWD (p<0.01) and PWT (p<0.05). In women, average exercise cadence during the home exercise sessions was the only predictor that entered the model for change in COT (p=0.082), and was the first predictor in the model for change in PWT (p=0.029) and 6MWD (p=0.006). In men, the ABI was the only predictor that entered the model for change in 6MWD (p=0.002), and ABI was a predictor along with metabolic syndrome in the model for change in COT (p=0.003). No variables entered the model for change in PWT. Faster ambulatory cadence during the step-monitored home-based exercise program may predict greater improvements in ambulatory function in women, whereas having less severe PAD and comorbid burden at baseline may predict greater improvements in ambulatory function in men. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00618670.

  5. It 'makes you feel more like a person than a patient': patients' experiences receiving home-based primary care (HBPC) in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Smith-Carrier, Tracy; Sinha, Samir K; Nowaczynski, Mark; Akhtar, Sabrina; Seddon, Gayle; Pham, Thuy-Nga Tia

    2017-03-01

    The lack of effective systems to appropriately manage the health and social care of frail older adults - especially among those who become homebound - is becoming all the more apparent. Home-based primary care (HBPC) is increasingly being promoted as a promising model that takes into account the accessibility needs of frail older adults, ensuring that they receive more appropriate primary and community care. There remains a paucity of literature exploring patients' experiences with HBPC programmes. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of patients accessing HBPC delivered by interprofessional teams, and their perspectives on the facilitators and barriers to this model of care in Ontario, Canada. Using certain grounded theory principles, we conducted an inductive qualitative content analysis of in-depth patient interviews (n = 26) undertaken in the winter of 2013 across seven programme sites exploring the lived experiences and perspectives of participants receiving HBPC. Themes emerged in relation to patients' perceptions regarding the preference for and necessity of HBPC, the promotion of better patient care afforded by the model in comparison to office-based care, and the benefits of and barriers to HBPC service provision. Underlying patterns also surfaced related to patients' feelings and emotions about their quality of life and satisfaction with HBPC services. We argue that HBPC is well positioned to serve frail homebound older adults, ensuring that patients receive appropriate primary and community care - which the office-based alternative provides little guarantee - and that they will be cared for, pointing to a model that may not only lead to greater patient satisfaction but also likely contributes to bettering the quality of life of a highly vulnerable population.

  6. Impact of a short home-based yoga programme on blood pressure in patients with hypertension: a randomized controlled trial in primary care.

    PubMed

    Wolff, M; Rogers, K; Erdal, B; Chalmers, J P; Sundquist, K; Midlöv, P

    2016-10-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate yoga's impact on blood pressure (BP) and quality of life (QOL) and on stress, depression and anxiety in patients with hypertension in a primary care setting. We conducted a multi-centre randomized controlled trial with follow-up after 12-week intervention completion. Adult primary care patients diagnosed with hypertension were randomly allocated to yoga or usual care. The intervention group performed a short home-based Kundalini yoga programme 15 min twice-daily during the 12-week intervention period. At baseline and follow-up, the participants underwent standardized BP measurements and completed questionnaires on QOL, stress, anxiety and depression. Data obtained from 191 patients (mean age 64.7 years, s.d. 8.4) allocated to yoga intervention (n=96) and control group (n=95), with a total proportion of 52% women, showed a significant reduction in systolic and diastolic BP for both groups (-3.8/-1.7 mm Hg for yoga and -4.5/-3.0 mm Hg for control groups, respectively). However, the BP reduction for the yoga group was not significantly different from control. There were small but significant improvements for the yoga group in some of the QOL and depression measures (P<0.05, Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale, HADS-D) compared with control. The findings of our study, which is the largest study from an OECD country (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development) to date, do not support the suggestion from previous smaller studies that yoga lowers the BP. Further clinical trials are needed to confirm these findings. However, the yoga patients had other health benefits.

  7. “It is always HIV/AIDS and TB”: Home-based carers’ perspectives on epilepsy in Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Keikelame, Mpoe Johannah; Swartz, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    The study highlights the complex cultural religious factors affecting epilepsy and a need for integrated home-based care services. Two focus group discussions exploring home-based carers’ (HBCs) perspectives on epilepsy were conducted using a semi-structured focus group interview guide, which was based on Kleinman's explanatory model framework. The audio-recorded data were transcribed verbatim, and a thematic analysis was done. The three main themes were epilepsy names and metaphors, religious beliefs about the cause and treatment of epilepsy, and HBCs’ perceived roles and strategies for engaging in epilepsy care. Findings provide some insights for research, policy, and practice. PMID:27258583

  8. [The present and future of community/home-based palliative care in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Ueng, Ruey-Shiuan; Hsu, Su-Hsuan; Shih, Chih-Yuan; Huang, Sheng-Jean

    2015-04-01

    In Taiwan, the Department of Health (DOH) has implemented regulations and policies related to hospice and palliative care since 1995. Taiwan is the first country in Asia to have a Natural Death Act, promulgated in 2000. Although recognition of the need for palliative care in non-cancer terminally ill patients is increasing, at present, the needs of these patients are often not met. Moreover, while a majority of the population prefers to die at home, the percentage of patients who die in the home setting remains small. The palliative care system should be adjusted to improve the accessibility and continuity of care based on the needs of patients. Therefore, the Jin-Shan Branch of the National Taiwan University Hospital has run a pilot community palliative care service model since 2012. National Health Insurance reimbursement was introduced in 2014 for community-based palliative care services. Establishing a formal system of community-based palliative care should be encouraged in order to improve the quality of care at the end of life and to allow more patients to receive end-of-life care and die in their own communities. This system will require that skilled nurses provide discharge planning, symptoms control, end-of-life communications, social-resources integration, and social-support networks in order to achieve a high quality of end-of-life care.

  9. Effectiveness of home based support for older people: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Elkan, Ruth; Kendrick, Denise; Dewey, Michael; Hewitt, Michael; Robinson, Jane; Blair, Mitch; Williams, Deb; Brummell, Kathy

    2001-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of home visiting programmes that offer health promotion and preventive care to older people. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of 15 studies of home visiting. Participants Older people living at home, including frail older people at risk of adverse outcomes. Outcome measures Mortality, admission to hospital, admission to institutional care, functional status, health status. Results Home visiting was associated with a significant reduction in mortality. The pooled odds ratio for eight studies that assessed mortality in members of the general elderly population was 0.76 (95% confidence interval 0.64 to 0.89). Five studies of home visiting to frail older people who were at risk of adverse outcomes also showed a significant reduction in mortality (0.72; 0.54 to 0.97). Home visiting was associated with a significant reduction in admissions to long term care in members of the general elderly population (0.65; 0.46 to 0.91). For three studies of home visiting to frail, “at risk” older people, the pooled odds ratio was 0.55 (0.35 to 0.88). Meta-analysis of six studies of home visiting to members of the general elderly population showed no significant reduction in admissions to hospital (odds ratio 0.95; 0.80 to 1.09). Three studies showed no significant effect on health (standardised effect size 0.06; –0.07 to 0.18). Four studies showed no effect on activities of daily living (0.05; –0.07 to 0.17). Conclusion Home visits to older people can reduce mortality and admission to long term institutional care. What is already known on this topicThe benefits of regular, preventive home visits to older people are the subject of controversyA recent systematic review found no clear evidence that preventive home visits were effectiveWhat this study addsThis meta-analysis of 15 trials shows that home visiting can reduce mortality and admission to institutional care among older people PMID:11576978

  10. The value of home-based collection of biospecimens in reproductive epidemiology.

    PubMed Central

    Rockett, John C; Buck, Germaine M; Lynch, Courtney D; Perreault, Sally D

    2004-01-01

    Detection, quantification, and prognosis of environmental exposures in humans has been vastly enhanced by the ability of epidemiologists to collect biospecimens for toxicologic or other laboratory evaluation. Ease of collection and level of invasiveness are commonly cited reasons why study participants fail to provide biospecimens for research purposes. The use of methodologies for the collection of biospecimens in the home offers promise for improving the validity of health effects linked to environmental exposures while maximizing the number and type of specimens capable of being collected in a timely and cost-effective manner. In this review we examine biospecimens (urine and blood) that have been successfully collected from the home environment. Related issues such as storage and transportation will also be examined as well as promising new approaches for collecting less frequently studied biospecimens (including hair follicles, breast milk, semen, and others). Such biospecimens are useful in the monitoring of reproductive development and function. PMID:14698937

  11. The 'cube' meta-model for the information system of large health sector organizations--a (platform neutral) mapping tool to integrate information system development with changing business functions and organizational development.

    PubMed

    Balkányi, László

    2002-01-01

    To develop information systems (IS) in the changing environment of the health sector, a simple but throughout model, avoiding the techno-jargon of informatics, might be useful for the top management. A platform neutral, extensible, transparent conceptual model should be established. Limitations of current methods lead to a simple, but comprehensive mapping, in the form of a three-dimensional cube. The three 'orthogonal' views are (a) organization functionality, (b) organizational structures and (c) information technology. Each of the cube-sides is described according to its nature. This approach enables to define any kind of an IS component as a certain point/layer/domain of the cube and enables also the management to label all IS components independently form any supplier(s) and/or any specific platform. The model handles changes in organization structure, business functionality and the serving info-system independently form each other. Practical application extends to (a) planning complex, new ISs, (b) guiding development of multi-vendor, multi-site ISs, (c) supporting large-scale public procurement procedures and the contracting, implementation phase by establishing a platform neutral reference, (d) keeping an exhaustive inventory of an existing large-scale system, that handles non-tangible aspects of the IS.

  12. Home-Based Care Program Reduces Disability And Promotes Aging In Place.

    PubMed

    Szanton, Sarah L; Leff, Bruce; Wolff, Jennifer L; Roberts, Laken; Gitlin, Laura N

    2016-09-01

    The Community Aging in Place, Advancing Better Living for Elders (CAPABLE) program, funded by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation, aims to reduce the impact of disability among low-income older adults by addressing individual capacities and the home environment. The program, described in this innovation profile, uses an interprofessional team (an occupational therapist, a registered nurse, and a handyman) to help participants achieve goals they set. For example, it provides assistive devices and makes home repairs and modifications that enable participants to navigate their homes more easily and safely. In the period 2012-15, a demonstration project enrolled 281 adults ages sixty-five and older who were dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid and who had difficulty performing activities of daily living (ADLs). After completing the five-month program, 75 percent of participants had improved their performance of ADLs. Participants had difficulty with an average of 3.9 out of 8.0 ADLs at baseline, compared to 2.0 after five months. Symptoms of depression and the ability to perform instrumental ADLs such as shopping and managing medications also improved. Health systems are testing CAPABLE on a larger scale. The program has the potential to improve older adults' ability to age in place.

  13. Older People’s Quality of Life and Role of Home-Based Technology

    PubMed Central

    Mckee, Kevin; Matlabi, Hossein; Parker, Stuart G

    2012-01-01

    Background: Household devices may have a positive impact on daily lives by reducing the burden of several tasks and enriching social interaction. There are varieties of assistive devices such as alarms, sensors, detectors, and life style monitoring devices, which can help in compensating for the activity limitations caused by impairments. This study aimed to review the contribution that residential technology devices can make to older people’s lives. Methods: An open-ended literature review following the guidance of the Centre for Review and Dissemination was conducted to establish the current understanding of the topics by using clear and appropriate criteria to select or reject studies. The studies entered into the review were limited by language, topic, and date of publication. Results: The research literature indicated that residential facilities which appropriately are designed and supplied can have many benefits for older people such as increasing in-dependence, maximising physical and mental health, and improving their quality of life. Conclusion: Although most of the literature has explored the positive effects of technology devices on older adults’ social networks, independence, psychological well-being, and social status, the possibilities of negative consequences have been neglected. Keywords: Quality of life, Older people, Residential technology, Computer-mediated communication PMID:24688912

  14. What Makes a Good Home-Based Nocturnal Seizure Detector? A Value Sensitive Design

    PubMed Central

    van Andel, Judith; Leijten, Frans; van Delden, Hans; van Thiel, Ghislaine

    2015-01-01

    A device for the in-home detection of nocturnal seizures is currently being developed in the Netherlands, to improve care for patients with severe epilepsy. It is recognized that the design of medical technology is not value neutral: perspectives of users and developers are influential in design, and design choices influence these perspectives. However, during development processes, these influences are generally ignored and value-related choices remain implicit and poorly argued for. In the development process of the seizure detector we aimed to take values of all stakeholders into consideration. Therefore, we performed a parallel ethics study, using “value sensitive design.” Analysis of stakeholder communication (in meetings and e-mail messages) identified five important values, namely, health, trust, autonomy, accessibility, and reliability. Stakeholders were then asked to give feedback on the choice of these values and how they should be interpreted. In a next step, the values were related to design choices relevant for the device, and then the consequences (risks and benefits) of these choices were investigated. Currently the process of design and testing of the device is still ongoing. The device will be validated in a trial in which the identified consequences of design choices are measured as secondary endpoints. Value sensitive design methodology is feasible for the development of new medical technology and can help designers substantiate the choices in their design. PMID:25875320

  15. Parental Satisfaction with a Home-Based Intervention for Developmentally Delayed Children in Switzerland: A Survey over a 10-year Period

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Favez, Nicolas; Metral, Eric; Govaerts, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a study of parental satisfaction with services provided to their child by an Early Intervention Service in Geneva, Switzerland. The Service offers psycho-educational home-based interventions for developmentally delayed children. Parents whose child used the service between 1991 and 2001 filled out a questionnaire with Likert…

  16. Determining the Reach of a Home-Based Physical Activity Program for Older Adults within the Context of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harden, Samantha M.; Fanning, Jason T.; Motl, Robert W.; McAuley, Edward; Estabrooks, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the reach of physical activity (PA) programs is challenging due to inconsistent reporting across studies. The purpose of this study was to document multiple indicators of program reach for a 6-month, Digital Versatile Disc (DVD)-delivered home-based PA program. Radio, newspaper and direct mailing advertisements were tracked to…

  17. Home-Based Businesses: Implications for the Rural Economy of the South. The Rural South: Preparing for the Challenges of the 21st Century, No. 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Pamela J.; Muske, Glenn

    In the face of changing agriculture, an aging population, and the outflow of citizens seeking livable wages, rural Southern communities are challenged with how to enhance their economies to insure long-term business viability. Home-based businesses are an effective aspect of rural economic development. They allow flexibility and choice of work…

  18. A Novel, Self-Guided, Home-Based Intervention to Improve Condom Use among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emetu, Roberta E.; Marshall, Alexandra; Sanders, Stephanie A.; Yarber, William L.; Milhausen, Robin R.; Crosby, Richard A.; Graham, Cynthia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study tested the efficacy of a brief, novel, theory-driven, self-guided, home-based intervention designed to promote condom use among young men who have sex with men (YMSM). Participants: Thirty YMSM were recruited from a large public US midwestern university during spring of 2012. Methods: The intervention was tested using a…

  19. Longitudinal comparison of a physiotherapist-led, home-based and group-based program for increasing physical activity in community-dwelling middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Freene, Nicole; Waddington, Gordon; Davey, Rachel; Cochrane, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have compared the longer-term effects of physical activity interventions. Here we compare a 6-month physiotherapist-led, home-based physical activity program to a community group exercise program over 2 years. Healthy, sedentary community-dwelling 50-65 year olds were recruited to a non-randomised community group exercise program (G, n = 93) or a physiotherapist-led, home-based physical activity program (HB, n = 65). Outcomes included 'sufficient' physical activity (Active Australia Survey), minutes of moderate-vigorous physical activity (ActiGraph GT1M), aerobic capacity (2-min step-test), quality of life (SF-12v2), blood pressure, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio and body mass index. Outcome measures were collected at baseline, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Using intention-to-treat analysis, both interventions resulted in significant and sustainable increases in the number of participants achieving 'sufficient' physical activity (HB 22 v. 41%, G 22 v. 47%, P ≤ 0.001) and decreases in waist circumference (HB 90 v. 89 cm, G 93 v. 91 cm, P < 0.001) over 2 years. The home-based program was less costly (HB A$47 v. G $84 per participant) but less effective in achieving the benefits at 2 years. The physiotherapist-led, home-based physical activity program may be a low-cost alternative to increase physical activity levels for those not interested in, or unable to attend, a group exercise program.

  20. A Randomised Controlled Trial of Two Early Intervention Programs for Young Children with Autism: Centre-Based with Parent Program and Home-Based

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jacqueline; Williams, Katrina; Carter, Mark; Evans, David; Parmenter, Trevor; Silove, Natalie; Clark, Trevor; Warren, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    This study compares outcomes of early intervention programs for young children with autism; an individualised home-based program (HB), a small group centre-based program for children combined with a parent training and support group (CB) and a non-treatment comparison group (WL). Outcome measures of interest include social and communication skill…

  1. Factors of Good Collaboration in Home-Based End-of-Life Care: A Questionnaire Survey of Japanese Home Care Nurses, Home Helpers, and Care Managers.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Igarashi, Ayumi; Noguchi-Watanabe, Maiko; Takemura, Yukie; Suzuki, Miho

    2015-01-01

    Good interprofessional work (IPW) is essential to provide quality home-based end-of-life (EOL) care. The purpose of this study was to explore the factors of "good collaboration," as evaluated separately by home care nurses (HNs), home helpers (HHs), and care managers (CMs). The relationship was examined between their evaluation of good collaboration and their recent actual experience of interprofessional collaborative work for a home-based EOL case. The questionnaire was returned nationwide by 378 HNs, 305 HHs, and 476 CMs, and data were collected on 177 EOL cases from HNs, 84 cases from HHs, and 123 cases from CMs. Evaluation of good collaboration by HNs was associated with working with a CM with whom they had multiple collaborative experiences, the client being independent for their toileting until just before dying, and sharing information regarding the client's EOL decision with an HH 1 month before dying. Evaluation of good collaboration by HHs was associated with working at an agency that collaborated with fewer CM agencies and working at an agency that allowed staff to visit dying clients. Evaluation of good collaboration by CMs was associated only with the client being dependent for toileting. Our results highlighted the characteristics of how each professional seeks to collaborate depending on their preparedness, contexts, and resultant expectations toward other professionals when entering the IPW for home-based EOL care. To promote good IPW for home-based EOL care further, professionals need to understand these differences among ourselves and try to meet others' expectations.

  2. Community SES, perceived environment, and physical activity during home-based cardiac rehabilitation: is there a need to consider the urban vs. rural distinction?

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Chris; Rainham, Daniel; McSweeney, Jill; Spence, John; McDonnell, Lisa; Rhodes, Ryan; Reid, Robert; McGannon, Kerry; Edwards, Nancy

    2012-04-01

    Physical activity (MVPA) levels during home-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) remain problematic. Consequently, the present study examined the association between MVPA and urban vs. rural residential status and the perceived environment in patients attending home-based CR. A total of 280 patients completed a questionnaire assessing demographic, clinical, MVPA, and perceived environmental variables measured at baseline and 3 months later. Patient addresses were geocoded and linked to the 2006 Canadian census to establish the urban/rural distinction. Results showed that urban and rural patients had similar baseline MVPA and improvements in MVPA by 3 months. Several perceived environmental variables were significantly related to MVPA throughout home-based CR that were common and urban/rural-specific. Therefore, although there does not appear to be an urban vs. rural advantage in MVPA levels during home-based CR, there does appear to be environmental/MVPA-specific relationships specific to urban and rural patients that may warrant attention.

  3. The Impact of Home-Based Child Care Provider Unionization on the Cost, Type, and Availability of Subsidized Child Care in Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grindal, Todd; West, Martin R.; Willett, John B.; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    In February 2005, Illinois became the first U.S. state to grant home-based child care providers (HBCPs) the right to form a labor union in order to bargain collectively with the state government. This policy inspired similar efforts across the country and represents a potentially important direction for child care policy. To date, the implications…

  4. 21 CFR 890.3940 - Wheelchair platform scale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wheelchair platform scale. 890.3940 Section 890.3940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... platform scale. (a) Identification. A wheelchair platform scale is a device with a base designed...

  5. 21 CFR 890.3940 - Wheelchair platform scale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wheelchair platform scale. 890.3940 Section 890.3940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... platform scale. (a) Identification. A wheelchair platform scale is a device with a base designed...

  6. 21 CFR 890.3940 - Wheelchair platform scale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wheelchair platform scale. 890.3940 Section 890.3940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... platform scale. (a) Identification. A wheelchair platform scale is a device with a base designed...

  7. 21 CFR 890.3940 - Wheelchair platform scale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wheelchair platform scale. 890.3940 Section 890.3940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... platform scale. (a) Identification. A wheelchair platform scale is a device with a base designed...

  8. 21 CFR 890.3940 - Wheelchair platform scale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wheelchair platform scale. 890.3940 Section 890.3940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... platform scale. (a) Identification. A wheelchair platform scale is a device with a base designed...

  9. 29 CFR 1917.115 - Platforms and skids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.115 Platforms and skids. (a) Platforms and skids... skid shall be protected from falling objects by a net stretched from the platform or skid to the...

  10. The effects of COREPOWER machine training versus home-based core training on golfers' physical fitness and sport performance.

    PubMed

    Loock, Henriëtte V; Grace, Jeanne M; Semple, Stuart J

    2013-10-21

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 36 session COREPOWER machine training intervention and those of a 36 session home-based core training intervention programme on golfers' physical fitness and sport specific performance. It was hypothesised that both modalities will improve on golf related fitness aspects. Subjects comprised of experienced golfers and were randomly divided into a machine group (M: n = 51) and a home group (H: n = 50). The following variables were measured both pre- and post-intervention: lower back flexibility (sit & reach), muscle endurance (sit-ups and push-ups), muscle strength (wall-squats and back dynamometer), cardio-respiratory fitness (3 minute step-test), balance (Biodex Balance System), club head speed and carry distance (Flightscope). The Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney signed-rank test was used to compare pre and post-intervention measurements within each group with significance set at p < 0.05. An ANCOVA analyses was also run as well as Pearson Product Moment correlations. Results portrayed that with the exception of cardiorespiratory fitness, all variables in both groups showed significant (p<0.05) improvement post intervention. Push-ups (p = 0.000; ↑17.03%; d = 0.92) and driver carry distance (p = 0.000; ↑30.30%; d = 0.40) showed the greatest percentage improvement post intervention within group M, while sit-ups (p = 0.000; ↑14.41%; d = 0.77) and push-ups (p = 0.000; ↑12.52%; d = 0.90) showed the greatest percentage improvement within group H. Lower back strength holds significant correlation to golf performance. Thus both modalities, the COREPOWER machine training and the home-based manual core training were equally effective in improving selected fitness components; however the machine was more effective in improving golf performance parameters. These observations can be applied to golfers in addition to their usual golfing activities as well as to other sport populations as this study formed an evidence

  11. Assessment of water, sanitation, and hygiene practice and associated factors among people living with HIV/AIDS home based care services in Gondar city, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background People living with HIV/AIDS have substantially greater need for water, sanitation, and hygiene. Encouraging hygiene education for People Living with HIV/AIDS in home based care services and additional support for the provision of water, sanitation, and hygiene services is recommended. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried during 2009 to assess water, sanitation status and hygiene practices and associated factors among People Living with HIV/AIDS in home based care services in Gondar city of Ethiopia. A systematic random sampling was used to select study subjects from 900 Home Based Care clients of People Living HIV/AIDS in Gondar city. Data was collected from 296 People Living with HIV/AIDS from two NGO’s in the city. For in-depth interview, four different categories were participated. Logistic regression and thematic framework analysis were performed for quantitative and qualitative part respectively. Results Two hundred ninety four subjects (72.8% (214) females and 27.2% (80) males) were studied. The mean age was 35.8 ± 8.7 years. In the study, 42.9% (126) of the households have unimproved water status, 67% (197) of the households have unimproved sanitation status, and 51.7% (152) of the households have poor hygienic practice. Diarrhoea with water status; educational status and latrine availability with sanitation status; and hand washing device availability and economical reasons for the affordability of soap with hygienic practice were significantly associated. Economical reasons and hygiene education were factors that affect water, sanitation, and hygienic practice. Stigma and discrimination were minimized as a factor in the study area. Conclusions There is high burden of water, sanitation and hygiene in people living HIV/AIDS in home based care services. Encouraging hygiene education for people living HIVAIDS in home based care services and additional support for the provision of water, sanitation, and hygiene services is recommended

  12. Stabilized floating platforms

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, David G.

    1976-01-01

    The subject invention is directed to a floating platform for supporting nuclear reactors and the like at selected offshore sites. The platform is provided with a stabilizer mechanism which significantly reduces the effects of wave action upon the platform and which comprises a pair of relatively small floats attached by rigid booms to the platform at locations spaced therefrom for reducing wave pitch, acceleration, and the resonance period of the wave.

  13. Effect of a Home-based Balance Training Protocol on Dynamic Postural Control in Subjects with Chronic Ankle Instability.

    PubMed

    De Ridder, R; Willems, T M; Vanrenterghem, J; Roosen, P

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the presence of postural deficits in subjects with chronic ankle instability (CAI) and to assess the effect of an 8-week balance training program on dynamic postural control. A total of 43 subjects with CAI and 31 controls participated in this case-control study. Participants with CAI performed an 8-week home-based balance training, including 3 sessions a week. As main outcome measure, postural control was quantified after a vertical drop by means of the dynamic postural stability index (DPSI). Perceptual outcomes were documented using the FADI, FADI-Sport and VAS scales. At baseline, subjects with CAI displayed higher anterior/posterior and vertical postural instability, a poorer DPSI, and lower subjective stability scores compared to the control group. After balance training, all subjective stability scores improved significantly, although no changes were noted for the stability indices. In conclusion, subjects with CAI have an impaired postural control. As a treatment modality, balance training exhibits the capability of improving the subjective feeling of instability in subjects with CAI. However, there was no effect on dynamic postural control. Further research on the explanatory mechanisms of balance training is warranted, and other training modalities should be considered.

  14. Feasibility of caregiver-directed home-based hand-arm bimanual intensive training: A brief report

    PubMed Central

    Ferre, Claudio L.; Brandão, Marina B.; Hung, Ya-Ching; Carmel, Jason B.; Gordon, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine feasibility of a home-based, intensive bimanual intervention with children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy. Methods Eleven children (aged 29–54 months) received 90 hours of home hand-arm bimanual intensive therapy (H-HABIT) provided by their trained caregivers. Parenting stress levels and compliance were monitored using the Parenting Stress Index and daily logs. Quality of bimanual performance and changes in performance/satisfaction of functional goals were assessed using the Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA) and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), respectively, at two pretreatment baseline sessions and two posttreatment sessions (immediate and six months). Results Ten children completed the study with caregivers completing on average 85.6 hours of H-HABIT. Daily logs indicated high caregiver compliance. Stress levels remained stable across the intervention. Children demonstrated significant improvements in the AHA and COPM. Conclusion H-HABIT is a feasible intervention for improving hand function and merits further investigation in a randomized-control trial. PMID:25180530

  15. Home-based management of severely acute malnutrition: feasibility of ethically designed, community-based randomised clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rajan R

    2015-01-01

    The Indian Council of Medical Research had, on May 31, 2011, called for research proposals on severely acute malnourished (SAM) children to generate evidence for the development of practical and scalable regimens to medically rehabilitate children suffering from SAM, without serious complications, at the home/community level and/or peripheral inpatient facilities. The primary outcomes of the proposed research study are recovery from SAM in the short term, as well as sustenance of recovery (for at least six months after the initiation of treatment). The secondary outcomes are the acceptability, feasibility and safety of the regimes being tested. It was suggested that the studies be designed as individual or cluster randomised or quasi randomised controlled trials (RCTs). This paper analyses the methodological, operational, and most importantly, ethical challenges and implications of conducting community-based RCTs involving SAM children. The paper dwells in detail on why and how the RCT design is inappropriate and unsuitable for studying the effectiveness of home-based management of SAM children in the community.

  16. Markerless motion capture and measurement of hand kinematics: validation and application to home-based upper limb rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Cheryl D; Robinson, Rebecca; Malpass, Adam J; Bogle, Tristan P; Dell, Thomas A; Harris, Chris; Demain, Sara H

    2013-08-01

    Dynamic movements of the hand, fingers, and thumb are difficult to measure due to the versatility and complexity of movement inherent in function. An innovative approach to measuring hand kinematics is proposed and validated. The proposed system utilizes the Microsoft Kinect and goes beyond gesture recognition to develop a validated measurement technique of finger kinematics. The proposed system adopted landmark definition (validated through ground truth estimation against assessors) and grip classification algorithms, including kinematic definitions (validated against a laboratory-based motion capture system). The results of the validation show 78% accuracy when identifying specific markerless landmarks. In addition, comparative data with a previously validated kinematic measurement technique show accuracy of MCP ± 10° (average absolute error (AAE) = 2.4°), PIP ± 12° (AAE = 4.8°), and DIP ± 11° (AAE = 4.8°). These results are notably better than clinically based alternative manual measurement techniques. The ability to measure hand movements, and therefore functional dexterity, without interfering with underlying composite movements, is the paramount objective to any bespoke measurement system. The proposed system is the first validated markerless measurement system using the Microsoft Kinect that is capable of measuring finger joint kinematics. It is suitable for home-based motion capture for the hand and, therefore, achieves this objective.

  17. Provider cultural competency, client satisfaction, and engagement in home-based programs to treat child abuse and neglect.

    PubMed

    Damashek, Amy; Bard, David; Hecht, Debra

    2012-02-01

    Home-based programs to treat child abuse and neglect suffer from high rates of attrition, limiting their impact. Thus, research is needed to identify factors related to client engagement. Using data (N = 1,305) from a statewide family preservation program, this study investigated the role of program type (i.e., SafeCare(®) [SC] vs. Services as Usual [SAU]) and client perceived provider cultural competence on client satisfaction and engagement with services. Families in SC completed more treatment goals than those in SAU. In addition, provider cultural competence and client satisfaction were higher in SC than in SAU. Higher provider cultural competence was associated with higher goal attainment and satisfaction, and these effects partially mediated the service program differences. The effects of service type and cultural competence on goal attainment and satisfaction varied somewhat by client ethnicity. Findings suggest that clients receiving manualized programs for child maltreatment may be more likely to meet their goals and may perceive such programs to be culturally appropriate and satisfactory.

  18. A home-based method to reduce phytate content and increase zinc bioavailability in maize-based complementary diets.

    PubMed

    Hotz, C; Gibson, R S; Temple, L

    2001-03-01

    This study aimed to develop and assess the feasibility of a home-based method to reduce the phytate content of maize and improve zinc bioavailability from maize-based complementary diets in rural Malawi. A method of extracting phytate through the soaking of pounded maize was developed, and found to reduce phytate content to 49% of unrefined maize. An educational program was used to teach the processing method to mothers of children receiving complementary foods in rural Malawian communities. Samples of maize flour prepared by this process by participants were collected and analysed for phytate and zinc content. Of these, 70% of samples were found to be adequately prepared; mean phytate content of these samples was 48% of unprocessed, unrefined maize flour controls. Most participants found the cooked product to have an acceptable taste (99%) and texture (68%), and felt the processing method took little or no extra time (86%) and was culturally acceptable (96%). The phytate and zinc content of the processed maize flour samples analysed from community prepared samples was substituted into the dietary analysis of complementary foods for 9- to 11-month-old children (n = 31). The bioavailability of zinc from the complementary diet would predict an increase from low (24%) to moderate (33%) levels.

  19. Mediators of the impact of a home-based intervention (beat the blues) on depressive symptoms among older African Americans.

    PubMed

    Gitlin, Laura N; Roth, David L; Huang, Jin

    2014-09-01

    Older African Americans (N = 208) with depressive symptoms were randomly assigned to a home-based nonpharmacologic intervention (Beat the Blues, or BTB) or wait-list control group. BTB was delivered by licensed social workers and involved up to 10 home visits focused on care management, referral and linkage, depression knowledge and efficacy in symptom recognition, instruction in stress reduction techniques, and behavioral activation through identification of personal goals and action plans for achieving them. Structured interviews by assessors masked to study assignment were used to assess changes in depressive symptoms (main trial endpoint), behavioral activation, depression knowledge, formal care service utilization, and anxiety (mediators) at baseline and 4 months. At 4 months, the intervention had a positive effect on depressive symptoms and all mediators except formal care service utilization. Structural equation models indicated that increased activation, enhanced depression knowledge, and decreased anxiety each independently mediated a significant proportion of the intervention's impact on depressive symptoms as assessed with 2 different measures (PHQ-9 and CES-D). These 3 factors also jointly explained over 60% of the intervention's total effect on both indicators of depressive symptoms. Our findings suggest that most of the impact of BTB on depressive symptoms is driven by enhancing activation or becoming active, reducing anxiety, and improving depression knowledge/efficacy. The intervention components appear to work in concert and may be mutually necessary for maximal benefits from treatment to occur. Implications for designing tailored interventions to address depressive symptoms among older African Americans are discussed.

  20. Home-based nursing interventions improve knowledge of disease and management in patients with heart failure 1

    PubMed Central

    Azzolin, Karina de Oliveira; Lemos, Dayanna Machado; Lucena, Amália de Fátima; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to assess patient knowledge of heart failure by home-based measurement of two NOC Nursing Outcomes over a six-month period and correlate mean outcome indicator scores with mean scores of a heart failure Knowledge Questionnaire. METHODS: in this before-and-after study, patients with heart failure received four home visits over a six-month period after hospital discharge. At each home visit, nursing interventions were implemented, NOC outcomes were assessed, and the Knowledge Questionnaire was administered. RESULTS: overall, 23 patients received home visits. Mean indicator scores for the outcome Knowledge: Medication were 2.27±0.14 at home visit 1 and 3.55±0.16 at home visit 4 (P<0.001); and, for the outcome Knowledge: Treatment Regimen, 2.33±0.13 at home visit 1 and 3.59±0.14 at home visit 4 (P<0.001). The correlation between the Knowledge Questionnaire and the Nursing Outcomes Classification scores was strong at home visit 1 (r=0.7, P<0.01), but weak and non significant at visit 4. CONCLUSION: the results show improved patient knowledge of heart failure and a strong correlation between Nursing Outcomes Classification indicator scores and Knowledge Questionnaire scores. The NOC Nursing Outcomes proved effective as knowledge assessment measures when compared with the validated instrument. PMID:25806630

  1. Implementation processes associated with a home-based phonological awareness intervention for children with specific language impairment.

    PubMed

    Skibbe, Lori E; Justice, Laura M; Bowles, Ryan P

    2011-04-01

    The implementation processes associated with a home-based phonological awareness intervention were observed for mothers and their 4-year-old children with specific language impairment (SLI). Mother-child dyads (n = 13) read books four times per week over 12 weeks; each book contained nine embedded phonological awareness (PA) tasks. Four hundred and ninety-eight book reading sessions were coded for three variables of interest: maternal support of concept development, quantity of maternal instructional support, and accuracy of children's responses to the PA tasks. Using growth curve modelling, results indicate that maternal support of concept development decreased over the course of the 12-week program, and the quantity of maternal supports changed considerably reflecting intra-individual differences among mothers. Both support of concept development and quantity of support decreased over the course of a given week. In addition, children's responses to the phonological awareness tasks significantly increased over the 12-week intervention. Overall, mothers did not provide support that consistently supported children's learning over time, and the increases in children's correct responses, although significant, were less than anticipated given the length of the intervention. These findings indicate that mothers may need additional supports when implementing emergent literacy programs with their children.

  2. Independent Living Capacity Evaluation in Home-Based Primary Care: Considerations and Outcomes of a Quality Improvement Project

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Michelle C.; Murphy, Margaret R.; Mlinac, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This article describes results of a quality improvement project review of 5 years of capacity evaluations for independent living conducted in one Home-Based Primary Care (HBPC) Program. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted for all patients evaluated for independent living capacity through the Boston VA HBPC Program (N = 25) to identify differences in outcomes for those with and without capacity. Descriptive information included referral sources, capacity decisions, time remaining in the home, and trajectory of patients following evaluation. Results All patients evaluated had been diagnosed with a cognitive disorder, and on average, a relatively lower prevalence of mental illness compared with the national HBPC population. Referrals were made primarily by the HBPC team. Patients with capacity were found to have remained in their home longer than those who lacked capacity. Conclusions Referral for a higher level of care was typically only recommended when no further intervention could be implemented and active risk in the home could not be managed. Clinical Implications In home capacity evaluations are complex and challenging, yet results help family and HBPC team support patients’ preferences for staying in their own home as long as possible. PMID:28111494

  3. The Dangers of Involving Children as Family Caregivers of Palliative Home-Based-Care to Advanced HIV/AIDS Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kangethe, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this research paper is to explore the dangers of involving children as family caregivers of palliative care and home-based-care to advanced HIV/AIDS patients, while its objective is to discuss the dangers or perfidiousness that minors especially the girl children face as they handle care giving of advanced HIV/AIDS patients. The article has relied on eclectic data sources. The research has foundminors disadvantaged by the following: being engulfed by fear and denied rights through care giving; being emotionally and physiologically overwhelmed; being oppressed and suppressed by caring duties; being at risk of contracting HIV/AIDS; and having their education compromised by care giving. The paper recommends: (1) strengthening and emphasizing on children’s rights; (2) maintaining gender balance in care giving; (3) implementation and domestication of the United Nations conventions on the rights of children; (4) community awareness on equal gender co participation in care giving; (5) and fostering realization that relying on child care giving is a negative score in fulfilling global Millennium Development Goals. PMID:21218000

  4. [The telematic platform trial concept. An attempt at definition and clarification].

    PubMed

    Noelle, G

    2005-06-01

    A telematic platform provides a comprehensive infrastructure for communication of health data among several participants in the health care system. The planned introduction of the electronic health card and accompanying measures in 2006 is the first step towards the realisation of a telematic platform. The course for further development of the platform will be set during this important initial phase.

  5. Health status, infection and disease in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) studied using a canine microarray platform and machine-learning approaches.

    PubMed

    Mancia, Annalaura; Ryan, James C; Chapman, Robert W; Wu, Qingzhong; Warr, Gregory W; Gulland, Frances M D; Van Dolah, Frances M

    2012-04-01

    Conservation biologists face many challenges in assessing health, immune status and infectious diseases in protected species. These challenges include unpredictable sample populations, diverse genetic and environmental backgrounds of the animals, as well as the practical, legal and ethical issues involved in experimentation. The use of whole genome scale transcriptomics with animal samples obtained in a minimally invasive manner is an approach that shows promise for health assessment. In this study we assessed the utility of a microarray to identify changes in gene expression predictive of health status by interrogating blood samples from California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) in rehabilitation. A custom microarray was developed from the commercially available dog microarray (Canis familiaris) by selecting probes that demonstrated reliable cross-hybridization with RNA in sea lion blood. This custom microarray was used for the analysis of RNA from 73 sea lion blood samples, from animals with a broad spectrum of health changes. Both traditional classifying techniques and newer artificial neural network approaches correctly classified sea lions with respect to health status, primarily distinguishing between leptospirosis infection and domoic acid exposure. Real time PCR validation for a small set of genes, followed by sequencing, showed good correlation with array results and high identity (96-98%) between the dog and sea lion sequences. This approach to health status classification shows promise for disease identification in a clinical setting, and assessment of health status of wildlife.

  6. Linked Patient-Reported Outcomes Data From Patients With Multiple Sclerosis Recruited on an Open Internet Platform to Health Care Claims Databases Identifies a Representative Population for Real-Life Data Analysis in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghodge, Bhaskar; Bonzani, Ian C; Korn, Jonathan R; Medin, Jennie; Saraykar, Tanmay; Sengupta, Souvik; Saini, Deepanshu; Olson, Melvin

    2016-01-01

    Background An enormous amount of information relevant to public health is being generated directly by online communities. Objective To explore the feasibility of creating a dataset that links patient-reported outcomes data, from a Web-based survey of US patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) recruited on open Internet platforms, to health care utilization information from health care claims databases. The dataset was generated by linkage analysis to a broader MS population in the United States using both pharmacy and medical claims data sources. Methods US Facebook users with an interest in MS were alerted to a patient-reported survey by targeted advertisements. Eligibility criteria were diagnosis of MS by a specialist (primary progressive, relapsing-remitting, or secondary progressive), ≥12-month history of disease, age 18-65 years, and commercial health insurance. Participants completed a questionnaire including data on demographic and disease characteristics, current and earlier therapies, relapses, disability, health-related quality of life, and employment status and productivity. A unique anonymous profile was generated for each survey respondent. Each anonymous profile was linked to a number of medical and pharmacy claims datasets in the United States. Linkage rates were assessed and survey respondents’ representativeness was evaluated based on differences in the distribution of characteristics between the linked survey population and the general MS population in the claims databases. Results The advertisement was placed on 1,063,973 Facebook users’ pages generating 68,674 clicks, 3719 survey attempts, and 651 successfully completed surveys, of which 440 could be linked to any of the claims databases for 2014 or 2015 (67.6% linkage rate). Overall, no significant differences were found between patients who were linked and not linked for educational status, ethnicity, current or prior disease-modifying therapy (DMT) treatment, or presence of a relapse in

  7. Floor Plans Engine Removal Platform, Hold Down Arm Platform, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Floor Plans - Engine Removal Platform, Hold Down Arm Platform, Hydraulic Equipment Platforms, Isometric Cutaway of Engine Removal Platform, Isometric Cutaway of Hold Down Arm Platform, Isometric Cutaway of Hydraulic Platforms and Engine Support System Access - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn V S-IC Static Test Facility, West Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  8. Home-Based Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Vestibular Disorder Family Support Network Desorden Vestibular/Vértigo - En Español הפרעות ... What is a Home VRT program? During vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT), home exercises ...

  9. Longer-term effects of home-based exercise interventions on exercise capacity and physical activity in coronary artery disease patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Claes, Jomme; Buys, Roselien; Budts, Werner; Smart, Neil; Cornelissen, Véronique A

    2017-02-01

    Background Exercise-based cardiovascular rehabilitation (CR) improves exercise capacity (EC), lowers cardiovascular risk profile and increases physical functioning in the short term. However, uptake of and adherence to a physically active lifestyle in the long run remain problematic. Home-based (HB) exercise programmes have been introduced in an attempt to enhance long-term adherence to recommended levels of physical activity (PA). The current systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to compare the longer-term effects of HB exercise programmes with usual care (UC) or centre-based (CB) CR in patients referred for CR. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods Non-randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or randomised trials comparing the effects of HB exercise programmes with UC or CB rehabilitation on EC and/or PA, with a follow-up period of ≥12 months and performed in coronary artery disease patients, were searched in four databases (PubMed, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials (CENTRAL)) from their inception until September 7, 2016. Standardised mean differences (SMDs) were calculated and pooled by means of random effects models. Risk of bias, publication bias and heterogeneity among trials were also assessed. Results Seven studies could be included in the meta-analysis on EC, but only two studies could be included in the meta-analysis on PA (total number of 1440 patients). The results showed no significant differences in EC between HB rehabilitation and UC (SMD 0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.13 to 0.33). There was a small but significant difference in EC in favour of HB compared to CB rehabilitation (SMD 0.25, 95% CI 0.02-0.48). No differences were found for PA (SMD 0.37, 95% CI -0.18 to 0.92). Conclusions HB exercise is slightly more effective than CB rehabilitation in terms of maintaining EC. The small number of studies warrants the need for more

  10. Adverse events in an integrated home-based treatment program for MDR-TB and HIV in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Brust, James C M; Shah, N Sarita; van der Merwe, Theo L; Bamber, Sheila; Ning, Yuming; Heo, Moonseong; Moll, Anthony P; Loveday, Marian; Lalloo, Umesh G; Friedland, Gerald H; Gandhi, Neel R

    2013-04-01

    Most patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in South Africa are HIV-infected, but the safety and tolerability of cotreatment are unknown. The authors reviewed all adverse events (AEs) for patients with MDR-TB in a home-based treatment program in rural KwaZulu-Natal. Of 91 MDR-TB patients, 74 (81%) were HIV-positive and receiving antiretroviral therapy. AEs were common, but most were mild and did not require therapy modification. The most common severe AEs were hypothyroidism (36%) and psychosis (5%). Patients receiving concurrent antiretroviral therapy did not experience AEs more frequently than those on MDR-TB therapy alone. Concurrent treatment for MDR-TB/HIV can be safely administered in a home-based care setting.

  11. FIRST-GENERATION LATINA MOTHERS' EXPERIENCES OF SUPPLEMENTING HOME-BASED EARLY HEAD START WITH THE ATTACHMENT AND BIOBEHAVIORAL CATCH-UP PROGRAM.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Elizabeth M; Denmark, Nicole; Berlin, Lisa J; Jones Harden, Brenda

    2016-09-01

    This qualitative pilot study examined first-generation Latina mothers' experiences of supplementing home-based Early Head Start (EHS) services with the evidence-based Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up (ABC; M. Dozier, O. Lindheim, & J. Ackerman, 2005) program. Ten low-income, first-generation Latina mothers with infants and toddlers enrolled in home-based EHS were provided 10 ABC home visits by a supplemental parent coach. Following delivery of ABC, mothers participated in in-depth, semistructured, qualitative interviews about their experiences. Interview themes included positive experiences of both EHS and the ABC, a high value placed on receiving both programs, and cultural relevance of the ABC program for Latino families. Participants offered several suggestions for improved program delivery. Study findings suggest that a model of EHS supplemented by ABC delivered to the Latino community is feasible, valuable to participants, and culturally relevant. Considerations for sustainability of this supplemental model are discussed.

  12. Platform switching and bone platform switching.

    PubMed

    Carinci, Francesco; Brunelli, Giorgio; Danza, Matteo

    2009-01-01

    Bone platform switching involves an inward bone ring in the coronal part of the implant that is in continuity with the alveolar bone crest. Bone platform switching is obtained by using a dental fixture with a reverse conical neck. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of conventional vs reverse conical neck implants. In the period between May 2004 and November 2007, 86 patients (55 females and 31 males; median age, 53 years) were operated and 234 implants were inserted: 40 and 194 were conventional vs reverse conical neck implants, respectively. Kaplan-Meier algorithm and Cox regression were used to detect those variables associated with the clinical outcome. No differences in survival and success rates were detected between conventional vs reverse conical neck implants alone or in combination with any of the studied variables. Although bone platform switching leads to several advantages, no statistical difference in alveolar crest resorption is detected in comparison with reverse conical neck implants. We suppose that the proximity of the implant abutment junction to the alveolar crestal bone gives no protection against the microflora contained in the micrograph. Additional studies on larger series and a combination of platform switching and bone platform switching could lead to improved clinical outcomes.

  13. Impact of a home-based walking intervention on outcomes of sleep quality, emotional distress, and fatigue in patients undergoing treatment for solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Jennifer A; Griffith, Kathleen A; Shang, Jingjing; Thompson, Carol B; Hedlin, Haley; Stewart, Kerry J; DeWeese, Theodore; Mock, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Exercise use among patients with cancer has been shown to have many benefits and few notable risks. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a home-based walking intervention during cancer treatment on sleep quality, emotional distress, and fatigue. Methods. A total of 138 patients with prostate (55.6%), breast (32.5%), and other solid tumors (11.9%) were randomized to a home-based walking intervention or usual care. Exercise dose was assessed using a five-item subscale of the Cooper Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study Physical Activity Questionnaire. Primary outcomes of sleep quality, distress, and fatigue were compared between the two study arms. Results. The exercise group (n = 68) reported more vigor (p = .03) than control group participants (n = 58). In dose response models, greater participation in aerobic exercise was associated with 11% less fatigue (p < .001), 7.5% more vigor (p = .001), and 3% less emotional distress (p = .03), after controlling for intervention group assignment, age, and baseline exercise and fatigue levels. Conclusion. Patients who exercised during cancer treatment experienced less emotional distress than those who were less active. Increasing exercise was also associated with less fatigue and more vigor. Home-based walking is a simple, sustainable strategy that may be helpful in improving a number of symptoms encountered by patients undergoing active treatment for cancer.

  14. Motor activity (exploration) and formation of home bases in mice (C57BL/6) influenced by visual and tactile cues: modification of movement distribution, distance, location, and speed.

    PubMed

    Clark, Benjamin J; Hamilton, Derek A; Whishaw, Ian Q

    2006-04-15

    The motor activity of mice in tests of "exploration" is organized. Mice establish home bases, operationally defined as places where they spend long periods of time, near physical objects and nesting material from which they make excursions. This organization raises the question of the extent to which mouse motoric activity is modulated by innate predispositions versus environmental influences. Here the influence of contextual cues (visual and tactile) on the motor activity of C57BL/6 mice was examined: (1) on an open field that had no walls, a partial wall, or a complete wall, (2) in the presence of distinct visual cues, room cues, or in the absence of visual cues (infrared light), and (3) in the presence of configurations of visual and tactile cues. Mice were generally less active in the presence of salient cues and formed home bases near those cues. In addition, movement speed, path distribution, and the number and length of stops were modulated by contextual cues. With repeated tests, mice favored tactile cues over visual cues as their home base locations. Although responses to cues were robust over test days, conditioning to context was generally weak. That the exploratory behavior of mice is affected by experience and context provides insights into performance variability and may prove useful in investigating the genetic and neural influences on mouse behavior.

  15. The Future of Home Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Landers, Steven; Madigan, Elizabeth; Leff, Bruce; Rosati, Robert J.; McCann, Barbara A.; Hornbake, Rodney; MacMillan, Richard; Jones, Kate; Bowles, Kathryn; Dowding, Dawn; Lee, Teresa; Moorhead, Tracey; Rodriguez, Sally; Breese, Erica

    2016-01-01

    The Future of Home Health project sought to support transformation of home health and home-based care to meet the needs of patients in the evolving U.S. health care system. Interviews with key thought leaders and stakeholders resulted in key themes about the future of home health care. By synthesizing this qualitative research, a literature review, case studies, and the themes from a 2014 Institute of Medicine and National Research Council workshop on “The Future of Home Health Care,” the authors articulate a vision for home-based care and recommend a bold framework for the Medicare-certified home health agency of the future. The authors also identify challenges and recommendations for achievement of this framework. PMID:27746670

  16. Omnidirectional holonomic platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, F.G.; Killough, S.M.

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents the concepts for a new family of wheeled platforms which feature full omnidirectionality with simultaneous and independently controlled rotational and translational motion capabilities. The authors first present the orthogonal-wheels concept and the two major wheel assemblies on which these platforms are based. They then describe how a combination of these assemblies with appropriate control can be used to generate an omnidirectional capability for mobile robot platforms. The design and control of two prototype platforms are then presented and their respective characteristics with respect to rotational and translational motion control are discussed.

  17. [The cascade scheme as a methodical platform for analysis of health risks in space flight and partially and fully analog conditions].

    PubMed

    Ushakov, I B; Poliakov, A V; Usov, V M

    2011-01-01

    Space anthropoecology, a subsection of human ecology, studies various aspects of physiological, psychological, social and professional adaptation to the extreme environment of space flight and human life and work in partially- and fully analogous conditions on Earth. Both SF and simulated extreme conditions are known for high human safety standards and a substantial analytic base that secures on-line analysis of torrent of information. Management evaluation and response to germing undesired developments aimed to curb their impact on the functioning of the crew-vehicle-environment system and human health involve the complete wealth of knowledge about risks to human health and performance. Spacecrew safety issues are tackled by experts of many specialties which emphasizes the importance of integral methodical approaches to risk estimation and mitigation, setting up barriers to adverse trends in human physiology and psychology in challenging conditions, and minimization of delayed effects on professional longevity and disorders in behavioral reactions.

  18. Laboratory-based surveillance in the molecular era: the TYPENED model, a joint data-sharing platform for clinical and public health laboratories.

    PubMed

    Niesters, H G; Rossen, J W; van der Avoort, H; Baas, D; Benschop, K; Claas, E C; Kroneman, A; van Maarseveen, N; Pas, S; van Pelt, W; Rahamat-Langendoen, J C; Schuurman, R; Vennema, H; Verhoef, L; Wolthers, K; Koopmans, M

    2013-01-24

    Laboratory-based surveillance, one of the pillars of monitoring infectious disease trends, relies on data produced in clinical and/or public health laboratories. Currently, diagnostic laboratories worldwide submit strains or samples to a relatively small number of reference laboratories for characterisation and typing. However, with the introduction of molecular diagnostic methods and sequencing in most of the larger diagnostic and university hospital centres in high-income countries, the distinction between diagnostic and reference/public health laboratory functions has become less clear-cut. Given these developments, new ways of networking and data sharing are needed. Assuming that clinical and public health laboratories may be able to use the same data for their own purposes when sequence-based testing and typing are used, we explored ways to develop a collaborative approach and a jointly owned database (TYPENED) in the Netherlands. The rationale was that sequence data - whether produced to support clinical care or for surveillance -can be aggregated to meet both needs. Here we describe the development of the TYPENED approach and supporting infrastructure, and the implementation of a pilot laboratory network sharing enterovirus sequences and metadata.

  19. Innovation in the North: are health service providers ready for the uptake of an internet-based chronic disease management platform?

    PubMed

    Tillotson, Sherri; Lear, Scott; Araki, Yuriko; Horvat, Dan; Prkachin, Ken; Bates, Joanna; Balka, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Remote and rural regions in Canada are faced with unique challenges in the delivery of primary health services. The purpose of this study was to understand how patients and healthcare professionals in northern British Columbia might make use of the Internet to manage cardiovascular diseases. The study used a qualitative methodology. Eighteen health professionals and 6 patients were recruited for a semi-structured interview that explored their experience in managing patients with cardiovascular disease and their opinions and preferences about the use of the Internet in chronic disease management. Key findings from the data suggest that a) use of the Internet helps to maintain continuity of care while a patient moves through various stages of care, b) the Internet may possibly be used as an educational tool in chronic disease self-management, c) there is a need for policy development to support Internet-based consultation processes, and d) while health providers endorse the notion of electronic advancement in their practice, the need for secure and stable electronic systems is essential.

  20. Effects of home-based constraint-induced therapy versus dose-matched control intervention on functional outcomes and caregiver well-being in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Keh-chung; Wang, Tien-ni; Wu, Ching-yi; Chen, Chia-ling; Chang, Kai-chieh; Lin, Yu-chan; Chen, Yi-ju

    2011-01-01

    This study compared home-based constraint-induced therapy (CIT) with a dose-matched home-based control intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP). The differences in unilateral and bilateral motor performance, daily functions, and quality of parental well-being (i.e., the stress level of their parents) were evaluated. The study included 21 children with CP (age range, 48-119 months) who were randomly assigned to the CIT or control group. All participants received individualized home-based interventions, 3.5-4h a day, twice a week for 4weeks. Primary outcomes were measured by the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales II (PDMS-2) and the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOTMP) is the whole name of the assessment. All first letters of this instrument title should be in upper case. Secondary outcome measures were the Pediatric Motor Activity Log (PMAL), the Caregiver Functional Use Survey (CFUS), and the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI). Outcome measures were performed at baseline (pretreatment), 4weeks (posttreatment), and 6-month (follow-up). Compared with the control group, the CIT group exhibited significantly better performance in grasping control as measured by the PDMS-2, unilateral/bilateral motor efficacy as measured by the BOTMP, and unilateral hand function as measured by the PMAL immediately after the treatment. At the 6-month follow-up, CIT had beneficial effects on grasping control assessed by PDMS-2 and on unilateral/bilateral functional performance measured by the PMAL and CFUS. Parents in both groups reported comparable stress levels at the 6-month follow-up, although the parent-child dysfunctional interaction deteriorated more immediately after CIT than after the control intervention. The follow-up of this randomized controlled trial suggested beneficial effects of home-based CIT on unilateral grasping skills and unilateral/bilateral functional performance at 6 months. The higher stress level reported by the parents in the

  1. HIV/AIDS and access to water: A case study of home-based care in Ngamiland, Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwenya, B. N.; Kgathi, D. L.

    This case study investigates access to potable water in HIV/AIDS related home-based care households in five rural communities in Ngamiland, Botswana. Primary data collected from five villages consisted of two parts. The first survey collected household data on demographic and rural livelihood features and impacts of HIV/AIDS. A total of 129 households were selected using a two-stage stratified random sampling method. In the second survey, a total of 39 family primary and community care givers of continuously ill, bed-ridden or non-bed-ridden HIV/AIDS patients were interviewed. A detailed questionnaire, with closed and open-ended questions, was used to collect household data. In addition to using the questionnaire, data were also collected through participant observation, informal interviews and secondary sources. The study revealed that there are several sources of water for communities in Ngamiland such as off-plot, outdoor (communal) and on-plot outdoor and/or indoor (private) water connections, as well as other sources such as bowsed water, well-points, boreholes and open perennial/ephemeral water from river channels and pans. There was a serious problem of unreliable water supply caused by, among other things, the breakdown of diesel-powered water pumps, high frequency of HIV/AIDS related absenteeism, and the failure of timely delivery of diesel fuel. Some villages experienced chronic supply disruptions while others experienced seasonal or occasional water shortages. Strategies for coping with unreliability of water supply included economizing on water, reserve storage, buying water, and collection from river/dug wells or other alternative sources such as rain harvesting tanks in government institutions. The unreliability of water supply resulted in an increase in the use of water of poor quality and other practices of poor hygiene as well as a high opportunity cost of water collection. In such instances, bathing of patients was cut from twice daily to once or

  2. The role of ‘hidden’ community volunteers in community-based health service delivery platforms: examples from sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Natalie; Sanders, David; Van Damme, Wim; Besada, Donela; Daviaud, Emmanuelle; Oliphant, Nicholas P.; Berzal, Rocio; Mason, John; Doherty, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    Community-based research on child survival in sub-Saharan Africa has focussed on the increased provision of curative health services by a formalised cadre of lay community health workers (CHWs), but we have identified a particular configuration, that deserves closer scrutiny. We identified a two-tiered CHW system, with the first tier being the lessor known or ‘hidden’ community/village level volunteers and the second tier being formal, paid CHWs, in Ethiopia, Mali, and Niger. Whilst the disease-focussed tasks of the formal CHW tier may be more amenable to classic epidemiological surveillance, we postulate that understanding the relationship between formalised CHWs and volunteer cadres, in terms of scope, location of practice and ratio to population, would be important for a comprehensive evaluation of child survival in these countries. We report on the findings from our joint qualitative and quantitative investigations, highlighting the need to recognise the ‘hidden’ contribution of volunteers. We need to better characterize the volunteers’ interaction with community-based and primary care services and to better understand ways to improve the volunteer systems with the right type of investments. This is particularly important for considering the models for scale-up of CHWs in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:25770090

  3. View from second floor platform looking up at subsequent platforms. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from second floor platform looking up at subsequent platforms. Note the Shuttle assembly outlined by the platform edges. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn V Dynamic Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  4. Floor Plans Rolling Platform, Tech Systems Platform, and Load ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Floor Plans - Rolling Platform, Tech Systems Platform, and Load Platform Plans - Marshall Space Flight Center, F-1 Engine Static Test Stand, On Route 565 between Huntsville and Decatur, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  5. Building a platform for translational research in chronic noncommunicable diseases to address population health: lessons from NHLBI supported CRONICAS in Peru.

    PubMed

    Miranda, J Jaime; Bernabé-Ortiz, Antonio; Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Málaga, Germán; Cardenas, María K; Carrillo-Larco, Rodrigo M; Pesantes, M Amalia; Araya, Ricardo; Boggio, Oscar; Checkley, William; García, Patricia J; León-Velarde, Fabiola; Lescano, Andrés G; Montori, Victor; Pan, William; Rivera-Chira, Maria; Sacksteder, Katherine; Smeeth, Liam; García, Héctor H; Gilman, Robert H

    2015-03-01

    The CRONICAS Centre of Excellence in Chronic Diseases, based at Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, was created in 2009 with support from the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). The vision of CRONICAS is to build a globally recognized center of excellence conducting quality and innovative research and generating high-impact evidence for health. The center's identity is embedded in its core values: generosity, innovation, integrity, and quality. This review has been structured to describe the development of the CRONICAS Centre, with a focus on highlighting the ongoing translational research projects and capacity-building strategies. The CRONICAS Centre of Excellence is not a risk-averse organization: it benefits from past experiences, including past mistakes, and improves upon them and thus challenges traditional research approaches. This ethos and environment are key to fostering innovation in research.

  6. Ladder attachment platform

    DOEpatents

    Swygert,; Richard, W [Springfield, SC

    2012-08-28

    A ladder attachment platform is provided that includes a base for attachment to a ladder that has first and second side rails and a plurality of rungs that extend between in a lateral direction. Also included is a user platform for having a user stand thereon that is carried by the base. The user platform may be positioned with respect to the ladder so that it is not located between a first plane that extends through the first side rail and is perpendicular to the lateral direction and a second plane that extends through the second side rail and is perpendicular to the lateral direction.

  7. Effect of a Home-Based Exercise Program on Functional Recovery Following Rehabilitation After Hip Fracture A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Latham, Nancy K.; Harris, Bette Ann; Bean, Jonathan F.; Heeren, Timothy; Goodyear, Christine; Zawacki, Stacey; Heislein, Diane M.; Mustafa, Jabed; Pardasaney, Poonam; Giorgetti, Marie; Holt, Nicole; Goehring, Lori; Jette, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    .1 [SD, 7.9] at 6 months; control group: 56 [SD, 7.1] at baseline, 56.6 [SD, 8.1] at 6 months; and between-group difference, 1.3 [95% CI, 0.2 to 2.4], P = .03; and mean AM-PAC daily activity scores for intervention group: 57.4 [SD, 13.7] at baseline, 61.3 [SD, 15.7] at 6 months; control group: 58.2 [SD, 15.2] at baseline, 58.6 [SD, 15.3] at 6 months; and between-group difference, 3.5 [95% CI, 0.9 to 6.0], P = .03). In multiple imputation analyses, between-group differences remained significant for SPPB and AM-PAC daily activity, but not for mobility. Significant between-group differences persisted at 9 months for all functional measures with and without imputation. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Among patients who had completed standard rehabilitation after hip fracture, the use of a home-based functionally oriented exercise program resulted in modest improvement in physical function at 6 months after randomization. The clinical importance of these findings remains to be determined. PMID:24549550

  8. Uptake of Home-Based HIV Testing, Linkage to Care, and Community Attitudes about ART in Rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: Descriptive Results from the First Phase of the ANRS 12249 TasP Cluster-Randomised Trial

    PubMed Central

    Okesola, Nonhlanhla; Tanser, Frank; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Rekacewicz, Claire; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2016-01-01

    350 cells/μl at first visit, of whom 92.8% initiated ART within 3 mo. Regarding attitudes about ART, 93% (8,802/9,460) of participants agreed with the statement that they would want to start ART as soon as possible if HIV-positive. Estimated baseline HIV prevalence was 30.5% (2,028/6,656) (95% CI 25.0%, 37.0%). HIV prevalence, uptake of home-based HIV testing, linkage to care within 6 mo, and initiation of ART within 3 mo in those with CD4 count ≤ 350 cells/μl did not differ significantly between the intervention and control clusters. Selection bias related to noncontact could not be entirely excluded. Conclusions Home-based HIV testing was well received in this rural population, although men were less easily contactable at home; immediate ART was acceptable, with good viral suppression and retention. However, only about half of HIV-positive people accessed care within 6 mo of being identified, with nearly two-thirds accessing care by 12 mo. The observed delay in linkage to care would limit the individual and public health ART benefits of universal testing and treatment in this population. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01509508 PMID:27504637

  9. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Home-Based Exercise for Cancer-Related Fatigue in Women during and after Chemotherapy with or without Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Marylin J.; Cho, Maria H.; Miaskowski, Christine; Painter, Patricia L.; Paul, Steven M.; Cooper, Bruce A.; Duda, John; Krasnoff, Joanne; Bank, Kayee A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated an individualized home-based exercise prescription during and after cancer treatment. Objective The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based exercise training intervention, the PRO-SELF FATIGUE CONTROL PROGRAM on the management of cancer related fatigue. Interventions/Methods Participants (N=119) were randomized into one of three groups: Group 1 (EE) received the exercise prescription throughout the study; Group 2 (CE) received their exercise prescription after completing cancer treatment; Group 3 (CC) received usual care. Patients completed the Piper Fatigue Scale, General Sleep Disturbance Scale, Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale, and Worst Pain Intensity Scale. Results All groups reported mild fatigue levels, sleep disturbance and mild pain, but not depression. Using multilevel regression analysis significant linear and quadratic trends were found for change in fatigue and pain (i.e., scores increased, then decreased over time). No group differences were found in the changing scores over time. A significant quadratic effect for the trajectory of sleep disturbance was found, but no group differences were detected over time. No significant time or group effects were found for depression. Conclusions Our home-based exercise intervention had no effect on fatigue or related symptoms associated with cancer treatment. The optimal timing of exercise remains to be determined. Implications for practice Clinicians need to be aware that some physical activity is better than none, and there is no harm in exercise as tolerated during cancer treatment. Further analysis is needed to examine the adherence to exercise. More frequent assessments of fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression, and pain may capture the effect of exercise. PMID:20467301

  10. Benefits of a novel concept of home-based exercise with the aim of preventing aspiration pneumonia and falls in frail older women: a pragmatic controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Takatori, Katsuhiko; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Nishida, Munenori; Matsushita, Shinnichiro; Noda, Tatsuya; Imamura, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether home-based exercise with the aim of preventing aspiration pneumonia and accidental falls improves swallowing-related and physical functions in community-dwelling frail older women. Methods Participants were 266 community-dwelling frail older women in a long-term care prevention class (mean (SD): age 75 (5) years). Participants were allocated to either an intervention group or a control group. In the intervention group, participants were asked to perform, at least three times a week for 6 months, a home-based exercise programme that was specifically developed to prevent aspiration pneumonia and accidental falls. Control group participants were instructed to perform general stretching exercises only. Voluntary peak cough flow and lip closure force were measured as swallowing-related functions. Static and dynamic balance function, lower limb strength and flexibility were measured as secondary outcomes. Intervention effects were determined using t tests; effect sizes were calculated using Cohen's d. Results Voluntary peak cough flow in the intervention group was significantly greater than in the control group (p<0.01, d=0.5). However, lip closure force did not differ between groups. Regarding physical function, results of the Timed Up and Go Test (p<0.05, d=0.4), Chair Stand Test (p<0.01, d=0.4), maximal knee extension strength (p<0.05, d=0.4), and Sit and Reach Test (p<0.05, d=0.3) showed greater improvement in the intervention group. Conclusions Specifically developed home-based exercise as described in this study is simple and can be performed briefly. Improvements in voluntary peak cough flow and physical function indicate the possible usefulness of such exercise in preventing falls and aspiration pneumonia in community-dwelling frail older adults. Trial registration number UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR): UMIN000014880. PMID:27900185

  11. Associations between psychological factors and the effect of home-based physical exercise in women with chronic neck and shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Linn; Gerdle, Björn; Takala, Esa-Pekka; Andersson, Gerhard; Larsson, Britt

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exercise is often used in the treatment of chronic neck and shoulder muscle pain. It is likely that psychological aspects have an impact on the results of exercise-based treatments. Objectives: (1) To examine the associations between psychological factors and the effect of a home-based physical exercise intervention. (2) To examine differences in psychological factors at baseline between (a) subjects who continued in the trial and those who did not and (b) subjects who completed the intervention and those who did not. Method: A total of 57 women with chronic neck and shoulder pain were included in a home-based exercise intervention trial. Pain intensity, disability, and psychological factors (anxiety and depression symptoms, catastrophizing, fear-avoidance beliefs, self-efficacy, and pain acceptance) were measured at baseline, after 4–6 months, and after 1 year of exercise. Associations between the psychological factors and changes in pain intensity and disability were analysed, as well as differences in psychological factors at baseline between subjects who continued in and completed the intervention, and those who did not. Results: Associations between positive changes in pain intensity and disability were found for low fear-avoidance beliefs and low-pain self-efficacy at baseline. In addition, fear-avoidance beliefs at baseline were higher in the subjects who dropped out of the intervention than in those who continued. Pain acceptance at baseline was higher in the subjects who completed the intervention at the end of the trial. Conclusion: Particularly, fear-avoidance beliefs and pain self-efficacy should be taken into consideration when implementing home-based physical exercise as treatment for chronic neck pain. In addition, high pain acceptance might improve the adherence to prescribed exercise. PMID:27688880

  12. A home-based exercise intervention to increase physical activity among people living with HIV: study design of a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background While combination antiretroviral therapy has extended the life expectancy of those infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), there is a high prevalence of comorbidities that increase the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). The side effects associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) lead to multiple metabolic disorders, making the management of these metabolic issues and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in those treated with ART a critical issue. Clinical research trials, primarily clinical exercise, rarely include this population due to unique challenges in research methods with underserved minority populations living with a life threatening illness like HIV/AIDS. This paper describes the rationale and design of a randomized clinical trial evaluating the feasibility of a home-based exercise program designed to increase physical activity (PA) and reduce the risk of CVD in PLWHA. Methods/design PLWHA being treated with ART will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: a home-based PA intervention or standard care. All participants will receive an educational weight loss workbook and pedometer for self-monitoring of PA. Only those in the intervention group will receive additional elastic Thera-bands® for strength training and behavioral telephone based coaching. Discussion This study will evaluate the feasibility of a home-based program designed to increase PA among PLWHA. Further, it will evaluate the effectiveness of such a program to decrease modifiable risk factors for CVD as a secondary outcome. This study was funded by the NIH/NINR R21 Grant 1R21NRO11281. Trial registration Clinical Trial Identifier NCT01377064 PMID:23706094

  13. Effectiveness of a Home-Based Counselling Strategy on Neonatal Care and Survival: A Cluster-Randomised Trial in Six Districts of Rural Southern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Claudia; Manzi, Fatuma; Mkumbo, Elibariki; Shirima, Kizito; Penfold, Suzanne; Hill, Zelee; Shamba, Donat; Jaribu, Jennie; Hamisi, Yuna; Soremekun, Seyi; Cousens, Simon; Marchant, Tanya; Mshinda, Hassan; Schellenberg, David; Tanner, Marcel; Schellenberg, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Background We report a cluster-randomised trial of a home-based counselling strategy, designed for large-scale implementation, in a population of 1.2 million people in rural southern Tanzania. We hypothesised that the strategy would improve neonatal survival by around 15%. Methods and Findings In 2010 we trained 824 female volunteers to make three home visits to women and their families during pregnancy and two visits to them in the first few days of the infant’s life in 65 wards, selected randomly from all 132 wards in six districts in Mtwara and Lindi regions, constituting typical rural areas in Southern Tanzania. The remaining wards were comparison areas. Participants were not blinded to the intervention. The primary analysis was an intention-to-treat analysis comparing the neonatal mortality (day 0–27) per 1,000 live births in intervention and comparison wards based on a representative survey in 185,000 households in 2013 with a response rate of 90%. We included 24,381 and 23,307 live births between July 2010 and June 2013 and 7,823 and 7,555 live births in the last year in intervention and comparison wards, respectively. We also compared changes in neonatal mortality and newborn care practices in intervention and comparison wards using baseline census data from 2007 including 225,000 households and 22,243 births in five of the six intervention districts. Amongst the 7,823 women with a live birth in the year prior to survey in intervention wards, 59% and 41% received at least one volunteer visit during pregnancy and postpartum, respectively. Neonatal mortality reduced from 35.0 to 30.5 deaths per 1,000 live births between 2007 and 2013 in the five districts, respectively. There was no evidence of an impact of the intervention on neonatal survival (odds ratio [OR] 1.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.9–1.2, p = 0.339). Newborn care practices reported by mothers were better in intervention than in comparison wards, including immediate breastfeeding (42% of 7

  14. Impact of a Home-Based Physical and Nutritional Intervention Program Conducted by Lay-Volunteers on Handgrip Strength in Prefrail and Frail Older Adults: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Sandra; Dorner, Thomas E.; Luger, Eva; Kapan, Ali; Titze, Sylvia; Lackinger, Christian; Schindler, Karin E.

    2017-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial was performed to compare the effects of a home-based physical and nutritional intervention program carried out by lay-volunteers to home visits with social support alone. Buddies visited 80 prefrail or frail older persons at home twice a week for 12 weeks. The physical training and nutrition group (PTN, n = 39) performed two sets of six strength exercises, discussed nutritional topics and received social support. The social support group (SoSu, n = 41) received home visits with social support only. In the PTN group, handgrip strength increased significantly by 2.4 kg (95% CI: 1.0–3.8). In the SoSu group we did not see a significant improvement. However, no significant between-group difference was found. Physical performance increased in both groups, although with a higher increase of 1.0 point (95% CI: 0.1–2.0) in the PTN group. In none of the groups muscle mass changed. Further results showed that frail individuals benefit more from the intervention than prefrail individuals (OR: 2.78; 95% CI: 1.01–7.66). Handgrip strength in the intervention group increased by a clinically relevant value and this effect is comparable to that obtained by health-care professionals. Therefore, home visits with a physical training and nutritional program could offer a new perspective in the care of community-dwelling prefrail and frail older persons. PMID:28085913

  15. Impact of a Home-Based Physical and Nutritional Intervention Program Conducted by Lay-Volunteers on Handgrip Strength in Prefrail and Frail Older Adults: A Randomized Control Trial.

    PubMed

    Haider, Sandra; Dorner, Thomas E; Luger, Eva; Kapan, Ali; Titze, Sylvia; Lackinger, Christian; Schindler, Karin E

    2017-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial was performed to compare the effects of a home-based physical and nutritional intervention program carried out by lay-volunteers to home visits with social support alone. Buddies visited 80 prefrail or frail older persons at home twice a week for 12 weeks. The physical training and nutrition group (PTN, n = 39) performed two sets of six strength exercises, discussed nutritional topics and received social support. The social support group (SoSu, n = 41) received home visits with social support only. In the PTN group, handgrip strength increased significantly by 2.4 kg (95% CI: 1.0-3.8). In the SoSu group we did not see a significant improvement. However, no significant between-group difference was found. Physical performance increased in both groups, although with a higher increase of 1.0 point (95% CI: 0.1-2.0) in the PTN group. In none of the groups muscle mass changed. Further results showed that frail individuals benefit more from the intervention than prefrail individuals (OR: 2.78; 95% CI: 1.01-7.66). Handgrip strength in the intervention group increased by a clinically relevant value and this effect is comparable to that obtained by health-care professionals. Therefore, home visits with a physical training and nutritional program could offer a new perspective in the care of community-dwelling prefrail and frail older persons.

  16. Effects and costs of home-based training with telemonitoring guidance in low to moderate risk patients entering cardiac rehabilitation: The FIT@Home study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical training has beneficial effects on exercise capacity, quality of life and mortality in patients after a cardiac event or intervention and is therefore a core component of cardiac rehabilitation. However, cardiac rehabilitation uptake is low and effects tend to decrease after the initial rehabilitation period. Home-based training has the potential to increase cardiac rehabilitation uptake, and was shown to be safe and effective in improving short-term exercise capacity. Long-term effects on physical fitness and activity, however, are disappointing. Therefore, we propose a novel strategy using telemonitoring guidance based on objective training data acquired during exercise at home. In this way, we aim to improve self-management skills like self-efficacy and action planning for independent exercise and, consequently, improve long-term effectiveness with respect to physical fitness and physical activity. In addition, we aim to compare costs of this strategy with centre-based cardiac rehabilitation. Methods/design This randomized controlled trial compares a 12-week telemonitoring guided home-based training program with a regular, 12-week centre-based training program of equal duration and training intensity in low to moderate risk patients entering cardiac rehabilitation after an acute coronary syndrome or cardiac intervention. The home-based group receives three supervised training sessions before they commence training with a heart rate monitor in their home environment. Participants are instructed to train at 70-85% of their maximal heart rate for 45–60 minutes, twice a week. Patients receive individual coaching by telephone once a week, based on measured heart rate data that are shared through the internet. Primary endpoints are physical fitness and physical activity, assessed at baseline, after 12 weeks and after one year. Physical fitness is expressed as peak oxygen uptake, assessed by symptom limited exercise testing with gas exchange

  17. Effect of workplace- versus home-based physical exercise on pain in healthcare workers: study protocol for a single blinded cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence and consequences of musculoskeletal pain is considerable among healthcare workers, allegedly due to high physical work demands of healthcare work. Previous investigations have shown promising results of physical exercise for relieving pain among different occupational groups, but the question remains whether such physical exercise should be performed at the workplace or conducted as home-based exercise. Performing physical exercise at the workplace together with colleagues may be more motivating for some employees and thus increase adherence. On the other hand, physical exercise performed during working hours at the workplace may be costly for the employers in terms of time spend. Thus, it seems relevant to compare the efficacy of workplace- versus home-based training on musculoskeletal pain. This study is intended to investigate the effect of workplace-based versus home-based physical exercise on musculoskeletal pain among healthcare workers. Methods/Design This study was designed as a cluster randomized controlled trial performed at 3 hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark. Clusters are hospital departments and hospital units. Cluster randomization was chosen to increase adherence and avoid contamination between interventions. Two hundred healthcare workers from 18 departments located at three different hospitals is allocated to 10 weeks of 1) workplace based physical exercise performed during working hours (using kettlebells, elastic bands and exercise balls) for 5 × 10 minutes per week and up to 5 group-based coaching sessions, or 2) home based physical exercise performed during leisure time (using elastic bands and body weight exercises) for 5 × 10 minutes per week. Both intervention groups will also receive ergonomic instructions on patient handling and use of lifting aides etc. Inclusion criteria are female healthcare workers working at a hospital. Average pain intensity (VAS scale 0-10) of the back, neck and shoulder

  18. Assessing the Party Platforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Patrick J.

    1980-01-01

    From the perspective of a Catholic educator, the author examines the education planks of the 1980 Democratic and Republican Party platforms, particularly those planks relating to private education and tuition tax credits. (SJL)

  19. ARM for Platform Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patte, Mathieu; Poupat, Jean-Luc; Le Meur, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    The activities described in this paper are part of the CNES R&T “Study of a Cortex-R ARM based architecture” performed by Airbus DS Space System & Electronics in 2014. With the support of CNES, Airbus DS has performed the porting of a representative space application software on an ARM based demonstration platform. This paper presents the platform itself, the activities performed at software level and the first results on this evaluation study.

  20. Building Community Web Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmukai, Ikki; Matsuo, Yutaka; Matsumura, Naohiro; Takeda, Hideaki

    In this paper we propose Web-based communication environment called ``Community Web Platform''. Our platform provides an easy way to exchange personal knowledge among people with lightweight metadata such like RSS and FOAF. We investigate the nature of ``personal trustness'' on the environment since it is one and only measure for evaluating subjective information and knowledge. We also discuss how to develop and maintain Community Web applications from our exrerience.

  1. Rationale, design, and baseline findings from HIPP: A randomized controlled trial testing a Home-based, Individually-tailored Physical activity Print intervention for African American women in the Deep South

    PubMed Central

    Pekmezi, Dori; Ainsworth, Cole; Joseph, Rodney; Bray, Molly S.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Isaac, Shiney; Desmond, Renee; Meneses, Karen; Marcus, Bess; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    African American women report high rates of physical inactivity and related health disparities. In our previous formative research, we conducted a series of qualitative assessments to examine physical activity barriers and intervention preferences among African American women in the Deep South. These data were used to inform a 12-month Home-based, Individually-tailored Physical activity Print (HIPP) intervention, which is currently being evaluated against a wellness contact control condition among 84 post-menopausal African American women residing in the metropolitan area of Birmingham, Alabama. This paper reports the rationale, design and baseline findings of the HIPP trial. The accrued participants had an average age of 57 (SD= 4.7), a BMI of 32.1 kg/m2 (SD=5.16) with more than half (55%) having a college education and an annual household income under $50,000 (53.6%). At baseline, participants reported an average of 41.5 minutes/week (SD=49.7) of moderate intensity physical activity, and 94.1% were in the contemplation or preparation stages of readiness for physical activity. While social support for exercise from friends and family was low, baseline levels of self-efficacy, cognitive and behavioral processes of change, decisional balance, outcome expectations, and enjoyment appeared promising. Baseline data indicated high rates of obesity and low levels of physical activity, providing strong evidence of need for intervention. Moreover, scores on psychosocial measures suggested that such efforts may be well received. This line of research in technology-based approaches for promoting physical activity in African American women in the Deep South has great potential to address health disparities and impact public health. PMID:26944022

  2. Rationale, design, and baseline findings from HIPP: A randomized controlled trial testing a home-based, individually-tailored physical activity print intervention for African American women in the Deep South.

    PubMed

    Pekmezi, Dori; Ainsworth, Cole; Joseph, Rodney; Bray, Molly S; Kvale, Elizabeth; Isaac, Shiney; Desmond, Renee; Meneses, Karen; Marcus, Bess; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2016-03-01

    African American women report high rates of physical inactivity and related health disparities. In our previous formative research, we conducted a series of qualitative assessments to examine physical activity barriers and intervention preferences among African American women in the Deep South. These data were used to inform a 12-month Home-based, Individually-tailored Physical activity Print (HIPP) intervention, which is currently being evaluated against a wellness contact control condition among 84 post-menopausal African American women residing in the metropolitan area of Birmingham, Alabama. This paper reports the rationale, design and baseline findings of the HIPP trial. The accrued participants had an average age of 57 (SD=4.7), a BMI of 32.1 kg/m(2) (SD=5.16) with more than half (55%) having a college education and an annual household income under $50,000 (53.6%). At baseline, participants reported an average of 41.5 min/week (SD=49.7) of moderate intensity physical activity, and 94.1% were in the contemplation or preparation stages of readiness for physical activity. While social support for exercise from friends and family was low, baseline levels of self-efficacy, cognitive and behavioral processes of change, decisional balance, outcome expectations, and enjoyment appeared promising. Baseline data indicated high rates of obesity and low levels of physical activity, providing strong evidence of need for intervention. Moreover, scores on psychosocial measures suggested that such efforts may be well received. This line of research in technology-based approaches for promoting physical activity in African American women in the Deep South has great potential to address health disparities and impact public health.

  3. National Community Solar Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, Bart

    2016-06-30

    This project was created to provide a National Community Solar Platform (NCSP) portal known as Community Solar Hub, that is available to any entity or individual who wants to develop community solar. This has been done by providing a comprehensive portal to make CEC’s solutions, and other proven community solar solutions, externally available for everyone to access – making the process easy through proven platforms to protect subscribers, developers and utilities. The successful completion of this project provides these tools via a web platform and integration APIs, a wide spectrum of community solar projects included in the platform, multiple groups of customers (utilities, EPCs, and advocates) using the platform to develop community solar, and open access to anyone interested in community solar. CEC’s Incubator project includes web-based informational resources, integrated systems for project information and billing systems, and engagement with customers and users by community solar experts. The combined effort externalizes much of Clean Energy Collective’s industry-leading expertise, allowing third parties to develop community solar without duplicating expensive start-up efforts. The availability of this platform creates community solar projects that are cheaper to build and cheaper to participate in, furthering the goals of DOE’s SunShot Initiative. Final SF 425 Final SF 428 Final DOE F 2050.11 Final Report Narrative

  4. Psychosocial burden among offshore drilling platform employees.

    PubMed

    Leszczyńska, Irena; Jeżewska, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Conditions of work on offshore drilling platforms are particularly hard due to extreme environmental situations created both by nature and technological processes. Oil drilling workers employed on the open sea are potentially exposed to permanently high stress. Apart from the obvious objective factors affecting drilling platform employees, a great role in the general work-related stress level is played by the working conditions and work-related psychosocial factors, defined according to Karask's concept as demands, control, and social support. A total of 184 drill platform workers were examined using objective and subjective research methods. The level of subjective stress among drilling platform workers is lower than the level of objective stress and the stress resulting from prognoses related with specificity of work in extremely hard conditions (audit). The examinations of drilling platform workers reveal a positive role of stress in psychological adaptation, being a special case of the "work ethos" and attachment to the firm. In such investigations of work-related stress on drilling platforms, which are very specific workplaces, a multi-aspect character, sociological and economic aspects, organizational culture conditions in the firm, and a tendency to conceal ailments and the stress experienced should be taken into account. It is important to apply measures referring to at least three different types of evidence (objective demands, subjective stress, health problems reported). Otherwise, the result reflecting work-related stress may not be objective and far from the truth.

  5. Effects of a Home-Based Family-Centred Early Habilitation Program on Neurobehavioural Outcomes of Very Preterm Born Infants: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Poggioli, Michela; Minichilli, Fabrizio; Bononi, Tiziana; Meghi, Pasquina; Andre, Paolo; Crecchi, Alessandra; Rossi, Bruno; Carboncini, Maria Chiara; Ottolini, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Preterm children have an increased risk of neurodevelopmental impairments which include psychomotor and language retardation. The objectives of the present retrospective cohort study were to examine the effects of an individually adapted, home-based, and family-centred early developmental habilitation program on neurodevelopmental and behavioural outcomes of very preterm children compared with a standard follow-up at 2 years' corrected age. Enrolled infants were retrospectively assigned to the intervention group (61 subjects) or to the control group (62 subjects) depending on whether they had or had not carried out a home-based family-centred early developmental habilitation program focused on environmental enrichment, parent-guided environmental interaction, and infant development. Developmental outcome was assessed for both groups at 24 months' corrected age using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development 2nd Edition. Intervention significantly improved both cognitive and behavioural outcomes. In addition, males had significantly lower scores than females either before or after treatment. However, the treatment was effective in both genders to the same extent. In conclusion, a timely updated environment suitable to the infant's developmental needs could provide the best substrate where the parent-infant relationship can be practised with the ultimate goal of achieving further developmental steps. PMID:28090357

  6. Structured Home-Based Exercise Versus Invasive Treatment: A Mission Impossible? A Pilot Randomized Study in Elderly Patients With Intermittent Claudication.

    PubMed

    Lamberti, Nicola; Malagoni, Anna Maria; Ficarra, Valentina; Basaglia, Nino; Manfredini, Roberto; Zamboni, Paolo; Mascoli, Francesco; Manfredini, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    We compared the effects of an original structured home-based exercise program and revascularization in elderly patients with peripheral arterial disease over a 4-month period. Twenty-seven participants (n = 21; age = 68 ± 7 years) with moderate to severe claudication were randomized into (1) a test in-train out group (Ti-To; n = 18) that performed a home-based walking program prescribed and controlled at the hospital or (2) a revascularization group (Rev; n = 9) that underwent an endovascular and/or surgical procedure. The primary end point was quality of life as evaluated by the physical component summary (PCS) score of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 questionnaire. Secondary outcome measures included initial claudication distance (ICD) and absolute claudication distance (ACD), 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) and pain-free walk distance (PFWD), ankle-brachial index (ABI), and cost per walking meter gained. The PCS score significantly increased for both treatments at follow-up without a significant intergroup difference, as did ICD, ACD, and PFWD. The 6MWD and ABI significantly improved in the Rev group, and the Ti-To group exhibited a markedly lower cost per meter gained. The comparable effects of the 2 treatments need to be confirmed in a larger, randomized controlled trial.

  7. Effects of a Home-Based Family-Centred Early Habilitation Program on Neurobehavioural Outcomes of Very Preterm Born Infants: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Poggioli, Michela; Minichilli, Fabrizio; Bononi, Tiziana; Meghi, Pasquina; Andre, Paolo; Crecchi, Alessandra; Rossi, Bruno; Carboncini, Maria Chiara; Ottolini, Alberto; Bonfiglio, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Preterm children have an increased risk of neurodevelopmental impairments which include psychomotor and language retardation. The objectives of the present retrospective cohort study were to examine the effects of an individually adapted, home-based, and family-centred early developmental habilitation program on neurodevelopmental and behavioural outcomes of very preterm children compared with a standard follow-up at 2 years' corrected age. Enrolled infants were retrospectively assigned to the intervention group (61 subjects) or to the control group (62 subjects) depending on whether they had or had not carried out a home-based family-centred early developmental habilitation program focused on environmental enrichment, parent-guided environmental interaction, and infant development. Developmental outcome was assessed for both groups at 24 months' corrected age using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development 2nd Edition. Intervention significantly improved both cognitive and behavioural outcomes. In addition, males had significantly lower scores than females either before or after treatment. However, the treatment was effective in both genders to the same extent. In conclusion, a timely updated environment suitable to the infant's developmental needs could provide the best substrate where the parent-infant relationship can be practised with the ultimate goal of achieving further developmental steps.

  8. Transactional Network Platform: Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Katipamula, Srinivas; Lutes, Robert G.; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.

    2013-10-31

    In FY13, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with funding from the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Office (BTO) designed, prototyped and tested a transactional network platform to support energy, operational and financial transactions between any networked entities (equipment, organizations, buildings, grid, etc.). Initially, in FY13, the concept demonstrated transactions between packaged rooftop air conditioners and heat pump units (RTUs) and the electric grid using applications or "agents" that reside on the platform, on the equipment, on a local building controller or in the Cloud. The transactional network project is a multi-lab effort with Oakridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) also contributing to the effort. PNNL coordinated the project and also was responsible for the development of the transactional network (TN) platform and three different applications associated with RTUs. This document describes two applications or "agents" in details, and also summarizes the platform. The TN platform details are described in another companion document.

  9. The Personal Motion Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Brian Vandellyn

    1993-01-01

    The Neutral Body Posture experienced in microgravity creates a biomechanical equilibrium by enabling the internal forces within the body to find their own balance. A patented reclining chair based on this posture provides a minimal stress environment for interfacing with computer systems for extended periods. When the chair is mounted on a 3 or 6 axis motion platform, a generic motion simulator for simulated digital environments is created. The Personal Motion Platform provides motional feedback to the occupant in synchronization with their movements inside the digital world which enhances the simulation experience. Existing HMD based simulation systems can be integrated to the turnkey system. Future developments are discussed.

  10. Manipulator mounted transfer platform

    DOEpatents

    Dobbins, James C.; Hoover, Mark A.; May, Kay W.; Ross, Maurice J.

    1990-01-01

    A transfer platform for the conveyance of objects by a manipulator includes a bed frame and saddle clamp secured along an edge of the bed frame and adapted so as to secure the bed frame to a horizontal crosspiece of the manipulator. The platform may thus move with the manipulator in a reciprocal linear path defined by a guide rail. A bed insert may be provided for the support of conveyed objects and a lifting bail may be provided to permit the manipulator arm to install the bed frame upon the crosspiece under remote control.

  11. Community Adaptation of Youth Accessing Residential Programs or a Home-Based Alternative: Contact with the Law and Delinquent Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Gary; Frensch, Karen; Preyde, Michele; Quosai, Trudy Smit

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the findings from a longitudinal investigation of the prevalence of negative contact with the law for a sample of youth 12-18 months after graduating from residential and intensive children's mental health programming. Results of this study suggest serious community adaptation difficulties face many youth graduating from…

  12. Development of a Zigbee platform for bioinstrumentation.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Carlos A; Gentiletti, Gabriel G; Suarez, Marco J; Rodriguez, Luis E

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a network platform which allows connecting multiple individual wireless devices for transmitting bioelectrics and biomechanics signals for application in a hospital network, or continuous monitoring in a patient's diary life. The Zigbee platform development proposal was made in three stages: 1) Hardware development, including the construction of a prototype network node and the integration of sensors, (2) Evaluation, in order to define the specifications of each node and scope of communication and (3) The Zigbee Network Implementation for bioinstrumentation based on ZigBee Health Care public application profile (ZHC). Finally, this work presents the experimental results based on measurements of Lost Packets and LQI (Link Quality Indicator), and the Zigbee Platform configuration for Bioinstrumentation in operation.

  13. The Health and Wellbeing of Adults Working in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Belinda J.; Huntington, Annette D.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports the results of a survey of 168 New Zealand early childhood workers and describes their health status, behaviours and concerns. The respondents included 73 childcare teachers, 58 kindergarten teachers and 37 home-based educators. Although 92 per cent of respondents reported that they had good or excellent health, statistically…

  14. Outcomes of Children Participating in Mental Health Residential and Intensive Family Services: Preliminary Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preyde, Michele; Adams, Gerald; Cameron, Gary; Frensch, Karen

    2009-01-01

    It has been estimated that approximately 20% of children experience some form of mental health problem, with 14% in the clinical range. Residential mental health treatment is often reserved for those with the most severe presentation of disorder, and intensive home-based alternatives have been developed to cope with increasing demand. The purpose…

  15. Strong effects of home-based voluntary HIV counselling and testing on acceptance and equity: a cluster randomised trial in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Fylkesnes, Knut; Sandøy, Ingvild Fossgard; Jürgensen, Marte; Chipimo, Peter J; Mwangala, Sheila; Michelo, Charles

    2013-06-01

    Home-based voluntary HIV counselling and testing (HB-VCT) has been reported to have a high uptake, but it has not been rigorously evaluated. We designed a model for HB-VCT appropriate for wider scale-up, and investigated the acceptance of home-based counselling and testing, equity in uptake and negative life events with a cluster-randomized trial. Thirty six rural clusters in southern Zambia were pair-matched based on baseline data and randomly assigned to the intervention or the control arm. Both arms had access to standard HIV testing services. Adults in the intervention clusters were offered HB-VCT by local lay counsellors. Effects were first analysed among those participating in the baseline and post-intervention surveys and then as intention-to-treat analysis. The study was registered with www.controlled-trials.com, number ISRCTN53353725. A total of 836 and 858 adults were assigned to the intervention and control clusters, respectively. In the intervention arm, counselling was accepted by 85% and 66% were tested (n = 686). Among counselled respondents who were cohabiting with the partner, 62% were counselled together with the partner. At follow-up eight months later, the proportion of adults reporting to have been tested the year prior to follow-up was 82% in the intervention arm and 52% in the control arm (Relative Risk (RR) 1.6, 95% CI 1.4-1.8), whereas the RR was 1.7 (1.4-2.0) according to the intention-to-treat analysis. At baseline the likelihood of being tested was higher for women vs. men and for more educated people. At follow-up these differences were found only in the control communities. Measured negative life events following HIV testing were similar in both groups. In conclusion, this HB-VCT model was found to be feasible, with a very high acceptance and to have important equity effects. The high couple counselling acceptance suggests that the home-based approach has a particularly high HIV prevention potential.

  16. Floating Ocean Platform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-15

    water from the Bacia de Campos oil field offshore platforms, ENVIRONMENTAL FORENSICS , 115-123 Environ. Forensics , 2002 Bybee, K, Intelligent well...PORTILLO, H, JUVENILE TURTLES FOR MOSQUITO-CONTROL IN WATER STORAGE TANKS, JOURNAL OF MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY , 943-946 J. Med. Entomol., 1993 LI, YS KAREEM

  17. Japan's builders study platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, R.G.

    1984-07-05

    This paper discusses the developing role of Japan as a major supplier of offshore drilling and production equipment. Different firms are discussed along with their capacity. The marketing areas, work experience, and plans for designs are also included. There is special attention payed on the potential for developing Arctic platforms.

  18. Education Platforms for America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District Administration, 2012

    2012-01-01

    What is at stake for K12 education in next month's presidential election? Both President Barack Obama (Democratic Party) and Gov. Mitt Romney (Republican Party) say improving education will be a top priority in their administrations, but their policies and initiatives would likely be quite different. While political platforms rarely offer detailed…

  19. An open source mobile platform for psychophysiological self tracking.

    PubMed

    Gaggioli, Andrea; Cipresso, Pietro; Serino, Silvia; Pioggia, Giovanni; Tartarisco, Gennaro; Baldus, Giovanni; Corda, Daniele; Riva, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Self tracking is a recent trend in e-health that refers to the collection, elaboration and visualization of personal health data through ubiquitous computing tools such as mobile devices and wearable sensors. Here, we describe the design of a mobile self-tracking platform that has been specifically designed for clinical and research applications in the field of mental health. The smartphone-based application allows collecting a) self-reported feelings and activities from pre-programmed questionnaires; b) electrocardiographic (ECG) data from a wireless sensor platform worn by the user; c) movement activity information obtained from a tri-axis accelerometer embedded in the wearable platform. Physiological signals are further processed by the application and stored on the smartphone's memory. The mobile data collection platform is free and released under an open source licence to allow wider adoption by the research community (download at: http://sourceforge.net/projects/psychlog/).

  20. Mobile Platform for Large Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, C. J.; Schneider, W. C.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed platform moves forward and in reverse, turns left and right, and changes planes. Mobile-platform concept proposed to move remote manipulators, workers, or other loads over truss panels on large structures. Platform moves at constant speed so does not cause swinging motion in hanging loads and overstress remote-manipulator arms. Transferred around corners to adjacent panels. Platform rides on sprocketed guide pins extending from structure at truss joints. Set of orthogonal tracks under platform slides on pins, which have enlarged heads to interlock with tracks. At least three tracks engage at least three pins at any position on panel so platform adequately and stably supported.

  1. Changes in derived measures from six-minute walk distance following home-based exercise training in congestive heart failure: A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Babu, Abraham Samuel; Desai, Charmie V; Maiya, Arun G; Guddattu, Vasudeva; Padmakumar, Ramachandran

    2016-01-01

    The response of derived parameters from six-minute walk distance (6MWD), like 6MW work (6MWW), to exercise training and its correlation with quality of life (QoL) in congestive heart failure (CHF) is not known. A secondary analysis from a randomized controlled trial on 30 patients (23 males; mean age 57.7±10.4 years; mean ejection fraction 31±10%) with CHF in NYHA class I-IV who completed an eight-week home-based exercise training program found a significant improvement in 6MWW (p<0.05), with similar correlations between 6MWD and 6MWW with QoL. 6MWW does not appear to provide additional benefit to 6MWD in cardiac rehabilitation for CHF.

  2. Chronic heart failure home-based management with a telecardiology system: a comparison between patients followed by general practitioners and by a cardiology department.

    PubMed

    Scalvini, Simonetta; Zanelli, Emanuela; Paletta, Laura; Benigno, Massimo; Domeneghini, Diego; De Giuli, Federica; Giordano, Amerigo; Glisenti, Fulvio

    2006-01-01

    A group of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) were followed by general practitioners (GPs) with a telecardiology system, and a second group of patients were followed by a home-based telemonitoring (HBT) protocol with medical and nursing supervision. The 212 GP patients were older than the 226 HBT patients, mostly women, with CHF secondary to chronic hypertension, less self-sufficient and with a non-optimized therapy. The mean number of telephone calls was 2.6 per patient in the GP group and 16.6 per patient in the HBT group (P<0.001). These preliminary data suggest the applicability and the efficacy of both management models for CHF patients.

  3. The social construction of identity in HIV/AIDS home-based care volunteers in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Thirusha; Sliep, Yvonne; Dageid, Wenche

    2012-01-01

    Home-based care volunteer (HBCV) identity and how it is shaped was the main focus of the study. Fifteen HBCVs were interviewed about their work and personal life stories and then interviewed reflectively using a narrative interviewing style. Specific attention was paid to contextual meta-narratives and social field narratives in understanding the women's stories. Findings indicate that social field narratives of the women's stories were dominated by negative aspects of gender, poverty and socio-political factors. These were seen to coincide with the 'feminisation of responsibility' in this context effectively coercing the women into agency which manifested as their home-based care work. Meta-narratives influencing the women's lives were dominated by stories of communal motherhood, aspirations to service-oriented work and religious beliefs and commitment. The question of how it is possible for women who are seemingly constrained by oppressive narratives to voluntarily engage in community participation was answered in the women's personal life stories about being compassionate, hopeful, helpful and ambitious and having initiative. These characteristics collectively pointed to personal agency. Exploring connections between the different aspects of identity and context revealed that the women made sense of their community participation through their personal identities as strong and loving mothers. Connections between volunteer personal identity, agency and volunteer group identity were explored to make sense of the link between HBCV identity and volunteerism. The mother identity, encompassing personal agency (strength or power) and love (the meta-narrative of communal motherly love), was salient in influencing community participation of the group.

  4. Influences of hand dominance on the maintenance of benefits after home-based modified constraint-induced movement therapy in individuals with stroke.

    PubMed

    Lima, Renata C M; Nascimento, Lucas R; Michaelsen, Stella M; Polese, Janaine C; Pereira, Natália D; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F

    2014-08-29

    Objective: To investigate the influence of hand dominance on the maintenance of gains after home-based modified constraint-induced movement therapy (mCIMT). Method: Aprevious randomized controlled trial was conducted to examine the addition of trunk restraint to the mCIMT. Twenty-two chronic stroke survivors with mild to moderate motor impairments received individual home-based mCIMT with or without trunk restraints, five times per week, three hours daily over two weeks. In this study, the participants were separated into dominant group, which had their paretic upper limb as dominant before the stroke (n=8), and non-dominant group (n=14) for analyses. The ability to perform unimanual tasks was measured by the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) and the Motor Activity Log (MAL), whereas the capacity to perform bimanual tasks was measured using the Bilateral Activity Assessment Scale (BAAS). Results: Analysis revealed significant positive effects on the MAL amount of use and quality of the movement scales, as well as on the BAAS scores after intervention, with no differences between groups. Both groups maintained the bimanual improvements during follow-ups (BAAS-seconds 0.1, 95% CI -10.0 to 10.0), however only the dominant group maintained the unilateral improvements (MAL-amount of use: 1.5, 95% CI 0.7 to 2.3; MAL-quality: 1.3, 95% CI 0.5 to 2.1). Conclusions: Upper limb dominance did not interfere with the acquisition of upper limb skills after mCIMT. However, the participants whose paretic upper limb was dominant demonstrated better abilities to maintain the unilateral gains. The bilateral improvements were maintained, regardless of upper limb dominance.

  5. Pilot Study to Show the Feasibility of a Multicenter Trial of Home-based Assessment of People Over 75 Years Old

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Mary; Egelko, Susan; Ferris, Steven; Kaye, Jeffrey; Hayes, Tamara L.; Mundt, James C.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Sun, Shelly; Sauceda-Cerda, Luis

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a pilot study to evaluate feasibility of new home-based assessment technologies applicable to clinical trials for prevention of cognitive loss and Alzheimer disease. Methods Community-dwelling nondemented individuals ≥ 75 years old were recruited and randomized to 1 of 3 assessment methodologies: (1) mail-in questionnaire/live telephone interviews (MIP); (2) automated telephone with interactive voice recognition (IVR); and (3) internet-based computer Kiosk (KIO). Brief versions of cognitive and noncognitive outcomes were adapted to the different methodologies and administered at baseline and 1-month. An Efficiency measure, consisting of direct staff-to-participant time required to complete assessments, was also compared across arms. Results Forty-eight out of 60 screened participants were randomized. The dropout rate across arms from randomization through 1-month was different: 33% for KIO, 25% for IVR, and 0% for MIP (Fisher Exact Test P = 0.04). Nearly all participants who completed baseline also completed 1-month assessment (38 out of 39). The 1-way ANOVA across arms for total staff-to-participant direct contact time (ie, training, baseline, and 1-month) was significant: F (2,33) = 4.588; P = 0.017, with lowest overall direct time in minutes for IVR (Mn = 44.4; SD = 21.5), followed by MIP (Mn = 74.9; SD = 29.9), followed by KIO (Mn = 129.4; SD = 117.0). Conclusions In this sample of older individuals, a higher dropout rate occurred in those assigned to the high-technology assessment techniques; however, once participants had completed baseline in all 3 arms, they continued participation through 1 month. High-technology home-based assessment methods, which do not require live testers, began to emerge as more time-efficient over the brief time of this pilot, despite initial time-intensive participant training. PMID:20592583

  6. A randomized clinical trial in preterm infants on the effects of a home-based early intervention with the 'CareToy System'

    PubMed Central

    Sgandurra, Giuseppina; Lorentzen, Jakob; Inguaggiato, Emanuela; Bartalena, Laura; Beani, Elena; Cecchi, Francesca; Dario, Paolo; Giampietri, Matteo; Greisen, Gorm; Herskind, Anna; Nielsen, Jens Bo; Rossi, Giuseppe; Cio